Science.gov

Sample records for artery catheter complications

  1. Nurses' guide to early detection of umbilical arterial catheter complications in infants.

    PubMed

    Furdon, Susan Arana; Horgan, Michael J; Bradshaw, Wanda Todd; Clark, David A

    2006-10-01

    Umbilical arterial catheters (UAC) are routinely used in the care of critically ill newborns. Complications related to UACs include vascular compromise, hemorrhage, complications related to malposition, severance of the catheter itself, and infection. This article is Part II in a series dedicated to assessing infants with an umbilical catheter. Part I focused on infants with umbilical venous catheters; this article will focus on the physical assessment relevant to infants with an UAC. Complications related to UACs can occur during any phase of treatment: insertion, while indwelling, or after discontinuing the catheter. Review of clinical signs of complications along with clinical photographs, will assist caregivers in promptly recognizing UAC-related complications.

  2. Clinical review: Complications and risk factors of peripheral arterial catheters used for haemodynamic monitoring in anaesthesia and intensive care medicine

    PubMed Central

    Scheer, Bernd Volker; Perel, Azriel; Pfeiffer, Ulrich J

    2002-01-01

    In order to evaluate the complications and risk factors associated with peripheral arterial catheters used for haemodynamic monitoring, we reviewed the literature published from 1978 to 2001. We closely examined the three most commonly used arterial cannulation sites. The reviewed papers included a total of 19,617 radial, 3899 femoral and 1989 axillary artery catheterizations. Factors that contribute to higher complication rates were investigated. Major complications occurred in fewer than 1% of the cases, and rates were similar for the radial, femoral and axillary arteries. We conclude that arterial cannulation is a safe procedure. PMID:12133178

  3. Evidence-based review of the use of the pulmonary artery catheter: impact data and complications

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    The pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) was introduced in 1971 for the assessment of heart function at the bedside. Since then it has generated much enthusiasm and controversy regarding the benefits and potential harms caused by this invasive form of hemodynamic monitoring. This review discusses all clinical studies conducted during the past 30 years, in intensive care unit settings or post mortem, on the impact of the PAC on outcomes and complications resulting from the procedure. Although most of the historical observational studies and randomized clinical trials also looked at PAC-related complications among their end-points, we opted to review the data under two main topics: the impact of PAC on clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness, and the major complications related to the use of the PAC. PMID:17164020

  4. Hemodialysis Tunneled Catheter Noninfectious Complications

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Lisa M.; MacRae, Jennifer M.; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Clark, Edward; Dipchand, Christine; Kappel, Joanne; Lok, Charmaine; Luscombe, Rick; Moist, Louise; Oliver, Matthew; Pike, Pamela; Hiremath, Swapnil

    2016-01-01

    Noninfectious hemodialysis catheter complications include catheter dysfunction, catheter-related thrombus, and central vein stenosis. The definitions, causes, and treatment strategies for catheter dysfunction are reviewed below. Catheter-related thrombus is a less common but serious complication of catheters, requiring catheter removal and systemic anticoagulation. In addition, the risk factors, clinical manifestation, and treatment options for central vein stenosis are outlined. PMID:28270922

  5. Pulmonary artery rupture as a complication of Swan-Ganz catheter application. Diagnosis and endovascular treatment: a single centre's experience.

    PubMed

    Rudziński, Piotr N; Henzel, Jan; Dzielińska, Zofia; Lubiszewska, Barbara M; Michałowska, Ilona; Szymański, Piotr; Pracoń, Radosław; Hryniewiecki, Tomasz; Demkow, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    The placement of a Swan-Ganz catheter into the pulmonary artery may lead to a number of complications (2-17%). In less than 0.2% of cases Swan-Ganz catheterization results in serious vascular damage - pulmonary artery rupture (PAR). This paper presents two distinct forms of iatrogenic PAR treated endovascularly using different vascular devices. To evaluate the effectiveness of endovascular treatment and the application of different types of vascular devices in the management of pulmonary artery rupture caused by Swan-Ganz catheterization. In this retrospective study we evaluated 2 patients in whom Swan-Ganz catheter application was used for perioperative monitoring and resulted in pulmonary artery rupture. This complication was treated endovascularly by means of interventional cardiology. We report the cases of 2 patients with a pulmonary artery pseudoaneurysm formed in the perioperative period. In case 1, a single, 4-loop, 3 mm diameter coil was implanted. In case 2, a 5 mm Amplatzer Vascular Plug IV was applied. In both cases, the endovascular approach resulted in total occlusion of the feeding artery and reduced further extravasation of the blood. Despite its extremely low incidence, iatrogenic PAR is a serious, life-threatening complication of Swan-Ganz catheterization that requires urgent attention. Among available methods of treatment, percutaneous embolization is a relatively quick, safe, accurate and highly effective alternative to traumatizing surgery.

  6. Arterial protocol including prophylactic distal perfusion catheter decreases limb ischemia complications in patients undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Kathleen M; DiMuzio, Paul J; Johnson, Adam; Batista, Philip; Moudgill, Neil; McCullough, Megan; Eisenberg, Joshua A; Hirose, Hitoshi; Cavarocchi, Nicholas C

    2017-04-01

    Venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a salvage therapy in patients with severe cardiopulmonary failure. Owing to the large size of the cannulas inserted via the femoral vessels (≤24-F) required for adequate oxygenation, this procedure could result in significant limb ischemic complications (10%-70%). This study evaluates the results of a distal limb perfusion arterial protocol designed to reduce associated complications. We conducted a retrospective institutional review board-approved review of consecutive patients requiring ECMO via femoral cannulation (July 2010-January 2015). To prevent arterial ischemia, a distal perfusion catheter (DPC) was placed antegrade into the superficial femoral artery and connected to the ECMO circuit. Limb perfusion was monitored via near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) placed on both calves. Decannulation involved open repair, patch angioplasty, and femoral thrombectomy as needed. A total of 91 patients were placed on ECMO via femoral arterial cannula (16-F to 24-F) for a mean duration of 9 days (range, 1-40 days). A percutaneous DPC was inserted prophylactically at the time of cannulation in 55 of 91 patients, without subsequent ischemia. Of the remaining 36 patients without initial DPC placement, 12 (33% without DPC) developed ipsilateral limb ischemia related to arterial insufficiency, as detected by NIRS and clinical findings. In these patients, the placement of a DPC (n = 7) with or without a fasciotomy, or with a fasciotomy alone (n = 4), resulted in limb salvage; only one patient required subsequent amputation. After decannulation (n = 7), no patients had further evidence of limb ischemia. Risk factors for the development of limb ischemia identified by categorical analysis included lack of DPC at time of cannulation and ECMO cannula size of less than 20-Fr. There was a trend toward younger patient age. Overall ECMO survival rate was 42%, whereas survival in patients with limb ischemia was only 25

  7. Frequency, Indications And Complications Of Pulmonary Artery Catheter Insertion In Adult Open-Heart Surgery Patients Of A Tertiary Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Syed Shabbir; Akhtar, Mohammad Irfan; Kamal, Rehana

    2016-01-01

    Patients presenting for cardiac surgery have unstable cardiovascular disease and haemodynamics with multiple coexisting diseases. Optimal monitoring in the perioperative period is very important for best perioperative outcome. The introduction of the flow-directed pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) into clinical practice is one of the most important and popular advances in the field of cardiac anaesthesia. The objective of the study was to determine the frequency, indications and complications of pulmonary artery catheter insertion in adult open-heart surgery patients. A Prospective observational study was conducted at cardiac operating rooms and Cardiac Intensive care unit (CICU) of Aga Khan University Hospital for a period of six months from Nov 2015 to April 2016.Two hundred and seven patients were included in this study. PAC was inserted through right/left internal jugular vein or subclavian vein. Complications noted were arrhythmias (atrial and ventricular), right bundle branch block, coiling and knotting, pulmonary artery rupture, and infection up to 72 hours of PAC insertion. Frequency and percentage were computed for gender, comorbids (Hypertension, Diabetes, Chronic kidney disease, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) and PAC frequency of insertion, indications and complications were noted. The frequency of PAC insertion was 47.83%. Major indications for PAC insertion were poor left ventricular function, acute coronary syndrome, cardiogenic shock, significant left main disease and valvular heart disease patients. Minor complications were found in 23.22% cases, which included arrhythmia in 19.2% cases and coiling in 4.02%. TPulmonary artery catheter insertion is a safe technique with useful clinical application in the management of high-risk cardiac surgical patients. The PAC insertion rationale must be standardized to confirm the judicious use.

  8. Pulmonary artery catheter entrapment in cardiac surgery: a simple percutaneous solution.

    PubMed

    Divakaran, Vijay; Caldera, Angel; Stephens, Jack; Gonzalez, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary artery catheter entrapment is a reported complication after cardiac surgery from inadvertent suturing of the catheter to the vena-caval wall during surgery. This article reports a simple percutaneous technique to retrieve the trapped catheter.

  9. Complications of flow-directed balloon-tipped catheters.

    PubMed

    Smart, F W; Husserl, F E

    1990-01-01

    Acute or short-term complications following the use of flow-directed balloon-tipped catheters are well recognized. Long-term sequelae are rarely reported. We report herein an early complication of pulmonary arterial rupture with infarction followed by the delayed development of a pulmonary arterial aneurysm.

  10. Comparison of the Complications between Left Side and Right Side Subclavian Vein Catheter Placement in Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery.

    PubMed

    Tarbiat, Masoud; Manafi, Babak; Davoudi, Maryam; Totonchi, Ziae

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous subclavian vein catheterization is one of the most common invasive procedures performed in cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was to compare left and right subclavian vein catheter placement via the infraclavicular approach in patients who undergo coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. This prospective, randomized clinical trial was performed in193 patients. The technique applied for cannulation was infraclavicular approach for both the right and the left sides. Subclavian vein of other side was attempted only when catheterization at initial side was unsuccessful at two attempts. The success and complication rates were compared for the two sides. On193 patients, catheterization attempts were performed. Overall 177 catheterizations (91.7%) were successful during the first attempt, 105 (92.1%) on the right side and 72 (91.1%) on the left side. There was no significant difference between success rate and side of catheterization. Malposition of the catheter tip on the right side (9.6%) was significantly more than the left side (0%) (P= 0.003). The differences in other complications on two sides were statistically insignificant. Compared with the right side, insertion of the cannula on the left side resulted in fewer catheter tip misplacements. Incidence of cannulation failure and other complications were similar on both sides.

  11. Catheter tip erosion due to Rotablator burr: An unusual complication.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Christopher; Schurtz, Guillaume; Lemesle, Gilles; Sudre, Arnaud; Van Belle, Eric; Delhaye, Cédric

    2016-01-01

    We report the occurrence of catheter tip erosion during use of a Rotablator, a rare but serious complication. A heavily calcified lesion of the right coronary artery ostium required use of a Rotablator, and the need for strong push led to the choice of an Amplatz Left guiding catheter. The traction of the catheter toward the ostium and the subsequent angle generated led to friction of the burr against the catheter and the erosion of its tip. If judged essential to get strong support, the Amplatz catheter should be used with caution in this setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Successful retrieval of an irretrievable jugular tesio catheter using a fogarty arterial embolectomy catheter.

    PubMed

    Arnáiz-García, María Elena; Gutiérrez-Diez, Francisco; Arnáiz-García, Ana María; Arnáiz, Javier; Expósito, Víctor; Nistal, Juan Francisco; Rodríquez-Entem, Felipe; Olalla, Juan José; López-Rodríguez, Javier; González-Santos, José María

    2014-05-01

    Long life expectancy and wide development of therapies have increased the number of patients under artificial treatment for lost kidney function or dialysis. Different options for vascular access are suitable for receiving this therapy. The use of tunneled catheters has consequently increased complications related to its use. A difficult retrieval of catheters caused by a hard fibrin sheath along its trajectory is a common drawback. Herein, we report a woman with suspicion of hemodialysis catheter infection and an irretrievable Tesio catheter. A novel technique using a Fogarty arterial catheter allowed a successful retrieval and avoided an aggressive management.

  13. Patency and complications of translumbar dialysis catheters

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fanna; Bennett, Stacy; Arrigain, Susana; Schold, Jesse; Heyka, Robert; McLennan, Gordon; Navaneethan, Sankar D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Translumbar tunneled dialysis catheter (TLDC) is a temporary dialysis access for patients exhausted traditional access for dialysis. While few small studies reported successes with TLDC, additional studies are warranted to understand the short and long-term patency and safety of TLDC. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of adult patients who received TLDC for hemodialysis access from June 2006 to June 2013. Patient demographics, comorbid conditions, dialysis details, catheter insertion procedures and associated complications, catheter patency, and patient survival data were collected. Catheter patency was studied using Kaplan-Meier curve; catheter functionality was assessed with catheter intervals and catheter related complications were used to estimate catheter safety. Results There were 84 TLDCs inserted in 28 patients with 28 primary insertions and 56 exchanges. All TLDC insertions were technically successful with good blood flow during dialysis (>300 ml/min) and no immediate complications (major bleeding or clotting) were noted. The median number of days in place for initial catheter, secondary catheter and total catheter were 65, 84 and 244 respectively. The catheter patency rate at 3, 6 and 12 months were 43%, 25% and 7% respectively. The main complications were poor blood flow (40%) and catheter related infection (36%), which led to 30.8% and 35.9% catheter removal respectively. After translumbar catheter, 42.8% of the patients were successfully converted to another vascular access or peritoneal dialysis. Conclusion This study data suggests that TLDC might serve as a safe, alternate access for dialysis patients in short-term who have exhausted conventional vascular access. PMID:25800550

  14. Patency and Complications of Translumbar Dialysis Catheters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fanna; Bennett, Stacy; Arrigain, Susana; Schold, Jesse; Heyka, Robert; McLennan, Gordon; Navaneethan, Sankar D

    2015-01-01

    Translumbar tunneled dialysis catheter (TLDC) is a temporary dialysis access for patients exhausted traditional access for dialysis. While few small studies reported successes with TLDC, additional studies are warranted to understand the short- and long-term patency and safety of TLDC. We conducted a retrospective analysis of adult patients who received TLDC for hemodialysis access from June 2006 to June 2013. Patient demographics, comorbid conditions, dialysis details, catheter insertion procedures and associated complications, catheter patency, and patient survival data were collected. Catheter patency was studied using Kaplan-Meier curve; catheter functionality was assessed with catheter intervals and catheter-related complications were used to estimate catheter safety. There were 84 TLDCs inserted in 28 patients with 28 primary insertions and 56 exchanges. All TLDC insertions were technically successful with good blood flow during dialysis (>300 ml/minute) and no immediate complications (major bleeding or clotting) were noted. The median number of days in place for initial catheter, secondary catheter, and total catheter were 65, 84, and 244 respectively. The catheter patency rate at 3, 6, and 12 months were 43%, 25%, and 7% respectively. The main complications were poor blood flow (40%) and catheter-related infection (36%), which led to 30.8% and 35.9% catheter removal, respectively. After translumbar catheter, 42.8% of the patients were successfully converted to another vascular access or peritoneal dialysis. This study data suggest that TLDC might serve as a safe, alternate access for dialysis patients in short-term who have exhausted conventional vascular access. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The pulmonary artery catheter: in medio virtus.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Jean-Louis; Pinsky, Michael R; Sprung, Charles L; Levy, Mitchell; Marini, John J; Payen, Didier; Rhodes, Andrew; Takala, Jukka

    2008-11-01

    To clarify the role of the pulmonary artery catheter in the intensive care unit. Recent and relevant literature from MEDLINE and authors' personal databases. Studies on pulmonary artery catheter use and use of other monitoring devices in critically ill patients. Based largely on clinical experience and assessment of the relevant published literature and in response to recent articles attacking the pulmonary artery catheter, we propose that the pulmonary artery catheter is still a valuable tool for the hemodynamic monitoring of patients with complex disease processes in whom the information obtained from the pulmonary artery catheter may influence management. We suggest that there is a need to revisit the basics of hemodynamic management and reassess the way in which the pulmonary artery catheter is used, applying three key principles: correct measurement, correct data interpretation, and correct application. The pulmonary artery catheter is still a valuable tool for hemodynamic monitoring when used in selected patients and by physicians adequately trained to correctly interpret and apply the data provided.

  16. A survey of the use of arterial catheters in anesthetized dogs and cats: 267 cases.

    PubMed

    Trim, Cynthia M; Hofmeister, Erik H; Quandt, Jane E; Shepard, Molly K

    2017-01-01

    To describe the clinical practice of insertion of arterial catheters in anesthetized dogs and cats, to document complications of arterial catheterization, and to determine risk factors associated with the complications. Prospective clinical study and retrospective evaluation of medical records. University teaching hospital. Dogs (n = 251) and 13 cats anesthetized for clinical procedures with arterial catheters inserted for blood pressure monitoring. None. Details of the animal and catheter were collected at the time of anesthesia. On the following day, the catheter site was palpated and observed for abnormalities and the medical records of all animals were reviewed retrospectively for complications. Details of catheter placement were available for 216 catheters: 158 catheters in a dorsal pedal artery, 50 catheters in the median caudal (coccygeal) artery, 6 in the median artery, and 1 each in a cranial tibial and lingual artery. Blood pressure was obtained from 200 catheters, and 12 catheters failed before the end of anesthesia. Postoperative observational data obtained from 112 catheters described a palpable arterial pulse at 73 sites and no pulse at 21 sites. No risk factor for arterial occlusion was identified. No complications resulting from arterial catheterization were noted in the medical records. Arterial catheterization resulted in loss of a peripheral pulse postoperatively in 21/94 (22.3%) of animals examined, although no evidence of tissue ischemia was noted in the medical records of any of the patients in this study. These results suggest that insertion of a catheter in the dorsal pedal or coccygeal arteries was not associated with a high risk for complications. However, the course of arterial occlusion postoperatively warrants further investigation. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2016.

  17. Closure Using a Surgical Closure Device of Inadvertent Subclavian Artery Punctures During Central Venous Catheter Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Berlet, Matthew H.; Steffen, Diana; Shaughness, George; Hanner, James

    2001-03-15

    Severe complications can and do occur when central venous catheters are inadvertently placed into subclavian arteries. Two cases are discussed that describe how these inadvertent arterial punctures can be closed using the Perclose device (Abbott Laboratories, Redwood City, CA, USA)

  18. Peripheral venous catheter fracture with embolism into the pulmonary artery

    PubMed Central

    Ammari, Chady; Campisi, Alessio; D’Andrea, Rocco

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral vein catheterization is generally considered a harmless procedure. Venous catheter rupture associated with pulmonary embolism is an unlikely but potentially serious complication. We report a case of a peripheral venous catheter (PVC) fracture with pulmonary artery embolization in the left lower lobe treated successfully by a surgical approach. The positioning of a PVC is not always a harmless procedure. Every time there are difficulties in positioning or in removal of a catheter device, it should be carefully inspected to verify integrity. The advisability of removal of these small foreign bodies is debated; percutaneous retrieval is preferred, while surgery should be discussed case by case. PMID:28149586

  19. Migration of Distal Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Catheter into the Pulmonary Artery

    PubMed Central

    Imagawa, Hiroshi; Nagashima, Mitsugi; Shikata, Fumiaki; Hashimoto, Naoki; Kawachi, Kanji

    2009-01-01

    A 50-year-old man presented with an abdominal bulge 2 years after receiving a ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt for hydrocephalus. Chest radiography revealed that the peritoneal end of the catheter had migrated into the right pulmonary artery. Exploration through a small neck incision revealed that the shunt catheter had entered the internal jugular vein. The catheter was extracted and positioned in the subcutaneous space in preparation for reimplantation. This type of shunt migration is quite unusual, but it could cause lethal pulmonary infarction or arrhythmia. Follow-up radiography should be scheduled to detect such complications. PMID:23555358

  20. Catheter-related complications of cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Greene, J N

    1996-06-01

    Although the management of CVC-related infection appears complex and at times the literature seems to be contradictory, simple guidelines can direct the clinician in a stepwise fashion. Knowledge of the pathogenesis of each organism and the immune status of the host is crucial to decide whether catheter removal or retention is indicated. For example, in general, GNB bacteremia does not immediately prompt catheter removal in a neutropenic patient but does in a nonneutropenic host because of the gastrointestinal source of the former and a primary catheter source in the latter. In summary, as more CVCs are inserted in patients undergoing chemotherapeutic, antimicrobial, transfusional, and nutritional supportive care, novel approaches to prevention and treatment of the associated infectious complications inherent with such devices are needed. A multifaceted approach from impregnated catheters to local catheter-site antisepsis was reviewed. We may find, however, that as simple handwashing between patients is crucial to infection control, so too is a trained catheter-care team using total barrier precautions and ensuring proper local catheter maintenance critical to preventing CVC-related infections.

  1. Lymphatic Leak Complicating Central Venous Catheter Insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Barnacle, Alex M. Kleidon, Tricia M.

    2005-12-15

    Many of the risks associated with central venous access are well recognized. We report a case of inadvertent lymphatic disruption during the insertion of a tunneled central venous catheter in a patient with raised left and right atrial pressures and severe pulmonary hypertension, which led to significant hemodynamic instability. To our knowledge, this rare complication is previously unreported.

  2. [Femoral venous catheter: an unusual complication].

    PubMed

    Garcia, P; Mora, A; Trambert, P; Maler, E; Courant, P

    2000-08-01

    We report an erratic course of a venous femoral catheter which was in the abdominal cavity in a patient with an haemoperitoneum and an hepatic injury. This complication led to an inefficiency of the transfusion and a worsening of the haemoperitoneum.

  3. Prospective study of peripheral arterial catheter infection and comparison with concurrently sited central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Koh, David Boon Chai; Gowardman, John R; Rickard, Claire M; Robertson, Iain K; Brown, Andrew

    2008-02-01

    Peripheral arterial catheters are perceived as having low infective potential compared with other catheters and may be overlooked as a cause of catheter-related bloodstream infection. We aimed to measure colonization and rates of catheter-related bloodstream infection in arterial catheters, to investigate risk factors for arterial catheter colonization, and to compare arterial catheter infection rates with those in concurrently sited and managed central venous catheters. Prospective 24-month cohort study. Eight-bed combined general intensive care and high-dependency unit of a 350-bed Australian teaching hospital. Three hundred twenty-one arterial catheters in 252 adult and pediatric patients were observed for 1,082 catheter days, and 618 central venous catheters in 410 patients were observed for 4,040 catheter days. All catheters were inserted in, or presented to, the intensive care unit. Both arterial catheters and central venous catheters were inserted by trained personnel under aseptic conditions, and management was standardized. None. The incidence per 1,000 (95% confidence interval) catheter days of colonization (> or = 15 colonies) and catheter-related bloodstream infection was 15.7 (9.5-25.9) and 0.92 (0.13-6.44) for arterial catheters and 16.8 (13.3-21.3) and 2.23 (1.12-4.44) for central venous catheters. Arterial catheter colonization was not significantly different than that in central venous catheters (hazard ratio, 1.17; 95% confidence interval, 0.41-3.36; p = .77). Arterial catheter colonization increased with dwell time and was similar to central venous catheters over time. Femoral arterial catheters were colonized more often than radial arterial catheters (hazard ratio, 5.08; 95% confidence interval, 0.85, 30.3; p = .075), and colonization was significantly higher when the catheter was inserted in the operating theater or emergency department (hazard ratio, 4.45; 95% confidence interval, 1.42-13.9; p = .01) compared with the intensive care unit. The

  4. [Methodologic procedure in the removal of a knotted intravascular pulmonary artery catheter].

    PubMed

    Kaltenborn, H A; Klose, K J

    1990-01-01

    Distal knotting of a pulmonary artery catheter that had been introduced via the subclavian or jugular vein, is a possible complication. To avoid venous dissection in the thoracic or cervical regions, removal via a transfemoral approach should be considered as a feasible alternative. The article report on the extraction of two knotted pulmonary artery catheters, effected transfemorally.

  5. Successful Retrieval of a Dismembered Central Venous Catheter Stuck to the Right Pulmonary Artery Using a Stepwise Approach

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Hidekimi; Isomura, Daichi; Sugiura, Ryo; Oka, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in anticancer chemotherapy have resulted in an increase in the number of patients requiring a central venous port catheter, and the incidence of catheter pinch-off syndrome has been increasing. Catheter pinch-off syndrome is a rare and unusual complication. It is difficult to retrieve dislodged catheters from the pulmonary artery, especially if the catheter is stuck to the peripheral pulmonary artery. We herein describe the successful removal of a catheter stuck in the pulmonary artery with a stepwise approach. First, a pigtail catheter was used to tug the dislodged catheter in order to free the unilateral end. Then, a gooseneck snare was used to catch and pull the catheter out of the patient. The key to success is to free the end of the catheter. PMID:27668096

  6. Causes and nursing countermeasures in pediatric PICC catheter complications.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Mingli; Li, Na; Yi, Lan; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the complications and nursing countermeasures of PICC (Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter) catheters using children PICC catheter technique 40 cases, complications were observed, and analyze the original causes, in order to propose a solution. There were 10 cases of catheter blockage, 5 cases of catheter infection, 6 cases of phlebitis, 5 cases of puncture difficulties, 2 cases of poor feeding tube, 2 cases of bleeding puncture site with the continuous exploration and research of nursing intervention, the production of clinical complications from PICC has been used in children were greatly reduced.

  7. Complications of Transfemoral Removal of Percutaneous Transfemorally Implanted Port-Catheter Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yahiro, Yoshiyuki; Toyota, Naoyuki Kakizawa, Hideaki; Hieda, Masashi; Hirai, Nobuhiko; Naito, Akira; Ito, Katsuhide

    2006-10-15

    Our purpose is to evaluate the feasibility and safety of the withdrawal procedure of percutaneous transfemorally implanted port-catheter systems. Thirty-seven patients (17.7%) underwent the withdrawal procedure of this port-catheter system among 209 patients. The reasons for withdrawal were as follows: termination of intra-arterial chemotherapy (n = 7), obstruction of hepatic artery (n = 5), port infection (n = 4), catheter infection (n = 4), catheter obstruction (n = 4), lower-limb palsy and pain (n = 2), exposure of the port due to skin defect (n = 2), patient's desire (n = 2), side effect of chemotherapy (n = 1), no effectiveness of chemotherapy (n = 1), hematoma at the puncture site (n = 1), duodenum perforation by the catheter (n = 1), intermittent claudication due to severe stenosis of right common iliac artery (n = 1), dissection of common hepatic artery (n = 1), and broken catheter (n = 1). In thirty-four of the 37 cases, the port-catheter system was successfully withdrawn without any complications. Clinical success rate was 91.9%. Complications occurred in three cases (8.1%), which were a pseudoaneurysm, thromboembolism of the right common iliac artery, and continuous bleeding from the subcutaneous pocket where the port system was placed for 1 month. In 15 cases, correction of the catheter tip or exchange for dislocation of the tip had to be done without withdrawal. It is not rare to withdraw port-catheter systems in cases of infection or hematoma around the system. Although withdrawal of a percutaneous transfemorally implanted port-catheter system is a relatively safe procedure, the port-catheter system should not be removed unless absolutely indicated.

  8. Accidental subclavian artery catheterization during attempted internal jugular central venous catheter placement: a case report.

    PubMed

    Paliwal, Bharat; Kamal, Manoj; Purohit, Anamika; Rana, Kirti; Chouhan, Dilip Singh

    2015-01-01

    Central venous catheter placement has been routinely employed for anesthetic and intensive care management. Despite proper technique used and expertise complications do occur; some of which are related to catheter misplacements. We report a case in which subclavian artery was accidently catheterized during attempted internal jugular venous cannulation.

  9. Percutaneous Retrieval of a Pulmonary Artery Catheter Knot in Pacing Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Valenzuela-Garcia, Luis Felipe Almendro-Delia, Manuel; Gonzalez-Valdayo, Miguel; Munoz-Campos, Juan; Dorado-Garcia, Jose C.; Gomez-Rosa, Francisco; Vazquez-Garcia, Rafael; Calderon-Leal, Jose M.

    2007-09-15

    To illustrate a successful approach to resolving a pulmonary artery catheter knot in the pacing leads of a cardiac resynchronization device. When planning invasive monitoring for patients having right chamber electrodes, fluoroscopic-guided catheter insertion and extraction is advisable. In the event of coiling or knotting, an interventional radiologist should be contacted as soon as possible to avoid serious complications.

  10. Brachial Arterial Pressure Monitoring during Cardiac Surgery Rarely Causes Complications.

    PubMed

    Singh, Asha; Bahadorani, Bobby; Wakefield, Brett J; Makarova, Natalya; Kumar, Priya A; Tong, Michael Zhen-Yu; Sessler, Daniel I; Duncan, Andra E

    2017-06-01

    Brachial arterial catheters better estimate aortic pressure than radial arterial catheters but are used infrequently because complications in a major artery without collateral flow are potentially serious. However, the extent to which brachial artery cannulation promotes complications remains unknown. The authors thus evaluated a large cohort of cardiac surgical patients to estimate the incidence of related serious complications. The institutional Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database and Perioperative Health Documentation System Registry of the Cleveland Clinic were used to identify patients who had brachial artery cannulation between 2007 and 2015. Complications within 6 months after surgery were identified by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision diagnostic and procedural codes, Current Procedural Terminology procedure codes, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons variables. The authors reviewed electronic medical records to confirm that putative complications were related plausibly to brachial arterial catheterization. Complications were categorized as (1) vascular, (2) peripheral nerve injury, or (3) infection. The authors evaluated associations between brachial arterial complications and patient comorbidities and between complications and in-hospital mortality and duration of hospitalization. Among 21,597 qualifying patients, 777 had vascular or nerve injuries or local infections, but only 41 (incidence 0.19% [95% CI, 0.14 to 0.26%]) were potentially consequent to brachial arterial cannulation. Vascular complications occurred in 33 patients (0.15% [0.10 to 0.23%]). Definitely or possibly related infection occurred in 8 (0.04% [0.02 to 0.08%]) patients. There were no plausibly related neurologic complications. Peripheral arterial disease was associated with increased risk of complications. Brachial catheter complications were associated with prolonged hospitalization and in-hospital mortality. Brachial artery cannulation for

  11. Complications Related to Insertion and Use of Central Venous Catheters (CVC)

    PubMed Central

    Hodzic, Samir; Golic, Darko; Smajic, Jasmina; Sijercic, Selma; Umihanic, Sekib; Umihanic, Sefika

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Central Venous Catheters (CVC) are essential in everyday medical practice, especially in treating patients in intensive care units (ICU). The application of these catheters is accompanied with the risk of complications, such as the complications caused during the CVC insertion, infections at the location of the insertion, and complications during the use of the catheter, sepsis and other metastatic infections. Patients and methods: This study is a retrospective-prospective and it was implemented in the period 1st January 2011- 31st December 2012. It included 108 examinees with CVC placed for more than 7 days. Results: The most common complications occurring in more than 2 attempts of CVC applications are: hearth arrhythmias in both groups in 12 cases, 7 in multi-lumen (12.72%) and 5 in mono-lumen ones (9.43%). Artery puncture occurs in both groups in 7 cases, 5 in multi-lumen (9.09%) and 2 in mono-lumen ones (3.77%). Hematoma occurred in both groups in 4 cases, 3 in multi-lumen CVCs (5.45%) and 1 in mono-lumen ones (1.88%). The most common complication in multi-lumen catheters was heart arrhythmia, in 20 cases (36.37%). The most common complications in mono-lumen CVCs was hearth arrhythmias, in 20 cases as extrasystoles and they were registered in 16 catheter insertions (30.18%). Out of total number of catheters of both groups, out of 108 catheters the complications during insertion occurred in 49 catheters (45.40%). The most common complications in both groups were heart arrhythmias, artery punctures and hematomas at the place of catheter insertion. PMID:25568558

  12. Recanalization of thrombosed superficial femoral arteries with a hydraulic thrombectomy catheter in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Qian, Z; Wholey, M; Ferral, H; Maynar, M; Postoak, D; Hamide, J; Newman, W P; Moncada, R; Gonzalez-Roman, A; Gimenez, C; Castañeda, W R

    1999-12-01

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate efficacy and safety of the Oasis thrombectomy catheter on arterial thrombosis in dogs. Thrombosis was induced in 18 femoral arteries of nine mongrel dogs. Recanalization of the thrombosed femoral artery was performed using a thrombectomy catheter 7-10 days after thrombus induction. Pre- and postprocedural arterial status was documented by angiography. After mechanical thrombectomy, the animals were sacrificed and the femoral arteries were harvested and examined macro- and microscopically. Additionally, in vitro fragmentation was carried out to determine particle size and distribution from the recovered effluent. Subacute thrombosis was successfully created in 15 femoral arteries. Full recanalization was achieved in 80% (12/15) of the thrombosed femoral arteries without any residual thrombus. No significant downstream embolization was documented angiographically. Endothelial denudation was observed in all the treated arteries along with occasional disruption of the internal elastic lamina. No medial injury was seen. Ninety-eight percent of thrombus was liquefied, defined as particles smaller than 15 microm, by the catheter. Particles larger than 400 microm represented 0.27% of the original clot weight. Occluded femoral arteries with 7- to 10-day-old thrombus can be efficiently recanalized with the Oasis catheter in dogs without any significant complication. This thrombectomy catheter appears to be highly effective and safe and requires no sophisticated equipment. Blood loss was our major concern regarding use of this catheter but can be minimized by strictly controlling activation time and restricting the inflow into the vascular segment being treated.

  13. Iatrogenic brachial and femoral artery complications following venipuncture in children.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Omer Faruk; Demircin, Metin; Ucar, Ibrahim; Duman, Umit; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Boke, Erkmen

    2006-01-01

    Catheter- or noncatheter-related peripheral arterial complications such as arterial pseudoaneurysm, embolus, or arteriovenous fistula may be seen in the pediatric age group. The most common etiologies defined for arterial complications are peripheral arterial puncture performed for a routine arterial blood gas analysis, arterial catheters placed for invasive monitorization of children, or catheterization performed for diagnostic purposes through the peripheral arterial system, most commonly the femoral artery. Nine children with peripheral arterial complications, whose ages varied between 2 months and 2.5 years, were enrolled in this study. All patients were treated surgically. Following physical examination, Doppler ultrasonography, computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, or digital subtraction angiography were used as diagnostic tools. We studied thrombophilic panels preoperatively. Six patients had brachial artery pseudoaneurysms that developed accidentally during venipuncture, I had a brachial arteriovenous fistula that developed after an accidental brachial artery puncture during routine peripheral blood analysis. In the remaining 2 patients, peripheral arterial embolic events were detected. One had a left brachial arterial embolus and the other had a sudden onset right femoral artery embolus that was detected via diagnostic interventions. No morbidity such as amputation, extremity loss, or mortality occurred due to the arterial events or surgery. All patients were discharged from the hospital in good clinical condition. In all patients, follow-up at 3 or 6 months revealed palpable peripheral artery pulsations of the ulnar and radial arteries at wrist level. Because the incidence of peripheral arterial complications is relatively low in children compared to adults, the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches are extrapolated from the adult guidelines. We proposed that early diagnosis and surgical approach prevented the complications from

  14. Forced Arterial Suction Thrombectomy Using Distal Access Catheter in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho-Cheol; Kang, Dong-Hun; Hwang, Yang-Ha; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2017-01-01

    Historical innovations in mechanical thrombectomy devices and strategies for ischemic stroke have resulted in improved angiographic outcomes and better clinical outcomes. Various devices have been used, but the two most common approaches are aspiration thrombectomy and stent-retrieval thrombectomy. Aspiration thrombectomy has advanced from the traditional Penumbra system to forced arterial suction thrombectomy and a direct aspiration first-pass technique. Newer generation aspiration catheters with flexible distal tips and a larger bore have demonstrated faster and better recanalization relative to older devices. Recently, several species of distal access catheters have similar structural characteristics to the Penumbra reperfusion catheter. Therefore, we used the distal access catheter for forced arterial suction thrombectomy in three patients with acute ischemic stroke. In each case, we achieved fast and complete recanalization without significant complications. Forced arterial suction thrombectomy using a distal access catheter might provide another option for mechanical thrombectomy in patients with acute ischemic stroke. PMID:28316869

  15. Central venous catheter "pinch-off" and fracture: a review of two under-recognized complications.

    PubMed

    Nace, C S; Ingle, R J

    1993-09-01

    Although uncommon, "pinch-off syndrome" and catheter fracture are reported complications of central venous catheters (CVCs). Pinch-off syndrome is characterized by intermittent catheter malfunction in conjunction with radiologic evidence of catheter compression. Warning signs of pinch-off syndrome include difficulty with-drawing blood samples and resistance to infusion of IV fluids. CVC fracture is characterized by migration of the distal catheter fragment through the heart and, often, into the pulmonary artery; it may be accompanied by the sudden onset of chest pain, palpitations, and arrhythmias. Twenty-seven cases of CVC fracture were reviewed, including 22 cases reported in the literature as well as an analysis of 5 cases that occurred at the authors' institution. Among the 22 cases reported in the literature, the average length of time between catheter insertion and fracture was 6.7 months. In 82% of these cases, the fracture occurred at the clavicle/first rib junction, where mechanical friction against the catheter has been well established as the mechanism for most fractures. In 9 of these 22 cases, evidence of catheter compression was noted on chest x-ray prior to fracture. This paper discusses assessment criteria for pinch-off syndrome and catheter fracture, as well as nursing implications regarding the prevention and early detection of these potentially serious complications.

  16. Complete step section microscopic study of a Swan-Ganz catheter-related pulmonary artery rupture: a frequently lethal complication that to our knowledge has not had a comprehensive microscopic examination: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ya; Stout, L Clarke

    2017-07-04

    Introduced in 1970, the Swan-Ganz catheter (SGC) soon became widely used because of its unique usefulness in managing intensive care patients. Unfortunately, SGC usage was complicated by pulmonary artery rupture (PAR) with a 50% mortality rate that led to a near banning of the SCG in the late 1980s. Increasing knowledge and decreasing incidence of SGC-related PARs (SGPARs) led to the current feeling that the present SGPAR incidence is now low enough to tolerate given the lives saved by SGC usage. However, an important unknown is that, to our knowledge, pathologists have never published a comprehensive microscopic description of a SGPAR. A 73-year-old woman with moderate pulmonary hypertension died from a SGPAR soon after single SGC measurements of right ventricular and pulmonary capillary wedge pressures. By using what we thought to be an appropriate method of dissection, we did a complete microscopic step section study of the 1.6 cm SGPAR revealing 12 relatively uniform longitudinal tears (one perforating) consistent with an overinflated SGC balloon or a weakened arterial wall. A MEDLINE search of 38 consecutive SGPARs from 2014 to 1980 found 52 cases in 38 papers. Analysis revealed that all 46 SGPARs suitable for study came from large institutions, and confirmed that elderly women were more likely to have SGPARs than elderly men. More and better data are needed before fully informed decisions can be made regarding future SGC usage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Management of non-catheter-associated complicated urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Dielubanza, Elodi J; Mazur, Daniel J; Schaeffer, Anthony J

    2014-03-01

    This article presents an overview of non-catheter-associated complicated urinary tract infection (UTI) from a urologic point of view. Discussion includes the evaluation and workup a complicated UTI through history, physical examination, laboratory analysis, and radiographic studies. Specific types of complicated UTI, such as urinary obstruction and renal abscess, are reviewed.

  18. Is the pulmonary artery catheter useful?

    PubMed

    Murphy, Glenn S; Nitsun, Martin; Vender, Jeffery S

    2005-03-01

    In the United States more than 1.5 million pulmonary artery catheters (PACs) are inserted each year. Of these, approximately 55% are placed in high-risk surgical and trauma patients. Most clinicians believe that PAC use is beneficial in guiding therapy and may improve outcome. Despite these beliefs and hundreds of published articles related to PACs, appropriate use and impact on outcome remain unclear. A review of the current literature reveals conflicting data and significant flaws in most study designs. Inadequate sample size, lack of randomization, lack of standardization of therapies to PAC data, and deficiencies in user knowledge all significantly limit interpretation of clinical trials. Despite these deficiencies and the need for better-designed investigations, it is the opinion of the authors that access to hemodynamic data provided by the PAC, coupled with accurate interpretation of the data, may lead to reduced perioperative morbidity and mortality.

  19. Imaging of the complications of peripherally inserted central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Amerasekera, S S H; Jones, C M; Patel, R; Cleasby, M J

    2009-08-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are widely used to provide central venous access, often in chronically ill patients with long-term intravenous access requirements. There are a number of significant complications related to both insertion and maintenance of PICC lines, including catheter malposition, migration, venous thrombosis, and line fracture. The incidence of these complications is likely to rise as the number of patients undergoing intravenous outpatient therapy increases, with a corresponding rise in radiologist input. This paper provides an overview of the relevant peripheral and central venous anatomy, including anatomical variations, and outlines the complications of PICC lines. Imaging examples demonstrate the range of radiological findings seen in these complications.

  20. Comparison of complications and dialysis adequacy between temporary and permanent tunnelled catheter for haemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Kukavica, Nihad; Resic, Halima; Sahovic, Vahidin

    2009-11-01

    Number of hemodialysis patients each day is increasing. The quality of their lives is largely determined by the quality of hemodialysis treatment. One of the most important factors is the type of applied blood approach. The type of blood approach in the most case is artery venous fistula, permanent, temporary catheters, grafts. Any complications of blood strand approach inevitably leads to lower quality of hemodialysis treatment which is connected with not adequate dialysis and poorer general state of patients. Our research was carried out as a prospective study, for the period of 36 months. In the study were included 31 patients, which are on chronic haemodialysis treatment. During this study, we are followed all complications, which occurred at temporary, and permanent tunneled haemodialysis catheters. Complications have occurred in terms of thrombotic problems, low blood flow, occurrence of infection. All patients are divided in two groups, 16 patients with permanent and 15 patients with temporary catheters. In the course of the study was analyzed blood flow and dialysis adequacy (Kt/Vdp) as well as complications and results was compared with randomly selected 16 patients who haemodialysis treatment performed by artery venous fistula (AVF). Two patients were lost to further follow-up to the end of the study. 26 patients at the end of the study had functional catheters, while in the case of 3 patients the catheter was removed. Infection was found in 10 patients while thrombotic complications were observed in 27 cases regardless of catheter type. Mean blood flow in patients with permanent catheter was significantly higher (296,9+/-28,45 cm3/min) compared to patients with temporary catheter (226,3+/-39,8 cm3/min) (p<0,001). Kt/Vdp delivered was 1,22+/-0,15 on patients with permanent catheter and 1,30+/-0,18 for artery venous fistula (AVF) access respectively. The loss of dialysis efficacy using catheters was estimated at 6%. However, in all cases Kt/Vdp values

  1. COMPARISON OF COMPLICATIONS AND DIALYSIS ADEQUACY BETWEEN TEMPORARY AND PERMANENT TUNNELLED CATHETER FOR HAEMODIALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Kukavica, Nihad; Resić, Halima; Šahović, Vahidin

    2009-01-01

    Number of hemodialysis patients each day is increasing. The quality of their lives is largely determined by the quality of hemodialysis treatment. One of the most important factors is the type of applied blood approach. The type of blood approach in the most case is artery venous fistula, permanent, temporary catheters, grafts. Any complications of blood strand approach inevitably leads to lower quality of hemodialysis treatment which is connected with not adequate dialysis and poorer general state of patients. Our research was carried out as a prospective study, for the period of 36 months. In the study were included 31 patients, which are on chronic haemodialysis treatment. During this study, we are followed all complications, which occurred at temporary, and permanent tunneled haemodialysis catheters. Complications have occurred in terms of thrombotic problems, low blood flow, occurrence of infection. All patients are divided in two groups, 16 patients with permanent and 15 patients with temporary catheters. In the course of the study was analyzed blood flow and dialysis adequacy (Kt/Vdp) as well as complications and results was compared with randomly selected 16 patients who haemodialysis treatment performed by artery venous fistula (AVF). Two patients were lost to further follow-up to the end of the study. 26 patients at the end of the study had functional catheters, while in the case of 3 patients the catheter was removed. Infection was found in 10 patients while thrombotic complications were observed in 27 cases regardless of catheter type. Mean blood flow in patients with permanent catheter was significantly higher (296,9±28,45 cm3/min) compared to patients with temporary catheter (226,3±39,8 cm3/min) (p<0,001). Kt/Vdp delivered was 1,22±0,15 on patients with permanent catheter and 1,30±0,18 for artery venous fistula (AVF) access respectively. The loss of dialysis efficacy using catheters was estimated at 6%. However, in all cases Kt/Vdp values remained

  2. [Thrombotic complications of central venous catheters in hematooncological patients].

    PubMed

    Joks, Monika; Kroll, Renata; Komarnicki, Mieczysław

    2010-01-01

    Central venous catheters (CVC) are frequently used in patients with a hematological disorders in order to administer drugs, stem cell infusions, blood products, parenteral alimentation as well as for blood sampling. There are known mechanical, infectious and thrombotic complications of central venous catheters in hematological patients. Infectious and thrombotic complications have been considered as separate entities so far, but there are theory and accumulating evidence that they are interrelated. Since data on central venous catheters-related thrombosis in hematological patients have been obtained mainly from retrospective studies of small size, prospective randomized studies are warranted. In this review we present current opinions about epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis of CVC-related thrombosis and also its correlations with infectious CVC-related complications.

  3. Renal Infarction Caused by Spontaneous Renal Artery Dissection: Treatment with Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis and Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Yong Sun Cho, Soon Gu; Hong, Ki Cheon

    2009-03-15

    Spontaneous renal artery dissection (SRAD) is rare and presents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. We report a case of a 36-year-old man who had an SRAD-complicated renal infarction. The patient experienced severe unilateral flank pain. Enhanced abdominal computed axial tomography scan showed renal infarction, and urinalysis showed no hematuria. Selective renal angiography was essential to evaluate the extent of dissection and suitability for repair. The patient was treated with catheter-directed thrombolysis and frenal artery stenting.

  4. Hemodialysis catheter insertion: is increased PO2 a sign of arterial cannulation? A case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ultrasound-guided Central Venous Catheterization (CVC) for temporary vascular access, preferably using the right internal jugular vein, is widely accepted by nephrologists. However CVC is associated with numerous potential complications, including death. We describe the finding of a rare left-sided partial anomalous pulmonary vein connection during central venous catheterization for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). Case presentation Ultrasound-guided cannulation of a large bore temporary dual-lumen Quinton-Mahurkar catheter into the left internal jugular vein was performed for CRRT initiation in a 66 year old African-American with sepsis-related oliguric acute kidney injury. The post-procedure chest X-ray suggested inadvertent left carotid artery cannulation. Blood gases obtained from the catheter showed high partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) of 140 mmHg and low partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) of 22 mmHg, suggestive of arterial cannulation. However, the pressure-transduced wave forms appeared venous and Computed Tomography Angiography located the catheter in the left internal jugular vein, but demonstrated that the tip of the catheter was lying over a left pulmonary vein which was abnormally draining into the left brachiocephalic (innominate) vein rather than into the left atrium. Conclusion Although several mechanical complications of dialysis catheters have been described, ours is one of the few cases of malposition into an anomalous pulmonary vein, and highlights a sequential approach to properly identify the catheter location in this uncommon clinical scenario. PMID:25073708

  5. [Complications of double j catheters and their endourological management].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Fentes, D

    2016-10-01

    The insertion of a double J catheter (DJ) has widespread, becoming a usual procedure and standard of care in urology. Despite its relative simplicity it is not free from intraoperative risks or problems during the weeks after the implant. Conversely, despite great advances in design of these catheters the ideal material has not been discovered yet, one that is perfectly biocompatible with urine and avoids completely the advent of complications. The range of problems associated with DJs is variable: from mild self-limited dysuria or hematuria to more complex situations with higher risk, such as catheter migration, complete calcification, breakage, obstruction and renal unit loss. The treatment of theses complications must combine maximal efficacy for their resolution with the least possible surgical aggression. Accordingly, the different options of endourological approach become very important and they are the cornerstone for the treatment of the complications associated with ureteral catheters. The objective of this review is to present the main complications derived from the insertion of a DJ, their diagnosis, prevention and treatment, focusing mainly in the different endourological techniques.

  6. Intra-Arterial Hepatic Chemotherapy: A Comparison of Percutaneous Versus Surgical Implantation of Port-Catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Deschamps, F.; Elias, D. Goere, D.; Malka, D. Ducreux, M. Boige, V.; Auperin, A.; Baere, T. de

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To compare retrospectively the safety and efficacy of percutaneous and surgical implantations of port-catheters for intra-arterial hepatic chemotherapy (IAHC). Materials and Methods: Between January 2004 and December 2008, 126 consecutive patients (mean age 58 years) suffering from liver colorectal metastases were referred for intra-arterial hepatic chemotherapy (IAHC). Port-catheters were percutaneously implanted (P) through femoral access with the patient under conscious sedation when no other surgery was planned or were surgically implanted (S) when laparotomy was performed for another purpose. We report the implantation success rate, primary functionality, functionality after revision, and complications of IAHC. Results: The success rates of implantation were 97% (n = 65 of 67) for P and 98% (n = 58 of 59) for S. One hundred eleven patients received IAHC in our institution (n = 56P and n = 55S). Primary functionality was the same for P and S (4.80 vs. 4.82 courses), but functionality after revision was significantly higher for P (9.18 vs. 5.95 courses, p = 0.004) than for S. Forty-five complications occurred during 516 courses for P and 28 complications occurred during 331 courses for S. The rates of discontinuation of IAHC linked to complications of the port-catheters were 21% (n = 12 of 56) for P and 34% (n = 19 of 55) for S. Conclusion: Overall, significantly better functionality and similar complication rates occurred after P versus S port-catheters.

  7. Complications of indwelling pleural catheter use and their management

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Macy M S; Thomas, Rajesh; Lee, Y C Gary

    2016-01-01

    The growing utilisation of indwelling pleural catheters (IPCs) has put forward a new era in the management of recurrent symptomatic pleural effusions. IPC use is safe compared to talc pleurodesis, though complications can occur. Pleural infection affects <5% of patients, and is usually responsive to antibiotic treatment without requiring catheter removal or surgery. Pleural loculations develop over time, limiting drainage in 10% of patients, which can be improved with intrapleural fibrinolytic therapy. Catheter tract metastasis can occur with most tumours but is more common in mesothelioma. The metastases usually respond to analgaesics and/or external radiotherapy. Long-term intermittent drainage of exudative effusions or chylothorax can potentially lead to loss of nutrients, though no data exist on any clinical impact. Fibrin clots within the catheter lumen can result in blockage. Chest pain following IPC insertion is often mild, and adjustments in analgaesics and drainage practice are usually all that are required. As clinical experience with the use of IPC accumulates, the profile and natural course of complications are increasingly described. We aim to summarise the available literature on IPC-related complications and the evidence to support specific strategies. PMID:26870384

  8. A study of outcome and complications associated with temporary hemodialysis catheters in a Nigerian dialysis unit.

    PubMed

    Amira, Christiana Oluwatoyin; Bello, Babawale Taslim; Braimoh, Rotimi Williams

    2016-05-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) catheters are commonly used as temporary vascular access in patients with kidney failure who require immediate HD. The use of these catheters is limited by complications such as infections, thrombosis resulting in poor blood flow. We studied the complications and outcomes of nontunneled catheters used for vascular access in our dialysis unit. The records of all patients, with renal failure who were dialyzed over a two-year period and had a double lumen nontunneled catheter inserted, were retrieved. Catheter insertion was carried out under ultrasound guidance using the modified Seldinger technique. The demographic data of patients, etiology of chronic kidney disease, and complications and outcomes of these catheters were noted. Fifty-four patients with mean age 43.7 ± 15.8 years had 69 catheters inserted for a cumulative total of 4047 catheter-days. The mean catheter patency was 36.4 ± 37.2 days (range: 1-173 days). Thrombosis occluding the catheters was the most common complication and occurred in 58% of catheters leading to catheter malfunction, followed by infections in18.8% of catheters. During follow-up, 30 (43.5%) catheters were removed, 14 (20.3%) due to catheter malfunction, eight (11.6%) due to infection, five (7.2%) elective removal, and three (4.3%) due to damage. Thrombotic occlusion of catheters was a major limiting factor to the survival of HD catheters. Improvement in catheter patency can be achieved with more potent lock solutions.

  9. Successful retrieval of a knotted pulmonary artery catheter trapped in the tricuspid valve apparatus.

    PubMed

    Ishaq, Muhammad; Alexander, Nicki; Scott, David H T

    2013-04-01

    We report the case of a 64-year-old patient in whom a pulmonary artery catheter formed a knot fixed within the right ventricle in the region of the tricuspid valve apparatus. Knot formation is a recognized complication associated with pulmonary artery catheters (PAC) insertion. This problem is usually dealt with by simply withdrawing the PAC until the knot impacts onto the introducer and after enlarging the puncture site by a small skin incision removing the introducer-PAC as one unit. However, we recently encountered a situation where the PAC was knotted around the tricuspid valve apparatus and could not be withdrawn. An interventional radiologist was able to unknot the catheter and release it from the tricuspid valve. We reviewed the literature related to this topic. We believe our experience could be of use to others.

  10. Umbilical catheters

    MedlinePlus

    ... arteries and one umbilical vein in the umbilical cord. After the umbilical cord is cut off, the health care provider can find these blood vessels. The catheters are placed into the blood vessel, ... Complications include: Interruption of the blood flow ...

  11. Dissection of Extracranial Internal Carotid Artery Due to Balloon Guiding Catheter Resulting in Asymptomatic Internal Carotid Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Akpinar, Suha; Yilmaz, Guliz

    2016-01-01

    Dissection of the internal carotid artery (ICA) is a rare condition that accounts for a significant proportion of ischemic strokes in young adults. Iatrogenic dissection as a complication of neurointerventional procedures is a traumatic dissection which has been reported relatively rare in the literature. In this report, a case of dissection of the ICA is reported that was caused by repetitive movement of the balloon guiding catheter during stent-assisted thrombectomy (SAT), resulting in occlusion of the ICA. PMID:27853491

  12. Unusual complication of prolonged indwelling urinary catheter - iatrogenic hypospadias

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Gunjan; Baghele, Vishal; Chawla, Naveen; Gogia, Atul; Kakar, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Long-time urethral catheterization may be responsible for various complications such as urethral stricture, urethral fracture, urinary tract infections, and hypospadias. Hypospadias is the most common congenital anomaly of male external genitalia. However, urethral catheter-induced iatrogenic hypospadias is a rare entity. In this article, we describe a case of an elderly male who was found to have iatrogenic hypospadias 2 months after urinary catheterization. PMID:27843874

  13. Efficacy of Intra-Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy for Head and Neck Cancers Using Coaxial Catheter Technique: Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Tsurumaru, Daisuke Kuroiwa, Toshiro; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Hirata, Hideki; Higaki, Yuichiro; Tomita, Kichinobu

    2007-04-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy for head and neck cancers using a coaxial catheter technique: the superficial temporal artery (STA)-coaxial catheter method. Thirty-one patients (21 males and 10 females; 37-83 years of age) with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (maxilla, 2; epipharynx, 4; mesopharynx, 8; oral floor, 4; tongue, 10; lower gingiva, 1; buccal mucosa, 2) were treated by intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy. Four patients were excluded from the tumor-response evaluation because of a previous operation or impossibility of treatment due to catheter trouble. Forty-eight sessions of catheterization were performed. A guiding catheter was inserted into the STA and a microcatheter was advanced into the tumor-feeding artery via the guiding catheter under angiographic guidance. When the location of the tumor or its feeding artery was uncertain on angiography, computed tomographic angiography was performed. The anticancer agent carboplatin (CBDCA) was continuously injected for 24 h through the microcatheter from a portable infusion pump attached to the patient's waist. The total administration dose was 300-1300 mg per body. External radiotherapy was administered during intra-arterial chemotherapy at a total dose of 21-70.5 Gy.The initial response was complete response in 15 patients, partial response in 7 patients, and no change in 5 patients; the overall response rate was 81.5% (22/27). Complication-related catheter maintenance was observed in 15 of 48 sessions of catheterization. Injury and dislocation of the microcatheter occurred 10 times in 7 patients. Catheter infection was observed three times in each of two patients, and catheter occlusion and vasculitis occurred in two patients. Intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy via the STA-coaxial catheter method could have potential as a favorable treatment for head and neck tumors.

  14. [Arterial lesions caused by the Fogarty catheter (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Natali, J; Kieffer, E; Laurian, C; Chermet, J; Maraval, M

    1977-01-01

    The authors report 7 cases of arterial wound consecutive to the use of the Fogarty catheter: 1 rupture, 1 perforation, 2 arteriovenous fistulae. They investigate the mechanism and stress the importance of preoperative angiography to minimize the risk of unknwon anomalies. Also they indicate the ease and efficiency of the surgical correction when needed.

  15. Intra-arterial catheter for simultaneous microstructural and molecular imaging in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Hongki; Kim, Jin Won; Shishkov, Milen; Namati, Eman; Morse, Theodore; Shubochkin, Roman; McCarthy, Jason R; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Bouma, Brett E; Jaffer, Farouc A; Tearney, Guillermo J

    2011-01-01

    Advancing our understanding of human coronary artery disease requires new methods that can be used in patients for studying atherosclerotic plaque microstructure in relation to the molecular mechanisms that underlie its initiation, progression, and clinical complications, including myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death. Here we report a dual-modality intra-arterial catheter for simultaneous microstructural and molecular imaging in vivo using a combination of optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging. By providing simultaneous molecular information in the context of the surrounding tissue microstructure, this novel catheter could provide new opportunities for investigating coronary atherosclerosis and stent healing, and for identifying high-risk biological and structural coronary arterial plaques in vivo. PMID:22057345

  16. Pneumothorax as a complication of central venous catheter insertion.

    PubMed

    Tsotsolis, Nikolaos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Baka, Sofia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Karavergou, Anastasia; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Karapantzos, Ilias; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Barbetakis, Nikos; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Kuhajda, Ivan; Andjelkovic, Dejan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Zarogoulidis, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The central venous catheter (CVC) is a catheter placed into a large vein in the neck [internal jugular vein (IJV)], chest (subclavian vein or axillary vein) or groin (femoral vein). There are several situations that require the insertion of a CVC mainly to administer medications or fluids, obtain blood tests (specifically the "central venous oxygen saturation"), and measure central venous pressure. CVC usually remain in place for a longer period of time than other venous access devices. There are situations according to the drug administration or length of stay of the catheter that specific systems are indicated such as; a Hickman line, a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) line or a Port-a-Cath may be considered because of their smaller infection risk. Sterile technique is highly important here, as a line may serve as a port of entry for pathogenic organisms, and the line itself may become infected with organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococci. In the current review we will present the complication of pneumothorax after CVC insertion.

  17. Pneumothorax as a complication of central venous catheter insertion

    PubMed Central

    Tsotsolis, Nikolaos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Baka, Sofia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Karavergou, Anastasia; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Karapantzos, Ilias; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Barbetakis, Nikos; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Kuhajda, Ivan; Andjelkovic, Dejan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    The central venous catheter (CVC) is a catheter placed into a large vein in the neck [internal jugular vein (IJV)], chest (subclavian vein or axillary vein) or groin (femoral vein). There are several situations that require the insertion of a CVC mainly to administer medications or fluids, obtain blood tests (specifically the “central venous oxygen saturation”), and measure central venous pressure. CVC usually remain in place for a longer period of time than other venous access devices. There are situations according to the drug administration or length of stay of the catheter that specific systems are indicated such as; a Hickman line, a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) line or a Port-a-Cath may be considered because of their smaller infection risk. Sterile technique is highly important here, as a line may serve as a port of entry for pathogenic organisms, and the line itself may become infected with organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococci. In the current review we will present the complication of pneumothorax after CVC insertion. PMID:25815301

  18. [Hemodynamic monitoring in the intensive care unit: pulmonary artery catheter versus PiCCO].

    PubMed

    Gassanov, N; Caglayan, E; Nia, A; Erdmann, E; Er, F

    2011-02-01

    Hemodynamic monitoring is essential in the diagnosis and management of critically ill patients. Cardiac output represents a major monitoring parameter. There are a number of methods for measurement of cardiac output with various invasive capacities and functional reliability. Thermodilution pulmonary artery catheter and pulse contour analysis by PiCCO are widely used techniques to measure cardiac output in intensive care unit. This review describes the basic principles, limitations and complications of both monitoring tools.

  19. Stabilization of a Percutaneously Implanted Port Catheter System for Hepatic Artery Chemotherapy Infusion

    SciTech Connect

    Shindoh, Noboru; Ozaki, Yutaka; Kyogoku, Shinsuke; Yamana, Daigo; Sumi, Yukiharu; Katayama, Hitoshi

    1999-07-15

    A port catheter system for hepatic artery infusion chemotherapy was implanted percutaneously via the left subclavian artery in 41 patients for treatment of unresectable liver metastases. The catheter tip was inserted into the gastroduodenal artery (GDA), the end hole was occluded with a guidewire fragment, and a side-hole for infusion was positioned at the bifurcation of the proper hepatic artery and the GDA. The GDA was embolized with steel coils around the infusion catheter tip via a transfemoral catheter. This procedure is designed to reduce the incidence of hepatic artery occlusion and infusion catheter dislocation.

  20. Incidence of catheter-related complications in patients with central venous or hemodialysis catheters: a health care claims database analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Central venous catheter (CVC) and hemodialysis (HD) catheter usage are associated with complications that occur during catheter insertion, dwell period, and removal. This study aims to identify and describe the incidence rates of catheter-related complications in a large patient population in a United States-based health care claims database after CVC or HD catheter placement. Methods Patients in the i3 InVision DataMart® health care claims database with at least 1 CVC or HD catheter insertion claim were categorized into CVC or HD cohorts using diagnostic and procedural codes from the US Renal Data System, American College of Surgeons, and American Medical Association’s Physician Performance Measures. Catheter-related complications were identified using published diagnostic and procedural codes. Incidence rates (IRs)/1000 catheter-days were calculated for complications including catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs), thrombosis, embolism, intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), major bleeding (MB), and mechanical catheter–related complications (MCRCs). Results Thirty percent of the CVC cohort and 54% of the HD cohort had catheter placements lasting <90 days. Catheter-related complications occurred most often during the first 90 days of catheter placement. IRs were highest for CRBSIs in both cohorts (4.0 [95% CI, 3.7-4.3] and 5.1 [95% CI, 4.7-5.6], respectively). Other IRs in CVC and HD cohorts, respectively, were thrombosis, 1.3 and 0.8; MCRCs, 0.6 and 0.7; embolism, 0.4 and 0.5; MB, 0.1 and 0.3; and ICH, 0.1 in both cohorts. Patients with cancer at baseline had significantly higher IRs for CRBSIs and thrombosis than non-cancer patients. CVC or HD catheter–related complications were most frequently seen in patients 16 years or younger. Conclusions The risk of catheter-related complications is highest during the first 90 days of catheter placement in patients with CVCs and HD catheters and in younger patients (≤16 years of age) with HD

  1. Do pulmonary artery catheters alter outcome in trauma patients?

    PubMed

    Kirton, O C; Civetta, J M

    1997-08-01

    To review the literature addressing the use of the pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) in victims of blunt and penetrating trauma and examine the available evidence that supports or refutes the claim that PAC use alters outcome in this patient population. Furthermore, to determine what additional research should be done in this area. All pertinent English language articles dealing with pulmonary artery catheterization in trauma patients were retrieved from 1979 through 1996. Clinical studies were considered if PACs were used to establish a cardiopulmonary diagnosis, optimize or achieve endpoints of oxygen transport and utilization indices, or guide and/or determine response to therapy. Emphasis was placed on prospective, randomized, controlled trials. However, descriptive case series and retrospectively-analyzed, uncontrolled reviews comprise the majority of available literature. From these selective studies, information was obtained regarding patient demographics, therapeutic endpoints, and achieved outcome. Insufficient evidence exists to support a true survival benefit. However, recommendations for indications can be proposed where a reduction in morbidity or improvement in functional outcome is suggested. Hemodynamic data obtained from the PAC appear to be beneficial for the following indications: a) to ascertain the status of underlying cardiovascular performance and/or the need for improvement; b) to direct therapy when noninvasive monitoring may be inadequate, misleading, or the endpoints of resuscitation difficult to define; c) to assess response to resuscitation; d) to potentially decrease secondary injury when severe closed-head or acute spinal cord injuries are components of multisystem trauma; e) to augment clinical decision-making when major trauma is complicated by severe adult respiratory distress syndrome, progressive oliguria/anuria, myocardial ischemia, congestive heart failure, or major thermal injury; and f) to establish futility of care.

  2. Retrograde blood flow in the brachial and axillary arteries during routine radial arterial catheter flushing.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Glenn S; Szokol, Joseph W; Marymont, Jesse H; Avram, Michael J; Vender, Jeffery S; Kubasiak, John

    2006-09-01

    Flushing of radial arterial catheters may be associated with retrograde embolization of air or thrombus into the cerebral circulation. For embolization into the central circulation to occur, sufficient pressure must be generated during the flushing process to reverse antegrade blood flow in the arterial blood vessels of the upper extremity. This ultrasound study was designed to examine whether routine radial catheter flushing practices produce retrograde blood flow patterns in the brachial and proximal axillary arteries. Duplex ultrasound examinations of the brachial and axillary arteries were conducted in 100 surgical patients to quantify direction and velocity of blood flow during catheter flushing. After obtaining Doppler spectral images of brachial and axillary arterial flow patterns, manual flushing was performed by injecting 10 ml flush solution using a syringe at a rate reflecting standard clinical practices. The flow-regulating device on the pressurized (300 mmHg) arterial flushing-sampling system was then opened for 10 s to deliver a rapid bolus of fluid (flush valve opening). The rate of manual flush solution injection through the radial arterial catheter was related to the probability of retrograde flow in the axillary artery (P < 0.001). Reversed arterial flow was noted in the majority of subjects (33 of 51) at a manual flush rate of less than 9 s and in no subjects (0 of 48) at a rate 9 s or greater. Retrograde flow was observed less frequently during flush valve opening (2 of 99 patients; P < 0.001 vs. manual flushing). Rapid manual flushing of radial arterial catheters at rates faster than 1 ml/s produces retrograde flow in the proximal axillary artery.

  3. Peripherally inserted central catheter-related complications in cancer patients: a prospective study of over 50,000 catheter days.

    PubMed

    Kang, Junren; Chen, Wei; Sun, Wenyan; Ge, Ruibin; Li, Hailong; Ma, Enling; Su, Qingxia; Cheng, Fang; Hong, Jinhua; Zhang, Yuanjuan; Lei, Cheng; Wang, Xinchuan; Jin, Aiyun; Liu, Wanli

    2017-03-21

    To evaluate incidence and risk factors of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC)-related complications in cancer patients. A prospective, multicenter, cohort study of cancer patients with PICC insertion was performed from February 1, 2013 to April 24, 2014. All patients were monitored in clinic until PICCs were removed. The primary endpoint was PICC removal due to complications. Patient-, catheter- and insertion-related factors were analyzed in univariable and multivariable logistic regression analysis to identify significant independent risk factors for PICC-related complications. There were 477 cancer patients included, for a total of 50,841 catheter-days. Eighty-one patients (17.0%) developed PICC-related complications, with an incidence of 1.59 per 1000 catheter days. Thirty-six (7.5%) PICCs were removed because of complications. The most common complications were skin allergy (4.6%), catheter occlusion (3.4%) and accidental withdrawal (2.3%). Nine (1.9%) patients developed symptomatic upper extremity deep venous thrombosis (UEDVT) and central line associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) was shown in six (1.3%) PICCs with an infection rate 0.12 per 1000 catheter days. In multivariable analysis, body mass index (BMI) >25 (odds ratio, 2.09; 95% confidence interval, 1.26-3.47, p = 0.004) was shown to be a significant risk factor for PICC complications. Cancer patients with BMI greater than 25 were more likely to have PICC complications.

  4. Osler's nodes, pseudoaneurysm formation, and sepsis complicating percutaneous radial artery cannulation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, A; Reyes, R; Kirk, M; Fulks, R M

    1984-12-01

    Percutaneous arterial cannulation is useful for hemodynamic monitoring and frequent arterial blood gas determinations in selected intensive care patients. However, this procedure is not without risk. We report a case of localized Osler node formation, distal to a radial artery catheter, associated with sepsis, pseudoaneurysm formation, and thrombosis at the site of catheterization. Complications of this technique require aggressive medical and, in selected cases, surgical intervention.

  5. A complicated case of renal artery stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Chetcuti-Ganado, C; Samuel, A; Grech, V

    2005-01-01

    We present a boy with bilateral renal artery stenosis who presented with severe hypertension and haemorrhagic stroke. The diagnostic workup along with a complication of eventual surgical intervention are demonstrated. PMID:22368652

  6. Hypertensive encephalopathy complicating transplant renal artery stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    McGonigle, R. J.; Bewick, M.; Trafford, J. A.; Parsons, V.

    1984-01-01

    A 26-year-old female diabetic patient developed hypertensive encephalopathy with gross neurological abnormalities complicating renal artery stenosis of her transplant kidney. The elevated blood pressure was unresponsive to medical treatment. Surgical correction of the stenoses in the renal artery cured the hypertension and renal failure and led to the patient's complete recovery. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6377286

  7. Complications of Permanent Hemodialysis Catheter Placement; Need for Better Pre-Implantation Algorithm?

    PubMed

    Premuzic, Vedran; Smiljanic, Ranko; Perkov, Drazen; Gavranic, Bruna Brunetta; Tomasevic, Boris; Jelakovic, Bojan

    2016-08-01

    There is a correlation between central venous cannulation and the development of central venous stenosis. Minor retrosternal vein lesions can be easily missed. Computerized tomographic (CT) venography is the diagnostic procedure of choice. The aim of this study was to examine the complications after catheter implantation in patients with prior permanent catheter placement and to evaluate present diagnostic procedures performed prior to choosing permanent access site in order to reduce possible complications after catheter placement. Complications of permanent CVC insertion in our department were analyzed between October 2011 and February 2015. We have implanted the Tesio twin catheter system and the Hickman Bard dual lumen catheter. All patients with prior permanent dialysis catheter were evaluated with color doppler, while patients with suspected central venous stenosis (CVS) or thrombosis were evaluated with phlebography or CT venography prior to catheter placement. One hundred and ninety-eight permanent dialysis catheters were placed (173 Tesio [87.4%] and 25 Hickman [12.6%]) in 163 patients. There were 125 patients (76.7%) with prior temporary catheter and 61 (48.8%) of them had more than one prior permanent catheter (1.92 catheter per person).There were 4/61 (6.5%) patients with catheter-related complications without prior phlebography and CT venography. Phlebography and CT venography were performed in 30 (24.0%) patients with suspected CVS/thrombosis and with dialysis vintage of 76.23 months (52.78-98.28). Phlebography and CT venography were more sensitive than color doppler in the detection of CVS/thrombosis in patients with prior permanent catheter placements (P < 0.001). Since this diagnostic algorithm was introduced prior to catheter placement there were no catheter insertion-related complications or dysfunctions (P < 0.001). All our procedures on patients with prior permanent catheters followed preliminary color doppler diagnostics. Nevertheless

  8. Morbidity of Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters in Pediatric Complicated Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Sulkowski, Jason P.; Asti, Lindsey; Cooper, Jennifer N.; Kenney, Brian D.; Raval, Mehul V.; Rangel, Shawn J.; Deans, Katherine J.; Minneci, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare postoperative outcomes of pediatric patients with complicated appendicitis managed with or without a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC). Methods Patients ≤18 years old in the Pediatric Health Information System database with complicated appendicitis that underwent appendectomy during their index admission in 2000–2012 were grouped by whether they had a PICC placed using relevant procedure and billing codes. Rates of subsequent encounters within 30 days of discharge along with associated diagnoses and procedures were determined. A propensity score matched (PSM) analysis was performed to account for differences in baseline exposures and severity of illness. Results We included 33,482 patients with complicated appendicitis, of whom 6,620 (19.8%) received a PICC and 26,862 (80.2%) did not. The PICC group had a longer post-operative length of stay (median 7 vs. 5 days, p<0.001), and were more likely to undergo intra-abdominal abscess drainage during the index admission (14.4% vs. 2.1%, p<0.001), and have a re-encounter (17.5% vs. 11.4%, p<0.001) within 30 days of discharge. However, in the PSM cohort (n=4,428 in each group), outcomes did not differ between treatment groups, although the PICC group did have increased odds for development of other post-operative complications (odds ratio=3.95, 95% confidence interval: 1.45, 10.71). Conclusions After accounting for differences in severity of illness by propensity score matching, patients managed with PICCs had a similar risk for nearly all post-operative complications, including re-encounters. Post-operative management of pediatric complicated appendicitis with a PICC is not clearly associated with improved outcomes. PMID:24721604

  9. Endovascular Treatment of Complications of Femoral Arterial Access

    SciTech Connect

    Tsetis, Dimitrios

    2010-06-15

    Endovascular repair of femoral arterial access complications is nowadays the treatment of choice in a group of patients who cannot tolerate vascular reconstruction and bleeding due to advanced cardiovascular disease. Endovascular procedures can be performed under local anesthesia, are well tolerated by the patient, and are associated with a short hospitalization time. Ninitinol stent technology allows for safe stent and stent-graft extension at the common femoral artery (CFA) level, due to increased resistance to external compression and bending stress. Active pelvic bleeding can be insidious, and prompt placement of a stent-graft at the site of leakage is a lifesaving procedure. Percutaneous thrombin injection under US guidance is the treatment of choice for femoral pseudoaneurysms (PAs); this can theoretically be safer with simultaneous balloon occlusion across the entry site of a PA without a neck or with a short and wide neck. In a few cases with thrombin failure due to a large arterial defect or accompanying arteriovenous fistula (AVF), a stent-graft can be deployed. The vast majority of catheter-induced AVFs can be treated effectively with stent-graft implantation even if they are located very close to the femoral bifurcation. Obstructive dissection flaps localized in the CFA are usually treated with prolonged balloon inflation; however, in more extensive dissections involving iliac arteries, self-expanding stents should be deployed. Iliofemoral thrombosis can be treated effectively with catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) followed by prolonged balloon inflation or stent placement. Balloon angioplasty and CDT can occasionally be used to treat stenoses and occlusions complicating the use of percutaneous closure devices.

  10. Video Fluoroscopy for Positioning of Pulmonary Artery Catheters in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Laurence; Miles, Lachlan F; Allaf, Maysana; Pillai, Param; Peyton, Philip; Doolan, Laurie

    2015-12-01

    To determine whether video fluoroscopy combined with traditional pressure waveform analyses facilitates optimal pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) flotation and final positioning compared with the traditional pressure waveform flotation technique alone. Prospective, single-center, randomized, controlled trial. Single-center university teaching hospital. The study included 50 cardiac surgery patients at higher risk for PAC complications. Use of video fluoroscopy to facilitate optimal PAC flotation and positioning. The primary outcome was the time taken to float and position the PAC balloon in the pulmonary artery as confirmed by transesophageal echocardiography. Secondary outcomes included number of attempts at flotation, ventricular rhythm disturbances, and catheter malposition. Patients were evenly matched in baseline demographics, New York Heart Association symptoms of heart failure, severity of left and right ventricular dysfunction, end-diastolic pressures and dimensions, severity of tricuspid valvular disease, and atrial and pulmonary artery pressures. Mean (SD) time to float the PAC was significantly shorter in the video fluoroscopy group than in the usual care group: 73 seconds (SD, 65.1) versus 176 seconds (SD, 180.6), respectively; p = 0.014. The median (interquartile range [IQR]) number of attempts to successful flotation was fewer in the video fluoroscopy group than in the usual care group: 1 (IQR 1:2) attempt versus 2 (IQR 1:4) attempts, respectively; p = 0.007. The composite complication rate (malposition and arrhythmias) was lower in the video fluoroscopy group than in the usual care group (16% v 52%, respectively; p = 0.01). In cardiac surgery patients at higher risk for PAC complications, video fluoroscopy facilitated faster and safer catheter flotation and positioning compared with the traditional pressure waveform flotation technique. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Brain abscess and granuloma formation as late complications of retained ventricular catheter.

    PubMed

    Khan, S A; Gretchel, A; Govender, H; Hartzenberg, B

    2009-01-01

    This report presents a rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunt, delayed development of brain abscess and foreign body granuloma formation adjacent to the intraventricular catheter. Both the complications occurring in the same patient is unusual.

  12. Saphenous neuralgia: a complication of arterial surgery.

    PubMed

    Jones, N A

    1978-07-01

    The saphenous nerve may be damaged during arterial surgery in the thigh as it emerges through the aponeurotic covering of the adductor canal. A clean cut of the nerve gives rise to anaesthesia, but an incomplete cut or tearing of the nerve, followed by its involvement in scar tissue, leads to saphenous neuralgia--a painful sensation in the area supplied by the nerve. Two hundred and fifty-seven arterial operations involving the course of the saphenous nerve in the thigh have been reviewed. Twenty-six of these operations were complicated by early failure of the arterial procedure necessitating amputation and have not been considered in assessing the incidence of damage to the nerve. One in five superficial femoral thromboendarterectomies and one in nine femoropopliteal bypass grafts were complicated by saphenous neuralgia. Profundaplasty was not followed by this complication. Appreciation of this troublesome symptom should lead to greater care of the nerve during surgery.

  13. Neonatal peripherally inserted central catheters: recommendations for prevention of insertion and postinsertion complications.

    PubMed

    Paulson, Pamela R; Miller, Kellee M

    2008-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) continue to be necessary in neonatal care. They benefit many premature infants and those needing long-term intravenous access. An experienced inserter, early recognition of PICC candidates, early PICC placement, knowledge of anatomy, and correct choice of vein all increase placement success. As with any invasive procedure, there are risks. These include pain, difficulty advancing the catheter, damage to vessels, catheter malposition, and bleeding. Utilizing assessment skills, following the product manufacturer's instructions, and carefully placing the catheter should minimize most of these risks. Additional risks include postinsertion complications such as occlusions, thrombosis, catheter failure, infection, and catheter malposition. Proper nursing care--which includes controlling infection, properly securing the catheter, and changing the dressing as needed--is key to preventing complications and maintaining the PICC until treatment has been completed.

  14. Complications after tenckhoff catheter insertion: a single-centre experience using multiple operators over four years.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen Jiun; Hooi, Lai Seong

    2010-01-01

    To analyze the complications after Tenckhoff catheter insertion among patients with renal failure needing dialysis. ♢ The open, paramedian approach is the commonest technique to insert the 62-cm coiled double-cuffed Tenckhoff peritoneal catheter. All patients with catheters inserted between January 2004 and November 2007 were retrospectively analyzed for demographics and followed for up to 1 month for complications. We excluded patients whose catheters had been anchored to the bladder wall and who underwent concurrent omentectomy or readjustment without removal of a malfunctioning catheter (n = 7). Intravenous cloxacillin was the standard preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis. ♢ Over the 4-year study period, 384 catheters were inserted under local anesthetic into 319 patients [201 women (62.8%); mean age: 49.4 ± 16.7 years (range: 13 - 89 years); 167 (52.2%) with diabetes; 303 (95%) with end-stage renal disease] by 22 different operators. All Tenckhoff catheters were inserted by the general surgical (n = 223) or urology (n = 161) team. There were 29 cases (7.6%) of catheter migration, 22 (5.7%) of catheter obstruction without migration, 24 (6.3%) of exit-site infection, 12 (3.1%) of leak from the main incision, 14 (3.6%) of culture-proven wound infection, 11 (2.9%) post-insertion peritonitis, and 1 (0.3%) hemoperitoneum. No deaths were attributed to surgical mishap. ♢ The most common complication was catheter migration. The paramedian insertion technique was safe, with low complication rates.

  15. Complications of peripherally inserted central catheters in advanced cancer patients undergoing combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jun; Xu, Linjie; Xu, Xiaomin; Huang, Yunjuan

    2017-03-23

    To identify whether patients with advanced cancers were at high risk of peripherall"y inserted central catheter-related complications when treated with concurrent chemo-radiotherapy. Peripherally inserted central catheters are widely used in chemotherapy. However, catheter usage may elevate the risks of infections and thrombosis. It is important to identify the patients with high risk of peripherally inserted central catheter-related complications. To date, little is known about peripherally inserted central catheter-related complications in patients with advanced cancers and receiving concurrent chemo-radiotherapy. Five hundred and sixty-nine cancer patients with advanced cancers and treated by chemo-radiotherapy were analysed in the study. The incidences of peripherally inserted central catheter-related complications were investigated. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were employed for identification of risk factors. Eighty-six (15.1%) patients exhibited peripherally inserted central catheter-related infectious complications, of which 6.3% were local infection, 3.9% were catheter-related bloodstream infection and 4.9% were exit-site infection. Sixty-five (11.4%) developed symptomatic peripherally inserted central catheter-related thrombosis, and 52 (9.1%) were suffering from phlebitis. The overall complication rate was 53.1%. The univariable logistic regression and multivariate analysis showed that comorbidity (OR 1.51, p = .0148) and body mass index (OR 1.46, p = .0157), and duration of radio-chemotherapy (OR 1.4733, p = .0049) were significantly associated with peripherally inserted central catheter-related complications. Patients with peripherally inserted central catheter-related complications showed lower 5-year survival rate than those without peripherally inserted central catheter-related complications. Identification of risk factors for peripherally inserted central catheter-related complications in patients with advanced

  16. Use of Pulmonary Artery Catheter in Coronary Artery Bypass Graft. Costs and Long-Term Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fei; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Heng; Chen, Sipeng; Ao, Hushan

    2015-01-01

    Background Pulmonary artery catheters (PAC) are used widely to monitor hemodynamics in patients undergoing coronary bypass graft (CABG) surgery. However, recent studies have raised concerns regarding both the effectiveness and safety of PAC. Therefore, our aim was to determine the effects of the use of PAC on the short- and long-term health and economic outcomes of patients undergoing CABG. Methods 1361 Chinese patients who consecutively underwent isolated, primary CABG at the Cardiovascular Institute of Fuwai Hospital from June 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012 were included in this study. Of all the patients, 453 received PAC during operation (PAC group) and 908 received no PAC therapy (control group). Short-term and long-term mortality and major complications were analyzed with multivariate regression analysis and propensity score matched-pair analysis was used to yield two well-matched groups for further comparison. Results The patients who were managed with PAC more often received intraoperative vasoactive drugs dopamine (70.9% vs. 45.5%; P<0.001) and epinephrine (7.7% vs. 2.6%; P<0.001). In addition, costs for initial hospitalization were higher for PAC patients ($14,535 vs. $13,873, respectively, p = 0.004). PAC use was neither associated with the perioperative mortality or major complications, nor was it associated with long-term mortality and major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events. In addition, comparison between two well-matched groups showed no significant differences either in baseline characteristics or in short-term and long-term outcomes. Conclusions There is no clear indication of any benefit or harm in managing CABG patients with PAC. However, use of PAC in CABG is more expensive. That is, PAC use increased costs without benefit and thus appears unjustified for routine use in CABG surgery. PMID:25689312

  17. Catheter fracture: a rare complication of totally implantable subclavian venous access devices.

    PubMed

    Klotz, H P; Schöpke, W; Kohler, A; Pestalozzi, B; Largiadèr, F

    1996-07-01

    Catheter fracture represents a rare problem among non-infectious complications following the insertion of totally implantable long-term central venous access systems for the application of chemotherapeutic agents. A literature survey revealed a total incidence of catheter fractures of 0-2.1%. Imminent catheter fracture can be identified radiologically, using different degrees of catheter narrowing between the clavicle and the first rib, called pinch-off sign. Two cases of catheter fracture are described and potential causes are discussed. Recommendations to avoid the pinch-off sign with the subsequent risk of catheter fracture and migration include a more lateral and direct puncture of the subclavian vein. In case of catheter narrowing in the clavicular-first rib angle, patients should be followed carefully by chest X-rays every 4 weeks. Whenever possible, the system should be removed within 6 months following insertion.

  18. Retrospective data about the catheter-related complications and management in massive bus burn casualties.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hongfei; Hu, Hang; Ren, Haitao; Han, Chunmao; Wang, Xingang; You, Chuangang; Zhao, Ruiyi

    2016-07-12

    This is a single-center, descriptive report of the management and complications of venous catheter use in 19 severely burned passengers from a bus fire that occurred on July 5, 2014, in Hangzhou. We recorded the parameters of the catheters insertion and indwelling. Sampling of each removed catheter was conducted to monitor for catheter-related infections. Bedside ultrasound screening was performed for recording central venous catheter (CVC)-related complications. Of the 174 venous accesses placed, 108 were CVCs. 27 (25.0%) catheter tip cultures (CTC) were positive; 12 (11.1%) were catheter-related blood stream infections (CRBSI). Acinetobacter baumannii was the most prominent bacterial infection for both CTC- (55.56%) and CRBSI- (75.00%) positive catheters. CTC- and CRBSI-positive rates were higher during the emergency stage, and both dropped rapidly after reform measures (chi-square test, p = 0.003), and all were negative after the no.8 catheters. Accumulative regression results indicated that total body surface area burned (TBSA), number of catheters, days of indwelling, and bloodstream infections were independently associated with CTC results, while gender and number of catheters were independently associated with CRBSI results. 1 femur vein thrombosis was detected and cured. Bedside ultrasound and professional IV team for CVC management are pivotal for massive burn victims. Their intervention helps control CVC-related infections and other complications. A. baumannii was the most frequent bacterial infection found in both CTC- and CRBSI-positive catheters. Several most important factors associated with catheter-related infections were concluded. This information alerts us to watch for patients with such warning factors.

  19. Bacteremic complications of intravascular catheter tip colonization with Gram-negative micro-organisms in patients without preceding bacteremia.

    PubMed

    van Eck van der Sluijs, A; Oosterheert, J J; Ekkelenkamp, M B; Hoepelman, I M; Peters, Edgar J G

    2012-06-01

    Although Gram-negative micro-organisms are frequently associated with catheter-related bloodstream infections, the prognostic value and clinical implication of a positive catheter tip culture with Gram-negative micro-organisms without preceding bacteremia remains unclear. We determined the outcomes of patients with intravascular catheters colonized with these micro-organisms, without preceding positive blood cultures, and identified risk factors for the development of subsequent Gram-negative bacteremia. All patients with positive intravascular catheter tip cultures with Gram-negative micro-organisms at the University Medical Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands, between 2005 and 2009, were retrospectively studied. Patients with Gram-negative bacteremia within 48 h before catheter removal were excluded. The main outcome measure was bacteremia with Gram-negative micro-organisms. Other endpoints were length of the hospital stay, in-hospital mortality, secondary complications of Gram-negative bacteremia, and duration of intensive care admission. A total of 280 catheters from 248 patients were colonized with Gram-negative micro-organisms. Sixty-seven cases were excluded because of preceding positive blood cultures, leaving 213 catheter tips from 181 patients for analysis. In 40 (19%) cases, subsequent Gram-negative bacteremia developed. In multivariate analysis, arterial catheters were independently associated with subsequent Gram-negative bacteremia (odds ratio [OR] = 5.00, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.20-20.92), as was selective decontamination of the digestive tract (SDD) (OR = 2.47, 95% CI: 1.07-5.69). Gram-negative bacteremia in patients who received SDD was predominantly caused by cefotaxime (part of the SDD)-resistant organisms. Mortality was significantly higher in the group with subsequent Gram-negative bacteremia (35% versus 20%, OR = 2.12, 95% CI: 1.00-4.49). Patients with a catheter tip colonized with Gram-negative micro-organisms had a high chance of

  20. Identifying complications of central venous catheters: infection, thrombosis, occlusion.

    PubMed

    2009-08-01

    (1) The signs of infection of implanted port catheters are inflammation along the course of a central catheter, oozing or signs of an abscess of the pocket in which the port is implanted. Catheter-related venous thrombosis should be suspected in the event of pain, oedema, local swelling, a palpable venous cord and development of superficial collateral circulation; (2) The rapid appearance of local signs and symptoms at the time of injection suggests extravasation of the injected drug; (3) Catheter patency should be checked with normal saline, never using too much force if resistance is encountered. If there is a thrombotic occlusion, the catheter can often be unblocked with heparin, or if not, with urokinase. There is only a moderate risk of bleeding if these agents are used carefully.

  1. Coronary artery embolism from infectious endocarditis treated with catheter thrombectomy using a GuideLiner catheter.

    PubMed

    Oestreich, Brett A; Sommer, Per; Armstrong, Ehrin J

    2016-04-01

    A 27-year-old male with history of IV drug use and recurrent endocarditis necessitating bioprosthetic mitral and tricuspid valve replacements presented with 2 weeks of fevers and chest pain. ECG revealed inferior ST-elevation myocardial infarction and he was taken urgently to the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Coronary angiography revealed thrombotic occlusion of the distal right coronary artery (RCA) with no angiographic evidence of atherosclerotic disease. Aspiration thrombectomy was performed followed by rheolytic thrombectomy. Despite multiple attempts at thrombectomy, significant residual organized thrombus persisted in the distal RCA. Therefore, further thrombectomy was performed by placing a GuideLiner catheter (Vascular Solutions, Minneapolis, MN) deep within the right coronary artery near the bifurcation into the posterior descending and posterior left ventricular arteries. After repeat aspiration, there was significant improvement with thrombolysis in myocardial infarction 3 flow. Intravascular ultrasound of the RCA revealed a normal-appearing vessel without evidence of atherosclerotic disease and mild residual thrombus. The decision was made to not pursue stent placement, given the concern for a likely embolic source. Following the procedure, the patient's chest pain resolved and his ST-segments normalized. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Patients with Life-Threatening Arterial Renal Hemorrhage: CT Angiography and Catheter Angiography with Subsequent Superselective Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, C. M. Stampfl, U.; Bellemann, N.; Ramsauer, S.; Loenard, B. M.; Haferkamp, A.; Hallscheidt, P.; Richter, G. M.; Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A.

    2010-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical and clinical success of superselective embolization in patients with life-threatening arterial renal hemorrhage undergoing preinterventional CT angiography. Forty-three patients with clinical signs of life-threatening arterial renal hemorrhage underwent CT angiography and catheter angiography. Superselective embolization was indicated in the case of a positive catheter angiography. Primary study goals were technical and clinical success of superselective embolization. Secondary study goals were CT angiographic and catheter angiographic image findings and clinical follow-up. The mean time interval between CT angiography and catheter angiography was 8.3 {+-} 10.3 h (range, 0.2-34.1 h). Arterial renal hemorrhage was identified with CT angiography in 42 of 43 patients (98%) and catheter angiography in 39 of 43 patients (91%) (overview angiography in 4 of 43 patients [9%], selective angiography in 16 of 43 patients [37%], and superselective angiography in 39 of 43 patients [91%]). Superselective embolization was performed in 39 of 43 patients (91%) and technically successful in 37 of 39 patients (95%). Therefore, coil embolization was performed in 13 of 37 patients (35%), liquid embolization in 9 of 37 patients (24%), particulate embolization in 1 of 37 patients (3%), and a combination in 14 of 37 patients (38%). Clinical failure occurred in 8 of 39 patients (21%) and procedure-related complications in 2 of 39 patients (5%). The 30-day mortality rate was 3%. Hemoglobin decreased significantly prior to intervention (P < 0.001) and increased significantly after intervention (P < 0.005). In conclusion, superselective embolization is effective, reliable, and safe in patients with life-threatening arterial renal hemorrhage. In contrast to overview and selective angiography, only superselective angiography allows reliable detection of arterial renal hemorrhage. Preinterventional CT angiography is excellent for detection

  3. Novel treatment of coronary artery fistulae concealing severe coronary artery lesion: using thrombus aspiration catheter as a delivery guide

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Levent; Acar, Zeydin; Dursun, İhsan; Akyüz, Ali Rıza; Korkmaz, Ayca Ata

    2014-01-01

    In this case report, we present the occlusion of multiple coronary artery fistulae originating from proximal left anterior descending (LAD) and right sinus valsavla and empting to the pulmonary artery at the same place. We occluded LAD fistulae by using thrombus aspiration catheter as a delivery guide. To the best of our knowlege, this is the first case of occlusion of coronary fistulae with the help of thrombus aspiration catheter. Our experience may suggest that thrombus aspiration catheters can be used in treating coronary artery fistulae with difficult anotomy. PMID:24748888

  4. Pulmonary artery catheter insertion in a patient of dextrocardia with anomalous venous connections.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Mukesh; Kumar, Naresh; Singh, Prabhat K

    2004-08-01

    In a young adult patient having situs solitus with dextrocardia the attempted pulmonary artery catheter placement for emergency mitral valve replacement required an unduly long length (50cm) of catheter insertion to get into right ventricle and then into pulmonary artery. Although catheter coiling was suspected initially, chest x-ray taken after successfully placement revealed an uncommon congenital anomalous venous connection i.e. right internal jugular opening into left sided superior vena cava then into inferior vena cava after running all along the left border of the heart. With the result, it required to pass 50cm of PA catheter to get into right ventricle in our patient. This emphasizes the need to look for abnormal venous connections during echocardiography and x-ray screening in congenital heart disease. Fluoroscopy is recommended when an unusual length of pulmonary artery catheter insertion is required to enter the pulmonary artery.

  5. Complications, effects on dialysis dose, and survival of tunneled femoral dialysis catheters in acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Klouche, Kada; Amigues, Laurent; Deleuze, Sebastien; Beraud, Jean-Jacques; Canaud, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    Availability of a functional vascular access is a mandatory prerequisite for extracorporeal renal replacement therapy in patients with acute renal failure. The femoral site of insertion commonly is chosen because it is an easy and convenient access. However, an array of complications may substantially alter the quality of treatment, and it appears that catheter-related morbidity and dysfunction are more frequent with the femoral than internal jugular site. This study is designed to evaluate the potential benefits of using soft silicone tunneled catheters ((ST)Caths) at the femoral site. Thirty patients with acute renal failure treated by intermittent hemodialysis (IHD) and/or continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF) were assigned to either twin (ST)Caths or twin polyurethane nontunneled femoral catheters. Time necessary for catheter insertion, catheter-related complications, and catheter lifespan were monitored. Catheter performance during IHD and the effect of catheter type on dialysis dose were evaluated. The time necessary for (ST)Cath insertion was significantly longer. The incidence of vein thrombosis and catheter-related infection was lower, and the ratio of venous return pressure to catheter blood flow was better with an (ST)Cath. Recirculation rates were similar for both types of catheters. Whether treated by using IHD or CVVHDF, patients with an (ST)Cath benefited from a greater delivered dialysis dose. Multivariate analysis confirmed that (ST)Cath use was a determinant factor to optimize dialysis dose delivery. (ST)Cath patency was significantly longer. In patients with acute renal failure, use of an (ST)Cath minimizes catheter-related morbidity and improves dialysis efficiency compared with conventional femoral catheters.

  6. Complications of peripherally inserted central catheters in adults with cystic fibrosis or bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Christian; Gouya, Hervé; Panzo, Rozy; Hubert, Dominique; Correas, Jean-Michel; Agrario, Line; Chapron, Jeanne; Honoré, Isabelle; Kanaan, Reem; Legmann, Paul; Dusser, Daniel; Vignaux, Olivier; Burgel, Pierre-Régis

    2015-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are increasingly used in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) or with non-CF bronchiectasis, but little data exist on catheter-related complications in this setting. Prospective follow-up of consecutive PICCs inserted for intravenous (IV) antibiotics in adults with CF or with non-CF bronchiectasis at Cochin Hospital (Paris, France). Between March 2009 and December 2011, 182 PICCs were prescribed in 117 adults (67 CF and 50 non-CF patients). Ultrasound-guided placement of catheter was successful in 174/182 (95.6%) procedures; no insertion complication occurred. The mean ± SD catheter dwell time was 15 ± 9 days. No catheter-associated bloodstream infection occurred; main complications were symptomatic upper limb deep vein thrombosis (2%), catheter obstruction (18%) and persistent pain after catheter insertion (18%). Patients' satisfaction was high and PICC could be used to perform antibiotic courses in most patients. PICCs were generally safe for performing IV antibiotic courses in patients with CF or non-CF bronchiectasis, but prolonged pain and/or catheter obstruction occurred in approximately 20% of cases.

  7. Endovascular Repair Using Suture-Mediated Closure Devices and Balloon Tamponade following Inadvertent Subclavian Artery Catheterization with Large-Caliber Hemodialysis Catheter.

    PubMed

    Park, Taek Kyu; Yang, Jeong Hoon; Choi, Seung-Hyuk

    2016-07-01

    Accidental subclavian artery cannulation is an uncommon but potentially serious complication of central venous catheterization. Removal of a catheter inadvertently placed in the subclavian artery can lead to substantial bleeding, as achieving hemostasis in this area through manual compression presents considerable difficulty. Additionally, surgical treatment might be unsuitable for high-risk patients due to comorbidities. Here, we report a case of an inadvertently-inserted 11.5-French hemodialysis catheter in the subclavian artery during internal jugular venous catheterization. We performed percutaneous closure of the subclavian artery using three 6-French Perclose Proglide® devices with a balloon tamponade in the proximal part of the subclavian artery. Closure was completed without embolic neurological complications.

  8. Endovascular technique using a snare and suture for retrieving a migrated peripherally inserted central catheter in the left pulmonary artery

    PubMed Central

    Teragawa, Hiroki; Sueda, Takashi; Fujii, Yuichi; Takemoto, Hiroaki; Toyota, Yasushi; Nomura, Shuichi; Nakagawa, Keigo

    2013-01-01

    We report a successful endovascular technique using a snare with a suture for retrieving a migrated broken peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) in a chemotherapy patient. A 62-year-old male received monthly chemotherapy through a central venous port implanted into his right subclavian area. The patient completed chemotherapy without complications 1 mo ago; however, he experienced pain in the right subclavian area during his last chemotherapy session. Computed tomography on that day showed migration of a broken PICC in his left pulmonary artery, for which the patient was admitted to our hospital. We attempted to retrieve the ectopic PICC through the right jugular vein using a gooseneck snare, but were unsuccessful because the catheter was lodged in the pulmonary artery wall. Therefore, a second attempt was made through the right femoral vein using a snare with triple loops, but we could not grasp the migrated PICC. Finally, a string was tied to the top of the snare, allowing us to curve the snare toward the pulmonary artery by pulling the string. Finally, the catheter body was grasped and retrieved. The endovascular suture technique is occasionally extremely useful and should be considered by interventional cardiologists for retrieving migrated catheters. PMID:24109502

  9. Emergency Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Through the Left Radial Artery is Associated with Less Vascular Complications than Emergency Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Through the Femoral Artery.

    PubMed

    Qi, Guoqing; Sun, Qi; Xia, Yue; Wei, Liye

    2017-01-01

    To compare the advantages and disadvantages of emergency percutaneous coronary intervention through the left radial artery with those of emergency percutaneous coronary intervention through the femoral artery. A total of 206 patients with acute myocardial infarction who required emergency percutaneous coronary intervention and were admitted to our hospital between January 2011 and August 2013 were divided into the following two groups: a group that underwent percutaneous coronary intervention through the left radial artery and a group that underwent percutaneous coronary intervention through the femoral artery. The times required for angiographic catheter and guiding catheter placement, the success rate of the procedure and the incidence of vascular complications in the two groups were observed. There was no significant difference in catheter placement time or the ultimate success rate of the procedure between the two groups. However, the left radial artery group showed a significantly lower incidence of vascular complications than the femoral artery group (p<0.05). Emergency percutaneous coronary intervention through the left radial artery is associated with less vascular complications than emergency percutaneous coronary intervention through the femoral artery and is thus potentially advantageous for patients.

  10. Emergency Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Through the Left Radial Artery is Associated with Less Vascular Complications than Emergency Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Through the Femoral Artery

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Guoqing; Sun, Qi; Xia, Yue; Wei, Liye

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the advantages and disadvantages of emergency percutaneous coronary intervention through the left radial artery with those of emergency percutaneous coronary intervention through the femoral artery. METHODS: A total of 206 patients with acute myocardial infarction who required emergency percutaneous coronary intervention and were admitted to our hospital between January 2011 and August 2013 were divided into the following two groups: a group that underwent percutaneous coronary intervention through the left radial artery and a group that underwent percutaneous coronary intervention through the femoral artery. The times required for angiographic catheter and guiding catheter placement, the success rate of the procedure and the incidence of vascular complications in the two groups were observed. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in catheter placement time or the ultimate success rate of the procedure between the two groups. However, the left radial artery group showed a significantly lower incidence of vascular complications than the femoral artery group (p<0.05). CONCLUSION: Emergency percutaneous coronary intervention through the left radial artery is associated with less vascular complications than emergency percutaneous coronary intervention through the femoral artery and is thus potentially advantageous for patients. PMID:28226025

  11. Update on Insertion and Complications of Central Venous Catheters for Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Bream, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Central venous catheters are a popular choice for the initiation of hemodialysis or for bridging between different types of access. Despite this, they have many drawbacks including a high morbidity from thrombosis and infection. Advances in technology have allowed placement of these lines relatively safely, and national guidelines have been established to help prevent complications. There is an established algorithm for location and technique for placement that minimizes harm to the patient; however, there are significant short- and long-term complications that proceduralists who place catheters should be able to recognize and manage. This review covers insertion and complications of central venous catheters for hemodialysis, and the social and economic impact of the use of catheters for initiating dialysis is reviewed. PMID:27011425

  12. Rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunt: Catheter protrusion to subcutaneous tissue – Case report

    PubMed Central

    Gatto, Luana Antunes Maranha; Mathias, Roger; Tuma, Rogério; Abdalla, Ricardo; de Aguiar, Paulo Henrique Pires

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt is a day-to-day procedure performed by a neurosurgeon. The most frequent associated complications are obstructive and infectious. Although rare, there are well-reported complications related to the poor positioning of the distal catheter, with perforation of organs and tissues. Still rarer are the complications related to the migration of this catheter. Case Description: We describe an atypical case of VP shunt postoperative by normal pressure hydrocephalus. After well-documented proper positioning of the distal catheter into the intraperitoneal cavity, it protruded into the subcutaneous space. Even on a new documented satisfactory abdominal tomography, this catheter migrated back again to the subcutaneous tissue. Conclusion: We did not find plausible explanation for this rare event. PMID:28194301

  13. Hepatic intra-arterial chemotherapy using a percutaneous catheter in pretreated patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fazio, N; Orsi, F; Grasso, R F; Ferretti, G; Medici, M; Rocca, A; Zampino, G; Curigliano, G; De Pas, T; Colleoni, M; Bonomo, G; Marrocco, E; Lunghi, L; De Braud, F

    2003-01-01

    Hepatic intra-arterial chemotherapy (HIAC) leads to a higher response rate than systemic administration in untreated patients with liver metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity and safety of giving HIAC through a percutaneous catheter in pre-treated patients. Forty-five CRC patients with liver-only or liver-dominant metastases, resistant or refractory to previous systemic therapy, were treated using a temporary trans-subclavian catheter. A 3-day chemotherapy regimen of daily 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) 1000 mg/m2/day + heparin 5000 IU/day given as a 24-hour continuous infusion, and twice daily bolus injections of cisplatin (CDDP) 10 mg/m2 and mitomycin C (MMC) 2 mg/m2, was administered every six weeks. One hundred and seventeen courses were administered to 45 patients (a median of three per patient: range 1-5). Of the 44 patients evaluable for response, 16 (35%) had a partial response, 15 (33%) stable disease and 12 (26%) progressive disease. Eleven of the 16 responding patients had been refractory to a previous 5-FU-based systemic therapy. The most relevant grade 3-4 toxicities included neutropenia (22%) and thrombocytopenia (15%). Gastro-duodenal ulcers occurred in nine patients. Catheter displacement was recorded during 22 out of 117 (18%) courses. HIAC with 5-FU, CDDP and MMC given through a temporary percutaneous catheter is safe and active in pretreated patients with metastatic CRC. Iatrogenic gastroduodenal ulcers are a serious but manageable complication.

  14. Knotting of a Cervical Epidural Catheter in the Patient with Post-Herpetic Neuralgia: A Rare Complication

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Taek; Cho, Dong Woo; Lee, Young Bok

    2017-01-01

    Epidural block is achieved either by single injection of local anesthetic through an epidural needle or as a continuous block by infusion pump through an epidural catheter. Complications associated with epidural catheters include breakage, entrapment, and knotting. Knotting of epidural catheters is very rare, but knotting in lumbar epidural catheters has been reported in a number of studies, and most of these cases involved removal difficulty. We report a case in which we inserted a cervical epidural catheter in a patient who was experiencing severe post-herpetic neuralgia and then removed the knotted catheter without complications. PMID:28261560

  15. Pulmonary Artery Catheter Use During Cardiac Surgery in the United States, 2010 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Brovman, Ethan Y; Gabriel, Rodney A; Dutton, Richard P; Urman, Richard D

    2016-06-01

    To examine patterns of use of pulmonary artery catheters in a large cohort of patients undergoing cardiac surgery. A retrospective study with univariate and multivariate logistic regression to identify independent predictors for the utilization of pulmonary artery catheters. University, small, medium and large community hospitals participating in the National Anesthesia Clinical Outcomes Registry. A total of 116,333 patients undergoing pulmonary artery catheter placement during cardiac surgery in the National Anesthesia Clinical Outcomes Registry from the Anesthesia Quality Institute. Age older than 50 years, American Society of Anesthesiologists classification of 3 or higher, case duration of longer than 6 hours, and presence of a resident physician or certified nurse anesthetist were associated with increased likelihood of pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) placement. Age<18 years, or presence of a board-certified anesthesiologist, were associated with a decreased likelihood of catheter placement. The use of PACs has increased from 2010 to 2014. The presence of a PAC did not alter the risk of cardiac arrest intraoperatively. A nonsignificant decrease in mortality was associated with catheter placement. Transfusion was 75% less likely in the PAC cohort than in the control group. Pulmonary artery catheter use remains a mainstay of cardiac anesthesia practice. No significant change in the incidence of intraoperative death was noted, but patients with a PAC were less likely to have blood transfused. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Extravasation from venous catheter: a serious complication potentially missed by lung imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Spicer, K.M.; Gordon, L.

    1983-11-01

    Three patients were referred for lung ventiliation and perfusion (V/Q) imaging with symptoms strongly suggestive of pulmonary embolus (PE). Chest roentgenograms and xenon ventilation studies on all three were normal, save for prominent mediastinal silhouettes and effusions. Technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin(Tc-99m MAA), when injected through the central venous catheter (CVP), revealed mediastinal localization, whereas antecubital injections showed normal pulmonary perfusion. Contrast fluoroscopy introduced through the venous catheter in the first patient defined the extravasation. For patients under strong suspicion of PE, with a venous catheter whose distal tip is seen about the level of the heart on chest radiograph, the authors recommend administering the perfusion agent slowly through the central catheter to exclude catheter-induced complications. When extravasation is detected, injection of Tc-99m MAA by peripheral vein should be used to exclude PE.

  17. Postoperative life-threatening recurrent ventricular arrhythmia triggered by the swan-ganz catheter in a patient undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Min, Jooncheol; Choi, Jae-Sung; Oh, Se Jin; Seong, Yong Won; Moon, Hyun Jong; Lee, Jeong Sang

    2014-08-01

    Recurrent ventricular arrhythmia can be fatal and cause serious complications, particularly when it is caused immediately after an operation. Incorrect placement of a Swan-Ganz catheter can trigger life-threatening ventricular arrhythmia, but even intensive care specialists tend to miss this fact. Here, we report a case of recurrent ventricular arrhythmia causing a severe hemodynamic compromise; the arrhythmia was induced by a severely angulated Swan-Ganz catheter. The recurrent ventricular arrhythmia was not controlled by any measures including repositioning of the catheter, until the complete removal of the Swan-Ganz catheter. It is necessary to keep in mind that the position of the pulmonary artery catheter should be promptly checked if there is intractable recurrent ventricular arrhythmia.

  18. A patient with an uncommon complication from insertion of a central venous catheter: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Khalid, Imran; Khalid, Tabindeh J; DiGiovine, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    Background A 72 year old male was admitted to the medical intensive care unit with septic shock. Case presentation A left subclavian central venous catheter was inserted on the day of admission whose tip was pushing against the wall of the vessel lumen. The patient's condition improved with treatment, but three days later had a new episode of acute hypotension. CT scan of the chest showed that the catheter had eroded through the superior vena cava wall. Conclusion The catheter was pulled out and patient recovered from the complication with supportive therapy. Care should be taken that the tip of the catheter is in the center of the vessel lumen to avoid this rare, but potentially life threatening, complication. PMID:19036145

  19. Laparoscopic Treatment of Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Complication Caused by Distal Catheter Isolation Inside the Falciform Ligament.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Hoon; Jung, Young-Jin; Chang, Chul-Hoon

    2016-06-01

    A ventriculoperitoneal shunt is a widely recognized treatment that we use to treat hydrocephalus. In one's lifetime, there is a high possibility of being diagnosed with shunt dysfunction. Occasionally, complications caused by the distal catheter located in the intra-abdominal cavity may occur. In this case, after undergoing shunt surgery, the patient's distal catheter had not moved and was fixed in 1 place. Therefore, we used abdominal computed tomography and discovered the presence of a pseudocyst where the distal catheter was located. Through laparoscopic-assisted surgery performed by the department of general surgery, we discovered that the distal catheter entered into the falciform ligament and caused it to expand, creating a cyst. The fascia of the falciform ligament was dissected using a harmonic scalpel. Cerebrospinal fluid and the distal catheter were noted. Afterwards, the distal catheter was placed into the peritoneal cavity. After surgery, the patient was discharged without any complications. Although this is an unusual circumstance, there have been reports of some cases in which the ventriculoperitoneal shunt distal catheter entered the falciform ligament. Therefore, one must pay close attention during the operation. In addition, when treatment is necessary, laparoscopic-assisted surgery might serve as an effective diagnostic and therapeutic modality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Emergent Right Coronary Artery Thrombectomy with a Jet Aspiration Thrombectomy Catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Teiyu; Furui, Shigeru; Isshiki, Takaaki; Toyoizumi, Hideki; Kohtake, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Kohji; Suzuki, Shigeru; Harasawa, Arimi; Sasaki, Yasushi

    1999-07-15

    A saline-jet aspiration thrombectomy (JAT) catheter was used in a patient with acute myocardial infarction. A right coronary arteriogram showed complete thrombotic occlusion at the proximal segment. With this catheter the thrombus was removed without complications in 5 sec. The patient underwent percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty and placement of a Palmaz-Schatz stent after successful thrombectomy. Thrombectomy with a JAT catheter was very useful in this patient.0.

  1. Prospective study of incidence and predictors of peripheral intravenous catheter-induced complications

    PubMed Central

    Abolfotouh, Mostafa A; Salam, Mahmoud; Bani-Mustafa, Ala’a; White, David; Balkhy, Hanan H

    2014-01-01

    Background Although intravenous therapy is one of the most commonly performed procedures in hospitalized patients, it remains susceptible to infectious and noninfectious complications. Previous studies investigated peripheral intravenous catheter (PIVC) complications mainly in pediatrics, but apparently none were investigated among Saudi adult populations. The aim of this study was to assess the pattern and complications of PIVCs at King Abdulaziz Medical City (KAMC), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Methods An observational prospective cohort study investigated PIVCs pattern and complications among adults with PIVCs, admitted to various wards at KAMC. PIVCs-related clinical outcomes (pain, phlebitis, leaking, and others) were recorded in 12-hour intervals, using the Visual Inspection Phlebitis scale. Density incidence (DI) and cumulative incidence (CI) of complications and their relative risks (RRs) were calculated. Regression analyses were applied and significance limits were set at P<0.05. Results During the study period, 359 adults were included, mounting to 842 PIVCs and 2,505 catheter days. The majority of patients, 276 (76.9%), had medical, chief admission complaints, whereas 83 (23.1%) were trauma/surgical and infectious cases. Complicated catheters were found in 141 (39.3%) patients, with 273 complications (32.4/100 catheters), in 190 complicated catheters (CI =22.56/100 catheters and DI =75.84/1,000 catheter days). Phlebitis ranked first among complications, 148 (CI =17.6%), followed by pain 64 (CI =7.6%), leaking 33 (CI =3.9%), dislodgement 20 (CI =2.4%), and extravasations and occlusion 4 (CI =0.5% each). Phlebitis was predicted with female sex (P<0.001), insertion in fore/upper arm (P=0.024), and infusion of medication (P=0.02). Removal time for PIVCs insertion was not a significant predictor of phlebitis (RR =1.46, P=0.08). Conclusion Incidence of complications in this study was significantly higher than rates in previous studies. Better insertion techniques may

  2. Prospective study of incidence and predictors of peripheral intravenous catheter-induced complications.

    PubMed

    Abolfotouh, Mostafa A; Salam, Mahmoud; Bani-Mustafa, Ala'a; White, David; Balkhy, Hanan H

    2014-01-01

    Although intravenous therapy is one of the most commonly performed procedures in hospitalized patients, it remains susceptible to infectious and noninfectious complications. Previous studies investigated peripheral intravenous catheter (PIVC) complications mainly in pediatrics, but apparently none were investigated among Saudi adult populations. The aim of this study was to assess the pattern and complications of PIVCs at King Abdulaziz Medical City (KAMC), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. An observational prospective cohort study investigated PIVCs pattern and complications among adults with PIVCs, admitted to various wards at KAMC. PIVCs-related clinical outcomes (pain, phlebitis, leaking, and others) were recorded in 12-hour intervals, using the Visual Inspection Phlebitis scale. Density incidence (DI) and cumulative incidence (CI) of complications and their relative risks (RRs) were calculated. Regression analyses were applied and significance limits were set at P<0.05. During the study period, 359 adults were included, mounting to 842 PIVCs and 2,505 catheter days. The majority of patients, 276 (76.9%), had medical, chief admission complaints, whereas 83 (23.1%) were trauma/surgical and infectious cases. Complicated catheters were found in 141 (39.3%) patients, with 273 complications (32.4/100 catheters), in 190 complicated catheters (CI =22.56/100 catheters and DI =75.84/1,000 catheter days). Phlebitis ranked first among complications, 148 (CI =17.6%), followed by pain 64 (CI =7.6%), leaking 33 (CI =3.9%), dislodgement 20 (CI =2.4%), and extravasations and occlusion 4 (CI =0.5% each). Phlebitis was predicted with female sex (P<0.001), insertion in fore/upper arm (P=0.024), and infusion of medication (P=0.02). Removal time for PIVCs insertion was not a significant predictor of phlebitis (RR =1.46, P=0.08). Incidence of complications in this study was significantly higher than rates in previous studies. Better insertion techniques may be sought to lower the incidences of

  3. Prospective follow-up of complications related to peripherally inserted central catheters.

    PubMed

    Leroyer, C; Lashéras, A; Marie, V; Le Bras, Y; Carteret, T; Dupon, M; Rogues, A-M

    2013-08-01

    An increased use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) in French hospitals has been observed in recent years. We report complications having occurred following the placement of PICC in a teaching hospital. A prospective study was made for 7 months, between October 2010 and April 2011, including all patients having undergone PICC placement in interventional radiology. Two hundred and sixty-seven PICC were inserted in 222 patients for intravenous antibiotic therapy (68%), parenteral nutrition (13%), or chemotherapy (9%). The median duration of PICC use was 17 days (min-max: 1-140) for the 200 PICC monitored until removal. The most common complication was obstruction (n=41), 16 of which motivated PICC removal (8%). Five cases of vein thrombosis (2.5%) and 20 infectious complications (10%) led to removal. There were 14 accidental removals (7%). The overall infection rate was 2.3 per 1000 catheter-days with 0.86 per 1000 catheter-days for central line-associated bloodstream infection. Thirty-four percent of PICC were removed without any complications without any difference according to use. PICC are a simple alternative to standard central venous catheter but the rate of complications is high and could be decreased by a stringent management and training for this type of catheter. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Epidemiology of haemodialysis catheter complications: a survey of 865 dialysis patients from 14 haemodialysis centres in Henan province in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Wang, Pei; Liang, Xianhui; Lu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Zhangsuo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the incidence rates and risk factors for catheter-related complications in different districts and populations in Henan Province in China. Design Cross-sectional. Setting Fourteen hospitals in Henan Province. Participants 865 patients with renal dysfunction undergoing dialysis using catheters between October 2013 and October 2014. Main outcome measures The main outcome measures were complications, risk factors and patient characteristics. Catheter-related complications included catheter-related infection (catheter exit-site infection, catheter tunnel infection and catheter-related bloodstream infection), catheter dysfunction (thrombosis, catheter malposition or kinking, and fibrin shell formation) and central vein stenosis. Results The overall incidence rate was 7.74/1000 catheter-days, affecting 38.61% of all patients, for catheter infections, 10.58/1000 catheter-days, affecting 56.65% of all patients, for catheter dysfunction, and 0.68/1000 catheter-days, affecting 8.79% of all patients, for central vein stenosis. Multivariate analysis showed that increased age, diabetes, primary educational level or below, rural residence, lack of a nephropathy visit before dialysis and pre-established permanent vascular access, not taking oral drugs to prevent catheter thrombus, lower serum albumin levels and higher ferritin levels were independently associated with catheter infections. Rural residence, not taking oral drugs to prevent thrombus, lack of an imaging examination after catheter insertion, non-tunnel catheter type, lack of medical insurance, lack of nephropathy visit before dialysis and pre-established permanent vascular access, left-sided catheter position, access via the femoral vein and lower haemoglobin level were independently associated with catheter dysfunction. Diabetes, lack of nephropathy visit before dialysis and pre-established permanent vascular access, lack of oral drugs to prevent catheter thrombus, left-sided catheter

  5. Epidemiology of haemodialysis catheter complications: a survey of 865 dialysis patients from 14 haemodialysis centres in Henan province in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Wang, Pei; Liang, Xianhui; Lu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Zhangsuo

    2015-11-20

    To investigate the incidence rates and risk factors for catheter-related complications in different districts and populations in Henan Province in China. Cross-sectional. Fourteen hospitals in Henan Province. 865 patients with renal dysfunction undergoing dialysis using catheters between October 2013 and October 2014. The main outcome measures were complications, risk factors and patient characteristics. Catheter-related complications included catheter-related infection (catheter exit-site infection, catheter tunnel infection and catheter-related bloodstream infection), catheter dysfunction (thrombosis, catheter malposition or kinking, and fibrin shell formation) and central vein stenosis. The overall incidence rate was 7.74/1000 catheter-days, affecting 38.61% of all patients, for catheter infections, 10.58/1000 catheter-days, affecting 56.65% of all patients, for catheter dysfunction, and 0.68/1000 catheter-days, affecting 8.79% of all patients, for central vein stenosis. Multivariate analysis showed that increased age, diabetes, primary educational level or below, rural residence, lack of a nephropathy visit before dialysis and pre-established permanent vascular access, not taking oral drugs to prevent catheter thrombus, lower serum albumin levels and higher ferritin levels were independently associated with catheter infections. Rural residence, not taking oral drugs to prevent thrombus, lack of an imaging examination after catheter insertion, non-tunnel catheter type, lack of medical insurance, lack of nephropathy visit before dialysis and pre-established permanent vascular access, left-sided catheter position, access via the femoral vein and lower haemoglobin level were independently associated with catheter dysfunction. Diabetes, lack of nephropathy visit before dialysis and pre-established permanent vascular access, lack of oral drugs to prevent catheter thrombus, left-sided catheter location and higher number of catheter insertions, were independently

  6. Minimally Invasive Catheter Procedures to Assist Complicated Pacemaker Lead Extraction and Implantation in the Operating Room

    SciTech Connect

    Kroepil, Patric; Lanzman, Rotem S. Miese, Falk R.; Blondin, Dirk; Winter, Joachim; Scherer, Axel; Fuerst, Guenter

    2011-04-15

    We report on percutaneous catheter procedures in the operating room (OR) to assist complicated manual extraction or insertion of pacemaker (PM) and implantable cardioverter defibrillator leads. We retrospectively reviewed complicated PM revisions and implantations performed between 2004 and 2009 that required percutaneous catheter procedures performed in the OR. The type of interventional procedure, catheter and retrieval system used, venous access, success rates, and procedural complications were analyzed. In 41 (12 female and 29 male [mean age 62 {+-} 17 years]) of 3021 (1.4%) patients, standard manual retrieval of old leads or insertion of new leads was not achievable and thus required percutaneous catheter intervention for retrieval of misplaced leads and/or recanalisation of occluded central veins. Thirteen of 18 (72.2%) catheter-guided retrieval procedures for misplaced (right atrium [RA] or ventricle [RV; n = 3], superior vena cava [n = 2], brachiocephalic vein [n = 5], and subclavian vein [n = 3]) lead fragments in 16 patients were successful. Percutaneous catheter retrieval failed in five patients because there were extremely fixed or adhered lead fragments. Percutaneous transluminal angiography (PTA) of central veins for occlusion or high-grade stenosis was performed in 25 patients. In 22 of 25 patients (88%), recanalization of central veins was successful, thus enabling subsequent lead replacement. Major periprocedural complications were not observed. In the case of complicated manual PM lead implantation or revision, percutaneous catheter-guided extraction of misplaced lead fragments or recanalisation of central veins can be performed safely in the OR, thus enabling subsequent implantation or revision of PM systems in the majority of patients.

  7. Complications of Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheters: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Jose Amo-Setién, Francisco; Herrero-Montes, Manuel; Olavarría-Beivíde, Encarnación; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Mercedes; Torres-Manrique, Blanca; Rodríguez-de la Vega, Carlos; Caso-Álvarez, Vanesa; González-Parralo, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim The use of venous catheters is a widespread practice, especially in oncological and oncohematological units. The objective of this study was to evaluate the complications associated with peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) in a cohort of patients. Materials and Methods In this retrospective cohort study, we included all patient carrying PICCs (n = 603) inserted at our institute between October 2010 and December 2013. The main variables collected were medical diagnosis, catheter care, location, duration of catheterization, reasons for catheter removal, complications, and nursing care. Complications were classified as infection, thrombosis, phlebitis, migration, edema, and/or ecchymosis. Results All patients were treated according to the same “nursing care” protocol. The incidence rate of complications was two cases per 1000 days of catheter duration. The most relevant complications were infection and thrombosis, both with an incidence of 0.17 cases per 1000 days of the total catheterization period. The total average duration of catheterization was 170 days [SD 6.06]. Additionally to “end of treatment” (48.42%) and “exitus”, (22.53%) the most frequent cause of removal was migration (displacement towards the exterior) of the catheter (5.80%). Conclusions PICCs are safe devices that allow the administration of long-term treatment and preserve the integrity of the venous system of the patient. Proper care of the catheter is very important to improve the quality life of patients with oncologic and hematologic conditions. Therefore, correct training of professionals and patients as well as following the latest scientific recommendations are particularly relevant. PMID:27588946

  8. Minimally invasive catheter procedures to assist complicated pacemaker lead extraction and implantation in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Kröpil, Patric; Lanzman, Rotem S; Miese, Falk R; Blondin, Dirk; Winter, Joachim; Scherer, Axel; Fürst, Günter

    2011-04-01

    We report on percutaneous catheter procedures in the operating room (OR) to assist complicated manual extraction or insertion of pacemaker (PM) and implantable cardioverter defibrillator leads. We retrospectively reviewed complicated PM revisions and implantations performed between 2004 and 2009 that required percutaneous catheter procedures performed in the OR. The type of interventional procedure, catheter and retrieval system used, venous access, success rates, and procedural complications were analyzed. In 41 (12 female and 29 male [mean age 62 ± 17 years]) of 3021 (1.4%) patients, standard manual retrieval of old leads or insertion of new leads was not achievable and thus required percutaneous catheter intervention for retrieval of misplaced leads and/or recanalisation of occluded central veins. Thirteen of 18 (72.2%) catheter-guided retrieval procedures for misplaced (right atrium [RA] or ventricle [RV; n = 3], superior vena cava [n = 2], brachiocephalic vein [n = 5], and subclavian vein [n = 3]) lead fragments in 16 patients were successful. Percutaneous catheter retrieval failed in five patients because there were extremely fixed or adhered lead fragments. Percutaneous transluminal angiography (PTA) of central veins for occlusion or high-grade stenosis was performed in 25 patients. In 22 of 25 patients (88%), recanalization of central veins was successful, thus enabling subsequent lead replacement. Major periprocedural complications were not observed. In the case of complicated manual PM lead implantation or revision, percutaneous catheter-guided extraction of misplaced lead fragments or recanalisation of central veins can be performed safely in the OR, thus enabling subsequent implantation or revision of PM systems in the majority of patients.

  9. Radiofrequency catheter ablation of intractable ventricular tachycardia in an infant following arterial switch operation.

    PubMed

    Costello, John P; He, Dingchao; Greene, Elizabeth A; Berul, Charles I; Moak, Jeffrey P; Nath, Dilip S

    2014-01-01

    A full-term male neonate presented with cyanosis upon delivery and was subsequently diagnosed with d-transposition of the great arteries, ventricular septal defect, and restrictive atrial septal defect. Following initiation of intravenous prostaglandins and balloon atrial septostomy, an arterial switch operation was performed on day 3 of life. The postoperative course was complicated by intractable ventricular tachycardia that was refractory to lidocaine, amiodarone, esmolol, fosphenytoin, and mexiletine drug therapy. Ventricular tachycardia was suppressed with overdrive atrial pacing but recurred upon discontinuation. Seven weeks postoperatively, radiofrequency catheter ablation was performed due to hemodynamically compromising persistent ventricular tachycardia refractory to medical therapy. The ventricular tachycardia was localized to the inferior-lateral right ventricular outlet septum. The procedure was successful without complications or recurrence. Antiarrhythmics were discontinued after the ablation procedure. Seven days after the ablation, a different, slower fascicular rhythm was noted to compete with the infant's sinus rhythm. This was consistent with the preablation amiodarone having reached subtherapeutic levels given its very long half-life. The patient was restarted on oral beta blockers and amiodarone. The patient was subsequently discharged home in predominantly sinus rhythm with intermittent fascicular rhythm.

  10. Accidental carotid artery catheterization during attempted central venous catheter placement: a case report.

    PubMed

    Maietta, Pauline Marie

    2012-08-01

    More than 2.1 million central venous catheters are placed annually. While carotid artery cannulation is rare, its effects can be devastating. Anesthesia providers frequently work with central venous catheters in the perioperative setting. Therefore, it is imperative that they be able to identify and react appropriately to carotid artery injury both in preexisting central lines and those that they have placed. This case report details a case of accidental carotid artery catheterization during attempted right internal jugular vein catheterization and the steps taken to treat the patient following its recognition. A discussion of technique for central venous catheterization, indications for suspicion of arterial puncture, methods for confirming venous or arterial placement, appropriate methods for management of carotid artery cannulation, and the benefit of ultrasound in central venous cannulation follow. Through the appropriate use of equipment, early detection and management of carotid artery injury, and proper training, patient outcomes may be improved.

  11. Clinical complications of urinary catheters caused by crystalline biofilms: something needs to be done.

    PubMed

    Stickler, D J

    2014-08-01

    This review is largely based on a previous paper published in the journal Spinal Cord. The care of many patients undergoing long-term bladder catheterization is complicated by encrustation and blockage of their Foley catheters. This problem stems from infection by urease-producing bacteria, particularly Proteus mirabilis. These organisms colonize the catheter forming an extensive biofilm; they also generate ammonia from urea, thus elevating the pH of urine. As the pH rises, crystals of calcium and magnesium phosphates precipitate in the urine and in the catheter biofilm. The continued development of this crystalline biofilm blocks the flow of urine through the catheter. Urine then either leaks along the outside of the catheter and the patient becomes incontinent or is retained causing painful distension of the bladder and reflux of urine to the kidneys. The process of crystal deposition can also initiate stone formation. Most patients suffering from recurrent catheter encrustation develop bladder stones. P. mirabilis establishes stable residence in these stones and is extremely difficult to eliminate from the catheterized urinary tract by antibiotic therapy. If blocked catheters are not identified and changed, serious symptomatic episodes of pyelonephritis, septicaemia and endotoxic shock can result. All types of Foley catheters including silver- or nitrofurazone-coated devices are vulnerable to this problem. In this review, the ways in which biofilm formation on Foley catheters is initiated by P. mirabilis will be described. The implications of understanding these mechanisms for the development of an encrustation-resistant catheter will be discussed. Finally, the way forward for the prevention and control of this problem will be considered.

  12. Bilateral ophthalmoplegia and exophthalmos complicating central hemodialysis catheter placement.

    PubMed

    Varelas, P N; Bertorini, T E; Halford, H

    1999-05-01

    We describe a 58-year-old woman who presented with bilateral ophthalmoplegia, exophthalmos, and headache and was found to have retrograde internal jugular vein flow secondary to a high-grade obstruction of the ipsilateral brachiocephalic vein from a previous hemodialysis catheter placement. The patient had also a high-flow dialysis graft in the ipsilateral arm. The cranial and extracranial venous system congestion resolved, and the signs disappeared soon after a balloon angioplasty and stent placement at the level of the obstruction.

  13. Carina as a useful and reliable radiological landmark for detection of accidental arterial placement of central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Umesh, Goneppanavar; Ranjan, Shetty; Jasvinder, Kaur; Nanda, Shetty

    2010-12-01

    Central venous catheters are commonly used in the management of critically ill patients. Their insertion can be challenging in hemodynamically unstable patients and in those with altered thoracic anatomy. Although ultrasound guided insertion can reduce this problem, this facility may not be available in all locations and in all institutions. Accidental arterial puncture is one of the very serious complications that can occur during central venous catheter insertion. This is usually detected clinically by bright color and projectile/pulsatile flow of the returning blood. However, such means are known to be misleading especially in hypoxic and hemodynamically unstable patients. Other recognized measures used to identify arterial puncture would be blood gas analysis of the returning blood, use of pressure transducer to identify waveform pattern and the pressures. In this article, we propose that trachea and carina can be used as a reliable radiological landmark to identify accidental arterial placement of central venous catheters. We further conclude that this information could be useful especially when dealing with post-resuscitation victims and hemodynamically unstable critically ill patients.

  14. Cross-sectional imaging of thoracic and abdominal complications of cerebrospinal fluid shunt catheters.

    PubMed

    Bolster, Ferdia; Fardanesh, Reza; Morgan, Tara; Katz, Douglas S; Daly, Barry

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to review the imaging findings of distal (thoracic and abdominal) complications related to ventriculo-peritoneal (VP), ventriculo-pleural (VPL), and ventriculo-atrial (VA) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt catheter placement. Institution review board-approved single-center study of patients with thoracic and abdominal CSF catheter-related complications on cross-sectional imaging examinations over a 14-year period was performed. Clinical presentation, patient demographics, prior medical history, and subsequent surgical treatment were recorded. The presence or absence of CSF catheter-related infection and/or acute hydrocephalus on cross-sectional imaging was also recorded. There were 81 distal CSF catheter-related complications identified on 47 thoracic or abdominal imaging examinations in 30 patients (age 5-80 years, mean 39.3 years), most often on CT (CT = 42, MRI = 1, US = 4). Complications included 38 intraperitoneal and 11 extraperitoneal fluid collections. Extraperitoneal collections included nine abdominal wall subcutaneous (SC) pseudocysts associated with shunt migration and obesity, an intrapleural pseudocyst, and a breast pseudocyst. There were also two large VPL-related pleural effusions, a fractured catheter in the SC tissues, and a large VA shunt thrombus within the right atrium. Ten patients (33.3 %) had culture-positive infection from CSF or shunt catheter samples. Ten patients (33.3 %) had features of temporally related acute or worsening hydrocephalus on neuroimaging. In four of these patients, the detection of thoracic and abdominal complications on CT preceded and predicted the findings of acute hydrocephalus on cranial imaging. Thoracic and abdominal complications of CSF shunts, as can be identified on CT, include shunt infection and/or obstruction, may be both multiple and recurrent, and may be predictive of concurrent acute intracranial problems.

  15. An umbilical venous catheter complication presented as acute abdomen: case report.

    PubMed

    Oztan, Mustafa O; Ilhan, Ozkan; Abay, Elif; Koyluoglu, Gokhan

    2016-12-01

    Umbilical venous catheterization has become a widely accepted intravenous route for premature babies. These catheters allow administration of parenteral nutrition and medication and facilitate blood sampling. Besides these benefits, they also have significant potential complications like portal vein thrombosis, infection, vascular or hepatic injury, arrhythmia and sepsis. One of the rare but important complication is extravasation of the fluids due to misplacement of the catheter. The typical symptoms of this condition are sudden deterioration, hepatic enlargement, hematocrit drop, hypotension and abdominal distension. We herein present a premature newborn with unusual acute abdomen findings suggesting a surgical pathology after the extravasation of total parenteral nutrition into the abdomen.

  16. Erosion of a Tenckhoff catheter to the sigmoid colon: an uncommon delayed complication.

    PubMed

    Quinto Ruiz, Jorge; Durón Gutiérrez, Carlos Eduardo; Romero Moreno, Antonio Hiram; González Rosas, Stephanie; Castañeda Gutiérrez, Alfonsina Daniela

    2017-04-26

    Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis is one of the most commonly used therapies for patients with impaired renal function. Most frequent complications directly related to the catheter usually present within the first weeks, and range from catheter dysfunction to dialysis-associated peritonitis; bowel perforation while placing the catheter is uncommon, and it is usually assessed in the same surgical event. There are, however, delayed complications, and one of the least frequently described is erosion of the catheter into the bowel. We present the case of a 65-year-old man, who shows up at the emergency room referring to "acute diarrhea" associated with his dialysis, it is quickly diagnosed as a bowel perforation and underwent emergency surgery. During the operation we found adhesions compromising small bowel and sigmoid colon, the far end of the dialysis catheter inside the sigmoid colon, with no signs of colonic leakage to the peritoneal space. We removed the dialysis catheter, resected the fibrous borders of the site of insertion and performed a primary closure. The patient evolved satisfactorily and was subsequently discharged to continue with hemodialysis for renal substitution therapy.

  17. Successful deployment of polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stent to seal left internal mammary artery graft perforation due to guide catheter extension system.

    PubMed

    Ichimoto, Eiji; De Gregorio, Joseph

    2016-12-01

    Coronary artery bypass graft perforation during percutaneous coronary intervention is a rare complication. Perforation of a left internal mammary artery (LIMA) graft due to a guide catheter extension system has not been described. We report the successful deployment of a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered stent to seal the LIMA graft perforation due to the guide catheter extension system. Percutaneous coronary intervention was performed for a culprit lesion of the distal left circumflex via the LIMA graft. A balloon catheter failed to be delivered because the LIMA graft was very long and tortuous. The guide catheter extension system was introduced, and the balloon was delivered and inflated. However, the LIMA graft perforation with continuous extravasation was caused by the edge of deeper intubated guide extension catheter when a coronary stent was attempted to be delivered to the culprit lesion. A long balloon inflation was performed, but the perforation was not completely sealed. The PTFE-covered stent was successfully deployed and sealed the LIMA graft perforation. This case describes that the rapid deployment of PTFE-covered stent is effective to treat severe coronary artery bypass graft perforation due to the guide catheter extension system.

  18. Short-term central venous catheter complications in patients with sickle cell disease who undergo apheresis.

    PubMed

    Yeral, Mahmut; Boga, Can; Oguzkurt, Levent; Asma, Suheyl; Kasar, Mutlu; Kozanoglu, Ilknur

    2014-01-01

    Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) are prone to develop thrombosis and infection due to their inflammatory and immune deficiency state. These patients require red cell exchange therapy for treatment or prevention of hemoglobin S associated complications. Owing to vascular access problems, adult patients need central venous catheterization (CVC) for exchange procedures. Procedure related complications have been reported for long-term CVCs in pediatric patients. However, short-term CVC complications in adult patients are not clear. This report represents the results of documented complications of short-term CVCs in patients with SCD who undergo apheresis. A total of 142 non-tunneled catheters with average median diameter of 9 F (range 8-16 F) were implanted for apheresis. The catheters were mainly inserted through the right internal jugular vein (66.2 %). Total days of catheter were 412. Results were reported as a complication rate and event according to 1,000 catheter days and compared to a control group including 37 healthy stem cell donors. In the patient group, 1 (1 %) hematoma and 1 (1 %) infection were observed for internal jugular vein catheterization (3.7 hemorrhages and 3.7 infections according to 1,000 catheter days), whereas four (8.9 %) cases of thrombosis and 1 (2.2 %) infection (27 and 6.9 according to 1,000 catheter days) developed in femoral vein. There was a significant difference in terms of thrombosis (P = 0.009). In the control group, only individual developed thrombosis in internal jugular vein. Short-term CVC inserted through to the internal jugular vein seems to be safer than femoral vein in patients with SCD.

  19. Complications of central venous catheter in patients transplanted with hematopoietic stem cells in a specialized service

    PubMed Central

    Barretta, Lidiane Miotto; Beccaria, Lúcia Marinilza; Cesarino, Cláudia Bernardi; Pinto, Maria Helena

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to identify the model, average length of stay on site and complications of central venous catheter in patients undergoing transplant of hematopoietic stem cells and verify the corresponding relationship between the variables: age, gender, medical diagnosis, type of transplant, implanted catheter and insertion site. Method: a retrospective and quantitative study with a sample of 188 patients transplanted records between 2007 and 2011. Results: the majority of patients used Hickman catheter with an average length of stay on site of 47.6 days. The complication fever/bacteremia was significant in young males with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma undergoing autologous transplant, which remained with the device for a long period in the subclavian vein. Conclusion: nurses should plan with their team the minimum waiting time, recommended between the catheter insertion and start of the conditioning regimen, as well as not to extend the length of time that catheter should be on site and undertake their continuing education, focusing on the prevention of complications. PMID:27276021

  20. Assessment of infants with peripherally inserted central catheters: Part 1. Detecting the most frequently occurring complications.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Janet

    2002-12-01

    Inserting, maintaining, and monitoring vascular access are integral components of neonatal care. Advances in vascular access technology have led to the insertion of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) to provide stable venous access for early and aggressive parenteral nutrition. Medications that are irritating or damaging, or those with a high osmolality or a nonphysiologic pH, can also be safely administered into the central venous system. The need for repeated peripheral intravenous attempts, as well as the associated pain and physiologic instability, are virtually eliminated once a PICC line is placed. Complications related to PICCs may occur at any phase of therapy: during insertion, while indwelling, or after discontinuing the line. The risk factors associated with PICCs are distinctly different from peripheral intravenous lines because of their long dwell time, central placement, and potential to migrate. Part 1 of Focus on the Physical offers a review of the relevant anatomy of the vascular system and a discussion of the appropriate sites for catheter tip placement. Guidelines for a systematic physical assessment, along with recommendations for standardized PICC documentation, are provided. A review of the signs and symptoms of more frequently occurring complications, such as catheter occlusion and bloodstream infections, is presented to enhance awareness of PICC-specific complications in the neonate and to expedite early detection and treatment. Part 2 of this series will focus on systematic assessment for less common complications such as catheter migration, dislodgement, breakage, and thrombosis, as well as the life-threatening complications of pleural and pericardial effusion.

  1. [Catheter aspiration alone or combined with thrombolysis in the treatment of superior mesenteric artery embolism].

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanquan; Jia, Zhongzhi; Wang, Qi; Chen, Wenhua; He, Zhongming; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Kai; Tian, Feng

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the efficacy of catheter aspiration or combined with thrombolysis in the treatment of superior mesenteric artery embolism(SMAE). Clinical and imaging data of 25 SMAE patients who underwent catheter aspiration or combined with urokinase thrombolysis in the First People's Hospital and the Second People's Hospital of Changzhou from January 2005 to July 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. Twenty patients were confirmed as SMA trunk embolism and 5 as SMA branch artery embolism. The embolic SMA trunks were completely recannulated by catheter aspiration in the above 20 cases, but small emboli embolized distal branch artery in 6 cases. These 6 patients plus above 5 patients with branch artery embolism received catheter aspiration combined with thrombolytic therapy. Among these 11 patients, complete open, partial open and non-open of branch arteries were found in 5, 3, 3 cases respectively, while collateral circulation increased significantly in non-open patients. During the follow-up period of (4.1±2.2) months, clinical symptom relief and digestive function recovery were observed in 24 cases. Only one case underwent bowel resection because of intestinal necrosis 24 hours after treatment and developed short bowel syndrome. Catheter aspiration or combined with thrombolysis is a safe and effective method in treating SMAE.

  2. [Cardiac tamponade: a rare complication of central venous catheter - a clinical case report].

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Ana Catarina; Flor de Lima, Isabel; Brito, Vânia; Centeno, Maria João; Fernandes, Antero

    2016-03-22

    The extensive use of central venous catheters (CVC) in a hospital environment leads to increased iatrogenic complications, as more catheters are used enclosed and its maintenance is prolonged. Several complications are known to be related to central venous catheter, of which the uncommon cardiac tamponade (CT), hardly recognized and associated with high mortality. We present a clinical case, with favorable outcome, of a patient who developed a CT 17 days after CVC placement, and try to reflect on the measures that can be taken to reduce its incidence, as well as the therapeutic approaches to practice in the presence of a suspected CT. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Adjuvant Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy After Resection for Pancreatic Cancer Using Coaxial Catheter-Port System Compared with Conventional System.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Aya; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Sho, Masayuki; Nishiofuku, Hideyuki; Masada, Tetsuya; Sato, Takeshi; Marugami, Nagaaki; Anai, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Hiroshi; Kanno, Masatoshi; Tamamoto, Tetsuro; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki; Kichikawa, Kimihiko

    2016-06-01

    Previous reports have shown the effectiveness of adjuvant hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) in pancreatic cancer. However, percutaneous catheter placement is technically difficult after pancreatic surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and outcome of HAIC using a coaxial technique compared with conventional technique for postoperative pancreatic cancer. 93 consecutive patients who received percutaneous catheter-port system placement after pancreatectomy were enrolled. In 58 patients from March 2006 to August 2010 (Group A), a conventional technique with a 5-Fr indwelling catheter was used and in 35 patients from September 2010 to September 2012 (Group B), a coaxial technique with a 2.7-Fr coaxial catheter was used. The overall technical success rates were 97.1 % in Group B and 86.2 % in Group A. In cases with arterial tortuousness and stenosis, the success rate was significantly higher in Group B (91.7 vs. 53.8 %; P = 0.046). Fluoroscopic and total procedure times were significantly shorter in Group B: 14.7 versus 26.7 min (P = 0.001) and 64.8 versus 80.7 min (P = 0.0051), respectively. No differences were seen in the complication rate. The 1 year liver metastasis rates were 9.9 % using the conventional system and 9.1 % using the coaxial system (P = 0.678). The overall median survival time was 44 months. There was no difference in the survival period between two systems (P = 0.312). The coaxial technique is useful for catheter placement after pancreatectomy, achieving a high success rate and reducing fluoroscopic and procedure times, while maintaining the safety and efficacy for adjuvant HAIC in pancreatic cancer.

  4. [Complications with peripherally inserted central catheters - observations and nursing experiences at one medical center in Chengdu].

    PubMed

    Yue, Zhi-Ying; Li, Jun-Ying; Yu, Chun-Hua; Zhao, Shu-Zhen; Fu, Yan

    2010-06-01

    Its peripheral vein puncture point, safe insertion procedure and high rate of success have made the peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) a particularly suitable medical device for cancer patients who require long-term intravenous chemotherapy. PICC can help avoid the pain of repeat punctures as well as reduce incidence of cytotoxic drug extravasation-induced phlebitis and tissue necrosis. With PICC, patient activity is not limited, which improves quality of life. This paper reported on complications and subsequent nursing care provided to 400 cancer patients who received PICC in our center between September 2007 and October 2008. A total of 395 cases had successful PICC insertion on the first attempt and 5 cases achieved success immediately following the second insertion attempt (overall success rate: 98.8%). The average catheter dwell-in time was 122 days (range 2-350 days), during which time no patient required repeat puncture. During the insertion process, arrhythmia occurred in 1.5% (6/400), difficult catheter propelling in 3.75% (15/400), and excessive oozing of blood in 0.3% (1/400) of subjects. During the catheter dwell-in period, sensitizing dermatitis occurred in 8% (38/400), mechanical phlebitis in 7.5% (30/400), catheter occlusion in 9.5% (38/400) (including 2% [8/400] complete and 7.5% [30/400] partial occlusions), catheter associated hematogenous infection in 3% (12/400) and venous thrombosis in 2% (8/400) of subjects. All complications were well controlled with active and effective management. In conclusion, the safety of PICC can be maximized and complications reduced when nurses fully evaluate patients prior to their operation, strictly adhere to PICC operating guidelines, detect complications early, and manage problems promptly.

  5. A comparison of infections and complications in central venous catheters in adults with solid tumours.

    PubMed

    Coady, Karin; Ali, Mohammed; Sidloff, David; Kenningham, Richard R; Ahmed, Samreen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the complication rates of three vascular access devices in patients with solid tumours having infusion chemotherapy. An observational study of 58 central venous catheter (CVC) lines inserted in 55 patients with solid tumours requiring infusional chemotherapy was performed. The study was conducted between January 2011 and August 2013, looking at complication and infection rates as primary outcomes. Data were recorded from patients with 19 tunnelled cuffed silicone catheters, nine with peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) and 30 central venous ports. The two CVC groups (ports and non-ports) matched equally in terms of tumour site; all patients with solid tumours were included, haematology patients were excluded and chemotherapy regimens were comparable. Thirteen out of 28 non- ports had complications compared with one out of 30 central venous ports. Ten out of 19 tunnelled catheters had complications including three displacements and seven were removed due to infection. There were no reports of line-related sepsis in the PICC or ports. Three out of nine PICC lines had complications including two displacements and one PICC blocked permanently requiring removal. In addition, one port out of 30 was removed due to erosion through the skin. There were no episodes of thrombosis or fibrin sheath formation related to any of the devices. In our study, we demonstrated that central venous ports and PICC lines in patients undergoing infusional chemotherapy had lower line infection rates than tunnelled catheters, and only ports have been shown to be almost complication-free. In addition, we found infection rates higher in CVCs s cared for by patient/carers rather than hospital only care, and higher in colorectal patients with stomas. Therefore, we recommend that central venous ports are a safe, acceptable CVC option for infusional chemotherapy for adults with solid tumours.

  6. Extrusion of peritoneal catheter through a thoracic skin fistula: report of a rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunt.

    PubMed

    Turtas, S; Orunesu, G

    1992-07-01

    A very rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunt is presented. The tip of the distal catheter extruded through a skin fistula in the right subclavian region. After the replacement of a new catheter in the peritoneal cavity, inflammation of the overlying scar occurred. Then, a ventriculoatrial shunt was carried out. The authors suggest a possible mechanism of this complication.

  7. Vaginal Migration of Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Catheter and Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak as a Complication of Hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Houten, John K; Smith, Shiela; Schwartz, Amit Y

    2017-08-01

    Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunting is a common neurosurgical procedure to treat hydrocephalus that diverts cerebrospinal fluid from the cerebral ventricles to the peritoneal cavity for reabsorption. The distal catheter may potentially migrate through any potential or iatrogenic opening in the peritoneal cavity. Increasingly successfully management of childhood hydrocephalus and adult-onset conditions leading to hydrocephalus, such as subarachnoid hemorrhage, is leading many adult female patients harboring VP shunts needing to undergo hysterectomy. Hysterectomy creates a potential defect though which a VP shunt catheter may migrate. It is not known whether the hysterectomy cuff closure technique may affect the likelihood of distal catheter migration though the repair site. We report the case of a 38-year-old woman with a VP shunt who underwent laparoscopic hysterectomy via an open vaginal cuff technique who subsequently presented with vaginal cerebrospinal fluid leakage secondary to migration of the distal shunt catheter through the hysterectomy cuff. Vaginal migration of the distal VP shunt catheter is a possible complication of hysterectomy. The authors postulate that an open cuff hysterectomy closure technique may increase the risk of catheter migration, an issue that may be better understood with further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Complicated Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections Due to Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, S. M.; Stickler, D. J.; Mobley, H. L. T.; Shirtliff, M. E.

    2008-01-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) represent the most common type of nosocomial infection and are a major health concern due to the complications and frequent recurrence. These infections are often caused by Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis. Gram-negative bacterial species that cause CAUTIs express a number of virulence factors associated with adhesion, motility, biofilm formation, immunoavoidance, and nutrient acquisition as well as factors that cause damage to the host. These infections can be reduced by limiting catheter usage and ensuring that health care professionals correctly use closed-system Foley catheters. A number of novel approaches such as condom and suprapubic catheters, intermittent catheterization, new surfaces, catheters with antimicrobial agents, and probiotics have thus far met with limited success. While the diagnosis of symptomatic versus asymptomatic CAUTIs may be a contentious issue, it is generally agreed that once a catheterized patient is believed to have a symptomatic urinary tract infection, the catheter is removed if possible due to the high rate of relapse. Research focusing on the pathogenesis of CAUTIs will lead to a better understanding of the disease process and will subsequently lead to the development of new diagnosis, prevention, and treatment options. PMID:18202436

  9. Complicated catheter-associated urinary tract infections due to Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, S M; Stickler, D J; Mobley, H L T; Shirtliff, M E

    2008-01-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) represent the most common type of nosocomial infection and are a major health concern due to the complications and frequent recurrence. These infections are often caused by Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis. Gram-negative bacterial species that cause CAUTIs express a number of virulence factors associated with adhesion, motility, biofilm formation, immunoavoidance, and nutrient acquisition as well as factors that cause damage to the host. These infections can be reduced by limiting catheter usage and ensuring that health care professionals correctly use closed-system Foley catheters. A number of novel approaches such as condom and suprapubic catheters, intermittent catheterization, new surfaces, catheters with antimicrobial agents, and probiotics have thus far met with limited success. While the diagnosis of symptomatic versus asymptomatic CAUTIs may be a contentious issue, it is generally agreed that once a catheterized patient is believed to have a symptomatic urinary tract infection, the catheter is removed if possible due to the high rate of relapse. Research focusing on the pathogenesis of CAUTIs will lead to a better understanding of the disease process and will subsequently lead to the development of new diagnosis, prevention, and treatment options.

  10. Broken Umbilical Vein Catheter as an Embolus in a Neonate- An Unusual Preventable Complication

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bijender; Kumar, Dilip; Awasthy, Neeraj

    2013-01-01

    Umbilical vein catheter (UVC) is used in managing critically sick neonates all over the world. It is generally considered to be safe although various complications can arise and are well known. Herein we describe a successful retrieval of a broken and migrated UVC across the heart in a neonate. Pertinent literature regarding rarity of its occurrence and mechanism of occurrence has been touched upon to prevent such untoward complications. PMID:26023465

  11. Delayed cardiac tamponade: A rare but life-threatening complication of catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Yetter, Elizabeth; Brazg, Jared; Del Valle, Diane; Mulvey, Laura; Dickman, Eitan

    2016-11-17

    Delayed cardiac tamponade (DCT) is a rare and life-threatening complication of catheter ablation performed as a treatment of atrial fibrillation, with few cases described in the medical literature. We present the case of a 57year-old man presenting with DCT 61days following a catheter ablation procedure. To the best of our knowledge, this is the most delayed case of cardiac tamponade (CT) following catheter ablation described in the literature. We also discuss the importance of point of care ultrasound (POCUS) in the diagnosis and treatment of CT. Emergency physicians must maintain a high index of suspicion in making the diagnosis of CT as patients may present with vague symptoms such as neck or back pain, shortness of breath, fatigue, dizziness, or altered mental status, often without chest pain. Common risk factors for CT include cancer, renal failure, pericarditis, cardiac surgery, myocardial rupture, trauma, and retrograde aortic dissection. In addition, although rare, both catheter ablation and use of anticoagulation carry risks of developing CT. A worldwide survey of medical centers performing catheter ablation found CT as a complication in less than 2% of cases [1]. Some proposed mechanisms of DCT include small pericardial hemorrhages following post-procedural anticoagulation or rupture of the sealed ablation-induced left atrial wall [2]. Clinical examination and electrocardiography may be helpful. However, the criterion standard for diagnosing CT is echocardiography [3].

  12. Efficacy of a coaxial system with a compliant balloon catheter for navigation of the Penumbra reperfusion catheter in tortuous arteries: technique and case experience.

    PubMed

    Takahira, Kazuki; Kataoka, Taketo; Ogino, Tatsuya; Endo, Hideki; Nakamura, Hirohiko

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE The authors describe a method by which they easily and atraumatically navigate a large-bore reperfusion catheter of the Penumbra system to an embolus by using a coaxial system with a compliant balloon catheter in patients with tortuous arteries. METHODS A retrospective review of the prospective endovascular database was performed to identify cases in which a coaxial system with a compliant balloon catheter (Scepter C, MicroVention/Terumo; or TransForm C, Stryker Neurovascular) and a large-bore reperfusion catheter of the Penumbra system (Penumbra, Inc.) was used. The authors achieved a stable guiding sheath position and delivered the coaxial system with a compliant balloon catheter and a large-bore reperfusion catheter. Then, the balloon was inflated somewhat when the distal tip of the balloon was slightly advanced from the tip of the reperfusion catheter, and together the coaxial system was advanced to an embolus over a 0.014-in guidewire, even around the corner. When the distal tip of the balloon catheter reached the embolus, the authors deflated the balloon and navigated the large-bore reperfusion catheter to the embolus. Finally, the aspiration of the embolus with the Penumbra MAX pump was begun. RESULTS Between May 2014 and September 2015, the authors used this technique in 17 cases: 16 cases of middle cerebral artery occlusion (including 5 cases of internal carotid artery occlusion) and 1 case of basilar artery occlusion (age range 36-88 years, mean age 74.7 years, 13 men). For the reperfusion catheter of the Penumbra system, the 5MAX ACE was used in 15 cases, and the 5MAX was used in 2 cases. As a compliant balloon catheter, the Scepter C was used in 16 cases, and the TransForm C was used in 1 case. The technique was successful in 16 cases (94.1%). No parent artery dissections were noted in any cases. Catheter-induced vasospasm was noted in 1 case, but the vasospasm was transient. CONCLUSIONS A coaxial system with a compliant balloon catheter can

  13. Management of complications related to central venous catheters in cancer patients: an update.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Birgit

    2014-04-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are important for the treatment of patients with cancer, especially in the perioperative and palliative care settings. These devices not only allow for the administration of chemotherapy, parenteral nutrition, and other intravenous therapies, but they may also improve the patients' quality of life by reducing the need for repeated peripheral venipunctures. Thrombotic and infectious complications are common, especially in the long-term use of CVCs. There are different types of thrombotic complications associated with CVCs, that is, a thrombotic occlusion of the catheter, a mural thrombus at the catheter tip and classical deep vein thrombosis, which occurs most frequently in the upper extremity where the majority of long-term catheters are inserted. Infections are common complications associated with CVCs. Patients with cancer who receive intensive chemotherapy and those patients who undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have a markedly increased risk for insertion site and bloodstream infections. In this review, the epidemiology and risk factors that predispose patients to CVC-related thrombosis and infection are discussed. The diagnostic and therapeutic options according to the published data and the current guidelines are summarized and data for establishing primary and secondary preventative strategies are provided.

  14. An Indwelling Urethral Catheter Knotted Around a Double-J Ureteral Stent: An Unusual Complication after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Warmerdam, E. G.; Toorop, R. J.; Abrahams, A. C.; Berger, P.

    2011-01-01

    Urethral catheterization is a common procedure with a relatively low complication rate. Knotting of an indwelling urethral catheter is a very rare complication, and there are only a few case reports on knotted catheters, most of them concerning children. We report an especially rare case where a urethral catheter formed a knot around a double-J ureteral stent after a kidney transplantation. We will discuss the various risk factors for knotting of a catheter and the methods to untangle a knot. PMID:24533194

  15. Delayed Haemothorax Resulting from Indwelling Right Internal Jugular Central Venous Catheter: A Rare Complication.

    PubMed

    Vinod, K V; Nishanth, S; Vidya, M V

    2016-09-01

    Haemothorax is an uncommon and serious complication, occurring most often during or immediately after percutaneous internal jugular and subclavian vein catheterizations. Delayed haemothorax is a rare complication, especially following right-sided catheterization. We report a case of acute yellow phosphorus poisoning with acute liver failure (resulting from rat killer paste ingestion) in a 28-year-old male who developed right-sided haemothorax eight days after placement of right internal jugular central venous catheter. The proposed pathogenesis involves vascular wall erosion by the indwelling catheter tip. Awareness of this complication perhaps avoids unnecessary investigations for other causes of haemothorax such as pulmonary embolism. © Journal of the Association of Physicians of India 2011.

  16. Complications of tunneled cuffed hemodialysis catheters in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Naoum, Joseph J; Weakley, Sarah M; Athamneh, Husam; Kougias, Panagiotis; Bechara, Carlos F; Lin, Peter H

    2011-01-01

    Although increased infectious and thrombotic complications have been reported in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), little is known regarding hemodialysis catheter-related complications in HIV patients. In this report, we reviewed our experience and complication rates for tunneled cuffed catheters (TCCs) in HIV patients requiring hemodialysis. A total of 85 patients with HIV infection underwent TCC placement for hemodialysis between 1996 and 2009. Hospital records were reviewed to determine causes and risk factors for TCC-related complications in HIV patients. For comparison, we studied 85 age- and sex-matched low-risk HIV case controls who received TCC for hemodialysis during the same period. A total of 119 and 102 TCCs were inserted in the HIV and control group, respectively. Total numbers of catheter days in the HIV and control groups were 17,321 and 15,620 days, respectively. The primary unassisted TCC patency rates at 6 months in the HIV and control groups were 74% ± 11% and 86% ± 8%, respectively (NS). There was an increased TCC bacteremia rate in HIV patients compared with control subjects (5.38 vs. 2.66 per 1,000 TCC days, p=0.03). There was also a higher TCC tunnel infection rate in HIV patients compared with control cohorts (3.72 vs. 1.87 per 1,000 TCC days, p=0.04). Factors associated with increased catheter infection rate in HIV patients were 1) low CD4+ lymphocyte counts (<200/mm3), 2) low albumin level (<2.5 g/dl), and 3) history of illicit intravenous drug use. TCCs are associated with an increased risk of infection in HIV patients requiring hemodialysis. Moreover, HIV infection is associated with an increased risk of mortality among hemodialysis patients. Hypoalbuminemia, history of intravenous drug use, and low CD4+ lymphocyte counts are associated with increased risk of catheter infection in HIV patients requiring hemodialysis.

  17. An Analysis of Complications of Brachial and Axillary Artery Punctures.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhu; Gu, Yongquan; Guo, Lianrui; Guo, Jianming; Gao, Xixiang; Li, Jianxin; Wang, Zhonggao; Zhang, Jian

    2016-12-01

    To examine the complications of brachial and axillary artery punctures and the precautionary measures taken to lower their incidences. Retrospective analysis of 266 cases of brachial and axillary artery punctures was performed for angiography or angioplasty between January 2009 and December 2013 at the Department of Vascular Surgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University. Complications and their causes were assessed. Among all brachial artery punctures (n = 140), there were complications in 3.6 per cent of cases, including local hematoma in 1.4 per cent, pseudoaneurysm in 0.7 per cent, acute arterial thrombosis in 0.7 per cent, and median nerve injury in 0.7 per cent. Among all axillary artery punctures (n = 126), there were complications in 10.3 per cent of cases, including local hematoma in 4.8 per cent, pseudoaneurysm in 0.8 per cent, acute arterial thrombosis in 0.8 per cent, acute venous thrombosis in 0.8 per cent, and nerve injury in 3.2 per cent. The incidence of complications was significantly lower in brachial axillary artery puncture compared with axillary artery puncture (P < 0.05). The main factors associated with complications might be patient's vascular condition, perioperative medication, anatomical features of the artery, puncture site, successful rate of first-attempt puncture, and bandage strength. Incidence of complications of brachial and axillary artery punctures could be lowered by strengthening the choice of indications, improving the perioperative managements, being fully aware of the anatomical characteristics of the brachial and axillary arteries, and applying the standardized techniques of puncture and compression hemostasis.

  18. Feeding premature infants while low umbilical artery catheters are in place: a prospective, randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Davey, A M; Wagner, C L; Cox, C; Kendig, J W

    1994-05-01

    The objective of this prospective, randomized clinical trial was to test the hypothesis that there is no difference in the frequency of feeding problems and necrotizing enterocolitis between a group of premature infants who received early enteral feedings while low umbilical artery catheters (LUACs) were in place, and a late group who were not fed until 24 hours after removal of LUACs. Twenty-nine premature infants (born at 28.5 +/- 3.0 SD weeks of gestational age) who were in stable condition received early enteral feedings at a median of 2 days while a LUAC was in place; 31 infants (born at 28.6 +/- 2.7 SD weeks of gestational age) received late enteral feedings at a median of 5 days of age, 24 hours after the removal of the LUAC. Feeding complications and interventions and nutritional characteristics were recorded prospectively. There were no differences in the baseline perinatal characteristics of the two groups. The incidence of gastric residua and the incidence of abdominal distention were the same in both groups. The early feeding group had significantly fewer percutaneous central venous catheters, evaluations for sepsis, and episodes of receiving nothing by mouth while a gastric suction tube was in place. Infants in the early group received parenteral alimentation-lipid emulsion infusions for a median of 13 days versus 30 days for the late-fed group (p = 0.0028 by Wilcoxon test). There were two cases of necrotizing enterocolitis in the early group versus four cases in the late group. Premature infants in stable condition who receive enteral feedings while LUACs are in place do not have an increased incidence of feeding problems compared with infants who do not receive enteral feedings until 24 hours after removal of LUACs.

  19. The use of an occlusion perfusion catheter to deliver paclitaxel to the arterial wall.

    PubMed

    Atigh, Marzieh K; Turner, Emily; Christians, Uwe; Yazdani, Saami K

    2017-08-01

    Nonstent drug delivery platforms have recently emerged as an alternative treatment of peripheral arterial disease. Perfusion catheters have the potential to directly deliver antiproliferative agents to the medial arterial layer to prevent restenosis. The purpose of this study was to therefore determine the effectiveness of a perfusion catheter to deliver paclitaxel, a proven antiproliferative agent, to combat restenosis. A benchtop model was utilized to determine the varying parameters of a novel occlusion perfusion catheter to maximize paclitaxel delivery using pharmacokinetic evaluation and fluorescent microscopy. Parameters tested included concentration of paclitaxel, delivery pressure, duration of delivery, and the use of an excipient. In addition, bilateral rabbit iliac arteries were treated with the perfusion catheter and pharmacokinetic evaluation performed at 1 hour, 1 day and 3 days. Benchtop testing demonstrated uniform and circumferential penetration of paclitaxel within the treated arteries. The results of the ex vivo test identified two groups with and without an excipient with similar loading conditions (with excipient: 15.4±8.6 ng/mg vs without excipient: 8.9±6.9 ng/mg, P=.77). The in vivo pharmacokinetic analysis of these two groups demonstrated the use of contrast agent increased arterial paclitaxel levels and maintained initial paclitaxel dosing up to 3 days (With excipient: 1 hour: 107±62 ng vs 3 days: 40±23 ng, P=.824; No excipient: 1 hour: 247±120 ng vs 3 days: 2.92±2.9 ng, P=.009). These results demonstrate the feasibility to deliver paclitaxel directly to the medial layer of an artery via a perfusion catheter. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Conductance catheter measurements of lumen area of stenotic coronary arteries: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyo Won; Farren, Neil D; Zhang, Zhen-Du; Huo, Yunlong; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2011-09-01

    An injection of saline solution is required for the measurement of vessel lumen area using a conductance catheter. The injection of room temperature saline to displace blood in a vessel inevitably involves mass and heat transport and electric field conductance. The objective of the present study is to understand the accuracy of conductance method based on the phenomena associated with the saline injection into a stenotic blood vessel. Computational fluid dynamics were performed to simulate flow and its relation to transport and electric field in a stenotic artery for two different sized conductance catheters (0.9 and 0.35 mm diameter) over a range of occlusions [56-84% cross-sectional area (CSA) stenosis]. The results suggest that the performance of conductance catheter is dependent on catheter size and severity of stenosis more significantly for 0.9 mm than for 0.35 mm catheter. Specifically, the time of detection of 95% of injected saline solution at the detection electrodes was shown to range from 0.67 to 3.7 s and 0.82 to 0.94 s for 0.9 mm and 0.35 mm catheter, respectively. The results also suggest that the detection electrodes of conductance catheter should be placed outside of flow recirculation region distal to the stenosis to minimize the detection time. Finally, the simulations show that the accuracy in distal CSA measurements, however, is not significantly altered by whether the position of detection electrodes is inside or outside of recirculation zone (error was within 12% regardless of detection electrodes position). The results were experimentally validated for one lesion geometry and the simulation results are within 8% of actual measurements. The simulation of conductance catheter injection method may lead to further optimization of device and method for accurate sizing of diseased coronary arteries, which has clinical relevance to percutaneous intervention.

  1. Comparison between an Ascenda and a silicone catheter in intrathecal baclofen therapy in pediatric patients: analysis of complications.

    PubMed

    Motta, Francesco; Antonello, Clara Eleonora

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE In this single-center study the authors investigated the complications occurring before and after the introduction of the new Ascenda intrathecal catheter (Medtronic Inc.) in pediatric patients treated with intrathecal baclofen therapy (ITB) for spasticity and/or dystonia. METHODS This was a retrospective review of 508 children who had received ITB, 416 with silicone catheters in the 13 years between September 1998 and September 2011 and 92 with Ascenda catheters in the 3 years between September 2011 and August 2014. The authors evaluated major complications such as infections, CSF leaks treated, and problems related to the catheter or pump, and they compared the 2 groups of patients who had received either a silicone catheter or an Ascenda catheter implant. RESULTS One hundred twenty patients in the silicone group (29%) and 1 patient in the Ascenda group (1.1%; p < 0.001) had a major complication. In the silicone group 23 patients (5.5%) were affected by CSF leakage and 75 patients (18%) experienced 82 catheter-related events, such as occlusion, dislodgment, disconnection, or breakage, which required catheter replacement. In the Ascenda group, only 1 patient (1.1%) was affected by CSF leakage. CONCLUSIONS To the authors' knowledge, this study is the first in the literature to compare the performance of the new Ascenda catheter, introduced in 2011, with the traditional silicone catheter for intrathecal drug infusion. In their analysis, the authors found that the Ascenda catheter can reduce major complications related to the catheter after ITB pump implantation. Further investigation is necessary to expand on and confirm their results.

  2. Increased rates of local complication of central venous catheters in the targeted anticancer therapy era: a 2-year retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Berardi, R; Rinaldi, S; Santini, D; Vincenzi, B; Giampieri, R; Maccaroni, E; Marcucci, F; Francoletti, M; Onofri, A; Lucarelli, A; Pierantoni, C; Tonini, G; Cascinu, S

    2015-05-01

    Totally implantable central venous accesses (port-a-cath) are often used for chemotherapy administration or prolonged intravenous infusions in cancer patients. Local and systemic complications may occur both during and after placement of port-a-cath despite the well-established techniques for its placement and care. Out of other catheter-related local complications, thrombosis and infections represent the most common. Complications related to central venous catheter may be associated with infusion of both conventional chemotherapy and molecularly targeted therapy. Incidence and nature of complications of central venous catheter have been well established for long-term chemotherapy. However, very sparse data exists on the incidence of complications of molecularly targeted therapies administered through a central venous catheter. Hence, we decided to retrospectively analyze the local complications of a central venous catheter in patients receiving molecularly targeted therapy and conventional chemotherapy, respectively. Over a 2-year period, 459 devices were placed in two academic Italian institutions. Patients' characteristics, catheter-related complications, and their relationship with targeted therapy administration were retrospectively assessed. Catheter-related complications occurred in 30 out of the 459 analyzed cancer patients (7 %). Local complications occurred in 12 (40 %) and 18 (60 %) patients receiving standard chemotherapy and biological drugs, respectively. Eighteen (72 %) out of 25 patients developing biological complications (BC) were receiving biological drugs. Infusion of a biological drug through a central venous catheter has been shown to increase the risk of central venous catheter complications (p = 0.02). No difference between the incidence of complication between anti-angiogenic and anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) agents was observed in our study despite the statistically significant early development of port

  3. Hemodialysis access usage patterns in the incident dialysis year and associated catheter-related complications.

    PubMed

    Xue, Hui; Ix, Joachim H; Wang, Weiling; Brunelli, Steven M; Lazarus, Michael; Hakim, Raymond; Lacson, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) access is considered a critical and actionable determinant of morbidity, with a growing literature suggesting that initial HD access type is an important marker of long-term outcomes. Accordingly, we examined HD access during the incident dialysis period, focusing on infection risk and successful fistula creation during the first dialysis year. Longitudinal cohort. All US adults admitted to Fresenius Medical Care North America facilities within 15 days of first maintenance dialysis session between January 1 and December 31, 2007. Vascular access type at HD therapy initiation. Vascular access type at 90 days and at the end of the first year on HD therapy, bloodstream infection within the first year by access type, and catheter complication rate. Of 25,003 incident dialysis patients studied, 19,622 (78.5%) initiated dialysis with a catheter; 4,151 (16.6%), with a fistula; and 1,230 (4.9%), with a graft. At 90 days, 14,105 (69.7%) had a catheter, 4,432 (21.9%) had a fistula, and 1,705 (8.4%) had a graft. Functioning fistulas and grafts at dialysis therapy initiation had first-year failure rates of 10% and 15%, respectively. Grafts were seldom replaced by fistulas (3%), whereas 7,064 (47.6%) of all patients who initiated with a catheter alone still had only a catheter at 1 year. Overall, 3,327 (13.3%) patients had at least one positive blood culture during follow-up, with the risk being similar between the fistula and graft groups, but approximately 3-fold higher in patients with a catheter (P<0.001 for either comparison). Nearly 1 in 3 catheters (32.5%) will require tissue plasminogen activator use by a median of 41 days, with 59% requiring more than one tissue plasminogen activator administration. Potential underestimation of bacteremia because follow-up blood culture results did not include samples sent to local laboratories. In a large and representative population of incident US dialysis patients, catheter use remains very high during the first

  4. Complications Associated with Insertion of Intrauterine Pressure Catheters: An Unusual Case of Uterine Hypertonicity and Uterine Perforation Resulting in Fetal Distress after Insertion of an Intrauterine Pressure Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Rood, Kara M.

    2012-01-01

    Insertion of intrauterine pressure catheters is a routine procedure performed in labor and delivery departments, with few associated complications. There are several reports of maternal and neonatal morbidity associated with the use of intrauterine pressure catheters and their rare adverse outcomes. We report an unusual case of uterine hypertonicity resulting in fetal distress, immediately after the placement of an intrauterine pressure catheter. An emergent Cesarean section was performed for fetal distress and revealed a 5 cm vertical rent in the posterior lower uterine segment. The uterine perforation was repaired intraoperatively. Mother and infant did well and were discharged home on postoperative day four. PMID:22928133

  5. Complications associated with insertion of intrauterine pressure catheters: an unusual case of uterine hypertonicity and uterine perforation resulting in fetal distress after insertion of an intrauterine pressure catheter.

    PubMed

    Rood, Kara M

    2012-01-01

    Insertion of intrauterine pressure catheters is a routine procedure performed in labor and delivery departments, with few associated complications. There are several reports of maternal and neonatal morbidity associated with the use of intrauterine pressure catheters and their rare adverse outcomes. We report an unusual case of uterine hypertonicity resulting in fetal distress, immediately after the placement of an intrauterine pressure catheter. An emergent Cesarean section was performed for fetal distress and revealed a 5 cm vertical rent in the posterior lower uterine segment. The uterine perforation was repaired intraoperatively. Mother and infant did well and were discharged home on postoperative day four.

  6. Risk factors, management and primary prevention of thrombotic complications related to the use of central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Birgit; Lindhoff-Last, Edelgard

    2012-09-01

    An adequate vascular access is of importance for the treatment of patients with cancer and complex illnesses in the intensive, perioperative or palliative care setting. Deep vein thrombosis and thrombotic occlusion are the most common complications attributed to central venous catheters in short-term and, especially, in long-term use. In this review we will focus on the risk factors, management and prevention strategies of catheter-related thrombosis and occlusion. Due to the lack of randomised controlled trials, there is still controversy about the optimal treatment of catheter-related thrombotic complications, and therapy has been widely adopted using the evidence concerning lower extremity deep vein thrombosis. Given the increasing use of central venous catheters in patients that require long-term intravenous therapy, the problem of upper extremity deep venous thrombosis can be expected to increase in the future. We provide data for establishing a more uniform strategy for preventing, diagnosing and treating catheter-related thrombotic complications.

  7. ESPEN Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition: central venous catheters (access, care, diagnosis and therapy of complications).

    PubMed

    Pittiruti, Mauro; Hamilton, Helen; Biffi, Roberto; MacFie, John; Pertkiewicz, Marek

    2009-08-01

    When planning parenteral nutrition (PN), the proper choice, insertion, and nursing of the venous access are of paramount importance. In hospitalized patients, PN can be delivered through short-term, non-tunneled central venous catheters, through peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC), or - for limited period of time and with limitation in the osmolarity and composition of the solution - through peripheral venous access devices (short cannulas and midline catheters). Home PN usually requires PICCs or - if planned for an extended or unlimited time - long-term venous access devices (tunneled catheters and totally implantable ports). The most appropriate site for central venous access will take into account many factors, including the patient's conditions and the relative risk of infective and non-infective complications associated with each site. Ultrasound-guided venepuncture is strongly recommended for access to all central veins. For parenteral nutrition, the ideal position of the catheter tip is between the lower third of the superior cava vein and the upper third of the right atrium; this should preferably be checked during the procedure. Catheter-related bloodstream infection is an important and still too common complication of parenteral nutrition. The risk of infection can be reduced by adopting cost-effective, evidence-based interventions such as proper education and specific training of the staff, an adequate hand washing policy, proper choices of the type of device and the site of insertion, use of maximal barrier protection during insertion, use of chlorhexidine as antiseptic prior to insertion and for disinfecting the exit site thereafter, appropriate policies for the dressing of the exit site, routine changes of administration sets, and removal of central lines as soon as they are no longer necessary. Most non-infective complications of central venous access devices can also be prevented by appropriate, standardized protocols for line insertion

  8. Coronary artery dissection and perforation complicating percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Jason H; Lasala, John M

    2004-09-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is widely utilized in the treatment of symptomatic coronary artery disease. Despite its numerous benefits, serious and potentially life-threatening complications of PCI can occur, including iatrogenic coronary artery dissection and perforation. The incidence of these complications has been augmented by the development of coronary interventional devices intended to remove or ablate tissue. We herein review the classification, incidence, pathogenesis, clinical sequelae and management of coronary artery dissection and perforation in the current era. Specifically, the current angiographic classifications of coronary artery dissections and perforations are reviewed. The findings of several recent, large registries of PCI-related coronary artery perforations are summarized. The management of coronary artery dissection and perforation is discussed at length, including the application of newer modalities such as covered stents.

  9. High Mortality without ESCAPE: The Registry of Heart Failure Patients Receiving Pulmonary Artery Catheters without Randomization

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Larry A.; Rogers, Joseph G.; Warnica, J. Wayne; DiSalvo, Thomas G.; Tasissa, Gudaye; Binanay, Cynthia; O’Connor, Christopher M.; Califf, Robert M.; Leier, Carl V.; Shah, Monica R.; Stevenson, Lynne W.

    2008-01-01

    Background In ESCAPE, there was no difference in days alive and out of the hospital for patients with decompensated heart failure (HF) randomly assigned to therapy guided by pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) plus clinical assessment versus clinical assessment alone. The external validity of these findings is debated. Methods and Results ESCAPE sites enrolled 439 patients receiving PAC without randomization in a prospective registry. Baseline characteristics, pertinent trial exclusion criteria, reasons for PAC use, hemodynamics, and complications were collected. Survival was determined from the National Death Index and the Alberta Registry. On average, registry patients had lower blood pressure, worse renal function, less neurohormonal antagonist therapy, and higher use of intravenous inotropes as compared with trial patients. Although clinical assessment anticipated less volume overload and greater hypoperfusion among the registry population, measured filling pressures were similarly elevated in the registry and trial, while measured perfusion was slightly higher among registry patients. Registry patients had longer hospitalization (13 vs. 6 days, p <0.001) and higher 6-month mortality (34% vs. 20%, p < 0.001) than trial patients. Conclusions The decision to use PAC without randomization identified a population with higher disease severity and risk of mortality. This prospective registry highlights the complex context of patient selection for randomized trials. PMID:18926438

  10. [Bilateral popliteal artery complications of multiple hereditary exostosis].

    PubMed

    Chaouch, N; Alimi, F; Kortas, C; Limayem, F; Braham, A; Mlika, Sinan; Jerbi, S; Ennabli, K

    2011-04-01

    The osseous exostose is a rare benign tumor of the bone from which the vascular complications can be of venous or arterial order, are translated in various boards. We report the case of a young adult who presents a forgery aneurysm of the right popliteal artery with the popliteal artery booby-trapped to the left. The patient benefited from surgical treatment with good clinical and radiological evolution. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  11. Novel technologies can provide effective dressing and securement for peripheral arterial catheters: A pilot randomised controlled trial in the operating theatre and the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Heather; Taraporewalla, Kersi; Tower, Marion; Mihala, Gabor; Tuffaha, Haitham W; Fraser, John F; Rickard, Claire M

    2015-08-01

    Peripheral arterial catheters are widely used in the care of intensive care patients for continuous blood pressure monitoring and blood sampling, yet failure - from dislodgement, accidental removal, and complications of phlebitis, pain, occlusion and infection - is common. While appropriate methods of dressing and securement are required to reduce these complications that cause failure, few studies have been conducted in this area. To determine initial effectiveness of one dressing and two securement methods versus usual care, in minimising failure in peripheral arterial catheters. Feasibility objectives were considered successful if 90/120 patients (75%) received the study intervention and protocol correctly, and had ease and satisfaction scores for the study dressing and securement devices of ≥ 7 on Numerical Rating Scale scores 1-10. In this single-site, four-arm, parallel, pilot randomised controlled trial, patients with arterial catheters, inserted in the operating theatre and admitted to the intensive care unit postoperatively, were randomly assigned to either one of the three treatment groups (bordered polyurethane dressing (n=30); a sutureless securement device (n=31); tissue adhesive (n=32)), or a control group (usual practice polyurethane dressing (not bordered) (n=30)). One hundred and twenty-three patients completed the trial. The primary outcome of catheter failure was 2/32 (6.3%) for tissue adhesive, 4/30 (13.3%) for bordered polyurethane, 5/31 (16.1%) for the sutureless securement device, and 6/30 (20%) for the control usual care polyurethane. Feasibility criteria were fulfilled. Cost analysis suggested that tissue adhesive was the most cost effective. The pilot trial showed that the novel technologies were at least as effective as the present method of a polyurethane dressing for dressing and securement of arterial catheters, and may be cost effective. The trial also provided evidence that a larger, multicentre trial would be feasible. Copyright

  12. Prospective monocentric study of non-tunnelled central venous catheter-related complications in hematological patients.

    PubMed

    Nosari, Anna Maria; Nador, Guido; De Gasperi, Andrea; Ortisi, Giuseppe; Volonterio, Alberto; Cantoni, Silvia; Nichelatti, Michele; Marbello, Laura; Mazza, Ernestina; Mancini, Valentina; Ravelli, Erica; Ricci, Francesca; Ciapanna, Denis; Garrone, Federica; Gesu, Giovanni; Morra, Enrica

    2008-11-01

    Indwelling central venous catheters (CVCs) are used in the management of hematologic patients. However, insertion and maintenance of CVCs are susceptible to complications. Study design and methods data concerning 388 consecutive catheterisations, performed in oncohematologic patients between April 2003 and December 2004, were prospectively collected. At insertion thrombocytopenia was present in 109 cases (28.1%) and neutropenia in 67 (17.3%). Hemorrhage after CVC insertion occurred in five thrombocytopenic patients (1.3%). The median duration of catheterisation was 18.8 days (range 1-89), longer in the 7-French CVCs utilised in leukemic patients (24.3 days) and shorter in 12-French CVCs (11 days), used for PBSC harvesting. Deep venous thrombosis was diagnosed in 13 cases (3.3%). Ninety-two catheterisations (12.6/1000 days-catheter) were complicated by infections: 19 local infections (4.8%) and 73 (18.8%) bacteraemias of which 45 (11.6%) were catheter-related, mainly due to Gram positive germs (32/45, 71.1%). The frequency of catheter-related bacteraemia was 7.2 events/1000 days-catheter. Thirteen CVCs were removed due to thrombosis, 15 due to infections, 20 due to malfunction, the remaining 333 at patients discharge. At univariate analysis high-dose chemotherapy (p = 0.013), 7-Fr lumen (p = 0.023), acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (p = 0.001), duration of neutropenia >10 days and length of catheterisation were significantly correlated to infection. Multivariate analysis confirmed the duration of catheterisation, AML and high-dose chemotherapy as risk factors. Even though hematological in-patients are at increased risk for bleeding and infections, non-tunnelled CVCs offer a safe venous access also in patients affected by severe thrombocytopenia and prolonged neutropenia.

  13. Complications arising from catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation: temporal trends and predictors.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, Hana; Bhonsale, Aditya; Chilukuri, Karuna; Alhumaid, Fawaz; Needleman, Matthew; Edwards, David; Govil, Ashul; Nazarian, Saman; Cheng, Alan; Henrikson, Charles A; Sinha, Sunil; Marine, Joseph E; Berger, Ronald; Calkins, Hugh; Spragg, David D

    2011-12-01

    The reported complication rate of catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) varies. Our goal was to assess temporal trends and the effect of both institutional and individual operators' experience on the incidence of complications. All patients undergoing AF ablation at Johns Hopkins Hospital between February 2001 and December 2010 were prospectively enrolled in a database. Major complications were defined as those that were life-threatening, resulted in permanent harm, required intervention, or significantly prolonged hospitalization. Fifty-six major complications occurred in 1190 procedures (4.7%). The majority of complications were vascular (18; 1.5%), followed by pericardial tamponade (13; 1.1%) and cerebrovascular accident (12; 1.1%). No cases of death or atrioesophageal fistula occurred. The overall complication rate decreased from 11.1% in 2002 to 1.6% in 2010 (P <.05). On univariate analysis, demographic and clinical factors associated with the increased risk of complications were CHADS(2) score of ≥2 (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.4-4.4; P = .002), female gender (HR = 2.0; 95% CI = 1.2-3.5; P = .014), and age (HR = 1.03; 95% CI = 1.0-1.1; P = .042). Gender and CHADS(2) score of ≥2 remained independent predictors of complication on multivariable analysis. The complication rate of catheter ablation of AF decreased with increased institutional experience. Female gender and CHADS(2) score of ≥2 are significant independent risk factors for complications and should be considered when referring patients for AF ablation. Copyright © 2011 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Neurological Complications Comparing Endoscopically vs. Open Harvest of the Radial Artery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-05

    Complications Due to Coronary Artery Bypass Graft; Coronary Artery Disease; Myocardial Ischemia; Coronary Disease; Heart Diseases; Cardiovascular Diseases; Arteriosclerosis; Arterial Occlusive Diseases; Vascular Diseases

  15. Abnormal origin of right coronary artery and use of Tiger catheter through femoral route.

    PubMed

    Datta, Goutam; Rai, Durga Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal origin of right coronary artery (RCA) is not uncommon. The incidence is .25-.92%. Right Judkin catheter is used universally for engaging right coronary ostium from femoral route. We have tried Tiger catheter from femoral route in abnormal origin of RCA patients. We were successful in cannulating RCA ostium in most of the cases. We have studied about 5120 patients over 4 years. We have selected patients from November 2010 to November 2014. Our patients are from two institutions-I.P.G.M.E.R., Kolkata and Burdwan Medical College, West Bengal. Right Judkin 3.5 and 4 were used universally. We have used AL-1,2,3, AR1,2, multipurpose, different guide catheters for cannulating RCA ostium in those cases where we failed to engage by right Judkin catheter. We have used Tiger catheter as a last resort when all endeavor failed. Among 40 cases of left sinus origin Type A-9, Type B-14, Type C-6, Type D-3, and Type E-8 patients were observed. But 668 cases abnormal origin of RCA were from right coronary sinus only. High take-off origin were 422 cases (8%), low take-off were 132 cases (2.5%), and posterior origin were 114 cases (2%). We could engage right coronary ostium by Tiger catheter in 690 cases (97%). We failed in 23 cases (3%). Tiger catheter can be used successfully in abnormal RCA origin cases. It is more effective but less risky in comparison to other catheters. Copyright © 2015 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Abnormal origin of right coronary artery and use of Tiger catheter through femoral route

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Goutam; Rai, Durga Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Background Abnormal origin of right coronary artery (RCA) is not uncommon. The incidence is .25–.92%. Right Judkin catheter is used universally for engaging right coronary ostium from femoral route. We have tried Tiger catheter from femoral route in abnormal origin of RCA patients. We were successful in cannulating RCA ostium in most of the cases. Materials and methods We have studied about 5120 patients over 4 years. We have selected patients from November 2010 to November 2014. Our patients are from two institutions—I.P.G.M.E.R., Kolkata and Burdwan Medical College, West Bengal. Right Judkin 3.5 and 4 were used universally. We have used AL-1,2,3, AR1,2, multipurpose, different guide catheters for cannulating RCA ostium in those cases where we failed to engage by right Judkin catheter. We have used Tiger catheter as a last resort when all endeavor failed. Results and analysis Among 40 cases of left sinus origin Type A—9, Type B—14, Type C—6, Type D—3, and Type E—8 patients were observed. But 668 cases abnormal origin of RCA were from right coronary sinus only. High take-off origin were 422 cases (8%), low take-off were 132 cases (2.5%), and posterior origin were 114 cases (2%). We could engage right coronary ostium by Tiger catheter in 690 cases (97%). We failed in 23 cases (3%). Conclusion Tiger catheter can be used successfully in abnormal RCA origin cases. It is more effective but less risky in comparison to other catheters. PMID:26896276

  17. Convection-enhanced delivery catheter placements for high-grade gliomas: complications and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Shahar, Tal; Ram, Zvi; Kanner, Andrew A

    2012-04-01

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of compounds into brain tumors reportedly circumvents the blood brain barrier. CED intends to increase drug delivery to malignant cells, reaching high local therapeutic concentration and decreasing or eliminating systemic side effects. Clinical experience and published data on catheter placement (CP) surgery are scarce. We propose practical and technical guidelines for planning CED based on our experience. We retrospectively analyzed the medical charts and relevant neuroimages of 25 patients following the insertion of 64 CED catheters. The patients were enrolled in at least one of four clinical trials using CED for treating recurrent glioblastoma multiforme in our institution between 2003-2006. Intra- and postoperative complications related to CP surgery and the difficulties and pitfalls of planning were evaluated. There were 29 CP surgeries. Forty-four peritumoral brain tissue catheters were inserted in 16 CP surgeries following tumor resection in 16 patients, and 20 catheters were placed into the tumor in 13 procedures in 10 patients. The lesions were in or near eloquent brain tissue areas in 13 of all CP surgeries. Complications included increased edema (31%), infection (6.9%), bleeding (6.9%) and seizures (13.8%). Significant neurological deterioration occurred in 4 patients (13.8%). Difficulties in adhering to CP surgery guidelines included lesion site (superficial, mesial temporal lobe, proximity to CSF spaces), proximity to eloquent cortical areas, tissue density that interfered with the trajectory, and technical limitations of stereotactic instruments. CED procedures for high-grade gliomas may be associated with surgical morbidity. Adherence to guidelines might be difficult because of lesion site and complicated by brain and tumor tissue characteristics. This should be considered while planning clinical trials that use convection-based technology.

  18. [Aggressive management of the arterial complications of liver transplantation. Impact upon survival and biliary complications].

    PubMed

    Fernández Aguilar, José Luís; Suárez-Muñoz, Miguel Angel; Santoyo Santoyo, Julio; Sánchez Pérez, Belinda; Pérez Daga, Antonio; Ramírez Plaza, César P; Aranda Narváez, José Manuel; González Sánchez, Antonio; Montiel Casado, Custodia; Carrasco Campos, Joaquín; Alvarez Alcalde, Antonio

    2010-03-01

    A study was made of the arterial complications documented in 400 transplants performed between 1997 and 2006. The patients were divided into two groups according to the type of treatment provided. Group I: invasive management (arterial treatment or re-transplant), and Group II: conservative or symptomatic management. The impact of management upon survival and biliary complications was analysed. There were 18 arterial complications (4.5%): 10 early (7 thromboses and 3 stenoses) and 8 late (5 thromboses and 3 stenoses). Ninety percent of the early complications were subjected to invasive management (4 emergency thrombectomies, 1 re-transplant and 3 angioplasties), while 25% of the late complications were treated in the form of re-transplant and the remaining 75% were subjected to symptomatic treatment. Survival after 12 and 60 months was lower in Group II (57% and 42%) than in Group I (90% and 68%), although without reaching statistical significance. The overall biliary complications rate among the patients with arterial thrombosis was 50%. The rate was significantly lower in Group I than in Group II (10% versus 71%) (P<04). Invasive management of the arterial complications of liver transplantation is associated with longer short-term survival and significantly fewer biliary complications. In our experience, patients benefit from an early diagnosis and aggressive management of complications of this kind. Copyright 2009 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of a New Subclavian Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy Method for Locally or Recurrent Advanced Breast Cancer Using an Implanted Catheter-Port System After Redistribution of Arterial Tumor Supply

    SciTech Connect

    Takizawa, Kenji Shimamoto, Hiroshi Ogawa, Yukihisa Yoshimatsu, Misako Yagihashi, Kunihiro Nakajima, Yasuo; Kitanosono, Takashi

    2009-09-15

    Locally or recurrent advanced breast cancers can receive arterial blood supply from various arteries, such as the internal thoracic artery (ITA), the lateral thoracic artery, and the other small arterial branches originating from the subclavian artery. Failure to catheterize and subsequent formation of collateral arterial blood supply from various arteries are some of the reasons why the response to conventional selective transarterial infusion chemotherapy is limited and variable. To overcome this problem, we developed a new subclavian arterial infusion chemotherapy method using an implanted catheter-port system after redistribution of arterial tumor blood supply by embolizing the ITA. We named this technique ('redistributed subclavian arterial infusion chemotherapy' (RESAIC)). Using RESAIC, patients can be treated on an outpatient basis for extended periods of time. Eleven patients underwent RESAIC, and the complete remission and partial response rate in 10 evaluable patients was 90%: complete remission [CR] n = 4, partial remission n = 4, stable disease n = 1, and not evaluable n = 1. Three of four patients with CR had no distant metastasis, and modified radical mastectomy was performed 1 month after conclusion of RESAIC. The resected specimens showed no residual cancer cells, and pathologically confirmed complete remission was diagnosed in each of these cases. Although temporary grade-3 myelosuppression was seen in three patients who were previously treated by systemic chemotherapy, there was no other drug-induced toxicity or procedure-related complications. RESAIC produced a better response and showed no major complications compared with other studies despite the advanced stage of the cancers.

  20. Post insertion catheter care in peritoneal dialysis (PD) centres across Europe--Part 2: complication rates and individual patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Vijt, Denise; Castro, Maria José; Endall, Gerry; Lindley, Elizabeth; Elseviers, Monique

    2004-01-01

    The first part of this report, which looked at centre policy, showed that there was no consensus on the best way to manage a patient in the rest period between PD catheter insertion and the first use of the catheter for dialysis. This paper intends to investigate if the differences in policy had any effect on complication rate and individual patient outcomes. Data were included from 298 patients of 49 participating centres. The results revealed a high rate of catheter related complications, with half of the patients having been treated for complications including leakage (29%), malfunction (23%) or infection (10%), and a quarter of patients having been hospitalised for catheter problems. Leakage was more frequently observed in lean and obese patients and if the catheter was only immobilized for a short time period. Diabetes, having constipation at first use and having rested for less than 6 hours after catheter insertion were significant risk factors for malfunction. Infection seemed to be related to the type of catheter used and hygienic precautions (not significant) and showed a significant relationship with the frequency of dressing changes. There is still an important lack of evidence on which to develop an optimal protocol for PD catheter insertion and care before first use.

  1. Extravasation of parenteral alimentation fluid into the renal pelvis--a complication of central venous catheter in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Nadroo, A M; al-Sowailem, A M

    2001-01-01

    Many complications of central venous catheters, which include perforation of the vessel walls and extravasation of the infusate into pericardial, pleural, and peritoneal cavities, have been reported. We report an infant with a central venous catheter in inferior vena cava who experienced extravasation of parenteral alimentation fluid into the right renal pelvis secondary to perforation of the renal vein. To our knowledge, this rare complication has not been reported earlier.

  2. Transcatheter arterial embolization - major complications and their prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, F.J. Jr.; Mineau, D.E.

    1983-08-01

    A thorough account is given of the complications of embolization techniques in nonneurovascular areas, including hepatic infarction, renal and splenic abscess formation. Infarction of the urinary bladder, gallbladder, stomach, and bowel are discussed. Suggestions are offered to prevent complications from embolization where possible. Specific agents for embolization are detailed and their relative merits are compared; ethyl alcohol has recently gained popularity for treating esophageal varices and infarcting renal tumors. Care is advocated when using alcohol in the renal arteries; employing this agent is currently contraindicated in the celiac and mesenteric arteries. Coils and balloon systems are also described along with their potential complications.

  3. An aspergillotic aneurysm of the internal carotid artery following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation: successful management with catheter coil embolization and long-term antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Okada, T; Okada, C; Onishi, T; Watanabe, H; Okamoto, Y; Kitamura, Y; Manabe, S; Matsubara, S; Kageji, T; Iwai, A

    2009-02-01

    We report a case of a mycotic aneurysm of the internal carotid artery and cerebral hemorrhagic infarction resulting from Aspergillus middle ear infection in a patient with severe aplastic anemia who received unrelated bone marrow transplantation. Although a mycotic aneurysm is a rare complication, and most often fatal, the patient was successfully treated with catheter coil embolization of the internal carotid artery and long-term systemic antifungal therapy. This case emphasizes the need for the rapid diagnosis of potential fungal involvement of the vascular system and suggests the necessity for aggressive treatment, such as with the modality illustrated in this case.

  4. Radial artery pseudoaneurysm: A rare complication after a single arterial puncture for blood-gas analysis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kajal Nitin; Gandhi, Shruti P; Sutariya, Harsh C

    2016-10-01

    With a reported incidence of 0.048%, radial artery pseudoaneurysm (PA) is a rare but serious complication of arterial cannulation. We report a case of PA developing after a single puncture of the right radial artery for arterial blood-gas analysis diagnosed by Doppler ultrasound in young male patient. The development of PA after puncture of radial artery for continuous blood pressure monitoring and serial blood-gas analysis has been reported in the past; however, to the best of our knowledge, there is only one case report of development of PA after a single arterial puncture for blood-gas analysis is reported in the past.

  5. Pseudoaneurysm of the inferior epigastric artery: a rare complication of laparoscopic ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Nichols-Totten, Kysha; Pollema, Travis; Moncure, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Pseudoaneurysm of the inferior epigastric artery (IEA) is a recognized complication of surgery; however, it is a very rare clinical occurrence. The anatomic position of the IEA subjects patients to possible IEA injury during abdominal wall procedures that are close to the artery, such as insertions of drains, Tenckhoff catheters, laparoscopic trocars, or paracentesis. Treatment options include open surgery, percutaneous coil embolization, embolization with N-butyl cyanoacrylate, sonographic-guided thrombin injection, or sonographic-guided compression. We report the first case of a pseudoaneurysm arising from the IEA after a laparoscopic ventral hernia repair. To our knowledge, 17 IEA pseudoaneurysms have been reported, only 3 of which were spontaneous. The pseudoaneurysm in our patient was successfully treated by percutaneous injection of thrombin by interventional radiology.

  6. A simple catheter-vessel model for MR assessment of drug distribution in arteries and optimization of catheter design for intraarterial infusion therapy.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Uchida, Koji; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Hirota, Shozo; Nakamura, Tomonori; Yoshizako, Takeshi; Ishida, Jun; Kitagaki, Hajime

    2007-05-01

    To investigate the efficacy of a new catheter-vessel model for MRI to evaluate drug distribution and to optimize catheter design for intraarterial infusion therapy The model consisted of a hepatic artery simulant tube through which blood simulant water flowed continuously and a water cistern. Catheters were inserted into the tube and a gadolinium contrast medium was injected at rates suitable for angiographic or computed tomographic evaluation and commensurate with the clinical drug infusion rate. Axial images of the tube were obtained with a 0.2-T scanner and gradient echo technique. Preliminary studies and catheter tests were conducted. The points at which drug and water were completely mixed were defined as the site with uniform enhancement nearest the catheter tip. Flip angle and gadolinium concentrations were optimized at 90 degrees, and at 62.5 and 500 mM for the high and low infusion rates, respectively. Drug distribution near the catheter tips was clearly visualized. The drug was mixed in shorter distances via the slit side-hole than the end- or side-hole catheters, and the smaller diametrical than the larger at either rate. This model appeared to be effective for evaluation of drug distribution and optimization of catheter design. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Indwell times, complications and costs of open vs closed safety peripheral intravenous catheters: a randomized study.

    PubMed

    González López, J L; Arribi Vilela, A; Fernández del Palacio, E; Olivares Corral, J; Benedicto Martí, C; Herrera Portal, P

    2014-02-01

    Catheter-related infections (CRIs) caused by peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs) are an increasingly common iatrogenic complication. To prevent this, recommended timelines for routine replacement of PIVCs have increased from 48 h to 72 h and subsequently to 96 h, despite a lack of supporting scientific evidence. To compare closed-system (COS) PIVCs with open-system (MOS) PIVCs. This prospective, randomized controlled trial compared the indwell time of COS PIVCs without complications with that of MOS PIVCs, removed only by clinical indication. In total, 1199 PIVCs (642 inpatients) were randomized and 283 PIVCs were cultured. Sixteen catheters (11 patients) were lost to the study after randomization. In total, 104,469 catheter-hours (54,173 h in 584 COS and 50,296 h in 599 MOS) were recorded. The median dwell time was 137.1h for COS PIVCs and 96 h for MOS PIVCs (P = 0.001). Among PIVCs in place for ≥ 24 h, the median dwell time was 144.5h for COS PIVCs [95% confidence interval (CI) 123.4-165.6] and 99 h for MOS PIVCs (95% CI 87.2-110.8). Use of COS PIVCs reduced phlebitis rates by 29% (31 vs 45 cases/1000 catheter-days; P = 0.004). The probability that a MOS PIVC would last for 96 h was 79.9%, and the probability that a COS PIVC would last for 144 h was 80.4%. There were no significant differences in rates of bacterial colonization per 1000 catheter-days (51.1 COS vs 54.1 MOS) or CRI (5.76 COS vs 6.65 MOS). Nevertheless, there was a 20% relative risk reduction in CRI. Use of COS PIVCs reduced episodes of phlebitis and risk of infection at a cost of only € 0.09/day. When PIVCs are replaced based on clinical indication, COS PIVCs last for up to 144 h and MOS PIVCs last for up to 96 h without increased risk and with significant cost savings (€ 786,257/year/1000 beds). Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. A Novel Two-Step Technique for Retrieving Fractured Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter Segments Migrating into the Heart or the Pulmonary Artery

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Juan; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Xu, Hao; Miao, Nan-Dong; Ren, Yong-Jun; Liu, Kang; Min, Xu-Li; Yang, Ke; Yang, Shi; Yang, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To report the experience of a percutaneous technique for retrieving fractured peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) segments migrating into the heart or the pulmonary artery. Method. From April 2013 to July 2015, we performed percutaneous retrieval of fractured PICC segments migrating into the heart or the pulmonary artery in five cancer patients who had undergone chemotherapy via PICC. The fractures were diagnosed with chest plain radiography. The patients included three cases of breast cancer, one case of rectal cancer, and one case of lower limb Ewing's tumor. The fractures were retained in the vessels of the patients for 1 to 3 days. All the fractures were retrieved by using a novel two-step technique in the digital subtraction angiography (DSA) suite. This two-step technique involves inserting a pigtail catheter to the heart or the pulmonary artery to grasp the fractured catheter fragment and bring it to the lower segment of the inferior vena cava, followed by grasping and removing the catheter fragment with a retrieval loop system of the vena cava filter retrieval set. Result. The fractured PICC segments were removed successfully in all five patients via unilateral (four patients) or bilateral (one patient) femoral vein access. No complications occurred during the interventional procedure. Conclusion. Percutaneous retrieval can be a safe, convenient, and minimally invasive method for the removal of fractured PICC segments. The technique reported in this paper will be applicable for the retrieval of fractured PICC segments and other catheter fragments migrating into the heart or the pulmonary artery. PMID:27642604

  9. Cuffed-tunneled hemodialysis catheter survival and complications in pediatric patients: a single-center data analysis in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Wang, Pei; Liang, Xian-Hui; Yuan, Fang-Fang; Liu, Zhang-Suo

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the outcome and complications of cuffed-tunneled catheters in pediatric patients. Between January 2010 and December 2013, 16 pediatric patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) were included. 21 cuffed-tunneled hemodialysis catheters were inserted in patients for long-term hemodialysis access. No serious complications were observed in all patients receiving catheter insertion operation, except one with hemopneumothorax. Median survival time was 413.5 days, with rate being 67.5% in the first year, 51.5% in the second year and 43.6% in the third year. Among attempted catheter insertions, 21 (100%) achieved successful vascular access with 13 (61.9%) being remained for the required period and 8 (38.1%) being removed due to death, intractable blood or tunnel infections, catheter thrombosis or malposition. The overall rate of catheter-related infections, thrombosis and malposition was 7.3, 23.4 and 3.4 episodes/1000 catheter days, respectively. Cuffed-tunneled hemodialysis catheters could be effectively used for maintenance of hemodialysis vascular access for pediatric patients with ESRD. Various surveillance measures should be taken to ensure cuffed-tunneled catheters’ long-term patency. PMID:26309654

  10. Impact of Multislice CT Angiography on Planning of Radiological Catheter Placement for Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sone, Miyuki Kato, Kenichi; Hirose, Atsuo; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Tomabechi, Makiko; Ehara, Shigeru; Hanari, Takao

    2008-01-15

    The objective of this study was to assess prospectively the role of multislice CT angiography (MSCTA) on planning of radiological catheter placement for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC). Forty-six patients with malignant liver tumors planned for HAIC were included. In each patient, both MSCTA and intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were performed, except one patient who did not undergo DSA. Comparison of MSCTA and DSA images was performed for the remaining 45 patients. Detectability of anatomical variants of the hepatic artery, course of the celiac trunk, visualization scores of arterial branches and interobserver agreement, presence of arterial stenosis, and technical outcome were evaluated. Anatomical variations of the hepatic artery were detected in 19 of 45 patients (42%) on both modalities. The course of the celiac trunk was different in 12 patients. The visualization scores of celiac arterial branches on MSCTA/DSA were 3.0 {+-} 0/2.9 {+-} 0.2 in the celiac trunk, 3.0 {+-} 0/2.9 {+-} 0.3 in the common hepatic artery, 2.9 {+-} 0.2/2.9 {+-} 0.3 in the proper hepatic artery, 2.9 {+-} 0.3/2.9 {+-} 0.4 in the right hepatic artery, 2.8 {+-} 0.4/2.9 {+-} 0.4 in the left hepatic artery, 2.9 {+-} 0.2/2.9 {+-} 0.3 in the gastroduodenal artery, 2.1 {+-} 0.8/2.2 {+-} 0.9 in the right gastric artery, and 2.7 {+-} 0.8/2.6 {+-} 0.8 in the left gastric artery. No statistically significant differences exist between the two modalities. Interobserver agreement for MSCTA was equivalent to that for DSA. Two patients showed stenosis of the celiac trunk on both modalities. Based on these imaging findings, technical success was accomplished in all patients. In conclusion, MSCTA is accurate in assessing arterial anatomy and abnormalities. MSCTA can provide adequate information for planning of radiological catheter placement for HAIC.

  11. Impact of multislice CT angiography on planning of radiological catheter placement for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sone, Miyuki; Kato, Kenichi; Hirose, Atsuo; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Tomabechi, Makiko; Ehara, Shigeru; Hanari, Takao

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess prospectively the role of multislice CT angiography (MSCTA) on planning of radiological catheter placement for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC). Forty-six patients with malignant liver tumors planned for HAIC were included. In each patient, both MSCTA and intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were performed, except one patient who did not undergo DSA. Comparison of MSCTA and DSA images was performed for the remaining 45 patients. Detectability of anatomical variants of the hepatic artery, course of the celiac trunk, visualization scores of arterial branches and interobserver agreement, presence of arterial stenosis, and technical outcome were evaluated. Anatomical variations of the hepatic artery were detected in 19 of 45 patients (42%) on both modalities. The course of the celiac trunk was different in 12 patients. The visualization scores of celiac arterial branches on MSCTA/DSA were 3.0 +/- 0/2.9 +/- 0.2 in the celiac trunk, 3.0 +/- 0/2.9 +/- 0.3 in the common hepatic artery, 2.9 +/- 0.2/2.9 +/- 0.3 in the proper hepatic artery, 2.9 +/- 0.3/2.9 +/- 0.4 in the right hepatic artery, 2.8 +/- 0.4/2.9 +/- 0.4 in the left hepatic artery, 2.9 +/- 0.2/2.9 +/- 0.3 in the gastroduodenal artery, 2.1 +/- 0.8/2.2 +/- 0.9 in the right gastric artery, and 2.7 +/- 0.8/2.6 +/- 0.8 in the left gastric artery. No statistically significant differences exist between the two modalities. Interobserver agreement for MSCTA was equivalent to that for DSA. Two patients showed stenosis of the celiac trunk on both modalities. Based on these imaging findings, technical success was accomplished in all patients. In conclusion, MSCTA is accurate in assessing arterial anatomy and abnormalities. MSCTA can provide adequate information for planning of radiological catheter placement for HAIC.

  12. Complications and Cost Analysis of Intraoperative Arterial Complications in Head and Neck Free Flap Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Catherine S; Chu, Michael W; Nelson, Jonas A; Basta, Marten; Gerety, Patrick; Kanchwala, Suhail K; Wu, Liza C

    2017-02-25

    Background Microvascular anastomotic patency is fundamental to head and neck free flap reconstructive success. The aims of this study were to identify factors associated with intraoperative arterial anastomotic issues and analyze the impact on subsequent complications and cost in head and neck reconstruction. Methods A retrospective review was performed on all head and neck free flap reconstructions from 2005 to 2013. Patients with intraoperative, arterial anastomotic difficulties were compared with patients without. Postoperative outcomes and costs were analyzed to determine factors associated with microvascular arterial complications. A regression analysis was performed to control for confounders. Results Total 438 head and neck free flaps were performed, with 24 (5.5%) having intraoperative arterial complications. Patient groups and flap survival between the two groups were similar. Free flaps with arterial issues had higher rates of unplanned reoperations (p < 0.001), emergent take-backs (p = 0.034), and major surgical (p = 0.002) and respiratory (p = 0.036) complications. The overall cost of reconstruction was nearly double in patients with arterial issues (p = 0.001). Regression analysis revealed that African American race (OR = 5.5, p < 0.009), use of vasopressors (OR = 6.0, p = 0.024), end-to-side venous anastomosis (OR = 4.0, p = 0.009), and use of internal fixation hardware (OR =3.5, p = 0.013) were significantly associated with arterial complications. Conclusion Intraoperative arterial complications may impact complications and overall cost of free flap head and neck reconstruction. Although some factors are nonmodifiable or unavoidable, microsurgeons should nonetheless be aware of the risk association. We recommend optimizing preoperative comorbidities and avoiding use of vasopressors in head and neck free flap cases to the extent possible.

  13. Urethral protrusion of the abdominal catheter of ventriculoperitoneal shunt: Case report of extremely rare complication.

    PubMed

    Yazar, Ugur; Kanat, Ayhan; Akca, Nezih; Gazioglu, Gurkan; Arda, Irfan S; Kazdal, Hizir

    2012-05-01

    Hydrocephalus in its various forms constitutes one of the major problems in pediatric neurosurgical practice. The placement of a ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt is the most common form of treatment for hydrocephalus, so that all neurosurgeons struggle with shunt malfunctions and their complications. Well-known complications are connected with the use of the valve systems (malfunction, infectious, overdrainage, secondary craniosynostosis, etc.). We report an unusual case of protruding abdominal catheter from the urethra. This girl had received a VP shunt for hydrocephalus following surgery of posterior fossa medulloblastoma 4 years ago. After admission, the entire system was removed, antibiotic treatment was administered for 2 weeks, and a new VP shunt was placed. The postoperative course was uneventful. This complication is extremely rare.

  14. Complications of catheter-based electrophysiology procedures in adults with congenital heart disease: a national analysis.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Bryan G; Steppan, Jochen; Cheng, Alan

    2015-04-01

    To determine whether adult congenital heart disease patients (ACHD) undergoing catheter-based electrophysiology (EP) procedures have an increased risk for complications compared with adults without congenital heart disease. Retrospective cohort study of a national administrative database. Nationwide Inpatient Sample, 1998 through 2011. All admission records of patients who underwent a catheter-based electrophysiology procedure, categorized based on the presence or absence of ACHD. ACHD and non-ACHD cohorts were compared with respect to baseline, procedural, and outcome characteristics. ACHD patients accounted for n=15,133 (1.7%) of n=873,437 EP procedure admissions and comprised a significantly increasing proportion over the study period (from 0.8% in 1998 to 2.4% in 2011, p<0.0001). ACHD patients were younger than non-ACHD patients (52.5±0.3 years v 61.9±0.04 years; p<0.0001), had a longer length of stay (4.6±0.1 days v 4.4±0.01 days, p=0.013), higher total hospital charges ($89,485±$1,543 v $70,456±$175, p<0.0001), and a higher rate of procedure-related complications (odds ratio 1.66, 95% confidence interval 1.49-1.85, p<0.0001). On multivariate analysis, ACHD patients continued to demonstrate an increased risk of procedural complications (odds ratio 1.95, 95% confidence interval 1.75-2.19, p<0.0001). ACHD patients experienced greater morbidity after catheter-based EP procedures. This finding will be of increasing significance as ACHD patients occupy a growing segment of the population undergoing these procedures. Further investigations are warranted to determine whether this increased risk is modifiable, with the aim of improving patient safety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Retrograde air embolization during routine radial artery catheter flushing in adult cardiac surgical patients: an ultrasound study.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Glenn S; Szokol, Joseph W; Marymont, Jesse H; Avram, Michael J; Vender, Jeffery S

    2004-09-01

    Rapid flushing of radial artery catheters may result in retrograde embolization of air into the cerebral circulation. This study examined the incidence of central air embolization during and after flushing of an arterial pressure monitoring system. One hundred adult patients undergoing cardiac surgical procedures were enrolled in this study. Ten ml of saline and blood were withdrawn into a syringe in the arterial flushing-sampling pressure system and then readministered to the patient through a 20-gauge radial artery catheter over 3-12 s. The right carotid artery, left carotid artery, and aortic arch were visualized using ultrasound imaging techniques during three manual flushes of the system. The left and right common carotid arteries were examined for the presence of macrobubbles or microbubbles using a linear array ultrasound transducer. The aortic arch was imaged using transesophageal echocardiography to detect retrograde air emboli. The severity of air embolization was quantified using a modification of an established grading system. A total of 298 ultrasound studies in 100 patients were recorded and analyzed after radial artery catheter flushing. Two aortic arch images were not obtained because of an inability to place the probe. Most clinicians (54%) returned flush solution to patients at near-maximal injection rates (2-3 ml per second). No air emboli (macrobubbles or microbubbles) were detected in the carotid arteries or aortic arch of any subject. Retrograde air embolization is a rare event after routine radial artery catheter flushing in adult patients with stable hemodynamic conditions.

  16. A Rare Complication of Central Venous Catheter Extravasation in a Preterm Neonate: Hemidiaphragmatic Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Hobson, C.; Dubillot, D.; Lardy, H.; Sirinelli, D.; Saliba, E.; Lopez, E.

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of a preterm neonate born at 26 weeks' of gestation diagnosed with unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis. This paralysis was a consequence of a phrenic nerve injury due to extravasation of hyperosmolar parenteral nutrition fluid in the upper thorax. Chest X-rays and ultrasonography confirmed the diagnosis. The neonate was treated with prolonged respiratory support and did not require surgical treatment. This report describes a case of hemidiaphragmatic paralysis as a complication of central venous catheter insertion. In neonates, spontaneous recovery of diaphragmatic paralysis is possible. This study concludes that recovery of extravasation injury-induced phrenic nerve palsy in the context of conservative management is possible. PMID:28405492

  17. Main complications and results of treatment with intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy through the subclavian and thoracic arteries for locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyi; Gan, Changing; Li, Hongyuan; Wei, Yuxian; Zhu, Donchang; Yang, Guanglun; Su, Xinliang; Rodier, Jean-François; Ren, Guosheng

    2013-07-01

    Intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy for locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) has been previously performed. However, the main complications of this type of chemotherapy remain to be clarified. In the present study, catheterization chemotherapy was carried out for 53 LABC cases (stage IIIa-IIIc) between May, 2006 and March, 2007. For IIIB and IIIC patients, the catheters were guided to the opening of the subclavian artery. For stage IIIa patients, the catheters were placed into the thoracic artery through a subcutaneous femoral artery puncture. One to four cycles of chemotherapy (mean, 1.6 cycles) were administered for the patients using taxotere, epidoxorubicin, 5-fluorouracil and/or cyclophosphamide. The interval time between the two cycles was 21 days. Seven cases were identified as complete response (CR, 13.2%), 41 cases were partial response (PR, 77.4%) with a rate of effectiveness of (CR + PR, 90.6%), 5 cases were stable disease (SD, 9.40%) and no case was progressive. Pain of the ipsilateral upper extremity was present in 7 cases. Two cases exhibited ipsilateral upper extremity atrophy following drug administration from the opening of the subclavian artery. One case experienced neck pain and headache, while in one case necrosis of local skin was evident. Hematological toxicity over grade 3 was observed in 6 cases (11.30%). Systemic toxicity was mild and did not affect the quality of life of the patients. Overall survival was identified as 18/51 (35.3%), and free-disease survival as 10/51 (19.6%). In conclusion, intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy is an effective local control treatment for LABC. The main complications are pain of the ipsilateral upper extremity and neck as well as headache. Severe complications are ipsilateral upper extremity atrophy and necrosis of local skin. During the treatment, controlling the pressure of the tourniquet and velocity of drug administration are crucial for reducing local complications.

  18. Main complications and results of treatment with intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy through the subclavian and thoracic arteries for locally advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    WANG, XIAOYI; GAN, CHANGING; LI, HONGYUAN; WEI, YUXIAN; ZHU, DONCHANG; YANG, GUANGLUN; SU, XINLIANG; RODIER, JEAN-FRANÇOIS; REN, GUOSHENG

    2013-01-01

    Intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy for locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) has been previously performed. However, the main complications of this type of chemotherapy remain to be clarified. In the present study, catheterization chemotherapy was carried out for 53 LABC cases (stage IIIa–IIIc) between May, 2006 and March, 2007. For IIIB and IIIC patients, the catheters were guided to the opening of the subclavian artery. For stage IIIa patients, the catheters were placed into the thoracic artery through a subcutaneous femoral artery puncture. One to four cycles of chemotherapy (mean, 1.6 cycles) were administered for the patients using taxotere, epidoxorubicin, 5-fluorouracil and/or cyclophosphamide. The interval time between the two cycles was 21 days. Seven cases were identified as complete response (CR, 13.2%), 41 cases were partial response (PR, 77.4%) with a rate of effectiveness of (CR + PR, 90.6%), 5 cases were stable disease (SD, 9.40%) and no case was progressive. Pain of the ipsilateral upper extremity was present in 7 cases. Two cases exhibited ipsilateral upper extremity atrophy following drug administration from the opening of the subclavian artery. One case experienced neck pain and headache, while in one case necrosis of local skin was evident. Hematological toxicity over grade 3 was observed in 6 cases (11.30%). Systemic toxicity was mild and did not affect the quality of life of the patients. Overall survival was identified as 18/51 (35.3%), and free-disease survival as 10/51 (19.6%). In conclusion, intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy is an effective local control treatment for LABC. The main complications are pain of the ipsilateral upper extremity and neck as well as headache. Severe complications are ipsilateral upper extremity atrophy and necrosis of local skin. During the treatment, controlling the pressure of the tourniquet and velocity of drug administration are crucial for reducing local complications. PMID:24649239

  19. Complications during renal artery stent placement for atherosclerotic ostial stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Beek, Frederik J. A.; Kaatee, Robert; Beutler, Jaap J.; Ven, Peter J. van der; Mali, Willem P. T. M.

    1997-05-15

    Purpose. To describe short-term complications during stent placement for atherosclerotic renal artery ostial stenosis. Methods. Sixty-one arteries in 50 patients were treated with Palmaz stents. Nineteen patients had a single functioning kidney, 23 had a bilateral stenosis, which was stented bilaterally in 11, and 8 had a unilateral stenosis. The complications were grouped as those related to the catheterization procedure, those related to stent placement, and those possibly related to either category. The complications were divided into those with severe clinical significance (SCS), those with minor clinical significance (MCS), and radiological-technical complications (RTC). The stent placement procedures were ordered chronologically according to examination date and the complications were tabulated per group of 10 patients. Results. Five (10%) SCS, 5 (10%) MCS, and 8 (16%) RTC occurred in 50 patients. The catheterization procedure led to 2 SCS, 3 MCS, and 1 RTC. Stent placement gave rise to 7 RTC. Three SCS and 2 MCS could have been related to either catheterization or stent placement. More SCS occurred in the first group of 10 patients than in the following groups. Conclusion. Renal artery stent placement for atherosclerotic ostial stenosis has a considerable complication rate and a learning curve is present. The complications related to the actual stent placement were without clinical consequences.

  20. Accuracy of 11 formulae to guide umbilical arterial catheter tip placement in newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Lean, Wei Ling; Dawson, Jennifer A; Davis, Peter G; Theda, Christiane; Thio, Marta

    2017-08-17

    Umbilical arterial catheter (UAC) insertion is a common procedure in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Correct placement of the tip of the UAC at first attempt minimises handling of the infant and reduces the risk of infection and complications. We aimed to determine the accuracy of 11 published formulae to guide UAC placement. This was a one-year prospective observational study in a tertiary NICU. Clinicians used their preferred formula for UAC insertion, with X-rays performed immediately post-procedure to check the tip position. Birth weight and measurements included in the 11 formulae were recorded within 48 hours. The gold standard insertion distance was defined as the distance from the abdominal wall to the mid-descending aorta, at T8 level on X-ray (range T6-T10). Insertion length using the 11 formulae was calculated and compared with this gold standard distance. One hundred and three infants were included, with median (IQR) gestational age and weight of 28 (26-33.5) weeks and 980 (780-2045) g, respectively. The predicted value of the 11 formulae to place the UAC in correct position ranged from 51.0% to 73.8%. Formulae that involved direct body part measurements showed the highest predicted success rates, smallest mean difference from T8 and narrowest limits of agreement using the Bland-Altman method. Success rates for accurate UAC placement are highest when formulae that involve body measurements are used. However, even the most accurate method would result in more than 25% of UACs needing manipulation to achieve an optimal position. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. Instantaneous and continuous cardiac output in humans obtained with a Doppler pulmonary artery catheter.

    PubMed

    Segal, J; Nassi, M; Ford, A J; Schuenemeyer, T D

    1990-11-01

    A new Doppler pulmonary artery catheter was used to measure instantaneous and continuous cardiac output in both an in vitro model and in 44 patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. Cardiac output was calculated with use of the Doppler catheter-determined instantaneous space-average velocity and the ultrasonically determined instantaneous vessel area. Doppler flow and thermodilution were compared with electromagnetic flow in the in vitro model and with Fick cardiac output in patients. Doppler catheter-determined flow was highly predictive of electro-magnetic flow in the pulsatile flow model (r = 0.99, slope [m] = 1.01 and SEE = 0.05) and appeared comparable to thermodilution measurements (r = 1.00, m = 1.03 and SEE = 0.02). In patients undergoing cardiac catheterization, Doppler catheter-determined cardiac output appeared to modestly underestimate Fick cardiac output (r = 0.82, m = 0.80 and SEE = 0.09; mean error +/- SEM = -0.26 +/- 0.14 liters/min). However, predictive accuracy was comparable to simultaneously obtained thermodilution measurements (r = 0.85, m = 1.07 and SEE = 0.10; mean error +/- SEM = 0.61 +/- 0.16 liters/min). This new Doppler catheter system utilizes multiple ultrasound transducers to provide angle-independent measurements of vessel diameter and instantaneous velocity within the main pulmonary artery, resulting in a more accurate assessment of Doppler-derived cardiac output. In addition, useful information concerning hemodynamic variables such as peak flow, acceleration, deceleration, stroke work and pulmonary impedance may be derived.

  2. Clinical Application of a New Indwelling Catheter with a Side-Hole and Spirally Arranged Shape-Memory Alloy for Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yagihashi, Kunihiro Takizawa, Kenji; Ogawa, Yukihisa; Okamoto, Kyoko; Yoshimatsu, Misako; Fujikawa, Atsuko; Shimamoto, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2010-12-15

    A new indwelling catheter, G-spiral (GSP), was developed for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) by way of an implanted catheter-port system (CPS). Here we evaluated its physical properties and the outcomes of its clinical use. The GSP vessel-fixing power and its ability to follow a guidewire were determined with a vascular in vitro model, and Student t test was used to determine statistical significance (P < 0.05). A retrospective analysis was performed to evaluate the technical success rate and to identify the clinical complications associated with radiologic CPS implantation with GSP in 65 patients with unresectable hepatic tumors. The mean vessel-fixing power of the GSP (14.4 g) significantly differed from that of a GSP with a cut shape-memory alloy (3.3 g). The mean resistance to following the guidewire displayed by the GSP (88.5 g) was significantly less than that for a 5F W-spiral (106.3 g) or 4F Cobra-type angiographic catheter (117.8 g). The CPS was placed successfully in 64 of 65 cases (98.5%). Hepatic artery occlusion was observed in one case. Occlusion, cracking, and infection of CPS were observed in one, two, and one case, respectively. The GSP is a highly useful indwelling catheter that can be used for HAIC.

  3. Evaluation of a New Balloon Catheter for Difficult Calcified Lesions in Infrainguinal Arterial Disease: Outcome of a Multicenter Registry

    SciTech Connect

    Spaargaren, G. J.; Lee, M. J.; Reekers, J. A.; Overhagen, H. van; Schultze Kool, L. J.; Hoogeveen, Y. L.

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the technical performance and immediate procedure outcome of a new balloon catheter in the treatment of calcified lesions in infrainguinal arterial disease. Seventy-five patients with infrainguinal arterial disease were prospectively entered into the registry. The catheter (ReeKross Clearstream, Ireland) is a 5- to 6-Fr balloon catheter with a rigid shaft intended for enhanced pushability. Only technical procedural outcome was recorded. Treated calcified lesions (range: 5-30 cm), assessed angiographically, were located in the superficial femoral, popliteal, and crural arteries. In 67 patients the lesion was an occlusion. Guidewire passage occurred subintimally in 68 patients. In 24 patients a standard balloon catheter was chosen as first treatment catheter: 5 failed to cross the lesion, 8 balloons ruptured, and in 11 patients there was an inadequate dilatation result. In only one of the five patients did subsequent use of the ReeKross catheter also fail in lesion crossing. The ReeKross was successful as secondary catheter in the other 23 cases. In 50 patients the ReeKross was used as primary catheter. In total the ReeKross crossed the lesions in 74 patients. After passage and dilatation with this catheter in 73 patients (1 failed true-lumen reentry), 19 had >30% residual lesions, of which 11 were not treated and 8 were successfully stented. No ReeKross balloons ruptured. We conclude that in the treatment of difficult calcified lesions in arterial stenotic or occlusive disease, the choice of a high-pushability angioplasty catheter, with more calcification-resistant balloon characteristics, like the ReeKross, warrants consideration.

  4. Peroneal nerve palsy: a complication of umbilical artery catheterization in the full-term newborn of a mother with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Giannakopoulou, Christina; Korakaki, Eftichia; Hatzidaki, Eleftheria; Manoura, Antonia; Aligizakis, Agisilaos; Velivasakis, Emmanuel

    2002-04-01

    Umbilical artery catheters are an essential aid in the treatment of newborn infants who have cardiopulmonary disease. However, it is well-known that umbilical artery catheterization is associated with complications. The most frequent visible problem in an umbilical line is blanching or cyanosis of part or all of a distal extremity or the buttock area resulting from either vasospasm or a thrombotic or embolic incidence. Ischemic necrosis of the gluteal region is a rare complication of umbilical artery catheterization. We report the case of a full-term infant of an insulin-dependent diabetic mother with poor blood glucose control who developed a left peroneal nerve palsy after ischemic necrosis of the gluteal region after umbilical artery catheterization. The infant was born weighing 5050 g. The mother of the infant had preexisting diabetes mellitus that was treated with insulin from the age of 14 years. The metabolic control of the mother had been unstable both before and during the pregnancy. The neonate developed respiratory distress syndrome soon after birth and was immediately transferred to the neonatal intensive care unit. Mechanical ventilation via endotracheal tube was quickly considered necessary after rapid pulmonary deterioration. Her blood glucose levels were 13 mg/dL. A 3.5-gauge umbilical catheter was inserted into the left umbilical artery for blood sampling without difficulty when the infant required 100% oxygen to maintain satisfactory arterial oxygen pressure. Femoral pulses and circulation in the lower limbs were normal immediately before and after catheterization. A radiograph, which was taken immediately, showed the tip of the catheter to be at a level between the fourth and fifth sacral vertebrae. The catheter was removed immediately. Circulation and femoral pulses were normal and no blanching of the skin was observed. Another catheter was repositioned and the tip was confirmed radiologically to be in the thoracic aorta between the sixth and

  5. Integration of a capacitive pressure sensing system into the outer catheter wall for coronary artery FFR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stam, Frank; Kuisma, Heikki; Gao, Feng; Saarilahti, Jaakko; Gomes Martins, David; Kärkkäinen, Anu; Marrinan, Brendan; Pintal, Sebastian

    2017-05-01

    The deadliest disease in the world is coronary artery disease (CAD), which is related to a narrowing (stenosis) of blood vessels due to fatty deposits, plaque, on the arterial walls. The level of stenosis in the coronary arteries can be assessed by Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR) measurements. This involves determining the ratio between the maximum achievable blood flow in a diseased coronary artery and the theoretical maximum flow in a normal coronary artery. The blood flow is represented by a pressure drop, thus a pressure wire or pressure sensor integrated in a catheter can be used to calculate the ratio between the coronary pressure distal to the stenosis and the normal coronary pressure. A 2 Fr (0.67mm) outer diameter catheter was used, which required a high level of microelectronics miniaturisation to fit a pressure sensing system into the outer wall. The catheter has an eccentric guidewire lumen with a diameter of 0.43mm, which implies that the thickest catheter wall section provides less than 210 microns height for flex assembly integration consisting of two dies, a capacitive MEMS pressure sensor and an ASIC. In order to achieve this a very thin circuit flex was used, and the two chips were thinned down to 75 microns and flip chip mounted face down on the flex. Many challenges were involved in obtaining a flex layout that could wrap into a small tube without getting the dies damaged, while still maintaining enough flexibility for the catheter to navigate the arterial system.

  6. Bilateral persistent sciatic arteries with unilateral complicating aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Aziz, M E; Yusof, N R N; Abdullah, M S; Yusof, A H; Yusof, M I

    2005-08-01

    Persistent sciatic artery is a very uncommon embryological vascular variant. This case report highlights this rare vascular anomaly, diagnostic difficulty, complication and subsequent treatment in a 43-year-old man who presented with sudden onset of right leg pain for a few hours. He was unable to walk because of pain and numbness. Emergency right lower limb angiogram showed a large aneurysm that was initially thought to arise from the right common femoral artery, associated with thrombus formation within the right popliteal artery. A below knee amputation was performed due to worsening ischaemia of the right leg. The persistent right sciatic artery was later obliterated using percutaneous stenting and endovascular grafting, with deployment of two wallstents.

  7. Hysterectomy for complications after uterine artery embolization for leiomyoma: results of a Canadian multicenter clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Pron, Gaylene; Mocarski, Eva; Cohen, Marsha; Colgan, Terence; Bennett, John; Common, Andrew; Vilos, George; Kung, Rose

    2003-02-01

    To determine the complication-related hysterectomy rate after uterine artery embolization (UAE) for symptomatic uterine leiomyomas. Prospective, multicenter, nonrandomized, single-arm clinical trial (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). Eight Ontario University-affiliated teaching and community hospitals. Five hundred fifty-five women. Polyvinyl alcohol particles were delivered through a catheter into uterine arteries under fluoroscopic guidance. Prospective follow-up investigations consisted of telephone interviews, ultrasound examinations, and reviews of pathology and surgery reports. Median follow-up was 8.1 months, and all but five patients had complete 3-month follow-up. At 3 months, eight women (1.5%, 95% CI 0.6-2.8) underwent complication-related hysterectomy. Half of the surgeries were performed at institutions other than where UAE had been performed. Indications for hysterectomies were infections (2), postembolization pain (4), vaginal bleeding (1), and prolapsed leiomyoma (1). The 3-month complication rate resulting in hysterectomy after UAE in a large cohort of women was low. Hysterectomy after UAE is an important measure of safety and a key outcome measure of this new therapy.

  8. Probe exchange catheter used for angioplasty of total coronary artery occlusions.

    PubMed

    Kiemeneij, F; Suwarganda, J S; van der Wieken, L R

    1990-04-01

    Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) for total occlusions frequently fails, because the guidewire fails to pass the occlusion. With the use of the Probe exchange catheter (PEC), however, stiffness of the guidewire is increased and a higher pushability is obtained in order to manipulate the guidewire beyond the lesion. Once the guidewire has passed, the PEC is advanced and a non-over-the-wire dilatation catheter can be introduced through the PEC. This paper describes the technique in a representative case. The results of this technique in 19 consecutive patients with class III-IV/IV(NYHA) angina due to an occluded coronary artery are presented. In 16 patients the PEC reached the lesion (84%) and in all these patients the guidewire could pass the occlusion. A successful PTCA was performed in 14 patients (74%).

  9. Catheter ablation of arrhythmic storm triggered by monomorphic ectopic beats in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Peichl, Petr; Cihák, Robert; Kozeluhová, Markéta; Wichterle, Dan; Vancura, Vlastimil; Kautzner, Josef

    2010-01-01

    Frequent episodes of polymorphic ventricular tachycardias/ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF) in patients with coronary artery disease can be triggered by monomorphic ventricular premature beats (VPBs) and thus, amenable to catheter ablation. The goal of this study was to review single-center experience in catheter ablation of electrical storm caused by focally triggered polymorphic VT/VF. Catheter ablation of electrical storm due to focally triggered polymorphic VT/VF was performed in nine patients (mean age, 62+/-7 years; two females). All patients had previous myocardial infarction (interval of 3 days to 171 months). Mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 27+/-6 percent. All patients presented with repeated runs of polymorphic VT/VF triggered by monomorphic VPBs. Based on mapping data, the ectopic beats originated from scar border zone on interventricular septum (n=5), inferior wall (n=3), and lateral wall (n=1). Catheter ablation was performed to abolish the triggering ectopy and to modify the arrhythmogenic substrate by linear lesions within the infarct border zone. The ablation procedure was acutely successful in eight out of nine patients. During the follow-up of 13+/-7 months, two patients died due to progressive heart failure. One patient had late recurrence of electrical storm due to ectopic beats of different morphology and was successfully reablated. Electrical storm due to focally triggered polymorphic VT/VF may occur either in subacute phase of myocardial infarction or substantially later after index event. Catheter ablation of ectopic beats triggering these arrhythmias can successfully abolish electrical storm and become a life-saving procedure.

  10. A prospective randomised trial comparing insertion success rate and incidence of catheterisation-related complications for subclavian venous catheterisation using a thin-walled introducer needle or a catheter-over-needle technique.

    PubMed

    Kim, E; Kim, B G; Lim, Y J; Jeon, Y T; Hwang, J W; Kim, H C; Choi, Y H; Park, H P

    2016-09-01

    In clinical practice, both a thin-walled introducer needle and catheter-over-needle technique can be used to allow insertion of a guidewire during central venous catheterisation using the Seldinger technique. We compared the incidence of catheterisation-related complications (arterial puncture, haemothorax, pneumothorax, haematoma and catheter tip malposition) and insertion success rate for these two techniques in patients requiring right-sided subclavian central venous catheterisation. A total of 414 patients requiring infraclavicular subclavian venous catheterisation were randomly allocated to either a thin-walled introducer needle (needle group, n = 208) or catheter-over-needle technique (catheter group, n = 206). The catheterisation-related complication rate was lower in the needle group compared with the catheter group (5.8% vs. 15.5%; p = 0.001). Overall insertion success rates were similar (97.1% and 92.7% in the needle and catheter groups respectively; p = 0.046), although the first-pass success rate was higher in the needle group (62.0% vs. 35.4%; p < 0.001). We recommend the use of a thin-walled introducer needle technique for right-sided infraclavicular subclavian venous catheterisation.

  11. An Extreme Case of CoreValve Bioprosthesis Embolization into the Abdominal Aorta and of the Delivery Catheter Cone into the Right Internal Iliac Artery.

    PubMed

    Alsancak, Yakup; Bilge, Mehmet; Ali, Sina; Duran, Mustafa; Saatci Yasar, Ayse

    2015-11-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a new and hopefully therapeutic option in patients with symptomatic severe calcific aortic valve stenosis and multiple comorbidities who are not eligible for open-heart surgery due to unacceptable conventional surgical risks. Herein is reported the case of a patient who underwent TAVI in whom an unusual CoreValve bioprosthesis embolization occurred into the abdominal aorta. While attempting to retrieve the whole system, the conical tip of the catheter delivery system also became embolized into the right iliac artery. Importantly, this case demonstrated a rare complication of CoreValve bioprosthesis embolization which was managed without surgical intervention. Video 1: Peripheral angiography demonstrating the embolized CoreValve bioprosthesis. Video 2: Fluoroscopy demonstrating completely opened CoreValve bioprosthesis at a level above the iliac artery bifurcation and the mobile conical tip in the valve system. Video 3: Peripheral angiography demonstrating prosthetic valve without any flow limitation and embolized conical tip into the right internal iliac artery. Video 4: Peripheral angiography demonstrating prosthetic valve without any flow limitation and embolized conical tip into the right internal iliac artery. Video 5: Aortography demonstrating the successfully implanted second CoreValve bioprosthesis in an optimal aortic position, with no paravalvular leak. Video 6: Peripheral angiography demonstrating the embolized conical tip into the right iliac artery with a normal external iliac artery flow. Video 7: Peripheral angiography demonstrating the embolized conical tip into the right iliac artery with a normal external iliac artery flow.

  12. Complications of central venous catheter in patients transplanted with hematopoietic stem cells in a specialized service.

    PubMed

    Barretta, Lidiane Miotto; Beccaria, Lúcia Marinilza; Cesarino, Cláudia Bernardi; Pinto, Maria Helena

    2016-06-07

    to identify the model, average length of stay on site and complications of central venous catheter in patients undergoing transplant of hematopoietic stem cells and verify the corresponding relationship between the variables: age, gender, medical diagnosis, type of transplant, implanted catheter and insertion site. a retrospective and quantitative study with a sample of 188 patients transplanted records between 2007 and 2011. the majority of patients used Hickman catheter with an average length of stay on site of 47.6 days. The complication fever/bacteremia was significant in young males with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma undergoing autologous transplant, which remained with the device for a long period in the subclavian vein. nurses should plan with their team the minimum waiting time, recommended between the catheter insertion and start of the conditioning regimen, as well as not to extend the length of time that catheter should be on site and undertake their continuing education, focusing on the prevention of complications. identificar o modelo, tempo médio de permanência e complicações de cateter venoso central em pacientes submetidos ao transplante de células-tronco hematopoiéticas e verificar a relação de correspondência entre as variáveis: idade, sexo, diagnóstico médico, tipo de transplante, cateter implantado e local de inserção. retrospectivo, quantitativo, com amostra de prontuários de 188 pacientes transplantados, entre 2007 e 2011. a maioria dos pacientes utilizou o cateter de Hickman com permanência média de 47,6 dias. A complicação febre/bacteremia foi significante em jovens do sexo masculino, com linfoma não Hodgkin, submetidos ao transplante autólogo, que permaneceram com o dispositivo por longo período, em veia subclávia. os enfermeiros devem planejar com a equipe o aguardo do tempo mínimo preconizado entre o implante do cateter e início do regime de condicionamento, assim como não estender o período de permanência e realizar

  13. Vascular Complications During Catheter Ablation of Cardiac Arrhythmias: A Comparison Between Vascular Ultrasound Guided Access and Conventional Vascular Access.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Parikshit S; Padala, Santosh K; Gunda, Sampath; Koneru, Jayanthi N; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A

    2016-10-01

    Vascular access related complications are the most common complications from catheter based EP procedures and have been reported to occur in 1-13% of cases. We prospectively assessed vascular complications in a large series of consecutive patients undergoing catheter based electrophysiologic (EP) procedures with ultrasound (US) guided vascular access versus conventional access. Consecutive patients undergoing catheter ablation procedures at VCU medical center were included. US guided access was obtained in all cases starting June 2015 (US group) while modified Seldinger technique without US guidance (non-US group) was used in cases prior to this date. All vascular complications were recorded for a 30-day period after the procedure. A total of 689 patients underwent 720 procedures. Ablations for ventricular tachyarrhythmias (ventricular tachycardia: VT, premature ventricular contractions: PVCs) accounted for 89 (12%) cases; atrial fibrillation (AF) ablations accounted for 328 procedures (46%) and other catheter based procedures accounted for 42% of cases. A significantly higher incidence of complications was noted in the non-US group compared with the US group (19 [5.3%] vs. 4 [1.1%], respectively, P = 0.002). Major complications were also higher among the non-US group (9 [2.5%] vs. 2 [0.6%], P = 0.03). Increasing age (P = 0.04) and non-US guided vascular access (P = 0.002) were associated with a higher risk of vascular access complications. In a large series of patients undergoing catheter based EP procedures for cardiac arrhythmias, US guided vascular access was associated with a significantly decreased 30-day risk of vascular complications. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Recanalization of Acute and Subacute Femoropopliteal Artery Occlusions with the Rotarex Catheter: One Year Follow-up, Single Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Duc, Sylvain R. Schoch, Eric; Pfyffer, Markus; Jenelten, Regula; Zollikofer, Christoph L.

    2005-06-15

    Purpose:To assess the efficacy and safety of a new rotational catheter for percutaneous removal of fresh and organized thrombi in the femoropopliteal artery.Methods:Forty-one limbs in 38 patients (age 56-90 years, mean 75.6 years) with acute, subacute or chronic femoropopliteal occlusions of 1-180 days' duration (mean 31.6 days) were treated with the Rotarex device. The Fontaine stage was mainly IIB (Rutherford 2-3, 22 patients) or III (Rutherford 4, 14 patients). The length of occlusion varied from 2 to 35 cm (mean 13.1 cm). After recanalization percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) was performed if there was a residual stenosis of >25%. Patients were followed up with color Doppler ultrasound at 48 hr and clinically with Doppler pressures and oscillometry at 3, 6, and 12 months.Results:After an average of two passages with the Rotarex catheter all but two limbs required PTA for residual stenosis >25%. Five patients needed additional stenting. Major complications were one groin hematoma requiring blood transfusion and one arteriovenous fistula spontaneously thrombosing after unsuccessful primary prolonged balloon dilation. Distal embolizations occurred in 10 patients; 6 clinically relevant emboli were aspirated. All occlusions were technically successfully recanalised there were 2 early reocclusions after 1 day and two at 2 weeks. Brachial-ankle indices improved from an average of 0.41 before to 0.93 after recanalization. Primary and secondary patency rates were 62% / 84% after 6 months and 39% / 68% after 1 year. The amputation-free survival at 12 months was 100%.Conclusion:The Rotarex mechanical thrombectomy device is an efficient, quick, easy to handle, and safe tool for the treatment of acute, subacute or even chronic peripheral arterial thromboembolic occlusions. It can be used for short or long occlusions with equal success, provided the obstruction is not heavily calcified and has been safely passed with a guidewire first.

  15. Hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm; a rare complication of amoebic liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Khan, Anam; Pal, Khawaja Muhammad Inam; Khan, Hussain Ijaz

    2011-08-01

    Hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm (HAP) is an infrequently encountered entity, usually seen secondary to blunt or penetrating trauma. The clinical presentation is often due to complications such as intrahepatic or intraperitoneal bleeding as a result of rupture of the pseudoaneurysm. Diagnosis is frequently delayed and made by splanchnic angiography. HAP associated with a liver abscess, has very rarely been described in the literature. We report the case of a 50-year-old man with amoebic liver abscess and right hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm which was suspected on high resolution contrast-enhanced abdominal computer tomography (CT). The lesion was confirmed by arteriography and treated prophylactically with transcatheteter embolization.

  16. Free floating ventricular shunt catheter between lateral ventricles: a case report of an unusual ventriculoperitoneal shunt complication.

    PubMed

    Erol, Fatih Serhat; Cakin, Hakan; Ozturk, Sait; Donmez, Osman; Kaplan, Metin

    2013-01-01

    Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt proximal tip disconnection is rarely seen as a shunt complication. Shunt dysfunction and hydrocephaly can develop due to this disconnection. Presented here is a case of a disconnection of the ventricular catheter from the shunt valve, which passed between both lateral ventricles by free floating in the brain CT. The patient was operated on for hydrocephaly. The dysfunctional shunt valve and peritoneal catheter were removed and a new VP shunt system was implemented. Although some publications report that the ventricular catheter can be disconnected from the shunt valve, can adhere to the intraventricular structures, and can be a source of infection, no studies similar to the current case were found in the literature reporting a free floating ventricular catheter between the lateral ventricles.

  17. Risk factors for complications in peripheral intravenous catheters in adults: secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial 1

    PubMed Central

    Johann, Derdried Athanasio; Danski, Mitzy Tannia Reichembach; Vayego, Stela Adami; Barbosa, Dulce Aparecida; Lind, Jolline

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: analyze the risk factors linked to complications in peripheral intravenous catheters. Method: secondary data analysis of a randomized controlled trial with 169 medical and surgical patients placed in two groups, one with integrated safety catheter (n=90) and other using simple needle catheter (n=79), with three months follow-up time. Results: the risk factors that raised the odds of developing complications were: hospitalization between 10-19 days (p=0.0483) and 20-29 days (p=0,0098), antimicrobial use (p=0.0288) and use of fluid solutions (p=0.0362). The 20 Gauge lowered the risks of complications (p=0.0153). Multiple analysis showed reduction of risk for the 20 Gauge (p=0.0350); heightened risk for solutions and fluids (p=0.0351) and use of corticosteroids (p=0.0214). Conclusion: risk factors linked to complications in peripheral intravenous catheters were: hospitalization periods between 10-29 days, antimicrobial infusion, solutions and fluids and corticosteroids. Regarding complications, 20 Gauge is a protecting factor compared with 22. Brazilian Clinical Trials Registry: RBR-46ZQR8. PMID:27901218

  18. Recanalization of a Heavily Calcified Chronic Total Occlusion in a Femoropopliteal Artery Using a Wingman Crossing Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Naoto; Tanaka, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    We present a 77-year-old female with heavily calcified chronic total occlusions (CTO) in a superficial femoral artery treated by endovascular therapy using a Wingman crossing catheter, which is an over-the-wire catheter with a metallic blade, controlled manually. The blade could probe and track the calcified cap of CTO, wherein any hydrophilic guidewires or looped wires could not penetrate. Moreover, the Wingman could proceed through the occlusion and introduce a guidewire into distal intramedial lumen as a support catheter. Finally, wire crossing was achieved using a bi-directional approach. The Wingman can be a simple solution for crossing calcified peripheral CTO. PMID:27375810

  19. Safety and efficacy of the frontrunner XP catheter for recanalization of chronic total occlusion of the femoropopliteal arteries.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Ranjan; Vivek, G; Thakkar, Ashok; Prasad, Rajaram; Pai, Umesh; Nayak, Krishnananda

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the safety and efficacy of the Frontrunner XP CTO (chronic total occlusion) catheter (Cordis Corporation) for recanalization of CTO of femoropopliteal arteries. A retrospective analysis of consecutive patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI) who underwent femoropopliteal angioplasty for TransAtlantic Inter-Society Consensus (TASC) class D lesions between 2009 and 2011 was performed. Twenty-two patients were enrolled with a mean age of 58.9 ± 11.5 years. Patients were enrolled with totally occluded arteries (mean occlusion length, 18.0 ± 10.1 cm) that were treated with the Frontrunner XP CTO catheter. All lesions were complex (TASC D) and 86.4% of the lesions were mildly calcified. A Frontrunner catheter was used to treat 22 CTOs after guidewire failure. Twenty-two of the 33 cases (66.7%) had failed previous attempts of percutaneous intervention with conventional guidewire. The Frontrunner catheter was used to treat 22 CTOs after guidewire failure. The Frontrunner catheter successfully facilitated the placement of a guidewire into the distal true lumen in 21 cases (95.5%). Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction 3 flow was achieved in all target vessels after further balloon angioplasty or stenting. The Frontrunner XP CTO catheter is safe and effective for successful recanalization of CTO of femoropopliteal arteries and it should be an alternative method after guidewire failure.

  20. Pulmonary Artery Versus Central Venous Catheter Monitoring in the Outcome of Patients Undergoing Bilateral Total Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    YaDeau, Jacques T.; Urban, Michael K.

    2008-01-01

    Bilateral total knee replacement (BTKR) has been associated with a higher incidence of fat embolism (FES) compared to single knee replacement. Consequently, intraoperative monitoring with a pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) has been recommended. This study compares clinical outcome in BTKR patients monitored with central venous pressure versus PAC. A retrospective chart review of 249 consecutive patients undergoing BTKR, 132 of whom had PAC insertion versus 117 who had central line insertion, over a 1-year period were included in the study. Their medical records were reviewed for co-morbidities, baseline characteristics, and type of intraoperative monitoring. Need and duration for postoperative monitoring in the postoperative care, length of hospital stay (LOHS), signs of fat embolism, development of arrhythmias, and respiratory failure were all outcome measures. A total of four patients (1.6%) had FES as per Schonfeld criteria. One of these patients died within 48 h of surgery. They all had PAC monitoring intraoperatively. Pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) remained unchanged during surgery which raises doubt as to the clinical utility and advisability of the use of PAC’s in this setting. There was no statistically significant difference in cardiac or pulmonary complications, or LOHS between the two groups. Central venous pressure monitoring appears to be sufficient in patients undergoing BTKR. PMID:19002531

  1. Description of a new non-injectable connector to reduce the complications of arterial blood sampling.

    PubMed

    Mariyaselvam, M Z; Heij, R E; Laba, D; Richardson, J A; Hodges, E J; Maduakor, C A; Carter, J J; Young, P J

    2015-01-01

    Arterial cannulation is associated with complications including bacterial contamination, accidental intra-arterial injection and blood spillage. We performed a series of audits and experiments to gauge the potential for these, as well as assess the possible contribution of a new device, the Needle-Free Arterial Non-Injectable Connector (NIC), in reducing these risks. The NIC comprises a needle-free connector that prevents blood spillage and a one-way valve allowing aspiration only; once screwed onto the side port of a three-way tap, the device can only be removed with difficulty. We performed a clinical audit of arterial monitoring systems in our intensive care unit, which showed an incidence of bacterial colonisation of five in 86 (6%) three-way tap ports. We constructed a manikin simulation experiment of the management of acute bradycardia, in which trainee doctors were required to inject atropine intravenously. Ten of 15 (66%) doctors injected the drug into the three-way tap of the arterial monitoring system rather than into the intravenous cannula or the central venous catheter. In a laboratory study, we replicated the arterial blood sampling and flushing sequence from a three-way tap, with the syringes attached either directly to the three-way tap port or to a NIC attached to the port. The first (discard) syringe attached to the three-way tap was contaminated with bacteria. Bacterial growth was found in 17 of 20 (85%) downstream flushed samples (corresponding to the patient's circulation) when the three-way tap was accessed directly, compared to none of 20 accessed via the NIC (p < 0.0001). Growth was found on all of 20 (100%) ports accessed directly compared to none of 20 accessed via the NIC (p < 0.0001). The NIC effectively prevents bacteria from contaminating sampling lines. As its design also prevents accidental intra-arterial injection, we suggest that it can reduce complications of arterial monitoring. © 2014 The Association of Anaesthetists of

  2. Reconstructing single hepatic artery with two arterial stumps: biliary complications in pediatric living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Julka, Karan D; Lin, Tsan-Shiun; Chen, Chao-Long; Wang, Chih-Chi; Komorowski, Andrzej L

    2014-01-01

    Liver grafts can at times have two hepatic arterial stumps. This can result in a dilemma whether to reconstruct single or both the arteries. Hepatic artery (HA) thrombosis is the most dreaded complication in pediatric living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) as it can result in biliary complications and subsequent graft loss. We herein report the feasibility of reconstructing single hepatic artery in pediatric living donor liver transplantation having two arterial stumps in the liver graft. From 2008 to 2010, 87 pediatric patients undergoing LDLT were divided into three groups. Group 1 (n = 20): two HA stumps with two HA reconstruction, Group 2 (n = 22): two HA stumps with one HA reconstruction and Group 3 (n = 45): one HA stump with one HA reconstruction. The decision regarding the reconstruction of single or multiple HAs was made depending on the pre-operative radiological and intraoperative assessments. The incidence of HA thrombosis (p = 0.126) and biliary complications (p = 0.617), was similar in the three groups. Single HA reconstruction does not increase the risk of biliary strictures in pediatric LDLT recipients having dual hepatic arterial stumps in the liver graft.

  3. Pulmonary complications of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nhu, Quan M; Knowles, Harry; Pockros, Paul J; Frenette, Catherine T

    2016-01-01

    Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is an effective palliative intervention that is widely accepted for the management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Post-TACE pulmonary complications resulting in acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are rare events. Pulmonary complications after TACE are thought to be related to chemical injury subsequent to the migration of the infused ethiodized oil or chemotherapeutic agent to the lung vasculature, facilitated by arteriovenous (AV) shunts within the hyper-vascular HCC. We review herein the literature on pulmonary complications related to TACE for HCC. Post-TACE pulmonary complications have included pulmonary oil embolism, interstitial pneumonitis, chemical pneumonitis, ALI, ARDS, lipoid pneumonia, acute eosinophilic and neutrophilic pneumonia, bilious pleuritis, pulmonary abscess, pulmonary tumor embolism, and possibly pulmonary metastasis with HCC. The risk factors associated with post-TACE pulmonary complications identified in the literature include large hyper-vascular HCC with AV shunts, large-volume Lipiodol infusion, and embolization via the right inferior phrenic artery. However, the absence of known risk factors is not a guarantee against serious complications. An astute awareness of the potential post-TACE pulmonary complications should expedite appropriate therapeutic interventions and increase potential for early recovery. PMID:27904836

  4. Association of physical examination with pulmonary artery catheter parameters in acute lung injury*

    PubMed Central

    Grissom, Colin K.; Morris, Alan H.; Lanken, Paul N.; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Orme, James F.; Schoenfeld, David A.; Thompson, B. Taylor

    2016-01-01

    Objective To correlate physical examination findings, central venous pressure, fluid output, and central venous oxygen saturation with pulmonary artery catheter parameters. Design Retrospective study. Setting Data from the multicenter Fluid and Catheter Treatment Trial of the National Institutes of Health Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network. Patients Five hundred thirteen patients with acute lung injury randomized to treatment with a pulmonary artery catheter. Interventions Correlation of physical examination findings (capillary refill time >2 secs, knee mottling, or cool extremities), central venous pressure, fluid output, and central venous oxygen saturation with parameters from a pulmonary artery catheter. Measurements We determined association of baseline physical examination findings and on-study parameters of central venous pressure and central venous oxygen saturation with cardiac index <2.5 L/min/m2 and mixed venous oxygen saturation <60%. We determined correlation of baseline central venous oxygen saturation and mixed venous oxygen saturation and predictive value of a low central venous oxygen saturation for a low mixed venous oxygen saturation. Measurements and Main Results Prevalence of cardiac index <2.5 and mixed venous oxygen saturation <60% was 8.1% and 15.5%, respectively. Baseline presence of all three physical examination findings had low sensitivity (12% and 8%), high specificity (98% and 99%), low positive predictive value (40% and 56%), but high negative predictive value (93% and 86%) for cardiac index <2.5 and mixed venous oxygen saturation <60%, respectively. Central venous oxygen saturation <70% predicted a mixed venous oxygen saturation <60% with a sensitivity 84%, specificity 70%, positive predictive value 31%, and negative predictive value of 96%. Low cardiac index correlated with cool extremities, high central venous pressure, and low 24-hr fluid output; and low mixed venous oxygen saturation correlated with knee mottling and

  5. Association of physical examination with pulmonary artery catheter parameters in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Grissom, Colin K; Morris, Alan H; Lanken, Paul N; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Orme, James F; Schoenfeld, David A; Thompson, B Taylor

    2009-10-01

    To correlate physical examination findings, central venous pressure, fluid output, and central venous oxygen saturation with pulmonary artery catheter parameters. Retrospective study. Data from the multicenter Fluid and Catheter Treatment Trial of the National Institutes of Health Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network. Five hundred thirteen patients with acute lung injury randomized to treatment with a pulmonary artery catheter. Correlation of physical examination findings (capillary refill time >2 secs, knee mottling, or cool extremities), central venous pressure, fluid output, and central venous oxygen saturation with parameters from a pulmonary artery catheter. We determined association of baseline physical examination findings and on-study parameters of central venous pressure and central venous oxygen saturation with cardiac index <2.5 L/min/m2 and mixed venous oxygen saturation <60%. We determined correlation of baseline central venous oxygen saturation and mixed venous oxygen saturation and predictive value of a low central venous oxygen saturation for a low mixed venous oxygen saturation. Prevalence of cardiac index <2.5 and mixed venous oxygen saturation <60% was 8.1% and 15.5%, respectively. Baseline presence of all three physical examination findings had low sensitivity (12% and 8%), high specificity (98% and 99%), low positive predictive value (40% and 56%), but high negative predictive value (93% and 86%) for cardiac index <2.5 and mixed venous oxygen saturation <60%, respectively. Central venous oxygen saturation <70% predicted a mixed venous oxygen saturation <60% with a sensitivity 84%,specificity 70%, positive predictive value 31%, and negative predictive value of 96%. Low cardiac index correlated with cool extremities, high central venous pressure, and low 24-hr fluid output; and low mixed venous oxygen saturation correlated with knee mottling and high central venous pressure, but these correlations were not found to be clinically useful. In

  6. Effect of isoflavone on balloon catheter-induced neointimal hyperplasia in ovariectomised rabbit carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gai-Ying; Qiu, Ren-Feng; Sun, Ying-Chun; Wang, Le-Xin

    2013-02-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of phytoestrogen isoflavone on balloon catheter-induced hyperplasia of carotid artery. Forty-eight female New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into four groups: control (balloon-induced carotid artery injury only); ovariectomy control (ovariectomy and carotid artery injury), oestrogen (ovariectomy, carotid artery injury and nilestriol, 5mg/kg daily for 28 days), and isoflavone (ovariectomy, carotid artery injury and isoflavone 120 mg/kg daily for 28 days). The arterial wall thickness was assessed by coloured ultrasonography, and the oestrogen-α and oestrogen-β receptors in the abdominal aorta were measured by Western blotting. The medial layer thickness in the isoflavone group was less than in the ovariectomy control group (0.28±0.03 vs. 0.35±0.04 mm, p<0.01), and the intimal/medial layer (I/M) ratio is the isoflavone group was also less than in the ovariectomy control group (16.85±3.79 vs. 48.94±8.92, p<0.01). There was no statistically significant difference in the medial layer thickness or I/M ratio between the isoflavone and the oestrogen groups. The optical density of the oestrogen-α receptors in the isoflavone group (0.317±0.002) was less than in the oestrogen (0.633±0.002) or ovariectomy control group (0.590±0.001, p<0.01). The optical density of the oestrogen-β receptors in the isoflavone group (1.350±0.002) and the ovariectomy control group (1.2033±0.002) was less than in the oestrogen group (1.7699±0.003, p<0.01). Isoflavone therapy in the ovariectomised rabbit model attenuated balloon catheter-induced intimal and medial layer hyperplasia in the carotid arteries. Down-regulation of the oestrogen-α receptors may be involved in the hyperplasia-preventative effect. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. [Complications in reconstructive procedures on arteries in the lower extremities].

    PubMed

    Radak, D; Rosato, E; Cyba-Altunbay, S

    1990-01-01

    During a year (1987/88) a study was performed at he Clinic of Thoracal and Vascular Surgery, supervised by Prof. dr J. Vollmar. Analysis of all cases with complications after reconstruction of the lower limbs arteries necessitating reoperation was performed. There were 56 patients in all. They were retrospectively analysed for establishing risk factors, clinical stage (by Fonstine), and time lapse from the surgery to the occurrence of complications. There were 12(21,4%), 23 (41,1%) and 21 (37,5%) of immediate, early and late complications, respectively. The following causes of complications following reconstruction of the lower limbs arteries were recorded: graft trombosis (41,1%), pseudoaneurism of anastomosis (17,8%), progressive arteriosclerosis (12,7%), proximally or distally to the operated segment. The following reoperations were applied: graft prolongation due to distal occlusion (35,7%), desobstruction of the graft and patch plasty (21,2%), partial or total replacement of the graft (17,9%), correction of the supplying vascular tree (7,1%). More than one reoperation were performed in 22 cases (39,2%) and amputation of the limb was necessitated in 4 (7,1%) cases.

  8. Complications and Follow-up after Unprotected Carotid Artery Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Hauth, Elke A.M. Drescher, Robert; Jansen, Christian; Gissler, H. Martin; Schwarz, Michael; Forsting, Michael; Jaeger, Horst J.; Mathias, Klaus D.

    2006-08-15

    Purpose. This prospective study was undertaken to determine the success rate, complications, and outcome of carotid artery stenting (CAS) without the use of cerebral protection devices. Methods. During 12 months, 94 high-grade stenoses of the carotid artery in 91 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-six (70%) of the stenoses were symptomatic and 28 (30%) were asymptomatic. Results. In all 94 carotid stenoses CAS was successfully performed. During the procedure and within the 30 days afterwards, there were 2 deaths and 3 major strokes in the 66 symptomatic patients, resulting in a combined death and stroke rate of 5 of 66 (7%). Only one of these complications, a major stroke, occurred during the procedure. In the 6-month follow-up, one additional major stroke occurred in a originally symptomatic patient resulting in a combined death and stroke rate of 6 of 66 (10%) for symptomatic patients at 6 months. No major complications occurred in asymptomatic patients during the procedure or in the 6-month follow-up period. At 6 months angiographic follow-up the restenosis rate with a degree of >50% was 3 of 49 (6%) and the rate with a degree of {>=}70% was 1 of 49 (2%). Conclusions. Cerebral embolization during CAS is not the only cause of the stroke and death rate associated with the procedure. The use of cerebral protection devices during the procedure may therefore not prevent all major complications following CAS.

  9. Non-central peripherally inserted central catheters in neonatal intensive care: complication rates and longevity of catheters relative to tip position.

    PubMed

    Goldwasser, Bernard; Baia, Catalina; Kim, Mimi; Taragin, Benjamin H; Angert, Robert M

    2017-08-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) represent a mainstay of intravascular access in the neonatal intensive care setting when long-term vascular access is needed. Ideally, PICCs should be inserted and maintained in a central position with the tip ending in the superior or inferior vena cava. This is not always achievable, and sometimes the tip remains in a peripheral location. Higher complication rates have been reported with non-central PICCs; however these findings have not been confirmed in a solely neonatal series and PICCs with tips in peripheral veins have not been studied. To compare complication rates and length of catheter duration related to PICC position in neonates. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all PICCs inserted in term and preterm infants in a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit between May 2007 and December 2009. A single pediatric radiologist reinterpreted the catheter tip site on initial anteroposterior (AP) chest radiographs and categorized sites as central (superior vena cava, inferior vena cava, brachiocephalic vein), intermediate (subclavian, axillary, common or external iliac veins), or peripheral (veins peripheral to axillary or external iliac veins). We analyzed complication rates and length of catheter duration among the three categories. We collected data on a total of 176 PICCs. Infants with PICCs in a central location had a significantly lower complication rate (18/97, 19%) than those with the PICC tip in an intermediate (24/64, 38%) or peripheral (9/15, 60%) locations (P=0.0003). Length of catheter duration was noted to be longest with central, intermediate with intermediate, and shortest with peripheral PICC tip locations (17.7±14.8 days for central vs. 11.4±10.7 days for intermediate vs. 5.4±2.5 days for peripheral, P=0.0003). A central location is ideal for the tip of a PICC. When this is not achievable, an intermediate location is preferable to a more peripheral position.

  10. OUTBACK catheter for treatment of superficial femoral and iliac artery chronic total occlusion: Experience from two centers

    PubMed Central

    Husainy, Mohammad Ali; Suresh, Balla; Fang, Cheng; Ammar, Thoraya; Botchu, Rajesh; Thava, V

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The OUTBACK® catheter is a reentry device that enables reentry into a vessel lumen from the subintimal space during subintimal angioplasty. It is reserved for cases where reentry has not been possible using conventional wire and catheter techniques. We report a two-center experience in recanalization of the chronic total occlusions of the common iliac (CIA) and the superficial femoral artery (SFA) using the OUTBACK® catheter in cases where other techniques were unsuccessful. Material and Methods: All cases where recanalization was performed using the OUTBACK® reentry catheter between January 2010 to January 2015 were retrospectively identified and included in this study. 21 patients were identified. The indication for intervention in these cases included claudication and critical leg ischemia. In all cases, conventional recanalization could not be successfully achieved. Results: The OUTBACK® catheter was used to recanalize 10 SFA occlusion and 9 CIA occlusions. In 19 patients (90%), reentry into true arterial lumen was successfully achieved. 17 patients had their recanalization through the transfemoral approach whereas 2 patients had a transpopliteal artery approach. In 2 patients, reentry into the true lumen could not be achieved using the OUTBACK® catheter due to patient's intolerability for the procedure and severe atherosclerotic calcified plaques. There was 100% patency of the vessel intervened on Duplex ultrasound at 24 months of follow up. 16 patients (84%) remained asymptomatic and 2 patients (10.5%) reported worsening of their symptoms due to the development of new lesions within the arterial system. Conclusion: The OUTBACK® catheter is an effective and safe technique for reentry into the vessel lumen when conventional techniques fail. PMID:27413275

  11. Induction of kinin B1 receptor-dependent vasoconstriction following balloon catheter injury to the rabbit carotid artery.

    PubMed Central

    Pruneau, D.; Luccarini, J. M.; Robert, C.; Bélichard, P.

    1994-01-01

    1. Balloon catheter injury to the rabbit carotid artery damaged the endothelium and induced neointima formation over 7 days. The area of intima, expressed as a percentage of the media, was 16.2 +/- 4.2% and 8.2 +/- 0.1% in balloon catheter-injured and sham-operated arteries. 2. Seven days after arterial injury, carotid arteries were isolated and set up as ring preparations in organ baths for isometric tension measurements. Balloon catheter-injured arteries first contracted with noradrenaline (0.01-0.1 microM), contracted further in a concentration-dependent manner to bradykinin (BK; pD2, 5.98 +/- 0.22; Emax, 41.3 +/- 5.2% of KCl) and to des-Arg9-BK (pD2, 7.12 +/- 0.36; Emax, 46.0 +/- 9.9% of KCl). In contrast, vessel segments with endothelium either intact or acutely removed were unresponsive to both BK receptor agonists. 3. The concentration-contraction curves for BK and for des-Arg9-BK were shifted to the right by the B1 receptor antagonist, [Leu8]des-Arg9-BK (3 microM), but not by the selective B2 receptor antagonist, Hoe 140 (1 microM). 4. Thus, BK and its metabolite, des-Arg9-BK act as vasoconstrictor agents following balloon catheter injury. These effects appear to be mediated by activation of B1 receptors. Images Figure 4 PMID:8032586

  12. Prospective randomized trial comparing pushable coil and detachable coil during percutaneous implantation of port-catheter system for hepatic artery infusion chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Ii; Lee, Shin Jae; Lee, Myungsu; Lee, Mu Sook; Kim, Gyoung Min; Kim, Man Deuk; Won, Jong Yun; Lee, Do Yun

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively compare the efficacy and controllability of pushable coil and detachable coil during embolization of gastroduodenal artery (GDA) while performing percutaneous implantation of port-catheter system for hepatic artery infusion chemotherapy. Fifty patients (M:F = 42:8, age: 31-81 years) with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma undergoing port-catheter system implantation were randomized into pushable coil group and detachable coil group. During catheter fixation, GDA was embolized as close to the origin as possible. Success rate, number of coils used, number of coils removed due to malposition after deployment, time to occlusion, uncoiled GDA length, pushability, and complications were compared. Pushability was graded as no tension, slight tension, and difficult to advance. Embolization was successful in 49 patients. One failure resulted from repeated regurgitation of pushable coil into hepatic artery. Number of coils used and removed coils, time to occlusion, and uncoiled GDA length were 1-3 (mean 2.32), 5 coils in 3 patients, 4-20 min (mean 8.00), and 0-15.0 mm (mean 3.36) in pushable coil group, and 1-5 (mean 2.12), 2 coils in 2 patients, 2-15 min (mean 7.40), and 0-10.2 mm (mean 2.92) in detachable coil group, respectively, without significant difference. Pushability was no tension (n = 24) and slight tension (n = 1) in pushable coil group and no tension (n = 16), slight tension (n = 7), and difficult to advance (n = 2) in detachable coil group. One hepatic artery dissection occurred in the failed case during coil removal. Pushable coils and detachable coils had similar efficacy and controllability during GDA embolization, although there was a trend favoring detachable coil.

  13. Measurement of pleural pressure swings with a fluid-filled esophageal catheter vs pulmonary artery occlusion pressure.

    PubMed

    Verscheure, S; Massion, P B; Gottfried, S; Goldberg, P; Samy, L; Damas, P; Magder, S

    2017-02-01

    Pleural pressure measured with esophageal balloon catheters (Peso) can guide ventilator management and help with the interpretation of hemodynamic measurements, but these catheters are not readily available or easy to use. We tested the utility of an inexpensive, fluid-filled esophageal catheter (Peso) by comparing respiratory-induced changes in pulmonary artery occlusion (Ppao), central venous (CVP), and Peso pressures. We studied 30 patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery who had pulmonary artery and esophageal catheters in place. Proper placement was confirmed by chest compression with airway occlusion. Measurements were made during pressure-regulated volume control (VC) and pressure support (PS) ventilation. The fluid-filled esophageal catheter provided a high-quality signal. During VC and PS, change in Ppao (∆Ppao) was greater than ∆Peso (bias = -2 mm Hg) indicating an inspiratory increase in cardiac filling. During VC, ∆CVP bias was 0 indicating no change in right heart filling, but during PS, CVP fell less than Peso indicating an inspiratory increase in filling. Peso measurements detected activation of expiratory muscles, development of non-west zone 3 lung conditions during inspiration, and ventilator-triggered inspiratory efforts. A fluid-filled esophageal catheter provides a high-quality, easily accessible, and inexpensive measure of change in pleural pressure and provided insights into patient-ventilator interactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Measurement of minimum disposable volume in the extraction of an analysis through an arterial catheter].

    PubMed

    Arias Rivera, Susana; Conde Alonso, Pilar; Sánchez Izquierdo, Raquel; García Granell, Carmen; Martín de la Torre Pérez-Cejuela, José Antonio; Ortega Castro, M Elena; Berlanga, M Luz; Pascual Durán, Tomás; Oña Compari, Francisca; de la Cal, Miguel Angel

    2004-01-01

    Arterial catheters are used to extract blood samples. To maintain its permeability we use heparin solution, which may contaminate and alter the desired results. Our aim was to determine the volume of the minimum discards during blood extractions to avoid results that might be altered in the analysis of biochemistry. A prospective study was carried out in 18 beds intensive care unit. Patients with arterial catheter (Seldicath) were included, maintaining 500 UI of heparin in saline of 500 ml, at a pressure of 300 mmHg through pressurizer (Tycos). The dead space (DS) in the radial arterial system is 0.8 ml and 1 ml in the femoral. We analyzed the reliability of different discards comparing the following: 3 ml + DS, 7.5 ml + DS, 12 ml + DS and 16.5 ml + DS. The statistical analysis was carried out through ANOVA and t Student. In biochemistry, significant differences were not found except for potasium (p< 0.001) with 3 ml+DS during control, although it is not clinically relevant [difference through = 0.1 mEq/l (DS 0.2)]. Significant differences in prothrombina (p = 0.004) were found in coagulation, comparing 3 ml+DS and 16.5 ml + DS and in cefaline, comparing 7.5 ml + DS (p< 0.0001) and 16.5 ml + DS. There were not significant differences in the studies of gases. Our study shows that to reach a reliable analytical results, it is not necessary to discard more than 3 ml+DS in biochemistry and in blood gases, and to determine cefalina time would necessary to discard a minimum of 7.5 ml+DS.

  15. Mechanical Recanalization of Subacute Vessel Occlusion in Peripheral Arterial Disease with a Directional Atherectomy Catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Massmann, Alexander Katoh, Marcus; Shayesteh-Kheslat, Roushanak; Buecker, Arno

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively examine the technical feasibility and safety of directional atherectomy for treatment of subacute infrainguinal arterial vessel occlusions. Methods: Five patients (one woman, four men, age range 51-81 years) with peripheral arterial disease who experienced sudden worsening of their peripheral arterial disease-related symptoms during the last 2-6 weeks underwent digital subtraction angiography, which revealed vessel occlusion in native popliteal artery (n = 4) and in-stent occlusion of the superficial femoral artery (n = 1). Subsequently, all patients were treated by atherectomy with the SilverHawk (ev3 Endovascular, USA) device. Results: The mean diameter of treated vessels was 5.1 {+-} 1.0 mm. The length of the occlusion ranged 2-14 cm. The primary technical success rate was 100%. One patient experienced a reocclusion during hospitalization due to heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. There were no further periprocedural complications, in particular no peripheral embolizations, until hospital discharge or during the follow-up period of 1 year. Conclusion: The recanalization of infrainguinal arterial vessel occlusions by atherectomy with the SilverHawk device is technically feasible and safe. In our limited retrospective study, it was associated with a high technical success rate and a low procedure-related complication rate.

  16. Devices and dressings to secure peripheral venous catheters to prevent complications.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Nicole; Webster, Joan; Mihala, Gabor; Rickard, Claire M

    2015-06-12

    A peripheral venous catheter (PVC) is typically used for short-term delivery of intravascular fluids and medications. It is an essential element of modern medicine and the most frequent invasive procedure performed in hospitals. However, PVCs often fail before intravenous treatment is completed: this can occur because the device is not adequately attached to the skin, allowing the PVC to fall out, leading to complications such as phlebitis (irritation or inflammation to the vein wall), infiltration (fluid leaking into surrounding tissues) or occlusion (blockage). An inadequately secured PVC also increases the risk of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI), as the pistoning action (moving back and forth in the vein) of the catheter can allow migration of organisms along the catheter and into the bloodstream. Despite the many dressings and securement devices available, the impact of different securement techniques for increasing PVC dwell time is still unclear; there is a need to provide guidance for clinicians by reviewing current studies systematically. To assess the effects of PVC dressings and securement devices on the incidence of PVC failure. We searched the following electronic databases to identify reports of relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs): the Cochrane Wounds Group Register (searched 08 April 2015): The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015, Issue 3), Ovid MEDLINE (1946 to March 7 2015); Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, March 7 2015); Ovid EMBASE (1974 to March 7 2015); and EBSCO CINAHL (1982 to March 8 2015). RCTs or cluster RCTs comparing different dressings or securement devices for the stabilisation of PVCs. Cross-over trials were ineligible for inclusion, unless data for the first treatment period could be obtained. Two review authors independently selected studies, assessed trial quality and extracted data. We contacted study authors for missing information. We used standard

  17. Spontaneous arterial hemorrhage as a complication of dengue

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shoma Vinay; Jacob, Gijoe George; Raju, Nithin Abraham; Ancheri, Sneha Ann

    2016-01-01

    Bleeding complications of dengue hemorrhagic fever such as epistaxis, gum bleeding, gastrointestinal bleeding, hypermenorrhea, hematuria, and thrombocytopenia have been documented. A 49-year-old female presented with complaints of intermittent high-grade fever for the past 4 days, lower abdominal pain and altered sensorium for 1 day. Laboratory investigations revealed severe anemia, mild thrombocytopenia, hypofibrinogenemia, and positive dengue serology. Emergency ultrasound examination of the abdomen revealed a possible rapidly expanding hematoma from the inferior epigastric artery and suggested urgent computed tomography (CT) angiogram for confirmation of the same. CT angiogram was confirmatory, and patient underwent emergency embolization of the right inferior epigastric artery. We report the first case of inferior epigastric hemorrhage and rectus sheath hematoma as a consequence of dengue. PMID:27275081

  18. Forced arterial suction thrombectomy with the penumbra reperfusion catheter in acute basilar artery occlusion: a retrospective comparison study in 2 Korean university hospitals.

    PubMed

    Eom, Y-I; Hwang, Y-H; Hong, J M; Choi, J W; Lim, Y C; Kang, D-H; Kim, Y-W; Kim, Y-S; Kim, S Y; Lee, J S

    2014-12-01

    A performance of forced arterial suction thrombectomy was not reported for the treatment of acute basilar artery occlusion. This study compared revascularization performance between intra-arterial fibrinolytic treatment and forced arterial suction thrombectomy with a Penumbra reperfusion catheter in patients with acute basilar artery occlusion. Fifty-seven patients with acute basilar artery occlusion were treated with intra-arterial fibrinolysis (n = 25) or forced arterial suction thrombectomy (n = 32). Baseline characteristics, successful revascularization rate, and clinical outcomes were compared between the groups. Baseline characteristics, the frequency of patients receiving intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, and mean time interval between symptom onset and femoral puncture did not differ between groups. The forced arterial suction thrombectomy group had a shorter procedure duration (75.5 minutes versus 113.3 minutes, P = .016) and higher successful revascularization rate (88% versus 60%, P = .017) than the fibrinolysis group. Fair outcome, indicated by a modified Rankin Scale 0-3, at 3 months was achieved in 34% of patients undergoing forced arterial suction thrombectomy and 8% of patients undergoing fibrinolysis (P = .019), and the mortality rate was significantly higher in the fibrinolysis group (25% versus 68%, P = .001). Multiple logistic regression analysis identified the forced arterial suction thrombectomy method as an independent predictor of fair outcome with adjustment for age, sex, initial NIHSS score, and the use of intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (odds ratio, 7.768; 95% CI, 1.246-48.416; P = .028). In acute basilar artery occlusion, forced arterial suction thrombectomy demonstrated a higher revascularization rate and improved clinical outcome compared with traditional intra-arterial fibrinolysis. Further clinical trials with the newer Penumbra catheter are warranted. © 2014 by American Journal of

  19. Endovascular repair of iliac artery injury complicating lumbar disc surgery

    PubMed Central

    Raja, J.; McFarland, R.; Belli, A. M.

    2007-01-01

    Vascular injury as a complication of disc surgery was first reported in 1945 by Linton and White. It is a rare but potentially fatal complication. The high mortality rate (40–100%) is attributed to a combination of rapid blood loss and the failure to recognise the cause of the deteriorating patient. Early diagnosis and treatment is essential. Treatment has traditionally been by open vascular surgical repair, however with modern imaging and endovascular techniques, minimally invasive treatment should be considered first line in patients who are stable. We present the case of a 51-year-old woman who sustained common iliac artery injury during lumbar spinal surgery that was treated successfully using a covered stent. PMID:17712578

  20. Late coronary complications after arterial switch operation and their treatment.

    PubMed

    El-Segaier, Milad; Lundin, Anders; Hochbergs, Peter; Jögi, Peeter; Pesonen, Erkki

    2010-12-01

    To report the late coronary complications and their treatment after arterial switch operation (ASO). Asymptomatic patients after ASO may have coronary ostial stenosis or obstruction. Since 1980, 279 patients were operated with ASO. At the time of preparing this article, selective follow-up coronary angiograms were done on 81 patients. Coronary stenosis was found in six patients. A 6-year-old patient with left coronary artery (LCA) ostial stenosis and a 9-year-old patient with conus branch occlusion had good collaterals without a need for further treatment. One patient with LCA obstruction, myocardial infarction, and left ventricular failure was operated with osteoplasty at age of 16 years. In three essentially asymptomatic patients, stenting of LCA ostium stenosis was done: in two of them with drug-eluting stents at 9 and 10 years of age and in one with bare-metal stent at 18 years of age. One of these patients was earlier treated with balloon dilatation at 5 years of age which caused intimal dissection. Asymptomatic patients with an uneventful course after ASO may have coronary obstruction. This necessitates follow-up coronary evaluation in all patients. Stenting of the coronary arteries is an option for treatment. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Guidelines for the prevention of central venous catheter-related blood stream infections with prostanoid therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Doran, A K; Ivy, D D; Barst, R J; Hill, N; Murali, S; Benza, R L

    2008-07-01

    Intravenous prostanoids are the backbone of therapy for advanced pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and have improved long-term outcome and quality of life. Currently, two prostanoids are approved by the US Food and Drug administration for parenteral administration: epoprostenol (Flolan) and treprostinil (Remodulin). Chronic intravenous therapy presents considerable challenges for patients and caregivers who must learn sterile preparation of the medication, operation of the pump, and care of the central venous catheter. Patients are routinely counseled and advised regarding the risks of CR-BSIs and catheter care before central line insertion. Central line infections as well as bacteremia are well documented risks of chronic intravenous therapy and may significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality. Recent reports have suggested a possible increase in CR-BSI; therefore, the Scientific Leadership Council of the Pulmonary Hypertension Association decided to provide guidelines for good clinical practice regarding catheter care. Although data exits regarding patients with central venous catheters and the risk of blood stream infections in patients with cancer or other disorders, there is little data regarding the special needs of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension requiring central venous access. These guidelines are extrapolated from the diverse body of literature regarding central venous catheter care.

  2. Andreas Grüntzig's balloon catheter for angioplasty of peripheral arteries (PTA) is 25 years old.

    PubMed

    Bollinger, A; Schlumpf, M

    1999-02-01

    History of Andreas Grüntzig's time spent in Angiology and Radiology of the Zürich University Hospital (1969-1975). First, the pioneer of catheter therapy discovered that the Achilles tendon reflex is significantly prolonged during claudication pain. Furthermore, he participated actively in the clinical evaluation of Doppler ultrasound. After a stay in the Aggertalklinik (Engelskirchen near Köln, Germany), where he learnt Charles Dotter's original procedure with Eberhard Zeitler, he introduced catheter therapy of peripheral arteries in Zürich. In the same period he developed a new, rigid, sausage-shaped balloon catheter (polyvinylchloride), manufactured the device on his kitchen table together with his wife Michaela, Maria and Walter Schlumpf, and used it first on February 12, 1974 in a patient with intermittent claudication due to subtotal stenosis of the superficial femoral artery. The first successful dilatation of an iliac artery stenosis by his double-lumen catheter, which was modified later on into the famous coronary catheter, followed on January 23, 1975. Soon, the innovative catheter became commercially available (Cook and Schneider Companies). Andreas Grüntzig not only excelled in pioneering novel techniques, but also in patient care, in a prospective follow-up study of his own 242 patients lasting 15 years (results summarized in this article), in the teaching of Swiss scholars like Felix Mahler, Ernst Schneider and Bernhard Meier and many more in the world, and in organizing life demonstrations for large numbers of participants. His career in Cardiology, his work in Atlanta Georgia, USA, and his early tragic death in an airplane accident are briefly mentioned.

  3. Combined Use of an Occlusion Balloon Catheter and a Microcatheter for Embolization of the Unselectable Right Inferior Phrenic Artery Supplying Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Miyayama, Shiro Matsui, Osamu; Taki, Keiichi; Minami, Tetsuya; Ito, Chiharu; Shinmura, Rieko; Takamatsu, Shigeyuki; Kobayashi, Miki; Notsumata, Kazuo

    2004-11-15

    We report the combined use of an occlusion balloon catheter and a microcatheter for transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) fed by the unselectable right inferior phrenic artery (IPA). In one case, HCC was fed by the reconstructed right IPA via a small branch arising from the proximate portion of the celiac artery. In another, the tumor was fed by the right IPA that had been previously embolized with coils. TAE was successfully performed through a microcatheter placed in the celiac artery immediately proximal to the occluding balloon catheter of the celiac trunk and coil embolization of the left gastric artery.

  4. The Use of Pulmonary Artery Catheter in Sepsis Patients: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Velissaris, Dimitrios; Karamouzos, Vasilios; Kotroni, Ioanna; Pierrakos, Charalampos; Karanikolas, Menelaos

    2016-01-01

    This article was to review the literature regarding the use of the pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) in the management of patients with sepsis and septic shock. A PubMed search was conducted in order to identify publications evaluating the use of PAC as a tool for management and therapeutic guidance in patients with sepsis. The bibliographies of all identified publications were reviewed for additional relevant references. Much information is identified in the literature regarding the indications for pulmonary artery catheterization in the assessment and treatment of patients with sepsis. Although the PAC has been widely used for many years, there is no clear benefit with regard to outcome, and there is controversy regarding its use. It is not clear that use of the PAC contributes to reduced morbidity and mortality in patients with sepsis. The role of the PAC is becoming less clear, as newer, non-invasive techniques are developed for hemodynamic assessment of sepsis patients. Large, well-designed clinical trials are needed to better assess the role and potential benefit from use of the PAC in sepsis. PMID:27738477

  5. A novel solution to reduce the complications of distal shunt catheter displacement associated with obesity.

    PubMed

    Morrison, John F; Sung, Kristin E; Bergman, Ari M; Rosenblatt, Michael S; Arle, Jeffrey E

    2010-12-01

    Despite the varied sources of hydrocephalus, all shunt-treated conditions involve redirection of CSF to the body, commonly the peritoneum. Migration of the distal catheter tip out of the peritoneal space can occur, leading to the need for reoperation. Although uncommon, the authors have recently had 3 such cases in obese patients involving distal tubing retropulsion in otherwise uncomplicated surgeries. In addressing this issue, the authors performed anchoring of the distal catheter tubing through a small abdominal mesh, which is commonly used for hernia repair to increase catheter tube friction without compromising CSF flow. The results suggest this method may mitigate the chance of peritoneal catheter displacement in patients with higher than normal intraabdominal pressure.

  6. A Large Posttraumatic Subclavian Artery Aneurysm Complicated by Artery Occlusion and Arteriobronchial Fistula Successfully Treated Using a Covered Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanczyk, Ludomir; Czeczotka, Jaroslaw; Elgalal, Marcin; Sapieha, Michal; Rowinski, Olgierd

    2011-02-15

    The treatment of posttraumatic aneurysms of peripheral arteries using covered stents is increasingly commonplace. We present the case of a 10-year-old girl with a pseudoaneurysm of the subclavian artery complicated by an arteriobronchial fistula with hemorrhaging into the bronchial tree and distal subclavian artery occlusion. Despite the lack of artery patency, endovascular stent graft implantation was successful. Pseudoaneurysm exclusion and involution was achieved, together with a patent implant and maintained collateral circulation patency.

  7. Vascular complications after orthotopic liver transplantation: hepatic artery thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Pareja, E; Cortes, M; Navarro, R; Sanjuan, F; López, R; Mir, J

    2010-10-01

    Hepatic artery thrombosis (HAT) is the second main cause of liver graft failure after primary nonfunction. It is the most frequent arterial complication in orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). The consensus for early HAT definition consists of an arterial thrombosis detected during the first month after OLT. HAT is associated with markedly increased morbidity, being the leading cause of graft loss (53%) and mortality. However, improvements in postoperative care have resulted in a marked reduction of its incidence. We performed a review of all patients who underwent liver transplantations from January 1991 to December 2009, involving 1560 subjects who underwent 1674 OLT, excluding children. To analyze the impact of the study period on HAT, we defined 3 periods: the first between January 1991 and April 1993, the second from May 1993 to December 2003, and the last from January 2004 to December 2009. The total number of patients with HAT was 48 (2.8%) including 32 (1.9%) early HAT and 16 (0.9%) late HAT. The incidence of HAT diminished as the surgical team gained experience from 9.3% in the first period to 2.1% in the last. Most patients with early HAT presented acute fulminant hepatic failure (30%) and most were retransplantations (81%). In general, there are 3 modalities for HAT: revascularization, retransplantation, and observation. The choice of the treatment depended on the time of diagnosis although retransplantation was the treatment of choice for most groups. Minimizing risk factors, protocols for early detection, and good operative techniques should be the standard in all centers. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Diverticula of Kommerell and Aberrant Subclavian Arteries Complicated by Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R. G. Whigham, C. J.; Trinh, C.

    2005-06-15

    This is a retrospective evaluation of the incidence of aberrant subclavian arteries (ASAs) and diverticula of Kommerell, as well as the occurrence and significance of associated aneurysms. Thoracic aortograms obtained during a 12.5-year period were reviewed, seeking the presence of aberrant right and left subclavian arteries (ARSAs/ALSAs), diverticula of Kommerell, and the incidence of associated aortic aneurysms. Several cases were evaluated with computed tomography concomitantly. Results were correlated with a literature review. Twenty-two ASAs were identified. Nineteen were on the right (ARSAs) and three were on the left (ALSAs). A diverticulum of Kommerell (DOK) was also present on the right in seven and on the left in three. Five of these patients had complicating aneurysms. Four of these were associated with ARSAs and their diverticula. Two were atherosclerotic; one was a limited dissection and one of uncertain etiology was ruptured. One additional aneurysm (atherosclerotic) involved an ALSA/DOK. The patient with the ruptured aneurysm died in surgery; three were managed conservatively because of concomitant disease; and one is being followed because of the small size (2.5 cm) of the aneurysm. ARSAs are relatively uncommon and ALSAs are rare. Both ARSA and ALSA are frequently associated with a DOK. Aneurysms rarely involve ASAs (with or without a DOK), but they are associated with a high mortality rate if they are not discovered before rupture. Early diagnosis plus surgical and/or endovascular management can be lifesaving.

  9. The Accuracy of Temperature Measurements Provided by the Edwards Lifesciences Pulmonary Artery Catheter.

    PubMed

    Launey, Yoann; Larmet, Raphaëlle; Nesseler, Nicolas; Malledant, Yannick; Palpacuer, Clément; Seguin, Philippe

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary artery catheters (PACs) are frequently used for monitoring patient temperatures in the intensive care unit. Nevertheless, data regarding the accuracy of these measurements are lacking, and few data testify to the accuracy of temperatures recorded after the PAC has been in place for several days. The absolute values of such measurements are relevant for critical care because patient temperatures are often used as diagnostic criteria for sepsis and antibiotic therapy. We thus hypothesized that the Edwards Lifesciences PAC would accurately measure blood temperature. To test our hypothesis, we compared temperature measurements obtained from PACs inserted in patients for different lengths of time with measurements of a reference platinum resistance thermometer (PRT). PACs were removed and analyzed in 39 patients in whom PACs were inserted for 0 to 5 days. The PACs were placed in calibration baths, and 10 consecutive measurements at each of 7 different temperatures were obtained (36°C, 36.5°C, 37°C, 38°C, 38.3°C, 39°C, and 40°C). The temperature measurements obtained using PACs were compared with measurements obtained using a PRT. Bland-Altman statistical analyses were performed. Outliers, defined as PAC temperature measurements that varied more than ±0.3°C from PRT measurements, were identified. We considered a catheter unfit for clinical diagnostic or therapeutic use if ≥15% of data pairs were outliers. A total of 2730 data pairs were analyzed. Overall, the bias was -0.15°C; the precision was +0.13°C; and the limits of agreement were -0.45°C to +0.13°C. The bias and limits of agreement did not differ according to the age of the catheter or the temperature tested. One hundred fourteen data pairs (4.2% [95% confidence interval, 2.0%-6.4%]), involving 13 PACs and mostly from 4 PACs, were outliers. We conclude that temperature measurements obtained using the Edwards Lifesciences PACs are thus sufficiently accurate to be used for clinical

  10. [Peritoneal catheter placement into the suprahepatic space: a report of 2 cases with abdominal complications of ventriculoperitoneal shunts].

    PubMed

    Ishi, Yukitomo; Ito, Masaki; Terasaka, Shunsuke; Motegi, Hiroaki; Shinbo, Daisuke; Kaneko, Sadahiro; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2011-11-01

    Complications arising from the placement of ventriculoperitoneal shunts are common. These complications may be related to a number of causes and present with various symptoms. Of these, abdominal complications such as formation of intraperitoneal pseudocysts and abdominal abscesses possibly recur, but, alternative sites for placing the peritoneal catheter of ventriculoperitoneal shunts are limited. We present two cases of ventriculoperitoneal shunt malfunctioning due to repeated abdominal complications. The location of the peritoneal end of the shunt was successfully revised to the suprahepatic space in the peritoneal cavity. We describe the clinical course of these two cases in this report, along with a precise technique of placing the peritoneal end of the shunt into the suprahepatic space. In addition, we will discuss the validity of this space as an alternative site for the placement of the peritoneal end of the ventriculoperitoneal shunt.

  11. Environmental Exposures and the Risk of Central Venous Catheter Complications and Readmissions in Home Infusion Therapy Patients.

    PubMed

    Keller, Sara C; Williams, Deborah; Gavgani, Mitra; Hirsch, David; Adamovich, John; Hohl, Dawn; Krosche, Amanda; Cosgrove, Sara; Perl, Trish M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients are frequently discharged with central venous catheters (CVCs) for home infusion therapy. OBJECTIVE To study a prospective cohort of patients receiving home infusion therapy to identify environmental and other risk factors for complications. DESIGN Prospective cohort study between March and December 2015. SETTING Home infusion therapy after discharge from academic medical centers. PARTICIPANTS Of 368 eligible patients discharged from 2 academic hospitals to home with peripherally inserted central catheters and tunneled CVCs, 222 consented. Patients remained in the study until 30 days after CVC removal. METHODS Patients underwent chart abstraction and monthly telephone surveys while the CVC was in place, focusing on complications and environmental exposures. Multivariable analyses estimated adjusted odds ratios and adjusted incident rate ratios between clinical, demographic, and environmental risk factors and 30-day readmissions or CVC complications. RESULTS Of 222 patients, total parenteral nutrition was associated with increased 30-day readmissions (adjusted odds ratio, 4.80 [95% CI, 1.51-15.21) and CVC complications (adjusted odds ratio, 2.41 [95% CI, 1.09-5.33]). Exposure to soil through gardening or yard work was associated with a decreased likelihood of readmissions (adjusted odds ratio, 0.09 [95% CI, 0.01-0.74]). Other environmental exposures were not associated with CVC complications. CONCLUSIONS complications and readmissions were common and associated with the use of total parenteral nutrition. Common environmental exposures (well water, cooking with raw meat, or pets) did not increase the rate of CVC complications, whereas soil exposures were associated with decreased readmissions. Interventions to decrease home CVC complications should focus on total parenteral nutrition patients. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;1-8.

  12. Environmental Exposures and the Risk of Central Venous Catheter Complications and Readmissions in Home Infusion Therapy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Sara C.; Williams, Deborah; Gavgani, Mitra; Hirsch, David; Adamovich, John; Hohl, Dawn; Krosche, Amanda; Cosgrove, Sara; Perl, Trish M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients are frequently discharged with central venous catheters (CVCs) for home infusion therapy. OBJECTIVE To study a prospective cohort of patients receiving home infusion therapy to identify environmental and other risk factors for complications. DESIGN Prospective cohort study between March and December 2015. SETTING Home infusion therapy after discharge from academic medical centers. PARTICIPANTS Of 368 eligible patients discharged from 2 academic hospitals to home with peripherally inserted central catheters and tunneled CVCs, 222 consented. Patients remained in the study until 30 days after CVC removal. METHODS Patients underwent chart abstraction and monthly telephone surveys while the CVC was in place, focusing on complications and environmental exposures. Multivariable analyses estimated adjusted odds ratios and adjusted incident rate ratios between clinical, demographic, and environmental risk factors and 30-day readmissions or CVC complications. RESULTS Of 222 patients, total parenteral nutrition was associated with increased 30-day readmissions (adjusted odds ratio, 4.80 [95% CI, 1.51–15.21) and CVC complications (adjusted odds ratio, 2.41 [95% CI, 1.09–5.33]). Exposure to soil through gardening or yard work was associated with a decreased likelihood of readmissions (adjusted odds ratio, 0.09 [95% CI, 0.01–0.74]). Other environmental exposures were not associated with CVC complications. CONCLUSIONS complications and readmissions were common and associated with the use of total parenteral nutrition. Common environmental exposures (well water, cooking with raw meat, or pets) did not increase the rate of CVC complications, whereas soil exposures were associated with decreased readmissions. Interventions to decrease home CVC complications should focus on total parenteral nutrition patients. PMID:27697084

  13. Minimally invasive catheter implantation for regional chemotherapy of the liver: A new percutaneous transsubclavian approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wacker, Frank K.; Boese-Landgraf, Jochen; Wagner, Armin; Albrecht, Dirk; Wolf, Karl-Juergen; Fobbe, Franz

    1997-03-15

    Purpose. Development of a percutaneously implantable catheter system for regional chemotherapy of liver metastases and its application in patients with surgically implanted but dislocated catheters. Methods. Thirty-three patients with liver metastases of colorectal tumors were submitted to percutaneous puncture of the subclavian artery and insertion of a catheter whose tip was placed in the proper hepatic artery and whose end was subcutaneously connected with an infusion pump. Results. The mean duration of therapy via the percutaneously inserted catheter was 27 weeks ({+-}14 weeks). The most frequent complication was disconnection of the therapy catheter from the tube of the infusion pump. Eighty percent of all complications were corrected by reintervention. The therapy drop-out rate due to catheter-associated complications was 9%. Conclusion. Percutaneous insertion of a catheter for regional chemotherapy of the liver is a relatively uncomplicated method with high patient acceptance and simple access for reintervention.

  14. Evaluation of complications and feasibility of indwelling epidural catheter use for post-operative pain control in dogs in the home environment.

    PubMed

    Phillips, L R; McAbee, K P; Stephenson, N; Stanke, N J; Booms, M L; Degner, D D

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the use of indwelling epidural catheters post-operatively in dogs in a home environment, and to report associated complications. Dogs undergoing surgical procedures of the hind limb (n=83) were included in the study and were administered 0.05 or 0.10 mg/kg epidural morphine via an indwelling epidural catheter every 6 hours. Data compiled relating to catheter placement included time of placement, ease of placement and problems encountered, number of attempts of placement, and individual placing the catheter. A client questionnaire was provided to evaluate side effects, complications, pain, and ease of use of the epidural catheter system after discharge from the hospital and catheter removal at home. Side effects were compared between the dogs receiving 0.05 or 0.1 mg/kg epidural morphine. The most common patient complication was abnormal urination patterns (32/82, 39%); specifically dribbling urine where laying, emptying the entire bladder where laying, not urinating for extended periods of time, and taking a longer time to pass urine were reported. There were no significant differences in the number or types of side effects reported in either dosing group. The most common technical issues reported by owners were difficulty getting the needle into the injection port (10/81, 12%) and removing the adhesive covering keeping the epidural catheter system in place (19/78, 24%). There were no reports of inflammation or discharge at the catheter site in any of the dogs. Of the respondents surveyed, 76/79 (97%) found the epidural catheter system easy to use at home in the post-operative period. Indwelling epidural catheters are a feasible method of administration of post-operative analgesia in the immediate post-operative period in the home environment and were associated with only a few minor complications in this population.

  15. Prospective, randomized trial of two antiseptic solutions for prevention of central venous or arterial catheter colonization and infection in intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Mimoz, O; Pieroni, L; Lawrence, C; Edouard, A; Costa, Y; Samii, K; Brun-Buisson, C

    1996-11-01

    To compare the efficacy of a newly available antiseptic solution (composed of 0.25% chlorhexidine gluconate, 0.025% benzalkonium chloride, and 4% benzyl alcohol), with 10% povidone iodine, on the prevention of central venous or arterial catheter colonization and infection. Prospective, randomized clinical trial. Surgical-trauma intensive care unit (ICU) in a university hospital. All patients admitted to the ICU and requiring the insertion of a central venous and/or an arterial catheter from July 1, 1992 to October 31, 1993. Patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups according to the antiseptic solution used for insertion and catheter care. The same solution was used for skin disinfection from the time of catheter insertion to the time of removal of each catheter. Catheter distal tips were quantitatively cultured when catheters were no longer necessary, if there was a suspicion of catheter-related infection, and routinely after 7 days of use for arterial catheters, or after 15 days of use for central venous catheters. The rate of significant catheter colonization (i.e., > or = 10(3) colony-forming units [cfu]/mL by quantitative culture), and catheter-related sepsis (as defined by sepsis abating following catheter removal per 1,000 catheter-days), were significantly lower in the chlorhexidine group (12 vs. 31 [relative risk 0.4, 95% confidence interval 0.1 to 0.9, p < .01] and 6 vs. 16 [relative risk 0.4, 95% confidence interval 0.1 to 1, p = 0.5], respectively). The rate of central venous catheter colonization and central venous catheter-related sepsis per 1,000 catheter-days were also significantly lower in the chlorhexidine group (8 vs. 31 [relative risk 0.3, 95% confidence interval 0.1 to 1, p = .03] and 5 vs. 19 [relative risk 0.3, 95% confidence interval 0.1 to 1, p = .02], respectively). Finally, the rate of arterial catheter colonization per 1,000 catheter-days was significantly lower in the chlorhexidine group (15 vs. 32 [relative risk 0.5, 95

  16. Phasic disappearance of left circumflex coronary artery from an early complication of mitral valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Devabhaktuni, Subodh; Sunkara, Nirmal; Ahsan, Chowdhury

    2015-11-01

    LV pseudoaneurysm can be a late complication of mitral valve replacement. In our case, it was an early postoperative complication. This pseudoaneurysm was causing compression of LCX artery during systole, leading to presentation of NSTEMI two weeks after the surgery.

  17. Brachial insertion of fully implantable venous catheters for chemotherapy: complications and quality of life assessment in 35 patients

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Igor Yoshio Imagawa; Krutman, Mariana; Nishinari, Kenji; Yazbek, Guilherme; Teivelis, Marcelo Passos; Bomfim, Guilherme André Zottele; Cavalcante, Rafael Noronha; Wolosker, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To prospectively evaluate the perioperative safety, early complications and satisfaction of patients who underwent the implantation of central catheters peripherally inserted via basilic vein. Methods Thirty-five consecutive patients with active oncologic disease requiring chemotherapy were prospectively followed up after undergoing peripheral implantation of indwelling venous catheters, between November 2013 and June 2014. The procedures were performed in the operating room by the same team of three vascular surgeons. The primary endpoints assessed were early postoperative complications, occurring within 30 days after implantation. The evaluation of patient satisfaction was based on a specific questionnaire used in previous studies. Results In all cases, ultrasound-guided puncture of the basilic vein was feasible and the procedure successfully completed. Early complications included one case of basilic vein thrombophlebitis and one case of pocket infection that did not require device removal. Out of 35 patients interviewed, 33 (94.3%) would recommend the device to other patients. Conclusion Implanting brachial ports is a feasible option, with low intraoperative risk and similar rates of early postoperative complications when compared to the existing data of the conventional technique. The patients studied were satisfied with the device and would recommend the procedure to others. PMID:28076593

  18. [Evaluation of thromboembolic complications in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia with Vascuport catheters].

    PubMed

    Rycaj, Jarosław; Misiołek, Hanna; Stoksik, Piotr; Tomaszewska, Renata; Karpe, Jacek; Kaczmarski, Jacek; Kucia, Hanna; Knapik, Piotr; Kasza, Tadeusz

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the work was to evaluate the safety of Vascuport catheter long-term application in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). 21 children treated in the Department of Pediatric and Hematology in Zabrze were enrolled in the study. Echocardiography and ultrasonography were performed to examine Vascuport catheter in the central vein. Coagulation parameters were estimated too. None of the children presented symptoms of pulmonary embolism or venous thrombosis. Thrombotic material was found on the course of Vascuport catheter in 5 (23%) children. Changes in the hemostatic system: increased d-dimmer levels in 2 (9%), increased fibrinogen level in 7 (33%), decreased value of APC-R in 7 (33%) and protein C in 8 (38%) children were observed. Changes of hemostatic system and presence of thrombotic material on the course of Vascuport catheter in 23% of the patients with ALL imply the necessity of rigorous monitoring of haemostatic system as well as Vascuport catheter in the central vein. In case the risk factors of thrombotic events or their clinical symptoms are present anticoagulant therapy should be introduced.

  19. Complications Associated With Use of Long-Term Central Venous Catheters Among Commercially Insured Women With Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lipitz-Snyderman, Allison; Ma, Qinli; Pollack, Michael F.; Barron, John; Elkin, Elena B.; Bach, Peter B.; Malin, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Despite some advantages to their use, long-term central venous catheters (CVCs) are associated with complications for patients who require chemotherapy. Understanding of these risks in commercially insured populations is limited. This information can inform medical policies that ensure the appropriate use of venous access devices. This study's objectives were to assess the extent of variation in use of long-term CVCs in a cohort of commercially insured women with breast cancer, and to assess risks of associated complications. Methods: Retrospective cohort analysis was conducted using health insurance claims between January 2006 and October 2013. The cohort included commercially insured women age ≥ 18 years diagnosed with breast cancer who received infusion chemotherapy (N = 31,047). We conducted matched and case-mix adjusted Cox proportional hazard modeling to assess differences in bloodstream infections and thrombovascular complications between patients using long-term CVCs and those using temporary intravenous catheters. Results: Approximately two thirds of the cohort had a long-term CVC, although rates varied across regions (57% to 75%), health plans (65% to 70%), and insurance coverage (63% to 68%). After propensity score matching, the adjusted hazard ratio for infection was 2.70 (95% CI, 2.31 to 3.16) and thrombovascular complications, 2.61 (95% CI, 2.33 to 2.93) in patients with long-term CVCs compared with those with temporary intravenous catheters. Conclusion: Although long-term CVCs may have benefits, they are associated with increased morbidity. Regional and health plan variation in long-term CVC insertion suggests that some of their use reflects provider- or institution-driven variation in practice. Evidence-based guidelines and tools may help decrease discretionary use of long-term CVCs. PMID:26265170

  20. Anchor technique: Use of stent retrievers as an anchor to advance thrombectomy catheters in internal carotid artery occlusions

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Stacey Q; Janjua, Rashid M; Hedayat, Hirad; Burnette, Christofer

    2015-01-01

    In three recent cases of acute complete internal artery occlusions, we used stent retriever deployed through the mechanical aspiration/distal access catheters to achieve recanalization. In all cases the stent retriever was used as an anchor and supplemented mechanical thrombectomy. This report describes the technical details of the procedure and presents an alternative plan of action in difficult cases when standard thrombectomy techniques do not work. PMID:26494404

  1. Inpatient Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheter Complications: Should Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter Lines Be Placed in the Intensive Care Unit Setting?

    PubMed

    Martyak, Michael; Kabir, Ishraq; Britt, Rebecca

    2017-08-01

    Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) are now commonly used for central access in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting; however, there is a paucity of data evaluating the complication rates associated with these lines. We performed a retrospective review of all PICCs placed in the inpatient setting at our institution during a 1-year period from January 2013 to December 2013. These were divided into two groups: those placed at the bedside in the ICU and those placed by interventional radiology in non-ICU patients. Data regarding infectious and thrombotic complications were collected and evaluated. During the study period, 1209 PICC line placements met inclusion criteria and were evaluated; 1038 were placed by interventional radiology in non-ICU patients, and 171 were placed at the bedside in ICU patients. The combined thrombotic and central line associated blood stream infection rate was 6.17 per cent in the non-ICU group and 10.53 per cent in the ICU group (P = 0.035). The thrombotic complication rate was 5.88 per cent in the non-ICU group and 7.60 per cent in the ICU group (P = 0.38), whereas the central line associated blood stream infection rate was 0.29 per cent in the non-ICU group and 2.92 per cent in the ICU group (P = 0.002). This study seems to suggest that PICC lines placed at the bedside in the ICU setting are associated with higher complication rates, in particular infectious complications, than those placed by interventional radiology in non-ICU patients. The routine placement of PICC lines in the ICU settings needs to be reevaluated given these findings.

  2. The Use of a Re-Entry Catheter in Recanalization of Chronic Inflow Occlusions of the Common Iliac Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Ramjas, Greg; Thurley, Peter Habib, Said

    2008-05-15

    Endovascular treatment of iliac artery occlusions can be unsuccessful due to a failure to break back into the true lumen, and lesions without a proximal stump can be particularly problematic. True lumen re-entry catheters have not been previously used for this type of lesion. The authors report eight patients, five males and three females, with lifestyle-limiting intermittent claudication referred for endovascular treatment. Imaging demonstrated unilateral chronic total occlusion of the common iliac artery in six patients and two patients with short patent stumps at the origin of the occluded common iliac artery. Endovascular therapy was initially unsuccessful due to an inability to re-enter the true lumen after crossing the occlusion in the subintimal plane. With the assistance of the Outback LTD catheter it was possible to achieve continuity of the dissecting tract with the true lumen, thus facilitating successful primary stenting in all eight patients. To our knowledge this is the first report of the use of the Outback LTD catheter in this type of lesion.

  3. Rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Early onset of distal catheter migration into scrotum in an adult male: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bryan S.; Vadera, Sumeet; Gonzalez-Martinez, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The role of shunt placement is to divert cerebrospinal fluid from within the ventricles to an alternative location in the setting of hydrocephalus. One of the rare shunt complications is distal catheter migration, and various body sites have been reported, including the scrotum. Although cases of scrotal migration of distal catheter have been reported in pediatric patients, cases in adult patients are rare due to obliterated processus vaginalis. Furthermore, there has not been a case reported for scrotal migration in an adult at an early onset. Presentation of case 65-year-old male underwent shunt placement for normal-pressure hydrocephalus-like symptoms. On post-operative day seven patient developed right testicular edema, for which ultrasound was performed, revealing hydrocele along with the presence of distal catheter in the scrotum. On post-operative day nine patient underwent distal catheter trimming via laparoscopic approach with general surgery, with post-operative imaging showing satisfactory location of distal catheter in the peritoneal cavity. Discussion/Conclusion Early onset of distal catheter migration into scrotum in an adult male is a unique case, as most cases are reported in pediatric patients, and it is the first case reported in the English literature to have occurrence at an early onset during the peri-operative period. As our case demonstrates, early occurrence and detection of scrotal migration of the distal catheter prevent shunt malfunction. Prompt surgical management of catheter repositioning is therefore recommended to avoid the risk of further complications. PMID:25553524

  4. Implantable insulin pump therapy: an unusual presentation of a catheter-related complication.

    PubMed

    Moore, Kevin B; Saudek, Christopher D; Greene, Alicia; Dackiw, Alan

    2006-06-01

    We report the case of a 63-year-old man who has a 19-year history of involvement in the implantable insulin pump program at Johns Hopkins University. After his most recent pump implantation in February 2004, his 24-h insulin requirement gradually increased from a baseline of 75 units to a peak of almost 500 units in June 2005. Surprisingly, insulin delivery from the pump and glycemic control remained satisfactory despite the dramatic change in insulin requirement. Laparotomy revealed a fibrous mass in the peritoneal cavity, with the track of the catheter extending into the mass. Insulin requirement declined post-resection of the mass and relocation of the catheter tip.

  5. A Rare Complication of Subdural-peritoneal Shunt: Migration of Catheter Components through the Pelvic Inlet into the Subdural Space.

    PubMed

    Çakir, Mürteza; Yilmaz, Atilla; Çalikoğlu, Çağatay

    2017-01-01

    Subdural-peritoneal (SP) shunting is a simple procedure to treat subdural hygromas; however, several rare complications such as shunt migration exist. A 15-year-old boy presented with headache, nausea, and vomiting, and underwent SP shunting for left frontoparietal chronic subdural effusion. Six weeks later, radiographic examinations revealed total migration of the shunt through the pelvic inlet. The migrated shunt was replaced with a new SP shunt. Four weeks later, radiographic examinations revealed shunt migration into the subdural space. The shunt catheter was removed and the subdural effusion was evacuated. Shunt migration may result from pressure differences between the abdomen and the cranium or from head movement, and insufficient fixation and/or large burr holes can facilitate shunt migration. Double firm anchoring and small-sized burr holes can prevent this complication. SP shunt is a simple procedure, and its assumed complications can be prevented through precaution.

  6. The Wiley Spinal Catheter-Over-Needle System for Continuous Spinal Anesthesia: A Case Series of 5 Cesarean Deliveries Complicated by Paresthesias and Headaches.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Christine P; Carvalho, Brendan; Riley, Edward T

    2016-01-01

    Intrathecal catheter devices using a catheter-over-needle design and softer flexible material have been introduced to clinical practice with the aim of reducing some of the complications such as postdural puncture headaches and paresthesias seen with previous versions of intrathecal catheters. We present a case series of 5 cesarean deliveries using the Wiley Spinal intrathecal system (Epimed, Johnstown, New York), which was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. The intrathecal catheter system consists of a flexible 23-gauge intrathecal cannula over a 27-gauge pencil-point spinal needle. The placement of the intrathecal catheter was successful in all 5 cases; however, paresthesias in 3 cases and postdural puncture headaches in 2 cases complicated the placement and use of the device. Although the unique catheter-over-needle design facilitates the use of smaller-gauge spinal needles for dural puncture and larger-gauge catheters for medication administration, this case series using the Wiley Spinal suggests that paresthesias and postdural puncture headaches may still limit its widespread utilization. Future studies are needed to determine the true incidence of complications and to determine the role of continuous spinal anesthesia in the obstetric population.

  7. Calcified Thrombus in Right Atrium: Rare but Treatable Complication of Long-term Indwelling Central Venous Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Fabi, Marianna; Gesuete, Valentina; Testa, Gabriella; Balducci, Anna; Picchio, Fernando Maria; Gargiulo, Gaetano

    2011-01-01

    Catheter-related central thrombosis is a rare complication of long-term central line. We describe the case of an asymptomatic boy who was diagnosed a calcified thrombus in right atrium eight years after the removal of a long-term central venous device. Although the most appropriate therapeutic approach for managing floating right heart thrombi remains to be determined, surgical removal is an effective and safe procedure for calcified long-standing thrombus and it is to be preferred in elective conditions especially in young asymptomatic patients without hemodynamic involvement, that are at low risk of surgery-related morbidity and mortality.

  8. Catheter-based transarterial therapies for hepatocellular cancer.

    PubMed

    Laroia, Sandeep T; Morales, Steven A; Laroia, Archana T

    2015-12-01

    As the prevalence of liver cancer increases, so does the demand for nonsurgical, minimally invasive alternatives to surgery, since many patients have tumors that cannot be surgically resected. Catheter-based hepatic arterial procedures may be an option in patients with primary and metastatic liver cancer. The authors describe four catheter-based hepatic arterial procedures and outline the management of potential complications during the immediate postprocedural period.

  9. Internal jugular vein thrombosis presenting as a painful neck mass due to a spontaneous dislocated subclavian port catheter as long-term complication: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Grommes, Jochen; Junge, Karsten; Göbner, Sonja; Schumpelick, Volker; Truong, Son

    2009-01-01

    Central venous access devices are extensively used for long-term chemotherapy and parenteral nutrition. However, there are some possible immediate, early, and late complications related to the implantation technique, care, and maintenance. We present the uncommon occurrence of a thrombosis of the internal jugular vein due to a spontaneous migration of a Port-A-Cath catheter into the ipsilateral internal jugular vein as a delayed complication of a central venous access catheter implanted for chemotherapy delivery. A review of the literature is given, and the factors responsible for this unusual complication will be discussed. PMID:19830037

  10. Management of a Complicated Ruptured Infected Pseudoaneurysm of the Femoral Artery in a Drug Addict

    PubMed Central

    Psathas, Emmanouil; Lioudaki, Stella; Karantonis, Fotios-Filippos; Charalampoudis, Petros; Papadopoulos, Othon; Klonaris, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Infected pseudoaneurysm of the femoral artery represents a devastating complication of intravenous drug abuse, especially in the event of rupture. Operative strategy depends upon the extent of arterial injury and the coexistence of infection or sepsis. Options range from simple common femoral artery (CFA) ligation to complex arterial reconstruction with autologous grafts (arterial, venous, or homografts). We report herein the management of a 29-year-old male patient who was urgently admitted with a ruptured pseudoaneurysm of the right CFA, extending well above the inguinal ligament. Multidisciplinary approach with multiple arterial reconstructions and subsequent coverage of the tissue defect with a rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap transposition was performed. PMID:23227421

  11. Pelvic drainage during removal of dialysis catheter decreases the risk of subsequent intra-abdominal complications in refractory peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chih-Yang; Huang, Wei-Chieh; Huang, Chun-Kai; Huang, Chien-Wei; Chou, Nan-Hua; Lee, Po-Tsang; Fang, Hua-Chang; Chou, Kang-Ju; Chen, Chien-Liang

    2015-11-01

    Some patients with refractory peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis continue to develop intra-abdominal complications despite removal of the peritoneal catheter. Repeated percutaneous drainage or open laparotomy is often required, and mortality is not uncommon. The benefits of pelvic drainage placement during catheter removal in decreasing these complications and interventions remain unproven. Forty-six patients with refractory peritonitis who underwent removal of a Tenckhoff catheter between 1991 and 2013 were reviewed retrospectively. Twelve patients had pelvic drainage using closed active suction devices during catheter removal (drainage group). The remaining 34 patients underwent catheter removal without drainage (non-drainage group). The outcomes measured were the development of intra-abdominal complications and the requirement for repeated percutaneous drainage or open laparotomy within 90 days after the catheter removal. Baseline characteristics were similar with the exception of a higher median number of previous peritonitis episodes in the drainage group compared with the non-drainage group (2 vs 0, P = 0.02). During the follow-up period, intra-abdominal complications occurred in 15 (44%) of 34 patients in the non-drainage group, compared with one (8%) of 12 patients in the drainage group (P = 0.03). Twelve (35%) patients in the non-drainage group required repeated percutaneous drainage or open laparotomy for management, compared with zero (0%) patients in the drainage group (P = 0.02). Drain tubes were removed at a median of 6 days (inter-quartile range: 5-10) without complications. In the management of refractory peritonitis, pelvic drainage during removal of dialysis catheter decreases the risk of subsequent intra-abdominal complications and invasive interventions. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  12. Validity of an arterial pressure waveform analysis device: does the puncture site play a role in the agreement with intermittent pulmonary artery catheter thermodilution measurements?

    PubMed

    Schramm, Sebastian; Albrecht, Eric; Frascarolo, Philippe; Chassot, Pierre-Guy; Spahn, Donat R

    2010-04-01

    The measurement of cardiac output is a key element in the assessment of cardiac function. Recently, a pulse contour analysis-based device without need for calibration became available (FloTrac/Vigileo, Edwards Lifescience, Irvine, CA). This study was conducted to determine if there is an impact of the arterial catheter site and to investigate the accuracy of this system when compared with the pulmonary artery catheter using the bolus thermodilution technique (PAC). Prospective study. The operating room of 1 university hospital. Twenty patients undergoing cardiac surgery. CO was determined in parallel by the use of the Flotrac/Vigileo systems in the radial and femoral position (CO_rad and CO_fem) and by PAC as the reference method. Data triplets were recorded at defined time points. The primary endpoint was the comparison of CO_rad and CO_fem, and the secondary endpoint was the comparison with the PAC. Seventy-eight simultaneous data recordings were obtained. The Bland-Altman analysis for CO_fem and CO_rad showed a bias of 0.46 L/min, precision was 0.85 L/min, and the percentage error was 34%. The Bland-Altman analysis for CO_rad and PAC showed a bias of -0.35 L/min, the precision was 1.88 L/min, and the percentage error was 76%. The Bland-Altman analysis for CO_fem and PAC showed a bias of 0.11 L/min, the precision was 1.8 L/min, and the percentage error was 69%. The FloTrac/Vigileo system was shown to not produce exactly the same CO data when used in radial and femoral arteries, even though the percentage error was close to the clinically acceptable range. Thus, the impact of the introduction site of the arterial catheter is not negligible. The agreement with thermodilution was low. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Systematic review of catheter-based intra-arterial therapies in hepatocellular carcinoma: state of the art and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Duran, R; Chapiro, J; Schernthaner, R E

    2015-01-01

    Intra-arterial therapies (IATs) play a pivotal role in the management of patients with primary and secondary liver malignancies. The unique advantages of these treatments are their ability to selectively deliver a high dose of anticancer treatment while preserving healthy liver tissue. The proven efficacy of these catheter-based locoregional therapies in a highly systemic chemoresistant cancer such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), along with the minimally invasive nature of these treatments, quickly yielded wide acceptance in the medical community and revolutionized the field of Interventional Oncology. In this article, we describe the clinical rationale and background of catheter-based IATs. We provide an overview of clinical achievements of these treatments alone and in combination with sorafenib in patients with HCC. PMID:25978585

  14. Successful Embolization of an Ovarian Artery Pseudoaneurysm Complicating Obstetric Hysterectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Rathod, Krantikumar R Deshmukh, Hemant L; Asrani, Ashwin; Salvi, Vinita S; Prabhu, Santoshi

    2005-01-15

    Transcatheter arterial embolization is becoming the therapy of choice for controlling obstetric hemorrhage, affording the ability to control persistent bleeding from pelvic vessels while avoiding the morbidity of surgical exploration. The clinicians are left with little choice if pelvic hemorrhage continues after hysterectomy and ligation of anterior division of both internal iliac arteries. We present one such case of intractable post-obstetric hysterectomy hemorrhage in which an ovarian artery pseudoaneurysm was diagnosed angiographically and successfully embolized, highlighting the role of transcatheter embolization.

  15. Posterior Circulation Stroke After Bronchial Artery Embolization. A Rare but Serious Complication

    SciTech Connect

    Laborda, Alicia; Tejero, Carlos; Fredes, Arturo; Cebrian, Luis; Guelbenzu, Santiago; Gregorio, Miguel Angel de

    2013-06-15

    Bronchial artery embolization (BAE) is the treatment of choice for massive hemoptysis with rare complications that generally are mild and transient. There are few references in the medical literature with acute cerebral embolization as a complication of BAE. We report a case of intracranial posterior territory infarctions as a complication BAE in a patient with hemoptysis due to bronchiectasis.

  16. Ocelot catheter for the recanalization of lower extremity arterial chronic total occlusion.

    PubMed

    Marmagkiolis, Konstantinos; Lendel, Vasili; Cawich, Ian; Cilingiroglu, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a growing clinical condition affecting more than 10 million patients in the United States and it is responsible for more than 120,000 amputations annually. The presence of chronic total occlusions (CTO) increases the complexity of endovascular procedures and open surgery may often be the preferred approach. Despite the optimization of the CTO devices and technique, percutaneous CTO revascularization remains a challenging procedure even for experienced operators with important complication rates. The Ocelot(TM) system is a novel CTO device to use real-time optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging guidance for the recanalization of peripheral CTOs. We review the mechanism of the Ocelot system, the initial results from the multi-center Connect-II trial and two cases of Ocelot-assisted CTO recanalization. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Renal Artery Stent Placement Complicated by Development of a Type B Aortic Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Haesemeyer, Scott W.; Vedantham, Suresh Braverman, Alan

    2005-01-15

    Percutaneous renal artery angioplasty and stent placement have demonstrated safety and effectiveness in the treatment of selected patients with renovascular hypertension and ischemic nephropathy. Major complications have been predominantly confined to the affected renal artery and kidneys, including renal artery dissection and/or thrombosis, distal embolization, and contrast-related nephropathy. We report a case in which treatment of an ostial renal artery lesion with placement of a balloon-expandable stent was complicated by the development of an acute Type B aortic dissection.

  18. Continuous cardiac output measurement by un-calibrated pulse wave analysis and pulmonary artery catheter in patients with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Ganter, Michael T; Alhashemi, Jamal A; Al-Shabasy, Adel M; Schmid, Ursina M; Schott, Peter; Shalabi, Sanaa A; Badri, Ahmed M; Hartnack, Sonja; Hofer, Christoph K

    2016-02-01

    Septic shock is a serious medical condition. With increased concerns about invasive techniques, a number of non-invasive and semi-invasive devices measuring cardiac output (CO) have become commercially available. The aim of the present study was to determine the accuracy, precision and trending abilities of the FloTrac and the continuous pulmonary artery catheter thermodilution technique determining CO in septic shock patients. Consecutive septic shock patients were included in two centres and CO was measured every 4 h up to 48 h by FloTrac (APCO) and by pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) using the continuous (CCO) and intermittent (ICO) technique. Forty-seven septic shock patients with 326 matched sets of APCO, CCO and ICO data were available for analysis. Bland and Altman analysis revealed a mean bias ±2 SD of 0.0 ± 2.14 L min(-1) for APCO-ICO (%error = 34.5 %) and 0.23 ± 2.55 L min(-1) for CCO-ICO (%error = 40.4 %). Trend analysis showed a concordance of 85 and 81 % for APCO and CCO, respectively. In contrast to CCO, APCO was influenced by systemic vascular resistance and by mean arterial pressure. In septic shock patients, APCO measurements assessed by FloTrac but also the established CCO measurements using the PAC did not meet the currently accepted statistical criteria indicating acceptable clinical performance.

  19. Pulmonary artery rupture in pregnancy complicating patent ductus arteriosus

    PubMed Central

    Green, Nicholas J; Rollason, Terence P

    1992-01-01

    Fatal haemopericardium in a 27 year old pregnant woman was caused by rupture of a dissecting aneurysm of the pulmonary artery. She had an uncorrected patent ductus arteriosus and severe pulmonary hypertension. The wall of the pulmonary artery showed atherosclerosis and cystic medionecrosis. PMID:1467058

  20. Rare central venous catheter malposition - an ultrasound-guided approach would be helpful: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kumada, Keisuke; Murakami, Nobuo; Okada, Hideshi; Toyoda, Izumi; Ogura, Shinji; Kondo, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Atsuhiro

    2016-09-13

    A central venous catheter enables the measurement of hemodynamic variations, such as accurate central venous pressure; catheter malposition may induce potentially fatal complications. This case report describes a rare central venous catheter tip malposition in the right internal mammary artery. A 56-year-old Japanese woman who presented with severe pneumonia secondary to scleroderma was treated under ventilator support because of acute respiratory failure. A right central venous catheter was inserted using a landmark technique to monitor central venous pressure and administer medications. However, central venous waveforms detected by the catheter using a pressure lot transducer were later found to be absent. Further imaging studies, including plain radiography, computed tomography, and angiography, confirmed central venous catheter malposition in the internal mammary artery. Her right internal mammary artery was embolized using two interlocking detachable coils, and the central venous catheter was removed from her internal mammary artery without further complications. Internal mammary artery malposition is a rare but potentially lethal complication of central venous catheter catheterization; however, caution should be taken regarding the assessment of risk factors and management of a severe complication. An ultrasound-guided approach would be helpful.

  1. Data on procedural handling and complications of pulmonary vein isolation using the pulmonary vein ablation catheter GOLD®.

    PubMed

    Leitz, Patrick; Güner, Fatih; Wasmer, Kristina; Foraita, Philip; Pott, Christian; Dechering, Dirk Georg; Zellerhoff, Stephan; Kochhäuser, Simon; Lange, Philipp Sebastian; Eckardt, Lars; Mönnig, Gerold

    2016-05-01

    The second-generation multi-electrode-phased radiofrequency pulmonary vein ablation catheter (PVAC GOLD(®)) was redesigned with the intent to improve its safety and efficacy. Using a prospectively designed single-centre database, we retrospectively analysed 128 consecutive patients (102 paroxysmal and 43 female) who underwent their first pulmonary vein isolation with the PVAC GOLD(®). The analysis focused on procedural data as well as in-hospital complications. Baseline characteristics of the patient collective were as follows: mean age 57.9 years, mean CHA2DS2-VASC was 1.73 ± 1.30; structural heart disease was present in seven patients. The PVAC GOLD(®) exhibited procedure durations of 123.1 min ± 27.9, duration of energy delivery was 18.3 min ± 11.4, and fluoroscopy duration was 16.0 min ± 7.7. The redesigned catheter shows major complication [major bleeding, transitory ischaemic attack (TIA), and pericardial tamponade] rates of 2.3% (n = 3). The overall rate of adverse events was 5.4% (n = 7). Bleeding complications were observed in three patients (2.3%), in particular there were two cases (1.6%) of minor bleeding and one case (0.8%) of major bleeding. Two patients suffered pericardial effusion, but there was no need for pericardiocentesis. Besides one TIA, there was no other thrombo-embolic event. Furthermore, one case of post-procedural fever was observed. No deaths, stroke, or haemorrhagic shock occurred. Of the 510 pulmonary veins, 508 could be reached with the PVAC GOLD(®) device using a non-steerable long sheath. The PVAC GOLD(®) seems to have an acceptable safety profile. The handling is comparable with the previous generation PVAC(®). Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. High MICs for Vancomycin and Daptomycin and Complicated Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infections with Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Viedma, Esther; Chaves, Fernando; Lalueza, Antonio; Fortún, Jesús; Loza, Elena; Pujol, Miquel; Ardanuy, Carmen; Morales, Isabel; de Cueto, Marina; Resino-Foz, Elena; Morales-Cartagena, Alejandra; Rico, Alicia; Romero, María P.; Orellana, María Ángeles; López-Medrano, Francisco; Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; Aguado, José María

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the prognostic role of high MICs for antistaphylococcal agents in patients with methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus catheter-related bloodstream infection (MSSA CRBSI). We prospectively reviewed 83 episodes from 5 centers in Spain during April 2011–June 2014 that had optimized clinical management and analyzed the relationship between E-test MICs for vancomycin, daptomycin, oxacillin, and linezolid and development of complicated bacteremia by using multivariate analysis. Complicated MSSA CRBSI occurred in 26 (31.3%) patients; MICs for vancomycin and daptomycin were higher in these patients (optimal cutoff values for predictive accuracy = 1.5 μg/mL and 0.5 μg/mL). High MICs for vancomycin (hazard ratio 2.4, 95% CI 1.2–5.5) and daptomycin (hazard ratio 2.4, 95% CI 1.1–5.9) were independent risk factors for development of complicated MSSA CRBSI. Our data suggest that patients with MSSA CRBSI caused by strains that have high MICs for vancomycin or daptomycin are at increased risk for complications. PMID:27192097

  3. Axillary artery injury as a complication of proximal humerus fractures.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, J A; Light, R; Lustrin, I

    1998-01-01

    Proximal humerus fractures are common injuries and represent approximately 5% of all fractures. These fractures are infrequently associated with neurovascular injuries. Brachial plexus injuries are uncommon, whereas axillary artery injuries are rare. A review of 19 previously reported cases of axillary artery injury after proximal humerus fracture revealed that 84% occurred in patients older than 50 years, 53% were associated with brachial plexus injury, and 21% resulted in upper extremity amputation. This study describes a case of axillary artery injury after proximal humerus fracture and, on the basis of a literature review, offers suggestions for the early diagnosis and effective treatment of this uncommon injury.

  4. 8B.03: ATHEROMA PROGRESSION IN RENAL ARTERIES AFTER CATHETER-BASED RENAL ARTERY DENERVATION USING SERIAL VOLUMETRIC COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY ANALYSIS: ANALYSIS FROM THE ENLIGHTN 1 TRIAL.

    PubMed

    Worthley, S; Kataoka, Y; Nicholls, S; Sidharta, S; Worthley, M; Tsioufis, C; Papademetriou, V

    2015-06-01

    We analysed the renal artery wall using serial high resolution CT image analysis before and at 6 months after renal artery denervation in the EnligHTN 1 trial. The EnligHTN-I study was a prospective, multi-center, non-randomized study to evaluate the clinical efficacy of the EnligHTN multi-electrode radiofrequency ablation catheter in resistant hypertensive patients. 40 patients with serial renal artery CT imaging were analyzed. Cross-sectional images of renal arteries at 1-mm interval were acquired by a commercially available software (3-mensio, Structural heart, ver 5.1). The luminal and outer wall boundaries of renal arteries were manually traced at 1 mm interval. Total atheroma volume (TAV) was calculated by summation of the plaque area which was the difference between the lumen and vessel wall areas. Percent atheroma volume (PAV) was calculated as the proportion of vessel wall volume occupied by plaque volume. On serial evaluation, greater progression of PAV and TAV was observed in the proximal zone (Change in PAV, 6.9 ± 0.6 vs. 4.4 ± 0.6; p = 0.01, change in TAV, 76.9 ± 12.9 vs. 17.9 ± 12.9, p = 0.002). Receiver-operating characteristics analysis demonstrated that baseline PAV in the ablation zone > 38.1% was an optimal cut-off value to predict its substantial progression at 6 months after the procedure (AUC = 0.83, sensitivity 90.0%, specificity 74.3%). Interestingly, the change in PAV and lumen areas were associated with reduction in office BP in the distal segment (p = 0.0142 and 0.0226 respectively), but not in the poroximal segment. This could suggest that ablations occurring in the more distal segment may be more effective at inducing renal denervation and therefore inducing a BP reduction, than the more proximal segment. Renal artery denervation with the EnligHTN multi-electrode catheter was associated with subsequent vessel wall thickening of the renal arteries. Proximal position and larger atheroma volume at

  5. Guide Catheter-Induced Aortic Dissection Complicated by Pericardial Effusion with Pulsus Paradoxus: A Case Report of Successful Medical Management

    PubMed Central

    Avadhani, Sriya A.; Marmur, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Aortic dissection is a rare but potentially fatal complication of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Management strategies of PCI induced dissection are not clearly identified in literature; such occurrences often mandate surgical repair of the aortic root with reimplantation of the coronary arteries. Another trend seen in case reports is the use of coronary-aortic stenting if such lesions permit. Several factors impact the management decision including the hemodynamic stability of the patient; mechanism of aortic injury; size, severity, and direction of propagation of the dissection; presence of an intimal flap; and preexisting atherosclerotic disease. We describe a case of a 65-year-old woman who underwent PCI for a chronic right coronary artery (RCA) occlusion, which was complicated by aortic dissection and pericardial effusion. Our case report suggests that nonsurgical management may also be appropriate for PCI induced dissections, and potentially even those associated with new pericardial effusion. PMID:25685153

  6. Bladder Morphology Using 2 Different Catheter Designs

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-10

    Urologic Injuries; Urologic Diseases; Bladder Infection; Urinary Tract Infections; Mucosal Inflammation; Mucosal Infection; Bladder Injury; Catheter-Related Infections; Catheter Complications; Catheter; Infection (Indwelling Catheter); Pelvic Floor Disorders; Urinary Incontinence

  7. Transcatheter Embolization of a Renal Arteriovenous Fistula Complicated by an Aneurysm of the Feeding Renal Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Kensella, Denise; Kakani, Nirmal Pocock, Richard; Thompson, John; Cowan, Andrew; Watkinson, A.

    2008-03-15

    Renal arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is rare. Renal AVF complicated by aneurysm of the feeding artery presents a technical challenge for endovascular treatment. We report a case managed by covered stenting of the renal artery aneurysm, coil embolization of the fistula, and bare stenting of the aorta.

  8. [Prospective evaluation of umbilical catheters in newborn infants. The Castrillo Hospital Group].

    PubMed

    2000-11-01

    To evaluate the current use of umbilical catheters in newborn infants in spain by analyzing technical characteristics and infections, as well as mechanical and local complications. Umbilical catheters inserted in newborns in the neonatal units of the hospitals in the Castrillo hospital group from july 15, 1998 to december 31, 1998 were collected for prospective analysis. A total of 489 umbilical catheters (201 venous and 288 arterial) placed in 475 newborns were analysed. No difficulties were found in inserting the catheters and they had an average indwelling time of less than 5 days. Most were removed electively. A total of 461 (94.3%) catheter tips were sent for microbiological examination and cultures were positive in 98 (21.2%). Of these, catheter contamination was found in 85 (18.4%) and catheter related sepsis was confirmed in 11(2.4%). Staphylococcus epidermidis was the most commonly isolated organism (72.2% of contaminated catheters and 63.6% of catheter-related sepsis). The main risk factor for contamination was duration of catheterization >/= 3 days and that for cather related sepsis was duration of catheterization >/= 3 days and birth weight complications were documented in 7.9% of venous catheters and 9% of arterial catheters. The most common complications were accidental dislodgment in venous catheters (3.98%) and clinical vascular compromise in the lower extremities in arterial catheters (2.77%). In our experience, the umbilical catheter had a low complication rate. To ensure that the benefits of catheterization outweigh the risks, prolonged use of these devices should be avoided.

  9. Rescue strategy for acute carotid stent thrombosis during carotid stenting with distal filter protection using forced arterial suction thrombectomy with a reperfusion catheter of the Penumbra System: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Won; Kang, Dong-Hun; Hwang, Jeong-Hyun; Park, Jaechan; Hwang, Yang-Ha; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2013-08-01

    Among the procedural complications related to carotid artery stenting (CAS), internal carotid artery (ICA) flow arrest is one of the most drastic complications, as it can cause major ischemic stroke. Acute carotid stent thrombosis (ACST) is a rare etiology of ICA flow arrest during carotid artery stenting with distal filter protection, but the most devastating. Moreover, no definitive management strategy has been established so far for treating ACST. We introduce a rescue management strategy for differential diagnosis of ICA flow arrest and for recanalization of ACST with a simple endovascular mechanical thrombectomy technique. In three cases of ICA flow arrest caused by ACST, selective angiography with a 1.7 F microcatheter provided confirmative diagnosis. Recanalization was then achieved with a Penumbra System (PS) reperfusion catheter using the forced arterial suction thrombectomy (FAST) technique. Successful recanalization with a Thrombolysis In Cerebral Infarction score of 3 was achieved for all three patients. Recanalization was confirmed with follow-up angiography at least 24 h after the procedure. No complications associated with this technique occurred. Based on our preliminary experiences, selective microangiography can be helpful for rapid diagnosis of ACST, and the present mechanical thrombectomy technique, using a modification of the PS, can play a role in adjuvant management or as a last resort for the treatment of ACST during CAS.

  10. Autonomic dysreflexia in a tetraplegic patient due to a blocked urethral catheter: spinal cord injury patients with lesions above T-6 require prompt treatment of an obstructed urinary catheter to prevent life-threatening complications of autonomic dysreflexia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Manchester Triage System is commonly used as the triage system in emergency departments of the UK. As per the Manchester Triage System, patients presenting with retention of urine to the accident and emergency department are categorized to yellow, which denotes that the ideal maximum time to first contact with a treating clinician will be 60 min. Cervical spinal cord injury patients, in whom urinary catheter is blocked, may develop suddenly headache, sweating, high blood pressure, cardiac dysrhythmia, convulsions, intracranial bleed, and acute neurogenic pulmonary oedema as a result of autonomic dysreflexia due to a distended bladder. Case presentation A 46-year-old male with C-6 tetraplegia developed urinary retention because of a blocked catheter. He was seen immediately on arrival in the spinal injuries unit. The blocked catheter was removed and a new catheter was about to be inserted. Then this patient said that the ceiling lights were very bright and glaring. Five milligrams of Nifedipine was given sublingually. This patient started having fits involving his head, face, neck and shoulders with loss of consciousness. A 14-French silicone Foley catheter was inserted per urethra without any delay and 300 ml of clear urine was drained. This patient recovered consciousness within 5 min. Computed tomography of the brain revealed no focal cerebral or cerebellar abnormality. There was no intra-cranial haemorrhage. Conclusion This case illustrates that spinal cord injury patients with lesion above T-6, who develop retention of urine because of a blocked catheter, may look apparently well, but these patients can develop suddenly life-threatening autonomic dysreflexia. Therefore, spinal cord injury patients, who present to the accident and emergency department or spinal units with a blocked urinary catheter, should be seen urgently although their vital signs may be stable on arrival. Increasing the awareness of staff in emergency departments regarding

  11. Total parenteral alimentation via indwelling umbilical catheters in the newborn period.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, R T; Rhodes, P G

    1976-01-01

    Total parenteral alimentation (TPA) was delivered to 80 infants via indwelling umbilical artery and to 9 via indwelling umbilical venous catheters. The primary indication for catheter placement and maintenance was monitoring of arterial blood gases (umbilical venous catheter tip in left atrium) in a group of sick neonates requiring increased inspired oxygen or assisted ventilation. Results were compared with those from 23 infants who had tunnelled jugular catheters for a variety of chronic medical and surgical problems preventing gastric or intestinal feeding. A mean weight gain was achieved in both groups. Mortality and morbidity rates were similar in both groups. The most common complications were infection and thrombotic phenomena. Metabolic complications were few. It is concluded that infusing TPA solutions via indwelling umbilical catheters presents no greater risk than infusion via tunnelled jugular catheters, and provides a method for supplying adequate caloric intake for growth during the acute stage of illness. PMID:827978

  12. Retrograde rotational thrombectomy with the Rotarex® catheter system: treatment option for an acute thrombotic occlusion of a subclavian artery

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenberg, Michael; Kaeunicke, Matthias; Lukat, Michael; Hailer, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The Rotarex® catheter system is an effective tool for endovascular therapy of acute occluded arteries of the lower extremities, especially for the femoral artery. The authors report the use of the Rotarex catheter system for retrograde percutaneous thrombectomy of an occluded subclavian artery. Case presentation: A 79-year-old male patient was referred because of acute pain and paleness of his left arm. Ultrasound examination and computed tomography angiography proved an occlusion of the left subclavian artery from the origin of the vessel. A retrograde recanalization was attempted using the 6F Rotarex catheter and combined with initiation of a local low-dose lytic therapy. A normal blood flow to the left arm was restored. Follow-up examination 3 months later showed a normal perfusion situation of the left upper extremity. Conclusion: The Rotarex catheter system is an effective tool for endovascular therapy of acute occluded arteries and efficacy is not restricted to the lower extremities. PMID:22102785

  13. [Thrombosis of the ending internal carotid artery complicating giant aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Truffert, A; Jouvenot, M; Coulaud, X; Dandelot, J B

    1993-01-01

    A 30-year old man suddenly developed left hemiplegia. CT scan and cerebral angiography showed complete thrombosis of a right internal carotid giant aneurysm. Anterograde propagation of the thrombus in the parent artery led to ipsilateral hemispheric infarction, an exceptional presenting symptom of such vascular malformation. The diagnostic and etiopathogenic aspects are briefly discussed.

  14. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension-A Deadly Complication of Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pankey, Edward A; Epps, Matthew; Nossaman, Bobby D; Hyman, Albert L; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease with limited therapeutic options. Moreover, when PAH occurs in patients diagnosed with systemic sclerosis, worse outcomes are observed. The purpose of this review is to discuss the etiologies of PAH found in the systemic sclerosis patient, limitations of current medical therapies, and, finally, potential therapies for patients with this combination. PMID:23626904

  15. Recommended Clinical Trial End Points for Dialysis Catheters.

    PubMed

    Allon, Michael; Brouwer-Maier, Deborah J; Abreo, Kenneth; Baskin, Kevin M; Bregel, Kay; Chand, Deepa H; Easom, Andrea M; Mermel, Leonard; Mokrzycki, Michele H; Patel, Priti R; Roy-Chaudhury, Prabir; Shenoy, Surendra; Valentini, Rudolph P; Wasse, Haimanot

    2017-07-20

    Central venous catheters are used frequently in patients on hemodialysis as a bridge to a permanent vascular access. They are prone to frequent complications, including catheter-related bloodstream infection, catheter dysfunction, and central vein obstruction. There is a compelling need to develop new drugs or devices to prevent central venous catheter complications. We convened a multidisciplinary panel of experts to propose standardized definitions of catheter end points to guide the design of future clinical trials seeking approval from the Food and Drug Administration. Our workgroup suggests diagnosing catheter-related bloodstream infection in catheter-dependent patients on hemodialysis with a clinical suspicion of infection (fever, rigors, altered mental status, or unexplained hypotension), blood cultures growing the same organism from the catheter hub and a peripheral vein (or the dialysis bloodline), and absence of evidence for an alternative source of infection. Catheter dysfunction is defined as the inability of a central venous catheter to (1) complete a single dialysis session without triggering recurrent pressure alarms or (2) reproducibly deliver a mean dialysis blood flow of >300 ml/min (with arterial and venous pressures being within the hemodialysis unit parameters) on two consecutive dialysis sessions or provide a Kt/V≥1.2 in 4 hours or less. Catheter dysfunction is defined only if it persists, despite attempts to reposition the patient, reverse the arterial and venous lines, or forcefully flush the catheter. Central vein obstruction is suspected in patients with >70% stenosis of a central vein by contrast venography or the equivalent, ipsilateral upper extremity edema, and an existing or prior history of a central venous catheter. There is some uncertainty about the specific criteria for these diagnoses, and the workgroup has also proposed future high-priority studies to resolve these questions. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of

  16. Phasic disappearance of left circumflex coronary artery from an early complication of mitral valve surgery

    PubMed Central

    Devabhaktuni, Subodh; Sunkara, Nirmal; Ahsan, Chowdhury

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message LV pseudoaneurysm can be a late complication of mitral valve replacement. In our case, it was an early postoperative complication. This pseudoaneurysm was causing compression of LCX artery during systole, leading to presentation of NSTEMI two weeks after the surgery. PMID:26576286

  17. Pseudoaneurysm of the hepatic artery, a rare complication of an amebic liver abscess

    PubMed Central

    Tacconi, D.; Lapini, L.; Giorni, P.; Corradini, S.; Caremani, M.

    2009-01-01

    Hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm is a rare complication of amebic or pyogenic liver abscesses, and it is generally diagnosed because of hemobilia due to rupture of the aneurysm into the biliary tract. The authors describe a case of vascular complication in a patient affected by amebic liver abscess. Pseudoaneurysm was diagnosed and resolved without hemobilia. PMID:23396987

  18. Procedural Complications, Rehospitalizations, and Repeat Procedures After Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rashmee U.; Freeman, James V.; Shilane, David; Wang, Paul J.; Go, Alan S.; Hlatky, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to estimate rates and identify predictors of inpatient complications and 30-day readmissions, as well as repeat hospitalization rates for arrhythmia recurrence following atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. Background AF is the most common clinically significant arrhythmia and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Radiofrequency or cryotherapy ablation of AF is a relatively new treatment option, and data on post-procedural outcomes in large general populations are limited. Methods Using data from the California State Inpatient Database, we identified all adult patients who underwent their first AF ablation from 2005 to 2008. We used multivariable logistic regression to identify predictors of complications and/or 30-day readmissions and Kaplan-Meier analyses to estimate rates of all-cause and arrhythmia readmissions. Results Among 4,156 patients who underwent an initial AF ablation, 5% had periprocedural complications, most commonly vascular, and 9% were readmitted within 30 days. Older age, female, prior AF hospitalizations, and less hospital experience with AF ablation were associated with higher adjusted risk of complications and/or 30-day readmissions. The rate of all-cause hospitalization was 38.5% by 1 year. The rate of readmission for recurrent AF, atrial flutter, and/or repeat ablation was 21.7% by 1 year and 29.6% by 2 years. Conclusions Periprocedural complications occurred in 1 of 20 patients undergoing AF ablation, and all-cause and arrhythmia-related rehospitalizations were common. Older age, female sex, prior AF hospitalizations, and recent hospital procedure experience were associated with a higher risk of complications and/or 30-day readmission after AF ablation. PMID:22222078

  19. [Proximal humeral fracture complicated by axillary artery lesion--a case review].

    PubMed

    Edelmann, K; Dvorák, J; Kopp, L; Obruba, P

    2010-09-01

    Although proximal humeral fractures are common diagnosis in emergency, cases of axillary artery injuries are rare. Authors present a patient, who underwent high energy trauma during a traffic accident like a pedestrian. Comminuted proximal humeral fracture was complicated with an occlusion of the third part of the axillary artery. There was necessary an urgent surgery, ostesynthesis with locking plate and reconstruction of the axillary artery by interposition of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) graft. Postoperative course was uncomplicated, patient had no symptoms of ischaemia of extremity or claudication and started physiotherapy. In review of the literature authors present possible reasons of arterial injuries, possibilities of treatments to minimize risk of amputation. Axillary artery injury from proximal humeral fracture is rare, but every surgeon must be aware of this entity in order to avoid fatal complications.

  20. Pulmonary artery dissection: an emerging cardiovascular complication in surviving patients with chronic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Khattar, R S; Fox, D J; Alty, J E; Arora, A

    2005-02-01

    Pulmonary arterial dissection is an extremely rare and usually lethal complication of chronic pulmonary hypertension. The condition usually manifests as cardiogenic shock or sudden death and is therefore typically diagnosed at postmortem examination rather than during life. However, recent isolated reports have described pulmonary artery dissection in surviving patients. The first case of pulmonary artery dissection in a surviving patient with cor pulmonale caused by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is presented. The aetiology, pathophysiology, and clinical presentation of pulmonary artery dissection are reviewed and factors that may aid diagnosis during life are discussed.

  1. Catheter ablation of postinfarction ventricular tachycardia: ten-year trends in utilization, in-hospital complications, and in-hospital mortality in the United States.

    PubMed

    Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Kolte, Dhaval; Harikrishnan, Prakash; Khera, Sahil; Aronow, Wilbert S; Mujib, Marjan; Mellana, William Michael; Eugenio, Paul; Lessner, Seth; Ferrick, Aileen; Fonarow, Gregg C; Ahmed, Ali; Cooper, Howard A; Frishman, William H; Panza, Julio A; Iwai, Sei

    2014-11-01

    There is a paucity of data regarding the complications and in-hospital mortality after catheter ablation for ventricular tachycardia (VT) in patients with ischemic heart disease. The purpose of this study was to determine the temporal trends in utilization, in-hospital mortality, and complications of catheter ablation of postinfarction VT in the United States. We used the 2002-2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database to identify all patients ≥18 years of age with a primary diagnosis of VT (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Edition, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] code 427.1) and who also had a secondary diagnosis of prior history of myocardial infarction (ICD-9-CM 412). Patients with supraventricular arrhythmias were excluded. Patients who underwent catheter ablation were identified using ICD-9-CM procedure code 37.34. Temporal trends in catheter ablation, in-hospital complications, and in-hospital mortality were analyzed. Of 81,539 patients with postinfarct VT, 4653 (5.7%) underwent catheter ablation. Utilization of catheter ablation increased significantly from 2.8% in 2002 to 10.8% in 2011 (Ptrend < .001). The overall rate of any in-hospital complication was 11.2% (523/4653), with vascular complications in 6.9%, cardiac in 4.3%, and neurologic in 0.5%. In-hospital mortality was 1.6% (75/4653). From 2002 to 2011, there was no significant change in the overall complication rates (8.4% to 10.2%, Ptrend = .101; adjusted odds ratio [per year] 1.02, 95% confidence interval 0.98-1.06) or in-hospital mortality (1.3% to 1.8%, Ptrend = .266; adjusted odds ratio [per year] 1.03, 95% confidence interval 0.92-1.15). The utilization rate of catheter ablation as therapy for postinfarct VT has steadily increased over the past decade. However, procedural complication rates and in-hospital mortality have not changed significantly during this period. Copyright © 2014 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Anal extrusion of migrated ventriculo-peritoneal shunt catheter: An unusual complication and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Sarkari, Avijit; Borkar, Sachin A.; Mahapatra, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    Authors present an unusual case of anal extrusion of peritoneal end of ventriculo-peritoneal shunt in a 2-year-old male child. Pertinent literature is reviewed regarding this rare complication of a very commonly performed neurosurgical procedure. PMID:27695576

  3. Assessing Intra-arterial Complications of Planning and Treatment Angiograms for Y-90 Radioembolization.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Osman; Patel, Mikin V; Masrani, Abdulrahman; Chong, Bradford; Osman, Mohammed; Tasse, Jordan; Soni, Jayesh; Turba, Ulku Cenk; Arslan, Bulent

    2017-05-01

    To report hepatic arterial-related complications encountered during planning and treatment angiograms for radioembolization and understand any potential-associated risk factors. 518 mapping or treatment angiograms for 180 patients with primary or metastatic disease to the liver treated by Yttrium-90 radioembolization between 2/2010 and 12/2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Intra-procedural complications were recorded per SIR guidelines. Patient demographics, indication for treatment, prior exposure to chemotherapeutic agents, operator experience, and disease burden were reviewed. Technical variables including type of radioembolic (glass vs. resin microspheres), indication for angiography (mapping vs. treatment), variant anatomy, and attempts at coil embolization were also assessed. Thirteen (13/518, 2.5%) arterial-related complications occurred in 13 patients. All but two complications resulted during transcatheter coil embolization to prevent non-target embolization. Complications included coil migration (n = 6), arterial dissection (n = 2), focal vessel perforation (n = 2), arterial thrombus (n = 2), and vasospasm prohibiting further arterial sub-selection (n = 1). Transarterial coiling was identified as a significant risk factor of complications on both univariate and multivariate regression analysis (odds ratio 7.8, P = 0.004). Usage of resin microspheres was also a significant risk factor (odds ratio 9.5, P = 0.042). No other technical parameters or pre-procedural variables were significant after adjusting for confounding on multivariate analysis (P > 0.05). Intra-procedural hepatic arterial complications encountered during radioembolization were infrequent but occurred mainly during coil embolization to prevent non-target delivery to extra-hepatic arteries.

  4. Incidence and treatment of hepatic artery complications after orthotopic liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ji-Chun; Lu, Shi-Chun; Yan, Lu-Nan; Li, Bo; Wen, Tian-Fu; Zeng, Yong; Cheng, Nan-Sheng; Wang, Jing; Luo, Yan; Pen, Yu-Lan

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the incidence and treatment of hepatic artery complications after orthotopic liver transplantation. METHODS: From February 1999 to May 2002, orthotopic liver transplantations (OLT) were performed in 72 patients with end-stage liver diseases with an average age of 40.2 ± 13.6 years (ranged from 11 to 68 years), 56 were males and 16 females. The preoperative evaluation for the 72 patients was performed using duplexsonography, abdominal CT scan, and angiography of the hepatic artery. All donor grafts were perfused and preserved in University of Wisconsin solution at 4 °C. OLT was performed with standard techniques with or without a veno-venous bypass. Reconstructions of hepatic artery were performed between the branch patches of gastroduodenal/hepatic or splenic/common hepatic artery confluence of the donors and recipients, and an end-to-end anastomosis between other arterial vessels of the donors and recipients was done. Arterial anastomosis was performed with interrupted 7-0/8-0 monofilament polypropylene suture under 3.5 x loupe magnification. Diagnosis of the complications of hepatic artery after OLT was based on the clinical presentations, ultrasound findings and arterial angiography. All patients were followed up regularly for duplex ultrasound scan after discharge. RESULTS: The overall incidence of arterial complications in 72 patients after OLTs was 1.4% (1/72). One 3 cm pseudoaneurysm at the side of anastomotic site of hepatic artery was found by urgent arteriogram due to hemoperitoneum secondary to bile leakage after OLT. Subsequently the pseudoaneurysm was successfully embolized and the blood flow toward the donor liver in hepatic artery remained. The overall postoperative 30-day mortality rate was 8.33%. The one-year survival rate was 83.72% in 50 patients with benign diseases and was 71.43% in 22 patients with malignant diseases following OLT. No death associated with complications of hepatic artery occurred. CONCLUSION: Careful

  5. Cervical internal carotid artery pseudoaneurysm complicating malignant otitis externa: first case report.

    PubMed

    Baker, Andrew; Rizk, Habib; Carroll, William; Lambert, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Pseudoaneurysm of the internal carotid artery (ICA) is a rare complication of head and neck infections. To date, three cases of petrous ICA pseudoaneurysm have been described as a complication of otogenic infection, including only one secondary to malignant otitis externa. We present here the first case of cervical ICA pseudoaneurysm as a complication of malignant otitis externa, and stress the importance of timely diagnosis to avoid fatal outcomes. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  6. [Hemothorax complicated with celiac artery compression syndrome (CACS); report of a case].

    PubMed

    Uga, Naoko; Adachi, Katsutoshi; Tarukawa, Tomohito; Okuda, Yasuyuki; Tanigawa, Kanji; Nakaya, Hitoshi; Sato, Tomoaki; Hioki, Iwao

    2014-05-01

    We report a case of hemothorax complicated with celiac artery compression syndrome (CACS). A 43-year-old man presented with a sudden onset left back pain. Computed tomography (CT) showed its hemothorax, esophageal artery aneurysm and severe stenosis of the celiac truncus with its anterior compression by median accurate ligament, and a diagnosis of CACS associated with rupture of the aneurysm was made. Emergent transcatheter arterial embolization of the aneurysm resulted in a technical failure, although the patient's condition was stable and performed esophageal artery ligation through video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery on day 5 after onset. After surgery, the patient recovered without significant incidents. A cause of this aneurysmal development was supposed to be a significantly increased esophageal arterial blood flow with its luminal dilation to compensate a decreased celiac blood flow. Segmental arterial mediolysis could not be excluded as another cause.

  7. [Technical Note: Subclavian artery misplacement of a 12F Shaldon catheter: percutaneous repair with a local closure device under temporary balloon tamponade].

    PubMed

    Wildberger, J E; Katoh, M; Fussen, R; Günther, R W

    2006-06-01

    A case of subsequent percutaneous repair using a local closure device with a collagen block (VasoSeal(R)) and temporary balloon tamponade after inadvertent subclavian artery misplacement of a 12F Shaldon catheter is reported. Balloon occlusion safely prevented displacement of collagen into the vascular lumen by occluding the 12F entry site. Furthermore, collagen-induced coagulation was facilitated.

  8. Emergency Stenting of Unprotected Left Main Coronary Artery after Acute Catheter-Induced Occlusive Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Akgul, Ferit; Batyraliev, Talantbek; Besnili, Fikret; Karben, Zarema

    2006-01-01

    Left main coronary artery dissection occurs very rarely during selective coronary angiography, but it generally progresses to complete coronary occlusion. The traditional treatment of occlusive dissection of the unprotected left main coronary artery has been surgical. Percutaneous treatment has been sporadic and controversial. We report a case of iatrogenic occlusive dissection of the unprotected left main coronary artery during diagnostic coronary angiography, followed by successful stenting of the lesion. PMID:17215985

  9. Association of pre and intraoperative variables with postoperative complications in coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gimenes, Camila; Barrile, Silvia Regina; Martinelli, Bruno; Ronchi, Carlos Fernando; Arca, Eduardo Aguilar; Gimenes, Rodrigo; Okoshi, Marina Politi; Okoshi, Katashi

    2013-01-01

    Objective To associate the pre- and intraoperative variables with postoperative complications of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Methods The pre- and intraoperative risk factors of individuals of both genders with diagnosis of coronary insufficiency undergoing coronary artery bypass graft have been studied. Results Fifty-eight individuals with median age 62 ± 10 year-old were included in the study, 67% of whom were male. Fourteen (24.1%) patients were smokers, 39 (67.2%) had previous myocardial infarction history, 11 (19%) had undergone coronary angioplasty, 74% had hypertension, 27% had diabetes mellitus, 64% had dyslipidemia and 15.5% had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Eighteen (31%) patients presented postoperative complications, most frequent being: infection in surgical incision, difficulties in deambulation, dyspnea, urinary infection and generalized weakness. Male patients had fewer complications than females (P=0.005). Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease remained hospitalized for longer time periods (P=0.019). Postoperative complications occurred in 50% of the patients with creatinine increased, while only 27.1% of the patients with normal value of creatinine had complications (P=0.049). In addition, complications occurred in 50% of the patients with diabetes mellitus, while only 23.8% of patients without diabetes mellitus had complications (P=0.032). The intraoperative factors showed no statistically significant differences. Conclusion The preoperative factors are associated with postoperative complications in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. PMID:24598958

  10. [Ischemic stroke secondary to spontaneous arterial dissection of the internal carotid artery: a rare postpartum complication].

    PubMed

    Chtaou, N; Messouak, O; Belahsen, M F

    2014-07-01

    We report a case of ischemic stroke caused by internal carotid artery dissection in a 35-year-old woman in postpartum following spontaneous labor and vaginal delivery. Ischemic stroke due to arterial dissection requires rapid diagnosis and anticoagulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Risk factors for complications in peripheral intravenous catheters in adults: secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Johann, Derdried Athanasio; Danski, Mitzy Tannia Reichembach; Vayego, Stela Adami; Barbosa, Dulce Aparecida; Lind, Jolline

    2016-11-28

    analyze the risk factors linked to complications in peripheral intravenous catheters. secondary data analysis of a randomized controlled trial with 169 medical and surgical patients placed in two groups, one with integrated safety catheter (n=90) and other using simple needle catheter (n=79), with three months follow-up time. the risk factors that raised the odds of developing complications were: hospitalization between 10-19 days (p=0.0483) and 20-29 days (p=0,0098), antimicrobial use (p=0.0288) and use of fluid solutions (p=0.0362). The 20 Gauge lowered the risks of complications (p=0.0153). Multiple analysis showed reduction of risk for the 20 Gauge (p=0.0350); heightened risk for solutions and fluids (p=0.0351) and use of corticosteroids (p=0.0214). risk factors linked to complications in peripheral intravenous catheters were: hospitalization periods between 10-29 days, antimicrobial infusion, solutions and fluids and corticosteroids. Regarding complications, 20 Gauge is a protecting factor compared with 22. Brazilian Clinical Trials Registry: RBR-46ZQR8. analisar os fatores de risco relacionados à ocorrência de complicações no cateterismo venoso periférico. análise secundária de dados de um ensaio clínico randomizado, no qual 169 pacientes clínicos e cirúrgicos foram alocados no grupo em uso de cateter de segurança completo (n = 90) e no grupo que utilizou cateter sobre agulha simples (n = 79), tempo de seguimento de três meses. os fatores de risco que aumentaram as chances de desenvolvimento de complicações foram: períodos de internação compreendidos entre 10 a 19 dias (p = 0,0483) e 20 a 29 dias (p = 0,0098), uso de antimicrobianos (p = 0,0288) e soluções e planos de soro (p = 0,0362). O calibre 20 Gauge diminuiu os riscos de ocorrência de complicações (p=0,0153). A análise múltipla apontou redução do risco para o calibre 20 (p = 0,0350); aumento do risco para a infusão de soluções e planos de soro (p = 0,0351) e administra

  12. Uncalibrated continuous cardiac output measurement in liver transplant patients: LiDCOrapid™ system versus pulmonary artery catheter.

    PubMed

    Costa, Maria Gabriella; Chiarandini, Paolo; Scudeller, Luigia; Vetrugno, Luigi; Pompei, Livia; Serena, Giovanni; Buttera, Stefania; Della Rocca, Giorgio

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the level of agreement between continuous cardiac output estimated by uncalibrated pulse-power analysis (PulseCOLiR) and intermittent (ICO) and continuous cardiac output (CCO) obtained using a pulmonary artery catheter (PAC). Prospective cohort study. University hospital intensive care unit. Twenty patients after liver transplantation. Pulmonary artery catheters were placed in all patients, and ICO and CCO were determined using thermodilution. PulseCOLiR measurements were made using a LiDCOrapid(TM) (LiDCO Ltd, Cambridge, UK). ICO data were determined after intensive care unit admission and every 8 hours until the 48th postoperative hour. CCO and PulseCOLiR measurements were recorded simultaneously at these same time intervals as well as hourly. For the 8-hour data set (140 data pairs), the mean bias and percentage errors (PE) were, respectively,-0.10 L/min and 39.2% for ICO versus PulseCOLiR and 0.79 L/min and 34.6% for CCO versus PulseCOLiR. For the hourly comparison of CCO versus PulseCOLiR (980 data pairs), the bias was 0.75 L/min and the PE 37%. To assess the ability to measure change, a 4-quadrant plot was produced for each pair of methods. The performance of PulseCOLiR was moderate in detecting changes in ICO. In conclusion, the uncalibrated PulseCOLir method should not be used as a substitute for the thermodilution technique for the monitoring of cardiac output in liver transplant patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. External carotid artery pseudoaneurysm with arteriovenous fistula: A rare complication of glass shrapnel injury

    PubMed Central

    Saraf, Rashmi; Sharma, Rajaram; Jaini, Lodha V; Mhashal, Shashikant

    2016-01-01

    Posttraumatic external carotid artery pseudoaneurysm with arteriovenous fistula is a rare condition. An 8-year-old child presented with painful pulsatile swelling in the preauricular region following a penetrating glass shrapnel injury. Detailed evaluation showed distal external carotid artery pseudoaneurysm with fistula, which was draining into the retromandibular vein. Endovascular treatment was performed. This case highlights the role of endovascular intervention for such rare complicated vascular pathologies. PMID:28104948

  14. Coil Embolization of an Arteriobiliary Fistula Caused by Hepatic Intra-Arterial Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Takao, Hidemasa Doi, Ippei; Makita, Kohzoh; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2005-12-15

    Arteriobiliary fistula is a rare complication of hepatic intra-arterial chemotherapy. We report successful coil embolization of an arteriobiliary fistula. An 80-year-old woman underwent percutaneous placement of an indwelling catheter into the replaced right hepatic artery for intra-arterial chemotherapy of liver metastases. Coil embolization of the left hepatic artery was not performed. The patient complained of abdominal pain during intra-arterial chemotherapy. Angiography revealed a fistula between the replaced right hepatic artery and the common bile duct. The fistula was successfully treated by coil embolization via the indwelling catheter, and the indwelling catheter was removed. Although such complications usually herald the termination of intra-arterial chemotherapy, the patient underwent percutaneous implantation of a new catheter-port system, and intra-arterial chemotherapy was restarted.

  15. [Systematic review of complications for proper informed consent (9) periprocedural complications of carotid artery stenting: a review article].

    PubMed

    Asai, Takumi; Miyachi, Shigeru; Izumi, Takashi; Matsubara, Noriaki; Yamanouchi, Takashi; Ota, Keisuke; Oda, Keiko; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko

    2013-08-01

    Carotid artery stenting(CAS)is a common procedure for the treatment of high surgical risk patients with carotid artery stenosis. Recent clinical study failed to show the non-inferiority of CAS to carotid endarterectomy(CEA)because of higher complication rates of CAS. However the result of a multicenter case study in Japan with tailored application of adequate devices including stents and protection devices revealed the safety of CAS in Japan. In this article the overall review in the previous reports of CAS are reviewed focusing on the complications and clinical outcome. Five randomized controlled trials concerning CAS versus CEA and 14 case series of CAS were reviewed, and the rates of periprocedural complications of CAS including death, stroke, myocardial infarction, hypotension and bradycardia, cranial nerve palsy, major vascular injury, cholesterol crystal embolization and hyperperfusion syndrome were summarized. Mortality within 30 days of procedures was 0.9%. The rate of any stroke was 6.0% from the five RCT results, but a recent 14-case series reported any stroke rate at 3-4% and severe stroke rate at 1-2% respectively. The rates of acute myocardial infarction, hypotension, and bradycardia were 1%, 4%, and 4-12% respectively. The rate of bleeding complication of the access root was about 2% and non-bleeding was 1-2%. Cholesterol crystal embolization occurred in 0.2%. Incidence of hyperperfusion syndrome occurred in 1.5%, and intracranial hemorrhage in 0.8%. Historically, the rapid improvement of devices and technical skills have contributed to the better clinical results. Also the lessons from complication cases have led to more appropriate indication and perfect protection to avoid adverse events. Therefore the rate of complication is always improving and those written in this article may not reflect the present real number. This article should be quoted with the previous reference as well as the newest data according to the operator's own experiences on

  16. Brachial insertion of fully implantable venous catheters for chemotherapy: complications and quality of life assessment in 35 patients.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Igor Yoshio Imagawa; Krutman, Mariana; Nishinari, Kenji; Yazbek, Guilherme; Teivelis, Marcelo Passos; Bomfim, Guilherme André Zottele; Cavalcante, Rafael Noronha; Wolosker, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate the perioperative safety, early complications and satisfaction of patients who underwent the implantation of central catheters peripherally inserted via basilic vein. Thirty-five consecutive patients with active oncologic disease requiring chemotherapy were prospectively followed up after undergoing peripheral implantation of indwelling venous catheters, between November 2013 and June 2014. The procedures were performed in the operating room by the same team of three vascular surgeons. The primary endpoints assessed were early postoperative complications, occurring within 30 days after implantation. The evaluation of patient satisfaction was based on a specific questionnaire used in previous studies. In all cases, ultrasound-guided puncture of the basilic vein was feasible and the procedure successfully completed. Early complications included one case of basilic vein thrombophlebitis and one case of pocket infection that did not require device removal. Out of 35 patients interviewed, 33 (94.3%) would recommend the device to other patients. Implanting brachial ports is a feasible option, with low intraoperative risk and similar rates of early postoperative complications when compared to the existing data of the conventional technique. The patients studied were satisfied with the device and would recommend the procedure to others. Avaliar prospectivamente segurança perioperatória, complicações precoces e grau de satisfação de pacientes submetidos ao implante de cateteres centrais de inserção periférica pela veia basílica. Foram acompanhados prospectivamente e submetidos ao implante de cateteres de longa permanência de inserção periférica, entre novembro de 2013 e junho de 2014, 35 pacientes consecutivos com doença oncológica ativa necessitando de quimioterapia. Os procedimentos foram realizados em centro cirúrgico por uma mesma equipe composta por três cirurgiões vasculares. Os desfechos primários avaliados foram as

  17. Subclavian artery- internal jugular vein fistula and heart failure: complication of internal jugular vein catheterization.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Jai; Takhellambam, Brojen; Ghosh, Biplab; Choudhury, Tauhidul Alam; Singh, Shivendra; Sharma, Om Prakash

    2013-02-01

    Hemodialysis in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) requires vascular access which can be either temporary or permanent. However, these procedures are not without complications. Arterial puncture is the most common immediate complication and pseudoaneurysm formation is the most common late sequel of internal jugular venous catheterization (IJVC). However, arterio-venous fistula (AVF) formatiorn following IJVC is rare. We are reporting a case of AVF formation between subclavian artery (SCA) and internal jugular vein (IJV) following IJVC which later on leads to the development of cardiac failure.

  18. Coronary artery perforation complicated by recurrent cardiac tamponade: a case illustration and review.

    PubMed

    DePersis, Michael; Khan, Safi U; Kaluski, Edo; Lombardi, William

    2017-03-07

    Coronary artery perforation during percutaneous intervention is a rare but potentially life threatening complication. The treatment of coronary perforation can be challenging in view of potential life threatening consequences such as cardiac tamponade or myocardial infarction. Presented is a clinical course of a 69year-old female who developed cardiac tamponade as a result of presumed wire related perforation of the posterolateral branch of the right coronary artery. Her clinical course was further complicated by recurrent tamponade, atrial fibrillation, stress induced cardiomyopathy, heparin induced thrombocytopenia and cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Based on review of the medical literature a treatment algorithm for wire perforation is suggested.

  19. Arterial-esophageal fistula: a severe complication in children with cardiovascular abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Sara; Cano, Indalecio; López, María; Moreno, Cecilia; Tejedor, Raquel; Marianeschi, Stefano; García, Enrique; Gómez, Andrés

    2010-03-01

    Fistulae between esophagus and major arteries are an extremely rare and severe condition. They have been described in patients with previous impairment or abnormalities of mediastinal vessels and intraesophageal increased pressure or as a complication of cardiovascular procedures. We report three cases of children with an aorto-esophageal fistula, a collateral pulmonary artery-esophageal fistula and an aberrant right subclavian artery-esophageal fistula that were successfully managed in coordination with pediatricians, anesthesiologists and both cardiovascular and pediatric surgeons. The severity of this pathology makes it important to suspect it and treat it by a multidisciplinary group of physicians.

  20. Dose-Dependent Effect of Statin Pretreatment on Preventing the Periprocedural Complications of Carotid Artery Stenting.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jeong-Ho; Sohn, Sung-Il; Kwak, Jaehyuk; Yoo, Joonsang; Chang, Hyuk Won; Kwon, O-Ki; Jung, Cheolkyu; Chung, Inyoung; Bae, Hee-Joon; Lee, Ji Sung; Han, Moon-Ku

    2017-07-01

    We investigated whether statin pretreatment can dose dependently reduce periprocedural complications in patients undergoing carotid artery stenting because of symptomatic carotid artery stenosis. We enrolled a consecutive series of 397 symptomatic carotid artery stenosis (≥50% stenosis on conventional angiography) treated with carotid artery stenting at 2 tertiary university hospitals over a decade. Definition of periprocedural complications included any stroke, myocardial infarction, and death within 1 month after or during the procedure. Statin pretreatment was divided into 3 categories according to the atorvastatin equivalent dose: none (n=158; 39.8%), standard dose (<40 mg of atorvastatin, n=155; 39.0%), and high dose (≥40 mg; n=84; 21.2%). A multivariable logistic regression analysis with the generalized estimating equation method was used to investigate independent factors in periprocedural complications. The patients' mean age was 68.7 years (81.6% men). The periprocedural complication rates across the 3 categories of statin use were 12.0%, 4.5%, and 1.2%. After adjustment, a change in the atorvastatin dose category was associated with reduction in the odds of periprocedural complications for each change in dose category (standard-dose statin: odds ratio, 0.24; 95% confidence interval, 0.07-0.81; high-dose statin: odds ratio, 0.11; 95% confidence interval, 0.01-0.96; P for trend=0.01). Administration of antiplatelet drugs was also an independent factor in periprocedural complications (OR, 0.18; 95% CI, 0.05-0.69). This study shows that statin pretreatment may reduce the incidence of periprocedural complications dose dependently in patients with symptomatic carotid artery stenting. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Hetastarch and bleeding complications after coronary artery surgery.

    PubMed

    Avorn, Jerry; Patel, Minalkumar; Levin, Raisa; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C

    2003-10-01

    Controversy persists concerning the potential association between intraoperative use of hetastarch (ie, hydroxyethyl starch [HES]) and postoperative bleeding in patients undergoing surgery. To determine whether intraoperative HES use is associated with an increased risk of postoperative bleeding following coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Case-control study. A large academic medical center in the northeastern United States. A consecutive sample of 238 patients undergoing CABG surgery. Cases consisted of patients who had received either > or = 3 U packed RBCs, > or = 3 U platelets, > or= 3 U fresh frozen plasma, or any cryoprecipitate within 72 h after undergoing a CABG procedure, or who had undergone surgical revision for bleeding. All other CABG surgery patients served as control subjects. In multivariate models that controlled for a wide variety of demographic and clinical characteristics, we found that, compared to patients who did not receive any HES during surgery, those who received 1 U intraoperative HES had more than twice the risk of a bleeding outcome (odds ratio [OR], 2.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10 to 4.91), and those who received 2 or 3 U HES had more than four times the risk of postoperative bleeding (OR, 4.57; 95% CI, 1.74 to 12.00). HES use in patients undergoing CABG surgery may be associated with a significant risk of postoperative bleeding. A double-blinded, randomized, controlled trial will be necessary to confirm this finding.

  2. Continuous blood pressure monitoring via non-invasive radial artery applanation tonometry and invasive arterial catheter demonstrates good agreement in patients undergoing colon carcinoma surgery.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Chen, Hanjian; Zheng, Jun; Mao, Bin; Zhu, Shengmei; Feng, Jingyi

    2016-12-20

    Radial artery applanation tonometry (RAAT) has been developed and utilized for continuous arterial pressure monitoring. However, evidence is lacking to clinically verify the RAAT technology and identify appropriate patient groups before routine clinical use. This study aims to evaluate the RAAT technology by comparing systolic blood pressure (SBP), mean blood pressure (MBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) values in patients undergoing colon carcinoma surgery. Blood Pressure (BP) values obtained via RAAT (TL-300, Tensys Medical Inc., San Diego, CA, USA) and conventional arterial catheterization from 30 colon carcinoma surgical patients were collected and compared via Bland-Atman method, linear regression and 4-quadrant plot concordance analysis. For SBPs, MBPs and DBPs, means of the differences (±standard deviation; 95% limits of agreement) were -0.9 (±7.6; -15.7 to 13.9) mmHg, 3.1 (±6.5; -9.6 to 15.8) mmHg and 4.3 (±7.4; -10.3 to 18.8) mmHg, respectively. Linear regression coefficients of determination were 0.8706 for SBPs, 0.8353 for MBPs and 0.6858 for DBPs. Four-quadrant concordance correlation coefficients were 0.8740, 0.8522 and 0.7108 for SBPs, MBPs and DBPs, respectively. A highly selected patient collective undergoing colon carcinoma surgery was studied. BP measurements obtained via the TL-300 had clinically acceptable agreement with that acquired invasively using an arterial catheter. For use in clinical routine, it is necessary to take measures for improvement regarding movement artifacts and dilution of noise. A large sample size of patients under various conditions is also needed to further evaluate the RAAT technology before clinically routine use.

  3. Complications from long-term indwelling central venous catheters in hematologic patients with special reference to infection.

    PubMed

    Kappers-Klunne, M C; Degener, J E; Stijnen, T; Abels, J

    1989-10-15

    Forty-three evaluable patients with hematologic malignancies, mainly acute leukemia, were prospectively randomized to receive a double lumen central venous catheter or a totally implantable venous access system. The mean catheter stay was 166 days (median, 104 days) for the 23 double lumen catheters and 164 days (median, 65 days) for implanted systems. Exit site infections were not encountered in double lumen catheters, but there were two proven infections around the injection port of implanted devices. Tunnel infections did not occur. Seven double lumen catheters and four implanted systems were removed because of infection. Staphylococcus epidermidis was the predominant microorganism cultured from these catheters. Five of nine patients with double lumen catheters and catheter-related S. epidermidis infection and the two patients with implanted systems in whom S. epidermidis was cultured were on selective gut decontamination. The pattern of infection did not seem to be influenced by this regimen. Totally implantable systems proved to be as safe as double lumen central venous lines.

  4. Perforation of Transverse Colon: A Catastrophic Complication of Uterine Artery Embolization for Fibroids

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, Jyotsna Bancroft, Karen; Lay, James

    2012-12-15

    We report a case of a 43-year-old woman who underwent uterine artery embolization (UAE) for a symptomatic large fibroid uterus and had spontaneous perforation of the transverse colon 3 months after embolisation with near-fatal consequences. We believe this is the first reported case in the literature of this serious complication of UAE. We briefly review the literature on bowel complications after UAE and discuss lessons to be learned regarding patient selection and postprocedure follow-up.

  5. Technique, Complication, and Long-Term Outcome for Endovascular Treatment of Iliac Artery Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ozkan, Ugur Oguzkurt, Levent; Tercan, Fahri

    2010-02-15

    The aim of this study was to report technical details, procedure-related complications, and results of endovascular treatment in chronic iliac artery occlusion. Between 2001 and 2008, endovascular treatments of 127 chronic iliac artery occlusions in 118 patients (8 women and 110 men; mean age, 59 years) were retrospectively reviewed. The study was based on Ad Hoc Committee on Reporting Standards (Society for Vascular Surgery/International Society for Cardiovascular Surgery Standards). All occlusions were treated with stent placement with or without preliminary balloon angioplasty. Kaplan-Meier estimators were used to determine patency rates. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine variables affecting successful recanalization, major complications, early stent thrombosis ({<=}30 days), and primary and secondary patency rates. Initial technical success was achieved in 117 (92%) procedures. Successful recanalization was obtained by antegrade approach in 69 of 77 (90%) procedures and by retrograde approach in 52 of 105 (50%) procedures (p < 0.001). Complications were encountered in 28 (24%) patients [minor in 7 patients (6%) and major in 22 patients (19%)]. One death occurred in the operative period secondary to iliac artery rupture. Early stent thrombosis was seen in eight (7%) patients. Presence of critical limb ischemia (p = 0.03), subintimal recanalization (p = 0.03), and major complication (p = 0.02) were the independent predictors of early stent thrombosis on multivariate analysis. Primary and secondary patency rates at 5 years were 63 and 93%, respectively. Presence of critical limb ischemia, TASC type C iliac lesions, combined occlusions of both common and external iliac arteries, and major complications were associated with decreased patency rates on univariate analysis, whereas these factors were not independent predictors of stent patency on multivariate analysis. In conclusion, endovascular treatment of iliac artery occlusion has a

  6. Pedicled and skeletonized single and bilateral internal thoracic artery grafts and the incidence of sternal wound complications: Insights from the Arterial Revascularization Trial.

    PubMed

    Benedetto, Umberto; Altman, Douglas G; Gerry, Stephen; Gray, Alastair; Lees, Belinda; Pawlaczyk, Rafal; Flather, Marcus; Taggart, David P

    2016-07-01

    The question of whether skeletonized internal thoracic artery harvesting reduces the incidence of sternal wound complications in comparison with the pedicled technique, in the context of single or bilateral internal thoracic arteries, remains controversial. We studied the impact of the internal thoracic artery harvesting strategy on sternal wound complication in the Arterial Revascularization Trial. Patients enrolled in the Arterial Revascularization Trial (n = 3102) were randomized to coronary artery bypass grafting with single or bilateral internal thoracic arteries. Sternal wound complication rates were examined according to the harvesting technique that was documented in 2056 patients. The internal thoracic artery harvesting technique, based on the surgeon's preference, resulted in 4 groups: pedicled single internal thoracic artery (n = 607), pedicled bilateral internal thoracic artery (n = 459), skeletonized single internal thoracic artery (n = 512), and skeletonized bilateral internal thoracic artery (n = 478). Propensity scores weighting was used to estimate the impact of the harvesting technique on sternal wound complications. A total of 219 of 2056 patients (10.6%) experienced a sternal wound complication within 1 year from the index operation. Of those, only 25 patients (1.2%) required sternal wound reconstruction. Pedicled bilateral internal thoracic artery (odds ratio [OR], 1.80; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23-2.63) but not skeletonized bilateral internal thoracic artery (OR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.65-1.53) or skeletonized single internal thoracic artery (OR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.57-1.38) was associated with a significantly increased risk of any sternal wound complications compared with pedicled single internal thoracic artery. The present Arterial Revascularization Trial substudy suggests that, with a skeletonization technique, the risk of sternal wound complication with bilateral internal thoracic artery grafting is similar to that after standard

  7. Visceral and Renal Artery Complications of Suprarenal Fixation during Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Choke, Edward; Munneke, Graham; Morgan, Robert; Belli, Anna-Maria; Dawson, Joseph; Loftus, Ian M.; McFarland, Robert; Loosemore, Thomas; Thompson, Matthew M.

    2007-07-15

    Background. The effect of suprarenal fixation of endovascular grafts on renal and visceral artery function remains undefined. This study aimed to determine renal and visceral artery complications following suprarenal fixation during endovascular aneurysm repair (EVR). Methods. Prospectively collected data from 112 patients who received suprarenal fixation (group SF) and 36 patients who received infrarenal fixation (group IF) in a single institution from December 1997 to April 2005 were reviewed retrospectively. Median follow-up was 26 months (range 0.1-101 months). Results. Stent struts extended to or above the level of 106 (94.6%) right renal arteries, 104 (92.9%) left renal arteries, 49 (43.8%) superior mesenteric arteries (SMA), and 7 (6.3%) celiac arteries in group SF. This group had 2 (1.8%) unintentional main renal artery occlusions, of which 1 was successfully treated at the first procedure with a renal stent. There was 1 (0.9%) SMA occlusion which resulted in bowel infarction and death. Group IF had no renal or visceral artery complications. There were no late-onset occlusions or infarcts. There was no significant difference in median serum creatinine between groups SF and IF at 1 month (p = 0.18) and 6 months to 12 months (p 0.22) follow-up. The change in serum creatinine over time was also not significantly different within each group (SF, p = 0.09; IF, p 0.38). Conclusions. In this study, suprarenal fixation was associated with a very small incidence of immediate renal and visceral artery occlusion. There did not appear to be any medium-term sequelae of suprarenal fixation.

  8. Giant coronary artery aneurysms complicating Kawasaki disease in Mexican children.

    PubMed

    Garrido-García, Luis M; Morán-Villaseñor, Edna; Yamazaki-Nakashimada, Marco A; Cravioto, Patricia; Galván, Fernando

    2017-08-29

    One of the most important complications of Kawasaki disease is the development of giant coronary aneurysms. Risk factors for their development are still not clear. A retrospective analysis was conducted at the National Institute of Paediatrics in Mexico City, Mexico. It included all patients with a diagnosis of acute Kawasaki disease between August, 1995 and August, 2015. Clinical and laboratory findings, as well as echocardiographic measurements, were recorded. Patients with giant coronary aneurysms (z-score⩾10) were compared with the rest of the patients. A value of p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals were calculated to define risk factors. During the study period, 416 patients were diagnosed with Kawasaki disease. Of them, 34 developed giant coronary aneurysms during the acute stage of the disease. In the multivariate analysis, patients younger than 1 year, those with a higher duration of illness at the time of diagnosis, and those who received additional intravenous immunoglobulin showed a significantly higher frequency of giant coronary aneurysms. One of the main factors associated with the development of giant coronary aneurysms was the delay in the diagnosis of Kawasaki disease. This finding highlights the importance of maintaining a high suspicion of the disease, which would enable an early diagnosis and prompt treatment and decrease the risk for developing giant coronary aneurysms.

  9. The efficacy of pre-delivery prophylactic trans-catheter arterial balloon occlusion of bilateral internal iliac artery in patients with suspected placental adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yoon Jin; Oh, Yong Taek; Kim, Ju Young; Jung, Sun Young; Chon, Seung Joo; Kim, Jeong Ho; Byun, Sung Su

    2017-01-01

    Objective Prophylactic trans-catheter arterial balloon occlusion (PTABO) before cesarean section of placenta previa totalis has been introduced to prevent massive hemorrhage. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical usefulness of PTABO in cases of suspected placental adhesion and to examine antepartal risk factors and perinatal outcomes in women with placental adhesion. Methods Between January 2012 and December 2015, 77 patients who had undergone ultrasonography for evaluation of placenta previa were enrolled in this study. Seventeen of these patients with suspected placental adhesion by ultrasonography and Pelvic MRI underwent PTABO before cesarean section and another 59 patients underwent cesarean section without PTABO. Antepartal risk factors and peripartum maternal and neonatal outcomes were compared between patients with PTABO and those without PTABO. Results More advanced maternal age, longer in gestational weeks at delivery, and more common previous cesarean section history were observed in the PTABO group. Placenta adhesion, abnormal Doppler findings, and frequency of transfusion were more common in the PTABO group. However there was no significant difference in estimated blood loss, hospital days, and neonatal outcome. It had occurred 3 cases of hysterectomy and 1 case of uterine artery embolization after cesarean section in the PTABO group. Conclusion Close surveillance of antepartum risk factors for placental adhesion using ultrasonography and pelvic magnetic resonance imaging is important to prevention of massive hemorrhage during cesarean section. PTABO before cesarean section might result in reduced blood loss and requirement for transfusion during the operation. PMID:28217667

  10. Subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm: a rare and serious complication of central venous catheterization in an infant.

    PubMed

    Koklu, Esad; Poyrazoglu, Hakan; Yikilmaz, Ali; Canpolat, Mehmet; Konuskan, Bahadir

    2008-02-01

    Serious complications of central venous access occur in 0.4-9.9% of patients undergoing attempted central venepuncture. We report an unusual case of an 18-month-old infant in whom a right subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm developed rapidly after attempted subclavian vein catheterization without US guidance failed.

  11. The 10-year Trend of Periprocedural Complication Following Carotid Artery Stenting; Single Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Jeong-Ho; Kang, Jihoon; Yeo, Min-Ju; Kim, Beom Joon; Jang, Min Uk; Bae, Hee-Joon; Kwon, O-Ki; Hwang, Gyo Jun; Oh, Chang Wan; Jung, Cheolkyu; Lee, Ji Sung; Han, Moon-Ku

    2015-04-15

    PurposeCarotid endarterectomy and stenting are used to treat carotid stenosis, with the volume of carotid artery procedures increasing over the past decade. We investigated the 10-year trend of periprocedural complications with an increasing procedure volume of carotid stenting at a single tertiary hospital.MethodsWe collected 416 consecutive cases (384 patients) of carotid artery stenting performed for either symptomatic (231 cases, 55.5 %) or asymptomatic (185 cases, 44.5 %) internal carotid artery stenosis at a single center. Periprocedural complication was defined as any stroke, myocardial infarction, or death. Procedure-related outcome included any dissection, hemodynamic event, or periprocedural complication.ResultsThe mean age was 68.8 years (82.8 % males; range of 20–89 years); 23.9 % were older than 75 years. Before the procedure, 99.3 and 56.0 % of patients received antiplatelet and lipid-lowering medication, respectively. The overall periprocedural complication rate was 3.6 % (1.6 and 5.2 % in the asymptomatic and symptomatic group, respectively). The composite outcome of any stroke or death was 3.4 %. Periprocedural complication and procedure-related outcome showed a decremental trend with increasing procedure volume, and this trend remained after adjusting for confounders.ConclusionsOur study suggests that carotid stenting at an experienced center might reduce the periprocedural complications. Our periprocedural complication rate of carotid artery stenting may be comparable to, or somewhat lower than, that reported in other clinical trials.

  12. Endovascular treatment of PA pseudoaneurysm caused by Swan-Ganz catheter.

    PubMed

    Rudziński, Piotr N; Demkow, Marcin; Michałowska, Ilona; Abramczuk, Elżbieta; Szymański, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    The following case report describes a complication of Swan-Ganz catheterization and its endovascular treatment with a single coil. Application of this particular catheter in the pulmonary artery during cardiac surgery may lead to mechanical perforation and creation of an extravascular sac, which is called a pseudoaneurysm. There are different methods that lead to tamponade or closure of the leakage. Interventional cardiology procedures are nowadays the most appropriate way of treatment of Swan-Ganz catheter induced vascular complications.

  13. Successful hybrid treatment for huge visceral artery aneurysms with contained rupture complicating segmental arterial mediolysis.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yasutoshi; Ito, Toshiro; Imamura, Masafumi; Hirata, Koichi

    2015-12-01

    Segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM) is a rare arteriopathy that can cause acute abdomen. This report describes the case of a 31-year old male suffering from huge visceral aneurysms with contained rupture. We established a treatment strategy using a hybrid procedure that consisted of endovascular and surgical techniques for these splenic, common hepatic artery and coeliac axis aneurysms related to SAM. The patient was successfully treated with aorto-superior mesenteric artery bypass followed by endovascular aortic stent grafting to interrupt inflow to coeliac aneurysms, and distal splenopancreatectomy with en bloc resection of those aneurysms. We conclude that this hybrid procedure consisting of endovascular and surgical techniques is useful and is a safe treatment option for SAM-related visceral aneurysms.

  14. The application of autologous pulmonary artery in surgical correction of complicated aortic arch anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Shusheng; Cen, Jianzheng; Chen, Jimei; Xu, Gang; He, Biaochuan; Teng, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Background In the patients with longer-segment aortic arch hypoplasia or interruption with ventricular septal defect, surgery with homograft vessel or autologous pericardial patch to augment descending aortic arch will not result in adverse reactions caused by end-to-end anastomosis. In this study, we retrospectively analyzed primary experience of surgical correction of complicated aortic arch anomaly with autologous main pulmonary artery. Methods From July 2010 to March 2016, the twenty-one cases of aortic arch complex anomalies were reconstructed with autologous main pulmonary artery. There were 5 patients with interrupted aortic arch and 16 patients with coarctation of aorta. In patients with interrupted aortic arch, anterior wall of main pulmonary artery was excised to form a conduit whose diameter varied according to the area of patient’s body surface. Both ends of the conduit were anastomosed to aortic arch and descending aorta, respectively. In other patients with coarctation of aorta, aortic arch was augmented with tailored pulmonary artery patch in oval shape. The defect of main pulmonary artery was repaired with autologous pericardial patch. Results There was only one patient died of multiple organ failure postoperatively. The other twenty patients survived without any neurologic complications. Differences of blood pressure between upper and lower limbs were not significant in all cases. During follow-up period, the echocardiography for all patients in the third, sixth, twelfth, and twenty-fourth months showed that blood flow in the descending aortic arch was fluent and there was no obvious blood pressure gradient. Conclusions Autologous main pulmonary artery can be used to repair complicated aortic arch anomalies completely without any anastomotic tension or bronchial obstruction postoperatively. This procedure is feasible and possesses predominant early and mid-term effects, and autologous main pulmonary artery can retain growth capacity during follow

  15. [Case of Central Venous Catheter Laceration of the Pectoralis Minor Muscle].

    PubMed

    Endo, Shunji; Furuichi, Kinya; Morimoto, Kengo; Kotsuma, Yasuyuki; Yamada, Terumasa; Ikenaga, Masakazu; Adachi, Shinichi; Ohta, Katsuya; Nakashima, Shinsuke; Ueda, Masami; Tsuda, Yujiro; Takayama, Hirotoshi; Itakura, Hiroaki; Nishikawa, Kazuhiro; Nishijima, Junichi

    2016-12-01

    A 50's underwent gastrectomy for gastric cancer 4 years before. He had received chemotherapy for para-aortic lymph node metastases. A central venous catheter with a subcutaneous port was implanted via the right subclavian vein, under ultrasonographic guidance, 1 year 3 months earlier. The patient complained of swelling in his right chest during intravenous injection of ramucirumab and paclitaxel via the port. A chest radiograph revealed that a catheter fracture. A CT scan showed that the fractured catheter had lacerated the pectoralis minor muscle and the tip was in the right inferior pulmonary artery. The catheter fragment was removed using a pigtail catheter and a snare catheter via a percutaneous transfemoral approach, without any complication. The catheter was cut at 15.5 cm from the tip. This fracture was thought to be caused by a kink in the pectoralis muscle.

  16. Horner's syndrome: a complication of experimental carotid artery surgery in rats.

    PubMed

    Aalbers, M W; Rijkers, K; van Winden, L A A P; Hoogland, G; Vles, J S H; Majoie, H J M

    2009-05-11

    To report on the occurrence of iatrogenic Horner's syndrome (HS) in epileptic rats after implantation of an electrode for vagus nerve stimulation and to describe the possible consequences of this new complication of carotid artery surgery in rats. A bipolar circular electrode was placed around the left carotid artery and vagus nerve of 31 rats. The incidence of HS was evaluated by visual inspection within 24 h after surgery. 68% of rats suffered from HS immediately after surgery. This complication did not affect epileptogenesis. The occurrence of HS in the rat is a frequent complication of vagus nerve electrode implantation, which does not affect epileptogenesis in this study. However, rats affected by HS may suffer from damage to the sympathetic innervation of the gut, due to rat-specific neuroanatomy. Therefore, caution towards other research questions is warranted.

  17. Arterial cutdown reduces complications after brachial access for peripheral vascular intervention.

    PubMed

    Kret, Marcus R; Dalman, Ronald L; Kalish, Jeffrey; Mell, Matthew

    2016-07-01

    Factors influencing risk for brachial access site complications after peripheral vascular intervention are poorly understood. We queried the Society for Vascular Surgery Vascular Quality Initiative to identify unique demographic and technical risks for such complications. The Vascular Quality Initiative peripheral vascular intervention data files from years 2010 to 2014 were analyzed to compare puncture site complication rates and associations encountered with either brachial or femoral arterial access for peripheral vascular intervention. Procedures requiring multiple access sites were excluded. Complications were defined as wound hematoma or access vessel stenosis/occlusion. Univariate and hierarchical logistic regression was used to identify independent factors associated with site complications after brachial access. Of 44,634 eligible peripheral vascular intervention procedures, 732 (1.6%) were performed through brachial access. Brachial access was associated with an increased complication rate compared with femoral access (9.0% vs 3.3%; P < .001), including more hematomas (7.2% vs 3.0%; P < .001) and access site stenosis/occlusion (2.1% vs 0.4%; P < .001). On univariate analysis, factors associated with brachial access complications included age, female gender, and sheath size. Complications occurred less frequently after arterial cutdown (4.1%) compared with either ultrasound-guided (11.8%) or fluoroscopically guided percutaneous access (7.3%; P = .07 across all variables). Neither surgeons' overall peripheral vascular intervention experience nor prior experience with brachial access predicted likelihood of adverse events. By multivariate analysis, male gender (odds ratio [OR], 0.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.28-0.84; P < .01) and arterial cutdown (OR, 0.25; 95% CI, 0.07-0.87; P = .04) were associated with significantly decreased risk for access complications. Larger sheath sizes (>5F) were associated with increased risk of complications (OR

  18. Endovascular Retrieval of Migrated Distal End of Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt from Bilateral Pulmonary Arteries: A Technical Note.

    PubMed

    Dossani, Rimal Hanif; Maiti, Tanmoy Kumar; Patra, Devi Prasad; Nanda, Anil; Cuellar, Hugo

    2017-06-21

    Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunting of cerebrospinal fluid is one of the most common procedures performed by neurosurgeons around the world. Migration of distal VP shunt catheter into bilateral segmental pulmonary arteries is an extremely rare complication of VP shunt placement. In the present case, a 30-year-old male underwent VP shunting complicated by migration of distal VP shunt catheter into the bilateral pulmonary arteries. Despite manual attempt at externalizing the distal VP shunt catheter at the level of the clavicle, a small piece of distal VP shunt catheter in bilateral pulmonary arteries was noted on computed tomography of the chest obtained after manual externalization. This persistent distal VP shunt catheter was likely left behind after a break in the distal VP shunt catheter during manual externalization procedure. Given the small size of the segmental pulmonary arteries, a novel endovascular technique was used to move the distal VP shunt catheter from the bilateral segmental pulmonary arteries to the main pulmonary trunk. Once in the main pulmonary trunk, a snare device was used to retrieve the distal shunt catheter through the femoral vein. In this technical note, the authors highlight the relevant endovascular technical details to first move the VP shunt catheter from the bilateral segmental arteries followed by successful catheter retrieval using snare device. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [The bladder catheter].

    PubMed

    Pestalozzi, D M

    1996-09-01

    The benefit of the transurethral catheter to protect or measure renal function is well accepted. Urethral stricture and infection of the lower urinary tract as the complications should lead to a cautious use of catheters. A careful placement, the choice of the best material and a correct management help to avoid complications. Alternatives are discussed.

  20. Infectious complications associated with the use of central venous catheters in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Martinho, Gláucia Helena; Romanelli, Roberta M C; Teixeira, Gustavo Machado; Macedo, Antonio V; Chaia, Juliana M C; Nobre, Vandack

    2013-07-01

    In this prospective, observational study, we sought to investigate the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of central venous catheter-associated infection in 56 patients admitted for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In multivariate analysis, we found a 7-fold higher risk of central line-associated bloodstream infection with central venous catheter insertion in the internal jugular vein as compared with the subclavian access. Patients with central line-associated bloodstream infection had a higher incidence of acute renal failure.

  1. Minimally invasive transradial intervention using sheathless standard guiding catheters.

    PubMed

    From, Aaron M; Bell, Malcolm R; Rihal, Charanjit S; Gulati, Rajiv

    2011-11-15

    We evaluated a sheathless transradial technique for interventions using standard five and six French nonhydrophilic guiding catheters. Miniaturization of transradial interventions may serve to improve patient comfort and reduce the risk of access-site complications. Guiding catheters carry an outer diameter approximately 2 Fr sizes smaller than their corresponding introducer sheaths. We identified consecutive patients who underwent transradial intervention between August 2010 and December 2010 using 5 or 6 Fr guides with a sheathless technique. A total of 11 patients were identified (mean age 70.7 ± 10.9 years; 73% male). Single coronary intervention was performed in 10 patients and renal artery intervention in one. Right radial access and 6 Fr guide catheters were used in the majority (each 73%). Five techniques were used to create an inner dilator as the taper. Four of these inner tapers (standard diagnostic catheters, hydrophilic diagnostic catheters, long sheath dilators and guide extensions) enabled successful sheathless guide insertion in all 10 patients attempted. One technique (a partially inflated angioplasty balloon protruding from the guide) attempted in one patient was unsuccessful. All interventional procedures were successful, there were no radial artery access-site complications and in no case was cross-over to femoral artery access-site required. Sheathless transradial intervention using standard 5 and 6 Fr guiding catheters is a safe and effective method for treatment of coronary and peripheral vascular lesions. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Arterial and venous complications of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia in burn patients.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jeffrey R; Klein, Matthew B; Gernsheimer, Terri; Honari, Shari; Gibbons, Janet; Gibran, Nicole S

    2007-01-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is an antibody-mediated complication of heparin treatment that can result in a number of devastating thrombotic complications. Given the common use of heparin for deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis in patients with burns, we reviewed the incidence and complications of HIT in our burn center. We performed a retrospective review of all patients treated with heparin at our burn center who underwent testing for HIT from 2001 to 2005. Screening for HIT was performed by platelet factor 4 enzyme-linked immunoassay. Records were reviewed with particular attention to indications for HIT testing, duration of heparin therapy, type of heparin used (fractionated vs unfractionated), indication for heparin use (prophylactic vs therapeutic), treatment of HIT, and complications of HIT. During the 4-year study period, 625 patients received heparin therapy at some point during their hospital course. Of these patients, 43 (6.9%) underwent testing for HIT and 10 of the 43 screened patients (23%) were positive; the incidence among all heparinized burn patients was 1.6%. Thrombotic complications of HIT included arterial thrombosis requiring limb amputation (two patients), deep venous thrombosis (three patients), and pulmonary embolism (two patients). One patient died, presumably secondary to a pulmonary embolism. All patients were anticoagulated after HIT diagnosis, and four patients developed bleeding complications. HIT is a potentially devastating complication of heparin administration. Whereas our overall incidence of HIT was low, HIT+ patients developed significant complications, including arterial and venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolus, limb loss, and death. Treatment for such HIT-related thromboses usually resulted in bleeding complications requiring transfusions. The routine use of heparin for deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis needs to be carefully considered in light of these potential complications.

  3. Lack of difference between continuous versus intermittent heparin infusion on maintenance of intra-arterial catheter in postoperative pediatric surgery: a randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Witkowski, Maria Carolina; de Moraes, Maria Antonieta P.; Firpo, Cora Maria F.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare two systems of arterial catheters maintenance in postoperative pediatric surgery using intermittent or continuous infusion of heparin solution and to analyze adverse events related to the site of catheter insertion and the volume of infused heparin solution. METHODS: Randomized control trial with 140 patients selected for continuous infusion group (CIG) and intermittent infusion group (IIG). The variables analyzed were: type of heart disease, permanence time and size of the catheter, insertion site, technique used, volume of heparin solution and adverse events. The descriptive variables were analyzed by Student's t-test and the categorical variables, by chi-square test, being significant p<0.05. RESULTS: The median age was 11 (0-22) months, and 77 (55%) were females. No significant differences between studied variables were found, except for the volume used in CIG (12.0±1.2mL/24 hours) when compared to IIG (5.3±3.5mL/24 hours) with p<0.0003. CONCLUSIONS: The continuous infusion system and the intermittent infusion of heparin solution can be used for intra-arterial catheters maintenance in postoperative pediatric surgery, regardless of patient's clinical and demographic characteristics. Adverse events up to the third postoperative day occurred similarly in both groups. However, the intermittent infusion system usage in underweight children should be considered, due to the lower volume of infused heparin solution [ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01097031]. PMID:24473958

  4. Influence of catheter and arterial diameter on flow distal to an intra-aortic balloon insertion site: a theoretic examination and in vitro assessment.

    PubMed

    Ohley, W J; Antonelli, L; Leschinsky, B

    1998-01-01

    Percutaneous placement of an intra-aortic balloon (IAB) through a femoral artery of a patient is associated with a risk of reduction of blood flow distal to the balloon insertion site. If this reduction is severe, it ultimately causes limb ischemia and necessitates IAB removal. Although clinicians intuitively know that larger catheters cause higher flow restrictions, very few studies have examined this situation quantitatively. The authors theoretically analyzed the insertion site geometry in relationship to the catheter diameter and other factors effecting distal flow. To verify the findings, in vitro flow tests were conducted with various IAB catheters currently available on the market, as well as their respective sheaths and hemostasis plugs. This was done using a blood analog solution in an array of polyvinyl chloride tubing sizes. Diameters of the vessel and catheter have a profound and nonlinear effect on the distal flow. For example, a 12.2 Fr catheter in a 0.187 in. vessel only allows 19.9% of normal flow, whereas a 6.1 Fr catheter in the same size vessel allows a 92.0% flow. As the catheter diameter increases, the physical resistance suddenly grows, which causes a significant drop in distal flow. These results are accurately predicted by a mathematical model that gives flow percentage results to within 15% of those measured experimentally. In general, vessels larger than 5 mm in diameter do not exhibit substantial flow reduction for most IABs with and without sheaths. In smaller vessels, however, this reduction may be significant. Sheathless insertion is extremely effective in improving distal blood flow in such a situation. Hemostasis plugs restrict the distal flow similar to respective sheaths, thus diminishing the benefits of sheathless insertion.

  5. Carotid artery surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... through the catheter around the blocked area during surgery. Your carotid artery is opened. The surgeon removes ...

  6. [Myelomalacia following vertebral angiography with a femoral catheter (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Seitz, D; Hintze, A

    1976-07-01

    Cerebral angiography with femoral catheters in two patients was followed by an incomplete cervical transverse myelitis. The complications were thought to be due to high contrast concentration in the cervical spinal vessels because of hypoplasia of one vertebral artery, and to contrast injection into the thyro-cervical trunk.

  7. Prophylactic antibiotics in umbilical artery catheterization in the newborn*

    PubMed Central

    van Vliet, P. K. J.; Gupta, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Over a period of 30 months, umbilical artery catheters were inserted in 229 infants. The main complications were haemorrhage, infection, and obstruction of a blood vessel. The incidence of infection was not affected by the use of prophylactic antibiotics. Vascular obstruction was more common in small infants, and in those in whom a catheter was reintroduced in the same blood vessel. PMID:21032490

  8. Transradial artery coronary angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Kiemeneij, F; Laarman, G J; de Melker, E

    1995-01-01

    This study explored the feasibility and safety of percutaneous coronary balloon angioplasty (PTCA) with miniaturized PTCA equipment via the radial artery. Coronary angioplasty (PTCA) via the femoral or brachial arteries may be associated with rare vascular complications such as bleeding and damage to the artery and adjacent structures. It was postulated that PTCA via the radial artery with miniaturized angioplasty equipment is feasible and that no major puncture site-related complications occur because hemostasis is obtained easily and because no major structures are near the radial artery. With double blood supply to the hand, radial artery occlusion is well tolerated. In 100 patients with collateral blood supply to the right hand, PTCA was attempted with 6F guiding catheters and rapid-exchange balloon catheters for exertional angina (87 patients) or nonexertional angina (13 patients). Angioplasty was attempted in 122 lesions (type A n = 67 [55%], Type B n = 37 [30%], and type C n = 18 [15%]). Pre- and post-PTCA computerized quantitative coronary analysis was performed. Radial artery function and structure were assessed clinically and with Doppler and two-dimensional ultrasound on the day of discharge. Coronary catheterization via the radial artery was successful in 94 patients (94%). The 6 remaining patients had successful PTCA via the femoral artery (n = 5) or the brachial artery (n = 1). Procedural success (120 of 122 lesions) was achieved in 92 patients (98%) via the radial artery and in 98 patients of the total study population.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. The Correlation between Systolic Blood Pressure Measured by Return to Flow Versus Systolic Blood Pressure Measured by Arterial Catheter in the Adult Anesthetized Patient.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    Appendixes A. Scatterplot and Deccriptive Statistics ........ 85 B. Consent Form ................................. 104 C. Data Collection Form...planned procedure required the insertion of an intra-arterial catheter prior to the induction of anesthesia. The blood pressure cuff was placed on the...the intravenous lines distal to the occlusive cuff (66). The intravenous line is essential to the anesthetist for the administration of .~, , S *< i

  10. Supraclavicular approach to the subclavian/innominate vein for large-bore central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Muhm, M; Sunder-Plassmann, G; Apsner, R; Kritzinger, M; Hiesmayr, M; Druml, W

    1997-12-01

    Infraclavicular and internal jugular catheterization are commonly used techniques for hemodialysis access, but may at times be impeded in patients whose anatomy makes cannulation difficult. In an effort to enlarge the spectrum of alternative access sites, we evaluated the supraclavicular approach for large-bore catheters. During an 18-month period we prospectively collected data on success rate and major and minor complications of the supraclavicular access for conventional dialysis catheters as well as Dacron-cuffed tunneled devices in 175 adult patients admitted for various extracorporeal therapies and bone marrow transplantation. Two hundred eight large-bore catheters (99 conventional dialysis catheters, 63 semirigid tunneled Dacron-cuffed catheters, and 46 Hickman catheters) were successfully placed in 164 patients (success rate, 93.8%), 58 (33.1%) of whom had been previously catheterized. Complications included pneumothorax (one patient), arterial puncture (seven patients), and puncture of the thoracic duct (two patients) without sequelae. Postinsertional chest radiographs demonstrated impressive coaxial lie of most catheters. Catheter malpositions occurred only sporadically (1%). Difficulty of introducing the catheter via a placed sheath was rarely observed. There was no clinically significant evidence of catheter-induced venous thrombosis or stenosis. We conclude that the supraclavicular route is an easy and safe first approach for large-bore catheters, as well as a useful alternative to traditional puncture sites for precatheterized and anatomically problematic patients.

  11. Robotic-Assisted Placement of an Hepatic Artery Infusion Pump and Catheter for Regional Chemotherapy of the Liver.

    PubMed

    Dhir, Mashaal; Magge, Deepa; Novak, Stephanie; Bartlett, David L; Zureikat, Amer H

    2016-12-01

    Hepatic artery infusion (HAI) chemotherapy is an effective regional therapy for unresectable colorectal liver metastases (U-CRLM).1 (,) 2 One of its limitations is the need for a laparotomy, which can delay the use of systemic therapy.3 Here, we describe a purely robotic technique for placement of an HAI pump (Fig 1). A 62-year-old male presented with a symptomatic ascending colon cancer and multiple bilobar unresectable liver metastases. He underwent laparoscopic right colectomy followed by six cycles of FOLFOXIRI and bevacizumab with stable disease by RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) criteria, and also underwent robotic HAI pump placement. The patient was placed supine on a split-leg table, and four robotic and two laparoscopic assistant ports were placed as shown. Use of the robot allowed for precise dissection of the common hepatic artery (CHA) and gastroduodenal artery (GDA), as well as a portal lymphadenectomy. A standard cholecystectomy was performed and the GDA was dissected for a distance of 2-3 cm from its takeoff from the CHA. The robotic scissors were used to create a precise transverse GDA arteriotomy, and the HAI pump catheter tip was advanced to the CHA/GDA junction and secured with two silk ties. Finally, a methylene blue dye injection test was performed to ensure uniform distribution within the liver. Operative time was 147 min, estimated blood loss was 20 ml, and the postoperative course was uneventful. The first dose of HAI with floxuridine was administered on postoperative day 4 (day of discharge) and systemic chemotherapy was administered 2 weeks later. The robotic platform allows for minimally invasive HAI pump placement. Fig. 1 Port placement for robotic-assisted hepatic artery infusion pump placement using the DaVinci Si platform. Illustration depicts a 12 mm periumbilical port for the robotic camera (upper green port), three 8 mm (purple) robotic working ports (the left MCL, right MCL, and right AAL for robotic arms

  12. Effectiveness of a handmade "New Carotid Catheter" in transradial carotid angiography: A comparison with conventional multipurpose catheters.

    PubMed

    Balaban, Yakup

    2017-10-11

    The incidence and severity of carotid atherosclerosis increases in proportion with coronary artery disease and its severity. A special catheter specifically used for transradial carotid angiography has not yet been marketed. In this study, we investigate the feasibility and safety of our carotid catheter, which was made by reshaping currently available catheters. Between 2010 and 2017, a total of 921 patients with indications for carotid angiography were identified after angiographic examinations and included in the study. Carotid angiography was performed in 403 patients (female, n = 161) using the 3.5 JL catheter, while in 518 (female, n = 207) patients, new catheters were employed. The new catheter was shaped like a hook in the laboratory with a heat gun. Demographic information and angiographic data from the patients in both groups were retrospectively analyzed. The baseline characteristics of both groups were comparable. When compared with the use of a 3.5 JL catheter, right transradial carotid angiographies performed with our new handmade catheter resulted in lesser amounts of opaque material used (55 mL vs 66 mL, P < 0.001) and shorter total fluoroscopy time, (3.60 ± 1.85 min vs 3.14 ± 1.55 min, P < 0.001). The handmade catheter also resulted in a higher success rate of selective visualization (97% vs 40%, P < 0.001). Rates of minor complication were comparable between the two catheters (6.5% vs 6.6% P = 234). Neither permanent damage nor morbidity or mortality was observed in either arm. Currently available catheters and methods are inadequate for routine transradial carotid angiography. For routine transradial carotid angiography, innovatively designed catheters are required. The catheter we developed for transradial carotid angiography was more successful than the conventional catheter in obtaining satisfactory images. High quality images can be obtained with the newly designed catheters. Transradial carotid

  13. [Successful endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysm secondary to infection of the umbilical artery catheter in preterm infants].

    PubMed

    Borchert, Evelyn; Lema, Guillermo; Springmuller, Daniel; González, Katia; Chang, Win T; González, Rodrigo; Garay, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Aortic aneurysms (AA) in the paediatric population are uncommon. The use of umbilical catheters in neonates has been associated with infections and, on some occasions, the formation of aortic aneurysms. The surgical repair of these aneurysms is one type of treatment; however, percutaneous intervention with stents could provide an alternative treatment route, with fewer complications. The aim of this report is to present the therapeutic scope of a hybrid procedure, in which the combined surgical and percutaneous technique offers a less invasive alternative to open surgery for the repair of aortic aneurysms or their main branches. The case concerns a pre-term newborn of 30 weeks weighing 1,335 g. An umbilical catheter was introduced, which was withdrawn at 14 days due to an infection. It developed as Staphylococcus aureus with sepsis. The echocardiogram and Angio-CT confirmed AA, which were managed using a hybrid procedure of surgery and the endovascular implantation of 2 coated stents (Atrium V12 XR Medical Corp, Hudson, NH). The post-procedure clinical follow-ups, including abdominal echo-tomography, confirmed the success of the treatment. The endovascular aortic aneurysm repair procedure in premature newborns may be considered when deciding treatment of this disease, and could avoid the risks associated with open surgery. However, follow-up and monitoring is required while the patient grows up, due to the possibility that the implanted stents require re-dilating. The outcomes of neonatal endovascular procedures in the future are unknown. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Measurement of cardiac output in ventricular rupture following acute myocardial infarction--pulmonary artery catheter vs transpulmonary thermodilution--a case report.

    PubMed

    Schwarzkopf, Konrad; Simon, Stefan; Preussler, Niels-Peter; Hüter, Lars

    2009-02-01

    We compared the cardiac output measured by the transpulmonary aortic single indicator thermodilution method with that by the pulmonary artery catheterization in a patient with ventricular septal rupture after acute myocardial infarction. Though the former cardiac output was lower than the latter, in the presence of the ventricular septal rupture, the cardiac outputs were equal after the rupture was closed. This indicates that, while the cardiac output measured by the pulmonary artery catheter is influenced by the ventricular left-to-right shunt, transpulmonary aortic thermodilution method measures the true cardiac output of the left heart, which is responsible for organ perfusion.

  15. Usefulness of Groshong catheters for central venous access via the external jugular vein.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Mitsuru; Nagata, Hitoshi; Takagi, Kazutoshi; Horie, Toru; Sawada, Tokihiko; Kubota, Keiichi

    2008-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the usefulness of central venous access via the external jugular vein (EJV) employing Groshong catheters, and to compare the complications with those of conventional internal jugular venous catheterization. Central venous access was achieved by insertion of a single-lumen 4.0 Fr Groshong catheter via the EJV or internal jugular vein (IJV) with a single puncture. Complications associated with insertion and central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection (CVC-RBSI) were evaluated from the database. Two hundred and twenty-five patients received 400 catheters for a total period of 5377 catheter-days. Ninety-six patients underwent 201 internal jugular venous catheter (IJV-C) procedures for 2381 catheter-days, and 129 patients underwent 199 external jugular venous catheter (EJV-C) procedures for 2996 catheter-days. Use of EJV-C was associated with a longer catheter insertion length (p < .01) and period (p < .01), a larger number of operations (p < .01), and more frequent use of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) (p < .01) and less frequent use of chemotherapy (p < .01) than for IJV-C. However, there were no significant differences (NS) in complications associated with insertion and CVC-RBSI between IJV-C and EJV-C. There were no significant differences such complications as malposition, oozing or hematoma formation of insertion site, arterial bleeding, nerve damage, pneumothorax, and phlebitis between IJV-C and EJV-C. Moreover, EJV-C was not associated with morbidities such as pneumothorax, arterial bleeding, and nerve damage. Thus the study concluded that EJV-C using Groshong catheters has no severe complications and has the same rates of CVC-RBSI as conventional IJV-C for central venous access.

  16. Pulmonary Artery Catheter (PAC) Accuracy and Efficacy Compared with Flow Probe and Transcutaneous Doppler (USCOM): An Ovine Cardiac Output Validation.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Robert A; Hood, Sally G; Jacobson, Beverley M; West, Malcolm J; Wan, Li; May, Clive N

    2012-01-01

    Background. The pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) is an accepted clinical method of measuring cardiac output (CO) despite no prior validation. The ultrasonic cardiac output monitor (USCOM) is a noninvasive alternative to PAC using Doppler ultrasound (CW). We compared PAC and USCOM CO measurements against a gold standard, the aortic flow probe (FP), in sheep at varying outputs. Methods. Ten conscious sheep, with implanted FPs, had measurements of CO by FP, USCOM, and PAC, at rest and during intervention with inotropes and vasopressors. Results. CO measurements by FP, PAC, and USCOM were 4.0 ± 1.2 L/min, 4.8 ± 1.5 L/min, and 4.0 ± 1.4 L/min, respectively, (n = 280, range 1.9 L/min to 11.7 L/min). Percentage bias and precision between FP and PAC, and FP and USCOM was -17 and 47%, and 1 and 36%, respectively. PAC under-measured Dobutamine-induced CO changes by 20% (relative 66%) compared with FP, while USCOM measures varied from FP by 3% (relative 10%). PAC reliably detected -30% but not +40% CO changes, as measured by receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (AUC), while USCOM reliably detected ±5% changes in CO (AUC > 0.70). Conclusions. PAC demonstrated poor accuracy and sensitivity as a measure of CO. USCOM provided equivalent measurements to FP across a sixfold range of outputs, reliably detecting ±5% changes.

  17. Initial Experience with Balloon-Occluded Trans-catheter Arterial Chemoembolization (B-TACE) for Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Mitsunari; Yoshizako, Takeshi; Nakamura, Tomonori; Nakamura, Megumi; Yoshida, Rika; Kitagaki, Hajime

    2016-03-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the accumulation of lipiodol emulsion (LE) and adverse events during our initial experience of balloon-occluded trans-catheter arterial chemoembolization (B-TACE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) compared with conventional TACE (C-TACE). B-TACE group (50 cases) was compared with C-TACE group (50 cases). The ratio of the LE concentration in the tumor to that in the surrounding embolized liver parenchyma (LE ratio) was calculated after each treatment. Adverse events were evaluated according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Effects (CTCAE) version 4.0. The LE ratio at the level of subsegmental showed a statistically significant difference between the groups (t test: P < 0.05). Only elevation of alanine aminotransferase was more frequent in the B-TACE group, showing a statistically significant difference (Mann-Whitney test: P < 0.05). While B-TACE caused severe adverse events (liver abscess and infarction) in patients with bile duct dilatation, there was no statistically significant difference in incidence between the groups. Multivariate logistic regression analysis suggested that the significant risk factor for liver abscess/infarction was bile duct dilatation (P < 0.05). The LE ratio at the level of subsegmental showed a statistically significant difference between the groups (t test: P < 0.05). B-TACE caused severe adverse events (liver abscess and infarction) in patients with bile duct dilatation.

  18. Initial Experience with Balloon-Occluded Trans-catheter Arterial Chemoembolization (B-TACE) for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Mitsunari Yoshizako, Takeshi Nakamura, Tomonori Nakamura, Megumi Yoshida, Rika Kitagaki, Hajime

    2016-03-15

    PurposeThis study was performed to evaluate the accumulation of lipiodol emulsion (LE) and adverse events during our initial experience of balloon-occluded trans-catheter arterial chemoembolization (B-TACE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) compared with conventional TACE (C-TACE).MethodsB-TACE group (50 cases) was compared with C-TACE group (50 cases). The ratio of the LE concentration in the tumor to that in the surrounding embolized liver parenchyma (LE ratio) was calculated after each treatment. Adverse events were evaluated according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Effects (CTCAE) version 4.0.ResultsThe LE ratio at the level of subsegmental showed a statistically significant difference between the groups (t test: P < 0.05). Only elevation of alanine aminotransferase was more frequent in the B-TACE group, showing a statistically significant difference (Mann–Whitney test: P < 0.05). While B-TACE caused severe adverse events (liver abscess and infarction) in patients with bile duct dilatation, there was no statistically significant difference in incidence between the groups. Multivariate logistic regression analysis suggested that the significant risk factor for liver abscess/infarction was bile duct dilatation (P < 0.05).ConclusionThe LE ratio at the level of subsegmental showed a statistically significant difference between the groups (t test: P < 0.05). B-TACE caused severe adverse events (liver abscess and infarction) in patients with bile duct dilatation.

  19. Clinical outcomes in patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass graft surgery with and without utilization of pulmonary artery catheter-generated data.

    PubMed

    Djaiani, George; Karski, Jacek; Yudin, Mark; Hynninen, Maria; Fedorko, Ludwik; Carroll, Jo; Poonawala, Humara; Cheng, Davy

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) quantitative data requirements for modifying patient management during and after elective coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. A prospective observational clinical trial. University tertiary referral center. Two hundred patients undergoing elective CABG surgery. Attending anesthesiologist and surgeon were blinded to PAC numeric values. These data could be revealed in the presence of at least 2 of the following criteria: (1) systolic blood pressure <90 mmHg, (2) central venous pressure >15 mmHg, (3) urine output <0.5 mL/kg/h, (4) pH <7.35/HCO(3) <18 mmol/L, (5) SaO(2) <95%/F(I)O(2) >80%, and (6) ST changes +/- 2 mm if the empiric treatment failed to restore normal hemodynamics within 10 minutes. All patients were classified into either blinded or unblinded PAC groups. PAC data were unblinded in 46 (23%) patients. Preliminary diagnosis was confirmed in 28 (14%), and treatment was modified in 18 (9%) of these patients. Four (2%) patients were given additional fluid challenges, 10 (5%) patients received a combination of fluid challenges and inotropic support, 3 (1.5%) patients were started on vasoconstrictors, and 1 (0.5%) patient required insertion of an intra-aortic balloon pump. Patients in the unblinded PAC group had a higher prevalence of perioperative myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, and inotropic support; longer intubation times; and increased intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital lengths of stay. This study confirmed the contention that insertion of a PAC can be safely delayed until the clinical need arises either in the operating room or in the ICU after elective CABG surgery.

  20. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Postpartum Hemorrhage: Indications, Technique, Results, and Complications

    SciTech Connect

    Soyer, Philippe Dohan, Anthony Dautry, Raphael Guerrache, Youcef; Ricbourg, Aude; Gayat, Etienne; Boudiaf, Mourad Sirol, Marc Ledref, Olivier

    2015-10-15

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is a potentially life-threatening condition, which needs multidisciplinary management. Uterine atony represents up to 80 % of all causes of PPH. Transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) has now a well-established role in the management of severe PPH. TAE allows stopping the bleeding in 90 % of women with severe PHH, obviating surgery. Pledgets of gelatin sponge as torpedoes are commonly used for safe TAE, and coils, glue, and microspheres have been primarily used in specific situations such as arterial rupture, pseudoaneurysm, and arteriovenous fistula. TAE is a minimally invasive procedure with a low rate of complications, which preserves future fertility. Knowledge of causes of PPH, potential risks, and limitations of TAE is essential for a timely decision, optimizing TAE, preventing irreversible complications, avoiding hysterectomy, and ultimately preserving fertility.

  1. Utilization of laser arterial angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Steg, P G; Ménasché, P

    1989-01-01

    Arterial angioplasty with continuous wave laser radiation is now available in clinical practice and, coupled with balloon catheter angioplasty, has been successful in the treatment of lower limb arterial disease. It appears premature to apply laser angioplasty to coronary artery lesions because of the high incidence of severe complications observed in clinical trials. Experimental studies suggest that some of these complications are related to thermal injury induced by continuous wave laser energy and that they could be minimized by the utilization of pulsed laser sources. Because of recent technologic advances, pulsed laser sources coupled with flexible fiberoptic devices will soon be available for peripheral arterial angioplasty in clinical practice.

  2. Peritoneal catheters and related infections.

    PubMed

    Thodis, Elias; Passadakis, Ploumis; Lyrantzopooulos, Nikolaos; Panagoutsos, Stelios; Vargemezis, Vassilis; Oreopoulos, Dimitrios

    2005-01-01

    Catheter related infectious complications (exit-site infections, tunnel infections, and peritonitis) remain the major reasons for technique failure during the three decades since, continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) treatment has been first established. Despite improvements in catheter's survival rates, catheter related complications result in an increase in the cumulative patients' morbidity and often leading to the catheter removal. The ideal catheter provides reliable and rapid dialysate flow rates without leaks or infections. Among several types, the double-cuff straight Tenckhoff catheter, developed in 1968, is still the most widely used, although its use is decreasing in favour of swanneck catheters. Although there are only few well-designed trials comparing catheters and catheters related infectious complications, controlling for all other important variables, no difference in these complications among the main types of catheters was seen. The single cuff catheters have been associated with a shorter survival rate and time to the first peritonitis episode than the double-cuff catheters. Also exit-site infections were found to be more frequent and significantly more resistant to treatment with single-cuff compared to double-cuff ones. Finally, better results have been reported with the latest developed presternal peritoneal dialysis catheter both regarding survival rates and exit-site infection and peritonitis rates. Recently a renewed interest in continuous flow peritoneal dialysis stimulated inventions of imaginative, double-lumen catheters since a suitable peritoneal access is a sine qua non condition for the development of this new technique of peritoneal dialysis.

  3. Long-term Tesio catheter access for hemodialysis can deliver high dialysis adequacy with low complication rates.

    PubMed

    Power, Albert; Singh, Seema K; Ashby, Damien; Cairns, Tom; Taube, David; Duncan, Neill

    2011-05-01

    The use of central venous catheters for long-term hemodialysis has been associated with increased mortality and high prevalence of infection and venous stenosis. However, because central venous catheters still constitute a significant proportion of vascular access in prevalent populations, even in the Fistula-First era, the authors examined the long-term patient outcomes and performance of this vascular access type to inform current clinical practice. The authors conducted a retrospective cohort study of 433 patients on maintenance hemodialysis in a dialysis program from January 1999 through April 2008 all using twin-catheter Tesio Caths (TCs) (MedCOMP, Harleysville, Pennsylvania). Written and electronic records were examined with respect to laboratory indices as well as mortality, access-related infection, need for thrombolytic infusion, access revision and dialysis adequacy. A total of 759 TCs were inserted with 552,035 catheter days follow-up. Thirty-six percent of insertions were in patients incident to dialysis (< 90 days). Mean single-pool Kt/V was 1.6 ± 0.3. Cumulative cohort survival rates were 85%, 72%, and 48% at 1, 2, and 5 years, respectively. No patients died as a result of lack of vascular access. Cumulative assisted primary access site patencies were 76%, 62%, and 42% at 1, 2, and 5 years, respectively. The prevalence of symptomatic central venous stenosis was 5%. Catheter-related bacteremia occurred at a rate of 0.34 per 1,000 catheter days. Appropriate use of TCs with protocolized care can deliver effective long-term hemodialysis with good adequacy and rates of access-related infection approaching those seen with arteriovenous grafts. Copyright © 2011 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Arteriovenous fistula complicating iliac artery pseudo aneurysm: diagnosis by CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Huawei, L; Bei, D; Huan, Z; Zilai, P; Aorong, T; Kemin, C

    2002-01-01

    Fistula formation to the inferior vena cava is a rare complication of aortic aneurysm which is often misdiagnosed clinically. In one hundred of reported arteriocaval fistulae, none was originating from the right common iliac artery. We report a case of ileo-caval fistula due to a iatrogenic pseudoaneurysm. High resolution 3D imaging using breath-hold CT angiography is highly specific in identifying the location, extent of the aortocaval fistula as well as the neighbouring anatomic structures.

  5. Pocket-size imaging devices allow for reliable bedside screening for femoral artery access site complications.

    PubMed

    Filipiak-Strzecka, Dominika; Michalski, Błażej; Kasprzak, Jarosław D; Lipiec, Piotr

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to validate pocket-size imaging devices (PSIDs) as a fast screening tool for detecting complications after femoral artery puncture. Forty patients undergoing femoral artery puncture for arterial access related to percutaneous coronary intervention were enrolled. Twenty-four hours after percutaneous coronary intervention, the involved inguinal region was assessed with PSIDs enabling 2-D gray-scale and color Doppler imaging. Subsequently, examination with a stationary high-end ultrasound system was performed to verify the findings of bedside examination in all patients. In 37 patients, PSID imaging had good diagnostic quality. False aneurysms (one asymptomatic) occurred in four patients, and all were recognized during bedside screening with PSID. One case of femoral artery thrombosis was confirmed with PSID and during standard ultrasonographic examination. Physical examination augmented with the quick bedside PSID examination had a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 91%. PSID facilitated rapid bedside detection of serious access site complications in the vast majority of patients, including asymptomatic cases.

  6. MRI evaluation of frequent complications after intra-arterial transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namestnikova, D.; Gubskiy, I.; Gabashvili, A.; Sukhinich, K.; Melnikov, P.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Soloveva, A.; Vitushev, E.; Chekhonin, V.; Gubsky, L.; Yarygin, K.

    2017-08-01

    Intra-arterial transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is an effective delivery route for treatment of ischemic brain injury. Despite significant therapeutic effects and targeted cells delivery to the brain infraction, serious adverse events such as cerebral embolism have been reported and may restrict potential clinical applications of this method. In current study, we evaluate potential complications of intra-arterial MSCs administration and determine the optimum parameters for cell transplantation. We injected SPIO-labeled human MSCs via internal carotid artery with different infusion parameters and cell dose in intact rats and in rats with the middle cerebral occlusion stroke model. Cerebrovascular complications and labeled cells were visualized in vivo using MRI. We have shown that the incidence of cerebral embolic events depends on such parameters as cell dose, infusion rate and maintenance of blood flow in the internal carotid artery (ICA). Optimal parameters were considered to be 5×105 hMSC in 1 ml of PBS by syringe pump with velocity 100 μ/min and maintenance of blood flow in the ICA. Obtained data should be considered before planning experiments in rats and, potentially, can help in planning clinical trials in stroke patients.

  7. New developments in the clinical use of drug-coated balloon catheters in peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Naghi, Jesse; Yalvac, Ethan A; Pourdjabbar, Ali; Ang, Lawrence; Bahadorani, John; Reeves, Ryan R; Mahmud, Ehtisham; Patel, Mitul

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) involving the lower extremity is a major source of morbidity and mortality. Clinical manifestations of PAD span the spectrum from lifestyle limiting claudication to ulceration and gangrene leading to amputation. Advancements including balloon angioplasty, self-expanding stents, drug-eluting stents, and atherectomy have resulted in high technical success rates for endovascular therapy in patients with PAD. However, these advances have been limited by somewhat high rates of clinical restenosis and clinically driven target lesion revascularization. The recent introduction of drug-coated balloon technology shows promise in limiting neointimal hyperplasia induced by vascular injury after endovascular therapies. This review summarizes the contemporary clinical data in the emerging area of drug-coated balloons. PMID:27418859

  8. Performance, pain, and quality of life on use of central venous catheter for management of pericardial effusions in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ghods, Kamran; Razavi, Mohammad Reza; Forozeshfard, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Different pericardial catheters have been suggested as an effective alternative method for drainage of pericardial effusion. The aim of this study was to determine the performance, pain, and quality of life on use of central venous catheter (CVC) for drainage of pericardial effusion in patients undergoing open heart surgery. Fifty-five patients who had developed pericardial effusion after an open heart surgery (2012–2015) were prospectively assessed. Triple-lumen central catheters were inserted under echocardiographic guidance. Clinical, procedural, complication, and outcome details were analyzed. Intensity of pain and quality of life of patients were assessed using the numerical rating scale and Short-Form Health Survey. CVC was inserted for 36 males and 19 females, all of whom had a mean age of 58.5±15 years, and the mean duration of the open heart surgery was 8±3.5 hours. The mean central venous pressure catheter life span was 14.6 days. No cases of recurrent effusion and complication were reported. The technical success rate of procedure was 100%. Intensity of pain and quality of life of patients had improved during follow-up. CVC insertion is a safe and effective technique for the management of pericardial effusion in patients after open heart surgery. PMID:27826210

  9. Analysis of carotid artery deformation in different head and neck positions for maxillofacial catheter navigation in advanced oral cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Ohya, Takashi; Iwai, Toshinori; Luan, Kuan; Kato, Takashi; Liao, Hongen; Kobayashi, Etsuko; Mitsudo, Kenji; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Kohno, Ryuji; Sakuma, Ichiro; Tohnai, Iwai

    2012-09-04

    To improve the accuracy of catheter navigation, it is important to develop a method to predict shifts of carotid artery (CA) bifurcations caused by intraoperative deformation. An important factor affecting the accuracy of electromagnetic maxillofacial catheter navigation systems is CA deformations. We aimed to assess CA deformation in different head and neck positions. Using two sets of computed tomography angiography (CTA) images of six patients, displacements of the skull (maxillofacial segments), C1-C4 cervical vertebrae, mandible (mandibular segment), and CA along with its branches were analyzed. Segmented rigid bones around CA were considered the main causes of CA deformation. After superimposition of maxillofacial segments, C1-C4 and mandible segments were superimposed separately for displacement measurements. Five bifurcation points (vA-vE) were assessed after extracting the CA centerline. A new standardized coordinate system, regardless of patient-specific scanning positions, was employed. It was created using the principal axes of inertia of the maxillofacial bone segments of patients. Position and orientation parameters were transferred to this coordinate system. CA deformation in different head and neck positions was assessed. Absolute shifts in the center of gravity in the bone models for different segments were C1, 1.02 ± 0.9; C2, 2.18 ± 1.81; C3, 4.25 ± 3.85; C4, 5.90 ± 5.14; and mandible, 1.75 ± 2.76 mm. Shifts of CA bifurcations were vA, 5.52 ± 4.12; vB, 4.02 ± 3.27; vC, 4.39 ± 2.42; vD, 4.48 ± 1.88; and vE, 2.47 ± 1.32. Displacements, position changes, and orientation changes of C1-C4 segments as well as the displacements of all CA bifurcation points were similar in individual patients. CA deformation was objectively proven as an important factor contributing to errors in maxillofacial navigation. Our study results suggest that small movements of the bones around CA can result in small CA

  10. Urinary catheters

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider's office. An indwelling catheter has a small balloon inflated on the end of it. This prevents ... When the catheter needs to be removed, the balloon is deflated. CONDOM CATHETERS Condom catheters can be ...

  11. Percutaneous femoral arterial and venous catheterisation during neonatal intensive care.

    PubMed

    Wardle, S P; Kelsall, A W; Yoxall, C W; Subhedar, N V

    2001-09-01

    Femoral vessel catheterisation is generally avoided in the neonatal period because of technical difficulties and the fear of complications. To review the use of femoral arterial and venous catheters inserted percutaneously on the neonatal intensive care unit. Infants admitted to one of two regional neonatal intensive care units who underwent femoral vessel catheterisation were identified. Information collected included basic details, indication for insertion of catheter, type of catheter and insertion technique, duration of use, and any catheter related complications. Sixty five femoral catheters were inserted into 53 infants. The median gestational age was 29 weeks (range 23-40). Twenty three femoral arterial catheters (FACs) were inserted into 21 infants and remained in situ for a median of three days (range one to eight). Twelve (52%) FACs remained in place until no longer required, and four (17%) infants developed transient ischaemia of the distal limb. Forty two femoral venous catheters (FVCs) were inserted into 40 infants and remained in situ for a median of seven days (range 1-29). Twenty seven (64%) FVCs remained in place until no longer required, and eight (19%) catheters were removed because of catheter related bloodstream infection. FACs and FVCs are useful routes of vascular access in neonates when other sites are unavailable. Complications from femoral vessel catheterisation include transient lower limb ischaemia with FACs and catheter related bloodstream infection.

  12. Percutaneous femoral arterial and venous catheterisation during neonatal intensive care

    PubMed Central

    Wardle, S; Kelsall, A; Yoxall, C; Subhedar, N

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Femoral vessel catheterisation is generally avoided in the neonatal period because of technical difficulties and the fear of complications.
AIM—To review the use of femoral arterial and venous catheters inserted percutaneously on the neonatal intensive care unit.
METHODS—Infants admitted to one of two regional neonatal intensive care units who underwent femoral vessel catheterisation were identified. Information collected included basic details, indication for insertion of catheter, type of catheter and insertion technique, duration of use, and any catheter related complications.
RESULTS—Sixty five femoral catheters were inserted into 53 infants. The median gestational age was 29 weeks (range 23-40). Twenty three femoral arterial catheters (FACs) were inserted into 21infants and remained in situ for a median of three days (range one to eight). Twelve (52%) FACs remained in place until no longer required, and four (17%) infants developed transient ischaemia of the distal limb. Forty two femoral venous catheters (FVCs) were inserted into 40 infants and remained in situ for a median of seven days (range 1-29). Twenty seven (64%) FVCs remained in place until no longer required, and eight (19%) catheters were removed because of catheter related bloodstream infection.
CONCLUSIONS—FACs and FVCs are useful routes of vascular access in neonates when other sites are unavailable. Complications from femoral vessel catheterisation include transient lower limb ischaemia with FACs and catheter related bloodstream infection.

 PMID:11517206

  13. Evaluation of Pediatric Liver Transplantation-Related Artery Complications Using Intra-Operative Multi-Parameter Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xiuyun; Guan, Junhui; Gao, Nong; Niu, Hong; Tang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background This article discusses the value of using multi-parameter evaluation of intra-operative ultrasonography in evaluating pediatric liver transplantation-related arterial complications. Material/Methods Sixty-eight children receiving a liver transplant underwent intraoperative ultrasonography for monitoring of artery hemodynamics. The ultrasonic measurement parameters included the diameters of the hepatic artery (HA) of the donor and anastomotic stoma, peak systolic velocity (PSV), resistance index (RI), acceleration time (SAT), and blood flow volume. Results After being treated immediately using surgery or other means, blood flow returned to normal in 8 cases, and did not in 3 cases, of whom 2 experienced postoperative HAT. There was a significant difference in HA diameter of the donor, anastomotic stoma diameter, PSV, RI, SAT, and blood flow volume before and after treatment of the donor in the complications group. Postoperative complications occurred in 7 of 68 recipients, including the 2 cases exhibiting complications during the surgery (complication group) and 5 without complications during the surgery (no complication group). There was a statistically significant difference (P<0.05) between the 2 groups in intraoperative ultrasonography parameters of HA diameter, anastomotic stoma diameter, RI, and blood flow volume. Conclusions Through intraoperative multi-parameter ultrasonic measurement, a definite diagnosis of hepatic artery complications can be made in liver transplantation patients. HA diameter of the donor, anastomotic stoma diameter, PSV, RI, SAT, and blood flow volume are important in assessing intraoperative artery complications. PMID:27870825

  14. Ambulatory setting for peritoneal dialysis catheter placement.

    PubMed

    Maya, Ivan D

    2008-01-01

    A modified fluoroscopic technique by adding ultrasound-assistance ensuring entry into the abdominal cavity and avoiding the risk of epigastric artery injury under direct ultrasound visualization was recently published. This study demonstrated that the technique was minimally invasive and allowed for accurate assessment of entry into the abdominal cavity and avoidance of vascular injury. In the current analysis, we report the impact of this technique on hospital stay during a peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheter insertion. Twenty-six PD catheters have been placed on an outpatient basis using this technique. All catheter insertions were successful. Patients were discharge on the same day of the procedure. There were no procedure-related complication or related to short hospital stay. An ambulatory setting allows for a short hospital stay without compromising patient care. This brief paper explains in detail the pre, peri and postoperative period and follow-up.

  15. Pulmonary Artery Catheter (PAC) Accuracy and Efficacy Compared with Flow Probe and Transcutaneous Doppler (USCOM): An Ovine Cardiac Output Validation

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Robert A.; Hood, Sally G.; Jacobson, Beverley M.; West, Malcolm J.; Wan, Li; May, Clive N.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) is an accepted clinical method of measuring cardiac output (CO) despite no prior validation. The ultrasonic cardiac output monitor (USCOM) is a noninvasive alternative to PAC using Doppler ultrasound (CW). We compared PAC and USCOM CO measurements against a gold standard, the aortic flow probe (FP), in sheep at varying outputs. Methods. Ten conscious sheep, with implanted FPs, had measurements of CO by FP, USCOM, and PAC, at rest and during intervention with inotropes and vasopressors. Results. CO measurements by FP, PAC, and USCOM were 4.0 ± 1.2 L/min, 4.8 ± 1.5 L/min, and 4.0 ± 1.4 L/min, respectively, (n = 280, range 1.9 L/min to 11.7 L/min). Percentage bias and precision between FP and PAC, and FP and USCOM was −17 and 47%, and 1 and 36%, respectively. PAC under-measured Dobutamine-induced CO changes by 20% (relative 66%) compared with FP, while USCOM measures varied from FP by 3% (relative 10%). PAC reliably detected −30% but not +40% CO changes, as measured by receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (AUC), while USCOM reliably detected ±5% changes in CO (AUC > 0.70). Conclusions. PAC demonstrated poor accuracy and sensitivity as a measure of CO. USCOM provided equivalent measurements to FP across a sixfold range of outputs, reliably detecting ±5% changes. PMID:22649718

  16. Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy through a Port-Catheter System as Preoperative Initial Therapy in Patients with Advanced Liver Dysfunction due to Synchronous and Unresectable Liver Metastases from Colorectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Iguchi, Toshihiro; Arai, Yasuaki; Inaba, Yoshitaka Yamaura, Hidekazu; Sato, Yozo; Miyazaki, Masaya; Shimamoto, Hiroshi

    2008-01-15

    Purpose. We retrospectively evaluated the safety and efficacy of preoperative initial hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) through a port-catheter system in patients with liver dysfunction due to synchronous and unresectable liver metastases. The aim of HAIC was to improve patients' clinical condition for later surgical removal of primary colorectal cancer. Methods. Port-catheter systems were placed radiologically in 21 patients (mean age 58.6 {+-} 8.1 years) with liver dysfunction due to synchronous liver metastases from colorectal cancer. Initial HAIC of 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} 5-fluorouracil was administered weekly as a 5 hr continuous infusion through this system. Surgical removal of the primary lesion was planned after HAIC improved the liver function. Results. Port-catheter system placement was successful in all patients without severe complications. Patients were followed up for a median of 309 days (range 51-998 days). After starting HAIC, no severe adverse events that caused drug loss and treatment postponement or suspension were observed in any of the patients. HAIC was performed a mean of 4.5 {+-} 3.0 times and the liver function improved in all patients. Curative (n = 18) or palliative (n = 1) surgical removal of the primary lesion was performed. The remaining 2 patients died because extrahepatic metastases developed and their performance status worsened; thus, surgery could not be performed. The median survival times of all patients and the operated patients were 309 and 386 days, respectively. Conclusion. Initial HAIC administration is a safe and efficacious method for improving liver function prior to operative resection of primary colorectal cancer in patients with liver dysfunction due to synchronous and unresectable liver metastases.

  17. Double-lumen, silicone rubber, indwelling venous catheters. A new modality for angioaccess.

    PubMed

    Schanzer, H; Kaplan, S; Bosch, J; Glabman, S; Burrows, L

    1986-02-01

    This report presents our experience using double-lumen, silicone rubber, indwelling central venous catheters with a subcutaneous Dacron cuff as access for hemodialysis. Twenty-seven catheters were placed in 27 patients through venous cutdowns. A 10-cm subcutaneous tunnel was created leaving the Dacron cuff 2 cm from the external exit. Sixteen Raaf catheters (lumen diameter [LD], 1 mm), three double-lumen Hickman catheters (LD, 1.6 mm) and eight HemoCath catheters (LD, 2 mm) were used. The tip of the catheter was positioned fluoroscopically in either the superior vena cava or the right atrium. One hundred fifty-nine treatments were done with the Raaf catheters (mean blood flow [MBF], 188.1 +/- 26.4 mL/min); two of these catheters became obstructed and could not be used further. Three double-lumen Hickman catheters were used in 12 hemodialysis treatments (MBF, 216.3 +/- 27.1 mL/min). One hundred fifty-five treatments were done using the HemoCath catheters (MBF, 236.7 +/- 5.5 mL/min). The degree of recirculation of these catheters was 8.56% +/- 4.34%. The major advantages of this modality include simplicity of introduction, lack of serious complications, no sacrifice of major arteries, no need for venipuncture, and potential use in either short- or long-term hemodialysis.

  18. Minimizing bleeding complications in spinal tumor surgery with preoperative Onyx embolization via dual-lumen balloon catheter.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Travis R; He, Lucy; Lakomkin, Nikita; Davis, Brandon J; Cheng, Joseph S; Devin, Clinton J; Mocco, J

    2016-02-01

    Intraoperative bleeding is a significant risk in surgery for highly vascular spinal tumors, but preoperative embolization can safely decrease intraoperative blood loss in extrinsic spine tumors. Onyx, widely used for cerebrovascular embolization, has been increasingly used as an embolic agent for preoperative spinal tumor embolization. The Scepter catheter, a dual-lumen balloon catheter, may improve tumor parenchymal penetration without the danger and limitations of significant embolic reflux. This may reduce bleeding risk during spinal surgery. Eleven consecutive cases of preoperative Onyx embolization of extrinsic spinal tumors were identified, all of whom had subsequent spinal surgery. Demographic data and clinical variables were collected. Patients were divided into Scepter (n=6) and non-Scepter (n=5) groups. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare continuous outcome variables and the Fisher exact test was used to compare categorical variables. Estimated blood loss in the Scepter group was significantly lower than in the non-Scepter group (584±124 vs 2400±738 mL, p=0.004). The volume of intraoperative transfusion was also significantly lower (1.2±0.4 vs 5.8±1.7 units, p=0.004). There was no significant difference in the number of vessels embolized, vials of Onyx used, use of coiling adjunct, contrast load, radiation dose, or fluoroscopy time per pedicle (p>0.05). The addition of the Scepter catheter to preoperative Onyx embolization is safe and feasible. In this small series, the Scepter catheter was associated with a reduction of intraoperative bleeding by 76% and a 79% lower transfusion volume. This was not accompanied by any unwanted increase in vials of Onyx used, contrast load, radiation dose, or fluoroscopy time. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. Urinary retention and acute kidney injury in a tetraplegic patient using condom catheter after partying: a preventable complication.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Subramanian; Selmi, Fahed; Hughes, Peter L; Singh, Gurpreet; Soni, Bakul M

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury patients, who manage their bladder using a condom catheter, are at risk of developing urine retention when they consume large volumes of alcoholic drinks within a short period of time. A male tetraplegic patient had been managing satisfactorily penile sheath drainage for 8 years. He went out socializing during which he consumed large volumes of alcohol but did not take any recreational drugs. The following morning, he noticed distension of the lower abdomen and passed urine in dribbles. He then developed a temperature and became unwell. He was seen by district nurses and a doctor, who prescribed antibiotics. He continued to feel unwell. After 8 days, he referred himself to a spinal unit at Regional Spinal Injuries Centre, Southport. The blood test results showed the following: blood urea: 19.8 mmol/L; creatinine: 172 μmol/L; and C-reactive protein: 336.4 mg/L. Urethral catheterization led to immediate drainage of 1,400 mL of urine. A computed tomography scan revealed an enlarged, swollen left kidney, indicating acute bacterial nephritis. He was prescribed intravenous fluids and Meropenem. Creatinine decreased to 46 μmol/L. Spinal cord injury patients using condom catheters should be made aware of the risk of urine retention when they consume large amounts of alcoholic drinks in a short period of time. Patients and caregivers should be informed to consider intermittent catheterizations for 24-48 hours or insert indwelling urethral catheter when planning for an evening out.

  20. For reliable urine cultures in the detection of complicated urinary tract infection, do we use urine specimens obtained with urethral catheter or a nephrostomy tube?

    PubMed Central

    Dede, Gülay; Deveci, Özcan; Dede, Onur; Utanğac, Mazhar; Dağgulli, Mansur; Penbegül, Necmettin; Hatipoğlu, Namık Kemal

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the results of urine cultures obtained either from urethral, and percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) catheters. Materials and methods This study included 328 consecutive patients that underwent PCN at our institution with complicated urinary tract infections (UTIs) between July 2010 and April 2015. Results of urine cultures obtained from the urethral and nephrostomy catheters were compared. Results This study included 152 male and 176 female patients. Mean age of the patients was 46.2±24.3 years. The main indications were obstructive uropathy due to urolithiasis complicated with pyonephrosis 145 (44%), malignant disease (n=87; 26%), pregnancy (n=26; 8%), and anatomical abnormality (n=23; 7%). One hundred and twenty three patients had diabetes mellitus. The most common causative organisms were Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Blood cultures showed the same results for the PCN and bladder urine cultures. The bladder urine culture was positive in 304 patients, while the PCN urine culture in 314 patients. Conclusion PCN is an important treatment for the management of pyonephrosis. Cultures from the PCN yield valuable information that is not available from urethral urine cultures, and is a guiding tool for antibiotic therapy selection. PMID:27909624

  1. [Primary biliary cirrhosis complicated by pulmonary arterial hypertension: a clinical analysis].

    PubMed

    Shen, Min; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Feng-chun

    2005-04-13

    To analyze the clinical features and prognosis of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) complicated by pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The medical records of 80 PBC inpatients, 8 of which were complicated by pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) were retrospectively analyzed to compare the differences in clinical features, biochemical parameters, positive rates of autoantibodies and Mayo risk score between the 2 groups with or without PAH. The prevalence of portal hypertension was 7/8, in the PAH group, significantly higher than that in the non-PAHG group [(44.4%, 32/72), P < 0.05]. The Mayo score of the PAH group was 7.0 +/- 1.2, significantly higher than that in the non-PAH group (5.6 +/- 1.5, P < 0.05). The IgA level of the PAH group was (4.4 +/- 1.9) g/L, significantly higher than that in the non-PAH group [(3.0 +/- 1.8) g/L, P < 0.05]. The serum level of alkaline phophatase of the noon-PAH group was 293 +/- 218 U/L, significantly higher than that of the PAH group [(150 +/- 53) U/L, P < 0.05]. Closely associated with portal hypertension and indicating poor prognosis, moderate to severe PAH is not a rare complication of PBC.

  2. Fluoroscopy-guided femoral artery puncture reduces the risk of PCI-related vascular complications.

    PubMed

    Fitts, James; Ver Lee, Peter; Hofmaster, Patricia; Malenka, David

    2008-06-01

    In previous work by the Northern New England Cardiovascular Study Group, risk factors for vascular access site complications in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were identified and a regional effort to reduce these complications was initiated. As part of this effort we considered making a regional recommendation that location of the femoral head as seen on fluoroscopy (fluoro) be used to help determine the site of femoral artery puncture. Therefore, we assessed the use of fluoro to determine whether it actually reduced the rate of vascular complications and shortened length of stay. Data were collected prospectively on 2,651 consecutive PCIs at Eastern Maine Medical Center from 2000 to 2003 including use of fluoro, vascular access site complications (bleeding, pseudoaneurysm formation, hematoma, embolic event or thrombus, A-V fistula), and length of stay. Use of fluoro among eight interventionists was variable: 3 < 20%, 3 35-50%, 2 > 70%. Among all interventions, 48% were performed with fluoro to guide vascular access. The use of fluoro was associated with a significantly lower incidence of pseudoaneurysms (0.3% vs. 1.1%, P = 0.017) and any arterial injury (0.7% vs. 1.9%, P < 0.01). There was no significant difference in bleeding (1.6% vs. 1.8%, P = 0.69). For each physician, there were fewer vascular injuries when fluoro was used. Average length of stay was significantly lower among patients in the fluoro group (2.1 days vs. 2.4, P < 0.01). We conclude that using fluoro to guide vascular access leads to lower complication rates and a shorter length of stay. This approach may become our regional standard of care.

  3. Minimally invasive atherectomy with a virtual 3-Fr sheathless guiding catheter and a 0.9-mm excimer laser catheter for the treatment of coronary in-stent restenosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Sho; Takahashi, Akihiko; Mizuguchi, Yukio; Yamada, Takeshi; Taniguchi, Norimasa; Hata, Tetsuya

    2016-10-01

    A 50-year-old man underwent percutaneous coronary intervention for stent restenosis in his left anterior descending artery. After insertion of a 5-Fr sheathless guiding catheter through the right radial artery, optical coherence tomography (OCT) revealed a circumferential dense fibrotic plaque in the distal part of the stent. Therefore, we performed excimer laser coronary atherectomy using a 0.9-mm concentric catheter and dilatation with a drug-coated balloon catheter. Subsequent OCT revealed a circumferential reduction of the neointimal material. The patient's clinical course was uneventful, and he was discharged 2 days after the percutaneous coronary intervention without any access site complications.

  4. Spontaneous Renal Artery Dissection Complicated by Renal Infarction: Three Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Im, Chami; Park, Hyung Sub; Kim, Dae Hwan; Lee, Taeseung

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous renal artery dissection (SRAD) is a rare disease entity. The diagnosis is usually delayed because clinical presentation is non-specific. We report three cases of symptomatic SRAD complicated by renal infarction which occurred in previously healthy middle-aged male patients. They visited the hospital due to acute abdominal or flank pain. They had no specific underlying disease or trauma history. The laboratory tests and physical examination were normal. They were not suspected of having SRAD initially, but computed tomography (CT) revealed dissection of the renal artery with distal hypoperfusion leading to renal infarction. They were treated conservatively with anticoagulation and/or antiplatelets for 6 months. They had a 6-month regular follow-up with CT, where resolution was confirmed in one patient and all patients remained asymptomatic. These cases emphasize the importance of clinical suspicion of SRAD in previously healthy patients who complain of abdominal pain without specific findings on initial investigation. PMID:28042561

  5. [Cerebral artery infarction presented as an unusual complication of acute middle otitis].

    PubMed

    Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael; Alcalá-Cerra, Gabriel; Castellar-Leones, Sandra Milena; Gutiérrez-Paternina, Juan José

    2013-01-01

    acute otitis media is a frequent disease in the pediatric age. About 2 % of all cases develop intracranial complications such as meningitis. The cerebral infarction originates meningitis and usually occurs in the venous system. The presence of a cerebral artery infarction secondary to acute otitis media is a rare cause described in the literature. a girl of 12 months who presented a febrile syndrome due to acute otitis media and mental confusion. On physical examination, she appeared sleepy with anisocoria, mydriasis in the right eye and left hemiparesis. The computed tomography examination showed extensive cerebral artery infarction. The patient's parents refused the proposed surgical treatment and the girl died 48 hours later. regardless of the current technological advances, the clinical prognosis of cerebral infarction associated with acute otitis media is bad. The focused neurological signs and progressive clinical deterioration should raise suspicion that antimicrobial therapy is not effective.

  6. Radiocephalic Fistula Complicated by Distal Ischemia: Treatment by Ulnar Artery Dilatation

    SciTech Connect

    Raynaud, Alain; Novelli, Luigi Rovani, Xavier; Carreres, Thierry; Bourquelot, Pierre; Hermelin, Alain; Angel, C.; Beyssen, B.

    2010-02-15

    Hand ischemic steal syndrome due to a forearm arteriovenous fistula is a rare occurrence. However, its frequency is increasing with the rise in numbers of elderly and diabetic patients. This complication, which is more common for proximal than for distal accesses, can be very severe and may cause loss of hand function, damage to fingers, and even amputation of fingers or the hand. Its treatment is difficult and often leads to access loss. We report here a case of severe hand ischemia related to a radiocephalic fistula successfully treated by ulnar artery dilatation.

  7. A child with Epstein-Barr Virus-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis complicated by coronary artery lesion mimicking Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shogo; Yoshimura, Ken; Tanabe, Yuko; Kimata, Takahisa; Noda, Yukihiro; Kawasaki, Hirohide; Kaneko, Kazunari

    2013-10-01

    There is considerable overlap between hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) and Kawasaki disease (KD) in terms of aberrant immune response though the etiology of KD remains unknown. We present a case fulfilling the criteria of both HLH and KD complicated by coronary artery dilatation: HLH was confirmed to be triggered by Epstein-Barr virus. This case alarms us the possibility that even patients with HLH may be complicated by coronary artery lesion, which is one of the hallmarks of KD. We would like to draw attention that if features of KD become apparent in patients with HLH, echocardiographic examinations should be performed not to miss coronary artery lesion.

  8. Multiple Coaxial Catheter System for Reliable Access in Interventional Stroke Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kulcsar, Zsolt Yilmaz, Hasan; Bonvin, Christophe; Lovblad, Karl O.; Ruefenacht, Daniel A.

    2010-12-15

    In some patients with acute cerebral vessel occlusion, navigating mechanical thrombectomy systems is difficult due to tortuous anatomy of the aortic arch, carotid arteries, or vertebral arteries. Our purpose was to describe a multiple coaxial catheter system used for mechanical revascularization that helps navigation and manipulations in tortuous vessels. A triple or quadruple coaxial catheter system was built in 28 consecutive cases presenting with acute ischemic stroke. All cases were treated by mechanical thrombectomy with the Penumbra System. In cases of unsuccessful thrombo-aspiration, additional thrombolysis or angioplasty with stent placement was used for improving recanalization. The catheter system consisted of an outermost 8-Fr and an intermediate 6-Fr guiding catheter, containing the inner Penumbra reperfusion catheters. The largest, 4.1-Fr, reperfusion catheter was navigated over a Prowler Select Plus microcatheter. The catheter system provided access to reach the cerebral lesions and provided stability for the mechanically demanding manipulations of thromboaspiration and stent navigation in all cases. Apart from their mechanical role, the specific parts of the system could also provide access to different types of interventions, like carotid stenting through the 8-Fr guiding catheter and intracranial stenting and thrombolysis through the Prowler Select Plus microcatheter. In this series, there were no complications related to the catheter system. In conclusion, building up a triple or quadruple coaxial system proved to be safe and efficient in our experience for the mechanical thrombectomy treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

  9. Analysis of carotid artery deformation in different head and neck positions for maxillofacial catheter navigation in advanced oral cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To improve the accuracy of catheter navigation, it is important to develop a method to predict shifts of carotid artery (CA) bifurcations caused by intraoperative deformation. An important factor affecting the accuracy of electromagnetic maxillofacial catheter navigation systems is CA deformations. We aimed to assess CA deformation in different head and neck positions. Methods Using two sets of computed tomography angiography (CTA) images of six patients, displacements of the skull (maxillofacial segments), C1–C4 cervical vertebrae, mandible (mandibular segment), and CA along with its branches were analyzed. Segmented rigid bones around CA were considered the main causes of CA deformation. After superimposition of maxillofacial segments, C1–C4 and mandible segments were superimposed separately for displacement measurements. Five bifurcation points (vA–vE) were assessed after extracting the CA centerline. A new standardized coordinate system, regardless of patient-specific scanning positions, was employed. It was created using the principal axes of inertia of the maxillofacial bone segments of patients. Position and orientation parameters were transferred to this coordinate system. CA deformation in different head and neck positions was assessed. Results Absolute shifts in the center of gravity in the bone models for different segments were C1, 1.02 ± 0.9; C2, 2.18 ± 1.81; C3, 4.25 ± 3.85; C4, 5.90 ± 5.14; and mandible, 1.75 ± 2.76 mm. Shifts of CA bifurcations were vA, 5.52 ± 4.12; vB, 4.02 ± 3.27; vC, 4.39 ± 2.42; vD, 4.48 ± 1.88; and vE, 2.47 ± 1.32. Displacements, position changes, and orientation changes of C1–C4 segments as well as the displacements of all CA bifurcation points were similar in individual patients. Conclusions CA deformation was objectively proven as an important factor contributing to errors in maxillofacial navigation. Our study results suggest that small movements of the

  10. Acute pancreatitis as a complication of trans-arterial chemoembolization of hepatocellular cancer—case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Mathew; Agrawal, Sangeeta; Short, Robert F.

    2017-01-01

    Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is a therapeutic procedure often performed for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Local complications, though generally uncommon, can arise from arterial ischemia and local cytotoxicity from the chemotherapeutic delivery. We present a case of acute pancreatitis as a rare complication of the TACE procedure along with a review of literature of this uncommon adverse effect. PMID:28280633

  11. Adenosine-induced torsade de pointes complicating a fractional flow reserve measurement in a right coronary artery intermediate stenosis.

    PubMed

    Piccolo, Raffaele; Niglio, Tullio; Di Gioia, Giuseppe; D'Anna, Carolina; De Rosa, Roberta; Strisciuglio, Teresa; Trimarco, Bruno; Piscione, Federico; Galasso, Gennaro

    2013-01-01

    We present the case of a 57 year-old patient that presented to our Institution with a positive treadmill stress test. Coronary angiography revealed an intermediate stenosis of the right coronary artery evaluated with a fractional flow reserve (FFR), complicated by torsade de pointes. Despite this being a very rare arrhythmic complication during FFR, its prompt recognition and treatment are of utmost importance.

  12. Urinary retention and acute kidney injury in a tetraplegic patient using condom catheter after partying: a preventable complication

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Subramanian; Selmi, Fahed; Hughes, Peter L; Singh, Gurpreet; Soni, Bakul M

    2015-01-01

    Background Spinal cord injury patients, who manage their bladder using a condom catheter, are at risk of developing urine retention when they consume large volumes of alcoholic drinks within a short period of time. Case presentation A male tetraplegic patient had been managing satisfactorily penile sheath drainage for 8 years. He went out socializing during which he consumed large volumes of alcohol but did not take any recreational drugs. The following morning, he noticed distension of the lower abdomen and passed urine in dribbles. He then developed a temperature and became unwell. He was seen by district nurses and a doctor, who prescribed antibiotics. He continued to feel unwell. After 8 days, he referred himself to a spinal unit at Regional Spinal Injuries Centre, Southport. The blood test results showed the following: blood urea: 19.8 mmol/L; creatinine: 172 μmol/L; and C-reactive protein: 336.4 mg/L. Urethral catheterization led to immediate drainage of 1,400 mL of urine. A computed tomography scan revealed an enlarged, swollen left kidney, indicating acute bacterial nephritis. He was prescribed intravenous fluids and Meropenem. Creatinine decreased to 46 μmol/L. Conclusion Spinal cord injury patients using condom catheters should be made aware of the risk of urine retention when they consume large amounts of alcoholic drinks in a short period of time. Patients and caregivers should be informed to consider intermittent catheterizations for 24–48 hours or insert indwelling urethral catheter when planning for an evening out. PMID:26508892

  13. The laser driven short-term heating balloon catheter: Relation between the chronic neointimal hyperplasia formation and thermal damage to arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Natsumi; Hayashi, Tomoaki; Kunio, Mie; Igami, Yuka; Arai, Tsunenori; Sakurada, Masami

    2010-01-01

    We proposed a novel laser-driven short-term heating angioplasty to realize restenosis-suppressive angioplasty for peripheral artery disease. In this study, we investigated the chronic intimal hyperplasia formation after the short-term heating dilatation in vivo, as well as the thermal damage calculation on arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs). The prototype short-term heating balloon catheter with 5.0, 5.5, 6.0 mm φ in balloon diameter and 25 mm in balloon length were employed. The short-term heating dilatation was performed in porcine iliac arteries with dilatation conditions of 75°C (N=4) and 65°C (N=5) as peak balloon temperature, 18 ± 4s as heating duration, 3.5 atm as balloon dilatation pressure. Four weeks after the balloon dilatation, the balloon-dilated artery segments were extracted and were stained with HE and picrosirius red for histological observation. In the case of 75°C as the peak balloon temperature, neointimal hyperplasia formation was significantly reduced. In this case, the SMCs density in the artery media measured from the HE-stained specimen was 20% lower than that in the reference artery. According to the thermal damage calculation, it was estimated that the SMCs lethality in artery media after the short-term heating angioplasty was 20% in the case of 75°C as the peak balloon temperature. We demonstrated that the short-term heating dilatation reduced the number of SMCs in artery media. We think this SMCs reduction might contribute to the suppression of chronic neointimal hyperplasia.

  14. [Color Doppler evaluation and diagnosis of local complications after arterial endovascular procedures].

    PubMed

    Novelli, Marco; Righi, Daniele; Pilato, Alida

    2012-09-01

    Diagnostic and therapeutic percutaneous endovascular procedures have become more and more common in recent years, and so also the number of local complications has increased. After such procedures a simple clinical examination may show the presence of an inguinal mass, but does not permit a diagnosis, while Color Doppler and Duplex Scanner can make a differential diagnosis between hematoma, pseudoaneurysm, arteriovenous fistula or other disease. Color Doppler is ubiquitously used to diagnose such complications as it offers a low-cost, easy-to-use method, only minimally uncomfortable for the patient. This ultrasound system can provide both anatomic and haemodynamic information. Our study highlights the diagnostic possibilities offered by the Color Doppler and Duplex Scanner and details, using many illustrations and examples, how the most common complications such as hematoma, pseudoaneurysm, arteriovenous fistula and thrombosis are imaged. Hematoma appears as a hypoechogenic zone, with no color inside, as flow is not present. Pseudoaneurysms, unlike hematoma, maintain a connection with an injured blood vessel, and so they show blood flow both inside the lesion and in the communicating channel, with a typical pattern. The arteriovenous fistula is a vascular channel created, after a percutaneous procedure, between an artery and an adjacent vein that have both been damaged. An endovascular thrombus is directly shown as a luminal defect of flow. Other less common complications are discussed and illustrated.

  15. [Technical solution to a complication caused by intra-arterial catheterization].

    PubMed

    Oliu Torres, O; Pedroso Mendoza, L E; Figueredo Barreras, F; Corteguera Fonte, M E

    1990-01-01

    Knot formation in the distal segment of an angiographic catheter is not very frequent. Its early recognition, as well as domination of several techniques in order to untie it, may avoid surgery. An unique technique in order to untie a knot in a catheter is described, which consists in using other more rigid catheter with "J" shaped end by contralateral femoral via and under direct fluoroscopic visualization, with image magnifier and fitted TV.

  16. Immediate- and short-term outcome following recanalization of long chronic total occlusions (> 50 mm) of native coronary arteries with the Frontrunner catheter.

    PubMed

    Loli, Akil; Liu, Rex; Pershad, Ashish

    2006-06-01

    Thirty percent of diagnostic angiograms have at least 1 chronic total occlusion (CTO). The 10-year survival of patients with a CTO is improved if they have the CTO successfully recanalized. The success of recanalization with conventional wires is 50% and the impact of new technology on recanalization is unknown. This abstract reports a single center experience with one such new device, the Lumend Frontrunner catheter in revascularization of this difficult lesion subset. A consecutive series of 18 patients with CTO's of native coronary arteries were enrolled in this single center, single operator series. The mean age of the CTO was 5.3 years. The indication for attempt at recanalization was ischemia in the territory of the CTO on SPECT imaging. Success was defined as TIMI flow restoration and < 40% residual stenosis. Primary success (defined as TIMI 3 Flow restoration and < 40% residual stenosis) was achieved in 77% of patients. At 30 days and out to 6 months, clinical TVR was 11% (2/18) in this difficult lesion subset. Conventional predictors of failure to recanalize CTOs do not appear to hold true with the use of the Frontrunner catheter. In this small series, dual cusp injections and use of the Microglide catheter appears to correlate with favorable outcomes. Fluoroscopy times and contrast use are high when attempting recanalization of CTOs with this technology.

  17. The Swan-Ganz catheters: past, present, and future. A viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Kanu

    2009-01-06

    The Swan-Ganz balloon flotation catheter was introduced in 1970. It can be placed at the bedside within a few minutes even in critically ill patients. Although placement of these catheters is not difficult, some training and experience are required to avoid complications and for proper interpretation of the hemodynamic data that can be obtained by pulmonary artery catheterization. Because of the many advantages of balloon flotation catheters compared with conventional catheters, they have been used without a proper indication and frequently overused in critical care units, resulting in many complications, including mortality. The prospective randomized trials have reported that in the majority of clinical circumstances, the routine use of balloon flotation catheters is not indicated. These results are not surprising because balloon flotation catheters are diagnostic and not therapeutic tools. That we have learned a great deal about hemodynamics in critically ill patients with the use of balloon flotation catheters should not be ignored or forgotten. Furthermore, our clinical knowledge of hemodynamics has been made possible because of extensive experience gained from directly determined hemodynamics with the use of balloon flotation catheters. It should also be realized that despite the introduction and refinement of newer noninvasive imaging modalities, a number of clinical circumstances exist in which determination of hemodynamics with the use of a balloon flotation catheter is necessary and should be considered, but only by experienced physicians. With the proper use of Swan-Ganz catheters, our knowledge of hemodynamics has been enhanced considerably. Its abuse, particularly by relatively inexperienced operators, has resulted in serious complications, including death. Prospective randomized clinical trials have demonstrated that the routine use of Swan-Ganz catheters does not provide any benefit. However, use of the Swan-Ganz catheter is still indicated in many

  18. [Clinical efficacy and safety of uterine artery chemoembolization in abnormal placental implantation complicated with postpartum hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao-ting; Xu, Lin-feng; Sun, Hong-liang; Li, Hui-qing; Hu, Ren-mei; Tan, Qi-yin

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the safety and clinical efficacy of uterime artery chemoembolization in postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) caused by abnormal placental implantation. Between December 2006 and September 2009, there were 23 cases of abnormal placental implantation with PPH in our hospital, among which 9 presented with continuous small amount of vaginal bleeding and 14 with acute excessive bleeding. The average bleeding time was (8+/-6) d and the mean blood loss was (980+/-660) ml. Abnormal placental implantation was confirmed by color Doppler ultrasound (CD-US) in all cases, the internal iliac artery angiography was performed to identify the uterine artery and bilateral uterine artery chemoembolization (UACE) with methotrexate (MTX) and gelfoam particles to the distal end of uterine artery was conducted after. CD-US rechecked all patients within 48 h after UACE and those patients with blurred margins between placenta and uterus and abnormal blood flow (>1 cmx1 cm) received ultrasonic-guided per vagina MTX multipoint injections. All cases were followed up for 3-26 months (average 12 months) to observe vaginal bleeding, placenta tissue discharge, serum human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), uterine involution, menses, and side-effects or complications. (1) Curative effect: These 23 cases underwent 24 procedures of UACE successfully and vaginal bleeding ceased at an average of (3.5+/-1.3) min after UACE. Reduced blood flow in the placental implantation area was detected under CD-US after UACE. Among the 23 patients, wterine curettage was required in 16 cases due to retained placenta tissues with the mean blood loss of (40+/-28) ml during the operation, 2 underwent subtotal hysterectomy and confirmed to be placenta percreta by pathology examination, and placenta tissues were spontaneously discharged completely in 5 cases. Totally, 91% of the patients (21/23) reserved their uterus. (2) FOLLOW-UP: the serum hCG reduced to normal within 1-13 d after the placenta tissue were evacuated

  19. Reduction of Intimal Hyperplasia in Injured Rat Arteries Promoted by Catheter Balloons Coated with Polyelectrolyte Multilayers that Contain Plasmid DNA Encoding PKCδ

    PubMed Central

    Bechler, Shane L.; Si, Yi; Yu, Yan; Ren, Jun; Liu, Bo; Lynn, David M.

    2012-01-01

    New therapeutic approaches that eliminate or reduce the occurrence of intimal hyperplasia following balloon angioplasty could improve the efficacy of vascular interventions and improve the quality of life of patients suffering from vascular diseases. Here, we report that treatment of arteries using catheter balloons coated with thin polyelectrolyte-based films (‘polyelectrolyte multilayers’, PEMs) can substantially reduce intimal hyperplasia in an in vivo rat model of vascular injury. We used a layer-by-layer (LbL) process to coat the surfaces of inflatable catheter balloons with PEMs composed of nanolayers of a cationic poly(β-amino ester) (polymer 1) and plasmid DNA (pPKCδ) encoding the δ isoform of protein kinase C (PKCδ), a regulator of apoptosis and other cell processes that has been demonstrated to reduce intimal hyperplasia in injured arterial tissue when administered via perfusion using viral vectors. Insertion of balloons coated with polymer 1/pPKCδ multilayers into injured arteries for 20 min resulted in local transfer of DNA and elevated levels of PKCδ expression in the media of treated tissue 3 days after delivery. IFC and IHC analysis revealed these levels of expression to promote downstream cellular processes associated with up-regulation of apoptosis. Analysis of arterial tissue 14 days after treatment revealed polymer 1/pPKCδ-coated balloons to reduce the occurrence of intimal hyperplasia by ~60% compared to balloons coated with films containing empty plasmid vectors. Our results demonstrate the potential therapeutic value of this nanotechnology-based approach to local gene delivery in the clinically important context of balloon-mediated vascular interventions. These PEM-based methods could also prove useful for other in vivo applications that require short-term, surface-mediated transfer of plasmid DNA. PMID:23069712

  20. Reduction of intimal hyperplasia in injured rat arteries promoted by catheter balloons coated with polyelectrolyte multilayers that contain plasmid DNA encoding PKCδ.

    PubMed

    Bechler, Shane L; Si, Yi; Yu, Yan; Ren, Jun; Liu, Bo; Lynn, David M

    2013-01-01

    New therapeutic approaches that eliminate or reduce the occurrence of intimal hyperplasia following balloon angioplasty could improve the efficacy of vascular interventions and improve the quality of life of patients suffering from vascular diseases. Here, we report that treatment of arteries using catheter balloons coated with thin polyelectrolyte-based films ('polyelectrolyte multilayers', PEMs) can substantially reduce intimal hyperplasia in an in vivo rat model of vascular injury. We used a layer-by-layer (LbL) process to coat the surfaces of inflatable catheter balloons with PEMs composed of nanolayers of a cationic poly(β-amino ester) (polymer 1) and plasmid DNA (pPKCδ) encoding the δ isoform of protein kinase C (PKCδ), a regulator of apoptosis and other cell processes that has been demonstrated to reduce intimal hyperplasia in injured arterial tissue when administered via perfusion using viral vectors. Insertion of balloons coated with polymer 1/pPKCδ multilayers into injured arteries for 20 min resulted in local transfer of DNA and elevated levels of PKCδ expression in the media of treated tissue three days after delivery. IFC and IHC analysis revealed these levels of expression to promote downstream cellular processes associated with up-regulation of apoptosis. Analysis of arterial tissue 14 days after treatment revealed polymer 1/pPKCδ-coated balloons to reduce the occurrence of intimal hyperplasia by ~60% compared to balloons coated with films containing empty plasmid vectors. Our results demonstrate the potential therapeutic value of this nanotechnology-based approach to local gene delivery in the clinically important context of balloon-mediated vascular interventions. These PEM-based methods could also prove useful for other in vivo applications that require short-term, surface-mediated transfer of plasmid DNA.

  1. Percutaneous Implantation of a Catheter with Subcutaneous Reservoir for Intraarterial Regional Chemotherapy: Technique and Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Grosso, Maurizio; Zanon, Claudio; Mancini, Andrea; Garruso, Matteo; Gazzera, Carlo; Anselmetti, Giovanni Carlo; Veglia, Simona; Gandini, Giovanni

    2000-03-15

    Purpose: We present the technique and the preliminary results of percutaneous implantation of intraarterial catheters connected to a subcutaneous infusion reservoir for prolonged regional chemotherapy of hepatic and extrahepatic tumors.Methods: Two hundred patients with primary or secondary hepatic neoplasms, pelvic, pancreatic, renal, lingual, and breast cancer underwent the procedure. The access was the left axillary artery (188 patients) and the femoral artery (12 patients). The catheter tip was placed in the hepatic (170 patients), hypogastric (18), splenic (4), internal thoracic (2), gastroduodenal (3), renal (2) or the external carotid artery (1). The catheter was connected to a subcutaneous reservoir and filled with heparin; chemotherapeutic infusion was subsequently started.Results: One hundred percent immediate technical success was obtained. Forty-three of 200 (21.5%) patients had a complication: 29 patients had a catheter dislodgment, nine had arterial thrombosis, three had a pseudoaneurysm of the left axillary artery and two had a port pocket hematoma. Most complications (37/43, 86%) were treated percutaneously without interruption of chemotherapy. In only six cases (3% of the total population) was chemotherapy discontinued due to the complication itself. The mean duration of catheter patency was 7.2 months.Conclusion: Percutaneous placement of an intraarterial catheter is feasible and causes less discomfort to the patient than the surgical approach. The technique has an acceptable complication rate (21.5%), similar to that for surgical implantation (17.8%), with the advantage that in most cases the complications can be resolved percutaneously. This technique represents an alternative to surgical implantation in the treatment of liver metastases from colorectal cancer and opens new therapeutic possibilities for the local prolonged treatment of other kinds of tumor, though its clinical efficacy must be assessed in selected trials.

  2. Internal low energy cardioversion of atrial fibrillation using a single lead system: comparison of a left and right pulmonary artery catheter approach.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, S; Schneider, M A; Karch, M R; Schmitt, C

    2001-07-01

    Internal cardioversion (ICV) has been demonstrated as an effective and safe method for restoring sinus rhythm in patients with AF. Recently, a new single lead system with a balloon-guided cardioversion catheter was introduced. ICV was performed after advancing a 7.5 Fr catheter flow-directed into the left or right pulmonary artery (PA, distal array, cathode). The proximal array (anode) was placed at the lateral RA wall. Synchronized shocks (3/3 ms biphasic impulse) were applied using a stepwise protocol (0.5, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 J) until sinus rhythm was restored or maximum energy (15 J) was reached. Sixty-five patients (mean age 58 +/- 13 years) with acute and chronic AF were included. Sinus rhythm could be restored in 59 (91%) patients. Cardioversion success was 93% in the left PA compared to 86% in right PA. DFTs for the left and right PA approaches were 7.1 +/- 4.0 J and 10.2 +/- 4.0 J, respectively (P < 0.0001). It was significantly higher in patients with an AF history > 7 days (7.2 +/- 4.1 J) than for those with a recent onset of AF (5.6 +/- 4.1 J), P = 0.0012. Shock impedance differed for the left and right PA lead configuration (53 +/- 11 vs 49 +/- 13 omega, P < 0.05). A right PA lead configuration is as effective compared to a left PA catheter approach when performing ICV for AF. ICV with a single lead system is safe and cardioversion success is comparable to other internal and external cardioversion techniques. In combination with hemodynamic monitoring, flow-directed nonfluoroscopic catheter positioning is feasible and may serve as a valuable therapeutic and diagnostic tool in intensive care units.

  3. Catheter Ablation of Ventricular Tachycardia as the First-Line Therapy in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease and Preserved Left Ventricular Systolic Function: Long-Term Results.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Marcell; Peichl, Petr; Wichterle, Dan; Pavlů, Luděk; Čihák, Robert; Aldhoon, Bashar; Kautzner, Josef

    2015-10-01

    Patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), relatively preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), and hemodynamically tolerated ventricular tachycardia (VT) may benefit from catheter ablation as the first-line treatment. Our aim was to analyze the long-term results of VT ablation in this population. Thirty-one patients (1 woman, mean age 67 ± 10 years) with CAD, tolerated VT, and LVEF ≥40% underwent catheter ablation as the first-line treatment of the arrhythmia. Catheter ablation was performed in order to abolish all inducible VTs. An ICD was implanted if sustained VT of any morphology remained inducible after the procedure. The mean LVEF was 48 ± 6% and the mean VT cycle length reached 348 ± 70 milliseconds in the study cohort. Clinical and all inducible VTs were abolished in 90% (28/31) and 58% (18/31) of the patients, respectively. An ICD was subsequently implanted in 42% of cases. Over a mean follow-up of 3.8 ± 2.9 years, 42% (13/31) patients died. Survival of the patients with or without the ICD was not significantly different (P = 0.47). VT recurrence was observed in 11% (2/18) of patients who had complete elimination of all inducible VTs. No sudden death occurred in patients without the ICD. Catheter ablation of VT as the first-line treatment in patients with CAD and relatively preserved LVEF is a viable strategy. It may prevent implantation of the ICD in a considerable proportion of patients. Abolition of all inducible VTs confers low VT recurrence rate over a long-term follow-up. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Effectiveness of Arterial Closure Devices for Preventing Complications With Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: An Instrumental Variable Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wimmer, Neil J.; Secemsky, Eric A; Mauri, Laura; Roe, Matthew T.; Saha-Chaudhuri, Paramita; Dai, David; McCabe, James M.; Resnic, Frederic S.; Gurm, Hitinder S.; Yeh, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Bleeding is associated with poor outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). While arterial closure devices (ACDs) are widely used in clinical practice, whether they are effective in reducing bleeding complications during transfemoral PCI is uncertain. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of ACDs for the prevention of vascular access site complications in patients undergoing transfemoral PCI using an instrumental variable approach. Methods and Results We performed a retrospective analysis of CathPCI Registry from 2009-2013 at 1,470 sites across United States. Variation in the proportion of ACDs used by each individual physician operator was used as an instrumental variable to address potential confounding. A two stage instrumental variable analysis was used as the primary approach. The main outcome measure was vascular access site complications, and non-access site bleeding was used as a “falsification endpoint” (negative control) to evaluate for potential confounding. A total of 1,053,155 ACDs were used during 2,056,585 PCIs during the study period. The vascular access site complication rate was 1.5%. In the instrumental variable analysis, the use of ACDs was associated with a 0.40% absolute risk reduction in vascular access site complications (95% confidence interval (95% CI):0.31%−0.42%, number needed to treat=250). Absolute differences in non-access site bleeding were negligible (risk difference 0.04%, 95% CI:0.01%−0.07%), suggesting acceptable control of confounding in the comparison. Conclusions ACDs are associated with a modest reduction in major bleeding after PCI. The number needed to treat with ACDs to prevent one major bleeding event is high. PMID:27059685

  5. Incentive spirometry for preventing pulmonary complications after coronary artery bypass graft.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Eliane R F S; Soares, Bernardo G O; Cardoso, Jefferson R; Atallah, Álvaro N

    2012-09-12

    Incentive spirometry (IS) is a treatment technique that uses a mechanical device to reduce pulmonary complications during postoperative care. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2007. Update the previously published systematic review to compare the effects of IS for preventing postoperative pulmonary complications in adults undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). We searched CENTRAL and DARE on The Cochrane Library (Issue 2 of 4 2011), MEDLINE OVID (1948 to May 2011), EMBASE (1980 to Week 20 2011), LILACS (1982 to July 2011) , the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) (1980 to July 2011), Allied & Complementary Medicine (AMED) (1985 to May 2011), CINAHL (1982 to May 2011). Randomised controlled trials comparing IS with any type of prophylactic physiotherapy for prevention of postoperative pulmonary complications in adults undergoing CABG. Two reviewers independently evaluated trial quality using the guidelines of the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews and extracted data from included trials. For continuous outcomes, we used the generic inverse variance method for meta-analysis and for dichotomous data we used the Peto Odds Ratio. This update included 592 participants from seven studies (two new and one that had been excluded in the previous review in 2007. There was no evidence of a difference between groups in the incidence of any pulmonary complications and functional capacity between treatment with IS and treatment with physical therapy, positive pressure breathing techniques (including continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP) and intermittent positive pressure breathing (IPPB), active cycle of breathing techniques (ACBT) or preoperative patient education. Patients treated with IS had worse pulmonary function and arterial oxygenation compared with positive pressure breathing. Based on these studies there was no improvement in the muscle strength between groups who received IS

  6. Comparison of Complications of Arteriovenous Fistula with Permanent Catheter in Hemodialysis Patients: A Six-month Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Ali; Mardani, Saeed; Kabiri, Maryam; Amiri, Masoud

    2017-01-01

    Arteriovenous fistula (AVF), permanent catheter (PC), and vascular graft are three vascular access types used for hemodialysis procedure. Due to insufficient reliable information on the comparison between AVF and PC, this study was conducted to compare AVF and PC regarding dialysis adequacy. This prospective study was carried out from March, 2013 to September, 2013. In this study, 76 hemodialysis patients were enrolled and assigned to two unequal groups of AVF and PC. Before and after the dialysis session, blood samples were taken for laboratory examinations and measurement of urea reduction ratio (URR) and Kt/V. The patients were followed up for six months, and then laboratory examinations were repeated. Of the 76 hemodialysis patients, 30 had AVF and others PC. During the 6-month follow-up, 24 patients in PC group but only one patient in AVF group showed infection (P = 0.006), while in each group, three cases of thrombosis were seen (P = 0.58); however, catheter dysfunction was seen in 13 patients of PC group but no patients of AVF group (P = 0.004). There was no difference between the two groups in Kt/V and URR at the beginning of the study; however, after six months, Kt/V and URR were greater in AVF group (P < 0.05). In addition to some advantages of AVF over PC, such as lower rate of infection and thrombosis, we also found better dialysis adequacy in AVF group. We recommend that AVF be created in all of patients with chronic kidney disease who are candidates for hemodialysis.

  7. Successful removal of an entrapped and kinked catheter during right transradial cardiac catheterization by snaring and unwinding the catheter via femoral access.

    PubMed

    Khoubyari, Rostam; Arsanjani, Reza; Habibzadeh, Mohammad Reza; Echeverri, Jose; Movahed, Mohammad Reza

    2012-01-01

    Since its introduction by Campeau in 1989, the transradial approach for coronary angiography has gained significant popularity among interventional cardiologists due to its lower access site complication rates, cost-effectiveness, and shorter hospital course. Although the transradial approach is much safer than the transfemoral approach, it has its own inherent rare complications including radial artery occlusion, thrombosis, nonocclusive radial artery injury, vasospasm, and compartment syndrome. Herein, we present an unusual case of entrapment and kinking of a catheter in the radial artery, which was successfully removed by using a gooseneck snare via the transfemoral route. The distal and proximal tips were then simultaneously rotated in opposite directions, allowing for the unkinking and removal of the catheter. To our knowledge, this is the first report of this rare complication.

  8. Intravenous Versus Oral Antibiotics for the Prevention of Treatment Failure in Children With Complicated Appendicitis: Has the Abandonment of Peripherally Inserted Catheters Been Justified?

    PubMed

    Rangel, Shawn J; Anderson, Brett R; Srivastava, Rajendu; Shah, Samir S; Ishimine, Paul; Srinivasan, Mythili; Bryan, Matthew; Gong, Wu; Hall, Matt; Localio, Russell; Luan, Xianqun; Anandalwar, Seema; Keren, Ron

    2017-08-01

    To compare treatment failure leading to hospital readmission in children with complicated appendicitis who received oral versus intravenous antibiotics after discharge. Antibiotics are often employed after discharge to prevent treatment failure in children with complicated appendicitis, although existing studies comparing intravenous and oral antibiotics for this purpose are limited. We identified all patients aged 3 to 18 years undergoing appendectomy for complicated appendicitis, who received postdischarge antibiotics at 35 childrens hospitals from 2009 to 2012. Discharge codes were used to identify study subjects from the Pediatric Health Information System database, and chart review confirmed eligibility, treatment assignment, and outcomes. Exposure status was based on outpatient antibiotic therapy, and analysis used optimal and full matching methods to adjust for demographic and clinical characteristics. Treatment failure (defined as an organ-space infection) requiring inpatient readmission was the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included revisits from any cause to either the inpatient or emergency department setting. In all, 4579 patients were included (median: 99/hospital), and utilization of intravenous antibiotics after discharge ranged from 0% to 91.7% across hospitals. In the matched analysis, the rate of treatment failure was significantly higher for the intravenous group than the oral group [odds ratio (OR) 1.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05-2.88; risk difference: 4.0%, 95% CI 0.4-7.6%], as was the rate of all-cause revisits (OR 2.11, 95% CI 1.44-3.11; risk difference: 9.4%, 95% CI 4.7-14.2%). The rate of peripherally inserted central catheter line complications was 3.2% in the intravenous group, and drug reactions were rare in both groups (intravenous: 0.7%, oral: 0.5%). Compared with oral antibiotics, use of intravenous antibiotics after discharge in children with complicated appendicitis was associated with higher rates of both treatment

  9. Superselective embolization of arterial bleeding as a late complication 3 months after nephron sparing surgery for renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J; Perabo, F G E; Bachmann, R; Steiner, G; Schild, H; Müller, S C

    2004-06-07

    To our knowledge, this is the first case of an arterial bleeding as a late complication 3 months after nephron sparing surgery of renal cell cancer, presumably originating from an arteriocalyceal fistula. Superselective embolization of the feeding arterial branch was chosen for treatment of the hemorrhage and proved successful. The high efficacy of superselective embolization as a minimally invasive procedure in this and other cases of bleeding Vessels should be the preferred method instead of open surgery.

  10. Late Complication after Superficial Femoral Artery (SFA) Aneurysm: Stent-graft Expulsion Outside the Skin

    SciTech Connect

    Pecoraro, Felice Sabatino, Ermanno R.; Dinoto, Ettore; Rosa, Giuliana La; Corte, Giuseppe; Bajardi, Guido

    2015-10-15

    A 78-year-old man presented with a 7-cm aneurysm in the left superficial femoral artery, which was considered unfit and anatomically unsuitable for conventional open surgery for multiple comorbidities. The patient was treated with stent-graft [Viabhan stent-graft (WL Gore and Associates, Flagstaff, AZ)]. Two years from stent-graft implantation, the patient presented a purulent secretion and a spontaneous external expulsion through a fistulous channel. No claudication symptoms or hemorrhagic signs were present. The pus and device cultures were positive for Staphylococcus aureus sensitive to piperacillin/tazobactam. Patient management consisted of fistula drainage, systemic antibiotic therapy, and daily wound dressing. At 1-month follow-up, the wound was closed. To our knowledge, this is the first case of this type of stent-graft complication presenting with external expulsion.

  11. [A case of transient postoperative median nerve palsy due to the use of the wrist holder to stabilize an intra-arterial catheter].

    PubMed

    Ohata, Hiroto; Iida, Yuko; Kito, Kazuhiro; Kawamura, Michika; Yamashita, Mika; Ohta, Shuichiro; Ueda, Norio; Iida, Hiroki

    2013-06-01

    We experienced a case of right median nerve palsy at the distal forearm following abdominal surgery. We postulate that the cause of the median nerve palsy is overextension of the wrist by the inappropriate fixation with a holder. The patient was a 46-year-old man with habit of smoking receiving low-anterior resection of the rectum under general and epidural anesthesia in lithotomy position. During surgery his upper limbs were placed on padded arm board abducted about 80 degrees and affixed with soft cotton. His forearms were slightly supinated, whereas his elbows were not over-extended. A 22 G cannula was inserted in the right radial artery and the right wrist was fixed with plastic-holder with soft pad. This position was maintained throughout the operation approximetly for 250 minutes. During anesthesia any special events regarding hemodynamic variables were not observed. He complained of numbness in the palmar side of the digits 1-3 on his right hand without motor disturbance 4 hours after the operation. Examination by the anesthesiologist revealed median nerve palsy. Fortunately, this symptom gradually but completely resolved over the next few days. The possible causes of this neuropathy include the overextension of the wrist or the unexpected extension of the elbow beyond the acceptable range by the supination of forearm, which was induced by the attachment used to stabilize an intra-arterial catheter. Therefore, in the current case we should have returned the wrists promptly to the neutral position following arterial catheter placement to prevent the median nerve palsy. This case suggests the importance of holding the proper position of the arm during surgery.

  12. Diabetes insipidus-like state complicating percutaneous transluminal renal stenting for transplant renal artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lu; He, Yangyan; Zhang, Hongkun; Wu, Ziheng; Li, Donglin; Chen, Shanwen

    2014-07-01

    To report the incidence, etiology, and treatments of diabetes insipidus-like state that complicate percutaneous transluminal renal stenting (PTRS) for transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS). Data from 7 patients on whom PTRS for TRAS was performed between October 2008 and March 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. The parameters investigated included blood flow velocity, blood pressure, and creatinine levels before and after the intervention. The procedural success rate was 100%. Three cases developed a diabetes insipidus-like state in the immediate postprocedural period. Urine output returned to normal within 2 weeks after treatment. The median blood flow velocity was significantly reduced from 4.51 m/sec (4.31-4.61 m/sec) at the time of TRAS diagnosis to 1.33 m/sec (1.31-1.51 m/sec) at the most recent follow-up of the group with a diabetes insipidus-like state. The ratio of median blood flow velocity before and after stenting in the group with a diabetes insipidus-like state was significantly higher than that in the group without a diabetes insipidus-like state (3.39 vs. 1.93). Diabetes insipidus-like state that complicates PTRS for TRAS is not an uncommon event, but appears to be underreported in the medical literature. A high ratio of pre- and poststenting median blood flow velocity may be a predictor for a postprocedural diabetes insipidus-like state. The most probable cause may be the marked increase in renal arterial flow. Early recognition of the condition is essential to avoid dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Does a plain X-ray of the pelvis predict arterial complications in renal transplantation? A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Aalten, Jeroen; Dekker, Helena M; van der Vliet, J A Daan; Hoitsma, Andries J

    2011-06-01

    It is unknown whether if a plain X-ray of the iliac arteries (pelvic X-ray) is a reliable tool to detect calcifications and predict vascular complications. In a prospective study, a pelvic X-ray was performed before transplantation in patients without evidence of peripheral vascular disease (n = 109) and vascular calcifications were scored. Vascular calcifications in the iliac arteries and complications were scored by the transplant surgeon during the operation (gold standard). Vascular calcifications were found on the pelvic X-ray in 33 patients (30.2%). The transplant surgeon identified vascular calcifications in 35%. Sensitivity and specificity of the pelvic X-ray for vascular calcifications in the iliac arteries were 48 and 82%, respectively. Technical problems with the arterial anastomosis due to vascular calcifications were observed in five patients. The negative predictive value and positive predictive value of a pelvic X-ray for complications with the arterial anastomosis were 99 and 14%, respectively. A pelvic X-ray is not a reliable tool to detect vascular calcifications. Technical problems with the arterial anastomosis due to calcifications are infrequent in the absence of vascular calcifications on the pelvic X-ray.

  14. Biliary complications secondary to late hepatic artery thrombosis in adult liver transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Margarit, C; Hidalgo, E; Lázaro, J L; Murio, E; Charco, R; Balsells, J

    1998-01-01

    Biliary complications (BC) are the usual presentation of late hepatic artery thrombosis (HAT) of the liver graft. Our aim was to study the clinical features and outcome of BC secondary to HAT compared to BC which occurred in liver transplant (LT) patients with patent vessels. We present a retrospective study of 224 LTs performed in 204 patients between 1988 and 1996. The mean recipient x s age was 51 years. A choledochocholedochostomy without T-tube was used as biliary reconstruction in most cases (67%); in 12%, a choledochojejunostomy was performed. An iliac conduit was necessary in 15% of cases and back-table arterial reconstruction was performed in 10% of cases of anatomic variants in graft arteries. Different donor, recipient and intraoperative variables, as well as treatment and outcome. were studied in the two groups of patients presenting BC with or without HAT. BC occurred in 38 cases (17%) whereas HAT was diagnosed in 11 cases (4.9%). Therefore, 23% of BC encountered after LT were secondary to HAT. Nine cases of late HAT manifested as BC, septicaemia (88%) and hepatic bilomas (8 cases). Percutaneous or surgical drainage of hepatic bilomas was performed in all cases, followed by retransplantation in six cases (66%). BC secondary to HAT appeared later than the rest of BC. Donor age was the only significant predisposing factor found in our study. Graft survival is significantly reduced as most patients needed retransplantation. In conclusion, BC secondary to HAT presented later in livers from older donors in the form of biliary sepsis and hepatic biloma. Retransplantation was ultimately required in most cases and graft survival was significantly diminished.

  15. Catheter-related bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Tracie A

    2009-06-01

    Tunneled, cuffed, double-lumen catheters are commonly used for long-term venous access in hemodialysis patients. Complications of these catheters, including catheter-related infection, are a major cause of morbidity and resource utilization in the hemodialysis population. Treatment of catheter-related bloodstream infections includes the use of antibiotics and evaluation of the need for catheter removal or exchange. Measures to prevent catheter-related infections include use of an aseptic technique and antiseptic cleaning solution, elimination of Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage, topical exit site application of antibiotics, use of antibiotic lock solutions, and use of catheters and cuffs coated or impregnated with antimicrobial or antiseptic agents. This review article will provide an update on the prevalence, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of catheter-related infections in the hemodialysis population.

  16. The impact of occupational stress factors on temporary work disability related to arterial hypertension and its complications.

    PubMed

    Lazaridis, Konstantinos; Jovanović, Jovica; Jovanović, Jovana; Šarac, Ivana; Jovanović, Stefan

    2017-06-01

    To determine which specific groups of occupational stress factors influence the duration of temporary work disability related to arterial hypertension and joint complications/co-morbidities. Workers (n = 1398; 1009 in the exposed group, 389 in the control group) with arterial hypertension who worked at one workplace for a minimum of 10 years were divided into 10 subgroups, depending on the presence of joint complications/co-morbidities. The intensity of seven groups of occupational stress factors, the total score of Occupational Stress Index (OSI) and the average number of lost working days during 1 year were analysed. The number of lost working days due to arterial hypertension and joint complications/co-morbidities was significantly higher in the exposed group. In all subgroups of the exposed group there was a high correlation between the number of lost working days and the total OSI score. Specific occupational stress factors were associated with specific complications: High Demands with chronic myocardial infarction, Strictness with cerebral haemorrhage, Conflict/Uncertainty with cerebral infarction, Extrinsic Time Pressure with acute myocardial infarction, and Avoidance/Symbolic Aversiveness with non-insulin-dependent diabetes. There are specific groups of occupational stress factors which can influence the duration of work disability associated with certain complications and co-morbidities of arterial hypertension.

  17. Complications of internal jugular vein retrograde catheterization.

    PubMed

    Gemma, M; Beretta, L; De Vitis, A; Mattioli, C; Calvi, M R; Antonino, A; Rizzi, B; Crippa, L; D'Angelo, A

    1998-01-01

    We report on the incidence of complications of 172 internal jugular vein retrograde catheterizations (IJVRCs) performed on 126 patients. Standard cannulation and X-ray control of the catheter tip placement were performed. Difficulties encountered during the manouvre were registered. Patients with a jugular catheter in place for more than one day had neck echography on catheter removal and one week later. Carotid artery puncture occurred in 20 (12%) cases and lymphatic vessel puncture in one. In 13 (8%) cases IJVRC failed due to difficulties in advancing the guide. X-ray films documented catheter misplacement in 39 (23%) cases: loop into the internal jugular vein in 11 (6%); paravertebral venous plexus cannulated in one; other extracranial jugular afferent cannulated in 4 (2%); catheter tip into the jugular lumen in 10 (6%); catheter tip beyond the jugular bulb in 13 (8%). First neck echography documented: one perivascular hematoma (absent one week later); 3 (4%) jugular vein thrombosis (2 asymptomatic and absent one week later; one symptomatic and still evident one week later). Positive neck echography was not associated with difficulties, length of catheterization, diameter of the catheter. IJVRC is a simple and safe procedure with a low incidence of serious complications.

  18. MRI findings in multifetal pregnancies complicated by twin reversed arterial perfusion sequence (TRAP).

    PubMed

    Guimaraes, Carolina V A; Kline-Fath, Beth M; Linam, Leann E; Garcia, Maria A Calvo; Rubio, Eva I; Lim, Foong-Yen

    2011-06-01

    Twin reversed arterial perfusion sequence (TRAP) is a rare complication in multifetal monochorionic pregnancies in which a normal "pump" twin provides circulation to an abnormal acardiac co-twin, resulting in high-output cardiac dysfunction in the pump twin. To define fetal MRI findings of TRAP sequence. Fetal MR images were retrospectively reviewed in 35 pregnancies complicated by TRAP sequence. Abnormalities of the pump twin, acardiac twin, umbilical cord, placenta and amniotic fluid were reviewed. Acardiac twins were classified as: acephalus (51%), anceps (40%), amorphus (9%), acormus (0%). Common findings in acardiac twins include subcutaneous edema (77%), absent cardiac structures (86%), absent or abnormal thoracic cavity (100%), abnormal abdominal organs (100%), superior limbs absent (46%) or abnormal (51%), and inferior limbs present but abnormal (83%). There were pump twin findings of cardiac dysfunction in 43% and intracranial ischemic changes in 3%. Umbilical cord anomalies were present in 97%. Acardiac twins present with a predictable pattern of malformation with poorly developed superior structures, more normally formed inferior structures and absent or rudimentary heart. Although usually absent, abnormal heart structures can be seen and do not exclude TRAP sequence. Pump twins are commonly normal with exception of findings of cardiac dysfunction and possible brain ischemia.

  19. Feasibility of virtual 3-Fr percutaneous coronary intervention using standard guiding catheters.

    PubMed

    Honda, Tsuyoshi; Fujimoto, Kazuteru; Miyao, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have reported the efficacy of sheathless percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) using hydrophilic-coated 5-Fr guiding catheters that are one to two Fr sizes smaller in diameter than the corresponding introducer sheath (virtual 3-Fr PCI). However, the limited number of shapes of hydrophilic-coated guiding catheters occasionally makes them difficult to engage and control. To evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of virtual 3-Fr PCI using standard guiding catheters of various shapes. We identified 35 consecutive patients with stable angina, who underwent virtual 3-Fr PCI using either hydrophilic-coated guiding catheters (Works™, Medikit, Japan) or standard guiding catheters (Heartrail™, Terumo, Japan). Thirty-five patients were identified (63% men; mean age 70 ±13 years). In 2 cases, hydrophilic-coated guiding catheters were exchanged to standard guiding catheters because of difficulty in engaging the target coronary arteries. Ultimately, standard guiding catheters were used in 20 patients (57%) and hydrophilic-coated catheters were used in 15 (43%). One of 20 patients treated with standard guiding catheters and 1 of 15 treated with hydrophilic-coated guiding catheters underwent the 4-in-3 "slender mother and child" PCI technique due to difficulty of stent deployment. There were no differences between the two groups in PCI procedural variables such as procedural time, fluoroscopy time, radiation dose, or contrast dye volume. There were no access site-related complications in this study. These findings indicate that virtual 3-Fr PCI using standard guiding catheters is as efficient and safe as virtual 3-Fr PCI using hydrophilic-coated guiding catheters.

  20. Feasibility of virtual 3-Fr percutaneous coronary intervention using standard guiding catheters

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Kazuteru; Miyao, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Recent studies have reported the efficacy of sheathless percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) using hydrophilic-coated 5-Fr guiding catheters that are one to two Fr sizes smaller in diameter than the corresponding introducer sheath (virtual 3-Fr PCI). However, the limited number of shapes of hydrophilic-coated guiding catheters occasionally makes them difficult to engage and control. Aim To evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of virtual 3-Fr PCI using standard guiding catheters of various shapes. Material and methods We identified 35 consecutive patients with stable angina, who underwent virtual 3-Fr PCI using either hydrophilic-coated guiding catheters (Works™, Medikit, Japan) or standard guiding catheters (Heartrail™, Terumo, Japan). Results Thirty-five patients were identified (63% men; mean age 70 ±13 years). In 2 cases, hydrophilic-coated guiding catheters were exchanged to standard guiding catheters because of difficulty in engaging the target coronary arteries. Ultimately, standard guiding catheters were used in 20 patients (57%) and hydrophilic-coated catheters were used in 15 (43%). One of 20 patients treated with standard guiding catheters and 1 of 15 treated with hydrophilic-coated guiding catheters underwent the 4-in-3 “slender mother and child” PCI technique due to difficulty of stent deployment. There were no differences between the two groups in PCI procedural variables such as procedural time, fluoroscopy time, radiation dose, or contrast dye volume. There were no access site-related complications in this study. Conclusions These findings indicate that virtual 3-Fr PCI using standard guiding catheters is as efficient and safe as virtual 3-Fr PCI using hydrophilic-coated guiding catheters. PMID:25489315

  1. [Clinico-statistical analysis of arterial hypertension complicated with hypertensive crisis in Moscow in 2005-2009].

    PubMed

    Gaponova, N I; Plavunov, N F; Tereshchenko, S N; Baratashvili, V L; Abdurakhmanov, V R; Komissarenko, I A; Filippov, D V; Podkopaev, D V

    2011-01-01

    Clinicostatistical analysis of arterial hypertension complicated with hypertensive crisis using data of Moscow A.S.Puchkov Station of Urgent and Emergent Medical Aid revealed 14% rise in number of hypertensive crises during the period from 2005 to 2009. Number of hypertensive crises increased among persons of young age (18-35 years). Frequency of cerebrovascular complications of hypertensive crises was age dependent with maximal values among men aged 36-74 years and women older than 75 years.

  2. Early results and complications of prostatic arterial embolization for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Lebdai, Souhil; Delongchamps, Nicolas Barry; Sapoval, Marc; Robert, Grégoire; Amouyal, Gregory; Thiounn, Nicolas; Karsenty, Gilles; Ruffion, Alain; de La Taille, Alexandre; Descazeaud, Aurélien; Mathieu, Romain

    2016-05-01

    To review current knowledge on clinical outcomes and peri-operative complications of prostatic arterial embolization (PAE) in patients treated for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) related to benign prostatic obstruction (BPO). A systematic review of the literature published from January 2008 to January 2015 was performed on PubMed/MEDLINE. Fifty-seven articles were identified, and four were selected for inclusion in this review. Only one randomized clinical trial compared transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) to PAE. At 3 months after the procedure, mean IPSS reduction from baseline ranged from 7.2 to 15.6 points. Mean urine peak-flow improvement ranged from +3.21 ml/s to +9.5 ml/s. When compared to TURP, PAE was associated with a significantly lower IPSS reduction 1 and 3 months after the procedure. A trend toward similar symptoms improvement was however reported without statistical significance from 6 to 24 months. Major complications were rare with one bladder partial necrosis due to non-selective embolization. Mild adverse events occurred in 10 % of the patients and included transient hyperthermia, hematuria, rectal bleeding, painful urination or acute urinary retention. Further comparative studies are mandatory to assess post-operative rates of complications, especially acute urinary retention, after PAE and standard procedures. Early reports suggest that PAE may be a promising procedure for the treatment of patients with LUTS due to BPO. However, the low level of evidence and short follow-up of published reports preclude any firm conclusion on its mid-term efficiency. Further clinical trials are warranted before any use in clinical practice.

  3. Risk Factors and Complications Associated with Difficult Retrieval of Embolic Protection Devices in Carotid Artery Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Lian Xuegan; Liu Wenhua; Li Min; Lin Min; Zhu Shuanggen; Sun Wen; Yin Qin; Xu Gelin; Zhang Renliang; Liu Xinfeng

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to investigate the risk factors and complications of difficult retrieval (DR) of embolic protection devices (EPDs) in carotid artery stenting (CAS). Methods: A total of 195 consecutive patients who underwent CAS between December 2007 and March 2010 in a general hospital were enrolled and divided into two groups: with DR and without DR. The risk factors of DR were analyzed with univariate and multivariate analyses. The complications of DR were recorded and analyzed. Results: A total of 30 (15.4%) patients with DR of EPDs were observed, of whom EPDs were successfully retrieved in 29, and in 1 was it taken out by surgical treatment. The retrieval time was significantly longer in patients with DR (490.5 {+-} 143.9 s) than in patients without DR (157.2 {+-} 15.7 s, p = 0.000). Vasospasm was observed more frequently in patients with DR than in patients without DR (55.2% vs. 14.5%, p = 0.000). Intracranial compilations were more frequent in patients with DR than in those without DR (17.2% vs. 0.6%, p = 0.000). Calcified plaques, degree of residual stenosis, types of the stents, and tortuosity index (TI > 80 Degree-Sign) were all associated with DR. A logistic regression analysis indicated that calcified plaques (odds ratio (OR) = 6.5; p = 0.000) and TI > 80 Degree-Sign (OR = 18.8; p = 0.000) were independent predictors of DR. Conclusions: Calcified plaques and TI > 80 Degree-Sign may be related to DR in patients with CAS. DR may lengthen the retrieving time and increase the complications of the procedure.

  4. [Arterial and portal venous complications after HPB surgical procedures: Interdisciplinary management].

    PubMed

    Arend, J; Schütte, K; Peglow, S; Däberitz, T; Popp, F; Benedix, F; Pech, M; Wolff, S; Bruns, C

    2015-06-01

    The surgical treatment of hepatopancreatobiliary (HPB) diseases requires complex operative procedures. Within the last decades the morbidity (36-50 %) and mortality (<5 %) of these procedures could be reduced; nonetheless, postoperative complications still occur in 41.2 % of cases. Compared with hepatobiliary procedures, pancreatic surgery shows an increased rate of complications. Postoperative bleeding has a major effect on the outcome and the incidence is 6.7 % after pancreatic surgery and 3.2 % after hepatobiliary surgery. The major causes of early postoperative hemorrhage are related to technical difficulties in surgery whereas late onset postoperative hemorrhage is linked to anastomosis insufficiency, formation of fistulae or abscesses due to vascular arrosion or formation of pseudoaneurysms. In many cases, delayed hemorrhage is preceded by a self-limiting sentinel bleeding. The treatment is dependent on the point in time, location and severity of the hemorrhage. The majority of early postoperative hemorrhages require surgical treatment. Late onset hemorrhage in hemodynamically stable patients is preferably treated by radiological interventions. After interventional hemostatic therapy 8.2 % of patients require secondary procedures. In the case of hemodynamic instability or development of sepsis, a relaparotomy is necessary. The treatment concept includes surgical or interventional remediation of the underlying cause of the hemorrhage. Other causes of postoperative morbidity and mortality are arterial and portal venous stenosis and thrombosis. Following liver resection, thrombosis of the portal vein occurs in 8.5-9.1 % and in 11.6 % following pancreatic resection with vascular involvement. Interventional surgical procedures or conservative treatment are suitable therapeutic options depending on the time of diagnosis and clinical symptoms. The risk of morbidity and mortality after HPB surgery can be reduced only in close interdisciplinary

  5. Insulin Infusion on Postoperative Complications of Coronary Artery Bypass Graft in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Masoumi, Gholamreza; Frasatkhish, Rasoul; Bigdelian, Hamid; Ziyaefard, Mohsen; Sadeghpour-Tabae, Ali; Mansouri, Mojtaba; Jalali, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular events are common in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), which make coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) a highly demanded surgery in this population. Tight control of blood glucose in patients with DM is beneficial in reducing postoperative complications; however, the adequate range has not been determined yet. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the effect of semi-tight (moderate) control of DM on complications and serum glucose levels during and after CABG. Patients and Methods: In this prospective clinical trial, 18 and 31 patients with and without DM, respectively, who were referred to Shahid Chamran Hospital, Isfahan, Iran, for elective CABG surgery, were enrolled. For DM group, patients with controlled DM (i.e. glycosylated hemoglobin levels [HgA1C] ≤ 7%) were recruited. Blood glucose level (blood sugar, BS) was measured after anesthesia, during pumping, warming, off pumping, six and 12 hours after Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission, and at discharging from the hospital. The hemodynamic state of the patients, bleeding, need of blood transfusion, infection, and duration of hospitalization were also monitored and recorded. Results: None of the BS measurements (FBS, after anesthesia, on-pump, warming, off pump, six and 12 hours after ICU admission, and at discharge) were significantly different between study groups (P > 0.05). Frequency of surgery site bleeding and blood transfusion need were not significantly different between these groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Semi-tight control of DM with insulin infusion during operation did not led to any difference in the type and rate of CABG complications between patients with well-controlled and those without DM; however, BS levels in patients with well-controlled DM could be more easily controlled. PMID:25478540

  6. Comparison of Goal-Directed Hemodynamic Optimization Using Pulmonary Artery Catheter and Transpulmonary Thermodilution in Combined Valve Repair: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lenkin, Andrey I.; Kirov, Mikhail Y.; Kuzkov, Vsevolod V.; Paromov, Konstantin V.; Smetkin, Alexey A.; Lie, Mons; Bjertnæs, Lars J.

    2012-01-01

    Our aim was to compare the effects of goal-directed therapy guided either by pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) or by transpulmonary thermodilution (TTD) combined with monitoring of oxygen transport on perioperative hemodynamics and outcome after complex elective valve surgery. Measurements and Main Results. Forty patients were randomized into two equal groups: a PAC group and a TTD group. In the PAC group, therapy was guided by mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac index (CI) and pulmonary artery occlusion pressure (PAOP), whereas in the TTD group we additionally used global end-diastolic volume index (GEDVI), extravascular lung water index (EVLWI), and oxygen delivery index (DO2I). We observed a gradual increase in GEDVI, whereas EVLWI and PAOP decreased by 20–30% postoperatively (P < 0.05). The TTD group received 20% more fluid accompanied by increased stroke volume index and DO2I by 15–20% compared to the PAC group (P < 0.05). Duration of mechanical ventilation was increased by 5.2 hrs in the PAC group (P = 0.04). Conclusions. As compared to the PAC-guided algorithm, goal-directed therapy based on transpulmonary thermodilution and oxygen transport increases the volume of fluid therapy, improves hemodynamics and DO2I, and reduces the duration of respiratory support after complex valve surgery. PMID:22611489

  7. Ultrasound/fluoroscopy-assisted placement of peritoneal dialysis catheters.

    PubMed

    Maya, Ivan D

    2007-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheters may be inserted blindly, surgically, and either by laparoscopic, peritoneoscopic, or fluoroscopic approach. A modified fluoroscopic technique by adding ultrasound-assistance was performed in the present study to ensure entry into the abdominal cavity under direct ultrasound visualization. From March 2005 to May 2007, ultrasound-fluoroscopic guided placement of PD catheters was attempted in 32 end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Preoperative evaluation was performed on all patients prior to the procedure. After initial dissection of the subcutaneous tissue anterior to the anterior rectus sheath, the needle was inserted into the abdominal cavity under the guidance of ultrasound. The position of the epigastric artery was also examined using ultrasonography to avoid the risk of arterial injury. PD catheters were successfully placed in 31 of the 32 ESRD patients using this technique. In all of these patients, the needle could be seen entering the abdominal cavity using an ultrasound. In one patient the procedure was abandoned because of bowel puncture by the micro-puncture needle that was inadvertently advanced into a loop of bowel. This patient did not develop acute abdomen nor needed any intervention. One patient died 4 days after placement of the catheter of unrelated causes. One patient was started on acute peritoneal dialysis the same day of catheter placement without any complications. The rest of the patients started peritoneal dialysis within 2-6 weeks of catheter placement. None of the patients had bleeding related to arterial injury as ultrasound was able to visualize the epigastric artery. Our experience shows that ultrasound-fluoroscopic technique is minimally invasive and allows for accurate assessment of the entry into the abdominal cavity. This technique can avoid the risk of vascular injury altogether.

  8. Perforation of the Right Ventricle Induced by Pulmonary Artery Catheter at Induction of Anesthesia for the Surgery for Liver Transplantation: A Case Report and Reviewed of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Auxiliadora-Martins, Maria; Apinagés dos Santos, Erick; Adans Wenzinger, Daniel; Alkmim-Teixeira, Gil Cezar; Neto, Gerardo Cristino de M.; Sankarankutty, Ajith Kumar; de Castro e Silva, Orlando; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Basile-Filho, Anibal

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of a 45-year-old male patient diagnosed with liver cirrhosis by hepatitis C and alcohol, with a Child-Pugh score C and a model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score of 27, and submitted to liver transplantation. The subject underwent insertion of the pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) in the right internal jugular vein, with technical difficulty concerning catheter advance. There was sudden hypotension, increase in central venous pressure (CVP), and decrease in SvO2 15 minutes after the PAC had been inserted, followed by cardiorespiratory arrest in pulseless electrical activity (PEA), which was promptly assisted with resuscitation. Pericardiocentesis was performed without success, so the individual was subjected to a subxiphoid pericardial window, which led to output of large amounts of blood as well as PEA reversal to sinus rhythm. Sternotomy was performed; rupture of the apex of the right ventricle (RV) was detected, and suture of the site was accomplished. After hemodynamic stabilization, the patient was transferred to the ICU, where he developed septic shock and, despite adequate therapy, died on the eighteenth day after ICU admission. PMID:20066172

  9. Use of an Intravascular Warming Catheter during Off-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery in a Patient with Severe Cold Hemagglutinin Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bracey, Arthur W.; Baker, Kelty R.; Reul, Ross M.; Chen, Alice J.

    2016-01-01

    Cold hemagglutinin disease with broad thermal amplitude and high titers presents challenges in treating cardiac-surgery patients. Careful planning is needed to prevent the activation of cold agglutinins and the agglutination of red blood cells as the patient's temperature drops during surgery. We describe our approach to mitigating cold agglutinin formation in a 77-year-old man with severe cold hemagglutinin disease who underwent off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery without the use of preoperative plasmapheresis. This experience shows that the use of an intravascular warming catheter can maintain normothermia and prevent the activation and subsequent formation of cold agglutinins. To our knowledge, this is the first reported use of this technique in a patient with cold hemagglutinin disease. The chief feature in this approach is the use of optimal thermal maintenance—rather than the more usual decrease in cold-agglutinin content by means of therapeutic plasma exchange. PMID:27547154

  10. Usefulness of Suction Decompression Method Combined with Extradural Temporopolar Approach During Clipping of Complicated Internal Carotid Artery Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Otani, Naoki; Wada, Kojiro; Toyooka, Terushige; Fujii, Kazuya; Ueno, Hideaki; Tomura, Satoshi; Tomiyama, Arata; Nakao, Yasuaki; Yamamoto, Takuji; Mori, Kentaro

    2016-06-01

    Surgical clipping of complicated internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysms can be very difficult because strong adhesion may hinder dissection of the perforators and surrounding anatomical structures from the aneurysm dome. We describe our experience in the clipping of these aneurysms using retrograde suction decompression (RSD) combined with extradural temporopolar approach (ETA) and discuss its advantages and pitfalls. This retrospective study included 30 consecutive patients with complicated ICA aneurysms treated by direct clipping with RSD assistance between March 2004 and March 2015. The aneurysms were located on the paraclinoid ICA in 20 cases, the posterior communicating artery bifurcation in 8, ICA bifurcation in 1, and the anterior wall of the ICA in 1. No patient suffered any complication related to the puncture of the common carotid artery. Surgical outcome was good recovery in 20 patients, moderate disability in 4, severe disability in 4, and vegetative state in 1. One patient died of re-rupture of the aneurysm caused by incomplete dome clipping. Two patients suffered cerebral infarction, caused by anterior choroidal artery infarction in 1 patient. Retrograde suction decompression combined with ETA is a useful technique for clipping of complicated ICA aneurysms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Treatment of Uterine Artery Vasospasm with Transdermal Nitroglycerin Ointment During Uterine Artery Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Denison, Gregory L. Ha, Thuong Van; Keblinskas, Darius

    2005-06-15

    Uterine artery vasospasm can complicate uterine artery embolization (UAE) by prolonging procedure times or even causing treatment failure. Embolization must be delayed until the spasm improves and adequate antegrade flow in the vessel is restored. Vasospasm can also produce a 'false endpoint' to the procedure, where stasis of flow in the vessel is falsely attributed to successful embolization but is actually the result of vasospasm, leading to undertreatment or treatment failure. Traditional treatments for uterine artery vasospasm have included transcatheter intra-arterial vasodilators and catheter withdrawal from the vessel, both of which can yield mixed results. We report a case of uterine artery vasospasm during UAE successfully treated with transdermal nitroglycerine ointment.

  12. Subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm complicating central venous catheterization: endovascular treatment with Amplatzer Vascular Plug 4 and covered stent.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Umberto G; Petrocelli, Francesco; Ferro, Carlo

    2013-12-01

    Central venous catheterization is a routine vascular access procedure; however, it may be associated with life-threatening complications such as arterial puncture, leading to pseudoaneurysm formation. We report a case of a 41-year-old female that developed an iatrogenic left subclavian pseudoaneurysm complicating the attempt of left internal jugular vein cannulation for temporary hemodialysis therapy. The patient underwent urgent endovascular treatment with deployment of covered stent into the left subclavian artery (SCA) after embolization of the origin of the left internal mammary artery with Amplatzer Vascular Plug 4. The patient's recovery was unremarkable. Follow-up till 24 months reveals total exclusion of the pseudoaneurysm of the left SCA with patency of the distal branches.

  13. Impact of clopidogrel on bleeding complications and survival in off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Bittner, Hartmuth B; Lehmann, Sven; Rastan, Ardawan; Mohr, Friedrich W

    2012-03-01

    This study investigated the impact of preoperative clopidogrel on bleeding complications and survival during and after off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCABG) and assessed the possible role of the antifibrinolytic agent aprotinin for attenuating blood loss after clopidogrel exposure. Prospectively collected data of 753 consecutive adult patients undergoing OPCABG were retrospectively reviewed; 139 (18.5%) patients received clopidogrel preoperatively. Statistical methods used were student paired t-test, Mann-Whitney U, Kruskal-Wallis, chi-square analysis and Kaplan-Meier with log-rank analysis. Clopidogrel was associated with a significant increase in perioperative blood loss (P = 0.003) and more excessive postoperative haemorrhage (P = 0.04). Overall transfusion rates (P = 0.02) and the amount of administered blood products (P = 0.01) were also higher after clopidogrel exposure. Intraoperative aprotinin reduced postoperative bleeding significantly in patients administered clopidogrel [18.7% after 24 h (P = 0.006) and 15.2% after 48 h (P = 0.03)] and attenuated excessive postoperative haemorrhaging. Five-year survival was markedly improved in clopidogrel-treated patients. Preoperative clopidogrel exposure does increase perioperative blood loss and blood transfusion requirements in patients undergoing OPCABG but has an otherwise excellent safety profile with a 94% 5-year survival rate. Aprotinin attenuated this blood loss. Based on these results a recommendation to discontinue clopidogrel prior to coronary artery bypass grafting cannot be maintained, if OPCABG strategies are considered.

  14. Congenital coronary artery fistulas complicated with pulmonary hypertension: Analysis of 211 cases

    PubMed Central

    Said, Salah AM

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare the behavior of pulmonary hypertension (PHT) associated with coronary artery fistulas (CAFs) between the Asian and Caucasian subjects. METHODS CAFs may be complicated with PHT secondary to left-to-right shunt. Literature review limited to the English language. A total of 211 reviewed patients were collected. Of those, 111 were of Asian and 100 were of Caucasian ethnic origin. The mean age of the Asian and the Caucasian groups of patients were 48.9 (range 19-83) and 49.9 years (range 16-85), respectively. In both groups, right heart catheterization was the most commonly (95%) used method for determining pulmonary artery pressure. RESULTS From all of the reviewed subjects, PHT was found in 49 patients (23%), of which 15 were Asian and 34 were Caucasian. In 75% of PHT subjects, mild to moderate PHT was reported and 76% of the fistulas had a vascular mode of termination. Treatment was surgical in 61%, followed by percutaneous therapeutic embolization (27%) and finally conservative medical management in 12% of PHT subjects. PHT was associated with a slight female gender predominance. The majority demonstrated mild to moderate PHT. PHT was reported more frequent in the Caucasian compared with the Asian ethnicity group. The majority of fistulas in patients with PHT had a vascular mode of termination. The results of this review are intended to be indicative and require cautious interpretation. CONCLUSION The likelihood for a CAF patient to develop PHT is presented when possessing the following features, with a Caucasian female having a fistula with a vascular mode of termination. PMID:27847561

  15. Pseudoaneurysm of the Right Internal Mammary Artery Post Vacuum-Assisted Closure Therapy: A Rare Complication and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Datta, Subir; Manoly, Imthiaz; Karangelis, Dimos; Hasan, Ragheb

    2016-02-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy in the management of sternal wound infection post cardiac surgery has gained popularity since last decade. It is very cost effective and has survival benefit compared with conventional management. Although there are few complications associated with VAC therapy including right ventricular free wall rupture and infectious erosion to aorta, there are now isolated reports of vein graft pseudoaneurysm associated with it. We describe an extremely rare complication of right internal mammary artery pseudoaneurysm post VAC therapy in a 56-year-old man which was successfully managed surgically. We also did a literature review on the possible complications of VAC therapy post cardiac surgery and its management.

  16. Spontaneous left main coronary artery dissection complicated by pseudoaneurysm formation in pregnancy: role of CT coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Shahid; Abdul-Waheed, Mohammed; Helmy, Tarek; Huffman, Lynn C; Koshal, Vipin; Guitron, Julian; Merrill, Walter H; Lewis, David F; Dunlap, Stephanie; Shizukuda, Yukitaka; Weintraub, Neal L; Meyer, Christopher; Cilingiroglu, Mehmet

    2009-04-01

    We report a case of a 26-year-old female, who presented at 34 weeks of an uncomplicated pregnancy with an acute ST elevation anterior wall myocardial infarction. Cardiac catheterization suggested a left main coronary artery dissection with pseudoaneurysm formation. The patient's course was complicated by congestive heart failure. She was initially managed conservatively by a multidisciplinary team including heart failure specialists, obstetricians, and cardiovascular surgeons. 4 days after admission, her LMC was imaged by dual-source 64 slice Cardiac computed tomography, coronary dissection was identified extending to the lumen, and the presence of pseudoaneurysm was confirmed. She underwent subsequently a staged procedure, which included placement of an intra-aortic balloon pump, cesarean section, and coronary artery bypass grafting. This case illustrates the utility of coronary artery CT imaging to assess the complexity and stability of coronary artery dissections, thereby helping to determine the need for, and timing of revascularization procedures.

  17. Does fetal macrosomia affect umbilical artery Doppler velocity waveforms in pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes?

    PubMed

    Sirico, Angelo; Rizzo, Giuseppe; Maruotti, Giuseppe Maria; Aiello, Elisa; Morlando, Maddalena; Arduini, Domenico; Martinelli, Pasquale

    2016-10-01

    We aimed to establish whether macrosomic fetuses in pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes (GDM) show different Pulsatility Index (PI) values in umbilical artery (UA) than in non-macrosomic fetuses. We considered 106 pregnant women with GDM. Doppler recordings of UA-PI were performed at 34-41 weeks and related to neonatal birthweight. Pregnancies were divided in two groups according to birthweight, macrosomic group (>4000 g) and controls (<4000 g), and according to birthweight centile, >90th centile and <90th centile. Differences in UA-PI and maternal and fetal characteristics between groups were tested. Mean UA-PI was significantly lower in newborns with birthweight >4000 g than in controls (PI = 0.69; 95% CI 0.64-0.74 versus PI = 0.87; 95% CI 0.84-0.90, p < 000.1). Mean UA-PI was significantly lower in newborns with birthweight centile >90th centile than in controls (PI = 0.79; 95% CI 0.74-0.84 versus PI = 0.87; 95% CI 0.83-0.90; t = 2.653; p = 0.01). Linear regression analysis revealed a significant correlation between UA-PI and neonatal birthweight and between UA-PI and neonatal birthweight centile. Macrosomic fetuses of pregnancies complicated by GDM show lower values of UA-PI compared with controls. Despite UA-PI results, a variable related to macrosomia its role in the management of these pregnancies remains to be established.

  18. Stenting for pulmonary artery stenosis complicated by univentricular physiology: subanalysis of JPIC stent survey.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takanari; Tomita, Hideshi; Otsuki, Shinichi; Kobayashi, Toshiki; Ono, Yasuo; Yazaki, Satoshi; Kim, Sung-Hae; Nakanishi, Toshio

    2014-10-01

    Stent implantation is an important treatment option for pulmonary artery stenosis (PS), even if complicated by univentricular physiology (UVP). However, there is paucity of evidence concerning not only its hemodynamic and morphologic indications but also on markers for its optimal target attainment in UVP. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the acute outcome and factors associated with efficacy of stenting for PS complicating UVP. A subanalysis was performed using the data of the Japanese Society of Pediatric Interventional Cardiology (JPIC) stent survey. We analyzed the morphologic and hemodynamic data of 11 patients with UVP who underwent stenting for PS. We defined "a 50% increase in the minimum lumen diameter (MLD)" as "morphologically effective," and "an achievement of 0 mmHg pressure gradient" as "hemodynamically effective." We analyzed the success rate for each criterion and determined factors which may have contributed to hemodynamic effectiveness. Stenting was morphologically effective in all patients, while it was hemodynamically effective in 6/11 (55%). The percent diameter stenosis after stenting was significantly lower in the "hemodynamically effective" group (2.5 ± 5.5% vs 19.6 ± 13.1%, p=0.017). The cutoff value of percent diameter stenosis after stenting to "hemodynamically effective" was 14.6%; the sensitivity was 80% and the specificity was 100% (area under the curve 0.825, p=0.021). The percent diameter stenosis after stenting significantly contributed to achieving a "0 mmHg" pressure gradient, while in order to achieve a "0 mmHg" pressure gradient, the residual percent diameter stenosis should be less than around 15%. Copyright © 2014 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Pyogenic abscess after hepatic artery embolization: a rare but potentially lethal complication.

    PubMed

    Mezhir, James J; Fong, Yuman; Fleischer, Deborah; Seo, Susan K; D'Amico, Francesco; Petre, Elena; Covey, Anne M; Getrajdman, George I; Thornton, Raymond H; Solomon, Stephen B; Jarnagin, William R; Brown, Karen T

    2011-02-01

    Hepatic artery embolization (HAE) is used commonly to treat liver tumors or hemorrhage. Infectious complications are rare but carry high rates of morbidity and mortality. Identification of clinical factors associated with postembolization abscess may improve management and outcome. Clinical and pathologic variables of patients treated with HAE were collected and analyzed to determine the etiology, incidence, and outcome of pyogenic hepatic abscess. From January 1998 to January 2010, 971 patients underwent 2,045 HAE procedures. Fourteen patients developed a pyogenic hepatic abscess after embolization, for an overall rate of 1.4%. Thirty-four patients (4%) had a history of bilioenteric anastomosis (BEA) and 21 patients (2%) lacked a competent sphincter of Oddi because of the presence of a biliary stent (n = 19) or a previous sphincterotomy (n = 2). Eleven of the 34 patients with a BEA (33%) and two of 21 patients with an incompetent sphincter (10%) developed abscesses, in contrast to only one abscess (0.05%) among the 916 patients with apparently normal sphincters (0.1%; odds ratio, 437.6; 95% CI, 54.2-3,533; P < .0001). Gram-negative and Gram-positive aerobes were the most common bacteria isolated after drainage. Percutaneous drainage was the initial management strategy in all patients; two patients (14%) required subsequent surgical drainage and hepatectomy, and three (21%) died. Pyogenic hepatic abscess is rare after HAE. A history of BEA or an incompetent sphincter of Oddi caused by a biliary stent or previous sphincterotomy substantially increases the likelihood of this highly morbid and potentially fatal complication. Copyright © 2011 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pyogenic abscess after hepatic artery embolization: A rare but potentially lethal complication

    PubMed Central

    Mezhir, James J.; Fong, Yuman; Fleischer, Deborah; Seo, Susan K.; D’Amico, Francesco; Petre, Elena; Covey, Ann M.; Getrajdman, George I.; Thornton, Raymond H.; Solomon, Stephen B.; Jarnagin, William R.; Brown, Karen T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatic artery embolization (HAE) is used commonly to treat liver tumors or hemorrhage. Infectious complications are rare, but carry high morbidity and mortality. Identification of clinical factors associated with post-embolization abscess may improve management and outcome. Methods Clinical and pathologic variables of patients treated with HAE were collected and analyzed to determine the etiology, incidence, and outcome of pyogenic hepatic abscess. Results From January 1998 to January 2010, 971 patients underwent 2,045 HAE procedures. Fourteen patients developed a pyogenic hepatic abscess following embolization for an overall rate of 1.4%. Thirty-four patients (4%) had a history of bilioenteric anastomosis (BEA) and 21 patients (2%) lacked a competent sphincter of Oddi due to the presence of a biliary stent (N=19) or a prior sphincterotomy (N=2). Eleven (33%) of the 34 patients with a BEA and 2 (10%) of 21 patients with an incompetent sphincter developed abscesses, in contrast to only 1 abscess (0.05%) among the 916 patients with apparently normal sphincters (0.1%, OR 437.6 (95% CI 54.2 – 3,533, p<0.0001). Gram negative and gram positive aerobes were the most common bacteria isolated following drainage. Percutaneous drainage was the initial management strategy in all patients; 2 patients (14%) required subsequent surgical drainage and hepatectomy and 3 (21%) died. Conclusion Pyogenic hepatic abscess is rare after HAE. A history of BEA or an incompetent sphincter of Oddi due to a biliary stent or prior sphincterotomy substantially increases in the likelihood of this highly morbid and potentially fatal complication. PMID:21195630

  1. [Incidence and management of acute left main coronary artery dissection as a complication of acute transluminal coronary angioplasty].

    PubMed

    Dittel, M; Prachar, H; Spiel, R; Mlczoch, J

    1996-09-01

    Out of 1730 consecutive patients undergoing percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) of left descending coronary artery (LAD) or circumflex artery (CX) five patients (0.3%) suffered an acute dissection of left main coronary artery. In three patients dissection developed because of manipulation of the guiding catheter. In one patient retrograde dissection of the left main stem occurred because of balloon angioplasty of ostial LAD stenosis and in a second patient because of balloon rupture in the setting of stent deployment in the proximal part of the LAD. Four patients were selected for emergency operation, but one patient died before reacting the operation theatre. Out of the three remaining patients one patient died postoperatively and another patient suffered a transmural myocardial infarction. In the fifth patient three AVE Micro stents were implanted; one just at the origin of the LAD, one at the origin of the CX and the third in the left main stem. This patient was not sent for operation and was discharged without symptoms.

  2. Misplaced central venous catheters: applied anatomy and practical management.

    PubMed

    Gibson, F; Bodenham, A

    2013-03-01

    Large numbers of central venous catheters (CVCs) are placed each year and misplacement occurs frequently. This review outlines the normal and abnormal anatomy of the central veins in relation to the placement of CVCs. An understanding of normal and variant anatomy enables identification of congenital and acquired abnormalities. Embryological variations such as a persistent left-sided superior vena cava are often diagnosed incidentally only after placement of a CVC, which is seen to take an abnormal course on X-ray. Acquired abnormalities such as stenosis or thrombosis of the central veins can be problematic and can present as a failure to pass a guidewire or catheter or complications after such attempts. Catheters can also be misplaced outside veins in a patient with otherwise normal anatomy with potentially disastrous consequences. We discuss the possible management options for these patients including the various imaging techniques used to verify correct or incorrect catheter placement and the limitations of each. If the course of a misplaced catheter can be correctly identified as not lying within a vulnerable structure then it can be safely removed. If the misplaced catheter is lying within or traversing large and incompressible arteries or veins, it should not be removed before consideration of what is likely to happen when it is removed. Advice and further imaging should be sought, typically in conjunction with interventional radiology or vascular surgery. With regard to misplaced CVCs, in the short term, a useful aide memoir is: 'if in doubt, don't take it out'.

  3. Intracorporeal knotting of a femoral nerve catheter.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Schnoor, Jörg; Wiegel, Martin; Josten, Christoph; Reske, Andreas W

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve catheters are effective and well-established tools to provide postoperative analgesia to patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. The performance of these techniques is usually considered safe. However, placement of nerve catheters may be associated with a considerable number of side effects and major complications have repeatedly been published. In this work, we report on a patient who underwent total knee replacement with spinal anesthesia and preoperative insertion of femoral and sciatic nerve catheters for postoperative analgesia. During insertion of the femoral catheter, significant resistance was encountered upon retracting the catheter. This occurred due to knotting of the catheter. The catheter had to be removed by operative intervention which has to be considered a major complication. The postoperative course was uneventful. The principles for removal of entrapped peripheral catheters are not well established, may differ from those for neuroaxial catheters, and range from cautious manipulation up to surgical intervention.

  4. Intracorporeal knotting of a femoral nerve catheter

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Schnoor, Jörg; Wiegel, Martin; Josten, Christoph; Reske, Andreas W.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve catheters are effective and well-established tools to provide postoperative analgesia to patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. The performance of these techniques is usually considered safe. However, placement of nerve catheters may be associated with a considerable number of side effects and major complications have repeatedly been published. In this work, we report on a patient who underwent total knee replacement with spinal anesthesia and preoperative insertion of femoral and sciatic nerve catheters for postoperative analgesia. During insertion of the femoral catheter, significant resistance was encountered upon retracting the catheter. This occurred due to knotting of the catheter. The catheter had to be removed by operative intervention which has to be considered a major complication. The postoperative course was uneventful. The principles for removal of entrapped peripheral catheters are not well established, may differ from those for neuroaxial catheters, and range from cautious manipulation up to surgical intervention. PMID:26504733

  5. Severe arterial hypertension: a possible complication of McCune-Albright syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ohata, Yasuhisa; Yamamoto, Takehisa; Mori, Ikuko; Kikuchi, Toru; Michigami, Toshimi; Imanishi, Yasuo; Satomura, Kenichi; Ida, Shinobu; Ozono, Keiichi

    2009-07-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome is characterized by café-au-lait spot, multiple endocrine hyperfunction, and polyostotic fibrous dysplasia. A somatic point mutation of Gsalpha protein leads to an increase in the Gsalpha-associated hormone activity in McCune-Albright syndrome. Because cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate stimulates the dopamine beta hydroxylase gene, an activating mutation of the Gsalpha protein may cause the hyperproduction of norepinephrine via dopamine. We report on a 9-year-old girl with McCune-Albright syndrome complicated by severe arterial hypertension. The urinary excretion of norepinephrine was 5- to 10-fold higher than in age-matched controls. Meta-iodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) revealed no hot spots. These findings suggest that severe hypertension might be due to an activating mutation of Gsalpha protein in sympathetic ganglia. Because of the reported association of GNAS1 gene polymorphism with hypertension, our patient provides further evidence for a role of Gsalpha protein in hypertension.

  6. Uterine artery Doppler longitudinal changes in pregnancies complicated with intrauterine growth restriction without preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Contro, Elena; Cha, Dong Hyun; De Maggio, Irene; Ismail, Sara Yasmin; Falcone, Veronica; Gabrielli, Sandro; Farina, Antonio

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this article is to evaluate the longitudinal changes in uterine artery Doppler pulsatility index (UtA-PI) in pregnancies complicated with early onset intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Case-control study comparing UtA-PI from 20 to 34 weeks gestation in pregnancies affected by IUGR at 20 to 28 weeks and confirmed at delivery (cases), matched with 1000 controls. Multivariable analyses were used to estimate the UtA-PI as a function of both gestational age and IUGR severity. Finally, bootstrapping technique was used to internally validate the models. We retrospectively retrieved 53 cases and 1000 controls. Regression line having log10 UtA-PI as dependent variable was a function of both gestational age and IUGR. UtA-PI decreased with gestational age in both groups. In IUGR group, UtA-PI was higher from 20 weeks onward and the difference with controls increased with gestational age. In fact, at 20 weeks, the UtA-PI ratio between cases and controls was 1.84, but at 30 weeks it rose to 2.05. Finally, the weight at delivery in the IUGR group was also inversely correlated with the UtA-PI values. We presented a reliable multivariable statistical model to evaluate the temporal changes of UtA-PI values as a function of both gestational age and IUGR. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. [Long-term course and complications of arterial hypertension after heart transplantation].

    PubMed

    Bortolotto, L A; Silva, H B; Bocchi, E A; Bellotti, G; Stolf, N; Jatene, A D

    1997-11-01

    To evaluate the progression of arterial hypertension (AH) and its consequences, in patients submitted to cardiac transplantation (CT) in use of cyclosporine (CY). In 65 patients submitted to orthotopic CT, we evaluated blood pressure, serum creatinine and blood levels of CY before, 15 and 30 days, and 6, 12, 24, 48 and 60 months after CT; in 20 patients we analyzed cardiac index and systemic vascular resistance pre-CT, 15 and 30 days, 6 and 12 months after CT; in 33 patients, we studied anatomic and functional modifications by echocardiography, 24 +/- 13 months after CT. Thirty days after CT, AH was present in 58.5% (50% mild), and after one year, 93% of patients were hypertensives (85% moderate-to-severe), remaining unchanged during the rest of follow-up. The serum creatinine progressively increased, reaching values significantly higher than those pre-CT after one year, persisting with a mild increment until 60 months. Echocardiography showed left ventricle hypertrophy in 54% of patients, all of which had normal function. Two patients died as a direct consequence of hypertensive complications. AH in patients submitted to CT on CY use occurs early, increases in prevalence and severity during the follow-up and is mediated by an increase in vascular resistance. Also, the AH does not correlate to CY blood levels or nefrotoxicity, but it can impair renal function and compromise longevity of transplantation by inducing ventricular hypertrophy.

  8. [Brachial artery pseudoaneurysm: a rare but serious complication in hemodialysis patients with arteriovenous fistula].

    PubMed

    Mancini, Andrea; Castriotta, Giuseppe; Angelini, Pernina; Bozzi, Michele; Giancaspro, Vincenzo; La Raia, Elvira; Nisi, Maria Teresa; Proscia, Anna Rita; Tarantino, Giuseppe; Vitale, Ottavia; Cuzzola, Cristoforo

    2017-06-01

    A pseudoaneurysm or false aneurysm of the brachial artery is an uncommon occurrence in patients receiving hemodialysis with arteriovenous fistula (AVF). We describe the case of a 76-year-old woman presenting with a large, tender, pulsatile mass in the right antecubital region 10 cm from the AVF. B-mode ultrasound examination revealed a saccular hematoma. Color doppler showed a recirculation movement of blood, creating a two colors image called "Korean flag". The patient was transferred to the surgical unit where she first underwent ultrasound-guided compression and then surgical repair of the pseudoaneurysm. Two weeks after surgery the AVF was used again as an access for hemodialysis. Differentiating between a false and a true aneurysm based on ultrasound is not always straightforward. Doppler ultrasound findings can be decisive for the early diagnosis of a pseudoaneurysm to ensure proper treatment planning given the dangerous complications of ruptures. Treatment options include: compression, percutaneous thrombin injection, endovascular exclusion with covered stents, aneurysmectomy and surgical repair. Copyright by Società Italiana di Nefrologia SIN, Rome, Italy.

  9. Effect of Body Mass Index on Postoperative Complications in Beating Coronary Artery Surgery.

    PubMed

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Faraji, Reza

    2016-11-01

    Body Mass Index (BMI) is considered as an important risk factor in cardiovascular surgery. We designed a historical cohort study for the evaluation of perioperative complications related to BMI in patients who underwent off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB). We studied 1120 consecutive patients who underwent OPCAB between January 2008 and December 2011 in Imam Ali Hospital, Kermanshah, Iran. Patients were divided into four groups according to BMI: underweight/low BMI (< 18.5 kg/m(2)), healthy weight (between 18.5 kg/m(2) and 24.9 kg/m(2)), overweight/high BMI (between 25 kg/m(2) and 30 kg/m(2)), and obese/very high BMI (> 30 kg/m(2)). In multivariable regression analysis, an important correlation between the underweight/low BMI group and mortality was observed (p=0.037). Postoperative stroke, postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF) and intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) use were not associated with BMI. In linear regression analysis, significant correlations between low BMI, reintubation, ICU stay time and intubation time were found. Re-exploration for bleeding was significantly correlated with having a low or high BMI. Having a low BMI (which is association with malnutrition and respiratory muscles weakness) was significantly associated with reintubation, prolonged intubation time and ICU stay time. The obese group was also associated with postoperative atelectasia and fever.

  10. Vascular Access System for Continuous Arterial Infusion of a Protease Inhibitor in Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Ganaha, Fumikiyo; Yamada, Tetsuhisa; Yorozu, Naoya; Ujita, Masuo; Irie, Takeo; Fukuda, Yasushi; Fukuda, Kunihiko; Tada, Shimpei

    1999-09-15

    We used a vascular access system (VAS) for continuous arterial infusion (CAI) of a protease inhibitor in two patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis. The infusion catheter was placed into the dorsal pancreatic artery in the first patient and into the gastroduodenal artery in the second, via a femoral artery approach. An implantable port was then connected to the catheter and was secured in a subcutaneous pocket prepared in the right lower abdomen. No complications related to the VAS were encountered. This system provided safe and uncontaminated vascular access for successful CAI for acute pancreatitis.

  11. A comprehensive approach to the prevention of central venous catheter complications: results of 10-year prospective surveillance in pediatric hematology-oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Cesaro, Simone; Cavaliere, Mara; Pegoraro, Anna; Gamba, Piergiorgio; Zadra, Nicola; Tridello, Gloria

    2016-04-01

    We report our decennial experience with 1161 newly-placed long-term central venous catheters inserted in 919 hematology-oncology patients for a total of 413,901 CVC-days of observation. Most of the CVCs were partially-implanted, open-ended, Broviac-Hickman type of CVC (95 %). One thousand and twenty-four complications were recorded equal to 2.47 per 1000 CVC-days. The frequency of complications per CVC, the rate of episodes per 1000 CVC-days, and removal rate were malfunction/occlusion 42 %, 1.18/1000, and 2.3 %; mechanical (dislodgement/rupture/kinking) 18.3 %, 0.51/1000, and 77.4 %; bacteremia 14.8 %, 0.42/1000, and 18.6 %; exit-site/tunnel infection 11.5 %, 0.32/1000, and 9.7 %; thrombosis 0.86 %, 0.02/1000, and 30 %; pneumothorax 0.52 %, 0.01/1000, and 0. In multivariate analysis, the risk factors were for mechanical complications, a younger age <6.1 years at CVC insertion (HR 1.8, p = 0.0006); for bacteremia, a double lumen CVC (HR 3.1, p < 0.0001) and the surgical modality of CVC insertion (HR 1.5, p = 0.03); for exit-site/tunnel infection, a double lumen CVC (HR 2.1, p = 0.0003) and a diagnosis of leukemia or lymphoma (HR 1.8, p = 0.01); for malfunction/occlusion, an age <6.1 years (HR 1.6, p = 0.0003), the diagnosis of leukemia or lymphoma (HR 1.9, p < 0.0001) and double lumen CVC (HR 1.33, p = 0.023). The cumulative incidence of premature CVC removal was 29.2 % and the risk factors associated with this event were the surgical modality of CVC insertion (HR 1.4, p = 0.0153) and an age at CVC positioning less than 6.1 years (HR 1.6, p = 0.0025). We conclude that a best-practice set of rules resulted in reduced CVC complications.

  12. Hemodialysis catheter implantation in the axillary vein by ultrasound guidance versus palpation or anatomical reference

    PubMed Central

    Valencia, Cesar A Restrepo; Villa, Carlos A Buitrago; Cardona, Jose A Chacon

    2013-01-01

    Background We compared the results of four different methods of hemodialysis catheter insertion in the medial segment of the axillary vein: ultrasound guidance, palpation, anatomical reference, and prior transient catheter. Methods All patients that required acute or chronic hemodialysis and for whom it was determined impossible or not recommended either to place a catheter in the internal jugular vein (for instance, those patients with a tracheostomy), or to practice arteriovenous fistula or graft; it was then essential to obtain an alternative vascular access. When the procedure of axillary vein catheter insertion was performed in the Renal Care Facility (RCF), ultrasound guidance was used, but in the intensive care unit (ICU), this resource was unavailable, so the palpation or anatomical reference technique was used. Results Two nephrologists with experience in the technique performed 83 procedures during a period lasting 15 years and 8 months (from January 1997–August 2012): 41 by ultrasound guidance; 19 by anatomical references; 15 by palpation of the contiguous axillary artery; and 8 through a temporary axillary catheter previously placed. The ultrasound-guided patients had fewer punctures than other groups, but the value was not statistically significant. Arterial punctures were infrequent in all techniques. Analyzing all the procedure-related complications, such as hematoma, pneumothorax, brachial-plexus injury, as well as the reasons for catheter removal, no differences were observed among the groups. The functioning time was longer in the ultrasound-guided and previous catheter groups. In 15 years and 8 months of surveillance, no clinical or image evidence for axillary vein stenosis was found. Conclusion The ultrasound guide makes the procedure of inserting catheters in the axillary veins easier, but knowledge of the anatomy of the midaxillary region and the ability to feel the axillary artery pulse (for the palpation method) also allow relatively easy

  13. Arterial complications, venous thromboembolism and deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Rob Paulus Augustinus; Reijman, Max; Janssen, Daan Martijn; van Mourik, Jan Bernardus Antonius

    2016-01-01

    AIM To summarize the current knowledge on vascular complications and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. METHODS A systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, Web of Science, CINAHL, PubMed publisher, and Google scholar medical literature databases were searched up to November 10, 2015. Any arthroscopic surgical method of primary or revision intra-articular ACL reconstruction of all graft types in humans was included. A risk of bias assessment was determined. RESULTS Fourty-seven studies were included in the review. Pseudaneurysms were the most frequently reported arterial complication after ACL reconstruction, irrespective of graft type or method of graft fixation with an incidence of 0.3%. The time to diagnosis of arterial complications after ACL reconstruction varied from days to mostly weeks but even years. After ACL reconstruction without thromboprophylaxis, the incidence of DVT was 9.7%, of which 2.1% was symptomatic. The incidence of pulmonary embolism was 0.1%. Tourniquet time > 2 h was related to venous thromboembolism. Thromboprophylaxis is indicated in patients with risk factors for venous thromboembolism. CONCLUSION After ACL reconstruction, the incidence of arterial complications, symptomatic DVT and pulmonary embolism was 0.3%, 2.1% and 0.1% respectively. Arterial complications may occur with all types of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction, methods of graft fixation as well as any type of graft. Patients considered to be at moderate or high risk of venous thromboembolism should routinely receive thromboprophylaxis after ACL reconstruction. PMID:27672574

  14. Import catheter in erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kayigil, O; Atahan, O; Metin, A

    1997-08-01

    We propose an alternative technique for intracavernous self-injection of sodium nitroprusside for erectile dysfunction by inserting a Medtronic ImPort* catheter with a valved tip. A silicone catheter was implanted in 3 patients with psychogenic impotence. The reservoir, which is used for vasoactive agent injection, was implanted laterally to the anterosuperior iliac spine and the distal tip of the catheter was inserted into the corpora cavernosa via a subcutaneous tunnel. The injection technique was taught to the patient and the initial injection was performed 1 week later. All patients and partners were satisfied with the technique and quality of erections at a mean followup of 14 months. There were no major local complications due to catheter implantation and no systemic complications due to sodium nitroprusside injection. An alternative technique for intracavernous pharmacotherapy of inserting an ImPort catheter prevented the complications of intracavernous injections in patients with erectile dysfunction.

  15. Peripheral arterial line (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A peripheral arterial line is a small, short plastic catheter placed through the skin into an artery of the arm or leg. The purpose of a peripheral arterial line is to allow continuous monitoring of blood pressure ...

  16. Guidelines for the management of intravascular catheter-related infections.

    PubMed

    Mermel, L A; Farr, B M; Sherertz, R J; Raad, I I; O'Grady, N; Harris, J S; Craven, D E

    2001-01-01

    These guidelines from the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American College of Critical Care Medicine (for the Society of Critical Care Medicine), and the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America contain recommendations for the management of adults and children with, and diagnosis of infections related to, peripheral and nontunneled central venous catheters (CVCs), pulmonary artery catheters, tunneled central catheters, and implantable devices. The guidelines, written for clinicians, contain IDSA evidence-based recommendations for assessment of the quality and strength of the data. Recommendations are presented according to the type of catheter, the infecting organism, and the associated complications. Intravascular catheter-related infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Coagulase-negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus, aerobic gram-negative bacilli, and Candida albicans most commonly cause catheter-related bloodstream infection. Management of catheter-related infection varies according to the type of catheter involved. After appropriate cultures of blood and catheter samples are done, empirical i.v. antimicrobial therapy should be initiated on the basis of clinical clues, the severity of the patient's acute illness, underlying disease, and the potential pathogen(s) involved. In most cases of nontunneled CVC-related bacteremia and fungemia, the CVC should be removed. For management of bacteremia and fungemia from a tunneled catheter or implantable device, such as a port, the decision to remove the catheter or device should be based on the severity of the patient's illness, documentation that the vascular-access device is infected, assessment of the specific pathogen involved, and presence of complications, such as endocarditis, septic thrombosis, tunnel infection, or metastatic seeding. When a catheter-related infection is documented and a specific pathogen is identified, systemic antimicrobial

  17. Intra-arterial thrombolysis in acute ischaemic stroke: experience with a superselective catheter embedded in the clot.

    PubMed Central

    Casto, L; Caverni, L; Camerlingo, M; Censori, B; Moschini, L; Servalli, M C; Partziguian, T; Belloni, G; Mamoli, A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To report experience of intra-arterial thrombolysis for acute stroke, performed with a microcatheter navigated into the intracranial circulation to impale the clot. METHODS--Patients were selected on the following criteria: (1) clinical examination suggesting a large vessel occlusion in stroke patients between 18 and 75 years; (2) no radiographic signs of large actual ischaemia on CT at admission; (3) angiographically documented occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) stem or of the basilar artery (BA), without occlusion of the ipsilateral extracranial internal carotid artery or of both the vertebral arteries; (4) end of the entire procedure within six hours of stroke. 12 patients with acute stroke were recruited, eight of whom had occlusion of the MCA stem and four of the BA. Urokinase was used as the thrombolytic agent. RESULTS--Complete recanalisation in six MCA stem and in two BA occurred, and partial recanalisation in two MCA stem and one BA. There was no recanalisation in one BA. A clinically silent haemorrhage occurred in two patients, and a parenchymal haematoma in one patient, all in MCA occlusions. At four months five patients achieved self sufficiency (four with MCA and one with BA occlusion). Six patients were dependent (three totally), and one died. CONCLUSIONS--The strict criteria of eligibility allowing the enrollment of very few patients and the procedure itself, requiring particular neuroradiological expertise, make this procedure not routine. Nevertheless, the approach can be considered a possible option for patients with acute ischaemic stroke. Images PMID:8648335

  18. Comparison of cuffed tunneled hemodialysis catheter survival.

    PubMed

    Rocklin, M A; Dwight, C A; Callen, L J; Bispham, B Z; Spiegel, D M

    2001-03-01

    Despite efforts to have hemodialysis patients begin renal replacement therapy with a mature arteriovenous shunt, many patients begin dialysis with a cuffed tunneled catheter as their access. An increasing number of differently designed tunneled hemodialysis catheters have become available in the last decade. The primary aim of this study is to compare catheter survival for Hickman (Bard, Salt Lake City, UT) and Opti-flow (Bard) catheters. The 16-month experience with 182 catheters, totaling 13,861 catheter-days, is reported. The probability of Hickman catheter failure at 30, 60, and 90 days was 29%, 49%, and 67%. The probability of Opti-flow catheter failure was significantly less at 10%, 24%, and 38% for the same times, respectively (P: < 0.05 for all time points). The difference in catheter failure rates was caused by a greater malfunction rate of Hickman catheters; the two catheters had similar infection rates. We conclude that survival of Opti-flow catheters was significantly better than that of Hickman catheters from 30 to 90 days, which is a clinically relevant period when patients are waiting for maturation of a permanent access or replacement of a failed access. Since the conclusion of our study, we documented 10 episodes of Opti-flow catheter malfunction within 4 months secondary to hairline fracture of the arterial hub. The Opti-flow catheter was recalled and is now available with retooled hubs.

  19. [Pharyngeal hemorrhaging due to iatrogenic false aneurysm. Complication after cannulation of the internal jugular vein].

    PubMed

    Kreckel, V; Langwara, H

    2009-03-01

    Catheterization of the internal jugular vein is used for temporary access to the central vein in patients with acute or chronic renal failure. The most frequent problem is the arterial puncture and accidental placement of the large catheter in an artery. This case report describes a rare secondary complication by accidental catheterization of the right common carotid artery after intended dual lumen catheter insertion into the right internal jugular vein. A false aneurysm with pharyngeal hemorrhaging developed 2 weeks after the puncture. The diagnosis was made using colour-Doppler ultrasound and the aneurysm was treated with vascular surgery.

  20. Phase I Study of Hepatic Arterial Melphalan Infusion and Hepatic Venous Hemofiltration Using Percutaneously Placed Catheters in Patients With Unresectable Hepatic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Pingpank, James F.; Libutti, Steven K.; Chang, Richard; Wood, Bradford J.; Neeman, Ziv; Kam, Anthony W.; Figg, William D.; Zhai, Souping; Beresneva, Tatiana; Seidel, Geoffrey D.; Alexander, H. Richard

    2008-01-01

    Purpose We conducted a phase I study of a 30-minute hepatic artery infusion of melphalan via a percutaneously placed catheter and hepatic venous hemofiltration using a double balloon catheter positioned in the retrohepatic inferior vena cava to shunt hepatic venous effluent through an activated charcoal filter and then to the systemic circulation. The purpose of the study was to demonstrate feasibility in an initial cohort and subsequently determine the maximum tolerated dose and dose-limiting toxicity of melphalan. Patients and Methods The initial cohort (n = 12) was treated with 2.0 mg/kg of melphalan before dose escalation to 3.5 mg/kg (n = 16). Total hepatic drug delivery, systemic levels, and percent filter efficiency were determined. Patients were assessed for hepatic and systemic toxicity and response. Results A total of 74 treatments were administered to 28 patients. Twelve patients with primary and metastatic hepatic tumors received 30 treatments (mean, 2.5 per patient) at an initial melphalan dose of 2.0 mg/kg. At 3.5 mg/kg, a dose-limiting toxicity (neutropenia and/or thrombocytopenia) was observed in two of six patients. Transient grade 3/4 hepatic and systemic toxicity was seen after 19% and 66% of treatments, respectively. An overall radiographic response rate of 30% was observed in treated patients. In the 10 patients with ocular melanoma, a 50% overall response rate was observed, including two complete responses. Conclusion Delivery of melphalan via this system is feasible, with limited, manageable toxicity and evidence of substantial antitumor activity; 3 mg/kg is the maximum safe tolerated dose of melphalan administered via this technique. PMID:15908655

  1. Pretransplant Intra-arterial Liver-Directed Therapy Does Not Increase the Risk of Hepatic Arterial Complications in Liver Transplantation: A Single-Center 10-Year Experience.

    PubMed

    Kallini, Joseph R; Gabr, Ahmed; Ali, Rehan; Abouchaleh, Nadine; Riaz, Ahsun; Baker, Talia; Kulik, Laura; Caicedo, Juan; Salem, Riad; Lewandowski, Robert J

    2017-09-12

    To investigate the association between pretransplant intra-arterial liver-directed therapy (IAT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and hepatic arterial complications (HAC) in orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) [namely hepatic artery thrombosis (HAT) and/or the need for hepatic arterial conduit]. A total of 175 HCC patients (mean age: 60 years) underwent IAT with either transarterial chemoembolization or yttrium-90 (90Y) transarterial radioembolization prior to OLT between 2003 and 2013. A matched control cohort of 159 HCC patients who underwent OLT without prior IAT was selected. Incidence of HAC in both cohorts was investigated. The categorical differences between both cohorts were calculated by chi-square test. Among the 175 patients (chemoembolization, n = 82; radioembolization, n = 93), 8 (5%) required conduits due to HA disease (chemoembolization, n = 6; radioembolization, n = 2), 3 (2%) developed HAT (chemoembolization, n = 2; radioembolization, n = 1). Eleven of 175 patients (6.7%) had HAC. Of the 159 control patients, 6 (4%) needed conduits for HA disease and 3 (2%) developed HAT. Nine of 159 patients (5.7%) had HAC. Chi-square analysis between the IAT cohort and the control group yielded a p value of 0.810. When comparing chemoembolization to radioembolization, p = 0.076 (not significant at p < 0.05). Although aggressive pretransplant radioembolization and chemoembolization are both utilized in most liver transplant centers, neither appears to increase the risk of peri-transplant hepatic arterial complications in HCC patients.

  2. Superior mesenteric artery syndrome as a complication of ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Goes, R N; Coy, C S; Amaral, C A; Fagundes, J J; Medeiros, R R

    1995-05-01

    Duodenal compression by the superior mesenteric artery following total proctocolectomy and ileal pouch-anal anastomosis is a rare occurrence. Previous surgical treatment involved duodenal division. The aim of this report was to describe a case with such a complication and to discuss an operative alternative. Case report. Mobilization of the duodenum from its retroperitoneal attachments, without transection and reanastomosis, allowed the free passage of gas through the duodenum and recovery for the patient. This case report suggests that a more conservative approach may be successful in managing this complication.

  3. Acute and long-term outcome after catheter ablation of supraventricular tachycardia in patients after the Mustard or Senning operation for D-transposition of the great arteries.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinjin; Deisenhofer, Isabel; Ammar, Sonja; Fichtner, Stephanie; Reents, Tilko; Zhu, Pinjun; Jilek, Clemens; Kolb, Christof; Hess, John; Hessling, Gabriele

    2013-06-01

    Data about the acute and long-term outcome of catheter ablation in patients with D-transposition of the great arteries (d-TGA) post-Mustard/Senning operation are scarce. This single-centre retrospective analysis includes 26 patients (mean age 28.7 ± 6.7 years, 8 females) after Mustard (n = 15) or Senning (n = 11) operation who underwent catheter ablation for intra-atrial re-entrant tachycardia (IART) or atrioventricular nodal re-entrant tachycardia (AVNRT) from January 2004 to May 2011. The electrophysiological studies were performed using a three-dimensional mapping system (CARTO). Remote magnetic navigation (RMN) was available since 2008. Follow-up on an outpatient basis was conducted 3, 6, and 12 months after ablation and yearly thereafter. In the 26 patients, 34 procedures were performed (one procedure n = 19, two n = 6, and three n = 1). Overall, 34 tachycardia forms (IART n = 30; AVNRT n = 4) were ablated manually (n = 25) or by RMN (n = 9). Acute success reached in 29/34 forms (85.3%). Mean fluoroscopy time (FT) was 28.2 ± 20.7 min and mean procedure duration (PD) was 290.9 ± 107.6 min. After a mean follow-up of 34.1 ± 24.5 months, 25/26 (96.2%) patients were free from IART or AVNRT. In the nine RMN ablations (mean follow-up 14.2 ± 5.8 months) acute and long-term success was 100%. Fluoroscopy time and PD were significantly reduced using RMN compared with manual ablation (11.9 ± 6.2 vs. 34.6 ± 20.6 min, 225.7 ± 24.1 vs. 312 ± 118.2 min, P = 0.02). Catheter ablation of IART or AVNRT in patients post-Mustard/Senning operation for d-TGA has a high acute success rate. The recurrence rate for IART is about 30%; however, after a second ablation, long-term results are excellent. Remote magnetic navigation seems to improve single-procedure acute and long-term success and significantly reduces FT and PD.

  4. Natural history of tunneled dialysis catheters placed for hemodialysis initiation.

    PubMed

    Shingarev, Roman; Barker-Finkel, Jill; Allon, Michael

    2013-09-01

    More than 80% of hemodialysis recipients in the United States initiate hemodialysis with a tunneled dialysis catheter (TDC). Published data on TDC outcomes are based on a case mix of prevalent and incident TDCs. The present study analyzes factors affecting patency and complications of first TDCs placed in a large cohort of incident hemodialysis recipients. A prospective, computerized vascular access database was retrospectively queried to identify 472 patients receiving a first-ever TDC. Multiple-variable survival analysis was used to identify clinical parameters affecting TDC patency (from placement to nonelective removal) and infection (from placement to first episode of catheter-related bacteremia [CRB]). The median patency of all TDCs was 202 days. Left-sided placement of TDCs was the only variable associated with inferior TDC patency (hazard ratio, 1.98; 95% confidence interval, 1.39-2.81; P < .0001). The 6-month TDC patency rate was 37% for left internal jugular vein (LIJV) catheters, versus 54% for right internal jugular vein (RIJV) catheters. The 1-year patency rate was 6% for LIJV catheters, versus 35% for RIJV catheters. Catheter patency was not associated with patient age, sex, race, hypertension, diabetes, coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, or heart failure. The median time to the first episode of CRB was 163 days. None of the clinical variables was associated with TDC infection. TDCs are plagued by high rates of infection. RIJV TDCs should be used preferentially to maximize catheter patency. Copyright © 2013 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Hemodialysis Tunneled Catheter-Related Infections

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Lisa M.; Clark, Edward; Dipchand, Christine; Hiremath, Swapnil; Kappel, Joanne; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Lok, Charmaine; Luscombe, Rick; Moist, Louise; Oliver, Matthew; MacRae, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections, exit-site infections, and tunnel infections are common complications related to hemodialysis central venous catheter use. The various definitions of catheter-related infections are reviewed, and various preventive strategies are discussed. Treatment options, for both empiric and definitive infections, including antibiotic locks and systemic antibiotics, are reviewed. PMID:28270921

  6. Bailout techniques for failed coronary angioplasty using 6 French guiding catheters.

    PubMed

    Kiemeneij, F; Laarman, G J

    1994-08-01

    Coronary angioplasty (PTCA) through 6 French (F) guiding catheters is feasible, although acute or threatened closure following coronary artery dissections may occur. This report describes our experience with the treatment of suboptimal results in 13 patients from a population of 144 patients who had PTCA through 6F guiding catheters. Patients were treated with a new low profile autoperfusion catheter (ACS, Flowtrack40) or with Palmaz Schatz stents, advanced through 6F guiding catheters. PTCA was performed via the radial artery in 11 pts (85%) or via the femoral artery in two patients (15%). In two patients, (15%) PTCA was complicated by an dissection associated with complete loss of flow (TIMI 0) and a dissection was considered to lead to abrupt closure in the remaining 11 patients (85%), despite the presence of normal flow. A Flow-track40 perfusion catheter was successfully applied in three of four patients. In one patient a persisting dissection after restoration of flow by a perfusion catheter was treated with three Palmaz Schatz stents. Implantation of Palmaz Schatz stents was attempted as primary technique in nine patients. In one patient the stent could not cross a dissection in the proximal LAD via the radial artery. With an 8F system via the femoral artery, two stents could successfully be deployed with the stent delivery system. In another patient the stent could not be advanced across a subtotal residual stenosis in a tortuous left anterior descending coronary artery. Despite normal antegrade flow and emergency bypass surgery, this patient developed a non-Q-myocardial infarction. In the remaining patients, the clinical course was uncomplicated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Isolated Calyx Mistaken for a Cyst: Inappropriately Performed Catheter-Directed Sclerotherapy and Safe Removal of the Catheter After Selective Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Gwak, Jng Won Lee, Seung Hwa Chung, Hwan Hoon Je, Bo Kyung Yeom, Suk kyu; Sung, Deuk Jae

    2015-02-15

    We present a case of isolated calyx that was mistaken for a large cyst. A 47-year-old woman was referred for sclerotherapy of a large cystic lesion on her left kidney. Computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound showed that the cystic lesion was a large cyst. We noticed that the cystic lesion was not a typical simple cyst, even after two sessions of catheter-mediated sclerotherapy. Isolated calyx was presumed by medical history review and was confirmed by aspirated fluid analysis and far delayed-phase CT after intravenous contrast injection. We performed meticulous selective arterial embolization for an isolated calyx and inserted a catheter that could be removed without complication.

  8. Complications and Reinterventions in Uterine Artery Embolization for Symptomatic Uterine Fibroids: A Literature Review and Meta Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jason Bhanot, Kunal; Athreya, Sriharsha

    2013-04-15

    To perform a literature review of the spectrum of complications associated with UAE relative to surgery and compare the risk of reintervention as well as minor, major, and overall complications. Literature review was conducted in PubMed, MEDLINE, Cochrane, and CINAHL databases, and meta-analysis was performed. In randomized clinical trials, common complications were discharge and fever (4.00 %), bilateral uterine artery embolization (UAE) failure (4.00 %), and postembolization syndrome (2.86 %). Two trials showed a significantly decreased risk in major complications with UAE, with odds ratios (ORs) of 0.07143 (0.009426-0.5413) and 0.5196 (0.279-0.9678). None of the trials showed a significant difference in OR for minor complications of UAE. None of the trials showed a significant difference in risk for overall complications of UAE. Three trials showed a significantly increased risk for reintervention with UAE with ORs of 10.45 (2.654-41.14), 2.679 (1.289-5.564), and 9.096 (1.269-65.18). In 76 nonrandomized studies, common complications were amenorrhea (4.26 %), pain (3.59 %), and discharge and fever (3.37 %). In 41 case studies, common complications were discharge and fever (n = 22 cases), repeat UAE (n = 6 cases), and fibroid expulsion (n = 5 cases). Overall, UAE has a significantly lower rate of major complications relative to surgery, but it comes at the cost of increased risk of reintervention in the future. Educating patients about the rate and types of complications of UAE versus surgery, as well as the potential for reintervention, should help the patient and clinician come to a reasoned decision.

  9. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging predicts cardiac catheter findings for great artery stenosis in children with congenital cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Oswal, Nilesh; Sullivan, Ian; Khambadkone, Sachin; Taylor, Andrew M; Hughes, Marina L

    2012-04-01

    To assess the cardiac catheterisation findings of all children in whom cardiac magnetic resonance imaging found great artery stenosis. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all 45 consecutive children with congenital cardiac disease who were undergoing cardiac catheterisation for intervention on cardiac magnetic resonance-defined great vessel stenosis, between January, 2006 and August, 2008. Following cardiac magnetic resonance, 60 significant great vessel stenoses were identified and referred to cardiac catheterisation for intervention. All patients were catheterised within a median and interquartile range of 84 and 4-149 days, respectively, of cardiac magnetic resonance. At cardiac catheterisation, the children were aged 11.5 years - with an interquartile range of 3.8-16.9 years - and weighed 34 kilograms - with an interquartile range of 15-56 kilograms. Comparing cardiac magnetic resonance and cardiac catheterisation findings, 53 (88%) findings were concordant and seven were discordant. In six of seven (86%) discordant observations, cardiac magnetic resonance defined moderate-severe great vessel stenosis - involving three branch pulmonary arteries and three aortas. This was not confirmed by cardiac catheterisation, which revealed mild stenoses and haemodynamic gradients insufficient for intervention. In one patient, a mild, proximal right pulmonary artery narrowing was found at cardiac catheterisation, which was not mentioned in the cardiac magnetic resonance report. There was no difference between discordant and concordant groups on the basis of patient age, weight, interval between cardiac magnetic resonance and cardiac catheterisation, or type of lesion. Invasive assessment confirmed cardiac magnetic resonance-diagnosed great vessel stenosis in the majority of this cohort. The predominant discordant finding was lower catherisation gradient than predicted by morphologic and functional cardiac magnetic resonance assessment. Flow volume diversion - for

  10. Correlation between congenital heart disease complicated with pulmonary artery hypertension and circulating endothelial cells as well as endothelin-1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofei; Qiu, Jun; Pan, Min; Zheng, Dongdong; Su, Yamin; Wei, Meifang; Kong, Xiangqing; Sun, Wei; Zhu, Jiahua

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate changes in the level of circulating endothelial cells (CECs) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) in peripheral venous blood of the patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) complicated with pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH), and research on their effects in the onset and progress of CHD complicated with PAH. Methods: A case-control study including 30 cases of healthy controls, 15 cases of left-to-right shunt CHD without PAH, 26 cases of CHD complicated with mild PAH, and 17 cases of CHD complicated with moderate-severe PAH was performed. We used flow cytometry to measure the percentage of CECs accounting for nucleated cells in whole blood, and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to measure the level of ET-1 in serum. The differences of above-mentioned biomarkers between different groups were compared. Results: (1) The level of CECs and ET-1in the group of moderate-severe PAH was significantly higher than those in the group of mild PAH and the group of CHD without PAH. Significantly difference was also observed between the level of CECs and ET-1 in the group of mild PAH and those in the group of CHD without PAH and the control group. Meanwhile, the level of CECs and ET-1 in the group of large shunt was significantly higher than those in the group few shunt and few-medium shunt. (2) Strong positive correlations were observed between pulmonary artery systolic pressure and percentage of CECs as well as ET-1 production. Mean pulmonary artery pressure also positively correlated with percentage of CECs as well as ET-1 production. (3) Arterial partial pressure of oxygen as well as arterial oxygen saturation negatively correlated with the level of CECs, whereas the volume of left-to-right shunt positively correlated with the level of ET-1. (4) The level of CECs and ET-1 were positively correlated as well in CHD patients. Conclusions: CHD complicated with PAH is associated with increased CEC counts and ET-1 production. This study suggests that CECs

  11. Catheter associated urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infection attributed to the use of an indwelling urinary catheter is one of the most common infections acquired by patients in health care facilities. As biofilm ultimately develops on all of these devices, the major determinant for development of bacteriuria is duration of catheterization. While the proportion of bacteriuric subjects who develop symptomatic infection is low, the high frequency of use of indwelling urinary catheters means there is a substantial burden attributable to these infections. Catheter-acquired urinary infection is the source for about 20% of episodes of health-care acquired bacteremia in acute care facilities, and over 50% in long term care facilities. The most important interventions to prevent bacteriuria and infection are to limit indwelling catheter use and, when catheter use is necessary, to discontinue the catheter as soon as clinically feasible. Infection control programs in health care facilities must implement