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  1. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain with blood. If you have carotid artery disease, the arteries become narrow, usually because of atherosclerosis. ... one of the causes of stroke. Carotid artery disease often does not cause symptoms, but there are ...

  2. Correlation between global longitudinal peak systolic strain and coronary artery disease severity as assessed by the angiographically derived SYNTAX score

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, David; Grigoratos, Chrysanthos; Nihoyannopoulos, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Background In this study, we investigate the correlation between reduced global longitudinal peak systolic strain (GLPSS) and the SYNTAX score (SS) in patients undergoing coronary angiography. Methods We examined 71 patients undergoing both echocardiogram and coronary angiography within 15 days. All patients had normal global and/or regional wall motion on resting echocardiogram. We calculated GLPSS using two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography. SS was calculated for each group of patients based on the presence and/or the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD): no CAD on angiogram (n=10, control group), low SS (n=36, SS<22) and high SS (n=25, SS≥22). We hypothesised that GLPSS at rest is inversely correlated with the angiographically derived SS. Results Age, sex and most of the risk factors were equally distributed among the groups. There was a significant inverse correlation between GLPSS and SS values (r2=0.3869, P<0.001). This correlation was weaker in the low-SS group (r2=0.1332, P<0.05), whereas it was lost in the high-SS group (r2=0.0002, P=NS). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis identified that the optimal cut-off for the detection of high-SS patients was 13.95% (sensitivity=71%, specificity=90%, P<0.001). Conclusions The results of our study suggest that GLPSS might be promising for the detection of patients with high SYNTAX score on coronary angiogram. There is an inverse correlation between resting GLPSS and SS as assessed by coronary angiography. In patients with the highest SS, however, the correlation with GLPSS was less significant. PMID:27248153

  3. Coronary Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. It is the leading cause of death ... both men and women. CAD happens when the arteries that supply blood to heart muscle become hardened ...

  4. Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... changes and medication . View an animation of atherosclerosis Atherosclerosis and PAD Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque builds up ... of an artery. PAD is usually caused by atherosclerosis in the peripheral arteries (or outer regions away ...

  5. Occlusive Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... artery. Such people should seek medical care immediately. Did You Know... When people suddenly develop a painful, ... In This Article Animation 1 Peripheral Arterial Disease Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Figure 1 ...

  6. [Upper extremity arterial diseases].

    PubMed

    Becker, F

    2007-02-01

    Compared to lower limb arterial diseases, upper limb arterial diseases look rare, heterogeneous with various etiologies and a rather vague clinical picture, but with a negligible risk of amputation. Almost all types of arterial diseases can be present in the upper limb, but the anatomical and hemodynamic conditions particular to the upper limb often confuse the issue. Thus, atherosclerosis affects mainly the subclavian artery in its proximal segment where the potential of collateral pathway is high making the symptomatic forms not very frequent whereas the prevalence of subclavian artery stenosis or occlusion is relatively high. The clinical examination and the etiologies are discussed according to the clinical, anatomical and hemodynamic context.

  7. Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) happens when there is a narrowing of the blood vessels outside of your heart. The cause of ... smoking. Other risk factors include older age and diseases like diabetes, high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, ...

  8. Coronary artery disease (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... through these arteries is critical for the heart. Coronary artery disease usually results from the build-up of fatty material and plaque, a condition called atherosclerosis. As the ... blood to the heart can slow or stop, causing chest pain (stable ...

  9. Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Atherosclerosis Coronary Heart Disease Heart Attack Smoking and Your ... in the body's arteries, the condition is called atherosclerosis . Over time, plaque can harden and narrow the ...

  10. Coronary Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... ve started to help the medicine work. Other Organizations American Heart Association Questions to Ask Your Doctor Am I at risk for coronary artery disease (CAD)? What lifestyle changes should I make to decrease my risk of ...

  11. Longitudinal changes in central artery stiffness with lifestyle modification, washout, and drug treatment in individuals at risk for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Kunihiko; Shoemaker, J Kevin; Overend, Tom J; Petrella, Robert J

    2010-08-01

    We assessed 17 middle-aged and older individuals (58.0 +/- 7.9 years, 7 females) at risk for cardiovascular disease regarding: (1) Whether carotid artery stiffness (cAS) would be reduced with a 1-year lifestyle modification program, (2) to what degree cAS would return following washout (mean of 26.9 +/- 4.0 months) from the active intervention, and (3) whether a 24-week telmisartan treatment would reduce cAS more than our lifestyle modification program. cAS by Doppler ultrasound, cardiovascular disease risk factors, and exercise capacity were assessed at three points: Following the 1-year lifestyle modification, following the washout period, and following a 24-week telmisartan treatment. Following telmisartan, systolic blood pressure (SBP) was significantly decreased (114.8 +/- 12.3 mmHg) compared to baseline (127.9 +/- 12.7 mmHg) and following the washout period (126.1 +/- 14.9 mmHg). Similarly, diastolic blood pressure (DBP) was significantly lower following telmisaratn than following the washout period. Exercise capacity was increased following lifestyle modification but returned to the baseline level following the washout period. Following the lifestyle modification program, cAS was significantly reduced, and this reduction was maintained following the washout period. Conversely, the subsequent telmisartan treatment did not change cAS despite a significant blood pressure reduction. These results suggest that the reduced cAS achieved with lifestyle modification may not necessarily disappear following a cessation of the active program, indicating a possible role that family physicians can play in their clinical practice, and also providing a further rationale to promote lifestyle modification as an initial therapy for this population. In contrast, no additional benefit of telmisartan beyond our lifestyle intervention was observed in this study.

  12. Hypertensive Target Organ Damage and Longitudinal Changes in Brain Structure and Function: The Second Manifestations of Arterial Disease-Magnetic Resonance Study.

    PubMed

    van der Veen, Pieternella H; Geerlings, Mirjam I; Visseren, Frank L J; Nathoe, Hendrik M; Mali, Willem P T M; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Muller, Majon

    2015-12-01

    Hypertension has been related to structural and functional brain changes. In high-risk populations, hypertensive target organ damage might better represent exposure to high blood pressure than the blood pressure measurement itself. We examined the association of hypertensive target organ damage with longitudinal changes in brain structure and function within the Second Manifestations of Arterial Disease-Magnetic Resonance (SMART-MR) study. Renal function, albuminuria, and left ventricular hypertrophy on electrocardiography were measured in 663 patients with manifest arterial disease (mean age, 57±9 years; 81% men). Automated brain segmentation was used to quantify progression of global brain atrophy (change in brain parenchymal fraction) and progression of cerebral small vessel disease on 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging, and memory and executive functioning were assessed at baseline and after on average 3.9 years of follow-up. Regression analyses showed that an increasing number of signs of target organ damage was associated with more progression of global brain atrophy and more rapid decline in memory performance. Compared with no target organ damage, mean differences in change in brain parenchymal fraction (95% confidence interval) for 1 and ≥2 signs of organ damage were -0.12 (-0.30; 0.06) and -0.41 (-0.77; -0.05) % intracranial volume, and mean (95% confidence interval) differences in change in memory performance (z score) were -0.15 (-0.29; -0.00) and -0.27 (-0.54; -0.01). Results were independent of blood pressure, antihypertensive treatment, and other confounders. Hypertension target organ damage was not associated with progression of cerebral small vessel disease or change in executive functioning. Routinely assessed signs of hypertensive target organ damage, and in particular impaired renal function, could be used to identify patients at the highest risk of cognitive decline.

  13. Asthma Is Associated With a Subsequent Risk of Peripheral Artery Disease: A Longitudinal Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chih-Wei; Shen, Te-Chun; Lu, Chiung-Ray; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Lin, Cheng-Li; Tu, Chih-Yen; Hsia, Te-Chun; Shih, Chuen-Ming; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Sung, Fung-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Asthma has been associated with the atherosclerosis risk, but not clear of peripheral artery disease (PAD). We attempted to examine the risk of PAD in patients with asthma.From the insurance claims data of Taiwan, we identified 28,158 newly diagnosed asthma patients in 2000 to 2005 and 56,316 persons without asthma randomly selected into the comparison cohort, frequency matched by sex, age, and the date of diagnosis. Both cohorts were followed up until the end of 2011 to estimate the incident PAD. Adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) of PAD were estimated using the Cox proportional hazards model after controlling for sex, age, and comorbidities.The incidence of PAD was 1.46 times higher in the asthma cohort than in the comparison cohort, with an aHR of 1.34 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.24-1.45]. Incidence of PAD was higher in men, the aged, and those with comorbidities in both cohorts. The aHRs of PAD remained significant for the asthma cohort in all subgroups of sex, age, and the presence of comorbidity. The aHRs of PAD were 14.1 (95% CI = 8.18-24.5) in asthma patients with multiple emergency visits and 22.3 (95% CI = 15.6-31.9) for those with multiple hospitalizations.Although smoking is a potential confounding factor, this study suggests patients with asthma have a significantly higher risk of developing PAD than the general population. The results also support the notion that poor control of asthma status is a key factor in subsequent PAD development. PMID:26817901

  14. Diagnostic power of longitudinal strain at rest for the detection of obstructive coronary artery disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Houjuan; Yan, Jiangtao; Zeng, Hesong; Li, Wenyu; Li, Pengcheng; Liu, Zhengxiang; Cui, Guanglin; Lv, Jiagao; Wang, Daowen; Wang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Global longitudinal strain (GLS) measured by 2-D speckle-tracking echocardiography (2-D STE) at rest has been recognized as a sensitive parameter in the detection of significant coronary artery disease (CAD). However, the diagnostic power of 2-D STE in the detection of significant CAD in patients with diabetes mellitus is unknown. Two-dimensional STE features were studied in total of 143 consecutive patients who underwent echocardiography and coronary angiography. Left ventricular global and segmental peak systolic longitudinal strains (PSLSs) were quantified by speckle-tracking imaging. In the presence of obstructive CAD (defined as stenosis ≥75%), global PSLS was significantly lower in patients with diabetes mellitus than in patients without (16.65 ± 2.29% vs. 17.32 ± 2.27%, p < 0.05). Receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that global PSLS could effectively detect obstructive CAD in patients without diabetes mellitus (cutoff value: -18.35%, sensitivity: 78.8%, specificity: 77.5%). However, global PSLS could detect obstructive CAD in diabetic patients at a lower cutoff value with inadequate sensitivity and specificity (cutoff value: -17.15%; sensitivity: 61.1%, specificity: 52.9%). In addition, the results for segmental PSLS were similar to those for global PSLS. In conclusion, global and segmental PSLSs at rest were significantly lower in patients with both obstructive CAD and diabetes mellitus than in patients with obstructive CAD only; thus, PSLSs at rest might not be a useful parameter in the detection of obstructive CAD in patients with diabetes mellitus.

  15. About Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... changes and medication . View an animation of atherosclerosis Atherosclerosis and PAD Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque builds up ... of an artery. PAD is usually caused by atherosclerosis in the peripheral arteries (or outer regions away ...

  16. Coronary artery disease

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The coronary arteries supply blood to the heart muscle itself. Damage to or blockage of a coronary artery can result in injury to the heart. Normally, blood flows through a coronary artery unimpeded. However, a ...

  17. Epigenetics and Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Golledge, Jonathan; Biros, Erik; Bingley, John; Iyer, Vikram; Krishna, Smriti M

    2016-04-01

    The term epigenetics is usually used to describe inheritable changes in gene function which do not involve changes in the DNA sequence. These typically include non-coding RNAs, DNA methylation and histone modifications. Smoking and older age are recognised risk factors for peripheral artery diseases, such as occlusive lower limb artery disease and abdominal aortic aneurysm, and have been implicated in promoting epigenetic changes. This brief review describes studies that have associated epigenetic factors with peripheral artery diseases and investigations which have examined the effect of epigenetic modifications on the outcome of peripheral artery diseases in mouse models. Investigations have largely focused on microRNAs and have identified a number of circulating microRNAs associated with human peripheral artery diseases. Upregulating or antagonising a number of microRNAs has also been reported to limit aortic aneurysm development and hind limb ischemia in mouse models. The importance of DNA methylation and histone modifications in peripheral artery disease has been relatively little studied. Whether circulating microRNAs can be used to assist identification of patients with peripheral artery diseases and be modified in order to improve the outcome of peripheral artery disease will require further investigation.

  18. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... and efficacy continues to be studied in several medical centers. This procedure involves the placement of a small flexible tube (catheter) into an artery from the groin. The catheter is then directed to the neck to reach the carotid artery blockage. A balloon pushes open the artery wall and a stent ( ...

  19. Almanac 2015: coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Shavelle, David M

    2016-04-01

    Recent years have seen major advances in the evaluation and treatment of patients with coronary artery disease. These include assessment of novel biomarkers and imaging methods for patients at risk for coronary artery disease, care of patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, a novel device to treat medical refractory angina, use of non-statin lipid-lowering agents, a better understanding of the risks and benefits of long-term dual antiplatelet therapy and the use of the newer antiplatelet agents. This article summarises research related to coronary artery disease published in Heart in 2014 and 2015, within the context of other major cardiovascular journals. PMID:26819234

  20. Peripheral artery disease - legs

    MedlinePlus

    ... legs; Arterial insufficiency of the legs; Recurrent leg pain and cramping; Calf pain with exercise ... The main symptoms of PAD are pain, achiness, fatigue, burning, or ... or thighs. These symptoms most often appear during walking or ...

  1. Arterial Stiffness and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Garnier, Anne-Sophie; Briet, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health concern due to the high prevalence of associated cardiovascular (CV) disease. CV mortality is 10-30 times higher in end-stage renal disease patients than in the age-adjusted general population. The last 20 years have been marked by a huge effort in the characterization of the vascular remodeling process associated with CKD and its consequences on the renal, CV and general prognosis. By comparison with patients with normal renal function, with or without hypertension, an increase in large artery stiffness has been described in end-stage renal disease as well as in CKD stages 2-5. Most clinical studies are consistent with the observation that damage to large arteries may contribute to the high incidence of CV disease. By contrast, the impact of large artery stiffening and remodeling on CKD progression is still a matter of debate. Concomitant exposure to other CV risk factors, including diabetes, seems to play a major role in the association between aortic stiffness and estimated GFR. The conflicting results obtained from longitudinal studies designed to evaluate the impact of baseline aortic stiffness on GFR progression are detailed in the present review. Only pulse pressure, central and peripheral, is almost constantly associated with incident CKD and GFR decline. Kidney transplantation improves patients’ CV prognosis, but its impact on arterial stiffness is still controversial. Donor age, living kidney donation and mean blood pressure appear to be the main determinants of improvement in aortic stiffness after kidney transplantation. PMID:27195244

  2. Modeling Disease Progression with Longitudinal Markers.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Lurdes Y T; Etzioni, Ruth; Morrell, Christopher; Müller, Peter

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we propose a Bayesian natural history model for disease progression based on the joint modeling of longitudinal biomarker levels, age at clinical detection of disease and disease status at diagnosis. We establish a link between the longitudinal responses and the natural history of the disease by using an underlying latent disease process which describes the onset of the disease and models the transition to an advanced stage of the disease as dependent on the biomarker levels. We apply our model to the data from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging on prostate specific antigen (PSA) to investigate the natural history of prostate cancer. PMID:24453387

  3. Carotid artery disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery, Society for Vascular Medicine, and Society for Vascular Surgery. Vasc Med . 2011;16:35-77. PMID: 23281092 ... disease. In: Cronenwett JL, Johnston KW, eds. Rutherford's Vascular Surgery . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap ...

  4. Coronary Artery Disease | Coronary Artery Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Coronary Artery Disease Coronary Artery Disease Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents ... exercise routine produced a strong heart!" Fast Facts Arteries are blood vessels that carry oxygen-rich blood ...

  5. Effect of comprehensive cardiovascular disease risk management on longitudinal changes in carotid artery intima-media thickness in a community-based prevention clinic

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Henry G.; Patel, Birju S.; Martin, Seth S.; Blaha, Michael; Doneen, Amy; Bale, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to examine changes in carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and carotid plaque morphology in patients receiving multifactorial cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor management in a community-based prevention clinic. Quantitative changes in CIMT and qualitative changes in carotid plaque morphology may be measured non-invasively by ultrasound. Material and methods This is a retrospective study on a cohort of 324 patients who received multifactorial cardiovascular risk reduction treatment at a community prevention clinic. All patients received lipid-lowering medications (statin, niacin, and/or ezetimibe) and lifestyle modification. All patients underwent at least one follow-up CIMT measurement after starting their regimen. Annual biomarker, CIMT, and plaque measurements were analyzed for associations with CVD risk reduction treatment. Results Median time to last CIMT was 3.0 years. Compared to baseline, follow-up analysis of all treatment groups at 2 years showed a 52.7% decrease in max CIMT, a 3.0% decrease in mean CIMT, and an 87.0% decrease in the difference between max and mean CIMT (p < 0.001). Plaque composition changes occurred, including a decrease in lipid-rich plaques of 78.4% within the first 2 years (p < 0.001). After the first 2 years, CIMT and lipid-rich plaques continued to decline at reduced rates. Conclusion In a cohort of patients receiving comprehensive CVD risk reduction therapy, delipidation of subclinical carotid plaque and reductions in CIMT predominantly occurred within 2 years, and correlated with changes in traditional biomarkers. These observations, generated from existing clinical data, provide unique insight into the longitudinal on-treatment changes in carotid plaque. PMID:27478452

  6. Signs and Symptoms of Artery Disease | Coronary Artery Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Coronary Artery Disease Signs and Symptoms of Artery Disease Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents ... this depends on which arteries are affected. Coronary Arteries Coronary arteries supply oxygen-rich blood to the ...

  7. Peripheral Arterial Disease (P.A.D.)

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. Peripheral Artery Disease (P.A.D.) What is P.A.D.? Arteries Clogged With Plaque Peripheral arterial disease (P. ... button on your keyboard.) Why Is P.A.D. Dangerous? Click for more information Blocked blood flow ...

  8. Understanding Arteries | Coronary Artery Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Coronary Artery Disease Understanding Arteries Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents Below: ... the arteries and veins are healthy. A Healthy Artery An artery is a muscular tube. It has ...

  9. Arterial stiffness as a risk factor for coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Liao, Josh; Farmer, John

    2014-02-01

    Hypertension is a major modifiable risk factor, and clinical trials have demonstrated that successful reduction of elevated blood pressure to target levels translates into decreased risk for the development of coronary artery disease, stroke, heart failure, and renal failure. The arterial system had previously been regarded as a passive conduit for the transportation of arterial blood to peripheral tissues. The physiologic role the arterial system was greatly expanded by the recognition of the central role of the endothelial function in a variety of physiologic processes. The role of arterial function and structure in cardiovascular physiology was expanded with the development of a variety of parameters that evaluate arterial stiffness. Markers of arterial stiffness have been correlated with cardiovascular outcomes, and have been classified as an emerging risk factor that provides prognostic information beyond standard stratification strategies involving hypertension, diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia and smoking. Multiple epidemiologic studies have correlated markers of arterial stiffness such as pulse-wave velocity, augmentation index and pulse pressure with risk for the development of fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events. Additionally, measurements of arterial stiffness had clarified the results of clinical trials that demonstrated differing impacts on clinical outcomes, despite similar reductions in blood pressure, as measured by brachial and sphygmomanometry.

  10. [Atherosclerotic renal artery disease diagnosis update].

    PubMed

    Meier, Pascal; Haesler, Erik; Teta, Daniel; Qanadli, Salah Dine; Burnier, Michel

    2009-02-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery disease represents a cause of which little is known but not a cause to be neglected for hypertension and renal insufficiency. Even though its occurrence remains badly defined, atherosclerotic renal artery disease is constantly on the rise due to the aging population, the never prevailing hypertension and diabetes mellitus. This review aims to give a clinical profile of patients presenting with atherosclerotic renal artery disease and to discuss, in the light of study results, which diagnostic evaluation should be used considering the sequence and the benefit and risk of each in order to initiate a personalized treatment. Patients affected by atherosclerotic renal artery disease are likely to have more complications and more extensive target-organ damage than patients without renal artery stenosis. The evolution of the atherosclerotic renal artery disease is in general slow and progressive. Nevertheless, certain clinical cases manifest themselves with the onset of acute renal failure bought upon by the administration of blockers of the rennin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, or by some other causes responsible for a sudden drop in renal plasma flow (e.g., thrombosis of the renal artery). The relationship between atherosclerotic renal artery disease and atherosclerosis is complex, and mediators implicated in the pathophysiology of renovascular disease may also contribute to the progression of cardiovascular damage. An early assumption of the atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis is warranted to determine the adapted treatment (i.e., medical treatment, revascularisation...) just as the assumption and the correction of the more general cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:18809367

  11. [Risk factors for arterial disease].

    PubMed

    Madoery, Roberto; Rubin, Graciela; Luquez, Hugo; Luquez, Cecilia; Cravero, Cecilia

    2004-01-01

    The risk factors of arterial disease (FREA) predict a future damage over the vascular system of the human body. Its detection are considered a key for the diagnostic as well as for the preventive and even curative strategies. For a long time, scientist considered those factors originated as a consecuence of large studies during the middle of the last century, with current validity up to our days. A simple classification spoke of them as traditionals. Further investigations described the so called new or emergents.factors that where joint together accordingly to their actions: coagulation factors, psicosocial, inflamatories and infectious. A recent classification, taking into account the type of impact, divided them into; causatives, predisposals and conditionals. Also, it was described a mechanism, the oxidative power, with consecuences over the endothelium, in the last part of the process. Before, another mechanism was described: the insulin resistance and the hiperinsulinism, bases for the Metabolic Syndrome, that includes a number of traditional risk factors.

  12. [Peripheral artery disease and acute coronary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease is a common manifestation of systemic atherosclerosis that is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. When presented in the context of an acute coronary syndrome a differential diagnosis with aorta dissection should be made, because peripheral arterial disease may be asymptomatic despite the absence or asymmetry of femoral pulses.

  13. Peripheral Arterial Disease and Claudication

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fatty deposits inside them. This is called atherosclerosis. If you have PAD, your arms, and more ... also more likely in people who already have atherosclerosis in other arteries, such as the arteries in ...

  14. Diagnosis and therapy of coronary artery disease: Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, P.F.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 18 selections. Some of the titles are: Nuclear cardiology; Diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction; Therapy of angina pectoris; Psychosocial aspects of coronary artery disease; Nonatherosclerotic coronary artery disease; and The epidemiology of coronary artery disease.

  15. Coronary artery disease in the military patient.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Iain; White, S; Gill, R; Gray, H H; Rees, P

    2015-09-01

    Ischaemic heart disease is the most common cause of sudden death in the UK, and the most common cardiac cause of medical discharge from the Armed Forces. This paper reviews current evidence pertaining to the diagnosis and management of coronary artery disease from a military perspective, encompassing stable angina and acute coronary syndromes. Emphasis is placed on the limitations inherent in the management of acute coronary syndromes in the deployed environment. Occupational issues affecting patients with coronary artery disease are reviewed. Consideration is also given to the potential for coronary artery disease screening in the military, and the management of modifiable cardiovascular disease risk factors, to help decrease the prevalence of coronary artery disease in the military population. PMID:26246347

  16. In situ longitudinal pre-stretch in the human femoropopliteal artery

    PubMed Central

    Kamenskiy, Alexey; Seas, Andreas; Bowen, Grant; Deegan, Paul; Desyatova, Anastasia; Bohlim, Nick; Poulson, William; MacTaggart, Jason

    2016-01-01

    In situ longitudinal (axial) pre-stretch (LPS) plays a fundamental role in the mechanics of the femoropopliteal artery (FPA). It conserves energy during pulsation and prevents buckling of the artery during limb movement. We investigated how LPS is affected by demographics and risk factors, and how these patient characteristics associate with the structural and physiologic features of the FPA. LPS was measured in n = 148 fresh human FPAs (14–80 years old). Mechanical properties were characterized with biaxial extension and histopathological characteristics were quantified with Verhoeff–Van Gieson Staining. Constitutive modeling was used to calculate physiological stresses and stretches which were then analyzed in the context of demographics, risk factors and structural characteristics. Age had the strongest negative effect (r = −0.812, p < 0.01) on LPS and could alone explain 66% of LPS variability. Male gender, higher body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, coronary artery disease, dyslipidemia and tobacco use had negative effects on LPS, but only the effect of tobacco was not associated with aging. FPAs with less pre-stretch had thicker medial layers, but thinner intramural elastic fibers with less dense and more fragmented external elastic laminae. Elastin degradation was associated with decreased physiological tethering force and longitudinal stress, while circumferential stress remained constant. FPA wall pathology was negatively associated with LPS (r = −0.553, p < 0.01), but the effect was due primarily to aging. LPS in the FPA may serve as an energy reserve for adaptive remodeling. Reduction of LPS due to degradation and fragmentation of intramural longitudinal elastin during aging can be accelerated in tobacco users. PMID:26766633

  17. Computer measurement of arterial disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J.; Selzer, R. H.; Barndt, R.; Blankenhorn, D. H.; Brooks, S.

    1980-01-01

    Image processing technique quantifies human atherosclerosis by computer analysis of arterial angiograms. X-ray film images are scanned and digitized, arterial shadow is tracked, and several quantitative measures of lumen irregularity are computed. In other tests, excellent agreement was found between computer evaluation of femoral angiograms on living subjects and evaluation by teams of trained angiographers.

  18. Patterns of disease distribution of lower extremity peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Shi, Yang; Wang, Yutang; Li, Xiaoying

    2015-03-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a common manifestation of atherosclerosis that is associated with an increased risk of mortality and cardiovascular (CV) events. Peripheral arterial disease involves the arteries distal to the aortic bifurcation in a nonuniform manner. Studies have shown that symptoms and prognosis of patients with PAD vary according to the location and size of the affected artery. Several modalities have been used to identify the location of PAD, including noninvasive evaluations and invasive procedures. Peripheral arterial disease has a risk factor profile similar to that associated with coronary artery disease (ie, age, gender, diabetes, smoking, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia). Many studies have shown that the distribution, extent, and progression of PAD are influenced by CV risk factors but the findings are not consistent. Management strategies for PAD are different for proximal and distal PAD. The objective of this review is to discuss the patterns of diseases distribution in patients with PAD.

  19. Acoustic detection of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Semmlow, John; Rahalkar, Ketaki

    2007-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) occurs when the arteries to the heart (the coronary arteries) become blocked by deposition of plaque, depriving the heart of oxygen-bearing blood. This disease is arguably the most important fatal disease in industrialized countries, causing one-third to one-half of all deaths in persons between the ages of 35 and 64 in the United States. Despite the fact that early detection of CAD allows for successful and cost-effective treatment of the disease, only 20% of CAD cases are diagnosed prior to a heart attack. The development of a definitive, noninvasive test for detection of coronary blockages is one of the holy grails of diagnostic cardiology. One promising approach to detecting coronary blockages noninvasively is based on identifying acoustic signatures generated by turbulent blood flow through partially occluded coronary arteries. In fact, no other approach to the detection of CAD promises to be as inexpensive, simple to perform, and risk free as the acoustic-based approach. Although sounds associated with partially blocked arteries are easy to identify in more superficial vessels such as the carotids, sounds from coronary arteries are very faint and surrounded by noise such as the very loud valve sounds. To detect these very weak signals requires sophisticated signal processing techniques. This review describes the work that has been done in this area since the 1980s and discusses future directions that may fulfill the promise of the acoustic approach to detecting coronary artery disease.

  20. Infectious and coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee-Zavareh, Mohammad Saeid; Tohidi, Mohammad; Sabouri, Amin; Ramezani-Binabaj, Mahdi; Sadeghi-Ghahrodi, Mohsen; Einollahi, Behzad

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Atherosclerotic event is one of the most causes of death in the world. Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one manifestation of atherosclerosis. It is well-known that several risk factors, such as diabetes mellitus (DM), smoking, hypertension (HTN), have effects on it. It is proposed that infection can lead to atherosclerosis or even make its process faster. Here, we discuss about the effect of some of infectious agents on the atherosclerosis and CAD. METHODS In this study, first we did a comprehensive search in PubMed, Scopus, and Science Direct using some related keywords such as atherosclerosis, CAD, myocardial infarction (MI), infection, and name of viruses and bacteria. After finding the related papers, we reviewed the correlation between some microbial agents and risk of CAD. RESULTS Literature has reported several infectious agents (viruses, bacteria, and parasites) that can be associated with risk of CAD. This association for some of them like Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), Chlamydia pneumonia (C. pneumoniae), and Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a very strong. On the other hand, there are some other agents like influenza that still need to be more investigated through original studies. Furthermore, different mechanisms (general and special) have been reported for the association of each agent with CAD. CONCLUSION Based on the studies in databases and our literature review, it is so clear that some microbes and infectious agents can be involved in the process of atherosclerosis. Therefore, controlling each type of infections especially among people with a traditional risk factor for atherosclerosis should be taken into account for reducing the risk of CAD and atherosclerosis. PMID:27114736

  1. Coronary artery disease and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Doron; Edelman, Elazer R

    2014-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Near-normal glycemic control does not reduce cardiovascular events. For many patients with 1- or 2-vessel coronary artery disease, there is little benefit from any revascularization procedure over optimal medical therapy. For multivessel coronary disease, randomized trials demonstrated the superiority of coronary artery bypass grafting over multivessel percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with treated DM. However, selection of the optimal myocardial revascularization strategy requires a multidisciplinary team approach ('heart team'). This review summarizes the current evidence regarding the effectiveness of various medical therapies and revascularization strategies in patients with DM. PMID:25091969

  2. Coronary Artery Disease and Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Doron; Edelman, Elazer R

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Near-normal glycemic control does not reduce cardiovascular events. For many patients with 1- or 2-vessel coronary artery disease, there is little benefit from any revascularization procedure over optimal medical therapy. For multivessel coronary disease, randomized trials demonstrated the superiority of coronary artery bypass grafting over multivessel percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with treated DM. However, selection of the optimal myocardial revascularization strategy requires a multidisciplinary team approach ('heart team'). This review summarizes the current evidence regarding the effectiveness of various medical therapies and revascularization strategies in patients with DM. PMID:26567979

  3. Peripheral arterial disease of the lower extremities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Persons with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) are at increased risk for all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and mortality from coronary artery disease. Smoking should be stopped and hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, and hypothyroidism treated. Statins reduce the incidence of intermittent claudication and improve exercise duration until the onset of intermittent claudication in persons with PAD and hypercholesterolemia. The serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol should be reduced to < 70 mg/dl. Antiplatelet drugs such as aspirin or clopidogrel, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and statins should be given to persons with PAD. β-Blockers should be given if coronary artery disease is present. Cilostazol improves exercise time until intermittent claudication. Exercise rehabilitation programs should be used. Revascularization should be performed if indicated. PMID:22662015

  4. Hepatic artery aneurysm in corticosteroid-treated, adult Kawasaki's disease.

    PubMed

    Caputo, A E; Roberts, W N; Yee, Y S; Posner, M P

    1991-11-01

    We describe a single case of Kawasaki's disease (mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome) with the rare complication of a hepatic artery aneurysm which was surgically repaired. Unusual features include arterial aneurysmal formation in the hepatic arteries rather than in coronary arteries, the unusual morphology of the hepatic artery aneurysm, and the expansion of the aneurysm after corticosteroid therapy.

  5. Cell Therapy of Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Raval, Zankhana; Losordo, Douglas W.

    2013-01-01

    The age-adjusted prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in the US population was estimated to approach 12% in 1985, and as the population ages, the overall population having peripheral arterial disease is predicted to rise. The clinical consequences of occlusive peripheral arterial disease include intermittent claudication, that is, pain with walking, and critical limb ischemia (CLI), which includes pain at rest and loss of tissue integrity in the distal limbs, which may ultimately lead to amputation of a portion of the lower extremity. The risk factors for CLI are similar to those linked to coronary artery disease and include advanced age, smoking, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension. The worldwide incidence of CLI was estimated to be 500 to 1000 cases per million people per year in 1991. The prognosis is poor for CLI subjects with advanced limb disease. One study of >400 such subjects in the United Kingdom found that 25% required amputation and 20% (including some subjects who had required amputation) died within 1 year. In the United States, ≈280 lower-limb amputations for ischemic disease are performed per million people each year. The first objective in treating CLI is to increase blood circulation to the affected limb. Theoretically, increased blood flow could be achieved by increasing the number of vessels that supply the ischemic tissue with blood. The use of pharmacological agents to induce new blood vessel growth for the treatment or prevention of pathological clinical conditions has been called therapeutic angiogenesis. Since the identification of the endothelial progenitor cell in 1997 by Asahara and Isner, the field of cell-based therapies for peripheral arterial disease has been in a state of continuous evolution. Here, we review the current state of that field. PMID:23620237

  6. Cadmium Exposure and Incident Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tellez-Plaza, Maria; Guallar, Eliseo; Fabsitz, Richard R.; Howard, Barbara V.; Umans, Jason G.; Francesconi, Kevin A.; Goessler, Walter; Devereux, Richard B.; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Background Cadmium has been associated with peripheral arterial disease in cross-sectional studies but prospective evidence is lacking. Our goal was to evaluate the association of urine cadmium concentrations with incident peripheral arterial disease in a large population-based cohort. Methods and Results A prospective cohort study was performed with 2,864 adult American Indians 45-74 years old from Arizona, Oklahoma and North and South Dakota who participated in the Strong Heart Study in 1989-91 and were followed through two follow-up examination visits in 1993-1995 and 1997-1999. Participants were free of peripheral arterial disease, defined as an ankle brachial index <0.9 or >1.4, at baseline and had complete baseline information on urine cadmium, potential confounders and ankle brachial index determinations in the follow-up examinations. Urine cadmium was measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) and corrected for urinary dilution by normalization to urine creatinine.. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) were computed using Cox-proportional hazards models for interval-censored data. A total of 470 cases of incident peripheral arterial disease, defined as an ankle brachial index <0.9 or >1.4, were identified. After adjustment for cardiovascular disease risk factors including smoking status and pack-years, the hazard ratio comparing the 80th to the 20th percentile of urine cadmium concentrations was 1.41 (1.05, 1.81). The hazard ratio comparing the highest to the lowest tertile was 1.96 (1.32, 2.81). The associations persisted after excluding participants with ankle brachial index > 1.4 only as well as in subgroups defined by sex and smoking status. Conclusions Urine cadmium, a biomarker of long-term cadmium exposure, was independently associated with incident peripheral arterial disease, providing further support for cadmium as a cardiovascular disease risk factor. PMID:24255048

  7. Noninvasive evaluation of peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Barnes, R W

    1978-08-01

    Doppler ultrasound is the most simple, inexpensive, accurate and versatile of the available noninvasive screening techniques to assess peripheral vascular diseases. The four fundamental components of peripheral arterial evaluation with this technique are assessment of blood velocity signal, measurement of resting ankle pressure, determination of segmental leg blood pressures, and measurement of ankle pressure response to exercise or reactive hyperemia. Plethysmography permits graphic recording of pulse-wave morphology, determination of digit blood pressure, and pulsatile responses to compression maneuvers. These techniques are useful in objectively quantifying peripheral arterial occlusive disease, predicting the results of operative therapy, monitoring the success of arterial reconstruction during surgery, and following the physiologic status of the patient after surgery.

  8. Distal arterial occlusive disease in diabetes is related to medial arterial calcification.

    PubMed

    Chantelau, E; Lee, K M; Jungblut, R

    1997-01-01

    In diabetes mellitus, peripheral arterial occlusive disease predominantly affects the lower leg (tibial and peroneal vessel disease). Our study suggests that this feature is related to the presence of forefoot medial arterial calcification.

  9. Association of ischemic heart disease to global and regional longitudinal strain in asymptomatic aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Carstensen, Helle Gervig; Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Hassager, Christian; Kofoed, Klaus Fuglsang; Jensen, Jan Skov; Mogelvang, Rasmus

    2015-03-01

    Longitudinal deformation has been shown to deteriorate with progressive aortic stenosis as well as ischemic heart disease. Despite that both conditions share risk factors and are often coexisting, studies have not assessed the influence on longitudinal deformation for both conditions simultaneously. Thus the purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between subclinical ischemic heart disease and global and regional longitudinal strain in asymptomatic patients with significant aortic stenosis. Prevalent patients with a diagnosis of aortic stenosis at six hospitals in the Greater Copenhagen area were screened for inclusion. A total of 104 asymptomatic patients with moderate-severe aortic stenosis (aortic valve area ≤1.5 cm(2)) fulfilled study criteria and underwent advanced echocardiographic analysis and coronary angiography by multi-detector computed tomography. Angiography revealed coronary stenosis >50% in 31% (n = 32). All regional longitudinal strain measures (apical, mid and basal longitudinal strain) were significant predictors of significant coronary stenosis (>70% stenosis), but only apical and mid longitudinal strain were significant predictors in multivariable analyses independent of aortic valve area, stroke volume index, pro-BNP, valvulo-arterial impedance, body mass index and heart rate. In linear regression models with both aortic valve area and significant coronary stenosis, apical (p < 0.001) and mid (p < 0.01) longitudinal strain were associated to significant coronary stenosis but not aortic valve area. Conversely, basal longitudinal strain was significantly associated to aortic valve area (p = 0.001), but not to significant coronary stenosis. Subclinical coronary artery disease is frequent in moderate and severe aortic stenosis, and should be suspected when regional longitudinal dysfunction is predominant in the apical and mid ventricular segments.

  10. Living with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... and other related problems, such as coronary heart disease, heart attack, stroke, and transient ischemic attack. Heart-healthy lifestyle changes include ... Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA ...

  11. Complexity of lower extremity peripheral artery disease reflects the complexity of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Aykan, Ahmet Çağrı; Hatem, Engin; Karabay, Can Yücel; Gül, İlker; Gökdeniz, Tayyar; Kalaycıoğlu, Ezgi; Turan, Turhan; Kara, Faruk; Arslan, Ahmet Oğuz; Dursun, İhsan; Çetin, Mustafa; Güler, Ahmet

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the relationship between peripheral artery disease complexity and coronary artery disease complexity in patients with peripheral artery disease. A total of 449 patients were enrolled. SYNTAX score, a marker of coronary artery disease complexity, was assessed by dedicated computer software and complexity of peripheral artery disease was determined by Trans Atlantic Inter-Society Consensus II classification. The SYNTAX score of patients with minimal peripheral artery disease, Trans Atlantic Inter-Society Consensus A, Trans Atlantic Inter-Society Consensus B, Trans Atlantic Inter-Society Consensus C and Trans Atlantic Inter-Society Consensus D were 5 (11), 12.5 (13.25), 20 (14), 20.5 (19) and 27.5 (19), respectively (values in brackets represent the interquartile range). SYNTAX score and Trans Atlantic Inter-Society Consensus class was moderately correlated (r = 0.495, p < 0.001). In multivariate regression analysis male sex (B = 0.169, p < 0.001, CI95% = 0.270-0.735), Log10 SYNTAX score (B = 0.282, p < 0.001, CI95% = 0.431-0.782), Log10 creatinine (B = 0.081, p = 0.036, CI95% = 0.043-1.239), low-density lipoprotein (B = 0.114, p = 0.003, CI95% = 0.001-0.006) and high-density lipoprotein (B = -0.360, p < 0.001, CI95% = -0.063 to -0.041) were the independent predictors of Trans Atlantic Inter-Society Consensus II class. We have shown that patients with complex peripheral artery disease had complex coronary artery disease.

  12. Longitudinal Strain and Strain Rate Abnormalities Precede Invasive Diagnosis of Transplant Coronary Artery Vasculopathy in Pediatric Cardiac Transplant Patients.

    PubMed

    Zoeller, Bridget B; Miyamoto, Shelley D; Younoszai, Adel K; Landeck, Bruce F

    2016-04-01

    Transplant coronary artery vasculopathy (TCAV) is the primary cause of late graft loss in pediatric heart transplant recipients. TCAV is diagnosed using angiography or intravascular ultrasound; however, noninvasive methods remain elusive. We sought to define patterns of myocardial mechanics in patients with TCAV and to determine whether this can detect TCAV before invasive methods. In this retrospective study, we queried our heart transplant database to identify all recipients with TCAV since 2006 (n = 41). Echoes were reviewed from the last normal catheterization and at TCAV diagnosis, and from time-matched transplant controls (n = 33) without TCAV. Peak global circumferential and longitudinal strain and systolic and diastolic strain rate (SSR and DSR) of the left ventricle were derived using velocity vector imaging. T tests were used to compare both groups longitudinally and between groups at both time points. Longitudinal strain, SSR, and DSR were diminished in the TCAV group compared to the transplant control group at both time points. No differences were found across time points in either group. Retrospective modeling using a longitudinal strain cutoff of 15 % on echoes 2 years prior to TCAV diagnosis predicted development or exclusion of TCAV with sensitivity of 53 %, specificity of 89 % with an area under the curve of 0.8. Decreases in longitudinal strain measurements demonstrate that alterations in myocardial mechanics occur in patients with TCAV at least 2 years prior to invasive diagnosis. These early changes may be due to microvascular disease. This modality could aid in earlier treatment and intervention for this challenging problem .

  13. Peripheral artery disease of the legs - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    Peripheral vascular disease - self-care; Intermittent claudication - self-care ... may prescribe the following medicines to control your peripheral artery disease. DO NOT stop taking these medicines ...

  14. Peripheral arterial disease in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Aronow, Wilbert S

    2007-01-01

    Smoking should be stopped and hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and hypothyroidism treated in elderly patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) of the lower extremities. Statins reduce the incidence of intermittent claudication and improve exercise duration until the onset of intermittent claudication in patients with PAD and hypercholesterolemia. Antiplatelet drugs such as aspirin or clopidogrel, especially clopidogrel, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and statins should be given to all elderly patients with PAD without contraindications to these drugs. Beta blockers should be given if coronary artery disease is present. Exercise rehabilitation programs and cilostazol increase exercise time until intermittent claudication develops. Chelation therapy should be avoided. Indications for lower extremity percutaneous transluminal angioplasty or bypass surgery are (1) incapacitating claudication in patients interfering with work or lifestyle; (2) limb salvage in patients with limb-threatening ischemia as manifested by rest pain, nonhealing ulcers, and/or infection or gangrene; and (3) vasculogenic impotence. PMID:18225466

  15. [New antiplatelet drugs in coronary artery disease].

    PubMed

    Tello-Montoliu, Antonio; Jover, Eva; Valdés, Mariano

    2014-12-01

    The dual antiplatelet therapy with acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel has been the mainstay of both acute and chronic phase coronary artery disease, reducing importantly the risk of adverse events. Despite a correct compliance, a non-negligible rate of adverse events still happens. New compounds, with improved properties, are now clinically available (such as prasugrel or ticagrelor) or under advanced development. The aim of the present review is the description of these new compounds, particularly prasugrel and ticagrelor. PMID:24480290

  16. [New antiplatelet drugs in coronary artery disease].

    PubMed

    Tello-Montoliu, Antonio; Jover, Eva; Valdés, Mariano

    2014-12-01

    The dual antiplatelet therapy with acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel has been the mainstay of both acute and chronic phase coronary artery disease, reducing importantly the risk of adverse events. Despite a correct compliance, a non-negligible rate of adverse events still happens. New compounds, with improved properties, are now clinically available (such as prasugrel or ticagrelor) or under advanced development. The aim of the present review is the description of these new compounds, particularly prasugrel and ticagrelor.

  17. Vitamin D, arterial hypertension & cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Kienreich, Katharina; Grubler, Martin; Tomaschitz, Andreas; Schmid, Johannes; Verheyen, Nicolas; Rutters, Femke; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Pilz, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Vitamin D is mainly derived from endogenous ultraviolet-B induced vitamin D synthesis in the skin, and the current high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency can, therefore, largely be attributed to lifestyle related low sunlight exposure. Regulation of bone and mineral metabolism is a classic vitamin D effect, but the identification of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in almost all human cells suggests a role for vitamin D also in extra-skeletal diseases. Experimental studies demonstrated several antihypertensive and vascular protective effects of vitamin D, such as suppression of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system, beneficial modulation of classic cardiovascular risk factors, and anti-atherosclerotic properties including improvements of endothelial function. Additional neuroprotective actions of vitamin D have also been reported. In line with this, epidemiological studies have largely shown that vitamin D deficiency is an independent risk factor for arterial hypertension and strokes. Data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are, however, limited and less promising, with currently no confirmation that vitamin D reduces stroke incidence. Whereas some RCTs suggest that vitamin D supplementation might modestly reduce blood pressure, this has not been consistently observed in all studies. It is, therefore, premature to recommend vitamin D supplementation for the prevention and treatment of arterial hypertension and stroke. Nevertheless, the fact that patients with arterial hypertension and cerebrovascular disease are at a relatively high risk of vitamin D deficiency, and therewith associated musculoskeletal diseases can serve as a rationale for the evaluation, prevention and treatment of vitamin D deficiency in these patients.

  18. Management of Extracranial Carotid Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Yinn Cher

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death in developed nations. Up to 88% of strokes are ischemic in nature. Extracranial carotid artery atherosclerotic disease is the third leading cause of ischemic stroke in the general population and the second most common non-traumatic cause among adults <45 years of age. The aim of this paper is to provide comprehensive, evidence-based recommendations for the management of extracranial atherosclerotic disease, including imaging for screening and diagnosis, medical management and interventional management. PMID:25439328

  19. Echocardiographic evaluation of coronary arteries in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Freire, Grace; Miller, Michelle S

    2015-12-01

    Among populations of patients with the congenital heart disease, there is considerable diversity in the anatomy of the coronary arteries. Understanding these anatomical differences is vitally important in directing interventions and surgical repair. In this report, the authors describe the echocardiographic evaluation of the variants of coronary artery anatomy in the following lesions: transposition of the great arteries, congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, double-inlet left ventricle, common arterial trunk, tetralogy of Fallot, and double-outlet right ventricle.

  20. Carotid artery longitudinal wall motion is associated with local blood velocity and left ventricular rotational, but not longitudinal, mechanics.

    PubMed

    Au, Jason S; Ditor, David S; MacDonald, Maureen J; Stöhr, Eric J

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have identified a predictable movement pattern of the common carotid artery wall in the longitudinal direction. While there is evidence that the magnitude of this carotid artery longitudinal wall motion (CALM) is sensitive to cardiovascular health status, little is known about the determinants of CALM The purpose of this integrative study was to evaluate the contribution of left ventricular (LV) cardiac motion and local blood velocity to CALM Simultaneous ultrasound measurements of CALM, common carotid artery mean blood velocity (MBV), and left ventricular motion were performed in ten young, healthy individuals (6 males; 22 ± 1 years). Peak anterograde CALM occurred at a similar time as peak MBV (18.57 ± 3.98% vs. 18.53 ± 2.81% cardiac cycle; t-test: P = 0.94; ICC: 0.79, P < 0.01). The timing of maximum retrograde CALM displacement was different, but related, to both peak apical (41.00 ± 7.81% vs. 35.33 ± 5.79% cardiac cycle; t-test: P < 0.01; ICC: 0.79, P < 0.01) and basal rotation (41.80 ± 6.12% vs. 37.30 ± 5.66% cardiac cycle; t-test: P < 0.01; ICC: 0.74, P < 0.01) with peak cardiac displacements preceding peak CALM displacements in both cases. The association between basal rotation and retrograde CALM was further supported by strong correlations between their peak magnitudes (r = -0.70, P = 0.02), whereas the magnitude of septal longitudinal displacement was not associated with peak CALM (r = 0.11, P = 0.77). These results suggest that the rotational mechanical movement of the LV base may be closely associated with longitudinal mechanics in the carotid artery. This finding may have important implications for interpreting the complex relationship between ventricular and vascular function.

  1. Genetics and Genomics of Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Pjanic, Milos; Miller, Clint L; Wirka, Robert; Kim, Juyong B; DiRenzo, Daniel M; Quertermous, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Coronary artery disease (or coronary heart disease), is the leading cause of mortality in many of the developing as well as the developed countries of the world. Cholesterol-enriched plaques in the heart's blood vessels combined with inflammation lead to the lesion expansion, narrowing of blood vessels, reduced blood flow, and may subsequently cause lesion rupture and a heart attack. Even though several environmental risk factors have been established, such as high LDL-cholesterol, diabetes, and high blood pressure, the underlying genetic composition may substantially modify the disease risk; hence, genome composition and gene-environment interactions may be critical for disease progression. Ongoing scientific efforts have seen substantial advancements related to the fields of genetics and genomics, with the major breakthroughs yet to come. As genomics is the most rapidly advancing field in the life sciences, it is important to present a comprehensive overview of current efforts. Here, we present a summary of various genetic and genomics assays and approaches applied to coronary artery disease research. PMID:27586139

  2. Adiposity, obesity, and arterial aging: longitudinal study of aortic stiffness in the Whitehall II cohort.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Eric J; Shipley, Martin J; Ahmadi-Abhari, Sara; Tabak, Adam G; McEniery, Carmel M; Wilkinson, Ian B; Marmot, Michael G; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Kivimaki, Mika

    2015-08-01

    We sought to determine whether adiposity in later midlife is an independent predictor of accelerated stiffening of the aorta. Whitehall II study participants (3789 men; 1383 women) underwent carotid-femoral applanation tonometry at the mean age of 66 and again 4 years later. General adiposity by body mass index, central adiposity by waist circumference and waist:hip ratio, and fat mass percent by body impedance were assessed 5 years before and at baseline. In linear mixed models adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, and mean arterial pressure, all adiposity measures were associated with aortic stiffening measured as increase in pulse wave velocity (PWV) between baseline and follow-up. The associations were similar in the metabolically healthy and unhealthy, according to Adult Treatment Panel-III criteria excluding waist circumference. C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 levels accounted for part of the longitudinal association between adiposity and PWV change. Adjusting for chronic disease, antihypertensive medication and risk factors, standardized effects of general and central adiposity and fat mass percent on PWV increase (m/s) were similar (0.14, 95% confidence interval: 0.05-0.24, P=0.003; 0.17, 0.08-0.27, P<0.001; 0.14, 0.05-0.22, P=0.002, respectively). Previous adiposity was associated with aortic stiffening independent of change in adiposity, glycaemia, and lipid levels across PWV assessments. We estimated that the body mass index-linked PWV increase will account for 12% of the projected increase in cardiovascular risk because of high body mass index. General and central adiposity in later midlife were strong independent predictors of aortic stiffening. Our findings suggest that adiposity is an important and potentially modifiable determinant of arterial aging. PMID:26056335

  3. [Atherosclerotic renal artery disease management update].

    PubMed

    Meier, Pascal; Haesler, Erik; Teta, Daniel; Qanadli, Salah Dine; Burnier, Michel

    2009-02-01

    In the case of atherosclerotic renal artery disease, the best conclusive results lie principally not in the degree of the stenosis but rather in the degree the renal parenchymal disease beyond the stenosis itself. These determining factors involve the controlling of the patients blood pressure, the improvement in the renal function and the beneficial results to the cardiovascular system. Besides the indispensable medical treatment, a revascularisation by angioplasty may be indicated. This procedure with or without vascular stent often allows satisfactory angiographic results. A treatment by surgical revascularisation is only recommended in the case of extensive atherosclerotic lesions of the aorta, complex lesions of the latter or an abdominal aortic aneurism. Although the frequency of restenosis of angioplasty with stent remains extremely low, the risk of cholesterol emboli due to the diffuse atherosclerotic lesions of the abdominal aorta, must be considered at the time of each aortic catheterization. The therapeutic approach of atherosclerotic renal artery disease must be dictated by the whole cardiovascular risk factors and by the threat of target organs. The control of the blood pressure and the maintenance of the renal function must be integrated in the decisional algorithm as well as the possible risks in carrying out an eventual revascularisation procedure. Finally, the renal angioplasty should in numerous situations be integrated in the overall assumption of responsibility of the atherosclerotic vascular diseases, and should be part of the medical treatment. Several questions still do exist; at what moment an atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis should and e considered critical, and which procedure should be considered for which patient? The purpose of this review is to propose a decisional tool for individualized treatments in the light of results from randomized and controlled studies. PMID:18815087

  4. [Atherosclerotic renal artery disease management update].

    PubMed

    Meier, Pascal; Haesler, Erik; Teta, Daniel; Qanadli, Salah Dine; Burnier, Michel

    2009-02-01

    In the case of atherosclerotic renal artery disease, the best conclusive results lie principally not in the degree of the stenosis but rather in the degree the renal parenchymal disease beyond the stenosis itself. These determining factors involve the controlling of the patients blood pressure, the improvement in the renal function and the beneficial results to the cardiovascular system. Besides the indispensable medical treatment, a revascularisation by angioplasty may be indicated. This procedure with or without vascular stent often allows satisfactory angiographic results. A treatment by surgical revascularisation is only recommended in the case of extensive atherosclerotic lesions of the aorta, complex lesions of the latter or an abdominal aortic aneurism. Although the frequency of restenosis of angioplasty with stent remains extremely low, the risk of cholesterol emboli due to the diffuse atherosclerotic lesions of the abdominal aorta, must be considered at the time of each aortic catheterization. The therapeutic approach of atherosclerotic renal artery disease must be dictated by the whole cardiovascular risk factors and by the threat of target organs. The control of the blood pressure and the maintenance of the renal function must be integrated in the decisional algorithm as well as the possible risks in carrying out an eventual revascularisation procedure. Finally, the renal angioplasty should in numerous situations be integrated in the overall assumption of responsibility of the atherosclerotic vascular diseases, and should be part of the medical treatment. Several questions still do exist; at what moment an atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis should and e considered critical, and which procedure should be considered for which patient? The purpose of this review is to propose a decisional tool for individualized treatments in the light of results from randomized and controlled studies.

  5. An Update on Coronary Artery Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Covic, Adrian; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Despite the improvements in diagnostic tools and medical applications, cardiovascular diseases (CVD), especially coronary artery disease (CAD), remain the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The main factors for the heightened risk in this population, beside advanced age and a high proportion of diabetes and hypertension, are malnutrition, chronic inflammation, accelerated atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction, coronary artery calcification, left ventricular structural and functional abnormalities, and bone mineral disorders. Chronic kidney disease is now recognized as an independent risk factor for CAD. In community-based studies, decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and proteinuria were both found to be independently associated with CAD. This paper will discuss classical and recent epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, and clinical aspects of CAD in CKD patients. PMID:24734178

  6. Clinical outcomes of fractional flow reserve by computed tomographic angiography-guided diagnostic strategies vs. usual care in patients with suspected coronary artery disease: the prospective longitudinal trial of FFRCT: outcome and resource impacts study

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Pamela S.; Pontone, Gianluca; Hlatky, Mark A.; Patel, Manesh R.; Norgaard, Bjarne L.; Byrne, Robert A.; Curzen, Nick; Purcell, Ian; Gutberlet, Matthias; Rioufol, Gilles; Hink, Ulrich; Schuchlenz, Herwig Walter; Feuchtner, Gudrun; Gilard, Martine; Andreini, Daniele; Jensen, Jesper M.; Hadamitzky, Martin; Chiswell, Karen; Cyr, Derek; Wilk, Alan; Wang, Furong; Rogers, Campbell; De Bruyne, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Aims In symptomatic patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD), computed tomographic angiography (CTA) improves patient selection for invasive coronary angiography (ICA) compared with functional testing. The impact of measuring fractional flow reserve by CTA (FFRCT) is unknown. Methods and results At 11 sites, 584 patients with new onset chest pain were prospectively assigned to receive either usual testing (n = 287) or CTA/FFRCT (n = 297). Test interpretation and care decisions were made by the clinical care team. The primary endpoint was the percentage of those with planned ICA in whom no significant obstructive CAD (no stenosis ≥50% by core laboratory quantitative analysis or invasive FFR < 0.80) was found at ICA within 90 days. Secondary endpoints including death, myocardial infarction, and unplanned revascularization were independently and blindly adjudicated. Subjects averaged 61 ± 11 years of age, 40% were female, and the mean pre-test probability of obstructive CAD was 49 ± 17%. Among those with intended ICA (FFRCT-guided = 193; usual care = 187), no obstructive CAD was found at ICA in 24 (12%) in the CTA/FFRCT arm and 137 (73%) in the usual care arm (risk difference 61%, 95% confidence interval 53–69, P< 0.0001), with similar mean cumulative radiation exposure (9.9 vs. 9.4 mSv, P = 0.20). Invasive coronary angiography was cancelled in 61% after receiving CTA/FFRCT results. Among those with intended non-invasive testing, the rates of finding no obstructive CAD at ICA were 13% (CTA/FFRCT) and 6% (usual care; P = 0.95). Clinical event rates within 90 days were low in usual care and CTA/FFRCT arms. Conclusions Computed tomographic angiography/fractional flow reserve by CTA was a feasible and safe alternative to ICA and was associated with a significantly lower rate of invasive angiography showing no obstructive CAD. PMID:26330417

  7. Longitudinal Evaluation of Segmental Arterial Mediolysis in Splanchnic Arteries: Case Series and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Min, Sang-il; Han, Ahram; Choi, Chanjoong; Min, Seung-Kee; Ha, Jongwon

    2016-01-01

    Background Segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM) is a rare non-atherosclerotic, non-inflammatory vascular disorder varying widely in clinical course. The purpose of this study is to analyze detailing clinical and imaging manifestations over time in patients with SAM through a literature review and to suggest an optimal management strategy. Methods A retrospective review of eight consecutive patients diagnosed with SAM between January, 2000 and January, 2012 was conducted. All presented with acute-onset abdominal or flank pain. Clinical features, imaging studies, and laboratory findings served as grounds for diagnosis, having excluded more common conditions (ie, fibromuscular dysplasia, collagen vascular disorders, or arteritis). CT angiography was done initially and repeated periodically (Week 1, Month 3, then yearly). Treatment was conservative, utilizing endovascular intervention as warranted by CT diagnostics. In a related systematic review, all English literature from 1976 to 2015 was screened via the PubMed database, assessing patient demographics, affected arteries, clinical presentations, and treatment methods. Findings Ultimately, 25 arterial lesions identified in eight patients (median age, 62.8 years; range, 40–84 years) were monitored for a median period of 26 months (range, 15–57 months). At baseline, celiac axis (3/8, 37.5%), superior mesenteric (4/8, 50%), and common hepatic (2/8, 25%) arteries were involved, in addition to isolated lesions of right renal, splenic, right colic, middle colic, gastroduodenal, left gastric, right gastroepiploic, proper hepatic, right hepatic, and left hepatic arteries. Compared with prior publications, celiac axis and superior mesenteric artery were more commonly affected in cohort. Arterial dissections (n = 8), aneurysms (n = 5), stenoses or occlusions (n = 4), and a single pseudoaneurysm were documented. Despite careful conservative management, new splanchnic arterial lesions (n = 4) arose during follow

  8. Unusual Systemic Artery to Pulmonary Artery Malformation Without Evidence of Systemic Disease, Trauma or Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Geyik, Serdar; Yavuz, Kivilcim; Keller, Frederick S.

    2006-10-15

    Connections between the systemic and pulmonary arterial systems are rare conditions that can be due to either congenital or acquired diseases such as anomalous systemic arterial supply to normal lung, pulmonary sequestration, and systemic supply to pulmonary arteriovenous malformations. Herein, a unique case of systemic artery to pulmonary arterial malformation and its endovascular treatment in a patient with no history of the usual etiologies is reported.

  9. Mechanisms linking nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Nseir, W; Shalata, A; Marmor, A; Assy, N

    2011-12-01

    The most common cause of death in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is coronary artery disease (CAD), not chronic liver disease. Fatty liver increases cardiovascular risk by classical (dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes) and by less conventional mechanisms. Common pathways involved in the pathogenesis of fatty liver and CAD includes hepatic insulin resistance and sub clinical inflammation. The hepatic insulin resistance state of fatty liver infiltration is characterized by increased FFA, which causes lipotoxicity and impairs endothelium-dependent vasodilatation, increases oxidative stress, and has a cardio toxic effect. Additional metabolic risk factors include leptin, adiponectin, pro inflammatory cytokines [such as IL-6, C-reactive protein and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1)], which together lead to increased oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, finally promoting coronary artery disease (CAD). When classical risk factors are superimposed on fatty liver accumulation, they may further increase the new metabolic risk factors, exacerbating CAD. The clinical implication is that patients with NAFLD are at higher risk (steatohepatitis, diabetes, obesity, atherogenic dyslipidemia) and should undergo periodic cardiovascular risk assessment including the Framingham score, cardiac effort test, and measurement of intimae-media thickening of the carotids arteries. This may improve risk stratification for CAD. PMID:21655948

  10. Motexafin lutetium in graft coronary artery disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodburn, Kathryn W.; Rodriquez, Shari L.; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Hayase, Motoya; Robbins, Robert C.; Kessel, David

    2000-03-01

    Graft coronary artery disease (GCAD) is the chief complication following cardiac transplantation. Presently, there are limited treatment options. Insights into more expedient diagnosis and amelioration, if only partially, of GCAD are fervently sought. The selectivity of Antrin Injection (Lu-Tex) with subsequent photoactivation has been evaluated in several preclinical atherosclerosis models. The inhibitory effect of Lu-Tex induced photosensitization was demonstrated with human bypass coronary smooth muscle cells. The biodistribution of Lu-Tex was evaluated in a rat model of heterotopic cardiac allografts 60 days following transplantation. Lu-Tex was retained in the cardiac allograft, exhibiting a five-fold increase in retention between the allograft and native heart. These findings lead us to suggest that further studies are warranted to ascertain the merits of Lu-Tex for the diagnosis and possible attenuation of chronic graft vascular disease.

  11. Digital ischemia: angiographic differentiation of embolism from primary arterial disease

    SciTech Connect

    Maiman, M.H.; Bookstein, J.J.; Bernstein, E.F.

    1981-12-01

    Embolic disease is often overlooked as a cause of digital ischemia. Unilateral symptoms, in particular, should suggest the possibility of emboli arising from the subclavian or more distal upper extremity vessels. Emboli may originate in the subclavian artery as the result of atherosclerosis at its origin or arterial injury secondary to thoracic outlet compression. Arteriography can be useful in the identification of upper extremity emboli and their source, and should include studies of the aortic, arch, proximal subclavian artery, and digital arteries. Retrograde subclavian injections may be required to adequately demonstrate the origin of the subclavian artery. Magnification technique is often essential in differentiating small digital artery emboli from primary arterial diseases, such as Buerger disease or scleroderma.

  12. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Cicchitto, Gaetano; Musella, Valentina; Acitorio, Maria; Capuano, Nicola; Fiorenzano, Giuseppe; Owen, Caroline A; Polverino, Mario; Polverino, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is defined as a chronic fibrosing interstitial disease of unknown cause, limited to the lungs, and associated with the histopathologic and/or radiologic pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP); it generally progresses into respiratory failure and death. Although progression of the disease is the most common cause of death, there are increasing reports of its association with other pathologies has been reported: e.g., IPF patients seem more susceptible to cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, other pathologies might also influence the natural course. In this paper, we describe a case of IPF and coronary artery disease (CAD). We emphasize the importance of cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) as a useful procedure to monitor disease progression in IPF patients. We also stress the importance of a careful analysis of variables measured for an accurate interpretation of the clinical picture and an improvement of the clinical management of patients. Moreover, we suggest that a careful assessment of CPET parameters may additionally help in the early detection of high cardiovascular ischemic risk.

  13. Regional flux analysis of longitudinal atrophy in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, Marco; Ayache, Nicholas; Xavier, Pennec

    2012-01-01

    The longitudinal analysis of the brain morphology in Alzheimer's disease(AD) is fundamental for understanding and quantifying the dynamics of the pathology. This study provides a new measure of the brain longitudinal changes based on the Helmholtz decomposition of deformation fields. We used the scalar pressure map associated to the irrotational component in order to identify a consistent group-wise set of areas of maximal volume change. The atrophy was then quantified in these areas for each subject by the probabilistic integration of the flux of the longitudinal deformations across the boundaries. The presented framework unifies voxel-based and regional approaches, and robustly describes the longitudinal atrophy at group level as a spatial process governed by consistently defined regions. Our experiments showed that the resulting regional flux analysis is able to detect the differential atrophy patterns across populations, and leads to precise and statistically powered quantifications of the longitudinal changes in AD, even in mild/premorbid cases.

  14. Gene Therapy Techniques for Peripheral Arterial Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Manninen, Hannu I.; Maekinen, Kimmo

    2002-03-15

    Somatic gene therapy is the introduction of new genetic material into selective somatic cells with resulting therapeutic benefits. Vascular wall and, subsequently, cardiovascular diseases have become an interesting target for gene therapy studies.Arteries are an attractive target for gene therapy since vascular interventions, both open surgical and endovascular, are well suited for minimally invasive, easily monitored gene delivery. Promising therapeutic effects have been obtained in animal models in preventing post-angioplasty restenosis and vein graft thickening, as well as increasing blood flow and collateral development in ischemic limbs.First clinical trials suggest a beneficial effect of vascular endothelial growth factor in achieving therapeutic angiogenesis in chronic limb ischemia and the efficacy of decoy oligonucleotides to prevent infrainguinal vein graft stenosis. However, further studies are mandatory to clarify the safety issues, to develop better gene delivery vectors and delivery catheters, to improve transgene expression, as well as to find the most effective and safe treatment genes.

  15. Coronary artery disease in Bangladesh: A review

    PubMed Central

    Islam, A.K.M. Monwarul; Majumder, A.A.S.

    2013-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is an increasingly important medical and public health problem, and is the leading cause of mortality in Bangladesh. Like other South Asians, Bangladeshis are unduly prone to develop CAD, which is often premature in onset, follows a rapidly progressive course and angiographically more severe. The underlying pathophysiology is poorly understood. Genetic predisposition, high prevalence of metabolic syndrome and conventional risk factors play important role. Lifestyle related factors, including poor dietary habits, excess saturated and trans fat, high salt intake, and low-level physical activity may be important as well. Some novel risk factors, including hypovitaminosis D, arsenic contamination in water and food-stuff, particulate matter air pollution may play unique role. At the advent of the new millennium, we know little about our real situation. Largescale epidemiological, genetic and clinical researches are needed to explore the different aspects of CAD in Bangladesh. PMID:23993003

  16. Hormones and arterial stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gungor, Ozkan; Kircelli, Fatih; Voroneanu, Luminita; Covic, Adrian; Ok, Ercan

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease constitutes the major cause of mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. Arterial stiffness is an important contributor to the occurrence and progression of cardiovascular disease. Various risk factors, including altered hormone levels, have been suggested to be associated with arterial stiffness. Based on the background that chronic kidney disease predisposes individuals to a wide range of hormonal changes, we herein review the available data on the association between arterial stiffness and hormones in patients with chronic kidney disease and summarize the data for the general population.

  17. Sex Differences in Predictors of Longitudinal Changes in Carotid Artery Stiffness: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Rebecca; Tattersall, Matthew C.; Gepner, Adam D.; Korcarz, Claudia E.; Kaufman, Joel; Colangelo, Laura A.; Liu, Kiang; Stein, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify sex differences in predictors of longitudinal changes in carotid arterial stiffness in a multi-ethnic cohort. Approach and Results Carotid artery distensibility coefficient (DC) and Young's Elastic Modulus (YEM) were measured in 2650 Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis participants (45-84 years old and free of cardiovascular disease) at baseline and after a mean of 9.4 years. Predictors of changes in DC and YEM for each sex were evaluated using multivariable linear regression models. The 1236 men (46.6%) were 60.0 (standard deviation 9.3) years; 40% were White, 22% Black, 16% Chinese, and 22% Hispanic. The 1414 (53.4%) women were 59.8 (9.4) years old with a similar race distribution. Despite similar rates of change in DC and YEM, predictors of changes in distensibility markers differed by sex. In men, Chinese (p=0.002) and Black (p=0.003) race/ethnicity, systolic blood pressure (p=0.012), and diabetes mellitus (p=0.05) were associated with more rapidly decreasing DC (accelerated stiffening). Starting antihypertensive medication was associated with improved DC (p=0.03); stopping anti-hypertensives was associated with more rapid stiffening (increased YEM, p=0.05). In women, higher education was associated with slower stiffening (DC p=0.041; YEM p<0.001) as was use of lipid-lowering medication (p=0.03), whereas baseline use of antihypertensive medications (YEM p=0.01) and systolic blood pressure (DC p=0.02; p=0.04) predicted increasing stiffening in women. Conclusions Longitudinal changes in carotid artery stiffness are associated with systolic blood pressure and antihypertensive therapy in both sexes; however, race/ethnicity (in men) and level of education (in women) may have different contributions between the sexes. PMID:25477347

  18. Surgical intervention for peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Vartanian, Shant M; Conte, Michael S

    2015-04-24

    The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is increasing worldwide, with recent global estimates exceeding 200 million people. Advanced PAD leads to a decline in ambulatory function and diminished quality of life. In its most severe form, critical limb ischemia, rest pain, and tissue necrosis are associated with high rates of limb loss, morbidity, and mortality. Revascularization of the limb plays a central role in the management of symptomatic PAD. Concomitant with advances in the pathogenesis, genetics, and medical management of PAD during the last 20 years, there has been an ongoing evolution of revascularization options. The increasing application of endovascular techniques has resulted in dramatic changes in practice patterns and has refocused the question of which patients should be offered surgical revascularization. Nonetheless, surgical therapy remains a cornerstone of management for advanced PAD, providing versatile and durable solutions to challenging patterns of disease. Although there is little high-quality comparative effectiveness data to guide patient selection, existing evidence suggests that outcomes are dependent on definable patient factors such as distribution of disease, status of the limb, comorbid conditions, and conduit availability. As it stands, surgical revascularization remains the standard against which emerging percutaneous techniques are compared. This review summarizes the principles of surgical revascularization, patient selection, and expected outcomes, while highlighting areas in need of further research and technological advancement.

  19. ABSORB: Postmarketing Surveillance Registry to Monitor the Everolimus-eluting Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffold in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-20

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Artery Disease; Myocardial Ischemia; Coronary Disease; Coronary Restenosis; Heart Diseases; Coronary Stenosis; Arteriosclerosis; Arterial Occlusive Diseases; Vascular Diseases

  20. Endovascular Intervention for Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thukkani, Arun K.; Kinlay, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Advances in endovascular therapies during the past decade have broadened the options for treating peripheral vascular disease percutaneously. Endovascular treatment offers a lower risk alternative to open surgery in many patients with multiple comorbidities. Noninvasive physiological tests and arterial imaging precede an endovascular intervention and help localize the disease and plan the procedure. The timing and need for revascularization are broadly related to the 3 main clinical presentations of claudication, critical limb ischemia, and acute limb ischemia. Many patients with claudication can be treated by exercise and medical therapy. Endovascular procedures are considered when these fail to improve quality of life and function. In contrast, critical limb ischemia and acute limb ischemia threaten the limb and require more urgent revascularization. In general, endovascular treatments have greater long-term durability for aortoiliac disease than femoral popliteal disease. Infrapopliteal revascularization is generally reserved for critical and acute limb ischemia. Balloon angioplasty and stenting are the mainstays of endovascular therapy. New well-tested innovations include drug-eluting stents and drug-coated balloons. Adjunctive devices for crossing chronic total occlusions or debulking plaque with atherectomy are less rigorously studied and have niche roles. Patients receiving endovascular procedures need a structured surveillance plan for follow-up care. This includes intensive treatment of cardiovascular risk factors to prevent myocardial infarction and stroke, which are the main causes of death. Limb surveillance aims to identify restenosis and new disease beyond the intervened segments, both of which may jeopardize patency and lead to recurrent symptoms, functional impairment, or a threatened limb. PMID:25908731

  1. Total Arterial Revascularization: Bypassing Antiquated Notions to Better Alternatives for Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Samak, Mostafa; Fatullayev, Javid; Sabashnikov, Anton; Zeriouh, Mohamed; Schmack, Bastian; Ruhparwar, Arjang; Karck, Matthias; Popov, Aron-Frederik; Dohmen, Pascal M.; Weymann, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Total arterial revascularization is the leading trend in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) for the treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD). Adding to its superiority to vein conduits, arteries allow for a high degree of versatility and long-term patency, while minimizing the need for reintervention. This is especially important for patients with multi-vessel coronary artery disease, as well as young patients. However, arterial revascularization has come a long way before being widely appreciated, with some yet unresolved debates, and advances that never cease to impress. In this review, we discuss the evolution of this surgical technique and its clinical success, as well as its most conspicuous limitations in light of accumulated published date from decades of experience. PMID:27698339

  2. Exercise Training and Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Tara L.; Lloyd, Pamela G.; Yang, Hsiao-Tung; Terjung, Ronald L.

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a common vascular disease that reduces blood flow capacity to the legs of patients. PAD leads to exercise intolerance that can progress in severity to greatly limit mobility, and in advanced cases leads to frank ischemia with pain at rest. It is estimated that 12–15 million people in the United States are diagnosed with PAD, with a much larger population that is undiagnosed. The presence of PAD predicts a 50–1500% increase in morbidity and mortality, depending on severity. Treatment of patients with PAD is limited to modification of cardiovascular disease risk factors, pharmacological intervention, surgery, and exercise therapy. Extended exercise programs that involve walking ~5 times/wk, at a significant intensity that requires frequent rest periods, are most significant. Pre-clinical studies and virtually all clinical trials demonstrate the benefits of exercise therapy, including: improved walking tolerance, modified inflammatory/hemostatic markers, enhanced vasoresponsiveness, adaptations within the limb (angiogenesis, arteriogenesis, mitochondrial synthesis) that enhance oxygen delivery and metabolic responses, potentially delayed progression of the disease, enhanced quality of life indices, and extended longevity. A synthesis is provided as to how these adaptations can develop in the context of our current state of knowledge and events known to be orchestrated by exercise. The benefits are so compelling that exercise prescription should be an essential option presented to patients with PAD in the absence of contraindications. Obviously, selecting for a life style pattern, that includes enhanced physical activity prior to the advance of PAD limitations, is the most desirable and beneficial. PMID:23720270

  3. Carotid artery disease following external cervical irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Elerding, S C; Fernandez, R N; Grotta, J C; Lindberg, R D; Causay, L C; McMurtrey, M J

    1981-01-01

    A retrospective study of 910 patients surviving at least five years after cervical irradiation for Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, or primary head an neck neoplasms showed the incidence of stroke following cervical irradiation was 63 of 910 patients (6.3%) during a mean period of observation of nine years. This represents a trend toward an increased risk for this population observed over the same period of time (p = 0.39). A prospective study of 118 similar patients currently living five years after cervical radiotherapy was performed to determine the incidence of carotid artery disease occurring as a consequence of neck irradiation. Abnormal carotid phonangiograms (CPA) were found in 25% of the patients and abnormal oculoplethysmographs (OPG) were found in 17%. These studies represent significant carotid lesions that are not expected in such a population. It is concluded that the carotid stenoses demonstrated are most likely a consequence of prior irradiation. Patients that are five-year survivors of cervical irradiation should have noninvasive vascular laboratory studies performed as part of their routine follow-up examinations in order to detect these carotid lesions while they are occult. PMID:7294930

  4. Mendelian randomization studies in coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Henning; Samani, Nilesh J; Schunkert, Heribert

    2014-08-01

    Epidemiological research over the last 50 years has discovered a plethora of biomarkers (including molecules, traits or other diseases) that associate with coronary artery disease (CAD) risk. Even the strongest association detected in such observational research precludes drawing conclusions about the causality underlying the relationship between biomarker and disease. Mendelian randomization (MR) studies can shed light on the causality of associations, i.e whether, on the one hand, the biomarker contributes to the development of disease or, on the other hand, the observed association is confounded by unrecognized exogenous factors or due to reverse causation, i.e. due to the fact that prevalent disease affects the level of the biomarker. However, conclusions from a MR study are based on a number of important assumptions. A prerequisite for such studies is that the genetic variant employed affects significantly the biomarker under investigation but has no effect on other phenotypes that might confound the association between the biomarker and disease. If this biomarker is a true causal risk factor for CAD, genotypes of the variant should associate with CAD risk in the direction predicted by the association of the biomarker with CAD. Given a random distribution of exogenous factors in individuals carrying respective genotypes, groups represented by the genotypes are highly similar except for the biomarker of interest. Thus, the genetic variant converts into an unconfounded surrogate of the respective biomarker. This scenario is nicely exemplified for LDL cholesterol. Almost every genotype found to increase LDL cholesterol level by a sufficient amount has also been found to increase CAD risk. Pending a number of conditions that needed to be fulfilled by the genetic variant under investigation (e.g. no pleiotropic effects) and the experimental set-up of the study, LDL cholesterol can be assumed to act as the functional component that links genotypes and CAD risk and

  5. Anterior cerebral artery velocity changes in disease of the middle cerebral artery stem.

    PubMed

    Brass, L M; Duterte, D L; Mohr, J P

    1989-12-01

    Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography can map the changes in blood velocity that result from stenosis or occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. To evaluate patterns of collateral blood flow in disease of the middle cerebral artery stem, we used both cerebral angiography and transcranial Doppler ultrasonography to study the systolic blood velocities in both anterior cerebral arteries in 10 consecutive patients with middle cerebral artery stenosis or occlusion. Five patients had no evidence of hemodynamically significant carotid disease and good-quality measurements of systolic velocity in each anterior cerebral artery. Two of the five patients had middle cerebral artery stem stenosis and the other three had occlusion. The ratios of mean blood velocity in the normal compared with the abnormal side for the five patients (mean 1.34 +/- 0.23, range 1.15-1.74) were significantly higher than ratios for 10 controls (mean 1.04 +/- 0.12, range 0.76 +/- 1.19) using an unpaired t test (t = 3.492, 0.0005 less than p less than 0.005). Our results suggest that transcranial Doppler ultrasound measurements of anterior cerebral artery blood velocity may be a useful index of collateral blood flow from the anterior cerebral artery territory into the middle cerebral artery territory. Changes in mean velocity ratio may document the evolution and adequacy of collateral blood flow over the cerebral convexity in middle cerebral artery stem disease. In addition, the changes in anterior cerebral artery blood velocity appear to be an important corroborative finding for middle cerebral artery stem occlusion. PMID:2688197

  6. [Aftermaths of lesions of coronary arteries in Kawasaki disease].

    PubMed

    Vostokova, A A; Grunina, E A; Klemenov, A V

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease, also known as cutaneous-mucous-glandular mucocutaneous glandular syndrome, is acute systemic vasculitis of small-to-medium calibre arteries, frequently involving coronary arteries, affect almost exceptionally children, with reports concerning cases of Kawasaki syndrome in 20-to-30-year-old adults being extremely rare. The most serious manifestation of Kawasaki disease is coronaritis and formation of coronary artery aneurysms. The dynamics of the formed coronary aneurysms and, consequently, the fate of patients may be different. Thrombosis of an aneurysm in the early period of the disease and stenosing of the affected coronary artery later on present possible complications of Kawasaki disease and potential causes of myocardial infection in young adults. Increased risk of coronary artery thromboses in Kawasaki disease is conditioned by a decrease in velocity of blood flow and its turbulent pattern in the aneurysms, endothelial dysfunction due to currently existing or endured coronaritis and thrombocytosis typical of this pathology. Predisposing factors of coronary artery stenosing are unfavourable haemodynamic conditions appearing at the sites of the "entry" and "exit" of the aneurysm. Described herein are two case reports of myocardial infarction, one of which being a complication of an acute case of Kawasaki disease in a 29-year-old patient, with the second one being a consequence of coronary artery stenosing in a 25-year-old patient who had endured Kawasaki disease in his childhood.

  7. Atrophic gastritis is associated with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Senmaru, Takafumi; Fukui, Michiaki; Tanaka, Muhei; Kuroda, Masaaki; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Oda, Yohei; Naito, Yuji; Hasegawa, Goji; Toda, Hitoshi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Nakamura, Naoto

    2012-07-01

    Atrophic gastritis is characterized by chronic inflammation of gastric mucosa by Helicobacter pylori infection and other factors. Helicobacter pylori infection has been linked to coronary artery disease. To our knowledge, however, no reports are available on the relationship between atrophic gastritis and coronary artery disease. In this study, we investigated the relationship between atrophic gastritis, which is diagnosed based on serum pepsinogen levels (pepsinogen I ≤ 70 ng/mL and pepsinogen I/II ratio ≤ 3.0), and the prevalence of coronary artery disease in general Japanese population. Among 2,633 study subjects, 531 subjects (20.2%) were diagnosed as atrophic gastritis. The prevalence of coronary artery disease was higher in the atrophic gastritis-positive group than that in the atrophic gastritis-negative group (5.8% vs 2.8%, p = 0.0005). Multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated that atrophic gastritis was independently associated with coronary artery disease (odds ratio, 1.67; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-2.72), after adjustment for age, sex, obesity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, hyperuricemia, and habits of smoking and drinking. These results suggest that atrophic gastritis is an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease. Chronic inflammation of gastric mucosa may be associated with the prevalence of coronary artery disease.

  8. "Obesity paradox" in coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Akin, Ibrahim; Nienaber, Christoph A

    2015-10-26

    Obesity used to be among the more neglected public health problems, but has unfolded as a growing medical and socioeconomic burden of epidemic proportions. Morbid obesity is linked to traditional cardiovascular risk factors like, hypertension, hyperlipidemia and diabetes, and suspected to incur increased morbidity and mortality in the Western and even third world populations. This patient cohort is also at greater risk to develop coronary artery disease. Recent population-based registries revealed that 43% and 24% of all cases of coronary revascularization were carried out in overweight and obese patients, respectively. However, despite evidence of a positive correlation between obesity and increased cardiovascular morbidity, some authors have described a better clinical outcome in overweight and obese patients, a phenomenon they coined "obesity paradoxon". Thus, there is an ongoing debate in light of conflicting data and the possibility of confounding bias causing misconception and challenging the "obesity paradox". In this review article we present the current evidence and throughly discuss the validity of the "obesity paradoxon" in a variety of clinical settings.

  9. Suppression of ischemia in arterial occlusive disease by JNK-promoted native collateral artery development

    PubMed Central

    Ramo, Kasmir; Sugamura, Koichi; Craige, Siobhan; Keaney, John F; Davis, Roger J

    2016-01-01

    Arterial occlusive diseases are major causes of morbidity and mortality. Blood flow to the affected tissue must be restored quickly if viability and function are to be preserved. We report that disruption of the mixed-lineage protein kinase (MLK) - cJun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway in endothelial cells causes severe blockade of blood flow and failure to recover in the murine femoral artery ligation model of hindlimb ischemia. We show that the MLK-JNK pathway is required for the formation of native collateral arteries that can restore circulation following arterial occlusion. Disruption of the MLK-JNK pathway causes decreased Dll4/Notch signaling, excessive sprouting angiogenesis, and defects in developmental vascular morphogenesis. Our analysis demonstrates that the MLK-JNK signaling pathway is a key regulatory mechanism that protects against ischemia in arterial occlusive disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18414.001 PMID:27504807

  10. Peripheral arterial disease and revascularization of the diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Forsythe, R O; Brownrigg, J; Hinchliffe, R J

    2015-05-01

    Diabetes is a complex disease with many serious potential sequelae, including large vessel arterial disease and microvascular dysfunction. Peripheral arterial disease is a common large vessel complication of diabetes, implicated in the development of tissue loss in up to half of patients with diabetic foot ulceration. In addition to peripheral arterial disease, functional changes in the microcirculation also contribute to the development of a diabetic foot ulcer, along with other factors such as infection, oedema and abnormal biomechanical loading. Peripheral arterial disease typically affects the distal vessels, resulting in multi-level occlusions and diffuse disease, which often necessitates challenging distal revascularisation surgery or angioplasty in order to improve blood flow. However, technically successful revascularisation does not always result in wound healing. The confounding effects of microvascular dysfunction must be recognised--treatment of a patient with a diabetic foot ulcer and peripheral arterial disease should address this complex interplay of pathophysiological changes. In the case of non-revascularisable peripheral arterial disease or poor response to conventional treatment, alternative approaches such as cell-based treatment, hyperbaric oxygen therapy and the use of vasodilators may appear attractive, however more robust evidence is required to justify these novel approaches.

  11. Skin autofluorescence is increased in patients with carotid artery stenosis and peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Noordzij, Marjon J; Lefrandt, Joop D; Loeffen, Erik A H; Saleem, Ben R; Meerwaldt, Robbert; Lutgers, Helen L; Smit, Andries J; Zeebregts, Clark J

    2012-02-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have a pivotal role in atherosclerosis. We evaluated skin autofluorescence (SAF), a non-invasive measurement of tissue AGE accumulation, in patients with carotid artery stenosis with and without coexisting peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD). SAF was measured using the AGE Reader™ in 56 patients with carotid artery stenosis and in 56 age- and sex-matched healthy controls without diabetes, renal dysfunction or known atherosclerotic disease. SAF was higher in patients with carotid artery stenosis compared to the control group: mean 2.81 versus 2.46 (P = 0.002), but especially in the younger age group of 50-60 years old: mean 2.82 versus 1.94 (P = 0.000). Patients with carotid artery stenosis and PAOD proved to have an even higher SAF than patients with carotid artery stenosis only: mean 3.28 versus 2.66 (P = 0.003). Backward linear regression analysis showed that age, smoking, diabetes mellitus, renal function and the presence of PAOD were the determinants of SAF, but carotid artery stenosis was not. SAF is increased in patients with carotid artery stenosis and PAOD. The univariate and multivariate associations of SAF with age, smoking, diabetes, renal insufficiency and PAOD suggest that increased SAF can be seen as an indicator of widespread atherosclerosis. PMID:21336554

  12. Skin autofluorescence is increased in patients with carotid artery stenosis and peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Noordzij, Marjon J; Lefrandt, Joop D; Loeffen, Erik A H; Saleem, Ben R; Meerwaldt, Robbert; Lutgers, Helen L; Smit, Andries J; Zeebregts, Clark J

    2012-02-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have a pivotal role in atherosclerosis. We evaluated skin autofluorescence (SAF), a non-invasive measurement of tissue AGE accumulation, in patients with carotid artery stenosis with and without coexisting peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD). SAF was measured using the AGE Reader™ in 56 patients with carotid artery stenosis and in 56 age- and sex-matched healthy controls without diabetes, renal dysfunction or known atherosclerotic disease. SAF was higher in patients with carotid artery stenosis compared to the control group: mean 2.81 versus 2.46 (P = 0.002), but especially in the younger age group of 50-60 years old: mean 2.82 versus 1.94 (P = 0.000). Patients with carotid artery stenosis and PAOD proved to have an even higher SAF than patients with carotid artery stenosis only: mean 3.28 versus 2.66 (P = 0.003). Backward linear regression analysis showed that age, smoking, diabetes mellitus, renal function and the presence of PAOD were the determinants of SAF, but carotid artery stenosis was not. SAF is increased in patients with carotid artery stenosis and PAOD. The univariate and multivariate associations of SAF with age, smoking, diabetes, renal insufficiency and PAOD suggest that increased SAF can be seen as an indicator of widespread atherosclerosis.

  13. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Peripheral Arterial Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Peripheral Artery Disease? Many people ... flow, so the symptoms will go away. Other Signs and Symptoms Other signs and symptoms of P. ...

  14. How Is Carotid Artery Disease Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Links Related Topics Atherosclerosis Carotid Endarterectomy Carotid Ultrasound Stents Stroke Send a link to NHLBI to someone ... outward against the wall of the artery. A stent (a small mesh tube) is then put in ...

  15. How Is Peripheral Arterial Disease Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood flow to the affected limb. Angioplasty and Stent Placement Your doctor may recommend angioplasty to restore ... widens the artery and restores blood flow. A stent (a small mesh tube) may be placed in ...

  16. Metals in Urine and Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Navas-Acien, Ana; Silbergeld, Ellen K.; Sharrett, A. Richey; Calderon-Aranda, Emma; Selvin, Elizabeth; Guallar, Eliseo

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to metals may promote atherosclerosis. Blood cadmium and lead were associated with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in the 1999–2000 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). In the present study we evaluated the association between urinary levels of cadmium, lead, barium, cobalt, cesium, molybdenum, antimony, thallium, and tungsten with PAD in a cross-sectional analysis of 790 participants ≥40 years of age in NHANES 1999–2000. PAD was defined as a blood pressure ankle brachial index < 0.9 in at least one leg. Metals were measured in casual (spot) urine specimens by inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry. After multivariable adjustment, subjects with PAD had 36% higher levels of cadmium in urine and 49% higher levels of tungsten compared with noncases. The adjusted odds ratio for PAD comparing the 75th to the 25th percentile of the cadmium distribution was 3.05 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.97 to 9.58]; that for tungsten was 2.25 (95% CI, 0.97 to 5.24). PAD risk increased sharply at low levels of antimony and remained elevated beyond 0.1 μg/L. PAD was not associated with other metals. In conclusion, urinary cadmium, tungsten, and possibly antimony were associated with PAD in a representative sample of the U.S. population. For cadmium, these results strengthen previous findings using blood cadmium as a biomarker, and they support its role in atherosclerosis. For tungsten and antimony, these results need to be interpreted cautiously in the context of an exploratory analysis but deserve further study. Other metals in urine were not associated with PAD at the levels found in the general population. PMID:15687053

  17. Cystic Adventitial Disease of Popliteal Artery: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Meecham, Lewis; Wright, Anna; Atwal, Amarjit

    2016-03-01

    Cystic adventitial disease (CAD) is a rare cause of arterial stenosis. A total of 85% of cases are usually found in the popliteal artery. Men in their fourth and fifth decade are more commonly affected. If untreated the disease will progress eventually ending in occlusion of the affected vessel and limb-threatening ischemia. With this in mind an effective and long-lasting treatment is required, and here we present a case with CAD of the popliteal artery and discuss the merits of different treatment strategies.

  18. [Why screen for lung cancer in patients with arterial disease?].

    PubMed

    Lederlin, M; Trédaniel, J; Priollet, P

    2015-12-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death in France. Such a prognosis is explained by late diagnosis at a metastatic stage for half of the patients. Tobacco is the main risk factor for lung cancer, as it is for peripheral arterial disease. A review of literature shows that between 2.3% and 19% of patients with arterial disease also have lung cancer. When lung cancer is detected after treatment of arterial disease, it is at an advanced stage. But it can be diagnosed at an early stage when it is searched simultaneously with arterial disease treatment. There is no recommendation for lung cancer screening specifically for patients with arterial disease. However individual screening based on an annual low-dose chest scan is proposed for smokers meeting the criteria defined by the study of the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST). Such screening has two disadvantages : the high number of false positives and the irradiation induced by the accumulation of examinations. The ISET method would alternatively help to identify circulating tumor cells on a simple blood test for subjects not yet at solid tumor stage, provided this method be subject to multicentric validation. Thus one could consider that the management of a patient with arterial disease meeting NLST criteria should be accompanied with screening for lung cancer by searching for tumor cells associated with low-dose scanner.

  19. Longitudinal perspective on the conundrum of central arterial stiffness, blood pressure, and aging.

    PubMed

    Scuteri, Angelo; Morrell, Christopher H; Orrù, Marco; Strait, James B; Tarasov, Kirill V; Ferreli, Liana Anna Pina; Loi, Francesco; Pilia, Maria Grazia; Delitala, Alessandro; Spurgeon, Harold; Najjar, Samer S; AlGhatrif, Majd; Lakatta, Edward G

    2014-12-01

    The age-associated increase in arterial stiffness has long been considered to parallel or to cause the age-associated increase in blood pressure (BP). Yet, the rates at which pulse wave velocity (PWV), a measure of arterial stiffness, and BP trajectories change over time within individuals who differ by age and sex have not been assessed and compared. This study determined the evolution of BP and aortic PWV trajectories during a 9.4-year follow-up in >4000 community-dwelling men and women of 20 to 100 years of age at entry into the SardiNIA Study. Linear mixed effects model analyses revealed that PWV accelerates with time during the observation period, at about the same rate over the entire age range in both men and women. In men, the longitudinal rate at which BP changed over time, however, did not generally parallel that of PWV acceleration: at ages>40 years the rates of change in systolic BP (SBP) and pulse pressure (PP) increase plateaued and then declined so that SBP, itself, also declined at older ages, whereas PP plateaued. In women, SBP, diastolic BP, and mean BP increased at constant rates across all ages, producing an increasing rate of increase in PP. Therefore, increased aortic stiffness is implicated in the age-associated increase in SBP and PP. These findings indicate that PWV is not a surrogate for BP and that arterial properties other than arterial wall stiffness that vary by age and sex also modulate the BP trajectories during aging and lead to the dissociation of PWV, PP, and SBP trajectories in men.

  20. Diseased Region Detection of Longitudinal Knee MRI Data

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chao; Niethammer, Marc; Shan, Liang; Charles, Cecil; Zhu, Hongtu

    2013-01-01

    Statistical analysis of longitudinal cartilage changes in osteoarthritis (OA) is of great importance and still a challenge in knee MRI data analysis. A major challenge is to establish a reliable correspondence across subjects within the same latent subpopulations. We develop a novel Gaussian hidden Markov model (GHMM) to establish spatial correspondence of cartilage thinning across both time and subjects within the same latent subpopulations and make statistical inference on the detection of diseased regions in each OA patient. A hidden Markov random filed (HMRF) is proposed to extract such latent subpopulation structure. The EM algorithm and pseudo-likelihood method are both considered in making statistical inference. The proposed model can effectively detect diseased regions and present a localized analysis of longitudinal cartilage thickness within each latent subpopulation. Simulation studies and diseased regions detection of 2D thickness map extracted from full 3D longitudinal knee MRI Data for Pfizer Longitudinal Dataset are performed, which shows that our proposed model outperforms standard voxel-based analysis. PMID:24684005

  1. Diseased Region Detection of Longitudinal Knee Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chao; Shan, Liang; Charles, H. Cecil; Wirth, Wolfgang; Niethammer, Marc; Zhu, Hongtu

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important imaging technique for quantifying the spatial location and magnitude/direction of longitudinal cartilage morphology changes in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Although several analytical methods, such as subregion-based analysis, have been developed to refine and improve quantitative cartilage analyses, they can be suboptimal due to two major issues: the lack of spatial correspondence across subjects and time and the spatial heterogeneity of cartilage progression across subjects. The aim of this paper is to present a statistical method for longitudinal cartilage quantification in OA patients, while addressing these two issues. The 3D knee image data is preprocessed to establish spatial correspondence across subjects and/or time. Then, a Gaussian hidden Markov model (GHMM) is proposed to deal with the spatial heterogeneity of cartilage progression across both time and OA subjects. To estimate unknown parameters in GHMM, we employ a pseudo-likelihood function and optimize it by using an expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. The proposed model can effectively detect diseased regions in each OA subject and present a localized analysis of longitudinal cartilage thickness within each latent subpopulation. Our GHMM integrates the strengths of two standard statistical methods including the local subregion-based analysis and the ordered value approach. We use simulation studies and the Pfizer longitudinal knee MRI dataset to evaluate the finite sample performance of GHMM in the quantification of longitudinal cartilage morphology changes. Our results indicate that GHMM significantly outperforms several standard analytical methods. PMID:25823031

  2. [Arterial hypertension in gravidity - a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Kováčová, M; Kiňová, S

    2012-12-01

    Gravidity is a dynamic process and complications may occur at any stage and anytime during a thus far physiological gravidity. Such gravidity puts the mother, the foetus and, later, the newborn at a greater risk. The incidence of arterial hypertension is between 7 and 15% and is one of the 4 main causes of maternal and perinatal mortality. Cardiovascular stress test, such as gravidity, might help to identify women at a greater risk of cardiovascular diseases or with a subclinical vascular disease. Women with a history of preeclampsia are more likely to develop chronic arterial hypertension in the future either alone or associated with a cardiovascular disease. Arterial hypertension during gravidity should be considered as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases during later stages of maternal life. Prevention of cardiovascular diseases should be a life-long aspiration.

  3. Left atrial myxoma associated with obstructive coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg Odebrecht Curi; Kaufman, Renato; Correa, Gabriel Angelo de Cata Preta; Nascimento, César; Weitzel, Luiz Henrique; Reis, José Oscar Brito; da Rocha, Antônio Sérgio Cordeiro; da Cunha, Ademir Batista

    2007-01-01

    We describe a case of a 67 year-old patient with obstructive coronary artery disease that, in the preoperative survey for inguinal herniorraphy surgery, discovered, by a two-dimensional echocardiogram, a tumor in left atrium, mobile, non-obstructive. The patient underwent a cineangiocoronariography showing severe stenosis in the left anterior descending artery, moderate stenosis in the left circumflex artery, near the origin of the first marginal branch, and a non-obstructive plaque in the right coronary artery. There was also moderate left ventricular dysfunction. After that, the patient has gone coronary artery bypass surgery and resection of the left atrial tumor. The histological exam revealed that the tumor was, in fact, a myxoma. PMID:17364102

  4. The association of central retinal artery occlusion and extracranial carotid artery disease.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, D J; Schuler, J J; Buchbinder, D; Dillon, B C; Flanigan, D P

    1988-01-01

    To determine the incidence of associated carotid artery disease and the effect of carotid endarterectomy on subsequent neurologic sequelae, a retrospective study of 66 patients with central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) was undertaken. Ipsilateral extracranial carotid artery disease was present in 23 of 33 patients (70%) who had carotid arteriography. Sixteen patients had carotid endarterectomy following their CRAO (Group I) and 50 did not (Group II). Seven of the 40 patients available for follow-up in Group II had a subsequent stroke (mean follow-up: 54 months). Of the seven Group II patients shown to have associated carotid disease (Group IIs), three (43%) had a subsequent stroke during follow-up (mean: 28.3 months) compared to zero in Group I (p = 0.033; mean follow-up: 18.7 months). Because of the strong association between CRAO and ipsilateral carotid artery disease and because of the significantly higher incidence of subsequent ipsilateral stroke in CRAO patients with carotid disease who did not undergo endarterectomy, thorough evaluation of the carotid arteries followed by carotid endarterectomy, if indicated, is warranted in CRAO patients who have no other obvious etiology for the occlusion. PMID:3389947

  5. Incidence of coronary artery disease in patients with valvular heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, G W; Thomas, R D; Grimmer, S F; Silverton, P N; Smith, D R

    1980-01-01

    The case notes, cardiac catheterisation data, and coronary arteriograms of 239 patients investigated for valvular heart disease during a five year period were reviewed. Angina present in 13 of 95 patients with isolated mitral valve disease, 43 of 90 patients with isolated aortic valve disease, and 18 of 54 patients with combined mitral and aortic valve disease. Significant coronary artery disease was present in 85 per cent of patients with mitral valve disease and angina, but in only 33 per cent of patients with aortic valve disease and angina. Patients with no chest pain still had a high incidence of coronary artery disease, significant coronary obstruction being present in 22 per cent with mitral valve disease, 22 per cent with aortic valve disease, and 11 per cent with combine mitral and aortic valve disease. Several possible clinical markers of coronary artery disease were examined but none was found to be of practical help. There was, however, a significant inverse relation between severity of coronary artery disease and severity of valve disease in patients with aortic valve disease. Asymptomatic coronary artery disease is not uncommon in patients with valvular heart disease and if it is policy to perform coronary artery bypass grafting in such patients, routine coronary arteriography must be part of the preoperative investigation. PMID:7459146

  6. Coronary Artery Disease Risk Factors, Coronary Artery Calcification and Coronary Bypass Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ulusoy, Fatih Rifat; Ipek, Emrah; Korkmaz, Ali Fuat; Gurler, Mehmet Yavuz; Gulbaran, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Atherosclerosis is an intimal disease which affects large and medium size arteries including aorta and carotid, coronary, cerebral and radial arteries. Calcium accumulated in the coronary arterial plaques have substantial contribution to the plaque volume. The aim of our study is to investigate the relationship between coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors and coronary arterial calcification, and to delineate the importance of CACS in coronary artery bypass surgery. Materials and Methods The current study is retrospective and 410 patients admitted to our clinic with atypical chest pain and without known CAD were included. These individuals were evaluated by 16 slice electron beam computed tomography with suspicion of CAD and their calcium scores were calculated. Detailed demographic and medical history were obtained from all of the patients. Results In our study, we employed five different analyses using different coronary arterial calcification score (CACS) thresold levels reported in previous studies. All of the analyses, performed according to the previously defined thresold levels, showed that risk factors had strong positive relationship with CACS as mentioned in previous studies. Conclusion Coronary arterial calcification is part of the athero-sclerotic process and although it can be detected in atherosclerotic vessel, it is absent in a normal vessel. It can be concluded that the clinical scores, even they are helpful, have some limitations in a significant part of the population for cardiovascular risk determination. It is important for an anastomosis region to be noncalcified in coronary bypass surgery. In a coronary artery, it will be helpness for showing of calcific field and anostomosis spot. PMID:26155507

  7. Coronary Artery Disease Severity and Cardiovascular Biomarkers in Patients with Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Hikita, Hiroyuki; Shigeta, Takatoshi; Kimura, Shigeki; Takahashi, Atsushi; Isobe, Mitsuaki

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular mortality in peripheral artery disease (PAD) patients is higher in critical limb ischemia (CLI) than in intermittent claudication (IC). We sought to evaluate differential characteristics of coronary artery disease (CAD) severity and prognostic biomarkers for cardiovascular events between CLI and IC patients. Coronary angiography was performed on 242 PAD patients (age 73 ± 8 years) with either CLI or IC. High-sensitivity troponin T (hs-TnT), eicosapentaenoic acid-arachidonic acid ratio (EPA/AA), and lipoprotein(a), as biomarkers for prognostic factors, were measured from blood samples. The study patients were divided into a CLI-group (n = 42) and IC-group (n = 200). The Gensini score as an indicator of coronary angiographic severity was higher in the CLI-group than in the IC-group (39.1 ± 31.2 vs. 8.5 ± 8.3, p < 0.0001). Hs-TnT and lipoprotein(a) values were higher in the CLI-group than in the IC-group (0.152 ± 0.186 ng/mL vs. 0.046 ± 0.091, p < 0.0001, 45.9 ± 23.3 mg/dL vs. 26.2 ± 27.7, p = 0.0002, respectively) and EPA/AA was lower in the CLI-group than in the IC-group (0.22 ± 0.11 vs. 0.38 ± 0.29, p = 0.0049, respectively). Greater CAD severity, higher hs-TnT, and lipoprotein(a), and lower EPA/AA were observed in the CLI-group, which may explain higher cardiovascular events in patients with CLI.

  8. Pulmonary artery aneurysm in Behcet's disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kasikcioglu, Erdem; Akhan, Hulya; Cuhadaroglu, Caglar; Erkan, Feyza

    2004-05-01

    The pulmonary artery is the second most common site of arterial involvement in Behcet's disease. A 32-year-old man presented with bilateral ankle edema, abdominal discomfort, and hemoptysis. He had a history of recurrent oral and genital aphthous ulcerations for 1 year. The diagnosis of Behcet's disease was made on the basis of the criteria published by the International Study Group for Behcet's Disease. His chest X-ray revealed left hilar enlargement. A helical computed tomography (CT) scan showed a pulmonary aneurysm with intramural thrombosis in the left pulmonary artery and enlarged hepatic veins. Treatment with colchicine and cyclophosphamide was given for 24 months, and helical thoracic CT was performed again. Helical CT showed that the pulmonary aneurysm was reduced by treatment. Helical CT could be used in Behcet's disease for the diagnosis and follow-up of pulmonary involvement.

  9. Endovascular Treatment of the Internal Iliac Artery in Peripheral Arterial Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Huetink, K. Steijling, J.J.F.; Mali, W.P.T.M.

    2008-03-15

    In patients with peripheral arterial disease not much is known about the relationship between the localization of the pain and the localization of arterial occlusions in the iliac arteries. Occlusions high in the iliac arteries are assumed to be able to induce pain in the buttocks and upper leg as well as pain in the calves. Several case reports show that the symptoms of arteriosclerotic lesions in the internal iliac artery are often atypical and not easy to diagnose. In this report, 3 patients with internal iliac artery occlusions who were treated with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) are described. One patient had isolated pain in the buttock region. In the other 2 patients the initial pain was focused on the buttock region with extension to the calves during exercise. After PTA, 2 patients were free of symptoms, while in the other patient the symptoms improved but did not disappear. Future research should clarify the relation between certain arterial occlusions and the location of the pain.

  10. Hydroxychloroquine, a promising choice for coronary artery disease?

    PubMed

    Sun, Lizhe; Liu, Mengping; Li, Ruifeng; Zhao, Qiang; Liu, Junhui; Yang, Yanjie; Zhang, Lisha; Bai, Xiaofang; Wei, Yuanyuan; Ma, Qiangqiang; Zhou, Juan; Yuan, Zuyi; Wu, Yue

    2016-08-01

    Coronary artery disease is a common disease that seriously threaten the health of more than 150 million people per year. Atherosclerosis is considered to be the main cause of coronary artery disease which begins with damage or injury to the inner layer of a coronary artery, sometimes as early as childhood. The damage may be caused by various factors, including: smoking, high blood pressure, hypercholesterolemia, sedentary lifestyle, diabetes and insulin resistance. Once a coronary artery disease has developed, all patients need to be treated with long term standard treatment, including heart-healthy lifestyle changes, medicines, and medical procedures or surgery. Hydroxychloroquine, an original antimalarial drug, prevents inflammation caused by lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. It is relatively safe and well-tolerated during the treatment. Since atherosclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis have resemble mechanism and increasing clinical researches confirm that hydroxychloroquine has an important role in both anti-rheumatoid arthritis and cardiovascular protection (such as anti-platelet, anti-thrombotic, lipid-regulating, anti-hypertension, hypoglycemia, and so on), we hypothesize that hydroxychloroquine might be a promising choice to coronary artery disease patients for its multiple benefits. PMID:27372847

  11. Subintimal Angioplasty for Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease: A Systematic Review

    SciTech Connect

    Met, Rosemarie Lienden, Krijn P. Van; Koelemay, Mark J. W.; Bipat, Shandra; Legemate, Dink A.; Reekers, Jim A.

    2008-07-15

    The objective of this study was to summarize outcomes of subintimal angioplasty (SA) for peripheral arterial occlusive disease. The Cochrane Library, Medline and Embase databases were searched to perform a systematic review of the literature from 1966 through May 2007 on outcomes of SA for peripheral arterial occlusive disease of the infrainguinal vessels. The keywords 'percutaneous intentional extraluminal revascularization,' 'subintimal angioplasty,' 'peripheral arterial disease,' 'femoral artery,' 'popliteal artery,' and 'tibial artery' were used. Assessment of study quality was done using a form based on a checklist of the Dutch Cochrane Centre. The recorded outcomes were technical and clinical success, primary (assisted) patency, limb salvage, complications, and survival, in relation to the clinical grade of disease (intermittent claudication or critical limb ischemia [CLI] or mixed) and location of lesion (femoropopliteal, crural, or mixed). Twenty-three cohort studies including a total of 1549 patients (range, 27 to 148) were included in this review. Methodological and reporting quality were moderate, e.g., there was selection bias and reporting was not done according to the reporting standards. These and significant clinical heterogeneity obstructed a meta-analysis. Reports about length of the lesion and TASC classification were too various to summarize or were not mentioned at all. The technical success rates varied between 80% and 90%, with lower rates for crural lesions compared with femoral lesions. Complication rates ranged between 8% and 17% and most complications were minor. After 1 year, clinical success was between 50% and 70%, primary patency was around 50% and limb salvage varied from 80% to 90%. In conclusion, taking into account the methodological shortcomings of the included studies, SA can play an important role in the treatment of peripheral arterial disease, especially in the case of critical limb ischemia. Despite the moderate patency

  12. Arterial structure and function in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Zanoli, Luca; Rastelli, Stefania; Inserra, Gaetano; Castellino, Pietro

    2015-10-28

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is the result of a combination of environmental, genetic and immunologic factors that trigger an uncontrolled immune response within the intestine, which results in inflammation among genetically predisposed individuals. Several studies have reported that the prevalence of classic cardiovascular risk factors is lower among subjects with IBD than in the general population, including obesity, dyslipidaemia, diabetes and hypertension. Therefore, given the risk profile of IBD subjects, the expected cardiovascular morbidity and mortality should be lower in these patients than in the general population. However, this is not the case because the standardized mortality ratio is not reduced and the risk of coronary heart disease is increased in patients with IBD. It is reasonable to hypothesize that other factors not considered in the classical stratification of cardiovascular risk may be involved in these subjects. Therefore, IBD may be a useful model with which to evaluate the effects of chronic low-grade inflammation in the development of cardiovascular diseases. Arterial stiffness is both a marker of subclinical target organ damage and a cardiovascular risk factor. In diseases characterized by chronic systemic inflammation, there is evidence that the inflammation affects arterial properties and induces both endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffening. It has been reported that decreasing inflammation via anti tumor necrosis factor alpha therapy decreases arterial stiffness and restores endothelial function in patients with chronic inflammatory disorders. Consistent with these results, several recent studies have been conducted to determine whether arterial properties are altered among patients with IBD. In this review, we discuss the evidence pertaining to arterial structure and function and present the available data regarding arterial stiffness and endothelial function in patients with IBD.

  13. Endovascular Treatment of Behcet Disease With Recurrent Infrainguinal Arterial Pseudoaneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ze-yang; Jin, Guan-nan; Ai, Xi; Li, Li-yan; Zheng, Ping; Guan, Yan; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Zhi-wei; Yang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aneurysm or pseudoaneurysm formation is one of the vascular complications of Behcet disease. At present, the optimal treatment for the disease has not been established. The authors report a case of vasculo-Behcet disease (v-BD) with recurrent pseudoaneurysms in the left infrainguinal arteries (common femoral artery, superficial femoral artery, and popliteal artery), as well as thrombosis in the popliteal vein and posterior tibial vein. The patient underwent 3 rounds of surgery, but developed a new pseudoaneurysm several months after each surgery. Eventually, the patient was successfully treated with a combination of endovascular repair, using a fully covered stent graft, and prednisone. The pseudoaneurysm regressed without recurrence for more than 1 year. For v-BD, treatment with immunosuppressive therapy alone may not be sufficient to prevent the recurrence of pseudoaneurysms. For the endovascular treatment of pseudoaneurysms affecting the infrainguinal arteries in v-BD, a fully covered stent graft without oversizing is essential to prevent the recurrence of pseudoaneurysms. PMID:27175653

  14. Stenting for Peripheral Artery Disease of the Lower Extremities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Executive Summary Background Objective In January 2010, the Medical Advisory Secretariat received an application from University Health Network to provide an evidentiary platform on stenting as a treatment management for peripheral artery disease. The purpose of this health technology assessment is to examine the effectiveness of primary stenting as a treatment management for peripheral artery disease of the lower extremities. Clinical Need: Condition and Target Population Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a progressive disease occurring as a result of plaque accumulation (atherosclerosis) in the arterial system that carries blood to the extremities (arms and legs) as well as vital organs. The vessels that are most affected by PAD are the arteries of the lower extremities, the aorta, the visceral arterial branches, the carotid arteries and the arteries of the upper limbs. In the lower extremities, PAD affects three major arterial segments i) aortic-iliac, ii) femoro-popliteal (FP) and iii) infra-popliteal (primarily tibial) arteries. The disease is commonly classified clinically as asymptomatic claudication, rest pain and critical ischemia. Although the prevalence of PAD in Canada is not known, it is estimated that 800,000 Canadians have PAD. The 2007 Trans Atlantic Intersociety Consensus (TASC) II Working Group for the Management of Peripheral Disease estimated that the prevalence of PAD in Europe and North America to be 27 million, of whom 88,000 are hospitalizations involving lower extremities. A higher prevalence of PAD among elderly individuals has been reported to range from 12% to 29%. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) estimated that the prevalence of PAD is 14.5% among individuals 70 years of age and over. Modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors associated with PAD include advanced age, male gender, family history, smoking, diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia. PAD is a strong predictor of myocardial infarction (MI

  15. Peripheral arterial disease: implications beyond the peripheral circulation.

    PubMed

    Paraskevas, Kosmas I; Mukherjee, Debabrata; Whayne, Thomas F

    2013-11-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) affects a considerable percentage of the population. The manifestations of this disease are not always clinically overt. As a result, PAD remains underdiagnosed and undertreated. PAD is not just a disease of the peripheral arteries, but also an indication of generalized vascular atherosclerosis. PAD patients also have a high prevalence of other arterial diseases, such as coronary/carotid artery disease and abdominal aortic aneurysms. PAD is also a predictor of increased risk of lung and other cancers. The most often used examination for the establishment of the diagnosis of PAD, the ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI), is also a predictor of generalized atherosclerosis, future cardiovascular events and cardiovascular mortality. Several markers that have been linked with PAD (e.g. C-reactive protein, serum bilirubin levels) may also have predictive value for other conditions besides PAD (e.g. kidney dysfunction). The management of PAD should therefore not be restricted to the peripheral circulation but should include measurements to manage and decrease the systemic atherosclerotic burden of the patient. PMID:23221278

  16. Giant aneurysm of the left anterior descending coronary artery in a pediatric patient with Behcet's disease.

    PubMed

    Cook, Amanda L; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; Williams, Derek A; Hines, Michael H

    2010-07-01

    Behcet's disease is a rare autoimmune vasculitis characterized by oral aphthosis, genital ulcers, and ocular and cutaneous lesions. Vascular involvement usually affects the veins more commonly than the arteries, and coronary arterial involvement is extremely rare. We report an adolescent with Behcet's disease who developed a large pseudoaneurysm of the left anterior descending coronary artery requiring a coronary arterial bypass graft.

  17. Impact of neonate haematocrit variability on the longitudinal relaxation time of blood: Implications for arterial spin labelling MRI

    PubMed Central

    De Vis, J.B.; Hendrikse, J.; Groenendaal, F.; de Vries, L.S.; Kersbergen, K.J.; Benders, M.J.N.L.; Petersen, E.T.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose The longitudinal relaxation time of blood (T1b) is influenced by haematocrit (Hct) which is known to vary in neonates. The purpose of this study was threefold: to obtain T1b values in neonates, to investigate how the T1b influences quantitative arterial spin labelling (ASL), and to evaluate if known relationships between T1b and haematocrit (Hct) hold true when Hct is measured by means of a point-of-care device. Materials and methods One hundred and four neonates with 120 MR scan sessions (3 T) were included. The T1b was obtained from a T1 inversion recovery sequence. T1b-induced changes in ASL cerebral blood flow estimates were evaluated. The Hct was obtained by means of a point-of-care device. Linear regression analysis was used to investigate the relation between Hct and MRI-derived R1 of blood (the inverse of the T1b). Results Mean T1b was 1.85 s (sd 0.2 s). The mean T1b in preterm neonates was 1.77 s, 1.89 s in preterm neonates scanned at term-equivalent age (TEA) and 1.81 s in diseased neonates. The T1b in the TEA was significantly different from the T1b in the preterm (p < 0.05). The change in perfusion induced by the T1b was −11% (sd 9.1%, p < 0.001). The relation between arterial-drawn Hct and R1b was R1b = 0.80 × Hct + 0.22, which falls within the confidence interval of the previously established relationships, whereas capillary-drawn Hct did not correlate with R1b. Conclusion We demonstrated a wide variability of the T1b in neonates and the implications it could have in methods relying on the actual T1b as for instance ASL. It was concluded that arterial-drawn Hct values obtained from a point-of-care device can be used to infer the T1b whereas our data did not support the use of capillary-drawn Hct for T1b correction. PMID:24818078

  18. Immunohistochemical Analysis of Paraoxonases and Chemokines in Arteries of Patients with Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Aguilera, Anna; Sepúlveda, Julio; Rodríguez-Gallego, Esther; Guirro, Maria; García-Heredia, Anabel; Cabré, Noemí; Luciano-Mateo, Fedra; Fort-Gallifa, Isabel; Martín-Paredero, Vicente; Joven, Jorge; Camps, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative damage to lipids and lipoproteins is implicated in the development of atherosclerotic vascular diseases, including peripheral artery disease (PAD). The paraoxonases (PON) are a group of antioxidant enzymes, termed PON1, PON2, and PON3 that protect lipoproteins and cells from peroxidation and, as such, may be involved in protection against the atherosclerosis process. PON1 inhibits the production of chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) in endothelial cells incubated with oxidized lipoproteins. PON1 and CCL2 are ubiquitously distributed in tissues, and this suggests a joint localization and combined systemic effect. The aim of the present study has been to analyze the quantitative immunohistochemical localization of PON1, PON3, CCL2 and CCL2 receptors in a series of patients with severe PAD. Portions of femoral and/or popliteal arteries from 66 patients with PAD were obtained during surgical procedures for infra-inguinal limb revascularization. We used eight normal arteries from donors as controls. PON1 and PON3, CCL2 and the chemokine-binding protein 2, and Duffy antigen/chemokine receptor, were increased in PAD patients. There were no significant changes in C–C chemokine receptor type 2. Our findings suggest that paraoxonases and chemokines play an important role in the development and progression of atherosclerosis in peripheral artery disease. PMID:25993297

  19. Genetic contribution of the leukotriene pathway to coronary artery disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the genetic contribution of the leukotriene (LT) pathway to risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) in 4,512 Caucasian and African American subjects ascertained through elective cardiac evaluation. Of the three previously associated variants, the shorter "3" and "4" alleles of a promoter ...

  20. Factors Influencing Smoking Cessation in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenna, Kryss; Higgins, Helen

    1997-01-01

    Ten sociodemographic, clinical, and psychological characteristics considered predictors of difficulty with smoking cessation in patients with coronary artery disease are reviewed. The compounding effects of nicotine addiction are discussed. Consideration of these factors may result in individualized programs for smoking cessation. A brief overview…

  1. Learning Style Preferences of Elderly Coronary Artery Disease Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theis, Saundra L.; Merritt, Sharon L.

    1992-01-01

    The Patient Learning Styles Questionnaire derived from Canfield and administered to 134 elderly coronary artery disease patients revealed the following order of learning preferences: structure, iconics, listening, direct experience, reading, achievement, affiliation, and eminence. Level of education significantly influenced preferred learning…

  2. Estrogens and Coronary Artery Disease: New Clinical Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Meyer, M R; Barton, M

    2016-01-01

    In premenopausal women, endogenous estrogens are associated with reduced prevalence of arterial hypertension, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Clinical trials conducted in the 1990s such as HERS, WHI, and WISDOM have shown that postmenopausal treatment with horse hormone mixtures (so-called conjugated equine estrogens) and synthetic progestins adversely affects female cardiovascular health. Our understanding of rapid (nongenomic) and chronic (genomic) estrogen signaling has since advanced considerably, including identification of a new G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER), which like the "classical" receptors ERα and ERβ is highly abundant in the cardiovascular system. Here, we discuss the role of estrogen receptors in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease and review natural and synthetic ligands of estrogen receptors as well as their effects in physiology, on cardiovascular risk factors, and atherosclerotic vascular disease. Data from preclinical and clinical studies using nonselective compounds activating GPER, which include selective estrogen receptor modulators such as tamoxifen or raloxifene, selective estrogen receptor downregulators such as Faslodex™ (fulvestrant/ICI 182,780), vitamin B3 (niacin), green tea catechins, and soy flavonoids such as genistein or resveratrol, strongly suggest that activation of GPER may afford therapeutic benefit for primary and secondary prevention in patients with or at risk for coronary artery disease. Evidence from preclinical studies suggest similar efficacy profiles for selective small molecule GPER agonists such as G-1 which are devoid of uterotrophic activity. Further clinical research in this area is warranted to provide opportunities for future cardiovascular drug development.

  3. Childhood Antecedents to Adult Coronary Artery Diseases. Special Reference Briefs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winick, Myron

    This reference brief deals with the childhood antecedents to atherosclerosis and hypertension. While diet is related to the development of coronary artery diseases, there is some disagreement about what dietary changes are necessary or desirable in children to prevent their development, and at what age such changes should be made. Fifty-five…

  4. Estrogens and Coronary Artery Disease: New Clinical Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Meyer, M R; Barton, M

    2016-01-01

    In premenopausal women, endogenous estrogens are associated with reduced prevalence of arterial hypertension, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Clinical trials conducted in the 1990s such as HERS, WHI, and WISDOM have shown that postmenopausal treatment with horse hormone mixtures (so-called conjugated equine estrogens) and synthetic progestins adversely affects female cardiovascular health. Our understanding of rapid (nongenomic) and chronic (genomic) estrogen signaling has since advanced considerably, including identification of a new G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER), which like the "classical" receptors ERα and ERβ is highly abundant in the cardiovascular system. Here, we discuss the role of estrogen receptors in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease and review natural and synthetic ligands of estrogen receptors as well as their effects in physiology, on cardiovascular risk factors, and atherosclerotic vascular disease. Data from preclinical and clinical studies using nonselective compounds activating GPER, which include selective estrogen receptor modulators such as tamoxifen or raloxifene, selective estrogen receptor downregulators such as Faslodex™ (fulvestrant/ICI 182,780), vitamin B3 (niacin), green tea catechins, and soy flavonoids such as genistein or resveratrol, strongly suggest that activation of GPER may afford therapeutic benefit for primary and secondary prevention in patients with or at risk for coronary artery disease. Evidence from preclinical studies suggest similar efficacy profiles for selective small molecule GPER agonists such as G-1 which are devoid of uterotrophic activity. Further clinical research in this area is warranted to provide opportunities for future cardiovascular drug development. PMID:27451102

  5. Ultrasound speckle tracking for radial, longitudinal and circumferential strain estimation of the carotid artery--an in vitro validation via sonomicrometry using clinical and high-frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Matilda; Heyde, Brecht; Kremer, Florence; Brodin, Lars-Åke; D'hooge, Jan

    2015-02-01

    Ultrasound speckle tracking for carotid strain assessment has in the past decade gained interest in studies of arterial stiffness and cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study was to validate and directly contrast carotid strain assessment by speckle tracking applied on clinical and high-frequency ultrasound images in vitro. Four polyvinyl alcohol phantoms mimicking the carotid artery were constructed with different mechanical properties and connected to a pump generating carotid flow profiles. Gray-scale ultrasound long- and short-axis images of the phantoms were obtained using a standard clinical ultrasound system, Vivid 7 (GE Healthcare, Horten, Norway) and a high-frequency ultrasound system, Vevo 2100 (FUJIFILM, VisualSonics, Toronto, Canada) with linear-array transducers (12L/MS250). Radial, longitudinal and circumferential strains were estimated using an in-house speckle tracking algorithm and compared with reference strain acquired by sonomicrometry. Overall, the estimated strain corresponded well with the reference strain. The correlation between estimated peak strain in clinical ultrasound images and reference strain was 0.91 (p<0.001) for radial strain, 0.73 (p<0.001) for longitudinal strain and 0.90 (p<0.001) for circumferential strain and for high-frequency ultrasound images 0.95 (p<0.001) for radial strain, 0.93 (p<0.001) for longitudinal strain and 0.90 (p<0.001) for circumferential strain. A significant larger bias and root mean square error was found for circumferential strain estimation on clinical ultrasound images compared to high frequency ultrasound images, but no significant difference in bias and root mean square error was found for radial and longitudinal strain when comparing estimation on clinical and high-frequency ultrasound images. The agreement between sonomicrometry and speckle tracking demonstrates that carotid strain assessment by ultrasound speckle tracking is feasible.

  6. Peripheral arterial disease in general and diabetic population.

    PubMed

    Rabia, K; Khoo, E M

    2007-06-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is stenosis or occlusion of peripheral arterial vessels by atherosclerotic plaque. It may present as intermittent claudication, rest pain and impotence. PAD of the lower limbs is the third most important site of atherosclerotic disease after coronary heart disease and cerebrovascular disease. Increasing age, family history, smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia and more decisively diabetes are significant risk factors. PAD is a clinical condition that has often been neglected, underdiagnosed, undertreated and has a serious outcome. It may lead to nonhealing wounds, gangrene and amputation of the lower limbs. Hence, early identification of patients at risk of PAD and timely referral to the vascular surgeon in severe cases is crucial. PMID:18705464

  7. Coronary artery bypass is superior to drug-eluting stents in multivessel coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Guyton, Robert A

    2006-06-01

    Percutaneous intervention for the treatment of multivessel coronary artery disease continues to displace coronary artery bypass graft surgery. But controlled trials of percutaneous intervention versus coronary bypass, in meta-analysis, have shown a significant survival advantage for coronary bypass. Studies of bare metal stents have not presented any data to prompt reversal of this conclusion for all but the small portion of patients most suited for stenting. Drug-eluting stents have no survival advantage compared with bare metal stents. Data from real-world registries have shown that the current therapy of multivessel disease patients has resulted in a relative excess mortality of as much as 46% in patients with initial stenting compared with patients with initial coronary bypass. Ethical considerations demand that patients with multivessel disease be informed of the documented mortality benefit of coronary bypass graft surgery.

  8. Superficial Femoral Artery Plaque and Functional Performance in Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Mary M.; Liu, Kiang; Carroll, Timothy J.; Tian, Lu; Ferrucci, Luigi; Li, Debiao; Carr, James; Guralnik, Jack M.; Kibbe, Melina; Pearce, William H.; Yuan, Chun; McCarthy, Walter; Kramer, Christopher M.; Tao, Huimin; Liao, Yihua; Clark, Elizabeth Talley; Xu, Dongxiang; Berry, Jarett; Orozco, Jennifer; Sharma, Leena; Criqui, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We studied associations of magnetic resonance imaging measurements of plaque area and relative percent lumen reduction in the proximal superficial femoral artery with functional performance among participants with peripheral arterial disease. BACKGROUND The clinical significance of directly imaged plaque characteristics in lower extremity arteries is not well established. METHODS A total of 454 participants with an ankle brachial index <1.00 underwent magnetic resonance cross-sectional imaging of the proximal superficial femoral artery and completed a 6-min walk test, measurement of 4-m walking velocity at usual and fastest pace, and measurement of physical activity with a vertical accelerometer. RESULTS Adjusting for age, sex, race, body mass index, smoking, statin use, comorbidities, and other covariates, higher mean plaque area (1st quintile [least plaque]: 394 m, 2nd quintile: 360 m, 3rd quintile: 359 m, 4th quintile: 329 m, 5th quintile [greatest plaque]: 311 m; p trend <0.001) and smaller mean percent lumen area (1st quintile [greatest plaque]: 319 m, 2nd quintile: 330 m, 3rd quintile: 364 m, 4th quintile: 350 m, 5th quintile: 390 m; p trend <0.001) were associated with shorter distance achieved in the 6-min walk test. Greater mean plaque area was also associated with slower usual-paced walking velocity (p trend = 0.006) and slower fastest-paced 4-m walking velocity (p trend = 0.003). Associations of mean plaque area and mean lumen area with 6-min walk distance remained statistically significant even after additional adjustment for the ankle brachial index and leg symptoms. CONCLUSIONS Among participants with peripheral arterial disease, greater plaque burden and smaller lumen area in the proximal superficial femoral artery are associated independently with poorer functional performance, even after adjusting for the ankle brachial index and leg symptoms. PMID:21757163

  9. Ozonized autohemotransfusion does not affect arterial vasodilation in patients with peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Antonino; Coppola, Ludovico; Luongo, Carlo; Arciello, Alessandro; Cacciapuoti, Federico; Lama, Diana; Luongo, Margherita; Ruggiero, Luigi; Pastore, Agostino; Gombos, Giorgio

    2007-01-01

    Ozonized autohemotransfusion has been used as a complementary therapy in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). To determine whether ozone therapy could acutely modify artery vasodilatory capacity, a flow-mediated dilation test was performed at the brachial artery level before and after an ozonized autohemotransfusion in 16 patients with PAD, mean (± SD) age 55±1.8 years, and 14 healthy volunteers matched for age, sex and body mass index. Before ozonized autohemotransfusion, the mean baseline diameter of the brachial artery was higher in PAD patients than in healthy subjects (4.6±0.54 mm versus 3.6±0.54 mm, P<0.001) while mean flow-mediated brachial artery dilation and percentage of increase in flow were significantly lower in PAD patients than in controls (6.3±6.1% versus 11.8±2.4%, P<0.02; 433±61% versus 580±46%, P<0.02, respectively). No significant changes were observed after ozonized autohemotransfusion, indicating that ozonized autohemotransfusion does not modify endothelium-dependent ischemia-induced vascular reactivity. PMID:22477241

  10. Noninvasive Assessment of Carotid Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bandyk, Dennis F.; Thiele, Brain L.

    1983-01-01

    Noninvasive methods of detecting carotid disease were developed to avoid the morbidity and occasional mortality associated with cerebral angiography. The tests developed are of the following two types: direct, which uses imaging or the detection of flow disturbances to identify disease at the bifurcation, and indirect, which infers the presence of bifurcation disease by detecting changes at a remote site. The initial goal of only detecting disease has now been broadened, with this technology being used to address important clinical and epidemiologic questions such as the natural history of carotid bifurcation disease. The recognition of these important contributions has been compounded, however, by the large number of tests that are available, producing the problem of deciding which test or tests should be used for a particular patient. The use of multiple tests avoids the deficiencies of single tests but compounds medical costs. For a cost-effective single form of testing for all circumstances, duplex scanning methods offer the greatest possibility of detecting all degrees of disease. Images PMID:6649597

  11. Revascularization therapy for coronary artery disease. Coronary artery bypass grafting versus percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J M; Ferguson, J J

    1995-01-01

    Coronary artery bypass surgery relieves the symptoms of myocardial ischemia and prolongs survival of patients with more severe coronary artery disease. Randomized trials of surgical therapy have consistently shown that the benefits of surgical revascularization are proportional to the amount of myocardium affected by, or at risk for, ischemic injury. This risk is inferred from angiographically delineated coronary anatomy, estimates of left ventricular function, and physiologic testing. The population that may see a survival benefit from surgical revascularization has probably been expanded beyond that reported in the VA, CASS, and ECSS trials, due to improved perioperative care, longer graft survival, and the use of internal mammary artery grafts. Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty revascularizes myocardium by dilating a stenotic segment of coronary artery. While successful in relieving the symptoms of myocardial ischemia, PTCA is hindered by the occurrence of abrupt vessel closure and the frequent development of restenosis. Furthermore, firm proof of a survival benefit, outside of emergency therapy for acute myocardial infarction, is not yet available. However, because the risk of procedure-related death or serious complication is lower than that seen with bypass surgery, PTCA provides a useful alternative revascularization method for patients with less extensive disease, in whom the risk of surgery may equal or exceed any beneficial effect. New technology and growing experience are widening the scope of percutaneous revascularization by extending the hope of symptomatic relief and survival benefit even to patients with extensive, severe coronary artery disease. Comparisons between surgical therapy and PTCA in select populations with single- and multivessel coronary artery disease have shown that PTCA is not as effective as surgery for long-term symptomatic control, and that it often requires repeat PTCA or cross-over to bypass surgery; however, long

  12. Multimodality Imaging in Coronary Artery Disease: Focus on Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Han, Donghee; Danad, Ibrahim; Hartaigh, Bríain ó; Lin, Fay Y.

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of mortality worldwide, and various cardiovascular imaging modalities have been introduced for the purpose of diagnosing and determining the severity of CAD. More recently, advances in computed tomography (CT) technology have contributed to the widespread clinical application of cardiac CT for accurate and noninvasive evaluation of CAD. In this review, we focus on imaging assessment of CAD based upon CT, which includes coronary artery calcium screening, coronary CT angiography, myocardial CT perfusion, and fractional flow reserve CT. Further, we provide a discussion regarding the potential implications, benefits and limitations, as well as the possible future directions according to each modality. PMID:27081438

  13. Advances in nanotechnology for the management of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Rhee, June-Wha; Wu, Joseph C

    2013-02-01

    Nanotechnology holds tremendous potential to advance the current treatment of coronary artery disease. Nanotechnology may assist medical therapies by providing a safe and efficacious delivery platform for a variety of drugs aimed at modulating lipid disorders, decreasing inflammation and angiogenesis within atherosclerotic plaques, and preventing plaque thrombosis. Nanotechnology may improve coronary stent applications by promoting endothelial recovery on a stent surface utilizing bio-mimetic nanofibrous scaffolds, and also by preventing in-stent restenosis using nanoparticle-based delivery of drugs that are decoupled from stents. Additionally, nanotechnology may enhance tissue-engineered graft materials for application in coronary artery bypass grafting by facilitating cellular infiltration and remodeling of a graft matrix.

  14. Women With Peripheral Arterial Disease Experience Faster Functional Decline Than Men With Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Mary M.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Liu, Kiang; Guralnik, Jack M.; Tian, Lu; Kibbe, Melina; Liao, Yihua; Tao, Huimin; Criqui, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We hypothesized that women with lower extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD) would have greater mobility loss and faster functional decline than men with PAD. Background Whether rates of mobility loss or functional decline differ between men and women with PAD is currently unknown. Methods Three hundred eighty men and women with PAD completed the 6-min walk, were assessed for mobility disability, and underwent measures of 4-m walking velocity at baseline and annually for up to 4 years. Computed tomography-assessed calf muscle characteristics were measured biannually. Outcomes included becoming unable to walk for 6 min continuously among participants who walked continuously for 6 min at baseline. Mobility loss was defined as becoming unable to walk for a quarter mile or to walk up and down 1 flight of stairs without assistance among those without baseline mobility disability. Results were adjusted for age, race, body mass index, physical activity, the ankle brachial index, comorbidities, and other confounders. Results At 4 years of follow-up, women were more likely to become unable to walk for 6 min continuously (hazard ratio: 2.30, 95% confidence interval: 1.30 to 4.06, p = 0.004), more likely to develop mobility disability (hazard ratio: 1.79, 95% confidence interval: 1.30 to 3.03, p = 0.030), and had faster declines in walking velocity (p = 0.022) and the distance achieved in the 6-min walk (p = 0.041) compared with men. Sex differences in functional decline were attenuated after additional adjustment for baseline sex differences in calf muscle area. Conclusions Women with PAD have faster functional decline and greater mobility loss than men with PAD. These sex differences may be attributable to smaller baseline calf muscle area among women with PAD. PMID:21292130

  15. Facial nerve palsy, Kawasaki disease, and coronary artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Stowe, Robert C

    2015-09-01

    Kawasaki disease is rarely complicated by cranial nerve VII palsy. This report describes a 15-month-old female presenting with 3 days of fever, irritability, and rash who was subsequently diagnosed with Kawasaki disease and treated with intravenous immunoglobulin. She was found to have mild coronary artery ectasia and developed an acute, transient, left-sided facial palsy on the sixth day of illness. Repeat echocardiography demonstrated worsening aneurysm and intravenous methylprednisolone was added to her treatment regimen. At 1 and 3 months post-discharge, echocardiography demonstrated resolution of her coronary aneurysm. This case makes 41 total described in the literature. Patients tend to be under 12-months-old and there is a higher association with coronary artery aneurysm in such patients compared to those without facial palsy who never even received treatment. Kawasaki disease associated with facial palsy may indicate increased inflammatory burden and patients may require additional anti-inflammatory agents and more vigilant echocardiography. PMID:26101056

  16. Facial nerve palsy, Kawasaki disease, and coronary artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Stowe, Robert C

    2015-09-01

    Kawasaki disease is rarely complicated by cranial nerve VII palsy. This report describes a 15-month-old female presenting with 3 days of fever, irritability, and rash who was subsequently diagnosed with Kawasaki disease and treated with intravenous immunoglobulin. She was found to have mild coronary artery ectasia and developed an acute, transient, left-sided facial palsy on the sixth day of illness. Repeat echocardiography demonstrated worsening aneurysm and intravenous methylprednisolone was added to her treatment regimen. At 1 and 3 months post-discharge, echocardiography demonstrated resolution of her coronary aneurysm. This case makes 41 total described in the literature. Patients tend to be under 12-months-old and there is a higher association with coronary artery aneurysm in such patients compared to those without facial palsy who never even received treatment. Kawasaki disease associated with facial palsy may indicate increased inflammatory burden and patients may require additional anti-inflammatory agents and more vigilant echocardiography.

  17. Novel Inflammatory Biomarkers in Coronary Artery Disease: Potential Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Voudris, Konstantinos V; Chanin, Jake; Feldman, Dmitriy N; Charitakis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery disease constitutes the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the modern world. Inflammation has been implicated to play a key role in the initiation and promotion of atherosclerosis, and the induction of plaque instability, possibly leading to acute coronary syndrome (ACS). This review aims to assess the clinical utility of well established (CRP) and novel inflammatory biomarkers (Homocyesteine, SAA, sCD40L, sLOX-1, IMA, MPO, PAPP-A and MMPs) in the diagnosis and outcome prediction of patients with ACS. The PubMed database was searched for reports using the terms "biomarkers", "acute coronary syndrome", "infarction", "markers" and only original articles written in English were included. The diversity of novel biomarkers for coronary artery disease provides an insight of the varied pathophysiology of this disease. A better understanding of their properties and assimilation in daily clinical use is essential for optimal management and patient care in the future. PMID:25891107

  18. Endovascular Intervention in the Treatment of Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Couto, Marian; Figueróa, Alejandro; Sotolongo, Antonio; Pérez, Reynerio; Ojeda, José Martinez

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular therapy has emerged as an essential part of the management we can offer patients suffering from peripheral arterial disease. The AHA/ACCF guidelines deemed ballon angioplasty as a reasonable alternative for patients with limb threatening lower extremity ischemia who are not candidates for an autologus venous graft. Endovascular treatment is most useful for the treatment of critical limb ischemia and should ensure adequate proximal flow before engaging in interventions of distal disease.To increase procedure success rate, a thorough diagnostic evaluation is fundamental. This evaluation must take into account amount of calcium, no flow occlusion, length of occlusion, and presence of collaterals. There are different tools and procedure techniques available. Among these are the medicated ballon angioplasty and atherectomy by laser or high-speed drill, among others. Further studies may consolidate endovascular intervention as a safe and effective management for patients with lower extremity arterial disease and possibly cause a change in the actual practice guidelines. PMID:26742196

  19. Sudden cardiac death from the perspective of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Sara, Jaskanwal D; Eleid, Mackram F; Gulati, Rajiv; Holmes, David R

    2014-12-01

    Sudden cardiac death accounts for approximately 50% of all deaths attributed to cardiovascular disease in the United States. It is most commonly associated with coronary artery disease and can be its initial manifestation or may occur in the period after an acute myocardial infarction. Decreasing the rate of sudden cardiac death requires the identification and treatment of at-risk patients through evidence-based pharmacotherapy and interventional strategies aimed at primary and secondary prevention. For this review, we searched PubMed for potentially relevant articles published from January 1, 1970, through March 1, 2014, using the following key search terms: sudden cardiac death, ischemic heart disease, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, and cardiac arrest. Searches were enhanced by scanning bibliographies of identified articles, and those deemed relevant were selected for full-text review. This review outlines various mechanisms for sudden cardiac death in the setting of coronary artery disease, describes risk factors for sudden cardiac death, explores the management of cardiac arrest, and outlines optimal practice for the monitoring and treatment of patients after an acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction to decrease the risk of sudden death. PMID:25440727

  20. Multislice computer tomography for detection of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Ropers, Dieter

    2006-12-01

    Multislice computer tomography has undergone substantial technological progress during the past years. Current 64-slice scanners with gantry rotation speeds of as little as 330 ms, and particularly the recently introduced dual source CT equipped with two X-ray tubes, provide a temporal and spatial resolution that is sufficient to allow reliable imaging of cardiac morphology and coronary arteries. Especially the ability to noninvasively visualize the coronary arteries, including the assessment and quantification of calcifications, as well as the detection of luminal obstruction and atherosclerotic plaque, constitutes an attractive addition to currently available diagnostic tools for the work-up of patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. Besides the evaluation of coronary artery calcium and atherosclerotic plaques, this review focuses on the contrast-enhanced CT visualization of the coronary vessels, including native coronary arteries, bypass grafts, and coronary stonts. Thereby detailed information concerning the scan protocol, clinical data, possible indications, and limitations using up-to-date 64-slice technology is provided. Finally, the overview includes design and initial image examples of dual source CT technology as the newest development in the field.

  1. Anomalous origin of the right coronary artery from the pulmonary artery: an autopsied sudden death case with severe atherosclerotic disease of the left coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Nagai, T; Mukai, T; Takahashi, S; Takada, A; Saito, K; Harada, K; Mori, S; Abe, N

    2014-03-01

    Anomalous origin of the right coronary artery from the pulmonary artery (ARCAPA) is a rare anomaly. It may contribute to myocardial ischemia or sudden death, although the lesion is usually asymptomatic. We report a sudden death case of a 58-year-old man with ARCAPA coexisting with severe atherosclerotic coronary artery disease. He had been healthy until he complained of chest pain, several days before death, despite the discovery of heart murmur in childhood and suspicion of valvular heart disease. The autopsy revealed not only typical findings of the right coronary anomaly with well-developed collateral circulations but also severe atherosclerotic lesions of the left coronary artery, and ischemic change of the myocardium in the left and right coronary arterial perfusion territory. In addition to the "coronary steal" phenomenon primarily caused by ARCAPA, the reduced flow of both coronary arteries and further increase of "coronary steal" due to atherosclerotic obstructive coronary disease might have contributed to the patient's death.

  2. Lower Extremity Arterial Calcification as a Predictor of Coronary Atherosclerosis in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hwa Seon; Jung Park, Mi; Nyeo Jeon, Kyung; Min Cho, Jae; Soo Bae, Kyung; Seob Choi, Dae; Boem Na, Jae; Cheol Choi, Ho; Young Choi, Hye; Eun Kim, Ji; Bueum Cho, Soo; Eun Park, Sung

    2016-01-01

    Background Until now, there has been no study on the relationship between the calcification of the lower extremity arteries and significant coronary arterial disease (CAD). Objectives To evaluate whether lower extremity calcium scores (LECS) are associated with CAD and whether this can predict multivessel-CAD in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Patients and Methods We retrospectively enrolled 103 PAD patients without cardiac symptoms or known CAD. All patients underwent cardiac computed tomography (CT) and lower extremity CT within 1 month and were categorized as nonsignificant CAD, single-CAD, or multivessel-CAD. The coronary calcium scores (CCS) were quantitatively measured according to the Agatston method and LECS were semi-quantitatively measured according to the presence of lower extremity calcification in the segment. The extent of CAD was evaluated according to the presence of ≥ 50% luminal diameter stenosis in the segment of CAD. Results LECS in multivessel-CAD were significantly higher than those in nonsignificant CAD (10.0 ± 5.8 versus 4.0 ± 3.1, P < 0.001). LECS significantly correlated with CCS (r = 0.831, P < 0.001) and the extent of CAD (r = 0.631, P < 0.001). Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated LECS and log-transformed CCS were independent predictors for multivessel-CAD. In receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the diagnostic performance of LECS was 0.807 (95% confidence interval = 0.724-0.891, P < 0.001) for predicting multivessel-CAD. Conclusion Peripheral arterial calcification is significantly correlated with CAD extent in patients with PAD. Peripheral arterial calcification can be a useful marker for predicting multivessel-CAD. PMID:27703657

  3. Plasma viscosity increase with progression of peripheral arterial atherosclerotic disease.

    PubMed

    Poredos, P; Zizek, B

    1996-03-01

    Increased blood and plasma viscosity has been described in patients with coronary and peripheral arterial disease. However, the relation of viscosity to the extent of arterial wall deterioration--the most important determinant of clinical manifestation and prognosis of the disease--is not well known. Therefore, the authors studied plasma viscosity as one of the major determinants of blood viscosity in patients with different stages of arterial disease of lower limbs (according to Fontaine) and its relation to the presence of some risk factors of atherosclerosis. The study encompassed four groups of subjects: 19 healthy volunteers (group A), 18 patients with intermittent claudication up to 200 m (stage II; group B), 15 patients with critical ischemia of lower limbs (stage III and IV; group C), and 16 patients with recanalization procedures on peripheral arteries. Venous blood samples were collected from an antecubital vein without stasis for the determination of plasma viscosity (with a rotational capillary microviscometer, PAAR), fibrinogen, total cholesterol, alpha-2-macroglobulin, and glucose concentrations. In patients with recanalization procedure local plasma viscosity was also determined from blood samples taken from a vein on the dorsum of the foot. Plasma viscosity was most significantly elevated in the patients with critical ischemia (1.78 mPa.sec) and was significantly higher than in the claudicants (1.68 mPa.sec), and the claudicants also had significantly higher viscosity than the controls (1.58 mPa.sec). In patients in whom a recanalization procedure was performed, no differences in systemic and local plasma viscosity were detected, neither before nor after recanalization of the diseased artery. In all groups plasma viscosity was correlated with fibrinogen concentration (r=0.70, P < 0.01) and total cholesterol concentration (r=0.24, P < 0.05), but in group C (critical ischemia) plasma viscosity was most closely linked to the concentration of alpha-2

  4. Longitudinal evaluation and assessment of cardiovascular disease in patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Kolansky, Daniel M; Cuchel, Marina; Clark, Bernard J; Paridon, Steve; McCrindle, Brian W; Wiegers, Susan E; Araujo, Luis; Vohra, Yogesh; Defesche, Joep C; Wilson, James M; Rader, Daniel J

    2008-12-01

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (hoFH) is caused by mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene and is characterized by severe hypercholesterolemia from birth and onset of premature cardiovascular disease (CVD) during childhood. The onset and progression of CVD using currently available testing methods in children with hoFH have not been fully characterized. A large cohort of patients with hoFH referred to our subspecialty clinic was studied. Thirty-nine patients (22 aged < or =16 years) underwent extensive cardiovascular, lipid, and genetic evaluation. Sixteen children < or =16 years without known CVD when first evaluated were followed up longitudinally for up to 8 years. CVD was clinically evident in 88% of subjects aged >16 years and 9% of those < or =16 years. Markers of atherosclerosis correlated significantly with age at which lipid-lowering treatment was initiated (abnormal coronary angiogram, abnormal aortic valve using echocardiography, and high calcium score using electron beam computed tomography; all p <0.01; abnormal carotid Doppler result; p = 0.03). Twenty of 22 children had no clinical evidence of coronary artery disease, yet 7 of these children had angiographically confirmed mild coronary artery disease (<50%) and 8 had mild to moderate aortic regurgitation using echocardiography. Of noninvasive tests, only evaluation of aortic valve regurgitation using echocardiography predicted the presence of angiographic coronary stenosis (p <0.001). During follow-up, 7 children developed progression of coronary and/or aortic valvular disease during their teenage years and 4 required surgical interventions. In conclusion, in these patients aggressive lipid-lowering treatment initiated in early childhood is warranted. Careful coronary and valvular surveillance strategies and coronary revascularization when appropriate are also warranted in this high-risk population. PMID:19026292

  5. Secretory phospholipase A2 in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Lima, Luciana Moreira; Carvalho, Maria das Graças; da Fonseca Neto, Cirilo Pereira; Garcia, José Carlos Faria; Sousa, Marinez Oliveira

    2010-04-01

    This study investigated the correlation of sPLA2 (secretory phospholipase A2) activity with the atheromatosis extent in subjects with coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing coronary angiography. We analyzed 123 patients, including 35 subjects with angiographically normal coronary arteries (controls), 31 with mild/moderate atheromatosis (stenosis of 30-70% of the luminal diameter in one or more coronary arteries) and 57 with severe atheromatosis (>70% stenosis). Plasma sPLA2 activity was significantly higher in subjects with severe [127.7 U/ml (102.3-162.7); p < 0.0001] and mild/moderate [112.0 U/ml (100.6-146.9); p < 0.0001] atheromatosis than in controls [19.8 U/ml (15.1-32.1)]. In a multiple logistic regression model, adjusted for age, gender, body mass index, tabagism, hypertension, sedentarism, family history for coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, total cholesterol, HDLc, LDLc, triglycerides, high sensitivity C-reactive protein and phospholipase A2, only sPLA2 was observed to be independently associated with severe CAD (>70% of stenosis) (p < 0.0001). PMID:19449149

  6. Association of Peripheral Arterial and Cardiovascular Diseases in Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Carolina; Miname, Marcio; Makdisse, Marcia; Kalil, Roberto; Santos, Raul D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant genetic disease characterized by an elevation in the serum levels of total cholesterol and of low-density lipoproteins (LDL- c). Known to be closely related to the atherosclerotic process, FH can determine the development of early obstructive lesions in different arterial beds. In this context, FH has also been proposed to be a risk factor for peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Objective This observational cross-sectional study assessed the association of PAD with other manifestations of cardiovascular disease (CVD), such as coronary artery and cerebrovascular disease, in patients with heterozygous FH. Methods The diagnosis of PAD was established by ankle-brachial index (ABI) values ≤ 0.90. This study assessed 202 patients (35% of men) with heterozygous FH (90.6% with LDL receptor mutations), mean age of 51 ± 14 years and total cholesterol levels of 342 ± 86 mg /dL. Results The prevalences of PAD and previous CVD were 17% and 28.2 %, respectively. On multivariate analysis, an independent association between CVD and the diagnosis of PAD was observed (OR = 2.50; 95% CI: 1.004 - 6.230; p = 0.049). Conclusion Systematic screening for PAD by use of ABI is feasible to assess patients with FH, and it might indicate an increased risk for CVD. However, further studies are required to determine the role of ABI as a tool to assess the cardiovascular risk of those patients. PMID:25029472

  7. Consolidated and emerging inflammatory markers in coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Lubrano, Valter; Balzan, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is an event of atherosclerosis characterized by a chronic vascular inflammation. Risk factors like obesity, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, smoking, hypercholesterolemia and positive family history sometimes are not sufficiently adequate to the enhancement of cardiovascular risk assessment. In the past years numerous biomarkers, like C reactive protein, cytokines and adhesion molecules, have been observed to be related to adverse cardiovascular prognosis. Recently, several studies found an association among inflammatory biomarkers and cardiovascular diseases suggesting their utility to identify the risk of an acute ischemic event and the detection of vulnerable plaques. The emerging inflammatory markers are well divided for diagnosis and prognosis and plaque instability of coronary artery disease. Some of them, the lectin-like oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor-1 can be important both in diagnosis and in the evaluation of plaque instability, other are inserted in the above reported classification. The emerging inflammatory markers in acute-phase include amyloid A, fibrinogen and pentraxin 3 while myeloperoxidase, myeloid-related protein 8/14 and pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A are recognize markers of plaque instability. Lastly, some studies demonstrated that circulating miRNAs are involved in coronary artery disease, acute myocardial infarction and heart failure. PMID:25699231

  8. Maggot Debridement Therapy for Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Maggots are potent debriding agents capable of removing necrotic tissue and slough; however, it is still unclear which wounds are most likely to benefit from maggot debridement therapy (MDT). Thus, we performed this retrospective review to gain insight into the patient and therapy characteristics influencing outcome. Patients and Methods: We reviewed patients with foot ulcers caused by critical limb ischemia, encountered during the period between June 2005 and May 2010. The treatment outcomes were defined as effective or ineffective. Results: There were 16 patients with 16 leg ulcers. The patients were 13 men and 3 women, with an average age of 67.2 years (range, 47–85 years). Ten (63%) of the 16 ulcers were treated effectively. According to univariate analyses, an ankle brachial pressure index (ABI) lower than 0.6 (p = 0.03) had a negative impact on the outcome of MDT; however, outcome was not influenced by gender, obesity, ischemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, hemodialysis, smoking, or laboratory findings. Conclusions: Some patient characteristics, such as gender, obesity, ischemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, hemodialysis, and smoking, do not seem to contraindicate eligibility for MDT. However, a limb with an ABI lower than 0.6 is less likely to benefit. (*English Translation of J Jpn Coll Angiol 2011; 51: 209-213.) PMID:23825493

  9. Fluid Mechanics, Arterial Disease, and Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarbell, John M.; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Dunn, Jessilyn; Jo, Hanjoong

    2014-01-01

    This review places modern research developments in vascular mechanobiology in the context of hemodynamic phenomena in the cardiovascular system and the discrete localization of vascular disease. The modern origins of this field are traced, beginning in the 1960s when associations between flow characteristics, particularly blood flow-induced wall shear stress, and the localization of atherosclerotic plaques were uncovered, and continuing to fluid shear stress effects on the vascular lining endothelial cells (ECs), including their effects on EC morphology, biochemical production, and gene expression. The earliest single-gene studies and genome-wide analyses are considered. The final section moves from the ECs lining the vessel wall to the smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts within the wall that are fluid mechanically activated by interstitial flow that imposes shear stresses on their surfaces comparable with those of flowing blood on EC surfaces. Interstitial flow stimulates biochemical production and gene expression, much like blood flow on ECs.

  10. Fluid Mechanics, Arterial Disease, and Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tarbell, John M.; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Dunn, Jessilyn; Jo, Hanjoong

    2014-01-01

    This review places modern research developments in vascular mechanobiology in the context of hemodynamic phenomena in the cardiovascular system and the discrete localization of vascular disease. The modern origins of this field are traced, beginning in the 1960s when associations between flow characteristics, particularly blood flow–induced wall shear stress, and the localization of atherosclerotic plaques were uncovered, and continuing to fluid shear stress effects on the vascular lining endothelial) cells (ECs), including their effects on EC morphology, biochemical production, and gene expression. The earliest single-gene studies and genome-wide analyses are considered. The final section moves from the ECs lining the vessel wall to the smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts within the wall that are fluid me chanically activated by interstitial flow that imposes shear stresses on their surfaces comparable with those of flowing blood on EC surfaces. Interstitial flow stimulates biochemical production and gene expression, much like blood flow on ECs. PMID:25360054

  11. Fluid Mechanics, Arterial Disease, and Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Tarbell, John M; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Dunn, Jessilyn; Jo, Hanjoong

    2014-01-01

    This review places modern research developments in vascular mechanobiology in the context of hemodynamic phenomena in the cardiovascular system and the discrete localization of vascular disease. The modern origins of this field are traced, beginning in the 1960s when associations between flow characteristics, particularly blood flow-induced wall shear stress, and the localization of atherosclerotic plaques were uncovered, and continuing to fluid shear stress effects on the vascular lining endothelial) cells (ECs), including their effects on EC morphology, biochemical production, and gene expression. The earliest single-gene studies and genome-wide analyses are considered. The final section moves from the ECs lining the vessel wall to the smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts within the wall that are fluid me chanically activated by interstitial flow that imposes shear stresses on their surfaces comparable with those of flowing blood on EC surfaces. Interstitial flow stimulates biochemical production and gene expression, much like blood flow on ECs.

  12. [Intermittent thrombolytic treatment. Results during severe, chronic arterial diseases].

    PubMed

    Fiessinger, J N; Aiach, M; Lagneau, P; Cormier, J M; Housset, E

    1975-04-20

    38 patients with severe chronic arteritis of the lower limbs were treated with streptokinase intermittently. All had been refused for surgical operation. One patient died, 4 others had early interruption of treatment. Eleven of the 38 patients had efficient thrombolysis confirmed by arteriography. The facts confirm the possibility of thrombolysis during chronic arterial disease. The fact that the aggravation was recent was favourable factor in prognosis. The eleven patients improved, had severe aggravation of symptomes for less than 2 months. Thus thrombolytic treatment has a place of choice in the treatment of severe arterial disease where surgery is impossible, or dangerous, owing to the uncertain state of the vascular bed below the lesion. Efficacious, it permits reconstructive surgery in cases where it had been at first refused. The use of intermittent treatment, apart from advantages of confort and cost, seems to increase the efficacy of treatment.

  13. Doppler ultrasonography in lower extremity peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Verim, Samet; Taşçı, Ilker

    2013-04-01

    Systemic atherosclerosis is a condition which progresses with age, decreases quality of life, and life expectancy. Lower extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a common manifestation of systemic atherosclerosis in the elderly. These individuals have a 2 to 4 fold higher risk of coronary heart disease and stroke. In addition, systemic atherosclerosis causes overall functional disability including restricted lower extremity movements. When used alone for diagnostic purposes, claudication is an unreliable sign of PAD in all age groups especially the elderly. Moreover, claudication is difficult to define due to the advancing age and degenerative changes in lumbar and peripheral joints. Doppler ultrasonography (US) is an easily available and noninvasive means of arterial visualization in the lower extremities. In this review, supporting evidence for the use of Doppler US in the diagnosis of PAD will be discussed. Past and present recommendations regarding Doppler US in the current PAD guidelines will be overviewed.

  14. Therapeutic options in coronary artery disease: Focusing on the guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Leonard

    2009-01-01

    There are three options for the treatment of patients with coronary artery disease: coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and optimal medical treatment alone. While there has been an active interface between CABG and PCI, medical treatment has not been as vociferously advocated. However, it performs well in randomized trials and is still a treatment arm in studies such as the Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) trial. The present review compares these options in acute and chronic coronary syndromes, including the indications for each as summarized by recent American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association guidelines. While the landscape in Canada is changing for CABG and PCI, with an increase in the latter procedure for patients with multivessel disease, optimal medical treatment alone is very effective. There are few subsets, particularly in chronic syndromes, in which revascularization is indicated for prognosis alone. PMID:19148338

  15. [Intermittent thrombolytic treatment. Results during severe, chronic arterial diseases].

    PubMed

    Fiessinger, J N; Aiach, M; Lagneau, P; Cormier, J M; Housset, E

    1975-04-20

    38 patients with severe chronic arteritis of the lower limbs were treated with streptokinase intermittently. All had been refused for surgical operation. One patient died, 4 others had early interruption of treatment. Eleven of the 38 patients had efficient thrombolysis confirmed by arteriography. The facts confirm the possibility of thrombolysis during chronic arterial disease. The fact that the aggravation was recent was favourable factor in prognosis. The eleven patients improved, had severe aggravation of symptomes for less than 2 months. Thus thrombolytic treatment has a place of choice in the treatment of severe arterial disease where surgery is impossible, or dangerous, owing to the uncertain state of the vascular bed below the lesion. Efficacious, it permits reconstructive surgery in cases where it had been at first refused. The use of intermittent treatment, apart from advantages of confort and cost, seems to increase the efficacy of treatment. PMID:176733

  16. Coronary heart disease index based on longitudinal electrocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, J. C.; Cronin, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    A coronary heart disease index was developed from longitudinal ECG (LCG) tracings to serve as a cardiac health measure in studies of working and, essentially, asymptomatic populations, such as pilots and executives. For a given subject, the index consisted of a composite score based on the presence of LCG aberrations and weighted values previously assigned to them. The index was validated by correlating it with the known presence or absence of CHD as determined by a complete physical examination, including treadmill, resting ECG, and risk factor information. The validating sample consisted of 111 subjects drawn by a stratified-random procedure from 5000 available case histories. The CHD index was found to be significantly more valid as a sole indicator of CHD than the LCG without the use of the index. The index consistently produced higher validity coefficients in identifying CHD than did treadmill testing, resting ECG, or risk factor analysis.

  17. Facial expression recognition in Alzheimer's disease: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Torres, Bianca; Santos, Raquel Luiza; Sousa, Maria Fernanda Barroso de; Simões Neto, José Pedro; Nogueira, Marcela Moreira Lima; Belfort, Tatiana T; Dias, Rachel; Dourado, Marcia Cristina Nascimento

    2015-05-01

    Facial recognition is one of the most important aspects of social cognition. In this study, we investigate the patterns of change and the factors involved in the ability to recognize emotion in mild Alzheimer's disease (AD). Through a longitudinal design, we assessed 30 people with AD. We used an experimental task that includes matching expressions with picture stimuli, labelling emotions and emotionally recognizing a stimulus situation. We observed a significant difference in the situational recognition task (p ≤ 0.05) between baseline and the second evaluation. The linear regression showed that cognition is a predictor of emotion recognition impairment (p ≤ 0.05). The ability to perceive emotions from facial expressions was impaired, particularly when the emotions presented were relatively subtle. Cognition is recruited to comprehend emotional situations in cases of mild dementia.

  18. Facial expression recognition in Alzheimer's disease: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Torres, Bianca; Santos, Raquel Luiza; Sousa, Maria Fernanda Barroso de; Simões Neto, José Pedro; Nogueira, Marcela Moreira Lima; Belfort, Tatiana T; Dias, Rachel; Dourado, Marcia Cristina Nascimento

    2015-05-01

    Facial recognition is one of the most important aspects of social cognition. In this study, we investigate the patterns of change and the factors involved in the ability to recognize emotion in mild Alzheimer's disease (AD). Through a longitudinal design, we assessed 30 people with AD. We used an experimental task that includes matching expressions with picture stimuli, labelling emotions and emotionally recognizing a stimulus situation. We observed a significant difference in the situational recognition task (p ≤ 0.05) between baseline and the second evaluation. The linear regression showed that cognition is a predictor of emotion recognition impairment (p ≤ 0.05). The ability to perceive emotions from facial expressions was impaired, particularly when the emotions presented were relatively subtle. Cognition is recruited to comprehend emotional situations in cases of mild dementia. PMID:26017202

  19. The establishment of Bayesian Coronary Artery Disease Prediction model.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chi-Ming; Tscai, Hui-Jen; Chu, Nian-Feng; Pai, Lu; Wetter, Thomas; Sun, Cien-An; Lin, Jin-Ding; Yang, Tsan; Pai, Cien-Yu; Bludau, Hans-Bernd

    2005-01-01

    This poster will demonstrate how we build up the module of Bayesian Coronary Artery Disease Predicting Evidence-Based Medicine. The system-module may help the young professional understand the effect of factors for referring patients to take the invasive examination of Angiographic.Moreover, the non-invasive information-tech also can perform as the screening tool on a clinical or a community-based epidemiology.

  20. Deaths from occlusive arterial disease in renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Ibels, L S; Stewart, J H; Mahony, J F; Sheil, A G

    1974-08-31

    In a series of 325 recipients of cadaveric renal transplants sudden occlusive arterial disease was found to be responsible for 12% of deaths. Acute myocardial infarction (9%) occurred 25 times more than expected in the normal population and cerebral thrombosis (3%) 300 times more. The greatest loss was in the initial three-month period after transplantation. Patients with renal failure due to essential hypertension were especially at risk, accounting for six of the 12 deaths.

  1. [Sulodexide in conservative treatment of peripheral arterial diseases].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, M R; Kosykh, I V; Yu, Tolstikhin V; Kuznetsova, V F; Magnitsky, I A

    2015-01-01

    Presented in the article is a review of the literature, analysing principles of conservative therapy of patients with obliterating diseases of lower limb arteries and most commonly used drugs to treat them, followed by discussing the mechanisms of action and efficacy of such pharmacological agents as pentoxyphyllin, cilostazol, naphthidrofuryl, aktovegin, sulodexide. Described in details are subtle mechanisms of action of sulodexide as an endothelioprotector, its clinical efficacy in intermittent claudication. PMID:26824094

  2. [Risk management of coronary artery disease--pharmacological therapy].

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Thomas

    2004-06-01

    Treatment of coronary artery disease primarily aims at reducing the severity and frequency of cardiac symptoms and improving prognosis. Both goals can be achieved by the administration of beta-receptor blockers, which are now used as first-line therapy in these patients. Calcium channel blockers or nitrates should be given in the event of contraindications or severe intolerance to beta-receptor blocking therapy. Only long-acting calcium channel blockers should be used in this setting. Another indication for additional treatment with calcium channel blockers and nitrates is given when the efficacy of beta-blocker therapy is not sufficient to relieve symptoms. Nitroglycerin and nitrates are the drugs of choice for the treatment of the acute angina pectoris attack. Calcium channel blockers are used as first-line treatment in patients with vasospastic angina. In patients with syndrome X, nitrates as well as calcium channel blockers or beta-receptor blockers can be administered. In the absence of contraindications, every patient with coronary artery disease should be given aspirin. A daily dosage of 75 to 150 mg is sufficient to reduce the rate of future cardiac events. Clopidogrel should be given in every patient with intolerance or contraindications for aspirin. Increased plasma homocystein levels seem to be a risk factor for coronary artery disease. Homocystein levels can be reduced by dietary means as well as supplementation of folic acid or vitamin B complex. There is no evidence from controlled randomised studies that a decrease of homocystein is beneficial for the prognosis of patients with coronary artery disease.

  3. Pulmonary and systemic arterial pressure in hyaline membrane disease.

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, J R; Boys, R J; Hunter, S; Hey, E N

    1992-01-01

    Systolic pulmonary arterial pressure was determined serially over the first 10 days of life in 33 babies with hyaline membrane disease by measuring the peak velocity of pansystolic tricuspid valve regurgitation, using Doppler ultrasound, and applying the Bernoulli equation. Results are presented in age groups 0-12, 13-36, 37-72, and 73-96 hours respectively. The incidence of tricuspid valve regurgitation was 92, 97, 80, and 64% (falling to 35% by day 10) compared with 53, 50, 31, and 0% in 17 healthy premature infants. In comparing healthy babies with those with hyaline membrane disease, no allowance was made for right atrial pressure. The derived 'right ventricle to right atrial (RV-RA) pressure difference', was expressed as a ratio of systemic arterial (systolic) pressure. Over the first three days, this ratio fell much faster in the healthy babies. Values were 0.78:1, 0.77:1, and 0.72:1 in babies with hyaline membrane disease and 0.87:1, 0.53:1, and 0.44:1 in healthy babies. Ductal patency was prolonged in babies with hyaline membrane disease (75% on day 4 compared with 6% in healthy babies). The incidence of bidirectional ductal flow, indicating balanced pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures, was 79, 53, 30, and 20%, and in healthy babies was 41% at 0-12 hours and zero thereafter. Pulmonary arterial pressure was then calculated by adding a right atrial pressure estimate of 5 mm Hg to the RV-RA difference when the babies were ventilated. Babies of lower gestation had lower values. The pulmonary: systemic arterial pressure ratio showed considerable temporal variability, but fell with age and was raised by high mean airway pressure and pneumothorax (through a reduction in systemic pressure), and less noticeably by carbon dioxide tension. It did not correlate significantly with other indices of disease severity. Hyaline membrane disease is associated with delayed postnatal circulatory adaptation characterized by pulmonary hypertension, systemic hypotension, and

  4. Coronary artery disease in patients with cerebrovascular disease: a prospective study

    SciTech Connect

    Rokey, R.; Rolak, L.A.; Harati, Y.; Kutka, N.; Verani, M.S.

    1984-07-01

    Coronary artery disease is the cause of death in most patients who have transient ischemic attacks or stroke. Evaluation for this condition is not routinely performed in such patients, and no prospective studies have been reported. We prospectively examined 50 consecutive patients with transient ischemic attacks or mild stroke to determine the prevalence and importance of coronary artery disease. All patients were examined by a cardiologist and underwent both exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy and exercise radionuclide ventriculography. Sixteen patients were suspected to have coronary artery disease on the basis of clinical evaluation. In 15 of these the was confirmed by the nuclear scans. The remaining 34 patients had no clinical evidence of heart disease, yet 14 had abnormal cardiac scans. Twenty of 22 patients with abnormal scans who underwent cardiac catheterization had significant coronary artery disease or a cardiomyopathy. The discovery of heart disease altered clinical management in 13 patients. Overall, 29 of 50 patients had significant coronary artery disease, compared with a 7% prevalence of the condition in other patients of similar age at the same institution.

  5. Connective tissue disease-related pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Vivek; Lau, Edmund M T

    2016-02-01

    Over the past two decades, there have been several advances in the assessment and management of connective tissue disease-related pulmonary arterial hypertension (CTD-PAH) that improved outcomes of the treatment of this lethal disease, and this will be the focus of this study. Systemic sclerosis is the leading cause of CTD-PAH, followed by systemic lupus erythematosus, mixed connective tissue disease, idiopathic inflammatory myositis, rheumatoid arthritis, and Sjogren's syndrome. Clinical registries have been invaluable in informing about the burden of disease, risk and prognostic factors, and temporal trends with respect to treatment and outcome in CTD-PAH. The major advances have centered on improved disease classification and diagnostic criteria, screening and early diagnosis, the emergence of evidence-based therapies including combination goal-orientated treatment strategies, and the establishment of centers with expertise in PAH.

  6. Connective tissue disease-related pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Vivek; Lau, Edmund M T

    2016-02-01

    Over the past two decades, there have been several advances in the assessment and management of connective tissue disease-related pulmonary arterial hypertension (CTD-PAH) that improved outcomes of the treatment of this lethal disease, and this will be the focus of this study. Systemic sclerosis is the leading cause of CTD-PAH, followed by systemic lupus erythematosus, mixed connective tissue disease, idiopathic inflammatory myositis, rheumatoid arthritis, and Sjogren's syndrome. Clinical registries have been invaluable in informing about the burden of disease, risk and prognostic factors, and temporal trends with respect to treatment and outcome in CTD-PAH. The major advances have centered on improved disease classification and diagnostic criteria, screening and early diagnosis, the emergence of evidence-based therapies including combination goal-orientated treatment strategies, and the establishment of centers with expertise in PAH. PMID:27421214

  7. Associations between pentraxin 3 and severity of coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hua; Guan, Shaofeng; Fang, Weiyi; Yuan, Fang; Zhang, Min; Qu, Xinkai

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the associations between plasma levels of pentraxins 3 (PTX3) and C reactive protein (CRP) and the severity of coronary artery lesions. Design and methods 60 patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) who underwent coronary angiography (CAG) in our hospital were included. Plasma was collected during CAG. The coronary Gensini score was used to evaluate the severity of coronary artery lesions. Associations between Gensini scores and plasma levels of PTX3 and CRP were analysed. Patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 were included in the chronic renal dysfunction subgroup. Results A linear correlation was observed between PTX3 and the Gensini score (r=0.513, p<0.001). One-way analysis of variance showed that PTX3 levels were significantly higher in patients with Gensini scores >90 compared with patients with scores of 46–90 or <45 (0–45:4.8±0.8, 46–90:6.7±1.2, >90:7.7±2.0, p<0.001). Stepwise multiple linear regression showed that PTX3 levels were significantly associated with Gensini score in patients with chronic renal dysfunction (p=0.012), while no significant association was found for CRP. Conclusions PTX3 levers were positively associated with the severity of coronary artery lesions. PTX3 is closely associated with the severity of coronary artery stenosis in patients with chronic renal dysfunction. PMID:25854969

  8. Imaging popliteal artery disease in young adults with claudication: self-assessment module.

    PubMed

    Chew, Felix S; Bui-Mansfield, Liem T

    2007-09-01

    The educational objectives of this self-assessment module on imaging popliteal artery disease in young adults with intermittent claudication are for the participant to exercise, self-assess, and improve his or her knowledge of the imaging and clinical features of popliteal artery entrapment syndrome, cystic adventitial disease,and masses associated with popliteal artery obstruction.

  9. The role of coronary artery disease in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lala, Anuradha; Desai, Akshay S

    2014-04-01

    Enhanced survival following acute myocardial infarction and the declining prevalence of hypertension and valvular heart disease as contributors to incident heart failure (HF) have fueled the emergence of coronary artery disease (CAD) as the primary risk factor for HF development. Despite the acknowledged role of CAD in the development of HF, the role of coronary revascularization in reducing HF-associated morbidity and mortality remains controversial. The authors review key features of the epidemiology and pathophysiology of CAD in patients with HF as well as the emerging data from recent clinical trials that inform the modern approach to management.

  10. Contemporary and optimal medical management of peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Tattersall, Matthew C; Johnson, Heather M; Mason, Peter J

    2013-08-01

    Atherosclerotic lower extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a highly prevalent condition associated with a significant increase in risk of all-cause mortality and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PAD is underdiagnosed and undertreated. Treatment is focused on (1) lowering cardiovascular risk and cardiovascular disease event rates and (2) improvement in symptoms and quality of life. Multidisciplinary and intersociety guidelines guide optimal medical therapy. Substantial evidence supports implementation of tobacco cessation counseling and pharmacotherapy to help achieve tobacco abstinence, antiplatelet therapy, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) therapy, and antihypertensive therapy for the purpose of lowering cardiovascular event rates and improving survival.

  11. Heart transplant coronary artery disease: Multimodality approach in percutaneous intervention.

    PubMed

    Leite, Luís; Matos, Vítor; Gonçalves, Lino; Silva Marques, João; Jorge, Elisabete; Calisto, João; Antunes, Manuel; Pego, Mariano

    2016-06-01

    Coronary artery disease is the most important cause of late morbidity and mortality after heart transplantation. It is usually an immunologic phenomenon termed cardiac allograft vasculopathy, but can also be the result of donor-transmitted atherosclerosis. Routine surveillance by coronary angiography should be complemented by intracoronary imaging, in order to determine the nature of the coronary lesions, and also by assessment of their functional significance to guide the decision whether to perform percutaneous coronary intervention. We report a case of coronary angiography at five-year follow-up after transplantation, using optical coherence tomography and fractional flow reserve to assess and optimize treatment of coronary disease in this challenging population.

  12. Longitudinal change in regional brain volumes in prodromal Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Aylward, Elizabeth H.; Nopoulos, Peggy C.; Ross, Christopher A.; Langbehn, Douglas R.; Pierson, Ronald K.; Mills, James A.; Johnson, Hans J.; Magnotta, Vincent A.; Juhl, Andrew R.; Paulsen, Jane S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective As therapeutics are being developed to target the underlying neuropathology of Huntington disease (HD), interest is increasing in methodologies for conducting clinical trials in the prodromal phase. This study was designed to examine the potential utility of structural MRI measures as outcome measures for such trials. Methods Data are presented from 211 prodromal individuals and 60 controls, scanned both at baseline and two-year follow-up. Prodromal participants were divided into groups based on proximity to estimated onset of diagnosable clinical disease: Far (>15 years from estimated onset); Mid (9–15 years); and Near (<9 years). Volumetric measurements of caudate, putamen, total striatum, globus pallidus, thalamus, total gray and white matter, and CSF were performed. Results All prodromal groups showed a faster rate of atrophy than Controls in striatum, total brain, and cerebral white matter (especially in the frontal lobe). Neither prodromal participants nor Controls showed significant longitudinal change in cortex (either total cortical gray or within individual lobes). When normal age-related atrophy (i.e., change observed in the Control group) was taken into account, there was more statistically significant disease-related atrophy in white matter than in striatum. Conclusion Measures of volume change in striatum and white matter volume, particularly in the frontal lobe, may serve as excellent outcome measures for future clinical trials in prodromal HD. Clinical trials using white matter or striatal volume change as an outcome measure will be most efficient if the sample is restricted to individuals who are within 15 years of estimated onset of diagnosable disease. PMID:20884680

  13. Longitudinal Measurements of Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Surova, Yulia; Öhrfelt, Annika; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hansson, Oskar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of tau, phosphorylated tau, β‐amyloid42, α‐synuclein, neurofilament light, and YKL‐40 change over time and if changes correlate with motor progression and/or cognitive decline in patients with PD and controls. Methods We included 63 patients with PD (nondemented) and 21 neurologically healthy controls from the prospective and longitudinal Swedish BioFINDER study, all of whom had clinical assessments and lumbar punctures at baseline and after 2 years. Results CSF tau levels correlated strongly with α‐synuclein. The levels of CSF α‐synuclein, tau, phosphorylated tau, neurofilament light, and YKL‐40, but not β‐amyloid42, increased in CSF over 2 years in PD. No changes were seen in the control group. Studying patients with a short disease duration ( ≤ 5 years) and patients with a long disease duration ( > 5 years) separately, α‐synuclein and tau only increased in the PD group with long disease duration. In the PD group, an increase in phosphorylated tau over 2 years correlated with faster motor progression and faster cognitive decline. An increase in YKL‐40 over 2 years correlated with faster cognitive decline. Conclusion CSF biomarkers reflecting Lewy body pathology and neurodegeneration (α‐synuclein), neuronal degeneration (tau, phosphorylated tau, and neurofilament light), and inflammation (YKL‐40) increase significantly over 2 years in PD. CSF levels of α‐synuclein and tau correlate and remain stable in the early symptomatic phase of PD but increase in the later phase. We hypothesize that CSF α‐synuclein levels might increase as a result of more intense neurodegeneration in PD with long disease duration. © 2016 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society PMID:26878815

  14. Relationship of Inflammatory Biomarkers with Severity of Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Toyofuku, Takahiro; Inoue, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The pentraxin family, including high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), serum amyloid P (SAP), and pentraxin 3 (PTX3), has been identified as playing a key role in inflammatory reactions such as in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. In this study, we examined the relationship between peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and serum levels of pentraxins. Methods. This study was undertaken via a retrospective review of PAD patients with surgical intervention for lesions of the common femoral artery. We evaluated the preoperative patient conditions, hemodynamic status, such as ankle brachial index (ABI), and clinical ischemic conditions according to Rutherford classification. Preoperatively, we collected blood samples for determining the serum levels of hs-CRP, SAP, and PTX3. Results. Twelve PAD patients with common femoral arterial lesions were treated and examined. The hemodynamic severity of PAD was not negatively correlated with hs-CRP, SAP, or PTX3. The clinical severity evaluated by Rutherford classification was significantly positively correlated with the serum level of PTX3 (p = 0.019). Conclusion. We demonstrated that PTX3 might be a better marker of PAD than hs-CRP and SAP. Furthermore, PTX3 might be a prognostic marker to evaluate the severity of PAD. PMID:27559483

  15. Low risk of coronary artery disease in patients with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos Silva, Cintia Marques; Lima, G A B; Volschan, I C M; Gottlieb, I; Kasuki, L; Neto, L Vieira; Gadelha, M R

    2015-12-01

    The aims of this study are to determine the prevalence of coronary atherosclerosis in acromegalic patients and to investigate the relationship between the coronary artery calcium score (CS) and acromegaly status and clinical parameters [Framingham risk score (FRS)]. Fifty-six acromegalic patients and paired non-acromegalic volunteers were stratified according to the FRS into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups. CS was assessed using multidetector computed tomography. The patients were considered to have controlled or active acromegaly at the time they were submitted to evaluation. Sixty-six percent of acromegalic patients exhibited arterial hypertension, 36 % had diabetes mellitus, and 34 % had hypercholesterolemia. The median FRS and the median risk for cardiovascular event within the next 10 years were similar in the acromegalics and the controls. The median total CS and CS >75th percentile didn't differ significantly between these groups. In patients with controlled acromegaly, a low, intermediate, or high FRS risk was observed in 86, 14, and 0 %, respectively. In patients with active disease, a low, intermediate, or high FRS risk was verified in 94, 3, and 3 %, respectively, and differences between the controlled and active groups were not significant. Seventy-two percent of the patients had total CS = 0, and there were no differences between the controlled and active groups. The risk of coronary artery disease in acromegalic patients, determined according to FRS and CS, is low despite the high prevalence of metabolic abnormalities.

  16. Non-Invasive Therapy of Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Marcial, José M; Pérez, Reynerio; Vargas, Pedro; Franqui-Rivera, Hilton

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Lifestyle changes, like the cessation of the use of tobacco as well as a modification of dietary and exercise habits, can be the most cost-effective interventions in patients with PAD. Smocking cessation is the most important intervention, since it increases survival in these patients. Antiplatelet therapy is an essential component in the treatment of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) of the lower extremities. In addition to delaying arterial obstructive progression, these agents are most usefull in reducing adverse cardiovascular events such as non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI), stroke and vascular death. Mainstay of treatment continues to be aspirin monotherapy (75-325mg daily). Current treatment for lower extremity PAD is directed towards the relief of symptoms and improvement in QoL. The two agents which have consistently been found to be most efficient in achieving these goals are cilostazol and naftidrofuryl oxalate. Naftidrofuryl oxalate may emerge as the most efficient and cost-effective treatment for symptom relief. PMID:26742197

  17. Relationship of Inflammatory Biomarkers with Severity of Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Igari, Kimihiro; Kudo, Toshifumi; Toyofuku, Takahiro; Inoue, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The pentraxin family, including high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), serum amyloid P (SAP), and pentraxin 3 (PTX3), has been identified as playing a key role in inflammatory reactions such as in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. In this study, we examined the relationship between peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and serum levels of pentraxins. Methods. This study was undertaken via a retrospective review of PAD patients with surgical intervention for lesions of the common femoral artery. We evaluated the preoperative patient conditions, hemodynamic status, such as ankle brachial index (ABI), and clinical ischemic conditions according to Rutherford classification. Preoperatively, we collected blood samples for determining the serum levels of hs-CRP, SAP, and PTX3. Results. Twelve PAD patients with common femoral arterial lesions were treated and examined. The hemodynamic severity of PAD was not negatively correlated with hs-CRP, SAP, or PTX3. The clinical severity evaluated by Rutherford classification was significantly positively correlated with the serum level of PTX3 (p = 0.019). Conclusion. We demonstrated that PTX3 might be a better marker of PAD than hs-CRP and SAP. Furthermore, PTX3 might be a prognostic marker to evaluate the severity of PAD. PMID:27559483

  18. Longitudinal study of circulating protein biomarkers in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Viennois, Emilie; Baker, Mark T.; Xiao, Bo; Wang, Lixin; Laroui, Hamed; Merlin, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic and progressive inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. In IBD, protein serological biomarkers could be relevant tools for assessing disease activity, performing early-stage diagnosis and managing the treatment. Using the interleukin-10 knockout (IL-10−/−) mouse, a model that develops a time-dependent IBD-like disorder that predominates in the colon; we performed longitudinal studies of circulating protein biomarkers in IBD. Circulating protein profiles in serum samples collected from 30-, 93-, and 135-day-old IL-10−/− mice were investigated using two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis and MALDI TOF/TOF tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 15 different proteins were identified and confirmed by ELISA and Western blot to be differentially accumulated in serum samples from mid- to late-stage IL-10−/− mice compared to early non-inflamed IL-10−/− mice. The use of another model of colitis and an extra-intestinal inflammation model validated this biomarker panel and demonstrated that comprised some global inflammatory markers, some intestinal inflammation-specific markers and some chronic intestinal inflammation markers. Statistical analyses using misclassification error rate charts validated the use of these identified proteins as powerful biomarkers of colitis. Unlike standard biomarker screening studies, our analyses identified a panel of proteins that allowed the definition of protein signatures that reflect colitis status. PMID:25230104

  19. Hypertension, obesity, and coronary artery disease in the survivors of congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Roche, S Lucy; Silversides, Candice K

    2013-07-01

    Obesity, hypertension, and coronary artery disease are prevalent in the general population and well recognized as contributors to cardiac morbidity and mortality. With surgical and medical advances, there is a growing and aging population with congenital heart disease who are also at risk of developing these comorbidities. In addition, some congenital cardiac lesions predispose patients to conditions such as hypertension or coronary artery disease. The effect of these comorbidities on the structurally abnormal heart is not well understood, but might be very important, especially in those with residual abnormalities. Thus, in addition to surveillance for and treatment of late complications it is important for the congenital cardiologist to consider and aggressively manage acquired comorbidities. In this review we explore the prevalence of hypertension, obesity, and coronary artery disease, discuss congenital lesions that predispose to these conditions and review management strategies for this unique population.

  20. [Diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease and heart disease].

    PubMed

    Clodi, Martin; Säly, Christoph; Hoppichler, Friedrich; Resl, Michael; Steinwender, Clemens; Eber, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and heart failure are interacting dynamically. Patients being diagnosed with cardiovascular disease should be screened for diabetes mellitus. Enhanced cardiovascular risk stratification based on biomarkers, symptoms and classical risk factors should be performed in patients with pre-existing diabetes mellitus. PMID:27052249

  1. [Tobacco smoking among hospitalised patients with coronary arterial disease].

    PubMed

    Kara, Izabella; Zysnarska, Monika; Borkowicz, Monika; Maksymiuk, Tomasz

    2009-01-01

    The impact of tobacco smoking on the development of cardio-vascular diseases, including coronary arterial disease (CAD) is very well known by now. More than 1/3 of the Polish adult population are affected which roughly corresponds with WHO accepted percentage of smokers world-wide (over 30%, over 15 years of age). Smokers with cardio-vascular problems are, naturally, even more dramatically affected. The article focuses on selected consequences of tobacco smoking among patients with coronary arterial disease. One hundred patients, already diagnosed with CAD, and hospitalised because of it, formed the studied group (71 male, 29 female). A survey questionnaire was employed as a tool, to inquire the subjects on elements of their life-style, encompassing both declared, acquired knowledge on behavioural patterns conducive to health and its implementation in every-day life. The life-style patterns included, for example, proper diet, physical activity and tobacco smoking. The study results showed that 97% of the group were well aware of the negative influence of smoking on their health (the remaining 3% left the question unanswered). None of the respondents was convinced of the alleged positive aspects of tobacco smoking. At the same time, 17% of the subjects with CAD still smoked, 56% ceased smoking, and the remaining 27% never smoked. The study revealed moreover that the very realisation that nicotinism influenced the CAD progress was instrumental in ceasing smoking by the 56% of former tobacco addicts. Tobacco smoking remains an issue among persons with diagnosed coronary arterial disease. A clear discrepancy was noted, between the almost 100% awareness of the habit's harmful consequences and reality of every-day life.

  2. Overview of Classification Systems in Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hardman, Rulon L.; Jazaeri, Omid; Yi, J.; Smith, M.; Gupta, Rajan

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD), secondary to atherosclerotic disease, is currently the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the western world. While PAD is common, it is estimated that the majority of patients with PAD are undiagnosed and undertreated. The challenge to the treatment of PAD is to accurately diagnose the symptoms and determine treatment for each patient. The varied presentations of peripheral vascular disease have led to numerous classification schemes throughout the literature. Consistent grading of patients leads to both objective criteria for treating patients and a baseline for clinical follow-up. Reproducible classification systems are also important in clinical trials and when comparing medical, surgical, and endovascular treatment paradigms. This article reviews the various classification systems for PAD and advantages to each system. PMID:25435665

  3. Diagnostic outcomes of magnetocardiography in patients with coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingmei; Che, Zaiqian; Quan, Weiwei; Yuan, Rong; Shen, Yue; Liu, Zongjun; Wang, Weiqing; Jin, Huigen; Lu, Guoping

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic outcomes of magnetocardiography (MCG) on the patients with coronary artery disease and compared the outcomes between MCG, ECG and Echocardiography. Methods: MCG measurements were performed on 101 patients with coronary artery disease and 116 healthy volunteers with a seven-channel magnetocardiographic system (MCG7, SQUID AG, Germany) installed in an unshielded room. CAD was diagnosed when stenosis ≥ 70% in ≥ 1 vessel. Three quantitative indicators were analyzed, R-max/T-max ratio, R value and á average angle. Results: R-max/T-max ratio of CAD group (6.30 ± 4.07) was much higher than that of healthy group (3.73 ± 1.41) (P < 0.001), R value of CAD group (69.16 ± 27.87)% was significantly higher than that of healthy group (34.96 ± 19.09)% (P < 0.001), á average angle of CAD group (221.46° ± 64.53°) was higher than that of healthy group (24.32° ± 20.70°) (P < 0.01). In 75 of 101 CAD patients (74.26%), MCG had abnormal mapping patterns. The resting ECG examination showed ischemic changes, such as abnormal Q waves and ST-T change in 49 patients (48.51%). Echocardiography revealed abnormal left ventricular wall motion and asynergy in 46 patients (45.54%). Thus, the diagnostic outcomes of MCG for the patients with CAD were much significant than those of ECG and echocardiography (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Our result showed that resting MCG under condition of an advanced data analysis has higher diagnostic outcomes and is superior to ECG or echocardiography for patients with CAD. MCG can detect ST-segment displacement caused by ischemic myocardium, thus helpful in diagnosing coronary artery disease early. PMID:25932186

  4. Aortic augmentation index in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Mariella; Scandale, Giovanni; Carzaniga, Gianni; Cinquini, Michela; Minola, Marzio; Antoniazzi, Valeria; Dimitrov, Gabriel; Carotta, Maria

    2014-11-01

    Aortic augmentation index (AIx) is used to investigate arterial stiffness. The authors tested the hypothesis that patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) demonstrate a higher AIx and also evaluated several related factors. In 97 patients with PAD, identified by ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI ≤ 0.9), and 97 controls (ABPI ≥ 0.91< 1.4), AIx (%) was determined using tonometry of the radial artery. There was no significant difference between patients and controls in characteristics of age, sex, height, diastolic blood pressure, mean blood pressure, and heart rate. AIx was higher in patients with PAD (32 ± 9 vs 28 ± 9; P = .001). In multivariate regression analysis, AIx was independently associated with heart rate (β = -0.40, P = .0005). This study showed that AIx increased in patients with PAD and that heart rate is a determinant of AIx. Further studies are necessary to assess the pathophysiological and clinical importance of AIx in patients with PAD. PMID:25228305

  5. [Stress echocardiography in diagnosis of coronary artery disease].

    PubMed

    Gackowski, A; Piwowarska, W

    1996-03-01

    Diagnostic value of stress echocardiography is discussed. Different stress modalities such as exercise, pharmacological tests (dipyridamole, adenosine, dobutamine), and atrial pacing are characterized and compared. Stress echo protocols are also described. A value of stress echocardiography is discussed in comparison with ECG stress testing and thalium perfusion scintigraphy. Stress echocardiography is a valuable, safe, inexpensive diagnostic technique in case of the coronary artery disease. It is time-consuming and has limited efficiency in patients with poor echocardiographic conditions. The test requires skills and experience of the performing physician.

  6. Ear lobe crease: a marker of coronary artery disease?

    PubMed Central

    Agouridis, Aris P.; Elisaf, Moses S.; Nair, Devaki R.

    2015-01-01

    The ear lobe crease (ELC) has been defined as a deep wrinkle that extends backwards from the tragus to the auricle. It has been proposed that ELC is a predictor of coronary artery disease (CAD). In this review, we consider the possible association between ELC and CAD. Our aim is to systematically address all the relevant evidence in this field. There are many studies that support an association between ELC and CAD. However, other studies did not find such an association. A recent meta-analysis supports the hypothesis that ELC could be a marker of CAD. However, several limitations raise doubts as to whether we should accept this link. PMID:26788075

  7. Coronary Artery Disease - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... تصلب الشرايين التاجية - العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Heart Cath and Heart Angioplasty (Arabic) شرايين القلب القسطرة القلبية وتوسيع - العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Bosnian (Bosanski) Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) Bolest koronarnih ( ...

  8. Diabetes is associated with impaired myocardial performance in patients without significant coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) have high risk of heart failure. Whether some of the risk is directly linked to metabolic derangements in the myocardium or whether the risk is primarily caused by coronary artery disease (CAD) and hypertension is incompletely understood. Echocardiographic tissue Doppler imaging was therefore performed in DM patients without significant CAD to examine whether DM per se influenced cardiac function. Methods Patients with a left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) > 35% and without significant CAD, prior myocardial infarction, cardiac pacemaker, atrial fibrillation, or significant valve disease were identified from a tertiary invasive center register. DM patients were matched with controls on age, gender and presence of hypertension. Results In total 31 patients with diabetes and 31 controls were included. Mean age was 58 ± 12 years, mean LVEF was 51 ± 7%, and 48% were women. No significant differences were found in LVEF, left atrial end systolic volume, or left ventricular dimensions. The global longitudinal strain was significantly reduced in patients with DM (15.9 ± 2.9 vs. 17.7 ± 2.9, p = 0.03), as were peak longitudinal systolic (S') and early diastolic (E') velocities (5.7 ± 1.1 vs. 6.4 ± 1.1 cm/s, p = 0.02 and 6.1 ± 1.7 vs. 7.7 ± 2.0 cm/s, p = 0.002). In multivariable regression analyses, DM remained significantly associated with impairments of S' and E', respectively. Conclusion In patients without significant CAD, DM is associated with an impaired systolic longitudinal LV function and global diastolic dysfunction. These abnormalities are likely to be markers of adverse prognosis. PMID:20082690

  9. Use of Anticoagulants and Antiplatelet Agents in Stable Outpatients with Coronary Artery Disease and Atrial Fibrillation. International CLARIFY Registry

    PubMed Central

    Fauchier, Laurent; Greenlaw, Nicola; Ferrari, Roberto; Ford, Ian; Fox, Kim M.; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tendera, Michal; Steg, Ph. Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Background Few data are available regarding the use of antithrombotic strategies in coronary artery disease patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) in everyday practice. We sought to describe the prevalence of AF and its antithrombotic management in a contemporary population of patients with stable coronary artery disease. Methods and Findings CLARIFY is an international, prospective, longitudinal registry of outpatients with stable coronary artery disease, defined as prior (≥12 months) myocardial infarction, revascularization procedure, coronary stenosis >50%, or chest pain associated with evidence of myocardial ischemia. Overall, 33,428 patients were screened, of whom 32,954 had data available for analysis at baseline; of these 2,229 (6.7%) had a history of AF. Median (interquartile range) CHA2DS2-VASc score was 4 (3, 5). Oral anticoagulation alone was used in 25.7%, antiplatelet therapy alone in 52.8% (single 41.8%, dual 11.0%), and both in 21.5%. OAC use was independently associated with permanent AF (p<0.001), CHA2DS2-VASc score (p=0.006), pacemaker (p<0.001), stroke (p=0.04), absence of angina (p=0.004), decreased left ventricular ejection fraction (p<0.001), increased waist circumference (p=0.005), and longer history of coronary artery disease (p=0.008). History of percutaneous coronary intervention (p=0.004) and no/partial reimbursement for cardiovascular medication (p=0.01, p<0.001, respectively) were associated with reduced oral anticoagulant use. Conclusions In this contemporary cohort of patients with stable coronary artery disease and AF, most of whom are theoretical candidates for anticoagulation, oral anticoagulants were used in only 47.2%. Half of the patients received antiplatelet therapy alone and one-fifth received both antiplatelets and oral anticoagulants. Efforts are needed to improve adherence to guidelines in these patients. Trial Registration ISRCTN registry of clinical trials: ISRCTN43070564. PMID:25915904

  10. Preoperative prediction of significant coronary artery disease in patients with valvular heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ramsdale, D R; Faragher, E B; Bennett, D H; Bray, C L; Ward, C; Beton, D C

    1982-01-01

    A prognostic index for predicting significant coronary artery disease was established using multiple logistic regression analysis of clinical data from 643 patients with valvular heart disease who had undergone routine coronary arteriography before valve replacement. The index or equation obtained incorporated the presence of angina, a family history of ischaemic heart disease, age, cigarette smoking habits, mitral valve disease, sex, and electrocardiographic evidence of myocardial infarction. The equation was validated using prospective data from 387 patients with valvular disease and shown to enable almost a third of routine coronary arteriograms to be omitted while maintaining 95% sensitivity for patients with coronary artery disease. Similar analysis of the more detailed prospective data produced a second discriminant function incorporating diastolic blood pressure, total cigarettes smoked in life, the severity of angina, family history of ischaemic heart disease, age, current cigarette smoking habits, and the ratio of total to high density lipoprotein cholesterol. This method improved the discrimination between patients with and without coronary artery disease, allowing omission of 30% of routine coronary arteriograms with 100% sensitivity for patients with coronary disease and omission of 41% with a 96% sensitivity level. Images FIG 1 FIG 2 PMID:6799111

  11. Arterial stiffness & Sri Lankan chronic kidney disease of unknown origin

    PubMed Central

    Gifford, Fiona; Kimmitt, Robert; Herath, Chula; Webb, David J; Melville, Vanessa; Siribaddana, Sisira; Eddleston, Michael; Dhaun, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and independently associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Arterial stiffness contributes to CVD risk in CKD. In many developing countries a considerable proportion of CKD remains unexplained, termed CKDu. We assessed arterial stiffness in subjects with Sri Lankan CKDu, in matched controls without CKD and in those with defined CKD. Aortic blood pressure (BP), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx) were assessed in 130 subjects (50 with CKDu, 45 with CKD and 35 without CKD) using the validated TensioMed™ Arteriograph monitor. Brachial and aortic BP was lower in controls than in CKDu and CKD subjects but no different between CKDu and CKD. Controls had a lower PWV compared to subjects with CKDu and CKD. Despite equivalent BP and renal dysfunction, CKDu subjects had a lower PWV than those with CKD (8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 9.9 ± 2.2 m/s, p < 0.01). Excluding diabetes accentuated the differences in PWV seen between groups (controls vs. CKDu vs. CKD: 6.7 ± 0.9 vs. 8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 10.4 ± 1.5 m/s, p < 0.001 for all). Sri Lankan CKDu is associated with less arterial stiffening than defined causes of CKD. Whether this translates to lower cardiovascular morbidity and mortality long term is unclear and should be the focus of future studies. PMID:27586642

  12. Arterial stiffness & Sri Lankan chronic kidney disease of unknown origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gifford, Fiona; Kimmitt, Robert; Herath, Chula; Webb, David J.; Melville, Vanessa; Siribaddana, Sisira; Eddleston, Michael; Dhaun, Neeraj

    2016-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and independently associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Arterial stiffness contributes to CVD risk in CKD. In many developing countries a considerable proportion of CKD remains unexplained, termed CKDu. We assessed arterial stiffness in subjects with Sri Lankan CKDu, in matched controls without CKD and in those with defined CKD. Aortic blood pressure (BP), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx) were assessed in 130 subjects (50 with CKDu, 45 with CKD and 35 without CKD) using the validated TensioMed™ Arteriograph monitor. Brachial and aortic BP was lower in controls than in CKDu and CKD subjects but no different between CKDu and CKD. Controls had a lower PWV compared to subjects with CKDu and CKD. Despite equivalent BP and renal dysfunction, CKDu subjects had a lower PWV than those with CKD (8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 9.9 ± 2.2 m/s, p < 0.01). Excluding diabetes accentuated the differences in PWV seen between groups (controls vs. CKDu vs. CKD: 6.7 ± 0.9 vs. 8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 10.4 ± 1.5 m/s, p < 0.001 for all). Sri Lankan CKDu is associated with less arterial stiffening than defined causes of CKD. Whether this translates to lower cardiovascular morbidity and mortality long term is unclear and should be the focus of future studies.

  13. Progression of asymptomatic peripheral artery disease over 1 year.

    PubMed

    Mohler, Emile R; Bundens, Warner; Denenberg, Julie; Medenilla, Elizabeth; Hiatt, William R; Criqui, Michael H

    2012-02-01

    The pathophysiology and time course of an individual converting from asymptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD) to symptomatic claudication is unclear. The objectives of this study were: (1) to characterize the extent of atherosclerotic disease in individuals with an abnormal ankle-brachial index (ABI), but without claudication; and over 1 year of follow-up to (2) evaluate the progression of PAD using ultrasound imaging, (3) determine changes in the ABI and leg pain symptoms, and (4) correlate PAD progression with changes in the ABI and leg symptoms. We hypothesized that PAD progression would be associated with the development of claudication and changes in the ABI, 6-minute walk distance (6-MWD), and walking quality of life. Individuals with a reduced ABI but without typical intermittent claudication noted on community screening were invited to undergo baseline and 1-year follow-up assessment, including duplex ultrasound. The initial and repeat evaluations included measurement of the ABI, lower extremity duplex arterial mapping, and assessment of leg pain and functional status. Of the 50 people studied, 44 (88%) had significant atherosclerotic lesions in the lower extremity arteries, affecting 80 legs. A total of 33 of 50 individuals (66%) returned for the 1-year follow-up visit. On ultrasound examination, two of 18 normal legs developed PAD, and in 48 legs with PAD at baseline, 17 legs (35%) developed new or progressive lesions. Thirteen legs developed new claudication. Overall, there was no significant worsening in the ABI, 6-MWD, or the Walking Impairment Questionnaire (WIQ). However, legs with new lesions or lesion progression were significantly more likely to develop claudication, and the 13 legs (seven subjects) developing claudication showed a significant decline in the 6-MWD. In conclusion, these data indicate that a significant number of people with asymptomatic PAD show progression over 1 year, that such individuals are more likely to develop

  14. Arterial stiffness &Sri Lankan chronic kidney disease of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Fiona; Kimmitt, Robert; Herath, Chula; Webb, David J; Melville, Vanessa; Siribaddana, Sisira; Eddleston, Michael; Dhaun, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and independently associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Arterial stiffness contributes to CVD risk in CKD. In many developing countries a considerable proportion of CKD remains unexplained, termed CKDu. We assessed arterial stiffness in subjects with Sri Lankan CKDu, in matched controls without CKD and in those with defined CKD. Aortic blood pressure (BP), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx) were assessed in 130 subjects (50 with CKDu, 45 with CKD and 35 without CKD) using the validated TensioMed™ Arteriograph monitor. Brachial and aortic BP was lower in controls than in CKDu and CKD subjects but no different between CKDu and CKD. Controls had a lower PWV compared to subjects with CKDu and CKD. Despite equivalent BP and renal dysfunction, CKDu subjects had a lower PWV than those with CKD (8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 9.9 ± 2.2 m/s, p < 0.01). Excluding diabetes accentuated the differences in PWV seen between groups (controls vs. CKDu vs. CKD: 6.7 ± 0.9 vs. 8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 10.4 ± 1.5 m/s, p < 0.001 for all). Sri Lankan CKDu is associated with less arterial stiffening than defined causes of CKD. Whether this translates to lower cardiovascular morbidity and mortality long term is unclear and should be the focus of future studies. PMID:27586642

  15. Peripheral artery disease in korean patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: prevalence and association with coronary artery disease severity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Kyoung; Song, Pil Sang; Yang, Jeong Hoon; Song, Young Bin; Hahn, Joo-Yong; Choi, Jin-Ho; Gwon, Hyeon-Cheol; Lee, Sang Hoon; Hong, Kyung Pyo; Park, Jeong Euy; Kim, Duk-kyung; Choi, Seung-Hyuk

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is an important marker for the risk stratification of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). We investigated the prevalence of PAD in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with CAD and the relationship between ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI) and CAD severity. A total of 711 patients undergoing PCI for CAD from August 2009 to August 2011 were enrolled. PAD diagnosis was made using the ABPI. The prevalence of PAD was 12.8%. In PAD patients, mean values of right and left ABPI were 0.71 ± 0.15 and 0.73 ± 0.15. Patients with PAD had a higher prevalence of left main coronary disease (14.3% vs 5.8%, P = 0.003), more frequently had multivessel lesions (74.9% vs 52.1%, P < 0.001) and had higher SYNTAX score (18.2 ± 12.3 vs 13.1 ± 8.26, P = 0.002). Using multivariate analysis, we determined that left main CAD (OR, 2.954; 95% CI, 1.418-6.152, P = 0.004) and multivessel CAD (OR, 2.321; 95% CI, 1.363-3.953, P = 0.002) were both independently associated with PAD. We recommend that ABPI-based PAD screening should be implemented in all patients undergoing PCI with CAD, especially in severe cases. PMID:23341717

  16. Arterial spin labelling reveals prolonged arterial arrival time in idiopathic Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Al-Bachari, Sarah; Parkes, Laura M.; Vidyasagar, Rishma; Hanby, Martha F.; Tharaken, Vivek; Leroi, Iracema; Emsley, Hedley C.A.

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease, yet effective disease modifying treatments are still lacking. Neurodegeneration involves multiple interacting pathological pathways. The extent to which neurovascular mechanisms are involved is not well defined in IPD. We aimed to determine whether novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, including arterial spin labelling (ASL) quantification of cerebral perfusion, can reveal altered neurovascular status (NVS) in IPD. Fourteen participants with IPD (mean ± SD age 65.1 ± 5.9 years) and 14 age and cardiovascular risk factor matched control participants (mean ± SD age 64.6 ± 4.2 years) underwent a 3T MRI scan protocol. ASL images were collected before, during and after a 6 minute hypercapnic challenge. FLAIR images were used to determine white matter lesion score. Quantitative images of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and arterial arrival time (AAT) were calculated from the ASL data both at rest and during hypercapnia. Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) images were calculated, depicting the change in CBF and AAT relative to the change in end-tidal CO2. A significant (p = 0.005) increase in whole brain averaged baseline AAT was observed in IPD participants (mean ± SD age 1532 ± 138 ms) compared to controls (mean ± SD age 1335 ± 165 ms). Voxel-wise analysis revealed this to be widespread across the brain. However, there were no statistically significant differences in white matter lesion score, CBF, or CVR between patients and controls. Regional CBF, but not AAT, in the IPD group was found to correlate positively with Montreal cognitive assessment (MoCA) scores. These findings provide further evidence of alterations in NVS in IPD. PMID:25379411

  17. High-density lipoprotein functionality in coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kosmas, Constantine E; Christodoulidis, Georgios; Cheng, Jeh-wei; Vittorio, Timothy J; Lerakis, Stamatios

    2014-06-01

    The role of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in cardiovascular atheroprotection is well established. Epidemiological data have clearly demonstrated an inverse relationship between HDL levels and the risk for coronary artery disease, which is independent of the low-density lipoprotein levels. However, more recent data provide evidence that high HDL levels are not always protective and that under certain conditions may even confer an increased risk. Thus, a new concept has arisen, which stresses the importance of HDL functionality, rather than HDL concentration per se, in the assessment of cardiovascular risk. HDL functionality is genetically defined but can also be modified by several environmental and lifestyle factors, such as diet, smoking or certain pharmacologic interventions. Furthermore, HDL is consisted of a heterogeneous group of particles with major differences in their structural, biological and functional properties. Recently, the cholesterol efflux capacity from macrophages was proven to be an excellent metric of HDL functionality, because it was shown to have a strong inverse relationship with the risk of angiographically documented coronary artery disease, independent of the HDL and apolipoprotein A-1 levels, although it may not actually predict the prospective risk for cardiovascular events. Thus, improving the quality of HDL may represent a better therapeutic target than simply raising the HDL level, and assessment of HDL function may prove informative in refining our understanding of HDL-mediated atheroprotection.

  18. Dense low density lipoproteins and coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Krauss, R M

    1995-02-23

    A common, genetically influenced lipoprotein subclass profile characterized by a predominance of small, dense low density lipoprotein (LDL) particles is associated with relative increases in plasma triglyceride and apolipoprotein (apo) B-100, and reduced levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol and apoAI. Recently, this phenotype has also been associated with the insulin resistance syndrome and familial combined hyperlipidemia. Case-control studies of patients with myocardial infarction and angiographically documented coronary artery disease (CAD) have demonstrated that 40-50% of patients have the small, dense LDL phenotype and that this is associated with a 2- to 3-fold increase in disease risk. However, because of strong statistical correlations among the multiple features of the phenotype, it has been difficult to determine whether > or = 1 of its metabolic alterations are primarily responsible for increased CAD susceptibility. More direct evidence for enhanced atherogenicity of lipoproteins in this trait derives from a recent report that LDL-cholesterol lowering by diet and drug treatment resulted in reduced coronary angiographic progression in CAD subjects with predominantly dense LDL, but that an equivalent lowering of LDL cholesterol in subjects with more buoyant LDL was not associated with angiographic benefit. Further, in vitro findings have indicated increased susceptibility of small, dense LDL to oxidative modification and relatively greater binding of these particles to arterial wall proteoglycans. Thus, the small, dense LDL trait may underlie familial predisposition to CAD in a large proportion of the population, and its presence may indicate the potential for benefit from specific therapeutic interventions.

  19. Coronary artery disease and its association with Vitamin D deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Ramesh; Akhthar, Tauseef; Jain, Sachin Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) has become the latest scourge of humankind and referred to in this article as CAD, is the end result of the accumulation of atheromatous plaques within the walls of coronary arteries that supply the myocardium, a process also known as atherosclerosis and manifests mostly in the form of chronic stable angina or acute coronary syndrome. Vitamin D has attracted considerable interest recently due to its role in a number of extraskeletal disease processes including multiple sclerosis, malignancies, diabetes mellitus, and CAD. It is also known as sunshine vitamin due to its production in the body following exposure to ultraviolet rays, and it is a unique vitamin as it acts like a hormone with its receptor present in a wide range of tissues including endothelium, which is the important mediator of atherosclerosis and subsequent CAD. A large number of studies conducted in the past have provided the basic scientific framework and this article attempts to explore the role of Vitamin D deficiency in the pathogenesis of CAD and stresses the need for further research to fill up gap in our knowledge. PMID:27499590

  20. Lack of MEF2A mutations in coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Li; Kavaslar, Nihan; Ustaszewska, Anna; Doelle, Heather; Schackwitz, Wendy; Hebert, Sybil; Cohen, Jonathan; McPherson, Ruth; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2004-12-01

    Mutations in MEF2A have been implicated in an autosomal dominant form of coronary artery disease (adCAD1). In this study we sought to determine whether severe mutations in MEF2A might also explain sporadic cases of coronary artery disease (CAD). To do this, we resequenced the coding sequence and splice sites of MEF2A in {approx}300 patients with premature CAD and failed to find causative mutations in the CAD cohort. However, we did identify the 21 base pair (bp) MEF2A coding sequence deletion originally implicated in adCAD1 in one of 300 elderly control subjects without CAD. Further screening of an additional {approx}1,500 non-CAD patients revealed two more subjects with the MEF2A 21 bp deletion. Genotyping of 19 family members of the three probands with the 21 bp deletion in MEF2A revealed that the mutation did not co-segregate with early CAD. These studies demonstrate that MEF2A mutations are not a common cause of CAD and cast serious doubt on the role of the MEF2A 21 bp deletion in adCAD1.

  1. The relationship between obesity and coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Jahangir, Eiman; De Schutter, Alban; Lavie, Carl J

    2014-10-01

    Obesity continues to be a growing issue in the United States, with an estimated prevalence of 72 million people. There are major health implications associated with obesity, including its relationship with hypertension, diabetes mellitus type 2, metabolic syndrome, and dyslipidemia, all independent risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD). Despite the increased risk of developing CAD, in recent years an "obesity paradox" has been described in which moderately obese individuals with established cardiovascular disease, including CAD, appear to have mortality similar to their normal-weight counterparts. This review examines the relationship between obesity and CAD, including the increased risk of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, and dyslipidemia, along with a discussion of the obesity paradox and the benefits of weight reduction.

  2. The exercise pressor reflex and peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Stone, Audrey J; Kaufman, Marc P

    2015-03-01

    The exercise pressor reflex contributes to increases in cardiovascular and ventilatory function during exercise. These reflexive increases are caused by both mechanical stimulation and metabolic stimulation of group III and IV afferents with endings in contracting skeletal muscle. Patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) have an augmented exercise pressor reflex. Recently, an animal model of PAD was established which allows further investigation of possible mechanisms involved in this augmented reflex. Earlier studies have identified ASIC3 channels, bradykinin receptors, P2X receptors, endoperoxide receptors, and thromboxane receptors as playing a role in evoking the exercise pressor reflex in healthy rats. This review focuses on recent studies using a rat model of PAD in order to determine possible mechanisms contributing to the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex seen in patients with this disease.

  3. Enzymatic antioxidant system in vascular inflammation and coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Lubrano, Valter; Balzan, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    In biological systems there is a balance between the production and neutralization of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This balance is maintained by the presence of natural antioxidants and antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and glutathione peroxidase. The enhancement of lipid peroxidation or the decrease of antioxidant protection present in metabolic diseases or bad lifestyle can induce endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Clinical studies have shown that oxidative stress can increase ROS reducing the formation of antioxidant defences, especially in subjects with coronary artery disease (CAD). Some observation indicated that in the early stages of the disease there is a homeostatic up-regulation of the antioxidant enzyme system in response to increased free radicals to prevent vascular damage. As soon as free radicals get to chronically elevated levels, this compensation ceases. Therefore, SOD and the other enzymes may represent a good therapeutic target against ROS, but they are not useful markers for the diagnosis of CAD. In conclusion antioxidant enzymes are reduced in presence of metabolic disease and CAD. However the existence of genes that promote their enzymatic activity could contribute to create new drugs for the treatment of damage caused by metabolic diseases or lifestyle that increases the plasma ROS levels. PMID:26618108

  4. Radiologic evaluation of coronary artery disease in adults with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, David M; Ordovas, Karen G

    2016-01-01

    Improved surgical and medical therapy have prolonged survival in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) such that general medical conditions like coronary artery disease (CAD) are now the main determinants of mortality. A summary of the association of CAD with CHD, as well as a discussion of the radiologic evaluation of the coronary arteries in adults with CHD is described herein. Cross sectional imaging to evaluate CAD in adults with CHD should follow the same appropriateness criteria as gender and aged matched patients without CHD. Coronary CT imaging may be particularly valuable in evaluating the coronary arteries in this patient population as invasive coronary angiography may prove challenging secondary to complicated or unconventional anatomy of the coronary arteries. Further, typical methods for evaluating CAD such as stress or echocardiography may be impractical in adults with CHD. Finally, delineating the anatomic relationship of the coronary arteries and their relationship with the sternum, chest wall, conduits, grafts, and valves is highly recommended in patients with CHD prior to reintervention to avoid iatrogenic complications.

  5. Antiplatelet effect of aspirin in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Grove, Erik Lerkevang

    2012-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death globally, and atherothrombosis is the underlying cause of most cardiovascular events. Several studies have shown that antiplatelet therapy, including aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), reduces the risk of cardiovascular events and death. However, it is well-known that many patients experience cardiovascular events despite treatment with aspirin, often termed "aspirin low-responsiveness". This fact has caused considerable debate: does biochemical aspirin low-responsiveness have prognostic value? Can low-responders be reliably identified? And if so, should antithrombotic treatment be changed? Is the whole discussion of antiplatelet drug response merely a result of low compliance? Compliance should be carefully optimised, before evaluating the pharmacological effect of a drug. It is well-known that cardiovascular disease is multifactorial, and, therefore, total risk reduction is not feasible. Aetiological factors to the variable platelet inhibition by aspirin seem to include genetic factors, pharmacological interactions, smoking, diabetes mellitus, and increased platelet turnover. It is a captivating thought that antiplatelet therapy may be improved by individually tailored therapy based on platelet function testing. Ongoing studies are challenging the current one-size-fits-all dosing strategy, but the preceding evaluation of platelet function assays has not been adequate. The overall objective of this thesis was to evaluate the reproducibility of and aggreement between a number of widely used platelet function tests and to explore the importance of platelet turnover for the antiplatelet effect of aspirin in patients with coronary artery disease. In the intervention studies (studies 1, 3, and 4), optimal compliance was confirmed by measurements of serum thromboxane, which is the most sensitive assay to confirm compliance with aspirin. In study 1, platelet function tests widely used to measure the antiplatelet effect

  6. Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease The Coronary Arterial Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Perloff, Joseph K

    2012-01-01

    Background: The coronary circulation in cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) includes the extramural coronary arteries, basal coronary blood flow, flow reserve, the coronary microcirculation, and coronary atherogenesis. Methods: Coronary arteriograms were analyzed in 59 adults with CCHD. Dilated extramural coronaries were examined histologically in six patients. Basal coronary blood flow was determined with N-13 positron emission tomography in 14 patients and in 10 controls. Hyperemic flow was induced by intravenous dipyridamole pharmacologic stress. Immunostaining against SM alpha-actin permitted microcirculatory morphometric analysis. Non-fasting total cholesterols were retrieved in 279 patients divided into four groups: Group A---143 cyanotic unoperated, Group B---47 rendered acyanotic by reparative surgery, Group C---41 acyanotic unoperated, Group D---48 acyanotic before and after operation. Results: Extramural coronary arteries were mildly or moderately dilated to ectatic in 49/59 angiograms. Histologic examination disclosed loss of medial smooth muscle, increased medial collagen, and duplication of internal elastic lamina. Basal coronary flow was appreciably increased. Hyperemic flow was comparable to controls. Remodeling of the microcirculation was based upon coronary arteriolar length, volume and surface densities. Coronary atherosclerosis was absent in both the arteriograms and the necropsy specimens. Conclusions: Extramural coronary arteries in CCHD dilate in response to endothelial vasodilator substances supplemented by mural attenuation caused by medial abnormalities. Basal coronary flow was appreciably increased, but hyperemic flow was normal. Remodeling of the microcirculation was responsible for preservation of flow reserve. The coronaries were atheroma-free because of the salutory effects of hypocholesterolemia, hypoxemia, upregulated nitric oxide, low platelet counts, and hyperbilirubinrmia. PMID:22845810

  7. Localization of coronary artery disease with exercise electrocardiography: correlation with thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, R.F.; Freedman, B.; Bailey, I.K.; Uren, R.F.; Kelly, D.T.

    1981-11-01

    In 61 patients with single vessel coronary artery disease (70 percent or greater obstruction of luminal diameter in only one vessel) and no previous myocardial infarction, the sites of ischemic changes on 12 lead exercise electrocardiography and on thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scanning were related to the obstructed coronary artery. The site of exercise-induced S-T segment depression did not identify which coronary artery was obstructed. In the 37 patients with left anterior descending coronary artery disease S-T depression was most often seen in the inferior leads and leads V4 to V6, and in the 18 patients with right coronary artery disease and in the 6 patients with left circumflex artery disease S-T depression was most often seen in leads V5 and V6. Although S-T segment elevation was uncommon in most leads, it occurred in lead V1 or a VL, or both, in 51 percent of the patients with left anterior descending coronary artery disease. A reversible anterior defect on exercise thallium scanning correlated with left anterior descending coronary artery disease (probability (p) less than 0.0001) and a reversible inferior thallium defect correlated with right coronary or left circumflex artery disease (p less than 0.0001). In patients with single vessel disease, the site of S-T segment depression does not identify the obstructed coronary artery; S-T segment elevation in lead V1 or aVL, or both, identifies left anterior descending coronary artery disease; and the site of reversible perfusion defect on thallium scanning identifies the site of myocardial ischemia and the obstructed coronary artery.

  8. Myocardial Strain and Strain Rate in Kawasaki Disease: Range, Recovery, and Relationship to Systemic Inflammation/Coronary Artery Dilation

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Benjamin; Davidson, Jesse; Tong, Suhong; Martin, Blake; Heizer, Heather; Anderson, Marsha S; Glode, Mary P; Dominguez, Samuel R; Jone, Pei-Ni

    2016-01-01

    Background Kawasaki Disease (KD), a systemic vasculitis of medium sized vessels, is the most common cause of acquired heart disease among children in the developed world. Some KD patients demonstrate echocardiographic evidence of depressed myocardial mechanics. However, the incidence, etiology, and reversibility of abnormal mechanics in KD patients remain undefined. Methods and results We retrospectively studied 41 KD patients and measured myocardial strain and strain rate by velocity vector imaging from pre-treatment and convalescent echocardiograms. Pre-treatment procalcitonin, C-reactive protein (CRP), and coronary artery z-scores were obtained in all patients and compared between the groups with preserved versus depressed acute phase mechanics. The change in mechanics between the acute and convalescent phases was also assessed. Patients with initially low longitudinal strain improved by the convalescent period (mean difference - 4.0%; p<0.005) with the greatest improvement occurring in patients with the lowest initial strain (−7.3%; p<0.05). Patients with higher initial strain did not change significantly by the convalescent period. Patients with lower longitudinal and circumferential strain demonstrated higher median procalcitonin levels (1.2 vs. 0.3 ng/mL; p<0.05 and 1.8 vs. 0.4 ng/mL; p<0.05 respectively) and a trend towards higher CRP, but no difference in coronary artery z-scores. Strain rate was not associated with inflammatory markers or coronary artery z-scores. Conclusions The range of strain found in our cohort was large. Improvement in mean strain was driven primarily by patients with lower initial strain. Lower strain was associated with increased markers of systemic inflammation, but not proximal coronary artery changes. PMID:27182455

  9. Budd-chiari syndrome and renal arterial neurysms due to behcet disease: a rare association

    PubMed Central

    Batur, Abdussamet; Dorum, Meltem; Yüksekkaya, Hasan Ali; Koc, Osman

    2015-01-01

    Behcet's disease is a multisystemic vasculitis of unknown etiology with a chronic relapsing course. Vasculitis in Behcet's disease with predominant vascular involvement is the only vasculitis that affects both arteries and veins of any size. Involvement of the renal artery and inferior vena cava is rare among the arteries and veins, respectively. When disease affect the veins, it is in the form of thrombosis. Arterial complications include aneurysms, stenosis and occlusions. Both rupture of arterial aneurysm and occlusion of suprahepatic veins, causing Budd-Chiari syndrome, are associated with a high mortality rate. Vascular involvement is more common in male patients than in female patients. Men and patients with a younger age of onset present with a more severe prognosis. In this case report, we describe a very rare cause of intrarenal arterial aneurysm's rupture with previous Budd-Chiari syndrome due to Behcet's disease and successful angiographic embolization of actively bleeding aneurysm. PMID:26491527

  10. Obesity and coronary artery disease: evaluation and treatment.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Labbé, David; Ruka, Emmeline; Bertrand, Olivier F; Voisine, Pierre; Costerousse, Olivier; Poirier, Paul

    2015-02-01

    With the increasing prevalence of obesity, clinicians are now facing a growing population of patients with specific features of clinical presentation, diagnostic challenges, and interventional, medical, and surgical management. After briefly discussing the effect of obesity on atherosclerotic burden in this review, we will focus on strategies clinicians might use to ensure better outcomes when performing revascularization in obese and severely obese patients. These patients tend to present comorbidities at a younger age, and their anthropometric features might limit the use of traditional cardiovascular risk stratification approaches for ischemic disease. Alternative techniques have emerged, especially in nuclear medicine. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography might be the diagnostic imaging technique of choice. When revascularization is considered, features associated with obesity must be considered to guide therapeutic strategies. In percutaneous coronary intervention, a radial approach should be favoured, and adequate antiplatelet therapy with new and more potent agents should be initiated. Weight-based anticoagulation should be contemplated if needed, with the use of drug-eluting stents. An "off-pump" approach for coronary artery bypass grafting might be preferable to the use of cardiopulmonary bypass. For patients who undergo bilateral internal thoracic artery grafting, harvesting using skeletonization might prevent deep sternal wound infections. In contrast to percutaneous coronary intervention, lower surgical bleeding has been observed when lean body mass is used for perioperative heparin dose determination.

  11. [Amputation of the leg in arterial occlusive disease].

    PubMed

    Uranüs, S; Breinl, E; Hauser, H; Lackner, R; Rödl, S; Neumayer, K

    1991-01-01

    The until recently held opinion that above-knee amputations were the method of choice for treating stage IV chronic occlusive arterial disease, is outdated. Determining the appropriate level for amputation in patients with peripheral arterial obstruction is difficult, and requires much experience. Successful fitting of a prosthetic device and subsequent rehabilitation depend not only on the patient's bodily and emotional reserves, but also on the operative technique employed. The more distal the amputation, the better is the prognosis for satisfactory prosthetic function and social reintegration. A total of 280 amputations on 268 patients was performed over a 48-month period. In 181 patients (68%) primary healing occurred without complications. Total mortality was 10%, occurring mainly in the group of above-knee amputees. The majority of local wound complications was found in transmetatarsal resections and below-knee amputations. A total of 42 patients (15%) underwent re-amputation. Only half of the above-knee amputees could be fitted with a prosthesis and rehabilitated, whereas nearly all patients amputated more distally experienced satisfactory outcomes in this respect.

  12. Time to rethink management strategies in asymptomatic carotid artery disease.

    PubMed

    Naylor, A Ross

    2011-10-11

    Despite level I evidence, no worldwide consensus of opinion exists on how best to manage patients with asymptomatic carotid artery disease. In this article, I present the evidence supporting intervention in these patients, highlighting a number of 'inconvenient truths' that challenge the current 'one size fits all' approach to treatment. I will demonstrate that, even if one could identify and treat every individual with a 60-99% asymptomatic stenosis, >95% of all strokes will still occur. Evidence shows that 94% of all carotid endarterectomy and carotid artery stenting procedures in asymptomatic patients in the US are ultimately unnecessary, costing health-care providers US$2 billion annually. Evidence also exists that the risk of stroke in patients treated medically is lower than when the asymptomatic trials were recruiting, challenging the appropriateness of basing contemporary guidelines upon historical data. A small cohort of 'high-risk for stroke' patients will undoubtedly benefit from intervention and our goal must be to identify and treat these individuals, rather than continuing with a policy of mass intervention that benefits very few patients in the long term.

  13. Pneumoconiosis increases the risk of peripheral arterial disease: a nationwide population-based study.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chih-Hao; Lin, Te-Yu; Huang, Wen-Yen; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-05-01

    This nationwide population-based retrospective cohort study was used to evaluate the association between pneumoconiosis and peripheral arterial disease (PAD). We identified 3374 patients with pneumoconiosis from the catastrophic illness registry who were newly diagnosed from 2000 to 2005; 13,496 patients without pneumoconiosis from Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000 (LHID2000) were randomly frequency matched according to sex, age, and index year and used as a nonpneumoconiosis group. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of PAD in the pneumoconiosis group compared with the nonpneumoconiosis group. The mean follow-up years were 7.44 years in the pneumoconiosis group and 8.17 years in the nonpneumoconiosis group. The incidence density rate of PAD was 1.25 times greater in the pneumoconiosis group than in the nonpneumoconiosis group (8.37 vs 6.70 per 1000 person-years). After adjusting for sex, age, and comorbidities, the adjusted HRs of PAD for the pneumoconiosis group were 1.30 (95% CI = 1.08-1.57), compared with the nonpneumoconiosis group. The combined impacts of patients with pneumoconiosis and diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, ischemic heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and asthma showed a significant by joint association with PAD risk compared with patients with no pneumoconiosis and no counterpart comorbidity. Patients with pneumoconiosis have an independently higher risk of developing PAD. Physicians should include pneumoconiosis in evaluating PAD risk.

  14. [Peripheral arterial pseudo-aneurysm in Behçet's disease: Report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Abissegue, Y; Ouldsalek, E; Lyazidi, Y; El Ochi, M R; El Fatemi, B; Chtata, H T; Bensaid, Y; Taberkant, M

    2016-05-01

    Behçet's disease is a systemic vasculitis of unknown etiopathogenesis. Arterial events such as pseudo-aneurysms are rare and may be the mode of occurrence of the disease. These pseudo-aneurysms tend, regardless of size, to progress rapidly to life-threatening rupture. We report two cases of arterial pseudo-aneurysms that ruptured. Treatment consisted of surgical repair in one case and arterial ligation in the other; the postoperative course was uneventful in both cases.

  15. Creating a genetic risk score for coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Dandona, Sonny; Roberts, Robert

    2009-05-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) and its sequelae represent a significant health burden. Over the past two decades, numerous studies have attempted to link DNA sequence variation with the risk of CAD and related phenotypes. There has been significant evolution in technology from the early linkage studies within kindreds, and now we are able to use high-density genotyping to facilitate large-scale genome-wide association studies. The first novel genetic risk factor for CAD, 9p21.3, has been confirmed, and other loci are awaiting replication studies. The relative importance of each locus from a global standpoint and the incremental information conferred by testing for genetic variants remain to be determined. PMID:19361348

  16. Contemporary evaluation and management of lower extremity peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Foley, T Raymond; Armstrong, Ehrin J; Waldo, Stephen W

    2016-09-15

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) includes atherosclerosis of the aorta and lower extremities. Affecting a large segment of the population, PAD is associated with impaired functional capacity and reduced quality of life as well as an increased risk of stroke, myocardial infarction and cardiovascular death. The evaluation of PAD begins with the physical examination, incorporating non-invasive testing such as ankle-brachial indices to confirm the diagnosis. Therapeutic interventions are aimed at alleviating symptoms while preserving limb integrity and reducing overall cardiovascular risk. With this in mind, risk factor modification with exercise and medical therapy are the mainstays of treatment for many patients with PAD. Persistent symptoms or non-healing wounds should prompt more aggressive therapies with endovascular or surgical revascularisation. The following manuscript provides a comprehensive review on the contemporary evaluation and management of PAD.

  17. Endovascular surgery for peripheral arterial occlusive disease. A critical review.

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, S S; Eton, D; Moore, W S

    1992-01-01

    Endovascular surgery is a new multidisciplinary field that applies the recently innovated techniques of angioscopy, intraluminal ultrasound, balloon angioplasty, laser, mechanical atherectomy, and stents. This field can be defined as a diagnostic and therapeutic discipline that uses catheter-based systems to treat vascular disease. As such, it integrates the subspecialties of vascular surgery, interventional radiology, interventional cardiology, and biomedical engineering for the common purpose of improving arterial hemodynamics. Endovascular surgery offers many potential benefits: long incisions are replaced with a puncture wound, the need for postoperative intensive care is significantly reduced, major cardiac and pulmonary complications from general anesthesia are side stepped, and the dollar savings could be dramatic as the need for intensive care unit and in-hospital stay diminishes. Despite these technological advancements, endovascular surgery is still in its infancy and currently has limited applications. This review provides an updated summary of endovascular surgery today and addresses some of the obstacles still preventing its widespread use. PMID:1385944

  18. Use of adenosine echocardiography for diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Zoghbi, W.A. )

    1991-07-01

    Two-dimensional echocardiography combined with exercise is sensitive and specific in the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) by demonstrating transient abnormalities in wall motion. Frequently, however, patients cannot achieve maximal exercise because of various factors. Pharmacologic stress testing with intravenous adenosine was evaluated as a means of detecting CAD in a noninvasive manner. Patients with suspected CAD underwent echocardiographic imaging and simultaneous thallium 201 single-photon emission computed tomography during the intravenous administration of 140 micrograms/kg/min of adenosine. An increase in heart rate, decrease in blood pressure, and increase in double product were observed during adenosine administration. Initial observations revealed that wall motion abnormalities were induced by adenosine in areas of perfusion defects. The adenosine infusion was well tolerated, and symptoms disappeared within 1 to 2 minutes after termination of the infusion. Therefore preliminary observations suggest that adenosine echocardiography appears to be useful in the assessment of CAD.

  19. Conditions Presenting with Symptoms of Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Aditya M.; Norton, Patrick T.; Zhu, Daisy

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is estimated to affect more than 20% of people older than 65 years. The vast majority of patients with symptoms suggestive of PAD have atherosclerosis often associated with conventional vascular risk factors such as smoking, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and inflammation. A minority of people presenting with symptoms suggesting PAD have an alternative etiology. These groups of disorders are often underdiagnosed, and if diagnosed correctly the diagnosis may be delayed. Understanding these pathologies well is important, as they can be very debilitating and optimal treatment may vary significantly. Inappropriate treatment of these disorders can lead to worsening morbidity and mortality. This article discusses the underlying causes of nonatherosclerotic PAD, including the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders. PMID:25435652

  20. Doppler assessment of pulmonary artery pressure in neonates at risk of chronic lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Su, B.; Watanabe, T.; Shimizu, M.; Yanagisawa, M.

    1997-01-01

    AIM—To evaluate the pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) change in very low birthweight (VLBW) infants at risk of chronic lung disease (CLD).
METHODS—The time to peak velocity:right ventricular ejection time (TPV:RVET) ratio calculated from the pulmonary artery Doppler waveform, which is inversely related to PAP, was used. The TPV:RVET ratio was corrected for different heart rate (TPV:RVET(c)). Seventy three VLBW infants studied on days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 were enrolled for the analysis.
RESULTS—Twenty two infants developed CLD with a characteristic chest radiograph at day 28. Fifty one did not, of whom 17 were oxygen dependent on account of apnoea rather than respiratory disease, and 34 were non-oxygen dependent. The TPV:RVET(c) ratio rose progressively in all three groups over the first three days of life, suggesting a fall in PAP. In the oxygen and non-oxygen dependent groups, the mean (SD) ratio rose to 0.53 (0.09) and 0.57 (0.09), respectively, on day 7, then remained relatively constant thereafter. The CLD group rose more slowly after day 3 and had a significantly lower mean ratio from day 7 onwards compared with the other two groups (day 7: P<0.001, days 14-28: P<0.0001), and fell significantly from 0.47 (0.11) on day 7 to 0.41 (0.07) on day 28 (P=0.01), suggesting a progressive rise in PAP. The mean (SD) ratios at day 28 of all infants were: CLD group 0.41 (0.07); oxygen dependent group 0.66 (0.15); and the non-oxygen group 0.67 (0.11). The CLD group had a significantly lower ratio than the oxygen dependent group and the non-oxygen group (P<0.0001). Using the TPV:RVET(c) ratio of <0.46, infants at risk of developing CLD could be predicted on day 7 (predictive value 82.8%, sensitivity 54.5%, specificity 94.1%).
CONCLUSION—The non-invasive assessment of PAP using the TPV:RVET(c) ratio may be useful in the longitudinal monitoring of PAP change in VLBW infants, and for prediction of chronic lung disease.

 Keywords

  1. Prognostic models in coronary artery disease: Cox and network approaches

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Antonio; Sicari, Rosa; Cortigiani, Lauro; Carpeggiani, Clara; Picano, Eugenio; Capobianco, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Predictive assessment of the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases is usually provided by computational approaches centred on Cox models. The complex interdependence structure underlying clinical data patterns can limit the performance of Cox analysis and complicate the interpretation of results, thus calling for complementary and integrative methods. Prognostic models are proposed for studying the risk associated with patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing vasodilator stress echocardiography, an established technique for CAD detection and prognostication. In order to complement standard Cox models, network inference is considered a possible solution to quantify the complex relationships between heterogeneous data categories. In particular, a mutual information network is designed to explore the paths linking patient-associated variables to endpoint events, to reveal prognostic factors and to identify the best possible predictors of death. Data from a prospective, multicentre, observational study are available from a previous study, based on 4313 patients (2532 men; 64±11 years) with known (n=1547) or suspected (n=2766) CAD, who underwent high-dose dipyridamole (0.84 mg kg−1 over 6 min) stress echocardiography with coronary flow reserve (CFR) evaluation of left anterior descending (LAD) artery by Doppler. The overall mortality was the only endpoint analysed by Cox models. The estimated connectivity between clinical variables assigns a complementary value to the proposed network approach in relation to the established Cox model, for instance revealing connectivity paths. Depending on the use of multiple metrics, the constraints of regression analysis in measuring the association strength among clinical variables can be relaxed, and identification of communities and prognostic paths can be provided. On the basis of evidence from various model comparisons, we show in this CAD study that there may be characteristic

  2. Prognostic models in coronary artery disease: Cox and network approaches.

    PubMed

    Mora, Antonio; Sicari, Rosa; Cortigiani, Lauro; Carpeggiani, Clara; Picano, Eugenio; Capobianco, Enrico

    2015-02-01

    Predictive assessment of the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases is usually provided by computational approaches centred on Cox models. The complex interdependence structure underlying clinical data patterns can limit the performance of Cox analysis and complicate the interpretation of results, thus calling for complementary and integrative methods. Prognostic models are proposed for studying the risk associated with patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing vasodilator stress echocardiography, an established technique for CAD detection and prognostication. In order to complement standard Cox models, network inference is considered a possible solution to quantify the complex relationships between heterogeneous data categories. In particular, a mutual information network is designed to explore the paths linking patient-associated variables to endpoint events, to reveal prognostic factors and to identify the best possible predictors of death. Data from a prospective, multicentre, observational study are available from a previous study, based on 4313 patients (2532 men; 64±11 years) with known (n=1547) or suspected (n=2766) CAD, who underwent high-dose dipyridamole (0.84 mg kg(-1) over 6 min) stress echocardiography with coronary flow reserve (CFR) evaluation of left anterior descending (LAD) artery by Doppler. The overall mortality was the only endpoint analysed by Cox models. The estimated connectivity between clinical variables assigns a complementary value to the proposed network approach in relation to the established Cox model, for instance revealing connectivity paths. Depending on the use of multiple metrics, the constraints of regression analysis in measuring the association strength among clinical variables can be relaxed, and identification of communities and prognostic paths can be provided. On the basis of evidence from various model comparisons, we show in this CAD study that there may be characteristic

  3. Dual-Energy CT Angiography in Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Brockmann, Carolin Jochum, Susanne; Sadick, Maliha; Huck, Kurt; Ziegler, Peter; Fink, Christian; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Diehl, Steffen J.

    2009-07-15

    We sought to study the accuracy of dual-energy computed tomographic angiography (DE-CTA) for the assessment of symptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease of the lower extremity by using the dual-energy bone removal technique compared with a commercially available conventional bone removal tool. Twenty patients underwent selective digital subtraction angiography and DE-CTA of the pelvis and lower extremities. CTA data were postprocessed with two different applications: conventional bone removal and dual-energy bone removal. All data were reconstructed and evaluated as 3D maximum-intensity projections. Time requirements for reconstruction were documented. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and concordance of DE-CTA regarding degree of stenosis and vessel wall calcification were calculated. A total of 359 vascular segments were analyzed. Compared with digital subtraction angiography, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy, respectively, of CTA was 97.2%, 94.1%, and 94.7% by the dual-energy bone removal technique. The conventional bone removal tool delivered a sensitivity of 77.1%, a specificity of 70.7%, and an accuracy of 72.0%. Best results for both postprocessing methods were achieved in the vascular segments of the upper leg. In severely calcified segments, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy stayed above 90% by the dual-energy bone removal technique, whereas the conventional bone removal technique showed a substantial decrease of sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. DE-CTA is a feasible and accurate diagnostic method in the assessment of symptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Results obtained by DE-CTA are superior to the conventional bone removal technique and less dependent on vessel wall calcifications.

  4. Standardized Outcome Measurement for Patients With Coronary Artery Disease: Consensus From the International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM)

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Robert L; Spatz, Erica S; Kelley, Thomas A; Stowell, Caleb J; Beltrame, John; Heidenreich, Paul; Tresserras, Ricard; Jernberg, Tomas; Chua, Terrance; Morgan, Louise; Panigrahi, Bishnu; Rosas Ruiz, Alba; Rumsfeld, John S; Sadwin, Lawrence; Schoeberl, Mark; Shahian, David; Weston, Clive; Yeh, Robert; Lewin, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Background Coronary artery disease (CAD) outcomes consistently improve when they are routinely measured and provided back to physicians and hospitals. However, few centers around the world systematically track outcomes, and no global standards exist. Furthermore, patient-centered outcomes and longitudinal outcomes are under-represented in current assessments. Methods and Results The nonprofit International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM) convened an international Working Group to define a consensus standard set of outcome measures and risk factors for tracking, comparing, and improving the outcomes of CAD care. Members were drawn from 4 continents and 6 countries. Using a modified Delphi method, the ICHOM Working Group defined who should be tracked, what should be measured, and when such measurements should be performed. The ICHOM CAD consensus measures were designed to be relevant for all patients diagnosed with CAD, including those with acute myocardial infarction, angina, and asymptomatic CAD. Thirteen specific outcomes were chosen, including acute complications occurring within 30 days of acute myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass grafting surgery, or percutaneous coronary intervention; and longitudinal outcomes for up to 5 years for patient-reported health status (Seattle Angina Questionnaire [SAQ-7], elements of Rose Dyspnea Score, and Patient Health Questionnaire [PHQ-2]), cardiovascular hospital admissions, cardiovascular procedures, renal failure, and mortality. Baseline demographic, cardiovascular disease, and comorbidity information is included to improve the interpretability of comparisons. Conclusions ICHOM recommends that this set of outcomes and other patient information be measured for all patients with CAD. PMID:25991011

  5. Heart Attacks, Strokes, and Peripheral Artery Disease in Patients With Giant-Cell Arteritis

    MedlinePlus

    Annals of Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Heart Attacks, Strokes, and Peripheral Artery Disease in Patients With Giant-Cell Arteritis The full report is titled “Risk for Cardiovascular Disease Early and Late ...

  6. The impact of preventive cardiology on coronary artery disease.

    PubMed Central

    Elford, R W; Yeo, M

    1988-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease continues to be the leading cause of death among middle-aged people in industrialized countries. However, in North America the rates of death and disability from coronary artery disease (CAD) have declined, mostly because of a reduction of the main modifiable risk factors (high serum cholesterol levels, smoking and hypertension). Intervention trials have consistently shown that the lowering of the severity of risk factors decreases the incidence of CAD. These studies have introduced the goals of preventive cardiology to clinicians but have not provided the necessary knowledge and skills to achieve them. Unfortunately, with the exception of hypertension, the risk factors for CAD are infrequently assessed and managed in ambulatory patients. Incorporation of detection and intervention strategies derived from recent epidemiologic, behavioural and biomedical research into the existing primary health care system may be the most efficient and effective approach to further reducing the impact of CAD. The family physician's office is the ideal location to implement behavioural change strategies. However, primary care intervention to decrease the risk of ischemic heart disease among people at high risk has yet to be studied. In addition, whether the same clinicians who render primary care can assume the responsibility for surveillance and preventive care has to be demonstrated. PMID:3139276

  7. The genetic basis for survivorship in coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Dungan, Jennifer R.; Hauser, Elizabeth R.; Qin, Xuejun; Kraus, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Survivorship is a trait characterized by endurance and virility in the face of hardship. It is largely considered a psychosocial attribute developed during fatal conditions, rather than a biological trait for robustness in the context of complex, age-dependent diseases like coronary artery disease (CAD). The purpose of this paper is to present the novel phenotype, survivorship in CAD as an observed survival advantage concurrent with clinically significant CAD. We present a model for characterizing survivorship in CAD and its relationships with overlapping time- and clinically-related phenotypes. We offer an optimal measurement interval for investigating survivorship in CAD. We hypothesize genetic contributions to this construct and review the literature for evidence of genetic contribution to overlapping phenotypes in support of our hypothesis. We also present preliminary evidence of genetic effects on survival in people with clinically significant CAD from a primary case-control study of symptomatic coronary disease. Identifying gene variants that confer improved survival in the context of clinically appreciable CAD may improve our understanding of cardioprotective mechanisms acting at the gene level and potentially impact patients clinically in the future. Further, characterizing other survival-variant genetic effects may improve signal-to-noise ratio in detecting gene associations for CAD. PMID:24143143

  8. Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Avolio, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Stiffness of large arteries has been long recognized as a significant determinant of pulse pressure. However, it is only in recent decades, with the accumulation of longitudinal data from large and varied epidemiological studies of morbidity and mortality associated with cardiovascular disease, that it has emerged as an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk. This has generated substantial interest in investigations related to intrinsic causative and associated factors responsible for the alteration of mechanical properties of the arterial wall, with the aim to uncover specific pathways that could be interrogated to prevent or reverse arterial stiffening. Much has been written on the haemodynamic relevance of arterial stiffness in terms of the quantification of pulsatile relationships of blood pressure and flow in conduit arteries. Indeed, much of this early work regarded blood vessels as passive elastic conduits, with the endothelial layer considered as an inactive lining of the lumen and as an interface to flowing blood. However, recent advances in molecular biology and increased technological sophistication for the detection of low concentrations of biochemical compounds have elucidated the highly important regulatory role of the endothelial cell affecting vascular function. These techniques have enabled research into the interaction of the underlying passive mechanical properties of the arterial wall with the active cellular and molecular processes that regulate the local environment of the load-bearing components. This review addresses these emerging concepts. PMID:26587425

  9. The Risk of Peripheral Arterial Disease after Parathyroidectomy in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Li, Tsai-Chung; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The changes of the risk of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in patients with end-stage renal disease after parathyroidectomy are scant. Methods We used a nationwide health insurance claims database to select all dialysis-dependent patients with end-stage renal disease aged 18 years and older for the study population in 2000 to 2006. Of the patients with end-stage renal disease, we selected 947 patients who had undergone parathyroidectomy as the parathyroidectomy group and frequency matched 3746 patients with end-stage renal disease by sex, age, years since the disease diagnosis, and the year of index date as the non-parathyroidectomy group. We used a multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis with the use of a robust sandwich covariance matrix estimate, accounting for the intra-cluster dependence of hospitals or clinics, to measure the risk of peripheral arterial disease for the parathyroidectomy group compared with the non-parathyroidectomy group after adjusting for sex, age, premium-based income, urbanization, and comorbidity. Results The mean post-op follow-up periods were 5.08 and 4.52 years for the parathyroidectomy and non-parathyroidectomy groups, respectively; the incidence density rate of PAD in the PTX group was 12.26 per 1000 person-years, significantly lower than the data in the non-PTX group (24.09 per 1000 person-years, adjusted HR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.46–0.94). Conclusion Parathyroidectomy is associated with reduced risk of peripheral arterial disease in patients with end-stage renal disease complicated with severe secondary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:27284924

  10. Chronic kidney disease and the severity of coronary artery disease and retinal microvasculature changes: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Au, Cheryl; Mitchell, Paul; Liew, Gerald; Plant, Adam J. H.; Wang, Sarah B.; Chiha, Joseph; Thiagalingam, Aravinda; Burlutsky, George; Gopinath, Bamini

    2016-01-01

    Background Prior studies have suggested the association between incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD) with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and poor glomerular filtration function. However to the best of our knowledge, few studies have specifically assessed this relationship based on the severity of CAD as quantified using Extent and Gensini scores. Methods Between June 2009 and January 2012, data were collected from 1,680 participants as part of the Australian Heart Eye Study (AHES) cohort. Coronary angiograms were scored according to Gensini (severity) and Extent scores. Retinal vessel calibres were measured using validated semi-automated software. Potential confounders were adjusted for using multivariate analysis. Results There were no significant associations found between CKD status with Extent and Gensini scores for CAD severity, both unadjusted and when adjusted for confounding factors. In unadjusted analyses, a significant association between CKD and narrower retinal arteriolar diameter was observed (P=0.0072). After multivariate adjustment, the association between CKD and retinal arteriolar diameter was attenuated and was no longer significant (P=0.1466). No associations were observed between retinal venular calibre and prevalent CKD. Conclusions The present study demonstrated no independent associations between CKD and CAD severity. These results warrant validation by future large, prospective longitudinal studies. PMID:27621866

  11. Genetic variants associated with celiac disease and the risk for coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Henning; Willenborg, Christina; Schlesinger, Sabrina; Ferrario, Paola G; König, Inke R; Erdmann, Jeanette; Samani, Nilesh J; Lieb, Wolfgang; Schunkert, Heribert

    2015-10-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that patients with celiac disease are at increased risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). Genetic-epidemiological analyses identified many single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with celiac disease. If there is a causal relation between celiac disease and CAD, one might expect that risk alleles primarily associated with celiac disease also increase the risk of CAD. In this study we identified from literature 41 SNPs that have been previously described to be genome-wide associated with celiac disease (p < 5 × 10(-08)). These SNPs were evaluated for their association with CAD in the Coronary ARtery DIsease Genome-wide Replication and Meta-analysis (CARDIoGRAM) dataset, a meta-analysis comprising genome-wide SNP association data from 22,233 CAD cases and 64,762 controls. 24 out of 41 (58.5 %) risk alleles for celiac disease displayed a positive association with CAD (CAD-OR range 1.001-1.081). The remaining risk alleles for celiac disease (n = 16) revealed CAD-ORs of ≤1.0 (range 0.951-1.0). The proportion of CAD associated alleles was greater but did not differ significantly from the proportion of 50 % expected by chance (p = 0.069). One SNP (rs653178 at the SH2B3/ATXN2 locus) displayed study-wise statistically significant association with CAD with directionality consistent effects on celiac disease and CAD. However, the effect of this locus is most likely driven by pleiotropic effects on multiple other diseases. In conclusion, this genetically based approach provided no convincing evidence that SNPs associated with celiac disease contribute to the risk of CAD. Hence, common non-genetic factors may play a more important role explaining the coincidence of these two complex disease conditions.

  12. Computerized analysis of coronary artery disease: Performance evaluation of segmentation and tracking of coronary arteries in CT angiograms

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Chuan Chan, Heang-Ping; Chughtai, Aamer; Kuriakose, Jean; Agarwal, Prachi; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Patel, Smita; Wei, Jun

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: The authors are developing a computer-aided detection system to assist radiologists in analysis of coronary artery disease in coronary CT angiograms (cCTA). This study evaluated the accuracy of the authors’ coronary artery segmentation and tracking method which are the essential steps to define the search space for the detection of atherosclerotic plaques. Methods: The heart region in cCTA is segmented and the vascular structures are enhanced using the authors’ multiscale coronary artery response (MSCAR) method that performed 3D multiscale filtering and analysis of the eigenvalues of Hessian matrices. Starting from seed points at the origins of the left and right coronary arteries, a 3D rolling balloon region growing (RBG) method that adapts to the local vessel size segmented and tracked each of the coronary arteries and identifies the branches along the tracked vessels. The branches are queued and subsequently tracked until the queue is exhausted. With Institutional Review Board approval, 62 cCTA were collected retrospectively from the authors’ patient files. Three experienced cardiothoracic radiologists manually tracked and marked center points of the coronary arteries as reference standard following the 17-segment model that includes clinically significant coronary arteries. Two radiologists visually examined the computer-segmented vessels and marked the mistakenly tracked veins and noisy structures as false positives (FPs). For the 62 cases, the radiologists marked a total of 10191 center points on 865 visible coronary artery segments. Results: The computer-segmented vessels overlapped with 83.6% (8520/10191) of the center points. Relative to the 865 radiologist-marked segments, the sensitivity reached 91.9% (795/865) if a true positive is defined as a computer-segmented vessel that overlapped with at least 10% of the reference center points marked on the segment. When the overlap threshold is increased to 50% and 100%, the sensitivities were 86

  13. Peripheral artery occlusive disease in chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients treated with nilotinib or imatinib.

    PubMed

    Kim, T D; Rea, D; Schwarz, M; Grille, P; Nicolini, F E; Rosti, G; Levato, L; Giles, F J; Dombret, H; Mirault, T; Labussière, H; Lindhorst, R; Haverkamp, W; Buschmann, I; Dörken, B; le Coutre, P D

    2013-06-01

    Several retrospective studies have described the clinical manifestation of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) in patients receiving nilotinib. We thus prospectively screened for PAOD in patients with chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CP CML) being treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), including imatinib and nilotinib. One hundred and fifty-nine consecutive patients were evaluated for clinical and biochemical risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Non-invasive assessment for PAOD included determination of the ankle-brachial index (ABI) and duplex ultrasonography. A second cohort consisted of patients with clinically manifest PAOD recruited from additional collaborating centers. Pathological ABI were significantly more frequent in patients on first-line nilotinib (7 of 27; 26%) and in patients on second-line nilotinib (10 of 28; 35.7%) as compared with patients on first-line imatinib (3 of 48; 6.3%). Clinically manifest PAOD was identified in five patients, all with current or previous nilotinib exposure only. Relative risk for PAOD determined by a pathological ABI in first-line nilotinib-treated patients as compared with first-line imatinib-treated patients was 10.3. PAOD is more frequently observed in patients receiving nilotinib as compared with imatinib. Owing to the severe nature of clinically manifest PAOD, longitudinal non-invasive monitoring and careful assessment of risk factors is warranted.

  14. Myocardial performance and perfusion during exercise in patients with coronary artery disease caused by Kawasaki disease

    SciTech Connect

    Paridon, S.M.; Ross, R.D.; Kuhns, L.R.; Pinsky, W.W. )

    1990-01-01

    For a study of the natural history of coronary artery lesions after Kawasaki disease and their effect on myocardial blood flow reserve with exercise, five such patients underwent exercise testing on a bicycle. Oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, minute ventilation, and electrocardiograms were monitored continuously. Thallium-201 scintigraphy was performed for all patients. One patient stopped exercise before exhaustion of cardiovascular reserve but had no evidence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities. Four patients terminated exercise because of exhaustion of cardiovascular reserve; one had normal cardiovascular reserve and thallium scintiscans, but the remaining patients had diminished cardiovascular reserve. Thallium scintigrams showed myocardial ischemia in two and infarction in one. No patient had exercise-induced electrocardiographic changes. These results indicate that patients with residual coronary artery lesions after Kawasaki disease frequently have reduced cardiovascular reserve during exercise. The addition of thallium scintigraphy and metabolic measurements to exercise testing improved the detection of exercise-induced abnormalities of myocardial perfusion.

  15. Antioxidants and Coronary Artery Disease: From Pathophysiology to Preventive Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Jane A.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidant stress in the cardiovascular system may occur when antioxidant capacity is insufficient to reduce reactive oxygen species and other free radicals. Oxidant stress has been linked to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and incident coronary artery disease. As a result of this connection, early observational studies focused on dietary antioxidants, such as β-carotene, α-tocopherol, and ascorbic acid, and demonstrated an inverse relationship between intake of these antioxidants and major adverse cardiovascular events. These findings supported a number of randomized trials of selected antioxidants as primary and secondary prevention to decrease cardiac risk; however, many of these studies reported disappointing results with little or no observed risk reduction in antioxidant treated patients. Several plausible explanations for these findings have been suggested, including incorrect antioxidant choice or dose, synthetic versus dietary antioxidant as the intervention, and patient selection, all of which will be important to consider when designing future clinical trials. This review will focus on the contemporary evidence that is the basis for our current understanding of the role of antioxidants in cardiovascular disease prevention. PMID:25369999

  16. Antioxidants and coronary artery disease: from pathophysiology to preventive therapy.

    PubMed

    Leopold, Jane A

    2015-03-01

    Oxidant stress in the cardiovascular system may occur when antioxidant capacity is insufficient to reduce reactive oxygen species and other free radicals. Oxidant stress has been linked to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and incident coronary artery disease. As a result of this connection, early observational studies focused on dietary antioxidants, such as β-carotene, α-tocopherol, and ascorbic acid, and demonstrated an inverse relationship between intake of these antioxidants and major adverse cardiovascular events. These findings supported a number of randomized trials on the use of selected antioxidants as primary or secondary prevention strategies to decrease cardiac risk; however, many of these studies reported disappointing results with little or no observed risk reduction in antioxidant-treated patients. Several plausible explanations for these findings have been suggested, including incorrect antioxidant choice or dose, synthetic versus dietary antioxidants as the intervention, and patient selection, all of which will be important to consider when designing future clinical trials. This review will focus on the contemporary evidence that is the basis for our current understanding of the role of antioxidants in cardiovascular disease prevention.

  17. Finger gangrene caused by small artery occlusive disease.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, L M; Baur, G M; Porter, J M

    1981-01-01

    Available evidence indicates that about one third of all patients presenting with localized finger gangrene developed the condition due to intrinsic occlusions of the small arteries of the hand and fingers caused by one of a variety of systemic diseases. We have treated 35 such patients in the past seven years. A variety of diagnostic tests allowed the establishment of the diagnosis of connective tissue disease in 14 patients, hypersensitivity angiitis in 13 patients, arteriosclerosis in five patients, and myeloid metaplasia, calciphylaxis, and carcinoma in one patient each. Treatment with cold and tobacco avoidance, vasodilators, and local debridement produced good results without amputation in 30 patients. Five patients required partial phalangeal amputation. These results suggest that appropriate diagnostic tests will allow an accurate diagnosis in all patients, and that the natural history is that of spontaneous improvement without major tissue loss. In our experience, surgical sympathectomy plays no role in the treatment of these patients. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:7212808

  18. Placental Induced Growth Factor (PIGf) in Coronary Artery Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, Alamelu; Carabello, Blaise; Mehta, Satish; Schlegel, Todd; Pellis, Neal; Ott, Mark; Pierson, Duane

    2010-01-01

    Our previous studies on normal human lymphocytes have shown a five-fold increase (p less than 0.001) in angiogenic inducers such as Placental Induced Growth Factor (PIGf) in physiologically stressful environments such as modeled microgravity, a space analog. This suggests de-regulation of cardiovascular signalling pathways indicated by upregulation of PIGf. In the current study, we measured PIGf in the plasma of 33 patients with and without coronary artery disease (CAD) to investigate whether such disease is associated with increased levels of PIGf. A control consisting of 31 sex matched apparently healthy subjects was also included in the study. We observed that the levels of PIGf in CAD patients were significantly increased compared to those in healthy control subjects (p less than 0.001) and usually increased beyond the clinical threshold level (greater than 27ng/L). The mechanisms leading to up-regulation of angiogenic factors and the adaptation of organisms to stressful environments such as isolation, high altitude, hypoxia, ischemia, microgravity, increased radiation, etc are presently unknown and require further investigation in spaceflight and these other physiologically stressed environments.

  19. Connective tissue disease-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Luke S.

    2015-01-01

    Although rare in its idiopathic form, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is not uncommon in association with various associated medical conditions, most notably connective tissue disease (CTD). In particular, it develops in approximately 10% of patients with systemic sclerosis and so these patients are increasingly screened to enable early detection. The response of patients with systemic sclerosis to PAH-specific therapy appears to be worse than in other forms of PAH. Survival in systemic sclerosis-associated PAH is inferior to that observed in idiopathic PAH. Potential reasons for this include differences in age, the nature of the underlying pulmonary vasculopathy and the ability of the right ventricle to cope with increased afterload between patients with systemic sclerosis-associated PAH and idiopathic PAH, while coexisting cardiac and pulmonary disease is common in systemic sclerosis-associated PAH. Other forms of connective tissue-associated PAH have been less well studied, however PAH associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has a better prognosis than systemic sclerosis-associated PAH and likely responds to immunosuppression. PMID:25705389

  20. Prehospital Identification of Underlying Coronary Artery Disease by Community Paramedics.

    PubMed

    Heinelt, Martina; Drennan, Ian R; Kim, Jinbaek; Lucas, Steven; Grant, Kyle; Spearen, Chris; Tavares, Walter; Al-Imari, Lina; Philpott, Jane; Hoogeveen, Paul; Morrison, Laurie J

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of definitive evidence that preventative, in-home medical care provided by highly trained community paramedics reduces acute health care utilization and improves the overall well-being of patients suffering from chronic diseases. The Expanding Paramedicine in the Community (EPIC) trial is a randomized controlled trial designed to investigate the use of community paramedics in chronic disease management (ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT02034045). This case of a patient randomized to the intervention arm of the EPIC study demonstrates how the added layer of frequent patient contact by community paramedics and real-time electronic medical record (EMR) correspondence between the paramedics, physicians and other involved practitioners prevented possible life-threatening complications. The visiting community paramedic deduced the need for an electrocardiogram, which prompted the primary care physician to order a stress test revealing abnormalities and thus a coronary artery bypass graft was performed without emergency procedures, unnecessary financial expenditure or further health degradation such as a myocardial infarction. PMID:25909892

  1. Prognostic impact of stress testing in coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Severi, S.; Michelassi, C. )

    1991-05-01

    Observational data prospectively collected permit the examination of a complex set of decisions, including the decision not to perform any stress testing. Patients with or without previous myocardial infarction admitted for coronary evaluation and not submitted to any stress testing because of clinical reasons are at a higher risk for subsequent death. For prognostication, no test has been better validated than exercise electrocardiography: it can identify patients at low and high risk for future cardiac events among those without symptoms, with typical chest pain, and with previous myocardial infarction. In patients with triple-vessel disease, the results of exercise also allow those at low and high risk to be recognized. Both exercise radionuclide angiography and {sup 201}Tl scintigraphy (the latter in larger patient populations) have also demonstrated significant prognostic value on patients with or without previous myocardial infarction. Neither one has shown superiority to the other in prognostication. So far, they have been considered the only viable alternatives to exercise electrocardiography stress testing for diagnosis and prognostication. However, their costs limit their extensive application. Preliminary data suggest that intravenous dipyridamole echocardiography can be used for both diagnosis and prognostication of coronary artery disease; moreover, the prognostic information derived from dipyridamole echocardiography testing seems independent of and additive to that provided by exercise electrocardiography. Further prospective studies on larger patient populations are needed to better define the prognostic value of dipyridamole echocardiography testing.47 references.

  2. Prediction of causal candidate genes in coronary artery disease loci

    PubMed Central

    Brænne, Ingrid; Civelek, Mete; Vilne, Baiba; Di Narzo, Antonio; Johnson, Andrew D.; Zhao, Yuqi; Reiz, Benedikt; Codoni, Veronica; Webb, Thomas R.; Asl, Hassan Foroughi; Hamby, Stephen E.; Zeng, Lingyao; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Hao, Ke; Topol, Eric J.; Schadt, Eric E.; Yang, Xia; Samani, Nilesh J.; Björkegren, Johan L.M.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Schunkert, Heribert; Lusis, Aldons J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have so far identified 159 significant and suggestive loci for coronary artery disease (CAD). We now report comprehensive bioinformatics analyses of sequence variation in these loci to predict candidate causal genes. Approach and Results All annotated genes in the loci were evaluated with respect to protein coding SNPs and gene expression parameters. The latter included expression quantitative trait loci, tissue specificity, and miRNA binding. High priority candidate genes were further identified based on literature searches and our experimental data. We conclude that the great majority of causal variations affecting CAD risk occur in non-coding regions, with 41 % affecting gene expression robustly versus 6% leading to amino acid changes. Many of these genes differed from the traditionally annotated genes, which was usually based on proximity to the lead SNP. Indeed, we obtained evidence that genetic variants at CAD loci affect 98 genes which had not been linked to CAD previously. Conclusions Our results substantially revise the list of likely candidates for CAD and suggest that GWAS efforts in other diseases may benefit from similar bioinformatics analyses. PMID:26293461

  3. Coronary artery disease in Alström syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jatti, Kumar; Paisey, Richard; More, Ranjit

    2012-01-01

    Alström syndrome (ALMS) is a rare autosomal recessive condition, caused by mutations in the ALMS1 gene located on the short arm of chromosome 2. This gene codes for a protein linked with the centrosome, whose precise function is unknown. This condition was first described by Alström in 1959. ALMS is a multisystem condition that is characterised by childhood onset of blindness secondary to rod-cone retinal degeneration and dilated cardiomyopathy with heart failure, which often presents in infanthood and may recur later in life. Metabolic abnormalities including hypertriglyceridemia, liver steatosis, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus are common, often occurring in association with obesity. Other abnormalities include endocrinological disturbances, such as thyroid disorder, growth hormone deficiency, hypogonadism and, in women, hyperandrogenism. This syndrome is also associated with sensorineural hearing loss, renal failure secondary to glomerulo-fibrosis, and fibrotic lung disease. Multiorgan fibrotic infiltration is the common feature in all cases. Considering the history of diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity and renal dysfunction in ALMS, it would be expected that this group of patients could develop coronary artery disease (CAD). But such cases have not been reported so far. We report a case of premature onset of CAD in one of the longest surviving patient with ALMS.

  4. Diagnostic Potential of Pulsed Arterial Spin Labeling in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Trebeschi, Stefano; Riederer, Isabelle; Preibisch, Christine; Bohn, Karl P.; Förster, Stefan; Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Zimmer, Claus; Kirschke, Jan S.; Valentinitsch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimers disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia. Although the underlying pathology is still not completely understood, several diagnostic methods are available. Frequently, the most accurate methods are also the most invasive. The present work investigates the diagnostic potential of Pulsed Arterial Spin Labeling (PASL) for AD: a non-invasive, MRI-based technique for the quantification of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). In particular, we propose a pilot computer aided diagnostic (CAD) procedure able to discriminate between healthy and diseased subjects, and at the same time, providing visual informative results. This method encompasses the creation of a healthy model, the computation of a voxel-wise likelihood function as comparison between the healthy model and the subject under examination, and the correction of the likelihood function via prior distributions. The discriminant analysis is carried out to maximize the accuracy of the classification. The algorithm has been trained on a dataset of 81 subjects and achieved a sensitivity of 0.750 and a specificity of 0.875. Moreover, in accordance with the current pathological knowledge, the parietal lobe, and limbic system are shown to be the main discriminant factors. PMID:27147946

  5. Clinical Assessment of Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Marc A.; Griffin, Kathryn J.; Scott, D. Julian A.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) describes the clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis affecting the circulation in the legs. The severity of PAD is classified according to symptom severity, time course, and anatomical distribution. The signs and symptoms of PAD reflect the degree of circulatory compromise and whether there has been a gradual reduction in the circulation or an abrupt, uncompensated decrease. Accurate clinical assessment underpins decisions on management strategy and should objectively assess the severity of the ischemia and need for revascularization. Clinical history should discriminate symptoms of PAD from other conditions presenting with leg pain, elucidate cardiovascular risk factors and the effect of symptoms on the patient's quality of life. Clinical examination includes signs of general cardiovascular disease and associated conditions before assessing the circulation and viability of the limb. Palpation of peripheral pulses must be augmented by determination of the ankle brachial pressure index using hand held Doppler. A whole patient approach to management is required and must include modification of cardiovascular risk status as well as dealing with the local circulatory manifestation of PAD. PMID:25435653

  6. Clinical assessment of patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Marc A; Griffin, Kathryn J; Scott, D Julian A

    2014-12-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) describes the clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis affecting the circulation in the legs. The severity of PAD is classified according to symptom severity, time course, and anatomical distribution. The signs and symptoms of PAD reflect the degree of circulatory compromise and whether there has been a gradual reduction in the circulation or an abrupt, uncompensated decrease. Accurate clinical assessment underpins decisions on management strategy and should objectively assess the severity of the ischemia and need for revascularization. Clinical history should discriminate symptoms of PAD from other conditions presenting with leg pain, elucidate cardiovascular risk factors and the effect of symptoms on the patient's quality of life. Clinical examination includes signs of general cardiovascular disease and associated conditions before assessing the circulation and viability of the limb. Palpation of peripheral pulses must be augmented by determination of the ankle brachial pressure index using hand held Doppler. A whole patient approach to management is required and must include modification of cardiovascular risk status as well as dealing with the local circulatory manifestation of PAD. PMID:25435653

  7. Heart rate reduction in coronary artery disease and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Roberto; Fox, Kim

    2016-08-01

    Elevated heart rate is known to induce myocardial ischaemia in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), and heart rate reduction is a recognized strategy to prevent ischaemic episodes. In addition, clinical evidence shows that slowing the heart rate reduces the symptoms of angina by improving microcirculation and coronary flow. Elevated heart rate is an established risk factor for cardiovascular events in patients with CAD and in those with chronic heart failure (HF). Accordingly, reducing heart rate improves prognosis in patients with HF, as demonstrated in SHIFT. By contrast, data from SIGNIFY indicate that heart rate is not a modifiable risk factor in patients with CAD who do not also have HF. Heart rate is also an important determinant of cardiac arrhythmias; low heart rate can be associated with atrial fibrillation, and high heart rate after exercise can be associated with sudden cardiac death. In this Review, we critically assess these clinical findings, and propose hypotheses for the variable effect of heart rate reduction in cardiovascular disease.

  8. Lower extremity amputation in peripheral artery disease: improving patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Aparna; Vemulapalli, Sreekanth; Patel, Manesh R; Jones, W Schuyler

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease affects over eight million Americans and is associated with an increased risk of mortality, cardiovascular disease, functional limitation, and limb loss. In its most severe form, critical limb ischemia, patients are often treated with lower extremity (LE) amputation (LEA), although the overall incidence of LEA is declining. In the US, there is significant geographic variation in the performing of major LEA. The rate of death after major LEA in the US is approximately 48% at 1 year and 71% at 3 years. Despite this significant morbidity and mortality, the use of diagnostic testing (both noninvasive and invasive testing) in the year prior to LEA is low and varies based on patient, provider, and regional factors. In this review we discuss the significance of LEA and methods to reduce its occurrence. These methods include improved recognition of the risk factors for LEA by clinicians and patients, strong advocacy for noninvasive and/or invasive imaging prior to LEA, improved endovascular revascularization techniques, and novel therapies. PMID:25075192

  9. Coronary Artery Disease: Why We should Consider the Y Chromosome.

    PubMed

    Molina, Elsa; Clarence, Elyse Michele; Ahmady, Farah; Chew, Guat Siew; Charchar, Fadi Joseph

    2016-08-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality globally. In the last few years our understanding of the genetic and molecular mechanisms that promote CAD in individuals has increased with the advent of the genome era. This complex inflammatory disease has well-defined environmental risk factors. However, in the last 10 years, studies including genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have clearly demonstrated a genetic influence on CAD. Recently, studies on the human Y chromosome have also demonstrated that genetic variation within the male-specific region of the Y chromosome (MSY) could play a part in determining cardiovascular risk in men, confirming the notion that the increased risk for CAD in men cannot be fully explained through common CAD risk factors. Here, we review the literature about the pathophysiology of CAD, its potential causes and environmental risk factors known so far. Furthermore, we review the genetics of CAD, especially the latest discoveries regarding the implication of the Y chromosome, the most underexplored portion of the human genome to date, highlighting methods and difficulties arising in this research field, and discussing the importance of considering the Y chromosome in CAD research.

  10. Challenges associated with peripheral arterial disease in women

    PubMed Central

    Barochiner, Jessica; Aparicio, Lucas S; Waisman, Gabriel D

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is an increasingly recognized disorder that is associated with functional impairment, quality-of-life deterioration, increased risk of cardiovascular ischemic events, and increased risk of total and cardiovascular mortality. Although earlier studies suggested that PAD was more common in men, recent reports based on more sensitive tests have shown that the prevalence of PAD in women is at least the same as in men, if not higher. PAD tends to present itself asymptomatically or with atypical symptoms more frequently in women than in men, and is associated with comorbidities or situations particularly or exclusively found in the female sex, such as osteoporosis, hypothyroidism, the use of oral contraceptives, and a history of complications during pregnancy. Fat-distribution patterns and differential vascular characteristics in women may influence the interpretation of diagnostic methods, whereas sex-related vulnerability to drugs typically used in subjects with PAD, differences in risk-factor distribution among sexes, and distinct responses to revascularization procedures in men and women must be taken into account for proper disease management. All these issues pose important challenges associated with PAD in women. Of note, this group has classically been underrepresented in research studies. As a consequence, several sex-related challenges regarding diagnosis and management issues should be acknowledged, and research gaps should be addressed in order to successfully deal with this major health issue. PMID:24648743

  11. [Perioperative myocardial ischemia in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive diseases].

    PubMed

    Rapp, H J; Buselmeier, P; Gasteiger, P; Hoberg, E; Striebel, J P

    1990-04-01

    Patients with peripheral vascular disease (PVD) often have coronary artery disease (CAD) which means an increased risk during anesthesia. The prevalence of CAD is nearly 50% among such patients. Owing to claudication, diagnostic stress tests can rarely be performed in PVD patients. In order to evaluate the frequency of transient perioperative myocardial ischemia, Holter monitoring was performed in 30 consecutive PVD patients with ASA II-III and AVK scale (Fontaine) II-IV who were undergoing femoropopliteal bypass surgery. Patients who had left bundle branch block and left ventricular hypertrophy or were taking digitalis medication were excluded from Holter monitoring. The ST-segment analysis of the frequency modulated recordings (n = 19) revealed episodes of myocardial ischemia in 26% of the patients. Most (75%) of the episodes occurred preoperatively, and 25%, during or after the anesthesia or during preparation for it. Risk factors for CAD were more often found in patients with ST segment alterations than in patients without ST segment deviations, even though the preoperative antianginal medication administered was comparable in the two subgroups. It is concluded that in a considerable subset of PVD patients silent myocardial ischemia occurs, which can be related to the different perioperative intervals by means of ST segment analyses of Holter recordings. The ST segment may allow a better insight into the cardiac state of PVD patients. Further studies are necessary in larger populations to test our suspicion.

  12. Lifestyle and dietary risk factors for peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Canela, Miguel; Martínez-González, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) usually refers to ischemia of the lower limb vessels. Currently, the estimated number of cases in the world is 202 million. PAD is the third leading cause of atherosclerotic cardiovascular morbidity. The measurement of the ankle-brachial index (ABI) is recommended as a first-line noninvasive test for screening and diagnosis of PAD. An ABI <0.90 is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events and this measurement is useful to identify patients at moderate to high risk of cardiovascular disease. However, there is insufficient evidence to assess the benefits and harms of screening for PAD with the ABI in asymptomatic adults. Lifestyle modifications, including smoking cessation, dietary changes and physical activity, are currently the most cost-effective interventions. Inverse associations with PAD have been reported for some subtypes of dietary fats, fiber, antioxidants (vitamins E and C), folate, vitamins B6, B12 and D, flavonoids, and fruits and vegetables. A possible inverse association between better adherence to the Mediterranean diet and the risk of symptomatic PAD has also been reported in a large randomized clinical trial. Therefore, a Mediterranean-style diet could be effective in the primary and secondary prevention of PAD, although further experimental studies are needed to better clarify this association.  (Circ J 2014; 78: 553-559).

  13. Ischemia-modified albumin in type 2 diabetic patients with and without peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Shao-gang; WEI, Chun-ling; HONG, Bing; YU, Wei-nan

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether there is an association between serum ischemia-modified albumin and the risk factor profile in type 2 diabetic patients with peripheral arterial disease and to identify the risk markers for peripheral arterial disease. METHODS: Participants included 290 patients (35.2% women) with type 2 diabetes. The ankle-brachial pressure index was measured using a standard protocol, and peripheral arterial disease was defined as an ankle-brachial index <0.90 or ≥1.3. The basal ischemia-modified albumin levels and clinical parameters were measured and analyzed. The risk factors for peripheral arterial disease were examined by multiple logistic analyses. RESULTS: Age, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, urine albumin, homocysteine, and ischemia-modified albumin were significantly higher in patients with peripheral arterial disease than in disease-free patients (p<0.05), while ankle-brachial index was lower in the former group (p<0.05). Ischemia-modified albumin was positively associated with HbA1c and homocysteine levels (r = 0.220, p = 0.030; r = 0.446, p = 0.044, respectively), while no correlation was found with ankle-brachial index. Multiple logistic analyses indicated that HbA1c, systolic blood pressure, homocysteine and ischemia-modified albumin were independent risk factors for peripheral arterial disease in the diabetic subjects. CONCLUSION: The baseline ischemia-modified albumin levels were significantly higher and positively associated with HbA1c and homocysteine levels in type 2 diabetic patients with peripheral arterial disease. Ischemia-modified albumin was a risk marker for peripheral arterial disease. Taken together, these results might be helpful for monitoring diabetic peripheral arterial disease. PMID:22012037

  14. Proximal Superficial Femoral Artery Occlusion, Collateral Vessels, and Walking Performance in Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Mary M.; Carroll, Timothy J.; Kibbe, Melina; Kramer, Christopher M.; Liu, Kiang; Guralnik, Jack M.; Keeling, Aoife N.; Criqui, Michael H.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Yuan, Chun; Tian, Lu; Liao, Yihua; Berry, Jarrett; Zhao, Lihui; Carr, James

    2013-01-01

    Objective We studied associations of MRI-measured SFA occlusions with functional performance, leg symptoms, and collateral vessel number in PAD. We studied associations of collateral vessel number with functional performance in PAD. Background Associations of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected superficial femoral artery (SFA) occlusion and collateral vessel number with functional performance among individuals with peripheral artery disease (PAD) have not been reported. Methods 457 participants with an ankle brachial index (ABI) < 1.00 had MRI measurement of the proximal SFA with twelve consecutive 2.5 millimeter cross-sectional images. An occluded SFA was defined as an SFA in which at least one segment was occluded. A non-occluded SFA was defined as absence of any occluded slices. Collateral vessels were visualized with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Lower extremity functional performance was measured with the six-minute walk, four-meter walking velocity at usual and fastest pace, and the short physical performance battery (SPPB) (0-12 scale, 12=best). Results Adjusting for age, sex, race, comorbidities, and other confounders, the presence of an SFA occlusion was associated with poorer six-minute walk performance (1,031 vs. 1,169 feet, P=0.006), slower fast-paced walking velocity (1.15 vs. 1.22 meters/second, P =0.042), and lower SPPB score (9.07 vs. 9.75, P=0.038) compared to the absence of an SFA occlusion. More numerous collateral vessels were associated with better six-minute walk performance (0-3 collaterals-1,064 feet, 4-7 collaterals-1,165 feet, ≥ 8 collaterals-1,246 feet, P trend=0.007), faster usual-paced walking speed (0-3 collaterals-0.84 meters/second, 4-7 collaterals-0.88 meters/second, ≥ 8 collaterals-0.91 meters/second, P trend=0.029), and faster rapid-paced walking speed (0-3 collaterals-1.17 meters/second, 4-7 collaterals-1.22 meters/second, ≥ 8 collaterals-1.29 meters/second, P trend=0.002), adjusting for age, sex, race

  15. Stress scintigraphy using single-photon emission computed tomography in the evaluation of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Nohara, R.; Kambara, H.; Suzuki, Y.; Tamaki, S.; Kadota, K.; Kawai, C.; Tamaki, N.; Torizuka, K.

    1984-05-01

    Twenty-seven patients with angina pectoris, 24 with postmyocardial infarction angina and 7 with normal coronary arteries were examined by exercise thallium-201 emission computed tomography (SPECT) and planar scintigraphy. Exercise SPECT was compared with the reperfusion imaging obtained approximately 2 to 3 hours after exercise. The sensitivity and specificity of demonstrating involved coronary arteries by identifying the locations of myocardial perfusion defects were 96 and 87% for right coronary artery, 88 and 89% for left anterior descending artery (LAD) and 78 and 100% for left circumflex artery (LC). These figures are higher than those for planar scintigraphy (85 and 87% for right coronary artery, 73 and 89% for LAD and 39 and 100% for LC arteries). In patients with 3-vessel disease, sensitivity of SPECT (100, 88 and 75% for right coronary artery, LAD and LC, respectively) was higher than planar imaging (88, 63 and 31%, respectively), with a significant difference for LC (p less than 0.05). In 1, 2 and 0-vessel disease the sensitivity and specificity of the 2 techniques were comparable. Multivessel disease was more easily identified as multiple coronary involvement than planar imaging with a significant difference in 3-vessel disease (p less than 0.05). In conclusion, stress SPECT provides useful information for the identification of LC lesions in coronary heart disease, including 3-vessel involvement.

  16. Multiple Intrahepatic Artery Aneurysms in a Patient with Behcet's Disease: Use of Transcatheter Embolization for Rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Irfan; Fotiadis, Nikolas I. Dilks, Phil; Kocher, Hemant M.; Fotheringham, Tim; Matson, Matthew

    2010-04-15

    Intrahepatic artery aneuryms are a rare and potentially life-threatening condition. We present the first case in the English literature of multiple intrahepatic artery aneuryms in a patient with Behcet's disease who presented acutely with rupture. The ruptured aneurysm was treated successfully with transcatheter arterial coil embolization-CT and clinical follow-up confirming a good result. We discuss the management dilemma with regard to prophylactic embolization of the numerous other small asymptomatic intrahepatic aneurysms in this same patient.

  17. A Striking Coronary Artery Pattern in a Grown-Up Congenital Heart Disease Patient

    PubMed Central

    Iacovelli, Fortunato; Pepe, Martino; Contegiacomo, Gaetano; Alberotanza, Vito; Masi, Filippo; Bortone, Alessandro Santo; Favale, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) is a myocardial disorder probably due to the arrest of normal embryogenesis of the left ventricle. It could be isolated or associated with other extracardiac and cardiac abnormalities, including coronary artery anomalies. Despite the continuous improvement of imaging resolution quality, this cardiomyopathy still remains frequently misdiagnosed, especially if associated with other heart diseases. We report a case of LVNC association with both malposition of the great arteries and a very original coronary artery pattern. PMID:26881144

  18. A Striking Coronary Artery Pattern in a Grown-Up Congenital Heart Disease Patient.

    PubMed

    Iacovelli, Fortunato; Pepe, Martino; Contegiacomo, Gaetano; Alberotanza, Vito; Masi, Filippo; Bortone, Alessandro Santo; Favale, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) is a myocardial disorder probably due to the arrest of normal embryogenesis of the left ventricle. It could be isolated or associated with other extracardiac and cardiac abnormalities, including coronary artery anomalies. Despite the continuous improvement of imaging resolution quality, this cardiomyopathy still remains frequently misdiagnosed, especially if associated with other heart diseases. We report a case of LVNC association with both malposition of the great arteries and a very original coronary artery pattern. PMID:26881144

  19. Genetic etiology of coronary artery disease considering NOS 3 gene variant rs1799983.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Syed Kashif; Rani, Asima; Yousaf, Memoona; Noreen, Aasma; Arshad, Muhammad

    2015-06-01

    Reduced production of nitric oxide due to rs1799983 single nucleotide polymorphism in nitric oxide synthase 3 gene (NOS3) may enhance the risk of coronary artery disease. The association of rs1799983 polymorphism with coronary artery disease was investigated in the local population of Pakistan. Study consisted of 376 individuals, out of which 198 were coronary artery disease patients and 178 were normal healthy individuals. Allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based strategy was used for the detection of different genotypes of rs1799983 polymorphism. PCR amplification results were obtained for 354 samples. Frequency of T allele was higher as compared to G allele in our population. Strong association between rs1799983 and coronary artery disease was observed (p < 0.01). TT genotype was found to enhance 5.717 times the risk of coronary artery disease (odds ratio (OR): 5.717; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 3.586-9.115). On the basis of present results, it can be concluded that rs1799983 is strongly associated with coronary artery disease in our population and TT genotype of this polymorphism enhanced the risk of coronary artery disease in Pakistani population.

  20. Relation Between Family History of Premature Coronary Artery Disease and the Risk of Death in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Abdi-Ali, Ahmed; Shaheen, AbdelAziz; Southern, Danielle; Zhang, Mei; Knudtson, Merril; White, James; Graham, Michelle; James, Mathew T; Wilton, Stephen B

    2016-02-01

    Family history (FHx) of premature coronary artery disease (CAD) is a risk factor for development of incident cardiovascular disease. However the association between FHx and outcomes in patients with established CAD is unclear. We followed 84,373 patients with angiographic CAD enrolled in the inclusive Alberta Provincial Project for Outcomes Assessment in Coronary Heart Disease registry between April 2002 and March 2013. Overall, 25,566 (30%) self-reported an FHx of CAD, defined as a first-degree relative with premature CAD (men, age <55 years; women, age <65 years). We tested the association between FHx and all-cause mortality using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression. After adjusting for baseline differences in clinical characteristics, indication, and extent of CAD, FHx was associated with reduced all-cause mortality over a median 5.6 years in follow-up (hazard ratio [HR] 0.77 [95% CI 0.73 to 0.80]). The magnitude of this protective association was weaker in those with versus without a previous myocardial infarction (HR 0.87 [95% CI 0.81 to 0.93] versus 0.72 [0.69 to 0.76], interaction p <0.0001) and slightly stronger in those presenting with versus without an acute coronary syndrome (HR 0.74 [0.70 to 0.79] versus 0.80 [0.75 to 0.85], interaction p = 0.08). There was attenuation of association with increasing age, but FHx remained protective even in those aged older than 80 years (HR 0.86 [0.77 to 0.95]). In conclusion, in patients with angiographic CAD, self-reported FHx of premature CAD is associated with improved long-term survival rate, independent of clinical characteristics, mode of presentation, and extent of disease. Further investigation of potential patient- and system-level mediators of this seemingly paradoxical relation is required. PMID:26723106

  1. Predicting Coronary Heart Disease Events in Women: A Longitudinal Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    McSweeney, Jean; Cleves, Mario A.; Fischer, Ellen P.; Moser, Debra K.; Wei, Jeanne; Pettey, Christina; Rojo, Martha O.; Armbya, Narain

    2013-01-01

    Background Over 240,000 women die in the U.S. from coronary heart disease (CHD) annually. Identifying women’s symptoms that predict a CHD event such as myocardial infarction (MI) could decrease mortality. Objective For this longitudinal observational study, we recruited 1097 women, who were either clinician or self-referred to a cardiologist and undergoing initial evaluation by a cardiologist, to assess the utility of the prodromal symptoms (PS) section of the McSweeney Acute and Prodromal Myocardial Infarction Symptom Survey (MAPMISS) in predicting the occurrence of cardiac events in women. Methods and Results Seventy-seven women experienced events (angioplasty, stent placement, coronary artery bypass, MI, death) during the two-year follow up. The most common events were stents alone (38.9%) or in combination with angioplasty (18.2%). Ten women had MIs; 4 experienced cardiac death. Cox proportional hazards was used to model time to event. The prodromal score was significantly associated with risk of an event (HR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.06–1.13), as was the number of PS endorsed by each woman per visit. After covariate adjustment, five symptoms were significantly associated with increased risk: discomfort in jaws/teeth, unusual fatigue, arm discomfort, shortness of breath and general chest discomfort (HR = 3.97, 95% CI = 2.32–6.78). Women reporting >1of these symptoms were 4 times as likely to suffer a cardiac event as women with none. Conclusions Both the MAPMISS PS scores and number of PS were significantly associated with cardiac events, independent of risk factors, suggesting there are specific PS that can be easily assessed using the MAPMISS. This instrument could be an important component of a predictive screen to assist clinicians in deciding the course of management for women. PMID:24231895

  2. Haemodynamic responses to exercise stress test in postmenopausal women with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, Sangeeta; Walia, Lily

    2013-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of death and disability in women. The incidence of coronary artery disease increases sharply after menopause. Coronary artery disease results from imbalance between myocardial oxygen supply and oxygen demand of the heart. Myocardial oxygen consumption is a helpful indicator of the response of the coronary circulation to the myocardial oxygen demand. Myocardial oxygen consumption is calculated by indirect methods like Stroke's work, Fick's principle, tension time index and rate pressure product. Rate pressure product is a major determinant of cardiac oxygen consumption. It is the product of heart rate with systolic blood pressure. It indicates that adequate stress was achieved and is an important indicator of ventricular function. It increases progressively with exercise. Peak rate pressure product is the rate pressure product at peak of exercise. Peak rate pressure product gives an accurate reflection of the myocardial oxygen demand and myocardial workload. The higher the peak rate pressure product, more will be the myocardial oxygen consumption. The ability to reach higher peak rate pressure product is associated with more adequate coronary perfusion. Thus the low value of peak rate pressure product suggests significant compromise of coronary perfusion and decreased left ventricular function. In the present study effect of exercise on haemodynamic parameters of postmenopausal women without coronary artery disease and postmenopausal women with coronary artery disease were compared. The percentage increase in systolic blood pressure was significantly more in postmenopausal women without coronary artery disease. The peak rate pressure product was significantly more in postmenopausal women without coronary artery disease (28.04 +/- 0.8293 mm of Hg beats / minute x 10(3)) as compared to postmenopausal women with coronary artery disease (25.14+/- 0.8993 mm of Hg beats/ minute x 10(3)) indicating more compromised coronary

  3. Comparison between Angiographic Findings of Coronary Artery Disease in STEMI and NSTEMI Patients of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Khan, M H; Islam, M N; Ahmed, M U; Shafique, A M; Bari, M S; Islam, M Z; Ahamed, N U; Masud, M R; Bhowmick, K; Begum, M; Akhter, S M; Siddique, S R

    2016-04-01

    Coronary Angiogram (CAG) has been used to detect coronary artery disease in myocardial infarction (both STEMI and NSTEMI) patients. The purpose of this study was to compare the degree of coronary artery disease among STEMI and NSTEMI patients. Among acute coronary syndrome in NSTEMI we found more widespread coronary artery disease other than STEMI. Lack of documentations encouraged us to perform this study in our center. In this retrospective observational study we summarized all myocardial infarction (MI) patients who underwent coronary angiography (CAG) from August 2013 to August 2014 at Enam Medical College Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh and data of degree of coronary artery disease were recorded. Data of 100 consecutive MI patients who underwent CAG during that period were recorded. Among them 50 patients having STEMI as Group I (male 45, female 5) & other 50 patients sustained NSTEMI as Group II (male 38, female 12). Among NSTEMI patient group 80% were having multi-vessel disease and in STEMI patient group 80% having single vessel disease and remaining having multi-vessel disease. The degree of coronary artery disease is extensive in NSTEMI patients than in STEMI group. Coronary angiogram can visualize the degree of coronary artery involvement and is a useful screening modality to compare disease extent in MI patients.

  4. Comparison between Angiographic Findings of Coronary Artery Disease in STEMI and NSTEMI Patients of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Khan, M H; Islam, M N; Ahmed, M U; Shafique, A M; Bari, M S; Islam, M Z; Ahamed, N U; Masud, M R; Bhowmick, K; Begum, M; Akhter, S M; Siddique, S R

    2016-04-01

    Coronary Angiogram (CAG) has been used to detect coronary artery disease in myocardial infarction (both STEMI and NSTEMI) patients. The purpose of this study was to compare the degree of coronary artery disease among STEMI and NSTEMI patients. Among acute coronary syndrome in NSTEMI we found more widespread coronary artery disease other than STEMI. Lack of documentations encouraged us to perform this study in our center. In this retrospective observational study we summarized all myocardial infarction (MI) patients who underwent coronary angiography (CAG) from August 2013 to August 2014 at Enam Medical College Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh and data of degree of coronary artery disease were recorded. Data of 100 consecutive MI patients who underwent CAG during that period were recorded. Among them 50 patients having STEMI as Group I (male 45, female 5) & other 50 patients sustained NSTEMI as Group II (male 38, female 12). Among NSTEMI patient group 80% were having multi-vessel disease and in STEMI patient group 80% having single vessel disease and remaining having multi-vessel disease. The degree of coronary artery disease is extensive in NSTEMI patients than in STEMI group. Coronary angiogram can visualize the degree of coronary artery involvement and is a useful screening modality to compare disease extent in MI patients. PMID:27277351

  5. An electrophysiological study of excitatory purinergic neuromuscular transmission in longitudinal smooth muscle of chicken anterior mesenteric artery

    PubMed Central

    Khalifa, Maisa; El-Mahmoudy, AbuBakr; Shiina, Takahiko; Shimizu, Yasutake; Nikami, Hideki; El-Sayed, Mossad; Kobayashi, Haruo; Takewaki, Tadashi

    2005-01-01

    The object of the present study was to clarify the neurotransmitters controlling membrane responses to electrical field stimulation (EFS) in the longitudinal smooth muscle cells of the chicken anterior mesenteric artery. EFS (5 pulses at 20 Hz) evoked a depolarization of amplitude 19.7±2.1 mV, total duration 29.6±3.1 s and latency 413.0±67.8 ms. This depolarization was tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive and its amplitude was partially decreased by atropine (0.5 μM); however, its duration was shortened by further addition of prazosin (10 μM). Atropine/prazosin-resistant component was blocked by the nonspecific purinergic antagonist, suramin, in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that this component is mediated by the neurotransmitter adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP). Neither desensitization nor blocking of P2X receptor with its putative receptor agonist α,β-methylene ATP (α,β-MeATP, 1 μM) and its antagonist pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2′,4′-disulfonic (PPADS, up to 50 μM), had significant effect on the purinergic depolarization. In contrast, either desensitization or blocking of P2Y receptor with its putative agonist 2-methylthioATP (2-MeSATP, 1 μM) and its antagonist Cibacron blue F3GA (CBF3GA, 10 μM) abolished the purinergic depolarization, indicating that this response is mediated through P2Y but not P2X receptor. The purinergic depolarization was inhibited by pertussis toxin (PTX, 600 ng ml−1). Furthermore, it was significantly inhibited by a phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor, U-73122 (10 μM), indicating that the receptors involved in mediating the purinergic depolarization are linked to a PTX-sensitive G-protein, which is involved in a PLC-mediated signaling pathway. Data of the present study suggest that the EFS-induced excitatory membrane response occurring in the longitudinal smooth muscle of the chicken anterior mesenteric artery is mainly purinergic in nature and is mediated via P2Y purinoceptors. PMID:15685211

  6. [Clinical characteristics of angina pectoris in relation to disease of the coronary arteries].

    PubMed

    Buslenko, N S; Fitileva, L M; Zingerman, L S

    1975-05-01

    Clinical and coronary angiographic comparison conducted in 164 patients with typical angina pectoris demonstrated that the nature of the pains may serve as a criterion of the degree of stenosis and the number of diseased arteries. The development of typical anginal seizures indicates the presence of clear changes in the coronary arteries. A daily intake of over 10 pills of nitroglycerine is a sign of a narrowing of the diameter of the coronary arteries exceeding 75%. A growing number of daily taken pills of nitroglycerine indicates an increase in number of diseased coronaries. Pains occurring during or after meals, when lying down, awakening the patient at night are typical for coronary narrowings exceeding 75% of their diameter. Usually such pains are observed in patients with 2 and more cornary arteries affected by the disease. Rightward irradiation and especially strictly localized pains are often associated with the lesion of the right coronary artery.

  7. [Efficacy of metformin as initial therapy in patients with coronary artery disease and diabetes type 2].

    PubMed

    Lavrenko, A V; Kutsenko, L A; Solokhina, I L; Rasin, M S; Kaĭdashev, I P

    2011-01-01

    The use of metformin during the first month of treatment of patients with coronary artery disease and diabetes type 2 led to the decrease of insulin resistance and reduced activity of systemic inflammation (significant decrease in the concentrations of IL-1, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-alpha). Reduced activity of systemic inflammation had a beneficial effect on the course of coronary artery disease (significant decrease in the functional class of stable angina). Type 2 diabetes appears to be quite successfully modifiable risk factor for coronary artery disease by the adequate controls.

  8. The Relationship between Spontaneous Multi-Vessel Coronary Artery Dissection and Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Çağırcı, Göksel; Üreyen, Çağın Mustafa; Kuş, Görkem; Küçükseymen, Selçuk; Arslan, Şakir

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy involving the small intestines. Genetic and environmental risk factors as well as autoimmunity have been linked to its etiology. Studies have shown that coronary artery disease, autoimmune myocarditis, arrhythmias and premature atherosclerosis are more prevalent in individuals with CD compared to individuals without the disease. In this case report a young male patient with CD presented with acute myocardial infarction with spontaneous coronary artery dissections of two vessels. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of spontaneous multi-vessel coronary artery dissection in a patient with CD. PMID:26023313

  9. Signal and image processing for early detection of coronary artery diseases: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobssite, Youness; Samir, B. Belhaouari; Mohamad Hani, Ahmed Fadzil B.

    2012-09-01

    Today biomedical signals and image based detection are a basic step to diagnose heart diseases, in particular, coronary artery diseases. The goal of this work is to provide non-invasive early detection of Coronary Artery Diseases relying on analyzing images and ECG signals as a combined approach to extract features, further classify and quantify the severity of DCAD by using B-splines method. In an aim of creating a prototype of screening biomedical imaging for coronary arteries to help cardiologists to decide the kind of treatment needed to reduce or control the risk of heart attack.

  10. The Infrapopliteal Arterial Occlusions Similar to Buerger Disease: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Igari, Kimihiro; Toyofuku, Takahiro; Inoue, Yoshinori; Iwai, Takehisa

    2014-01-01

    We herein present two cases that required the differential diagnosis of Buerger disease. Case 1 involved a 55-year-old male with a smoking habit who was admitted with ulcers and coldness in his fingers and toes. Angiography showed blockage in both the radial and posterior tibial arteries, which led to an initial diagnosis of Buerger disease. However, a biopsy of the right posterior tibial artery showed pathological findings of fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD). Case 2 involved a 28-year-old male with intermittent claudication who was examined at another hospital. Angiography showed occlusion of both popliteal and crural arteries, and the patient was suspected to have Buerger disease. However, computed tomography disclosed an abnormal slip on both sides of the popliteal fossa, and we diagnosed him with bilateral popliteal artery entrapment syndrome (PAES). These cases illustrate that other occlusive diseases, such as FMD and PAES, may sometimes be misdiagnosed as Buerger disease. PMID:25431737

  11. Herpes zoster infection increases the risk of peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Te-Yu; Yang, Fu-Chi; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung; Lo, Hsin-Yi; Yang, Tse-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Varicella-zoster virus infection can cause meningoencephalitis, myelitis, ocular disorders, and vasculopathy. However, no study has investigated the association between herpes zoster (HZ) and peripheral arterial disease (PAD). We identified newly diagnosed HZ from the Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database recorded during 2000 to 2010, with a follow-up period extending until December 31, 2011. In addition, we included a comparison cohort that was randomly frequency-matched with the HZ cohort according to age, sex, and index year. We analyzed the risk of PAD with respect to sex, age, and comorbidities by using Cox proportional-hazards regression models. In total, 35,391 HZ patients and 141,556 controls were enrolled in this study. The risk of PAD was 13% increased in the HZ cohort than in the comparison cohort after adjustment for age, sex, and comorbidities. The Kaplan–Meier survival curve showed that the risk of PAD was significantly higher in the HZ cohort than in the non-HZ cohort (P < 0.001). This nationwide population-based cohort study revealed a higher risk of PAD in patients with HZ infection than in those without the infection. Careful follow-up and aggressive treatment is recommended for patients with HZ to reduce the risk of PAD. PMID:27583856

  12. Gene and stem cell therapy in peripheral arterial occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Kalka, C; Baumgartner, Iris

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) is a manifestation of systemic atherosclerosis strongly associated with a high risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In a considerable proportion of patients with PAOD, revascularization either by endovascular means or by open surgery combined with best possible risk factor modification does not achieve limb salvage or relief of ischaemic rest pain. As a consequence, novel therapeutic strategies have been developed over the last two decades aiming to promote neovascularization and remodelling of collaterals. Gene and stem cell therapy are the main directions for clinical investigation concepts. For both, preclinical studies have shown promising results using a wide variety of genes encoding for growth factors and populations of adult stem cells, respectively. As a consequence, clinical trials have been performed applying gene and stem cell-based concepts. However, it has become apparent that a straightforward translation into humans is not possible. While several trials reported relief of symptoms and functional improvement, other trials did not confirm this early promise of efficacy. Ongoing clinical trials with an improved study design are needed to confirm the potential that gene and cell therapy may have and to prevent the gaps in our scientific knowledge that will jeopardize the establishment of angiogenic therapy as an additional medical treatment of PAOD. This review summarizes the experimental background and presents the current status of clinical applications and future perspectives of the therapeutic use of gene and cell therapy strategies for PAOD.

  13. Genetics of Lipid Traits and Relationship to Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Tanya E.; Rader, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the critical importance of plasma lipoproteins in the development of atherosclerosis, varying degrees of evidence surround the causal associations of lipoproteins with coronary artery disease (CAD). These causal contributions can be assessed by employing genetic variants as unbiased proxies for lipid levels. A relatively large number of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) variants strongly associate with CAD, confirming the causal impact of this lipoprotein on atherosclerosis. Although not as firmly established, genetic evidence supporting a causal role of triglycerides (TG) in CAD is growing. Conversely, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) variants not associated with LDL-C or TG have not yet been shown to be convincingly associated with CAD, raising questions about the causality of HDL-C in atherosclerosis. Finally, genetic variants at the LPA locus associated with lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] are decisively linked to CAD, indicating a causal role for Lp(a). Translational investigation of CAD-associated lipid variants may identify novel regulatory pathways with therapeutic potential to alter CAD risk. PMID:23881580

  14. The value of imaging in subclinical coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Zimarino, Marco; Prati, Francesco; Marano, Riccardo; Angeramo, Francesca; Pescetelli, Irene; Gatto, Laura; Marco, Valeria; Bruno, Isabella; De Caterina, Raffaele

    2016-07-01

    Although the treatment of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) has advanced considerably, the ability to detect, predict, and prevent complications of atherosclerotic plaques, considered the main cause of ACS, remains elusive. Several imaging tools have therefore been developed to characterize morphological determinants of plaque vulnerability, defined as the propensity or probability of plaques to complicate with coronary thrombosis, able to predict patients at risk. By utilizing both intravascular and noninvasive imaging tools, indeed prospective longitudinal studies have recently provided considerable knowledge, increasing our understanding of determinants of plaque formation, progression, and instabilization. In the present review we aim at 1) critically analyzing the incremental utility of imaging tools over currently available "traditional" methods of risk stratification; 2) documenting the capacity of such modalities to monitor atherosclerosis progression and regression according to lifestyle modifications and targeted therapy; and 3) evaluating the potential clinical relevance of advanced imaging, testing whether detection of such lesions may guide therapeutic decisions and changes in treatment strategy. The current understanding of modes of progression of atherosclerotic vascular disease and the appropriate use of available diagnostic tools may already now gauge the selection of patients to be enrolled in primary and secondary prevention studies. Appropriate trials should now, however, evaluate the cost-effectiveness of an aggressive search of vulnerable plaques, favoring implementation of such diagnostic tools in daily practice. PMID:26851577

  15. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease and Arterial Stiffness: Tsunami Effect in the Brain?

    PubMed Central

    Saji, Naoki; Toba, Kenji; Sakurai, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Background Cerebral small vessel diseases, including silent lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and microbleeds, pose a risk for cerebrovascular disease, cognitive impairment, and the geriatric syndrome via effects on arterial stiffness. However, the vascular, physiological, and metabolic roles of arterial stiffness in cerebral small vessel diseases remain unclear. Summary Arterial stiffness can be assessed using various indicators such as the ankle-brachial index, pulse wave velocity, cardio-ankle vascular index, and augmentation index. Arterial stiffness is independently associated with all components of cerebral small vessel disease including silent lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and microbleeds, although there are some methodological differences between the various surrogate markers. Evidence of arterial stiffness indicates microvessel arteriosclerosis presenting with vascular endothelial dysfunction. Further, vascular narrowing due to atherosclerosis and vascular stiffness due to lipohyalinosis can accelerate the pulse waves. This hemodynamic stress, pulsatile pressure, or blood pressure variability can cause a ‘tsunami effect’ towards the cerebral parenchyma and lead to cerebral small vessel disease. Previous studies have shown that silent lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities are strongly associated with arterial stiffness. However, the association between microbleeds and arterial stiffness remains controversial, as there are two vessel mechanisms related to microbleeds: cerebral amyloid angiopathy and hypertensive small vessel disease. Key Messages Cerebral small vessel disease with associated arterial stiffness is a risk factor for silent cerebral lesions, stroke, and cognitive impairment. Improvement of the living environment, management of risk factors, and innovation and development of novel drugs that improve arterial stiffness may suppress the progression of cerebral small vessel disease, and may reduce

  16. Limitations of regional myocardial thallium clearance for identification of disease in individual coronary arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, L.C.; Rogers, W.J. Jr.; Links, J.M.; Corn, C. )

    1989-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to critically evaluate the usefulness of postexercise regional myocardial thallium-201 clearance for identifying disease in individual coronary arteries. Exercise and redistribution planar imaging studies were performed in 114 subjects, including 19 normal volunteers and 95 patients undergoing cardiac catheterization (70 with and 25 without greater than or equal to 50% narrowing in one or more coronary arteries). Thallium clearance was measured from predefined myocardial regions corresponding to the left anterior descending, left circumflex and right coronary arteries and was expressed as the percent decrease in activity at 4 h, assuming monoexponential clearance. In regions perfused by a normal or insignificantly diseased coronary artery, mean 4 h clearance was 58.9 +/- 9.4% for normal volunteers, 43.1 +/- 15.5% for catheterized patients without coronary artery disease and 36.3 +/- 24.9% for catheterized patients with coronary artery disease (p less than 0.001 patients with coronary artery disease versus normal volunteers). Clearance from normal regions was significantly associated with two measures of exercise performance: percent of predicted maximal heart rate achieved (r = 0.49) and exercise duration (r = 0.35). In regions perfused by a stenotic coronary artery, mean clearance was lower (31.1 +/- 19.8%) but was not significantly different from that in normal regions in the same patients. Clearance from diseased regions was also associated with maximal exercise heart rate (r = 0.28) and exercise duration (r = 0.41), but not with percent coronary artery stenosis (r = 0.02). After taking exercise performance into account, the number of diseased vessels or the presence or absence of disease in a given vessel had little influence on regional thallium clearance.

  17. A case of Behçet's disease accompanied by colitis with longitudinal ulcers and granuloma.

    PubMed

    Naganuma, Makoto; Iwao, Yasushi; Kashiwagi, Kazuhiro; Funakoshi, Shinsuke; Ishii, Hiromasa; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2002-01-01

    A 37-year-old female presenting with oral and genital ulcers and erythema nodosum on both arms was diagnosed as having Behçet's disease. The symptoms resolved spontaneously. However, she was admitted to our hospital (Keio University Hospital) several months later because of fever, aphthous ulcers of the oral cavity, lower abdominal pain and frequent diarrhea. A colonoscopic examination revealed multiple ulcers including longitudinal ulcers in the ascending and transverse colon, and histological examination of biopsied specimens demonstrated non-caseating epithelioid granuloma. Treatment with prednisolone and 5-aminosalicylic acid was started, and the patient responded well clinically. One month later, a repeated colonoscopy confirmed that the lesions including longitudinal ulcers had disappeared. In this report, we describe our experience of this rare case of Behçet's disease concomitant with colonic longitudinal ulcers and epithelioid granuloma, and discuss the difficulties in making a differential diagnosis, primarily with regard to Crohn's disease.

  18. Aging syndrome genes and premature coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Low, Adrian F; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Kathiresan, Sekar; Everett, Brendan; Chae, Claudia U; Shaw, Stanley Y; Ellinor, Patrick T; MacRae, Calum A

    2005-01-01

    Background Vascular disease is a feature of aging, and coronary vascular events are a major source of morbidity and mortality in rare premature aging syndromes. One such syndrome is caused by mutations in the lamin A/C (LMNA) gene, which also has been implicated in familial insulin resistance. A second gene related to premature aging in man and in murine models is the KLOTHO gene, a hypomorphic variant of which (KL-VS) is significantly more common in the first-degree relatives of patients with premature coronary artery disease (CAD). We evaluated whether common variants at the LMNA or KLOTHO genes are associated with rigorously defined premature CAD. Methods We identified 295 patients presenting with premature acute coronary syndromes confirmed by angiography. A control group of 145 patients with no evidence of CAD was recruited from outpatient referral clinics. Comprehensive haplotyping of the entire LMNA gene, including the promoter and untranslated regions, was performed using a combination of TaqMan® probes and direct sequencing of 14 haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The KL-VS variant of the KLOTHO gene was typed using restriction digest of a PCR amplicon. Results Two SNPs that were not in Hardy Weinberg equilibrium were excluded from analysis. We observed no significant differences in allele, genotype or haplotype frequencies at the LMNA or KLOTHO loci between the two groups. In addition, there was no evidence of excess homozygosity at the LMNA locus. Conclusion Our data do not support the hypothesis that premature CAD is associated with common variants in the progeroid syndrome genes LMNA and KLOTHO. PMID:16262891

  19. Genetics of coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xuming; Wiernek, Szymon; Evans, James P; Runge, Marschall S

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD) comprises a broad spectrum of clinical entities that include asymptomatic subclinical atherosclerosis and its clinical complications, such as angina pectoris, myocardial infarction (MI) and sudden cardiac death. CAD continues to be the leading cause of death in industrialized society. The long-recognized familial clustering of CAD suggests that genetics plays a central role in its development, with the heritability of CAD and MI estimated at approximately 50% to 60%. Understanding the genetic architecture of CAD and MI has proven to be difficult and costly due to the heterogeneity of clinical CAD and the underlying multi-decade complex pathophysiological processes that involve both genetic and environmental interactions. This review describes the clinical heterogeneity of CAD and MI to clarify the disease spectrum in genetic studies, provides a brief overview of the historical understanding and estimation of the heritability of CAD and MI, recounts major gene discoveries of potential causal mutations in familial CAD and MI, summarizes CAD and MI-associated genetic variants identified using candidate gene approaches and genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and summarizes the current status of the construction and validations of genetic risk scores for lifetime risk prediction and guidance for preventive strategies. Potential protective genetic factors against the development of CAD and MI are also discussed. Finally, GWAS have identified multiple genetic factors associated with an increased risk of in-stent restenosis following stent placement for obstructive CAD. This review will also address genetic factors associated with in-stent restenosis, which may ultimately guide clinical decision-making regarding revascularization strategies for patients with CAD and MI. PMID:26839654

  20. Pulmonary arterial hypertension among Filipino patients with connective tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Santos Estrella, Paul V; Lin, Yih Chang; Navarra, Sandra V

    2007-01-01

    We describe the clinical features, therapies, and clinical course of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in a group of Filipinos with connective tissue diseases (CTDs). We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients diagnosed with PAH by a two-dimensional echocardiogram as a tricuspid regurgitant jet of more than 25 mmHg. All patients had underlying CTDs, defined by the American College of Rheumatology criteria, and were seen at the rheumatology clinics of the University of Santo Tomas Hospital and the St. Luke's Medical Center, Philippines. Of the 33 patients (32 women) included in the analysis, there were 14 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 12 with scleroderma, 5 with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), 1 with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), and 1 with dermatomyositis. The average age at PAH diagnosis was 38 +/- 14 years (mean +/- SD), and the mean duration of illness from CTD to PAH diagnosis was 53 +/- 52 months. Twelve patients had died at the time of this report, with a median duration of 15 months (range 1-57 months) from PAH diagnosis to mortality: six of these had scleroderma, five with SLE, and one with APS. The following therapies were used in this group of patients: low molecular weight heparin, warfarin, calcium-channel blockers, aspirin, cyclophosphamide, bosentan, iloprost, and sildenafil. We have described the clinical profile of PAH in a group of Filipino patients with CTDs, most commonly SLE. Various forms of pharmacologic therapies were used among these patients. Mortality remains high, particularly among those with underlying scleroderma. Early recognition and treatment are crucial in order to provide a better outcome for these patients.

  1. Association between abdominal aortic plaque and coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Luo, Songyuan; Luo, Jianfang; Liu, Yuan; Huang, Wenhui; Chen, Jiyan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Currently, the association between abdominal aortic plaques and coronary artery disease (CAD) has not yet been clarified clearly. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of abdominal aortic plaques by ultrasound imaging and to explore its association with CAD in patients undergoing coronary angiography. Methods Between October 2014 and June 2015, a prospective study was conducted in the Department of Cardiology at Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China. Ultrasound scanning of the abdominal aortas was performed in 1,667 consecutive patients undergoing coronary angiography. Clinical characteristics and coronary profile were collected from the patients. Results Of the 1,667 study patients (male, 68.9%; mean age, 63±11 years) undergoing coronary angiography, 1,268 had CAD. Compared with 399 patients without CAD, 1,268 patients with CAD had higher prevalence of abdominal aortic plaques (37.3% vs 17%, P<0.001). In multivariate analysis, abdominal aortic plaques served as independent factors associated with the presence of CAD (odds ratio =2.08; 95% confidence interval =1.50–2.90; P<0.001). Of the 1,268 patients with CAD, the prevalence of abdominal aortic plaques was 27.0% (98/363) in patients with one-vessel disease, 35.0% (107/306) in patients with two-vessel disease, and 44.7% (268/599) in patients with three-vessel disease. Stepwise increases in the prevalence of abdominal aortic plaque was found depending on the number of stenotic coronary vessels (P<0.001; P-value for trend <0.001). In an ordinal logistic regression model, abdominal aortic plaques served as independent factors associated with the severity of CAD according to the number of stenotic coronary vessels (P<0.001). Conclusion The prevalence of abdominal aortic plaques was higher in patients with CAD than in those without CAD. Abdominal aortic plaque was an independent factor associated with the presence and severity of CAD. PMID:27279740

  2. Angiotensin-Converting-Enzyme Inhibition in Stable Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are effective in reducing the risk of heart failure, myocardial infarction, and death from cardiovascular causes in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction or heart failure. ACE inhibitors have also been shown to reduce atherosclerotic complications in patients who have vascular disease without heart failure. METHODS In the Prevention of Events with Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibition (PEACE) Trial, we tested the hypothesis that patients with stable coronary artery disease and normal or slightly reduced left ventricular function derive therapeutic benefit from the addition of ACE inhibitors to modern conventional therapy. The trial was a double-blind, placebo-controlled study in which 8290 patients were randomly assigned to receive either trandolapril at a target dose of 4 mg per day (4158 patients) or matching placebo (4132 patients). RESULTS The mean (±SD) age of the patients was 64±8 years, the mean blood pressure 133±17/78±10 mm Hg, and the mean left ventricular ejection fraction 58±9 percent. The patients received intensive treatment, with 72 percent having previously undergone coronary revascularization and 70 percent receiving lipid-lowering drugs. The incidence of the primary end point — death from cardiovascular causes, myocardial infarction, or coronary revascularization — was 21.9 percent in the trandolapril group, as compared with 22.5 percent in the placebo group (hazard ratio in the trandolapril group, 0.96; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.88 to 1.06; P=0.43) over a median follow-up period of 4.8 years. CONCLUSIONS In patients with stable coronary heart disease and preserved left ventricular function who are receiving “current standard” therapy and in whom the rate of cardiovascular events is lower than in previous trials of ACE inhibitors in patients with vascular disease, there is no evidence that the addition of an ACE inhibitor provides further benefit in

  3. Multi-Detector Computed Tomography Angiography for Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Purpose Computed tomography (CT) scanning continues to be an important modality for the diagnosis of injury and disease, most notably for indications of the head and abdomen. (1) According to a recent report published by the Canadian Institutes of Health Information, (1) there were about 10.3 scanners per million people in Canada as of January 2004. Ontario had the fewest number of CT scanners per million compared to the other provinces (8 CT scanners per million). The wait time for CT in Ontario of 5 weeks approaches the Canadian median of 6 weeks. This health technology and policy appraisal systematically reviews the published literature on multidetector CT (MDCT) angiography as a diagnostic tool for the newest indication for CT, coronary artery disease (CAD), and will apply the results of the review to current health care practices in Ontario. This review does not evaluate MDCT to detect coronary calcification without contrast medium for CAD screening purposes. The Technology Compared with conventional CT scanning, MDCT can provide smaller pieces of information and can cover a larger area faster. (2) Advancing MDCT technology (8, 16, 32, 64 slice systems) is capable of producing more images in less time. For general CT scanning, this faster capability can reduce the time that patients must stay still during the procedure, thereby reducing potential movement artefact. However, the additional clinical utility of images obtained from faster scanners compared to the images obtained from conventional CT scanners for current CT indications (i.e., non-moving body parts) is not known. There are suggestions that the new fast scanners can reduce wait times for general CT. MDCT angiography that utilizes a contrast medium, has been proposed as a minimally invasive replacement to coronary angiography to detect coronary artery disease. MDCT may take between 15 to 45 minutes; coronary angiography may take up to 1 hour. Although 16-slice and 32-slice CT

  4. Emerging relations between infectious diseases and coronary artery disease and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fong, I W

    2000-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in developed countries. The cause is multifactorial. A substantial proportion of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) do not have traditional risk factors. Infectious diseases may play a role in these cases, or they may intensify the effect of other risk factors. The association of CAD and Chlamydia pneumoniae infection is firmly established, but causality is yet to be proven. The link with other infectious agents or conditions, such as cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, Helicobacter pylori and periodontitis, is more controversial. Cytomegalovirus infection is more strongly linked than native CAD to coronary artery restenosis after angioplasty and to accelerated CAD after cardiac transplantation. However, new data on this topic are appearing in the literature almost every month. The potential for novel therapeutic management of cardiovascular disease and stroke is great if infection is proven to cause or accelerate CAD or atherosclerosis. However, physicians should not "jump the gun" and start using antibiotic therapy prematurely for CAD. The results of large randomized clinical trials in progress will help establish causality and the benefits of antimicrobial therapy in CAD. PMID:10920732

  5. Coronary artery problems and disease in adults with congenital heart disease: how to evaluate, how to prevent, how to treat.

    PubMed

    Cataldo, S; Stuart, A G

    2014-10-01

    There are a wide variety of coronary artery anomalies and disease in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). In fact, the increasing burden of acquired coronary artery disease (CAD) has to be considered in addition to congenital abnormalities of the coronary arteries, isolated or associated to other congenital diseases. This is largely a consequence of the increasing number of patients reaching older age. Due to complex underlying cardiac anatomy, previous surgery and comorbidities, treatment can be challenging. Individualized and multidisciplinary management involving congenital heart cardiologists, cardiac surgeons, coronary interventionists and imaging specialists is essential. This review gives an overview of coronary artery involvement in adults with CHD, summarizes the current literature and focuses on prevention, diagnosis and treatment. The potential role of cardiovascular risk factors for CAD is also discussed.

  6. Diagnosis by ultrasound of severe carotid artery disease in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass operations.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, R R; Beasley, M G; Ayoub, A; Deverall, P B; Yates, A K; Gosling, R G

    1980-01-01

    A non-invasive method using continuous wave Doppler shift ultrasound and spectral analysis was used as a screening test for severe carotid artery disease in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass operations. One hundred and eighty-eight patients were examined before cardiac surgery (91 for ischaemic heart disease, 17 for ischaemic heart disease and valve replacement, 66 for valve replacement alone, and 14 for congenital abnormalities). The mean age of the 108 patients suffering from ischaemic heart disease was 54 years (+/- 8) and that of the 80 patients admitted either for valve replacement alone or for congenital abnormalities was 52 years (+/- 12). Five of the 108 patients suffering from ischaemic heart disease were found to have severe occlusive disease of the internal carotid artery by the ultrasound test, while the test was normal in the other two groups. Patients with severe carotid artery disease proceeded to carotid arteriography and endarterectomy before the planned heart operation. Images PMID:7397042

  7. Clinical utility of digital dobutamine stress echocardiography in the noninvasive evaluation of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Madu, E C; Ahmar, W; Arthur, J; Fraker, T D

    1994-05-23

    Exercise electrocardiography is an established mode of evaluation for patients with suspected coronary artery disease. It also provides prognostic information and guides therapeutic management in patients with established disease. However, some patients are unable to exercise because of orthopedic problems, neurologic diseases, peripheral vascular disease, or deconditioning. In the past, these patients have been referred for angiography to help assess their disease. Recently, however, new techniques to assess myocardial perfusion and/or function, including stress echocardiography, have been used in the noninvasive assessment of coronary artery disease in this group of patients. Echocardiography has been used in combination with different drugs, including dobutamine, dipyridamole, and adenosine. Dobutamine is probably the single most studied drug for stress echocardiography. Dobutamine stress echocardiography is a safe, feasible, and valuable technique for evaluating coronary artery disease.

  8. Arterial stiffness: a novel cardiovascular risk factor in kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Georgianos, Panagiotis I; Sarafidis, Pantelis A; Lasaridis, Anastasios N

    2015-01-01

    Prospective observational studies have shown that arterial stiffness is a strong and independent predictor of cardiovascular disease in hemodialysis patients. Recent evidence further supports that arterial hardening predicts cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in peritoneal dialysis patients, renal transplant recipients and patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) not on dialysis. Of note, dissociation of arterial stiffness with blood pressure reduction were related to worsened cardiovascular outcome in kidney disease patients, suggesting that arterial stiffness may not only be a predictor, but also a true risk factor, representing a specific and potentially reversible pattern of outward arterial remodeling in these individuals. On this basis, arterial stiffness has emerged as a novel therapeutic target for cardiovascular risk reduction in patients with CKD; specific interventions, such as renin-angiotensin-system blockade, use of statins, and decrease of calcium- phosphate product may delay the progression of arteriosclerotic process. This article summarizes the accumulated evidence from clinical and epidemiological studies regarding the prognostic significance of arterial stiffening on cardiovascular outcomes and provides insights on possible treatment strategies for arterial stiffness attenuation in patients with CKD.

  9. What You Need to Know If You Have Coronary Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics → Circ: Cardiovascular Imaging → Circ: Cardiovascular Interventions → Circ: Cardiovascular ... Know If You Have Coronary Artery Disease Joseph S. Alpert Download PDF http://dx.doi.org/ ...

  10. Evaluation and Treatment of Patients With Lower Extremity Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Manesh R.; Conte, Michael S.; Cutlip, Donald E.; Dib, Nabil; Geraghty, Patrick; Gray, William; Hiatt, William R.; Ho, Mami; Ikeda, Koji; Ikeno, Fumiaki; Jaff, Michael R.; Jones, W. Schuyler; Kawahara, Masayuki; Lookstein, Robert A.; Mehran, Roxana; Misra, Sanjay; Norgren, Lars; Olin, Jeffrey W.; Povsic, Thomas J.; Rosenfield, Kenneth; Rundback, John; Shamoun, Fadi; Tcheng, James; Tsai, Thomas T.; Suzuki, Yuka; Vranckx, Pascal; Wiechmann, Bret N.; White, Christopher J.; Yokoi, Hiroyoshi; Krucoff, Mitchell W.

    2016-01-01

    The lack of consistent definitions and nomenclature across clinical trials of novel devices, drugs, or biologics poses a significant barrier to accrual of knowledge in and across peripheral artery disease therapies and technologies. Recognizing this problem, the Peripheral Academic Research Consortium, together with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Japanese Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency, has developed a series of pragmatic consensus definitions for patients being treated for peripheral artery disease affecting the lower extremities. These consensus definitions include the clinical presentation, anatomic depiction, interventional outcomes, surrogate imaging and physiological follow-up, and clinical outcomes of patients with lower-extremity peripheral artery disease. Consistent application of these definitions in clinical trials evaluating novel revascularization technologies should result in more efficient regulatory evaluation and best practice guidelines to inform clinical decisions in patients with lower extremity peripheral artery disease. PMID:25744011

  11. Cardiac CT vs. Stress Testing in Patients with Suspected Coronary Artery Disease: Review and Expert Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Rahsepar, Amir Ali; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis and management of coronary artery disease represent a major challenge to our health care systems affecting millions of patients each year. Until recently, the diagnosis of coronary artery disease could be conclusively determined only by invasive coronary angiography. To avoid risks from cardiac catheterization, many healthcare systems relied on stress testing as gatekeeper for coronary angiography. Advancements in cardiac computed tomography angiography technology now allows to noninvasively visualize coronary artery disease, challenging the role of stress testing as the default noninvasive imaging tool for evaluating patients with chest pain. In this review, we summarize current data on the clinical utility of cardiac computed tomography and stress testing in stable patients with suspected coronary artery disease. PMID:26500716

  12. Managing chronic oedema in a patient with arterial disease and leg ulceration.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Robin

    2016-04-01

    Treating lymphoedema in patients with critical arterial disease can be contraindicated. This case study describes current methods of managing lymphoedema in a patient with arterial disease and leg ulcers. The patient, a 65-year-old male, had paraplegia and lower-limb lymphoedema with leg ulceration for 18 years, as well as arterial disease. The patient was referred to the lymphoedema/vascular service in 2013. Duplex ultrasound indicated superficial femoral occlusion. The arterial disease was treated with an angiogram and angioplasty, and when the blood supply was improved, the lymphoedema was treated. Emphasis was placed on self-care and reducing the need for community nurse involvement. Selfcare included compression bandaging, use of FarrowWrap, low-level light therapy, and ulcer dressings. Outcomes were measured using a telemedicine software programme. The patient's lymphoedema was reduced, leg ulcers healed, and quality of life transformed.

  13. Peripheral Arterial Disease Study (PERART): Prevalence and predictive values of asymptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease related to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Alzamora, María Teresa; Baena-Díez, José Miguel; Sorribes, Marta; Forés, Rosa; Toran, Pere; Vicheto, Marisa; Pera, Guillem; Reina, María Dolores; Albaladejo, Carlos; Llussà, Judith; Bundó, Magda; Sancho, Amparo; Heras, Antonio; Rubiés, Joan; Arenillas, Juan Francisco

    2007-01-01

    Background The early diagnosis of atherosclerotic disease is essential for developing preventive strategies in populations at high risk and acting when the disease is still asymptomatic. A low ankle-arm index (AAI) is a good marker of vascular events and may be diminished without presenting symptomatology (silent peripheral arterial disease). The aim of the PERART study (PERipheral ARTerial disease) is to determine the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease (both silent and symptomatic) in a general population of both sexes and determine its predictive value related to morbimortality (cohort study). Methods/Design This cross-over, cohort study consists of 2 phases: firstly a descriptive, transversal cross-over study to determine the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease, and secondly, a cohort study to evaluate the predictive value of AAI in relation to cardiovascular morbimortality. From September 2006 to June 2007, a total of 3,010 patients over the age of 50 years will be randomly selected from a population adscribed to 24 healthcare centres in the province of Barcelona (Spain). The diagnostic criteria of peripheral arterial disease will be considered as an AAI < 0.90, determined by portable Doppler (8 Mhz probe) measured twice by trained personnel. Cardiovascular risk will be calculated with the Framingham-Wilson tables, with Framingham calibrated by the REGICOR and SCORE groups. The subjects included will be evaluted every 6 months by telephone interview and the clnical history and death registries will be reviewed. The appearance of the following cardiovascular events will be considered as variables of response: transitory ischaemic accident, ictus, angina, myocardial infartction, symptomatic abdominal aneurysm and vascular mortality. Discussion In this study we hope to determine the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease, especially the silent forms, in the general population and establish its relationship with cardiovascular morbimortality. A low

  14. Increased Arterial Diameters in the Posterior Cerebral Circulation in Men with Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Üçeyler, Nurcan; Homola, György A.; Guerrero González, Hans; Kramer, Daniela; Wanner, Christoph; Weidemann, Frank; Solymosi, László; Sommer, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    A high load of white matter lesions and enlarged basilar arteries have been shown in selected patients with Fabry disease, a disorder associated with an increased stroke risk. We studied a large cohort of patients with Fabry disease to differentially investigate white matter lesion load and cerebral artery diameters. We retrospectively analyzed cranial magnetic resonance imaging scans of 87 consecutive Fabry patients, 20 patients with ischemic stroke, and 36 controls. We determined the white matter lesion load applying the Fazekas score on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences and measured the diameters of cerebral arteries on 3D-reconstructions of the time-of-flight-MR-angiography scans. Data of different Fabry patient subgroups (males – females; normal – impaired renal function) were compared with data of patients with stroke and controls. A history of stroke or transient ischemic attacks was present in 4/30 males (13%) and 5/57 (9%) females with Fabry disease, all in the anterior circulation. Only one man with Fabry disease showed confluent cerebral white matter lesions in the Fazekas score assessment (1%). Male Fabry patients had a larger basilar artery (p<0.01) and posterior cerebral artery diameter (p<0.05) compared to male controls. This was independent of disease severity as measured by renal function and did not lead to changes in arterial blood flow properties. A basilar artery diameter of >3.2 mm distinguished between men with Fabry disease and controls (sensitivity: 87%, specificity: 86%, p<0.001), but not from stroke patients. Enlarged arterial diameters of the posterior circulation are present only in men with Fabry disease independent of disease severity. PMID:24475221

  15. Just leg pain? Think again: What health leaders must know about peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Papia, Giuseppe; Mayer, Perry; Kelton, David; Queen, Douglas; Elliott, James A; Kuhnke, Janet L

    2015-11-01

    Approximately 800,000 Canadians have Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD). Peripheral arterial disease is also a leading cause of limb amputation. Yet public and clinical awareness of PAD is very limited. This article discusses the "Just Leg Pain? Think Again" awareness campaign the Canadian Association of Wound Care has launched in response. This article also summarizes PAD risk factors, screening, linkage with diabetes, treatment and care interventions, PAD care innovations, and the need for policy leadership on this issue. PMID:26487729

  16. Increased arterial diameters in the posterior cerebral circulation in men with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Uçeyler, Nurcan; Homola, György A; Guerrero González, Hans; Kramer, Daniela; Wanner, Christoph; Weidemann, Frank; Solymosi, László; Sommer, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    A high load of white matter lesions and enlarged basilar arteries have been shown in selected patients with Fabry disease, a disorder associated with an increased stroke risk. We studied a large cohort of patients with Fabry disease to differentially investigate white matter lesion load and cerebral artery diameters. We retrospectively analyzed cranial magnetic resonance imaging scans of 87 consecutive Fabry patients, 20 patients with ischemic stroke, and 36 controls. We determined the white matter lesion load applying the Fazekas score on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences and measured the diameters of cerebral arteries on 3D-reconstructions of the time-of-flight-MR-angiography scans. Data of different Fabry patient subgroups (males-females; normal-impaired renal function) were compared with data of patients with stroke and controls. A history of stroke or transient ischemic attacks was present in 4/30 males (13%) and 5/57 (9%) females with Fabry disease, all in the anterior circulation. Only one man with Fabry disease showed confluent cerebral white matter lesions in the Fazekas score assessment (1%). Male Fabry patients had a larger basilar artery (p<0.01) and posterior cerebral artery diameter (p<0.05) compared to male controls. This was independent of disease severity as measured by renal function and did not lead to changes in arterial blood flow properties. A basilar artery diameter of >3.2 mm distinguished between men with Fabry disease and controls (sensitivity: 87%, specificity: 86%, p<0.001), but not from stroke patients. Enlarged arterial diameters of the posterior circulation are present only in men with Fabry disease independent of disease severity.

  17. Longitudinal displacement of the carotid wall and cardiovascular risk factors: associations with aging, adiposity, blood pressure and periodontal disease independent of cross-sectional distensibility and intima-media thickness.

    PubMed

    Zahnd, Guillaume; Vray, Didier; Sérusclat, André; Alibay, Djhianne; Bartold, Mark; Brown, Alex; Durand, Marion; Jamieson, Lisa M; Kapellas, Kostas; Maple-Brown, Louise J; O'Dea, Kerin; Moulin, Philippe; Celermajer, David S; Skilton, Michael R

    2012-10-01

    The recently discovered longitudinal displacement of the common carotid arterial wall (i.e., the motion along the same plane as the blood flow), may be associated with incident cardiovascular events and represents a novel and relevant clinical information. At present, there have only been a few studies that have been conducted to investigate this longitudinal movement. We propose here a method to assess noninvasively the wall bi-dimensional (two-dimensional [2-D], cross-sectional and longitudinal) motion and present an original approach that combines a robust speckle tracking scheme to guidance by minimal path contours segmentation. Our method is well suited to large clinical population studies as it does not necessitate strong imaging prerequisites. The aim of this study is to describe the association between the longitudinal displacement of the carotid arterial wall and cardiovascular risk factors, among which periodontal disease. Some 126 Indigenous Australians with periodontal disease, an emerging risk factor, and 27 healthy age- and sex-matched non-indigenous control subjects had high-resolution ultrasound scans of the common carotid artery. Carotid intima-media thickness and arterial wall 2-D motion were then assessed using our method in ultrasound B-mode sequences. Carotid longitudinal displacement was markedly lower in the periodontal disease group than the control group (geometric mean (IQR): 0.15 mm (0.13) vs. 0.42 mm (0.30), respectively; p < 0.0001), independent of cardiovascular risk factors, cross-sectional distensibility and carotid intima-media thickness (p < 0.0001). A multivariable model indicated that the strongest correlates of carotid longitudinal displacement in adults with periodontal disease were age (β-coefficient = -.235, p = .03), waist (β-coefficient = -.357, p = 0.001), and pulse pressure (β-coefficient = .175, p = 0.07), independent of other cardiovascular risk factors, cross-sectional distensibility and pulse wave velocity. Carotid

  18. CARDIOVASCULAR RESPONSES TO WALKING IN PATIENTS WITH PERIPHERAL ARTERY DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Ritti-Dias, Raphael Mendes; Meneses, Annelise Lins; Parker, Donald E.; Montgomery, Polly S.; Khurana, Aman; Gardner, Andrew W.

    2013-01-01

    Purposes To assess the cardiovascular responses during constant load walking and to identify predictors of this response in peripheral artery disease (PAD) patients. Methods Seventy-nine patients with PAD performed a constant load treadmill test (2 mph, 0% grade). During the test, systolic blood pressure (BP), diastolic BP, and heart rate (HR) were obtained at the fourth minute to the last minute of exercise. Patients were also characterized on demographic measures, cardiovascular risk factors, baseline exercise performance and vascular measures. Results During constant load walking, there was a significant increase (p<0.01) in systolic BP (+12 ± 10 mmHg), diastolic BP (+6 ± 9 mmHg), and HR (+5 ± 5 bpm). The HR responses was negatively correlated with ischemic window (r= −0.23; p<0.05), expressed as an area under the curve of the resting ankle systolic BP and its recovery from maximal graded treadmill test, and positively correlated with the HR during the first minute of recovery from maximal graded treadmill test (r= 0.27; p<0.05). The increase in cardiovascular variables during constant load walking was greater in subjects with higher body mass index and in men (p<0.05). Conclusion Patients with PAD had an increased cardiovascular response during constant load walking, and these responses were greater in obese patients and in men. The clinical implication is that PAD patients engaged in walking training programs, particularly men and those with obesity, require frequent assessment of cardiovascular parameters to avoid exaggerated increases in BP and HR during constant load walking. PMID:21502888

  19. Increased prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in osteoporotic postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Mangiafico, Roberto Antonio; Russo, Enzo; Riccobene, Stefania; Pennisi, Pietra; Mangiafico, Marco; D'Amico, Ferdinando; Fiore, Carmelo Erio

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and correlates of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in a population of osteoporotic postmenopausal women. The presence of PAD was assessed by ankle brachial index (ABI) in 345 ambulatory osteoporotic postmenopausal women, and in 360 community-based, age- and race-matched postmenopausal women with normal bone mineral density (BMD) (control group). PAD was detected in 63/345 (18.2%) osteoporotic women and in 14/360 (3.8%) control subjects (P < 0.0001). The mean ABI values were significantly lower in the osteoporosis group than in the control group (0.98 +/- 0.09 vs. 1.04 +/- 0.06, P < 0.0001). No difference in cardiovascular risk factors was observed between osteoporotic patients and controls, or between osteoporotic patients with and without PAD. Osteoporotic patients with PAD had lower femoral neck BMD T scores than those without PAD (-4.2 +/- 0.7 vs. -2.3 +/- 0.7, P < 0.0001). Only 4 PAD patients (5.1%) had intermittent claudication. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, factors independently associated with PAD within osteoporotic patients were lower femoral neck BMD T score (odds ratio (OR) = 0.20, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.05-0.70, P = 0.01) and systolic blood pressure (OR = 1.02, 95% CI, 1.00-1.03, P = 0.01). This study shows for the first time an increased prevalence of PAD among osteoporotic postmenopausal women, with a lower femoral neck BMD T score being a significant independent predictor. The findings suggest that vascular status evaluation should be done in osteoporotic postmenopausal women in order to identify candidate patients for preventive and therapeutic cardiovascular interventions. PMID:16502119

  20. Coronary artery disease and the contours of pharmaceuticalization.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Anne; Jones, David S

    2015-04-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) has dominated mortality for most of the past century, not just in Europe and North America but worldwide. Treatments for CAD, both pharmaceutical and surgical, have become leading sectors of the healthcare economy. This paper focuses on the therapeutic landscape for CAD in the United States. We hope to add texture to the broader conversation of pharmaceuticalization explored in this issue by situating pharmaceutical therapies as just one element in the broader therapeutic terrain, alongside cardiac surgery and interventional cardiology. Patients with CAD must navigate a therapeutic landscape with three intersecting paths: lifestyle change, pharmaceuticals, and surgery. While pharmaceuticals are often seen as a quick fix, a way of avoiding more difficult lifestyle changes, it is surgery and angioplasty that promise patients the quickest fix of all. There also is another option, often overlooked by analysts but popular among physicians and patients: inaction. The U.S. context is often critiqued as a site of excessive treatment with respect to both drugs and procedures, and yet there is deep stratification within it--over-treatment in many populations and under-treatment in others. People who experience the serious risks of CAD do so in a racialized terrain of durable preoccupations with difference and unequal access to care. While the pharmaceuticalization literature disproportionately attends to lifestyle drugs, which some observers consider to be medically inappropriate or unnecessary, CAD does remain the leading cause of death. Thus, the stakes are high. Examination of the pharmaceuticalization of CAD in light of surgical treatments and racial disparities offers a window into the pervasiveness and persuasiveness of pharmaceuticals in an increasingly consumer-driven medicine, as well as the limits of their appeal and their reach.

  1. Network motif-based method for identifying coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    LI, YIN; CONG, YAN; ZHAO, YUN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to develop a more efficient method for identifying coronary artery disease (CAD) than the conventional method using individual differentially expressed genes (DEGs). GSE42148 gene microarray data were downloaded, preprocessed and screened for DEGs. Additionally, based on transcriptional regulation data obtained from ENCODE database and protein-protein interaction data from the HPRD, the common genes were downloaded and compared with genes annotated from gene microarrays to screen additional common genes in order to construct an integrated regulation network. FANMOD was then used to detect significant three-gene network motifs. Subsequently, GlobalAncova was used to screen differential three-gene network motifs between the CAD group and the normal control data from GSE42148. Genes involved in the differential network motifs were then subjected to functional annotation and pathway enrichment analysis. Finally, clustering analysis of the CAD and control samples was performed based on individual DEGs and the top 20 network motifs identified. In total, 9,008 significant three-node network motifs were detected from the integrated regulation network; these were categorized into 22 interaction modes, each containing a minimum of one transcription factor. Subsequently, 1,132 differential network motifs involving 697 genes were screened between the CAD and control group. The 697 genes were enriched in 154 gene ontology terms, including 119 biological processes, and 14 KEGG pathways. Identifying patients with CAD based on the top 20 network motifs provided increased accuracy compared with the conventional method based on individual DEGs. The results of the present study indicate that the network motif-based method is more efficient and accurate for identifying CAD patients than the conventional method based on individual DEGs. PMID:27347046

  2. Dietary nitrate supplementation enhances exercise performance in peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Kenjale, Aarti A.; Ham, Katherine L.; Stabler, Thomas; Robbins, Jennifer L.; Johnson, Johanna L.; VanBruggen, Mitch; Privette, Grayson; Yim, Eunji; Kraus, William E.

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) results in a failure to adequately supply blood and oxygen (O2) to working tissues and presents as claudication pain during walking. Nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability is essential for vascular health and function. Plasma nitrite (NO2−) is a marker of vascular NO production but may also be a protected circulating “source” that can be converted to NO during hypoxic conditions, possibly aiding perfusion. We hypothesized that dietary supplementation of inorganic nitrate in the form of beetroot (BR) juice would increase plasma NO2− concentration, increase exercise tolerance, and decrease gastrocnemius fractional O2 extraction, compared with placebo (PL). This was a randomized, open-label, crossover study. At each visit, subjects (n = 8) underwent resting blood draws, followed by consumption of 500 ml BR or PL and subsequent blood draws prior to, during, and following a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise (CPX) test. Gastrocnemius oxygenation during the CPX was measured by near-infrared spectroscopy. There were no changes from rest for [NO2−] (152 ± 72 nM) following PL. BR increased plasma [NO2−] after 3 h (943 ± 826 nM; P ≤ 0.01). Subjects walked 18% longer before the onset of claudication pain (183 ± 84 s vs. 215 ± 99 s; P ≤ 0.01) and had a 17% longer peak walking time (467 ± 223 s vs. 533 ± 233 s; P ≤ 0.05) following BR vs. PL. Gastrocnemius tissue fractional O2 extraction was lower during exercise following BR (7.3 ± 6.2 vs. 10.4 ± 6.1 arbitrary units; P ≤ 0.01). Diastolic blood pressure was lower in the BR group at rest and during CPX testing (P ≤ 0.05). These findings support the hypothesis that NO2−-related NO signaling increases peripheral tissue oxygenation in areas of hypoxia and increases exercise tolerance in PAD. PMID:21454745

  3. Renovascular heart failure: heart failure in patients with atherosclerotic renal artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kawarada, Osami; Yasuda, Satoshi; Noguchi, Teruo; Anzai, Toshihisa; Ogawa, Hisao

    2016-07-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery disease presents with a broad spectrum of clinical features, including heart failure as well as hypertension, and renal failure. Although recent randomized controlled trials failed to demonstrate renal artery stenting can reduce blood pressure or the number of cardiovascular or renal events more so than medical therapy, increasing attention has been paid to flash pulmonary edema and congestive heart failure associated with atherosclerotic renal artery disease. This clinical entity "renovascular heart failure" is diagnosed retrospectively. Given the increasing global burden of heart failure, this review highlights the background and catheter-based therapeutic aspects for renovascular heart failure.

  4. Pathogenesis of the limb manifestations and exercise limitations in peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Hiatt, William R; Armstrong, Ehrin J; Larson, Christopher J; Brass, Eric P

    2015-04-24

    Patients with peripheral artery disease have a marked reduction in exercise performance and daily ambulatory activity irrespective of their limb symptoms of classic or atypical claudication. This review will evaluate the multiple pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the exercise impairment in peripheral artery disease based on an evaluation of the current literature and research performed by the authors. Peripheral artery disease results in atherosclerotic obstructions in the major conduit arteries supplying the lower extremities. This arterial disease process impairs the supply of oxygen and metabolic substrates needed to match the metabolic demand generated by active skeletal muscle during walking exercise. However, the hemodynamic impairment associated with the occlusive disease process does not fully account for the reduced exercise impairment, indicating that additional pathophysiologic mechanisms contribute to the limb manifestations. These mechanisms include a cascade of pathophysiological responses during exercise-induced ischemia and reperfusion at rest that are associated with endothelial dysfunction, oxidant stress, inflammation, and muscle metabolic abnormalities that provide opportunities for targeted therapeutic interventions to address the complex pathophysiology of the exercise impairment in peripheral artery disease.

  5. Automated detection of the carotid artery wall in longitudinal B-mode images using active contours initialized by the Hough transform.

    PubMed

    Matsakou, A I; Golemati, S; Stoitsis, J S; Nikita, K S

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a fully automatic active-contour-based segmentation method is presented, for detecting the carotid artery wall in longitudinal B-mode ultrasound images. A Hough-transform-based methodology is used for the definition of the initial snake, followed by a gradient vector flow (GVF) snake deformation for the final contour detection. The GVF snake is based on the calculation of the image edge map and the calculation of GVF field which guides its deformation for the estimation of the real arterial wall boundaries. In twenty cases there was no significant difference between the automated segmentation and the manual diameter measurements. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 0.97, 0.99 and 0.98, respectively, for both diastolic and systolic cases. In conclusion, the proposed methodology provides an accurate and reliable way to segment ultrasound images of the carotid artery.

  6. A focus on the prognosis and management of ischemic heart disease in patients without evidence of obstructive coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Scalone, Giancarla; Niccoli, Giampaolo

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease without evidence of obstructive coronary artery disease is a common phenotype comprising different coronary syndromes with either stable or unstable clinical presentation. In this context, the clinical outcome and management appear extremely variable, due to different etiologies. Of note, coronary microvascular dysfunction is the pathogenetic mechanism linking different clinical scenarios in most of the cases. Hence, in this article, we aim to provide a systematic approach of reviewing the prognosis and management of angina or myocardial infarction without evidence of obstructive coronary artery disease. Moreover, we will propose a new scheme of classification by distinguishing between angina with normal coronary artery and myocardial infarction with normal coronary artery in order to facilitate clinicians to perform a proper management workflow.

  7. Presence of anomalous coronary seen on angiogram is not associated with increased risk of significant coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Suryanarayana, Prakash; Kollampare, Shubha; Riaz, Irbaz Bin; Lee, Justin; Husnain, Muhammad; Luni, Faraz Khan; Movahed, Mohammad Reza

    2014-12-01

    It is unclear if anomalous coronary arteries are at higher risk for atherosclerosis. The link between anomalous coronary artery and early coronary artery disease has been suggested. The aim of this study is to determine whether the coronary artery anomaly predisposes to development of significant coronary disease. Using retrospective chart review, patients with documented anomalous coronary arteries recognized during coronary angiography between years 2000 to 2007 were analyzed. Prevalence of significant atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (defined as more than 50% luminal narrowing) was compared between normal and anomalous coronaries. A total of 147 patients with anomalous coronary arteries were found. Right coronary artery was the most common anomalous artery 128 of 148 (86.5%) in our dataset. There was no difference in the occurrence of atherosclerosis between anomalous and nonanomalous coronaries. Significant atherosclerosis was present in 59 of the 148 anomalous coronary arteries (37.8%), and 112 of the 293 nonanomalous coronary arteries (38.2%, p = 0.9). On the basis of our study, there is no evidence that anomalous coronary arteries predispose to significant coronary artery disease in comparison to normal coronary arteries.

  8. Cystic adventitial disease of the popliteal artery: elongation into the media of the popliteal artery and communication with the knee joint capsule: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Unno, N; Kaneko, H; Uchiyama, T; Yamamoto, N; Nakamura, S

    2000-01-01

    Cystic disease of the popliteal artery is a rare disorder in which most cases involve the formation of an adventitial cyst that disturbs the popliteal artery blood flow. We present herein the case of a patient presenting with popliteal artery occlusion due to compression by a cyst which formed at the media of the popliteal artery. The onset occurred during a baseball game in which he played catcher. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a communication of the cyst with the adjacent knee joint. This unusual case could provide important clues to help identify the pathogenesis of this disease.

  9. Variability in Fundamental Frequency during Speech in Prodromal and Incipient Parkinson's Disease: A Longitudinal Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harel, Brian; Cannizzaro, Michael; Snyder, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    Nearly two centuries ago, Parkinson (1817) first observed that a particular pattern of speech changes occur in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). Numerous studies have documented these changes using a wide variety of acoustic measures, and yet few studies have attempted to quantify any such changes longitudinally, through the early…

  10. IREB2 and GALC are associated with pulmonary artery enlargement in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Hwa; Cho, Michael H; Hersh, Craig P; McDonald, Merry-Lynn N; Wells, J Michael; Dransfield, Mark T; Bowler, Russell P; Lynch, David A; Lomas, David A; Crapo, James D; Silverman, Edwin K

    2015-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is associated with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), although pulmonary vascular changes occur early in the course of the disease. Pulmonary artery (PA) enlargement (PAE) measured by computed tomography correlates with pulmonary hypertension and COPD exacerbation frequency. Genome-wide association studies of PAE in subjects with COPD have not been reported. To investigate whether genetic variants are associated with PAE within subjects with COPD, we investigated data from current and former smokers from the COPDGene Study and the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints study. The ratio of the diameter of the PA to the diameter of the aorta (A) was measured using computed tomography. PAE was defined as PA/A greater than 1. A genome-wide association study for COPD with PAE was performed using subjects with COPD without PAE (PA/A ≤ 1) as a control group. A secondary analysis used smokers with normal spirometry as a control group. Genotyping was performed on Illumina platforms. The results were summarized using fixed-effect meta-analysis. Both meta-analyses revealed a genome-wide significant locus on chromosome 15q25.1 in IREB2 (COPD with versus without PAE, rs7181486; odds ratio [OR] = 1.32; P = 2.10 × 10(-8); versus smoking control subjects, rs2009746; OR = 1.42; P = 1.32 × 10(-9)). PAE was also associated with a region on 14q31.3 near the GALC gene (rs7140285; OR = 1.55; P = 3.75 × 10(-8)). Genetic variants near IREB2 and GALC likely contribute to genetic susceptibility to PAE associated with COPD. This study provides evidence for genetic heterogeneity associated with a clinically important COPD vascular subtype.

  11. IREB2 and GALC Are Associated with Pulmonary Artery Enlargement in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Hwa; Cho, Michael H.; Hersh, Craig P.; McDonald, Merry-Lynn N.; Wells, J. Michael; Dransfield, Mark T.; Bowler, Russell P.; Lynch, David A.; Lomas, David A.; Crapo, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is associated with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), although pulmonary vascular changes occur early in the course of the disease. Pulmonary artery (PA) enlargement (PAE) measured by computed tomography correlates with pulmonary hypertension and COPD exacerbation frequency. Genome-wide association studies of PAE in subjects with COPD have not been reported. To investigate whether genetic variants are associated with PAE within subjects with COPD, we investigated data from current and former smokers from the COPDGene Study and the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints study. The ratio of the diameter of the PA to the diameter of the aorta (A) was measured using computed tomography. PAE was defined as PA/A greater than 1. A genome-wide association study for COPD with PAE was performed using subjects with COPD without PAE (PA/A ≤ 1) as a control group. A secondary analysis used smokers with normal spirometry as a control group. Genotyping was performed on Illumina platforms. The results were summarized using fixed-effect meta-analysis. Both meta-analyses revealed a genome-wide significant locus on chromosome 15q25.1 in IREB2 (COPD with versus without PAE, rs7181486; odds ratio [OR] = 1.32; P = 2.10 × 10−8; versus smoking control subjects, rs2009746; OR = 1.42; P = 1.32 × 10−9). PAE was also associated with a region on 14q31.3 near the GALC gene (rs7140285; OR = 1.55; P = 3.75 × 10−8). Genetic variants near IREB2 and GALC likely contribute to genetic susceptibility to PAE associated with COPD. This study provides evidence for genetic heterogeneity associated with a clinically important COPD vascular subtype. PMID:25101718

  12. Epigenetics of Cardiovascular Disease – A New “Beat” in Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Turgeon, Paul J.; Sukumar, Aravin N.; Marsden, Philip A.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have become a powerful tool in the identification of disease-associated variants. Unfortunately, many of these studies have found that the estimated variability in cardiovascular disease risk cannot be fully explained by traditional paradigms of genetic variation in protein coding genes. Moreover, traditional views do not sufficiently explain the well-known link between cardiovascular disease and environmental influence. We posit that epigenetics, defined as chromatin-based mechanisms important in the regulation of gene expression that do not involve changes in the DNA sequence per se, represents the missing link. The nuclear-based mechanisms that contribute to epigenetic gene regulation can be broadly separated into three unique but highly interrelated processes: DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation; histone density and post-translational modifications; and RNA-based mechanisms. Together they complement the cis/trans perspective on transcriptional control paradigms in blood vessels. Moreover, it provides a molecular basis for understanding how the environment impacts the genome to modify cardiovascular disease risk over the lifetime of a cell and its offspring. This review provides an introduction to epigenetic function and cardiovascular disease, with a focus on endothelial cell biology. Additionally, we highlight emerging concepts on epigenetic gene regulation that are highly relevant to atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease. PMID:25408699

  13. Coronary CT findings of coronary to bronchial arterial communication in chronic pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Byun, Sung Su; Park, Jae Hyung; Kim, Jeong Ho; Sung, Yon Mi; Kim, Yoon Kyung; Kim, Eun Young; Park, Eun Ah

    2015-06-01

    To describe the coronary CT findings of coronary-to-bronchial artery communication (CBAC) in chronic pulmonary disease. Coronary CT was performed in 15 patients with chronic pulmonary disease using 64-channel or greater multidetector CT. Among those patients, one or two CBACs were identified. A retrospective analysis of the CT findings was done to determine the originating artery, arterial course of the communications and other associated results. The main underlying pulmonary disease was bronchiectasis (n = 12). The origin of the CBAC was from the left atrial (n = 7) or sinoatrial (SA) nodal (n = 3) branch of the left circumflex artery in nine patients and the SA nodal branch of the right coronary artery in six patients. The CBAC was connected to the left bronchial artery in 11 patients and the right bronchial artery in five patients. The course of the CBAC passed through the interpulmonary venous bare area between reflections of the serous pericardium of the transverse and oblique sinuses in 13 patients. In three patients, it passed through the perivascular space around the left upper or lower pulmonary vein. In one patient, there were two communications-one through the interpulmonary venous bare area and the other through the perivascular space around the left lower pulmonary vein. There was no significant coronary arterial stenosis except in two patients. Bronchial arterial hypertrophy was found in all 15 patients. Detailed analysis of coronary CT can be a helpful guide for hemodynamic significance and clinical management including embolotherapy for CBAC in patients of chronic pulmonary disease with hemoptysis.

  14. [Impact of lipid metabolism parameters on the development and progression of coronary artery disease : An update].

    PubMed

    Sinning, D; Leistner, D M; Landmesser, U

    2016-06-01

    Disorders of lipid metabolism play a major role in the development and progression of coronary artery disease. Dyslipidemia therefore plays a central role in therapeutic approaches for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular events associated with coronary artery disease. Epidemiological studies have shown an association between various lipid metabolism parameters, the risk of developing coronary artery disease and progression of a pre-existing disease. In particular, increased levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), reduced levels of HDL cholesterol (HDL-C), as well as high levels of triglycerides and increased lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels can be taken into account when assessing the risk stratification of patients for primary prevention of coronary artery disease. Lifestyle and dietary changes, intensified statin therapy and possibly the addition of ezetimibe remain the major interventions in both primary and secondary prevention of coronary artery disease, as they improve the prognosis particularly by lowering levels of LDL-C. Recently, genetic studies have contributed to extending our understanding of the relationship between lipid metabolism and coronary artery disease. A causal role for progression of coronary artery disease could be demonstrated for LDL-C, Lpa and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL), which could not be demonstrated for HDL-C in various studies. Furthermore, the effect of reduction of LDL-C by proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibition and by the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitor anacetrapib on cardiovascular events is currently being investigated in large clinical outcome study programs.

  15. A controlled, longitudinal study of dementia in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Biggins, C A; Boyd, J L; Harrop, F M; Madeley, P; Mindham, R H; Randall, J I; Spokes, E G

    1992-01-01

    Serial assessments of cognition, mood, and disability were carried out at nine month intervals over a 54 month period on a cohort of 87 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and a matched cohort of 50 control subjects. Dementia was diagnosed from data by rigorously applying DSM-III-R criteria. Initially, 6% (5/87) PD patients were demented, compared with none of the 50 control subjects. A further 10 PD patients met the dementia criteria during the follow up period; this was equivalent, with survival analysis, to a cumulative incidence of 19%. With the number of person years of observation as the denominator, the incidence was 47.6/1000 person years of observation. None of the control subjects fulfilled dementia criteria during the follow up period. The patients with PD who became demented during follow up were older at onset of Parkinson's disease than patients who did not become demented, had a longer duration of Parkinson's disease, and were older at inclusion to the study. PMID:1640232

  16. Disrupted brain network topology in Parkinson's disease: a longitudinal magnetoencephalography study.

    PubMed

    Olde Dubbelink, Kim T E; Hillebrand, Arjan; Stoffers, Diederick; Deijen, Jan Berend; Twisk, Jos W R; Stam, Cornelis J; Berendse, Henk W

    2014-01-01

    Although alterations in resting-state functional connectivity between brain regions have previously been reported in Parkinson's disease, the spatial organization of these changes remains largely unknown. Here, we longitudinally studied brain network topology in Parkinson's disease in relation to clinical measures of disease progression, using magnetoencephalography and concepts from graph theory. We characterized whole-brain functional networks by means of a standard graph analysis approach, measuring clustering coefficient and shortest path length, as well as the construction of a minimum spanning tree, a novel approach that allows a unique and unbiased characterization of brain networks. We observed that brain networks in early stage untreated patients displayed lower local clustering with preserved path length in the delta frequency band in comparison to controls. Longitudinal analysis over a 4-year period in a larger group of patients showed a progressive decrease in local clustering in multiple frequency bands together with a decrease in path length in the alpha2 frequency band. In addition, minimum spanning tree analysis revealed a decentralized and less integrated network configuration in early stage, untreated Parkinson's disease that also progressed over time. Moreover, the longitudinal changes in network topology identified with both techniques were associated with deteriorating motor function and cognitive performance. Our results indicate that impaired local efficiency and network decentralization are very early features of Parkinson's disease that continue to progress over time, together with reductions in global efficiency. As these network changes appear to reflect clinically relevant phenomena, they hold promise as markers of disease progression.

  17. Impaired Global Right Ventricular Longitudinal Strain Predicts Long-Term Adverse Outcomes in Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Hyeong; Park, Margaret M.; Farha, Samar; Sharp, Jacqueline; Lundgrin, Erika; Comhair, Suzy; Tang, Wai Hong; Erzurum, Serpil C.

    2015-01-01

    Background New 2-dimensional strain echocardiography enables quantification of right ventricular (RV) mechanics by assessing global longitudinal strain of RV (GLSRV) in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). However, the prognostic significance of impaired GLSRV is unclear in these patients. Methods Comprehensive echocardiography was performed in 51 consecutive PAH patients without atrial fibrillation (40 females, 48 ± 14 years old) with long-term follow-up. GLSRV was measured with off-line with velocity vector imaging (VVI, Siemens Medical System, Mountain View, CA, USA). Results GLSRV showed significant correlation with RV fractional area change (r = -0.606, p < 0.001), tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (r = -0.579, p < 0.001), and RV Tei index (r = 0.590, p < 0.001). It showed significant correlations with pulmonary vascular resistance (r = 0.469, p = 0.001) and B-natriuretic peptide concentration (r = 0.351, p = 0.012). During a clinical followup time (45 ± 15 months), 20 patients experienced one or more adverse events (12 death, 2 lung transplantation, and 15 heart failure hospitalization). After multivariate analysis, age [hazard ratio (HR) = 2.343, p = 0.040] and GLSRV (HR = 2.122, p = 0.040) were associated with adverse clinical events. Age (HR = 3.200, p = 0.016) and GLSRV (HR = 2.090, p = 0.042) were also significant predictors of death. Impaired GLSRV (≥ -15.5%) was associated with lower event-free survival (HR = 4.906, p = 0.001) and increased mortality (HR = 8.842, p = 0.005). Conclusion GLSRV by VVI showed significant correlations with conventional echocardiographic parameters indicating RV systolic function. Lower GLSRV (≥ -15.5%) was significantly associated with presence of adverse clinical events and deaths in PAH patients. PMID:26140151

  18. Relationship of dental diseases with coronary artery diseases and diabetes in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Arup Ratan; Choudhury, Kamrun Nahar

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that dental diseases might have a role in the development and progression of coronary artery diseases (CAD) and diabetes mellitus (DM). The objective of this study was to determine the relationship of dental diseases with CAD and DM in Bangladesh. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study among 216 consecutive patients admitted in a tertiary hospital between March and July 2011. Data were collected on socio-demographic status, smoking, blood pressure (BP), diet, physical activities, and biochemical measurements of lipid profile, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, creatinine kinase MB (CK-MB), troponin, serum creatinine and serum glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (SGPT). CAD was detected using echocardiographic and coronary angiogram (CAG) reports. All patients underwent oral examination for dental disease. Relationship between dental disease with CAD and DM were explored statistically. Results The mean age of the participants was 57.8±12.5 years and almost two-thirds (67.1%) were male. A great majority of the patients had CAD (90.3%) and type 2 DM (83.8%), and only 44% suffered from dental diseases. Less than one-third patients presented with acute myocardial infarction (MI), 23% with old MI, 11% unstable angina (UA) and 26.4% with non-ST elevation MI. Logistic regression results indicated that patients with DM and CAD had approximately 2.6 and 4.6 times more odds of association with dental diseases than those without DM and CAD (both P value <0.001). Conclusions This study suggests a relationship of dental diseases with CAD and DM among Bangladeshi patients. Further studies are required to confirm these relationships in large clinical studies. Screening for CAD and DM should be considered among those with dental diseases and vice-versa. PMID:27054102

  19. Longitudinal Algorithms to Estimate Cardiorespiratory Fitness: Associations with Nonfatal Cardiovascular Disease and Disease-Specific Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Artero, Enrique G.; Jackson, Andrew S.; Sui, Xuemei; Lee, Duck-chul; O’Connor, Daniel P.; Lavie, Carl J.; Church, Timothy S.; Blair, Steven N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To predict risk for non-fatal cardiovascular disease (CVD) and disease-specific mortality using CRF algorithms that do not involve exercise testing. Background Cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is not routinely measured, as it requires trained personnel and specialized equipment. Methods Participants were 43,356 adults (21% women) from the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study followed between 1974 and 2003. Estimated CRF was based on sex, age, body mass index, waist circumference, resting heart rate, physical activity level and smoking status. Actual CRF was measured by a maximal treadmill test. Results During a median follow-up of 14.5 years, 1,934 deaths occurred, 627 due to CVD. In a sub-sample of 18,095 participants, 1,049 cases of non-fatal CVD events were ascertained. After adjusting for potential confounders, both measured CRF and estimated CRF were inversely associated with risk of all-cause mortality, CVD mortality and non-fatal CVD incidence in men, and with all-cause mortality and non-fatal CVD in women. The risk reduction per 1-metabolic equivalent (MET) increase ranged approximately from 10 to 20 %. Measured CRF had a slightly better discriminative ability (c-statistic) than estimated CRF, and the net reclassification improvement (NRI) of measured CRF vs. estimated CRF was 12.3% in men (p<0.05) and 19.8% in women (p<0.001). Conclusions These algorithms utilize information routinely collected to obtain an estimate of CRF that provides a valid indication of health status. In addition to identifying people at risk, this method can provide more appropriate exercise recommendations that reflect initial CRF levels. PMID:24703924

  20. Outcomes of Anatomical versus Functional Testing for Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Pamela S.; Hoffmann, Udo; Patel, Manesh R.; Mark, Daniel B.; Al-Khalidi, Hussein R.; Cavanaugh, Brendan; Cole, Jason; Dolor, Rowena J.; Fordyce, Christopher B.; Huang, Megan; Khan, Muhammad Akram; Kosinski, Andrzej S.; Krucoff, Mitchell W.; Malhotra, Vinay; Picard, Michael H.; Udelson, James E.; Velazquez, Eric J.; Yow, Eric; Cooper, Lawton S.; Lee, Kerry L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Many patients have symptoms suggestive of coronary artery disease (CAD) and are often evaluated with the use of diagnostic testing, although there are limited data from randomized trials to guide care. METHODS We randomly assigned 10,003 symptomatic patients to a strategy of initial anatomical testing with the use of coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA) or to functional testing (exercise electrocardiography, nuclear stress testing, or stress echocardiography). The composite primary end point was death, myocardial infarction, hospitalization for unstable angina, or major procedural complication. Secondary end points included invasive cardiac catheterization that did not show obstructive CAD and radiation exposure. RESULTS The mean age of the patients was 60.8±8.3 years, 52.7% were women, and 87.7% had chest pain or dyspnea on exertion. The mean pretest likelihood of obstructive CAD was 53.3±21.4%. Over a median follow-up period of 25 months, a primary end-point event occurred in 164 of 4996 patients in the CTA group (3.3%) and in 151 of 5007 (3.0%) in the functional-testing group (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.83 to 1.29; P = 0.75). CTA was associated with fewer catheterizations showing no obstructive CAD than was functional testing (3.4% vs. 4.3%, P = 0.02), although more patients in the CTA group underwent catheterization within 90 days after randomization (12.2% vs. 8.1%). The median cumulative radiation exposure per patient was lower in the CTA group than in the functional-testing group (10.0 mSv vs. 11.3 mSv), but 32.6% of the patients in the functional-testing group had no exposure, so the overall exposure was higher in the CTA group (mean, 12.0 mSv vs. 10.1 mSv; P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS In symptomatic patients with suspected CAD who required noninvasive testing, a strategy of initial CTA, as compared with functional testing, did not improve clinical outcomes over a median follow-up of 2 years. (Funded by the

  1. Spatial regression analysis of serial DTI for subject-specific longitudinal changes of neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bilan; Qiu, Xing; Zhu, Tong; Tian, Wei; Hu, Rui; Ekholm, Sven; Schifitto, Giovanni; Zhong, Jianhui

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative measurement of localized longitudinal changes in brain abnormalities at an individual level may offer critical information for disease diagnosis and treatment. The voxel-wise permutation-based method SPREAD/iSPREAD, which combines resampling and spatial regression of neighboring voxels, provides an effective and robust method for detecting subject-specific longitudinal changes within the whole brain, especially for longitudinal studies with a limited number of scans. As an extension of SPREAD/iSPREAD, we present a general method that facilitates analysis of serial Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) measurements (with more than two time points) for testing localized changes in longitudinal studies. Two types of voxel-level test statistics (model-free test statistics, which measure intra-subject variability across time, and test statistics based on general linear model that incorporate specific lesion evolution models) were estimated and tested against the null hypothesis among groups of DTI data across time. The implementation and utility of the proposed statistical method were demonstrated by both Monte Carlo simulations and applications on clinical DTI data from human brain in vivo. By a design of test statistics based on the disease progression model, it was possible to apportion the true significant voxels attributed to the disease progression and those caused by underlying anatomical differences that cannot be explained by the model, which led to improvement in false positive (FP) control in the results. Extension of the proposed method to include other diseases or drug effect models, as well as the feasibility of global statistics, was discussed. The proposed statistical method can be extended to a broad spectrum of longitudinal studies with carefully designed test statistics, which helps to detect localized changes at the individual level.

  2. A 45-year old man with recurrent syncope: an unusual presentation of coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Adeoye, Abiodun Moshood; Adekunle, Aina Nnodim; Adebiyi, Adewole Adesoji; Mullassari, Ajit; Vijayakumar, Subban; Nwafor, Chibuike Eze

    2013-01-01

    A 45-year old normotensive, euglycaemic, non-smoker was referred from a peripheral hospital to the Cardiology unit of the University College Hospital, Nigeria for evaluation of recurrent exercise induced syncope. Initial 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG), 24-hr ambulatory ECG, trans-thoracic echocardiogram and electroencephalogram (EEG) were normal. A repeat episode of syncope warranted further investigation. Immediate post syncope ECG showed deeply inverted symmetrical T waves in the anterior leads. He underwent coronary angiogram which revealed distal left main disease and 70-80% stenosis of the proximal Left Anterior Descending Artery (LAD). The Circumflex artery was non dominant with normal Right Coronary artery. He subsequently had Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Angioplasty (PTCA) of the LAD. Post-revascularisation course has been satisfactory with no recurrence of syncope. In view of the rising trend of cardiac death in the country, there is the need for high index of suspicion in making diagnosis of coronary artery disease in patients with syncope. PMID:23646207

  3. Evaluation of diseased coronary arterial branches by polar representations of thallium-201 rotational myocardial imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Iino, T.; Toyosaki, N.; Katsuki, T.; Noda, T.; Natsume, T.; Yaginuma, T.; Hosoda, S.; Furuse, M.

    1987-09-01

    The perfusion territories in polar representations of stress Tl-201 rotational myocardial imaging in patients with angina pectoris who had one diseased coronary segment were analyzed. The lesions proximal or distal to the first major septal perforator in left anterior descending arteries were detected by the presence or absence of defects at the base of the anterior septum. Right coronary artery lesions were detected by the presence of defects at the basal posterior septum, in contrast to the preservation of myocardial uptake at this portion in lesions of the left circumflex artery. The specific defect patterns were detected in cases with lesions at the first diagonal, obtuse marginal, and posterolateral branches. Recognition of these defects in the polar maps allows detailed detection of diseased coronary arterial branches.

  4. Long term follow up results of sequential left internal thoracic artery grafts on severe left anterior descending artery disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Several alternative procedures have been proposed to achieve complete revascularization in the presence of diffuse left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) disease. With the extensive use of internal thoracic artery grafts in coronary artery bypass procedures, sequential anastomosis of the left internal thoracic artery (LITA) to LAD has gained popularity in these challenging cases. The long term results of sequential LITA to LAD anstomosis were examined in this study. Patients and Methods In order to determine the long term results of the sequential revascularization of LAD by LITA graft, 41 out of 49 patients operated between January 2001 and December 2005 were selected for control coronary arteriography. The median period for control coronary arteriography was 64 months. Results Seventy five anastomoses were found to be fully patent (91,46%) among the 82 sequential LITA anastomoses (41 LITA grafts) on the LAD at a median follow-up period of 64 months (53 to 123 months). Among the 41 LITA grafts used for this purpose, 36 were found intact (complete patency of the proximal and distal anastomoses) (87,8%). Two LITA grafts (4 anastomoses) were found to be totally occluded (4,87%). The proximal anastomosis of the LITA graft was observed to be 90% stenotic in one patient (1,21%). In one patient tight stenosis of the distal anastomosis line was observed (1,21%), while in another patient 70% narrowing of LITA lumen after the proximal anastomosis was detected (1,21%). Conclusion We strongly beleive that sequential LITA grafting of LAD is a safe alternative in the presence of severe LAD disease to achieve complete revascularization of the anterior myocardium with patency rates not much differing from conventional single LITA to LAD anastomosis. PMID:20958964

  5. Association Between Albuminuria and Duration of Diabetes and Myocardial Dysfunction and Peripheral Arterial Disease Among Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease in the BARI 2D Study

    PubMed Central

    Escobedo, Jorge; Rana, Jamal S.; Lombardero, Manuel S.; Albert, Stewart G.; Davis, Andrew M.; Kennedy, Frank P.; Mooradian, Arshag D.; Robertson, David G.; Srinivas, V. S.; Gebhart, Suzanne S. P.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of prior duration of diabetes, glycated hemoglobin level at study entry, and microalbuminuria or macroalbuminuria on the extent and severity of coronary artery disease (CAD) and peripheral arterial disease. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We studied baseline characteristics of the 2368 participants of the BARI 2D (Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes) study, a randomized clinical trial that evaluates treatment efficacy for patients with type 2 diabetes and angiographically documented stable CAD. Patients were enrolled from January 1, 2001, through March 31, 2005. Peripheral arterial disease was ascertained by an ankle-brachial index (ABI) of 0.9 or less, and extent of CAD was measured by presence of multivessel disease, a left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) of less than 50%, and myocardial jeopardy index. RESULTS: Duration of diabetes of 20 or more years was associated with increased risk of ABI of 0.9 or less (odds ratio [OR], 1.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-2.26), intermittent claudication (OR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.10-2.35), and LVEF of less than 50% (OR, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.37-3.02). Microalbuminuria was associated with intermittent claudication (OR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.16-2.02) and ABI of 0.9 or less (OR, 1.31; 95% CI, 0.98-1.75), whereas macroalbuminuria was associated with abnormal ABI, claudication, and LVEF of less than 50%. There was a significant association between diabetes duration and extent of CAD as manifested by number of coronary lesions, but no other significant associations were observed between duration of disease, glycated hemoglobin levels, or albumin-to-creatinine ratio and other manifestations of CAD. CONCLUSION: Duration of diabetes and microalbuminuria or macroalbuminuria are important predictors of severity of peripheral arterial disease and left ventricular dysfunction in a cohort of patients selected for the presence of CAD. PMID:20042560

  6. Longitudinal studies of blood lymphocyte capacity in Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bjoerkholm, M.; Wedelin, C.; Holm, G.; Johansson, B.; Mellstedt, H.

    1981-11-01

    Blood lymphocyte functional capacity and serum immunoglobulins were studied in 40 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) admitted to Radiumhemmet, Stockholm, before treatment and in complete remission 2-56 months following termination of radiotherapy (total nodal irradiation (TNI); n . 29) or chemotherapy (MOPP; n . 11). Lymphocyte studies included determination of total lymphocyte and T-cell counts and evaluation of spontaneous DNA synthesis during the first day of culture and mitogen-(concanavalin A, pokeweed mitogen) and antigen (purified protein derivative, PPD)-induced activation on the third day. Blood lymphocyte and T-cell counts decreased dramatically following TNI. A slow restitution was seen, but pretreatment levels were not reached even four years following therapy. The responses to ConA and PPD but not PWM were significantly reduced shortly after TNI. The mitogen response did not increase with time as did the PPD response. Lymphocyte counts and lymphocyte stimulation, which were severely depressed before treatment of patients in the chemotherapy group, remained unchanged 2-36 months after termination of therapy. A significant reduction of IgM levels was observed regardless of the mode of treatment. Splenectomy prevented the profound reduction of blood lymphocyte and T-cell counts following therapy but did not influence the other immunologic variables under study.

  7. Effects of cranberry juice consumption on vascular function in patients with coronary artery disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cranberry juice contains polyphenolic compounds that could improve endothelial function and reduce cardiovascular disease risk. The objective was to examine the effects of cranberry juice on vascular function in subjects with coronary artery disease. We completed an acute pilot study with no placebo...

  8. Marital Discord and Coronary Artery Disease: A Comparison of Behaviorally Defined Discrete Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Timothy W.; Uchino, Bert N.; Berg, Cynthia A.; Florsheim, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Marital difficulties can confer risk of coronary heart disease, as in a study of outwardly healthy couples (T. W. Smith et al., 2011) where behavioral ratings of low affiliation and high control during marital disagreements were associated with asymptomatic coronary artery disease (CAD). However, taxometric studies suggest that marital…

  9. Periodontal Disease and its Association with Angiographically Verified Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Miovski, Zoran; Strozzi, Maja; Puhar, Ivan; Badovinac, Ana; Božić, Darko; Plančak, Darije

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this research was to investigate the association of chronic and aggressive periodontitis with the severity of coronary artery disease which was angiographically verified. Material and methods Subjects were selected among the hospitalized patients at the University Hospital Centre Zagreb who had coronary angiography done because of the chest pain. Thorough clinical examination included periodontal indices and clinical and socio-demographic characteristics of participants. Subjects were divided in two test groups, acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and stable coronary artery disease (CAD), and the control group with no significant CAD. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Pearson’s Chi-Square test. Results From 106 subjects, 66 (62.3%) were hospitalized for ACS, 22 (20.7%) had stable CAD and only 18 (17.0%) had no significant CAD. Only 26 (24.5%) out of 106 patients were never smokers (p<0.05). Chronic periodontitis was the most common finding with 68.2% in ACS group and 54.5% in stable CAD group, while healthy patients without periodontitis (72.6%) were dominant in the control group (p<0.001). Stable CAD group had the highest mean probing depth (PD) 3.92±1.16, gingival recession (GR) 1.34±0.78, clinical attachment level (CAL) 4.60±1.41 and bleeding on probing (BOP) 45.98±26.19 values, whereas ACS group had mean PD value of 3.77±0.91, GR 1.11±0.66, CAL 4.32±1.08 and BOP 41.30±22.09, and no significant CAD group had mean PD value of 3.27±0.97, GR 0.69±0.37, CAL 3.62±1.04 and BOP 26.39±13.92 (p<0.05). Conclusion Periodontitis was shown to be associated with angiographically verified coronary artery disease. Physical inactivity, poor oral hygiene and periodontal inflammation were observed in patients with ACS and stable CAD.

  10. Dermatoglyphs in Coronary Artery Disease Among Ningxia Population of North China

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hong; Qian, Wenli; Geng, Zhi; Sheng, Youjing; Yu, Haochen; Ma, Zhanbing

    2015-01-01

    Background Coronary artery disease (CAD) is an enormous health problem in the world. Dermatoglyphs are cutaneous ridges on the fingers, palms, and soles, formed by genetic regulation and control during early intrauterine life. The Dermatoglyphic traits do not change significantly as the growth of the age. They may be the phenotypic characters of individual genes and represent the predisposition to certain diseases. Aims and Objectives The study was carried out to document characteristic dermatoglyphic patterns in coronary artery disease which could be useful in early diagnosis of the disease. Materials and Methods Dermatoglyphic study of 258 male (129 coronary artery disease cases and 129 normal subjects) of Ningxia China were studied in the present cross-sectional study. It involved the digital patterns, ATD angles, A-B ridge counts on the hands. Chi-square test, t-test were used for the statistical analysis in this study. Results The overall frequency of whorls was higher followed by loop and arch in both two groups. It was observed that there was significant difference of digital frequency of whorls and ulnar loops in patients in both hands as compared to controls (p≤0.01). The mean value of finger ridge counts, total ridge counts were similar between two groups. The A-B ridge counts were significantly higher in coronary artery disease compared with controls on the right palm (p≤0.01). However, the mean ATD angle values were significantly higher in cases than those of in normal on both hands (p<0.05). Conclusion: Abnormally high A-B ridge count, ATD angles and the frequency of whorls are characteristic dermatoglyphic patterns of coronary artery disease. Dermatoglyphics may have an important role in early diagnosis of coronary artery disease in future. PMID:26816877

  11. The diagnostic value of serum homocysteine concentration as a risk factor for coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Dierkes, J; Bissé, E; Nauck, M; Orth, M; Mayer, H; Luley, C; Wieland, H

    1998-06-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is now regarded as an established risk factor for coronary artery disease and is present frequently in the general population. However, the diagnostic value of this risk factor relative to others has only occasionally been investigated. We compared the diagnostic value of classic risk factors and of homocysteine in a retrospective case-control study in 191 cases with angiographically established coronary artery disease and 231 healthy controls. Life style habits were assessed by a detailed questionnaire. Laboratory parameters including lipoproteins and blood lipids, homocysteine, folate, and vitamin B12 were measured and their diagnostic value compared with each other by use of receiver-operator characteristic analysis. Comparison of the receiver-operator characteristic curves revealed that homocysteine significantly discriminated between cases and control subjects. High-density-lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides and non-esterified fatty acids also had an area under the curve significantly different from 0.5 (the area under the curve representing no discrimination). Homocysteine was weakly related to folate, vitamin B12, age and serum creatinine concentration. We conclude that hyperhomocysteinemia is at least as important as conventional risk factors for coronary artery disease and that receiver operator characteristic analysis of homocysteine is suitable to determine patients at the highest risk for coronary artery disease. Clinical trials testing the effect of homocysteine lowering by vitamin supplementation in the prevention of coronary artery disease are needed.

  12. Layer-specific analysis of dobutamine stress echocardiography for the evaluation of coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Hun; Woo, Jong Shin; Ju, Shin; Jung, Su Woong; Lee, Insoo; Kim, Jin Bae; Kim, Soo Joong; Kim, Weon; Kim, Woo-Shik; Kim, Kwon Sam

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE) is a well-defined tool for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD), false-negative and false-positive results still occur. This study investigated the diagnostic role of layer-specific analysis using 2-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography (STE) during DSE. A total of 121 patients who underwent DSE and showed normal wall motion and ejection fraction during baseline echocardiography were enrolled. All patients underwent coronary angiography after DSE within 2 weeks. The patients were divided into the following 4 groups according to DSE results and CAD status: negative DSE with no significant CAD (n = 73), positive DSE with significant CAD (n = 16), negative DSE with significant CAD (n = 17), and positive DSE with no significant CAD (n = 15). Layer-specific global longitudinal strain (GLS) was assessed in the endocardium, mid-myocardium, and epicardium by STE techniques. Patients with significant CAD were older, more male and showed higher glucose level compared to patients without CAD. But coronary risk factors and previous medications were not different between patients with and without CAD. There were no significant differences in whole myocardium or layer-specific GLS found in the baseline echocardiography. During recovery echocardiography, endocardial GLS was significantly different between patients with and without CAD, regardless of the DSE results. A receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis showed that endocardial GLS (>−16%) was superior for identifying significant CAD during the DSE recovery stage. Diagnostic accuracy was improved by applying the results of endocardial GLS compared with visual estimation of DSE. The assessment of layer-specific strain by STE during DSE was feasible, and the evaluation of poststress endocardial function is a more sensitive tool for the detection of CAD. PMID:27512879

  13. Diagnosis of Coronary Heart Diseases Using Gene Expression Profiling; Stable Coronary Artery Disease, Cardiac Ischemia with and without Myocardial Necrosis.

    PubMed

    Kazmi, Nabila; Gaunt, Tom R

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (including coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction) is one of the leading causes of death in Europe, and is influenced by both environmental and genetic factors. With the recent advances in genomic tools and technologies there is potential to predict and diagnose heart disease using molecular data from analysis of blood cells. We analyzed gene expression data from blood samples taken from normal people (n = 21), non-significant coronary artery disease (n = 93), patients with unstable angina (n = 16), stable coronary artery disease (n = 14) and myocardial infarction (MI; n = 207). We used a feature selection approach to identify a set of gene expression variables which successfully differentiate different cardiovascular diseases. The initial features were discovered by fitting a linear model for each probe set across all arrays of normal individuals and patients with myocardial infarction. Three different feature optimisation algorithms were devised which identified two discriminating sets of genes, one using MI and normal controls (total genes = 6) and another one using MI and unstable angina patients (total genes = 7). In all our classification approaches we used a non-parametric k-nearest neighbour (KNN) classification method (k = 3). The results proved the diagnostic robustness of the final feature sets in discriminating patients with myocardial infarction from healthy controls. Interestingly it also showed efficacy in discriminating myocardial infarction patients from patients with clinical symptoms of cardiac ischemia but no myocardial necrosis or stable coronary artery disease, despite the influence of batch effects and different microarray gene chips and platforms.

  14. Diagnosis of Coronary Heart Diseases Using Gene Expression Profiling; Stable Coronary Artery Disease, Cardiac Ischemia with and without Myocardial Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kazmi, Nabila; Gaunt, Tom R.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (including coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction) is one of the leading causes of death in Europe, and is influenced by both environmental and genetic factors. With the recent advances in genomic tools and technologies there is potential to predict and diagnose heart disease using molecular data from analysis of blood cells. We analyzed gene expression data from blood samples taken from normal people (n = 21), non-significant coronary artery disease (n = 93), patients with unstable angina (n = 16), stable coronary artery disease (n = 14) and myocardial infarction (MI; n = 207). We used a feature selection approach to identify a set of gene expression variables which successfully differentiate different cardiovascular diseases. The initial features were discovered by fitting a linear model for each probe set across all arrays of normal individuals and patients with myocardial infarction. Three different feature optimisation algorithms were devised which identified two discriminating sets of genes, one using MI and normal controls (total genes = 6) and another one using MI and unstable angina patients (total genes = 7). In all our classification approaches we used a non-parametric k-nearest neighbour (KNN) classification method (k = 3). The results proved the diagnostic robustness of the final feature sets in discriminating patients with myocardial infarction from healthy controls. Interestingly it also showed efficacy in discriminating myocardial infarction patients from patients with clinical symptoms of cardiac ischemia but no myocardial necrosis or stable coronary artery disease, despite the influence of batch effects and different microarray gene chips and platforms. PMID:26930047

  15. Longitudinal clinical score prediction in Alzheimer's disease with soft-split sparse regression based random forest.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lei; Jin, Yan; Gao, Yaozong; Thung, Kim-Han; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible neurodegenerative disease and affects a large population in the world. Cognitive scores at multiple time points can be reliably used to evaluate the progression of the disease clinically. In recent studies, machine learning techniques have shown promising results on the prediction of AD clinical scores. However, there are multiple limitations in the current models such as linearity assumption and missing data exclusion. Here, we present a nonlinear supervised sparse regression-based random forest (RF) framework to predict a variety of longitudinal AD clinical scores. Furthermore, we propose a soft-split technique to assign probabilistic paths to a test sample in RF for more accurate predictions. In order to benefit from the longitudinal scores in the study, unlike the previous studies that often removed the subjects with missing scores, we first estimate those missing scores with our proposed soft-split sparse regression-based RF and then utilize those estimated longitudinal scores at all the previous time points to predict the scores at the next time point. The experiment results demonstrate that our proposed method is superior to the traditional RF and outperforms other state-of-art regression models. Our method can also be extended to be a general regression framework to predict other disease scores. PMID:27500865

  16. Nonobstructive Coronary Artery Disease and Risk of Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Maddox, Thomas M.; Stanislawski, Maggie A.; Grunwald, Gary K.; Bradley, Steven M.; Ho, P. Michael; Tsai, Thomas T.; Patel, Manesh R.; Sandhu, Amneet; Valle, Javier; Magid, David J.; Leon, Benjamin; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Fihn, Stephan D.; Rumsfeld, John S.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Little is known about cardiac adverse events among patients with nonobstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). OBJECTIVE To compare myocardial infarction (MI) and mortality rates between patients with nonobstructive CAD, obstructive CAD, and no apparent CAD in a national cohort. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective cohort study of all US veterans undergoing elective coronary angiography for CAD between October 2007 and September 2012 in the Veterans Affairs health care system. Patients with prior CAD events were excluded. EXPOSURES Angiographic CAD extent, defined by degree (no apparent CAD: no stenosis >20%; nonobstructive CAD: ≥1 stenosis ≥20% but no stenosis ≥70%; obstructive CAD: any stenosis ≥70% or left main [LM] stenosis ≥50%) and distribution (1,2, or 3 vessel). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary outcome was 1-year hospitalization for nonfatal MI after the index angiography. Secondary outcomes included 1-year all-cause mortality and combined 1-year MI and mortality. RESULTS Among37 674 patients, 8384 patients (22.3%) had nonobstructive CAD and 20 899 patients (55.4%) had obstructive CAD. Within 1 year, 845 patients died and 385 were rehospitalized for MI. Among patients with no apparent CAD, the 1-year MI rate was 0.11% (n = 8, 95% CI, 0.10%–0.20%) and increased progressively by 1-vessel nonobstructive CAD, 0.24% (n = 10, 95% CI, 0.10%–0.40%); 2-vessel nonobstructive CAD, 0.56% (n = 13, 95% CI, 0.30%–1.00%); 3-vessel nonobstructive CAD, 0.59% (n = 6, 95% CI, 0.30%–1.30%); 1-vessel obstructive CAD, 1.18% (n = 101, 95% CI, 1.00%–1.40%); 2-vessel obstructive CAD, 2.18% (n = 110, 95% CI, 1.80%–2.60%); and 3-vessel or LM obstructive CAD, 2.47% (n = 137, 95% CI, 2.10%–2.90%). After adjustment, 1-year MI rates increased with increasing CAD extent. Relative to patients with no apparent CAD, patients with 1-vessel nonobstructive CAD had a hazard ratio (HR) for 1-year MI of 2.0 (95% CI, 0.8–5.1); 2-vessel

  17. Risk Stratification for Primary Prevention of Coronary Artery Disease: Roles of C-Reactive Protein and Coronary Artery Calcium.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Waqas T; Rana, Jamal S; Yeboah, Joseph; Bin Nasir, Usama; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H

    2015-12-01

    Risk stratification of individuals at risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) plays an important role in primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. In addition to risk scores derived from conventional cardiovascular risk factors, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and coronary artery calcium (CAC) have emerged as two of the widely accepted non traditional risk factors for atherosclerotic disease that have shown incremental prognostic value in predicting cardiovascular events. This review systematically assesses the role of hs-CRP and CAC in various studies and demonstrates meta-analyses of the incremental prognostic value of hs-CRP and CAC in identifying patients at risk of future CVD events. Compared with this, CAC showed better incremental prognostic value and might be a better indicator of ASCVD risk in asymptomatic adults.

  18. Arterial pulse wave velocity, inflammatory markers, pathological GH and IGF states, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Michael R; Evans, Peter; Davies, Bruce; Baker, Julien S

    2008-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) measurements provide information regarding risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease, but only in a specific artery. Arterial stiffness (AS) can be determined by measurement of arterial pulse wave velocity (APWV). Separate from any role as a surrogate marker, AS is an important determinant of pulse pressure, left ventricular function and coronary artery perfusion pressure. Proximal elastic arteries and peripheral muscular arteries respond differently to aging and to medication. Endogenous human growth hormone (hGH), secreted by the anterior pituitary, peaks during early adulthood, declining at 14% per decade. Levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) are at their peak during late adolescence and decline throughout adulthood, mirror imaging GH. Arterial endothelial dysfunction, an accepted cause of increased APWV in GH deficiency (GHD) is reversed by recombinant human (rh) GH therapy, favorably influencing the risk for atherogenesis. APWV is a noninvasive method for measuring atherosclerotic and hypertensive vascular changes increases with age and atherosclerosis leading to increased systolic blood pressure and increased left ventricular hypertrophy. Aerobic exercise training increases arterial compliance and reduces systolic blood pressure. Whole body arterial compliance is lowered in strength-trained individuals. Homocysteine and C-reactive protein are two inflammatory markers directly linked with arterial endothelial dysfunction. Reviews of GH in the somatopause have not been favorable and side effects of treatment have marred its use except in classical GHD. Is it possible that we should be assessing the combined effects of therapy with rhGH and rhIGF-I? Only multiple intervention studies will provide the answer. PMID:19337549

  19. Quantitative analysis of regional myocardial performance in coronary artery disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, D. K.; Dodge, H. T.; Frimer, M.

    1975-01-01

    Findings from a group of subjects with significant coronary artery stenosis are given. A group of controls determined by use of a quantitative method for the study of regional myocardial performance based on the frame-by-frame analysis of biplane left ventricular angiograms are presented. Particular emphasis was placed upon the analysis of wall motion in terms of normalized segment dimensions, timing and velocity of contraction. The results were compared with the method of subjective assessment used clinically.

  20. Association of coronary artery disease and chronic kidney disease in Lebanese population

    PubMed Central

    Milane, Aline; Khazen, Georges; Zeineddine, Nabil; Amro, Mazen; Masri, Leila; Ghassibe-Sabbagh, Michella; Youhanna, Sonia; Salloum, Angelique K; Haber, Marc; Platt, Daniel E; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Othman, Raed; Kabbani, Samer; Sbeite, Hana; Chami, Youssef; Chammas, Elie; el Bayeh, Hamid; Gauguier, Dominique; Abchee, Antoine B; Zalloua, Pierre; Barbari, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Background: More evidence is emerging on the strong association between chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular disease. We assessed the relationship between coronary artery disease (CAD) and renal dysfunction level (RDL) in a group of Lebanese patients. Methods: A total of 1268 patients undergoing cardiac catheterization were sequentially enrolled in a multicenter cross sectional study. Angiograms were reviewed and CAD severity scores (CADSS) were determined. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated and clinical and laboratory data were obtained. CKD was defined as eGFR < 60 ml/min. Logistic regression model was performed using multivariate analysis including all traditional risk factors associated with both diseases. ANOVA and the Tukeytestswere used to compare subgroups of patients and to assess the impact of each disease on the severity of the other. Results: Among the 82% patients who exhibited variable degrees of CAD, 20.6% had an eGFR < 60 ml/min. Logistic regression analysis revealed a bidirectional independent association between CAD and CKD with an OR = 2.01 (P < 0.01) and an OR = 1.99 (P < 0.01) for CAD and CKD frequencies, respectively. We observed a steady increase in the CADSS mean as eGFR declined and a progressive reduction in renal function with the worsening of CAD (P < 0.05). This correlation remained highly significant despite considerable inter-patient variability and was at its highest at the most advanced stages of both diseases. Conclusions: Our results show a strong, independent and graded bidirectional relationship between CAD severity and RDL. We propose to add CAD to the list of risk factors for the development and progression of CKD. PMID:26629090

  1. Current Status of Interventional Radiology Treatment of Infrapopliteal Arterial Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, T.; Uberoi, R.

    2013-06-15

    Treatment of infrapopliteal arteries has developed to a standard technique during the past two decades. With the introduction of innovative devices, a variety of techniques has been created and is still under investigation. Treatment options range from plain balloon angioplasty (POBA), all sorts of stent applications, such as bare metal, balloon expanding, self-expanding, coated and drug-eluting stents, and bio-absorbable stents, to latest developments, such as drug-eluting balloons. Regarding the scientific background, several prospective, randomized studies with relevant numbers of patients have been (or will be) published that are Level I evidence. In contrast to older studies, which primarily were based mostly on numeric parameters, such as diameters or residual stenoses, more recent study concepts focus increasingly on clinical features, such as amputation rate improvement or changes of clinical stages and quality of life standards. Although it is still not decided, which of the individual techniques might be the best one, we can definitely conclude that whatever treatment of infrapopliteal arteries will be used it is of substantial benefit for the patient. Therefore, the goal of this review is to give an overview about the current developments and techniques for the treatment of infrapopliteal arteries, to present clinical and technical results, to weigh individual techniques, and to discuss the recent developments.

  2. [Comparative assessment of immediate outcomes of surgical treatment of patients with coronary artery disease and lesion of the brachiocephalic arteries].

    PubMed

    Drozhzhin, E V; Ibragimov, O R; Koval'chuk, D N; Efanov, Iu M; Zor'kin, A A; Ibragimova, E A; Urvantseva, I A

    2014-01-01

    of treatment of patients with haemodynamically significant stenoses of the coronary and brachiocephalic arteries makes it possible to increase the overall survival rate in patients suffering this disease and to decrease the incidence rate of ischaemic impairments of the coronary and cerebral circulation. The hybrid method of treatment on arteries of various vascular basins may be an alternative to carotid endarterectomy and CABG, especially in patients running high surgical risk.

  3. Evaluation of Urinary Biomarkers for Coronary Artery Disease, Diabetes, and Diabetic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Maahs, David M.; Ogden, Lorraine G.; Kinney, Gregory L.; Hokanson, John E.; Schiffer, Eric; Rewers, Marian; Mischak, Harald

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background In this study we sought to validate urinary biomarkers for diabetes and two common complications, coronary artery disease (CAD) and diabetic nephropathy (DN). Methods A CAD score calculated by summing the product of a classification coefficient and signal amplitude of 15 urinary polypeptides was previously developed. Five sequences of biomarkers in the panel were identified as fragments of collagen Α-1(I) and Α-1(III). Prospectively collected urine samples available for analysis from 19 out of 20 individuals with CAD (15 with type 1 diabetes [T1D] and four without diabetes) and age-, sex-, and diabetes-matched controls enrolled in the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study were analyzed for the CAD score using capillary electrophoresis and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Two panels of biomarkers that were previously defined to distinguish diabetes status were analyzed to determine their relationship to T1D. Three biomarker panels developed to distinguish DN (DNS) and two biomarker panels developed to distinguish renal disease (RDS) were examined to determine their relationship with renal function. Results The CAD score was associated with CAD (odds ratio with 95% confidence interval, 2.2 [1.3–5.2]; P = 0.0016) and remained significant when adjusted individually for age, albumin excretion rate (AER), blood pressure, waist circumference, intraabdominal fat, glycosylated hemoglobin, and lipids. DNS and RDS were significantly correlated with AER, cystatin C, and serum creatinine. The biomarker panels for diabetes were both significantly associated with T1D status (P < 0.05 for both). Conclusions We validated a urinary proteome pattern associated with CAD and urinary proteome patterns associated with T1D and DN. PMID:19132849

  4. Pharmacological and non pharmacological strategies in the management of coronary artery disease and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Harsh; Aggarwal, Kul; Littrell, Rachel; Velagapudi, Poonam; Turagam, Mohit K; Mittal, Mayank; Alpert, Martin A

    2015-01-01

    Patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD), including those treated with dialysis, are at high risk for the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). CVD accounts for 45-50% of deaths among dialysis patients. Therapy of acute and chronic coronary heart disease (CHD) that is effective in the general population is frequently less effective in patients with advanced CKD. Drug therapy in such patients may require dose modification in some cases. Oral anti-platelet drugs are less effective in those with advanced CKD than in persons with normal or near normal renal function. The intravenous antiplatelet drugs eptifibatide and tirofiban both require dose reductions in patients with advanced CKD. Enoxaparin requires dose reduction in early stage CKD and is contraindicated in hemodialysis patients. Unfractionated heparin and warfarin maybe used without dose adjustment in CKD patients. Atenolol, acetbutolol and nadolol may require dose adjustments in CKD. Metoprolol and carvedilol do not. Calcium channel blockers and nitrates do not require dose adjustment, whereas ranolazine does. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers may safely be used in CKD patients with close observation for hyperkalemia. The safety of spironolactone in such patients is questionable. Statins are less effective in reducing cardiovascular complication in CKD patients and their initiation is not recommended in dialysis patients. Coronary artery bypass grafting is associated with higher shortterm mortality, but better long-term morbidity and mortality than percutaneous coronary interventions in patients with advanced CKD with non-ST segment ACS and chronic CHD. PMID:25981315

  5. Pharmacological and Non Pharmacological Strategies in the Management of Coronary Artery Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Harsh; Aggarwal, Kul; Littrell, Rachel; Velagapudi, Poonam; Turagam, Mohit K.; Mittal, Mayank; Alpert, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD), including those treated with dialysis, are at high risk for the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). CVD accounts for 45-50% of deaths among dialysis patients. Therapy of acute and chronic coronary heart disease (CHD) that is effective in the general population is frequently less effective in patients with advanced CKD. Drug therapy in such patients may require dose modification in some cases. Oral anti-platelet drugs are less effective in those with advanced CKD than in persons with normal or near normal renal function. The intravenous antiplatelet drugs eptifibatide and tirofiban both require dose reductions in patients with advanced CKD. Enoxaparin requires dose reduction in early stage CKD and is contraindicated in hemodialysis patients. Unfractionated heparin and warfarin maybe used without dose adjustment in CKD patients. Atenolol, acetbutolol and nadolol may require dose adjustments in CKD. Metoprolol and carvedilol do not. Calcium channel blockers and nitrates do not require dose adjustment, whereas ranolazine does. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers may safely be used in CKD patients with close observation for hyperkalemia. The safety of spironolactone in such patients is questionable. Statins are less effective in reducing cardiovascular complication in CKD patients and their initiation is not recommended in dialysis patients. Coronary artery bypass grafting is associated with higher short-term mortality, but better long-term morbidity and mortality than percutaneous coronary interventions in patients with advanced CKD with non-ST segment ACS and chronic CHD. PMID:25981315

  6. Off Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery for Multivessel Disease in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Oduwole, Adefisayo M.

    2015-01-01

    A 31 year old female with known history of coronary artery disease and percutaneous coronary intervention presented with acute coronary syndrome. Unknown that patient was pregnant she had inadvertent radiation exposure to the fetus during cardiac catheterization which showed triple vessel disease and severe left ventricular dysfunction. Patient subsequently underwent multivessel off pump coronary artery bypass surgery with intraaortic balloon pump support after declining the recommendation for abortion. Postoperative course was uneventful and patient subsequently delivered a full term healthy baby several months later. Off pump revascularization with its ability to maintain pulsatile perfusion to the fetus should be considered if technically feasible for severe coronary artery disease requiring surgery during pregnancy. PMID:26268262

  7. The impact of peripheral arterial disease: A proposal for a new classification.

    PubMed

    Vaquero Morillo, Fernando

    2016-05-01

    Clasically, intermittent claudication, an intermediate stage in peripheral arterial disease, has been considered as a benign condition when considering only the muscular pain on walking. In this paper our aim is to attract attention about the effects linked to ischemic pain and the oxidative injury resulting from episodes of ischemia/reperfusion. Throughout this process alterations in calcium homeostasis as well as uncontrolled generation of reactive oxygen species, in association with the mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammatory phenomena, could lead to accelerate atherosclerosis, with an increased cardiovascular risk stated by means of a reduced ankle-brachial index. Taking this idea into account we propose a possible new classification for the management of the peripheral arterial disease, combining the Fontaine and Rutherford classifications and thinking about the described systemic effects in order to change the traditional management of peripheral arterial disease.

  8. Inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system for lowering coronary artery disease risk.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Richard J; Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2013-04-01

    The renin-angiotensin system when activated exerts proliferative and pro-inflammatory actions and thereby contributes to progression of atherosclerosis, including that occurring in the coronary arteries. It thus contributes as well to coronary artery disease (CAD). Several clinical trials have examined effects of renin-angiotensin system inhibition for primary and secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. These include important trials such as HOPE, EUROPA and PEACE using angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, VALIANT, OPTIMAAL and TRANSCEND using angiotensin receptor blockers, and the ongoing TOPCAT study in patients with preserved ejection fraction heart failure, many of who also have coronary artery disease. Data are unavailable as yet of effects of either direct renin inhibitors or the new angiotensin receptor/neprilysin inhibitor agents. Today, inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system is standard-of-care therapy for lowering cardiovascular risk in secondary prevention in high cardiovascular risk subjects. PMID:23523606

  9. The role of microRNAs in coronary artery disease: From pathophysiology to diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Economou, Evangelos K; Oikonomou, Evangelos; Siasos, Gerasimos; Papageorgiou, Nikolaos; Tsalamandris, Sotiris; Mourouzis, Konsantinos; Papaioanou, Spyridon; Tousoulis, Dimitris

    2015-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are tiny non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression predominantly at the post-transcriptional level. Far from being simple intracellular regulators, miRNAs have recently been involved in intercellular communication and have been shown to circulate in the bloodstream in stable forms. In the past years specific miRNA expression patterns have been linked to the development of atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease, two closely related conditions. The study of miRNAs has promoted our understanding of the processes involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and innovative diagnostic and therapeutic approaches have emerged. In this review, we present the role of miRNAs in the development of atherosclerosis, on coronary artery disease progression and we assess their role as diagnostic biomarkers. Finally we evaluate the therapeutic and preventive opportunities that arise from the study of miRNAs in coronary artery disease and especially in myocardial infarction. PMID:26117399

  10. Histopathological Characteristics of Post-inflamed Coronary Arteries in Kawasaki Disease-like Vasculitis of Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Maiko; Tanaka, Hideo; Nakamura, Akihiro; Suzuki, Chinatsu; Harada, Yoshinori; Takamatsu, Tetsuro; Hamaoka, Kenji

    2016-02-27

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic vasculitis in infants that develops predominantly in the coronary arteries. Despite the clinically transient nature of active inflammation in childhood albeit rare complications (e.g., coronary artery aneurysm), KD has recently been suggested to increase the incidence of ischemic heart diseases in young adulthood. However, little is known about the histopathology of the coronary artery long after development of the acute KD vasculitis. To address this, we conducted histological studies of rabbit coronary arteries in adolescent phase after induction of the KD-like vasculitis induced by horse serum administration. After a transmural infiltration of inflammatory cells in acute phase at day 7, the artery exhibited a gradual decrease in the number of inflammatory cells and thickening of the intima during the chronic phase up to day 90, where proteoglycans were distinctly accumulated in the intima with abundant involvement of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)-positive cells, most of which accompanied expression of VCAM-1 and NF-κB. Distinct from classical atherosclerosis, inflammatory cells, e.g., macrophages, were barely detected during the chronic phase. These observations indicate that the KD-like coronary arteritis is followed by intimal thickening via accumulation of proteoglycans and proliferation of α-SMA-positive cells, reflecting aberrant coronary artery remodeling. PMID:27006519

  11. Mechanical Recanalization of Subacute Vessel Occlusion in Peripheral Arterial Disease with a Directional Atherectomy Catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Massmann, Alexander Katoh, Marcus; Shayesteh-Kheslat, Roushanak; Buecker, Arno

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively examine the technical feasibility and safety of directional atherectomy for treatment of subacute infrainguinal arterial vessel occlusions. Methods: Five patients (one woman, four men, age range 51-81 years) with peripheral arterial disease who experienced sudden worsening of their peripheral arterial disease-related symptoms during the last 2-6 weeks underwent digital subtraction angiography, which revealed vessel occlusion in native popliteal artery (n = 4) and in-stent occlusion of the superficial femoral artery (n = 1). Subsequently, all patients were treated by atherectomy with the SilverHawk (ev3 Endovascular, USA) device. Results: The mean diameter of treated vessels was 5.1 {+-} 1.0 mm. The length of the occlusion ranged 2-14 cm. The primary technical success rate was 100%. One patient experienced a reocclusion during hospitalization due to heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. There were no further periprocedural complications, in particular no peripheral embolizations, until hospital discharge or during the follow-up period of 1 year. Conclusion: The recanalization of infrainguinal arterial vessel occlusions by atherectomy with the SilverHawk device is technically feasible and safe. In our limited retrospective study, it was associated with a high technical success rate and a low procedure-related complication rate.

  12. Prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among patients with systemic arterial hypertension without respiratory symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Rabahi, Marcelo Fouad; Pereira, Sheila Alves; Silva Júnior, José Laerte Rodrigues; de Rezende, Aline Pacheco; Castro da Costa, Adeliane; de Sousa Corrêa, Krislainy; Conde, Marcus Barreto

    2015-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is often delayed until later stages of the disease. The purpose of the present study was to determine the prevalence of COPD among adults on treatment for systemic arterial hypertension independently of the presence of respiratory symptoms. Methods This cross-sectional study included adults aged ≥40 years with tobacco/occupational exposure and systemic arterial hypertension diagnosed at three Primary Health Care facilities in Goiania, Brazil. Patients were evaluated using a standardized respiratory questionnaire and spirometry. COPD prevalence was measured considering the value of forced vital capacity and/or forced expiratory volume in 1 second <0.70. Results Of a total of 570 subjects, 316 (55%) met inclusion criteria and were invited to participate. Two hundred and thirty-three (73.7%) patients with arterial hypertension reported at least one respiratory symptom, while 83 (26.3%) reported no respiratory symptoms; 41 (17.6%) patients with arterial hypertension and at least one respiratory symptom, and 10 (12%) patients with arterial hypertension but no respiratory symptoms were diagnosed with COPD (P=0.24). The prevalence of COPD in people with no previous COPD diagnosis was greater among those with no respiratory symptoms (100%) than among those with respiratory symptoms (56.1%) (P=0.01). Conclusion Our findings suggest that regardless of the presence of respiratory symptoms, individuals aged ≥40 years with tobacco/occupational exposure and arterial hypertension may benefit from spirometric evaluation. PMID:26257517

  13. Cystic adventitial disease of the popliteal artery: an infrequent cause of intermittent claudication

    PubMed Central

    Kauffman, Paulo; Kuzniec, Sergio; Sacilotto, Roberto; Teivelis, Marcelo Passos; Wolosker, Nelson; Tachibana, Adriano

    2014-01-01

    Intermittent claudication is frequently associated with atherosclerotic disease, but differential diagnosis must be sought in patients with no traditional risk factors. Cystic adventitial disease, of unknown etiology, most frequently affects the popliteal artery, and occasionally presents as intermittent claudication. We report a case of this disease and the surgical treatment, and discuss some aspects related to etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of this condition. PMID:25167336

  14. Pharmacology in Peripheral Arterial Disease: What the Interventional Radiologist Needs to Know

    PubMed Central

    Atturu, Gnaneswar; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Russell, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a progressive disease with significant morbidity and mortality. Risk factor control, using diet and lifestyle modification, exercise, and pharmacological methods, improves symptoms and reduces associated cardiovascular events in these patients. Antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants may be used to reduce the incidence of acute events related to thrombosis. The armamentarium available for symptom relief and disease modification is discussed. Novel treatments such as therapeutic angiogenesis are in their evolutionary phase with promising preclinical data. PMID:25435658

  15. Summary of cases of adventitial cystic disease of the popliteal artery.

    PubMed Central

    Flanigan, D P; Burnham, S J; Goodreau, J J; Bergan, J J

    1979-01-01

    Adventitial cystic disease of the popliteal artery is explored. The results of correspondence with authors reporting this condition are elaborated upon. This has provided an opportunity to discuss the history of the condition, the findings in 115 cases which have come to the attention of the Correspondence Office dealing with this entity, and the results of treatment. A discussion of the suspected etiology of the condition is presented. The condition remains one of unknown etiology which can be treated by cyst evacuation or aspiration when the popliteal artery is patent and which is best treated by arterial reconstruction when the artery is occluded. The results of such treatment are good but are dependent upon technical excellence of the operative procedure. PMID:426549

  16. Current Role of Ivabradine in Stable Coronary Artery Disease Without Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Porres-Aguilar, Mateo; Muñoz, Oscar C; Abbas, Aamer

    2016-02-01

    Increase in heart rate represents a significant contribution in the pathophysiology of coronary artery disease and heart failure, by promoting atherosclerotic process and endothelial dysfunction. Thus, it negatively influences cardiovascular risk in the general population. The aim of this review is to analyze the current, controversial, and future role of ivabradine as an anti-anginal agent in the setting of coronary artery disease without heart failure. Ivabradine represents a selective heart rate-lowering agent that increased diastolic perfusion time and improving energetics in the ischemic myocardium.

  17. Obesity and the challenges of noninvasive imaging for the detection of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Lim, Siok P; Arasaratnam, Punitha; Chow, Benjamin J; Beanlands, Rob S; Hessian, Renée C

    2015-02-01

    Obesity is a significant health problem that could potentially lead to increased cardiovascular risk. Noninvasive imaging plays an important role in the evaluation of cardiovascular symptoms and risk of these patients. Selection of the appropriate test in the diagnosis of obstructive coronary artery disease in this unique population is important. In this article, we focus on the strengths, limitations, and recommendations of the various noninvasive cardiac imaging modalities available in the detection of obstructive coronary artery disease. We have suggested an algorithm to help direct investigation. Ultimately, patient management should be individualized based on clinical judgement, test availability, and local expertise.

  18. Polymorphism in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (C677T) gene and homocysteine levels: a comparison in Brazilian patients with coronary arterial disease, ischemic stroke and peripheral arterial obstructive disease.

    PubMed

    Sabino, Adriano; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Lima, Luciana Moreira; Ribeiro, Daniel Dias; Sousa, Marinez Oliveira; de Castro Santos, Maria Elizabeth Rennó; Mota, Ana Paula Lucas; Dusse, Luci Maria Sant'Ana; das Graças Carvalho, Maria

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to compare plasma levels of total homocysteine (tHcy) in different arterial events as well as to investigate an association between homocysteine levels and C677T polymorphism in Brazilian patients. A total of 145 subjects were enrolled in this study including 43 patients with coronary arterial disease (CAD), 21 with ischemic stroke (IS), 44 with peripheral arterial obstructive disease (PAOD) and 37 control subjects. A preliminary analysis showed significant difference for tHcy plasma levels between patients with CAD (P = 0.003) or PAOD (P = 0.03) compared to controls. However, after adjustment for sex, age, total cholesterol, LDL, diabetes, tabagism or C677T polymorphism, no significant differences were detected in tHcy levels among patients groups and controls. No significant correlation was demonstrated for C677T polymorphism and homocysteine levels. These results indicate that increased Hcy levels may not be considered an independent risk factor for atherothrombotic diseases in Brazilian patients. PMID:18040753

  19. Incidence and severity of atherosclerotic cardiovascular artery disease in patients undergoing TAVI.

    PubMed

    Fusini, Laura; Mirea, Oana; Tamborini, Gloria; Muratori, Manuela; Gripari, Paola; Cefalù, Claudia; Ghulam Ali, Sarah; Maffessanti, Francesco; Andreini, Daniele; Pontone, Gianluca; Bartorelli, Antonio L; Alamanni, Francesco; Agrifoglio, Marco; Pepi, Mauro

    2015-06-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has extended the treatment options for severe, symptomatic aortic valve stenosis (AS). Risk factors for AS have been shown to be similar to atherosclerosis. Consequently, coronary artery disease (CAD), peripheral vascular and carotid artery diseases are often found concurrently with diagnostic, procedural and prognostic implications. This study sought to describe comprehensive vascular assessment in terms of prevalence, severity and correlations in TAVI candidates. A total of 323 patients (81 ± 6 years) undergoing TAVI were enrolled. Vascular pathologies were evaluated by invasive coronary angiography, computer-tomography (abdominal aorta, renal, iliac and femoral arteries), echo-color Doppler ultrasound (carotid artery), and transoesophageal echocardiography (thoracic aorta). CAD was found in 173 (54%) patients, of which 65 (38%) had 1-vessel, 45 (26%) 2-vessel and 59 (34%) 3-vessel disease. Carotid artery disease was present in 33.6% patients, of which 23.6% unilateral and 10.0% bilateral. Iliac, femoral and renal stenosis were found in 29.2%, 22.0%, and 4.7%, respectively. Cardiovascular risk factor and gender correlated with CAD. CAD patients presented more frequently with significant stenosis (luminal narrowing ≥ 50%) of at least one other district. Multi-districts significant stenosis stratified patients on long-term survival and the coexistence of 3-districts involvement with CAD negatively impacts on mortality. Multimodality imaging assessment shows that coronary, carotid, and peripheral artery disease are often found concurrently in patients undergoing TAVI. Several risk factors and gender correlate with the presence and severity of CAD and peripheral pathologies. Long-term mortality is increased in patients with a more compromised vascular situation. PMID:25805046

  20. Effect of age on left ventricular function during exercise in patients with coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hakki, A.H.; DePace, N.L.; Iskandrian, A.S.

    1983-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of age on left ventricular performance during exercise in 79 patients with coronary artery disease (greater than or equal to 50% narrowing of one or more major coronary arteries). Fifty patients under the age of 60 years (group I) and 29 patients 60 years or older (group II) were studied. Radionuclide angiograms were obtained at rest and during symptom-limited upright bicycle exercise. The history of hypertension, angina or Q wave myocardial infarction was similar in both groups. Multivessel coronary artery disease was present in 30 patients (60%) in group I and in 19 patients (66%) in group II (p . not significant). There were no significant differences between the two groups in the hemodynamic variables (at rest or during exercise) of left ventricular ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume and cardiac index. Exercise tolerance was higher in group I than in group II (7.8 +/- 0.4 versus 5.7 +/- 0.4 minutes, p . 0.009), although the exercise heart rate and rate-pressure product were not significantly different between the groups. There was poor correlation between age and ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume and end-systolic volume at rest and during exercise. Abnormal left ventricular function at rest or an abnormal response to exercise was noted in 42 patients (84%) in group I and in 25 patients (86%) in group II (p . not significant). Thus, in patients with coronary artery disease, age does not influence left ventricular function at rest or response to exercise. Older patients with coronary artery disease show changes in left ventricular function similar to those in younger patients with corresponding severity of coronary artery disease.

  1. Dynamics of the connectome in Huntington's disease: A longitudinal diffusion MRI study

    PubMed Central

    Odish, Omar F.F.; Caeyenberghs, Karen; Hosseini, Hadi; van den Bogaard, Simon J.A.; Roos, Raymund A.C.; Leemans, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To longitudinally investigate the connectome in different stages of Huntington's disease (HD) by applying graph theoretical analysis to diffusion MRI data. Experimental design We constructed weighted structural networks and calculated their topological properties. Twenty-two premanifest (preHD), 10 early manifest HD and 24 healthy controls completed baseline and 2 year follow-up scans. We stratified the preHD group based on their predicted years to disease onset into a far (preHD-A) and near (preHD-B) to disease onset group. We collected clinical and behavioural measures per assessment time point. Principle observations We found a significant reduction over time in nodal betweenness centrality both in the early manifest HD and preHD-B groups as compared to the preHD-A and control groups, suggesting a decrease of importance of specific nodes to overall network organization in these groups (FDR adjusted ps < 0.05). Additionally, we found a significant longitudinal decrease of the clustering coefficient in preHD when compared to healthy controls (FDR adjusted p < 0.05), which can be interpreted as a reduced capacity for internodal information processing at the local level. Furthermore, we demonstrated dynamic changes to hub-status loss and gain both in preHD and early manifest HD. Finally, we found significant cross-sectional as well as longitudinal relationships between graph metrics and clinical and neurocognitive measures. Conclusions This study demonstrates divergent longitudinal changes to the connectome in (pre) HD compared to healthy controls. This provides novel insights into structural correlates associated with clinical and cognitive functions in HD and possible compensatory mechanisms at play in preHD. PMID:26288754

  2. A giant pseudoaneurysm of the left anterior descending coronary artery related to Behçet disease.

    PubMed

    Calafiore, Antonio M; Al Helali, Sumaya; Iaco', Angela L; Sheickh, Azmat A; Kheirallah, Hatim; Di Mauro, Michele

    2015-03-01

    We report the case of a young patient with a recent diagnosis of Behçet disease, in whom the left anterior descending coronary artery was found fully open into a giant pseudoaneurysm, with occlusion of the distal segment. Surgical treatment included opening of the pseudoaneurysm with clot and fibrous tissue removal, proximal left anterior descending coronary artery closure, and distal left anterior descending coronary artery grafting. In patients with Behçet disease, it is advisable to perform computed tomography coronary angiography to rule out the presence of coronary artery disease and the occurrence of a rare but potentially life-threatening complication. PMID:25742859

  3. Classification of coronary artery tissues using optical coherence tomography imaging in Kawasaki disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdolmanafi, Atefeh; Prasad, Arpan Suravi; Duong, Luc; Dahdah, Nagib

    2016-03-01

    Intravascular imaging modalities, such as Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) allow nowadays improving diagnosis, treatment, follow-up, and even prevention of coronary artery disease in the adult. OCT has been recently used in children following Kawasaki disease (KD), the most prevalent acquired coronary artery disease during childhood with devastating complications. The assessment of coronary artery layers with OCT and early detection of coronary sequelae secondary to KD is a promising tool for preventing myocardial infarction in this population. More importantly, OCT is promising for tissue quantification of the inner vessel wall, including neo intima luminal myofibroblast proliferation, calcification, and fibrous scar deposits. The goal of this study is to classify the coronary artery layers of OCT imaging obtained from a series of KD patients. Our approach is focused on developing a robust Random Forest classifier built on the idea of randomly selecting a subset of features at each node and based on second- and higher-order statistical texture analysis which estimates the gray-level spatial distribution of images by specifying the local features of each pixel and extracting the statistics from their distribution. The average classification accuracy for intima and media are 76.36% and 73.72% respectively. Random forest classifier with texture analysis promises for classification of coronary artery tissue.

  4. Role of disease status and type D personality in outcomes in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Aquarius, Annelies E; Denollet, Johan; Hamming, Jaap F; De Vries, Jolanda

    2005-10-01

    Patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) often experience diminishing quality of life (QOL) in many domains of their lives. However, factors associated with impaired QOL and perceived stress in these patients are not completely understood. The relative effects of disease status and type D ("distressed") personality (tendencies to experience negative emotions and be socially inhibited) on these patient-based outcomes were examined. It has been argued that type D personality might depend on disease status; therefore, its effect was examined in a combined sample of 150 patients with PAD and 150 healthy controls. The Type D Scale-14, World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment Instrument-100, and Perceived Stress Scale-10 Item assessed type D personality, QOL, and perceived stress, respectively. PAD severity (mild, moderate, or severe) was not associated with QOL or perceived stress. However, patients with PAD reported decreased QOL (p < 0.05) compared with healthy controls. Type D patients reported significantly poorer QOL than non-type D patients across PAD and healthy subgroups (p < 0.0001). After controlling for disease status (presence or absence of PAD), type D personality remained associated with increased risk for impaired QOL (odds ratio [OR] 7.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.39 to 15.96, p < 0.0001) and perceived stress (OR 6.45, 95% CI 3.42 to 12.18, p < 0.0001). Hence, type D personality was associated with impaired QOL beyond the impairment already related to PAD and with increased stress in this high-risk population. In conclusion, type D personality is not merely a function of PAD but seems to represent a different determinant of patient-based outcomes.

  5. Assessment of myocardial viability with delayed-enhancement MRI in coronary artery disease: A correlative study with coronary artery stenosis using digital subtraction angiography

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinxiang; Zhang, Yanglin; Sun, Yong; Sun, Lin; Cai, Renhui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between the degree of coronary artery stenosis determined by digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and infarcted segments detected by delayed enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (DE-MRI). DE-MRI and DSA were performed in 40 patients with coronary artery disease. The number of myocardial segments with infarction, the transmural extent of myocardial infarction, score of myocardial infarction by MRI, degree of coronary artery stenosis and Gensini score of the coronary artery were assessed. The correlation was analyzed using Spearman's rank correlation test. Among the 40 patients, 126 infarcted myocardial segments with a total score of 307 were found by DE-MRI; the total Gensini score for coronary artery stenosis was 587. It was observed that 81.74% of the infarcted segments were at sites with >50% coronary artery stenosis. The correlation coefficient between the Gensini score and myocardial infarction score was 0.786 (P<0.001), indicating a good correlation. However, 18.26% of myocardial infarction segments were found in patients with slight coronary artery stenosis (≤25%). A correlation was identified between DSA detected coronary artery stenosis and infarcted segments detected by DE-MRI; a higher transmural extent of myocardial infarction correlated with more severe stenosis of the coronary artery. The combined use of the two tools may facilitate accurate diagnosis.

  6. Assessment of myocardial viability with delayed-enhancement MRI in coronary artery disease: A correlative study with coronary artery stenosis using digital subtraction angiography

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinxiang; Zhang, Yanglin; Sun, Yong; Sun, Lin; Cai, Renhui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between the degree of coronary artery stenosis determined by digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and infarcted segments detected by delayed enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (DE-MRI). DE-MRI and DSA were performed in 40 patients with coronary artery disease. The number of myocardial segments with infarction, the transmural extent of myocardial infarction, score of myocardial infarction by MRI, degree of coronary artery stenosis and Gensini score of the coronary artery were assessed. The correlation was analyzed using Spearman's rank correlation test. Among the 40 patients, 126 infarcted myocardial segments with a total score of 307 were found by DE-MRI; the total Gensini score for coronary artery stenosis was 587. It was observed that 81.74% of the infarcted segments were at sites with >50% coronary artery stenosis. The correlation coefficient between the Gensini score and myocardial infarction score was 0.786 (P<0.001), indicating a good correlation. However, 18.26% of myocardial infarction segments were found in patients with slight coronary artery stenosis (≤25%). A correlation was identified between DSA detected coronary artery stenosis and infarcted segments detected by DE-MRI; a higher transmural extent of myocardial infarction correlated with more severe stenosis of the coronary artery. The combined use of the two tools may facilitate accurate diagnosis. PMID:27698725

  7. Hepatic artery aneurysm presenting with hemobilia in a patient with Behçet's disease: treatment with percutaneous transcatheteral embolization.

    PubMed

    Hatzidakis, Adam; Petrakis, Jannis; Krokidis, Miltiadis; Tsetis, Dimitrios; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2006-03-01

    We herein report a case of hemobilia caused by a hepatic artery aneurysm. A 40-year-old male patient with a history of Behçet's disease with a thrombus hanging out of the papilla of Vater had a large hepatic aneurysm in angiography. The hepatic artery feeding the aneurysm was embolized. Endovascular treatment can treat patients with hepatic artery aneurysms caused by Behçet's disease.

  8. Effects of statin treatment in patients with coronary artery disease and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Hidehiro; Yajima, Junji; Oikawa, Yuji; Tanaka, Shingo; Fukamachi, Daisuke; Suzuki, Shinya; Sagara, Koichi; Otsuka, Takayuki; Matsuno, Shunsuke; Funada, Ryuichi; Kano, Hiroto; Uejima, Tokuhisa; Koike, Akira; Nagashima, Kazuyuki; Kirigaya, Hajime; Sawada, Hitoshi; Aizawa, Tadanori; Yamashita, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Statins reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality from coronary artery disease (CAD). However, the effects of statin therapy in patients with CAD and chronic kidney disease (CKD) remain unclear. Within a single hospital-based cohort in the Shinken Database 2004-2010 comprising all patients (n = 15,227) who visited the Cardiovascular Institute, we followed patients with CKD and CAD after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). A major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular event (MACCE) was defined by composite end points, including death, myocardial infarction, cerebral infarction, cerebral hemorrhage, and target lesion revascularization. A total of 391 patients were included in this study (median follow-up time 905 ± 679 days). Of these, 209 patients used statins. Patients with statin therapy were younger than those without. Obesity and dyslipidemia were more common, and the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was significantly higher, in patients undergoing statin treatment. MACCE and cardiac death tended to be less common, and all-cause death was significantly less common, in patients taking statins. Multivariate analysis showed that low estimated GFR, poor left ventricular ejection fraction, and the absence of statin therapy were independent predictors for all-cause death of CKD patients after PCI. Statin therapy was associated with reduced all-cause mortality in patients with CKD and CAD after PCI.

  9. Imaging of Small Animal Peripheral Artery Disease Models: Recent Advancements and Translational Potential

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jenny B.; Phillips, Evan H.; Riggins, Ti’Air E.; Sangha, Gurneet S.; Chakraborty, Sreyashi; Lee, Janice Y.; Lycke, Roy J.; Hernandez, Clarissa L.; Soepriatna, Arvin H.; Thorne, Bradford R. H.; Yrineo, Alexa A.; Goergen, Craig J.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a broad disorder encompassing multiple forms of arterial disease outside of the heart. As such, PAD development is a multifactorial process with a variety of manifestations. For example, aneurysms are pathological expansions of an artery that can lead to rupture, while ischemic atherosclerosis reduces blood flow, increasing the risk of claudication, poor wound healing, limb amputation, and stroke. Current PAD treatment is often ineffective or associated with serious risks, largely because these disorders are commonly undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Active areas of research are focused on detecting and characterizing deleterious arterial changes at early stages using non-invasive imaging strategies, such as ultrasound, as well as emerging technologies like photoacoustic imaging. Earlier disease detection and characterization could improve interventional strategies, leading to better prognosis in PAD patients. While rodents are being used to investigate PAD pathophysiology, imaging of these animal models has been underutilized. This review focuses on structural and molecular information and disease progression revealed by recent imaging efforts of aortic, cerebral, and peripheral vascular disease models in mice, rats, and rabbits. Effective translation to humans involves better understanding of underlying PAD pathophysiology to develop novel therapeutics and apply non-invasive imaging techniques in the clinic. PMID:25993289

  10. Peripheral arterial disease, type 2 diabetes and postprandial lipidaemia: Is there a link?

    PubMed Central

    Valdivielso, Pedro; Ramírez-Bollero, José; Pérez-López, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease, manifested as intermittent claudication or critical ischaemia, or identified by an ankle/brachial index < 0.9, is present in at least one in every four patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Several reasons exist for peripheral arterial disease in diabetes. In addition to hyperglycaemia, smoking and hypertension, the dyslipidaemia that accompanies type 2 diabetes and is characterised by increased triglyceride levels and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations also seems to contribute to this association. Recent years have witnessed an increased interest in postprandial lipidaemia, as a result of various prospective studies showing that non-fasting triglycerides predict the onset of arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease better than fasting measurements do. Additionally, the use of certain specific postprandial particle markers, such as apolipoprotein B-48, makes it easier and more simple to approach the postprandial phenomenon. Despite this, only a few studies have evaluated the role of postprandial triglycerides in the development of peripheral arterial disease and type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this review is to examine the epidemiology and risk factors of peripheral arterial disease in type 2 diabetes, focusing on the role of postprandial triglycerides and particles. PMID:25317236

  11. Peripheral arterial disease, type 2 diabetes and postprandial lipidaemia: Is there a link?

    PubMed

    Valdivielso, Pedro; Ramírez-Bollero, José; Pérez-López, Carmen

    2014-10-15

    Peripheral arterial disease, manifested as intermittent claudication or critical ischaemia, or identified by an ankle/brachial index < 0.9, is present in at least one in every four patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Several reasons exist for peripheral arterial disease in diabetes. In addition to hyperglycaemia, smoking and hypertension, the dyslipidaemia that accompanies type 2 diabetes and is characterised by increased triglyceride levels and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations also seems to contribute to this association. Recent years have witnessed an increased interest in postprandial lipidaemia, as a result of various prospective studies showing that non-fasting triglycerides predict the onset of arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease better than fasting measurements do. Additionally, the use of certain specific postprandial particle markers, such as apolipoprotein B-48, makes it easier and more simple to approach the postprandial phenomenon. Despite this, only a few studies have evaluated the role of postprandial triglycerides in the development of peripheral arterial disease and type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this review is to examine the epidemiology and risk factors of peripheral arterial disease in type 2 diabetes, focusing on the role of postprandial triglycerides and particles. PMID:25317236

  12. An absent ophthalmic artery or carotid siphon signal on transcranial Doppler confirms the presence of severe ipsilateral internal carotid artery disease.

    PubMed

    Wilterdink, J L; Feldmann, E; Bragoni, M; Brooks, J M; Benavides, J G

    1994-10-01

    Transcranial Doppler ultrasound provides a useful adjunct to extracranial ultrasound in the diagnosis of carotid bifurcation disease. Previous studies have shown that collateral flow patterns and diminished flow velocities in the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery correlate with hemodynamically significant carotid disease. In a series of 7,054 carotid duplex and transcranial Doppler examinations, 12.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.7, 16.4) of 287 ophthalmic arteries ipsilateral to an apparent carotid occlusion had no detectable flow signal, compared with 0.5% (95% CI: 0.3, 0.7) of 6,767 ophthalmic arteries ipsilateral to a non-occluded carotid artery (p < 0.001). Carotid siphon signals were not detectable in 24.4% (95% CI: 19.4, 29.4) of arteries ipsilateral to the carotid occlusion, versus 1.0% (95% CI: 0.8, 1.3) ipsilateral to nonoccluded carotid arteries (p < 0.001). A significant number of absent ophthalmic artery and carotid siphon signals (5.7 and 8.7%, respectively) were also found in patients with 80 to 99% extracranial carotid stenosis. A subset of 216 studies with angiographic correlation confirmed the high association of these transcranial Doppler findings with severe stenosis or occlusion of the internal carotid artery. Primary ophthalmological disease or siphon occlusion did not explain these findings. An absent ophthalmic artery or carotid siphon signal on transcranial Doppler examination is believed to represent a failure to detect slow flow distal to severe carotid bifurcation lesions. As a sign of ipsilateral carotid occlusion, the sensitivities of absent ophthalmic artery and carotid siphon signals are quite low (12.5 and 24.4%, respectively). The high specificities of 99.5 and 99.0%, however, make these findings useful in confirming the diagnosis of presumptive carotid occlusion by carotid duplex ultrasound.

  13. Genetic risk and longitudinal disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus using targeted maximum likelihood estimation.

    PubMed

    Gianfrancesco, M A; Balzer, L; Taylor, K E; Trupin, L; Nititham, J; Seldin, M F; Singer, A W; Criswell, L A; Barcellos, L F

    2016-09-01

    Systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease associated with genetic and environmental risk factors. However, the extent to which genetic risk is causally associated with disease activity is unknown. We utilized longitudinal-targeted maximum likelihood estimation to estimate the causal association between a genetic risk score (GRS) comprising 41 established SLE variants and clinically important disease activity as measured by the validated Systemic Lupus Activity Questionnaire (SLAQ) in a multiethnic cohort of 942 individuals with SLE. We did not find evidence of a clinically important SLAQ score difference (>4.0) for individuals with a high GRS compared with those with a low GRS across nine time points after controlling for sex, ancestry, renal status, dialysis, disease duration, treatment, depression, smoking and education, as well as time-dependent confounding of missing visits. Individual single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analyses revealed that 12 of the 41 variants were significantly associated with clinically relevant changes in SLAQ scores across time points eight and nine after controlling for multiple testing. Results based on sophisticated causal modeling of longitudinal data in a large patient cohort suggest that individual SLE risk variants may influence disease activity over time. Our findings also emphasize a role for other biological or environmental factors. PMID:27467283

  14. Quantitative evaluation of disease progression in a longitudinal mild cognitive impairment cohort.

    PubMed

    Runtti, Hilkka; Mattila, Jussi; van Gils, Mark; Koikkalainen, Juha; Soininen, Hilkka; Lötjönen, Jyrki

    2014-01-01

    Several neuropsychological tests and biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been validated and their evolution over time has been explored. In this study, multiple heterogeneous predictors of AD were combined using a supervised learning method called Disease State Index (DSI). The behavior of DSI values over time was examined to study disease progression quantitatively in a mild cognitive impairment (MCI) cohort. The DSI method was applied to longitudinal data from 140 MCI cases that progressed to AD and 149 MCI cases that did not progress to AD during the follow-up. The data included neuropsychological tests, brain volumes from magnetic resonance imaging, cerebrospinal fluid samples, and apolipoprotein E from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative database. Linear regression of the longitudinal DSI values (including the DSI value at the point of MCI to AD conversion) was performed for each subject having at least three DSI values available (147 non-converters, 126 converters). Converters had five times higher slopes and almost three times higher intercepts than non-converters. Two subgroups were found in the group of non-converters: one group with stable DSI values over time and another group with clearly increasing DSI values suggesting possible progression to AD in the future. The regression parameters differentiated between the converters and the non-converters with classification accuracy of 76.9% for the slopes and 74.6% for the intercepts. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that quantifying longitudinal patient data using the DSI method provides valid information for follow-up of disease progression and support for decision making.

  15. Predicting missing biomarker data in a longitudinal study of Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Jagust, William J.; Aisen, Paul; Jack, Clifford R.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Gamst, Anthony; Soares, Holly; C. Green, Robert; Montine, Tom; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Dale, Anders; Bernstein, Matthew; Felmlee, Joel; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene; DeCarli, Charles; Bandy, Dan; Chen, Kewei; Morris, John; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Korecka, Magdalena; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Harvey, Danielle; Kornak, John; Saykin, Andrew J.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven; Shen, Li; Buckholtz, Neil; Kaye, Jeffrey; Dolen, Sara; Quinn, Joseph; Schneider, Lon; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Petersen, Ronald; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Morris, John C.; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Grossman, Hillel; Tang, Cheuk; Marzloff, George; Toledo-Morrell, Leylade; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn S.; Pedroso, Julia; Toroney, Jaimie; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J; De Santi, Susan M; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Aiello, Marilyn; Clark, Christopher M.; Pham, Cassie; Nunez, Jessica; Smith, Charles D.; Given, Curtis A.; Hardy, Peter; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Richard, Jennifer; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Laubinger, Mary M.; Bartzokis, George; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Lu, Po H.; Graff-Radford MBBCH, Neill R; Parfitt, Francine; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin; Herring, Scott; Hake, Ann M.; van Dyck, Christopher H.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Benincasa, Amanda L.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Graham, Simon; Caldwell, Curtis; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek Robin; Feldman, Howard; Assaly, Michele; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Mesulam, Marsel; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Scott; Johnson, Kathleen B.; Behan, Kelly E.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Rentz, Dorene M.; Johnson, Keith A.; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Ashford, Wes; Sabbagh, Marwan; Connor, Donald; Jacobson, Sandra; Killiany, Ronald; Norbash, Alexander; Nair, Anil; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Jayam-Trouth, Annapurni; Wang, Paul; Lerner, Alan; Hudson, Leon; Ogrocki, Paula; DeCarli, Charles; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Kittur, Smita; Mirje, Seema; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T-Y; Bartha, Dr Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Hendin, Barry A.; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Gandy, Sam; Marenberg, Marjorie E.; Rovner, Barry W.; Pearlson, Godfrey; Anderson, Karen; Saykin, Andrew J.; Santulli, Robert B.; Englert, Jessica; Williamson, Jeff D.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Cohen, Ronald; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate predictors of missing data in a longitudinal study of Alzheimer disease (AD). Methods: The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) is a clinic-based, multicenter, longitudinal study with blood, CSF, PET, and MRI scans repeatedly measured in 229 participants with normal cognition (NC), 397 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 193 with mild AD during 2005–2007. We used univariate and multivariable logistic regression models to examine the associations between baseline demographic/clinical features and loss of biomarker follow-ups in ADNI. Results: CSF studies tended to recruit and retain patients with MCI with more AD-like features, including lower levels of baseline CSF Aβ42. Depression was the major predictor for MCI dropouts, while family history of AD kept more patients with AD enrolled in PET and MRI studies. Poor cognitive performance was associated with loss of follow-up in most biomarker studies, even among NC participants. The presence of vascular risk factors seemed more critical than cognitive function for predicting dropouts in AD. Conclusion: The missing data are not missing completely at random in ADNI and likely conditional on certain features in addition to cognitive function. Missing data predictors vary across biomarkers and even MCI and AD groups do not share the same missing data pattern. Understanding the missing data structure may help in the design of future longitudinal studies and clinical trials in AD. PMID:22491869

  16. Trajectories of Alzheimer disease-related cognitive measures in a longitudinal sample

    PubMed Central

    Bilgel, Murat; An, Yang; Lang, Andrew; Prince, Jerry; Ferrucci, Luigi; Jedynak, Bruno; Resnick, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Delineation of the relative temporal trajectories of specific cognitive measures associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is important for evaluating preclinical markers and monitoring disease progression. Methods We characterized the temporal trajectories of measures of verbal episodic memory, short-term visual memory, and mental status using data from 895 participants in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. Results The California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT) immediate recall was the first measure to decline, followed by CVLT delayed recall. However, further along the disease progression scale, CVLT delayed recall and visual memory changed more rapidly than CVLT immediate recall. Conclusions Our findings reconcile reports of early changes in immediate recall with greater reliance on delayed recall performance in clinical settings. Moreover, the utility of cognitive markers in evaluating AD progression depends on the stage of cognitive decline, suggesting that optimal endpoints in therapeutic trials may vary across different stages of the disease process. PMID:25035155

  17. Longitudinal epitope mapping in MuSK myasthenia gravis: implications for disease severity.

    PubMed

    Huijbers, Maartje G; Vink, Anna-Fleur D; Niks, Erik H; Westhuis, Ruben H; van Zwet, Erik W; de Meel, Robert H; Rojas-García, Ricardo; Díaz-Manera, Jordi; Kuks, Jan B; Klooster, Rinse; Straasheijm, Kirsten; Evoli, Amelia; Illa, Isabel; van der Maarel, Silvère M; Verschuuren, Jan J

    2016-02-15

    Muscle weakness in MuSK myasthenia gravis (MG) is caused predominantly by IgG4 antibodies which block MuSK signalling and destabilize neuromuscular junctions. We determined whether the binding pattern of MuSK IgG4 antibodies change throughout the disease course ("epitope spreading"), and affect disease severity or treatment responsiveness. We mapped the MuSK epitopes of 255 longitudinal serum samples of 53 unique MuSK MG patients from three independent cohorts with ELISA. Antibodies against the MuSK Iglike-1 domain determine disease severity. Epitope spreading outside this domain did not contribute to disease severity nor to pyridostigmine responsiveness. This provides a rationale for epitope specific treatment strategies.

  18. Spontaneous Intra-Abdominal Hemorrhage Due to Rupture of Jejunal Artery Aneurysm in Behcet Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao-yan; Wei, Jiang-peng; Zhao, Xiu-yuan; Wang, Yue; Wu, Huan-huan; Shi, Tao; Liu, Tong; Liu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Rupture of jejunal artery aneurysm is a very rare event resulting in life-threatening hemorrhage in Behcet disease (BD). We report a case of ruptured jejunal artery aneurysm in a 35-year-old patient with BD. The patient had a 1-year history of intermittent abdominal pain caused by superior mesenteric artery aneurysm with thrombosis. Anticoagulation treatment showed a good response. Past surgical history included stenting for aortic pseudoaneurysm. On admission, the patient underwent an urgent operation due to sudden hemorrhagic shock. Resection was performed for jejunal artery aneurysm and partial ischemia of intestine. The patient was diagnosed with BD, based on a history of recurrent oral and skin lesions over the past 6 years. Treatment with anti-inflammatory medications showed a good response during the 8-month follow-up. An increased awareness of BD and its vascular complications is essential. Aneurysms in BD involving jejunal artery are rare, neglected and require proper management to prevent rupture and death. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of jejunal artery aneurysm caused by BD. PMID:26559278

  19. Role of Metals and Aspects of Socioeconomic Status (SES) in Peripheral Arterial Disease in the US Population

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis are serious pathological changes and are responsible for various disease conditions such as peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The prevalence of PAD, commonly assessed by Ankle–Brachial Index (ABI), is over 10% in the US population over...

  20. Non-dipping blood pressure patterns and arterial stiffness parameters in patients with Behcet's disease.

    PubMed

    Celik, Gulperi; Yilmaz, Sema; Ergulu Esmen, Serpil

    2015-12-01

    Behcet's disease is a multisystemic vasculitis involving veins and arteries of various sizes. Non-dipping status, augmentation index and pulse wave velocity are important determinants of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. We investigated the non-dipping status and arterial stiffness in patients with Behcet's disease. In this cross-sectional study, we examined the vascular parameters of 96 patients with Behcet's disease (53% female) and 60 age- and sex-matched control subjects. The non-dipping status and arterial distensibility were assessed using a Mobil-O-Graph Arteriograph, an automatic oscillometric device. In total, 65.6% of 96 patients were systolic non-dippers, and 34.4% exhibited high augmentation indices. Ten percent of the control subjects were systolic non-dippers, and 11.7% exhibited high augmentation indices. Nocturnal decreases in systolic blood pressure correlated with central systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure, as well as nocturnal decreases in diastolic blood pressure. Furthermore, non-dipper patients with Behcet's disease exhibited higher nocturnal cardiac outputs than did dipper patients with Behcet's disease. Augmentation index correlated negatively with C-reactive protein and correlated positively with both 24 h and nocturnal peripheral resistance, as well as 24 h pulse wave velocity. The patients with high augmentation indices exhibited lower creatinine clearance, as well as lower nocturnal cardiac outputs, higher 24 h peripheral resistance and higher 24 h pulse wave velocities. Non-dipping status and arterial stiffness may exacerbate the harmful cardiovascular effects of the other. In addition to conventional risk factors, non-dipping status and arterial stiffness should be examined during the follow-up evaluations of patients with Behcet's disease.

  1. Peripheral Arterial Disease - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... krvnih žila - Bosanski (Bosnian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Blood Vessel Disease 血管疾病 - 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) Blood Vessel Disease 血管疾病 - 繁體中文 ( ...

  2. Cortical and Subcortical Changes in Alzheimer's Disease: A Longitudinal and Quantitative MRI Study.

    PubMed

    Su, Li; Blamire, Andrew M; Watson, Rosie; He, Jiabao; Aribisala, Benjamin; O'Brien, John T

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative MRI provides important information about tissue properties in brain both in normal ageing and in degenerative disorders. Although it is well known that those with Alzheimer's disease (AD) show a specific pattern and faster rate of atrophy than controls, the precise spatial and temporal patterns of quantitative MRI in AD are unknown. We aimed to investigate neuroimaging correlates of AD using serial quantitative MRI. In our study, twenty-one subjects with AD and thirty-two similar-aged healthy controls underwent two serial MRI scans at baseline and 12 months. Tissue characteristics were captured using two quantitative MRI parameters: longitudinal relaxation time (qT1) and transverse relaxation time (qT2). The two groups (AD and controls) were statistically compared using a voxel based quantification (VBQ) method based on Matlab and SPM8. At baseline, subjects with AD showed a significant reduction of qT1 and qT2 compared to controls in bilateral temporal and parietal lobes, hippocampus, and basal ganglia. This pattern was also observed at follow-up. Longitudinally, in AD we found a significant increase rather than further reduction of qT1 and qT2 from the baseline in bilateral hippocampus, thalamus and right caudate nucleus. In addition, the longitudinal change of qT1 in left hippocampus was negatively correlated with cognitive decline in AD over the 1-year period, and the general disease severity significantly predicted the amount of increase of qT1 in bilateral hippocampus over 12 months. The longitudinal change of qT2 in left parahippocampus correlated with change in neuropsychiatric features over time. In summary, quantitative MRI parameters were reduced in AD cross-sectionally, but increased over time, showing distinct spatiotemporal patterns from the atrophy in AD. We also showed the clinical relevance of quantitative MRI parameters, indicating their potential promise as new imaging markers in AD.

  3. (F)Utility of invasive haemodynamic measurements to guide percutaneous intervention in chronic coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in chronic stable coronary artery disease has not been shown to reduce the incidence of myocardial infarction or death. There is, however, evidence that the outcome from PCI is dependent on the amount of myocardial ischaemia. This review provides an overview of coronary circulatory pathophysiology and focuses on fractional flow reserve from a semantical, conceptual and practical point of view.

  4. Tailored therapy of ACE inhibitors in stable coronary artery disease: pharmacogenetic profiling of treatment benefit.

    PubMed

    Brugts, Jasper J; Boersma, Eric; Simoons, Maarten L

    2010-08-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are among the most commonly used drugs in stable coronary artery disease as these agents have been proven to be effective for reducing the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. As with other drugs, individual variation in treatment benefit is likely. Such heterogeneity could be used to target ACE-inhibitor therapy to those patients most likely to benefit from treatment. However, prior attempts to target ACE-inhibitor therapy to those patients who are most likely to benefit of such prophylactic treatment in secondary prevention using clinical characteristics or the level of baseline risk appeared not to be useful. A new approach of 'tailored therapy' could be to integrate more patient-specific characteristics, such as the genetic information of patients. Pharmacogenetic research of ACE inhibitors in coronary artery disease patients is at a formative stage, and studies are limited. The Perindopril Genetic association (PERGENE) study is a large pharmacogenetic substudy of the randomized placebo-controlled European trial On Reduction of Cardiac Events with Perindopril in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery disease (EUROPA) trial, aimed to assess the feasibility of pharmacogenetic profiling of ACE-inhibitor therapy by perindopril. This article summarizes the recent findings of the PERGENE study and pharmacogenetic research of the treatment benefit of perindopril in stable coronary artery disease. PMID:20712529

  5. Red blood cell MUFAs and risk of coronary artery disease in the Physicians’ Health Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have reported beneficial effects of a Mediterranean diet rich in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) on coronary artery disease (CAD) risk. However, these findings remain inconsistent because some experimental studies have suggested atherogenic and lipotoxicity effects of long-chain...

  6. Physiological Adaptations to Chronic Endurance Exercise Training in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physician and Sportsmedicine, 1987

    1987-01-01

    In a roundtable format, five doctors explore the reasons why regular physical activity should continue to play a significant role in the rehabilitation of patients with coronary artery disease. Endurance exercise training improves aerobic capacity, reduces blood pressure, and decreases risk. (Author/MT)

  7. Validity of a Questionnaire to Assess the Physical Activity Level in Coronary Artery Disease Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guiraud, Thibaut; Granger, Richard; Bousquet, Marc; Gremeaux, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study is to compare, in coronary artery disease patients, physical activity (PA) assessed with the Dijon Physical Activity Questionnaire (DPAQ) and the true PA objectively measured using an accelerometer. Seventy patients wore an accelerometer (MyWellness Key actimeter) throughout 1 week after a cardiac rehabilitation program that…

  8. Common variants associated with plasma triglycerides and risk for coronary artery disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triglycerides are transported in plasma by specific triglyceride-rich lipoproteins; in epidemiological studies, increased triglyceride levels correlate with higher risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). However, it is unclear whether this association reflects causal processes. We used 185 common va...

  9. Common genetic loci influencing plasma homocysteine concentrations and their effect on risk of coronary artery disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The strong observational association between total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations and risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) and the null associations in the homocysteine-lowering trials have prompted the need to identify genetic variants associated with homocysteine concentrations and risk of CA...

  10. Renal Artery Embolization Controls Intractable Pain in a Patient with Polycystic Kidney Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Seong Tai; Park, Seog Hee; Lee, Jae Mun; Kim, Choon-Yul; Chang, Yoon Sik

    1999-09-15

    A 65-year-old man with adult polycystic kidney disease (APKD) and chronic renal failure suffered from intractable abdominal pain and distension for 2 weeks. Meperidine infusion did not alleviate his pain. However, pain and abdominal distension were successfully controlled by embolization of both renal arteries.

  11. Coronary leukocyte activation in relation to progression of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Marijke A; Alipour, Arash; Birnie, Erwin; Westzaan, Andrew; van Santen, Selvetta; van der Zwan, Ellen; Liem, Anho H; van der Meulen, Noëlle; Cabezas, Manuel Castro

    2016-03-01

    Leukocyte activation has been linked to atherogenesis, but there is little in vivo evidence for its role in the progression of atherosclerosis. We evaluated the predictive value for progression of coronary artery disease (CAD) of leukocyte activation markers in the coronary circulation. Monocyte and neutrophil CD11b, neutrophil CD66b expression and intracellular neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the coronary arteries were determined by flow cytometry in patients undergoing coronary angiography. The primary outcome included fatal and nonfatal myocardial infarction or arterial vascular intervention due to unstable angina pectoris. In total 99 subjects who were included, 70 had CAD at inclusion (26 patients had single-vessel disease, 18 patients had twovessel disease and 26 patients had three-vessel disease). The median follow-up duration was 2242 days (interquartile range: 2142-2358). During follow-up, 13 patients (13%) developed progression of CAD. Monocyte CD11b, neutrophil CD11b and CD66b expression and intracellular MPO measured in blood obtained from the coronary arteries were not associated with the progression of CAD. These data indicate that coronary monocyte CD11b, neutrophil CD11b and CD66b expression and intracellular MPO do not predict the risk of progression of CAD. PMID:26831871

  12. Prevalence and frequency of microembolic signals in 105 patients with extracranial carotid artery occlusive disease

    PubMed Central

    Droste, D.; Dittrich, R.; Kemeny, V.; Schulte-Altedorne..., G.; Ringelstein, E

    1999-01-01

    Besides the established factors "presence of symptoms" and "degree of stenosis", plaque echolucency is considered to be associated with increased risk of stroke in patients with carotid artery disease. An evaluation was carried out as to whether the prevalence and number of microembolic signals (MES) detected by transcranial Doppler ultrasound were higher in patients with echolucent carotid plaques. One hundred and five patients with carotid artery stenosis from 20%-99% or occlusion underwent clinical investigations, duplex ultrasound of the carotid arteries, and a 1 hour recording from the middle cerebral artery downstream to the carotid artery pathology using the four gate technique. The presence of MES was more frequent and the number greater in symptomatic patients (21 out of 64 patients (33%); mean number of MES in all 64 patients 3.1) than in asymptomatic patients (four out of 41 patients (10%); mean number of MES in all 41 patients 0.3) (p=0.007, and p=0.006, respectively). Echogenicity of the lesions did not affect either number or presence of MES. Positivity for MES and the number of MES increased with increasing degree of stenosis (both p=0.002). Four out of 12 patients with carotid artery occlusion showed MES. No MES could be detected in carotid artery stenosis below 80%. There was a decline in positivity of MES and of the number of MES with the time after the ischaemic event. After 80 days or more after the index event, only one patient showed MES. In conclusion, increasing degree of stenosis and presence of symptoms similarly affect macroembolic and microembolic risk. Thus MES may be a surrogate parameter for risk of stroke. The presence of MES in a few asymptomatic patients suggests that clinically silent circulating microemboli may give additional information on the pending embolic potential of carotid artery stenoses. Echolucency of the plaque was not related to an increased number of MES.

 PMID:10486404

  13. Bayesian analysis of longitudinal Johne's disease diagnostic data without a gold standard test.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Turnbull, B W; Nielsen, S S; Gröhn, Y T

    2011-05-01

    A Bayesian methodology was developed based on a latent change-point model to evaluate the performance of milk ELISA and fecal culture tests for longitudinal Johne's disease diagnostic data. The situation of no perfect reference test was considered; that is, no "gold standard." A change-point process with a Weibull survival hazard function was used to model the progression of the hidden disease status. The model adjusted for the fixed effects of covariate variables and random effects of subject on the diagnostic testing procedure. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods were used to compute the posterior estimates of the model parameters that provide the basis for inference concerning the accuracy of the diagnostic procedure. Based on the Bayesian approach, the posterior probability distribution of the change-point onset time can be obtained and used as a criterion for infection diagnosis. An application is presented to an analysis of ELISA and fecal culture test outcomes in the diagnostic testing of paratuberculosis (Johne's disease) for a Danish longitudinal study from January 2000 to March 2003. The posterior probability criterion based on the Bayesian model with 4 repeated observations has an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.984, and is superior to the raw ELISA (AUC=0.911) and fecal culture (sensitivity=0.358, specificity=0.980) tests for Johne's disease diagnosis. PMID:21524521

  14. Discriminant analysis of intermediate brain atrophy rates in longitudinal diagnosis of alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Diagnosing Alzheimer's disease through MRI neuroimaging biomarkers has been used as a complementary marker for traditional clinical markers to improve diagnostic accuracy and also help in developing new pharmacotherapeutic trials. It has been revealed that longitudinal analysis of the whole brain atrophy has the power of discriminating Alzheimer's disease and elderly normal controls. In this work, effect of involving intermediate atrophy rates and impact of using uncorrelated principal components of these features instead of original ones on discriminating normal controls and Alzheimer's disease subjects, is inspected. In fact, linear discriminative analysis of atrophy rates is used to classify subjects into Alzheimer's disease and controls. Leave-one-out cross-validation has been adopted to evaluate the generalization rate of the classifier along with its memorization. Results show that incorporating uncorrelated version of intermediate features leads to the same memorization performance as the original ones but higher generalization rate. As a conclusion, it is revealed that in a longitudinal study, using intermediate MRI scans and transferring them to an uncorrelated feature space can improve diagnostic accuracy. PMID:22035255

  15. Longitudinal change in CSF biomarkers in autosomal-dominant Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Anne M.; Xiong, Chengjie; Jasielec, Mateusz S.; Bateman, Randall J.; Goate, Alison M.; Benzinger, Tammie L.S.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Martins, Ralph N.; Masters, Colin L.; Mayeux, Richard; Ringman, John M.; Rossor, Martin N.; Salloway, Stephen; Schofield, Peter R.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Marcus, Daniel; Cairns, Nigel J.; Buckles, Virginia D.; Ladenson, Jack H.; Morris, John C.; Holtzman, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Clinicopathologic evidence suggests the pathology of Alzheimer disease (AD) begins many years prior to cognitive symptoms. Biomarkers are required to identify affected individuals during this asymptomatic (“pre-clinical”) stage to permit intervention with potential disease-modifying therapies designed to preserve normal brain function. Studies of families with autosomal-dominant AD (ADAD) mutations provide a unique and powerful means to investigate AD biomarker changes during the asymptomatic period. In this biomarker study comparing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), plasma and in vivo amyloid imaging, cross-sectional data obtained at baseline in individuals from ADAD families enrolled in the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN) demonstrate reduced concentrations of CSF amyloid-β1-42 (Aβ1–42) associated with the presence of β-amyloid plaques, and elevated concentrations of CSF tau, ptau181 and VILIP-1, markers of neurofibrillary tangles and/or neuronal injury/death, in asymptomatic mutation carriers 10-20 years prior to their estimated age at symptom onset (EAO), and prior to detection of cognitive deficits. When compared longitudinally, however, the concentrations of CSF biomarkers of neuronal injury/death within-individuals decrease after their EAO, suggesting a slowing of acute neurodegenerative processes with symptomatic disease progression. These results emphasize the importance of longitudinal, within-person assessment when modeling biomarker trajectories across the course of the disease. If corroborated, this pattern may influence the definition of a positive neurodegenerative biomarker outcome in clinical trials. PMID:24598588

  16. Longitudinal influence of microglial activation and amyloid on neuronal function in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhen; Okello, Aren A; Brooks, David J; Edison, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Amyloid deposition, tangle formation, neuroinflammation and neuronal dysfunction are pathological processes involved in Alzheimer's disease. However, the relative role of these processes in driving disease progression is still unclear. The aim of this positron emission tomography study was to: (i) investigate longitudinal changes of microglial activation, amyloid and glucose metabolism; and (ii) assess the temporospatial relationship between these three processes in Alzheimer's disease. A group of eight patients with a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (66 ± 4.8 years) and 14 healthy controls (65 ± 5.5 years) underwent T1 and T2 magnetic resonance imaging, along with (11)C-(R)-PK11195, (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scans for microglial activation, amyloid deposition and glucose metabolism. All patients were followed-up with repeated magnetic resonance imaging and three positron emission tomography scans after 16 months. Parametric maps were interrogated using region of interest analysis, Statistical Parametric Mapping, and between-group correlation analysis at voxel-level using Biological Parametric Mapping. At baseline, patients with Alzheimer's disease showed significantly increased microglial activation compared to the control subjects. During follow-up, for the first time, we found that while there is a progressive reduction of glucose metabolism, there was a longitudinal increase of microglial activation in the majority of the patients with Alzheimer's disease. Voxel-wise correlation analysis revealed that microglial activation in patients with Alzheimer's disease was positively correlated with amyloid deposition and inversely correlated with regional cerebral metabolic rate at voxel level over time. Even though one of the limitations of this study is the lack of longitudinal follow-up of healthy control subjects, this study demonstrates that there is persistent neuroinflammation throughout the Alzheimer

  17. Longitudinal influence of microglial activation and amyloid on neuronal function in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhen; Okello, Aren A; Brooks, David J; Edison, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Amyloid deposition, tangle formation, neuroinflammation and neuronal dysfunction are pathological processes involved in Alzheimer's disease. However, the relative role of these processes in driving disease progression is still unclear. The aim of this positron emission tomography study was to: (i) investigate longitudinal changes of microglial activation, amyloid and glucose metabolism; and (ii) assess the temporospatial relationship between these three processes in Alzheimer's disease. A group of eight patients with a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (66 ± 4.8 years) and 14 healthy controls (65 ± 5.5 years) underwent T1 and T2 magnetic resonance imaging, along with (11)C-(R)-PK11195, (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scans for microglial activation, amyloid deposition and glucose metabolism. All patients were followed-up with repeated magnetic resonance imaging and three positron emission tomography scans after 16 months. Parametric maps were interrogated using region of interest analysis, Statistical Parametric Mapping, and between-group correlation analysis at voxel-level using Biological Parametric Mapping. At baseline, patients with Alzheimer's disease showed significantly increased microglial activation compared to the control subjects. During follow-up, for the first time, we found that while there is a progressive reduction of glucose metabolism, there was a longitudinal increase of microglial activation in the majority of the patients with Alzheimer's disease. Voxel-wise correlation analysis revealed that microglial activation in patients with Alzheimer's disease was positively correlated with amyloid deposition and inversely correlated with regional cerebral metabolic rate at voxel level over time. Even though one of the limitations of this study is the lack of longitudinal follow-up of healthy control subjects, this study demonstrates that there is persistent neuroinflammation throughout the Alzheimer

  18. Slow late myocardial clearance of thallium: a characteristic phenomenon in coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Sklar, J.; Kirch, D.; Johnson, T.; Hasegawa, B.; Peck, S.; Steele, P.

    1982-06-01

    Researchers extended the quantitative seven-pinhole method to follow the dynamics of thallium redistribution after exercise. Researchers observed a pattern of slow late thallium clearance that appears to be characteristic of myocardium supplied by obstructed coronary arteries. In 28 subjects, quantitative thallium scintigrams and blood samples for thallium concentration were taken immediately, 2 hours and 4 hours after maximal treadmill exercise. Twenty subjects had coronary artery disease (CAD) and eight were normal. The rate of thallium clearance from the blood (TCB) was compared with the rate of thallium clearance from each segmental region of myocardium between the 2- and 4-hour images. In seven of the eight normal subjects, TCM exceeded TCB in all regions of all images. Seventeen of the 20 CAD patients had at least one region where TCM was less than TCB. Of the 13 patients with multivessel CAD 11 had multiple regions with TCM less than TCB. Using this criterion, we detected 31 of 39 obstructed coronary arteries. Of the 37 regions that were abnormal by this analysis, 30 corresponded to obstructed coronary arteries. In contrast, while conventional circumferential count profile analysis also was abnormal in 17 of the 20 CAD patients, it diagnosed multivessel CAD in only five of the 13 patients that had it. These results show that slow late thallium clearance from myocardium is characteristic of regions of myocardium supplied by diseased coronary arteries and that observation of this phenomenon may improve diagnostic sensitivity for the presence of multivessel CAD.

  19. Periodontal disease and inflammatory blood cytokines in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    KAMPITS, Cassio; MONTENEGRO, Marlon M.; RIBEIRO, Ingrid W. J.; FURTADO, Mariana V.; POLANCZYK, Carisi A.; RÖSING, Cassiano K.; HAAS, Alex. N

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Periodontal disease has been associated with elevations of blood cytokines involved in atherosclerosis in systemically healthy individuals, but little is known about this association in stable cardiovascular patients. The aim of this study was to assess the association between periodontal disease (exposure) and blood cytokine levels (outcomes) in a target population of patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Material and Methods This cross-sectional study included 91 patients with stable CAD who had been under optimized cardiovascular care. Blood levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IFN-γ, and TNF-α were measured by Luminex technology. A full-mouth periodontal examination was conducted to record probing depth (PD) and clinical attachment (CA) loss. Multiple linear regression models, adjusting for gender, body mass index, oral hypoglycemic drugs, smoking, and occurre:nce of acute myocardial infarction were applied. Results CAD patients that experienced major events had higher concentrations of IFN-γ (median: 5.05 pg/mL vs. 3.01 pg/mL; p=0.01), IL-10 (median: 2.33 pg/mL vs. 1.01 pg/mL; p=0.03), and TNF-α (median: 9.17 pg/mL vs. 7.47 pg/mL; p=0.02). Higher numbers of teeth with at least 6 mm of CA loss (R2=0.07) and PD (R2=0.06) were significantly associated with higher IFN-γ log concentrations. Mean CA loss (R2=0.05) and PD (R2=0.06) were significantly related to IL-10 concentrations. Elevated concentrations of TNF-α were associated with higher mean CA loss (R2=0.07). Conclusion Periodontal disease is associated with increased systemic inflammation in stable cardiovascular patients. These findings provide additional evidence supporting the idea that periodontal disease can be a prognostic factor in cardiovascular patients. PMID:27556206

  20. Atrial Fibrillation and Coronary Artery Disease as Risk Factors of Retinal Artery Occlusion: A Nationwide Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Ju-Chuan; Lin, Hsiu-Li; Hsu, Chia-An; Li, Yu-Chuan (Jack); Hsu, Min-Huei

    2015-01-01

    We use Taiwanese national health insurance research database (NHIRD) to investigate whether thrombolism (carotid artery disease (CAD) as a surrogate) or embolism (atrial fibrillation (AF) as a surrogate) plays roles in later retinal artery occlusion (RAO) development and examine their relative weights. The relative risks of RAO between AF and CAD patients and controls were compared by estimating the crude hazard ratio with logistic regression. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to calculate the cumulative incidence rates of developing RAO, and a log-rank test was used to analyze the differences between the survival curves. Separate Cox proportional hazard regressions were done to compute the RAO-free rate after adjusting for possible confounding factors such as age and sex. The crude hazard ratios were 7.98 for the AF group and 5.27 for the CAD group, and the adjusted hazard ratios were 8.32 and 5.34 for the AF and CAD groups, respectively. The observation time with RAO-free was shorter for AF compared with CAD group (1490 versus 1819 days). AF and CAD were both risk factors for RAO with different hazard ratios. To tackle both AF and CAD is crucial for curbing RAO. PMID:26558268

  1. Pulmonary artery denervation for treatment of a patient with pulmonary hypertension secondary to left heart disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary hypertension (PH) predicts poor outcome in patients with left heart disease. A 62-year-old man was referred for heart failure associated with ischemic cardiomyopathy. He received a diagnosis of combined postcapillary and precapillary PH secondary to left heart disease on the basis of hemodynamic parameters. After the pulmonary artery denervation procedure was performed, hemodynamic parameters were markedly improved, which resulted in a significant increase in functional capacity. PMID:27252851

  2. The Peripheral Arterial disease study (PERART/ARTPER): prevalence and risk factors in the general population

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The early diagnosis of atherosclerotic disease is essential for developing preventive strategies in populations at high risk and acting when the disease is still asymptomatic. A low ankle-arm index is a good marker of vascular events and may be diminished without presenting symptomatology (silent peripheral arterial disease). The aim of the study is to know the prevalence and associated risk factors of peripheral arterial disease in the general population. Methods We performed a cross-sectional, multicentre, population-based study in 3786 individuals >49 years, randomly selected in 28 primary care centres in Barcelona (Spain). Peripheral arterial disease was evaluated using the ankle-arm index. Values < 0.9 were considered as peripheral arterial disease. Results The prevalence (95% confidence interval) of peripheral arterial disease was 7.6% (6.7-8.4), (males 10.2% (9.2-11.2), females 5.3% (4.6-6.0); p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed the following risk factors: male sex [odds ratio (OR) 1.62; 95% confidence interval 1.01-2.59]; age OR 2.00 per 10 years (1.64-2.44); inability to perform physical activity [OR 1.77 (1.17-2.68) for mild limitation to OR 7.08 (2.61-19.16) for breathless performing any activity]; smoking [OR 2.19 (1.34-3.58) for former smokers and OR 3.83 (2.23-6.58) for current smokers]; hypertension OR 1.85 (1.29-2.65); diabetes OR 2.01 (1.42-2.83); previous cardiovascular disease OR 2.19 (1.52-3.15); hypercholesterolemia OR 1.55 (1.11-2.18); hypertriglyceridemia OR 1.55 (1.10-2.19). Body mass index ≥25 Kg/m2 OR 0.57 (0.38-0.87) and walking >7 hours/week OR 0.67 (0.49-0.94) were found as protector factors. Conclusions The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease is low, higher in males and increases with age in both sexes. In addition to previously described risk factors we found a protector effect in physical exercise and overweight. PMID:20529387

  3. Association between resting heart rate and coronary artery disease, stroke, sudden death and noncardiovascular diseases: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dongfeng; Wang, Weijing; Li, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Resting heart rate is linked to risk of coronary artery disease, stroke, sudden death and noncardiovascular diseases. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess these associations in general populations and in populations of patients with hypertension or diabetes mellitus. Methods: We searched PubMed, Embase and MEDLINE from inception to Mar. 5, 2016. We used a random-effects model to combine study-specific relative risks (RRs). We used restricted cubic splines to assess the dose–response relation. Results: We included 45 nonrandomized prospective cohort studies in the meta-analysis. The multivariable adjusted RR with an increment of 10 beats/min in resting heart rate was 1.12 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09–1.14) for coronary artery disease, 1.05 (95% CI 1.01–1.08) for stroke, 1.12 (95% CI 1.02–1.24) for sudden death, 1.16 (95% CI 1.12–1.21) for noncardiovascular diseases, 1.09 (95% CI 1.06–1.12) for all types of cancer and 1.25 (95% CI 1.17–1.34) for noncardiovascular diseases excluding cancer. All of these relations were linear. In an analysis by category of resting heart rate (< 60 [reference], 60–70, 70–80 and > 80 beats/min), the RRs were 0.99 (95% CI 0.93–1.04), 1.08 (95% CI 1.01–1.16) and 1.30 (95% CI 1.19–1.43), respectively, for coronary artery disease; 1.08 (95% CI 0.98–1.19), 1.11 (95% CI 0.98–1.25) and 1.08 (95% CI 0.93–1.25), respectively, for stroke; and 1.17 (95% CI 0.94–1.46), 1.31 (95% CI 1.12–1.54) and 1.57 (95% CI 1.39–1.77), respectively, for noncardiovascular diseases. After excluding studies involving patients with hypertension or diabetes, we obtained similar results for coronary artery disease, stroke and noncardiovascular diseases, but found no association with sudden death. Interpretation: Resting heart rate was an independent predictor of coronary artery disease, stroke, sudden death and noncardiovascular diseases over all of the studies combined. When the analysis included only studies

  4. Atypical presentation of acute and chronic coronary artery disease in diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Khafaji, Hadi AR Hadi; Suwaidi, Jassim M Al

    2014-01-01

    In patients with diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease is the principal cause of mortality and chest pain is the most frequent symptom in patients with stable and acute coronary artery disease. However, there is little knowledge concerning the pervasiveness of uncommon presentations in diabetics. The symptomatology of acute coronary syndrome, which comprises both pain and non-pain symptoms, may be affected by traditional risk factors such as age, gender, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Such atypical symptoms may range from silent myocardial ischemia to a wide spectrum of non-chest pain symptoms. Worldwide, few studies have highlighted this under-investigated subject, and this aspect of ischemic heart disease has also been under-evaluated in the major clinical trials. The results of these studies are highly diverse which makes definitive conclusions regarding the spectrum of atypical presentation of acute and even stable chronic coronay artery disease difficult to confirm. This may have a significant impact on the morbidity and mortality of coronary artery disease in diabetics. In this up-to-date review we will try to analyze the most recent studies on the atypical presentations in both acute and chronic ischemic heart disease which may give some emphasis to this under-investigated topic. PMID:25228959

  5. [Peripheral artery disease in patients younger than 50 years old: Which etiology?].

    PubMed

    Cotard, S; Nouni, A; Jaquinandi, V; Gladu, G; Kaladji, A; Mahé, G

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) encompasses disease of all arteries of the body except the coronary arteries. The main etiology whatever the patient's age is atherosclerosis. Different etiologies can induce PAD especially when patients are younger than 50 years old and have no cardiovascular risk factors (smoking, hypertension, diabetes…). PAD that appears before 50 years old can be named juvenile PAD (JPAD) although there is no consensus about the definition. The aim of this work is to present the different etiologies of JPAD according to their hereditary, acquired or mixed origins. The following hereditary causes are addressed: Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, homocystinuria, pseudoxanthoma elasticum, osteogenesis imperfecta "mid-aortic" syndrome. Among the acquired etiologies, inflammatory JPADs without extravascular signs such as atherosclerosis and Buerger's disease, inflammatory JPADs with extravascular signs as Takayasu's disease, Behçet's disease and Cogan's syndrome, JPADs like aortitis, embolic JPADs, iatrogenic JPADs, and mechanical or traumatic JPADs are described. Finally, mixed origins as thrombotic disease and fibromuscular dysplasia are presented. This work will assist clinicians in the diagnosis of JPAD.

  6. [Peripheral artery disease in patients younger than 50 years old: Which etiology?].

    PubMed

    Cotard, S; Nouni, A; Jaquinandi, V; Gladu, G; Kaladji, A; Mahé, G

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) encompasses disease of all arteries of the body except the coronary arteries. The main etiology whatever the patient's age is atherosclerosis. Different etiologies can induce PAD especially when patients are younger than 50 years old and have no cardiovascular risk factors (smoking, hypertension, diabetes…). PAD that appears before 50 years old can be named juvenile PAD (JPAD) although there is no consensus about the definition. The aim of this work is to present the different etiologies of JPAD according to their hereditary, acquired or mixed origins. The following hereditary causes are addressed: Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, homocystinuria, pseudoxanthoma elasticum, osteogenesis imperfecta "mid-aortic" syndrome. Among the acquired etiologies, inflammatory JPADs without extravascular signs such as atherosclerosis and Buerger's disease, inflammatory JPADs with extravascular signs as Takayasu's disease, Behçet's disease and Cogan's syndrome, JPADs like aortitis, embolic JPADs, iatrogenic JPADs, and mechanical or traumatic JPADs are described. Finally, mixed origins as thrombotic disease and fibromuscular dysplasia are presented. This work will assist clinicians in the diagnosis of JPAD. PMID:27319272

  7. Emergency Endovascular Management of Pulmonary Artery Aneurysms In Behcet's Disease: Report of Two Cases and a Review of the Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Cantasdemir, Murat; Kantarci, Fatih; Mihmanli, Ismail; Akman, Canan; Numan, Furuzan; Islak, Civan; Bozkurt, A. Kursat

    2002-12-15

    his report describes two patients with a known history of Behcet's disease in whom massive hemoptysis developed from rupture of pulmonary artery aneurysms. The high recurrence rate of complications related to pulmonary artery aneurysms and even the aneurysms themselves due to inadequacy of medical therapy and the disadvantages of surgical treatment make these aneurysms candidates for endovascular management.The pulmonary artery aneurysms reported here were successfully treated with endovascular embolization using n-butylcyanoacrylate. Pulmonary artery aneurysm embolization in Behcet's disease has been reviewed in the light of relevant literature.

  8. Baseline and longitudinal grey matter changes in newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease: ICICLE-PD study.

    PubMed

    Mak, Elijah; Su, Li; Williams, Guy B; Firbank, Michael J; Lawson, Rachael A; Yarnall, Alison J; Duncan, Gordon W; Owen, Adrian M; Khoo, Tien K; Brooks, David J; Rowe, James B; Barker, Roger A; Burn, David J; O'Brien, John T

    2015-10-01

    converters showed bilateral temporal cortex thinning relative to the Parkinson's disease with no cognitive impairment stable subjects. Although loss of both cortical and subcortical volume occurs in non-demented Parkinson's disease, our longitudinal analyses revealed that Parkinson's disease with mild cognitive impairment shows more extensive atrophy and greater percentage of cortical thinning compared to Parkinson's disease with no cognitive impairment. In particular, an extension of cortical thinning in the temporo-parietal regions in addition to frontal atrophy could be a biomarker in therapeutic studies of mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease for progression towards dementia.

  9. Five years' experience of transverse groin incision for femoral artery access in arterial reconstructive surgery: parallel observational longitudinal group comparison study.

    PubMed

    Beirne, Christopher; Martin, Fiachra; Hynes, Niamh; Sultan, Sherif

    2008-01-01

    Vertical groin incisions (VGIs) have been used to access femoral vessels, but reports allude to wound complications. Our aim was to compare VGI with transverse groin incision (TGI) for femoral artery exposure. Over a 5-year interval, 196 patients with 284 femoral artery exposures for supra- and infrainguinal procedures were studied. Primary endpoints were surgical skin site wound infection, seroma, haematoma formation, and major lower limb amputation. Secondary endpoints were graft patency, wound paresthesias, and length of hospital stay. There were 160 TGIs and 124 VGIs. The demographics and risk factor profile were not statistically different between groups. Seroma developed in 4.4% of TGIs and 13.7% of VGIs (p= .005). The complicated skin and soft tissue infection rate was five times greater with VGI (p= .001). The VGI group had a significantly higher rate of major amputation (p= .0005). Significantly higher graft failure rates were observed in the VGI group (p= .011). No paresthesia was reported in any TGI wound. The mean hospital stay was also significantly shorter in the TGI group (p= .006). The study data support and expound on the theory that an alternative incision to VGI offers lower short- and long-term morbidity. Our findings sustain the selection of the TGI in femoral artery surgery for both supra- and infrainguinal procedures without compromise of vessel exposure. PMID:18845101

  10. [Treatment of hypertension in patients with coronary arterial disease].

    PubMed

    Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Borrayo-Sánchez, Gabriela; Madrid-Miller, Alejandra; Ramírez-Arias, Erick; Pérez-Rodríguez, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    Reports of randomized controlled trials and prospective observational studies provide the most reliable data on the association between blood pressure and coronary heart disease (CHD). The totality of the evidence indicate a strong association between blood pressure and coronary heart disease, which is continuous at levels of less than 115 mm Hg of systolic. In general, 60 to 69 years of age, 10 lower mm Hg systolic blood pressure is associated with lower risk of one-fifth of a coronary heart disease event. The size and shape of this Association are consistent in all regions, for men and women and life-threatening events such as stroke and myocardial infarction. Trials that compared active treatment with placebo or no treatment have shown that the benefits of reducing blood pressure with different classes of drugs (e.g., diuretics, beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors, calcium antagonists) are quite similar, with about a fifth of reduction in coronary heart disease. The important points in this review are: First, that the relative benefit to the decline in blood pressure for the prevention of coronary heart disease appears to be constant in a range of different populations. Second, it is likely that considerable benefit with blood pressure low below thresholds of "traditional" blood pressure (140/90 mm Hg), especially in those with high absolute risk. Third, start, reduce with caution -especially in adult- and keep the maximum tolerance of blood pressure reduction is an issue more important than the choice of the initial agent. PMID:27428346

  11. [Treatment of hypertension in patients with coronary arterial disease].

    PubMed

    Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Borrayo-Sánchez, Gabriela; Madrid-Miller, Alejandra; Ramírez-Arias, Erick; Pérez-Rodríguez, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    Reports of randomized controlled trials and prospective observational studies provide the most reliable data on the association between blood pressure and coronary heart disease (CHD). The totality of the evidence indicate a strong association between blood pressure and coronary heart disease, which is continuous at levels of less than 115 mm Hg of systolic. In general, 60 to 69 years of age, 10 lower mm Hg systolic blood pressure is associated with lower risk of one-fifth of a coronary heart disease event. The size and shape of this Association are consistent in all regions, for men and women and life-threatening events such as stroke and myocardial infarction. Trials that compared active treatment with placebo or no treatment have shown that the benefits of reducing blood pressure with different classes of drugs (e.g., diuretics, beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors, calcium antagonists) are quite similar, with about a fifth of reduction in coronary heart disease. The important points in this review are: First, that the relative benefit to the decline in blood pressure for the prevention of coronary heart disease appears to be constant in a range of different populations. Second, it is likely that considerable benefit with blood pressure low below thresholds of "traditional" blood pressure (140/90 mm Hg), especially in those with high absolute risk. Third, start, reduce with caution -especially in adult- and keep the maximum tolerance of blood pressure reduction is an issue more important than the choice of the initial agent.

  12. Successful Intra-Arterial Chemotherapy for Extramammary Paget's Disease of the Axilla in a Patient with Parkinson's Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Damascelli, Bruno; Ticha, Vladimira

    2011-02-15

    Extramammary Paget's disease (EMPD) is a rare intraepithelial neoplasm occurring less frequently in men and even more rarely in the axilla. A 59-year-old man with severe Parkinson's disease presented with axillary EMPD. The neurological comorbidity made treatment of the EMPD problematical and prompted us to propose locoregional intra-arterial chemotherapy in single short sessions. Two innovative chemotherapeutic macrocomplexes were used: doxorubicin incorporated in large liposomes and the taxane paclitaxel incorporated in albumin nanoparticles. A therapeutic response was seen right from the first treatment and was macroscopically close to complete after four cycles. Five months after the end of treatment the patient had minimal visible disease and had enjoyed a distinct improvement in quality of life, with no noteworthy complications related to the intra-arterial chemotherapy with percutaneous transfemoral catheterization.

  13. Retrograde Pedal/Tibial Artery Access for Treatment of Infragenicular Arterial Occlusive Disease

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Hosam F.

    2013-01-01

    Endovascular intervention has emerged as an accepted modality for treating patients with critical limb ischemia. However, this therapy poses multiple challenges to the interventionalist due to the presence of widespread multilevel disease, long and complex occlusive lesions, and the common involvement of the tibial vessels. Retrograde pedal/tibial access is a relatively new technique that allows the treatment of tibial occlusive lesions when conventional endovascular techniques fail. This article reviews the technical details and published data regarding this technique and evaluates its use in this difficult-to-treat patient population. PMID:23805338

  14. Bronchial Artery Embolization for Hemoptysis Due to Benign Diseases: Immediate and Long-Term Results

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Akira; Kudo, Sho; Matsumoto, Koichi; Fukahori, Tetsuhiro; Shimizu, Toshihisa; Uchino, Akira; Hayashi, Shinichiro

    2000-09-15

    Purpose: To clarify the immediate effect and long-term results of bronchial artery embolization (BAE) for hemoptysis due to benign diseases and the factors influencing the outcomes.Methods: One hundred and one patients (aged 34-89 years) received bronchial artery embolization with polyvinyl alcohol particles and gelatin sponge for massive or continuing moderate hemoptysis caused by benign pulmonary diseases and resistant to medical treatment.Results: After BAE, bleeding stopped in 94 patients (94%). The immediate effect was unfavorable in cases where feeder vessels were overlooked or the embolization of the intercostal arteries was insufficient. Long-term cumulative hemoptysis non recurrence rates after the initial embolization were 77.7% for 1 year and 62.5% for 5 years. In bronchitis (n 9) and active tuberculosis (n = 4) groups, an excellent (100%) 5-year cumulative non recurrence rate was obtained. The rate was lower in groups with pneumonia/abscess/pyothorax (n = 8) or with pulmonary aspergillosis (n = 9) (53.3%, 1-year cumulative non recurrence). There were higher incidences of early recurrence among patients with massive hemorrhage or more marked vascularity and systemic artery-pulmonary artery shunt in angiography: however, these trends were not statistically significant. Conclusions: BAE can yield long-term benefit in patients with hemoptysis due to benign diseases. Technical problems in the procedure had an impact on the short-term effect. The degree of hemorrhage or the severity of angiographical findings were not significant factors affecting the outcome. The most significant factor affecting long-term results was whether the inflammation caused by the underlying disease was medically well controlled.

  15. Celiac artery disease and fatal rupture of a hepatic artery aneurysm in the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nat, Amritpal; George, Tanya; Mak, Gregory; Sharma, Amit; Nat, Amitpal; Lebel, Robert

    2014-04-01

    Isolated visceral arteriopathies of the celiac and hepatic artery are rare. We present a case of a Caucasian man who presented with abdominal pain and was found to have a spontaneous celiac artery dissection. Genetic analysis revealed a mutation consistent with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV. The patient died 2 months later from a spontaneous rupture of his hepatic artery. PMID:24688192

  16. [DIAGNOSIS OF ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE CAUSED BY TORTUOSITY OF CORONARY ARTERIES].

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, E O; Lazoryshynets, V V; Beshliaga, V M; Grusha, M M

    2015-01-01

    This article is devoted to the problems of diagnostics of coronary artery tortuosity phenomenon. Given the lack of literature about the role of phenomenon tortuosity of coronary arteries in the genesis of ischemic myocardial damage, the purpose of study was to determine the clinical relevance as well as necessity for prevention and treatment of this vascular anomaly. Therefore were analyzed medical history, laboratory and clinical database as well as data functional studies of the heart and cardiovascular system in 1404 patients which were divided into four groups on the results of coronary angiography. The results of the study indicate tortuosity of coronary arteries may be independent and additional burdening factor in the development of ischemic heart disease.

  17. Detecting lower extremity vascular dynamics in patients with peripheral artery disease using diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Michael A.; Kim, Hyun-Keol K.; Kim, In-Kyong; Dayal, Rajeev; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2011-02-01

    Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) affects over 10 million Americans and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. While in many cases the ankle-brachial index (ABI) can be used for diagnosing the disease, this parameter is not dependable in the diabetic and elderly population. These populations tend to have calcified arteries, which leads to elevated ABI values. Dynamic optical tomography (DDOT) promises to overcome the limitations of the current diagnostic techniques and has the potential to initiate a paradigm shift in the diagnosis of vascular disease. We have performed initial pilot studies involving 5 PAD patients and 3 healthy volunteers. The time traces and tomographic reconstruction obtained from measurements on the feet show significant differences between healthy and affected vasculatures. In addition, we found that DOT is capable of identifying PAD in diabetic patients, who are misdiagnosed by the traditional ABI screening.

  18. Increased arterial stiffness in young adults with end-stage renal disease since childhood.

    PubMed

    Groothoff, Jaap W; Gruppen, Mariken P; Offringa, Martin; de Groot, Eric; Stok, Willem; Bos, Willem Jan; Davin, Jean Claude; Lilien, Marc R; Van de Kar, Nicole Caj; Wolff, Eric D; Heymans, Hugo S

    2002-12-01

    Increased arterial stiffness is a risk factor for mortality in adults over 40 yr of age with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). As no data exist on vascular changes in young adults with ESRD since childhood, a long-term outcome study was performed. All living Dutch adult patients with onset of ESRD between 1972 and 1992 at age 0 to 14 yr were invited for carotid artery and cardiac ultrasound and BP measurements. Data on clinical characteristics were collected by review of all medical charts. Carotid ultrasound data were compared with those of 48 age-matched and gender-matched healthy controls. Carotid artery and cardiac ultrasound was performed in 130 out of 187 eligible patients. Mean age was 29.0 (20.7 to 40.6) yr. Compared with controls, patients had a similar intima media thickness but a reduced mean arterial wall distensibility DC (40.0 versus 45.0 kPa(-1). 10(-3); 95% CI, -9.1 to -0.8; P < 0.001), an increased stiffness parameter beta (4.2 versus 3.8; 95% CI, 0.05 to 0.68; P = 0.02), an increased elastic incremental modulus E(inc) (0.35 versus 0.27 kPa. 10(3); 95% CI, 0.02 to 0.12; P < 0.001). Multiple regression analyses in all subjects revealed that ESRD was associated with an increase in beta and E(inc). Arterial wall properties of patients currently on dialysis and transplanted patients were comparable. In all patients, current systolic hypertension was associated with increased E(inc) and decreased DC. In conclusion, carotid arterial wall stiffness is increased in young adult patients with pediatric ESRD. Hypertension is a main determinant and might be a target for treatment of these potentially lethal arterial wall changes.

  19. Coronary artery disease and peripheral vascular disease in chronic kidney disease: an epidemiological perspective.

    PubMed

    Stack, Austin G

    2005-08-01

    The enormous burden of CAD and PVD inpatients who have CKD contributes substantially to increased morbidity and mortality. The increased risk of vascular disease observed in CKD patients is likely to be multifactorial, with contributions from traditional and nontraditional cardiovascular factors. Given the overwhelming evidence on the known benefits of cardioprotective medications, their underuse remains puzzling in a population at enormous risk. During the past 5 years, the research community and national interest groups have made significant progress in organizing a concerted approach to improve the management of patients who have CKD and vascular disease. Much work remains to be done. The development of national guidelines in the management of these patients at high risk for future cardiovascular events will be a welcome step. The evaluation of multitargeted interventions for reduction of cardiovascular risk through randomized clinical trials is desperately needed. Finally, the low use of known cardioprotective strategies in this high-risk group is a serious issue and warrants immediate attention at local and national levels.

  20. Exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy in the diagnosis and prognosis of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kotler, T.S.; Diamond, G.A. )

    1990-11-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the discriminant accuracy of exercise thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy for the diagnosis and prognosis of patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. This is a survey of the National Library of Medicine MEDLINE database. The key medical subject headings used were coronary disease, myocardial infarction, radionuclide imaging, and thallium. A total of 122 retrieved studies were considered relevant and were reviewed in depth. Only studies reporting both the sensitivity and specificity of thallium scintigraphy were analyzed. Discriminant accuracy for diagnosis and prognosis was summarized in terms of pooled sensitivity and specificity. Exercise thallium scintigraphy is useful in the noninvasive diagnosis of coronary artery disease, especially in patients with abnormal resting electrocardiograms, restricted exercise tolerance, and intermediate probability of having disease at the time of testing as well as of defining the prognosis of patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease, especially in those with previous myocardial infarction. Because of various shortcomings in the published record, however, the marginal discriminant accuracy and cost effectiveness of thallium scintigraphy compared with conventional clinical assessment and exercise electrocardiography remain controversial. 193 references.

  1. Arm exercise-thallium imaging testing for the detection of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Balady, G.J.; Weiner, D.A.; Rothendler, J.A.; Ryan, T.J.

    1987-01-01

    Patients with lower limb impairment are often unable to undergo a standard bicycle or treadmill test for the evaluation of coronary artery disease. To establish an alternative method of testing, 50 subjects (aged 56 +/- 10 years) performed arm ergometry testing in conjunction with myocardial thallium scintigraphy. All underwent coronary angiography; significant coronary artery disease (greater than or equal to 70% stenosis) in at least one vessel was present in 41 (82%) of the 50 patients. Thallium scintigraphy was found to have an 83% sensitivity and 78% specificity for detecting coronary disease, compared with a sensitivity and specificity of 54% (p less than 0.01) and 67% (p = NS), respectively, for exercise electrocardiography. In the subgroup of 23 patients who had no prior myocardial infarction or left bundle branch block and were not taking digitalis, thallium scintigraphy had a sensitivity of 80% versus 50% for exercise electrocardiography. Scintigraphy yielded a sensitivity of 84, 74 and 90% for one, two and three vessel disease, respectively. Noninvasive arm ergometry exercise-thallium imaging testing appears to be reliable and useful and should be considered in the evaluation of coronary artery disease in patients with lower limb impairment.

  2. Colchicine in Coronary Artery Disease: An Old Acquaintance in New Attire?

    PubMed

    Giannopoulos, Georgios; Angelidis, Christos; Papoutsidakis, Nikolaos; Panagopoulou, Vasiliki; Cleman, Michael W; Lekakis, John; Deftereos, Spyridon

    2015-01-01

    Colchicine has recently gained considerable attention in the field of cardiovascular research, after a number of studies showed that it may be of use in several settings of cardiovascular disease, including chronic coronary artery disease and following stent implantation. Its unique anti-inflammatory mechanism of action makes it safe to use in patients with cardiovascular disease, unlike most--if not all--currently available antiinflammatory agents. While its prophylactic and therapeutic value is well-established in certain conditions involving an acute inflammatory response, e.g. pericarditis, in other conditions, including coronary artery disease and heart failure, which are associated with a chronic low-grade inflammatory state, the evidence regarding its potential use remains sparse. In this concise review, we present key features of this drug and the rationale for colchicine therapy, in the context of acute and chronic coronary artery disease, as well as in ischemic heart failure and critically examine the evidence concerning a possible future role of colchicine treatment in these conditions.

  3. TCF7L2 Polymorphism rs7903146 Is Associated with Coronary Artery Disease Severity and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, André Gustavo P.; Marquezine, Guilherme F.; Lemos, Pedro A.; Martinez, Eulogio; Lopes, Neuza; Hueb, Whady A.; Krieger, José E.; Pereira, Alexandre C.

    2009-01-01

    Background TCF7L2 polymorphisms have been consistently associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus in different populations and type 2 diabetes mellitus is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, especially coronary artery disease. This study aimed to evaluate the association between TCF7L2 polymorphism rs7903146 and coronary artery disease in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects. Methods and Results two populations were studied in order to assess severity of coronary artery disease and cardiovascular events incidence. Eight-hundred and eighty nine subjects who were referred for cardiac catheterization for coronary artery disease diagnosis were cross-sectionally evaluated for coronary lesions (atherosclerotic burden) and 559 subjects from the MASS-II Trial were prospectively followed-up for 5 years and assessed for major cardiovascular events incidence. As expected, rs7903146 T allele was associated with diabetes. Although diabetic patients had a higher prevalence of coronary lesions, no association between TCF7L2 genotype and coronary lesions was found in this subgroup. However, non-diabetic individuals carrying the T allele were associated with a significantly higher frequency of coronary lesions than non-diabetic non-carriers of the risk allele (adjusted OR  = 2.32 95%CI 1.27–4.24, p = 0.006). Moreover, presence of multi-vessel coronary artery disease was also associated with the CT or TT genotypes in non-diabetics. Similarly, from the prospective sample analysis, non-diabetics carrying the CT/TT genotypes had significantly more composite cardiovascular end-points events than CC carriers (p = 0.049), mainly due to an increased incidence of death (p = 0.004). Conclusions rs7903146 T allele is associated with diabetes and, in non-diabetic individuals, with a higher prevalence and severity of coronary artery disease and cardiovascular events. name of registry site (see list below), registration number, trial registration URL in brackets

  4. Primary Stenting of Subclavian and Innominate Artery Occlusive Disease: A Single Center's Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Brountzos, E. N. Petersen, B.; Binkert, C.; Panagiotou, I.; Kaufman, J. A.

    2004-11-15

    Purpose: To review immediate and midterm results of primary stenting for innominate and subclavian artery occlusive lesions. Methods: Retrospective data were collected from 48 consecutive symptomatic patients (27 men and 21 women, median age 64 years) having 49 subclavian and innominate artery lesions treated with stenting. Of the patients 52% had concomitant ischemic heart disease, and 30% had carotid and/or vertebral artery disease. Indication for treatment was vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI) in 16.6% of the patients; upper limb ischemia (ULI) in 31.3%; VBI and ULI in 12.5%; transient ischemic attack in 16.7%; angina in 12.5% before or after left internal mammary artery-to-coronary artery bypass grafting; and leg claudication in 10.4% before or after axillofemoral bypass grafting. Balloon-expandable stents were used in 44 lesions and self-expandable stents in 5 lesions. In total, 53 stents were placed in 48 patients. Results: Technical success was 96%, and clinical success 94%. We encountered four complications (two puncture site hematomas, one distal hand embolization and one transient cerebral ischemia). Two patients died within 30 days from other causes, and seven patients were lost to follow-up. Mean follow-up time was 16.7 months (range 0.3 to 68.2). Five patients had recurrent lesions treated by surgical (n = 2) or endovascular (n = 3) means. Cumulative primary patency rate was 91.7% and 77% at 12 and 24 months, respectively. Cumulative secondary patency rate was 96.5% and 91.7% at 12 and 24 months, respectively. Conclusion: Stenting of subclavian and innominate artery lesions resulted in immediate resolution of patients' symptoms with durable midterm effect and few complications in a larger patient group with serious comorbid conditions.

  5. Identical mitochondrial somatic mutations unique to chronic periodontitis and coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Pallavi, Tokala; Chandra, Rampalli Viswa; Reddy, Aileni Amarender; Reddy, Bavigadda Harish; Naveen, Anumala

    2016-01-01

    Context: The inflammatory processes involved in chronic periodontitis and coronary artery diseases (CADs) are similar and produce reactive oxygen species that may result in similar somatic mutations in mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid (mtDNA). Aims: The aims of the present study were to identify somatic mtDNA mutations in periodontal and cardiac tissues from subjects undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery and determine what fraction was identical and unique to these tissues. Settings and Design: The study population consisted of 30 chronic periodontitis subjects who underwent coronary artery surgery after an angiogram had indicated CAD. Materials and Methods: Gingival tissue samples were taken from the site with deepest probing depth; coronary artery tissue samples were taken during the coronary artery bypass grafting procedures, and blood samples were drawn during this surgical procedure. These samples were stored under aseptic conditions and later transported for mtDNA analysis. Statistical Analysis Used: Complete mtDNA sequences were obtained and aligned with the revised Cambridge reference sequence (NC_012920) using sequence analysis and auto assembler tools. Results: Among the complete mtDNA sequences, a total of 162 variations were spread across the whole mitochondrial genome and present only in the coronary artery and the gingival tissue samples but not in the blood samples. Among the 162 variations, 12 were novel and four of the 12 novel variations were found in mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 complex I gene (33.3%). Conclusions: Analysis of mtDNA mutations indicated 162 variants unique to periodontitis and CAD. Of these, 12 were novel and may have resulted from destructive oxidative forces common to these two diseases. PMID:27041832

  6. Ankle Brachial Index: simple non-invasive estimation of peripheral artery disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieniak, Marcin; Cieślicki, Krzysztof; Żyliński, Marek; Górski, Piotr; Murgrabia, Agnieszka; Cybulski, Gerard

    2014-11-01

    According to international guidelines, patients with Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) are burdened with high cardiovascular risk. One of the simplest, non-invasive methods for PAD detection is the ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurement. The ABI is calculated as the ratio of systolic blood pressure at the ankle (pressure in the posterior tibial artery or the dorsal artery) to the systolic pressure in the arm (in the brachial artery) when the body is in a horizontal position. The physiological value of the ABI is assumed to be between 1 and 1.3; however, these limits vary from study to study. A value less than 0.9 indicates PAD. Some authors propose also measuring the ABI on both sides of the body to highlight possible differences in blood pressure between the opposite arterial segments. The aim of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of the ABI diagnostic criteria used in different publications. Additionally, ABI measurements were performed on 19 healthy patients in age ranged from 20 to 63 years. The results showed a slight dependence between age and the differences between the values obtained from left and right sides of the body.

  7. [Transcutaneous transcatheter use of laser recanalization of coronary arteries in patients with ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Natsvlishvili, Z G; Rabkin, I Kh; Abugov, A M; Babunashvili, A M; Levina, G A

    1991-09-01

    The paper discusses the potential possibility and effectiveness of X-ray endovascular laser recanalization (ELR) of the coronary arteries in order to treat coronary atherosclerosis in patients with coronary heart disease. The intervention was performed in 4 patients (into the anterior interventricular artery in 3 and into the right coronary artery in 1). In 3 of 4 cases, X-ray ELR proved to be successful, in one case the intervention failed due to technological reasons. Recanalization of a completely occluded segment of the coronary artery with a residual stenosis of no more than 40% was observed in two cases. Laser recanalization of profound local coronary stenosis was made in the mid-third of the vessel in one case. It can be stated that X-ray ELR of the coronary artery may extend the scope of X-ray surgical therapeutical tools of the treatment of coronary atherosclerosis. At the same time, accumulation of clinical experience and further improvement of laser and laser catheter engineering are essential in defining the value and possible scope for the application of this method.

  8. A prospective randomized longitudinal study involving 6 months of endurance or resistance exercise. Conduit artery adaptation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Angela L; Carter, Howard H; Naylor, Louise H; Green, Daniel J

    2013-01-01

    This randomized trial evaluated the impact of different exercise training modalities on the function and size of conduit arteries in healthy volunteers. Young (27 ± 5 years) healthy male subjects were randomized to undertake 6 months of either endurance training (ET; n= 10) or resistance training (RT; n= 13). High-resolution ultrasound was used to determine brachial, femoral and carotid artery diameter and wall thickness (IMT) and femoral and brachial flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and glyceryl trinitrate (GTN)-mediated dilatation. Improvements in peak oxygen uptake occurred with ET (from 3.6 ± 0.7 to 3.8 ± 0.6 l min−1, P= 0.024) but not RT. Upper body muscular strength increased following RT (from 57.8 ± 17.7 to 69.0 ± 19.5 kg, P < 0.001), but not ET. Both groups exhibited increases in lean body mass (ΔET, 1.4 ± 1.8 kg and ΔRT, 2.3 ± 1.3 kg, P < 0.05). Resistance training increased brachial artery resting diameter (from 3.8 ± 0.5 to 4.1 ± 0.4 mm, P < 0.05), peak FMD diameter (+0.2 ± 0.2 mm, P < 0.05) and GTN-mediated diameter (+0.3 ± 0.3 mm, P < 0.01), as well as brachial FMD (from 5.1 ± 2.2 to 7.0 ± 3.9%, P < 0.05). No improvements in any brachial parameters were observed following ET. Conversely, ET increased femoral artery resting diameter (from 6.2 ± 0.7 to 6.4 ± 0.6 mm, P < 0.05), peak FMD diameter (+0.4 ± 0.4 mm, P < 0.05) and GTN-induced diameter (+0.3 ± 0.3 mm, P < 0.05), as well as femoral FMD-to-GTN ratio (from 0.6 ± 0.3 to 1.1 ± 0.8, P < 0.05). Resistance training did not induce changes in femoral artery parameters. Carotid artery IMT decreased in response to both forms of training. These findings indicate that 6 months of supervised exercise training induced changes in brachial and femoral artery size and function and decreased carotid artery IMT. These impacts of both RT and ET would be expected to translate to decreased cardiovascular risk. PMID:23247114

  9. [Wine consumption and prevention of coronary artery disease].

    PubMed

    Flesch, M; Morbach, S; Erdmann, E; Bulut, D

    2016-09-01

    There is a J-shaped correlation between the amount of alcohol consumed per day and overall mortality risk and an inverse correlation between the amount of alcohol consumed per day and cardiovascular mortality. The evidence is stronger for men than for women. The correlations are independent of the type of alcoholic beverage predominantly consumed. Possible mechanisms explaining the cardioprotective, antiatherosclerotic effects of moderate alcohol consumption are inhibition of platelet aggregation, increase in serum high density lipoprotein (HDL) levels and prevention of diabetes mellitus. The two latter mechanisms can also explain a delayed progression of atherosclerosis due to alcohol consumption. The beneficial effects are counteracted by detrimental effects of alcohol on the incidence of cancer diseases, liver cirrhosis, violence and accidents; therefore, alcohol consumption in general cannot be recommended for prevention of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27541820

  10. Assessment of the myocardial perfusion pattern in patients with multivessel coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Hakki, A.H.; Segal, B.L.; Kane, S.A.; Amenta, A.

    1983-11-01

    A total of 42 symptomatic patients with coronary artery disease involving two or three vessels were studied using exercise thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy. Qualitative analysis of the images predicted multivessel disease in 75% of the patients with two-vessel disease and in 82% of the patients with three-vessel disease. Quantitative analysis of the size of the perfusion defect indicated that approximately 40% of the left ventricular perimeter showed abnormal perfusion pattern during stress in these patients, and there was no significant difference in the size of the defect in patients with two-vessel disease or three-vessel disease (41 +/- 17% vs 42 +/- 14%, respectively, mean +/- SD). The exercise heart rate, exercise ECG response, and severity of narrowing did not correlate with the size of the perfusion defect. Patients with anterior infarction had larger defects in the distribution of the left anterior descending artery than those without infarction. Collaterals offered partial protection during exercise only when they were not jeopardized. This study confirms the value of qualitative analysis of exercise thallium-201 imaging in predicting multivessel disease, and describes a simple method of assessing the extent of perfusion abnormalities during stress in patients with multivessel disease. The results may be important in patient management and prognosis.

  11. Coronary artery disease in offender populations: incarceration as a risk factor and a point of intervention.

    PubMed

    Donahue, John

    2014-10-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a significant health problem and global burden. Research on antisocial behaviors has identified some groups of offenders as vulnerable to the development of cardiovascular disorders. This article reviews the relationship between criminal offending and CAD, with a particular emphasis on incarcerated populations. Existing research supports this link, with incarceration demonstrating substantial associations with numerous cardiac risk factors, development of cardiac problems, and cardiovascular disease mortality. Comprehensive multicomponent prevention programs, while often available in the community, have received little research attention in prison settings. In addition to clarifying the relationship between incarceration and heart disease, this article reviews various treatment and management responses made by prison officials.

  12. Decreased arterial elasticity associated with cardiovascular disease risk factors in the young. Bogalusa Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Riley, W A; Freedman, D S; Higgs, N A; Barnes, R W; Zinkgraf, S A; Berenson, G S

    1986-01-01

    Noninvasive ultrasonic examinations were performed in 1984 on a biracial sample of 109 10- to 17-year-old adolescents to determine whether elastic properties of the carotid arteries are associated with cardiovascular disease risk factors in the young. The subjects examined were in either the upper (high risk) or lower (low risk) race-, sex-, and age-specific tertile for both serum total cholesterol (TC) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) during a 1981-82 community survey. The pressure-strain elastic modulus (Ep), a measure of stiffness, for the carotid arteries was calculated by dividing the pulse pressure by the fractional diameter increase in the carotid artery during the cardiac cycle, as measured by ultrasonic techniques. Repeat studies on 20 randomly selected subjects demonstrated high reproducibility of the elasticity measurements (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.84). The mean Ep in the high risk group was 5.1 kPa higher than in the low risk group, after controlling for race, sex, and age (one-sided p value = 0.03). Furthermore, a positive parental history of myocardial infarction was related to increased Ep levels (p less than 0.05), independently of race, sex, age, TC, and SBP. The results indicate that ultrasonic techniques can detect functional differences in the carotid arteries of children and adolescents that are associated with the risk of cardiovascular disease as adults.

  13. L-2-Oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid reverses endothelial dysfunction in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed Central

    Vita, J A; Frei, B; Holbrook, M; Gokce, N; Leaf, C; Keaney, J F

    1998-01-01

    The effective action of endothelium-derived nitric oxide (EDNO) is impaired in patients with atherosclerosis. This impairment has been attributed in part to increased vascular oxidative stress. EDNO action is improved by administration of ascorbic acid, a water-soluble antioxidant. Ascorbic acid is a potent free-radical scavenger in plasma, and also regulates intracellular redox state in part by sparing cellular glutathione. We specifically investigated the role of intracellular redox state in EDNO action by examining the effect of L-2-oxo-4-thiazolidine carboxylate (OTC) on EDNO-dependent, flow-mediated dilation in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study of patients with angiographically proven coronary artery disease. OTC augments intracellular glutathione by providing substrate cysteine for glutathione synthesis. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation was examined with high-resolution ultrasound before and after oral administration of 4.5 g of OTC or placebo in 48 subjects with angiographically documented coronary artery disease. Placebo treatment produced no change in flow-mediated dilation (7.0+/-3.9% vs. 7.2+/-3.7%), whereas OTC treatment was associated with a significant improvement in flow-mediated dilation (6.6+/-4.4% vs. 11.0+/-6.3%; P = 0.005). OTC had no effect on arterial dilation to nitroglycerin, systemic blood pressure, heart rate, or reactive hyperemia. These data suggest that augmenting cellular glutathione levels improves EDNO action in human atherosclerosis. Cellular redox state may be an important regulator of EDNO action, and is a potential target for therapy in patients with coronary artery disease. PMID:9502783

  14. Longitudinal Changes in Functional Brain Connectivity Predicts Conversion to Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Serra, Laura; Cercignani, Mara; Mastropasqua, Chiara; Torso, Mario; Spanò, Barbara; Makovac, Elena; Viola, Vanda; Giulietti, Giovanni; Marra, Camillo; Caltagirone, Carlo; Bozzali, Marco

    2016-01-01

    This longitudinal study investigates the modifications in structure and function occurring to typical Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains over a 2-year follow-up, from pre-dementia stages of disease, with the aim of identifying biomarkers of prognostic value. Thirty-one patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment were recruited and followed-up with clinical, neuropsychological, and MRI assessments. Patients were retrospectively classified as AD Converters or Non-Converters, and the data compared between groups. Cross-sectional MRI data at baseline, assessing volume and functional connectivity abnormalities, confirmed previous findings, showing a more severe pattern of regional grey matter atrophy and default-mode network disconnection in Converters than in Non-Converters. Longitudinally, Converters showed more grey matter atrophy in the frontotemporal areas, accompanied by increased connectivity in the precuneus. Discriminant analysis revealed that functional connectivity of the precuneus within the default mode network at baseline is the parameter able to correctly classify patients in Converters and Non-Converters with high sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy.

  15. Coronary artery disease risk assessment from unstructured electronic health records using text mining.

    PubMed

    Jonnagaddala, Jitendra; Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Ray, Pradeep; Kumar, Manish; Chang, Nai-Wen; Dai, Hong-Jie

    2015-12-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) often leads to myocardial infarction, which may be fatal. Risk factors can be used to predict CAD, which may subsequently lead to prevention or early intervention. Patient data such as co-morbidities, medication history, social history and family history are required to determine the risk factors for a disease. However, risk factor data are usually embedded in unstructured clinical narratives if the data is not collected specifically for risk assessment purposes. Clinical text mining can be used to extract data related to risk factors from unstructured clinical notes. This study presents methods to extract Framingham risk factors from unstructured electronic health records using clinical text mining and to calculate 10-year coronary artery disease risk scores in a cohort of diabetic patients. We developed a rule-based system to extract risk factors: age, gender, total cholesterol, HDL-C, blood pressure, diabetes history and smoking history. The results showed that the output from the text mining system was reliable, but there was a significant amount of missing data to calculate the Framingham risk score. A systematic approach for understanding missing data was followed by implementation of imputation strategies. An analysis of the 10-year Framingham risk scores for coronary artery disease in this cohort has shown that the majority of the diabetic patients are at moderate risk of CAD.

  16. Blood fluidity, fibrinogen, and cardiovascular risk factors of occlusive arterial disease: results of the Aachen study.

    PubMed

    Koscielny, J; Jung, E M; Mrowietz, C; Kiesewetter, H; Latza, R

    2004-01-01

    In the Aachen study the prevalence of arterial disease was established in 346 out of a cohort of 2821 subjects between 45 and 65 years of age. Rheological variables and risk factor profile for patients with peripheral occlusive arterial disease (POAD), coronary heart disease (CHD) and cerebrovascular insufficiency (CI) in comparison to a control group are given. Significantly elevated are hematocrit in males, plasma viscosity, erythrocyte aggregation and fibrinogen. It is evident that plasma viscosity is the rheological parameter most often elevated in patients with arterial disease (70.8%). In patients with CI (80.6%) plasma viscosity is elevated about four times more often than in healthy subjects. While 85.8% of healthy volunteers show no or only one elevated rheological parameter only 44.5% of the patients have this constellation. Risk factors are bundled in patients compared to healthy volunteers. 84.2% of the healthy volunteers have no or only one risk factor whereas patients with OAD show this constellation in only 30.9% (32.4% in POAD, 16.1% in CI and 32.4% in CHD).

  17. Diagnosing coronary artery disease with a backpropagation neural network: Lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.D.; Holmes, E.R.

    1995-12-31

    The SPECT (single photon emitted computed tomography) procedure, while widely used for diagnosing coronary artery disease, is not a perfect technology. We have investigated using a backpropagation neural network to diagnose patients suffering from coronary artery disease that is independent from the SPECT procedure. The raw thallium-201 scintigrams produced before the SPECT tomographic reconstruction were used as input patterns for the backpropagation neural network, and the diagnoses resulting mainly from cardiac catheterization as the desired outputs for each pattern. Several preprocessing techniques were applied to the scintigrams, in an attempt to improve the information to noise ratio. After using the a procedure that extracted a subimage containing the heart from each scintigram, we used a data reduction technique, thereby encoding the scintigram in 12 values, which were the inputs to the backpropagation neural network. The network was then trained. This network per-formed superbly for patients suffering from inferolateral disease (classifying 10 out of 10 correctly), but performance was less than optimal for cases involving other coronary zones. While the scope of this project was limited to diagnosing coronary artery disease, this initial work can be extended to other medical imaging procedures, such as diagnosing breast cancer from a mammogram and evaluating lung perfusion studies.

  18. Tai Chi Chuan for Cardiac Rehabilitation in Patients with Coronary Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nery, Rosane Maria; Zanini, Maurice; Ferrari, Juliana Nery; Silva, César Augusto; Farias, Leonardo Fontanive; Comel, João Carlos; Belli, Karlyse Claudino; da Silveira, Anderson Donelli; Santos, Antonio Cardoso; Stein, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Background Several studies have shown that Tai Chi Chuan can improve cardiac function in patients with heart disease. Objective To conduct a systematic review of the literature to assess the effects of Tai Chi Chuan on cardiac rehabilitation for patients with coronary artery disease. Methods We performed a search for studies published in English, Portuguese and Spanish in the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS and Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials. Data were extracted in a standardized manner by three independent investigators, who were responsible for assessing the methodological quality of the manuscripts. Results The initial search found 201 studies that, after review of titles and abstracts, resulted in a selection of 12 manuscripts. They were fully analyzed and of these, nine were excluded. As a final result, three randomized controlled trials remained. The studies analyzed in this systematic review included patients with a confirmed diagnosis of coronary artery disease, all were clinically stable and able to exercise. The three experiments had a control group that practiced structured exercise training or received counseling for exercise. Follow-up ranged from 2 to 12 months. Conclusion Preliminary evidence suggests that Tai Chi Chuan can be an unconventional form of cardiac rehabilitation, being an adjunctive therapy in the treatment of patients with stable coronary artery disease. However, the methodological quality of the included articles and the small sample sizes clearly indicate that new randomized controlled trials are needed in this regard. PMID:24759952

  19. The practicing physician's current perspective on therapeutic options in coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Drenth, D.J.; Zijlstra, F.; Boonstra, P.W.

    2005-01-01

    Over the past decades the management of patients with stable as well as unstable manifestations of coronary artery disease has evolved in every aspect of routine clinical practice. Modern diagnostic modalities allow reliable and objective assessment of both the anatomical and functional consequences of the early as well as advanced stages of this disease, which remains one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Pharmacological therapy now includes several classes of drugs with mortality benefits documented by randomised controlled trials. Surgical and percutaneous revascularisation techniques have shown rapid technical improvements and are now applicable in a wide range of clinical conditions. In this paper we will attempt to place the current status of the three therapeutic options for patients with coronary artery disease into perspective. It is important to realise that it is impossible to write a complete overview, a Pubmed search: 'PCI or drug therapy or surgery for coronary artery disease' results in 1,152,117 hits. Therefore, we have chosen the viewpoint of the practicing physician to synthesise this abundance of information in the context of modern clinical practice in a high volume cardiothoracic and cardiological practice. PMID:25696508

  20. Coronary Artery Disease Detection Using a Fuzzy-Boosting PSO Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ghadiri Hedeshi, N.; Saniee Abadeh, M.

    2014-01-01

    In the past decades, medical data mining has become a popular data mining subject. Researchers have proposed several tools and various methodologies for developing effective medical expert systems. Diagnosing heart diseases is one of the important topics and many researchers have tried to develop intelligent medical expert systems to help the physicians. In this paper, we propose the use of PSO algorithm with a boosting approach to extract rules for recognizing the presence or absence of coronary artery disease in a patient. The weight of training examples that are classified properly by the new rules is reduced by a boosting mechanism. Therefore, in the next rule generation cycle, the focus is on those fuzzy rules that account for the currently misclassified or uncovered instances. We have used coronary artery disease data sets taken from University of California Irvine, (UCI), to evaluate our new classification approach. Results show that the proposed method can detect the coronary artery disease with an acceptable accuracy. Also, the discovered rules have significant interpretability as well. PMID:24817883

  1. Coronary artery disease risk assessment from unstructured electronic health records using text mining.

    PubMed

    Jonnagaddala, Jitendra; Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Ray, Pradeep; Kumar, Manish; Chang, Nai-Wen; Dai, Hong-Jie

    2015-12-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) often leads to myocardial infarction, which may be fatal. Risk factors can be used to predict CAD, which may subsequently lead to prevention or early intervention. Patient data such as co-morbidities, medication history, social history and family history are required to determine the risk factors for a disease. However, risk factor data are usually embedded in unstructured clinical narratives if the data is not collected specifically for risk assessment purposes. Clinical text mining can be used to extract data related to risk factors from unstructured clinical notes. This study presents methods to extract Framingham risk factors from unstructured electronic health records using clinical text mining and to calculate 10-year coronary artery disease risk scores in a cohort of diabetic patients. We developed a rule-based system to extract risk factors: age, gender, total cholesterol, HDL-C, blood pressure, diabetes history and smoking history. The results showed that the output from the text mining system was reliable, but there was a significant amount of missing data to calculate the Framingham risk score. A systematic approach for understanding missing data was followed by implementation of imputation strategies. An analysis of the 10-year Framingham risk scores for coronary artery disease in this cohort has shown that the majority of the diabetic patients are at moderate risk of CAD. PMID:26319542

  2. Temporal Effect of Depressive Symptoms on the Longitudinal Evolution of Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Rathbun, Alan M.; Harrold, Leslie R.; Reed, George W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Depression is common in the rheumatoid arthritis (RA) population, yet little is known of its effect on the course of disease activity. The aim of our study was to determine if prevalent and incident depressive symptoms influenced longitudinal changes in RA disease activity. Methods RA patients with and without depressive symptoms were identified using single-item questions from an existing registry sample. Mixed-effects models were used to examine changes in disease activity over 2 years in those with and without prevalent and incident depressive symptoms. Outcome variables included composite disease activity, joint counts, global assessments, pain, function, and acute-phase reactants. Model-based outcome estimations at the index dates and corresponding 1- and 2-year changes were calculated. Results Rates of disease activity change were significantly different in patients with a lifetime prevalence of symptomology, but not incident depressive symptoms, when compared to controls. Prior symptoms were associated with slower rates of disease activity decline, evidenced by the estimated 1-year Clinical Disease Activity Index changes: −3.0 (−3.3, −2.6) and −4.0 (−4.3, −3.6) in patients with and without lifetime prevalence, respectively. Analogous results were obtained for most of the other disease activity outcomes; although, there was no temporal effect of prevalent symptoms of depression on swollen joints and acute-phase reactants. Conclusion Depressive symptoms temporally influence the evolution of RA disease activity, and the magnitude is dependent on the time of symptomatic onset. However, the effect is limited to patient-reported pain, global assessment, and function, as well as physician-reported global assessment and tender joints. PMID:25384985

  3. An unusual case with vasculo-Behçet's disease: peripheral arterial aneurysm in an elderly woman.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz-Oner, Sibel; Can, Meryem; Ozen, Gulsen; Oz, Buge; Baltacioglu, Feyyaz; Tuzun, Hasan; Direskeneli, Haner

    2014-01-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a chronic, multi-systemic disorder that can affect all sizes of arteries and veins. Vascular involvement of BD is generally observed in young men and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Arterial lesions can appear as aneurysms, stenosis and occlusions in BD. We, here, present the case of a woman who developed a peripheral arterial aneurysm in her sixth decade, 20 years after disease onset. BD patients with aneurysms should be consulted at any age for pre- and post-operative assessment for immunosuppressive treatment to reduce recurrences, complications and disease activation.

  4. Longitudinal assessment of tau and amyloid beta in cerebrospinal fluid of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Mattison, Hayley A; Liu, Changqin; Ginghina, Carmen; Auinger, Peggy; McDermott, Michael P; Stewart, Tessandra; Kang, Un Jung; Cain, Kevin C; Shi, Min

    2013-11-01

    Tau gene has been consistently associated with the risk of Parkinson disease in recent genome wide association studies. In addition, alterations of the levels of total tau, phosphorylated tau [181P], and amyloid beta 1-42 in cerebrospinal fluid have been reported in patients with sporadic Parkinson disease and asymptomatic carriers of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 mutations, in patterns that clearly differ from those typically described for patients with Alzheimer disease. To further determine the potential roles of these molecules in Parkinson disease pathogenesis and/or in tracking the disease progression, especially at early stages, the current study assessed all three proteins in 403 Parkinson disease patients enrolled in the DATATOP (Deprenyl and tocopherol antioxidative therapy of parkinsonism) placebo-controlled clinical trial, the largest cohort to date with cerebrospinal fluid samples collected longitudinally. These initially drug-naive patients at early disease stages were clinically evaluated, and cerebrospinal fluid was collected at baseline and then at endpoint, defined as the time at which symptomatic anti-Parkinson disease medications were determined to be required. General linear models were used to test for associations between baseline cerebrospinal fluid biomarker levels or their rates of change and changes in the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (total or part III motor score) over time. Robust associations among candidate markers are readily noted. Baseline levels of amyloid beta were weakly but negatively correlated with baseline Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale total scores. Baseline phosphorylated tau/total tau and phosphorylated tau/amyloid beta were significantly and negatively correlated with the rates of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale change. While medications (deprenyl and/or tocopherol) did not appear to alter biomarkers appreciably, a weak but significant positive correlation between the rate of change in total

  5. Insights into the pathophysiology of unstable coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, S D; Ravn, H B; Falk, E

    1997-09-01

    Coronary atherosclerosis without thrombosis is, in general, a benign disease. However, plaque disruption, or fissuring, with superimposed thrombosis, frequently complicates the course of coronary atherosclerosis. Small ruptures often remain clinically silent, whereas more extensive plaque rupture may cause the development of unstable angina, myocardial infarction, and sudden death. The risk of plaque disruption depends more on plaque type (composition) than on plaque size and stenosis severity. Major determinants of a plaque's vulnerability to rupture are: the size and consistency of the lipid-rich atheromatous core; the thickness of the fibrous cap covering the core; and ongoing inflammation and repair within the cap. Both plaque vulnerability (intrinsic disease) and rupture triggers (extrinsic forces) are important for plaque disruption. The former predisposes the plaque to rupture whereas the latter may precipitate it. The resultant thrombotic response, which is important for the clinical presentation and outcome, is portly determined by the reactivity of the circulating platelets and the balance between the fibrinolytic and coagulation systems. New ways of identification and treatment of the dangerous vulnerable plaques responsible for infarction and death, and optimization of antithrombotic treatment, are highly warranted in order to prevent and treat life-threatening coronary thrombosis.

  6. Prevalence of coronary artery disease in patients with isolated aortic valve stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Exadactylos, N; Sugrue, D D; Oakley, C M

    1984-01-01

    The prevalence of significant coronary artery disease (reduction in luminal diameter by more than 50%) among 88 consecutive patients with aortic stenosis requiring aortic valve replacement at Hammersmith Hospital was examined. Twenty two (34%) patients had significant coronary disease. Nineteen of 42 (45%) patients with typical angina had coronary disease; three of 20 (15%) patients with atypical chest pain had coronary disease, while none of 26 patients free of chest pain had significant coronary disease. Risk factors for coronary disease were equally distributed among patients with and without significant luminal obstruction. Because of the small, but definite, hazard of coronary arteriography and in the interest of cost containment it is suggested that patients with aortic stenosis who are free of chest pain do not require routine coronary arteriography. This applies particularly to patients requiring urgent aortic valve replacement. PMID:6691863

  7. Inheritance of coronary artery disease in men: an analysis of the role of the Y chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Charchar, Fadi J; Bloomer, Lisa DS; Barnes, Timothy A; Cowley, Mark J; Nelson, Christopher P; Wang, Yanzhong; Denniff, Matthew; Debiec, Radoslaw; Christofidou, Paraskevi; Nankervis, Scott; Dominiczak, Anna F; Bani-Mustafa, Ahmed; Balmforth, Anthony J; Hall, Alistair S; Erdmann, Jeanette; Cambien, Francois; Deloukas, Panos; Hengstenberg, Christian; Packard, Chris; Schunkert, Heribert; Ouwehand, Willem H; Ford, Ian; Goodall, Alison H; Jobling, Mark A; Samani, Nilesh J; Tomaszewski, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background A sexual dimorphism exists in the incidence and prevalence of coronary artery disease—men are more commonly affected than are age-matched women. We explored the role of the Y chromosome in coronary artery disease in the context of this sexual inequity. Methods We genotyped 11 markers of the male-specific region of the Y chromosome in 3233 biologically unrelated British men from three cohorts: the British Heart Foundation Family Heart Study (BHF-FHS), West of Scotland Coronary Prevention Study (WOSCOPS), and Cardiogenics Study. On the basis of this information, each Y chromosome was tracked back into one of 13 ancient lineages defined as haplogroups. We then examined associations between common Y chromosome haplogroups and the risk of coronary artery disease in cross-sectional BHF-FHS and prospective WOSCOPS. Finally, we undertook functional analysis of Y chromosome effects on monocyte and macrophage transcriptome in British men from the Cardiogenics Study. Findings Of nine haplogroups identified, two (R1b1b2 and I) accounted for roughly 90% of the Y chromosome variants among British men. Carriers of haplogroup I had about a 50% higher age-adjusted risk of coronary artery disease than did men with other Y chromosome lineages in BHF-FHS (odds ratio 1·75, 95% CI 1·20–2·54, p=0·004), WOSCOPS (1·45, 1·08–1·95, p=0·012), and joint analysis of both populations (1·56, 1·24–1·97, p=0·0002). The association between haplogroup I and increased risk of coronary artery disease was independent of traditional cardiovascular and socioeconomic risk factors. Analysis of macrophage transcriptome in the Cardiogenics Study revealed that 19 molecular pathways showing strong differential expression between men with haplogroup I and other lineages of the Y chromosome were interconnected by common genes related to inflammation and immunity, and that some of them have a strong relevance to atherosclerosis. Interpretation The human Y chromosome is

  8. [SICI-GISE position paper on the requirements for diagnostic and interventional procedures in patients with peripheral arterial disease].

    PubMed

    Cremonesi, Alberto; Setacci, Carlo; Rubino, Paolo; Stabile, Eugenio; Castriota, Fausto; Reimers, Bernhard; Inglese, Luigi; Berti, Sergio; Sbarzaglia, Paolo; Biamino, Giancarlo; Guagliumi, Giulio

    2013-10-01

    Interventional procedures on peripheral vessels are the field of a novel specialty dedicated to the diagnosis and minimally invasive endovascular treatment of diseases involving the cerebral, thoracic and abdominal arteries (including renal and visceral arteries), as well as the peripheral arteries (femoro-popliteal arteries and the arteries below the knee). At present, physicians with three different types of medical training, each involving particular strengths and characteristics, specialize in endovascular treatment of patients with peripheral arterial disease: vascular surgeons, interventional radiologists and interventional cardiologists. Treatment of high-risk patients in terms of anatomical and clinical (serious comorbidities) complexity raised the need for the interventional cardiologist to face issues related to technical aspects of the procedure, multilevel pathology management and adequate indication. To achieve this goal, interventional cardiologists require particular facilities and clinical skills. The objectives of this position paper from the Italian Society of Interventional Cardiology (SICI-GISE) are (i) to define the theoretical background and practical training required to ensure that interventional cardiologists maintain high-quality standards also in the field of treatment of peripheral arterial disease, by establishing shared rules and drafting papers; (ii) to standardize the procedures of interventional cardiology operational units that treat patients with peripheral arterial disease in Italy on the basis of scientific evidence, and (iii) to establish common requirements in terms of facilities and regulations. PMID:24121895

  9. Detection of longitudinal ulcer using roughness value for computer aided diagnosis of Crohn's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Masahiro; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Osamu; Ando, Takafumi; Goto, Hidemi; Mori, Kensaku

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a new method to detect ulcers, which is one of the symptoms of Crohn's disease, from CT images. Crohn's disease is an inflammatory disease of the digestive tract. Crohn's disease commonly affects the small intestine. An optical or a capsule endoscope is used for small intestine examinations. However, these endoscopes cannot pass through intestinal stenosis parts in some cases. A CT image based diagnosis allows a physician to observe whole intestine even if intestinal stenosis exists. However, because of the complicated shape of the small and large intestines, understanding of shapes of the intestines and lesion positions are difficult in the CT image based diagnosis. Computer-aided diagnosis system for Crohn's disease having automated lesion detection is required for efficient diagnosis. We propose an automated method to detect ulcers from CT images. Longitudinal ulcers make rough surface of the small and large intestinal wall. The rough surface consists of combination of convex and concave parts on the intestinal wall. We detect convex and concave parts on the intestinal wall by a blob and an inverse-blob structure enhancement filters. A lot of convex and concave parts concentrate on roughed parts. We introduce a roughness value to differentiate convex and concave parts concentrated on the roughed parts from the other on the intestinal wall. The roughness value effectively reduces false positives of ulcer detection. Experimental results showed that the proposed method can detect convex and concave parts on the ulcers.

  10. Correlation of Global Strain Rate and Left Ventricular Filling Pressure in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease: A 2-D Speckle-Tracking Study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hong; Wu, Wei-Chun; Xie, Rong-Ai; Gao, Li-Jian; Wang, Hao

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of 2-D speckle-tracking imaging in the prediction of left ventricular filling pressure in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and normal left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Eighty-four patients with CAD and 30 healthy controls were recruited prospectively. The longitudinal strain rate (SR) curves were determined in three apical views of the left ventricle long axis. Circumferential and radial SR curves were determined in three short-axis views. Left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) was invasively obtained by left heart catheterization. Compared with the 30 controls, the patients with CAD had significantly lower global SR during early diastole (SRe) and higher E/SRe in three directions of myocardial deformation. CAD patients with elevated LVEDP had significantly lower SRe and higher E/SRe of three deformations. Pearson's correlation analysis revealed that LVEDP correlated positively with E/E' ratio, radial SRe and longitudinal and circumferential E/SRe. LVEDP correlated negatively with longitudinal and circumferential SRe and radial E/SRe. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that these SR indexes predicted elevated LVEDP (areas under the curve: longitudinal E/SRe = 0.74, circumferential E/SRe = 0.74, circumferential SRe = 0.70, longitudinal SRe = 0.69, radial E/SRe = 0.68, radial SRe = 0.65), but neither was superior to the tissue Doppler imaging index E/E' (area under the curve = 0.84). The present study indicates that 2-D speckle-tracking imaging is a practical method for evaluating LV filling pressure, but it might not provide additional advantages compared with E/E' in CAD patients.

  11. Hemodynamic effects of intravenous PGE1 on patients with arterial occlusive disease of the leg.

    PubMed

    Hirai, M; Nanki, M; Nakayama, R

    1985-07-01

    In 42 patients with arterial occlusive disease of the leg, the hemodynamic effects of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) given intravenously were studied. Blood pressure of the leg and crest time of the pulse wave did not change significantly, while increases in blood flow at the calf and foot, amplitude of the pulse wave, velocity, and skin temperature at the foot and toes were significant. Skin temperature of the calf dropped significantly. The increase in blood flow, velocity, and skin temperature was significantly more dominant in the distal part of the leg than that in the proximal part. In separate observation of individuals, 12 of the 66 legs with arterial occlusive disease (18%) showed a decrease in skin temperature at the toes. The steal phenomenon was observed most frequently in limbs with rest pain, gangrene, or both.

  12. Relative Amplitude based Features of characteristic ECG-Peaks for Identification of Coronary Artery Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohel, Bakul; Tiwary, U. S.; Lahiri, T.

    Coronary artery disease or Myocardial Infarction is the leading cause of death and disability in the world. ECG is widely used as a cheap diagnostic tool for diagnosis of coronary artery disease but has low sensitivity with the present criteria based on ST-segment, T wave and Q wave changes. So to increase the sensitivity of the ECG we have introduced relative amplitude based new features of characteristic ‘R’ and ‘S’ ECG-peaks between two leads. Relative amplitude based features shows remarkable capability in discriminating Myocardial Infarction and Healthy pattern using backpropogation neural network classifier yield results with 81.82% sensitivity and 81.82% specificity. Also relative amplitude might be an efficient method in minimizing the effect of body composition on ECG amplitude based features without use of any information from other than ECG

  13. A Primary Care Approach to the Diagnosis and Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, David L.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of this work are: (1) Be able to recognize characteristic symptoms of intermittent claudication (2) Diagnose PAD on the basis of history, physical exam, and simple limb blood pressure measurements (3) Recognize the significance of peripheral artery disease as a marker for coronary or cerebrovascular atherosclerosis (4) Provide appropriate medical management of atherosclerosis risk factors-- including use of antiplatelet therapy to reduce risk of myocardial infarction, stroke and death (5) Manage symptoms of intermittent claudication with program of smoking cessation, exercise, and medication The diagnosis of intermittent claudication secondary to peripheral artery disease (PAD) can often be made on the basis of history and physical examination. Additional evaluation of PAD is multi-modal and the techniques used will vary depending on the nature and severity of the patient's presenting problem. Most patients can be appropriately managed without referral for specialized diagnostic services or interventions.

  14. Excimer laser debulking for percutaneous coronary intervention in left main coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Topaz, On; Polkampally, Pritam R; Mohanty, Pramod K; Rizk, Maged; Bangs, Julie; Bernardo, Nelson L

    2009-11-01

    Excimer laser has been successfully applied to complex atherosclerotic plaques in acute coronary syndromes; however, its role in debulking in left main coronary artery disease has not been fully explored. Details of a series of 20 patients who underwent excimer laser revascularization of a spectrum of left main coronary artery lesions are presented. Twenty symptomatic patients who received excimer laser debulking were examined for procedural outcome and follow up results. The left main coronary artery was characterized as protected, semi-protected, poorly protected, or unprotected, depending on the presence or absence of patent bypass grafts to the left anterior descending (LAD) and circumflex (CX) arteries. A fully protected left main coronary artery (LMCA) was present in only 20% of the patients. The target lesions included 11(55%) distal LMCA stenoses, six (30%) ostial stenoses, and one (5%) mid-portion lesions. Two (10%) patients had in-stent re-stenosis of the entire length of the LMCA. Small (0.7 mm-1.4 mm) excimer laser catheters were mostly used. A relatively high number of laser energy pulses (1,334 +/- 643) were required to achieve adequate debulking. Successful LMCA intervention was performed in 19 (95%) patients, while in-hospital complications occurred in only one (5%) patient. Subacute/late stent thrombosis developed 3 months after the procedure in one patient, and two patients died from non-cardiac causes during follow-up. Lesions in LMCAs can be revascularized in selected patients by laser debulking and adjunct stenting. Inadequate protection by bypass grafts and decreased left ventricular function do not contradict utilization of excimer laser. Small laser catheters and high energy levels are required during laser debulking of stenoses of left main coronary arteries.

  15. Acute coronary syndrome in Behcet’s disease caused by a coronary artery aneurysm and thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Tekin, Bahar; Özen, Gülsen; Tekayev, Nazar; Gerçek, Şeyma; Direskeneli, Haner

    2014-01-01

    Behcet’s disease (BD) is a multisystemic vasculitis that can involve vessels of all sizes and is characterized by recurrent oral and genital ulcers with variable manifestations affecting the skin, eyes, and central nervous and musculoskeletal systems. Vascular involvement in BD is reported to be up to 40% in different series. The abdominal and thoracic aorta and pulmonary and femoral arteries are the most commonly involved arteries. However coronary arteries are rarely affected. Herein, we present a 29-year-old man who was consulted with progressive severe chest pain of 3 days in duration to our clinic. The patient was diagnosed with BD with mucocutaneous symptoms and a positive pathergy test 1 year ago and was in clinical remission for the last 6 months. At the first evaluation in the emergency department, the patient’s vital signs were stable, whereas he had elevated troponin T levels with a normal electrocardiogram and hypokinetic areas in the apex of the heart in the echocardiography. Conventional and computed tomography coronary angiography revealed aneurysms and intramural thrombosis in the left anterior descending and right coronary arteries. Although ischemic symptoms and signs improved with anticoagulant and antiaggregant therapies, coronary aneurysms were observed to increase in size. Immunosuppressive (IS) treatment was started with pulse intravenous corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide. Because of the high re-stenosis risk, stents were not applied to the affected vessels during the acute thrombosis period. During routine investigations, an in situ pulmonary thrombosis was also detected bilaterally in the peripheral pulmonary arteries. In conclusion, coronary artery aneurysm is a rare and poor prognostic manifestation of BD. The treatment protocol for these aneurysms is not well clarified. IS therapies are definitely indicated, but the role of anticoagulants and invasive vascular interventions is controversial.

  16. Well-Being and Chronic Disease Incidence: The English Longitudinal Study of Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Okely, Judith A.; Gale, Catharine R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Previous research suggests that greater well-being may protect against onset of chronic disease. However, it is unclear whether this association is similar across different types of disease. Method We used Cox proportional hazards regression to examine the prospective relationship between well-being (measured using the CASP-19 quality of life questionnaire) and incidence of arthritis, cancer, stroke, diabetes, myocardial infarction, and chronic lung disease over 8 years. The sample consisted of 8182 participants 50 years or older from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Results After adjustments for established risk factors, a standard deviation increase in CASP-19 score was associated with a decrease in arthritis risk (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.83–0.96) and, in those younger than 65 years, a decrease in diabetes risk (HR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.70–0.95) and chronic lung disease risk (HR = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.66–0.97). Higher CASP-19 scores were associated with reduced risk for stroke and myocardial infarction; however, these associations were no longer significant after adjustments for established risk factors. No association was observed for cancer incidence. An age interaction was observed for diabetes, myocardial infarction, and chronic lung disease, with a stronger association between CASP-19 score and disease incidence at younger ages. Conclusions The extent of association between well-being and incident disease risk is not consistent across different chronic diseases. Future studies should examine the cause of this variation. PMID:26569542

  17. Longitudinal changes in free-water within the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ofori, Edward; Pasternak, Ofer; Planetta, Peggy J; Li, Hong; Burciu, Roxana G; Snyder, Amy F; Lai, Song; Okun, Michael S; Vaillancourt, David E

    2015-08-01

    There is a clear need to develop non-invasive markers of substantia nigra progression in Parkinson's disease. We previously found elevated free-water levels in the substantia nigra for patients with Parkinson's disease compared with controls in single-site and multi-site cohorts. Here, we test the hypotheses that free-water levels in the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease increase following 1 year of progression, and that baseline free-water levels in the substantia nigra predict the change in bradykinesia following 1 year. We conducted a longitudinal study in controls (n = 19) and patients with Parkinson's disease (n = 25). Diffusion imaging and clinical data were collected at baseline and after 1 year. Free-water analyses were performed on diffusion imaging data using blinded, hand-drawn regions of interest in the posterior substantia nigra. A group effect indicated free-water values were increased in the posterior substantia nigra of patients with Parkinson's disease compared with controls (P = 0.003) and we observed a significant group × time interaction (P < 0.05). Free-water values increased for the Parkinson's disease group after 1 year (P = 0.006), whereas control free-water values did not change. Baseline free-water values predicted the 1 year change in bradykinesia scores (r = 0.74, P < 0.001) and 1 year change in Montreal Cognitive Assessment scores (r = -0.44, P = 0.03). Free-water in the posterior substantia nigra is elevated in Parkinson's disease, increases with progression of Parkinson's disease, and predicts subsequent changes in bradykinesia and cognitive status over 1 year. These findings demonstrate that free-water provides a potential non-invasive progression marker of the substantia nigra.

  18. A normal electrocardiogram precludes the need for left ventriculography in the assessment of coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M; Sinha, S; Hayton, S; Fynn, S; Henderson, R; Bennett, D

    1998-01-01

    Objective—To assess whether a normal electrocardiogram can identify good left ventricular function and obviate the need for routine left ventriculography in patients undergoing cardiac catheterisation for suspected coronary artery disease.
Design—A prospective study of patients undergoing cardiac catheterisation.
Setting—A regional cardiac centre.
Patients—The electrocardiograms, coronary angiograms, and left ventriculograms of 391 consecutive patients undergoing investigations for suspected coronary artery disease were entered into the study. Patients with arrhythmias and cardiac pathologies other than coronary artery disease were excluded.
Main outcome measures—The electrocardiogram was assessed using a 29 point QRS scoring system, and classified by two cardiologists and a trainee cardiologist as normal or abnormal. Left ventricular function was assessed by digital ventriculography.
Results—The sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive value of a QRS score of 0 (normal QRS complexes) for discriminating good left ventricular function (ejection fraction ⩾ 50%) were 92.6%, 41.5%, and 97.2%, respectively. The figures for a normal electrocardiogram as assessed by a doctor were 96.3%, 40.4%, and 98.6% for cardiologist A; 96.3%, 37.4%, and 98.4% for cardiologist B; and 94.4%, 49.6%, and 98.2% for the cardiology trainee.
Conclusions—If a cardiologist judges the ECG to be normal, left ventriculography is unnecessary and a formal QRS score does not improve reliability of this clinical judgment. Adopting this strategy would save £30-40 000 in consumables and 65-87 hours of catheter laboratory and staff time for a department catheterising 3000 patients with suspected coronary artery disease annually.

 Keywords: cardiac catheterisation;  electrocardiogram;  left ventricular ejection fraction PMID:9602660

  19. Prognostic value of non-invasive stress testing for coronary artery disease in obese patients.

    PubMed

    Bigvava, Tamar; Zamani, Seyedeh Mahsa; Pieske-Kraigher, Elisabeth; Gebker, Rolf; Pieske, Burkert; Kelle, Sebastian

    2015-12-01

    Detecting coronary artery disease (CAD) in obese patients remains a challenge but can have substantial prognostic implications for this patient group. Until now, sufficient data was not available on which to base the selection of the imaging modality in obese patients. The decision on which imaging modality to use should therefore follow the general guidelines. In this article, the authors discuss the prognostic value of the different non-invasive stress testing methods for CAD in obese patients.

  20. Visceral artery embolization after endoscopic injection of Enteryx for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Helo, Naseem; Wu, Alex; Moon, Eunice; Wang, Weiping

    2014-09-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can be difficult to manage medically and may require endoscopic or surgical interventions. The Enteryx procedure was designed to enhance the gastroesophageal barrier function by endoscopic injection of a copolymer into the lower esophageal sphincter. We present a rare case of a patient who was found to have migration of the copolymer into the celiac trunk and bilateral renal arteries during a work-up for persistent intermittent hematuria, which began shortly after Enteryx therapy for GERD. PMID:25426247

  1. ACTIVATING PERIPHERAL ARTERIAL DISEASE PATIENTS TO REDUCE CHOLESTEROL: A RANDOMIZED TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Mary M.; Reed, George; Greenland, Philip; Mazor, Kathy M.; Pagoto, Sherry; Ockene, Judith K.; Graff, Rex; Merriam, Philip A.; Leung, Kathy; Manheim, Larry; Kibbe, Melina R.; Olendzki, Barbara; Pearce, William H.; Ockene, Ira S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Peripheral arterial disease patients are less likely than other high-risk patients to achieve ideal low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-cholesterol) levels. This randomized controlled trial assessed whether a telephone counseling intervention, designed to help peripheral arterial disease patients request more intensive cholesterol lowering therapy from their physician, achieves lower LDL-cholesterol levels than two control conditions. Methods 355 peripheral arterial disease participants with baseline LDL-cholesterol ≥ 70 mg/dl were enrolled. The primary outcome was change in LDL-cholesterol level at twelve-month follow-up. There were three parallel arms: telephone counseling intervention, attention control condition, and usual care. The intervention consisted of patient-centered counseling, delivered every six weeks, encouraging participants to request increases in cholesterol-lowering therapy from their physician. The attention control condition consisted of telephone calls every six weeks providing information only. The usual care condition participated in baseline and follow-up testing. Results At 12-month follow-up, participants in the intervention improved their LDL-cholesterol level, compared to those in attention control (−18.4 mg/dl vs. −6.8 mg/dl, p= 0.010) but not compared to those in usual care (−18.4 mg/dl vs. −11.1 mg/dl, p= 0.208). Intervention participants were more likely to start a cholesterol-lowering medication or increase their cholesterol-lowering medication dose than those in the attention control (54% vs. 18%, p=0.001) and usual care (54% vs. 31%, P<0.001) conditions. Conclusion Telephone counseling that helped peripheral arterial disease patients request more intensive cholesterol-lowering therapy from their physician achieved greater LDL-cholesterol declines than an attention control arm that provided health information alone. PMID:21605733

  2. Lymphocyte activation gene 3 and coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Diana; Kolmakova, Antonina; Sura, Sunitha; Vella, Anthony T.; Manichaikul, Ani; Wang, Xin-Qun; Bielinski, Suzette J.; Taylor, Kent D.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Rich, Stephen S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The lipoprotein scavenger receptor BI (SCARB1) rs10846744 noncoding variant is significantly associated with atherosclerotic disease independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. We identified a potentially novel connection between rs10846744, the immune checkpoint inhibitor lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG3), and atherosclerosis. METHODS: In vitro approaches included flow cytometry, lipid raft isolation, phosphosignaling, cytokine measurements, and overexpressing and silencing LAG3 protein. Fasting plasma LAG3 protein was measured in hyperalphalipoproteinemic (HALP) and Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) participants. RESULTS: In comparison with rs10846744 reference (GG homozygous) cells, LAG3 protein levels by flow cytometry (P < 0.001), in lipid rafts stimulated and unstimulated (P = 0.03), and phosphosignaling downstream of B cell receptor engagement of CD79A (P = 0.04), CD19 (P = 0.04), and LYN (P = 0.001) were lower in rs10846744 risk (CC homozygous) cells. Overexpressing LAG3 protein in risk cells and silencing LAG3 in reference cells confirmed its importance in phosphosignaling. Secretion of TNF-α was higher (P = 0.04) and IL-10 was lower (P = 0.04) in risk cells. Plasma LAG3 levels were lower in HALP carriers of the CC allele (P < 0.0001) and by race (P = 0.004). In MESA, race (P = 0.0005), age (P = 0.003), lipid medications (P = 0.03), smoking history (P < 0.0001), and rs10846744 genotype (P = 0.002) were independent predictors of plasma LAG3. In multivariable regression models, plasma LAG3 was significantly associated with HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) (P = 0.007), plasma IL-10 (P < 0.0001), and provided additional predictive value above the Framingham risk score (P = 0.04). In MESA, when stratified by high HDL-C, plasma LAG3 was associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) (odds ratio 1.45, P = 0.004). CONCLUSION: Plasma LAG3 is a potentially novel independent predictor of HDL-C levels and CHD risk. FUNDING: This work was

  3. Longitudinal patterns of leukoaraiosis and brain atrophy in symptomatic small vessel disease.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Christian; Benjamin, Philip; Zeestraten, Eva; Lawrence, Andrew J; Barrick, Thomas R; Markus, Hugh S

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease is a common condition associated with lacunar stroke, cognitive impairment and significant functional morbidity. White matter hyperintensities and brain atrophy, seen on magnetic resonance imaging, are correlated with increasing disease severity. However, how the two are related remains an open question. To better define the relationship between white matter hyperintensity growth and brain atrophy, we applied a semi-automated magnetic resonance imaging segmentation analysis pipeline to a 3-year longitudinal cohort of 99 subjects with symptomatic small vessel disease, who were followed-up for ≥1 years. Using a novel two-stage warping pipeline with tissue repair step, voxel-by-voxel rate of change maps were calculated for each tissue class (grey matter, white matter, white matter hyperintensities and lacunes) for each individual. These maps capture both the distribution of disease and spatial information showing local rates of growth and atrophy. These were analysed to answer three primary questions: first, is there a relationship between whole brain atrophy and magnetic resonance imaging markers of small vessel disease (white matter hyperintensities or lacune volume)? Second, is there regional variation within the cerebral white matter in the rate of white matter hyperintensity progression? Finally, are there regionally specific relationships between the rates of white matter hyperintensity progression and cortical grey matter atrophy? We demonstrate that the rates of white matter hyperintensity expansion and grey matter atrophy are strongly correlated (Pearson's R = -0.69, P < 1 × 10(-7)), and significant grey matter loss and whole brain atrophy occurs annually (P < 0.05). Additionally, the rate of white matter hyperintensity growth was heterogeneous, occurring more rapidly within long association fasciculi. Using voxel-based quantification (family-wise error corrected P < 0.05), we show the rate of white matter hyperintensity

  4. Longitudinal patterns of leukoaraiosis and brain atrophy in symptomatic small vessel disease

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Philip; Zeestraten, Eva; Lawrence, Andrew J.; Barrick, Thomas R.; Markus, Hugh S.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease is a common condition associated with lacunar stroke, cognitive impairment and significant functional morbidity. White matter hyperintensities and brain atrophy, seen on magnetic resonance imaging, are correlated with increasing disease severity. However, how the two are related remains an open question. To better define the relationship between white matter hyperintensity growth and brain atrophy, we applied a semi-automated magnetic resonance imaging segmentation analysis pipeline to a 3-year longitudinal cohort of 99 subjects with symptomatic small vessel disease, who were followed-up for ≥1 years. Using a novel two-stage warping pipeline with tissue repair step, voxel-by-voxel rate of change maps were calculated for each tissue class (grey matter, white matter, white matter hyperintensities and lacunes) for each individual. These maps capture both the distribution of disease and spatial information showing local rates of growth and atrophy. These were analysed to answer three primary questions: first, is there a relationship between whole brain atrophy and magnetic resonance imaging markers of small vessel disease (white matter hyperintensities or lacune volume)? Second, is there regional variation within the cerebral white matter in the rate of white matter hyperintensity progression? Finally, are there regionally specific relationships between the rates of white matter hyperintensity progression and cortical grey matter atrophy? We demonstrate that the rates of white matter hyperintensity expansion and grey matter atrophy are strongly correlated (Pearson’s R = −0.69, P < 1 × 10−7), and significant grey matter loss and whole brain atrophy occurs annually (P < 0.05). Additionally, the rate of white matter hyperintensity growth was heterogeneous, occurring more rapidly within long association fasciculi. Using voxel-based quantification (family-wise error corrected P < 0.05), we show the rate of white matter hyperintensity

  5. [Peripheral arterial occlusive diseases: opinion of lay audience].

    PubMed

    Blättler, W; Largiadèr, J; Humbel, G

    2003-10-22

    An audience of about 500 elderly people were interviewed about their knowledge and therapeutic opinion on peripheral vascular disease. After a brief introduction by vascular surgeons 12 questions were presented for vote and answered with the use of a poll system. The audience proved well informed about the risk factors but confounded the symptoms. The participants declined to accept any limitation of their walking ability, overestimated the mid-term results of an eventual revascularisation and underestimated their risks and costs. 80% asked for a stop of smoking as a prerequisite for an intervention and again 80% were willing to pay by them-selves if the insurances would not reimburse them for an operation that would just improve their quality of life status. The honorarium for the surgeon was put up high. The poll shows that an audience can be enabled within a short period of time to deliberate therapeutic decisions and socio-economic problems. The answers reflect an overestimation of the medical possibilities but also a willingness to ask for and make personal contributions to a treatment which is not compelling in many cases.

  6. Progression of carotid-artery disease in type 2 diabetic patients: a cohort prospective study.

    PubMed

    Bosevski, Marijan; Stojanovska, Lily

    2015-01-01

    In order to assess the progression of carotid-artery disease in type 2 diabetic cohort (n=207 patients), the dynamic change in carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and the occurrence of plaques were followed for a period of 31.35±10.59 months. The mean CIMT at the beginning of the study was 0.9178±0.1447 mm, with a maximal value of 1.1210±0.2366 mm. The maximal value of CIMT changed by 0.07 mm/year. Progression of CIMT was noted in 86.8% and its regression in 7.8% of patients. The occurrence of carotid plaques was detected in 41.8% of patients. Multiple regression analysis revealed the maximal value of CIMT to be associated with diastolic blood pressure, despite mean CIMT being predicted by body mass index. The presence of peripheral arterial disease and hypo-high-density lipoproteinemia were found to be predictors for the occurrence of carotid plaques. Our data have clinical implications in predicting risk factors for the progression of carotid-artery disease in type 2 diabetic patients for their appropriate management. PMID:26527880

  7. Effect of posture on arterial oxygenation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Ries, A L; Kaplan, R M; Chang, J

    1992-01-01

    We studied 117 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) to evaluate (1) the frequency and magnitude of postural changes in resting arterial oxygenation and (2) the relationship of these changes to other measures of pulmonary function and exercise arterial blood gases. Compared to the supine measurement, room air PaO2 measured while standing increased more than 3 mm Hg in 28 patients (group 1), did not change (+/- 3 mm Hg) in 57 patients (group 2), and decreased more than 3 mm Hg in 32 patients (group 3) (range = 31 mm Hg increase to 20 mm Hg decrease). Patients in group 1 had significantly less severe disease than patients in the other two groups. There were no significant pulmonary function differences between groups 2 and 3. Supine PaO2 was similar for all groups, suggesting that standing PaO2 accounted for the postural change in PaO2. Because of unpredictable postural changes in PaO2 in patients with COPD, we believe that body position should be noted for arterial blood gas measurements and should be kept constant for valid comparison of serial measurements. These findings may also be important for other diffuse lung diseases.

  8. B-Flow Imaging in Lower Limb Peripheral Arterial Disease and Bypass Graft Ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    D'Abate, Fabrizio; Ramachandran, Veni; Young, Mark A; Farrah, John; Ahmed, Mudasar H; Jones, Keith; Hinchliffe, Robert J

    2016-09-01

    Doppler ultrasonography plays a key role in the diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease, but is often limited by pitfalls that may be overcome by B-flow imaging. Thus far, there is little information on B-flow imaging for the assessment of peripheral arterial disease and bypass grafts in lower limbs. This article describes the authors' early experience with B-flow in the lower extremities. Sixty patients were included among a large cohort of patients routinely referred to the vascular laboratory for peripheral arterial disease and bypass graft assessments. Two experienced vascular sonographers performed all scans, comparing color Doppler ultrasonography with B-flow imaging. All scans were performed using a combination of the 9 L linear and C2-9 curvilinear transducers with the LOGIQ E9 system (GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI, USA). Our experience indicates that this relatively unexplored technology has the potential to significantly improve peripheral blood flow evaluation. Nevertheless, B-flow imaging is not exempt from limitations and should be considered complementary to color Doppler ultrasonography.

  9. Progression of carotid-artery disease in type 2 diabetic patients: a cohort prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Bosevski, Marijan; Stojanovska, Lily

    2015-01-01

    In order to assess the progression of carotid-artery disease in type 2 diabetic cohort (n=207 patients), the dynamic change in carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and the occurrence of plaques were followed for a period of 31.35±10.59 months. The mean CIMT at the beginning of the study was 0.9178±0.1447 mm, with a maximal value of 1.1210±0.2366 mm. The maximal value of CIMT changed by 0.07 mm/year. Progression of CIMT was noted in 86.8% and its regression in 7.8% of patients. The occurrence of carotid plaques was detected in 41.8% of patients. Multiple regression analysis revealed the maximal value of CIMT to be associated with diastolic blood pressure, despite mean CIMT being predicted by body mass index. The presence of peripheral arterial disease and hypo-high-density lipoproteinemia were found to be predictors for the occurrence of carotid plaques. Our data have clinical implications in predicting risk factors for the progression of carotid-artery disease in type 2 diabetic patients for their appropriate management. PMID:26527880

  10. Interhemispheric Cerebral Blood Flow Balance during Recovery of Motor Hand Function after Ischemic Stroke—A Longitudinal MRI Study Using Arterial Spin Labeling Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Missimer, John; Schroth, Gerhard; Hess, Christian W.; Sturzenegger, Matthias; Wang, Danny J. J.; Weder, Bruno; Federspiel, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background Unilateral ischemic stroke disrupts the well balanced interactions within bilateral cortical networks. Restitution of interhemispheric balance is thought to contribute to post-stroke recovery. Longitudinal measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes might act as surrogate marker for this process. Objective To quantify longitudinal CBF changes using arterial spin labeling MRI (ASL) and interhemispheric balance within the cortical sensorimotor network and to assess their relationship with motor hand function recovery. Methods Longitudinal CBF data were acquired in 23 patients at 3 and 9 months after cortical sensorimotor stroke and in 20 healthy controls using pulsed ASL. Recovery of grip force and manual dexterity was assessed with tasks requiring power and precision grips. Voxel-based analysis was performed to identify areas of significant CBF change. Region-of-interest analyses were used to quantify the interhemispheric balance across nodes of the cortical sensorimotor network. Results Dexterity was more affected, and recovered at a slower pace than grip force. In patients with successful recovery of dexterous hand function, CBF decreased over time in the contralesional supplementary motor area, paralimbic anterior cingulate cortex and superior precuneus, and interhemispheric balance returned to healthy control levels. In contrast, patients with poor recovery presented with sustained hypoperfusion in the sensorimotor cortices encompassing the ischemic tissue, and CBF remained lateralized to the contralesional hemisphere. Conclusions Sustained perfusion imbalance within the cortical sensorimotor network, as measured with task-unrelated ASL, is associated with poor recovery of dexterous hand function after stroke. CBF at rest might be used to monitor recovery and gain prognostic information. PMID:25191858

  11. Genetic testing for inherited heart diseases: longitudinal impact on health-related quality of life.

    PubMed

    Ingles, Jodie; Yeates, Laura; O'Brien, Lisa; McGaughran, Julie; Scuffham, Paul A; Atherton, John; Semsarian, Christopher

    2012-05-03

    Purpose:A genetic diagnosis is an extremely useful tool in the management and care of families with inherited heart diseases, particularly in allowing clarification of risk status of asymptomatic family members. The psychosocial consequences of genetic testing in this group are poorly understood. This longitudinal pilot study sought to determine changes in health-related quality of life in patients and asymptomatic family members undergoing genetic testing for inherited heart diseases.Methods:Individuals attending two specialized multidisciplinary cardiac genetic clinics in Australia were invited to participate. Patients undergoing proband or predictive genetic testing for an inherited cardiomyopathy or primary arrhythmogenic disorder were eligible. The Medical Outcomes Short Form-36 (version 2) was administered before the genetic result was given, and follow-up surveys were completed 1-3, 6, and 12 months after the result was given.Results:A total of 54 individuals with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, familial dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, and long QT syndrome completed baseline and at least one follow-up survey, including 33 probands and 21 asymptomatic relatives. Physical and mental component scores analyzed at baseline and 1-3 months were found to be unchanged in all groups. Furthermore, no significant differences were observed up to 12 months after result.Conclusion:In this longitudinal pilot study, no change in health-related quality of life was observed up to 12 months after the result was given in patients and their asymptomatic family members undergoing genetic testing for an inherited heart disease.Genet Med 2012 advance online publication 3 May 2012.

  12. Diagnostic accuracy of myocardial deformation indices for detecting high risk coronary artery disease in patients without regional wall motion abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Rostamzadeh, Alireza; Shojaeifard, Maryam; Rezaei, Yousef; Dehghan, Kasra

    2015-01-01

    Background: The prediction of coronary artery disease (CAD) by conventional echocardiographic measurements is principally based on the estimation of ejection fraction and regional wall motion abnormality (RWMA). This study aimed to determine whether strain echocardiography of left ventricle measured by velocity vector imaging (VVI) method could detect patients with a high-risk CAD. Methods: In a prospective study, a total of 119 consecutive patients who were assessed for eligibility were categorized into three groups: (1) without CAD as normal (n=59), (2) 1- or 2-vessel disease as low-risk (n=29), and (3) left main and/or 3-vessel disease as high-risk (n=31). The peaks of systolic strain and strain rate from 18 curves of apical views were averaged as global longitudinal strain and strain rate (GLS and GLSR), respectively; the 6 systolic peaks of strain and strain rate at base- and mid-ventricular of short axis views were averaged as mean radial strain rate (MRSR). Results: GLS, GLSR, and basal MRSR of left ventricle were significantly lower in the high-risk group (P=0.047, P=0.004 and P=0.030, respectively). Receiver operating characteristics curve showed that the optimal values of GLS, GLSR, and basal MRSR for detecting the severe CAD were -17%, -1 s-1, and 1.45 s-1 with the sensitivities of 77%, 71%, and 71% and the specificities of 63%, 67%, and 62%, respectively. Conclusion: Decrements in the GLS, GLSR, and basal MRSR of the left ventricle can detect the high-risk CAD cases among patients without RWMA at rest. PMID:26309603

  13. Pathogenesis of coronary artery disease: focus on genetic risk factors and identification of genetic variants

    PubMed Central

    Sayols-Baixeras, Sergi; Lluís-Ganella, Carla; Lucas, Gavin; Elosua, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide, and its prevalence is expected to increase in the coming years. CAD events are caused by the interplay of genetic and environmental factors, the effects of which are mainly mediated through cardiovascular risk factors. The techniques used to study the genetic basis of these diseases have evolved from linkage studies to candidate gene studies and genome-wide association studies. Linkage studies have been able to identify genetic variants associated with monogenic diseases, whereas genome-wide association studies have been more successful in determining genetic variants associated with complex diseases. Currently, genome-wide association studies have identified approximately 40 loci that explain 6% of the heritability of CAD. The application of this knowledge to clinical practice is challenging, but can be achieved using various strategies, such as genetic variants to identify new therapeutic targets, personal genetic information to improve disease risk prediction, and pharmacogenomics. The main aim of this narrative review is to provide a general overview of our current understanding of the genetics of coronary artery disease and its potential clinical utility. PMID:24520200

  14. Gated thallium scintigraphy in the assessment of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, W.; Tweddel, A.C.; McGhie, A.I.; McKillop, J.H.; Hutton, I.

    1984-01-01

    This study was aimed at assessing ECG gated images to provide both perfusion and ventricular function information. 18 patients with acute myocardial infarction were studied at rest, and 12 male volunteers and 55 male patients undergoing routine coronary angiography were studied following the injection of 2 mCi (80 MBq) of thallous chloride 30s prior to termination of a symptom limited maximal exercise. Listmode data gated to the ECG were obtained in 3 projections for 6 minutes using a mobile gamma camera with a high sensitivity collimator. Three independent observers, on separate occasions analysed firstly standard reconstructed thallium scintigrams and secondly cine display of the gated image for perfusion defects and regional wall motion (RWM) using a 4 point scoring system. In addition ejection fraction (EF) was calculated from the 45/sup 0/ LAO projection. The gated thallium EF ranged from 52-65% in the volunteers, from 24-65% in the angiography patients and from 13-61% in the acute infarcts, and correlated well against the gated blood pool (r=.84) and contrast angiography (r=.78). RWM assessed for 850 segments gave interobserver disagreement of 0.9% and when compared to gated blood pool scans, disagreement occurred in 2 of 77 segments (2.8%). In the detection of significant coronary disease static thallium images provided a sensitivity of 71% and overall predictive accuracy of 75%. If the perfusion and wall motion from the gated image were considered the sensitivity was 93% at a predictive accuracy of 90%. The authors conclude that multiple view gated thallium scintigraphy gives accurate information as to ventricular function and enhances the detection of perfusion defects.

  15. Endovascular Therapy for Femoropopliteal Artery Disease and Association of Risk Factors With Primary Patency: The Implication of Critical Limb Ischemia and TASC II C/D Disease.

    PubMed

    Nishibe, Toshiya; Yamamoto, Kiyohito; Seike, Yoshimasa; Ogino, Hitoshi; Nishibe, Masayasu; Koizumi, Jun; Dardik, Alan

    2015-11-01

    The treatment of femoropopliteal artery disease remains controversial, without clear guidelines specifying the indications for endovascular therapy (EVT). Accordingly, we retrospectively examined our experience of using EVT to treat femoropopliteal artery disease. A total of 91 limbs in 82 patients underwent EVT for the treatment of femoropopliteal artery disease. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty alone was performed in 20 limbs, and additional stenting was performed in 71 limbs. The 1-year primary patency, primary-assisted patency, limb salvage, and survival rates were 76%, 88%, 96%, and 92%, respectively. Multivariate Cox analysis of primary patency showed that critical limb ischemia (CLI; hazard ratio [HR], 2.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08-5.33; P < .01) and TASC II C/D disease (HR, 2.70; 95% CI, 1.14-6.39; P < .05) were independent predictors of decreased primary patency. In conclusion, patients with CLI or extensive lesions have reduced patency after EVT for femoropopliteal artery disease. PMID:26574486

  16. Evaluation and treatment of patients with lower extremity peripheral artery disease: consensus definitions from Peripheral Academic Research Consortium (PARC).

    PubMed

    Patel, Manesh R; Conte, Michael S; Cutlip, Donald E; Dib, Nabil; Geraghty, Patrick; Gray, William; Hiatt, William R; Ho, Mami; Ikeda, Koji; Ikeno, Fumiaki; Jaff, Michael R; Jones, W Schuyler; Kawahara, Masayuki; Lookstein, Robert A; Mehran, Roxana; Misra, Sanjay; Norgren, Lars; Olin, Jeffrey W; Povsic, Thomas J; Rosenfield, Kenneth; Rundback, John; Shamoun, Fadi; Tcheng, James; Tsai, Thomas T; Suzuki, Yuka; Vranckx, Pascal; Wiechmann, Bret N; White, Christopher J; Yokoi, Hiroyoshi; Krucoff, Mitchell W

    2015-03-10

    The lack of consistent definitions and nomenclature across clinical trials of novel devices, drugs, or biologics poses a significant barrier to accrual of knowledge in and across peripheral artery disease therapies and technologies. Recognizing this problem, the Peripheral Academic Research Consortium, together with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Japanese Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency, has developed a series of pragmatic consensus definitions for patients being treated for peripheral artery disease affecting the lower extremities. These consensus definitions include the clinical presentation, anatomic depiction, interventional outcomes, surrogate imaging and physiological follow-up, and clinical outcomes of patients with lower-extremity peripheral artery disease. Consistent application of these definitions in clinical trials evaluating novel revascularization technologies should result in more efficient regulatory evaluation and best practice guidelines to inform clinical decisions in patients with lower extremity peripheral artery disease.

  17. What's wrong with this artery? A medical disease discovered by a surgeon

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vasvi; Luthra, Saurav; Kouides, Ruth; Gadir, Abdel K

    2014-01-01

    A 50-year-old man presenting with chest pain had positive stress echocardiography; and angiogram showed single artery coronary stenosis, presumed to be atherosclerotic. He was started on optimal medical therapy with good compliance. Four months later, he had a myocardial infarction (MI) and cardiac catheterisation surprisingly showed interval development of severe three-vessel stenosis. He underwent coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), during which the cardiothoracic surgeon noticed severely inflamed coronary arteries, concerning for vasculitis. Following CABG, the patient continued to have chest pain and was admitted again for MI within 4 months of surgery. Subsequent autoimmune workup was consistent with sarcoidosis. He was started on immunosuppressive therapy for presumed sarcoid-related coronary vasculitis, and 23 months later, the patient has not developed further ischaemic events. This is a rare case and extends the clinical spectrum of cardiac sarcoidosis, presenting with rapidly progressive coronary stenosis most likely due to vasculitis, mimicking atherosclerotic coronary artery disease. PMID:25246466

  18. Intra-arterial Methylprednisolone Infusion in Treatment-Resistant Graft-Versus-Host Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Weintraub, Joshua L. Belanger, Adam R.; Sung, Chris C.; Stangl, P. Anondo; Nowakowski, F. Scott; Lookstein, Robert L.

    2010-06-15

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a potentially fatal complication following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Standard primary therapy for acute GVHD includes systemic steroids, often in combination with other agents. Unfortunately, primary treatment failure is common and carries a high mortality. There is no generally accepted secondary therapy for acute GVHD. Although few data on localized therapy for GVHD have been published, intra-arterial injection of high-dose corticosteroids may be a viable option. We treated 11 patients with steroid-resistant GVHD using a single administration of intra-arterial high-dose methylprednisolone. Three patients (27%) died periprocedurally. Four patients (36%) had a partial response to intra-arterial treatment and were discharged on total parenteral nutrition and oral medication. Four patients (36%) had a complete response and were discharged on oral diet and oral medication. No immediate treatment or procedure-related complications were noted. Twenty-seven percent of patients survived long-term. Our preliminary results suggest that regional intra-arterial treatment of steroid-resistant GVHD is a safe and potentially viable secondary therapy in primary treatment-resistant GVHD.

  19. Wall Morphology, Blood Flow and Wall Shear Stress: MR Findings in Patients with Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Galizia, Mauricio S.; Barker, Alex; Liao, Yihua; Collins, Jeremy; Carr, James; McDermott, Mary; Markl, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the influence of atherosclerotic plaques on femoral haemodynamics assessed by 2D phase contrast (PC) MRI with three-directional velocity encoding. Methods: During one year, patients with peripheral artery disease and an ankle brachial index <1.00 were enrolled. After IRB approval and written informed consent, 44 patients (age=70±12 years) underwent common femoral artery MRI. Patients with contraindications for MRI were excluded. Sequences included 2D time-of-flight, proton-density, T1-, and T2-weighted MRI. ECG-gated 2D PC-MRI with 3D velocity encoding was acquired. A radiologist classified images in five categories. Blood flow, velocity, and WSS along the vessel circumference were quantified from the PC-MRI data. Results: The acquired images were of good quality for interpretation. There were no image quality problems related to poor ECG-gating or slice positioning. Velocities, oscillatory shear stress, and total flow were similar between patients with normal arteries and wall thickening/plaque. Patients with plaques demonstrated regionally increased peak systolic WSS and enhanced WSS eccentricity. Conclusions: Combined multi-contrast morphological imaging of the peripheral arterial wall with PC-MRI with 3 directional velocity encoding is a feasible technique. Further study is needed to determine whether flow is an appropriate marker for altered endothelial cell function, vascular remodelling, and plaque progression. PMID:24326757

  20. Percutaneous Management of Occlusive Arterial Disease Associated with Vasculitis: A Single Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Both, M.; Jahnke, T.; Reinhold-Keller, E.; Reuter, M.; Grimm, J.; Biederer, J.; Brossmann, J.; Gross, W.L.; Heller, M.; Mueller-Huelsbeck, S.

    2003-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty for occlusive arterial disease associated with vasculitis. Eleven patients(10 women, 1 man; ages 35-82 years) with the diagnosis of vasculitis of the large vessels underwent interventional treatment during intraarterial angiography. The causes included giant cell arteritis(n = 8) and Takayasu arteritis (n = 3).Thirty-three occlusive lesions (including brachiocephalic and renalarteries, and arteries of upper and lower extremities) were treated with balloon angioplasty and/or stent placement. Follow-up included clinical examination, angiography, and color duplex ultrasound.Technical success was 100% (25/25) for stenoses and 50% (4/8) for occlusive lesions, representing all lesions combined from different anatomic locations. Dissection (n = 3) and arterial rupture with retroperitoneal hematoma (n = 1) was found in three patients. During follow-up (mean 12 months), restenoses(n = 8) and re-restenoses (n = 1)occurred in 8 vascular areas. Three of these lesions were treated with repeated PTA (n = 4). The cumulative primary clinical success rate was 67.6%, cumulative secondary success rate 74.4%, and cumulative tertiary success rate 75.9%. Interventional therapy in systemic vasculitis provides promising results in technical success rates and followup. Angioplasty may result in arterial injury, but the rate of complications is low.

  1. Giant high-pressure pulmonary artery aneurysm in an elderly patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Morais, Sandra A; Oliveira, Hugo M; de Almeida, José R; Eiras, Eduardo; Silva, Ana Catarina; Gavina, Cristina

    2016-03-01

    The authors report the case of a 74-year-old man, with a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), GOLD grade 3, stable for the past two decades, who was admitted to our center with severe right heart failure. The chest radiograph showed moderate heart enlargement mainly of the right atrium and pulmonary artery, similar to previous chest radiographs in the previous 20 years. The transthoracic echocardiogram showed a pulmonary artery aneurysm (PAA), dilatation of the right chambers with pulmonary artery systolic pressure of 52 mmHg, and preserved right ventricular systolic function. A thoracic computed tomography scan confirmed the presence of a giant PAA 72 mm in diameter. The patient was started on high-dose diuretics, with significant clinical improvement. After optimization of medical therapy right heart catheterization was carried out with the patient in optimal clinical condition, which revealed mild precapillary pulmonary hypertension with a mean pulmonary artery pressure of 26 mmHg. On the basis of the clinical and imaging findings a stable, giant, high-pressure, PAA was diagnosed secondary to pulmonary hypertension induced by COPD, with a 20-year follow-up without need for surgical repair, which helped in our decision to maintain medical surveillance. The recent onset of heart failure is explained by the unfavorable evolution of COPD. This case may change the attitude expressed in previous studies favoring the choice of an invasive approach to treat giant high-pressure PAAs, instead supporting the maintenance of medical treatment.