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Sample records for arthritis fibromyalgia alopecia

  1. Association of antithyroid peroxidase antibody with fibromyalgia in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Jowairiyya; Blumen, Helena; Tagoe, Clement E

    2015-08-01

    To investigate how autoimmune thyroiditis (ATD) affects the clinical presentation of established rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with particular reference to fibromyalgia and chronic widespread pain (CWP). A cohort of 204 patients with RA for whom the presence or absence of autoimmune thyroid antibodies was documented was examined for the relationships between thyroid autoantibodies and fibromyalgia or CWP. We identified 29 % who tested positive for antithyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb). The anti-thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb) was found in 24 %. Among the thyroid autoantibody-positive patients, 40 % had a diagnosis of fibromyalgia or CWP versus 17 % for antibody negative patients. Logistic regression analyses (adjusted by age, sex, diabetes and BMI) indicated that TPOAb-positive patients were more likely to have fibromyalgia or CWP, with an odds ratio (OR) of 4.641, 95 % confidence interval (CI) (2.110-10.207) P < .001. Adjusting for spinal degenerative disc disease did not change the association with fibromyalgia, OR 4.458, 95 % CI (1.950-10.191), P < .001. The OR between TgAb and fibromyalgia was not significant (P > .05). Additional logistic regression analyses (adjusted by age, sex and BMI) indicated a significant relationship between TPOAb and fibromyalgia or CWP in patients without diabetes and those without hypothyroidism (OR of 4.873, 95 % CI (1.877-12.653), P = .001 and OR of 4.615 95 % CI (1.810-11.770), P = .001, respectively). There may be a positive association between the ATD antibody TPOAb, and fibromyalgia syndrome and CWP in patients with established RA. PMID:25976307

  2. Association of antithyroid peroxidase antibody with fibromyalgia in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Jowairiyya; Blumen, Helena; Tagoe, Clement E

    2015-08-01

    To investigate how autoimmune thyroiditis (ATD) affects the clinical presentation of established rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with particular reference to fibromyalgia and chronic widespread pain (CWP). A cohort of 204 patients with RA for whom the presence or absence of autoimmune thyroid antibodies was documented was examined for the relationships between thyroid autoantibodies and fibromyalgia or CWP. We identified 29 % who tested positive for antithyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb). The anti-thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb) was found in 24 %. Among the thyroid autoantibody-positive patients, 40 % had a diagnosis of fibromyalgia or CWP versus 17 % for antibody negative patients. Logistic regression analyses (adjusted by age, sex, diabetes and BMI) indicated that TPOAb-positive patients were more likely to have fibromyalgia or CWP, with an odds ratio (OR) of 4.641, 95 % confidence interval (CI) (2.110-10.207) P < .001. Adjusting for spinal degenerative disc disease did not change the association with fibromyalgia, OR 4.458, 95 % CI (1.950-10.191), P < .001. The OR between TgAb and fibromyalgia was not significant (P > .05). Additional logistic regression analyses (adjusted by age, sex and BMI) indicated a significant relationship between TPOAb and fibromyalgia or CWP in patients without diabetes and those without hypothyroidism (OR of 4.873, 95 % CI (1.877-12.653), P = .001 and OR of 4.615 95 % CI (1.810-11.770), P = .001, respectively). There may be a positive association between the ATD antibody TPOAb, and fibromyalgia syndrome and CWP in patients with established RA.

  3. Fibromyalgia

    MedlinePlus

    Fibromyalgia is a disorder that causes muscle pain and fatigue. People with fibromyalgia have "tender points" on the body. Tender points ... when pressure is put on them. People with fibromyalgia may also have other symptoms, such as Trouble ...

  4. Fibromyalgia

    MedlinePlus

    Bennett RM. Fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and myofascial pain. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 274. Marvisi M, Balzarini ...

  5. [Fibromyalgia].

    PubMed

    Brückle, W; Zeidler, H

    2004-08-01

    Fibromyalgia is a frequent disorder of the middle aged, particularly in women characterized by diffuse and widespread pain, and tenderness on palpation at characteristic sites, called tender points. Additional characteristic symptoms of fibromyalgia are fatigue, sleep disturbances, irritable bowel and bladder syndrome, chronic headaches, paresthesia, hearing and vestibular dysfunction. The etiology remains poorly understood. Diagnosis is based on characteristic symptoms, presence of tender points and exclusion of similar confounding conditions. Because of the unknown etiology, all therapies are symptomatic. Interdisciplinary combined treatments can relief the pain in about 50% of the patients.

  6. Fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joseph; Sheth, Samir

    2016-09-01

    Questions from patients about pain conditions and analgesic pharmacotherapy and responses from authors are presented to help educate patients and make them more effective self-advocates. In reply to a question about fibromyalgia, the authors discuss symptoms, the use of opioids and naltrexone, other medication and nonmedication options, and managing expectations for treatment. PMID:27636677

  7. Fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joseph; Sheth, Samir

    2016-09-01

    Questions from patients about pain conditions and analgesic pharmacotherapy and responses from authors are presented to help educate patients and make them more effective self-advocates. In reply to a question about fibromyalgia, the authors discuss symptoms, the use of opioids and naltrexone, other medication and nonmedication options, and managing expectations for treatment.

  8. [Alopecia areata secondary to the use of leflunomide in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Molina Molina, María Ignacia; Pinochet Paiva, Carmen María; Quezada Morales, José Ignacio

    2015-12-30

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, highly disabling autoimmune disease that requires aggressive pharmacological treatment using immunomodulatory drugs grouped under the name of Disease-Modifying Anti-rheumatic Drugs (DMARDs). Leflunomide is one of the most frequently prescribed. This drug, through its mechanism of action is able to suppress key factors in the disease process. However, its use is not without side effects. While there are series that report that the most prevalent adverse effects are diarrhea, nausea, rash and alopecia, there are few reported cases of alopecia universalis secondary to the use of leflunomide. We present a case in the Regional Hospital of Talca and a review of the use of leflunomide.

  9. The meaning and process of pain acceptance. Perceptions of women living with arthritis and fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    LaChapelle, Diane L; Lavoie, Susan; Boudreau, Ainsley

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Within the past 10 years, cognitive-behavioural pain management models have moved beyond the traditional focus on coping strategies and perceived control over pain, to incorporate mindfulness-and acceptance-based approaches. Pain acceptance is the process of giving up the struggle with pain and learning to live life despite pain. Acceptance is associated with lower levels of pain, disability and psychological distress. Relatively little is known, however, about how patients arrive at a state of acceptance without the aid of therapy. OBJECTIVES: To explore personal definitions of acceptance and the factors that facilitate or hinder acceptance. METHODS: Eleven focus groups, involving a total of 45 women with arthritis and fibromyalgia, were conducted. RESULTS: The qualitative analysis revealed that, while the women rejected the word ‘acceptance’, they did agree with the main components of existing research definitions. The women’s responses revealed that acceptance was a process of realizations and acknowledgements, including realizing that the pain was not normal and help was needed, receiving a diagnosis, acknowledging that there was no cure and realizing that they needed to redefine ‘normal’. Diagnosis, social support, educating self and others, and self-care were factors that promoted acceptance. Struggling to retain a prepain identity, negative impacts on relationships, others not accepting their pain and the unspoken message that the pain was ‘all in their head’ were barriers to acceptance. CONCLUSION: The implications of these findings, distinctions between the diagnostic groups and recommendations regarding how health professionals can facilitate the process of acceptance are discussed. PMID:18592056

  10. Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bursitis and Tendinitis, Q&A Fibromyalgia, Q&A Gout, Q&A Juvenile Arthritis, Q&A Childhood Arthritis ( ... Many people also experience fatigue and sleep disturbances. Gout. A type of arthritis resulting from deposits of ...

  11. A comparison of impact of fatigue on cognitive, physical, and psychosocial status in patients with fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Oncü, Jülide; Başoğlu, Fatma; Kuran, Banu

    2013-12-01

    This study was performed to compare the impact of fatigue on different aspects of quality of life in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and fibromyalgia syndrome (FM). This study involved subjects with FM (n = 45) and RA (n = 44). Impact of fatigue on physical, cognitive, and psychosocial status was measured with Fatigue Impact Scale (FIS) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) with the Medical Outcome Study Short Form 36 (SF-36). Multiple regression analyses were used to evaluate impact of fatigue on quality of life by taking into account clinical symptoms and disease activity scores in these two patient groups. Although the severity of fatigue assessed by FSS was the same in FM and RA; according to Fatigue Impact Scale, fatigue has higher impact on cognitive function in FM (mean ± SD; 28.8 ± 19.9), and on the other hand, it has higher impact on mainly physical component (mean ± SD; 26.3 ± 4.9) in RA. Regarding all the clinical symptoms and disease activity scores, multiple regression models showed that fatigue together with pain affected the HRQoL (SF-36) in both patient groups. Fatigue has different impacts on QoL in FM and RA, respectively. Together with pain, fatigue lead FM patients to see disease as having worse health in terms of mental function, whereas it leads to poor health in terms of physical function in RA.

  12. Cytokine and chemokine profiles in fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus: a potentially useful tool in differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Daniel J; Gavin, Igor M; Karpenko, Oleksly; Barkhordar, Farnaz; Gillis, Bruce S

    2015-06-01

    Making a correct diagnosis is pivotal in the practice of clinical rheumatology. Occasionally, the consultation fails to provide desired clarity in making labeling an individual as having fibromyalgia (FM), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A chemokine and cytokine multiplex assay was developed and tested with the goal of improving and achieving an accurate differential diagnosis. 160 patients with FM, 98 with RA and 100 with SLE fulfilling accepted criteria were recruited and compared to 119 controls. Supernatant cytokine concentrations for IL-6, IL-8, MIP-1 alpha and MIP-1 beta were determined using the Luminex multiplex immunoassay bead array technology after mitogenic stimulation of cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Each patient's profile was scored using a logistical regression model to achieve statistically determined weighting for each chemokine and cytokine. Among the 477 patients evaluated, the mean scores for FM (1.7 ± 1.2; 1.52-1.89), controls (-3.56 ± 5.7; -4.59 to -2.54), RA (-0.68 ± 2.26; -1.12 to -0.23) and SLE (-1.45 ± 3.34, -2.1 to -0.79). Ninety-three percent with FM scored positive compared to only 11% of healthy controls, 69% RA or 71% SLE patients had negative scores. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive and negative predictive value for having FM compared to controls was 93, 89, 92 and 91%, respectively (p < 2.2 × 10(-16)). Evaluating cytokine and chemokine profiles in stimulated cells reveals patterns that are uniquely present in patients with FM. This assay can be a useful tool in assisting clinicians in differentiating systemic inflammatory autoimmune processes from FM and its related syndromes and healthy individuals. PMID:25377646

  13. The role of the central nervous system in the generation and maintenance of chronic pain in rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Pain is a key component of most rheumatologic diseases. In fibromyalgia, the importance of central nervous system pain mechanisms (for example, loss of descending analgesic activity and central sensitization) is well documented. A few studies have also noted alterations in central pain processing in osteoarthritis, and some data, including the observation of widespread pain sensitivity, suggest that central pain-processing defects may alter the pain response in rheumatoid arthritis patients. When central pain is identified, different classes of analgesics (for example, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, α2δ ligands) may be more effective than drugs that treat peripheral or nociceptive pain (for example, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opioids). PMID:21542893

  14. Scarring alopecia.

    PubMed

    Newton, R C; Hebert, A A; Freese, T W; Solomon, A R

    1987-07-01

    The scarring alopecias are a diverse group of diseases characterized by the combination of follicular destruction and dermal scarring. In this article we divide scarring alopecias into three broad categories, pediatric diseases, perifollicular lymphocytic diseases, and folliculopustular diseases, and discuss selected entities from each category. PMID:3301117

  15. Comparisons of Body Image Perceptions of a Sample of Black and White Women with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Fibromyalgia in the US

    PubMed Central

    Boyington, Josephine E.A; Schoster, Britta; Callahan, Leigh F

    2015-01-01

    Objective : To explore the disease-related, body image (BI) perceptions of women diagnosed with, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and fibromyalgia (FM). Methods : A purposive sample of twenty-seven females participated in individual semi-structured phone interviews to elicit BI perceptions relative to pain, activity limitations and coping measures. Sessions were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim, and content analyzed. Results : Body image perceptions relative to 5 major themes emerged in the analysis. They focused on Pain, Disease Impact on Physical and Mental Function, Weight, Diseased-Induced Fears and, Coping measures. Pain was a common experience of all participants. Other troubling factors verbalized by participants included dislike and shame of visibly affected body parts, and disease-induced social, psychological and physical limitations. RA participants thought that manifested joint changes, such as swelling and redness, undergirded their prompt diagnosis and receipt of health care. Contrarily, women with fibromyalgia perceived that the lack of visible, disease-related, physical signs led to a discounting of their disease, which led to delayed health care and subsequent frustrations and anger. All but one participant used prayer and meditation as a coping measure. Conclusion : The body image perceptions evidenced by the majority of participants were generally negative and included specific focus on their disease-affected body parts (e.g. joints), mental function, self-identity, health care experiences, activity limitations and overall quality of life. Given the global effect of RA and FM, assessment and integration of findings about the BI perceptions of individuals with FM and RA may help define suitable interdisciplinary strategies for managing these conditions and improving participants’ quality of life. PMID:25674181

  16. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or have trouble moving around, you might have arthritis. Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints ... joint can become severely damaged. Some kinds of arthritis can also cause problems in your organs, such ...

  17. [Androgenetic alopecia].

    PubMed

    del Marmol, V; Jouanique, C

    2004-09-01

    The physiopathology of androgenetic alopecia is linked to the action of the androgens of the bulbs pilairs of the scalp. The action of these androgens can be associated with the level of hormones in circulation and with the genetic predisposition which will influence the activity of these androgens at the periphery. The classifications of the evolution of alopecia will be done following Norwood for the male and following Ludwig for the female. Hormonal investigation will be effectuated on the female only in the case of research on or the identification of hyperandrogenia; this is essential in order to direct the therapy. The diagnose and the therapeutic follow-up are essentially clinical but can be assisted by a trichogram which will show-up the miniaturisation process of androgenetic alopecia and the telogen effluvium of the affected areas. The treatment of alopecia can be local or general. The local treatment will use a lotion of minoxidil 2 to 5% whether the patient is male of female. On males, an inhibitor of the 5 alpha reductase 2, finasteride, has shown its efficiency at a dose of 1 mg/day. On females oestroprogestatives will be used, if they are not counter-advised, associated with an anti-androgen: either cyproterone acetate or spironolactone. A therapeutic evaluation will be made after 6 months of treatment.

  18. National Alopecia Areata Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2016, 7:30PM PST See More Imagine a world without alopecia areata NAAF’s Alopecia Areata Treatment Development ... launched with one bold vision: to create a world without alopecia areata. This program brings together the ...

  19. Androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Piraccini, B M; Alessandrini, A

    2014-02-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is the most common form of alopecia, affecting up to 80% of men and 50% of women in the course of their life. AGA is caused by a progressive reduction in the diameter, length and pigmentation of the hair. Hair thinning results from the effects of the testosterone metabolite dehydrotestosterone (DHT) on androgen-sensitive hair follicles. In women, AGA produces diffuse thinning of the crown region with maintenance of the frontal hairline (Ludwig pattern AGA). In premenopausal women, AGA can be a sign of hyperandrogenism, together with hirsutism and acnes. Male pattern is characterized by bitemporal recession of the frontal hairline, followed by diffuse thinning at the vertex. Today, scalp dermoscopy is used routinely in patients with androgenetic alopecia, as it facilitates the diagnosis and differential diagnosis with other diseases, allows staging of severity, and allows you to monitor the progress of the disease in time and response to treatment. AGA is a progressive disease that tends to worsen with time. Medical treatment of AGA includes topical minoxidil, antiandrogen agents, 5-alpha reductase inhibitors. PMID:24566563

  20. Androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Otberg, Nina; Finner, Andreas M; Shapiro, Jerry

    2007-06-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA), or male pattern hair loss, affects approximately 50% of the male population. AGA is an androgen-related condition in genetically predisposed individuals. There is no treatment to completely reverse AGA in advanced stages, but with medical treatment (eg, finasteride, minoxidil, or a combination of both), the progression can be arrested and partly reversed in the majority of patients who have mild to moderate AGA. Combination with hair restoration surgery leads to best results in suitable candidates. Physicians who specialize in male health issues should be familiar with this common condition and all the available approved treatment options. PMID:17543725

  1. Alopecia areata

    PubMed Central

    Spano, Frank; Donovan, Jeff C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To provide family physicians with a background understanding of the therapeutic regimens and treatment outcomes for alopecia areata (AA), as well as to help identify those patients for whom dermatologist referral might be required. Sources of information PubMed was searched for relevant articles regarding the treatment of AA. Main message Alopecia areata is a form of autoimmune hair loss affecting both children and adults. While there is no associated mortality with the disease, morbidity from the psychological effects of hair loss can be devastating. Upon identification of AA and the disease subtype, an appropriate therapeutic regimen can be instituted to help halt hair loss or possibly initiate hair regrowth. First-line treatment involves intralesional triamcinolone with topical steroids or minoxidil or both. Primary care physicians can safely prescribe and institute these treatments. More advanced or refractory cases might require oral immunosuppressants, topical diphenylcyclopropenone, or topical anthralin. Eyelash loss can be treated with prostaglandin analogues. Those with extensive loss might choose camouflaging options or a hair prosthesis. It is important to monitor for psychiatric disorders owing to the profound psychological effects of hair loss. Conclusion Family physicians will encounter many patients experiencing hair loss. Recognition of AA and an understanding of the underlying disease process will allow an appropriate therapeutic regimen to be instituted. More advanced or refractory cases need to be identified, allowing for an appropriate dermatologist referral when necessary. PMID:26371098

  2. Alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Perera, Eshini; Yip, Leona; Sinclair, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is a common, non-scarring alopecia that usually presents as well-circumscribed patches of sudden hair loss and affects 0.1-0.2% of the population. The aetiology of AA is thought to be both genetic and autoimmune in nature. One hundred and thirty-nine single nucleotide polymorphisms linked to AA have been identified in 8 regions of the genome and have been found to be associated with T cells or the hair follicle. Furthermore, patients with AA have been found to have an increased frequency of hair follicle-specific auto-antibodies. The diagnosis of AA is usually made on clinical grounds, and further investigations are not usually needed. Intralesional corticosteroids remain the treatment of choice. Systemic steroids are also highly effective; however, side effects make them less desirable to both patients and physicians. Other available treatment options include anthralin, minoxidil, topical immunotherapy and systemic immunosuppressants. These treatments will be discussed in depth in this chapter. The morbidity of AA is largely psychological; therefore, the successful treatment of AA should include focusing on improving the psychological impact of this condition. PMID:26370645

  3. Primary scarring alopecias.

    PubMed

    Rigopoulos, Dimitrios; Stamatios, Gregoriou; Ioannides, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Scarring alopecia or cicatricial alopecia results from follicular damage that is sufficient to cause the destruction and replacement of pilosebaceous structures by scar tissue. Primary scarring alopecias represent a group of disorders that primarily affect the hair follicles, as opposed to secondary scarring alopecias, which affect the dermis and secondarily cause follicular destruction. Inflammation may predominantly involve lymphocytes or neutrophils. Cicatricial alopecias that mainly involve lymphocytic inflammation include discoid lupus erythematosus, lichen planopilaris, frontal fibrosing alopecia, central centrifugal alopecia, and pseudopelade (Brocq). Cicatricial alopecias that are due to predominantly neutrophilic inflammation include folliculitis decalvans, tufted folliculitis, and dissecting cellulitis of the scalp. Folliculitis keloidalis is a cicatricial alopecia with a mixed inflammatory infiltrate. PMID:26370646

  4. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... training for muscle tone. Your provider may suggest physical therapy. This might include: Heat or ice Splints or ... American College of Rheumatology guidelines for management of gout. Part 2: therapy and anti-inflammatory prophylaxis of acute gouty arthritis. ...

  5. Linear Alopecia Areata.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Shricharith; Rao, Raghavendra; Kudva, R Ranjini; Subramanian, Kumudhini

    2016-01-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) over scalp is known to present in various shapes and extents of hair loss. Typically it presents as circumscribed patches of alopecia with underlying skin remaining normal. We describe a rare variant of AA presenting in linear band-like form. Only four cases of linear alopecia have been reported in medical literature till today, all four being diagnosed as lupus erythematosus profundus. PMID:27625568

  6. Linear Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Shricharith; Rao, Raghavendra; Kudva, R Ranjini; Subramanian, Kumudhini

    2016-01-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) over scalp is known to present in various shapes and extents of hair loss. Typically it presents as circumscribed patches of alopecia with underlying skin remaining normal. We describe a rare variant of AA presenting in linear band-like form. Only four cases of linear alopecia have been reported in medical literature till today, all four being diagnosed as lupus erythematosus profundus.

  7. Interesting Patchy Alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Prashant; Zawar, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Patchy alopecias of the scalp are frequently seen in clinical practice. We report a young man who presented with progressive patchy alopecia of the scalp, which was finally diagnosed to be due to tuberculoid leprosy. Progression of alopecia was stopped after anti-leprosy treatment was instituted. Despite high prevalence of leprosy in our country, scalp affection due to leprosy is extremely rare but important to recognize. PMID:26180453

  8. Linear Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Shricharith; Rao, Raghavendra; Kudva, R Ranjini; Subramanian, Kumudhini

    2016-01-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) over scalp is known to present in various shapes and extents of hair loss. Typically it presents as circumscribed patches of alopecia with underlying skin remaining normal. We describe a rare variant of AA presenting in linear band-like form. Only four cases of linear alopecia have been reported in medical literature till today, all four being diagnosed as lupus erythematosus profundus. PMID:27625568

  9. The Japanese version of the 2010 American College of Rheumatology Preliminary Diagnostic Criteria for Fibromyalgia and the Fibromyalgia Symptom Scale: reliability and validity.

    PubMed

    Usui, Chie; Hatta, Kotaro; Aratani, Satoko; Yagishita, Naoko; Nishioka, Kenya; Kanazawa, Teruhisa; Ito, Kenji; Yamano, Yoshihisa; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Nakajima, Toshihiro; Nishioka, Kusuki

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the reliability and the validity of the Japanese version of the 2010 American College of Rheumatology Preliminary Diagnostic Criteria for Fibromyalgia (ACR 2010-J), and its quantification scale, the Fibromyalgia Symptom Scale (FS-J). In this study, we divided patients with chronic pain without psychiatric disorders other than depression into two groups according to the 1990 ACR Diagnostic Criteria for Fibromyalgia, a fibromyalgia group and a non-fibromyalgia group (rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and gout). Patients in both groups were assessed using the ACR 2010-J and FS-J. Seventy-seven of 94 (82%) patients in the fibromyalgia group met the ACR 2010-J, whereas 9% (4/43) of the non-fibromyalgia group did so, with a sensitivity of 82%, specificity of 91%, positive predictive value of 95%, negative predictive value of 70%, and positive likelihood ratio of 8.8. Mean total scores on the FS-J significantly differentiated the fibromyalgia from the non-fibromyalgia group. The scale had high inter-rater reliability and high internal consistency. With a cutoff score of 10, the positive likelihood ratio was 10.1. Our findings indicate that the ACR 2010-J and FS-J have high reliability and validity, and are useful for assessing fibromyalgia in Japanese populations with chronic pain. As regards the positive likelihood ratio, that of the FS-J might be suitable as a positive test.

  10. Phototherapy for alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Oliverio

    2016-01-01

    Phototherapy is a useful therapeutic method for various skin diseases due to its modulatory effect on the cutaneous immune system. Alopecia areata is a dermatosis characterized by partial or complete hair loss. Collapse of the immune privilege of the hair follicle, which induces noncicatricial alopecia, is an important factor in its etiology. Several forms of phototherapy are used in dermatology.

  11. Phototherapy for alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Oliverio

    2016-01-01

    Phototherapy is a useful therapeutic method for various skin diseases due to its modulatory effect on the cutaneous immune system. Alopecia areata is a dermatosis characterized by partial or complete hair loss. Collapse of the immune privilege of the hair follicle, which induces noncicatricial alopecia, is an important factor in its etiology. Several forms of phototherapy are used in dermatology. PMID:27638443

  12. Treatment for alopecia.

    PubMed

    Rossi, A; Calvieri, S

    2014-02-01

    Satisfactory, evidence-based medicine regimen for treating alopecia are available in literature only regarding alopecia areata and androgenetic alopecia. About all the other kinds of alopecia, recommendations for therapy are still based upon the literature review, expert opinion, personal experience, expected adverse effects, and some pragmatic considerations such as the cost and the patient's compliance. Cicatricial alopecia is one of the most difficult challenges for dermatologists, because it is uncommon, its etiopathogenesis is not completely understood and there is no best therapy approach. Moreover, in Italy, most of the drugs mentioned below are not always available. Finally, therapies for hair disorders are long treatment and not always lead to a good improvement. PMID:24566570

  13. Sleep disorders and fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Roizenblatt, Suely; Neto, Nilton Salles Rosa; Tufik, Sergio

    2011-10-01

    Disordered sleep is such a prominent symptom in fibromyalgia that the American College of Rheumatology included symptoms such as waking unrefreshed, fatigue, tiredness, and insomnia in the 2010 diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia. Even though sleep recording is not part of the routine evaluation, polysomnography may disclose primary sleep disorders in patients with fibromyalgia, including obstructive sleep apnea and restless leg syndrome. In addition, genetic background and environmental susceptibility link fibromyalgia and further sleep disorders. Among nonpharmacological treatment proposed for sleep disturbance in fibromyalgia, positive results have been obtained with sleep hygiene and cognitive-behavioral therapy. The effect of exercise is contradictory, but overweight or obese patients with fibromyalgia should be encouraged to lose weight. Regarding the approved antidepressants, amitriptyline proved to be superior to duloxetine and milnacipran for sleep disturbances. New perspectives remain on the narcolepsy drug sodium oxybate, which recently was approved for sleep management in fibromyalgia.

  14. An Overview of Alopecias

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Ji; Garza, Luis A.

    2014-01-01

    Hair loss is a topic of enormous public interest and understanding the pathophysiology and treatment of various alopecias will likely make a large impact on patients’ lives. The investigation of alopecias also provides important insight in the basic sciences; for instance, the abundance of stem cell populations and regenerative cycles that characterize a hair follicle render it an excellent model for the study of stem cell biology. This review seeks to provide a concise summary of the major alopecias with regard to presentation and management, and correlate these to recent advances in relevant research on pathogenesis. PMID:24591533

  15. [Fibromyalgia syndrome].

    PubMed

    Naranjo Hernández, A; Rodríguez Lozano, C; Ojeda Bruno, S

    1992-02-01

    The Fibromialgia Syndrome (FS) is a common clinical entity which may produce symtoms and signs related to multiple fields of Medicine. Typical clinical characteristics of FS include extensive pain, presence of sensitive points during exploration, morning stiffness, asthenia and non-refresing sleep. Frequently, associated rheumatologic diseases are observed, as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthrosis and vertebral disorders. In FS, complementary tests are usually normal. The most widely accepted hypothesis suggests that this is a disorder affecting modulation of pain sensitivity.

  16. Exposure to a specific pulsed low-frequency magnetic field: A double-blind placebo-controlled study of effects on pain ratings in rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia patients

    PubMed Central

    Shupak, Naomi M; McKay, Julia C; Nielson, Warren R; Rollman, Gary B; Prato, Frank S; Thomas, Alex W

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Specific pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) have been shown to induce analgesia (antinociception) in snails, rodents and healthy human volunteers. OBJECTIVE The effect of specific PEMF exposure on pain and anxiety ratings was investigated in two patient populations. DESIGN A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled parallel design was used. METHOD The present study investigated the effects of an acute 30 min magnetic field exposure (less than or equal to 400 μTpk; less than 3 kHz) on pain (McGill Pain Questionnaire [MPQ], visual analogue scale [VAS]) and anxiety (VAS) ratings in female rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (n=13; mean age 52 years) and fibromyalgia (FM) patients (n=18; mean age 51 years) who received either the PEMF or sham exposure treatment. RESULTS A repeated measures analysis revealed a significant pre-post-testing by condition interaction for the MPQ Pain Rating Index total for the RA patients, F(1,11)=5.09, P<0.05, estimate of effect size = 0.32, power = 0.54. A significant pre-post-effect for the same variable was present for the FM patients, F(1,15=16.2, P<0.01, estimate of effect size = 0.52, power =0.96. Similar findings were found for MPQ subcomponents and the VAS (pain). There was no significant reduction in VAS anxiety ratings pre- to post-exposure for either the RA or FM patients. CONCLUSION These findings provide some initial support for the use of PEMF exposure in reducing pain in chronic pain populations and warrants continued investigation into the use of PEMF exposure for short-term pain relief. PMID:16770449

  17. [Feline paraneoplastic alopecia].

    PubMed

    van der Luer, R; van den Ingh, T; van Hoe, N

    2008-03-01

    A 14-year-old neutered female cat was presented for a second opinion regarding hair loss, anorexia, and lethargy. Examination revealed alopecia of the ventral chest, abdomen, axilla, and groin. The footpads were encrusted. The liver was enlarged and nodular. Investigation revealed an enlarged liver with multiple nodules, and small and atrophic hair follicles. Paraneoplastic alopecia due to hepatocellular carcinoma was diagnosed and subsequently confirmed postmortem.

  18. Strategies for managing fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Lesley M

    2009-12-01

    The presentation of fibromyalgia is heterogeneous, and the treatment approach should be individualized for each patient, depending on the severity of the patient's pain, the presence of other symptoms or comorbidities, and the degree of functional impairment. The management of fibromyalgia includes the identification and treatment of all pain sources that may be present in addition to fibromyalgia, such as peripheral pain generators (e.g., comorbid osteoarthritis or neuropathic pain) or visceral pain (e.g., comorbid irritable bowel syndrome). It is also important to address other symptoms or disorders that commonly occur in patients with fibromyalgia, such as fatigue, sleep disturbances, cognitive impairment, stiffness, and mood or anxiety disorders. Finally, the treatment should strive to improve the patient's function and global health status. In most cases, the management of fibromyalgia involves both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatments. This report provides an in-depth review of randomized, controlled trials for pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic approaches to fibromyalgia therapy.

  19. Trichoscopy of Noncicatricial Pressure-induced Alopecia Resembling Alopecia Areata.

    PubMed

    Papaiordanou, Francine; da Silveira, Bruno Rebelo Lages; Piñeiro-Maceira, Juan; Pirmez, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    Pressure-induced alopecia is an unusual cause of hair loss, and reports of its trichoscopic features are scarce. In this paper, we describe a case of pressure-induced alopecia in which trichoscopic and histopathological findings overlap with those described for alopecia areata. PMID:27601865

  20. Trichoscopy of Noncicatricial Pressure-induced Alopecia Resembling Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Papaiordanou, Francine; da Silveira, Bruno Rebelo Lages; Piñeiro-Maceira, Juan; Pirmez, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    Pressure-induced alopecia is an unusual cause of hair loss, and reports of its trichoscopic features are scarce. In this paper, we describe a case of pressure-induced alopecia in which trichoscopic and histopathological findings overlap with those described for alopecia areata. PMID:27601865

  1. Patchy Traction Alopecia Mimicking Areata

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Aline Blanco; Donati, Aline; Valente, Neusa S; Romiti, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Acute traction alopecia is a diagnostic challenge when the external factor is not suspected or admitted. We report two female patients with non-scarring patchy alopecia resulting from traction of video-electroencephalogram electrodes in which the clinical diagnosis of alopecia areata was suspected. Associated diffuse hair disorders might be implicated in these cases. The correct diagnosis of traction alopecia is important in order to avoid unnecessary treatments. PMID:26903751

  2. Management of androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Bolduc, C; Shapiro, J

    2000-01-01

    Androgenetic alopecia is by far the most common cause of hair loss. It affects approximately 50% of men by the age of 50 and 20 to 53% of women by the age 50. Although it is a medically benign condition, it is a significant psychosocial issue for many patients. Various different treatment options are now available for androgenetic alopecia. The best treatment option for women with androgenetic alopecia Ludwig stage I and II is minoxidil 5% solution. If it is not effective after 1 year, antiandrogens can be tried, but there are no large studies showing their efficacy and they have considerable adverse effects. Also, for patients with alopecia that is unresponsive to treatment or with Ludwig stage III, hair transplantation can be offered if the occipital donor area is sufficient. For men, we always offer minoxidil or finasteride therapy and leave the choice of therapy to the patient. Some patients may prefer a systemic agent, whereas others may favor a topical agent. If the condition is not stabilized after 1 year or if the patient wants greater hair density, hair transplantation can be discussed. There have been tremendous advances in the treatment of hair loss in recent years and the future is very encouraging. As our knowledge of androgenetic alopecia pathophysiology increases, novel targeted treatments will potentially be developed. PMID:11702296

  3. Are fibromyalgia patients as inactive as they say they are?

    PubMed

    Raftery, Graham; Bridges, Matthew; Heslop, Peta; Walker, David J

    2009-06-01

    Both fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients self-report similar disability. These diseases are viewed differently by the medical profession as one has ample evidence of tissue damage and inflammation and the other does not. We were interested to see if an objective measure produced similar results. Twelve patients with RA were matched with 12 fibromyalgia patients by sex, age, and Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) score. The 24-h ambulatory activity of these patients was recorded using the Numact monitor. Statistical analysis was performed using independent group t test for the ambulatory activity data and Spearman's correlation coefficients for HAQ and total energy. There were no significant differences found between the two groups in terms of total activity. Other compared analyses for activity included the number of steps taken, vigor of steps, and time spent standing, which were not statistically different. The correlation coefficients of HAQ and total ambulatory activity for the fibromyalgia group were rho = -0.638 (p = 0.026). Patients with RA and fibromyalgia displaying similar levels of self-reported disability have objective evidence of similar levels of total ambulatory activity. There is a statistically significant correlation between self-reported and objective measurements of disability for the fibromyalgia patients. Either of these measures merits further study as outcome measures for fibromyalgia.

  4. Myalgias and Myopathies: Fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a syndrome of chronic widespread pain typically accompanied by fatigue, nonrestorative sleep, cognitive dysfunction, and mood disorders. As defined by the 2010 American College of Rheumatology criteria, fibromyalgia affects approximately 5% of the population and is the second most common disorder, after osteoarthritis, for which patients are referred to rheumatology subspecialists. These criteria provide a framework for diagnosing fibromyalgia that does not require tender points and incorporates other symptoms of the syndrome in addition to pain. Extensive laboratory tests and imaging are not required to diagnose fibromyalgia. A patient-centered, multimodal approach that includes patient education, behavioral therapy, a graded exercise program, and pharmacotherapy should be used for patients with fibromyalgia. Prescribers must be mindful of adverse drug effects and should tailor therapy to the individual patient. Strong evidence of benefit exists for tricyclic antidepressants, cyclobenzaprine, and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors in fibromyalgia management, whereas nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opioids have limited proven benefit. Fibromyalgia can cause significant disability and loss of function. Family physicians are well equipped to direct the multimodal care of patients with fibromyalgia.

  5. Myalgias and Myopathies: Fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a syndrome of chronic widespread pain typically accompanied by fatigue, nonrestorative sleep, cognitive dysfunction, and mood disorders. As defined by the 2010 American College of Rheumatology criteria, fibromyalgia affects approximately 5% of the population and is the second most common disorder, after osteoarthritis, for which patients are referred to rheumatology subspecialists. These criteria provide a framework for diagnosing fibromyalgia that does not require tender points and incorporates other symptoms of the syndrome in addition to pain. Extensive laboratory tests and imaging are not required to diagnose fibromyalgia. A patient-centered, multimodal approach that includes patient education, behavioral therapy, a graded exercise program, and pharmacotherapy should be used for patients with fibromyalgia. Prescribers must be mindful of adverse drug effects and should tailor therapy to the individual patient. Strong evidence of benefit exists for tricyclic antidepressants, cyclobenzaprine, and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors in fibromyalgia management, whereas nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opioids have limited proven benefit. Fibromyalgia can cause significant disability and loss of function. Family physicians are well equipped to direct the multimodal care of patients with fibromyalgia. PMID:26734831

  6. Pathophysiology of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Laurence A

    2009-12-01

    This article reviews the biologic, genetic, and environmental factors that may contribute to the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia. As an affective spectrum disorder, fibromyalgia may share these causal factors with a number of related and co-occurring pain conditions, such as irritable bowel syndrome or temporomandibular disorder. There is strong evidence that cardinal pain symptoms of fibromyalgia may be due to alterations in central processing of sensory input, along with aberrations in the endogenous inhibition of pain. Genetic research has shown familial aggregation of fibromyalgia and other related disorders such as major depressive disorder. Exposure to physical or psychosocial stressors, as well as abnormal biologic responses in the autonomic nervous system and neuroendocrine responses, may also contribute to dysfunctional pain processing. As fibromyalgia research continues to progress, it is expected that the pathophysiology of this disorder will be further elucidated, leading to more rational and targeted strategies for the treatment of patients with this condition.

  7. Fibromyalgia: an overview.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Diane; Lettich, Louise; Takeshita, Junji

    2003-07-01

    In this article, the authors review current concepts in fibromyalgia. Findings regarding diagnosis, prevalence, comorbidities, and potential pathophysiologic links are discussed. Although fibromyalgia continues to be a complex disorder, there are specific criteria one must meet. Fibromyalgia questionnaires, along with commonalities of age, gender, menopause status, sleep disturbances, and mood symptoms, may aid in the diagnosis. Additionally, the close relationship between fibromyalgia and other chronic disorders should alert the physician to explore for comorbid illness. The relationship between fibromyalgia and irritable bowel syndrome, migraine headaches, and obesity are addressed. The roles of the hypothalamic-pituitary-axis, potential effects of neurotransmitters, and gender-specific hormones all substantiate this diagnosis and provide clues to causality, as well as venues for future treatment.

  8. Management strategies for fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Le Marshall, Kim Francis; Littlejohn, Geoffrey Owen

    2011-01-01

    Clinical question What are the effective, evidence-based strategies available for the management of fibromyalgia? Conclusion There are a number of management strategies available with robust evidence to support their use in clinical practice. Definition Fibromyalgia is a complex pain syndrome characterized by widespread, chronic muscular pain and tenderness, disordered sleep, emotional distress, cognitive disturbance, and fatigue. Its prevalence is estimated to be 3%–5% in the population and higher yet in patients with comorbid rheumatic diseases. Level of evidence Systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Search sources PubMed, Cochrane Library, manual search Consumer summary Key messages for patients and clinicians are: There are many effective pharmacological management strategies available for fibromyalgia.A nonpharmacological, multicomponent approach utilizing education, aerobic exercise, psychological therapy, and other strategies is also effective for fibromyalgia.Despite the significant and, at times, disabling physical and psychological symptoms, fibromyalgia can be a manageable condition with a potentially good outcome.

  9. Milnacipran: in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Chwieduk, Claudine M; McCormack, Paul L

    2010-01-01

    Milnacipran is an orally administered selective serotonin and norepinephrine (noradrenaline) reuptake inhibitor indicated for the management of fibromyalgia in adults. In adults, milnacipran was generally effective in the treatment of fibromyalgia in four well designed trials of 3 or 6 months' duration. Composite responder rates for the treatment of fibromyalgia and fibromyalgia pain (co-primary efficacy variables) were generally higher with milnacipran 100 or 200 mg/day (in two divided doses) than with placebo after 12 weeks of fixed-dose treatment. In one study, the composite responder rate for fibromyalgia pain (co-primary efficacy variable) was also higher with milnacipran 200 mg/day than with placebo after 24 weeks of fixed-dose treatment. Furthermore, the benefits of milnacipran therapy were sustained in a 6-month extension of an initial double-blind trial. Improvements from baseline in mean 24-hour recall pain scores, mean weekly recall pain scores, Patient Global Impression of Change scores and in several items of the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire were observed in patients receiving continuous milnacipran for up to 12 months, as well as in patients who switched from placebo to milnacipran therapy at the start of the extension phase. Milnacipran was generally well tolerated in adults with fibromyalgia, with most adverse events being mild to moderate in severity. Nausea was the most common adverse event reported in milnacipran recipients.

  10. Fibromyalgia Symptoms and Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Bielefeldt, Klaus; Wasan, Ajay D.; Szigethy, Eva; Lotrich, Francis; DiMartini, Andrea F.

    2015-01-01

    Background An association between fibromyalgia and hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been previously described. However, the relationship between nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and fibromyalgia symptoms has not been assessed, though they share several risk factors. Aim We aimed to assess the factors associated with fibromyalgia symptoms across etiologies of liver disease. Methods Patients with cirrhosis due to HCV, NASH, or alcohol were recruited from an outpatient hepatology clinic and administered the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and the modified 2010 American College of Rheumatology Diagnostic Criteria for Fibromyalgia. Serum inflammatory markers were measured with standard luminex assays. Results Of 193 participants, 53 (27 %) met criteria for fibromyalgia. Fibromyalgia symptoms were significantly associated with etiology of liver disease (HCV: 35 %, NASH: 30 %, alcohol-related liver disease: 12 %, p < 0.01). Using logistic regression, mood symptoms (OR 1.14, 95 % CI 1.06, 1.22), sleep disturbance (OR 1.32, 95 % CI 1.16, 1.52), and etiology of liver disease (NASH vs. HCV not different, alcohol vs. HCV OR 0.19, 95 % CI 0.05, 0.63) were associated with fibromyalgia symptoms. If abdominal pain was included in the model, etiology became nonsignificant, indicating that it may be central sensitization due to abdominal pain in patients with chronic liver disease that explains fibromyalgia symptoms rather than the etiology of liver disease or inflammation. Conclusions Fibromyalgia symptoms were significantly associated with HCV and NASH cirrhosis and with psychiatric symptoms. Future work should focus on the underlying pathophysiology and management of widespread pain in patients with cirrhosis. PMID:25433921

  11. Diagnosing and treating fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Zanni, Guido R

    2009-08-01

    Characterized by chronic, widespread pain and heightened pain sensitivity, fibromyalgia affects up to 10 million adults. It is physically disabling and often is accompanied by chronic fatigue and psychiatric comorbidities. Individuals frequently see multiple providers before finding an answer about their condition; diagnosis is often a process of elimination. Etiology is unknown, but studies suggest fibromyalgia is a centrally mediated neurosensory disorder. Despite its recognition as an independent condition, debate continues with critics arguing fibromyalgia is a variant of other known disorders. Treatment consists of pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, and exercise.

  12. Fibromyalgia: an overview.

    PubMed

    Clauw, Daniel J

    2009-12-01

    Fibromyalgia is the diagnosis given to individuals with chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain for which no alternative cause, such as tissue inflammation or damage, can be identified. Fibromyalgia is now believed to be, at least in part, a disorder of central pain processing that produces heightened responses to painful stimuli (hyperalgesia) and painful responses to nonpainful stimuli (allodynia). Aberrations in central pain processing may also be partly responsible for symptoms experienced in several chronic pain disorders that coaggregate with fibromyalgia, which is itself a product of genetic and environmental factors. Thus, aberrational central pain processing is implicated in irritable bowel syndrome, temporomandibular disorder, chronic low back pain, and certain other chronic pain disorders. Fibromyalgia and related disorders appear to reflect deficiencies in serotonergic and noradrenergic, but not opioidergic, transmission in the central nervous system. The heightened state of pain transmission may also be owing to increases in pronociceptive neurotransmitters such as glutamate and substance P. In some cases, psychological and behavioral factors are also in play. Although the overlapping symptomatology between fibromyalgia and related disorders may present diagnostic challenges, proper examination and observation can help clinicians make an accurate diagnosis. In recent years, the vastly improved understanding of the mechanism underlying fibromyalgia and the related spectrum of diseases has fostered rapid advances in the therapy of these chronic pain disorders by both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions.

  13. Alopecia areata update.

    PubMed

    Hordinsky, Maria; Junqueira, Ana Lucia

    2015-06-01

    There is neither a cure for alopecia areata (AA) nor any universally proven therapy that induces and sustains remission in patients afflicted with this autoimmune disease. AA is characterized as a nonscarring alopecia which affects children and adults. It can be relatively easy to treat when the disease is patchy and limited; but when children and adults present with long standing extensive scalp and body hair loss, successful management can be challenging. Of the treatment choices available, physicians and midlevel providers usually select a cost-effective treatment approach based on disease duration, disease activity, age of the patient, and disease extent. In this manuscript, the clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathophysiology, plus current and evolving treatments for AA will be reviewed.

  14. Focal and generalized alopecia.

    PubMed

    O'Dair, H A; Foster, A P

    1995-07-01

    Focal or generalized alopecia is defined as hair loss affecting the ventral, lateral, perineal, and dorsal aspects of the trunk of the cat, usually in a symmetric pattern. This may be attributable to failure of hair coat production, excess loss of hair due to self trauma, or excess shedding of whole hairs. Self trauma is the most common cause of hair loss and is associated particularly with flea allergy dermatitis. Other causes of hair loss are reviewed.

  15. Alopecia areata in Eringer cows.

    PubMed

    Timm, Katrin; Rüfenacht, Silvia; von Tscharner, Claudia; Bornand, Valérie F; Doherr, Marcus G; Oevermann, Anna; Flury, Christine; Rieder, Stefan; Hirsbrunner, Gaby; Drögemüller, Cord; Roosje, Petra J

    2010-12-01

    Alopecia areata is a hair loss disorder in humans, dogs and horses with a suspected autoimmune aetiology targeting anagen hair follicles. Alopecia areata is only sporadically reported in cows. Recently, we observed several cases of suspected alopecia areata in Eringer cows. The aim of this study was to confirm the presumptive diagnosis of alopecia areata and to define the clinical phenotype and histopathological patterns, including characterization of the infiltrating inflammatory cells. Twenty Eringer cows with alopecia and 11 Eringer cows without skin problems were included in this study. Affected cows had either generalized or multifocal alopecia or hypotrichosis. The tail, forehead and distal extremities were usually spared. Punch biopsies were obtained from the centre and margin of alopecic lesions and normal haired skin. Histological examination revealed several alterations in anagen hair bulbs. These included peri- and intrabulbar lymphocytic infiltration, peribulbar fibrosis, degenerate matrix cells with clumped melanosomes and pigmentary incontinence. Mild lymphocytic infiltrative mural folliculitis was seen in the inferior segment and isthmus of the hair follicles. Hair shafts were often unpigmented and dysplastic. The large majority of infiltrating lymphocytes were CD3(+) T cells, whereas only occasional CD20(+) lymphocytes were present in the peribulbar infiltrate. Our findings confirm the diagnosis of T-cell-mediated alopecia areata in these cows. Alopecia areata appears to occur with increased frequency in the Eringer breed, but distinct predisposing factors could not be identified. PMID:20626715

  16. Seasonal flank alopecia in affenpinschers.

    PubMed

    Waldman, L

    1995-06-01

    Two intact, distantly related, female affenpinschers, belonging to a breeder, were referred in March 1993 for the investigation of bilateral, symmetrical flank alopecia in one bitch and bilateral, symmetrical flank, dorsum and tail alopecia in the other; the alopecia occurred from November to May and January to May, respectively. During that period the bitches were kept in a conservatory without artificial heating or lighting. The owner reported that the mother of one bitch had had bilateral, symmetrical flank alopecia during one winter when kept in the conservatory, but was normal the following winter when kept in the house. Three other females and a male exhibited the same clinical signs when kept in the conservatory during the winter. Seasonal flank alopecia has not previously been reported in affenpinschers.

  17. Topical Immunotherapy in Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gurcharan; Lavanya, MS

    2010-01-01

    Alopecia Areata (AA) is a common non-scarring alopecia directed against the anagenic hair follicle. Various treatment modalities have been used for the treatment of severe AA. Topical immunotherapy is the best documented treatment so far for severe and refractory AA. Dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB), squaric acid dibutylester (SADBE), and diphencyprone (DPCP) are the contact allergens used for this purpose. DNCB has been found to be mutagenic by the Ames test and is largely replaced by DPCP and SADBE. DPCP and SADBE are both known to be non-mutagenic compounds and have comparable efficacy results and relapse rates. SADBE requires special solvents and additives to maintain its potency and is more expensive than the rest. DPCP has a response rate varying from 60% in severe Alopecia Areata to 17% in patients with alopecia totalis or universalis, and shows about 88 to 100% high response rate in patients with patchy Alopecia Areata. PMID:21188022

  18. Alopecia as the Presenting Symptom of Syphilis.

    PubMed

    Ornelas, Jennifer; Agbai, Oma N; Kiuru, Maija; Sivamani, Raja K

    2015-07-15

    Alopecia can be one of the many symptoms of secondary syphilis and the clinical presentations include essential syphilitic alopecia or symptomatic syphilitic alopecia. In this report, we present a case of a patient with essential syphilitic alopecia whose sole presenting symptom of syphilis was alopecia. Despite an initial negative rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test, he was ultimately found to have syphilis on scalp biopsy. His alopecia improved following treatment with benzathine penicillin. This presentation serves as a reminder to clinicians to be cognizant of alopecia as a presenting sign of syphilis. A review of the specificity and sensitivity of the typical tests used for the diagnosis is presented.

  19. Treatment of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Dussias, Peter; Kalali, Amir H; Staud, Roland M

    2010-05-01

    In this article, we investigate the range of treatments prescribed for fibromyalgia. The data suggest that the majority of those treated, 82 percent, receive only one pharmaceutical. An additional 12 percent of patients were prescribed two products and six percent received three products. Pregabalin (Lyrica(R)) monotherapy was the most commonly prescribed regimen (21% of patients) followed by duloxetine (Cymbalta(R)) monotherapy (20%). From a therapeutic class perspective, fibromyalgia patients received antidepressants (46%), antiepileptics (35%), pain therapies (25%), muscle relaxants (8%), and sleep agents (2%). An expert commentary is included.

  20. Psoriatic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Arthritis - psoriatic; Psoriasis - psoriatic arthritis; Spondylitis - psoriatic arthritis ... inflammatory condition. About 1 in 20 people with psoriasis may develop arthritis with the skin condition. Nail psoriasis is linked ...

  1. Histologic features of alopecias: part II: scarring alopecias.

    PubMed

    Bernárdez, C; Molina-Ruiz, A M; Requena, L

    2015-05-01

    The diagnosis of disorders of the hair and scalp can generally be made on clinical grounds, but clinical signs are not always diagnostic and in some cases more invasive techniques, such as a biopsy, may be necessary. This 2-part article is a detailed review of the histologic features of the main types of alopecia based on the traditional classification of these disorders into 2 major groups: scarring and nonscarring alopecias. Scarring alopecias are disorders in which the hair follicle is replaced by fibrous scar tissue, a process that leads to permanent hair loss. In nonscarring alopecias, the follicles are preserved and hair growth can resume when the cause of the problem is eliminated. In the second part of this review, we describe the histologic features of the main forms of scarring alopecia. Since a close clinical-pathological correlation is essential for making a correct histopathologic diagnosis of alopecia, we also include a brief description of the clinical features of the principal forms of this disorder. PMID:25439143

  2. Histologic features of alopecias: part II: scarring alopecias.

    PubMed

    Bernárdez, C; Molina-Ruiz, A M; Requena, L

    2015-05-01

    The diagnosis of disorders of the hair and scalp can generally be made on clinical grounds, but clinical signs are not always diagnostic and in some cases more invasive techniques, such as a biopsy, may be necessary. This 2-part article is a detailed review of the histologic features of the main types of alopecia based on the traditional classification of these disorders into 2 major groups: scarring and nonscarring alopecias. Scarring alopecias are disorders in which the hair follicle is replaced by fibrous scar tissue, a process that leads to permanent hair loss. In nonscarring alopecias, the follicles are preserved and hair growth can resume when the cause of the problem is eliminated. In the second part of this review, we describe the histologic features of the main forms of scarring alopecia. Since a close clinical-pathological correlation is essential for making a correct histopathologic diagnosis of alopecia, we also include a brief description of the clinical features of the principal forms of this disorder.

  3. Trichoscopy in Alopecias: Diagnosis Simplified

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Nilam; Doshi, Bhavana; Khopkar, Uday

    2013-01-01

    Trichoscopy is the term coined for dermoscopic imaging of the scalp and hair. This novel diagnostic technique, both simple and non-invasive, can be used as a handy bed side tool for diagnosing common hair and scalp disorders. Trichoscopic observations can be broadly grouped as hair signs, vascular patterns, pigment patterns and interfollicular patterns. In this article, we have briefly described the trichoscopic findings in the common categories of cicatricial and non-cicatricial alopecias such as androgenetic alopecia, alopecia areata, telogen effluvium, tinea capitis, trichotillomania, lichen planopilaris, discoid lupus erythematosus and hair shaft disorders. Besides diagnosing alopecia, it has the potential for obviating unnecessary biopsies and when a biopsy is still needed it is helpful in choosing an ideal biopsy site. Moreover, trichoscopy is a valuable tool for evaluating the treatment response photographically at each follow-up. The last statement here is deleted as asked. PMID:24778525

  4. Contemporary management strategies for fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Robert P

    2009-06-01

    A roundtable meeting that comprised clinical, patient advocacy, and managed care experts discussed issues regarding the diagnosis and management of fibromyalgia. The panel agreed that earlier diagnosis and treatment, additional education for the medical community, and appropriate management by health plans, including patient access to US Food and Drug Administration-approved fibromyalgia medications, are needed. In addition, physicians, payers, and patient advocates must work to improve clinical, economic, and quality-of-life outcomes for fibromyalgia patients. Finally, treatment and diagnostic guidelines must be updated as advances in disease management are made (including approvals of 3 new pharmacologic agents), and development of a therapeutic category for "fibromyalgia" on payer formularies is needed.

  5. Androgenetic alopecia in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Price, Vera H

    2003-02-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA), or hereditary hair thinning, is a common and unwelcome cause of hair loss in men and women. AGA also occurs in adolescents, though its prevalence in this younger population is not known. Physical appearance is extremely important to most adolescents, and early onset of hair loss can have a definite negative effect on self-image and self-esteem. Minoxidil topical solution is widely used by adults for hair loss, but its use by adolescents has not been systematically evaluated. This article provides an overview of AGA and presents new information on the prevalence and age at onset of hereditary hair thinning in adolescents. In addition, data are presented on the efficacy and proper use of minoxidil topical solution in adolescent boys and girls. PMID:12635889

  6. Androgenetic alopecia: an update.

    PubMed

    Kaliyadan, Feroze; Nambiar, Ajit; Vijayaraghavan, Sundeep

    2013-01-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is one of the commonest reasons for dermatological consultation. Over the last few years our understanding of the pathophysiology of AGA has improved and this has paved way for better diagnostic and therapeutic options. Recent research has dwelled on the role of stem cells in the pathophysiology of AGA and has also identified newer genetic basis for the condition. Dermoscopy/trichoscopy has emerged as a useful diagnostic tool for AGA. While the major treatment options continue to be topical minoxidil, systemic Finasteride and hair transplantations, newer modalities are under investigation. Specific diagnostic and treatment recommendations have also been developed on evidence based principles. This article reviews the recent concepts in relation to AGA. With regards to the pathophysiology we have tried to stress on recent knowledge of the molecular and genetic basis of AGA. We have emphasized on an evidence based approach for treatment and diagnosis. PMID:23974579

  7. Prevalence of falls in fibromyalgia patients

    PubMed Central

    Meireles, Sandra Adolph; Antero, Daniel Casagrande; Kulczycki, Marciane Maria; Skare, Thelma Larocca

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the risk of falls in fibromyalgia (FM) patients compared to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and normal controls. METHODS: We studied 60 FM, 60 RA patients and 60 controls for fall frequency in one week, one month, six months and one year. Patients were submitted to body mass index determination and balance evaluation through the Berg scale. Data on disease impact and depression were collected in FM patients through the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) and the Beck Questionnaire. RESULTS: FM patients had a higher frequency of falls than RA patients and control individuals in one month (p<0.0001), in six months (p<0.0001) and in one year (p<0.0001). No relationship was found between falls and body mass index, pain or depression scores. Falls in 12 months were associated with higher FIQ values. CONCLUSION: FM patients fall more often than RA patients and control individuals. Level of Evidence II, Investigation of the effect of a patient characteristic on the disease outcome. PMID:25061425

  8. Arthritis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  9. Neurobiology Underlying Fibromyalgia Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Ceko, Marta; Bushnell, M. Catherine; Gracely, Richard H.

    2012-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is characterized by chronic widespread pain, clinical symptoms that include cognitive and sleep disturbances, and other abnormalities such as increased sensitivity to painful stimuli, increased sensitivity to multiple sensory modalities, and altered pain modulatory mechanisms. Here we relate experimental findings of fibromyalgia symptoms to anatomical and functional brain changes. Neuroimaging studies show augmented sensory processing in pain-related areas, which, together with gray matter decreases and neurochemical abnormalities in areas related to pain modulation, supports the psychophysical evidence of altered pain perception and inhibition. Gray matter decreases in areas related to emotional decision making and working memory suggest that cognitive disturbances could be related to brain alterations. Altered levels of neurotransmitters involved in sleep regulation link disordered sleep to neurochemical abnormalities. Thus, current evidence supports the view that at least some fibromyalgia symptoms are associated with brain dysfunctions or alterations, giving the long-held “it is all in your head” view of the disorder a new meaning. PMID:22135739

  10. Reported Experiences of Persons with Alopecia Areata

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Nigel; McHale, Sue

    2005-01-01

    Alopecia is a chronic disease of hair loss. The study focuses on psychological issues relating to the experience of alopecia. Previous research has considered psychological problems as secondary to the medical disorder. The first part consisted of spontaneous written accounts (N = 62) of the experience of alopecia. The second part was an…

  11. Reported Experiences of Persons with Alopecia Areata

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Nigel; McHale, Sue

    2005-01-01

    Alopecia is a chronic disease of hair loss. The study focuses on psychological issues relating to the experience of alopecia. Previous research has considered psychological problems as secondary to the medical disorder. The first part consisted of spontaneous written accounts (N=162) of the experience of alopecia. The second part was an…

  12. What causes alopecia areata?

    PubMed Central

    McElwee, K. J.; Gilhar, A.; Tobin, D. J.; Ramot, Y.; Sundberg, J. P.; Nakamura, M.; Bertolini, M.; Inui, S.; Tokura, Y.; Jr, L. E. King; Duque-Estrada, B.; Tosti, A; Keren, A.; Itami, S.; Shoenfeld, Y.; Zlotogorski, A.; Paus, R.

    2014-01-01

    The pathobiology of alopecia areata (AA), one of the most frequent autoimmune diseases and a major unsolved clinical problem, has intrigued dermatologists, hair biologists and immunologists for decades. Simultaneously, both affected patients and the physicians who take care of them are increasingly frustrated that there is still no fully satisfactory treatment. Much of this frustration results from the fact that the pathobiology of AA remains unclear, and no single AA pathogenesis concept can claim to be universally accepted. In fact, some investigators still harbour doubts whether this even is an autoimmune disease, and the relative importance of CD8+ T cells, CD4+ T cells and NKGD2+ NK or NKT cells and the exact role of genetic factors in AA pathogenesis remain bones of contention. Also, is AA one disease, a spectrum of distinct disease entities or only a response pattern of normal hair follicles to immunologically mediated damage? During the past decade, substantial progress has been made in basic AA-related research, in the development of new models for translationally relevant AA research and in the identification of new therapeutic agents and targets for future AA management. This calls for a re-evaluation and public debate of currently prevalent AA pathobiology concepts. The present Controversies feature takes on this challenge, hoping to attract more skin biologists, immunologists and professional autoimmunity experts to this biologically fascinating and clinically important model disease. PMID:23947678

  13. Androgenetic alopecia in women.

    PubMed

    Price, Vera H

    2003-06-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA), also known in women as female pattern hair loss, is caused by androgens in genetically susceptible women and men. The thinning begins between ages 12 and 40 years, the inheritance pattern is polygenic, and the incidence is the same as in men. In susceptible hair follicles, dihydrotestosterone binds to the androgen receptor, and the hormone-receptor complex activates the genes responsible for the gradual transformation of large terminal follicles to miniaturized follicles. Both young women and young men with AGA have higher levels of 5alpha reductase and androgen receptor in frontal hair follicles compared to occipital follicles. At the same time, young women have much higher levels of cytochrome p-450 aromatase in frontal follicles than men who have minimal aromatase, and women have even higher aromatase levels in occipital follicles. The diagnosis of AGA in women is supported by early age of onset, the pattern of increased thinning over the frontal/parietal scalp with greater density over the occipital scalp, retention of the frontal hairline, and the presence of miniaturized hairs. Most women with AGA have normal menses and pregnancies. Extensive hormonal testing is usually not needed unless symptoms and signs of androgen excess are present such as hirsutism, severe unresponsive cystic acne, virilization, or galactorrhea. Topical minoxidil solution is the only drug available for promoting hair growth in women with AGA. Efficacy has been shown in double-blind studies using hair counts and hair weight. PMID:12894991

  14. Fibromyalgia Impact and Mindfulness Characteristics in 4986 People with Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kim D.; Mist, Scott D.; Casselberry, Marie A.; Ali, Ather; Christopher, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Context and Objective A growing body of literature suggests that mindfulness techniques may be beneficial in fibromyalgia. A recent systematic review and meta-analysis of six trials indicated improvement in depressive symptoms and quality of life, calling for increased rigor and use of standardized measures in future trials. The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between mindfulness [as measured by the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ)] and fibromyalgia impact [as measured by the Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR)]. Design, Setting, and Participants A cross-sectional survey was conducted with adults diagnosed with fibromyalgia from a national fibromyalgia advocacy foundation e-mail list. Results A total of 4986 respondents represented all 50 states in the United States and 30 countries. FIQR scores demonstrated moderate to severe fibromyalgia with the majority of subjects (59%) scoring ≤60. Scores on the FFMQ subscales ranged from 20.8 to 27.3, with highest scores for the observe subscale. All subscale correlations were small to moderate and indicated that more severe fibromyalgia impact was associated with less mindfulness except in the observe scale (r = .15, P > .000). No clinical or demographics explained as much variance in the FIQR total as any of the mindfulness subscales. Conclusions Fibromyalgia patients experience symptoms that may be alleviated by mindfulness interventions. Baseline values for the observe subscale of the FFMQ were unexpectedly high. Further research is needed to know if this may be due to non-mindful observations and should be noted when the FFMQ is used in fibromyalgia clinical trials. PMID:26005199

  15. Massage therapy for fibromyalgia symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Leonid

    2010-07-01

    Massage therapy is widely used by patients with fibromyalgia seeking symptom relief. We performed a review of all available studies with an emphasis on randomized controlled trials to determine whether massage therapy can be a viable treatment of fibromyalgia symptoms. Extensive narrative review. PubMed, PsychInfo, CINAHL, PEDro, ISI Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases (inception-December 2009) were searched for the key words "massage", "massotherapy", "self-massage", "soft tissue manipulation", "soft tissue mobilization", "complementary medicine", "fibromyalgia" "fibrositis", and "myofascial pain". No language restrictions were imposed. The reference lists of all articles retrieved in full were also searched. The effects of massage on fibromyalgia symptoms have been examined in two single-arm studies and six randomized controlled trials. All reviewed studies showed short-term benefits of massage, and only one single-arm study demonstrated long-term benefits. All reviewed studies had methodological problems. The existing literature provides modest support for use of massage therapy in treating fibromyalgia. Additional rigorous research is needed in order to establish massage therapy as a safe and effective intervention for fibromyalgia. In massage therapy of fibromyalgia, we suggest that massage will be painless, its intensity should be increased gradually from session to session, in accordance with patient's symptoms; and the sessions should be performed at least 1-2 times a week.

  16. [Fibromyalgia. Diagnostics--disease approach--therapy].

    PubMed

    Lakomek, Heinz-Jürgen; Lakomek, Mechthild; Bosquet-Nahrwold, Karola

    2007-01-15

    Fibromyalgia is a complex of symptoms predominantly affecting females and consisting of widespread pain. Etiology and pathogenesis are not sufficiently known yet, however, there is the assumption that fibromyalgia is looked at as being an illness with biological, psychological, and social aspects. Therefore, the treatment of fibromyalgia calls for a multimodal therapy approach. The importance of fibromyalgia has been recognized within the German health system by creating the new ICD code M79.70 and by assigning fibromyalgia its own rheumatologic DRG (I79Z). In future research of fibromyalgia special attention needs to be placed upon gender-specific problems. PMID:17221348

  17. Fungal arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Mycotic arthritis; Infectious arthritis - fungal ... Marquez J, Espinoza LR. Infectious arthritis II: mycobacterial, brucellar, fungal, and parasitic arthritis. In: Hochberg MC, Silman AJ, Smolen JS, Weinblatt ME, Weisman MH, eds. Rheumatology . ...

  18. Current treatment of alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Jerry

    2013-12-01

    Treatment of alopecia areata is dependent on age of patient as well as the extent and duration of scalp involvement. Treatments include steroids, topical immunotherapy, topical minoxidil, anthralin, and immunosuppressants. Each case must be dealt with on a customized individual basis. PMID:24326551

  19. Complementary and alternative medicine in alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    van den Biggelaar, Frank J H M; Smolders, Joost; Jansen, Jacobus F A

    2010-01-01

    Alopecia areata is an unpredictable hair-loss condition. As there is no cure for alopecia areata and no effective conventional therapy, a substantial number of alopecia areata patients resort to complementary and alternative medical remedies and therapies (CAM). This review on the application of CAM in alopecia areata addresses two pertinent aspects. First, it provides a current overview of the published medical literature on CAM used in alopecia areata, and alopecia areata-related studies. Second, it presents a thorough assessment of the considerations and limitations of the use of CAM for the treatment of alopecia areata. A systematic MEDLINE search yielded 13 studies of the clinical use of CAM in the management of alopecia areata, all belonging to one of the five main categories of CAM. Methodological quality was analyzed using objective assessment scores (Wilson and Lawrence scores). Unfortunately, no study was of sufficient internal validity to provide robust evidence of the benefit of CAM. This might be attributable to several specific disease characteristics of alopecia areata, which require an especially solid trial design to properly assess the therapeutic effects of CAM. The review concludes with some recommendations for improving the quality of trials incorporating CAM in the treatment of alopecia areata. PMID:20000871

  20. BET 2: Acupuncture and fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Goldie, Laura; Hogg, Kerstin

    2016-10-01

    A shortcut review was carried out to see if acupuncture is an effective pain treatment in fibromyalgia. One Cochrane review and five subsequent papers and conference abstracts were identified. There are no large studies addressing this question and acupuncture has been compared with many different treatment modalities. Acupuncture may be a valid treatment for pain in fibromyalgia, but more research is required to validate this.

  1. Fibromyalgia: Timely diagnosis and treatment options.

    PubMed

    DʼArcy, Yvonne; Kraus, Susan; Clair, Andrew; Kiley, Deborah

    2016-09-22

    Fibromyalgia can be challenging to diagnose and treat, and patients often feel isolated and misunderstood. Surveys of patients with fibromyalgia suggest that patients would benefit from greater understanding and acceptance. NPs can provide this support and play a prominent role in helping patients manage their fibromyalgia.

  2. Fibromyalgia: Timely diagnosis and treatment options.

    PubMed

    DʼArcy, Yvonne; Kraus, Susan; Clair, Andrew; Kiley, Deborah

    2016-09-22

    Fibromyalgia can be challenging to diagnose and treat, and patients often feel isolated and misunderstood. Surveys of patients with fibromyalgia suggest that patients would benefit from greater understanding and acceptance. NPs can provide this support and play a prominent role in helping patients manage their fibromyalgia. PMID:27552689

  3. Female pattern alopecia and telogen effluvium: figuring out diffuse alopecia.

    PubMed

    Torres, Fernanda; Tosti, Antonella

    2015-06-01

    Diffuse hair loss in women causes a significant impact on quality of life, reduces self-esteem, and increases stress. One of the major challenges when evaluating patients with diffuse hair loss is to determine whether you are dealing with either female pattern alopecia, telogen effluvium, or both, as they can coexist. Establishing the correct diagnosis is mandatory for optimal patient care. This article will highlight how to distinguish between and properly manage these 2 conditions. PMID:26176282

  4. Acquired scalp alopecia. Part II: A review.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, J R; Kossard, S

    1999-05-01

    The neutrophil-associated and infiltrative scarring alopecias are reviewed including folliculitis decalvans, tufted folliculitis, dissecting cellulitis of the scalp, acne keloidalis and follicular degeneration syndrome. The management of acquired scalp alopecia is also reviewed including newer, promising therapies. More specific agents targeting components of the androgen system will make the treatment of androgenetic alopecia more rewarding. Similarly new immunomodulatory therapies show great promise for the lymphocyte-associated alopecias and include a new generation of macrolide immunosuppressives (tacrolimus, SDZ ASM 981, and SDZ 281-240), some of which appear to have good transcutaneous absorption. PMID:10333615

  5. Premature Aging in Fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Hassett, Afton L; Clauw, Daniel J; Williams, David A

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain is highly prevalent in older adults, and until recently, was considered to be common but relatively "benign." Mounting evidence, however, suggests that some of the 116 million US adults who suffer from chronic pain are also at an increased risk for developing age-related diseases prematurely, suffering earlier cognitive and physical decline, and experiencing earlier mortality. Given the aging US population and the prevalence of chronic pain along with related healthcare consequences, there is a critical need to better understand the relationship between aging and chronic pain. Herein, we focus on one chronic pain state, fibromyalgia, and provide an overview of the evidence suggesting that individuals with this chronic pain condition show signs of premature aging.

  6. Selenium status in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, P; Schweinsberg, F; Wernet, D; Kötter, I

    1998-08-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic musculoskeletal pain syndrome of unknown etiology. The serum concentration of selenium (Se) was measured in 68 consecutive patients (nine male, mean age: 47 years; 59 female, mean age 49 years) with FM. The age- and sex-matched control group included 97 female healthy blood donors (mean age 46 years). The method is based on high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) involving detection of the fluorescent diaminonaphthalene (DAN) derivate of selenite. There was a statistical significant difference (P < 0.05) in serum Se between control (median 77 microg/l; range: 50-118 microg/l) and patients (median 71 microg/l; range: 39-154 microg/l) groups in the region of Tübingen, Germany.

  7. What's eating you? tick bite alopecia.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Leonard C; Sutton, Elizabeth; Wilke, Marke S

    2016-08-01

    Tick bite alopecia is seldom reported in the literature. The condition usually presents as a solitary oval zone of alopecia with a central eschar. Histologic findings are not well described but generally indicate dense perifollicular lymphocytic inflammation. The mechanism for hair loss is poorly understood, but the prognosis for hair regrowth appears to be favorable. PMID:27622251

  8. Alopecia areata and its effects on patients.

    PubMed

    McGettigan, Maureen L

    2013-12-01

    The onset of alopecia areata creates a roller coaster of emotions. Like the disease, a patient's emotions are unpredictable. The lack of control over one's body is both frightening and intimidating. Alopecia areata not only impacts an individual but it also has a halo effect, impacting family and friends, thereby increasing the number of people affected by the disease. PMID:24326550

  9. Nail Involvement in Frontal Fibrosing Alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Macpherson, Melanie; Hohendorf-Ansari, Parinaz; Trüeb, Ralph Michel

    2015-01-01

    A case of frontal fibrosing alopecia with nail involvement is presented. Nail involvement provides evidence for underlying lichen planus, and that the disease represents a rather generalized than localized process. Favorable response of the scalp condition to oral dutasteride points to an inflammatory reaction on the background of androgenetic alopecia. PMID:26180450

  10. Nail Involvement in Frontal Fibrosing Alopecia.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Melanie; Hohendorf-Ansari, Parinaz; Trüeb, Ralph Michel

    2015-01-01

    A case of frontal fibrosing alopecia with nail involvement is presented. Nail involvement provides evidence for underlying lichen planus, and that the disease represents a rather generalized than localized process. Favorable response of the scalp condition to oral dutasteride points to an inflammatory reaction on the background of androgenetic alopecia. PMID:26180450

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a form of arthritis that causes pain, swelling, stiffness and loss of function in ... wrist and fingers. More women than men get rheumatoid arthritis. It often starts in middle age and is ...

  12. Juvenile Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Juvenile arthritis (JA) is arthritis that happens in children. It causes joint swelling, pain, stiffness, and loss ... common type of JA that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. There are several other forms of ...

  13. Fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and myofascial pain.

    PubMed

    Bennett, R

    1998-03-01

    Epidemiologic studies continue to provide evidence that fibromyalgia is part of a spectrum of chronic widespread pain. The prevalence of chronic widespread pain is several times higher than fibromyalgia as defined by the 1990 American College of Rheumatology guidelines. There is now compelling evidence of a familial clustering of fibromyalgia cases in female sufferers; whether this clustering results from nature or nature remains to be elucidated. A wide spectrum of fibromyalgia-associated symptomatology and syndromes continues to be described. During the past year the association with interstitial cystitis has been explored, and neurally mediated hypotension has been documented in both fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome. Abnormalities of the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-1 axis have been also documented in both fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome. The commonly reported but anecdotal association of fibromyalgia with whiplash-type neck trauma was validated in a report from Israel. However, unlike North America, 100% of Israeli patients with posttraumatic fibromyalgia returned to work. Basic research in fibromyalgia continues to pinpoint abnormal sensory processing as being integral to understanding fibromyalgia pain. Drugs such as ketamine, which block N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (which are often upregulated in central pain states) were shown to benefit fibromyalgia pain in an experimental setting. The combination of fluoxetine and amitriptyline was reported to be more beneficial than either drug alone in patients with fibromyalgia. A high prevalence of autoantibodies to cytoskeletal and nuclear envelope proteins was found in chronic fatigue syndrome, and an increased prevalence of antipolymer antibodies was found in symptomatic silicone breast implant recipients who often have fibromyalgia.

  14. Fibromyalgia: a rheumatologic diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Endresen, Gerhard K M

    2007-09-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a medically unexplained or functional somatic syndrome (FSS). The two classification criteria are chronic widespread pain (CWP) and the finding of 11/18 tender points (TP). FM overlaps and co-occurs with other FSSs, and auxiliary symptoms that are not included in the criteria may be clues to other FSSs. About ten FSSs include chronic fatigue syndrome, myofascial pain syndromes and irritable bowel syndrome. TP do not reflect demonstrable pathology, and are locations where everyone is generally more tender. In FM they are more tender than normal due to lowered pain threshold. High TP counts are associated with the extent of distress or unspecific somatic symptoms in the absence of chronic pain. TP lack validity and should be excluded. CWP and distress are outside the domain of rheumatology, and abnormal mechanisms in FM relate to the central nervous system, as compared to "peripheral" mechanisms studied in rheumatology. FM should not be considered as a rheumatologic condition but rather as part of a broader spectre of FSSs. Patients with FSSs should be considered and treated together across medical specialities by general physicians in primary health care.

  15. [Cognitive dysfunction in fibromyalgia].

    PubMed

    Gelonch, Olga; Garolera, Maite; Rosselló, Lluís; Pifarré, Josep

    2013-06-01

    Introduccion. Las personas diagnosticadas de fibromialgia refieren de manera muy frecuente quejas sobre su pobre funcionamiento cognitivo. En los ultimos anos ha aumentado el interes para investigar cuales son las alteraciones cognitivas presentes en esta enfermedad. Objetivo. Realizar una revision de las investigaciones publicadas sobre fibromialgia y funciones cognitivas. Desarrollo. Se realizo una busqueda bibliografica con un intervalo temporal desde 1995 hasta 2012. Los terminos de busqueda incluyeron las palabras clave 'fibromyalgia' y 'cognition', 'attention', 'memory', 'language', 'perception', 'executive functions' y 'disexecutive syndrome'. Se seleccionaron 64 registros tras aplicar criterios de inclusion. Conclusiones. Los estudios que han analizado las funciones cognitivas en las personas diagnosticadas de fibromialgia han sido escasos y mayoritariamente con muestras pequenas. Se han identificado deficits principalmente en la memoria de trabajo y en las capacidades atencionales mas complejas, donde el factor distraccion tiene una relevancia importante. Tambien se ha identificado deterioro en la memoria a largo plazo y en las funciones ejecutivas. Existe consenso entre los diversos estudios en que el grado de dolor tiene una relacion directa con el nivel de disfuncion cognitiva, mientras que no existe total consenso para explicar la influencia de la depresion y ansiedad sobre el funcionamiento cognitivo en estos pacientes.

  16. Fibromyalgia, Fibro Fog, and Exercise.

    PubMed

    Karper, William B; Letvak, Susan A

    2015-01-01

    Fibro fog causes serious problems for those with fibromyalgia syndrome. The mechanisms that cause it have not been well identified. Since prescription medication and other conventional medical interventions have proven less than satisfactory, and while waiting for more investigational information, research suggests that exercise might be helpful.

  17. Psoriatic arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, L.H.; Espinoza, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the titles are: The history and epidemiologic definition of psoriatic arthritis as a distinct entity; Psoriatic arthritis: Further epidemiologic and genetic considerations; The radiologic features of psoriatic arthritis; and Laboratory findings and pathology of psoriatic arthritis.

  18. Vitiligo after Diphencyprone for Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Mario Cezar; Martins, João Mauricio; Montealegre, F.; Gatti, Flávia Romero

    2010-01-01

    The topical immunotherapy is used to treat alopecia areata and recalcitrant warts since the 1970s. Diphencyprone is a contact sensitizer used to treat dermatological conditions resulting from as altered immunological state, such as extensive alopecia areata, being partially effective and safe. Side effects include local eczema with blistering, regional lymphadenopathy and contact urticaria. Rare adverse effects include an erythema multiforme-like reaction, hyperpigmenttion, hypopigmentation, and vitiligo. We report a 30-year-old, Brazilian male who developed vitiligo lesions following DPCP therapy for alopecia areata. PMID:20585597

  19. Androgenetic Alopecia: An Update of Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Yanna; Blanco, Aline; Tosti, Antonella

    2016-09-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is characterized by a non-scarring progressive miniaturization of the hair follicle in predisposed men and women with a pattern distribution. Although AGA is a very prevalent condition, approved therapeutic options are limited. This article discusses the current treatment alternatives including their efficacy, safety profile, and quality of evidence. Finasteride and minoxidil for male androgenetic alopecia and minoxidil for female androgenetic alopecia still are the therapeutic options with the highest level evidence. The role of antiandrogens for female patients, the importance of adjuvant therapies, as well as new drugs and procedures are also addressed. PMID:27554257

  20. Acupuncture for treating fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Deare, John C; Zheng, Zhen; Xue, Charlie CL; Liu, Jian Ping; Shang, Jingsheng; Scott, Sean W; Littlejohn, Geoff

    2014-01-01

    Background One in five fibromyalgia sufferers use acupuncture treatment within two years of diagnosis. Objectives To examine the benefits and safety of acupuncture treatment for fibromyalgia. Search methods We searched CENTRAL, PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, National Research Register, HSR Project and Current Contents, as well as the Chinese databases VIP and Wangfang to January 2012 with no language restrictions. Selection criteria Randomised and quasi-randomised studies evaluating any type of invasive acupuncture for fibromyalgia diagnosed according to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, and reporting any main outcome: pain, physical function, fatigue, sleep, total well-being, stiffness and adverse events. Data collection and analysis Two author pairs selected trials, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. Treatment effects were reported as standardised mean differences (SMD) and 95%confidence intervals (CI) for continuous outcomes using different measurement tools (pain, physical function, fatigue, sleep, total well-being and stiffness) and risk ratio (RR) and 95% CI for dichotomous outcomes (adverse events).We pooled data using the random-effects model. Main results Nine trials (395 participants) were included. All studies except one were at low risk of selection bias; five were at risk of selective reporting bias (favouring either treatment group); two were subject to attrition bias (favouring acupuncture); three were subject to performance bias (favouring acupuncture) and one to detection bias (favouring acupuncture). Three studies utilised electro-acupuncture (EA) with the remainder using manual acupuncture (MA) without electrical stimulation. All studies used ’formula acupuncture’ except for one, which used trigger points. Low quality evidence from one study (13 participants) showed EA improved symptoms with no adverse events at one month following treatment. Mean pain in the non-treatment control group was 70 points on a 100 point scale

  1. Differentiating Central Centrifugal Cicatricial Alopecia and Androgenetic Alopecia in African American Men

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Erica C.; Reid, Sophia D.; Sperling, Leonard C.

    2012-01-01

    Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia is a scarring alopecia that is predominantly seen in African American women, but occurs less frequently in men. The authors present three cases of African American men with biopsy-proven central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia and detail the clinical presentation, histological findings, and treatment regimens. Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia should be considered in the differential diagnosis when evaluating male patients with vertex hair loss accompanied by scalp symptoms. Physicians should maintain a high index of suspicion in African American men with the appropriate clinical picture and confirm the diagnosis by scalp biopsy. Prompt and appropriate treatment can help halt or slow disease progression. PMID:22768355

  2. Diagnosis and differential diagnosis of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Don L

    2009-12-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic functional illness that presents with widespread musculoskeletal pain as well as a constellation of symptoms including fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, sleep difficulties, stiffness, anxiety, and depressed mood. The diagnosis of fibromyalgia, similar to other functional disorders, requires that organic diseases are not causing the symptoms. Systemic and rheumatic diseases can be ruled out by a patient history, physical examination, and laboratory investigations. Because there are no specific laboratory tests for fibromyalgia, the 1990 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) classification criteria have been used in clinical settings; however, they are not ideal for individual patient diagnosis. Clinicians should be aware of limitations inherent in using tender points in the diagnosis of fibromyalgia. The multiple symptoms of fibromyalgia often overlap with those of related disorders and may further complicate the diagnosis. One of the most challenging diagnostic dilemmas that clinicians face is distinguishing fibromyalgia from other central pain disorders (e.g., irritable bowel syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome, migraine). Screening questions based on published criteria can be used as a first approach in diagnosing functional illnesses. Numerous studies report a higher prevalence of psychiatric disorders in patients with fibromyalgia. Therefore, a careful history and evaluation should be taken for the presence of primary mood disturbances. To date, there is no "gold standard" for diagnosing fibromyalgia. Until a better clinical case definition of fibromyalgia exists, all diagnostic criteria should be interpreted with caution, considered rudimentary, and subject to modification.

  3. Fibromyalgia: clinical features, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Walker, Jennie

    2016-09-28

    Patients with fibromyalgia experience chronic widespread pain, with associated symptoms of fatigue, sleep disturbance and memory problems. There are many therapies which may be helpful in managing the symptoms of fibromyalgia; however, these often require a process of trial and error to establish optimum management using a combination of pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches. Nurses can support patients with fibromyalgia using a biopsychosocial approach to symptom management. Understanding the nature of fibromyalgia and management options will enable nurses to deliver holistic patient-centred care. PMID:27682568

  4. Fibromyalgia: clinical features, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Walker, Jennie

    2016-09-28

    Patients with fibromyalgia experience chronic widespread pain, with associated symptoms of fatigue, sleep disturbance and memory problems. There are many therapies which may be helpful in managing the symptoms of fibromyalgia; however, these often require a process of trial and error to establish optimum management using a combination of pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches. Nurses can support patients with fibromyalgia using a biopsychosocial approach to symptom management. Understanding the nature of fibromyalgia and management options will enable nurses to deliver holistic patient-centred care.

  5. Fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and myofascial pain.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, D L

    1996-03-01

    The prevalence of fibromyalgia in the general population was found to be 2% and increased with age. Multiple traumatic factors, including sexual and physical abuse, may be important initiating events. The most important pathophysiologic studies in fibromyalgia included evidence of altered blood flow to the brain and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal dysfunction. The prevalence of chronic fatigue syndrome is much less than that of fibromyalgia. Epidemiologic studies demonstrated that chronic fatigue and symptoms of fibromyalgia are distributed as continuous variables in the general population. No association between chronic fatigue and initial infections was seen in primary care practices.

  6. Hypnotic approaches for alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Willemsen, Ria; Vanderlinden, Johan

    2008-07-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is an autoimmune disease leading to loss of scalp hairs. The disease seems triggered by stress. Data on the possibility of using hypnotherapy in the treatment of AA are very limited. Twenty-eight patients with extensive AA, all refractory to previous conventional treatment, were treated with hypnosis at the Academic Hospital UZ Brussel, Brussels, Belgium. This paper describes in detail the authors' hypnotherapeutic approach combining symptom-oriented suggestions with suggestions to improve self-esteem. Twelve out of 21 patients, including 4 with total loss of scalp hair, presented a significant hair growth. All patients presented a significant decrease in scores for anxiety and depression. Although the exact mechanism of hypnotic interventions has not been elucidated, the authors' results demonstrate that hypnotic interventions may ameliorate the clinical outcome of patients with AA and may improve their psychological well-being.

  7. [Androgenetic alopecia in the man].

    PubMed

    Bader, U; Trüeb, R M

    2002-05-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) occurs in approximately 40% of men at the age of 40 and 50% at 50, respectively. Especially for young men progressive hair loss can be distressing. Therefore, understanding of these patients' concerns is important for appropriate management. Current understanding of the pathophysiology of AGA mainly focuses on androgen metabolism as it affects hair growth. As a result, pharmacologic treatment has made considerable progress through the introduction of selective 5 alpha-reductase inhibition with finasteride. In placebo-controlled clinical trials in men with AGA, treatment with oral finasteride proved to be effective. Minoxidil is the only pharmacological substance for topical application with proven efficacy. So far, other treatment modalities have no proven efficacy in clinical trials, so that their use cannot be recommended. Options for advanced AGA not amenable to pharmacologic treatment are autologous hair transplantation and hair replacement, both of which have recently also made progress in terms of cosmetic appeal. PMID:12090116

  8. The Prevalence of Fibromyalgia in Other Chronic Pain Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yunus, Muhammad B.

    2012-01-01

    Central sensitivity syndromes (CSS) include fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), irritable bowel syndrome, temporomandibular disorder, restless legs syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome, and other similar chronic painful conditions that are based on central sensitization (CS). CSS are mutually associated. In this paper, prevalence of FMS among other members of CSS has been described. An important recent recognition is an increased prevalence of FMS in other chronic pain conditions with structural pathology, for example, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus, ankylosing spondylitis, osteoarthritis, diabetes mellitus, and inflammatory bowel disease. Diagnosis and proper management of FMS among these diseases are of crucial importance so that unwarranted use of such medications as corticosteroids can be avoided, since FMS often occurs when RA or SLE is relatively mild. PMID:22191024

  9. Duloxetine for the treatment of fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Cheryl L; Mist, Scott D; Ross, Rebecca L; Jones, Kim D

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a brief review of the physiologic abnormalities seen in fibromyalgia, current theories of widespread pain, and treatment options, including emerging therapeutics, with a focus on the use of duloxetine to manage fibromyalgia symptoms. Major clinical trials that examine the efficacy and effectiveness of duloxetine to date are reviewed, and safety issues are discussed. PMID:20828282

  10. Fibromyalgia and nutrition: what news?

    PubMed

    Rossi, Alessandra; Di Lollo, Anna Chiara; Guzzo, Maria Paola; Giacomelli, Camillo; Atzeni, Fabiola; Bazzichi, Laura; Di Franco, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FM) is a chronic, generalised pain condition usually accompanied by several associated symptoms, such as fatigue, sleep disturbance, headache, irritable bowel syndrome and mood disorders. Different medical treatments are used to treat fibromyalgia and the recent guidelines suggest that the optimal treatment consists in a multidisciplinary approach with a combination of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment modalities. Among non-pharmacological treatment, nutrition is a promising tool for FM patients. The aim of this review is to update the present knowledge about fibromyalgia and nutrition by means of a systematic search performed on Medline from January 2000 to December 2014. Nutritional deficiencies have been described in FM patients and the benefits of specific diet and nutritional supplementation are shown. Obesity and overweight, often present in FM patients, are related to the severity of FM worsening the quality of life in terms of higher pain, fatigue, worsened sleep quality and higher incidence of mood disorders. Weight control is thus an effective tool to improve the symptoms. Moreover, it seems reasonable to eliminate some foods from the diet of FM patients, for example excitotoxins. Non-coeliac gluten sensitivity is increasingly recognised as a frequent condition with similar manifestations which overlap with those of FM. The elimination of gluten from the diet of FM patients is recently becoming a potential dietary intervention for clinical improvement. In summary, this review reveals the potential benefit of specific dietary interventions as non-pharmacological tools as part of a multidisciplinary treatment for FM patients.

  11. Sleep architecture in patients with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Besteiro González, José Luis; Suárez Fernández, Tomás Vicente; Arboleya Rodríguez, Luis; Muñiz, José; Lemos Giráldez, Serafín; Alvarez Fernández, Angel

    2011-08-01

    The main objective of this work was to evaluate the characteristics of sleep in patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia syndrome. Sleep architecture in 32 patients with fibromyalgia and 20 healthy controls was evaluated. Following the recommendations of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology, polysomnographies were conducted with fibromyalgia patients and the control subjects. The fibromyalgia patients showed alterations in cyclic organization of sleep and an increased number of periodic leg movements associated with cortical arousals. No significant differences were found in respiratory and oximetry variables or in alpha-delta sleep. The results support that fibromyalgia patients present an increase of superficial sleep at the expense of deep sleep and also an increase of periodic leg movements, which could have a pathogenic effect, facilitating the onset of the illness. Lastly, we discuss the results and propose some future lines of research. PMID:21774887

  12. Clinical manifestations and diagnosis of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Robert M

    2009-05-01

    Since the publication of the American College of Rheumatology Classification Criteria for Fibromyalgia 18 years ago, there have been an ever-increasing number of research articles and reviews. From the National Library of Medicine alone there are more than 10,000 articles related to fibromyalgia. The major clinical manifestations of fibromyalgia have not changed, but their prevalence, associations, relative importance to the patient, and scientific underpinnings are increasingly better understood. This article provides an update on fibromyalgia symptomatology and looks at issues that need to be considered in the development of updated diagnostic guidelines. There is still no gold standard for making a diagnosis of fibromyalgia, but there is an increasing consensus for the development of new guidelines for diagnosis that modifies the currently proscribed tender point evaluation.

  13. Sleep architecture in patients with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Besteiro González, José Luis; Suárez Fernández, Tomás Vicente; Arboleya Rodríguez, Luis; Muñiz, José; Lemos Giráldez, Serafín; Alvarez Fernández, Angel

    2011-08-01

    The main objective of this work was to evaluate the characteristics of sleep in patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia syndrome. Sleep architecture in 32 patients with fibromyalgia and 20 healthy controls was evaluated. Following the recommendations of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology, polysomnographies were conducted with fibromyalgia patients and the control subjects. The fibromyalgia patients showed alterations in cyclic organization of sleep and an increased number of periodic leg movements associated with cortical arousals. No significant differences were found in respiratory and oximetry variables or in alpha-delta sleep. The results support that fibromyalgia patients present an increase of superficial sleep at the expense of deep sleep and also an increase of periodic leg movements, which could have a pathogenic effect, facilitating the onset of the illness. Lastly, we discuss the results and propose some future lines of research.

  14. Septic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... acute septic arthritis are caused by Staphylococcus or Streptococcus bacteria . Chronic septic arthritis (which is less common) ... cases are caused by the bacteria group B streptococcus. Another common cause is Haemophilus influenza , especially if ...

  15. Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your body. Some people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling of the ... physical exam and imaging tests to diagnose psoriatic arthritis. There is no cure, but medicines can help ...

  16. Viral arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Infectious arthritis - viral ... Ohl CA, Forster D. Infectious arthritis of native joints. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious ...

  17. Infectious Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Infectious arthritis is an infection in the joint. The infection ... from another part of the body. Symptoms of infectious arthritis include Intense pain in the joint Joint redness ...

  18. Reactive arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hind, C. R. K.

    1982-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is a rare complication of certain infections. The similar features and HLA associations with the seronegative arthropathies have raised the possibility that the latter may be forms of reactive arthritis. This review describes the clinical and epidemiological features, and the recent advances in our understanding of the underlying pathogenesis of reactive arthritis. PMID:7100033

  19. Current Treatments for Alopecia Areata.

    PubMed

    Hordinsky, Maria K

    2015-11-01

    Selection of a therapy for a patient with alopecia areata (AA) is frequently based on the age of the patient, disease extent, perhaps disease duration, patient expectations, cost of therapy in terms of time commitment, and financial resources, as well as the results of screening laboratory studies that rule out the presence of other co-morbidities such as anemia, low iron stores, thyroid abnormalities, low vitamin D, or other autoimmune diseases. Although there is currently no cure for AA and no universally proven therapy that induces and sustains remission, many therapies are available which can be of benefit to both affected children and adults. Before selecting a treatment for patients with extensive long-standing AA, a scalp biopsy may provide useful information about the degree of inflammation and follicle differentiation. Recent clinical and translational research observations with the systemic Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors and interleukin-2 (IL-2) have excited the clinical and AA patient communities and have led to clinical trials, as well as to the off-label use of these more expensive and targeted systemic therapies. PMID:26551946

  20. Female pattern alopecia: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Levy, Lauren L; Emer, Jason J

    2013-01-01

    Hair loss is a commonly encountered problem in clinical practice, with men presenting with a distinctive pattern involving hairline recession and vertex balding (Norwood-Hamilton classification) and women exhibiting diffuse hair thinning over the crown (increased part width) and sparing of the frontal hairline (Ludwig classification). Female pattern hair loss has a strikingly overwhelming psychological effect; thus, successful treatments are necessary. Difficulty lies in successful treatment interventions, as only two medications - minoxidil and finasteride - are approved for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia, and these medications offer mediocre results, lack of a permanent cure, and potential complications. Hair transplantation is the only current successful permanent option, and it requires surgical procedures. Several other medical options, such as antiandrogens (eg, spironolactone, oral contraceptives, cyproterone, flutamide, dutasteride), prostaglandin analogs (eg, bimatoprost, latanoprost), and ketoconazole are reported to be beneficial. Laser and light therapies have also become popular despite the lack of a profound benefit. Management of expectations is crucial, and the aim of therapy, given the current therapeutic options, is to slow or stop disease progression with contentment despite patient expectations of permanent hair regrowth. This article reviews current perspectives on therapeutic options for female pattern hair loss. PMID:24039457

  1. Female pattern alopecia: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Lauren L; Emer, Jason J

    2013-01-01

    Hair loss is a commonly encountered problem in clinical practice, with men presenting with a distinctive pattern involving hairline recession and vertex balding (Norwood-Hamilton classification) and women exhibiting diffuse hair thinning over the crown (increased part width) and sparing of the frontal hairline (Ludwig classification). Female pattern hair loss has a strikingly overwhelming psychological effect; thus, successful treatments are necessary. Difficulty lies in successful treatment interventions, as only two medications – minoxidil and finasteride – are approved for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia, and these medications offer mediocre results, lack of a permanent cure, and potential complications. Hair transplantation is the only current successful permanent option, and it requires surgical procedures. Several other medical options, such as antiandrogens (eg, spironolactone, oral contraceptives, cyproterone, flutamide, dutasteride), prostaglandin analogs (eg, bimatoprost, latanoprost), and ketoconazole are reported to be beneficial. Laser and light therapies have also become popular despite the lack of a profound benefit. Management of expectations is crucial, and the aim of therapy, given the current therapeutic options, is to slow or stop disease progression with contentment despite patient expectations of permanent hair regrowth. This article reviews current perspectives on therapeutic options for female pattern hair loss. PMID:24039457

  2. Molecular mechanisms of androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Trüeb, Ralph M

    2002-01-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is hereditary and androgen-dependent, progressive thinning of the scalp hair that follows a defined pattern. While the genetic involvement is pronounced but poorly understood, major advances have been achieved in understanding principal elements of the androgen metabolism involved: androgen-dependent processes are predominantly due to the binding of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) to the androgen receptor (AR). DHT-dependent cell functions depend on the availability of weak androgens, their conversion to more potent androgens via the action of 5 alpha-reductase, low enzymatic activity of androgen inactivating enzymes, and functionally active AR present in high numbers. The predisposed scalp exhibits high levels of DHT, and increased expression of the AR. Conversion of testosterone to DHT within the dermal papilla plays a central role, while androgen-regulated factors deriving from dermal papilla cells are believed to influence growth of other components of the hair follicle. Current available treatment modalities with proven efficacy are oral finasteride, a competitive inhibitor of type 2 5 alpha-reductase, and topical minoxidil, an adenosine-triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel opener which has been reported to stimulate the production of vascular endothelial growth factor in cultured dermal papilla cells. Since the clinical success rate of treatment of AGA with modulators of androgen metabolism or hair growth promoters is limited, sustained microscopic follicular inflammation with connective tissue remodeling, eventually resulting in permanent hair loss, is considered a possible cofactor in the complex etiology of AGA. PMID:12213548

  3. Modified immunotherapy for alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Yoshimasu, Takashi; Furukawa, Fukumi

    2016-07-01

    Squaric acid dibutylester (SADBE) is a commonly used contact sensitizer in immunotherapy for alopecia areata (AA). Severe contact dermatitis is induced by the currently high recommended sensitization dose of 1%-2% SADBE, often decreasing patient compliance. We assessed a modified immunotherapy for AA using SADBE at a starting concentration of 0.01% without sensitization. After one or two weeks of initial 0.01% SADBE application, the concentration of SADBE was increased gradually to 0.025%, 0.05%, 0.1%, 0.25%, 0.5%, 1% and 2% until the patients felt itching or erythema at the AA lesion site. The modified immunotherapy showed a response rate of 69.4% (25/36), equivalent to conventional immunotherapy using SADBE starting at 1%-2% sensitization. Furthermore, we investigated the combination therapy of SADBE and multiple courses of steroid pulses for AA. The response rate for combination therapy was 73.7% (28/38); however, the group receiving combination therapy showed a significant prevalence of severe AA compared with the group receiving modified immunotherapy only. We reviewed the efficacy and safety of modified immunotherapy without initial sensitization and combination therapy with immunotherapy and multiple courses of pulses for AA.

  4. Fibromyalgia: A Critical and Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Borchers, Andrea T; Gershwin, M Eric

    2015-10-01

    Fibromyalgia is a disorder that is part of a spectrum of syndromes that lack precise classification. It is often considered as part of the global overview of functional somatic syndromes that are otherwise medically unexplained or part of a somatization disorder. Patients with fibromyalgia share symptoms with other functional somatic problems, including issues of myalgias, arthralgias, fatigue and sleep disturbances. Indeed, there is often diagnostic and classification overlap for the case definitions of a variety of somatization disorders. Fibromyalgia, however, is a critically important syndrome for physicians and scientists to be aware of. Patients should be taken very seriously and provided optimal care. Although inflammatory, infectious, and autoimmune disorders have all been ascribed to be etiological events in the development of fibromyalgia, there is very little data to support such a thesis. Many of these disorders are associated with depression and anxiety and may even be part of what has been sometimes called affected spectrum disorders. There is no evidence that physical trauma, i.e., automobile accidents, is associated with the development or exacerbation of fibromyalgia. Treatment should be placed on education, patient support, physical therapy, nutrition, and exercise, including the use of drugs that are approved for the treatment of fibromyalgia. Treatment should not include opiates and patients should not become poly pharmacies in which the treatment itself can lead to significant morbidities. Patients with fibromyalgia are living and not dying of this disorder and positive outlooks and family support are key elements in the management of patients.

  5. Fibromyalgia: A Critical and Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Borchers, Andrea T; Gershwin, M Eric

    2015-10-01

    Fibromyalgia is a disorder that is part of a spectrum of syndromes that lack precise classification. It is often considered as part of the global overview of functional somatic syndromes that are otherwise medically unexplained or part of a somatization disorder. Patients with fibromyalgia share symptoms with other functional somatic problems, including issues of myalgias, arthralgias, fatigue and sleep disturbances. Indeed, there is often diagnostic and classification overlap for the case definitions of a variety of somatization disorders. Fibromyalgia, however, is a critically important syndrome for physicians and scientists to be aware of. Patients should be taken very seriously and provided optimal care. Although inflammatory, infectious, and autoimmune disorders have all been ascribed to be etiological events in the development of fibromyalgia, there is very little data to support such a thesis. Many of these disorders are associated with depression and anxiety and may even be part of what has been sometimes called affected spectrum disorders. There is no evidence that physical trauma, i.e., automobile accidents, is associated with the development or exacerbation of fibromyalgia. Treatment should be placed on education, patient support, physical therapy, nutrition, and exercise, including the use of drugs that are approved for the treatment of fibromyalgia. Treatment should not include opiates and patients should not become poly pharmacies in which the treatment itself can lead to significant morbidities. Patients with fibromyalgia are living and not dying of this disorder and positive outlooks and family support are key elements in the management of patients. PMID:26445775

  6. Patients’ and professionals’ views on managing fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Briones-Vozmediano, Erica; Vives-Cases, Carmen; Ronda-Pérez, Elena; Gil-González, Diana

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Managing fibromyalgia is a challenge for both health care systems and the professionals caring for these patients, due, in part, to the fact that the etiology of this disease is unknown, its symptoms are not specific and there is no standardized treatment. OBJECTIVE: The present study examines three aspects of fibromyalgia management, namely diagnostic approach, therapeutic management and the health professional-patient relationship, to explore specific areas of the health care process that professionals and patients may consider unsatisfactory. METHODS: A qualitative study involving semistructured interviews with 12 fibromyalgia patients and nine health professionals was performed. RESULTS: The most commonly recurring theme was the dissatisfaction of both patients and professionals with the management process as a whole. Both groups expressed dissatisfaction with the delay in reaching a diagnosis and obtaining effective treatment. Patients reported the need for greater moral support from professionals, whereas the latter often felt frustrated and of little help to patients. Patients and professionals agreed on one point: the uncertainty surrounding the management of fibromyalgia and, especially, its etiology. CONCLUSION: The present study contributes to a better understanding regarding why current management of fibromyalgia is neither effective nor satisfactory. It also provides insight into how health professionals can support fibromyalgia patients to achieve beneficial results. Health care services should offer greater support for these patients in the form of specific resources such as fibromyalgia clinics and health professionals with increased awareness of the disease. PMID:23457682

  7. Bacterial arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ho, G

    2001-07-01

    The septic arthritis literature of 2000 revisited several topics previously examined in some detail. These include septic arthritis in rheumatoid arthritis, rheumatic manifestations of bacterial endocarditis, and infectious complications of prosthetic joints. The trend in antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent late infections in total joint replacement is to narrow the targeted hosts to those most at risk, to define the procedures associated with the greatest risk of bacteremia, and to simplify the antibiotic regimen. The diagnoses of septic arthritis of the lumbar facet joint and septic arthritis caused by direct inoculation of bacteria by a foreign object penetrating the joint are facilitated by noninvasive imaging technologies. Septic arthritis caused by uncommon microorganisms and septic arthritis in immunocompromised hosts are other noteworthy topics in this year's literature. PMID:11555734

  8. [Scalp cooling for chemotherapy-induced alopecia].

    PubMed

    Komen, Marion M C; Smorenburg, Carolien H; van den Hurk, Corina J G; Nortier, J W R Hans

    2011-01-01

    Alopecia is a very common side effect of cytostatic therapy and is considered one of the most emotionally distressing effects. To prevent alopecia scalp cooling is currently used in some indications in medical oncology in 59 hospitals in the Netherlands. The success of scalp cooling depends on various factors such as type of chemotherapy, dose, infusion time, number of treatment cycles and combinations of drugs. In general, scalp cooling is well tolerated. The reported side-effects are headache, coldness, dizziness and sometimes claustrophobia. An increase in the risk of scalp metastases has not been demonstrated. Proceeding from the South Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Centre a national working group is put together in order to draw up a national guideline for chemotherapy-induced alopecia. PMID:22085565

  9. Fibromyalgia syndrome: novel therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Ablin, Jacob N; Häuser, Winfried

    2016-05-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a chronic disorder characterized by widespread pain and tenderness, accompanied by disturbed sleep, chronic fatigue and multiple additional functional symptoms. FMS continues to pose an unmet need regarding pharmacological treatment and many patients fail to achieve sufficient relief from existing treatments. As FMS is considered to be a condition in which pain amplification occurs within the CNS, therapeutic interventions, both pharmacological and otherwise, have revolved around attempts to influence pain processing in the CNS. In the current review, we present an update on novel targets in the search for effective treatment of FMS. PMID:27296699

  10. Fibromyalgia: nosography and therapeutic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Coaccioli, Stefano; Varrassi, Giustino; Sabatini, Chiara; Marinangeli, Franco; Giuliani, Marco; Puxeddu, Adolfo

    2008-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is an important cause of morbidity and health expenditure. Severe widespread extra-articular chronic pain, along with nonrestorative sleep, dominates the clinical syndrome. The pathogenesis of FM remains unclear. While dysfunction in serotoninergic neurotransmission is believed to play an important role, several neurologic and immuno-endocrine mechanisms may also be relevant. A theory is advanced based on an inherited imbalance in neuro-vegetative systems resulting from increased sympathetic tone because of a metabolic deficiency in the serotoninergic system that, when exposed to a precipitating event, leads to the development of the clinical manifestations of FM. The importance of both nonpharmacological treatments and multimodal medication management is stressed.

  11. Alopecia in Systemic Amyloidosis: Trichoscopic-Pathologic Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Miteva, Mariya; Wei, Erin; Milikowski, Clara; Tosti, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Alopecia in systemic amyloidosis is very rare and has been described as individual cases of diffuse nonscarring alopecia and a case of alopecia universalis. We report the trichoscopic findings in alopecia associated with systemic amyloidosis. The most prominent feature was a salmon colored halo (0.3-1 mm in diameter) surrounding the follicular ostia. Other features included broken hairs and black dots. The salmon colored halo correlated on pathology with the perifollicular deposition of amyloid. The horizontal sections showed that the sebaceous glands were preserved which supports the nonscarring pattern of the alopecia. PMID:26903748

  12. Current Treatment Strategies in Pediatric Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Etienne; Lee, Joyce SS; Tang, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is a non-scarring autoimmune disease of the hair follicle that can present at any age. Pediatric cases are commonly seen in a dermatology clinic, and management can potentially be challenging, with a small proportion of cases experiencing a chronic relapsing course marked by distressing hair loss that can bring about significant psychosocial morbidity. We review the established treatments for pediatric alopecia areata, alongside second and third line therapies that have shown to be efficacious. We also offer a treatment algorithm as a guide to the treatment of pediatric AA. PMID:23248364

  13. [Management of androgenetic alopecia in postmenopausal women].

    PubMed

    Rivera, R; Guerra-Tapia, A

    2008-05-01

    Female androgenetic alopecia or female-pattern alopecia is one of the most common causes of hair loss, affecting 50 % of women over their lifetime. The appearance of this condition is the cause of significant stress and psychological problems, making appropriate management important. Cases exist in which it is associated with hyperandrogenism. Here, we review the different clinical forms (diffuse, male-pattern, and Christmas-tree pattern), discuss the most appropriate laboratory tests (complete blood count, thyroid stimulating hormone, ferritin, prolactin, free and/or total testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate), and the different treatments, including finasteride.

  14. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 69 KB November 2014 What is Reactive Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Information About Reactive Arthritis and Other Related Conditions What Causes Reactive Arthritis? Sometimes, reactive arthritis is set ...

  15. Juvenile Fibromyalgia: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Treatment.

    PubMed

    Tesher, Melissa S

    2015-06-01

    A 14-year-old boy presented with months of severe widespread musculoskeletal pain. He was profoundly fatigued and unable to attend school. Laboratory evaluation, including complete blood count, comprehensive metabolic panel, inflammatory markers, and thyroid function, was unrevealing. Physical examination was also normal except for multiple tender points. The patient was diagnosed with juvenile primary fibromyalgia syndrome and referred for multidisciplinary treatment including physical therapy, exercise, and counseling, and his daily functioning gradually improves. Juvenile fibromyalgia is a complex syndrome that often severely limits patients' activities and can impede normal adolescent development. Effective treatment requires an understanding of the biologic, psychologic, and social factors contributing to the perpetuation of chronic pain. The author reviews the diagnostic criteria, pathophysiology, and treatment of juvenile fibromyalgia. Medications, particularly antidepressants and anticonvulsants, can be useful adjuncts to therapy. However, multimodal pain management including intensive physical therapy, exercise, counseling, and sleep hygiene is most effective in treating fibromyalgia. PMID:26114368

  16. Does exercise improve symptoms in fibromyalgia?

    PubMed

    Rain, Carmen; Seguel, Willy; Vergara, Luis

    2015-12-14

    It has been proposed that fibromyalgia could be managed by pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions. Regular physical exercise is commonly used as a non-pharmacological intervention. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified 14 systematic reviews including 25 randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We conclude that regular physical exercise probably reduces pain in patients with fibromyalgia.

  17. Does exercise improve symptoms in fibromyalgia?

    PubMed

    Rain, Carmen; Seguel, Willy; Vergara, Luis

    2015-01-01

    It has been proposed that fibromyalgia could be managed by pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions. Regular physical exercise is commonly used as a non-pharmacological intervention. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified 14 systematic reviews including 25 randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We conclude that regular physical exercise probably reduces pain in patients with fibromyalgia. PMID:26730713

  18. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Hair Loss (Alopecia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Hair Loss (Alopecia) “Losing my hair was hard at first. Then I got used ... uncovered.” Questions other people have asked: Why does hair fall out? Chemotherapy can harm the cells that ...

  19. Vulnerability to traumatic stress in fibromyalgia patients: 19 month follow-up after the great East Japan disaster

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate vulnerability and long-term influence of traumatic stress caused by the Great East Japan Disaster which occurred on March 11, 2011, in patients with fibromyalgia, which is a chronic pain syndrome probably involving central sensitization. Methods A total of 60 female patients with fibromyalgia were compared with female patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, n = 23) as another chronic pain disease, and with female healthy controls (HC, n = 26) in the observational study. To evaluate responses to traumatic stress, the scores of Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) were assessed one month after the disaster and every six months until 19 months after the disaster. We also evaluated levels of depression during the study period. To know the score of IES-R of patients with fibromyalgia during usual living, we assessed IES-R in another population of fibromyalgia patients without exposure to a great disaster. Results The mean score of IES-R one month after the disaster in the fibromyalgia group (24.6 [SD 18.9]) was significantly higher than that of RA group (13.4 [SD 14.5]) or HC group (9.1 [9.2]) (F = 9.96, p < 0.0001). However, the mean score of IES-R in fibromyalgia patients without exposure to a great disaster was (20.3 [SD 18.7]), which was almost the same value as the fibromyalgia group seven months after the disaster (20.2 [SD 19.5]). Repeated measures analysis of variance showed significant effect of time course in the depression-related symptoms (F = 6.68, P = 0.001), and a post-hoc test revealed that the number of depression-related symptoms one month before the disaster was significantly different from other time points until 19 months after the disaster, respectively. Conclusions Although response to acute stress induced by the great earthquake was likely to be settled within seven months after the disaster, depression-related symptoms have been increasing for more than one year after the disaster, despite

  20. Fibromyalgia-associated hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Rivera, J; de Diego, A; Trinchet, M; García Monforte, A

    1997-09-01

    The objective was to determine whether there might be an association between hepatitis C virus (HCV) chronic infection and fibromyalgia (FM). We determined the prevalence of HCV infection in 112 FM patients, in comparison with matched rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients from the out-patient clinic of a teaching tertiary care general hospital. Furthermore, we looked for evidence of FM in 58 patients diagnosed with chronic hepatitis due to HCV, compared with matched surgery clinic patients, HCV antibodies were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and recombinant immunoblot assay (RIBA). Serum RNA of HCV (HCV-RNA) was determined by polymerase chain reaction. In the group of FM patients, HCV antibodies were found by ELISA in 17 (15.2%) patients and in six (5.3%) of the RA controls (P < 0.05). RIBA was positive in 16 and indeterminate in one of the FM patients. Serum HCV-RNA was found in 13 of these FM patients. In eight (47%) FM patients, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was normal, although HCV-RNA was detected in four (50%) of them. In the group of patients with chronic hepatitis due to HCV, all patients had HCV antibodies and the presence of HCV-RNA in serum. Within these patients, 31 (53%) had diffuse musculoskeletal pain, while six (10%) fulfilled FM diagnostic criteria. In the control group, 13/58 (22%) had diffuse musculoskeletal pain (P < 0.001), whereas only one female patient (1.7%) fulfilled FM criteria (P < 0.05). Serum ALT was 51.7 +/- 38.4 in FM patients, whereas it was 122 +/- 76.3 in patients with HCV chronic hepatitis but without FM (P < 0.001). There were no statistical differences in autoimmune markers between patients with and without FM. These data suggest that there exists an association between FM and active HCV infection in some of our patients. FM is not associated with liver damage or autoimmune markers in these patients. HCV infection should be considered in FM patients even though ALT elevations were absent.

  1. Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... physical exam as well as x rays or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the affected joints. Although there is no lab test to diagnose psoriatic arthritis, your doctor may order tests on blood or joint fluid to rule out other forms of arthritis with ...

  2. Exploring Genetic Susceptibility to Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong-Jin; Kang, Ji-Hyoun; Yim, Yi-Rang; Kim, Ji-Eun; Lee, Jeong-Won; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Wen, Lihui; Kim, Tae-Jong; Park, Yong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) affects 1% to 5% of the population, and approximately 90% of the affected individuals are women. FM patients experience impaired quality of life and the disorder places a considerable economic burden on the medical care system. With the recognition of FM as a major health problem, many recent studies have evaluated the pathophysiology of FM. Although the etiology of FM remains unknown, it is thought to involve some combination of genetic susceptibility and environmental exposure that triggers further alterations in gene expression. Because FM shows marked familial aggregation, most previous research has focused on genetic predisposition to FM and has revealed associations between genetic factors and the development of FM, including specific gene polymorphisms involved in the serotonergic, dopaminergic, and catecholaminergic pathways. The aim of this review was to discuss the current evidence regarding genetic factors that may play a role in the development and symptom severity of FM. PMID:26306300

  3. Circadian rhythms of women with fibromyalgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klerman, E. B.; Goldenberg, D. L.; Brown, E. N.; Maliszewski, A. M.; Adler, G. K.

    2001-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is a chronic and debilitating disorder characterized by widespread nonarticular musculoskeletal pain whose etiology is unknown. Many of the symptoms of this syndrome, including difficulty sleeping, fatigue, malaise, myalgias, gastrointestinal complaints, and decreased cognitive function, are similar to those observed in individuals whose circadian pacemaker is abnormally aligned with their sleep-wake schedule or with local environmental time. Abnormalities in melatonin and cortisol, two hormones whose secretion is strongly influenced by the circadian pacemaker, have been reported in women with fibromyalgia. We studied the circadian rhythms of 10 women with fibromyalgia and 12 control healthy women. The protocol controlled factors known to affect markers of the circadian system, including light levels, posture, sleep-wake state, meals, and activity. The timing of the events in the protocol were calculated relative to the habitual sleep-wake schedule of each individual subject. Under these conditions, we found no significant difference between the women with fibromyalgia and control women in the circadian amplitude or phase of rhythms of melatonin, cortisol, and core body temperature. The average circadian phases expressed in hours posthabitual bedtime for women with and without fibromyalgia were 3:43 +/- 0:19 and 3:46 +/- 0:13, respectively, for melatonin; 10:13 +/- 0:23 and 10:32 +/- 0:20, respectively for cortisol; and 5:19 +/- 0:19 and 4:57 +/- 0:33, respectively, for core body temperature phases. Both groups of women had similar circadian rhythms in self-reported alertness. Although pain and stiffness were significantly increased in women with fibromyalgia compared with healthy women, there were no circadian rhythms in either parameter. We suggest that abnormalities in circadian rhythmicity are not a primary cause of fibromyalgia or its symptoms.

  4. Safety and efficacy of the JAK inhibitor tofacitinib citrate in patients with alopecia areata

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy Crispin, Milène; Ko, Justin M.; Craiglow, Brittany G.; Li, Shufeng; Shankar, Gautam; Urban, Jennifer R.; Chen, James C.; Cerise, Jane E.; Winge, Mårten C.G.; Marinkovich, M. Peter; Christiano, Angela M.; Oro, Anthony E.; King, Brett A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Alopecia areata (AA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by hair loss mediated by CD8+ T cells. There are no reliably effective therapies for AA. Based on recent developments in the understanding of the pathomechanism of AA, JAK inhibitors appear to be a therapeutic option; however, their efficacy for the treatment of AA has not been systematically examined. METHODS. This was a 2-center, open-label, single-arm trial using the pan-JAK inhibitor, tofacitinib citrate, for AA with >50% scalp hair loss, alopecia totalis (AT), and alopecia universalis (AU). Tofacitinib (5 mg) was given twice daily for 3 months. Endpoints included regrowth of scalp hair, as assessed by the severity of alopecia tool (SALT), duration of hair growth after completion of therapy, and disease transcriptome. RESULTS. Of 66 subjects treated, 32% experienced 50% or greater improvement in SALT score. AA and ophiasis subtypes were more responsive than AT and AU subtypes. Shorter duration of disease and histological peribulbar inflammation on pretreatment scalp biopsies were associated with improvement in SALT score. Drug cessation resulted in disease relapse in 8.5 weeks. Adverse events were limited to grade I and II infections. An AA responsiveness to JAK/STAT inhibitors score was developed to segregate responders and nonresponders, and the previously developed AA disease activity index score tracked response to treatment. CONCLUSIONS. At the dose and duration studied, tofacitinib is a safe and effective treatment for severe AA, though it does not result in a durable response. Transcriptome changes reveal unexpected molecular complexity within the disease. TRIAL REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02197455 and NCT02312882. FUNDING. This work was supported by the US Department of Veterans Affairs Office of Research and Development, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases National Institutes of Health grant R01 AR47223 and U01 AR67173, the National

  5. Safety and efficacy of the JAK inhibitor tofacitinib citrate in patients with alopecia areata

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy Crispin, Milène; Ko, Justin M.; Craiglow, Brittany G.; Li, Shufeng; Shankar, Gautam; Urban, Jennifer R.; Chen, James C.; Cerise, Jane E.; Winge, Mårten C.G.; Marinkovich, M. Peter; Christiano, Angela M.; Oro, Anthony E.; King, Brett A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Alopecia areata (AA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by hair loss mediated by CD8+ T cells. There are no reliably effective therapies for AA. Based on recent developments in the understanding of the pathomechanism of AA, JAK inhibitors appear to be a therapeutic option; however, their efficacy for the treatment of AA has not been systematically examined. METHODS. This was a 2-center, open-label, single-arm trial using the pan-JAK inhibitor, tofacitinib citrate, for AA with >50% scalp hair loss, alopecia totalis (AT), and alopecia universalis (AU). Tofacitinib (5 mg) was given twice daily for 3 months. Endpoints included regrowth of scalp hair, as assessed by the severity of alopecia tool (SALT), duration of hair growth after completion of therapy, and disease transcriptome. RESULTS. Of 66 subjects treated, 32% experienced 50% or greater improvement in SALT score. AA and ophiasis subtypes were more responsive than AT and AU subtypes. Shorter duration of disease and histological peribulbar inflammation on pretreatment scalp biopsies were associated with improvement in SALT score. Drug cessation resulted in disease relapse in 8.5 weeks. Adverse events were limited to grade I and II infections. An AA responsiveness to JAK/STAT inhibitors score was developed to segregate responders and nonresponders, and the previously developed AA disease activity index score tracked response to treatment. CONCLUSIONS. At the dose and duration studied, tofacitinib is a safe and effective treatment for severe AA, though it does not result in a durable response. Transcriptome changes reveal unexpected molecular complexity within the disease. TRIAL REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02197455 and NCT02312882. FUNDING. This work was supported by the US Department of Veterans Affairs Office of Research and Development, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases National Institutes of Health grant R01 AR47223 and U01 AR67173, the National

  6. Fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and myofascial pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, D L

    1997-03-01

    The diagnosis of fibromyalgia continues to generate heated debate. The presence of multiple lifetime psychiatric diagnoses was not intrinsically related to fibromyalgia but rather to the decision of patients to seek specialty medical care. Better outcome measures in fibromyalgia were tested. Neurally mediated hypotension may be associated with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Treatment of patients with fibromyalgia and CFS continues to be of limited success, although the role of multidisciplinary group intervention appears promising. Two position papers focused on the adverse aspects of the medicolegal issues in fibromyalgia and CFS.

  7. NONCICATRIZING ALOPECIAS—With Special Reference to Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    New, William N.; Nickel, Walter R.

    1958-01-01

    Since the epochal work of Hamilton there has been general acceptance of the causal relationship of the male sex hormone, age and familial inheritance in development of male pattern baldness. Some of the medicaments used in recent years may cause a diffuse loss of scalp hair. Alopecia that accompanies disease states is probably due to generalized toxemia and disturbances in metabolism. Sometimes male pattern baldness occurs in physiologic states, as exemplified by diffuse hair loss occasionally in the postpartum period. Alopecia areata deserves a critical appraisal, since it may be evidence of underlying neuropsychotic states that need psychiatric diagnosis and treatment. The development of alopecia totalis or universalis in 50 per cent of the prepuberal cases of alopecia areata is of real significance, especially since so very few patients recover their normal scalp hair. The conclusions reached by the authors of two articles reporting on 368 cases of alopecia areata, alopecia totalis and alopecia universalis that the evidence is overwhelming against the malfunction of the endocrine glands as the cause of alopecia areata must be considered real contributions to our understanding of this condition. A few conditions simulate alopecia areata. Probably the ones which are seen most often are trichotillomania and patchy baldness caused by agents used in hair waving and straightening. Our findings in 22 cases of alopecia areata of a persistent inflammatory perivascular and perifollicular infiltrate, massive plugging of the ostia, disappearance of robust hair follicles and diminution in total number of hair follicles and sometimes fibrosis are not necessarily diagnostic of alopecia areata but seem to be very definitely characteristic. Treatment for alopecia areata is of little avail. At this time we do not recommend the general use of the corticosteroids despite the improvement of scalp appearance in the majority of instances in which the systemic administration of these

  8. The psychiatrist confronted with a fibromyalgia patient.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Siegfried

    2009-06-01

    Fibromyalgia is usually treated by rheumatologists but since co-morbid depression and anxiety are frequent, psychiatrists are likely to be confronted with patients suffering from the syndrome. The symptoms associated with fibromyalgia vary from patient to patient but there is one common symptom-they ache all over. In addition to pain, patients report headaches, poor sleep, fatigue, depressed mood and irregular bowel habits, which are also all symptoms of depression. For a formal diagnosis of fibromyalgia, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria require the patient to have widespread pain for at least 3 months together with tenderness at 11 or more of 18 specific tender points.Treatment of fibromyalgia requires a comprehensive approach involving education, aerobic exercise and cognitive behavioural therapy in addition to pharmacotherapy. The most effective drugs available for the treatment for fibromyalgia, the serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors, milnacipran and duloxetine and the anti-epileptic, pregabalin, are well known to psychiatrists. Thus the psychiatrist is well placed to initiate treatment in these patients.

  9. Fibromyalgia: pathogenetic, diagnostic and therapeutic concerns.

    PubMed

    Podolecki, Tomasz; Podolecki, Andrzej; Hrycek, Antoni

    2009-03-01

    Musculoskeletal pains are one of the most common complaints reported by patients. In 1972, Smythe described the generalized pain and tenderness on palpation at specific points and, 4 years later, the term fibromyalgia was introduced for determining the disease syndrome. The etiology and pathogenesis of fibromyalgia are still unknown. This disease appears probably multi-factorial. It is considered that the changes in the neuronal activity in the central nervous system, abnormal metabolism of biogenic amines and immunological disorders may among other things, contribute to the development of the disease. The complaints are non characteristic and highly sujective, which makes it substantially difficult to differentiate between fibromialgia and both chronic fatigue syndrome and psychosomatic diseases. The treatment of fibromyalgia is complex and long-term. The antidepressants and psychotherapy is of vital importance. The effectiveness of locally used agents is also being emphasized. Fibromyalgia has become a serious social problem in the well developed countries in the recent years. Therefore, of importance are efforts to appropriately diagnose fibromyalgia and to implement its appropriate treatment that resolves disease symptoms in a possibly maximum degree.

  10. Fibromyalgia: When Distress Becomes (Un)sympathetic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Lavin, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a painful stress-related disorder. A key issue in fibromyalgia research is to investigate how distress could be converted into pain. The sympathetic nervous system is the main element of the stress response system. In animal models, physical trauma, infection, or distressing noise can induce abnormal connections between the sympathetic nervous system and the nociceptive system. Dorsal root ganglia sodium channels facilitate this type of sympathetic pain. Similar mechanisms may operate in fibromyalgia. Signs of sympathetic hyperactivity have been described in this condition. Genetic factors and/or distressful lifestyle may lead to this state of sympathetic hyperactivity. Trauma and infection are recognized fibromyalgia triggers. Women who suffer from fibromyalgia have catecholamine-evoked pain. Sympathetic dysfunction may also explain nonpain-related fibromyalgia symptoms. In conclusion, in fibromyalgia, distress could be converted into pain through forced hyperactivity of the sympathetic component of the stress response system. PMID:22110948

  11. Biology and therapy of fibromyalgia. Stress, the stress response system, and fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Lavin, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    Stress is a state of disharmony, or threatened homeostasis. A stressor could have a psychological origin or a biological origin. Societies have become more intricate with industrialization, and modern individuals try to adapt to the new defiance by forcing their stress response system. The main component of the stress response network is the autonomic nervous system. The present article reviews current knowledge on autonomic dysfunction in fibromyalgia. Sympathetic hyperactivity has been consistently described by diverse groups of investigators. Fibromyalgia is proposed to be a sympathetically maintained neuropathic pain syndrome, and genomic data support this contention. Autonomic dysfunction may also explain other fibromyalgia features not related to pain. PMID:17626613

  12. Cytokines and Other Mediators in Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Gregoriou, Stamatis; Papafragkaki, Dafni; Kontochristopoulos, George; Rallis, Eustathios; Kalogeromitros, Dimitrios; Rigopoulos, Dimitris

    2010-01-01

    Alopecia areata, a disease of the hair follicles with multifactorial etiology and a strong component of autoimmune origin, has been extensively studied as far as the role of several cytokines is concerned. So far, IFN-γ, interleukins, TNF-α, are cytokines that are well known to play a major role in the pathogenesis of the disease, while several studies have shown that many more pathways exist. Among them, MIG, IP-10, BAFF, HLA antigens, MIG, as well as stress hormones are implicated in disease onset and activity. Within the scope of this paper, the authors attempt to shed light upon the complexity of alopecia areata underlying mechanisms and indicate pathways that may suggest future treatments. PMID:20300578

  13. Topical minoxidil for extended areate alopecia.

    PubMed

    Frentz, G

    1985-01-01

    A double-blind cross over study on the effect of 3 months' treatment with 1% topical minoxidil on 23 individuals with alopecia areata was performed. Thirteen of the patients showed some increase in terminal hair growth, the difference between the number of responders to placebo and minoxidil lotion being significant (p less than 0.005). However, in one case only, the result was cosmetically satisfying. In two male patients the blood pressure increased coinciding with the withdrawal of the minoxidil lotion.

  14. Primary cicatricial alopecia: clinical features and management.

    PubMed

    Ross, Elizabeth K

    2007-04-01

    The primary cicatricial alopecias are an uncommon, complex group of disorders that result in permanent destruction of the hair follicle, usually involving scalp hair alone. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are needed to help thwart continued hair loss and the distress that often accompanies this hair loss. Nurses can facilitate the diagnostic and treatment process and, through educational and emotionally supportive measures, have a meaningful, positive impact on the patient's well being.

  15. Evidence for supplemental treatments in androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Famenini, Shannon; Goh, Carolyn

    2014-07-01

    Currently, topical minoxidil and finasteride are the only treatments that have been FDA approved for the treatment of female pattern hair loss and androgenetic alopecia. Given the incomplete efficacy and sife effect profile of these medications, some patients utilize alternative treatments to help improve this condition. In this review, we illustrate the scientific evidence underlying the efficacy of these alternative approaches, including biotin, caffeine, melatonin, a marine extract, and zinc. PMID:25007363

  16. Forms of Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... It typically begins during the early-adult years. Juvenile arthritisarthritis that is diagnosed before age 16. The most common form of juvenile arthritis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, affects between 30,000 and ...

  17. Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease that can cause attacks of arthritis. Like gout, crystals form in the joints. But in this ... CPPD arthritis can be confused with: Gouty arthritis (gout) Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid arthritis Exams and Tests Most arthritic ...

  18. Fibromyalgia: A Puzzling and Painful Condition | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Fibromyalgia Fibromyalgia: A Puzzling and Painful Condition Past Issues / Spring ... or internal organs. Wise Choices: Feeling Better with Fibromyalgia Get enough sleep. Getting the right kind of ...

  19. Gonococcal arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... people who have gonorrhea caused by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae . Gonococcal arthritis affects women more often than ... Saunders; 2013:chap 109. Marrazzo JM, Apicella MA. Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonnorrhea). In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser ...

  20. Fibromyalgia

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Provider Outreach Provider Outreach Videos Developing a Marketing and Promotion Plan Preparing for Provider Outreach Conducting Provider Outreach Evaluating Your Efforts FAQs ... this Page Background Prevalence ...

  1. Fibromyalgia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Insurance (SSI) are the largest Federal programs providing financial assistance ... how much they have paid into the system. SSI is funded by general tax revenues, and those ...

  2. Fibromyalgia

    MedlinePlus

    ... first. He or she may also recommend an anti-depressant, such as duloxetine or milnacipran. Anti-seizure medicines, such as preglabin, may also be effective in managing your pain. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medicines (which include ibuprofen, aspirin and naproxen) ...

  3. Viral arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Michael; Marks, Jonathan L

    2016-01-01

    Acute-onset arthritis is a common clinical problem facing both the general clinician and the rheumatologist. A viral aetiology is though to be responsible for approximately 1% of all cases of acute arthritis with a wide range of causal agents recognised. The epidemiology of acute viral arthritis continues to evolve, with some aetiologies, such as rubella, becoming less common due to vaccination, while some vector-borne viruses have become more widespread. A travel history therefore forms an important part of the assessment of patients presenting with an acute arthritis. Worldwide, parvovirus B19, hepatitis B and C, HIV and the alphaviruses are among the most important causes of virally mediated arthritis. Targeted serological testing may be of value in establishing a diagnosis, and clinicians must also be aware that low-titre autoantibodies, such as rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody, can occur in the context of acute viral arthritis. A careful consideration of epidemiological, clinical and serological features is therefore required to guide clinicians in making diagnostic and treatment decisions. While most virally mediated arthritides are self-limiting some warrant the initiation of specific antiviral therapy. PMID:27037381

  4. Fibromyalgia syndrome, a problem of tautology.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M L; Quintner, J L

    1993-10-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is generally taken to denote a clinical state of widespread musculoskeletal pain, stiffness, and fatigue but its pathophysiology, physical and psychological, is unknown, and the nature of the diagnostically mandatory "tender points" remains obscure. Diagnostic criteria convey no pathophysiological insight and they have been "validated" via a circular argument in which the evidence on which the construct is based is taken as proof of its veracity. The concept of fibromyalgia syndrome is valid only in the sense that it includes all possibilities. An alternative approach to this very real clinical presentation is via secondary hyperalgesia.

  5. Disability and quality of life in patients with fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Verbunt, Jeanine A; Pernot, Dia HFM; Smeets, Rob JEM

    2008-01-01

    Background Patients with fibromyalgia often feel disabled in the performance of daily activities. Psychological factors seem to play a pronounced disabling role in fibromyalgia. The objectives of the study are: Firstly, to investigate contributing factors for disability in fibromyalgia. Secondly, to study psychological distress in patients with fibromyalgia as compared to other nonspecific pain syndromes. And finally, to explore the impact of fibromyalgia on a patient's quality of life. Methods In this cross sectional study, explaining factors for disability were studied based on a regression analysis with gender, mental health, physical and social functioning as independent variables. For the assessment of disability in fibromyalgia the FIQ was used. The levels of psychological distress in patients with fibromyalgia, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) and chronic low back pain (CLBP) were compared based on scores on the Symptom Checklist (SCL90). Quality of life of patients with fibromyalgia was compared with scores (SF36) of both patients with fibromyalgia and other health conditions as derived from the literature. Results Disability in fibromyalgia seemed best explained by a patients mental health condition (β = -0.360 p = 0.02). The level of psychological distress was higher in patients with fibromyalgia as compared to patients with CRPS or CLBP (p < 0.01). The impact of fibromyalgia on quality of life appeared to be high as compared to the impact of other health conditions. Conclusion Patients with fibromyalgia report a considerable impact on their quality of life and their perceived disability level seems influenced by their mental health condition. In comparison with patients with other pain conditions psychological distress is higher. PMID:18211701

  6. Can mastalgia be another somatic symptom in fibromyalgia syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Meral; Kilic, Murat Ozgur; Cemeroglu, Ozlem; Icen, Duygu

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purposes of this study were to determine the coexistence of mastalgia and fibromyalgia, to investigate the effects of this combination on pain patterns, and to discuss the status of breast pain in the diagnostic algorithm of fibromyalgia syndrome. METHODS: Sixty-one female patients reporting breast pain during the last three months and 53 female patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia syndrome were enrolled in this study. The Breast Pain Questionnaire was administered to all participants in the mastalgia group and to those in the fibromyalgia syndrome group who had experienced mastalgia during the past three months. The patients in the fibromyalgia syndrome group were evaluated using the 2010 preliminary American College of Rheumatology classification criteria. All of the patients in the mastalgia group were evaluated for the diagnosis of fibromyalgia syndrome by a single physiatrist. The coexistence and pain patterns of mastalgia and fibromyalgia were assessed statistically. RESULTS: Approximately half of the patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (47.2%) reported having mastalgia at the time of admission and 37.7% of the patients with mastalgia met the diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia syndrome. The patients with mastalgia in the fibromyalgia syndrome group had significantly higher total breast pain scores compared with the women in the mastalgia group. In addition, the patients with fibromyalgia syndrome in the mastalgia group had significantly higher Widespread Pain Index and Symptom Severity Scale scores than the patients with fibromyalgia syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: We suggest that mastalgia can be an aspect of the central sensitivity syndrome and can be added to the somatic symptoms of fibromyalgia. PMID:26602519

  7. Juvenile fibromyalgia: Guidance for management.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Shumpei; Kikuchi, Masako; Miyamae, Takako

    2013-08-01

    Juvenile fibromyalgia (JFM) is a disease in which patients complain of acute and chronic severe pain, an overt primary cause for which cannot be found or surmised. Although patients with JFM mainly complain of systemic pain or allodynia in the medical interview and physical examination, the concept of the disease is the total sum of painful illness, chronic fatigue, hypothermia and many other autonomic symptoms and signs. Many issues are interacting including individual traits (personality, temperament, sensitivity, memory of pain; age: early adolescence), individual states (self-esteem, anxiety, developmental level), and external stressors (parent especially mother, school environment). JFM is diagnosed on the combination of disease history, physical examination to determine the 18 tender points and allodynia, pain from gently touching their hair, and negative results of blood tests (inflammatory markers, thyroid function, myogenic enzymes). The goals of treatment are the following: restoration of function and relief of pain. Psychological support is advocated. Although the exact number of patients with JFM is still to be elucidated, it seems to be growing because pediatric rheumatologists in Japan encounter children with a wide variety of musculoskeletal pains. This guideline describes how to diagnose JFM in children and how to treat them appropriately.

  8. Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Choy, Ernest; Clauw, Daniel J.; Goldenberg, Don L.; Harris, Richard E.; Helfenstein, Milton; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Noguchi, Koichi; Silverman, Stuart L.; Ushida, Takahiro; Wang, Guochun

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript, developed by a group of chronic pain researchers and clinicians from around the world, aims to address the state of knowledge about fibromyalgia (FM) and identify ongoing challenges in the field of FM and other chronic pain syndromes that may be characterized by pain centralization/amplification/hypersensitivity. There have been many exciting developments in research studies of the pathophysiology and treatment of FM and related syndromes that have the potential to improve the recognition and management of patients with FM and other conditions with FM-like pain. However, much of the new information has not reached all clinicians, especially primary care clinicians, who have the greatest potential to use this new knowledge to positively impact their patients’ lives. Furthermore, there are persistent misconceptions about FM and a lack of consensus regarding the diagnosis and treatment of FM. This paper presents a framework for future global efforts to improve the understanding and treatment of FM and other associated chronic pain syndromes, disseminate research findings, identify ways to enhance advocacy for these patients, and improve global efforts to collaborate and reach consensus about key issues related to FM and chronic pain in general. PMID:27022674

  9. Fibromyalgia Syndrome - a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Binkiewicz-Glińska, Anna; Bakuła, Stanisław; Tomczak, Hanna; Landowski, Jerzy; Ruckemann-Dziurdzińska, Katarzyna; Zaborowska-Sapeta, Katarzyna; Kowalski, Ireneusz; Kiebzak, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    According to American College of Rheumatology fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a common health problem characterized by widespread pain and tenderness. The pain and tenderness, although chronic, present a tendency to fluctuate both in intensity and location around the body. Patients with FMS experience fatigue and often have sleep disorders. It is estimated that FMS affects two to four percent of the general population. It is most common in women, though it can also occur in men. FMS most often first occur in the middle adulthood, but it can start as early as in the teen years or in the old age. The causes of FMS are unclear. Various infectious agents have recently been linked with the development of FMS. Some genes are potentially linked with an increased risk of developing FMS and some other health problems, which are common comorbidities to FMS. It is the genes that determine individual sensitivity and reaction to pain, quality of the antinociceptive system and complex biochemistry of pain sensation. Diagnosis and therapy may be complex and require cooperation of many specialists. Rheumatologists often make the diagnosis and differentiate FMS with other disorders from the rheumatoid group. FMS patients may also require help from the Psychiatric Clinic (Out-Patients Clinic) due to accompanying mental problems. As the pharmacological treatment options are limited and only complex therapy gives relatively good results, the treatment plan should include elements of physical therapy. PMID:26488355

  10. Cicatricial alopecia as a manifestation of different dermatoses.

    PubMed

    Oremović, Lenka; Lugović, Liborija; Vucić, Majda; Buljan, Marija; Ozanić-Bulić, Suzana

    2006-01-01

    There are numerous dermatoses which may cause cicatricial alopecia when localized on the scalp, such as chronic discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE), lichen planus, graft-versus-host disease, dermatomyositis, scleroderma, cicatricial pemphigoid, porphyria cutanea tarda, follicular mucinosis, perifolliculitis capitis abscedens, lichen sclerosus et atrophicus, necrobiosis lipoidica, sarcoidosis, etc. Histologically, cicatricial alopecia is characterized by dermal scarring, along with absent or reduced hair follicles and reduced number of erector pili muscles. According to working classification of cicatricial alopecia by the North American Hair Society, primary cicatricial alopecia may be divided into the following categories: lymphocytic group (e.g., DLE, lichen planopilaris, classic pseudopelade (Brocq), central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia); neutrophilic group (e.g., folliculitis decalvans, dissecting cellulitis); and mixed group (e.g., folliculitis keloidalis). Over a 5-year period, 36 patients with cicatricial alopecia were hospitalized at our Department: DLE (n = 27), pseudopelade Brocq (n = 3), mucinosis follicularis (n = 2), and lichen planopilaris, folliculitis decalvans, folliculitis abscedens and folliculitis keloidalis (one patient each). Clinical evaluation was compared with histopathologic analysis of follicular architecture, as well as with the type, localization and extent of inflammatory infiltrate. Scalp biopsy was considered mandatory in all cases. Our experience indicates the need of more complex research to extend the knowledge about the etiopathogenesis and treatment options for cicatricial alopecia. We hope that this type of alopecia may attract more attention and research in the future. PMID:17311739

  11. Color dilution alopecia in a blue Doberman pinscher crossbreed

    PubMed Central

    Perego, Roberta; Proverbio, Daniela; Roccabianca, Paola; Spada, Eva

    2009-01-01

    A 6-year-old male, blue Doberman pinscher crossbreed was presented with coat abnormalities; in particular, flank alopecia and pruritus. Based on medical the history, clinical evidence, and histopathological examination, color dilution alopecia was diagnosed. The dog was with oral melatonin treated for 3 months without success. PMID:19436637

  12. Halo naevi, vitiligo and diffuse alopecia areata associated with tocilizumab therapy.

    PubMed

    Nadesalingam, Kavitha; Goodfield, Mark; Emery, Paul

    2016-08-01

    We present a follow-up case report of a 33-year-old lady with juvenile onset arthritis who developed halo naevi while on treatment with tocilizumab. This case report describes the development of halo naevi, vitiligo and diffuse alopecia areata associated with tocilizumab therapy following infection with Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Panton-Valentine leukocidin positivity. This is the first case that describes these events and supports previous theories on cellular and humoral immunity as causative factors. The regression of melanocytes during treatment with tocilizumab could also implicate IL-6 and sIL-6R as future targets in the treatment of melanoma through its direct effect of melanocytic cytotoxicity, which supports previous studies. PMID:27516894

  13. Halo naevi, vitiligo and diffuse alopecia areata associated with tocilizumab therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nadesalingam, Kavitha; Goodfield, Mark; Emery, Paul

    2016-01-01

    We present a follow-up case report of a 33-year-old lady with juvenile onset arthritis who developed halo naevi while on treatment with tocilizumab. This case report describes the development of halo naevi, vitiligo and diffuse alopecia areata associated with tocilizumab therapy following infection with Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Panton–Valentine leukocidin positivity. This is the first case that describes these events and supports previous theories on cellular and humoral immunity as causative factors. The regression of melanocytes during treatment with tocilizumab could also implicate IL-6 and sIL-6R as future targets in the treatment of melanoma through its direct effect of melanocytic cytotoxicity, which supports previous studies. PMID:27516894

  14. Psychogenic Alopecia in Rhesus Macaques Presenting as Focally Extensive Alopecia of the Distal Limb

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Joshua A; Mansfield, Keith G; Simmons, Joe H; Bernstein, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    Focally extensive alopecia affecting the distal limbs is a common clinical finding in rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) colonies and is both a regulatory and colony-health concern. We performed diagnostic examinations including physical exams, bloodwork, skin scrapes, surface cytology, and surface bacterial–fungal cultures on 17 rhesus macaques with this presentation of alopecia. Skin biopsies from alopecic skin obtained from each macaque were compared with those of normal skin from the same animal. Immunohistochemistry and metachromatic staining for inflammatory cells were performed to compare alopecic and normal skin. In addition, we compared these biopsies with those previously obtained from macaques with generalized alopecia and dermal inflammatory infiltrates consistent with cutaneous hypersensitivity disorders and with those from animals with normal haircoats. Bacterial and fungal cultures, skin scrapes, surface cytology, and bloodwork were unremarkable. Affected skin showed only mild histologic alteration, with rare evidence of trichomalacia and follicular loss. Numbers of mast cells and CD3+ lymphocytes did not differ between alopecic and normally haired skin from the same animal. The number of mast cells in alopecic skin from animals in the current cohort was significantly lower than that in skin of animals previously diagnosed with a cutaneous hypersensitivity disorder. Numbers of both mast cells and CD3+ lymphocytes in alopecic skin from the current cohort were similar to those from biopsies of animals with normal haircoats. Together, the clinical findings and pathology are consistent with a psychogenic origin for this pattern of alopecia in rhesus macaques. PMID:21819697

  15. Etiology of cicatricial alopecias: a basic science point of view.

    PubMed

    McElwee, Kevin J

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a short summary of our current knowledge of cicatricial alopecia disease pathogenesis and the hypothetical disease mechanisms that may be involved in scarring alopecia development. Several forms of scarring alopecia likely involve targeted cytotoxic action against hair follicle cells mediated by a folliculocentric inflammation. However, the specific nature of the inflammatory interference in hair follicle growth is open to question. A popular hypothesis of lymphocyte-mediated scarring alopecia development involves autoimmune targeting of hair follicle-specific self-antigens, although there is no direct evidence in support of such a view. Alternative hypotheses focus on defects in sebaceous gland function, destruction of hair follicle stem cells, and interference in the communication between hair follicle mesenchyme and epithelium. Many questions arise from these hypotheses, and addressing them with a systematic research approach may enable significant advances in understanding cicatricial alopecia etiology. PMID:18715290

  16. Etiology of cicatricial alopecias: a basic science point of view.

    PubMed

    McElwee, Kevin J

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a short summary of our current knowledge of cicatricial alopecia disease pathogenesis and the hypothetical disease mechanisms that may be involved in scarring alopecia development. Several forms of scarring alopecia likely involve targeted cytotoxic action against hair follicle cells mediated by a folliculocentric inflammation. However, the specific nature of the inflammatory interference in hair follicle growth is open to question. A popular hypothesis of lymphocyte-mediated scarring alopecia development involves autoimmune targeting of hair follicle-specific self-antigens, although there is no direct evidence in support of such a view. Alternative hypotheses focus on defects in sebaceous gland function, destruction of hair follicle stem cells, and interference in the communication between hair follicle mesenchyme and epithelium. Many questions arise from these hypotheses, and addressing them with a systematic research approach may enable significant advances in understanding cicatricial alopecia etiology.

  17. Rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Scott, David L; Wolfe, Frederick; Huizinga, Tom W J

    2010-09-25

    Rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by persistent synovitis, systemic inflammation, and autoantibodies (particularly to rheumatoid factor and citrullinated peptide). 50% of the risk for development of rheumatoid arthritis is attributable to genetic factors. Smoking is the main environmental risk. In industrialised countries, rheumatoid arthritis affects 0·5-1·0% of adults, with 5-50 per 100 000 new cases annually. The disorder is most typical in women and elderly people. Uncontrolled active rheumatoid arthritis causes joint damage, disability, decreased quality of life, and cardiovascular and other comorbidities. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), the key therapeutic agents, reduce synovitis and systemic inflammation and improve function. The leading DMARD is methotrexate, which can be combined with other drugs of this type. Biological agents are used when arthritis is uncontrolled or toxic effects arise with DMARDs. Tumour necrosis factor inhibitors were the first biological agents, followed by abatacept, rituximab, and tocilizumab. Infections and high costs restrict prescription of biological agents. Long-term remission induced by intensive, short-term treatment selected by biomarker profiles is the ultimate goal.

  18. Fibromyalgia Syndrome: Etiology, Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bellato, Enrico; Marini, Eleonora; Castoldi, Filippo; Barbasetti, Nicola; Mattei, Lorenzo; Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; Blonna, Davide

    2012-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is mainly characterized by pain, fatigue, and sleep disruption. The etiology of fibromyalgia is still unclear: if central sensitization is considered to be the main mechanism involved, then many other factors, genetic, immunological, and hormonal, may play an important role. The diagnosis is typically clinical (there are no laboratory abnormalities) and the physician must concentrate on pain and on its features. Additional symptoms (e.g., Raynaud's phenomenon, irritable bowel disease, and heat and cold intolerance) can be associated with this condition. A careful differential diagnosis is mandatory: fibromyalgia is not a diagnosis of exclusion. Since 1990, diagnosis has been principally based on the two major diagnostic criteria defined by the ACR. Recently, new criteria have been proposed. The main goals of the treatment are to alleviate pain, increase restorative sleep, and improve physical function. A multidisciplinary approach is optimal. While most nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opioids have limited benefit, an important role is played by antidepressants and neuromodulating antiepileptics: currently duloxetine (NNT for a 30% pain reduction 7.2), milnacipran (NNT 19), and pregabalin (NNT 8.6) are the only drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of fibromyalgia. In addition, nonpharmacological treatments should be associated with drug therapy. PMID:23213512

  19. One year in review 2016: fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Bazzichi, Laura; Giacomelli, Camillo; Consensi, Arianna; Atzeni, Fabiola; Batticciotto, Alberto; Di Franco, Manuela; Casale, Roberto; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) syndrome is a chronic disease with unknown aetiology, characterised by widespread pain, fatigue and other functional symptoms. We reviewed the literature of the past year to underline the recent progress in the etiopathogenesis, assessment and therapies of this syndrome, evaluating the articles published between January 2015 and January 2016.

  20. Fibromyalgia characterization in a psychosocial approach.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Barbara; Baptista, Telmo M; Branco, Jaime C; Novo, Rosa F

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize a group of women diagnosed with fibromyalgia, evaluating the relationship between personality and psychopathology, health status (disability, physical health, mental health, and pain), and potentially traumatic life events (PTLE) before the onset of the syndrome. The disability caused by fibromyalgia, physical and mental health status, pain, PTLE in childhood and in the course of life, and personality were assessed in a sample of 50 women with fibromyalgia, age 25-70 years (M = 46.96; SD = 10.96). A multiple correspondence analysis with all the variables identified two types of profiles and a K-Means cluster analysis confirmed two groups of patients: cluster 1 (n = 36), with better health and less psychopathological problems, named "Better adjustment" and cluster 2 (n = 14), with less health and more personality problems, named "Disorder and disability." Pertaining to personality only, a K-Means cluster analysis replicated the three classic personality profiles (normal, neurotic, and psychopathological) identified in chronic pain patients; and the normal profile was the more prevalent (n = 22). The results enhance the importance of recognizing the heterogeneity of fibromyalgia population and the great closeness between personality and physical health, with the PTLE having a less important role than expected.

  1. Amitriptyline for the treatment of fibromyalgia: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Rico-Villademoros, Fernando; Slim, Mahmoud; Calandre, Elena P

    2015-10-01

    Fibromyalgia is characterized by chronic generalized pain accompanied by a wide range of clinical manifestations. Most clinical practice guidelines recommend multidisciplinary treatment using a combination of pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies. The tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline has been most thoroughly studied in fibromyalgia. Amitriptyline has been evaluated in placebo-controlled studies, and it has served as an active comparator to other therapeutic interventions in the treatment of fibromyalgia. In addition, several systematic reviews and meta-analyses have evaluated its efficacy and safety for the treatment of fibromyalgia. Data from individual studies as well as from systematic reviews indicate that low doses (10-75 mg/day) of amitriptyline are effective for the treatment of fibromyalgia and, despite the limited quality of the data, they do not seem to be associated with relevant tolerability or safety issues. Consistent with some clinical guidelines, we believe amitriptyline in low doses should be considered a first-line drug for the treatment of fibromyalgia.

  2. Androgenetic alopecia and current methods of treatment.

    PubMed

    Bienová, Martina; Kucerová, Renata; Fiurásková, Michala; Hajdúch, Marián; Koláŕ, Zdenìk

    2005-03-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is a common dermatological condition affecting both men and women. In the case of men, up to 30% over the age of 30 and more than 50% over the age of 50 are affected. AGA also affects women although clinical signs are usually milder and associated with diffuse thinning of the scalp hair. AGA invariably causes serious psychological problems especially in women. By far the most promising approaches to the treatment of baldness in men are drug therapies, such as topical minoxidil and finasteride administered systemically. Mild to moderate AGA in women can be treated with antiandrogens and/or topical minoxidil with good results in many cases. PMID:15818439

  3. Topical Melatonin for Treatment of Androgenetic Alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Tobias W; Trüeb, Ralph M; Hänggi, Gabriella; Innocenti, Marcello; Elsner, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background: In the search for alternative agents to oral finasteride and topical minoxidil for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia (AGA), melatonin, a potent antioxidant and growth modulator, was identified as a promising candidate based on in vitro and in vivo studies. Materials and Methods: One pharmacodynamic study on topical application of melatonin and four clinical pre-post studies were performed in patients with androgenetic alopecia or general hair loss and evaluated by standardised questionnaires, TrichoScan, 60-second hair count test and hair pull test. Results: Five clinical studies showed positive effects of a topical melatonin solution in the treatment of AGA in men and women while showing good tolerability: (1) Pharmacodynamics under once-daily topical application in the evening showed no significant influence on endogenous serum melatonin levels. (2) An observational study involving 30 men and women showed a significant reduction in the degree of severity of alopecia after 30 and 90 days (P < 0.001) based on questionnaires completed by investigators and patients. (3) Using a digital software-supported epiluminescence technique (TrichoScan) in 35 men with AGA, after 3 and 6 months in 54.8% to 58.1% of the patients a significant increase of hair density of 29% and 41%, respectively was measured (M0: 123/cm2; M3: 159/cm2; M6: 173/cm2;) (P < 0,001). (4) In 60 men and women with hair loss, a significant reduction in hair loss was observed in women, while hair loss in men remained constant (P < 0.001). (5) In a large, 3-month, multi-center study with more than 1800 volunteers at 200 centers, the percentage of patients with a 2- to 3-fold positive hair-pull test decreased from 61.6% to 7.8%, while the percentage of patients with a negative hair-pull test increased from 12.2.% to 61.5% (P < 0.001). In addition, a decrease in seborrhea and seborrheic dermatitis of the scalp was observed. Conclusions: Since safety and tolerability in all of the studies was

  4. Characteristics of Androgenetic Alopecia in Asian

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hae-Jin

    2012-01-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA), or pattern hair loss, is a common disorder in Asian men and women, with a reported incidence of up to 73% among general population. There are several descriptions regarding the characteristics of AGA in patients of European descent. Asian patients with AGA have different types of hair loss and family histories from Europeans, which may affect treatment response. Therefore, in this review, prevalence, hair loss patterns, familial factors, androgen receptor gene polymorphisms of Asian AGA patients, and management based on algorithmic guidelines for AGA are discussed. This review may be useful for dermatologists in clinical practice for diagnosing and designing management approaches for Asian patients with AGA. PMID:22879706

  5. Differential dopamine function in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Daniel S; MacKie, Palmer J; Kareken, David A; Hutchins, Gary D; Chumin, Evgeny J; Christian, Bradley T; Yoder, Karmen K

    2016-09-01

    Approximately 30 % of Americans suffer from chronic pain disorders, such as fibromyalgia (FM), which can cause debilitating pain. Many pain-killing drugs prescribed for chronic pain disorders are highly addictive, have limited clinical efficacy, and do not treat the cognitive symptoms reported by many patients. The neurobiological substrates of chronic pain are largely unknown, but evidence points to altered dopaminergic transmission in aberrant pain perception. We sought to characterize the dopamine (DA) system in individuals with FM. Positron emission tomography (PET) with [(18)F]fallypride (FAL) was used to assess changes in DA during a working memory challenge relative to a baseline task, and to test for associations between baseline D2/D3 availability and experimental pain measures. Twelve female subjects with FM and 11 female controls completed study procedures. Subjects received one FAL PET scan while performing a "2-back" task, and one while performing a "0-back" (attentional control, "baseline") task. FM subjects had lower baseline FAL binding potential (BP) in several cortical regions relative to controls, including anterior cingulate cortex. In FM subjects, self-reported spontaneous pain negatively correlated with FAL BP in the left orbitofrontal cortex and parahippocampal gyrus. Baseline BP was significantly negatively correlated with experimental pain sensitivity and tolerance in both FM and CON subjects, although spatial patterns of these associations differed between groups. The data suggest that abnormal DA function may be associated with differential processing of pain perception in FM. Further studies are needed to explore the functional significance of DA in nociception and cognitive processing in chronic pain.

  6. Myofascial pain, fibromyalgia or fibrositis?

    PubMed

    Pearce, J M S

    2004-01-01

    The terms myofascial pain, fibromyalgia and fibrositis are critically examined. They constitute diagnostic labels for non-specific musculoskeletal aches and pains. Analysis of the evidence shows that none of these labels is substantiated by hard physical signs or by laboratory evidence of consistent pathological or biochemical abnormality. What is the objective evidence for disorder(s) of muscle, fascia or fibrous tissues, so clearly indicated by these diagnostic names? Alternative terms such as 'regional pain syndrome' or 'chronic pain syndrome' merely redefine the clinical problem without providing a mechanism or basis for diagnosis. Despite different diagnostic criteria, these conditions, along with chronic fatigue syndrome, have many demographic and clinical similarities, most notably tender trigger points. Indeed, the terms are often used interchangeably. There are few differences in the symptoms, physical findings, laboratory tests, functional status, psychosocial features and psychiatric disorders. This paper seeks not to deny the existence of aches and pains, but to critically examine the utility of these terms. The only claimed physical sign is the presence of tender trigger points over muscles or muscle attachments. Research suggests that tender points are a measure of general distress related to pain complaints but separately associated with fatigue and depression. They are present in some normal subjects and are variable in occurrence in time in the same individual. They reflect no demonstrable pathology. It is therefore argued that none of these commonly used diagnoses represent distinct disease entities. A possible but unproven alternative hypothesis is that such symptoms relate to neural pain with both peripheral and central components, and in some instances psychological or wilful embellishment.

  7. Haemophilic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Steven, M M; Yogarajah, S; Madhok, R; Forbes, C D; Sturrock, R D

    1986-02-01

    A detailed clinical and radiological examination of the joints and laboratory studies were carried out on 139 haemophiliacs attending a single centre. The group included more patients with mild and moderate haemophilia (factor levels 6 to 60 per cent) than in previous studies. Haemarthrosis, the most common bleeding manifestation, had affected more than two-thirds of patients including many with mild or moderate disease. Restriction and contracture of the knees and elbows were the most common clinical features and, with the ankles, these joints were most frequently affected both clinically and radiologically. Using a combination of clinical and radiological features, 42 per cent of the patients could be classed as having 'definite' and a further 14 per cent 'possible' haemophilic arthritis. Although haemarthroses were equally prevalent in patients with classical haemophilia and Christmas disease, arthritis was more frequently present in the former. Haemarthrosis and joint disease were exceptional in von Willebrand's disease. The prevalence of arthritis generally related to disease severity as measured by factor level but, in contrast to earlier studies, definite arthritis was seen in some patients with factor levels up to 20 per cent of normal although the number of affected joints was less in these patients with milder disease. Laboratory test abnormalities including circulating immune complexes and hypocomplementaemia were noted in some patients but the abnormalities correlated poorly with clinical features. The present results suggest a recent slight reduction in the prevalence or severity of haemophilic arthritis, possibly attributable to recent improvements in factor replacement treatment. Longer-term studies are required to show whether arthritis is indeed lessening or whether the onset is merely being delayed.

  8. Focusing on Fibromyalgia : A Puzzling and Painful Condition

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Fibromyalgia Health Capsules Infertility Treatments and Children’s Development Help for Rare and Undiagnosed Conditions Featured Website: NIH Office of Dietary Supplements Past Issues Most ...

  9. Comorbidity between myofascial pain of the masticatory muscles and fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Dao, T T; Reynolds, W J; Tenenbaum, H C

    1997-01-01

    This study compared myofascial pain of the masticatory muscles to fibromyalgia. Study data show that, in both myofascial pain and fibromyalgia patients, facial pain intensity and its daily pattern and effect on quality of life are very similar. This indicates that fibromyalgia should be included in the differential diagnosis for myofascial pain of the masticatory muscles. However, with the higher prevalence of neurologic and gastrointestinal symptoms, and the stronger words used to describe the affective dimension of pain, it is apparent that fibromyalgia may be a more debilitating condition than myofascial pain of the masticatory muscles. Since the intensity of facial pain was strongly and significantly correlated to the body-pain index in fibromyalgia but not in myofascial pain patients, it can be concluded that facial pain may be part of the clinical manifestations of fibromyalgia, but it is unlikely to be related to body pain in myofascial pain patients. On the other hand, while body pain is episodic in most myofascial pain patients, it is constant and more severe in the majority of fibromyalgia patients. This difference in the pain patterns suggests that body pain in fibromyalgia and myofascial pain could have different etiologies. The lack of correlation between the intensity of pain and the length of time since onset also supports the concept that myofascial pain of the masticatory muscles and fibromyalgia are unlikely to be progressive disorders.

  10. Fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and myofascial pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, D L

    1995-03-01

    Two important studies in which nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used convincingly demonstrated that muscle is not the primary pathologic factor in fibromyalgia. There were further studies reporting that fibromyalgia-chronic fatigue syndrome may follow well treated Lyme disease or mimic Lyme disease. The longest therapeutic trial to date in fibromyalgia demonstrated an initial modest effect of tricyclic medications, but at 6 months that efficacy was no longer evident. Investigation in both fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome now focuses on the central nervous system. The use of new technology, eg, neurohormonal assays and imaging such as single-photon emission computed tomography scan, may be important in understanding these elusive conditions.

  11. Association between the COMT Val158Met polymorphism and fibromyalgia susceptibility and fibromyalgia impact questionnaire score: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Ho; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Song, Gwan Gyu

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore whether the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) Val158Met polymorphism is associated with susceptibility to fibromyalgia and fibromyalgia impact questionnaire (FIQ) score in fibromyalgia patients. We conducted a meta-analysis of the associations of the COMT Val158Met polymorphism with fibromyalgia risk as well as FIQ score in fibromyalgia patients. A total of 993 fibromyalgia patients and 778 controls from 10 studies on the COMT Val158Met polymorphism and 538 fibromyalgia patients from 5 studies on the COMT Val158Met polymorphism and FIQ score were included in this meta-analysis. The meta-analysis revealed an association between fibromyalgia and the COMT Met/Met + Val/Met genotype in all study subjects (odds ratio (OR) 1.635, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.029-2.597, p = 0.037). However, stratification by ethnicity indicated no association between the Met/Met + Val/Met genotype and fibromyalgia in the European and Turkish populations (OR 1.202, 95 % CI 0.876-1.649, p = 0.255; OR 2.132, 95 % CI 0.764-5.949, p = 0.148, respectively). Analysis using other genetic models showed no association between the COMT Val158Met polymorphism and fibromyalgia. The meta-analysis also revealed that the FIQ score was significantly higher in individuals with the COMT Met/Met genotype than in those with the Val/Val genotype [weighted mean difference (WMD) = 14.39, 95 % CI 3.316-25.48, p = 0.011] and the Val/Met genotype (WMD = 5.108, 95 % CI 2.212-4.891, p = 0.021). This meta-analysis identified an association between fibromyalgia risk and the COMT Val158Met polymorphism as well as the FIQ score in fibromyalgia patients.

  12. Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Herskovitz, Ingrid; Miteva, Mariya

    2016-01-01

    Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA) is the most common scarring alopecia among African American women. Data about epidemiology, etiology, genetic inheritance, and management are scarce and come from individual reports or small series. CCCA has been associated with hot combing and traumatic hair styling for years; however, studies fail to confirm it as the sole etiologic factor. It has been shown in a small series that CCCA can be inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion, with a partial penetrance and a strong modifying effect of hairstyling and sex. CCCA presents clinically as a central area of progressive irreversible hair loss that expands to the periphery. A patchy form has also been described. Dermoscopy is helpful to identify the optimal site for the biopsy, which establishes the diagnosis. Well-designed randomized controlled trials are needed to discover the optimal management. At this point, patients are advised to avoid traction and chemical treatments; topical and intralesional steroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and minoxidil can be helpful in halting the progression. PMID:27574457

  13. Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Herskovitz, Ingrid; Miteva, Mariya

    2016-01-01

    Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA) is the most common scarring alopecia among African American women. Data about epidemiology, etiology, genetic inheritance, and management are scarce and come from individual reports or small series. CCCA has been associated with hot combing and traumatic hair styling for years; however, studies fail to confirm it as the sole etiologic factor. It has been shown in a small series that CCCA can be inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion, with a partial penetrance and a strong modifying effect of hairstyling and sex. CCCA presents clinically as a central area of progressive irreversible hair loss that expands to the periphery. A patchy form has also been described. Dermoscopy is helpful to identify the optimal site for the biopsy, which establishes the diagnosis. Well-designed randomized controlled trials are needed to discover the optimal management. At this point, patients are advised to avoid traction and chemical treatments; topical and intralesional steroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and minoxidil can be helpful in halting the progression. PMID:27574457

  14. ILK Index and Regrowth in Alopecia Areata.

    PubMed

    Stallings, Alicia M; Velez, Mara Weinstein; Fiessinger, Lori A; Piliang, Melissa P; Mesinkovska, Natasha A; Kyei, Angela; Bergfeld, Wilma F

    2015-11-01

    There is insufficient data in the literature concerning optimal intralesional kenalog (ILK) dosing for the treatment of alopecia areata (AA). The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the utility of using the ratio of ILK received to initial Severity of Alopecia Tool (SALT) score to guide ILK dosing in patients with AA. Using photographic data from patients at baseline and 4-months follow-up, hair loss in 15 patients treated with AA was retrospectively graded using the SALT scores. The ILK received/initial SALT score (ILK index) was calculated for each patient, and the mean ILK index for patients who experienced significant (≥50%) and suboptimal (<50%) hair regrowth at 4 months follow-up were compared. Patients who experienced suboptimal hair regrowth had a lower ILK index on average than patients who experienced significant improvement. Although the difference did not meet significance (<0.1), the trend suggests that the ILK index, a novel calculation, may be a useful tool for guiding ILK dosing in the treatment of AA.

  15. Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Herskovitz, Ingrid; Miteva, Mariya

    2016-01-01

    Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA) is the most common scarring alopecia among African American women. Data about epidemiology, etiology, genetic inheritance, and management are scarce and come from individual reports or small series. CCCA has been associated with hot combing and traumatic hair styling for years; however, studies fail to confirm it as the sole etiologic factor. It has been shown in a small series that CCCA can be inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion, with a partial penetrance and a strong modifying effect of hairstyling and sex. CCCA presents clinically as a central area of progressive irreversible hair loss that expands to the periphery. A patchy form has also been described. Dermoscopy is helpful to identify the optimal site for the biopsy, which establishes the diagnosis. Well-designed randomized controlled trials are needed to discover the optimal management. At this point, patients are advised to avoid traction and chemical treatments; topical and intralesional steroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and minoxidil can be helpful in halting the progression.

  16. A review of hormonal therapy for female pattern (androgenic) alopecia.

    PubMed

    Scheinfeld, Noah

    2008-01-01

    Female pattern hair loss (female androgenetic alopecia) is a common, but puzzling, condition in women. Approximately 10 percent of pre-menopausal women show evidence of androgenetic alopecia. Age increases the incidence and 50-75 percent of women 65 years or older suffer from this condition. Only 2 percent topical mindoxidil is approved for treating female androgenetic alopecia. Reviews suggest that anti-hormonal therapy (e.g. cyproterone acetate, spironolactone) is helpful in treating female pattern alopecia in some women who have normal hormone levels. The use of hormonal therapies is most extensively studied in post-menopausal women. Several studies have suggested that cyproterone acetate with or without ethinyl estradiol and spironolactone can ameliorate female androgenetic alopecia in women with normal hormone levels, but larger controlled studies need to be done. Flutamide was found to be more effective than spironolactone or cyproterone in one study. Testosterone conversion inhibitors have been tried in post-menopausual women with normal hormone levels to treat alopecia. No study has shown that 1 mg of finasteride effectively treats female androgenetic alopecia but doses of 2.5 and 5 mg finasteride have helped some women in a few open studies. One case report notes the utility of dutasteride after finasteride failed. The role and place of anti-androgentic agents in female androgenetic alopecia in both pre and post-menopausal women remains to be fully defined. The need for effective agents is highlighted by the paucity of effective treatments and the substantial psychosocial impact of alopecia on women. PMID:18627703

  17. Grammatical Arthritis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Don

    1994-01-01

    Discusses grammatical arthritis (an internal buildup of rules that hinders writing flexibility); four new "rules" (concerning "data is,""none are,""hopefully," and the restrictive "which"); attitudes toward English grammar; how to be a helpful editor; and where to learn about grammar. (SR)

  18. Three-Quarters of Persons in the US Population Reporting a Clinical Diagnosis of Fibromyalgia Do Not Satisfy Fibromyalgia Criteria: The 2012 National Health Interview Survey

    PubMed Central

    Walitt, Brian; Katz, Robert S.; Bergman, Martin J.; Wolfe, Frederick

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Although fibromyalgia criteria have been in effect for decades, little is known about how the fibromyalgia diagnosis is applied and understood by clinicians and patients. We used the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) to determine the prevalence of self-reported clinician diagnosed fibromyalgia and then compared demographics, symptoms, disability and medical utilization measures of persons with a clinical diagnosis of fibromyalgia that did not meet diagnostic criteria (false-positive or prior [F/P] fibromyalgia) to persons with and without criteria-positive fibromyalgia. Methods The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) collected information about both clinical diagnosis and symptoms of fibromyalgia that was appropriately weighted to represent 225,726,257 US adults. Surrogate NHIS diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia were developed based on the level of polysymptomatic distress (PSD) as characterized in the 2011 modified American College of Rheumatology criteria (ACR) for fibromyalgia. Persons with F/P fibromyalgia were compared with persons who do not have fibromyalgia and those meeting surrogate NHIS fibromyalgia criteria. Results Of the 1.78% of persons reporting a clinical diagnosis, 73.5% did not meet NHIS fibromyalgia criteria. The prevalence of F/P fibromyalgia is 1.3%. F/P fibromyalgia is associated with a mild degree of polysymptomatic distress (NHIS PSD score 6.2) and characterized by frequent but not widespread pain and insomnia. Measures of work disability and medical utilization in F/P fibromyalgia were equal to that seen with NHIS criteria positive fibromyalgia and were 6-7x greater in F/P fibromyalgia than in non-fibromyalgia persons. F/P fibromyalgia was best predicted by being female (Odds Ratio [OR] 8.81), married (OR 3.27), and white (OR 1.96). In contrast, being a white, married woman was only modestly predictive of NHIS (criteria positive) fibromyalgia (OR 2.1). Conclusions The majority of clinically diagnosed fibromyalgia

  19. Development of a self-reporting tool to obtain a Combined Index of Severity of Fibromyalgia (ICAF*)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia is a syndrome with heterogeneous symptoms. The evaluation in the clinical setting usually fails to cover the complexity of the syndrome. This study aims to determine how different aspects of fibromyalgia are inter-related when measured by means of a self-reporting tool. The objective is to develop a more complete evaluation model adjusted to the complexity and multi-dimensional nature of the syndrome. Methods Application was made of the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Brief Pain Inventory, the Fatigue Assessment Scale, the Health Assessment Questionnaire, the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28), the Chronic Pain Coping Inventory, the Arthritis Self-efficacy Scale and the Sleep Quality Scale. An assessment was made, on the basis of clinical interviews, case histories and specific tests, of the patient sociodemographic data, comorbidity, physical exploration and other clinical indexes. An exploratory factor analysis was made, with comparisons of the clinical index scores in extreme groups of patients. Results The ICAF composed of 59 items was obtained, offering four factors that explain 64% of the variance, and referred to as Emotional Factor (33.7%), Physical-Activity (15%), Active Coping (9%) and Passive Coping (6.3%). A t-test between the extreme scores of these factors in the 301 patients revealed statistically significant differences in occupational status, medically unexplained syndromes, number of tender points, the six-minutes walk test, comorbidity and health care costs. Conclusions This study offers a tool allowing more complete and rapid evaluation of patients with fibromyalgia. The test intrinsically evaluates the emotional aspects: anxiety and depression, and their impact upon social aspects. It also evaluates patient functional capacity, fatigue, sleep quality, pain, and the way in which the patient copes with the disease. This is achieved by means of a self

  20. Fibromyalgia: poorly understood; treatments are disappointing.

    PubMed

    2009-08-01

    (1) Fibromyalgia is characterised by a range of symptoms that include muscle pain, fatigue and sleep disorders. Anxiety and depression are often also present. The cause is unknown. More women than men are affected; (2) The following review focuses on differential diagnoses and available treatments for fibromyalgia, based on a review of the literature using the standard Prescrire methodology; (3) Fibromyalgia is mainly diagnosed by excluding other possibilities. The principal differential diagnoses are rheumatic involvement of the spine, systemic inflammatory disorders, and hypothyroidism. Unlike these other conditions, fibromyalgia is not associated with radiological or laboratory abnormalities; (4) Paracetamol has not been compared with other treatments in fibromyalgia. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs have no specific effect; (5) The only two trials assessing tramadol showed little effect; in one study the average pain score was 53 mm in the tramadol group versus 65 mm in the placebo group, on a scale ranging from 0 to 100 mm. The adverse effects of tramadol are those of opiates in general, mainly nausea and dependence. Tramadol interacts with numerous other drugs; (6) The efficacy of tricyclic antidepressants is also difficult to quantify. Their limited superiority over placebo lasts no more than a few months. The efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants (fluoxetine, paroxetine and citalopram), serotonin and nonadrenaline reuptake inhibitors (duloxetine and milnacipran) is even less well established. Duloxetine has been tested in four placebo-controlled trials with unconvincing results; (7) Pregabalin and gabapentin, two antiepileptic drugs, appear to be more effective than placebo but have only been tested in short-term trials. In one trial 44% of patients in the pregabalin group said they felt better after 13 weeks versus 35% of patients in the placebo group. However, adverse effects are frequent and sometimes troublesome

  1. Arthritis of the Wrist

    MedlinePlus

    ... is caused by just two types: osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive condition that ... other, it results in pain, stiffness, and weakness. Rheumatoid Arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease that ...

  2. What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Arthritis Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Rheumatoid Arthritis PDF Version Size: 57 KB Audio Version Time: ... Size: 9.7 MB November 2014 What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of ...

  3. Fibromyalgia, Spirituality, Coping and Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Biccheri, Eliane; Roussiau, Nicolas; Mambet-Doué, Constance

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the impact of spirituality on coping strategies and on the quality of life of fibromyalgia patients. The study was carried out on 590 people suffering from fibromyalgia. The data were collected with the French version of the WCC-R (The Ways of Coping Checklist: Cousson et al. 1996), the questionnaire of spirituality (Evaluation de La Spiritualité: Renard and Roussiau, 2016) and Diener's Satisfaction with Life Scale questionnaire, translated into French (Blais et al. 1989). An analysis carried out with the software SPSS and Hayes' models showed that both problem-focused coping and coping through social support seeking are mediating variables that enable an indirect link between spirituality and quality of life.

  4. [Fibromyalgia--a challenge for interdisciplinary management].

    PubMed

    Fürst, Gerhard

    2007-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a common chronic pain syndrome affecting particularly middle aged women. The symptomatology is characterized by diffuse widespread myofascial pain and tenderness on palpation at multiple "tender points". Additional symptoms are various vegetative and functional disorders, nonrestorative sleep, depression and anxiety. Etiology and pathogenesis of fibromyalgia still remain unclear. Current pathogenetic theories conceptualize a combination of biological and psychic, social and mental factors. Diagnosis is based on the characteristic clinical presentation, the presence of multiple tender points and the exclusion of certain disorders with similar symptoms. Laboratory examinations and imaging only provide nonconclusive results. Medication and physical therapies only accomplish some temporary symptomatic relief (30-50%). Psychosomatic rehabilitation should not focus on reduction of pain, but rather on physical reconditioning and development of an active coping style. In this context psychological interventions, education and psychotherapy are essential.

  5. Paraneoplastic alopecia associated with hepatocellular carcinoma in a cat.

    PubMed

    Marconato, Laura; Albanese, Francesco; Viacava, Paolo; Marchetti, Veronica; Abramo, Francesca

    2007-08-01

    A 15-year-old spayed female domestic shorthair cat presented with alopecia associated with hepatocellular carcinoma. Clinical signs, which had commenced 6 months previously, included loss of appetite, loss of weight, and depression. As reported by the owner, the cat developed alopecia a week before referral. The hair loss was localized to the ventral aspect of the thorax and abdomen, medial aspect of front and hind limbs, and ventral aspect of the tail, and was associated with histological features consistent with paraneoplastic alopecia. At necropsy, multiple hepatic nodules were observed, and subsequent histopathological investigation showed cords and sheets of hepatocyte-like neoplastic cells positive for the hepatocyte marker (Hep Par 1), thereby demonstrating the hepatocellular origin of the tumour, which was diagnosed as a hepatocellular carcinoma. This is the first report of feline paraneoplastic alopecia associated with hepatocellular carcinoma confirmed by the Hep Par 1 marker.

  6. Transient Efficacy of Tofacitinib in Alopecia Areata Universalis.

    PubMed

    Anzengruber, Florian; Maul, Julia-Tatjana; Kamarachev, Jivko; Trüeb, Ralph M; French, Lars E; Navarini, Alexander A

    2016-01-01

    Alopecia areata is a common autoimmune disorder that targets hair follicles. Swarms of lymphocytes surround the basis of the follicles, inducing loss of pigmented terminal hair and subsequently inhibit further hair growth. Depending on the extent of involvement, alopecia areata can be associated with a dramatic reduction of quality of life. Currently, no targeted treatment option is available, and topical immune therapies or immunosuppressive drugs are typically used with mixed success. Recently, several cases of alopecia areata responding to Janus kinase inhibitors were published. Here, we report on a businessman with alopecia areata universalis who was treated with tofacitinib. We observed initial signs of hair regrowth in the same timeframe as previously reported, but efficacy quickly waned again, leading to renewed effluvium. Thus, even though tofacitinib and ruxolitinib are a promising new treatment option, we have yet to learn more about their potential role in each particular patient's individual treatment strategy. PMID:27194979

  7. Acquired alopecia, mental retardation, short stature, microcephaly, and optic atrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Hennekam, R C; Renckens-Wennen, E G

    1990-01-01

    We report on a female patient who had acquired total alopecia, short stature, microcephaly, optic atrophy, severe myopia, and mental retardation. A survey of published reports failed to show an identical patient, despite various similar cases. Images PMID:2246773

  8. VIEWPOINT – Vitiligo and alopecia areata: Apples and oranges?

    PubMed Central

    Harris, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Vitiligo and alopecia areata are common autoimmune diseases of the skin. Vitiligo is caused by the destruction of melanocytes and results in the appearance of white patches on any part of the body, while alopecia areata is characterized by patchy hair loss primarily on the scalp, but may also involve other areas as well. At first glance, the two diseases appear to be quite different, targeting different cell types and managed using different treatment approaches. However, the immune cell populations and cytokines that drive each disease are similar, they are closely associated within patients and their family members, and vitiligo and alopecia areata have common genetic risk factors, suggesting that they share a similar pathogenesis. Like apples and oranges, vitiligo and alopecia areata have some obvious differences, but similarities abound. Recognizing both similarities and differences will promote research into the pathogenesis of each disease, as well as the development of new treatments. PMID:24131336

  9. Transient Efficacy of Tofacitinib in Alopecia Areata Universalis

    PubMed Central

    Anzengruber, Florian; Maul, Julia-Tatjana; Kamarachev, Jivko; Trüeb, Ralph M.; French, Lars E.; Navarini, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    Alopecia areata is a common autoimmune disorder that targets hair follicles. Swarms of lymphocytes surround the basis of the follicles, inducing loss of pigmented terminal hair and subsequently inhibit further hair growth. Depending on the extent of involvement, alopecia areata can be associated with a dramatic reduction of quality of life. Currently, no targeted treatment option is available, and topical immune therapies or immunosuppressive drugs are typically used with mixed success. Recently, several cases of alopecia areata responding to Janus kinase inhibitors were published. Here, we report on a businessman with alopecia areata universalis who was treated with tofacitinib. We observed initial signs of hair regrowth in the same timeframe as previously reported, but efficacy quickly waned again, leading to renewed effluvium. Thus, even though tofacitinib and ruxolitinib are a promising new treatment option, we have yet to learn more about their potential role in each particular patient's individual treatment strategy. PMID:27194979

  10. [Value of aerobic rehabilitation in the management of fibromyalgia].

    PubMed

    Maquet, D; Croisier, J L; Demoulin, C; Faymonville, M; Crielaard, J M

    2006-02-01

    This study assesses the influence of a muscular aerobic revalidation program on the management of the fibromyalgia syndrome. After 3 months, benefits consisting of increased muscle performances associated with a reduction of pain and an improvement of quality of life were documented. This study confirms the value of aerobic muscle exercise in fibromyalgia patients. PMID:16566119

  11. Fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and myofascial pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Buskila, D

    1999-03-01

    Fibromyalgia was almost completely absent from an urban affluent population compared with poor urban and rural communities. Seventeen percent of Gulf War veterans with soft tissue syndromes had fibromyalgia, a much higher rate than was seen in previous studies of rheumatic disease in the military population. A state of central hyperexcitability in the nociceptive system was reported in fibromyalgia. Altered functioning of the stress-response system has been further documented in fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome. Administration of growth hormone to patients with fibromyalgia who have low levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 resulted in improvement in their symptoms and tenderness. An association between chronic fatigue syndrome and initial infections was demonstrated. A correlation between particular immunologic abnormalities and measures of disease severity was documented in chronic fatigue syndrome. Concomitant fibromyalgia in other rheumatic diseases was a major contributor to poor quality of life. A favorable outcome of fibromyalgia in children was reported; the majority of patients improved over 2 to 3 years of follow-up. Treatment of patients with fibromyalgia continues to be of limited success.

  12. Vegetarian diet in the treatment of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Azad, K A; Alam, M N; Haq, S A; Nahar, S; Chowdhury, M A; Ali, S M; Ullah, A K

    2000-08-01

    Brain tryptophan is low in fibromyalgia. Intake of protein rich in large neutral amino acids is reported to lower brain tryptophan. This study was undertaken to assess whether any reduction of such proteins by exclusion of animal protein from the diet reduced pain and morbidity in fibromyalgia patients. It was an open, randomized controlled trial. 37 subjects with fibromyalgia were enrolled in the vegetarian diet and 41 in the amitriptyline groups. The outcome was assessed with the help of frequencies of fatigue, insomnia & non-restorative sleep, pain score on a 10-point VAS and tender point count. Fatigue, insomnia and non-restorative sleep were present in 41, 26 and 32 subjects before and in 3, 0 and 0 subjects respectively at six weeks of treatment in the amitriptyline group. The pain score and tender point count were 6.2 +/- 1.9 & 16.1 +/- 2.3 before and 2.3 +/- 1.3 & 6.4 +/- 3.0 after treatment. All these differences were significant (P < 0.001). In the vegetarian diet group, fatigue, insomnia and non-restorative sleep were present in 36, 24 and 27 subjects before and in 34, 29 and 29 subjects at six weeks of treatment. The pain score and tender point count were 5.7 +/- 1.8 and 15.7 +/- 2.4 before and 5.0 +/- 1.8 & 14.7 +/- 3.6 after treatment. All these differences were insignificant except that in the pain score. The decrease in the pain score, though significant, was much smaller than that in the amitriptyline group. So, it may be concluded that vegetarian diet is a poor option in the treatment of fibromyalgia.

  13. Childhood risk factors for developing fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Olivieri, Patrick; Solitar, Bruce; Dubois, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia is a disease process without an obvious etiology. While some evidence suggests that adverse experiences in childhood contribute to its development, specific evidence has been equivocal. Methods A total of 36 patients with fibromyalgia from the greater New York area were recruited and surveyed using the Centers for Disease Control’s Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey, and questions from the section on adverse childhood experiences were administered. The results were compared to those obtained from over 400,000 people surveyed by the Centers for Disease control each year, and were monitored for statistically significant differences. Results A statistically significant difference was noted among the control group, suggesting that individuals reported growing up with someone who was depressed when the respondents were between the ages of 0 and 18 years old. Moreover, respondents reported that they were hit by their parents in some way, were insulted or cursed at by their parents, and had been forced to have sex with someone at least 5 years older than them or with an adult. No correlation was found with the following variables and the development of fibromyalgia: growing up with divorced or separated parents; growing up with someone sentenced to serve time in jail; or having parents that abused each other. Additionally, statistically significant differences were found for the following categories: lack of emotional support; life dissatisfaction; fair or poor health; physical, mental or emotional disability; and being divorced or not married. Discussion Using this well-validated survey, it became clear that at least six specific adverse childhood experiences were correlated with the development of fibromyalgia. Data pertaining to disability, quality of life, life satisfaction, number of days of depression, emotional support, and marriage status illustrated the extent of subjective disability that these patients feel every day.

  14. Frontal Fibrosing Alopecia in a Male Presenting with Sideburn Loss

    PubMed Central

    AlGaadi, Salim; Miteva, Mariya; Tosti, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA) is a cicatricial alopecia that affects mainly postmenopausal women. It is typically characterized by recession of frontotemporal hairline. Hair loss of eyebrows, eyelashes, axillae, limbs, and pubic area may be observed. Here, we describe a case of FFA in a male patient presenting with only localized loss of sideburns. Skin biopsy findings were consistent with lichen planopilaris. To our knowledge, this is the only reported case of FFA patient with only localized loss of sideburns. PMID:26180452

  15. Male frontal fibrosing alopecia with generalised hair loss.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenchieh; Kigitsidou, Evanthia; Prucha, Hanna; Ring, Johannes; Andres, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Frontal fibrosing alopecia predominantly affects postmenopausal women and is regarded as a variant of lichen planopilaris. Male cases have rarely been reported. Here we describe a 66-year-old man with a typical receding fronto-temporal hair line in a form of scarring alopecia, which shows features of lichen planopilaris in histology. An extensive loss of body hair involving bilateral axillae, limbs and pubic area was also observed. PMID:24720432

  16. [Treatment of androgenic alopecia with topical minoxidil].

    PubMed

    Brenner, S; Tamir, A

    1991-11-01

    Minoxidil, a vasodilator, was first marketed in 1979 as an oral antihypertensive. Since hypertrichosis occurred as an adverse effect in most patients treated, a 2% topical solution was developed for use in men with androgenic alopecia. It was approved by the American Food and Drug Administration and by the Israel Ministry of Health. A follow-up of 30 cases treated with the preparation is presented. Efficacy of treatment was assessed by hair counts in a marked area on the balding scalp, as well as by subjective evaluations of patients and physicians. The treatment was beneficial in 63%: balding was slowed in most, while in a minority hair density actually increased. However, in only 6.6% was dramatic cosmetic improvement achieved. PMID:1800277

  17. Current management of androgenetic alopecia in men.

    PubMed

    Wolff, H; Kunte, C

    1999-12-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is a common dermatological condition affecting both men and women. Until recently there has been little interest in AGA as a clinical condition, largely due to the lack of any genuinely effective treatment for it. A number of "remedies" exist, such as vitamin supplements, which are not generally harmful but which have no proven efficacy in promoting hair growth or preventing further hair loss. Hair systems and surgery provide camouflage for the symptoms but do not effect a cure. By far the most promising approaches to the treatment of AGA are drug therapies, such as minoxidil and finasteride. Finasteride, an inhibitor of the type II 5alpha-reductase that converts testosterone to dihydrotestosterone, has been shown to prevent further hair loss, and promotes new hair growth in the majority of the men taking part in clinical trials. Tailored drug approaches like this offer the greatest hope for the successful future treatment of AGA. PMID:10586125

  18. Androgenic alopecia in women: an Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Srivastava, Govind; Aggarwal, Ashok K; Midha, Reshmi

    2013-01-01

    The authors sought to investigate androgenic alopecia (AA) utilizing clinical and investigative procedures to establish the pattern of AA in the Indian subcontinent. A total of 35 consecutive women presenting with AA were included. After obtaining informed consent, a detailed history/examination, hair pull test, trichogram, and a scalp biopsy were performed in patients. AA classification was attempted across Ludwig and Norwood guidelines. Of 35 women, 16 had grade I, 10 had grade II, and 1 had grade III Ludwig classification. In addition, 6 other women had Christmas tree baldness: 1 each of fronto-parietal and male pattern baldness. Several investigations including hormonal profile were inconclusive; however, hair pull test and trichogram may be helpful in understanding the sequence in AA in women. AA has infrequently been reported, particularly India and in Asia in general.

  19. Features of temporomandibular disorders in fibromyalgia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Marcele Jardim; Gui, Maisa Soares; Martins de Aquino, Luana Maria; Rizzatti-Barbosa, Célia Marisa

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of clinical features of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in patients with fibromyalgia. The test group (FMG) consisted of 40 women with fibromyalgia (FM) compared to the control group of 40 healthy subjects using the research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (RDC/TMD). The variables were compared using Fisher's exact test and a Mann-Whitney test. Facial pain was reported by 85% of the FM group, and 77.5% were diagnosed with myofascial TMD. Muscle pain during jaw movements, daytime bruxism/clenching, and limited mouth opening were significantly higher in the test group. There was no difference between groups in: (1) joint noises; (2) sleep bruxism/clenching; and (3) excursive or non-excursive movements. Classic signs of TMD, such as joint noise and self-reporting of clenching at night, are not associated with fibromyalgia syndrome as demonstrated in the current study. However, the self-reported daytime parafunctions, muscle pain in jaw movements, and limited mouth opening are features of the patients in the current study. This study revealed specific muscle involvement of TMD is also presence in FM.

  20. Neurogenic neuroinflammation in fibromyalgia and complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Littlejohn, Geoffrey

    2015-11-01

    Although fibromyalgia and complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) have distinct clinical phenotypes, they do share many other features. Pain, allodynia and dysaesthesia occur in each condition and seem to exist on a similar spectrum. Fibromyalgia and CRPS can both be triggered by specific traumatic events, although fibromyalgia is most commonly associated with psychological trauma and CRPS is most often associated with physical trauma, which is frequently deemed routine or minor by the patient. Fibromyalgia and CRPS also seem to share many pathophysiological mechanisms, among which the most important are those involving central effects. Nonetheless, peripheral effects, such as neurogenic neuroinflammation, are also important contributors to the clinical features of each of these disorders. This Review highlights the differing degrees to which neurogenic neuroinflammation might contribute to the multifactorial pathogenesis of both fibromyalgia and CRPS, and discusses the evidence suggesting that this mechanism is an important link between the two disorders, and could offer novel therapeutic targets.

  1. Common questions about the diagnosis and management of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Kodner, Charles

    2015-04-01

    Fibromyalgia has a distinct pathophysiology involving central amplification of peripheral sensory signals. Core symptoms are chronic widespread pain, fatigue, and sleep disturbance. Most patients with fibromyalgia have muscle pain and tenderness, forgetfulness or problems concentrating, and significant functional limitations. Fibromyalgia is diagnosed using an updated set of clinical criteria that no longer depend on tender point examination; laboratory testing may rule out other disorders that commonly present with fatigue, such as anemia and thyroid disease. Patients with fibromyalgia should be evaluated for comorbid functional pain syndromes and mood disorders. Management of fibromyalgia should include patient education, symptom relief, and regular aerobic physical activity. Serotoninnorepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, antiepileptics, and muscle relaxants have the strongest evidence of benefit for improving pain, fatigue, sleep symptoms, and quality of life. Multiple complementary and alternative medicine therapies have been used but have limited evidence of effectiveness. Opioids should be used to relieve pain in carefully selected patients only if alternative therapies are ineffective.

  2. Common questions about the diagnosis and management of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Kodner, Charles

    2015-04-01

    Fibromyalgia has a distinct pathophysiology involving central amplification of peripheral sensory signals. Core symptoms are chronic widespread pain, fatigue, and sleep disturbance. Most patients with fibromyalgia have muscle pain and tenderness, forgetfulness or problems concentrating, and significant functional limitations. Fibromyalgia is diagnosed using an updated set of clinical criteria that no longer depend on tender point examination; laboratory testing may rule out other disorders that commonly present with fatigue, such as anemia and thyroid disease. Patients with fibromyalgia should be evaluated for comorbid functional pain syndromes and mood disorders. Management of fibromyalgia should include patient education, symptom relief, and regular aerobic physical activity. Serotoninnorepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, antiepileptics, and muscle relaxants have the strongest evidence of benefit for improving pain, fatigue, sleep symptoms, and quality of life. Multiple complementary and alternative medicine therapies have been used but have limited evidence of effectiveness. Opioids should be used to relieve pain in carefully selected patients only if alternative therapies are ineffective. PMID:25884747

  3. Association of reversible alopecia with occupational topical exposure to common borax-containing solutions.

    PubMed

    Beckett, W S; Oskvig, R; Gaynor, M E; Goldgeier, M H

    2001-04-01

    Boron is widely used in industrial materials, most frequently as the salt borax. Systemic exposure (eg, ingestion) to boron in boric acid been associated with reversible toxic alopecia among other manifestations. There is scant clinical literature on alopecia caused by topical exposure to boron. We observed a series of 3 patients in 2 workplaces who suffered reversible alopecia from cutaneous boron exposure. The scalp alopecia was global in 1 patient and patchy in 2 patients. Alopecia was completely reversed by elimination or reduction of exposure to boron-containing materials in all 3 patients. We conclude that occupational topical exposure to boron in solutions may cause reversible alopecia.

  4. Alopecia: Possible Causes and Treatments, Particularly in Captive Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Melinda A; Meyer, Jerrold S

    2009-01-01

    Alopecia (hair loss) occurs in some nonhuman primates housed in captivity and is of concern to colony managers and veterinarians. Here we review the characteristics, potential causes, and treatments for this condition. Although we focus on nonhuman primates, relevant research on other mammalian species is discussed also, due to the relative paucity of studies on alopecia in the primate literature. We first discuss the cycle of hair growth and explain how this cycle can be disrupted to produce alopecia. Numerous factors may be related to hair loss and range from naturally occurring processes (for example, seasonality, aging) to various biologic dysfunctions, including vitamin and mineral imbalances, endocrine disorders, immunologic diseases, and genetic mutations. We also address bacterial and fungal infections, infestation by parasites, and atopic dermatitis as possible causes of alopecia. Finally, we examine the role of psychogenic factors, such as stress. Depending on the presumed cause of the hair loss, various treatment strategies can be pursued. Alopecia in nonhuman primates is a multifaceted disorder with many potential sources. For this reason, appropriate testing for various disease conditions should be completed before alopecia is considered to be related to stress. PMID:19295051

  5. Emotional modulation of pain and spinal nociception in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Rhudy, Jamie L; DelVentura, Jennifer L; Terry, Ellen L; Bartley, Emily J; Olech, Ewa; Palit, Shreela; Kerr, Kara L

    2013-07-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is characterized by widespread pain, as well as affective disturbance (eg, depression). Given that emotional processes are known to modulate pain, a disruption of emotion and emotional modulation of pain and nociception may contribute to FM. The present study used a well-validated affective picture-viewing paradigm to study emotional processing and emotional modulation of pain and spinal nociception. Participants were 18 individuals with FM, 18 individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and 19 healthy pain-free controls (HC). Mutilation, neutral, and erotic pictures were presented in 4 blocks; 2 blocks assessed only physiological-emotional reactions (ie, pleasure/arousal ratings, corrugator electromyography, startle modulation, skin conductance) in the absence of pain, and 2 blocks assessed emotional reactivity and emotional modulation of pain and the nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR, a physiological measure of spinal nociception) evoked by suprathreshold electric stimulations over the sural nerve. In general, mutilation pictures elicited displeasure, corrugator activity, subjective arousal, and sympathetic activation, whereas erotic pictures elicited pleasure, subjective arousal, and sympathetic activation. However, FM was associated with deficits in appetitive activation (eg, reduced pleasure/arousal to erotica). Moreover, emotional modulation of pain was observed in HC and RA, but not FM, even though all 3 groups evidenced modulation of NFR. Additionally, NFR thresholds were not lower in the FM group, indicating a lack of spinal sensitization. Together, these results suggest that FM is associated with a disruption of supraspinal processes associated with positive affect and emotional modulation of pain, but not brain-to-spinal cord circuitry that modulates spinal nociceptive processes. PMID:23622762

  6. Music as a sleep aid in fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Picard, Larry M; Bartel, Lee R; Gordon, Allan S; Cepo, Davor; Wu, Qi; Pink, Leah R

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Interventions to improve sleep in fibromyalgia may generalize to improvements in multiple symptom domains. Delta-embedded music, pulsating regularly within the 0.25 Hz to 4 Hz frequency band of brain wave activity, has the potential to induce sleep. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of a delta-embedded music program over four weeks for sleep induction in patients with fibromyalgia. METHODS: The present unblinded, investigator-led pilot study used a within-subject design. Analysis was based on 20 individuals with fibromyalgia who completed the study, of the 24 recruited into the study. The primary outcome variables were the change from baseline in Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) and Jenkins Sleep Scale scores. A patient global impression of change was measured on a seven-point Likert scale. Secondary outcome measures, comprised of items 5, 6 and 7 of the FIQ, were used as indicators of pain, tiredness and being tired on awakening. RESULTS: The FIQ median score of 76.4 (95% CI 61.3 to 82.1) at baseline improved to 60.3 (95% CI 53.1 to 72.0; P=0.004). The Jenkins Sleep Scale median value of 17.5 (95% CI 15.5 to 18.5) at baseline fell to 12.5 (95% CI 8.5 to 14.5; P=0.001) at study completion. The outcomes of the patient global impression of change ratings were mostly positive (P=0.001). Being tired on awakening declined significantly from a median of 9.0 (95% CI 8.0 to 10.0) to 8.0 (95% CI 5.5 to 9.0; P=0.021). However, there was no significant improvement in pain level (baseline median 7.5 [95% CI 7.0 to 8.5] versus study completion median 7.0 [95% CI 6.5 to 8.0]; P=0.335) or tiredness (baseline median 9.0 [95% CI 8.0 to 9.5] versus study completion median 8.0 [95% CI 6.0 to 8.5]; P=0.061). There were no serious adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: Delta-embedded music is a potential alternative therapy for fibromyalgia. PMID:24555178

  7. Oral ruxolitinib induces hair regrowth in patients with moderate-to-severe alopecia areata

    PubMed Central

    Mackay-Wiggan, Julian; Nguyen, Nhan; Cerise, Jane E.; Clark, Charlotte; Ulerio, Grace; Furniss, Megan; Vaughan, Roger; Clynes, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Alopecia areata (AA) is a common autoimmune disease with a lifetime risk of 1.7%; there are no FDA-approved treatments for AA. We previously identified a dominant IFN-γ transcriptional signature in cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in human and mouse AA skin and showed that treatment with JAK inhibitors induced durable hair regrowth in mice by targeting this pathway. Here, we investigated the use of the oral JAK1/2 inhibitor ruxolitinib in the treatment of patients with moderate-to-severe AA. METHODS. We initiated an open-label clinical trial of 12 patients with moderate-to-severe AA, using oral ruxolitinib, 20 mg twice per day, for 3–6 months of treatment followed by 3 months follow-up off drug. The primary endpoint was the proportion of subjects with 50% or greater hair regrowth from baseline to end of treatment. RESULTS. Nine of twelve patients (75%) demonstrated a remarkable response to treatment, with average hair regrowth of 92% at the end of treatment. Safety parameters remained largely within normal limits, and no serious adverse effects were reported. Gene expression profiling revealed treatment-related downregulation of inflammatory markers, including signatures for CTLs and IFN response genes and upregulation of hair-specific markers. CONCLUSION. In this pilot study, 9 of 12 patients (75%) treated with ruxolitinib showed significant scalp hair regrowth and improvement of AA. Larger randomized controlled trials are needed to further assess the safety and efficacy of ruxolitinib in the treatment of AA. TRIAL REGISTRATION. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01950780. FUNDING. Locks of Love Foundation, the Alopecia Areata Initiative, NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), and the Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research/Columbia University Medical Center Clinical and Translational Science Award (CUMC CTSA). PMID:27699253

  8. Oral ruxolitinib induces hair regrowth in patients with moderate-to-severe alopecia areata

    PubMed Central

    Mackay-Wiggan, Julian; Nguyen, Nhan; Cerise, Jane E.; Clark, Charlotte; Ulerio, Grace; Furniss, Megan; Vaughan, Roger; Clynes, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Alopecia areata (AA) is a common autoimmune disease with a lifetime risk of 1.7%; there are no FDA-approved treatments for AA. We previously identified a dominant IFN-γ transcriptional signature in cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in human and mouse AA skin and showed that treatment with JAK inhibitors induced durable hair regrowth in mice by targeting this pathway. Here, we investigated the use of the oral JAK1/2 inhibitor ruxolitinib in the treatment of patients with moderate-to-severe AA. METHODS. We initiated an open-label clinical trial of 12 patients with moderate-to-severe AA, using oral ruxolitinib, 20 mg twice per day, for 3–6 months of treatment followed by 3 months follow-up off drug. The primary endpoint was the proportion of subjects with 50% or greater hair regrowth from baseline to end of treatment. RESULTS. Nine of twelve patients (75%) demonstrated a remarkable response to treatment, with average hair regrowth of 92% at the end of treatment. Safety parameters remained largely within normal limits, and no serious adverse effects were reported. Gene expression profiling revealed treatment-related downregulation of inflammatory markers, including signatures for CTLs and IFN response genes and upregulation of hair-specific markers. CONCLUSION. In this pilot study, 9 of 12 patients (75%) treated with ruxolitinib showed significant scalp hair regrowth and improvement of AA. Larger randomized controlled trials are needed to further assess the safety and efficacy of ruxolitinib in the treatment of AA. TRIAL REGISTRATION. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01950780. FUNDING. Locks of Love Foundation, the Alopecia Areata Initiative, NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), and the Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research/Columbia University Medical Center Clinical and Translational Science Award (CUMC CTSA).

  9. Chronic urticaria is usually associated with fibromyalgia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Torresani, Claudio; Bellafiore, Salvatore; De Panfilis, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    Although the pathophysiology of chronic urticaria is not fully understood, it is possible that dysfunctioning of peripheral cutaneous nerve fibres may be involved. It has also been suggested that fibromyalgia syndrome, a multi-symptomatic chronic pain condition, may be associated with alterations and dysfunctioning of peripheral cutaneous nerve fibres. The aim of this study was to determine whether patients with chronic urticaria are also affected by fibromyalgia syndrome. A total of 126 patients with chronic urticaria were investigated for fibromyalgia syndrome. An unexpectedly high proportion (over 70%) had fibromyalgia syndrome. The corresponding proportion for 50 control dermatological patients was 16%, which is higher than previously published data for the Italian general population (2.2%). It is possible that dysfunctional cutaneous nerve fibres of patients with fibromyalgia syndrome may release neuropeptides, which, in turn, may induce dermal microvessel dilatation and plasma extravasation. Furthermore, some neuropeptides may favour mast cell degranulation, which stimulates nerve endings, thus providing positive feedback. Chronic urticaria may thus be viewed in many patients, as a consequence of fibromyalgia syndrome; in fact, skin neuropathy (fibromyalgia syndrome) may trigger neurogenic skin inflammation (chronic urticaria).

  10. Oxidative stress in fibromyalgia and its relationship to symptoms.

    PubMed

    Chung, Cecilia P; Titova, Dina; Oeser, Annette; Randels, Margaret; Avalos, Ingrid; Milne, Ginger L; Morrow, Jason D; Stein, C Michael

    2009-04-01

    Oxidative stress is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of fibromyalgia. We examined the hypothesis that oxidative stress was increased in patients with fibromyalgia and related to the severity of symptoms. Urinary F(2)-isoprostane excretion was measured in 48 patients with fibromyalgia and compared to those of 96 control subjects. In patients, we examined the association between oxidative stress and symptoms. Patients with fibromyalgia were significantly more symptomatic than control subjects, but urinary F(2)-isoprostane excretion did not differ significantly (2.3+/-1.9 vs. 2.8+/-2.2 ng/mg creatinine, p=0.16). In patients with fibromyalgia, F(2)-isoprostane excretion was associated with fatigue visual analog scale (rho=0.30, p=0.04) but not with pain, quality of life, functional capacity, depression, number of tender points, or overall impact of fibromyalgia. Oxidative stress is not increased in patients with fibromyalgia, but as was previously found in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, oxidative stress was associated with fatigue.

  11. Review of overlap between thermoregulation and pain modulation in fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Alice A.; Pardo, José V.; Pasley, Jeffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is characterized by widespread pain that is exacerbated by cold and stress but relieved by warmth. We review the points along thermal and pain pathways where temperature may influence pain. We also present evidence addressing the possibility that brown adipose tissue activity is linked to the pain of fibromyalgia given that cold initiates thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue via adrenergic activity, while warmth suspends thermogenesis. Although females have a higher incidence of fibromyalgia as well as more resting thermogenesis, they are less able to recruit brown adipose tissue in response to chronic stress than males. In addition, conditions that are frequently comorbid with fibromyalgia compromise brown adipose activity making it less responsive to sympathetic stimulation. This results in lower body temperatures, lower metabolic rates, and lower circulating cortisol/corticosterone in response to stress - characteristics of fibromyalgia. In the periphery, sympathetic nerves to brown adipose also project to surrounding tissues, including tender points characterizing fibromyalgia. As a result, the musculoskeletal hyperalgesia associated with conditions like fibromyalgia may result from referred pain in the adjacent muscle and skin. PMID:23887348

  12. Monosodium glutamate and aspartame in perceived pain in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Vellisca, María Y; Latorre, José I

    2014-07-01

    Our aim was to assess the effect of dietary elimination of monosodium glutamate (MSG) and aspartame on perceived pain in fibromyalgia. A total of 72 female patients with fibromyalgia were randomized to discontinuation of dietary MSG and aspartame (n = 36) or waiting list (n = 36). Patients were requested to rate their pain using a seven-point scale. Comparisons between both groups showed no significant differences on pain referred during the baseline or after the elimination of dietary MSG and aspartame. The discontinuation of dietary MSG and aspartame did not improve the symptoms of fibromyalgia.

  13. Fibromyalgia Syndrome: An Overview of Pathophysiology, Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Jahan, Firdous; Nanji, Kashmira; Qidwai, Waris; Qasim, Rizwan

    2012-01-01

    Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS) is a chronic condition causing pain, stiffness, and tenderness of the muscles, tendons, and joints. It is also characterized by restless sleep, tiredness, fatigue, anxiety, depression, and disturbances in bowel functions. The etiology of fibromyalgia remains unknown, but recent advances and discoveries have helped to unravel some of the mysteries of this disease. Research highlights some of the biochemical, metabolic, and immunoregulatory abnormalities associated with fibromyalgia. Management of FMS at the present time is very difficult as it has multiple etiological factors and psychological predispositions; however, a patient centered approach is essential to handle this problem. PMID:22811766

  14. [Rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Strunk, J; Lange, U; Müller-Ladner, U

    2005-07-29

    The development of novel anti-rheumatic drugs revolutionizes currently therapeutic strategies and diagnostic management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, facilitating the goal of true remission instead of only symptomatic treatment as in former years. Since early treatment is known to be crucial for the longterm outcome, imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging and high-frequency ultrasonography including Doppler sonography, which allow direct visualization of very early pathologic alterations of synovitis, or even initial destruction, become increasingly important. Besides the established therapy with methotrexate, new drugs such as leflunomide or the use of various combination therapies have been successfully introduced into the therapeutic armamentarium. Especially the introduction of cytokine-antagonists such as TNF-a inhibitors target the aim of remission. In addition, the upcoming therapeutic agents, which influence very effectively the inflammatory and destructive process need also to be integrated into the concert of different therapeutic strategies in the management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, which includes the mandatory complementary factors such as physiotherapy, ergotherapy and orthopedic surgery.

  15. Advances in the Assessment of Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David A.; Schilling, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) has historically been considered a chronic pain condition. Recent clinical studies however reveal that while pain may be the cardinal symptom of FM, there are many other symptoms and consequences of having FM that impact the lives of individuals with this condition. As such, an area of intense clinical research has focused upon improving approaches to assessment for FM. This article provides an overview of how the art of assessing FM has evolved over time, the value of patients’ perspectives in assessment, current methods of assessment, and emerging advancements representing the future of assessment for FM. PMID:19647147

  16. Tramadol for the treatment of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    MacLean, Ashley J B; Schwartz, Thomas L

    2015-05-01

    Tramadol is a novel, synthetic opioid receptor agonist with serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor properties that is often prescribed acutely for painful conditions. Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic painful condition that is difficult to treat and until more recently has had no approved medical treatments. Currently, the only US FDA-approved medications for FM include duloxetine, milnacipran and pregabalin. No opioid is approved for use in the treatment of FM. This paper specifically reviews the literature on tramadol use in FM and concludes that there is a fair evidence base to support its use as a second-line treatment for more resistant cases. PMID:25896486

  17. [Predictors of healthcare resource use in fibromyalgia].

    PubMed

    Pastor Mira, Ma Ángeles; Lledó Boyer, Ana; López-Roig, Sofía; Pons Calatayud, Nieves; Martín-Aragón Gelabert, Maite

    2010-11-01

    This work identifies which psychosocial, clinical and perceived health status factors predict health-resource use in Fibromyalgia (FM), considering the patients' assistance level. Participants were 315 FM patients from Primary Care (PC: n=101) and Rheumatology Services (RS: n=214). Stepwise regression analysis showed that self-efficacy variables were significant predictors of medication intake in PC, and, along with Illness-focused coping, of the health service use. In RS, perceived health status was the best predictor of medication intake. In any case, Pain intensity significantly predicted the use of health resources. These data offer a new perspective for intervention in these patients, taking into account the level of assistance.

  18. Involvement of Mechanical Stress in Androgenetic Alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Tellez-Segura, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Context: Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is a frequent disorder characterized by progressive hair miniaturization in a very similar pattern among all affected men. The pathogenesis is related to androgen-inducible overexpression of transforming growth factor β-1 from balding dermal papilla cells, which is involved in epithelial inhibition and perifollicular fibrosis. Recent research shows that hair follicle androgen sensitivity is regulated by Hic-5, an androgen receptor co-activator which may be activated by the mechanical stimulation. Moreover, the dermis of scalp susceptible to be affected by AGA is firmly bounded to the galea aponeurotica, so the physical force exerted by the occipitofrontalis muscle is transmitted to the scalp skin. Aims: To know whether mechanical stress supported by hair follicles is involved in AGA phenomenon. Materials and Methods: It is performed with a finite element analysis of a galea model and a schematic representation of AGA progression according to Hamilton–Norwood scale in order to establish the correlation between elastic deformation in scalp and clinical progression of male pattern baldness. Results: The result was a highly significant correlation (r: −0.885, P < 0.001) that clearly identifies a mechanical factor in AGA development. Conclusions: All these data suggest that mechanical stress determines AGA patterning and a stretch-induced and androgen-mediated mechanotransduction in dermal papilla cells could be the primary mechanism in AGA pathogenesis. PMID:26622151

  19. Alopecia in bats from Tabasco, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bello-Gutiérrez, Joaquín; Suzán, Gerardo; Hidalgo-Mihart, Mircea G; Salas, Gerardo

    2010-07-01

    We report alopecic syndrome (hair loss in areas of the body, including chest, abdomen, and back) in four frugivorous bat species (Artibeus jamaicensis, Artibeus lituratus, Sturnira lilium, and Sturnira ludovici) within urban and periurban areas of Villahermosa, Tabasco, México, during 2007 and 2008. The overall prevalence of alopecic syndrome was 5.25% (135/2,567 bats). The highest prevalence was found in A. lituratus (5.6%; 62/1,105), followed by A. jamaicensis (5%; 3/1,462). We found a higher prevalence in the dry season, when more than 90% of the alopecic individuals (n=122) were captured. Higher prevalence of alopecia was recorded in urban areas (80% of captured alopecic bats, n=108) than in periurban areas (20%, n=27). Histopathologic studies revealed no evidence of infectious agents. The syndrome may be related to nutritional or endocrinal deficiencies. Spatial and seasonal aggregation in urban areas suggests that anthropogenic activities may interfere with nutritional processes. Further studies are needed to confirm the etiology of the syndrome as well as its impact on population dynamics. This is the first report of alopecic syndrome in sylvatic bats.

  20. A mouse model of androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Crabtree, Judy S; Kilbourne, Edward J; Peano, Bryan J; Chippari, Susan; Kenney, Thomas; McNally, Christopher; Wang, Wei; Harris, Heather A; Winneker, Richard C; Nagpal, Sunil; Thompson, Catherine C

    2010-05-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA), commonly known as male pattern baldness, is a form of hair loss that occurs in both males and females. Although the exact cause of AGA is not known, it is associated with genetic predisposition through traits related to androgen synthesis/metabolism and androgen signaling mediated by the androgen receptor (AR). Current therapies for AGA show limited efficacy and are often associated with undesirable side effects. A major hurdle to developing new therapies for AGA is the lack of small animal models to support drug discovery research. Here, we report the first rodent model of AGA. Previous work demonstrating that the interaction between androgen-bound AR and beta-catenin can inhibit Wnt signaling led us to test the hypothesis that expression of AR in hair follicle cells could interfere with hair growth in an androgen-dependent manner. Transgenic mice overexpressing human AR in the skin under control of the keratin 5 promoter were generated. Keratin 5-human AR transgenic mice exposed to high levels of 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone showed delayed hair regeneration, mimicking the AGA scalp. This effect is AR mediated, because treatment with the AR antagonist hydroxyflutamide inhibited the effect of dihydrotestosterone on hair growth. These results support the hypothesis that androgen-mediated hair loss is AR dependent and suggest that AR and beta-catenin mediate this effect. These mice can now be used to test new therapeutic agents for the treatment of AGA, accelerating the drug discovery process.

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed to help you ... Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic Arthritis 101 2010 E.S.C.A.P. ...

  2. Alopecia areata treated with phenolisation and intravenous dexamethasone pulses.

    PubMed

    Kar, Sumit; Singh, Neha

    2013-01-01

    Phenol is an aromatic hydrocarbon derived from coal tar or manufactured from monochlorobenzene. Alopecia areata is a common non scarring autoimmune condition characterised by patchy loss of hair without atrophy. Various treatment modalities have been proposed and used for the treatment of alopecia areata, which is indeed a difficult condition to treat. Variable results have been documented using intralesional corticosteroid injections, topical minoxidil, topical anthralin ointment, topical contact sensitizers like diphencyprone, dinitrochlorobenzene or squaric acid dibutyl ester, and oral mini pulse with betamethasone. The use of 88% phenol for the treatment of alopecia areata has been documented in literature, but it has failed to secure a place in the priority list. Herein we have reported a case of a young girl who was treated with short-time aggressive therapy using 88% phenol and dexamethasone pulse therapy and who responded well to the treatment with no recurrence in the last 6 months of follow-up. PMID:23960401

  3. Pharmacogenomics in clinical drug development and potential for alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Warner, Amelia W

    2013-12-01

    Alopecia areata, alopecia totalis, and alopecia universalis likely represent a constellation of related diseases with similar, yet distinct heritability markers. There is currently no known curative therapy that works universally for all patients. Pharmacogenomic research enables the pharmaceutical industry to understand variability of patient responses to drugs during clinical drug development and during post-marketing surveillance. Understanding the genetic basis for patient response/non-response can enable the development of individualized therapies for those patients with an inherited basis for altered response to drug therapy. There are multiple examples of drugs that now contain a recommendation for genetic testing before dosing in their drug labels, directing clinicians to obtain genetic information for each individual patient in order to help direct drug therapy. PMID:24326549

  4. Alopecia universalis with remission during pregnancy and prednisolone therapy.

    PubMed

    Asanuma, N; Sakurai, A; Aizawa, T; Hashizume, K

    1997-01-01

    In a 32-year-old woman, alopecia universalis went into unequivocal remission during pregnancy and prednisolone therapy. A skin biopsy specimen showed intense infiltration of the lymphocyte around the hair follicle without immunoglobulin and complement deposition. Autoantibody test results were negative except for the antithyroid and anti-nuclear antibodies. Human leukocyte antigen haplotypes common in Japanese patients with insulin-dependent diabetes were found in this patient. However, thyroid function and glucose tolerance were normal, and other clinical evidence of collagen vascular disorders was not found. In this patient, alopecia was considered to have been caused by autoimmune abnormalities. This is the first documentation of remission of autoimmune alopecia universalis during pregnancy.

  5. Fibromyalgia: a complex syndrome requiring a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Spaeth, Michael; Briley, Mike

    2009-06-01

    Fibromyalgia is a pain syndrome which is not due to tissue damage or inflammation and is thus fundamentally different from rheumatic disorders and many other pain conditions. In addition to widespread pain it is associated with a range of other symptoms such as sleep disturbance, fatigue, cognitive disturbance, stiffness and depressive symptoms. A number of multidisciplinary therapeutic programmes involving education, exercise and cognitive therapy have been shown to be effective in bringing relief. The various medications that are currently being developed for the treatment of fibromyalgia are based on different mechanistic approaches. In particular, serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRI) such as duloxetine and milnacipran and alpha2-delta receptor ligands such as pregabalin have been shown, in a variety of placebo-controlled studies, to bring significant relief from pain and other symptoms. The complex symptomatology of fibromyalgia will, however, continue to require a multidisciplinary approach including education and exercise in addition to drug therapy to achieve the most efficient management of fibromyalgia.

  6. Facing Fibromyalgia | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... with NIH MedlinePlus magazine about her conditions. When did you start having symptoms of fibromyalgia? I actually ... with my right wrist since the third grade. Did your problems become more severe over time? Yes, ...

  7. Anticonvulsant Drugs for Nerve Pain, Bipolar Disorder and Fibromyalgia

    MedlinePlus

    Anticonvulsant Drugs for Nerve Pain, Bipolar Disorder &Fibromyalgia: Choosing What’sRight for You What are anticonvulsant drugs? Anticonvulsants are drugs used to treat seizures. They are also used ...

  8. Living with Fibromyalgia, Drugs Approved to Manage Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... with fibromyalgia may find relief of symptoms with pain relievers, sleep medicines, antidepressants, muscle relaxants, and anti-seizure medications. But medication is just one part of the treatment approach. What helped Matallana was a combination of ...

  9. Menstrual arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    McDonagh, J E; Singh, M M; Griffiths, I D

    1993-01-01

    The menstrual cycle is characterised by variations in the absolute and relative concentrations of the hormones of the hypothalamic pituitary ovarian axis, which in turn affect cell function and cytokine and heat shock protein production. Menstruation involves the shedding of the secretory endometrium, which is part of the mucosal associated lymphoid tissue and hence is rich in immunologically competent cells such as CD8 T cells and macrophages. The case is reported here of a patient presenting with a recurrent but transient symmetrical inflammatory polyarthritis which only occurred at menstruation with no residual damage. The disease was suppressed by danazol. Endometrial degradation products are suggested as the trigger of this 'menstrual arthritis'. PMID:8427519

  10. Opioid Use in Fibromyalgia: A Cautionary Tale.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Don L; Clauw, Daniel J; Palmer, Roy E; Clair, Andrew G

    2016-05-01

    Multiple pharmacotherapies are available for the treatment of fibromyalgia (FM), including opioid analgesics. We postulate that the mechanism of action of traditional opioids predicts their lack of efficacy in FM. Literature searches of the MEDLINE and Cochrane Library databases were conducted using the search term opioid AND fibromyalgia to identify relevant articles, with no date limitations set. Citation lists in returned articles and personal archives of references were also examined for additional relevant items, and articles were selected based on the expert opinions of the authors. We found no evidence from clinical trials that opioids are effective for the treatment of FM. Observational studies have found that patients with FM receiving opioids have poorer outcomes than patients receiving nonopioids, and FM guidelines recommend against the use of opioid analgesics. Despite this, and despite the availability of alternative Food and Drug Administration-approved pharmacotherapies and the efficacy of nonpharmacologic therapies, opioids are commonly used in the treatment of FM. Factors associated with opioid use include female sex; geographic variation; psychological factors; a history of opioid use, misuse, or abuse; and patient or physician preference. The long-term use of opioid analgesics is of particular concern in the United States given the ongoing public health emergency relating to excess prescription opioid consumption. The continued use of opioids to treat FM despite a proven lack of efficacy, lack of support from treatment guidelines, and the availability of approved pharmacotherapy options provides a cautionary tale for their use in other chronic pain conditions.

  11. Fibromyalgia syndrome in Turkish hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Leblebici, Berrin; Özelsancak, Rüya; Yılmaz, Emine Ece; Doruk, Pınar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the frequency of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) in hemodialysis (HD) patients and to assess whether this syndrome is associated with gender, age, duration of HD, or various laboratory parameters. This study was composed of 221 chronic HD patients (99 females and 122 males), and we recorded each participant's age, gender, causes of kidney failure, HD duration, education level, and symptoms related to FMS, which was diagnosed according to the 2010 American College of Rheumatology criteria. We documented the laboratory parameters for all patients. In addition, patients with FMS filled out the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire. Twenty-two patients met the diagnostic criteria for FMS (9%), and there were no statistically significant differences related to age, gender, or HD duration between FMS and non-FMS groups (P > 0.05). In addition, the education levels were lower in patients diagnosed with FMS (P < 0.05), and there were statistically significant differences related to sleep disturbance, fatigue, and cognitive symptoms between the two groups (P < 0.05) as well. However, their laboratory parameters were similar (P > 0.05). There was a higher prevalence of FMS in HD patients than in the general population. Sleep disturbances, fatigue, education level, and cognitive symptoms were associated with FMS, but there was no correlation between the laboratory parameters and this condition.

  12. Coping with fibromyalgia. A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, L R; Carlsson, S G

    2000-01-01

    This study aims to describe, from the perspective of patients with fibromyalgia themselves, their experiences of having to live with chronic pain and how they manage their situation. The sample consists of 22 female patients (22-60 years). Open-ended in-depth interviews were analysed by a method directed by the tradition of Grounded Theory. Three descriptive categories were grounded in the data, labelled subjective pain language, diversified pain coping, and pain communication. These descriptive categories formed the higher-order, or core, concept preoccupied with pain. Having to live with chronic pain seems to include that the sufferer becomes self-centred and preoccupied with the pain: the pain is mostly present and affects every aspect of life, leading to a continuous awareness of and coping with the pain. Pain tends to interrupt normal life, demands attention and is difficult to disengage from. Although coping should not be evaluated in terms of good and bad, passivity, escape behaviours, and resignation/catastrophizing, which dominated in the present study sample, might affect social and psychological functioning negatively. Patients with fibromyalgia might benefit from psychological support in coping with their pain and from reinforcement of healthy behaviours.

  13. Spiritual Needs in Patients Suffering from Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Offenbaecher, M.; Kohls, N.; Toussaint, L. L.; Sigl, C.; Winkelmann, A.; Hieblinger, R.; Walther, A.; Büssing, A.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess spiritual needs of patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and to evaluate correlations with disease and health associated variables. Using a set of standardized questionnaires (i.e., Spiritual Needs Questionnaire, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, SF-36's Quality of Life, Brief Multidimensional Life Satisfaction Scale, etc.), we enrolled 141 patients (95% women, mean age 58 ± 10 years). Here, needs for inner peace and giving/generativity scored the highest, while existential needs and religious needs scored lowest. Particularly inner peace needs and existential needs correlated with different domains of reduced mental health, particularly with anxiety, the intention to escape from illness, and psychosocial restrictions. Thirty-eight percent of the patients stated needs to be forgiven and nearly half to forgive someone from their past life. Therefore, the specific spiritual needs of patients with chronic diseases should be addressed in clinical care in order to identify potential therapeutic avenues to support and stabilize their psychoemotional situation. PMID:24348691

  14. Cognitive and dissociative manifestations in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Leavitt, Frank; Katz, Robert S; Mills, Megan; Heard, Amy R

    2002-04-01

    Memory decline and mental confusion frequently complicate the clinical presentation of fibromyalgia; however, formal cognitive examination often does not support deterioration. This paradox was examined in the context of dissociation, a condition with many cognitive similarities. Dissociation refers to the separation of parts of experience from the mainstream of consciousness. A common example is highway hypnosis. Eighty-nine fibromyalgia (FM) patients and 64 other rheumatic disease patients were screened for memory decline and mental confusion using a questionnaire format. Pain, dissociation, affective distress, fatigue, sleep difficulty, and mental confusion were also assessed. Cognitive complaints (76.4%-43.8%) and dissociative symptoms (37.1%-1.9%) were overrepresented in patients with FM. Among FM patients with high dissociation, cognitive difficulties were reported by 95%; 100% of these cases reported that both memory and mental clarity were affected, a condition referred to as fibrofog. Dissociation in combination with fibrofog was associated with higher levels of FM symptom intensity and decreased mental well being. These findings suggest that dissociation may play a role in FM symptom amplification and may aid in comprehending the regularity of cognitive symptoms. Separating cases of fibrofog from cognitive conditions with actual brain damage is important. It may be prudent to add a test of dissociation as an adjunct to the evaluation of FM patients in cases of suspected fibrofog. Otherwise, test results may prove normal even in patients with disabling cognitive symptoms.

  15. [Pharmacologic treatment of fibromyalgia: Towards chemical neuromodulation].

    PubMed

    Collado, Antonio; Conesa, Arantxa

    2009-08-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic pathology and its main symptom is pain which usually does not respond to traditional analgesia. Its clinical characteristics and the diverse neurophysiologic findings in these patients point to a central sensitization process of the nociceptive system as the central physiopathologic axis in this disease. The knowledge of the nociceptive system functioning and its behavior in this disease has led, in the past few years, to new possibilities for the therapeutic approach. In that way, drugs with a differential mechanism of action, allowing a modulation of the nociceptive system capable of producing analgesia where other medications have failed are being developed. Different drugs with the capacity increasing the activity of biologically active amines implicated in the nociceptive inhibition process and others which are destined to reduce the excitability of the system through ion channels, are being tested with some benefit in Fibromyalgia patients and may constitute a more rational neuromodulating drug profile for this disease. This article reviews the different pharmacological strategies supported by scientific evidence and points to some future research lines that fortifies the therapeutic change taking place in the treatment approach of these patients.

  16. Fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and myofascial pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Buskila, D

    2000-03-01

    Fibromyalgia and widespread pain were common in Gulf War veterans with unexplained illness referred to a rheumatology clinic. Increased tenderness was demonstrated in the postmenstrual phase of the cycle compared with the intermenstrual phase in normally cycling women but not in users of oral contraceptives. Patients with fibromyalgia had high levels of symptoms that have been used to define silicone implant-associated syndrome. Tender points were found to be a common transient finding associated with acute infectious mononucleosis, but fibromyalgia was an unusual long-term outcome. The common association of fibromyalgia with other rheumatic and systemic illnesses was further explored. A preliminary study revealed a possible linkage of fibromyalgia to the HLA region. Patients with fibromyalgia were found to have an impaired ability to activate the hypothalamic pituitary portion of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis as well as the sympathoadrenal system, leading to reduced corticotropin and epinephrine response to hypoglycemia. Much interest has been expressed in the literature on the possible role of autonomic dysfunction in the development or exacerbation of fatigue and other symptoms in chronic fatigue syndrome. Mycoplasma genus and mycoplasma fermentans were detected by polymerase chain reaction in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. It was reported that myofascial temporomandibular disorder does not run in families. No major therapeutic trials in fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, or myofascial pain syndrome were reported over the past year. The effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy and behavior therapy for chronic pain in adults was emphasized. A favorable outcome of fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome in children and adolescents was reported.

  17. Hereditary vitamin D-resistant rickets presenting as alopecia.

    PubMed

    Casey, Genevieve; McPherson, Tess; Kini, Usha; Ryan, Fiona; Taibjee, Saleem M; Moss, Celia; Burge, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary vitamin D-resistant rickets (HVDRR) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene. We report the case of an infant presenting with alopecia, growth failure, and gross motor developmental delay. Serum biochemistry and skeletal survey were consistent with rickets. After a poor response to standard treatment, genetic testing confirmed a c.147-2A>T novel mutation in the VDR gene consistent with HVDRR. It is important for dermatologists and pediatricians to recognize alopecia as a presenting sign of HVDRR because appropriate treatment leads to better growth and development of the child.

  18. Altered neuromuscular control mechanisms of the trapezius muscle in fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background fibromyalgia is a relatively common condition with widespread pain and pressure allodynia, but unknown aetiology. For decades, the association between motor control strategies and chronic pain has been a topic for debate. One long held functional neuromuscular control mechanism is differential activation between regions within a single muscle. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in neuromuscular control, i.e. differential activation, between myalgic trapezius in fibromyalgia patients and healthy controls. Methods 27 fibromyalgia patients and 30 healthy controls performed 3 minutes bilateral shoulder elevations with different loads (0-4 Kg) with a high-density surface electromyographical (EMG) grid placed above the upper trapezius. Differential activation was quantified by the power spectral median frequency of the difference in EMG amplitude between the cranial and caudal parts of the upper trapezius. The average duration of the differential activation was described by the inverse of the median frequency of the differential activations. Results the median frequency of the differential activations was significantly lower, and the average duration of the differential activations significantly longer in fibromyalgia compared with controls at the two lowest load levels (0-1 Kg) (p < 0.04), but not at the two highest load levels (2 and 4 Kg). Conclusion these findings illustrate a different neuromuscular control between fibromyalgia patients and healthy controls during a low load functional task, either sustaining or resulting from the chronic painful condition. The findings may have clinical relevance for rehabilitation strategies for fibromyalgia. PMID:20205731

  19. Psychophysical and neurochemical abnormalities of pain processing in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Staud, Roland; Spaeth, Michael

    2008-03-01

    Fibromyalgia pain is frequent in the general population, but its pathogenesis is only partially understood. Patients with fibromyalgia lack consistent tissue abnormalities but display features of hyperalgesia (increased sensitivity to painful stimuli) and allodynia (lowered pain threshold). Many recent fibromyalgia studies have demonstrated central nervous system (CNS) pain processing abnormalities, including abnormal temporal summation of pain. In the CNS, persistent nociceptive input from peripheral tissues can lead to neuroplastic changes resulting in central sensitization and pain. This mechanism appears to represent a hallmark of fibromyalgia and many other chronic pain syndromes, including irritable bowel syndrome, temporomandibular disorder, migraine, and low back pain. Importantly, after central sensitization has been established, only minimal peripheral input is required for the maintenance of the chronic pain state. Additional factors, including pain-related negative affect and poor sleep have been shown to significantly contribute to clinical fibromyalgia pain. Better understanding of these mechanisms and their relationship to central sensitization and clinical pain will provide new approaches for the prevention and treatment of fibromyalgia and other chronic pain syndromes.

  20. Predictors of clinical pain intensity in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Staud, Roland

    2004-08-01

    Central changes in pain processing have been previously reported in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome. These changes include decreased thresholds to mechanical and thermal stimuli (allodynia) and central sensitization, both of which are fundamental to the generation of clinical pain. Therefore, psychophysical measures of central pain processing may be useful predictors of clinical pain intensity of fibromyalgia syndrome patients. Previous studies of fibromyalgia syndrome patients have shown statistically significant correlations of psychophysical test results with clinical pain intensity. The tests used to characterize this important relationship were dependent on spinal cord pain mechanisms and included temporal summation of pain or wind-up and wind-up after-sensations. Particularly, the magnitude of wind-up after-sensations appeared to be one of the best predictors for clinical pain intensity of fibromyalgia syndrome patients (27%). Furthermore, the combination of tender point count, negative affect, and wind-up after-sensations accounted for approximately 50% of the variance in clinical pain intensity of fibromyalgia syndrome patients. Therefore, wind-up after-sensations, tender point count, and negative affect not only seem to represent relevant pain mechanisms but also strongly emphasize their importance for fibromyalgia syndrome pain.

  1. Beyond pain in fibromyalgia: insights into the symptom of fatigue

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue is a disabling, multifaceted symptom that is highly prevalent and stubbornly persistent. Although fatigue is a frequent complaint among patients with fibromyalgia, it has not received the same attention as pain. Reasons for this include lack of standardized nomenclature to communicate about fatigue, lack of evidence-based guidelines for fatigue assessment, and a deficiency in effective treatment strategies. Fatigue does not occur in isolation; rather, it is present concurrently in varying severity with other fibromyalgia symptoms such as chronic widespread pain, unrefreshing sleep, anxiety, depression, cognitive difficulties, and so on. Survey-based and preliminary mechanistic studies indicate that multiple symptoms feed into fatigue and it may be associated with a variety of physiological mechanisms. Therefore, fatigue assessment in clinical and research settings must consider this multi-dimensionality. While no clinical trial to date has specifically targeted fatigue, randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses indicate that treatment modalities studied in the context of other fibromyalgia symptoms could also improve fatigue. The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Fibromyalgia Working Group and the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) have been instrumental in propelling the study of fatigue in fibromyalgia to the forefront. The ongoing efforts by PROMIS to develop a brief fibromyalgia-specific fatigue measure for use in clinical and research settings will help define fatigue, allow for better assessment, and advance our understanding of fatigue. PMID:24289848

  2. Reflectance confocal microscopy for scarring and non-scarring alopecia real-time assessment.

    PubMed

    Ardigò, Marco; Agozzino, Marina; Franceschini, Chiara; Donadio, Carlo; Abraham, Leonardo Spagnol; Barbieri, Luca; Sperduti, Isabella; Berardesca, Enzo; González, Salvador

    2016-07-01

    Clinical management of alopecia represents one of the major issues in dermatology. Scalp biopsies are not easily accepted because of the high bleeding and sensitive anatomical area. Trichoscopy is routinely used for diagnosis of alopecia, but in several cases lack to provide sufficient information on the status of the disease. Recently, reflectance confocal microscopy demonstrated its usefulness for the evaluation of several inflammatory skin condition and preliminary reports about alopecia have been proposed in the literature. The aim was to identify the confocal features characterizing scarring and non-scarring alopecia. Reflectance confocal microscopy from 86 patients affected by scarring (28 lichen planopilaris and 9 lupus erythematosus) and non-scarring alopecia (30 androgenic alopecia and 19 alopecia areata), were retrospectively, blinded evaluated. Good concordance between different readers on the confocal criteria has been assessed. Statistical significant features, specific for scarring alopecia and non-scarring alopecia have been identified. In this study, data on reflectance confocal microscopy features useful for the differential diagnosis between scarring and non-scarring alopecia have been identified. Further studies focusing on the use of this non-invasive technique in the therapeutic follow-up and distinction of sub-entities of alopecia are still required.

  3. A mouse model of clonal CD8+ T lymphocyte-mediated alopecia areata progressing to alopecia universalis

    PubMed Central

    Alli, Rajshekhar; Nguyen, Phuong; Boyd, Kelli; Sundberg, John P.; Geiger, Terrence L.

    2011-01-01

    Alopecia areata is among the most prevalent autoimmune diseases, yet compared with other autoimmune conditions is not well studied. This in part results from limitations in the C3H/HeJ mouse and DEBR rat model systems most commonly used to study the disease, which display a low frequency and late onset. We describe a novel high incidence model for spontaneous alopecia areata. The 1MOG244 T cell expresses dual TCRA chains, one of which, when combined with the single TCRB present, promotes the development of CD8+ T cells with specificity for hair follicles. Retroviral transgenic mice expressing this TCR develop spontaneous alopecia areata at nearly 100% incidence. Disease initially follows a reticular pattern, with regionally cyclic episodes of hair loss and regrowth, and ultimately progresses to alopecia universalis. Alopecia development is associated with CD8+ T cell activation, migration into the intrafollicular region, and hair follicle destruction. The disease may be adoptively transferred with T lymphocytes, and is class I and not class II MHC-dependent. Pathologic T cells primarily express IFNG and IL17 early in disease, with dramatic increases in cytokine production and recruitment of IL4 and IL10 production with disease progression. Inhibition of individual cytokines did not significantly alter disease incidence, potentially indicating redundancy in cytokine responses. These results therefore characterize a new high incidence model for alopecia areata in C57BL/6J mice, the first to apply a monoclonal TCR, and indicate that class I MHC-restricted CD8+ T lymphocytes can independently mediate the pathologic response. PMID:22116824

  4. Treating Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Contact our Patient Navigators for free and confidential ...

  5. Classification of Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Contact our Patient Navigators for free and confidential ...

  6. Diagnosing Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Contact our Patient Navigators for free and confidential ...

  7. Rheumatoid arthritis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks itself. The pattern of joints ... other joints and is worse in the morning. Rheumatoid arthritis is also a systemic disease, involving other body ...

  8. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ... The cause of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is not known. It is thought to be an autoimmune illness . This means the body attacks ...

  9. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for fibromyalgia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Walitt, Brian; Urrútia, Gerard; Nishishinya, María Betina; Cantrell, Sarah E; Häuser, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia is a clinically well-defined chronic condition with a biopsychosocial aetiology. Fibromyalgia is characterized by chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain, sleep problems, cognitive dysfunction, and fatigue. Patients often report high disability levels and poor quality of life. Since there is no specific treatment that alters the pathogenesis of fibromyalgia, drug therapy focuses on pain reduction and improvement of other aversive symptoms. Objectives The objective was to assess the benefits and harms of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the treatment of fibromyalgia. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 5), MEDLINE (1966 to June 2014), EMBASE (1946 to June 2014), and the reference lists of reviewed articles. Selection criteria We selected all randomized, double-blind trials of SSRIs used for the treatment of fibromyalgia symptoms in adult participants. We considered the following SSRIs in this review: citalopram, fluoxetine, escitalopram, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline. Data collection and analysis Three authors extracted the data of all included studies and assessed the risks of bias of the studies. We resolved discrepancies by discussion. Main results The quality of evidence was very low for each outcome. We downgraded the quality of evidence to very low due to concerns about risk of bias and studies with few participants. We included seven placebo-controlled studies, two with citalopram, three with fluoxetine and two with paroxetine, with a median study duration of eight weeks (4 to 16 weeks) and 383 participants, who were pooled together. All studies had one or more sources of potential major bias. There was a small (10%) difference in patients who reported a 30% pain reduction between SSRIs (56/172 (32.6%)) and placebo (39/171 (22.8%)) risk difference (RD) 0.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.01 to 0.20; number needed to treat for an additional

  10. Sex hormone-related and growth hormone-related alopecias.

    PubMed

    Schmeitzel, L P

    1990-11-01

    Canine endocrine dermatoses are characterized by bilateral symmetrical alopecia. Although growth hormone-related and sex hormone-related dermatoses are less common than hypothyroidism and hyperadrenocorticism, they are important causes of hormonal skin disease. Several new syndromes associated with growth and sex hormones recently have been described.

  11. Colocalization of vitiligo and alopecia areata presenting as poliosis.

    PubMed

    Walker, Addie; Mesinkovska, Natasha Atanaskova; Boncher, Julia; Tamburro, Joan; Bergfeld, Wilma F

    2015-02-01

    Vitiligo and alopecia areata are two cutaneous diseases believed to be primarily autoimmune in pathogenesis. While the coexistence of the two conditions in the same patient has been well-described, reports of the two disease processes occurring in the same location are rare. We report the case of a 10-year-old male with an unremarkable past medical history who presented with a single localized area of poliosis with depigmented underlying skin on the frontal scalp. The hair in the affected area was relatively decreased in density. A punch biopsy of the depigmented patch demonstrated features consistent with both vitiligo and alopecia areata. The decreased number of large hair follicles and a focal peribulbar lymphocytic infiltrate around an anagen follicle were suggestive of alopecia areata. A panel of melanocyte-specific stains revealed absent melanocytes in the epidermis, consistent with vitiligo. Loss of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor-positive root sheath cells was seen, suggestive of loss of melanocyte stem cells. The combination of clinical and histopathologic findings supports the theory of a common pathogenesis of alopecia areata and vitiligo.

  12. Fibromyalgia syndrome in need of effective treatments.

    PubMed

    Theoharides, Theoharis C; Tsilioni, Irene; Arbetman, Lauren; Panagiotidou, Smaro; Stewart, Julia M; Gleason, Rae M; Russell, Irwin J

    2015-11-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a chronic, idiopathic condition of widespread musculoskeletal pain, affecting primarily women. It is clinically characterized by chronic, nonarticular pain and a heightened response to pressure along with sleep disturbances, fatigue, bowel and bladder abnormalities, and cognitive dysfunction. The diagnostic criteria have changed repeatedly, and there is neither a definitive pathogenesis nor reliable diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers. Clinical and laboratory studies have provided evidence of altered central pain pathways. Recent evidence suggests the involvement of neuroinflammation with stress peptides triggering the release of neurosenzitizing mediators. The management of FMS requires a multidimensional approach including patient education, behavioral therapy, exercise, and pain management. Here we review recent data on the pathogenesis and propose new directions for research and treatment. PMID:26306765

  13. Heart Rate Variability for Quantification of Autonomic Dysfunction in Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jin Ho; Hong, Seok Hyun; Lee, Chang Hyun; Choi, Byoong Yong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To quantify autonomic dysfunction in fibromyalgia patients compared to healthy controls using heart rate variability (HRV). Methods Sixteen patients with fibromyalgia and 16 healthy controls were recruited in this case control study. HRV was measured using the time-domain method incorporating the following parameters: total heartbeats, the mean of intervals between consecutive heartbeats (R-R intervals), the standard deviation of normal to normal R-R intervals (SDNN), the square root of the mean squared differences of successive R-R intervals (RMSSD), ratio of SDNN to RMSSD (SDNN/RMSSD), and difference between the longest and shortest R-R interval under different three conditions including normal quiet breathing, rate controlled breathing, and Valsalva maneuver. The severity of autonomic symptoms in the group of patients with fibromyalgia was measured by Composite Autonomic Symptom Scale 31 (COMPASS 31). Then we analyzed the difference between the fibromyalgia and control groups and the correlation between the COMPASS 31 and aforementioned HRV parameters in the study groups. Results Patients with fibromyalgia had significantly higher SDNN/RMSSD values under both normal quiet breathing and rate controlled breathing compared to controls. Differences between the longest and shortest R-R interval under Valsalva maneuver were also significantly lower in patients with fibromyalgia than in controls. COMPASS 31 score was negatively correlated with SDNN/RMSSD values under rate controlled breathing. Conclusion SDNN/RMSSD is a valuable parameter for autonomic nervous system function and can be used to quantify subjective autonomic symptoms in patients with fibromyalgia. PMID:27152281

  14. Fatigue, worry, and fear--life events in the narratives of women with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Sallinen, Merja; Kukkurainen, Marja Leena; Peltokallio, Liisa; Mikkelsson, Marja; Anderberg, Ulla Maria

    2012-01-01

    In this article we explored narrated life stories of 20 women with a long history of fibromyalgia to reach a deeper understanding of how people interpret the causes and consequences of different life events and illness experiences. Based on narrative analysis, we identified three model narratives that illustrate the different life courses of women with fibromyalgia. In addition, we described a counternarrative that questions fibromyalgia as a chronic disease. In this narrative study, we give insights to the invisible symptoms and unheard experiences that are associated with fibromyalgia and to the ongoing discussion on the etiology and maintenance of fibromyalgia.

  15. The disproportionate impact of chronic arthralgia and arthritis among women.

    PubMed

    Buckwalter, J A; Lappin, D R

    2000-03-01

    The heterogeneous group of diseases that causes chronic arthralgia and arthritis is the most common cause of activity limitation and disability among middle age and older women. For reasons that remain poorly understood this group of diseases affects women substantially more frequently than men. In particular, the prevalence rates of the most common causes of arthralgia and arthritis, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, and the prevalence rates of less common diseases that cause arthralgia, including systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and fibromyalgia, are between two and 10 times higher in women. Prevalence rates for most of these conditions increase with age, and may vary among populations. For example, in the United States, systemic lupus erythematosus is approximately three times as common among African-American women as among white women. All of these disorders typically have an insidious onset and variable course that can make diagnosis difficult. Yet, most patients with these diseases benefit from early diagnosis and early nonoperative treatments including patient education, patient participation in disease treatment, activity modification, assistive devices, and medications. Furthermore, early aggressive medical therapy may prevent development of permanent joint and visceral damage in patients with inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and systemic sclerosis. Failure to make the diagnosis of an underlying disease in patients with arthralgia may lead to inappropriate treatment or delay in treatment that can result in irreversible impairment. Because many women with these conditions seek medical care from orthopaedists, orthopaedic residency education and continuing medical education should place emphasis on early diagnosis and nonoperative treatment of patients with arthralgia and arthritis, and, when appropriate, early referral to rheumatologists. PMID:10738425

  16. Exercise reduces depressive symptoms in adults with arthritis: Evidential value

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, George A; Kelley, Kristi S

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine whether evidential value exists that exercise reduces depression in adults with arthritis and other rheumatic conditions. METHODS Utilizing data derived from a prior meta-analysis of 29 randomized controlled trials comprising 2449 participants (1470 exercise, 979 control) with fibromyalgia, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosus, a new method, P-curve, was utilized to assess for evidentiary worth as well as dismiss the possibility of discriminating reporting of statistically significant results regarding exercise and depression in adults with arthritis and other rheumatic conditions. Using the method of Stouffer, Z-scores were calculated to examine selective-reporting bias. An alpha (P) value < 0.05 was deemed statistically significant. In addition, average power of the tests included in P-curve, adjusted for publication bias, was calculated. RESULTS Fifteen of 29 studies (51.7%) with exercise and depression results were statistically significant (P < 0.05) while none of the results were statistically significant with respect to exercise increasing depression in adults with arthritis and other rheumatic conditions. Right-skew to dismiss selective reporting was identified (Z = −5.28, P < 0.0001). In addition, the included studies did not lack evidential value (Z = 2.39, P = 0.99), nor did they lack evidential value and were P-hacked (Z = 5.28, P > 0.99). The relative frequencies of P-values were 66.7% at 0.01, 6.7% each at 0.02 and 0.03, 13.3% at 0.04 and 6.7% at 0.05. The average power of the tests included in P-curve, corrected for publication bias, was 69%. Diagnostic plot results revealed that the observed power estimate was a better fit than the alternatives. CONCLUSION Evidential value results provide additional support that exercise reduces depression in adults with arthritis and other rheumatic conditions. PMID:27489782

  17. The role of sleep in pain and fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Choy, Ernest H S

    2015-09-01

    Fibromyalgia is a common cause of chronic widespread pain, characterized by reduced pressure pain thresholds with hyperalgesia and allodynia. In addition to pain, common symptoms include nonrestorative sleep, fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, stiffness and mood disturbances. The latest research indicates that the dominant pathophysiology in fibromyalgia is abnormal pain processing and central sensitization. Neuroimaging studies have shown that patients with fibromyalgia have similar neural activation to healthy age-matched and gender-matched individuals; however, they have a lower pressure-pain threshold. Polysomnography data has demonstrated that these patients have reduced short-wave sleep and abnormal α-rhythms, suggestive of wakefulness during non-REM (rapid eye movement) sleep. Sleep deprivation in healthy individuals can cause symptoms of fibromyalgia, including myalgia, tenderness and fatigue, suggesting that sleep dysfunction might be not only a consequence of pain, but also pathogenic. Epidemiological studies indicate that poor sleep quality is a risk factor for the development of chronic widespread pain among an otherwise healthy population. Mechanistically, sleep deprivation impairs descending pain-inhibition pathways that are important in controlling and coping with pain. Clinical trials of pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies have shown that improving sleep quality can reduce pain and fatigue, further supporting the hypothesis that sleep dysfunction is a pathogenic stimulus of fibromyalgia.

  18. The Occupational Profile of Women with Fibromyalgia Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pérez-de-Heredia-Torres, Marta; Huertas Hoyas, Elisabet; Sánchez-Camarero, Carlos; Pérez-Corrales, Jorge; Fernández de-Las-Peñas, César

    2016-06-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the functional level of women with fibromyalgia; to investigate the differences in the occupational activities between women with fibromyalgia and healthy women; and to analyse the perceived importance of occupational performance during self-care, productivity and leisure activities. A cross-sectional case control study was performed. Twenty women with fibromyalgia and 20 healthy women completed the Functional Independence Measure (FIM), the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM), a Numerical Pain Rating Scale, the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire and the SF-36 health survey. The Chi-square test (χ2), the Student's t test and the Spearman's test were used on the data. The FIM revealed significant differences regarding several activities: personal hygiene, bathing and memory (p < 0.01). The COPM scores did not reveal significant differences between groups (p > 0.10). Women with fibromyalgia had higher disability and reduced quality of life and required greater assistance to perform specific activities of daily living, i.e. hygiene, than healthy women. This highlights the specific occupational therapy needs these women have for performing many basic activities and for improving their quality of life. Limitations of the study include the small sample size, the exclusion of male participants and the possible influence of the women's psychological status on the assessments performed. Findings should be generalized with caution. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. The Occupational Profile of Women with Fibromyalgia Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pérez-de-Heredia-Torres, Marta; Huertas Hoyas, Elisabet; Sánchez-Camarero, Carlos; Pérez-Corrales, Jorge; Fernández de-Las-Peñas, César

    2016-06-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the functional level of women with fibromyalgia; to investigate the differences in the occupational activities between women with fibromyalgia and healthy women; and to analyse the perceived importance of occupational performance during self-care, productivity and leisure activities. A cross-sectional case control study was performed. Twenty women with fibromyalgia and 20 healthy women completed the Functional Independence Measure (FIM), the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM), a Numerical Pain Rating Scale, the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire and the SF-36 health survey. The Chi-square test (χ2), the Student's t test and the Spearman's test were used on the data. The FIM revealed significant differences regarding several activities: personal hygiene, bathing and memory (p < 0.01). The COPM scores did not reveal significant differences between groups (p > 0.10). Women with fibromyalgia had higher disability and reduced quality of life and required greater assistance to perform specific activities of daily living, i.e. hygiene, than healthy women. This highlights the specific occupational therapy needs these women have for performing many basic activities and for improving their quality of life. Limitations of the study include the small sample size, the exclusion of male participants and the possible influence of the women's psychological status on the assessments performed. Findings should be generalized with caution. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26679109

  20. Current status of atypical antipsychotics for the treatment of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Rico-Villademoros, F; Calandre, E P; Slim, M

    2014-06-01

    The treatment of fibromyalgia requires pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies. The pharmacological treatment of fibromyalgia is limited to a few drugs that have been demonstrated to be moderately effective in some but not all dimensions of the disease. Therefore, the search for new drugs to treat this condition is warranted. Atypical antipsychotics offered an attractive alternative because they had been shown to be active against several key symptoms of fibromyalgia. The results of open-label studies, however, appear to indicate that atypical antipsychotics are poorly tolerated in patients with fibromyalgia, and only quetiapine XR has been studied in randomized controlled trials. Quetiapine XR has demonstrated effectiveness in treating comorbid major depression, anxiety and sleep disturbance. However, in two randomized controlled trials, quetiapine XR was not differentiated from placebo and failed to demonstrate noninferiority to amitriptyline in terms of improving overall symptomatology. The effect of quetiapine XR on pain and its usefulness as part of a combination pharmacological regimen should be further evaluated. Overall, the use of quetiapine (initiated at a low dose and slowly titrated) in fibromyalgia should be limited to patients with comorbid major depression or patients who are currently receiving other treatments and have unresolved and disabling depressive and/or anxiety symptoms.

  1. Arthritis: joints inflamed.

    PubMed

    Casey, Georgina

    2015-06-01

    ARTHRITIS IS a generic term for inflammatory joint disease. There are various forms of arthritis, including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis. Arthritis can be a chronic debilitating condition or a transient effect of bacterial or viral infections. As a chronic condition, arthritis can cause loss of quality of life, disability and, with rheumatoid disease, early death. The economic burden of arthritis, in terms of management and loss of productivity due to disability, is high and set to increase with the ageing population. Recent advances in our understanding of the causes and progression of a number of forms of arthritis have raised hopes of better management and possible remission. Pharmacotherapy has moved from symptom management to addressing underlying disease processes. However, therapies that prevent or cure arthritis remain elusive. Current care for people with arthritis relies on a multidisciplinary approach and substantial pharmacological intervention. Nurses have a key role to play in guiding patients through treatment, ensuring they receive optimal therapy to reduce the impact of arthritis and its management on their lives.

  2. Gómez-López-Hernández Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Bilateral Nonscarring Alopecia.

    PubMed

    Saricam, Merve Hatun; Tekin, Burak; Unver, Olcay; Ekinci, Gazanfer; Ergun, Tulin

    2015-01-01

    Gómez-López-Hernández syndrome is a rare neurocutaneous disorder characterized by the triad of rhombencephalosynapsis, parietal alopecia, and trigeminal anesthesia. We report a 16-year-old girl with bilateral parietotemporal alopecia in whom cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed rhombencephalosynapsis, suggesting a diagnosis of Gómez-López-Hernández syndrome. Neurologic examination and neuroimaging may be warranted in select patients with parietal alopecia to exclude this uncommon entity. PMID:26391554

  3. Linear Non Scarring Alopecia of the Scalp: A Rare Manifestation of Lupus Panniculitis.

    PubMed

    Kshetrimayum, Sandhyarani; Thokchom, Nandakishore; Hmar, Vanlalhriatpuii

    2016-01-01

    Alopecia in a linear pattern is very rare with only a few cases reported in the medical literature. We report a case of linear non scarring alopecia involving the scalp in a 17-year-old boy with a histological diagnosis of lupus panniculitis. We report this case because of its rarity and also the inclusion of this entity as one of the rare differential of non scarring alopecia. PMID:27688465

  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed ... Activity Role of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic ...

  5. Culture, science and the changing nature of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Frederick; Walitt, Brian

    2013-12-01

    Fibromyalgia is a common but contested illness. Its definition and content have changed repeatedly in the 110 years of its existence. The most important change was the requirement for multiple tender points and extensive pain that arose in the 1980s, features that were not required previously. By 2010, a second shift occurred that excluded tender points, allowed less extensive pain, and placed reliance on patient-reported somatic symptoms and cognitive difficulties ('fibro fog') that had never been part of past definitions or content. Fibromyalgia is closely allied with and often indistinguishable from neurasthenia, a disorder of the late 19th and early 20th centuries that lost favour when it was perceived as being a psychological illness. Fibromyalgia's status as a 'real disease', rather than a psychocultural illness, is buttressed by social forces that include support from official criteria, patient and professional organizations, pharmaceutical companies, disability access, and the legal and academic communities.

  6. Pediatric fibromyalgia and dizziness: evaluation of vestibular function.

    PubMed

    Rusy, L M; Harvey, S A; Beste, D J

    1999-08-01

    Twelve children with fibromyalgia and complaints of chronic dizziness were evaluated with both clinical office maneuvers of vestibular function and laboratory tests composed of electronystagmography and sinusoidal harmonic acceleration rotary chair testing. All test results were normal for spontaneous nystagmus with or without visual fixation, oculocephalic reflex, dynamic visual acuity, head-shaking nystagmus, Quix test, and Dix-Hallpike maneuver. Electronystagmography test results were essentially normal for saccades, gaze, Dix-Hallpike, pendular tracking, and caloric evaluation. Rotary chair testing was normal in all 12 patients. These findings suggest that central (brainstem) and peripheral vestibular (inner ear) mechanisms do not account for the complaints of dizziness in the pediatric patient with fibromyalgia. The common musculoskeletal abnormalities of fibromyalgia may affect their proprioceptive orientation, therefore giving them a sense of imbalance.

  7. Utility of Periodontal exploration in patients with Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Santos-García, Rocío; Sánchez-Domínguez, Benito; Cordero, Mario D.; Rios-Santos, José V.; Jaramillo-Santos, María R.; Climent, Mariano H.

    2012-01-01

    Objetive: Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain syndrome with unknown etiology, which affects predominantly women. Mitochondrial alteration could have a role in the pathophysilogical mechanisms of inflammatory conditions as FM and periodontitis. The aim of the present study was assay the relationship between both diseases and mitochondrial dysfunction. Patient and Methods: We study the presence of periodontitis in twelve patients diagnosed of FM and mitochondrial dysfunction described. The diagnosis of FM was established according to ACR criteria and clinical symptoms were evaluated using the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Results: Only one patients of twelve included and agreed to participate in the study were diagnosed with periodontitis. Conclusions: Pending studies with larger numbers of patients, we can conclude that mitochondrial dysfunction in FM is a itself event not related with periodontitis. Periodontitis could be considered a exclusion criterion in all studies about mitochondrial dysfunction in patients. Key words:Peridontitis, fibromyalgia, mitocondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress. PMID:24558523

  8. Fibromyalgia, mood disorders, and intense creative energy: A1AT polymorphisms are not always silent.

    PubMed

    Schmechel, Donald E; Edwards, Christopher L

    2012-12-01

    diagnosis of juvenile rheumatoid or idiopathic arthritis (JRA, JIA) had a significantly high proportion of A1AT polymorphisms (63%), suggesting a spectrum for JRA to later FMS presentations. Likewise, persons reporting a history of attention deficit disorder (ADD) had an increased proportion of A1AT polymorphisms (26%) compared to non-ADD persons (13%). Toxic environmental exposures are common (23%) and associated with diagnoses of PSP, PPA, FTD, FTD-PD, PD and ADVD. A1AT carriers were increased in cases of toxic exposure and PSP, PPA and FTD-PD. Our findings support the ICE behavioral phenotype for A1AT polymorphism carriers and the reported association with anxiety and bipolar spectrum disorders. We now extend that phenotype to apparent vulnerability to inflammatory muscle disease in a spectrum from JRA to fibromyalgia (FMS) and specific behavioral subsets of ADD, PTSD, and specific late onset neurological syndromes (FTD-PD and PPA). High and low risk FMS subsets can be defined using A1AT, MTHFR and APOE genotyping. Clinical diagnoses associated with A1AT polymorphisms included fibromyalgia, JRA/JIA, bipolar disorder, PTSD, primary progressive aphasia and FTDPD, but not most Alzheimer Disease subtypes. These results support an extended phenotype for A1AT mutation carriers beyond liver and lung vulnerability to selective advantages: ICE phenotype and disadvantages: fibromyalgia, affective disorders, and selected late onset neurological syndromes.

  9. Infectious arthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Mateo Soria, L; Miquel Nolla Solé, J; Rozadilla Sacanell, A; Valverde García, J; Roig Escofet, D

    1992-01-01

    Eleven cases of infectious arthritis occurring in patients with rheumatoid arthritis are reported. Staphylococcus aureus was the causative organism in eight patients. Streptococcus anginosus and Streptococcus agalactiae in one patient each, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in two patients. The mean duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 16 days in patients with pyogenic arthritis. The diagnosis of joint infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis was especially delayed (57 days). Four patients died; they were found to have a longer time to diagnosis and two of them had multiple joint infection. Although Staphylococcus aureus is the microorganism most often affecting patients with rheumatoid arthritis, infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis must also be considered in such patients. PMID:1575593

  10. Introduction to innovations in the immunology and clinical science of alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Kalabokes, Victoria D; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Christiano, Angela M

    2013-12-01

    Alopecia areata is an autoimmune skin disease resulting in the loss of hair on the scalp and elsewhere on the body. The disease most often occurs in childhood and affects males and females of all ages. The National Alopecia Areata Foundation conducts research summits every 2 years to review progress and create new directions in its funded and promoted research. The Foundation brings together scientists from all disciplines to get a broad and varied perspective. These summits are part of the Foundation's main strategic initiative, the Alopecia Areata Treatment Development Program to accelerate progress toward a viable alopecia areata treatment. PMID:24326539

  11. Low-power laser use in the treatment of alopecia and crural ulcers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciuchita, Tavi; Usurelu, Mircea; Antipa, Ciprian; Vlaiculescu, Mihaela; Ionescu, Elena

    1998-07-01

    The authors tried to verify the efficacy of Low Power Laser (LPL) in scalp alopecia and crural ulcers of different causes. Laser used was (red diode, continuous emission, 8 mW power, wave length 670 nm spot size about 5 mm diameter on some points 1 - 2 minutes per point. We also use as control classical therapy. Before, during and after treatment, histological samples were done for alopecia. For laser groups (alopecia and ulcers) the results were rather superior and in a three or twice time shorter than control group. We conclude that LPL therapy is a very useful complementary method for the treatment of scalp alopecia and crural ulcers.

  12. Diagnostic Clues to Frontal Fibrosing Alopecia in Patients of African Descent

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Sophia D.; Obayan, Olubusayo; Mcclellan, Liza; Sperling, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    Importance: Frontal fibrosing alopecia has previously been reported as rare among patients of African descent. The authors present 18 cases of frontal fibrosing alopecia affecting African American patients and review all published cases of frontal fibrosing alopecia involving patients of African descent. Observations: Since 2010, there have been 66 published cases of frontal fibrosing alopecia among patients of African descent; 59 women, five men, and two cases of unknown gender. Frontal fibrosing alopecia is not uncommon among patients of African descent. In this study, the authors find that female African American patients may have fewer symptoms and unique clinical presentations. Conclusion and relevance: Frontal fibrosing alopecia is an entity that can be seen in patients with many different ethnic backgrounds, often with varying presentations. The diagnosis of frontal fibrosing alopecia must be considered in any patient of African descent who presents with frontotemporal alopecia. In the authors’ patient population, there was a younger age of presentation. The presence of perifollicular hyperpigmentation along the hairline and concomitant facial hyperpigmentation may aid in making the diagnosis and distinguishing this entity from traction alopecia. PMID:27721910

  13. Introduction to innovations in the immunology and clinical science of alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Kalabokes, Victoria D; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Christiano, Angela M

    2013-12-01

    Alopecia areata is an autoimmune skin disease resulting in the loss of hair on the scalp and elsewhere on the body. The disease most often occurs in childhood and affects males and females of all ages. The National Alopecia Areata Foundation conducts research summits every 2 years to review progress and create new directions in its funded and promoted research. The Foundation brings together scientists from all disciplines to get a broad and varied perspective. These summits are part of the Foundation's main strategic initiative, the Alopecia Areata Treatment Development Program to accelerate progress toward a viable alopecia areata treatment.

  14. Role for the epidermal growth factor receptor in chemotherapy-induced alopecia.

    PubMed

    Bichsel, Kyle J; Gogia, Navdeep; Malouff, Timothy; Pena, Zachary; Forney, Eric; Hammiller, Brianna; Watson, Patrice; Hansen, Laura A

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of cancer patients with chemotherapeutics like cyclophosphamide often causes alopecia as a result of premature and aberrant catagen. Because the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signals anagen hair follicles to enter catagen, we hypothesized that EGFR signaling may be involved in cyclophosphamide-induced alopecia. To test this hypothesis, skin-targeted Egfr mutant mice were generated by crossing floxed Egfr and Keratin 14 promoter-driven Cre recombinase mice. Cyclophosphamide treatment of control mice resulted in alopecia while Egfr mutant skin was resistant to cyclophosphamide-induced alopecia. Egfr mutant skin entered catagen normally, as indicated by dermal papilla condensation and decreased follicular proliferation, but did not progress to telogen as did Egfr wild type follicles. Egfr mutant follicles responded with less proliferation, apoptosis, and fewer p53-positive cells after cyclophosphamide. Treatment of control mice with the EGFR inhibitors erlotinib or gefitinib similarly suppressed alopecia and catagen progression by cyclophosphamide. Secondary analysis of clinical trials utilizing EGFR-targeted therapies and alopecia-inducing chemotherapy also revealed evidence for involvement of EGFR in chemotherapy-induced alopecia. Taken together, our results demonstrated the involvement of EGFR signaling in chemotherapy-induced alopecia, which will help in the design of novel therapeutic regimens to minimize chemotherapy-induced alopecia.

  15. Comparison of alopecia areata in human and nonhuman mammalian species.

    PubMed

    McElwee, K J; Boggess, D; Olivry, T; Oliver, R F; Whiting, D; Tobin, D J; Bystryn, J C; King, L E; Sundberg, J P

    1998-01-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is a nonscarring form of inflammatory hair loss in humans. AA-like hair loss has also been observed in other species. In recent years the Dundee experimental bald rat and the C3H/HeJ mouse have been put forward as models for human AA. AA in all species presents with a wide range of clinical features from focal, locally extensive, diffuse hair loss, to near universal alopecia. Histologically, all species have dystrophic anagen stage hair follicles associated with a peri- and intrafollicular inflammatory cell infiltrate. Autoantibodies directed against anagen stage hair follicle structures are a consistent finding. Observations on AA pathogenesis suggest nonhuman species can provide excellent models for the human disease. Ultimately, animal models will be used to determine the genetic basis of AA, potential endogenous and/or environmental trigger(s), mechanism(s) of disease initiation and progression, and allow rapid evaluation of new and improved disease treatments.

  16. Molecular signatures define alopecia areata subtypes and transcriptional biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Jabbari, Ali; Cerise, Jane E; Chen, James C; Mackay-Wiggan, Julian; Duvic, Madeleine; Price, Vera; Hordinsky, Maria; Norris, David; Clynes, Raphael; Christiano, Angela M

    2016-05-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is an autoimmune disease typified by nonscarring hair loss with a variable clinical course. In this study, we conducted whole genome gene expression analysis of 96 human scalp skin biopsy specimens from AA or normal control subjects. Based on gene expression profiling, samples formed distinct clusters based on the presence or absence of disease as well as disease phenotype (patchy disease compared with alopecia totalis or universalis). Differential gene expression analysis allowed us to robustly demonstrate graded immune activity in samples of increasing phenotypic severity and generate a quantitative gene expression scoring system that classified samples based on interferon and cytotoxic T lymphocyte immune signatures critical for disease pathogenesis. PMID:27322477

  17. Promising therapies for treating and/or preventing androgenic alopecia.

    PubMed

    McElwee, K J; Shapiro, J S

    2012-06-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) may affect up to 70% of men and 40% of women at some point in their lifetime. While men typically present with a distinctive alopecia pattern involving hairline recession and vertex balding, women normally exhibit a diffuse hair thinning over the top of their scalps. The treatment standard in dermatology clinics continues to be minoxidil and finasteride with hair transplantation as a surgical option. Here we briefly review current therapeutic options and treatments under active investigation. Dutasteride and ketoconazole are also employed for AGA, while prostaglandin analogues latanoprost and bimatoprost are being investigated for their hair growth promoting potential. Laser treatment products available for home use and from cosmetic clinics are becoming popular. In the future, new cell mediated treatment approaches may be available for AGA. While there are a number of potential treatment options, good clinical trial data proving hair growth efficacy is limited. PMID:22735503

  18. [The treatment of alopecia areata with sinusoidal modulated currents].

    PubMed

    Sergeev, S Ia; Pesterev, P N; Rodionova, T F; Labzovskaia, N L; Levitskaia, N S

    1989-01-01

    The technique of alopecia areata treatment with sinusoidal modulated currents is simple and may be used on an outpatient basis. The Amplipul's-4 apparatus sensors have been placed in the cervical sympathetic node area. The current parameters have been as follows: P-1, III PP for 2-3 min, then IV PP for 2-3 min, modulation frequency 100-80 Hz and depth 50-75%, the pulse length within 2-4 sec provided the current strength is sufficient. The course of treatment included 10-12 sessions. Parallel with this physiotherapeutic modality, the patients were administered FiBS (a liman mud biogenic stimulant), vitamins B1 and B6, and andecalin. Clinical effect has been achieved in 46 of the 53 patients with a short duration of the disease. The authors' observations confirm the contribution of the sympathetic nervous system function to the genesis of alopecia.

  19. Enthesitis-related arthritis.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Amita; Misra, Durga Prasanna

    2015-11-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic arthritis of childhood. Currently, it is characterized by seven categories. The enthesitis-related arthritis (ERA) category usually affects boys older than 6 years and presents with lower limb asymmetrical arthritis associated with enthesitis. Later, these children can develop inflammatory lumbosacral pain (IBP). These children are at risk of developing acute anterior uveitis. A recently devised disease activity index, Juvenile Spondyloarthropathy Disease Activity Index (JSpADA), has been validated in retrospective cohorts. The corner stone of treatment is NSAIDs, local corticosteroid injections, and exercise. Methotrexate and sulfasalazine can be used for peripheral arthritis while anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents are sometimes used to treat refractory enthesitis and sacroiliitis. Almost two third of patients with ERA have persistent disease and often have impairments in their quality of life. The presence of hip or ankle arthritis and a family history of spondyloarthropathy or polyarticular joint involvement at onset are associated with poorer prognosis.

  20. Disordered sleep in fibromyalgia and related myofascial facial pain conditions.

    PubMed

    Moldofsky, H K

    2001-10-01

    Myofascial pain and fibromyalgia have a recognized relationship to sleep disturbances. Understanding the comorbidity of these entities helps the practitioner, physician and dentist alike, be better prepared to manage the causative factors related to these conditions rather than treating only the symptoms. The increasing recognition of the coexistence of fibromyalgia, myofascial pain in the head and neck region, and the presence of temporomandibular disorders further increases the need for the dentist to be aware of sleep as a contributory factor from the diagnostic and the therapeutic aspects. This awareness results in more comprehensive management and an improved opportunity for optimal patient management as well as improved sleep and diminished pain levels.

  1. Treatment of fibromyalgia, myofascial pain, and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Borg-Stein, Joanne

    2006-05-01

    Chronic muscle pain is a common complaint among patients who seek care for musculoskeletal disorders. A spectrum of clinical presentations exists, ranging from focal or regional complaints that usually represent myofascial pain syndromes to more wide spread pain that may meet criteria for a diagnosis of fibromyalgia. This article addresses the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical management of myofascial pain syndrome and fibromyalgia. These conditions are challenging to treat and require physiatrists to be aware of the wide range of pharmacologic, rehabilitative,and psychosocial interventions that can be helpful.

  2. A novel rat model for chemotherapy-induced alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Wikramanayake, T. C.; Amini, S.; Simon, J.; Mauro, L. M.; Elgart, G.; Schachner, L. A.; Jimenez, J. J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background More than half of all people diagnosed with cancer receive chemotherapy, and approximately 65% of these develop chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA), a side-effect that can have considerable negative psychological repercussions. Currently, there are very few animal models available to study the mechanism and prevention of CIA. Aim To develop a clinically relevant adult rat model for CIA. Methods We first tested whether neonatal pigmented Long–Evans (LE) rats developed alopecia in response to the chemotherapeutic agents etoposide and cyclophosphamide. We then determined whether the rats developed CIA as adults. In the latter experiment, rat dorsal hair was clipped during the early telogen stage to synchronize the hair cycle. and starting 15 days later, the rats were treated with etoposide for 3 days. Results Neonatal LE pups developed CIA in response to etoposide and cyclophosphamide, similar to other murine models for CIA. Clipping of the hair shaft during early telogen resulted in synchronized anagen induction and subsequent alopecia after etoposide treatment in the clipped areas only. Hair follicles in the clipped areas had the typical chemotherapy-induced follicular dystrophy (dystrophic catagen). When the hair in the pigmented alopecic areas regrew, it had normal pigmentation. Conclusions A novel, pigmented adult rat model has been established for CIA. By hair shaft clipping during early telogen, synchronized anagen entry was induced that resulted in alopecia in response to chemotherapy. This is the first clinically relevant adult rat model for CIA and will be a useful tool to test agents for the prevention and treatment of CIA. PMID:22409523

  3. Hair restoration approaches for early onset male androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Hammad A; Basra, Mohammad K A; Patel, Girish K

    2013-09-01

    Society places great emphasis on the presence of hair. Some degree of hair loss is accepted as a normal part of the aging process, in line with the observation that more than 50% of men will develop androgenetic alopecia by the age of 50 years. However, it is possible to understand the psychosocial isolation and distress felt by men with a strong familial predisposition to androgenetic alopecia, who tend to display hair loss in their late teens or twenties. There are currently two drugs which have been licensed for the treatment of male androgenetic alopecia: oral finasteride and topical minoxidil solution which are effective to some extent. Furthermore, upon discontinuing treatment, any gain that has been achieved is quickly lost. Added to which there is an entire market of unproven over the counter products: advertised in the electronic media, local hair salons, and various departmental stores. In this review, we highlight the important advances in the management of male androgenetic alopecia with emphasis on approaches that can lead to more successful and long-term hair restoration for young adults. In particular, we discuss the evidence supporting the use of the follicular unit grafting technique in conjunction with medical treatment before and after the procedure. Moreover, some other alterations of this most popular state of the art hair restoration technique have been mentioned briefly. As a result, patients and physicians seem equally satisfied from this procedure for its naturally looking results which are cosmetically more acceptable and esthetically pleasing for longer period of time. PMID:23992164

  4. Alopecia in lambs associated with micronutrient-deficient milk replacer.

    PubMed

    2016-09-24

    Alopecia associated with micronutrient deficiency in lambs fed milk replacer▪ Idiopathic necrotising enteritis in suckler calves▪ Mannheimia haemolytica abomasitis in a five-week-old calf▪ Increased diagnoses of nematodirosis in lambs▪ Enteric and spinal listeriosis in sheepThese are among matters discussed in the disease surveillance report for June 2016 from SAC Consulting: Veterinary Services (SAC C VS). PMID:27660354

  5. Alopecias due to drugs and other skin and systemic disorders.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Sánchez, Daniela; Asz-Sigall, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we will discuss the most common alopecias due to drugs and other skin and systemic disorders. The following hair disorders will be analyzed: telogen effluvium (acute and chronic); anagen effluvium; folliculotropic mycosis fungoides; and folliculitis due to bacteria, fungi, parasites, human immunodeficiency virus disease, lupus erythematosus, and sarcoidosis. We will cover topics including the epidemiology, etiology, clinical picture, and diagnosis of and current treatments for each disease. PMID:26370648

  6. Drug discovery for alopecia: gone today, hair tomorrow

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Zenildo; Avci, Pinar; Hamblin, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hair loss or alopecia affects the majority of the population at some time in their life, and increasingly, sufferers are demanding treatment. Three main types of alopecia (androgenic [AGA], areata [AA] and chemotherapy-induced [CIA]) are very different, and have their own laboratory models and separate drug-discovery efforts. Areas covered In this article, the authors review the biology of hair, hair follicle (HF) cycling, stem cells and signaling pathways. AGA, due to dihydrotesterone, is treated by 5-α reductase inhibitors, androgen receptor blockers and ATP-sensitive potassium channel-openers. AA, which involves attack by CD8+NK group 2D-positive (NKG2D+) T cells, is treated with immunosuppressives, biologics and JAK inhibitors. Meanwhile, CIA is treated by apoptosis inhibitors, cytokines and topical immunotherapy. Expert opinion The desire to treat alopecia with an easy topical preparation is expected to grow with time, particularly with an increasing aging population. The discovery of epidermal stem cells in the HF has given new life to the search for a cure for baldness. Drug discovery efforts are being increasingly centered on these stem cells, boosting the hair cycle and reversing miniaturization of HF. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the immune attack in AA will yield new drugs. New discoveries in HF neogenesis and low-level light therapy will undoubtedly have a role to play. PMID:25662177

  7. Retinoid metabolism is altered in human and mouse cicatricial alopecia.

    PubMed

    Everts, Helen B; Silva, Kathleen A; Montgomery, Shalise; Suo, Liye; Menser, Monica; Valet, Amy S; King, Lloyd E; Ong, David E; Sundberg, John P

    2013-02-01

    C57BL/6 mice develop dermatitis and scarring alopecia resembling human cicatricial alopecias (CAs), particularly the central centrifugal CA (CCCA) type. To evaluate the role of retinoids in CA, the expression of retinoid metabolism components were examined in these mice with mild, moderate, or severe CA compared with hair cycle-matched mice with no disease. Two feeding studies were conducted with dams fed either NIH 31 diet (study 1) or AIN93G diet (study 2). Adult mice were fed AIN93M diet with 4 (recommended), 28, or 56 IU vitamin A g(-1) diet. Feeding the AIN93M diet to adults increased CA frequency over NIH 31 fed mice. Increased follicular dystrophy was seen in study 1 and increased dermal scars in study 2 in mice fed the 28 IU diet. These results indicate that retinoid metabolism is altered in CA in C57BL/6J mice that require precise levels of dietary vitamin A. Human patients with CCCA, pseudopelade (end-stage scarring), and controls with no alopecia were also studied. Many retinoid metabolism proteins were increased in mild CCCA, but were undetectable in pseudopelade. Studies to determine whether these dietary alterations in retinoid metabolism seen in C57BL/6J mice are also involved in different types of human CA are needed. PMID:23096705

  8. Milnacipran for the management of fibromyalgia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ormseth, Michelle J; Eyler, Anne E; Hammonds, Cara L; Boomershine, Chad S

    2010-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a widespread pain condition associated with fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, sleep disturbance, depression, anxiety, and stiffness. Milnacipran is one of three medications currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration in the United States for the management of adult FMS patients. This review is the second in a three-part series reviewing each of the approved FMS drugs and serves as a primer on the use of milnacipran in FMS treatment including information on pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability. Milnacipran is a mixed serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor thought to improve FMS symptoms by increasing neurotransmitter levels in descending central nervous system inhibitory pathways. Milnacipran has proven efficacy in managing global FMS symptoms and pain as well as improving symptoms of fatigue and cognitive dysfunction without affecting sleep. Due to its antidepressant activity, milnacipran can also be beneficial to FMS patients with coexisting depression. However, side effects can limit milnacipran tolerability in FMS patients due to its association with headache, nausea, tachycardia, hyper- and hypotension, and increased risk for bleeding and suicidality in at-risk patients. Tolerability can be maximized by starting at low dose and slowly up-titrating if needed. As with all medications used in FMS management, milnacipran works best when used as part of an individualized treatment regimen that includes resistance and aerobic exercise, patient education and behavioral therapies. PMID:21197306

  9. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Mario D; de Miguel, Manuel; Carmona-López, Inés; Bonal, Pablo; Campa, Francisco; Moreno-Fernández, Ana María

    2010-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain syndrome with unknown etiology and pathophysiology. Recent studies have shown some evidence demonstrating that oxidative stress may have a role in the pathophysiology of FM. Furthermore, it is controversial the role of mitochondria in the oxidant imbalance documented in FM. Signs and symptoms associated with muscular alteration and mitochondrial dysfunction, including oxidative stress, have been observed in patients with FM. To this respect, Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency, an essential electron carrier in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and a strong antioxidant, alters mitochondria function and mitochondrial respiratory complexes organization and leading to increased ROS generation. Recently have been showed CoQ10 deficiency in blood mononuclear cells in FM patients, so if the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction is the origin of oxidative stress in FM patients is demonstrated, could help to understand the complex pathophysiology of this disorder and may lead to development of new therapeutic strategies for prevention and treatment of this disease.

  10. Fibromyalgia Syndrome: Current Considerations in Symptom Management.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), one of the most common rheumatic disorders, is estimated to affect up to 15 million people in the United States, 80% to 90% of whom are women. The syndrome is characterized by the presence of chronic widespread pain and various concurrent symptoms, which may include fatigue, cognitive disturbances (memory problems, difficulty concentrating, confusion), distressed mood (anxiety, depression), nonrestorative sleep, and muscular stiffness. Symptom management appears to be best addressed using a multimodal approach, with treatment strategies tailored to the individual. While medication may provide adequate symptom relief for some patients, experts generally recommend integrating both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic approaches. Some patients may benefit from the adjunctive use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) modalities. Because symptom remission is rare and medication adverse effects can complicate symptom management, well-informed nursing care practices and patient education are essential. This article describes the existing treatment guidelines, discusses pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic approaches (including CAM-based modalities), and outlines nursing approaches aimed at enhancing patient self-management.

  11. Analysing Biological Rhythms in Fibromyalgia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ucar, M; Sarp, Ü; Gül, Aİ; Tanik, N; Yetisgin, A; Arik, HO; Nas, O; Yılmaz, YK

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: This study evaluated biological rhythm disorders in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). Methods: The study enrolled 82 patients with FMS and 82 controls. Pain intensity was evaluated using a visual analogue scale (VAS). The psychological conditions of the patients were evaluated using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The Biological Rhythms Interview of Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (BRIAN) was used to assess disturbances in biological rhythms (ie sleep, activity, social and eating patterns). Results: There was no difference between the two groups at baseline (all p > 0.05). The BDI, BRIAN total, sleep, activity, social, and eating scores were higher in patients with FMS than in the controls (all p < 0.001). Further, a significant correlation was found between biological rhythms and BDI scores (p < 0.001) and there were positive correlations between the VAS score and BRIAN total, sleep, and eating and BDI in patients with FMS (all p < 0.001). Conclusion: There are marked biological rhythm disturbances in FMS. There is an important relationship between rhythm disorders and FMS. The disturbances in sleep, functional activities, social participation, and disordered rhythms like eating patterns show the need for a multidisciplinary approach to treating patients with FMS. PMID:26426177

  12. Duloxetine for the management of fibromyalgia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Beth A; Hammonds, Cara L; Boomershine, Chad S

    2009-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a widespread pain condition associated with a wide range of additional symptoms including fatigue, insomnia, depression, anxiety and stiffness. Duloxetine is one of three medications currently FDA approved for use in FMS management. Duloxetine is a mixed serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) that functions by increasing central nervous system levels of serotonin and norepinephrine. This review is a primer on use of duloxetine in FMS management and includes information on pharmacology and pharmacokinetics, a review of the three duloxetine FMS treatment trials currently in publication, a discussion of the safety and tolerability of duloxetine, and patient-focused perspectives on duloxetine use in FMS management. Duloxetine has proven efficacy in managing pain and mood symptoms in adult FMS patients with and without major depressive disorder. However, due to side effects, duloxetine must be used with caution in patients with fatigue, insomnia, gastrointestinal complaints, headache, cardiovascular disease, bleeding-risk, and in those 24 years of age and younger due to risk of suicidality. Duloxetine use should be avoided in patients with liver disease or alcoholics. As with all medications, duloxetine is best used as part of an individualized regimen that includes nonpharmacologic modalities of exercise, education and behavioral therapies. PMID:21197298

  13. Review of pharmacological therapies in fibromyalgia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This review addresses the current status of drug therapy for the management of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and is based on interdisciplinary FMS management guidelines, meta-analyses of drug trial data, and observational studies. In the absence of a single gold-standard medication, patients are treated with a variety of drugs from different categories, often with limited evidence. Drug therapy is not mandatory for the management of FMS. Pregabalin, duloxetine, milnacipran, and amitriptyline are the current first-line prescribed agents but have had a mostly modest effect. With only a minority of patients expected to experience substantial benefit, most will discontinue therapy because of either a lack of efficacy or tolerability problems. Many drug treatments have undergone limited study and have had negative results. It is unlikely that these failed pilot trials will undergo future study. However, medications, though imperfect, will continue to be a component of treatment strategy for these patients. Both the potential for medication therapy to relieve symptoms and the potential to cause harm should be carefully considered in their administration. PMID:24433463

  14. Fibromyalgia Syndrome: Current Considerations in Symptom Management.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), one of the most common rheumatic disorders, is estimated to affect up to 15 million people in the United States, 80% to 90% of whom are women. The syndrome is characterized by the presence of chronic widespread pain and various concurrent symptoms, which may include fatigue, cognitive disturbances (memory problems, difficulty concentrating, confusion), distressed mood (anxiety, depression), nonrestorative sleep, and muscular stiffness. Symptom management appears to be best addressed using a multimodal approach, with treatment strategies tailored to the individual. While medication may provide adequate symptom relief for some patients, experts generally recommend integrating both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic approaches. Some patients may benefit from the adjunctive use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) modalities. Because symptom remission is rare and medication adverse effects can complicate symptom management, well-informed nursing care practices and patient education are essential. This article describes the existing treatment guidelines, discusses pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic approaches (including CAM-based modalities), and outlines nursing approaches aimed at enhancing patient self-management. PMID:26669843

  15. Fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome: management issues.

    PubMed

    Bourke, Julius

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome represent two of the most commonly encountered functional somatic syndromes in clinical practice. Both have been contentious diagnoses in the past, and this diagnostic dispute has resulted in a therapeutic nihilism that has been of great detriment to their management and to alleviation of the intense suffering and disability that they have caused their innumerable sufferers. A new age has dawned in terms of a better understanding of these syndromes' physiology and improved approaches to their management. Here, the diagnosis and management of these closely related disorders are discussed, with particular reference to the recent empirical evidence that has come to light as a consequence of neurophysiological insights and robustly designed randomised clinical trials. Much work remains to be done in this vein, but we are better placed to facilitate recovery from these disorders than we have been previously. Whilst remission should always be a goal, complete symptom resolution is not the norm, but 'moderate' improvements are certainly attainable with appropriate management. PMID:25832515

  16. Management of fibromyalgia in older adults.

    PubMed

    Fitzcharles, Mary-Ann; Ste-Marie, Peter A; Shir, Yoram; Lussier, David

    2014-10-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a pain syndrome characterized by dysregulation of pain-processing mechanisms. FM may arise de novo or evolve following nervous system sensitization after an identifiable triggering event or related to a peripheral pain generator such as osteoarthritis. Although the focus symptom of FM is generalized body pain, patients may also experience sleep and mood disturbance, fatigue, and other somatic symptoms leading to the concept of a polysymptomatic condition. In view of prevalent other comorbidities in older patients, FM may be overlooked and management may be neglected, thereby contributing to poor well-being. Pertinent to the older patient is to ensure that the diagnosis of FM is correct and that other conditions are not misdiagnosed as FM. Whereever possible, treatment strategies should emphasize non-pharmacologic interventions that encompass healthy lifestyle habits, with attention to adequate physical activity in particular. Drug treatments should be tailored to the individual needs of the patient, with knowledge that they may offer only a modest effect, but with caution to ensure that adverse effects do not overshadow therapeutic effects.

  17. Fibromyalgia: the prototypical central sensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boomershine, Chad S

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FM), the most common central sensitivity syndrome (CSS) affecting over 5% of the population, is a disorder of chronic widespread pain accompanied by numerous other symptoms that causes significant functional impairment. The core FM symptom domains can be recalled using the FIBRO mnemonic and include Fatigue and Fog (cognitive dysfunction), Insomnia (difficulties with all aspects of sleep including initiation, maintenance and restorative), Blues (depression and anxiety), Rigidity (stiffness in muscles and joints) and Ow! (widespread pain and tenderness). While typically presenting in middle-aged women, FM can affect both sexes at any age. FM is a syndrome of abnormal central pain processing and increased central sensitivity caused by neurobiological changes that cause dysregulation of mechanisms that normally regulate pain sensation. There are currently three different methods for diagnosing FM; the 1990, 2010 and modified 2010 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria. While disabling, FM symptoms can be managed with a regimen of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatments. Medication types with benefit in treating FM include anticonvulsants, antidepressants, anti-inflammatories, muscle relaxers, tramadol, and stimulants. Beneficial nonpharmacologic therapies include aerobic and resistance exercise, stretching, cognitive behavioral therapy, and education. Effective management requires formulation of an individualized regimen since patients differ widely in symptoms and treatments they find beneficial. Such an individualized regimen should be based on a systematic assessment of problematic symptoms conducted at baseline and each follow-up with treatments modified over time. While challenging, FM symptoms can be effectively managed and patients can lead full, productive lives.

  18. Pain in fibromyalgia and related conditions.

    PubMed

    Cassisi, G; Sarzi-Puttini, P; Casale, R; Cazzola, M; Boccassini, L; Atzeni, F; Stisi, S

    2014-06-06

    Pain is the hallmark symptom of fibromyalgia (FM) and other related syndromes, but quite different from that of other rheumatic diseases, which depends on the degree of damage or inflammation in peripheral tissues. Sufferers are often defined as patients with chronic pain without an underlying mechanistic cause, and these syndromes and their symptoms are most appropriately described as "central pain", "neuropathic pain", "nonnociceptive pain" or "central sensitivity syndromes". The pain is particular, regional or widespread, and mainly relates to the musculoskeletal system; hyperalgesia or allodynia are typical. Its origin is currently considered to be distorted pain or sensory processing, rather than a local or regional abnormality. FM is probably the most important and extensively described central pain syndrome, but the characteristics and features of FM-related pain are similar in other disorders of particular interest for rheumatologists, such as myofascial pain syndromes and temporo-mandibular joint disorders, and there is also an intriguing overlap between FM and benign joint hypermobility syndrome. This suggests that the distinctive aspects of pain in these idiopathic or functional conditions is caused by central nervous system hypersensitivity and abnormalities. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies have been suggested for the treatment of these conditions, but a multidisciplinary approach is required in order to reduce the abnormal cycle of pain amplification and the related maladaptive and self-limiting behaviours.

  19. Fibromyalgia Is Correlated with Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thinning

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Martin, Elena; Garcia-Campayo, Javier; Puebla-Guedea, Marta; Ascaso, Francisco J.; Roca, Miguel; Gutierrez-Ruiz, Fernando; Vilades, Elisa; Polo, Vicente; Larrosa, Jose M.; Pablo, Luis E.; Satue, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether fibromyalgia induces axonal damage in the optic nerve that can be detected using optical coherence tomography (OCT), as the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) is atrophied in patients with fibromyalgia compared with controls. Methods Fibromyalgia patients (n = 116) and age-matched healthy controls (n = 144) were included in this observational and prospective cohort study. All subjects underwent visual acuity measurement and structural analysis of the RNFL using two OCT devices (Cirrus and Spectralis). Fibromyalgia patients were evaluated according to Giesecke’s fibromyalgia subgroups, the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), and the European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ5D) scale. We compared the differences between fibromyalgia patients and controls, and analyzed the correlations between OCT measurements, disease duration, fibromyalgia subgroups, severity, and quality of life. The impact on quality of life in fibromyalgia subgroups and in patients with different disease severity was also analyzed. Results A significant decrease in the RNFL was detected in fibromyalgia patients compared with controls using the two OCT devices: Cirrus OCT ganglion cell layer analysis registered a significant decrease in the minimum thickness of the inner plexiform layer (74.99±16.63 vs 79.36±3.38 μm, respectively; p = 0.023), nasal inferior, temporal inferior and temporal superior sectors (p = 0.040; 0.011 and 0.046 respectively). The Glaucoma application of the Spectralis OCT revealed thinning in the nasal, temporal inferior and temporal superior sectors (p = 0.009, 0.006, and 0.002 respectively) of fibromyalgia patients and the Axonal application in all sectors, except the nasal superior and temporal sectors. The odds ratio (OR) to estimate the size effect of FM in RNFL thickness was 1.39. RNFL atrophy was detected in patients with FIQ scores <60 (patients in early disease stages) compared with controls in the temporal inferior sector (78

  20. Fibromyalgia Syndrome Symptoms and Effects: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince, Alice; Bernard, Amy L.; Edsall, Patricia A.

    2000-01-01

    Surveyed fibromyalgia syndrome support group members about characteristics of the disease and how it affected their lives. Respondents had symptoms for many years before being diagnosed. Symptoms varied tremendously on a daily and yearly basis, so disease management was in a constant state of flux. Most symptoms significantly impacted quality of…

  1. Intravenous lidocaine for fibromyalgia syndrome: an open trial.

    PubMed

    Schafranski, Marcelo Derbli; Malucelli, Tiago; Machado, Fabíola; Takeshi, Hélcio; Kaiber, Flávia; Schmidt, Carolina; Harth, Fabielle

    2009-07-01

    Fibromyalgia is a disorder characterized by chronic widespread pain. In this study, we investigated the effect of intravenous infusions of lidocaine in pain and quality of life of patients with fibromyalgia. Twenty-three consecutive patients were included in the study, which consisted on five sequential intravenous 2% lidocaine infusions with rising dosages (2-5 mg/kg, days 1-5). Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), Health Assessment Questionnaire, and a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain were applied before the first lidocaine infusion, immediately after the fifth infusion and 30 days after the fifth infusion. A significant improvement was observed in the FIQ scores after the fifth infusion (73.52 +/- 16.56 vs 63.29 +/- 21.21, p = 0.02), which was maintained after 30 days (73.52 +/- 16.56 vs 63.85 +/- 24.59, p = 0.04). Similar results were seen concerning the VAS: 8.19 +/- 1.76 vs 6.84 +/- 2.44, p = 0.01 and 8.19 +/- 1.76 vs 7.17 +/- 2.35, p = 0.05, respectively. Intravenous lidocaine infusions are safe and effective in the management of fibromyalgia.

  2. Fibromyalgia: patient perspectives on symptoms, symptom management, and provider utilization.

    PubMed

    Wassem, Rebecca; McDonald, Marie; Racine, Janet

    2002-01-01

    Two surveys of individuals with fibromyalgia were conducted to assess the frequency and prevalence of symptoms (N = 99) as well as healthcare providers, medications, and self-care activities used to manage one's fibromyalgia (N = 54). The pervasiveness of symptoms was striking, with 24 various symptoms ranging from cognitive to intestinal problems occurring in at least 75% of the respondents. Significant correlations were present between health status and both physical (P = .002) and psychological (P =.008) symptoms. There was also a significant correlation between the total number of symptoms and the degree of life disruption attributed to fibromyalgia (P =.015). A variety of healthcare professionals were seen, with internists, family physicians, and rheumatologist most frequently used. Although at least 80% of the respondents reported difficulty with anxiety, confusion, irritability, depression, and cognitive difficulties, less than 10% of the respondents reported seeing a psychiatrist. Most frequently used medications were: amitriptyline, (fluoxetine HCl) Prozac, ibuprofen (Motrin), sertraline HCI (Zoloft), and zolpidem (Ambein). Self-care activities used with the most success were walking, stretching, and exercising. These studies indicate the need for more research and support for healthcare providers as well as patients with fibromyalgia. PMID:11839925

  3. Temporal Preparation and Inhibitory Deficit in Fibromyalgia Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correa, Angel; Miro, Elena; Martinez, M. Pilar; Sanchez, Ana I.; Lupianez, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive deficits in fibromyalgia may be specifically related to controlled processes, such as those measured by working memory or executive function tasks. This hypothesis was tested here by measuring controlled temporal preparation (temporal orienting) during a response inhibition (go no-go) task. Temporal orienting effects (faster reaction…

  4. [The (putative) pathological impact of fibromyalgia on the orofacial system].

    PubMed

    de Baat, C; Gerritsen, A E; de Baat-Ananta, M; de Baat, P

    2016-03-01

    Fibromyalgia is a syndrome without apparent aetiology, characterised by pain, fatigue, memory disorders, mood disorders, and sleep disturbances. The syndrome is considered to be one of the rheumatic diseases. In the general population, the prevalence varies from 2 to 8%, with a women-men ratio of about 2:1. Suspicion of fibromyalgia arises when a patient has pain at multiple locations that cannot be attributed to trauma or inflammation, and when the pain is especially musculoskeletal. Primary management includes explaining the syndrome and offering reassurance. In addition, one can also attempt to increase mobility, avoid overloading, and improve physical condition and the level of activity, and to activate problem-solving skills. Subsequently, behavioural therapy and pharmacotherapy may be considered. The most important manifestations of fibromyalgia in the orofacial and occlusal system seem to be temporomandibular dysfunction, headache, xerostomia, hyposalivation, burning mouth and dysgeusia. However, with respect to the precise relation of fibromyalgia with the orofacial system, much needs to be elucidated. PMID:26973987

  5. Temporomandibular disorders in fibromyalgia syndrome: a short-communication.

    PubMed

    Gui, Maísa Soares; Pimentel, Marcele Jardim; Rizzatti-Barbosa, Célia Marisa

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a chronic painful syndrome and the coexistence of a painful condition caused by Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) and FMS has been frequently raised for several studies, however, more likely hypothesis is that a set of FMS characteristics may lead to the onset of TMD symptoms and they are not merely coexisting conditions. Therefore, our aim is presenting a review of literature about the relation between fibromyalgia and the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. For this purpose, a bibliographic search was performed of the period of 1990-2013, in the Medline, Pubmed, Lilacs and Scielo databases, using the keywords fibromyalgia, temporomandibular disorders and facial pain. Here we present a set of findings in the literature showing that fibromyalgia can lead to TMD symptoms. These studies demonstrated greater involvement of the stomatognathic system in FMS and myogenic disorders of masticatory system are the most commonly found in those patients. FMS appears to have a series of characteristics that constitute predisposing and triggering factors for TMD.

  6. Assessment of the usefulness of dihydrotestosterone in the diagnostics of patients with androgenetic alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Urysiak-Czubatka, Izabela; Broniarczyk-Dyła, Grażyna

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is the most common form of hair loss. Clinically observed hair loss is due to the continuous miniaturization of affected hair follicles. Genetic factors and androgenic factors especially dihydrotestosterone (DHT), which is a testosterone tissue metabolite, play major roles in the pathogenesis of AGA. However, expert opinions about the usefulness of DHT in the diagnosis of this type of alopecia are divided. Aim To evaluate the usefulness of DHT level in patients with androgenetic alopecia compared with the control group. Material and methods The study comprised 49 subjects: 19 women and 9 men with androgenetic alopecia. The control group consisted of 17 healthy women and 4 men without hair loss. Results Increased serum concentrations of DHT were observed in patients with androgenetic alopecia (17 women, 5 men), but also in the control group. The differences in mean values of DHT were not significant according to the types of alopecia and the control group. Increased serum concentrations of DHT were not correlated with the advance of alopecia. Conclusions Dihydrotestosterone is the most influential androgen and seems to play a very important role in the pathogenesis of androgenetic alopecia. Based on the results of our study and others, the most important factors would appear to be the genetically-determined sensitivity of the follicles to DHT and their different reactions to androgen concentration. PMID:25254005

  7. Postinfectious Arthritis in Pediatric Practice

    PubMed Central

    PLESCA, Doina Anca; LUMINOS, Monica; SPATARIU, Luminita; STEFANESCU, Mihaela; CINTEZA, Eliza; BALGRADEAN, Mihaela

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Postinfectious arthritis is a relatively often encountered in pediatric practice. The authors present the most important data concerneing this pathology, with up to date informations exemplifying with case presentations. Clinical cases bring to attention the most common forms of postinfectious arthritis (reactive arthritis, postinfectious arthritis bacterial, viral, spirochete, and so on). Although highly studied and commonly found in current pediatric practice, arthritis occurring after infections remains controversial entities, especially regarding terminology. While, according to some authors, postinfectious arthritis belongs to the large group of reactive arthritis, by other authors, these joint events are independent entities. PMID:24371480

  8. Pain characteristics in fibromyalgia: understanding the multiple dimensions of pain.

    PubMed

    Plazier, Mark; Ost, Jan; Stassijns, Gaëtane; De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven

    2015-04-01

    Fibromyalgia is a common disease with a high economic burden. The etiology of this disease remains unclear, as there are no specific abnormalities on clinical or technical examinations. Evidence suggests that central pain sensitization at the brain pain matrix might be involved. Understanding the pain characteristics of this disease is of importance both for diagnosis and treatment. The authors present their findings of pain characteristics in a Belgium population of fibromyalgia patients. Data of 65 patients (57 male and 8 female patients) were analyzed in this study (mean age 46.86, SD = +8.79). Patients filled out the following questionnaires: visual analogue scale, fibromyalgia impact questionnaire, pain-catastrophizing scale, pain vigilance and awareness questionnaire, modified fatigue impact scale, the Beck depression inventory, the short form 36 and the Dutch shortened profile of mood states. Statistical analysis was performed making use of a factor analysis and a hierarchical cluster analysis. We were able to define pain characteristics in this group of patients. The reciprocal effects of mood and fatigue on pain experience could be identified within the data, catastrophizing scores show a high correlation with overall life quality and pain experience. We have performed a cluster analysis on the fibromyalgia patients, based on the four main principal components defining the overall disease burden. Mood explained most of the variance in symptoms, followed by mental health state, fatigue, and catastrophizing. Three clusters of patients could be revealed by these components. Clusters: 1 high scores on mood disorders, pain, and decreased mental health, 2 high scores on fatigue and physical health, and 3 a mixture of these two groups. This data suggest that different subgroups of fibromyalgia patients could be identified and based on that, treatment strategies and results might be adapted.

  9. Pain characteristics in fibromyalgia: understanding the multiple dimensions of pain.

    PubMed

    Plazier, Mark; Ost, Jan; Stassijns, Gaëtane; De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven

    2015-04-01

    Fibromyalgia is a common disease with a high economic burden. The etiology of this disease remains unclear, as there are no specific abnormalities on clinical or technical examinations. Evidence suggests that central pain sensitization at the brain pain matrix might be involved. Understanding the pain characteristics of this disease is of importance both for diagnosis and treatment. The authors present their findings of pain characteristics in a Belgium population of fibromyalgia patients. Data of 65 patients (57 male and 8 female patients) were analyzed in this study (mean age 46.86, SD = +8.79). Patients filled out the following questionnaires: visual analogue scale, fibromyalgia impact questionnaire, pain-catastrophizing scale, pain vigilance and awareness questionnaire, modified fatigue impact scale, the Beck depression inventory, the short form 36 and the Dutch shortened profile of mood states. Statistical analysis was performed making use of a factor analysis and a hierarchical cluster analysis. We were able to define pain characteristics in this group of patients. The reciprocal effects of mood and fatigue on pain experience could be identified within the data, catastrophizing scores show a high correlation with overall life quality and pain experience. We have performed a cluster analysis on the fibromyalgia patients, based on the four main principal components defining the overall disease burden. Mood explained most of the variance in symptoms, followed by mental health state, fatigue, and catastrophizing. Three clusters of patients could be revealed by these components. Clusters: 1 high scores on mood disorders, pain, and decreased mental health, 2 high scores on fatigue and physical health, and 3 a mixture of these two groups. This data suggest that different subgroups of fibromyalgia patients could be identified and based on that, treatment strategies and results might be adapted. PMID:25048743

  10. Prevalence of fibromyalgia in a low socioeconomic status population

    PubMed Central

    Assumpção, Ana; Cavalcante, Alane B; Capela, Cristina E; Sauer, Juliana F; Chalot, Suellen D; Pereira, Carlos AB; Marques, Amélia P

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of fibromyalgia, as well as to assess the major symptoms of this syndrome in an adult, low socioeconomic status population assisted by the primary health care system in a city in Brazil. Methods We cross-sectionally sampled individuals assisted by the public primary health care system (n = 768, 35–60 years old). Participants were interviewed by phone and screened about pain. They were then invited to be clinically assessed (304 accepted). Pain was estimated using a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Fibromyalgia was assessed using the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), as well as screening for tender points using dolorimetry. Statistical analyses included Bayesian Statistics and the Kruskal-Wallis Anova test (significance level = 5%). Results From the phone-interview screening, we divided participants (n = 768) in three groups: No Pain (NP) (n = 185); Regional Pain (RP) (n = 388) and Widespread Pain (WP) (n = 106). Among those participating in the clinical assessments, (304 subjects), the prevalence of fibromyalgia was 4.4% (95% confidence interval [2.6%; 6.3%]). Symptoms of pain (VAS and FIQ), feeling well, job ability, fatigue, morning tiredness, stiffness, anxiety and depression were statically different among the groups. In multivariate analyses we found that individuals with FM and WP had significantly higher impairment than those with RP and NP. FM and WP were similarly disabling. Similarly, RP was no significantly different than NP. Conclusion Fibromyalgia is prevalent in the low socioeconomic status population assisted by the public primary health care system. Prevalence was similar to other studies (4.4%) in a more diverse socioeconomic population. Individuals with FM and WP have significant impact in their well being. PMID:19505321

  11. Efficacy of platelet-rich plasma in treatment of androgenic alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Parul; Agarwal, Sachin; Dhot, Paramjeet Singh; Sayal, Satish K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has shown remarkable beneficial effects without any major adverse reactions in the treatment of androgenic alopecia. The growth factors in activated autologous PRP induce the proliferation of dermal papilla cells. Objectives: The objective was to investigate the clinical efficacy of PRP in treatment of androgenic alopecia. Materials and Methods: Ten patients were given autologous PRP injections on the affected area of alopecia over a period of 3 months at interval of 2-3 weeks and results were assessed. Results: Three months after the treatment, the patients presented clinical improvement in the hair counts, hair thickness, hair root strength, and overall alopecia. Conclusion: PRP appears to be a cheap, effective, and promising therapy for androgenic alopecia with no major adverse effects. PMID:26420936

  12. [What's new in the therapy of fibromyalgia?].

    PubMed

    Späth, M

    2003-12-01

    Modern management of fibromyalgia (FM) requires a holistic approach, which includes nonpharmacologic strategies (both exercise and behavioral strategies) and pharmacologic treatment. Despite only partial effects in some patients, tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, analgesics and opioids are in use. The use of antiepileptic drugs and antispasticity agents is mainly supported by anecdotal data. Three other classes of agents are currently thought to have useful potentials. N-methyl-D-aspartate-(NMDA-)mediated neurotransmission may play an important role in mediating wind-up and related phenomena in pain pathways. Recent studies have demonstrated that NMDA receptor antagonists improve pain symptoms in FM. But a poor side effect profile represents a significant problem. Cerebrospinal fluid substance P concentrations are significantly elevated in FM patients, but the analgesic potential of neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptor antagonists did not meet early expectations. Tropisetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, was tested in a multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial including 403 patients. In those receiving 5 mg tropisetron, 39.2% fulfilled the response criterion (pain reduction 35%) as compared to 26.2% in the placebo group (p=0.033). On 10 and 15 mg, the responder rates were smaller and statistically not significant. A total of 78 responders to therapy were followed up for 12 months. After the end of treatment, pain intensity rose within one month in all 4 groups. Patients having received 5 or 10 mg showed a less pronounced increase in pain. In addition, even 12 months after stopping treatment, pain was still markedly below baseline levels in the 5 and 10 mg groups. PMID:14648317

  13. Assessment of sleep in patients with fibromyalgia: qualitative development of the fibromyalgia sleep diary

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Sleep disturbance is a common experience in fibromyalgia (FM). The field lacks a sleep specific patient reported outcome (PRO) measure developed and validated in a FM population. The study objective is to gain an in-depth understanding of sleep in FM and to develop a PRO measure of it. Methods Research involved the following stages: 1) A literature review conducted to identify key concepts associated with FM patient experience of sleep and PRO measures that have been used to assess this; 2) Qualitative interviews with therapeutic area experts; 3) Focus groups with FM patients who experienced sleep disturbance; 4) Development of a conceptual framework and the Fibromyalgia Sleep Diary (FMSD); and 5) Cognitive interviews with patients to explore content validity of the FMSD. Results The literature review and expert interviews supported sleep disturbance being an important aspect of the FM patient experience, and underscored the need for a new FM specific sleep PRO measure. Results from the focus groups demonstrated that FM patients experience sleep disturbances that they attribute to their FM symptoms, such as pain and stiffness, confirming the importance of understanding more about sleep changes. Aspects of sleep raised by FM patients included poor sleep quality and insufficient quantity including difficulty with falling asleep, getting comfortable, and staying asleep; restlessness; light sleep; not feeling rested upon awakening; and difficulty starting the day. Cognitive interview results showed that the 8-item FMSD, developed to reflect the concepts identified above, was relevant to FM patients with content that was interpreted as intended. Conclusions The FMSD was developed in line with the recommendations of the FDA PRO guidance and ISPOR PRO Task Force. The qualitative evidence generated thus far strongly supports the content validity of the FMSD as a PRO measure of sleep disturbance in FM populations. Psychometric evaluation of the FMSD to

  14. Clustering of symptoms associated with fibromyalgia in a Finnish Twin Cohort.

    PubMed

    Markkula, Ritva; Järvinen, Pentti; Leino-Arjas, Päivi; Koskenvuo, Markku; Kalso, Eija; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2009-08-01

    The objective was to assess the prevalence and heritability of symptoms associated with fibromyalgia in a population-based working-age twin sample. The study was based on the 12,502 like-sexed twins of the Finnish Twin Cohort and 49 diagnosed fibromyalgia patients who answered the same questionnaire in 1990-1992. Questions that were considered to best match symptoms of fibromyalgia were validated between the twins and the fibromyalgia patients. Latent class analysis was used to classify the subjects into more homogeneous groups with respect to the symptom items. The pairwise distribution of symptom classes in relation to zygosity and gender was modelled using quantitative genetic models to estimate heritability. Responses to all fibromyalgia-related items were obtained from 10,608 twins. A similar proportion of men (12%) and women (13%) was placed in the third latent class, which best represented possible fibromyalgia patients. Subjects in this class had a similar symptom profile as the diagnosed fibromyalgia patient group, but they were less severely affected. The two other latent classes represented subjects that were virtually symptom free and subjects with some symptoms. The heritability of liability to symptom class membership was estimated to be 51% (95% CI 45-56%). The prevalence of symptoms associated with fibromyalgia in our population-based sample unselected for disease status was comparable to the prevalence of widespread pain reported in population based studies. The symptoms known to be associated with fibromyalgia seem to have a strong genetic background.

  15. Celiac symptoms in patients with fibromyalgia: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    García-Leiva, Juan Miguel; Carrasco, Jorge Luis Ordóñez; Slim, Mahmoud; Calandre, Elena P

    2015-03-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain syndrome associated with numerous somatic symptoms including gastrointestinal manifestations of nonspecific nature. Celiac disease and nongluten sensitivity frequently evolve in adults with gastrointestinal and extraintestinal symptoms similar to those found among patients with fibromyalgia. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the presence of celiac-type symptoms among patients with fibromyalgia in comparison with healthy subjects and with those experienced by adult celiac patients and subjects with gluten sensitivity. A list of typical celiac-type symptoms was developed, comparing the frequency of presentation of these symptoms between patients with fibromyalgia (N = 178) and healthy subjects (N = 131), in addition to those of celiac patients and gluten-sensitive patients reported in the literature. The frequency of presentation of every celiac-type symptom, excepting anemia, was significantly higher among patients with fibromyalgia compared to controls (p < 0.0001). Regarding the existing data in the literature, the prevalence of fatigue, depression, cognitive symptoms and cutaneous lesions predominated among patients with fibromyalgia, whereas the prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms was higher among patients with fibromyalgia compared to gluten-sensitive patients and was similar among patients with fibromyalgia and celiac disease patient. The symptomatological similarity of both pathologies, especially gastrointestinal symptoms, suggests that at least a subgroup of patients with fibromyalgia could experience subclinical celiac disease or nonceliac gluten intolerance.

  16. Current treatments to counter sleep dysfunction as a pathogenic stimulus of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Choy, Ernest H

    2016-05-01

    Fibromyalgia is characterized by chronic widespread pain, fatigue and nonrestorative sleep. Polysomnography showed reduced short-wave sleep and abnormal alpha rhythms during nonrapid eye movement sleep in patients with fibromyalgia. However, sleep dysfunction might be pathogenic in fibromyalgia since myalgia and fatigue could be induced in healthy individuals by disrupting sleep. Poor sleep quality was a major risk factor for the subsequent development of chronic widespread pain in healthy pain-free individuals. Sleep disruption leads to impairment of the descending pain inhibition pathways. Aside from good sleep, hygiene, exercise can promote sleep. Among currently available pharmacological treatments, evidence suggests amitriptyline and pregabalin can improve sleep in fibromyalgia. PMID:27312978

  17. Celiac symptoms in patients with fibromyalgia: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    García-Leiva, Juan Miguel; Carrasco, Jorge Luis Ordóñez; Slim, Mahmoud; Calandre, Elena P

    2015-03-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain syndrome associated with numerous somatic symptoms including gastrointestinal manifestations of nonspecific nature. Celiac disease and nongluten sensitivity frequently evolve in adults with gastrointestinal and extraintestinal symptoms similar to those found among patients with fibromyalgia. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the presence of celiac-type symptoms among patients with fibromyalgia in comparison with healthy subjects and with those experienced by adult celiac patients and subjects with gluten sensitivity. A list of typical celiac-type symptoms was developed, comparing the frequency of presentation of these symptoms between patients with fibromyalgia (N = 178) and healthy subjects (N = 131), in addition to those of celiac patients and gluten-sensitive patients reported in the literature. The frequency of presentation of every celiac-type symptom, excepting anemia, was significantly higher among patients with fibromyalgia compared to controls (p < 0.0001). Regarding the existing data in the literature, the prevalence of fatigue, depression, cognitive symptoms and cutaneous lesions predominated among patients with fibromyalgia, whereas the prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms was higher among patients with fibromyalgia compared to gluten-sensitive patients and was similar among patients with fibromyalgia and celiac disease patient. The symptomatological similarity of both pathologies, especially gastrointestinal symptoms, suggests that at least a subgroup of patients with fibromyalgia could experience subclinical celiac disease or nonceliac gluten intolerance. PMID:25119831

  18. Stem Cell Markers (Cytokeratin 17 and Cytokeratin 19) in Scarring and Nonscarring Alopecia

    PubMed Central

    El Sakka, Dalia; Gaber, Mohamed Abdel Wahed; Abdou, Asmaa Gaber; Wahed, Moshira Abdel; Saleh, Ahmed Abdel-Wahab; Shehata, Walla

    2016-01-01

    Background: Alopecia is one of the most important hair follicle (HF) disorders, which is divided into scarring (cicatricial) and nonscarring (noncicatricial) types. Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate the expression of stem cell (SC) markers such as cytokeratin (CK) 17 and CK19 in scarring and nonscarring alopecia. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients with scalp alopecia (15 with scarring alopecia and 15 without) together with ten healthy volunteers were included in this study. Biopsies were taken from all participants and stained for CK17 and CK19 using immunohistochemistry. Results: There was a statistically significant difference between the nonscarring group and the control group with regard to CK17 expression in the outer layers of the HFs (P = 0.00) and CK19 staining of the inner layers of the HFs (P = 0.008). There was a statistically significant difference between the scarring and the control groups regarding CK17 expression in the outer (P = 0.00) and the inner layers (P = 0.00) of the HFs and CK19 expression in the inner layers of the HFs (P = 0.00). CK17 expression in the outer layers (P = 0.02) and the inner layers of the HFs (P = 0.00) together with CK19 expression in the inner layers of the HFs (P = 0.00) showed statistically significant differences between scarring and nonscarring alopecia groups. Conclusions: The presence of SC markers (CK17 and CK19) in the HFs was affected in both scarring and nonscarring alopecia, but the defect in scarring alopecia is more evident than that of nonscarring alopecia. The persistence of SC markers in some types of scarring alopecia could give a hope for the recovery of these lesions. Further studies are recommended to clarify the benefit from using HF SCs in the treatment of alopecia. PMID:27761086

  19. Epidemiology and burden of alopecia areata: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Villasante Fricke, Alexandra C; Miteva, Mariya

    2015-01-01

    Background Alopecia areata (AA) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by patches of non-scarring alopecia affecting scalp and body hair that can be psychologically devastating. AA is clinically heterogenous, and its natural history is unpredictable. There is no preventative therapy or cure. Objective The objective of this study is to provide an evidence-based systematic review on the epidemiology and the burden of AA. Methods and selection criteria A search was conducted of the published, peer-reviewed literature via PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science. Studies published in English within the last 51 years that measured AA’s incidence, prevalence, distribution, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), quality of life, and associated psychiatric and medical comorbidities were included. Two authors assessed studies and extracted the data. Results The lifetime incidence of AA is approximately 2% worldwide. Both formal population studies found no sex predominance. First onset is most common in the third and fourth decades of life but may occur at any age. An earlier age of first onset corresponds with an increased lifetime risk of extensive disease. Global DALYs for AA were calculated at 1,332,800 in 2010. AA patients are at risk for depression and anxiety, atopy, vitiligo, thyroid disease, and other autoimmune conditions. Conclusion AA is the most prevalent autoimmune disorder and the second most prevalent hair loss disorder after androgenetic alopecia, and the lifetime risk in the global population is approximately 2%. AA is associated with psychiatric and medical comorbidities including depression, anxiety, and several autoimmune disorders, and an increased global burden of disease. PMID:26244028

  20. HLA antigens in individuals with down syndrome and alopecia areata

    PubMed Central

    Estefan, Juliany L; Oliveira, Juliana C; Abad, Eliane D; Saintive, Simone B; Porto, Luis Cristóvão MS; Ribeiro, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To describe human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles in individuals with Down syndrome and alopecia areata. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted, which evaluated 109 individuals. Ten with down syndrome (DS) and alopecia areata (AA), ten with DS without AA and ten with AA without DS, and their families. The individuals were matched by gender and age. The following data were computed: gender, age, ethnic group, karyotype, clinical presentation and family history of alopecia areata. Descriptive analysis: measures of central tendency and frequency distribution. Inferential analysis: Fisher’s exact test to compare categorical data between the three groups and Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA test for numerical data. RESULTS: Seventy per cent of evaluated individuals in the DS and AA group were male; presented mean age of 18.6 (SD ± 7.2) years and 70% were Caucasian. We observed involvement of the scalp, with a single lesion in 10% and multiple in 90% of subjects. It was observed that there is no significant difference in the frequency distributions of the alleles HLA loci A, B, C, DRB1 and DQB1 of subjects studied. However, according to Fisher’s exact test, there is a trend (P = 0.089) of DS group to present higher proportions of HLA-A 36 and HLA-B 15 than the AA group and AA and DS group. CONCLUSION: There was a tendency for the DS group, to present proportion of HLA-A 36 and HLA-B 15 higher than the AA group and group of individuals with AA and DS. However, there was no significant difference in the frequency distribution of the alleles. PMID:25325065

  1. Neem oil: an herbal therapy for alopecia causes dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Reutemann, Patricia; Ehrlich, Alison

    2008-01-01

    For more than 2,000 years, the neem tree has been considered one of the most useful and versatile plants in the world. Neem oil has been used for both homeopathic remedies and as a pesticide. Both systemic and contact reactions have occurred with the use of neem oil. We report a patient who presented with an acute case of contact dermatitis on the scalp and face after the use of neem oil for alopecia and present a review of the literature regarding its uses, toxicity, and regulation. PMID:18627678

  2. Autoimmune Polyglandular Syndrome Type 2 with Alopecia Universalis and Hypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Dave, Priti; Bhosle, Deepak; Dharme, Madhav; Deshmukh, Deepak; Patel, Jay

    2015-04-01

    A 46 years old female, presented with severe fatigue, nypotension ana hyperpigmentation. Her basal serum cortisol level at 8 a.m. was < 1.0 μg/dl which suggested a diagnosis of Addison's disease. An association with latent autoimmune diabetes of adult and autoimmune hypothyroidism led to a diagnosis of Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome type II (PAS II). She also had alopecia universalis and hypoparathyroidism which are very rare in PAS type II syndrome. On treatment with hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone there was drastic improvement in the clinical features.

  3. [Septic arthritis and spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Yosuke

    2014-10-01

    Septic arthritis and spondylitis in elderly adult are uncommon disease. But symptoms and signs of septic arthritis and spondylitis are an important medical emergency, with high mortality and morbidity. Delayed or inadequate treatment can result in irreversible joint destruction and neurological condition. Early diagnoses as well as prompt and effective treatment are essential for avoiding severe outcomes. In spite of advances in diagnostic imaging techniques, the incidence of septic arthritis and spondylitis appears to have been increased. The aging of the population, the widespread use of immunosuppressant therapies, including systemic corticosteroids, cytokines and anticytokines, and growing resistance to conventional antibiotics seem to be the major cause.

  4. Challenges in Fibromyalgia Management: A Study of Anxiety, Depression, and Motivation Using Distance Learning and Social Networking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caines, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    Patients with fibromyalgia have difficulty managing symptoms (e.g., fatigue, chronic pain). The challenges in fibromyalgia management may vary from patient to patient, from painful physical exercise to pharmaceutical side-effects. Since the management of fibromyalgia greatly varies, there seems to be an individualist or personal component to…

  5. Fascia: A missing link in our understanding of the pathology of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Liptan, Ginevra L

    2010-01-01

    Significant evidence exists for central sensitization in fibromyalgia, however the cause of this process in fibromyalgia-and how it relates to other known abnormalities in fibromyalgia-remains unclear. Central sensitization occurs when persistent nociceptive input leads to increased excitability in the dorsal horn neurons of the spinal cord. In this hyperexcited state, spinal cord neurons produce an enhanced responsiveness to noxious stimulation, and even to formerly innocuous stimulation. No definite evidence of muscle pathology in fibromyalgia has been found. However, there is some evidence for dysfunction of the intramuscular connective tissue, or fascia, in fibromyalgia. This paper proposes that inflammation of the fascia is the source of peripheral nociceptive input that leads to central sensitization in fibromyalgia. The fascial dysfunction is proposed to be due to inadequate growth hormone production and HPA axis dysfunction in fibromyalgia. Fascia is richly innervated, and the major cell of the fascia, the fibroblast, has been shown to secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines, particularly IL-6, in response to strain. Recent biopsy studies using immuno-histochemical staining techniques have found increased levels of collagen and inflammatory mediators in the connective tissue surrounding the muscle cells in fibromyalgia patients. The inflammation of the fascia is similar to that described in conditions such as plantar fasciitis and lateral epicondylitis, and may be better described as a dysfunctional healing response. This may explain why NSAIDs and oral steroids have not been found effective in fibromyalgia. Inflammation and dysfunction of the fascia may lead to central sensitization in fibromyalgia. If this hypothesis is confirmed, it could significantly expand treatment options to include manual therapies directed at the fascia such as Rolfing and myofascial release, and direct further research on the peripheral pathology in fibromyalgia to the fascia. PMID

  6. The Prevalence and Characteristics of Fibromyalgia in the 2012 National Health Interview Survey

    PubMed Central

    Walitt, Brian; Nahin, Richard L.; Katz, Robert S.; Bergman, Martin J.; Wolfe, Frederick

    2015-01-01

    Background Most knowledge of fibromyalgia comes from the clinical setting, where healthcare-seeking behavior and selection issues influence study results. The characteristics of fibromyalgia in the general population have not been studied in detail. Methods We developed and tested surrogate study specific criteria for fibromyalgia in rheumatology practices using variables from the US National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the modification (for surveys) of the 2010 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) preliminary fibromyalgia criteria. The surrogate criteria were applied to the 2012 NHIS and identified persons who satisfied criteria from symptom data. The NHIS weighted sample of 8446 persons represents 225.7 million US adults. Results Fibromyalgia was identified in 1.75% (95% CI 1.42, 2.07), or 3.94 million persons. However, 73% of identified cases self-reported a physician’s diagnosis other than fibromyalgia. Identified cases had high levels of self-reported pain, non-pain symptoms, comorbidity, psychological distress, medical costs, Social Security and work disability. Caseness was associated with gender, education, ethnicity, citizenship and unhealthy behaviors. Demographics, behaviors, and comorbidity were predictive of case status. Examination of the surrogate polysymptomatic distress scale (PSD) of the 2010 ACR criteria found fibromyalgia symptoms extending through the full length of the scale. Conclusions Persons identified with criteria-based fibromyalgia have severe symptoms, but most (73%) have not received a clinical diagnosis of fibromyalgia. The association of fibromyalgia-like symptoms over the full length of the PSD scale with physiological as well as mental stressors suggests PSD may be a universal response variable rather than one restricted to fibromyalgia. PMID:26379048

  7. Alopecia in Outdoor Group- and Corral-Housed Baboons (Papio hamadryas spp.).

    PubMed

    Lutz, Corrine K; Sharp, R Mark

    2015-07-01

    Alopecia has been reported to occur in several species of captive NHP. Much of this research has focused on macaque monkeys; whether other primate species such as baboons are affected similarly is unknown. Because alopecia can be a focus of inspectors and a possible marker of wellbeing, the purpose of the current study was to survey the occurrence of alopecia in 2 baboon populations and to identify potential risk factors. Subjects were 262 group-housed and 279 corral-housed baboons. Alopecia was assessed cage-side (group-housed) and on sedated animals (corral-housed). Although alopecia was mild in both populations, there were significant effects of season and sex. Alopecia was greater in the winter (group-housed) and the fall (corral-housed) and in female baboons. In addition, the group-housed baboons showed a significant negative effect of age and a lesser effect of group size on alopecia. These results demonstrate that variables other than those associated with animal management practices can affect hair loss in baboons.

  8. Alopecia in Outdoor Group- and Corral-Housed Baboons (Papio hamadryas spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Corrine K; Sharp, R Mark

    2015-01-01

    Alopecia has been reported to occur in several species of captive NHP. Much of this research has focused on macaque monkeys; whether other primate species such as baboons are affected similarly is unknown. Because alopecia can be a focus of inspectors and a possible marker of wellbeing, the purpose of the current study was to survey the occurrence of alopecia in 2 baboon populations and to identify potential risk factors. Subjects were 262 group-housed and 279 corral-housed baboons. Alopecia was assessed cage-side (group-housed) and on sedated animals (corral-housed). Although alopecia was mild in both populations, there were significant effects of season and sex. Alopecia was greater in the winter (group-housed) and the fall (corral-housed) and in female baboons. In addition, the group-housed baboons showed a significant negative effect of age and a lesser effect of group size on alopecia. These results demonstrate that variables other than those associated with animal management practices can affect hair loss in baboons. PMID:26224438

  9. Pattern Alopecia during Hormonal Anticancer Therapy in Patients with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ju-Ik; Yun, Seok-Kweon; Kim, Han-Uk; Ihm, Chull-Wan

    2014-01-01

    We report five cases of pattern alopecia in female patients who are undergoing hormonal anticancer therapy for the prevention of recurrence of breast cancer after surgery. Three patients demonstrated male pattern alopecia with receding frontal hairlines, and two patients demonstrated female pattern alopecia without receding hairlines. The detailed clinical history showed that the pattern alopecia of the patients developed after the full recovery of global hair loss of the entire scalp due to previous cytotoxic chemotherapy. All of the adjuvant hormonal anticancer drugs that were used in the patients are antiestrogenic agents, either aromatase inhibitors or selective estrogen receptor modulators. Considering androgen effect on the hair follicles of the fronto-parietal scalp, the androgen-estrogen imbalance caused by the drugs was thought to be the reason for the onset of pattern alopecia in the patients. In general, alopecia that develops during cytotoxic chemotherapy is well known to both physicians and patients; however, the diagnosis of pattern alopecia during hormonal anticancer therapy in breast cancer patients seems to be overlooked. PMID:25473228

  10. Arthritis and IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... Events Search: What are Crohn's & Colitis? What is Crohn's Disease What is Ulcerative Colitis Types of Medications What’s ... affect as many as 25% of people with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. Although arthritis is typically associated ...

  11. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... vein that are done regularly at the hospital. Physical Therapy An appropriate physical therapy program is essential to the management of any type of arthritis. A physical therapist will explain the importance of certain activities ...

  12. Living with Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... effects. Learn more about biologic treatments . Reducing your sensitivity to pain When the pain of psoriatic arthritis ... your doctor about medication that helps reduce your sensitivity to pain. Prescription pain medications such as Gabapentin ...

  13. Arthritis of the Hand

    MedlinePlus

    ... of hand and wrist arthritis. (Note: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not test dietary supplements. These compounds may cause negative interactions with other medications. Always consult your doctor before taking dietary supplements.) ...

  14. Arthritis and the Feet

    MedlinePlus

    ... for months, or years, then abate, sometimes permanently. Gout (gouty arthritis) : Gout is a condition caused by a buildup of ... sauces, shellfish, and brandy is popularly associated with gout, there are other protein compounds in foods such ...

  15. Alopecia Areata: news on diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment.

    PubMed

    D'Ovidio, R

    2014-02-01

    This review focuses on recent changes in the clinical, pathogenetic and therapeutic developments with regards to Alopecia Areata. Some new clinical forms and some phenomena have been described for the first time in recent years. Several phenomena previously observed such as the Renbok, the Koebner and the possibility that an exclamation mark hair can resume its physiological growth have been confirmed. The pathogenetic role of cytotoxic cells is increasingly evident, as well as the deficit of cells and the factors regulating the autoimmune response. The concept of immune privilege of the hair follicle has had further confirmation and have been identified some of the molecular mechanisms such as the expression of the receptors for killer lymphocytes on the trichokeratinocytes of the Outer Root Sheat. There is a renewed interest on the possible role of mast cell as a key element in the acute and chronic phases of the disease. New therapies are focused on the inhibition of the killer cells directed against antigens not yet fully specified of the hair follicle and on the restoration of the immune privilege of this structure. Alopecia Areata is a disease with high emotional impact, able to reduce the quality of life of patients and their family entourage. It is often frustrating for those affected and for the therapists due to its evolution quite unpredictable and the mixed response to the few validated therapies. Investment in research originate almost exclusively from voluntary associations of patients, which need to be known and supported.

  16. EVALUATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ANDROGENETIC ALOPECIA AND DEMODEX INFESTATION

    PubMed Central

    Zari, Javidi; Abdolmajid, Fata; Masood, Maleki; Vahid, Mashayekhi; Yalda, Nahidi

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is one of the most common dermatologic disorders with a multifactorial etiology. Inflammatory activators such as Demodex infestation may play a role in the pathogenesis of some cases of androgenetic alopecia that do not respond to common treatments such as minoxidil and finasteride. The goal of this study is to evaluate the relationship between Demodex infestation and AGA. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study, 41 patients with AGA referred to the Dermatology Clinic of Imam Reza Hospital and 33 healthy individuals were evaluated as control. All of them were between 20 and 40 years old men. In order to identify Demodex infestation they were referred to the Parasitology laboratory. Results: Demodex was detected in 19.5% of patients and 15.2% of controls; therefore, there was no significant relationship between them statistically (P = 0.0787). Most of patients (85.4%) had greasy hair. The most common pattern of baldness was II degree in Hamilton scale. Conclusion: There is no relation between AGA and Demodex. PMID:19881989

  17. Serum Vitamin D in patients with alopecia areata

    PubMed Central

    Bakry, Ola Ahmed; El Farargy, Shawky M; El Shafiee, Maathir K; Soliman, Amira

    2016-01-01

    Background: Alopecia areata (AA) is a common, recurrent, autoimmune hair disorder. It has been found that vitamin D deficiency is associated with many autoimmune diseases. Aims: The current study aimed to estimate serum levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D in patients with AA. Materials and Methods: This case–control study included 60 patients with AA and 60 age, gender, skin phototype, and body mass index-matched healthy subjects as a control group. Levels of serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D were estimated using ELISA technique. Results: Serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels were significantly lower in AA cases when compared with healthy controls (P < 0.001). The least values were significantly associated with alopecia totalis/universalis compared with patchy AA (P < 0.001) and ophiasis (P = 0.04). Severe AA showed significantly the lowest vitamin D levels compared with cases with mild (P = 0.002) and moderate disease (P = 0.03). A significant inverse correlation was found between 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels and age of the patients (r = −0.38; P = 0.03). There was no significant association between serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels and gender, disease duration, disease recurrence, nail affection, duration of sun exposure/day, or positive family history of AA. Conclusion: AA patients have lower levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D than healthy subjects. More studies are required to assess the value of vitamin D supplementation in the treatment of that disease. PMID:27730032

  18. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gowdie, Peter J; Tse, Shirley M L

    2012-04-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) encompasses a complex group of disorders with arthritis as a common feature. This article provides the pediatrician with a review of the epidemiology, classification, clinical manifestations, and complications of JIA. It also provides an update on the current understanding of the cause of JIA and recent developments in management and a recent review of the long-term outcome in JIA.

  19. Fibromyalgia and Myofascial Pain Syndrome-A Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Chandola, H C; Chakraborty, Arunangshu

    2009-01-01

    Summary Pain and fatigue associated to the musculoskeletal system are among the leading causes of patients to visit their physicians and nearly one-third of such patients suffer from fibromyalgia. Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a chronic debilitating disorder characterized by widespread pain with tenderness in specific areas, leading to fatigue, headache and sleep disorder. Myofascial Pain Syndrome (MPS), is also a localized musculoskeletal pain producing condition whose diagnostic and management criteria differ from FMS but still considered by many only a subtype of FMS. Till date no exact cause has been held responsible for these painful conditions, therefore treatment of these disorders is always a challenge. The therapies are not precise but multimodal including pharmacological and alternative approaches. This article describes the existing knowledge pertaining to these conditions in regard of causative factors diagnosis and management. PMID:20640108

  20. The role of antipsychotics in the management of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Calandre, Elena P; Rico-Villademoros, Fernando

    2012-02-01

    Fibromyalgia is a syndrome characterized by chronic generalized pain associated with different somatic symptoms, such as sleep disturbances, fatigue, stiffness, balance problems, hypersensitivity to physical and psychological environmental stimuli, depression and anxiety. It has been estimated to affect roughly the 2-4% of the general population in most countries studied, and it has been shown to be much more prevalent in women than in men. Although its pathophysiology is not yet fully understood, it is known that both genetic and environmental factors are involved in its development. Fibromyalgia shares a high degree of co-morbidity with other conditions, including chronic headache, temporomandibular disorder, irritable bowel syndrome, major depression, anxiety disorders and chronic fatigue syndrome. Therefore, this is a syndrome difficult to treat for which multimodal treatments including physical exercise, psychological therapies and pharmacological treatment are recommended. Although different kinds of drugs have been studied for the treatment of fibromyalgia, the most widely used drugs that have the higher degree of evidence for efficacy include the α(2)δ ligands pregabalin and gabapentin, and the tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) and serotonin noradrenaline (norepinephrine) reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). However, there is a need to look for newer additional therapeutic pharmacological options for the treatment of this complex and disabling disease. First- and second-generation antipsychotics have shown analgesic properties both in an experimental setting and in humans, although most of the available evidence for the treatment of human pain concerns older antipsychotics and involves clinical trials performed several decades ago. In addition, several second-generation antipsychotics, risperidone, olanzapine and quetiapine, have shown efficacy in the treatment of some anxiety disorders. Some second-generation antipsychotics, mainly quetiapine, aripiprazole and

  1. Adjudication of fibromyalgia syndrome: Challenges in the medicolegal arena

    PubMed Central

    Fitzcharles, Mary-Ann; Ste-Marie, Peter A; Mailis, Angela; Shir, Yoram

    2014-01-01

    The medicolegal challenges surrounding fibromyalgia (FM) arise from the subjectivity of symptoms, causal attribution and reported symptoms sufficiently severe to cause disablement. In the present article, the authors have endeavoured to provide clarification of some current issues by referencing the current literature, including the 2012 Canadian Fibromyalgia Guidelines. While FM is accepted as a valid condition, its diagnosis is vulnerable to misuse due to the subjectivity of symptoms. Without a defining cause, a physical or psychological event may be alleged to trigger FM, but adjudication of causation must be prudent. Although some individuals may experience severe symptoms, the prevalent societal concept of disablement due to FM must be tempered with the knowledge that working contributes to psychosocial wellbeing. Evidence provided in the present report may assist the courts in reaching decisions concerning FM. PMID:25479148

  2. Juvenile Fibromyalgia: Different from the Adult Chronic Pain Syndrome?

    PubMed

    Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; King, Christopher; Ting, Tracy V; Arnold, Lesley M

    2016-04-01

    While a majority of research has focused on adult fibromyalgia (FM), recent evidence has provided insights into the presence and impact of FM in children and adolescents. Commonly referred as juvenile fibromyalgia (JFM), youths, particularly adolescent girls, present with persistent widespread pain and cardinal symptoms observed in adult FM. A majority of youth with JFM continue to experience symptoms into adulthood, which highlights the importance of early recognition and intervention. Some differences are observed between adult and juvenile-onset FM syndrome with regard to comorbidities (e.g., joint hypermobility is common in JFM). Psychological comorbidities are common but less severe in JFM. Compared to adult FM, approved pharmacological treatments for JFM are lacking, but non-pharmacologic approaches (e.g., cognitive-behavioral therapy and exercise) show promise. A number of conceptual issues still remain including (1) directly comparing similarities and differences in symptoms and (2) identifying shared and unique mechanisms underlying FM in adults and youths. PMID:26984803

  3. Bayesian analysis of factors associated with fibromyalgia syndrome subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayawardana, Veroni; Mondal, Sumona; Russek, Leslie

    2015-01-01

    Factors contributing to movement-related fear were assessed by Russek, et al. 2014 for subjects with Fibromyalgia (FM) based on the collected data by a national internet survey of community-based individuals. The study focused on the variables, Activities-Specific Balance Confidence scale (ABC), Primary Care Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder screen (PC-PTSD), Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (TSK), a Joint Hypermobility Syndrome screen (JHS), Vertigo Symptom Scale (VSS-SF), Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder (OCPD), Pain, work status and physical activity dependent from the "Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire" (FIQR). The study presented in this paper revisits same data with a Bayesian analysis where appropriate priors were introduced for variables selected in the Russek's paper.

  4. Fibromyalgia at an Educational Facility--Is There a Link to Indoor Air Quality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Emily J.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses whether it is biologically plausible for an environmental laboratory contaminant to cause fibromyalgia. Presents a study of two populations which indicated that fibromyalgia was occurring at an elevated rate in a building where ventilation was deemed inadequate for laboratory activities. (Author/WRM)

  5. Psychological factors mediate key symptoms of fibromyalgia through their influence on stress.

    PubMed

    Malin, Katrina; Littlejohn, Geoffrey Owen

    2016-09-01

    The clinical features of fibromyalgia are associated with various psychological factors, including stress. We examined the hypothesis that the path that psychological factors follow in influencing fibromyalgia symptoms is through their direct effect on stress. Ninety-eight females with ACR 1990 classified fibromyalgia completed the following questionnaires: The Big 5 Personality Inventory, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, Perceived Stress Scale, Profile of Mood States, Mastery Scale, and Perceived Control of Internal States Scale. SPSS (PASW version 22) was used to perform basic t tests, means, and standard deviations to show difference between symptom characteristics. Pathway analysis using structural equation modelling (Laavan) examined the effect of stress on the relationships between psychological factors and the elements that define the fibromyalgia phenotype. The preferred model showed that the identified path clearly linked the psychological variables of anxiety, neuroticism and mastery, but not internal control, to the three key elements of fibromyalgia, namely pain, fatigue and sleep (p < 0.001), via the person's perceived stress. Confusion, however, did not fit the preferred model. This study confirms that stress is a necessary link in the pathway between certain identified, established and significant psychological factors and key fibromyalgia symptoms. This has implications for the understanding of contributing mechanisms and the clinical care of patients with fibromyalgia.

  6. Psychological factors mediate key symptoms of fibromyalgia through their influence on stress.

    PubMed

    Malin, Katrina; Littlejohn, Geoffrey Owen

    2016-09-01

    The clinical features of fibromyalgia are associated with various psychological factors, including stress. We examined the hypothesis that the path that psychological factors follow in influencing fibromyalgia symptoms is through their direct effect on stress. Ninety-eight females with ACR 1990 classified fibromyalgia completed the following questionnaires: The Big 5 Personality Inventory, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, Perceived Stress Scale, Profile of Mood States, Mastery Scale, and Perceived Control of Internal States Scale. SPSS (PASW version 22) was used to perform basic t tests, means, and standard deviations to show difference between symptom characteristics. Pathway analysis using structural equation modelling (Laavan) examined the effect of stress on the relationships between psychological factors and the elements that define the fibromyalgia phenotype. The preferred model showed that the identified path clearly linked the psychological variables of anxiety, neuroticism and mastery, but not internal control, to the three key elements of fibromyalgia, namely pain, fatigue and sleep (p < 0.001), via the person's perceived stress. Confusion, however, did not fit the preferred model. This study confirms that stress is a necessary link in the pathway between certain identified, established and significant psychological factors and key fibromyalgia symptoms. This has implications for the understanding of contributing mechanisms and the clinical care of patients with fibromyalgia. PMID:27245234

  7. Chronic Pain Syndromes in Gynaecological Practice: Endometriosis and Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Siedentopf, F.

    2012-01-01

    As gynaecologists frequently function as “general practitioners” for women, gynaecologists are frequently confronted with questions which initially appear to have only a tenuous connection to their field. Chronic pain syndromes represent a particular challenge, especially as pain syndromes are often associated with severe psychosocial stress for the affected woman. This article discusses some of the psychometric aspects of chronic pain in endometriosis and fibromyalgia together with practical therapeutic approaches. PMID:26640283

  8. Amisulpride in the treatment of fibromyalgia: an uncontrolled study.

    PubMed

    Rico-Villademoros, Fernando; Rodriguez-Lopez, Carmen Maria; Morillas-Arques, Piedad; Vilchez, Juan S; Hidalgo, Javier; Calandre, Elena P

    2012-09-01

    Some antipsychotics, including amisulpride, have shown to be effective in the treatment of various painful conditions, lessening pain as well as symptoms of anxiety and/or depression. In this open-label, 12-week study, we explored the efficacy and tolerability of amisulpride in patients with fibromyalgia. We recruited 40 patients, 1 male and 39 females, aged 46.2 ± 6.8 years, who met the ACR criteria for fibromyalgia and had a score equal to or greater than 4 in the pain severity item of the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ). Amisulpride was added to their current treatment regimen at an initial dose of 25 mg/day and titrated according to the clinical response and tolerability (mean final dose, 87.5 ± 41.3 mg/day). In the intent-to-treat analysis (i.e., all recruited patients), using a baseline-observation-carried-forward approach, the mean score in the FIQ decreased from 75.7 ± 10.6 to 73.2 ± 15.4, but this change was not statistically significant. Pain severity, as measured with the visual analogue scale from the FIQ, remained unchanged. Nonsignificant improvements were observed in depressive or anxiety symptoms using the Beck Depression Inventory and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, respectively. Twenty-six patients either withdrew from the study, mainly due to adverse reactions, or were lost to follow-up (n = 11, 27.5 %, for each category). Despite its promising results in some chronic painful conditions and in a related illness, such as chronic fatigue syndrome, amisulpride does not seem to provide any benefit to patients with fibromyalgia. Amisulpride was poorly tolerated by our participants.

  9. [Diagnostic rationalism. Views of general practitioners on fibromyalgia].

    PubMed

    Daehli, B

    1993-09-20

    Clinical practice is characterized by having to make numerous important decisions, including the diagnosis. In this study, general practitioners were asked to agree or to disagree with statements of fibromyalgia. The main purpose was to test the usefulness of two well-known models for decision-making when studying diagnosis in cases of uncertainty and scepticism. The results show that the models are inadequate to explain the decisions.

  10. Evaluation of treatments for myofascial pain syndrome and fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Rudin, Nathan J

    2003-12-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) and fibromyalgia (FM) are complex conditions and pose significant challenges to clinicians and patients. This chapter explores available treatments for MPS and FM in the context of pathophysiology, clinical evidence, and experimental support. This information may prove to be helpful in designing individualized treatment for patients with these complex syndromes. New treatments should be critically and carefully evaluated as they appear.

  11. Concomitance of fibromyalgia syndrome and cervical disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Güler, Mustafa; Aydın, Teoman; Akgöl, Erdal; Taşpınar, Özgür

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and cervical disc herniation (CDH) are a common diseases commonly encountered in physical therapy clinics. There are also patients who have both of these diseases. In this study we aim to investigated whether FMS is a risk factor for cervical disc herniation and the frequency of their coincident occurrence. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-five patients having a primary FMS diagnosis according to the American Rheumatism Association criteria are taken into consideration and a control group were the subjects of this study. The two groups were compared with respect to cervical disc hernia using cervical region MRI. [Results] The distribution of disc hernia of 6 fibromyalgia patients who had cervical discopathy was: 16.6% C2-3, 16.6% C5-6, 16.6% C6-7, 33.3% C4-5, C5-6 (two levels in two patients) and 16.6% C4-5, C5-6, C7-1 (three levels in one patient) . The herniation directions were given as: central in 5 levels, right paramedian in 1 level, and left paramedian disc hernia in 1 level. There were 4 cervical disk hernia in the control group. The herniation direction were central in two, right paramedian in one, and left paramedian in one patient. [Conclusion] In this study, the existence of cervical disc herniation in fibromyalgia patients was found to be not different from the normal population. PMID:25931731

  12. Concomitance of fibromyalgia syndrome and cervical disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Güler, Mustafa; Aydın, Teoman; Akgöl, Erdal; Taşpınar, Özgür

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and cervical disc herniation (CDH) are a common diseases commonly encountered in physical therapy clinics. There are also patients who have both of these diseases. In this study we aim to investigated whether FMS is a risk factor for cervical disc herniation and the frequency of their coincident occurrence. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-five patients having a primary FMS diagnosis according to the American Rheumatism Association criteria are taken into consideration and a control group were the subjects of this study. The two groups were compared with respect to cervical disc hernia using cervical region MRI. [Results] The distribution of disc hernia of 6 fibromyalgia patients who had cervical discopathy was: 16.6% C2–3, 16.6% C5–6, 16.6% C6–7, 33.3% C4–5, C5–6 (two levels in two patients) and 16.6% C4–5, C5–6, C7–1 (three levels in one patient) . The herniation directions were given as: central in 5 levels, right paramedian in 1 level, and left paramedian disc hernia in 1 level. There were 4 cervical disk hernia in the control group. The herniation direction were central in two, right paramedian in one, and left paramedian in one patient. [Conclusion] In this study, the existence of cervical disc herniation in fibromyalgia patients was found to be not different from the normal population. PMID:25931731

  13. Juvenile fibromyalgia in an adolescent patient with sickle cell disease presenting with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Ramprakash, Stalin; Fishman, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Juvenile fibromyalgia in children with sickle cell disease has not been reported in the literature. We report an adolescent patient with sickle cell whose pain symptoms progressed from having recurrent acute sickle cell pain crisis episodes to a chronic pain syndrome over several years. He was eventually diagnosed with juvenile fibromyalgia based on the clinical history and myofascial tender points and his pain symptoms responded better to multidisciplinary strategies for chronic fibromyalgia pain. Chronic pain in sickle cell disease is an area of poor research, and in addition there is inconsistency in the definition of chronic pain in sickle cell disease. Central sensitisation to pain is shown to occur after recurrent painful stimuli in a genetically vulnerable individual. In a chronic pain condition such as fibromyalgia central sensitisation is thought to play a key role. Fibromyalgia should be considered as one of the main differential diagnosis in any sickle cell patient with chronic pain.

  14. The prevalence of fibromyalgia syndrome in a group of patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yanmaz, Muyesser Nergiz; Mert, Meral; Korkmaz, Müge

    2012-04-01

    We have studied the prevalence of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Relationship with disease control of DM and the presence of FMS was also evaluated. We have studied 93 consecutive patients with DM (85 with type 2 DM and 8 patients with type 1 DM) followed in Diabetes Center. Single researcher took the history and did physical examination including manual tender point examination according to Manual Tender Point Survey instructions. For the diagnosis of FMS, 1990 American College of Rheumatology Classification Criteria for FMS was used. We measured patients' fasting blood sugar levels and HbA1c levels around the same time period. Patients were excluded from the study if they had any other serious disease, and if there was any history of drug use that interferes with the symptoms of FMS. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were accepted as controls. FMS was found in 18% of patients with DM type 2 (no patients with FMS in type 1 DM group), in 34% of patients with RA. Female patients with DM type 2 had significantly higher FMS rates. Mean fasting blood sugar levels and mean HbA1c levels were not significantly different between type 2 DM patients with FMS and DM patients without FMS. In RA group, in RA patients without FMS, the use of steroids was significantly higher. We have found an increased prevalence rate of FMS in patients with DM type 2 and RA. There was no correlation between the prevalence rate of FMS and good DM disease control. PMID:21221595

  15. The Use of Polysymptomatic Distress Categories in the Evaluation of Fibromyalgia (FM) and FM Severity

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Frederick; Walitt, Brian T.; Rasker, Johannes J.; Katz, Robert S.; Hauser, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Objective The polysymptomatic distress (PSD) scale is derived from variables used in the 2010 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) fibromyalgia (FM) criteria modified for survey and clinical research. The scale is useful in measuring the effect of PSD over the full range of pain-related clinical symptoms, not just in those who are FM criteria-positive. However, no PSD scale categories have been defined to distinguish severity of illness in FM or in those who do not satisfy the FM criteria. We analyzed the scale and multiple covariates to develop clinical categories and to further validate the scale. Methods FM was diagnosed according to the research criteria modification of the 2010 ACR FM criteria. We investigated categories in a large database of patients with pain (2732 with rheumatoid arthritis) and developed categories by using germane clinic variables that had been previously studied for severity groupings. By definition, FM cannot be diagnosed unless PSD is at least 12. Results Based on population categories, regression analysis, and inspections of curvilinear relationships, we established PSD severity categories of none (0–3), mild (4–7), moderate (8–11), severe (12–19), and very severe (20–31). Categories were statistically distinct, and a generally linear relationship between PSD categories and covariate severity was noted. Conclusion PSD categories are clinically relevant and demonstrate FM type symptoms over the full range of clinical illness. Although FM criteria can be clinically useful, there is no clear-cut symptom distinction between FM (+) and FM (−), and PSD categories can aid in more effectively classifying patients. PMID:26077414

  16. Integrated review of the association of cytokines with fibromyalgia and fibromyalgia core symptoms.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Victoria; Lyon, Debra E

    2010-04-01

    Fibromyalgia (FMS) is a chronic widespread pain (CWP) and fatigue syndrome that affects three to six million adults in the United States. Core symptoms of FMS include pain, fatigue, and mood and sleep disturbances. To date, consensus has not been reached among researchers regarding the pathogenesis of FMS nor the specific role of cytokine activation on the neuroendocrine-immune response patterns in persons with FMS. The purpose of this article is to describe and synthesize the results of research studies focused on the relationship between cytokines and FMS and among cytokines and core symptoms of FMS. There is some support in the literature for relationships among FMS symptoms and cytokines; however, there are discrepant findings related to whether proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines are elevated or reduced in persons with FMS and whether their levels correlate with the core symptoms of this disorder. Although the use of cytokine biomarkers must be considered exploratory at this time due to the lack of consistent empirical findings, biobehavioral research focused on understanding the relationship of FMS with cytokines may lead to a better understanding of this complex syndrome. This knowledge may ultimately contribute to the development of interventions for symptom management that address not only the symptom manifestation but also a biological mediator of symptoms.

  17. Psychological Resilience, Affective Mechanisms and Symptom Burden in a Tertiary-care Sample of Patients with Fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Samantha J; Vincent, Ann; Hassett, Afton L; Whipple, Mary O; Oh, Terry H; Benzo, Roberto P; Toussaint, Loren L

    2015-10-01

    Research demonstrates that patients with fibromyalgia who have higher positive and lower negative affect have lower symptom burden. Affect has been shown to be associated with resilience. This study examined the relationship between affect, resilience and fibromyalgia symptom burden in a clinical sample of patients with fibromyalgia. We hypothesized that (a) positive and negative affect would be associated with fibromyalgia symptom burden; (b) resilience would be associated with positive and negative affect; (c) resilience would be associated with fibromyalgia symptom burden; and (d) the connection between resilience and fibromyalgia symptom burden would be mediated by both positive and negative affect. A sample of 858 patients with fibromyalgia completed questionnaires. Mediation modelling revealed statistically significant direct effects of resilience on fibromyalgia symptom burden (β = -0.10, P < 0.001) and statistically significant indirect effects of resilience on fibromyalgia symptom burden through affect (β = -0.36, P < 0.001), suggesting that both resilience and affect influence fibromyalgia symptom burden. Our results suggest that improving affect through resiliency training could be studied as a modality for improving fibromyalgia symptom burden.

  18. Physical Activity and Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Contact our Patient Navigators for free and confidential ...

  19. Potential Involvement of the Stem Cell Factor Receptor c-kit in Alopecia Areata and Androgenetic Alopecia: Histopathological, Immunohistochemical, and Semiquantitative Investigations

    PubMed Central

    Ashrafuzzaman, Md.; Yamamoto, Tomoko; Shibata, Noriyuki; Hirayama, Takeshi Thomas; Kobayashi, Makio

    2010-01-01

    Alopecia areata (AAR) and androgenetic alopecia (AGA) are two major forms of alopecia based on altered hair growth condition. In general, the cell cycle is regulated by several mechanisms including the stem cell factor/c-kit signaling. To assess a role for stem cell activity in alopecia, we performed histopathological, immunohistochemical, and semiquantitative analyses of c-kit as well as Ki-67 in scalp biopsy specimens obtained from 14 patients with AAR, 18 patients with AGA, and 6 age-matched control subjects, using the specific antibodies. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded skin sections were examined. Immunoreactivities for Ki-67 and c-kit were localized in keratinocytes and melanocytes in the outermost layer of hair follicles. The mean length of hair follicles was significantly shorter in the AAR and AGA groups than in the control group. The mean number of Ki-67-immunoreactive cells per follicle was significantly reduced in the AAR and AGA groups as compared with the control group. The mean number of c-kit-immunoreactive cells per follicle was significantly increased in the AAR and AGA groups as compared with the control group. Our results indicate that c-kit is upregulated in the hair follicle cells in these forms of alopecia, and suggest that the upregulation reflects a negative feedback mechanism in response to possible downregulation of the ligand stem cell factor. PMID:20300219

  20. The relationship between disease activity, sleep, psychiatric distress and pain sensitivity in rheumatoid arthritis: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Despite recent advances in anti-inflammatory therapy, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients continue to rate pain as a priority. The etiology of RA pain is likely multifactorial, including both inflammatory and non-inflammatory components. In this study, we examine the association between disease activity, sleep, psychiatric distress and pain sensitivity in RA. Methods Fifty-nine female RA patients completed questionnaires and underwent pressure pain threshold testing to assess hyperalgesia/allodynia at joint and non-joint sites. Blood samples were taken to measure C-reactive protein (CRP). The association between disease activity, sleep problems, psychiatric distress and pain threshold was assessed using Pearson/Spearman correlations and multivariable linear regression. Disease activity levels, sleep problems and psychiatric distress were compared between RA patients with fibromyalgia and RA patients without fibromyalgia. Results In unadjusted analyses, CRP was not correlated with pain threshold, but tender joint count was inversely correlated with pain threshold at all sites (P ≤ 0.004). Sleep problems were associated with low pain threshold at all sites (P ≤ 0.0008). Psychiatric distress was associated with low pain threshold at the wrist and thumbnail (P ≤ 0.006). In multivariable linear regression models, CRP was inversely associated with wrist pain threshold (P = 0.003). Sleep problems were inversely associated with pain threshold at all sites (P ≤ 0.01), but psychiatric distress was not. Despite differences in pain threshold, CRP levels and sleep problems between RA patients with fibromyalgia and those without fibromyalgia, associations between these variables did not change when patients with fibromyalgia were excluded. Conclusions Multivariable models are essential in analyses of pain. Among RA patients, inflammation is associated with heightened pain sensitivity at joints. In contrast, poor sleep is associated with diffuse pain

  1. Platelet-rich Plasma as a Potential Treatment for Noncicatricial Alopecias

    PubMed Central

    Maria-Angeliki, Gkini; Alexandros-Efstratios, Kouskoukis; Dimitris, Rigopoulos; Konstantinos, Kouskoukis

    2015-01-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) and alopecia areata (AA) are common hair loss disorders affecting both men and women. Despite available therapeutic options, search for new, more effective treatment is constant. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) could be effective in promoting hair growth: (1) To present PRP and its mechanism of action in promoting hair growth and (2) to evaluate its preparation methods and its therapeutic potential in noncicatrial alopecias in a systematic review. An international bibliography search, through five databases, was conducted to find articles regarding PRP's action on hair loss. Growth factors in platelets’ granules of PRP bind in the bulge area of hair follicle, promoting hair growth. In our systematic review, 14 articles matched our criteria, including 12 articles for AGA and two for AA. PRP is a potential useful therapeutic tool for alopecias, without major adverse effects. Nevertheless, due to the small number of conducted trials, further studies are required to investigate its efficacy. PMID:26180449

  2. Illness perception and fibromyalgia impact on female patients from Spain and the Netherlands: do cultural differences exist?

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Montero, Pedro J; Van Wilgen, C Paul; Segura-Jiménez, Victor; Carbonell-Baeza, Ana; Delgado-Fernández, Manuel

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the differences in illness perception and overall impact on fibromyalgia females from Spain and the Netherlands. A total of 325 fibromyalgia females from Spain (54.3 ± 7.1 years) and the Netherlands (51.8 ± 7.2 years) participated in the study. Illness perception and impact of fibromyalgia were assessed by the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire and the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, respectively. Spanish fibromyalgia females perceived more symptoms related to their fibromyalgia (identity) such as nausea, breathlessness, wheezing or fatigue (P < 0.001) and had greater emotional representation (P < 0.01). Dutch fibromyalgia females experienced less timeline (acute/chronic) and consequences (all, P < 0.05), had a better cyclical timeline, personal control, treatment control and illness coherence (all, P < 0.001). Spanish fibromyalgia females reported higher impact of fibromyalgia than Dutch females (61.2 + 14.8 vs. 54.9 + 16.4, respectively; P < 0.001), but the effect size was small (Cohen's d = 0.41) . Impact of fibromyalgia and negative views of fibromyalgia were higher in Spanish fibromyalgia females, whereas Dutch fibromyalgia females presented higher score of positive beliefs about the controllability of the illness. Psychological interventions which help patients to cope with their illness perception might lead to an improvement of the impact of the disease on fibromyalgia females. PMID:25969339

  3. Illness perception and fibromyalgia impact on female patients from Spain and the Netherlands: do cultural differences exist?

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Montero, Pedro J; Van Wilgen, C Paul; Segura-Jiménez, Victor; Carbonell-Baeza, Ana; Delgado-Fernández, Manuel

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the differences in illness perception and overall impact on fibromyalgia females from Spain and the Netherlands. A total of 325 fibromyalgia females from Spain (54.3 ± 7.1 years) and the Netherlands (51.8 ± 7.2 years) participated in the study. Illness perception and impact of fibromyalgia were assessed by the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire and the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, respectively. Spanish fibromyalgia females perceived more symptoms related to their fibromyalgia (identity) such as nausea, breathlessness, wheezing or fatigue (P < 0.001) and had greater emotional representation (P < 0.01). Dutch fibromyalgia females experienced less timeline (acute/chronic) and consequences (all, P < 0.05), had a better cyclical timeline, personal control, treatment control and illness coherence (all, P < 0.001). Spanish fibromyalgia females reported higher impact of fibromyalgia than Dutch females (61.2 + 14.8 vs. 54.9 + 16.4, respectively; P < 0.001), but the effect size was small (Cohen's d = 0.41) . Impact of fibromyalgia and negative views of fibromyalgia were higher in Spanish fibromyalgia females, whereas Dutch fibromyalgia females presented higher score of positive beliefs about the controllability of the illness. Psychological interventions which help patients to cope with their illness perception might lead to an improvement of the impact of the disease on fibromyalgia females.

  4. Aeromonas hydrophila septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Danaher, Patrick J; Mueller, William P

    2011-12-01

    Septic arthritis is a serious, life and limb threatening infection. If suspected, empiric treatment must begin immediately and account for the most likely pathogens. Eight days following left knee arthroscopic surgery, a 51-year-old active duty male spent approximately 1 hour driving a personal watercraft on Okaloosa Bay near the Gulf of Mexico. Eight days later, he presented to the emergency room with septic arthritis of that knee. Fluid aspirated from the joint yielded Aeromonas hydrophila. The infection resolved with surgical drainage and 21 days of levofloxacin. A. hydrophila is a rare cause of septic arthritis, and reported cases have involved exposure to water after trauma to the affected joint. Many U.S. military bases are located in coastal areas and military members frequently participate in activities which compromise skin integrity and place them at increased risk for contracting waterborne infections. We present the ninth case of A. hydrophila septic arthritis described in the English language literature, highlight the importance of considering this pathogen in at-risk populations, and review the diagnosis and management of septic arthritis.

  5. Single Lesion of Sarcoidosis Presenting as Cicatricial Alopecia: A Rare Report from India

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Aparajita; Sengupta, Sujata; Coondoo, Arijit; Gharami, Ramesh Chandra

    2014-01-01

    Sarcoidosis affects different systems of the body including the skin where it can affect various cutaneous sites. Among these sites, the scalp is a very unusual location for lesions of sarcoidosis. Sarcoidosis of the scalp can very rarely be accompanied by cicatricial alopecia. We report here a rare case of sarcoidosis of scalp with cicatricial alopecia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such report from India. PMID:25191039

  6. Diesel oil-induced alopecia in two cats.

    PubMed

    Declercq, Jan; De Bosschere, Hendrik

    2009-04-01

    Two cats were presented for acute onset of rapidly progressive, bilaterally symmetrical hair loss of the ventrum and limbs. Alopecia occurred within 2 weeks after accidental skin exposure to diesel oil. The remaining hair epilated easily in affected areas. Denuded skin was strikingly dry and had adherent scale. Erythema and demarcation between affected and normal skin by a liquid-line were present in one case. Above this line, the hair could not be removed. The head and the footpads were not involved. Systemic signs were not observed. Both cats made a complete recovery without treatment. Histological examination in one cat revealed severe orthokeratotic hyperkeratosis, mild to moderate acanthosis, follicular keratosis, a moderate dermal infiltrate of mast cells and an almost complete absence of sebaceous glands. If skin contact with diesel oil occurs in a cat, thorough washing of skin and haircoat after soaking in prue vegetable oil is recommended.

  7. Alopecia areata in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: an overview.

    PubMed

    Sobolewska-Włodarczyk, Aleksandra; Włodarczyk, Marcin; Fichna, Jakub; Wiśniewska-Jarosińska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is one of the most common causes of non-scarring hair loss, which is associated with the premature induction of hair follicle regression. The pathogenesis of AA is unknown, although it is believed that a complicated autoimmune mechanism with Th1 lymphocytes and proinfammatory cytokines, such as IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1 and IL-2, may be involved. AA may occur as a single disease entity or coexist with other autoimmunological disorders. In some cases the relationship with infammatory bowel disease (IBD) was observed and the link between molecular pathways and main proinfammatory cytokines in IBD and AA has been suggested. AA is also described in literature as a side efect of biological therapy with the anti-TNF-α agents. To address the association between AA and IBD, in this review we discuss the most relevant clinical studies and case reports found in MEDLINE, Pubmed and EMBASE. PMID:27513834

  8. Eosinophilic Esophagitis: Another Atopy-Related Alopecia Areata Trigger?

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Omer; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Piliang, Melissa

    2015-11-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is associated with atopy in 10-22% of patients, twice the prevalence in the general population. Patients can present with concomitant atopic dermatitis, hay fever, asthma, and even allergies to dust mites. In many cases, severity and flares of these atopic diatheses correlate with severity of AA. Herein we present a patient with AA affected by contemporaneous eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). EoE is a recently recognized allergic disorder, mediated by eosiniphils and histamine. It is characterized by esophageal dysfunction and intraepithelial microabscesses. We propose that EoE be considered as a condition falling within the realm of atopic diseases, and a potential trigger of AA in affected patients.

  9. Effect of Citrullus colocynthis Schrad fruits on testosterone-induced alopecia.

    PubMed

    Dhanotia, Renuka; Chauhan, Nagendra Singh; Saraf, Dinesh K; Dixit, Vinod K

    2011-09-01

    Alopecia is a psychologically distressing phenomenon. Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is the most common form of alopecia, which affects millions of men and women worldwide, and is an androgen driven disorder. Here, the Citrullus colocynthis Schrad fruit is evaluated for hair growth activity in androgen-induced alopecia. Petroleum ether extract of C. colocynthis was applied topically for its hair growth-promoting activity. Alopecia was induced in albino mice by testosterone administration intramuscularly for 21 days. Its inhibition by simultaneous administration of extract was evaluated using follicular density, anagen/telogen (A/T) ratio and microscopic observation of skin sections. Finasteride (5α-reductase inhibitor) solution was applied topically and served as positive control. Petroleum ether extract of C. colocynthis exhibited promising hair growth-promoting activity, as reflected from follicular density, A/T ratio and skin sections. The treatment was also successful in bringing a greater number of hair follicles in anagenic phase than the standard finasteride. The result of treatment with 2 and 5% petroleum ether extracts were comparable to the positive control finasteride. The petroleum ether extract of C. colocynthis and its isolate is useful in the treatment of androgen-induced alopecia.

  10. Dermatoglyphics in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, Roopa; Shubha, R; Nagesh, H V; Johnson, Job; Rajangam, Sayee

    2003-10-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have been referred to Division of Human Genetics for counselling. Qualitative dermatoglyphics comprising of finger print pattern, interdigital pattern, hypothenar pattern and palmar crease were studied on 26 female and 11 male rheumatoid arthritis patients. Comparison between patient male and control male; and patient female and control female has been done. 'Chi' square test was performed. In male patients, with hands together, arches were increased, loops/ whorls were decreased. Partial Simian crease was significantly increased. In the right hand, patterns were increased in the 3rd interdigital area. On the other hand, in female patients there was a significant increase in whorls and decrease in loops on the first finger on both the hands, increase in arches on the 3rd finger; both arches and whorls on the 4th finger of left hand. Present study has emphasized that dermatoglyphics could be applied as a diagnostic tool to patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  11. Pressure-induced alopecia in pediatric patients following prolonged urological surgeries: The case reports and a review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Khokhar, Rashid Saeed; Baaj, Jumana; Alhazmi, Hamdan Hammad Ayed; Dammas, Fatima Al; Aldalati, Alaa M. Z.

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative alopecia has been reported as a rare complication after prolonged immobilization during general anesthesia. The constant pressure on the scalp is causative and may be exacerbated by hypoxemia or hypotension. There is a correlation between the length surgery duration under anesthesia and the development of permanent alopecia. Regular head turning schedules and vigilance for the condition should be used as prophylaxis to prevent permanent alopecia. PMID:26712991

  12. Glucocorticoids and Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Joana Fonseca; Ahmed Mohamed, Alaa Abdelkhalik; Emery, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) were discovered in the 1940s and were administered for the first time to patients with rheumatoid arthritis in 1948. However, side effects were subsequently reported. In the last 7 decades, the mechanisms of action for both therapeutic properties and side effects have been elucidated. Mechanisms for minimizing side effects were also developed. GCs are the most frequently used class of drugs in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis because of their efficacy in relieving symptoms and their low cost. A review of clinical applications, side effects, and drug interactions is presented. PMID:26611549

  13. Psoriatic Arthritis Registries.

    PubMed

    Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo; Varisco, Valentina; Ditto, Maria Chiara; Benucci, Maurizio; Atzeni, Fabiola

    2015-11-01

    The introduction of new biological drugs for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis has led to the creation of a number of registries in Europe and the United States. Most of them are sponsored by national rheumatology societies, and provide information that is useful in clinical practice concerning the clinical characteristics, efficacy, and safety of all licensed biological drugs. Their findings also help to improve our understanding of the quality of life and working ability of patients receiving biological drugs, and suggest methods for allocating resources. However, there are only a few registries for psoriatic arthritis, and efforts should be made to increase their number to obtain further reliable and useful data.

  14. Newer drugs for arthritis.

    PubMed

    McGillivray, D C

    1977-01-01

    The major area of new drug discoveries for the treatment of arthritis is in non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIA). Unfortunately, as yet no new and safe drug of major significance has appeared. Aspirin still ranks high beside the newcomers. Indomethacin, ibuprofen, naproxen, fenoprofen and tolmetin are described and their roles in therapy are discussed. A further group of older drugs receiving new application in the treatment of arthritis is presented. These include penicillamine and the immunosuppressive drugs. Gold and chloroquin are also discussed to put these agents in their proper perspective.

  15. A protocol and pilot study for managing fibromyalgia with yoga and meditation.

    PubMed

    Hennard, Janet

    2011-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic syndrome characterized by widespread pain, sleep disturbance, stiffness, fatigue, headache, and mood disorders. Recent research has resulted in an improved understanding of fibromyalgia and its possible causes. This article highlights some of the current research, discusses a strategy for using yoga and meditation as a therapy for fibromyalgia sufferers, and presents the results of a preliminary 8-week study using yoga and meditation to help manage fibromyalgia symptoms. The study of 11 participants found significant improvement in the overall health status of the participants and in symptoms of stiffness, anxiety, and depression. Significant improvements were also seen in the reported number of days "felt good" and number of days "missed work" because of fibromyalgia. Nonsignificant improvements were seen in measures of pain, fatigue, and how one felt in the morning. Effect sizes were medium to large for most tested areas. This study supports the benefits of yoga and meditation for individuals with fibromyalgia and encourages further research to explore their use as standard therapies for fibromyalgia.

  16. Fibrofog and fibromyalgia: a narrative review and implications for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Kravitz, Howard M; Katz, Robert S

    2015-07-01

    Patients with fibromyalgia often report forgetfulness as well as declines in cognitive function, memory, and mental alertness-symptoms that have been termed "fibrofog" in popular and electronic media as well as in professional literature. "Fibrofog" is the subjectively experienced cognitive dysfunction associated with fibromyalgia and is a clinically important yet comparatively less well-studied aspect of the disorder; it includes loss of mental clarity (mental fogginess) as well as attention and memory impairment. Although until recently cognitive symptoms have been largely ignored, these symptoms can be more disturbing than the widespread pain and can change these patients' lives, sometimes dramatically so. Whereas widespread musculoskeletal pain, tenderness, and fatigue may be the hallmark symptoms of fibromyalgia, patients rank cognitive dysfunction highly in terms of disease impact. This review addresses (1) the prevalence of self-reported cognitive disturbances in fibromyalgia, (2) the clinical presentation of fibrofog, (3) neuropsychological test performance, with particular attention to discrepancies between self-report and test results, (3) clinical correlates of impaired cognitive function in fibromyalgia, (4) neurobiology relevant to cognitive disturbances in fibromyalgia, and (5) clinical management of fibrofog. Although the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia remains an enigma, evidence suggests that it may be a brain disorder, with cognitive deficits ("fibrofog") reflecting disturbed centrally mediated processes.

  17. An insight into the gastrointestinal component of fibromyalgia: clinical manifestations and potential underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Slim, Mahmoud; Calandre, Elena Pita; Rico-Villademoros, Fernando

    2015-03-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is characterized by chronic generalized pain accompanied by a broad symptomatologic spectrum. Besides chronic fatigue, sleep disturbances, headaches and cognitive dysfunction that are extensively described in the literature, a considerable proportion of patients with fibromyalgia experience gastrointestinal symptoms that are commonly overlooked in the studies that are not specifically dedicated to evaluate these manifestations. Nevertheless, various attempts were undertaken to explore the gastrointestinal dimension of fibromyalgia. Several studies have demonstrated an elevated comorbidity of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) among patients with fibromyalgia. Other studies have investigated the frequency of presentation of gastrointestinal symptoms in fibromyalgia in a nonspecific approach describing several gastrointestinal complaints frequently reported by these patients such as abdominal pain, dyspepsia and bowel changes, among others. Several underlying mechanisms that require further investigation could serve as potential explanatory hypotheses for the appearance of such manifestations. These include sensitivity to dietary constituents such as gluten, lactose or FODMAPs or alterations in the brain-gut axis as a result of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth or subclinical enteric infections such as giardiasis. The gastrointestinal component of fibromyalgia constitutes a relevant element of the multidisciplinary pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying fibromyalgia that need to be unveiled, as this would contribute to the adequate designation of relevant treatment alternatives corresponding to these manifestations.

  18. Clinical utility, safety, and efficacy of pregabalin in the treatment of fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Bhusal, Santosh; Diomampo, Sherilyn; Magrey, Marina N

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic debilitating medical syndrome with limited therapeutic options. Pregabalin, an anticonvulsant and α-2-Δ subunit receptor ligand, is one of the anchor drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of fibromyalgia. The drug has shown clinically meaningful benefits across multiple symptom domains of fibromyalgia. Efficacy of pregabalin in fibromyalgia pain has been evaluated in at least five high-quality randomized trials, two long-term extension studies, a meta-analysis, a Cochrane database systematic review, and several post hoc analyses. These studies also hint towards a meaningful benefit on sleep, functioning, quality of life, and work productivity. Side effects of pregabalin, although common, are mild to moderate in intensity. They are noted early during therapy, improve or disappear with dose reduction, and are not usually life- or organ threatening. In most patients, tolerance develops to the most common side effects, dizziness, and somnolence, with time. With close clinical monitoring at initiation or dose titration, pregabalin can be effectively used in primary care setting. Pregabalin is cost saving with long-term use and its cost-effectiveness profile is comparable, if not better, to that of other drugs used in fibromyalgia. In the present era of limited therapeutic options, pregabalin undoubtedly retains its role as one of cardinal drugs used in the treatment of fibromyalgia. This review intends to discuss the clinical utility of pregabalin in the management of fibromyalgia with a focus on efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness. PMID:26937205

  19. An insight into the gastrointestinal component of fibromyalgia: clinical manifestations and potential underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Slim, Mahmoud; Calandre, Elena Pita; Rico-Villademoros, Fernando

    2015-03-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is characterized by chronic generalized pain accompanied by a broad symptomatologic spectrum. Besides chronic fatigue, sleep disturbances, headaches and cognitive dysfunction that are extensively described in the literature, a considerable proportion of patients with fibromyalgia experience gastrointestinal symptoms that are commonly overlooked in the studies that are not specifically dedicated to evaluate these manifestations. Nevertheless, various attempts were undertaken to explore the gastrointestinal dimension of fibromyalgia. Several studies have demonstrated an elevated comorbidity of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) among patients with fibromyalgia. Other studies have investigated the frequency of presentation of gastrointestinal symptoms in fibromyalgia in a nonspecific approach describing several gastrointestinal complaints frequently reported by these patients such as abdominal pain, dyspepsia and bowel changes, among others. Several underlying mechanisms that require further investigation could serve as potential explanatory hypotheses for the appearance of such manifestations. These include sensitivity to dietary constituents such as gluten, lactose or FODMAPs or alterations in the brain-gut axis as a result of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth or subclinical enteric infections such as giardiasis. The gastrointestinal component of fibromyalgia constitutes a relevant element of the multidisciplinary pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying fibromyalgia that need to be unveiled, as this would contribute to the adequate designation of relevant treatment alternatives corresponding to these manifestations. PMID:25119830

  20. Effects of low sleep quality on sexual function, in women with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Amasyali, A S; Taştaban, E; Amasyali, S Y; Turan, Y; Kazan, E; Sari, E; Erol, B; Cengiz, M; Erol, H

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common experience in women with fibromyalgia. However, the physiopathology of this association is unclear. We aimed to evaluate whether sleep disturbance has an influence on sexual function in women with fibromyalgia. Fifty-four sexually active premenopausal women with fibromyalgia were enrolled in the study. The following questionnaires were used: the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Appropriate statistical analyses were used by using SPSS 18. The mean FSFI score was 25.344 ± 6.52 and showed no correlation with age, body mass index, BDI or duration of fibromyalgia. However, a positive correlation between sexual dysfunction and low sleep quality was found (r=0.43; P=0.001). In addition, the median FSFI score was 29.2 (27.2-32.4) in patients with higher sleep quality (PSQI⩽5), whereas it was 21.4 (18.9-25.3) in patients with lower sleep quality (PSQI>5) (P<0.001). There was a positive correlation between sexual dysfunction and symptoms of fibromyalgia as indicated by a higher FIQ score (r=0.37; P=0.006). Sexual dysfunction in female patients with fibromyalgia may be due to low sleep quality. Treatment of the sleep disorder may improve female sexual function. PMID:26581913

  1. Clinical utility, safety, and efficacy of pregabalin in the treatment of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Bhusal, Santosh; Diomampo, Sherilyn; Magrey, Marina N

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic debilitating medical syndrome with limited therapeutic options. Pregabalin, an anticonvulsant and α-2-Δ subunit receptor ligand, is one of the anchor drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of fibromyalgia. The drug has shown clinically meaningful benefits across multiple symptom domains of fibromyalgia. Efficacy of pregabalin in fibromyalgia pain has been evaluated in at least five high-quality randomized trials, two long-term extension studies, a meta-analysis, a Cochrane database systematic review, and several post hoc analyses. These studies also hint towards a meaningful benefit on sleep, functioning, quality of life, and work productivity. Side effects of pregabalin, although common, are mild to moderate in intensity. They are noted early during therapy, improve or disappear with dose reduction, and are not usually life- or organ threatening. In most patients, tolerance develops to the most common side effects, dizziness, and somnolence, with time. With close clinical monitoring at initiation or dose titration, pregabalin can be effectively used in primary care setting. Pregabalin is cost saving with long-term use and its cost-effectiveness profile is comparable, if not better, to that of other drugs used in fibromyalgia. In the present era of limited therapeutic options, pregabalin undoubtedly retains its role as one of cardinal drugs used in the treatment of fibromyalgia. This review intends to discuss the clinical utility of pregabalin in the management of fibromyalgia with a focus on efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness.

  2. Application of the Diagnostic Evaluation for Alopecia in Traditional Veterinary Species to Laboratory Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Luchins, Kerith R; Baker, Kate C; Gilbert, Margaret H; Blanchard, James L; Liu, David Xianhong; Myers, Leann; Bohm, Rudolf P

    2011-01-01

    Alopecia in nonhuman primates in the biomedical research setting is often attributed to compromised psychologic wellbeing. Behavioral causes, mainly hair plucking, have become the unconfirmed and exclusive default diagnosis, and the possibility that alopecia may be secondary to a primary medical or dermatologic disease is often overlooked. Although nonbehavioral causes of alopecia in nonhuman primates are described in the literature, few prospective hypothesis-based studies have investigated medical and behavioral etiologies concurrently. We therefore undertook such a study with the aim of designing a clinical diagnostic guide for approaching cases of nonhuman primate alopecia. Because most cases of alopecia in nonhuman primates in the literature and at our facility are not associated with a definitive diagnosis, the hypothesis we tested was that the well-established diagnostic evaluation for alopecia used for traditional veterinary species is not applicable to nonhuman primates. Discounting differences in histopathology and behavioral assessment, the current study revealed few clinically relevant significant differences between nonhuman primates with and without alopecia. As a result, our hypothesis was confirmed, and we conclude that the standard dermatologic diagnostic plan typically described for alopecia diagnosis in traditional veterinary species and used as the basis for assessment of alopecia in nonhuman primates should be reassessed. PMID:22330789

  3. Implementation of Health Information Technology in Routine Care for Fibromyalgia: Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Toni; Kawi, Jennifer; Menzel, Nancy Nivison; Hartley, Kendall

    2016-02-01

    Fibromyalgia management remains complicated and challenging. Health information technology is an evidence-based, nonpharmacological self and symptom management strategy, but few studies have evaluated its feasibility for managing fibromyalgia patients in clinical practice. FibroGuide is an example of an evidence-based, interactive, and computer-based program comprised of 10 educational modules on fibromyalgia. Study aims were to: (1) develop a process for implementing FibroGuide into the routine care of patients with fibromyalgia, (2) evaluate the overall impact on fibromyalgia before and after a 12-week implementation, and (3) assess patient perspectives on using FibroGuide health information technology to assist in self-management. In this pilot study, 35 participants with fibromyalgia were recruited from an Advanced Practice Registered Nurse's outpatient clinic. Using a descriptive design, quantitative data analysis was employed to address study aims. Based on data collection pre- and post-intervention using paired samples testing, a statistically significant change (p = .017) was observed in overall fibromyalgia impact (improved symptom severity, activity, and function). Majority felt that FibroGuide was helpful as part of their routine care, and nearly half reported that it assisted in their self-management. Although 65% noted that technology was an effective and efficient way to receive education for fibromyalgia management, 57% preferred talking to healthcare providers. Larger longitudinal studies are needed on the use of health information technology in fibromyalgia, evaluating both statistical and clinical significance, while decreasing barriers to participant use for this promising adjunct to clinical management. Providers need to be well educated on supporting self-management strategies and health information technology.

  4. Fibromyalgia, myofascial pain, tender points and trigger points: splitting or lumping?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Myofascial trigger points (MTPs) have long been a contentious issue in relation to fibromyalgia, and poorly defined pain complaints in general. Can MTPs be reproducibly identified? Do MTPs have valid objective findings, such as spontaneous electromyographic activity, muscle microdialysis evidence for an inflammatory milieu or visualization with newer ultrasound techniques? Is fibromyalgia a syndrome of multiple MTPs, or is focal muscle tenderness a manifestation of central sensitization? These issues are discussed with relevance to a recent paper reporting that manual palpation of active MTPs elicits the spontaneous pain experienced by fibromyalgia patients. PMID:21722339

  5. Fibromyalgia, myofascial pain, tender points and trigger points: splitting or lumping?

    PubMed

    Bennett, Robert M; Goldenberg, Don L

    2011-06-30

    Myofascial trigger points (MTPs) have long been a contentious issue in relation to fibromyalgia, and poorly defined pain complaints in general. Can MTPs be reproducibly identified? Do MTPs have valid objective findings, such as spontaneous electromyographic activity, muscle microdialysis evidence for an inflammatory milieu or visualization with newer ultrasound techniques? Is fibromyalgia a syndrome of multiple MTPs, or is focal muscle tenderness a manifestation of central sensitization? These issues are discussed with relevance to a recent paper reporting that manual palpation of active MTPs elicits the spontaneous pain experienced by fibromyalgia patients.

  6. Chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia resources on the world wide web: a descriptive journey.

    PubMed

    Gantz, N M; Coldsmith, E E

    2001-03-15

    A wealth of information on chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and fibromyalgia is available on the World Wide Web for health care providers and patients. These illnesses have overlapping features, and their etiologies remain unknown. Multiple Web sites were reviewed, and selected sites providing useful information were identified. Sites were classified according to their content and target audience and were judged according to suggested standards of Internet publishing. Fifty-eight sites were classified into groups as follows: comprehensive and research Web sites for CFS and fibromyalgia, meetings, clinical trials, literature search services, bibliographies, journal, and CFS and fibromyalgia Web sites for the patient. PMID:11247716

  7. An internet survey of 2,596 people with fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Robert M; Jones, Jessie; Turk, Dennis C; Russell, I Jon; Matallana, Lynne

    2007-01-01

    Background This study explored the feasibility of using an Internet survey of people with fibromyalgia (FM), with a view to providing information on demographics, sources of information, symptoms, functionality, perceived aggravating factors, perceived triggering events, health care utilization, management strategies, and medication use. Methods A survey questionnaire was developed by the National Fibromyalgia Association (NFA) in conjunction with a task force of "experts in the field". The questionnaire underwent several rounds of testing to improve its face validity, content validity, clarity and readability before it was mounted on the internet. The questionnaire consisted of 121 items and is available online at the website of the National Fibromyalgia Association. Results The questionnaire was completed by 2,569 people. Most were from the United States, with at least one respondent from each of the 50 states. Respondents were predominantly middle-aged Caucasian females, most of whom had FM symptoms for ≥ 4 years. The most common problems were morning stiffness, fatigue, nonrestorative sleep, pain, concentration, and memory. Aggravating factors included: emotional distress, weather changes, insomnia, and strenuous activity. Respondents rated the most effective management modalities as rest, heat, pain medications, antidepressants, and hypnotics. The most commonly used medications were: acetaminophen, ibuprofen, naproxen, cyclobenzaprine, amitriptyline, and aspirin. The medications perceived to be the most effective were: hydrocodone preparations, aprazolam, oxycodone preparations, zolpidem, cyclobenzaprine, and clonazepam. Conclusion This survey provides a snap-shot of FM at the end of 2005, as reported by a self-selected population of people. This descriptive data has a heuristic function, in that it identifies several issues for further research, such as the prescribing habits of FM health care providers, the role of emotional precipitants, the impact of

  8. Impact of Animal-Assisted Therapy for Outpatients with Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Dawn A.; Bernstein, Cheryl D.; Constantin, Janet M.; Kunkel, Frank A.; Breuer, Paula; Hanlon, Raymond B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Animal-assisted therapy using dogs trained to be calm and provide comfort to strangers has been used as a complementary therapy for a range of medical conditions. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of brief therapy dog visits for fibromyalgia patients attending a tertiary outpatient pain management facility compared with time spent in a waiting room. Design Open-label with waiting room control Setting Tertiary care, university-based, outpatient pain management clinic Subjects A convenience sample of fibromyalgia patients was obtained through advertisements posted in the clinic. Interventions Participants were able to spend clinic waiting time with a certified therapy dog instead of waiting in the outpatient waiting area. When the therapy dog was not available, individuals remained in the waiting area. Outcome measures Self-reported pain, fatigue, and emotional distress were recorded using 11-point numeric rating scales before and after the therapy dog visit or waiting room time. Results Data were evaluated from 106 therapy dog visits and 49 waiting room controls, with no significant between-group demographic differences in participants. Average intervention duration was 12 minutes for the therapy dog visit and 17 minutes for the waiting room control. Significant improvements were reported for pain, mood, and other measures of distress among patients after the therapy dog visit but not the waiting room control. Clinically meaningful pain relief (≥2 points pain severity reduction) occurred in 34% after the therapy dog visit and 4% in the waiting room control. Outcome was not affected by the presence of comorbid anxiety or depression. Conclusions Brief therapy dog visits may provide a valuable complementary therapy for fibromyalgia outpatients. PMID:23170993

  9. Piriformis Syndrome in Fibromyalgia: Clinical Diagnosis and Successful Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Siddiq, Md Abu Bakar; Khasru, Moshiur Rahman; Rasker, Johannes J.

    2014-01-01

    Piriformis syndrome is an underdiagnosed extraspinal association of sciatica. Patients usually complain of deep seated gluteal pain. In severe cases the clinical features of piriformis syndrome are primarily due to spasm of the piriformis muscle and irritation of the underlying sciatic nerve but this mysterious clinical scenario is also described in lumbar spinal canal stenosis, leg length discrepancy, piriformis myofascial pain syndrome, following vaginal delivery, and anomalous piriformis muscle or sciatic nerve. In this paper, we describe piriformis and fibromyalgia syndrome in a 30-year-old young lady, an often missed diagnosis. We also focus on management of the piriformis syndrome. PMID:25328750

  10. Meanings of feeling well for women with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Juuso, Päivi; Skär, Lisa; Olsson, Malin; Söderberg, Siv

    2013-01-01

    The researchers' focus in this study was to elucidate meanings of feeling well for women with fibromyalgia (FM). We obtained narrative interviews with 13 women with FM and used a phenomenological-hermeneutic interpretation to analyze the interview texts. Our interpretation of the findings shows that for women with FM meanings of feeling well can be understood as having strength to be involved. The women's experiences of feeling well meant being in control, having power, finding one's own pace, and experiencing feelings of belonging.

  11. Recommendations for resistance training in patients with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kim Dupree

    2015-01-01

    It may seem counter-intuitive to purposely stress muscle in patients who have muscle pain. However, a growing body of evidence challenges the assumption that resistance (strength) training worsens muscle pain in people with fibromyalgia (FM). In fact, the latest evidence indicates that when resistance training is tailored to individual needs, people with FM can obtain worthwhile improvements in FM severity. Clinicians need a deeper understanding of how resistance training helps people with FM, so as to prescribe more specific, personalized resistance training to their patients. PMID:26377808

  12. Piriformis syndrome in fibromyalgia: clinical diagnosis and successful treatment.

    PubMed

    Siddiq, Md Abu Bakar; Khasru, Moshiur Rahman; Rasker, Johannes J

    2014-01-01

    Piriformis syndrome is an underdiagnosed extraspinal association of sciatica. Patients usually complain of deep seated gluteal pain. In severe cases the clinical features of piriformis syndrome are primarily due to spasm of the piriformis muscle and irritation of the underlying sciatic nerve but this mysterious clinical scenario is also described in lumbar spinal canal stenosis, leg length discrepancy, piriformis myofascial pain syndrome, following vaginal delivery, and anomalous piriformis muscle or sciatic nerve. In this paper, we describe piriformis and fibromyalgia syndrome in a 30-year-old young lady, an often missed diagnosis. We also focus on management of the piriformis syndrome.

  13. Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy for Gallbladder Calculosis in Fibromyalgia Patients: Impact on Musculoskeletal Pain, Somatic Hyperalgesia and Central Sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Raffaele; Affaitati, Giannapia; Massimini, Francesca; Tana, Claudio; Innocenti, Paolo; Giamberardino, Maria Adele

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia, a chronic syndrome of diffuse musculoskeletal pain and somatic hyperalgesia from central sensitization, is very often comorbid with visceral pain conditions. In fibromyalgia patients with gallbladder calculosis, this study assessed the short and long-term impact of laparoscopic cholecystectomy on fibromyalgia pain symptoms. Fibromyalgia pain (VAS scale) and pain thresholds in tender points and control areas (skin, subcutis and muscle) were evaluated 1week before (basis) and 1week, 1,3,6 and 12months after laparoscopic cholecystectomy in fibromyalgia patients with symptomatic calculosis (n = 31) vs calculosis patients without fibromyalgia (n. 26) and at comparable time points in fibromyalgia patients not undergoing cholecystectomy, with symptomatic (n = 27) and asymptomatic (n = 28) calculosis, and no calculosis (n = 30). At basis, fibromyalgia+symptomatic calculosis patients presented a significant linear correlation between the number of previously experienced biliary colics and fibromyalgia pain (direct) and muscle thresholds (inverse)(p<0.0001). After cholecystectomy, fibromyalgia pain significantly increased and all thresholds significantly decreased at 1week and 1month (1-way ANOVA, p<0.01-p<0.001), the decrease in muscle thresholds correlating linearly with the peak postoperative pain at surgery site (p<0.003-p<0.0001). Fibromyalgia pain and thresholds returned to preoperative values at 3months, then pain significantly decreased and thresholds significantly increased at 6 and 12months (p<0.05-p<0.0001). Over the same 12-month period: in non-fibromyalgia patients undergoing cholecystectomy thresholds did not change; in all other fibromyalgia groups not undergoing cholecystectomy fibromyalgia pain and thresholds remained stable, except in fibromyalgia+symptomatic calculosis at 12months when pain significantly increased and muscle thresholds significantly decreased (p<0.05-p<0.0001). The results of the study show that biliary colics from

  14. Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy for Gallbladder Calculosis in Fibromyalgia Patients: Impact on Musculoskeletal Pain, Somatic Hyperalgesia and Central Sensitization.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Raffaele; Affaitati, Giannapia; Massimini, Francesca; Tana, Claudio; Innocenti, Paolo; Giamberardino, Maria Adele

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia, a chronic syndrome of diffuse musculoskeletal pain and somatic hyperalgesia from central sensitization, is very often comorbid with visceral pain conditions. In fibromyalgia patients with gallbladder calculosis, this study assessed the short and long-term impact of laparoscopic cholecystectomy on fibromyalgia pain symptoms. Fibromyalgia pain (VAS scale) and pain thresholds in tender points and control areas (skin, subcutis and muscle) were evaluated 1week before (basis) and 1week, 1,3,6 and 12months after laparoscopic cholecystectomy in fibromyalgia patients with symptomatic calculosis (n = 31) vs calculosis patients without fibromyalgia (n. 26) and at comparable time points in fibromyalgia patients not undergoing cholecystectomy, with symptomatic (n = 27) and asymptomatic (n = 28) calculosis, and no calculosis (n = 30). At basis, fibromyalgia+symptomatic calculosis patients presented a significant linear correlation between the number of previously experienced biliary colics and fibromyalgia pain (direct) and muscle thresholds (inverse)(p<0.0001). After cholecystectomy, fibromyalgia pain significantly increased and all thresholds significantly decreased at 1week and 1month (1-way ANOVA, p<0.01-p<0.001), the decrease in muscle thresholds correlating linearly with the peak postoperative pain at surgery site (p<0.003-p<0.0001). Fibromyalgia pain and thresholds returned to preoperative values at 3months, then pain significantly decreased and thresholds significantly increased at 6 and 12months (p<0.05-p<0.0001). Over the same 12-month period: in non-fibromyalgia patients undergoing cholecystectomy thresholds did not change; in all other fibromyalgia groups not undergoing cholecystectomy fibromyalgia pain and thresholds remained stable, except in fibromyalgia+symptomatic calculosis at 12months when pain significantly increased and muscle thresholds significantly decreased (p<0.05-p<0.0001). The results of the study show that biliary colics from

  15. Diffuse alopecia in a child due to dietary zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Alhaj, Eyad; Alhaj, Nehad; Alhaj, Nezam E

    2007-01-01

    A 4-year-old girl was evaluated for hair loss of a few weeks' duration. History of the present illness, medical history, and review of systems were obtained from the parents, who described progressive diffuse hair loss with hair dryness and brittleness, with no change in the child's eating habits or any other unusual symptoms. No fever, weight loss, diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain, chronic cough, dyspnea, change in appetite, change in bowel habit, or urinary symptoms were noted. On further questioning, her nutritional history revealed that she always favored cow's milk in her diet. The patient has been healthy with no significant medical history, surgical history, psychiatric history, or history of hospitalization. She was taking no medications. Her mother's pregnancy and the child's birth history were uneventful. The child was up-to-date on her vaccinations. Her physical examination showed a healthy-appearing child who was at 50% on the height chart and 70% on the weight growth chart. She was afebrile with a respiratory rate of 24 breaths per minute, pulse rate of 110 beats per minute, and pulse oximetry of 99% on room air. Skin examination revealed interstitial diffuse patchy alopecia with very dry hair and nonscarred, normal-appearing scalp. The hair pull test was normal, with 4 hairs extracted. Results of examination of her eyes (including visual acuity) and lungs were normal, and no abnormalities were found on heart, abdominal, musculoskeletal, and neurologic examinations. Laboratory workup showed normal electrolytes, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and blood sugar levels. Her complete blood cell count with differential was normal, ferritin concentration level was 110 ng/mL (reference, 40-200 ng/mL), iron level was 75 microg/dL (reference, 35-175 microg/dL), and total iron-binding capacity was 310 microg/dL (reference, 245-400 microg/dL). Levels of liver enzymes, total bilirubin, serum protein, and albumin were normal, as were the results of urinalysis

  16. Disability in Children and Adolescents With Irritable Bowel Syndrome and/or Fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Otu-Nyarko, Charles G; Gedalia, Abraham; Karpinski, Aryn C; Kolomensky, Andrew; Hyman, Paul E

    2015-11-01

    To compare disability and emotional health in individuals with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), fibromyalgia, or both, patients completed the Questionnaire on Pediatric Gastrointestinal Symptoms-Rome III, childhood Functional Disability Inventory (FDI), and the Behavior Assessment System for Children, Second Edition. Patients' (age range 8-18 years, 19 IBS, 12 fibromyalgia, and 12 both) FDI scores showed greater disability than scores from historically healthy patients. Fibromyalgia (FDI 22.5 ± 12.7, P = 0.018) and patients with both (FDI 26.2 ± 13.8, P = 0.001) averaged greater disability than those with IBS (FDI 10.6 ± 7.9). Disability was correlated with anxiety and depression symptoms. Disability and psychological symptoms are important when evaluating individuals with fibromyalgia and IBS.

  17. Is there a role for opioids in the treatment of fibromyalgia?

    PubMed

    Littlejohn, Geoffrey O; Guymer, Emma K; Ngian, Gene-Siew

    2016-05-01

    The use of opioids for chronic pain has increased significantly due to a combination of the high patient burden of pain and the more widespread availability of a range of long-acting opioid preparations. This increased opioid use has translated into the care of many patients with fibromyalgia. The pain mechanism in fibromyalgia is complex but does not seem to involve disturbance of opioid analgesic functions. Hence, there is general concern about the harms in the absence of benefits of opioids in this setting. There is no evidence that pure opioids are effective in fibromyalgia but there is some evidence that opioids with additional actions on the norepinephrine-related pain modulatory pathways, such as tramadol, can be clinically useful in some patients. Novel actions of low-dose opioid antagonists may lead to better understanding of the role of opioid function in fibromyalgia. PMID:27296831

  18. Acupuncture and Trigger Point Injections for Fibromyalgia: East-West Medicine Case Report.

    PubMed

    Taw, Lawrence B; Henry, Eve

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a clinical syndrome characterized by chronic widespread pain that is often accompanied by ≥1 concomitant symptoms (eg, fatigue, poor sleep, cognitive alterations, and mood disturbances). In 2005, an estimated 5 million people in the United States suffered from fibromyalgia, and its growing effect on health-related quality of life is substantial. An increasingly popular hypothesis proposes that noxious, peripheral sensory input might contribute to the initiation and perpetuation of the diffuse pain seen in patients with fibromyalgia. That theory has led to the evaluation of multiple interventions to stimulate distal areas as a means to modulate the peripheral and central nervous systems. It has been the authors' experiences that the combination of trigger point injections and acupuncture provides improved clinical outcomes. In the current article, the authors present a case report of a patient with fibromyalgia who was successfully treated with an integrative approach that combined acupuncture with trigger point injections.

  19. The effects of meditation-based interventions on the treatment of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Kozasa, Elisa H; Tanaka, Luiza H; Monson, Carlos; Little, Stephen; Leao, Frederico Camelo; Peres, Mario P

    2012-10-01

    Meditation is the third most commonly requested complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapy reported in a US survey. Those who suffer from chronic pain are those who most frequently use CAM therapies. This review aims to evaluate whether meditation-based interventions can help the treatment of fibromyalgia. A PubMed search was conducted using the terms "fibromyalgia" and "meditation", or "mindfulness", or "mantra" or "relaxation response". We selected articles which clearly described a meditation intervention being used in the treatment of fibromyalgia. Only four articles were classified with score 3 in the Jadad scale. Another seven articles were included in this review. Most of the results indicate improvement in fibromyalgia-related symptoms in patients who participated in a meditation-based intervention. Considering only 4 of the 13 studies achieved a score of 3 on the Jadad scale, researchers of meditation interventions should discuss the best methodologic control for these studies.

  20. Fibromyalgia comorbid with anxiety disorders and depression: combined medical and psychological treatment.

    PubMed

    Bernik, Marcio; Sampaio, Thiago P A; Gandarela, Lucas

    2013-09-01

    Fibromyalgia is associated with high level of pain and suffering. Lack of diagnosis leads to onerous indirect economic costs. Recent data indicate that fibromyalgia; anxiety disorders, and depression tend to occur as comorbid conditions. They also share some common neurochemical dysfunctions and central nervous system alterations such as hypofunctional serotonergic system and altered reactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Conversely, functional neuroimaging findings point to different patterns of altered pain processing mechanisms between fibromyalgia and depression. There is no cure for fibromyalgia, and treatment response effect size is usually small to moderate. Treatment should be based on drugs that also target the comorbid psychiatric condition. Combined pharmacotherapy and cognitive-behavior therapy should ideally be offered to all patients. Lifestyle changes, such as physical exercise should be encouraged. The message to patients should be that all forms of pain are true medical conditions and deserve proper care.

  1. Durability of Benefit From Repeated Intravenous Lidocaine Infusions in Fibromyalgia Patients: A Case Series and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Marks, David M.; Newhouse, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a painful disorder with no curative treatments, and available medications typically provide partial relief of pain. Reported here is the effective use of serial intravenous lidocaine infusions for the chronic management of 3 patients with fibromyalgia. The details of the infusion procedure are described, and relevant literature is reviewed. Lidocaine infusions should be considered in fibromyalgia patients who are refractory to other treatments, and a positive response to 1 infusion may justify repeated infusions for chronic management. PMID:26835161

  2. Evaluation of Serum Homocysteine, High-Sensitivity CRP, and RBC Folate in Patients with Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi, Maryam; Namazi, Mohammad Reza; Rahimi, Hoda; Younespour, Shima; Ehsani, Amir Houshang; Shakoei, Safoura

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Alopecia areata (AA) is a common type of hair loss with an autoimmune basis. As the role of homocysteine (Hcys), folate, and CRP has been considered in some autoimmune diseases. Objectives: To evaluate homocysteine, folate and CRP level in AA. Methods: This study was performed on 29 patients who had AA for at least 6 months affecting more than 20% of scalp, and 32 healthy controls. Levels of serum Hcys, blood high-sensitivity CRP, and RBC folate were measured in all subjects. Results: The mean level of RBC folate was significantly lower in the patient group than that in controls (P < 0.001). Also, the level of RBC folate was significantly lower in patients with extensive forms of disease (alopecia totalis/alopecia universalis) in comparison with more localized form (patchy hair loss) (P < 0.05). Patients with higher “Severity of Alopecia Total” (SALT) score had lower RBC folate, as well. Serum Hcys and blood high-sensitivity CRP levels did not show a significant difference in two groups. Conclusion: Patients with alopecia areata have lower level of RBC folate which is in negative correlation with both severity and extension of AA. PMID:25484412

  3. Quality of life in fibromyalgia patients with craniomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Di Venere, D; Corsalini, M; Stefanachi, G; Tafuri, S; De Tommaso, M; Cervinara, F; Re, A; Pettini, F

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a rheumatic disease which affects fibrous tissues and muscles; it is characterized by chronic pain and it is often associated with craniomandibular disorders (CMD). 31 patients were assessed from March 2012 to October 2012 through the administration of specific questionnaires and following neurologic and gnatologic assessment. A relevant corre-lation between FM and CMD emerges from the present study, as 80.6% of our patients report CMD symptoms with high prevalence of myofascial pain (84%). Multivariate regression analysis revealed that the patients in the present study did not differ in score of quality of life questionnaires from patients with fibromyalgia. The neuropathic pain diagnostic question-naire (DN4) scores were positively affected by belonging to group II of Research Diagnostic Criteria of Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/ TDM) classification, suggesting the possibility of a neuropathic component in chronic pain in this CMD group, as already speculated in our study on the correlation between burning mouth syndrome and CMD and by other au-thors in studies on chronic low back pain. However, further clinic and instrumental studies are needed in order to test this as-sumption. PMID:25674166

  4. Quality of Life in Fibromyalgia Patients with Craniomandibular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Di Venere, D; Corsalini, M; Stefanachi, G; Tafuri, S; De Tommaso, M; Cervinara, F; Re, A; Pettini, F

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a rheumatic disease which affects fibrous tissues and muscles; it is characterized by chronic pain and it is often associated with craniomandibular disorders (CMD). 31 patients were assessed from March 2012 to October 2012 through the administration of specific questionnaires and following neurologic and gnatologic assessment. A relevant corre-lation between FM and CMD emerges from the present study, as 80.6% of our patients report CMD symptoms with high prevalence of myofascial pain (84%). Multivariate regression analysis revealed that the patients in the present study did not differ in score of quality of life questionnaires from patients with fibromyalgia. The neuropathic pain diagnostic question-naire (DN4) scores were positively affected by belonging to group II of Research Diagnostic Criteria of Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/ TDM) classification, suggesting the possibility of a neuropathic component in chronic pain in this CMD group, as already speculated in our study on the correlation between burning mouth syndrome and CMD and by other au-thors in studies on chronic low back pain. However, further clinic and instrumental studies are needed in order to test this as-sumption. PMID:25674166

  5. Juvenile fibromyalgia: current status of research and future developments

    PubMed Central

    Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; Ting, Tracy V.

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile-onset fibromyalgia (JFM) is a poorly understood chronic pain condition most commonly affecting adolescent girls. The condition is characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain and other associated symptoms, including fatigue, nonrestorative sleep, headaches, irritable bowel symptoms, dysautonomia and mood disorders such as anxiety and/or depression. In the past few years, there has been a greater focus on understanding JFM in adolescents. Research studies have provided insight into the clinical characteristics of this condition and its effect on both short-term and long-term psychosocial and physical functioning. The importance of early and effective intervention is being recognized, as research has shown that symptoms of JFM tend to persist and do not resolve over time as was previously believed. Efforts to improve treatments for JFM are underway, and new evidence strongly points to the potential benefits of cognitive–behavioural therapy on improving mood and daily functioning. Research into pharmacotherapy and other nonpharmacological options is in progress. Advancements in the understanding of adult fibromyalgia have paved the way for future studies on diagnosis, assessment and management of JFM. This Review focuses on our current knowledge of the condition, provides an update of the latest research advances, and highlights areas for further study. PMID:24275966

  6. Quality of life in fibromyalgia patients with craniomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Di Venere, D; Corsalini, M; Stefanachi, G; Tafuri, S; De Tommaso, M; Cervinara, F; Re, A; Pettini, F

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a rheumatic disease which affects fibrous tissues and muscles; it is characterized by chronic pain and it is often associated with craniomandibular disorders (CMD). 31 patients were assessed from March 2012 to October 2012 through the administration of specific questionnaires and following neurologic and gnatologic assessment. A relevant corre-lation between FM and CMD emerges from the present study, as 80.6% of our patients report CMD symptoms with high prevalence of myofascial pain (84%). Multivariate regression analysis revealed that the patients in the present study did not differ in score of quality of life questionnaires from patients with fibromyalgia. The neuropathic pain diagnostic question-naire (DN4) scores were positively affected by belonging to group II of Research Diagnostic Criteria of Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/ TDM) classification, suggesting the possibility of a neuropathic component in chronic pain in this CMD group, as already speculated in our study on the correlation between burning mouth syndrome and CMD and by other au-thors in studies on chronic low back pain. However, further clinic and instrumental studies are needed in order to test this as-sumption.

  7. Couple perceptions of fibromyalgia symptoms: the role of communication.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Karen S; Jones, Kim D; Bennett, Robert M; Hiatt, Shirin O; Sayer, Aline G

    2013-11-01

    The objectives of the current study were to describe fibromyalgia patient-spouse incongruence regarding patient pain, fatigue, and physical function; and to examine the associations of individual and interpersonal factors with patient-spouse incongruence. Two hundred four fibromyalgia patients and their coresiding partners rated the patient's symptoms and function. Multilevel modeling revealed that spouses, on average, rated patient fatigue significantly lower than patients. Couple incongruence was not significantly different from zero, on average, for pain severity, interference, or physical function. However, there was significant variability across couples in how they rated the severity of symptoms and function, and how much incongruence existed within couples. Controlling for individual factors, patient and spouse reports of communication problems were significantly associated with levels of couple incongruence regarding patient fatigue and physical function, albeit in opposing directions. Across couples, incongruence was high when patients rated communication problems as high; incongruence was low when spouses rated communication problems as high. An important within-couple interaction was found for pain interference, suggesting that couples who are similar on level of communication problems experience low incongruence; those with disparate ratings of communication problems experience high incongruence. Findings suggest the important roles of spouse response and the patient's perception of how well the couple is communicating. Couple-level interventions targeting communication or other interpersonal factors may help to decrease incongruence and lead to better patient outcomes.

  8. Excimer laser: a module of the alopecia areata common protocol.

    PubMed

    McMichael, Amy J

    2013-12-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is an autoimmune condition characterized by T cell-mediated attack of the hair follicle. The inciting antigenic stimulus is unknown. A dense perbulbar lymphocytic infiltrate and reproducible immunologic abnormalities are hallmark features of the condition. The cellular infiltrate primarily consists of activated T lymphocytes and antigen-presenting Langerhans cells. The xenon chloride excimer laser emits its total energy at the wavelength of 308 nm and therefore is regarded as a "super-narrowband" UVB light source. Excimer laser treatment is highly effective in psoriasis, another T cell-mediated disorder that shares many immunologic features with AA. The excimer laser is superior in inducing T cell apoptosis in vitro compared with narrowband UVB, with paralleled improved clinical efficacy. The excimer laser has been used successfully in patients with AA. In this context, evaluation of the potential benefit of 308-nm excimer laser therapy in the treatment of AA is clinically warranted. Herein, the use of a common treatment protocol with a specifically designed module to study the outcome of excimer laser treatment on moderate-to-severe scalp AA in adults is described.

  9. Alopecia Areata in the Elderly: A 10-Year Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yong Hyun; Park, Kyung Hea; Kim, Sang Lim; Lim, Hyun Jung; Lee, Weon Ju; Lee, Seok-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Background Alopecia areata (AA) is an organ-specific autoimmune disease that typically occurs in young adults. AA in the elderly is relatively rare, thus little data have been reported. Objective This study aimed to understand the clinical characteristics of AA in the elderly. Methods We performed a 10-year retrospective study of AA in the elderly who visited our dermatologic clinic from January 2002 to December 2011. A clinical review of medical records and telephone interviews were performed by two dermatologists. Results Among 1,761 patients with newly diagnosed AA, 61 (3.5%) were older than 60 years at the first visit. Among those who completed a telephone interview, 74.3% (26/35) had less than 50% of scalp-localized hair loss. There was no association between the extent of AA and hair graying (p=0.679). Favorable therapeutic response was observed in 62.9% (22/35) of cases. Conclusion AA in the elderly shows mild disease severity and favorable treatment response. There is no association between graying and the extent of AA. However, the influence of aging on the pathogenesis of AA in the elderly deserves further investigation. PMID:26273157

  10. Pathologic diagnosis of central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia on horizontal sections.

    PubMed

    Miteva, Mariya; Tosti, Antonella

    2014-11-01

    The pathologic findings in Central Centrifugal Cicatricial Alopecia (CCCA) have not been studied systematically in horizontal sections. Our objective was to establish the pathologic features, and their frequency in horizontal sections of scalp biopsies obtained from patients with clinically and histologically proven CCCA. Serial horizontal sections of 51 cases were evaluated retrospectively. All biopsies were assessed at 4 levels and at least on 24 horizontal sections. The most common pathologic findings were follicular miniaturization (81% of the cases); premature desquamation of the inner root sheath (96%), focal preservation of the sebaceous glands (94%), which in most of these cases appeared as surrounding "in a hug" an intact vellus follicle; compound follicular structures with perifollicular fibrosis and/or inflammation (89%), lamellar hyperkeratosis/parakeratosis in the hair canal (79%), absent or mild inflammation (77%), and naked hair shafts (68%). Horizontal sections are useful in CCCA to identify early or focal disease and to provide the clinician with better information on the presence of follicular miniaturization, inflammation, and scarring, which can be used to tailor the treatment to the individual patient.

  11. Pathologic diagnosis of central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia on horizontal sections.

    PubMed

    Miteva, Mariya; Tosti, Antonella

    2014-11-01

    The pathologic findings in Central Centrifugal Cicatricial Alopecia (CCCA) have not been studied systematically in horizontal sections. Our objective was to establish the pathologic features, and their frequency in horizontal sections of scalp biopsies obtained from patients with clinically and histologically proven CCCA. Serial horizontal sections of 51 cases were evaluated retrospectively. All biopsies were assessed at 4 levels and at least on 24 horizontal sections. The most common pathologic findings were follicular miniaturization (81% of the cases); premature desquamation of the inner root sheath (96%), focal preservation of the sebaceous glands (94%), which in most of these cases appeared as surrounding "in a hug" an intact vellus follicle; compound follicular structures with perifollicular fibrosis and/or inflammation (89%), lamellar hyperkeratosis/parakeratosis in the hair canal (79%), absent or mild inflammation (77%), and naked hair shafts (68%). Horizontal sections are useful in CCCA to identify early or focal disease and to provide the clinician with better information on the presence of follicular miniaturization, inflammation, and scarring, which can be used to tailor the treatment to the individual patient. PMID:25222198

  12. Jet cryotherapy vs clobetasol proprionate lotion in alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Faghihi, Gita; Radan, Mohammadreza

    2014-01-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is a common disease of hair follicles. Cryotherapy has been employed to stimulate hair regrowth. The current investigation evaluated the efficacy of this method in patchyAA. Forty patients older than 5 years and with 120 recalcitrant patches were enrolled in the study. AA covered less than 50% of the patients' scalps. In each individual, one lesion was treated with N2 jet cryotherapy once a week for a period of 12 weeks, while another lesion was treated with topical 0.05% clobetasol proprionate lotion. All patients were followed from weeks 2 to 16. Thirty-eight of 40 patients completed therapy. The overall response rate of patches was 80% in the cryotherapy group and 91.5% in the clobetasol group. Complete recovery (>95% terminal hair growth) was not obtained in any patient. Results from chi-square test showed no significant difference between improvements in AA in the two groups (reliability 95%). Pearson measurement showed a significant reverse relationship between diameter and duration of patches and the improvement rate in both groups. Liquid nitrogen jet cryotherapy can be a helpful modality in the treatment of AA.

  13. Dermal lymphatic dilation in a mouse model of alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, John P; Pratt, C Herbert; Silva, Kathleen A; Kennedy, Victoria E; Stearns, Timothy M; Sundberg, Beth A; King, Lloyd E; HogenEsch, Harm

    2016-04-01

    Mouse models of various types of inflammatory skin disease are often accompanied by increased dermal angiogenesis. The C3H/HeJ inbred strain spontaneously develops alopecia areata (AA), a cell mediated autoimmune disorder that can be controllably expanded using full thickness skin grafts to young unaffected mice. This provides a reproducible and progressive model for AA in which the vascularization of the skin can be examined. Mice receiving skin grafts from AA or normal mice were evaluated at 5, 10, 15, and 20 weeks after engraftment. Lymphatics are often overlooked as they are small slit-like structures above the hair follicle that resemble artifact-like separation of collagen bundles with some fixatives. Lymphatics are easily detected using lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor 1 (LYVE1) by immunohistochemistry to label their endothelial cells. Using LYVE1, there were no changes in distribution or numbers of lymphatics although they were more prominent (dilated) in the mice with AA. Lyve1 transcripts were not significantly upregulated except at 10 weeks after skin grafting when clinical signs of AA first become apparent. Other genes involved with vascular growth and dilation or movement of immune cells were dysregulated, mostly upregulated. These findings emphasize aspects of AA not commonly considered and provide potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

  14. Dermal lymphatic dilation in a mouse model of alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, John P; Pratt, C Herbert; Silva, Kathleen A; Kennedy, Victoria E; Stearns, Timothy M; Sundberg, Beth A; King, Lloyd E; HogenEsch, Harm

    2016-04-01

    Mouse models of various types of inflammatory skin disease are often accompanied by increased dermal angiogenesis. The C3H/HeJ inbred strain spontaneously develops alopecia areata (AA), a cell mediated autoimmune disorder that can be controllably expanded using full thickness skin grafts to young unaffected mice. This provides a reproducible and progressive model for AA in which the vascularization of the skin can be examined. Mice receiving skin grafts from AA or normal mice were evaluated at 5, 10, 15, and 20 weeks after engraftment. Lymphatics are often overlooked as they are small slit-like structures above the hair follicle that resemble artifact-like separation of collagen bundles with some fixatives. Lymphatics are easily detected using lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor 1 (LYVE1) by immunohistochemistry to label their endothelial cells. Using LYVE1, there were no changes in distribution or numbers of lymphatics although they were more prominent (dilated) in the mice with AA. Lyve1 transcripts were not significantly upregulated except at 10 weeks after skin grafting when clinical signs of AA first become apparent. Other genes involved with vascular growth and dilation or movement of immune cells were dysregulated, mostly upregulated. These findings emphasize aspects of AA not commonly considered and provide potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26960166

  15. Is There Really Relationship between Androgenetic Alopecia and Metabolic Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Ozbas Gok, Seyran; Akin Belli, Asli; Dervis, Emine

    2015-01-01

    Background. There are several studies investigating the relationship between androgenetic alopecia (AGA) and metabolic syndrome (MS) with conflicting results. Objective. We sought to investigate whether there is a relationship between AGA and MS. Methods. A case-control study including 74 male patients with AGA and 42 male controls was conducted. Age, duration of AGA, AGA onset age, anthropometric measures, body mass index, lipid parameters, fasting blood glucose, blood pressure, and presence of MS were recorded. Results. Of the 74 male AGA patients (age range 20–50 years, mean 32.14), 24 were in stage 2, 26 were in stage 3, 17 were in stage 3V, 1 was in stage 5, and 6 were in stage 7. There was no significant difference in the rate of MS between AGA and control groups (P = 0.135). Among the evaluated parameters, only systolic blood pressure in AGA group was significantly higher than control group. Conclusion. In contrast to the most of the previous studies, our study does not support the link between AGA and MS. To exclude confounding factors such as advanced age and therefore metabolic disturbances, further studies are needed with large group of AGA patients including different age groups and varying severity. PMID:26617635

  16. Endogenous retinoids in the pathogenesis of alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Duncan, F Jason; Silva, Kathleen A; Johnson, Charles J; King, Benjamin L; Szatkiewicz, Jin P; Kamdar, Sonya P; Ong, David E; Napoli, Joseph L; Wang, Jinshan; King, Lloyd E; Whiting, David A; McElwee, Kevin J; Sundberg, John P; Everts, Helen B

    2013-02-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is an autoimmune disease that attacks anagen hair follicles. Gene array in graft-induced C3H/HeJ mice revealed that genes involved in retinoic acid (RA) synthesis were increased, whereas RA degradation genes were decreased in AA compared with sham controls. This was confirmed by immunohistochemistry in biopsies from patients with AA and both mouse and rat AA models. RA levels were also increased in C3H/HeJ mice with AA. C3H/HeJ mice were fed a purified diet containing one of the four levels of dietary vitamin A or an unpurified diet 2 weeks before grafting and disease progression followed. High vitamin A accelerated AA, whereas mice that were not fed vitamin A had more severe disease by the end of the study. More hair follicles were in anagen in mice fed high vitamin A. Both the number and localization of granzyme B-positive cells were altered by vitamin A. IFNγ was also the lowest and IL13 highest in mice fed high vitamin A. Other cytokines were reduced and chemokines increased as the disease progressed, but no additional effects of vitamin A were seen. Combined, these results suggest that vitamin A regulates both the hair cycle and immune response to alter the progression of AA. PMID:23014334

  17. Clinical management of septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sharff, Katie A; Richards, Eric P; Townes, John M

    2013-06-01

    Septic arthritis is a rheumatologic emergency as joint destruction occurs rapidly and can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Accurate diagnosis can be particularly challenging in patients with underlying inflammatory joint disease. This review outlines the risk factors for septic arthritis and summarizes the causative bacterial organisms. We highlight advances in antibiotic management with a focus on new drugs for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and discuss the use of adjunctive therapies for treatment of septic arthritis in adults.

  18. Arthritis associated with hidradenitis suppurativa.

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, R; Sequeira, W

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To review the presentation and clinical findings of arthritis associated with hidradenitis suppurativa. METHOD--Medical records from the rheumatology clinics of two major teaching hospitals were reviewed for arthritis and hidradenitis suppurativa. The nine patient records fulfilling these criteria were reviewed and compared with 20 previous reports. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION--The arthritis associated with hidradenitis suppurativa is rare and most commonly affects the peripheral joints. The axial skeleton is less frequently involved and is often asymptomatic. Images PMID:8311560

  19. Does association of opioid use with pain and function differ by fibromyalgia or widespread pain status?

    PubMed

    Turner, Judith A; Shortreed, Susan M; Saunders, Kathleen W; LeResche, Linda; Thielke, Stephen; Von Korff, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Many consider chronic opioid therapy (COT) to be ineffective for fibromyalgia, but empirical evidence is limited. Among patients identified as initiating COT, we examined whether fibromyalgia was associated with different relationships of opioid use to pain and activity interference outcomes 12 months later. We obtained electronic data on diagnoses and opioid prescriptions. We obtained patient self-report data, including pain and activity interference measures, at baseline, 4 months, and 12 months. Among 1218 patients, 429 (35%) met our definition of fibromyalgia. Patients with and without fibromyalgia who had intermittent/lower-dose or regular/higher-dose opioid use at 12 months had similar 12-month pain intensity scores. However, among patients with minimal/no opioid use at 12 months, 12-month pain intensity was greater for those with fibromyalgia (adjusted mean = 5.15 [95% confidence interval, 4.80-5.51]; 0-10 scale) than for those without (4.44 [4.15-4.72]). Similar patterns were observed for 12-month activity interference. Among patients who discontinued opioids by 12 months, those with fibromyalgia were more likely to report bothersome side effects and less likely to report pain improvement as important reasons for discontinuation (P < 0.05). In sum, at 12 months, among patients who had discontinued opioids or used them minimally, those with fibromyalgia had worse outcomes and were less likely to have discontinued because of pain improvement. Among patients continuing COT, pain and activity interference outcomes were worse than those of patients with minimal/no opioid use and did not differ for those with fibromyalgia vs those with diverse other chronic pain conditions.

  20. Does association of opioid use with pain and function differ by fibromyalgia or widespread pain status?

    PubMed

    Turner, Judith A; Shortreed, Susan M; Saunders, Kathleen W; LeResche, Linda; Thielke, Stephen; Von Korff, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Many consider chronic opioid therapy (COT) to be ineffective for fibromyalgia, but empirical evidence is limited. Among patients identified as initiating COT, we examined whether fibromyalgia was associated with different relationships of opioid use to pain and activity interference outcomes 12 months later. We obtained electronic data on diagnoses and opioid prescriptions. We obtained patient self-report data, including pain and activity interference measures, at baseline, 4 months, and 12 months. Among 1218 patients, 429 (35%) met our definition of fibromyalgia. Patients with and without fibromyalgia who had intermittent/lower-dose or regular/higher-dose opioid use at 12 months had similar 12-month pain intensity scores. However, among patients with minimal/no opioid use at 12 months, 12-month pain intensity was greater for those with fibromyalgia (adjusted mean = 5.15 [95% confidence interval, 4.80-5.51]; 0-10 scale) than for those without (4.44 [4.15-4.72]). Similar patterns were observed for 12-month activity interference. Among patients who discontinued opioids by 12 months, those with fibromyalgia were more likely to report bothersome side effects and less likely to report pain improvement as important reasons for discontinuation (P < 0.05). In sum, at 12 months, among patients who had discontinued opioids or used them minimally, those with fibromyalgia had worse outcomes and were less likely to have discontinued because of pain improvement. Among patients continuing COT, pain and activity interference outcomes were worse than those of patients with minimal/no opioid use and did not differ for those with fibromyalgia vs those with diverse other chronic pain conditions. PMID:27643834

  1. Effects of naltrexone on pain sensitivity and mood in fibromyalgia: no evidence for endogenous opioid pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Younger, Jarred W; Zautra, Alex J; Cummins, Eric T

    2009-01-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying fibromyalgia are still unknown, although some evidence points to endogenous opioid dysfunction. We examined how endogenous opioid antagonism affects pain and mood for women with and without fibromyalgia. Ten women with fibromyalgia and ten age- and gender-matched, healthy controls each attended two laboratory sessions. Each participant received naltrexone (50mg) at one session, and placebo at the other session, in a randomized and double-blind fashion. Participants were tested for changes in sensitivity to heat, cold, and mechanical pain. Additionally, we collected measures of mood and opioid withdrawal symptoms during the laboratory sessions and at home the night following each session. At baseline, the fibromyalgia group exhibited more somatic complaints, greater sensory sensitivity, more opioid withdrawal somatic symptoms, and lower mechanical and cold pain-tolerance than did the healthy control group. Neither group experienced changes in pain sensitivity due to naltrexone administration. Naltrexone did not differentially affect self-reported withdrawal symptoms, or mood, in the fibromyalgia and control groups. Consistent with prior research, there was no evidence found for abnormal endogenous opioid activity in women with fibromyalgia.

  2. The impact of a meditation-based stress reduction program on fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, K H; Goldenberg, D L; Galvin-Nadeau, M

    1993-09-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic illness characterized by widespread pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, and resistance to treatment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a meditation-based stress reduction program on fibromyalgia. Seventy-seven patients meeting the 1990 criteria of the American College of Rheumatology for fibromyalgia took part in a 10-week group outpatient program. Therapists followed a carefully defined treatment approach and met weekly to further promote uniformity. Patients were evaluated before and after the program. Initial evaluation included a psychiatric structured clinical interview (SCID). Outcome measures included visual analog scales to measure global well-being, pain, sleep, fatigue, and feeling refreshed in the morning. Patients also completed a medical symptom checklist, SCL-90-R, Coping Strategies Questionnaire, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, and the Fibromyalgia Attitude Index. Although the mean scores of all the patients completing the program showed improvement, 51% showed moderate to marked improvement and only they were counted as "responders." These preliminary findings suggest that a meditation-based stress reduction program is effective for patients with fibromyalgia.

  3. Cognitive and Physical Fatigue Tasks Enhance Pain, Cognitive Fatigue and Physical Fatigue in People with Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Dailey, Dana L; Keffala, Valerie J; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2014-01-01

    Objective Fibromyalgia is a condition characterized by chronic widespread muscle pain and fatigue. The primary objective of this study was to determine if pain, perceived cognitive fatigue, and perceived physical fatigue were enhanced in participants with fibromyalgia compared to healthy controls during a cognitive fatigue task, a physical fatigue task and a dual fatigue task. Methods Twenty four people with fibromyalgia and 33 healthy controls completed pain, fatigue and function measures. A cognitive fatigue task (Controlled Oral Word Association Test) and physical fatigue task (Valpar peg test) were done individually and combined for a dual fatigue task. Resting pain, perceived cognitive fatigue and perceived physical fatigue were assessed during each task using visual analogue scales. Function was assessed with shoulder range of motion and grip. Results People with fibromyalgia had significantly higher increases in pain, cognitive fatigue and physical fatigue when compared to healthy controls after completion of a cognitive fatigue task, a physical fatigue task, or a dual fatigue task (p<0.01). People with fibromyalgia performed equivalently on measures of physical performance and cognitive performance on the physical and cognitive fatigue tasks, respectively. Conclusions These data show that people with fibromyalgia show larger increases in pain, perceived cognitive fatigue and perceived physical fatigue to both cognitive and physical fatigue tasks compared to healthy controls. The increases in pain and fatigue during cognitive and physical fatigue tasks could influence subject participation in daily activities and rehabilitation. PMID:25074583

  4. Suicidal ideation in patients with fibromyalgia: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Calandre, Elena P; Navajas-Rojas, M Angustias; Ballesteros, Javier; Garcia-Carrillo, Jocelyne; Garcia-Leiva, Juan M; Rico-Villademoros, Fernando

    2015-02-01

    Chronic pain, sleep disturbances, and depression, which are relevant symptoms of fibromyalgia syndrome, have been demonstrated to be associated with an increased likelihood of suicidal behaviors. Mortality from suicide has been shown to be greater among patients with fibromyalgia. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of suicidal ideation among a sample of patients with fibromyalgia and to evaluate its relationship with the clinical symptomatology of fibromyalgia. Baseline data from fibromyalgia patients willing to participate in different clinical studies were collected. Outcome measures included the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, the Beck Depression Inventory, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Brief Pain Inventory, and the SF-12 Health Survey. The scores for these scales were compared between patients with and without suicidal ideation. The presence of suicidal ideation was assessed using the answer provided to item 9 of the Beck Depression Inventory. The results were adjusted by age, sex, total comorbidity, and time since diagnosis with multiple linear regression. The sample comprised 373 patients of whom one hundred and seventy-nine (48%) reported suicidal ideation: 148 (39.7%) reported passive suicidal ideation and 31 (8.3%) active suicidal ideation. Suicidal ideation was markedly associated with depression, anxiety, sleep quality, and global mental health, whereas only weak relationships were observed between suicidal ideation and both pain and general physical health.

  5. The association between borderline personality disorder, fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Penfold, Sarah; St. Denis, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Background Overlap of aetiological factors and demographic characteristics with clinical observations of comorbidity has been documented in fibromyalgia syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and borderline personality disorder (BPD). Aims The purpose of this study was to assess the association of BPD with fibromyalgia syndrome and CFS. The authors reviewed literature on the prevalence of BPD in patients with fibromyalgia or CFS and vice versa. Methods A search of five databases yielded six eligible studies. A hand search and contact with experts yielded two additional studies. We extracted information pertaining to study setting and design, demographic information, diagnostic criteria and prevalence. Results We did not identify any studies that specifically assessed the prevalence of fibromyalgia or CFS in patients with BPD. Three studies assessed the prevalence of BPD in fibromyalgia patients and reported prevalence of 1.0, 5.25 and 16.7%. Five studies assessed BPD in CFS patients and reported prevalence of 3.03, 1.8, 2.0, 6.5 and 17%. Conclusions More research is required to clarify possible associations between BPD, fibromyalgia and CFS. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) license. PMID:27703787

  6. Advances in diagnostic and treatment options in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gur, Ali; Oktayoglu, Pelin

    2009-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is characterized as a chronic, painful, noninflammatory syndrome affecting the musculoskeletal system. In addition to pain, common co-morbid symptoms associated with FM include sleep disturbances, fatigue, morning stiffness, affective disorders, chronic daily headache, dyscognition, irritable bowel syndrome, and irritable bladder. Fibromyalgia is usually classified by application of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria. Although these criteria are accepted among investigators who agree with the concept of fibromyalgia, they do so with some reservations. Tender points and widespread pain alone does not describe the esence of fibromyalgia. New diagnostic tools including either clinical or radiological components are studied to diminish these problems. Although various pharmacological solutions have been studied for treating fibromyalgia, no single drug or groups of drugs have proved to be useful in treating fibromyalgia patients. Recently, three drugs, pregabalin, duloxetine and milnacipran, were approved for the treatment of FM by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Novel therapeutic approaches to the management of FM include cannabinoids, sodium channel blockade and new generation antiepileptics. This review evaluates both new diagnostic tools, including clinical or radiological regimes, and tries to highlight the efficacy of medicinal and nonmedicinal treatments with new therapeutic approaches in the management of FM with a wide perspective.

  7. Influence of Craniosacral Therapy on Anxiety, Depression and Quality of Life in Patients with Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Matarán-Peñarrocha, Guillermo A.; Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida María; García, Gloria Carballo; Moreno-Lorenzo, Carmen; Carreño, Tesifón Parrón; Zafra, María Dolores Onieva

    2011-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is considered as a combination of physical, psychological and social disabilities. The causes of pathologic mechanism underlying fibromyalgia are unknown, but fibromyalgia may lead to reduced quality of life. The objective of this study was to analyze the repercussions of craniosacral therapy on depression, anxiety and quality of life in fibromyalgia patients with painful symptoms. An experimental, double-blind longitudinal clinical trial design was undertaken. Eighty-four patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia were randomly assigned to an intervention group (craniosacral therapy) or placebo group (simulated treatment with disconnected ultrasound). The treatment period was 25 weeks. Anxiety, pain, sleep quality, depression and quality of life were determined at baseline and at 10 minutes, 6 months and 1-year post-treatment. State anxiety and trait anxiety, pain, quality of life and Pittsburgh sleep quality index were significantly higher in the intervention versus placebo group after the treatment period and at the 6-month follow-up. However, at the 1-year follow-up, the groups only differed in the Pittsburgh sleep quality index. Approaching fibromyalgia by means of craniosacral therapy contributes to improving anxiety and quality of life levels in these patients. PMID:19729492

  8. Arthritis in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Aarli, J A; Milde, E J; Thunold, S

    1975-11-01

    Seven patients with myasthenia gravis developed clinical signs of arthropathy. In two patients, the symptoms were due to a deforming rheumatoid arthritis and the myasthenic symptoms appeared as a transitory phase during the course of the disease. Muscle antibodies of IgG class were demonstrated with sera from both patients. Autoreactivity between muscle antibodies and rheumatoid factor was detected in one patient. Both patients died from sudden cardiac failure. Necropsy was performed in one and revealed a spotty myocardial necrosis. One patient had juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Two patients had mild articular symptoms with indices of multivisceral disease and serological findings indicating a systemic lupus erythematous. One patient had classical ankylosing spondylitis, and one, unspecified arthropathy.

  9. Staphylococcal peptidoglycans induce arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zai-Qing; Deng, Guo-Min; Foster, Simon; Tarkowski, Andrej

    2001-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important pathogens in septic arthritis. To analyse the arthritogenic properties of staphylococcal peptidoglycan (PGN), highly purified PGN from S. aureus was intra-articularly injected into murine joints. The results demonstrate that PGN will trigger arthritis in a dose-dependent manner. A single injection of this compound leads to massive infiltration of predominantly macrophages and polymorphonuclear cells with occasional signs of cartilage and/or bone destruction, lasting for at least 14 days. Further studies showed that this condition is mediated by the combined impact of acquired and innate immune systems. Our results indicate that PGN exerts a central role in joint inflammation triggered by S. aureus. PMID:11714392

  10. [Reactive arthritis. A review].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, F; Espinoza, L R

    1990-07-01

    The arthritides that meet the definition or reactive arthritis include the so-called seronegative spondyloarthropathies. Patients are usually aged less than thirty-two. Preceding infection is generally intestinal or venereal, although the involved agent may remain unknown. Enteric forms occur in small epidemics, whereas venereal forms correlate with a recent new sexual partner. The clinical picture varies in severity, with manifestations overlapping between disorders, and often the first complaint is extra-articular. Highly suggestive of reactive arthritis is "sausage" deformity of fingers and toes, pain and stiffness about multiple joints accompanied by radiating lower back discomfort, and enthesitis, particularly at the Achilles tendon. One out of six or seven patients becomes disabled; therapy aimed at preventing disability is vital since medication has little effect on spinal involvement. Antibiotic therapy may be effective in cases in which specific etiologic agents are well defined.

  11. Rheumatoid arthritis: vocational rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, G M

    1982-01-01

    The consequences of inflation and accelerating introduction of automation and microprocessors into industry are a shift from unskilled to skilled work, the lessening of opportunities for the unskilled worker, and growing unemployment. If disabled people are competing for employment they must take every opportunity to extend education and acquire skills. Juvenile chronic arthritis presents one set of problems in vocational rehabilitation at the beginning of a working career and adult rheumatoid arthritis another, commonly in those over 45 years old and previously established in work. The prevalence of severe disability in juvenile chronic arthritis is about 1 in 20 000 of the population, females are affected twice as often as males and 1 in 10 has defective vision or blindness due to chronic iridocyclitis. At school, besides education, there must be emphasis on encouraging independence, self-confidence, mobility and determination. A School Leavers' Conference early in the last year at school gives the adolescent the best chance of choosing a career. Rheumatoid arthritis is three times more common in women and increasingly, over the last 40 years, women are working besides home-making. Morning stiffness, fatigue, immobility and pain are the common symptoms of widespread involvement of joints and systemic disturbance. The principal determinant in the success of vocational rehabilitation is personality, and the social and environmental factors are more significant than the degree of disability. The Disablement Resettlement Officer can assure continuity of rehabilitation between the health and employment services: a favourable outcome is work, self-derived income independence and freedom of movement using whatever technical aids are required to achieve this.

  12. Evaluating relationship in cytokines level, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire and Body Mass Index in women with Fibromyalgia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ghizal, Fatima; Das, Siddharth Kumar; Verma, Narsingh; Mahdi, Abbas Ali

    2016-01-01

    Cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) levels are reported to be perturbed in Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) patients. Moreover, Body Mass Index (BMI) may also be related to disturbed cytokines level. Therefore, the present study was planned to evaluate the levels of cytokines and to correlate them with BMI and Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire Revised (FIQR) in female FMS patients (n= 60) and control group (n= 60). 4 ml of blood samples were taken from both the group of patients and controls to measure the levels of IL-6 and TNF-α . Symptoms of FMS were assessed by FIQR. BMI was calculated by a standard formula of weight in kilograms divided by height in meter square. There were significant differences in BMI levels in FMS patients than in control group. However, no significant association was found between BMI and TNF-α levels, and BMI and IL-6 levels in patient and control groups. However, a significant association was found between FIQR and BMI in patients group. On the basis of the results we conclude that the levels of IL-6 and TNF-alpha are not associated with BMI in FMS patients. Furthermore, patients with higher BMI may fall at the risk of FMS. Therefore, weight management may be an important aspect for treatment of FMS patients.

  13. Chronic arthritis in children.

    PubMed

    Prieur, A M

    1994-09-01

    Chronic inflammatory arthritides in children include a wide range of various diseases. One of the main concerns of physicians who treat these disorders is the risk of permanent physical disability resulting from joint damage. Actual classification relies mainly on clinical features, particularly the number of joints affected at onset, although the general feeling is that chronic childhood arthritis exists in many different entities gathered together under the common names juvenile chronic arthritis or juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. The past 2 years were rather fertile in debates for proposing a progression for more objectivity in nomenclature, which was the theme of the Pediatric Rheumatology Study Group session at the American College of Rheumatology annual meeting held in Atlanta in 1992. The viewpoints from North America and Europe addressed at this meeting were published in a supplement of the Journal of Rheumatology in 1993. A debate on this topic was also organized at the International League Against Rheumatism Congress held in Barcelona in 1993. At present, the main criteria rely on clinical experience and natural history of the diseases and on biology and immunogenetics. Another important concern among pediatric rheumatologists is efficacy of treatment. Questions include, "Are we doing enough?" and "How safe are the therapeutic strategies?" In this review some of the recent studies that may be important for classification and nomenclature and therapy and management are discussed.

  14. Resolution of paraneoplastic alopecia following surgical removal of a pancreatic carcinoma in a cat.

    PubMed

    Tasker, S; Griffon, D J; Nuttall, T J; Hill, P B

    1999-01-01

    A 13-year-old female neutered domestic longhaired cat was presented with a five-month history of progressive weight loss and bilaterally symmetrical alopecia of the ventrum, limbs and perineum. The alopecic skin had a shiny appearance and hair in the non-alopecic areas was easily epilated. Fine needle aspirate cytology of a palpable cranial abdominal mass revealed it to be of epithelial or glandular origin. A pancreatic mass was excised by left pancreatectomy during exploratory laparotomy, and histopathology and skin biopsies confirmed a diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma with concurrent paraneoplastic alopecia. No evidence of metastases was found on liver and lymph node biopsies. At re-examination 10 weeks after surgery, the hair had fully regrown. Skin signs recurred after 18 weeks and metastatic spread of the tumour was confirmed on postmortem examination. This case confirms that paraneoplastic alopecia associated with internal malignancies is a potentially reversible process if the internal neoplasm is excised.

  15. A case of feline paraneoplastic alopecia with secondary Malassezia-associated dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, D R

    1998-08-01

    A 13-year-old neutered female domestic shorthaired cat had progressive ventral abdominal alopecia attributed initially to hyperthyroidism. Corrective treatment by unilateral thyroidectomy did not, however, resolve the dermatosis and the alopecia progressed to involve the whole ventral trunk, the lower limbs and the head. Pruritus of the lower limbs was a prominent feature and was associated with the finding of Malassezia on cytology; Malassezia-associated dermatitis was diagnosed. Resolution of pruritus was seen after treatment with oral ketoconazole and a cleansing shampoo to eliminate the yeast, but severe polyphagia, small intestinal diarrhoea and polydipsia developed subsequently and the cat was euthanased. Necropsy revealed an exocrine pancreatic adenocarcinoma with hepatic metastases. The pancreatic, hepatic and dermatological lesions were found to be typical of feline paraneoplastic alopecia (FPA). Malassezia-associated dermatitis can be associated with pruritus in cats with FPA.

  16. The effects of clomipramine hydrochloride in cats with psychogenic alopecia: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Petra A; Torres, Sheila; Jessen, Carl

    2006-01-01

    A double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted to determine the efficacy of clomipramine hydrochloride in cats with psychogenic alopecia. Twenty-five cats were randomly assigned to receive clomipramine hydrochloride (0.5 mg/kg orally q 24 hours) or placebo for 56 days. Eleven cats in each group completed the trial. The results of this study showed that clomipramine hydrochloride failed to demonstrate significant changes in the number of grooming bouts, hair regrowth, and the area of alopecia in cats with psychogenic alopecia when compared to a placebo. It was uncertain whether these results reflected a lack of drug efficacy, insufficient treatment duration, or an insufficient number of cases enrolled.

  17. A humanized mouse model of hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-resistant rickets without alopecia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seong Min; Goellner, Joseph J; O'Brien, Charles A; Pike, J Wesley

    2014-11-01

    The syndrome of hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-resistant rickets (HVDRR) is a genetic disease of altered mineral homeostasis due to mutations in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene. It is frequently, but not always, accompanied by the presence of alopecia. Mouse models that recapitulate this syndrome have been prepared through genetic deletion of the Vdr gene and are characterized by the presence of rickets and alopecia. Subsequent studies have revealed that VDR expression in hair follicle keratinocytes protects against alopecia and that this activity is independent of the protein's ability to bind 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3]. In the present study, we introduced into VDR-null mice a human VDR (hVDR) bacterial artificial chromosome minigene containing a mutation that converts leucine to serine at amino acid 233 in the hVDR protein, which prevents 1,25(OH)2D3 binding. We then assessed whether this transgene recreated features of the HVDRR syndrome without alopecia. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis in one strain showed an appropriate level of mutant hVDR expression in all tissues examined including skin. The hVDR-L233S mutant failed to rescue the aberrant systemic and skeletal phenotype characteristic of the VDR null mouse due to the inability of the mutant receptor to activate transcription after treatment with 1,25(OH)2D3. Importantly, however, neither alopecia nor the dermal cysts characteristic of VDR-null mice were observed in the skin of these hVDR-L233S mutant mice. This study confirms that we have created a humanized mouse model of HVDRR without alopecia that will be useful in defining additional features of this syndrome and in identifying potential novel functions of the unoccupied VDR.

  18. Facial Papules in Fibrosing Alopecia in a Pattern Distribution (Cicatricial Pattern Hair Loss).

    PubMed

    Ramanauskaite, Ausrine; Trüeb, Ralph M

    2015-01-01

    Frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA) and fibrosing alopecia in a pattern distribution (FAPD) represent clinically distinctive conditions characterized by pattern hair loss with evidence of follicular inflammation and fibrosis. Since Kossard's original description, the condition has been recognized to represent a rather generalized than localized process, with extension well beyond the frontotemporal hairline. More recently, peculiar facial papules have been reported in FFA representing facial vellus hair involvement. We report the case of a 42-year-old woman with FAPD associated with the same facial papules, supporting that both entities belong to the same spectrum of cicatricial pattern hair loss.

  19. Alopecia and dermatopathy of the lower back following pelvic fractures in three cats.

    PubMed

    Declercq, Jan

    2004-02-01

    An alopecia and dermatopathy following pelvic fractures associated with vehicular trauma is reported in three cats. The animals presented 3-4 weeks post injury with acute hair loss, glistening appearance of the skin and erosions involving the lower back. Histological examination revealed atrophy of the hair follicles and adnexal structures and follicular telogenization, dermal fibroplasia and mild lymphocytic infiltrate, fibroplasia and inflammation in the panniculus. Vascular damage secondary to the external trauma to blood vessels supplying the skin over the lumbar region and subsequent ischaemia may represent the pathomechanism of this type of alopecia. Focal permanent hair loss can be expected.

  20. Low-energy laser in the treatment of alopecia of the scalp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciuchita, Tavi; Usurelu, Mircea; Antipa, Ciprian

    1997-12-01

    The authors tried to verify the efficacy of low energy laser (LEL) in scalp alopecia. Sixty patients were divided in two groups: A) laser group, 33 patients treated with both LEL and classical therapy; B) control group, 27 patients treated only with classical therapy, Before, during and after treatment, historical samples were done. For the group A the results were rather superior but in a twice shorter time shorter time than group B. The maintenance of the good results needed classical therapy for a long period. We conclude that LEL therapy could have a useful complementary method for the treatment of scalp alopecia.

  1. A genome-wide association study of chemotherapy-induced alopecia in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Chemotherapy-induced alopecia is one of the most common adverse events caused by conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy, yet there has been very little progress in the prevention or treatment of this side effect. Although this is not a life-threatening event, alopecia is very psychologically difficult for many women to manage. In order to improve the quality of life for these women, it is important to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of chemotherapy-induced alopecia and develop ways to effectively prevent and/or treat it. To identify the genetic risk factors associated with chemotherapy-induced alopecia, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using DNA samples from breast cancer patients who were treated with chemotherapy. Methods We performed a case-control association study of 303 individuals who developed grade 2 alopecia, and compared them with 880 breast cancer patients who did not show hair loss after being treated with conventional chemotherapy. In addition, we separately analyzed a subset of patients who received specific combination therapies by GWASs and applied the weighted genetic risk scoring (wGRS) system to investigate the cumulative effects of the associated SNPs. Results We identified an SNP significantly associated with drug-induced grade 2 alopecia (rs3820706 in CACNB4 (calcium channel voltage-dependent subunit beta 4) on 2q23, P = 8.13 × 10-9, OR = 3.71) and detected several SNPs that showed some suggestive associations by subgroup analyses. We also classified patients into four groups on the basis of wGRS analysis and found that patients who classified in the highest risk group showed 443 times higher risk of antimicrotubule agents-induced alopecia than the lowest risk group. Conclusions Our study suggests several associated genes and should shed some light on the molecular mechanism of alopecia in chemotherapy-treated breast cancer patients and hopefully will contribute to development of interventions that will

  2. Facial Papules in Fibrosing Alopecia in a Pattern Distribution (Cicatricial Pattern Hair Loss)

    PubMed Central

    Ramanauskaite, Ausrine; Trüeb, Ralph M

    2015-01-01

    Frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA) and fibrosing alopecia in a pattern distribution (FAPD) represent clinically distinctive conditions characterized by pattern hair loss with evidence of follicular inflammation and fibrosis. Since Kossard's original description, the condition has been recognized to represent a rather generalized than localized process, with extension well beyond the frontotemporal hairline. More recently, peculiar facial papules have been reported in FFA representing facial vellus hair involvement. We report the case of a 42-year-old woman with FAPD associated with the same facial papules, supporting that both entities belong to the same spectrum of cicatricial pattern hair loss. PMID:26622155

  3. Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia: what has been achieved, current clues for future research.

    PubMed

    Ogunleye, Temitayo A; McMichael, Amy; Olsen, Elise A

    2014-04-01

    Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia is an inflammatory type of central scalp hair loss seen primarily in women of African descent. The prevalence is unknown, but may vary from 2.7% to 5.7% and increases with age. This review outlines the history and current beliefs and identifies clues for future research for this enigmatic condition. Despite that the cause of central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia is unknown, research is ongoing. The role of cytokeratins, androgens, genetics, and various possible sources of chronic inflammation in disease pathogenesis remain to be elucidated.

  4. Report of a Rare Case of Alopecia Areata Coexisting with Trichotillomania.

    PubMed

    Brzezinski, Piotr; Cywinska, Ewelina; Chiriac, Anca

    2016-01-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is a common dermatological disease characterized by patchy areas of nonscarring alopecia. Trichotillomania (TT) is an expression of obsessive-compulsive disorder defined by the urge to pull out his/her hair. We describe a case of AA coexisting with TT. A 6-year-old male child presented with a localized patch of hair loss in the occipital area of 2 years duration. Dermoscopy revealed numerous exclamation mark hairs along with signs of scratching and bleeding. A detailed medical anamnesis and thorough examination of the child during the consultation put in evidence TT. PMID:27127375

  5. Real-world comparison of health care utilization between duloxetine and pregabalin initiators with fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Peng, X; Sun, P; Novick, D; Andrews, J; Sun, S

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare health care utilization of duloxetine initiators and pregabalin initiators among fibromyalgia patients in a real-world setting. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted based on a US national commercial health claims database (2006–2009). Fibromyalgia patients who initiated duloxetine or pregabalin in 2008, aged 18–64 years, and who maintained continuous health insurance coverage 1 year before and 1 year after initiation were assigned to duloxetine or pregabalin cohorts on the basis of their initiated agent. Patients who had pill coverage of the agents over the course of 90 days preceding the initiation were excluded. The two comparative cohorts were constructed using propensity score greedy match methods. Descriptive analysis and paired t-test were performed to compare health care utilization rates in the postinitiation year and the changes of these rates from the preinitiation year to the postinitiation year. Results Both matched cohorts (n=1,265 pairs) had a similar mean initiation age (49–50 years), percentage of women (87%–88%), and prevalence of baseline comorbid conditions (neuropathic pain other than diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain, low back pain, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, headache or migraine, and osteoarthritis). In the preinitiation year, both cohorts had similar inpatient, outpatient, and medication utilization rates (inpatient, 15.7%–16.1%; outpatient, 100.0%; medication, 97.9%–98.7%). The utilization rates diverged in the postinitiation year, with the pregabalin cohort using more fibromyalgia-related inpatient care (3.2% versus 2.2%; P<0.05), any inpatient care (19.3% versus 16.8%; P<0.05), and fibromyalgia-related outpatient care (62.1% versus 51.8%; P<0.05). From the preinitiation period to the postinitiation period, the duloxetine cohort experienced decreases in certain utilization rates, whereas the pregabalin cohort had increases (percentage of patients with a fibromyalgia

  6. The Relation of Androgenetic Alopecia Severity with Epicardial Fat Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Ede, Huseyin; Erkoc, Mustafa Fatih; Akyuz, Yurdanur; Erbay, Ali Riza

    2016-01-01

    Background Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is the most commonly encountered baldness pattern in men. Epicardial fat tissue is found on the cardiac surface between the myocardium and visceral pericardium. Both AGA and epicardial fat thickness (EFT) are related to coronary artery disease, which is also reflected by an increase in carotid intima media thickness (CIMT). Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation of AGA severity with EFT. Methods One hundred twenty-six male patients with AGA aged 18 to 55 years without histories of chronic disease were enrolled. Subjects were divided into three groups (mild, moderate, and severe) on the basis of the Hamilton baldness scale as modified by Norwood. Maximum EFT was measured at end-systole on the midventricular free wall of the right ventricle. CIMT was also recorded for all patients. Results The groups did not have statistically significant differences with respect to age, height, weight, body mass index, left ventricular ejection fraction, or left atrial diameter (p>0.05 for all comparisons), but the severe group had a higher EFT compared with the moderate (p<0.001; z score, -7.040) and mild groups (p<0.001; z score, -6.667). The moderate group also had higher EFT than the mild group (p<0.001; z score, -5.931). Mean CIMT value in the severe group was significantly higher compared with the value in the other groups. Conclusion The study showed that subjects in advanced stages of AGA had increased EFT, which was measured via echocardiography. PMID:27081268

  7. Septic arthritis in adult horses.

    PubMed

    Carstanjen, B; Boehart, S; Cislakova, M

    2010-01-01

    Septic arthritis in horses is a serious disease which can become life-threatening. In case the infection can be eliminated before irreversible joint damage occurs, complete recovery is possible. This article gives an overview of the literature concerning etiology, diagnosis and strategies of therapy in cases of septic arthritis in adult horses, with special reference to novel options of treatment.

  8. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients.

  9. A comparison of pain measures used with patients with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Bigatti, Silvia M; Cronan, Terry A

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate instruments used to assess pain in patients with fibromyalgia (FMS). Participants were 602 patients with FMS. Pain was measured with five scales: a visual analog scale (VAS), the Pain Rating, Present Pain, and Number of Words Chosen Indexes from the McGill Pain Questionnaire; and intensity of pain obtained from a manual tender point exam. The VAS had the highest correlations with other measures of pain and with self-efficacy for pain, physical functioning, fatigue, and stiffness. The correlations between the VAS and fatigue and stiffness were significantly higher than those of other pain measures (p < .01). Our findings suggest that the easy-to-administer VAS may be the most useful measure of pain with patients with FMS. PMID:12048970

  10. Multi-system fibromyalgia syndrome emulator - biomed 2009.

    PubMed

    Frenger, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Fibromyalgia Syndrome is a chronic disorder characterized by abnormal pain, fatigue, depression, cognitive dysfunction and sleep disturbance. The body's immune, hormonal, and nervous systems are involved. The author proposes a model from his clinical practice where a relapsing human Herpesvirus 4 infection of ss-lymphocytes causes inappropriate activation of immune system components, thus leading to typical FMS signs and symptoms. This clinical model was subsequently embodied in a computer based on the author's human nervous system function emulator, which imitates the brain's biochemicalneural-cognitive operations. This Forth language emulator program runs on a multiprocessor network recently enhanced with 8-core 32-bit CPUs. Supplemental analog circuit boards provide support for an artificial neural network, synthetic emotion and cellular substrate-receptor binding activity simulation. The effects of antiviral antibiotics and other chemicals on this disease are included in the emulator. PMID:19369778

  11. How to manage fatigue in fibromyalgia: nonpharmacological options.

    PubMed

    Ericsson, Anna; Mannerkorpi, Kaisa

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this article is to suggest recommendations for the management of fatigue in fibromyalgia (FM) by reviewing and compiling findings of nonpharmacological treatment for fatigue in patients with FM. The management of fatigue in FM should incorporate regular physical exercise maintained for a longer period of time, which contributes to improved general health and facilitates coping with fatigue and other symptoms. The evidence is still low and the effect of exercise on fatigue in FM needs to be further studied. Patients with FM appear to benefit from general sleep hygiene advice and also need to develop individual strategies to manage the complex factors in everyday life that may be related to fatigue. PMID:27297077

  12. Myofascial pain and fibromyalgia: two different but overlapping disorders.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2016-05-01

    There is good evidence supporting that people with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) exhibit central sensitization. The role of peripheral nociception is under debate in FMS. It seems that widespread pain experienced in FMS is considered multiple regional pains; therefore, several authors proposed that muscles play a relevant role in FMS. Trigger points (TrPs) have long been a contentious issue in relation to FMS. Preliminary evidence reported that the overall spontaneous pain is reproduced by referred pain from active TrPs, suggesting that FMS pain is largely composed of pain arising, at least partially, from TrPs. Finally, there is preliminary evidence suggesting that management of TrPs is able to modulate the CNS and is effective for reducing pain in FMS, although results are conflicting and future studies are clearly needed. PMID:27296946

  13. Cognitive-behavioral intervention for juvenile primary fibromyalgia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Walco, G A; Ilowite, N T

    1992-10-01

    Seven girls between 8.6 and 17.7 years of age were treated for symptoms of juvenile primary fibromyalgia syndrome (JPFS) using cognitive-behavioral techniques (progressive muscle relaxation, guided imagery) aimed at reducing pain and facilitating sleep, as well as strategies aimed at increasing mastery over the pain and improving mood. Patients satisfying diagnostic criteria for JPFS based on the presence of chronic diffuse musculoskeletal pain lasting at least 3 months (mean = 9.4, SD = 8.28) and a minimum of 5 characteristic soft tissue trigger and/or tender points with absence of synovitis, were referred for intervention. Results indicated that in the majority of patients, such techniques were effective in reducing pain and facilitating improved functioning. PMID:1464878

  14. Myofascial pain and fibromyalgia: two different but overlapping disorders.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2016-05-01

    There is good evidence supporting that people with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) exhibit central sensitization. The role of peripheral nociception is under debate in FMS. It seems that widespread pain experienced in FMS is considered multiple regional pains; therefore, several authors proposed that muscles play a relevant role in FMS. Trigger points (TrPs) have long been a contentious issue in relation to FMS. Preliminary evidence reported that the overall spontaneous pain is reproduced by referred pain from active TrPs, suggesting that FMS pain is largely composed of pain arising, at least partially, from TrPs. Finally, there is preliminary evidence suggesting that management of TrPs is able to modulate the CNS and is effective for reducing pain in FMS, although results are conflicting and future studies are clearly needed.

  15. Fibromyalgia syndrome: presentation, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Russell, I Jon; Raphael, Karen G

    2008-03-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) presents with widespread soft tissue pain. Common comorbidities include severe insomnia, body stiffness, affective symptoms, irritable bowels, and urethral syndrome. A 1990 research classification depends on a history of widespread pain and prominent tenderness to palpation at 11 or more of 18 specific tender points. It is a criteria-based diagnosis rather than one by exclusion and can accompany other medical conditions. FMS occurs worldwide, and can present any age, but is most common in adult females. Although numerous studies and reviews contend that FMS may be caused by psychological stress such as sexual abuse, critical epidemiological review fails to support that concept. Existing data suggest that some individuals with FMS may have a dysregulated physiological stress response system that predates the onset of symptoms.

  16. [Fibromyalgia classification: are there different classes of patients?].

    PubMed

    Belenguer, Rafael; Siso, Antoni; Ramos-Casals, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is one of the most frequent diseases causing chronic pain. Due to the heterogeneity of its clinical expression and the lack of standardized instruments to classify the signs and symptoms, the availability of a classification system would allow more homogeneous groups of patients to be identified and would permit individualizing diagnostic and therapeutic management. Correct classification of patients with FM requires individual diagnostic evaluation by a multidisciplinary team comprising the family doctor, a specialist in rheumatology or autoimmune diseases, a trauma doctor and a psychologist/psychiatrist. The diagnostic contribution of each specialist together with analysis of the timeline of appearance of signs and symptoms is essential in order to decide to which FM subgroup the patient belongs.

  17. Potential Benefits of Non-Pharmacological Therapies in Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Sueiro Blanco, F.; Estévez Schwarz, I.; Ayán, C.; Cancela, JM.; Martín, V.

    2008-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is an incurable common syndrome of non-articular origin, and with no effective treatment by now. A great deal of research has sought to assess the efficacy of different therapies, especially non-pharmacological and low-cost ones, in the reduction of the intensity of symptoms. Despite the availability of a wide range of alternative therapies nowadays, there is little scientific evidence of the potential benefits of most of them, with results being contradictories. The purpose of this paper is to review some of the less well known alternative therapies in FM treatment, to describe the more relevant clinical studies published in this matter, and to analyze the potential effects of the main alternative therapies, in order to verify their efficacy. PMID:19088863

  18. Is magnesium citrate treatment effective on pain, clinical parameters and functional status in patients with fibromyalgia?

    PubMed

    Bagis, Selda; Karabiber, Mehmet; As, Ismet; Tamer, Lülüfer; Erdogan, Canan; Atalay, Ayçe

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the relationship between magnesium levels and fibromyalgia symptoms and to determine the effect of magnesium citrate treatment on these symptoms. Sixty premenopausal women diagnosed with fibromyalgia according to the ACR criteria and 20 healthy women whose age and weight matched the premenopausal women were evaluated. Pain intensity, pain threshold, the number of tender points, the tender point index, the fibromyalgia impact questionnaire (FIQ), the Beck depression and Beck anxiety scores and patient symptoms were evaluated in all the women. Serum and erythrocyte magnesium levels were also measured. The patients were divided into three groups. The magnesium citrate (300 mg/day) was given to the first group (n = 20), amitriptyline (10 mg/day) was given to the second group (n = 20), and magnesium citrate (300 mg/day) + amitriptyline (10 mg/day) treatment was given to the third group (n = 20). All parameters were reevaluated after the 8 weeks of treatment. The serum and erythrocyte magnesium levels were significantly lower in patients with fibromyalgia than in the controls. Also there was a negative correlation between the magnesium levels and fibromyalgia symptoms. The number of tender points, tender point index, FIQ and Beck depression scores decreased significantly with the magnesium citrate treatment. The combined amitriptyline + magnesium citrate treatment proved effective on all parameters except numbness. Low magnesium levels in the erythrocyte might be an etiologic factor on fibromyalgia symptoms. The magnesium citrate treatment was only effective tender points and the intensity of fibromyalgia. However, it was effective on all parameters when used in combination with amitriptyline.

  19. A prospective study of the 1-year incidence of fibromyalgia after acute whiplash injury

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objective To measure the 1-year incidence of fibromyalgia in a cohort of acute whiplash-injured participants. Methods Consecutive acute patients with whiplash were assessed via the 2010 Modified American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for fibromyalgia at 3 months, 6 months and 1 year postinjury. At each of these follow-up points, participants were also examined for recovery from whiplash injury. Results Of an initial 268 participants, data on recovery was available for 264 participants during the 1-year follow-up period. At the 3-month follow-up, 62% (167/268) of participants reported recovery from their whiplash injuries. At 6 months, 76% (203/268) reported recovery, and at 1 year 82% (216/264) reported recovery. At 3 and 6 months follow-up none of the participants met the 2010 Modified ACR Criteria for fibromyalgia, but fibromyalgia criteria were met for 2 (of 264) seen at the 1-year follow-up, yielding a 1-year incidence of 0.8% (95% CI 0.1% to 3.0%). Conclusions In the primary care setting, a significant proportion of patients with whiplash recover from whiplash injury at 1 year, and the incidence of fibromyalgia after acute whiplash injury is very low. The impression that fibromyalgia is common after whiplash injury may be due to the failure to exclude precollision fibromyalgia cases or due to referral bias of non-recovered patients. PMID:26509044

  20. Effects of treatment of peripheral pain generators in fibromyalgia patients.

    PubMed

    Affaitati, Giannapia; Costantini, Raffaele; Fabrizio, Alessandra; Lapenna, Domenico; Tafuri, Emmanuele; Giamberardino, Maria Adele

    2011-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FS) frequently co-occurs with regional pain disorders. This study evaluated how these disorders contribute to FS, by assessing effects of local active vs placebo treatment of muscle/joint pain sources on FS symptoms. Female patients with (1) FS+myofascial pain syndromes from trigger points (n=68), or (2) FS+joint pain (n=56) underwent evaluation of myofascial/joint symptoms [number/intensity of pain episodes, pressure pain thresholds at trigger/joint site, paracetamol consumption] and FS symptoms [pain intensity, pressure pain thresholds at tender points, pressure and electrical pain thresholds in skin, subcutis and muscle in a non-painful site]. Patients of both protocols were randomly assigned to two groups [34 each for (1); 28 each for (2)] to receive active or placebo local TrP or joint treatment [injection/hydroelectrophoresis] on days 1 and 4. Evaluations were repeated on days 4 and 8. After therapy, in active--but not placebo-treated-- groups: number and intensity of myofascial/joint episodes and paracetamol consumption decreased and pressure thresholds at trigger/joint increased (p<0.001); FS pain intensity decreased and all thresholds increased progressively in tender points and the non-painful site (p<0.0001). At day 8, all placebo-treated patients requested active local therapy (days 8 and 11) vs only three patients under active treatment. At a 3-week follow-up, FS pain was still lower than basis in patients not undergoing further therapy and had decreased in those undergoing active therapy from day 8 (p<0.0001). Localized muscle/joint pains impact significantly on FS, probably through increased central sensitization by the peripheral input; their systematic identification and treatment are recommended in fibromyalgia.

  1. The premenstrual syndrome and fibromyalgia--similarities and common features.

    PubMed

    Amital, Daniela; Herskovitz, Calanit; Fostick, Leah; Silberman, Alysa; Doron, Yariv; Zohar, Joseph; Itsekson, Alek; Zolti, Matityahu; Rubinow, Alan; Amital, Howard

    2010-04-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the clinical similarities and common features of fibromyalgia syndrome (FM) and premenstrual dysphoric syndrome (PMDD). Thirty young patients who met the diagnostic criteria for PMDD were included in the study and compared to 26 women belonging to the medical staff of a general psychiatry department. All enrollees were interviewed and examined by a skilled physician. They completed the following nine survey items: demographic information, clinical health assessment questionnaire, fibromyalgia impact questionnaire, sleep and fatigue questionnaires, Sheehan disability scales, SF-36 assessment for quality of life, visual analog scale for pain, Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) questionnaire (assessment of coexistent psychiatric conditions), and the premenstrual severity scale. Additionally, each individual underwent a physical examination measuring the classical tender points and was asked to describe the distribution and continuum of her pain or tenderness. The PMDD group scored significantly higher in the measures pain and tenderness as well as in severity of premenstrual symptoms compared to the control group. Five patients in the PMDD group and none in the control group had FM. Quality of life measured by the SF-36 was higher in the control group than in the PMDD group and correlated with the degree of tenderness reported. Psychiatric comorbidity was significantly more common in the PMDD group, affecting 16 of the 30 PMDD patients compared to only three of the 26 control patients. In this study, patients with PMDD were found to have higher levels of tenderness, higher psychiatric comorbidity, greater level of physical disabilities, and a lower quality of life. These parameters were highly correlated with a lower pain threshold.

  2. Autoantibodies in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Conigliaro, P; Chimenti, M S; Triggianese, P; Sunzini, F; Novelli, L; Perricone, C; Perricone, R

    2016-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease characterized by extensive synovitis resulting in erosions of articular cartilage and marginal bone with joint destruction. The lack of immunological tolerance in RA represents the first step toward the development of autoimmunity. Susceptible individuals, under the influence of environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, and silica exposure, develop autoimmune phenomena that result in the presence of autoantibodies. HLA and non-HLA haplotypes play a major role in determining the development of specific autoantibodies differentiating anti-citrullinated antibodies (ACPA)-positive and negative RA patients. Rheumatoid factor (RF) and ACPA are the serological markers for RA, and during the preclinical immunological phase, autoantibody titers increase with a progressive spread of ACPA antigens repertoire. The presence of ACPA represents an independent risk factor for developing RA in patients with undifferentiated arthritis or arthralgia. Moreover, anti-CarP antibodies have been identified in patients with RA as well as in individuals before the onset of clinical symptoms of RA. Several autoantibodies mainly targeting post-translational modified proteins have been investigated as possible biomarkers to improve the early diagnosis, prognosis and response to therapy in RA patients. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is distinguished from RA by infrequent positivity for RF and ACPA, together with other distinctive clinical features. Actually, specific autoantibodies have not been described. Recently, anti-CarP antibodies have been reported in sera from PsA patients with active disease. Further investigations on autoantibodies showing high specificity and sensibility as well as relevant correlation with disease severity, progression, and response to therapy are awaited in inflammatory arthritides.

  3. Physical and Cognitive-Affective Factors Associated with Fatigue in Individuals with Fibromyalgia: A Multiple Regression Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Veronica; Brooks, Jessica; Tu, Wei-Mo; Moser, Erin; Lo, Chu-Ling; Chan, Fong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The main objective of this study was to determine the extent to which physical and cognitive-affective factors are associated with fibromyalgia (FM) fatigue. Method: A quantitative descriptive design using correlation techniques and multiple regression analysis. The participants consisted of 302 members of the National Fibromyalgia &…

  4. The Relevance of Depressive Symptoms and Social Support to Disability in Women with Multiple Sclerosis or Fibromyalgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Lorraine J.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis and fibromyalgia syndrome may spur substantial disability for those affected. Using structural equation modeling, this secondary analysis examined predictors of disability in women with multiple sclerosis (n = 118) and fibromyalgia syndrome (n = 197) recruited for separate wellness studies. Greater functional limitations, lower…

  5. Clinicoepidemiological Observational Study of Acquired Alopecias in Females Correlating with Anemia and Thyroid Function

    PubMed Central

    Deo, Kirti; Sharma, Yugal K.; Wadhokar, Meenakshi; Tyagi, Neha

    2016-01-01

    Alopecia can either be inherited or acquired; the latter, more common, can be diffuse, patterned, and focal, each having cicatricial and noncicatricial forms. This observational study of 135 cases in a semiurban Indian population aimed to detect the prevalence of various forms of acquired alopecia in females and correlate the same with levels of hemoglobin, serum ferritin, triiodothyronine, thyroxin, and thyroid stimulating hormone. The majority (84, 62.2%) of our cases of alopecia had telogen effluvium followed by female pattern alopecia (32, 23.7%). Stress (86, 63.7%), topical application of chemicals (72, 53.3%), systemic medications for concurrent illnesses (62, 5%), and pregnancy (14, 10.3%) were the common exacerbating factors. Neither low hemoglobin (<12 gm%, 73.4%) nor low serum ferritin (<12 μg/L, 6.7%) was found to be statistically significant. A majority (90, 90.9%) of 99 cases with anemia (hemoglobin levels of <12 gm%) had serum ferritin levels >12 μg/L. Though lack of vitamin B12 testing was a limitation of our study, its deficiency could be the probable cause of iron deficiency as the majority (58, 64.4%) of these cases, as indeed majority (89, 65.4%) of our study population, were vegetarians. Thyroid disorders (23, 17%, including 9 newly diagnosed) were not of significance statistically. PMID:26904106

  6. Extensive Scalp Angioedema Following High-Dose Diphenylcyclopropenone for Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Rachel; Huynh, Gloria; Tanner, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe a case of an unusual adverse drug reaction to diphenylcyclopropenone for the treatment of alopecia areata. Case summary: A 31-year-old Caucasian male presented with extensive angioedema to the head with neck involvement 10 days following treatment with diphenylcyclopropenone 2% solution in acetone topically on his scalp to treat alopecia areata. Findings on patient presentation included edema of the soft tissues (deeper dermis and subcutaneous tissue) of the head and face with mild neck involvement, acute inflammatory changes from chemical-induced irritation, scalp erythema, and serous fluid drainage from inflamed and fissured edematous scalp. Acute treatments used for control of the reaction included intravenous steroids and antihistamines during hospitalization followed by oral steroids and antihistamines for maintenance during outpatient treatment of the resolving condition. Discussion: The role of topical diphenylcyclopropenone in this case of alopecia areata is probable according to the Naranjo criteria, with a score of 8. Diphenylcyclopropenone is not approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, but it has been used by many clinicians for the treatment of alopecia areata. Diphenylcyclopropenone causes an allergic contact dermatitis in the area of hair loss. In general, diphenylcyclopropenone is applied at a high concentration of 2% once and then at lower concentrations once weekly after the sensitization dose. This patient applied the 2% concentration on multiple consecutive days. Conclusion: Frequent use of topical diphenylcyclopropenone 2% applied to the scalp may cause scalp angioedema. PMID:24421563

  7. Diffuse nonscarring alopecia of scalp: an indicator of early infantile scurvy?

    PubMed

    Ragunatha, Shivanna; Inamadar, Arun C; Palit, Aparna; Sampagavi, Vishwanath V; Deshmukh, Niranjan S

    2008-01-01

    An infant with diffuse nonscarring alopecia of scalp and radiologic features of scurvy responded dramatically to oral vitamin C therapy. The characteristic cutaneous manifestations of scurvy are usually not seen in infancy. The manifestations of initial stage of scurvy that are not related to collagen synthesis, as in the present case, should alert to the possibility of this potentially fatal condition.

  8. UV laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and laser Doppler flowmetry in the diagnostics of alopecia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skomorokha, Diana P.; Pigoreva, Yulia N.; Salmin, Vladimir V.

    2016-04-01

    Development of optical biopsy methods has a great interest for medical diagnostics. In clinical and experimental studies it is very important to analyze blood circulation quickly and accurately, thereby laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is widely used. UV laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (UV LIFS) is express highly sensitive and widely-spread method with no destructive impact, high excitation selectivity and the possibility to use in highly scattering media. The goal of this work was to assess a correlation of UV laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and laser Doppler flowmetry parameters, and a possibility to identify or to differentiate various types of pathological changes in tissues according to their autofluorescence spectra. Three groups of patients with diffuse (symptomatic) alopecia, androgenic alopecia, and focal alopecia have been tested. Each groups consisted of not less than 20 persons. The measurements have been done in the parietal and occipital regions of the sculls. We used the original automated spectrofluorimeter to record autofluorescence spectra, and standard laser Doppler flowmeter BLF-21 (Transonic Systems, Inc., USA) to analyze the basal levels of blood circulation. Our results show that UV LIFS accurately distinguishes the zones with different types of alopecia. We found high correlation of the basal levels of blood circulation and the integrated intensity of autofluorescence in the affected tissue.

  9. Preventive effects of cedrol against alopecia in cyclophosphamide-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Yan; Lu, Qiu-Li; Lin, Zhe; Zhao, Yuqing

    2016-09-01

    Although numerous hypotheses have been proposed to prevent chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA), effective pharmaceuticals have yet to be developed. In our study, the back hairs of C57BL/6 mice were factitiously removed. These mice were then treated with cedrol or minoxidil daily. Mice with early-stage anagen VI hair follicles were treated with cyclophosphamide (CYP, 125mg/kg) to induce alopecia. The CYP-damaged hair follicles were observed and quantified by using a digital photomicrograph. The results demonstrated that the minoxidil-treated mice suffered from complete alopecia similar to the model 6days after CYP administration. Simultaneously, the cedrol-treated (200mg/kg) mice manifested mild alopecia with 40% suppression. Histological observation revealed that anagen hair follicles of the cedrol-pretreated mice (82.5%) likely provided from damage compared with the sparse and dystrophic hair follicles of the model mice (37.0%). Therefore, the use of topical cedrol can prevent hair follicle dystrophy and provide local protection against CIA. PMID:27522546

  10. Management of septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Avinash K; Gedalia, Abraham

    2004-09-01

    Septic arthritis in children remains a serious disease with the potential for significant systemic and musculoskeletal morbidity. Staphlococcus aureus is the most common cause of bone and joint infections in all age groups. Microbial invasion of the synovial space occurs typically results from hematogenous seeding. Diagnosis in neonates and young infants can be difficult since the clinical signs are much less specific in these age groups. Early diagnosis by needle aspiration of the affected joint and prompt initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy in conjunction with drainage of the affected joint is critical to avoid destruction of the articular cartilage and prevent disability. Septic arthritis in infants and children should always be managed by a pediatrician in close consultation with an orthopedic surgeon. Empiric antibiotic regimens should always include adequate anti-staphylococcal coverage. Antibiotic treatment should be started with appropriate doses of intravenous antibiotics. Switch to oral antibiotic therapy can be made when patient demonstrates clinical improvement. A minimum of 3-4 weeks of therapy is recommended. Close follow-up is warranted to monitor the growth of the affected limb until skeletal maturity.

  11. Treatment of pain in fibromyalgia patients with testosterone gel: Pharmacokinetics and clinical response.

    PubMed

    White, Hillary D; Brown, Lin A J; Gyurik, Robert J; Manganiello, Paul D; Robinson, Thomas D; Hallock, Linda S; Lewis, Lionel D; Yeo, Kiang-Teck J

    2015-08-01

    To test our hypothesis that testosterone deficiency plays an important role in chronic pain, a Phase I/II pilot study was initiated with 12 fibromyalgia patients to verify that a daily dose for 28days with transdermal testosterone gel would 1) significantly and safely increase mean serum testosterone concentrations from low baseline levels to mid/high-normal levels, and 2) effectively treat the pain and fatigue symptoms of fibromyalgia. Pharmacokinetic data confirmed that serum free testosterone concentrations were raised significantly above baseline levels, by assessment of maximum hormone concentration (Cmax) and area under the curve (AUC) parameters: free testosterone Cmax was significantly raised from a mean of 2.64pg/mL to 3.91pg/mL (p<0.05), and 24hour free testosterone AUC was significantly raised from a mean of 35.0pg-hr/mL to 53.89pg-hr/mL. Assessment of the typical symptoms of fibromyalgia by patient questionnaire and tender point exam demonstrated significant change in: decreased muscle pain, stiffness, and fatigue, and increased libido during study treatment. These results are consistent with the hypothesized ability of testosterone to relieve the symptoms of fibromyalgia. Symptoms not tightly related to fibromyalgia were not improved. PMID:26004317

  12. Reduced dermal nerve fiber diameter in skin biopsies of patients with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Doppler, Kathrin; Rittner, Heike L; Deckart, Maximiliane; Sommer, Claudia

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have provided evidence of pathology and functional abnormalities of small nerve fibers as a potential correlate of pain in the fibromyalgia syndrome. Here, we aimed to quantify dermal unmyelinated nerve fiber diameter at the electron microscopic level to find a potential morphological correlate of the functional disturbance. Thirty-two patients with fibromyalgia syndrome, 12 patients with small fiber neuropathy, and 24 healthy controls were prospectively recruited. Skin biopsies of the distal and proximal legs and index finger were taken and processed for immunofluorescence and for electron microscopy. We determined the diameter of small unmyelinated nerve fibers by measuring ten transversely cut axons of each biopsy. The mean axon diameter was reduced in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome compared with patients with small fiber neuropathy and controls (P < 0.05). Furthermore, we confirmed previous findings of disturbed small fiber function in quantitative sensory testing and of reduced intraepidermal nerve fiber density in patients with fibromyalgia. Our study provides further evidence of small fiber pathology in fibromyalgia syndrome and discloses differences compared with small fiber neuropathy, indicating that different pathomechanisms may lead to small fiber loss in the 2 disorders.

  13. Ideal versus reality: physicians perspectives on patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Asbring, Pia; Närvänen, Anna-Liisa

    2003-08-01

    Encountering patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) or fibromyalgia can cause dilemmas for physicians due to the uncertainty inherent in these illnesses. The aim of this study was to investigate: (1). How physicians in a Swedish sample describe and categorize patients with CFS and fibromyalgia; (2). What the character of CFS and fibromyalgia, with regard to diagnosing, treatment and medical knowledge/aetiology, mean to the physicians in encounters with patients; and (3). Which strategies physicians describe that they use in the encounter with these patients. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 26 physicians, specialists in various fields who all had some experience of either CFS or fibromyalgia. The results suggest that there is a discrepancy between the ideal role of the physician and reality in the everyday work in interaction with these patients. This may lead to the professional role being questioned. Different strategies are developed to handle the encounters with these patients. The results also illuminate the physician's interpretations of patients in moralising terms. Conditions given the status of illness were regarded, for example, as less serious by the physicians than those with disease status. Scepticism was expressed regarding especially CFS, but also fibromyalgia. Moreover, it is shown how the patients are characterised by the physicians as ambitious, active, illness focused, demanding and medicalising. The patient groups in question do not always gain full access to the sick-role, in part as a consequence of the conditions not being defined as diseases.

  14. Depressive-like symptoms in a reserpine-induced model of fibromyalgia in rats.

    PubMed

    Blasco-Serra, Arantxa; Escrihuela-Vidal, Francesc; González-Soler, Eva M; Martínez-Expósito, Fernando; Blasco-Ausina, M Carmen; Martínez-Bellver, Sergio; Cervera-Ferri, Ana; Teruel-Martí, Vicent; Valverde-Navarro, Alfonso A

    2015-11-01

    Since the pathogenesis of fibromyalgia is unknown, treatment options are limited, ineffective and in fact based on symptom relief. A recently proposed rat model of fibromyalgia is based on central depletion of monamines caused by reserpine administration. This model showed widespread musculoskeletal pain and depressive-like symptoms, but the methodology used to measure such symptoms has been criticized. Evidence relates the high prevalence of pain and depression in fibromyalgia to common pathogenic pathways, most probably focused on the monoaminergic system. The present study aims at a validation of the reserpine model of fibromyalgia. For this purpose, rats undergoing this model have been tested for depressive-like symptoms with a Novelty-Suppressed Feeding Test adaptation. Animals administered with reserpine and subjected to forced food deprivation performed a smaller number of incursions to the center of the open field, evidenced by a decrease in the per-minute rate of the rats' approaching, smelling or touching the food. They also took more time to eat from the central food than control rats. These NSFT findings suggest the presence of depressive-like disorders in this animal model of fibromyalgia.

  15. Treatment of pain in fibromyalgia patients with testosterone gel: Pharmacokinetics and clinical response.

    PubMed

    White, Hillary D; Brown, Lin A J; Gyurik, Robert J; Manganiello, Paul D; Robinson, Thomas D; Hallock, Linda S; Lewis, Lionel D; Yeo, Kiang-Teck J

    2015-08-01

    To test our hypothesis that testosterone deficiency plays an important role in chronic pain, a Phase I/II pilot study was initiated with 12 fibromyalgia patients to verify that a daily dose for 28days with transdermal testosterone gel would 1) significantly and safely increase mean serum testosterone concentrations from low baseline levels to mid/high-normal levels, and 2) effectively treat the pain and fatigue symptoms of fibromyalgia. Pharmacokinetic data confirmed that serum free testosterone concentrations were raised significantly above baseline levels, by assessment of maximum hormone concentration (Cmax) and area under the curve (AUC) parameters: free testosterone Cmax was significantly raised from a mean of 2.64pg/mL to 3.91pg/mL (p<0.05), and 24hour free testosterone AUC was significantly raised from a mean of 35.0pg-hr/mL to 53.89pg-hr/mL. Assessment of the typical symptoms of fibromyalgia by patient questionnaire and tender point exam demonstrated significant change in: decreased muscle pain, stiffness, and fatigue, and increased libido during study treatment. These results are consistent with the hypothesized ability of testosterone to relieve the symptoms of fibromyalgia. Symptoms not tightly related to fibromyalgia were not improved.

  16. Cognitive Factors in Fibromyalgia: The Role of Self-Concept and Identity Related Conflicts

    PubMed Central

    Compañ, Victoria; Feixas, Guillem; Varlotta-Domínguez, Nicolás; Torres-Viñals, Mercedes; Aguilar-Alonso, Ángel; Dada, Gloria; Ángel Saúl, Luís

    2010-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a syndrome characterized by the presence of diffuse and chronic musculoskeletal pain of unknown etiology. Clinical diagnosis and the merely palliative treatments considerably affect the patient's experience and the chronic course of the disease. Therefore, several authors have emphasized the need to explore issues related to self in these patients. The repertory grid technique (RGT), derived from personal construct theory, is a method designed to assess the patient's construction of self and others. A group of women with fibromyalgia (n = 30) and a control group (n = 30) were assessed using RGT. Women with fibromyalgia also completed the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire and a visualanalogue scale for pain, and painful tender points were explored. Results suggest that these women had a higher present self–ideal self discrepancy and a lower perceived adequacy of others, and it was more likely to find implicative dilemmas among them compared to controls. These dilemmas are a type of cognitive conflict in which the symptom is construed as “enmeshed” with positive characteristics of the self. Finally, implications of these results for the psychological treatment of fibromyalgia are suggested to give a more central role to self-identity issues and to the related cognitive conflicts. PMID:22629110

  17. Mitochondrial dysfunction and mitophagy activation in blood mononuclear cells of fibromyalgia patients: implications in the pathogenesis of the disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain syndrome with unknown etiology. Recent studies have shown some evidence demonstrating that oxidative stress may have a role in the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia. However, it is still not clear whether oxidative stress is the cause or the effect of the abnormalities documented in fibromyalgia. Furthermore, the role of mitochondria in the redox imbalance reported in fibromyalgia also is controversial. We undertook this study to investigate the role of mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and mitophagy in fibromyalgia. Methods We studied 20 patients (2 male, 18 female patients) from the database of the Sevillian Fibromyalgia Association and 10 healthy controls. We evaluated mitochondrial function in blood mononuclear cells from fibromyalgia patients measuring, coenzyme Q10 levels with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and mitochondrial membrane potential with flow cytometry. Oxidative stress was determined by measuring mitochondrial superoxide production with MitoSOX™ and lipid peroxidation in blood mononuclear cells and plasma from fibromyalgia patients. Autophagy activation was evaluated by quantifying the fluorescence intensity of LysoTracker™ Red staining of blood mononuclear cells. Mitophagy was confirmed by measuring citrate synthase activity and electron microscopy examination of blood mononuclear cells. Results We found reduced levels of coenzyme Q10, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, increased levels of mitochondrial superoxide in blood mononuclear cells, and increased levels of lipid peroxidation in both blood mononuclear cells and plasma from fibromyalgia patients. Mitochondrial dysfunction was also associated with increased expression of autophagic genes and the elimination of dysfunctional mitochondria with mitophagy. Conclusions These findings may support the role of oxidative stress and mitophagy in the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia. PMID:20109177

  18. The Spectrum of Histopathological Lesions in Scarring Alopecia: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar U., Mahesh; Yelikar, Balasaheb Ramling

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the article was to study the histopathological features of various lesions of Scarring Alopecia (SA) and to classify Primary SA on the basis of the predominant type of inflammatory cell component. Scarring or cicatricial alopecias are those that are produced as a result of the malformation, damage or destruction of the pilosebaceous follicles, which are replaced by cicatricial tissue, in such a way that they cannot again produce hair. Material and Methods: This prospective study included 32 biopsy – proven cases of SA, who had attended our hospital. Primary SA was classified according to the North American Hair Research Society. The informed consents of the subjects and the institutional ethical clearance was obtained for the study. The SPSS, version 14 software was used to analyse the data. Frequencies and percentages were used to describe the data. Results: During the study period, 32 cases of scarring alopecia were diagnosed, of which 24 were primary SA and 8 were secondary SA. Among the primary SA, there were 23 cases of lymphocyte associated primary scarring alopecias, of which, 19 of lupus erythematosus, 3 of lichen planopilaris (LPP) and one case of non specific SA. 1 case of neutrophil associated primary scarring (folliculitis decalvans) was also noted and among the secondary SA, there were 4 cases of morphea and 1 case each of lupus vulgaris, congenital absence of skin, burn and sarcoidosis. Conclusion: To conclude, histopathology is a dependable tool for identifying the underlying cause in scarring alopecia, which is helpful for an early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:23998068

  19. Rheumatoid arthritis and ocular involvement.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Chittaranjan; Banik, Sujoy; Islam, Md Nazarul; Biswas, Mukul Chandra; Biswas, Gautam; Biswas, Sobhan

    2003-09-01

    To study the occurrence and incidence of different ocular manifestations in rheumatoid arthritis a random cross-sectional study was carried out among 54 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis. The patients were examined thoroughly to detect any ocular disease associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Complete ocular examination with special emphasis on anterior segment evaluation and tearfilm study was done. Two-thirds of the patients examined had some kind of visual problem at presentation. Three patients (5.55%) had marked dry eye with another 20 (37.03%) having borderline tear deficiency. Two cases ( 3.70% ) of episcleritis were also seen. No cases of scleritis or retinopathy were found. The most common ocular association with rheumatoid arthritis was secondary Sjogren's syndrome. Other conditions include episcleritis and marginal keratitis.

  20. Stay active and exercise - arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your overall health and sense of well-being. Exercise keeps your muscles strong and increases your range ... Water exercises may be the best exercise for your arthritis. Swimming laps, water aerobics, or even just walking in ...