Science.gov

Sample records for arterial iliac thrombosis

  1. Spontaneous renal artery thrombosis and common iliac artery dissection in a previously healthy young adult.

    PubMed

    Penn, D Eli; Gist, Amber; Axon, R Neal

    2008-12-01

    A previously healthy 20-year-old male with a history of easy bruising presented to the emergency department complaining of intermittent left lower quadrant abdominal pain for one week. He was diagnosed with vascular (type IV) Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) and attendant defects in type III collagen leading to spontaneous left renal artery thrombosis and common iliac artery dissection. Treatment was conservative. The types of EDS and their general management are discussed. PMID:19005424

  2. Bilateral iliac and popliteal arterial thrombosis in a child with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyoung Hee; Park, Ji Youn; Min, Seung-Kee; Ha, Il-Soo; Cheong, Hae Il

    2016-01-01

    Thromboembolic complications (TECs) are clinically important sequelae of nephrotic syndrome (NS). The incidence of TECs in children is approximately 2%–5%. The veins are the most commonly affected sites, particularly the deep veins in the legs, the inferior vena cava, the superior vena cava, and the renal veins. Arterial thrombosis, which is less common, typically occurs in the cerebral, pulmonary, and femoral arteries, and is associated with the use of steroids and diuretics. Popliteal artery thrombosis in children has been described in cases of traumatic dissection, osteochondroma, Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection, and fibromuscular dysplasia. We report of a 33-month-old girl with bilateral iliac and popliteal arterial thrombosis associated with steroid-resistant NS due to focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Her treatment involved thrombectomy and intravenous heparinization, followed by oral warfarin for 8 months. Herein, we report a rare case of spontaneous iliac and popliteal arterial thrombosis in a young child with NS. PMID:27279890

  3. Neonatal arterial iliac thrombosis in type-I protein C deficiency: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A male infant born by caesarean section at 38 weeks of gestational age (B.W. 4055 g; Apgar 9-10), in the first two hours of life his right leg became hypovascularizated. Normal values of leukocities, red cells, haematocrit, hemoglobin, platelets. C-Reactive Protein negative. Electrolytes and coagulation tests were normal. Normal vitamin K coagulation proteins levels. Serological tests for TORCH (IgM) and Parvovirus (IgG and IgM) were negative. Sonography showed a reduced blood flow in the iliac artery and reported a 1 cm long vessel thrombosis. From 8 hours of life we administred an intravenous infusion of unfractionated heparin (UFH) 75 UI/Kg for the first 10 minutes then 28 UI/Kg/h. On the 2nd day tests were performed to assess absence of inhibiting-clot factors. The dosage of homocysteine, protein S and antithrombin was normal. FV Leiden and antiphospholipid antibodies were negative. The mapping of G20210A prothrombin's gene resulted normal, whereas the concentration of Protein C was lower than normal: activity 46% (68-150%), antigen 35% (70-150%). The same deficiency was also found in the father. The mother showed normal concentrations. No episodies of thrombosis events were documentated in the family. The intravenous unfractionated heparin (UFH) therapy was replaced after 64 hours by subcutaneous nadroparin 600 UI twice/day, which was stopped 5 days later when the vessel sonografic images were completely normal. During the hospitalization the infant didn't show bleeding. The child was followed-up yearly until 4 years of age: he was well and had a normal body and mental development. The final diagnosis is likely to be of a permanent protein C deficiency in heterozygous form. Our case is interesting because the first manifestation was an important thrombosis of large vessel that occurred within a few hours of life in absence of perinatal risk factors, as if it was a homozygous disease, but the patient had a heterozygotic form. In literature few cases are

  4. Percutaneous Endovascular Treatment of Chronic Iliac Artery Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Carnevale, F. C. De Blas, Mariano; Merino, Santiago; Egana, Jose M.; Caldas, Jose G.M.P.

    2004-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical and radiological long-term results of recanalization of chronic occluded iliac arteries with balloon angioplasty and stent placement.Methods: Sixty-nine occluded iliac arteries (mean length 8.1 cm; range 4-16 cm) in 67 patients were treated by percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stent placement. Evaluations included clinical assesment according to Fontaine stages, Doppler examinations with ankle-brachial index (ABI) and bilateral lower extremity arteriograms. Wallstent and Cragg vascular stents were inserted for iliac artery recanalization under local anesthesia. Follow-up lasted 1-83 months (mean 29.5 months).Results: Technical success rate was 97.1% (67 of 69). The mean ABI increased from 0.46 to 0.85 within 30 days after treatment and was 0.83 at the most recent follow-up. Mean hospitalization time was 2 days and major complications included arterial thrombosis (3%), arterial rupture (3%) and distal embolization (1%). During follow-up 6% stenosis and 9% thrombosis of the stents were observed. Clinical improvement occurred in 92% of patients. Primary and secondary patency rates were 75% and 95%, respectively.Conclusion: The long-term patency rates and clinical benefits suggest that percutaneous endovascular revascularization with metallic stents is a safe and effective treatment for patients with chronic iliac artery occlusion.

  5. Femorofemoral bypass allowed limb preservation after late diagnosis of left common iliac artery thrombosis due to blunt trauma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Huang, Jing-Yong; Wang, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Acute common iliac artery occlusion which results from blunt abdominal trauma is rare and potentially leads to a late diagnosis. Methods: We report a case of a 58-year-old patient who suffered a late diagnosed acute left common iliac artery occlusion secondary to abdominal trauma. An emergency exploratory laparotomy was performed to stop intra-abdominal bleeding, while his left limb ischemia was not noticed until 32 h later and femorofemoral bypass was then successfully performed for revascularization. Compartment syndrome was observed postoperatively, and fasciotomy was performed promptly. The wound was temporarily covered with Vaccum Sealing Drainage due to high skin tension. Patient underwent skin-grafting after leg swelling subsided. Results: The follow-up turned out that these managements were valid in the preservation of the limb viability. Conclusions: This case highlights the prudent recognition of the acute lower extremity ischemia in the abdominal trauma and immediate remedy for acute iliac artery occlusion after a late diagnosis. PMID:27489675

  6. Embolomycotic Aneurysm of External Iliac Artery

    PubMed Central

    Terán, Nemesio A.; Gonzalez, Nerio M.; García, Luis; Gonzalez, Freddy E.; Rivera, Humberto E.

    1989-01-01

    We report a case of embolomycotic aneurysm of the right iliac artery secondary to bacterial endocarditis. The patient, a 33-year-old woman, presented with unilateral hydronephrosis and lower extremity edema caused by aneurysmal compression of the ipsilateral ureter and the external iliac vein. She was treated with ligation and an extraperitoneal left-external-iliac-artery to right-femoral-artery bypass using a knitted Dacron prosthesis. Since her surgery, our patient has been well except for persistence of moderate leg edema. To the best of our knowledge, we are reporting the 1st case of embolomycotic external-iliac-artery aneurysm secondary to bacterial endocarditis and resulting in hydronephrosis and venous insufficiency. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1989;16:51-55) Images PMID:15227238

  7. Iliac Artery Stent Placement Relieves Claudication in Patients with Iliac and Superficial Femoral Artery Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Ichihashi, Shigeo Higashiura, Wataru; Itoh, Hirofumi; Sakaguchi, Shoji; Kichikawa, Kimihiko

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy of iliac artery stent placement for relief of claudication in patients with both iliac and superficial femoral artery (SFA) lesions. Methods. Stent placement for only iliac artery occlusive disease was performed in 94 limbs (74 patients) with both iliac and SFA occlusive disease on the same limb. All procedures were performed because intermittent claudication did not improve after continuation of antiplatelet medication therapy and home-based exercise for 3 months. Rutherford classification was 2 in 20 limbs and 3 in 74 limbs. Patients with critical limb ischemia were excluded. Median duration of follow-up was 40 months. Primary patency rates of the iliac stent, clinical improvement rates, and risk factors for requiring additional SFA procedures were evaluated. Results. Primary patency rates of the iliac stent at 1, 3, 5, and 7 years were 97, 93, 79, and 79 %, respectively. The initial clinical improvement rate was 87 %. Continued clinical improvement rates at 1, 3, 5, and 7 years were 87, 81, 69, and 66 %, respectively. SFA Trans-Atlantic Inter-Society Consensus (TASC) II C/D lesion was a significant risk factor for requiring additional SFA procedures. Conclusion. Intermittent claudication was relieved by iliac stent placement in most patients with both iliac and SFA lesions. Thus, the indications for treatment of the SFA intended for claudicants should be evaluated after treatment of the iliac lesion.

  8. Iliac artery kinking with endovascular therapies: technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Dawson, David L; Hellinger, Jeffrey C; Terramani, Thomas T; Najibi, Sasan; Martin, Louis G; Lumsden, Alan B

    2002-07-01

    Iliac artery tortuosity should be considered when planning endovascular interventions from a femoral approach. Stiff guide wires across tortuous iliac segments can introduce foreshortening and temporary kinking. Recognition of this phenomenon and its implications is important when making anatomic measurements before endovascular device placement, when assessing iliac runoff, and when considering adjunctive procedures after aortoiliac interventions. Two illustrative cases of external iliac artery kinking are presented, one during an abdominal aortic aneurysm endograft procedure and another encountered during stent placement in an external iliac artery dissection. In both cases, the temporary nature of the deformity was recognized, avoiding unnecessary additional intervention. PMID:12119333

  9. Technique, Complication, and Long-Term Outcome for Endovascular Treatment of Iliac Artery Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ozkan, Ugur Oguzkurt, Levent; Tercan, Fahri

    2010-02-15

    The aim of this study was to report technical details, procedure-related complications, and results of endovascular treatment in chronic iliac artery occlusion. Between 2001 and 2008, endovascular treatments of 127 chronic iliac artery occlusions in 118 patients (8 women and 110 men; mean age, 59 years) were retrospectively reviewed. The study was based on Ad Hoc Committee on Reporting Standards (Society for Vascular Surgery/International Society for Cardiovascular Surgery Standards). All occlusions were treated with stent placement with or without preliminary balloon angioplasty. Kaplan-Meier estimators were used to determine patency rates. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine variables affecting successful recanalization, major complications, early stent thrombosis ({<=}30 days), and primary and secondary patency rates. Initial technical success was achieved in 117 (92%) procedures. Successful recanalization was obtained by antegrade approach in 69 of 77 (90%) procedures and by retrograde approach in 52 of 105 (50%) procedures (p < 0.001). Complications were encountered in 28 (24%) patients [minor in 7 patients (6%) and major in 22 patients (19%)]. One death occurred in the operative period secondary to iliac artery rupture. Early stent thrombosis was seen in eight (7%) patients. Presence of critical limb ischemia (p = 0.03), subintimal recanalization (p = 0.03), and major complication (p = 0.02) were the independent predictors of early stent thrombosis on multivariate analysis. Primary and secondary patency rates at 5 years were 63 and 93%, respectively. Presence of critical limb ischemia, TASC type C iliac lesions, combined occlusions of both common and external iliac arteries, and major complications were associated with decreased patency rates on univariate analysis, whereas these factors were not independent predictors of stent patency on multivariate analysis. In conclusion, endovascular treatment of iliac artery occlusion has a

  10. Transluminal angiomicroscopy of arterial thrombosis and thrombolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaru, Takanobu; Uchida, Yasumi; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Miwa, Atsuko; Yamada, Koichiro; Sugimoto, Tsuneaki

    1992-08-01

    To examine the process of microscopic changes during arterial thrombosis and thrombolysis a novel angiomicroscope (3 or 4 mm in diameter, magnification rate X 145) was introduced through a sheath into the right iliac artery of anesthetized dogs. A small portion of the luminal surface was mechanically damaged and processes of thrombogenesis were examined. Platelet aggregation on the damaged portion, fibrin thread growth on the exfoliated endothelium and naked subendothelial layers, trapping of red blood cells by fibrin networks, and gradual growth of mixed thrombi were observed. Following administration of prourokinase, or t-PA, dispersion of platelet aggregates and red blood cells, simulating sandstorm and gradual melting of fibrin, were also observed. The results indicate that detailed microscopic processes of thrombogenesis and thrombolysis can be observed percutaneously by angiomicroscopy.

  11. Repair of Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm Anastomosed to Donor Renal Artery in a Renal Transplant Patient

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Hiroshi; Kin, Keiwa; Maeda, Shuusaku

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a successful repair of an internal iliac artery aneurysm in a renal transplant patient. At renal transplantation, the main renal artery and accessory renal artery had been anastomosed to the right internal iliac artery and right external iliac artery, respectively. The patient underwent resection and graft replacement of the iliac artery aneurysm with reattachment of the main renal artery to the right external iliac artery through a midline laparotomy with repeated topical cold perfusion for renal protection. The postoperative course was uneventful, and no evidence of renal function impairment was present at discharge. PMID:27738467

  12. The Endovascular Management of Iliac Artery Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Stroumpouli, Evangelia; Nassef, Ahmed; Loosemore, Tom; Thompson, Matt; Morgan, Robert; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2007-11-15

    Background: Isolated aneurysms of the iliac arteries are uncommon. Previously treated by conventional surgery, there is increasing use of endografts to treat these lesions. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy, safety, and durability of the stent-grafts for treatment of iliac artery aneurysms (IAAs). The results of endografting for isolated IAAs over a 10-year period were analyzed retrospectively. The treatment methods differed depending on the anatomic location of the aneurysms. Twenty-one patients (1 woman, 20 men) underwent endovascular stent-graft repair, with one procedure carried out under emergency conditions after acute rupture. The mean aneurysm diameter was 4.6 cm.Results:The procedural technical success was 100%. There was zero 30-day mortality. Follow-up was by interval CT scans. At a mean follow-up of 51.2 months, the stent-graft patency rate was 100%. Reintervention was performed in four patients (19%): one patient (4.7%) with a type I endoleak and three patients (14.3%) with type II endoleaks.Conclusion:We conclude that endovascular repair of isolated IAAs is a safe, minimally invasive technique with low morbidity rates. Follow-up results up to 10 years suggest that this approach is durable and should be regarded as a first treatment option for appropriate candidates.

  13. The inferior epigastric artery arising from the internal iliac artery via a common trunk with the obturator artery.

    PubMed

    Won, Hyung-Sun; Won, Hyung-Jin; Oh, Chang-Seok; Han, Seung-Ho; Chung, In-Hyuk; Kim, Dong-Hoan

    2012-12-01

    We report a rare case of a left inferior epigastric artery arising from the internal iliac artery via a common trunk with the obturator artery in an 84-year-old female cadaver. A common trunk for the inferior epigastric and obturator arteries firstly originated from the left internal iliac artery, at 3.0 mm below the bifurcation of the left common iliac artery. This trunk ran straight between the left external iliac artery and left external iliac vein, and was finally divided into the left inferior epigastric and left obturator arteries just superior to the inguinal ligament. PMID:23301197

  14. [Cerebral artery thrombosis in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Charco Roca, L M; Ortiz Sanchez, V E; Hernandez Gutierrez-Manchon, O; Quesada Villar, J; Bonmatí García, L; Rubio Postigo, G

    2015-11-01

    A 28 year old woman, ASA I, who, in the final stages of her pregnancy presented with signs of neural deficit that consisted of distortion of the oral commissure, dysphagia, dysarthria, and weakness on the left side of the body. She was diagnosed with thrombosis in a segment of the right middle cerebral artery which led to an ischemic area in the right frontal lobe. Termination of pregnancy and conservative treatment was decided, with good resolution of the symptoms. PMID:25698610

  15. [Cerebral artery thrombosis in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Charco Roca, L M; Ortiz Sanchez, V E; Hernandez Gutierrez-Manchon, O; Quesada Villar, J; Bonmatí García, L; Rubio Postigo, G

    2015-11-01

    A 28 year old woman, ASA I, who, in the final stages of her pregnancy presented with signs of neural deficit that consisted of distortion of the oral commissure, dysphagia, dysarthria, and weakness on the left side of the body. She was diagnosed with thrombosis in a segment of the right middle cerebral artery which led to an ischemic area in the right frontal lobe. Termination of pregnancy and conservative treatment was decided, with good resolution of the symptoms.

  16. Monocortical Deep Circumflex Iliac Artery Flap in Jaw Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Moon, Seong-Yong

    2015-06-01

    Conventionally deep circumflex iliac artery (DCIA) flap had been harvested as bicortical form. However, several complications and adverse effects occurred such as abnormal hip contour, hernia, severe bleeding tendency, gait disturbance, and hypoesthesia. All the 9 patients required reconstruction of the jaw with microvascular free flaps after radical resection. Monocortical bone segment was harvested from the anterior iliac crest, and the amount of bone harvested was from 47 to 90 mm (mean, 63 ± 14.6). Monocortical deep circumflex iliac artery flap has sufficient advantages in donor-site morbidity, which is one of the factors to choose flap.

  17. Brachiocephalic artery thrombosis in adult nephrotic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Brahmbhatt, B. K.; Mathew, A.; Rajesh, R.; Kurian, G.; Unni, V. N.

    2011-01-01

    Thrombotic events are known to occur in nephrotic syndrome, as these patients have a hypercoagulable state. Venous thrombosis is well recognized, but arterial thrombosis is rare and is mainly noted in pediatric population. In the present study, we report a case of thrombosis of right brachiocephalic artery, embolic occlusion of right axillary artery, and right middle cerebral artery territory infarction due to thromboembolism in an adult patient with nephrotic syndrome (Minimal change disease). Patient underwent thromboembolectomy in the right axillary artery followed by anticoagulation therapy. PMID:21886984

  18. Acute Arterial Thrombosis of the Hand.

    PubMed

    Iannuzzi, Nicholas P; Higgins, James P

    2015-10-01

    Arterial thrombosis of the hand occurs infrequently but may result in considerable morbidity and compromise of hand function. The hand surgeon may be called upon to direct management in cases of acute arterial thrombosis of the hand and should have an understanding of the available diagnostic tools and treatment modalities. This article discusses the vascular anatomy of the hand and clinical manifestations of arterial thrombosis. Differences between isolated thrombosis and diffuse intravascular injury are detailed, and treatment options for these conditions are described. Appropriate care often requires coordination with interventional radiologists or vascular surgeons. Outcomes after treatment of arterial thrombosis of the hand are variable, and prognosis may be related to whether isolated thrombosis or diffuse intravascular injury is present.

  19. Acute Arterial Thrombosis of the Hand.

    PubMed

    Iannuzzi, Nicholas P; Higgins, James P

    2015-10-01

    Arterial thrombosis of the hand occurs infrequently but may result in considerable morbidity and compromise of hand function. The hand surgeon may be called upon to direct management in cases of acute arterial thrombosis of the hand and should have an understanding of the available diagnostic tools and treatment modalities. This article discusses the vascular anatomy of the hand and clinical manifestations of arterial thrombosis. Differences between isolated thrombosis and diffuse intravascular injury are detailed, and treatment options for these conditions are described. Appropriate care often requires coordination with interventional radiologists or vascular surgeons. Outcomes after treatment of arterial thrombosis of the hand are variable, and prognosis may be related to whether isolated thrombosis or diffuse intravascular injury is present. PMID:26408378

  20. Primary Iliac Venous Leiomyosarcoma: A Rare Cause of Deep Vein Thrombosis in a Young Patient

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Nelson; Dias, Emanuel; Lima, Ricardo; Oliveira, Fernando; Cássio, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Primary venous tumours are a rare cause of deep vein thrombosis. The authors present a case where the definitive diagnosis was delayed by inconclusive complementary imaging. Clinical Case. A thirty-seven-year-old female presented with an iliofemoral venous thrombosis of the right lower limb. The patient had presented with an episode of femoral-popliteal vein thrombosis five months before and was currently under anticoagulation. Phlegmasia alba dolens installed progressively, as thrombus rapidly extended to the inferior vena cava despite systemic thrombolysis and anticoagulation. Diagnostic imaging failed to identify the underlying aetiology of the deep vein thrombosis. The definitive diagnosis of primary venous leiomyosarcoma was reached by a subcutaneous abdominal wall nodule biopsy. Conclusion. Primary venous leiomyosarcoma of the iliac vein is a rare cause of deep vein thrombosis, which must be considered in young patients with recurrent or refractory to treatment deep vein thrombosis. PMID:21738532

  1. Primary iliac venous leiomyosarcoma: a rare cause of deep vein thrombosis in a young patient.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Nelson; Dias, Emanuel; Lima, Ricardo; Oliveira, Fernando; Cássio, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Primary venous tumours are a rare cause of deep vein thrombosis. The authors present a case where the definitive diagnosis was delayed by inconclusive complementary imaging. Clinical Case. A thirty-seven-year-old female presented with an iliofemoral venous thrombosis of the right lower limb. The patient had presented with an episode of femoral-popliteal vein thrombosis five months before and was currently under anticoagulation. Phlegmasia alba dolens installed progressively, as thrombus rapidly extended to the inferior vena cava despite systemic thrombolysis and anticoagulation. Diagnostic imaging failed to identify the underlying aetiology of the deep vein thrombosis. The definitive diagnosis of primary venous leiomyosarcoma was reached by a subcutaneous abdominal wall nodule biopsy. Conclusion. Primary venous leiomyosarcoma of the iliac vein is a rare cause of deep vein thrombosis, which must be considered in young patients with recurrent or refractory to treatment deep vein thrombosis.

  2. [Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair Via Internal Iliac Artery Conduit].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Taro; Tobe, Satoshi; Sugiyama, Hironobu; Ijyuin, Shinichi; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Masato; Oka, Takanori; Misato, Takuya; Tsunemi, Kotaro; Tanimura, Nobuhiro

    2016-09-01

    A 77-year-old man with a history of stent implantation in the right common iliac artery(CIA) and the left external iliac artery(EIA) was admitted to our hospital for a rapid growth of an aneurysm( max 53 mm) at Th11 level of the descending aorta. Although thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) was required, there were many problems about access rout. The infrarenal abdominal aorta and the left EIA were severely calcified, and the lumens of the right CIA stent(5.3 mm) and the left EIA stent( 4.3 mm) were small in size. Besides, the left CIA was short(13 mm). Therefore, TEVAR was performed by retrograde approach from the left internal iliac artery( IIA) with a tube graft conduit in the hybrid operation room. IIA is a useful option for an access rout in endovascular aortic repair. PMID:27586313

  3. Endovascular Stent-Grafting for Infected Iliac Artery Pseudoaneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Sanada, Junichiro Matsui, Osamu; Arakawa, Fumitaka; Tawara, Mari; Endo, Tamao; Ito, Hiroshi; Ushijima, Satoshi; Endo, Masamitsu; Ikeda, Masahiro; Miyazu, Katsuyuki

    2005-01-15

    We report two cases of acutely infected pseudoaneurysms of the iliac arteries, successfully treated with endovascular stent-grafting. Two patients underwent stent-graft treatment for erosive rupture of the iliac artery caused by surrounding infection. The first case is that of a 61-year-old man who had undergone Miles' operation for an advanced rectal cancer. Postoperatively, he developed intrapelvic abscess formation, from which methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was cultured, followed by rupture of the right external iliac artery. The second case is that of a 60-year-old man who had a pseudoaneurysm of the left common iliac artery, which was contiguous with a left psoas muscle abscess, from which Streptococcus agalactiae was cultured. Both patients were successfully treated with only a stent-graft and antibiotic therapy, and remained symptom-free 12 months and 10 months later. Although endovascular stent-grafting should not be considered standard therapy for infected aneurysms, our cases suggest that it can result in repair of infected aneurysms even in the uncontrolled active stage.

  4. Preservation of Internal Iliac Artery after Endovascular Repair of Common Iliac Artery Dissection Using Modified Fenestrated Stent Graft

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Binshan; Liu, Bin; Ye, Yusheng; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Standard endovascular repair of iliac/aortoiliac pathologies can lead to complications, such as buttock claudication, colon ischemia and erectile dysfunction. Branch grafts have been developed but require at least 6 weeks for customization and are not currently available in China; they are also quite expensive. To our knowledge, modified fenestrated stent grafts (MFSGs) are a safe and effective alternative for treating patients with juxtarenal aneurysms. Most MFSGs are used for the preservation of renal and left subclavian arteries. Few cases of MFSGs have been reported in the treatment of iliac pathologies. The use of an MFSG is decided on a case-by-case basis. This report presents our first clinical use of an MFSG for preservation of the internal iliac artery. PMID:27275179

  5. Aberrant Ovarian Collateral Originating from External Iliac Artery During Uterine Artery Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Joon Ho; Kim, Man Deuk Lee, Kwang-hun; Lee, Myungsu; Lee, Mu Sook; Won, Jong Yun; Park, Sung Il; Lee, Do Yun

    2013-02-15

    We report a case of a 35-year-old woman who underwent uterine artery embolization (UAE) for symptomatic multiple uterine fibroids with collateral aberrant right ovarian artery that originated from the right external iliac artery. We believe that this is the first reported case in the literature of this collateral uterine flow by the right ovarian artery originated from the right external iliac artery. We briefly present the details of the case and review the literature on variations of ovarian artery origin that might be encountered during UAE.

  6. Endovascular Treatment of Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysms: Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Rui Manuel; Rego, Duarte Nuno Cunha; de Oliveira, Pedro Nuno Ferreira Pinto; de Almeida, Rui Manuel Gonçalves Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Objective Internal iliac artery aneurysms (IIAA) are rare, representing only 0.3% of aortoiliac aneurysms. Its treatment with open surgery is complex and associated with high morbidity and mortality, which led to increasing application of endovascular solutions. In this study, we aimed to evaluate outcomes of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of IIAA in one institution. Methods We retrospectively reviewed all cases of IIAA treated with endovascular techniques between 2003 and 2014. Endpoints were morbidity, mortality, freedom from pelvic ischemic symptoms (buttock claudication, ischemic colitis, and spinal cord injury), and need for reintervention. Results There were 16 patients, 13 males and 3 females, with mean age of 75.1±7 years. A total of 20 IIAA (4 cases were bilateral), with mean diameter of 37.9 mm, were treated. EVAR was performed in 13 (81.3%) patients, with associated internal iliac artery's outflow occlusion in 2. Iliac branch device was used in one patient. Two patients underwent endovascular IIAA embolization alone. One patient underwent percutaneous, transgluteal, IIAA embolization. IIAA flow preservation in at least one internal iliac artery was possible in 9 (56.3%) patients. Early mortality was 7% (1 case). Early morbidity was 18.8%. Pelvic ischemic complications occurred in 1 (7%) patient with buttock claudication. Late reintervention was needed in 3 patients, none of them for IIAA related complications. Conclusion Endovascular treatment of IIAA is technically feasible and durable. Although overall morbidity is relatively high, major complications are infrequent and perioperative mortality is low. internal iliac artery flow preservation is technically challenging and, in a significant number of cases, not possible at all. PMID:27556311

  7. Mechanical Thrombectomy of Iliac Vein Thrombosis in a Pig Model Using the Rotarex and Aspirex Catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Minko, P. Bücker, A.

    2013-06-08

    PurposeTo investigate the efficacy and safety of mechanical thrombectomy for iliac vein thrombosis using Rotarex and Aspirex catheters in a pig model.Materials and MethodsIliac vein thrombosis was induced in six pigs by means of an occlusion-balloon catheter and thrombin injection. The presence of thrombi was verified by digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and computed tomography (CT). Thrombectomy was performed using 6F and 8F Rotarex and 6F, 8F, and 10F Aspirex catheters (Straub Medical AG, Wangs, Switzerland). After intervention, DSA and CT were repeated to evaluate the efficacy of mechanical thrombectomy and to exclude local complications. In addition, pulmonary CT was performed to rule out pulmonary embolism. Finally, all pigs were killed, and iliac veins were dissected to perform macroscopic and histological examination.ResultsThrombus induction was successfully achieved in all animals as verified by DSA and CT. Subsequent thrombectomy lead to incomplete recanalization of the iliac veins with residual thrombi in all cases. However, the use of the 6F and 8F Rotarex catheters caused vessel perforation and retroperitoneal hemorrhage in all cases. Application of the Aspirex device caused one small transmural perforation in a vessel treated with a 10F Aspirex catheter, and this was only seen microscopically. Pulmonary embolism was detected in one animal treated with the Rotarex catheters, whereas no pulmonary emboli were seen in animals treated with the Aspirex catheters.ConclusionThe Aspirex catheter allowed subtotal and safe recanalization of iliac vein thrombosis. In contrast, the use of the Rotarex catheter caused macroscopically obvious vessel perforations in all cases.

  8. Tuberculous iliac artery aneurysm in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Cox, Sharon Gail; Naidoo, Nadraj G; Wood, Richard John; Clark, Lizelle; Kilborn, Tracy

    2013-03-01

    Vascular complications of tuberculous infections are rare and occur even less frequently in the pediatric population. Tuberculous pseudoaneurysms can occur either as a result of contiguous spread from a neighboring focus-invariably infected lymph nodes-or by hematogenous spread and seeding of acid-fast bacilli that lodge in the adventitia or media via the vasa vasorum. We report a case of turberculous right common iliac artery pseudoaneurysm in a 12-year-old and review the relevant literature.

  9. Arterial thrombosis in the nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Fahal, I. H.; McClelland, P.; Hay, C. R.; Bell, G. M.

    1994-01-01

    Thrombosis is a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with the nephrotic syndrome. Venous thrombotic complications are well recognized but arterial complications are rare. Thrombosis is multifactorial, and has been attributed to a hypercoaguable state due to alterations in blood levels of the various factors involved in the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems, alterations in platelet function, venous stasis, haemoconcentration, increased blood viscosity and possibly the administration of steroids. Thrombosis in general and arterial thrombosis in particular is a significant and potentially serious problem in nephrotic patients. Awareness of the condition and its pathogenesis is needed. Assessment for the risk factors is required to allow appropriate prophylactic measures to be taken. PMID:7870639

  10. Percutaneous Treatment in Iliac Artery Occlusion: Long-Term Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gandini, Roberto; Fabiano, Sebastiano; Chiocchi, Marcello; Chiappa, Roberto Simonetti, Giovanni

    2008-11-15

    We evaluated the long-term results of recanalization with primary stenting for patients with long and complex iliac artery occlusions. This was a retrospective nonrandomised study. Between 1995 and 1999, 138 patients underwent recanalization of an occluded iliac artery with subsequent stenting. Patency results were calculated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. The mean length of follow-up was 108 months. Variables affecting primary stent patency such as patient age; stent type and diameter; lesion site, shape, and length; Society of Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology classification; total runoff score; Fontaine classification; and cardiovascular risk factors were analysed using Breslow test. These variables were then evaluated for their relation to stent patency using Cox proportional hazards test. Technical success was 99%. Primary patency rates were 90% (SE .024), 85% (SE .029), 80% (SE .034), and 68% (SE .052) at 3, 5, 7, and 10 years, respectively. Lesion site (p = 0.022) and stent diameter (p = 0.028) were shown to have a statistically significant influence on primary stent patency. Long-term results of iliac recanalization and stent placement were excellent, without major complications, even in highly complex vascular obstructions. A primary endovascular approach appears to be justified in the majority of patients as a less invasive alternative treatment to surgery. In any case, a first-line interventional approach should be considered in elderly patients or in patients with severe comorbidities.

  11. Iliopsoas abscess with iliac and femoral vein thrombosis in an adult Siberian husky.

    PubMed

    Grösslinger, K; Lorinson, D; Hittmair, K; Konar, M; Weissenböck, H

    2004-02-01

    A nine-year-old, male Siberian husky was presented with fever, decreased appetite and activity, non-weightbearing lameness, and oedematous swelling of the right inguinal and preputial area and the right hindlimb. An abscess within the right iliopsoas muscle, with severe thrombosis of the iliac and femoral vein, was diagnosed by haematology and diagnostic imaging. The abscess and adjoining lymph node were removed surgically through a median coellotomy. The isolated pathogen was Staphylococcus intermedius. Clinical signs resolved completely after surgery. Antimicrobial therapy was continued for four weeks. Within the follow-up period of six months, no recurrence of the clinical signs was detected.

  12. Endovascular Treatment of the Internal Iliac Artery in Peripheral Arterial Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Huetink, K. Steijling, J.J.F.; Mali, W.P.T.M.

    2008-03-15

    In patients with peripheral arterial disease not much is known about the relationship between the localization of the pain and the localization of arterial occlusions in the iliac arteries. Occlusions high in the iliac arteries are assumed to be able to induce pain in the buttocks and upper leg as well as pain in the calves. Several case reports show that the symptoms of arteriosclerotic lesions in the internal iliac artery are often atypical and not easy to diagnose. In this report, 3 patients with internal iliac artery occlusions who were treated with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) are described. One patient had isolated pain in the buttock region. In the other 2 patients the initial pain was focused on the buttock region with extension to the calves during exercise. After PTA, 2 patients were free of symptoms, while in the other patient the symptoms improved but did not disappear. Future research should clarify the relation between certain arterial occlusions and the location of the pain.

  13. Internal iliac artery pseudoaneurysm in primary total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Agarwala, Sanjay; Mohrir, Ganesh; Moonot, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Vascular injury is one of the rare complications of primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). We report an unusual case of lobulated pseudoaneurysm arising from one of the branches of the left internal iliac artery during acetabulum preparation in THA, which was successfully treated with coil embolization and multidisciplinary care. After 6 years follow up, patient did not have any symptoms related to the hip replacement. We recommend that surgeons should be extremely cautious while drilling medial wall of the acetabulum for depth assessment. Aggressive multidisciplinary approach, including possible support from an interventional radiologist is required for the treatment of such vascular injuries. PMID:27053814

  14. Late Thromboembolic Complication from a Palmaz Stent in the Common Iliac Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Stoeckelhuber, Beate M.; Szeimies, Ulrike; Spengel, Florentin A.; Kueffer, Georg

    1996-05-15

    A 56-year-old smoker presented with rest pain in his left leg and hyperfibrinogenemia. He was found to have a high-grade stenosing thrombus in a Palmaz stent which had been placed 4 years ago across a stenosing ulcerating plaque in the left common iliac artery. Systemic thrombolysis was successful but the patient refused long-term anticoagulation. He presented 2 months later with recurrent stent thrombosis and an embolus to the tibioperoneal trunk. Systemic lysis was successfully performed for the stent reobstruction but the distal embolic occlusion responded neither to systemic nor to local thrombolysis. This case suggests that patients with vascular stents and hyperfibrinogenemia and/or nicotine abuse should be considered candidates for long-term anticoagulation.

  15. Incidence and Risk Factors of Deep Venous Thrombosis in Asymptomatic Iliac Vein Compression: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min-Kai; Luo, Xiao-Yun; Zhang, Fu-Xian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) may be associated with iliac vein compression. Up to now, the majority of data has come from a retrospective study about the correlation between DVT and iliac vein compression. This prospective study was to determine the incidence of DVT in individuals with iliac vein compression and identify risk factors predictive of DVT. Methods: A total of 500 volunteers without symptoms of venous diseases of lower extremities and overt risk factors of deep venous thrombosis between October 2011 and September 2012 in Shijitan Hospital were enrolled in this cohort study. All the participants underwent contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography (CT) to evaluate iliac vein compression. Baseline demographic information and degree of iliac vein compression were collected. They were categorized into ≥50% or <50% iliac vein compression group. Ultrasound examination was performed to screen DVT at the time of CT examination and 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after the examination. Primary event was DVT of ipsilateral lower extremity. Correlation between DVT and iliac vein compression was estimated by multivariate Logistic regression after adjusting for age, gender, malignancy, surgery/immobilization, chemotherapy/hormonal therapy, and pregnancy. Results: In 500 volunteers, 8.8% (44) had ≥50% iliac vein compression and 91.2% (456) had <50% iliac vein compression. Ipsilateral DVT occurred in six volunteers including two in iliofemoral vein, two in popliteal vein, and two in calf vein within 1 year. Univariate analysis showed that the incidence of DVT was 6.8% in ≥50% compression group, significantly higher than that in <50% compression group (0.7%) (χ2 = 12.84, P = 0.01). Patients with malignancy had significantly higher incidence of DVT than those without malignancy (χ2 = 69.60, P < 0.01). Multivariate Logistic regression indicated that iliac vein compression and malignancy were independent risk factors of DVT. After adjustment for malignancy

  16. [Laparoscopic ligation of the internal iliac artery in bleeding cervix carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Skret, A; Obrzut, B; Stachurski, J

    1995-01-01

    Laparoscopic ligation of internal iliac artery was performed in two patients with bleeding from stage II cervical cancer. The hemostatic effect, shortening of convalescence and early initiation of radiotherapy was obtained. Additionally, during procedure the lymph node sampling was performed. Laparoscopy appeared to be an alternative procedure to abdominal or extraperitoneal ligation of internal iliac artery. PMID:7483884

  17. Endovascular treatment of aortoiliac aneurysms: From intentional occlusion of the internal iliac artery to branch iliac stent graft

    PubMed Central

    Duvnjak, Stevo

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 20%-40% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms can have unilateral or bilateral iliac artery aneurysms and/or ectasia. This influences and compromises the distal sealing zone during endovascular aneurysm repair. There are a few endovascular techniques that are used to treat these types of aneurysms, including intentional occlusion/over-stenting of the internal iliac artery on one or both sides, the “bell-bottom” technique, and the more recent method of using an iliac branch stent graft. In some cases, other options include the “snorkel and sandwich” technique and hybrid interventions. Pelvic ischemia, represented as buttock claudication, has been reported in 16%-55% of cases; this is followed by impotence, which has been described in 10%-17% of cases following internal iliac artery occlusion. The bell-bottom technique can be used for a common iliac artery up to 24 mm in diameter given that the largest diameter of the stent graft is 28 mm. There is a paucity of data and evidence regarding the “snorkel and sandwich” technique, which can be used in a few clinical scenarios. The hybrid intervention is comprised of a surgical operation, and is not purely endovascular. The newest branch stent graft technology enables preservation of the anterograde flow of important side branches. Technical success with the newest technique ranges from 85%-96.3%, and in some small series, technical success is 100%. Buttock claudication was reported in up to 4% of patients treated with a branch stent graft at 5-year follow-up. Mid- and short-term follow-up results showed branch patency of up to 88% during the 5-6-year period. Furthermore, branch graft occlusion is a potential complication, and it has been described to occur in 1.2%-11% of cases. Iliac branch stent graft placement represents a further development in endovascular medicine, and it has a high technical success rate without serious complications. PMID:27027393

  18. Endovascular treatment of aortoiliac aneurysms: From intentional occlusion of the internal iliac artery to branch iliac stent graft.

    PubMed

    Duvnjak, Stevo

    2016-03-28

    Approximately 20%-40% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms can have unilateral or bilateral iliac artery aneurysms and/or ectasia. This influences and compromises the distal sealing zone during endovascular aneurysm repair. There are a few endovascular techniques that are used to treat these types of aneurysms, including intentional occlusion/over-stenting of the internal iliac artery on one or both sides, the "bell-bottom" technique, and the more recent method of using an iliac branch stent graft. In some cases, other options include the "snorkel and sandwich" technique and hybrid interventions. Pelvic ischemia, represented as buttock claudication, has been reported in 16%-55% of cases; this is followed by impotence, which has been described in 10%-17% of cases following internal iliac artery occlusion. The bell-bottom technique can be used for a common iliac artery up to 24 mm in diameter given that the largest diameter of the stent graft is 28 mm. There is a paucity of data and evidence regarding the "snorkel and sandwich" technique, which can be used in a few clinical scenarios. The hybrid intervention is comprised of a surgical operation, and is not purely endovascular. The newest branch stent graft technology enables preservation of the anterograde flow of important side branches. Technical success with the newest technique ranges from 85%-96.3%, and in some small series, technical success is 100%. Buttock claudication was reported in up to 4% of patients treated with a branch stent graft at 5-year follow-up. Mid- and short-term follow-up results showed branch patency of up to 88% during the 5-6-year period. Furthermore, branch graft occlusion is a potential complication, and it has been described to occur in 1.2%-11% of cases. Iliac branch stent graft placement represents a further development in endovascular medicine, and it has a high technical success rate without serious complications.

  19. Immediate Bilateral Breast Reconstruction with Unilateral Deep Superior Epigastric Artery and Superficial Circumflex Iliac Artery Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Keith S.; Hartman, Brett C.; Sood, Rajiv; Socas, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Autologous breast reconstruction utilizing a perforator flap is an increasingly popular method for reducing donor site morbidity and implant-related complications. However, aberrant anatomy not readily visible on computed tomography angiography is a rare albeit real risk when undergoing perforator flap reconstruction. We present an operative case of a patient who successfully underwent a bilateral breast reconstruction sourced from a unilateral abdominal flap divided into deep superior epigastric artery and superficial circumflex iliac artery flap segments. PMID:27689054

  20. Immediate Bilateral Breast Reconstruction with Unilateral Deep Superior Epigastric Artery and Superficial Circumflex Iliac Artery Flaps.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Keith S; Gutwein, Luke G; Hartman, Brett C; Sood, Rajiv; Socas, Juan

    2016-09-01

    Autologous breast reconstruction utilizing a perforator flap is an increasingly popular method for reducing donor site morbidity and implant-related complications. However, aberrant anatomy not readily visible on computed tomography angiography is a rare albeit real risk when undergoing perforator flap reconstruction. We present an operative case of a patient who successfully underwent a bilateral breast reconstruction sourced from a unilateral abdominal flap divided into deep superior epigastric artery and superficial circumflex iliac artery flap segments. PMID:27689054

  1. Immediate Bilateral Breast Reconstruction with Unilateral Deep Superior Epigastric Artery and Superficial Circumflex Iliac Artery Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Keith S.; Hartman, Brett C.; Sood, Rajiv; Socas, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Autologous breast reconstruction utilizing a perforator flap is an increasingly popular method for reducing donor site morbidity and implant-related complications. However, aberrant anatomy not readily visible on computed tomography angiography is a rare albeit real risk when undergoing perforator flap reconstruction. We present an operative case of a patient who successfully underwent a bilateral breast reconstruction sourced from a unilateral abdominal flap divided into deep superior epigastric artery and superficial circumflex iliac artery flap segments.

  2. Internal iliac artery embolisation for intractable bladder haemorrhage in the peri-operative phase

    PubMed Central

    Gujral, S.; Bell, R.; Kabala, J.; Persad, R.

    1999-01-01

    Intractable haemorrhage from the bladder wall during transurethral resection of bladder tumour is uncommon but potentially catastrophic. Internal iliac artery embolisation is a minimally invasive technique, which is now widely practised to stop bleeding from branches of these arteries in situations including pelvic malignancy, obstetric and gynaecological emergencies and trauma. We report its successful use peri-operatively, in an unfit, elderly patient with uncontrolled bleeding.


Keywords: embolisation; internal iliac artery; transurethral resection of bladder tumour PMID:10448498

  3. Iliac artery occlusion with "oxbow lake" formation following stent deployment in a tortuous external iliac artery during EVAR: a case report.

    PubMed

    Culverwell, Adam D; Kent, Patrick; Puppala, Sapna

    2011-10-01

    In this case report, we describe a complication that we term the "oxbow lake" deformity. This phenomenon occurs when a tortuous elongated external iliac artery segment is artificially straightened by an iliac stent resulting in kinking and compression of a redundant loop with lumen compromise. We describe the anatomy, corrective treatment, and outcome. This occurrence is potentially foreseeable with tortuous vascular anatomy and recognition can allow appropriate management planning avoiding complications for the patient. PMID:21788283

  4. Embolization for Acute Small-Bowel Bleeding from the Collateral Artery of the Superior Mesenteric Left Deep Circumflex Iliac Artery Associated with Narrowing of the Bilateral Common External Iliac Arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Shimohira, Masashi Ogino, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Shigeru; Nishikawa, Hiroko; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2009-03-15

    We present a case of acute small-bowel bleeding from the collateral artery of the superior mesenteric-left deep circumflex iliac artery that was successfully managed by transarterial coil embolization.

  5. Modified Stent-Assisted Coil Embolization Technique to Treat an Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, M. M.; Northeast, A.; Lintott, P.; Liong, W.-C.; Warakaulle, D. R.

    2010-10-15

    Stent-assisted coil embolization is a well-described technique for the treatment of wide-necked intracranial aneurysms. We describe a modification of this technique used successfully to occlude a wide-necked internal iliac artery aneurysm.

  6. Vertebral artery thrombosis: a rare presentation of primary polycythaemia

    PubMed Central

    Gul, H L; Lau, S Y M; Chan-Lam, D; Ng, J-P

    2014-01-01

    Primary polycythaemia, also known as polycythaemia vera (PV), is a myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) which is associated with arterial and venous thrombosis and which can contribute to significant morbidity and mortality if untreated. Arterial thrombosis accounts for a large proportion of PV-related thrombotic events which may manifest as stroke and myocardial infarction. There is an abundance of literature documenting thrombosis arising in the cerebral vasculature secondary to PV. However, vertebral artery thrombosis associated with PV has not been previously described. We present a case of vertebral artery thrombosis as the presenting manifestation of PV. This case demonstrates the importance of recognising MPNs as a cause of an unusual presentation of thrombosis. PMID:24862411

  7. Vertebral artery thrombosis: a rare presentation of primary polycythaemia.

    PubMed

    Gul, H L; Lau, S Y M; Chan-Lam, D; Ng, J-P

    2014-01-01

    Primary polycythaemia, also known as polycythaemia vera (PV), is a myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) which is associated with arterial and venous thrombosis and which can contribute to significant morbidity and mortality if untreated. Arterial thrombosis accounts for a large proportion of PV-related thrombotic events which may manifest as stroke and myocardial infarction. There is an abundance of literature documenting thrombosis arising in the cerebral vasculature secondary to PV. However, vertebral artery thrombosis associated with PV has not been previously described. We present a case of vertebral artery thrombosis as the presenting manifestation of PV. This case demonstrates the importance of recognising MPNs as a cause of an unusual presentation of thrombosis. PMID:24862411

  8. Arterial and Venous Thrombosis in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Blann, Andrew D.; Dunmore, Simon

    2011-01-01

    The most frequent ultimate cause of death is myocardial arrest. In many cases this is due to myocardial hypoxia, generally arising from failure of the coronary macro- and microcirculation to deliver enough oxygenated red cells to the cardiomyocytes. The principle reason for this is occlusive thrombosis, either by isolated circulating thrombi, or by rupture of upstream plaque. However, an additionally serious pathology causing potentially fatal stress to the heart is extra-cardiac disease, such as pulmonary hypertension. A primary cause of the latter is pulmonary embolus, considered to be a venous thromboembolism. Whilst the thrombotic scenario has for decades been the dominating paradigm in cardiovascular disease, these issues have, until recently, been infrequently considered in cancer. However, there is now a developing view that cancer is also a thrombotic disease, and notably a disease predominantly of the venous circulation, manifesting as deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Indeed, for many, a venous thromboembolism is one of the first symptoms of a developing cancer. Furthermore, many of the standard chemotherapies in cancer are prothrombotic. Accordingly, thromboprophylaxis in cancer with heparins or oral anticoagulation (such as Warfarin), especially in high risk groups (such as those who are immobile and on high dose chemotherapy), may be an important therapy. The objective of this communication is to summarise current views on the epidemiology and pathophysiology of arterial and venous thrombosis in cancer. PMID:21403876

  9. Exchange of intraoperative balloon occlusion of the internal iliac artery for the common iliac artery during cesarean hysterectomy in a patient with placenta percreta

    PubMed Central

    Hishikawa, Kenji; Koshiyama, Masafumi; Ueda, Masashi; Yamaguchi, Ayaka; Ukita, Shingo; Yagi, Haruhiko; Kakui, Kazuyo

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Female, 36 Final Diagnosis: Pregnancy – placenta increta Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Cesarean hysterectomy Specialty: Obstetrics and Gynecology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: The generally accepted treatment for placenta percreta is cesarean hysterectomy without attempts to detach the placenta. Preoperative internal iliac artery balloon occlusion (IIABO) has been widely performed to minimize blood loss during cesarean hysterectomy for an abnormal attachment of the placenta. Our case is the first reported case of common iliac artery balloon occlusion (CIABO) being more effective than IIABO for reducing blood loss during a cesarean hysterectomy in the same patient. Case Report: We performed cesarean hysterectomy with IIABO in a 36-year-old Japanese female who had placenta percreta. However, there was still a large amount of blood loss. We immediately changed the balloon from the internal iliac artery to the common iliac artery, which visibly reduced the amount of blood loss. We finally achieved cesarean hysterectomy. Conclusions: CIABO was found to be more effective than IIABO for reducing blood loss during cesarean hysterectomy. Failure of IIABO can be explained by the presence of extensive anastomoses in the pelvic vasculature. PMID:24147189

  10. Hyperdensity of the Basilar Artery on Postmortem CT: A Potential Indicator for Basilar Artery Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Garland, Jack; Tse, Rexson; Beh, Raymond J; Lyons, Timothy J; Cala, Allan D

    2016-06-01

    Basilar artery thrombosis constitutes 1% of all types of stroke, carries a mortality rate of up to 90%, and is one of the rarer causes of sudden death. It leads to brain stem ischemia and commonly presents with impaired consciousness, cranial nerve palsy, hemiplegia or quadriplegia, and sudden collapse. Clinically, the diagnosis of basilar artery thrombosis is made on clinical symptoms, along with a hyperdense basilar artery in antemortem computed tomography (CT) scan. To our knowledge, whether a hyperdense basilar artery indicates basilar artery thrombosis on postmortem CT scan is not documented in the literature. We present a case report of a 55-year-old man who on postmortem CT scan showed a hyperdense basilar artery and was subsequently confirmed to be a fatal basilar artery thrombosis. We suggest that a hyperdense basilar artery on postmortem CT should prompt the pathologist to consider basilar artery thrombosis. PMID:27049662

  11. Dilatation of Common Iliac Arteries after Endovascular Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Repair with Bell-Bottom Extension

    PubMed Central

    Telles, Gustavo José Politzer; Razuk Filho, Álvaro; Karakhanian, Walter Khegan; Saad, Paulo Fernandes; Saad, Karen Ruggeri; Park, Jong Hun; Siqueira, Leticia Cristina Dalledone; Caffaro, Roberto Augusto

    2016-01-01

    Objective Endovascular techniques to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms results in lower morbidity and mortality rates. However, dilation of the common iliac arteries prevents adequate distal sealing, which compromises the procedure success. The aim of this study is report the long-term outcomes of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms associated with aneurysm of the common iliac artery following endovascular repair using a bifurcated bell-bottom stent graft. Methods This is a retrospective study that evaluated patients treated with bifurcated bell-bottom extension stent grafts to repair an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm and who had at least one common iliac artery with dilatation > 1.5 cm for at least 12 months after the endovascular intervention. Results Thirty-eight patients with a mean age of 70.4±8.2 years were included. Stent graft placement was followed by dilation of the common iliac artery aneurysms in 35.3% of cases; endoleak and reoperation rates were 17.6% and 15.7%, respectively. Younger patients showed a higher rate of artery diameter increase following the procedure. The average arterial dilation was 16% in the first year, 29% in the second year, 57% in the third year and 95% from the fourth year until the end of follow-up. Conclusion Repair of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms with bifurcated bell-bottom type stents when there is common iliac artery dilation is a good therapeutic option to preserve hypogastric flow. The rate of endoleak was 17.6%, and 15.7% of cases required reoperation. Younger patients are more likely to experience dilation of the common iliac artery after the procedure. PMID:27556314

  12. Covered stent in the superior gluteal artery in a hybrid approach to treat internal iliac artery aneurysm: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Noël-Lamy, Maxime; Teng Tan, Kong; Lindsay, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    This brief report describes a hybrid endovascular and open procedure to treat internal iliac artery (IIA) aneurysms and preserve pelvic blood flow. A covered stent was deployed before surgery in the superior gluteal artery, extending across the IIA aneurysm, with the proximal end in the common iliac artery lumen. During open aortoiliac aneurysm repair, the stent graft was anastomosed in an end-to-side manner to the surgical graft. Four aneurysms were treated in 3 patients. Technical success was achieved in all cases. There were no complications or repeat interventions. Stents were all patent at imaging follow-up (range, 6-25 mo). Patients were free from buttock claudication. PMID:26095271

  13. Lumbar artery perforator (LAP) flap: a salvage tool for extended lumbo-sacral necrosis after bilateral internal iliac arteries embolization.

    PubMed

    di Summa, Pietro Giovanni; Schaffer, Clara; Zaugg, Patrice; Bauquis, Olivier; Raffoul, Wassim

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 52-year-old man presenting an extensive lumbosacral necrosis after bilateral internal iliac arteries embolization following unstable pelvic fracture. Coverage of the defect was performed using two extended lumbar artery perforator flaps in a propeller fashion. Good functional and esthetic result was achieved at one-year follow-up. PMID:27583264

  14. Endovascular Repair of a Ruptured Mycotic Aneurysm of the Common Iliac Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Mofidi, R. Bhat, R.; Nagy, J.; Griffiths, G. D.; Chakraverty, S.

    2007-09-15

    This report describes the case of a ruptured mycotic aneurysm of the left common iliac artery, successfully treated with endovascular stent-grafting. A 64-year-old woman underwent diagnostic coronary angiography complicated by an infected hematoma of the left groin. Seven days later, she developed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus septicemia and CT scan evidence of perivascular inflammation around the left common iliac artery. This was followed by rupture of a mycotic aneurysm of the left common iliac artery. The lesion was successfully treated with a stent-graft and prolonged antibiotic therapy, and the patient remains free of infection 10 months later. Accumulating evidence suggests that endovascular repair can be used safely for the repair of ruptured infected aneurysms.

  15. Valve-Like and Protruding Calcified Intimal Flap Complicating Common Iliac Arteries Kissing Stenting.

    PubMed

    Georgiadis, George S; Georgakarakos, Efstratios I; Schoretsanitis, Nikolaos; Argyriou, Christos C; Antoniou, George A; Lazarides, Miltos K

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular therapy for iliac artery chronic total occlusions is nowadays associated with low rates of procedure-related complications and improved clinical outcomes, and it is predominantly used as first-line therapy prior to aortobifemoral bypass grafting. Herein, we describe the case of a patient presenting with an ischemic left foot digit ulcer and suffering complex aortoiliac lesions, who received common iliac arteries kissing stents, illustrating at final antegrade and retrograde angiograms the early recognition of a blood flow obstructing valve-like calcified intimal flap protruding through the stent struts, which was obstructing antegrade but not retrograde unilateral iliac arterial axis blood flow. The problem was resolved by reconstructing the aortic bifurcation at a more proximal level. Completion angiogram verified normal patency of aorta and iliac vessels. Additionally, a severe left femoral bifurcation stenosis was also corrected by endarterectomy-arterioplasty with a bovine patch. Postintervention ankle brachial pressure indices were significantly improved. At the 6-month and 2-year follow-up, normal peripheral pulses were still reported without intermittent claudication suggesting the durability of the procedure. Through stent-protruding calcified intimal flap, is a very rare, but existing source of antegrade blood flow obstruction after common iliac arteries kissing stents. PMID:26783493

  16. Valve-Like and Protruding Calcified Intimal Flap Complicating Common Iliac Arteries Kissing Stenting

    PubMed Central

    Georgiadis, George S.; Georgakarakos, Efstratios I.; Schoretsanitis, Nikolaos; Argyriou, Christos C.; Antoniou, George A.; Lazarides, Miltos K.

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular therapy for iliac artery chronic total occlusions is nowadays associated with low rates of procedure-related complications and improved clinical outcomes, and it is predominantly used as first-line therapy prior to aortobifemoral bypass grafting. Herein, we describe the case of a patient presenting with an ischemic left foot digit ulcer and suffering complex aortoiliac lesions, who received common iliac arteries kissing stents, illustrating at final antegrade and retrograde angiograms the early recognition of a blood flow obstructing valve-like calcified intimal flap protruding through the stent struts, which was obstructing antegrade but not retrograde unilateral iliac arterial axis blood flow. The problem was resolved by reconstructing the aortic bifurcation at a more proximal level. Completion angiogram verified normal patency of aorta and iliac vessels. Additionally, a severe left femoral bifurcation stenosis was also corrected by endarterectomy-arterioplasty with a bovine patch. Postintervention ankle brachial pressure indices were significantly improved. At the 6-month and 2-year follow-up, normal peripheral pulses were still reported without intermittent claudication suggesting the durability of the procedure. Through stent-protruding calcified intimal flap, is a very rare, but existing source of antegrade blood flow obstruction after common iliac arteries kissing stents. PMID:26783493

  17. Standard of Practice for the Interventional Management of Isolated Iliac Artery Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Uberoi, Raman; Tsetis, Dimitrios; Shrivastava, Vivek; Morgan, Robert; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2011-02-15

    Isolated iliac artery aneurysms are uncommon, comprising less than 2% of all abdominal aneurysmal disease. Although they have a fairly innocuous natural history, when they have attained a large size they carry a significant risk of rupture. Rupture is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, an early diagnosis and treatment are crucial. Over the last decade, interventional treatment options have become established alternatives to open surgical repair. These guidelines aim to review the pathogenesis, natural history, and presentation of isolated iliac artery aneurysms including a description of imaging and interventional treatment strategies.

  18. Discrepant ratios of arterial versus venous thrombosis in hemophilia A as compared with hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Girolami, Antonio; Bertozzi, Irene; de Marinis, Giulia Berti; Tasinato, Valentina; Sambado, Luisa

    2014-04-01

    The occurrence of thrombosis in patients with congenital bleeding disorders represents an exceptional event. Hemophilia A and hemophilia B patients have been showed to present both arterial and venous thrombosis (85 cases of arterial thrombosis and 34 cases of venous thrombosis). The great majority of arterial thrombosis are myocardial infarction or other acute coronary syndromes, whereas the majority of venous thrombosis are deep vein thrombosis and/or pulmonary embolisms. However there are discrepancies in the proportion of arterial and venous thrombosis seen in hemophilia A versus hemophilia B. The ratio of arterial versus venous thrombosis in hemophilia A is 3.72 whereas that for hemophilia B is 1.12. This indicates that arterial thrombosis is more frequent in hemophilia A as compared to hemophilia B and the opposite is true for venous thrombosis. The potential significance of this discrepancy is discussed.

  19. Arterial thrombosis in mice with factor V Leiden mutation.

    PubMed

    Sampram, Ellis S; Saad, Yasser; Ouriel, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    The factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation has been demonstrated to be associated with the development of venous thrombosis in humans. Whether such a propensity also exists in the arterial circulation remains controversial. In an effort to minimize the variability that clouds the clinical study of arterial thrombosis, we studied FVL-associated arterial thrombosis in an experimental model of homozygous, heterozygous, and wild-type mice. Heterozygous FVL mice were crossbred to C57BL/6J mice over several generations. The genotypes of the resulting three genotype groups (wild type, heterozygous FVL, and homozygous FVL) were blinded to the investigators. Arterial injury was produced with the injection of ferric chloride into an isolated segment of carotid artery. Arterial thrombosis was assessed with an ultrasonic flow probe and the time to occlusion (TTO) was recorded. The carotid artery occluded within 60 minutes of injury in 72 of the animals studied (97.3%). The carotid artery remained patent at 60 minutes in the remaining two animals, both of whom were subsequently found to be genotypically wild type. There was a statistically significant relationship between TTO and genotype (p = .002). TTO was greatest in the wild-type mice (p < .001 vs heterozygous, < .001 vs homozygous) and least in the homozygotes (p < .001 vs heterozygotes). Increased thrombogenicity is present in mice with the FVL mutation and is more prolonged in homozygotes than heterozygotes. These findings provide some corroboration to the clinical studies that suggest an increased risk of arterial events in patients with the FVL mutation.

  20. Treating patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm with endovascular repair and the crossover chimney technique in the internal iliac artery to protect the unilateral internal iliac artery

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xi; Li, Peng; Liu, Guang-Rui; Huang, Xiao-Yong; Huang, Lian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to explore the treatment methods for patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) that required occlusion of the openings of the bilateral internal iliac arteries (IIAs) in endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and to evaluate the efficacy of these treatments. Four patients with AAA were treated with endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and the crossover chimney technique in the bilateral internal iliac arteries (IIAs). We inserted and released the abdominal aortic stent as usual and implanted the bypass stent graft simultaneously. The intraoperative immediate angiography showed complete isolation of the AAA and patency of the bypass. One month after surgery, it showed contrast engorgement in the bypass stent in three patients. The IIA on the bypass side and its branches had good developing. Another case in which we utilized a COOK stent, occlusion started at the opening of the bypass stent, with no occurrence of other complications. For patients in whom AAAs involve bilateral iliac arteries and the openings of the bilateral IIAs need to be occluded, EVAR and a crossover chimney technique can protect the unilateral IIA. PMID:26885136

  1. Compression of the Inferior Vena Cava by the Right Iliac Artery: A Rare Variant of May-Thurner Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Fretz, V.; Binkert, C. A.

    2010-10-15

    May-Thurner syndrome is known as compression of the left common iliac vein by the right common iliac artery. We describe a case of an atypical compression of the inferior vena cava by the right common iliac artery secondary to a high aortic bifurcation. Despite an extensive collateral network, there was a significant venous gradient between the iliac veins and the inferior vena cava above the compression. After stenting the venous pressure gradient disappeared. Follow-up 4 months later revealed a good clinical response with a patent stent.

  2. Basilar artery thrombosis in the setting of antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saad, Amin F; Nickell, Larry T; Heithaus, R Evans; Shamim, Sadat A; Opatowsky, Michael J; Layton, Kennith F

    2014-07-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is an autoimmune disorder characterized by arterial or venous thrombosis, recurrent first-trimester pregnancy loss, and multiple additional clinical manifestations. We describe a man with severe atherosclerotic basilar artery stenosis and superimposed in situ thrombus who was found to have antiphospholipid syndrome.

  3. Basilar artery thrombosis in the setting of antiphospholipid syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nickell, Larry T.; Heithaus, R. Evans; Shamim, Sadat A.; Opatowsky, Michael J.; Layton, Kennith F.

    2014-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is an autoimmune disorder characterized by arterial or venous thrombosis, recurrent first-trimester pregnancy loss, and multiple additional clinical manifestations. We describe a man with severe atherosclerotic basilar artery stenosis and superimposed in situ thrombus who was found to have antiphospholipid syndrome. PMID:24982561

  4. Open Surgery for Giant Bilateral Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysms with Compression of Neighboring Abdominal Structures: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tomioka, Hideyuki; Katahira, Seiichiro; Hoshino, Takeshi; Hanzawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    We describe a patient with successfully treated giant bilateral internal iliac artery aneurysms that were associated with acute renal failure secondary to bilateral hydronephrosis, lumbosacral plexopathy, and ileus. After hemodialysis for 1 month, the patient underwent graft replacement of the abdominal aorta and iliac arteries, including complete obliteration of the internal iliac artery branches, reconstruction of the inferior mesenteric artery, and ureterolysis. Weaning from hemodialysis was achieved and postoperative renal function improved. Although the patient had serious preoperative co-morbidities, emergency traditional open surgery should be the gold standard for securely releasing compression of the neighboring organs instead of endovascular treatment. PMID:26421081

  5. [Endovascular closure of iatrogenic arteriovenous anastomosis of the iliac artery and vein].

    PubMed

    Sin'kov, M A; Murashkovskiĭ, A L; Pogorelov, E A; Golovin, A A; Kalinichenko, N A; Khaes, B L; Kokov, A N; Kheraskov, V Iu; Evtushenko, S A; Popov, V A; Barbarash, L S

    2014-01-01

    The presented herein clinical case report concerns successful endovascular closure of a iatrogenic lesion of the iliac artery and inferior vena cava with formation of a pathological arteriovenous anastomosis manifesting itself by venous thromboembolic syndrome and severe right-ventricular insufficiency. PMID:24722024

  6. Post-Kidney Transplantation Iliac Artery Stenosis due toIatrogenic Injury: Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Khankan, Azzam Anwar Maeda, Munehiro; Osuga, Keigo; Murakami, Takamichi; Nakamura, Hironobu

    2003-04-15

    We report a case of left external iliac artery lesions as a complication of post-kidney transplantation due to vascular clamp application injury. The lesions were proximal stenosis and distal occlusion just near the graft anastomosis site and they were diagnosed incidentally during the embolization for arteriovenous fistula. Angiography confirmed the diagnosis and it was managed successfully by percutaneous interventional techniques.

  7. Isolated Spontaneous Dissection of the Common Iliac Artery: Percutaneous Stent Placement in Two Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Hyo-Sung; Han, Young-Min Chung, Gyung-Ho; Yu, Hee Chul; Jeong, Yeon-Jun

    2006-10-15

    Isolated spontaneous dissection of the common iliac artery (CIA) is a rare entity. Two patients with this condition were successfully treated by percutaneous stent placement. We emphasize the feasibility of nonsurgical management by percutaneous stent placement for isolated spontaneous dissection of the CIA.

  8. Quantitative changes of calcium, phosphorus, and magnesium in common iliac arteries with aging.

    PubMed

    Tohno, S; Tohno, Y; Moriwake, Y; Azuma, C; Ohnishi, Y; Minami, T

    2001-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of element accumulations in the arteries with aging, the authors investigated the mass ratios among calcium, phosphorus, and magnesium in the common iliac arteries by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. The subjects consisted of 16 men and 8 women, ranging in age from 65 to 93 yr. It was found that there were extremely significant correlations between calcium and phosphorus contents, between calcium and magnesium contents, and between phosphorus and magnesium contents in the common iliac arteries. In regard to the mass ratio, although the mass ratio of calcium to phosphorus was almost constant, the mass ratios of magnesium to calcium and phosphorus were different at early and advanced stages of the accumulation of calcium and phosphorus. It was found that both the mass ratios of magnesium to calcium and phosphorus were higher at an early stage of the accumulation of calcium and phosphorus in the arteries than at an advanced stage of the accumulation.

  9. Is Internal Iliac Artery Embolization Essential Prior to Endovascular Repair of Aortoiliac Aneurysms?

    SciTech Connect

    Bharwani, N. Raja, J.; Choke, E.; Belli, A. M.; Thompson, M. M.; Morgan, R. A.; Munneke, G.

    2008-05-15

    Patients who undergo endovascular repair of aorto-iliac aneurysms (EVAR) require internal iliac artery (IIA) embolization (IIAE) to prevent type II endoleaks after extending the endografts into the external iliac artery. However, IIAE may not be possible in some patients due to technical factors or adverse anatomy. The aim of this study was to assess retrospectively whether patients with aorto-iliac aneurysms who fail IIAE have an increase in type II endoleak after EVAR compared with similar patients who undergo successful embolization. We retrospectively analyzed the records of 148 patients who underwent EVAR from December 1997 to June 2005. Sixty-one patients had aorto-iliac aneurysms which required IIAE before EVAR. Fifty patients had successful IIAE and 11 patients had unsuccessful IIAE prior to EVAR. The clinical and imaging follow-up was reviewed before and after EVAR. The endoleak rate of the embolized group was compared with that of the group in whom embolization failed. After a mean follow-up of 19.7 months in the study group and 25 months in the control group, there were no statistically significant differences in outcome measures between the two groups. Specifically, there were no type II endoleaks related to the IIA in patients where IIAE had failed. We conclude that failure to embolize the IIA prior to EVAR should not necessarily preclude patients from treatment. In patients where there is difficulty in achieving coil embolization, it is recommended that EVAR should proceed, as clinical sequelae are unlikely.

  10. Internal iliac artery embolisation for intractable bladder haemorrhage in the peri-operative phase.

    PubMed

    Gujral, S; Bell, R; Kabala, J; Persad, R

    1999-03-01

    Intractable haemorrhage from the bladder wall during transurethral resection of bladder tumour is uncommon but potentially catastrophic. Internal iliac artery embolisation is a minimally invasive technique, which is now widely practised to stop bleeding from branches of these arteries is situations including pelvic malignancy, obstetric and gynaecological emergencies and trauma. We report its successful use peri-operatively, in an unfit, elderly patient with uncontrolled bleeding.

  11. Treatment of Secondary Stent-Graft Collapse After Endovascular Stent-Grafting for Iliac Artery Pseudoaneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Clevert, D.-A. Stickel, M.; Steitz, H.-O.; Kopp, R.; Strautz, T.; Flach, P.; Johnson, T.; Jung, E.M.; Jauch, K.W.; Reiser, M.

    2007-02-15

    We report the case of a patient who developed an asymptomatic pseudoaneurysm in the left external iliac artery after transplant nephrectomy. The pseudoaneurysm most probably arose as a suture aneurysm from the external iliac artery after removal of the graft renal artery. Obviously we can not exclude the possibility it was a true aneurysm, although this seems much less likely. The pseudoaneurysm was detected during a routine CT scan and was treated interventionally with a stent-graft. One month later the asymptomatic patient underwent a vascular ultrasound examination including color Doppler, power Doppler, and B-flow as a routine control. An endoleak with collapse of the stent-graft was diagnosed. There was no evidence of stent infection. At a reintervention, the pseudoaneurysm was successfully treated using two uncovered Palmaz stents at the proximal and distal edge of the stent graft. Peri- and post-interventional ultrasound and CT angiography confirmed the exclusion of the aneurysm without an endoleak.

  12. Superior mesenteric artery thrombosis after abrupt discontinuation of rivaroxaban.

    PubMed

    Adams, Christopher B; Acquisto, Nicole M; Rotoli, Jason M; LoStracco, Thomas; Shamaskin, Ann R; Pasternack, Joel S

    2016-04-01

    We report a case of superior mesenteric artery thrombosis after the abrupt discontinuation of rivaroxaban in a 59-year-old male patient. The initial presentation was of sudden onset abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and hematochezia in the setting of recently holding rivaroxaban anticoagulation for an atrial flutter ablative procedure. Imaging revealed thrombosis of the superior mesenteric artery and acute mesenteric ischemia requiring emergent surgical intervention for embolectomy. Upon exploratory laparotomy, the bowel was found to be viable, and an embolectomy with patch angioplasty was successful without complication. This case illustrates the need for emergency medicine clinician familiarity with this possible medication adverse event with rivaroxaban.

  13. Iliac Arteries: How Registries Can Help Improve Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tapping, Charles Ross; Uberoi, Raman

    2014-01-01

    There are many publications reporting excellent short and long-term results with endovascular techniques. Patients included in trials are often highly selected and may not represent real world practice. Registries are important to interventional radiologists for several reasons; they reflect prevailing practice and can be used to establish real world standards of care and safety profiles. This information allows individuals and centers to evaluate their outcomes compared with national norms. The British Iliac Angioplasty and Stenting (BIAS) registry is an example of a mature registry that has been collecting data since 2000 and has been reporting outcomes since 2001. This article discusses the evidence to support both endovascular and surgical intervention for aortoiliac occlusive disease, the role of registries, and optimal techniques for aortoiliac intervention. PMID:25435659

  14. Large Diameter Limbs for Dilated Common Iliac Arteries in Endovascular Aneurysm Repair. Is It Safe?

    SciTech Connect

    Malagari, Katerina Brountzos, Elias; Gougoulakis, Alexandros; Papathanasiou, Matilda; Alexopoulou, Efthymia; Mastorakou, Renata; Kelekis, Dimitris

    2004-09-15

    In this prospective study we examined whether dilated common iliac arteries (CIAs) can provide a safe distal seal in endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) with the use of bifurcated stent grafts with large diameter limbs. Sixteen patients with 26 dilated CIAs with a diameter of {>=}6 mm who were offered EVAR using stent grafts with large diameter limbs were included in the study (Group A). Forty-two patients who also underwent EVAR without iliac dilatation, matched for age, sex and surgical risk were used for comparison (controls-Group B). In group A mean CIA diameter was 18.2 mm (16-28) and mean abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) diameter was 6.87 {+-} 1.05 cm; mean age was 77.2 {+-} 4.8 yrs (67-81). Mean follow-up was 33.6 months (2.8 yrs). CIA diameter changes and development of endoleaks were assessed by CT angiography (CTA). Overall iliac dilatation was present in 16/58 of our patients (27.6%). In 10 patients dilatation was bilateral (17.3%). Partial or complete flow to the internal iliac artery (IIA) territories was preserved in all patients post-EVAR. On follow-up, stable caliber of the dilated CIAs was observed in 21 patients (84%), enlargement of 1mm in 3 (16%), and failure of the distal attachment in 1 (6.2%). Compared to the control group there was no statistical significance in the incidence of complications. Dilated common iliac arteries provide a safe distal seal in patients who have undergone EVAR, thus obviating the need for additional endovascular procedures and sparing flow in the IIA vascular bed.

  15. British Society of Interventional Radiology Iliac Artery Angioplasty-Stent Registry III

    SciTech Connect

    Uberoi, Raman Milburn, Simon; Moss, Jon

    2009-09-15

    The objective of this study was to audit current practice in iliac artery intervention in the United Kingdom. In 2001 the British Society of Interventional Radiology Iliac Artery Angioplasty-Stent (BIAS) III registry provided the first national database for iliac intervention. It recommended that data collection needed to continue in order to facilitate the dissemination of comparative data to individual units. BIAS III was designed to continue this work and has a simplified data set with an online submission form. Interventionalists were invited to complete a 3-page tick sheet for all iliac angioplasties and stents. Questions covered risk factors, procedural data, and outcome. Data for 2233 patients were submitted from 37 institutions over a 43-month period. Consultants performed 80% of the procedures, 62% of which were for claudication. Fifty-four percent of lesions were treated with stents and 25% of patients underwent bilateral intervention, resulting in a residual stenosis of <50% in 98%. Ninety-seven percent of procedures had no limb complication and there was a 98% inpatient survival rate. In conclusion, these figures provide an essential benchmark for both audit and patient information. National databases need to be expanded across the range of interventional procedures, and their collection made simple and, preferably, online.

  16. Endovascular PTFE-Covered Stent for Treatment of an External Iliac Artery Pseudoaneurysm in the Presence of Chronic Infection

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Martin J. Fabian, Sebastian; Tisi, Paul

    2007-07-15

    A 75-year-old woman with an external iliac artery pseudoaneurysm, thought to have resulted from a chronic loosening and infection of a total hip replacement, was successfully treated by placement of a covered endoluminal stent.

  17. T-Stenting-and-Small-Protrusion Technique for Bifurcation Stenoses After End-to-Side Anastomosis of Transplant Renal Artery and External Iliac Artery: Report of Two Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yong Ye, Peng; Jiang, Wen-jin; Ma, Shuo-yi Zhao, Jian-bo Zeng, Qing-le

    2015-10-15

    Bifurcation stenoses after end-to-side anastomosis of transplant renal artery (TRA) and external iliac artery (EIA), including stenoses at the anastomosis and the iliac artery proximal to the TRA, are rare. In the present article, we report two successfully managed cases of bifurcation stenoses after end-to-side anastomosis of the TRA and EIA using the technique of T-stenting and small protrusion (TAP stenting)

  18. Ruptured Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm: Staged Emergency Endovascular Treatment in the Interventional Radiology Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Kelckhoven, Bas-Jeroen van Bruijninckx, Boy M. A.; Knippenberg, Bob; Overhagen, Hans van

    2007-07-15

    Ruptured aneurysms of the internal iliac artery (IIA) are rare and challenging to treat surgically. Due to their anatomic location they are difficult to operate on and perioperative morbidity is high. An endovascular approach can be helpful. We recently treated a patient with a ruptured IIA aneurysm in the interventional radiology suite with embolization of the side-branch of the IIA and placement of a covered stent in the ipsilateral common and external iliac arteries. A suitable stent-graft was not available initially and had to be brought in from elsewhere. An angioplasty balloon was temporarily placed across the ostium of the IIA to obtain hemostasis. Two hours later, the procedure was finished by placing the stent-graft.

  19. Arteriovenous fistula complicating iliac artery pseudo aneurysm: diagnosis by CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Huawei, L; Bei, D; Huan, Z; Zilai, P; Aorong, T; Kemin, C

    2002-01-01

    Fistula formation to the inferior vena cava is a rare complication of aortic aneurysm which is often misdiagnosed clinically. In one hundred of reported arteriocaval fistulae, none was originating from the right common iliac artery. We report a case of ileo-caval fistula due to a iatrogenic pseudoaneurysm. High resolution 3D imaging using breath-hold CT angiography is highly specific in identifying the location, extent of the aortocaval fistula as well as the neighbouring anatomic structures.

  20. Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm Embolization with Fibrin Sealant: A Simple and Effective Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Brountzos, Elias N.; Malagari, Katerina; Papathanasiou, Mathildi A.; Gougoulakis, Alexandros; Kelekis, Dimitrios A.

    2003-02-15

    Endovascular treatment of internal iliac artery (IIA) aneurysms is an attractive alternative to surgical management, because the former is associated with less morbidity and mortality.Embolization with coils or exclusion of the IIA orifice with stent -grafts are the preferred techniques. Although uncommon, technical failures occur with reported aneurysm rupture. Two patients with IIA aneurysms are reported here, where we describe successful occlusion of their IIA aneurysms with the use of fibrin sealant, after initial failure of coil embolization.

  1. Self expandable stent application to prevent limb occlusion in external iliac artery during endovascular aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Iliac extension of stent-graft during endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) increases the incidence of limb occlusion (LO). Hypothetically, adjunctive iliac stent (AIS) could offer some additional protection to overcome this anatomic hostility. But still there is no consensus in terms of effective stent characteristics or configuration. We retrospectively reviewed our center's experience to offer a possible answer to this question. Methods Our study included 30 patients (38 limbs) with AIS placed in the external iliac artery (EIA) from January 2010 to December 2013. We classified iliac tortuosity based on anatomic characteristics. AIS's were deployed in EIA with a minimum 5-mm stick-out configuration from the distal edge of the stent-graft. Results According to the iliac artery tortuosity index, grade 0, grade 1, and grade 2 were 5 (13.2%), 30 (78.9%), and 3 (7.9%), respectively. The diameter of all AIS was 12 mm, which was as large as or larger than the diameter of the stent-graft distal limb. SMART stents were preferred in 34 limbs (89.5%) and stents with 60-mm length were usually used (89.5%). During a mean follow-up of 9.13 ± 10.78 months, ischemic limb pain, which could be the sign of LO, was not noticed in any patients. There was no fracture, kinking, migration, in-stent restenosis, or occlusion of AIS. Conclusion The installation of AIS after extension of stent-graft to EIA reduced the risk of LO without any complications. AIS should be considered as a preventive procedure of LO if stent-graft needs to be extended to EIA during EVAR.

  2. Self expandable stent application to prevent limb occlusion in external iliac artery during endovascular aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Iliac extension of stent-graft during endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) increases the incidence of limb occlusion (LO). Hypothetically, adjunctive iliac stent (AIS) could offer some additional protection to overcome this anatomic hostility. But still there is no consensus in terms of effective stent characteristics or configuration. We retrospectively reviewed our center's experience to offer a possible answer to this question. Methods Our study included 30 patients (38 limbs) with AIS placed in the external iliac artery (EIA) from January 2010 to December 2013. We classified iliac tortuosity based on anatomic characteristics. AIS's were deployed in EIA with a minimum 5-mm stick-out configuration from the distal edge of the stent-graft. Results According to the iliac artery tortuosity index, grade 0, grade 1, and grade 2 were 5 (13.2%), 30 (78.9%), and 3 (7.9%), respectively. The diameter of all AIS was 12 mm, which was as large as or larger than the diameter of the stent-graft distal limb. SMART stents were preferred in 34 limbs (89.5%) and stents with 60-mm length were usually used (89.5%). During a mean follow-up of 9.13 ± 10.78 months, ischemic limb pain, which could be the sign of LO, was not noticed in any patients. There was no fracture, kinking, migration, in-stent restenosis, or occlusion of AIS. Conclusion The installation of AIS after extension of stent-graft to EIA reduced the risk of LO without any complications. AIS should be considered as a preventive procedure of LO if stent-graft needs to be extended to EIA during EVAR. PMID:27617255

  3. Catheter-directed Thrombolysis with Argatroban and tPA for Massive Iliac and Femoropopliteal Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sharifi, Mohsen; Bay, Curt; Nowroozi, Sasan; Bentz, Suzanne; Valeros, Gayle; Memari, Sara

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) is a highly effective approach in the treatment of deep venous thrombosis (DVT). There are no data on the primary use of CDT with argatroban and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in patients without heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the combined administration of argatroban and tPA during CDT for massive DVT in patients without HIT. Methods: Thirty-three patients with massive symptomatic iliac and femoropopliteal DVT underwent CDT with tPA and argatroban within 28 {+-} 6 h of presentation. The dose of tPA was 0.75-1 mg/h through the infusion port and that of argatroban at 0.3-1 {mu}g/kg/min through the side port of the sheath. The patients were evaluated for the efficacy and safety of CDT and recurrent symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) at a mean follow-up of 22 months. Results: There was no bleeding or iatrogenic pulmonary embolism with the CDT regimen we used. Grade III lysis (complete resolution of thrombus on venography) was achieved in 30 patients (91 %). In 3 patients with additional inferior vena cava filter thrombosis, further thrombectomy of the filter was required. No patient developed recurrent VTE. Conclusion: Concomitant administration of argatroban and tPA is a highly safe and effective regimen for CDT for massive DVT.

  4. Internal Iliac Artery Stenosis: Diagnosis and How to Manage it in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Mahé, Guillaume; Kaladji, Adrien; Le Faucheur, Alexis; Jaquinandi, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Lower extremity arterial disease (LEAD) is a highly prevalent disease affecting 202 million people worldwide. Internal iliac artery stenosis (IIAS) is one of the localization of LEAD. This diagnosis is often neglected when a patient has a proximal walking pain since most physicians evoke a pseudoclaudication. Surprisingly, IIAS management is reported neither in the Trans-Atlantic Inter-Society Consensus II nor in the report of the American College Foundation/American Heart Association guidelines. The aims of this review are to present the current knowledge about the disease, how should it be managed in 2015 and what are the future research trends. PMID:26664904

  5. Axillary artery compression and thrombosis in throwing athletes.

    PubMed

    Rohrer, M J; Cardullo, P A; Pappas, A M; Phillips, D A; Wheeler, H B

    1990-06-01

    A 28-year-old major league baseball pitcher sustained an axillary artery thrombosis which was successfully treated with intraarterial urokinase. Subsequent angiography and duplex scanning with the arm elevated in the pitching position demonstrated inducible compression of the axillary artery by the humeral head as well as compression at the thoracic outlet. To determine the incidence of axillary and subclavian artery compression and to investigate the mechanism of injury, brachial artery blood pressures and duplex scans of the subclavian and axillary arteries were performed in both the neutral position and the throwing position in the 92 extremities of 19 major league baseball pitchers, 16 non-pitching major league players, and 11 nonathlete controls. A drop in blood pressure of greater than 20 mm Hg was noted in the position in 56% of extremities tested, with a loss of a detectable blood pressure in 13%. Compression of the axillary artery by the humeral head was documented in 83% of extremities, but in only 7.6% was a greater than 50% stenosis inducible. No statistical difference was found in the incidence of arterial compression between the three groups tested or between their dominant and nondominant extremities. Dissection of the axillary artery in two cadavers documented that abduction and external rotation of the arm causes compression of the axillary artery by the humeral head, which acts as a fulcrum. We conclude that the repetitive mechanical trauma of the throwing motion can cause intermittent compression and contusion of the axillary artery by the humeral head and predisposes the athlete who throws to thrombosis of the axillary artery.

  6. A case of neonatal arterial thrombosis mimicking interrupted aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Gürsu, Hazım Alper; Varan, Birgül; Oktay, Ayla; Özkan, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal arterial thrombosis is a very rare entity with clinical findings resembling coarctation of aorta or interrupted aortic arch. A two day-old male newborn was admitted to a different hospital with difficulty in sucking and sleepiness. On echocardiographic examination, a diagnosis of interrupted aortic arch was made and he was treated with prostoglandin E2. When the patient presented to our center, physical examination revealed that his feet were bilaterally cold. The pulses were not palpable and there were ecchymotic regions in the lower extremities. Echocardiography ruled out interrupted aortic arch. Computerized tomographic angiography revealed a large thrombosis and total occlusion of the abdominal aorta. Since there was no response to treatment with tissue plasminogen activator, we performed thrombectomy. Homozygous Factor V Leiden and Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase mutations were found in this patient. Neonatal aortic thrombosis which is observed very rarely and fatal should be considered in the differential diagnosis of coarctation of aorta and interrupted aortic arch. PMID:26265897

  7. Acute Carotid Artery Stent Thrombosis Due to Dual Antiplatelet Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Köklü, Erkan Arslan, Şakir; Yüksel, İsa Öner; Bayar, Nermin; Koç, Pınar

    2015-08-15

    Carotid artery stenting (CAS) is a revascularization modality that is an alternative to carotid endarterectomy. The efficacy of CAS in primary and secondary prevention from ischemic stroke has been demonstrated in various trials. Acute thrombosis of CAS is a rare complication that can lead to dramatic and catastrophic consequences. We discuss a case of acute CAS thrombosis in a patient who had previously undergone successful CAS. CAS was performed in a 73-year-old man who had had dysarthria lasting 2 weeks with 95 % stenosis in his left internal carotid artery. An acute cerebrovascular event resulting in right-sided hemiplegia developed 24 h after the procedure. Computed tomographic carotid angiography revealed complete occlusion of the stent with thrombus. The cause of stent thrombosis was thought to be antiaggregant resistance to both acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel. The most important cause of acute CAS thrombosis is inadequate or ineffective antiaggregant therapy. Evaluating patients who are candidates for CAS for acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel resistance may preclude this complication.

  8. Single and Tandem Stents in Sheep Iliac Arteries: Is There a Difference in Patency?

    SciTech Connect

    Schuermann, Karl; Vorwerk, Dierk; Buecker, Arno; Grosskortenhaus, Stefanie; Guenther, Rolf W.

    1998-09-15

    Purpose: To compare patency and neointima formation of single and tandem arterial stents. Methods: In each of six sheep, two Memotherm nitinol stents (tandem stents) were inserted into the external iliac artery on one side and a single stent into the artery on the opposite side. The size of the iliac lumen was assessed in the proximal, middle, and distal segments of the stents by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) before, immediately after, and 1 month after implantation when the sheep were killed. Neointimal thickness was determined in the proximal, middle, and distal segments of each stent by light microscopy. Results: All stents remained patent. There was no significant difference in lumen and neointimal thickness between single and tandem stents. Cranial tandem stents showed a significantly wider lumen and smaller neointimal thickness than caudal tandem stents. In the proximal and distal segments, the lumen of the stents was significantly smaller and the neointimal thickness greater than in the middle segment; differences in neointimal thickness were significant only between the proximal and the middle segment. Conclusion: In an experimental setting, tandem stents did not interfere with one another with regard to patency and neointima formation when compared with a single contralateral stent. Neointimal thickening after stent insertion seems to be inversely related to the original arterial diameter.

  9. Risk Factor Analysis for Buttock Claudication after Internal Iliac Artery Embolization with Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hye Ryeon; Park, Ki Hyuk; Lee, Jae Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) involving the common iliac artery requires extension of the stent-graft limb into the external iliac artery. For this procedure, internal iliac artery (IIA) embolization is performed to prevent type II endoleak. In this study, we investigated the frequency and risk factor of buttock claudication (BC) in patients having interventional embolization of the IIA. Materials and Methods: From January 2010 to December 2013, a total of 110 patients with AAA were treated with EVAR in our institution. This study included 27 patients (24.5%) who had undergone unilateral IIA coil embolization with EVAR. We examined hospital charts retrospectively and interviewed by telephone for the occurrence of BC. Results: Mean age of total patients was 71.9±7.0 years and 88.9% were males. During a mean follow-up of 8.65±9.04 months, the incidence of BC was 40.7% (11 of 27 patients). In 8 patients with claudication, the symptoms had resolved within 1 month of IIA embolization, but the symptoms persisted for more than 6 months in the remaining 3 patients. In univariate and multivariate analysis, risk factors such as age, sex, comorbidity, patency of collateral arteries, and anatomical characteristics of AAA were not significantly related with BC. Conclusion: In this study, BC was a frequent complication of IIA embolization during EVAR and there was no associated risk factor. Certain principles such as checking preoperative angiogram, proximal and unilateral IIA embolization may have contributed to reducing the incidence of BC. PMID:27386451

  10. Laser-driven short-duration heating angioplasty: chronic artery lumen patency and histology in porcine iliac artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazaki, Natsumi; Kunio, Mie; Naruse, Sho; Arai, Tsunenori; Sakurada, Masami

    2012-02-01

    We proposed a short-duration heating balloon angioplasty. We designed a prototype short-duration heating balloon catheter that can heat artery media to 60-70°C within 15-25 s with a combination of laser-driven heat generation and continuous fluid irrigation in the balloon. The purpose of this study was to investigate chronic artery lumen patency as well as histological alteration of artery wall after the short-duration heating balloon dilatation with porcine healthy iliac artery. The short-term heating balloon dilated sites were angiographically patent in acute (1 hour) and in chronic phases (1 and 4 weeks). One week after the dilatation, smooth muscle cells (SMCs) density in the artery media measured from H&E-stained specimens was approx. 20% lower than that in the reference artery. One and four weeks after the dilatations, normal structure of artery adventitia was maintained without any incidence of thermal injury. Normal lamellar structure of the artery media was also maintained. We found that the localized heating restricted to artery media by the short-duration heating could maintain adventitial function and artery normal structure in chronic phase.

  11. Diffuse Arterial Thrombosis as a First Manifestation of Occult Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Kotlar, Irina; Antova, Emilija; Kedev, Sasko

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To raise the awareness of a hypercoagulability state as it is often associated with the different types of malignancies. Venous thromboembolism is a frequent complication in these patients, and usually it happens after the diagnosis of cancer is confirmed. However, hypercoagulability disorders presenting as the first symptoms or signs in the cancer patients have rarely been reported. Furthermore, arterial thrombosis is extremely rare even in cancer patients. Method. Review of the case characteristics and literature review. Results. We present a case of 39-year-old woman who was admitted to our hospital because of intermittent claudication in the right lower extremity. CT angiography revealed multiple thrombi in the arterial system starting from the left ventricle, followed by a thrombus in the distal part of the descending aorta, in the superior mesenteric artery, and in the right popliteal artery. Further investigation of this young patient with no risk factors for hypercoagulable state and no other comorbidities led to complete work-up including diagnostic evaluation for malignancy. The suspicion was confirmed after performing upper endoscopy with biopsy, which revealed malignant neoplasm of the stomach. Conclusion. Whenever a patient suffers hypercoagulability disorders, even arterial thrombosis, we should always consider the possibility of a cancer. PMID:27799941

  12. Embolization of the Internal Iliac Artery: Cost-Effectiveness of Two Different Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Pellerin, Olivier; Caruba, Thibaud; Kandounakis, Yanis; Novelli, Luigi; Pineau, Judith; Prognon, Patrice; Sapoval, Marc

    2008-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare the cost-effectiveness of coils versus the Amplatzer Vascular Plug (AVP) for occlusion of the internal iliac artery (IAA). Between 2002 and January 2006, 13 patients (mean age 73 {+-} 13 years) were referred for stent-grafting of abdominal aortic aneurysm (n = 6); type I distal endoleak (n = 3), isolated iliac aneurysm (n = 3), or rupture of a common iliac aneurysm (n = 1). In all patients, extension of the stent-graft was needed because the distal neck was absent. Two different techniques were used to occlude the IIA: AVP in seven patients (group A) and coil embolization in six patients (group C). Immediate results and direct material costs were assessed retrospectively. Immediate success was achieved in all patients, and simultaneous stent-grafting was successfully performed in two of six patients in group C versus five of seven patients in group A. In all group A patients, a single AVP was sufficient to achieve occlusion of the IIA, accounting for a mean cost of 485 Euro , whereas in group C patients, an average of 7 {+-} 3 coils were used, accounting for a mean cost of 1,745 Euro . Mean average cost savings using the AVP was 1,239 Euro . When IIA occlusion is needed, the AVP allows a single-step procedure at significant cost savings.

  13. The Effect of Endovascular Revascularization of Common Iliac Artery Occlusions on Erectile Function

    SciTech Connect

    Gur, Serkan; Ozkan, Ugur; Onder, Hakan; Tekbas, Gueven; Oguzkurt, Levent

    2013-02-15

    To determine the incidence of erectile dysfunction in patients with common iliac artery (CIA) occlusive disease and the effect of revascularization on erectile function using the sexual health inventory for males (SHIM) questionnaire. All patients (35 men; mean age 57 {+-} 5 years; range 42-67 years) were asked to recall their sexual function before and 1 month after iliac recanalization. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine variables effecting improvement of impotence. The incidence of impotence in patients with CIA occlusion was 74% (26 of 35) preoperatively. Overall 16 (46%) of 35 patients reported improved erectile function after iliac recanalization. The rate of improvement of impotence was 61.5% (16 of 26 impotent patients). Sixteen patients (46%), including seven with normal erectile function before the procedure, had no change. Three patients (8%) reported deterioration of their sexual function, two of whom (6%) had normal erectile function before the procedure. The median SHIM score increased from 14 (range 4-25) before the procedure to 20 (range 1-25) after the procedure (P = 0.005). The type of recanalization, the age of the patients, and the length of occlusion were related to erectile function improvement in univariate analysis. However, these factors were not independent factors for improvement of erectile dysfunction in multivariate analysis (P > 0.05). Endovascular recanalization of CIA occlusions clearly improves sexual function. More than half of the patients with erectile dysfunction who underwent endovascular recanalization of the CIA experienced improvement.

  14. Percutaneous Transosseous Embolization of Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm Type II Endoleak: Report of Two Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Gemmete, Joseph J. Arabi, Mohammad; Cwikiel, Wojciech B.

    2011-02-15

    This report describes two cases of successful treatment of an internal iliac artery aneurysm (IIAA) type II endoleak utilizing a percutaneous transosseous access that could not be treated using an endovascular or standard percutaneous approach. A direct percutaneous approach through bone was chosen to avoid vital structures and the surrounding bowel. The procedure was successful and required minimal fluoroscopy time compared with other treatment options. We believe this procedure is an alternative to some of the more complex and technically challenging means of treating this lesion.

  15. Successful Recanalization of a Longstanding Right Common Iliac Artery Occlusion with a Radiofrequency Guidewire

    SciTech Connect

    Tapping, C. R.; Uri, I. F.; Dixon, S.; Bratby, M. J.; Anthony, S.; Uberoi, R.

    2012-10-15

    We describe a case of successful recanalization of a longstanding right common iliac occlusion with a radiofrequency (RF) guidewire. The patient had been symptomatic with claudication for 3 years, and a preliminary attempt to cross the lesion using conventional techniques proved unsuccessful. Using low and medium intensity RF pulses and a PowerWire, a tract through the occlusion was established, which allowed subsequent stenting with an excellent angiographic result and a good immediate clinical response. We propose this as a useful technique in the peripheral arterial system for occlusive lesions not amenable to traditional recanalization techniques.

  16. Deep Circumflex Iliac Artery-Related Hemoperitoneum Formation After Surgical Drain Placement: Successful Transcatheter Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sang Woo; Chang, Seong-Hwan Yun, Ik Jin; Lee, Hae Won

    2010-04-15

    A 53-year-old woman with liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma underwent living donor liver transplantation. After transplantation, her hemoglobin and hematocrit levels decreased to 6.3 g/dl and 18.5%, respectively, during the course of 3 days. A contrast-enhanced abdominal computed axial tomography (CAT) scan showed a hemoperitoneum in the right perihepatic space with no evidence of abdominal wall hematoma or pseudoaneurysm formation. An angiogram of the deep circumflex iliac artery (DCIA) showed extravasation of contrast media along the surgical drain, which had been inserted during the transplantation procedure. Transcatheter embolization of the branches of the DCIA was successfully performed using N-butyl cyanoacrylate.

  17. Retrograde superior mesenteric artery stenting for acute mesenteric arterial thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Do, Natalie; Wisniewski, Paul; Sarmiento, Jose; Vo, Trung; Aka, Paul K; Hsu, Jeffrey H; Tayyarah, Majid

    2010-08-01

    Retrograde superior mesenteric artery stenting (ROMS) represents a significant development in the treatment of acute mesenteric ischemia. Compared to traditional surgical mesenteric bypass, ROMS is a less invasive technique that avoids many complications associated with emergent mesenteric bypass. This case report illustrates that retrograde superior mesenteric artery (SMA) stenting is an option for the treatment of acute mesenteric ischemia for patients in extremis.

  18. Successful Treatment of Acute on Chronic Mesenteric Ischaemia by Common Iliac to Inferior Mesenteric Artery Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Coakley, D. N.; Shaikh, F. M.; Kavanagh, E. G.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic mesenteric ischaemia is a rare and potentially fatal condition most commonly due to atherosclerotic stenosis or occlusion of two or more mesenteric arteries. Multivessel revascularisation of both primary mesenteric vessels, the celiac artery and superior mesenteric artery (SMA), is the current mainstay of treatment; however, in a certain cohort of patients, revascularisation one or both vessels may not be possible. Arteries may be technically unreconstructable or the patient may be surgically unfit for the prolonged aortic cross clamping times required. Here we present a case involving a 72-year-old woman with acute on chronic mesenteric ischaemia. She was a high risk surgical patient with severe unreconstructable stenotic disease of the SMA and celiac arteries. She was successfully treated with single vessel revascularisation of the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) via a common iliac to IMA reversed vein bypass. At two-year follow-up, the graft remains patent and the patient continues to be symptom-free and is maintaining her weight. PMID:26421207

  19. Spontaneous ruptured dissection of the right common iliac artery in a patient with classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome phenotype.

    PubMed

    Gaines, Rick; Tinkle, Brad T; Halandras, Pegge M; Al-Nouri, Omar; Crisostomo, Paul; Cho, Jae S

    2015-04-01

    Unlike vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), classic EDS is rarely associated with vascular manifestation. We report the case of a 39-year-old man who presented with acute abdominal pain. At the time of presentation, the patient was in hypovolemic shock, and computed tomography angiogram demonstrated common iliac artery dissection with rupture. He underwent an attempted endovascular repair that was converted to an open repair of a ruptured right common iliac artery dissection. Subsequent genetic testing revealed a substitution of arginine for cysteine in type I collagen, COL1A1 exon 14 c.934C>T mutation, consistent with a rare variant of classic EDS. PMID:25597651

  20. Spontaneous ruptured dissection of the right common iliac artery in a patient with classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome phenotype.

    PubMed

    Gaines, Rick; Tinkle, Brad T; Halandras, Pegge M; Al-Nouri, Omar; Crisostomo, Paul; Cho, Jae S

    2015-04-01

    Unlike vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), classic EDS is rarely associated with vascular manifestation. We report the case of a 39-year-old man who presented with acute abdominal pain. At the time of presentation, the patient was in hypovolemic shock, and computed tomography angiogram demonstrated common iliac artery dissection with rupture. He underwent an attempted endovascular repair that was converted to an open repair of a ruptured right common iliac artery dissection. Subsequent genetic testing revealed a substitution of arginine for cysteine in type I collagen, COL1A1 exon 14 c.934C>T mutation, consistent with a rare variant of classic EDS.

  1. A rare cause of ureteral injuries; simultaneous common iliac artery and ureter injury during posterior lumbar disc surgery

    PubMed Central

    Başer, Aykut; Alkış, Okan; Toktaş, Cihan; Zümrütbaş, Ali Ersin

    2016-01-01

    Major vascular injuries during lumbar disc surgery are rare but well-recognized complications. However, vascular injuries of the branches of the aorta and ureteral injuries are very rare. Although its incidence is not known definitely, it is estimated to be 1/1000. Ureteral injuries comprise less than 1% of all genitourinary traumas. In this article, we report clinical progress of a patient who had simultaneous internal iliac artery and ureteral injury during lumbar discectomy. The patient was managed with primary ureteroureterostomy. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported with simultaneous ureter and iliac artery trauma during lumbar disc surgery. PMID:27274898

  2. Intraarterial Pressure Gradients After Randomized Angioplasty or Stenting of Iliac Artery Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Tetteroo, Eric; Haaring, Cees; Graaf, Yolanda van der; Schaik, Jan P.J. van; Engelen, A.D. van; Mali, Willem P.T.M.

    1996-11-15

    Purpose: To determine initial technical results of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) and stent procedures in the iliac artery, mean intraarterial pressure gradients were recorded before and after each procedure. Methods: We randomly assigned 213 patients with typical intermittent claudication to primary stent placement (n= 107) or primary PTA (n= 106), with subsequent stenting in the case of a residual mean pressure gradient of > 10 mmHg (n= 45). Eligibility criteria included angiographic iliac artery stenosis (> 50% diameter reduction) and/or a peak systolic velocity ratio > 2.5 on duplex examination. Mean intraarterial pressures were simultaneously recorded above and below the lesion, at rest and also during vasodilatation in the case of a resting gradient {<=} 10 mmHg. Results: Pressure gradients in the primary stent group were 14.9 {+-} 10.4 mmHg before and 2.9 {+-} 3.5 mmHg after stenting. Pressure gradients in the primary PTA group were 17.3 {+-} 11.3 mmHg pre-PTA, 4.2 {+-} 5.4 mmHg post-PTA, and 2.5 {+-} 2.8 mmHg after selective stenting. Compared with primary stent placement, PTA plus selective stent placement avoided application of a stent in 63% (86/137) of cases, resulting in a considerable cost saving. Conclusion: Technical results of primary stenting and PTA plus selective stenting are similar in terms of residual pressure gradients.

  3. Bifurcated Endograft (Excluder) in the Treatment of Isolated Iliac Artery Aneurysm: Preliminary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Zander, Tobias Baldi, Sebastian; Rabellino, Martin; Kirsch, David; Llorens, Rafael; Zerolo, Ignacio; Qian, Zhong; Maynar, Manuel

    2009-09-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of endovascular repair in the treatment of isolated iliac artery aneurysm (IAA) using Excluder bifurcated endograft. Eight consecutive patients with IAA were treated during a period of 45 months using Excluder bifurcated endograft. Two patients presented with isolated IAA rupture and were treated emergently, whereas the other six patients underwent elective treatment. All aneurysms lacked sufficient proximal necks and therefore were not suitable for tubular-shaped endograft. Follow-up imaging was performed at 1 week, at every 3 months during the first year, semiannually until 2 years, and annually afterward using angio-computed axial tomography and plain films. Technical success was achieved in all patients. No mortality was seen despite two patients having IAA rupture. Follow-up (12 to 60 months) was done in all but one patient. During this period, complications were observed in three patients. One patient developed sexual impotence at 3-month follow up; one patient presented unilateral gluteal claudication after the procedure, which resolved at 3 months; and one patient developed a graft porosity-related endoleak, which was successfully managed with placement of an additional ipsilateral iliac extension. Endovascular treatment of isolated IAA using bifurcated endograft is safe and can be an alternative to surgical treatment. The benefits from decreased morbidity and mortality of endoluminal treatment of isolated IAA using bifurcated endograft outweigh the minor complications associated with this technique, which are mostly related to occlusion of hypogastric arteries.

  4. Simultaneous thrombosis of multiple coronary arteries in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kalayci, Arzu; Arslan, Erol; Bakar, Salih Murat; Guneri, Mahmut; Dizman, Rafet; Kivanc, Eylem; Karabay, Can Yucel

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of simultaneous coronary thrombosis of the left main, the left anterior descending artery and the right coronary artery in a patient, recently diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27489603

  5. Simultaneous thrombosis of multiple coronary arteries in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kalayci, Arzu; Arslan, Erol; Bakar, Salih Murat; Guneri, Mahmut; Dizman, Rafet; Kivanc, Eylem; Karabay, Can Yucel

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of simultaneous coronary thrombosis of the left main, the left anterior descending artery and the right coronary artery in a patient, recently diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27489603

  6. Warfarin therapy in a dog with acute arterial thrombosis and pyometra.

    PubMed

    Arai, Shiori; Callan, Mary Beth

    2014-11-01

    This report describes the presentation of acute arterial thrombosis causing triparesis in a 6-year-old female Chihuahua with pyometra and its successful management in combination with warfarin therapy. This is the first case report of a dog with arterial thrombosis associated with pyometra. PMID:25392549

  7. Warfarin therapy in a dog with acute arterial thrombosis and pyometra

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Shiori; Callan, Mary Beth

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the presentation of acute arterial thrombosis causing triparesis in a 6-year-old female Chihuahua with pyometra and its successful management in combination with warfarin therapy. This is the first case report of a dog with arterial thrombosis associated with pyometra. PMID:25392549

  8. Severe gastric variceal haemorrhage due to splenic artery thrombosis and consecutive arterial bypass

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage is mainly caused by ulcers. Gastric varicosis due to portal hypertension can also be held responsible for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Portal hypertension causes the development of a collateral circulation from the portal to the caval venous system resulting in development of oesophageal and gastric fundus varices. Those may also be held responsible for upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Case presentation In this study, we describe the case of a 69-year-old male with recurrent severe upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by arterial submucosal collaterals due to idiopathic splenic artery thrombosis. The diagnosis was secured using endoscopic duplex ultrasound and angiography. The patient was successfully treated with a laparoscopic splenectomy and complete dissection of the short gastric arteries, resulting in the collapse of the submucosal arteries in the gastric wall. Follow-up gastroscopy was performed on the 12th postoperative week and showed no signs of bleeding and a significant reduction in the arterial blood flow within the gastric wall. Subsequent follow-up after 6 months also showed no further gastrointestinal bleeding as well as subjective good quality of life for the patient. Conclusion Submucosal arterial collaterals must be excluded by endosonography via endoscopy in case of recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Laparoscopic splenectomy provides adequate treatment in preventing any recurrent bleeding, if gastric arterial collaterals are caused by splenic artery thrombosis. PMID:21711534

  9. Assessment of a Polyester-Covered Nitinol Stent in the Canine Aorta and Iliac Arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Castaneda, Flavio; Ball-Kell, Susan M.; Young, Kate; Li Ruizong

    2000-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the patency and healing characteristics of a woven polyester fabric-covered stent in the canine model.Methods: Twenty-four self-expanding covered stents were placed in the infrarenal aorta and bilateral common iliac arteries of eight dogs and evaluated at 1 (n = 2), 3 (n = 2), and 6 (n = 4) months. Stent assessment was done using angiography prior to euthanasia, and light and scanning electron microscopy.Results: Angiographically, just prior to euthanasia, 8 of 8 aortic and 14 of 16 iliac endovascular covered stents were patent. Histologically, the stented regions showed complete endothelialization 6 months after graft implantation. A neointima had formed inside the stented vessel regions resulting in complete encasement of the fabric-covered stent by 3 months after graft implantation. Medial compression with smooth muscle cell atrophy was present in all stented regions. Explanted stent wires, examined by scanning electron microscopy, showed pitting but no cracks or breakage.Conclusion: The covered stent demonstrated predictable healing and is effective in preventing stenosis in vessels 10.0 mm or greater in diameter but does not completely preclude stenosis in vessels 6.0 mm or less in diameter.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Angiography of Nonferromagnetic Iliac Artery Stents and Stent-Grafts: A Comparative Study in Sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Schuermann, Karl; Vorwerk, Dierk; Buecker, Arno; Neuerburg, Joerg; Grosskortenhaus, Stefanie; Haage, Patrick; Piroth, Werner; Hunter, David W.; Guenther, Rolf W.

    1999-09-15

    Purpose: To compare nonferromagnetic iliac artery prostheses in their suitability for patency monitoring with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) using conventional angiography as a reference. Methods: In experiment 1, three Memotherm stents were inserted into the iliac arteries of each of six sheep: two 'tandem' stents on one side and a single stent on the other side. In experiment 2, four prostheses (normal and low-porosity Corvita stent-grafts, Memotherm, ZA-stent) were inserted in each of 11 sheep. Patency was monitored before and 1, 3, and 6 months after insertion with 3D phase-contrast and two 2D time-of-flight sequences (TOF-1: TR/TE = 18/6.9, TOF-2: 13/2.5) with and without contrast at 1.5 T. On 206 coronal MIP images (72 pre-, 134 post-stenting), three readers analyzed 824 iliac segments (206 x 4) for patency and artifacts. Results: There was no difference in the number of artifacts between tandem and single iliac Memotherm stents. The ZA-stent induced significantly fewer artifacts than the other prostheses (p < 0.00001). With MRA, patency of the ZA-stent was correctly diagnosed in 88% of cases, which was almost comparable to nonstented iliac segments (95%), patency of the Memotherm stent in 59%, and of the Corvita stent-grafts in 57% and 55%. The TOF-2 sequence with contrast yielded the best images. Conclusion: MRA compatibility of nonferromagnetic prostheses depends strongly on the design of the device. MRA may be used to monitor the patency of iliac ZA-stents, whereas iliac Memotherm stents and Corvita stent-grafts appear to be less suited for follow-up with MRA.

  11. Pre-transplant portal vein thrombosis is an independent risk factor for graft loss due to hepatic artery thrombosis in liver transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Stine, Jonathan G.; Pelletier, Shawn J.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Porte, Robert J.; Northup, Patrick G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatic artery thrombosis is an uncommon but catastrophic complication following liver transplantation. We hypothesize that recipients with portal vein thrombosis are at increased risk. Methods Data on all liver transplants in the U.S. during the MELD era through September 2014 were obtained from UNOS. Status one, multivisceral, living donor, re-transplants, pediatric recipients and donation after cardiac death were excluded. Logistic regression models were constructed for hepatic artery thrombosis with resultant graft loss within 90 days of transplantation. Results 63,182 recipients underwent transplantation; 662 (1.1%) recipients had early hepatic artery thrombosis; of those, 91 (13.8%) had pre-transplant portal vein thrombosis, versus 7.5% with portal vein thrombosis but no hepatic artery thrombosis (p < 0.0001). Portal vein thrombosis was associated with an increased independent risk of hepatic artery thrombosis (OR 2.17, 95% CI 1.71–2.76, p < 0.001) as was donor risk index (OR 2.02, 95% CI 1.65–2.48, p < 0.001). Heparin use at cross clamp, INR, and male donors were all significantly associated with lower risk. Discussion Pre-transplant portal vein thrombosis is associated with post-transplant hepatic artery thrombosis independent of other factors. Recipients with portal vein thrombosis might benefit from aggressive coagulation management and careful donor selection. More research is needed to determine causal mechanism. PMID:27017168

  12. Comparison of diamond-like carbon-coated nitinol stents with or without polyethylene glycol grafting and uncoated nitinol stents in a canine iliac artery model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J H; Shin, J H; Shin, D H; Moon, M-W; Park, K; Kim, T-H; Shin, K M; Won, Y H; Han, D K; Lee, K-R

    2011-01-01

    Objective Neointimal hyperplasia is a major complication of endovascular stent placement with consequent in-stent restenosis or occlusion. Improvements in the biocompatibility of stent designs could reduce stent-associated thrombosis and in-stent restenosis. We hypothesised that the use of a diamond-like carbon (DLC)-coated nitinol stent or a polyethylene glycol (PEG)-DLC-coated nitinol stent could reduce the formation of neointimal hyperplasia, thereby improving stent patency with improved biocompatibility. Methods A total of 24 stents were implanted, under general anaesthesia, into the iliac arteries of six dogs (four stents in each dog) using the carotid artery approach. The experimental study dogs were divided into three groups: the uncoated nitinol stent group (n = 8), the DLC-nitinol stent group (n = 8) and the PEG-DLC-nitinol stent group (n = 8). Results The mean percentage of neointimal hyperplasia was significantly less in the DLC-nitinol stent group (26.7±7.6%) than in the nitinol stent group (40.0±20.3%) (p = 0.021). However, the mean percentage of neointimal hyperplasia was significantly greater in the PEG-DLC-nitinol stent group (58.7±24.7%) than in the nitinol stent group (40.0±20.3%) (p = 0.01). Conclusion Our findings indicate that DLC-coated nitinol stents might induce less neointimal hyperplasia than conventional nitinol stents following implantation in a canine iliac artery model; however, the DLC-coated nitinol stent surface when reformed with PEG induces more neointimal hyperplasia than either a conventional or DLC-coated nitinol stent. PMID:21325363

  13. Involvement of 5-HT1B receptors in triptan-induced contractile responses in guinea-pig isolated iliac artery.

    PubMed

    Jähnichen, S; Radtke, O A; Pertz, H H

    2004-07-01

    Using a series of triptans we characterized in vitro the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor that mediates the contraction in guinea-pig iliac arteries moderately precontracted by prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2alpha). Additionally, we investigated by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) which triptan-sensitive receptor is present in this tissue. Frovatriptan, zolmitriptan, rizatriptan, naratriptan, sumatriptan, and almotriptan contracted guinea-pig iliac arteries with pD2 values of 7.52+/-0.04, 6.72+/-0.03, 6.38+/-0.06, 6.22+/-0.05, 5.86+/-0.05 and 5.26+/-0.04 respectively. For comparison, the pD2 values for 5-HT and 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) were 7.52+/-0.02 and 7.55+/-0.03 respectively. In contrast to all other triptans tested, the concentration-response curve for eletriptan was biphasic (first phase: 0.01-3 microM, pD2 approximately 6.6; second phase: > or = 10 microM). Contractions to 5-HT, 5-CT, frovatriptan, zolmitriptan, rizatriptan, naratriptan, sumatriptan, almotriptan, and eletriptan (first phase) were antagonized by the 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist GR127935 (10 nM) and the 5-HT1B receptor antagonist SB216641 (10 nM). RT-PCR studies in guinea-pig iliac arteries showed a strong signal for the 5-HT1B receptor while expression of 5-HT1D and 5-HT1F receptors was not detected in any sample. The present results demonstrate that triptan-induced contraction in guinea-pig iliac arteries is mediated by the 5-HT1B receptor. The guinea-pig iliac artery may be used as a convenient in vitro model to study the (cardio)vascular side-effect potential of anti-migraine drugs of the triptan family. PMID:15185063

  14. Iatrogenic left common iliac artery and vein perforation during lumbar discectomy: a fatal case.

    PubMed

    Busardò, Francesco Paolo; Frati, Paola; Carbone, Iacopo; Pugnetti, Paola; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    Iatrogenic vascular injury during lumbar disk surgery, although rare, is a serious complication, and when it does occur, can be sudden and life-threatening. The risk of injury to the pelvic vessels intra-operatively can be explained by the close proximity of the retroperitoneal vessels to the vertebral column therefore causing injury to the anterior longitudinal ligament, which can give access to the retroperitoneal space. If signs of circulatory instability are noted during lumbar disk surgery, early diagnosis of vascular injury and urgent transperitoneal surgery or emergency stenting can save the patient's life. Here, is presented the case of a 52-year-old man who underwent an elective lumbar discectomy for a rightward disk herniation in the L4-L5 intervertebral space and died 12h after the operation for a hemorrhagic shock due to a severe intra-abdominal hemorrhage following iatrogenic left common iliac artery and vein perforation during lumbar discectomy. PMID:25467198

  15. MRSA-Infected External Iliac Artery Pseudoaneurysm Treated with Endovascular Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, M.G.; Thomas, H.G. Chester, J.F.

    2005-04-15

    A 48-year-old woman with severe juvenile-onset rheumatoid arthritis presented with a bleeding cutaneous sinus distal to her right total hip replacement scar. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was isolated on culture. She had previously undergone bilateral total hip and knee replacements at aged 23 and six years later had the right knee prosthesis removed for infection, with subsequent osteomyelitis of the femoral shaft and right total hip prosthesis disruption. Peripheral arteriography was performed in view of persistent bleeding from the sinus, which revealed a 6 cm false aneurysm filling from and compressing the right external iliac artery (EIA). A PTFE-covered, balloon expandable JOSTENT was deployed in the right EIA, successfully excluding the false aneurysm and preventing further bleeding from the sinus. No graft infection was reported at 12 months. This case illustrates the potential use of endovascular stent-grafting in the treatment of an infected pseudoaneurysm.

  16. Estimating the Radiation Dose to the Fetus in Prophylactic Internal Iliac Artery Balloon Occlusion: Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Kai, Kentaro; Hamada, Tomohiro; Yuge, Akitoshi; Kiyosue, Hiro; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Nasu, Kaei; Narahara, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    Background. Although radiation exposure is of great concern to expecting patients, little information is available on the fetal radiation dose associated with prophylactic internal iliac artery balloon occlusion (IIABO). Here we estimated the fetal radiation dose associated with prophylactic IIABO in Caesarean section (CS). Cases. We report our experience with the IIABO procedure in three consecutive patients with suspected placenta previa/accreta. Fetal radiation dose measurements were conducted prior to each CS by using an anthropomorphic phantom. Based on the simulated value, we calculated the fetal radiation dose as the absorbed dose. We found that the fetal radiation doses ranged from 12.88 to 31.6 mGy. The fetal radiation dose during the prophylactic IIABOs did not exceed 50 mGy. Conclusion. The IIABO procedure could result in a very small increase in the risk of harmful effects to the fetus. PMID:26180648

  17. Impact of Stent Design on In-Stent Stenosis in a Rabbit Iliac Artery Model

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, C. M. Grenacher, L.; Stampfl, U.; Arnegger, F. U.; Rehnitz, C.; Thierjung, H.; Stampfl, S.; Berger, I.; Richter, G. M.; Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A.

    2010-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of stent design on in-stent stenosis in rabbit iliac arteries. Four different types of stent were implanted in rabbit iliac arteries, being different in stent design (crown or wave) and strut thickness (50 or 100 {mu}m). Ten stents of each type were implanted. Each animal received one crown and one wave stent with the same strut thickness. Follow-up was either 12 weeks (n = 10 rabbits) or 24 weeks (n = 10 rabbits). Primary study end points were angiographic and microscopic in-stent stenosis. Secondary study end points were vessel injury, vascular inflammation, and stent endothelialization. Average stent diameter, relative stent overdilation, average and minimal luminal diameter, and relative average and maximum luminal loss were not significantly different. However, a trend to higher relative stent overdilation was recognized in crown stents compared to wave stents. A trend toward higher average and minimal luminal diameter and lower relative average and maximum luminal loss was recognized in crown stents compared to wave stents with a strut thickness of 100 {mu}m. Neointimal height, relative luminal area stenosis, injury score, inflammation score, and endothelialization score were not significantly different. However, a trend toward higher neointimal height was recognized in crown stents compared to wave stents with a strut thickness of 50 {mu}m and a follow-up of 24 weeks. In conclusion, in this study, crown stents seem to trigger neointima. However, the optimized radial force might equalize the theoretically higher tendency for restenosis in crown stents. In this context, also more favorable positive remodeling in crown stents could be important.

  18. Predictors of Reintervention After Endovascular Repair of Isolated Iliac Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Zayed, Hany A. Attia, Rizwan; Modarai, Bijan; Clough, Rachel E.; Bell, Rachel E.; Carrell, Tom; Sabharwal, Tarun; Reidy, John; Taylor, Peter R.

    2011-02-15

    The objective of this study was to identify factors predicting the need for reintervention after endovascular repair of isolated iliac artery aneurysm (IIAA). We reviewed prospectively collected database records of all patients who underwent endovascular repair of IIAA between 1999 and 2008. Detailed assessment of the aneurysms was performed using computed tomography angiography (CTA). Follow-up protocol included CTA at 3 months. If this showed no complication, then annual duplex scan was arranged. Multivariate analysis and analysis of patient survival and freedom from reintervention were performed using Kaplan-Meier life tables. Forty IIAAs (median diameter 44 mm) in 38 patients were treated (all men; median age 75 years), and median follow-up was 27 months. Endovascular repair of IIAA was required in 14 of 40 aneurysms (35%). The rate of type I endoleak was significantly higher with proximal landing zone (PLZ) diameter >30 mm in the aorta or >24 mm in the common iliac artery or distal landing zone (DLZ) diameter >24 mm (P = 0.03, 0.03, and 0.0014, respectively). Reintervention rate (RR) increased significantly with increased diameter or decreased length of PLZ; increased DLZ diameter; and endovascular IIAA repair (P = 0.005, 0.005, 0.02, and 0.02 respectively); however, RR was not significantly affected by length of PLZ or DLZ. Freedom-from-reintervention was 97, 93, and 86% at 12, 24, and 108 months. There was no in-hospital or aneurysm-related mortality. Endovascular IIAA repair is a safe treatment option. Proper patient selection is essential to decrease the RR.

  19. How Safe is Bilateral Internal Iliac Artery Embolization Prior to EVAR?

    SciTech Connect

    Bratby, M. J. Munneke, G. M.; Belli, A.-M.; Loosemore, T. M.; Loftus, I.; Thompson, M. M.; Morgan, R. A.

    2008-03-15

    Purpose. To assess the outcomes of patients after bilateral internal iliac artery (IIA) embolization prior to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Methods. Thirty-nine patients (age range 55-88 years, mean 72.5 years; 2 women) underwent IIA embolization/occlusion before EVAR. There were 28 patients with aorto-biiliac aneurysms and 6 with bilateral common iliac artery (CIA) aneurysms. Five patients with unilateral CIA aneurysms had previous surgical ligation of the contralateral IIA or inadvertent covering by the stent-graft of the contralateral IIA origin. Outcomes were assessed by clinical follow-up. Results. Severe ischemic complications were limited to spinal cord ischemia in 1 patient (3%) who developed paraparesis following EVAR. No other severe ischemic complications such as buttock necrosis, or bowel or bladder ischemia, occurred. Buttock and/or thigh claudication occurred in 12 patients (31%) and persisted beyond 1 year in 3 patients (9%). Sexual dysfunction occurred in 2 patients (5%). Patients who underwent simultaneous embolization had a 25% (3/12) ischemic complication rate versus 41% (11/27) in those with sequential embolization (p = 0.48). Embolization limited to the main trunk of the IIA resulted in a significantly reduced ischemic complication rate of 16% (3/19) versus 55% (11/20) of patients who had a more distal embolization of the IIA (p = 0.019, Fisher's exact test). Conclusion. Severe complications after bilateral IIA embolization are uncommon. Although buttock/thigh claudication occurs in around 30% of patients soon after the procedure, this resolves in the majority after 1 year. There is no obvious benefit for sequential versus simultaneous IIA embolization in our series. Occlusion of the proximal IIA trunk is associated with reduced complications compared with occlusion of the distal IIA.

  20. Balloon-Assisted Occlusion of the Internal Iliac Arteries in Patients with Placenta Accreta/Percreta

    SciTech Connect

    Bodner, Leonard J.; Nosher, John L. Gribbin, Christopher; Siegel, Randall L.; Beale, Stephanie; Scorza, William

    2006-06-15

    Background. Placenta accreta/percreta is a leading cause of third trimester hemorrhage and postpartum maternal death. The current treatment for third trimester hemorrhage due to placenta accreta/percreta is cesarean hysterectomy, which may be complicated by large volume blood loss. Purpose. To determine what role, if any, prophylactic temporary balloon occlusion and transcatheter embolization of the anterior division of the internal iliac arteries plays in the management of patients with placenta accreta/percreta. Methods. The records of 28 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of placenta accreta/percreta were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were divided into two groups. Six patients underwent prophylactic temporary balloon occlusion, followed by cesarean section, transcatheter embolization of the anterior division of the internal iliac arteries and cesarean hysterectomy (n = 5) or uterine curettage (n = 1). Twenty-two patients underwent cesarean hysterectomy without endovascular intervention. The following parameters were compared in the two groups: patient age, gravidity, parity, gestational age at delivery, days in the intensive care unit after delivery, total hospital days, volume of transfused blood products, volume of fluid replacement intraoperatively, operating room time, estimated blood loss, and postoperative morbidity and mortality. Results. Patients in the embolization group had more frequent episodes of third trimester bleeding requiring admission and bedrest prior to delivery (16.7 days vs. 2.9 days), resulting in significantly more hospitalization time in the embolization group (23 days vs. 8.8 days) and delivery at an earlier gestational age than in those in the surgical group (32.5 weeks). There was no statistical difference in mean estimated blood loss, volume of replaced blood products, fluid replacement needs, operating room time or postoperative recovery time. Conclusion. Our findings do not support the contention that in patients with

  1. Differential changes in vascular mRNA levels between rat iliac and renal arteries produced by cessation of voluntary running.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Jaume; Jenkins, Nathan T; Roberts, Michael D; Arce-Esquivel, Arturo A; Martin, Jeffrey S; Laughlin, M Harold; Booth, Frank W

    2013-01-01

    Early vascular changes at the molecular level caused by adoption of a sedentary lifestyle are incompletely characterized. Herein, we employed the rodent wheel-lock model to identify mRNAs in the arterial wall that are responsive to the acute transition from higher to lower levels of daily physical activity. Specifically, we evaluated whether short-term cessation of voluntary wheel running alters vascular mRNA levels in rat conduit arteries previously reported to have marked increases (i.e. iliac artery) versus marked decreases (i.e. renal artery) in blood flow during running. We used young female Wistar rats with free access to voluntary running wheels. Following 23 days of voluntary running (average distance of ∼15 km per night; ∼4.4 h per night), rats in one group were rapidly transitioned to a sedentary state by locking the wheels for 7 days (n = 9; wheel-lock 7 day rats) or remained active in a second group for an additional 7 days (n = 9; wheel-lock 0 day rats). Real-time PCR was conducted on total RNA isolated from iliac and renal arteries to evaluate expression of 25 pro-atherogenic and anti-atherogenic genes. Compared with the iliac arteries of wheel-lock 0 day rats, iliac arteries of wheel-lock 7 day rats exhibited increased expression of TNFR1 (+19%), ET1 (+59%) and LOX-1 (+31%; all P < 0.05). Moreover, compared with renal arteries of wheel-lock 0 day rats, renal arteries of wheel-lock 7 day rats exhibited decreased expression of ETb (-23%), p47phox (-32%) and p67phox (-19%; all P < 0.05). These data demonstrate that cessation of voluntary wheel running for 7 days produces modest, but differential changes in mRNA levels between the iliac and renal arteries of healthy rats. This heterogeneous influence of short-term physical inactivity could be attributed to the distinct alteration in haemodynamic forces between arteries.

  2. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with a Dilated Common Iliac Artery: Treatment Using a Handmade Bifurcated Stent-Graft with a Wide Iliac Limb End

    SciTech Connect

    Miyayama, Shiro; Matsui, Osamu; Akakura, Yukari; Yamamoto, Toru; Nishida, Hiroto; Yoneda, Kenji; Kawai, Keiichi; Murakami, Shinya

    2003-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a bifurcated stent-graft with a wide iliac limb end (WILE) in the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) with a dilated common iliac artery (CIA) to avoid occlusion of the internaliliac artery (IIA). The WILE, covered with an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene graft which was constructed of large diameter stents according to the individual CIA diameter, was connected to a two-piece bifurcated stent-graft covering a polyester graft. The WILE was placed in eight dilated CIAs of six patients. All but one WILE fitted the dilated CIA well. One did not fit, and coil embolization of the leak was needed. All eight IIA derived from the dilated CIA avoided occlusion. Perigraft leak due to other causes was identified in another two patients. Limb kinking was observed in two patients. Our stent is useful in the treatment of AAA with dilated CIA to avoid occlusion of the IIA, and may extend the indication of endoluminal repair of AAA.

  3. Internal iliac and uterine arteries Doppler ultrasound in the assessment of normotensive and chronic hypertensive pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    Guedes-Martins, L.; Cunha, A.; Saraiva, J.; Gaio, R.; Macedo, F.; Almeida, H.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work was to compare Doppler flows pulsatility index (PI) and resistance indexes (RI) of uterine and internal iliac arteries during pregnancy in low risk women and in those with stage-1 essential hypertension. From January 2010 and December 2012, a longitudinal and prospective study was carried out in 103 singleton uneventful pregnancies (72 low-risk pregnancies and 31 with stage 1 essential hypertension)at the 1st, 2nd and 3rd trimesters. Multiple linear regression models, fitted using generalized least squares and whose errors were allowed to be correlated and/or have unequal variances, were employed; a model for the relative differences of both arteries impedance was utilized. In both groups, uterine artery PI and RI exhibited a gestational age related decreasing trend whereas internal iliac artery PI and RI increased. The model testing the hemodynamic adaptation in women with and without hypertension showed similar trend. Irrespective of blood pressure conditions, the internal iliac artery resistance pattern contrasts with the capacitance pattern of its immediate pelvic division, suggesting a pregnancy-related regulatory mechanism in the pelvic circulation. PMID:24445576

  4. Late iliac artery aneurysms and occlusive disease after aortic tube grafts for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. A 35-year experience.

    PubMed Central

    Calcagno, D; Hallett, J W; Ballard, D J; Naessens, J M; Cherry, K J; Gloviczki, P; Pairolero, P C

    1991-01-01

    Controversy continues over whether patients treated with straight Dacron aortic tube grafts for an abdominal aortic aneurysm remain at significant risk for subsequent development of iliac aneurysm or occlusive disease. To address this issue, the authors performed a population-based analysis of 432 patients who had an abdominal aortic aneurysm diagnosed between 1951 and 1984. Aneurysm repair was performed eventually in 206 patients (48%). To ascertain differences in late development of graft-related complications, iliac aneurysms, and arterial occlusions, the authors compared all tube-graft patients with similar numbers of bifurcated-graft patients matched for age and year of operation. In the tube-graft group, no subsequent clinically evident or autopsy-proven iliac aneurysms or iliac occlusive disease were noted. Over a mean follow-up of 6 years (range, 4 to 18 years), new aortic aneurysms occurred in the proximal aorta in both tube and bifurcated-graft patients (5.0% and 2.5%, respectively). In contrast the cumulative incidence of graft-related complications was higher with a bifurcated prosthesis (12.8%) compared with a straight graft (5.0%) (p = 0.15). These problems generally occurred 5 to 15 years postoperatively and emphasize the need for long-term graft surveillance. The authors conclude that straight tube-grafts for repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms provide excellent late patency with minimal risk of subsequent iliac aneurysm development. PMID:1835832

  5. Thrombolysis of palmar and digital arterial thrombosis by intra-arterial Thrombolysin.

    PubMed

    Kartchner, M M; Wilcox, W C

    1976-07-01

    In nine patients, one with bilateral findings, impending gangrene of the hand due to thrombosis of the palmar arch or digital arteries did not respond to current surgical methods or to common nonsurgical measures and was treated by intra-arterial thrombolysin. The author's recommended diagnostic arteriography, direct surgical treatment, if indicated, and specific coagulation studies. Thrombolysin was given by perfusion at a rate of 100,000 U. per hour. Careful monitoring of the clotting process prevented any significant bleeding and excellent recovery occurred in eight hands and there was a good result in two.

  6. Endovascular Tubular Stent-Graft Placement for Isolated Iliac Artery Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Takuya Yamaguchi, Masato; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Kawasaki, Ryota; Nomura, Yoshikatsu; Okita, Yutaka; Sugimura, Kazuro; Sugimoto, Koji

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety, efficacy, and mid-term outcomes of endovascular tubular stent-graft placement for repair of isolated iliac artery aneurysms (IAAs). Materials and Methods: Between January 2002 and March 2010, 20 patients (7 women and 13 men; mean age 74 years) underwent endovascular repair of 22 isolated IAAs. Two patients underwent endovascular repair for bilateral aneurysms. Ten para-anastomotic aneurysms (45%) developed after open abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair with an aorto-iliac graft, and 12 were true aneurysms (55%). Eleven straight and 11 tapered stent-grafts were placed. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) was performed to detect complications and evaluate aneurysmal shrinkage at week 1, 3, 6, and 12 months and once every year thereafter. Non-contrast-enhanced CT was performed in seven patients with chronic kidney disease. Results: All procedures were successful, without serious complications, during the mean (range) follow-up period of 746 days (47-2651). Type II endoleak not requiring treatment was noted in one patient. The mean (SD) diameters of the true and para-anastomotic aneurysms significantly (p < 0.05) decreased from 42.0 (9.3) to 36.9 (13.6) mm and from 40.1 (13.0) to 33.6 (15.8) mm, respectively; the mean (SD) shrinkage rates were 15.1% (20.2%) and 18.9% (22.4%), respectively. The primary patency rate was 100%, and no secondary interventions were required. Four patients (21%) developed transient buttock claudication, and one patient (5%) developed colorectal ischaemia, which was treated conservatively. Conclusion: Endovascular tubular stent-graft placement for the repair of isolated IAAs is safe and efficacious. Tapered stent-grafts of various sizes are required for accurate placement.

  7. Spontaneous Iliac Vein Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Hwan; Park, Hyung Sub; Lee, Taeseung

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous iliac vein rupture (SIVR) is a rare entity, which usually occurs without a precipitating factor, but can be a life-threatening emergency often requiring an emergency operation. This is a case report of SIVR in a 62-year-old female who presented to the emergency room with left leg swelling. Workup with contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed a left leg deep vein thrombosis with May-Thurner syndrome and a hematoma in the pelvic cavity without definite evidence of arterial bleeding. She was managed conservatively without surgical intervention, and also underwent inferior vena cava filter insertion and subsequent anticoagulation therapy for pulmonary thromboembolism. This case shows that SIVR can be successfully managed with close monitoring and conservative management, and anticoagulation may be safely applied despite the patient presenting with venous bleeding. PMID:26217647

  8. Variability in the branching pattern of the internal iliac artery in Indian population and its clinical importance.

    PubMed

    Sakthivelavan, Sumathilatha; Aristotle, Sharmila; Sivanandan, Anandarani; Sendiladibban, Sakthivelavan; Felicia Jebakani, Christilda

    2014-01-01

    Internal iliac artery (IIA) is one of the terminal branches of the common iliac artery and is the prime artery of pelvis. The artery has many parietal and visceral branches and hence the variations are frequently noted. The larger branches, namely, the inferior gluteal artery, the superior gluteal artery, and the internal pudendal artery, show sufficient regularity in their patterns of origin to allow typing. The variability of the IIA and its branching pattern were studied by dissecting sixty-eight male pelvic halves (34 right and 34 left) and forty-eight female pelvic halves (24 right and 24 left sides). In significant number of specimens, IIA terminated without dividing into 2 trunks as against the usual description. There was also considerable interchange of branches between the 2 terminal divisions. The patterns of branching noted were grouped as per Adachi's classification. The incidence was noted to be as follows: type Ia in 60.6%, type Ib in 2.6%, type IIa in 15.8%, and type III in 21%. The other types were not observed in this study. Conclusion. Interventions in the pelvic region must take into account the variability of the IIA and its branches that can modify the expected relations and may lead to undesired hemorrhagic or embolic accidents.

  9. Persistent trigeminal artery: in situ thrombosis and associated perforating vessel infarction.

    PubMed

    Gaughen, John R; Starke, Robert M; Durst, Christopher R; Evans, Avery J; Jensen, Mary E

    2014-06-01

    We report a patient with progressive brainstem infarction despite medical therapy. The patient was transferred to our institution for potential angioplasty of basilar stenosis. Imaging review demonstrated persistent trigeminal artery in situ thrombosis and associated perforating vessel infarction. Persistent trigeminal arteries are commonly associated with an atretic basilar artery and interventional treatment can result in significant morbidity and mortality.

  10. Axillary artery thrombosis in a major league baseball pitcher: a case report and rehabilitation guide.

    PubMed

    Zajac, John M; Angeline, Michael E; Bohon, Tiffany M; Loftus, Michael; Potter, Hollis G; Weiland, Andrew J; Thompson, Robert W; Coleman, Struan H; Altchek, David W

    2013-09-01

    This case study describes a Major League Baseball player who was diagnosed with an axillary artery thrombosis due to arterial compression from throwing. The purpose of this article is to create awareness as to the signs and symptoms associated with arterial positional compression and the rehabilitative implications to surgical intervention.

  11. Fracture and Collapse of Balloon-Expandable Stents in the Bilateral Common Iliac Arteries Due to Shiatsu Massage

    SciTech Connect

    Ichihashi, Shigeo Higashiura, Wataru; Itoh, Hirofumi; Sakaguchi, Shoji; Kichikawa, Kimihiko

    2012-12-15

    We report a case of stent fracture and collapse of balloon-expandable stents caused by shiatsu massage. A 76-year-old man presented with complaints of intermittent claudication of the right lower extremity. Stenoses of the bilateral common iliac arteries (CIAs) were detected. Balloon-expandable stents were deployed in both CIAs, resulting in resolution of symptoms. Five months later, pelvis x-ray showed collapse of both stents. Despite the stent collapse, the patient was asymptomatic, and his ankle brachial index values were within the normal range. Further history showed that the patient underwent daily shiatsu therapy in the umbilical region, which may have triggered collapse of the stent. Physicians should advise patients to avoid compression of the abdominal wall after implantation of a stent in the iliac artery.

  12. Successful endovascular treatment of a ruptured gigantic pseudoaneurysm of the common iliac artery secondarily complicated by infection.

    PubMed

    Georgakarakos, Efstratios I; Nikolopoulos, Evagelos S; Karanikas, Michael A; Mantatzis, Michalis; Lazarides, Miltos K

    2013-06-01

    We report our experience with a case of emergent endovascular treatment of a large ruptured pseudoaneurysm of the common iliac artery. A 65-year-old male was admitted to the surgical department in hypovolemic shock, due to active retroperitoneal bleeding. A computerized tomography scan with intravenous contrast revealed a ruptured gigantic pseudoaneurysm of the right common iliac artery, with a maximal diameter of 7 cm and retroperitoneal hematoma. An intraoperative angiogram revealed active extravasation through the neck of the pseudoaneurysm, which was successfully sealed with the placement of a stent graft (Medtronic Endurant(®))limb component. Infection of the pseudoaneurysm sac after one month was successfully treated with catheter drainage. No shortterm relapse occurred. Endovascular management should be part of the basic surgical armamentarium on emergent basis, since it provides a fast and safe solution, especially when a patient's co-morbitities preclude open management and hemodynamic and anatomical status allows endovascular treatment. PMID:22983544

  13. Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair with the Talent Stent-Graft: Outcomes in Patients with Large Iliac Arteries

    SciTech Connect

    England, Andrew; Butterfield, John S.; McCollum, Charles N.; Ashleigh, Raymond J.

    2008-07-15

    The purpose of this study is to report outcomes following endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in patients with ectatic common iliac arteries (CIAs). Of 117 AAA patients treated by EVAR between 1998 and 2005, 87 (74%) had CIAs diameters <18 mm and 30 (26%) patients had one or more CIA diameters >18 but <25 mm. All patients were treated with Talent stent-grafts, 114 bifurcated and 3 AUI devices. Departmental databases and patient records were reviewed to assess outcomes. Technical success, iliac-related outcome, and iliac-related reintervention (IRSI) were analyzed. Patients with EVAR extending into the external iliac artery were excluded. Median (range) follow-up for the study group was 24 (1-84) months. Initial technical success was 98% for CIAs <18 mm and 100% for CIAs {>=}18 mm (p = 0.551). There were three distal type I endoleaks (two in the ectatic group) and six iliac limb occlusions (one in an ectatic patient); there were no statistically significant differences between groups (p = 0.4). There were nine IRSIs (three stent-graft extensions, six femorofemoral crossover grafts); three of these patients had one or both CIAs {>=}18 mm (p = 0.232). One-year freedom from IRSI was 92% {+-} 3% and 84% {+-} 9% for the <18-mm and {>=}18-mm CIA groups, respectively (p = 0.232). We conclude that the treatment of AAA by EVAR in patients with CIAs 18-24 mm appears to be safe and effective, however, it may be associated with more frequent reinterventions.

  14. Sectioned images and surface models of a cadaver for understanding the deep circumflex iliac artery flap.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bong Chul; Chung, Min Suk; Kim, Hyung Jun; Park, Jin Seo; Shin, Dong Sun

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the deep circumflex iliac artery (DCIA) flap from sectioned images and stereoscopic anatomic models using Visible Korean, for the benefit of medical education and clinical training in the field of oromandibular reconstructive surgery. Serially sectioned images of the pelvic area were obtained from a cadaver. Outlines of significant structures in the sectioned images were drawn and stacked to build surface models. The PDF (portable document format) file (size, 30 MB) of the constructed models is available for free download on the Web site of the Department of Anatomy at Ajou University School of Medicine (http://anatomy.co.kr). In the PDF file, the relevant structures of the DCIA flap can be seen in the sectioned images. All surface models and stereoscopic structures associated with the DCIA flap are displayed in real time. We hope that these state-of-the-art sectioned images, outlined images, and surface models will help students and trainees better understand the anatomy associated with DCIA flap.

  15. Endovascular Treatment of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Lesions With or Without Common Iliac Artery Involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Oender, Hakan; Oguzkurt, Levent; Guer, Serkan; Tekbas, Gueven; Guerel, Kamil; Coskun, Isa; Oezkan, Ugur

    2013-02-15

    To evaluate the results of stent placement for obstructive atherosclerotic aortic disease with or without involvement of the common iliac artery. Forty patients had self-expanding stents primarily or after balloon dilatation in the abdominal aorta between January 2005 and May 2011. All patients had trouble walking. Follow-up examinations were performed with clinical visits; these included color Doppler ultrasonography and computed tomographic angiography. Technical, clinical, and hemodynamic success was achieved in all patients. None of the patients underwent reintervention during the follow-up period, which ranged from 3 months to 6 years (median 24 months). Nine complications occurred in six patients. Of the nine complications, four were distal thromboembolisms, which were successfully treated with catheter-directed thrombolysis or anticoagulation therapy. Endovascular treatment of the obstructive aortic disease using self-expanding stents was safe and effective, with high technical success and long-term patency. Thromboembolic complications were high even though direct stenting was considered protective for thromboembolism formation. Particularly for infrarenal aortic stenosis, it can be recommended as the first-line treatment option for patients with obstructive atherosclerotic aortic disease.

  16. Simultaneous thrombosis of superior mesenteric artery and superior mesenteric vein following chemotherapy: MDCT findings.

    PubMed

    Olgun, Deniz Cebi; Bakan, Selim; Samanci, Cesur; Tutar, Onur; Demiryas, Suleyman; Korkmazer, Bora; Kantarci, Fatih

    2014-02-01

    A case of acute mesenteric ischemia due to thrombosis of superior mesenteric artery and vein in a 44-year-old woman following chemotherapy for invasive laryngeal carcinoma was diagnosed on a multi-detector CT scan. Although the link between malignancy and thromboembolism is widely recognized in patients with cancer, chemotherapy further elevates the risk of thrombosis. Acute mesenteric ischemia associated or not associated with chemotherapy rarely occurs in patients with cancer. Moreover, co-occurrence of superior mesenteric artery and superior mesenteric vein thrombosis is reported for the first time.

  17. A Case of Intestinal Necrosis after Bilateral Internal Iliac Artery-Preserving Endovascular Repair for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Masataka; Imai, Akito; Watanabe, Yasunori

    2016-01-01

    A 79-year-old man underwent endovascular repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), and both internal iliac arteries (IIAs) were preserved. Postoperatively, loss of appetite developed. On the fifth day, computerized tomography (CT) showed inferior mesenteric artery thrombus formation, necrosis of the descending colon and rectum, and generalized peritonitis. The endovascular devices had not migrated. A colonic resection was performed. Histological analysis confirmed intestinal necrosis associated with mesenteric thrombus. The colon can become necrotic even if both IIAs are patent. Ischemic changes in the colon should be detected if it occurs and subsequent laparotomy should be done if it is necessary.

  18. Intraoperative hepatic artery blood flow predicts early hepatic artery thrombosis after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Marín-Gómez, L M; Bernal-Bellido, C; Alamo-Martínez, J M; Porras-López, F M; Suárez-Artacho, G; Serrano-Diaz-Canedo, J; Padillo-Ruiz, J; Gómez-Bravo, M A

    2012-09-01

    Hepatic artery complications after orthotopic liver transplantation are associated with a high rate of graft loss and mortality (23% to 35%) because they can lead to liver ischemia. The reported incidence of hepatic artery thrombosis (HAT) after adult liver transplantation is 2.5% to 6.8%. Typically, these patients are treated with urgent surgical revascularization or emergent liver retransplantation. Since January 2007, we have recorded the postanastomotic hepatic artery flow after revascularization. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between hepatic blood flow on revascularization and early HAT. Retrospectively, we reviewed perioperative variables from 110 consecutive liver transplantation performed at the Virgen del Rocío University Hospital (Seville, Spain) between January 2007 and October 2010. We evaluated the following preoperative (donor and recipient) and intraoperative variables: donor and recipient age, cytomegalovirus serology, ABO-compatibility, anatomical variations of the donor hepatic artery, number of arterial anastomoses, portal and hepatic artery flow before closure, cold ischemia time, and blood transfusion. These variables were included in a univariate analysis. Of the 110 patients included in the study, 85 (77.7%) were male. The median age was 52 years. ABO blood groups were identical between donor and recipient in all the patients. The prevalence of early HAT was 6.36% (7 of 110). Crude mortality with/without HAT was 22% versus 2% (P = .001), respectively. Crude graft loss rate with/without HAT was 27% versus 4% (P = .003), respectively. Early HAT was shown to be primarily associated with intraoperative hepatic artery blood flow (93.3 mL/min recipients with HAT versus 187.7 mL/min recipients without HAT, P < .0001). No retransplantation showed early HAT. In our experience, intraoperative hepatic artery blood flow predicts early HAT after liver transplantation.

  19. Predictors of Long-Term Results After Treatment of Iliac Artery Obliteration by Transluminal Angioplasty and Stent Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Funovics, M.A.; Lackner, B.; Cejna, M.; Peloschek, P.; Sailer, J.; Philipp, M.O.; Maca, T.; Ahmadi, A.; Minar, E.; Lammer, J.

    2002-10-15

    Purpose: To investigate initial and long-term success rate after percutaneous treatment of iliac artery occlusion with angioplasty and stent deployment. To investigate the influence of vascular comorbidity, lesion length, stent placement and lesion coverage as possible predictors of outcome. Methods: Between January 1994 and December 1999, 80 iliac recanalizations were performed on 78 patients, median age 61.1 {+-}11.5 (SD) years. All patients were followed up by clinical examinations, duplex ultrasound and intravenous digital subtraction angiography. Mean follow-up time was 2.0 {+-} 1.53 (SD) years.Multivariate Cox regression analysis was used to determine the influence of cofactors on patency. Results: One, 2 and 4 years after recanalization, primary patency was 78.1%, 74.5% and 64.0%; secondary patency was 88.8%, 88.8% and 77.9%, respectively.Patients with shorter occlusions, complete lesion coverage and patent ipsilateral femoral arteries had significantly longer patency rates.Complications included inguinal hematoma (n=1), technical failure (n=3) aortic dissection (n=1), embolic occlusions (n=7), gluteal claudication (n=1) and genital necrosis after subsequent urethral surgery in one patient with contralateral occlusion and ipsilateral overstenting of the internal iliac artery with subsequent stenosis. Complications were of permanent clinical significance in seven of 78 (9%) of the patients. In 17 (22%) cases, percutaneous reintervention was performed with angioplasty in the stent (n=16) or deployment of a new stent (n=1). Conclusion: Endoluminal stent placement has its place in an interdisciplinary therapeutic approach as a viable therapeutic alternative to major transabdominal bypass surgery and can be performed with comparable complication rates. Patients with short occlusions, patent femoral arteries, and stents covering the entire occlusion have significant longer patency.

  20. Hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma with tumor thrombosis of the portal vein tumor thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yung-Chih; Shih, Cheng-Yen; Jeng, Chin-Ming; Yang, Sien-Sing; Hu, Jui-Ting; Sung, Yung-Chuan; Liu, Han-Ting; Hou, Shaw-Min; Wu, Chi-Hwa; Chen, Tzen-Kwan

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) is associated with poor prognosis. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the efficacy of hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) for patients with this disease. METHODS: Eighteen HCC patients with PVTT were treated with HAIC via a subcutaneously implanted injection port. A course of chemotherapy consisted of daily cisplatin (10 mg for one hour) followed by 5-fluorouracil (250 mg for five hours) for five continuous days within a given week. The patients were scheduled to receive four consecutive courses of HAIC. Responders were defined in whom either a complete or partial response was achieved, while non-responders were defined based on stable or progressive disease status. The prognostic factors associated with survival after treatment were analyzed. RESULTS: Six patients exhibited partial response to this form of HAIC (response rate = 33%). The 3, 6, 9, 12 and 18-month cumulative survival rates for the 18 patients were 83%, 72%, 50%, 28%, and 7%, respectively. Median survival times for the six responders and 12 non-responders were 15.0 (range, 11-18) and 7.5 (range, 1-13) months, respectively. It was demonstrated by both univariate and multivariate analyses that the therapeutic response and hepatic reserve function were significant prognostic factors. CONCLUSION: HAIC using low-dose cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil may be a useful alternative for the treatment of patients with advanced HCC complicated with PVTT. There may also be survival-related benefits associated with HAIC. PMID:14669309

  1. Development of Advanced Atherosclerotic Plaque by Injection of Inflammatory Proteins in a Rabbit Iliac Artery Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Sun; Lee, Seul-Gee; Oh, Jaewon; Park, Se-Il; Hong, Sung-Yu; Kim, Sehoon; Lee, Sang-Hak; Ko, Young-Guk; Choi, Donghoon; Hong, Myeong-Ki; Jang, Yangsoo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Appropriate animal models of atherosclerotic plaque are crucial to investigating the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, as well as for the evaluation of the efficacy and safety of vascular devices. We aimed to develop a novel animal model that would be suitable for the study of advanced atherosclerotic lesions in vivo. Materials and Methods Atherosclerotic plaque was induced in 24 iliac arteries from 12 rabbits by combining a high cholesterol diet, endothelial denudation, and injection into the vessel wall with either saline (n=5), olive oil (n=6), or inflammatory proteins [n=13, high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) n=8 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α n=5] using a Cricket™ Micro-infusion catheter. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was performed to detect plaque characteristics after 4 weeks, and all tissues were harvested for histological evaluation. Results Advanced plaque was more frequently observed in the group injected with inflammatory proteins. Macrophage infiltration was present to a higher degree in the HMGB1 and TNF-α groups, compared to the oil or saline group (82.1±5.1% and 94.6±2.2% compared to 49.6±14.0% and 46.5±9.6%, p-value<0.001), using RAM11 antibody staining. On OCT, lipid rich plaques were more frequently detected in the inflammatory protein group [saline group: 2/5 (40%), oil group: 3/5 (50%), HMGB1 group: 6/8 (75%), and TNF-α group: 5/5 (100%)]. Conclusion These data indicate that this rabbit model of atherosclerotic lesion formation via direct injection of pro-inflammatory proteins into the vessel wall is useful for in vivo studies investigating atherosclerosis. PMID:27401639

  2. Mid-Term Outcomes Following Endovascular Re-Intervention for Iliac Artery In-Stent Restenosis

    PubMed Central

    Javed, Usman; Balwanz, Christopher R.; Armstrong, Ehrin J.; Yeo, Khung-Keong; Singh, Gagan D.; Singh, Satinder; Anderson, David; Westin, Gregory G.; Pevec, William C.; Laird, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We sought to evaluate the procedural characteristics and clinical outcomes of endovascular repair for iliac artery (IA) in-stent restenosis (ISR). Background An increasing percentage of patients with complex IA occlusive disease are treated with an endovascular approach, but the outcomes of IA-ISR have not been well described. Methods We analyzed all endovascular procedures for treatment of IA-ISR performed at our institution between July 2006–December 2010. The primary outcome was primary patency, defined as <50% stenosis as assessed by clinical examination and duplex ultrasonography (DUS). Results Forty-one lesions in 24 patients who underwent repeated endovascular intervention for treatment of IA-ISR. Most lesions were unilateral and involved the common IA (66%). The mean length of ISR was 30.1 ± 14.1 mm with type I (focal) and II (diffuse) ISR occurring with the greatest frequency (34% and 39%, respectively). All patients underwent balloon angioplasty; adjunctive stenting zwas performed in 27 (66%) of the lesions. Type II ISR lesions more frequently required stenting (13/16 lesions, P = 0.02 compared with other patterns of ISR). Procedural success was 100% with a mean gain of 0.13 in the ankle-brachial index (P = 0.001). The 6-and 12-month primary patency rates were 96% and 82%, respectively. The 12-month primary-assisted patency rate was 90% with clinically driven target lesion revascularization (TLR) in three patients. Conclusions Endovascular treatment of IA-ISR using an approach of balloon angioplasty followed by selective stenting is associated with high-patency rates and low rates of TLR at 1 year. PMID:23613343

  3. Interventional Exclusion of Iliac Artery Aneurysms Using the Flow-Diverting Multilayer Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, Claus Christian Meyer, Carsten; Rudolph, Jens Verrel, Frauke; Schild, Hans Heinz Wilhelm, Kai E.

    2013-08-01

    PurposeThis study was designed to evaluate retrospectively the results of complex iliac artery aneurysm (IAA) exclusion using the Cardiatis-Multilayer-Stent.MethodsBetween October 2010 and August 2012, ten IAAs were treated in eight males (mean age 75 (59-91) years) using the Multilayer Stent. All IAA exceeded a diameter of 3 cm or were symptomatic. Follow-up (FU) examinations included CT or MR angiography, sonography, and clinical assessment up to 2 years.ResultsPrimary stent placement was technically successful in eight of ten cases. In two cases, severe stent retraction during deployment necessitated placement of an additional stent. Immediately after stent placement, a marked reduction of flow within the sac was observed in all cases (peri-interventional mortality 0 %). During FU, there were two thrombotic stent occlusions, making reintervention necessary (primary patency rate 80 %, secondary patency 100 %). Four IAA were completely occluded at FU, whereas the original vessel and covered branches (n = 8) were patent. In four IAA, there was still residual perfusion. In one patient, IAA diameter decreased slightly, while it remained constant in seven (mean imaging FU 195 (range 1-695) days). There were no adverse events on clinical FU (mean FU 467 (range 101-695) days).ConclusionsOther studies showed the Cardiatis-Multilayer-Stent to be a technically relatively simple treatment option for complex IAA with inadequate landing zones, especially in patients with multiple comorbidities to avoid ipsilateral IIA obstruction. However, in our series complication rate was high. Incomplete sac exclusion, stent-shortening, and thrombotic occlusion can complicate treatment, making meticulous patient selection necessary. Close imaging surveillance is mandatory especially in the early postinterventional period.

  4. Iliac Artery-Uretero-Colonic Fistula Presenting as Severe Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage and Hematuria: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Policha, Aleksandra; Baldwin, Melissa; Mussa, Firas; Rockman, Caron

    2015-11-01

    Arterioenteric fistulas represent an infrequent but potentially fatal cause of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Patients often present in extremis from shock and sepsis. This mandates a rapid diagnosis so that prompt, potentially life-saving interventions can be performed. We report the case of a 35-year-old man who presented with hematuria and hematochezia secondary to an iliac artery-uretero-colonic fistula that developed years after open common iliac artery aneurysm repair. His condition rapidly progressed to hemorrhagic shock, and he underwent successful endovascular treatment with a covered stent graft as a bridge to definitive open surgery. Subsequently, graft explantation, extra-anatomic arterial bypass, bowel resection, and ureter ligation was undertaken. A summary of the literature on iliac artery-enteric fistulas follows. PMID:26303272

  5. Pulmonary Artery Aneurysm Thrombosis with Combined Pulmonary Fibrosis and Emphysema: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Mitali Bharat; Awad, Nilkant Tukaram

    2016-05-01

    We report a rare case of Pulmonary Artery Aneurysm (PAA) thrombosis with Combined Pulmonary Fibrosis and Emphysema (CPFE) with pulmonary hypertension. A 75-year-old male presented with haemoptysis, dyspnoea, clubbing and bilateral fine end inspiratory rales on examination. He was diagnosed to have PAA thrombosis with CPFE on the basis of computed tomographical angiography and high resolution computed tomography. He was then managed conservatively with pirfenidone for the interstitial lung disease. PMID:27437277

  6. Pulmonary Artery Aneurysm Thrombosis with Combined Pulmonary Fibrosis and Emphysema: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Nilkant Tukaram

    2016-01-01

    We report a rare case of Pulmonary Artery Aneurysm (PAA) thrombosis with Combined Pulmonary Fibrosis and Emphysema (CPFE) with pulmonary hypertension. A 75-year-old male presented with haemoptysis, dyspnoea, clubbing and bilateral fine end inspiratory rales on examination. He was diagnosed to have PAA thrombosis with CPFE on the basis of computed tomographical angiography and high resolution computed tomography. He was then managed conservatively with pirfenidone for the interstitial lung disease. PMID:27437277

  7. Massive Hematuria and Shock Caused by Ilio-Ureteral Fistula in a Patient with an Isolated Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Yuhei; Setozaki, Shuji; Harada, Hisao

    2013-01-01

    An emergent operation was performed on a 73-year-old woman with massive hematuria and serious shock. A computed tomography (CT) revealed that the cause of the shock was hemorrhage from an aneurysm into the ureter, with resultant massive hematuria. During surgery, we observed that the ureter was encased into the wall of the aneurysm, with exposure of the pre-positioned ureteric stent inside the aneurysmal space. Reconstruction of the ureter was performed by wrapping the tissues with the ureteric stent inside. Postoperative recovery was uneventful, and CT angiography showed complete exclusion of the right internal iliac artery with the in situ ureteric stent. PMID:23641292

  8. Occult internal iliac arterial injury identified during open reduction internal fixation of an acetabular fracture: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Chaus, George W; Heng, Marilyn; Smith, Raymond M

    2015-07-01

    We present two cases of occult internal iliac arterial injury identified during operative reduction of a widely displaced posterior column posterior wall acetabular fracture. This complication was not recognised until reduction of the column fracture. There were no preoperative signs or symptoms indicative of a vascular injury. These cases emphasise the heightened awareness one must have when treating widely displaced posterior column fractures of the acetabulum, especially those fractures with extension into the greater sciatic notch, as previously formed clot can become dislodged and hemostasis lost. We also present management options when this complication occurs. We believe any surgeon treating acetabular fractures should be aware of this serious and potentially fatal complication.

  9. Biaxial mechanical properties of the human thoracic and abdominal aorta, common carotid, subclavian, renal and common iliac arteries.

    PubMed

    Kamenskiy, Alexey V; Dzenis, Yuris A; Kazmi, Syed A Jaffar; Pemberton, Mark A; Pipinos, Iraklis I; Phillips, Nick Y; Herber, Kyle; Woodford, Thomas; Bowen, Robert E; Lomneth, Carol S; MacTaggart, Jason N

    2014-11-01

    The biomechanics of large- and medium-sized arteries influence the pathophysiology of arterial disease and the response to therapeutic interventions. However, a comprehensive comparative analysis of human arterial biaxial mechanical properties has not yet been reported. Planar biaxial extension was used to establish the passive mechanical properties of human thoracic (TA, [Formula: see text]) and abdominal (AA, [Formula: see text]) aorta, common carotid (CCA, [Formula: see text]), subclavian (SA, [Formula: see text]), renal (RA, [Formula: see text]) and common iliac (CIA, [Formula: see text]) arteries from 11 deceased subjects ([Formula: see text] years old). Histological evaluation determined the structure of each specimen. Experimental data were used to determine constitutive parameters for a structurally motivated nonlinear anisotropic constitutive model. All arteries demonstrated appreciable anisotropy and large nonlinear deformations. Most CCA, SA, TA, AA and CIA specimens were stiffer longitudinally, while most RAs were stiffer circumferentially. A switch in anisotropy was occasionally demonstrated for all arteries. The CCA was the most compliant, least anisotropic and least frequently diseased of all arteries, while the CIA and AA were the stiffest and the most diseased. The severity of atherosclerosis correlated with age, but was not affected by laterality. Elastin fibers in the aorta, SA and CCA were uniformly and mostly circumferentially distributed throughout the media, while in the RA and CIA, elastin was primarily axially aligned and concentrated in the external elastic lamina. Constitutive modeling provided good fits to the experimental data for most arteries. Biomechanical and architectural features of major arteries differ depending on location and functional environment. A better understanding of localized arterial mechanical properties may support the development of site-specific treatment modalities for arterial disease.

  10. Renal artery thrombosis secondary to sepsis-induced disseminated intravascular coagulation in acute pyelonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jayoung; Chul Nam, Hee; Gyoung Kim, Boo; Gyung Kim, Hyun; Chan Jung, Hee; Hee Kim, Ji; Seok Yang, Geun; Jeong Park, Youn; Young Kim, Ka; Yun, Yu-Seon; Ok Kim, Young; Yu, Jihan

    2012-01-01

    There are some reports of renal vein thrombosis associated with acute pyelonephritis, but a case of renal artery thrombosis in acute pyelonephritis has not been reported yet. Here we report a case of renal artery thrombosis which developed in a patient with acute pyelonephritis complicated with sepsis-induced disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). A 65-year-old woman with diabetes was diagnosed with acute pyelonephritis complicated with sepsis. Escherichia coli was isolated from both blood and urine cultures. When treated with antibiotics, her condition gradually improved. She suddenly complained of severe right flank pain without fever in the recovery phase. A computed tomography scan revealed right renal artery thrombosis with concomitant renal infarction. Prophylactic anticoagulation therapy was not suggested because of sustained thrombocytopenia and increased risk of bleeding. Flank pain resolved with conservative treatment and perfusion of infarcted kidney improved at the time of discharge. To our knowledge, this is the first case of renal artery thrombosis related to acute pyelonephritis with sepsis-induced DIC. PMID:26889428

  11. Infusion of recombinant human tissue plasminogen activator through the superior mesenteric artery in the treatment of acute mesenteric venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    da Motta Leal Filho, Joaquim Mauricio; Santos, Aline Cristine Barbosa; Carnevale, Francisco Cesar; de Oliveira Sousa, Wilson; Grillo, Luiz Sérgio Pereira; Cerri, Giovanni Guido

    2011-08-01

    Acute mesenteric venous thrombosis is an uncommon condition that is usually treated with systemic anticoagulation. Catheter-directed thrombolysis through the superior mesenteric artery may be a viable adjunct to treat this morbid condition. In the present article, we have described a case of superior mesenteric venous thrombosis treated with catheter-directed infusion of tissue plasminogen activator through the superior mesenteric artery.

  12. Non-surgical management of superior mesenteric artery thrombosis using spinal cord stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tod, Laura; Ghosh, Jonathan; Lieberman, Ilan; Baguneid, Mohamed

    2013-08-05

    We report the use of a spinal cord stimulator (SCS) for non-surgical management of superior mesenteric artery thrombosis. A 59-year-old woman with polycythaemia rubra vera presented with extensive superior mesenteric artery thrombosis not amenable to surgical or endovascular revascularisation. A SCS was implanted for analgesia thereby allowing enteral feeding to be tolerated during the acute period. Four months later the patient developed a focal ischaemic jejunal stricture and underwent resection of a short segment of small bowel with primary anastomosis that healed without complication. Spinal cord stimulation can facilitate non-surgical management of mesenteric ischaemia.

  13. Reconstruction of complex shoulder defect in a case of subclavian artery thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Satish, Chetan

    2013-06-01

    We report a case of a 24-year-old man with complex shoulder defect on the right side following a road traffic accident. The patient was found to have a subclavian artery thrombosis in its second part with good collaterals ensuring limb viability. Free-flap reconstruction was not possible because of lack of recipient vascular pedicle nearby. Pedicled flaps routinely used for this area such as pectoralis major and latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flaps could not be used as their vascular pedicles arise from the second and third parts of the axillary artery distal to the subclavian artery thrombosis. The best option we could think was the trapezius myocutaneous flap as its vascular pedicle arises from the first part of the subclavian artery proximal to the thrombosis. This article further establishes the importance of knowing the vascular supply of flaps before their clinical application. In this case the trapezius flap acts as a lifeboat for coverage of the complex shoulder defect as its vascular supply is proximal to the site of subclavian artery thrombosis.

  14. In vitro measurement and calculation of drag force on iliac limb stentgraft in a compliant arterial wall model.

    PubMed

    Sinha Roy, A; Westt, K; Rontala, R S; Greenberg, R K; Banerjee, R K

    2007-12-01

    Interventional treatment of aortic aneurysms using endovascular stentgrafting is a minimally invasive technique. Following device implantation, transient drag forces act on the stentgraft. When the drag force exceeds the fixation force, complications like stentgraft migration, endoleaks and stentgraft failure occur. In such a scenario the device becomes unstable, causing concern over the long-term durability of endovascular repairs. The objective of this study is: (1) to measure the drag force on iliac limb stentgraft, having a distal diameter that is half the size of the proximal end, in an in vitro experiment; (2) to calculate the drag force using blood flow-compliant arterial wall interaction model and compare it with the measured values on the stentgraft for the in vitro experiment; (3) to calculate drag force on the stentgraft using physiological flow conditions. Experimental data for a stentgraft within a silicon tubing, representing a compliant artery, shows a peak drag force of 2.79 N whereas the calculation predicts a peak drag force of 2.57 N; thus a percentage difference of 7.8% is observed. When physiological flow and pressure pulse are used for the blood flow-compliant arterial wall computations, a peak drag force of 0.59 N is obtained for the same stentgraft that was used in the experiment. The outer cavity between the distal end of the iliac limb stentgraft and the arterial wall reduces the drag force. These forces can be used as design guideline for determining the fixation force needed for the stentgraft under physiological pulsatile flow.

  15. Hepatic artery thrombosis in live liver donor transplantation: how to solve--a case report.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, S; Martins, A; Barroso, E

    2014-01-01

    The decrease in the number of cadaveric donors has proved a limiting factor in the number of liver transplants, leading to the death of many patients on the waiting list. The living donor liver transplantation is an option that allows, in selected cases, increase the number of donors. One of the most serious complications in liver transplantation is hepatic artery thrombosis, in the past considered potentially fatal without urgent re-transplantation. A white male patient, 48 years old, diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma in chronic liver failure caused by hepatitis B virus, underwent living donor liver transplantation (right lobe). Doppler echocardiography performed in the immediate postoperative period did not identify arterial flow in the right branch, having been confirmed thrombosis of the right hepatic artery in CT angiography. Urgent re-laparotomy was performed, which consisted of thrombectomy and re-anastomosis of the hepatic artery with segmental splenic artery allograft interposition. The patient started anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy with acetylsalicylic acid. Serial evaluation with Doppler echocardiography showed hepatic artery patency. At present, the patient is asymptomatic. One of the most devastating complications in liver transplantation, and particularly in living liver donor, is thrombosis of the hepatic artery; thus, early diagnosis and treatment is vital. The rapid intervention for revascularization of the graft avoids irreversible ischemia of the bile ducts and hepatic parenchyma, thus avoiding the need for re-transplantation.

  16. Complement Activation in Arterial and Venous Thrombosis is Mediated by Plasmin

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Jonathan H.; Walton, Bethany L.; Aleman, Maria M.; O'Byrne, Alice M.; Lei, Victor; Harrasser, Micaela; Foley, Kimberley A.; Wolberg, Alisa S.; Conway, Edward M.

    2016-01-01

    Thrombus formation leading to vaso-occlusive events is a major cause of death, and involves complex interactions between coagulation, fibrinolytic and innate immune systems. Leukocyte recruitment is a key step, mediated partly by chemotactic complement activation factors C3a and C5a. However, mechanisms mediating C3a/C5a generation during thrombosis have not been studied. In a murine venous thrombosis model, levels of thrombin–antithrombin complexes poorly correlated with C3a and C5a, excluding a central role for thrombin in C3a/C5a production. However, clot weight strongly correlated with C5a, suggesting processes triggered during thrombosis promote C5a generation. Since thrombosis elicits fibrinolysis, we hypothesized that plasmin activates C5 during thrombosis. In vitro, the catalytic efficiency of plasmin-mediated C5a generation greatly exceeded that of thrombin or factor Xa, but was similar to the recognized complement C5 convertases. Plasmin-activated C5 yielded a functional membrane attack complex (MAC). In an arterial thrombosis model, plasminogen activator administration increased C5a levels. Overall, these findings suggest plasmin bridges thrombosis and the immune response by liberating C5a and inducing MAC assembly. These new insights may lead to the development of strategies to limit thrombus formation and/or enhance resolution. PMID:27077125

  17. Platelet transfusions in platelet consumptive disorders are associated with arterial thrombosis and in-hospital mortality.

    PubMed

    Goel, Ruchika; Ness, Paul M; Takemoto, Clifford M; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; King, Karen E; Tobian, Aaron A R

    2015-02-26

    While platelets are primary mediators of hemostasis, there is emerging evidence to show that they may also mediate pathologic thrombogenesis. Little data are available on risks and benefits associated with platelet transfusions in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) and immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). This study utilized the Nationwide Inpatient Sample to evaluate the current in-hospital platelet transfusion practices and their association with arterial/venous thrombosis, acute myocardial infarction (AMI), stroke, and in-hospital mortality over 5 years (2007-2011). Age and gender-adjusted odds ratios (adjOR) associated with platelet transfusions were calculated. There were 10 624 hospitalizations with TTP; 6332 with HIT and 79 980 with ITP. Platelet transfusions were reported in 10.1% TTP, 7.1% HIT, and 25.8% ITP admissions. Platelet transfusions in TTP were associated with higher odds of arterial thrombosis (adjOR = 5.8, 95%CI = 1.3-26.6), AMI (adjOR = 2.0, 95%CI = 1.2-3.3) and mortality (adjOR = 2.0,95%CI = 1.3-3.0), but not venous thrombosis. Platelet transfusions in HIT were associated with higher odds of arterial thrombosis (adjOR = 3.4, 95%CI = 1.2-9.5) and mortality (adjOR = 5.2, 95%CI = 2.6-10.5) but not venous thrombosis. Except for AMI, all relationships remained significant after adjusting for clinical severity and acuity. No associations were significant for ITP. Platelet transfusions are associated with higher odds of arterial thrombosis and mortality among TTP and HIT patients.

  18. Eosinophilia: Rare cause of arterial thrombosis and cardioembolic stroke in childhood.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sanjeev Kumar; Kumar, Suman; Seth, Tulika; Mishra, Pravas; Mahapatra, Manoranjan

    2012-04-26

    Eosinophilia has been reported as a very rare cause of stroke in children. The thrombotic event may be either due to cardiac damage induced by eosinophils and their granular protein, that is, the major basic protein, or the systemic hypercoagulable state induced by eosinophilia. We report here a case of eosinophilia whose initial presentation was recurrent strokes and cardiac and arterial thrombosis.

  19. Pathologic findings of renal biopsy were a helpful diagnostic clue of stenosis of the iliac segment proximal to the transplant renal artery: a case report.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, H; Saigo, K; Hasegawa, M; Akutsu, N; Maruyama, M; Otsuki, K; Matsumoto, I; Kawaguchi, T; Kitamura, H; Asano, T; Kenmochi, T; Itou, T; Matsubara, H

    2014-01-01

    Common iliac artery stenosis after renal transplantation is a rare complication; it can occur in the course of hypertension and renal dysfunction. We report a case of suspected renal allograft rejection with iliac artery stenosis proximal to a transplanted kidney. A 52-year-old man with a history of cadaveric kidney transplantation 26 years previously underwent a second cadaveric kidney transplantation in the left iliac fossa because of graft failure 3 years before. In June 2012, the patient had progressive renal dysfunction. In July, a percutaneous needle biopsy was taken, and it showed no rejection; however, his renal function continued to get worse through September. A percutaneous allograft renal biopsy was performed under ultrasound guidance and showed hyperplasia of the juxtaglomerular apparatus and renin granules. Magnetic resonance angiography was used to evaluate the arteries in the pelvis and showed left common iliac artery stenosis, and a stent was placed. After percutaneous intervention, the patient's ankle brachial pressure index was within the normal range and the allograft function had improved. PMID:24656037

  20. Customized Tapered Stent-Grafts in the Endovascular Management of Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysms: A Useful Adjunct to Conventional Endovascular Options

    SciTech Connect

    Haslam, J. Elizabeth Hardman, John; Horrocks, Michael; Fay, Dominic

    2009-01-15

    The endovascular exclusion of an isolated iliac artery aneurysm is recognized as a safe and favorable alternative to open surgical repair, with low associated morbidity and mortality. It has particular advantages in the treatment of internal iliac artery aneurysm (IIAA) given the technical difficulties associated with open surgical repair deep within the pelvis. We describe the use of customized tapered stent-grafts in the exclusion of wide-necked IIAA in five male patients considered high-risk for conventional surgical repair, in whom the common and external iliac artery morphology precluded the use of standard endovascular devices. In each case, IIAA outflow was selectively embolized and the aneurysm neck excluded by placement of a customized tapered stent-graft across the internal iliac artery origin. This technique was extremely effective, with 100% technical success, no serious associated morbidity, and zero mortality. In all five patients sac size was stable or reduced on computed tomography follow-up of up to 3 years (mean, 24.4 months), with a primary patency rate of 100%. We therefore advocate the use of customized tapered stent-grafts as a further endovascular option in the management of IIAA unsuitable for conventional endovascular repair.

  1. Traumatic thrombosis of internal carotid artery sustained by transfer of kinetic energy.

    PubMed

    Kalcioglu, Mahmut Tayyar; Celbis, Osman; Mizrak, Bulent; Firat, Yezdan; Selimoglu, Erol

    2012-06-01

    A 31-year-old male patient with a fatal thrombosis of the internal carotid artery caused by gun shot injury was presented in this case report. The patient was referred to the hospital with a diffuse edema on his left cheek. On otolaryngologic examination, there was a bullet entrance hole at the left mandibular corpus. No exit hole could be found. The finding from his axial computed tomography of neck and paranasal sinuses was normal. On neurological examination, a dense right hemiparesis was observed. In his cerebral angiogram, left common carotid artery was totally obliterated. Diffuse ischemia was observed in the left cerebral hemisphere. Despite intensive interventions, the patient died 4 days after the accident. In the autopsy, a large thrombosis was obtained in the left common carotid artery. This case emphasizes a fatal kinetic energy effect in vascular structures. It is stressed that a gun shot injury could be fatal with its indirect kinetic energy effects at subacute phase.

  2. Successfully Treated Femoral Artery Thrombosis in a Patient with Minimal Change Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Kyoung; Baek, Moon Seong; Mok, Young Mi; Kim, Sung-Ai; Lim, Beom Jin; Lee, Ji Eun

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to widely recognized venous thrombotic complications, peripheral arterial thrombosis as a complication of nephrotic syndrome, especially without preceding iatrogenic venous puncture, corticosteroid treatment, or coagulation factor abnormalities, has rarely been reported in adult female patients. We report the case of a 39-year-old woman who presented with pain in the right lower leg accompanied by minimal change nephrotic syndrome. Lower-extremity angiography showed total occlusion of the right superficial femoral artery. Thrombectomy was performed with a balloon catheter, and the thrombi were successfully aspirated. Our experience indicates that even if few traditional risk factors for atherosclerosis are identified, a high index of suspicion and aggressive treatment of arterial thrombosis in adult nephrotic syndrome are crucial to minimize serious ischemic injuries. PMID:23678479

  3. A Case of Brucella Endocarditis in Association with Subclavian Artery Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Colomba, Claudia; Siracusa, Lucia; Rubino, Raffaella; Trizzino, Marcello; Scarlata, Francesco; Imburgia, Claudia; Titone, Lucina

    2012-01-01

    Brucellosis is a common zoonosis, endemic in Mediterranean countries, and caused by bacteria of Brucella genus. Brucellosis is a systemic infection and the clinical presentation varies widely from asymptomatic and mild to severe disease. Cardiovascular complications are extremely rare. We present a case of arterial thrombosis in a previously healthy young patient with Brucella endocarditis. Careful attention must be paid to any sign or symptom of thrombosis in patients affected by brucellosis, regardless of the presence of endocarditis and cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:22844622

  4. [Coronary thrombosis and ectasia of coronary arteries after long-term use of anabolic steroids].

    PubMed

    Tischer, K-H; Heyny-von Haussen, R; Mall, G; Doenecke, P

    2003-04-01

    Chronic abuse of anabolic steroids is widespread. Hypertrophy of skeletal and heart muscle is a well-known effect of chronic anabolic steroid abuse. Structural alterations of blood vessels are new side effects. We report a case of a 32-year-old bodybuilder after long-term use of anabolic steroids who died of cardiac arrest. Coronary angiography and autopsy findings showed especially a hypertrophic heart, structural changes of coronary arteries, intracoronary thrombosis and myocardial infarction, ventricular thrombosis and systemic embolism PMID:12707792

  5. [Diagnosis and treatment of embolism and thrombosis of abdominal aorta and superior mesenteric artery].

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Kentaro; Obara, Hideaki; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2014-07-01

    Although acute aortic occlusion (AAO) and acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) are relatively rare condition, it is very important to know clinical features and managements for these because a delay in diagnosis and appropriate interventions results in high morbidity and mortality. AAO can result from aortic saddle embolus, acute thrombosis of an atherosclerotic aorta, and so on. Superior mesenteric artery embolism and thrombosis are main cause of AMI. The purpose of this article is to review the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of these diseases. The latest information in this article may help readers to promptly make the diagnosis and effectively manage it in a timely manner.

  6. The Medusa Multi-Coil Versus Alternative Vascular Plugs for Iliac Artery Aneurysm Embolization (MVP-EMBO) Study.

    PubMed

    George, Jon C; Varghese, Vincent; Kovach, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter embolization has evolved from the use of autologous clot as the embolic agent, to stainless-steel coils, to braided-nitinol vascular plugs. However, there are disadvantages to platinum and metal coils, including procedural time, radiation exposure, mass effect, risk of distal embolization, recanalization, imaging artifacts, and cost. Therefore, a large vessel-occluding device is needed to mitigate these current disadvantages. The Medusa Multi-Coil (MMC; EndoShape, Inc) is a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved embolization device constructed primarily of radioopaque coils with synthetic fibers to promote thrombogenicity, and a unique delivery platform with both proximal and distal attachment to assist with precise placement. We report our experience with the endovascular treatment of internal iliac artery aneurysms using platinum coils vs MMCs. PMID:26716591

  7. Adolescent External Iliac Artery Trauma: Recurrent Aneurysmal Dilatation of an Iliofemoral Saphenous Vein Graft Treated by Stent-Grafting

    SciTech Connect

    Lenton, James; Davies, John; Homer-Vanniasinkam, S.; McPherson, Simon

    2008-09-15

    An adolescent male sustained a severe penetrating injury to the external iliac artery. Emergency surgical revascularization was with a reversed long saphenous vein interposition graft. The primary graft and the subsequent revision graft both became aneurysmal. The second graft aneurysm was successfully excluded by endovascular stent-grafts with medium-term primary patency. A venous graft was used initially rather than a synthetic graft to reduce the risk of infection and the potential problems from future growth. Aneurysmal dilatation of venous grafts in children and adolescents is a rare but recognized complication. To the best of our knowledge, exclusion of these aneurysms with stent-grafts has not been previously reported in the adolescent population.

  8. Hydrogen sulfide attenuates ferric chloride-induced arterial thrombosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yi-Ren; You, Shou-Jiang; Zhang, Yan; Li, Qian; Wang, Xian-Hui; Wang, Fen; Hu, Li-Fang; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a novel gaseous transmitter, regulating a multitude of biological processes in the cardiovascular and other systems. However, it remains unclear whether it exerts any effect on arterial thrombosis. In this study, we examined the effect of H2S on ferric chloride (FeCl3)-induced thrombosis in the rat common carotid artery (CCA). The results revealed a decrease of the H2S-producing enzyme cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) expression and H2S production that persisted until 48 h after FeCl3 application. Intriguingly, administration with NaHS at appropriate regimen reduced the thrombus formation and enhanced the blood flow, accompanied with the alleviation of CSE and CD31 downregulation, and endothelial cell apoptosis in the rat CCA following FeCl3 application. Moreover, the antithrombotic effect of H2S was also observed in Rose Bengal photochemical model in which the development of thrombosis is contributed by oxidative injury to the endothelium. The in vitro study demonstrated that the mRNA and protein expression of CSE, as well as H2S production, was decreased in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-treated endothelial cells. Exogenous supplement of NaHS and CSE overexpression consistently alleviated the increase of cleaved caspase-3 and endothelial cell damage caused by H2O2. Taken together, our findings suggest that endogenous H2S generation in the endothelium may be impaired during arterial thrombosis and that modulation of H2S, either exogenous supplement or boost of endogenous production, may become a potential venue for arterial thrombosis therapy.

  9. Iliac artery mural thrombus formation. Effect of antiplatelet therapy on 111In-platelet deposition in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, S.R.; Paxton, L.D.; Harker, L.A.

    1986-09-01

    To measure the rate, extent, and time course of arterial mural thrombus formation in vivo and to assess the effects of antiplatelet therapy in that setting, we have studied autologous /sup 111/In-platelet deposition induced by experimental iliac artery aneurysms in baboons. Scintillation camera imaging analyses were performed at 1, 24, 48, and 72 hours after implantation of the device. Correction for tissue attenuation was determined by using a small, comparably located /sup 111/In source implanted at the time of surgery. In five animals, /sup 111/In-platelet activity accumulated progressively after device implantation, reaching a maximum after the third day. Repeat image analysis carried out 2 weeks after the surgical procedure also showed progressive accumulation of /sup 111/In-platelets over 3 days but at markedly reduced amounts as compared with the initial study. In five additional animals, treatment with a combination of aspirin and dipyridamole begun 1 hour after surgical implantation reduced /sup 111/In-platelet deposition to negligible levels by the third day. Although platelet survival time was shortened and platelet turnover was reciprocally increased in all operated animals, platelet survival and turnover were not affected by antiplatelet therapy. We conclude that, in contrast to platelet survival and turnover measurements, /sup 111/In-platelet imaging is a reliable and sensitive method for localizing and quantifying focal arterial thrombi and for assessing the effects of antiplatelet therapy.

  10. An Unusual Log-splitter Injury Leading to Radial Artery Thrombosis, Ulnar Artery Laceration, and Scapholunate Dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Spock, Christopher R.; Salomon, Jeffrey C.; Narayan, Deepak

    2008-01-01

    A log splitter is a gasoline- or diesel-powered machine that uses a hydraulic-powered cutting wedge to do the work of an axe. Log-splitter injuries that do not result in amputation of digits or limbs are uncommon and not well described in the literature. We present a unique case of a patient who sustained a log-splitter injury that resulted in thrombosis of the radial artery and avulsion laceration of the ulnar artery leading to acute hand ischemia, in addition to scapholunate ligament disruption leading to a DISI deformity. In this case, thrombolytic therapy was contraindicated and surgical revascularization was the best possible treatment option. Our case illustrates the pitfalls of using this modality in a crush injury, since the use of thrombolytics in this instance would have resulted in severe hemorrhage. An important clinical caveat is the potentially misleading arteriographic diagnosis of thrombosis and/or spasm. PMID:18827886

  11. Successful Endovascular Treatment of Iliac Vein Compression (May-Thurner) Syndrome in a Pediatric Patient

    SciTech Connect

    Oguzkurt, Levent Tercan, Fahri; Sener, Mesut

    2006-06-15

    A 10-year-old boy presented to our clinic with left lower extremity swelling present for 1 year with deterioration of symptoms during the prior month. Laboratory investigation for deep vein thrombosis was negative. Venography and computed tomography scan of the pelvis showed compression of the left common iliac vein by the right common iliac artery. A diagnosis of iliac vein compression syndrome was made. After venography, endovascular treatment was planned. The stenosis did not respond to balloon dilatation and a 12 mm Wallstent was placed with successful outcome. The patient's symptoms improved but did not resolve completely, probably due to a chronically occluded left superficial femoral vein that did not respond to endovascular recanalization. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of successful endovascular treatment of iliac vein compression syndrome with stent placement in a pediatric patient.

  12. Sudden death from superior mesenteric artery thrombosis in a cocaine user.

    PubMed

    Edgecombe, Allison; Milroy, Christopher

    2012-03-01

    Cocaine-mediated tissue injury is well established, particularly myocardial ischemia and infarction. Gastrointestinal complications including mesenteric ischemia, ischemic colitis and intestinal perforation occur less frequently. Cocaine-induced visceral arterial thrombosis is a rare finding. We report a case of a 49-year-old chronic cocaine user with superior mesenteric artery (SMA) thrombosis. The patient presented with a 24-h history of abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. Physical examination documented tachycardia and a soft, non-rigid abdomen with voluntary guarding. Abdominal X-ray did not show any evidence of peritoneal free air or bowel obstruction. Laboratory investigations revealed elevated white blood cells and a high anion gap; a blood gas analysis was not done. Three hours after initial presentation, the patient had a cardiac arrest and died. At autopsy, the jejunum was ischemic, without obvious infarction. The SMA was occluded at its origin by significant atherosclerosis with superimposed thrombus. The myocardium had fibrosis, without acute infarction, and severe triple coronary artery atherosclerosis. Toxicological blood analysis confirmed cocaine use. This report emphasizes the need to consider chronic stimulant drug abuse in accelerated atheroma and thrombosis of visceral arteries.

  13. Hybrid repair of penetrating aortic ulcer associated with right aortic arch and aberrant left innominate artery arising from aneurysmal Kommerell's diverticulum with simultaneous repair of bilateral common iliac artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuanyuan; Yang, Bin; Cai, Hongbo; Jin, Hui

    2014-02-01

    We present the first case of a hybrid endovascular approach to a penetrating aortic ulcer on the left descending aorta with a right aortic arch and aberrant left innominate artery arising from an aneurysmal Kommerell's diverticulum. The patient also had bilateral common iliac artery aneurysms. The three-step procedure consisted of a carotid-carotid bypass, followed by endovascular exclusion of the ulcer and the aneurysmal Kommerell's diverticulum, and then completion by covering the iliac aneurysms. The patient had no complications at 18 months after surgery. In such rare configurations, endovascular repair is a safe therapeutic option.

  14. Elevated plasma tissue factor levels in neonates with umbilical arterial catheter-associated thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Tay, S P; Cheong, S K; Boo, N Y

    2006-06-01

    Catheterization of the umbilical artery has been a useful aid in the management of sick neonates for the past few decades. However, it is associated with various complications. Reported studies strongly suggest a significant role of intravascular catheterization in the development of aortic thrombi. Increase in thrombosis of large vessels is believed to be related to mechanical injury in the catheterized vessels, which provide direct exposure of blood to tissue factor (TF), the primary cellular initiator of the extrinsic coagulation pathway. This study was conducted to determine the levels of plasma TF, tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) and D-dimer (DD) in infants with umbilical arterial catheter (UAC)-associated thrombosis. Quantification of TF was carried out using an in-house sandwich ELISA, whereas TFPI and DD levels were measured with commercial immunoassay kits. Infants with UAC inserted were found to have significantly higher levels of plasma TF (p < 0.001) than baseline levels. However, there were no significantly elevated levels of TFPI or DD. Infants with UAC-associated thrombosis demonstrated a greater increase of TF level (median: 414.5 pg/mL; range: -76.0, 6667.0) than infants without UAC-associated thrombosis (105.0 pg/mL; -976.0, 9480.0; p = 0.009) following UAC insertion. Our findings indicate that quantification and monitoring of TF levels could predict thrombus formation in infants with indwelling UAC. Following umbilical arterial catheterisation, infants with an approximately 3-fold rise in plasma TF levels were most at risk of developing abdominal aorta thrombosis as confirmed by real-time abdominal ultrasonography.

  15. Spontaneous thrombosis of giant intracranial aneurysm and posterior cerebral artery followed by also spontaneous recanalization

    PubMed Central

    de Aguiar, Guilherme Brasileiro; Pagotto, Mário Vítor Caldeira; Conti, Mario Luiz Marques; Veiga, José Carlos Esteves

    2016-01-01

    Background: Spontaneous complete thrombosis of a giant aneurysm and its parent artery is a rare event. Their spontaneous recanalization is even rarer, with few reports. Case Description: A 17-year-old male patient presenting blurred vision and headache, with a history of seizures, was referred to our service. After further investigation with cranial computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and cerebral angiography (CAG), it was diagnosed a thrombosed aneurysm of the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) and also complete thrombosis of the PCA. Three years later, he experienced visual worsening. A new MRI scan indicated flow both through the aneurysm and the left PCA, which was further confirmed by CAG. We decided for a noninterventional treatment combined with strict clinical follow-up. The patient continues to present with the previous neurological deficit, without recurrence of headaches. Conclusions: Thrombosis is not the final event in the natural history of giant aneurysms, and partial thrombosis does not preclude the risk of rupture. Thrombosed aneurysms may display additional growth brought about by wall dissections or intramural hemorrhages. Their treatment may be either surgical or involve endovascular procedures such as embolization. Thrombosed giant aneurysms are dynamic and unstable lesions. A noninterventional treatment is feasible, but aneurysmal growth or recanalization may suggest the need for a more active intervention. PMID:26958421

  16. Very late in-stent thrombosis 9 years after double stent treatment of fusiform basilar artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Juszkat, Robert; Stanislawska, Katarzyna; Wasik, Norbert; Jankowski, Roman; Liebert, Włodzimierz

    2015-06-01

    Endovascular treatment seems to be the best approach to posterior circulation fusiform aneurysms. Double stent techniques are frequently used to occlude basilar artery dilations. Unfortunately, there is a limited number of studies that have followed up with patients over prolonged periods of time in order to evaluate delayed complications, such as stenosis, thrombosis or migration of stents. We present an unusual case of in-stent thrombosis 9 years after basilar artery aneurysm treatment to caution about complications associated with double stent implantation.

  17. OUTBACK catheter for treatment of superficial femoral and iliac artery chronic total occlusion: Experience from two centers

    PubMed Central

    Husainy, Mohammad Ali; Suresh, Balla; Fang, Cheng; Ammar, Thoraya; Botchu, Rajesh; Thava, V

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The OUTBACK® catheter is a reentry device that enables reentry into a vessel lumen from the subintimal space during subintimal angioplasty. It is reserved for cases where reentry has not been possible using conventional wire and catheter techniques. We report a two-center experience in recanalization of the chronic total occlusions of the common iliac (CIA) and the superficial femoral artery (SFA) using the OUTBACK® catheter in cases where other techniques were unsuccessful. Material and Methods: All cases where recanalization was performed using the OUTBACK® reentry catheter between January 2010 to January 2015 were retrospectively identified and included in this study. 21 patients were identified. The indication for intervention in these cases included claudication and critical leg ischemia. In all cases, conventional recanalization could not be successfully achieved. Results: The OUTBACK® catheter was used to recanalize 10 SFA occlusion and 9 CIA occlusions. In 19 patients (90%), reentry into true arterial lumen was successfully achieved. 17 patients had their recanalization through the transfemoral approach whereas 2 patients had a transpopliteal artery approach. In 2 patients, reentry into the true lumen could not be achieved using the OUTBACK® catheter due to patient's intolerability for the procedure and severe atherosclerotic calcified plaques. There was 100% patency of the vessel intervened on Duplex ultrasound at 24 months of follow up. 16 patients (84%) remained asymptomatic and 2 patients (10.5%) reported worsening of their symptoms due to the development of new lesions within the arterial system. Conclusion: The OUTBACK® catheter is an effective and safe technique for reentry into the vessel lumen when conventional techniques fail. PMID:27413275

  18. Diagnosis and management of iliac vein compression syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shebel, Nancy D; Whalen, Chyrle C

    2005-03-01

    Iliac vein compression syndrome (IVCS) is the most probable cause of iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis (DVT). One half to two thirds of patients with left-sided iliofemoral DVT have intraluminal webs or spurs from chronic extrinsic compression of the left iliac vein at the crossing point of the right common iliac artery. Approximately 2% to 5% of those with chronic deep venous insufficiency of the left leg may have IVCS. IVCS occurs when compression of the common iliac vein is severe enough to inhibit the rate of venous outflow. In its more severe manifestation, IVCS is known to cause acute iliofemoral DVT. IVCS is caused by the combination of compression and the vibratory pressure of the right iliac artery on the iliac vein that is pinched between the artery and the pelvic bone. With the advent of catheter-directed thrombolytic therapy for patients presenting with iliofemoral DVT, the underlying cause has been unveiled and IVCS is gaining recognition. Patients presenting with symptoms of chronic venous insufficiency often fail conservative treatment, and because of their crippling symptoms, they may have a high rate of work absence or are on permanent disability. If IVCS can be identified as the cause and corrected, the patients' quality of life would improve. With the advent of endovascular stenting, the underlying cause can be easily corrected, and long-term patency is acceptable. Diagnosis can be made by being highly suspicious when patients present in either the acute or chronic state and selecting the best diagnostic tool to confirm the diagnosis. This article discusses the prevalence of IVCS, its significance for the affected population, and the relevance of recognition, and reviews the best methods of its diagnosis and treatment. Special emphasis is placed on diagnostic tools and their efficacy, and our results to date are reported. PMID:15741959

  19. Splenic artery embolization for the treatment of bleeding gastric varices secondary to splenic vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Stone, Patrick A; Phang, David; Richmond, Bryan; Gill, Gurpreet; Campbell, John E

    2014-04-01

    Splenic vein thrombosis can lead to gastric varices. Subsequent upper gastrointestinal bleeding may ensue related to the change in venous outflow to the portal system. Vascular surgeons are infrequently asked to assist in the management of this entity. However, with many vascular surgeons providing diverse endovascular-based interventions, understanding catheter-based solutions is imperative. This report presents a case in which arterial embolization was used to treat gastric variceal bleeding.

  20. Popliteal artery thrombosis in a patient with Cogan syndrome: Treatment with thrombolysis and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Bastug, Demir E.; Dominic, Anthony; Ortiz, Orlando; DiBartolomeo, Anthony G.; Kotzan, Jeffrey M.; Abraham, F. Matthew

    1997-01-15

    A 31-year-old woman with Cogan syndrome (a rare form of systemic vasculitis) was evaluated for a cold, painful left foot with diminished pulses. Arteriography demonstrated thrombosis of the left popliteal artery with evidence of vasculitis. Thrombolytic therapy was begun with initial success but eventual rethrombosis. After reinitiating thrombolytic therapy combined with intraarterial vasodilator therapy, successful angioplasty was performed with sustained results, at 6-month follow-up.

  1. Laparoscopic nephrectomy for complete renal infarction due to post traumatic renal artery thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Gidaro, Stefano; Schips, Luigi; Cindolo, Luca; Ziguener, Richard

    2008-06-01

    We report a case of post traumatic thrombosis of the renal artery with renal infarction and associated liver injury. Conservative treatment was initially planned in consideration of the delayed diagnosis (> 3 hours), but the patient subsequently developed hypertension not controllable with anti-hypertensive drugs. He underwent laparoscopy with nephrectomy and liver injury repair. Hypertension resolved after nephrectomy without further medical treatment. Laparoscopic nephrectomy is not a standard procedure for renal trauma but it could be an option in selected patients.

  2. Buttock Claudication and Erectile Dysfunction After Internal Iliac Artery Embolization in Patients Prior to Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Rayt, H. S. Bown, M. J.; Lambert, K. V.; Fishwick, N. G.; McCarthy, M. J.; London, N. J. M.; Sayers, R. D.

    2008-07-15

    Coil embolization of the internal iliac artery (IIA) is used to extend the application of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in cases of challenging iliac anatomy. Pelvic ischemia is a complication of the technique, but reports vary as to the rate and severity. This study reports our experience with IIA embolization and compares the results to those of other published series. The vascular unit database of the Leicester Royal Infirmary was used to identify patients who had undergone IIA coil embolization prior to EVAR. Data were collected from hospital case notes and by telephone interviews. Thirty-eight patients were identified; 29 of these were contactable by telephone. A literature search was performed for other studies of IIA embolization and the results were pooled. In this series buttock claudication occurred in 55% (16 of 29 patients) overall: in 52% of unilateral embolizations (11 of 21) and 63% of bilateral embolizations (5 of 8). New erectile dysfunction occurred in 46% (6 of 13 patients) overall: in 38% of unilateral embolizations (3 of 8) and 60% of bilateral embolizations (3 of 5). The literature review identified 18 relevant studies. The results were pooled with our results, to give 634 patients in total. Buttock claudication occurred in 28% overall (178 of 634 patients): in 31% of unilateral embolizations (99 of 322) and 35% of bilateral embolizations (34 of 98) (p = 0.46, Fisher's exact test). New erectile dysfunction occurred in 17% overall (27 of 159 patients): in 17% of unilateral embolizations (16 of 97) and 24% of bilateral embolizations (9 of 38) (p = 0.33). We conclude that buttock claudication and erectile dysfunction are frequent complications of IIA embolization and patients should be counseled accordingly.

  3. Acute coronary syndrome in Behcet’s disease caused by a coronary artery aneurysm and thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Tekin, Bahar; Özen, Gülsen; Tekayev, Nazar; Gerçek, Şeyma; Direskeneli, Haner

    2014-01-01

    Behcet’s disease (BD) is a multisystemic vasculitis that can involve vessels of all sizes and is characterized by recurrent oral and genital ulcers with variable manifestations affecting the skin, eyes, and central nervous and musculoskeletal systems. Vascular involvement in BD is reported to be up to 40% in different series. The abdominal and thoracic aorta and pulmonary and femoral arteries are the most commonly involved arteries. However coronary arteries are rarely affected. Herein, we present a 29-year-old man who was consulted with progressive severe chest pain of 3 days in duration to our clinic. The patient was diagnosed with BD with mucocutaneous symptoms and a positive pathergy test 1 year ago and was in clinical remission for the last 6 months. At the first evaluation in the emergency department, the patient’s vital signs were stable, whereas he had elevated troponin T levels with a normal electrocardiogram and hypokinetic areas in the apex of the heart in the echocardiography. Conventional and computed tomography coronary angiography revealed aneurysms and intramural thrombosis in the left anterior descending and right coronary arteries. Although ischemic symptoms and signs improved with anticoagulant and antiaggregant therapies, coronary aneurysms were observed to increase in size. Immunosuppressive (IS) treatment was started with pulse intravenous corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide. Because of the high re-stenosis risk, stents were not applied to the affected vessels during the acute thrombosis period. During routine investigations, an in situ pulmonary thrombosis was also detected bilaterally in the peripheral pulmonary arteries. In conclusion, coronary artery aneurysm is a rare and poor prognostic manifestation of BD. The treatment protocol for these aneurysms is not well clarified. IS therapies are definitely indicated, but the role of anticoagulants and invasive vascular interventions is controversial.

  4. Loss of matrix metalloproteinase 2 in platelets reduces arterial thrombosis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Momi, Stefania; Falcinelli, Emanuela; Giannini, Silvia; Ruggeri, Loredana; Cecchetti, Luca; Corazzi, Teresa; Libert, Claude

    2009-01-01

    Platelet activation at a site of vascular injury is essential for the arrest of bleeding; however, excessive platelet activation at a site of arterial damage can result in the unwarranted formation of arterial thrombi, precipitating acute myocardial infarction, or ischemic stroke. Activation of platelets beyond the purpose of hemostasis may occur when substances facilitating thrombus growth and stability accumulate. Human platelets contain matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and release it upon activation. Active MMP-2 amplifies the platelet aggregation response to several agonists by potentiating phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activation. Using several in vivo thrombosis models, we show that the inactivation of the MMP-2 gene prevented thrombosis induced by weak, but not strong, stimuli in mice but produced only a moderate prolongation of the bleeding time. Moreover, using cross-transfusion experiments and wild-type/MMP-2−/− chimeric mice, we show that it is platelet-derived MMP-2 that facilitates thrombus formation. Finally, we show that platelets activated by a mild vascular damage induce thrombus formation at a downstream arterial injury site by releasing MMP-2. Thus, platelet-derived MMP-2 plays a crucial role in thrombus formation by amplifying the response of platelets to weak activating stimuli. These findings open new possibilities for the prevention of thrombosis by the development of MMP-2 inhibitors. PMID:19808257

  5. Effect of quercetin-rich onion peel extracts on arterial thrombosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Min; Moon, Jiyoung; Chung, Ji Hyung; Cha, Yong-Jun; Shin, Min-Jeong

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether oral supplementation of quercetin-rich onion peel extract (OPE) influences blood coagulation and arterial thrombosis in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. 24 male rats, 5 weeks old, were divided into three groups with different diets (C: control, 2mg OPE: chow diet with 2mg OPE supplementation, 10mg OPE: chow diet with 10mg OPE supplementation) for 6 weeks. Blood coagulation parameters including prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and platelet aggregation were examined. The OPE did not affect blood cholesterol levels but significantly decreased blood triglyceride and glucose levels. PT, aPTT and platelet aggregation were not significantly different among all tested groups. However, in vivo arterial thrombosis was significantly delayed in groups that were fed 2mg and 10mg OPE diets compared to the control group. In addition, the OPE greatly diminished thrombin-induced expression of tissue factor in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), a coagulation initiator. In addition, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathways activated by thrombin treatment were prevented by the OPE pre-treatment. These results indicate that OPE may have anti-thrombotic effects through restricting the induced expression of tissue factor via down-regulating mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation upon coagulation stimulus, leading to the prolongation of time for arterial thrombosis.

  6. Effect of quercetin-rich onion peel extracts on arterial thrombosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Min; Moon, Jiyoung; Chung, Ji Hyung; Cha, Yong-Jun; Shin, Min-Jeong

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether oral supplementation of quercetin-rich onion peel extract (OPE) influences blood coagulation and arterial thrombosis in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. 24 male rats, 5 weeks old, were divided into three groups with different diets (C: control, 2mg OPE: chow diet with 2mg OPE supplementation, 10mg OPE: chow diet with 10mg OPE supplementation) for 6 weeks. Blood coagulation parameters including prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and platelet aggregation were examined. The OPE did not affect blood cholesterol levels but significantly decreased blood triglyceride and glucose levels. PT, aPTT and platelet aggregation were not significantly different among all tested groups. However, in vivo arterial thrombosis was significantly delayed in groups that were fed 2mg and 10mg OPE diets compared to the control group. In addition, the OPE greatly diminished thrombin-induced expression of tissue factor in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), a coagulation initiator. In addition, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathways activated by thrombin treatment were prevented by the OPE pre-treatment. These results indicate that OPE may have anti-thrombotic effects through restricting the induced expression of tissue factor via down-regulating mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation upon coagulation stimulus, leading to the prolongation of time for arterial thrombosis. PMID:23524316

  7. Renal artery thrombosis and hypertension in a 13 year old girl with antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Ostuni, P A; Lazzarin, P; Pengo, V; Ruffatti, A; Schiavon, F; Gambari, P

    1990-01-01

    The case of a 13 year old girl with renal artery thrombosis and hypertension is described. A cerebrovascular accident and a probable occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery also occurred. Very high levels of 'lupus anticoagulant', anticardiolipin antibodies as well as false positive Venereal Disease Research Laboratory tests were repeatedly shown. Moreover, the patient fulfilled at least four classification criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus, but only a slight positivity for antinucleolar antibodies was present. The striking relation between antiphospholipid antibody levels and clinical events and the treatment of this complex syndrome are discussed. Images PMID:2108619

  8. Spontaneous coronary artery thrombosis in the setting of active lupus mesenteric vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Yogesh N V; Sundaram, V; Tam, M; Parikh, S A

    2015-07-01

    A 33-year-old male with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) presented with acute abdominal pain and was found to have lupus mesenteric vasculitis on imaging and during exploratory laparotomy. Post laparotomy he continued to have persistent nausea and dyspepsia and an electrocardiogram showed evidence of an inferior ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Emergency cardiac catheterization showed evidence of thrombotic right coronary artery occlusion. His coronaries were otherwise normal with no evidence of underlying coronary artery disease. Extensive workup with trans-esophageal echo, serologies for antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) and bubble study was negative. This effectively ruled out Libman-Sacks endocarditis, APS-induced arterial thrombus and paradoxical emboli as potential causes of his STEMI. By exclusion of other causes, the etiology of his STEMI was felt to be secondary to in-situ coronary artery thrombosis in the setting of active SLE. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient with SLE presenting with both lupus mesenteric vasculitis and in-situ coronary arterial thrombosis in the absence of APS.

  9. Unusual presentation of renal vein thrombosis with pulmonary artery embolism.

    PubMed

    Mzayen, Khaled; Al-Said, Jafar; Nayak-Rao, Shobhana; Catacutan, Maria Teresa; Kamel, Olfat

    2013-05-01

    A young 23-year-old male patient presented with a two-day history of right flank pain. He had no history of any significant illnesses in the past. His investigations showed nephrotic range proteinuria with hypoalbuminemia. The patient developed cough and shortness of breath after having a left kidney biopsy. He did not respond to regular respiratory tract infection treatment. The kidney biopsy revealed membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. Further investigations for the cough showed thromboembolism of the posterior and lateral basal segments of the right lower lobe. Moreover he was found to have thrombosis of the right upper pole renal vein. The patient was started on full anticoagulation along with three days pulse steroid, followed by 1 mg/kg oral steroid. Clinical improvement was noticed within 48 h. After eight weeks the proteinuria decreased from 8.5 gm/day to 1.1 gm/day. The kidney function was normal with eGFR 145 mL/min through the course of the disease. This case represent one of the unusual presentation of nephrotic syndrome with pulmonary and renal vascular thromboembolic events. The response to the combination of anticoagulation and steroid was remarkable.

  10. Pulmonary artery stump thrombosis developed during the late postoperative period

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Seyda Ors; Samancilar, Ozgur; Ceylan, Kenan Can

    2016-01-01

    A 73-year-old man underwent left pneumonectomy for squamous cell lung carcinoma 3 years ago. The postoperative and follow-up periods were uneventful. A thrombus was detected in the left pulmonary artery stump during the last chest computed tomography (CT) scan. Anticoagulant treatment was applied: intravenous heparin for 3 days followed by oral warfarin. The follow-up chest CT examination revealed regression in the size of the thrombus.

  11. CT Study of the Relationship Between the Common Iliac Artery and Vein and Their Juxtaposition: Implications for Conduit Construction Prior to Endosvascular Stent-Graft Repair of Aortic Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Lenton, James; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Kent, Patrick; Nicholson, Tony

    2008-11-15

    The objective of this study was to determine the anatomical relationship and juxtaposition between the common iliac artery and vein in a population of patients with aortic aneurysmal disease and a population clinically and radiologically free of atheroma. It was a retrospective study of 100 consecutive patients undergoing computed tomographic assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysm prior to endovascular or open surgical repair and 100 patients undergoing computed tomographic assessment for other pathologies who did not have clinical or imaging signs of aorto-iliac atheroma. In both groups the anatomical relationship between the right and left iliac artery and vein was studied, and the thickness of the fat plane separating the artery from the vein measured. The right iliac vein was posterolateral to the artery at the level of the common iliac artery bifurcation in 95% of patients in both groups. At the same level the left iliac vein was posterior in 23% (p {<=} 0.001). Eighty-three percent of patients in the aneurysm group had a fat plane between the right artery and vein that measured 0 mm (no visible fat plane = 52%) to 1 mm (= 31%). Ninety-eight percent of patients in the aneurysm group had a measurable fat plane between the left iliac artery and vein of up to 5 mm (p = 0.001). Six percent of the control group demonstrated no visible fat plane between the right iliac artery and vein (p {<=} 0.001), while the fat plane measured more than 1 mm (1-5 mm) on the left in 100%. We conclude that in patients where conduit construction is required for aortic stent-graft access, the anatomical configuration and intimate relationship of the iliac arteries and veins should be assessed and taken into account at CT scan evaluation. The distal right common iliac artery should not be used, as venous damage can be predicted from the anatomical and intimate relationship of the iliac artery and vein at this level in patients with atheroma and the difficulties this relationship

  12. Pediatric isolated bilateral iliac aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Chithra, R; Sundar, R Ajai; Velladuraichi, B; Sritharan, N; Amalorpavanathan, J; Vidyasagaran, T

    2013-07-01

    Aneurysms are rare in children. Isolated iliac artery aneurysms are very rare, especially bilateral aneurysms. Pediatric aneurysms are usually secondary to connective tissue disorders, arteritis, or mycotic causes. We present a case of a 3-year-old child with bilateral idiopathic common iliac aneurysms that were successfully repaired with autogenous vein grafts.

  13. Stent Fracture and Reocclusion After Placement of a Single Self-Expanding Stent in the Common Iliac Artery and Endovascular Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Higashiura, Wataru Sakaguchi, Shoji; Morimoto, Kengo; Kichikawa, Kimihiko

    2008-09-15

    We present a case of fracture of a single self-expanding stent placed in the common iliac artery (CIA). An 80-year-old woman underwent placement of a self-expanding stent for CIA occlusion. Stent fracture and reocclusion were detected after 18 months. Successful revascularization was achieved using a stent-in-stent maneuver. The possibility of stent fracture with reocclusion should be considered following treatment with a single self-expanding stent for CIA occlusion.

  14. Using Rivaroxaban as Thrombolytic Treatment for a Patient of Pedal Arch Arterial Thrombosis with Suboptimal Result of Endovascular Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hsin-Fu; Chan, Yi-Hsin; Wang, Chun-Li

    2016-01-01

    A 77-year-old male with subacute right foot ischemia was treated with endovascular therapy to relieve total thrombosis of the pedal arch extending from the dorsalis pedis of the anterior tibial artery into the posterior tibial artery, plantar segment. Because the procedure was only partially successful, rivaroxaban was used for thrombolytic treatment resulting in improvement of the patient’s ischemic pain and avoidance of gangrenous progression and surgical amputation. This is the first report describing successful recanalization of pedal arch arterial thrombosis using rivaroxaban in a patient after suboptimal results of endovascular therapy. PMID:27713614

  15. Vascular pentraxin 3 controls arterial thrombosis by targeting collagen and fibrinogen induced platelets aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Bonacina, F.; Barbieri, S.S.; Cutuli, L.; Amadio, P.; Doni, A.; Sironi, M.; Tartari, S.; Mantovani, A.; Bottazzi, B.; Garlanda, C.; Tremoli, E.; Catapano, A.L.; Norata, G.D.

    2016-01-01

    Aim The long pentraxin PTX3 plays a non-redundant role during acute myocardial infarction, atherosclerosis and in the orchestration of tissue repair and remodeling during vascular injury, clotting and fibrin deposition. The aim of this work is to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the protective role of PTX3 during arterial thrombosis. Methods and results PTX3 KO mice transplanted with bone marrow from WT or PTX3 KO mice presented a significant reduction in carotid artery blood flow following FeCl3 induced arterial thrombosis (− 80.36 ± 11.5% and − 95.53 ± 4.46%), while in WT mice transplanted with bone marrow from either WT or PTX3 KO mice, the reduction was less dramatic (− 45.55 ± 1.37% and − 53.39 ± 9.8%), thus pointing to a protective effect independent of a hematopoietic cell's derived PTX3. By using P-selectin/PTX3 double KO mice, we further excluded a role for P-selectin, a target of PTX3 released by neutrophils, in vascular protection played by PTX3. In agreement with a minor role for hematopoietic cell-derived PTX3, platelet activation (assessed by flow cytometric expression of markers of platelet activation) was similar in PTX3 KO and WT mice as were haemostatic properties. Histological analysis indicated that PTX3 localizes within the thrombus and the vessel wall, and specific experiments with the N-terminal and the C-terminal PTX3 domain showed the ability of PTX3 to selectively dampen either fibrinogen or collagen induced platelet adhesion and aggregation. Conclusion PTX3 interacts with fibrinogen and collagen and, by dampening their pro-thrombotic effects, plays a protective role during arterial thrombosis. PMID:26976330

  16. Renal and iliac artery stenting by interventional cardiologists and vascular surgeons: the Foundation to Advance Medical Education (FAME) initiative.

    PubMed

    Holmes, David R; Fox, Robert D; Tommaso, Carl; Hodgson, Patricia K; Green, Richard; Rocha-Singh, Krishna; Rosenfield, Kenneth

    2005-05-01

    The American College of Cardiology, in concert with the Society for Coronary Angiography and Interventions and the Society for Vascular Surgery, planned and implemented an initiative to teach stenting of renal and iliac arteries to their peers in practice. Supported by the Foundation to advance medical Education (FAME), the initiative involved 25 preceptees and 6 preceptors and included a didactic portion (a remote learning exercise), an animal practicum, a procedural simulation, and a preceptor/preceptee training segment, all of which was followed by evaluations by the participants. Assessments of the success of the initiative differed between preceptees, who were positive about the experience, and preceptors, who were more critical of the endeavor (with surgeons more critical than cardiologists). Technical problems, such as obtaining temporary licensure to practice medicine in another state, interfered with the hands-on experiences of several preceptees. Programs such as the FAME initiative will grow in importance as new technologies continue to be introduced into medical practice and the need to train physicians in practice in their use expands.

  17. The Practical Uses of Ultrasound in a Clinical Setting to Diagnose Thrombosis of the Ulnar Artery

    PubMed Central

    Serafine, Matthew S.; Peterson, Charles S.

    2013-01-01

    A 43-year-old professional skateboarder presented to the sports medicine clinic with complaints of left wrist pain to the ulnar aspect. Two weeks prior to presentation, his wrist became suddenly painful with no specific trauma. He reported a history of falls over the years while skateboarding but none directly correlated to his onset of wrist pain. Radiographic results were negative for wrist or hand fracture. Physical examination yielded tenderness and mild swelling to the ulnar aspect of the wrist. Musculoskeletal ultrasound was used to assess tendon and ligament integrity, all of which was intact. Both radial and ulnar arteries were visualized, and ulnar artery thrombosis was incidentally diagnosed. He was advised to immediately proceed to the hospital, where an open arthrectomy was performed to the ulnar artery the following day. The patient was released from the hospital 2 days later and subsequently made a full recovery. PMID:24459558

  18. The Kallikrein Inhibitor from Bauhinia bauhinioides (BbKI) shows antithrombotic properties in venous and arterial thrombosis models.

    PubMed

    Brito, Marlon V; de Oliveira, Cleide; Salu, Bruno R; Andrade, Sonia A; Malloy, Paula M D; Sato, Ana C; Vicente, Cristina P; Sampaio, Misako U; Maffei, Francisco H A; Oliva, Maria Luiza V

    2014-05-01

    The Bauhinia bauhinioides Kallikrein Inhibitor (BbKI) is a Kunitz-type serine peptidase inhibitor of plant origin that has been shown to impair the viability of some tumor cells and to feature a potent inhibitory activity against human and rat plasma kallikrein (Kiapp 2.4 nmol/L and 5.2 nmol/L, respectively). This inhibitory activity is possibly responsible for an effect on hemostasis by prolonging activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT). Because the association between cancer and thrombosis is well established, we evaluated the possible antithrombotic activity of this protein in venous and arterial thrombosis models. Vein thrombosis was studied in the vena cava ligature model in Wistar rats, and arterial thrombosis in the photochemical induced endothelium lesion model in the carotid artery of C57 black 6 mice. BbKI at a concentration of 2.0 mg/kg reduced the venous thrombus weight by 65% in treated rats in comparison to rats in the control group. The inhibitor prolonged the time for total artery occlusion in the carotid artery model mice indicating that this potent plasma kallikrein inhibitor prevented thrombosis.

  19. Ferric Chloride-induced Thrombosis Mouse Model on Carotid Artery and Mesentery Vessel.

    PubMed

    Bonnard, Thomas; Hagemeyer, Christoph E

    2015-06-29

    Severe thrombosis and its ischemic consequences such as myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism and stroke are major worldwide health issues. The ferric chloride injury is now a well-established technique to rapidly and accurately induce the formation of thrombi in exposed veins or artery of small and large diameter. This model has played a key role in the study of the pathophysiology of thrombosis, in the discovery and validation of novel antithrombotic drugs and in the understanding of the mechanism of action of these new agents. Here, the implementation of this technique on a mesenteric vessel and carotid artery in mice is presented. The method describes how to label circulating leukocytes and platelets with a fluorescent dye and to observe, by intravital microscopy on the exposed mesentery, their accumulation at the injured vessel wall which leads to the formation of a thrombus. On the carotid artery, the occlusion caused by the clot formation is measured by monitoring the blood flow with a Doppler probe.

  20. Optimizing human apyrase to treat arterial thrombosis and limit reperfusion injury without increasing bleeding risk.

    PubMed

    Moeckel, Douglas; Jeong, Soon Soeg; Sun, Xiaofeng; Broekman, M Johan; Nguyen, Annie; Drosopoulos, Joan H F; Marcus, Aaron J; Robson, Simon C; Chen, Ridong; Abendschein, Dana

    2014-08-01

    In patients with acute myocardial infarction undergoing reperfusion therapy to restore blood flow through blocked arteries, simultaneous inhibition of platelet P2Y12 receptors with the current standard of care neither completely prevents recurrent thrombosis nor provides satisfactory protection against reperfusion injury. Additionally, these antiplatelet drugs increase the risk of bleeding. To devise a different strategy, we engineered and optimized the apyrase activity of human nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-3 (CD39L3) to enhance scavenging of extracellular adenosine diphosphate, a predominant ligand of P2Y12 receptors. The resulting recombinant protein, APT102, exhibited greater than four times higher adenosine diphosphatase activity and a 50 times longer plasma half-life than did native apyrase. Treatment with APT102 before coronary fibrinolysis with intravenous recombinant human tissue-type plasminogen activator in conscious dogs completely prevented thrombotic reocclusion and significantly decreased infarction size by 81% without increasing bleeding time. In contrast, clopidogrel did not prevent coronary reocclusion and increased bleeding time. In a murine model of myocardial reperfusion injury caused by transient coronary artery occlusion, APT102 also decreased infarct size by 51%, whereas clopidogrel was not effective. These preclinical data suggest that APT102 should be tested for its ability to safely and effectively maximize the benefits of myocardial reperfusion therapy in patients with arterial thrombosis.

  1. Restraint stress enhances arterial thrombosis in vivo--role of the sympathetic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Stämpfli, Simon F; Camici, Giovanni G; Keller, Stephan; Rozenberg, Izabela; Arras, Margarete; Schuler, Beat; Gassmann, Max; Garcia, Irene; Lüscher, Thomas F; Tanner, Felix C

    2014-01-01

    Stress is known to correlate with the incidence of acute myocardial infarction. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this correlation are not known. This study was designed to assess the effect of experimental stress on arterial thrombus formation, the key event in acute myocardial infarction. Mice exposed to 20 h of restraint stress displayed an increased arterial prothrombotic potential as assessed by photochemical injury-induced time to thrombotic occlusion. This increase was prevented by chemical sympathectomy performed through 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Blood-born tissue factor (TF) activity was enhanced by stress and this increase could be prevented by 6-OHDA treatment. Vessel wall TF, platelet count, platelet aggregation, coagulation times (PT, aPTT), fibrinolytic system (t-PA and PAI-1) and tail bleeding time remained unaltered. Telemetric analysis revealed only minor hemodynamic changes throughout the stress protocol. Plasma catecholamines remained unaffected after restraint stress. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) plasma levels were unchanged and inhibition of TNF-α had no effect on stress-enhanced thrombosis. These results indicate that restraint stress enhances arterial thrombosis via the sympathetic nervous system. Blood-borne TF contributes, at least in part, to the observed effect whereas vessel wall TF, platelets, circulating coagulation factors, fibrinolysis and inflammation do not appear to play a role. These findings shed new light on the understanding of stress-induced cardiovascular events.

  2. Ferric Chloride-induced Thrombosis Mouse Model on Carotid Artery and Mesentery Vessel.

    PubMed

    Bonnard, Thomas; Hagemeyer, Christoph E

    2015-01-01

    Severe thrombosis and its ischemic consequences such as myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism and stroke are major worldwide health issues. The ferric chloride injury is now a well-established technique to rapidly and accurately induce the formation of thrombi in exposed veins or artery of small and large diameter. This model has played a key role in the study of the pathophysiology of thrombosis, in the discovery and validation of novel antithrombotic drugs and in the understanding of the mechanism of action of these new agents. Here, the implementation of this technique on a mesenteric vessel and carotid artery in mice is presented. The method describes how to label circulating leukocytes and platelets with a fluorescent dye and to observe, by intravital microscopy on the exposed mesentery, their accumulation at the injured vessel wall which leads to the formation of a thrombus. On the carotid artery, the occlusion caused by the clot formation is measured by monitoring the blood flow with a Doppler probe. PMID:26167713

  3. "Isolated Spontaneous Renal Artery Thrombosis - A Rare Cause of Acute Flank Pain".

    PubMed

    Raghavendran, M; Sarkar, Mrityunjoy; Kumar, Kiran G

    2016-11-01

    Many patients present with severe abdominal pain. Renal Artery Thrombosis (RAT) is rare, serious and misdiagnosed. RAT has been well described in association with various disorders, but isolated spontaneously occurring RAT is rare and only 2 cases have been described as of date. We present a case of flank pain presenting to emergency for evaluation and discuss the clinical aspects and management. We would like to stress on the important role of serum LDH levels and CT scan in RAT. Early diagnosis may result in salvage of organ by minimally invasive techniques. Late diagnosis will almost always result in nephrectomy. PMID:27617211

  4. Arterial thrombosis is accelerated in mice deficient in histidine-rich glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Vu, Trang T; Zhou, Ji; Leslie, Beverly A; Stafford, Alan R; Fredenburgh, James C; Ni, Ran; Qiao, Shengjun; Vaezzadeh, Nima; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi; Monia, Brett P; Gross, Peter L; Weitz, Jeffrey I

    2015-04-23

    Factor (F) XII, a key component of the contact system, triggers clotting via the intrinsic pathway, and is implicated in propagating thrombosis. Although nucleic acids are potent activators, it is unclear how the contact system is regulated to prevent uncontrolled clotting. Previously, we showed that histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG) binds FXIIa and attenuates its capacity to trigger coagulation. To investigate the role of HRG as a regulator of the intrinsic pathway, we compared RNA- and DNA-induced thrombin generation in plasma from HRG-deficient and wild-type mice. Thrombin generation was enhanced in plasma from HRG-deficient mice, and accelerated clotting was restored to normal with HRG reconstitution. Although blood loss after tail tip amputation was similar in HRG-deficient and wild-type mice, carotid artery occlusion after FeCl3 injury was accelerated in HRG-deficient mice, and HRG administration abrogated this effect. To confirm that HRG modulates the contact system, we used DNase, RNase, and antisense oligonucleotides to characterize the FeCl3 model. Whereas DNase or FVII knockdown had no effect, carotid occlusion was abrogated with RNase or FXII knockdown, confirming that FeCl3-induced thrombosis is triggered by RNA in a FXII-dependent fashion. Therefore, in a nucleic acid-driven model, HRG inhibits thrombosis by modulating the intrinsic pathway of coagulation.

  5. Snare-assisted Trans-brachial Stenting for the Cervical Internal Carotid Artery Stenosis of Patient with Aorto-Iliac Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Oowaki, H.; Matsuura, N; Ishikawa, M.

    2006-01-01

    Summary We describe a case of endo-luminal stent placement with Snare-assist for a cervical internal carotid artery stenosis in which percutaneous access was obtained via the brachial artery. A 68-year-old man with known disease of the carotid, peripheral, and coronary arteries, with Human T-cell Lymphotrophic Virus type-1 (HTLV-1) Associated Myelopathy (HAM) presented for endoluminal revascularization of a severe, progressive right internal carotid artery stenosis, but with aorto-iliac occlusion. Transfemoral access was complicated by an aorto-iliac occlusion. A trans-brachial approach was successfully attempted, and a SMARTer stent (Cordis Endovascular, Miami Lakes, FL) was successfully placed through a 7-French Shuttle-SL guide sheath (Cook, Bloomington) under Snare-assist. The trans-brachial approach is becoming an increasingly viable alternative route for stent placement in patients with contra-indicated or complicated femoral access routes. As devices become increasingly more pliable and smaller, the trans-brachial route will be used with increasing frequency in the select patient population for stenting of both the cervical and intracranial circulation. PMID:20569637

  6. Angioplasty and stent placement -- peripheral arteries

    MedlinePlus

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty - peripheral artery; PTA - peripheral artery; Angioplasty - peripheral arteries; Iliac artery -angioplasty; Femoral artery - angioplasty; Popliteal artery - angioplasty; Tibial artery - angioplasty; ...

  7. Value of Single-Dose Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography Versus Intraarterial Digital Subtraction Angiography in Therapy Indications in Abdominal and Iliac Arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, Philipp J. Schaefer, Fritz K. W.; Mueller-Huelsbeck, Stefan; Both, Markus; Heller, Martin; Jahnke, Thomas

    2007-06-15

    The objective of the study was to prove the value of single-dose contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography [three-dimensional (3D) ceMRA] in abdominal and iliac arteries versus the reference standard intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (i.a.DSA) when indicating a therapy. Patients suspected of having abdominal or iliac artery stenosis were included in this study. A positive vote of the local Ethics Committee was given. After written informed consent was obtained, 37 patients were enrolled, of which 34 were available for image evaluation. Both 3D ceMRA and i.a. DSA were performed for each patient. The dosage for 3D ceMRA was 0.1 mmol/kg body weight in a 1.5-T scanner with a phased-array coil. The parameters of the 3D-FLASH sequence were as follows: TR/TE 4.6/1.8 ms, effective thickness 3.5 mm, matrix 512 x 200, flip angle 30{sup o}, field of view 420 mm, TA 23 s, coronal scan orientation. Totally, 476 vessel segments were evaluated for stenosis degree by two radiologists in a consensus fashion in a blinded read. For each patient, a therapy was proposed, if clinically indicated. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy for stenoses {>=}50% were 68%, 92%, 44%, 97%, and 90%, respectively. In 13/34 patients, a discrepancy was found concerning therapy decisions based on MRA findings versus therapy decisions based on the reference standard DSA. The results showed that the used MRA imaging technique of abdominal and iliac arteries is not competitive to i.a. DSA, with a high rate of misinterpretation of the MRAs resulting in incorrect therapies.

  8. Ischemic-reperfusion of unilateral external iliac artery in rat: A new model for vasculitic femoral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Muthuraman, Arunachalam; Ramesh, Muthusamy

    2016-08-15

    Clinically, ischemic environment during gynecological surgery at lithotomy position is most common causative factor for the development of vasculitic femoral neuropathy (VFN). The present study was designed to induce the clinically relevant rat model of VFN by ischemic-reperfusion (I/R) injury of unilateral external iliac artery (uEIA). The VFN was induced by 3, 4 and 5h occlusion of uEIA followed by reperfusion. The I/R of uEIA induced VFN was evaluated by (i) behavioral parameters i.e., hind limb temperature; weight bearing capacity; (ii) kinematic analysis i.e., paw posture, splay angle, static sciatic index (SSI), and ankle-angle tests; (iii) evaluation of pain perception i.e., plantar and pin prick; (iv) serum biochemical estimation i.e., nitrate, lipid peroxidation, TNF-α and calcium level; (v) evaluation of motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity; and (vi) measurement of nerve fiber density. The 4 and 5h occlusion of uEIA has produced the potential changes in behavioral, functional, electrophysiological, biochemical and histopathological assessment. The 5h occlusion of uEIA has shown to produce the mortality. Whereas, 3h occlusion does not produce the significant changes in the development of VFN. The 4h ischemic occlusion of uEIA has shown potential rat model of VFN due to its close mimicking capacity of VFN in human. Therefore, it can be useful to explore the newer anti-neuralgic medicine and with their pharmacodynamic action in the field of various neurovascular disorders. PMID:27288016

  9. Very late in-stent thrombosis 9 years after double stent treatment of fusiform basilar artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Juszkat, Robert; Stanislawska, Katarzyna; Jankowski, Roman; Liebert, Włodzimierz

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular treatment seems to be the best approach to posterior circulation fusiform aneurysms. Double stent techniques are frequently used to occlude basilar artery dilations. Unfortunately, there is a limited number of studies that have followed up with patients over prolonged periods of time in order to evaluate delayed complications, such as stenosis, thrombosis or migration of stents. We present an unusual case of in-stent thrombosis 9 years after basilar artery aneurysm treatment to caution about complications associated with double stent implantation. PMID:25964437

  10. Platelet deposition at angioplasty sites and its relation to restenosis in human iliac and femoropopliteal arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Minar, E.; Ehringer, H.; Ahmadi, R.; Dudczak, R.; Leitha, T.; Koppensteiner, R.; Jung, M.; Stuempflen, A.

    1989-03-01

    The amount and time course of platelet accumulation at angioplasty sites and influence of these platelets on restenosis after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) in peripheral arteries were determined in 92 patients, who received either a high or low dose of aspirin. Platelet deposition was quantitated by means of dual-radiotracer scintigraphy and calculation of a platelet accumulation index (PAI). The PAI was higher (P less than .05) 4-6 hours after PTA compared with that on subsequent days. There was a trend toward greater platelet accumulation in vessels with extensive dissection. Platelet accumulation at the PTA site occurred with both doses of aspirin, with no differences between the two dosage groups. Twenty-one of 67 patients who underwent PTA in the femoropopliteal segment developed restenosis during a median follow-up of 14 months. The median PAI at 4-6 and 22-24 hours after PTA was significantly less in these 21 patients than in the 46 without restenosis. The data suggest that use of antiplatelet agents to prevent platelet deposition after PTA may not be useful for prevention of restenosis.

  11. Evolving Treatments for Arterial and Venous Thrombosis: Role of the Direct Oral Anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Chan, Noel C; Eikelboom, John W; Weitz, Jeffrey I

    2016-04-29

    The direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) represent a major advance in oral anticoagulant therapy and have replaced the vitamin K antagonists as the preferred treatment for many indications. By simplifying long-term anticoagulant therapy and improving its safety, the DOACs have the potential to reduce the global burden of thrombosis. Postmarketing studies suggest that the favorable results achieved with DOACs in the randomized controlled trials can be readily translated into practice, but highlight the need for appropriate patient, drug and dose selection, and careful follow-up. Leveraging on their success to date, ongoing studies are assessing the utility of DOACs for the prevention of thrombosis in patients with embolic stroke of unknown source, heart failure, coronary artery disease, peripheral artery disease, antiphospholipid syndrome, and cancer. The purpose of this article is to (1) review the pharmacology of the DOACs, (2) describe the advantages of the DOACs over vitamin K antagonists, (3) summarize the experience with the DOACs in established indications, (4) highlight current challenges and limitations, (5) highlight potential new indications; and (6) identify future directions for anticoagulant therapy. PMID:27126650

  12. Preventive effect of a novel diosgenin derivative on arterial and venous thrombosis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Huajie; Wei, Zeliang; Xin, Guang; Ji, Chengjie; Wen, Li; Xia, Qing; Niu, Hai; Huang, Wen

    2016-07-15

    Current therapy for blood vessel thrombosis has the risk of leading to gastrointestinal bleeding and thrombocytopenia. We previously reported that a new derivative of diosgenin, compound 5, had significant anti-inflammatory activity superior to that of aspirin, prolonged bleeding time, and inhibited platelet aggregation in vitro. In the present study, we investigated the in vivo efficacy and safety of compound 5 using the ferric chloride (FeCl3)-induced arterial and venous thrombosis models in rats as well as its toxicity in mice. Compared with the control rats, those treated with compound 5 showed significantly less adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation and a prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time mediated by the specific regulation of factor VIII. Furthermore, compound 5 significantly reduced the average length and weight of thrombi in both arteries and veins. These findings were similar to those of aspirin at the same dose. The safety evaluation revealed a much lower risk of bleeding and lesser gastric mucosal damage with compound 5 than with the same dose of aspirin. An oral dose of up to 575.5mg/kg showed no toxicity in mice. In conclusion, consistent with our in vitro findings, compound 5 exhibited an in vivo antithrombotic activity that was comparable to aspirin mainly by reducing platelet aggregation and regulating factor VIII, but with fewer side effects. PMID:27217000

  13. Confluence of the right internal iliac vein into a compressed left common iliac vein.

    PubMed

    Caggiati, Alberto; Amore, Miguel; Sedati, Pietro

    2016-03-01

    The authors describe the abnormal confluence of the right internal iliac vein into a left common iliac vein compressed by the overlying right common iliac artery. The prevalence of this combination of abnormalities, evaluated in cadavers and in living subjects by CT, was 0.9%. The possible obstacle to venous pelvic return by these anomalies is pointed out.

  14. Single-Center Experience and 1-Year Follow-up Results of 'Sandwich Technique' in the Management of Common Iliac Artery Aneurysms During EVAR

    SciTech Connect

    Ricci, Carmelo; Ceccherini, Claudio Cini, Marco; Vigni, Francesco; Leonini, Sara; Tommasino, Giulio; Muzzi, Luigi; Tucci, Enrico; Benvenuti, Antonio; Neri, Eugenio

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) accompanied by common iliac artery (CIA) aneurysms requires a more demanding procedure owing to the difficulties in obtaining an adequate distal landing zone for the stent-graft limb(s), a potential site of endoleak. The 'sandwich technique' is a procedure to increase EVAR feasibility in the setting of adverse or challenging CIA anatomy. Its main advantages include no restrictions in terms of CIA diameter or length or internal iliac artery (IIA) diameter, no need to wait for a specific stent-graft. Our purpose is to describe our single-center experience and one year follow-up results of this new procedure. Materials and Methods: From April 2009 to June 2010, the sandwich technique was performed in our institution in 7 patients treated for AAA and unilateral CIA aneurysms (n. 5) or bilateral CIA aneurysms (n. 2). Inclusion criteria were the presence of unilateral or bilateral CIA aneurysm (independently from its diameter), IIA artery measuring up to 9 mm in its maximum diameter, not dilatation of IIA and EIA. Results: The mean follow-up length was 15 months (range: 14-20 months). All stent-implanted iliac branches remained patent on 1 year follow-up and IIA flow was preserved. None of the patients had symptoms of pelvic ischemia. CT scan follow-up showed aneurysm shrinkage in five patients, without any sign of endoleaks in all cases. Conclusions: In selected cases, the 'sandwich technique' showed good outcomes confirming to be a safe and easy to perform way to overcome anatomical constraints and expanding the limits of EVAR.

  15. Hepatic artery thrombosis after orthotopic liver transplantation: 3 patients with collateral formation and conservative treatment.

    PubMed

    Fouzas, I; Sklavos, A; Bismpa, K; Paxiadakis, I; Antoniadis, N; Giakoustidis, D; Katsiki, E; Tatsou, N; Mouloudi, E; Karapanagiotou, A; Tsitlakidis, A; Karakatsanis, A; Patsiaoura, K; Petridis, A; Gakis, D; Imvrios, G; Papanikolaou, V

    2012-11-01

    Hepatic artery thrombosis (HAT), a serious complication after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT), can lead to patient death in the absence of revascularization or retransplantation. Herein we have presented clinical characteristics, imaging findings, and long-term outcomes of 3 OLT patients with HAT who were treated conservatively and developed hepatic arterial collaterals. These patients underwent transplantation due to hepatitis B cirrhosis, cryptogenic cirrhosis, or hepatitis C infection and alcoholic disease. They presented with bile duct stenosis and/or a bile leak at 1, 3, and 36 months after transplantation, respectively, and were treated with percutaneous drainage and stent placement, endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP), or reanastomosis of the bile duct over a T tube. HAT was confirmed using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) 3-dimensional (3D) angiography and Doppler sonography. They survive in good condition with normal liver function at 30, 50, and 42 months after OLT, respectively. Development of collateral arterial circulation to the liver graft was detected with MDCT 3D angiography and Doppler sonography. From our experience with 3 patients and a literature review, we believe that there are a number of patients who experience long-term survival after the diagnosis of irreversible HAT and the development of collaterals. Although this group is at high risk for sepsis and biliary complications, these are usually self-limiting complications due to improved treatment regimens. The development of collateral arterial flow may also be beneficial.

  16. Thoracic Stent Graft Implantation for Aortic Coarctation with Patent Ductus Arteriosus via Retroperitoneal Iliac Approach in the Presence of Small Sized Femoral Artery

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Ozge; Beton, Osman; Goksel, Sabahattin; Kaya, Hakkı; Berkan, Ocal

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular stent graft implantation is a favorable method for complex aortic coarctation accompanied by patent ductus arteriosus. Herein, an 18-year-old woman with complex aortic coarctation and patent ductus arteriosus was successfully treated by endovascular thoracic stent graft via retroperitoneal approach. The reason for retroperitoneal iliac approach was small sized common femoral arteries which were not suitable for stent graft passage. This case is the first aortic coarctation plus patent ductus arteriosus case described in the literature which is treated by endovascular thoracic stent graft via retroperitoneal approach. PMID:27242935

  17. [Hemolytic thrombectomy and stenting of the superior mesenteric artery in acute mesenteric thrombosis (a clinical case report)].

    PubMed

    Shipovskiĭ, V N; Tsitsiashvili, M Sh; Khuan, Ch; Piliposian, E A

    2010-01-01

    Presented herein is a clinical case report concerning successful rheolytic thrombectomy (using the AngioJet catheter) followed by stenting and having yielded a good angiographic and clinical outcome in a female patient suffering from thrombosis of the superior mesenteric artery.

  18. Endovascular management of porto-mesenteric venous thrombosis developing after trans-arterial occlusion of a superior mesenteric arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Garg, Deepak; Lopera, Jorge Enrique; Goei, Anthony D

    2013-09-01

    Porto-mesenteric venous thrombosis following a trans-arterial occlusion of a superior mesenteric arteriovenous fistula is a rare occurrence. We present a case of endovascular management of one such case treated pharmacomechanically with catheter-directed mesenteric thrombolysis and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt creation without long-term successful outcome.

  19. Antirestenotic Effects of a Novel Polymer-Coated D-24851 Eluting Stent. Experimental Data in a Rabbit Iliac Artery Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lysitsas, Dimitrios N.; Katsouras, Christos S.; Papakostas, John C.; Toumpoulis, Ioannis K.; Angelidis, Charalampos; Bozidis, Petros; Thomas, Christopher G.; Seferiadis, Konstantin; Psychoyios, Nikolaos; Frillingos, Stathis; Pavlidis, Nikolaos; Marinos, Euaggelos; Khaldi, Lubna; Sideris, Dimitris A.; Michalis, Lampros K.

    2007-11-15

    Experimental and clinical data suggest that stents eluting antiproliferative agents can be used for the prevention of in-stent restenosis. Here we investigate in vitro the antiproliferative and apoptotic effect of D-24851 and evaluate the safety and efficacy of D-24851-eluting polymer-coated stents in a rabbit restenosis model (n = 53). Uncoated stents (n = 6), poly (dl-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)-coated stents (n = 7), and PLGA-coated stents loaded with 0.08 {+-} 0.0025 {mu}M (31 {+-} 1 {mu}g; low dose; n = 7), 0.55 {+-} 0.02 {mu}M (216 {+-} 8 {mu}g; high dose; n = 6), and 4.55 {+-} 0.1 {mu}M (1774 {+-} 39 {mu}g; extreme dose; n = 5) of D-24851 were randomly implanted in New Zealand rabbit right iliac arteries and the animals were sacrificed after 28 days for histomorphometric analysis. For the assessment of endothelial regrowth in 90 days, 12 rabbits were subjected to PLGA-coated (n = 3), low-dose (n = 3), high-dose (n = 3), and extreme-dose (n = 3) stent implantation. In vitro studies revealed that D-24851 exerts its growth inhibitory effects via inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis without increasing the expression of heat shock protein-70, a cytoprotective and antiapoptotic protein. Treatment with low-dose D-24851 stents was associated with a significant reduction in neointimal area and percentage stenosis only compared with bare metal stents (38% [P = 0.029] and 35% [P = 0.003] reduction, respectively). Suboptimal healing, however, was observed in all groups of D-24851-loaded stents in 90 days in comparison with PLGA-coated stents. We conclude that low-dose D-24851-eluting polymer-coated stents significantly inhibit neointimal hyperplasia at 28 days through inhibition of proliferation and enhancement of apoptosis. In view of the suboptimal re-endothelialization, longer-term studies are needed in order to establish whether the inhibition of intimal growth is maintained.

  20. Predictors of quality of life in pediatric survivors of arterial ischemic stroke and cerebral sinovenous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Friefeld, Sharon J; Westmacott, Robyn; Macgregor, Daune; Deveber, Gabrielle A

    2011-09-01

    Predictors of quality of life can define potentially modifiable factors to increase favorable outcomes after pediatric stroke. Quality of life was measured using the Centre for Health Promotion's Quality of Life Profile (CHP-QOL) in 112 children surviving arterial ischemic stroke or cerebral sinovenous thrombosis at mean 3 years after stroke. Overall quality of life was poor in 17.8% children despite mean scores (3.52) in the "adequate" range. Quality of life related to school and play was most problematic and that related to physical and home environment was least problematic. Female gender, cerebral sinovenous thrombosis stroke, and older age at testing predicted reduced overall and domain-specific quality of life (P < .05), whereas neurological outcome and family socioeconomic status did not. Cognitive/behavioral deficit and low Verbal IQ adversely affected socialization and quality of life, especially among older children and females. Altered cognition/behavior has a major impact on quality of life after pediatric stroke. Implementation of ameliorative strategies warrants further study.

  1. Effect of the factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban on arterial thrombosis in wild-type and apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Nana-Maria; Dressel, Tobias; Schäfer, Katrin; Konstantinides, Stavros

    2012-11-01

    Rivaroxaban is a potent and specific direct inhibitor of coagulation factor Xa. Recent studies have highlighted its effectiveness in the prevention of venous thrombosis and embolic stroke due to atrial fibrillation. To evaluate the antithrombotic effects of rivaroxaban in an in vivo model of arterial thrombosis, photochemical vascular injury was induced in wild-type mice by intravenous rose bengal (50 mg/kg body weight [BW]) followed by illumination of the left common carotid artery using a 543 nm helium-neon laser beam. Rivaroxaban, injected concomitantly with rose bengal at doses of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, or 3.0 mg/kg BW, dose-dependently prolonged the times to first thrombotic occlusion and stable thrombosis. Quantitative analysis of carotid flow curves revealed higher blood volumes passing through the injured artery with increasing rivaroxaban doses (P<0.01 and P<0.001 vs. vehicle for 2.0 and 3.0 mg/kg , respectively), suggesting a dose-dependent effect on vascular patency. Consistently, a significantly higher proportion of mice that received 2.0 and 3.0 mg/kg rivaroxaban exhibited patent carotid arteries at the end of the flow monitoring period compared to vehicle alone (P<0.05 and P<0.001, respectively). Histological analysis showed complete thrombotic arterial occlusion in vehicle-treated mice compared to less thrombotic material in mice injected with 3.0 mg/kg rivaroxaban (P<0.05). Rivaroxaban also prolonged the time to cessation of tail bleeding in a dose-dependent manner, starting at 1.5 mg/kg. Similar findings were obtained in apolipoprotein E-knockout mice. Rivaroxaban may exert beneficial effects by preventing arterial thrombosis and vascular occlusion after endothelial injury. PMID:22281071

  2. Effect of Blood Shear Forces on Platelet Mediated Thrombosis Inside Arterial Stenosis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maalej, Nabil

    Shear induced activation of platelets plays a major role in the onset of thrombosis in atherosclerotic arteries. Blood hemodynamics and its effect on platelet kinetics has been studied mainly in in vitro and in ex vivo experiments. We designed new in vivo methods to study blood hemodynamic effects on platelet kinetics in canine stenosed carotid arteries. A carotid artery-jugular vein anastomotic shunt was produced. Intimal damage and controlled variations in the degree of stenosis were produced on the artery. An inflatable cuff was placed around the jugular vein to control vascular resistance. An electromagnetic flowmeter was used to measure blood flow. Doppler ultrasound crystals were used to measure the velocity profiles inside and distal to the stenosis. Stenosis geometry was obtained using digital subtraction angiography and quantitative arteriography. Using these measurements we calculated the wall shear stress using the finite difference solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. To study platelet kinetics, autologous platelets were labeled with Indium Oxine and injected IV. A collimated Nal gamma counter was placed over the stenosis to detect radio-labeled platelet accumulation as platelet mediated thrombi formed in the stenosis. The radioactive count rate increased in an inverse parallel fashion to the decline in flow rate during thrombus formation. The platelet accumulation increased with the increase of percent stenosis and was maximal at the narrow portion of the stenosis. Acute thrombus formation leading to arterial occlusion was only observed for stenosis higher than 70 +/- 5%. Platelet accumulation rate was not significant until the pressure gradient across the stenosis exceeded 40 +/- 10 mmHg. Totally occlusive thrombus formation was only observed for shear stresses greater than a critical value of 100 +/- 10 Pa. Beyond this critical value acute platelet thrombus formation increased exponentially with shear. Increased shear stresses were found to

  3. Fiberoptic observation of thrombosis and thrombolysis in isolated human coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Y; Masuo, M; Tomaru, T; Kato, A; Sugimoto, T

    1986-10-01

    Coronary arteries isolated from cadavers autopsied within 7 hours after death were perfused with canine arterial blood, and the processes of thrombus formation at the segments stenosed with atheroma and the thrombolytic effects of urokinase were investigated by angioscopy. Ten minutes of blood perfusion caused thin mural thrombi localized at the stenotic or nonstenotic segments. During 30 minutes of blood perfusion, the thin mural thrombi of the outlet or inlet of the segment grew into a doughnut-shaped thrombus. Also, the thin mural thrombi in the stenotic segment grew into a streamer-like thrombus and drifted downstream. These thrombi grew in size with increasing perfusion time and finally obstructed the stenotic segment. Globular thrombi close to the outlet also were formed in a few preparations. Unlike the thrombi at the stenotic segment, the mural thrombi in the nonstenotic segments did not grow into massive thrombi. The thrombi were reduced in size within 10 minutes of perfusion with 320 U/ml or more of urokinase. During thrombolysis, sandstorm-like dispersion of the blood cells occurred, small fragments detached from the mother thrombus and flew downstream, or the fibrin core of the thrombus was exposed. The results indicate the usefulness of angioscopy for the dynamic and serial investigation of thrombosis and thrombolysis. PMID:3766368

  4. Numerical simulations of post-surgical flow and thrombosis in basilar artery aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshadhri, Santhosh; Lawton, Michael; Boussel, Loic; Saloner, David; Rayz, Vitaliy

    2015-11-01

    Surgical treatment of basilar artery aneurysms presents a major challenge since it is crucial to preserve the flow to the vital brainstem perforators branching of the basilar artery. In some cases, basilar aneurysms can be treated by clipping vessels in order to induce flow reduction and aneurysm thrombosis. Patient-specific CFD models can provide guidance to clinicians by simulating postoperative flows resulting from alternative surgeries. Several surgical options were evaluated for four basilar aneurysm patients. Patient-specific models were generated from preoperative MR angiography and MR velocimetry data and modified to simulate different procedures. The Navier-Stokes equations were solved with a finite-volume solver Fluent. Virtual contrast injections were simulated by solving the advection-diffusion equation in order to estimate the flow residence time and determine thrombus-prone regions. The results indicated on procedures that reduce intra-aneurysmal velocities and flow regions which are likely to become thrombosed. Thus CFD modeling can help improve the outcome of surgeries altering the flow in basilar aneurysms.

  5. Considerations and Protocols in Virtual Surgical Planning of Reconstructive Surgery for More Accurate and Esthetic Neomandible with Deep Circumflex Iliac Artery Free Flap

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam-Kyoo; Kim, Hyun Young; Kim, Hyung Jun; Cha, In-Ho; Nam, Woong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The reconstruction of mandibular defects poses many difficulties due to the unique, complex shape of the mandible and the temporomandibular joints. With development of microvascular anastomosis, free tissue transplantation techniques, such as deep circumflex iliac artery (DCIA) flap and fibular free flap (FFF), were developed. The DCIA offers good quality and quantity of bone tissue for mandibular segmental defect and implant for dental rehabilitation. Virtual surgical planning (VSP) and stereolithography-guided osteotomy are currently successfully applied in three-dimensional mandibular reconstruction, but most use FFF. There are only a few articles on reconstruction with the DCIA that assess the postoperative results. Methods: Three patients admitted during a five month period (April of 2013 to August of 2013) underwent resection of mandible and DCIA musculo-osseous reconstruction using a VSP and stereolithographic modeling and assessment of outcomes included technical accuracy, esthetic contour, and functional outcomes. Results: This technique yielded iliac bone segment with excellent apposition and duplication of the preoperative plan. Flap survival was 100 percent and all patients maintained preoperative occlusion and contour. Conclusion: Based on our experience, we offer considerations and logically consistent protocols by classification of mandibular defects, and demonstrate the benefits in VSP and stereolithographic modeling of mandibular reconstructive surgery with DCIA flap. PMID:27489828

  6. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided Embolization of Growing Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm after Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: A Transretroperitoneal Approach with Intramuscular Lidocaine Injection Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Joon Young Kim, Shin Jung Kim, Hyoung Ook; Kim, Yong Tae; Lim, Nam Yeol Kim, Jae Kyu; Chung, Sang Young Choi, Soo Jin Na Lee, Ho Kyun

    2015-02-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of CT-guided embolization of internal iliac artery aneurysm (IIAA) after repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm by transretroperitoneal approach using the lidocaine injection technique to iliacus muscle, making window for safe needle path for three patients for whom CT-guided embolization of IIAA was performed by transretroperitoneal approach with intramuscular lidocaine injection technique. Transretroperitoneal access to the IIAA was successful in all three patients. In all three patients, the IIAA was first embolized using microcoils. The aneurysmal sac was then embolized with glue and coils without complication. With a mean follow-up of 7 months, the volume of the IIAAs remained stable without residual endoleaks. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided embolization of IIAA using intramuscular lidocaine injection technique is effective, safe, and results in good outcome.

  7. Carotid artery thrombosis, encephalitis, myelitis and optic neuritis associated with rubella virus infections.

    PubMed

    Connolly, J H; Hutchinson, W M; Allen, I V; Lyttle, J A; Swallow, M W; Dermott, E; Thomsom, D

    1975-12-01

    The clinical, virological and pathological findings in 5 patients with neurological complications associated with rubella virus infection are described. The neurological illnesses began four to ten days after the rubella illnesses. The patients were all males aged between 6 and 17 years and were diagnosed during one non-epidemic year in a population of 1-5 million people. All the patients had rubella specific IgM in their sera. Two patients had no rash. In one of the patients who died, left internal carotid artery thrombosis and cerebral infarction were found at post-mortem. Rubella virus antigen and particles resembling rubella virus were found in the brain together with IgG and IgM in the same areas. This patient also had extensive liver necrosis. The other patient had a severe meningomyelitis and radiculitis and he recovered completely after two years. His serum rubella antibody rose significantly and was shown to leak into CSF during the acute stage of his illness. Three patients had a rash. Two of these patients had encephalitis: one recovered completely and the other had residual disability. The third patient had bilateral optic neuritis from which he recovered completely. Rubella specific IgM was, however, present in his serum for the abnormally long time of twenty-eight weeks indicating possible persistence of rubella virus. PMID:1218369

  8. Liver Transplantation for Acute Intermittent Porphyria is Complicated by a High Rate of Hepatic Artery Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Dowman, Joanna K; Gunson, Bridget K; Mirza, Darius F; Bramhall, Simon R; Badminton, Mike N; Newsome, Philip N

    2012-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an autosomal-dominant condition resulting from a partial deficiency of the ubiquitously expressed enzyme porphobilinogen deaminase. Although its clinical expression is highly variable, a minority of patients suffer recurrent life-threatening neurovisceral attacks despite optimal medical therapy. Because the liver is the major source of excess precursor production, liver transplantation (LT) represents a potentially effective treatment for severely affected patients. Using data from the UK Transplant Registry, we analyzed all transplants performed for AIP in the United Kingdom and Ireland. Between 2002 and 2010, 10 patients underwent LT for AIP. In all cases, the indication for transplantation was recurrent, biochemically proven, medically nonresponsive acute attacks of porphyria resulting in significantly impaired quality of life. Five patients had developed significant neurological morbidities such as paraplegia before transplantation. The median follow-up time was 23.4 months, and there were 2 deaths from multiorgan failure at 98 days and 26 months. Eight recipients were alive for 3.2 to 109 months after transplantation. Complete biochemical and symptomatic resolution was observed in all patients after transplantation. However, there was a high rate of hepatic artery thrombosis (HAT; 4/10), with 1 patient requiring regrafting. The effects of previous neuronal damage such as joint contractures were not improved by transplantation. Thus, impaired quality of life in the surviving patients was usually a result of preoperative complications. Refractory AIP is an excellent indication for LT, and long-term outcomes for carefully selected patients are good. There is, however, an increased incidence of HAT in these patients, and we recommend routine antiplatelet therapy after transplantation. Liver Transpl 18:195–200, 2012. © 2011 AASLD. PMID:21618697

  9. Synthetic gestagens exert differential effects on arterial thrombosis and aortic gene expression in ovariectomized apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Freudenberger, T; Deenen, R; Kretschmer, I; Zimmermann, A; Seiler, L F; Mayer, P; Heim, H-K; Köhrer, K; Fischer, J W

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Combined hormone replacement therapy with oestrogens plus the synthetic progestin medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) is associated with an increased risk of thrombosis. However, the mechanisms of this pro-thrombotic effect are largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to: (i) compare the pro-thrombotic effect of MPA with another synthetic progestin, norethisterone acetate (NET-A), (ii) determine if MPA's pro-thrombotic effect can be antagonized by the progesterone and glucocorticoid receptor antagonist mifepristone and (iii) elucidate underlying mechanisms by comparing aortic gene expression after chronic MPA with that after NET-A treatment. Experimental Approach Female apolipoprotein E-deficient mice were ovariectomized and treated with placebo, MPA, a combination of MPA + mifepristone or NET-A for 90 days on a Western-type diet. Arterial thrombosis was measured in vivo in a photothrombosis model. Aortic gene expression was analysed using microarrays; GeneOntology and KEGG pathway analyses were conducted. Key Results MPA's pro-thrombotic effects were prevented by mifepristone, while NET-A did not affect arterial thrombosis. Aortic gene expression analysis showed, for the first time, that gestagens induce similar effects on a set of genes potentially promoting thrombosis. However, in NET-A-treated mice other genes with potentially anti-thrombotic effects were also affected, which might counterbalance the effects of the pro-thrombotic genes. Conclusions and Implications The pro-thrombotic effects of synthetic progestins appear to be compound-specific, rather than representing a class effect of gestagens. Furthermore, the different thrombotic responses elicited by MPA and NET-A might be attributed to a more balanced, ‘homeostatic’ gene expression induced in NET-A- as compared with MPA-treated mice. PMID:24923668

  10. Novel Use of an Iliac Branch Device in the Treatment of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Shiraev, Timothy P; Dubenec, Steven

    2016-07-01

    Iliac branch devices (IBDs) are commonly used to treat iliac artery aneurysms and maintain patency of the internal iliac artery or its branches. This case report illustrates another possible application for an IBD. We present the case of a 77-year-old male who underwent repair of his infrarenal aneurysm with an IBD as a bifurcated aortic stent-graft in a small diameter aorta to maintain bilateral common iliac artery patency. PMID:27174353

  11. May-Thurner syndrome and other obstructive iliac vein lesions: meaning, myth, and mystery.

    PubMed

    Birn, Jeffrey; Vedantham, Suresh

    2015-02-01

    Acute and chronic venous disorders of the lower extremities affect millions of people and cause substantial disability. Long ago, surgeons and pathologists identified the presence of 'spur-like' abnormalities of the left common iliac vein; these abnormalities were hypothesized to result from compression and/or irritation from the adjacent crossing right common iliac artery. In the 1990s, physicians, starting to perform catheter-directed thrombolysis to treat extensive deep vein thrombosis (DVT), observed that about 50% of patients had an iliac vein stenosis. Vascular physicians have become aware of the occasional patient with otherwise-unexplained extremity swelling and/or pain but without a DVT history who is subsequently found to have an iliac vein abnormality. These 'lesions' have been hypothesized to elevate ambulatory venous pressures and thereby produce lower-extremity symptoms, increase the risk of initial and recurrent DVT episodes, and increase the risk of treatment failure with medical and endovascular therapies for thrombotic and non-thrombotic venous conditions. As a result, many practitioners now actively seek iliac venous obstructive 'lesions' when evaluating patients with known or suspected venous disease. However, for many patients, it continues to be unclear what degree of obstruction to venous blood flow is being caused by such lesions, how clinically significant they are, how much emphasis should be placed on identifying them, and when they should be treated. This article seeks to improve the knowledge base of vascular practitioners who make clinical decisions about the diagnosis and treatment of obstructive iliac vein lesions. PMID:25502563

  12. Vascular type Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome with fatal spontaneous rupture of a right common iliac artery dissection: case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Abayazeed, Aly; Hayman, Emily; Moghadamfalahi, Mana; Cain, Darren

    2014-01-01

    Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (previously Ehlers-Danlos IV) is a rare autosomal dominant collagen vascular disorder caused by a 2q31 COL3A1 gene mutation encoding pro-alpha1 chain of type III collagen (in contrast to classic Ehlers-Danlos, caused by a COL5A1 mutation). The vascular type accounts for less than 4% of all Ehlers-Danlos cases and usually has a poor prognosis due to life threatening vascular ruptures and difficult, frequently unsuccessful surgical and vascular interventions. In 70% of cases, vascular rupture or dissection, gastrointestinal perforation, or organ rupture is a presenting sign. We present a case of genetically proven vascular Ehlers-Danlos with fatal recurrent retroperitoneal hemorrhages secondary to a ruptured right common iliac artery dissection in a 30-year-old male. This case highlights the need to suspect collagen vascular disorders when a young adult presents with unexplained retroperitoneal hemorrhage, even without family history of such diseases. PMID:24967021

  13. Vascular type Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome with fatal spontaneous rupture of a right common iliac artery dissection: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Abayazeed, Aly; Hayman, Emily; Moghadamfalahi, Mana; Cain, Darren

    2014-02-01

    Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (previously Ehlers-Danlos IV) is a rare autosomal dominant collagen vascular disorder caused by a 2q31 COL3A1 gene mutation encoding pro-alpha1 chain of type III collagen (in contrast to classic Ehlers-Danlos, caused by a COL5A1 mutation). The vascular type accounts for less than 4% of all Ehlers-Danlos cases and usually has a poor prognosis due to life threatening vascular ruptures and difficult, frequently unsuccessful surgical and vascular interventions. In 70% of cases, vascular rupture or dissection, gastrointestinal perforation, or organ rupture is a presenting sign. We present a case of genetically proven vascular Ehlers-Danlos with fatal recurrent retroperitoneal hemorrhages secondary to a ruptured right common iliac artery dissection in a 30-year-old male. This case highlights the need to suspect collagen vascular disorders when a young adult presents with unexplained retroperitoneal hemorrhage, even without family history of such diseases.

  14. Vascular type Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome with fatal spontaneous rupture of a right common iliac artery dissection: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Abayazeed, Aly; Hayman, Emily; Moghadamfalahi, Mana; Cain, Darren

    2014-02-01

    Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (previously Ehlers-Danlos IV) is a rare autosomal dominant collagen vascular disorder caused by a 2q31 COL3A1 gene mutation encoding pro-alpha1 chain of type III collagen (in contrast to classic Ehlers-Danlos, caused by a COL5A1 mutation). The vascular type accounts for less than 4% of all Ehlers-Danlos cases and usually has a poor prognosis due to life threatening vascular ruptures and difficult, frequently unsuccessful surgical and vascular interventions. In 70% of cases, vascular rupture or dissection, gastrointestinal perforation, or organ rupture is a presenting sign. We present a case of genetically proven vascular Ehlers-Danlos with fatal recurrent retroperitoneal hemorrhages secondary to a ruptured right common iliac artery dissection in a 30-year-old male. This case highlights the need to suspect collagen vascular disorders when a young adult presents with unexplained retroperitoneal hemorrhage, even without family history of such diseases. PMID:24967021

  15. Activated Platelets in Carotid Artery Thrombosis in Mice Can Be Selectively Targeted with a Radiolabeled Single-Chain Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmidt, Jürgen; Pethe, Annette; Hagemeyer, Christoph E.; Neudorfer, Irene; Zirlik, Andreas; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Bode, Christoph; Meyer, Philipp T.

    2011-01-01

    Background Activated platelets can be found on the surface of inflamed, rupture-prone and ruptured plaques as well as in intravascular thrombosis. They are key players in thrombosis and atherosclerosis. In this study we describe the construction of a radiolabeled single-chain antibody targeting the LIBS-epitope of activated platelets to selectively depict platelet activation and wall-adherent non-occlusive thrombosis in a mouse model with nuclear imaging using in vitro and ex vivo autoradiography as well as small animal SPECT-CT for in vivo analysis. Methodology/Principal Findings LIBS as well as an unspecific control single-chain antibody were labeled with 111Indium (111In) via bifunctional DTPA ( = 111In-LIBS/111In-control). Autoradiography after incubation with 111In-LIBS on activated platelets in vitro (mean 3866±28 DLU/mm2, 4010±630 DLU/mm2 and 4520±293 DLU/mm2) produced a significantly higher ligand uptake compared to 111In-control (2101±76 DLU/mm2, 1181±96 DLU/mm2 and 1866±246 DLU/mm2) indicating a specific binding to activated platelets; P<0.05. Applying these findings to an ex vivo mouse model of carotid artery thrombosis revealed a significant increase in ligand uptake after injection of 111In-LIBS in the presence of small thrombi compared to the non-injured side, as confirmed by histology (49630±10650 DLU/mm2 vs. 17390±7470 DLU/mm2; P<0.05). These findings could also be reproduced in vivo. SPECT-CT analysis of the injured carotid artery with 111In-LIBS resulted in a significant increase of the target-to-background ratio compared to 111In-control (1.99±0.36 vs. 1.1±0.24; P<0.01). Conclusions/Significance Nuclear imaging with 111In-LIBS allows the detection of platelet activation in vitro and ex vivo with high sensitivity. Using SPECT-CT, wall-adherent activated platelets in carotid arteries could be depicted in vivo. These results encourage further studies elucidating the role of activated platelets in plaque pathology and atherosclerosis

  16. Function of von Willebrand factor after crossed bone marrow transplantation between normal and von Willebrand disease pigs: effect on arterial thrombosis in chimeras.

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, T C; Samama, C M; Bellinger, D A; Roussi, J; Reddick, R L; Bonneau, M; Read, M S; Bailliart, O; Koch, G G; Vaiman, M

    1995-01-01

    von Willebrand factor (vWF) is essential for the induction of occlusive thrombosis in stenosed and injured pig arteries and for normal hemostasis. To separate the relative contribution of plasma and platelet vWF to arterial thrombosis, we produced chimeric normal and von Willebrand disease pigs by crossed bone marrow transplantation; von Willebrand disease (vWD) pigs were engrafted with normal pig bone marrow and normal pigs were engrafted with vWD bone marrow. Thrombosis developed in the chimeric normal pigs that showed normal levels of plasma vWF and an absence of platelet vWF; but no thrombosis occurred in the chimeric vWD pigs that demonstrated normal platelet vWF and an absence of plasma vWF. The ear bleeding times of the chimeric pigs were partially corrected by endogenous plasma vWF but not by platelet vWF. Our animal model demonstrated that vWF in the plasma compartment is essential for the development of arterial thrombosis and that it also contributes to the maintenance of bleeding time and hemostasis. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7708664

  17. Late diagnosis of Takayasu's arteritis with repeated attacks of heart failure and uncontrolled hypertension due to abdominal aortic thrombosis: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Lai, Baochun; Wu, Xiaoying; Han, Tao; Chen, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Takayasu's arteritis (TA) is a chronic, idiopathic, inflammatory disease affecting the aorta and its branches. To date, only one case involving abdominal aortic thrombosis due to TA has been reported. After bilateral artificial subclavian-iliac bypass, a case of abdominal aortic thrombosis due to TA received a delayed diagnosis in a 44-year-old Chinese male who experienced recurrent episodes of heart failure and uncontrolled hypertension with claudication of two extremities. Abdominal color Doppler sonography and computed tomography aortography (CTA) showed occlusion of the abdominal aorta and bilateral renal artery stenosis. After vascular bypass and during 1 year follow-up, his cardiac function improved and blood pressure was well controlled, with reduced serum creatinine. Postoperative CTA still showed abdominal aortic thrombosis resulting in arterial occlusion extending from the left renal artery initial segment level to the bilateral common iliac artery and the bifurcation of the renal artery, except for the vascular bypass. Abdominal aortic thrombosis due to TA is very rare and potentially life threatening, probably becoming an atherosclerosis risk factor. Doppler sonography and CTA results are important for diagnosis. Artificial vascular bypass can be used for TA in debilitated patients with diffuse aortic disease.

  18. Iliac vein compression syndrome: Clinical, imaging and pathologic findings

    PubMed Central

    Brinegar, Katelyn N; Sheth, Rahul A; Khademhosseini, Ali; Bautista, Jemianne; Oklu, Rahmi

    2015-01-01

    May-Thurner syndrome (MTS) is the pathologic compression of the left common iliac vein by the right common iliac artery, resulting in left lower extremity pain, swelling, and deep venous thrombosis. Though this syndrome was first described in 1851, there are currently no standardized criteria to establish the diagnosis of MTS. Since MTS is treated by a wide array of specialties, including interventional radiology, vascular surgery, cardiology, and vascular medicine, the need for an established diagnostic criterion is imperative in order to reduce misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment. Although MTS has historically been diagnosed by the presence of pathologic features, the use of dynamic imaging techniques has led to a more radiologic based diagnosis. Thus, imaging plays an integral part in screening patients for MTS, and the utility of a wide array of imaging modalities has been evaluated. Here, we summarize the historical aspects of the clinical features of this syndrome. We then provide a comprehensive assessment of the literature on the efficacy of imaging tools available to diagnose MTS. Lastly, we provide clinical pearls and recommendations to aid physicians in diagnosing the syndrome through the use of provocative measures. PMID:26644823

  19. Simultaneous occlusion of left anterior descending and left circumflex arteries by very late stent thrombosis: vascular response to drug-eluting stents assessed by intravascular ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Yamawaki, Masahiro; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Nakano, Masatsugu; Muramatsu, Takashi; Nakatani, Shimpei; Ishibashi, Yuki; Ishimori, Hiroshi; Hirano, Keisuke; Ito, Yoshiaki; Tsukahara, Reiko; Muramatsu, Toshiya

    2015-11-01

    Very late stent thrombosis (VLST) is a catastrophic complication after implantation of a drug-eluting stent (DES). It has been reported that VLST is associated with pathological changes, which often include late acquired incomplete stent apposition (LAISA) with thrombus formation. In addition, the vascular response to the stent (evaginations, neointimal growth, and thrombosis) and the incidence of LAISA are reported to vary among the different types of DES. We experienced a patient with cardiogenic shock induced by simultaneous VLST of both the left anterior descending artery (LAD) and the left circumflex artery (LCX) at 3 years after implantation of two sirolimus-eluting stents. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) showed LAISA of both arteries. A paclitaxel-eluting stent, which had been implanted in the right coronary artery 3 years earlier, did not show such a finding. IVUS revealed "different vascular reactions" to "different types of DES" in this patient.

  20. Assessing the Anatomical Variability of Deep Circumflex Iliac Vessels in Harvesting of Iliac Crest-Free Flap for Mandibular Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kheradmand, Ali A; Garajei, Ata; Kiafar, Mahyar; Nikparto, Nariman

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the authors' aims were to measure the length and location of branching of the pedicle from iliac artery, to describe the anatomical variability of iliac crest free flap with deep circumflex iliac (DCI) artery pedicle. Fourteen patients with ameloblastoma, osteosarcoma, and squamous cell carcinoma underwent mandibular resection and iliac crest-free flap reconstruction in one-step surgery. During surgery and before harvesting the deep circumflex iliac artery vascular pedicle, the location, origin, and the branching pattern of the pedicles were studied. Then, the pedicle length was measured and the data was analyzed using χ and independent samples t test. In all patients, the DCI vascular pedicles were separated with a common trunk from the external iliac artery and vein and the DCI arteries were posterior and lateral to the veins. Also after branching from the external iliac artery, all vascular DCI pedicles traveled upward and medially along the Iliacus muscle and the iliac fascia. The mean pedicle length was 21.78 mm for men and 19 mm for women. No statistically significant relationship was observed between the patient's age and the vascular pedicle length or number of branches. There are great variations in the anatomy of this vascular pedicle. According to the finding of this study, the length of the vascular pedicle is 2.78 mm higher in men which might help to increase the feasibility and success rate of this operation. No significant correlation was found between other variables. PMID:27100644

  1. Gene Therapy to Promote Thromboresistance: Local Overexpression of Tissue Plasminogen Activator to Prevent Arterial Thrombosis in an in vivo Rabbit Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waugh, J. M.; Kattash, M.; Li, J.; Yuksel, E.; Kuo, M. D.; Lussier, M.; Weinfeld, A. B.; Saxena, R.; Rabinovsky, E. D.; Thung, S.; Woo, S. L. C.; Shenaq, S. M.

    1999-02-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) catalyzes the rate-limiting initial step in the fibrinolytic cascade. Systemic infusion of tPA has become the standard of care for acute myocardial infarction. However, even the relatively short-duration protocols currently employed have encountered significant hemorrhagic complications, as well as complications from rebound thrombosis. Gene therapy offers a method of local high-level tPA expression over a prolonged time period to avoid both systemic hemorrhage and local rebound thrombosis. To examine the impact of local tPA overexpression, an adenoviral vector expressing tPA was created. The construct was characterized functionally in vitro, and the function of the vector was confirmed in vivo by delivery to the rabbit common femoral artery. Systemic coagulation parameters were not perturbed at any of the doses examined. The impact of local overexpression of tPA on in vivo thrombus formation was examined subsequently in a stasis/injury model of arterial thrombosis. The construct effectively prevented arterial thrombosis in treated animals, whereas viral and nonviral controls typically developed occluding thrombi. This construct thus offers a viable technique for promoting a locally thromboresistant small-caliber artery.

  2. Quadruple-component superficial circumflex iliac artery perforator (SCIP) flap: A chimeric SCIP flap for complex ankle reconstruction of an exposed artificial joint after total ankle arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takumi; Saito, Takafumi; Ishiura, Ryohei; Iida, Takuya

    2016-09-01

    Total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) is becoming popular in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-associated ankle joint degeneration. However, ankle wound complications can occur after TAA, which sometimes requires challenging reconstruction due to anatomical complexity of the ankle. Superficial circumflex iliac artery (SCIA) perforator (SCIP) flap has been reported to be useful for various reconstructions, but no case has been reported regarding a chimeric SCIP flap for complex ankle reconstruction. We report a case of complex ankle defect successfully reconstructed with a free quadruple-component chimeric SCIP flap. A 73-year-old female patient with RA underwent TAA, and suffered from an extensive ankle soft tissue defect (13 × 5 cm) with exposure of the implanted artificial joint and the extensor tendons. A chimeric SCIP flap was raised based on the deep branch and the superficial branch of the SCIA, which included chimeric portions of the sartorius muscle, the deep fascia, the inguinal lymph node (ILN), and the skin/fat. The flap was transferred to the recipient ankle. The sartorius muscle was used to cover the artificial joint, the deep fascia to reconstruct the extensor retinaculum, the ILN to prevent postoperative lymphedema, and the adiposal tissue to put around the extensor tendons for prevention of postoperative adhesion. Postoperatively, the patient could walk by herself without persistent leg edema or bowstringing of the extensor tendons, and was satisfied with the concealable donor scar. Although further studies are required to confirm efficacy, multicomponent chimeric SCIP has a potential to be a useful option for complex defects of the ankle. PMID:27423250

  3. Quadruple-component superficial circumflex iliac artery perforator (SCIP) flap: A chimeric SCIP flap for complex ankle reconstruction of an exposed artificial joint after total ankle arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takumi; Saito, Takafumi; Ishiura, Ryohei; Iida, Takuya

    2016-09-01

    Total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) is becoming popular in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-associated ankle joint degeneration. However, ankle wound complications can occur after TAA, which sometimes requires challenging reconstruction due to anatomical complexity of the ankle. Superficial circumflex iliac artery (SCIA) perforator (SCIP) flap has been reported to be useful for various reconstructions, but no case has been reported regarding a chimeric SCIP flap for complex ankle reconstruction. We report a case of complex ankle defect successfully reconstructed with a free quadruple-component chimeric SCIP flap. A 73-year-old female patient with RA underwent TAA, and suffered from an extensive ankle soft tissue defect (13 × 5 cm) with exposure of the implanted artificial joint and the extensor tendons. A chimeric SCIP flap was raised based on the deep branch and the superficial branch of the SCIA, which included chimeric portions of the sartorius muscle, the deep fascia, the inguinal lymph node (ILN), and the skin/fat. The flap was transferred to the recipient ankle. The sartorius muscle was used to cover the artificial joint, the deep fascia to reconstruct the extensor retinaculum, the ILN to prevent postoperative lymphedema, and the adiposal tissue to put around the extensor tendons for prevention of postoperative adhesion. Postoperatively, the patient could walk by herself without persistent leg edema or bowstringing of the extensor tendons, and was satisfied with the concealable donor scar. Although further studies are required to confirm efficacy, multicomponent chimeric SCIP has a potential to be a useful option for complex defects of the ankle.

  4. Inhibitory effects of total flavones of Hippophae Rhamnoides L on thrombosis in mouse femoral artery and in vitro platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jiayi; Kondo, Kazunao; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Ikeda, Yasuhiko; Meng, Xiansheng; Umemura, Kazuo

    2003-04-01

    Total flavones of Hippophae Rhamnoides L (TFH) are extracted from Sea buckthorn, a Chinese herbal medicine. Sea buckthorn has antioxidant, anti-ulcerogenic and hepato-protective actions, and its berry oil is reported to suppress platelet aggregation. Though it is frequently used for patients with thrombosis, the likely mechanism(s) and effects of TFH on thrombogenesis remain unclear. Thus, we have investigated the effect in-vivo of TFH on thrombogenesis and in vitro on platelet aggregation, comparing them to those of aspirin. We measured thrombotic occlusion time in a mouse femoral artery thrombosis model by the photochemical reaction between intravenously injected rose bengal and green light irradiation. In vitro platelet aggregation in whole blood was measured by single platelet counting. Thrombotic occlusion time was 8.5 +/- 0.6 min in the control group. TFH at a dose of 300 micro g/kg, intravenously administered 15 min before the rose bengal injection, significantly prolonged it to 11.6 +/- 1.0 min (P < 0.05), a similar effect on in-vivo thrombogenesis to that of aspirin. TFH at a concentration of 3.0 micro g/ml significantly (P < 0.01) inhibited in vitro platelet aggregation induced by collagen (2 micro g/ml) in a concentration dependent manner, in contrast TFH did not affect aggregation induced by arachidonic acid (80 micro M) and ADP (0.3 micro M). The results of the present study, in which TFH prevented in-vivo thrombogenesis, probably due to inhibition of platelet aggregation, suggest a possible clinical approach for the prevention of thrombosis. PMID:12628446

  5. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    Acute renal arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... main artery to the kidney is called the renal artery. Reduced blood flow through the renal artery ...

  6. A rat model of thrombosis in common carotid artery induced by implantable wireless light-emitting diode device.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Jih-Chao; Huang, Kuo-Lun; Hsiao, Yung-Chin; Hsu, Yu-Han; Lin, Yun-Han; Lou, Shyh-Liang; Lee, Tsong-Hai

    2014-01-01

    This work has developed a novel approach to form common carotid artery (CCA) thrombus in rats with a wireless implantable light-emitting diode (LED) device. The device mainly consists of an external controller and an internal LED assembly. The controller was responsible for wirelessly transmitting electrical power. The internal LED assembly served as an implant to receive the power and irradiate light on CCA. The thrombus formation was identified with animal sonography, 7 T magnetic resonance imaging, and histopathologic examination. The present study showed that a LED assembly implanted on the outer surface of CCA could induce acute occlusion with single irradiation with 6 mW/cm(2) LED for 4 h. If intermittent irradiation with 4.3-4.5 mW/cm(2) LED for 2 h was shut off for 30 min, then irradiation for another 2 h was applied; the thrombus was observed to grow gradually and was totally occluded at 7 days. Compared with the contralateral CCA without LED irradiation, the arterial endothelium in the LED-irradiated artery was discontinued. Our study has shown that, by adjusting the duration of irradiation and the power intensity of LED, it is possible to produce acute occlusion and progressive thrombosis, which can be used as an animal model for antithrombotic drug development.

  7. A Rat Model of Thrombosis in Common Carotid Artery Induced by Implantable Wireless Light-Emitting Diode Device

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kuo-Lun; Hsiao, Yung-Chin; Lin, Yun-Han; Lou, Shyh-Liang; Lee, Tsong-Hai

    2014-01-01

    This work has developed a novel approach to form common carotid artery (CCA) thrombus in rats with a wireless implantable light-emitting diode (LED) device. The device mainly consists of an external controller and an internal LED assembly. The controller was responsible for wirelessly transmitting electrical power. The internal LED assembly served as an implant to receive the power and irradiate light on CCA. The thrombus formation was identified with animal sonography, 7T magnetic resonance imaging, and histopathologic examination. The present study showed that a LED assembly implanted on the outer surface of CCA could induce acute occlusion with single irradiation with 6 mW/cm2 LED for 4 h. If intermittent irradiation with 4.3–4.5 mW/cm2 LED for 2 h was shut off for 30 min, then irradiation for another 2 h was applied; the thrombus was observed to grow gradually and was totally occluded at 7 days. Compared with the contralateral CCA without LED irradiation, the arterial endothelium in the LED-irradiated artery was discontinued. Our study has shown that, by adjusting the duration of irradiation and the power intensity of LED, it is possible to produce acute occlusion and progressive thrombosis, which can be used as an animal model for antithrombotic drug development. PMID:25045695

  8. Simultaneous thrombosis of the mesenteric artery and vein as a novel clinical manifestation of intravascular large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Arima, Hiroshi; Inoue, Daichi; Tabata, Sumie; Matsushita, Akiko; Imai, Yukihiro; Ishikawa, Takayuki; Takahashi, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    A 79-year-old man with a 2-month history of fever and weight loss was admitted to our hospital because of an acute abdomen. Abdominal CT scans showed marked sectional thickening and edema of the small intestine. On laparotomy, a 16-cm section of the small intestine was ischemic and necrotic; therefore, segmentectomy of the intestine was performed. A thrombus was noted at the stump of the mesenteric artery branch. Histopathological analysis of the resected intestine revealed fibrin thrombi in both mesenteric arteries and veins. Furthermore, a cluster of large, abnormal lymphoid cells bordering the intima of most branches of the mesenteric veins and small vessels was observed. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that these abnormal cells were positive for CD20, leading to a diagnosis of intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL). The patient was successfully treated with standard R-CHOP chemotherapy; however, the lymphoma recurred in the central nervous system 18 months after the initial diagnosis, and the patient died. Simultaneous thrombosis of the mesenteric artery and vein is unusual as a clinical manifestation of IVLBCL. However, IVLBCL should be taken into consideration when ischemic disorders of unknown cause, accompanied by fever of unknown origin, are encountered.

  9. Spontaneous thrombosis in giant aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery complex in pediatric age: five-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Vítor M; Cristino, N; Cunha E Sá, M

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are rare in the pediatric population, especially in infancy, representing less than 1% of all aneurysms. In this age group, they are more frequent at the carotid bifurcation and in the posterior circulation, with a greater number of giant aneurysms and spontaneous aneurysm thrombosis when compared with the adults. They are life-threatening, and, therefore, early investigation, characterization of the lesion, and treatment are essential. The appropriate management depends on the child's condition, aneurysm characteristics, and the experience of a multidisciplinary team. Noninvasive and radiation-free imagiological studies play an important role in the diagnosis and follow-up of these young patients. We present the case of a 3-month-old boy with an intracranial hemorrhage secondary to the rupture of a giant aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery complex, with spontaneous thrombosis, which is a rare situation due to its location. A conservative approach was assumed and noninvasive evolutive imagiological studies revealed a reduction in the thrombosed aneurysm size and no signs of recanalization. The child recovered to his baseline neurological condition and has had no rehemorrhage until 5 years of follow-up.

  10. Replacement of the left common iliac vein with a custom-made bovine pericardium tubular graft.

    PubMed

    Del Campo, C; Fonseca, A

    2001-01-01

    To date, venous reconstruction has not been as successful as arterial reconstruction. Prosthetic materials used as venous substitutes produce much lower patency rates with a higher incidence of early thrombosis than those used as arterial substitutes. We describe the case of a 38-year-old obese woman in whom we encountered an unexpected tear of the common iliac vein intraoperatively, during an anterior approach to the lumbar spine. Because of limited options, we replaced the vein with an interposition tubulargraft that was custom-made from bovine pericardium. Two years later, the patient remained asymptomatic with a patent graft. To our knowledge, there has been no other reported case in the world medical literature of replacement of medium-sized veins by this technique. PMID:11330739

  11. Arterial complications, venous thromboembolism and deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Rob Paulus Augustinus; Reijman, Max; Janssen, Daan Martijn; van Mourik, Jan Bernardus Antonius

    2016-01-01

    AIM To summarize the current knowledge on vascular complications and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. METHODS A systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, Web of Science, CINAHL, PubMed publisher, and Google scholar medical literature databases were searched up to November 10, 2015. Any arthroscopic surgical method of primary or revision intra-articular ACL reconstruction of all graft types in humans was included. A risk of bias assessment was determined. RESULTS Fourty-seven studies were included in the review. Pseudaneurysms were the most frequently reported arterial complication after ACL reconstruction, irrespective of graft type or method of graft fixation with an incidence of 0.3%. The time to diagnosis of arterial complications after ACL reconstruction varied from days to mostly weeks but even years. After ACL reconstruction without thromboprophylaxis, the incidence of DVT was 9.7%, of which 2.1% was symptomatic. The incidence of pulmonary embolism was 0.1%. Tourniquet time > 2 h was related to venous thromboembolism. Thromboprophylaxis is indicated in patients with risk factors for venous thromboembolism. CONCLUSION After ACL reconstruction, the incidence of arterial complications, symptomatic DVT and pulmonary embolism was 0.3%, 2.1% and 0.1% respectively. Arterial complications may occur with all types of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction, methods of graft fixation as well as any type of graft. Patients considered to be at moderate or high risk of venous thromboembolism should routinely receive thromboprophylaxis after ACL reconstruction.

  12. Arterial complications, venous thromboembolism and deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Rob Paulus Augustinus; Reijman, Max; Janssen, Daan Martijn; van Mourik, Jan Bernardus Antonius

    2016-01-01

    AIM To summarize the current knowledge on vascular complications and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. METHODS A systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, Web of Science, CINAHL, PubMed publisher, and Google scholar medical literature databases were searched up to November 10, 2015. Any arthroscopic surgical method of primary or revision intra-articular ACL reconstruction of all graft types in humans was included. A risk of bias assessment was determined. RESULTS Fourty-seven studies were included in the review. Pseudaneurysms were the most frequently reported arterial complication after ACL reconstruction, irrespective of graft type or method of graft fixation with an incidence of 0.3%. The time to diagnosis of arterial complications after ACL reconstruction varied from days to mostly weeks but even years. After ACL reconstruction without thromboprophylaxis, the incidence of DVT was 9.7%, of which 2.1% was symptomatic. The incidence of pulmonary embolism was 0.1%. Tourniquet time > 2 h was related to venous thromboembolism. Thromboprophylaxis is indicated in patients with risk factors for venous thromboembolism. CONCLUSION After ACL reconstruction, the incidence of arterial complications, symptomatic DVT and pulmonary embolism was 0.3%, 2.1% and 0.1% respectively. Arterial complications may occur with all types of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction, methods of graft fixation as well as any type of graft. Patients considered to be at moderate or high risk of venous thromboembolism should routinely receive thromboprophylaxis after ACL reconstruction. PMID:27672574

  13. Recurrent thrombosis in an HIV-1 infected child

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Though thromboembolic complications in HIV infected patients have been described in literature, recurrent thrombosis is very rare. We present a six-year-old HIV infected boy who presented with recurrent thrombosis. He initially had renal artery thrombosis, then middle cerebral artery thrombosis and finally hepatic vein thrombosis that was fatal. PMID:23188939

  14. 8-Year Long-Term Outcome Comparison: Two Ways to Exclude the Internal Iliac Artery during Endovascular Aorta Repair (EVAR) Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ding; Yang, Yi; Xiong, Fei; Zeng, Guojun; Wu, Zhoupeng; Chen, Xiyang; Du, Xiaojiong; Wen, Xiaorong; Liu, Chuncheng; Yang, Hongliu; Zhao, Jichun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the 8-year long-term outcome after internal iliac artery (IIA) coverage with or without embolization in EVAR. Patients and Methods From January 2006 to December 2013, abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) subjects that underwent EVAR and IIA exclusion were recruited and analyzed retrospectively. All the subjects were divided into group A or B based on the presence or absence of intraoperative IIA embolization before coverage (group A: without embolization; group B: with embolization). The 30-day mortality, stent patency, and the incidences of endoleaks and ischemia of the buttocks and lower limbs were compared. The follow-up period was 96 months. Result There were 137 subjects (A: 74 vs. B: 63), 124 male (91.1%) and 13 female (9.5%), with a mean age of 71.6 years. There were no significant differences in the early outcomes of intraoperative blood loss (87.23±14.07 ml; A: 86.53±9.57 ml vs. B: 88.06±18.04 ml, p = .545) and surgery time (87.13±9.25 min; A: 85.99±7.07 min vs. B: 88.48±11.19 min, p = .130). However, there were significant differences in contrast consumption (65.18±9.85 ml; A: 61.89±7.95 ml vs. B: 69.05±10.50 ml, p<.001) and intraoperative X-ray time (5.9±0.86 min; A: 5.63±0.49 min vs. B: 6.22±1.07 min, P<.001). The 30-day mortality was approximately 0.73%. In the follow-up analysis, no significant differences were identified in the incidence of endoleak (22 subjects; type I: A: 2 vs. B: 2, p = 1.000; type II: A: 8 vs. B: 4, p = .666; type III: A: 4 vs. B: 3, p = 1.000), occlusion (5 subjects; 4.35%; A: 1 vs. B: 4, p = .180), or ischemia (9 subjects; 7.83%; A: 3 vs. B: 6, p = .301). In the analysis of group B, although there were no significant differences between subjects with unilateral and bilateral IIA embolization, but longer hospital stays were required (P<.001), and a more severe complication (skin and gluteus necrosis) occurred in 1 subject with bilateral IIA embolization. Conclusion IIA could be excluded during EVAR

  15. Aortic, celiac axis, and superior mesenteric artery thrombosis associated with sigmoid colon adenocarcinoma and hypercoagulable state.

    PubMed

    Serck, Luke C; Cogbill, Thomas H

    2009-01-01

    A patient with sigmoid colon adenocarcinoma and hypercoagulable state developed acute visceral ischemia secondary to thrombus involving the suprarenal aorta, celiac axis and superior mesenteric artery. A large, laminated fibrin thrombus was removed via supraceliac aortotomy. Attempts to clear thrombus from branches of the celiac axis and superior mesenteric artery by open and catheter-based techniques were of limited success. Extensive visceral infarction ensued and the patient died.

  16. Transradial approach for transcatheter selective superior mesenteric artery urokinase infusion therapy in patients with acute extensive portal and superior mesenteric vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mao Qiang; Guo, Li Ping; Lin, Han Ying; Liu, Feng Yong; Duan, Feng; Wang, Zhi Jun

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of transradial approach for transcatheter superior mesenteric artery (SMA) urokinase infusion therapy in patients with acute extensive portal and superior mesenteric venous thrombosis. During a period of 7 years, 16 patients with acute extensive thrombosis of the portal (PV) and superior mesenteric veins (SMV) were treated by transcatheter selective SMA urokinase infusion therapy by way of the radial artery. The mean age of the patients was 39.5 years. Through the radial sheath, a 5F Cobra catheter was inserted into the SMA, and continuous infusion of urokinase was performed for 5-11 days (7.1 +/- 2.5 days). Adequate anticoagulation was given during treatment, throughout hospitalization, and after discharge. Technical success was achieved in all 16 patients. Substantial clinical improvement was seen in these 16 patients after the procedure. Minor complications at the radial puncture site were observed in 5 patients, but trans-SMA infusion therapy was not interrupted. Follow-up computed tomography scan before discharge demonstrated nearly complete disappearance of PV-SMV thrombosis in 9 patients and partial recanalization of PV-SMV thrombosis in 7 patients. The 16 patients were discharged 9-19 days (12 +/- 6.0 days) after admission. Mean duration of follow-up after hospital discharge was 44 +/- 18.5 months, and no recurrent episodes of PV-SMV thrombosis developed during that time period. Transradial approach for transcatheter selective SMA urokinase infusion therapy in addition to anticoagulation is a safe and effective therapy for the management of patients with acute extensive PV-SMV thrombosis.

  17. Transradial Approach for Transcatheter Selective Superior Mesenteric Artery Urokinase Infusion Therapy in Patients with Acute Extensive Portal and Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Maoqiang Guo Liping; Lin Hanying; Liu Fengyong; Duan Feng; Wang Zhijun

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of transradial approach for transcatheter superior mesenteric artery (SMA) urokinase infusion therapy in patients with acute extensive portal and superior mesenteric venous thrombosis. During a period of 7 years, 16 patients with acute extensive thrombosis of the portal (PV) and superior mesenteric veins (SMV) were treated by transcatheter selective SMA urokinase infusion therapy by way of the radial artery. The mean age of the patients was 39.5 years. Through the radial sheath, a 5F Cobra catheter was inserted into the SMA, and continuous infusion of urokinase was performed for 5-11 days (7.1 {+-} 2.5 days). Adequate anticoagulation was given during treatment, throughout hospitalization, and after discharge. Technical success was achieved in all 16 patients. Substantial clinical improvement was seen in these 16 patients after the procedure. Minor complications at the radial puncture site were observed in 5 patients, but trans-SMA infusion therapy was not interrupted. Follow-up computed tomography scan before discharge demonstrated nearly complete disappearance of PV-SMV thrombosis in 9 patients and partial recanalization of PV-SMV thrombosis in 7 patients. The 16 patients were discharged 9-19 days (12 {+-} 6.0 days) after admission. Mean duration of follow-up after hospital discharge was 44 {+-} 18.5 months, and no recurrent episodes of PV-SMV thrombosis developed during that time period. Transradial approach for transcatheter selective SMA urokinase infusion therapy in addition to anticoagulation is a safe and effective therapy for the management of patients with acute extensive PV-SMV thrombosis.

  18. A Rare Occurrence of Simultaneous Venous and Arterial Thromboembolic Events – Lower Limb Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Thromboembolism as Initial Presentation in Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kutiyal, Aditya S.; Dharmshaktu, Pramila; Kataria, Babita; Garg, Abhilasha

    2016-01-01

    The development of acute myeloid leukemia has been attributed to various factors, including hereditary, radiation, drugs, and certain occupational exposures. The association between malignancy and venous thromboembolism events is well established. Here, we present a case of a 70-year-old Indian man who had presented with arterial and venous thrombosis, and the patient was later diagnosed with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). In our case, the patient presented with right lower limb deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism four months prior to the diagnosis of APL. Although thromboembolic event subsequent to the diagnosis of malignancy, and especially during the chemotherapy has been widely reported, this prior presentation with simultaneous occurrence of both venous and arterial thromboembolism has rarely been reported. We take this opportunity to state the significance of a complete medical evaluation in cases of recurrent or unusual thrombotic events. PMID:26949347

  19. Acute thrombosis of the superior mesenteric artery in a 39-year-old woman with protein-S deficiency: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Acute thromboembolic occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery is a condition with an unfavorable prognosis. Treatment of this condition is focused on early diagnosis, surgical or intravascular restoration of blood flow to the ischemic intestine, surgical resection of the necrotic bowel and supportive intensive care. In this report, we describe a case of a 39-year-old woman who developed a small bowel infarct because of an acute thrombotic occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery, also involving the splenic artery. Case presentation A 39-year-old Caucasian woman presented with acute abdominal pain and signs of intestinal occlusion. The patient was given an abdominal computed tomography scan and ultrasonography in association with Doppler ultrasonography, highlighting a thrombosis of the celiac trunk, of the superior mesenteric artery, and of the splenic artery. She immediately underwent an explorative laparotomy, and revascularization was performed by thromboendarterectomy with a Fogarty catheter. In the following postoperative days, she was given a scheduled second and third look, evidencing necrotic jejunal and ileal handles. During all the surgical procedures, we performed intraoperative Doppler ultrasound of the superior mesenteric artery and celiac trunk to control the arterial flow without evidence of a new thrombosis. Conclusion Acute mesenteric ischemia is a rare abdominal emergency that is characterized by a high mortality rate. Generally, acute mesenteric ischemia is due to an impaired blood supply to the intestine caused by thromboembolic phenomena. These phenomena may be associated with a variety of congenital prothrombotic disorders. A prompt diagnosis is a prerequisite for successful treatment. The treatment of choice remains laparotomy and thromboendarterectomy, although some prefer an endovascular approach. A second-look laparotomy could be required to evaluate viable intestinal handles. Some authors support a laparoscopic second

  20. Spontaneous common iliac vein rupture: a case report

    PubMed Central

    DePass, Ian E.

    1998-01-01

    A 68-year-old woman, admitted because of acute lower quadrant abdominal pain but no history of trauma, underwent laparotomy for a suspected ruptured aortic aneurysm. Exploration revealed a 20-mm longitudinal tear in the left iliac vein. The vein was repaired primarily. Her postoperative course was complicated by deep vein thrombosis. Spontaneous rupture of the iliac vein without trauma is rare. but occurs predominantly in healthy white women between the ages of 40 and 80 years. Various causative mechanisms have been described: inflammation of the vessel wall secondary to thrombophlebitis, proximal obstruction of the iliac vein and spontaneous rupture without obstruction or thrombosis. In many cases an increase in intra-abdominal pressure is noted. PMID:9854541

  1. Thrombosis as a complication of pulmonary-artery catheterization via the internal jugular vein: prospective evaluation by phlebography

    SciTech Connect

    Chastre, J.; Cornud, F.; Bouchama, A.; Viau, F.; Benacerraf, R.; Gibert, C.

    1982-02-04

    A prospective study was made to determine, by angiography, the incidence of internal jugular-vein thrombosis in 33 consecutive critically ill patients who required temporary monitoring with Swan-Ganz catheters via the internal jugular vein. Twenty-two patients (66 per cent) had venographic or autopsy evidence of internal jugular-vein thrombosis. There was a statistically significant difference between the group of patients without thrombosis (Group 1) and the group with thrombosis (Group 2) with regard to the duration of hemodynamic compromise. Fifteen patients in Group 2 (as compared with eight in Group 1) were treated with heparin infusion, but nevertheless evidence of deep-vein thrombosis developd. Thus, it is concluded that venous thrombosis is a frequent complication of temporary monitoring with the Swan-Ganz catheter, especially in patients whose circulatory function has been impaired for a prolonged period. (JMT)

  2. Diagnosis of abdominal mural aortic thrombus following discovery of common femoral artery and vein thrombosis by point-of-care ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Shaukat, Nadia Maria; Taha, Farook; Vortsman, Eugene; Desai, Poonam; Kindschuh, Mark

    2015-12-01

    Acute limb ischemia (ALI) is a limb-threatening and life-threatening disease process. Mural aortic thrombosis (MAT) is a rare cause of ALI. While there is limited evidence on the use of bedside ultrasound for the detection of ALI or MAT, duplex ultrasound remains the standard in the diagnosis and ultimate medical decision-making in patients with acute and chronic limb ischemia. Point-of-care ultrasound may be used in the evaluation of patients with signs and symptoms of this disease entity. This is a case of a 79-year-old female with a complicated medical history, who presented with a pulseless right leg and abdominal tenderness. The patient quickly decompensated requiring intubation for airway protection. A post-intubation arterial blood gas (ABG) was unsuccessfully attempted in the right femoral artery, prompting an ultrasound-guided ABG. On B-mode ultrasound evaluation, echogenic material was visualized in the right common femoral artery without evidence of Doppler flow signal. Additionally, a partially obstructing echogenic material was also noted at the femoro-saphenous vein junction with only partial compressibility by compression sonography. A computed tomography angiography of the aorta was performed indicating extensive infrarenal aortic thrombosis. The patient expired despite the relatively prompt diagnosis, highlighting the importance of early identification of acute arterial occlusion.

  3. Sonographic Findings in Fetal Renal Vein Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Rebecca E; Bromley, Bryann; Benson, Carol B; Frates, Mary C

    2015-08-01

    We present the sonographic findings of fetal renal vein thrombosis in a series of 6 patients. The mean gestational age at diagnosis was 31.2 weeks. Four cases were unilateral, and 2 were bilateral. The most common findings were renal enlargement and intrarenal vascular calcifications, followed by increased renal parenchymal echogenicity. Inferior vena cava thrombosis was found in 4 patients and common iliac vein thrombosis in 2. Fetal renal vein thrombosis is an uncommon diagnosis with characteristic sonographic findings. The presence of these findings should prompt Doppler interrogation of the renal vein and inferior vena cava to confirm the diagnosis.

  4. Eptifibatide-induced thrombocytopenia: with thrombosis and disseminated intravascular coagulation immediately after left main coronary artery percutaneous coronary angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Tempelhof, Michael W; Benzuly, Keith H; Fintel, Dan; Krichavsky, Marc Z

    2012-01-01

    Early clinical trials of eptifibatide did not show a significant association between eptifibatide and the development of thrombocytopenia, thrombosis, or disseminated intravascular coagulation. However, more recent literature has suggested a significant association between eptifibatide and the development of thrombocytopenia and thrombosis. Although the true incidence and the pathophysiology of these associations are unknown, the development of these events can be life-threatening. Herein, we describe the case of a patient who experienced acute onset of profound thrombocytopenia, developing thrombosis, pulmonary emboli, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. This paper adds to the few previous reports of cases that suggested an association between thrombocytopenia, thrombosis, and the administration of eptifibatide. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report in the medical literature that associates the new onset of thrombocytopenia, thrombosis, and disseminated intravascular coagulation with the administration of eptifibatide. We also provide a subject review.

  5. Deep arterial injury during experimental angioplasty: relation to a positive indium-111-labeled platelet scintigram, quantitative platelet deposition and mural thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, J.Y.; Chesebro, J.H.; Steele, P.M.; Dewanjee, M.K.; Badimon, L.; Fuster, V.

    1986-12-01

    Although it is not clear why coronary occlusion and restenosis occur after successful coronary angioplasty, factors related to the procedure may influence early and late results. The possible adverse effects of a medial tear documented histologically and produced during balloon angioplasty of the common carotid arteries were studied in 30 fully heparinized (100 U/kg body weight) normal pigs. Scanning electron microscopy showed endothelial denudation and extensive platelet deposition in all dilated arterial segments. Visible macroscopic mural thrombus was present within an hour of the procedure in 29 (91%) of the 32 arteries that had a medial tear documented by histologic study; the tear produced an indium-111-labeled platelet deposition of 116.4 +/- 26.5 X 10(6)/cm2 (mean +/- SE) and total thrombotic occlusion in 2 arteries (4%). None of the 24 arteries without a medial tear had a thrombus, and the mean platelet deposition in that group was 7.0 +/- 0.5 X 10(6)/cm2 (p less than 0.0008). In 12 pigs scanned with a gamma camera, visible thrombus was associated with platelet deposition in excess of 20 X 10(6)/cm2 in 12 arteries, 9 of which had a positive indium-111-labeled platelet scintigram. Thus, arterial angioplasty causes deep arterial injury, which appears to be a major cause of mural thrombosis, heavy platelet deposition, a positive indium-111-labeled platelet scintigram and acute arterial occlusion. A positive indium-111-labeled platelet scintigram was always associated with macroscopic thrombus of at least 20 > 10(6) platelets/cm2 and underlying deep arterial injury.

  6. Contemporary results of treatment of acute arterial mesenteric thrombosis: has endovascular treatment improved outcomes?

    PubMed

    Kalra, Manju; Ryer, Evan J; Oderich, Gustavo S; Duncan, Audra A; Bower, Thomas C; Gloviczki, Peter

    2012-12-01

    Acute mesenteric ischemia is an uncommon but highly complex clinical problem and carries a high mortality. Traditional treatment has yielded only modest improvements in mortality and an endovascular first treatment paradigm has been adopted by selected centers over the past decade. However, the technique does not allow for immediate assessment of intestinal viability and availability of the expertise and equipment is mostly limited to tertiary referral centers. Experience gained with endovascular treatment thus far suggests that careful patient selection, procedure planning, and meticulous technique are the key to further improving results. Most important, prolonged attempts at percutaneous intervention should not be allowed to delay laparotomy and bowel assessment. In patients requiring urgent laparotomy, intraoperative retrograde superior mesenteric artery recanalization remains an attractive option and should be given due consideration. Liberal use of second-look laparotomy is to be encouraged for continued bowel assessment and eventual reestablishment of bowel continuity. Early recognition of the problem with expeditious implementation of the appropriate treatment is likely to improve outcomes of this challenging problem in the future.

  7. Endovascular repair of a spontaneous ilio-iliac fistula presenting as pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Melas, N; Saratzis, A; Abbas, A; Sarris, K; Saratzis, N; Lazaridis, I; Kiskinis, D

    2011-05-01

    Spontaneous rupture of a common iliac artery aneurysm into the common iliac vein is a rare phenomenon. We report the case of a 68 year old man admitted with acute cardiac failure and massive pulmonary embolism as a complication of a spontaneous ilio-iliac fistula, secondary to aneurysmal rupture. The aneurysm was successfully excluded using an aorto-uni-iliac stent graft. No complications were noted at 9 months follow-up. Arteriovenous fistulae should be considered in patients with aortic or iliac aneurysms who develop a pulmonary embolism or symptoms of venous congestion. Endovascular repair of these pathologies is a feasible therapeutic option; however long term results remain unknown.

  8. Endovascular Therapeutic Options for Isolated Iliac Aneurysms with a Working Classification

    SciTech Connect

    Fahrni, Markus; Lachat, Mario M; Wildermuth, Simon; Pfammatter, Thomas

    2003-09-15

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a variety of stent-grafting and embolization techniques and describe a new classification for endovascular treatment of isolated iliac artery aneurysms. A total of 19 patients were treated for isolated iliac aneurysms. Depending on the proximal iliac neck and the uni-/bilaterality of common iliac artery aneurysms (CIAA's) the patient may be treated by a tube (Type Ia) or a bifurcated stent-graft (Type Ib) in addition to internal iliac artery embolization. Neck anatomy is also critical in determining therapeutical options for internal iliac artery aneurysms (IIAA's). These are tube stent-grafting plus internal iliac branch embolization (Type IIa), coiling of afferent and efferent internal iliac vessels (Type IIb) and IIAA packing (Type IIc). The average length of stay for these procedures was 3.8 days. During the mean follow-up of 20.9 months, aneurysm size remained unchanged in all but 4 patients. Reinterventions were necessary in option Type Ib (3/8 pat.) and Type Ia (1/7 pat.) due to extender stent-graft migration (n = 2) or reperfusion leaks (n 2). We conclude that Iliac artery aneurysms may be successfully and safely treated by a tailored approach using embolization or a combination of embolization and stent-grafting. Long-term CT imaging follow-up is necessary, particularly in patients treated with bifurcated stent-grafts (Type Ib)

  9. Percutaneous Endoluminal Bypass of Iliac Aneurysms with a Covered Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Ruebben, Alexander; Tettoni, Serena; Muratore, Pierluigi; Rossato, Dennis; Savio, Daniele; Rabbia, Claudio

    1998-07-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of percutaneous treatment of iliac aneurysms, a covered stent was inserted in nine men suffering from common iliac artery aneurysms (six cases), external iliac aneurysms (one case), or pseudoaneurysms (two cases). Placement of the stent was successful in all patients. In one patient, an endoprosthesis thrombosed after 15 days, but was successfully treated by thrombolysis and additional stent placement. At the follow-up examinations (mean period 22 months) all stent-grafts had remained patent. No late leakage or stenosis was observed.

  10. Long-Term Follow-Up of Iliac Wallstents

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, Ricardo; Carreira, Jose Martin Gude, Francisco; Gorriz, Elias; Gallardo, Laura; Pardo, Maria Dolores; Hermida, Maria

    2004-11-15

    We evaluated the long-term results of the iliac artery stent placement for the treatment of patients with intermittent claudication. From November 1988 to December 1998, 303 legs were treated with metal stents in 259 patients with iliac occlusive arterial disease in a follow-up study approved by the institutional review board. Stenoses (n = 162) were treated after failed angioplasty and occlusions (n = 141) were treated with primary stent placement. According to Fontaine's clinical classification of chronic ischemia, 266 (88%) legs presented stage IIB, 14 (5%) stage III, and 23 (7%) stage IV. In all legs, self-expandable stents (Wallstent) were implanted. The patients were followed up with clinical examination, ankle brachial- index examination measurement and intravenous angiography. The data were analyzed using the univariate analysis (Kaplan-Meier method) and multivariate analysis (Cox proportional model). The primary endpoint of the study was the identification of restenosis or reoclusion of the stenting arterial segment and a secondary endpoint that was an identification of the risk factors of restenosis and reoclusion. The mean {+-} SD ankle-brachial index pre-, post-procedure, and in the last control was 0.58 {+-} 0.18, 0.90 {+-} 0.23, and 0.86 {+-} 0.24, respectively. Primary cumulative patency rates were 70% {+-} 4 after 5 years, and 65% {+-} 5 after 7 years, and secondary patency rates were 92% {+-} 2 after 5 years, and 87% {+-} 4 after 9 years. Immediate complications in the first 24 hours appeared in 12 (4%) legs, thrombosis in 5 legs, 3 legs presented with distal embolism, 2 thrombi at the access site and pseudo aneurysm and artery rupture in 1 leg. A patient died in the first 24 hours. Within 30 days after the procedure seven complications, 3 thromboses and 4 stenosis appeared. During follow-up, 42 (16%) patients died of other causes. The main causes of death were cardiac disease (39%), cerebrovascular disease (15%), cancer (7%), respiratory diseases

  11. Sagittal sinus thrombosis in adult minimal change nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Urch, C; Pusey, C D

    1996-02-01

    Nephrotic syndrome causes a hypercoagulable state, leading to both venous and arterial thrombosis. The mechanisms are as yet unclear, but numerous alterations in coagulant and anti-coagulant factors have been reported [Llach et al. 1985, Harris and Ismail 1994]. The most common clinical features in adults are renal vein thrombosis, femoral vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, although thrombosis in numerous other arterial and venous sites has been described [Cameron 1984, Llach et al. 1985]. Intracranial thrombosis is rare, although in adult nephrotic syndrome arterial thrombosis is well recognized [Fuh et al. 1991]. We report a patient with minimal change nephrotic syndrome who developed venous sinus thrombosis detected by magnetic resonance (MR) scanning.

  12. A conversion disorder or a stroke? A proximal basilar artery thrombosis induced 'locked-in' syndrome in a young Caucasian woman.

    PubMed

    Li, Wang; Brandon, Ohman; Smith, Debbie Villarreal; Petersen, Eric

    2013-03-14

    The incidence of the basilar artery occlusion is relatively low among all strokes. Clinical presentation varies depending on the location of the occlusion. The symptoms include mild dysarthria to coma or sudden death. The initial subtle clinical presentation could lead to misdiagnosis. Psychogenic diagnosis in the differential could make the timely diagnosis more difficult. This case involves a 34-year-old woman presenting with a gradual onset of slurred speech. The initial CT scan of head did not indicate any intracranial pathology, and she was initially treated for an anxiety/conversion disorder. With progression of the pathology, the patient quickly developed a 'locked-in' syndrome, with preserved high cognitive function and vertical eye movement, but otherwise total loss of motor function. The diagnosis was confirmed with MRI/MR angiography studies, which indicated thrombosis of the proximal basilar artery. Serological studies did not disclose any relevant risk factors.

  13. Arterial endofibrosis in professional cyclists

    PubMed Central

    VERALDI, G.F.; MACRÌ, M.; CRISCENTI, P.; SCORSONE, L.; ZINGARETTI, C.C.; GNONI, M.; MEZZETTO, L.

    2015-01-01

    External Iliac Artery Endofibrosis (EIAE) is an uncommon disease usually affecting young, otherwise healthy, patients. It usually involves cyclists but cases have been reported in other groups of endurance athletes. The external iliac artery is the most affected anatomical site but other locations are described too. The precise pathophysiology and long-term evolution of the disease still remain unknown. The diagnosis may be challenging and delayed as the patients usually present symptoms only in extreme conditions and physical and instrumental examinations may be normal at rest. We present two cases of young professional cyclists who suffered of exercise-induced leg pain which led them to reduce running. Both patients were firstly treated with balloon angioplasty that rapidly failed to improve their symptoms. The successive open surgery with endofibrosectomy and autologous saphenous vein closure patch completely resolved physical limitations. EIAE is a rare disease that can induce arterial stenosis, thrombosis, dissection and secondary atheroma. After-exercise ankle-brachial index represents a useful diagnostic criterion. Careful observation of angio-CT may strengthen the suspect. Knowledge of the these features allows a better pre-operative assessment and an early effective treatment. Surgical revascularization remains the gold standard approach. PMID:26888703

  14. Animal Model of Acute Deep Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Sumit; Laerum, Frode; Brosstad, Frank; Kvernebo, Knut; Sakariassen, Kjell S.

    1998-07-15

    Purpose: To develop an animal model of acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Methods: In part I of the study nine juvenile domestic pigs were used. Each external iliac vein was transluminally occluded with a balloon catheter. Thrombin was infused through a microcatheter in one leg according to one of the following protocols: (1) intraarterial (IA): 1250 U at 25 U/min in the common femoral artery (n= 3); (2) intravenous (IV): 5000 U in the popliteal vein at 500 U/min (n= 3), or at 100 U/min (n= 3). Saline was administered in the opposite leg. After the animals were killed, the mass of thrombus in the iliofemoral veins was measured. The pudendoepiploic (PEV), profunda femoris (PF), and popliteal veins (PV) were examined. Thrombosis in the tributaries of the superficial femoral vein (SFVt) was graded according to a three-point scale (0, +, ++). In part II of the study IV administration was further investigated in nine pigs using the following three regimens with 1000 U at 25 U/min serving as the control: (1) 1000 U at 100 U/min, (2) 250 U at 25 U/min, (3) 250 U at 6.25 U/min. Results: All animals survived. In part I median thrombus mass in the test limbs was 1.40 g as compared with 0.25 g in the controls (p= 0.01). PEV, PFV and PV were thrombosed in all limbs infused with thrombin. IV infusion was more effective in inducing thrombosis in both the parent veins (mass 1.32-1.78 g) and SVFt (++ in 4 of 6 legs), as compared with IA infusion (mass 0.0-1.16 g; SFVt ++ in 1 of 3 legs). In part II thrombus mass in axial veins ranged from 1.23 to 2.86 g, and showed no relationship with the dose of thrombin or the rate of infusion. Tributary thrombosis was less extensive with 250 U at 25 U/min than with the other regimens. Conclusion: Slow distal intravenous thrombin infusion in the hind legs of pigs combined with proximal venous occlusion induces thrombosis in the leg veins that closely resembles clinical DVT in distribution.

  15. Complex common and internal iliac or aortoiliac aneurysms and current approach: individualised open-endovascular or combined procedures.

    PubMed

    Kotsis, Thomas; Louizos, Louizos Alexander; Pappas, Evangelos; Theodoraki, Kassiani

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Bilateral internal iliac artery aneurysms constitute the utmost configuration of infrarenal aortoiliac disease. We detail characteristic aortoiliac disease patterns and reconstructive techniques we have used, along with a visualized decision-making chart and a short review of the literature. Material and Methods. A retrospective, observational study of twelve clinical cases of patients with aortoiliac disease are described. Two patients had a common iliac artery aneurysm and were managed by the application of inversed stent-grafts; another case was repaired by the insertion of a standard bifurcated stent-graft flared in the right common iliac artery and with an iliac branched device in the left iliac arterial axis. Open approach was used in 5 cases and in 4 cases a combination of aortouniliac stent-grafting with femoral-femoral bypass was applied. Results. Technical success was 100%. One endoleak type Ib in a flared iliac limb was observed and corrected by internal iliac embolism and use of an iliac limb stent-graft extension. We report 100% patency rate during 26.3 months of followup. Conclusion. Individualized techniques for the management of isolated iliac or aortoiliac aneurismal desease with special concern in maintaining internal iliac artery perfusion lead to elimination of perioperative complications and long-term durability and patency rates. PMID:25328706

  16. [First experience with hybrid operations for chronic obstruction of iliac-femoral segment veins in patients with post-thrombotic disease].

    PubMed

    Pokrovskiĭ, A V; Ignat'ev, I M; Volodiukhin, M Iu; Gradusov, E G

    2016-01-01

    The present study was aimed at assessing initial results of hybrid operations in obstructive lesions of the iliac-femoral veins in patients with post-thrombotic disease (PTD). Hybrid operations [open endovenectomy from the common femoral vein (CFV) with creation of an arteriovenous fistula + stenting of iliac veins] were performed carried out in a total of eleven patients with PTD. Of these, there were 7 men and 4 women aged from 34 to 52 years (mean age - 42.8±7 years). All patients had severe-degree chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). The distribution of patients according to the CEAP classification was as follows: C4a - 2 patients, C4b - 4 patients, C5 - 4 subjects, C6 - 1 patient. The time having elapsed since a newly onset episode of acute iliac-femoral venous thrombosis varied from 2 to 12 years (averagely - 7.1±3.3 years). The degree of manifestation of PTD was determined by means of the Villalta-Pradoni scale before and 6 months after the operation. Instrumental methods of study included ultrasound duplex scanning (USDS), magnetic resonance and/or multispiral computed venography, and contrast-enhanced X-ray venography. The technical success of the procedure amounted to 91%. In one patient with occlusion of the common and external iliac veins we failed to perform recanalization and stenting. A further one patient developed in-stent and CFV thrombosis on the second postoperative day. An attempt of catheter thrombolysis turned out unsuccessful. There were no wound complications in the postoperative period. Neither was pulmonary artery thromboembolism registered. The dynamic control was carried out by means of USDS before discharge from hospital and at 1, 3 and 6 months after the intervention. The outcomes of hybrid operations after 6 months were followed up in five patients. Secondary patency rate of the stented iliac veins amounted to 100%. No relapses of trophic ulcers were observed. According to the Villalta-Prandoni scale the value of the median of the

  17. Mesenteric venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Singal, Ashwani K; Kamath, Patrick S; Tefferi, Ayalew

    2013-03-01

    The prevalence of mesenteric venous thrombosis has increased over the past 2 decades with the routine use of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) in patients presenting with abdominal pain and those with portal hypertension. Concurrent with increasing recognition, routine and frequent use of anticoagulation has reduced the need for surgical intervention and improved outcome in these patients. Acute thrombosis often presents with abdominal pain, whereas chronic disease manifests either as an incidental finding on CT or with features of portal hypertension. Contrast-enhanced CT diagnoses about 90% of cases. The presence of collateral circulation and cavernoma around a chronically thrombosed vein differentiates chronic from acute disease. The superior mesenteric vein is often involved, whereas involvement of the inferior mesenteric vein is rare. Associated portal venous thrombosis can be seen if the disease originates in the major veins instead of the small vena rectae. Thrombophilia and local abdominal inflammatory conditions are common causes. Management is aimed at preventing bowel infarction and recurrent thrombosis. Anticoagulation, the mainstay of management, has also been safely used in patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension. This review discusses the pathogenesis of thrombosis of mesenteric veins, the diagnosis and differentiation from arterial ischemia, the emergence of the JAK2 (Janus kinase 2) sequence variation as a marker of thrombophilia and myelodysplastic neoplasms, and new anticoagulants. Algorithms for the management of acute and chronic mesenteric venous thrombosis are provided to help readers understand and remember the approach to the management of acute and chronic mesenteric venous thrombosis.

  18. Limb salvage following iatrogenic arterial injury: complications of cardiac support using intra-aortic balloon pumps.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Adam; Waldin, Owen; Slim, Hani; Brar, Ranjeet

    2016-01-01

    This is a unique case report describing complex limb salvage in a patient who experienced acute limb ischaemia due to a complication of intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) counterpulsation. This case focuses on a patient who had an IABP counterpulsation device inserted following myocardial infarction, requiring urgent coronary artery bypass grafting for acute coronary syndrome. Postoperatively, the IABP could not be removed, with consequent iliac thrombosis and acute limb ischaemia. Emergency femoral-to-femoral crossover bypass was performed using a polytetrafluoroethylene graft. A portion of the IABP balloon tip was entrapped and retained, however, and became the focus of delayed septicaemia, resulting in graft infection and wound breakdown 6 weeks later. Explantation of the residual balloon tip, ligation of the right external iliac artery and redo femoral-femoral crossover using the great saphenous vein were successfully performed. PMID:27268290

  19. Transradial bilateral common iliac ostial stenting using simultaneous hugging stent (SHS) technique.

    PubMed

    Patel, Tejas; Shah, Sanjay; Pancholy, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Current literature has limited reports of iliac artery interventions performed via transradial approach (TRA). We report four successive cases of bilateral common iliac ostial stenting using simultaneous hugging stent (SHS) technique through bilateral TRA. This technique allows the patient and the operator to exploit the benefits of TRA while treating this complex substrate. PMID:26804292

  20. Drug diffusion and biological responses of arteries using a drug-eluting stent with nonuniform coating

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Noboru; Mori, Yuhei; Uchiyama, Sayaka

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a nonuniform coating, abluminal-gradient coating (AGC), which leaves the abluminal surface of the curves and links parts of the stent free from the drug coating, on the diffusion direction of the drug and the biological responses of the artery to drug-eluting stent (DES) by comparing the AGC-sirolimus stent and the conventional full-surface coating (CFC) sirolimus stent. The study aimed to verify whether the AGC approach was appropriate for the development of a safer DES, minimizing the risks of stent thrombosis due to delayed endothelialization by the drug and distal embolization due to cracking of the coating layer on the hinge parts of the DES on stent expansion. In the in vitro local drug diffusion study, we used rhodamine B as a model drug, and rhodamine B released from the AGC stent diffused predominantly into the abluminal side of the alginate artery model. Conversely, rhodamine B released from the CFC stent quickly spread to the luminal side of the artery model, where endothelial cell regeneration is required. In the biological responses study, the luminal surface of the iliac artery implanted with the AGC-sirolimus stent in a rabbit iliac artery for 2 weeks was completely covered with endothelial-like cells. On the other hand, the luminal surface of the iliac artery implanted with the CFC-sirolimus stent for 2 weeks only showed partial coverage with endothelial-like cells. While thrombosis was observed in two of the three CFC-sirolimus stents, it was observed in only one of the three AGC-sirolimus stents. Taken together, these findings indicate that the designed nonuniform coating (AGC) is an appropriate approach to ensure a safer DES. However, the number of studies is limited and a larger study should be conducted to reach a statistically significant conclusion. PMID:27051322

  1. Triple antithrombotic therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing coronary artery stenting: hovering among bleeding risk, thromboembolic events, and stent thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Dual antiplatelet treatment with aspirin and clopidogrel is the antithrombotic treatment recommended after an acute coronary syndrome and/or coronary artery stenting. The evidence for optimal antiplatelet therapy for patients, in whom long-term treatment oral anticoagulation is mandatory, is however scarce. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of the various antithrombotic strategies adopted in this population, we reviewed the available evidence on the management of patients receiving oral anticoagulation, such as a vitamin-k-antagonists, referred for coronary artery stenting. Atrial fibrillation is the most frequent indication for oral anticoagulation. The need of starting antiplatelet therapy in this clinical scenario raises concerns about the combination to choose: triple therapy with warfarin, aspirin, and a thienopyridine being the most frequent and advised. The safety of this regimen appeared suboptimal because of an increased risk in hemorrhagic complications. On the other hand, the combination of oral anticoagulation and an antiplatelet agent is suboptimal in preventing thromboembolic events and stent thrombosis; dual antiplatelet therapy may be considered only when a high hemorrhagic risk and low thromboembolic risk are perceived. Indeed, the need for prolonged multiple-drug antithrombotic therapy increases the bleeding risks when drug eluting stents are used. Since current evidence derives mainly from small, single-center and retrospective studies, large-scale prospective multicenter studies are urgently needed. PMID:23075316

  2. An autoantibody directed against human thrombin anion-binding exosite in a patient with arterial thrombosis: effects on platelets, endothelial cells, and protein C activation.

    PubMed

    Arnaud, E; Lafay, M; Gaussem, P; Picard, V; Jandrot-Perrus, M; Aiach, M; Rendu, F

    1994-09-15

    An autoantibody, developed by a patient with severe and recurrent arterial thrombosis, was characterized to be directed against the anion-binding exosite of thrombin, and inhibited all thrombin interactions requiring this secondary binding site without interfering with the catalytic site. The effect of the antibody was studied on thrombin interactions with platelets and endothelial cells from human umbilical veins (HUVEC). The autoantibody specifically and concentration-dependently inhibited alpha-thrombin-induced platelet activation and prostacyclin (PGI2) synthesis from HUVEC. It had no effect when gamma-thrombin or the thrombin receptor activation peptide SFLLR were the inducers. The effect of the antibody on protein C activation has been studied. The antibody blocked the thrombin-thrombomodulin activation of protein C. The inhibition of the activation was maximal with a low concentration of thrombomodulin. The fact that the autoantibody inhibited concentration-dependent alpha-thrombin-induced platelet and endothelial cell functions emphasizes the crucial role of the anion-binding exosite of thrombin to activate its receptor. In regard to the pathology, the antibody inhibited two vascular processes implicated in thrombin-antithrombotic functions, PGI2 secretion, and protein C activation, which could be implicated in this arterial thrombotic disease.

  3. Functioning pancreas graft with thromboses of splenic and superior mesenteric arteries after simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, I; Shinzeki, M; Asari, S; Goto, T; Shirakawa, S; Ajiki, T; Fukumoto, T; Ku, Y

    2014-04-01

    Graft thrombosis is the most common cause of early graft loss after pancreas transplantation. The grafted pancreas is difficult to salvage after complete thrombosis, especially arterial thrombosis, and graft pancreatectomy is required. We describe a patient presenting with a functioning pancreas graft with thromboses of the splenic artery (SA) and superior mesenteric artery (SMA) after simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPK). A 37-year-old woman with a 20-year history of type 1 diabetes mellitus underwent SPK. The pancreaticoduodenal graft was implanted in the right iliac fossa with enteric drainage. A Carrel patch was anastomosed to the recipient's right common iliac artery, and the graft gastroduodenal artery was anastomosed to the common hepatic artery using an arterial I-graft. The donor portal vein was anastomosed to the recipient's inferior vena cava. Four days after surgery, graft thromboses were detected by Doppler ultrasound without increases in the serum amylase and blood glucose levels. Contrast enhanced computed tomography revealed thromboses in the SA, splenic vein and SMA. Selective angiography showed that blood flow was interrupted in the SA and SMA. However, pancreatic graft perfusion was maintained by the I-graft in the head of the pancreas and the transverse pancreatic artery in the body and tail of the pancreas. We performed percutaneous direct thrombolysis and adjuvant thrombolytic therapy. However, we had to stop the thrombolytic therapy because of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Thereafter, the postoperative course was uneventful and the pancreas graft was functioning with a fasting blood glucose level of 75 mg/dL, HbA1c of 5.1%, and serum C-peptide level of 1.9 ng/mL at 30 months post-transplantation.

  4. The discovery of a new class of synaptic transmitters in smooth muscle 50 years ago and amelioration of coronary artery thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, M R

    2013-02-01

    Clopidogrel and ticagrelor, antagonists to P2Y(12) receptor molecules on platelet membranes, significantly ameliorate acute myocardial infarction due to coronary artery thrombosis, the most common cause of death in the developed world. A personal account is given here of the foundational research that lead to the identification of P2Y receptors, carried out 50 years ago in the Melbourne University Zoology Department headed by Geoffrey Burnstock. In Christmas 1962, I made the serendipitous observation of large hyperpolarizing changes across the membranes of smooth muscle cells in the taenia coli of the intestine on stimulating its nerve supply. I then showed that these potentials relaxed the muscle and were not due to noradrenaline or acetylcholine, which were then the only substances known to be released from nerves. I called these non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic (NANC) terminals in the laboratory and showed that this NANC transmitter acted at receptor molecules on the muscle cells, promoting efflux of potassium ions, and so the observed potential changes. In 1968, Graeme Campbell showed that ATP relaxed the taenia coli muscle, and in 1969, David Satchell, using purine chromatography, showed that ATP was likely to be released from NANC terminals. The receptor molecules involved were shown to be exceptionally sensitive to 2-methylthio-ATP (Satchell and Macguire, 1975, J Pharmacol Exp Ther, 195, 540), and so belonged to the class P2Y receptors as designated by Abbracchio and Burnstock, with subclasses P2Y(1)-P2Y(12). The discovery of the role of P2Y(12) receptors in increasing thrombosis lead to the focused research that resulted in clopidogrel and ticagrelor.

  5. Primary uretero-iliac fistula: the unusual source of haematuria.

    PubMed

    Khong, Tak Loon; Winstanley, Virginia; Lee, George; Christmas, Tim; Ramsay, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Uretero-iliac fistula is a rare cause of frank haematuria. The aetiology of such fistula is commonly iatrogenic. We present a unique case of a primary aorto-iliac fistula in the absence of an aneurysm or arteriovenous malformation. The diagnosis was demonstrated by ureteroscopy and real-time retrograde ureterogram. Multiple arterial embolisation of the fistula had failed, and the patient underwent a successful ureterolysis and ligation of fistula. We demonstrate the diagnostic difficulties and treatment dilemma of such rare cause of haematuria.

  6. Implantation of a composite bifurcated cryopreserved aorto-iliac-femoral homograft in a patient with Candida albicans endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Abad, C; Maynar, M; Ponce, G; Chau, O; Cárdenes, M A; Jiménez, P; Betancor, P

    2000-04-01

    A 35 year old woman, cocaine addict, suffered Candida albicans aortic valve endocarditis complicated with embolisation of infected vegetations in the distal abdominal aorta. She underwent successful staged aortic valve replacement followed by transaortic and transfemoral thrombectomy. One month later an arteriogram disclosed partial occlusion of the left iliac artery, bilateral aneurysmal degeneration of both iliac arteries and right iliac artery-right iliac vein fistula. She was operated again, performing re-laparotomy and re-exploration. A composite bifurcated cryopreserved homograft was implanted end-to-side between the infrarenal abdominal aorta, right external iliac artery and left common femoral artery. The right iliac artery-iliac vein fistula was obliterated with suture. The patient had an uneventful recovery but a relapsing arterio-venous fistula was diagnosed by arteriography. Three months later she underwent percutaneous transluminal closure of the reopened fistula. At present, 17 months after the implantation of the homograft, the patient is symptom-free, on antifungal agents and with arteriographic and clinical evidence of a well-functioning arterial homograft.

  7. Right Double Inferior Vena Cava (IVC) with Preaortic Iliac Confluence - Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Babu, C S Ramesh; Lalwani, Rekha; Kumar, Indra

    2014-02-01

    Anomalies of the inferior vena cava (IVC) are uncommon and most of them remain asymptomatic. Though rare, anomalies of IVC can lead to severe hemorrhagic complications especially during aortoiliac surgery. Prior knowledge of these variations facilitates proper interpretation of radiological images and safe performance of interventional procedures and surgeries. During routine anatomical dissection of abdomen in a female cadaver we observed the presence of right sided duplication of IVC. Both IVCs were present on the right side of abdominal aorta, one ventral and the other more dorsal in position and named ventral right IVC and dorsal right IVC. The ventrally and medially placed IVC, which appeared to be the main IVC was formed by the union of two common iliac veins in front of the right common iliac artery (Preaortic iliac confluence-"Marsupial Cava"). The right external iliac vein continued as the more dorsally and laterally placed dorsal right IVC. The right internal iliac vein after receiving a transverse anastomotic vein from the external iliac continued as the right common iliac vein. This transverse anastomosis was present behind the right common iliac artery. The narrower dorsal right IVC joined the wider ventral right IVC just below the level of renal veins to form a single IVC. The abdominal aorta presented a convexity to the left.

  8. Percutaneous Treatment of Deep Vein Thrombosis in May-Thurner Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jong-Youn; Choi, Donghoon Guk Ko, Young; Park, Sungha; Jang, Yangsoo; Lee, Do Yun

    2006-08-15

    Background/Purpose. May-Thurner syndrome is an uncommon disease entity in which the left common iliac vein is compressed by the right common iliac artery with subsequent development of deep vein thrombosis and chronic venous insufficiency. We report our experience on the treatment of extensive iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis due to May-Thurner syndrome using endovascular techniques. Methods. The study group comprised 21 patients (8 men, 13 women; mean age 51 years) diagnosed with May-Thurner syndrome by venogram. Eighteen patients were treated with catheter-guided thrombolysis; 3 patients with short segment involvement did not require thrombolysis. After completion of the thrombolytic therapy, the residual venous narrowing was treated by balloon angioplasty and/or placement of a self-expandable stent. Results. The mean total dose of urokinase was 4.28 {+-} 1.89 million units, and the mean duration of infusion was 72 {+-} 35 hr. Eighteen of the 21 patients received stent deployment. The mean diameter of the stents was 12.9 {+-} 2.0 mm. Initial technical successes with immediate symptom resolution were achieved in 20 of the 21 patients (95%). We performed a follow-up venogram 6 months after procedure and checked clinical symptoms at outpatient clinics (mean follow-up duration 10.8 months). Among the patients who received stent implantation, 2 had recurrent thrombotic occlusion during the follow-up period. Three patients, who did not receive stent implantation, all had recurrent thrombosis. There were no major bleeding complications except in 1 patient who developed retroperitoneal hematoma. Conclusion. Catheter-guided thrombolysis and angioplasty with stent implantation is a safe and effective method for the treatment of May-Thurner syndrome.

  9. Deep venous thrombosis in a young woman with hypoplastic inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Lavens, Matthias; Moors, Boudewijn; Thomis, Sarah

    2014-05-01

    We present a 33-year-old woman with deep venous thrombosis of the left iliac vein and the left lower limb. A computed tomography scan of her abdomen revealed a hypoplastic inferior vena cava and agenesis of the right kidney. Congenital anomalies of the inferior vena cava are uncommon and are sometimes an unrecognized cause of deep venous thrombosis.

  10. Novel mediators and biomarkers of thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Travis; Smyth, Susan S

    2014-01-01

    Spurred by advances in understanding the molecular basis of thrombosis, this issue of the Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis is devoted to exploring aspects of novel paradigms and their potential impact on diagnosis and treatment. Complex interplay between blood and vascular cells, inflammation, and pro- and anti-coagulant pathways determines the formation and stability of arterial and venous thrombosis. A causal role for inflammation in coronary artery disease is currently being tested in large clinical trials. Basic science observations implicate inflammation in venous thromboembolic disorders and inflammatory processes, may have a similar influence on device thrombosis. In this article and throughout this issue of the Journal, we discuss biomarkers and mediators associated with arterial and venous thrombosis, atrial fibrillation, and other clinical scenarios. PMID:24356857

  11. Comparison of procedural success and long-term outcomes of stent thrombosis in coronary bypass grafts versus native coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Waldo, Stephen W; Armstrong, Ehrin J; Yeo, Khung Keong; Mahmud, Ehtisham; Patel, Mitul; Reeves, Ryan; MacGregor, John S; Low, Reginald I; Rogers, Jason H; Shunk, Kendrick A

    2013-03-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention within bypass grafts accounts for a significant percentage of total interventions. Bypass graft interventions are associated with an increased risk for stent thrombosis (ST), a condition that leads to significant morbidity and mortality. Despite this, the procedural characteristics and long-term outcomes of patients with bypass-graft ST have not been reported. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the procedural success and long-term outcomes of patients presenting with ST of coronary bypass grafts. Clinical and procedural characteristics of 205 ST cases at 5 academic hospitals were reviewed. Long-term mortality and major adverse cardiovascular events (stroke, reinfarction, and revascularization) were ascertained through review of medical records and the Social Security Death Index. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to determine the association between ST in a bypass graft and long-term outcomes. Thirteen patients (6%) in the cohort presented with ST of a coronary bypass graft. Patients with bypass-graft ST had less severe presentations with a lower proportion of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (23% vs 69%, p <0.001). Despite this, ST of a bypass graft was associated with a trend toward reduced postprocedural Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) flow grade (p = 0.09), leading to lower angiographic (58% vs 92%, p <0.001) and procedural (62% vs 92%, p <0.001) success. After multivariate adjustment, bypass-graft ST was associated with increased long-term mortality (hazard ratio 3.3, 95% confidence interval 1.0 to 10.7) and major adverse cardiovascular events (hazard ratio 2.7, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 6.9). In conclusion, ST in coronary bypass grafts is associated with reduced angiographic and procedural success as well as increased long-term major adverse cardiovascular events compared to ST in native coronary vessels. PMID:23261000

  12. [Evaluation of the right internal iliac artery which is anastomosed to transplant renal artery using non-contrast enhanced MR angiography with electrocardiography-gated and 3D True SSFP time-spatial labeling inversion pulse sequence].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Ayako; Shiratori, Yoko; Suzuki, Makoto; Ozasa, Masaya; Takeyama, Mamoru; Eshima, Mitsuhiro; Shinohara, Maiko; Yamamoto, Takao; Tajima, Tsuyoshi

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate whether electrocardiography-gated is useful in non-contrast-enhanced MRA with time-spatial labeling inversion pulse (Time-SLIP) in renal transplantation patients compared with respiration-triggered free-breathing. Simulation-based analyses of black blood time interval (BBTI) values for spatial selective inversion-recovery pulse and electrocardiography rates were performed, and confirmed on human subjects using a three-dimensional (3D) coherent steady-state free precession (SSFP) sequence on a 1.5 tesla Toshiba MRI scanner. Signal acquisition interval and BBTI values in which signal of a water tissue becomes the null point showed a strong correlation, and successfully suppressed signals from the background and provided better contrast between the arteries and the background. Because electrocardiography-gated non-contrast MRA does not depend on the respiration interval, providing a contrast stable, it was suggested to be an effective screening tool for evaluation of pelvic arteries.

  13. Adipokines and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Katrin; Konstantinides, Stavros

    2011-12-01

    1. Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. An increased body mass index (BMI) is associated with venous thromboembolism, myocardial infarction, stroke and stent thrombosis after percutaneous interventions. Studies in mouse models of obesity and induced arterial or venous thrombosis have provided insights into the mechanisms involved. 2. In addition to elevated circulating levels of fibrinogen, factor VII and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1, changes in platelet biology and function may underlie the increased (athero) thrombotic risk in obesity. These include elevated platelet counts, an increase in mean platelet volume, an increased platelet aggregatory response to agonists and a reversible resistance to the anti-aggregatory effects of nitric oxide and prostacyclin I(2) . 3. Specific adipokines mediate the prothrombotic state in obesity. Of these, leptin enhances both arterial and venous thrombosis by promoting platelet adhesion, activation and aggregation. Leptin also induces tissue factor expression by human neutrophils and other cells. C-Reactive protein enhances the formation of monocyte-platelet aggregates and also promotes P-selectin expression and platelet adhesion to endothelial cells. Further, the adipose tissue is a significant source of tissue factor and PAI-1. Conversely, the circulating levels of adiponectin, a hormone that exerts vasculoprotective, anti-atherosclerotic and antithrombotic effects, are reduced in obese individuals. 4. A better understanding of the interactions of the adipose tissue with circulating and vascular cells and the dissection of the mechanisms linking adipokines to arterial and venous thrombosis may identify obese individuals at particularly high cardiovascular risk and indicate promising vasculoprotective and therapeutic targets. PMID:21848866

  14. Excellent long-term results with iliac stenting in local anesthesia for post-thrombotic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Just, Sven; Foegh, Pia; Baekgaard, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Background Only 20% of iliac veins will recanalize on anticoagulation (AC) treatment alone and may, therefore, develop venous obstruction after iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis (DVT). A considerable number of these patients will suffer from post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) leading to impaired quality of life in more than 50%. Endovascular treatment for iliac vein obstruction using stents is known to alleviate PTS symptoms in selected patients. Purpose To report the Danish long-term results of endovascular treatment with iliac stenting. Material and Methods From 2000 to 2013 consecutive patients were evaluated and 19 patients with severe venous claudication were identified and subsequently underwent angioplasty and stenting. AC treatment was prescribed for 6 months, and knee-high class II compression stocking recommended for 1 year. Scheduled follow-up was done in the outpatient clinic at 6 weeks, 3 months, and annually thereafter. Results Nineteen patients, all women, all with left-sided iliac vein obstruction, and all with severe PTS symptoms were included. The median follow-up time was 81 months (range, 1–146 months; mean, 69 months). Primary patency rate of the inserted iliac stent was 89% (17/19) and 16 patients (84 %) had almost or total symptom relief at follow-up. Conclusion Endovascular stenting of iliac obstruction in local anesthesia is minimally invasive and shows excellent long-term outcomes for patients suffering from PTS. PMID:26445677

  15. Acute Superior Mesenteric Venous Thrombosis: Transcatheter Thrombolysis and Aspiration Thrombectomy Therapy by Combined Route of Superior Mesenteric Vein and Artery in Eight Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shuofei Liu, Baochen Ding, Weiwei He, Changsheng Wu, Xingjiang Li, Jieshou

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo assess the feasibility, effectiveness, and safety of catheter-directed thrombolysis and aspiration thrombectomy therapy by combined route of superior mesenteric vein and artery (SMV+SMA) for acute superior mesenteric venous thrombosis (ASMVT).MethodsThis retrospective study reviewed eight ASMVT patients with transcatheter direct thrombolysis and aspiration thrombectomy therapy via SMV and indirect thrombolysis via SMA during a period of 14 months. The demographics, etiology, risk factors, therapeutic effect, complications, mortality, and follow-up of the study population were assessed. Anatomic and imaging classification of location and extent of thrombus at diagnosis and degree of thrombus lysis were described.ResultsTechnical success was achieved with substantial improvement in symptoms and thrombus resolution after thrombolytic therapy in all patients. The local urokinase infusion by SMA and SMV was performed for 5–7 (6.13 ± 0.83) and 7–15 (12 ± 2.51) days. Anticoagulation was performed catheter-directed and then orally throughout hospitalization and after discharge. Four patients required delayed localized bowel resection after thrombolytic therapy with no death. Thrombolytic therapy was not interrupted despite minor bleeding at the puncture site in two patients and sepsis in another two postoperatively. Nearly complete removal of thrombus was demonstrated by contrast-enhanced CT scan and portography before discharge. Patients were discharged in 10–27 (19.25 ± 4.89) days after admission. No recurrence developed during the follow-up of 10–13 (12.13 ± 0.99) months.ConclusionsCatheter-directed thrombolytic and aspiration therapy via SMV+SMA is beneficial for ASMVT in avoiding patient death, efficient resolving thrombus, rapid improving symptoms, reversing extensive intestinal ischemia, averting bowel resection, or localizing infarcted bowel segment and preventing short bowel syndrome.

  16. Effect of different aspirin doses on arterial thrombosis after canine carotid endarterectomy: a scanning electron microscope and indium-111-labeled platelet study

    SciTech Connect

    Ercius, M.S.; Chandler, W.F.; Ford, J.W.; Swanson, D.P.; Burke, J.C.

    1984-02-01

    Although it is widely accepted that aspirin inhibits platelet aggregation in arterial thrombosis, the appropriate dosage of aspirin remains quite controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of different doses of aspirin (0.5 mg/kg vs. 10 mg/kg) on mural thrombus formation after carotid endarterectomy. Eighteen hours after oral aspirin administration, 20 endarterectomies were performed on mongrel dogs with the use of the operating microscope. Blood flow was then restored for 3 hours and the vessels were prepared for investigation with the scanning electron microscope. Ten endarterectomies were also performed on unmedicated dogs as controls. Five minutes before vessel unclamping, autologous indium-111-labeled platelets were administered intravenously, and the endarterectomized portions of the vessels were studied with a gamma counter system after harvesting. Group 1, the control group, revealed extensive mural thrombus consisting of platelet aggregates, fibrin, red blood cells, and white blood cells. Six of the 10 vessels in Group 2, premedicated with 0.5 mg of aspirin per kg, demonstrated varying amounts of mural thrombus. Group 3 (10 vessels), premedicated with 10 mg of aspirin per kg, revealed a platelet monolayer completely covering the exposed vessel wall media, with scattered white blood cells and infrequent fine fibrin strands overlying the platelet surface. The mean (+/- SD) radioactivity per group expressed as counts/minute/mm2 was: Group 1--2055.3 +/- 1905.5, log . 7.253 +/- 0.926; Group 2--1235.6 +/- 1234.3, log . 6.785 +/- 0.817; Group 3--526 +/- 433.06, log . 5.989 +/- 0.774.

  17. Antithrombotic activity of NSP-513, a novel selective phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor, on femoral arterial thrombosis induced by physical stenosis and electrical current: comparison of antithrombotic and hemodynamic effects.

    PubMed

    Hirose, H; Mashiko, S; Kimura, T; Ishida, F; Mochizuki, N; Nishibe, T; Nishikibe, M

    2000-04-01

    NSP-513, a novel potent and selective phosphodiesterase 3 (PDE 3) inhibitor, and cilostazol, a previously developed PDE 3 inhibitor, were compared with respect to antiplatelet, antithrombotic, and hemodynamic effects. In the in vitro antiplatelet aggregation studies, NSP-513 and cilostazol inhibited collagen-induced canine platelet aggregation with median inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 0.093 and 3.1 miccroM, respectively, and inhibited adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced canine platelet aggregation with IC50 values of 0.15 and 12 microM, respectively. For ADP-induced platelet aggregation, the presence of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1; 3 and 10 nM) further decreased the IC50 values for NSP-513 to 0.11 and 0.032 microM, respectively. In ex vivo antiplatelet aggregation studies, orally administered NSP-513 (0.03-1 mg/kg) and cilostazol (50 mg/kg) inhibited collagen-induced canine platelet aggregation. In an in vivo canine femoral arterial thrombosis model, intraduodenally administered NSP-513 (0.01-0.03 mg/ kg) dose-dependently prevented thrombus formation without any changes in blood pressure, heart rate, or bleeding time. In conscious dogs, NSP-513 at oral doses of > or =0.3 mg/kg produced hemodynamic changes such as decreased blood pressure and increased heart rate and LVdP/dt(max). Thus the minimal hemodynamically effective dose of NSP-513 was 0.3 mg/kg, and the hemodynamic effects of this dose were comparable to those of 50 mg/kg of cilostazol. In conclusion, these data suggest that NSP-513 has in vivo selectivity for antiplatelet and antithrombotic activities over hemodynamic activity, and that the selectivity of NSP-513 is higher than that of cilostazol in dogs.

  18. Emergency Endovascular 'Bridge' Treatment for Iliac-Enteric Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Franchin, Marco; Tozzi, Matteo; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Castelli, Patrizio

    2011-10-15

    Aortic aneurysm has been reported to be the dominant cause of primary iliac-enteric fistula (IEF) in >70% of cases [1]; other less common causes of primary IEF include peptic ulcer, primary aortitis, pancreatic pseudocyst, or neoplastic erosion into an adjacent artery [2, 3]. We describe an unusual case of IEF managed with a staged approach using an endovascular stent-graft as a 'bridge' in the emergency setting to optimize the next elective definitive excision of the lesion.

  19. Dissecting aneurysm of the middle cerebral artery treated with heparin infusion in a 6-year-old child; neurological recovery with delayed spontaneous thrombosis: case illustration and literature review.

    PubMed

    Anichini, G; Passacantilli, E; Lenzi, J; Guidetti, G; Santoro, A

    2012-04-01

    Aneurysms in the pediatric population are a rare pathology with specific features which requires a deep knowledge of their pathogenesis for the best therapeutic choice; the authors report their experience with a patient presenting aneurysm of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) associated with proximal stenosis of the vessel. A six-year-old girl came to our observation after sudden onset of headache and left hemiparesis. Angio-MRI and angio-CT scan showed a right MCA dissecting aneurysms associated with proximal stenosis of the vessel. Patient started a therapy with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), replaced, 15 days later, with acetyl-salicylic acid (ASA). Patient showed a rapid and almost complete neurological recovery, despite several radiological exams confirmed a complete occlusion of the right MCA. As many other authors noted, dissecting aneurysms in the pediatric population are probably due to a defect of the entire arterial wall. Combination of stenosis, turbulence and partial thrombosis of the aneurysm led to a complete occlusion of artery involved, leading to the formation of collateral circles. In our case, complete thrombosis was probably delayed with anticoagulant therapy and the progressive reinforcement of collateral circles lead to the patient's neurological recovery.

  20. Thrombosis in pregnancy and maternal outcomes.

    PubMed

    James, Andra H

    2015-09-01

    Pregnancy increases the risk of thrombosis four- to five-fold. Seventy-five to eighty percent of pregnancy-related thrombotic events are venous and twenty to -twenty-five percent are arterial. The main reason for the increased risk is hypercoagulability. Women are hypercoagulable because they have evolved so that they are protected against the bleeding challenges of pregnancy, miscarriage, or childbirth. Both genetic and acquired risk factors can further increase the risk of thrombosis. The maternal consequences of thrombosis of pregnancy include permanent vascular damage, disability, and death. While the maternal outcomes of thrombosis can be modified by anticoagulation therapy, management of thrombosis during pregnancy is the subject of another paper in this issue (see paper by B. Konkle). This review will focus on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, risk factors, and maternal consequences of thrombosis in pregnancy.

  1. Travelers' thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Raymond V; Hudson, Martin F

    2014-02-01

    The suggestion that venous thromboembolism (VTE) is associated with air travel has for several decades been the subject of both "media hype" and extensive debate in the medical literature. As emotion and anecdote is often a feature in this debate, it is therefore necessary to separate evidence from anecdote. "Travelers' thrombosis" is a more appropriate term because the evidence suggests that any form of travel involving immobility lasting more than 4 h can predispose to thrombosis. There is no unique factor in the air travel cabin environment that has been shown to have any effect on the coagulation cascade. Prevention of thrombosis in any form of travel, including air travel, requires being aware of the issue and making an adequate risk assessment together with appropriate prophylactic measures.

  2. Travelers' thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Raymond V; Hudson, Martin F

    2014-02-01

    The suggestion that venous thromboembolism (VTE) is associated with air travel has for several decades been the subject of both "media hype" and extensive debate in the medical literature. As emotion and anecdote is often a feature in this debate, it is therefore necessary to separate evidence from anecdote. "Travelers' thrombosis" is a more appropriate term because the evidence suggests that any form of travel involving immobility lasting more than 4 h can predispose to thrombosis. There is no unique factor in the air travel cabin environment that has been shown to have any effect on the coagulation cascade. Prevention of thrombosis in any form of travel, including air travel, requires being aware of the issue and making an adequate risk assessment together with appropriate prophylactic measures. PMID:24597166

  3. Venous Covered Stent: Successful Occlusion of a Symptomatic Internal Iliac Arteriovenous Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Cronin, P.; McPherson, S.; Meaney, J.F.; Mavor, A.

    2002-08-15

    We report the placement of a covered stent within the internal iliac vein (IIV) to occlude a symptomatic iatrogenic internal iliac arteriovenous fistula following an abdominal aortic graft. Angiography revealed a direct communication between an internal iliac graft to artery anastomosis and the right IIV with rapid shunting into the inferior vena cava and a small associated pseudoaneurysm. Femoral, brachial or axillary arterial access was precluded. The fistula was successfully occluded by a stent-graft placed in the IIV. Arteriovenous fistula can be treated in a number of ways including covered stent placement on the arterial side. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time placement in a vein has been described. Where access is difficult or the procedure carries a high risk of complication, avenous covered stent may offer an alternative.

  4. Vampire bat salivary plasminogen activator promotes rapid and sustained reperfusion without concomitant systemic plasminogen activation in a canine model of arterial thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Mellott, M J; Stabilito, I I; Holahan, M A; Cuca, G C; Wang, S; Li, P; Barrett, J S; Lynch, J J; Gardell, S J

    1992-02-01

    The efficacy of recombinant vampire bat salivary plasminogen activator (bat-PA) as a thrombolytic agent was compared with that of human tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) in a canine model of arterial thrombosis. An occlusive thrombus was formed in the femoral artery by insertion of a thrombogenic copper coil; femoral arterial blood flow was monitored with a Doppler flow meter. Bat-PA and t-PA, when administered by 5-minute intravenous infusion (14 nmol/kg), reperfused seven out of eight and four out of eight dogs, respectively. The median reperfusion times in the bat-PA and t-PA groups were 24 and greater than or equal to 131 minutes, respectively. The mean reperfusion times (+/- SEM) in the recanalized bat-PA- and t-PA-treated dogs were similar (20 +/- 5 and 11 +/- 2 minutes, respectively, p = NS). Maximal blood flow after reperfusion was greater with bat-PA than with t-PA (80 +/- 10% and 41 +/- 15% of control flow, respectively, p less than 0.05). Furthermore, the median reocclusion time was markedly delayed in the bat-PA group relative to the t-PA group (131 versus 34 minutes, respectively, p less than 0.05). Plasma fibrinogen and plasminogen were not significantly depleted by the administration of t-PA or bat-PA. However, plasma alpha 2-antiplasmin activity was moderately depressed in the t-PA group relative to the bat-PA group (p less than 0.05). The clearance profile for t-PA was monoexponential, with a half-life (t1/2) of 2.4 +/- 0.3 minutes and a mean residence time of 3.5 +/- 0.4 minutes. The clearance profile for bat-PA was biexponential, with a t1/2 alpha of 0.9 +/- 0.2 minutes, a t1/2 beta of 20.2 +/- 2.7 minutes, and a mean residence time of 21.3 +/- 4.3 minutes. The steady-state volume of distribution displayed by bat-PA was 16-fold greater than that of t-PA. Zymography of serial plasma samples from the bat-PA-treated dogs failed to demonstrate the apparent generation of a complex between bat-PA and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1; the

  5. Right Double Inferior Vena Cava (IVC) with Preaortic Iliac Confluence – Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Babu, C.S. Ramesh; Lalwani, Rekha; Kumar, Indra

    2014-01-01

    Anomalies of the inferior vena cava (IVC) are uncommon and most of them remain asymptomatic. Though rare, anomalies of IVC can lead to severe hemorrhagic complications especially during aortoiliac surgery. Prior knowledge of these variations facilitates proper interpretation of radiological images and safe performance of interventional procedures and surgeries. During routine anatomical dissection of abdomen in a female cadaver we observed the presence of right sided duplication of IVC. Both IVCs were present on the right side of abdominal aorta, one ventral and the other more dorsal in position and named ventral right IVC and dorsal right IVC. The ventrally and medially placed IVC, which appeared to be the main IVC was formed by the union of two common iliac veins in front of the right common iliac artery (Preaortic iliac confluence-“Marsupial Cava”). The right external iliac vein continued as the more dorsally and laterally placed dorsal right IVC. The right internal iliac vein after receiving a transverse anastomotic vein from the external iliac continued as the right common iliac vein. This transverse anastomosis was present behind the right common iliac artery. The narrower dorsal right IVC joined the wider ventral right IVC just below the level of renal veins to form a single IVC. The abdominal aorta presented a convexity to the left. PMID:24701503

  6. [Traveler's thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Riedel, M; Bohanes, V

    2002-08-01

    It is pathophysiologically conceivable that prolonged sitting in a tight space (e.g., in airplane or other transport vehicle) may lead to leg vein thrombosis. The association between the incidence of venous thromboembolism and long travel has not been sufficiently documented but seems probable. However, this association is only weak and the incidence of symptomatic thromboembolism much lower than the impression given by the recent publicity. In a healthy person, the risk of suffering a clinically relevant leg vein thrombosis solely because of a flight is extreme low. In persons with risk factors for venous thromboembolism, the flight represents an additional, as yet not quantifiable risk. This risk increases with the duration of the travel. The most important cause of thrombosis during long journeys seems to be venostasis due to relative immobilization. It is not clear whether flight travel represents a higher risk of thrombosis compared to other transport vehicles with comparable duration and immobilization. Until more exact information becomes available, it seems reasonable to recommend simple isometric and isotonic leg exercises during long travel. More aggressive measures must be considered for persons with risk factors for thromboembolism, but these measures should be individualized.

  7. Endovascular Treatment of Ruptured Iliac Aneurysm Previously Treated by Endovascular Means

    SciTech Connect

    Dalainas, Ilias Nano, Giovanni; Stegher, Silvia; Bianchi, Paolo; Malacrida, Giovanni; Tealdi, Domenico G.

    2008-03-15

    A patient with a ruptured iliac aneurysm was admitted to the Emergency Department in hypovolemic shock. He had previously undergone surgical treatment for an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm, which was managed with a terminal-terminal Dacron tube graft. Subsequently, he developed two iliac aneurysms, which were treated endovascularly with two wall-grafts in the right and one wall-graft in the left iliac arteries. He suffered chronic renal failure and arterial hypertension. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed rupture of the right iliac aneurysm and dislocation of the two wall-grafts. He was treated in an emergency situation with the implantation of an iliac endograft that bridged the two wall-grafts, which resulted in hemostasis and stabilization of his condition. Five days later, in an elective surgical situation, he was treated with the implantation of an aorto-uni-iliac endograft combined with a femoral-femoral bypass. He was discharged 5 days later in good condition. At the 4 year follow-up visit, the endoprosthesis remained in place with no evidence of an endoleak. In conclusion, overlapping of endografts should be avoided, if possible. Strict surveillance of the endovascularly treated patient remains mandatory.

  8. [Combination Chemotherapy Using Sorafenib and Hepatic Arterial Infusion with a Fine-Powder Formulation of Cisplatin for Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Portal Vein Tumor Thrombosis--A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Tadashi; Kanazawa, Akishige; Shimizu, Sadatoshi; Murata, Akihiro; Sakae, Masayuki; Kurihara, Shigeaki; Tashima, Tetsuzo; Deguchi, Sota; Nakai, Takashi; Kawasaki, Yasuko; Kioka, Kiyohide

    2015-11-01

    Sorafenib has been a standard therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein thrombosis. Hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) is still preferably performed in Japan because of its relatively good tumor-shrinking effect. We report a case of advanced multiple HCC with portal thrombus that responded to combination chemotherapy with sorafenib and repeat hepatic arterial infusion with a fine-powder formulation of cisplatin (IA-call®). A 57-year-old man presented for the treatment of HCC with alcoholic cirrhosis. Multiple HCC were found to be rapidly progressing with portal thrombosis. HAIC with IA-call® was performed, but the tumors progressed. TAE was performed 3 times thereafter and the main tumor shrunk to some extent. A month after the last TAE, the HCC was found to progress again, and oral sorafenib was administered. A reservoir and catheter were placed and HAIC with low-dose 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin was performed for 3 cycles following 1 HAIC cycle with epirubicin and mitomycin C, which was not effective. For 10 months after initial therapy, HAIC using IA-call® has been performed once for 6 weeks. After performing HAIC with IA-call® 5 times, the serum levels of HCC tumor markers AFP and PIVKA-Ⅱdecreased, and the tumors continued to shrink and were not stained on enhanced CT scan. The patient has been alive for 23 months after the initial therapy and has maintained stable disease. PMID:26805203

  9. Stent Placement on Fresh Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Vorwerk, Dierk; Guenther, Rolf W.; Schuermann, Karl

    1997-09-15

    Purpose: To report on the efficacy of fixing fresh venous thrombus to the venous wall by stent placement. Methods: Seven patients underwent stenting to treat acute venous thrombosis. In two patients, the hemodialysis fistula was thrombosed with the thrombus extending into the brachial veins. In three patients, the hemodialysis fistula was patent but massive swelling of the ipsilateral arm was caused by proximal venous thrombosis. Two patients presented with iliac venous thrombosis within stented pelvic veins. Stent placement was preceded by other mechanical thrombectomy methods in all cases. Results: Attachment of thrombus to the venous wall was successful in all cases treated. Acute rethrombosis did not occur. Follow-up patency in dialysis patients was 7.2 {+-} 2.1 months. One patient had rethrombosis of the dialysis graft 3 months after primary treatment. Three patients developed restenosis within a mean period of 7.7 months. One shunt remained patent for 10 months with no event of reobstruction during follow-up. In both patients with iliac stent placement, the vein remained patent over a follow-up period of 8 and 12 months respectively. Conclusion: Stenting fresh venous thrombus can achieve immediate venous patency. It may be used as an alternative approach when all other percutaneous methods fail. Frequent restenosis within stented veins limits its use to very selected cases.

  10. Power-Pulse Thrombolysis and Stent Recanalization for Acute Post-Liver Transplant Iliocaval Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Baccin, Carlos E.; Haskal, Ziv J.

    2008-07-15

    Postoperative inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombosis is a potentially lethal complication in a liver transplant recipient. We report the case of a 57-year-old liver transplant recipient, who developed acute, postoperative, markedly symptomatic complete IVC, ilial-femoral-caval, and left renal vein thrombosis. After treatment with power-pulse tissue plasminogen activator thrombolysis, thrombectomy, and stent placement, the IVC and iliac veins were successfully recanalized. At 2.5-year imaging and laboratory follow-up, the IVC, iliac, and renal veins remained patent and graft function was preserved.

  11. Thrombosis in newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Bacciedoni, Viviana; Attie, Myriam; Donato, Hugo

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of thrombosis is higher among newborn infants than in any other stage of pediatric development. This fact is the consequence of labile characteristics of the neonatal hemostatic system, in addition to exposure to multiple risk factors and the wide use of vascular catheters. Venous thromboses, which mainly affect the limbs, the right atrium and renal veins, are more frequently seen than arterial thromboses. A stroke may be caused by the occlusion of the arterial flow entering the brain or by occlusion of its venous drainage system. Purpura fulminans is a very severe condition that should be treated as a medical emergency, and is secondary to severe protein C deficiency or, less frequently, protein S or antithrombin deficiency. Most thrombotic events should be managed with antithrombotic therapy, which is done with unfractionated and/or low molecular weight heparins. Purpura fulminans requires protein C replacement and/or fresh frozen plasma infusion. Thrombolytic therapy is done using tissue plasminogen activator and should only be used for life-, or limb-, or organ-threatening thrombosis.

  12. Thrombosis in newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Bacciedoni, Viviana; Attie, Myriam; Donato, Hugo

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of thrombosis is higher among newborn infants than in any other stage of pediatric development. This fact is the consequence of labile characteristics of the neonatal hemostatic system, in addition to exposure to multiple risk factors and the wide use of vascular catheters. Venous thromboses, which mainly affect the limbs, the right atrium and renal veins, are more frequently seen than arterial thromboses. A stroke may be caused by the occlusion of the arterial flow entering the brain or by occlusion of its venous drainage system. Purpura fulminans is a very severe condition that should be treated as a medical emergency, and is secondary to severe protein C deficiency or, less frequently, protein S or antithrombin deficiency. Most thrombotic events should be managed with antithrombotic therapy, which is done with unfractionated and/or low molecular weight heparins. Purpura fulminans requires protein C replacement and/or fresh frozen plasma infusion. Thrombolytic therapy is done using tissue plasminogen activator and should only be used for life-, or limb-, or organ-threatening thrombosis. PMID:27079395

  13. [Cockett's syndrome, May-Thurner syndrome, or iliac vein compression syndrome].

    PubMed

    Gil Martín, A R; Carreras Aja, M; Arrieta Ardieta, I; Labayen Azparren, I

    2014-01-01

    Iliac vein compression syndrome (also known as May-Thurner syndrome or Cockett's syndrome) is a rare clinical entity in which the left common iliac vein is compressed when it passes between the right common iliac artery and the spine. The sustained compression and trauma caused by the pulsatile force of the artery on the vein damage the intima and lead to the formation of membranes or bands in the vascular lumen that hinder or obstruct the flow of blood in the vein, favoring thrombus formation. The current treatment strategy of choice is endovascular vein patch angioplasty and stenting with the aim of improving the caliber of the lumen and enabling normal venous drainage. We present two cases of May-Thurner syndrome and review the clinical and CT findings.

  14. Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis of Lower Limb Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Pianta, Marcus J.; Thomson, Kenneth R.

    2011-02-15

    Late complications of thrombosis of the deep veins in the region between the popliteal vein termination and the confluence of the common iliac veins and inferior vena cava (suprapopliteal deep-vein thrombosis) are common and often unrecognized by those responsible for the initial management. Pharmacomechanical-assisted clearance of the thrombus at the time of first presentation provides the best opportunity for complete recovery with preservation of normal venous valve function and avoidance of recurrent deep-vein thrombosis and postthrombotic syndrome. Recent interventional radiology methods provide for rapid and complete thrombolysis even in some patients in whom thrombolysis was previously considered contraindicated. This review describes the methods, safety, and efficacy of acute interventional treatment of suprapopliteal deep-vein thrombosis.

  15. Treatment of a Common Iliac Aneurysm by Endovascular Exclusion Using the Amplatzer Vascular Plug and Femorofemoral Crossover Graft

    SciTech Connect

    Coupe, Nicholas J. Ling, Lynn; Cowling, Mark G.; Asquith, John R.; Hopkinson, Gregory B.

    2009-07-15

    We report our initial experience using the Amplatzer Vascular Plug II (AVP2) in the treatment of a left common iliac aneurysm. Following investigation by computerized tomographic angiography and catheter angiography, a 79-year-old man was found to have a markedly tortuous iliac system, with a left common iliac artery aneurysm that measured 48 mm in maximal diameter. Due to the patient's age and comorbidities the surgical opinion was that conventional open repair was not suitable. However, due to the tortuous nature of the aneurysm and iliac vessels, standard endovascular repair, using either a bifurcated or an aorto-uni-iliac stent graft, was also not possible. A combined approach was used by embolizing the ipsilateral internal iliac artery using coils and excluding the aneurysm using two AVP2 occlusion devices, followed by femorofemoral crossover grafting. Total aneurysm occlusion was achieved using this method and this allowed the patient to have a much less invasive surgical procedure than with conventional open repair of common iliac aneurysms, thus avoiding potential comorbidity and mortality.

  16. Triple, simultaneous, very late coronary stent thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Miguel Silva; Luz, André; Anjo, Diana; Antunes, Nuno; Santos, Mário; Carvalho, Henrique; Torres, Severo

    2013-03-01

    Coronary artery stent thrombosis is an uncommon but potentially catastrophic complication. The risk of very late stent thrombosis (VLST) raises important safety issues regarding the first generation of drug-eluting stents (DES). Although several complex mechanisms for VLST have been suggested and various predictors have been described, its pathophysiology is not completely understood and it is not known whether longer-term dual antiplatelet therapy reduces the risk. We present a rare case of simultaneous very late DES thrombosis in the three vascular territories, following discontinuation of antiplatelet therapy seven years after stent placement, presenting as cardiogenic shock.

  17. IVC agenesis: a rare cause of deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Man, Louise; Hendricks, Nicholas; Maitland, Hillary

    2016-04-01

    We present the case of a healthy, young Caucasian female who presented to an outside hospital with phlegmasia cerulea dolens of both lower extremities. Computed tomography angiography revealed inferior vena cava (IVC) occlusion. She was initiated on heparin infusion and transferred to University of Virginia Medical Center. Our evaluation revealed aplasia of the IVC from the infrahepatic segment to the confluence of the common iliac veins and acute bilateral iliac vein thromboses. An extensive network of collateral veins was noted. These findings were consistent with IVC agenesis. She was not pregnant or using contraception. Primary thrombophilia workup was negative. She underwent bilateral iliac vein thrombolysis and was started on anticoagulation. While IVC agenesis is rare, it carries risk for development of thrombotic sequelae and bears consideration when evaluating young patients with unexplained deep vein thrombosis, especially if extensive and bilateral.

  18. Endovascular Stent-Graft Placement as Emergency Treatment for Ruptured Iliac Pseudoaneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Aytekin, Cueneyt; Boyvat, Fatih; Yildirim, Erkan; Coskun, Mehmet

    2002-08-15

    A 65-year-old woman with advanced mucinous carcinoma of the ovary presented with massive rectal bleeding caused by rupture of an iliac artery pseudoaneurysm into the bowel. Surgery was contraindicated due to the patient's poor clinical condition. We successfully placed an endovascular stent-graft that excluded the pseudoaneurysm. There were no complications, and the patient recovered well.

  19. Primary Stenting for Complex Atherosclerotic Plaques in Aortic and Iliac Stenoses

    SciTech Connect

    Onal, Baran; Ilgit, Erhan T.; Yuecel, Cem; Ozbek, Erdal; Vural, Murat; Akpek, Sergin

    1998-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of primary stenting for complex atherosclerotic plaques in aortic and iliac stenoses that are not amenable to balloon angioplasty alone. Methods: Nineteen patients with complex atherosclerotic plaques were treated with a Palmaz stent (n= 19), Wallstent (n= 1), Strecker stent (n= 1), or Memotherm stent (n= 1). A total of 22 stenoses presenting with complex plaque morphology including ulcerated plaques, ulcerated plaques with focal aneurysms, plaques with heavy calcification, severely eccentric plaques, plaques with overhanging edge, and plaques with spontaneous dissection were stented. The lesions were in the aorta (n= 1), common iliac artery (n= 19), or external iliac artery (n= 2). Results: Immediate angiography after stent placement revealed restoration of patency of the stented segment. Focal aneurysms and ulcerated areas were occluded in the follow-up angiographies obtained 4-12 weeks after the procedure. In one case with poor distal runoff and multiple complex lesions of the iliac artery, subacute occlusion occurred. Clinical and angiographic follow-up (3-46 months) revealed patency of all other stented segments. Conclusion: Primary stenting is an effective and reliable approach for complex plaques in stenoses. Patency of the arterial segment with a smooth lumen can be created without the risk of acute complications such as distal embolization, dissection, or occlusion.

  20. Thrombosis in vasculitic disorders-clinical manifestations, pathogenesis and management.

    PubMed

    Katz, Ofrat Beyar; Brenner, Benjamin; Horowitz, Netanel A

    2015-09-01

    Inflammation and coagulation are known to affect each other in many ways. Vasculitis represents a group of disorders where blood vessels (small, medium, large or variable) are infiltrated with inflammatory cells. Accumulating evidence in the literature suggests both clinical and physiological association between vasculitis and thrombosis. Vasculitis-associated thrombosis involves arteries and veins, and a tight connection has been reported between the activity of vasculitis and the appearance of thrombosis. Pathophysiology of these relations is complex and not completely understood. While thrombophilic factors are associated with vasculitis, it remains unclear whether a true association with clinical thrombosis is present. Furthermore, several factors leading to hemostasis, endothelial injury and induction of microparticles were described as possibly accounting for thrombosis. Management of thrombosis in vasculitis patients is challenging and should be further assessed in randomized controlled studies. The current review describes clinical manifestations, pathogenesis and management of thrombosis associated with different vasculitides.

  1. An animal model of coronary thrombosis and thrombolysis--comparisons of vascular damage and thrombus formation in the coronary and femoral arteries after balloon angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Katsuragawa, M; Fujiwara, H; Kawamura, A; Htay, T; Yoshikuni, Y; Mori, K; Sasayama, S

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare vascular damage and thrombus formation in the coronary and femoral arteries after balloon angioplasty, and to develop a physiological animal model of intracoronary occlusive thrombus using the balloon angioplasty technique. Angioplasty of the left anterior descending coronary arteries of 14 dogs was performed with an oversized balloon catheter at a high inflation pressure (150 PSI). This was followed angiographically (PTCA protocol). Dogs that showed arterial occlusion were divided into 2 groups. The dogs in 1 group were killed with an overdose of sodium pentobarbital, and those in the other group were infused with a tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA; 300,000 unit/kg). Angioplasty of the femoral and profunda femoris arteries (n = 5) was performed in 5 other dogs (PTA protocol). All of the animals were eventually sacrificed and tissue preparations were made from all 3 types of arteries. In the PTCA protocol, acute arterial occlusion was seen angiographically within 2 h in 10 of the 14 dogs. A histological study of the acutely occluded arteries (n = 5) showed thrombotic occlusion and severe arterial damage with medial tearing. T-PA was infused to 5 of the dogs with acute occlusion, and all showed reperfusion. A histological study of these animals showed severe arterial damage, but no macroscopic thrombus. In 4 dogs without acute occlusion, none of the 10 arteries examined were acutely occluded. In the PTA protocol, none of the 10 arteries were acutely occluded. A histological study showed fewer thrombi and less severe arterial damage.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Thrombosis following ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kasum, Miro; Danolić, Damir; Orešković, Slavko; Ježek, Davor; Beketić-Orešković, Lidija; Pekez, Marijeta

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this review is to analyse the pathophysiology and complications of thrombosis in conjuction with ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) following ovulation induction and to suggest practical guidelines usefull for the prevention and treatment. Although the incidence of thrombosis varies from 0.2% among in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles and up to 10% for severe cases of the syndrome, it represents the most dangerous complication of OHSS. Different changes in haemostatic markers have been found to create a state of hypercoagulability, but no single standard test is available to estimate the state of thrombosis. The role of markers for thrombophilia is controversial. Thromboses are mostly venous (67-75%) involving upper limbs and neck, then arterial (25-33%) which are mainly intracerebral. The predominant sites of venous thromboembolism in the upper part of the body may be explained by higher concentrations of estrogens drained through lymphatic ducts from ascites and by compression of rudimentary branchyal cysts. Once early diagnosis is established, it is crucial to use an anticoagulant treatment with heparin proceeded with thromboprophylaxis. However, identification of patients at risk and preventive measures of OHSS are the best means in reducing the risk of thrombosis after ovarian stimulation.

  3. Doping and thrombosis in sports.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Banfi, Giuseppe

    2011-11-01

    Historically, humans have long sought to enhance their "athletic" performance to increase body weight, aggressiveness, mental concentration and physical strength, contextually reducing fatigue, pain, and improving recovery. Although regular training is the mainstay for achieving these targets, the ancillary use of ergogenic aids has become commonplace in all sports. The demarcation between ergogenic aids and doping substances or practices is continuously challenging and mostly based on perceptions regarding the corruption of the fairness of competition and the potential side effects or adverse events arising from the use of otherwise unnecessary ergogenic substances. A kaleidoscope of side effects has been associated with the use of doping agents, including behavioral, skeletal, endocrinologic, metabolic, hemodynamic, and cardiovascular imbalances. Among the various doping substances, the most striking association with thrombotic complications has been reported for androgenic anabolic steroids (i.e., cardiomyopathy, fatal and nonfatal arrhythmias, myocardial infarction [MI], intracardiac thrombosis, stroke, venous thromboembolism [VTE], limb arterial thrombosis, branch retinal vein occlusion, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis) and blood boosting (i.e., VTE and MI, especially for epoetin and analogs). The potential thrombotic complication arising from misuse of other doping agents such as the administration of cortisol, growth hormone, prolactin, cocaine, and platelet-derived preparations is instead speculative or anecdotal at best. The present article provides an overview on the epidemiological association as well as the underlying biochemical and biological mechanisms linking the practice of doping in sports with the development of thrombosis.

  4. Cancer associated thrombosis: risk factors and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Eichinger, Sabine

    2016-04-01

    Deep vein thrombosis of the leg and pulmonary embolism are frequent diseases and cancer is one of their most important risk factors. Patients with cancer also have a higher prevalence of venous thrombosis located in other parts than in the legs and/or in unusual sites including upper extremity, splanchnic or cerebral veins. Cancer also affects the risk of arterial thrombotic events particularly in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms and in vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitor recipients. Several risk factors need to interact to trigger thrombosis. In addition to common risk factors such as surgery, hospitalisation, infection and genetic coagulation disorders, the thrombotic risk is also driven and modified by cancer-specific factors including type, histology, and stage of the malignancy, cancer treatment and certain biomarkers. A venous thrombotic event in a cancer patient has serious consequences as the risk of recurrent thrombosis, the risk of bleeding during anticoagulation and hospitalisation rates are all increased. Survival of cancer patients with thrombosis is worse compared to that of cancer patients without thrombosis, and thrombosis is a leading direct cause of death in cancer patients. PMID:27067965

  5. Abdominal aortic thrombosis in a patient with nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, M; Ohnishi, T; Okamoto, S; Yamakado, T; Isaka, N; Nakano, T

    1998-01-01

    We report a patient who presented with severe nephrotic syndrome complicated with infrarenal aortic and right renal arterial thrombosis. The nephrotic syndrome frequently causes thromboembolic complications in veins, but arterial thrombosis is relatively rare, especially in the aorta. Various predisposing factors leading to thromboembolic complications are discussed. In this case, the thromboembolic complication may have some clinical association with the hypercoagulable state in nephrotic syndrome.

  6. Detection of thrombosis and restenosis in an endovascular stent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Junru; Weissman, Eric

    2002-05-01

    Endovascular stents that are implanted in an artery are often used in the interventional treatment of coronary artery disease. Its widespread applications are, however, limited by the development of subacute thrombosis (clot forming inside of the stent). Ex vivo experiments with pigs have shown that the broadband A-mode ultrasound is quite effective in detection thrombosis and restenosis in an endovascular stent. [Work supported by BFGoodrich and Noveon, Inc.

  7. [Abnormal popliteal arteries].

    PubMed

    Elbaz, C

    1975-01-01

    Arteriopathy restricted to the popliteal artery, except in cases of atheroma, must indicate three of four unusual diagnoses: the trapped popliteal artery and the dessicating haematoma are anatomo-clinical entities that have been identified only relatively recently. The popliteal artery may be trapped by the medial gastrocnomius muscle, round the tendon of which the artery passes (totally or partially). This results in compression of the artery and eventually in thrombosis. Clinically, intermittent claudication is seen that may deteriorate and lead to gangrene of the toes. Arteriography makes it possible to diagnose the condition as the condition as the artery is considerably displaced inwards. Surgical correction is simple: sectioning of the tendon and repositioning of the artery. Dessicating haematoma of the popliteal artery is due essentially to atheroma, associated with medianecrosis. A "egg-timer" stenosis is found by arteriography and this condition also progresses towards thrombosis. Arterial restoration is called for, usually by bridging. PMID:1230799

  8. CEREBRAL VENOUS THROMBOSIS AND TURNER SYNDROME: A RARE REPORTED ASSOCIATION.

    PubMed

    Guler, A; Alpaydin, S; Bademkiran, F; Sirin, H; Celebisoy, N

    2015-01-01

    Turner Syndrome is the only known viable chromosomal monosomy, characterised by the complete or partial absence of an X chromosome. It's the most common chromosomal abnormality in females. Apart from the well known dysmorphic features of the syndrome, it has been associated with a number of vascular pathologies; mainly involving the cardiovascular, renovascular, peripheral vascular and cerebrovascular system. It seems striking that thromboembolism is not considered as a feature of the syndrome. Most of the thromboembolism cases are related to the arterial vascular system; except for some rare reported portal venous thrombosis cases, peripheral venous thrombosis cases and to the best of our knowledge a single case of cerebral venous thrombosis with Dandy Walker malformation and polymicrogyria. We herein report a cerebral venous thrombosis case with Turner Syndrome. With no other found underlying etiology, we want to highlight that Turner Syndrome, itself, may have a relationship not only with the cerebral arterial vascular system pathologies but also with the cerebral venous thrombosis.

  9. Stenting in Acute Lower Limb Arterial Occlusions

    SciTech Connect

    Raja, Jowad; Munneke, Graham; Morgan, Robert; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2008-07-15

    Management of critical limb ischemia of acute onset includes surgical embolectomy, bypass grafting, aspiration thrombectomy, thrombolysis, and mechanical thrombectomy followed by treatment of the underlying cause. We present our experience with the use of stents to treat acute embolic/thrombotic occlusions in one iliac and three femoropopliteal arteries. Although this is a small case series, excellent immediate and midterm results suggest that stenting of acute occlusions of the iliac, superficial femoral, and popliteal arteries is a safe and effective treatment option.

  10. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    Deep vein thrombosis, or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Most deep vein ... the condition is called thrombophlebitis. A deep vein thrombosis can break loose and cause a serious problem ...

  11. Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Education FAQs Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis FAQ174, August 2011 PDF ... Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality Payment Reform (MACRA) Education & Events Annual ... Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  12. [Prognosis of complications after reconstructive surgeries on the aorto-iliac segment].

    PubMed

    Poliantsev, A A; Mozgovoĭ, P V; Frolov, D V; Shcherbakov, M V

    2004-01-01

    Evaluation of efficacy of neuronet technologies for prognosis of specific complications after reconstructive surgeries on aorto-iliac segment was made. A learning sample consisted of 500 reconstructive surgeries, a test one - 161. High efficacy of analog neuron nets was revealed. Prognosis of early thrombosis, postoperative bleeding and also of lethal outcome demonstrated better results, mistake of prognosis was 3.7, 1.2 and 4.6%, respectively. Prognosis of infectious complications and long-term outcomes demonstrated worse results, mistake of prognosis was 7.0 and 10.5%, respectively.

  13. Thrombosis in the uremic milieu--emerging role of "thrombolome".

    PubMed

    Shashar, Moshe; Francis, Jean; Chitalia, Vipul

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by retention of a number of toxins, which unleash cellular damage. CKD environment with these toxins and a host of metabolic abnormalities (collectively termed as uremic milieu) is highly thrombogenic. CKD represents a strong and independent risk factor for both spontaneous venous and arterial (postvascular injury) thrombosis. Emerging evidence points to a previously unrecognized role of some of the prothrombotic uremic toxins. Here, we provide an overview of thrombosis in CKD and an update on indolic uremic toxins, which robustly increase tissue factor, a potent procoagulant, in several vascular cell types enhancing thrombosis. This panel of uremic toxins, which we term "thrombolome" (thrombosis and metabolome), represents a novel risk factor for thrombosis and can be further explored as biomarker for postvascular interventional thrombosis in patients with CKD.

  14. Adjunctive treatment with ticagrelor, but not clopidogrel, added to tPA enables sustained coronary artery recanalisation with recovery of myocardium perfusion in a canine coronary thrombosis model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Zhou, Xiaorong; Huang, Yanming; Khalil, Mazen; Wiktor, Dominik; van Giezen, J J J; Penn, Marc S

    2010-09-01

    Reperfusion therapy for myocardial infarction is limited by significant re-occlusion rates and less-than-optimal myocardial tissue perfusion. It was the objective of this study to assess and compare the effect of ticagrelor, the first reversibly binding oral P2Y12 receptor antagonist, with that of clopidogrel, in conjunction with thrombolytic therapy, on platelet aggregation, thrombus formation, and myocardial perfusion in a canine model. Thrombus formation was induced by electrolytic injury and blood flow was measured with a Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter. All animals received tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) (1 mg/kg over 20 min); 10 animals received clopidogrel (10 mg/kg IV bolus over 5 min), 10 animals received ticagrelor initiated with a 1-min bolus (75 microg/kg/min), followed by continuous infusion (10 microg/kg/min) for 2 h, and 10 animals received IV saline. Re-occlusion rate and cyclic flow variation decreased with ticagrelor compared to saline groups (p<0.05). Adenosine phosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation decreased with ticagrelor (1.9% +/- 2.67) and clopidogrel (1.11% +/- 2.0) vs. saline (26.3% +/- 23.5, p<0.05) at the end of adjunctive therapy. Bleeding time increased in the clopidogrel compared to the ticagrelor group (p=0.01). Infarct size was reduced with ticagrelor compared to the clopidogrel and saline groups (p<0.05). Blood flow remained significantly below baseline values at 20 min after tPA administration in the saline and clopidogrel groups but not in the ticagrelor group. In conclusion, in a dog coronary thrombosis model, ticagrelor blocks ADP-induced platelet activation and aggregation; prevents platelet-mediated thrombosis; prolongs reperfusion time and reduces re-occlusion and cyclic flow variation; and significantly decreases infarct size and rapidly restores myocardial tissue perfusion. PMID:20694285

  15. [Collaterals after flow alternation in pelvic arteries: precondition for pelvic reservoir therapy].

    PubMed

    Nasu, K; Fujimoto, H; Yamamoto, S; Naitou, H; Maekawa, I; Yasuda, S; Itou, H

    1998-04-01

    To determine the best flow alternation in the internal iliac arteries for regional chemotherapy using a reservoir to treat pelvic malignancies, collateral arteries that arose after arterial flow alternation were evaluated on follow-up pelvic angiographies. Follow-up angiographies were obtained in 11 patients with 21 embolized arteries; six male and five female patients including three with urinary bladder cancer, two with prostate cancer, four with uterine cervical cancer and two with bone metastasis. The interval until follow-up angiography ranged from one to-28 months (mean 8.9 months). Three radiologists interpreted the angiographic results and evaluated collateral vessels. Among 21 embolized arteries, 19 were well occluded, while two were not blocked completely. The two arteries with incomplete embolization did not induce collaterals. Eight internal iliac arteries occluded at the proximal portion enhanced retrogradely via collaterals from the ipsilateral external iliac arteries. Collaterals between the bilateral internal iliac arteries were noted only in four of them. In conclusion, embolization at the proximal point of the internal iliac arteries usually induced collaterals from the ipsilateral external iliac arteries and did not always from collaterals between the bilateral internal iliac arteries, which were necessary for regional chemotherapy. This should be considered when pelvic malignancies are treated with reservoirs.

  16. Ferric Chloride-induced Murine Thrombosis Models.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Nieman, Marvin; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Arterial thrombosis (blood clot) is a common complication of many systemic diseases associated with chronic inflammation, including atherosclerosis, diabetes, obesity, cancer and chronic autoimmune rheumatologic disorders. Thrombi are the cause of most heart attacks, strokes and extremity loss, making thrombosis an extremely important public health problem. Since these thrombi stem from inappropriate platelet activation and subsequent coagulation, targeting these systems therapeutically has important clinical significance for developing safer treatments. Due to the complexities of the hemostatic system, in vitro experiments cannot replicate the blood-to-vessel wall interactions; therefore, in vivo studies are critical to understand pathological mechanisms of thrombus formation. To this end, various thrombosis models have been developed in mice. Among them, ferric chloride (FeCl3) induced vascular injury is a widely used model of occlusive thrombosis that reports platelet activation and aggregation in the context of an aseptic closed vascular system. This model is based on redox-induced endothelial cell injury, which is simple and sensitive to both anticoagulant and anti-platelets drugs. The time required for the development of a thrombus that occludes blood flow gives a quantitative measure of vascular injury, platelet activation and aggregation that is relevant to thrombotic diseases. We have significantly refined this FeCl3-induced vascular thrombosis model, which makes the data highly reproducible with minimal variation. Here we describe the model and present representative data from several experimental set-ups that demonstrate the utility of this model in thrombosis research. PMID:27684194

  17. Postpartum renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Rubens, D; Sterns, R H; Segal, A J

    1985-01-01

    Renal vein thrombosis in adults is usually a complication of the nephrotic syndrome. Rarely, it has been reported in nonnephrotic women postpartum. The thrombosis may be a complication of the hypercoagulable state associated with both the nephrotic syndrome and pregnancy. Two postpartum patients with renal vein thrombosis and no prior history of renal disease are reported here. Neither patient had heavy proteinuria. In both cases, pyelonephritis was suspected clinically and the diagnosis of renal vein thrombosis was first suggested and confirmed by radiologic examination. Renal vein thrombosis should be considered in women presenting postpartum with flank pain.

  18. Coronary sinus orifice atresia and persistent left superior vena cava. A report of two cases, one associated with atypical coronary artery thrombosis.

    PubMed Central

    Gerlis, L M; Gibbs, J L; Williams, G J; Thomas, G D

    1984-01-01

    Fourteen previously reported cases of atresia of the coronary sinus ostium, in which the coronary venous flow entered the right atrium by a persistent left superior vena cava, the innominate vein, and the right superior vena cava, are reviewed and two new cases reported. The first new case was in a 43 year old woman with atypical chest pains in whom investigations for suspected ischaemic heart disease, including coronary arteriography, yielded normal results. She died suddenly from massive myocardial infarction due to extensive old thrombotic occlusion of a major coronary artery without any appreciable underlying disease of the vessel wall. Exercise testing is considered to be advisable in symptomatic patients with normal coronary angiograms and attention to the venous phase might be informative. The second new case occurred in a child with an atrial septal defect and complete transposition of the great arteries, who died aged 1 month. Images PMID:6508965

  19. Mechanisms of arterial thrombosis in nonparallel streamlines: platelet thrombi grow on the apex of stenotic severely injured vessel wall. Experimental study in the pig model.

    PubMed Central

    Badimon, L; Badimon, J J

    1989-01-01

    The role of thrombosis in various acute coronary syndromes has been established. However, the basic mechanism by which plaque rupture leads to a growing thrombus in the vicinity of stenotic lesions is not well understood. Using a characterized flow chamber in a rheologically controlled system, we have mimicked stenotic vessels and studied for the first time cell-vessel wall interaction in nonparallel streamlines. Stenoses ranging from 0 to 80% were produced with stripped tunica media to mimic severe vessel wall damage, and perfused with heparinized flowing blood. This perfusion device was placed within an extracorporeal system in swine, and blood was perfused for selected times from 1 to 30 min. Platelet deposition on the surface was evaluated by 111Indium-labeled platelets. As percent stenosis increased, platelet deposition significantly increased (P less than 0.001), indicating a shear-induced cell activation. Analysis of the axial distribution of platelet deposition indicated that the apex, and not the flow recirculation zone distal to the apex, was the segment of greater platelet accumulation within 30 min of blood perfusion (P less than 0.001). These results also indicate that the severity of the acute platelet response to plaque rupture probably depends on the location of the rupture with relation to the apex of the plaque. PMID:2794050

  20. Thrombosis in rare bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Sáez, Arlette

    2012-04-01

    Inherited deficiencies of blood coagulation factors are usually associated with lifelong bleeding tendency. In addition to Haemophilias A and B and von Willebrand disease, congenital deficiencies of such factors as fibrinogen, prothrombin (FII)), FV, FVII, FX, FXI, FXIII, and combined deficiencies occur and can lead to a diversity of clinical conditions. Paradoxically, for some of these disorders associated with significant bleeding tendency there are reports of thrombotic events, both arterial and venous. Thrombosis in hemophilia patients has a multifactorial pathogenesis and the main conditions associated with this complication are the use of long-term central venous catheters, intensive replacement therapy usually in the setting of surgical procedures, the use of bypassing agents or the coexistence of acquired or inherited prothrombotic risk factors. Regarding other rare bleeding disorders, thrombotic phenomena has been described particularly in patients with afibrinogenemia, FXI and FVII deficiency and the events can occur even in young patients, in the presence of concomitant risk factors or spontaneously. Replacement therapy must be individualized and should take into account past history of haemostatic challenges, family history of bleeding and thrombosis, just like the level of factor. For mild deficiencies when patients are asymptomatic the use of antithrombotic prophylaxis must be considered with or without concomitant use of replacement therapy. In patients with history of thrombosis it may be helpful to perform a thrombophilia screening to exclude coexisting prothrombotic defects and for all patients it is recommended to control known cardiovascular disease risk factors.

  1. Tearing of the left iliac vessels in lumbar surgery revealed by multiphase post-mortem CT-angiography (MPMCTA).

    PubMed

    Vilariño Villaverde, Raquel; Bruguier, Christine; Zerlauth, Jean-Baptiste; De Froidmont, Sébastien; Grabherr, Silke

    2016-05-01

    Lumbar surgery is regularly applied in cases of discal hernia and acquired lumbar stenosis. In this report, we present a case of a laceration in the left common iliac artery and iliac vein during a lumbar surgery and discuss the literature concerning this kind of event. In the present case, the surgical procedure was followed by a sudden decrease in blood pressure, and the surgeon discovered an intra-abdominal haemorrhage that led to the patient's death. Postmortem investigation confirmed the intra-abdominal haemorrhage and revealed a laceration of the proximal portion of the left common iliac artery and left iliac vein. The source of bleeding could be detected especially thanks to multi-phase postmortem CT angiography (MPMCTA), which was performed prior to autopsy. We also found a haemorrhagic path through the intervertebral disc between the L4-L5 vertebrae, caused by the surgeon's instrument (pituitary rongeur). To date, a few cases have been described of iatrogenic death resulting from a tear in the iliac vessels during lumbar surgery, but not from the postmortem perspective. Such investigations have recently been modernized thanks to the introduction of forensic imaging. In particular, MPMCTA offers new possibilities in postmortem investigations and can be considered the new gold standard for investigating deaths related to medical intervention. Here we describe the first case of a death during lumbar surgery using this new method. PMID:27161923

  2. Thrombosis in nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Barbano, Biagio; Gigante, Antonietta; Amoroso, Antonio; Cianci, Rosario

    2013-07-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is characterized by heavy proteinuria, edema, hypoalbuminemia, and hyperlipidemia and the most frequent causes are glomerular diseases. An uncommon presentation is iatrogenic NS, an adverse effect of some drugs administration. In the clinical course of NS, a typical feature is dysregulated coagulation state, promoted by the breakdown of permselectivity barrier of the glomerular capillary wall, resulting in the leakage of high-molecular-mass proteins, at least the size of albumin. This hypercoagulable condition is supported by several factors, such as abnormalities in platelet activation and an imbalance between anticoagulation/antithrombosis and procoagulant/prothrombotic mechanisms. Thus, NS and the risk of developing thromboses are strictly related. Thrombotic events affect the venous system rather than arterial vessels with different features and frequencies. Deep venous system of the lower extremities and renal veins are the most frequent source of pulmonary embolism, the most dangerous NS complication. Prophylactic anticoagulation and thrombosis treatment are not clearly established because large randomized trials and guidelines are lacking. The management of NS and the decision of when and how to anticoagulate the patient represent a teamwork challenge for physicians.

  3. Embolization for a bleeding pelvic fracture in a patient with persistent sciatic artery.

    PubMed

    Hiki, Taro; Okada, Yoshitaka; Wake, Kouji; Fujiwara, Atsushi; Kaji, Yasushi

    2007-04-01

    Emergency embolization for a bleeding pelvic fracture was performed in a patient with persistent sciatic artery, a rare anatomic variation in which the internal iliac artery continues to the popliteal artery. Successful hemostasis was achieved without complications by means of selective catheterization into each branch of the internal iliac artery. Awareness of this unusual vascular anatomy is critically important to avoid serious complication of emergency embolization.

  4. Mesenteric venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Hmoud, Bashar; Singal, Ashwani K; Kamath, Patrick S

    2014-09-01

    Mesenteric vein thrombosis is increasingly recognized as a cause of mesenteric ischemia. Acute thrombosis commonly presents with abdominal pain and chronic type with features of portal hypertension. Contrast enhanced CT scan of abdomen is quite accurate for diagnosing and differentiating two types of mesenteric venous thrombosis. Prothrombotic state, hematological malignancy, and local abdominal inflammatory conditions are common predisposing conditions. Over the last decade, JAK-2 (janus kinase 2) mutation has emerged as an accurate biomarker for diagnosis of myeloproliferative neoplasm, an important cause for mesenteric venous thrombosis. Anticoagulation is the treatment of choice for acute mesenteric venous thrombosis. Thrombolysis using systemic or transcatheter route is another option. Patients with peritoneal signs or refractory to initial measures require surgical exploration. Increasing recognition of mesenteric venous thrombosis and use of anticoagulation for treatment has resulted in reduction in the need for surgery with improvement in survival.

  5. Deep vein thrombosis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    DVT - discharge; Blood clot in the legs - discharge; Thromboembolism - discharge; Venous thromboembolism - deep vein thrombosis; Post-phlebitic syndrome - discharge; Post-thrombotic syndrome - discharge

  6. Case of Cerebral Venous Thrombosis with Unusual Venous Infarcts

    PubMed Central

    Kamaraju, Susheel Kumar; Pasupaleti, Bhimeswarao; Juluri, Naganarasimharaju

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis is a relatively rare condition when compared with vascular accidents of arterial origin representing 0.5-1% of all strokes. Unlike arterial infarcts parenchymal changes are seldom present and when present most of the times are reversible. We present a case report of 28-year-old female with thrombosis of internal cerebral veins and straight sinus and hemorrhagic infarcts in bilateral basal ganglia and bilateral thalami .The findings of bilateral symmetrical hyper intensities in basal ganglia and thalami on MRI may be due to various causes of diverse etiology and cerebral venous thrombosis remains an important cause. Early recognition and prompt anticoagulation therapy helps to reduce the mortality to a great extent. The MRI imaging features of straight sinus thrombosis and other imaging differentials are discussed. PMID:26023623

  7. Therapeutic Consequences of Variation in Intraarterial Pressure Measurements After Iliac Angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Tetteroo, Eric; Haaring, Cees; Engelen, Andries D. van; Graaf, Yolanda van der; Mali, Willem P.T.M.

    1997-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of intraarterial measurement of transstenotic pressure gradients for the detection of hemodynamically suboptimal iliac angioplasty. Methods: In 14 patients, referred for diagnostic angiography, mean pressure gradients in the aorta and iliac artery were obtained twice, using a double-sensor pressure catheter. Additional iliac measurements were performed during pharmacologically induced flow augmentation. Repeatability was assessed by calculation of the mean difference plus standard deviation (MD {+-} SD) and repeatability coefficient (2 x SD). These results were extrapolated to 137 iliac angioplasty procedures with secondary stenting where there was a residual pressure gradient > 10 mmHg. Results: MD {+-} SD for repeated measurements at rest and during flow augmentation were 0 {+-} 2 mmHg and 1 {+-} 3 mmHg, respectively. Repeatability coefficients were 3 and 6 mmHg. Mean pressure gradients after hemodynamically insufficient angioplasty were 8 {+-} 7 mmHg at rest and 17 {+-} 5 mmHg following vasodilatation. Inaccurate pressure recordings may have led to inappropriate stent placement in less than 2.5%, and inappropriate denial of stent placement in less than 5% of the lesions. Conclusion: Variability of intraarterial pressure measurements has little consequence in the detection of hemodynamically significant stenosis after angioplasty.

  8. Use of the vascularized iliac-crest flap in musculoskeletal lesions.

    PubMed

    Tonoli, Cristiane; Bechara, Alexandre H S; Rossanez, Roberto; Belangero, William D; Livani, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Bone loss was in the past treated by several methods, such as bone distraction and the use of nonvascularized or tissue-bank bone grafts. With the advent of modern microsurgical techniques, the vascularized bone flap has been used with good results; it resolves local nutritional problems, repairs soft tissue that is often damaged by severe trauma, and treats bone loss due to tumors, pseudarthroses, and osteomyelitis. This paper reports the authors' experience with the use of vascularized iliac-crest flaps to treat orthopedic pathologies in five patients with traumatic bone loss (<10 cm), three with osteomyelitis, and three with atrophic nonunion. In all cases, the same surgeon obtained a vascularized iliac-crest flap with a pedicle based on the deep iliac circumflex artery. All flaps consolidated within a mean period of 3 months. These findings demonstrate that the use of an iliac-crest flap is a treatment option in cases of bone loss and that it is associated with good functional results and minimal donor-site morbidity. PMID:24233062

  9. Use of the Vascularized Iliac-Crest Flap in Musculoskeletal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Tonoli, Cristiane; Bechara, Alexandre H. S.; Rossanez, Roberto; Belangero, William D.; Livani, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Bone loss was in the past treated by several methods, such as bone distraction and the use of nonvascularized or tissue-bank bone grafts. With the advent of modern microsurgical techniques, the vascularized bone flap has been used with good results; it resolves local nutritional problems, repairs soft tissue that is often damaged by severe trauma, and treats bone loss due to tumors, pseudarthroses, and osteomyelitis. This paper reports the authors' experience with the use of vascularized iliac-crest flaps to treat orthopedic pathologies in five patients with traumatic bone loss (<10 cm), three with osteomyelitis, and three with atrophic nonunion. In all cases, the same surgeon obtained a vascularized iliac-crest flap with a pedicle based on the deep iliac circumflex artery. All flaps consolidated within a mean period of 3 months. These findings demonstrate that the use of an iliac-crest flap is a treatment option in cases of bone loss and that it is associated with good functional results and minimal donor-site morbidity. PMID:24233062

  10. Percutaneous Salvage of Crushed Bilateral Aorto-Iliac Stents: Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Soares, Gregory M.; Coiner, Leonard G.; Gunlock, Michael G.; Hagino, Ryan T.

    2002-12-15

    There are multiple reports of externally deformed or crimped intravascular stents. Percutaneous salvage has been described in multiple anatomic locations including the carotid artery,coronary artery bypass grafts, and hemodialysis conduits. We report successful percutaneous salvage of severely crushed aortoiliac stents in a patient status post low anterior resection, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy for rectal carcinoma. A review of the literature describing approaches to externally deformed stents in other anatomic regions, the limited experience with crushed iliac stents, and our technique is presented.

  11. Occurrence of thrombosis in rare bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Saez, Arlette

    2013-09-01

    Paradoxically, there are reports of thrombotic events for some rare bleeding disorders associated with significant bleeding tendency. Afibrinogenemia, factor (F) VII, or FXI deficiencies are those most commonly associated with venous or arterial thrombosis. Pathogenesis is multifactorial and the main conditions associated with this complication relate to the coexistence of inherited or acquired thrombotic risk factors linked to certain specific characteristics of the underlying defect. Patients with afibrinogenemia can develop severe, spontaneous, or recurrent thromboembolic disease. Up to 20% of congenital dysfibrinogenemia patients show predisposition to thrombosis. Thrombotic episodes, particularly deep vein thrombosis, have been reported in 3 to 4% FVII deficient patients, even those who were severely affected. These events have been reported either after infusion of plasma derived FXI concentrate or recombinant activated FVII in FXI deficient patients. So, in addition to factor level, replacement therapy must be individualized and should take into account past personal or family history of bleeding and thrombosis, and other prothrombotic risk factors. Treatment of thrombosis represents a challenge. For mild factor deficiencies, antithrombotic prophylaxis must be considered with or without concomitant use of replacement therapy. For all patients, it is also recommended to control known cardiovascular disease risk factors.

  12. 49 CFR 572.199 - Pelvis iliac.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... pelvis impactor is specified in 49 CFR 572.200(c). (8) The dummy is positioned with respect to the... accelerometer as specified in 49 CFR 572.200(d), and iliac wing load cell SA572-S66, mounted as shown in sheet 2... procedure. (1) Soak the dummy assembly (180-0000) in a test environment as specified in 49 CFR...

  13. 49 CFR 572.199 - Pelvis iliac.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... pelvis impactor is specified in 49 CFR 572.200(c). (8) The dummy is positioned with respect to the... accelerometer as specified in 49 CFR 572.200(d), and iliac wing load cell SA572-S66, mounted as shown in sheet 2... procedure. (1) Soak the dummy assembly (180-0000) in a test environment as specified in 49 CFR...

  14. Unprovoked deep venous thrombosis in a young adult associated with membranous obstruction of inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Epperla, Narendranath; Usoltseva, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    Unprovoked deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in young adults is an unusual phenomenon, but it is associated with significant morbidity. Developmental anomalies of the inferior vena cava (IVC) should be considered as a possible aetiological factor, and appropriate investigations should be performed to determine the conclusive diagnosis and necessary treatment plan. We report a case of spontaneous thrombosis of the IVC and bilateral iliac venous system in a young man, associated with membranous obstruction of the IVC. He was diagnosed using several different investigational techniques, and successfully treated with mechanical thrombectomy, thrombolysis therapy and anticoagulation.

  15. Splanchnic Vein Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Valla, Dominique

    2015-07-01

    Splanchnic vein thrombosis includes thrombosis of the hepatic venous system (Budd-Chiari syndrome) and thrombosis of the portal venous system. Both conditions share uncommon prothrombotic disorders as causal factors, among which myeloproliferative neoplasms rank first. Budd-Chiari syndrome presents with acute or chronic, asymptomatic or severe liver disease. Diagnosis depends on noninvasive imaging of the obstructed hepatic venous outflow tract. A spontaneously fatal course can be prevented by a stepwise approach: (1) anticoagulation therapy, specific therapy for underlying disease, and medical or endoscopic management of liver-related complications, (2) angioplasty/stenting in a second step, and (3) eventually the insertion of transjugular intrahepatic stent shunt or liver transplantation. Recent portal vein thrombosis mostly jeopardizes the gut. Early anticoagulation prevents thrombus extension but is incompletely successful in achieving recanalization. Chronic portal vein thrombosis is complicated by bleeding related to portal hypertension, which can be prevented by usual pharmacological and endoscopic means. The prevention of recurrent thrombosis is achieved by anticoagulation therapy the impact of which on the risk of bleeding remains unclear. Portal vein thrombosis in patients with cirrhosis is likely neither a direct consequence of nor a direct cause for liver disease progression. Therefore, the indications and effects of anticoagulation therapy for portal vein thrombosis in patients with cirrhosis remain uncertain. PMID:26080307

  16. Thrombosis and acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Crespo-Solís, Erick

    2012-04-01

    Thrombosis is a common complication in patients with acute leukemia. While the presence of central venous lines, concomitant steroids, the use of Escherichia coli asparaginase and hereditary thrombophilic abnormalities are known risk factors for thrombosis in children, information on the pathogenesis, risk factors, and clinical outcome of thrombosis in adult patients with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is still scarce. Expert consensus and guidelines regarding leukemia-specific risk factors, thrombosis prevention, and treatment strategies, as well as optimal type of central venous catheter in acute leukemia patients are required. It is likely that each subtype of acute leukemia represents a different setting for the development of thrombosis and the risk of bleeding. This is perhaps due to a combination of different disease-specific pathogenic mechanisms of thrombosis, including the type of chemotherapy protocol chosen, the underlying patients health, associated risk factors, as well as the biology of the disease itself. The risk of thrombosis may also vary according to ethnicity and prevalence of hereditary risk factors for thrombosis; thus, it is advisable for Latin American, Asian, and African countries to report on their specific patient population. PMID:22507812

  17. Iliac arteriovenous fistula due to spinal disk surgery. Causes severe hemodynamic repercussion with pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Machado-Atías, I; Fornés, O; González-Bello, R; Machado-Hernández, I

    1993-01-01

    We present a case of a 46-year-old man with a pulsatile mass in the left inferior abdominal quadrant that irradiated a continuous murmur extending to the left lumbar region. Despite an 8-year history of cardiomegaly, he appeared to be asymptomatic except for the mass and could recollect no traumatic injury or surgery that might have caused it. Near the vertebral column, we found a small scar, the result of spinal disk surgery 11 years before. Following chest radiography and electrocardiography, we located the suspected arteriovenous fistula by selective angiography of the aorta and its branches: a communication of the left iliac artery with the left iliac vein had resulted in a very large left-to-right shunt and a severely dilated inferior vena cava. We then divided and isolated the arterial segment containing the fistula, but left this segment in continuity with the left iliac vein by over-sewing both ends. To avoid injury to surrounding structures, dissection was limited to the area of maximal thrill. Hemodynamic improvement was immediate, and the postoperative course was uneventful. At the present time, almost 3 years postoperatively, the patient is asymptomatic. Images PMID:8508067

  18. Deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Gargi; Roy, Subesha Basu; Haldar, Swaraj; Bhattacharya, Rabindra

    2010-12-01

    Occlusive clot formation in the veins causes venous thrombosis, the site most common in the deep veins of leg, called deep vein thrombosis. The clot can block blood flow and when it breaks off, called an embolism which in turn can damage the vital organs. Venous thrombosis occurs via three mechanisms ie, Virchow's triad. The mechanisms are decreased flow rate of blood, damage to the blood vessel wall and an increased tendency of the blood to clot. There are several factors which can increase a person's risk for deep vein thrombosis. The symptoms of deep vein thrombosis in the legs are pain, swelling and redness of the part. One variety of venous thrombosis is phlegmasia alba dolens where the leg becomes pale and cool. Investigations include Doppler ultrasound examination of the limb, D-dimer blood test, plethysmography of the legs, x-rays to show vein in the affected area (venography). Hospitalisation is necessary in some cases with some risk factors. The mainstream of treatment is with anticoagulants, mostly low molecular weight heparin for 6 months. Deep venous thrombosis is a rising problem. Early diagnosis and treatment is associated with a good prognosis.

  19. Endovascular Treatment of a Ruptured Profunda Femoral Artery Branch After Fogarty Thrombectomy of a Femoro-Femoral Crossover Arterial Graft: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Manousaki, Eirini; Tsetis, Dimitrios; Kostas, Theodoros; Katsamouris, Asterios

    2010-02-15

    We present a very rare case of a life-threatening rupture of a profunda femoral artery distal branch after a Fogarty thrombectomy of a thrombosed crossover synthetic graft between the ipsilateral common femoral artery and a contralateral iliac-popliteal graft; the bleeding profunda femoral artery branch was successfully embolized with metallic coils through the axillary artery approach.

  20. Pediatric transplantation: preventing thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Robertson, J D

    2015-06-01

    Due to progressive advances in surgical techniques, immunosuppressive therapies, and supportive care, outcomes from both solid organ transplantation and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation continue to improve. Thrombosis remains a challenging management issue in this context, with implications for both graft survival and long-term quality of life. Unfortunately, there remains a general paucity of pediatric-specific data regarding thrombosis incidence, risk stratification, and the safety or efficacy of preventative strategies with which to guide treatment algorithms. This review summarizes the available evidence and rationale underlying the spectrum of current practices aimed at preventing thrombosis in the transplant recipient, with a particular focus on risk factors, pathophysiology, and described antithrombotic regimens.

  1. Postpartal right ventricular thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Velicki, Lazar; Milosavljević, Aleksandar; Majin, Marijan; Vujin, Bojan; Kovacević, Pavle

    2008-11-01

    The discovery of an intracardial mass in patients presents a serious diagnostic dilemma. The differential diagnosis of this condition may seem abundant, but myxomas and intracardial thrombosis are the most frequent diagnoses. A connection between pregnancy and the presence of thrombosis has been documented frequently. Normal pregnancy leads to changes of the coagulative and fibrinolytic status toward a hypercoagulable condition which has its own physiological justification (the risk of blood loss decreases during labor). The case of a patient suffering from postpartal right ventricular thrombosis, which was successfully resolved by surgery as described in this contribution, demonstrates the value of a multidisciplinary approach.

  2. Acute mesenteric and aortic thrombosis associated with antithrombin deficiency: a rare occurrence.

    PubMed

    Calcaterra, Domenico; Martin, Jeremiah T; Ferneini, Antoine M; De Natale, Ralph W

    2010-04-01

    Antithrombin is a potent inhibitor of the coagulation cascade exerting its primary effects on activated factors X, IX and II. It is the mechanism by which heparin and low-molecular weight heparin cause anti-coagulation. Deficiency of antithrombin presents as a hypercoagulable state, and may result in unexplained deep venous thrombosis, arterial thrombosis and systemic embolization.

  3. 49 CFR 572.199 - Pelvis iliac.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... specified in 49 CFR 572.200(d), and iliac wing load cell SA572-S66, mounted as shown in sheet 2 of 5 of... the dummy assembly (180-0000) in a test environment as specified in 49 CFR 572.200(j). (2) Seat the... impactor is specified in 49 CFR 572.200(c). (8) The dummy is positioned with respect to the impactor...

  4. 49 CFR 572.199 - Pelvis iliac.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... specified in 49 CFR 572.200(d), and iliac wing load cell SA572-S66, mounted as shown in sheet 2 of 5 of... the dummy assembly (180-0000) in a test environment as specified in 49 CFR 572.200(j). (2) Seat the... impactor is specified in 49 CFR 572.200(c). (8) The dummy is positioned with respect to the impactor...

  5. 49 CFR 572.199 - Pelvis iliac.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... specified in 49 CFR 572.200(d), and iliac wing load cell SA572-S66, mounted as shown in sheet 2 of 5 of... the dummy assembly (180-0000) in a test environment as specified in 49 CFR 572.200(j). (2) Seat the... impactor is specified in 49 CFR 572.200(c). (8) The dummy is positioned with respect to the impactor...

  6. [Endovascular stent implantation as a treatment for iliac artery disease].

    PubMed

    Tetteroo, E; van Engelen, A D; van der Graaf, Y; Mali, W P

    2000-01-22

    A stent is an endovascular prosthesis that may be used in the treatment of intermittent claudication caused by lesions of the A. iliaca communis and the A. iliaca externa in which earlier balloon dilatation has proved insufficiently effective. The expansion is caused by inflation of an angioplasty balloon (plastic remodelling: Palmaz stent) or by self-expansion due to elastic transformation as in the Wail stent or to thermic memory metal, as in the Memotherm stent. Evaluation of the literature shows that stent placement is a safe method of treatment. The proportion of initial technical success appears to be higher than that of balloon angioplasty, especially in the treatment of total occlusions. The haemodynamic situation immediately after treatment also appears to be better in case of stent placement. Long-term comparison of the clinical efficacy is not well possible because the published studies differ with regard to patient population, definition of indication and criteria of success. PMID:10668541

  7. Renal vein thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the kidneys. Possible Complications Complications may include: Acute renal failure (especially if thrombosis occurs in a dehydrated child) ... Saunders; 2012:chap 34. Read More Acute kidney failure Arteriogram Blood ... embolus Renal Tumor Update Date 5/19/2015 Updated by: ...

  8. Endovascular Treatment of Complications of Femoral Arterial Access

    SciTech Connect

    Tsetis, Dimitrios

    2010-06-15

    Endovascular repair of femoral arterial access complications is nowadays the treatment of choice in a group of patients who cannot tolerate vascular reconstruction and bleeding due to advanced cardiovascular disease. Endovascular procedures can be performed under local anesthesia, are well tolerated by the patient, and are associated with a short hospitalization time. Ninitinol stent technology allows for safe stent and stent-graft extension at the common femoral artery (CFA) level, due to increased resistance to external compression and bending stress. Active pelvic bleeding can be insidious, and prompt placement of a stent-graft at the site of leakage is a lifesaving procedure. Percutaneous thrombin injection under US guidance is the treatment of choice for femoral pseudoaneurysms (PAs); this can theoretically be safer with simultaneous balloon occlusion across the entry site of a PA without a neck or with a short and wide neck. In a few cases with thrombin failure due to a large arterial defect or accompanying arteriovenous fistula (AVF), a stent-graft can be deployed. The vast majority of catheter-induced AVFs can be treated effectively with stent-graft implantation even if they are located very close to the femoral bifurcation. Obstructive dissection flaps localized in the CFA are usually treated with prolonged balloon inflation; however, in more extensive dissections involving iliac arteries, self-expanding stents should be deployed. Iliofemoral thrombosis can be treated effectively with catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) followed by prolonged balloon inflation or stent placement. Balloon angioplasty and CDT can occasionally be used to treat stenoses and occlusions complicating the use of percutaneous closure devices.

  9. Liver Transplantation Utilizing Mixed Biologic and Synthetic Arterial Conduits

    PubMed Central

    Grezzana-Filho, Tomaz J. M.; Chedid, Aljamir D.; Hendges, Luiz Pedro P.; Leipnitz, Ian; Alvares-da-Silva, Mario R.; Backes, Ariane N.; Reis, Matheus J.; Kruel, Cleber Dario P.; Kruel, Cleber R. P.

    2016-01-01

    Arterial conduits are necessary in nearly 5% of all liver transplants and are usually constructed utilizing segments of donor iliac artery. However, available segments of donor iliac artery may not be lengthy enough or may not possess enough quality to enable its inclusion in the conduit. Although there are few reports of arterial conduits constructed solely utilizing prosthetic material, no previous reports of conduits composed of a segment of donor iliac artery and prosthetic material (mixed biologic and synthetic arterial conduits) were found in the medial literature to date. Two cases reporting successful outcomes after creation of mixed biologic and prosthetic arterial conduits are outlined in this report. Reason for creation of conduits was complete intimal dissection of the recipient's hepatic artery in both cases. In both cases, available segments of donor iliac artery were not lengthy enough to bridge infrarenal aorta to porta hepatis. Both patients have patent conduits and normally functioning liver allografts, respectively, at 4 and 31 months after transplant. Mixed biologic and synthetic arterial conduits constitute a viable technical option and may offer potential advantages over fully prosthetic arterial conduits.

  10. [Deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Chagoya, Gloria Alejandra; Laniado-Laborín, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Background: despite the proven effectiveness of preventive therapy for deep vein thrombosis, a significant proportion of patients at risk for thromboembolism do not receive prophylaxis during hospitalization. Our objective was to determine the adherence to thrombosis prophylaxis guidelines in a general hospital as a quality control strategy. Methods: a random audit of clinical charts was conducted at the Tijuana General Hospital, Baja California, Mexico, to determine the degree of adherence to deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis guidelines. The instrument used was the Caprini's checklist for thrombosis risk assessment in adult patients. Results: the sample included 300 patient charts; 182 (60.7 %) were surgical patients and 118 were medical patients. Forty six patients (15.3 %) received deep vein thrombosis pharmacologic prophylaxis; 27.1 % of medical patients received deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis versus 8.3 % of surgical patients (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: our results show that adherence to DVT prophylaxis at our hospital is extremely low. Only 15.3 % of our patients at risk received treatment, and even patients with very high risk received treatment in less than 25 % of the cases. We have implemented strategies to increase compliance with clinical guidelines.

  11. Brachial Artery Access for Percutaneous Renal Artery Interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaukanen, Erkki T.; Manninen, Hannu I.; Matsi, Pekka J.; Soeder, Heini K.

    1997-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the suitability of transbrachial access for endovascular renal artery interventions. Methods: During 37 consecutive endovascular renal artery interventions, the transbrachial approach was used on nine patients (mean age 63 years; range 41-76 years) for 11 renal artery procedures on native kidneys and one percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) on a transplanted kidney. The reason for using transbrachial access was a steep aorta-renal angle in five, and severe aorta-iliac atherosclerosis in the remaining patients. In addition to the intervention catheter in the left brachial artery, an additional nonselective catheter for controlling the procedure was inserted transfemorally (six patients) or via the contralateral brachial artery. Results: Eleven interventions (six PTAs, five stents) were successfully completed. The one failure resulted from impenetrable subclavian artery stenosis. The only major complication was a brachial artery pseudoaneurysm requiring surgical treatment. Conclusion: Transbrachial access is an effective and relatively safe technique for renal artery interventions when transfemoral access is not possible.

  12. Patient Presentation and Management of Labial Ulceration Following Uterine Artery Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Gonsalves, Carin Franciosa, Stefan V.; Shah, Suken; Bonn, Joseph; Wu, Christine

    2007-11-15

    Uterine artery embolization is a safe and effective procedure for the treatment of symptomatic uterine fibroids. Nontarget embolization of adjacent internal iliac artery branches is a reported complication of uterine artery embolization. The following report describes the presentation and management of ulcerations of the labium minora due to nontarget embolization of the internal pudendal artery.

  13. Direct aneurysm sac catheterization and embolization of an enlarging internal iliac aneurysm using cone-beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Monish; Shah, Rohan; Resnick, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Since cone-beam computed tomography (CT) has been adapted for use with a C-arm system it has brought volumetric CT capabilities in the interventional suite. Although cone-beam CT image resolution is far inferior to that generated by traditional CT scanners, the system offers the ability to place an access needle into position under tomographic guidance and use the access to immediately begin a fluoroscopic procedure without moving the patient. We describe a case of a “jailed” enlarging internal iliac artery aneurysm secondary to abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, in which direct percutaneous puncture of the internal iliac artery aneurysm sac was performed under cone-beam CT guidance. PMID:25858522

  14. Bilateral Leg Ischemia due to Descending Aortic Dissection: Combined Treatment with Femoro-femoral Cross-over Bypass and Unilateral Aorto-iliac stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Frahm, Christian; Widmer, Matthias K.; Do, Dai-Do

    2002-10-15

    We report a case of aorto-iliac occlusion due to descending aortic dissection treated initially with femoro-femoral cross-over bypass and secondarily with unilateral aorto-iliac stenting because of progression of the dissection. A 75-year-old man presented with acute ischemia of the right leg. CT revealed occlusion of the right iliac artery due to descending aortic dissection with a clotted false lumen. Three days after femoro-femoral cross-over bypass,ischemia of both legs developed and angiography demonstrated occlusion of the infrarenal aorta and left common iliac artery. Two overlapping stents were deployed in these vessel segments. Completion angiography confirmed successful recanalization with adequate distal flow and good patency of the cross-over bypass. Peripheral pulses were restored and the patient's symptoms were alleviated. Combined treatment with cross-over bypass and endovascular recanalization may be considered as a viable alternative to open aortic surgery in selected cases of complicated aorto-iliac dissection with bilateral leg ischemia.

  15. Intraosseous lipoma of the iliac: case report☆

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Frederico Barra; Paranahyba, Rodrigo Marques; do Amaral, Rogério Andrade; Bonfim, Vinícius Mendes; Jordão, Nathalya Ducarmo; Souza, Raimundo Djalma

    2016-01-01

    Lipomas are benign tumors that attack fat cells and most often affecting soft tissues in adulthood. On rare occasions, they may affect bones, preferentially the metaphyses of the long bone. They are generally asymptomatic and radiography shows radiolucent lesions with a thin sclerotic rim or radiodense lesions with a thick sclerotic rim. Malignant transformation of these tumors is rare, as is their recurrence, and there is no need for surgery in most cases. In this report, we present a rare case of intraosseous lipoma in the iliac bone. PMID:26962507

  16. Preclinical Feasibility of a Technology Framework for MRI-guided Iliac Angioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Rube, Martin A.; Fernandez-Gutierrez, Fabiola; Cox, Benjamin F.; Holbrook, Andrew B.; Houston, J. Graeme; White, Richard D.; McLeod, Helen; Fatahi, Mahsa; Melzer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Interventional MRI has significant potential for image guidance of iliac angioplasty and related vascular procedures. A technology framework with in-room image display, control, communication and MRI-guided intervention techniques was designed and tested for its potential to provide safe, fast and efficient MRI-guided angioplasty of the iliac arteries. Methods A 1.5T MRI scanner was adapted for interactive imaging during endovascular procedures using new or modified interventional devices such as guidewires and catheters. A perfused vascular phantom was used for testing. Pre-, intra- and post-procedural visualization and measurement of vascular morphology and flow was implemented. A detailed analysis of X-Ray fluoroscopic angiography workflow was conducted and applied. Two interventional radiologists and one physician in training performed 39 procedures. All procedures were timed and analyzed. Results MRI-guided iliac angioplasty procedures were successfully performed with progressive adaptation of techniques and workflow. The workflow, setup and protocol enabled a reduction in table time for a dedicated MRI-guided procedure to 6 min 33 s with a mean procedure time of 9 min 2 s, comparable to the mean procedure time of 8 min 42 s for the standard X-Ray guided procedure. Conclusions MRI-guided iliac vascular interventions were found to be feasible and practical using this framework and optimized workflow. In particular the real-time flow analysis was found to be helpful for pre- and post-interventional assessments. Design optimization of the catheters and in vivo experiments are required before clinical evaluation. PMID:25102933

  17. Unusual Case of Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis in Patient with Ulcerative Colitis in Remission.

    PubMed

    Meher, Lalit Kumar; Dalai, Siba Prasad; Panda, Sameer; Hui, Pankaj Kumar; Nayak, Sachidananda

    2016-05-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an idiopathic autoimmune inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis along with deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and arterial thrombosis have occasionally been reported as a complication in the active phase of UC being attributed to its pro-thrombotic state. This paper depicts a 38-year-old female with a history of UC in remission who developed sudden onset headache, blurring of vision and seizures. Subsequent diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis was made with MRI venography and treated with low molecular weight heparin with complete resolution of symptoms. The highlights of this case underscore the importance of evaluating cerebral venous sinus thrombosis as a cause of acute onset neurological deterioration in a setting of inflammatory bowel disease. It also emphasizes on the hypothesis that the risk of venous thrombosis or other hypercoagulable states have no direct relationship with the disease activity or flare-up. PMID:27437291

  18. Unusual Case of Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis in Patient with Ulcerative Colitis in Remission

    PubMed Central

    Meher, Lalit Kumar; Panda, Sameer; Hui, Pankaj Kumar; Nayak, Sachidananda

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an idiopathic autoimmune inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis along with deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and arterial thrombosis have occasionally been reported as a complication in the active phase of UC being attributed to its pro-thrombotic state. This paper depicts a 38-year-old female with a history of UC in remission who developed sudden onset headache, blurring of vision and seizures. Subsequent diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis was made with MRI venography and treated with low molecular weight heparin with complete resolution of symptoms. The highlights of this case underscore the importance of evaluating cerebral venous sinus thrombosis as a cause of acute onset neurological deterioration in a setting of inflammatory bowel disease. It also emphasizes on the hypothesis that the risk of venous thrombosis or other hypercoagulable states have no direct relationship with the disease activity or flare-up. PMID:27437291

  19. The wheelchair thrombosis syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Lohiya, Ghan-Shyam; Tan-Figueroa, Lilia; Silverman, Steve; Le, Hung Van

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report a case of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) related to prolonged wheelchair use. CASE REPORT: A 48-year-old patient with spastic quadriplegia usually spent 10-12 hours daily in a wheelchair. He suddenly developed marked swelling of his right foot, leg and thigh. His plasma D-dimer level was 1,030 (normal <500) ng/ml. A duplex ultrasound revealed common femoral vein thrombosis. He was hospitalized and anticoagulated; his extremity swelling decreased considerably by day 45. Hypercoagulability work-up disclosed previously subclinical mild elevation of serum cardiolipin immunoglobulin G (antiphospholipid syndrome). This patient will receive longterm anticoagulation. CONCLUSION: Prolonged sitting in wheelchair may cause DVT. To enhance public recognition of this avoidable risk, we propose the term "wheelchair thrombosis syndrome." PMID:16895294

  20. Venous thrombosis: an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, C.W.

    1986-07-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease contributes to morbidity and mortality in certain groups of hospitalized patients, particularly those who have undergone surgery. Although principles of treatment have changed relatively little during the past 20 years, significant advances have been made in the diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Venography, once the only reliable diagnostic technique, has been largely replaced by noninvasive tests: impedance plethysmography, venous Doppler, /sup 125/I-radiofibrinogen-uptake test, and phleborheography. Virchow's triad of stasis, vessel injury, and hypercoagulability remains a valid explanation of the pathogenesis of thrombus formation, but laboratory and clinical data have refined our knowledge of how these factors interact to result in clinically significant disease. Knowledge of the natural history of venous thrombosis, plus heightened awareness of the long-term morbidity and expense associated with the postphlebitic syndrome, have led to increased interest in preventing DVT. Clinically and economically, venous thrombosis is best managed by prevention. 61 references.

  1. Endovascular exclusion of a large external iliac vein aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Todorov, Mina; Hernandez, Diego

    2013-07-01

    Iliac vein aneurysms are uncommon, and there is no consensus on optimal treatment. We present a case of venous exclusion using an endovascular approach. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a large external iliac vein aneurysm treated endovascularly. We have demonstrated the feasibility of this approach with satisfactory 1-year follow-up.

  2. Intestinal Infarction Through Arterial Vascular Obstruction - Case Series from 1st and 3rd Surgery Clinics Cluj-Napoca.

    PubMed

    Jeican, Ionuţ Isaia; Mocan, Mihaela; Gheban, Dan

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a case series of intestinal infarction through obstruction of superior mesenteric artery - two cases of acute mesenteric artery embolism, two cases of acute mesenteric artery thrombosis and a case of volvulus.

  3. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Allroggen, H.; Abbott, R.

    2000-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a challenging condition because of its variability of clinical symptoms and signs. It is very often unrecognised at initial presentation. All age groups can be affected. Large sinuses such as the superior sagittal sinus are most frequently involved. Extensive collateral circulation within the cerebral venous system allows for a significant degree of compensation in the early stages of thrombus formation. Systemic inflammatory diseases and inherited as well as acquired coagulation disorders are frequent causes, although in up to 30% of cases no underlying cause can be identified. The oral contraceptive pill appears to be an important additional risk factor. The spectrum of clinical presentations ranges from headache with papilloedema to focal deficit, seizures and coma. Magnetic resonance imaging with venography is the investigation of choice; computed tomography alone will miss a significant number of cases. It has now been conclusively shown that intravenous heparin is the first-line treatment for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis because of its efficacy, safety and feasability. Local thrombolysis may be indicated in cases of deterioration, despite adequate heparinisation. This should be followed by oral anticoagulation for 3-6 months. The prognosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is generally favourable. A high index of clinical suspicion is needed to diagnose this uncommon condition so that appropriate treatment can be initiated.


Keywords: cerebral venous sinus thrombosis PMID:10622773

  4. Venous thrombosis - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Venous thrombosis can cause swelling and pain of the leg in which it forms. Large clots can also break free and travel to the heart and lungs, where they can cause cardiac arrest and sometimes death. This is called pulmonary embolism.

  5. [Travel thrombosis, 2008].

    PubMed

    Sándor, Tamás

    2009-01-18

    In Hungary, the first studies on travel thrombosis were published at the beginning of the 2000s. In this paper recent investigational results of this special type of venous thrombosis have been reviewed. Travel thrombosis is a subgroup of sitting thromboses. It is a consequence of prolonged sitting which is common of ground transportation and air travel. More and more computer-linked sitting thromboses have been observed as well. Long-haul air travel related venous thrombosis is a multifactorial disease. Possible contributory risk factors are in connection with the milieu of the cabin. Various investigations evaluated the effect of immobilization and hypobaric hypoxia on thrombin generation and fibrinolysis. The studies differed much in participants' characteristics, duration and type of exposure and statistical analysis, so the results are contradictory. Personal, traveller-related risk factors may be regarded as triggers. The presently available evidences do not permit to assess the exact actual risk. For healthy young passengers there seem to be low risk. However, passengers suffering from predisposing factors for venous thromboembolism can be exposed to serious hazards, if they fly more than 5000 km or travel more than 8 hours. Proper safety measures are summarized on the basis of recent international recommendations.

  6. Spontaneous thrombosis in giant intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    Whittle, I R; Dorsch, N W; Besser, M

    1982-01-01

    Twelve patients in a series of 22 with giant intracranial aneurysms demonstrated neuroradiological features of partial or total spontaneous intra-aneurysmal thrombosis. The presence of this intra-aneurysmal clot significantly altered the computed tomographic appearance of the giant aneurysm. Massive intra-aneurysmal thrombosis did not protect against subarachnoid haemorrhage and the likelihood of rupture of a clot containing giant aneurysm was not significantly different from that of a non-thrombosed giant aneurysm. Although parent artery occlusion from a thrombosed giant aneurysm, and massive aneurysmal thrombosis leading to the formation of giant serpentine aneurysm were documented, these are rare epiphenomena. The risk of embolisation from a partially thrombosed giant aneurysm, which was documented in one case, would appear to be greater than that from a non-thrombosed giant aneurysm. The findings in this series, and a review of literature, suggest that the presence of intra-aneurysmal clot in giant intracranial aneurysms has little prognostic significance and does not alter the management or outcome after treatment. Images PMID:7175528

  7. Cancer-Associated Thrombosis: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Elyamany, Ghaleb; Alzahrani, Ali Mattar; Bukhary, Eman

    2014-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common complication in patients with malignant disease. Emerging data have enhanced our understanding of cancer-associated thrombosis, a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cancer. In addition to VTE, arterial occlusion with stroke and anginal symptoms is relatively common among cancer patients, and is possibly related to genetic predisposition. Several risk factors for developing venous thrombosis usually coexist in cancer patients including surgery, hospital admissions and immobilization, the presence of an indwelling central catheter, chemotherapy, use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) and new molecular-targeted therapies such as antiangiogenic agents. Effective prophylaxis and treatment of VTE reduced morbidity and mortality, and improved quality of life. Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) is preferred as an effective and safe means for prophylaxis and treatment of VTE. It has largely replaced unfractionated heparin (UFH) and vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). Recently, the development of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) that directly inhibit factor Xa or thrombin is a milestone achievement in the prevention and treatment of VTE. This review will focus on the epidemiology and pathophysiology of cancer-associated thrombosis, risk factors, and new predictive biomarkers for VTE as well as discuss novel prevention and management regimens of VTE in cancer according to published guidelines. PMID:25520567

  8. [Thrombosis and assisted reproductive techniques (ART)].

    PubMed

    Conard, J; Plu-Bureau, G; Horellou, M-H; Samama, M-M; Gompel, A

    2011-06-01

    Assisted reproductive techniques (ART) concern procedures designed to increase fertility of couples: artificial insemination, in vitro fertilization (IVF), either classical or after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), transfer of frozen embryos, or gamete intrafallopian transfer. Their use has greatly increased these last years. They may be associated with severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome and one possible major complication is venous or arterial thrombosis. Thromboses are rare but potentially serious with important sequellae. They are mostly observed in unusual sites such as head and neck vessels and the mechanism is still unknown although hypotheses have been proposed. This review is an update of our knowledge and an attempt to consider guidelines for the prevention and treatment of ART-associated thromboses, which frequently occur when the woman is pregnant. Prevention of severe ovarian hyperstimulation by appropriate stimulation procedures, detection of women at risk of hyperstimulation and of women at high risk of thrombosis should allow reduction of the risk of thrombosis, possibly by administration of a thromboprophylaxis at a timing and dose which can be only determined by extrapolation. PMID:21333476

  9. Thrombosis at mountain altitudes.

    PubMed

    Cucinell, S A; Pitts, C M

    1987-11-01

    Victims of high-altitude pulmonary edema often have clots obstructing the pulmonary vessels. This, together with an apparent high incidence of thrombophlebitis and cerebral emboli at altitude suggests that mountain travel may predispose to hypercoagulability. A critical analysis of the available data suggests that, although thrombosis may be a late event complicating various forms of mountain sickness, the laboratory techniques of characterizing hypercoagulability are not sufficient to define and characterize the mechanism.

  10. Portal Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Yogesh K.; Bodh, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis is an important cause of portal hypertension. PVT occurs in association with cirrhosis or as a result of malignant invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma or even in the absence of associated liver disease. With the current research into its genesis, majority now have an underlying prothrombotic state detectable. Endothelial activation and stagnant portal blood flow also contribute to formation of the thrombus. Acute non-cirrhotic PVT, chronic PVT (EHPVO), and portal vein thrombosis in cirrhosis are the three main variants of portal vein thrombosis with varying etiological factors and variability in presentation and management. Procoagulant state should be actively investigated. Anticoagulation is the mainstay of therapy for acute non-cirrhotic PVT, with supporting evidence for its use in cirrhotic population as well. Chronic PVT (EHPVO) on the other hand requires the management of portal hypertension as such and with role for anticoagulation in the setting of underlying prothrombotic state, however data is awaited in those with no underlying prothrombotic states. TIPS and liver transplant may be feasible even in the setting of PVT however proper selection of candidates and type of surgery is warranted. Thrombolysis and thrombectomy have some role. TARE is a new modality for management of HCC with portal vein invasion. PMID:25941431

  11. Neonatal renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Leonardo R; Simpson, Ewurabena A; Lau, Keith K

    2011-12-01

    Neonatal renal vein thrombosis (RVT) continues to pose significant challenges for pediatric hematologists and nephrologists. The precise mechanism for the onset and propagation of renal thrombosis within the neonatal population is unclear, but there is suggestion that acquired and/or inherited thrombophilia traits may increase the risk for renal thromboembolic disease during the newborn period. This review summarizes the most recent studies of neonatal RVT, examining its most common features, the prevalence of acquired and inherited prothrombotic risk factors among these patients, and evaluates their short and long term renal and thrombotic outcomes as they may relate to these risk factors. Although there is some consensus regarding the management of neonatal RVT, the most recent antithrombotic therapy guidelines for the management of childhood thrombosis do not provide a risk-based algorithm for the acute management of RVT among newborns with hereditary prothrombotic disorders. Whereas neonatal RVT is not a condition associated with a high mortality rate, it is associated with significant morbidity due to renal impairment. Recent evidence to evaluate the effects of heparin-based anticoagulation and thrombolytic therapy on the long term renal function of these patients has yielded conflicting results. Long term cohort studies and randomized trials may be helpful to clarify the impact of acute versus prolonged antithrombotic therapy for reducing the morbidity that is associated with neonatal RVT.

  12. Venous thrombosis in athletes.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Gregory; Whiteside, William K; Kanwisher, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Because deep vein thrombosis (DVT) can occur following orthopaedic procedures, knowledge of hereditary and acquired risk factors for DVT is essential. Hereditary forms of thrombophilia include factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A mutations, and deficiencies of antithrombin III, protein C, and protein S. Acquired risk factors include but are not limited to trauma, immobilization, and surgical procedures. In general, athletes have a low risk of venous thrombosis; however, this population is exposed to many acquired thrombogenic risk factors, including hemoconcentration, trauma, immobilization, long-distance travel, and the use of oral contraceptives. Thus, orthopaedic surgeons should consider screening athletes for thrombogenic risk factors, including history of venous thrombosis, hypercoagulable disorders, or high altitude exercise, during preparticipation physicals and preoperative examinations. If a patient is determined to be at high risk of DVT, preventive measures such as physical antithrombotic measures and/or low-molecular-weight heparin should be instituted. If an athlete develops a DVT, a risk factor assessment should be conducted along with anticoagulation treatment in accordance with the American College of Chest Physicians guidelines. PMID:23378374

  13. Pediatric cavernous sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Vossough, Arastoo; Vorona, Gregory A.; Beslow, Lauren A.; Ichord, Rebecca N.; Licht, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe clinical characteristics, imaging findings, morbidity, and mortality in a single-center cohort of 12 pediatric cavernous sinus thrombosis cases and to review all cases available in recent English literature. Methods: Clinical data and radiographic studies on 12 cases from our institution were analyzed retrospectively. A literature search and review was conducted, with additional cases pooled with the new cohort for an aggregate analysis. Results: Twelve cases of cavernous sinus thrombosis in children from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2013, were reviewed. All patients survived to discharge; 3 of 12 (25%) experienced neurologic morbidity. Contrast-enhanced MRI and contrast-enhanced head CT were 100% sensitive for detecting cavernous sinus thrombosis, while noncontrast time-of-flight magnetic resonance venography (TOF MRV) and noncontrast head CT were 0% sensitive. Literature review produced an additional 40 cases, and the aggregate mortality rate was 4 of 52 (8%) and morbidity rate was 10 of 40 (25%). Outcomes did not vary by treatment or with unilateral vs bilateral cavernous sinus involvement. There was a trend toward worse outcomes with fungal infections. Conclusion: Our case series demonstrates low morbidity and mortality with early, aggressive surgical, antimicrobial, and anticoagulation therapies. Although anticoagulation and surgery were not associated with significantly different outcomes, more study is needed. PMID:26231260

  14. Mechanical Thrombectomy in Patients with Deep Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Delomez, Maxence; Beregi, Jean-Paul; Willoteaux, Serge; Bauchart, Jean-Jacques; D'Othee, Bertrand Janne; Asseman, Philippe; Perez, Nessim; Thery, Claude

    2001-01-15

    Purpose: To report our experience with mechanical thrombectomy in proximal deep vein thrombosis (DVT).Methods: Eighteen patients with a mean ({+-} SD) age of 37.6 {+-} 16.1 years who presented with DVT in the iliac and femoral vein (n = 3), inferior vena cava (n = 5), or inferior vena cava and iliac vein (n = 10), were treated with the Amplatz Thrombectomy Device after insertion of a temporary caval filter.Results: Successful recanalization was achieved in 15 of 18 patients (83%). Overall, the percentage of thrombus removed was 66 {+-} 29%: 73 {+-} 30% at caval level and 55 {+-} 36% at iliofemoral level. Complementary interventions (seven patients) were balloon angioplasty (n = 2), angioplasty and stenting (n = 2), thrombo-aspiration alone (n = 1), thrombo-aspiration, balloon angioplasty, and permanent filter (n = 1), and permanent filter alone (n = 1). There was one in-hospital death. Follow-up was obtained at a mean of 29.6 months; three patients had died (two cancers, one myocardial infarction); 10 had no or minimal sequelae; one had post-phlebitic limb.Conclusion: Mechanical thrombectomy is a potential therapeutic option in patients presenting with proximal DVT.

  15. Iliac Crest Avulsion Fracture in a Young Sprinter

    PubMed Central

    Casabianca, L.; Rousseau, R.; Loriaut, P.; Massein, A.; Mirouse, G.; Gerometta, A.; Khiami, F.

    2015-01-01

    Avulsion fracture of the iliac crest is an uncommon pathology. It usually occurs in teenagers during sport activities, more common in boys. We report a case of 16-year-old male competitive sprinter, who had an avulsion of a part of the iliac crest and the anterior-superior iliac spine during a competition. The traumatism occurred during the period of acceleration phase out of the blocks which corresponds to the maximum traction phase on the tendons. Then a total loss of function of the lower limb appears forcing him to stop the run. X-ray and CT scan confirmed the rare diagnosis of avulsion of the quasitotality of the iliac crest apophysis, corresponding to Salter 2 fracture. We performed an open reduction and internal fixation with two screws, allowing a return to sport after 3 months and his personal best record in the 100 meters at the 6th postoperative month. PMID:26421205

  16. An iliac bone stress fracture in a basketball player.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Ejnisman, Benno; de Figueiredo, Eduardo Antônio; Terra, Bernardo Barcellos; de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Pochini, Alberto Castro; Cohen, Moises; Faloppa, Flavio

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe the case of an athlete from the Brazilian national men's basketball team (sub-16) who reported pain in the right iliac region at the end of the season. Clinical and imaging exams revealed an iliac bone stress fracture. A conservative treatment of removing the load from the fracture in combination with physical therapy was chosen. The athlete improved satisfactorily and returned to the sport at the same level as prior to the injury after 14 weeks of treatment.

  17. Endovascular Exclusion of Renal Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Poul Erik Rohr, Nils

    2005-06-15

    A patient who was operated for an abdominal aortic aneurysm 7 years earlier presented with recently discovered iliac and renal artery aneurysms. The renal artery had an angulation of 90{sup o}, but the aneurysm was successfully excluded using a covered vascular stent graft placed over an extrastiff guidewire. Even in cases of complex anatomy of a renal aneurysm, endovascular treatment should be considered. With development of more flexible and low-profile endoprosthesis with accurate deployment, these have become more usable.

  18. [Spontaneous dissolution of isolated superior mesenteric vein thrombosis in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Na, Byung Soo; John, Byung Min; Kim, Ki Bum; Lee, Je Soo; Jo, Hyun Woo; Seock, Chang Hyeon; Kim, Dong Hui; Lee, Ki Sung

    2011-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis can result in many vascular complications in both artery and vein. Venous complication usually occurs as a form of splenic or portal vein thrombosis, and also can simultaneously occur in superior mesenteric vein as well. Rarely, isolated superior mesenteric vein thrombosis occurs as a venous complication. Although it is uncommon, mesenteric vein thrombosis is an important clinical entity because of the possibility of mesenteric ischemia and infarction of small bowel. The treatments of mesenteric venous thrombosis include anticoagulation therapy, transcatheter therapy and surgical intervention. We report a case of 45-year- old man who had acute pancreatitis with isolated superior mesenteric vein thrombosis, which was spontaneously dissolved with the resolution of underlying inflammation without anticoagulation or surgical intervention.

  19. [Spontaneous dissolution of isolated superior mesenteric vein thrombosis in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Na, Byung Soo; John, Byung Min; Kim, Ki Bum; Lee, Je Soo; Jo, Hyun Woo; Seock, Chang Hyeon; Kim, Dong Hui; Lee, Ki Sung

    2011-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis can result in many vascular complications in both artery and vein. Venous complication usually occurs as a form of splenic or portal vein thrombosis, and also can simultaneously occur in superior mesenteric vein as well. Rarely, isolated superior mesenteric vein thrombosis occurs as a venous complication. Although it is uncommon, mesenteric vein thrombosis is an important clinical entity because of the possibility of mesenteric ischemia and infarction of small bowel. The treatments of mesenteric venous thrombosis include anticoagulation therapy, transcatheter therapy and surgical intervention. We report a case of 45-year- old man who had acute pancreatitis with isolated superior mesenteric vein thrombosis, which was spontaneously dissolved with the resolution of underlying inflammation without anticoagulation or surgical intervention. PMID:21258200

  20. Supra hepatic inferior vena cava and right atrial thrombosis following a traffic car crash

    PubMed Central

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Karim, Hosein; Haghi, Marjan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: We present a case of nephrotic syndrome associated with right atrial and supra hepatic vein part of inferior vena caval thrombosis. This patient presented with dyspena, lower extremity edema and back pain after a vehicle accident and blunt trauma to the abdomen. Trauma should be considered not only as a thrombophilic pre-disposition, but also as a predisposing factor to IVC endothelium injury and thrombosis formation. Echocardiography revealed supra hepatic vein IVC thrombosis floating to the right atrium. A C-T scan with contrast also showed pulmonary artery emboli to the left upper lobe. With open heart surgery, the right atrial and IVC clot were extracted and the main left and right pulmonary arteries were evaluated for possible clot lodging. The patient had an uneventful postoperative recovery and thrombosis has not reoccurred with periodical follow-up examinations. PMID:26836612

  1. Supra hepatic inferior vena cava and right atrial thrombosis following a traffic car crash.

    PubMed

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Karim, Hosein; Haghi, Marjan

    2016-07-01

    We present a case of nephrotic syndrome associated with right atrial and supra hepatic vein part of inferior vena caval thrombosis. This patient presented with dyspena, lower extremity edema and back pain after a vehicle accident and blunt trauma to the abdomen. Trauma should be considered not only as a thrombophilic pre-disposition, but also as a predisposing factor to IVC endothelium injury and thrombosis formation. Echocardiography revealed supra hepatic vein IVC thrombosis floating to the right atrium. A C-T scan with contrast also showed pulmonary artery emboli to the left upper lobe. With open heart surgery, the right atrial and IVC clot were extracted and the main left and right pulmonary arteries were evaluated for possible clot lodging. The patient had an uneventful postoperative recovery and thrombosis has not reoccurred with periodical follow-up examinations. PMID:26836612

  2. The hepatic artery in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Merion, R M; Burtch, G D; Ham, J M; Turcotte, J G; Campbell, D A

    1989-09-01

    Hepatic artery complications after liver transplantation are uncommon, but represent an important cause of morbidity and mortality. In addition, these complications tax an already limited supply of donor organs because of the frequent need for retransplantation in this group of patients. In this study, we examined the incidence of hepatic arterial anomalies in donors and recipients of orthotopic liver transplants, focusing on the techniques that are available for hepatic arterial reconstruction and on the occurrence of hepatic arterial complications. A total of 77 liver transplants were carried out in 68 patients. Standard recipient anatomy was present in 60 of 68 patients (88%). Anomalous vessels were identified in eight patients (12%), including six cases of replaced right hepatic artery (9%) and two cases of replaced left hepatic artery (3%). Donor liver arterial anatomy was standard in 62 cases (80%). Anomalous arterial supply was identified in 15 of 77 donor livers (20%), including replaced left hepatic artery in nine (12%) and replaced right hepatic artery in six (8%). A variety of methods were used to manage the anomalous vessels. There was one hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm, three cases of hepatic artery thrombosis (4%), and one patient developed a dissection of the native celiac axis. In primary transplants, utilization of the recipient's proper hepatic artery was associated with a significantly higher risk of hepatic artery thrombosis (P less than 0.04) when compared with the common hepatic artery or the branch patch technique. Use of a Carrel patch on the donor artery was associated with a significantly reduced incidence of hepatic artery thrombosis (P less than 0.0003). For retransplantation, it is recommended that a more proximal recipient anastomotic site be chosen. An innovative method is described that provides increased length of the donor arterial supply without the use of an arterial graft. PMID:2675403

  3. [Cerebral venous thrombosis in minimal change nephrotic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Hirata, M; Kuroda, M; Koni, I

    1999-06-01

    A 46-year old man presented with an eight-day history of edema and was found to be nephrotic, with a plasma albumin level of 1.1 g/dl and urine protein excretion of 13.3 g/24 hrs. The level of plasma creatinine was normal at 1.0 mg/dl. A finding of renal biopsy was consistent with minimal change glomerulopathy. On the 6th hospital day, he suddenly developed a severe headache and was noted to have bilateral papilledema. Lumbar puncture revealed an opening pressure of 250 mm of water. Magnetic resonance venography showed an irregular flow in the superior sagittal sinus and right transverse sinus, a finding consistent with thrombus. The diagnosis of cerebral venous thrombosis was made, and the patient was given both Warfarin 2 mg/day and prednisolone 60 mg/day. A complete recovery from nephrotic syndrome was achieved within eight weeks. Nephrotic syndrome causes a hypercoagulable state, leading to both venous and arterial thrombosis. The most common clinical features are renal vein thrombosis, femoral vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism, however, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is rare in patients with nephrotic syndrome. It is important to be aware of this complication, since prompt treatment with anticoagulation and control of nephrotic syndrome can lead to a successful outcome.

  4. External-to-Internal Iliac Stent-Graft: Medium-Term Patency Following Exclusion of a Retrogradely Perfused Common Iliac Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholls, Marcus John; McPherson, Simon

    2010-08-15

    Following complicated aortic aneurysm surgery a complete left iliac occlusion resulted in buttock claudication. A retrogradely perfused right common iliac aneurysm expanded. Exclusion was by external-to-internal iliac stent-graft. No deterioration in claudication occurred with medium-term stent-graft patency.

  5. Laparoscopic management of a strangulated internal hernia underneath the left external iliac artery☆

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Karl-Andreas; Wexels, Jan Cyril

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Internal herniation of a small bowel behind pelvic vessels is a rare complication seen after pelvic lymphadenectomy. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 56-year-old woman was operated due to a gynecological cancer. 4 years thereafter she presented with a 2 days history of abdominal pain and vomiting. Clinical and radiological findings indicated a small bowel obstruction. A loop of small bowel had herniated behind the left external iliac artery. Using laparoscopic technique the herniated bowel was reduced. Due to limited peritoneum around the area and skeletonized vessel, we decided not to do any repair of the hernia orifice. The postoperative recovery was uneventful, bowel activity returned to normal and she was discharged the next day. Follow-up was done at 1 month and the latest at 10 months. She didn’t experience pain or discomfort after the operation. DISCUSSION Due to limited peritoneum around the skeletonized vessel, we decided to leave the hernia orifice unrepaired. We found it hazardous to do any direct suture of the orifice or use a free peritoneal graft to repair the defect as the fibrosis and inflammatory process might have compromised the artery or the vein. A longer follow-up of the patient is needed to clearly conclude if this simple procedure has been sufficient. We agreed that if the patient would experience any sign of recurrence and need another operation we would close the defect at that time. CONCLUSION 4 years after pelvic lymphadenectomy a small bowel herniation behind an external iliac artery occurred. The patient was successfully treated with reduction of the small bowel using laparoscopic technique. A quick recovery with minimal discomfort and no sign of recurrence after 10 months made our approach an acceptable surgical option. PMID:24121051

  6. Transvenous Embolization of a Spontaneous Femoral AVF 5 Years After an Incomplete Treatment with Arterial Stent-Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Peynircioglu, Bora Ozkan, Murat; Dogan, Omer Faruk; Cil, Barbaros E.; Dogan, Riza

    2008-03-15

    A 66-year-old man with complex left femoral arterio-venous fistula (AVF) was first diagnosed after a deep venous thrombosis incident approximately 5 years ago. Partial treatment was performed by means of endografts along the superficial femoral artery, which remained patent for 5 years. The patient had been doing well until a couple of months ago when he developed severe venous stasis and ulcers of the left cruris, due to a high-flow nonhealing complex AVF with additional iliac vein occlusion. Therefore; the definitive treatment was performed by a unique endovascular technique combined with surgical venous bypass (femoro-femoral crossover saphenous bypass, the Palma operation). A novel percutaneous transvenous technique for occlusion of a complex high-flow AVF is reported with a review of the literature. The case is unique with spontaneous AVF, transvenous embolization with detachable coils and ONYX, and the hybrid treatment technique as well as the long-term patency of superficial femoral artery stent-grafts.

  7. Global Burden of Thrombosis: Epidemiologic Aspects.

    PubMed

    Wendelboe, Aaron M; Raskob, Gary E

    2016-04-29

    Thromboembolic conditions were estimated to account for 1 in 4 deaths worldwide in 2010 and are the leading cause of mortality. Thromboembolic conditions are divided into arterial and venous thrombotic conditions. Ischemic heart disease and ischemic stroke comprise the major arterial thromboses and deep-vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism comprise venous thromboembolism. Atrial fibrillation is a major risk factor for stroke and systemic arterial thromboembolism. Estimates of the global burden of disease were obtained from Global Burden of Disease Project reports, recent systematic reviews, and searching the published literature for recent studies reporting measures of incidence, burden, and disability-adjusted life-years. Estimates per 100 000 of the global incidence rate (IR) for each condition are ischemic heart disease, IR=1518.7; myocardial infarction, IR=139.3; ischemic stroke, IR=114.3; atrial fibrillation, IR=77.5 in males and 59.5 in females; and venous thromboembolism, IR=115 to 269. Mortality rates (MRs) for each condition are ischemic heart disease, MR=105.5; ischemic stroke, MR=42.3; atrial fibrillation, MR=1.7; and venous thromboembolism, MR=9.4 to 32.3. Global public awareness is substantially lower for pulmonary embolism (54%) and deep-vein thrombosis (44%) than heart attack (88%) and stroke (85%). Over time, the incidence and MRs of these conditions have improved in developed countries, but are increasing in developing countries. Public health efforts to measure disease burden and increase awareness of symptoms and risk factors need to improve, particularly in low- and middle-income regions to address this leading cause of morbidity and mortality. PMID:27126645

  8. Thrombosis of abdominal aorta in congenital afibrinogenemia: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Sartori, M T; Teresa, S M; Milan, M; Marta, M; de Bon, E; Emiliano, D B; Fadin, M; Mariangela, F; Pesavento, R; Raffaele, P; Zanon, E; Ezio, Z

    2015-01-01

    Thrombotic events in congenital hypo-afibrinogenemia have been rarely reported, either in association or not with replacement therapy or thrombotic risk factors. We describe clinical findings and management of thrombosis of abdominal aorta with peripheral embolism in a patient with congenital afibrinogenemia. A review of arterial thrombosis in inherited hypo-afibrinogenemia was also performed. The patient with a severe bleeding history requiring prophylaxis with fibrinogen concentrates (FC) was admitted for ischaemia of the 4th right toe. An angio-CT of abdominal aorta showed a thrombosis from the origin of renal arteries to the carrefour with a distal floating part. No thrombotic risk factors were found; a previous traumatic lesion of aortic wall might have triggered the thrombus formation, whereas the role of FC prophylaxis remains uncertain. The patient was successfully treated with FC, enoxaparin followed by fondaparinux, and low-dose aspirin without bleeding or thrombosis recurrence. After 2 years, aortic thrombus was almost completely recovered. Sixteen hypo/afibrinogenemia patients with arterial thrombosis were found in Literature, showing that thrombosis often occurs at a young age, involves large vessels, its recurrence is not unusual, and therapeutic strategy is not defined yet. Our therapeutic approach was effective and also safe, but further studies are needed to improve the knowledge of pathogenesis and the anti-thrombotic management in this peculiar setting.

  9. Percutaneous Treatment of Iliac Aneurysms and Pseudoaneurysms with Cragg Endopro System 1 Stent-Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Gasparini, Daniele; Lovaria, Andrea; Saccheri, Silvia; Nicolini, Antonio; Favini, Giorgio; Inglese, Luigi; Giorgetti, Pier Luigi; Basadonna, Pier Tommaso

    1997-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and short-term follow-up results of treating iliac aneurysms by the Cragg Endopro System 1 stent-graft. Methods: Nine lesions (two pseudoaneurysms and seven atherosclerotic aneurysms) were treated in eight patients by percutaneous implantation of a total of 10 stent-grafts. The procedure was followed by anticoagulation with heparin for 6 days, then antiplatelet therapy. Follow-up was by color Doppler ultrasound scan at 2 days and 3 months after the procedure for all patients, and by venous digital subtraction angiography and/or angio-CT up to 12 months later for four patients. Results: Initial clinical success rate was 100% and there were two minor complications. In one case the delivery system was faulty resulting in failure to deploy the stent-graft. An additional device had to be used. At 3-12 months all prostheses were patent but one patient (12.5%) had a minimal pergraft leak. Conclusion: Percutaneous stent-grafting with this device is a safe and efficacious treatment of iliac artery aneurysms.

  10. One Year Experience of Iliac Bifurcated Device for Aortoiliac Aneurysm in a Korean Single Center

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Moon Hwan; Park, Keun-Myoung; Jeon, Yong Sun; Cho, Soon Gu; Hong, Kee Chun; Shin, Woo Young; Choe, Yun-Mee; Shin, Seok-Hwan; Kim, Kyung Rae

    2015-01-01

    One of the predominant methods for preserving the internal iliac artery (IIA) in aortoiliac aneurysms is to use an iliac bifurcated device (IBD). However, there are a few limitations to the use of IBD in Korea. Our study aims to present the technical aspects of these devices, and to provide a mid-term analysis of IBD. Since 2013, 4 IBDs were used in 4 patients, with a mean follow-up of 14 months (range, 6–22 months). A 100% technical success rate was achieved without mortality and morbidity in our cases. The mean procedural time was 176 min (range, 145–240 min), and the mean contrast dose used was 184 mL (range, 135–220 mL). Type I or III endoleaks and postoperative expansion of the aneurysms weren't observed. Our cases demonstrates that IBD is a relatively safe repair method of aortoiliac aneurysms with preservation of the IIAs. However, a longer follow-up is needed to review the midterm results. PMID:26719840

  11. The Upside-Down Gore Excluder Limb and Double-Barrel Sandwich Technique for Penetrating Aortic Ulcer and Iliac Aneurysm Exclusion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung-Kee; Song, Incheol; Huh, Seung

    2016-03-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair has become the first-line treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysms and iliac artery aneurysms in recent years. However, the diameter of the infrarenal aorta is larger than that of the aortic bifurcation, especially with small aortic diameters, for which a reversed tapered device is necessary. We describe the off-label use of the upside-down Gore Excluder limb and double-barrel sandwich technique for the treatment of a penetrating abdominal aortic ulcer with a large common iliac artery aneurysm. These techniques offer an easy endovascular approach for excluding an aneurysm in selected patients. However, this technique is outside the standard instructions for use, therefore careful planning and long-term follow-up are mandatory. PMID:27051656

  12. The Upside-Down Gore Excluder Limb and Double-Barrel Sandwich Technique for Penetrating Aortic Ulcer and Iliac Aneurysm Exclusion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung-Kee; Song, Incheol; Huh, Seung

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair has become the first-line treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysms and iliac artery aneurysms in recent years. However, the diameter of the infrarenal aorta is larger than that of the aortic bifurcation, especially with small aortic diameters, for which a reversed tapered device is necessary. We describe the off-label use of the upside-down Gore Excluder limb and double-barrel sandwich technique for the treatment of a penetrating abdominal aortic ulcer with a large common iliac artery aneurysm. These techniques offer an easy endovascular approach for excluding an aneurysm in selected patients. However, this technique is outside the standard instructions for use, therefore careful planning and long-term follow-up are mandatory. PMID:27051656

  13. Predictability of sacral base levelness based on iliac crest measurements.

    PubMed

    Dott, G A; Hart, C L; McKay, C

    1994-05-01

    A level sacral base plane is necessary to allow normalization of complex lumbosacral mechanics. Palpatory examinations are often used to evaluate for leg length discrepancy and pelvic obliquity despite improved accuracy and consistency of radiographic techniques. Treatment based on palpatory examinations suppose a direct and consistent relationship between the pelvic bones (innominates) and the sacral base. To evaluate the relationship between iliac crest levelness and sacral base levelness, a radiographic postural survey in the upright, weight-bearing position was performed on 358 men and women thought to have pelvic obliquity. Of these subjects, 293 demonstrated unlevel iliac crest heights or sacral base > or = 3/16 inch (4.76 mm), with iliac crest heights accurately predicting sacral base position 62% of the time. At > or = 3/8 inch (9.53 mm), 68% of the cases were accurately predicted. When the criterion for unlevelness was increased to > or = 1/2 inch (12.70 mm), the predictive accuracy improved to 83%. Radiographic findings in this study demonstrate a significant difference between iliac crest heights and sacral base position. In cases of mild to moderate short leg syndromes, the iliac crest height is an unreliable predictor of the direction or degree of sacral base levelness. PMID:8056627

  14. Purinergic Receptors in Thrombosis and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hechler, Béatrice; Gachet, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Under various pathological conditions, including thrombosis and inflammation, extracellular nucleotide levels may increase because of both active release and passive leakage from damaged or dying cells. Once in the extracellular compartment, nucleotides interact with plasma membrane receptors belonging to the P2 purinergic family, which are expressed by virtually all circulating blood cells and in most blood vessels. In this review, we focus on the specific role of the 3 platelet P2 receptors P2Y1, P2Y12, and P2X1 in hemostasis and arterial thrombosis. Beyond platelets, these 3 receptors, along with the P2Y2, P2Y6, and P2X7 receptors, constitute the main P2 receptors mediating the proinflammatory effects of nucleotides, which play important roles in various functions of circulating blood cells and cells of the vessel wall. Each of these P2 receptor subtypes specifically contributes to chronic or acute vascular inflammation and related diseases, such as atherosclerosis, restenosis, endotoxemia, and sepsis. The potential for therapeutic targeting of these P2 receptor subtypes is also discussed.

  15. Unusual shunt for symptomatic portal vein thrombosis after liver transplantation - Clatworthy revisited.

    PubMed

    Mali, V P; Robless, P A; Aw, M; Loh, D L; Quak, S H; Prabhakaran, K

    2012-06-01

    PV thrombosis is not an uncommon occurrence following pediatric LT. Symptomatic PHT following PV thrombosis is treated medically, surgical portosystemic shunting (mesorex, splenorenal, and mesocaval) being reserved for refractory cases. A 10-yr-old boy suffered recurrent malena and hemorrhagic shock because of chronic PV thrombosis following LT nine yr ago (1999). Extensive work-up failed to localize the bleeding source. The liver function remained normal. Initial attempts at surgical shunts failed owing to thrombosis (mesocaval 2001, splenorenal, inferior mesenteric-left renal vein, splenic-left external iliac vein 2008). In this situation, we performed a Clatworthy shunt by anastomosing the divided lower end of the LCIV to the side of SMV. There was a single, large caliber anastomosis. Post-operatively, the malena stopped completely, and clinically, there was no lower limb edema or encephalopathy. Doppler USG revealed persistence of hepatopetal flow within the portal collaterals. Follow-up at two yr reveals stable hepatic function with a patent shunt. To the best of our knowledge, we are not aware of a Clatworthy shunt being performed in a transplant setting. We reviewed the literature pertaining to this shunt in non-transplant patients with PHT.

  16. The Role of Coagulation and Inflammation After Angioplasty in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wahlgren, C.M. Sten-Linder, M.; Egberg, N.; Kalin, B.; Blohme, L.; Swedenborg, J.

    2006-08-15

    Purpose. Restenosis remains a frequent complication after angioplasty in peripheral arterial disease. Inflammation plays a critical role in the vascular response to injury. Effective medical treatment to improve patency after angioplasty is still elusive. The aims of this prospective clinical study were to investigate changes in blood coagulation and inflammatory markers after angioplasty and their significance for restenosis. Methods. Thirty-four patients with peripheral arterial disease underwent angioplasty of the iliac and superficial femoral arteries. Ten patients undergoing diagnostic angiography were included in the study as controls. Plasma levels of tissue factor, prothrombin fragment 1 + 2, D-dimer, P-selectin, C-reactive protein (CRP), and fibrinogen were analyzed before and after angioplasty. Patients were followed up with angiography after 6 months to assess restenosis. Results. CRP was elevated the day after angioplasty (6.6 mg/l, p = 0.0001) and tended to peak after 1 week (11 mg/l, p = 0.09). There was a significant increase of D-dimer and P-selectin 1-4 hr after angioplasty (0.4 mg/l, p = 0.001 and 68 ng/ml, p = 0.05, respectively). None of the biochemical markers was a statistically significant predictor of restenosis. Conclusion. We have observed a much more prolonged inflammatory response than previously noted, but only minor changes in coagulation activity after angioplasty. The biochemical markers, before and after angioplasty, were not related to restenosis. Further studies are needed to delineate the molecular mechanisms behind these observations and their involvement in thrombosis and restenosis. If these pathways are further defined, improved treatment strategies, including antithrombotic treatments and statins, could be tailored to modulate postprocedural inflammation.

  17. Incidence of metastasis in circumflex iliac nodes distal to the external iliac nodes in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Kazuhira; Kato, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    Objective A causal relationship between removal of circumflex iliac nodes distal to the external iliac nodes (CINDEIN) and lower leg edema has been recently suggested. The aim of this study was to elucidate the incidence of CINDEIN metastasis in cervical cancer. Methods A retrospective chart review was carried out for 531 patients with cervical cancer who underwent lymph node dissection between 1993 and 2014. CINDEIN metastasis was pathologically identified by microscopic investigation. After 2007, sentinel lymph node biopsy was performed selectively in patients with non-bulky cervical cancer. The sentinel node was identified using 99mTc-phytate and by scanning the pelvic cavity with a γ probe. Results Two hundred and ninety-seven patients (55.9%) underwent CINDEIN dissection and 234 (44.1%) did not. The percentage of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IIb to IV (42.4% vs. 23.5%, p<0.001) was significantly higher in patients who underwent CINDEIN dissection than those who did not. CINDEIN metastasis was identified in 1.9% overall and in 3.4% of patients who underwent CINDEIN dissection. For patients with stage Ia to IIa disease, CINDEIN metastasis was identified in 0.6% overall and in 1.2% of patients who underwent CINDEIN dissection. Of 115 patients with sentinel node mapping, only one (0.9%) had CINDEIN detected as a sentinel node. In this case, the other three lymph nodes were concurrently detected as sentinel lymph nodes. Conclusion CINDEIN dissection can be eliminated in patients with stage Ia to IIa disease. CINDEIN might not be regional lymph nodes in cervical cancer. PMID:27102250

  18. Acute Unilateral Blindness from Superior Ophthalmic Vein Thrombosis: A Rare Presentation of Nephrotic Syndrome from Class IV Lupus Nephritis in the Absence of Antiphospholipid or Anticardiolipin Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Baidoun, Firas; Issa, Rommy; Al-Turk, Bashar

    2015-01-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are at high risk of arterial and venous thrombosis secondary to anti-phospholipid antibodies. Herein, we are presenting an interesting case of venous thrombosis in a patient with SLE in the absence of anti-phospholipid antibodies. PMID:26858847

  19. Use of embolic protective devices in treating acute arterial occlusions: an interventional radiology and vascular surgery collaborative learning experience

    PubMed Central

    Woodley-Cook, Joel; Prabhudesai, Vikram; Moloney, Tony

    2013-01-01

    A 43-year-old man presented to the emergency department with left leg claudication. CT angiogram confirmed an acute left leg arterial occlusion from a left ventricular thrombus. During intra-arterial thrombolysis, he developed severe abdominal pain and a CT angiogram confirmed an acute occlusive thromboembolism to his left renal artery. Prior to left renal artery intra-arterial embolectomy, temporary intra-arterial occlusion balloons were inflated within his (1) right renal artery to protect this kidney from acute embolism and (2) left iliac artery to protect his left leg from further clot burden. Following the left renal embolectomy, an angiogram demonstrated patent renal arteries, acute occlusion of the right common iliac artery and persistent clot in his left iliac/lower limb. These occlusions were retrieved by surgical embolectomy. Final angiogram demonstrated patent bilateral iliac/lower limb arteries. The patient was discharged on lifelong anticoagulation and remains asymptomatic with bilateral palpable distal pulses and normal serum creatine. PMID:23580669

  20. The importance of cardiovascular risk factors for thrombosis prediction in patients with essential thrombocythemia.

    PubMed

    Lekovic, Danijela; Gotic, Mirjana; Milic, Natasa; Miljic, Predrag; Mitrovic, Mirjana; Cokic, Vladan; Elezovic, Ivo

    2014-10-01

    The current widely accepted stratification defined by age and previous thrombosis in patients with essential thrombocythemia (ET) probably deserves deeper analysis. The aim of our study was to identify additional factors at the time of diagnosis, which have an impact on the thrombosis prediction. We conducted a study of 244 consecutive ET patients with median follow-up of 83 months. We analyzed the influence of age, gender, laboratory parameters, history of previous thrombosis, spleen size, JAK2 mutation as well as cardiovascular (CV) risk factors including arterial hypertension, diabetes, active tobacco use and hyperlipidemia in the terms of thrombosis. The most important predictors of thrombosis in multivariate Cox regression model were the presence of CV risk factors (p=0.004) and previous thrombosis (p=0.038). Accordingly, we assigned risk scores based on multivariable analysis-derived hazard ratios (HR) to the presence of 1 CV risk factor (HR=3.5; 1 point), >1 CV risk factors (HR=8.3; 2 points) and previous thrombosis (HR=2.0; 1 point). A final three-tiered prognostic model for thrombosis prediction was developed as low (score 0), intermediate (score 1 or 2) and high risk (score 3) (p<0.001). The hazard of thrombosis was 3.8% in low-risk group, 16.7% in the intermediate-risk group and 60% in the high-risk group (p<0.001). Patients with thrombotic complications during the follow-up had a significantly shorter survival (p=0.018). The new score based on CV risk factors and previous thrombotic events allows a better patient selection within prognostic-risk groups and improved identification of the high-risk patients for thrombosis.

  1. Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis in Children.

    PubMed

    Sweis, Rochelle; Biller, José

    2016-01-01

    Investigators from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia analyzed the clinical and radiographic findings in 12 cases of cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) seen between 2000 and 2013, and conducted a literature search and review of the pooled data. PMID:27004138

  2. Thrombosis in stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kansu, Emin

    2012-04-01

    Hemostatic changes and thrombotic events are frequent in patients undergoing stem cell transplantation. Arterial and venous thromboses are major causes of morbidity and mortality. Thrombotic complications can be classified into four groups including: catheter-related thrombosis, venous thromboembolic (VTE) events, sinusoidal obstructive syndrome (SOS)/veno-occlusive disease, and transplant-associated thrombotic microangiopathy (TAM). The incidence of catheter-related thrombosis is 8-20% in patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), and the incidence is low in syngeneic and allogeneic transplant patients. Venous duplex Doppler ultrasound, venogram, and computed tomography scan are required to visualize the venous thrombus. The treatment should be aimed at the prevention of pulmonary embolism, the avoidance of thrombus extension, and the preservation of catheter patency. Patients undergoing HSCT may have risk factors for VTE including underlying malignancy, traumatic brain injury, prolonged hospitalization, administration of conditioning regimens, and central venous catheters. Important risk factors are presence of history of VTE and graft-versus-host disease. One-year incidence of symptomatic VTE is 3.7%. SOS, also known as veno-occlusive disease, is a serious liver disease, seen in approximately 50-60% of HSCT patients. The mortality rate from the severe form of SOS is 84.3% and majority of the patients have multi-organ failure. The frequency is quite low after autologous transplantation. Risk factors for SOS include pre-existing hepatic damage, previous high-dose chemotherapy and abdominal irradiation, female gender and donor-recipient human leukocyte antigen disparity. Cyclophosphamide and busulphan are the most common agents with the highest incidence and fatal SOS. Histopathologic features of SOS include dilatation of sinusoids, necrosis of perivenular hepatocytes, and obstruction of small intrahepatic central venules by

  3. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Malignant Osseous and Soft-Tissue Sarcomas. I. A Rabbit Experimental Model

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, Yasushi; Fujiwara, Kazuhisa; Okajima, Kaoru; Mitsumori, Michihide; Mizowaki, Takashi; Ohya, Natsuo; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Abe, Mitsuyuki; Ohura, Koitirou; Wataya, Shigeki

    1998-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) on metastatic bone tumors in an experimental study. Methods: Fifteen Japanese white rabbits were transplanted with VX2 sarcoma cells into the iliac crest. In 10 rabbits, the arterial supply to the iliac bone tumors, internal iliac artery and iliolumbar artery were then embolized with particles of gelatin sponge. The therapeutic effect was evaluated by comparison with the natural course of control tumors in the other five rabbits. Results: After TAE, extensive necrosis, fibrosis, and vacuolization within the tumors were confirmed histologically. In the control rabbits, 19% {+-} 7% of the entire tumor was found to be spontaneous tumor necrosis; in contrast, the tumors of the TAE group showed necrosis as 62% {+-} 22% of the entire tumor. In one TAE group rabbit, no active tumor cell could be detected in the residual tumor. Conclusion: TAE was found to be an effective treatment for bone tumors in an experimental model.

  4. Renal transplantation with venous drainage through the superior mesenteric vein in cases of thrombosis of the inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Aguirrezabalaga, Javier; Novas, Serafín; Veiga, Francisco; Chantada, Venancio; Rey, Ignacio; Gonzalez, Marcelino; Gomez, Manuel

    2002-08-15

    Renal transplantation usually is performed by placing the graft in the iliac fossa, anastomosing the renal vein to the iliac vein or, when this is not possible, to the vena cava. When vascular complications occur, particularly on the venous side, the position of the graft may have to be changed. This report describes orthotopic renal grafts and positioning of the organ with anastomosis to the splenic vessels. Venous drainage was established directly into the mesenteric-portal territory, with two cases to the portal vein and one to the inferior mesenteric vein. A new technique for the venous drainage of the renal graft is shown. We have used this model in two cases of infrarenal inferior vena cava thrombosis. The kidney was located in a retroperitoneal position, with venous drainage to the superior mesenteric vein through an orifice in the posterior peritoneum.

  5. Atypical presentation of priapism in a patient with acute iliocaval deep venous thrombosis secondary to May-Thurner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alhalbouni, Saadi; Deem, Samuel; Abu-Halimah, Shadi; Sadek, Betro T; Mousa, Albeir

    2013-08-01

    We report on a 42-year-old male who presented with priapism, severe scrotal swelling, and left lower extremity pain and swelling. Initial management of priapism failed, and he was noted to have both cavernosal and glandular venous obstruction. Computed tomography (CT) was performed and identified extensive acute thrombosis involving the distal inferior vena cava and the left iliac veins. Pharmacomechanical thrombolysis (PMT) was started over the course of two days. At completion of thrombolysis, the culprit lesion in the left common iliac vein was treated with angioplasty and stenting. His postoperative course was uneventful, and his priapism as well as the scrotal and leg swelling improved. He was discharged home on full anticoagulation. To our knowledge, this is the first available description of this rare presentation along with a literature review of the underlying vascular etiology for priapism.

  6. Nontoxic polyphosphate inhibitors reduce thrombosis while sparing hemostasis

    PubMed Central

    Travers, Richard J.; Shenoi, Rajesh A.; Kalathottukaren, Manu Thomas; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N.

    2014-01-01

    Polyphosphate (polyP) is secreted by activated platelets and has been shown to contribute to thrombosis, suggesting that it could be a novel antithrombotic target. Previously reported polyP inhibitors based on polycationic substances, such as polyethylenimine, polyamidoamine dendrimers, and polymyxin B, although they attenuate thrombosis, all have significant toxicity in vivo, likely due to the presence of multiple primary amines responsible for their polyP binding ability. In this study, we examined a novel class of nontoxic polycationic compounds initially designed as universal heparin reversal agents (UHRAs) to determine their ability to block polyP procoagulant activity and also to determine their utility as antithrombotic treatments. Several UHRA compounds strongly inhibited polyP procoagulant activity in vitro, and 4 were selected for further examination in mouse models of thrombosis and hemostasis. Compounds UHRA-9 and UHRA-10 significantly reduced arterial thrombosis in mice. In mouse tail bleeding tests, administration of UHRA-9 or UHRA-10 was associated with significantly less bleeding compared with therapeutically equivalent doses of heparin. Thus, these compounds offer a new platform for developing novel antithrombotic agents that target procoagulant anionic polymers such as polyP with reduced toxicity and bleeding side effects. PMID:25202141

  7. Role of thrombin signalling in platelets in haemostasis and thrombosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambrano, Gilberto R.; Weiss, Ethan J.; Zheng, Yao-Wu; Huang, Wei; Coughlin, Shaun R.

    2001-09-01

    Platelets are critical in haemostasis and in arterial thrombosis, which causes heart attacks and other events triggered by abnormal clotting. The coagulation protease thrombin is a potent activator of platelets ex vivo. However, because thrombin also mediates fibrin deposition and because multiple agonists can trigger platelet activation, the relative importance of platelet activation by thrombin in haemostasis and thrombosis is unknown. Thrombin triggers cellular responses at least in part through protease-activated receptors (PARs). Mouse platelets express PAR3 and PAR4 (ref. 9). Here we show that platelets from PAR4-deficient mice failed to change shape, mobilize calcium, secrete ATP or aggregate in response to thrombin. This result demonstrates that PAR signalling is necessary for mouse platelet activation by thrombin and supports the model that mouse PAR3 (mPAR3) does not by itself mediate transmembrane signalling but instead acts as a cofactor for thrombin cleavage and activation of mPAR4 (ref. 10). Importantly, PAR4-deficient mice had markedly prolonged bleeding times and were protected in a model of arteriolar thrombosis. Thus platelet activation by thrombin is necessary for normal haemostasis and may be an important target in the treatment of thrombosis.

  8. Thrombosis: Novel nanomedical concepts of diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Cicha, Iwona

    2015-01-01

    Intravascular thrombosis, a critical pathophysiological feature of many cardiovascular disorders, leads to the formation of life-threatening obstructive blood clots within the vessels. Rapid recanalization of occluded vessels is essential for the patients’ outcome, but the currently available systemic fibrinolytic therapy is associated with low efficacy and tremendous side effects. Additionally, many patients are ineligible for systemic thrombolytic therapy, either due to delayed admission to the hospital after symptom onset, or because of recent surgery, or bleeding. In order to improve the treatment efficacy and to limit the risk of hemorrhagic complications, both precise imaging of the affected vascular regions, and the localized application of fibrinolytic agents, are required. Recent years have brought about considerable advances in nanomedical approaches to thrombosis. Although these thrombus-targeting imaging agents and nanotherapies are not yet implemented in humans, substantial amount of successful in vivo applications have been reported, including animal models of stroke, acute arterial thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism. It is evident that the future progress in diagnosis and treatment of thrombosis will be closely bound with the development of novel nanotechnology-based strategies. This Editorial focuses on the recently reported approaches, which hold a great promise for personalized, disease-targeted treatment and reduced side effects in the patients suffering from this life-threatening condition. PMID:26322182

  9. [Management of mesenteric ischemia and mesenteric vein thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, M; Keck, T

    2014-07-01

    Acute mesenteric ischemia is secondary to acute embolic disease or thrombosis of the superior mesenteric artery. Further pathologies that manifest themselves with the same clinical presentation are thrombosis of the superior mesenteric vein and non-occlusive disease. The patients are admitted to the emergency room with an acute abdomen. Most patients are more than 70 years old. Known risk factors for mesenteric ischemia are cardiac diseases as atrial fibrillation, aneurysms of the aorta and the visceral arteries, occlusive arterial diseases, tumorigenic compression of the vessel and several diseases that result in a reduction of the flow and intravascular volume in the superior mesenteric artery. The golden standard in the diagnosis of acute mesenteric ischemia is CT-angiography of the abdominal vessels with 3 D reconstruction. The therapy is different and dependent from the underlying pathology. A statistically significantly elevated mortality of more than 95% is associated with a delay of surgical or interventional therapy of more than 12 hours after the initial symptoms and non-occlusive mesenteric ischemia. Because of the advanced age of the patients and the co-morbidities a non-surgical interventional re-canalisation of the superior mesenteric vessels is recommended. A laparotomy is necessary in all patients with peritonitis and/or bowel necrosis or perforation.

  10. Intractable Postpartum Hemorrhage Resulting from Uterine Artery Pseudoaneurysm: Superselective Arteriographic Embolization via the Collateral Route

    SciTech Connect

    Doenmez, Halil Oztuerk, M. Halil; Guergen, Fatma; Soylu, Serra O.; Hekimoglu, Baki

    2007-04-15

    We present a patient with intractable postpartum hemorrhage resulting from uterine artery pseudoaneurysm despite bilateral hypogastric artery ligation who was successfully treated by an endovascular approach via the collateral route. Although there is a good argument for postponing surgery until transcatheter embolization has been attempted, this case shows that embolization can still be successful even if the iliac vessels have been ligated.

  11. Oral anticoagulation to prevent thrombosis recurrence in polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Boluda, Juan-Carlos; Arellano-Rodrigo, Eduardo; Cervantes, Francisco; Alvarez-Larrán, Alberto; Gómez, Montse; Barba, Pere; Mata, María-Isabel; González-Porras, José-Ramón; Ferrer-Marín, Francisca; García-Gutiérrez, Valentín; Magro, Elena; Moreno, Melania; Kerguelen, Ana; Pérez-Encinas, Manuel; Estrada, Natàlia; Ayala, Rosa; Besses, Carles; Pereira, Arturo

    2015-06-01

    It is unclear whether anticoagulation guidelines intended for the general population are applicable to patients with polycythemia vera (PV) and essential thrombocythemia (ET). In the present study, the risk of thrombotic recurrence was analyzed in 150 patients with PV and ET treated with vitamin K antagonists (VKA) because of an arterial or venous thrombosis. After an observation period of 963 patient-years, the incidence of re-thrombosis was 4.5 and 12 per 100 patient-years under VKA therapy and after stopping it, respectively (P < 0.0005). After a multivariate adjustment for other prognostic factors, VKA treatment was associated with a 2.8-fold reduction in the risk of thrombotic recurrence. Notably, VKA therapy offset the increased risk of re-thrombosis associated with a prior history of remote thrombosis. Both the protective effect of VKA therapy and the predisposing factors for recurrence were independent of the anatomical site involved in the index thrombosis. Treatment periods with VKA did not result in a higher incidence of major bleeding as compared with those without VKA. These findings support the use of long-term anticoagulation for the secondary prevention of thrombosis in patients with PV and ET, particularly in those with history of remote thrombosis.

  12. [Splenic artery aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Colović, R; Davidović, L; Bilanović, D; Krivokapić, Z; Grubor, N; Cvetković, S; Radak, V; Marković, M

    2006-01-01

    Although the third most frequent aneurysm in the abdomen, after aneurysms of the aorta and iliac arteries, and most frequent aneurisms of visceral arteries, splenic artery aneurysms are rare, but not very rare. Thanks to the new imaging techniques, first of all ultrasonography, they have been discovered with increasing frequency. We present a series of 9 splenic artery aneurysms. Seven patients were female and two male of average age 49 years (ranging from 28 to 75 years). The majority of afected women were multiparae, with average 3 children (ranging from 1 to 6). One patient had a subacute rupture, and 2 had ruptures into the splenic vein causing portal hypertension. The spleen was enlarged in 7 out of 9 patients. The average size of aneurysms was 3,2 cm (ranging from 2 to 8 cm). The preoperative diagnosis of splenic artery aneurysm was established in 6 patients while in 3 patients aneurism was accidentally found during other operations, during splenectomy in 2, and during the excision of a retroperitoneal tumour in 1 patient. Aneurysmectomy was carried out in 7 patients, while a ligation of the incoming and outcoming wessels was performed in 2 patients with arteriovenous fistula. Splenectomy was performed in 6 patients, while pancreatic tail resection, cholecystectomy and excision of the retroperitoneal tumor were performed in 3 patients. Additional resection of the abdominal aortic aneurysm with reconstruction of aortoiliac segment was performed in 2 patients. There were no mortality and the postoperative recovery was uneventful in all patients. PMID:16989145

  13. Sharp Recanalization for Chronic Left Iliac Vein Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Nobutake Isfort, Peter; Penzkofer, Tobias; Grommes, Jochen; Greiner, Andreas; Mahnken, Andreas

    2012-08-15

    Endovascular treatment has emerged as a first-line treatment for venous occlusions, but is sometimes challenging with conventional approaches. This article describes a helpful technique using a Roesch-Uchida needle to cross a chronic occlusion of the iliac vein when conventional techniques have failed.

  14. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Milena Castellar-Leones, Sandra; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT) and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24347950

  15. Do neutrophil extracellular traps contribute to the heightened risk of thrombosis in inflammatory diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Ashish N; Kazzaz, Nayef M; Knight, Jason S

    2015-01-01

    Thrombotic events, both arterial and venous, are a major health concern worldwide. Further, autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, and antiphospholipid syndrome, predispose to thrombosis, and thereby push the risk for these morbid events even higher. In recent years, neutrophils have been identified as important players in both arterial and venous thrombosis. Specifically, chromatin-based structures called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) play a key role in activating the coagulation cascade, recruiting platelets, and serving as scaffolding upon which the thrombus can be assembled. At the same time, neutrophils and NETs are emerging as important mediators of pathogenic inflammation in the aforementioned autoimmune diseases. Here, we first review the general role of NETs in thrombosis. We then posit that exaggerated NET release contributes to the prothrombotic diatheses of systemic lupus erythematosus, ANCA-associated vasculitis, and antiphospholipid syndrome. PMID:26730289

  16. Paralytic Ileus due to Superior Mesenteric Venous Thrombosis after Transarterial Injection for Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yuki; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kanno, Yukiko; Gunji, Naohiko; Imaizumi, Hiromichi; Hayashi, Manabu; Okai, Ken; Abe, Kazumichi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ohira, Hiromasa

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old man was admitted to hospital with abdominal pain. In the four years prior to his presentation, he had undergone repeated transarterial chemoembolizations and injections for hepatocellular carcinoma. He underwent his 8th transcatheter arterial therapy one month prior to admission. Abdominal X-rays and contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed large amounts of small intestinal gas and venous thrombosis from the portal vein to the superior mesenteric vein, respectively. The thrombosis was reduced after anticoagulation therapy (heparin, antithrombin III, danaparoid sodium and warfarin). This is the first case report of paralytic ileus due to superior mesenteric venous thrombosis after transcatheter arterial therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma with an arterioportal shunt.

  17. Paralytic Ileus due to Superior Mesenteric Venous Thrombosis after Transarterial Injection for Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yuki; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kanno, Yukiko; Gunji, Naohiko; Imaizumi, Hiromichi; Hayashi, Manabu; Okai, Ken; Abe, Kazumichi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ohira, Hiromasa

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old man was admitted to hospital with abdominal pain. In the four years prior to his presentation, he had undergone repeated transarterial chemoembolizations and injections for hepatocellular carcinoma. He underwent his 8th transcatheter arterial therapy one month prior to admission. Abdominal X-rays and contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed large amounts of small intestinal gas and venous thrombosis from the portal vein to the superior mesenteric vein, respectively. The thrombosis was reduced after anticoagulation therapy (heparin, antithrombin III, danaparoid sodium and warfarin). This is the first case report of paralytic ileus due to superior mesenteric venous thrombosis after transcatheter arterial therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma with an arterioportal shunt. PMID:26726083

  18. A Rabbit Model of Thrombosis on Atherosclerotic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Atsushi; Asada, Yujiro

    2011-01-01

    Thrombus formation on a disrupted atherosclerotic plaque is a key event that leads to atherothrombosis. Because thrombus is induced by chemical or physical injury of normal arteries in most animal models of thrombosis, the mechanisms of thrombogenesis and thrombus growth in atherosclerotic vessels should be investigated in diseased arteries of appropriate models. Pathological findings of human atherothrombosis suggest that tissue factor, an initiator of the coagulation cascade, significantly affects enhanced platelet aggregation and fibrin formation after plaque disruption. We established a rabbit model of atherothrombosis based on human pathology in which differences in thrombus formation between normal and atherosclerotic arteries, factors contributing to thrombus growth, and mechanisms of plaque erosion can be investigated. Emerging transgenic and stem cell technologies should also provide an invaluable rabbit experimental model in the near future. PMID:21253503

  19. Pheochromocytoma with inferior vena cava thrombosis: An unusual association

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Sunil K.; Kota, Siva K.; Jammula, Sruti; Meher, Lalit K.; Modi, Kirtikumar D.

    2012-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas have been described in association with vascular abnormalities like renal artery stenosis. A 48-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with the complaints of headache, sweating, anxiety, dizziness, nausea, vomiting and hypertension. For last several days, he was having a dull aching abdominal pain. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed the presence of a left adrenal pheochromocytoma. An inferior vena cava (IVC) venogram via the right jugular vein demonstrated occlusion of the IVC inferior to the right atrium. Surgical removal of pheochromocytoma was done, followed by anticoagulant treatment for IVC thrombosis, initially with subcutaneous low molecular weight heparin, and then with oral warfarin, resulting in restoration of patency. To the best of our knowledge, the occurrence of pheochromocytoma in IVC thrombosis has not been reported so far from India. Possible mechanisms of such an involvement are discussed. PMID:22629039

  20. Which spinal levels are identified by palpation of the iliac crests and the posterior superior iliac spines?

    PubMed Central

    Chakraverty, Robin; Pynsent, Paul; Isaacs, Karen

    2007-01-01

    The line joining the superior aspect of the iliac crests posteriorly (the intercristal line) is commonly stated to cross the midline at the L4 or L4–5 spinal level on imaging. This study aimed to assess the spinal level identified through palpation of surface anatomy (iliac crests and posterior superior iliac spines) in adults and the level of agreement compared with the intercristal line identified through imaging. The study participants included consecutive adult patients undergoing prone fluoroscopically guided spinal injections for chronic low back pain at the Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Birmingham, between April and July 2004. Prior to fluoroscopic imaging, each patient's surface anatomy was palpated by two examiners and lines created to form the palpated intercristal line and the posterior superior iliac spine line. Following imaging, the mid-line spinal levels identified by these palpated lines were recorded and the level of agreement (kappa coefficient) with the intercristal line formed by imaging of the iliac crests was assessed. The results showed that although the L4 or L4–5 spinal levels were identified on imaging of the intercristal line in 86.7% of 75 patients (49 female), the intercristal line formed through palpation tended to identify higher levels; the L3 or L3–4 spinal levels in 77.3% of cases and more commonly in females than in males (85.7 vs. 61.5%) and in patients with higher body mass indices. The level of agreement between the two lines was poor (κ = 0.05). The posterior superior iliac spine line identified the S2 spinous process in 51% and the S1 in 44% of 60 (45 female) patients. The results suggest that formation of the intercristal line by palpation of the iliac crests identifies different spinal levels to those identified by imaging and that both methods should be regarded as different instruments. In the clinical situation, it may be more appropriate to consider that palpation of the intercristal line is a guide for identifying

  1. Bronchovascular reconstruction with a bovine pericardial conduit and surgical reintervention due to thrombosis with revascularisation.

    PubMed

    Peña, Emilio; Blanco, Montserrat; Otero, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 57-year-old male with left hilar squamous cell carcinoma infiltrating the pulmonary artery and in whom a sleeve bronchoplasty and angioplasty were performed using a bovine pericardial conduit. Three days post-operatively, graft thrombosis was detected; thrombectomy and graft reconstruction were performed with revascularisation of the graft.

  2. Internal jugular vein thrombosis in Behcet’s disease: a rare complication

    PubMed Central

    Bilici, Muhammet; Pehlivan, Yavuz; Kimyon, Gezmis; Kisacik, Bunyamin

    2014-01-01

    Behcet’s disease (BD) is a systemic inflammatory disorder characterised by oral/genital ulcers, ocular lesions, and gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, neurological and major vessel involvements. Venous manifestations are more common than arterial involvements. In this case report, we present a patient with internal jugular vein thrombosis, which is a very rare complication of BD. PMID:25239979

  3. Impairment of 40-km time-trial performance but not peak power output with external iliac kinking: a case study in a world-class cyclist.

    PubMed

    Lamberts, Robert P; Mann, T N; Rietjens, Gerard J; Tijdink, Hendrik H

    2014-07-01

    Iliac blood-flow restrictions causing painful and "powerless" legs are often attributed to overtraining and may develop for some time before being correctly diagnosed. In the current study, differences between actual performance parameters and performance parameters predicted from the Lamberts and Lambert Submaximal Cycle Test (LSCT) were studied in a world-class cyclist with bilateral kinking of the external iliac artery before and after surgery. Two performance-testing sessions, including a peak-power-output (PPO) test and a 40-km time trial (TT) were conducted before surgery, while 1 testing session was conducted after the surgery. Actual vs LSCT-predicted performance parameters in the world-class cyclists were compared with 82 symptom-free trained to elite male cyclists. No differences were found between actual and LSCT-predicted PPO before and after surgical intervention. However, there were differences between actual and LSCT-predicted 40-km TT time in the tests performed before the surgery (2:51and 2:55 min:s, respectively). These differences were no longer apparent in the postsurgery 40-km TT (2 s). This finding suggests that iliac blood-flow restrictions seem to mainly impair endurance performance rather than peak cycling performance. A standard PPO test without brachial ankle blood-pressure measurements might not be able to reflect iliac blood-flow restrictions. Differences between actual and LSCT-predicted 40-km TT time may assist in earlier referral to a cardiovascular specialist and result in earlier detection of iliac blood-flow restrictions.

  4. High prevalence of anti-prothrombin antibody in patients with deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ishikura, Ken; Wada, Hideo; Kamikura, Yuko; Hattori, Kyouko; Fukuzawa, Toshiaki; Yamada, Norikazu; Nakamura, Masio; Nobori, Tsutomu; Nakano, Takeshi

    2004-08-01

    The present study was designed to determine the prevalence of lupus anticoagulant (LA) antibody and several antibodies for antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT)/pulmonary embolism (PE) (n = 48), cerebral thrombosis (CT, n = 30), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, n = 22), and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP, n = 30). The presence of antibodies was examined by using the respective ELISA kits. LA was positive in 38.6% of patients with DVT/PE, suggesting that LA is one of the most important risk factors in DVT/PE. The highest prevalence of anti-beta(2) glycoprotein I (beta(2)GPI) IgG was in CT and SLE, followed by DVT, and none in ITP and healthy volunteers (control, n = 40), suggesting that it is related to thrombosis, particularly arterial thrombosis. The highest prevalence of anti-prothrombin (aPT) IgG antibody was in DVT, followed by CT and SLE, and none in ITP and the control, suggesting that it is related to thrombosis, especially venous thrombosis. The highest prevalence of antiphospholipid (aPL) IgG was in DVT, CT, and SLE, but 0% in ITP and control. On the other hand, aPL IgM, anti-annexin V IgG, and anti-annexin V IgM were positive in patients both with and without thrombosis, suggesting that they are not related to thrombosis. Our results indicated that among the anti-phospholipid antibodies, LA is the most sensitive marker for APS while anti-beta(2)GPI IgG, aPT IgG, and aPL IgG are risk factors for thrombosis. In particular, aPT IgG is a significant marker for DVT/PE. PMID:15282665

  5. Association of anti-cardiolipin antibodies with vascular thrombosis and neurological manifestation of Behçets disease.

    PubMed

    al-Dalaan, A N; al-Ballaa, S R; al-Janadi, M A; Bohlega, S; Bahabri, S

    1993-03-01

    We have studied 44 patients with Behçet's Disease (BD) to look for any correlation of arterial and venous thrombosis or central nervous system (CNS) manifestations with anti-cardiolipin antibodies (ACLA). Twenty patients were positive for ACLA by MELISA method. Ten patients had IgG antibody, four had IgM and six had both IgG and IgM. Of these patients, 11 had a history of vascular thrombosis and thrombophlebitis and nine had CNS manifestations. The association of ACLA with vascular thrombosis or CNS manifestation of Behçet's disease was statistically not significant. PMID:8467608

  6. Who is responsible for the consequences? A case of stent thrombosis subsequent to noncompliance with post angioplasty treatment regimen.

    PubMed

    Sajwani, Salma Abdul Aziz; Allana, Saleema

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a major cause of mortality internationally and in Pakistan. Angioplasty has been proven to be an effective treatment for CAD. Stent thrombosis is a known but preventable complication of angioplasty. Several factors may lead to stent thrombosis with non-compliance with the prescribed drug regimen, being one of the most important factors. We report a case of stent thrombosis after four months of angioplasty. After exploring of patient's post angioplasty routines, it was found that the patient was non-compliant with the prescribed anti- platelets and other prescribed drugs. This time the patient presented with another acute myocardial infarction, and he went through angioplasty again.

  7. Identification of Risk Factors for Vascular Thrombosis May Reduce Early Renal Graft Loss: A Review of Recent Literature

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Anna Krarup; Jorgensen, Troels Munch; Jespersen, Bente

    2012-01-01

    Renal graft survival has improved over the past years, mainly owing to better immunosuppression. Vascular thrombosis, though rare, therefore accounts for up to one third of early graft loss. We assess current literature on transplantation, identify thrombosis risk factors, and discuss means of avoiding thrombotic events and saving thrombosed grafts. The incidence of arterial thrombosis was reported to 0.2–7.5% and venous thrombosis 0.1–8.2%, with the highest incidence among children and infants, and the lowest in living donor reports. The most significant risk factors for developing thrombosis were donor-age below 6 or above 60 years, or recipient-age below 5-6 years, per- or postoperative hemodynamic instability, peritoneal dialysis, diabetic nephropathy, a history of thrombosis, deceased donor, or >24 hours cold ischemia. Multiple arteries were not a risk factor, and a right kidney graft was most often reported not to be. Given the thrombosed kidney graft is diagnosed in time, salvage is possible by urgent reoperation and thrombectomy. Despite meticulous attentions to reduce thrombotic risk factors, thrombosis cannot be entirely prevented and means to an early detection of this complication is desirable in order to save the kidneys through prompt reoperation. Microdialysis may be a new tool for this. PMID:22701162

  8. Microparticle Surface Proteins are Associated with Experimental Venous Thrombosis: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Newaj M.; Kachman, Maureen; Walker, Angela; Hawley, Angela E.; Wrobleski, Shirely K.; Myers, Daniel D.; Strahler, John R.; Andrews, Philip C.; Michailidis, George C.; Henke, Peter K.; Wakefield, Thomas W.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Microparticles (MPs) are small membrane vesicles released from activated cells and are associated with thrombosis and inflammation. Microparticles contain a unique subset of surface proteins derived from the parent cell and may be responsible for their diverse biological functions. To identify these proteins juvenile baboons (Papio anubis, n=4) underwent iliac vein thrombosis with six-hour balloon occlusion. Plasma samples were taken at baseline and at 2 days post thrombosis for MP analysis. Microparticles were extracted from platelet-poor plasma, digested separately with trypsin and tagged using iTRAQ reagents. The digests were subjected to 2-D LC separation followed by MALDI tandem mass spectrometry. Peak lists were generated and searched against all primate sequences. For protein identity, a minimum of two peptides at 95% confidence was required. Later, iTRAQ ratios were generated comparing relative protein level of day-2 to baseline. The proteomic analysis was performed twice for each blood sample, totaling 8 experiments. Proteins were considered elevated or depressed if the iTRAQ ratio deviated by 20% change from normal and a p-value less than 0.05. Significantly, 7 proteins were differentially expressed on day-2 compared to baseline, and appeared in at least two animals and regulated in at least 4 experiments, and appeared in at least three animals and regulated in at least four experiments. Among these 7 proteins, up-regulated proteins include various forms of fibrinogen and alpha-1-antichymotrypsin, and down-regulated proteins include immunoglobulins. These proteins influence thrombosis and inflammation through hemostatic plug formation (fibrinogen), inhibiting neutrophil adhesion (alpha-1-antichymoptrypsin), and immunoregulation (immunoglobulins). Further studies are needed to confirm the mechanistic role of these proteins in the pathogenesis of venous thrombosis. PMID:19028772

  9. Pancreas Transplant Venous Thrombosis: Role of Endovascular Interventions for Graft Salvage

    SciTech Connect

    Stockland, Andrew H.; Willingham, Darrin L.; Paz-Fumagalli, Ricardo; Grewal, Hani P.; McKinney, J. Mark; Hughes, Christopher B.; Walser, Eric M.

    2009-03-15

    Venous thrombosis of pancreas transplant allografts often leads to graft loss. We evaluated the efficacy of emergent endovascular techniques to salvage thrombosed pancreatic allografts in a series of six patients. Of the 76 pancreas transplants performed between 2002 and 2006, six patients were diagnosed with venous thrombosis on MRI between 2 and 28 days posttransplant (mean, 9 days). Five patients were systemic-enteric (donor portal vein anastomosis to recipient iliac vein) and one patient was portal-enteric (donor portal vein anastomosis to recipient superior mesenteric vein). Conventional venography confirmed the diagnosis of venous thrombosis in all patients. One patient was treated with catheter-directed venous thrombolysis and balloon thrombectomy. Another patient was treated with rheolytic thrombectomy alone. The remaining four patients were treated with a combination of these mechanical and thrombolytic techniques. Completion venography revealed >50% clot reduction and resumption of venous drainage in all patients. One patient required additional intervention 16 days later for recurrent thrombosis. Two patients required metal stent placement for anastomotic stenoses or kinks. One patient required pancreatectomy 36 h after attempted salvage secondary to a major hemorrhage and graft necrosis. Two patients recovered pancreatic function initially but lost graft function at 8 and 14 months, respectively, from severe chronic rejection. Patient survival was 100%, long-term graft survival was 50%, rethrombosis rate was 16.6%, and graft loss from rejection was 33%. In conclusion, early recognition and treatment of venous thrombosis after pancreas transplantation has acceptable morbidity and no mortality using short-term endovascular pharmacomechanical therapy.

  10. Multiple steno-obstructive vascular lesions and femoral superficial artery dissection in a young Caucasian male with antiphospholipid syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cianci, Rosario; Gigante, Antonietta; Barbano, Biagio; Zaccaria, Alvaro; Polidori, Lelio; Borghesi, Francesca; Gasperini, Ludovica; Di Donato, Domenico; Amoroso, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    A young Caucasian male was admitted for claudication intermittens, hyposphygmia on the right lower limb, high blood pressure and deterioration of renal function. Instrumental investigations documented right renal artery stenosis, multiple steno-obstructive manifestations of the splanchnic artery system, occlusion of the right external iliac artery and dissection of the left superficial femoral artery. The patient had not been previously diagnosed with antiphospholipid syndrome. Subsequently, the vascular lesions, because of his thrombophilic state, needed endovascular treatment and anticoagulant therapy. PMID:21686361

  11. Actinomyces infection causing acute right iliac fossa pain

    PubMed Central

    Govindarajah, Narendranath; Hameed, Waseem; Middleton, Simon; Booth, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This is a case of a 75-year-old man being admitted to the on-call surgical department with acute abdominal pain. On arrival he was clinically dehydrated and shocked with localised pain over McBurney's point and examination findings were suggestive of appendiceal or other colonic pathology. Full blood testing revealed a white cell count of 38×109/L and a C reactive protein (CRP) of 278 mg/L. A CT scan revealed a gallbladder empyema that extended into the right iliac fossa. This case highlights the potential for a hyperdistended gallbladder empyema to present as acute right iliac fossa pain with blood tests suggestive of complicated disease. Further analysis confirmed Actinomyces infection as the underlying aetiology prior to a laparoscopic subtotal cholecystectomy. This case serves to remind clinicians of this as a rare potential cause of atypical gallbladder pathology. PMID:24872493

  12. Laparoscopic iliac and iliofemoral lymph node resection for melanoma.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Don; Roberts, Kurt E; Teng, Edward; Narayan, Deepak

    2012-12-01

    Regional lymphadenectomy in the iliac and groin, originally devised by Basset in 1912, is performed for the treatment of melanoma metastatic to this lymphatic basin. Laparoscopic iliac node dissection may be a valuable management option because it allows performance of the same procedure as in open surgery but with significant benefits such as decreased operative morbidity due to decreased surgical trauma, less violation of the abdominal muscles or the inguinal ligament, reduced postoperative pain, and increased patient satisfaction with the cosmetic appearance. The authors' approach makes use of a laparoscopic technique to offer an alternative to traditionally described lymph node dissection for melanoma. A review of the literature showed few laparoscopic approaches in this context. Jones et al. do not perform the resection en bloc and do not address the iliofemoral lymph node dissection with a combined retroperitoneal technique such as the current authors use. Two authors in the literature use laparoscopy through a transperitoneal approach, with a piecemeal removal of nodes. Delman et al. limit their technique to the inguinal and high femoral basin alone. The video demonstrates the novel use of a laparoscopic method to harvest iliac lymph nodes in combination with a minimally invasive approach to groin dissection for metastatic melanoma. After a laparoscopic resection of these nodes, the authors deliver the iliac nodal contents through the groin using a minimally invasive approach. This approach is highly beneficial to the patient. He is able to leave the hospital significantly earlier than he would have after a traditional open procedure. He can return to his job as a car mechanic within 1 week and is metastasis free at the 9-month follow-up assessment without evidence of lymphocele formation. The authors do not believe that this technique has any significant implication for lymphocele formation compared with an open procedure because in essence, the same

  13. Factor V Leiden and Thrombosis in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE): A Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, R.; Barton, J.L.; Chang, M.; Catanese, JJ.; Li, Y.; Begovich, A.B.; Criswell, LA.

    2009-01-01

    To perform a meta-analysis of the association between the factor V Leiden polymorphism (FVL) and thrombosis among patients with SLE and/or antiphospholipid antibody (aPL) positivity. Included studies recruited patients based on SLE or aPL positive status, confirmed subjects' SLE diagnosis as defined by the American College of Rheumatology, and documented thrombotic events. Excluded studies were non-English or considered only arterial thrombosis. Individual patient data, available from five studies, together with unpublished data from 1210 European-American SLE patients from the UCSF Lupus Genetics Collection genotyped for FVL, were further analyzed. Seventeen studies (n=2090 subjects) were included in the initial meta-analysis. Unadjusted odds ratios (OR) were calculated to assess association of FVL with thrombosis. The OR for association of thrombosis with FVL was 2.88 (95% C.I. 1.98-4.20). In the secondary analysis with our individual patient dataset (n=1447 European-derived individuals), SLE subjects with the FVL polymorphism still had more than two times the odds of thrombosis compared to subjects without this polymorphism, even when adjusting for covariates such as gender, age, and aPL status. SLE and/or aPL positive patients with the FVL variant have more than two times the odds of thrombosis compared to those without this polymorphism. PMID:19421222

  14. Nephrotic Syndrome Associated with Renal Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sung Kyew; Park, Sung Kwang

    1987-01-01

    The coexistence of nephrotic syndrome and renal vein thrombosis has been of medical interest since Rayer’s description in 1840. Renal vein thrombosis has been underdiagnosed because of its variable clinical and radiological findings but it becomes a more frequently recognizable clinical entity since diagnosis can be easily established by modern angiographic techniques. Generally it has been believed that renal vein thrombosis may cause nephrotic syndrome. But recent articles strongly suggest that renal vein thrombosis is a complication of the nephrotic syndrome rather than a cause. We report three cases of nephrotic syndrome associated with renal vein thrombosis. PMID:3154812

  15. Septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Ismail A; Wasay, Mohammad

    2016-03-15

    Septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, once a common and deadly disease, has fortunately become rare now. Not only that the incidence has fallen significantly after the antibiotic era, the morbidity and mortality has also decreased substantially. Cavernous sinus thrombosis is by far the commonest form of septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Due to its rare occurrence, a lot of current generation clinicians have not encountered the entity in person. Despite all the advances in diagnostic modalities, a high index of clinical suspicion remains the mainstay in prompt diagnosis and management of this potentially lethal condition. Keeping this in view, the authors have reviewed the subject including the old literature and have summarized the current approach to diagnosis and management. Septic cavernous thrombosis is a fulminant disease with dramatic presentation in most cases comprised of fever, periorbital pain and swelling, associated with systemic symptoms and signs. The preceding infection is usually in the central face or paranasal sinuses. The disease rapidly spreads to contralateral side and if remains undiagnosed and untreated can result in severe complications or even death. Prompt diagnosis using radiological imaging in suspected patient, early use of broad spectrum antibiotics, and judicial use of anticoagulation may save the life and prevent disability. Surgery is used only to treat the nidus of infection. PMID:26944152

  16. Diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed Central

    Douketis, J. D.; Ginsberg, J. S.

    1996-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT), a common disease, can be difficult to diagnose because its clinical features are nonspecific. Venography is the standard test, but other less expensive, easily performed, noninvasive tests are available. At present, duplex ultrasonography is the noninvasive test of choice. PMID:8616289

  17. Blood viscosity and thrombosis: clinical considerations.

    PubMed

    Smith, B D; La Celle, P L

    1982-01-01

    Thrombus formation depends on adherence of blood-formed elements to the intimal surface through platelet-vessel surface interaction, platelet release phenomena and aggregation, formation of fibrin, and the enmeshing of blood cells. Arterial thrombi involve platelet aggregation, whereas venous thrombi found in low flow or during stasis have greater proportions of erythrocytes and fibrin. It is not known if or how abnormalities of flow resistance, platelet thrombus formation, or endothelial and dynamic parameters affect the microcirculation, largely due to the difficulty of obtaining comprehensive data from these systems. Increases of fibrinogen observed in many disorders may result in minor changes in blood viscosity without known physiologic consequence, but in most disorders in which thrombosis is observed, the pathophysiologic mechanisms are multifactorial and abnormal blood viscosity is presumed to be a significant but not limiting component. Therapeutic approaches in thrombotic disorders should recognize which elements of the thrombotic triad predominate. In arterial disorders focus should be on platelet activity, and the objectives of venous thrombosis treatment include prevention of morbidity and death from pulmonary embolism, reduction of morbidity resulting from the acute thrombotic episode, and prevention of the postphlebitic syndrome. Pathology, mechanism, and treatment for specific thrombogenic disorders are described. Treatments suggested for hyperviscosity involve giving antibiotics during crises. Also discussed are thalassemia, paroxysomal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, polycythemia, cryoglobulinemia, paraproteinemia, diabetes mellitus, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Studies have established a relationship between thromboembolic disease and oral contraceptives (OCs). The risk is only increased while the patient is taking OCs but is compounded in women undergoing surgery or who have a disorder which predisposes to venous disease. The risk for

  18. Renal failure due to renal vein thrombosis in a fetus with growth restriction and thrombophilia.

    PubMed

    Has, Recep; Corbacioglu Esmer, Aytul; Kalelioglu, Ibrahim H; Yumru, Harika; Yüksel, Atil; Ziylan, Orhan

    2014-04-01

    We report a case of renal vein thrombosis diagnosed at 27 weeks of gestation in a dichorionic twin pregnancy. The left kidney of one fetus was hyperechoic and enlarged with echoic streaks following the direction of interlobular veins and the loss of corticomedullary differentiation. In the following weeks, left kidney became smaller and echoic, and Doppler examination showed no flow in both artery and vein. The right kidney had totally normal appearance in the beginning, but it became enlarged and hyperechoic, and progressed into a small echoic kidney with no flow in artery and vein. In the postnatal ultrasound examination, both kidneys appeared hyperechoic with no vascularization in the hilum region. There was thrombosis in arteries and veins of both kidneys, as well as in the inferior vena cava. The investigation for thrombophilia resulted with the combined presence of heterozygote mutation in factor V Leiden and prothrombin 20210 genes.

  19. Transcatheter Splenic Artery Occlusion for Treatment of Splenic Artery Steal Syndrome After Orthotopic Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Uflacker, Renan; Selby, J. Bayne; Chavin, Kenneth; Rogers, Jeffrey; Baliga, Prabhakar

    2002-08-15

    Purpose: To review some aspects of the problem of splenic artery steal syndrome as cause of ischemia in transplanted livers and treatment by selective splenic artery occlusion. Materials and Methods: Eleven liver transplant patients from a group of 350 patients, nine men and two women,ranging in age from 40 years to 61 years (mean 52 years), presented with biochemical evidences of liver ischemia and failure, ranging from one to 60 days following orthotopic liver transplantation. Diagnosis of splenic artery steal syndrome was suspected by elevated enzymes, Doppler ultrasound and confirmed by celiac angiogram. Patients with confirmed hepatic artery thrombosis before angiography were excluded from the study. Embolization with Gianturco coils was performed. Results: All patients were treated by splenic artery embolization with Gianturco coils. The 11 patients improved clinically within 24 hours of the procedure with significant change in the biochemical and clinical parameters. Followup ranged from one month to two years. One of the 11 patient initially improved, but developed hepatic artery thrombosis within 24 hours of the embolic treatment,requiring surgical repair. Conclusion: Splenicartery steal syndrome following liver transplantation surgery can be diagnosed by celiac angiography, and effectively treated by splenic artery embolization with coils. Embolization is one of the treatments available, it is minimally invasive, and leads to immediate clinical improvement. Hepatic artery thrombosis is a possible complication of the procedure.

  20. Bupivacaine for pain reduction after iliac crest bone graft harvest.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Kevin R; Lockney, Dennis T; Bible, Jesse E; Crosby, Colin G; Devin, Clinton J

    2014-05-01

    Iliac crest bone graft remains the gold standard in achieving spinal arthrodesis, but chronic pain from graft harvest occurs in up to 39% of patients. Studies have shown that a single administration of local anesthetic reduces short-term pain, but they have not adequately investigated possible longer-term benefits. The goal of this study was to determine whether local administration of bupivacaine after iliac crest bone graft harvesting reduces pain and improves patient-reported outcomes. In this prospective, randomized, controlled, and blinded clinical study, 40 patients were identified who underwent posterior spine fusion with iliac crest bone graft and were randomized to receive either bupivacaine (treatment group, n=20) or saline (control group, n=20) at the iliac crest bone graft site. Pain at the harvest site was determined by a series of 12 visual and numeric pain scale assessments. Short Form-12 mental and physical component scores, EuroQol-5D, and Oswestry Disability Index assessments were made, along with determination of patient satisfaction and self-reported outcome of surgery. Baseline pain and outcome assessments were statistically similar (P>.05). Average pain scores were lower for all 12 assessments in the treatment group at mean follow-up of 5 weeks (significant differences in 6 assessments) and 20 weeks (significant differences in 2 assessments). No significant differences were found in Short Form-12 and EuroQol-5D scores. For patients who underwent lumbar fusion, the treatment group had significantly improved Oswestry Disability Index scores (mean±SD=10.8±7.1 vs 18.7±5.9, P=.012). Significantly more patients in the treatment group reported that surgery met all expectations (90% vs 50%, P=.016). This study is the 1st to show that a single administration of bupivacaine at the iliac crest bone graft harvest site during posterior spine fusion surgery can result in improved outcomes and reduced pain far beyond the anesthetic duration of activity

  1. Thrombosis and occlusion of vascular access in hemodialyzed patients.

    PubMed

    Montagnana, Martina; Meschi, Tiziana; Borghi, Loris; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2011-11-01

    Patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis have a high risk of arterial thrombotic events as well as vascular access thrombosis (VAT). The latter complication has been consistently associated with inherited (i.e., the prothrombin 20210 polymorphism, and polymorphisms in the genes encoding for transforming growth factor-β1, nitric oxide synthase, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, angiotensin converting enzyme, and methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase), and acquired thrombotic risk factors (i.e., diabetes, obesity, atrial fibrillation, hypertension, hyperhomocysteinemia, hyperlipoproteinemia(a), low serum albumin, antiphospholipid antibodies, autoantibodies against protein C and S, erythropoietin administration, malnutrition, and cytomegalovirus infection). The three main factors involved in the pathogenesis of VAT overlap those of venous thrombosis and therefore include endothelial cell injury, blood stasis, and hypercoagulability. These changes are characteristic of patients affected by end-stage renal disease and might be further aggravated during and after hemodialysis. The aim of this review is to describe the epidemiology and pathogenesis of thrombosis of dialysis vascular access and to discuss the application of therapeutic interventions in prevention and treatment of this clinical problem. PMID:22198859

  2. Effect of the direct factor Xa inhibitor apixaban in rat models of thrombosis and hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, William A; Bostwick, Jeffrey S; Stewart, Anne B; Steinbacher, Thomas E; Xin, Baomin; Wong, Pancras C

    2010-06-01

    Apixaban is an oral, direct, and highly selective factor Xa inhibitor in late-stage clinical development for the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic diseases. Apixaban was evaluated in rat thrombosis and hemostasis models. Thrombosis was produced in the carotid artery by FeCl2 application, in the vena cava by either FeCl2 application or tissue factor injection, and in an arterial-venous shunt. Hemostasis was assessed using cuticle, renal cortex, and mesenteric artery bleeding times. Intravenous apixaban infusions of 0.1, 0.3, 1, and 3 mg/kg per hour increased the ex vivo prothrombin time to 1.24, 1.93, 2.75, and 3.98 times control, respectively. The 0.3, 1, and 3-mg/kg per hour doses inhibited thrombosis in all models. Concentrations for 50% thrombus reduction ranged from 1.84 to 7.57 microM. The 3-mg/kg per hour dose increased cuticle, renal, and mesenteric bleeding times to 1.92, 2.13, and 2.98 times control, respectively. Lower doses had variable (1 mg/kg per hour) or no effect (0.1, 0.3 mg/kg per hour) on hemostasis. Heparin's prolongation of renal and cuticle bleeding time was twice that of apixaban when administered at a dose that approximated apixaban (3 mg/kg per hour) efficacy in arterial thrombosis. In summary, apixaban was effective in a broad range of thrombosis models at doses producing modest increases in multiple bleeding time models. PMID:20224421

  3. Blood Flow in Arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, David N.

    Blood flow in arteries is dominated by unsteady flow phenomena. The cardiovascular system is an internal flow loop with multiple branches in which a complex liquid circulates. A nondimensional frequency parameter, the Womersley number, governs the relationship between the unsteady and viscous forces. Normal arterial flow is laminar with secondary flows generated at curves and branches. The arteries are living organs that can adapt to and change with the varying hemodynamic conditions. In certain circumstances, unusual hemodynamic conditions create an abnormal biological response. Velocity profile skewing can create pockets in which the direction of the wall shear stress oscillates. Atherosclerotic disease tends to be localized in these sites and results in a narrowing of the artery lumena stenosis. The stenosis can cause turbulence and reduce flow by means of viscous head losses and flow choking. Very high shear stresses near the throat of the stenosis can activate platelets and thereby induce thrombosis, which can totally block blood flow to the heart or brain. Detection and quantification of stenosis serve as the basis for surgical intervention. In the future, the study of arterial blood flow will lead to the prediction of individual hemodynamic flows in any patient, the development of diagnostic tools to quantify disease, and the design of devices that mimic or alter blood flow. This field is rich with challenging problems in fluid mechanics involving three-dimensional, pulsatile flows at the edge of turbulence.

  4. Deep vein thrombosis in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Colman-Brochu, Stephanie

    2004-01-01

    This article provides a review of the incidence, pathophysiology, and treatment of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in pregnancy, a rare but serious complication of pregnancy. The incidence of DVT in pregnancy varies widely, but it is a leading cause of maternal morbidity in both the United States and the United Kingdom. Risk factors during pregnancy include prolonged bed rest or immobility, pelvic or leg trauma, and obesity. Additional risk factors are preeclampsia, Cesarean section, instrument-assisted delivery, hemorrhage, multiparity, varicose veins, a previous history of a thromboembolic event, and hereditary or acquired thrombophilias such as Factor V Leiden. Heparin is the anticoagulant of choice to treat active thromboembolic disease or to administer for thromboprophylaxis, but low molecular-weight heparin is being used with increasing frequency in the pregnant woman. Perinatal nurses should be aware of the symptoms, diagnostic tools, and treatment options available to manage active thrombosis during pregnancy and in the intrapartum and postpartum periods.

  5. Hydrocephalus in cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Zuurbier, Susanna M; van den Berg, René; Troost, Dirk; Majoie, Charles B; Stam, Jan; Coutinho, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    Increased intracranial pressure is common in cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), but hydrocephalus is rarely reported in these patients. We examined the frequency, pathophysiology and associated clinical manifestations of hydrocephalus in patients with CVT admitted to our hospital between 2000 and 2010 (prospectively since July 2006). Hydrocephalus was defined as a bicaudate index larger than the 95th percentile for age, and/or a radial width of the temporal horn of ≥ 5 mm. We excluded patients in whom hydrocephalus was caused by a disease other than CVT or if it was iatrogenic. 20 out of 99 patients with CVT had hydrocephalus. 6 patients with hydrocephalus were excluded from the analysis. Patients with hydrocephalus more often had focal neurological deficits (86 vs. 49%, p = 0.02) and were more frequently comatose (43 vs. 16%, p = 0.06), as compared to patients without hydrocephalus. Deep cerebral venous thrombosis (64 vs. 9%, p < 0.001) and edema of the basal ganglia and thalami (64 vs. 4%, p < 0.001) were more common in patients with hydrocephalus. Intraventricular hemorrhage was present in 1 patient with hydrocephalus, compared to none among patients without hydrocephalus (7 vs. 0%, p = 0.15). Outcome at follow-up was worse in patients with hydrocephalus (mRS 0-1, 36 vs. 68%, p = 0.02; mortality 29 vs. 9%, p = 0.07). Hydrocephalus occurs more frequently in cerebral venous thrombosis than previously believed, especially in patients with deep cerebral venous thrombosis and edema of the basal ganglia. The presence of hydrocephalus is associated with a worse clinical outcome, but a direct causal relation is unlikely. Routine shunting procedures are not advisable.

  6. Porcine radial artery decellularization by high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Jun; Funamoto, Seiichi; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Nam, Kwangoo; Higami, Tetsuya; Kishida, Akio

    2015-11-01

    Many types of decellularized tissues have been studied and some have been commercially used in clinics. In this study, small-diameter vascular grafts were made using HHP to decellularize porcine radial arteries. One decellularization method, high hydrostatic pressure (HHP), has been used to prepare the decellularized porcine tissues. Low-temperature treatment was effective in preserving collagen and collagen structures in decellularized porcine carotid arteries. The collagen and elastin structures and mechanical properties of HHP-decellularized radial arteries were similar to those of untreated radial arteries. Xenogeneic transplantation (into rats) was performed using HHP-decellularized radial arteries and an untreated porcine radial artery. Two weeks after transplantation into rat carotid arteries, the HHP-decellularized radial arteries were patent and without thrombosis. In addition, the luminal surface of each decellularized artery was covered by recipient endothelial cells and the arterial medium was fully infiltrated with recipient cells.

  7. [Step-up strategy for diagnosis and treatment of acute superior mesenteric venous thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuofei; Wu, Xingjiang; Li, Jieshou

    2014-05-01

    Acute superior mesenteric venous thrombosis is rare. With advance in CT venography, angiography and diagnostic laparoscopy, the incidence of acute superior mesenteric venous thrombosis has increased worldwide with more access to early diagnosis. The use of anticoagulation medication, interventional radiology, and damage control approach has resulted in better clinical outcomes. At present, the new step-up approach for acute superior mesenteric venous thrombosis includes CT venography as the main diagnostic technique, anticoagulation as the cornerstone of therapy, local transcatheter thrombolytic therapy as the key recanalization method, and adjunctive use of arterial spasmolysis and various endovascular manipulation and damage control surgery by intestinal resection plus jejunostomy and ileostomy or open abdomen. This strategy may further improve clinical outcomes. This review will present the most recent advance in this strategy.

  8. Cavernous sinus thrombosis secondary to aspergillus granuloma: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Brenet, Esteban; Boulagnon-Rombi, Camille; N'guyen, Yohan; Litré, Claude-Fabien

    2016-10-01

    Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a rare but serious complication of sphenoid aspergillosis. The rarity of this pathology makes its diagnostic very difficult on a clinical, biological and radiological sense. The authors present a case of cavernous sinus thrombosis with ipsilateral internal carotid artery thrombosis secondary to a non-invasive sphenoid aspergillosis in an immunocompetent host, responsible of a cavernous syndrome associated to a Claude Bernard Horner syndrome. One year after surgery, the patient is still asymptomatic without recurrence. Diagnostic modalities are detailed and several management of this pathology are compared. Surgery is essential in a diagnostic and therapeutic sense. There is no evidence of the interest of adjuvant therapies such as antibiotic and anticoagulation. Concerning the antifungal treatment, the attitude towards a non-invasive sphenoid aspergillosis in an immunocompetent host is unclear. PMID:26860234

  9. Cerebral vein thrombosis in a four year old with Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Hacihamdioglu, Duygu Ovunc; Demiriz, Murat; Sobaci, Gungor; Kocaoglu, Murat; Demirkaya, Erkan; Gok, Faysal

    2014-01-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a multisystem disorder. The main pathology in BD is vasculitis that involves arteries and veins of all calibers. Central nervous system involvement occurs in 5-10% of patients. Increased morbidity and mortality is rarely observed in children. The mean age at onset in pediatric BD is approximately 7 years. Neurologic involvement in BD is usually observed after 3-6 years. We report the case of a four-year-old Turkish boy with BD with sagittal sinus thrombosis treated with infliximab. The patient presented papilledema without neurologic signs. Although long-term efficacy evaluations are needed in this case, infliximab therapy may be a good option in childhood BD with refractory sinus thrombosis. This is the youngest case of BD with sagittal sinus thrombosis reported so far.

  10. Novel repair of an external iliac vein aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Jayaraj, Arjun; Meissner, Mark

    2012-08-01

    Aneurysms involving the venous system are a rare entity. We report the case of a 37-year-old woman who presented to us with activity-limiting left gluteal pain and who on consequent workup was found to have a left external iliac vein aneurysm in a setting of iliocavomegaly. She underwent successful treatment of her aneurysm with a novel approach that involved staple plication and resection of the aneurysm over a balloon mandrel. We discuss the presentation, diagnosis, and surgical technique adopted for the treatment of this uncommon condition. PMID:22704912

  11. Histological study on the left common iliac vein spur.

    PubMed

    Mitsuoka, Hiroki; Ohta, Takashi; Hayashi, Shogo; Yokoi, Toyoharu; Arima, Takahiro; Asamoto, Ken; Nakano, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    The spur occasionally seen in a left common iliac vein was investigated by anatomical and histological examination of cadavers so the occurrence mechanism could be discussed. Spurs were found in six cases of the 28 cadavers (21.4%) and they were classified into few different kinds of composition of endosporia, tunica media and adventitia. It is considered that there may be different formation mechanisms and stages even in cases of similar anatomical finding. (English translation of J Jpn Coll Angiol 2013; 53: 43-47).

  12. Pyomyositis mimicking right iliac fossa mass: review of the literature.

    PubMed Central

    Iwuagwu, O. C.; Deans, G. T.

    2000-01-01

    Pyomyositis is a pyogenic infection of skeletal muscle. Its incidence in temperate countries though low is rising. Most cases from the temperate region involve immuno-compromised patients. The onset is usually insidious with progression to large purulent collections. Because of its low incidence in temperate countries, it is often initially misdiagnosed. A high index of suspicion with appropriate imaging techniques, aggressive surgical intervention and adjunctive antibiotic therapy are the keys to prompt resolution. A case of pyomyositis mimicking right iliac fossa (RIF) mass is described with a review of the literature. Images Figure 1 PMID:11041041

  13. Recurrent Stenotrophomonas maltophilia bacteremia after iliac crest bone graft harvest.

    PubMed

    Hagiya, Hideharu; Ogawa, Hiroko; Ishida, Tomoharu; Terasaka, Tomohiro; Kimura, Kosuke; Waseda, Koichi; Hanayama, Yoshihisa; Horita, Masahiro; Shimamura, Yasunori; Kondo, Eisei; Otsuka, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    We describe a rare case of recurrent Stenotrophomonas maltophilia bacteremia in a previously healthy 45-year-old man. The infection was caused by osteomyelitis at the site of an iliac crest bone graft harvest. A genetic analysis using enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR) revealed that the blood isolates and pathogens obtained from the surgical wound were identical. Initial treatment with levofloxacin and cefozopran was ineffective, but the patient's infection was successfully treated by long-term administration of latamoxef and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. The present case suggests that attention should be given to the possibility of S. maltophilia infection in any situations. PMID:25088888

  14. Thrombosis in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Casserly, Liam F; Dember, Laura M

    2003-01-01

    Although renal failure has classically been associated with a bleeding tendency, thrombotic events are common among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). A variety of thrombosis-favoring hematologic alterations have been demonstrated in these patients. In addition, "nontraditional" risk factors for thrombosis, such as hyperhomocysteinemia, endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and malnutrition, are present in a significant proportion of chronic dialysis patients. Hemodialysis (HD) vascular access thrombosis, ischemic heart disease, and renal allograft thrombosis are well-recognized complications in these patients. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism are viewed as rare in chronic dialysis patients, but recent studies suggest that this perception should be reconsidered. Several ESRD treatment factors such as recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) administration, dialyzer bioincompatibility, and calcineurin inhibitor administration may have prothrombotic effects. In this article we review the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of thrombosis in ESRD and evaluate the evidence that chronic renal failure or its management predisposes to thrombotic events.

  15. Ischaemic distal limb necrosis and Klebsiella pneumoniae infection associated with arterial catheterisation in a cat.

    PubMed

    Bowlt, Kelly L; Bortolami, Elisa; Harley, Ross; Murison, Pamela; Wallace, Adrian

    2013-12-01

    This case report describes dorsal pedal arterial thrombosis and infection with Klebsiella pneumoniae subsequent to arterial catheter placement in a cat. The complication led to avascular necrosis of the metatarsal and pedal soft tissue. The catheter was placed for blood pressure monitoring during surgery for correction of a peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia. The exact mechanism of thrombosis was unclear. Amputation of the limb was required and the histopathological findings are presented. This is the first report of such a complication.

  16. An uncommon cause of myocardial ischemia after coronary artery bypass grafting: "the dangerous drainage".

    PubMed

    Beiras-Fernandez, Andres; Möhnle, Patrick; Kopf, Carsten; Vicol, Calin; Kur, Felix; Reichart, Bruno

    2011-06-01

    The most common causes of myocardial ischemia and myocardial infarction early after coronary artery bypass grafting surgery are early graft occlusion/thrombosis or occlusion/ thrombosis of coronary arteries due to advanced coronary heart disease. We describe a case of postoperative myocardial ischemia due to an uncommon and quickly reversible cause: mechanical compression of a vein graft by a 19F flexible silicone mediastinal drainage tube.

  17. Clinical usefulness of red cell distribution width to angiographic severity and coronary stent thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Aysun; Ceylan, Ufuk Sadik; Esen, Aycan; Zencirci, Ertugrul; Topcu, Birol; Ozden, Kivilcim; Yazici, Selcuk; Terzi, Sait; Emre, Ayse; Yesilcimen, Kemal

    2016-01-01

    Background Red cell distribution width (RDW) is a quantitative measurement and shows heterogeneity of red blood cell size in peripheral blood. RDW has recently been associated with cardiovascular events and cardiovascular diseases, and it is a novel predictor of mortality. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the clinical usefulness of measuring RDW in patients with coronary stent thrombosis. Patients and methods We retrospectively reviewed 3,925 consecutive patients who presented with acute coronary syndrome and who underwent coronary angiography at the Siyami Ersek Hospital between May 2011 and December 2013. Of the 3,925 patients, 73 patients (55 males, mean age 59±11 years, 55 with ST elevated myocardial infarction) with stent thrombosis formed group 1. Another 54 consecutive patients who presented with acute coronary syndrome (without coronary stent thrombosis, 22 patients with ST elevated myocardial infarction, 44 males, mean age 54±2 years) and underwent percutaneous coronary intervention in May 2011 formed group 2. Data were collected from all groups for 2 years. The RDW values were calculated from patients 1 month later at follow-up. Syntax scores were calculated for all the patients. The patients were also divided as low syntax score group and moderate–high syntax score group. Results The patients in group 1 with stent thrombosis had significantly higher RDW level (13.85) than the patients in group 2 without stent thrombosis (12) (P<0.001). In addition, in all study patients, the moderate–high syntax score group had significantly higher RDW level (13.6) than the low syntax score group (12.9) (P=0.009). A positive correlation was determined between RDW and syntax scores (r=0.204). Conclusion RDW is a new marker of poor prognosis in coronary artery disease. Increased RDW level is correlated with angiographic severity of coronary artery disease, and RDW may be an important clinical marker of coronary stent thrombosis in patients undergoing coronary

  18. Clinical usefulness of red cell distribution width to angiographic severity and coronary stent thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Aysun; Ceylan, Ufuk Sadik; Esen, Aycan; Zencirci, Ertugrul; Topcu, Birol; Ozden, Kivilcim; Yazici, Selcuk; Terzi, Sait; Emre, Ayse; Yesilcimen, Kemal

    2016-01-01

    Background Red cell distribution width (RDW) is a quantitative measurement and shows heterogeneity of red blood cell size in peripheral blood. RDW has recently been associated with cardiovascular events and cardiovascular diseases, and it is a novel predictor of mortality. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the clinical usefulness of measuring RDW in patients with coronary stent thrombosis. Patients and methods We retrospectively reviewed 3,925 consecutive patients who presented with acute coronary syndrome and who underwent coronary angiography at the Siyami Ersek Hospital between May 2011 and December 2013. Of the 3,925 patients, 73 patients (55 males, mean age 59±11 years, 55 with ST elevated myocardial infarction) with stent thrombosis formed group 1. Another 54 consecutive patients who presented with acute coronary syndrome (without coronary stent thrombosis, 22 patients with ST elevated myocardial infarction, 44 males, mean age 54±2 years) and underwent percutaneous coronary intervention in May 2011 formed group 2. Data were collected from all groups for 2 years. The RDW values were calculated from patients 1 month later at follow-up. Syntax scores were calculated for all the patients. The patients were also divided as low syntax score group and moderate–high syntax score group. Results The patients in group 1 with stent thrombosis had significantly higher RDW level (13.85) than the patients in group 2 without stent thrombosis (12) (P<0.001). In addition, in all study patients, the moderate–high syntax score group had significantly higher RDW level (13.6) than the low syntax score group (12.9) (P=0.009). A positive correlation was determined between RDW and syntax scores (r=0.204). Conclusion RDW is a new marker of poor prognosis in coronary artery disease. Increased RDW level is correlated with angiographic severity of coronary artery disease, and RDW may be an important clinical marker of coronary stent thrombosis in patients undergoing coronary

  19. Simultaneous Two-Vessel Subacute Stent Thrombosis Caused by Clopidogrel Resistance from CYP2C19 Polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Ashwad; Patel, Bimal; Patel, Neel; Sattur, Sudhakar; Patel, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Clopidogrel resistance from CYP2C19 polymorphism has been associated with stent thrombosis in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention with drug-eluting stents. We present a case of a 76-year-old male who received drug-eluting stents to the right coronary artery and left anterior descending artery for non-ST elevation myocardial infarction and was discharged on dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel. He subsequently presented with chest pain from anterior, anteroseptal, and inferior ST segment elevation myocardial infarction. An emergent coronary angiogram revealed acute stent thrombosis with 100% occlusion of RCA and LAD that was successfully treated with thrombus aspiration and angioplasty. Although he was compliant with his dual antiplatelet therapy, he developed stent thrombosis, which was confirmed as clopidogrel resistance from homozygous CYP2C19 polymorphism. PMID:27555873

  20. Simultaneous Two-Vessel Subacute Stent Thrombosis Caused by Clopidogrel Resistance from CYP2C19 Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Bimal; Patel, Neel; Sattur, Sudhakar; Patel, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Clopidogrel resistance from CYP2C19 polymorphism has been associated with stent thrombosis in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention with drug-eluting stents. We present a case of a 76-year-old male who received drug-eluting stents to the right coronary artery and left anterior descending artery for non-ST elevation myocardial infarction and was discharged on dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel. He subsequently presented with chest pain from anterior, anteroseptal, and inferior ST segment elevation myocardial infarction. An emergent coronary angiogram revealed acute stent thrombosis with 100% occlusion of RCA and LAD that was successfully treated with thrombus aspiration and angioplasty. Although he was compliant with his dual antiplatelet therapy, he developed stent thrombosis, which was confirmed as clopidogrel resistance from homozygous CYP2C19 polymorphism. PMID:27555873

  1. [Trapped popliteal arteries. Incidence, epidemiology, therapeutic considerations].

    PubMed

    Dany, F; Laskar, M; Legarcon, C; Aubard, Y; Dupuy, J P; Brutus, P; Lacroix, P; Christides, C

    1985-10-01

    The trapped popliteal artery syndrome is an extrinsic dynamic compression of the vascular structures in the popliteal fossa by the surrounding fibromuscular structures. The condition mainly affects the popliteal artery resulting in atypical intermittent claudication because it often occurs in young and active patients. The arterial lesions are initially purely extrinsic and dynamic; sometimes they progress to thrombosis, embolism or aneurysm due to jet lesions. The diagnosis is obtained by radiology in the uncomplicated forms by showing compression or complete occlusion of the artery during contraction of the gastrocnemius and quadriceps muscles. Doppler studies of the posterior tibial artery may also demonstrate the condition during these manoeuvres. The epidemiological study was performed in 199 medical students and 80 athletes. A positional abolition of the posterior tibial artery was demonstrated in 39 students (19%) and 12 athletes (15%). The entrapment was commoner in females (24%) than males (13%). It was observed more frequently in dancers, cyclists and basket ball players: 12 control digitised intravenous angiographies were performed; the diagnosis was confirmed in 11 cases. Several anatomical anomalies of the popliteal fossa may give rise to this condition. The commonest is a deviation of the artery within the internal head of the gastronemius muscle; compression by the soleus or fibro muscular bands arising from the semi-tendinous or semi-membranous have been described. The treatment is surgical in very symptomatic or complicated cases; uncrossing the artery associated with venous grafting in cases of thrombosis are the procedures of choice. PMID:3938217

  2. Vascularized iliac bone graft in cases of ankle tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tatsuya; Sakamoto, Akio; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2009-02-01

    Ankle tuberculosis is a very rare occurrence. Because the ankle is a weightbearing joint, the affected ankle tends to become damaged. Consequently, the surgical procedure of arthrodesis is necessary, which usually proves effective. We report two cases of ankle tuberculosis, in patients 53 and 71 years of age. The former case had been diagnosed initially as osteoarthritis and then later as pyogenic osteomyelitis; the latter case had been diagnosed as pigmented villonodular synovitis, a benign but aggressive lesion that involves the joints. In addition to antitubercular medicine, these cases were treated with debridement for necrotic tissue and arthrodesis. In the former case, an iliac osteocutaneous flap was performed, and arthrodesis between the tibia, talus, and calcaneus was obtained. In the other case, a vascularized iliac bone graft was performed that resulted in arthrodesis between the tarsal bones, talus, and calcaneus but with pseudoarthrosis between the tibia and the talus. Settlement of the joint tuberculosis and gait ability without resorption or corruption of the grafted bone was obtained in both cases. Vascularized bone graft offers the benefits of achieving bone defect reconstruction with promotion of bone union, and the infection can be expected to resolve through medication delivered via the circulation.

  3. Transplantation of iliac bone flaps pedicled with sartorius muscular fascia around superficial circumflex iliac vessels in the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head

    PubMed Central

    CUI, GUOFENG; WEI, RONG; HOU, CHUNYING; BI, ZHENGGANG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and clinical application of iliac bone flaps pedicled with sartorius muscular fascia around superficial circumflex iliac vessels for the treatment of Association for Research on Osseous Circulation (ARCO) stage II–III osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) in young adults. In total, 35 patients with ONFH at ARCO stage II–III were treated with iliac bone flaps pedicled with sartorius muscular fascia around superficial circumflex iliac vessels. Patients were classified according to etiological factors and ARCO stages. Postoperative clinical assessment was accomplished with Harris hip scores (HHSs), and ARCO stage change was evaluated with imaging. All 35 patients completed the follow-up. The HHS results indicated that hip function was improved significantly from the preoperative status of 56.53±7.66 points to the postoperative status of 87.49±5.89 points (P<0.0001). Postoperative imaging displayed apparent osteogenesis and satisfactory structural remodeling in 32 patients, presenting no staging progress. Three patients exhibited mild collapse (<2 mm) compared with preoperative collapse. No patients developed osteoarthritis or required total hip arthroplasty. The clinical success rate was 91.43%. Iliac bone flaps pedicled with sartorius muscular fascia around superficial circumflex iliac vessels is a feasible means for treating ARCO stage II–III ONFH in young adults, who have abundant blood circulation, good osteogenesis and function of the hip. It is also an effective means for retaining the femoral head. PMID:27284301

  4. α(1,3)-Fucosyltransferases FUT4 and FUT7 Control Murine Susceptibility to Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huili; Morales-Levy, Maria; Rose, Jason; Mackey, Lantz C.; Bodary, Peter; Eitzman, Daniel; Homeister, Jonathon W.

    2014-01-01

    The α(1,3)-fucosyltransferases, types IV and VII (FUT4 and FUT7, respectively), are required for the synthesis of functional selectin-type leukocyte adhesion molecule ligands. The selectins and their ligands modulate leukocyte trafficking, and P-selectin and its ligand, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1, can modulate hemostasis and thrombosis. Regulation of thrombosis by FUT4 and/or FUT7 activity was examined in mouse models of carotid artery thrombosis and collagen/epinephrine-induced thromboembolism. Mice lacking both FUT4 and FUT7 (Fut−/− mice) had a shorter time to occlusive thrombus formation in the injured carotid artery and a higher mortality due to collagen/epinephrine-induced pulmonary thromboemboli. Mice lacking P-selectin or P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 did not have a prothrombotic phenotype. Whole blood platelet aggregation was enhanced, and plasma fibrinogen content, clot weight, and clot strength were increased in Fut−/− mice, and in vitro clot lysis was reduced compared with wild type. Fut4−/−, but not Fut7−/−, mice had increased pulmonary thromboembolism-induced mortality and decreased thromboemboli dissolution in vivo. These data show that FUT4 and FUT7 activity regulates thrombosis in a P-selectin– and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1–independent manner and suggest that FUT4 activity is important for thrombolysis. PMID:23562273

  5. Management of nonocclusive hepatic artery complications after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Saad, Wael E A

    2007-09-01

    Nonocclusive arterial disease represents less than 5% of posttransplant arterial complications. Nonocclusive arterial complications are classified into (1) nonocclusive diminished flow in the hepatic artery, (2) arteriovenous fistulae, (3) pseudoaneurysms, and (4) arterial rupture. Due to the rarity of these complications, particularly when considering them individually, many of the opinions and managements of these complications are anecdotal. Transcatheter embolization is the main mode of minimal invasive management of these uncommon complications. Other minimal invasive methods have been described such as stent placement or direct percutaneous embolization/thrombosis. The article discusses the presentation, etiology, types, treatment indications, and various modes of minimal invasive therapy used to manage these complications.

  6. The new technique of using the epigastric arteries in renal transplantation with multiple renal arteries.

    PubMed

    Amirzargar, Mohammad Ali; Babolhavaeji, Hooshang; Hosseini, Shahriar Amir; Bahar, Habibmousavi; Gholyaf, Mahmood; Dadras, Farahnaz; Khoshjoo, Farhad; Yavangi, Mahnaz; Amirzargar, Nasibeh

    2013-03-01

    The most common anatomic variant seen in the donor kidneys for renal transplantation is multiple renal arteries (MRA), which can cause an increased risk of complications. We describe the long-term outcomes of 16 years of experience in 76 kidney transplantations with MRAs. In a new reconstruction technique, we remove arterial clamps after anastomosing the donor to the recipient's main renal vessels, which cause backflow from accessory arteries to prevent thrombosis. By this technique, we reduce the ischemic times as well as the operating times. Both in live or cadaver donor kidneys, lower polar arteries were anastomosed to the inferior epigastric artery and upper polar arteries were anastomosed to the superior epigastric arteries. Injection of Papaverine and ablation of sympathic nerves of these arteries dilate and prevent them from post-operative spasm. Follow-up DTPA renal scan in all patients showed good perfusion and function of the transplanted kidney, except two cases of polar arterial thrombosis. Mean creatinine levels during at least two years of follow-up remained acceptable. Patient and graft survival were excellent. No cases of ATN, hypertension, rejection and urologic complications were found. In conclusion, this technique can be safely and successfully utilized for renal transplantation with kidneys having MRAs, and may be associated with a lower complication rate and better graft function compared with the existing techniques.

  7. A rare variation in the origin and course of the artery of penis.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Satheesha B; Kumar, Naveen; Patil, Jyothsna; Shetty, Surekha D; Rao Sirasanagandla, Srinivasa; Ravindra, Swamy

    2014-01-01

    Vascular variations of the penis are very rare. Awareness of its variations is of utmost importance to the urologists and radiologist dealing with the reconstruction or transplants of penis, erectile dysfunctions, and priapism. We report an extremely rare variation of the artery of the penis and discuss its clinical importance. The artery of the penis arose from a common arterial trunk from the left internal iliac artery. The common trunk also gave origin to the obturator and inferior vesical arteries. The artery of the penis coursed forward in the pelvis above the pelvic diaphragm and divided into deep and dorsal arteries of the penis just below the pubic symphysis. The internal pudendal artery was small and supplied the anal canal and musculature of the perineum. It also gave an artery to the bulb of the penis.

  8. A Patient with Recurrent Arteriovenous Graft Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Allon, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Arteriovenous grafts (AVGs) are prone to frequent thrombosis that is superimposed on underlying hemodynamically significant stenosis, most commonly at the graft-vein anastomosis. There has been great interest in detecting AVG stenosis in a timely fashion and performing preemptive angioplasty, in the belief that this will prevent AVG thrombosis. Three surveillance methods (static dialysis venous pressure, flow monitoring, and duplex ultrasound) can detect AVG stenosis. Whereas observational studies have reported that surveillance with preemptive angioplasty substantially reduces AVG thrombosis, randomized clinical trials have failed to confirm such a benefit. There is a high frequency of early AVG restenosis after angioplasty caused by aggressive neointimal hyperplasia resulting from vascular injury. Stent grafts prevent AVG restenosis better than balloon angioplasty, but they do not prevent AVG thrombosis. Several pharmacologic interventions to prevent AVG failure have been evaluated in randomized clinical trials. Anticoagulation or aspirin plus clopidogrel do not prevent AVG thrombosis, but increase hemorrhagic events. Treatment of hyperhomocysteinemia does not prevent AVG thrombosis. Dipyridamole plus aspirin modestly decreases AVG stenosis or thrombosis. Fish oil substantially decreases the frequency of AVG stenosis and thrombosis. In patients who have exhausted all options for vascular access in the upper extremities, thigh AVGs are a superior option to tunneled internal jugular vein central vein catheters (CVCs). An immediate-use AVG is a reasonable option in patients with recurrent CVC dysfunction or infection. Tunneled femoral CVCs have much worse survival than internal jugular CVCs.

  9. Successful management of neonatal renal venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Piscitelli, Antonio; Galiano, Rossella; Piccolo, Vincenzo; Concolino, Daniela; Strisciuglio, Pietro

    2014-10-01

    Renal vein thrombosis is the most common vascular condition involving the newborn kidney and it can result in severe renal damage. We report a newborn with renal vein thrombosis treated with continuous infusion of unfractionated heparin who had normal total renal function after 3 years of follow up, despite reduction of the functional contribution of the affected kidney.

  10. Spontaneous thrombosis of a pseudoaneurysm complicating pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Vanlangenhove, P; Defreyne, L; Kunnen, M

    1999-01-01

    Patients with a visceral aneurysm are at high risk for acute transpapillary, intra-, or retroperitoneal hemorrhage, necessitating either surgical or endovascular therapy. We report an instance of spontaneous thrombosis of a pseudoaneurysm complicating pancreatitis before endovascular treatment could be performed. Causality and the literature of spontaneous thrombosis in pseudoaneurysms are discussed.

  11. Acute torsion of a retroperitoneal renal transplant mimicking renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Winter, Thomas C; Clarke, Andrea Lynn; Campsen, Jeffrey

    2013-09-01

    When imaging a renal transplant, the combination of absent flow in the main renal vein and reversed diastolic flow in the intrarenal arteries is considered highly suggestive of renal vein thrombosis. We present a case of torsion of a transplant kidney presenting with identical findings. Renal transplant torsion in general is a rare entity, previously described only in intraperitoneally placed organs; this case is the first that we are aware of with torsion occurring in a retroperitoneally placed graft.

  12. Reduction of venous thrombosis complicating phlebography

    SciTech Connect

    Bettmann, M.A.; Salzman, E.W.; Rosenthal, D.; Clagett, P.; Davies, G.; Nebesar, R.; Rabinov, K.; Ploetz, J.; Skillman, J.

    1980-06-01

    Patients who underwent radiographic phlebography were studied to determine the frequency of postphlebographic venous thrombosis. In a group of 23 patients who had negative phlebograms performed with standard contrast agent (60% sodium methylglucamine diatrizoate), nine had positive /sup 125/I-fibrinogen leg scans. On repeat phlebography, three had confirmed deep vein thrombosis, six overall developed deep or superficial thrombosis, and three had positive scans without demonstrable thrombi. In a second group of 34 patients studied with the contrast material diluted to 45%, only three developed positive scans, one due to deep venous thrombosis and two to superficial thrombosis. There was also a reuction in the incidence of postphlebographic symptoms of pain, tenderness, and erythema, but no apparent sacrifice in diagnostic accuracy.

  13. Experimental Impeller Fragmentation of Iliocaval Thrombosis Under Tulip Filter Protection: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Vorwerk, Dierk; Schuermann, Karl; Guenther, Rolf W.

    1996-04-15

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of catheter fragmentation of massive caval thrombosis and of filter protection against procedure-related pulmonary embolism. Methods: In 10 sheep, a self-expanding tulip-shaped filter made from Wallstent mesh (diameter 25 mm) was introduced from the right jugular approach into the proximal inferior vena cava. Experimentally induced massive iliocaval thrombosis was fragmented by an impeller catheter (expanded diameter 14 mm), which was advanced coaxially through the sheath of the expanded filter. Post-procedural cavography and pulmonary angiography were performed to document the extent of caval recanalization and pulmonary embolism. Results: In all cases, impeller fragmentation cleared the inferior vena cava and the iliac veins of thrombi completely. Fragments washed downstream were trapped in the filter. In two of the first cases, parts of the clots caused pulmonary embolism before the filter was in place. Further events were avoided by a modification of the experimental setup. Except for some small peripheral perfusion defects in two cases, pulmonary angiograms did not show any incidence of pulmonary embolism. Conclusion: Our preliminary results suggest that impeller fragmentation of iliocaval thrombi under tulip filter protection is effective and does not cause significant pulmonary embolism.

  14. Goldenhar Syndrome Associated with Extensive Arterial Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Modica, Renee Frances; Barbeau, L. Daphna Yasova; Co-Vu, Jennifer; Beegle, Richard D.; Williams, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Goldenhar Syndrome is characterized by craniofacial, ocular and vertebral defects secondary to abnormal development of the 1st and 2nd branchial arches and vertebrae. Other findings include cardiac and vascular abnormalities. Though these associations are known, the specific anomalies are not well defined. We present a 7-month-old infant with intermittent respiratory distress that did not improve with respiratory interventions. Echocardiogram suggested a double aortic arch. Cardiac CT angiogram confirmed a right arch and aberrant, stenotic left subclavian artery, dilation of the main pulmonary artery, and agenesis of the left thyroid lobe. Repeat echocardiograms were concerning for severely dilated coronary arteries. Given dilation, a rheumatologic workup ensued, only identifying few weakly positive autoantibodies. Further imaging demonstrated narrowing of the aorta below the renal arteries and extending into the common iliac arteries and proximal femoral arteries. Given a physical exam devoid of rheumatologic findings, only weakly positive autoantibodies, normal inflammatory markers, and presence of the coronary artery dilation, the peripheral artery narrowings were not thought to be vasculitic. This case illustrates the need to identify definitive anomalies related to Goldenhar Syndrome. Although this infant's presentation is rare, recognition of specific vascular findings will help differentiate Goldenhar Syndrome from other disease processes. PMID:26688769

  15. Idiopathic Bilateral External Jugular Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Hindi, Zakaria; Fadel, Ehab

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 21 Final Diagnosis: Idiopathic bilateral external jugular vein thrombosis Symptoms: Face engorgement • neck swelling Medication: — Clinical Procedure: None Specialty: Hematology Objective: Unknown ethiology Background: Vein thrombosis is mainly determined by 3 factors, which constitute a triad called Virchow’s triad: hypercoagulability, stasis, and endothelial injury. Venous thrombosis commonly occurs in the lower extremities since most of the blood resides there and flows against gravity. The veins of the lower extremities are dependent on intact valves and fully functional leg muscles. However, in case of valvular incompetency or muscular weakness, thrombosis and blood stasis will occur as a result. In contrast, the veins of the neck, specially the jugulars, have distensible walls which allow flexibility during respiration. In addition, the blood directly flows downward towards the heart. Nevertheless, many case reports mentioned the thrombosis of internal jugular veins and external jugular veins with identified risk factors. Jugular vein thrombosis has previously been associated in the literature with a variety of medical conditions, including malignancy. Case Report: This report is of a case of idiopathic bilateral external jugular vein thrombosis in a 21 year-old male construction worker of Southeast Asian origin with no previous medical history who presented with bilateral facial puffiness of gradual onset over 1 month. Doppler ultrasound and computed tomography were used in the diagnosis. Further work-up showed no evidence of infection or neoplasia. The patient was eventually discharged on warfarin. The patient was assessed after 6 months and his symptoms had resolved completely. Conclusions: Bilateral idiopathic external jugular veins thrombosis is extremely rare and can be an indicator of early malignancy or hidden infection. While previous reports in the literature have associated jugular vein thrombosis with malignancy, the present

  16. The adverse effects of estrogen and selective estrogen receptor modulators on hemostasis and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Artero, Arturo; Tarín, Juan J; Cano, Antonio

    2012-11-01

    Agonists of the estrogen receptor include estrogens and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs). Both types of compounds increase the risk for thrombosis in the arterial and the venous tree. The magnitude of the effect is influenced by potency, which depends on the type of compound and the dose. The particulars of the process change in each territory. Atherosclerosis, which creates local inflammatory conditions, may favor thrombogenesis in arteries. A direct effect of estrogen agonists is also well endorsed at both arteries, as suggested from data with high-estrogenic contraceptives, and veins. Dose reduction has been proved to be an effective strategy, but there is debate on whether additional benefit may be attained beyond a certain threshold. Hormone therapy and SERMs exhibit a lower potency estrogenic profile, but are mainly used by older women, who have a baseline increased thrombogenic risk. When used as sole agents, estrogens substantially reduce the increased risk (venous thrombosis) or may even be neutral (coronary disease). SERMs exhibit a neutral profile for coronary disease and possibly for stroke but not for venous thrombosis.

  17. The Diagnosis of Iliac Bone Destruction in Children: 22 Cases from Two Centres

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiangshui; Lou, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Iliac bone destruction in children is uncommon and presents various imaging features. Correct diagnosis based on clinical and imaging features is difficult. This research aimed to retrospectively explore the clinical features, imaging, and histopathological diagnosis of children with iliac bone destruction. A total of 22 children with iliac bone destruction were enrolled in this retrospective analysis from two children's hospitals during July 2007 to April 2015. Clinical features, imaging, and histopathological findings were analysed. The mode of iliac bone destruction, lesion structure, and the relationship between the range of soft tissue mass and cortical destruction were determined based on imaging data. The data were analysed using descriptive methods. Of the iliac bone destruction cases, eight cases were neuroblastoma iliac bone metastasis, seven cases were bone eosinophilic granuloma, two cases were Ewing's sarcoma, two cases were osteomyelitis, one case was bone cyst, one case was bone fibrous dysplasia, and one case was non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Iliac bone destruction varies widely in children. Metastatic neuroblastoma and eosinophilic granuloma are the most commonly involved childhood tumours. PMID:27579306

  18. The Diagnosis of Iliac Bone Destruction in Children: 22 Cases from Two Centres.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiangshui; Lou, Yue; Wang, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Iliac bone destruction in children is uncommon and presents various imaging features. Correct diagnosis based on clinical and imaging features is difficult. This research aimed to retrospectively explore the clinical features, imaging, and histopathological diagnosis of children with iliac bone destruction. A total of 22 children with iliac bone destruction were enrolled in this retrospective analysis from two children's hospitals during July 2007 to April 2015. Clinical features, imaging, and histopathological findings were analysed. The mode of iliac bone destruction, lesion structure, and the relationship between the range of soft tissue mass and cortical destruction were determined based on imaging data. The data were analysed using descriptive methods. Of the iliac bone destruction cases, eight cases were neuroblastoma iliac bone metastasis, seven cases were bone eosinophilic granuloma, two cases were Ewing's sarcoma, two cases were osteomyelitis, one case was bone cyst, one case was bone fibrous dysplasia, and one case was non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Iliac bone destruction varies widely in children. Metastatic neuroblastoma and eosinophilic granuloma are the most commonly involved childhood tumours. PMID:27579306

  19. Ultrasound in the investigation of the right iliac fossa mass.

    PubMed

    Millard, F C; Collins, M C; Peck, R J

    1991-01-01

    Patients presenting with a right iliac fossa (RIF) mass are a diagnostic problem. The objective of this study was to assess the role of ultrasound (US) in their investigation. A prospective series of 50 patients presenting with a clinically suspected RIF mass was examined by US and the finding correlated with the final diagnosis. There was a positive finding in 34 patients (68%). Ultrasound correctly identified the organ of origin in 33 (97%) and was able to guide the patients' further management. In 12 cases no abnormality was found in the RIF, of which 11 had no positive findings at follow-up and one was shown to have an unrelated abnormality at laparotomy. In four cases the findings were due to normal variants. Ultrasound is the imaging modality of first choice in patients presenting with a RIF mass.

  20. Arterial insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    Hansson GK, Hamsten A. Atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and vascular biology. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ... Saunders; 2016:chap 70. Libby P. The vascular biology of atherosclerosis. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby ...