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Sample records for arterial stiffness hypertension

  1. Hypertension and arterial stiffness in heart transplantation patients

    PubMed Central

    de Souza-Neto, João David; de Oliveira, Ítalo Martins; Lima-Rocha, Hermano Alexandre; Oliveira-Lima, José Wellington; Bacal, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Post-transplantation hypertension is prevalent and is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and subsequent graft dysfunction. The present study aimed to identify the factors associated with arterial stiffness as measured by the ambulatory arterial stiffness index. METHODS: The current study used a prospective, observational, analytical design to evaluate a group of adult heart transplantation patients. Arterial stiffness was obtained by monitoring ambulatory blood pressure and using the ambulatory arterial stiffness index as the surrogate outcome. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to control confounding. RESULTS: In a group of 85 adult heart transplantation patients, hypertension was independently associated with arterial stiffness (OR 4.98, CI 95% 1.06-23.4) as well as systolic and diastolic blood pressure averages and nighttime descent. CONCLUSIONS: Measurement of ambulatory arterial stiffness index is a new, non-invasive method that is easy to perform, may contribute to better defining arterial stiffness prognosis and is associated with hypertension. PMID:27652829

  2. Arterial stiffness, hypertension, and rational use of nebivolol.

    PubMed

    Agabiti-Rosei, Enrico; Porteri, Enzo; Rizzoni, Damiano

    2009-01-01

    Arterial stiffness plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system. Some indices of arterial stiffness (pulse wave velocity, augmentation index, characteristics of central blood pressure waveform) may be presently calculated and evaluated in the clinical setting. Age and blood pressure are the two major clinical determinants of increased arterial stiffness, while molecular determinants of arterial stiffness are related to fibrotic components of the extracellular matrix, mainly elastin, collagen and fibronectin. Increased arterial stiffness has been consistently observed in conditions such as hypertension, dyslipidemia and diabetes. Arterial stiffness evaluated by means of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity yielded prognostic significance beyond and above traditional risk factors. A more favorable effect of calcium channel blockers, diuretics and ACE inhibitors compared with beta-blockers on indices of arterial stiffness was observed in several studies. It is conceivable that newer beta-blockers with additional vasodilating properties, such as nebivolol, which has favorable effects on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, as well as on endothelial function and on oxidative stress, may have favorable effects on arterial stiffness, compared with atenolol. In fact, in recent studies, nebivolol was demonstrated to improve artery stiffness to a greater extent than older beta-blockers. Because endothelial dysfunction and increased arterial stiffness play an important role in the early atherosclerotic processes and are associated with poor outcomes and increased mortality, independently of blood pressure, the ability of nebivolol to enhance release of endothelium-derived nitric oxide, and consequently improve endothelial function and arterial stiffness, may have significant clinical implications for the use of this agent in the treatment of hypertension and cardiovascular diseases.

  3. Arterial stiffness, hypertension, and rational use of nebivolol

    PubMed Central

    Agabiti-Rosei, Enrico; Porteri, Enzo; Rizzoni, Damiano

    2009-01-01

    Arterial stiffness plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system. Some indices of arterial stiffness (pulse wave velocity, augmentation index, characteristics of central blood pressure waveform) may be presently calculated and evaluated in the clinical setting. Age and blood pressure are the two major clinical determinants of increased arterial stiffness, while molecular determinants of arterial stiffness are related to fibrotic components of the extracellular matrix, mainly elastin, collagen and fibronectin. Increased arterial stiffness has been consistently observed in conditions such as hypertension, dyslipidemia and diabetes. Arterial stiffness evaluated by means of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity yielded prognostic significance beyond and above traditional risk factors. A more favorable effect of calcium channel blockers, diuretics and ACE inhibitors compared with β-blockers on indices of arterial stiffness was observed in several studies. It is conceivable that newer β-blockers with additional vasodilating properties, such as nebivolol, which has favorable effects on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, as well as on endothelial function and on oxidative stress, may have favorable effects on arterial stiffness, compared with atenolol. In fact, in recent studies, nebivolol was demonstrated to improve artery stiffness to a greater extent than older β-blockers. Because endothelial dysfunction and increased arterial stiffness play an important role in the early atherosclerotic processes and are associated with poor outcomes and increased mortality, independently of blood pressure, the ability of nebivolol to enhance release of endothelium-derived nitric oxide, and consequently improve endothelial function and arterial stiffness, may have significant clinical implications for the use of this agent in the treatment of hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:19475771

  4. Arterial stiffness, central hemodynamics, and cardiovascular risk in hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Palatini, Paolo; Casiglia, Edoardo; Gąsowski, Jerzy; Głuszek, Jerzy; Jankowski, Piotr; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof; Saladini, Francesca; Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Tikhonoff, Valérie; Van Bortel, Luc; Wojciechowska, Wiktoria; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina

    2011-01-01

    This review summarizes several scientific contributions at the recent Satellite Symposium of the European Society of Hypertension, held in Milan, Italy. Arterial stiffening and its hemodynamic consequences can be easily and reliably measured using a range of noninvasive techniques. However, like blood pressure (BP) measurements, arterial stiffness should be measured carefully under standardized patient conditions. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity has been proposed as the gold standard for arterial stiffness measurement and is a well recognized predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcome. Systolic BP and pulse pressure in the ascending aorta may be lower than pressures measured in the upper limb, especially in young individuals. A number of studies suggest closer correlation of end-organ damage with central BP than with peripheral BP, and central BP may provide additional prognostic information regarding cardiovascular risk. Moreover, BP-lowering drugs can have differential effects on central aortic pressures and hemodynamics compared with brachial BP. This may explain the greater beneficial effect provided by newer antihypertensive drugs beyond peripheral BP reduction. Although many methodological problems still hinder the wide clinical application of parameters of arterial stiffness, these will likely contribute to cardiovascular assessment and management in future clinical practice. Each of the abovementioned parameters reflects a different characteristic of the atherosclerotic process, involving functional and/or morphological changes in the vessel wall. Therefore, acquiring simultaneous measurements of different parameters of vascular function and structure could theoretically enhance the power to improve risk stratification. Continuous technological effort is necessary to refine our methods of investigation in order to detect early arterial abnormalities. Arterial stiffness and its consequences represent the great challenge of the twenty-first century for

  5. Association of Parental Hypertension with Arterial Stiffness in Non-Hypertensive Offspring: The Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Charlotte; Quiroz, Rene; Enserro, Danielle; Larson, Martin G.; Hamburg, Naomi M.; Vita, Joseph A.; Levy, Daniel; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Mitchell, Gary F.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.

    2016-01-01

    High arterial stiffness appears to be causally involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. We tested the hypothesis that offspring of parents with hypertension may display higher arterial stiffness prior to clinically manifest hypertension, given that hypertension is a heritable condition. We compared arterial tonometry measures in a sample of 1564 non-hypertensive Framingham Heart Study Third generation cohort participants (mean age 38 years, 55% women) whose parents were enrolled in the Framingham Offspring Study. A totally of 468, 715, and 381 participants had 0 (referent), 1, and 2 parents with hypertension. Parental hypertension was associated with greater offspring mean arterial pressure (multivariable-adjusted estimate= 2.9 mm Hg, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.9-3.9, and 4.2 mm Hg, 95% CI 2.9-5.5, for 1 and 2 parents with hypertension, respectively, p<0.001 for both), and with greater forward pressure wave amplitude (1.6 mm Hg, 95% CI 0.6-2.7, and 1.9 mm Hg, 95% CI 0.6-3.2, for 1 and 2 parents with hypertension, respectively, p=0.003 for both). Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and augmentation index displayed similar dose-dependent relations with parental hypertension in sex, age, and height-adjusted models, but associations were attenuated upon further adjustment. Offspring with at least one parent in the upper quartile of augmentation index and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity had significantly higher values themselves (p≤0.02). In conclusion, in this community-based sample of young, non-hypertensive adults, we observed greater arterial stiffness in offspring of parents with hypertension. These observations are consistent with higher vascular stiffness at an early stage in the pathogenesis of hypertension. PMID:27456526

  6. Aerobic, resistance and combined exercise training on arterial stiffness in normotensive and hypertensive adults: A review.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanlei; Hanssen, Henner; Cordes, Mareike; Rossmeissl, Anja; Endes, Simon; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno

    2015-01-01

    Exercise training has different effects on arterial stiffness according to training modalities. The optimal exercise modality for improvement of arterial function in normotensive and hypertensive individuals has not been well established. In this review, we aim to evaluate the effects of aerobic, resistance and combined aerobic and resistance training on arterial stiffness in individuals with and without hypertension. We systematically searched the Pubmed and Web of Science database from 1985 until December 2013 for relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs). The data were extracted by one investigator and checked by a second investigator. The training effects on arterial stiffness were estimated using weighted mean differences of the relative changes (%) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We finally reviewed the results from 17 RCTs. The available evidence indicates that aerobic exercise tends to have a beneficial effect on arterial stiffness in normotensive and hypertensive patients, but does not affect arterial stiffness in patients with isolated systolic hypertension. Resistance exercise has differing effects on arterial stiffness depending on type and intensity. Vigorous resistance training is associated with an increase in arterial stiffness. There seem to be no unfavourable effects on arterial stiffness if the training is of low intensity, in a slow eccentric manner or with lower limb in healthy individuals. Combined training has neutral or even a beneficial effect on arterial stiffness. In conclusion, our review shows that exercise training has varying effects on arterial stiffness depending on the exercise modalities.

  7. Arterial stiffness, antiphospholipid antibodies, and pulmonary arterial hypertension in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Im Cho, Kyoung

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of arterial stiffness in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and its relationship with antiphospholipid antibody (aPL). Measurement of brachial ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), carotid arterial stiffness, and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) was performed in 51 patients with SLE. PAH was diagnosed if the pulmonary artery systolic pressure was >40mmHg. Information concerning SLE duration, medication, and serum autoantibodies was recorded. SLE activity was assessed by the SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI). aPL was present in 10 patients (20%), and PAH was detected in 6 patients (12%). The prevalence of Raynaud's phenomenon, baPWV, positive aPL, and titers of IgG anticardiolipin antibody (aCL) were increased in SLE with PAH; however, no difference was found in inflammatory markers, disease duration, and SLEDAI compared to SLE without PAH. Carotid artery deformation and right ventricular function were reduced in patients with PAH (all p<0.05). Carotid artery circumferential strain (r=0.34, p=0.021), radial strain (r=-0.30, p=0.045), and baPWV (r=0.46, p=0.001) showed significant correlation between IgG aCL. Univariate and multiple regression analysis revealed that the only significant independent predictors of the presence of PAH were baPWV, carotid artery stiffness, and IgG aCL. Arterial stiffness might contribute to the pathogenesis of PAH related to SLE as well as aPLs. Furthermore, the significant association of aPL with arterial stiffness suggests its important role in PAH with SLE. Copyright © 2014 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Central Artery Stiffness in Hypertension and Aging: A Problem with Cause and Consequence

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, Jay D.; Harrison, David G.; Figueroa, C. Alberto; Lacolley, Patrick; Laurent, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Systemic hypertension is a risk factor for many diseases affecting the heart, brain, and kidneys. It has long been thought that hypertension leads to a thickening and stiffening of central arteries (i.e., stiffness is a consequence) while more recent evidence suggests that stiffening precedes hypertension (i.e., stiffness is a cause). We submit, however, that consideration of the wall biomechanics and hemodynamics reveals an insidious positive feedback loop that may render it irrelevant whether hypertension causes or is caused by central arterial stiffening. A progressive worsening can ensue in either case, thus any onset of stiffening merits early intervention. PMID:26846637

  9. Add-on therapy with doxazosin in patients with hypertension influences arterial stiffness and albuterol-mediated arterial vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Wykretowicz, Andrzej; Guzik, Przemyslaw; Krauze, Tomasz; Adamska, Karolina; Milewska, Agata; Wysocki, Henryk

    2007-12-01

    Doxazosin is an antihypertensive agent with largely unknown effects on arterial stiffness and vasodilation. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the addition of doxazosin extended-release (ER) to the standard management of hypertension in patients with inadequately controlled blood pressure (BP) on arterial stiffness and arterial vasodilation. Twenty patients with inadequately controlled hypertension were treated with 4 mg doxazosin ER daily for 16 weeks as an adjunct to their existing antihypertensive regimen. Doxazosin ER add-on therapy was associated with significantly reduced systolic (P < 0.0001) and diastolic (P = 0.0003) BP, improved arterial stiffness (determined by digital volume pulse analysis (P = 0.048) and albuterol-mediated arterial vasodilation (P = 0.030). Add-on therapy with 4 mg of doxazosin ER daily reduces BP and arterial stiffness and improves arterial vasodilation in response to adrenergic stimulation.

  10. Roles of Arterial Stiffness and Blood Pressure in Hypertension-Associated Cognitive Decline in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Hajjar, Ihab; Goldstein, Felicia C; Martin, Greg S; Quyyumi, Arshed A

    2016-01-01

    Although there is strong evidence that hypertension leads to cognitive decline, especially in the executive domain, the relationship between blood pressure and cognition has been conflicted. Hypertension is characterized by blood pressure elevation and increased arterial stiffness. We aimed at investigating whether arterial stiffness would be superior to blood pressure in predicting cognitive decline and explaining the hypertension-executive decline association. A randomly selected asymptomatic population (n=591, age=49.2 years, 70% women, 27% black, and education=18 years) underwent annual vascular and cognitive assessments. Cognition was assessed using computerized versions commonly used cognitive tests, and principal component analysis was used for deriving cognitive scores for executive function, memory, and working memory. Arterial stiffness was measured by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV). Higher PWV, but not blood pressure, was associated with a steeper decline in executive (P=0.0002), memory (P=0.05), and working memory (P=0.02) scores after adjusting for demographics, education, and baseline cognitive performance. This remained true after adjusting for hypertension. Hypertension was associated with greater decline in executive score (P=0.0029) and those with combined hypertension and elevated PWV (>7 m/s) had the greatest decline in executive score (P value hypertension×PWV=0.02). PWV explained the association between hypertension and executive function (P value for hypertension=0.0029 versus 0.24 when adjusting for PWV). In healthy adults, increased arterial stiffness is superior to blood pressure in predicting cognitive decline in all domains and in explaining the hypertension-executive function association. Arterial stiffness, especially in hypertension, may be a target in the prevention of cognitive decline.

  11. Association of Parental Hypertension With Arterial Stiffness in Nonhypertensive Offspring: The Framingham Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Charlotte; Quiroz, Rene; Enserro, Danielle; Larson, Martin G; Hamburg, Naomi M; Vita, Joseph A; Levy, Daniel; Benjamin, Emelia J; Mitchell, Gary F; Vasan, Ramachandran S

    2016-09-01

    High arterial stiffness seems to be causally involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. We tested the hypothesis that offspring of parents with hypertension may display higher arterial stiffness before clinically manifest hypertension, given that hypertension is a heritable condition. We compared arterial tonometry measures in a sample of 1564 nonhypertensive Framingham Heart Study third-generation cohort participants (mean age: 38 years; 55% women) whose parents were enrolled in the Framingham Offspring Study. A total of 468, 715, and 381 participants had 0 (referent), 1, and 2 parents with hypertension. Parental hypertension was associated with greater offspring mean arterial pressure (multivariable-adjusted estimate=2.9 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 1.9-3.9, and 4.2 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 2.9-5.5, for 1 and 2 parents with hypertension, respectively; P<0.001 for both) and with greater forward pressure wave amplitude (1.6 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 0.6-2.7, and 1.9 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 0.6-3.2, for 1 and 2 parents with hypertension, respectively; P=0.003 for both). Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and augmentation index displayed similar dose-dependent relations with parental hypertension in sex-, age-, and height-adjusted models, but associations were attenuated on further adjustment. Offspring with at least 1 parent in the upper quartile of augmentation index and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity had significantly higher values themselves (P≤0.02). In conclusion, in this community-based sample of young, nonhypertensive adults, we observed greater arterial stiffness in offspring of parents with hypertension. These observations are consistent with higher vascular stiffness at an early stage in the pathogenesis of hypertension. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Pulmonary Arterial Stiffness: Toward a New Paradigm in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Pathophysiology and Assessment.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Michal; Myers, Cynthia; Brown, R Dale; Frid, Maria G; Tan, Wei; Hunter, Kendall; Stenmark, Kurt R

    2016-01-01

    Stiffening of the pulmonary arterial bed with the subsequent increased load on the right ventricle is a paramount feature of pulmonary hypertension (PH). The pathophysiology of vascular stiffening is a complex and self-reinforcing function of extracellular matrix remodeling, driven by recruitment of circulating inflammatory cells and their interactions with resident vascular cells, and mechanotransduction of altered hemodynamic forces throughout the ventricular-vascular axis. New approaches to understanding the cell and molecular determinants of the pathophysiology combine novel biopolymer substrates, controlled flow conditions, and defined cell types to recapitulate the biomechanical environment in vitro. Simultaneously, advances are occurring to assess novel parameters of stiffness in vivo. In this comprehensive state-of-art review, we describe clinical hemodynamic markers, together with the newest translational echocardiographic and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging methods, to assess vascular stiffness and ventricular-vascular coupling. Finally, fluid-tissue interactions appear to offer a novel route of investigating the mechanotransduction processes and disease progression.

  13. Add-on therapy with doxazosin in patients with hypertension influences arterial stiffness and albuterol-mediated arterial vasodilation

    PubMed Central

    Wykretowicz, Andrzej; Guzik, Przemyslaw; Krauze, Tomasz; Adamska, Karolina; Milewska, Agata; Wysocki, Henryk

    2007-01-01

    What is already known about this subject Hypertension is associated with increased arterial stiffness and impaired endothelial function. Arterial vasodilation depends on endothelial function and can be regulated by β2-adrenergic stimulation. Doxazosin is a known and potent antihypertensive agent. However, its effects on arterial stiffness and vasodilation have not been fully established. What this study adds Sixteen-week add-on antihypertensive therapy with 4 mg of doxazosin extended release daily: Reduces arterial stiffness. Improves albuterol-mediated, i.e. endothelium-dependent, arterial vasodilation. Does not influence nitroglycerin-mediated, i.e. endothelium-independent, arterial vasodilation. Aims Doxazosin is an antihypertensive agent with largely unknown effects on arterial stiffness and vasodilation. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the addition of doxazosin extended-release (ER) to the standard management of hypertension in patients with inadequately controlled blood pressure (BP) on arterial stiffness and arterial vasodilation. Methods Twenty patients with inadequately controlled hypertension were treated with 4 mg doxazosin ER daily for 16 weeks as an adjunct to their existing antihypertensive regimen. Results Doxazosin ER add-on therapy was associated with significantly reduced systolic (P < 0.0001) and diastolic (P = 0.0003) BP, improved arterial stiffness (determined by digital volume pulse analysis (P = 0.048) and albuterol-mediated arterial vasodilation (P = 0.030). Conclusions Add-on therapy with 4 mg of doxazosin ER daily reduces BP and arterial stiffness and improves arterial vasodilation in response to adrenergic stimulation. PMID:17635498

  14. Skinfold thickness as a predictor of arterial stiffness: obesity and fatness linked to higher stiffness measurements in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Selcuk, Ali; Bulucu, Fatih; Kalafat, Firdevs; Cakar, Mustafa; Demirbas, Seref; Karaman, Murat; Ay, Seyid Ahmet; Saglam, Kenan; Balta, Sevket; Demirkol, Sait; Arslan, Erol

    2013-01-01

    Hypertensive patients have strong evidence of endothelial dysfunction. Some novel endothelial dysfunction parameters such as pulse wave velocity (PWV), augmentation index (AIx), and central aortic pressure (CAP) have been investigated as predictive markers of atherosclerosis. It is well known that obesity has relationships with endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. We aimed to investigate relationships between anthropometric measurements and arterial stiffness parameters in essentially hypertensive patients. The study population included 100 patients (56 females, 44 males) newly or formerly diagnosed as essentially hypertensive in an outpatient clinic. Arterial stiffness measurements, including PWV, AIx, CAP, and body mass index (BMI); waist circumference, hip circumference; waist/hip ratio; and triceps, biceps, subscapular, and suprailiac skinfold thicknesses were also applied to all the study patients. Then, the relationships between BMI, anthropometric measurements, and arterial stiffness parameters were investigated. The mean systolic arterial blood pressure of the study population was 135.85 ± 15.27 mm Hg and the mean diastolic arterial blood pressure of the study population was 84.17 ± 9.58 mm Hg. The parameters such as PWV, AIx, and CAP measured for arterial stiffness had correlations between BMI and different anthropometric measurements. The statistically significant correlations were present between PWV and triceps skinfold thickness (TST) (r = 0.377, P < .001) and it was also seen when regression analysis was performed (PWV = 6.41 + [0.072 × TST]; R(2) = 0.142, F[1-98] = 16.23, P < .001). Triceps skinfold thickness among these correlations may be used to estimate the carotid-femoral PWV, which is an indicator of subclinical organ damage due to hypertension.

  15. Arterial stiffness evaluated by cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) in adolescent hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mestanik, Michal; Jurko, Alexander; Mestanikova, Andrea; Jurko, Tomas; Tonhajzerova, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Elevated blood pressure (BP) is a major risk factor for atherosclerosis. As the studies concerning vascular alterations in pediatric patients are rare, we aimed to study the relationship between hypertension and arterial stiffness in adolescence by novel method independent from BP during examination. Twenty nonobese adolescent boys (16.5 ± 0.4 years) with newly diagnosed essential hypertension, 20 adolescent boys (16.7 ± 0.4 years) with newly diagnosed white-coat hypertension, and 20 healthy controls matched to age and body mass index were examined. Cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI), brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), pre-ejection period (PEP), and ejection time (ET) were evaluated. CAVI was significantly increased in essential hypertension patients compared with controls (p < 0.05) with no significant difference in white-coat hypertension patients. Significantly higher baPWV was found in essential and white-coat hypertension patients compared with controls (both p < 0.001). White-coat hypertension patients showed significantly shortened PEP and ET compared with controls (p < 0.01 and p < 0.001, respectively) and essential hypertension patients (both p < 0.05). For the first time, the arterial stiffness in adolescents with newly diagnosed essential and white-coat hypertension was studied using BP-independent index CAVI combined with conventional baPWV. Our study revealed significantly increased CAVI in adolescents with newly diagnosed essential hypertension compared with controls. Our findings could help to understand hypertension-atherosclerosis interaction.

  16. Inverse relationship between physical activity and arterial stiffness in adults with hypertension.

    PubMed

    O'Donovan, Cuisle; Lithander, Fiona E; Raftery, Tara; Gormley, John; Mahmud, Azra; Hussey, Juliette

    2014-02-01

    Physical activity has beneficial effects on arterial stiffness among healthy adults. There is a lack of data on this relationship in adults with hypertension. The majority of studies which have examined physical activity and arterial stiffness have used subjective measures of activity. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between objectively measured habitual physical activity and arterial stiffness in individuals with newly diagnosed essential hypertension. Adults attending an outpatient hypertension clinic were recruited into this cross sectional study. Physical activity was measured using a triaxial accelerometer. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx) were measured using applanation tonometry. Participant's full lipid profile and glucose were determined through the collection of a fasting blood sample. Fifty-three adults [51(14) years, 26 male] participated, 16 of whom had the metabolic syndrome. Inactivity was positively correlated with PWV (r = .53, P < .001) and AIx (r = .48, P < .001). There were significant inverse associations between habitual physical activity of all intensities and both AIx and PWV. In stepwise regression, after adjusting for potential confounders, physical activity was a significant predictor of AIx and PWV. Habitual physical activity of all intensities is associated with reduced arterial stiffness among adults with hypertension.

  17. Arterial Stiffness is Associated with Increase in Blood Pressure Over Time in Treated Hypertensives

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, T; Bailey, KR; Turner, ST; Kullo, IJ

    2014-01-01

    Background Arterial stiffness is associated with incident hypertension. We hypothesized that arterial stiffness would predict increases in systolic (SBP), mean (MAP) and pulse pressure (PP) over time in treated hypertensives. Methods Blood pressure (BP) was measured a mean of 8.5±0.9 years apart in 414 non-Hispanic white hypertensives (mean age 60±8 years, 55% women). The average of 3 supine right brachial BPs was recorded. Measures of arterial stiffness including carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV), aortic augmentation index (AIx) and central pulse pressure (CPP) were obtained at baseline by applanation tonometry. We performed stepwise multivariable linear regression analyses adjusting for potential confounders to assess the associations of arterial stiffness parameters with BP changes over time. Results Systolic, mean and pulse pressure increased in 80% of participants. After adjustment for the covariates listed above, cfPWV was significantly associated with increases in SBP (β±SE: 0.71±0.31) and PP (β±SE: 1.09±0.27); AIx was associated with increases in SBP (β±SE: 0.23±0.10) and MAP (β±SE: 0.27±0.07); and CPP was associated with increases in SBP (β±SE: 0.44±0.07), MAP (β±SE: 0.24±0.05) and PP (β±SE: 0.42±0.06) over time (P≤0.02 for all). Conclusions Baseline arterial stiffness measures were associated with longitudinal increases in SBP, MAP and PP in treated hypertensives. PMID:24952654

  18. Prostate-specific antigen levels are associated with arterial stiffness in essential hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Vyssoulis, Gregory; Karpanou, Eva; Kyvelou, Stella-Maria; Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Tzamou, Vanessa; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2012-12-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) has been recently related to cardiovascular system in a multifactorial way. Arterial stiffness is a independent predictor of cardiovascular events and is involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether PSA values, are associated with arterial stiffness indices in patients with essential arterial hypertension. The study comprised 150 consecutive male patients (mean age 60 years) with uncomplicated never-treated essential hypertension. All patients underwent a complete clinical and laboratory evaluation, including measurement of PSA levels. Aortic stiffness and arterial wave reflection assessment was made by using carotid-femoral (PWVc-f) pulse wave velocity and aortic augmentation index corrected for heart rate (AIx75). Patients with prostate cancer or benign prostate hyperplasia (PSA > 4 ng/mL) were excluded from the study. PSA was positively associated with waist-to-hip ratio (r = 0.235, P = 0.04), PWVc-f (r = 0.426, P < 0.001), AIx75 (r = 0.264, P = 0.001), and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP; r = 0.376, P < 0.001). In categorization to PSA quartiles, patients in the higher quartile presented with higher waist-to hip ratio (P = 0.009), PWVc-f (P < 0.00001), AIx75 (P < 0.001) and hsCRP (P < 0.001) values. In multivariate analysis after adjustment for various confounders PSA remained a significant determinant of PWVc-f values (beta [SE] = 0.477 [0.13], R(2) = 0.405, P < 0.001). The present study points towards an association between PSA levels and aortic stiffness in untreated essential hypertensive males. Potential causal relationships between PSA and arterial stiffness remain to be further explored. © 2010 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  19. Arterial Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Avolio, Alberto

    2013-04-01

    Stiffness of large arteries has been long recognized as a significant determinant of pulse pressure. However, it is only in recent decades, with the accumulation of longitudinal data from large and varied epidemiological studies of morbidity and mortality associated with cardiovascular disease, that it has emerged as an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk. This has generated substantial interest in investigations related to intrinsic causative and associated factors responsible for the alteration of mechanical properties of the arterial wall, with the aim to uncover specific pathways that could be interrogated to prevent or reverse arterial stiffening. Much has been written on the haemodynamic relevance of arterial stiffness in terms of the quantification of pulsatile relationships of blood pressure and flow in conduit arteries. Indeed, much of this early work regarded blood vessels as passive elastic conduits, with the endothelial layer considered as an inactive lining of the lumen and as an interface to flowing blood. However, recent advances in molecular biology and increased technological sophistication for the detection of low concentrations of biochemical compounds have elucidated the highly important regulatory role of the endothelial cell affecting vascular function. These techniques have enabled research into the interaction of the underlying passive mechanical properties of the arterial wall with the active cellular and molecular processes that regulate the local environment of the load-bearing components. This review addresses these emerging concepts.

  20. Investigation of the relationship between arterial stiffness and sleep architecture in patients with essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hang; Zhao, Liming; Liu, Kai; Chen, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    A change in sleep architecture might increase the risk of hypertension and worsen target organs. This study thus aimed to study the features of sleep architecture and examine its relationship with pulse wave velocity (PWV), a measure of arterial stiffness, in patients with essential hypertension and healthy people aged 45-65 years (n = 106). We collected data on demographics, the serum index, overnight polysomnography, vascular testing and ambulatory blood pressure in addition to measuring arterial stiffness and monitoring sleep respiration. We found that patients with hypertension had longer sleep latency and shorter duration. Their sleep efficiency and the ratio of N3 in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement were lower, while the micro-arousal index (MI), N1 and N2 in NREM, and the apnea-hypopnea index were higher than normal people in controls. PWV raised with a decrease in N3 and an increase in the MI. In summary, there were notable changes in sleep architecture and with a decrease in N3 and increase in MI can accelerate arterial stiffness and then worsen target organ damage in patients with hypertension.

  1. Relationship between occupational exposure to lead and local arterial stiffness and left ventricular diastolic function in individuals with arterial hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Poreba, Rafal; Gac, Pawel; Poreba, Malgorzata; Antonowicz-Juchniewicz, Jolanta; Andrzejak, Ryszard

    2011-08-01

    Relationship between occupational exposure to lead and frequency of complications in persons with arterial hypertension has been poorly investigated. This study aimed at evaluation of the relationship between occupational exposure to lead and manifestation of an increased local arterial stiffness and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. The studies included 105 men (mean age: 44.47 {+-} 9.12 years) with arterial hypertension, treated with hypotensive drugs: group I - men occupationally exposed to lead (n = 53), and group II - men not exposed to lead (n = 52). In echocardiographic examination, the left ventricular diastolic dysfunction was diagnosed significantly more frequently in group I than in group II. In eTracking examination mean values of stiffness parameter ({beta}), augmentation index (AI) and one-point pulse wave velocity (PWV-{beta}) were significantly higher and mean values of arterial compliance (AC) were significantly lower in group I than in group II. The logistic regression showed that in the group of persons with arterial hypertension occupationally exposed to lead a more advanced age, higher blood lead concentration and higher mean values of augmentation index represent independent risk factors of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. The multifactorial regression showed that amongst persons with arterial hypertension occupationally exposed to lead higher blood zinc protoporphyrin concentration, a more advanced age and higher value of body mass index (BMI) represent independent risk factors of an increased local arterial stiffness. In summary, we should note that in the group of persons with arterial hypertension occupationally exposed to lead the study has demonstrated a significantly more frequent manifestation of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction and an increase in local arterial stiffness. - Highlights: > Amongst persons with AH exposed to Pb higher ZnPP represent independent risk factor of increased local arterial stiffness

  2. Arterial stiffness in normotensive and hypertensive subjects: Frequency in community pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Rodilla Sala, Enrique; Adell Alegre, Manuel; Giner Galvañ, Vicente; Perseguer Torregrosa, Zeneida; Pascual Izuel, Jose Maria; Climent Catalá, María Teresa

    2017-07-11

    Arterial stiffness (AS) is a well-recognized target organ lesion. This study aims to determine: 1) the frequency of AS in community pharmacies; 2) if stiffened subjects identified by brachial oscillometry have more CV risk factors than normal subjects, and 3) the dependence of stiffness on using either age-adjusted values or a fixed threshold. Observational, cross-sectional study in 32 community pharmacies of the Valencia Community, between November/2015 and April/2016. Stiffness was as pulse wave velocity (PWV) measured with a semi-automatic, validated device (Mobil-O-Graph(®), IEM), followed by a 10-item questionnaire. Mean age of the 1,427 consecutive recruited patients was 56.6 years. Overall proportion of patients with AS was 17.4% with age-adjusted PWV (9.4% in normotensives, 28.3% in hypertensives). Multivariate logistic regression showed independent association of stiffness in normotensives with male gender, obesity, higher pulse pressure and heart rate, in hypertensives, with higher pulse pressure and lower age. AS was globally found in 20.5% of subjects, defining stiffness by PWV>10m/s (6.2% in normotensives, 40.2% in hypertensives). It was associated with higher age and pulse pressure in both groups. Concordance in classifying stiffness was 74.6%. Frequency of AS varied between 17.4-20.5%. Age-adjusted stiffness is associated in normotensives with male gender, pulse pressure, obesity and heart rate, in hypertensives with pulse pressure and inversely to age. Stiffness by 10m/s is determined by higher pulse pressure and higher age. Both definitions of PWV are not interchangeable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Associations of endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness with intradialytic hypotension and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    DUBIN, Ruth; OWENS, Christopher; GASPER, Warren; GANZ, Peter; JOHANSEN, Kirsten

    2011-01-01

    Intradialytic hypotension and hypertension are both independently associated with mortality among persons with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis. Endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness are two possible mechanisms underlying these phenomena, but their association with hemodynamic instability during dialysis has not been evaluated. Thirty patients were recruited from chronic dialysis units at San Francisco General Hospital and San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Endothelial dysfunction was assessed with flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery after upper arm occlusion. Arterial stiffness was assessed using carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity measured by tonometry. Intradialytic hypotension and hypertension were defined as the average decrease in systolic blood pressure (SBP) over 1 week, as well as the frequency over 1 month of hypotension or hypertension. Every 5% decrease in flow-mediated dilation was associated with a 7.5mmHg decrease in SBP after adjustment for phosphorus, body mass index, atherosclerosis, and ultrafiltration (P=0.02). Every 5 m/s increase in pulse wave velocity was associated with an 8mmHg increase in SBP after adjustment for predialysis SBP and ultrafiltration (P=0.03). Over 1 month, every 5% lower flow-mediated dilation was associated with a 10% higher frequency of hypotension (P=0.09), and every 5 m/s increase in pulse wave velocity was associated with an 15% higher frequency of hypertension (P=0.02). In a cross-sectional analysis of 30 dialysis patients, endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness were independently associated with intradialytic hypotension and intradialytic hypertension, respectively. Elucidating these potential mechanisms of hemodynamic instability during dialysis may facilitate development of treatment strategies specific to this pathophysiology. PMID:21658174

  4. The Use of the Ambulatory Arterial Stiffness Index in Patients Suspected of Secondary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Verbakel, Joshua R. A.; Adiyaman, Ahmet; Kraayvanger, Nicole; Dechering, Dirk G.; Postma, Cornelis T.

    2016-01-01

    The ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) is a marker of arterial stiffness and is derived from ambulatory 24-h blood pressure registration. We studied whether the AASI could be used as a predictive factor for the presence of renal artery stenosis (RAS) in patients with a suspicion of secondary hypertension and as such as a diagnostic tool for RAS. We included 169 patients with difficult-to-treat hypertension. They all underwent 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring registration, imaging of the renal arteries, and cardiovascular risk measurement, including smoking, history, biometrics, blood pressure, renal function, lipids, and glucose metabolism. Performing univariate and multivariate analyses, we investigated if AASI and the other cardiovascular risk factors were related to the presence of RAS. Of the 169 patients (49% women), 31% had RAS. The mean AASI was 0.44 (0.16). The presence of RAS showed no significant correlation with AASI (r = 0.14, P = 0.06). Age (r = 0.19, P = 0.01), hypercholesterolemia (r = 0.26, P = 0.001), history of CVD (r = 0.22, P = 0.004), and creatinine clearance (r = −0.34, P < 0.001) all demonstrated a correlation with RAS. Although AASI is higher in patients with RAS, AASI does not independently predict the presence of RAS in hypertensive subjects. PMID:28018907

  5. Arterial stiffness evaluation by cardio-ankle vascular index in hypertension and diabetes mellitus subjects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyu; Liu, Jinbo; Zhao, Hongwei; Fu, Xiaobao; Shang, Guangyun; Zhou, Yingyan; Yu, Xiaolan; Zhao, Xujing; Wang, Guang; Shi, Hongyan

    2013-01-01

    Arterial stiffness is an independent predictor for vascular diseases. Cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) is a new index of arterial stiffness. In the present study, we investigated the possible risk factors involving CAVI in hypertension and diabetes mellitus (DM) subjects. One thousand sixty-three subjects (M/F 533/530) from Shougang Corporation Examination Center were divided into four groups: healthy group (n = 639); hypertension group (n = 312); DM group (n = 58); and hypertension with DM group (n = 54). CAVI was measured by VS-1000 apparatus. Our results showed that CAVI was significantly higher in hypertension subjects with DM than in healthy and hypertension group, respectively (8.59 ± 1.08 vs 7.23 ± 1.10; 8.59 ± 1.08 vs 7.94 ± 1.33; both P < .05). CAVI was positively correlated with age, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, uric acid, total cholesterol, triglycerides in the entire group (r = 0.633, 0.280, 0.172, 0.269, 0.209, 0.254, 0.176, 0.129, 0.175; all P < .05, respectively). There was negatively correlation between CAVI and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in the entire group (r = -0.167; P < .05). Multivariate analysis showed that age, body mass index, HbA1c, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were independent associating factors of CAVI in all subjects (β = 0.699; P < .001, β = -0.189; P = .001, β = 0.144; P = .015, β = -0.136; P = .019, respectively). Our present study suggested that CAVI was significantly higher in hypertension subjects with DM compared with healthy and hypertension groups. Copyright © 2013 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Morning blood pressure surge and arterial stiffness in newly diagnosed hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Kıvrak, Ali; Özbiçer, Süleyman; Kalkan, Gülhan Yüksel; Gür, Mustafa

    2017-06-01

    We aimed to investigate the relationship between the morning blood pressure (BP) surge and arterial stiffness in patients with newly diagnosed hypertension. Three hundred and twenty four (mean age 51.7 ± 11.4 years) patients who had newly diagnosed hypertension with 24 h ambulatory BP monitoring were enrolled. Parameters of arterial stiffness, pulse wave velocity and augmentation index (Aix) were measured by applanation tonometry and aortic distensibility was calculated by echocardiography. Compared with the other groups, pulse wave velocity, day-night systolic BP (SBP) difference (p < 0.001, for all) and hs-CRP (p = 0.005) were higher in morning BP surge high group. Aortic distensibility values were significantly lower in morning BP surge high group compared to the other groups (p < 0.05, for all). Morning BP surge was found to be independently associated with pulse wave velocity (β = 0.286, p < 0.001), aortic distensibility (β= -0.384, p < 0.001) and day-night SBP difference (β = 0.229, p < 0.001) in multivariate linear regression analysis. We found independent relationship between morning BP surge and arterial stiffness which is a surrogate endpoint for cardiovascular diseases. The inverse relationship between morning BP surge and aortic distensibility and direct relation found in our study is new to the literature.

  7. Relationships between urinary electrolytes excretion and central hemodynamics, and arterial stiffness in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Han, Weizhong; Han, Xiao; Sun, Ningling; Chen, Yunchao; Jiang, Shiliang; Li, Min

    2017-08-01

    High sodium intake plays an important role in the onset and exacerbation of hypertension. However, the relationships between urinary electrolytes excretion and central hemodynamics and between urinary electrolyte excretion and arterial stiffness are still the subject of debate. This study sought to clarify the associations of salt intake with central aortic pressure and arterial stiffness indicators. A total of 431 untreated hypertensive individuals were recruited into the study. Twenty-four-hour urinary samples were collected to measure the excretion of urinary electrolytes. Central hemodynamics parameters and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) were measured. We evaluated the independent relationship between urinary sodium or potassium excretion and the abovementioned indices. The mean 24-h urinary sodium of all subjects was 166.6±70.0 mmol/24 h. With increases in urinary sodium excretion, central blood pressure and baPWV values markedly increased. Multiple regression analysis showed that urinary sodium was independently associated with increases in central systolic blood pressure, central diastolic blood pressure, the augmentation index, and baPWV. Significant correlations were identified between high dietary sodium and central hemodynamics and between high dietary sodium and arterial elasticity. Prospective interventional studies in hypertensive patients may be required to determine the effect of salt intake on central hemodynamics.

  8. Cullin-3 mutation causes arterial stiffness and hypertension through a vascular smooth muscle mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Agbor, Larry N.; Ibeawuchi, Stella-Rita C.; Hu, Chunyan; Davis, Deborah R.; Keen, Henry L.; Quelle, Frederick W.; Sigmund, Curt D.

    2016-01-01

    Cullin-3 (CUL3) mutations (CUL3Δ9) were previously identified in hypertensive patients with pseudohypoaldosteronism type-II (PHAII), but the mechanism causing hypertension and whether this is driven by renal tubular or extratubular mechanisms remains unknown. We report that selective expression of CUL3Δ9 in smooth muscle acts by interfering with expression and function of endogenous CUL3, resulting in impaired turnover of the CUL3 substrate RhoA, increased RhoA activity, and augmented RhoA/Rho kinase signaling. This caused vascular dysfunction and increased arterial pressure under baseline conditions and a marked increase in arterial pressure, collagen deposition, and vascular stiffness in response to a subpressor dose of angiotensin II, which did not cause hypertension in control mice. Inhibition of total cullin activity increased the level of CUL3 substrates cyclin E and RhoA, and expression of CUL3Δ9 decreased the level of the active form of endogenous CUL3 in human aortic smooth muscle cells. These data indicate that selective expression of the Cul3Δ9 mutation in vascular smooth muscle phenocopies the hypertension observed in Cul3Δ9 human subjects and suggest that mutations in CUL3 cause human hypertension in part through a mechanism involving smooth muscle dysfunction initiated by a loss of CUL3-mediated degradation of RhoA. PMID:27882355

  9. Cardiac Organ Damage and Arterial Stiffness in Autonomic Failure: Comparison With Essential Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Milazzo, Valeria; Maule, Simona; Di Stefano, Cristina; Tosello, Francesco; Totaro, Silvia; Veglio, Franco; Milan, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Autonomic failure (AF) is characterized by orthostatic hypotension, supine hypertension, and increased blood pressure (BP) variability. AF patients develop cardiac organ damage, similarly to essential hypertension (EH), and have higher arterial stiffness than healthy controls. Determinants of cardiovascular organ damage in AF are not well known: both BP variability and mean BP values may be involved. The aim of the study was to evaluate cardiac organ damage, arterial stiffness, and central hemodynamics in AF, compared with EH subjects with similar 24-hour BP and a group of healthy controls, and to evaluate determinants of target organ damage in patients with AF. Twenty-seven patients with primary AF were studied (mean age, 65.7±11.2 years) using transthoracic echocardiography, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, central hemodynamics, and 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring. They were compared with 27 EH subjects matched for age, sex, and 24-hour mean BP and with 27 healthy controls. AF and EH had similar left ventricular mass (101.6±33.3 versus 97.7±28.1 g/m(2), P=0.59) and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (9.3±1.8 versus 9.2±3.0 m/s, P=0.93); both parameters were significantly lower in healthy controls (P<0.01). Compared with EH, AF patients had higher augmentation index (31.0±7.6% versus 26.1±9.2%, P=0.04) and central BP values. Nighttime systolic BP and 24-hour systolic BP predicted organ damage, independent of BP variability. AF patients develop hypertensive heart disease and increased arterial stiffness, similar to EH with comparable mean BP values. Twenty-four-hour and nighttime systolic BP were determinants of cardiovascular damage, independent of BP variability.

  10. Ambulatory Arterial Stiffness Index Is Higher in Hypertensive Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg; Neves, Mario Fritsch; Oigman, Wille; Bregman, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) is a parameter obtained from ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) that correlates with clinical endpoints. The aim of this study was to compare AASI in nondiabetic hypertensive patients with and without chronic kidney disease (CKD). Subjects with systemic arterial hypertension (SAH, n = 30) with normal renal function, aged 40 to 75 years, were compared to hypertensive patients with CKD (n = 30) presenting estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min by MDRD formula. ABPM was carried out in all patients. In CKD group, eGFR was 35.3 ± 2.8 ml/min. The mean 24-hour systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) was similar in both groups. AASI was significantly higher in CKD group (0.45 ± 0.03 versus 0.37 ± 0.02, P < 0.05), positively correlated to age (r = 0.38, P < 0.01) and pulse pressure (r = 0.43, P < 0.01) and negatively correlated to nocturnal BP fall (r = -0.28, P = 0.03). These findings indicate the presence of stiffer vessels in CKD hypertensive patients. PMID:22675608

  11. Effect of Lysyl Oxidase Inhibition on Angiotensin II-Induced Arterial Hypertension, Remodeling, and Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Eberson, Lance S.; Sanchez, Pablo A.; Majeed, Beenish A.; Tawinwung, Supannikar; Secomb, Timothy W.; Larson, Douglas F.

    2015-01-01

    It is well accepted that angiotensin II (Ang II) induces altered vascular stiffness through responses including both structural and material remodeling. Concurrent with remodeling is the induction of the enzyme lysyl oxidase (LOX) through which ECM proteins are cross-linked. The study objective was to determine the effect of LOX mediated cross-linking on vascular mechanical properties. Three-month old mice were chronically treated with Ang II with or without the LOX blocker, β -aminopropionitrile (BAPN), for 14 days. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) from Doppler measurements of the aortic flow wave was used to quantify in vivo vascular stiffness in terms of an effective Young’s modulus. The increase in effective Young’s modulus with Ang II administration was abolished with the addition of BAPN, suggesting that the material properties are a major controlling element in vascular stiffness. BAPN inhibited the Ang II induced collagen cross-link formation by 2-fold and PWV by 44% (P<0.05). Consistent with this observation, morphometric analysis showed that BAPN did not affect the Ang II mediated increase in medial thickness but significantly reduced the adventitial thickness. Since the hypertensive state contributes to the measured in vivo PWV stiffness, we removed the Ang II infusion pumps on Day 14 and achieved normal arterial blood pressures. With pump removal we observed a decrease of the PWV in the Ang II group to 25% above that of the control values (P=0.002), with a complete return to control values in the Ang II plus BAPN group. In conclusion, we have shown that the increase in vascular stiffness with 14 day Ang II administration results from a combination of hypertension-induced wall strain, adventitial wall thickening and Ang II mediated LOX ECM cross-linking, which is a major material source of vascular stiffening, and that the increased PWV was significantly inhibited with co-administration of BAPN. PMID:25875748

  12. Arterial hypertension and cardiovascular damage in the elderly: focus on arterial stiffness and left ventricular hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Paciaroni, E; Antonicelli, R; Gambini, C; Sirolla, C

    1993-01-01

    Both aging and Arterial Hypertension (AH) cause a series of structural and functional changes in the cardiovascular apparatus. The reduction of aortic distensibility (RAD) and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) are, in particular, two significant markers of cardiovascular damage apart from being factors of serious and widespread morphological alterations. In this paper, the Authors analyze the effects of aging and of AH on the cardiovascular apparatus in order to find a possible clinical significance in relation to both RAD and LVH.

  13. Peripheral Augmentation Index is Associated With the Ambulatory Arterial Stiffness Index in Patients With Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Heffernan, Kevin S.; Patvardhan, Eshan A.; Karas, Richard H.; Kuvin, Jeffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    Background Vascular dysfunction is highly prevalent if not ubiquitous in patients with hypertension. We compared two different measures of vascular function obtained from digital volume waveforms with measures of ventricular-vascular load derived from 24-hour blood pressure (BP) recordings in patients with hypertension. Methods Digital pulsatile volume waveforms were captured via plethysmography (peripheral arterial tone, PAT) and used to derive augmentation index (a measure of ventricular-vascular coupling) and the pulse wave amplitude-reactive hyperemia index (a measure of microvascular reactivity). Ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) and the BP variability ratio (BPVR) were derived from 24-hour ambulatory BP recordings. Results There was a positive association between PAT-AIx and AASI (r = 0.52, P < 0.05). There was also a positive association between PAT-AIx and BPVR (r = 0.37, P < 0.05). PAT-AIx was not associated with PWA-RHI (r = -0.14, P > 0.05). PWA-RHI was not associated with AASI or BPVR (P > 0.05). Conclusions PAT-AIx is associated with ambulatory measures of vascular function and may offer clinical insight into vascular burden and cardiovascular disease risk in patients with hypertension independent of information obtained from PWA-RHI.

  14. Main pulmonary arterial wall shear stress correlates with invasive hemodynamics and stiffness in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kheyfets, Vitaly O.; Schroeder, Joyce D.; Dunning, Jamie; Shandas, Robin; Buckner, J. Kern; Browning, James; Hertzberg, Jean; Hunter, Kendall S.; Fenster, Brett E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with proximal pulmonary arterial remodeling characterized by increased vessel diameter, wall thickening, and stiffness. In vivo assessment of wall shear stress (WSS) may provide insights into the relationships between pulmonary hemodynamics and vascular remodeling. We investigated the relationship between main pulmonary artery (MPA) WSS and pulmonary hemodynamics as well as markers of stiffness. As part of a prospective study, 17 PH patients and 5 controls underwent same-day four-dimensional flow cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (4-D CMR) and right heart catheterization. Streamwise velocity profiles were generated in the cross-sectional MPA in 45° increments from velocity vector fields determined by 4-D CMR. WSS was calculated as the product of hematocrit-dependent viscosity and shear rate generated from the spatial gradient of the velocity profiles. In-plane average MPA WSS was significantly decreased in the PH cohort compared with that in controls (0.18 ± 0.07 vs. 0.32 ± 0.08 N/m2; P = 0.01). In-plane MPA WSS showed strong inverse correlations with multiple hemodynamic indices, including pulmonary resistance (ρ = −0.74, P < 0.001), mean pulmonary pressure (ρ = −0.64, P = 0.006), and elastance (ρ = −0.70, P < 0.001). In addition, MPA WSS had significant associations with markers of stiffness, including capacitance (ρ = 0.67, P < 0.001), distensibility (ρ = 0.52, P = 0.013), and elastic modulus (ρ = −0.54, P = 0.01). In conclusion, MPA WSS is decreased in PH and is significantly associated with invasive hemodynamic indices and markers of stiffness. 4-D CMR–based assessment of WSS may represent a novel methodology to study blood-vessel wall interactions in PH. PMID:27076906

  15. Main pulmonary arterial wall shear stress correlates with invasive hemodynamics and stiffness in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Michal; Kheyfets, Vitaly O; Schroeder, Joyce D; Dunning, Jamie; Shandas, Robin; Buckner, J Kern; Browning, James; Hertzberg, Jean; Hunter, Kendall S; Fenster, Brett E

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with proximal pulmonary arterial remodeling characterized by increased vessel diameter, wall thickening, and stiffness. In vivo assessment of wall shear stress (WSS) may provide insights into the relationships between pulmonary hemodynamics and vascular remodeling. We investigated the relationship between main pulmonary artery (MPA) WSS and pulmonary hemodynamics as well as markers of stiffness. As part of a prospective study, 17 PH patients and 5 controls underwent same-day four-dimensional flow cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (4-D CMR) and right heart catheterization. Streamwise velocity profiles were generated in the cross-sectional MPA in 45° increments from velocity vector fields determined by 4-D CMR. WSS was calculated as the product of hematocrit-dependent viscosity and shear rate generated from the spatial gradient of the velocity profiles. In-plane average MPA WSS was significantly decreased in the PH cohort compared with that in controls (0.18 ± 0.07 vs. 0.32 ± 0.08 N/m(2); P = 0.01). In-plane MPA WSS showed strong inverse correlations with multiple hemodynamic indices, including pulmonary resistance (ρ = -0.74, P < 0.001), mean pulmonary pressure (ρ = -0.64, P = 0.006), and elastance (ρ = -0.70, P < 0.001). In addition, MPA WSS had significant associations with markers of stiffness, including capacitance (ρ = 0.67, P < 0.001), distensibility (ρ = 0.52, P = 0.013), and elastic modulus (ρ = -0.54, P = 0.01). In conclusion, MPA WSS is decreased in PH and is significantly associated with invasive hemodynamic indices and markers of stiffness. 4-D CMR-based assessment of WSS may represent a novel methodology to study blood-vessel wall interactions in PH.

  16. Long-term anti-hypertensive therapy with benidipine improves arterial stiffness over blood pressure lowering.

    PubMed

    Kita, Toshihiro; Suzuki, Yoshihiko; Eto, Tanenao; Kitamura, Kazuo

    2005-12-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) reflects arterial stiffness and is an independent predictor of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. However, because it is closely related to blood pressure (BP), PWV is an imperfect measure for evaluating the effects of anti-hypertensive drugs on arterial wall properties. To clarify the effect of benidipine on arterial properties, we first derived the regression line between BP and PWV changes in a short-term experiment. Using this line, we evaluated the long-term effect of benidipine on PWV changes. In the short-term experiment, 29 participants were intravenously administered nicardipine for 90 min. Maximum decreases of brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) were plotted against the corresponding decreases in BP. In the long-term experiment, 9 hypertensive patients were treated with benidipine for 1 year, during which BP and baPWV were monitored. After 1 year, benidipine was suspended for 2 weeks, and BP and baPWV were reevaluated. In the short-term experiment, PWV was dependent on BP only, and the equation of the regression line was deltaPWV (cm/s) =10.114 x deltaMBP (mmHg) (r=0.913) or deltaPWV (%) =0.719 x deltaMBP (%) (r=0.926). In the long-term therapy, benidipine treatment achieved stable BP control within 3 months; the real PWV decreases (r-PWV) were almost identical to the PWV decrease estimated (e-PWV) from BP lowering at 3 months. However, r-PWV exceeded e-PWV after 6 months. Relative BP and PWV improvements compared to the control were maintained 2 weeks after suspension of benidipine. In conclusion, long-term benidipine administration improves arterial wall properties beyond what can be accounted for by changes in BP.

  17. Arterial Stiffness: Recommendations and Standardization

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Raymond R.

    2017-01-01

    The use of arterial stiffness measurements in longitudinal cohorts of normal populations, hypertensive patients, diabetic patients, healthy elderly, and patients on hemodialysis have confirmed the value of this important measure of arterial health, and established its complementary role to measures of blood pressure. Its contribution to understanding cardiovascular and mortality risk beyond blood pressure measurements has moved measures of arterial stiffness into the ranks of factors such as elevated cholesterol, diabetes, and left ventricular hypertrophy in considering cardiovascular risk. The recent international collaboration's publication of reference ranges for normal people and those with hypertension, along with the American Heart Association's recent scientific statement on standardizing arterial stiffness measurements are important aspects to consider in future studies employing these valuable methods, particularly as interventions that not only lower blood pressure but improve arterial function are tested in the clinical arena. PMID:28275588

  18. The effect of aliskiren versus ramipril-based treatment on the Ambulatory Arterial Stiffness Index in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Andreadis, E A; Angelopoulos, E T; Kolyvas, G N; Agaliotis, G D; Mousoulis, C G; Mousoulis, G P

    2014-02-01

    Aim of the present study was to compare the effectiveness of two renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors in arterial stiffness reduction in previously untreated hypertensive patients. In this open label study, 154 naïve, or not treated in the last six months hypertensive patients were randomly assigned to receive aliskiren 300 mg or ramipril 5 mg daily. Six weeks after the initiation of treatment, patients were evaluated for blood pressure (BP) control. Patients with SBP ≥140 and/or DBP ≥90 mmHg were assigned to an adjunct of 25 mg hydrochlorothiazide as combination treatment. A re-evaluation of BP control was done after another 6 weeks. Individuals with BP ≥140/90 mmHg were further administered amlodipine 5 mg. The final evaluation was performed six months after the start of the study. Twenty four-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was carried out and the ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) was calculated at baseline and after 6 months of treatment. Aliskiren-based therapy, as compared with ramipril-based therapy reduced BP to a similar degree: 13±11 vs. 12±11 mmHg reduction in systolic (P=0.34) and 8±7 vs. 7±7 mmHg reduction in diastolic BP (P=0.44). AASI was reduced by 0.04±0.1 in the aliskiren group and by 0.02±0.2 in the ramipril group. AASI reduction did not differ significantly in the two groups (P=0.13). In hypertensive patients, aliskiren-based treatment as well as ramipril-based treatment appears to have a beneficial effect on arterial stiffness. As arterial stiffness is an important modifiable risk factor, our findings highlight the value of aliskiren beyond BP lowering properties.

  19. The age-related increase in arterial stiffness is augmented in phases according to the severity of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Hirofumi; Arai, Tomio; Koji, Yutaka; Yambe, Minoru; Motobe, Kohki; Zaydun, Glunisa; Yamamoto, Yoshio; Hori, Saburoh; Yamashina, Akira

    2004-07-01

    Although blood pressure and age are major determinants of arterial stiffness, it is still unclear whether age-related changes in arterial stiffness are similar among subjects with different degrees of severity of hypertension. The present study examined the association between age and pulse wave velocity in subjects with different degrees of hypertension stratified according to the JNC-7 classification (Normal, Prehypertensive, and Stage I or II Hypertensive subjects). A number of 5,312 subjects (age range, 30-79 years) with no atherosclerotic risk factors other than high blood pressure were selected from two cohorts who regularly underwent annual health checkups, including the measurement of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). baPWV was increased according to the severity of hypertension in all age groups. The association between age and baPWV formed a quadratic curve in each stage in both genders. The steepness of the slope of the quadratic curve increased according to the severity of hypertension. In each stage of hypertension, age and the baPWV were divided into tertiles. After adjustment for systolic and diastolic blood pressure, the odds ratio of having an increased baPWV in the 3rd age tertile (the highest-age group) was found to increase according to the severity of hypertension. In conclusion, the age-related increase of baPWV was shown to be augmented in phases according to the severity of hypertension, and this augmentation occurred even between the Normal and Prehypertensive stages. These results support the JNC-7 recommendations for a strict control of blood pressure even in the elderly.

  20. Comparison of the effects of antihypertensive agents on central blood pressure and arterial stiffness in isolated systolic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Isla S; McEniery, Carmel M; Dhakam, Zahid; Brown, Morris J; Cockcroft, John R; Wilkinson, Ian B

    2009-08-01

    Isolated systolic hypertension is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and results primarily from elastic artery stiffening. Although various drug therapies are used to lower peripheral blood pressure (BP) in patients with isolated systolic hypertension, the effects of the 4 major classes of antihypertensive agents on central BP, pulse pressure (PP) amplification, and arterial stiffness in this condition are not clear. Fifty-nine patients over the age of 60 years with untreated isolated systolic hypertension (systolic BP > or =140 mm Hg and diastolic BP hypertension, the choice of therapy may be influenced by these findings in the future.

  1. Effect of American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius L.) on arterial stiffness in subjects with type-2 diabetes and concomitant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mucalo, Iva; Jovanovski, Elena; Rahelić, Dario; Božikov, Velimir; Romić, Zeljko; Vuksan, Vladimir

    2013-10-28

    Substantial pre-clinical and some clinical data are available showing that Asian ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer) varieties or its particular ginsenosides exert a vasodilatating effect, thus may modulate vascular function. However, the clinical evidence for American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius L.) is scarce. Therefore, this study evaluates the effect of American ginseng (AG) on arterial stiffness, as measured by augmentation index (AI), and blood pressure (BP), in type 2 diabetes patients with concomitant hypertension. Using a double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel design, each participant was randomized to either the selected AG extract or placebo at daily dose of 3g for 12 weeks as an adjunct to their usual antihypertensive and anti-diabetic therapy (diet and/or medications). AI and BP were measured by applanation tonometry at baseline and after 12 weeks of treatment. A total of 64 individuals with well-controlled essential hypertension and type 2 diabetes (gender: 22 M:42 F, age:63 ± 9.3 years, BP: 145 ± 10.8/84 ± 8.0 mmHg, HbA1c: 7.0 ± 1.3%, fasting blood glucose (FBG): 8.1 ± 2.3 mmol/L) completed the study. Compared to placebo, 3g of AG significantly lowered radial AI by 5.3% (P=0.041) and systolic BP by 11.7% (P<0.001) at 12 weeks. No effect was observed with diastolic BP. Addition of AG extract to conventional therapy in diabetes with concomitant hypertension improved arterial stiffness and attenuated systolic BP, thus warrants further investigation on long-term endothelial parameters before recommended as an adjunct treatment. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Epidemiology of the arterial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Breithaupt-Grögler, K; Belz, G G

    1999-06-01

    Aortic stiffening is as much an important risk factor in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, as it serves as reliable surrogate marker for clinical endpoints like myocardial and cerebrovascular incidents. Elevated aortic stiffness induces high systolic blood pressure, augmented pulse pressure with increased ventricular afterload, reduced subendocardial blood flow and augmented pulsatile stress in the peripheral arteries. Factors with relevant impact on the epidemiology of arterial stiffness are widely spread. 3 major groups of parameters influencing the stiffness of the aorta and the large arteries have been studied and described up to now: (i) physiological properties like age, gender, body height, pressure, hormonal state, genetic factors; (ii) environmental factors like nutrition (fish-, salt-, garlic consumption), smoking, performance of sports and aerobic capacity; (iii) diseases like hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, renal failure, Marfan-syndrome, growth hormone deficiency. Close association between several of these factors impedes analyzing them independently from each other. Age and blood pressure were found to be the most prominent predictors of arterial stiffness in normal as well as in disease populations. Physiological and environmental factors can modulate these effects of aging, diseases generally seem to amplify them.

  3. Relationship Between Ambulatory Arterial Stiffness Index (Aasi) And Night/Day Blood Pressure Ratio In Essential hypertensives.

    PubMed

    Di Raimondo, Domenico; Casuccio, Alessandra; Di Liberti, Rosangela; Musiari, Gaia; Zappulla, Valentina; D'angelo, Alessandra; Pinto, Antonio

    2017-06-21

    Ambulatory Arterial Stiffness Index (AASI) has been proposed as an indirect and simpler method to estimate the Arterial Stiffness (AS). AASI, calculated from a set of data collected during a 24-hours ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM), is defined as 1 minus the regression slope of diastolic on systolic blood pressure (BP) values. For a given increase in diastolic BP, the increase in systolic BP is smaller in a compliant compared to a stiff artery; the stiffer the arterial tree, the closer AASI is to 1. AASI demonstrated to predict cardiovascular mortality, cerebrovascular events and to be associated with target organ damage. Taking into account the almost completely absence of data regarding the ability of AASI to predict the different degree of AS when hypertensives are divided into four class of dipping in relation to the extent of the nocturnal reduction of BP (extreme dippers, dippers, mild dippers and reverse dippers) aim of the study was to clarify the ability of AASI to estimate the different degree of AS of hypertensive subjects with different nocturnal BP profile and resulting different extent of organ damage. We enrolled 816 subjects (403 men and 413 women) with essential hypertension, referred to the U.O.C of Medicina Interna e Cardioangiologia of the University of Palermo; 173 subjects (71 men and 102 women, mean age 44.4 ± 14.6 years) without a history of hypertension were enrolled as controls. The analysis of data was performed by dividing the populating into four categories in relation to the extent of the nocturnal decline of BP: 124 extreme dipper (mean age 54,8 ± 12,4 years, men 46.8 %); 287 dipper (mean age 55,9 ± 14,2 years, men 54,0 %); 271 mild dipper (mean age 61,5 ± 14,7 years, men 52,0 %); 134 reverse dipper (mean age 61,5 ± 14,7 years, men 33.6 %). The mean value of AASI was significantly higher for mild and reverse dippers versus control patients and versus the other categories of dipping. The multiple regression analysis

  4. A constitutive modeling interpretation of the relationship among carotid artery stiffness, blood pressure, and age in hypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Spronck, Bart; Heusinkveld, Maarten H G; Donders, Wouter P; de Lepper, Anouk G W; Op't Roodt, Jos; Kroon, Abraham A; Delhaas, Tammo; Reesink, Koen D

    2015-03-15

    Aging has a profound influence on arterial wall structure and function. We have previously reported the relationship among pulse wave velocity, age, and blood pressure in hypertensive subjects. In the present study, we aimed for a quantitative interpretation of the observed changes in wall behavior with age using a constitutive modeling approach. We implemented a model of arterial wall biomechanics and fitted this to the group-averaged pressure-area (P-A) relationship of the "young" subgroup of our study population. Using this model as our take-off point, we assessed which parameters had to be changed to let the model describe the "old" subgroup's P-A relationship. We allowed elastin stiffness and collagen recruitment parameters to vary and adjusted residual stress parameters according to published age-related changes. We required wall stress to be homogeneously distributed over the arterial wall and assumed wall stress normalization with age by keeping average "old" wall stress at the "young" level. Additionally, we required axial force to remain constant over the cardiac cycle. Our simulations showed an age-related shift in pressure-load bearing from elastin to collagen, caused by a decrease in elastin stiffness and a considerable increase in collagen recruitment. Correspondingly, simulated diameter and wall thickness increased by about 20 and 17%, respectively. The latter compared well with a measured thickness increase of 21%. We conclude that the physiologically realistic changes in constitutive properties we found under physiological constraints with respect to wall stress could well explain the influence of aging in the stiffness-pressure-age pattern observed.

  5. Activation of SIRT1 Attenuates Klotho Deficiency-Induced Arterial Stiffness and Hypertension by Enhancing AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Activity.

    PubMed

    Gao, Diansa; Zuo, Zhong; Tian, Jing; Ali, Quaisar; Lin, Yi; Lei, Han; Sun, Zhongjie

    2016-11-01

    Arterial stiffness is an independent risk factor for stroke and myocardial infarction. This study was designed to investigate the role of SIRT1, an important deacetylase, and its relationship with Klotho, a kidney-derived aging-suppressor protein, in the pathogenesis of arterial stiffness and hypertension. We found that the serum level of Klotho was decreased by ≈45% in patients with arterial stiffness and hypertension. Interestingly, Klotho haplodeficiency caused arterial stiffening and hypertension, as evidenced by significant increases in pulse wave velocity and blood pressure in Klotho-haplodeficient (KL(+/-)) mice. Notably, the expression and activity of SIRT1 were decreased significantly in aortic endothelial and smooth muscle cells in KL(+/-) mice, suggesting that Klotho deficiency downregulates SIRT1. Treatment with SRT1720 (15 mg/kg/d, IP), a specific SIRT1 activator, abolished Klotho deficiency-induced arterial stiffness and hypertension in KL(+/-) mice. Klotho deficiency was associated with significant decreases in activities of AMP-activated protein kinase α (AMPKα) and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) in aortas, which were abolished by SRT1720. Furthermore, Klotho deficiency upregulated NADPH oxidase activity and superoxide production, increased collagen expression, and enhanced elastin fragmentation in the media of aortas. These Klotho deficiency-associated changes were blocked by SRT1720. In conclusion, this study provides the first evidence that Klotho deficiency downregulates SIRT1 activity in arterial endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Pharmacological activation of SIRT1 may be an effective therapeutic strategy for arterial stiffness and hypertension. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Effect of aliskiren on arterial stiffness, compared with ramipril in patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jian-Qiang; Wang, Hong-Yi; Sun, Ning-Ling

    2013-04-01

    Aliskiren is a novel blood pressure-lowering agent acting as an oral direct renin inhibitor. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of aliskiren on arterial stiffness, compared with that of ramipril in mild to moderate essential hypertensive patients. Following a two week placebo run-in period, patients with a mean sitting diastolic blood pressure (ms-DBP) ≥ 95 and < 110 mmHg (1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa), and a mean sitting systolic blood pressure (ms-SBP) < 180 mmHg were randomly allocated to treatment with aliskiren (150 mg/d, n = 20) or ramipril (5 mg/d, n = 20) for eight weeks. Blood pressure, plasma renin activity, and the brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV) were measured before and after eight weeks of treatment. Eight weeks of treatment significantly decreased systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure in both the aliskiren group and ramipril group. The hypotensive effect did not differ between the two groups. Plasma renin activity decreased after aliskiren treatment and increased after ramipril treatment. There was no significant difference in baseline ba-PWV between the aliskiren and ramipril groups (P = 0.892). The ba-PWV was significantly reduced in both the aliskiren group (1535 (1405 - 1666) vs. 1464 (1360 - 1506) cm/s) (P < 0.01) and the ramipril group (1544 (1433 - 1673) vs. 1447 (1327 - 1549) cm/s) (P < 0.01). No statistically significant difference was found in the decline of ba-PWV between the two groups (P = 0.766). The current study revealed that aliskiren (150 mg/d) could ameliorate arterial stiffness and its effect was similar to ramipril (5 mg/d) in mild to moderate hypertensive patients, indicating that in addition to lowering blood pressure, aliskiren had beneficial effect on vascular protection.

  7. Effects of omega-3 fatty acids on arterial stiffness in patients with hypertension: a randomized pilot study.

    PubMed

    Krantz, Mori J; Havranek, Edward P; Pereira, Rocio I; Beaty, Brenda; Mehler, Philip S; Long, Carlin S

    2015-12-02

    Omega-3 fatty acids prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in patients with myocardial infarction or heart failure. Benefits in patients without overt CVD have not been demonstrated, though most studies did not use treatment doses (3.36 g) of omega-3 fatty acids. Arterial stiffness measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV) predicts CVD events independent of standard risk factors. However, no therapy has been shown to reduce PWV in a blood pressure-independent manner. We assessed the effects of esterified omega-3 fatty acids on PWV and serum markers of inflammation among patients with hypertension. We performed a prospective, randomized; double-blinded pilot study of omega-3 fatty acids among 62 patients in an urban, safety net hospital. Patients received 3.36 g of omega-3 fatty acids vs. matched placebo daily for 3-months. The principal outcome measure was change in brachial-ankle PWV. Serum inflammatory markers associated with CVD risk were also assessed. The majority (71 %) were of Latino ethnicity. After 3-months, mean change in arterial PWV among omega-3 and placebo groups was -97 cm/s vs. -33 cm/s respectively (p = 0.36 for difference, after multivariate adjustment for baseline age, systolic blood pressure, and serum adiponectin). Non-significant reductions in lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (LpPLA2) mass and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) relative to placebo were also observed (p = 0.08, and 0.21, respectively). High-dose omega-3 fatty acids did not reduce arterial PWV or markers of inflammation among patients within a Latino-predominant population with hypertension. NCT00935766 , registered July 8 2009.

  8. Reduction of plasma aldosterone and arterial stiffness in obese pre- and stage1 hypertensive subjects after aerobic exercise

    PubMed Central

    Collier, SR; Sandberg, K; Moody, AM; Frechette, V; Curry, CD; Ji, H; Gowdar, R; Chaudhuri, D; Meucci, M

    2017-01-01

    Obesity-related hypertension is associated with increased activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), increasing arterial stiffness. Aerobic exercise decreases pulse wave velocity (PWV), therefore a treatment option for hypertension and obesity. Assess RAAS activity and PWV before and after 4 weeks of aerobic training in unmedicated, pre-to-stage-1 hypertensives. Ten obese subjects (52±3.2 years, body mass index=33.5±1.4) performed 30 min of aerobic exercise on a treadmill 3 days per week at 65% of peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak). Descriptive characteristics, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP), PWV, and a blood draw was performed at baseline, following the 4-week control and training interventions. No differences in descriptive characteristics during the control period were observed, however, a significant decrease in plasma aldosterone (ALDO) (255.4±75 to 215.8±66 pg ml−1, P=0.001), SBP (140±12 to 136±10.4 mm Hg; P=0.02), DBP (89±4.2 to 85±6.3 mm Hg; P =0.03) and central PWV (11.2±0.6 to 9.8±0.8 m s−1; P=0.04) was shown pre-to-post exercise training. Four weeks of moderate-intensity aerobic training in obese, hypertensives decreases plasma ALDO independently of body weight and is significantly correlated to decreases in PWV reductions. PMID:24785976

  9. Lysyl Oxidase Induces Vascular Oxidative Stress and Contributes to Arterial Stiffness and Abnormal Elastin Structure in Hypertension: Role of p38MAPK.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Revelles, Sonia; García-Redondo, Ana B; Avendaño, María S; Varona, Saray; Palao, Teresa; Orriols, Mar; Roque, Fernanda R; Fortuño, Ana; Touyz, Rhian M; Martínez-González, Jose; Salaices, Mercedes; Rodríguez, Cristina; Briones, Ana M

    2017-09-01

    Vascular stiffness, structural elastin abnormalities, and increased oxidative stress are hallmarks of hypertension. Lysyl oxidase (LOX) is an elastin crosslinking enzyme that produces H2O2 as a by-product. We addressed the interplay between LOX, oxidative stress, vessel stiffness, and elastin. Angiotensin II (Ang II)-infused hypertensive mice and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) showed increased vascular LOX expression and stiffness and an abnormal elastin structure. Mice over-expressing LOX in vascular smooth muscle cells (TgLOX) exhibited similar mechanical and elastin alterations to those of hypertensive models. LOX inhibition with β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN) attenuated mechanical and elastin alterations in TgLOX mice, Ang II-infused mice, and SHR. Arteries from TgLOX mice, Ang II-infused mice, and/or SHR exhibited increased vascular H2O2 and O2(.-) levels, NADPH oxidase activity, and/or mitochondrial dysfunction. BAPN prevented the higher oxidative stress in hypertensive models. Treatment of TgLOX and Ang II-infused mice and SHR with the mitochondrial-targeted superoxide dismutase mimetic mito-TEMPO, the antioxidant apocynin, or the H2O2 scavenger polyethylene glycol-conjugated catalase (PEG-catalase) reduced oxidative stress, vascular stiffness, and elastin alterations. Vascular p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) activation was increased in Ang II-infused and TgLOX mice and this effect was prevented by BAPN, mito-TEMPO, or PEG-catalase. SB203580, the p38MAPK inhibitor, normalized vessel stiffness and elastin structure in TgLOX mice. We identify LOX as a novel source of vascular reactive oxygen species and a new pathway involved in vascular stiffness and elastin remodeling in hypertension. LOX up-regulation is associated with enhanced oxidative stress that promotes p38MAPK activation, elastin structural alterations, and vascular stiffness. This pathway contributes to vascular abnormalities in hypertension. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 379-397.

  10. Low-sodium dietary approaches to stop hypertension diet reduces blood pressure, arterial stiffness, and oxidative stress in hypertensive heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Scott L; Seymour, E Mitchell; Brook, Robert D; Kolias, Theodore J; Sheth, Samar S; Rosenblum, Hannah R; Wells, Joanna M; Weder, Alan B

    2012-11-01

    Recent studies suggest that oxidative stress and vascular dysfunction contribute to heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF). In salt-sensitive HFPEF animal models, diets low in sodium and high in potassium, calcium, magnesium, and antioxidants attenuate oxidative stress and cardiovascular damage. We hypothesized that the sodium-restricted Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet (DASH/SRD) would have similar effects in human hypertensive HFPEF. Thirteen patients with treated hypertension and compensated HFPEF consumed the DASH/SRD for 21 days (all food/most beverages provided). The DASH/SRD reduced clinic systolic (155-138 mm Hg; P=0.02) and diastolic blood pressure (79-72 mm Hg; P=0.04), 24-hour ambulatory systolic (130-123 mm Hg; P=0.02) and diastolic blood pressure (67-62 mm Hg; P=0.02), and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (12.4-11.0 m/s; P=0.03). Urinary F2-isoprostanes decreased by 31% (209-144 pmol/mmol Cr; P=0.02) despite increased urinary aldosterone excretion. The reduction in urinary F2-isoprostanes closely correlated with the reduction in urinary sodium excretion on the DASH/SRD. In this cohort of HFPEF patients with treated hypertension, the DASH/SRD reduced systemic blood pressure, arterial stiffness, and oxidative stress. These findings are characteristic of salt-sensitive hypertension, a phenotype present in many HFPEF animal models and suggest shared pathophysiological mechanisms linking these 2 conditions. Further dietary modification studies could provide insights into the development and progression of hypertensive HFPEF.

  11. Association between long-term blood pressure control and ten-year progression in carotid arterial stiffness among hypertensive individuals: the multiethnic study of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tedla, Yacob G; Gepner, Adam D; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Colangelo, Laura; Stein, James H; Liu, Kiang; Greenland, Philip

    2017-04-01

    Arterial stiffness was shown to be higher among hypertensive patients with diabetes than those without diabetes and among older than younger hypertensive patients. We examined whether the association between long-term blood pressure (BP) control and 10-year progression in carotid arterial stiffness varies by diabetes status and age. Participants were 906 individuals with hypertension at baseline and three follow-up visits in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (mean age 63.7 years, 44% males). Participants with SBP of less than 140 mmHg and DBP of less than 90 mmHg were considered to have a controlled BP. Arterial stiffness was measured using distensibility coefficient × 10/mmHg and Young's elastic modulus (YEM × 10 mmHg) at baseline and after a mean of 9.5 years (visit 5). Multiple linear regression model was used for the analysis. Having controlled BP at three visits (distensibility coefficient: β = 3.6, P = 0.004; YEM: β = -6.8, P = 0.07) or four visits (distensibility coefficient: β = 2.4, P = 0.04; YEM: β = -6.8, P = 0.05), when compared with having uncontrolled BP at all four visit, was associated with lesser progression in arterial stiffness. In a stratified analysis, arterial stiffness progression was slower only among nondiabetics with controlled BP at three visits (distensibility coefficient: β = 4.3, P = 0.002; YEM: β = -8.8, P = 0.04) or four visits (β = 3.7, P = 0.01; YEM: β = -10.4, P = 0.01) and among those less than 70 years with controlled BP at three visits (distensibility coefficient: β = 4.9, P = 0.004; YEM: β = -10.6, P = 0.01) or four visits (distensibility coefficient: β = 2.9, P = 0.07; YEM: β = -7.6, P = 0.03). These findings suggest that controlling BP alone may not be sufficient to slow progression of arterial stiffness among hypertensive patients with concurrent diabetes and elderly hypertensive patients.

  12. Arterial stiffness in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Prenner, Stuart B; Chirinos, Julio A

    2015-02-01

    Arterial stiffness is an age-related process that is a shared consequence of numerous diseases including diabetes mellitus (DM), and is an independent predictor of mortality both in this population and in the general population. While much has been published about arterial stiffness in patients with DM, a thorough review of the current literature is lacking. Using a systematic literature search strategy, we aimed to summarize our current understanding related to arterial stiffness in DM. We review key studies demonstrating that, among patients with established DM, arterial stiffness is closely related to the progression of complications of DM, including nephropathy, retinopathy, and neuropathy. It is also becoming clear that arterial stiffness can be increased even in pre-diabetic populations with impaired glucose tolerance, and in those with the metabolic syndrome (METS), well before the onset of overt DM. Some data suggests that arterial stiffness can predict the onset of DM. However, future work is needed to further clarify whether large artery stiffness and the pulsatile hemodynamic changes that accompany it are involved in the pathogenesis of DM, and whether interventions targeting arterial stiffness are associated with improved clinical outcomes in DM. We also review of the potential mechanisms of arterial stiffness in DM, with particular emphasis on the role of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) and nitric oxide dysregulation, and address potential future directions for research.

  13. Arterial stiffness is increased in healthy subjects with a positive family history of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinbo; Wang, Hongyu; Zhao, Hongwei; Liu, Huan; Li, Lihong; Zhou, Yingyan

    2015-01-01

    A positive family history of hypertension is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We investigated the value of pulse wave velocity (PWV) in healthy subjects with a positive family history of hypertension. 255 healthy subjects (M/F: 75/180) were divided into two groups according to without (group 1) or with (group 2) a positive family history of hypertension. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (CF-PWV) was measured by Complior apparatus. Our results showed that CF-PWV was significantly higher in group 2 than in group 1 (7.90 ± 1.31 versus 7.32 ± 1.15 m/s, p < 0.001). High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) was significantly higher in group 1 than in group 2. Multiple linear regressions showed that age, family history, GLU, and MAP were independent influencing factors of CF-PWV in the entire study group. Our present study showed PWV is significantly higher in healthy subjects with a positive family history of hypertension. Family history might play an important role in this process.

  14. Lysyl Oxidase Induces Vascular Oxidative Stress and Contributes to Arterial Stiffness and Abnormal Elastin Structure in Hypertension: Role of p38MAPK

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Revelles, Sonia; García-Redondo, Ana B.; Avendaño, María S.; Varona, Saray; Palao, Teresa; Orriols, Mar; Roque, Fernanda R.; Fortuño, Ana; Touyz, Rhian M.; Martínez-González, Jose; Salaices, Mercedes

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Vascular stiffness, structural elastin abnormalities, and increased oxidative stress are hallmarks of hypertension. Lysyl oxidase (LOX) is an elastin crosslinking enzyme that produces H2O2 as a by-product. We addressed the interplay between LOX, oxidative stress, vessel stiffness, and elastin. Results: Angiotensin II (Ang II)-infused hypertensive mice and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) showed increased vascular LOX expression and stiffness and an abnormal elastin structure. Mice over-expressing LOX in vascular smooth muscle cells (TgLOX) exhibited similar mechanical and elastin alterations to those of hypertensive models. LOX inhibition with β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN) attenuated mechanical and elastin alterations in TgLOX mice, Ang II-infused mice, and SHR. Arteries from TgLOX mice, Ang II-infused mice, and/or SHR exhibited increased vascular H2O2 and O2.− levels, NADPH oxidase activity, and/or mitochondrial dysfunction. BAPN prevented the higher oxidative stress in hypertensive models. Treatment of TgLOX and Ang II-infused mice and SHR with the mitochondrial-targeted superoxide dismutase mimetic mito-TEMPO, the antioxidant apocynin, or the H2O2 scavenger polyethylene glycol-conjugated catalase (PEG-catalase) reduced oxidative stress, vascular stiffness, and elastin alterations. Vascular p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) activation was increased in Ang II-infused and TgLOX mice and this effect was prevented by BAPN, mito-TEMPO, or PEG-catalase. SB203580, the p38MAPK inhibitor, normalized vessel stiffness and elastin structure in TgLOX mice. Innovation: We identify LOX as a novel source of vascular reactive oxygen species and a new pathway involved in vascular stiffness and elastin remodeling in hypertension. Conclusion: LOX up-regulation is associated with enhanced oxidative stress that promotes p38MAPK activation, elastin structural alterations, and vascular stiffness. This pathway contributes to vascular abnormalities in

  15. Omega-3 fatty acids supplementation improves endothelial function and arterial stiffness in hypertensive patients with hypertriglyceridemia and high cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Marcela A; Medeiros, Fernanda; Trindade, Michelle; Cohen, Célia; Oigman, Wille; Neves, Mario Fritsch

    2017-01-01

    Association between hypertriglyceridemia and cardiovascular (CV) disease is still controversial. The purpose of this study was to compare omega-3 and ciprofibrate effects on the vascular structure and function in low and high CV risk hypertensive patients with hypertriglyceridemia. Twenty-nine adults with triglycerides 150-499 mg/dL were divided into low (<7.5%) and high (≥7.5%) CV risk, randomized to receive omega-3 fatty acids 1800 mg/d or ciprofibrate 100 mg/d for 12 weeks. Treatment was switched after 8-week washout. Clinical evaluation and vascular tests were assessed at baseline and after intervention. Peripheral (131 ± 3 to 125 ± 3 mm Hg, P < .05) and aortic (124 ± 3 to 118 ± 2 mg/dL, P < .05) systolic blood pressure were decreased by ciprofibrate in low-risk patients. In high-risk patients, pulse wave velocity was reduced (10.4 ± 0.4 to 9.4 ± 0.3 m/s, P < .05) and flow-mediated dilation was increased (11.1 ± 1.6 to 13.5 ± 1.2%, P < .05) by omega-3. In conclusion, omega-3 improved arterial stiffness and endothelial function, pointing out the beneficial effect of this therapy on vascular aging, in high-risk patients.

  16. Effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors on arterial stiffness in hypertension: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Mallareddy, Madhavi; Parikh, Chirag R; Peixoto, Aldo J

    2006-06-01

    Arterial stiffness is an independent cardiovascular prognostic factor and is modulated by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs). The authors performed a meta-analysis of clinical trials investigating the effects of ACEIs on pulse wave velocity (PWV) or augmentation index. The search included randomized clinical trials as well as uncontrolled studies that measured in-treatment changes in arterial stiffness. The authors performed separate analyses for carotid-femoral PWV, brachioradial PWV, and augmentation index. Average absolute and relative reduction in mean arterial pressure and PWV were -15.4 mm Hg and -13.04% and -1.15 m/s and -9.74% for carotid-femoral PWV studies; and -11.2 mm Hg and -9.3% and -1.9 m/s and -16.7% for brachioradial PWV studies. There was a greater reduction in augmentation index by ACEIs when compared with controls (-1.0% to -5.3%). The authors conclude that ACEIs have modest beneficial effects on arterial stiffness measured as PWV and augmentation index, and this effect is at least partly independent of changes in blood pressure.

  17. Vascular Health Assessment of The Hypertensive Patients (VASOTENS) Registry: Study Protocol of an International, Web-Based Telemonitoring Registry for Ambulatory Blood Pressure and Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Parati, Gianfranco; Avolio, Alberto; Rogoza, Anatoly N; Kotovskaya, Yulia V; Mulè, Giuseppe; Muiesan, Maria Lorenza; Orlova, Iana A; Grigoricheva, Elena A; Cardona Muñoz, Ernesto; Zelveian, Parounak H; Pereira, Telmo; Peixoto Maldonado, João Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypertension guidelines recommend ambulatory blood pressure (ABP), central aortic pressure (CAP), and pulse wave velocity (PWV) as parameters for estimating blood pressure (BP) control and vascular impairment. Recent advances in technology have enabled devices to combine non-invasive estimation of these parameters over the 24-hour ABP monitoring. However, currently there is limited evidence on the usefulness of such an approach for routine hypertension management. Objective We recently launched an investigator-initiated, international, multicenter, observational, prospective study, the Vascular health Assessment Of The Hypertensive patients (VASOTENS) Registry, aimed at (1) evaluating non-invasive 24-hour ABP and arterial stiffness estimates (through 24-hour pulse wave analysis, PWA) in hypertensive subjects undergoing ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) for clinical reasons; (2) assessing the changes in estimates following treatment; (3) weighing the impact of 24-hour PWA on target organ damage and cardiovascular prognosis; (4) assessing the relationship between arterial stiffness, BP absolute mean level and variability, and prognosis; and (5) validating the use of a 24-hour PWA electronic health (e-health) solution for hypertension screening. Methods Approximately 2000 subjects, referred to 20 hypertension clinics for routine diagnostic evaluation and follow-up of hypertension of any severity or stage, will be recruited. Data collection will include ABPM, performed with a device allowing simultaneous non-invasive assessment of 24-hour CAP and arterial stiffness (BPLab), and clinical data (including cardiovascular outcomes). As recommended by current guidelines, each patient will be followed-up with visits occurring at regular intervals (ideally every 6 months, and not less than once a year depending on disease severity). A Web-based telemedicine platform (THOLOMEUS) will be used for data collection. The use of the telemedicine system will allow

  18. Vascular Aging and Arterial Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Mikael, Luana de Rezende; Paiva, Anelise Machado Gomes de; Gomes, Marco Mota; Sousa, Ana Luiza Lima; Jardim, Paulo César Brandão Veiga; Vitorino, Priscila Valverde de Oliveira; Euzébio, Maicon Borges; Sousa, Wátila de Moura; Barroso, Weimar Kunz Sebba

    2017-06-29

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) account annually for almost one third of all deaths worldwide. Among the CVD, systemic arterial hypertension (SAH) is related to more than half of those outcomes. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is an independent risk factor for SAH because it causes functional and structural damage to the arterial wall, leading to stiffness. Several studies have related oxidative stress, production of free radicals, and neuroendocrine and genetic changes to the physiopathogenesis of vascular aging. Indirect ways to analyze that aging process have been widely studied, pulse wave velocity (PWV) being considered gold standard to assess arterial stiffness, because there is large epidemiological evidence of its predictive value for cardiovascular events, and it requires little technical knowledge to be performed. A pulse wave is generated during each cardiac contraction and travels along the arterial bed until finding peripheral resistance or any bifurcation point, determining the appearance of a reflected wave. In young individuals, arteries tend to be more elastic, therefore, the reflected wave occurs later in the cardiac cycle, reaching the heart during diastole. In older individuals, however, the reflected wave occurs earlier, reaching the heart during systole. Because PWV is an important biomarker of vascular damage, highly valuable in determining the patient's global cardiovascular risk, we chose to review the articles on vascular aging in the context of cardiovascular risk factors and the tools available to the early identification of that damage. Resumo As doenças cardiovasculares são anualmente responsáveis por quase um terço do total de mortes no mundo. Dentre elas, a hipertensão arterial sistêmica (HAS) está relacionada com mais da metade desses desfechos. O diabetes mellitus tipo 2 é visto com um fator de risco independente para HAS por causar lesões funcionais e estruturais na parede arterial, ocasionando-lhe enrijecimento. Diversos estudos

  19. Daily blueberry consumption improves blood pressure and arterial stiffness in postmenopausal women with pre- and stage 1-hypertension: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sarah A; Figueroa, Arturo; Navaei, Negin; Wong, Alexei; Kalfon, Roy; Ormsbee, Lauren T; Feresin, Rafaela G; Elam, Marcus L; Hooshmand, Shirin; Payton, Mark E; Arjmandi, Bahram H

    2015-03-01

    Postmenopausal women have a high prevalence of hypertension and often develop arterial stiffness thereby increasing cardiovascular disease risk. Although antihypertensive drug therapies exist, increasing numbers of people prefer natural therapies. In vivo studies and a limited number of clinical studies have demonstrated the antihypertensive and vascular-protective effects of blueberries. To examine the effects of daily blueberry consumption for 8 weeks on blood pressure and arterial stiffness in postmenopausal women with pre- and stage 1-hypertension. This was an 8-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Forty-eight postmenopausal women with pre- and stage 1-hypertension recruited from the greater Tallahassee, FL, area participated. Participants were randomly assigned to receive either 22 g freeze-dried blueberry powder or 22 g control powder. Resting brachial systolic and diastolic blood pressures were evaluated and arterial stiffness was assessed using carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity. C-reactive protein, nitric oxide, and superoxide dismutase were measured at baseline, 4 weeks, and 8 weeks. Statistical analysis was performed using a split plot model of repeated measures analysis of variance. After 8 weeks, systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure (131±17 mm Hg [P<0.05] and 75±9 mm Hg [P<0.01], respectively) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (1,401±122 cm/second; P<0.01) were significantly lower than baseline levels (138±14 mm Hg, 80±7 mm Hg, and 1,498±179 cm/second, respectively), with significant (P<0.05) group×time interactions in the blueberry powder group, whereas there were no changes in the group receiving the control powder. Nitric oxide levels were greater (15.35±11.16 μmol/L; P<0.01) in the blueberry powder group at 8 weeks compared with baseline values (9.11±7.95 μmol/L), whereas there were no changes in the control group. Daily blueberry consumption may

  20. Arterial Stiffness in Children: Pediatric Measurement and Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Savant, Jonathan D.; Furth, Susan L.; Meyers, Kevin E.C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Arterial stiffness is a natural consequence of aging, accelerated in certain chronic conditions, and predictive of cardiovascular events in adults. Emerging research suggests the importance of arterial stiffness in pediatric populations. Methods There are different indices of arterial stiffness. The present manuscript focuses on carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and pulse wave analysis, although other methodologies are discussed. Also reviewed are specific measurement considerations for pediatric populations and the literature describing arterial stiffness in children with certain chronic conditions (primary hypertension, obesity, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, hypercholesterolemia, genetic syndromes involving vasculopathy, and solid organ transplant recipients). Conclusions The measurement of arterial stiffness in children is feasible and, under controlled conditions, can give accurate information about the underlying state of the arteries. This potentially adds valuable information about the functionality of the cardiovascular system in children with a variety of chronic diseases well beyond that of the brachial artery blood pressure. PMID:26587447

  1. Arterial Stiffness in Children: Pediatric Measurement and Considerations.

    PubMed

    Savant, Jonathan D; Furth, Susan L; Meyers, Kevin E C

    2014-05-01

    Arterial stiffness is a natural consequence of aging, accelerated in certain chronic conditions, and predictive of cardiovascular events in adults. Emerging research suggests the importance of arterial stiffness in pediatric populations. There are different indices of arterial stiffness. The present manuscript focuses on carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and pulse wave analysis, although other methodologies are discussed. Also reviewed are specific measurement considerations for pediatric populations and the literature describing arterial stiffness in children with certain chronic conditions (primary hypertension, obesity, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, hypercholesterolemia, genetic syndromes involving vasculopathy, and solid organ transplant recipients). The measurement of arterial stiffness in children is feasible and, under controlled conditions, can give accurate information about the underlying state of the arteries. This potentially adds valuable information about the functionality of the cardiovascular system in children with a variety of chronic diseases well beyond that of the brachial artery blood pressure.

  2. Arterial stiffness: pathophysiology and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    London, Gérard M; Marchais, Sylvain J; Guerin, Alain P; Pannier, Bruno

    2004-01-01

    The ill effects of hypertension are usually attributed to a reduction in the caliber or the number of arterioles, resulting in an increase in total peripheral resistance (TPR). This definition does not take into account the fact that BP is a cyclic phenomenon with systolic and diastolic BP being the limits of these oscillations. The appropriate term to define the arterial factor(s) opposing LV ejection is aortic input impedance which depends on TPR, arterial distensibility (D), and wave reflections (WR). D defines the capacitive properties of arterial stiffness, whose role is to dampen pressure and flow oscillations and to transform pulsatile flow and pressure in arteries into a steady flow and pressure in peripheral tissues. Stiffness is the reciprocal value of D. These parameters are BP dependent, and arteries become stiffer at high pressure. In to D which provides information about the of artery as a hollow structure, the elastic incremental modulus (Einc) characterizes the properties of the arterial wall biomaterials, independently of vessel geometry. As an alternative, arterial D can be evaluated by measuring the pulse wave velocity (PWV) which increases with the stiffening of arteries. Arterial stiffening increases left ventricular (LV) afterload and alters the coronary perfusion. With increased PWV, the WR impacts on the aorta during systole, increasing systolic pressures and myocardial oxygen consumption, and decreasing diastolic BP and coronary flow. The arterial stiffness is altered primarily in association with increased collagen content and alterations of extracellular matrix (arteriosclerosis) as classically observed during aging or in arterial hypertension. The arterial stiffening estimated by changes in aortic PWV and intensity of WR are independent predictors of survival in end stage renal disease (ESRD) and general population. Improvement of arterial stiffening could be obtained by antihypertensive treatmen as observed with the calcium

  3. Arterial Stiffness and Cardiovascular Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Janić, Miodrag; Lunder, Mojca; Šabovič, Mišo

    2014-01-01

    The world population is aging and the number of old people is continuously increasing. Arterial structure and function change with age, progressively leading to arterial stiffening. Arterial stiffness is best characterized by measurement of pulse wave velocity (PWV), which is its surrogate marker. It has been shown that PWV could improve cardiovascular event prediction in models that included standard risk factors. Consequently, it might therefore enable better identification of populations at high-risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The present review is focused on a survey of different pharmacological therapeutic options for decreasing arterial stiffness. The influence of several groups of drugs is described: antihypertensive drugs (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, calcium channel blockers, beta-blockers, diuretics, and nitrates), statins, peroral antidiabetics, advanced glycation end-products (AGE) cross-link breakers, anti-inflammatory drugs, endothelin-A receptor antagonists, and vasopeptidase inhibitors. All of these have shown some effect in decreasing arterial stiffness. Nevertheless, further studies are needed which should address the influence of arterial stiffness diminishment on major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events (MACCE). PMID:25170513

  4. Azelnidipine plus olmesartan versus amlodipine plus olmesartan on arterial stiffness and cardiac function in hypertensive patients: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Takami, Takeshi; Saito, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    To compare the long-term effects of olmesartan combined with either azelnidipine or amlodipine on central blood pressure (CBP), left ventricular (LV) mass index (LVMI), LV diastolic function (e' velocity, E/e' ratio, E/A ratio) and arterial stiffness (brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity [baPWV] and augmentation index normalized for a heart rate of 75 bpm [AIx]). Patients with systolic BP ≥ 140 mmHg and/or diastolic BP ≥ 90 mmHg received olmesartan monotherapy (20 mg/day) for 12 weeks. They were then randomly assigned to fixed-dose add-on therapy with azelnidipine (16 mg/day; n = 26) or amlodipine (5 mg/day; n = 26) for a further 2 years. CBP, LVMI, e' velocity, E/e' ratio, E/A ratio, baPWV, and AIx were measured at baseline, 6 months, and 2 years. Baseline characteristics of both groups were similar. The decrease in brachial BP over 2 years was similar in both groups. CBP, LVMI, E/e' ratio, baPWV, and AIx decreased significantly, and the E/A ratio and e' velocity increased significantly in both groups. The decreases in CBP (P < 0.001), AIx (P < 0.001), baPWV (P < 0.001), LVMI (P < 0.001), and E/e' (P = 0.002) as well as the increase in E/A ratio (P = 0.03) over 2 years were significantly greater in the olmesartan/azelnidipine group than in the olmesartan/amlodipine group. Multivariate linear regression analyses showed that the changes in baPWV (β = 0.41, P < 0.001) and CBP (β = 0.47, P = 0.01) were independently associated with the change in LVMI, the change in baPWV (β = 0.25, P < 0.001) was independently associated with the change in E/e' ratio, and the changes in baPWV (β = 0.21, P = 0.001) and AIx (β = 0.25, P = 0.03) were independently associated with the change in E/A ratio. Treatment with olmesartan/azelnidipine for 2 years resulted in greater improvements in CBP, LVMI, and LV diastolic function, and arterial stiffness compared with olmesartan/amlodipine. Improvements in LV diastolic function were associated with improvements in arterial stiffness.

  5. Azelnidipine plus olmesartan versus amlodipine plus olmesartan on arterial stiffness and cardiac function in hypertensive patients: a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Takami, Takeshi; Saito, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To compare the long-term effects of olmesartan combined with either azelnidipine or amlodipine on central blood pressure (CBP), left ventricular (LV) mass index (LVMI), LV diastolic function (e′ velocity, E/e′ ratio, E/A ratio) and arterial stiffness (brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity [baPWV] and augmentation index normalized for a heart rate of 75 bpm [AIx]). Patients and methods Patients with systolic BP ≥ 140 mmHg and/or diastolic BP ≥ 90 mmHg received olmesartan monotherapy (20 mg/day) for 12 weeks. They were then randomly assigned to fixed-dose add-on therapy with azelnidipine (16 mg/day; n = 26) or amlodipine (5 mg/day; n = 26) for a further 2 years. CBP, LVMI, e′ velocity, E/e′ ratio, E/A ratio, baPWV, and AIx were measured at baseline, 6 months, and 2 years. Results Baseline characteristics of both groups were similar. The decrease in brachial BP over 2 years was similar in both groups. CBP, LVMI, E/e′ ratio, baPWV, and AIx decreased significantly, and the E/A ratio and e′ velocity increased significantly in both groups. The decreases in CBP (P < 0.001), AIx (P < 0.001), baPWV (P < 0.001), LVMI (P < 0.001), and E/e′ (P = 0.002) as well as the increase in E/A ratio (P = 0.03) over 2 years were significantly greater in the olmesartan/azelnidipine group than in the olmesartan/amlodipine group. Multivariate linear regression analyses showed that the changes in baPWV (β = 0.41, P < 0.001) and CBP (β = 0.47, P = 0.01) were independently associated with the change in LVMI, the change in baPWV (β = 0.25, P < 0.001) was independently associated with the change in E/e′ ratio, and the changes in baPWV (β = 0.21, P = 0.001) and AIx (β = 0.25, P = 0.03) were independently associated with the change in E/A ratio. Conclusion Treatment with olmesartan/azelnidipine for 2 years resulted in greater improvements in CBP, LVMI, and LV diastolic function, and arterial stiffness compared with olmesartan/amlodipine. Improvements in LV diastolic

  6. Large artery stiffness: implications for exercise capacity and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Kingwell, Bronwyn A

    2002-03-01

    1. Large artery stiffness, or its inverse, compliance, determines pulse pressure, which, in turn, influences myocardial work capacity and coronary perfusion, both of which impact on exercise capacity and cardiovascular risk. 2. In support of a role for arterial properties in exercise performance, aerobically trained athletes (aged 30-59 years) have lower arterial stiffness than their sedentary counterparts. Furthermore, in healthy older subjects (aged 57-80 years), time to exhaustion on treadmill testing correlated positively with arterial compliance. 3. Arterial stiffness is more closely linked to exercise capacity and myocardial risk in patients with coronary disease where, independently of degree of coronary disease, those with stiffer proximal arteries have a lower exercise-induced ischaemic threshold. 4. Moderate aerobic training elevates resting arterial compliance by approximately 30%, independently of mean pressure reduction, in young healthy individuals but not in isolated systolic hypertensive patients. Rat training studies support a role for exercise training in structural remodelling of the large arteries. 5. High-resistance strength training is associated with stiffer large arteries and higher pulse pressure than matched controls. 6. Large artery stiffness is an important modulator of the myocardial blood supply and demand equation, with significant ramifications for athletic performance and ischaemic threshold in coronary disease patients. Moderate aerobic training, but not high-resistance strength training, reduces large artery stiffness in young individuals whereas older subjects with established isolated systolic hypertension are resistant to such adaptation.

  7. Adrenalectomy improves arterial stiffness in primary aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Strauch, Branislav; Petrák, Ondrej; Zelinka, Tomás; Wichterle, Dan; Holaj, Robert; Kasalický, Mojmír; Safarík, Libor; Rosa, Ján; Widimský, Jirí

    2008-10-01

    BackgroundAldosterone has been shown to substantially contribute to the accumulation of different types of collagen fibers and growth factors in the arterial wall, which increase wall stiffness. We previously showed that arterial wall stiffness is increased in primary aldosteronism (PA) independently of concomitant hypertension. This study was aimed at assessing the effects of specific treatment of PA on the arterial stiffness.MethodsTwenty-nine patients with confirmed PA (15 with aldosterone-producing adenoma treated by unilateral laparoscopic adrenalectomy, 14 treated with spironolactone (mainly idiopathic aldosteronism) were investigated by Sphygmocor applanation tonometer (using measurement of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AI)) at the time of the diagnosis and then approximately 1 year after the specific treatment.ResultsThe office blood pressure (BP) decreased from 167 +/- 18/96 +/- 9 to 136 +/- 12/80 +/- 7 mm Hg after adrenalectomy (P = 0.001), and from 165 +/- 21/91 +/- 13 to 151 +/- 22/88 +/- 8 mm Hg (not significant (n.s.)) on spironolactone. The mean 24-h BP decreased from 150 +/- 18/93 +/- 11 mm Hg to 126 +/- 17/80 +/- 10 mm Hg after adrenalectomy (P < 0.01), and from 155 +/- 16/94 +/- 12 to 139 +/- 18/88 +/- 8 mm Hg (n.s.) on spironolactone. The PWV significantly decreased after surgery from 9.5 +/- 2.7 m/s to 7.6 +/- 2 m/s (P = 0.001), and the AI (recalculated for heart rate 75/min) decreased significantly from 27 +/- 10 to 19 +/- 9% (P < 0.01). On the other hand, we did not find significant change of arterial stiffness indices in patients treated with spironolactone (PWV: 9.3 +/- 1.6 m/s vs. 8.8 +/- 1.3 m/s (n.s.); AI: 25 +/- 9% vs. 25 +/- 8% (n.s.)).ConclusionsSurgical but not conservative treatment of PA led to a significant decrease of BP and arterial stiffness parameters.American Journal of Hypertension (2008). doi:10.1038/ajh.2008.243American Journal of Hypertension (2008); 21, 10, 1086-1092. doi 10.1038/ajh

  8. Large Artery Stiffness Assessment Using SphygmoCor Technology

    PubMed Central

    Butlin, Mark; Qasem, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Large artery stiffness assessment has been an integral part of the SphygmoCor technology since 1998. Aortic stiffness is approximated with non-invasive measurement of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, with improvements made with time to make the assessment procedure quicker and more user independent. Also standard in the devices is the ability to reliably calculate the central aortic waveform shape from a peripheral pressure waveform from either the brachial or radial artery. This waveform contains much information beyond peak and trough (systolic and diastolic pressure). Relative waveform features such as the augmentation index, wave reflection magnitude, reflection time index, and subendocardial viability ratio are parameters that are influenced by the stiffness of systemic arteries. This article briefly describes these parameters related to large artery stiffness and provides reference to validation and repeatability studies relative to the clinical use of the SphygmoCor devices. It is beyond the scope to review here the 424 original research articles that have employed SphygmoCor devices in measuring arterial stiffness. Instead, the method of measurement across the devices is described, including tonometry, volumetric displacement through cuff placement around limbs, and ambulatory monitoring. Key population and subpopulation studies are cited where the average stiffness parameter progression with age and gender, as measured by SphygmoCor devices, is quantified in the healthy and general population. Finally, with reference to guidelines from working groups on arterial stiffness and hypertension, the clinical utility of large artery stiffness measurement is discussed in the context of the arterial stiffness parameters provided by the SphygmoCor systems. PMID:28229053

  9. Psychological Stress and Arterial Stiffness in Korean Americans

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Jeongok G; Barksdale, Debra J; Carlson, John; Carlson, Barbara W; Rowsey, Pamela J

    2012-01-01

    Objective Arterial stiffness is identified as a causative factor for hypertension. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between psychological stress and arterial stiffness in Korean Americans. Methods A convenience sample of 102 Korean Americans (aged 21–60 years, 60% women) was recruited from North Carolina. Psychological stress was measured by the Perceived Stress Scale, the Social, Attitudinal, Familiar, and Environmental (SAFE) Acculturative Stress Scale, and the Spielberger’s State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Arterial stiffness was measured by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) using the SphygmoCor system (AtCor Medical, Australia). Results This study shows that the emotional stress response, measured by anxiety, significantly predicted arterial stiffness (β= .25, p=.008), independently of such confounding factors as age, mean arterial pressure (MAP), gender, body mass index, smoking, education, and income. Anxiety was neither related to age (r=.12, p=.212) nor MAP (r=.14, p=.151). Additionally, this sample of Korean Americans had higher levels of psychological stress when compared to previous findings from studies of other racial/ethnic groups in the U.S. Conclusion Findings demonstrate that anxiety is a significant and independent determinant of arterial stiffness. Given that anxiety was not related to MAP, these findings suggest that arterial stiffness may be a pathway to explain the connection between anxiety and hypertension risk. Studies that scrutinize the relationship between anxiety and arterial stiffness are an important next step for future research. Further studies are also recommended to explore cultural factors and individual characteristics that may affect anxiety in Korean Americans. PMID:22691560

  10. Flavonoids and arterial stiffness: promising perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lilamand, M; Kelaiditi, E; Guyonnet, S; Antonelli Incalzi, R; Raynaud-Simon, A; Vellas, B; Cesari, M

    2014-07-01

    Flavonoids are a group of polyphenol compounds, ubiquitously found in plants. Great emphasis has been given to their possible benefits for cardiovascular health. These beneficial effects may be mediated by a specific action on arterial walls. Arterial stiffness is a marker of vascular aging, increasingly used in the clinical setting and assessed by pulse wave velocity. It has shown to be a robust predictor of cardiovascular events and mortality. This review aims at providing a comprehensive evaluation of available intervention and observational studies examining the relationship between flavonoid consumption and arterial stiffness. A Medline(®) literature search was performed using the keywords "arterial stiffness" and "flavonoids". As a result, 2 cross-sectional and 16 intervention studies assessing the relationship between flavonoids intake and arterial stiffness were retained. Four intervention trials reported a significant decrease of arterial stiffness after a flavonoid-based intervention, independently from blood pressure changes. The two observational studies reported significant associations between a higher flavonoid consumption and a lower arterial stiffness. In this review, isoflavones, anthocyanins and to a lesser extent cocoa flavan-3-ols appeared to be the more efficient to improve vascular function. Despite their heterogeneity, preliminary data seem to support an improvement of the arterial stiffness related to flavonoid intake. However, further research on absorption and dose-response effects of the specific flavonoid subclasses on arterial structure is warranted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Crosstalk between oxidative and nitrosative stress and arterial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Mozos, Ioana; Luca, Constantin Tudor

    2017-02-01

    Arterial stiffness, the expression of reduced arterial elasticity, is an effective predictor of cardiovascular disorders. Oxidative stress is an imbalance between exposure to toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant systems. The increase in reactive nitrogen species (RNS) is termed nitrosative stress. We review the main mechanisms and products linking arterial stiffness with oxidative and nitrosative stress in several disorders, focusing on recent experimental and clinical data, and the mechanisms explaining benefits of antioxidant therapy. Oxidative and nitrosative stress play important roles in arterial stiffness elevation in several disorders, including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, metabolic syndrome, obesity, peripheral arterial disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, thalassemia, Kawasaki disease and malignant disorders. Oxidative and nitrosative stress are responsible for endothelial dysfunction due to uncoupling of the nitric oxide synthase, oxidative damage to lipids, proteins and DNA in vascular endothelial cells, associated with inflammation, arteriosclerosis and atherosclerosis. Regular physical exercise, caloric restriction, red wine, statins, sartans, metformin, oestradiol, curcumin and combinations of antioxidant vitamins are therapeutic strategies that may decrease arterial stiffness and oxidative stress thus reducing the risk of cardiovascular events. ROS and RNS represent potential therapeutic targets for preventing progression of arterial stiffness.

  12. Caffeine increases aortic stiffness in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Hirata, Kozo; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Toutouzas, Pavlos; O'Rourke, Michael F

    2003-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used pharmacologic substance. Aortic stiffness is an important factor for cardiovascular system performance and a prognosticator of cardiovascular risk. We investigated the effect of caffeine on aortic stiffness in treated hypertensive patients. We studied the effect of caffeine (250 mg) in 12 treated hypertensive patients according to a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, cross-over design during a 3-h period. Aortic stiffness was evaluated by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity. Systolic blood pressure (BP) and pulse pressure increased significantly throughout the study (by 12.3 and 7.4 mm Hg, P =.005 and P <.01, respectively), whereas diastolic BP did not change. Pulse wave velocity increased (by 0.57 m/sec, P <.05) denoting an increase in aortic stiffness. This effect of caffeine lasted throughout the study (3 h), peaking at 60 min and decreasing progressively thereafter. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that caffeine exerts an acute unfavorable effect on aortic stiffness in treated hypertensive patients. This finding has important implications for the impact of caffeine consumption on cardiovascular risk in hypertension.

  13. Physical inactivity and arterial stiffness in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Sievi, Noriane A; Franzen, Daniel; Kohler, Malcolm; Clarenbach, Christian F

    2015-01-01

    Background Arterial stiffness is an important predictor of cardiovascular risk besides classic cardiovascular risk factors. Previous studies showed that arterial stiffness is increased in patients with COPD compared to healthy controls and exercise training may reduce arterial stiffness. Since physical inactivity is frequently observed in patients with COPD and exercise training may improve arterial stiffness, we hypothesized that low daily physical activity may be associated with increased arterial stiffness. Methods In 123 patients with COPD (72% men; mean [standard deviation] age: 62 [7.5] years; median [quartile] forced expiratory volume in 1 second 35 [27/65] %predicted), arterial stiffness was assessed by augmentation index (AI). Daily physical activity level (PAL) was measured by an activity monitor (SenseWear Pro™) >1 week. The association between AI and PAL was investigated by univariate and multivariate regression analysis, taking into account disease-specific characteristics and comorbidities. Results Patients suffered from moderate (35%), severe (32%), and very severe (33%) COPD, and 22% were active smokers. Median (quartile) PAL was 1.4 (1.3/1.5) and mean (standard deviation) AI 26% (9.2%). PAL showed a negative association with AI (B=−9.32, P=0.017) independent of age, sex, blood pressure, and airflow limitation. Conclusion In COPD patients, a higher PAL seems to favorably influence arterial stiffness and therefore may reduce cardiovascular risk. Clinical Trial Registration http://www.ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01527773 PMID:26392763

  14. A Review of Genetics, Arterial Stiffness, and Blood Pressure in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Jennifer L.; Duprez, Daniel A.; Barac, Ana; Rich, Stephen S.

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of hypertension in African Americans in the United States is amongst the highest in the world and increasing. The identification of genes and pathways regulating blood pressure in African Americans has been challenging. An early predictor of hypertension is arterial stiffness. The prevalence of arterial stiffness is significantly higher in African Americans compared to Caucasians. Approximately 20% of the variance in arterial stiffness is estimated to be heritable. Identifying genes and biological pathways regulating arterial stiffness may provide insight into the genetics underlying the increased risk of hypertension in African Americans. This paper reviews the genetic findings to date in the area of arterial stiffness and blood pressure in African Americans with an emphasis on the current limitations and new efforts to move the field forward. PMID:22492025

  15. Arterial stiffness profiles: investigating various sections of the arterial tree of African and Caucasian people.

    PubMed

    Schutte, Aletta E; Huisman, Hugo W; Schutte, Rudolph; Van Rooyen, Johannes M; Malan, Leoné; Malan, Nicolaas T; Reimann, Manja

    2011-01-01

    In Africans, arterial stiffness progression seems more pronounced compared to Caucasians. We compared the arterial stiffness profiles of different age groups and focused on muscular arteries and two more central arterial segments in African and Caucasian people from South Africa. In African (N = 374) and Caucasian (N = 376) participants (20-70 years), we measured carotid-radial (C-R) and carotid-dorsalis pedis (C-DP) pulse wave velocity (PWV) and aortic characteristic impedance (Zao). Major findings were that normotensive and high-normal/hypertensive (HT) Caucasians indicated increased trends of C-R PWV with aging (P = .029 and P = .067), not seen in the African groups (P = .122 and P = .526). Both ethnic groups showed significant increases of C-DP PWV and Zao with aging. High-normal/hypertensive Africans had significantly stiffer arteries than hypertensive Caucasians for almost all age groups, and for all stiffness measures. African C-R PWV correlated significantly with blood pressure (BP), but not with age. Opposite results were observed for Caucasians. In conclusion, the stiffness of muscular arteries is already elevated in young Africans, in both those with normal or elevated BP. This is possibly due to an earlier deterioration during childhood, or perhaps already present from birth. Also, in Caucasians stiffness seems more age-related, while in Africans it seems to be more pressure-related.

  16. Arterial Stiffness and Cardiovascular Autonomic Dysfunction in Patients with Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong-Seok; Lee, Si-Hoon; Oh, Yoon-Sang; Park, Jeong-Wook; An, Jae-Young; Choi, Hyun-Seok; Lee, Kwang-Soo

    2017-01-01

    Pulse wave velocity is a marker of arterial stiffness and a surrogate marker of vascular damage. Autonomic abnormalities associated with blood pressure are relatively commonly observed in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). The purpose of this study was to compare arterial stiffness between patients with PD and controls and investigate the associations between cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction and pulse wave velocity in PD. One hundred twenty-five PD patients without diabetes mellitus were enrolled into this study, along with 22 age-matched controls. Orthostatic vital signs and ambulatory 24-hour blood pressure monitoring values were recorded. Pulse wave velocity was used to evaluate arterial stiffness. In PD, greater arterial stiffness was associated with orthostatic hypotension, supine hypertension, nocturnal hypertension, and nondipping. Dopaminergic treatment did not influence cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction or arterial stiffness. Although pulse wave velocity was mildly increased in patients with PD compared to controls, the arterial stiffness in PD patients without autonomic failure was similar to that in normal controls. Stiffer arteries were found only in patients with PD and autonomic failure. These findings suggest that cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction is associated with arterial stiffness in PD. PD itself does not affect arterial stiffness, whereas autonomic blood pressure disturbances influence alterations in arterial stiffness and architectural changes in the arteries of PD patients. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Pressure-dependence of arterial stiffness: potential clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Spronck, Bart; Heusinkveld, Maarten H G; Vanmolkot, Floris H; Roodt, Jos Op 't; Hermeling, Evelien; Delhaas, Tammo; Kroon, Abraham A; Reesink, Koen D

    2015-02-01

    Arterial stiffness measures such as pulse wave velocity (PWV) have a known dependence on actual blood pressure, requiring consideration in cardiovascular risk assessment and management. Given the impact of ageing on arterial wall structure, the pressure-dependence of PWV may vary with age. Using a noninvasive model-based approach, combining carotid artery echo-tracking and tonometry waveforms, we obtained pressure-area curves in 23 hypertensive patients at baseline and after 3 months of antihypertensive treatment. We predicted the follow-up PWV decrease using modelled baseline curves and follow-up pressures. In addition, on the basis of these curves, we estimated PWV values for two age groups (mean ages 41 and 64 years) at predefined hypertensive (160/90 mmHg) and normotensive (120/80 mmHg) pressure ranges. Follow-up measurements showed a near 1 m/s decrease in carotid PWV when compared with baseline, which fully agreed with our model-prediction given the roughly 10 mmHg decrease in diastolic pressure. The stiffness-blood pressure-age pattern was in close agreement with corresponding data from the 'Reference Values for Arterial Stiffness' study, linking the physical and empirical bases of our findings. Our study demonstrates that the innate pressure-dependence of arterial stiffness may have implications for the clinical use of arterial stiffness measurements, both in risk assessment and in treatment monitoring of individual patients. We propose a number of clinically feasible approaches to account for the blood pressure effect on PWV measurements.

  18. The association between oxidative stress, activator protein-1, inflammatory, total antioxidant status and artery stiffness and the efficacy of olmesartan in elderly patients with mild-to-moderate essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qunwei; Han, Limin; Du, Qiufan; Zhang, Ming; Zhou, Shenghua; Shen, Xiangqian

    This study investigated the change of oxidative stress, activator protein-1 (AP-1), inflammatory, total antioxidant status (TAS) and artery stiffness, and explored the relationship between these characteristics and the efficacy of olmesartan intervention in elderly patients with mild-to-moderate essential hypertension (EH). In total, 386 elderly patients with EH and 353 normotensive controls were recruited. All study subjects had oxidative stress markers, AP-1, inflammatory factors, TAS and brancial-ankle artery pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV) measured. In total, 193 elderly patients with EH were randomized to olmesartan and were matched with 193 normotensive controls to observe the change of index above mentioned before and after the treatment. Compared with the controls, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and TAS were significantly reduced in patients with EH, and malondialdehyde (MDA), AP-1, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP), Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1), heart rate, endothelin-1 (ET-1), TAS and ba-PWV were significantly increased (P < 0.01 for all). Pearson's correlation analysis showed that SOD and TAS were negatively related to AP-1 (P < 0.05 for all), and that blood pressure (BP), age, MDA, Hs-CRP, MCP-1, ET-1 were positively related to AP-1 (P < 0.01 for all). Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that BP, SOD, MDA, AP-1, Hs-CRP, MCP-1, ET-1, TAS, heart rate and age were independent risk factors for ba-PWV. After treatment with olmesartan, SOD and TAS were increased, while BP, heart rate, AP-1 and inflammatory factors were reduced with significant improvement in ba-PWV (P < 0.05 for all). More increase of arterial stiffness was reported in elderly hypertensive patients with greater oxidative stress, inflammatory, AP-1, heart rate, and lower TAS. Higher oxidative stress, AP-1 and inflammatory may predict higher arterial stiffness. Olmesartan may increase TAS, yet inhibit oxidative stress, AP-1, inflammatory, and heart rate with

  19. Association between arterial stiffness and peripheral artery disease as measured by radial artery tonometry.

    PubMed

    Zahner, Greg J; Gruendl, Magdalena A; Spaulding, Kimberly A; Schaller, Melinda S; Hills, Nancy K; Gasper, Warren J; Grenon, S Marlene

    2017-07-26

    Arterial stiffness and peripheral artery disease (PAD) are both associated with an elevated risk of major adverse cardiac events; however, the association between arterial stiffness and PAD is less well characterized. The goal of this study was to examine the association between parameters of radial artery tonometry, a noninvasive measure of arterial stiffness, and PAD. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 134 vascular surgery outpatients (controls, 33; PAD, 101) using arterial applanation tonometry. Central augmentation index (AIX) normalized to 75 beats/min and peripheral AIX were measured using radial artery pulse wave analysis. Pulse wave velocity was recorded at the carotid and femoral arteries. PAD was defined as symptomatic claudication with an ankle-brachial index of <0.9 or a history of peripheral revascularization. Controls had no history of atherosclerotic vascular disease and an ankle-brachial index ≥0.9. Among the 126 participants with high-quality tonometry data, compared with controls (n = 33), patients with PAD (n = 93) were older, with higher rates of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and smoking (P < .05). Patients with PAD also had greater arterial stiffness as measured by central AIX, peripheral AIX, and pulse wave velocity (P < .05). In a multivariable model, a significantly increased odds of PAD was associated with each 10-unit increase in central AIX (odds ratio, 2.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-3.9; P = .03) and peripheral AIX (odds ratio, 1.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-3.2; P = .01). In addition, central and peripheral AIX were highly correlated (r120 = 0.76; P < .001). In a cross-sectional analysis, arterial stiffness as measured by the AIX is independently associated with PAD, even when adjusting for several atherosclerotic risk factors. Further prospective data are needed to establish whether radial artery tonometry could be a tool for risk stratification in the PAD population. Copyright © 2017 Society for

  20. Arterial Stiffness in Nonhypertensive Type 2 Diabetes Patients in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Antwi, Daniel A.; Gyan, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Background. Increased arterial stiffness is an independent cardiovascular risk factor in diabetes patients and general population. However, the contribution of diabetes to arterial stiffness is often masked by coexistent obesity and hypertension. In this study, we assessed arterial stiffness in nonhypertensive, nonobese type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients in Ghana. Methods. In case-control design, 166 nonhypertensive, nonobese participants, comprising 96 T2DM patients and 70 nondiabetes controls, were recruited. Peripheral and central blood pressure (BP) indices were measured, and arterial stiffness was assessed as aortic pulse wave velocity (PWVao), augmentation index (AIx), cardioankle vascular index (CAVI), and heart-ankle pulse wave velocity (haPWV). Results. With similar peripheral and central BP indices, T2DM patients had higher PWVao (8.3 ± 1 versus 7.8 ± 1.3, p = 0.044) and CAVI (7.9 ± 1.2 versus 6.9 ± 0.7, p = 0.021) than nondiabetic control. AIx and haPWV were similar between T2DM and nondiabetic controls. Multiple regression models showed that, in the entire study participants, the major determinants of PWVao were diabetes status, age, gender, systolic BP, and previous smoking status (β = 0.22, 0.36, 0.48, 0.21, and 0.25, resp.; all p < 0.05); the determinants of CAVI were diabetes status, age, BMI, heart rate, HbA1c, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and previous smoking status (β = 0.21, 0.38, 0.2, 0.18, 0.24. 0.2, −0.19, and 0.2, resp.; all p < 0.05). Conclusion. Our findings suggest that nonhypertensive, nonobese T2DM patients have increased arterial stiffness without appreciable increase in peripheral and central pressure indices. PMID:27774104

  1. Pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease leading to right heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. The first classification of PH was proposed in 1973. In 2008, the fourth World Symposium on PH held in Dana Point (California, USA) revised previous classifications. Currently, PH is devided into five subgroups. Group 1 includes patients suffering from idiopathic or familial PAH with or without germline mutations. Patients with a diagnosis of PAH should systematically been screened regarding to underlying mutations of BMPR2 gene (bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2) or more rarely of ACVRL1 (activine receptor-like kinase type 1), ENG (endogline) or Smad8 genes. Pulmonary veno occusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemagiomatosis are individualized and designated as clinical group 1'. Group 2 'Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases' is divided into three sub-groups: systolic dysfonction, diastolic dysfonction and valvular dysfonction. Group 3 'Pulmonary hypertension due to respiratory diseases' includes a heterogenous subgroup of respiratory diseases like PH due to pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, lung emphysema or interstitial lung disease for exemple. Group 4 includes chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension without any distinction of proximal or distal forms. Group 5 regroup PH patients with unclear multifactorial mechanisms. Invasive hemodynamic assessment with right heart catheterization is requested to confirm the definite diagnosis of PH showing a resting mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of ≥ 25 mmHg and a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of ≤ 15 mmHg. The assessment of PCWP may allow the distinction between pre-capillary and post-capillary PH (PCWP > 15 mmHg). Echocardiography is an important tool in the management of patients with underlying suspicion of PH. The European Society of Cardiology and the European Respiratory Society (ESC-ERS) guidelines specify its role

  2. Pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Montani, David; Günther, Sven; Dorfmüller, Peter; Perros, Frédéric; Girerd, Barbara; Garcia, Gilles; Jaïs, Xavier; Savale, Laurent; Artaud-Macari, Elise; Price, Laura C; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gérald; Sitbon, Olivier

    2013-07-06

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease leading to right heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. The first classification of PH was proposed in 1973. In 2008, the fourth World Symposium on PH held in Dana Point (California, USA) revised previous classifications. Currently, PH is devided into five subgroups. Group 1 includes patients suffering from idiopathic or familial PAH with or without germline mutations. Patients with a diagnosis of PAH should systematically been screened regarding to underlying mutations of BMPR2 gene (bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2) or more rarely of ACVRL1 (activine receptor-like kinase type 1), ENG (endogline) or Smad8 genes. Pulmonary veno occusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemagiomatosis are individualized and designated as clinical group 1'. Group 2 'Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases' is divided into three sub-groups: systolic dysfonction, diastolic dysfonction and valvular dysfonction. Group 3 'Pulmonary hypertension due to respiratory diseases' includes a heterogenous subgroup of respiratory diseases like PH due to pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, lung emphysema or interstitial lung disease for exemple. Group 4 includes chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension without any distinction of proximal or distal forms. Group 5 regroup PH patients with unclear multifactorial mechanisms. Invasive hemodynamic assessment with right heart catheterization is requested to confirm the definite diagnosis of PH showing a resting mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of ≥ 25 mmHg and a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of ≤ 15 mmHg. The assessment of PCWP may allow the distinction between pre-capillary and post-capillary PH (PCWP > 15 mmHg). Echocardiography is an important tool in the management of patients with underlying suspicion of PH. The European Society of Cardiology and the European Respiratory Society (ESC-ERS) guidelines specify its role

  3. Early intervention of long-acting nifedipine GITS reduces brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and improves arterial stiffness in Chinese patients with mild hypertension: a 24-week, single-arm, open-label, prospective study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jidong; Wang, Yan; Hu, Haijuan; Yang, Xiaohong; Tian, Zejun; Liu, Demin; Gu, Guoqiang; Zheng, Hongmei; Xie, Ruiqin; Cui, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Nifedipine gastrointestinal therapeutic system (GITS) is used to treat angina and hypertension. The authors aimed to study the early intervention impact on arterial stiffness and pulse wave velocity (PWV) independent of its blood-pressure-(BP) lowering effect in mild hypertensive patients. This single-center, single-arm, open-label, prospective, Phase IV study recruited patients with mild hypertension and increased PWV from December 2013 to December 2014 (N=138; age, 18-75 years; systolic blood pressure, 140-160 mmHg; diastolic BP, 90-100 mmHg; increased brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity [baPWV, ≥12 m/s]). Nifedipine GITS (30 mg/d) was administered for 24 weeks to achieve target BP of <140/90 mmHg. The dose was uptitrated at 60 mg/d in case of unsatisfactory BP reduction after 4 weeks. Primary study end point was the change in baPWV after nifedipine GITS treatment. Hemodynamic parameters (office BP, 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring, and heart rate and adverse events) were evaluated at baseline and followed-up at 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 weeks. Majority of patients (n=117; 84.8%) completed the study. baPWV decreased significantly at 4 weeks compared with baseline (1,598.87±239.82 vs 1,500.89±241.15 cm/s, P<0.001), was stable at 12 weeks (1,482.24±215.14 cm/s, P<0.001), and remained steady through 24 weeks (1,472.58±205.01 cm/s, P<0.001). Office BP reduced from baseline to week 4 (154/95 vs 136/85 mmHg) and remained steady until 24 weeks. Nifedipine GITS significantly decreased 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring (P<0.001) after 24 weeks from baseline. Mean arterial pressure and pulse pressure were lowered significantly after 4, 12, and 24 weeks of treatment (P<0.001). These changes in baPWV were significantly correlated with changes in systolic blood pressure, diastolic BP, and mean arterial pressure (P<0.05), but not with changes in pulse pressure (P>0.05). There were no other drug-related serious adverse events. Nifedipine GITS was considerably effective in

  4. Early intervention of long-acting nifedipine GITS reduces brachial–ankle pulse wave velocity and improves arterial stiffness in Chinese patients with mild hypertension: a 24-week, single-arm, open-label, prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jidong; Wang, Yan; Hu, Haijuan; Yang, Xiaohong; Tian, Zejun; Liu, Demin; Gu, Guoqiang; Zheng, Hongmei; Xie, Ruiqin; Cui, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background Nifedipine gastrointestinal therapeutic system (GITS) is used to treat angina and hypertension. The authors aimed to study the early intervention impact on arterial stiffness and pulse wave velocity (PWV) independent of its blood-pressure-(BP) lowering effect in mild hypertensive patients. Methods This single-center, single-arm, open-label, prospective, Phase IV study recruited patients with mild hypertension and increased PWV from December 2013 to December 2014 (N=138; age, 18–75 years; systolic blood pressure, 140–160 mmHg; diastolic BP, 90–100 mmHg; increased brachial–ankle pulse wave velocity [baPWV, ≥12 m/s]). Nifedipine GITS (30 mg/d) was administered for 24 weeks to achieve target BP of <140/90 mmHg. The dose was uptitrated at 60 mg/d in case of unsatisfactory BP reduction after 4 weeks. Primary study end point was the change in baPWV after nifedipine GITS treatment. Hemodynamic parameters (office BP, 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring, and heart rate and adverse events) were evaluated at baseline and followed-up at 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 weeks. Results Majority of patients (n=117; 84.8%) completed the study. baPWV decreased significantly at 4 weeks compared with baseline (1,598.87±239.82 vs 1,500.89±241.15 cm/s, P<0.001), was stable at 12 weeks (1,482.24±215.14 cm/s, P<0.001), and remained steady through 24 weeks (1,472.58±205.01 cm/s, P<0.001). Office BP reduced from baseline to week 4 (154/95 vs 136/85 mmHg) and remained steady until 24 weeks. Nifedipine GITS significantly decreased 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring (P<0.001) after 24 weeks from baseline. Mean arterial pressure and pulse pressure were lowered significantly after 4, 12, and 24 weeks of treatment (P<0.001). These changes in baPWV were significantly correlated with changes in systolic blood pressure, diastolic BP, and mean arterial pressure (P<0.05), but not with changes in pulse pressure (P>0.05). There were no other drug-related serious adverse events. Conclusion

  5. Update in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mejía Chew, C R; Alcolea Batres, S; Ríos Blanco, J J

    2016-11-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a rare and progressive disease that mainly affects the pulmonary arterioles (precapillary), regardless of the triggering aetiology. The prevalence of pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary arterial hypertension in Spain is estimated at 19.2 and 16 cases per million inhabitants, respectively. The diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension is based on haemodynamic criteria (mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥25mmHg, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure ≤15mmHg and pulmonary vascular resistance >3 Wood units) and therefore requires the implementation of right cardiac catheterisation. Sequential therapy with a single drug has been used in clinical practice. However, recent European guidelines recommend combined initial therapy in some situations. This review conducts a critical update of our knowledge of this disease according to the latest guidelines and recommendations.

  6. Effects of safflower seed extract on arterial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Katsuya; Tsubaki, Shigekazu; Fujita, Masami; Koyama, Naoto; Takahashi, Michio; Takazawa, Kenji

    2010-11-03

    Safflower seed extract (SSE) contains characteristic polyphenols and serotonin derivatives (N-( p-coumaroyl) serotonin and N-feruloylserotonin), which are reported to inhibit oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), formation of atherosclerotic plaques, and improve arterial stiffness as assessed by pulse wave analysis in animal models. The effects of long-term supplementation with SSE on arterial stiffness in human subjects were evaluated. This doubleblind, placebo-controlled study was conducted in 77 males (35-65 years) and 15 postmenopausal females (55-65 years) with high-normal blood pressure or mild hypertension who were not undergoing treatment. Subjects received SSE (70 mg/day as serotonin derivatives) or placebo for 12 weeks, and pulse wave measurements, ie, second derivative of photoplethysmogram (SDPTG), augmentation index, and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) were conducted at baseline, and at weeks 4, 8, and 12. Vascular age estimated by SDPTG aging index improved in the SSE-supplemented group when compared with the placebo group at four (P = 0.0368) and 12 weeks (P = 0.0927). The trend of augmentation index reduction (P = 0.072 versus baseline) was observed in the SSE-supplemented group, but reduction of baPWV by SSE supplementation was not observed. The SSE-supplemented group also showed a trend towards a lower malondialdehyde-modified-LDL autoantibody titer at 12 weeks from baseline. These results suggest long-term ingestion of SSE in humans could help to improve arterial stiffness.

  7. Stiffness Indices and Fractal Dimension relationship in Arterial Pressure and Diameter Time Series in-Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cymberknop, L.; Legnani, W.; Pessana, F.; Bia, D.; Zócalo, Y.; Armentano, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    The advent of vascular diseases, such as hypertension and atherosclerosis, is associated to significant alterations in the physical properties of arterial vessels. Evaluation of arterial biomechanical behaviour is related to the assessment of three representative indices: arterial compliance, arterial distensibility and arterial stiffness index. Elasticity is the most important mechanical property of the arterial wall, whose natures is strictly non-linear. Intervention of elastin and collagen fibres, passive constituent elements of the arterial wall, is related to the applied wall stress level. Concerning this, appropriate tools are required to analyse the temporal dynamics of the signals involved, in order to characterize the whole phenomenon. Fractal geometry can be mentioned as one of those techniques. The aim of this study consisted on arterial pressure and diameter signals processing, by means of nonlinear techniques based on fractal geometry. Time series morphology was related to different arterial stiffness states, generated by means of blood flow variations, during experiences performed in vitro.

  8. Long sleep duration associated with a higher risk of increased arterial stiffness in males.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsai-Chen; Wu, Jin-Shang; Yang, Yi-Ching; Huang, Ying-Hsiang; Lu, Feng-Hwa; Chang, Chih-Jen

    2014-08-01

    We aimed to examine the association between sleep duration and arterial stiffness among adults of different ages, because to date there has been only one study on this relationship, which was confined to middle-aged civil servants. Cross-sectional study. A health examination center in National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Taiwan. A total of 3,508 subjects, age 20-87 y, were enrolled after excluding those with a history of cerebrovascular events, coronary artery disease, peripheral artery disease, and taking lipid-lowering drugs, antihypertensives, hypoglycemic agents, and anti-inflammatory drugs, from October 2006 to August 2009. N/A. SLEEP DURATION WAS CLASSIFIED INTO THREE GROUPS: short (< 6 h), normal (6-8 h) and long (> 8 h). Arterial stiffness was measured by brachial-ankle pulse-wave velocity (baPWV), and increased arterial stiffness was defined as baPWV ≥ 1400 cm/sec. The sleep duration was different for subjects with and without increased arterial stiffness in males, but not in females. In the multivariate analysis for males, long sleepers (odds ratio [OR] 1.75, P = 0.034) but not short sleepers (OR 0.98, P = 0.92) had a higher risk of increased arterial stiffness. In addition, age, estimated glomerular filtration rate, hypertension, diabetes, total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, cigarette smoking, and exercise were also independently associated factors. However, in females, neither short nor long sleep duration was associated with increased arterial stiffness. Long sleep duration was associated with a higher risk of increased arterial stiffness in males. Short sleepers did not exhibit a significant risk of increased arterial stiffness in either sex. Tsai TC, Wu JS, Yang YC, Huang YH, Lu FH, Chang CJ. Long sleep duration associated with a higher risk of increased arterial stiffness in males. SLEEP 2014;37(8):1315-1320.

  9. The role of pulmonary arterial stiffness in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Weir-McCall, Jonathan R.; Struthers, Allan D.; Lipworth, Brian J.; Houston, J. Graeme

    2015-01-01

    COPD is the second most common cause of pulmonary hypertension, and is a common complication of severe COPD with significant implications for both quality of life and mortality. However, the use of a rigid diagnostic threshold of a mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) of ≥25mHg when considering the impact of the pulmonary vasculature on symptoms and disease is misleading. Even minimal exertion causes oxygen desaturation and elevations in mPAP, with right ventricular hypertrophy and dilatation present in patients with mild to moderate COPD with pressures below the threshold for diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension. This has significant implications, with right ventricular dysfunction associated with poorer exercise capability and increased mortality independent of pulmonary function tests. The compliance of the pulmonary artery (PA) is a key component in decoupling the right ventricle from the pulmonary bed, allowing the right ventricle to work at maximum efficiency and protecting the microcirculation from large pressure gradients. PA stiffness increases with the severity of COPD, and correlates well with the presence of exercise induced pulmonary hypertension. A curvilinear relationship exists between PA distensibility and mPAP and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) with marked loss of distensibility before a rapid rise in mPAP and PVR occurs with resultant right ventricular failure. This combination of features suggests PA stiffness as a promising biomarker for early detection of pulmonary vascular disease, and to play a role in right ventricular failure in COPD. Early detection would open this up as a potential therapeutic target before end stage arterial remodelling occurs. PMID:26095859

  10. Dietary potassium regulates vascular calcification and arterial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yong; Byon, Chang Hyun; Yang, Youfeng; Bradley, Wayne E; Dell'Italia, Louis J; Sanders, Paul W; Agarwal, Anupam; Wu, Hui; Chen, Yabing

    2017-10-05

    Vascular calcification is a risk factor that predicts adverse cardiovascular complications of several diseases including atherosclerosis. Reduced dietary potassium intake has been linked to cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and incidental stroke, although the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Using the ApoE-deficient mouse model, we demonstrated for the first time to our knowledge that reduced dietary potassium (0.3%) promoted atherosclerotic vascular calcification and increased aortic stiffness, compared with normal (0.7%) potassium-fed mice. In contrast, increased dietary potassium (2.1%) attenuated vascular calcification and aortic stiffness. Mechanistically, reduction in the potassium concentration to the lower limit of the physiological range increased intracellular calcium, which activated a cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) signal that subsequently enhanced autophagy and promoted vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification. Inhibition of calcium signals and knockdown of either CREB or ATG7, an autophagy regulator, attenuated VSMC calcification induced by low potassium. Consistently, elevated autophagy and CREB signaling were demonstrated in the calcified arteries from low potassium diet-fed mice as well as aortic arteries exposed to low potassium ex vivo. These studies established a potentially novel causative role of dietary potassium intake in regulating atherosclerotic vascular calcification and stiffness, and uncovered mechanisms that offer opportunities to develop therapeutic strategies to control vascular disease.

  11. Aortic Stiffness, Blood Pressure Progression, and Incident Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kaess, Bernhard M.; Rong, Jian; Larson, Martin G.; Hamburg, Naomi M.; Vita, Joseph A.; Levy, Daniel; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Mitchell, Gary F.

    2013-01-01

    Context Vascular stiffness increases with advancing age and is a major risk factor for age-related morbidity and mortality. Vascular stiffness and blood pressure pulsatility are related; however, temporal relationships between vascular stiffening and blood pressure elevation have not been fully delineated. Objective To examine temporal relationships among vascular stiffness, central hemodynamics, microvascular function, and blood pressure progression. Design, Setting, and Participants Longitudinal community-based cohort study conducted in Framingham, Massachusetts. The present investigation is based on the 2 latest examination cycles (cycle 7: 1998–2001; cycle 8: 2005–2008 [last visit: January 25, 2008]) of the Framingham Offspring study (recruited: 1971–1975). Temporal relationships among blood pressure and 3 measures of vascular stiffness and pressure pulsatility derived from arterial tonometry (carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity [CFPWV], forward wave amplitude [FWA], and augmentation index) were examined over a 7-year period in 1759 participants (mean [SD] age: 60 [9] years; 974 women). Main Outcome Measures The primary outcomes were blood pressure and incident hypertension during examination cycle 8. The secondary outcomes were CFPWV, FWA, and augmentation index during examination cycle 8. Results In a multivariable-adjusted regression model, higher FWA (β, 1.3 [95% CI, 0.5–2.1] mm Hg per 1 SD; P=.002) and higher CFPWV (β, 1.5 [95% CI, 0.5–2.6] mm Hg per 1 SD; P=.006) during examination cycle 7 were jointly associated with systolic blood pressure during examination cycle 8. Similarly, in a model that included systolic and diastolic blood pressure and additional risk factors during examination cycle 7, higher FWA (odds ratio [OR], 1.6 [95% CI, 1.3–2.0] per 1 SD; P < .001), augmentation index (OR, 1.7 [95% CI, 1.4–2.0] per 1 SD; P < .001), and CFPWV (OR, 1.3 [95% CI, 1.0–1.6] per 1 SD; P=.04) were associated with incident hypertension during

  12. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease and Arterial Stiffness: Tsunami Effect in the Brain?

    PubMed Central

    Saji, Naoki; Toba, Kenji; Sakurai, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Background Cerebral small vessel diseases, including silent lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and microbleeds, pose a risk for cerebrovascular disease, cognitive impairment, and the geriatric syndrome via effects on arterial stiffness. However, the vascular, physiological, and metabolic roles of arterial stiffness in cerebral small vessel diseases remain unclear. Summary Arterial stiffness can be assessed using various indicators such as the ankle-brachial index, pulse wave velocity, cardio-ankle vascular index, and augmentation index. Arterial stiffness is independently associated with all components of cerebral small vessel disease including silent lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and microbleeds, although there are some methodological differences between the various surrogate markers. Evidence of arterial stiffness indicates microvessel arteriosclerosis presenting with vascular endothelial dysfunction. Further, vascular narrowing due to atherosclerosis and vascular stiffness due to lipohyalinosis can accelerate the pulse waves. This hemodynamic stress, pulsatile pressure, or blood pressure variability can cause a ‘tsunami effect’ towards the cerebral parenchyma and lead to cerebral small vessel disease. Previous studies have shown that silent lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities are strongly associated with arterial stiffness. However, the association between microbleeds and arterial stiffness remains controversial, as there are two vessel mechanisms related to microbleeds: cerebral amyloid angiopathy and hypertensive small vessel disease. Key Messages Cerebral small vessel disease with associated arterial stiffness is a risk factor for silent cerebral lesions, stroke, and cognitive impairment. Improvement of the living environment, management of risk factors, and innovation and development of novel drugs that improve arterial stiffness may suppress the progression of cerebral small vessel disease, and may reduce

  13. [Definition of arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Degaute, J P

    1994-01-01

    Recent publication of several consensus by well-known international experts in the field of high blood pressure gives us the opportunity to update the definition of hypertension. For the first time, systolic blood pressure is taken into account to define hypertensives. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring has been recently developed for the evaluation and treatment of hypertensive patients. Due to the absence of world-wide recognized normative data and the lack of prospective studies assessing the superiority of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring over casual blood pressure measurement for the prediction of cardiovascular events, the use of this new technique is to be restricted to a limited number of hypertensive patients.

  14. Genetic variation in CYP17A1 is associated with arterial stiffness in diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Soo Jin; Lee, Seung-Tae; Kim, Won Jun; Park, Se Eun; Park, Sung Woo; Kim, Jong-Won; Park, Cheol-Young

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension and arterial stiffness are associated with an increasing risk of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. This study aimed to identify genetic variants affecting hypertension and arterial stiffness in diabetic subjects and to compare genetic associations with hypertension between prediabetic and diabetic subjects. A total of 1,069 participants (326 prediabetic and 743 diabetic subjects) were assessed to determine the genetic variants affecting hypertension by analyzing 52 SNPs previously reported to be associated with hypertension. Moreover, the SNPs were tested for association with hemodynamic parameters related to hypertension. Out of the 52 SNPs analyzed, four SNPs including rs5326 (DRD1), rs1004467 (CYP17A1), rs2960306 (GRK4), and rs11191548 (near NT5C2) in diabetic subjects and rs1530440 (C10orf107) in prediabetic subjects showed a modest association with hypertension (P = 0.0265, 0.0020, 0.0066, 0.0078, and 0.0015, resp; all were insignificant after Bonferroni correction). Of these SNPs, rs1004467 in CYP17A1 was significantly associated with augmentation index in diabetic subjects who were not taking antihypertensive medication (P = 0.0001; corrected P = 0.006) but not in diabetic subjects receiving antihypertensive medication. This finding suggests that certain genetic variations found in diabetic subjects may confer arterial stiffness and the development of hypertension and also be affected by antihypertensive medication.

  15. Age, arterial stiffness, and components of blood pressure in Chinese adults.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Meili; Xu, Xiping; Wang, Xiaobin; Huo, Yong; Xu, Xin; Qin, Xianhui; Tang, Genfu; Xing, Houxun; Fan, Fangfang; Cui, Wei; Yang, Xinchun

    2014-12-01

    Blood pressure (BP) changes with age. We conducted a cross-sectional study in rural Chinese adults to investigate: (1) what is the relationship between age, arterial stiffness, and BP in Chinese men and women; and (2) to what degree can the age-BP relationship be explained by arterial stiffness, controlling for other covariables. These analyses included a total of 1688 subjects (males/females: 623/1065), aged 40 to 88 years. Among them, 353 (20.9%) had hypertension (defined as systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥ 140 mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥ 90 mm Hg). Arterial stiffness was measured by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). baPWV appeared to be more strongly correlated with BP (including SBP, DBP, mean arterial pressure [MAP], pulse pressure [PP]) than age (P < 0.001 for comparisons between Spearman correlation coefficients). Furthermore, baPWV was associated with BP (including SBP, DBP, MAP, and PP) and risk of hypertension in a dose-response fashion, independent of age; in contrast, the age-BP associations were either attenuated or became negative after adjusting for baPWV. Arterial stiffness appears to be an independent contributor to hypertension, even after adjusting for age and other covariables. In contrast, age-BP associations became attenuated or negative after adjusting for baPWV. The utility of baPWV as a diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic indicator for hypertension warrants further investigation.

  16. Telemetric ambulatory arterial stiffness index, a predictor of cardio-cerebro-vascular mortality, is associated with aortic stiffness-determining factors.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Yong; Xu, Tian-Ying; Zhang, Sai-Long; Zhou, Xiao-Ming; Xu, Xue-Wen; Guan, Yun-Feng; Lo, Ming; Miao, Chao-Yu

    2013-09-01

    Ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) has been proposed as a new measure of arterial stiffness for predicting cardio-cerebro-vascular morbidity and mortality. However, there has been no research on the direct relationships between AASI and arterial stiffness-determining factors. We utilized beat-to-beat intra-aortic blood pressure (BP) telemetry to characterize AASI in Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). By determination of aortic structural components and analysis of their correlations with AASI, we provided the first direct evidence for the associations between AASI and arterial stiffness-determining factors including the collagen content and collagen/elastin. Ambulatory arterial stiffness index was positively correlated with pulse pressure in both WKY and SHR, less dependent on BP and BP variability than pulse pressure, and relatively stable, especially the number of BP readings not less than ~36. The correlations between AASI and aortic components were comparable for various AASI values derived from BP readings not less than ~36. Not only AASI but also BP variability and pulse pressure demonstrated a direct relationship with arterial stiffness. These findings indicate AASI may become a routine measure in human arterial stiffness assessment. It is recommended to use a cluster of parameters such as AASI, BP variability, and pulse pressure for evaluating arterial stiffness. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Arterial pressure suffices to increase liver stiffness.

    PubMed

    Piecha, Felix; Peccerella, Teresa; Bruckner, Tom; Seitz, Helmut-Karl; Rausch, Vanessa; Mueller, Sebastian

    2016-11-01

    Noninvasive measurement of liver stiffness (LS) has been established to screen for liver fibrosis. Since LS is also elevated in response to pressure-related conditions such as liver congestion, this study was undertaken to learn more about the role of arterial pressure on LS. LS was measured by transient elastography (μFibroscan platform, Echosens, Paris, France) during single intravenous injections of catecholamines in anesthetized rats with and without thioacetamide (TAA)-induced fibrosis. The effect of vasodilating glycerol trinitrate (GTN) on LS was also studied. Pressures in the abdominal aorta and caval and portal veins were measured in real time with the PowerLab device (AD Instruments, Dunedin, New Zealand). Baseline LS values in all rats (3.8 ± 0.5 kPa, n = 25) did not significantly differ from those in humans. Epinephrine and norepinephrine drastically increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) from 82 to 173 and 156 mmHg. Concomitantly, LS almost doubled from 4 to 8 kPa, while central venous pressure remained unchanged. Likewise, portal pressure only showed a slight and delayed increase. In the TAA-induced fibrosis model, LS increased from 9.5 ± 1.0 to 25.6 ± 14.7 kPa upon epinephrine injection and could efficiently be decreased by GTN. We finally show a direct association in humans in a physiological setting of elevated cardiac output and MAP. During continuous spinning at 200 W, MAP increased from 84 ± 8 to 99 ± 11 mmHg while LS significantly increased from 4.4 ± 1.8 to 6.7 ± 2.1 kPa. In conclusion, our data show that arterial pressure suffices to increase LS. Moreover, lowering MAP efficiently decreases LS in fibrotic livers that are predominantly supplied by arterial blood. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. [Arterial hypertension in children].

    PubMed

    Mota-Hernández, F

    1993-07-01

    It is considered hypertension in children, the persistent increase of the blood pressure values above percentile 95 for age and sex, in no less than three determinations, with adequate register techniques. Blood pressure is maintained mainly by the regulation of metabolism of sodium and water in the intravascular space, through the adequate balance of intake, filtration, reabsorption and renal throughout. It is also regulated by hormonal factors. Weight gain control in teen-agers could be useful to prevent high blood pressure in adults. In children, it is generally secondary to renal, reno-vascular, endocrinological or tumoral diseases. Clinical manifestations and the recommended diagnostic procedures are analysed to detect the most frequent causes of hypertension at different ages. Most cases response with antihypertensive drugs in combination with hyposodic diet. For the hypertensive crisis, asa diuretics and powerful antihypertensive drugs may be employed. Patients with chronic renal insufficiency could also need dialytic treatments. Renovascular diseases require almost always invasive treatments. Better prognosis in children with severe high blood pressure is related with recent diagnostic procedures, surgical techniques and antihypertensive drugs improvements.

  19. Pulmonary vascular wall stiffness: An important contributor to the increased right ventricular afterload with pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhijie; Chesler, Naomi C

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with structural and mechanical changes in the pulmonary vascular bed that increase right ventricular (RV) afterload. These changes, characterized by narrowing and stiffening, occur in both proximal and distal pulmonary arteries (PAs). An important consequence of arterial narrowing is increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). Arterial stiffening, which can occur in both the proximal and distal pulmonary arteries, is an important index of disease progression and is a significant contributor to increased RV afterload in PH. In particular, arterial narrowing and stiffening increase the RV afterload by increasing steady and oscillatory RV work, respectively. Here we review the current state of knowledge of the causes and consequences of pulmonary arterial stiffening in PH and its impact on RV function. We review direct and indirect techniques for measuring proximal and distal pulmonary arterial stiffness, measures of arterial stiffness including elastic modulus, incremental elastic modulus, stiffness coefficient β and others, the changes in cellular function and the extracellular matrix proteins that contribute to pulmonary arterial stiffening, the consequences of PA stiffening for RV function and the clinical implications of pulmonary vascular stiffening for PH progression. Future investigation of the relationship between PA stiffening and RV dysfunction may facilitate new therapies aimed at improving RV function and thus ultimately reducing mortality in PH.

  20. Capsaicin and arterial hypertensive crisis.

    PubMed

    Patanè, Salvatore; Marte, Filippo; La Rosa, Felice Carmelo; La Rocca, Roberto

    2010-10-08

    Chili peppers are rich in capsaicin. The potent vasodilator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is stored in a population of C-fiber afferents that are sensitive to capsaicin. CGRP and peptides released from cardiac C fibers have a beneficial effect in myocardial ischemia and reperfusion. It has been reported that capsaicin pretreatment can deplete cardiac C-fiber peptide stores. Furthermore, it has also been reported that capsaicin-treated pigs have significantly increased mean arterial blood pressure compared with controls, and that the decrease in CGRP synthesis and release contributes to the elevated blood pressure. A case has also been reported of an arterial hypertensive crisis in a patient with a large ingestion of peppers and chili peppers the day before. We present a case of an arterial hypertensive crisis in a 19-year-old Italian man with an abundant ingestion of peppers and of chili peppers the preceding day. This case describes an unusual pattern of arterial hypertensive crisis due to capsaicin.

  1. [Arterial hypertension and prediabetes].

    PubMed

    Boned Ombuena, Patricia; Rodilla Sala, Enrique; Costa Muñoz, José Antonio; Pascual Izuel, José María

    2016-11-04

    The aim of this study was to assess the factors related to new diabetes in hypertensive. This prospective follow-up study involved 2588 non-diabetic, hypertensive patients. The total follow-up was 15053 patient-years with a median of 3.4 years (interquartile interval 1.4-6.8). During the follow-up 333 (13%) patients had new diabetes, with a conversion rate of 2.21 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.98-2.46) 100/patients/year. In a Cox proportional hazard model including baseline characteristics and modifications during the follow up the three components of metabolic syndrome (excluding blood pressure and glucose values) HR 1.69 (95% CI, 1.36-2.09), family history of diabetes HR 1,49 (95% CI, 1,20-1,85) and baseline blood glucose ≥110 mg/dl HR 7.84 (95% CI, 5.99-10.29) were the most important factors related to new diabetes. Weight variation during the follow up, and statins, beta-bloquers or diuretic treatment did not increase the risk of new diabetes, blood pressure control at the end of study reduce the risk HR 0,74 (95% CI, 0.61-0.91). In hypertensive non-diabetic patients in primary prevention the factors related to new diabetes can easily identified at the beginning of follow up. Being obese, with family history of diabetes, and glucose values ≥110 mg/dl dramatically increase the risk of developing new diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. [Chronotherapy in arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Bendersky, M

    2015-01-01

    The blood pressure profile in most normo- and hypertensive subjects are currently known, as well as the impact their changes induced on the cardio- and cerebrovascular risk. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) has contributed greatly to the knowledge of this parameter. It to correct the schedule of drug administration (chronotherapy) with changes in any component of the BP profile that have better correlation with risk. These include the nocturnal decrease and the morning BP surge. Investigations in this direction are still scarce, and multicenter studies need to be conducted that can answer the true preventive impact of such modifications.

  3. Arterial Stiffness and Renal Replacement Therapy: A Controversial Topic

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Edmundo Cabrera; Zócalo, Yanina; Galli, Cintia; Bia, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The increase of arterial stiffness has been to have a significant impact on predicting mortality in end-stage renal disease patients. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a noninvasive, reliable parameter of regional arterial stiffness that integrates the vascular geometry and arterial wall intrinsic elasticity and is capable of predicting cardiovascular mortality in this patient population. Nevertheless, reports on PWV in dialyzed patients are contradictory and sometimes inconsistent: some reports claim the arterial wall stiffness increases (i.e., PWV increase), others claim that it is reduced, and some even state that it augments in the aorta while it simultaneously decreases in the brachial artery pathway. The purpose of this study was to analyze the literature in which longitudinal or transversal studies were performed in hemodialysis and/or peritoneal dialysis patients, in order to characterize arterial stiffness and the responsiveness to renal replacement therapy. PMID:26064684

  4. Martial arts training attenuates arterial stiffness in middle aged adults.

    PubMed

    Douris, Peter C; Ingenito, Teresa; Piccirillo, Barbara; Herbst, Meredith; Petrizzo, John; Cherian, Vincen; McCutchan, Christopher; Burke, Caitlin; Stamatinos, George; Jung, Min-Kyung

    2013-09-01

    Arterial stiffness increases with age and is related to an increased risk of coronary artery disease. Poor trunk flexibility has been shown to be associated with arterial stiffness in middle-aged subjects. The purpose of our research study was to measure arterial stiffness and flexibility in healthy middle-aged martial artists compared to age and gender matched healthy sedentary controls. Ten martial artists (54.0 ± 2.0 years), who practice Soo Bahk Do (SBD), a Korean martial art, and ten sedentary subjects (54.7 ± 1.8 years) for a total of twenty subjects took part in this cross-sectional study. Arterial stiffness was assessed in all subjects using pulse wave velocity (PWV), a recognized index of arterial stiffness. Flexibility of the trunk and hamstring were also measured. The independent variables were the martial artists and matched sedentary controls. The dependent variables were PWV and flexibility. There were significant differences, between the SBD practitioners and sedentary controls, in PWV (P = 0.004), in trunk flexibility (P= 0.002), and in hamstring length (P= 0.003). The middle-aged martial artists were more flexible in their trunk and hamstrings and had less arterial stiffness compared to the healthy sedentary controls. The flexibility component of martial art training or flexibility exercises in general may be considered as a possible intervention to reduce the effects of aging on arterial stiffness.

  5. Martial Arts Training Attenuates Arterial Stiffness in Middle Aged Adults

    PubMed Central

    Douris, Peter C.; Ingenito, Teresa; Piccirillo, Barbara; Herbst, Meredith; Petrizzo, John; Cherian, Vincen; McCutchan, Christopher; Burke, Caitlin; Stamatinos, George; Jung, Min-Kyung

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Arterial stiffness increases with age and is related to an increased risk of coronary artery disease. Poor trunk flexibility has been shown to be associated with arterial stiffness in middle-aged subjects. The purpose of our research study was to measure arterial stiffness and flexibility in healthy middle-aged martial artists compared to age and gender matched healthy sedentary controls. Methods Ten martial artists (54.0 ± 2.0 years), who practice Soo Bahk Do (SBD), a Korean martial art, and ten sedentary subjects (54.7 ± 1.8 years) for a total of twenty subjects took part in this cross-sectional study. Arterial stiffness was assessed in all subjects using pulse wave velocity (PWV), a recognized index of arterial stiffness. Flexibility of the trunk and hamstring were also measured. The independent variables were the martial artists and matched sedentary controls. The dependent variables were PWV and flexibility. Results There were significant differences, between the SBD practitioners and sedentary controls, in PWV (P = 0.004), in trunk flexibility (P= 0.002), and in hamstring length (P= 0.003). Conclusion The middle-aged martial artists were more flexible in their trunk and hamstrings and had less arterial stiffness compared to the healthy sedentary controls. The flexibility component of martial art training or flexibility exercises in general may be considered as a possible intervention to reduce the effects of aging on arterial stiffness. PMID:24427479

  6. New therapies for arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pagliaro, Beniamino; Santolamazza, Caterina; Rubattu, Speranza; Volpe, Massimo

    2016-03-01

    Arterial hypertension is the most common chronic disease in developed countries and it is the leading risk factor for stroke, ischemic heart disease, congestive heart failure, chronic renal failure and peripheral artery disease. Its prevalence appears to be about 30-45% of the general population. Recent European guidelines estimate that up to 15-20% of the hypertensive patients are not controlled on a dual antihypertensive combination and they require three or more different antihypertensive drug classes to achieve adequate blood pressure control. The guidelines confirmed that diuretics, beta-blockers, calcium-channel blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers are suitable for the initiation and maintenance of antihypertensive treatment, either as monotherapy or in combination therapy. Very few antihypertensive agents have reached the market over the last few years, but no new therapeutic class has really emerged. The long-term adherence to cardiovascular drugs is still low in both primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases. In particular, the issue of compliance is persistently high in hypertension, despite the fixed-dose combination therapy. As a consequence, a cohort of high-risk hypertensive population, represented by patients affected by refractory and resistant hypertension, can be identified. Therefore, the need of controlling BP in high-risk patients may be addressed, in part, by the development of new drugs, devices and procedures that are designed to treat hypertension and comorbidities. In this review we will comprehensively discuss the current literature on recent therapeutic advances in hypertension, including both medical therapy and interventional procedures.

  7. Etiology of End-Stage Renal Disease and Arterial Stiffness among Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    El Ghoul, Balsam; Korjian, Serge; El Alam, Andrew; Samad, Salam; Dahdah, Georges; Blacher, Jacques; Safar, Michel E.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Prior studies have demonstrated that conventional and emerging CV risk factors are associated with worsening arterial stiffness among end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on hemodialysis. The present cross-sectional study evaluates the association between the etiology of ESRD and arterial stiffness among a cohort of hemodialysis patients. Methods. Etiology of ESRD was identified from patients' medical records and classified as either vascular renal disease, diabetic nephropathy, nondiabetic glomerulopathy, tubular interstitial nephropathy, hereditary nephropathy, or ESRD of unconfirmed etiology. Results. A total of 82 subjects were enrolled. cfPWV was independently associated with the composite of either diabetic nephropathy or vascular renal disease (p = 0.022), pulse pressure (p = 0.001), and a history of CV events (p = 0.025), but not history of hypertension or diabetes mellitus alone. The median cfPWVs in diabetic nephropathy and vascular renal disease were comparable and significantly higher than median cfPWVs in other etiologies of ESRD. Conclusion. The study suggests that the etiology of ESRD is independently associated with arterial stiffness among hemodialysis patients. Furthermore, arterial stiffness was higher among patients who developed renal sequelae of either diabetes mellitus or hypertension as compared with those who have a history of either diabetes mellitus or hypertension alone. PMID:28299320

  8. Effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on arterial stiffness and blood pressure in resistant hypertensive individuals: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Vilela-Martin, José Fernando; Giollo-Junior, Luiz Tadeu; Chiappa, Gaspar Rogério; Cipriano-Junior, Gerson; Vieira, Paulo José Cardoso; dos Santos Ricardi, Fábio; Paz-Landim, Manoel Ildefonso; de Andrade, Days Oliveira; Cestário, Elizabeth do Espírito Santo; Cosenso-Martin, Luciana Neves; Yugar-Toledo, Juan Carlos; Cipullo, José Paulo

    2016-03-29

    Resistant hypertension (RH) treatment requires an adequate and intense therapeutic approach. However, the results are not always satisfactory despite intensive treatment. Of the different pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of RH, sympathetic overstimulation and therapies that block the sympathetic system have been widely studied. These approaches, however, are invasive and expensive. Another possible approach is by transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), a noninvasive method that modulates activity by using low-frequency transcutaneous electrical stimulation to inhibit primary afferent pathways. Thus, the current study will evaluate the effect of applying TENS in the cervicothoracic region of subjects with RH and will seek to develop a new low-cost and readily available therapy to treat this group of hypertensive individuals. This is a randomized, single blind (subject), parallel-assignment study controlled with a sham group and including participants aged 40 to 70 years with resistant hypertension. The trial has two arms: the treatment and control (sham group). The treatment group will be submitted to the stimulation procedure (TENS). The sham group will not be submitted to stimulation. The primary outcomes will be a reduction in the peripheral blood pressure and adverse events. The secondary outcomes will be a reduction the central blood pressure. The study will last 30 days. The sample size was calculated assuming an alpha error of 5 % to reject the null hypothesis with a statistical power of 80 %, thereby resulting in 28 participants per group (intervention versus sham). In recent decades, RH has become very common and costly. Adequate control requires several drugs, and in many cases, treatment is not successful. Sympathetic nervous system inhibition by renal denervation and central inhibition have significant effects in reducing BP; however, these treatments are costly and invasive. Another type of sympathetic nervous

  9. Hormones and arterial stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gungor, Ozkan; Kircelli, Fatih; Voroneanu, Luminita; Covic, Adrian; Ok, Ercan

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease constitutes the major cause of mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. Arterial stiffness is an important contributor to the occurrence and progression of cardiovascular disease. Various risk factors, including altered hormone levels, have been suggested to be associated with arterial stiffness. Based on the background that chronic kidney disease predisposes individuals to a wide range of hormonal changes, we herein review the available data on the association between arterial stiffness and hormones in patients with chronic kidney disease and summarize the data for the general population.

  10. Aortic stiffness and flow-mediated dilatation in normotensive offspring of parents with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Evrengul, Harun; Tanriverdi, Halil; Kilic, Ismail D; Dursunoglu, Dursun; Ozcan, Emin E; Kaftan, Asuman; Kilic, Mustafa

    2012-08-01

    Although hypertension has been shown to be one of the most important risk factors for atherosclerosis, data about the presence of subclinical atherosclerosis in normotensive offspring with parental history of hypertension are scarce. Accordingly, the current study was designated to evaluate flow-mediated dilatation and aortic stiffness, which are early signs of atherosclerosis in young subjects with parental history of hypertension. A total of 140 [corrected] healthy, non-obese subjects in the age group of 18-22 years were included in this study and divided into two groups. The first group included 70 offspring of hypertensive parents and the second group included 70 offspring of normotensive parents as controls. In all subjects, endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilatation of the brachial artery and aortic elastic parameters were investigated using high-resolution Doppler echocardiography. Offspring of hypertensive parents demonstrated higher values of aortic stiffness (7.1 plus or minus 1.88 and 6.42 plus or minus 1.56, respectively) but lower distensibility (9.47 plus or minus 1.33 and 11.8 plus or minus 3.36 square centimetres per dyne per 106) and flow-mediated dilatation (4.57 plus or minus 1.3 versus 6.34 plus or minus 0.83 percent, p equals 0.0001, respectively) than offspring of hypertensive parents. We observed blunted endothelium-dependent dilatation and aortic stiffness in offspring of hypertensive parents compared with offspring of normotensive [corrected] parents. This is evident in the absence of overt hypertension and other diseases, suggesting that parental history of hypertension is a risk for subclinical atherosclerosis and it may contribute to the progression to hypertension and overt atherosclerosis in later life.

  11. Relationship between sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity and arterial stiffness in elderly men and women.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yoshiyuki; Galbreath, M Melyn; Shibata, Shigeki; Jarvis, Sara S; VanGundy, Tiffany B; Meier, Rhonda L; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen; Levine, Benjamin D; Fu, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Previous human studies have shown that large-artery stiffness contributes to an age-related decrease in cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity. Whether this is also true with sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity is associated with the stiffness of baroreceptor segments (the carotid artery and the aorta) in elderly individuals and that sex affects this relationship. Sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity was assessed from the spontaneous changes in beat-by-beat diastolic pressure and corresponding muscle sympathetic nerve activity (microneurography) during supine rest in 30 men (mean±SEM: 69±1 years) and 31 women (68±1 years). Carotid artery stiffness (B-mode ultrasonography) and aortic stiffness (MRI) were also determined. We found that elderly women had lower sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity than elderly men (-2.33±0.25 versus -3.32±0.25 bursts · 100 beats(-1) · mm Hg(-1); P=0.007). β-Stiffness indices of the carotid artery and the aorta were greater in elderly women than in men (6.68±0.48 versus 5.10±0.50 and 4.03±0.47 versus 2.68±0.42; both P<0.050). Sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity was inversely correlated with carotid artery stiffness in both men and women (r=0.49 and 0.50; both P<0.05), whereas this relation was shifted in parallel upward (toward a reduced sensitivity) in women with no changes in the slope (0.26 versus 0.24 arbitrary units). Sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity and aortic stiffness showed similar trends. Thus, barosensory artery stiffness seems to be one independent determinant of sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity in elderly men and women. The lower sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity in elderly women may predispose them to an increased prevalence of hypertension.

  12. Estimation of Stiffness Parameter on the Common Carotid Artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koya, Yoshiharu; Mizoshiri, Isao; Matsui, Kiyoaki; Nakamura, Takashi

    The arteriosclerosis is on the increase with an aging or change of our living environment. For that reason, diagnosis of the common carotid artery using echocardiogram is doing to take precautions carebropathy. Up to the present, several methods to measure stiffness parameter of the carotid artery have been proposed. However, they have analyzed at the only one point of common carotid artery. In this paper, we propose the method of analysis extended over a wide area of common carotid artery. In order to measure stiffness parameter of common carotid artery from echocardiogram, it is required to detect two border curves which are boundaries between vessel wall and blood. The method is composed of two steps. The first step is the detection of border curves, and the second step is the calculation of stiffness parameter using diameter of common carotid artery. Experimental results show the validity of the proposed method.

  13. Impaired Muscle Oxygenation and Elevated Exercise Blood Pressure in Hypertensive Patients: Links With Vascular Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Dipla, Konstantina; Triantafyllou, Areti; Koletsos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Stavros; Sachpekidis, Vasileios; Vrabas, Ioannis S; Gkaliagkousi, Eugenia; Zafeiridis, Andreas; Douma, Stella

    2017-08-01

    This study examined in vivo (1) skeletal muscle oxygenation and microvascular function, at rest and during handgrip exercise, and (2) their association with macrovascular function and exercise blood pressure (BP), in newly diagnosed, never-treated patients with hypertension and normotensive individuals. Ninety-one individuals (51 hypertensives and 40 normotensives) underwent office and 24-hour ambulatory BP, arterial stiffness, and central aortic BP assessment, followed by a 5-minute arterial occlusion and a 3-minute submaximal handgrip exercise. Changes in muscle oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin and tissue oxygen saturation were continuously monitored by near-infrared spectroscopy and beat-by-beat BP by Finapres. Hypertensives had higher (P<0.001) central aortic BP and pulse wave velocity versus normotensives and exhibited (1) a blunted tissue oxygen saturation response during occlusion, with slower (P=0.006) deoxygenation rate, suggesting reduced muscle oxidative capacity, and (2) a slower reoxygenation rate and blunted hyperemic response (P<0.05), showing reduced microvascular reactivity. Muscle oxygenation responses were correlated with aortic systolic and pulse pressure and augmentation index (P<0.05; age and body mass index (BMI) adjusted). When exercising at the same submaximal intensity, hypertensives required a significantly greater (P<0.001) increase in BP for achieving similar muscle oxygenation levels as normotensives. This response was correlated with the magnitude of microvascular hyperemia and aortic BP. In conclusion, nontreated patients with hypertension exhibit prominent reductions in in vivo indices of skeletal muscle oxidative capacity, suggestive of mitochondrial dysfunction, and blunted muscle microvascular reactivity. These dysfunctions were associated with higher aortic systolic BP and arterial stiffness. Dysregulations in muscle oxygen delivery/utilization and microvascular stiffness, in hypertensive patients, partially contribute to

  14. [Management of severe arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Leeman, M

    2015-09-01

    Severe arterial hypertension is defined as a systolic blood pressure (BP) ≥180 mmHg and/or a diastolic BP ≥ 110 mmHg. Initial assessment is to identify acute, ongoing, target-organ damage such as pulmonary edema, aortic dissection, ... (hypertensive emergency). If so, the patient requires urgent and specific management in a hospital setting. More commonly, however, BP in the severe range is relatively asymptomatic and not associated with end-organ damage (hypertensive urgency). Management can usually be carried out in the ambulatory setting. Severe hypertension should first be confirmed after a period of rest in a quiet room. If BP remains in the severe range, an antihypertensive drug can be initiated. Otherwise, the patient should be referred for further evaluation within a few days ; however, an antihypertensive treatment could be started immediately if there is concern that urgent outpatient follow-up cannot be ensured or if the patient is at high cardiovascular risk. The choice of the first drug should be tailored according to associated conditions and possible contraindications. Some guidelines recommend starting therapy with an antihypertensive combination of two drugs. In all cases, rapid and excessive reduction in BP, which could compromise organ perfusion, must be avoided, especially in elderly patients. In the short-term (days), BP should be progressively lowered to < 160/100 mmHg. In the long term, a BP < 140/90 mmHg should be obtained.

  15. A meta-analytical comparison of atenolol with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors on arterial stiffness, peripheral blood pressure and heart rate in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hong; Luo, Gaoqing; Zheng, Yong; Peng, Feng; Xie, Liangdi

    2017-01-01

    This meta-analysis of randomized parallel controlled trials was designed to compare the efficacy of atenolol with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) in changing pulse wave velocity (PWV), peripheral blood pressure and heart rate (HR) among patients with essential hypertension. This study was conducted according to the PRISMA guideline. Data collection was independently completed by two investigators. Statistical analyses were completed by Stata software (v12.0). Eight clinical trials were meta-analyzed in this study. Overall changes in PWV (weighted mean difference or WMD = 0.068, 95% confidence interval or CI: -0.487 to -0.623, P = 0.811) and peripheral systolic blood pressure (PSBP) (WMD = -1.281 mmHg, 95% CI: -6.936 to 4.375, P = 0.657) did not differ significantly between atenolol and ACEIs treatment. Relative to ACEIs, atenolol had a more favorable impact on peripheral diastolic blood pressure (PDBP) (WMD = -1.912 mmHg, 95% CI: -3.732 to -0.091, P = 0.040) and HR (WMD = -9.23 bpm, 95% CI: -12.53 to -5.93, P < 0.001). In stratified analyses, particularly by follow-up period, atenolol was observed to be superior over ACEIs within early 3-month treatment in PSBP (WMD = -4.097 mmHg, 95% CI: -6.589 to -1.605, P = 0.001), PDBP (WMD = -6.802 mmHg, 95% CI: -8.517 to -5.087, P < 0.001) and HR (WMD = -14.242 bpm, 95% CI: -16.427 to -12.058, P = 0.028), without heterogeneity (I(2) = 0.0%). There were low probabilities of publication bias for all comparisons. Our findings demonstrate that atenolol and ACEIs were equally effective in reducing PWV and PSBP, while atenolol was superior over ACEIs in improving PDBP and HR, especially within short-term treatment.

  16. Arterial stiffness is greater in African Americans than in whites: evidence from the Forsyth County, North Carolina, ARIC cohort.

    PubMed

    Din-Dzietham, Rebecca; Couper, David; Evans, Greg; Arnett, Donna K; Jones, Daniel W

    2004-04-01

    Impairment of arterial dilation is thought to occur earlier than arterial wall thickening in the atherosclerotic process. In comparison with whites, African Americans reportedly have a generalized attenuation of their vasodilation mechanisms. We set out to evaluate arterial stiffness and its correlates by ethnicity, hypothesizing that African Americans would have stiffer common carotid arteries (ie, lower arterial distension for a given systolic pressure) than their white counterparts. The study population included 268 African Americans and 2459 whites, who were aged 45 to 64 years at baseline examination in 1986 to 1989, free of coronary heart disease and stroke/transient ischemic attack, from Forsyth County, North Carolina. The beta stiffness index and pulsatile arterial diameter change were derived from brachial blood pressure and from echo-tracked systolic and diastolic carotid arterial diameters. African Americans had stiffer carotid arteries than their white counterparts, with a right shift of the beta stiffness index distribution. After adjustment for selected cardiovascular risk factors, the mean beta stiffness index was 9% higher for African Americans (mean +/- SEM: 11.3 +/- 0.3) than for whites (mean +/- SEM: 10.3 +/- 0.1) among participants not taking antihypertensive medication. Socioeconomic status and comorbidities were differentially associated with arterial stiffness by ethnicity. Specifically, the association between these correlates and beta stiffness index was stronger in African Americans than in whites. This report on arterial mechanics in African Americans suggests that large artery stiffening either occurs earlier, or is more accelerated in African Americans than in whites in our sample, perhaps as a result of earlier exposure to multiple risk factors. This finding may have implications for hypertension prevention, as arterial stiffness is associated with the development of hypertension.

  17. Genetics of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Elliott, C Gregory

    2013-12-01

    Painstaking research led to the discovery of gene mutations responsible for heritable forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Mutations in the gene BMPR2, which codes for a cell surface receptor (BMPRII), cause the approximately 80% of heritable cases of PAH. Less commonly mutations in ALK1, CAV1, ENG, and SMAD9, and newly discovered mutations in KCNK3, may cause heritable PAH. Other family members of many patients diagnosed with idiopathic PAH may be diagnosed with PAH. Genetic counseling and testing should be offered to patients diagnosed with heritable or idiopathic PAH.

  18. The impact of accelerometer wear location on the relationship between step counts and arterial stiffness in adults treated for hypertension and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Alexandra B; Daskalopoulou, Stella S; Dasgupta, Kaberi

    2017-08-24

    Accelerometer placement at the wrist is convenient and increasingly adopted despite less accurate physical activity (PA) measurement than with waist placement. Capitalizing on a study that started with wrist placement and shifted to waist placement, we compared associations between PA measures derived from different accelerometer locations with a responsive arterial health indicator, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV). Cross-sectional study. We previously demonstrated an inverse association between waist-worn pedometer-assessed step counts (Yamax SW-200, 7 days) and cfPWV (-0.20m/s, 95% CI -0.28, -0.12 per 1000 step/day increment) in 366 adults. Participants concurrently wore accelerometers (ActiGraph GT3X+), most at the waist but the first 46 at the wrist. We matched this subgroup with participants from the 'waist accelerometer' group (sex, age, and pedometer-assessed steps/day) and assessed associations with cfPWV (applanation tonometry, Sphygmocor) separately in each subgroup through linear regression models. Compared to the waist group, wrist group participants had higher step counts (mean difference 3980 steps/day; 95% CI 2517, 5443), energy expenditure (967kcal/day, 95% CI 755, 1179), and moderate-to-vigorous-PA (138min; 95% CI 114, 162). Accelerometer-assessed step counts (waist) suggested an association with cfPWV (-0.28m/s, 95% CI -0.58, 0.01); but no relationship was apparent with wrist-assessed steps (0.02m/s, 95% CI -0.24, 0.27). Waist but not wrist ActiGraph PA measures signal associations between PA and cfPWV. We urge researchers to consider the importance of wear location choice on relationships with health indicators. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The two faces of hypertension: role of aortic stiffness.

    PubMed

    Smulyan, Harold; Mookherjee, Saktipada; Safar, Michel E

    2016-02-01

    Adult hypertension can be divided into two relatively distinct forms-systolic/diastolic hypertension in midlife and systolic hypertension of the aged. The two types differ in prevalence, pathophysiology, and therapy. The prevalence of systolic hypertension in the elderly is twice that of midlife hypertension. The systolic pressure is elevated in both forms, but the high diastolic pressure in midlife is due to a raised total peripheral resistance, whereas the normal or low diastolic pressure in the elderly is due to aortic stiffening. Aortic stiffness, as measured by the carotid/femoral pulse wave velocity, has been found to be a cardiovascular risk marker independent of traditional risk factors for atherosclerosis. Instead, it is related to microcirculatory disease of the brain and kidney and to disorders of inflammation. Loss of aortic distensibility is an inevitable consequence of aging, but a review of its causes suggests that it may be amenable to future pharmacologic therapy.

  20. Airflow limitation in smokers is associated with arterial stiffness: the Nagahama Study.

    PubMed

    Tabara, Yasuharu; Muro, Shigeo; Takahashi, Yoshimitsu; Setoh, Kazuya; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Terao, Chikashi; Kosugi, Shinji; Sekine, Akihiro; Yamada, Ryo; Nakayama, Takeo; Mishima, Michiaki; Matsuda, Fumihiko

    2014-01-01

    Pathophysiological mechanisms of associations between airflow limitation (AL) and arterial stiffness remain unclear. One factor that might affect both AL and arterial stiffness is habitual smoking. The aim of this study is to investigate a possible interaction of smoking on the association between AL and arterial stiffness. Study subjects consisted of 8790 apparently healthy community residents. Airflow limitation was defined as a ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) to forced vital capacity of less than 70%. Brachial-to-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) was used as an index of arterial stiffness. Smoking habit was investigated using a structured questionnaire. Subjects with AL had significantly higher baPWV (AL 1381 ± 334, control 1261 ± 227 cm/s, p < 0.001). In a separate analysis by smoking habit, advanced arterial stiffness in AL was observed only in smokers (non-smokers: AL 1300 ± 220, control 1260 ± 218; smokers: AL 1436 ± 384, control 1264 ± 243 cm/s). Other clinical features of subjects with AL were older age; increased plasma hsCRP levels; and a high prevalence of male sex, hypertension, and smoking experience. Multiple linear regression analysis adjusted for these covariates identified the smoking × AL interaction as an independent determinant of baPWV (β = 0.066, p < 0.001). Conversely, baPWV was an independent determinant of AL in current and past smokers, but not in never smokers. AL arising from cigarette smoking, but not AL in non-smokers, was associated with arterial stiffness in a general population independently of established risk factors. Measurement of subclinical arterial change in smokers may be useful in identifying persons at risk for AL. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Hypertensive encephalopathy complicating transplant renal artery stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    McGonigle, R. J.; Bewick, M.; Trafford, J. A.; Parsons, V.

    1984-01-01

    A 26-year-old female diabetic patient developed hypertensive encephalopathy with gross neurological abnormalities complicating renal artery stenosis of her transplant kidney. The elevated blood pressure was unresponsive to medical treatment. Surgical correction of the stenoses in the renal artery cured the hypertension and renal failure and led to the patient's complete recovery. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6377286

  2. Heart Rate Dependency of Large Artery Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Tan, Isabella; Spronck, Bart; Kiat, Hosen; Barin, Edward; Reesink, Koen D; Delhaas, Tammo; Avolio, Alberto P; Butlin, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) quantifies large artery stiffness, it is used in hemodynamic research and is considered a useful cardiovascular clinical marker. cfPWV is blood pressure (BP) dependent. Intrinsic heart rate (HR) dependency of cfPWV is unknown because increasing HR is commonly accompanied by increasing BP. This study aims to quantify cfPWV dependency on acute, sympathovagal-independent changes in HR, independent of BP. Individuals (n=52, age 40-93 years, 11 female) with in situ cardiac pacemakers or cardioverter defibrillators were paced at 60, 70, 80, 90, and 100 bpm. BP and cfPWV were measured at each HR. Both cfPWV (mean [95% CI], 0.31 [0.26-0.37] m/s per 10 bpm; P<0.001) and central aortic diastolic pressure (3.78 [3.40-4.17] mm Hg/10 bpm; P<0.001) increased with HR. The HR effect on cfPWV was isolated by correcting the BP effects by 3 different methods: (1) statistically, by a linear mixed model; (2) mathematically, using an exponential relationship between BP and cross-sectional lumen area; and (3) using measured BP dependency of cfPWV derived from changes in BP induced by orthostatic changes (seated and supine) in a subset of subjects (n=17). The BP-independent effects of HR on cfPWV were quantified as 0.20 [0.11-0.28] m/s per 10 bpm (P<0.001, method 1), 0.16 [0.11-0.22] m/s per 10 bpm (P<0.001, method 2), and 0.16 [0.11-0.21] m/s per 10 bpm (P<0.001, method 3). With a mean HR dependency in the range of 0.16 to 0.20 m/s per 10 bpm, cfPWV may be considered to have minimal physiologically relevant changes for small changes in HR, but larger differences in HR must be considered as contributing to significant differences in cfPWV.

  3. Arterial Stiffness in the Young: Assessment, Determinants, and Implications

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Arterial stiffness describes the rigidity of the arterial wall. Its significance owes to its relationship with the pulsatile afterload presented to the left ventricle and its implications on ventricular-arterial coupling. In adults, the contention that arterial stiffness as a marker and risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is gaining support. Noninvasive methods have increasingly been adopted in both the research and clinical arena to determine local, segmental, and systemic arterial stiffness in the young. With adoption of these noninvasive techniques for use in children and adolescents, the phenomenon and significance of arterial stiffening in the young is beginning to be unveiled. The list of childhood factors and conditions found to be associated with arterial stiffening has expanded rapidly over the last decade; these include traditional cardiovascular risk factors, prenatal growth restriction, vasculitides, vasculopathies associated with various syndromes, congenital heart disease, and several systemic diseases. The findings of arterial stiffening have functional implications on energetic efficiency, structure, and function of the left ventricle. Early identification of arterial dysfunction in childhood may provide a window for early intervention, although longitudinal studies are required to determine whether improvement of arterial function in normal and at-risk paediatric populations will be translated into clinical benefits. PMID:20421954

  4. Assessment of Arterial Stiffness Using the Cardio-Ankle Vascular Index

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, Toru; Ito, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background Arterial stiffness is an independent predictor of outcomes for patients with cardiovascular disease. Although measurement of pulse wave velocity is a widely accepted, noninvasive approach for the assessment of arterial stiffness, its accuracy is affected by changes in blood pressure. Summary The cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) is an index of the overall stiffness of the artery from the origin of the aorta to the ankle and is theoretically independent of blood pressure at the time of measurement. CAVI increases linearly with age and is elevated even in mild arteriosclerotic disease. It can identify differences in the degree of arteriosclerosis among patients with severe arteriosclerotic disease and better reflects the severity of disease of the coronary artery than does brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity. Patients with higher CAVI values show a poor prognosis compared with those with lower CAVI values. Furthermore, CAVI can be lowered by controlling diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Key Messages The primary aims of assessing arterial stiffness using CAVI are to assist in the early detection of arteriosclerosis, allowing timely treatment and lifestyle modification, and to quantitatively evaluate the progression of disease and the effectiveness of treatment. Whether CAVI-guided therapy can improve prognosis in high-risk patients needs to be further examined to confirm the clinical usefulness of this measure. PMID:27493899

  5. Pulmonary Vascular Stiffness: Measurement, Modeling, and Implications in Normal and Hypertensive Pulmonary Circulations

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Kendall S.; Lammers, Steven R.; Shandas, Robin

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces the concept of pulmonary vascular stiffness, discusses its increasingly recognized importance as a diagnostic marker in the evaluation of pulmonary vascular disease, and describes methods to measure and model it clinically, experimentally, and computationally. It begins with a description of systems-level methods to evaluate pulmonary vascular compliance and recent clinical efforts in applying such techniques to better predict patient outcomes in pulmonary arterial hypertension. It then progresses from the systems-level to the local level, discusses proposed methods by which upstream pulmonary vessels increase in stiffness, introduces concepts around vascular mechanics, and concludes by describing recent work incorporating advanced numerical methods to more thoroughly evaluate changes in local mechanical properties of pulmonary arteries. PMID:23733649

  6. [Treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Roman, Antonio; López-Meseguer, Manuel; Domingo, Enric

    2015-06-22

    Treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension has achieved significant progress over the past 20 years. Currently, 3 groups of drugs have proven useful for the treatment of this disease: endothelin receptor antagonist, phosphodiesterase inhibitors and prostacyclin and its analogues. It is recommended to initiate treatment with one of these drugs, the choice depending on the initial severity of patient disease and the preferences of the treating physician. When the patient does not have a satisfactory response, new drugs acting at a different pathway are most commonly added. At this time, considering referral for lung transplantation could be an alternative. Most experts recommend grouping maximum experience in what is known as expert centers. Treatment has led to better survival in these patients, but there is still a long way to cure this life-threatening disease.

  7. Anticoagulation in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jeffrey C; Pugliese, Steven C; Fox, Daniel L; Badesch, David B

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by molecular and pathologic alteration to the pulmonary circulation, resulting in increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular failure, and eventual death. Pharmacologic treatment of PAH consists of use of a multitude of pulmonary vasodilators, sometimes in combination. PAH has been associated with increased thrombosis and disrupted coagulation and fibrinolysis, making anticoagulation an attractive and frequently employed therapeutic modality. Observational studies have provided some insight into the therapeutic potential of anticoagulation in idiopathic PAH, but there is a distinct lack of well-controlled prospective trials. Due to the conflicting evidence, there is a large amount of heterogeneity in the application of therapeutic anticoagulation in PAH and further well-controlled prospective trials are needed to clarify its role in treating PAH.

  8. Relationship of effective arterial elastance to demographic and arterial characteristics in normotensive and hypertensive adults.

    PubMed

    Saba, P S; Roman, M J; Ganau, A; Pini, R; Jones, E C; Pickering, T G; Devereux, R B

    1995-09-01

    To evaluate demographic and vascular correlates of the effective arterial elastance noninvasively in normotensive and hypertensive adults. In 202 subjects carotid ultrasonography and external arterial tonometry were simultaneously performed; carotid cross-sectional area, absolute and relative wall thicknesses, Peterson's and Young's elastic moduli and beta', a pressure-dependent index of arterial stiffness, were calculated. The impact of reflected waves on central pressure waveforms was evaluated by the 'augmentation index' (the relative increment in systolic pressure caused by the late-systolic peak). Left ventricular mass and relative wall thickness were assessed echocardiographically. The effective arterial elastance was estimated by dividing the pressure at the dicrotic notch by the Doppler-determined stroke index. The effective arterial elastance was higher in women among normotensives but similar between sexes among hypertensive subjects. It was correlated to age, mean blood pressure, body mass index and measures of arterial function, including Peterson's and Young's elastic moduli and beta', and to the augmentation index. It was also related to absolute and relative carotid wall thicknesses, lumen diameter and indexed cross-sectional area. Age, beta' and carotid cross-sectional area independently predicted effective arterial elastance in multiple regression analysis. Effective arterial elastance is related to demographic and arterial structural and functional characteristics. Increases in effective arterial elastance resulting from altered arterial structure and function may play a role in inducing left ventricular adaptative modifications.

  9. Diastolic dysfunction in arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    de Simone, G; Palmieri, V

    2001-01-01

    Left ventricular diastolic properties are important markers of pump function and are frequently abnormal when myocardial insults alter tissue structure. Alterations can be limited to the early diastolic phase (early active relaxation) or to late diastolic filling (late ventricular compliance), but more often involve regulation of both phases of diastole. In asymptomatic patients with arterial hypertension, left ventricular relaxation is often prolonged, independently, at least in part, of cardiac loading conditions and left ventricular geometry, but this abnormality is associated with early signs of systolic dysfunction. Uncontrolled hypertension, diabetes, and obesity are most often associated with ischemic heart disease and impaired diastolic function. Reducing blood pressure with antihypertension therapy will reduce myocardial afterload, regress LVH, and improve systolic and diastolic function. In patients with symptoms of CHF with a normal ejection fraction, however, changes in therapy may be indicated. Greater emphasis should be placed on using medications that decrease myocardial load, but also reduce the effects of neurohormonal activation. (c)2001 by Le Jacq Communications, Inc.

  10. Chronic antihypertensive treatment improves pulse pressure but not large artery mechanics in a mouse model of congenital vascular stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Halabi, Carmen M.; Broekelmann, Thomas J.; Knutsen, Russell H.; Ye, Li; Mecham, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Increased arterial stiffness is a common characteristic of humans with Williams-Beuren syndrome and mouse models of elastin insufficiency. Arterial stiffness is associated with multiple negative cardiovascular outcomes, including myocardial infarction, stroke, and sudden death. Therefore, identifying therapeutic interventions that improve arterial stiffness in response to changes in elastin levels is of vital importance. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of chronic pharmacologic therapy with different classes of antihypertensive medications on arterial stiffness in elastin insufficiency. Elastin-insufficient mice 4–6 wk of age and wild-type littermates were subcutaneously implanted with osmotic micropumps delivering a continuous dose of one of the following: vehicle, losartan, nicardipine, or propranolol for 8 wk. At the end of treatment period, arterial blood pressure and large artery compliance and remodeling were assessed. Our results show that losartan and nicardipine treatment lowered blood pressure and pulse pressure in elastin-insufficient mice. Elastin and collagen content of abdominal aortas as well as ascending aorta and carotid artery biomechanics were not affected by any of the drug treatments in either genotype. By reducing pulse pressure and shifting the working pressure range of an artery to a more compliant region of the pressure-diameter curve, antihypertensive medications may mitigate the consequences of arterial stiffness, an effect that is drug class independent. These data emphasize the importance of early recognition and long-term management of hypertension in Williams-Beuren syndrome and elastin insufficiency. PMID:26232234

  11. Small artery remodeling in hypertension and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rizzoni, Damiano; Agabiti Rosei, Enrico

    2006-04-01

    The development of structural changes in the systemic vasculature is the end result of established hypertension. In essential hypertension, small artery smooth muscle cells are restructured around a smaller lumen, and there is no net growth of the vascular wall, whereas in some secondary forms of hypertension and in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, a hypertrophic remodeling may be detected. Indices of small resistance artery structure, such as the tunica media to internal lumen ratio, may have a strong prognostic significance in hypertensive patients. Various antihypertensive drugs seem to have different effects on vascular structure. A complete normalization of small resistance artery structure was demonstrated in hypertensive patients, after prolonged and effective therapy with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II-receptor blockers, and calcium antagonists. Few data are available in diabetic hypertensive patients; however, blockade of the renin-angiotensin system seems to be effective in this regard.

  12. Experimental exposure to diesel exhaust increases arterial stiffness in man

    PubMed Central

    Lundbäck, Magnus; Mills, Nicholas L; Lucking, Andrew; Barath, Stefan; Donaldson, Ken; Newby, David E; Sandström, Thomas; Blomberg, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Exposure to air pollution is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity, although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Vascular dysfunction reduces arterial compliance and increases central arterial pressure and left ventricular after-load. We determined the effect of diesel exhaust exposure on arterial compliance using a validated non-invasive measure of arterial stiffness. Methods In a double-blind randomized fashion, 12 healthy volunteers were exposed to diesel exhaust (approximately 350 μg/m3) or filtered air for one hour during moderate exercise. Arterial stiffness was measured using applanation tonometry at the radial artery for pulse wave analysis (PWA), as well as at the femoral and carotid arteries for pulse wave velocity (PWV). PWA was performed 10, 20 and 30 min, and carotid-femoral PWV 40 min, post-exposure. Augmentation pressure (AP), augmentation index (AIx) and time to wave reflection (Tr) were calculated. Results Blood pressure, AP and AIx were generally low reflecting compliant arteries. In comparison to filtered air, diesel exhaust exposure induced an increase in AP of 2.5 mmHg (p = 0.02) and in AIx of 7.8% (p = 0.01), along with a 16 ms reduction in Tr (p = 0.03), 10 minutes post-exposure. Conclusion Acute exposure to diesel exhaust is associated with an immediate and transient increase in arterial stiffness. This may, in part, explain the increased risk for cardiovascular disease associated with air pollution exposure. If our findings are confirmed in larger cohorts of susceptible populations, this simple non-invasive method of assessing arterial stiffness may become a useful technique in measuring the impact of real world exposures to combustion derived-air pollution. PMID:19284640

  13. Experimental exposure to diesel exhaust increases arterial stiffness in man.

    PubMed

    Lundbäck, Magnus; Mills, Nicholas L; Lucking, Andrew; Barath, Stefan; Donaldson, Ken; Newby, David E; Sandström, Thomas; Blomberg, Anders

    2009-03-13

    Exposure to air pollution is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity, although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Vascular dysfunction reduces arterial compliance and increases central arterial pressure and left ventricular after-load. We determined the effect of diesel exhaust exposure on arterial compliance using a validated non-invasive measure of arterial stiffness. In a double-blind randomized fashion, 12 healthy volunteers were exposed to diesel exhaust (approximately 350 mug/m3) or filtered air for one hour during moderate exercise. Arterial stiffness was measured using applanation tonometry at the radial artery for pulse wave analysis (PWA), as well as at the femoral and carotid arteries for pulse wave velocity (PWV). PWA was performed 10, 20 and 30 min, and carotid-femoral PWV 40 min, post-exposure. Augmentation pressure (AP), augmentation index (AIx) and time to wave reflection (Tr) were calculated. Blood pressure, AP and AIx were generally low reflecting compliant arteries. In comparison to filtered air, diesel exhaust exposure induced an increase in AP of 2.5 mmHg (p = 0.02) and in AIx of 7.8% (p = 0.01), along with a 16 ms reduction in Tr (p = 0.03), 10 minutes post-exposure. Acute exposure to diesel exhaust is associated with an immediate and transient increase in arterial stiffness. This may, in part, explain the increased risk for cardiovascular disease associated with air pollution exposure. If our findings are confirmed in larger cohorts of susceptible populations, this simple non-invasive method of assessing arterial stiffness may become a useful technique in measuring the impact of real world exposures to combustion derived-air pollution.

  14. [Arterial hypertension and metabolic disorders].

    PubMed

    Dzherieva, I S; Volkova, N I

    2010-01-01

    Combination of arterial hypertension (AH) and metabolic disorders accelerates development of organic lesions in target organs. As shown in recent prospective studies, myocardial hypertrophy rate closely correlated with severity of metabolic disturbance. The thickness of interventricular septum and posterior wall show stronger dependence of severity of metabolic disorders than left ventricular density while left atrial enlargement is correlates with fasting glycemia and excess body mass. There is close relationship between microalbuminurea and hyperinsulinemia and the number of metabolic syndrome components is linearly correlated with glomerular filtration rate below 60 ml/min. It is shown that rigidity of arteries is a new independent risk factor of cardiovascular complications in obese patients. Moreover, metabolic disturbances cause affective disorders that impair quality of life and therapy motivation. Combination of AH, metabolic disturbances, and borderline psychic disorders dictated consideration of abnormal melatonin secretion as a condition developing as a consequence of disturbed adaptive circadian rhythms. This hypothesis was prompted by the discovery of the so-called "clock genes" in the central nervous system and practically all peripheral organs including heart, vessels, and adipose tissue.

  15. Iranian Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Registry.

    PubMed

    Masjedi, Mohammad Reza; Fahimi, Fanak; Sharif-Kashani, Babak; Malek Mohammad, Majid; Saliminejad, Leila; Monjazebi, Fateme

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is a fatal disorder with a prevalence of 8.6 per million. We introduce a registry website for IPAH and PAH patients ( www.IPAH.ir) for access and efficient delivery of government-aided and subsidized antihypertensive medications. The IPAH registry was opened in November 2009. Information of IPAH and PAH patients with a username and password were uploaded in the site. Data entry was possible only via the physicians and healthcare organizations via internet that were given a personalized username and password for entry. Following the patients' profile submission, a scientific committee composed of a cardiologist and a pulmonologist who were selected by the Ministry of Health of Iran (MOH), evaluated the data. The eligibility of the patient to receive the medications was confirmed after evaluation. If the patient was eligible, 82% of the Bosentan cost was paid by MOH. To date, one hundred and sixteen patients (82 females, 34 males) have been registered. The mean pulmonary artery pressure by right heart catheterization was 69.24±17 mmHg (ranging from 35 to 110 mmHg). The first online Iranian registry program for IPAH and PAH patients is believed to supply essential information for health care providers in the field.

  16. Arterial stiffness and enlargement in mild-to-moderate chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Briet, M; Bozec, E; Laurent, S; Fassot, C; London, G M; Jacquot, C; Froissart, M; Houillier, P; Boutouyrie, P

    2006-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Arterial stiffness and remodeling have been well documented in patients with end-stage renal disease, but little is known about arterial phenotype in CKD patients with moderate reduction in glomerular filtration rate (GFR). In total, 95 patients (58+/-15 years, mean+/-s.d.) with CKD and GFR measured by renal clearance of (51)Cr-ethylenediaminetetraacetate were compared to 121 hypertensive patients without CKD (59+/-11 years), and 57 normotensive subjects (56+/-6 years). Common carotid artery diameter, intima-media thickness (IMT), distensibility, and Young's elastic modulus were noninvasively determined with a high-definition echotracking system. Patients with CKD had a significantly larger carotid internal diameter than in hypertensives and normotensives (6.32+/-1.05, 5.84+/-0.74, and 5.50+/-0.64 m x 10(-3), respectively; P<0.001), resulting in 25% and 11% increases in circumferential wall stress, respectively, since no significant difference in IMT was observed. Carotid distensibility and elastic modulus did not significantly differ between CKD and hypertensives; normotensives had significantly higher distensibility and lower elastic modulus than CKD and hypertensive patients. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity was significantly higher in CKD patients than in hypertensives and normotensives. In multivariate analyses either involving the entire population or restricted to CKD patients, GFR was independently and strongly related to carotid diameter and elastic modulus. Arterial enlargement and increased arterial stiffness occur in parallel with the decline in renal function in patients with mild-to-moderate CKD.

  17. Modifiable risk factors for increased arterial stiffness in outpatient nephrology.

    PubMed

    Elewa, Usama; Fernandez-Fernandez, Beatriz; Alegre, Raquel; Sanchez-Niño, Maria D; Mahillo-Fernández, Ignacio; Perez-Gomez, Maria Vanessa; El-Fishawy, Hussein; Belal, Dawlat; Ortiz, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Arterial stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV), is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events and mortality. Arterial stiffness increases with age. However, modifiable risk factors such as smoking, BP and salt intake also impact on PWV. The finding of modifiable risk factors may lead to the identification of treatable factors, and, thus, is of interest to practicing nephrologist. We have now studied the prevalence and correlates of arterial stiffness, assessed by PWV, in 191 patients from nephrology outpatient clinics in order to identify modifiable risk factors for arterial stiffness that may in the future guide therapeutic decision-making. PWV was above normal levels for age in 85/191 (44.5%) patients. Multivariate analysis showed that advanced age, systolic BP, diabetes mellitus, serum uric acid and calcium polystyrene sulfonate therapy or calcium-containing medication were independent predictors of PWV. A new parameter, Delta above upper limit of normal PWV (Delta PWV) was defined to decrease the weight of age on PWV values. Delta PWV was calculated as (measured PWV) - (upper limit of the age-adjusted PWV values for the general population). Mean±SD Delta PWV was 0.76±1.60 m/sec. In multivariate analysis, systolic blood pressure, active smoking and calcium polystyrene sulfonate therapy remained independent predictors of higher delta PWV, while age, urinary potassium and beta blocker therapy were independent predictors of lower delta PWV. In conclusion, arterial stiffness was frequent in nephrology outpatients. Systolic blood pressure, smoking, serum uric acid, calcium-containing medications, potassium metabolism and non-use of beta blockers are modifiable factors associated with increased arterial stiffness in Nephrology outpatients.

  18. Aerobic training-induced improvements in arterial stiffness are not sustained in older adults with multiple cardiovascular risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Madden, K M; Lockhart, C; Cuff, D; Potter, T F; Meneilly, G S

    2013-01-01

    There is a well-established relationship between increased arterial stiffness and cardiovascular mortality. We examined whether a long-term aerobic exercise intervention (6 months) would increase arterial compliance in older adults with hypertension complicated by Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and hyperlipidemia. A total of 52 older adults (mean age 69.3±0.6 years, 30 males and 22 females) with diet/oral hypoglycemic-controlled T2DM, hypertension and hypercholesterolemia were recruited. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of two groups: an aerobic group (6 months vigorous aerobic exercise, AT group) and a non-aerobic group (6 months of no aerobic exercise, NA group). Arterial stiffness was measured as pulse-wave velocity (PWV) using the Complior device. Aerobic training decreased arterial stiffness as measured by both radial (P=0.001, 2-way analysis of variance with repeated measures) and femoral (P=0.002) PWV. This was due to a decrease in arterial stiffness in the AT group after 3 months of training, which was not maintained after 6-month training for either radial (P=0.707) or femoral (P=0.680) PWV. Our findings indicate that in older adults with multiple cardiovascular risk factors, short-term improvements in arterial stiffness became attenuated over the long term. PMID:22951625

  19. Pulmonary arterial hypertension: Basic knowledge for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Santos-Ribeiro, Diana; Mendes-Ferreira, Pedro; Maia-Rocha, Carolina; Adão, Rui; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F; Brás-Silva, Carmen

    2016-10-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a progressive syndrome based on diverse aetiologies, which is characterized by a persistent increase in pulmonary vascular resistance and overload of the right ventricle, leading to heart failure and death. Currently, none of the available treatments is able to cure pulmonary arterial hypertension; additional research is therefore needed to unravel the associated pathophysiological mechanisms. This review summarizes current knowledge related to this disorder, and the several experimental animal models that can mimic pulmonary arterial hypertension and are available for translational research.

  20. Endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness in ischemic stroke: the role of sleep-disordered breathing.

    PubMed

    Cereda, Carlo W; Tamisier, Renaud; Manconi, Mauro; Andreotti, Jennifer; Frangi, Jane; Pifferini, Valeria; Bassetti, Claudio L

    2013-04-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) represents a risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity after a cerebral ischemic event (acute ischemic event, ischemic stroke, or transient ischemic attack). In the present study, endothelial function and arterial stiffness were analyzed in patients who experienced a postacute ischemic event with relation to SDB, sleep disruption, and nocturnal oxygenation parameters. SDB was assessed by full polysomnography in patients with acute ischemic event 3 months after the admission at our stroke unit. Moderate-severe SDB was defined according to the apnea-hypopnea index as apnea-hypopnea index ≥ 20. Endothelial function and arterial stiffness were assessed by peripheral arterial tonometry using Endo-PAT 2000. Thirty-seven patients were included. The augmentation index was significantly different between patients with apnea-hypopnea index <20 and apnea-hypopnea index ≥ 20 (22.4 ± 15.6% versus 34.6 ± 21.6%; P=0.042), whereas reactive hyperemia index level was not (2.02 ± 0.65 versus 2.31 ± 0.61; P=0.127). Patients with apnea-hypopnea index ≥ 20 showed an increased risk for arterial stiffness (odds ratio, 5.98 [95% CI, 1.11-41.72]) even when controlling for age, sex, body mass index, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. The augmentation index was correlated with the arousal index (P=0.010) and with mean O2 saturation (P = 0.043). Poststroke patients with moderate-severe SDB were more prone to have increased arterial stiffness, although we did not find significant differences in endothelial function. Arterial stiffness also correlated with sleep disruption (arousal index) and mean O2 saturation.

  1. Which prognostic factors should be used in pulmonary arterial hypertension in elderly patients?

    PubMed Central

    Akdeniz, Bahri; Ozpelit, Ebru

    2017-01-01

    In recent times, the prevalence of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is more commonly seen among elderly populations. The increased prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, obesity, arterial stiffness, as well as diastolic dysfunction, may cause endothelial dysfunction and affect pulmonary vasculature. Furthermore, older patients have certain differences in clinical characteristics and outcomes. In this article, the special characteristics of aging in PAH patients have been reviewed, while the risk predictors of elderly patients are also discussed. PMID:28270839

  2. POA 02-2 ATHEROGENIC VASCULAR STIFFNESS AND HYPERTENSION: CAUSE OR EFFECT?

    PubMed

    Avolio, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    integrity of medial elastin, leading to arterial calcification and altered arterial stiffness. The changes in smooth muscle function are also affected by anchoring properties of integrins, in turn modifying wall properties. Superimposed on the cell-signalling phenomena modulating intimal and medial function is the modification of wall properties due to distending pressure. The task of assessing whether the relationship between atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis and hypertension constitutes a cause or effect presents a formidable challenge. However, emerging evidence suggests that investigating the inter-relationships may elucidate potential feedback signalling pathways that may be interrogated to possibly delay the ill effects of compromised vascular function and development of hypertension.

  3. [Arterial mean pressure and pulse pressure in young hypertensive patients].

    PubMed

    Carmona Puerta, Raimundo; Acosta de Armas, Francisco; Pérez de Armas, Alina; Morales Salinas, Alberto; González Paz, Héctor; Guirado Blanco, Otmara

    2006-09-02

    Evidence shows that pulse pressure (PP) is very useful when assessing the hypertensive patient and this has led to a lower use of mean arterial pressure (MAP). We intended to demonstrate that MAP should be better than PP in young hypertensive patients. Cross-sectional study in 70 white males with ages among 16-40 years, distributed in two groups of 35 individuals labelled as control group or hypertensive patients, who were assessed by echocardiography. PP was similar (36.37 +/- 7.90 mmHg vs. 36.67 +/- 9.41 mmHg, p = 0.8851) in both control and hypertensive groups, as well as the arterial compliance (2.22 +/- 0.62 ml/mmHg vs. 2.41 +/- 0.77 ml/mmHg, p = .2555) and the aortic stiffness index (0.88 +/- 0.23 vs. 0.91 +/- 0.33, P = .6591). MAP (94.85 +/- 8.68 mmHg vs. 115.11 +/- 10.01 mmHg, P < .001) and total peripheral resistance index (TPRI) [2681.42 +/- 602.31 dinas.s.cm-5/m2 vs. 3120.68 +/- 741.74 dinas.s.cm-5/m2, p = .0066] were higher in hypertensive patients. In our cross-sectional assessment in young hypertensive patients, MAP and its determiner (TPRI) were modified, with no important changes in the PP or its determiners.

  4. Effects of age and aerobic capacity on arterial stiffness in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Vaitkevicius, P V; Fleg, J L; Engel, J H; O'Connor, F C; Wright, J G; Lakatta, L E; Yin, F C; Lakatta, E G

    1993-10-01

    It has been well established that arterial stiffness, manifest as an increase in arterial pulse wave velocity or late systolic amplification of the carotid artery pressure pulse, increases with age. However, the populations studied in prior investigations were not rigorously screened to exclude clinical hypertension, occult coronary disease, or diabetes. Furthermore, it is unknown whether exercise capacity or chronic physical endurance training affects the age-associated increase in arterial stiffness. Carotid arterial pressure pulse augmentation index (AGI), using applanation tonometry, and aortic pulse wave velocity (APWV) were measured in 146 male and female volunteers 21 to 96 years old from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging, who were rigorously screened to exclude clinical and occult cardiovascular disease. Aerobic capacity was determined in all individuals by measurement of maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) during treadmill exercise. In this healthy, largely sedentary cohort, the arterial stiffness indexes AGI and APWV increased approximately fivefold and twofold, respectively, across the age span in both men and women, despite only a 14% increase in systolic blood pressure (SBP). These age-associated increases in AGI and APWV were of a similar magnitude to those in prior studies of less rigorously screened populations. Both AGI and APWV varied inversely with VO2max, and this relationship, at least for AGI, was independent of age. In endurance trained male athletes, 54 to 75 years old (VO2max = 44 +/- 3 mL.kg-1.min-1), the arterial stiffness indexes were significantly reduced relative to their sedentary age peers (AGI, 36% lower; APWV, 26% lower) despite similar blood pressures. Even in normotensive, rigorously screened volunteers in whom SBP increased an average of only 14% between ages 20 and 90 years, major age-associated increases of arterial stiffness occur. Higher physical conditioning status, indexed by VO2max, was associated with reduced

  5. [Arterial hypertension secondary to endocrine disorders].

    PubMed

    Minder, Anna; Zulewski, Henryk

    2015-06-01

    Endocrine hypertension offers a potentially curative therapy if the underlying cause is identified and treated accordingly. In contrast to the high prevalence of arterial hypertension especially in the elderly, the classical endocrine causes remain a rare entity. Among patients with arterial hypertension the prevalence of Cushing's syndrome or pheochromocytoma is less than 1%. Primary hyperaldosteronism is more frequent with a reported prevalence of up to 9%. In order to avoid unnecessary, costly and potentially harmful evaluations and therapies due to the limited sensitivity and specificity of the critical endocrine tests it is mandatory to limit the exploration for endocrine causes to preselected patients with high pretest probability for an endocrine disorder. Younger age at manifestation of arterial hypertension or drug resistant hypertension together with other clinical signs of an endocrine disorder should raise the suspicion and prompt the appropriate evaluation.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: pulmonary arterial hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... 4 Sources for This Page Austin ED, Loyd JE. The genetics of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Circ Res. ... Gräf S, Hinderhofer K, Humbert M, Keiles SB, Loyd JE, Morrell NW, Newman JH, Soubrier F, Trembath RC, ...

  7. Tinnitus and arterial hypertension: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Ricardo Rodrigues; de Azevedo, Andréia Aparecida; Penido, Norma de Oliveira

    2015-11-01

    Tinnitus is considered a multi-factorial symptom. Arterial hypertension has been cited as a tinnitus etiological factor. To assess the scientific evidence on the associations between arterial hypertension and tinnitus. A systematic review was performed using PubMed, ISI Web, Lilacs and SciELO scientific databases. This review included articles published in Portuguese, Spanish, French and English correlating tinnitus with hypertension. Letters to editors and case reports were excluded. A total of 424 articles were identified, of which only 20 met the inclusion criteria. Studies that analyzed the incidence of hypertension in tinnitus patients tended to show an association, while those that evaluated the incidence of tinnitus in hypertensive patients did not. There is evidence of an association between tinnitus and hypertension, although a cause and effect relationship is uncertain. Changes in the cochlear microcirculation, resulting in hearing loss, may be an adjuvant factor in tinnitus pathophysiology.

  8. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in congenital heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Beghetti, Maurice; Tissot, Cecile

    2009-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension complicates the course of many children and adults with congenital heart diseases (CHDs). The increase in pulmonary pressure associated with CHD is secondary to either increased pulmonary blood flow or increased postcapillary pressures. Pulmonary arterial hypertension is in the vast majority associated with congenital cardiac shunts. Despite major advances in the understanding of the regulation of the pulmonary vascular bed and the pulmonary endothelial lesions leading to pulmonary vascular disease, despite the advances in surgical repair and the discovery of potential therapies in the pre- and postoperative period, pulmonary hypertension still carries a significant mortality and morbidity in patients with CHD. The recent introduction of targeted therapies in other forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension has led to a renewed interest in pulmonary hypertension associated with CHD and this particularly for the most advanced form, the so-called Eisenmenger syndrome (ES). This review summarizes the current knowledge on pulmonary hypertension associated with CHD, focusing on the pathophysiology and treatment of ES.

  9. Cardiovascular Health and Arterial Stiffness: The Maine Syracuse Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Crichton, Georgina E; Elias, Merrill F; Robbins, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Ideal cardiovascular health is a recently defined construct by the American Heart Association (AHA) to promote cardiovascular disease reduction. Arterial stiffness is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The extent to which the presence of multiple prevalent cardiovascular risk factors and health behaviors is associated with arterial stiffness is unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the association between the AHA construct of cardiovascular health and arterial stiffness, as indexed by pulse wave velocity and pulse pressure. The AHA health metrics, comprising of four health behaviors (smoking, body mass index, physical activity, and diet) and three health factors (total cholesterol, blood pressure, and fasting plasma glucose) were evaluated among 505 participants in the Maine-Syracuse Longitudinal Study. Outcome measures were carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) and pulse pressure measured at 4 to 5-year follow-up. Better cardiovascular health, comprising both health factors and behaviors, was associated with lower arterial stiffness, as indexed by pulse wave velocity and pulse pressure. Those with at least five health metrics at ideal levels had significantly lower PWV (9.8 m/s) than those with two or less ideal health metrics (11.7 m/s) (P<0.001). This finding remained with the addition of demographic and PWV-related variables (P=0.004). PMID:24384629

  10. Both diabetes and fetuin-A are independently associated with increased risk of arterial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Ou, Horng-Yih; Lu, Feng-Hwa; Wu, Hung-Tsung; Hung, Hao-Chang; Wu, Jin-Shang; Yang, Yi-Ching; Chang, Chih-Jen

    2015-05-20

    Arterial stiffness is a functional assessment of vascular damage caused by cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Fetuin-A is associated with subclinical CVD and incident or fatal CVD, with some modification of its effect occurring with the presence of diabetes. We investigated the impact of different glycemic statuses and serum fetuin-A levels on arterial stiffness. A total of 312 age- and sex-matched subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and newly diagnosed diabetes (NDD) were recruited. Serum fetuin-A levels were measured, and arterial stiffness was assessed by brachial-ankle pulse-wave velocity (baPWV). We found that the mean values of baPWV were 1533±338, 1518±353, 1589±307, and 1690±414 cm/s, and fetuin-A levels were 298±69, 313±67, 330±86, and 342±93 μg/ml, in subjects with NGT, IFG, IGT, and NDD, respectively (both p<0.001, test for trend). NDD subjects had significantly higher baPWV and fetuin-A levels than those with NGT. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that age, fetuin-A, diabetes, hypertension, and hypertriglyceridemia are independently associated factors of baPWV after adjusting for cardiometabolic risk factors, HOMA-IR, and adiponectin. Both diabetes and fetuin-A levels are independently associated with arterial stiffness. Fetuin-A may further aggravate increased arterial stiffness in diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The relationship between various measures of obesity and arterial stiffness in morbidly obese patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Arterial stiffness assessed by carotid femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) is an independent predictor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. We aimed to investigate how various measures of body composition affect arterial stiffness. Methods This is an analysis of cross-sectional baseline data from a controlled clinical trial addressing changes in arterial stiffness after either surgery or lifestyle intervention in a population of morbidly obese patients. High-fidelity applanation tonometry (Millar®, Sphygmocor®) was used to measure pulse wave velocity (PWV). Carotid femoral PWV is a direct measure of arterial stiffness and is considered to be the gold standard method. The Inbody 720 Body Composition Analyzer was used for bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). Spearman's correlation, independent samples t-test, chi-square tests, Fisher's exact test and multiple linear regression analyses were used as statistical methods. Results A total of 133 patients (79 women), with a mean (SD) age of 43 (11) years were included in the study. Men had a significantly higher prevalence of obesity related comorbidities and significantly higher PWV, 9.1 (2.0) m/s vs. 8.1 (1.8) m/s, p = 0.003, than women. In the female group, PWV was positively correlated with WC, WHtR, BMI and visceral fat area. In the male group, PWV was negatively correlated with BMI. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that increasing BMI, WC, WHtR, visceral fat area and fat mass were independently associated with higher PWV in women, but not in men, after adjustment for age, hypertension and type 2 diabetes. Conclusion Most measures of general and abdominal obesity were predictors of arterial stiffness in female morbidly obese patients. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT00626964 PMID:21284837

  12. Arterial stiffness and inflammatory response to psychophysiological stress.

    PubMed

    Ellins, Elizabeth; Halcox, Julian; Donald, Ann; Field, Bryony; Brydon, Lena; Deanfield, John; Steptoe, Andrew

    2008-08-01

    The processes through which psychological stress influences cardiovascular disease are poorly understood, but may involve activation of hemodynamic, neuroendocrine and inflammatory responses. We assessed the relationship between carotid arterial stiffness and inflammatory responses to acute psychophysiologic stress. Participants were 155 healthy men and women aged 55.3, SD 2.7 years. Blood samples for the assessment of plasma fibrinogen, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha and interleukin (IL) 6 were drawn at baseline, immediately following standardized behavioral tasks, and 45 min later. Carotid artery stiffness was measured ultrasonically three years later, and blood pressure and heart rate responses were recorded. The tasks induced substantial increases in blood pressure and heart rate, together with increased fibrinogen, TNFalpha and IL-6 concentration. Carotid stiffness was positively associated with body mass, waist/hip ratio, blood pressure, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and C-reactive protein, and inversely with high density lipoprotein and grade of employment. Baseline levels of inflammatory variables were not related to carotid artery stiffness. But carotid stiffness was greater in participants with larger fibrinogen (p=0.037) and TNFalpha (p=0.036) responses to psychophysiological stress. These effects were independent of age, gender, grade of employment, smoking, body mass, waist/hip ratio, systolic and diastolic pressure, high and low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and C-reactive protein. There were no associations between carotid stiffness and stress responses in IL-6, blood pressure, or heart rate. We conclude that individual differences in inflammatory responses to psychophysiological stress are independently related to structural changes in artery walls that reflect increased cardiovascular disease risk.

  13. Application of speckle-tracking in the evaluation of carotid artery function in subjects with hypertension and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Eric Y; Brunner, Gerd; Dokainish, Hisham; Hartley, Craig J; Taffet, George; Lakkis, Nasser; Taylor, Addison A; Misra, Arunima; McCulloch, Marti L; Morrisett, Joel D; Virani, Salim S; Ballantyne, Christie M; Nagueh, Sherif F; Nambi, Vijay

    2013-08-01

    Speckle-tracking enables direct tracking of carotid arterial wall motion. Timing intervals determined with carotid speckle-tracking and slopes calculated from carotid artery area versus cardiac cycle curves may provide further information on arterial function and stiffness. The proposed arterial stiffness parameters were examined in healthy controls (n = 20), nondiabetic patients with hypertension (n = 20), and patients with type 2 diabetes (n = 21). Bilateral electrocardiographically gated ultrasonograms of the distal common carotid artery were acquired using a 12-MHz vascular probe. Four timing intervals were derived from speckle-tracked carotid arterial strain curves: (1) carotid predistension period, (2) peak carotid arterial strain time, (3) arterial distension period, and (4) arterial diastolic time. In addition, carotid artery area curves were recorded over the cardiac cycle and subdivided into four segments, S1 to S4, relating to arterial distention and contraction periods. Mean far wall predistension period and peak carotid arterial strain time were more delayed in patients with diabetes and hypertension than in controls. Global mean arterial distension period was prolonged and arterial diastolic time was shorter in patients with hypertension and diabetes than in controls. Slopes of segments S2 and S4 were markedly steeper in the combined group of patients with hypertension and diabetes compared with healthy controls (P = .03 and P = .02, respectively). Speckle-tracking-based measures of arterial stiffness may provide potential additive value in assessing vascular function in patients at risk for cardiovascular disease. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  14. Inhibition of SRF/myocardin reduces aortic stiffness by targeting vascular smooth muscle cell stiffening in hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ning; Lee, Jia-Jye; Stoll, Shaunrick; Ma, Ben; Wiener, Robert; Wang, Charles; Costa, Kevin D.; Qiu, Hongyu

    2017-01-01

    Aims Increased aortic stiffness is a fundamental manifestation of hypertension. However, the molecular mechanisms involved remain largely unknown. We tested the hypothesis that abnormal intrinsic vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) mechanical properties in large arteries, but not in distal arteries, contribute to the pathogenesis of aortic stiffening in hypertension, mediated by the serum response factor (SRF)/myocardin signalling pathway. Methods and results Four month old male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were studied. Using atomic force microscopy, significant VSMC stiffening was observed in the large conducting aorta compared with the distal arteries in SHR (P < 0.001), however, this regional variation was not observed in WKY rats (P > 0.4). The increase of VSMC stiffness was accompanied by a parallel increase in the expression of SRF by 9.8-fold and of myocardin by 10.5-fold in thoracic aortic VSMCs from SHR vs. WKY rats, resulting in a significant increase of downstream stiffness-associated genes (all, P < 0.01 vs. WKY). Inhibition of SRF/myocardin expression selectively attenuated aortic VSMC stiffening, and normalized downstream targets in VSMCs isolated from SHR but not from WKY rats. In vivo, 2 weeks of treatment with SRF/myocardin inhibitor delivered by subcutaneous osmotic minipump significantly reduced aortic stiffness and then blood pressure in SHR but not in WKY rats, although concomitant changes in aortic wall remodelling were not detected during this time frame. Conclusions SRF/myocardin pathway acts as a pivotal mediator of aortic VSMC mechanical properties and plays a central role in the pathological aortic stiffening in hypertension. Attenuation of aortic VSMC stiffening by pharmacological inhibition of SRF/myocardin signalling presents a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of hypertension by targeting the cellular contributors to aortic stiffness. PMID:28003268

  15. A review of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gan, C.T.; Noordegraaf, A. Vonk; Marques, K.M.J.; Bronzwaer, J.G.F.; Postmus, P.E.; Boonstra, A.

    2004-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a disease characterised by an increased pulmonary artery pressure. The precapillary pulmonary arteries show distinct pathobiological changes, i.e. medial hypertrophy, intimal fibrosis, microthrombi and plexiform lesions. Although the pathogenesis is not completely understood, pulmonary vascular proliferation and remodelling, due to a variety of mediators, is believed to play the pathogenetic key role. Genetic research reveals molecular deformities and gene mutations associated with phenotypic PAH. This article covers novel insights into pathobiology, pathogenesis and genes of PAH, which led to a novel classification system and a diagnostic work-up, emanated from the World Health Organisation Symposium on Pulmonary Hypertension in Venice in June 2003. PMID:25696347

  16. Non-invasive measurements of arterial compliance in hypertensive compared with normotensive adults.

    PubMed

    Roman, M J; Pini, R; Pickering, T G; Devereux, R B

    1992-08-01

    To determine differences in arterial compliance attributable to hypertension. Since measurements of arterial compliance have tended to vary in the past according to the method used, a new technique comprising carotid ultrasound and simultaneous, calibrated, carotid pressure waveform measurements was tested in 43 hypertensives and 43 control subjects matched for age, gender and body size. There was a significant reduction in compliance among the hypertensive patients, as estimated by the elastic modulus and the ratio of stroke volume to pulse pressure. However, when the non-linearity of the pressure-volume relationship and the impact of distending pressure were taken into account, by the arterial stiffness index and by the increase in arterial wall thickness associated with hypertension by Young's modulus, there were no significant differences in arterial compliance between the two groups.

  17. Role of COX-2-derived PGE2 on vascular stiffness and function in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Avendaño, M S; Martínez-Revelles, S; Aguado, A; Simões, M R; González-Amor, M; Palacios, R; Guillem-Llobat, P; Vassallo, D V; Vila, L; García-Puig, J; Beltrán, L M; Alonso, M J; Cachofeiro, M V; Salaices, M; Briones, A M

    2016-05-01

    Prostanoids derived from COX-2 and EP receptors are involved in vascular remodelling in different cardiovascular pathologies. This study evaluates the contribution of COX-2 and EP1 receptors to vascular remodelling and function in hypertension. Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and angiotensin II (AngII)-infused (1.44 mg · kg(-1) · day(-1), 2 weeks) mice were treated with the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib (25 mg · kg(-1) · day(-1) i.p) or with the EP1 receptor antagonist SC19220 (10 mg · kg(-1) · day(-1) i.p.). COX-2(-/-) mice with or without AngII infusion were also used. Celecoxib and SC19220 treatment did not modify the altered lumen diameter and wall : lumen ratio in mesenteric resistance arteries from SHR-infused and/or AngII-infused animals. However, both treatments and COX-2 deficiency decreased the augmented vascular stiffness in vessels from hypertensive animals. This was accompanied by diminished vascular collagen deposition, normalization of altered elastin structure and decreased connective tissue growth factor and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene expression. COX-2 deficiency and SC19220 treatment diminished the increased vasoconstrictor responses and endothelial dysfunction induced by AngII infusion. Hypertensive animals showed increased mPGES-1 expression and PGE2 production in vascular tissue, normalized by celecoxib. Celecoxib treatment also decreased AngII-induced macrophage infiltration and TNF-α expression. Macrophage conditioned media (MCM) increased COX-2 and collagen type I expression in vascular smooth muscle cells; the latter was reduced by celecoxib treatment. COX-2 and EP1 receptors participate in the increased extracellular matrix deposition and vascular stiffness, the impaired vascular function and inflammation in hypertension. Targeting PGE2 receptors might have benefits in hypertension-associated vascular damage. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  18. Uteroplacental insufficiency and lactational environment separately influence arterial stiffness and vascular function in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Tare, Marianne; Parkington, Helena C; Bubb, Kristen J; Wlodek, Mary E

    2012-08-01

    Early life environmental influences can have lifelong consequences for health, including the risk of cardiovascular disease. Uteroplacental insufficiency causes fetal undernutrition and impairs fetal growth. Previously we have shown that uteroplacental insufficiency is associated with impaired maternal mammary development, compromising postnatal growth leading to hypertension in male rat offspring. In this study we investigated the roles of prenatal and postnatal nutritional environments on endothelial and smooth muscle reactivity and passive wall stiffness of resistance arteries of male rat offspring. Fetal growth restriction was induced by maternal bilateral uterine vessel ligation (restricted) on day 18 of pregnancy. Control offspring were from mothers that had sham surgery (control) and another group from mothers with their litter size reduced (reduced; litter size reduced to 5 at birth, equivalent to the restricted group). On postnatal day 1, offspring (control, restricted, and reduced) were cross-fostered onto control or restricted mothers. At 6 months, mesenteric and femoral arteries were studied using wire and pressure myography. In restricted-on-restricted rats, wall stiffness was increased, and sensitivity to phenylephrine and relaxation evoked by endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor and sodium nitroprusside were impaired in mesenteric arteries. In femoral arteries, relaxation to sodium nitroprusside was reduced, whereas wall stiffness was unaltered. Cross-fostering restricted offspring onto control mothers alleviated deficits in vascular stiffness and reactivity. Control or reduced offspring who suckled a restricted mother had marked vascular stiffening. In conclusion, prenatal and early postnatal environments separately influence vascular function and stiffness. Furthermore, the early postnatal lactational environment is a determinant of later cardiovascular function.

  19. Effect of upper body aerobic exercise on arterial stiffness in older adults.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Kunihiko; Mendelsohn, Marissa E; Overend, Tom J; Petrella, Robert J

    2009-10-01

    The authors evaluated the effects of acute arm-cycling exercise on arterial stiffness of the brachial artery (BA: working limb) and posterior tibial artery (PTA: nonworking limb) in healthy older participants. Eleven participants were tested to evaluate BA and PTA stiffness. Blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and arterial stiffness indices of the BA and PTA measured by Doppler ultrasound were determined before and 10 min after graded arm-cycling exercise to volitional fatigue on 2 separate days. After the exercise, although BA diameter, brachial systolic BP, pulse pressure, and HR increased significantly (all p < .05), arterial stiffness indices of the BA remained unchanged. Similarly, arterial stiffness indices of the PTA remained unchanged after the exercise, whereas HR increased significantly (p < .05). These results show that acute arm-cycling exercise failed to modify arterial stiffness of the BA and PTA, suggesting that it has no systemic effect on arterial stiffness in healthy older adults.

  20. Wave reflections, arterial stiffness, and orthostatic hypotension.

    PubMed

    Sung, Shih-Hsien; Chen, Zu-Yin; Tseng, Tzu-Wei; Lu, Dai-Yin; Yu, Wen-Chung; Cheng, Hao-Min; Chen, Chen-Huan

    2014-12-01

    The effect of wave reflections on blood pressure change associated with posture remains unclear. We therefore applied a wave separation technique to investigate the relations of the backward pressure wave amplitude with orthostatic pressure changes and orthostatic hypotension (OH). We analyzed data from 613 subjects who had participated in our hemodynamic studies. Measurements of brachial systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressures (DBP), carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV), and backward pressure wave amplitude from a decomposed carotid pressure wave (Pb) were obtained at supine position. SBP and DBP were measured again 3 minutes after standing. OH was defined as a fall of ≥20 mm Hg in SBP and/or ≥10 mm Hg in DBP. Subjects with OH (n = 100) were characterized with significantly higher supine SBP and DBP and significantly lower standing SBP and DBP when compared with subjects without OH. Subjects with OH were also characterized with significantly higher cf-PWV and Pb. cf-PWV and Pb separately were significantly associated with the orthostatic SBP change in univariable and multivariable analyses. Also, cf-PWV and Pb separately were significant predictors of OH in univariable and multivariable analyses. cf-PWV predicted OH in the younger but less so in the older subgroup, whereas Pb demonstrated similar prediction in both subgroups. In a final multivariable model, both cf-PWV and Pb were significant independent predictors of OH. Wave reflections are an independent determinant of orthostatic SBP change and OH in both younger and older subjects. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2014. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Arterial–ventricular coupling and parameters of vascular stiffness in hypertensive patients: Role of gender

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Rosa Maria; Buralli, Simona; Barzacchi, Marta; Dal Canto, Elisa; Ghiadoni, Lorenzo; Taddei, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Objective Non-invasive estimation of arterial–ventricular coupling has been extensively used for the evaluation of cardiovascular performance, however, a relative small amount of data is available regarding arterial–ventricular coupling and its components in hypertension. The present study was designed to investigate the relationship between left ventricular elastance, arterial elastance, parameters of vascular stiffness and the influence of gender in a population of hypertensive individuals. Methods In 102 patients, trans-thoracic cardiac ultrasound, parameters of aortic stiffness (carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity) and wave reflection (augmentation index) were recorded. Ultrasound images of common carotid arteries were acquired for the assessment of intima-media thickness as well as carotid compliance and distensibility coefficient. Results Mean age was 61 years, 32% diabetes, 56% dyslipidemia, 9% previous cardiovascular events; women (n = 32) and men were superimposable for cardiovascular risk factors prevalence. In the population, ventricular elastance was significantly correlated with arterial elastance (r = 0.887), age (r = 0.334), gender (r = −0.494), BMI (r = −0.313), augmentation index (r = 0.479) (all p < 0.001); and with carotid compliance and distensibility coefficient (r = 0.229 and r = − 0.250, respectively, both p < 0.05); however, only arterial elastance and gender were independently associated with ventricular elastance in multiple regression models adjusted for confounding factors. Gender-specific analysis revealed that arterial elastance and augmentation index remained statistically significant associated with ventricular elastance in men (r = 0.275, p = 0.04); instead augmentation index was no longer significant (r = 0.052, p = 0.77) in the female sex. Conclusions In hypertensive patients, main determinants of ventricular elastance are arterial elastance, as an integrated

  2. Effect of Heart Rate on Arterial Stiffness as Assessed by Pulse Wave Velocity.

    PubMed

    Tan, Isabella; Butlin, Mark; Spronck, Bart; Xiao, Huanguang; Avolio, Alberto

    2017-07-24

    Vascular assessment is becoming increasingly important in the diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. In particular, clinical assessment of arterial stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV), is gaining increased interest due to the recognition of PWV as an influential factor on the prognosis of hypertension as well as being an independent predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Whilst age and blood pressure are established as the two major determinants of PWV, the influence of heart rate on PWV measurements remains controversial with conflicting results being observed in both acute and epidemiological studies. In a majority of studies investigating the acute effects of heart rate on PWV, results were confounded by concomitant changes in blood pressure. Observations from epidemiological studies have also failed to converge, with approximately just half of such studies reporting a significant blood-pressure-independent association between heart rate and PWV. Further to the lack of consensus on the effects of heart rate on PWV, the possible mechanisms contributing to observed PWV changes with heart rate have yet to be fully elucidated, although many investigators have attributed heart-rate related changes in arterial stiffness to the viscoelasticity of the arterial wall. With elevated heart rate being an independent prognostic factor of cardiovascular disease and its association with hypertension, the interaction between heart rate and PWV continues to be relevant in assessing cardiovascular risk. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Association of inflammatory gene polymorphisms and conventional risk factors with arterial stiffness by age.

    PubMed

    Kheradmand, Motahare; Niimura, Hideshi; Kuwabara, Kazuyo; Nakahata, Noriko; Nakamura, Akihiko; Ogawa, Shin; Mantjoro, Eva Mariane; Shimatani, Keiichi; Nerome, Yasuhito; Owaki, Tetsuhiro; Kusano, Ken; Takezaki, Toshiro

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory gene polymorphisms are potentially associated with atherosclerosis risk, but their age-related effects are unclear. To investigate the age-related effects of inflammatory gene polymorphisms on arterial stiffness, we conducted cross-sectional and 5-year follow-up studies using the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) as a surrogate marker of arterial stiffness. We recruited 1850 adults aged 34 to 69 years from the Japanese general population. Inflammatory gene polymorphisms were selected from NF-kB1, CD14, IL-6, IL-10, MCP-1, ICAM-1, and TNF-α. Associations of CAVI with genetic and conventional risk factors were estimated by sex and age group (34-49, 50-59, and 60-69 years) using a general linear model. The association with 5-year change in CAVI was examined longitudinally. Glucose intolerance was associated with high CAVI among women in all age groups, while hypertension was associated with high CAVI among participants in all age groups, except younger women. Mean CAVI for the CD14 CC genotype was lower than those for the TT and CT genotypes (P for trend = 0.005), while the CD14 polymorphism was associated with CAVI only among men aged 34 to 49 years (P = 0.006). No association of the other 6 polymorphisms with CAVI was observed. No association with 5-year change in CAVI was apparent. Inflammatory gene polymorphisms were not associated with arterial stiffness. To confirm these results, further large-scale prospective studies are warranted.

  4. Medical treatment update on pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Enderby, Cher Y; Burger, Charles

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a chronic, progressive disease of the pulmonary vasculature resulting in poor outcomes if left untreated. The management of group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension has included the use of prostanoids, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, and endothelin receptor antagonists targeting the prostacyclin, endothelin-1, and nitric oxide pathways. Three new medications have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration over the past couple of years. Macitentan is the newest endothelin receptor antagonist, riociguat is a soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator, and treprostinil diolamine is the first oral prostanoid. This review will focus on the key trials leading to their approval, special considerations for each medication, and their potential place in therapy. The use of combination therapy as initial therapy in pulmonary arterial hypertension will also be discussed.

  5. Diagnosis and assessment of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Badesch, David B; Champion, Hunter C; Sanchez, Miguel Angel Gomez; Hoeper, Marius M; Loyd, James E; Manes, Alessandra; McGoon, Michael; Naeije, Robert; Olschewski, Horst; Oudiz, Ronald J; Torbicki, Adam

    2009-06-30

    The diagnosis and assessment of pulmonary arterial hypertension is a rapidly evolving area, with changes occurring in the definition of the disease, screening and diagnostic techniques, and staging and follow-up assessment. The definition of pulmonary hypertension has been simplified, and is now based on currently available evidence. There has been substantial progress in advancing the imaging techniques and biomarkers used to screen patients for the disease and to follow up their response to therapy. The importance of accurate assessment of right ventricular function in following up the clinical course and response to therapy is more fully appreciated. As new therapies are developed for pulmonary arterial hypertension, screening, prompt diagnosis, and accurate assessment of disease severity become increasingly important. A clear definition of pulmonary hypertension and the development of a rational approach to diagnostic assessment and follow-up using both conventional and new tools will be essential to deriving maximal benefit from our expanding therapeutic armamentarium.

  6. Role of COX‐2‐derived PGE2 on vascular stiffness and function in hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Avendaño, M S; Martínez‐Revelles, S; Aguado, A; Simões, M R; González‐Amor, M; Palacios, R; Guillem‐Llobat, P; Vassallo, D V; Vila, L; García‐Puig, J; Beltrán, L M; Alonso, M J; Cachofeiro, M V

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Prostanoids derived from COX‐2 and EP receptors are involved in vascular remodelling in different cardiovascular pathologies. This study evaluates the contribution of COX‐2 and EP1 receptors to vascular remodelling and function in hypertension. Experimental Approach Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and angiotensin II (AngII)‐infused (1.44 mg·kg−1·day−1, 2 weeks) mice were treated with the COX‐2 inhibitor celecoxib (25 mg·kg−1·day−1 i.p) or with the EP1 receptor antagonist SC19220 (10 mg·kg−1·day−1 i.p.). COX‐2−/− mice with or without AngII infusion were also used. Key Results Celecoxib and SC19220 treatment did not modify the altered lumen diameter and wall : lumen ratio in mesenteric resistance arteries from SHR‐infused and/or AngII‐infused animals. However, both treatments and COX‐2 deficiency decreased the augmented vascular stiffness in vessels from hypertensive animals. This was accompanied by diminished vascular collagen deposition, normalization of altered elastin structure and decreased connective tissue growth factor and plasminogen activator inhibitor‐1 gene expression. COX‐2 deficiency and SC19220 treatment diminished the increased vasoconstrictor responses and endothelial dysfunction induced by AngII infusion. Hypertensive animals showed increased mPGES‐1 expression and PGE2 production in vascular tissue, normalized by celecoxib. Celecoxib treatment also decreased AngII‐induced macrophage infiltration and TNF‐α expression. Macrophage conditioned media (MCM) increased COX‐2 and collagen type I expression in vascular smooth muscle cells; the latter was reduced by celecoxib treatment. Conclusions and Implications COX‐2 and EP1 receptors participate in the increased extracellular matrix deposition and vascular stiffness, the impaired vascular function and inflammation in hypertension. Targeting PGE2 receptors might have benefits in hypertension‐associated vascular damage

  7. Arterial stiffness, oxidative stress, and smoke exposure in wildland firefighters.

    PubMed

    Gaughan, Denise M; Siegel, Paul D; Hughes, Michael D; Chang, Chiung-Yu; Law, Brandon F; Campbell, Corey R; Richards, Jennifer C; Kales, Stefanos F; Chertok, Marcia; Kobzik, Lester; Nguyen, Phuong-son; O'Donnell, Carl R; Kiefer, Max; Wagner, Gregory R; Christiani, David C

    2014-07-01

    To assess the association between exposure, oxidative stress, symptoms, and cardiorespiratory function in wildland firefighters. We studied two Interagency Hotshot Crews with questionnaires, pulse wave analysis for arterial stiffness, spirometry, urinary 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α (8-isoprostane) and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and the smoke exposure marker (urinary levoglucosan). Arterial stiffness was assessed by examining levels of the aortic augmentation index, expressed as a percentage. An oxidative stress score comprising the average of z-scores created for 8-OHdG and 8-isoprostane was calculated. Mean augmentation index % was higher for participants with higher oxidative stress scores after adjusting for smoking status. Specifically for every one unit increase in oxidative stress score the augmentation index % increased 10.5% (95% CI: 2.5, 18.5%). Higher mean lower respiratory symptom score was associated with lower percent predicted forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity. Biomarkers of oxidative stress may serve as indicators of arterial stiffness in wildland firefighters. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Pulmonary Function and Arterial Stiffness in Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bangchuan; Gong, Shijin; Yu, Yihua; Dai, Haiwen

    2016-01-01

    Arterial stiffness contributes to heart failure and is decreased by angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). This cross-sectional study aimed to assess associations of lung function and ARB with arterial stiffness in patients with chronic heart failure. 354 outpatients (168 males; 186 females; 68.2 ± 7.2 years old) with chronic heart failure were evaluated. Lung function parameters, including forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), and FEV1 to FVC ratio (FEV1/FVC), were assessed. The cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) was used to estimate arterial stiffness. Unadjusted correlation analyses revealed a positive association of CAVI with ARB but not ACEI, and a negative correlation with FEV1 (r = −0.2987, p < 0.0001). Multiple stepwise regression analyses showed that ARB and FEV1 (p < 0.0001) were independent predicting factors for CAVI. These findings suggest that reduced pulmonary function is associated with increased CAVI. Pulmonary function protection could be used to improve the prognosis in heart failure, but additional studies are necessary. PMID:28097138

  9. Arterial Stiffness, Oxidative Stress, and Smoke Exposure in Wildland Firefighters

    PubMed Central

    Gaughan, Denise M.; Siegel, Paul D.; Hughes, Michael D.; Chang, Chiung-Yu; Law, Brandon F.; Campbell, Corey R.; Richards, Jennifer C.; Kales, Stefanos F.; Chertok, Marcia; Kobzik, Lester; Nguyen, Phuongson; O’Donnell, Carl R.; Kiefer, Max; Wagner, Gregory R.; Christiani, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the association between exposure, oxidative stress, symptoms, and cardiorespiratory function in wildland firefighters. Methods We studied two Interagency Hotshot Crews with questionnaires, pulse wave analysis for arterial stiffness, spirometry, urinary 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α (8-isoprostane) and 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and the smoke exposure marker (urinary levoglucosan). Arterial stiffness was assessed by examining levels of the aortic augmentation index, expressed as a percentage. An oxidative stress score comprising the average of z-scores created for 8-OHdG and 8-isoprostane was calculated. Results Mean augmentation index % was higher for participants with higher oxidative stress scores after adjusting for smoking status. Specifically for every one unit increase in oxidative stress score the augmentation index % increased 10.5% (95% CI: 2.5, 18.5%). Higher mean lower respiratory symptom score was associated with lower percent predicted forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity. Conclusions Biomarkers of oxidative stress may serve as indicators of arterial stiffness in wildland firefighters. PMID:24909863

  10. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in primary amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, Lyska L.; Bull, David A.; Hatton, Nathan; Nativi-Nicolai, Jose; Hildebrandt, Gerhard C.; Ryan, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Amyloidosis involves extravascular deposition of fibrillar proteins within tissues and organs. Primary light chain amyloidosis represents the most common form of systemic amyloidosis involving deposition of monoclonal immunoglobulin light chains. Although pulmonary amyloid deposition is common in primary amyloidosis, clinically significant pulmonary amyloidosis is uncommon, and elevated pulmonary artery pressures are rarely observed in the absence of other underlying etiologies for pulmonary hypertension, such as elevated filling pressures secondary to cardiac amyloid. In this case report, we present a patient with primary light chain amyloidosis and pulmonary arterial hypertension in the setting of pulmonary vascular and right ventricular myocardial amyloid deposition. PMID:27252852

  11. Circulating Angiogenic Cell Populations, Vascular Function, and Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Susan; Wang, Na; Larson, Martin G.; Palmisano, Joseph N.; Mitchell, Gary F.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Levy, Daniel; McCabe, Elizabeth L.; Vita, Joseph A.; Wang, Thomas J.; Shaw, Stanley Y.; Cohen, Kenneth S.; Hamburg, Naomi M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Several bone marrow-derived cell populations have been identified that may possess angiogenic activity and contribute to vascular homeostasis in experimental studies. We examined the extent to which lower quantities of these circulating angiogenic cell phenotypes may be related to impaired vascular function and greater arterial stiffness. Methods We studied 1,948 Framingham Heart Study participants (mean age, 66±9 years; 54% women) who were phenotyped for circulating angiogenic cells: CD34+, CD34+/KDR+, and early outgrowth colony forming units (CFU). Participants underwent non-invasive assessments of vascular function including peripheral arterial tone (PAT), arterial tonometry, and brachial reactivity testing. Results In unadjusted analyses, higher CD34+ and CD34+/KDR+ concentrations were modestly associated with lower PAT ratio (β=−0.052±0.011, P<0.001 and β=−0.030±0.011, P=0.008, respectively) and with higher carotid-brachial pulse wave velocity (β=0.144±0.043, P=0.001 and β=0.112±0.043, P=0.009), but not with flow-mediated dilation; higher CD34+ was also associated with lower carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (β=−0.229±0.094, P=0.015) However, only the association of lower CD34+ concentration with higher PAT ratio persisted in multivariable analyses that adjusted for standard cardiovascular risk factors. In all analyses, CFU was not associated with measures of vascular function or arterial stiffness. Conclusions In our large, community-based sample of men and women, circulating angiogenic cell phenotypes largely were not associated with measures of vascular function or arterial stiffness in analyses adjusting for traditional risk factors. PMID:22093724

  12. ALT-711 decreases cardiovascular stiffness and has potential in diabetes, hypertension and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Doggrell, S A

    2001-05-01

    Vascular and/or myocardial stiffness is a major problem in ageing, diabetes, hypertension and heart failure. The development of the stiffness is partly due to the formation of glucose-dependent cross-links in the collagen. ALT-711 cleaves these cross-links. In aged-rhesus monkeys, ALT-711 decreases vascular stiffness and this effect is reversible. ALT-711 also decreases myocardial stiffness in the monkeys but this effect is not reversible in 39 weeks. ALT-711 has potential in the treatment of the stiffness associated with diabetes, hypertension and heart failure.

  13. Hemorheological abnormalities in human arterial hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Presti, Rosalia; Hopps, Eugenia; Caimi, Gregorio

    2014-05-01

    Blood rheology is impaired in hypertensive patients. The alteration involves blood and plasma viscosity, and the erythrocyte behaviour is often abnormal. The hemorheological pattern appears to be related to some pathophysiological mechanisms of hypertension and to organ damage, in particular left ventricular hypertrophy and myocardial ischemia. Abnormalities have been observed in erythrocyte membrane fluidity, explored by fluorescence spectroscopy and electron spin resonance. This may be relevant for red cell flow in microvessels and oxygen delivery to tissues. Although blood viscosity is not a direct target of antihypertensive therapy, the rheological properties of blood play a role in the pathophysiology of arterial hypertension and its vascular complications.

  14. Effects of weight loss and insulin reduction on arterial stiffness in the SAVE trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic arterial stiffness contributes to the negative health effects of obesity and insulin resistance, which include hypertension, stroke, and increased cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Weight loss and improved insulin sensitivity are individually associated with improved central arterial stiffness; however, their combined effects on arterial stiffness are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to determine how insulin levels modify the improvements in arterial stiffness seen with weight loss in overweight and obese young adults. Methods To assess the effects of weight loss and decreased fasting insulin on vascular stiffness, we studied 339 participants in the Slow the Adverse Effects of Vascular Aging (SAVE) trial. At study entry, the participants were aged 20–45, normotensive, non-diabetic, and had a body-mass index of 25–39.9 kg/m2. Measures of pulse wave velocity (PWV) in the central (carotid-femoral (cfPWV)), peripheral (femoral-ankle (faPWV)), and mixed (brachial-ankle (baPWV)) vascular beds were collected at baseline and 6 months. The effects of 6-month change in weight and insulin on measures of PWV were estimated using multivariate regression. Results After adjustment for baseline risk factors and change in systolic blood pressure, 6-month weight loss and 6-month change in fasting insulin independently predicted improvement in baPWV but not faPWV or cfPWV. There was a significant interaction between 6-month weight change and change in fasting insulin when predicting changes in baPWV (p < 0.001). Individuals experiencing both weight loss and insulin reductions showed the greatest improvement in baPWV. Conclusions Young adults with excess weight who both lower their insulin levels and lose weight see the greatest improvement in vascular stiffness. This improvement in vascular stiffness with weight loss and insulin declines may occur throughout the vasculature and may not be limited to individual vascular beds. Trial

  15. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension and Neonatal Arterial Switch Surgery for Correction of Transposition of the Great Arteries.

    PubMed

    Domínguez Manzano, Paula; Mendoza Soto, Alberto; Román Barba, Violeta; Moreno Galdó, Antonio; Galindo Izquierdo, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    There are few reports of the appearance of pulmonary arterial hypertension following arterial switch surgery in the neonatal period to correct transposition of the great arteries. We assessed the frequency and clinical pattern of this complication in our series of patients. Our database was reviewed to select patients with transposition of the great arteries corrected by neonatal arterial switch at our hospital and who developed pulmonary hypertension over time. We identified 2 (1.3%) patients with transposition of the great arteries successfully repaired in the first week of life who later experienced pulmonary arterial hypertension. The first patient was a 7-year-old girl diagnosed with severe pulmonary hypertension at age 8 months who did not respond to medical treatment and required lung transplantation. The anatomic pathology findings were consistent with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension. The second patient was a 24-month-old boy diagnosed with severe pulmonary hypertension at age 13 months who did not respond to medical therapy. Pulmonary hypertension is a rare but very severe complication that should be investigated in all patients with transposition of the great arteries who have undergone neonatal arterial switch, in order to start early aggressive therapy for affected patients, given the poor therapeutic response and poor prognosis involved. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Central artery stiffness, baroreflex sensitivity, and brain white matter neuronal fiber integrity in older adults.

    PubMed

    Tarumi, Takashi; de Jong, Daan L K; Zhu, David C; Tseng, Benjamin Y; Liu, Jie; Hill, Candace; Riley, Jonathan; Womack, Kyle B; Kerwin, Diana R; Lu, Hanzhang; Munro Cullum, C; Zhang, Rong

    2015-04-15

    Cerebral hypoperfusion elevates the risk of brain white matter (WM) lesions and cognitive impairment. Central artery stiffness impairs baroreflex, which controls systemic arterial perfusion, and may deteriorate neuronal fiber integrity of brain WM. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations among brain WM neuronal fiber integrity, baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), and central artery stiffness in older adults. Fifty-four adults (65 ± 6 years) with normal cognitive function or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) were tested. The neuronal fiber integrity of brain WM was assessed from diffusion metrics acquired by diffusion tensor imaging. BRS was measured in response to acute changes in blood pressure induced by bolus injections of vasoactive drugs. Central artery stiffness was measured by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV). The WM diffusion metrics including fractional anisotropy (FA) and radial (RD) and axial (AD) diffusivities, BRS, and cfPWV were not different between the control and MCI groups. Thus, the data from both groups were combined for subsequent analyses. Across WM, fiber tracts with decreased FA and increased RD were associated with lower BRS and higher cfPWV, with many of the areas presenting spatial overlap. In particular, the BRS assessed during hypotension was strongly correlated with FA and RD when compared with hypertension. Executive function performance was associated with FA and RD in the areas that correlated with cfPWV and BRS. These findings suggest that baroreflex-mediated control of systemic arterial perfusion, especially during hypotension, may play a crucial role in maintaining neuronal fiber integrity of brain WM in older adults. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Left ventricular function in pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Khomaziuk, V A

    1998-12-01

    Echocardiographic evaluation was done of left ventricular functional state in 90 patients with primary and secondary pulmonary arterial hypertension with and without intercavitary shunting. Changes in left ventricular function were identified in 86% cases; they reflected disturbances in both ventricles compensatory interaction. The degree of changes depended on the degree of dilatation of the right ventricle and level of interchamber shunting.

  18. MicroRNAs in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guofei; Chen, Tianji

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease without effective treatment. Despite decades of research and the development of novel treatments, PAH remains a fatal disease, suggesting an urgent need for better understanding of the pathogenesis of PAH. Recent studies suggest that microRNAs (miRNAs) are dysregulated in patients with PAH and in experimental pulmonary hypertension. Furthermore, normalization of a few miRNAs is reported to inhibit experimental pulmonary hypertension. We have reviewed the current knowledge about miRNA biogenesis, miRNA expression pattern, and their roles in regulation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts. We have also identified emerging trends in our understanding of the role of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of PAH and propose future studies that might lead to novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of PAH. PMID:25192340

  19. Relation of arterial stiffness with gestational age and birth weight

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Y; Wong, K; Lam, B.; Tsoi, N

    2004-01-01

    Background: The cardiovascular risk of individuals who are born small as a result of prematurity remains controversial. Given the previous findings of stiffer peripheral conduit arteries in growth restricted donor twins in twin–twin transfusion syndrome regardless of gestational age, we hypothesised that among children born preterm, only those with intrauterine growth retardation are predisposed to an increase in cardiovascular risks. Aim: To compare brachioradial arterial stiffness and systemic blood pressure (BP) among children born preterm and small for gestational age (group 1, n = 15), those born preterm but having birth weight appropriate for gestational age (group 2, n = 36), and those born at term with birth weight appropriate for gestational age (group 3, n = 35). Methods: Systemic BP was measured by an automated device (Dinamap), while stiffness of the brachioradial arterial segment was assessed by measuring pulse wave velocity (PWV). The birth weight was adjusted for gestational age and expressed as a z score for analysis. Results: The 86 children were studied at a mean (SD) age of 8.2 (1.7) years. Subjects from group 1, who were born at 32.3 (2.0) weeks' gestation had a significantly lower z score of birth weight (-2.29 (0.63), p<0.001), compared with those from groups 2 and 3. They had a significantly higher mean blood pressure (p<0.001) and their diastolic blood pressure also tended to be higher (p = 0.07). Likewise, their brachioradial PWV, and hence arterial stiffness, was the highest of the three groups (p<0.001). While subjects from group 2 were similarly born preterm, their PWV was not significantly different from that of group 3 subjects (p = 1.00) and likewise their z score of birth weight did not differ (-0.01 (0.71) v -0.04 (1.1), p = 1.00). Brachioradial PWV correlated significantly with systolic (r = 0.31, p = 0.004), diastolic (r = 0.38, p<0.001), and mean (0.47, p<0.001) BP, and with z score of birth weight (r = -0.43, p<0

  20. Increased arterial stiffness in South Dakota American Indian children.

    PubMed

    Litz, Andrew M; Van Guilder, Gary P

    2016-02-01

    Arterial stiffness has been observed in white American obese children, yet there are no data in American Indian youth, who are affected disproportionately by the cardiovascular consequences of childhood obesity and its accompanying risk factors. The purpose of this study was to determine the association of childhood overweight-obesity and cardiometabolic risk factors with arterial stiffness in South Dakota white American and American Indian children. Thirty-six (28 white American and 8 American Indian) children (age, 13 ± 1 years; grades 6-8) from a rural South Dakota elementary and middle school were studied: 18 had a healthy weight (body mass index (BMI), 19.5 ± 1.9 kg/m(2)) and 18 were overweight-obese (BMI, 26.8 ± 3.5 kg/m(2)). Arterial stiffness was assessed using applanation tonometry via pulse wave analysis to determine carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (crPWV) and aortic augmentation index (AIx). There were no differences (P = 0.94) in crPWV between healthy weight (7.1 ± 1.4 m/s) and overweight-obese (7.3 ± 1.0 m/s) children, even after controlling for risk factors. However, crPWV was markedly elevated (P = 0.002) in overweight-obese American Indian children (7.7 ± 1.1 m/s) compared with white American children (6.8 ± 0.5 m/s), and these differences remained after controlling for blood pressure and more severe obesity in the American Indians. An obesity-matched subgroup analysis indicated that crPWV (7.7 ± 1.1 vs 6.8 ± 0.4 m/s) remained significantly greater in the American Indians (P = 0.03). There were no between-group differences in aortic AIx. These findings indicate an adverse influence of American Indian ethnicity on arterial stiffening in children with elevated adiposity. Arterial stiffness in American Indian children may accelerate early adulthood vascular disease.

  1. 7C.05: PREDICTORS OF INCREASED ARTERIALL STIFFNESS IN HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    Tautu, O; Darabont, R; Onciul, S; Deaconu, A; Petre, I; Andrei, R D; Dragoescu, B; Dorobantu, M

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate arterial stiffness in hypertensive patients and to identify predictors of increased arterial stiffness. 798 hypertensives identifyed in SEPHAR II survey (mean age 51.46 ± 5.82 years; 48.1% females) were evaluated by a study questionnaire, blood pressure and antropometric measurements and laboratory work-up. Studied parameters definitions were: increased arterial stiffness: PWVao > 10m/s, visceral obesity: waist circumference >102 cm in men and > 88 cm in women, diabetes mellitus assessed by current ADA criteria, lipid dissorders by NCEP ATPIII recomendations and increased BP variability: mean SBP' standard deviation (s.d.) values above the 75th percentile. Subclinical organ damage definitions were: left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) on ECG assessed by Cornell product,urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR) of 30 - 300 mg/g) and eGFRCKD-EPI < 60-90 ml/min/1.73m2. Cardiovascular risk was assessed by SCORE system. Binary logistic regression using stepwise LR method (coliniarity analysis and adjustmens for major confunders) was used to validate predictors of increased arterial stiffness. Mean values of studied parameters were: BP-149.96 ± 20.94/89.18 ± 11.54, SBP's.d -7.73 ± 8.6mmHg (24.9% of subjects with increased SBP variability), PP-60.99 ± 17.95mmHg, HR-73.75 ± 10.89bpm. Mean PWVao-10.19 ± 2.22m/s, 27.2% of the study sample having PWVao >10m/s. Regression analysis validated as predictors of increased PWVao: age group [OR: 5.53; 95%CI (2.62-13.21)], hypertrygliceridemia [OR: 1.82; 95%CI (1.18-2.81)], low-HDL cholesterol [OR: 1.62; 95%CI (1.05-2.49)], SBP's.d values above 8,49mmHg [OR: 2.14; 95%CI (1.16-3.95)], UACR 30-300 mg/g [OR: 3.46; 95%CI (1.43-8.36)], LVH on ECG [OR: 2.14; 95%CI (1.79-7.34)], eGRFCKD-EPI < 60-90 ml/min/1.73m2 [OR: 1.49; 95%CI (1 -2.23)], lack of BP treatment control [OR: 5.53; 95%CI (2.62-13.21)] and high/very high CV risk category by SCORE [OR: 1.69; 95%CI (1.02-2.83)]. Age above

  2. Epoprostenol Therapy for Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Satoshi; Nakamura, Kazufumi; Matsubara, Hiromi; Ogawa, Aiko; Sarashina, Toshihiro; Ejiri, Kentaro; Ito, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by elevation of pulmonary artery pressure caused by pulmonary vasoconstriction and vascular remodeling, which leads to right heart failure and death. Epoprostenol (prostaglandin I2) has a potent short-acting vasodilator property, and intravenous continuous epoprostenol is therefore used for treatment of PAH. Here we review evidence for the usefulness of intravenous continuous epoprostenol therapy in patients with PAH. Epoprostenol therapy is effective in idiopathic PAH patients and in patients with PAH associated with connective tissue disease, portal hypertension or congenital heart diseases, but it is not effective in patients with pulmonary veno-occlusive disease or pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis. High-dose epoprostenol therapy markedly improved hemodynamics in some patients with PAH, possibly due to reverse remodeling of pulmonary arteries. This therapy has several side effects and complications such as headache, hypotension and catheter-related infections. Intravenous continuous epoprostenol is an effective treatment, but there are still some problems to be resolved.

  3. Serum free thyroxine levels are positively associated with arterial stiffness in the SardiNIA study.

    PubMed

    Delitala, Alessandro P; Orrù, Marco; Filigheddu, Fabiana; Pilia, Maria Grazia; Delitala, Giuseppe; Ganau, Antonello; Saba, Pier Sergio; Decandia, Federica; Scuteri, Angelo; Marongiu, Michele; Lakatta, Edward G; Strait, James; Cucca, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    Thyroid dysfunction may accelerate atherosclerosis. Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) is an early index of arterial stiffness and an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and might therefore be linked to changes in thyroid activity. We investigated the relationship between thyroid function and carotid-femoral PWV, as an index of arterial stiffness. Cross-sectional cohort study. Participants from the SardiNIA study. Those being treated for thyroid diseases were excluded, yielding a sample of 5875 aged 14-102. Clinical parameters, blood tests including serum TSH and serum FT4, and carotid-femoral PWV were measured. After adjusting for confounders, a direct and linear association between FT4 and PWV was shown (multiple regression analysis). The model containing age, mean blood pressure, body mass index, heart rate, FT4, hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidaemia accounted for 55% of the variation in PWV. Like several other known risk factors, serum FT4 levels are associated with carotid-femoral PWV, suggesting that high FT4 levels have a detrimental effect on aortic stiffness and may contribute to ageing process of the vascular system. This finding may help to understand the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease and contribute to improve prevention therapy. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. New photoplethysmographic signal analysis algorithm for arterial stiffness estimation.

    PubMed

    Pilt, Kristjan; Ferenets, Rain; Meigas, Kalju; Lindberg, Lars-Göran; Temitski, Kristina; Viigimaa, Margus

    2013-01-01

    The ability to identify premature arterial stiffening is of considerable value in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. The "ageing index" (AGI), which is calculated from the second derivative photoplethysmographic (SDPPG) waveform, has been used as one method for arterial stiffness estimation and the evaluation of cardiovascular ageing. In this study, the new SDPPG analysis algorithm is proposed with optimal filtering and signal normalization in time. The filter parameters were optimized in order to achieve the minimal standard deviation of AGI, which gives more effective differentiation between the levels of arterial stiffness. As a result, the optimal low-pass filter edge frequency of 6 Hz and transitionband of 1 Hz were found, which facilitates AGI calculation with a standard deviation of 0.06. The study was carried out on 21 healthy subjects and 20 diabetes patients. The linear relationship (r = 0.91) between each subject's age and AGI was found, and a linear model with regression line was constructed. For diabetes patients, the mean AGI value difference from the proposed model y AGI was found to be 0.359. The difference was found between healthy and diabetes patients groups with significance level of P < 0.0005.

  5. Arterial Stiffness in Patients Taking Second-generation Antipsychotics

    PubMed Central

    Fındıklı, Ebru; Gökçe, Mustafa; Nacitarhan, Vedat; Camkurt, Mehmet Akif; Fındıklı, Hüseyin Avni; Kardaş, Selçuk; Şahin, Merve Coşgun; Karaaslan, Mehmet Fatih

    2016-01-01

    Objective That treatment with second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) causes metabolic side effects and atherosclerosis in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (BD) is well-known. Increased arterial stiffness is an important marker of arteriosclerosis and has been identified as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We measured pulse wave velocity (PWV) as a marker of arteriosclerosis in patients with schizophrenia and BD who use SGAs. Methods Patients and controls were collected from our psychiatry outpatient clinics or family medicine. Mental illness was diagnosed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition. Mean age, gender, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, body mass index, Framingham risk score (FRS), etc. were determined. Simultaneous electrocardiography and pulse wave were recorded with an electromyography device. The photo-plethysmographic method was used to record the pulse wave. Inclusion criteria included use of SGAs for at least the last six months. Patients with diseases that are known to cause stiffness and the use of typical antipsychotics were excluded. Results Ninety-six subject (56 patients, 40 controls) were included in our study. There were 49 females, 47 males. Patients had schizophrenia (n=17) and BD (n=39). Their treatments were quetiapine (n=15), risperidone (n=13), olanzapine (n=15), and aripiprazole (n=13). Although differences in mean age, gender, and FRS in the patient and control groups were not statistically significant (p=1), PWV was greater in patients in the antipsychotic group (p=0.048). Conclusion This study supported the liability to stiffness in patients with schizophrenia and BD. Using SGAs may contribute to arterial stiffness in these patients. PMID:27776389

  6. Physical exercise improves arterial stiffness after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Hubli, Michèle; Currie, Katharine D.; West, Christopher R.; Gee, Cameron M.; Krassioukov, Andrei V.

    2014-01-01

    Objective/background Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV), the gold-standard assessment of central arterial stiffness, has prognostic value for cardiovascular disease risk in able-bodied individuals. The aim of this study was to compare aortic PWV in athletes and non-athletes with spinal cord injury (SCI). Design Cross-sectional comparison. Methods Aortic PWV was assessed in 20 individuals with motor-complete, chronic SCI (C2–T5; 18 ± 8 years post-injury) using applanation tonometry at the carotid and femoral arterial sites. Ten elite hand-cyclists were matched for sex to 10 non-athletes; age and time since injury were comparable between the groups. Heart rate and discrete brachial blood pressure measurements were collected throughout testing. Outcome measures Aortic PWV, blood pressure, heart rate. Results Aortic PWV was significantly lower in athletes vs. non-athletes (6.9 ± 1.0 vs. 8.7 ± 2.5 m/second, P = 0.044). There were no significant between-group differences in resting supine mean arterial blood pressure (91 ± 19 vs. 81 ± 10 mmHg) and heart rate (60 ± 10 vs. 58 ± 6 b.p.m.). Conclusion Athletes with SCI exhibited improved central arterial stiffness compared to non-athletes, which is in agreement with the previous able-bodied literature. This finding implies that chronic exercise training may improve arterial health and potentially lower cardiovascular disease risk in the SCI population. PMID:24976366

  7. Cigarette smoking and hypertension. Factors independently associated with blood hyperviscosity and arterial rigidity.

    PubMed

    Levenson, J; Simon, A C; Cambien, F A; Beretti, C

    1987-01-01

    The effects of cigarette smoking and hypertension on hemorheological variables (blood viscosity over a wide range of shear rates, plasma viscosity, microhematocrit, and plasma protein concentration) and on arterial stiffness (pulse wave velocity) were investigated in 33 normotensive men and 81 mild to moderately hypertensive men. Of these, 22 normotensive and 24 hypertensive subjects were cigarette smokers. Cigarette smoking and hypertension were independently associated with higher blood viscosity at all studied shear rates (from 0.2 to 241 sec-1) as well as with higher plasma viscosity, hematocrit, and pulse wave velocity. At constant hematocrit levels, hypertension remained associated with a higher blood viscosity, while the association with cigarette smoking disappeared. Normotensive smokers had the same increase of blood and plasma viscosity and pulse wave velocity as hypertensive nonsmokers. No interactive effects of hypertension or cigarette smoking on blood or arterial variables were observed, suggesting that the effect of these two factors on blood and vascular rheology are cumulative. Smoking and hypertension may change the flow properties of the blood and the behavior of the arterial wall and this may explain the arterial damage observed in cigarette smokers and hypertensive patients.

  8. Improved parameters of metabolic glycaemic and immune function and arterial stiffness with naltrexone implant therapy.

    PubMed

    Reece, Albert Stuart

    2009-01-01

    Here the dramatic and rapid response of a 54-year-old obese hypertensive man with poorly controlled insulin-dependent diabetes with a 33 year history of high dose heroin use, a 1 year history of refractory ulceration of his hands, ankles and feet, treated coronary artery disease, and the metabolic syndrome, to implantation with long-acting naltrexone implants is presented. In particular his hyperlipidaemia, hyperglycaemia, proinflammatory state, evidence of hepatic and renal insufficiency, arterial stiffness, and extensive and chronic cutaneous ulceration all improved dramatically over just 13 weeks, in association with complete control of his heroin, benzodiazepine, tobacco and cannabis use. The metabolic and vascular benefits were all highly statistically significant. The case is the first to document dramatic and rapid metabolic, immune and vascular improvements in association with clinical naltrexone therapy and are consistent with its likely effects in restoring addiction-related stem cell and immunological deficits.

  9. Hydration Status Is Associated with Aortic Stiffness, but Not with Peripheral Arterial Stiffness, in Chronically Hemodialysed Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bia, Daniel; Galli, Cintia; Zócalo, Yanina; Armentano, Ricardo L.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Adequate fluid management could be essential to minimize high arterial stiffness observed in chronically hemodialyzed patients (CHP). Aim. To determine the association between body fluid status and central and peripheral arterial stiffness levels. Methods. Arterial stiffness was assessed in 65 CHP by measuring the pulse wave velocity (PWV) in a central arterial pathway (carotid-femoral) and in a peripheral pathway (carotid-brachial). A blood pressure-independent regional arterial stiffness index was calculated using PWV. Volume status was assessed by whole-body multiple-frequency bioimpedance. Patients were first observed as an entire group and then divided into three different fluid status-related groups: normal, overhydration, and dehydration groups. Results. Only carotid-femoral stiffness was positively associated (P < 0.05) with the hydration status evaluated through extracellular/intracellular fluid, extracellular/Total Body Fluid, and absolute and relative overhydration. Conclusion. Volume status and overload are associated with central, but not peripheral, arterial stiffness levels with independence of the blood pressure level, in CHP. PMID:26167301

  10. Investigation of the arterial stiffness and associated factors in patients with familial Mediterranean fever

    PubMed Central

    Çakar, Mustafa; Akhan, Muharrem; Doğan, Tolga; Taşkın, Gürhan; Öztürk, Kadir; Çınar, Muhammet; Arslan, Erol; Yılmaz, Sedat

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Because of the ongoing and recurring inflammatory state in familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), patients may experience a high risk of cardiovascular events. Our aim was to investigate the arterial stiffness and associated factors in patients with FMF. Methods: Sixty-nine consecutive FMF patients (including 11 females) and 35 controls (including 5 females) were enrolled in the study. The demographical, clinical, and laboratory data and genetic mutations of the patients were recorded. In the study, FMF patients according to the Tel-Hashomer criteria were included, whereas patients with other known inflammatory rheumatologic disease, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes, those under the age of 18 years, or those refusing to participate in the study were excluded. Arterial stiffness measurements were performed using the TensioMed device (TensoMed Ltd, Budapest, Hungary). Results: The patient and control groups were similar in terms of the mean ages, BMIs, gender, systolic blood pressures, and smoking. FMF patients had a higher pulse wave velocity (PWV) (7.73±1.3 and 7.18±1.1 m/s; p=0.03) and lower brachial and aortic augmentation indexes (–64.6±14.6% and –54.6±25.9%, p=0.041 and 4.9±7.4% and 14.0±11.5%, p=0.025, respectively) compared with the controls. Thirty-one (45%) patients were in the “during-attack” state and had higher PWV (8.17±1.6 and 7.38±0.9 m/s; p=0.027) compared with the asymptomatic patients. PWV was correlated to serum CRP, WBC, ESR, fibrinogen, and neutrophil/lymphocyte ratios (r=0.666, 0.429, 0.441, 0.388, and 0.460, respectively). The genetic mutation and predominant attack type had no effect on arterial stiffness. Conclusion: FMF patients have increased arterial stiffness during attacks compared with asymptomatic patients and controls. The impaired arterial stiffness is correlated to the severity of the inflammatory state rather than to the attack type or genetic mutations. PMID:27488756

  11. Peripheral and Cerebral Resistance Arteries in the Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure Rat: Effects of Stilbenoid Polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Lee, Danielle I; Acosta, Crystal; Anderson, Christopher M; Anderson, Hope D

    2017-02-28

    Hypertension is associated with aberrant structure and mechanical properties of resistance arteries. We determined the effects of resveratrol, a non-flavonoid polyphenol found in foods such as red grapes, and structurally-similar analogues (pterostilbene and gnetol) on systolic blood pressure (SBP) and resistance arteries from the spontaneously hypertensive heart failure (SHHF) rat. SBP was elevated in 17-week-old SHHF vs. Sprague-Dawley rats (normotensive control; 194 ± 3 vs. 142 ± 6 mmHg, p < 0.01) and was unaffected by resveratrol, pterostilbene, or gnetol (2.5 mg/kg/d). Geometry and mechanical properties of pressurized mesenteric resistance arteries and middle cerebral arteries were calculated from media and lumen dimensions measured at incremental intraluminal pressures. SHHF arteries exhibited remodeling which consisted of augmented media-to-lumen ratios, and this was attenuated by stilbenoid treatment. Compliance was significantly reduced in SHHF middle cerebral arteries but not mesenteric arteries vis-à-vis increased wall component stiffness; stilbenoid treatment failed to normalize compliance and wall component stiffness. Our data suggest that neither AMPK nor ERK mediate stilbenoid effects. In conclusion, we observed arterial bed-specific abnormalities, where mesenteric resistance arteries exhibited remodeling and cerebral arteries exhibited remodeling and stiffening. Resveratrol, pterostilbene, and gnetol exhibited similar abilities to attenuate vascular alterations.

  12. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension and BMP system abnormality].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Fumio

    2008-11-01

    Genetic analysis has uncovered that familial and idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is linked to germline mutations in BMP type II receptor (BMPRII). PAH is characterized by enhanced remodeling of pulmonary arteries due to arterial smooth muscle cell proliferation. BMPRII mutations contribute to abnormal mitotic responses to BMP ligands in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Unbalanced Smad signaling induced by BMP and TGFbeta is functionally involved in the pathogenesis of PAH. BMPRII mutations also increase the susceptibility of endothelial cell apoptosis. The combination of increased endothelial injury and impaired suppression of smooth muscle cell proliferation is critical for the cellular pathogenesis of PAH. However, the detailed molecular mechanism leading to severe vascular remodeling caused by BMPRII mutations has yet to be elucidated.

  13. Aerobic exercise training increases plasma Klotho levels and reduces arterial stiffness in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Tomoko; Miyaki, Asako; Akazawa, Nobuhiko; Choi, Youngju; Ra, Song-Gyu; Tanahashi, Koichiro; Kumagai, Hiroshi; Oikawa, Satoshi; Maeda, Seiji

    2014-02-01

    The Klotho gene is a suppressor of the aging phenomena, and the secretion as well as the circulation of Klotho proteins decrease with aging. Although habitual exercise has antiaging effects (e.g., a decrease in arterial stiffness), the relationship between Klotho and habitual exercise remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effect of habitual exercise on Klotho, with a particular focus on arterial stiffness. First, we examined the correlation between plasma Klotho concentration and arterial stiffness (carotid artery compliance and β-stiffness index) or aerobic exercise capacity [oxygen uptake at ventilatory threshold (VT)] in 69 healthy, postmenopausal women (50-76 years old) by conducting a cross-sectional study. Second, we tested the effects of aerobic exercise training on plasma Klotho concentrations and arterial stiffness. A total of 19 healthy, postmenopausal women (50-76 years old) were divided into two groups: control group and exercise group. The exercise group completed 12 wk of moderate aerobic exercise training. In the cross-sectional study, plasma Klotho concentrations positively correlated with carotid artery compliance and VT and negatively correlated with the β-stiffness index. In the interventional study, aerobic exercise training increased plasma Klotho concentrations and carotid artery compliance and decreased the β-stiffness index. Moreover, the changes in plasma Klotho concentration and arterial stiffness were found to be correlated. These results suggest a possible role for secreted Klotho in the exercise-induced modulation of arterial stiffness.

  14. Blood pressure and arterial stiffness in obese children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Hvidt, Kristian Nebelin

    2015-03-01

    Obesity, elevated blood pressure (BP) and arterial stiffness are risk factors for cardiovascular disease. A strong relationship exists between obesity and elevated BP in both children and adults. Obesity and elevated BP in childhood track into adult life increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Ambulatory BP is the most precise measure to evaluate the BP burden, whereas carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) is regarded as the gold standard for evaluating arterial (i.e. aortic) stiffness. These measures might contribute to a better understanding of obesity's adverse impact on the cardiovascular system, and ultimately a better prevention and treatment of childhood obesity. The overall aim of the present PhD thesis is to investigate arterial stiffness and 24-hour BP in obese children and adolescents, and evaluate whether these measures are influenced by weight reduction. The present PhD thesis is based on four scientific papers.  In a cross-sectional design, 104 severe obese children and adolescents with an age of 10-18 years were recruited when newly referred to the Children's Obesity Clinic, Holbæk University Hospital, and compared to 50 normal weighted age and gender matched control individuals. Ambulatory BP was measured, and cfPWV was investigated in two ways in respect to the distance measure of aorta; the previously recommended length - the so called subtracted distance, and the currently recommended length - the direct distance. In a longitudinal design, the obese patients were re-investigated after one-year of lifestyle intervention at the Children's Obesity Clinic in purpose of reducing the degree of obesity. In the cross-sectional design, the obese group had higher measures of obesity, while matched for age, gender and height, when compared to the control group. In the longitudinal design, 74% of the 72 followed up obese patients experienced a significant weight reduction. CfPWV was dependent on the method used to measure the

  15. Augmented vascular smooth muscle cell stiffness and adhesion when hypertension is superimposed on aging.

    PubMed

    Sehgel, Nancy L; Sun, Zhe; Hong, Zhongkui; Hunter, William C; Hill, Michael A; Vatner, Dorothy E; Vatner, Stephen F; Meininger, Gerald A

    2015-02-01

    Hypertension and aging are both recognized to increase aortic stiffness, but their interactions are not completely understood. Most previous studies have attributed increased aortic stiffness to changes in extracellular matrix proteins that alter the mechanical properties of the vascular wall. Alternatively, we hypothesized that a significant component of increased vascular stiffness in hypertension is due to changes in the mechanical and adhesive properties of vascular smooth muscle cells, and that aging would augment the contribution from vascular smooth muscle cells when compared with the extracellular matrix. Accordingly, we studied aortic stiffness in young (16-week-old) and old (64-week-old) spontaneously hypertensive rats and Wistar-Kyoto wild-type controls. Systolic and pulse pressures were significantly increased in young spontaneously hypertensive rats when compared with young Wistar-Kyoto rats, and these continued to rise in old spontaneously hypertensive rats when compared with age-matched controls. Excised aortic ring segments exhibited significantly greater elastic moduli in both young and old spontaneously hypertensive rats versus Wistar-Kyoto rats. were isolated from the thoracic aorta, and stiffness and adhesion to fibronectin were measured by atomic force microscopy. Hypertension increased both vascular smooth muscle cell stiffness and vascular smooth muscle cell adhesion, and these increases were both augmented with aging. By contrast, hypertension did not affect histological measures of aortic collagen and elastin, which were predominantly changed by aging. These findings support the concept that stiffness and adhesive properties of vascular smooth muscle cells are novel mechanisms contributing to the increased aortic stiffness occurring with hypertension superimposed on aging. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: The Clinical Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yen-Chun; Potoka, Karin C.; Champion, Hunter C.; Mora, Ana L.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disorder in which endothelial dysfunction and vascular remodeling obstruct small pulmonary arteries, resulting in increased pulmonary vascular resistance and pulmonary pressures. This leads to reduced cardiac output, right heart failure, and ultimately death. In this review, we attempt to answer some important questions commonly asked by patients diagnosed with PAH pertaining to the disease, and aim to provide an explanation in terms of classification, diagnosis, pathophysiology, genetic etiologies, demographics, and prognostic factors. Furthermore, important molecular pathways that are central to the pathogenesis of PAH are reviewed, including nitric oxide, prostacyclin, endothelin-1, reactive oxygen species, and endothelial and smooth muscle proliferation. PMID:24951762

  17. Immunity in arterial hypertension: associations or causalities?

    PubMed Central

    Anders, Hans-Joachim; Baumann, Marcus; Tripepi, Giovanni; Mallamaci, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies describe associations between markers of inflammation and arterial hypertension (aHT), but does that imply causality? Interventional studies that reduce blood pressure reduced also markers of inflammation, but does immunosuppression improve hypertension? Here, we review the available mechanistic data. Aberrant immunity can trigger endothelial dysfunction but is hardly ever the primary cause of aHT. Innate and adaptive immunity get involved once hypertension has caused vascular wall injury as immunity is a modifier of endothelial dysfunction and vascular wall remodelling. As vascular remodelling progresses, immunity-related mechanisms can become significant cofactors for cardiovascular (CV) disease progression; vice versa, suppressing immunity can improve hypertension and CV outcomes. Innate and adaptive immunity both contribute to vascular wall remodelling. Innate immunity is driven by danger signals that activate Toll-like receptors and other pattern-recognition receptors. Adaptive immunity is based on loss of tolerance against vascular autoantigens and includes autoreactive T-cell immunity as well as non-HLA angiotensin II type 1 receptor-activating autoantibodies. Such processes involve numerous other modulators such as regulatory T cells. Together, immunity is not causal for hypertension but rather an important secondary pathomechanism and a potential therapeutic target in hypertension. PMID:25762356

  18. Invited Commentary: Hypertension and Arterial Stiffness—Origins Remain a Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, David R.; Duprez, Daniel A.; Shimbo, Daichi

    2016-01-01

    In this issue of the Journal, Chen et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2016;183(7):599–608) present repeated measures of aorto-femoral pulse wave velocity, capacitive compliance (C1), and oscillatory compliance (C2) in the Bogalusa Heart Study, with the purpose of addressing which comes first: blood pressure elevation or arterial stiffening. After an average follow-up period of 7 years (2000–2010), the authors found that blood pressure at a mean age of 36 years predicted change in arterial stiffening by a mean age of 43 years, but not the reverse. Essential hypertension results from a mosaic of pathological mechanisms. It has been theorized that biological pathways involving increased sympathetic tone, insulin resistance, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone activation, and inflammation lead to hyperkinetic circulation, volume overload, and vascular remodeling. The resultant accelerated vascular aging may be assessed by determining the degree of arterial stiffness. The findings of Chen et al. add important empirical information to the literature but do not solve the dilemma regarding the origins of essential hypertension, partly because there are many techniques for estimating the many aspects of arterial stiffness which are not fully understood. Mathematical features of estimates might not be uniform across the age range. There is a need for tracking blood pressure and different aspects of arterial stiffness from childhood onward, with an aim of preventing hypertension in adult life. PMID:26960705

  19. [Pathogenesis and epidemiology of arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Pardell, H; Armario, P; Hernández, R

    1998-01-01

    The pathogenesis of arterial hypertension is more clearly understood today because of the availability of data enabling identification of a certain number of precipitating factors. From a genetic standpoint, hypertension would appear to be a multifactorial polygenic disorder with a tendency to interact with certain environmental factors. The latter are mainly related to lifestyle and are potentially modifiable. Obesity during childhood and adolescence is the main predictive factor for hypertension. It has been suggested that the underlying mechanism could well be hyperinsulinaemia, which induces hyperactivity of the sympathetic nervous system. The mechanisms of the relationship between hypertension and alcohol are still unclear. However, in many countries, excessive alcohol consumption has been reported to be a significant factor in the development of arterial hypertension. The negative effect of a sedentary lifestyle on blood pressure has been widely demonstrated. In addition, it has also been shown that regular physical exercise under aerobic conditions leads to a reduction in blood pressure levels. An excessive sodium intake is also responsible for inducing arterial hypertension through increases in cardiac output and effects on vascular reactivity and contractility. Similarly, restricting sodium intake leads to a reduction in blood pressure levels. Smoking--namely, certain components of tobacco smoke--would appear to have both short and long term effects on blood pressure. These contributing factors all have specific effects on cardiac output and peripheral resistance in individuals. At the community level, the impact of hypertension is particularly significant. Prevalence is strongly influenced by the type of population studied, although it is generally estimated that this disease affects between 10 and 20% of the adult population and is responsible for 5.8% of all deaths worldwide. The direct and indirect costs of the disease are particularly high and are

  20. Preeclampsia Is Associated with Increased Central Aortic Pressure, Elastic Arteries Stiffness and Wave Reflections, and Resting and Recruitable Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Farro, Ignacio; Zócalo, Yanina; Farro, Federico; Sosa, Claudio; Scasso, Santiago; Alonso, Justo; Bia, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. An altered endothelial function (EF) could be associated with preeclampsia (PE). However, more specific and complementary analyses are required to confirm this topic. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD), low-flow-mediated constriction (L-FMC), and hyperemic-related changes in carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (PWVcr) offer complementary information about “recruitability” of EF. Objectives. To evaluate, in healthy and hypertensive pregnant women (with and without PE), central arterial parameters in conjunction with “basal and recruitable” EF. Methods. Nonhypertensive (HP) and hypertensive pregnant women (gestational hypertension, GH; preeclampsia, PE) were included. Aortic blood pressure (BP), wave reflection parameters (AIx@75), aortic pulse wave velocity (PWVcf) and PWVcr, and brachial and common carotid stiffness and intima-media thickness were measured. Brachial FMD and L-FMC and hyperemic-related change in PWVcr were measured. Results. Aortic BP and AIx@75 were elevated in PE. PE showed stiffer elastic but not muscular arteries. After cuff deflation, PWVcr decreased in HP, while GH showed a blunted PWVcr response and PE showed a tendency to increase. Maximal FMD and L-FMC were observed in HP followed by GH; PE did not reach significant arterial constriction. Conclusion. Aortic BP and wave reflections as well as elastic arteries stiffness are increased in PE. PE showed both “resting and recruitable” endothelial dysfunctions. PMID:26351578

  1. A review of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gan, C.T.; Noordegraaf, A. Vonk; Marques, K.M.J.; Bronzwaer, J.G.F.; Postmus, P.E.; Boonstra, A.

    2004-01-01

    Medical therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) focuses on pulmonary vascular remodelling and smooth muscle cell proliferation. This article covers the drugs which are approved or are in sight and the evidence-based treatment strategies that target the different pathobiological pathways, emanated from the World Health Organisation Symposium on Pulmonary Hypertension in Venice, June 2003. In addition we briefly look at the 'Venice consensus' on surgical treatment. In the past five and a half years more than 360 patients were seen for pulmonary hypertension in the Free University Medical Centre (VUmc). Present-day treatment, research studies and novel treatment strategies in the VUmc will be reviewed. Future treatments will be on the basis of insights into pathobiology, pathogenesis and genes in PAH and should focus on drug combinations, which theoretically target different or similar pathobiological pathways. PMID:25696358

  2. Evaluation of Blood Pressure Control using a New Arterial Stiffness Parameter, Cardio-ankle Vascular Index (CAVI)

    PubMed Central

    Shirai, Kohji; Utino, Junji; Saiki, Atsuhito; Endo, Kei; Ohira, Masahiro; Nagayama, Daiji; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Mao; Takahara, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Arterial stiffness has been known to be a surrogate marker of arteriosclerosis, and also of vascular function. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) had been the most popular index and was known to be a predictor of cardiovascular events. But, it depends on blood pressure at measuring time. To overcome this problem, cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) is developed. CAVI is derived from stiffness parameter β by Hayashi, and the equation of Bramwell-Hill, and is independent from blood pressure at a measuring time. Then, CAVI might reflect the proper change of arterial wall by antihypertensive agents. CAVI shows high value with aging and in many arteriosclerotic diseases and is also high in persons with main coronary risk factors. Furthermore, CAVI is decreased by an administration of α1 blocker, doxazosin for 2-4 hours, Those results suggested that CAVI reflected the arterial stiffness composed of organic components and of smooth muscle cell contracture. Angiotensin II receptor blocker, olmesartan decreased CAVI much more than that of calcium channel antagonist, amlodipine, even though the rates of decreased blood pressure were almost same. CAVI might differentiate the blood pressure-lowering agents from the point of the effects on proper arterial stiffness. This paper reviewed the principle and rationale of CAVI, and the possibilities of clinical applications, especially in the studies of hypertension. PMID:23807874

  3. Arterial stiffness & Sri Lankan chronic kidney disease of unknown origin

    PubMed Central

    Gifford, Fiona; Kimmitt, Robert; Herath, Chula; Webb, David J; Melville, Vanessa; Siribaddana, Sisira; Eddleston, Michael; Dhaun, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and independently associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Arterial stiffness contributes to CVD risk in CKD. In many developing countries a considerable proportion of CKD remains unexplained, termed CKDu. We assessed arterial stiffness in subjects with Sri Lankan CKDu, in matched controls without CKD and in those with defined CKD. Aortic blood pressure (BP), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx) were assessed in 130 subjects (50 with CKDu, 45 with CKD and 35 without CKD) using the validated TensioMed™ Arteriograph monitor. Brachial and aortic BP was lower in controls than in CKDu and CKD subjects but no different between CKDu and CKD. Controls had a lower PWV compared to subjects with CKDu and CKD. Despite equivalent BP and renal dysfunction, CKDu subjects had a lower PWV than those with CKD (8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 9.9 ± 2.2 m/s, p < 0.01). Excluding diabetes accentuated the differences in PWV seen between groups (controls vs. CKDu vs. CKD: 6.7 ± 0.9 vs. 8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 10.4 ± 1.5 m/s, p < 0.001 for all). Sri Lankan CKDu is associated with less arterial stiffening than defined causes of CKD. Whether this translates to lower cardiovascular morbidity and mortality long term is unclear and should be the focus of future studies. PMID:27586642

  4. Arterial stiffness &Sri Lankan chronic kidney disease of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Fiona; Kimmitt, Robert; Herath, Chula; Webb, David J; Melville, Vanessa; Siribaddana, Sisira; Eddleston, Michael; Dhaun, Neeraj

    2016-09-02

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and independently associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Arterial stiffness contributes to CVD risk in CKD. In many developing countries a considerable proportion of CKD remains unexplained, termed CKDu. We assessed arterial stiffness in subjects with Sri Lankan CKDu, in matched controls without CKD and in those with defined CKD. Aortic blood pressure (BP), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx) were assessed in 130 subjects (50 with CKDu, 45 with CKD and 35 without CKD) using the validated TensioMed™ Arteriograph monitor. Brachial and aortic BP was lower in controls than in CKDu and CKD subjects but no different between CKDu and CKD. Controls had a lower PWV compared to subjects with CKDu and CKD. Despite equivalent BP and renal dysfunction, CKDu subjects had a lower PWV than those with CKD (8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 9.9 ± 2.2 m/s, p < 0.01). Excluding diabetes accentuated the differences in PWV seen between groups (controls vs. CKDu vs. CKD: 6.7 ± 0.9 vs. 8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 10.4 ± 1.5 m/s, p < 0.001 for all). Sri Lankan CKDu is associated with less arterial stiffening than defined causes of CKD. Whether this translates to lower cardiovascular morbidity and mortality long term is unclear and should be the focus of future studies.

  5. Arterial stiffness and medial temporal lobe atrophy in elders with memory disorders.

    PubMed

    Lilamand, Matthieu; Vidal, Jean-Sébastien; Plichart, Matthieu; De Jong, Laura W; Duron, Emmanuelle; Hanon, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    Hypertension is a risk factor for cognitive impairment and dementia. Arterial stiffness could be involved in the mechanisms of vascular cognitive impairment and in Alzheimer's disease. We examined the association between arterial stiffness, assessed by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), and medial temporal lobe (MTL) atrophy, a biomarker of Alzheimer's disease. Elderly community-dwelling study participants (n = 149) with memory complaints were diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (n = 62) or mild cognitive impairment (n = 87) at a memory clinic. PWV, peripheral and central blood pressure (SBP), and pulse pressure (PP) were measured. MTL was graded on MRI according to the Scheltens' scale. Mean age was 79.5 (SD = 5) years old, 36% of study participants were men. MTL was absent or discrete in 23.5%, moderate in 53.0% and severe in 23.5% of study participants. PWV was 9.3 (2.2) m/s in none or discrete, 11.1 (2.8) in moderate and 13.5 (4.0) in severe MTL atrophy (P < 0.0001). PWV, central SBP, and central PP were overall associated with MTL atrophy after adjustment for age, sex, antihypertensive treatments and white matter lesions, and further adjusted for mean BP for PWV, whereas peripheral SBP and PP were not associated with MTL atrophy. PWV was significantly associated with severe MTL atrophy [odds ratio = 3.69 (95% confidence interval = 1.69-8.05), P = 0.001] and marginally associated with moderate MTL atrophy [1.80 (0.92-3.53), P = 0.09]. Furthermore PWV was significantly associated with severe MTL atrophy in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment study participants separately. The result of this study suggests a role of arterial stiffness in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Bone Strength and Arterial Stiffness Impact on Cardiovascular Mortality in a General Population

    PubMed Central

    Avramovska, Maja; Sikole, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis and increased arterial stiffness independently have been found to be associated with higher cardiovascular events rates in the general population (GP). We examined 558 patients from GP by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and pulse wave velocity (PWV) measurements at baseline, with 36-month follow-up period. DXA assessed bone mineral density of femoral neck (BMD FN) and lumbar spine (BMD LS). Carotid-femoral PWV was assessed by pulsed-Doppler. The aim of our study is to find correlation between bone strength and arterial stiffness and their impact on cardiovascular mortality in GP. The mean ± SD of BMD FN, BMD LS, and PWV was 0.852 ± 0.1432 g/cm2, 0.934 ± 0.1546 g/cm2, and 9.209 ± 1.9815 m/s. In multiple regression analysis we found BMD FN (βst = −6.0094, p < 0.0001), hypertension (βst = 1.7340, p < 0.0091), and diabetes (βst = 0.4595, p < 0.0046). With Cox-regression analysis, after 17 cardiovascular events, the significant covariates retained by the backward model were BMD FN (b = −2.4129, p = 0.015) and PWV (b = 0.2606, p = 0.0318). The cut-off values were PWV = 9.4 m/s, BMD FN = 0.783 g/cm2, and BMD LS = 0.992 g/cm2. The results for BMD FN and PWV hazard ratio risk were 1.116 and 1.297, respectively. BMD FN as a measure of bone strength and PWV as a measure of arterial stiffness are strong independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality in GP. PMID:27047700

  7. [Azilsartan Medoxomil Capabilities in Arterial Hypertension and Obesity].

    PubMed

    Vasyuk, Y A; Shupenina, E Y; Nesvetov, V V; Nesterova, E A; Golubkova, E I

    2016-12-01

    Arterial hypertension (AH) is one of the most common cardiovascular disease. Angiotensin II (AT II), the hormone of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, realizes its negative effects through AT 1 receptors - application point of angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB). Due to different dissociation AT 1 receptors properties some ARBs are more effective than others. Multiply multicenter randomized and observational studies approve the effectiveness and safety of azilsartan medoxomil in patients with AH 1-2 grade. Several preclinical studies have shown the additional properties of azilsartan, including increase of insulin sensitivity, cardio- and nephron protection in obesity. In our clinical case we showed the positive influence of azilsartan medoxomil on clinic and ambulatory blood pressure, 24-hour aortic stiffness parameters, longitudinal left ventricular strain in patient with AH and obesity.

  8. Arterial hypertension in the female world: pathophysiology and therapy.

    PubMed

    Cadeddu, Christian; Franconi, Flavia; Cassisa, Laura; Campesi, Ilaria; Pepe, Alessia; Cugusi, Lucia; Maffei, Silvia; Gallina, Sabina; Sciomer, Susanna; Mercuro, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and outcomes in women, and antihypertensive therapy is not always successful in achieving control over the blood pressure (BP). Nonoptimal control of BP remains a crucial risk factor for cardiovascular mortality, and in women, it could be related to sex-specific factors. Historically, women have been under-represented in clinical trials; therefore, the benefits of clinical outcomes and the safety profiles of antihypertensive therapies have been studied less extensively in women. The reasons for the sex differences in BP levels are multifactorial, implying different roles of the sex hormones, the renin-angiotensin system, sympathetic activity, and arterial stiffness. A complete understanding of the pathophysiological features of these differences requires further investigation.Nevertheless, the prevalence of the use of antihypertensive agents is higher among middle-aged women than among men. Notably, in the United States, hypertensive women use more diuretics and angiotensin receptor blockers than men, whereas hypertensive men more often receive beta-blockers, calcium channel antagonists, or inhibitors of angiotensin-converting enzyme. To date, the explanations for these sex differences in the consumption of antihypertensive drugs remain unknown.

  9. Central hemodynamics and arterial stiffness in idiopathic and multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Franzen, Klaas; Fliegen, Sabine; Koester, Jelena; Martin, Rafael Campos; Deuschl, Günther; Reppel, Michael; Mortensen, Kai; Schneider, Susanne A

    2017-02-01

    Blood pressure is commonly abnormal in parkinsonian disorders, but central hemodynamics and arterial stiffness, well-established predictors of total cardiovascular risk, have rarely been studied in these disorders. 32 patients [27 with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (iPD); 5 with multiple system atrophy (MSA)] and 15 controls matched for cardiac risk factors underwent 24 h-ambulatory blood pressure recordings using an I.E.M. device (Mobil-O-Graph™), measuring peripheral pressure and calculating central pressures and arterial stiffness. Mean augmentation indices corrected for heart rate (AIx@75) were significantly lower and pulse wave velocities were significantly elevated in patients compared to controls. Central systolic blood pressure, cardiac output and daytime total vascular resistance were significantly elevated in patients. Mean nocturnal systolic peripheral blood pressure and nocturnal heart rates were also significantly higher; 56.3% of patients had nocturnal hypertension (80% of the MSA group); 85.2% showed non-dipping. This supports previous findings of reduced vulnerability to systemic atherosclerosis and end-organ damage in treated PD. Yet, hemodynamic abnormalities were common and often remained asymptomatic.

  10. Differential effects of nebivolol and metoprolol on arterial stiffness, circulating progenitor cells, and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Hayek, Salim S; Poole, Joseph C; Neuman, Robert; Morris, Alanna A; Khayata, Mohamed; Kavtaradze, Nino; Topel, Matthew L; Binongo, Jose G; Li, Qunna; Jones, Dean P; Waller, Edmund K; Quyyumi, Arshed A

    2015-03-01

    Unlike traditional beta receptor antagonists, nebivolol activates nitric oxide. We hypothesized that therapy with nebivolol compared with metoprolol would improve arterial stiffness, increase levels of circulating progenitor cells (PC), and decrease oxidative stress (OS). In a randomized, double-blind, cross-over study, 30 hypertensive subjects received either once daily nebivolol or metoprolol succinate for 3 months each. Pulse wave velocity and augmentation index were measured using tonometry. Flow cytometry was used to measure circulating PC. OS was measured as plasma aminothiols. Measurements were performed at baseline, and repeated at 3 and 6 months. No significant differences were present between the levels of OS, arterial stiffness, and PC numbers during treatment with metoprolol compared with nebivolol. In subgroup analyses of beta-blocker naïve subjects (n = 19), nebivolol reduced pulse wave velocity significantly compared with metoprolol (-1.4 ± 1.9 vs. -0.1 ± 2.2; P = .005). Both nebivolol and metoprolol increased circulating levels of CD34+/CD133 + PC similarly (P = .05), suggesting improved regenerative capacity.

  11. Elderly Algerian women lose their sex-advantage in terms of arterial stiffness and cardiovascular profile.

    PubMed

    Temmar, Mohamed; Watfa, Ghassan; Joly, Laure; Kearney-Schwartz, Anna; Youcef, Merabia; Bensalah, Selt; Mustapha, Yahia; Salvi, Paolo; Gautier, Sylvie; Safar, Michel; Labat, Carlos; Benetos, Athanase

    2013-11-01

    Several studies have shown lower carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) levels in women compared to men, a difference that could partially explain the increased longevity in women. However, these studies have been performed in industrial countries while few data are available in emerging populations. We studied arterial stiffness, as evaluated by cfPWV, in elderly Algerian men and women. cfPWV was studied in 321 Algerian men (81.2 ± 5.3 years) and women (81.1 ± 4.4 years). An age-matched and sex-matched cohort of European individuals (n = 321) was used as a control group. Comparatively to men, Algerian women exhibited higher BMI and heart rate (HR), higher prevalence of hypertension, and were more frequently treated for hypertension. cfPWV was not different between Algerian men (14.8 ± 3.3 m/s) and women (14.9 ± 3.4 m/s). By contrast, in Europeans, women had lower cfPWV (12.7 ± 2.7 m/s) than men (14.0 ± 3.3 m/s; P <0.001). Comparatively to European women, Algerian women had a higher cfPWV (P <0.01). In both ethnic groups, multivariate analyses revealed that age, mean blood pressure (BP), HR, and diabetes were positively associated with cfPWV, whereas female sex was associated with lower cfPWV only in Europeans. Elderly Algerian women exhibit arterial stiffness similar to men, whereas European women display lower arterial stiffness than men. This loss of 'arterial sex advantage' in Algerians may be explained by higher BP, HR, and a worse metabolic profile in Algerian women. Interventions in emerging populations, especially in women, should be a priority in order to address these risk factors by acting on current lifestyle.

  12. Acute changes in arterial stiffness following exercise in people with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Jeyasundar; Swaminathan, Narasimman; Pereira, Natasha M; Henderson, Keiran; Brodie, David A

    2016-08-22

    This study aims to examine the changes in arterial stiffness immediately following sub-maximal exercise in people with metabolic syndrome. Ninety-four adult participants (19-80 years) with metabolic syndrome gave written consent and were measured for arterial stiffness using a SphygmoCor (SCOR-PVx, Version 8.0, Atcor Medical Private Ltd, USA) immediately before and within 5-10min after an incremental shuttle walk test. The arterial stiffness measures used were pulse wave velocity (PWV), aortic pulse pressure (PP), augmentation pressure, augmentation index (AI), subendocardial viability ratio (SEVR) and ejection duration (ED). There was a significant increase (p<0.05) in most of the arterial stiffness variables following exercise. Exercise capacity had a strong inverse correlation with arterial stiffness and age (p<0.01). Age influences arterial stiffness. Exercise capacity is inversely related to arterial stiffness and age in people with metabolic syndrome. Exercise induced changes in arterial stiffness measured using pulse wave analysis is an important tool that provides further evidence in studying cardiovascular risk in metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Decreased elastic energy storage, not increased material stiffness, characterizes central artery dysfunction in fibulin-5 deficiency independent of sex.

    PubMed

    Ferruzzi, J; Bersi, M R; Uman, S; Yanagisawa, H; Humphrey, J D

    2015-03-01

    Central artery stiffness has emerged over the past 15 years as a clinically significant indicator of cardiovascular function and initiator of disease. Loss of elastic fiber integrity is one of the primary contributors to increased arterial stiffening in aging, hypertension, and related conditions. Elastic fibers consist of an elastin core and multiple glycoproteins; hence defects in any of these constituents can adversely affect arterial wall mechanics. In this paper, we focus on mechanical consequences of the loss of fibulin-5, an elastin-associated glycoprotein involved in elastogenesis. Specifically, we compared the biaxial mechanical properties of five central arteries-the ascending thoracic aorta, descending thoracic aorta, suprarenal abdominal aorta, infrarenal abdominal aorta, and common carotid artery-from male and female wild-type and fibulin-5 deficient mice. Results revealed that, independent of sex, all five regions in the fibulin-5 deficient mice manifested a marked increase in structural stiffness but also a marked decrease in elastic energy storage and typically an increase in energy dissipation, with all differences being most dramatic in the ascending and abdominal aortas. Given that the primary function of large arteries is to store elastic energy during systole and to use this energy during diastole to work on the blood, fibulin-5 deficiency results in a widespread diminishment of central artery function that can have significant effects on hemodynamics and cardiac function.

  14. Aortic stiffness determines diastolic blood flow reversal in the descending thoracic aorta: potential implication for retrograde embolic stroke in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Junichiro; Ito, Sadayoshi

    2013-09-01

    Aortic stiffening often precedes cardiovascular diseases, including stroke, but the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remain obscure. We hypothesized that such abnormalities could be attributable to altered central blood flow dynamics. In 296 patients with uncomplicated hypertension, Doppler velocity pulse waveforms were recorded at the proximal descending aorta and carotid artery to calculate the reverse/forward flow ratio and diastolic/systolic flow index, respectively. Tonometric waveforms were recorded on the radial artery to estimate aortic pressure and characteristic impedance (Z0) and to determine carotid-femoral (aortic) and carotid-radial (peripheral) pulse wave velocities. In all subjects, the aortic flow waveform was bidirectional, comprising systolic forward and diastolic reverse flows. The aortic reverse/forward flow ratio (35 ± 10%) was positively associated with parameters of aortic stiffness (including pulse wave velocity, Z0, and aortic/peripheral pulse wave velocity ratio), independent of age, body mass index, aortic diameter, and aortic pressure. The carotid flow waveform was unidirectional and bimodal with systolic and diastolic maximal peaks. There was a positive relationship between the carotid diastolic/systolic flow index (28 ± 9%) and aortic reverse/forward flow ratio, which remained significant after adjustment for aortic stiffness and other related parameters. The Bland-Altman plots showed a close time correspondence between aortic reverse and carotid diastolic flow peaks. In conclusion, aortic stiffness determines the extent of flow reversal from the descending aorta to the aortic arch, which contributes to the diastolic antegrade flow into the carotid artery. This hemodynamic relationship constitutes a potential mechanism linking increased aortic stiffness, altered flow dynamics, and increased stroke risk in hypertension.

  15. [Resistant arterial hypertension and coarctation of the aorta].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rossique-Delmas, Pilar; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2014-01-01

    Coarctation of the aorta accounts for around 5 percent of all congenital heart defects. Many of these patients develop arterial hypertension, and occasionally resistant arterial hypertension, despite adequate correction. This may lead to potentially fatal complications such as heart failure, aortic dissection, cerebrovascular events, or myocardial infarction. Therefore, a correct diagnosis must be made and an appropriate treatment started to reduce arterial hypertension, arteriosclerotic vascular disease, as well as the increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  16. Association of body mass index with arterial stiffness and blood pressure components: a twin study.

    PubMed

    Tarnoki, Adam Domonkos; Tarnoki, David Laszlo; Bogl, Leonie H; Medda, Emanuela; Fagnani, Corrado; Nisticò, Lorenza; Stazi, Maria Antonietta; Brescianini, Sonia; Lucatelli, Pierleone; Boatta, Emanuele; Zini, Chiara; Fanelli, Fabrizio; Baracchini, Claudio; Meneghetti, Giorgio; Osztovits, Janos; Jermendy, Gyorgy; Kiss, Robert Gabor; Preda, Istvan; Karlinger, Kinga; Lannert, Agnes; Molnar, Andrea Agnes; Littvay, Levente; Garami, Zsolt; Berczi, Viktor; Pucci, Giacomo; Baffy, Gyorgy; Schillaci, Giuseppe; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H

    2013-08-01

    Obesity, blood pressure and arterial stiffness are heritable traits interconnected to each other but their possible common genetic and environmental etiologies are unknown. We studied 228 monozygotic and 150 dizygotic twin pairs aged 18-82 years from Italy, Hungary and the United States, of which 45 monozygotic and 38 dizygotic pairs were discordant for body mass index (BMI; intrapair difference (Δ) in BMI ≥ 3 kg/m(2)). Blood pressure components and arterial stiffness were measured by TensioMed Arteriograph. Hypertension was more prevalent among obese than non-obese individuals (55% vs. 29%, p < 0.001). Age-, sex- and country-adjusted heritability estimates were high for hemodynamic measures (45%-58%) and BMI (78%). According to bivariate Cholesky decomposition, phenotypic correlations between BMI and blood pressure components (r = -0.15 to 0.24, p < 0.05) were largely explained by additive genetic factors (65%-77%) with the remaining explained by the unique environment. When controlling for genetic factors within all monozygotic pairs, ΔBMI was significantly correlated with Δbrachial systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), Δmean arterial pressure, and Δaortic SBP (r = 0.15-0.17, p < 0.05). For the same measures, heavier co-twins of BMI-discordant monozygotic pairs had significantly higher values than their leaner counterparts (p < 0.05). Blood pressure components are moderately correlated with BMI, largely because of shared genetic factors. However, for the association of BMI with brachial SBP and DBP, aortic SBP and mean arterial pressure, acquired, modifiable factors were also found to be important. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Pregnancy in pulmonary arterial hypertension patients].

    PubMed

    Rosengarten, Dror; Kramer, Mordechai R

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a disorder defined by elevated mean pulmonary arterial pressure. PAH can be idiopathic or associated with a variety of medical conditions such as scleroderma, congenital heart disease, left heart failure, lung disease or chronic pulmonary thromboembolism. This progressive disease can cause severe right heart failure and death. Normal physiologic changes that occur during pregnancy may produce fatal consequences in PAH patients. Current guidelines recommend that pregnancy be avoided or terminated early in women with PAH. During the past decade, new advanced therapies for PAH have emerged gathering reports of successful pregnancies in patients with pulmonary hypertension. Substantial risk still exists and current recommendations have not changed. Nevertheless, in selected cases, if a patient insists on continuing the pregnancy, being fully aware of the risks involved, an intensive treatment approach should be implemented in experienced centers. This is necessary in order to control pulmonary hypertension during pregnancy and reduce the risk so as to improve outcomes. This review will focus on the pathophysiology of PAH in pregnancy and appropriate management during pregnancy, delivery and the post-partum period.

  18. Greater impairments in cerebral artery compared with skeletal muscle feed artery endothelial function in a mouse model of increased large artery stiffness.

    PubMed

    Walker, Ashley E; Henson, Grant D; Reihl, Kelly D; Morgan, R Garrett; Dobson, Parker S; Nielson, Elizabeth I; Ling, Jing; Mecham, Robert P; Li, Dean Y; Lesniewski, Lisa A; Donato, Anthony J

    2015-04-15

    Increased large artery stiffness is a hallmark of arterial dysfunction with advancing age and is also present in other disease conditions such as diabetes. Increased large artery stiffness is correlated with resistance artery dysfunction in humans. Using a mouse model of altered arterial elastin content, this is the first study to examine the cause-and-effect relationship between large artery stiffness and peripheral resistance artery function. Our results indicate that mice with genetically greater large artery stiffness have impaired cerebral artery endothelial function, but generally preserved skeletal muscle feed artery endothelial function. The mechanisms for impaired cerebral artery endothelial function are reduced nitric oxide bioavailability and increased oxidative stress. These findings suggest that interventions that target large artery stiffness may be important to reduce disease risk associated with cerebral artery dysfunction in conditions such as advancing age. Advancing age as well as diseases such as diabetes are characterized by both increased large artery stiffness and impaired peripheral artery function. It has been hypothesized that greater large artery stiffness causes peripheral artery dysfunction; however, a cause-and-effect relationship has not previously been established. We used elastin heterozygote mice (Eln(+/-) ) as a model of increased large artery stiffness without co-morbidities unrelated to the large artery properties. Aortic stiffness, measured by pulse wave velocity, was ∼35% greater in Eln(+/-) mice than in wild-type (Eln(+/+) ) mice (P = 0.04). Endothelium-dependent dilatation (EDD), assessed by the maximal dilatation to acetylcholine, was ∼40% lower in Eln(+/-) than Eln(+/+) mice in the middle cerebral artery (MCA, P < 0.001), but was similar between groups in the gastrocnemius feed arteries (GFA, P = 0.79). In the MCA, EDD did not differ between groups after incubation with the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor N

  19. [Novel immunopathological approaches to pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Perros, Frédéric; Montani, David; Dorfmüller, Peter; Huertas, Alice; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia; Humbert, Marc

    2011-04-01

    Inflammation is important for the initiation and the maintenance of vascular remodeling in the most commun animal models of pulmonary hypertension (PH), and its therapeutical targeting blocks PH development in these models. In human, pulmonary vascular lesions of PH are also the source of an intense chemokine production, linked to inflammatory cell recruitment. However, arteritis is uncommon in PH patients. Of note, current PH treatments have immunomodulatory properties. In addition, some studies have shown a correlation between levels of circulating inflammatory mediators and patients' survival. The study of autoimmunity in the pathophysiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension is becoming an area of intense investigation. New immunopathological approaches to PH should allow the development of innovative treatments for this very severe condition.

  20. Advances in pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ivy, Dunbar

    2012-03-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in children. Approved medications for the treatment of adult PAH have been used to treat children, but evidence-based treatment algorithms for children are lacking. Pediatric PAH registries have begun to define the incidence and prevalence of idiopathic PAH and PAH associated with congenital heart disease. A pediatric-specific classification of pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease has been proposed. Furthermore, the first randomized placebo-controlled trial of type-5 phosphodiesterase therapy in treatment-naïve children with PAH has been completed and reported. This trial highlights the importance of the difficulties of performing clinical trials in children with targeted PAH therapy as well as the importance of long-term follow-up of adverse events. Classification, clinical trials, and therapy for children with PAH must take into account the unique aspects of PAH in children.

  1. [Association between peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gene single nucleotide polymorphisms and arterial stiffness in adult Chinese population].

    PubMed

    Xu, Ru-Yi; Ye, Ping; Sheng, Li; Luo, Lei-Ming; Wu, Hong-Mei; Xiao, Wen-Kai

    2013-04-01

    To analyze the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor(PPAR) and arterial stiffness in adult Chinese population (> 50 years). Cardiovascular risk factors from participants of Beijing epidemiological investigation were analyzed. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) was measured by Complior system. The subjects were divided into normal arterial stiffness group (cfPWV < 12 m/s, n = 844) and increased arterial stiffness group (cfPWV > 12 m/s, n = 530). Three valid SNPs including rs1053049, rs1800234 and rs8192678 in the PPAR and PPARγC1a gene were genotyped by TaqMan allelic discrimination assays. The age [(67.9 ± 8.8) years vs. (58.0 ± 9.7) years], prevalence of hypertension [71.1% (377/530) vs. 30.5% (257/844)] and diabetes mellitus [21.7% (115/530) vs. 11.0% (93/844)] were all significantly higher in increased arterial stiffness group than in normal group (all P < 0.05). The frequencies of CC, CT and TT type of rs8192678 [CC: 32.2% (272/844) vs. 30.8% (163/530), CT: 48.7% (411/844) vs. 52.1% (276/530), TT: 19.1% (161/844) vs. 17.2% (91/530)], rs1053049 [CC: 55.7% (470/844) vs. 51.3% (272/530), CT: 36.7% (310/844) vs. 39.1% (207/530), TT: 7.6% (64/844) vs. 9.6% (51/530)] and rs1800234 [CC: 88.4% (746/844) vs. 90.4% (479/530), CT + TT: 11.6% (98/844) vs. 9.6% (51/530)] were similar between the two groups. There was also no association between haplotypes and the increased arterial stiffness in this cohort. In this community-based population, we found that aging, hypertension and diabetes mellitus were associated but SNPs of PPAR and PPARγC1a were not associated with arterial stiffness.

  2. [Effect of angiotensin converting enzyme lisinopril on the state of vascular bed in premenopausal women with arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Khabibulina, M M

    2013-01-01

    We assessed effect of lisinopril on structural-functional state of vascular bed in 82 premenopausal women with hypoestrogenia and arterial hypertension (AH). Test with postocclusion reactive hyperemia showed that at the background of significant lowering of endothelial vasomotor function before treatment 47.5% of women had inertial type of vasomotor reaction. This evidenced for considerable role of dyshormonal states in progression of AH first of all at the account of increase of vascular stiffness and development of endothelial dysfunction. Lisinopril improved structural-functional state of vascular wall of common carotid arteries, affected positively dysfunction of endothelium, lowered stiffness of arterial vascular wall.

  3. Developing treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Martin R.

    2013-01-01

    Developing new treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a challenge. We have enjoyed success with regulatory approvals for three drug classes—prostanoids, endothelin receptor antagonists and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. But we have also seen some disappointing results, for example, from studies with vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, statins and tergolide. Animal models are an unreliable predictor of efficacy in humans. The best model for the disease is the patient. This review discusses three major issues facing the evaluation of drugs in PAH patients—target validation, choosing the right dose, and early trial design. PMID:23662193

  4. [Anticoagulation therapy in pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Akagi, Satoshi; Kusano, Kengo Fukushima

    2008-11-01

    Vascular thrombosis implicates in the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Anticoagulation therapy (warfarin) has been recommended by many experts in the treatment of PAH. However, the long-term effectiveness of anticoagulation therapy remains controversial. Because of the various drugs, such as epoprostenol, bosentan, and sildenafil, for the treatment of PAH recently, warfarin alone is not a realistic therapy for PAH. Accordingly we reviewed the previous manuscript regarding anticoagulation therapy for PAH, and looked at the current role of anticoagulation therapy in Japan.

  5. "Nocturnal seizures" in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Anthony; McSweeney, Julia; Kulik, Thomas; Khatwa, Umakanth; Kothare, Sanjeev V

    2013-10-15

    The usual differential diagnoses of nocturnal events in children include parasomnias, nocturnal seizures, nocturnal reflux (Sandifer syndrome), hypnic jerks, periodic limb movements of sleep, and sleep disordered breathing. We report a previously healthy young girl who presented to the sleep clinic for evaluation of nocturnal events which were diagnosed as medically refractory nocturnal seizures. It was not until a syncopal event occurred in the daytime, which prompted referral for cardiac evaluation, the diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hyper-tension (IPAH) was made. Sleep physicians should consider IPAH in the differential diagnosis of nocturnal events in children.

  6. The metabolic basis of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sutendra, Gopinath; Michelakis, Evangelos D

    2014-04-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a vascular remodeling disease of the lungs resulting in heart failure and premature death. Although, until recently, it was thought that PAH pathology is restricted to pulmonary arteries, several extrapulmonary organs are also affected. The realization that these tissues share a common metabolic abnormality (i.e., suppression of mitochondrial glucose oxidation and increased glycolysis) is important for our understanding of PAH, if not a paradigm shift. Here, we discuss an emerging metabolic theory, which proposes that PAH should be viewed as a syndrome involving many organs sharing a mitochondrial abnormality and explains many PAH features and provides novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Potassium channels in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Boucherat, Olivier; Chabot, Sophie; Antigny, Fabrice; Perros, Frédéric; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating cardiopulmonary disorder with various origins. All forms of PAH share a common pulmonary arteriopathy characterised by vasoconstriction, remodelling of the pre-capillary pulmonary vessel wall, and in situ thrombosis. Although the pathogenesis of PAH is recognised as a complex and multifactorial process, there is growing evidence that potassium channels dysfunction in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells is a hallmark of PAH. Besides regulating many physiological functions, reduced potassium channels expression and/or activity have significant effects on PAH establishment and progression. This review describes the molecular mechanisms and physiological consequences of potassium channel modulation. Special emphasis is placed on KCNA5 (Kv1.5) and KCNK3 (TASK1), which are considered to play a central role in determining pulmonary vascular tone and may represent attractive therapeutic targets in the treatment of PAH.

  8. Arterial stiffness and arterial function in adult cyanotic patients with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Trojnarska, Olga; Szczepaniak-Chicheł, Ludwina; Gabriel, Marcin; Bartczak-Rutkowska, Agnieszka; Rupa-Matysek, Joanna; Tykarski, Andrzej; Grajek, Stefan

    2017-07-01

    Mortality in cyanotic patients with congenital heart diseases (CHD) is high, mainly due to cardiovascular complications. It is known that endothelial dysfunction, increased arterial stiffness, and impaired vascular function have negative influence on cardiovascular prognosis. The aim of the study was to assess parameters of arterial stiffness and vascular dysfunction in cyanotic patients with CHD as well as their potential relation to impaired blood oxygen saturation and polycythemia parameters typical for cyanosis. A total of 36 CHD cyanotic patients (17 males) (42.3±16.3 years) and 35 healthy individuals (16 males) (39.6±10.4 years) were enrolled. Assessed parameters were intima media thickness and flow-mediated dilatation (FMD). Assessed parameters using applanation tonometry methods were aortic systolic pressure, aortic pulse pressure (AoPP), augmentation pressure (AP), augmentation index (AI), pulse pressure amplification (PPampl), and pulse wave velocity (PWV). AoPP (37.3±11.1mmHg vs. 29±6.5mmHg; p=0.002), AP (10.1±7.3mmHg vs. 1.1±3.9mmHg; p=0.00001), AI (24.7±13.5% vs. 3.0±13.6%; p=0.00001), and PWV (7.4±2.1m/s vs. 6.3±0.7m/s; p=0.003) were higher, and PPampl was lower (135.3±16.1% vs. 160.4±12.8%; p=0.00001) in the studied group compared to controls and proved the presence of the increased stiffness of arteries. Impairment of FMD was observed (9.0±5.6 vs. 10.9±4.7; p=0.04). No significant correlations were found between analyzed arterial parameters and biochemical ones characterizing cyanotic patients depicting rheological properties of blood. Cyanotic patients with CHD are characterized by increased arterial stiffness estimated with pulse wave analysis parameters and by deteriorated arterial function expressed with worse vasodilatative response in comparison with healthy population. It may confirm relevance of those mechanisms in development of increased rate of cardiovascular events in this population. Association between oxygen saturation

  9. Arterial stiffness identification of the human carotid artery using the stress-strain relationship in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Khamdaeng, T.; Luo, J.; Vappou, J.; Terdtoon, P.; Konofagou, E.E.

    2014-01-01

    Arterial stiffness is well accepted as a reliable indicator of arterial disease. Increase in carotid arterial stiffness has been associated with carotid arterial disease, e.g., atherosclerotic plaque, thrombosis, stenosis, etc. Several methods for carotid arterial stiffness assessments have been proposed. In this study, in-vivo noninvasive assessment using applanation tonometry and an ultrasound-based motion estimation technique was applied in seven healthy volunteers (age 28 ± 3.6 years old) to determine pressure and wall displacement in the left common carotid artery (CCA), respectively. The carotid pressure was obtained using a calibration method by assuming that the mean and diastolic blood pressures remained constant throughout the arterial tree. The regional carotid arterial wall displacement was estimated using a 1D cross-correlation technique on the ultrasound radio frequency (RF) signals acquired at a frame rate of 505–1010 Hz. Young’s moduli were estimated under two different assumptions: (i) a linear elastic two-parallel spring model and (ii) a two-dimensional, nonlinear, hyperelastic model. The circumferential stress (σθ) and strain (εθ) relationship was then established in humans in vivo. A slope change in the circumferential stress-strain curve was observed and defined as a transition point. The Young’s moduli of the elastic lamellae (E1), elastin-collagen fibers (E2) and collagen fibers (E3) and the incremental Young’s moduli before (E0≤εθ<ε0T) and after the transition point (EεθT≤εθ) were determined from the first and second approach, respectively, to describe the contribution of the complex mechanical interaction of the different arterial wall constituents. The average E1, E2 and E3 from seven healthy volunteers were found to be equal to 0.15 ± 0.04, 0.89 ± 0.27 and 0.75 ± 0.29 MPa, respectively. The average E0≤εθ<εθTInt and EεθT≤εθInt of the intact wall (both the tunica adventitia and tunica media layers

  10. Arterial stiffness identification of the human carotid artery using the stress-strain relationship in vivo.

    PubMed

    Khamdaeng, T; Luo, J; Vappou, J; Terdtoon, P; Konofagou, E E

    2012-03-01

    Arterial stiffness is well accepted as a reliable indicator of arterial disease. Increase in carotid arterial stiffness has been associated with carotid arterial disease, e.g., atherosclerotic plaque, thrombosis, stenosis, etc. Several methods for carotid arterial stiffness assessment have been proposed. In this study, in vivo noninvasive assessment using applanation tonometry and an ultrasound-based motion estimation technique was applied in seven healthy volunteers (age 28±3.6years old) to determine pressure and wall displacement in the left common carotid artery (CCA), respectively. The carotid pressure was obtained using a calibration method by assuming that the mean and diastolic blood pressures remained constant throughout the arterial tree. The regional carotid arterial wall displacement was estimated using a 1D cross-correlation technique on the ultrasound radio frequency (RF) signals acquired at a frame rate of 505-1010Hz. Young's moduli were estimated under two different assumptions: (i) a linear elastic two-parallel spring model and (ii) a two-dimensional, nonlinear, hyperelastic model. The circumferential stress (σ(θ)) and strain (ɛ(θ)) relationship was then established in humans in vivo. A slope change in the circumferential stress-strain curve was observed and defined as the transition point. The Young's moduli of the elastic lamellae (E(1)), elastin-collagen fibers (E(2)) and collagen fibers (E(3)) and the incremental Young's moduli before ( [Formula: see text] ) and after the transition point ( [Formula: see text] ) were determined from the first and second approach, respectively, to describe the contribution of the complex mechanical interaction of the different arterial wall constituents. The average moduli E(1), E(2) and E(3) from seven healthy volunteers were found to be equal to 0.15±0.04, 0.89±0.27 and 0.75±0.29MPa, respectively. The average moduli [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] of the intact wall (both the tunica

  11. Arterial pressure measurement: Is the envelope curve of the oscillometric method influenced by arterial stiffness?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelido, G.; Angiletta, S.; Pujalte, A.; Quiroga, P.; Cornes, P.; Craiem, D.

    2007-11-01

    Measurement of peripheral arterial pressure using the oscillometric method is commonly used by professionals as well as by patients in their homes. This non invasive automatic method is fast, efficient and the required equipment is affordable with a low cost. The measurement method consists of obtaining parameters from a calibrated decreasing curve that is modulated by heart beats witch appear when arterial pressure reaches the cuff pressure. Diastolic, mean and systolic pressures are obtained calculating particular instants from the heart beats envelope curve. In this article we analyze the envelope of this amplified curve to find out if its morphology is related to arterial stiffness in patients. We found, in 33 volunteers, that the envelope waveform width correlates to systolic pressure (r=0.4, p<0.05), to pulse pressure (r=0.6, p<0.05) and to pulse pressure normalized to systolic pressure (r=0.6, p<0.05). We believe that the morphology of the heart beats envelope curve obtained with the oscillometric method for peripheral pressure measurement depends on arterial stiffness and can be used to enhance pressure measurements.

  12. [French as 2005-recommendations on the management of arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Chamontin, B; Halimi, J M

    2007-01-01

    Self blood pressure measurements (home BP) and/or ambulatory BP measurements are recommended in mild to moderate hypertension (140/90 - 179/109 mmHg) in order to confirm sustained hypertension and identify white coat and masked hypertension. The evaluation of target organ damages (TOD) has to be integrated in cardiovascular risk estimate and taken into account in the management of hypertensive patients. Beside echocardiography, there is a place for the screening of microalbuminuria in non diabetic hypertensive patients, but these investigations should not be performed systematically. Arterial stiffness evaluation and carotid intima-media thickness quantification are not yet recommended. Cardiovascular risk (CV risk) estimate plays a pivotal role in the therapeutic decision and strategy. The cardiovascular risk grade is based on [1] the list of cardiovascular risk factors (same list AFSSAPS recommendations on dyslipidemia), [2] the presence or absence of TOD and [3] cardiovascular complications: "low", "medium", and "high" CV risk. Lifestyle modifications are recommended in all hypertensive patients. Five antihypertensive drugs are recommended for first line therapy: beta-blockers, thiazide diuretics, ACEIs, ARA II and CCBs (and fixed low dose combinations with AFSSAPS agreement for first line). In order to initiate the treatment, Evidence-based therapy (according to clinical trials conducted in different clinical situations), certain comorbid conditions (compelling indications), efficacy and side-effects in a previous experience, and the cost are the determinants of the first choice. Most hypertensive patients require more than one agent to achieve target blood pressure and for second line therapy the recommended combinations are: betablockers-diuretics, ACEIs-diuretics, ARAII-diuretics, betablockers-CCBs (DHP), ACEIs-CCBs, ARA II-CCBs and CCBs-diuretics. The delay to establish a combination therapy depend on CV risk. The BP goals are those recommended by ESH

  13. [Assessment of arterial wall stiffness by 24-hour blood pressure monitoring].

    PubMed

    Korneva, V A; Kuznetsova, T Yu

    2016-01-01

    Arterial wall stiffness is an early marker of cardiovascular diseases. The gold standard for assessment of the stiffness of large vessels is presently pulse wave velocity (PWV). Work is in progress on the study of the reference values of PWV in people of different genders and ages. 24-hour blood pressure (BP) monitoring is not only a procedure that can estimate diurnal BP variability, but also monitor the indicators of vascular wall stiffness in a number of cases over a 24-hour period. The given review highlights the pathophysiology of arterial stiffness, methods for its assessment, and the aspects of use in therapeutic practice.

  14. [Arterial hypertension in females engaged into penal system work].

    PubMed

    Tagirova, M M; El'garov, A A; Shogenova, A B; Murtazov, A M

    2010-01-01

    The authors proved significant prevalence of arterial hypertension and atherosclerosis risk factors in women engaged into penal system work--so these values form cardiovascular risk caused by environmental parameters. Teveten and Nebilet were proved effective in the examinees with arterial hypertension.

  15. Tadalafil as treatment for idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Adriana Castro; Hovnanian, André Luiz; Fernandes, Caio Julio César dos Santos; Lapa, Mônica; Jardim, Carlos; Souza, Rogério

    2006-11-01

    Phosphodiesterase inhibitors like sildenafil have already been shown to improve functional capacity and hemodynamics in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Few studies address the effects of new phosphodiesterase inhibitors as tadalafil. We report a case of a patient with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension in functional class IV (New York Heart Association) with significant response to treatment with tadalafil.

  16. Inhaled treprostinil and pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Nadler, Samuel T; Edelman, Jeffrey D

    2010-01-01

    Multiple conditions result in development of pulmonary hypertension. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is the subclassification of pulmonary hypertension, in which known or unknown underlying conditions lead to similar intrinsic alterations in the pulmonary vasculature. PAH is a progressive condition characterized by restricted blood flow through the pulmonary circulation leading to poor survival in the absence of effective therapy. Over the last two decades, new therapeutic agents have substantially improved the course and prognosis for PAH patients. Three available classes of drugs, ie, prostacyclins, endothelin receptor antagonists, and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors provide multiple options for treatment of PAH. Endothelin receptor antagonists and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors are administered orally, whereas prostacyclin therapies are delivered by continuous intravenous or subcutaneous infusion, or as aerosols by nebulization. Because of the risks and inconveniences associated with administration, prostacyclins are typically reserved for patients with more advanced disease or progression despite oral therapy. Inhaled administration may be a safer and easier route for prostacyclin administration. Treprostinil is a prostacyclin analog that has been demonstrated to be effective when administered by continuous subcutaneous or intravenous infusion, and more recently by nebulization. PMID:21191432

  17. Surrogates of Large Artery versus Small Artery Stiffness and Ankle-Brachial Index

    PubMed Central

    Korhonen, Päivi; Syvänen, Kari; Aarnio, Pertti

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral artery tonometry (PAT) is a novel method for assessing arterial stiffness of small digital arteries. Pulse pressure can be regarded as a surrogate of large artery stiffness. When ankle-brachial index (ABI) is calculated using the higher of the two ankle systolic pressures as denominator (ABI-higher), leg perfusion can be reliably estimated. However, using the lower of the ankle pressures to calculate ABI (ABI-lower) identifies more patients with isolated peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in ankle arteries. We aimed to compare the ability of PAT, pulse pressure, and different calculations of ABI to detect atherosclerotic disease in lower extremities. We examined PAT, pulse pressure, and ABI in 66 cardiovascular risk subjects in whom borderline PAD (ABI 0.91 to 1.00) was diagnosed 4 years earlier. Using ABI-lower to diagnose PAD yielded 2-fold higher prevalence of PAD than using ABI-higher. Endothelial dysfunction was diagnosed in 15/66 subjects (23%). In a bivariate correlation analysis, pulse pressure was negatively correlated with ABI-higher (r = −0.347, p = 0.004) and with ABI-lower (r = −0.424, p < 0.001). PAT hyperemic response was not significantly correlated with either ABI-higher (r = −0.148, p = 0.24) or with ABI-lower (r = −0.208, p = 0.095). Measurement of ABI using the lower of the two ankle pressures is an efficient method to identify patients with clinical or subclinical atherosclerosis and worth performing on subjects with pulse pressure above 65 mm Hg. The usefulness of PAT measurement in detecting PAD is vague. PMID:22942632

  18. Arterial stiffness and sedentary lifestyle: Role of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Lessiani, Gianfranco; Santilli, Francesca; Boccatonda, Andrea; Iodice, Pierpaolo; Liani, Rossella; Tripaldi, Romina; Saggini, Raoul; Davì, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    Sedentary lifestyle is a risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease, and leads to a quantifiable impairment in vascular function and arterial wall stiffening. We tested the hypothesis of oxidative stress as a determinant of arterial stiffness (AS) in physically inactive subjects, and challenged the reversibility of these processes after the completion of an eight-week, high-intensity exercise training (ET). AS was assessed before and after ET, measuring carotid to femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) with a Vicorder device. At baseline and after ET, participants performed urine collection and underwent fasting blood sampling. Urinary 8-iso-PGF2α, an in vivo marker of lipid peroxidation, total, HDL and LDL cholesterol, and triglyceride concentrations were measured. ET was associated with significantly reduced urinary 8-iso-PGF2α(p<0.0001) levels. PWV was significantly reduced after ET completion (p<0.0001), and was directly related to urinary 8-iso-PGF2α(Rho=0.383, p=0.021). After ET, cardiovascular fitness improved [peak oxygen consumption (p<0.0001), peak heart rate (p<0.0001)]. However, no improvement in lipid profile was observed, apart from a significant reduction of triglycerides (p=0.022). PWV and triglycerides were significantly related (Rho=0.466, p=0.005) throughout the study period. PWV levels were also related to urinary 8-iso-PGF2α in our previously sedentary subjects. We conclude that regular physical exercise may be a natural antioxidant strategy, lowering oxidant stress and thereby the AS degree.

  19. Carotid Arterial Stiffness and Risk of Incident Cerebral Microbleeds in Older People: the AGES-Reykjavik Study

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jie; Mitchell, Gary F; Bots, Michiel L; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Harris, Tamara B; Garcia, Melissa; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; van Buchem, Mark A; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Launer, Lenore J

    2015-01-01

    Objective Age and high blood pressure are major risk factors for cerebral microbleeds (CMBs). However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear and arterial stiffness may be important. We investigated whether carotid arterial stiffness is associated with incidence and location of CMBs. Approach and Results In the prospective, population-based AGES-Reykjavik study, 2,512 participants aged 66–93 years underwent a baseline brain MRI examination and carotid ultrasound in 2002–2006, and returned for a repeat brain MRI in 2007–2011. Common carotid arterial stiffness was assessed using a standardized protocol and expressed as carotid arterial strain (CAS), distensibility coefficient (DC) and Young’s elastic modulus (YEM). Modified poisson regression was applied to relate carotid arterial stiffness parameters to CMBs incidence. During a mean follow-up of 5.2 years, 463 people (18.4%) developed new CMBs, of whom 292 had CMBs restricted to lobar regions and 171 had CMBs in a deep or infratentorial region. After adjusting for age, sex and follow-up interval, arterial stiffness measures were associated with incident CMBs (Risk ratio [RR] per SD decrease in CAS, 1.11 [95%CI, 1.01–1.21]; per SD decrease in natural log-transformed DC, 1.14[1.05–1.24]; per SD increase in natural log-transformed YEM, 1.13[1.04–1.23]). These measures were also significantly associated with incident deep CMBs (1.18[1.02–1.37]; 1.24[1.08–1.42]; 1.23[1.07–1.42]) but not with lobar CMBs. When further adjusted for blood pressure and other baseline vascular risk factors, carotid plaque, prevalent CMBs, subcortical infarcts and white matter hyperintensities, the associations persisted. Conclusions Our findings support the hypothesis that localized increases in carotid arterial stiffness may contribute to the development of CMBs, especially in a deep location atttributable to hypertension. PMID:26112009

  20. The structural factor of hypertension: large and small artery alterations.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Stéphane; Boutouyrie, Pierre

    2015-03-13

    Pathophysiological studies have extensively investigated the structural factor in hypertension, including large and small artery remodeling and functional changes. Here, we review the recent literature on the alterations in small and large arteries in hypertension. We discuss the possible mechanisms underlying these abnormalities and we explain how they accompany and often precede hypertension. Finally, we propose an integrated pathophysiological approach to better understand how the cross-talk between large and small artery changes interacts in pressure wave transmission, exaggerates cardiac, brain and kidney damage, and lead to cardiovascular and renal complications. We focus on patients with essential hypertension because this is the most prevalent form of hypertension, and describe other forms of hypertension only for contrasting their characteristics with those of uncomplicated essential hypertension. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Exercise training improves ambulatory blood pressure but not arterial stiffness in heart transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Pascoalino, Lucas Nóbilo; Ciolac, Emmanuel Gomes; Tavares, Aline Cristina; Castro, Rafael Ertner; Ayub-Ferreira, Silvia Moreira; Bacal, Fernando; Issa, Victor Sarli; Bocchi, Edimar Alcides; Guimarães, Guilherme Veiga

    2015-05-01

    Hypertension is the most prevalent comorbidity after heart transplantation (HT). Exercise training (ET) is widely recommended as a key non-pharmacologic intervention for the prevention and management of hypertension, but its effects on ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) and some mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of hypertension have not been studied in this population. The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of ET on ABP and arterial stiffness of HT recipients. 40 HT patients, randomized to ET (n = 31) or a control group (n = 9) underwent a maximal graded exercise test, 24-hour ABP monitoring, and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) assessment before the intervention and at a 12-week follow-up assessment. The ET program was performed thrice-weekly and consisted primarily of endurance exercise (40 minutes) at ~70% of maximum oxygen uptake (Vo2MAX). The ET group had reduced 24-hour (4.0 ± 1.4 mm Hg, p < 0.01) and daytime (4.8 ± 1.6 mm Hg, p < 0.01) systolic ABP, and 24-hour (7.0 ± 1.4 mm Hg, p < 0.001) daytime (7.5 ± 1.6 mm Hg, p < 0.001) and nighttime (5.9 ± 1.5 mm Hg, p < 0.001) diastolic ABP after the intervention. The ET group also had improved Vo2MAX (9.7% ± 2.6%, p < 0.001) after the intervention. However, PWV did not change after ET. No variable was changed in the control group after the intervention. The 12-week ET program was effective for reducing ABP but not PWV in heart transplant recipients. This result suggests that endurance ET may be a tool to counteract hypertension in this high-risk population. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Acute effects of firefighting on arterial stiffness and blood flow.

    PubMed

    Fahs, Christopher A; Yan, Huimin; Ranadive, Sushant; Rossow, Lindy M; Agiovlasitis, Stamatis; Echols, George; Smith, Denise; Horn, Gavin P; Rowland, Thomas; Lane, Abbi; Fernhall, Bo

    2011-04-01

    Sudden cardiac events are responsible for 40-50% of line-of-duty firefighter fatalities, yet the exact cause of these events is unknown. Likely, combinations of thermal, physical, and mental factors impair cardiovascular function and trigger such events. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the impact of firefighting activities on vascular function. Sixty-nine young (28 ± 1 years) male firefighters underwent 3 hours of firefighting activities. Carotid, aortic, and brachial blood pressures (BP), heart rate (HR), augmentation index (AIx), wave reflection timing (TR), aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV), forearm blood flow (FBF), and forearm reactive hyperemia (RH) were measured before and after firefighting activities. Paired samples t-tests revealed significant (p < 0.05) increases in aortic diastolic BP, HR, AIx, PWV, RH, and FBF, and significant decreases in brachial and aortic pulse pressure and TR following firefighting activities. In conclusion, these results suggest that 3 hours of firefighting activities increase both arterial stiffness and vasodilation.

  3. Modern Age Pathology of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Stacher, Elvira; Graham, Brian B.; Hunt, James M.; Gandjeva, Aneta; Groshong, Steve D.; McLaughlin, Vallerie V.; Jessup, Marsha; Grizzle, William E.; Aldred, Michaela A.; Cool, Carlyne D.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: The impact of modern treatments of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) on pulmonary vascular pathology remains unknown. Objectives: To assess the spectrum of pulmonary vascular remodeling in the modern era of PAH medication. Methods: Assessment of pulmonary vascular remodeling and inflammation in 62 PAH and 28 control explanted lungs systematically sampled. Measurements and Main Results: Intima and intima plus media fractional thicknesses of pulmonary arteries were increased in the PAH group versus the control lungs and correlated with pulmonary hemodynamic measurements. Despite a high variability of morphological measurements within a given PAH lung and among all PAH lungs, distinct pathological subphenotypes were detected in cohorts of PAH lungs. These included a subset of lungs lacking intima or, most prominently, media remodeling, which had similar numbers of profiles of plexiform lesions as those in lungs with more pronounced remodeling. Marked perivascular inflammation was present in a high number of PAH lungs and correlated with intima plus media remodeling. The number of profiles of plexiform lesions was significantly lower in lungs of male patients and those never treated with prostacyclin or its analogs. Conclusions: Our results indicate that multiple features of pulmonary vascular remodeling are present in patients treated with modern PAH therapies. Perivascular inflammation may have an important role in the processes of vascular remodeling, all of which may ultimately lead to increased pulmonary artery pressure. Moreover, our study provides a framework to interpret and design translational studies in PAH. PMID:22679007

  4. Modern age pathology of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Stacher, Elvira; Graham, Brian B; Hunt, James M; Gandjeva, Aneta; Groshong, Steve D; McLaughlin, Vallerie V; Jessup, Marsha; Grizzle, William E; Aldred, Michaela A; Cool, Carlyne D; Tuder, Rubin M

    2012-08-01

    The impact of modern treatments of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) on pulmonary vascular pathology remains unknown. To assess the spectrum of pulmonary vascular remodeling in the modern era of PAH medication. Assessment of pulmonary vascular remodeling and inflammation in 62 PAH and 28 control explanted lungs systematically sampled. Intima and intima plus media fractional thicknesses of pulmonary arteries were increased in the PAH group versus the control lungs and correlated with pulmonary hemodynamic measurements. Despite a high variability of morphological measurements within a given PAH lung and among all PAH lungs, distinct pathological subphenotypes were detected in cohorts of PAH lungs. These included a subset of lungs lacking intima or, most prominently, media remodeling, which had similar numbers of profiles of plexiform lesions as those in lungs with more pronounced remodeling. Marked perivascular inflammation was present in a high number of PAH lungs and correlated with intima plus media remodeling. The number of profiles of plexiform lesions was significantly lower in lungs of male patients and those never treated with prostacyclin or its analogs. Our results indicate that multiple features of pulmonary vascular remodeling are present in patients treated with modern PAH therapies. Perivascular inflammation may have an important role in the processes of vascular remodeling, all of which may ultimately lead to increased pulmonary artery pressure. Moreover, our study provides a framework to interpret and design translational studies in PAH.

  5. Mitochondrial Dynamics in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, John; Dasgupta, Asish; Huston, Jessica; Chen, Kuang-Huieh; Archer, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an idiopathic cardiopulmonary disease characterized by obstruction of small pulmonary arteries by excessive proliferation and apoptosis-resistance of vascular cells, as well as inflammation, thrombosis and vasoconstriction. Vascular obstruction increases the afterload faced by the right ventricle (RV), leading to RV failure. The proliferative, obstructive vasculopathy of PAH shares several mitochondrial abnormalities with cancer, notably a shift to aerobic glycolysis and mitochondrial fragmentation. Mitochondria in the pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) normally serve as oxygen sensors. In PAH, acquired mitochondrial abnormalities, including epigenetic silencing of superoxide dismutase (SOD2), disrupt oxygen sensing creating a pseudo-hypoxic environment characterized by normoxic activation of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α (HIF-1α). The resulting metabolic shift to aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg phenomenon) reflects inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases. In addition, altered mitochondrial dynamics result in mitochondrial fragmentation. The molecular basis of this structural change includes upregulation and activation of fission mediators, notably dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP-1), and downregulation of fusion mediators, especially mitofusin-2 (MFN2). These pathogenic mitochondrial abnormalities offer new therapeutic targets. Inhibition of mitotic fission or enhancement of fusion in PAH PASMC slows cell proliferation, causes cell cycle arrest, and induces apoptosis. DRP-1 inhibition or MFN2 gene therapy can regress PAH in experimental models of PAH. This review focuses on the etiology of mitochondrial fragmentation in PAH and explores the therapeutic implications of mitochondrial dynamics in the pulmonary vasculature and RV. PMID:25672499

  6. Treatment of idiopathic/hereditary pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Hiromi; Ogawa, Aiko

    2014-10-01

    Treatment of pulmonary hypertension has progressed by recently developed pulmonary arterial hypertension-targeted drugs. However, long-term survival of the patients with idiopathic/heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension is still suboptimal. To improve the outcomes, treatment goals of pulmonary hypertension were proposed at the 5th World Symposium on Pulmonary Hypertension held at Nice, France in 2013; parameters were obtained from cardiopulmonary exercise test, blood tests, echocardiography, and magnetic resonance imaging. In particular, parameters evaluating right ventricular function have been highlighted because survival of the patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension is closely related to right ventricular function. However, treatment specifically targeted to improve right ventricular function in pulmonary hypertension is not yet established. In this setting, we need to maintain or improve right ventricular function with available vasodilators. In this review, we focus on the following two points: (1) Why can pulmonary arterial hypertension-targeted drugs improve right ventricular function without an apparent decrease in pulmonary artery pressure? (2) Are proposed goals sufficient to improve long-term prognosis of the patients? Further, we will discuss what would be the appropriate goal in treating patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

  7. Aerobic exercise training reduces arterial stiffness in metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Donley, David A; Fournier, Sara B; Reger, Brian L; DeVallance, Evan; Bonner, Daniel E; Olfert, I Mark; Frisbee, Jefferson C; Chantler, Paul D

    2014-06-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with a threefold increase risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality partly due to increased arterial stiffening. We compared the effects of aerobic exercise training on arterial stiffening/mechanics in MetS subjects without overt CVD or type 2 diabetes. MetS and healthy control (Con) subjects underwent 8 wk of exercise training (ExT; 11 MetS and 11 Con) or remained inactive (11 MetS and 10 Con). The following measures were performed pre- and postintervention: radial pulse wave analysis (applanation tonometry) was used to measure augmentation pressure and index, central pressures, and an estimate of myocardial efficiency; arterial stiffness was assessed from carotid-femoral pulse-wave velocity (cfPWV, applanation tonometry); carotid thickness was assessed from B-mode ultrasound; and peak aerobic capacity (gas exchange) was performed in the seated position. Plasma matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and CVD risk (Framingham risk score) were also assessed. cfPWV was reduced (P < 0.05) in MetS-ExT subjects (7.9 ± 0.6 to 7.2 ± 0.4 m/s) and Con-ExT (6.6 ± 1.8 to 5.6 ± 1.6 m/s). Exercise training reduced (P < 0.05) central systolic pressure (116 ± 5 to 110 ± 4 mmHg), augmentation pressure (9 ± 1 to 7 ± 1 mmHg), augmentation index (19 ± 3 to 15 ± 4%), and improved myocardial efficiency (155 ± 8 to 168 ± 9), but only in the MetS group. Aerobic capacity increased (P < 0.05) in MetS-ExT (16.6 ± 1.0 to 19.9 ± 1.0) and Con-ExT subjects (23.8 ± 1.6 to 26.3 ± 1.6). MMP-1 and -7 were correlated with cfPWV, and both MMP-1 and -7 were reduced post-ExT in MetS subjects. These findings suggest that some of the pathophysiological changes associated with MetS can be improved after aerobic exercise training, thereby lowering their cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Aerobic exercise training reduces arterial stiffness in metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Donley, David A.; Fournier, Sara B.; Reger, Brian L.; DeVallance, Evan; Bonner, Daniel E.; Olfert, I. Mark; Frisbee, Jefferson C.

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with a threefold increase risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality partly due to increased arterial stiffening. We compared the effects of aerobic exercise training on arterial stiffening/mechanics in MetS subjects without overt CVD or type 2 diabetes. MetS and healthy control (Con) subjects underwent 8 wk of exercise training (ExT; 11 MetS and 11 Con) or remained inactive (11 MetS and 10 Con). The following measures were performed pre- and postintervention: radial pulse wave analysis (applanation tonometry) was used to measure augmentation pressure and index, central pressures, and an estimate of myocardial efficiency; arterial stiffness was assessed from carotid-femoral pulse-wave velocity (cfPWV, applanation tonometry); carotid thickness was assessed from B-mode ultrasound; and peak aerobic capacity (gas exchange) was performed in the seated position. Plasma matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and CVD risk (Framingham risk score) were also assessed. cfPWV was reduced (P < 0.05) in MetS-ExT subjects (7.9 ± 0.6 to 7.2 ± 0.4 m/s) and Con-ExT (6.6 ± 1.8 to 5.6 ± 1.6 m/s). Exercise training reduced (P < 0.05) central systolic pressure (116 ± 5 to 110 ± 4 mmHg), augmentation pressure (9 ± 1 to 7 ± 1 mmHg), augmentation index (19 ± 3 to 15 ± 4%), and improved myocardial efficiency (155 ± 8 to 168 ± 9), but only in the MetS group. Aerobic capacity increased (P < 0.05) in MetS-ExT (16.6 ± 1.0 to 19.9 ± 1.0) and Con-ExT subjects (23.8 ± 1.6 to 26.3 ± 1.6). MMP-1 and -7 were correlated with cfPWV, and both MMP-1 and -7 were reduced post-ExT in MetS subjects. These findings suggest that some of the pathophysiological changes associated with MetS can be improved after aerobic exercise training, thereby lowering their cardiovascular risk. PMID:24744384

  9. Arterial hypertension in chronic glomerulonephritis. An analysis of 310 cases.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, H; Kornerup, H J; Olsen, S; Posborg, V

    1983-06-01

    310 cases of glomerulonephritis classified morphologically according to the criteria of the WHO were analyzed retrospectively in order to determine the frequency of arterial hypertension. The overall prevalence of arterial hypertension was 61%. Hypertension was most frequent and severe in membranoproliferative and sclerotic glomerulonephritis, but often mild and transient in extracapillary glomerulonephritis. Hypertension usually developed during the early stages of the disease when kidney function was well preserved and in only 16% was hypertension first seen during the uremic stage. No correlation was found between hypertension and the presence of the nephrotic syndrome. During dialysis, hypertension was present in 78%; in 90% of these patients hypertension was "controllable" and in 10% it was "uncontrollable".

  10. Arterial Stiffness and Wave Reflection: Sex Differences and Relationship with Left Ventricular Diastolic Function

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Cesare; Jin, Zhezhen; Palmieri, Vittorio; Homma, Shunichi; Rundek, Tatjana; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Di Tullio, Marco R.

    2012-01-01

    Increased arterial stiffness and wave reflection have been reported in heart failure with normal ejection fraction (HFNEF) and in asymptomatic left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction, a precursor of HFNEF. It is unclear whether women, who have higher frequency of HFNEF, are more vulnerable than men to the deleterious effects of arterial stiffness on LV diastolic function. We investigated in a large community-based cohort, whether sex differences exist in the relationship between arterial stiffness, wave reflection and LV diastolic function. Arterial stiffness and wave reflection were assessed in 983 participants from the Cardiovascular Abnormalities and Brain Lesions (CABL) study using applanation tonometry. Central pulse pressure/stroke volume index (cPP/SVi), total arterial compliance, pulse pressure amplification and augmentation index were used as parameters of arterial stiffness and wave reflection. LV diastolic function was evaluated by two-dimensional echocardiography and tissue-Doppler imaging. Arterial stiffness and wave reflection were greater in women compared to men, independent of body size and heart rate (all p<0.01), and showed inverse relationships with parameters of diastolic function in both sexes. Further adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors attenuated these relationships; however, higher cPP/SVi predicted LV diastolic dysfunction in women [odds ratio (OR) 1.54, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.03–2.30] and men (OR: 2.09, 95% CI 1.30–3.39) independent of other risk factors. In conclusion, in our community-based cohort study, higher arterial stiffness was associated with worse LV diastolic function in men and women. Women’s higher arterial stiffness, independent of body size, may contribute to their greater susceptibility to develop HFNEF. PMID:22753223

  11. Arterial stiffness, body fat compartments, central hemodynamics, renal function and left atrial size.

    PubMed

    Katulska, Katarzyna; Milewska, Agata; Wykretowicz, Mateusz; Krauze, Tomasz; Przymuszala, Dagmara; Piskorski, Jaroslaw; Stajgis, Marek; Guzik, Przemyslaw; Wysocki, Henryk; Wykrętowicz, Andrzej

    2013-10-01

    Left atrial (LA) size is an important predictor of stroke, death, and atrial fibrillation. It was demonstrated recently that body fat, arterial stiffness and renal functions are associated with LA diameter. However, data are lacking for comprehensive assessments of all these risk factors in a single population. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the association between LA size and different fat descriptors, central hemodynamics, arterial stiffness, and renal function in healthy subjects. To this end, body fat percentage, abdominal, subcutaneous fat, and general descriptors of body fat were estimated in 162 healthy subjects (mean age 51 years). Echocardiography was performed to assess LA diameter. Arterial stiffness and peripheral and central hemodynamics were estimated by digital volume pulse analysis and pulse wave analysis. Glomerular filtration rate was estimated by MDRD formula. There were significant (p < 0.05) bivariate correlations between LA diameter and all descriptors of body fat (except subcutaneous fat). Arterial stiffness and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were also significantly correlated with LA size. Multiple regression analysis including all significant confounders, such as sex, mean arterial pressure, arterial stiffness, eGFR and body fat descriptors, explained 35% of variance in LA diameter. In conclusion, the present study reveals significant, independent relationships between body fat, arterial stiffness, and LA size.

  12. Parameters of Blood Flow in Great Arteries in Hypertensive ISIAH Rats with Stress-Dependent Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Seryapina, A A; Shevelev, O B; Moshkin, M P; Markel', A L

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography was used to examine blood flow in great arteries of hypertensive ISIAH and normotensive Wistar rats. In hypertensive ISIAH rats, increased vascular resistance in the basin of the abdominal aorta and renal arteries as well as reduced fraction of total renal blood flow were found. In contrast, blood flow through both carotid arteries in ISIAH rats was enhanced, which in suggests more intensive blood supply to brain regulatory centers providing enhanced stress reactivity of these rats characterized by stress-dependent arterial hypertension.

  13. The evolving definition of systemic arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ram, C Venkata S; Giles, Thomas D

    2010-05-01

    Systemic hypertension is an important risk factor for premature cardiovascular disease. Hypertension also contributes to excessive morbidity and mortality. Whereas excellent therapeutic options are available to treat hypertension, there is an unsettled issue about the very definition of hypertension. At what level of blood pressure should we treat hypertension? Does the definition of hypertension change in the presence of co-morbid conditions? This article covers in detail the evolving concepts in the diagnosis and management of hypertension.

  14. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension: a flavor of autoimmunity].

    PubMed

    Perros, Frédéric; Humbert, Marc; Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    It is admitted that autoimmunity results from a combination of risks such as genetic background, environmental triggers, and stochastic events. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) shares with the so-called prototypic autoimmune diseases, genetic risk factors, female predominance and sex hormone influence, association with other chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, defects in regulatory T cells function, and presence of autoantibodies. Case reports have been published indicating the beneficial effect of some immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory therapies in PAH, supporting the potential role of immune mechanisms in the pathophysiology of the disease. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge on autoimmune mechanisms operating in PAH, especially mounting a local autoimmune response inside the pulmonary tissue, namely pulmonary lymphoid neogenesis. A better understanding of the role of autoimmunity in pulmonary vascular remodelling may help develop targeted immunomodulatory strategies in PAH.

  15. Sildenafil in pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dhariwal, A K; Bavdekar, S B

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a life-threatening disease of varied etiologies. Although PAH has no curative treatment, a greater understanding of pathophysiology, technological advances resulting in early diagnosis, and the availability of several newer drugs have improved the outlook for patients with PAH. Sildenafil is one of the therapeutic agents used extensively in the treatment of PAH in children, as an off-label drug. In 2012, the United States Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) issued a warning regarding the of use high-dose sildenafil in children with PAH. This has led to a peculiar situation where there is a paucity of approved therapies for the management of PAH in children and the use of the most extensively used drug being discouraged by the regulator. This article provides a review of the use of sildenafil in the treatment of PAH in children.

  16. Sildenafil in pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Dhariwal, AK; Bavdekar, SB

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a life-threatening disease of varied etiologies. Although PAH has no curative treatment, a greater understanding of pathophysiology, technological advances resulting in early diagnosis, and the availability of several newer drugs have improved the outlook for patients with PAH. Sildenafil is one of the therapeutic agents used extensively in the treatment of PAH in children, as an off-label drug. In 2012, the United States Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) issued a warning regarding the of use high-dose sildenafil in children with PAH. This has led to a peculiar situation where there is a paucity of approved therapies for the management of PAH in children and the use of the most extensively used drug being discouraged by the regulator. This article provides a review of the use of sildenafil in the treatment of PAH in children. PMID:26119438

  17. [Segmental arterial mediolysis and renovascular hypertension].

    PubMed

    Gaud, Simon; Cridlig, Joelle; Claudon, Michel; Diarrassouba, Assetou; Kessler, Michèle; Frimat, Luc

    2010-12-01

    Segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM) is a rare nonarteriosclerotic, noninflammatory vascular disease of unknown origin that causes vascular occlusion or massive life-threatening intraabdominal hemorrhages. SAM is an acute disease. The initial injurious phase consist in mediolysis, then evolves in chronic vascular lesions. Diagnostic criteria are histologic, but rarely accessible apart from surgical complications. To our knowledge, there is no recommendation concerning therapy and follow-up of these patients. In our patient, we were interested in the atypical clinical presentation with renovascular hypertension, and the coexistence of acute and chronic vascular lesions that suppose the existence of recurrences in the evolution of this disease. We are interested also in the link that might exist between renal infarct and SAM, SAM's chronic vascular lesions and fibromuscular dysplasia vascular lesions.

  18. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension in connective tissue diseases].

    PubMed

    Cordier, Jean-François

    2009-11-01

    Among connective tissue diseases, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is frequently associated with systemic sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus. PAH is less common in mixed connective tissue diseases and Sjögren's syndrome, and rare in rheumatoid arthritis. PAH in systemic sclerosis may be either isolated (prevalence about 8%) or associated with interstitial lung disease. Echocardiographic screening for PAH is worthwhile in patients with systemic sclerosis, especially as treatments for idiopathic PAH (endothelin receptor antagonists, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, and prostanoids) are effective in this setting. The prevalence of PAH among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is poorly known; immunosuppressive treatment is sometimes effective by itself but most patients benefit from PAH treatment. PAH associated with connective tissue diseases has a worse prognosis than idiopathic PAH.

  19. Novel serum biomarkers in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    McGlinchey, Neil; Johnson, Martin K

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) remains a difficult-to-treat condition with high mortality. Biomarkers are utilized to aid with diagnosis, prognostication and response to treatment. A clinically useful and PAH-specific single biomarker that is easy to measure remains elusive. This is in part due to the heterogeneity of PAH and its complex etiology. Brain natriuretic peptide and its N-terminal fragment are currently the most widely used serum markers; however, several novel serum biomarkers have been investigated recently. Taken individually, the evidence for each of these seems provisionally promising though currently weak overall. It is likely that a multibiomarker panel will be recommended in the future, with the optimal combination yet to be determined.

  20. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension: changing approaches to management].

    PubMed

    Sidorenko, B A; Preobrazhenskiĭ, D V; Batyraliev, T A; Belenkov, Iu N

    2011-01-01

    The review is devoted to different aspects of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH); new classification of PAH is published in 2010. There are idiopathic PAH and PAH associated with other diseases. Current guidelines recommend to treat PAH only after the verification of diagnosis with right heart catheterization and acute tests with vasodilators. Patients-reactors should be treated with calcium antagonists. The following drugs related to one of three categories should be used in PAH: (1) prostanoids (epoprostenol, iloprost et al.); (2) blockers of endothelin receptors (bosentan, ambrisentan, sitaxsentan); (3) phosphodiesterase 5 type inhibitors (sildenafil, tadalafil et al.) In majority of cases the combined treatment is used, usually the combination of bosentan and sildenafil is used.

  1. A knowledge-based approach to arterial stiffness estimation using the digital volume pulse.

    PubMed

    Jang, Dae-Geun; Farooq, Umar; Park, Seung-Hun; Goh, Choong-Won; Hahn, Minsoo

    2012-08-01

    We have developed a knowledge based approach for arterial stiffness estimation. The proposed new approach reliably estimates arterial stiffness based on the analysis of age and heart rate normalized reflected wave arrival time. The proposed new approach reduces cost, space, technical expertise, specialized equipment, complexity, and increases the usability compared to recently researched noninvasive arterial stiffness estimators. The proposed method consists of two main stages: pulse feature extraction and linear regression analysis. The new approach extracts the pulse features and establishes a linear prediction equation. On evaluating proposed methodology with pulse wave velocity (PWV) based arterial stiffness estimators, the proposed methodology offered the error rate of 8.36% for men and 9.52% for women, respectively. With such low error rates and increased benefits, the proposed approach could be usefully applied as low cost and effective solution for ubiquitous and home healthcare environments.

  2. Assessment of arterial stiffness among schizophrenia-spectrum disorders using aortic pulse wave velocity and arterial compliance: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Aaron A; Warburton, Darren E R; Flynn, Sean W; Fredrikson, Diane; Lang, Donna J

    2014-01-30

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in individuals with chronic schizophrenia. Arterial stiffness provides a non-invasive indication of cardiovascular disease risk. To date, arterial stiffness, which has been shown to have independent predictive value for CVD morbidity and mortality, has not been evaluated in this population. We aimed to examine aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) as well as large and small artery compliance (Comp1 and Comp2) in patients being treated for schizophrenia, compared to healthy volunteers. Ten patients and 10 age and gendermatched volunteers underwent a comprehensive evaluation of arterial stiffness including: aPWV, Comp1, Comp2, stroke volume, cardiac output, and systemic vascular resistance. Patient aPWV was significantly elevated compared to healthy volunteers (9.1 ± 4.11 vs. 5.7 ± 1.4, P=0.03). Increased age, blood pressure, heart rate, and cigarettes/day were associated with reduced arterial health in patients. This is the first time aPWV has been described in those treated for schizophrenia. Arterial stiffness is increased in this population. Measuring arterial stiffness is a non-invasive, sensitive and effective tool for evaluating CVD risk in this population. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  3. Exercise Training Reduces Peripheral Arterial Stiffness and Myocardial Oxygen Demand in Young Prehypertensive Subjects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Large artery stiffness is a major risk factor for the development of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Persistent prehypertension accelerates the progression of arterial stiffness. METHODS Forty-three unmedicated prehypertensive (systolic blood pressure (SBP) = 120–139mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) = 80–89mm Hg) men and women and 15 normotensive time-matched control subjects (NMTCs; n = 15) aged 18–35 years of age met screening requirements and participated in the study. Prehypertensive subjects were randomly assigned to a resistance exercise training (PHRT; n = 15), endurance exercise training (PHET; n = 13) or time-control group (PHTC; n = 15). Treatment groups performed exercise training 3 days per week for 8 weeks. Pulse wave analysis, pulse wave velocity (PWV), and central and peripheral blood pressures were evaluated before and after exercise intervention or time-matched control. RESULTS PHRT and PHET reduced resting SBP by 9.6±3.6mm Hg and 11.9±3.4mm Hg, respectively, and DBP by 8.0±5.1mm Hg and 7.2±3.4mm Hg, respectively (P < 0.05). PHRT and PHET decreased augmentation index (AIx) by 7.5% ± 2.8% and 8.1% ± 3.2% (P < 0.05), AIx@75 by 8.0% ± 3.2% and 9.2% ± 3.8% (P < 0.05), and left ventricular wasted pressure energy, an index of extra left ventricular myocardial oxygen requirement due to early systolic wave reflection, by 573±161 dynes s/cm2 and 612±167 dynes s/cm2 (P < 0.05), respectively. PHRT and PHET reduced carotid–radial PWV by 1.02±0.32 m/sec and 0.92±0.36 m/sec (P < 0.05) and femoral–distal PWV by 1.04±0.31 m/sec and 1.34±0.33 m/sec (P < 0.05), respectively. No significant changes were observed in the time-control groups. CONCLUSIONS This study suggests that both resistance and endurance exercise alone effectively reduce peripheral arterial stiffness, central blood pressures, augmentation index, and myocardial oxygen demand in young prehypertensive subjects. PMID:23736111

  4. Exercise training reduces peripheral arterial stiffness and myocardial oxygen demand in young prehypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Beck, Darren T; Martin, Jeffrey S; Casey, Darren P; Braith, Randy W

    2013-09-01

    Large artery stiffness is a major risk factor for the development of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Persistent prehypertension accelerates the progression of arterial stiffness. Forty-three unmedicated prehypertensive (systolic blood pressure (SBP) = 120-139 mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) = 80-89 mm Hg) men and women and 15 normotensive time-matched control subjects (NMTCs; n = 15) aged 18-35 years of age met screening requirements and participated in the study. Prehypertensive subjects were randomly assigned to a resistance exercise training (PHRT; n = 15), endurance exercise training (PHET; n = 13) or time-control group (PHTC; n = 15). Treatment groups performed exercise training 3 days per week for 8 weeks. Pulse wave analysis, pulse wave velocity (PWV), and central and peripheral blood pressures were evaluated before and after exercise intervention or time-matched control. PHRT and PHET reduced resting SBP by 9.6±3.6mm Hg and 11.9±3.4mm Hg, respectively, and DBP by 8.0±5.1mm Hg and 7.2±3.4mm Hg, respectively (P < 0.05). PHRT and PHET decreased augmentation index (AIx) by 7.5% ± 2.8% and 8.1% ± 3.2% (P < 0.05), AIx@75 by 8.0% ± 3.2% and 9.2% ± 3.8% (P < 0.05), and left ventricular wasted pressure energy, an index of extra left ventricular myocardial oxygen requirement due to early systolic wave reflection, by 573±161 dynes s/cm(2) and 612±167 dynes s/cm(2) (P < 0.05), respectively. PHRT and PHET reduced carotid-radial PWV by 1.02±0.32 m/sec and 0.92±0.36 m/sec (P < 0.05) and femoral-distal PWV by 1.04±0.31 m/sec and 1.34±0.33 m/sec (P < 0.05), respectively. No significant changes were observed in the time-control groups. This study suggests that both resistance and endurance exercise alone effectively reduce peripheral arterial stiffness, central blood pressures, augmentation index, and myocardial oxygen demand in young prehypertensive subjects.

  5. Arterial Stiffness and Trace Elements in Apparently Healthy Population- A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Subrahmanyam, Gangapatnam; Ramalingam, Krishnan; Indira, Selvam Armugam; Kantha, Katari; Soren, Bhemasen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Stiffening of arteries is a natural ageing process. Any diseases/disorders or risk factors that escalate oxidative stress, microvascular inflammation and endothelial damage may promote to premature vascular stiffening. Any imbalance in these trace element levels may independently contribute to the changes in the components in the arterial wall and thus, arterial stiffness via one or more mechanisms. Aim To evaluate the severity of arterial stiffness in apparently healthy population and also to evaluate role of various risk factors and trace elements in the severity of arterial stiffness Materials and Methods Male and female subjects living in urban and rural areas of Nellore district, Andhra Pradesh, India, between 20-60 years, apparently normal as judged by the clinician basing on clinical and laboratory findings, were studied. Carotid-Femoral Pulse Wave Velocity (cf-PWV) a marker of arterial stiffness was assessed using non-invasive blood pressure curve monitoring (periscope). Furthermore, we also estimated serum levels of Copper (Cu), Zinc (Zn), Selenium (Se), chromium (Cr), Aluminium (Al), silicon (Si), Manganese (Mn), Molybdenum (Mb), Vanadium (Vn) and lead (Pb) using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. ANOVA and Chi-Square test were used to study the clinical correlations between severity of arterial stiffness, risk factors and trace elements. Results A total of 737 apparently healthy subjects participated in this cross-sectional study. Of the total 542 (73.5%) were from rural and the remaining 195 (26.5%) were living in urban areas, 328 (44.5%) were males, and 409 (55.5%) were females. A 63.5% (468/737) had normal arterial stiffness followed by 14.5% (107/737) with mild stiffness, 7% (57/737) had moderate stiffness and 14.2% (105/737) had severe arterial stiffness. Smoking, alcohol, blood pressures, fasting blood sugar, and total cholesterol, Cu, Al and Vn correlated (p<0.05) with different grades of arterial stiffness. Conclusion A 36.5% had

  6. Evaluation and management of the patient with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Lewis J; Badesch, David B

    2005-08-16

    Increased pressure in the pulmonary circulation, or pulmonary hypertension, is a common disorder that may complicate various cardiopulmonary conditions, including severe obstructive airways disease and left ventricular dysfunction. An increase in pulmonary arterial pressure that is not due to coexistent cardiopulmonary disease, known as pulmonary arterial hypertension, may occur in the absence of a demonstrable cause (idiopathic or familial); as a complication of systemic conditions, such as connective tissue disease, HIV infection, or chronic liver disease; or as a result of the use of fenfluramine anorexigens, amphetamines, or cocaine. The development of disease-specific therapies for pulmonary arterial hypertension over the past decade underscores the importance of diagnosing pulmonary hypertension early in the course of the condition and implementing a treatment strategy that is based on the condition's cause and severity. In this review, the authors present approaches to the diagnosis and management of pulmonary arterial hypertension, using a hypothetical case to highlight the key management points.

  7. Clinical appraisal of arterial stiffness: the Argonauts in front of the Golden Fleece

    PubMed Central

    Vlachopoulos, C; Aznaouridis, K; Stefanadis, C

    2006-01-01

    Interest in evaluating arterial elastic properties has grown in parallel with the widespread availability of non‐invasive methods for assessing arterial stiffness. A clinically useful diagnostic index must be pathophysiologically relevant, must be readily measurable, and must indicate the severity of the disease and predict the corresponding risk. Interventional modification of this index must parallel disease regression and benefit prognosis. The current evidence for the clinical value of estimating arterial stiffness (mainly of large, elastic‐type arteries, such as the aorta and the carotids) in the contemporary era of cardiovascular medicine is reviewed. PMID:16339817

  8. Clinical appraisal of arterial stiffness: the Argonauts in front of the Golden Fleece.

    PubMed

    Vlachopoulos, C; Aznaouridis, K; Stefanadis, C

    2006-11-01

    Interest in evaluating arterial elastic properties has grown in parallel with the widespread availability of non-invasive methods for assessing arterial stiffness. A clinically useful diagnostic index must be pathophysiologically relevant, must be readily measurable, and must indicate the severity of the disease and predict the corresponding risk. Interventional modification of this index must parallel disease regression and benefit prognosis. The current evidence for the clinical value of estimating arterial stiffness (mainly of large, elastic-type arteries, such as the aorta and the carotids) in the contemporary era of cardiovascular medicine is reviewed.

  9. Deterioration in Renal Function Is Associated With Increased Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Higher levels of baseline pulse wave velocity (PWV) have been associated with longitudinal decline in renal function in patients with kidney disease. We examined longitudinal decline in renal function in relation to levels of PWV. We hypothesized that longitudinal decline in renal function in a community-based, nonclinic sample would be associated with higher levels of PWV. METHODS We conducted a 4–5 year longitudinal study with 482 community-living individuals free from acute stroke, dementia, and end-stage renal disease (mean age = 60.9 years; 59% women; 93.2% white; 10% with diabetes mellitus; mean estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) = 79.2ml/min/1.73 m2). Multiple linear regression analyses were used to examine the association between changes in renal function (eGFR and serum creatinine) from baseline to follow-up and PWV levels at follow-up, the outcome measure. Regression coefficients were adjusted for age, sex, education, race/ethnicity, weight, activity level, mean arterial pressure, treatment of hypertension, and cardiovascular risk factors. RESULTS With adjustment for covariables, decline in renal function was associated with higher levels of PWV over a mean follow-up of 4.68 years. CONCLUSIONS Decline in renal functioning from baseline levels measured 4–5 years before measurement of PWV is related to higher levels of PWV in a community sample. PMID:24080989

  10. Pulmonary arterial hypertension: epidemiology and registries.

    PubMed

    McGoon, Michael D; Benza, Raymond L; Escribano-Subias, Pilar; Jiang, Xin; Miller, Dave P; Peacock, Andrew J; Pepke-Zaba, Joanna; Pulido, Tomas; Rich, Stuart; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Suissa, Samy; Humbert, Marc

    2013-12-24

    Registries of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) have been instrumental in characterizing the presentation and natural history of the disease and provide a basis for prognostication. Since the initial accumulation of data conducted in the 1980s, subsequent registry databases have yielded information about the demographic factors, treatment, and survival of patients and have permitted comparisons between populations in different eras and environments. Inclusion of patients with all subtypes of PAH has also allowed comparisons of these subpopulations. We describe herein the basic methodology by which PAH registries have been conducted, review key insights provided by registries, summarize issues related to interpretation and comparison of the results, and discuss the utility of data to predict survival outcomes. Potential sources of bias, particularly related to the inclusion of incident and/or prevalent patients and missing data, are addressed. A fundamental observation of current registries is that survival in the modern treatment era has improved compared with that observed previously and that outcomes among PAH subpopulations vary substantially. Continuing systematic clinical surveillance of PAH will be important as treatment evolves and as understanding of mechanisms advance. Considerations for future directions of registry studies include enrollment of a broader population of patients with pulmonary hypertension of all clinical types and severity and continued globalization and collaboration of registry databases. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Association between sleep condition and arterial stiffness in Chinese adult with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xia; Zhou, Jiansong; Yuan, Hong; Chen, Zhiheng

    2016-07-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFLD) usually has worse cardiovascular risk factors. Given the potential association between deterioration of sleep and arterial stiffness, we aim to investigate the association between deterioration of sleep and arterial stiffness in a middle-aged Chinese population with NAFLD. In this cross-sectional study, 15,372 Chinese aged 40-60 years who participated in periodic health checkups in central south China, were included. Self-reported sleep duration and sleep quality, anthropometric, biochemical, and liver ultrasound scan were analyzed and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) was used as the indicator of arterial stiffness. Poor sleep quality was found to be associated with increased arterial stiffness, with odds ratios and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) of 2.28 (95 % CI, 1.53-3.38) compared with good sleep quality. Using sleep duration ≥ 8 h as the reference, there was no significant association between sleep duration of ≤ 6 or 6-8 h and arterial stiffness after multivariable-adjusted. In additional analyses, further investigation of the association of different combinations of sleep duration and quality in relation to arterial stiffness indicated participants with poor sleep quality and sleep duration ≤ 6 h were more likely to have arterial stiffness than those with good quality sleep who sleep for ≥ 8 h (OR 2.59, 95 % CI 1.58-4.24). The present study indicates that short sleep duration, poor sleep quality in individuals with NAFLD correlate with increased arterial stiffness.

  12. A higher baseline plasma uric acid level is an independent predictor of arterial stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiao-Han; Wang, Xiaona; Cao, Ruihua; Yang, Xu; Xiao, Wenkai; Zhang, Yun; Bai, Yongyi; Wu, Hongmei; Ye, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Hyperuricemia has been demonstrated to be a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Though the association between uric acid (UA) and arterial stiffness has been investigated previously in patients with basic diseases, the predictive value of baseline UA level for arterial stiffness has not been conducted. We aimed at identifying the predictive role of UA for arterial stiffness prospectively. A longitudinal follow-up study in a routine health check-up population was performed with an average follow-up of 4.8 years. The demographic information, baseline and follow-up anthropometric parameters, arterial stiffness (pulse-wave velocity, PWV), and biomarker variables including UA have been measured and analyzed. A total of 1447 valid follow-ups were available for the final analysis. Both of the baseline and follow-up UA levels were significantly higher in the arterial stiffness groups than that in the nonarterial stiffness groups (all P values <0.001). The follow-up carotid-femoral PWV [(cf-PWV), r = 0.161, P < 0.001] was strongly correlated with baseline UA. At the follow-up cross-section, cf-PWV was also closely associated with UA (r = 0.101, P < 0.001). Logistic regressions revealed that a higher baseline UA level was an independent predictor of follow-up arterial stiffness assessed by cf-PWV [odds ratio (OR): 1.824; P = 0.046]. A higher baseline level of UA is closely related to arterial stiffness and is an independent predictor of arterial stiffening. PMID:28178136

  13. Carotid arterial stiffness and risk of incident cerebral microbleeds in older people: the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik study.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jie; Mitchell, Gary F; Bots, Michiel L; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Harris, Tamara B; Garcia, Melissa; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; van Buchem, Mark A; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Launer, Lenore J

    2015-08-01

    Age and high blood pressure are major risk factors for cerebral microbleeds (CMBs). However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear and arterial stiffness may be important. We investigated whether carotid arterial stiffness is associated with incidence and location of CMBs. In the prospective, population-based Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik study, 2512 participants aged 66 to 93 years underwent a baseline brain MRI examination and carotid ultrasound in 2002 to 2006 and returned for a repeat brain MRI in 2007 to 2011. Common carotid arterial stiffness was assessed using a standardized protocol and expressed as carotid arterial strain, distensibility coefficient, and Young elastic modulus. Modified Poisson regression was applied to relate carotid arterial stiffness parameters to CMB incidence. During a mean follow-up of 5.2 years, 463 people (18.4%) developed new CMBs, of whom 292 had CMBs restricted to lobar regions and 171 had CMBs in a deep or infratentorial region. After adjusting for age, sex, and follow-up interval, arterial stiffness measures were associated with incident CMBs (risk ratio per SD decrease in carotid arterial strain, 1.11 [95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.21]; per SD decrease in natural log-transformed distensibility coefficient, 1.14 [1.05-1.24]; and per SD increase in natural log-transformed Young elastic modulus, 1.13 [1.04-1.23]). These measures were also significantly associated with incident deep CMBs (1.18 [1.02-1.37]; 1.24 [1.08-1.42]; and 1.23 [1.07-1.42]) but not with lobar CMBs. When further adjusted for blood pressure and other baseline vascular risk factors, carotid plaque, prevalent CMBs, subcortical infarcts, and white matter hyperintensities, the associations persisted. Our findings support the hypothesis that localized increases in carotid arterial stiffness may contribute to the development of CMBs, especially in a deep location attributable to hypertension. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Alterations in structure and mechanics of resistance arteries from ouabain-induced hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Briones, Ana M; Xavier, Fabiano E; Arribas, Silvia M; González, M Carmen; Rossoni, Luciana V; Alonso, María J; Salaices, Mercedes

    2006-07-01

    We have previously described that chronic administration of ouabain induces hypertension and functional alterations in mesenteric resistance arteries. The aim of this study was to analyze whether ouabain treatment also alters the structural and mechanical properties of mesenteric resistance arteries. Wistar rats were treated for 5 wk with ouabain (8.0 microg/day sc). The vascular structure and mechanics of the third-order branches of the mesenteric artery were assessed with pressure myography and confocal microscopy. Total collagen content was determined by picrosirius red staining, collagen I/III was analyzed by Western blot, and elastin was studied by confocal microscopy. Vascular reactivity was analyzed by wire myography. Internal and external diameters and cross-sectional area were diminished, whereas the wall-to-lumen ratio was increased in arteries from ouabain-treated rats compared with controls. In addition, arteries from ouabain-treated rats were stiffer. Ouabain treatment decreased smooth muscle cell number and increased total and I/III collagens in the vascular wall. However, this treatment did not modify adventitia and media thickness, nuclei morphology, elastin structure, and vascular reactivity to norepinephrine and acetylcholine. The present work shows hypotrophic inward remodeling of mesenteric resistance arteries from ouabain-treated rats that seems to be the consequence of a combination of decreased cell number and impaired distension of the artery, possibly due to a higher stiffness associated with collagen deposition. The narrowing of resistance arteries could play a role in the pathogenesis of hypertension in this model.

  15. Computational modeling of hypertensive growth in the human carotid artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sáez, Pablo; Peña, Estefania; Martínez, Miguel Angel; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-06-01

    Arterial hypertension is a chronic medical condition associated with an elevated blood pressure. Chronic arterial hypertension initiates a series of events, which are known to collectively initiate arterial wall thickening. However, the correlation between macrostructural mechanical loading, microstructural cellular changes, and macrostructural adaptation remains unclear. Here, we present a microstructurally motivated computational model for chronic arterial hypertension through smooth muscle cell growth. To model growth, we adopt a classical concept based on the multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into an elastic part and a growth part. Motivated by clinical observations, we assume that the driving force for growth is the stretch sensed by the smooth muscle cells. We embed our model into a finite element framework, where growth is stored locally as an internal variable. First, to demonstrate the features of our model, we investigate the effects of hypertensive growth in a real human carotid artery. Our results agree nicely with experimental data reported in the literature both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  16. Arterial stiffness and hand osteoarthritis: a novel relationship?

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, A. S.; Najjar, S. S.; Muller, D. C.; Shetty, V.; Ferrucci, L.; Gelber, A. C.; Ling, S. M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Objective Osteoarthritis (OA) and vascular stiffening may share elements of common pathogenesis, but their potential relatedness has been the focus of little prior inquiry. We tested the hypothesis that these two aging-associated conditions are related to each other. Method We analyzed cross-sectional data from 256 participants of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA), a study of normative aging. All underwent measurement of arterial pulse wave velocity (PWV), an index of vascular stiffness, as well as hand radiographs that were graded for evidence of OA. Twenty total joints across three joint groups (distal interphalangeal [DIP], proximal interphalangeal [PIP], carpal-metacarpal [CMC]) were each assigned a Kellgren–Lawrence grade (K–L) of 0 (normal) through 4 (severe), with K–L grades ≥2 considered evidence of definite OA. Radiographic hand OA was defined as definite OA changes in at least two of the three anatomic hand sites (DIP, PIP, CMC). OA burden was represented by the total number of affected OA joints, and a cumulative K–L grade was aggregated across all hand joint groups. The relationship of PWV with these three measures of hand OA was assessed by linear regression. Results Upon univariate analysis, the presence of radiographic hand OA (β = 218.1, P < 0.01), the total number of OA joints (β = 32.9, P < 0.01), and the cumulative K–L grade across all joint groups (β = 12.2, P < 0.01) were each associated with increased PWV. These associations, however, were no longer significant in age-adjusted models. Conclusion Although significant individual relationships between PWV and several measures of hand OA were observed, these associations were largely attributable to the confounding effect of age. PMID:17097316

  17. Arterial pulmonary hypertension in noncardiac intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Tsapenko, Mykola V; Tsapenko, Arseniy V; Comfere, Thomas BO; Mour, Girish K; Mankad, Sunil V; Gajic, Ognjen

    2008-01-01

    Pulmonary artery pressure elevation complicates the course of many complex disorders treated in a noncardiac intensive care unit. Acute pulmonary hypertension, however, remains underdiagnosed and its treatment frequently begins only after serious complications have developed. Significant pathophysiologic differences between acute and chronic pulmonary hypertension make current classification and treatment recommendations for chronic pulmonary hypertension barely applicable to acute pulmonary hypertension. In order to clarify the terminology of acute pulmonary hypertension and distinguish it from chronic pulmonary hypertension, we provide a classification of acute pulmonary hypertension according to underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms, clinical features, natural history, and response to treatment. Based on available data, therapy of acute arterial pulmonary hypertension should generally be aimed at acutely relieving right ventricular (RV) pressure overload and preventing RV dysfunction. Cases of severe acute pulmonary hypertension complicated by RV failure and systemic arterial hypotension are real clinical challenges requiring tight hemodynamic monitoring and aggressive treatment including combinations of pulmonary vasodilators, inotropic agents and systemic arterial vasoconstrictors. The choice of vasopressor and inotropes in patients with acute pulmonary hypertension should take into consideration their effects on vascular resistance and cardiac output when used alone or in combinations with other agents, and must be individualized based on patient response. PMID:19183752

  18. The right ventricle in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Naeije, Robert; Manes, Alessandra

    2014-12-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a right heart failure syndrome. In early-stage PAH, the right ventricle tends to remain adapted to afterload with increased contractility and little or no increase in right heart chamber dimensions. However, less than optimal right ventricular (RV)-arterial coupling may already cause a decreased aerobic exercise capacity by limiting maximum cardiac output. In more advanced stages, RV systolic function cannot remain matched to afterload and dilatation of the right heart chamber progressively develops. In addition, diastolic dysfunction occurs due to myocardial fibrosis and sarcomeric stiffening. All these changes lead to limitation of RV flow output, increased right-sided filling pressures and under-filling of the left ventricle, with eventual decrease in systemic blood pressure and altered systolic ventricular interaction. These pathophysiological changes account for exertional dyspnoea and systemic venous congestion typical of PAH. Complete evaluation of RV failure requires echocardiographic or magnetic resonance imaging, and right heart catheterisation measurements. Treatment of RV failure in PAH relies on: decreasing afterload with drugs targeting pulmonary circulation; fluid management to optimise ventricular diastolic interactions; and inotropic interventions to reverse cardiogenic shock. To date, there has been no report of the efficacy of drug treatments that specifically target the right ventricle. ©ERS 2014.

  19. Periodontitis and arterial stiffness: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Audrey; Carra, Maria Clotilde; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Bouchard, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    Patients with periodontitis have a higher risk of cardiovascular diseases, although a causal relationship between these conditions remains unclear. Arterial stiffness is considered a marker of arteriosclerosis and a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. A systematic review of the literature on clinical studies using pulse wave velocity (PWV) to assess arterial stiffness in patients with periodontitis was carried out to answer the following questions: (i) Do patients with periodontitis have impaired arterial stiffness compared to non-periodontal diseased subjects? (ii) Is periodontal treatment effective as a means to improve arterial stiffness in patients with periodontitis? Literature search was done on different databases up to September 2014. All clinical studies (excluding case reports) using PWV in patients with periodontitis were retrieved for a full-text evaluation. A total of 10 studies were included. Patients with periodontitis have increased arterial stiffness compared to controls (PWV mean difference 0.85 m/s; 95% confidence interval: 0.53-1.16; p<0.00001). The only two interventional studies showed contradictory results on the effects of periodontal treatment on PWV. Patients with periodontitis appear to have higher values of PWV compared to controls. The effect of periodontal treatment on arterial stiffness remains unclear. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. A Review of Targeted Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension-Specific Pharmacotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ataya, Ali; Cope, Jessica; Alnuaimat, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Significant advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension over the past two decades have led to the development of targeted therapies and improved patient outcomes. Currently, a broad armamentarium of pulmonary arterial hypertension-specific drugs exists to assist in the treatment of this complex disease state. In this manuscript, we provide a comprehensive review of the current Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved pulmonary arterial hypertension-specific therapies, and their supporting evidence for adults, targeting the nitric oxide, soluble guanylate cyclase, endothelin, and prostacyclin pathways. PMID:27929408

  1. A Review of Targeted Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension-Specific Pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ataya, Ali; Cope, Jessica; Alnuaimat, Hassan

    2016-12-06

    Significant advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension over the past two decades have led to the development of targeted therapies and improved patient outcomes. Currently, a broad armamentarium of pulmonary arterial hypertension-specific drugs exists to assist in the treatment of this complex disease state. In this manuscript, we provide a comprehensive review of the current Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved pulmonary arterial hypertension-specific therapies, and their supporting evidence for adults, targeting the nitric oxide, soluble guanylate cyclase, endothelin, and prostacyclin pathways.

  2. Management of a child with pulmonary arterial hypertension presenting with systemic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Flores, Saul; Daily, Joshua; Pratap, Jayant Nick; Cash, Michelle C; Hirsch, Russel

    2016-02-01

    We describe the course and management of a 12-year-old girl with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension who initially presented with severe systemic hypertension. Successful therapy included pulmonary vasodilators and an atrial septostomy, while ensuring adequate maintenance of her systemic vascular resistance to maintain cardiac output. Clear understanding of the physiology and judicious medical management in patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension using extreme compensatory mechanisms is vitally important.

  3. Recapitulation of developing artery muscularization in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Abdul Q; Lighthouse, Janet K; Greif, Daniel M

    2014-03-13

    Excess smooth muscle accumulation is a key component of many vascular disorders, including atherosclerosis, restenosis, and pulmonary artery hypertension, but the underlying cell biological processes are not well defined. In pulmonary artery hypertension, reduced pulmonary artery compliance is a strong independent predictor of mortality, and pathological distal arteriole muscularization contributes to this reduced compliance. We recently demonstrated that embryonic pulmonary artery wall morphogenesis consists of discrete developmentally regulated steps. In contrast, poor understanding of distal arteriole muscularization in pulmonary artery hypertension severely limits existing therapies that aim to dilate the pulmonary vasculature but have modest clinical benefit and do not prevent hypermuscularization. Here, we show that most pathological distal arteriole smooth muscle cells, but not alveolar myofibroblasts, derive from pre-existing smooth muscle. Furthermore, the program of distal arteriole muscularization encompasses smooth muscle cell dedifferentiation, distal migration, proliferation, and then redifferentiation, thereby recapitulating many facets of arterial wall development.

  4. Association between high arterial stiffness and left ventricular filling pressures in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Milewska, Agata; Krauze, Tomasz; Piskorski, Jarosław; Minczykowski, Andrzej; Wykrętowicz, Andrzej; Guzik, Przemysław

    2015-01-01

    High arterial stiffness increases the left ventricular (LV) filling pressures in different cardiac disorders. The association between arterial stiffness and LV filling pressures has not been studied so far in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI). The aim of the study was to assess the association between arterial stiffness and LV filling pressures in patients with acute MI. Arterial stiffness, measured using the digital volume pulse stiffness index (SIDVP), and LV filling pressures, quantified as the ratio of early transmitral flow velocity to early diastolic septal mitral annulus velocity (E/e'), were evaluated in 263 patients with acute MI (mean age, 63.8 ±11 years; 69 women). The association between high E/e' (>15) and very stiff arteries (SIDVP >18 m/s) was analyzed by logistic regression, with data presented as odds ratios (OR s) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed an association between E/e' >15 and SIDVP >18 m/s (OR, 4.7; 95% CI, 1.8-12.3), independently of female sex (OR, 4.3; 95% CI, 1.4-10.2), LV ejection fraction <35% (OR, 3.1; 95% CI, 1.2-8.2), left atrial volume >34 ml/m2 (OR, 17.4; 95% CI, 5.8-52.0). There was no significant association between E/e' >15 and previous MI (OR, 2.2; 95% CI, 0.9-5.7). High arterial stiffness is an independent risk factor for LV diastolic dysfunction in patients with acute MI. A reduction in arterial stiffness may improve LV diastolic function in this patient group.

  5. [FEATURES OF ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION IN THE WORKING POPULATION].

    PubMed

    Mershenova, G; Kossybayeva, M; Chancharov, B; Mirzayeva, B; Amangeldiyeva, K

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of the research was to study clinical features of arterial hypertension in the working population in Karaganda. The number of participants (500 patients): base group (250 patients) and control group (250 patients). The criteria for inclusion (age and gender characteristics, diseases/conditions and etc): age from 18 to 63 years; presence of arterial hypertension 1, 2 and 3 grades; possibility to measure the arterial pressure in dynamic; patients, who agreed to participate in the research work (the existence of informed consent). The criteria for an exception: children under 18 years, pregnant, the patient's refusal to participate in the research work. Methods of research - retrospective analysis of patients card in base and control groups at the working population of the city of Karaganda; physical examinations (anthropometrical indicators) in base and control groups. The processing and analysis of materials was conducted by using the average values and their standard errors. Significance of differences of independent sets of were estimated with parametric and nonparametric methods. In the study group compared with control were more common all the risk factors of hypertension, especially hypercholesterolemia and dyslipidemia in half of the cases in patients with arterial hypertension working age. We believe that the main factors of risk in arterial hypertension are hypercholesterolemia and dyslipidemia with combination in other factors, affecting mainly on the course and outcome of hypertension. Degrees of hypertension was dependent from age of patients and duration of illness, there was a trend more pronounced degree of hypertension in men than in women. In men with slavic nationality was more pronounced hypertension 1,2 and 3 degree, while in Kazakh nationality men often was observed hypertension 1, 2 degree. The degree of hypertension in the study group depending on the mental and physical labor did not observed. Hypertension 2-3 degrees was observed at

  6. [Arterial hypertension and obesity--a dangerous combination].

    PubMed

    Zakharieva, S

    1999-01-01

    The combination of obesity with arterial hypertension is frequent finding in clinical practice. In 70% of the males and 61% of the females the high blood pressure is directly connected with obesity. The assumed mechanisms by which obesity leads to arterial hypertension are: insuline resistance; genetic factors (hypothesis for the sparing gene); correlations leptin-neuropeptide Y; fatty tissue as origin of local pressor and depressor humoral factors. The arterial hypertension in obesity is salt-sensible, associated with increased intraglomerular pressure, microalbuminuria and increased risk for cardiovascular complications. The reduction of the body weight is the principal nonmedical mean for treatment of the arterial hypertension. Of the antihypertensive drugs those which are neutral with respect to the carbohydrat and fat metabolism are preferred inhibitors of the converting enzyme, calcium antagonists, selective alpha-1 blockers, central alpha-2 agonist.

  7. Prostanoid therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Badesch, David B; McLaughlin, Vallerie V; Delcroix, Marion; Vizza, Carmine Dario; Olschewski, Horst; Sitbon, Olivier; Barst, Robyn J

    2004-06-16

    Prostanoids have played a prominent role in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Several compounds and methods of administration have been studied: chronic intravenously infused epoprostenol, chronic subcutaneously infused treprostinil, inhaled iloprost, and oral beraprost. Chronic intravenous epoprostenol therapy has had a substantial impact on the clinical management of patients with severe PAH. It improves exercise capacity, hemodynamics, and survival in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH). It also improves exercise capacity and hemodynamics in patients with PAH occurring in association with scleroderma. The complexity of epoprostenol therapy (chronic indwelling catheters, reconstitution of the drug, operation of the infusion pump, and others) has led to attempts to develop other prostanoids with simpler modes of delivery. Treprostinil, a stable prostacyclin analogue with a half-life of 3 h, has been developed for subcutaneous delivery. It has beneficial effects on exercise and hemodynamics, which depend somewhat on the dose achieved. This, in turn, is determined by the patient's ability to tolerate the drug's side effects, including pain and erythema at the infusion site. Inhaled iloprost therapy may provide selectivity of the hemodynamic effects to the lung vasculature, thus avoiding systemic side effects. In a randomized and controlled trial, iloprost resulted in improvement in a combined end point incorporating the New York Heart Association functional class, 6-min walk test, and deterioration or death. Beraprost is the first orally active prostacyclin analogue. In the first of two randomized controlled trials, beraprost increased exercise capacity in patients with IPAH, with no significant changes in subjects with associated conditions. Hemodynamics did not change significantly, and no difference in survival was detected between the two treatment groups. The second study showed that beraprost-treated patients

  8. Assessments of arterial stiffness and endothelial function using pulse wave analysis.

    PubMed

    Stoner, Lee; Young, Joanna M; Fryer, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Conventionally, the assessments of endothelial function and arterial stiffness require different sets of equipment, making the inclusion of both tests impractical for clinical and epidemiological studies. Pulse wave analysis (PWA) provides useful information regarding the mechanical properties of the arterial tree and can also be used to assess endothelial function. PWA is a simple, valid, reliable, and inexpensive technique, offering great clinical and epidemiological potential. The current paper will outline how to measure arterial stiffness and endothelial function using this technique and include discussion of validity and reliability.

  9. Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with impaired lysosomal endothelin-1 degradation.

    PubMed

    Recla, Sabine; Hahn, Andreas; Apitz, Christian

    2015-04-01

    We report on a boy with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with mucolipidosis, a rare lysosomal storage disorder. During diagnostic catheterisation, we found increased endothelin-1 levels, but normal big endothelin-1-levels (the precursor form of endothelin-1), which suggests impaired degradation of endothelin-1 rather than increased synthesis. As endothelin-1 degradation takes place in the lysosome, it appears likely that lysosomal dysfunction caused by the underlying disease contributes to the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension in this patient.

  10. Greater impairments in cerebral artery compared with skeletal muscle feed artery endothelial function in a mouse model of increased large artery stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Ashley E; Henson, Grant D; Reihl, Kelly D; Morgan, R Garrett; Dobson, Parker S; Nielson, Elizabeth I; Ling, Jing; Mecham, Robert P; Li, Dean Y; Lesniewski, Lisa A; Donato, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Advancing age as well as diseases such as diabetes are characterized by both increased large artery stiffness and impaired peripheral artery function. It has been hypothesized that greater large artery stiffness causes peripheral artery dysfunction; however, a cause-and-effect relationship has not previously been established. We used elastin heterozygote mice (Eln+/–) as a model of increased large artery stiffness without co-morbidities unrelated to the large artery properties. Aortic stiffness, measured by pulse wave velocity, was ∼35% greater in Eln+/– mice than in wild-type (Eln+/+) mice (P = 0.04). Endothelium-dependent dilatation (EDD), assessed by the maximal dilatation to acetylcholine, was ∼40% lower in Eln+/– than Eln+/+ mice in the middle cerebral artery (MCA, P < 0.001), but was similar between groups in the gastrocnemius feed arteries (GFA, P = 0.79). In the MCA, EDD did not differ between groups after incubation with the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (P > 0.05), indicating that lower NO bioavailability contributed to the impaired EDD in Eln+/– mice. Superoxide production and content of the oxidative stress marker nitrotyrosine was higher in MCAs from Eln+/− compared with Eln+/+ mice (P < 0.05). In the MCA, after incubation with the superoxide scavenger TEMPOL, maximal EDD improved by ∼65% in Eln+/– (P = 0.002), but was unchanged in Eln+/+ mice (P = 0.17). These results indicate that greater large artery stiffness has a more profound effect on endothelial function in cerebral arteries compared with skeletal muscle feed arteries. Greater large artery stiffness can cause cerebral artery endothelial dysfunction by reducing NO bioavailability and increasing oxidative stress. PMID:25627876

  11. The metabolic theory of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Paulin, Roxane; Michelakis, Evangelos D

    2014-06-20

    Numerous molecular abnormalities have been described in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), complicating the translation of candidate therapies to patients because, typically, 1 treatment addresses only 1 abnormality. The realization that in addition to pulmonary artery vascular cells, other tissues and cells are involved in the syndrome of PAH (eg, immune cells, right ventricular cardiomyocytes, skeletal muscle) further complicates the identification of optimal therapeutic targets. Here, we describe a metabolic theory that proposes that many apparently unrelated molecular abnormalities in PAH do have a common denominator; they either cause or promote a mitochondrial suppression (inhibition of glucose oxidation) in pulmonary vascular cells; in turn, the signaling downstream from this mitochondrial suppression can also explain numerous molecular events previously not connected. This integration of signals upstream and downstream of mitochondria has similarities to cancer and can explain many features of the PAH vascular phenotype, including proliferation and apoptosis resistance. This suppression of glucose oxidation (with secondary upregulation of glycolysis) also underlies the abnormalities in extrapulmonary tissues, suggesting a global metabolic disturbance. The metabolic theory places mitochondria at the center stage for our understanding of PAH pathogenesis and for the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic tools. Current PAH therapies are each addressing 1 abnormality (eg, upregulation of endothelin-1) and were not developed specifically for PAH but for systemic vascular diseases. Compared with the available therapies, mitochondria-targeting therapies have the advantage of addressing multiple molecular abnormalities simultaneously (thus being potentially more effective) and achieving higher specificity because they address PAH-specific biology. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. [Aerosolized iloprost therapy for pulmonary hypertensive crisis in 4 patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Deng, Ke-wu; Zhou, Yu-jie; Xu, Xi-qi; Wu, Ming-ying; Wang, Guo-hong; Bian, Hong; Chen, Bo; Wang, Chun-bo

    2012-10-01

    To summary the efficacy and safety of aerosolized iloprost in patients with pulmonary hypertensive crisis. On the basis of conventional therapy, aerosolized iloprost (10 µg per time for 10 - 15 min in 2 hours interval, 8 times per day) was administered to four patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and pulmonary hypertensive crisis. Blood pressure, heart rate, systemic artery oxygen saturation, systolic pulmonary arterial pressure (sPAP) measured by echocardiography and the adverse events were analyzed. After aerosolized iloprost therapy, sPAP was significantly decreased and systemic artery oxygen saturation was improved. Adverse events (nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dry cough) were observed in two patients, and the iloprost use was stopped in one patient due to severe vomiting and diarrhea. Aerosolized iloprost could significantly reduce the sPAP and improve the systemic artery oxygen saturation in patients with pulmonary hypertension crisis.

  13. [Systemic arterial hypertension in child and adolescent].

    PubMed

    Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Medina-Concebida, Luz Elena; Borrayo-Sánchez, Gabriela; Madrid-Miller, Alejandra; Ramírez-Arias, Erick; Pérez-Rodríguez, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    The epidemic of childhood obesity, the risk of developing left ventricular hypertrophy, and evidence of the early development of atherosclerosis in children would make the detection of and intervention in childhood hypertension important to reduce long-term health risks; however, supporting data are lacking. Secondary hypertension is more common in preadolescent children, with most cases caused by renal disease. Primary or essential hypertension is more common in adolescents and has multiple risk factors, including obesity and a family history of hypertension. Evaluation involves a through history and physical examination, laboratory tests, and specialized studies. Management is multifaceted. Nonpharmacologic treatments include weight reduction, exercise, and dietary modifications. Although the evidence of first line therapy for hypertension is still controversial, the recommendations for pharmacologic treatment are based on symptomatic hypertension, evidence of end-organ damage, stage 2 of hypertension, or stage 1 of hypertension unresponsive to lifestyle modifications, and hypertension with diabetes mellitus where is the search for microalbuminuria justified.

  14. Family caregiving in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Boyoung; Howie-Esquivel, Jill; Fleischmann, Kirsten E; Stotts, Nancy A; Dracup, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease that places a significant burden on patients and their families. However, family caregiving, to the best of our knowledge, has never been described in this population. This study sought to describe depressive symptoms, types of performed care tasks, social support, and the impact of caregiving among family caregivers of patients with PAH. Data were obtained from 35 dyads of patients with PAH (mean age, 51 years; 63% were female; 54% had World Health Organization functional class III symptoms) and their family caregivers (mean age, 52 years; 60% were female; 68% were spouses). Five caregivers (14%) were identified as manifesting moderate to severe depressive symptoms. The majority of caregivers reported that their daily activities were centered around caregiving responsibilities. More than 85% of caregivers were involved in managing care for the patient, and more than half helped the patient with self-management activities. The level of caregivers' perceived social support was low, especially for emotional and informational support. Lower levels of social support were significantly associated with more severe depressive symptoms in caregivers (r = -.50, P = .002). Caregivers of patients with PAH play a significant role in patients' medical care and self-management, yet they lack sufficient emotional support or information to meet the demands of caregiving. These findings underscore the importance of supporting family caregivers of patients with PAH. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Quantitative Indexes of Leukocytes in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats During Various Periods of Arterial Hypertension Development.

    PubMed

    Aliev, O I; Anishchenko, A M; Sidekhmenova, A V; Shamanaev, A Yu; Fedorova, E P; Plotnikov, M B

    2015-10-01

    SHR rats were examined in the period before arterial hypertension development (5th week), during the increase in BP (6th-10th weeks), and under conditions of constantly elevated BP (11th-12th weeks). The total number of leukocytes did not differ in SHR and normotensive WKY rats. However, the relative number of lymphocytes and monocytes was shown to differ in various periods of arterial hypertension development. Our results suggest that white blood cells (primarily lymphocytes) are involved in the development of arterial hypertension.

  16. Arterial stiffness is not increased in patients with short duration rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Dzieża-Grudnik, Anna; Sulicka, Joanna; Strach, Magdalena; Siga, Olga; Klimek, Ewa; Korkosz, Mariusz; Grodzicki, Tomasz

    2017-04-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) have increased cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. Arterial stiffness is an independent predictor of CV events. The aim of the study was to assess arterial stiffness and inflammatory markers in patients with short duration chronic arthritis. We assessed carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), augmentation index (AIx), traditional CV risk factors and inflammatory and endothelial markers in 71 chronic arthritis patients (RA and AS) and in 29 healthy controls. We did not find differences in PWV (for RA, AS and controls, respectively: 10 [8.8-10.9] versus 10.7 [9.1-11.8] versus 9.2 [8.3-11.4] m/s; p = .14) and AIx (for RA, AS and controls, respectively: 24.3 ± 11.5 versus 5.7 ± 12.4 versus 10 ± 12.8%; p = .22). Both groups of arthritis patients had active disease with significantly elevated inflammatory markers compared to controls. There were no correlations between endothelial and inflammatory markers and parameters of arterial stiffness in arthritis patients. When analyzing arthritis patients according to median of PVW, there were no significant differences in inflammatory and endothelial markers. We found that in patients with short duration active RA and AS arterial stiffness was not increased and furthermore, there was no association between markers of systemic inflammation and arterial stiffness.

  17. Effects of chronic carotid baroreceptor activation on arterial stiffness in severe heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gronda, Edoardo; Brambilla, GianMaria; Seravalle, Gino; Maloberti, Alessandro; Cairo, Matteo; Costantino, Giuseppe; Lovett, Eric; Vanoli, Emilio; Mancia, Giuseppe; Grassi, Guido

    2016-10-01

    Heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) is characterized by activation of the sympathetic nervous system and increased arterial stiffness, leading to an impaired ventricular-vascular coupling. Baroreflex activation therapy (BAT) has been shown to reduce muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and improve clinical status of patients with HFrEF. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of BAT on arterial stiffness in HFrEF. MSNA, clinical variables, and parameters of central blood pressure (BP) and arterial stiffness were collected in 18 NYHA Class III HFrEF patients, nine receiving BAT and nine continuing with optimal medical management alone. Patients were followed for 3 months, with measurements at that time compared to baseline evaluation. Baseline characteristics of the groups were well matched. At 3 months, BAT did not improve central BP and arterial stiffness despite a significant amelioration of MSNA, NYHA class, Minnesota living with heart failure questionnaire score, number of heart failure medications and six-minute walking distance. The control group exhibited no significant changes in all the measured variables. Despite significant reductions in MSNA and clinical improvement, BAT does not appear to chronically modify arterial stiffness within this HFrEF cohort. Additional study is required to determine if this result applies to the HFrEF population as a whole.

  18. The effects of resistance exercise training on arterial stiffness in metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    DeVallance, E; Fournier, S; Lemaster, K; Moore, C; Asano, S; Bonner, D; Donley, D; Olfert, I M; Chantler, P D

    2016-05-01

    Arterial stiffness is a strong independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and is elevated in individuals with metabolic syndrome (MetS). Resistance training is a popular form of exercise that has beneficial effects on muscle mass, strength, balance and glucose control. However, it is unknown whether resistance exercise training (RT) can lower arterial stiffness in patients with MetS. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine whether a progressive RT program would improve arterial stiffness in MetS. A total of 57 subjects (28 healthy sedentary subjects; 29 MetS) were evaluated for arterial structure and function, including pulse wave velocity (cfPWV: arterial stiffness), before and after an 8-week period of RT or continuation of sedentary lifestyle. We found that 8 weeks of progressive RT increased skeletal muscle strength in both Con and MetS, but did not change arterial stiffness in either MetS (cfPWV; Pre 7.9 ± 0.4 m/s vs. Post 7.7 ± 0.4 m/s) or healthy controls (cfPWV; Pre 6.9 ± 0.3 m/s vs. Post 7.0 ± 0.3 m/s). However, when cfPWV is considered as a continuous variable, high baseline measures of cfPWV tended to show a decrease in cfPWV following RT. Eight weeks of progressive RT did not decrease the group mean values of arterial stiffness in individuals with MetS or healthy controls.

  19. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Sanges, Sébastien; Yelnik, Cécile M.; Sitbon, Olivier; Benveniste, Olivier; Mariampillai, Kuberaka; Phillips-Houlbracq, Mathilde; Pison, Christophe; Deligny, Christophe; Inamo, Jocelyn; Cottin, Vincent; Mouthon, Luc; Launay, David; Lambert, Marc; Hatron, Pierre-Yves; Rottat, Laurence; Humbert, Marc; Hachulla, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Occurrence of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs) without extensive interstitial lung disease (ILD) has rarely been described in the medical literature. This study aimed to report all cases with association of PAH and IIM in the French Pulmonary Hypertension (PH) Registry, to identify IIM features associated with the presence of PAH, and to describe treatment modalities of these patients. All cases of IIM-PAH were retrieved from the French PH Registry, which gathers PH patients prospectively enrolled by 27 referral hospital centers across France. Patients were excluded if they had an extensive ILD or overlap syndrome. Characteristics of IIM-PAH patients were compared with a control group of IIM patients without PH. Among the 5223 PH patients in the Registry, 34 had a diagnosis of IIM. Among them, 3 IIM-PAH patients (2 females and 1 male) had no evidence of extensive ILD or overlap syndrome, and were included in this study. In these 3 patients, dermatomyositis (DM) was the only identified IIM. One patient had autoantibodies classically associated with IIM (anti-Ku). PAH had always developed after IIM onset, was severe in all cases, and led to a marked functional impairment. By pooling our cases with 6 patients previously reported in the literature, and comparing them with a control cohort of 35 IIM patients without PH, we identify several IIM characteristics possibly associated with PAH occurrence, including DM subtype (78% vs 46%; P = 0.02), skin involvement (P = 0.04), anti-SSA antibodies (P = 0.05), and peripheral microangiopathy (P = 0.06). Overall, IIM-PAH patients were managed by corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressants, either alone or combined with PAH therapy. Patients did not seem to respond to IIM treatment alone. Our study reports for the first time the rare but possible association of PAH and IIM in a large prospective PH Registry. In that setting, PAH seems associated with DM, skin involvement

  20. Metabolic risk factors and arterial stiffness in Indian children of parents with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khadilkar, Anuradha V; Chiplonkar, Shashi A; Pandit, Deepa S; Kinare, Arun S; Khadilkar, Vaman V

    2012-02-01

    To investigate the possible association between metabolic syndrome (MS) and arterial stiffness in Indian children with parental MS status. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 140 overweight/obese and 60 normal-weight Indian children (mean age, 11.4 ± 2.8 years) along with one of their parents during 2008-2009. Data on weight, height, blood pressure, serum lipids, zinc, insulin, and glucose were collected. Intima media thickness (CIMT) and stiffness parameters were assessed in the right carotid artery. Physical activity and diet were assessed using structured questionnaires. Body composition was measured using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. A gradual increase in the percentage of MS children with an increasing number of MS components in parents was observed. Mean values for arterial stiffness, pulse wave velocity, and elastic modulus were significantly higher in MS children of MS parents than in MS children of normal parents (p < 0.05). A significant correlation was observed for lifestyle, metabolic, and arterial parameters among child-parent pairs (p < 0.05). Multiple logistic regression revealed that children's CIMT and arterial stiffness were significantly associated (p < 0.01) with their serum levels of triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein, and zinc, as well as with parental MS-CIMT. Parental MS status and lifestyle factors increase the risk of MS and arterial abnormalities in children.

  1. Research on red cell membrane permeability in arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gatina, R; Balta, N; Moisin, C; Burtea, C; Botea, S; Ioan, M; Teleianu, C

    1998-01-01

    Arterial hypertension, including the elucidation of hypertension pathogenic mechanisms involving elements in the composition of the blood, continues to represent a topical research area. Recent work, such as nuclear magnetic resonance studies looking into red cell permeability, illustrates the presence of modifications of red cell permeability to water (RCPW) related to the stage of arterial hypertension. The identification of a significant increase of RCPW compared to that present in the population with normal arterial pressure values can be useful both in early diagnosis and in warning about a possible predisposition for this condition. At the same time, the dynamic investigation of protonic relaxation time of both intra- and extra-erythrocytic water, the assessment of proton exchange time across the red cell and the calculation of permeability to water enable one not only to diagnose arterial hypertension but also to ascertain the evolution of the disease, its complications and the effectiveness of anti-hypertensive medication. Our studies have also proven the existence of a correlation between the values of systolic arterial pressure and red cell permeability to water. The curve describing the interdependence of the two values has the shape of a bell, in the case of males. The peak of the curve is reached for a systolic pressure of 160 mmHg and gets below the values of the control group in the case of systolic pressures above 200 mmHg. The RCPW test can also be considered a valuable indicator in evaluating the risk of stroke in hypertensive patients. In the chronic therapy of arterial hypertension with various types of anti-hypertensive drugs, one can note differences in the RCPW values related to the effectiveness of the respective medication, to the clinical form and stage of the disease, the sex of the patient as well as to the existence of cerebro-vascular complications.

  2. Association of lipoprotein subfractions with endothelial function and arterial stiffness in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Šiarnik, Pavel; Čarnická, Zuzana; Krivošíková, Zuzana; Klobučníková, Katarína; Žitňanová, Ingrid; Kollár, Branislav; Sýkora, Marek; Turčáni, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Hypercholesterolemia represents a risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. Lipoprotein research has recently been focused on the phenomenon of atherogenic and non-atherogenic lipoproteins. The aim of this study was to explore the association of lipoprotein subfractions with a measure for endothelial function (represented by reactive hyperemia index [RHI]) and arterial stiffness (represented by augmentation index [AI]) in patients with acute ischemic stroke. We enrolled 51 patients with acute ischemic stroke. Blood samples were obtained within 24 h after the stroke onset in a fasting condition. Electrophoresis method on polyacrylamide gel was used for the analysis of plasma lipoproteins. RHI and AI was measured by peripheral arterial tonometry (EndoPAT2000 device). We failed to find any significant correlation between RHI and baseline characteristics of the population. Significant correlation was found between AI and age, hypertension, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) 1, LDL 3-7, score for anti-atherogenic risk and atherogenic profile. Age (beta = .362, p = .006) and LDL1 (beta = -0.283, p = .031) were the only independent variables significantly associated with AI in regression analysis. Significantly higher AI was found in an atherogenic lipoprotein profile compared to a non-atherogenic profile population (median 25% vs. median 11.5%, p = .043). In conclusion, our results suggest significant inverse correlation between levels of LDL 1 subfraction and measures of AI in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Significantly higher values of AI were observed in the population with an atherogenic lipoprotein profile.

  3. Hyperglycemia and Arterial Stiffness: the Atherosclerosis Risk in the Communities Study

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Jonathan; Nambi, Vijay; Chambless, Lloyd E.; Steffes, Michael W.; Juraschek, Stephen P.; Coresh, Josef; Sharrett, A. Richey; Selvin, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Hyperglycemia has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although numerous studies have demonstrated that hyperglycemia is associated with the atherosis component of atherosclerosis, limited studies have addressed the independent role of hyperglycemia in the pathophysiology of sclerotic vascular disease. We hypothesized that hyperglycemia, as assessed by hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), would be independently associated two common indices of arterial stiffness (pressure-strain elastic modulus (Ep) and Young’s elastic modulus (YEM)). Methods We examined the cross-sectional association between HbA1c and arterial stiffness using B-mode ultrasound examination of the carotid artery in 9,050 participants from the community-based Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. We used multivariable linear and logistic regression models to characterize the association between HbA1c and increased Ep and YEM. Results Higher values of HbA1c were associated in a graded fashion with increased arterial stiffness (P-trend <0.001 for both EP and YEM). After adjusting for traditional risk factors, increasing HbA1c deciles were significantly associated with elevated EP (OR for the highest decile of HbA1c compared to the lowest, 2.01, 95% CI 1.30, 3.11) and YEM (OR = 1.71, 95% CI 1.15, 2.55). Conclusion Elevated HbA1c is associated with measures of increased arterial stiffness, even after accounting for arterial wall thickness. This is consistent with the hypothesis that hyperglycemia contributes to arterial stiffness beyond its effects on atherosis and suggests that hyperglycemia is associated with altered material within the arterial wall. PMID:23031361

  4. Sublingual Microcirculation in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Dababneh, Luma; Cikach, Frank; Alkukhun, Laith; Dweik, Raed A.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a pulmonary vasculopathy that leads to failure of the right ventricle and premature death. Objectives: To determine whether the sublingual microcirculation is affected in patients with PAH compared with healthy age- and sex-matched control subjects. Methods: Using the CapiScope Handheld Video Capillaroscope we measured the sublingual microvasculature density, flow index, tortuosity, and curvature. Videos were acquired immediately after right heart catheterization, and determinations were made off-line by investigators blinded to the group assignment or hemodynamics. Measurements and Main Results: In this cross-sectional pilot study, we included 26 patients with PAH (age, mean ± SD, 56.7 ± 10 yr; 77% women) and 14 healthy control subjects (age, 53.1 ± 12 yr; 71% women). Sublingual microvasculature flow index was lower (2 ± 0.66 vs. 2.7 ± 0.37, P < 0.001) with higher heterogeneity index (0.63 ± 0.63 vs. 0.25 ± 0.25, P = 0.04) in patients with PAH than control subjects. Microvasculature density was similar between the groups, but tortuosity was more pronounced in patients than control subjects (tort 0: 45 ± 19 vs. 23.6 ± 12, P = 0.001 and tort 1: 0.2 ± 0.16 vs. 0.06 ± 0.04, P < 0.001). Conclusions: Patients with PAH showed lower sublingual microvasculature flow index and higher tortuosity compared with healthy age- and sex-matched control subjects. Further investigations are needed to assess whether this methodology can provide information on disease prognosis and/or response to therapy in this condition. PMID:24601682

  5. Genetics and genomics of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Soubrier, Florent; Chung, Wendy K; Machado, Rajiv; Grünig, Ekkehard; Aldred, Micheala; Geraci, Mark; Loyd, James E; Elliott, C Gregory; Trembath, Richard C; Newman, John H; Humbert, Marc

    2013-12-24

    Major discoveries have been obtained within the last decade in the field of hereditary predisposition to pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Among them, the identification of bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2 (BMPR2) as the major predisposing gene and activin A receptor type II-like kinase-1 (ACVRL1, also known as ALK1) as the major gene when PAH is associated with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. The mutation detection rate for the known genes is approximately 75% in familial PAH, but the mutation shortfall remains unexplained even after careful molecular investigation of these genes. To identify additional genetic variants predisposing to PAH, investigators harnessed the power of next-generation sequencing to successfully identify additional genes that will be described in this report. Furthermore, common genetic predisposing factors for PAH can be identified by genome-wide association studies and are detailed in this paper. The careful study of families and routine genetic diagnosis facilitated natural history studies based on large registries of PAH patients to be set up in different countries. These longitudinal or cross-sectional studies permitted the clinical characterization of PAH in mutation carriers to be accurately described. The availability of molecular genetic diagnosis has opened up a new field for patient care, including genetic counseling for a severe disease, taking into account that the major predisposing gene has a highly variable penetrance between families. Molecular information can be drawn from the genomic study of affected tissues in PAH, in particular, pulmonary vascular tissues and cells, to gain insight into the mechanisms leading to the development of the disease. High-throughput genomic techniques, on the basis of next-generation sequencing, now allow the accurate quantification and analysis of ribonucleic acid, species, including micro-ribonucleic acids, and allow for a genome-wide investigation of epigenetic or

  6. Development of easy operating arterial stiffness assessment instrument for home care.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsien-Tsai; Yao, Cheng-Tso; Wu, Tsang-Chih; Liu, An-Bang

    2007-01-01

    In this study, 41 asymptomatic subjects (22 men and 19 women, 20 to 60 years of age) were enrolled. The PWV was measured both by dual-channel PPG (PWV-DVP) and by the proposed PWV instrument, Pulse Wave Velocity by Digital Volume Pulse Easy (PWV-DVPE). The developed system recorded digital volume pulse simultaneously from both the finger and ear. Time of pulse transition was measured on the time delay difference between two digital volume pulses. The PWV was calculated by dividing the distance between finger and ear by that of transit time. PWV-DVPE's capability of precise self-monitoring arterial stiffness is being proven in this study. In home care area, only few minutes is needed for self arterial stiffness assessment. Therefore, early self-monitoring of cardio-vascular dys-function and arterial stiffness is easily and effectively achieved.

  7. HIV infection and arterial stiffness among older-adults taking antiretroviral therapy in rural Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Siedner, Mark J.; Kim, June-Ho; Nakku, Ruth Sentongo; Hemphill, Linda; Triant, Virginia A.; Haberer, Jessica E.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Boum, Yap; Kwon, Douglas S.; Tsai, Alexander C.; Hunt, Peter W.; Okello, Samson; Bangsberg, David R.

    2015-01-01

    HIV infection is associated with arterial stiffness, but no studies have assessed this relationship in sub-Saharan Africa. We enrolled 205 participants over 40 years old in Uganda: 105 on antiretroviral therapy for a median of 7 years, and a random sample of 100 age and gender-matched HIV-uninfected controls from the clinic catchment area. The prevalence of arterial stiffness (ABI>1.2) was 33%, 18%, 19% and 2% in HIV+ men, HIV- men, HIV+ women, and HIV- women. In multivariable models adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors, HIV+ individuals had over double the prevalence of arterial stiffness (APR 2.86, 95%CI 1.41–5.79, P=0.003). PMID:26636926

  8. Effect of angiotensin II-induced arterial hypertension on the voltage-dependent contractions of mouse arteries.

    PubMed

    Fransen, Paul; Van Hove, Cor E; Leloup, Arthur J A; Schrijvers, Dorien M; De Meyer, Guido R Y; De Keulenaer, Gilles W

    2016-02-01

    Arterial hypertension (AHT) affects the voltage dependency of L-type Ca(2+) channels in cardiomyocytes. We analyzed the effect of angiotensin II (AngII)-induced AHT on L-type Ca(2+) channel-mediated isometric contractions in conduit arteries. AHT was induced in C57Bl6 mice with AngII-filled osmotic mini-pumps (4 weeks). Normotensive mice treated with saline-filled osmotic mini-pumps were used for comparison. Voltage-dependent contractions mediated by L-type Ca(2+) channels were studied in vaso-reactive studies in vitro in isolated aortic and femoral arteries by using extracellular K(+) concentration-response (KDR) experiments. In aortic segments, AngII-induced AHT significantly sensitized isometric contractions induced by elevated extracellular K(+) and depolarization. This sensitization was partly prevented by normalizing blood pressure with hydralazine, suggesting that it was caused by AHT rather than by direct AngII effects on aortic smooth muscle cells. The EC50 for extracellular K(+) obtained in vitro correlated significantly with the rise in arterial blood pressure induced by AngII in vivo. The AHT-induced sensitization persisted when aortic segments were exposed to levcromakalim or to inhibitors of basal nitric oxide release. Consistent with these observations, AngII-treatment also sensitized the vaso-relaxing effects of the L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker diltiazem during K(+)-induced contractions. Unlike aorta, AngII-treatment desensitized the isometric contractions to depolarization in femoral arteries pointing to vascular bed specific responses of arteries to hypertension. AHT affects the voltage-dependent L-type Ca(2+) channel-mediated contraction of conduit arteries. This effect may contribute to the decreased vascular compliance in AHT and explain the efficacy of Ca(2+) channel blockers to reduce vascular stiffness and central blood pressure in AHT.

  9. Relation between coronary artery disease, risk factors and intima-media thickness of carotid artery, arterial distensibility, and stiffness index.

    PubMed

    Alan, Sait; Ulgen, Mehmet S; Ozturk, Onder; Alan, Bircan; Ozdemir, Levent; Toprak, Nizamettin

    2003-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a diffuse process that involves vessel structures. In recent years, the relation of noninvasive parameters such as intima-media thickening (IMT), arterial distensibility (AD), and stiffness index (SI) to cardiovascular diseases has been researched. However, we have not found any study that has included all these parameters. The aim of this study is to examine the relation between the presence of coronary artery disease (CAD) and its risk factors to AD, SI, and IMT, which are the noninvasive predictors of atherosclerotic process in the carotid artery. Included in the study were 180 patients who were diagnosed as having CAD by coronary angiography (those with at least > or = 30% stenosis in the coronary arteries) and, as a control group, 53 persons who had normal appearing coronary angiographies. IMT, AD, and SI values of all the patients in the study were measured by echo-Doppler imaging (AD formula = 2 x (AoS - AoD)/PP x AoD, SI formula = (SBP/DBP)/([AoS - AoD]/AoD). Significantly increased IMT (0.82 +/- 0.1, 0.57 +/- 0.1, p<0.05), decreased AD (0.25 +/- 0.9, 0.37 +/- 0.1, p<0.05), and increased SI (13 +/- 4, 8 +/- 3, p<0.05) values were detected in the CAD group compared to the control group. A significant correlation was found between IMT and presence of diabetes mellitus (DM), systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, and presence of plaque in carotids, and age. In the coronary artery disease group there was a significant correlation between AD and age, systolic blood pressure, and HDL cholesterol levels, while there was no significant correlation with plaque development. A significant correlation was also found between stiffness index and systolic blood pressure and age; however, there was no relation between number of involved vessels and IMT, AD, and SI. We found sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive and negative predictive values for CAD diagnosis to be 70%, 75%, 77%, and 66%, respectively. In CAD cases, according to data in

  10. [Treatment of arterial hypertension in children].

    PubMed

    Bensman, A

    1988-01-01

    Hypertension in children is divided in 2 groups: primary hypertension and the secondary forms which are more severe and mostly due to kidney diseases. The medical management of hypertension includes non pharmacological intervention (diet, exercise, life-style) and pharmacological agents. The children with primary and mild hypertension may need only non pharmacological strategies. The main pharmacological agents used are: diuretics, vasodilators, sympathetic blockers, centrally acting agents, converting enzyme inhibitors. Except for hypertensive emergencies, the management of children with hypertension is facilitated by a stepped-care titration approach. Step 1: beta adrenergic blockers or vaso-dilators; step 2: combine beta adrenergic blockers with vaso-dilators or with diuretics or converting enzyme inhibitors alone; step 3: combine converting enzyme inhibitors with vaso-dilators and/or diuretics and/or beta adrenergic blockers; step 4: drugs include minoxidil, prazosin, labetalol.

  11. Effects of sodium and potassium supplementation on blood pressure and arterial stiffness: a fully controlled dietary intervention study.

    PubMed

    Gijsbers, L; Dower, J I; Mensink, M; Siebelink, E; Bakker, S J L; Geleijnse, J M

    2015-10-01

    We performed a randomised, placebo-controlled, crossover study to examine the effects of sodium and potassium supplementation on blood pressure (BP) and arterial stiffness in untreated (pre)hypertensive individuals. During the study, subjects were on a fully controlled diet that was relatively low in sodium and potassium. After a 1-week run-in period, subjects received capsules with supplemental sodium (3 g d(-1), equals 7.6 g d(-1) of salt), supplemental potassium (3 g d(-1)) or placebo, for 4 weeks each, in random order. Fasting office BP, 24-h ambulatory BP and measures of arterial stiffness were assessed at baseline and every 4 weeks. Of 37 randomized subjects, 36 completed the study. They had a mean pre-treatment BP of 145/81 mm Hg and 69% had systolic BP ⩾140 mm Hg. Sodium excretion was increased by 98 mmol per 24 h and potassium excretion by 63 mmol per 24 h during active interventions, compared with placebo. During sodium supplementation, office BP was significantly increased by 7.5/3.3 mm Hg, 24-h BP by 7.5/2.7 mm Hg and central BP by 8.5/3.6 mm Hg. During potassium supplementation, 24-h BP was significantly reduced by 3.9/1.6 mm Hg and central pulse pressure by 2.9 mm Hg. Pulse wave velocity and augmentation index were not significantly affected by sodium or potassium supplementation. In conclusion, increasing the intake of sodium caused a substantial increase in BP in subjects with untreated elevated BP. Increased potassium intake, on top of a relatively low-sodium diet, had a beneficial effect on BP. Arterial stiffness did not materially change during 4-week interventions with sodium or potassium.

  12. Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid Reduces Arterial Stiffness and Improves Endothelial Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Battson, Micah L; Lee, Dustin M; Jarrell, Dillon K; Hou, Shoufei; Ecton, Kayl E; Phan, Anna B; Gentile, Christopher L

    2017-09-21

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has emerged as a potential mechanism contributing to diabetes and its comorbidities. However, the importance of ER stress in diabetic vascular dysfunction is unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of the ER stress inhibitor, tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), on arterial stiffness and endothelial dysfunction in type 2 diabetic mice. Carotid and mesenteric artery endothelial function were assessed via ex vivo pressure myography, and arterial stiffness was measured by aortic pulse wave velocity. The effects of TUDCA were examined both acutely (ex vivo) and chronically (250 mg/kg/day; i.p., 4 weeks). Compared to control C57BL/6J mice, db/db (DB) mice did not display carotid artery endothelial dysfunction; however, mesenteric artery endothelial function was markedly impaired. Acute incubation and chronic administration of TUDCA improved endothelium-dependent dilation in DB mesenteric arteries, without affecting endothelium-independent dilation. Chronic TUDCA administration also reduced arterial stiffness and was associated with reductions in ER stress markers in aortic and perivascular adipose tissue. These results suggest that ER stress may represent a novel cause of, and therapeutic target for, diabetic vascular dysfunction. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Structural abnormalities of small resistance arteries in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rizzoni, Damiano; Agabiti-Rosei, Enrico

    2012-06-01

    Regardless of the mechanisms that initiate the increase in blood pressure, the development of structural changes in the systemic vasculature is the end result of established hypertension. In essential hypertension, the small arteries smooth muscle cells are restructured around a smaller lumen, and there is no net growth of the vascular wall, while in some secondary forms of hypertension, a hypertrophic remodeling may be detected. Also, in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, a hypertrophic remodeling of subcutaneous small arteries is present. The results from our own group have suggested that indices of small resistance artery structure, such as the tunica media to internal lumen ratio, may have a strong prognostic significance in hypertensive patients, over and above all other known cardiovascular risk factors. Therefore, the regression of vascular alterations is an appealing goal of antihypertensive treatment. Different antihypertensive drugs seem to have different effect on vascular structure, both in human and in animal models of genetic and experimental hypertension. A complete normalization of small resistance artery structure is demonstrated in hypertensive patients, after long-term and effective therapy with ACE inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers and calcium antagonists. Few data are available in diabetic hypertensive patients; however, blockade of the renin-angiotensin system seems to be effective in this regard. In conclusion, there are several pieces of evidence that suggest that small resistance artery structure may be considered an intermediate endpoint in the evaluation of the effects of antihypertensive therapy; however, there are presently no data available about the prognostic impact of the regression of vascular structural alterations in hypertension and diabetes.

  14. A Comparative Study on Skin and Plasma Advanced Glycation End Products and Their Associations with Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang-Yuan; Huang, Qi-Fang; Cheng, Yi-Bang; Guo, Qian-Hui; Chen, Qi; Li, Yan; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2017-01-01

    Background We compared skin and plasma measurements of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), with particular focus on their levels in the presence of hypertension or diabetes and prediabetes and their associations with arterial stiffness in outpatients with suspected or diagnosed hypertension. Methods Skin AGE accumulation was measured as autofluorescence on the left forearm using the skin autofluorescence Reader and expressed in arbitrary units in the range from 0 to 25. Plasma AGE concentration was measured by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method and logarithmically transformed for statistical analysis. Arterial stiffness was assessed by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) using the SphygmoCor system (Sydney, Australia). Results The 218 participants (96 [44.0%] men, mean age 51.9 years) had a mean skin autofluorescence of 1.89 arbitrary units, plasma AGE concentration of 4.47 μg/ml, and cfPWV of 8.0 m/s. Skin autofluorescence was significantly correlated with plasma AGEs in diabetic or prediabetic patients (n = 31, r = 0.37, p = 0.04) but not in subjects with normoglycemia (n = 187, r = −0.05, p = 0.48). Nonetheless, both measurements were significantly (p ≤ 0.001) higher in men (2.00 arbitrary units and 6.73 μg/ml, respectively) than women (1.81 arbitrary units and 3.60 μg/ml, respectively) and in diabetic or prediabetic (2.03 arbitrary units and 6.61 μg/ml, respectively) than normoglycemia subjects (1.87 arbitrary units and 4.17 μg/ml, respectively), but similar in hypertensive (n = 105) and normotensive subjects (n = 113, p ≥ 0.35). In adjusted multiple regression analyses, plasma AGE concentration, but not skin autofluorescence (p ≥ 0.37), was significantly associated with cfPWV in all subjects (β 0.44 m/s for each 10-fold increase; p = 0.04) and in subgroups of men and diabetes and prediabetes (β 0.12-0.55 m/s for each 10-fold increase; p ≤ 0.02). Conclusions Although skin and plasma AGEs were similarly associated with

  15. [Arterial hypertension and alcoholism among workers in an oil refinery].

    PubMed

    Lima, C T; Carvalho, F M; Quadros, C de A; Gonçalves, H R; Silva Júnior, J A; Peres, M F; Bonfim, M S

    1999-09-01

    The role of alcohol ingestion in the incidence of arterial hypertension has not been completely established. In addition, there are few studies addressing this point in relation to populations of workers. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between alcoholism and arterial hypertension among workers in an oil refinery in Mataripe, Bahia, Brazil, from 1986 to 1993. We designed a retrospective cohort study with a 7-year follow-up in a stratified systematic sample of 335 workers from the refinery. Arterial hypertension was diagnosed based on blood pressure measurements done during routine medical examinations. At the beginning of follow-up, three groups were defined using the CAGE test of alcohol dependency: nondrinkers (n = 121), CAGE-negative workers (n = 116), and CAGE-positive workers (n = 98). In comparison with the CAGE-negative group, the CAGE-positive group had both greater relative risk and greater attributable risk for developing arterial hypertension (RR = 2.58; AR = 24.95 per 1,000 person-years). The CAGE-positive group also had greater risks compared to nondrinkers (RR = 2.06; AR = 20.97 per 1,000 person-years). The attributable fractions for the same two comparisons of groups were 61% and 51%, respectively. Rate standardization by age or smoking habit did not substantially change the results. Alcoholism is an important risk factor for arterial hypertension.

  16. Association between arterial stiffness and peritoneal small solute transport rate.

    PubMed

    Zhe, Xing-wei; Tian, Xin-kui; Chen, Wei; Guo, Li-juan; Gu, Yue; Chen, Hui-min; Tang, Li-jun; Wang, Tao

    2008-05-01

    While cardiovascular disease accounts for 40-50% of the mortality in dialysis patients, and while a high peritoneal transport in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) is an independent predictor of outcome, it is unclear if there are any links. Aortic stiffness has become established as a cardiovascular risk factor. We thus studied pulse wave velocity (PWV) in CAPD patients to explore the possible link between peritoneal small solute transport and aortic stiffness. CAPD patients (n = 76, 27 M/49 F) in our center were included in the present study. Aortic stiffness was assessed by brachial pulse pressure (PP) and carotid-femoral PWV. Patients' peritoneal small solute transport rate was assessed by D/P(cr) at 4 h. Extracellular water over total body water (E/T ratio) was assessed by means of bioimpedance analysis. C-reactive protein was also measured. Carotid-femoral PWV was positively associated with patients' age (r = 0.555; P < 0.01), time on peritoneal dialysis (r = 0.332; P < 0.01), diabetic status (r = 0.319; P < 0.01), D/P(cr) (r = 0.241; P < 0.05), PP (r = 0.475; P < 0.01), and E/T (r = 0.606; P < 0.01). In a multivariate regression analysis, carotid-femoral PWV was independently determined by E/T (P < 0.01), PP (P < 0.01), age (P < 0.01), and D/P(cr) (P < 0.05). D/P(cr), in addition to E/T, age, and PP, was an independent predictor of elevated carotid-femoral PWV in CAPD patients, suggesting that there might be a link between high aortic stiffness and increased peritoneal small solute transport rate.

  17. Relationship between sleep duration and arterial stiffness in a multi-ethnic population: The HELIUS study

    PubMed Central

    Anujuo, Kenneth; Stronks, Karien; Snijder, Marieke B.; Jean-Louis, Girardin; van den Born, Bert-Jan; Peters, Ron J.; Agyemang, Charles

    2017-01-01

    We examined the relationship between sleep duration and arterial stiffness among a multi-ethnic cohort, and whether the associations differed among ethnic minority groups in the Netherlands. Data were derived from 10 994 participants (aged 18–71 years) of the Healthy Life in an Urban Setting (HELIUS) study. Self-reported sleep duration was categorized into: short (<7 h/night), healthy (7–8 h/night) and long (≥9 h/night). Arterial stiffness was assessed by duplicate pulse-wave velocity (PWV in m/s) measurements using the Arteriograph system. The association of sleep duration with PWV was analysed using linear regression (β) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Results showed that neither short nor long sleep was related to PWV in all ethnic groups, except for long sleep in Dutch men which was associated with higher PWV (indicating stiffer arteries) after adjustment for potential confounders (β = 0.67, 95%CI, 0.23–1.11). Our study showed no convincing evidence that sleep duration was related to arterial stiffness among various ethnic groups. The link between sleep duration and cardiovascular outcomes does not seem to operate through arterial stiffness. Further research is needed to consolidate these findings. PMID:27058653

  18. Serum lipoprotein (a) levels in patients with arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Serban, Corina; Nicola, T; Mateescu, Rodica; Noveanu, Lavinia; Susan, Lelia; Pacurari, Alina; Caraba, A; Romoşan, I; Cristescu, A

    2010-01-01

    Lp(a) is capable of deleteriously altering the balance between the procoagulant and anticoagulant, proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory, and vasorelaxing and vasoconstricting properties of the endothelium. The purpose of this study was to investigate the serum concentration of Lp(a) and the main parameters of lipid profile in three groups of subjects: a control group that included 16 healthy subjects, 20 patients with arterial hypertension and dyslipidemia and 20 patients with arterial hypertension without dyslipidemia. Using B-mode ultrasonography, we evaluated carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and flow mediated vasodilation (FMD) on brachial artery. We found significant higher Lp(a) concentrations in hypertensive patients with dislipidemia (70 +/- 55.95 mg/dL, p < 0.001) and in hypertensive patients without dislipidemia (69 +/- 52.33 mg/dL, p < 0.001), comparative with the control group (19 +/- 14.64 mg/dL). In hypertensive patients with dislipidemia we found a strong negative correlation between Lp(a) and carotid IMT (R2 = -0.75, p < 0.001) and a moderate negative correlation between Lp(a) and FMD (R2 = -0.38, p < 0.001). Lp(a) level wasn't correlated with the main parameters of lipid profile. These results indicated that serum Lp(a) values could play an important role in essential hypertension pathogenesis and could be considered as an individual risk factor in hypertensive patients.

  19. Relations of Arterial Stiffness With Postural Change in Mean Arterial Pressure in Middle-Aged Adults: The Framingham Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Torjesen, Alyssa; Cooper, Leroy L; Rong, Jian; Larson, Martin G; Hamburg, Naomi M; Levy, Daniel; Benjamin, Emelia J; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Mitchell, Gary F

    2017-04-01

    Impaired regulation of blood pressure on standing can lead to adverse outcomes, including falls, syncope, and disorientation. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) typically increases on standing; however, an insufficient increase or a decline in MAP on standing may result in decreased cerebral perfusion. Orthostatic hypotension has been reported in older people with increased arterial stiffness, whereas the association between orthostatic change in MAP and arterial stiffness in young- to middle-aged individuals has not been examined. We analyzed orthostatic blood pressure response and comprehensive hemodynamic data in 3205 participants (1693 [53%] women) in the Framingham Heart Study Third Generation cohort. Participants were predominantly middle aged (mean age: 46±9 years). Arterial stiffness was assessed using carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, forward pressure wave amplitude, and characteristic impedance of the aorta. Adjusting for standard cardiovascular disease risk factors, orthostatic change in MAP (6.9±7.7 mm Hg) was inversely associated with carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (partial correlation, rp=-0.084; P<0.0001), forward wave amplitude (rp=-0.129; P<0.0001), and characteristic impedance (rp=-0.094; P<0.0001). The negative relation between forward wave amplitude and change in MAP on standing was accentuated in women (P=0.002 for sex interaction). Thus, higher aortic stiffness was associated with a blunted orthostatic increase in MAP, even in middle age. The clinical implications of these findings warrant further study. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. WILLIAMS SYNDROME PREDISPOSES TO VASCULAR STIFFNESS MODIFIED BY ANTI-HYPERTENSIVE USE AND COPY NUMBER CHANGES IN NCF1

    PubMed Central

    Kozel, Beth A.; Danback, Joshua; Waxler, Jessica; Knutsen, Russell H.; Fuentes, Lisa de las; Reusz, Gyorgy S.; Kis, Eva; Bhatt, Ami; Pober, Barbara R

    2014-01-01

    Williams syndrome, is caused by the deletion of 26-28 genes, including elastin, on human chromosome 7. Elastin insufficiency leads to the cardiovascular hallmarks of this condition, namely focal stenosis and hypertension. Extrapolation from the Eln+/− mouse suggests that affected persons may also have stiff vasculature, a risk factor for stroke, myocardial infarction and cardiac death. NCF1, one of the variably deleted Williams genes, is a component of the NAD(P)H oxidase complex and is involved in the generation of oxidative stress, making it an interesting candidate modifier for vascular stiffness. Using a case-control design, vascular stiffness was evaluated by pulse wave velocity in 77 Williams cases and matched controls. Cases had stiffer conducting vessels than controls (p<0.001), with increased stiffness observed in even the youngest Williams children. Pulse wave velocity increased with age at comparable rates in cases and controls and, although the degree of vascular stiffness varied, it was seen in both hypertensive and normotensive Williams participants. Use of anti-hypertension medication and extension of the Williams deletion to include NCF1 were associated with protection from vascular stiffness. These findings demonstrate that vascular stiffness is a primary vascular phenotype in Williams syndrome and that treatment with anti-hypertensives and/or agents inhibiting oxidative stress may be important in managing patients with this condition, potentially even those who are not overtly hypertensive. PMID:24126171

  1. Vascular stiffness determined from a nocturnal digital pulse wave signal: association with sleep, sleep-disordered breathing, and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Svedmyr, Sven; Zou, Ding; Sommermeyer, Dirk; Ficker, Joachim H; Randerath, Winfried; Fietze, Ingo; Sanner, Bernd; Hedner, Jan; Grote, Ludger

    2016-12-01

    Reflection of the finger pulse wave form is a valid measure of arterial stiffness, which may be continuously assessed during sleep. We investigated the relationships between sleep, sleep-disordered breathing, hypertension, and pulse propagation time (PPT) in patients with suspected sleep apnea. The digital photoplethysmographic signal derived from finger pulse oximetry was recorded during overnight sleep studies in 440 patients (64% men, age 55 ± 12 years, BMI 30 ± 6 kg/m, apnea-hypopnea index 19 ± 19 n/h). PPT, defined as the time interval between the systolic and diastolic peak of the finger pulse wave, was calculated. The influence of sleep stages on PPT were assessed in patients undergoing polysomnography. Generalized linear models were used to study predictors of PPT and hypertension. Mean overnight PPT was independently associated with age (β = -1.34, P < 0.001), height (β = 0.47, P = 0.047), history of smoking (β = -9.44, P = 0.005), and apnea-hypopnea index (β = -0.18, P = 0.043). PPT was shorter in hypertensive patients compared with normotensive patients (160 ± 33 vs. 177 ± 47 ms, P < 0.001) and independently associated with a diagnosis of hypertension (P = 0.043). PPT was influenced by sleep stage (highest PPT during slow wave sleep compared with wake and all other sleep stages, all P < 0.001) and varied across sleep apnea severity groups in normotensive but not in hypertensive patients (P = 0.028 and 0.64, respectively). Overnight PPT by oximetry was strongly associated with factors known to determine daytime vascular stiffness. In addition, PTT provides information on functional and structural vascular properties during sleep. This novel technique offers new opportunities to noninvasively monitor vascular function during the sleeping period.

  2. Pulmonary hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension; Sporadic primary pulmonary hypertension; Familial primary pulmonary hypertension; Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension; Primary pulmonary hypertension; PPH; Secondary pulmonary ...

  3. Serotonin 2B Receptor Antagonism Prevents Heritable Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Schroer, Alison K.; Chen, Peter; Ryzhova, Larisa M.; Gladson, Santhi; Shay, Sheila; Hutcheson, Joshua D.; Merryman, W. David

    2016-01-01

    Serotonergic anorexigens are the primary pharmacologic risk factor associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), and the resulting PAH is clinically indistinguishable from the heritable form of disease, associated with BMPR2 mutations. Both BMPR2 mutation and agonists to the serotonin receptor HTR2B have been shown to cause activation of SRC tyrosine kinase; conversely, antagonists to HTR2B inhibit SRC trafficking and downstream function. To test the hypothesis that a HTR2B antagonist can prevent BMRP2 mutation induced PAH by restricting aberrant SRC trafficking and downstream activity, we exposed BMPR2 mutant mice, which spontaneously develop PAH, to a HTR2B antagonist, SB204741, to block the SRC activation caused by BMPR2 mutation. SB204741 prevented the development of PAH in BMPR2 mutant mice, reduced recruitment of inflammatory cells to their lungs, and reduced muscularization of their blood vessels. By atomic force microscopy, we determined that BMPR2 mutant mice normally had a doubling of vessel stiffness, which was substantially normalized by HTR2B inhibition. SB204741 reduced SRC phosphorylation and downstream activity in BMPR2 mutant mice. Gene expression arrays indicate that the primary changes were in cytoskeletal and muscle contractility genes. These results were confirmed by gel contraction assays showing that HTR2B inhibition nearly normalizes the 400% increase in gel contraction normally seen in BMPR2 mutant smooth muscle cells. Heritable PAH results from increased SRC activation, cellular contraction, and vascular resistance, but antagonism of HTR2B prevents SRC phosphorylation, downstream activity, and PAH in BMPR2 mutant mice. PMID:26863209

  4. Norepinephrine release in arteries of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Zsoter, T.T.; Wolchinsky, C.; Lawrin, M.; Sirko, S.

    1982-01-01

    The role of the sympathetic nervous system in arterial hypertension cannot be properly evaluated until it is known about the activity in the vessels themselves. In this study researchers investigated the effect of transmural stimulation on the tail artery - labelled in vitro with /sup 3/H-norepinephrine - of 7-9 week old spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and Wistar Kyoto controls (WKR). Electrical stimulation using two frequencies (2 and 10 Hz) resulted in significantly more /sup 3/H overflow in vessels from SHR than from WKR. With 10 Hz stimulation the fractional release was also greater. Column chromatographic analysis of /sup 3/H overflow revealed that transmural stimulation in arteries of SHR enhanced mainly the release of norepinephrine and not of its metabolites. Significantly, an increased release of /sup 3/H-norepinephrine on stimulation was observed in SHR before the full development of hypertension suggesting that it might be a cause rather than a consequence of high blood pressure.

  5. Therapy for Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Associated with Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mathai, Stephen C.; Hassoun, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review Systemic sclerosis is commonly complicated by pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH-SSc) and is a leading cause of death in this population. We will review existing challenges and recent advances in the treatment of this disease. Recent findings Traditionally employed outcome measures in pulmonary arterial hypertension research may not be applicable in PAH-SSc. Importantly, new therapies that target abnormal cellular proliferation in the pulmonary vasculature are currently under investigation and may be particularly relevant to PAH-SSc. Summary Pulmonary arterial hypertension complicating systemic sclerosis occurs commonly and portends a poor prognosis. However, recent advances in our understanding of the disease in the context of systemic sclerosis may lead to novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies that will ultimately improve quality of life and survival in this population. PMID:19667994

  6. Effect of acute and long-term aerobic exercise on arterial stiffness in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Tabara, Yasuharu; Yuasa, Toshiaki; Oshiumi, Akira; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Miyawaki, Yoshinori; Miki, Tetsuro; Kohara, Katsuhiko

    2007-10-01

    Arterial stiffness is an important factor for cardiovascular performance and a predictor of cardiovascular risk. We evaluated the effects of both acute and long-term aerobic exercise on arterial stiffness in community-dwelling healthy elderly subjects. In addition, we evaluated the relationship between the effects of long-term exercise and those of acute exercise. The study subjects were participants in the Shimanami Health Promoting Program study (J-SHIPP), which was designed to investigate factors relating to cardiovascular disease, dementia, and death (67+/-6 years). They performed mild-to-moderate aerobic exercise lasting for 30 min twice a week for 6 months. Arterial stiffness was assessed before and after the first 30-min acute exercise (n=99) and long-term 6-month aerobic training (n=40). The radial arterial augmentation index (AI) obtained from the radial pulse waveform by the tonometry method was used as a parameter of arterial stiffness. Both systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were significantly decreased after 30-min of aerobic exercise, however no significant change in AI was observed. On the other hand, there were significant decreases in AI (from 87 to 84%, p<0.01), SBP (from 136 to 129 mmHg, p<0.01), and DBP (from 75 to 70 mmHg, p<0.01) after the 6-month exercise period. Long-term exercise-induced changes in AI were significantly and inversely correlated with the pre-exercise AI (r=-0.40, p<0.01). In addition, AI changes after the 6-month exercise period were significantly related to those observed after first 30-min exercise (r=0.48, p<0.01). These findings indicate that apparently healthy and sedentary elderly subjects with higher AI may benefit from mild-to-moderate aerobic exercise to improve arterial stiffness.

  7. The interleukin-6 –174 G/C promoter polymorphism and arterial stiffness; the Rotterdam Study

    PubMed Central

    Sie, Mark PS; Mattace-Raso, Francesco US; Uitterlinden, André G; Arp, Pascal P; Hofman, Albert; Pols, Huibert AP; Hoeks, Arnold PG; Reneman, Robert S; Asmar, Roland; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Witteman, Jacqueline CM

    2008-01-01

    Arterial stiffness normally increases with age and has been established as a precursor of cardiovascular disease. Interleukin-6 is a pleiotropic inflammatory cytokine with an important role in the inflammatory cascade, such as up-regulation of C-reactive protein (CRP). The interleukin-6 –174-G/C promoter polymorphism appears to influence levels of inflammatory markers, which have been shown to be associated with arterial stiffness. We studied the association of this polymorphism with levels of interleukin-6 and CRP and with arterial stiffness. The study (n = 3849) was embedded in the Rotterdam Study, a prospective, population-based study. Analyses on the association between the –174-G/C polymorphism and pulse wave velocity, distensibility coefficient, and pulse pressure were performed using analyses of variance. Analyses on the levels of inflammatory markers and arterial stiffness were performed using linear regression analyses. Analyses were adjusted for age, sex, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, known cardiovascular risk factors, and atherosclerosis. We found pulse wave velocity to be 0.35 m/s higher for CC-homozygotes vs. wildtype GG-homozygotes (p = 0.018) with evidence for an allele-dose effect (p trend = 0.013), and a similar pattern for pulse pressure (p trend = 0.041). No apparent consistent association with the distensibility coefficient was found. CRP levels were associated with pulse wave velocity (p = 0.007). In conclusion, the interleukin-6 –174 G/C polymorphism is associated with increased arterial stiffness and pulse pressure. PMID:19066003

  8. Arterial stiffness measurements with acoustic radiation force impulse imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trahey, Gregg E.; Dahl, Jeremy J.; McAleavey, Stephen A.; Gallippi, Caterina M.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.

    2003-05-01

    We have developed a new method of imaging the mechanical properties of tissues based on very brief (<1msec) and localized applications of acoustic radiation force and the ultrasonic measurement of local tissues' responses to that force. Initial results with this technique demonstrate its ability to image mechanical properties of the medial and adventitial layers within ex vivo and in vivo arteries, and to distinguish hard and soft atherosclerotic plaques from normal vessel wall. We have labeled this method Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging. We describe studies to utilize this technique in the characterization of diffuse and focal atherosclerosis. We describe phantom trials and finite element simulations which explore the fundamental resolution and contrast achievable with this method. We describe in vivo and ex vivo trials in the popliteal, femoral and brachial arteries to assess the relationship between the mechanical properties of healthy and diseased arteries provided by this method and those obtained by alternative methods.

  9. Pulse wave velocity measurement as a marker of arterial stiffness in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lurz, Eberhard; Aeschbacher, Eliane; Carman, Nicholas; Schibli, Susanne; Sokollik, Christiane; Simonetti, Giacomo D

    2017-07-01

    In adults with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the incidence of cardiovascular events is increased, leading to long-term morbidity. Arterial stiffness (AS) measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a validated early precursor of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and measurement of PWV was shown to be a feasible test in children. The aim of this study was to assess AS in children with IBD. In this prospective study, we determined PWV between the carotid and femoral artery (PWVcf) in 25 children and adolescents with IBD (11 females, median age 14.1 years, median disease duration 2.8 years). The majority (68%) of the subjects were in clinical remission, and 48% received anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) treatment. AS was not increased in this cohort of children and adolescents with IBD, who did not have signs of cardiovascular disease, such as arterial hypertension. PWV seems to be normal in children with IBD in remission or with mild disease activity. Larger studies should assess its potential role as a valid and non-invasive follow-up marker in children with IBD, to avoid cardiovascular complications. What is Known : • Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a risk factor of cardiovascular disease (CVD). • Pulse wave velocity (PWV) measurement is the current gold standard to assess arterial stiffness (AS), which is an early predictor of CVD. What is New: • This is the first study using PWV measurements to determine AS in children with IBD. • In children with IBD in remission or only mild disease activity AS is not increased.

  10. Visit-to-visit blood pressure variability, average BP level and carotid arterial stiffness in the elderly: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Nagai, M; Dote, K; Kato, M; Sasaki, S; Oda, N; Kagawa, E; Nakano, Y; Yamane, A; Kubo, Y; Higashihara, T; Miyauchi, S; Harada, W; Masuda, H

    2016-10-20

    In a cross-sectional study, visit-to-visit blood pressure (BP) variability was shown to be associated with artery remodelling. Here, we investigated the impact of visit-to-visit BP variability and average BP on the carotid artery remodelling progression in high-risk elderly according to different classes of antihypertension medication use/non-use. BP measurements and carotid ultrasound were performed in the common carotid artery in 164 subjects (mean age 79.7 years at baseline, 74.7% females) with one or more cardiovascular risk factors. Based on 12 visits (1 × /month for 1 year), we calculated visit-to-visit BP variability expressed as the standard deviation (s.d.), coefficient of variation (CV), maximum BP, minimum BP and delta (maximum-minimum) BP. We measured mean intima-media thickness (IMT) as well as stiffness parameter β were measured at baseline and at the mean 4.2-year follow-up. In a multiple regression analysis, the maximum, minimum, s.d. and average of systolic BP (SBP) were significantly associated with a change in β-values between the baseline and follow-up after adjustment for age, smoking, lower high-density lipoprotein level, baseline β-value and follow-up period. There were no significant associations between the visit-to-visit BP variability measures and the change in mean IMT. Significant associations of maximum, minimum, s.d. and average SBP were found with increased β-values in the subjects without calcium channel blocker (CCB) use and in the subjects using renin-angiotensin system inhibitors (RASIs). Thus, exaggerated visit-to-visit SBP variability and a high average SBP level were significant predictors of progression in carotid arterial stiffness in high-risk elderly without CCBs use and in those using a RASI.Journal of Human Hypertension advance online publication, 20 October 2016; doi:10.1038/jhh.2016.77.

  11. Relations of Arterial Stiffness and Brachial Flow-Mediated Dilation With New-Onset Atrial Fibrillation: The Framingham Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Amir Y; Wang, Na; Yin, Xiaoyan; Larson, Martin G; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Hamburg, Naomi M; Magnani, Jared W; Ellinor, Patrick T; Lubitz, Steven A; Mitchell, Gary F; Benjamin, Emelia J; McManus, David D

    2016-09-01

    The relations of measures of arterial stiffness, pulsatile hemodynamic load, and endothelial dysfunction to atrial fibrillation (AF) remain poorly understood. To better understand the pathophysiology of AF, we examined associations between noninvasive measures of vascular function and new-onset AF. The study sample included participants aged ≥45 years from the Framingham Heart Study offspring and third-generation cohorts. Using Cox proportional hazards regression models, we examined relations between incident AF and tonometry measures of arterial stiffness (carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity), wave reflection (augmentation index), pressure pulsatility (central pulse pressure), endothelial function (flow-mediated dilation), resting brachial arterial diameter, and hyperemic flow. AF developed in 407/5797 participants in the tonometry sample and 270/3921 participants in the endothelial function sample during follow-up (median 7.1 years, maximum 10 years). Higher augmentation index (hazard ratio, 1.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.32; P=0.02), baseline brachial artery diameter (hazard ratio, 1.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.43; P=0.04), and lower flow-mediated dilation (hazard ratio, 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.63-0.99; P=0.04) were associated with increased risk of incident AF. Central pulse pressure, when adjusted for age, sex, and hypertension (hazard ratio, 1.14; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.28; P=0.02) was associated with incident AF. Higher pulsatile load assessed by central pulse pressure and greater apparent wave reflection measured by augmentation index were associated with increased risk of incident AF. Vascular endothelial dysfunction may precede development of AF. These measures may be additional risk factors or markers of subclinical cardiovascular disease associated with increased risk of incident AF. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Developments in pulmonary arterial hypertension-targeted therapy for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hadinnapola, Charaka; Pepke-Zaba, Joanna

    2015-10-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a rare disease characterised by the presence of organised chronic thromboembolic material occluding the proximal pulmonary arteries and a vasculopathy in the distal pulmonary arterial tree. Pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) is a potential cure for many patients with CTEPH. However, PEA is not suitable for patients with a significant distal distribution of chronic thromboembolic material or with significant comorbidities. Also, a proportion of patients are left with residual CTEPH post PEA. Until recently, pulmonary arterial hypertension-targeted therapies have been used off licence to treat patients with inoperable or residual CTEPH. The CHEST1 study investigated the use of riociguat and was the first randomised controlled trial to show efficacy in inoperable or residual CTEPH. In this review, we explore the pathophysiology of CTEPH and review the current trial evidence for pulmonary arterial hypertension-targeted therapies. We also include a discussion of physiological considerations that require further investigation.

  13. Optical imaging of resting-state functional connectivity in a novel arterial stiffness model.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Edgar; Sadekova, Nataliya; Girouard, Hélène; Lesage, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to assess the impact of unilateral increases in carotid stiffness on cortical functional connectivity measures in the resting state. Using a novel animal model of induced arterial stiffness combined with optical intrinsic signals and laser speckle imaging, resting state functional networks derived from hemodynamic signals are investigated for their modulation by isolated changes in stiffness of the right common carotid artery. By means of seed-based analysis, results showed a decreasing trend of homologous correlation in the motor and cingulate cortices. Furthermore, a graph analysis indicated a randomization of the cortex functional networks, suggesting a loss of connectivity, more specifically in the motor cortex lateral to the treated carotid, which however did not translate in differentiated metabolic activity.

  14. Inhaled iloprost for therapy in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ewert, Ralf; Gläser, Sven; Bollmann, Tom; Schäper, Christoph

    2011-04-01

    Iloprost (Ventavis, Bayer Schering Pharma, Germany) is a synthetic prostacyclin that is used in its inhalative form for the therapy of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Long-term therapy can increase exercise capacity and quality of life. The use of modern nebulizers especially designed for the administration of iloprost guarantees the pulmonary deposition of the required doses and systematically minimizes side effects. Regarding existing data, inhalative iloprost acts in effective and safe combination with other classes of medication; indeed, such combination therapy is frequently necessary in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

  15. End points and clinical trial design in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Vallerie V; Badesch, David B; Delcroix, Marion; Fleming, Thomas R; Gaine, Sean P; Galiè, Nazzareno; Gibbs, J Simon R; Kim, Nick H; Oudiz, Ronald J; Peacock, Andrew; Provencher, Steeve; Sitbon, Olivier; Tapson, Victor F; Seeger, Werner

    2009-06-30

    New and emerging therapies might provide benefit in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Their efficacy and safety will be compared with existing combination therapies in randomized clinical trials. Appropriate end points for these trials need to be identified: these will include exercise testing, the composite end point of time to clinical worsening, and hemodynamic markers, including advanced imaging modalities and biomarkers. Quality-of-life questionnaires are useful and important secondary end points; pulmonary arterial hypertension-specific questionnaires are currently being developed. Advantages and disadvantages of various trial designs, including placebo-controlled monotherapy or add-on trials, noninferiority studies, and withdrawal trials are also discussed.

  16. Surrogate and combined end points in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ventetuolo, Corey E; Benza, Raymond L; Peacock, Andrew J; Zamanian, Roham T; Badesch, David B; Kawut, Steven M

    2008-07-15

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a rare and often devastating disease, although various effective therapies are now available. Clinical trials have used hemodynamic, cardiac imaging, laboratory, and exercise measurements as surrogate and intermediate end points in pulmonary arterial hypertension. Yet, based on the current literature, it is difficult to surmise which of these (if any) have been definitively validated. In addition, investigators have advocated the use of combined clinical end points in future clinical trials. The dependence of clinical trials and clinical management on such end points warrants a review of their use.

  17. Is arterial stiffness predicted by continuous metabolic syndrome score in obese children?

    PubMed

    Prochotska, Katarina; Kovacs, Laszlo; Vitariusova, Eva; Feber, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the article was to evaluate arterial stiffness, an early marker of increased cardiovascular risk, in relation to obesity. The continuous metabolic syndrome (cMetS) score was calculated as sum of Z score of mean arterial pressure, body mass index, serum glucose, triglyceride, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in 144 obese patients and 66 nonobese controls. Ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) was calculated as 1 minus regression slope of diastolic on systolic blood pressure from ambulatory blood pressure measurements. The mean AASI increased progressively with severity of obesity. The receiver operator curve analysis of body mass index and AASI showed area under the curve of 0.64 ± 0.06; cMetS area under the curve was 0.72 ± 0.05 suggesting a better predictive power of the cMetS for an increased AASI (>0.3). Patients with obesity have significantly higher arterial stiffness. A composite score such as cMetS seems to be better predictor of an increased stiffness than individual risk factors.

  18. Moderate and heavy metabolic stress interval training improve arterial stiffness and heart rate dynamics in humans.

    PubMed

    Rakobowchuk, Mark; Harris, Emma; Taylor, Annabelle; Cubbon, Richard M; Birch, Karen M

    2013-04-01

    Traditional continuous aerobic exercise training attenuates age-related increases of arterial stiffness, however, training studies have not determined whether metabolic stress impacts these favourable effects. Twenty untrained healthy participants (n = 11 heavy metabolic stress interval training, n = 9 moderate metabolic stress interval training) completed 6 weeks of moderate or heavy intensity interval training matched for total work and exercise duration. Carotid artery stiffness, blood pressure contour analysis, and linear and non-linear heart rate variability were assessed before and following training. Overall, carotid arterial stiffness was reduced (p < 0.01), but metabolic stress-specific alterations were not apparent. There was a trend for increased absolute high-frequency (HF) power (p = 0.10) whereas both absolute low-frequency (LF) power (p = 0.05) and overall power (p = 0.02) were increased to a similar degree following both training programmes. Non-linear heart rate dynamics such as detrended fluctuation analysis [Formula: see text] also improved (p > 0.05). This study demonstrates the effectiveness of interval training at improving arterial stiffness and autonomic function, however, the metabolic stress was not a mediator of this effect. In addition, these changes were also independent of improvements in aerobic capacity, which were only induced by training that involved a high metabolic stress.

  19. Long-term pioglitazone therapy improves arterial stiffness in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Harashima, Keiichiro; Hayashi, Junichi; Miwa, Takashi; Tsunoda, Tooru

    2009-06-01

    Pioglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonist, not only improves insulin resistance and glycemic control, but may also have additional beneficial vascular effects in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. We investigated whether pioglitazone had an influence on arterial stiffness, which is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events, in 204 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A prospective, nonrandomized, open-label trial was performed that involved 41 patients treated with pioglitazone, 46 patients receiving sulfonylureas, 67 patients on insulin, and 50 patients on diet/exercise only. The follow-up period was 56 +/- 3 months. Arterial stiffness was evaluated by using the arterial stiffness index (ASI), which was based on analysis of the pulse wave amplitude pattern obtained during automated blood pressure measurement in the upper limb. The 4 groups had a similar baseline ASI, which was greater than the reference range in each group. Although antidiabetic therapies improved hemoglobin A(1c) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, ASI only decreased significantly in the pioglitazone group. Thus, pioglitazone improved abnormal arterial stiffness in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus via a mechanism beyond the metabolic improvement. These findings may have important clinical implications in the use of pioglitazone in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  20. Acute effects of aerobic exercise intensity on arterial stiffness after glucose ingestion in young men.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Ryota; Hashimoto, Yuto; Hatakeyama, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Takanobu

    2016-10-18

    Arterial stiffness increases after glucose ingestion. Acute low- and moderate-intensity aerobic exercise decreases arterial stiffness. However, the acute effects of 30 min of cycling at low- and moderate-intensity [25% (LE trial) and 65% (ME trial) peak oxygen uptake, respectively] on arterial stiffness at 30, 60 and 120 min of a postexercise glucose ingestion. Ten healthy young men (age, 22·4 ± 0·5 years) performed LE and ME trials on separate days in a randomized controlled crossover fashion. Carotid-femoral (aortic) pulse wave velocity (PWV), femoral-ankle (leg) PWV, carotid augmentation index (AIx) and carotid blood pressure (BP) (applanation tonometry), brachial and ankle BP (oscillometric device), heart rate (HR) (electrocardiography), blood glucose (UV-hexokinase method) and blood insulin (CLEIA method) levels were measured at before (baseline) and at 30, 60 and 120 min after the 75-g OGTT. Leg PWV, ankle pulse pressure and BG levels significantly increased from baseline after the 75-g OGTT in the LE trial (P<0·05), but not in the ME trial. Insulin levels and HR significantly increased from baseline after the 75-g OGTT in both trials (P<0·05). Aortic PWV, carotid AIx, brachial BP and carotid BP did not change from baseline after the 75-g OGTT in both trials. The present findings indicate that aerobic exercise at moderate intensity before glucose ingestion suppresses increases leg arterial stiffness after glucose ingestion.

  1. Arterial hypertension in nursing personnel of an emergency hospital.

    PubMed

    Urbanetto, Janete de Souza; Prado Lima Figueiredo, Ana Elizabeth; da Silva Gustavo, Andreia; Bosi de Souza Magnago, Tânia Solange; Pinheiro da Costa, Bartira Ercilia; Poli-de-Figueiredo, Carlos Eduardo

    2015-08-01

    Risk factors related to the workplace environment are being studied to identify positive associations with hypertension disorders. Hypertension is considered as one of the main modifiable risk factors and most important public health issues. The study aims to describe the prevalence of hypertension and associate it with sociodemographic, labour and health aspects, in the health-care nursing staff of an emergency hospital.Cross-sectional study enrolled 606 nursing workers. The data were collected from February to June, and the analysis was conducted in November 2010. Arterial blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) were assessed, and sociodemographic and labour variables were investigated by means of a questionnaire. The data were analysed by descriptive statistics, univariate and multivariate analysis. The prevalence of hypertension was 32% (n = 388), with positive associations with age > 49 years (OR = 2.55 (CI: 1.19 to 5.43)), ethnicity (non-white) (odds ratio (OR) = 2.22, confidence interval (CI) 1.16 to 1.24), BMI (OR = 2.24 (CI: 1.25 to 4.01)) and WHR (OR = 2.65 (CI: 1.95 to 7.763)). Arterial hypertension was frequent in the nursing staff of this emergency hospital. Further studies are needed to better understand the relationship between occupational aspects and arterial hypertension.

  2. Acute Effect of Static Stretching Exercise on Arterial Stiffness in Healthy Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Yamato, Yosuke; Hasegawa, Natsuki; Sato, Koji; Hamaoka, Takafumi; Ogoh, Shigehiko; Iemitsu, Motoyuki

    2016-10-01

    Habitual stretching exercise increases carotid arterial compliance, and acute stretching exercise increases arterial compliance in patients with myocardial infarction. However, it is not known whether this arterial adaptation is sustained after exercise. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of a single bout of stretching exercise on the time course of systemic, central, and peripheral arterial stiffness in healthy young subjects. Twenty-six healthy young men performed static stretching exercise involving the entire body (trunk, upper limb, and lower limb) for 40 mins. Pulse-wave velocity (PWV; an index of arterial stiffness), blood pressure, and heart rate were measured before and 0, 15, 30, and 60 mins after stretching exercise. Femoral-ankle PWV and brachial-ankle PWV were reduced relative to baseline 15 and 30 mins after acute stretching (P < 0.05); however, these arterial responses were not sustained for longer periods, and both PWV values returned to the baseline levels within 60 mins. By contrast, carotid-femoral PWV was unchanged. These results suggest that chronic and sufficient repetition of muscle stretch stimulation may result in chronic high arterial compliance, although a single bout of stretch exercise acutely affects arterial compliance.

  3. Time course and factors predicting arterial stiffness reversal in patients with aldosterone-producing adenoma after adrenalectomy: prospective study of 102 patients

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Che-Wei; Lin, Lian-Yu; Hung, Chi-Sheng; Lin, Yen-Tin; Chang, Yi-Yao; Wang, Shuo-Meng; Wu, Vin-Cent; Wu, Kwan-Dun; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Satoh, Fumitoshi; Lin, Yen-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Primary aldosteronism not only results in hypertension but also stiffer arteries. The time course and factors predicting the reversal of arterial stiffness after treatment are unclear. We prospectively enrolled 102 patients with aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA) from March 2006 to January 2012. We measured the pulse wave velocity (PWV) between brachial-ankle (baPWV) and heart-ankle (haPWV) before, 6 and 12 months after their adrenalectomy. After treatment, the PWV decreased significantly during the first 6 months (both p < 0.001), but no further reduction in the following 6 months. The determinant factors for baseline baPWV were age, duration of hypertension, and baseline systolic blood pressure (SBP) in multivariate linear regression analysis, similar with baseline haPWV (determinants: age, duration of hypertension, baseline SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP)). In multivariate linear regression analysis, the decrease in DBP at 6 months (ΔDBP0-6mo) and baseline baPWV were significantly associated with the decrease in baPWV at 6 months (ΔbaPWV0-6mo). The associated factors of the change in haPWV at 6 months (ΔhaPWV0-6mo) were baseline haPWV, ΔDBP0-6mo and change in log-transformed plasma renin activity. Our result suggested that reversal of arterial stiffness in APA patients occurred early after adrenalectomy and determined by baseline vascular condition, hemodynamic factors, and humoral factors. PMID:26883298

  4. Time course and factors predicting arterial stiffness reversal in patients with aldosterone-producing adenoma after adrenalectomy: prospective study of 102 patients.

    PubMed

    Liao, Che-Wei; Lin, Lian-Yu; Hung, Chi-Sheng; Lin, Yen-Tin; Chang, Yi-Yao; Wang, Shuo-Meng; Wu, Vin-Cent; Wu, Kwan-Dun; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Satoh, Fumitoshi; Lin, Yen-Hung

    2016-02-17

    Primary aldosteronism not only results in hypertension but also stiffer arteries. The time course and factors predicting the reversal of arterial stiffness after treatment are unclear. We prospectively enrolled 102 patients with aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA) from March 2006 to January 2012. We measured the pulse wave velocity (PWV) between brachial-ankle (baPWV) and heart-ankle (haPWV) before, 6 and 12 months after their adrenalectomy. After treatment, the PWV decreased significantly during the first 6 months (both p < 0.001), but no further reduction in the following 6 months. The determinant factors for baseline baPWV were age, duration of hypertension, and baseline systolic blood pressure (SBP) in multivariate linear regression analysis, similar with baseline haPWV (determinants: age, duration of hypertension, baseline SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP)). In multivariate linear regression analysis, the decrease in DBP at 6 months (ΔDBP0-6mo) and baseline baPWV were significantly associated with the decrease in baPWV at 6 months (ΔbaPWV0-6mo). The associated factors of the change in haPWV at 6 months (ΔhaPWV0-6mo) were baseline haPWV, ΔDBP0-6mo and change in log-transformed plasma renin activity. Our result suggested that reversal of arterial stiffness in APA patients occurred early after adrenalectomy and determined by baseline vascular condition, hemodynamic factors, and humoral factors.

  5. Computational modeling of hypertensive growth in the human carotid artery

    PubMed Central

    Sáez, Pablo; Peña, Estefania; Martínez, Miguel Angel; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Arterial hypertension is a chronic medical condition associated with an elevated blood pressure. Chronic arterial hypertension initiates a series of events, which are known to collectively initiate arterial wall thickening. However, the correlation between macrostructural mechanical loading, microstructural cellular changes, and macrostructural adaptation remains unclear. Here, we present a microstructurally motivated computational model for chronic arterial hypertension through smooth muscle cell growth. To model growth, we adopt a classical concept based on the multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into an elastic part and a growth part. Motivated by clinical observations, we assume that the driving force for growth is the stretch sensed by the smooth muscle cells. We embed our model into a finite element framework, where growth is stored locally as an internal variable. First, to demonstrate the features of our model, we investigate the effects of hypertensive growth in a real human carotid artery. Our results agree nicely with experimental data reported in the literature both qualitatively and quantitatively. PMID:25342868

  6. [Impact of an active educational strategy in arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Peredo Rosado, Pedro; Gómez López, Victor Manuel; Sánchez Nuncio, Héctor Rafael; Sánchez Navarrete, Arturo; García Ruiz, Martha Elena

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of an active-participative educational intervention on the average arterial pressure, index of corporal mass and level of knowledge in hypertensive patients. A quasi-experimental open study was carried out. An active-participative educational intervention 4 h daily during a period of 5 days twice monthly for 3 months focused on themes related to arterial hypertension in patients with high blood pressure. No control subjects were included. Subject to acceptance and after informed consent, 48 patients (25-60 years of age) were included with slight and moderate arterial hypertension. Patients with evidence of severe organ damage or with chronic underlying disease were excluded. The impact of the educational intervention was evaluated based on the increase of knowledge, improvement of weight (IMC), and average arterial pressure, taking into consideration 2, 4, and 6 months of the educational strategy. Descriptive statistics were utilized for analyzing results using Student's ttest. The level of knowledge increased 31.30 points in the population studied and there was a decrease of the IMC of 2.75 points after educational intervention (p < 0.05). The decrease in weight, as well as the arterial pressure, showed statistically significant differences with respect to the initial measurements, with a difference of the PAM of 13.69 mm Hg at the conclusion of the study (p < 0.05). An active-participative educational strategy is useful in the control of the PAM and IMC in the hypertensive patient.

  7. Practical considerations for the pharmacotherapy of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Bryan M; Mauro, Vincent F; Khouri, Samer J

    2012-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a devastating disease. Before the 1990s, when pharmacologic treatment was finally approved, only supportive therapy was available, consisting of anticoagulation, digoxin, diuretics, and supplemental oxygen. Calcium channel blocker therapy was also an option, but only a small percentage of patients respond to it. However, starting with epoprostenol in 1996, the number of drugs approved to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension increased. Three distinct classes of drugs were developed based on the pathophysiology of the disease: the prostanoids, endothelin-1 receptor antagonists, and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. The prostanoids are administered either parenterally or by inhalation to replace the lack of prostacyclin within the pulmonary arterial vasculature. The endothelin-1 receptor antagonists were the first class of oral drugs to be developed, but drug interactions and adverse effects are prominent with this class. The phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors increase the second messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate (GMP) that is induced by nitric oxide stimulation. All of the drugs within these three classes are distinct in and of themselves, and their clinical use requires in-depth knowledge of pulmonary arterial hypertension and its pathophysiology. Because these drugs have different mechanisms of action, combination therapy has shown promise in patients with severe disease, although data are still lacking. This article should serve as a practical guide for clinicians who encounter patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension and the drugs used for the treatment of this devastating disease.

  8. Current insights on the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Perros, Frédéric; Dorfmüller, Peter; Humbert, Marc

    2005-08-01

    Regardless of the initial trigger, the elevated pulmonary arterial pressure and vascular resistance in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension are primarily caused by remodeling and thrombosis of small- and medium-sized pulmonary arteries and arterioles, as well as sustained vasoconstriction. The process of pulmonary vascular remodeling involves all layers of the vessel wall and is complicated by cellular heterogeneity within each compartment. Indeed, each cell type (endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts), as well as inflammatory cells and platelets, may play significant roles in this condition. Recent studies have emphasized the relevance of several mediators in this condition, including prostaglandin-I (2) (prostacyclin), nitric oxide, endothelin-1, angiopoietin-1, 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin), cytokines, chemokines, and members of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) superfamily. Targeting some of these dysfunctional pathways (prostacyclin, nitric oxide, and endothelin-1) has been beneficial in subjects displaying pulmonary arterial hypertension.

  9. Continuous inhaled iloprost in a neonate with d-transposition of the great arteries and severe pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dykes, John C; Torres, Marilyn; Alexander, Plato J

    2016-03-01

    This report describes the case of a neonate with d-transposition of the great arteries and severe pulmonary arterial hypertension stabilised in the post-operative period with continuous iloprost nebulisation. To our knowledge, this is the first documented method of treating post-operative severe pulmonary arterial hypertension with continuous inhaled iloprost in a patient with complex CHD. We found this method of delivering the drug very effective in stabilising haemodynamic swings in the setting of severe pulmonary arterial hypertension.

  10. Elevated vertebrobasilar artery resistance in neonatal spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Cates, Matthew J; Steed, Peter W; Abdala, Ana P L; Langton, Philip D; Paton, Julian F R

    2011-07-01

    There is a strong correlation between increased vertebral artery resistance and arterial blood pressure in humans. The reasons for this increased resistance at high systemic pressure remain unknown, but may include raised sympathetic activity. With the recent finding that prehypertensive spontaneously hypertensive (PHSH) rats, which have raised sympathetic nerve activity, but a blood pressure comparable to normotensive rat strains, we hypothesized that its vertebrobasilar vascular resistance would already be raised and, as a consequence, would exhibit a more responsive Cushing response (e.g., brain ischemia evoked sympathoexcitation and a pressor response). We report that PHSH rats exhibited a remodeling of the basilar artery (i.e., increased wall thickness and lower lumen-to-wall thickness ratio) that occurred before the onset of hypertension. In a novel in vitro vascularly isolated, arterially perfused brain stem preparation of PHSH rats of 4-5 wk of age, brain stem vascular resistance was raised by ∼35% relative to age- and sex-matched normotensive rats (P < 0.05). In the in situ arterial perfused working heart-brain stem preparation, occlusion of both vertebral arteries in the PHSH rat resulted in a significantly greater increase in sympathetic activity (57 vs. 20%, PHSH vs. control; P < 0.01) that triggered a greater increase in arterial perfusion pressure (8 vs. 3 mmHg, PHSH vs. control; P < 0.01) compared with normotensive rats. These data indicate raised vertebrobasilar artery resistance before the onset of hypertension in the PHSH rat. With the raised responsiveness of the Cushing response in the PHSH rat, we discuss the possibility of brain stem perfusion as a central nervous system determinant of the set point of vasomotor sympathetic tone in the hypertensive condition.

  11. Elevated vertebrobasilar artery resistance in neonatal spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Cates, Matthew J.; Steed, Peter W.; Abdala, Ana P. L.; Langton, Philip D.

    2011-01-01

    There is a strong correlation between increased vertebral artery resistance and arterial blood pressure in humans. The reasons for this increased resistance at high systemic pressure remain unknown, but may include raised sympathetic activity. With the recent finding that prehypertensive spontaneously hypertensive (PHSH) rats, which have raised sympathetic nerve activity, but a blood pressure comparable to normotensive rat strains, we hypothesized that its vertebrobasilar vascular resistance would already be raised and, as a consequence, would exhibit a more responsive Cushing response (e.g., brain ischemia evoked sympathoexcitation and a pressor response). We report that PHSH rats exhibited a remodeling of the basilar artery (i.e., increased wall thickness and lower lumen-to-wall thickness ratio) that occurred before the onset of hypertension. In a novel in vitro vascularly isolated, arterially perfused brain stem preparation of PHSH rats of 4–5 wk of age, brain stem vascular resistance was raised by ∼35% relative to age- and sex-matched normotensive rats (P < 0.05). In the in situ arterial perfused working heart-brain stem preparation, occlusion of both vertebral arteries in the PHSH rat resulted in a significantly greater increase in sympathetic activity (57 vs. 20%, PHSH vs. control; P < 0.01) that triggered a greater increase in arterial perfusion pressure (8 vs. 3 mmHg, PHSH vs. control; P < 0.01) compared with normotensive rats. These data indicate raised vertebrobasilar artery resistance before the onset of hypertension in the PHSH rat. With the raised responsiveness of the Cushing response in the PHSH rat, we discuss the possibility of brain stem perfusion as a central nervous system determinant of the set point of vasomotor sympathetic tone in the hypertensive condition. PMID:21493719

  12. How to manage hypertension with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis?

    PubMed

    Ricco, Jean-Baptiste; Belmonte, Romain; Illuminati, Guilio; Barral, Xavier; Schneider, Fabrice; Chavent, Bertrand

    2017-04-01

    The management of atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) in patients with hypertension has been the topic of great controversy. Major contemporary clinical trials such as the Cardiovascular Outcomes for Renal Artery lesions (CORAL) and Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Atherosclerotic lesions (ASTRAL) have failed to show significant benefit of revascularization over medical management in controlling blood pressure and preserving renal function. We present here the implications and limitations of these trials and formulate recommendations for management of ARAS.

  13. Physical Activity Correlates with Arterial Stiffness in Community-dwelling Individuals with Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ada; Eng, Janice J.; Brasher, Penelope M.; Madden, Kenneth M.; Mohammadi, Azam; Krassioukov, Andrei V.; Tsang, Teresa S. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Physical inactivity contributes to atherosclerotic processes, which manifest as increased arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness is associated with myocardial demand and coronary perfusion and is a risk factor for stroke and other adverse cardiac outcomes. Poststroke mobility limitations often lead to physical inactivity and sedentary behaviors. This exploratory study aimed to identify functional correlates, reflective of daily physical activity levels, with arterial stiffness in community-dwelling individuals >1 year poststroke. Methods Carotid–femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) was measured in 35 participants (65% men; mean ± SD age 66.9 ± 6.9 years; median time poststroke 3.7 years). Multivariable regression analyses examined the relationships between cfPWV and factors associated with daily physical activity: aerobic capacity (VO2 peak), gait speed, and balance ability (Berg Balance Scale). Age and the use of antihypertensive medications, known to be associated with pulse wave velocity, were also included in the model. Results Mean cfPWV was 11.2 ± 2.4 m/s. VO2 peak and age were correlated with cfPWV (r = −0.45 [P = .006] and r = 0.46 [P = .004], respectively). In the multivariable regression analyses, age and the use of antihypertensive medication accounted for 20.4% of the variance of cfPWV, and the addition of VO2 peak explained an additional 4.5% of the variance (R2 = 0.249). Conclusions We found that arterial stiffness is elevated in community-dwelling, ambulatory individuals with stroke relative to healthy people. Multivariable regression analysis suggests that aerobic capacity (VO2 peak) may contribute to the variance of cfPWV after accounting for the effects of age and medication use. Whether intense risk modification and augmented physical activity will improve arterial stiffness in this population remains to be determined. PMID:23473623

  14. Relationship between glycaemic levels and arterial stiffness in non-diabetic adults.

    PubMed

    Cavero-Redondo, Iván; Martínez-Vizcaíno, Vicente; Álvarez-Bueno, Celia; Recio-Rodríguez, José Ignacio; Gómez-Marcos, Manuel Ángel; García-Ortiz, Luis

    2017-09-15

    To examine, in a non-diabetic population, whether the association between arterial stiffness and glycaemic levels depends on the test used as a glycaemic indicator, fasting plasma glucose (FPG) or glycated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). A cross-sectional analysis of a 220 non-diabetic subsample from the EVIDENT II study in which FPG, HbA1c and arterial stiffness-related parameters (pulse wave velocity, radial and central augmentation index, and central pulse pressure) were determined. Mean differences in arterial stiffness-related parameters by HbA1c and FPG tertiles were tested using analysis of covariance. All means of arterial stiffness-related parameters increased by HbA1c tertiles, although mean differences were only statistically significant in pulse wave velocity (p ≤.001), even after controlling for potential confounders (HbA1c <5.30% = 6.88 m/s; HbA1c 5.30%-5.59% = 7.06 m/s; and HbA1c ≥5.60% = 8.16 m/s, p =.004). Conversely, mean differences in pulse wave velocity by FPG tertiles did not reach statistically significant differences after controlling for potential confounders (FPG 4.44 mmol/l = 7.18 m/s; FPG 4.44 mmol/l-4.87 mmol/l = 7.26 m/s; and FPG ≥4.88 mmol/l = 7.93 m/s, p =.066). Glucose levels in a non-diabetic population were associated with arterial stiffness but better when levels were determined using HbA1c. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. B-vitamin levels and genetics of hyperhomocysteinemia are not associated with arterial stiffness.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, S C; Enneman, A W; van Meurs, J; Swart, K M A; Ham, A H; van Wijngaarden, J P; Brouwer-Brolsma, E M; van der Zwaluw, N L; van Schoor, N M; Dhonukshe-Rutten, R A M; de Groot, L C P G M; Lips, P; Uitterlinden, A G; Blom, H; Geleijnse, J M; Feskens, E; de Jongh, R T; Smulders, Y M; van den Meiracker, A H; Mattace-Raso, F U S; van der Velde, N

    2014-07-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is associated with arterial stiffness, but underlying pathophysiological mechanisms explaining this association are to be revealed. This study was aimed to explore two potential pathways concerning the one-carbon metabolism. A potential causal effect of homocysteine was explored using a genetic risk score reflecting an individual's risk of having a long-term elevated plasma homocysteine level and also associations with B-vitamin levels were investigated. Baseline cross-sectional data of the B-PROOF study were used. In the cardiovascular subgroup (n = 567, 56% male, age 72.6 ± 5.6 yrs) pulse wave velocity (PWV) was determined using applanation tonometry. Plasma concentrations of vitamin B12, folate, methylmalonic acid (MMA) and holo transcobalamin (holoTC) were assessed and the genetic risk score was based on 13 SNPs being associated with elevated plasma homocysteine. Associations were examined using multivariable linear regression analysis. B-vitamin levels were not associated with PWV. The genetic risk score was also not associated with PWV. However, the homocysteine-gene interaction was significant (p < 0.001) in the association of the genetic risk score and PWV. Participants with the lowest genetic risk of having long-term elevated homocysteine levels, but with higher measured homocysteine levels, had the highest PWV levels. Homocysteine is unlikely to be causally related to arterial stiffness, because there was no association with genetic variants causing hyperhomocysteinemia, whereas non-genetically determined hyperhomocysteinemia was associated with arterial stiffness. Moreover, the association between homocysteine and arterial stiffness was not mediated by B-vitamins. Possibly, high plasma homocysteine levels reflect an unidentified factor, that causes increased arterial stiffness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Multicomponent supplement containing Chlorella decreases arterial stiffness in healthy young men

    PubMed Central

    Otsuki, Takeshi; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Iemitsu, Motoyuki; Kono, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Chlorella, a unicellular green alga, contains various antioxidants and other nutrients such as amino acids and fiber. Previous studies have reported that supplementation with multiple antioxidants reduces arterial stiffness, a well-established cardiovascular risk factor. We investigated the effects of Chlorella intake on arterial stiffness using a single-blinded, placebo-controlled crossover study design. Fourteen young men took placebo or Chlorella tablets for four weeks, with a 12-week washout period between trials, in a randomized order. Before and after each trial, blood pressure, heart rate, and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity, an index of arterial stiffness, were measured. Treatment compliance was comparable between the two groups. There were no differences in blood pressure and heart rate before and after supplementation in both the placebo and Chlorella groups. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity decreased after Chlorella intake (before vs after intake; 11.6 ± 0.2 vs 11.1 ± 0.1 m/s, p = 0.01), but not after placebo intake (11.4 ± 0.2 vs 11.4 ± 0.2 m/s, p = 0.98). Multicomponent analysis of the Chlorella-containing tablet detected nutrients that can reduce arterial stiffness, such as antioxidant vitamins, arginine, potassium, calcium, and n-3 unsaturated fatty acids. These results suggest that intake of a Chlorella-containing multicomponent supplement can decrease arterial stiffness. PMID:24249971

  17. Relationship between left ventricular diastolic function and arterial stiffness in asymptomatic patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Roos, Cornelis J; Auger, Dominique; Djaberi, Roxana; de Koning, Eelco J; Rabelink, Ton J; Pereira, Alberto M; Bax, Jeroen J; Delgado, Victoria; Jukema, J Wouter; Scholte, Arthur J

    2013-03-01

    Left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction and increased arterial stiffness are common in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). However, the relation between these two pathophysiological factors remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between LV diastolic function and arterial stiffness as assessed with applanation tonometry. In 142 asymptomatic patients with DM (mean age 48 years, 75 (53 %) men, 72 (51 %) patients with type 2 DM) LV diastolic function was assessed with echocardiography. Arterial stiffness was evaluated measuring the aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) whereas wave reflection was assessed measuring central systolic blood pressure (cSBP), central pulse pressure (cPP), and augmentation index (AIx) with applanation tonometry. Mean E/A ratio, E' and E/E' ratio were 1.1 ± 0.3, 8.1 ± 2.3 and 9.2 ± 3.3 cm/s, respectively. Mean PWV, mean cSBP, median cPP and mean AIx were 7.9 ± 2.4 m/s, 122 ± 17 mmHg, 40 [35-51] mmHg and 17.9 ± 12.1 %, respectively. PWV was independently associated with LV diastolic dysfunction grade (β = 0.76, p = 0.03). In contrast, measures of wave reflection, cPP, cSBP and AIx were independently related with E/A ratio, but not with the LV diastolic dysfunction grade. Parameters of arterial stiffness and wave reflection are associated with echocardiographic indices of LV diastolic function in asymptomatic patients with DM. Therapies that prevent progression of arterial stiffness and reduce late-systolic pressure overload may help to reduce the prevalence of LV diastolic dysfunction in this population.

  18. Arterial stiffness is not associated with bone parameters in an elderly hyperhomocysteinemic population.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, S C; de Jongh, R T; Enneman, A W; Ham, A C; Swart, K M A; van Wijngaarden, J P; van der Zwaluw, N L; Brouwer-Brolsma, E M; van Schoor, N M; Dhonukshe-Rutten, R A M; Lips, P; de Groot, C P G M; Smulders, Y M; Blom, H J; Feskens, E J; Geleijnse, J M; van den Meiracker, A H; Mattace Raso, F U S; Uitterlinden, A G; Zillikens, M C; van der Velde, N

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have observed positive associations between bone disease and cardiovascular disease. A potential common pathway is hyperhomocysteinemia; however, to date, there is a lack of data regarding hyperhomocysteinemic populations. Therefore, we examined both cross-sectionally and longitudinally, whether there is an association between bone parameters and arterial stiffness in a hyperhomocysteinemic population, and investigated the potential common role of homocysteine (hcy) level on these associations. Cross-sectional and longitudinal data of the B-PROOF study were used (n = 519). At both baseline and 2-year follow-up we determined bone measures-incident fractures and history of fractures, bone-mineral density (BMD) and quantitative ultrasound (QUS) measurement. We also measured arterial stiffness parameters at baseline-pulse wave velocity, augmentation index and aortic pulse pressure levels with applanation tonometry. Linear regression analysis was used to examine these associations and we tested for potential interaction of hcy level. The mean age of the study population was 72.3 years and 44.3 % were female. Both cross-sectionally and longitudinally there was no association between arterial stiffness measures and BMD or QUS measurements or with incident fractures (n = 16) within the 2-3 years of follow-up. Hcy level did not modify the associations and adjustment for hcy did not change the results. Arterial stiffness was not associated with bone parameters and fractures, and hcy neither acted as a pleiotropic factor nor as a mediator. The potential association between bone and arterial stiffness is therefore not likely to be driven by hyperhomocysteinemia.

  19. Assessments of endothelial function and arterial stiffness are reproducible in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Miguelez, Paula; Seigler, Nichole; Bass, Leon; Dillard, Thomas A; Harris, Ryan A

    2015-01-01

    Background Elevated cardiovascular disease risk is observed in patients with COPD. Non-invasive assessments of endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness have recently emerged to provide mechanistic insight into cardiovascular disease risk in COPD; however, the reproducibility of endothelial function and arterial stiffness has yet to be investigated in this patient population. Objectives This study sought to examine the within-day and between-day reproducibility of endothelial function and arterial stiffness in patients with COPD. Methods Baseline diameter, peak diameter, flow-mediated dilation, augmentation index, augmentation index at 75 beats per minute, and pulse wave velocity were assessed three times in 17 patients with COPD (six males, eleven females, age range 47–75 years old; forced expiratory volume in 1 second =51.5% predicted). Session A and B were separated by 3 hours (within-day), whereas session C was conducted at least 7 days following session B (between-day). Reproducibility was assessed by: 1) paired t-tests, 2) coefficients of variation, 3) coefficients of variation prime, 4) intra-class correlation coefficient, 5) Pearson’s correlations (r), and 6) Bland–Altman plots. Five acceptable assessments were required to confirm reproducibility. Results Six out of six within-day criteria were met for endothelial function and arterial stiffness outcomes. Six out of six between-day criteria were met for baseline and peak diameter, augmentation index and pulse wave velocity, whereas five out of six criteria were met for flow-mediated dilation. Conclusion The present study provides evidence for within-day and between-day reproducibility of endothelial function and arterial stiffness in patients with COPD. PMID:26396509

  20. Arterial stiffness, central hemodynamics and wave reflection in normal pregnancy and control nonpregnant women.

    PubMed

    Wykrętowicz, Magdalena; Krauze, Tomasz; Guzik, Przemyslaw; Piskorski, Jarosław; Markwitz, Wiesław; Wykrętowicz, Andrzej; Wysocki, Henryk

    2011-11-01

    Pregnancy is accompanied by different physiological adaptations in the cardiovascular system. However, information on central blood pressures, wave reflection, arterial stiffness in uncomplicated pregnancy compared with nonpregnant women is limited. Forty-six women (mean age 28 years) in the third trimester of pregnancy and 45 healthy age- and height-matched controls were evaluated. Arterial stiffness, central hemodynamics and wave reflection was assessed with the use of digital volume pulse analysis and pulse wave analysis. In comparison with nonpregnant participants, pregnant women had significantly lower mean (p=0.04) and central systolic (p=0.02) blood pressure, central pulse pressure (p=0.02), augmentation index (p=0.02) and augmentation pressure (p=0.002), whereas their pulse pressure amplification was significantly higher (p=0.001). Similarly, arterial stiffness index was higher in pregnant women than in healthy nonpregnant controls (p=0.006). This index was correlated significantly with central augmentation index and augmentation pressure (r=0.5, p=0.0005 and r=0.52, p=0.0002, respectively) but only in nonpregnant women. Healthy pregnancy is associated with increased pulse pressure amplification as well as diminished wave reflection, which results in lower central augmentation index and augmentation pressure. Women in the third trimester of pregnancy have slightly higher arterial stiffness in comparison with healthy nonpregnant, age- and height-matched controls. The increased value of measures of arterial stiffness might be secondary to a known physiological increase of cardiac output and the amount of circulating blood. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Estrogen receptor-alpha genotype affects exercise-related reduction of arterial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Koichiro; Maeda, Seiji; Iemitsu, Motoyuki; Otsuki, Takeshi; Sugawara, Jun; Tanabe, Takumi; Miyauchi, Takashi; Kuno, Shinya; Ajisaka, Ryuichi; Matsuda, Mitsuo

    2008-02-01

    Arterial stiffness, an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, increases with advancing age. Arterial stiffness is improved by regular exercise, but individual responses to exercise training are variable. Given that estrogen and estrogen receptor-alpha (ER-alpha) can induce vasodilation and can exert an antiatherosclerotic effect in vessels, we hypothesized that gene polymorphisms of ER-alpha might influence the ability of regular exercise to improve arterial stiffness in postmenopausal women. One hundred ninety-five healthy postmenopausal women (62 +/- 6 yr, mean +/- SD) participated in our cross-sectional study. We determined the genotype of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) at -401T/C of intron 1 of the ER-alpha gene. Arterial stiffness was measured by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), and daily physical activity was estimated by a uniaxial accelerometer. Subjects were divided into active and inactive groups according to the median value (200 kcal.d(-1)) of energy expenditure. baPWV in individuals with the TT variant of -401T/C genotype were significantly higher than for individuals with the TC+CC genotype. No significant differences in mean baPWV values were found between the active group and the inactive group (P = 0.09). A significant reduction of baPWV secondary to increased daily physical activity was observed in individuals with the TC+CC genotype but not in individuals with the TT genotype (TT/active: 1470 +/- 36 cm.s(-1); TT/inactive: 1457 +/- 34 cm.s(-1); TC+CC/active: 1359 +/- 21 cm.s(-1); TC+CC/inactive: 1433 +/- 24 cm.s(-1)). These results suggest that ER-alpha polymorphism affects the regular exercise-related reduction in arterial stiffness in healthy postmenopausal women.

  2. High glomerular filtration rate is associated with arterial stiffness in Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Peng, Kui; Du, Rui; Huang, Xiaolin; Sun, Wanwan; Ding, Lin; Wang, Po; Huang, Ya; Xu, Yu; Xu, Min; Chen, Yuhong; Bi, Yufang; Wang, Weiqing; Lu, Jieli

    2017-02-01

    Decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR) has been suspected as a risk factor for arterial stiffness. Whether high GFR is the risk factor of arterial stiffness and cardiovascular disease remains uncertain. We aim to evaluate the association between high estimated GFR (eGFR) and arterial stiffness in Chinese adults. We performed a cross-sectional study involving 9136 Chinese adults without chronic kidney disease. Arterial stiffness was measured by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and pulse pressure (PP). We divided participants into four groups according to age-specific quartiles of eGFR. Renal hyperfiltration (RHF) was defined with the highest age-specific quartile of eGFR. The odds ratios (ORs) of elevated baPWV and PP were estimated using multivariate logistic regression models and were further tested using propensity score matching analysis between participants with or without RHF. RHF was associated with 11 and 32% higher risk of elevated baPWV and PP in age-adjusted models, P = 0.35 and 0.005, respectively. After adjusting for covariates, RHF was significantly associated with 23 and 39% increased risk of elevated baPWV and PP, P = 0.01 and 0.001, respectively. These associations were further confirmed in propensity score matching analysis. The adjusted ORs (95% confidence interval) were 1.17 (1.03-1.30) for elevated baPWV and 1.28 (1.13-1.46) for elevated PP, P = 0.02 and P value less than 0.001, respectively. RHF was associated with elevated baPWV and PP, suggesting that RHF might be an early indicator for the detection of arterial stiffness.

  3. The importance of carotid artery stiffness and increased intima-media thickness in obese children.

    PubMed

    Ozcetin, Mustafa; Celikyay, Z Ruken Yuksekkaya; Celik, Atac; Yilmaz, Resul; Yerli, Yasemin; Erkorkmaz, Unal

    2012-03-08

    Atherosclerosis that starts in childhood invariably advances during adulthood. Aim. We aimed to study the effect of obesity on main carotid artery intima-media thickness and arterial stiffness. A total of 78 children were studied from October 2010 to February 2011. They were divided into obese (42 - group 1) and normal (36 - group 2). All the children were subjected to physical examination, routine biochemical and haematological analysis, carotid ultrasonography and echocardiographic measurements. A detailed medical history was obtained. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated by dividing participants' weight in kilograms by the square of their height in metres. Stiffness index β was calculated using blood pressure and diameter of the systolic and diastolic artery. Intima-media thickness was also measured. The mean age of the obese and normal (control) groups were 10.12±2.12 years and 9.78±1.78 years respectively. Weight, BMI, and systolic and and diastolic blood pressure values were significantly higher in the obese group (all p<0.001). In terms of arterial stiffness and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) measurements, all parameters were higher in the obese group than the control (p<0.001). There was a relationship between the degree of obesity and CIMT or stiffness index β. In addition, dilatation and hypertrophy levels in the left ventricle were higher in obese children. Obese children with risk factors for multiple atherosclerosis could have increased CIMT dimensions and consequently should be screened for these risks. Ultrasonographic CIMT and arterial stiffness measurements can detect vascular damage at an early stage of development in children with cardiovascular risk factors.

  4. Persistent arterial stiffness and endothelial dysfunction following successful pancreas-kidney transplantation in Type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Stadler, M; Theuer, E; Anderwald, C; Hanusch-Enserer, U; Auinger, M; Bieglmayer, C; Quehenberger, P; Bischof, M; Kästenbauer, T; Wolzt, M; Wagner, O; Prager, R

    2009-10-01

    Successful simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPK) in Type 1 diabetic (T1DM) patients results in improved cardiovascular outcome and survival. However, it is doubtful whether the impairment of cardiovascular and endothelial function in T1DM can be completely reversed. Pulse-wave velocity, stroke volume, heart rate, serological markers of endothelial dysfunction (soluble intercellular, vascular cell-adhesion molecules, E-selectin, and plasminogen-activator-inhibitor-1) were measured in 10 T1DM patients after SPK with non-diabetic glucose levels, 10 T1DM patients with poor [T1DM>8; glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c)>8%], and 10 with good glucose control (T1DM<7, HbA1c<7%), in 6 non-diabetic patients after kidney transplantation (KT) and 9 non-diabetic control subjects (CON), matching for major anthropometric characteristics. Pulse-wave velocity was increased in SPK (P < 0.02 vs. CON, KT, T1DM<7) and in T1DM>8 (P < 0.02 vs. T1DM<7). Systolic blood pressure was increased in SPK (P < 0.05 vs. CON). Stroke volume was reduced in SPK, T1DM>8 and T1DM<7 and KT (P < 0.01 vs. CON). Heart rate was elevated in SPK and in T1DM>8 (P < 0.0003 vs. CON and T1DM<7). In SPK, soluble intercellular and vascular cell-adhesion molecules were 100% and 44% higher (P < 0.03 vs. CON), respectively, while plasminogen-activator-inhibitor-1 was decreased in SPK (P < 0.02 vs. CON). T1DM patients after SPK experience arterial stiffness, a higher heart-rate and blood pressure, reduced stroke volume and serological signs of endothelial dysfunction. Thus, functional and structural cardiovascular alterations as a result of glucotoxicity, uraemia and hypertension in T1DM might not be completely resolved by SPK.

  5. Mean Platelet Volume and Arterial Stiffness – Clinical Relationship and Common Genetic Variability

    PubMed Central

    Panova-Noeva, Marina; Arnold, Natalie; Hermanns, M. Iris; Prochaska, Jürgen H.; Schulz, Andreas; Spronk, Henri M.; Binder, Harald; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Beutel, Manfred; Blankenberg, Stefan; Zeller, Tanja; Lotz, Johannes; Münzel, Thomas; Lackner, Karl J.; ten Cate, Hugo; Wild, Philipp S.

    2017-01-01

    Vessel wall stiffening is an important clinical parameter, but it is unknown whether platelets, key elements in the pathogenesis of arterial thrombosis, are associated with arterial stiffness. The present studies sought to determine whether mean platelet volume (MPV), a potential marker of platelet activation, is linked to vascular elasticity as assessed by the augmentation index (AIx), in 15,010 individuals from the population-based Gutenberg Health Study. Multivariable analysis showed that MPV in both males (β 0.776; 95thCI [0.250;1.16]; p = 0.0024) and females (β 0.881[0.328;1.43]; p = 0.0018) is strongly associated with AIx. Individuals with MPV and AIx above the sex-specific medians had worse survival. Association analysis between MPV-related genetic variants and arterial stiffness identified four genetic variants in males and one in females related with AIx. Cox regression analysis for mortality identified one of these joint genetic variants close to ring finger protein 145 gene (RNF145, rs10076782) linked with increased mortality (hazard ratio 2.02; 95thCI [1.35;3.02]; p = 0.00061). Thus, these population-based data demonstrate a close relation between platelet volume as a potential marker of platelet activation and arterial stiffness in both sexes. Further research is warranted to further elucidate the mechanisms underlying larger platelets‘ role in arterial stiffening including the role of shared common genetics. PMID:28059166

  6. Changes in the structure-function relationship of elastin and its impact on the proximal pulmonary arterial mechanics of hypertensive calves

    PubMed Central

    Lammers, Steven R.; Kao, Phil H.; Qi, H. Jerry; Hunter, Kendall; Lanning, Craig; Albietz, Joseph; Hofmeister, Stephen; Mecham, Robert; Stenmark, Kurt R.; Shandas, Robin

    2008-01-01

    Extracellular matrix remodeling has been proposed as one mechanism by which proximal pulmonary arteries stiffen during pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Although some attention has been paid to the role of collagen and metallomatrix proteins in affecting vascular stiffness, much less work has been performed on changes in elastin structure-function relationships in PAH. Such work is warranted, given the importance of elastin as the structural protein primarily responsible for the passive elastic behavior of these conduit arteries. Here, we study structure-function relationships of fresh arterial tissue and purified arterial elastin from the main, left, and right pulmonary artery branches of normotensive and hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertensive neonatal calves. PAH resulted in an average 81 and 72% increase in stiffness of fresh and digested tissue, respectively. Increase in stiffness appears most attributable to elevated elastic modulus, which increased 46 and 65%, respectively, for fresh and digested tissue. Comparison between fresh and digested tissues shows that, at 35% strain, a minimum of 48% of the arterial load is carried by elastin, and a minimum of 43% of the change in stiffness of arterial tissue is due to the change in elastin stiffness. Analysis of the stress-strain behavior revealed that PAH causes an increase in the strains associated with the physiological pressure range but had no effect on the strain of transition from elastin-dominant to collagen-dominant behavior. These results indicate that mechanobiological adaptations of the continuum and geometric properties of elastin, in response to PAH, significantly elevate the circumferential stiffness of proximal pulmonary arterial tissue. PMID:18660454

  7. Patients with resistant hypertension have more peripheral arterial disease than other uncontrolled hypertensives.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, P E; Kautiainen, H; Kantola, I

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether resistant hypertension differs from uncontrolled and controlled hypertension in terms of target organ damage. Hypertensive subjects with antihypertensive medication (n=385) were identified in a population survey conducted in southwestern Finland. None of the study subjects had previously diagnosed cardiovascular or renal disease or diabetes. Ankle-brachial index, estimated glomerular filtration rate, electrocardiogram-determined left ventricular hypertrophy and cardiometabolic risk factors were assessed. The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease among subjects with resistant, uncontrolled and controlled hypertension was 6/37 (16%), 22/275 (8%) and 0/73 (0%), respectively (P=0.006). There were no differences in the prevalence of renal insufficiency, left ventricular hypertrophy or metabolic parameters between the groups. Resistant hypertension affects vasculature more than uncontrolled hypertension, and thus it can be regarded as a marker of more severe disease.

  8. Manipulation of arterial stiffness, wave reflections, and retrograde shear rate in the femoral artery using lower limb external compression.

    PubMed

    Heffernan, Kevin S; Lefferts, Wesley K; Kasprowicz, Ari G; Tarzia, Brendan J; Thijssen, Dick H; Brutsaert, Tom D

    2013-07-01

    Exposure of the arterial wall to retrograde shear acutely leads to endothelial dysfunction and chronically contributes to a proatherogenic vascular phenotype. Arterial stiffness and increased pressure from wave reflections are known arbiters of blood flow in the systemic circulation and each related to atherosclerosis. Using distal external compression of the calf to increase upstream retrograde shear in the superficial femoral artery (SFA), we examined the hypothesis that changes in retrograde shear are correlated with changes in SFA stiffness and pressure from wave reflections. For this purpose, a pneumatic cuff was applied to the calf and inflated to 0, 35, and 70 mmHg (5 min compression, randomized order, separated by 5 min) in 16 healthy young men (23 ± 1 years of age). Doppler ultrasound and wave intensity analysis was used to measure SFA retrograde shear rate, reflected pressure wave intensity (negative area [NA]), elastic modulus (Ep), and a single-point pulse wave velocity (PWV) during acute cuff inflation. Cuff inflation resulted in stepwise increases in retrograde shear rate (P < 0.05 for main effect). There were also significant cuff pressure-dependent increases in NA, Ep, and PWV across conditions (P < 0.05 for main effects). Change in NA, but not Ep or PWV, was associated with change in retrograde shear rate across conditions (P < 0.05). In conclusion, external compression of the calf increases retrograde shear, arterial stiffness, and pressure from wave reflection in the upstream SFA in a dose-dependent manner. Wave reflection intensity, but not arterial stiffness, is correlated with changes in peripheral retrograde shear with this hemodynamic manipulation.

  9. A pathogenic role of complement in arterial hypertension and hypertensive end organ damage.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Ulrich O; Bode, Marlies; Köhl, Jörg; Ehmke, Heimo

    2017-03-01

    The self-amplifying cascade of messenger and effector molecules of the complement system serves as a powerful danger-sensing system that protects the host from a hostile microbial environment, while maintaining proper tissue and organ function through effective clearance of altered or dying cells. As an important effector arm of innate immunity, it also plays important roles in the regulation of adaptive immunity. Innate and adaptive immune responses have been identified as crucial players in the pathogenesis of arterial hypertension and hypertensive end organ damage. In line with this view, complement activation may drive the pathology of hypertension and hypertensive injury through its impact on innate and adaptive immune responses. It is well known that complement activation can cause tissue inflammation and injury and complement-inhibitory drugs are effective treatments for several inflammatory diseases. In addition to these proinflammatory properties, complement cleavage fragments of C3 and C5 can exert anti-inflammatory effects that dampen the inflammatory response to injury. Recent experimental data strongly support a role for complement in arterial hypertension. The remarkably similar clinical and histopathological features of malignant nephrosclerosis and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, which is driven by complement activation, suggest a role for complement also in the development of malignant nephrosclerosis. Herein, we will review canonical and noncanonical pathways of complement activation as the framework to understand the multiple roles of complement in arterial hypertension and hypertensive end organ damage.

  10. Ambulatory arterial stiffness index derived from 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wang, Ji-Guang; Dolan, Eamon; Gao, Ping-Jin; Guo, Hui-Feng; Nawrot, Tim; Stanton, Alice V; Zhu, Ding-Liang; O'Brien, Eoin; Staessen, Jan A

    2006-03-01

    We hypothesized that 1 minus the slope of diastolic on systolic pressure during 24-hour ambulatory monitoring (ambulatory arterial stiffness index [AASI]) might reflect arterial stiffness. We compared AASI with established measures of arterial stiffness and studied its distribution in Chinese and European populations. We used 90207 SpaceLabs monitors and the SphygmoCor device to measure AASI, central and peripheral pulse pressures, the central (CAIx) and peripheral (PAIx) systolic augmentation indexes, and aortic pulse wave velocity. In 166 volunteers, the correlation coefficient between AASI and pulse wave velocity was 0.51 (P<0.0001). In 348 randomly recruited Chinese subjects, AASI correlated (P<0.0001) with CAIx (r=0.48), PAIx (r=0.50), and central pulse pressure (r=0.50). AASI increased with age and mean arterial pressure but decreased with body height. Both before and after adjustment for arterial wave reflections by considering height and heart rate as covariates, AASI correlated more (P<0.0001) closely with CAIx and PAIx than 24-hour pulse pressure. Among normotensive subjects, the 95th percentile of AASI was 0.55 in Chinese and 0.57 in 1617 Europeans enrolled in the International Database on Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring. The upper boundary of the 95% prediction interval of AASI in relation to age ranged from 0.53 at 20 years to 0.72 at 80 years. In conclusion, AASI is a new index of arterial stiffness that can be easily measured under ambulatory conditions. Pending additional validation in outcome studies, normal values of AASI are probably <0.50 and 0.70 in young and older subjects, respectively.

  11. Can ambulatory blood-pressure monitoring provide reliable indices of arterial stiffness?

    PubMed

    Gosse, Philippe; Papaioanou, Georgios; Coulon, Paul; Reuter, Sylvain; Lemetayer, Philippe; Safar, Michel

    2007-08-01

    The use of ambulatory recordings of blood pressure (BP) was proposed to estimate arterial stiffness (AS). We compared the relative value of the ambulatory AS index (AASI), and of the slope of pulse pressure (PP) according to mean BP (MBP) obtained from 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring, to the monitoring of the arrival time of Korotkoff sounds (QKD interval) in the prediction of cardiovascular (CV) events. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory BP and QKD monitoring were recorded at baseline, before antihypertensive treatment of hypertensive patients in our Bordeaux cohort. From these recordings, the AASI, the PP/MBP slope, and the theoretical value of the QKD for a systolic pressure of 100 mm Hg and a heart rate of 60 beats/min (QKD100-60) were calculated. The patients were then given antihypertensive treatment and followed by their family physicians, who were unaware of the QKD, AASI, and PP/MBP slope results. Regular updates on patients were obtained. The reproducibility of measurements was studied in 38 normal subjects evaluated on two occasions. The reproducibility of the AASI and the PP/MBP slope was less than that of BP over 24 h and of QKD100-60. The cohort comprised 469 patients. With an average follow-up of 70+/-39 months, 62 CV complications, including 13 deaths, were recorded. In the monovariate analysis, age, PP over 24 h, QKD100-60, AASI, and the PP/MBP slope were significantly related to the occurrence of complications. In the multivariate analysis, when age and PP over 24 were included in the model, only QKD100-60 remained significantly linked to CV events. Our data support the value of the AASI as an indirect estimate of AS and as an element in the evaluation of CV risk in hypertensive patients. However, the reproducibility of this index is less, and its predictive value for complications is poorer, than that of QKD100-60, a parameter that we believe is more closely linked to AS.

  12. Effects of 8-week swimming training on carotid arterial stiffness and hemodynamics in young overweight adults.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wen-Xue; Liu, Hai-Bin; Gao, Feng-Shan; Wang, Yan-Xia; Qin, Kai-Rong

    2016-12-28

    Exercise has been found to either reduce or increase arterial stiffness. Land-based exercise modalities have been documented as effective physical therapies to decrease arterial stiffness. However, these land-based exercise modalities may not be suitable for overweight individuals, in terms of risks of joint injury. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of 8-week swimming training and 4-week detraining on carotid arterial stiffness and hemodynamics in young overweight adults. Twenty young male adults who were overweight were recruited and engaged in 8-week of swimming training and 4-week detraining. Five individuals withdrew due to lack of interest and failure to follow the training protocol. Body Fat Percentage (BFP) and carotid hemodynamic variables were measured on a resting day at the following intervals: baseline, 4 weeks, 8 weeks after swimming training and 4 weeks after detraining. A repeated analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to assess the differences between baseline and each measurement. When significant differences were detected, Tukey's test for post hoc comparisons was used. Eight-week swimming training at moderate intensity decreased BFP, including the trunk and four extremities. Additionally, the BFP of the right and left lower extremities continued to decrease in these overweight adults 4 weeks after ceasing training. Carotid arterial stiffness decreased, while there were no significant changes in arterial diameters. Blood flow velocity, flow rate, maximal and mean wall shear stress increased, while systolic blood pressure and peripheral resistance decreased. No significant differences existed in minimal wall shear stress and oscillatory shear stress. Eight-week swimming training at moderate intensity exhibited beneficial effects on systolic blood pressure, arterial stiffness and blood supply to the brain in overweight adults. Moreover, maximal and mean wall shear stress increased after training. It is worth noting that these

  13. Relationships between central arterial stiffness, lean body mass, and absolute and relative strength in young and older men and women.

    PubMed

    Fahs, Christopher A; Thiebaud, Robert S; Rossow, Lindy M; Loenneke, Jeremy P; Bemben, Debra A; Bemben, Michael G

    2017-08-16

    Relationships between muscular strength and arterial stiffness as well as between muscle mass and arterial stiffness have been observed suggesting a link between the neuromuscular system and vascular health. However, the relationship between central arterial stiffness and absolute and relative strength along with muscle mass has not been investigated in both sexes across a broad age range. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between central arterial stiffness and absolute and relative strength as well as between central arterial stiffness and lean body mass (LBM) in men and women across a broad age range. LBM, central arterial stiffness and strength were measured on 36 men and 35 women between the ages of 18 and 75 years. Strength was measured on five machine resistance exercises and summed as one measure of overall strength (absolute strength). Relative strength was calculated as total strength divided by LBM (relative strength). Central arterial stiffness was inversely related to both absolute (r = -0·230; P = 0·029) and relative strength (r = -0·484; P < 0·001) but not LBM (r = 0·097; P = 0·213). The relationship between central arterial stiffness and relative strength was attenuated but still present when controlling for either age, per cent body fat, LBM or mean arterial pressure. These results suggest that, across a wide age range, the expression of relative muscular strength has a stronger relationship with central arterial stiffness compared to either LBM or absolute strength. This suggests that muscle function more than muscle mass may be coupled with vascular health. © 2017 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. [Clinical utility of inhaled iloprost in pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Santos-Martínez, Luis Efren; Moreno-Ruiz, Luis Antonio; Jiménez-Santos, Moisés; Olmos-Temois, Sergio Gabriel; Bojorquez-Guerrero, Luis Armando; Baranda-Tovar, Francisco Martín

    2014-01-01

    Inhaled iloprost is a drug from the group of prostacyclins used in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Its efficacy and safety have allowed its use as monotherapy and combination therapy. This review describes the product characteristics, amenable to treatment groups, and updated clinical evidence of drug use.

  15. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated to human immunodeficiency virus].

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Gutiérrez, José Luis; Santos-Martínez, Luis Efren; Rodríguez-Silverio, Juan; Baranda-Tovar, Francisco Martín; Rivera-Rosales, Rosa María; Flores-Murrieta, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    From the advent of the highly effective antiretroviral treatment, the life expectancy of patients with human immunodeficiency virus has increased significantly. At present, the causes of death are non-infectious complications. Between them, the pulmonary arterial hypertension has a special importance. It is important early detection to establish the therapeutic, with the objective of preventing a fatal outcome to future.

  16. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension-A Deadly Complication of Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pankey, Edward A; Epps, Matthew; Nossaman, Bobby D; Hyman, Albert L; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease with limited therapeutic options. Moreover, when PAH occurs in patients diagnosed with systemic sclerosis, worse outcomes are observed. The purpose of this review is to discuss the etiologies of PAH found in the systemic sclerosis patient, limitations of current medical therapies, and, finally, potential therapies for patients with this combination. PMID:23626904

  17. Habitual rowing exercise is associated with high physical fitness without affecting arterial stiffness in older men.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Hiroshi; Iemitsu, Motoyuki; Gando, Yuko; Ishijima, Toshimichi; Asaka, Meiko; Aoyama, Tomoko; Ando, Takafumi; Tokizawa, Ken; Miyachi, Motohiko; Sakamoto, Shizuo; Higuchi, Mitsuru

    2012-01-01

    The present study elucidated the effects of habitual rowing exercise on arterial stiffness and plasma levels of the vasoconstrictor endothelin-1 and the vasodilator nitric oxide (NO) in older men. Eleven rowers (68.0 ± 1.6 years) and 11 sedentary control older men (64.9 ± 1.1 years) were studied. Peak oxygen uptake (36.0 ± 1.7 vs. 27.7 ±1.9 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1)), leg press power (1346 ± 99 vs. 1077 ± 68 W), and HDL-cholesterol (75 ± 5 vs. 58 ±3 mg · ml(-1)) were higher and triglyceride (78 ± 9 vs. 120 ± 14 mg · ml(-1)) was lower in rowers than in control participants (all P < 0.05). Arterial stiffness indices (carotid β-stiffness and cardio-ankle vascular index) and plasma endothelin-1 and NOx (nitrite + nitrate) levels did not differ between the two groups. These results suggest that habitual rowing exercise in older men is associated with high muscle power and aerobic capacity, and favourable blood lipid profile without affecting arterial stiffness or plasma levels of endotheline-1 and NO.

  18. Sleep-disordered breathing is associated with blood pressure and carotid arterial stiffness in obese children.

    PubMed

    Tagetti, Angela; Bonafini, Sara; Zaffanello, Marco; Benetti, Maria V; Vedove, Francesco Dalle; Gasperi, Emma; Cavarzere, Paolo; Gaudino, Rossella; Piacentini, Giorgio; Minuz, Pietro; Maffeis, Claudio; Antoniazzi, Franco; Fava, Cristiano

    2017-01-01

    Both sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and high blood pressure (BP) occur more frequently among obese children than among normal weight children, and this may be due to endothelial dysfunction and worsened arterial stiffness. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible association between SDB and BP, and the possible role of endothelial function and local and systemic arterial stiffness in a sample of obese children asymptomatic for sleep disturbances. Thirty-nine obese children were included in the study. Children underwent overnight limited channel polysomnography, and the vascular measurements included the following: office and 24-h ambulatory BP; brachial flow-mediated dilatation, carotid intima-media thickness and carotid distensibility measured using ultrasound; and systemic arterial stiffness index measured using digital volume pulse analysis. Significant correlations between different BP measurements (both office and ambulatory BP monitoring and estimated by Z score) and SDB were found, including correlations involving the respiratory disturbance index, the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), the number of desaturations per hour and the mean peripheral saturation (r ranging between 0.330 and 0.474). Carotid distensibility was correlated with the AHI (r = -0.367; P = 0.030) and with the mean oxygen saturation (r = 0.401; P = 0.017). In contrast, there was no relationship among flow-mediated dilatation, stiffness index, carotid intima-media thickness and all the tested respiratory markers. In the multivariate analysis, the supine Z SBP remained independently associated with the number of desaturations per hour and the AHI, even after correction for carotid distensibility and BMI. Our data suggest that in obese children asymptomatic for sleep respiratory problems, SDB might worsen BP, in part, through an increase in arterial stiffness.

  19. PREVALENCE OF DIABETES MELLITUS AMONG PATIENTS WITH ESSENTIAL ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION.

    PubMed

    Chahoud, Jad; Mrad, Jad; Semaan, Adele; Asmar, Roland

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) among patients with arterial hypertension, and indirectly, the crucial impact of adopting screening for diabetes as a standard procedure for all patients diagnosed with arterial hypertension. This cross-sectional study was performed on a sample of hypertensive patients recruited from three different university hospitals in Lebanon. Blood pressure and glycemic blood measurements were determined in all subjects. In addition, a complete clinical history and physical exam were performed. Data was entered and analyzed using SPSS 19.0. Frequencies for the different variables were calculated, and the chi-square and independent sample t-tests were conducted. This study included 294 patients. Prevalence of diabetes was 27%, and 23% of diabetic patients were newly diagnosed. More than half of the subjects suffering from DM had uncontrolled blood pressure, contrasted with only one third of the non-diabetic subjects with uncontrolled hypertension. The prevalence of DM in patients with essential hypertension was more than double that of the general population. Therefore, major recommendations would be to adopt strictly the diabetes screening requirements and aggressive management among hypertensive patients to minimize both the health and cost burdens associated with undetected DM.

  20. [Arterial hypertension in elderly patients - from pathophysiology to rational treatment].

    PubMed

    Kucharska, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    According to the WHO, arterial hypertension is a major cause of death in adult populations all over the world, regardless of the socio-economic level of a specific population. In Poland, the presence of hypertension is estimated to be about 1/3 in the population of adult Poles. Although hypertension may occur in people of all ages, as the population is ageing, a large group of patients are those over 65. In this age group, the dominant form of arterial hypertension is the isolated systolic hypertension (ISH), in which increased systolic blood pressure is disclosed (higher than or equal to 140 mm Hg), with diastolic blood pressure values remaining within the normal range (<90 mm Hg). Even 15 years ago, the therapeutic approach to ISH in the elderly was a subject of a broad debate. Until the results of main clinical trials and meta-analyzes summarising these results were announced, it was not certain whether active treatment of these patients was beneficial. Moreover, the drug selection issue was hotly debated. The last major problem was the question concerning benefits resulting from the treatment of isolated systolic hypertension in patients aged 80 years and older.

  1. Risk factors of arterial hypertension after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Béji, S; Abderrahim, E; Kaaroud, H; Jebali, H; Ben Abdallah, T; El Younsi, F; Ben Moussa, F; Ben Hamida, F; Sfaxi, A; Blah, M; Chebil, M; Ayed, M; Bardi, R; Gorgi, Y; Kheder, A

    2007-10-01

    Arterial hypertension often present after kidney transplantation is of multifactorial origin. The aim of this study was to determine the role of donor and recipient factors in the development of hypertension after renal transplantation. We retrospectively analyzed the data of 280 patients transplanted between 1985 and 2005, who still had functioning grafts at 1 year after transplantation. We recorded donor and recipient parameters. One hundred eighty-seven patients (66.8%) were hypertensive. Upon multivariate analysis of recipient factors, pretransplant hypertension (odds ratio) [OR]: 8.5, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.5 to 16.1); serum creatinine level > 130 micromol/L at 6 months (OR: 2.5, 95% CI: 1.3 to 4,7), male gender (OR: 2.02, 95% CI: 1.2 to 3.4), and chronic rejection (OR: 2.4, 95% CI: 1.2 to 4.7) were independent predisposing factors. Among donor factors, age was significantly associated with arterial hypertension upon univariate analysis. In conclusion, recipient factors, especially pretransplant hypertension, contribute to the disorder in renal transplant patients.

  2. Relationship between carotid intima‐media thickness and arterial stiffness in children after Kawasaki disease

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Y‐f; Wong, S J; Ho, M H K

    2007-01-01

    Background Evidence of premature atherosclerosis and systemic arterial stiffening in patients after Kawasaki disease is accumulating. Aim To test the hypothesis that carotid intima‐media thickness (IMT), a surrogate marker of atherosclerosis, is associated with systemic arterial stiffness in children after Kawasaki disease. Methods A cohort of 72 patients was studied, comprising 26 patients with Kawasaki disease and coronary aneurysms (group I), 24 patients with Kawasaki disease and normal coronary arteries (group II) and 22 healthy age‐matched children (group III). The carotid IMT, carotid artery stiffness index, brachioradial pulse wave velocity (PWV), fasting total cholesterol, high‐density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and low‐density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol were determined and compared among the three groups. Results The carotid IMT was related to indices of arterial stiffness, and significant determinants of carotid IMT were identified by multivariate analysis. The mean (standard deviation (SD)) carotid IMT of both group I (0.41 (0.04) mm) and group II (0.39 (0.04) mm) was significantly greater than that of group III (0.36 (0.04) mm; p<0.001 and p = 0.008, respectively). For the entire cohort, carotid IMT correlated positively with LDL cholesterol (r = 0.31, p = 0.009), carotid artery stiffness index (r = 0.40, p = 0.001) and brachioradial PWV (r = 0.28, p = 0.016), but not with age, body mass index, systemic blood pressure, and HDL and total cholesterol. Multiple linear regression analysis identified carotid artery stiffness index (β = 0.25, p = 0.028) and subject grouping (β = −0.39, p = 0.001; model R2 = 0.29) as significant correlates of carotid IMT. Conclusion The increased carotid IMT in children after Kawasaki disease is associated with systemic arterial stiffening. PMID:16820386

  3. [Lung function testing in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Escribano, P Martín; Sánchez, M A Gómez; de Atauri, M J Díaz; Frade, J Palomera; García, I Martín

    2005-07-01

    The main objective was to describe the results of lung function testing in a series of 120 patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, and the secondary objective was to compare these findings with hemodynamic variables. This was a descriptive study of lung function in 120 patients with stable pulmonary arterial hypertension (Evian/Venice groups 1 and 4) studied until January 2002 in the Pulmonary Hypertension and Lung Transplant Working Group attached to the Cardiology Department of the Hospital Universtario 12 de Octubre in Madrid, Spain. Data were collected retrospectively for the first 47 patients (1981 to 1995) and prospectively thereafter for the remaining 73 patients. The diagnosis was idiopathic arterial hypertension or hypertension associated with collagenosis, chronic pulmonary embolism, cardiac shunt, or toxic oil syndrome (30 cases). In the group as a whole, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, and total lung capacity were normal; mean (SD) values revealed low carbon dioxide diffusing capacity (67.6% [23.2%]), and moderate hypoxemia (65.8 [15.4] mm Hg). No significant associations were observed between lung function and hemodynamic parameters. Mean age in the toxic oil syndrome group was lower (33.7 [11.4] years), and these patients had higher mean scores on the New York Heart Association scale (3.3 [0.5]) and for pulmonary vascular resistance (20.3 [8.1] kPa.L(-1).s). Lung function was studied in a series of 120 patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (Evian/ Venice groups 1 and 4), 30 of whom had toxic oil syndrome. No significant associations were found between lung function and hemodynamic parameters.

  4. Abnormal Stress‐Related Measures of Arterial Stiffness in Middle‐Aged and Elderly Men and Women With Impaired Fasting Glucose at Risk for a First Episode of Symptomatic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Vasu, Sujethra; Morgan, Timothy M.; Kitzman, Dalane W.; Bertoni, Alain; Stacey, Richard B.; Hamilton, Craig; Chiles, Caroline; Thohan, Vinay; Hundley, W. Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Background Abnormal resting arterial stiffness is present in middle‐aged and elderly persons with abnormalities of fasting glucose (diabetes or impaired fasting glucose) and is associated with exercise intolerance. We sought to determine whether these same persons exhibited stress‐related abnormalities of arterial stiffness. Methods and Results We analyzed dobutamine magnetic resonance stress imaging results from 373 consecutively recruited persons aged 55 to 85 years with normal fasting glucose, impaired fasting glucose, or diabetes who were at risk for but without symptomatic heart failure. Personnel blinded to participant identifiers measured arterial stiffness (brachial pulse pressure/left ventricular stroke volume indexed to body surface area, the aortic elastance index [brachial end‐systolic pressure/left ventricular stroke volume indexed to body surface area], and thoracic aortic distensibility) at 80% of the maximum predicted heart rate response for age. Participants averaged 69±8 years of age; 79% were white, 92% were hypertensive, and 66% were women. After accounting for hypertension, sex, coronary artery disease, smoking, medications, hypercholesterolemia, and visceral fat, we observed an effect of glycemic status for stress measures of arterial stiffness in those with diabetes and impaired fasting glucose relative to those with normal fasting glucose (P=0.002, P=0.02, and P=0.003, respectively). Conclusion Middle‐ and older‐aged individuals with diabetes or impaired fasting glucose have higher stress measures of arterial stiffness than those with normal fasting glucose. These data emphasize the need for future studies with larger sample sizes to determine whether stress‐related elevations in arterial stiffness are related to exercise intolerance and future episodes of heart failure experienced by those with abnormalities of fasting glucose. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov/. Unique identifier: NCT00542503. PMID

  5. Influence of Postprandial Hyperglycemic Conditions on Arterial Stiffness in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gordin, Daniel; Saraheimo, Markku; Tuomikangas, Jaana; Soro-Paavonen, Aino; Forsblom, Carol; Paavonen, Karri; Steckel-Hamann, Birgit; Vandenhende, Francois; Nicolaou, Loizos; Pavo, Imre; Koivisto, Veikko

    2016-01-01

    Context: Patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) are at an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine whether postprandial hyperglycemia affects arterial function in T2D. Design: A single-center, open-label study of three groups of men were studied: 1) T2D patients with albuminuria (n = 22), 2) T2D patients without albuminuria (n = 24), and 3) nondiabetic controls (n = 25). Patients were randomized to a two-period crossover study schedule, ingesting breakfast, with or without insulin lispro (to induce low or high postprandial glycemia). Main Outcome Measures: Arterial stiffness was assessed by calculating pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index using applanation tonometry, and endothelial dysfunction was assessed using peripheral arterial tonometry, 30 minutes before breakfast and up to 240 minutes after breakfast. Results: At baseline, arterial stiffness was increased in patients. When adjusted for age and body mass index, in a combined group of patients with and without albuminuria, brachial PWV was higher during low (P = .032) and high (P = .038) postprandial glycemia vs controls. These differences were driven by the albuminuria group vs controls during low (P = .014) and high (P = .018) postprandial glycemia. No differences were observed in aortic PWV, augmentation index, or peripheral arterial tonometry ratio between patients and controls. Endothelin-1 and IL-6 were higher, and superoxide dismutase was lower, during postprandial hyperglycemia in T2D patients vs controls. Conclusions: In patients with T2D and albuminuria, brachial PWV was higher under postprandial hyperglycemic conditions, relative to controls. These data suggest that hyperglycemia induces an increase in stiffness of intermediate-sized arteries. We found no changes in other parts of the arterial bed. PMID:26731258

  6. Arterial stiffness is increased in Hodgkin lymphoma survivors treated with radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen-Segarceanu, Elena M; Dorresteijn, Lucille D A; Vogels, Oscar J M; Biesma, Douwe H; Bos, Willem-Jan W

    2013-08-01

    Radiotherapy has been associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Hodgkin lymphoma survivors (HLS). Identifying subjects most likely to develop these complications is challenging. Arterial stiffness has been frequently used as an early marker of CVD, but has never previously been investigated in patients treated with radiotherapy. The carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) and the distensibility coefficient (DC) of the common carotid artery were used as markers of arterial stiffness. Eighty-two HLS and 40 age- and gender-matched control subjects were studied. The aorta and the carotid arteries were situated within the radiation field in 50 and 39 patients. Mean PWV was not significantly different in HLS treated with radiotherapy on the mediastinum when compared to HLS treated without mediastinal radiotherapy and to controls. If HLS were 40 years or older at radiotherapy their PWV was significantly higher (8.54 m/s) than patients irradiated at a younger age (7.14 m/s, p = 0.004) and controls (6.91 m/s, p < 0.001), after adjusting for current age and other CVD risk factors. Mean DC was lower, indicative of stiffer arteries, in HLS treated with radiotherapy on the common carotid artery (2.79) than in HLS without radiotherapy (3.35, p = 0.029) and versus controls (3.60, p = 0.001). DC was lowest in HLS treated at 35 years of age or later (2.05), compared to HLS irradiated at a younger age (2.98, p = 0.046). In HLS, radiotherapy is associated with increased arterial stiffness. The effect of radiotherapy seems most evident when radiotherapy is administered at ages above 35-40 years.

  7. Evaluation of carotid intima-media thickness and carotid arterial stiffness in children with adenotonsillar hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Çiftel, Murat; Demir, Berrin; Kozan, Günay; Yılmaz, Osman; Kahveci, Hasan; Kılıç, Ömer

    2016-02-01

    Adenotonsillar hypertrophy can produce cardiopulmonary disease in children. However, it is unclear whether adenotonsillar hypertrophy causes atherosclerosis. This study evaluated carotid intimamedia thickness and carotid arterial stiffness in children with adenotonsillar hypertrophy. The study included 40 children with adenotonsillar hypertrophy (age: 5-10 years) and 36 healthy children with similar age and body mass index. Systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and pulse pressure were measured in all subjects. Carotid intima-media thickness, carotid arterial systolic diameter, and carotid arterial diastolic diameter were measured using a high-resolution ultrasound device. Based on these measurements, carotid arterial strain, carotid artery distensibility, beta stiffness index, and elasticity modulus were calculated. Carotid intima-media thickness was greater in children with adenotonsillar hypertrophy (0.36±0.05 mm vs. 0.34±0.04 mm, P=0.02) compared to healthy controls. Beta stiffness index (3.01±1.22 vs. 2.98±0.98, P=0.85), elasticity modulus (231.39±99.23 vs. 226.46±83.20, P=0.88), carotid arterial strain (0.17±0.06 vs. 0.17±0.04, P=0.95), and carotid artery distensibility (13.14±3.88 vs. 12.92±3.84, P=0.75) were similar between children with adenotonsillar hypertrophy and the healthy controls. The present study revealed increased carotid intima-media thickness in children with adenotonsillar hypertrophy. The risk of subclinical atherosclerosis may be higher in children with adenotonsillar hypertrophy.

  8. Cytomegalovirus seropositivity is associated with increased arterial stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Wall, Nadezhda A; Chue, Colin D; Edwards, Nicola C; Pankhurst, Tanya; Harper, Lorraine; Steeds, Richard P; Lauder, Sarah; Townend, Jonathan N; Moss, Paul; Ferro, Charles J

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease have an increased cardiovascular risk that is not fully explained by traditional risk factors but appears to be related to increased arterial stiffness. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is associated with increased cardiovascular risk although the mechanisms for this are unknown. We examined whether CMV seropositivity was associated with increased arterial stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease. In 215 non-diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease, CMV seropositivity was determined using an anti-CMV IgG ELISA. Pulse wave velocity was measured and aortic distensibility assessed in the ascending, proximal descending and distal descending thoracic aorta. Patients seropositive for CMV had a higher pulse wave velocity and lower aortic distensibility at all 3 levels. These differences (except for ascending aortic distensibility) persisted in a subcohort matched for age, gender and renal function, and when the whole cohort was divided into quartiles of age. In multivariable analyses, CMV seropositivity was an independent determinant of pulse wave velocity and proximal and distal descending aortic distensibility. In patients with chronic kidney disease, CMV seropositivity is associated with increased arterial stiffness and decreased distensibility of the proximal descending and distal aorta. These findings suggest that further research is required to examine CMV as a possible cause of arterial disease and increased cardiovascular risk in patients with CKD and may be relevant more widely for CMV seropositive patients with normal renal function.

  9. Effect of Simvastatin on Arterial Stiffness in Patients with Statin Myalgia

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Kevin D.; Lorson, Lindsay; White, C. Michael; Thompson, Paul D.; Taylor, Beth A.

    2015-01-01

    Statins reduce arterial stiffness but are also associated with mild muscle complaints. It is unclear whether individuals with muscle symptoms experience the same vascular benefit or whether statins affect striated and smooth muscle cells differently. We examined the effect of simvastatin treatment on arterial stiffness in patients who did versus those who did not exhibit muscle symptoms. Patients with a history of statin-related muscle complaints (n = 115) completed an 8 wk randomized, double-blind, cross-over trial of daily simvastatin 20 mg and placebo. Serum lipids and pulse wave velocity (PWV) were assessed before and after each treatment. Muscle symptoms with daily simvastatin treatment were reported by 38 patients (33%). Compared to baseline, central PWV decreased (P = 0.01) following simvastatin treatment but not placebo (drug ∗ time interaction: P = 0.047). Changes in central PWV with simvastatin treatment were not influenced by myalgia status or time on simvastatin (P ≥ 0.15). Change in central PWV after simvastatin treatment was inversely correlated with age (r = −0.207, P = 0.030), suggesting that advancing age is associated with enhanced statin-mediated arterial destiffening. In patients with a history of statin-related muscle complaints, the development of myalgia with short-term simvastatin treatment did not attenuate the improvement in arterial stiffness. PMID:26257959

  10. An Inverse Method to Determine Arterial Stiffness with Guided Axial Waves.

    PubMed

    Li, Guo-Yang; He, Qiong; Jia, Lin; He, Ping; Luo, Jianwen; Cao, Yanping

    2017-02-01

    Many cardiovascular diseases can alter arterial stiffness; therefore, measurement of arterial wall stiffness can provide valuable information for both diagnosis of such diseases in the clinic and evaluation of the effectiveness of relevant drugs. However, quantitative assessment of the in vivo elastic properties of arterial walls in a non-invasive manner remains a great challenge. In this study, we found that the elastic modulus of the arterial wall can be extracted from the dispersion curve of the guided axial wave (GAW) measured using the ultrasound elastography method. It is shown that the GAW in the arterial wall can be well described with the Lamb wave (LW) model when the frequency exceeds a critical value fc, whose explicit form is determined here based on dimensional analysis method and systematic finite-element simulations. Further, an inverse procedure is proposed to determine both fc and the elastic modulus of the arterial wall. Phantom experiments have been performed to validate the inverse method and illustrate its potential use in the clinic. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Acute effect of caffeine on arterial stiffness and aortic pressure waveform.

    PubMed

    Mahmud, A; Feely, J

    2001-08-01

    Caffeine acutely increases blood pressure and peripheral vascular resistance, in part because of sympathetic stimulation. Its effects on large artery properties are largely unknown. In a double-blind crossover study, 7 healthy subjects 26+/-2.6 years of age (mean+/-SEM) were studied for 90 minutes while in the supine position on 2 occasions separated by a week in random order after ingestion of 250 mL caffeinated (150 mg) and decaffeinated (<2 mg) coffee. Compared with baseline, arterial stiffness measured by carotid femoral pulse wave velocity increased progressively from 7.2+/-0.41 to 8.0+/-0.6 m/s (P<0.05) at 90 minutes after caffeine intake, an effect that may be independent of changes in blood pressure. In addition, arterial wave reflection, measured by applanation tonometry from the aortic pressure waveform, also increased from -5.7+/-7.6% to 5.28%+/-5.6 (P<0.01). No such changes were seen with decaffeinated coffee intake. Although the integral of the brachial systolic and diastolic blood pressure values over the 90 minutes was larger (P<0.05) after caffeinated than decaffeinated coffee intake, the effect on aortic systolic and diastolic blood pressures was more pronounced (P<0.05) than on the brachial artery. These results show a significant effect of caffeine intake on arterial tone and function and suggest that caffeine acutely increases arterial stiffness.

  12. Effect of passive heat stress on arterial stiffness in smokers versus non-smokers.

    PubMed

    Moyen, N E; Ganio, M S; Burchfield, J M; Tucker, M A; Gonzalez, M A; Dougherty, E K; Robinson, F B; Ridings, C B; Veilleux, J C

    2016-04-01

    In non-smokers, passive heat stress increases shear stress and vasodilation, decreasing arterial stiffness. Smokers, who reportedly have arterial dysfunction, may have similar improvements in arterial stiffness with passive heat stress. Therefore, we examined the effects of an acute bout of whole-body passive heat stress on arterial stiffness in smokers vs. non-smokers. Thirteen smokers (8.8 ± 5.5 [median = 6] cigarettes per day for > 4 years) and 13 non-smokers matched for age, mass, height, and exercise habits (27 ± 8 years; 78.8 ± 15.4 kg; 177.6 ± 6.7 cm) were passively heated to 1.5 °C core temperature (T C) increase. At baseline and each 0.5 °C T C increase, peripheral (pPWV) and central pulse wave velocity (cPWV) were measured via Doppler ultrasound. No differences existed between smokers and non-smokers for any variables (all p >  .05), except cPWV slightly increased from baseline (526.7 ± 81.7 cm · s(-1)) to 1.5 °C ΔT C (579.7 ± 69.8 cm · s(-1); p < 0.005), suggesting heat stress acutely increased central arterial stiffness. pPWV did not change with heating (grand mean: baseline = 691.9 ± 92.9 cm · s(-1); 1.5 °C ΔT C = 691.9 ± 79.5 cm · s(-1); p > 0.05). Changes in cPWV and pPWV during heating correlated (p < 0.05) with baseline PWV in smokers (cPWV: r = -0.59; pPWV: r = -0.62) and non-smokers (cPWV: r = -0.45; pPWV: r = -0.77). Independent of smoking status, baseline stiffness appears to mediate the magnitude of heating-induced changes in arterial stiffness.

  13. Effect of passive heat stress on arterial stiffness in smokers versus non-smokers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyen, N. E.; Ganio, M. S.; Burchfield, J. M.; Tucker, M. A.; Gonzalez, M. A.; Dougherty, E. K.; Robinson, F. B.; Ridings, C. B.; Veilleux, J. C.

    2016-04-01

    In non-smokers, passive heat stress increases shear stress and vasodilation, decreasing arterial stiffness. Smokers, who reportedly have arterial dysfunction, may have similar improvements in arterial stiffness with passive heat stress. Therefore, we examined the effects of an acute bout of whole-body passive heat stress on arterial stiffness in smokers vs. non-smokers. Thirteen smokers (8.8 ± 5.5 [median = 6] cigarettes per day for >4 years) and 13 non-smokers matched for age, mass, height, and exercise habits (27 ± 8 years; 78.8 ± 15.4 kg; 177.6 ± 6.7 cm) were passively heated to 1.5 °C core temperature ( T C) increase. At baseline and each 0.5 °C T C increase, peripheral (pPWV) and central pulse wave velocity (cPWV) were measured via Doppler ultrasound. No differences existed between smokers and non-smokers for any variables (all p > 0.05), except cPWV slightly increased from baseline (526.7 ± 81.7 cm · s-1) to 1.5 °C Δ T C (579.7 ± 69.8 cm · s-1; p < 0.005), suggesting heat stress acutely increased central arterial stiffness. pPWV did not change with heating (grand mean: baseline = 691.9 ± 92.9 cm · s-1; 1.5 °C Δ T C = 691.9 ± 79.5 cm · s-1; p > 0.05). Changes in cPWV and pPWV during heating correlated ( p < 0.05) with baseline PWV in smokers (cPWV: r = -0.59; pPWV: r = -0.62) and non-smokers (cPWV: r = -0.45; pPWV: r = -0.77). Independent of smoking status, baseline stiffness appears to mediate the magnitude of heating-induced changes in arterial stiffness.

  14. Serum Phospholipid Docosahexaenoic Acid Is Inversely Associated with Arterial Stiffness in Metabolically Healthy Men

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Hyang; Kwon, Nayeon; Yoon, So Ra

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that lower proportion of serum phospholipid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is inversely associated with increased cardiovascular risk and vascular function in metabolically healthy men. To elucidate it, we first compared serum phospholipid free fatty acid (FA) compositions and cardiovascular risk parameters between healthy men (n = 499) and male patients with coronary artery disease (CAD, n = 111) (30-69 years) without metabolic syndrome, and then further-analyzed the association of serum phospholipid DHA composition with arterial stiffness expressed by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV) in metabolically healthy men. Basic parameters, lipid profiles, fasting glycemic status, adiponectin, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and LDL particle size, and serum phospholipid FA compositions were significantly different between the two subject groups. Serum phospholipid DHA was highly correlated with most of long-chain FAs. Metabolically healthy men were subdivided into tertile groups according to serum phospholipid DHA proportion: lower (< 2.061%), middle (2.061%-3.235%) and higher (> 3.235%). Fasting glucose, insulin resistance, hs-CRP and ba-PWVs were significantly higher and adiponectin and LDL particle size were significantly lower in the lower-DHA group than the higher-DHA group after adjusted for confounding factors. In metabolically healthy men, multiple stepwise regression analysis revealed that serum phospholipid DHA mainly contributed to arterial stiffness (β′-coefficients = -0.127, p = 0.006) together with age, systolic blood pressure, triglyceride (r = 0.548, p = 0.023). Lower proportion of serum phospholipid DHA was associated with increased cardiovascular risk and arterial stiffness in metabolically healthy men. It suggests that maintaining higher proportion of serum phospholipid DHA may be beneficial for reducing cardiovascular risk including arterial stiffness in metabolically healthy men. PMID:27482523

  15. Serum Phospholipid Docosahexaenoic Acid Is Inversely Associated with Arterial Stiffness in Metabolically Healthy Men.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi-Hyang; Kwon, Nayeon; Yoon, So Ra; Kim, Oh Yoen

    2016-07-01

    We hypothesized that lower proportion of serum phospholipid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is inversely associated with increased cardiovascular risk and vascular function in metabolically healthy men. To elucidate it, we first compared serum phospholipid free fatty acid (FA) compositions and cardiovascular risk parameters between healthy men (n = 499) and male patients with coronary artery disease (CAD, n = 111) (30-69 years) without metabolic syndrome, and then further-analyzed the association of serum phospholipid DHA composition with arterial stiffness expressed by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV) in metabolically healthy men. Basic parameters, lipid profiles, fasting glycemic status, adiponectin, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and LDL particle size, and serum phospholipid FA compositions were significantly different between the two subject groups. Serum phospholipid DHA was highly correlated with most of long-chain FAs. Metabolically healthy men were subdivided into tertile groups according to serum phospholipid DHA proportion: lower (< 2.061%), middle (2.061%-3.235%) and higher (> 3.235%). Fasting glucose, insulin resistance, hs-CRP and ba-PWVs were significantly higher and adiponectin and LDL particle size were significantly lower in the lower-DHA group than the higher-DHA group after adjusted for confounding factors. In metabolically healthy men, multiple stepwise regression analysis revealed that serum phospholipid DHA mainly contributed to arterial stiffness (β'-coefficients = -0.127, p = 0.006) together with age, systolic blood pressure, triglyceride (r = 0.548, p = 0.023). Lower proportion of serum phospholipid DHA was associated with increased cardiovascular risk and arterial stiffness in metabolically healthy men. It suggests that maintaining higher proportion of serum phospholipid DHA may be beneficial for reducing cardiovascular risk including arterial stiffness in metabolically healthy men.

  16. Arterial Stiffness Is Associated With Cytomegalovirus-Specific Senescent CD8(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hee Tae; Youn, Jong-Chan; Kim, Jong Hoon; Seong, Yeon-Jae; Park, Su-Hyung; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Lee, Won-Woo; Park, Sungha; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2017-08-28

    Arterial stiffness is a well-known predictor of future cardiovascular events. Search for the underlying mechanism of arterial stiffening is still under way. We investigated the relationship between arterial stiffness and cytomegalovirus infection in terms of T-cell senescence. Arterial stiffness was evaluated using pulse wave velocity measurements in 415 Koreans (age 59±12 years). We also investigated the frequency of CD57(+) or CD28(null) senescent T cells in peripheral blood lymphocytes and analyzed which immune parameters were correlated with pulse wave velocity. Furthermore, cytomegalovirus-specific T cells were stimulated with overlapping peptides covering pp65 protein, and T-cell function was evaluated by intracellular cytokine staining of interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, and CD107a. In a multivariate analysis, it was found that the frequency of CD57(+) cells in the CD8(+) T-cell subset was independently correlated with pulse wave velocity after adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors such as age, sex, diabetes mellitus history, smoking history, body mass index, blood pressure, serum creatinine, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. Cytomegalovirus pp65-specific T cells were more frequently observed in the CD8(+)CD57(+) population than in the CD8(+)CD57(-) population, and multivariate analysis revealed that the frequency of cytomegalovirus pp65-specific interferon-γ(+), tumor necrosis factor-α(+), or CD107a(+) cells in the CD8(+) T-cell subset was independently correlated with pulse wave velocity as well. We demonstrate that arterial stiffness is associated with senescent CD57(+) T cells and CMV pp65-specific T cells in the CD8(+) T-cell subset. The precise role of cytomegalovirus-specific, senescent T cells in vascular aging needs to be further investigated. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  17. A systematic review on the effect of acute aerobic exercise on arterial stiffness reveals a differential response in the upper and lower arterial segments.

    PubMed

    Mutter, Andrew F; Cooke, Alexandra B; Saleh, Olivier; Gomez, Yessica-Haydee; Daskalopoulou, Stella S

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to provide insight into the controversy that still abounds as to the impact of acute aerobic exercise on immediate changes in arterial stiffness. Electronic databases were searched to identify articles assessing the effects of acute aerobic exercise on parameters of arterial stiffness. Eligible studies included arterial stiffness measurements before and after acute aerobic exercise in healthy human subjects. Forty-three studies were included. The effect of acute aerobic exercise on arterial stiffness was found to be dependent on the anatomical segment assessed, and on the timing of the measurement post-exercise. Arterial stiffness of the central and upper body peripheral arterial segments was found to be increased relative to resting values immediately post-exercise (0-5 min), whereas, thereafter (>5 min), decreased to a level at or below resting values. In the lower limbs, proximal to the primary working muscles, arterial stiffness decreased immediately post-exercise (0-5 min), which persisted into the recovery period post-exercise (>5 min). This systematic review reveals a differential response to acute exercise in the lower and upper/central arterial segments in healthy adult subjects. We further showed that the effect of acute aerobic exercise on arterial stiffness is dependent on the timing of the measurements post-exercise. Therefore, when assessing the overall impact of exercise on arterial stiffness, it is important to consider the arterial segment being analyzed and measurement time point, as failure to contextualize the measurement can lead to conflicting results and misleading clinical inferences.

  18. Childhood Socioeconomic Status and Arterial Stiffness in Adulthood: The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

    PubMed

    Puolakka, Elina; Pahkala, Katja; Laitinen, Tomi T; Magnussen, Costan G; Hutri-Kähönen, Nina; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Tossavainen, Päivi; Jokinen, Eero; Sabin, Matthew A; Laitinen, Tomi; Elovainio, Marko; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Viikari, Jorma S A; Raitakari, Olli T; Juonala, Markus

    2017-10-01

    Increasing evidence supports the importance of socioeconomic factors in the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. However, the association of childhood socioeconomic status (SES) with arterial stiffness in adulthood has not been reported. Our aim was to determine whether higher childhood family-level SES is associated with lower arterial stiffness in adulthood. The analyses were performed using data gathered within the longitudinal Young Finns Study. The sample comprised 2566 participants who had data concerning family SES at ages 3 to 18 years in 1980 and arterial pulse wave velocity and carotid artery distensibility measured 21 or 27 years later in adulthood. Higher family SES in childhood was associated with lower arterial stiffness in adulthood; carotid artery distensibility being higher (β value±SE, 0.029±0.0089%/10 mm Hg; P=0.001) and pulse wave velocity lower (β value±SE, -0.062±0.022 m/s; P=0.006) among those with higher family SES in a multivariable analysis adjusted with age, sex, and conventional childhood cardiometabolic risk factors. The association remained significant after further adjustment for participant's SES in adulthood (β value±SE, 0.026±0.010%/10 mm Hg; P=0.01 for carotid artery distensibility and β value±SE, -0.048±0.023 m/s; P=0.04 for pulse wave velocity) but attenuated after adjustment for adulthood cardiometabolic risk factors (β value±SE, 0.015±0.008%/10 mm Hg; P=0.08 for carotid artery distensibility and β value±SE, -0.019±0.02 m/s; P=0.38 for pulse wave velocity). In conclusion, we observed an association between higher family SES in childhood and lower arterial stiffness in adulthood. Our findings suggest that special attention could be paid to children from low SES families to prevent cardiometabolic diseases primordially. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Arterial stiffness is associated to cardiorespiratory fitness and body mass index in young Swedish adults: The Lifestyle, Biomarkers, and Atherosclerosis study.

    PubMed

    Fernberg, Ulrika; Fernström, Maria; Hurtig-Wennlöf, Anita

    2017-01-01

    Background Early changes in the large muscular arteries are already associated with risk factors as hypertension and obesity in adolescence and young adulthood. The present study examines the association between arterial stiffness measurements, pulse wave velocity and augmentation index and lifestyle-related factors, body composition and cardiorespiratory fitness, in young, healthy, Swedish adults. Design This study used a population-based cross-sectional sample. Methods The 834 participants in the study were self-reported healthy, non-smoking, age 18-25 years. Augmentation index and pulse wave velocity were measured with applanation tonometry. Cardiorespiratory fitness was measured by ergometer bike test to estimate maximal oxygen uptake. Body mass index (kg/m(2)) was calculated and categorised according to classification by the World Health Organisation. Results Young Swedish adults with obesity and low cardiorespiratory fitness have significantly higher pulse wave velocity and augmentation index than non-obese young adults with medium or high cardiorespiratory fitness. The observed U-shaped association between pulse wave velocity and body mass index categories in women indicates that it might be more beneficial to be normal weight than underweight when assessing the arterial stiffness with pulse wave velocity. The highest mean pulse wave velocity was found in overweight/obese individuals with low cardiorespiratory fitness. The lowest mean pulse wave velocity was found in normal weight individuals with high cardiorespiratory fitness. Cardiorespiratory fitness had a stronger effect than body mass index on arterial stiffness in multiple regression analyses. Conclusions The inverse association between cardiorespiratory fitness and arterial stiffness is observed already in young adults. The study result highlights the importance of high cardiorespiratory fitness, but also that underweight individuals may be a possible risk group that needs to be further studied.

  20. Arterial hypertension perpetuates alveolar bone loss.

    PubMed

    de Medeiros Vanderlei, Janine Montenegro Toscano Moura; Messora, Michel Reis; Fernandes, Patrícia Garani; Novaes, Arthur B; Palioto, Daniela Bazan; de Moraes Grisi, Marcio Fernando; Scombatti de Souza, Sergio Luis; Gerlach, Raquel Fernanda; Antoniali, Cristina; Taba, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have focused on the impact of hypertension on the progression of periodontitis (PD). The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether hypertension affects PD by enhancing bone loss even after the stimulus for PD induction is removed. Ligature-induced PD was created on the first mandibular molars of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and normotensive rats (Wistar Kyoto-WKY). The animals were assigned to non-ligated controls (C) and PD groups: WKY-C, WKY-PD, SHR-C, and SHR-PD. After 10 days, five animals of each group were killed and the ligatures of the other animals were removed. On the 21st day (11 days without PD induced), the remaining animals were killed. The jaws were defleshed and the amount of bone loss was measured. After 10 days, the PD groups showed more bone loss than its controls (P < .05); SHR-PD = 0.72 ± 0.05 mm, SHR-C = 0.39 ± 0.04 mm, WKY-PD = 0.75 ± 0.04 mm, and WKY-C = 0.56 ± 0.04 mm. The cumulative bone loss on day 21 (0.94 ± 0.13 mm) was significantly worse than on day 10 only in SHR-PD group (P < .05). The final bone loss differences between PD and C groups accounted for 102% (SHR) and 26% (WKY) increase in comparison with the initial control levels. Hypertension is associated with progressive alveolar bone loss even when the stimulus for PD induction is removed and it may be speculated that host condition perpetuates alveolar bone loss.

  1. Lineage Analysis in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    SMA with some globular domains, predominantly colocalizing with GFP endothelial lineage-marked cells in the neointima (Figure 4F). Figure 4. VE...whether the neointima arises from a small population of apoptosis- resistant pulmonary artery endothelial cells that proliferate after injury to produce

  2. Children and Adolescent Obesity Associates with Pressure-Dependent and Age-Related Increase in Carotid and Femoral Arteries' Stiffness and Not in Brachial Artery, Indicative of Nonintrinsic Arterial Wall Alteration

    PubMed Central

    García-Espinosa, Victoria; Curcio, Santiago; Castro, Juan Manuel; Arana, Maite; Giachetto, Gustavo; Chiesa, Pedro; Zócalo, Yanina

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To analyze if childhood obesity associates with changes in elastic, transitional, and/or muscular arteries' stiffness. Methods. 221 subjects (4–15 years, 92 females) were assigned to normal weight (NW, n = 137) or obesity (OB, n = 84) groups, considering their body mass index z-score. Age groups were defined: 4–8; 8–12; 12–15 years old. Carotid, femoral, and brachial artery local stiffness was determined through systodiastolic pressure-diameter and stress-strain relationships. To this end, arterial diameter and peripheral and aortic blood pressure (BP) levels and waveforms were recorded. Carotid-femoral, femoropedal, and carotid-radial pulse wave velocities were determined to evaluate aortic, lower-limb, and upper-limb regional arterial stiffness, respectively. Correlation analysis between stiffness parameters and BP was done. Results. Compared to NW, OB subjects showed higher peripheral and central BP and carotid and femoral stiffness, reaching statistical significance in subjects aged 12 and older. Arterial stiffness differences disappeared when levels were normalized for BP. There were no differences in intrinsic arterial wall stiffness (elastic modulus), BP stiffness relationships, and regional stiffness parameters. Conclusion. OB associates with BP-dependent and age-related increase in carotid and femoral (but not brachial) stiffness. Stiffness changes would not be explained by intrinsic arterial wall alterations but could be associated with the higher BP levels observed in obese children. PMID:27066273

  3. Angiotensin Receptor Blockades Effect on Peripheral Muscular and Central Aortic Arterial Stiffness: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Chih-Hsuan; Lai, Yau-Huei; Hung, Chung-Lieh; Lee, Ping-Ying; Kuo, Jen-Yuan; Yeh, Hung-I; Hou, Charles Jia-Yin; Chien, Kuo-Liong

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous clinical trials have demonstrated the impact of blocking upstream renin-angiotensin-axis with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) on arterial stiffness as evaluated by pulse-wave velocity (PWV). We ran a meta-analysis to evaluate the anti-stiffness effect of powerful downstream angiotensin receptor blockades (ARBs) on peripheral and central arterial stiffness (brachial to ankle, ba-PWV; carotid to femoral, cf-PWV, respectively), using a systematic review to assess the clinical arterial stiffness issues. Methods For our study, we searched the PubMed and Cochrane Library databases from inception to June 2013, targeting randomized controlled trials. ARBs along with other antihypertensive agents, ACEIs, calcium channel blockers (CCBs), beta-blockers and diuretics were evaluated to ascertain their comparable effect on ba-PWV and cf-PWV, respectively. A meta-analysis was conducted utilizing the fixed or random effect of the weighted mean change difference between the ARB and comparator groups, depending on the I2 statistic heterogeneity measurement. Results In 2 trials treating patients with ARBs (n = 30), the ARBs insignificantly reduced levels of ba-PWV (pooled mean change difference -188, 95% CI -687, 311, p = 0.24 with significant heterogeneity) as compared to other hypertensive agents (ACEIs and CCBs, n = 77). Interestingly, ARBs (n = 20) had a superior capacity to reduce levels of ba-PWV than CCBs (n = 20) in single study results (mean change difference -400, 95% CI -477, -322, p < 0.05). In 7 trials which included a total of 653 patients, treatment with ARBs (n = 308) also insignificantly reduced cf-PWV (pool mean change difference -0.197, 95% CI -0.54, 0.14, p = 0.218) as compared to other anti-hypertensive agents. Conclusions Our data suggested that ARBs had a similar effect as other anti-hypertensive agents in reducing ba-PWV and cf-PWV. Upon systematic review, the renin-angiotensin-axis system mechanism seems more significant

  4. [Clinico-statistical analysis of arterial hypertension complicated with hypertensive crisis in Moscow in 2005-2009].

    PubMed

    Gaponova, N I; Plavunov, N F; Tereshchenko, S N; Baratashvili, V L; Abdurakhmanov, V R; Komissarenko, I A; Filippov, D V; Podkopaev, D V

    2011-01-01

    Clinicostatistical analysis of arterial hypertension complicated with hypertensive crisis using data of Moscow A.S.Puchkov Station of Urgent and Emergent Medical Aid revealed 14% rise in number of hypertensive crises during the period from 2005 to 2009. Number of hypertensive crises increased among persons of young age (18-35 years). Frequency of cerebrovascular complications of hypertensive crises was age dependent with maximal values among men aged 36-74 years and women older than 75 years.

  5. Application of a four-channel vibrometer system for detection of arterial stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, Adriaan; Waz, Adam; Dudzik, Grzegorz; Dirckx, Joris; Abramski, Krzysztof

    2016-06-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CD) are the most important cause of death in the world and their prevalence is only rising. A significant aspect in the etiology of CD is the stiffening of the large arteries (arteriosclerosis) and plaque formation (atherosclerosis) in the common carotid artery (CCA) in the neck. As shown by increasing evidence, both conditions can be detected by assessing pulse wave velocity (PWV) in the CCA, and several approaches allow local detection of PWV, including ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In previous studies, laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) was introduced as an approach to assess arterial stiffness. In the present work, a new, compact four-channel LDV system is used for PWV detection in four phantom arteries mimicking real life CCA conditions. The high sensitivity of the LDV system allowed PWV to be assessed, and even local changes in phantom architecture could be detected. This method has potential for cardiovascular screening, as it allows arteriosclerosis assessment and plaque detection.

  6. Vascular stiffness mechanoactivates YAP/TAZ-dependent glutaminolysis to drive pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Bertero, Thomas; Oldham, William M.; Cottrill, Katherine A.; Pisano, Sabrina; Vanderpool, Rebecca R.; Yu, Qiujun; Zhao, Jingsi; Tai, Yiyin; Tang, Ying; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Rehman, Sofiya; Sugahara, Masataka; Qi, Zhi; Gorcsan, John; Vargas, Sara O.; Saggar, Rajan; Saggar, Rajeev; Wallace, W. Dean; Ross, David J.; Haley, Kathleen J.; Parikh, Victoria N.; De Marco, Teresa; Hsue, Priscilla Y.; Morris, Alison; Simon, Marc A.; Norris, Karen A.; Gaggioli, Cedric; Loscalzo, Joseph; Fessel, Joshua; Chan, Stephen Y.

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of vascular stiffness and cellular metabolism occurs early in pulmonary hypertension (PH). However, the mechanisms by which biophysical properties of the vascular extracellular matrix (ECM) relate to metabolic processes important in PH remain undefined. In this work, we examined cultured pulmonary vascular cells and various types of PH-diseased lung tissue and determined that ECM stiffening resulted in mechanoactivation of the transcriptional coactivators YAP and TAZ (WWTR1). YAP/TAZ activation modulated metabolic enzymes, including glutaminase (GLS1), to coordinate glutaminolysis and glycolysis. Glutaminolysis, an anaplerotic pathway, replenished aspartate for anabolic biosynthesis, which was critical for sustaining proliferation and migration within stiff ECM. In vitro, GLS1 inhibition blocked aspartate production and reprogrammed cellular proliferation pathways, while application of aspartate restored proliferation. In the monocrotaline rat model of PH, pharmacologic modulation of pulmonary vascular stiffness and YAP-dependent mechanotransduction altered glutaminolysis, pulmonary vascular proliferation, and manifestations of PH. Additionally, pharmacologic targeting of GLS1 in this model ameliorated disease progression. Notably, evaluation of simian immunodeficiency virus–infected nonhuman primates and HIV-infected subjects revealed a correlation between YAP/TAZ–GLS activation and PH. These results indicate that ECM stiffening sustains vascular cell growth and migration through YAP/TAZ-dependent glutaminolysis and anaplerosis, and thereby link mechanical stimuli to dysregulated vascular metabolism. Furthermore, this study identifies potential metabolic drug targets for therapeutic development in PH. PMID:27548520

  7. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Prevalence and Predictors.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Peñate, Gregorio Miguel; Rúa-Figueroa, Iñigo; Juliá-Serdá, Gabriel; León-Marrero, Fernándo; García-Quintana, Antonio; Ortega-Trujillo, José Ramón; Erausquin-Arruabarrena, Celia; Rodríguez-Lozano, Carlos; Cabrera-Navarro, Pedro; Ojeda-Betancor, Nazario; Gómez-Sánchez, Miguel Ángel

    2016-02-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) prevalence has been reported to be between 0.5% and 17% in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This study assessed PAH prevalence and predictors in an SLE cohort. The Borg dyspnea scale, DLCO, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), and Doppler echocardiographic (DE) were performed. An echocardiographic Doppler exercise test was conducted in selected patients. When DE systolic pulmonary arterial pressure was ≥ 45 mmHg or increased during exercise > 20 mmHg, a right heart catheterization was performed. Hemodynamic during exercise was measured if rest mean pulmonary arterial pressure was < 25 mmHg. Of the 203 patients with SLE, 152 were included. The mean age was 44.9 ± 12.3 years, and 94% were women. Three patients had known PAH. The algorithm diagnosed 1 patient with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and 5 with exercise-induced pulmonary artery pressure increase (4 with occult left diastolic dysfunction). These patients had significantly more dyspnea, higher NT-proBNP, and lower DLCO. These data confirm the low prevalence of PAH in SLE. In our cohort, occult left ventricular diastolic dysfunction was a frequent diagnosis of unexplained dyspnea. Dyspnea, DLCO, and NT-proBNP could be predictors of pulmonary hypertension in patients with SLE.

  8. Fibrinogen and d-dimer in contrasting relation with measures of wave reflection and arterial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Wykretowicz, Jedrzej; Guzik, Przemyslaw; Krauze, Tomasz; Marciniak, Ryszard; Komarnicki, Mieczyslaw; Piskorski, Jaroslaw; Wysocki, Henryk; Wykretowicz, Andrzej

    2012-12-01

    The relationship between the results of coagulation tests and measures of arterial stiffness or wave reflection has been investigated in different diseases. This exploratory study aimed at the evaluation of similar associations in healthy individuals. Pulse wave analysis of reconstructed aortic pressure waveform for the central augmentation index, augmentation pressure and pulse pressure, and digital volume pulse for the stiffness index were measured at supine rest in 91 healthy volunteers (54.1 ± 8.5 years; 56 female). Standard coagulation tests for the d-dimer and fibrinogen concentrations were performed in fasting venous blood. In univariate linear regression d-dimer and fibrinogen concentrations were significantly and positively, although weakly, associated with measures related to pulse wave analysis. Multivariate linear regression adjusted to subjects' age, resting pulse rate and mean blood pressure showed that the d-dimer concentration was significantly related to central augmentation index (p = 0.014), augmentation pressure (p = 0.003) and pulse pressure (p = 0.029) whereas fibrinogen was linked to the stiffness index (p = 0.04). Higher concentrations of d-dimers and fibrinogen are associated with increased arterial stiffness and faster pulse wave propagation in healthy people and the observed associations are independent of typical determinants of the shapes of pulse pressure waveforms like age, pulse rate and mean blood pressure. The independent relationships between the results of the coagulation tests and pulse wave analysis suggest that the existence of such associations may indicate a biologically plausible phenomenon.

  9. Cardiovascular outcome associations among cardiovascular magnetic resonance measures of arterial stiffness: the Dallas heart study.

    PubMed

    Maroules, Christopher D; Khera, Amit; Ayers, Colby; Goel, Akshay; Peshock, Ronald M; Abbara, Suhny; King, Kevin S

    2014-05-14

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has been validated for the noninvasive assessment of total arterial compliance and aortic stiffness, but their associations with cardiovascular outcomes is unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate associations of CMR measures of total arterial compliance and two CMR measures of aortic stiffness with respect to future cardiovascular events. The study consisted of 2122 Dallas Heart Study participants without cardiovascular disease who underwent CMR at 1.5 Tesla. Aortic stiffness was measured by CMR-derived ascending aortic distensibility and aortic arch pulse wave velocity. Total arterial compliance was calculated by dividing left ventricular stroke volume by pulse pressure. Participants were monitored for cardiovascular death, non-fatal cardiac events, and non-fatal extra-cardiac vascular events over 7.8 ± 1.5 years. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to assess for associations between CMR measures and cardiovascular events. Age, systolic blood pressure, and resting heart rate were independently associated with changes in ascending aortic distensibility, arch pulse wave velocity, and total arterial compliance (all p < .0001). A total of 153 participants (6.9%) experienced a cardiovascular event. After adjusting for traditional risk factors, total arterial compliance was modestly associated with increased risk for composite events (HR 1.07 per 1SD, p = 0.03) while the association between ascending aortic distensibility and composite events trended towards significance (HR 1.18 per 1SD, p = 0.08). Total arterial compliance and aortic distensibility were independently associated with nonfatal cardiac events (HR 1.11 per 1SD, p = 0.001 and HR 1.45 per 1SD, p = 0.0005, respectively), but not with cardiovascular death or nonfatal extra-cardiac vascular events. Arch pulse wave velocity was independently associated with nonfatal extra-cardiac vascular events (HR 1.18 per 1SD, p = 0

  10. Taurine supplementation attenuates delayed increase in exercise-induced arterial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Ra, Song-Gyu; Choi, Youngju; Akazawa, Nobuhiko; Ohmori, Hajime; Maeda, Seiji

    2016-06-01

    There is a delayed increase in arterial stiffness after eccentric exercise that is possibly mediated by the concurrent delayed increase in circulating oxidative stress. Taurine has anti-oxidant action, and taurine supplementation may be able to attenuate the increase in oxidative stress after exercise. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether taurine supplementation attenuates the delayed increase in arterial stiffness after eccentric exercise. In the present double-blind, randomized, and placebo-controlled trial, we divided 29 young, healthy men into 2 groups. Subjects received either 2.0 g of placebo (n = 14) or taurine (n = 15) 3 times per day for 14 days prior to the exercise, on the day of exercise, and the following 3 days. The exercise consisted of 2 sets of 20 maximal-effort eccentric repetitions with the nondominant arm only. On the morning of exercise and for 4 days thereafter, we measured serum malondialdehyde (MDA) and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) as indices of oxidative stress and arterial stiffness, respectively. On the third and fourth days after exercise, both MDA and cfPWV significantly increased in the placebo group. However, these elevations were significantly attenuated in the taurine group. The increase in MDA was associated with an increase in cfPWV from before exercise to 4 days after exercise (r = 0.597, p < 0.05) in the placebo group, but not in the taurine group. Our results suggest that delayed increase in arterial stiffness after eccentric exercise was probably affected by the exercise-induced oxidative stress and was attenuated by the taurine supplementation.

  11. Longitudinal changes of the serum calcium levels and accelerated progression of arterial stiffness with age.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kazutaka; Tomiyama, Hirofumi; Matsumoto, Chisa; Odaira, Mari; Shiina, Kazuki; Nagata, Mikio; Yamashina, Akira

    2015-12-01

    The progression of arterial stiffness is accelerated by aging, although the underlying mechanisms have not yet been clarified. This prospective observational study was conducted to clarify whether longitudinal changes in the serum calcium/phosphate levels are associated with the accelerated progression of arterial stiffness with age. In a cohort of employees at a construction company (1507 middle-aged Japanese men), the serum calcium/phosphate levels and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) were measured at the start and at the end of a 3-year study period. A general linear model multivariate analysis revealed a significant interaction of the 2 factors {age and longitudinal changes of the serum calcium levels (delCa) during the follow-up period} on the longitudinal changes of the baPWV during the study period (delPWV). The delCa was significantly correlated with the delPWV even after adjustments for covariates in subjects aged ≥48 years. The delPWV in subjects aged ≥48 years with the delCa in the upper tertile (69 ± 137 cm/s) was significantly larger than that in the other groups even after adjustments for covariates (e.g., del PWV in subjects aged <48 years with the delCa in the lower tertile = 1 ± 94 cm/s) (p < 0.01). The association between the arterial stiffness and serum calcium levels differed with age. Pathophysiological abnormalities related to increased serum calcium levels appeared to be associated with accelerated progression of arterial stiffness with age. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Exposure to wood smoke increases arterial stiffness and decreases heart rate variability in humans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Emissions from biomass combustion are a major source of indoor and outdoor air pollution, and are estimated to cause millions of premature deaths worldwide annually. Whilst adverse respiratory health effects of biomass exposure are well established, less is known about its effects on the cardiovascular system. In this study we assessed the effect of exposure to wood smoke on heart rate, blood pressure, central arterial stiffness and heart rate variability in otherwise healthy persons. Methods Fourteen healthy non-smoking subjects participated in a randomized, double-blind crossover study. Subjects were exposed to dilute wood smoke (mean particle concentration of 314±38 μg/m3) or filtered air for three hours during intermittent exercise. Heart rate, blood pressure, central arterial stiffness and heart rate variability were measured at baseline and for one hour post-exposure. Results Central arterial stiffness, measured as augmentation index, augmentation pressure and pulse wave velocity, was higher after wood smoke exposure as compared to filtered air (p < 0.01 for all), and heart rate was increased (p < 0.01) although there was no effect on blood pressure. Heart rate variability (SDNN, RMSSD and pNN50; p = 0.003, p < 0.001 and p < 0.001 respectively) was decreased one hour following exposure to wood smoke compared to filtered air. Conclusions Acute exposure to wood smoke as a model of exposure to biomass combustion is associated with an immediate increase in central arterial stiffness and a simultaneous reduction in heart rate variability. As biomass is used for cooking and heating by a large fraction of the global population and is currently advocated as a sustainable alternative energy source, further studies are required to establish its likely impact on cardiovascular disease. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01488500 PMID:23742058

  13. Differences in arterial stiffness at rest and after acute exercise between young men and women.

    PubMed

    Doonan, Robert J; Mutter, Andrew; Egiziano, Giordano; Gomez, Yessica-Haydee; Daskalopoulou, Stella S

    2013-03-01

    There is controversy as to whether there are sex differences in arterial stiffness. Acute physical stress can elicit vascular abnormalities not present at rest. Our objective was to assess sex differences in arterial stiffness at rest and in response to acute physical stress. Healthy young men (n=67) and women (n=55) underwent pulse wave analysis and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity measurements at rest and 2, 5, 10 and 15 min following an exercise test to exhaustion. At rest, aortic systolic, diastolic, pulse and mean pressures were all significantly higher in men as was aortic pulse pressure at 10 and 15 min post exercise and aortic systolic pressure at 15 min. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity was significantly higher in men (6.0±0.7 m s(-1) vs. 5.6±0.6 m s(-1), P=0.03) at rest and at all time points post exercise. Heart rate-adjusted augmentation index was significantly lower (-10.7±10.2% vs. -4.0±10.9, P<0.0001) and subendocardial viability ratio was significantly higher (176.2±43.8% vs. 163.4±40.9, P=0.04) in men at rest. To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess sex differences in the arterial stiffness response to acute physical stress in young men and women. Although we were not able to elicit differences in vascular function after adjustment, which were not present at rest, we found that young men and women exhibit differences in arterial stiffness at rest and after acute physical stress.

  14. Assessment of arterial stiffness in patients with metabolic syndrome in Ecuador: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Peñaherrera, Carlos A; Peñaherrera, Ruben; Duarte, Maria C; Peñaherrera, Ernesto

    Metabolic syndrome increases cardiovascular risk, and causes damage to the vascular wall. Through this mechanism, it might increase arterial rigidity, leading to further complications and heart strain. The use of a device that measures arterial rigidity can help determine if metabolic syndrome is related to a higher vascular stiffness and changes in estimated arterial age. Cross-sectional study at Luis Vernaza hospital of Guayaquil, Ecuador. Inpatients and outpatients from the Department of Cardiology with a full blood panel and echocardiogram were included. We used the IDF criteria to diagnose metabolic syndrome and measured arterial rigidity parameters in all of them, including augmentation indexes, central blood pressure, pulse wave velocity and arterial age. 95 patients were included for analysis, 44.2% were females and 55.8% were males. Mean age was 61.7 years (±13.1). Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in 49.5% of our patients and it was significantly more prevalent in women. We found significant differences in PWV, augmentation indexes, and peripheral and central blood pressure between metabolic and non-metabolic syndrome patients. There was a non-significant relationship between estimated arterial age and metabolic syndrome (p=0.32). Patients with metabolic syndrome have an increased arterial rigidity. This, added to the high prevalence of the disease we found in our sample, shows the high cardiovascular risk these patients are at. A multidisciplinary approach to management is needed, along with patient collaboration. The introduction of these devices to measure arterial stiffness in developing countries can improve diagnosis and therapy of patients with cardio-metabolic conditions. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of acute aerobic exercise and histamine receptor blockade on arterial stiffness in African Americans and Caucasians.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huimin; Ranadive, Sushant M; Lane-Cordova, Abbi D; Kappus, Rebecca M; Behun, Michael A; Cook, Marc D; Woods, Jeffrey A; Wilund, Kenneth R; Baynard, Tracy; Halliwill, John R; Fernhall, Bo

    2017-02-01

    African Americans (AA) exhibit exaggerated central blood pressure (BP) and arterial stiffness measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV) in response to an acute bout of maximal exercise compared with Caucasians (CA). However, whether potential racial differences exist in central BP, elastic, or muscular arterial distensibility after submaximal aerobic exercise remains unknown. Histamine receptor activation mediates sustained postexercise hyperemia in CA but the effect on arterial stiffness is unknown. This study sought to determine the effects of an acute bout of aerobic exercise on central BP and arterial stiffness and the role of histamine receptors, in AA and CA. Forty-nine (22 AA, 27 CA) young and healthy subjects completed the study. Subjects were randomly assigned to take either histamine receptor antagonist or control placebo. Central blood BP and arterial stiffness measurements were obtained at baseline, and at 30, 60, and 90 min after 45 min of moderate treadmill exercise. AA exhibited greater central diastolic BP, elevated brachial PWV, and local carotid arterial stiffness after an acute bout of submaximal exercise compared with CA, which may contribute to their higher risk of cardiovascular disease. Unexpectedly, histamine receptor blockade did not affect central BP or PWV in AA or CA after exercise, but it may play a role in mediating local carotid arterial stiffness. Furthermore, histamine may mediate postexercise carotid arterial dilation in CA but not in AA. These observations provide evidence that young and healthy AA exhibit an exaggerated hemodynamic response to exercise and attenuated vasodilator response compared with CA.NEW & NOTEWORTHY African Americans are at greater risk for developing cardiovascular disease than Caucasians. We are the first to show that young and healthy African Americans exhibit greater central blood pressure, elevated brachial stiffness, and local carotid arterial stiffness following an acute bout of submaximal exercise

  16. High-Dose versus Low-Dose Vitamin D Supplementation and Arterial Stiffness among Individuals with Prehypertension and Vitamin D Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Zaleski, Amanda; Panza, Gregory; Swales, Heather; Arora, Pankaj; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Wang, Thomas; Thompson, Paul D; Taylor, Beth

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with the onset and progression of hypertension and cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, mechanisms underlying vitamin D deficiency-mediated increased risk of CVD remain unknown. We sought to examine the differential effect of high-dose versus low-dose vitamin D supplementation on markers of arterial stiffness among ~40 vitamin D deficient adults with prehypertension. Participants were randomized to high-dose (4000 IU/d) versus low-dose (400 IU/d) oral vitamin D3 for 6 months. 24 hr ambulatory blood pressure (BP), carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, and pulse wave analyses were obtained at baseline and after 6 months of vitamin D supplementation. There were no changes in resting BP or pulse wave velocity over 6 mo regardless of vitamin D dose (all p > 0.202). High-dose vitamin D decreased augmentation index and pressure by 12.3 ± 5.3% (p = 0.047) and 4.0 ± 1.5 mmHg (p = 0.02), respectively. However, these decreases in arterial stiffness were not associated with increases in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D over 6 mo (p = 0.425). High-dose vitamin D supplementation appears to lower surrogate measures of arterial stiffness but not indices of central pulse wave velocity. Clinical Trial Registration. This trial is registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (Unique Identifier: NCT01240512).