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  1. Association of antithyroid peroxidase antibody with fibromyalgia in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Jowairiyya; Blumen, Helena; Tagoe, Clement E

    2015-08-01

    To investigate how autoimmune thyroiditis (ATD) affects the clinical presentation of established rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with particular reference to fibromyalgia and chronic widespread pain (CWP). A cohort of 204 patients with RA for whom the presence or absence of autoimmune thyroid antibodies was documented was examined for the relationships between thyroid autoantibodies and fibromyalgia or CWP. We identified 29 % who tested positive for antithyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb). The anti-thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb) was found in 24 %. Among the thyroid autoantibody-positive patients, 40 % had a diagnosis of fibromyalgia or CWP versus 17 % for antibody negative patients. Logistic regression analyses (adjusted by age, sex, diabetes and BMI) indicated that TPOAb-positive patients were more likely to have fibromyalgia or CWP, with an odds ratio (OR) of 4.641, 95 % confidence interval (CI) (2.110-10.207) P < .001. Adjusting for spinal degenerative disc disease did not change the association with fibromyalgia, OR 4.458, 95 % CI (1.950-10.191), P < .001. The OR between TgAb and fibromyalgia was not significant (P > .05). Additional logistic regression analyses (adjusted by age, sex and BMI) indicated a significant relationship between TPOAb and fibromyalgia or CWP in patients without diabetes and those without hypothyroidism (OR of 4.873, 95 % CI (1.877-12.653), P = .001 and OR of 4.615 95 % CI (1.810-11.770), P = .001, respectively). There may be a positive association between the ATD antibody TPOAb, and fibromyalgia syndrome and CWP in patients with established RA.

  2. Childhood Traumatic Experiences, Anxiety, and Depression Levels in Fibromyalgia and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    BAYRAM, Korhan; EROL, Almıla

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The close relationship between chronic pain, anxiety, depression, and childhood traumatic experiences is well known. The aim of this study is to investigate childhood traumatic experiences, anxiety, and depression levels in patients with fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis, which are diseases that cause chronic pain. Method A total of 30 patients with fibromyalgia, 30 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and 30 healthy controls, matched with patients with respect to gender, age, and education, were included in the study (90 participants in total). All participants were given a form for sociodemographic characteristics, the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD). Patients were also asked to complete a numeric pain scale (NPS). Results Patients with fibromyalgia reported significantly higher scores for CTQ emotional abuse and HAD depression compared with healthy controls. Patients with fibromyalgia reported significantly higher scores for HAD anxiety than both healthy controls and patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis reported significantly higher scores for CTQ emotional abuse and HAD depression compared with healthy controls. Pain scores of patients with fibromyalgia were higher than in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Participants who had scores over the threshold on HAD anxiety and depression had significantly higher scores on CTQ sexual abuse. Conclusion Both patients with fibromyalgia and patients with rheumatoid arthritis have high levels of childhood traumatic experiences and depression. Patients with pain-related disorders should be examined for childhood traumatic experiences, anxiety, and depression for better treatment outcomes.

  3. Dissociative depression among women with fibromyalgia or rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Ozge; Sar, Vedat; Taycan, Okan; Aksoy-Poyraz, Cana; Erol, Turgut C; Tecer, Ozlem; Emul, Murat H; Ozmen, Mine

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to inquire about the possible relations of childhood trauma, anger, and dissociation to depression among women with fibromyalgia or rheumatoid arthritis. Fifty female patients diagnosed as having fibromyalgia (n = 30) or rheumatoid arthritis (n = 20) participated in the study. The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire (SDQ), Dissociation Questionnaire (DIS-Q), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Spielberger State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory, and Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule were administered to all participants. Women with a lifetime diagnosis of depressive disorder had higher scores for somatoform and psychoform dissociation than the nondepressive patients. However, childhood trauma scores did not differ between the 2 groups. In regression analysis, current severity of depression (BDI) was predicted by psychoform dissociation (DIS-Q) and lower education, and lifetime diagnosis of major depression was predicted by somatoform dissociation (SDQ). Whereas childhood emotional neglect predicted somatoform dissociation, psychoform dissociation was predicted by childhood sexual abuse. Mental processing of anger seems to be 1 of the dimensions of psychodynamics in trauma-related depressive conditions. In the context of the perceived threat of loss of control due to expressed anger and mental disintegration, somatoform dissociation seems to contribute to overmodulation of emotions in dissociative depression. Among patients suffering from physical illness with possible psychosomatic dimensions, assessment of somatoform dissociation in addition to psychoform dissociation may be helpful to understand diverse psychopathological trajectories emerging in the aftermath of childhood adversities. The recently proposed category of "dissociative depression" (Sar, 2011) seems to be a promising concept for future research on psychosomatic aspects of traumatic stress.

  4. Fibromyalgia

    MedlinePlus

    Fibromyalgia is a disorder that causes muscle pain and fatigue. People with fibromyalgia have "tender points" on the body. Tender points ... when pressure is put on them. People with fibromyalgia may also have other symptoms, such as Trouble ...

  5. Fibromyalgia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Executive Summary Resources Infographics Online Training Press Room Fibromyalgia Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... their quality of life? More information What is fibromyalgia? Fibromyalgia (\\fi·bro·my·al·gi·a\\) is ...

  6. Pain mystery score beliefs: a comparison of fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Robert; Russell, Anthony Science

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To compare the mysteriousness scores of the Pain Beliefs and Perceptions Inventory in fibromyalgia. Methods. Two cohorts of patients, one with fibromyalgia (FM) and one with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), completed the Mystery Scale component of the Pain Beliefs and Perceptions Inventory to determine whether subjects in the two diagnostic groups had significantly different scores on the Mystery Scale. Results. A total of 126 subjects (64 FM, 62 RA) completed all questionnaires. The FM group had a greater percentage of female subjects, more severe pain, more severe anxiety, more severe depression, and a higher perceived injustice score. When the RA and FM group scores for the Mystery Scale were adjusted for age, sex, pain severity, HADS scores, and perceived injustice scores, the FM group still had a higher Mystery Scale score. Discussion. Fibromyalgia is associated with a higher level of perception of mysteriousness in the Pain Beliefs and Perceptions Inventory than is seen with rheumatoid arthritis. This difference appears to be independent of levels of pain, depression, anxiety, and perceived injustice. This sense of mysteriousness may reflect a lack of understanding of pain in fibromyalgia as previously reported and may be an area to be addressed in therapy.

  7. Key symptom domains to be assessed in fibromyalgia (outcome measures in rheumatoid arthritis clinical trials).

    PubMed

    Choy, Ernest H; Mease, Philip J

    2009-05-01

    This article discusses the key symptom domains to be assessed in fibromyalgia. Development of a consensus on a core set of outcome measures that should be assessed and reported in all clinical trials is needed to facilitate interpretation, pooling, and comparison of results. This aligns with the key objective of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatoid Arthritis Clinical Trials initiative to improve outcome measurement in rheumatic diseases through a data-driven interactive consensus process.

  8. [Alopecia areata secondary to the use of leflunomide in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Molina Molina, María Ignacia; Pinochet Paiva, Carmen María; Quezada Morales, José Ignacio

    2015-12-30

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, highly disabling autoimmune disease that requires aggressive pharmacological treatment using immunomodulatory drugs grouped under the name of Disease-Modifying Anti-rheumatic Drugs (DMARDs). Leflunomide is one of the most frequently prescribed. This drug, through its mechanism of action is able to suppress key factors in the disease process. However, its use is not without side effects. While there are series that report that the most prevalent adverse effects are diarrhea, nausea, rash and alopecia, there are few reported cases of alopecia universalis secondary to the use of leflunomide. We present a case in the Regional Hospital of Talca and a review of the use of leflunomide.

  9. Diurnal hormone variation in fibromyalgia syndrome: a comparison with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    McCain, G A; Tilbe, K S

    1989-11-01

    Twenty patients with fibromyalgia syndrome and 20 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were assessed as outpatients over a 3 day period with respect to peak and trough levels of plasma cortisol, growth hormone, prolactin, ACTH and thyroid stimulating hormone. Patients with fibromyalgia syndrome had loss of diurnal variation in plasma cortisol (trough levels 347.3 +/- 254.7 vs 232.8 +/- 70.0 nmol/l, p less than 0.001) compared with RA patients. Thirty-five percent (7/20) of patients with fibromyalgia syndrome and only 5 percent (1/20) of those with RA exhibited abnormal dexamethasone suppression tests (p less than 0.001). No differences were noted in the diurnal variation of other hormones tested. Beck Depression Inventory scores were similar in both groups and no patient exhibited clinical evidence of depression. These data suggest alteration in the pituitary hypothalamic axis with respect to cortisol secretion in fibromyalgia syndrome, perhaps as a consequence of chronic pain.

  10. Fibromyalgia

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment. Treatment for fibromyalgia may include the following: Pain management. Three medicines have been approved by the U.S. ... future. Your doctor may also suggest non-narcotic pain relievers, low-dose antidepressants, ... Sleep management. Getting the right amount of sleep at night ...

  11. Fibromyalgia

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms. The first type of treatment may involve: Physical therapy Exercise and fitness program Stress-relief methods, including ... M, Balzarini L, Mancini C, Ramponi S, Marvisi C. Fibromyalgia is frequent in obstructive sleep apnea and responds to CPAP therapy. Eur J Intern Med . 2015;26(9):e49- ...

  12. Fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Häuser, Winfried; Ablin, Jacob; Fitzcharles, Mary-Ann; Littlejohn, Geoffrey; Luciano, Juan V; Usui, Chie; Walitt, Brian

    2015-08-13

    Fibromyalgia is a common illness characterized by chronic widespread pain, sleep problems (including unrefreshing sleep), physical exhaustion and cognitive difficulties. The definition, pathogenesis and treatment are controversial, and some even contest the existence of this disorder. In 1990, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) defined classification criteria that required multiple tender points (areas of tenderness occurring in muscles and muscle-tendon junctions) and chronic widespread pain. In 2010, the ACR preliminary diagnostic criteria excluded tender points, allowed less extensive pain and placed reliance on patient-reported somatic symptoms and cognitive difficulties. Fibromyalgia occurs in all populations worldwide, and symptom prevalence ranges between 2% and 4% in the general population. The prevalence of people who are actually diagnosed with fibromyalgia ('administrative prevalence') is much lower. A model of fibromyalgia pathogenesis has been suggested in which biological and psychosocial variables interact to influence the predisposition, triggering and aggravation of a chronic disease, but the details are unclear. Diagnosis requires the history of a typical cluster of symptoms and the exclusion of a somatic disease that sufficiently explains the symptoms by medical examination. Current evidence-based guidelines emphasize the value of multimodal treatments, which encompass both non-pharmacological and selected pharmacological treatments tailored to individual symptoms, including pain, fatigue, sleep problems and mood problems. For an illustrated summary of this Primer, visit: http://go.nature.com/LIBdDX.

  13. Mucosal-Associated Invariant T Cell Is a Potential Marker to Distinguish Fibromyalgia Syndrome from Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Konno, Takahiko; Wakao, Rika; Fujita, Hiroko; Fujita, Hiroyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia (FM) is defined as a widely distributed pain. While many rheumatologists and pain physicians have considered it to be a pain disorder, psychiatry, psychology, and general medicine have deemed it to be a syndrome (FMS) or psychosomatic disorder. The lack of concrete structural and/or pathological evidence has made patients suffer prejudice that FMS is a medically unexplained symptom, implying inauthenticity. Furthermore, FMS often exhibits comorbidity with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or spondyloarthritis (SpA), both of which show similar indications. In this study, disease specific biomarkers were sought in blood samples from patients to facilitate objective diagnoses of FMS, and distinguish it from RA and SpA. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients and healthy donors (HD) were subjected to multicolor flow cytometric analysis. The percentage of mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells in PBMCs and the mean fluorescent intensity (MFI) of cell surface antigen expression in MAIT cells were analyzed. Results There was a decrease in the MAIT cell population in FMS, RA, and SpA compared with HD. Among the cell surface antigens in MAIT cells, three chemokine receptors, CCR4, CCR7, and CXCR1, a natural killer (NK) receptor, NKp80, a signaling lymphocyte associated molecule (SLAM) family, CD150, a degrunulation marker, CD107a, and a coreceptor, CD8β emerged as potential biomarkers for FMS to distinguish from HD. Additionally, a memory marker, CD44 and an inflammatory chemokine receptor, CXCR1 appeared possible markers for RA, while a homeostatic chemokine receptor, CXCR4 deserved for SpA to differentiate from FMS. Furthermore, the drug treatment interruption resulted in alternation of the expression of CCR4, CCR5, CXCR4, CD27, CD28, inducible costimulatory molecule (ICOS), CD127 (IL-7 receptor α), CD94, NKp80, an activation marker, CD69, an integrin family member, CD49d, and a dipeptidase, CD26, in FMS. Conclusions

  14. Self-Reported Childhood Maltreatment and Traumatic Events among Israeli Patients Suffering from Fibromyalgia and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hellou, Raneen; Brenner, Inbal; Buskila, Dan; Jacob, Giris; Elkayam, Ori; Aloush, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    Objective. The association between Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS) and childhood maltreatment and adversity has frequently been proposed but limited data exists regarding the transcultural nature of this association. Methods. 75 Israeli FMS patients and 23 Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) patients were compared. Childhood maltreatment was assessed by the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) and potential depressive and anxiety disorders were assessed by the Patient Health Questionnaire-4. FMS severity was assessed by the Widespread Pain Index (WPI), the Symptom Severity Score (SSS), and the FIQ. PTSD was diagnosed according to the DSM IV. RA severity was assessed by the RA Disease Activity Index. Health status was assessed by the SF-36. Results. Similar to reports in other countries, high levels of self-reported childhood adversity were reported by Israeli FMS patients. PTSD was significantly more common among FMS patients compared with RA patients, as well as childhood emotional abuse and physical and emotional neglect. Levels of depression and anxiety were significantly higher among FMS patients. Conclusion. The study demonstrated the cross cultural association between FMS and childhood maltreatment, including neglect, emotional abuse, and PTSD. Significant differences were demonstrated between FMS patients and patients suffering from RA, a model of an inflammatory chronic rheumatic disease. PMID:28167861

  15. Does primary fibromyalgia exist?

    PubMed

    Forslind, K; Fredriksson, E; Nived, O

    1990-10-01

    Twenty-one of 25 consecutive primary fibromyalgia or fibrositis patients, identified during a 5-year period in a tertiary care day-ward for pain syndromes, were re-examined. Fifteen fulfilled criteria for fibromyalgia but unexpectedly, all cases had either psychiatric disturbance or thyroid dysfunction. Of the four patients not seen at follow-up, two had developed neurological diseases, another rheumatoid arthritis and one other hypothyroidism. Thus, after 5 years no patient fulfilled the criteria for primary fibromyalgia. Women occupied as manual workers were over-represented. Most patients reported beneficial effects of physiotherapy. None of the patients has been able to return to full time work.

  16. Alopecia universalis during treatment with leflunomide and adalimumab - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Lazzarini, Rosana; Capareli, Gabriela Cunha; Buense, Roberta; Lellis, Rute Facchini

    2014-01-01

    Alopecia areata is a non-scarring form of alopecia that can be localized or widespread. Its etiology is unknown, but immunological factors are implicated in its pathogenesis. With the more frequent use of anti TNFα biologic drugs, some alopecia areata cases during their use have been described. We report a case of universal alopecia in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis while using adalimumab and leflunomide. PMID:24770511

  17. Cytokine and chemokine profiles in fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus: a potentially useful tool in differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Daniel J; Gavin, Igor M; Karpenko, Oleksly; Barkhordar, Farnaz; Gillis, Bruce S

    2015-06-01

    Making a correct diagnosis is pivotal in the practice of clinical rheumatology. Occasionally, the consultation fails to provide desired clarity in making labeling an individual as having fibromyalgia (FM), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A chemokine and cytokine multiplex assay was developed and tested with the goal of improving and achieving an accurate differential diagnosis. 160 patients with FM, 98 with RA and 100 with SLE fulfilling accepted criteria were recruited and compared to 119 controls. Supernatant cytokine concentrations for IL-6, IL-8, MIP-1 alpha and MIP-1 beta were determined using the Luminex multiplex immunoassay bead array technology after mitogenic stimulation of cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Each patient's profile was scored using a logistical regression model to achieve statistically determined weighting for each chemokine and cytokine. Among the 477 patients evaluated, the mean scores for FM (1.7 ± 1.2; 1.52-1.89), controls (-3.56 ± 5.7; -4.59 to -2.54), RA (-0.68 ± 2.26; -1.12 to -0.23) and SLE (-1.45 ± 3.34, -2.1 to -0.79). Ninety-three percent with FM scored positive compared to only 11% of healthy controls, 69% RA or 71% SLE patients had negative scores. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive and negative predictive value for having FM compared to controls was 93, 89, 92 and 91%, respectively (p < 2.2 × 10(-16)). Evaluating cytokine and chemokine profiles in stimulated cells reveals patterns that are uniquely present in patients with FM. This assay can be a useful tool in assisting clinicians in differentiating systemic inflammatory autoimmune processes from FM and its related syndromes and healthy individuals.

  18. Pressure Alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Kate E; Yesudian, PD

    2012-01-01

    Postoperative or pressure alopecia (PA) is an infrequently reported group of scarring and non-scarring alopecias. It has been reported after immobilization of the head during surgery and following prolonged stays on intensive care units, and may be analogous to a healed pressure ulcer. This review presents a summary of cases published in pediatrics and after cardiac, gynecological, abdominal and facial surgeries. PA may manifest as swelling, tenderness, and ulceration of the scalp in the first few postoperative days; in other cases, the alopecia may be the presenting feature with a history of scalp immobilization in the previous four weeks. The condition may cause considerable psychological distress in the long term. Regular head turning schedules and vigilance for the condition should be used as prophylaxis to prevent permanent alopecia. A multi-center study in high-risk patients would be beneficial to shed further light on the etiology of the condition. PMID:23180911

  19. Evidence of different mediators of central inflammation in dysfunctional and inflammatory pain — Interleukin-8 in fibromyalgia and interleukin-1 β in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kosek, Eva; Altawil, Reem; Kadetoff, Diana; Finn, Anja; Westman, Marie; Le Maître, Erwan; Andersson, Magnus; Jensen-Urstad, Mats; Lampa, Jon

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to relate central inflammation to autonomic activity (heart rate variability (HRV)) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and fibromyalgia (FM). RA patients had reduced parasympathetic activity and FM patients had increased sympathetic activity compared to healthy controls. Comparisons between RA and FM showed higher cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) interleukin (IL)-1β inversely correlated to parasympathetic activity in RA. The FM patients had higher concentrations of CSF IL-8, IL-1Ra, IL-4 and IL-10, but none of these cytokines correlated with HRV. In conclusion, we found different profiles of central cytokines, i.e., elevated IL-1β in inflammatory pain (RA) and elevated IL-8 in dysfunctional pain (FM). PMID:25773155

  20. National Alopecia Areata Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... HAP Alopecia Areata Donate Get Involved Email * ZIP Code * Nav Drop Down Alopecia Areata Overview Alopecia Areata ... latest updates Get the Latest Updates Email * ZIP Code * Footer About Menu About Staff Board of Directors ...

  1. Living with Alopecia Areata

    MedlinePlus

    ... HAP Alopecia Areata Donate Get Involved Email * ZIP Code * Nav Drop Down Alopecia Areata Overview Alopecia Areata ... NAAF info pack to learn more Email * ZIP Code * Connect with community Forming a community with people ...

  2. Androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Piraccini, B M; Alessandrini, A

    2014-02-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is the most common form of alopecia, affecting up to 80% of men and 50% of women in the course of their life. AGA is caused by a progressive reduction in the diameter, length and pigmentation of the hair. Hair thinning results from the effects of the testosterone metabolite dehydrotestosterone (DHT) on androgen-sensitive hair follicles. In women, AGA produces diffuse thinning of the crown region with maintenance of the frontal hairline (Ludwig pattern AGA). In premenopausal women, AGA can be a sign of hyperandrogenism, together with hirsutism and acnes. Male pattern is characterized by bitemporal recession of the frontal hairline, followed by diffuse thinning at the vertex. Today, scalp dermoscopy is used routinely in patients with androgenetic alopecia, as it facilitates the diagnosis and differential diagnosis with other diseases, allows staging of severity, and allows you to monitor the progress of the disease in time and response to treatment. AGA is a progressive disease that tends to worsen with time. Medical treatment of AGA includes topical minoxidil, antiandrogen agents, 5-alpha reductase inhibitors.

  3. Fibromyalgia Misconceptions

    MedlinePlus

    ... the mind is a real factor in pain perception. For example, studies have shown that anxiety that ... http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/fibromyalgia/in-depth/fibromyalgia/ART-20048097 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions ...

  4. Alopecia areata

    PubMed Central

    Spano, Frank; Donovan, Jeff C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To provide family physicians with a background understanding of the therapeutic regimens and treatment outcomes for alopecia areata (AA), as well as to help identify those patients for whom dermatologist referral might be required. Sources of information PubMed was searched for relevant articles regarding the treatment of AA. Main message Alopecia areata is a form of autoimmune hair loss affecting both children and adults. While there is no associated mortality with the disease, morbidity from the psychological effects of hair loss can be devastating. Upon identification of AA and the disease subtype, an appropriate therapeutic regimen can be instituted to help halt hair loss or possibly initiate hair regrowth. First-line treatment involves intralesional triamcinolone with topical steroids or minoxidil or both. Primary care physicians can safely prescribe and institute these treatments. More advanced or refractory cases might require oral immunosuppressants, topical diphenylcyclopropenone, or topical anthralin. Eyelash loss can be treated with prostaglandin analogues. Those with extensive loss might choose camouflaging options or a hair prosthesis. It is important to monitor for psychiatric disorders owing to the profound psychological effects of hair loss. Conclusion Family physicians will encounter many patients experiencing hair loss. Recognition of AA and an understanding of the underlying disease process will allow an appropriate therapeutic regimen to be instituted. More advanced or refractory cases need to be identified, allowing for an appropriate dermatologist referral when necessary. PMID:26371098

  5. Treatment for alopecia.

    PubMed

    Rossi, A; Calvieri, S

    2014-02-01

    Satisfactory, evidence-based medicine regimen for treating alopecia are available in literature only regarding alopecia areata and androgenetic alopecia. About all the other kinds of alopecia, recommendations for therapy are still based upon the literature review, expert opinion, personal experience, expected adverse effects, and some pragmatic considerations such as the cost and the patient's compliance. Cicatricial alopecia is one of the most difficult challenges for dermatologists, because it is uncommon, its etiopathogenesis is not completely understood and there is no best therapy approach. Moreover, in Italy, most of the drugs mentioned below are not always available. Finally, therapies for hair disorders are long treatment and not always lead to a good improvement.

  6. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Over time, a swollen joint can become severely damaged. Some kinds of arthritis can also cause problems in your organs, such as your eyes or skin. Types of arthritis include Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis. It's ...

  7. Alopecia secondary to mesotherapy.

    PubMed

    Duque-Estrada, Bruna; Vincenzi, Colombina; Misciali, Cosimo; Tosti, Antonella

    2009-10-01

    Mesotherapy has recently become an advertised method for the treatment of different types of alopecia despite the lack of any data regarding its efficacy and possible side effects. The substances injected into the scalp include "cocktails" of natural plant extracts, homoeopathic agents, vitamins, vasodilators, and drugs that may stimulate hair growth, such as finasteride and minoxidil. We report two cases of patchy alopecia that developed after mesotherapy for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia. In the first patient, alopecia developed after injections of the heparinoid vasodilator mesoglycan; the 3-month follow-up examination revealed a small residual area of cicatricial alopecia. The second patient developed reversible alopecia after multiple scalp injections of homeopathic agents. These cases underline the possible risks of mesotherapy as a therapeutic technique for hair loss.

  8. Mediterranean diet or extended fasting's influence on changing the intestinal microflora, immunoglobulin A secretion and clinical outcome in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Michalsen, Andreas; Riegert, Markus; Lüdtke, Rainer; Bäcker, Marcus; Langhorst, Jost; Schwickert, Myriam; Dobos, Gustav J

    2005-01-01

    Background Alterations in the intestinal bacterial flora are believed to be contributing factors to many chronic inflammatory and degenerative diseases including rheumatic diseases. While microbiological fecal culture analysis is now increasingly used, little is known about the relationship of changes in intestinal flora, dietary patterns and clinical outcome in specific diseases. To clarify the role of microbiological culture analysis we aimed to evaluate whether in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or fibromyalgia (FM) a Mediterranean diet or an 8-day fasting period are associated with changes in fecal flora and whether changes in fecal flora are associated with clinical outcome. Methods During a two-months-period 51 consecutive patients from an Integrative Medicine hospital department with an established diagnosis of RA (n = 16) or FM (n = 35) were included in the study. According to predefined clinical criteria and the subjects' choice the patients received a mostly vegetarian Mediterranean diet (n = 21; mean age 50.9 +/-13.3 y) or participated in an intermittent modified 8-day fasting therapy (n = 30; mean age 53.7 +/- 9.4 y). Quantitative aerob and anaerob bacterial flora, stool pH and concentrations of secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) were analysed from stool samples at the beginning, at the end of the 2-week hospital stay and at a 3-months follow-up. Clinical outcome was assessed with the DAS 28 for RA patients and with a disease severity rating scale in FM patients. Results We found no significant changes in the fecal bacterial counts following the two dietary interventions within and between groups, nor were significant differences found in the analysis of sIgA and stool ph. Clinical improvement at the end of the hospital stay tended to be greater in fasting vs. non-fasting patients with RA (p = 0.09). Clinical outcome was not related to alterations in the intestinal flora. Conclusion Neither Mediterranean diet nor fasting treatments affect the

  9. Adolescent androgenic alopecia.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Patrick Henry; Schwartz, Robert A

    2011-10-01

    Adolescent androgenic alopecia is pattern hair loss occurring in boys and girls younger than 18 years, whereas early-onset androgenic alopecia refers to pattern hair loss before 35 years of age. A number of studies published in the last decade have helped to elucidate the prevalence of adolescent androgenic alopecia, have clarified the genetic as well as physiologic mechanisms underlying hair loss, and have revealed the associated psychologic and systemic morbidities. This article provides an overview of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of adolescent androgenic alopecia.

  10. What Is Fibromyalgia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inflammation in the body and its relationship to fibromyalgia. Nondrug therapies to help reduce pain. Methods to improve sleep in people with fibromyalgia. For More Information About Fibromyalgia and Other Related ...

  11. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... joints Infection, most often by bacteria or virus Crystals such as uric acid or calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate ... common types of inflammatory arthritis include: Ankylosing ... calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease Juvenile rheumatoid ...

  12. An Overview of Alopecias

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Ji; Garza, Luis A.

    2014-01-01

    Hair loss is a topic of enormous public interest and understanding the pathophysiology and treatment of various alopecias will likely make a large impact on patients’ lives. The investigation of alopecias also provides important insight in the basic sciences; for instance, the abundance of stem cell populations and regenerative cycles that characterize a hair follicle render it an excellent model for the study of stem cell biology. This review seeks to provide a concise summary of the major alopecias with regard to presentation and management, and correlate these to recent advances in relevant research on pathogenesis. PMID:24591533

  13. Primary cicatricial alopecia: Other lymphocytic primary cicatricial alopecias and neutrophilic and mixed primary cicatricial alopecias.

    PubMed

    Bolduc, Chantal; Sperling, Leonard C; Shapiro, Jerry

    2016-12-01

    Primary cicatricial alopecias can be frustrating for both patients and physicians. Proper diagnosis guides more successful management of these challenging conditions. Part II will cover the remaining lymphocytic primary cicatricial alopecias, which include pseudopelade of Brocq, central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia, alopecia mucinosa, and keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans. It will also discuss the neutrophilic and mixed primary cicatricial alopecias, namely folliculitis decalvans, dissecting cellulitis, folliculitis keloidalis, folliculitis (acne) necrotica, and erosive pustular dermatosis.

  14. Fibromyalgia Symptoms or Not? Understand the Fibromyalgia Diagnosis Process

    MedlinePlus

    ... time to go from fibromyalgia symptoms to a fibromyalgia diagnosis. Fibromyalgia can't be easily confirmed or ruled out ... there is no lab test to confirm a diagnosis of fibromyalgia, your doctor may want to rule out other ...

  15. Hair Loss (Alopecia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... otherwise healthy people. The disease destroys a person’s hair follicles. Scar tissue forms where the follicles once were, ... tries to stop the inflammation, which destroys the hair follicles. Central centrifugal cicatricial (scarring) alopecia: This type of ...

  16. Fibromyalgia and arthritides.

    PubMed

    Atzeni, F; Sallì, S; Benucci, M; Di Franco, M; Alciati, A; Sarzi-Puttini, P

    2012-09-28

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain syndrome that affects at least 2% of the adult population. It is characterised by widespread pain, fatigue, sleep alterations and distress, and emerging evidence suggests a central nervous system (CNS) malfunction that increases pain transmission and perception. FM is often associated with other diseases that act as confounding and aggravating factors, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), spondyloarthritides (SpA), osteoarthritis (OA) and thyroid disease. Mechanism-based FM management should consider both peripheral and central pain, including effects due to cerebral input and that come from the descending inhibitory pathways. Rheumatologists should be able to distinguish primary and secondary FM, and need new guidelines and instruments to avoid making mistakes, bearing in mind that the diffuse pain of arthritides compromises the patients' quality of life.

  17. Postoperative permanent pressure alopecia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zi Yun; Ngian, Jan; Chong, Claudia; Chong, Chin Ted; Liew, Qui Yin

    2016-04-01

    A 49-year-old Chinese female underwent elective laparoscopic assisted Whipple's surgery lasting 12 h. This was complicated by postoperative pressure alopecia at the occipital area of the scalp. Pressure-induced hair loss after general anaesthesia is uncommon and typically temporary, but may be disconcerting to the patient. We report this case of postoperative permanent pressure alopecia due to its rarity in the anaesthesia/local literature, and review the risk factors for its development.

  18. Alopecia in general medicine.

    PubMed

    Nalluri, Rajani; Harries, Matthew

    2016-02-01

    Appreciation of different types of hair loss (alopecia) that may be encountered in hospital medicine is important to ensure accurate diagnosis and management, identify underlying medical conditions or treatments that may present with increased hair loss, recognise autoimmune alopecias and their associations, and understand the significant psychological impact of hair loss on an individual. This article discusses common causes of hair loss, as well as those conditions that may be associated with systemic disease, relevant to a general physician.

  19. Diagnosis and management of alopecia in children.

    PubMed

    Castelo-Soccio, Leslie

    2014-04-01

    Alopecia in childhood is a source of high concern, frustration, and anxiety. Delineating types of alopecia and those that are chronic or potentially related to underlying medical problems is important. There are 5 common types of hair loss in children: alopecia related to tinea capitis, alopecia areata spectrum/autoimmune alopecia, traction alopecia, telogen effluvium, and trichotillomania/trichotillosis. Hair-cycle anomalies including loose anagen syndrome can lead to sparse-appearing hair. Rarer reasons for alopecia in children include pressure-induced alopecia, alopecia related to nutritional deficiency or toxic ingestion, and androgenetic alopecia. Congenital lesions should be considered for areas of localized alopecia occurring at birth.

  20. Autoimmunity: alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Hordinsky, Maria; Ericson, Marna

    2004-01-01

    Strong direct and indirect evidence supports an autoimmune etiology for alopecia areata. T lymphocytes that have been shown to be oligoclonal and autoreactive are predominantly present in the peribulbar inflammatory infiltrate. Alopecia areata frequently occurs in association with other autoimmune diseases, such as thyroiditis and vitiligo, and autoantibodies to follicular components have been detected. Finally, the use of immune modulating drugs, including corticosteroids and contact sensitizers such as dyphencyprone, can be beneficial in the management of this disease. Recent studies have demonstrated that alopecia areata scalp skin grafted onto nude mice with severe combined immunodeficiency grow hair and that infiltrating lymphocytes in the graft are lost. It is now also possible to induce alopecia areata in human scalp explants on these mice by injecting T lymphocytes with scalp homogenate. Neuropeptides produced by cutaneous nerves are known to modify immune reactivity and, in all likelihood, affect the alopecia areata process. Future studies may show that modulation of neuropeptide expression is associated with hair regrowth. Likewise, testing the efficacy of the newly developed immunomodulatory agents in patients with alopecia areata may lead to the introduction of novel therapies for this immune-mediated disease of the hair follicle.

  1. Case for diagnosis. Alopecia areata and congenital triangular alopecia.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Lorena Cassia de Carvalho; Miranda, Amanda Rodrigues; Pinto, Sebastião Alves; Ianhez, Mayra

    2014-01-01

    A 6 year-old patient began to experience localized hairloss in the right temporal region three years ago. During the first appointment, diagnoses of alopecia areata and congenital triangular alopecia were made. After one year, there was no change. Upon dermatological examination, non-scarring alopecia was noted in the right temporal region, revealing extremely fine and fair hair follicles. A dermoscopy revealed only thin vellus-type hairs. Congenital triangular alopecia is a condition commonly confused with alopecia areata and is thus underdiagnosed. However, well-established clinical parameters and dermoscopic criteria can be used to distinguish skin diseases that affect hair and define the diagnosis.

  2. Rheumatic mimics and selected triggers of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Daoud, Katja F; Barkhuizen, Andre

    2002-08-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain syndrome of unknown etiology characterized by diffuse pain and tender points, which have been present for more than 3 months. Many patients with systemic illnesses can have diffuse pain similar to that found in fibromyalgia, including rheumatic diseases such as polymyalgia rheumatica, rheumatoid arthritis, idiopathic inflammatory myopathy, systemic lupus erythematosus, and joint hypermobility. Osteomalacia and thyroid disease are also in the differential diagnosis of diffuse pain and are imminently treatable. In addition, there has been interest throughout the past 10 years in infectious diseases including hepatitis C, Lyme disease, coxsackie B, HIV, and parvovirus infection, which may cause or trigger fibromyalgia. This paper provides a framework to use when identifying these diseases as part of the evaluation of a patient with chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain.

  3. Personality and Fibromyalgia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Malin, Katrina; Littlejohn, Geoffrey O

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: We aimed to review how personality characteristics contribute to the onset, maintenance or modulation of fibromyalgia. Method: The databases Medline and PsychINFO were examined from 1967 to 2012 to identify studies that investigated associations between fibromyalgia and personality. Search terms included fibromyalgia and personality, trait psychology, characteristics and individual differences. Results: Numerous studies indicate that patients with fibromyalgia experience psychological distress. Various instruments have been used to evaluate distress and related psychological domains, such as anxiety or depression, in fibromyalgia. In many cases, these same instruments have been used to study personality characteristics in fibromyalgia with a subsequent blurring of cause and effect between personality and psychological distress. In addition, the symptoms of fibromyalgia may change pre-illness personality characteristics themselves. These issues make it difficult to identify specific personality characteristics that might influence the fibromyalgia process. Despite this inherent problem with the methodologies used in the studies that make up this literature review, or perhaps because of it, we found no defined personality profile specific to fibromyalgia. However, many patients with fibromyalgia do show personality characteristics that facilitate psychological responses to stressful situations, such as catastrophising or poor coping techniques, and these in turn associate with mechanisms contributing to fibromyalgia. Conclusion: No specific fibromyalgia personality is defined but it is proposed that personality is an important filter that modulates a person’s response to psychological stressors. Certain personalities may facilitate translation of these stressors to physiological responses driving the fibromyalgia mechanism. PMID:23002409

  4. [The skin and alopecia].

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Kazuyuki

    2003-06-01

    Adverse skin reactions to anti-tumor agents, can be classified either as general symptoms or as local symptoms. The former type of symptom can manifest as intoxication dermatosis; however, while its occurrence is rare, the symptom that requires the closest attention is toxic epidermal necrolysis, the outcome of which is death in most patients. The latter type of symptom includes extravasation of anti-tumor agents and alopecia. Treatment of extravasation induced skin disorders includes prompt and repeated local injections of steroids, while treatment of alopecia includes scalp cooling and external therapies.

  5. Histopathologic diagnosis of multifactorial alopecia.

    PubMed

    Wohltmann, Wendi E; Sperling, Leonard

    2016-06-01

    Establishing a definitive diagnosis for any form of alopecia can be challenging. Adding to the diagnostic complexity is the fact that many patients have more than one form of alopecia contributing to their hair loss. We conducted a review of 1360 consecutive scalp biopsy specimens submitted for the evaluation of scalp hair loss over a 16-month period, demonstrating that 12.5% of cases had a combination of diagnoses (multifactorial alopecia) accounting for their hair loss. An approach to the histopathologic diagnosis of multifactorial alopecia, particularly multiple forms of alopecia found in a single biopsy, is here presented.

  6. Noninflammatory, nonpruritic alopecia of horses.

    PubMed

    Rosychuk, Rod A W

    2013-12-01

    Noninflammatory, nonpruritic alopecias are uncommonly encountered in the horse. Alopecia areata, an apparently autoimmune hair follicle bulbitis produces focal, multifocal to widespread hair loss. The skin is otherwise normal. Diseases that can mimic the widespread hair loss associated with alopecia areata include telogen and anagen effluvium, seasonal alopecias, follicular dysplasias (including color dilution alopecia), various nutritional deficiencies and chemical toxicosis, and diseases that result in defective hair shafts (eg, trichorrhexis nodosa and piedra). These problems are differentiated by history, physical examination, trichography, and skin biopsy. Most are cosmetic diseases that do not have predictably effective therapies.

  7. [Chemotherapy-induced alopecia].

    PubMed

    Spaëth, Dominique; Rosso, Nathalie; Clivot, Laetitia

    2006-11-30

    Chemotherapy-induced alopecia is frequent with most chemotherapy regimens; mechanisms, evolution and small prevention tools are described. Scalp cooling (helmets or continuous cooling systems) can avoid or diminish hair loss in selected chemotherapy regimens but tolerance can be fair and long harmlessness needs to be confirmed by prospective studies. Drug prevention is only in the first steps of research.

  8. [Frontal fibrosing alopecia].

    PubMed

    Jouanique, C; Reygagne, P

    2014-04-01

    Frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA) was first described in 1994. It is characterized by scarring alopecia in bands involving the anterior area of the scalp. Alopecia of the eyebrows is frequently associated, as are pubic, facial and body hair alopecia. The clinical and histologic features are evocative of lichen planopilaris (LPP), and AFF is in fact regarded as a special pattern of LPP. Histology reveals a lymphocytic infiltrate located around the isthmus and follicular infundibulum associated with a decrease in the number of follicles, which are supplanted by fibrous tract. AFF most commonly affects post-menopausal women, but instances have been described in men and in young women. This orphan disease has increased in recent years, with more than 37 articles dedicated to this condition since it was first described in 1994. The pathophysiology remains unknown. The condition develops slowly with spontaneous stabilization over several years but it is impossible to predict the degree of expression prior to stabilization. In this article we review the various treatments proposed, for none of which formal proof of efficacy has been provided to date.

  9. A Prospective Study of Lupus and Rheumatoid Arthritis in Relation to Deployment in Support of Iraq and Afghanistan: The Millennium Cohort Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    lupus erythematosus, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or fibromyalgia associated with Persian Gulf War service? An examination of Department of Defense...lupus erythematosus: comparisons with rheumatoid arthritis, noninflamma- tory rheumatic disorders, and fibromyalgia ,” Journal of Rheumatology, vol. 37, no

  10. Best Medications to Treat Fibromyalgia

    MedlinePlus

    ... privacy policy . A A Best medications to treat Fibromyalgia Comparing effectiveness, safety, and price Published: February 2014 ... be clearly more effective or safer. What is fibromyalgia? The symptoms of fibromyalgia include pain and tenderness ...

  11. Alopecia areata update.

    PubMed

    Hordinsky, Maria; Junqueira, Ana Lucia

    2015-06-01

    There is neither a cure for alopecia areata (AA) nor any universally proven therapy that induces and sustains remission in patients afflicted with this autoimmune disease. AA is characterized as a nonscarring alopecia which affects children and adults. It can be relatively easy to treat when the disease is patchy and limited; but when children and adults present with long standing extensive scalp and body hair loss, successful management can be challenging. Of the treatment choices available, physicians and midlevel providers usually select a cost-effective treatment approach based on disease duration, disease activity, age of the patient, and disease extent. In this manuscript, the clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathophysiology, plus current and evolving treatments for AA will be reviewed.

  12. [Fibromyalgia syndrome].

    PubMed

    Naranjo Hernández, A; Rodríguez Lozano, C; Ojeda Bruno, S

    1992-02-01

    The Fibromialgia Syndrome (FS) is a common clinical entity which may produce symtoms and signs related to multiple fields of Medicine. Typical clinical characteristics of FS include extensive pain, presence of sensitive points during exploration, morning stiffness, asthenia and non-refresing sleep. Frequently, associated rheumatologic diseases are observed, as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthrosis and vertebral disorders. In FS, complementary tests are usually normal. The most widely accepted hypothesis suggests that this is a disorder affecting modulation of pain sensitivity.

  13. Pathophysiology of Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Laurence A.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the biologic, genetic, and environmental factors that may contribute to the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia. As an affective spectrum disorder, fibromyalgia may share these causal factors with a number of related and co-occurring pain conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome or temporomandibular disorder. There is strong evidence that cardinal pain symptoms of fibromyalgia may be due to alterations in central processing of sensory input, along with aberrations in the endogenous inhibition of pain, Genetic research has shown familial aggregation of fibromyalgia and other related disorders such as major depressive disorder. Exposure to physical or psychosocial stressors, as well as abnormal biologic responses in the autonomic nervous system and neuroendocrine responses, may also contribute to dysfunctional pain processing. As fibromyalgia research continues to progress, it is expected that the pathophysiology of this disorder will be further elucidated, leading to more rational and targeted strategies for the treatment of fibromyalgia patients. PMID:19962493

  14. Topical Immunotherapy in Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gurcharan; Lavanya, MS

    2010-01-01

    Alopecia Areata (AA) is a common non-scarring alopecia directed against the anagenic hair follicle. Various treatment modalities have been used for the treatment of severe AA. Topical immunotherapy is the best documented treatment so far for severe and refractory AA. Dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB), squaric acid dibutylester (SADBE), and diphencyprone (DPCP) are the contact allergens used for this purpose. DNCB has been found to be mutagenic by the Ames test and is largely replaced by DPCP and SADBE. DPCP and SADBE are both known to be non-mutagenic compounds and have comparable efficacy results and relapse rates. SADBE requires special solvents and additives to maintain its potency and is more expensive than the rest. DPCP has a response rate varying from 60% in severe Alopecia Areata to 17% in patients with alopecia totalis or universalis, and shows about 88 to 100% high response rate in patients with patchy Alopecia Areata. PMID:21188022

  15. Alopecia as the Presenting Symptom of Syphilis.

    PubMed

    Ornelas, Jennifer; Agbai, Oma N; Kiuru, Maija; Sivamani, Raja K

    2015-07-15

    Alopecia can be one of the many symptoms of secondary syphilis and the clinical presentations include essential syphilitic alopecia or symptomatic syphilitic alopecia. In this report, we present a case of a patient with essential syphilitic alopecia whose sole presenting symptom of syphilis was alopecia. Despite an initial negative rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test, he was ultimately found to have syphilis on scalp biopsy. His alopecia improved following treatment with benzathine penicillin. This presentation serves as a reminder to clinicians to be cognizant of alopecia as a presenting sign of syphilis. A review of the specificity and sensitivity of the typical tests used for the diagnosis is presented.

  16. Fibromyalgia and seizures.

    PubMed

    Tatum, William O; Langston, Michael E; Acton, Emily K

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this case-matched study was to determine how frequently fibromyalgia is associated with different paroxysmal neurological disorders and explore the utility of fibromyalgia as a predictor for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures. The billing diagnosis codes of 1,730 new, non-selected patient encounters were reviewed over a three-year period for an epileptologist in a neurology clinic to identify all patients with historical diagnoses of fibromyalgia. The frequency with which epileptic seizures, psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and physiological non-epileptic events were comorbid with fibromyalgia was assessed. Age and gender case-matched controls were used for a between-group comparison. Wilcoxon tests were used to analyse interval data, and Chi-square was used to analyse categorical data (p<0.05). Fibromyalgia was retrospectively identified in 95/1,730 (5.5%) patients in this cohort. Females represented 95% of the fibromyalgia sample (age: 53 years; 95% CI: 57, 51). Forty-three percent of those with fibromyalgia had a non-paroxysmal, neurological primary clinical diagnosis, most commonly chronic pain. Paroxysmal events were present in 57% of fibromyalgia patients and 54% of case-matched controls. Among patients with fibromyalgia and paroxysmal disorders, 11% had epileptic seizures, 74% had psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and 15% had physiological non-epileptic events, compared to case-matched controls with 37% epileptic seizures, 51% psychogenic non-epileptic events, and 12% physiological non-epileptic events (p = 0.009). Fibromyalgia was shown to be a predictor for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in patients with undifferentiated paroxysmal spells. However, our results suggest that the specificity and sensitivity of fibromyalgia as a marker for psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in a mixed general neurological population of patients is less than previously described.

  17. Oxidative stress in androgenetic alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Prie, BE; Iosif, L; Tivig, I; Stoian, I; Giurcaneanu, C

    2016-01-01

    Rationale:Androgenetic alopecia is not considered a life threatening disease but can have serious impacts on the patient’s psychosocial life. Genetic, hormonal, and environmental factors are considered responsible for the presence of androgenetic alopecia. Recent literature reports have proved the presence of inflammation and also of oxidative stress at the level of dermal papilla cells of patients with androgenetic alopecia Objective:We have considered of interest to measure the oxidative stress parameters in the blood of patients with androgenetic alopecia Methods and results:27 patients with androgenetic alopecia and 25 age-matched controls were enrolled in the study. Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity (TEAC), malondialdehyde (MDA) and total thiols levels were measured on plasma samples. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) activities, and also non protein thiols levels together with TEAC activity were determined on erythrocytes samples No statistically significant changes were observed for TEAC erythrocytes, non-protein thiols, GPx and CAT activities. Significantly decreased (p<0.01) SOD activity was found in patients with androgenetic alopecia. For plasma samples decreased TEAC activity (p<0.001), increased MDA levels (p<0.001) and no change in total thiols concentration were found in patients when compared with the controls. Discussions:Decreased total antioxidant activity and increased MDA levels found in plasma samples of patients with androgenetic alopecia are indicators of oxidative stress presence in these patients. Significantly decreased SOD activity but no change in catalase, glutathione peroxidase, non protein thiols level and total antioxidant activity in erythrocytes are elements which suggest the presence of a compensatory mechanism for SOD dysfunction in red blood cells of patients with androgenetic alopecia. Abbreviations: AAG = androgenetic alopecia, MDA = malondialdehyde, SOD = superoxide dismutase

  18. Dermatologic manifestations of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Laniosz, Valerie; Wetter, David A; Godar, Desiree A

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the common dermatologic diagnoses and skin-related symptoms in a cohort of patients with fibromyalgia seen in a tertiary referral center. A retrospective chart review was performed of all patients with a fibromyalgia diagnosis from January 1 to December 31, 2008, whose diagnosis was confirmed in the Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Clinic at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Charts were reviewed for dermatologic conditions and cutaneous symptoms. Demographic and clinical data were collected to assess the frequency of skin-related issues in patients with fibromyalgia. Of 2,233 patients screened, 845 patients met the inclusion criteria of having a confirmed diagnosis of fibromyalgia. Among these fibromyalgia patients, various dermatologic conditions and cutaneous problems were identified, including hyperhidrosis in 270 (32.0 %), burning sensation of the skin or mucous membranes in 29 (3.4 %), and various unusual cutaneous sensations in 14 (1.7 %). Pruritus without identified cause was noted by 28 patients (3.3 %), with another 16 patients (1.9 %) reporting neurotic excoriations, prurigo nodules, or lichen simplex chronicus. Some form of dermatitis other than neurodermatitis was found in 77 patients (9.1 %). Patients with fibromyalgia may have skin-related symptoms associated with their fibromyalgia. No single dermatologic diagnosis appears to be overrepresented in this population, with the exception of a subjective increase in sweating.

  19. Myalgias and Myopathies: Fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a syndrome of chronic widespread pain typically accompanied by fatigue, nonrestorative sleep, cognitive dysfunction, and mood disorders. As defined by the 2010 American College of Rheumatology criteria, fibromyalgia affects approximately 5% of the population and is the second most common disorder, after osteoarthritis, for which patients are referred to rheumatology subspecialists. These criteria provide a framework for diagnosing fibromyalgia that does not require tender points and incorporates other symptoms of the syndrome in addition to pain. Extensive laboratory tests and imaging are not required to diagnose fibromyalgia. A patient-centered, multimodal approach that includes patient education, behavioral therapy, a graded exercise program, and pharmacotherapy should be used for patients with fibromyalgia. Prescribers must be mindful of adverse drug effects and should tailor therapy to the individual patient. Strong evidence of benefit exists for tricyclic antidepressants, cyclobenzaprine, and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors in fibromyalgia management, whereas nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opioids have limited proven benefit. Fibromyalgia can cause significant disability and loss of function. Family physicians are well equipped to direct the multimodal care of patients with fibromyalgia.

  20. Fibromyalgia syndrome. New associations.

    PubMed

    Waylonis, G W; Heck, W

    1992-12-01

    Previous research has demonstrated a number of conditions, such as sleep disturbance, fatigue, depression, spastic colon and mitral valve prolapse, associated with fibromyalgia. The present report describes additional symptoms and medical conditions that appear to be associated with the syndrome based on a survey of 554 individuals with fibromyalgia compared with a group of 169 controls. Individuals with fibromyalgia self report a greater incidence of bursitis, chondromalacia, constipation, diarrhea, temporomandibular joint dysfunction, vertigo, sinus and thyroid problems. Symptomatic complaints found statistically more prevalent in fibromyalgia patients included concentration problems, sensory symptoms, swollen glands and tinnitus. Other associations occurring with significant increased frequency were chronic cough, coccygeal and pelvic pain, tachycardia and weakness. Our previous report on inheritance patterns in fibromyalgia was reaffirmed with 12% reporting symptomatic children and 25% reporting symptomatic parents. Of the respondents, 70% noted that their symptoms were aggravated by noise, lights, stress, posture and weather.

  1. Histologic features of alopecias: part II: scarring alopecias.

    PubMed

    Bernárdez, C; Molina-Ruiz, A M; Requena, L

    2015-05-01

    The diagnosis of disorders of the hair and scalp can generally be made on clinical grounds, but clinical signs are not always diagnostic and in some cases more invasive techniques, such as a biopsy, may be necessary. This 2-part article is a detailed review of the histologic features of the main types of alopecia based on the traditional classification of these disorders into 2 major groups: scarring and nonscarring alopecias. Scarring alopecias are disorders in which the hair follicle is replaced by fibrous scar tissue, a process that leads to permanent hair loss. In nonscarring alopecias, the follicles are preserved and hair growth can resume when the cause of the problem is eliminated. In the second part of this review, we describe the histologic features of the main forms of scarring alopecia. Since a close clinical-pathological correlation is essential for making a correct histopathologic diagnosis of alopecia, we also include a brief description of the clinical features of the principal forms of this disorder.

  2. Androgenetic alopecia: an update.

    PubMed

    Kaliyadan, Feroze; Nambiar, Ajit; Vijayaraghavan, Sundeep

    2013-01-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is one of the commonest reasons for dermatological consultation. Over the last few years our understanding of the pathophysiology of AGA has improved and this has paved way for better diagnostic and therapeutic options. Recent research has dwelled on the role of stem cells in the pathophysiology of AGA and has also identified newer genetic basis for the condition. Dermoscopy/trichoscopy has emerged as a useful diagnostic tool for AGA. While the major treatment options continue to be topical minoxidil, systemic Finasteride and hair transplantations, newer modalities are under investigation. Specific diagnostic and treatment recommendations have also been developed on evidence based principles. This article reviews the recent concepts in relation to AGA. With regards to the pathophysiology we have tried to stress on recent knowledge of the molecular and genetic basis of AGA. We have emphasized on an evidence based approach for treatment and diagnosis.

  3. Industry Perspective on Alopecia Areata.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Amanda T

    2015-11-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of the autoimmune basis of alopecia areata provide an opportunity to create novel effective pharmaceutical interventions. The current lack of approved therapies for alopecia areata presents a high unmet medical need, as well as a potentially attractive market opportunity. From an industry perspective, achieving clinical proof of concept (PoC) gates investments into larger approval studies. Recent investigator-initiated experience suggests that it may be possible to demonstrate rigorous PoC for new therapies in an attractive time frame with relatively fewer patients than were believed necessary in the past. However, the lack of prior regulatory approval precedent for pharmaceuticals to treat alopecia areata poses significant development challenges, and early interaction with the FDA and other stakeholders will be critically important in evaluating the path to approval and reimbursement for new treatments for this indication. This paper presents a brief industry perspective on the potential development of new alopecia areata therapeutics.

  4. Alopecia of the unburned scalp.

    PubMed

    Chow, I J; Balakrishnan, C; Meininger, M S

    1996-05-01

    Alopecia of the unburned scalp, the temporary or permanent loss of hair, is a preventable complication. Patients at highest risk of developing alopecia are those with burn encephalopathy and in a prolonged shock state. The occipital scalp is the most common site and localized pressure-induced ischaemia is the likely cause. Frequent head repositioning and use of devices to decrease the pressure effect may decrease the incidence of this complication.

  5. Oxidative stress in androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Prie, B E; Iosif, L; Tivig, I; Stoian, I; Giurcaneanu, C

    2016-01-01

    Rationale:Androgenetic alopecia is not considered a life threatening disease but can have serious impacts on the patient's psychosocial life. Genetic, hormonal, and environmental factors are considered responsible for the presence of androgenetic alopecia. Recent literature reports have proved the presence of inflammation and also of oxidative stress at the level of dermal papilla cells of patients with androgenetic alopecia Objective:We have considered of interest to measure the oxidative stress parameters in the blood of patients with androgenetic alopecia Methods and results:27 patients with androgenetic alopecia and 25 age-matched controls were enrolled in the study. Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity (TEAC), malondialdehyde (MDA) and total thiols levels were measured on plasma samples. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) activities, and also non protein thiols levels together with TEAC activity were determined on erythrocytes samples No statistically significant changes were observed for TEAC erythrocytes, non-protein thiols, GPx and CAT activities. Significantly decreased (p<0.01) SOD activity was found in patients with androgenetic alopecia. For plasma samples decreased TEAC activity (p<0.001), increased MDA levels (p<0.001) and no change in total thiols concentration were found in patients when compared with the controls. Discussions:Decreased total antioxidant activity and increased MDA levels found in plasma samples of patients with androgenetic alopecia are indicators of oxidative stress presence in these patients. Significantly decreased SOD activity but no change in catalase, glutathione peroxidase, non protein thiols level and total antioxidant activity in erythrocytes are elements which suggest the presence of a compensatory mechanism for SOD dysfunction in red blood cells of patients with androgenetic alopecia.

  6. Milnacipran: in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Chwieduk, Claudine M; McCormack, Paul L

    2010-01-01

    Milnacipran is an orally administered selective serotonin and norepinephrine (noradrenaline) reuptake inhibitor indicated for the management of fibromyalgia in adults. In adults, milnacipran was generally effective in the treatment of fibromyalgia in four well designed trials of 3 or 6 months' duration. Composite responder rates for the treatment of fibromyalgia and fibromyalgia pain (co-primary efficacy variables) were generally higher with milnacipran 100 or 200 mg/day (in two divided doses) than with placebo after 12 weeks of fixed-dose treatment. In one study, the composite responder rate for fibromyalgia pain (co-primary efficacy variable) was also higher with milnacipran 200 mg/day than with placebo after 24 weeks of fixed-dose treatment. Furthermore, the benefits of milnacipran therapy were sustained in a 6-month extension of an initial double-blind trial. Improvements from baseline in mean 24-hour recall pain scores, mean weekly recall pain scores, Patient Global Impression of Change scores and in several items of the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire were observed in patients receiving continuous milnacipran for up to 12 months, as well as in patients who switched from placebo to milnacipran therapy at the start of the extension phase. Milnacipran was generally well tolerated in adults with fibromyalgia, with most adverse events being mild to moderate in severity. Nausea was the most common adverse event reported in milnacipran recipients.

  7. Fibromyalgia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Looking for Health Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development ( ... symptoms of fibromyalgia. Some kids also find that changing the way they think about their condition helps ...

  8. Exercise therapy for fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Busch, Angela J; Webber, Sandra C; Brachaniec, Mary; Bidonde, Julia; Bello-Haas, Vanina Dal; Danyliw, Adrienne D; Overend, Tom J; Richards, Rachel S; Sawant, Anuradha; Schachter, Candice L

    2011-10-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome, a chronic condition typically characterized by widespread pain, nonrestorative sleep, fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, and other somatic symptoms, negatively impacts physical and emotional function and reduces quality of life. Exercise is commonly recommended in the management of people with fibromyalgia, and interest in examining exercise benefits for those with the syndrome has grown substantially over the past 25 years. Research supports aerobic and strength training to improve physical fitness and function, reduce fibromyalgia symptoms, and improve quality of life. However, other forms of exercise (e.g., tai chi, yoga, Nordic walking, vibration techniques) and lifestyle physical activity also have been investigated to determine their effects. This paper highlights findings from recent randomized controlled trials and reviews of exercise for people with fibromyalgia, and includes information regarding factors that influence response and adherence to exercise to assist clinicians with exercise and physical activity prescription decision-making to optimize health and well-being.

  9. Chemotherapy-induced alopecia.

    PubMed

    Trüeb, Ralph M

    2009-03-01

    Few dermatologic conditions carry as much emotional distress as chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA). The prerequisite for successful development of strategies for CIA prevention is the understanding of the pathobiology of CIA. The incidence and severity of CIA are variable and related to the particular chemotherapeutic protocol. CIA is traditionally categorized as acute diffuse hair loss caused by dystrophic anagen effluvium; however, CIA presents with different clinical patterns of hair loss. When an arrest of mitotic activity occurs, obviously numerous and interacting factors influence the shedding pattern. The major approach to minimize CIA is by scalp cooling. Unfortunately, most published data on scalp cooling are of poor quality. Several experimental approaches to the development of pharmacologic agents are under evaluation and include drug-specific antibodies, hair growth cycle modifiers, cytokines and growth factors, antioxidants, inhibitors of apoptosis, and cell-cycle and proliferation modifiers. Ultimately, the protection should be selective to the hair follicle; for example, topical application, such that the anticancer efficacy of chemotherapy is not hampered. Among the few agents that have been evaluated so far in humans, AS101 and minoxidil were able to reduce the severity or shorten the duration of CIA, but could not prevent CIA.

  10. What causes alopecia areata?

    PubMed Central

    McElwee, K. J.; Gilhar, A.; Tobin, D. J.; Ramot, Y.; Sundberg, J. P.; Nakamura, M.; Bertolini, M.; Inui, S.; Tokura, Y.; Jr, L. E. King; Duque-Estrada, B.; Tosti, A; Keren, A.; Itami, S.; Shoenfeld, Y.; Zlotogorski, A.; Paus, R.

    2014-01-01

    The pathobiology of alopecia areata (AA), one of the most frequent autoimmune diseases and a major unsolved clinical problem, has intrigued dermatologists, hair biologists and immunologists for decades. Simultaneously, both affected patients and the physicians who take care of them are increasingly frustrated that there is still no fully satisfactory treatment. Much of this frustration results from the fact that the pathobiology of AA remains unclear, and no single AA pathogenesis concept can claim to be universally accepted. In fact, some investigators still harbour doubts whether this even is an autoimmune disease, and the relative importance of CD8+ T cells, CD4+ T cells and NKGD2+ NK or NKT cells and the exact role of genetic factors in AA pathogenesis remain bones of contention. Also, is AA one disease, a spectrum of distinct disease entities or only a response pattern of normal hair follicles to immunologically mediated damage? During the past decade, substantial progress has been made in basic AA-related research, in the development of new models for translationally relevant AA research and in the identification of new therapeutic agents and targets for future AA management. This calls for a re-evaluation and public debate of currently prevalent AA pathobiology concepts. The present Controversies feature takes on this challenge, hoping to attract more skin biologists, immunologists and professional autoimmunity experts to this biologically fascinating and clinically important model disease. PMID:23947678

  11. Fibromyalgia Pain: Options for Coping

    MedlinePlus

    ... to ourselves inside our heads can affect our perception of pain. Turning negative thoughts into positive ones ... http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/fibromyalgia/in-depth/fibromyalgia-pain/ART-20047867 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal ...

  12. Reported Experiences of Persons with Alopecia Areata

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Nigel; McHale, Sue

    2005-01-01

    Alopecia is a chronic disease of hair loss. The study focuses on psychological issues relating to the experience of alopecia. Previous research has considered psychological problems as secondary to the medical disorder. The first part consisted of spontaneous written accounts (N = 62) of the experience of alopecia. The second part was an…

  13. Reported Experiences of Persons with Alopecia Areata

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Nigel; McHale, Sue

    2005-01-01

    Alopecia is a chronic disease of hair loss. The study focuses on psychological issues relating to the experience of alopecia. Previous research has considered psychological problems as secondary to the medical disorder. The first part consisted of spontaneous written accounts (N=162) of the experience of alopecia. The second part was an…

  14. Fibromyalgia: generalized pain intolerance and manifold symptom reporting.

    PubMed

    Quimby, L G; Block, S R; Gratwick, G M

    1988-08-01

    We tested the current criteria for fibromyalgia. Pain tolerance was measured at tender point and control point sites using a pressure algometer, and responses to 6 standard psychological self-reports were obtained from 125 patients with generalized nonarticular rheumatism, rheumatoid arthritis, or osteoarthritis. Among patients with generalized nonarticular rheumatism, published symptom criteria for fibromyalgia did not correlate significantly with the number of tender points. Only lower generalized pressure point pain tolerance distinguished fibromyalgia from other generalized nonarticular rheumatism. Generalized nonarticular rheumatism mean scores were much higher than controls on tests measuring the tendency to report physical symptoms, including headaches and functional bowel syndrome. It is probable that patients with fibromyalgia do not differ in any important physical or psychological respect from other patients with generalized nonarticular rheumatism except for the presence of tender points. However, the presence of tender points is merely a reflection of the patient's general pressure pain sensitivity and is not indicative of any special localized pathological phenomenon. The concept of fibromyalgia as an entity separate from the rest of generalized nonarticular rheumatism may be an artifact of a physician's approach to the patient. Most patients with generalized nonarticular rheumatism demonstrate an abnormally high frequency of reporting manifold disagreeable symptoms and probably come to the attention of many medical disciplines.

  15. Postoperative (pressure) alopecia following sacrocolpopexy.

    PubMed

    Bagaria, Madhu; Luck, Ali Maria

    2015-06-01

    Postoperative alopecia is a rare occurrence seen after a variety of surgical procedures performed under general anesthesia. The speculated cause is pressure-induced ischemia due to prolonged head immobilization. This case describes a patient who developed this complication after undergoing sacrocolpopexy. A 57-year-old postmenopausal Caucasian female was consented to undergo a robotic-assisted sacrocolpopexy, perineoplasty, and midurethral sling with possible conversion to an open procedure. The indication was symptomatic proximal and distal rectocele with foreshortened vagina. It was converted to laparotomy due to difficult presacral dissection. Her total operative time was 540 with 240 min in the Trendelenburg position. No intraoperative hypotension or excessive blood loss was noted. She started complaining of scalp pain in the postoperative recovery area. She developed soreness, crusting, and later alopecia in the same area. It was noted at her 3-week office visit. Referral was made for dermatology and anesthesiology evaluation. There was spontaneous full recovery by the 5th month. Postoperative alopecia is a rare condition mimicking alopecia areata but it is preceded by inciting events. There is some evidence to suggest that it is a preventable condition by frequent head repositioning during surgery. This case report is intended to increase the surgeon's awareness about this rare complication as its occurrence can be distressing for the patient.

  16. [Fibromyalgia and physical therapy].

    PubMed

    Tits, M

    2011-09-01

    Fibromyalgia is a syndrome characterized by the existence of widespread musculoskeletal pain, present above and below the waist and the axial skeleton for a period of at least three months. Other symptoms are frequently present, intolerance to exercise, fatigue, trouble sleeping, morning stiffness, paresthesias, anxiety, headaches, etc. The exact etiology and pathophysiology of the disease are not clearly established. Currently, we primarily retain a bad handling of pain pathways. An understanding of these mechanisms is important as a basis for a global therapeutic program and the rehabilitation of patients with fibromyalgia. By the multiple nature of these symptoms associated with fibromyalgia, an accurate assessment of the patient will be a preamble to any optimal care. Current guidelines recommend comprehensive and multidisciplinary care, however centers that offer this type of care are rare. In mono-disciplinary treatment, the physical therapy recommended is aerobic exercise and the strengthening of muscles associated with different manual techniques to decrease the nociceptive input.

  17. Alopecia: Kids are not just little people.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Lynne J; Castelo-Soccio, Leslie A

    2015-01-01

    Alopecia is a disorder that affects all patients, young and old. Many diagnoses, particularly the scarring alopecias, are more common in adults; however, others, such as tinea capitis, are more common in children, and some, such as alopecia areata, often affect both age groups. The approach to, and evaluation of, an alopecia patient is thus highly dependent on his or her age. In adults with diffuse, non-scarring hair loss, a part-width examination can help detect pattern hair loss, the most common cause of diffuse loss in this age group. In children this is much less likely, and a careful evaluation for tinea capitis is in order. The same holds true for patchy alopecia in children, as well as scarring alopecia-tinea needs to always be considered. In adults, patchy alopecia is often due to alopecia areata and sometimes to one of the primary scarring alopecias. A laboratory evaluation, and especially a biopsy, would be a more appropriate undertaking for an adult than a child, and an adult would be more likely to tolerate certain therapeutic regimens such as intralesional injections. In a conversational manner, the authors discuss their individual approaches to the alopecia patient, highlighting the differences in diagnosis, workup, and management that depend on whether the affected individual is an adult or a child.

  18. Alopecia and mood stabilizers: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Uehlinger, C; Barrelet, L; Touabi, M; Baumann, P

    1992-01-01

    Two cases of alopecia observed during treatment with lithium and valproate are described, and the recent literature on this subject is reviewed. Our clinical observations confirm earlier reports. These toxic alopecias are characterized by a diffuse but rarely total hair loss. After stopping medication, the hair grows back generally and completely. Two cases of toxic alopecia are presented where hair grew back following a substitution of lithium by valproate in the first case and after stopping valproate in the second. The evaluation and therapeutic attitude in the presence of alopecia in patients needing mood stabilizers are also discussed.

  19. Diagnosis and management of primary cicatricial alopecia: part I.

    PubMed

    Otberg, Nina; Wu, Wen-Yu; McElwee, Kevin John; Shapiro, Jerry

    2008-01-01

    In this 2-part article, the authors review the primary cicatricial alopecias. Primary cicatricial alopecia can be defined as predominantly lymphocytic, neutrophilic, or mixed based on the nature of the follicular infiltrate that is present around affected hair follicles. Lymphocytic primary cicatricial alopecias include chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus (discoid lupus erythematosus), lichen planopilaris, classic pseudopelade of Brocq, central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia, alopecia mucinosa, and keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans. In this first part, the authors summarize the classification, epidemiology, diagnostic approach, and patient management of lymphocytic cicatricial alopecias. In part II, the authors will focus on neutrophilic cicatricial alopecias and mixed cicatricial alopecias.

  20. Effect and Treatment of Chronic Pain in Inflammatory Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pain is the most common reason patients with inflammatory arthritis see a rheumatologist. Patients consistently rate pain as one of their highest priorities, and pain is the single most important determinant of patient global assessment of disease activity. Although pain is commonly interpreted as a marker of inflammation, the correlation between pain intensity and measures of peripheral inflammation is imperfect. The prevalence of chronic, non-inflammatory pain syndromes such as fibromyalgia is higher among patients with inflammatory arthritis than in the general population. Inflammatory arthritis patients with fibromyalgia have higher measures of disease activity and lower quality of life than inflammatory patients who do not have fibromyalgia. This review article focuses on current literature involving the effects of pain on disease assessment and quality of life for patients with inflammatory arthritis. It also reviews non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic options for treatment of pain for patients with inflammatory arthritis, focusing on the implications of comorbidities and concurrent disease-modifying antirheumatic drug therapy. Although several studies have examined the effects of reducing inflammation for patients with inflammatory arthritis, very few clinical trials have examined the safety and efficacy of treatment directed specifically towards pain pathways. Most studies have been small, have focused on rheumatoid arthritis or mixed populations (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis plus osteoarthritis), and have been at high risk of bias. Larger, longitudinal studies are needed to examine the mechanisms of pain in inflammatory arthritis and to determine the safety and efficacy of analgesic medications in this specific patient population. PMID:23292816

  1. Prevalence of falls in fibromyalgia patients

    PubMed Central

    Meireles, Sandra Adolph; Antero, Daniel Casagrande; Kulczycki, Marciane Maria; Skare, Thelma Larocca

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the risk of falls in fibromyalgia (FM) patients compared to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and normal controls. METHODS: We studied 60 FM, 60 RA patients and 60 controls for fall frequency in one week, one month, six months and one year. Patients were submitted to body mass index determination and balance evaluation through the Berg scale. Data on disease impact and depression were collected in FM patients through the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) and the Beck Questionnaire. RESULTS: FM patients had a higher frequency of falls than RA patients and control individuals in one month (p<0.0001), in six months (p<0.0001) and in one year (p<0.0001). No relationship was found between falls and body mass index, pain or depression scores. Falls in 12 months were associated with higher FIQ values. CONCLUSION: FM patients fall more often than RA patients and control individuals. Level of Evidence II, Investigation of the effect of a patient characteristic on the disease outcome. PMID:25061425

  2. Arthritis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  3. Familial hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with alopecia.

    PubMed Central

    Slti, I S; Salem, Z

    1979-01-01

    In one family several male and female members had hypogonadism and frontoparietal alopecia, whereas other members with normal sexual development had normal scalp hair. Clinical and laboratory evaluation of three affected young men (two brothers and their cousin) revealed that the hypogonadism was the result of decreased serum concentrations of follicle stimulating and luteinizing hormones. There was no evidence of a deficiency of any other pituitary hormone. Long-term treatment of the three patients with human chorionic gonadotropin resulted in an increase in the serum testosterone concentration, the appearance of male secondary sex characteristics and an increase in the size of the external genitalia. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 4 PMID:466617

  4. Use of dermoscopy in the diagnosis of temporal triangular alopecia.

    PubMed

    Campos, Jullyene Gomes de; Oliveira, Cláudia Marina Puga Barbosa; Romero, Sandra Adolfina Reyes; Klein, Ana Paula; Akel, Patricia Bandeira de Melo; Pinto, Giselle Martins

    2015-01-01

    Temporal triangular alopecia, also referred as congenital triangular alopecia, is an uncommon dermatosis of unknown etiology. It is characterized by a non-scarring, circumscribed alopecia often located unilaterally in the frontotemporal region. It usually emerges at ages 2-9 years. Alopecia areata is the main differential diagnosis, especially in atypical cases. Dermoscopy is a noninvasive procedure that helps distinguish temporal triangular alopecia from aloepecia areata. Such procedure prevents invasive diagnostic methods as well as ineffective treatments.

  5. Vitiligo after Diphencyprone for Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Mario Cezar; Martins, João Mauricio; Montealegre, F.; Gatti, Flávia Romero

    2010-01-01

    The topical immunotherapy is used to treat alopecia areata and recalcitrant warts since the 1970s. Diphencyprone is a contact sensitizer used to treat dermatological conditions resulting from as altered immunological state, such as extensive alopecia areata, being partially effective and safe. Side effects include local eczema with blistering, regional lymphadenopathy and contact urticaria. Rare adverse effects include an erythema multiforme-like reaction, hyperpigmenttion, hypopigmentation, and vitiligo. We report a 30-year-old, Brazilian male who developed vitiligo lesions following DPCP therapy for alopecia areata. PMID:20585597

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education Visitor Information RePORT NIH Fact Sheets Home > Rheumatoid Arthritis Small Text Medium Text Large Text Rheumatoid Arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory disease affecting about ...

  7. Frontal fibrosing alopecia treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Fertig, Raymond; Tosti, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Summary Frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA) is a rare dermatologic disease that causes scarring and hair loss and is increasing in prevalence worldwide. FFA patients typically present with hair loss in the frontal scalp region and eyebrows which may be associated with sensations of itching or burning. FFA is a clinically distinct variant of lichen planopilaris (LPP) that affects predominantly postmenopausal women, although men and premenopausal women may also be affected. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment are necessary to prevent definitive scarring and permanent hair loss. Data from retrospective studies indicate that 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors (5aRIs) are effective in stabilizing the disease. In our clinical experience, we have seen optimal results treating FFA patients with oral finasteride in conjunction with hydroxychloroquine, topical calcineurin inhibitors (tacrolimus) and excimer laser in patients with signs of active inflammation. PMID:27904832

  8. Vitiligo and alopecia areata: apples and oranges?

    PubMed

    Harris, John E

    2013-12-01

    Vitiligo and alopecia areata are common autoimmune diseases of the skin. Vitiligo is caused by the destruction of melanocytes and results in the appearance of white patches on any part of the body, while alopecia areata is characterized by patchy hair loss primarily on the scalp, but may also involve other areas as well. At first glance, the two diseases appear to be quite different, targeting different cell types and managed using different treatment approaches. However, the immune cell populations and cytokines that drive each disease are similar, they are closely associated within patients and their family members, and vitiligo and alopecia areata have common genetic risk factors, suggesting that they share a similar pathogenesis. Like apples and oranges, vitiligo and alopecia areata have some obvious differences, but similarities abound. Recognizing both similarities and differences will promote research into the pathogenesis of each disease, as well as the development of new treatments.

  9. Tick Bite Alopecia: A Report and Review.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Michael C; Milchak, Marissa A; Parnes, Herbert; Ioffreda, Michael D

    2016-11-01

    Tick bites can cause a number of local inflammatory reactions, which are often difficult to differentiate from those induced by other arthropod bites or stings. These include erythematous nodular or pustular lesions, erosive plaques, annular lesions of erythema chronicum migrans, and both scarring and nonscarring inflammatory alopecia. We report a case of nonscarring alopecia in a 21-year-old male who reported a recent history of tick bite to the scalp. The biopsy demonstrated a dense pseudolymphomatous inflammatory infiltrate with numerous eosinophils associated with hair follicle miniaturization and an elevated catagen-telogen count. Signs of external rubbing, including lichen simplex chronicus and the "hamburger sign", were also visualized and are indicative of the associated pruritus. To the authors' knowledge, this is the fifth report of nonscarring tick bite alopecia in the literature and the first in an adult patient. This text will review the classic clinical presentation, histologic findings, and proposed mechanism of tick bite alopecia.

  10. [Hormonal perturbations in fibromyalgia].

    PubMed

    Schlienger, J L; Perrin, A E; Grunenberger, F; Goichot, B

    2001-12-01

    Fibromyalgia is a syndrome characterized by chronic musculoskeletal pain and fatigue without biological detectable disturbances. The mechanisms of this disease are unknown. It has been postulated that it can be the consequence of a chronic stress mediated mainly through the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and the sympathetic nervous system. These fields have been extensively studied. Results were scattered and non convincing. A reduction of growth hormone and IGF-1 levels described in a third of patients has led to a double blind random clinical trial with biogenetic growth hormone. Results were equivocal . Other hormonal systems are grossly normals and circadian rhythms are unaltered. Despite some arguments in favour of a CRH neurons hyperactivity, these results are not able to consolide a particular physiopathological mechanism and to argument for a new therapeutic approach. Many of the abnormalities may be the consequence of psychological disturbances.

  11. Premature Aging in Fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Hassett, Afton L; Clauw, Daniel J; Williams, David A

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain is highly prevalent in older adults, and until recently, was considered to be common but relatively "benign." Mounting evidence, however, suggests that some of the 116 million US adults who suffer from chronic pain are also at an increased risk for developing age-related diseases prematurely, suffering earlier cognitive and physical decline, and experiencing earlier mortality. Given the aging US population and the prevalence of chronic pain along with related healthcare consequences, there is a critical need to better understand the relationship between aging and chronic pain. Herein, we focus on one chronic pain state, fibromyalgia, and provide an overview of the evidence suggesting that individuals with this chronic pain condition show signs of premature aging.

  12. Genetics of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Buskila, Dan; Neumann, Lily

    2005-10-01

    The pathogenesis of fibromyalgia (FM) and related conditions is not entirely understood. Recent evidence suggests that these syndromes may share heritable pathophysiologic features. Familial studies suggest that genetic and familial factors may play a role in the etiopathogenesis of these conditions. There is evidence that polymorphisms of genes in the serotoninergic and catecholaminergic systems are linked to the pathophysiology of FM and related conditions and are associated with personality traits. The precise role of genetic factors in the etiopathology of FM remains unknown, but it is likely that several genes are operating together to initiate this syndrome. Larger longitudinal studies are needed to better clarify the role of genetics in the development of FM.

  13. Female pattern alopecia: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Lauren L; Emer, Jason J

    2013-01-01

    Hair loss is a commonly encountered problem in clinical practice, with men presenting with a distinctive pattern involving hairline recession and vertex balding (Norwood-Hamilton classification) and women exhibiting diffuse hair thinning over the crown (increased part width) and sparing of the frontal hairline (Ludwig classification). Female pattern hair loss has a strikingly overwhelming psychological effect; thus, successful treatments are necessary. Difficulty lies in successful treatment interventions, as only two medications – minoxidil and finasteride – are approved for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia, and these medications offer mediocre results, lack of a permanent cure, and potential complications. Hair transplantation is the only current successful permanent option, and it requires surgical procedures. Several other medical options, such as antiandrogens (eg, spironolactone, oral contraceptives, cyproterone, flutamide, dutasteride), prostaglandin analogs (eg, bimatoprost, latanoprost), and ketoconazole are reported to be beneficial. Laser and light therapies have also become popular despite the lack of a profound benefit. Management of expectations is crucial, and the aim of therapy, given the current therapeutic options, is to slow or stop disease progression with contentment despite patient expectations of permanent hair regrowth. This article reviews current perspectives on therapeutic options for female pattern hair loss. PMID:24039457

  14. Modified immunotherapy for alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Yoshimasu, Takashi; Furukawa, Fukumi

    2016-07-01

    Squaric acid dibutylester (SADBE) is a commonly used contact sensitizer in immunotherapy for alopecia areata (AA). Severe contact dermatitis is induced by the currently high recommended sensitization dose of 1%-2% SADBE, often decreasing patient compliance. We assessed a modified immunotherapy for AA using SADBE at a starting concentration of 0.01% without sensitization. After one or two weeks of initial 0.01% SADBE application, the concentration of SADBE was increased gradually to 0.025%, 0.05%, 0.1%, 0.25%, 0.5%, 1% and 2% until the patients felt itching or erythema at the AA lesion site. The modified immunotherapy showed a response rate of 69.4% (25/36), equivalent to conventional immunotherapy using SADBE starting at 1%-2% sensitization. Furthermore, we investigated the combination therapy of SADBE and multiple courses of steroid pulses for AA. The response rate for combination therapy was 73.7% (28/38); however, the group receiving combination therapy showed a significant prevalence of severe AA compared with the group receiving modified immunotherapy only. We reviewed the efficacy and safety of modified immunotherapy without initial sensitization and combination therapy with immunotherapy and multiple courses of pulses for AA.

  15. Alopecia in calves associated with milk substitute feeding.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, G C; Hill, M R; Slater, A J

    1983-04-30

    Outbreaks of alopecia with unusually high morbidity occurred among calves reared on milk substitutes on two unrelated farms in Suffolk. On one farm alopecia occurred for three consecutive years; during the winter of 1981-82 there were also clinical signs of muscular dystrophy among the same calves. On the second farm calves with alopecia also showed signs of muscular dystrophy. The apparent relationship between alopecia and milk substitute feeding is discussed together with the possible involvement of vitamin E.

  16. Comorbidities in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Amir; Zisman, Devy

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are often affected by numerous comorbidities that carry significant morbidity and mortality. Reported comorbidities include diabetes mellitus, obesity, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune eye disease, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, depression, and fibromyalgia. All health care providers for patients with PsA should recognize and monitor those comorbidities, as well as understand their effect on patient management to ensure an optimal clinical outcome. PMID:28178440

  17. [Scalp cooling for chemotherapy-induced alopecia].

    PubMed

    Komen, Marion M C; Smorenburg, Carolien H; van den Hurk, Corina J G; Nortier, J W R Hans

    2011-01-01

    Alopecia is a very common side effect of cytostatic therapy and is considered one of the most emotionally distressing effects. To prevent alopecia scalp cooling is currently used in some indications in medical oncology in 59 hospitals in the Netherlands. The success of scalp cooling depends on various factors such as type of chemotherapy, dose, infusion time, number of treatment cycles and combinations of drugs. In general, scalp cooling is well tolerated. The reported side-effects are headache, coldness, dizziness and sometimes claustrophobia. An increase in the risk of scalp metastases has not been demonstrated. Proceeding from the South Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Centre a national working group is put together in order to draw up a national guideline for chemotherapy-induced alopecia.

  18. Facing Fibromyalgia | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Fibromyalgia Facing Fibromyalgia Past Issues / Spring 2016 Table of Contents Amy ... conditions. When did you start having symptoms of fibromyalgia? I actually think I've had it since ...

  19. Endocrine alopecia in a miniature poodle.

    PubMed

    Allan, F J; Jones, B R; Purdie, E C

    1995-06-01

    Hypothyroidism and concurrent sex hormone imbalance associated with alopecia was diagnosed in a 5 year-old entire male Miniature Poodle. The dog had a 3-year history of alopecia, seborrhoea and recurrent superficial pyoderma. Abnormal thyrotropin releasing hormone stimulation test results supported a diagnosis of hypothyroidism. Partial hair regrowth occurred after interstitial cell tumours, which were present in both testicles, were removed by castration. Complete hair regrowth, however, occurred only after thyroid hormone supplementation. This case highlighted difficulties which may be encountered when interpreting serum hormone concentrations and endocrine function tests.

  20. Ichthyosis follicularis with alopecia and photophobia.

    PubMed

    Eramo, L R; Esterly, N B; Zieserl, E J; Stock, E L; Herrmann, J

    1985-09-01

    We treated two unrelated boys with ichthyosis follicularis, a rare skin disorder characterized by extensive noninflammatory spiny follicular hyperkeratoses, severe photophobia, and generalized noncicatricial alopecia. This disorder must be differentiated from keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans; ulerythema ophryogenes; keratosis pilaris rubra atrophicans faciei; atrichia with papular lesions; atrophodermia vermiculata; and keratitis, ichthyosis, and deafness syndrome, all of which share some clinical features. Ichthyosis follicularis with alopecia and photophobia appears to be a familial disorder, but too few cases have been reported to establish the exact mode of inheritance.

  1. Fibromyalgia dyscognition: concepts and issues.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, K R; Gracely, R H; Glass, J M

    2012-09-28

    Fibromyalgia is characterized by widespread pain and tenderness; however, comorbid cognitive difficulties are a common complaint among patients. Known as fibro fog or dyscognition, this symptom comprises difficulties with complex cognitive processes including memory, executive function, concentration and attention. While the mechanisms that initiate and maintain these cognitive deficits are still largely unknown, recent research has increased the understanding of subjective symptoms and objectively-determined deficits in cognitive performance. Treatments have also improved to include complementary cognitive and physical strategies. This review focuses on issues of dyscognition in fibromyalgia. Details of objective testing methods are not within the scope of this paper.

  2. [Cognitive dysfunction in fibromyalgia].

    PubMed

    Gelonch, Olga; Garolera, Maite; Rosselló, Lluís; Pifarré, Josep

    2013-06-01

    Introduccion. Las personas diagnosticadas de fibromialgia refieren de manera muy frecuente quejas sobre su pobre funcionamiento cognitivo. En los ultimos anos ha aumentado el interes para investigar cuales son las alteraciones cognitivas presentes en esta enfermedad. Objetivo. Realizar una revision de las investigaciones publicadas sobre fibromialgia y funciones cognitivas. Desarrollo. Se realizo una busqueda bibliografica con un intervalo temporal desde 1995 hasta 2012. Los terminos de busqueda incluyeron las palabras clave 'fibromyalgia' y 'cognition', 'attention', 'memory', 'language', 'perception', 'executive functions' y 'disexecutive syndrome'. Se seleccionaron 64 registros tras aplicar criterios de inclusion. Conclusiones. Los estudios que han analizado las funciones cognitivas en las personas diagnosticadas de fibromialgia han sido escasos y mayoritariamente con muestras pequenas. Se han identificado deficits principalmente en la memoria de trabajo y en las capacidades atencionales mas complejas, donde el factor distraccion tiene una relevancia importante. Tambien se ha identificado deterioro en la memoria a largo plazo y en las funciones ejecutivas. Existe consenso entre los diversos estudios en que el grado de dolor tiene una relacion directa con el nivel de disfuncion cognitiva, mientras que no existe total consenso para explicar la influencia de la depresion y ansiedad sobre el funcionamiento cognitivo en estos pacientes.

  3. Biology and therapy of fibromyalgia. New therapies in fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Lesley M

    2006-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic, musculoskeletal pain condition that predominately affects women. Although fibromyalgia is common and associated with substantial morbidity and disability, there are no US Food and Drug Administration-approved treatments. However, progress has been made in identifying pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for fibromyalgia. Recent pharmacological treatment studies have focused on selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, which enhance serotonin and norepinephrine neurotransmission in the descending pain pathways and lack many of the adverse side effects associated with tricyclic medications. Promising results have also been reported for medications that bind to the α2δ subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels, resulting in decreased calcium influx at nerve terminals and subsequent reduction in the release of several neurotransmitters thought to play a role in pain processing. There is also evidence to support exercise, cognitive behavioral therapy, education, and social support in the management of fibromyalgia. It is likely that many patients would benefit from combinations of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments, but more study is needed. PMID:16762044

  4. Permanent diffuse alopecia after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in childhood.

    PubMed

    Bresters, D; Wanders, D C M; Louwerens, M; Ball, L M; Fiocco, M; van Doorn, R

    2017-03-20

    Permanent alopecia after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is distressing and few studies have investigated this late effect. The aim of the study was to assess the percentage of patients with alopecia and investigate risk factors for alopecia. Patients who underwent allogeneic HSCT before age 19 years, from January 1990 to January 2013, who were at least 2 years after transplant and in follow-up in our clinic were included. Alopecia was defined as clinically apparent decreased hair density. Possible risk factors considered for alopecia after HSCT included: gender, age, diagnosis, donor type, conditioning regimen: cranial irradiation (TBI/cranial radiotherapy) and/or chemotherapy, which chemotherapeutic agents were used and acute/chronic GvHD. The percentage of permanent alopecia in our cohort was 15.6% (41/263 patients). All patients had diffuse alopecia except for one with alopecia totalis. In multivariate analysis, a conditioning regimen with busulphan and busulphan plus fludarabine (odds ratio (OR) 5.7 (confidence interval (CI): 2.5-12.7) and OR 7.4 (CI: 3.3-16.2), respectively, was the main risk factor and associated with alopecia independent of acute/chronic GvHD. Neither TBI nor other alkylating chemotherapy, including treosulfan, was associated with alopecia. In conclusion, permanent alopecia after HSCT is associated with busulphan and GvHD and occurs in 16% of patients.Bone Marrow Transplantation advance online publication, 20 March 2017; doi:10.1038/bmt.2017.15.

  5. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a form of arthritis that causes pain, swelling, stiffness and loss of function in ... wrist and fingers. More women than men get rheumatoid arthritis. It often starts in middle age and is ...

  6. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Hair Loss (Alopecia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Hair Loss (Alopecia) “Losing my hair was hard at first. Then I got used ... uncovered.” Questions other people have asked: Why does hair fall out? Chemotherapy can harm the cells that ...

  7. Hair transplantation in alopecia due to radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nordstroem, R.E.; Holsti, L.R.

    1983-10-01

    Two cases of alopecia due to radiation of the scalp are presented in which it has been possible to achieve a technically and cosmetically satisfactory reconstruction by punch hair grafting. This does not mean that every case is suitable, but it does mean that those without contraindications should at least be given a try.

  8. Experience of fibromyalgia. Qualitative study.

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, M. C.; Brown, J. B.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore illness experiences of patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia. DESIGN: Qualitative method of in-depth interviews. SETTING: Midsize city in Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: Seven patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia. METHOD: Seven in-depth interviews were conducted to explore the illness experience of patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia. All interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. All interview transcriptions were read independently by the researchers, who then compared and combined their analysis. Final analysis involved examining all interviews collectively, thus permitting relationships between and among central themes to emerge. The analysis strategy used a phenomenologic approach and occurred concurrently rather than sequentially. MAIN FINDINGS: Themes that emerged from the interpretive analysis depict patients' journeys along a continuum from experiencing symptoms, through seeking a diagnosis, to coping with the illness. Experiencing symptoms was composed of four subcategories: pain, a precipitating event, associated symptoms, and modulating factors. Seeking a diagnosis entailed frustration and social isolation. Confirmation of diagnosis brought relief as well as anxiety about the future. After diagnosis, several steps led to creation of adaptive coping strategies, which were influenced by several factors. CONCLUSION: Findings suggest that the conventional medical model fails to address the complex experience of fibromyalgia. Adopting a patient-centred approach is important for helping patients cope with this disease. PMID:10845136

  9. A practical approach to fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Brecher, L S; Cymet, T C

    2001-04-01

    The term fibromyalgia refers to a collection of symptoms with no clear physiologic cause, but the symptoms together constitute a clearly recognizable and distinct pathologic entity. The diagnosis is made through the examiner's clinical observations. The differential diagnosis must include other somatic syndromes as well as disease entities, including hepatitis, hypothyroidism, diabetes mellitus, electrolyte imbalance, multiple sclerosis, and cancer. Diagnostic criteria serve as guidelines for diagnosis, not as absolute requirements. Treatment of fibromyalgia, which is an ongoing process, remains individualized, relying on a good physician-patient relationship. It is goal-oriented, directed at helping patients get restorative sleep, alleviating the somatic pains, keeping patients productive, and regulating schedules. It can be achieved through a goal-oriented agreement between patient and provider. Because fibromyalgia is chronic and may affect all areas of an individual's functioning, the physician needs to also evaluate the social support systems of patients with fibromyalgia. The approach to treatment should integrate patient education as well as non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic modalities. To keep patients well educated and involved in their healthcare, physicians should provide patients with adequate sources for reliable information.

  10. Overlap of fibromyalgia with other medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Lavín, M

    2001-08-01

    Fibromyalgia is a multisystem illness. One of its defining features, generalized pain, may also be present in other rheumatic entities. The diagnosis of fibromyalgia is not easy by any means, it requires a profound knowledge of internal medicine. This article discusses the different rheumatic and nonrheumatic diseases that overlap or are prone to be confused with fibromyalgia. It emphasizes the key points in the differential diagnosis.

  11. The PedsQL™ as a patient-reported outcome in children and adolescents with fibromyalgia: an analysis of OMERACT domains

    PubMed Central

    Varni, James W; Burwinkle, Tasha M; Limbers, Christine A; Szer, Ilona S

    2007-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia is a chronic health condition characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain, multiple tender points on physical examination, generalized muscular aching, stiffness, fatigue, nonrestorative sleep pattern, cognitive dysfunction, and mood disturbance. Recently, the Outcome Measures in Rheumatoid Arthritis Clinical Trials (OMERACT) Fibromyalgia Syndrome Workshop ranked and prioritized the domains that should be consistently measured in fibromyalgia clinical trials, specifically, pain, generic health-related quality of life, fatigue, sleep quality, and physical function. The focus of these deliberations was exclusively on adult patients, and to our knowledge, these domains have not been previously tested within a multidimensional framework in children and adolescents with fibromyalgia. Methods An analysis to determine the feasibility, reliability, and validity of the PedsQL™ 4.0 (Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™) Generic Core Scales, PedsQL™ Multidimensional Fatigue Scale, and PedsQL™ Rheumatology Module Pain and Hurt Scale as patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures for pediatric patients with fibromyalgia. The PedsQL™ Scales were completed by 59 families in a pediatric rheumatology clinic in a large children's hospital. Results The PedsQL™ evidenced minimal missing responses (0.53% patient self-report, 0.70% parent proxy-report), achieved excellent reliability for the Generic Core Scales Total Scale Score (α = 0.88 patient self-report, 0.87 parent proxy-report), the Multidimensional Fatigue Scale Total Scale Score (α = 0.94 patient self-report, 0.94 parent proxy-report), and acceptable reliability for the 4-item Rheumatology Module Pain and Hurt Scale (α = 0.68 patient self-report, 0.75 parent proxy-report). The PedsQL™ Generic Core Scales and Multidimensional Fatigue Scale significantly distinguished between pediatric patients with fibromyalgia and healthy children. Pediatric patients with fibromyalgia self

  12. Psoriatic arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, L.H.; Espinoza, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the titles are: The history and epidemiologic definition of psoriatic arthritis as a distinct entity; Psoriatic arthritis: Further epidemiologic and genetic considerations; The radiologic features of psoriatic arthritis; and Laboratory findings and pathology of psoriatic arthritis.

  13. Follicular density and ratios in scarring and nonscarring alopecia.

    PubMed

    Horenstein, Marcelo G; Bacheler, Christian J

    2013-12-01

    Follicular counts from transverse sectioning of scalp biopsies have not been statistically scrutinized across disease entities in a standardized fashion. We applied uniform histological criteria and strict statistical measures to compare nonscarring and scarring alopecia. We studied 700 consecutive cases including 355 nonscarring alopecia [136 telogen effluvium, 115 alopecia areata (AA), 95 androgenetic alopecia, and 9 trichotillosis] and 345 scarring alopecia [238 central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia, 29 traction alopecia, 26 lichen planopilaris, 21 end-stage alopecia, 20 lupus erythematosus, 11 folliculitis decalvans]. We counted follicular units, anagen, catagen/telogen, and vellus-like follicles at the central follicular unit level. We calculated follicular density per square centimeter, anagen percentage, telogen percentage, anagen to telogen ratio, and terminal to vellus ratio (TVR). The following achieved statistical significance (P < 0.05): follicular density was 249.4 ± 4.6 in nonscarring alopecia versus 120.1 ± 3.8 in scarring alopecia, follicular density of telogen effluvium was 273.5 ± 7.0 (36.5 ± 12.5 above nonscarring alopecia mean), TVR of androgenetic alopecia was 1.6 ± 0.1 (3.6 ± 0.5 below nonscarring alopecia mean), TVR of AA was 3.2 ± 0.4 (1.5 ± 0.6 below nonscarring alopecia mean), anagen percentage of AA was 26.8 ± 1.8 (26.3 ± 3.0 below nonscarring alopecia mean), anagen to telogen ratio of AA was 1.6 ± 0.4 (3.9 ± 0.7 below nonscarring alopecia mean), and telogen percentage of AA was 59.0 ± 2.3 (31.0 ± 3.5 above nonscarring alopecia mean). There exists a great overlap of densities and ratios across the various disorders due to the limited nature of the punch biopsy sample, variations in scalp anatomy, disease biology and duration, patient gender, and age, etc. Our data provide a bell curve distribution that helps analyze hair counts in the clinicopathologic context.

  14. The prevalence of fibromyalgia in other chronic pain conditions.

    PubMed

    Yunus, Muhammad B

    2012-01-01

    Central sensitivity syndromes (CSS) include fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), irritable bowel syndrome, temporomandibular disorder, restless legs syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome, and other similar chronic painful conditions that are based on central sensitization (CS). CSS are mutually associated. In this paper, prevalence of FMS among other members of CSS has been described. An important recent recognition is an increased prevalence of FMS in other chronic pain conditions with structural pathology, for example, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus, ankylosing spondylitis, osteoarthritis, diabetes mellitus, and inflammatory bowel disease. Diagnosis and proper management of FMS among these diseases are of crucial importance so that unwarranted use of such medications as corticosteroids can be avoided, since FMS often occurs when RA or SLE is relatively mild.

  15. Radiation-Induced Alopecia after Endovascular Embolization under Fluoroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ounsakul, Vipawee; Iamsumang, Wimolsiri

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced alopecia after fluoroscopically guided procedures is becoming more common due to an increasing use of endovascular procedures. It is characterized by geometric shapes of nonscarring alopecia related to the area of radiation. We report a case of a 46-year-old man presenting with asymptomatic, sharply demarcated rectangular, nonscarring alopecic patch on the occipital scalp following cerebral angiography with fistula embolization under fluoroscopy. His presentations were compatible with radiation-induced alopecia. Herein, we also report a novel scalp dermoscopic finding of blue-grey dots in a target pattern around yellow dots and follicles, which we detected in the lesion of radiation-induced alopecia. PMID:28074164

  16. What's eating you? ant-induced alopecia (pheidole).

    PubMed

    Feily, Amir; Lal, Karan; Elston, Dirk M

    2015-10-01

    Ant-induced alopecia is a rare cause of acute, localized, nonscarring hair loss. It is most commonly caused by Pheidole pallidula ants, which can be found worldwide but are most common in Iran. The resulting alopecia can have many morphologic patterns (eg, patch, linear, nondiscrete) and thus ant-induced alopecia should be considered in the differential diagnosis for patients from endemic areas who present with new-onset localized hair loss. The condition is self-limited; however, patients should be evaluated for other more common causes of alopecia, especially in the absence of a convincing history.

  17. Alopecia in three macaque species housed in a laboratory environment.

    PubMed

    Kroeker, R; Bellanca, R U; Lee, G H; Thom, J P; Worlein, J M

    2014-04-01

    Alopecia is a persistent problem in captive macaque populations and despite recent interest, no factors have been identified that can unequivocally explain the presence of alopecia in a majority of cases. Seasonal, demographic, and environmental factors have been identified as affecting alopecia presentation in rhesus macaques, the most widely studied macaque species. However, few studies have investigated alopecia rates in other macaque species. We report alopecia scores over a period of 12 months for three macaque species (Macaca nemestrina, M. mulatta, and M. fascicularis) housed at three indoor facilities within the Washington National Primate Research Center (WaNPRC) in Seattle. Clear species differences emerged with cynomolgus (M. fascicularis) showing the lowest alopecia rates and pigtails (M. nemestrina) the highest rates. Further analysis of pigtail and rhesus (M. mulatta) macaques revealed that sex effects were apparent for rhesus but not pigtails. Age and seasonal effects were evident for both species. In contrast to previous reports, we found that older animals (over 10 years of age) had improved alopecia scores in comparison to younger adults. This is the first report on alopecia rates in pigtail macaques and the first comparison of alopecia scores in pigtail, cynomolgus, and rhesus macaques housed under similar conditions.

  18. Treatment of chemotherapy-induced alopecia.

    PubMed

    Yeager, Caroline E; Olsen, Elise A

    2011-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced alopecia has been well documented as a cause of distress to patients undergoing cancer treatment. Despite the importance of hair loss to patients, however, patients often receive little more counseling than the advice to purchase a wig or other head covering for the duration of their treatment. Research into non-camouflage (wigs, turbans, and head scarves) treatment methods has been complicated both by a lack of a standardized methodology for evaluating hair loss and hair regrowth and by a lack of human trials. Nevertheless, scalp cooling as a method of preventing hair loss during chemotherapy and 2% topical minoxidil as a therapy for accelerating regrowth after chemotherapy are both effective non-camouflage options for treatment. Other proposed treatments for prevention of hair loss during chemotherapy have demonstrated promise in early trials, but these findings will need validation from rigorous further studies. The increasing number of reports of permanent alopecia not just with pre-bone marrow transplant, high-dose busulfan, and cyclophosphamide regimens but also with standard breast cancer chemotherapy regimens illustrates the importance of further research into treatment methods for chemotherapy-induced alopecia.

  19. Frontal Fibrosing Alopecia: A research letter.

    PubMed

    Bomar, L; McMichael, A

    2017-01-04

    Frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA) is a primary cicatricial alopecia first described by Kossard in 1994. It is considered a clinical variant of lichen planopilaris (LPP). In the last two decades, there have been an explosion of cases worldwide. While predominately seen in Caucasian, post-menopausal women, it has been reported in various ethnicities including African-Americans, Hispanics, Asians, and Indians as well as in pre-menopausal women and men.(1-5) Characterized by progressive, scarring frontotemporal hair loss with perifollicular erythema, follicular keratinization, and reduced follicular orifices, the most common finding is bandlike recession of the scalp hairline.(1-5) Accompanying features include eyebrow thinning, eyelash loss, body hair loss, facial papules, lonely hairs, and occipital alopecia.(1-5) While typically asymptomatic, pruritus and trichodynia can occur. Eyebrow thinning often presents prior to scalp hairline regression and has been seen with milder hairline regression compared to individuals who do not experience eyebrow thinning first.(2-4) Other dermatoses seen in patients with FFA include lichen planus on regions other than the scalp and lichen planus pigmentosus in non-Cacuasians. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Duloxetine for the treatment of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Wright, Cheryl L; Mist, Scott D; Ross, Rebecca L; Jones, Kim D

    2010-09-01

    This article presents a brief review of the physiologic abnormalities seen in fibromyalgia, current theories of widespread pain, and treatment options, including emerging therapeutics, with a focus on the use of duloxetine to manage fibromyalgia symptoms. Major clinical trials that examine the efficacy and effectiveness of duloxetine to date are reviewed, and safety issues are discussed.

  1. Fibrositis/fibromyalgia syndrome in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Littlejohn, G O

    1989-02-01

    A recent major epidemic of localized fibrositis/fibromyalgia syndrome occurring in the workplaces of Australia is reviewed. The clinical features are described and the important provoking factors are detailed. A neurogenic model is proposed to explain this localized phenomena and also encompass primary generalized fibrositis/fibromyalgia syndrome.

  2. Alterations of brain activity in fibromyalgia patients.

    PubMed

    Sawaddiruk, Passakorn; Paiboonworachat, Sahattaya; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2017-04-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain syndrome, characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain with diffuse tenderness at multiple tender points. Despite intense investigations, the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia remains elusive. Evidence shows that it could be due to changes in either the peripheral or central nervous system (CNS). For the CNS changes, alterations in the high brain area of fibromyalgia patients have been investigated but the definite mechanisms are still unclear. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Functional Magnetic Resonance (fMRI) have been used to gather evidence regarding the changes of brain morphologies and activities in fibromyalgia patients. Nevertheless, due to few studies, limited knowledge for alterations in brain activities in fibromyalgia is currently available. In this review, the changes in brain activity in various brain areas obtained from reports in fibromyalgia patients are comprehensively summarized. Changes of the grey matter in multiple regions such as the superior temporal gyrus, posterior thalamus, amygdala, basal ganglia, cerebellum, cingulate cortex, SII, caudate and putamen from the MRI as well as the increase of brain activities in the cerebellum, prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, thalamus, somatosensory cortex, insula in fMRI studies are presented and discussed. Moreover, evidence from pharmacological interventions offering benefits for fibromyalgia patients by reducing brain activity is presented. Because of limited knowledge regarding the roles of brain activity alterations in fibromyalgia, this summarized review will encourage more future studies to elucidate the underlying mechanisms involved in the brains of these patients.

  3. Fibromyalgia and obesity: the hidden link.

    PubMed

    Ursini, Francesco; Naty, Saverio; Grembiale, Rosa Daniela

    2011-11-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic disorder of uncertain etiology, characterized by widespread pain, muscle tenderness, and decreased pain threshold to pressure and other stimuli. Obesity is a well-known aggravating factor for certain rheumatologic conditions, such as knee osteoarthritis. Emerging evidences are exploring the link between obesity and other rheumatic diseases, such as fibromyalgia. Epidemiological data show that fibromyalgia patients have higher prevalence of obesity (40%) and overweight (30%) in multiple studies compared with healthy patients. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain "the hidden link", but at this time is not possible to ascertain whether obesity is cause or consequence of fibromyalgia. Among mechanisms proposed, there are the following: impaired physical activity, cognitive and sleep disturbances, psychiatric comorbidity and depression, dysfunction of thyroid gland, dysfunction of the GH/IGF-1 axis, impairment of the endogenous opioid system. In this article, we review the scientific evidence supporting a possible link between obesity and fibromyalgia, how obesity influences fibromyalgia symptoms and how fibromyalgia severity can be improved by weight loss. In addition, we analyze the possible mechanisms by which fibromyalgia and obesity interrelate.

  4. Fibromyalgia and nutrition: what news?

    PubMed

    Rossi, Alessandra; Di Lollo, Anna Chiara; Guzzo, Maria Paola; Giacomelli, Camillo; Atzeni, Fabiola; Bazzichi, Laura; Di Franco, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FM) is a chronic, generalised pain condition usually accompanied by several associated symptoms, such as fatigue, sleep disturbance, headache, irritable bowel syndrome and mood disorders. Different medical treatments are used to treat fibromyalgia and the recent guidelines suggest that the optimal treatment consists in a multidisciplinary approach with a combination of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment modalities. Among non-pharmacological treatment, nutrition is a promising tool for FM patients. The aim of this review is to update the present knowledge about fibromyalgia and nutrition by means of a systematic search performed on Medline from January 2000 to December 2014. Nutritional deficiencies have been described in FM patients and the benefits of specific diet and nutritional supplementation are shown. Obesity and overweight, often present in FM patients, are related to the severity of FM worsening the quality of life in terms of higher pain, fatigue, worsened sleep quality and higher incidence of mood disorders. Weight control is thus an effective tool to improve the symptoms. Moreover, it seems reasonable to eliminate some foods from the diet of FM patients, for example excitotoxins. Non-coeliac gluten sensitivity is increasingly recognised as a frequent condition with similar manifestations which overlap with those of FM. The elimination of gluten from the diet of FM patients is recently becoming a potential dietary intervention for clinical improvement. In summary, this review reveals the potential benefit of specific dietary interventions as non-pharmacological tools as part of a multidisciplinary treatment for FM patients.

  5. Safety and efficacy of the JAK inhibitor tofacitinib citrate in patients with alopecia areata

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy Crispin, Milène; Ko, Justin M.; Craiglow, Brittany G.; Li, Shufeng; Shankar, Gautam; Urban, Jennifer R.; Chen, James C.; Cerise, Jane E.; Winge, Mårten C.G.; Marinkovich, M. Peter; Christiano, Angela M.; Oro, Anthony E.; King, Brett A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Alopecia areata (AA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by hair loss mediated by CD8+ T cells. There are no reliably effective therapies for AA. Based on recent developments in the understanding of the pathomechanism of AA, JAK inhibitors appear to be a therapeutic option; however, their efficacy for the treatment of AA has not been systematically examined. METHODS. This was a 2-center, open-label, single-arm trial using the pan-JAK inhibitor, tofacitinib citrate, for AA with >50% scalp hair loss, alopecia totalis (AT), and alopecia universalis (AU). Tofacitinib (5 mg) was given twice daily for 3 months. Endpoints included regrowth of scalp hair, as assessed by the severity of alopecia tool (SALT), duration of hair growth after completion of therapy, and disease transcriptome. RESULTS. Of 66 subjects treated, 32% experienced 50% or greater improvement in SALT score. AA and ophiasis subtypes were more responsive than AT and AU subtypes. Shorter duration of disease and histological peribulbar inflammation on pretreatment scalp biopsies were associated with improvement in SALT score. Drug cessation resulted in disease relapse in 8.5 weeks. Adverse events were limited to grade I and II infections. An AA responsiveness to JAK/STAT inhibitors score was developed to segregate responders and nonresponders, and the previously developed AA disease activity index score tracked response to treatment. CONCLUSIONS. At the dose and duration studied, tofacitinib is a safe and effective treatment for severe AA, though it does not result in a durable response. Transcriptome changes reveal unexpected molecular complexity within the disease. TRIAL REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02197455 and NCT02312882. FUNDING. This work was supported by the US Department of Veterans Affairs Office of Research and Development, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases National Institutes of Health grant R01 AR47223 and U01 AR67173, the National

  6. Sleep architecture in patients with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Besteiro González, José Luis; Suárez Fernández, Tomás Vicente; Arboleya Rodríguez, Luis; Muñiz, José; Lemos Giráldez, Serafín; Alvarez Fernández, Angel

    2011-08-01

    The main objective of this work was to evaluate the characteristics of sleep in patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia syndrome. Sleep architecture in 32 patients with fibromyalgia and 20 healthy controls was evaluated. Following the recommendations of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology, polysomnographies were conducted with fibromyalgia patients and the control subjects. The fibromyalgia patients showed alterations in cyclic organization of sleep and an increased number of periodic leg movements associated with cortical arousals. No significant differences were found in respiratory and oximetry variables or in alpha-delta sleep. The results support that fibromyalgia patients present an increase of superficial sleep at the expense of deep sleep and also an increase of periodic leg movements, which could have a pathogenic effect, facilitating the onset of the illness. Lastly, we discuss the results and propose some future lines of research.

  7. Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... psoriasis are also at risk for psoriatic arthritis. Identification of genes that increase the risk of psoriatic arthritis will help scientists unlock the secrets of this troubling disease, and identify targets for more specific and effective therapy. Biologic therapies. ...

  8. Gonococcal arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is inflammation of a joint due to a gonorrhea infection. Causes Gonococcal arthritis is an infection of a joint. It occurs in people who have gonorrhea caused by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae . Gonococcal arthritis ...

  9. How real is senescent alopecia? A histopathologic approach.

    PubMed

    Whiting, David A

    2011-01-01

    Senescent alopecia was originally thought to affect people aged 50 years or older with no family history or evidence of pattern balding. It was described as a diffuse thinning involving the whole scalp due to a steady decrease in thick terminal hairs, but without evidence of increased miniaturization. Senescent alopecia is not a primary diagnosis in this clinic. Most possible examples of it are assumed to be androgenetic or diffuse alopecia. In the study reported here, horizontal sections of 2149 scalp specimens from individuals with male and female pattern and diffuse alopecia, as well as from normal controls, were examined, and their follicular counts were recorded and sorted into decades. The decade of 20 to 29 years contained a significant number of patients and was used for baseline follicular counts for comparison with all succeeding decades up to age 99 years. A reduction of 15% below baseline was considered significant. In 10.6% of patients with male pattern alopecia, the age of onset of a significant reduction in follicular counts was 50 years; in 5.7% of patients with female pattern alopecia it was 70 years, and in 2.0% of patients with diffuse alopecia it was 80 years. These data suggest that most cases of significant hair loss in the elderly are androgen driven. The few patients with deteriorating diffuse alopecia may be the exception. The study concluded that old age is not a significant cause of hair loss.

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... men. About two to three times as many women as men have the disease. Living with Rheumatoid Arthritis Video length: 2 min 54 sec Click to watch this video Learn more about how rheumatoid arthritis occurs. Effects Vary Rheumatoid arthritis affects people differently. Some people ...

  11. Mean platelet volume in patients with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Haliloğlu, S; Carlioglu, A; Sahiner, E; Karaaslan, Y; Kosar, A

    2014-10-01

    Fibromyalgia is a syndrome characterised by chronic widespread pain at multiple tender points, as well as joint stiffness and systemic symptoms. The aetiology and pathogenesis of fibromyalgia still remain unclear, although many contributory factors have been suggested. The presence of some common features between fibromyalgia and cardiovascular risk factors (e.g. depression and sleep disturbance) led to question of whether there is there a relationship between fibromyalgia and cardiovascular disease and/or atherosclerosis. Mean platelet volume, which is a determinant of platelet activation, is a newly emerging independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease.The present study was designed to evaluate levels of mean platelet volume in patients with fibromyalgia; the study population consisted of 283 individuals with this syndrome, who were compared with 72 healthy controls. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, white blood cell count, platelet count and mean platelet volume levels were retrospectively recorded via the computerised patient database. The levels of mean platelet volume were significantly higher in the fibromyalgia group than in the control group (8.09 ± 0.84 fl and 7.73 ± 0.65 fl, respectively, p < 0.001). There were no statistical differences between groups with regard to platelet count and other parameters. These results suggest that an early atherosclerosis marker, mean platelet volume, is elevated in patients with fibromyalgia. This indicates increased platelet activation and therefore a higher risk of future cardiovascular disease.

  12. Patients’ and professionals’ views on managing fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Briones-Vozmediano, Erica; Vives-Cases, Carmen; Ronda-Pérez, Elena; Gil-González, Diana

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Managing fibromyalgia is a challenge for both health care systems and the professionals caring for these patients, due, in part, to the fact that the etiology of this disease is unknown, its symptoms are not specific and there is no standardized treatment. OBJECTIVE: The present study examines three aspects of fibromyalgia management, namely diagnostic approach, therapeutic management and the health professional-patient relationship, to explore specific areas of the health care process that professionals and patients may consider unsatisfactory. METHODS: A qualitative study involving semistructured interviews with 12 fibromyalgia patients and nine health professionals was performed. RESULTS: The most commonly recurring theme was the dissatisfaction of both patients and professionals with the management process as a whole. Both groups expressed dissatisfaction with the delay in reaching a diagnosis and obtaining effective treatment. Patients reported the need for greater moral support from professionals, whereas the latter often felt frustrated and of little help to patients. Patients and professionals agreed on one point: the uncertainty surrounding the management of fibromyalgia and, especially, its etiology. CONCLUSION: The present study contributes to a better understanding regarding why current management of fibromyalgia is neither effective nor satisfactory. It also provides insight into how health professionals can support fibromyalgia patients to achieve beneficial results. Health care services should offer greater support for these patients in the form of specific resources such as fibromyalgia clinics and health professionals with increased awareness of the disease. PMID:23457682

  13. Fibromyalgia: A Critical and Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Borchers, Andrea T; Gershwin, M Eric

    2015-10-01

    Fibromyalgia is a disorder that is part of a spectrum of syndromes that lack precise classification. It is often considered as part of the global overview of functional somatic syndromes that are otherwise medically unexplained or part of a somatization disorder. Patients with fibromyalgia share symptoms with other functional somatic problems, including issues of myalgias, arthralgias, fatigue and sleep disturbances. Indeed, there is often diagnostic and classification overlap for the case definitions of a variety of somatization disorders. Fibromyalgia, however, is a critically important syndrome for physicians and scientists to be aware of. Patients should be taken very seriously and provided optimal care. Although inflammatory, infectious, and autoimmune disorders have all been ascribed to be etiological events in the development of fibromyalgia, there is very little data to support such a thesis. Many of these disorders are associated with depression and anxiety and may even be part of what has been sometimes called affected spectrum disorders. There is no evidence that physical trauma, i.e., automobile accidents, is associated with the development or exacerbation of fibromyalgia. Treatment should be placed on education, patient support, physical therapy, nutrition, and exercise, including the use of drugs that are approved for the treatment of fibromyalgia. Treatment should not include opiates and patients should not become poly pharmacies in which the treatment itself can lead to significant morbidities. Patients with fibromyalgia are living and not dying of this disorder and positive outlooks and family support are key elements in the management of patients.

  14. Pharmacological treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome: new developments.

    PubMed

    Staud, Roland

    2010-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain disorder characterized by widespread pain, stiffness, insomnia, fatigue and distress. Several randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have shown moderate effectiveness of pharmacological therapies for fibromyalgia pain. Evidence from these trials suggests that pharmacological therapy can not only improve pain but also fatigue, function and well-being in patients with fibromyalgia. Duloxetine and milnacipran, two highly selective serotonin-norepinephrine (noradrenaline) reuptake inhibitors, and the alpha(2)delta agonist pregabalin have been approved by the US FDA for the treatment of fibromyalgia symptoms. In general, about half of all treated patients seem to experience a 30% reduction of symptoms, suggesting that many patients with fibromyalgia will require additional therapies. Thus, other forms of treatment, including exercise, cognitive behavioural therapies and self-management strategies, may be necessary to achieve satisfactory treatment outcomes. Despite promising results of pilot trials, RCTs with dopamine receptor agonists and sodium channel antagonists have so far been disappointing for patients with fibromyalgia. However, new pharmacological approaches for the treatment of fibromyalgia pain and insomnia using sodium oxybate appear to be promising.

  15. Alopecia areata and narcolepsy: a tale of obscure autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Nigam, Gaurav; Pathak, Charu; Riaz, Muhammad

    2016-04-08

    Alopecia areata is an autoimmune dermatological disorder characterised by loss of hair in one or more discrete patches over the scalp. It has been linked to multiple disorders having an autoimmune origin. Like many autoimmune disorders it tends to be more common in females. To date, only five cases have been reported where alopecia has been associated with narcolepsy. Male gender is less commonly affected by alopecia areata. No case of alopecia areata in males has been associated with narcolepsy to the best of our knowledge. The current case represents the first ever-reported case of alopecia areata in a male patient with narcolepsy type 1. This coexistence is most likely the manifestation of a common underlying pathoimmunological mechanism that has not been completely understood, rather than a random association.

  16. Etiology of cicatricial alopecias: a basic science point of view.

    PubMed

    McElwee, Kevin J

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a short summary of our current knowledge of cicatricial alopecia disease pathogenesis and the hypothetical disease mechanisms that may be involved in scarring alopecia development. Several forms of scarring alopecia likely involve targeted cytotoxic action against hair follicle cells mediated by a folliculocentric inflammation. However, the specific nature of the inflammatory interference in hair follicle growth is open to question. A popular hypothesis of lymphocyte-mediated scarring alopecia development involves autoimmune targeting of hair follicle-specific self-antigens, although there is no direct evidence in support of such a view. Alternative hypotheses focus on defects in sebaceous gland function, destruction of hair follicle stem cells, and interference in the communication between hair follicle mesenchyme and epithelium. Many questions arise from these hypotheses, and addressing them with a systematic research approach may enable significant advances in understanding cicatricial alopecia etiology.

  17. Alopecia areata. How not to miss Satoyoshi syndrome?

    PubMed

    Rudnicka, Lidia; Kwiatkowska, Małgorzata; Rakowska, Adriana; Czuwara, Joanna; Olszewska, Małgorzata

    2014-11-01

    Satoyoshi syndrome is a multisystem disorder of suspected autoimmune etiology, characterized predominantly by alopecia, muscle spasms and diarrhea. Antinuclear antibodies are present in 60% of patients. The syndrome primarily affects girls and young women. Trichoscopy shows regularly distributed yellow dots, indistinguishable from typical alopecia areata. The condition may be easily misdiagnosed and treated as alopecia areata. On the basis of an in-depth analysis of all published cases we developed diagnostic criteria for Satoyoshi syndrome. We also suggest that two subtypes of the disorder should be distinguished, the ANA-positive Satoyoshi syndrome with generally good response to systemic glucocorticosteroid therapy and the ANA-negative Satoyoshi with less favorable prognosis. In our opinion all patients will alopecia areata (in particular alopecia totalis) should be inquired about muscle spasms and diarrhea and tested for antinuclear antibodies to decrease the risk of missing Satoyoshi syndrome.

  18. Alopecia areata: a new treatment plan

    PubMed Central

    Alsantali, Adel

    2011-01-01

    Many therapeutic modalities have been used to treat alopecia areata, with variable efficacy and safety profiles. Unfortunately, none of these agents is curative or preventive. Also, many of these therapeutic agents have not been subjected to randomized, controlled trials, and, except for topical immunotherapy, there are few published studies on long-term outcomes. The treatment plan is designed according to the patient’s age and extent of disease. In this paper, the therapeutic agents are organized according to their efficacy and safety profiles into first-line, second-line, and third-line options. PMID:21833161

  19. Getting the point about fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Dell, Deena Damsky

    2007-02-01

    Invisible and incurable, this disorder can wreak havoc with your patient's life. Find out how to get her back on track. Fibromyalgia, a complex, chronic disorder of pain processing, is thought to be the most common cause of generalized musculoskeletal pain in women ages 20 to 55. This disorder, which affects the muscles, ligaments, and tendons, occurs in 3 to 6 million Americans, mostly women. Some patients are affected only mildly, but up to 30% have symptoms that seriously impair their quality of life.

  20. The Pathogenesis of Primary Cicatricial Alopecias

    PubMed Central

    Harries, Matthew J.; Paus, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    Cicatricial (scarring) alopecia results from irreversible damage to epithelial stem cells located in the bulge region of the hair follicle, generally as a result of inflammatory mechanisms (eg, in the context of autoimmune disease). In primary cicactricial alopecia (PCA), the hair follicle itself is the key target of autoaggressive immunity. This group of permanent hair loss disorders can be classified into distinct subgroups, characterized by the predominant peri-follicular inflammatory cell type. In none of these PCA forms do we know exactly why hair follicles begin to attract such an infiltrate. Thus, it is not surprising that halting or even reversing this inflammation in PCA is often extremely difficult. However, increasing evidence suggests that healthy hair follicle epithelial stem cells enjoy relative protection from inflammatory assault by being located in an immunologically “privileged” niche. Because this protection may collapse in PCA, one key challenge in PCA research is to identify the specific signaling pathways that endanger, or restore, the relative immunoprotection of these stem cells. After a summary of pathobiological principles that underlie the development and clinical phenotype of PCA, we close by defining key open questions that need to be answered if more effective treatment modalities for this therapeutically very frustrating, but biologically fascinating, group of diseases are to be developed. PMID:20889564

  1. Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Herskovitz, Ingrid; Miteva, Mariya

    2016-01-01

    Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA) is the most common scarring alopecia among African American women. Data about epidemiology, etiology, genetic inheritance, and management are scarce and come from individual reports or small series. CCCA has been associated with hot combing and traumatic hair styling for years; however, studies fail to confirm it as the sole etiologic factor. It has been shown in a small series that CCCA can be inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion, with a partial penetrance and a strong modifying effect of hairstyling and sex. CCCA presents clinically as a central area of progressive irreversible hair loss that expands to the periphery. A patchy form has also been described. Dermoscopy is helpful to identify the optimal site for the biopsy, which establishes the diagnosis. Well-designed randomized controlled trials are needed to discover the optimal management. At this point, patients are advised to avoid traction and chemical treatments; topical and intralesional steroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and minoxidil can be helpful in halting the progression. PMID:27574457

  2. Vegan diet alleviates fibromyalgia symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kaartinen, K; Lammi, K; Hypen, M; Nenonen, M; Hanninen, O; Rauma, A L

    2000-01-01

    The effect of a strict, low-salt, uncooked vegan diet rich in lactobacteria on symptoms in 18 fibromyalgia patients during and after a 3-month intervention period in an open, non-randomized controlled study was evaluated. As control 15 patients continued their omnivorous diet. The groups did not differ significantly from each other in the beginning of the study in any other parameters except in pain and urine sodium. The results revealed significant improvements in Visual analogue scale of pain (VAS) (p=0.005), joint stiffness (p=0.001), quality of sleep (p=0.0001), Health assessment questionnaire (HAQ) (p=0.031), General health questionnaire (GHQ) (p=0.021), and a rheumatologist's own questionnaire (p=0.038). The majority of patients were overweight to some extent at the beginning of the study and shifting to a vegan food caused a significant reduction in body mass index (BMI) (p=0.0001). Total serum cholesterol showed a statistically significant lowering (p=0.003). Urine sodium dropped to 1/3 of the beginning values (p=0.0001) indicating good diet compliance. It can be concluded that vegan diet had beneficial effects on fibromyalgia symptoms at least in the short run.

  3. Fibromyalgia: knowns, unknowns, and current treatment.

    PubMed

    Solitar, Bruce M

    2010-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic syndrome of diffuse musculoskeletal pain with tenderness at specific locations, often associated with persistent fatigue, cognitive and mood disorders, joint stiffness, and insomnia. Understanding the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia and the establishment of effective treatments have been complex endeavors that have not yielded simple answers. Nevertheless, recent studies have shed light on the roles of central pain processing, genetic abnormalities, and external factors on development of the fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). These findings have led to the use of new therapies that have shown beneficial effects on symptoms. This review discusses ideas that have become accepted as well as novel associations under consideration in regard to the pathogenesis of fibromyalgia and the current and emerging therapeutics for its treatment.

  4. Juvenile Fibromyalgia: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Treatment.

    PubMed

    Tesher, Melissa S

    2015-06-01

    A 14-year-old boy presented with months of severe widespread musculoskeletal pain. He was profoundly fatigued and unable to attend school. Laboratory evaluation, including complete blood count, comprehensive metabolic panel, inflammatory markers, and thyroid function, was unrevealing. Physical examination was also normal except for multiple tender points. The patient was diagnosed with juvenile primary fibromyalgia syndrome and referred for multidisciplinary treatment including physical therapy, exercise, and counseling, and his daily functioning gradually improves. Juvenile fibromyalgia is a complex syndrome that often severely limits patients' activities and can impede normal adolescent development. Effective treatment requires an understanding of the biologic, psychologic, and social factors contributing to the perpetuation of chronic pain. The author reviews the diagnostic criteria, pathophysiology, and treatment of juvenile fibromyalgia. Medications, particularly antidepressants and anticonvulsants, can be useful adjuncts to therapy. However, multimodal pain management including intensive physical therapy, exercise, counseling, and sleep hygiene is most effective in treating fibromyalgia.

  5. Imposters of androgenetic alopecia: diagnostic pearls for the hair restoration surgeon.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Nicole

    2013-08-01

    It is crucial that hair restoration surgeons understand the basic clinical diagnosis and pathologic condition of other hair loss conditions that are not always amenable to successful hair transplantation. In this article nonscarring and scarring mimickers of androgenetic alopecia are discussed. Nonscarring conditions include alopecia areata, telogen effluvium, and tinea capitis. Some of the more common scarring alopecias include lichen planopilaris, frontal fibrosing alopecia, and central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia. Less common inflammatory conditions include pseudopelade of Brocq, discoid lupus erythematosus, and folliculitis decalvans.

  6. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 69 KB November 2014 What is Reactive Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Information About Reactive Arthritis and Other Related Conditions What Causes Reactive Arthritis? Sometimes, reactive arthritis is set ...

  7. Does exercise improve symptoms in fibromyalgia?

    PubMed

    Rain, Carmen; Seguel, Willy; Vergara, Luis

    2015-12-14

    It has been proposed that fibromyalgia could be managed by pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions. Regular physical exercise is commonly used as a non-pharmacological intervention. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified 14 systematic reviews including 25 randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We conclude that regular physical exercise probably reduces pain in patients with fibromyalgia.

  8. [Fibromyalgia syndrome - updated s3 guidelines].

    PubMed

    Dreher, T; Häuser, W; Schiltenwolf, M

    2013-12-01

    Patients with chronic widespread pain often present with musculo-skeletal pain and therefore often initially contact an orthopaedist. For these patients fibromyalgia syndrome is an important differential diagnosis. Recommendations for the diagnosis of and therapy for fibromyalgia syndrome based on the recent German S3 guidelines for fibromyalgia syndrome (AWMF registration number 041/004) are outlined in this paper. These guidelines were developed under the coordination of the German interdisciplinary association for pain management DIVS and two patient support groups. The history of a typical symptom complex and the exclusion of relevant somatic causes for the pain are epecially relevant for the diagnosis of fibromyalgia syndrome. Besides the exclusion of relevant orthopaedic causes for the pain, psycho-social aspects should always be evaluated. According to the modified ACR criteria 2010, chronic widespread pain and accompanying sleep disturbances and a physical as well as mental state of exhaustion lead to the diagnosis of fibromyalgia syndrome. It is not mandatory to check tender points (ACR 1990 criteria). A graduated treatment approach depending on the severity level of the fibromyalgia syndrome in the individual patient is recommended. Active treatment options (aerobic training, meditative movement therapies, strength training) should be preferred to any drug therapy in the long-term treatment of fibromyalgia. If indicated, amitryptiline or duloxetine may be used to treat accompanying depressive or generalised anxiety disorder. Muscle relaxant medication, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and strong opioids should be avoided. The multimodal pain therapy considering all psycho-social aspects is a promising treatment option for fibromyalgia syndrome of moderate to high severity.

  9. A review of hormonal therapy for female pattern (androgenic) alopecia.

    PubMed

    Scheinfeld, Noah

    2008-03-15

    Female pattern hair loss (female androgenetic alopecia) is a common, but puzzling, condition in women. Approximately 10 percent of pre-menopausal women show evidence of androgenetic alopecia. Age increases the incidence and 50-75 percent of women 65 years or older suffer from this condition. Only 2 percent topical mindoxidil is approved for treating female androgenetic alopecia. Reviews suggest that anti-hormonal therapy (e.g. cyproterone acetate, spironolactone) is helpful in treating female pattern alopecia in some women who have normal hormone levels. The use of hormonal therapies is most extensively studied in post-menopausal women. Several studies have suggested that cyproterone acetate with or without ethinyl estradiol and spironolactone can ameliorate female androgenetic alopecia in women with normal hormone levels, but larger controlled studies need to be done. Flutamide was found to be more effective than spironolactone or cyproterone in one study. Testosterone conversion inhibitors have been tried in post-menopausual women with normal hormone levels to treat alopecia. No study has shown that 1 mg of finasteride effectively treats female androgenetic alopecia but doses of 2.5 and 5 mg finasteride have helped some women in a few open studies. One case report notes the utility of dutasteride after finasteride failed. The role and place of anti-androgentic agents in female androgenetic alopecia in both pre and post-menopausal women remains to be fully defined. The need for effective agents is highlighted by the paucity of effective treatments and the substantial psychosocial impact of alopecia on women.

  10. Clinical utility of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) for an outpatient fibromyalgia education program.

    PubMed

    Nam, Seungree; Tin, Diane; Bain, Lorna; Thorne, J Carter; Ginsburg, Liane

    2014-05-01

    This paper examines the clinical utility of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in the context of evaluating the Fibromyalgia Outpatient Education Program at Southlake Regional Health Centre (Newmarket, Canada). A pre-test/post-test design was implemented for data analysis. A total of 232 patients' data were obtained through retrospective patient chart review. Complete pre-post data were available for 70 patients and qualitative analysis was done for 12 patients. Main outcome measures included HADS and Arthritis Self-Efficacy (ASE) scores. At the end of the education program, subgroups of patients (high attendance, high exercise habit, low medication) experienced significant improvement on HADS-depression and ASE scores. Linear regression analysis found that HADS pre-program scores explain far more variance in HADS post-test scores than ASE pre-program scores explain in ASE post-program scores; more variance in ASE post-program scores was explained by other variables. In contrast to the quantitative analysis of the Anxiety subscale of HADS, patients in the focus group indicated that their anxiety level decreased through attending the education program. These findings suggest that HADS is an appropriate tool for evaluating fibromyalgia and related patient education programs. Moreover, patient education programs have positive effects on enhancing patients' psychological well-being and self-confidence in controlling fibromyalgia-related symptoms.

  11. The German fibromyalgia consumer reports – a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Consumer surveys provide information on effectiveness and side effects of medical interventions in routine clinical care. A report of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) consumers has not been carried out in Europe. Methods The study was carried out from November 2010 to April 2011. Participants diagnosed with FMS rated the effectiveness and side effects of pharmacological and non-pharmacological FMS interventions on a 0 to 10 scale, with 10 being most efficacious (harmful). The questionnaire was distributed by the German League for people with Arthritis and Rheumatism and the German Fibromyalgia Association to their members and to all consecutive FMS patients of nine clinical centers of different levels of care. Results 1661 questionnaires (95% women, mean age 54 years, mean duration since FMS diagnosis 6.8 years) were analysed. The most frequently used therapies were self-management strategies, prescription pain medication and aerobic exercise. The highest average effectiveness was attributed to whole body and local warmth therapies, thermal bathes, FMS education and resting. The highest average side effects were attributed to strong opioids, local cold therapy, gamma-amino-butyric acid analogues (pregabalin and gabapentin), tramadol and opioid transdermal systems. Conclusion The German fibromyalgia consumer reports highlight the importance of non-pharmcological therapies in the long-term management of FMS, and challenges the strong recommendations for drug therapies given by FMS-guidelines. PMID:22607517

  12. Living with Fibromyalgia, Drugs Approved to Manage Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Living with Fibromyalgia, Drugs Approved to Manage Pain Share Tweet Linkedin ... syndrome, and depression. back to top What Causes Fibromyalgia? Scientists believe that the condition may be due ...

  13. [Female androgenetic alopecia, a survey of causes and therapeutic options].

    PubMed

    Duchková, Hana; Hašková, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Mesotherapy is one of the options for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia. Testing 24 women with androgenetic alopecia has demonstrated a positive effect of mesotherapy on the hair growth, hair thickness, with only insignificant increase of hair density. It is known that androgenetic alopecia represents a localized aging of hair follicles. We therefore decided to examine the different effects of mesotherapy on hair density in younger and in elderly women. In younger women mesotherapy significantly increased hair density compared with older women. For mesotherapy we used a combination of micronutrients and antioxidants. Mesotherapy achievements were evident for 6-12 months. Treatment requires a long-term care.

  14. Living with the unexplained: coping, distress, and depression among women with chronic fatigue syndrome and/or fibromyalgia compared to an autoimmune disorder.

    PubMed

    McInnis, Opal A; Matheson, Kimberly; Anisman, Hymie

    2014-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and fibromyalgia are disabling conditions without objective diagnostic tests, clear-cut treatments, or established etiologies. Those with the disorders are viewed suspiciously, and claims of malingering are common, thus promoting further distress. It was hypothesized in the current study that levels of unsupportive social interactions and the coping styles used among those with CFS/fibromyalgia would be associated with perceived distress and depressive symptoms. Women with CFS/fibromyalgia (n=39), in fact, reported higher depression scores, greater perceived distress and more frequent unsupportive relationships than healthy women (n=55), whereas those with a chronic, but medically accepted illness comprising an autoimmune disorder (lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis; n=28), displayed intermediate scores. High problem-focused coping was associated with low levels of depression and perceived distress in those with an autoimmune condition. In contrast, although CFS/fibromyalgia was also accompanied by higher depression scores and higher perceived distress, this occurred irrespective of problem-focused coping. It is suggested that because the veracity of ambiguous illnesses is often questioned, this might represent a potent stressor in women with such illnesses, and even coping methods typically thought to be useful in other conditions, are not associated with diminished distress among those with CFS/fibromyalgia.

  15. Finasteride in the treatment of alopecia.

    PubMed

    Libecco, James F; Bergfeld, Wilma F

    2004-04-01

    Finasteride is a 5alpha-reductase inhibitor approved for the treatment of male pattern hair loss. Originally approved for the treatment of benign prostatic hypertrophy in 1992, its approval was expanded in 1997 to include the treatment of androgenetic alopecia (AGA) in men at a dose of 1 mg/day. Finasteride inhibits 5alpha-reductase, thereby prohibiting the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT), which is implicated in the development of hairless in some men. Reduction in DHT results in a significant improvement in subjective and objective assessments of hair growth and density. Finasteride is well-tolerated with a favourable adverse event history. The most common adverse events include reduced libido, decreased ejaculate volume and gynaecomastia.

  16. Androgenic alopecia in women: an Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Srivastava, Govind; Aggarwal, Ashok K; Midha, Reshmi

    2013-01-01

    The authors sought to investigate androgenic alopecia (AA) utilizing clinical and investigative procedures to establish the pattern of AA in the Indian subcontinent. A total of 35 consecutive women presenting with AA were included. After obtaining informed consent, a detailed history/examination, hair pull test, trichogram, and a scalp biopsy were performed in patients. AA classification was attempted across Ludwig and Norwood guidelines. Of 35 women, 16 had grade I, 10 had grade II, and 1 had grade III Ludwig classification. In addition, 6 other women had Christmas tree baldness: 1 each of fronto-parietal and male pattern baldness. Several investigations including hormonal profile were inconclusive; however, hair pull test and trichogram may be helpful in understanding the sequence in AA in women. AA has infrequently been reported, particularly India and in Asia in general.

  17. The Role of Hair Restoration Surgery in Primary Cicatricial Alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Dahdah, Maurice J.; Iorizzo, Matilde

    2016-01-01

    Primary scarring alopecias are a group of inflammatory conditions in which the main target of the inflammation is the hair follicle. They represent up to 7.3% of the hair loss cases presenting to specialty hair clinics. They are poorly understood, their pathogeneses are mostly unknown and their management is guided at best by the results of small case series and expert opinions. These alopecias are frequently referred to as a trichologic emergency as their progression can be rapid and the hair loss they induce is permanent. In view of the suboptimal solutions offered by the pharmacological treatments available and the significant emotional distress caused by these conditions, it is only normal for patients with scarring alopecias and their treating physicians alike to explore the prospects of surgical correction. This review attempts to summarize what is known about hair restoration surgery in scarring alopecia. PMID:27843925

  18. Frontal Fibrosing Alopecia: Role of Dermoscopy in Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Rubegni, P.; Mandato, F.; Fimiani, M.

    2010-01-01

    Frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA) is more common in postmenopausal women, but it can occur in younger women. Some authors consider FFA to be a distinct frontal variant of lichen planopilaris. From a clinical point of view, this relatively uncommon condition is characterized by progressive frontotemporal recession due to inflammatory destruction of hair follicles. Dermoscopy can be very useful, as the differential diagnosis between traction alopecia, alopecia areata, FFA and cicatricial marginal alopecia may be difficult. It is not clear whether or not treatment alters the natural history of the disease - the disease stabilized with time in most of the patients with or without continuing treatment. Here we report a case of a 50-year-old woman with FFA and discuss the relevance of dermoscopy in the differential diagnosis of this disease. PMID:21173926

  19. Exploring Genetic Susceptibility to Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong-Jin; Kang, Ji-Hyoun; Yim, Yi-Rang; Kim, Ji-Eun; Lee, Jeong-Won; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Wen, Lihui; Kim, Tae-Jong; Park, Yong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) affects 1% to 5% of the population, and approximately 90% of the affected individuals are women. FM patients experience impaired quality of life and the disorder places a considerable economic burden on the medical care system. With the recognition of FM as a major health problem, many recent studies have evaluated the pathophysiology of FM. Although the etiology of FM remains unknown, it is thought to involve some combination of genetic susceptibility and environmental exposure that triggers further alterations in gene expression. Because FM shows marked familial aggregation, most previous research has focused on genetic predisposition to FM and has revealed associations between genetic factors and the development of FM, including specific gene polymorphisms involved in the serotonergic, dopaminergic, and catecholaminergic pathways. The aim of this review was to discuss the current evidence regarding genetic factors that may play a role in the development and symptom severity of FM. PMID:26306300

  20. Alopecia areata in Korea (1982-1994).

    PubMed

    Ro, B I

    1995-11-01

    I clinically studied 905 patients with alopecia areata (AA) who visited the Department of Dermatology, College of Medicine, Chung Ang University, from January of 1982 to February of 1994. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the clinical manifestations and compare the effects of treatment with intralesional injection of triamcinolone acetonide suspension and immunotherapy with dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) or diphenylcyclopropenone (DPCP). The results were as follows: 1) The incidence of AA among all out-patients (59,970) was 1.5% (905 cases), and the ratio of males to females was 1.3:1 (512:393). 2) The age distribution showed high incidences in the third (41.8%) and fourth decades (20.0%). 3) The family history was contributory in 104 cases (11.5%). 4) The relapse rate was 17.5% (158 cases). 5) Almost half of the patients had a solitary lesion (408 cases, 46.7%). 6) The most common site of predilection was the occipital region of the scalp in both male and female patients. 7) Associated diseases were seborrheic dermatitis, atopic dermatitis, hepatitis, hypertension, open heart surgery, thyroid disease, pulmonary disease, and vitiligo in order of frequency. 8) The effect of treatment on the patients who had bald patches less than 50 cm2 was not significantly statistically different between intralesional injection of triamcinolone acetonide and immunotherapy with DNCB or DPCP. 9) In cases with bald areas more than 50 cm2, including alopecia totalis and universalis, DNCB or DPCP immunotherapy showed better therapeutic effects than did intralesional injection of triamcinolone acetonide.

  1. Frontal Fibrosing Alopecia in a Male Presenting with Sideburn Loss

    PubMed Central

    AlGaadi, Salim; Miteva, Mariya; Tosti, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA) is a cicatricial alopecia that affects mainly postmenopausal women. It is typically characterized by recession of frontotemporal hairline. Hair loss of eyebrows, eyelashes, axillae, limbs, and pubic area may be observed. Here, we describe a case of FFA in a male patient presenting with only localized loss of sideburns. Skin biopsy findings were consistent with lichen planopilaris. To our knowledge, this is the only reported case of FFA patient with only localized loss of sideburns. PMID:26180452

  2. Male frontal fibrosing alopecia with generalised hair loss.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenchieh; Kigitsidou, Evanthia; Prucha, Hanna; Ring, Johannes; Andres, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Frontal fibrosing alopecia predominantly affects postmenopausal women and is regarded as a variant of lichen planopilaris. Male cases have rarely been reported. Here we describe a 66-year-old man with a typical receding fronto-temporal hair line in a form of scarring alopecia, which shows features of lichen planopilaris in histology. An extensive loss of body hair involving bilateral axillae, limbs and pubic area was also observed.

  3. Altered Functional Performance in Patients with Fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Costa, Isis da Silva; Gamundí, Antoni; Miranda, José G Vivas; França, Lucas G Souza; De Santana, Charles Novaes; Montoya, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a common chronic pain condition that exerts a considerable impact on patients' daily activities and quality of life. Objectives: The main objective of the present study was to evaluate kinematic parameters of gait, functional performance, and balance in women with fibromyalgia syndrome. Methods: The study included 26 female patients with fibromyalgia (49.2 ± 8.0 years) according to the criteria of the American College of Rheumatology, as well as 16 pain-free women (43.5 ± 8.5 years). Gait and balance parameters were extracted from video recordings of participants performing several motor tasks. Non-linear dynamic of body sway time series was also analyzed by computing the Hurst exponent. In addition, functional performance and clinical pain were obtained by using standardized motor tests (Berg's balance scale, 6-min walking test, timed up and go task, Romberg's balance test) and self-report questionnaires (Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire). Results: Walking speed was significantly diminished (p < 0.001) in FM patients as compared to pain-free controls, probably due to significant reductions in stride length (p < 0.001) and cycle frequency (p < 0.001). Analyses of balance also revealed significant differences between fibromyalgia and pain-free controls on body sway in the medial-lateral and anterior-posterior axes (all ps < 0.01). Several parameters of gait and balance were significantly associated with high levels of pain, depression, stiffness, anxiety, and fatigue in fibromyalgia. Conclusion: Our data revealed that both gait and balance were severely impaired in FM, and that subjective complaints associated with FM could contribute to functional disability in these patients. These findings suggest that optimal rehabilitation and fall prevention in fibromyalgia require a comprehensive assessment of both psychological responses to pain and physical impairments during postural control and gait.

  4. Altered Functional Performance in Patients with Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Isis da Silva; Gamundí, Antoni; Miranda, José G. Vivas; França, Lucas G. Souza; De Santana, Charles Novaes; Montoya, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a common chronic pain condition that exerts a considerable impact on patients' daily activities and quality of life. Objectives: The main objective of the present study was to evaluate kinematic parameters of gait, functional performance, and balance in women with fibromyalgia syndrome. Methods: The study included 26 female patients with fibromyalgia (49.2 ± 8.0 years) according to the criteria of the American College of Rheumatology, as well as 16 pain-free women (43.5 ± 8.5 years). Gait and balance parameters were extracted from video recordings of participants performing several motor tasks. Non-linear dynamic of body sway time series was also analyzed by computing the Hurst exponent. In addition, functional performance and clinical pain were obtained by using standardized motor tests (Berg's balance scale, 6-min walking test, timed up and go task, Romberg's balance test) and self-report questionnaires (Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire). Results: Walking speed was significantly diminished (p < 0.001) in FM patients as compared to pain-free controls, probably due to significant reductions in stride length (p < 0.001) and cycle frequency (p < 0.001). Analyses of balance also revealed significant differences between fibromyalgia and pain-free controls on body sway in the medial-lateral and anterior-posterior axes (all ps < 0.01). Several parameters of gait and balance were significantly associated with high levels of pain, depression, stiffness, anxiety, and fatigue in fibromyalgia. Conclusion: Our data revealed that both gait and balance were severely impaired in FM, and that subjective complaints associated with FM could contribute to functional disability in these patients. These findings suggest that optimal rehabilitation and fall prevention in fibromyalgia require a comprehensive assessment of both psychological responses to pain and physical impairments during postural control and gait. PMID:28184193

  5. Circadian rhythms of women with fibromyalgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klerman, E. B.; Goldenberg, D. L.; Brown, E. N.; Maliszewski, A. M.; Adler, G. K.

    2001-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is a chronic and debilitating disorder characterized by widespread nonarticular musculoskeletal pain whose etiology is unknown. Many of the symptoms of this syndrome, including difficulty sleeping, fatigue, malaise, myalgias, gastrointestinal complaints, and decreased cognitive function, are similar to those observed in individuals whose circadian pacemaker is abnormally aligned with their sleep-wake schedule or with local environmental time. Abnormalities in melatonin and cortisol, two hormones whose secretion is strongly influenced by the circadian pacemaker, have been reported in women with fibromyalgia. We studied the circadian rhythms of 10 women with fibromyalgia and 12 control healthy women. The protocol controlled factors known to affect markers of the circadian system, including light levels, posture, sleep-wake state, meals, and activity. The timing of the events in the protocol were calculated relative to the habitual sleep-wake schedule of each individual subject. Under these conditions, we found no significant difference between the women with fibromyalgia and control women in the circadian amplitude or phase of rhythms of melatonin, cortisol, and core body temperature. The average circadian phases expressed in hours posthabitual bedtime for women with and without fibromyalgia were 3:43 +/- 0:19 and 3:46 +/- 0:13, respectively, for melatonin; 10:13 +/- 0:23 and 10:32 +/- 0:20, respectively for cortisol; and 5:19 +/- 0:19 and 4:57 +/- 0:33, respectively, for core body temperature phases. Both groups of women had similar circadian rhythms in self-reported alertness. Although pain and stiffness were significantly increased in women with fibromyalgia compared with healthy women, there were no circadian rhythms in either parameter. We suggest that abnormalities in circadian rhythmicity are not a primary cause of fibromyalgia or its symptoms.

  6. An overview on congenital alopecia in domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Mecklenburg, Lars

    2006-12-01

    Alopecia, that is, lack of hair in any quantity, is a frequent complaint of pet owners. Although mostly acquired, rare congenital forms of alopecia exist that are associated with abnormalities in hair follicle morphogenesis. Congenital alopecias can result in changes in quality or quantity of hair follicles and the hair fibres produced by them. They vary in terms of clinical presentation and mode of inheritance. Histopathology is usually needed in order to differentiate between a reduced number of otherwise normal hair follicles and qualitative hair follicle abnormalities. Although our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that drive hair follicle morphogenesis in mice and humans has significantly increased during the last decade, still very little is known about congenital alopecias in domestic animals. Because of their rarity and the general lack of knowledge about their pathophysiology, classification of congenital alopecias in domestic animals is still unsatisfactory. This article reviews hair follicle morphogenesis and its most important molecular mechanisms, and it discusses the various forms of congenital alopecia occurring in domestic animals that have been described in the literature, differentiating between hair follicle aplasia, hair follicle dysplasia (i.e. defects associated with hair follicle development and defects associated with hair shaft formation), and neuroectodermal dysplasias, the latter involving the hair follicle pigmentary system.

  7. Alopecia: Possible Causes and Treatments, Particularly in Captive Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Melinda A; Meyer, Jerrold S

    2009-01-01

    Alopecia (hair loss) occurs in some nonhuman primates housed in captivity and is of concern to colony managers and veterinarians. Here we review the characteristics, potential causes, and treatments for this condition. Although we focus on nonhuman primates, relevant research on other mammalian species is discussed also, due to the relative paucity of studies on alopecia in the primate literature. We first discuss the cycle of hair growth and explain how this cycle can be disrupted to produce alopecia. Numerous factors may be related to hair loss and range from naturally occurring processes (for example, seasonality, aging) to various biologic dysfunctions, including vitamin and mineral imbalances, endocrine disorders, immunologic diseases, and genetic mutations. We also address bacterial and fungal infections, infestation by parasites, and atopic dermatitis as possible causes of alopecia. Finally, we examine the role of psychogenic factors, such as stress. Depending on the presumed cause of the hair loss, various treatment strategies can be pursued. Alopecia in nonhuman primates is a multifaceted disorder with many potential sources. For this reason, appropriate testing for various disease conditions should be completed before alopecia is considered to be related to stress. PMID:19295051

  8. Septic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... septic arthritis. Knees are most commonly affected, but septic arthritis also can affect hips, shoulders and other joints. The infection can quickly and severely damage the cartilage and bone within the joint, so prompt treatment is crucial. Treatment involves draining the joint with ...

  9. Association of reversible alopecia with occupational topical exposure to common borax-containing solutions.

    PubMed

    Beckett, W S; Oskvig, R; Gaynor, M E; Goldgeier, M H

    2001-04-01

    Boron is widely used in industrial materials, most frequently as the salt borax. Systemic exposure (eg, ingestion) to boron in boric acid been associated with reversible toxic alopecia among other manifestations. There is scant clinical literature on alopecia caused by topical exposure to boron. We observed a series of 3 patients in 2 workplaces who suffered reversible alopecia from cutaneous boron exposure. The scalp alopecia was global in 1 patient and patchy in 2 patients. Alopecia was completely reversed by elimination or reduction of exposure to boron-containing materials in all 3 patients. We conclude that occupational topical exposure to boron in solutions may cause reversible alopecia.

  10. Fibromyalgia: pathogenetic, diagnostic and therapeutic concerns.

    PubMed

    Podolecki, Tomasz; Podolecki, Andrzej; Hrycek, Antoni

    2009-03-01

    Musculoskeletal pains are one of the most common complaints reported by patients. In 1972, Smythe described the generalized pain and tenderness on palpation at specific points and, 4 years later, the term fibromyalgia was introduced for determining the disease syndrome. The etiology and pathogenesis of fibromyalgia are still unknown. This disease appears probably multi-factorial. It is considered that the changes in the neuronal activity in the central nervous system, abnormal metabolism of biogenic amines and immunological disorders may among other things, contribute to the development of the disease. The complaints are non characteristic and highly sujective, which makes it substantially difficult to differentiate between fibromialgia and both chronic fatigue syndrome and psychosomatic diseases. The treatment of fibromyalgia is complex and long-term. The antidepressants and psychotherapy is of vital importance. The effectiveness of locally used agents is also being emphasized. Fibromyalgia has become a serious social problem in the well developed countries in the recent years. Therefore, of importance are efforts to appropriately diagnose fibromyalgia and to implement its appropriate treatment that resolves disease symptoms in a possibly maximum degree.

  11. Biology and therapy of fibromyalgia. Stress, the stress response system, and fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Lavin, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    Stress is a state of disharmony, or threatened homeostasis. A stressor could have a psychological origin or a biological origin. Societies have become more intricate with industrialization, and modern individuals try to adapt to the new defiance by forcing their stress response system. The main component of the stress response network is the autonomic nervous system. The present article reviews current knowledge on autonomic dysfunction in fibromyalgia. Sympathetic hyperactivity has been consistently described by diverse groups of investigators. Fibromyalgia is proposed to be a sympathetically maintained neuropathic pain syndrome, and genomic data support this contention. Autonomic dysfunction may also explain other fibromyalgia features not related to pain. PMID:17626613

  12. Fibromyalgia: When Distress Becomes (Un)sympathetic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Lavin, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a painful stress-related disorder. A key issue in fibromyalgia research is to investigate how distress could be converted into pain. The sympathetic nervous system is the main element of the stress response system. In animal models, physical trauma, infection, or distressing noise can induce abnormal connections between the sympathetic nervous system and the nociceptive system. Dorsal root ganglia sodium channels facilitate this type of sympathetic pain. Similar mechanisms may operate in fibromyalgia. Signs of sympathetic hyperactivity have been described in this condition. Genetic factors and/or distressful lifestyle may lead to this state of sympathetic hyperactivity. Trauma and infection are recognized fibromyalgia triggers. Women who suffer from fibromyalgia have catecholamine-evoked pain. Sympathetic dysfunction may also explain nonpain-related fibromyalgia symptoms. In conclusion, in fibromyalgia, distress could be converted into pain through forced hyperactivity of the sympathetic component of the stress response system. PMID:22110948

  13. Fibromyalgia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional ... Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional ...

  14. [Should we make the diagnosis of fibromyalgia?].

    PubMed

    Cathébras, Pascal; Lauwers, Anne

    2009-01-20

    Fibromyalgia is a functional somatic syndrome characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain, fatigue, poor sleep, and exercise intolerance, frequently (but inconstantly) associated with psychological distress. Fibromyalgia is a common condition, affecting predominantly middle-aged women, with a chronic course. Fibromaylgia should be differentiated from, and may be associated with, a number of metabolic, rheumatic, neurological or psychiatric conditions. The most plausible pathophysiologic mechanism involves an alteration of pain modulation at the peripheral and central levels of the nervous system ("sensitization"). Psychosocial factors play an important role in precipitating and maintaining symptoms, health care utilization, and disablement. Treatments of fibromyalgia rely mainly on the acknowledgement of pain and distress, patient education, analgesics, balneotherapy and physiotherapy, physical reconditioning (aerobic exercise), and certain antidepressants.

  15. Efficacy and safety of methotrexate in alopecia areata*

    PubMed Central

    Hammerschmidt, Mariana; Mulinari Brenner, Fabiane

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Alopecia areata is a chronic disorder of the hair follicles and nails, of unknown etiology, with clear autoimmune components and genetic factors. Several therapeutic options have been suggested; however, no treatment is able to modify the disease course. Methotrexate is an immunosuppressant used in various dermatoses and recently introduced as a therapeutic option for alopecia areata. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the efficacy and safety of methotrexate in alopecia areata. METHODS In a retrospective, non-controlled study, we evaluated 31 patients with alopecia areata in current or prior treatment with methotrexate to assess the therapeutic response according to sex, age, pattern of alopecia areata, disease duration, cumulative dose of methotrexate, use of systemic corticosteroids or other treatments, and drug safety. RESULTS Regrowth greater than 50% was observed in 67.7% of patients, with the best responses observed in those with <5 years of disease progression (79%), age over 40 years (73.3%), male patients (72.8%), cumulative dose of methotrexate 1000-1500 mg, and multifocal alopecia areata (93%). Among patients receiving systemic corticosteroids in combination with methotrexate, 77.3% had greater than 50% regrowth, compared with 44.4% in those who used methotrexate alone. The therapeutic dose ranged from 10-25 mg/week. No patient had serious adverse effects. Relapse was observed in 33.3% of patients with more than 50% regrowth. CONCLUSION Methotrexate appears to be a promising and safe medication for the treatment of severe alopecia areata when used alone or in combination with corticosteroids. PMID:25184911

  16. Fibromyalgia: A Puzzling and Painful Condition | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Fibromyalgia Fibromyalgia: A Puzzling and Painful Condition Past Issues / Spring ... or internal organs. Wise Choices: Feeling Better with Fibromyalgia Get enough sleep. Getting the right kind of ...

  17. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis the same as Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis? Yes, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is a new ... of chronic inflammatory diseases that affect children. Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA) is the older term that was used ...

  18. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... damage. Psoriatic arthritis is when a person has psoriasis and arthritis together. Enthesitis-related arthritis usually affects ... person's symptoms, find out if others in the family have had arthritis, and do a complete physical ...

  19. Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease that can cause attacks of arthritis. Like gout, crystals form in the joints. But in this ... CPPD arthritis can be confused with: Gouty arthritis (gout) Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid arthritis Exams and Tests Most arthritic ...

  20. Management of fibromyalgia syndrome in 2016.

    PubMed

    Okifuji, Akiko; Gao, Jeff; Bokat, Christina; Hare, Bradford D

    2016-05-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is a chronic pain disorder and defies definitively efficacious therapy. In this review, we summarize the results from the early treatment research as well as recent research evaluating the pharmacological, interventional and nonpharmacological therapies. We further discuss future directions of fibromyalgia syndrome management; we specifically focus on the issues that are associated with currently available treatments, such as the need for personalized approach, new technologically oriented and interventional treatments, the importance of understanding and harnessing placebo effects and enhancement of patient engagement in therapy.

  1. Alopecia: a common paraneoplastic manifestation of cholangiocarcinoma in humans and animals

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Efstathios; Paraskeva, Panorea; Smyrnis, Anastasios; Konstantopoulos, Kostas

    2012-01-01

    The coincidence of alopecia and a tumour may indicate the paraneoplastic nature of alopecia. Paraneoplastic alopecia is not uncommon in animals, feline paraneoplastic alopecia being the best example known. We present a case of alopecia coinciding with the presentation of a cholangiocarcinoma in a woman. Following surgical resection of the tumour, alopecia resolved spontaneously and it reappeared on local recurrence, 2 years later. As far as pathogenesis is concerned, the coincidence of alopecia and cholangiocarcinoma may indicate the paraneoplastic nature of alopecia as a rare complication of this rare tumour in humans. This also implies that common interspecies mechanism(s) must exist as far as this paraneoplastic complication is concerned. PMID:22717934

  2. Alopecia areata associated with abacavir therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Sung; Shin, Hyoung-Shik

    2014-06-01

    Abacavir is a nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor that has been approved for use in combination with other retroviral agents in the treatment of HIV infection. Common adverse reactions include headache, fatigue, nausea, and rash. A fatal hypersensitivity reaction may occur in 5% of patients receiving abacavir; therefore, screening for HLA-B5701 should be performed before starting abacavir. Alopecia areata (AA) is infrequently reported in HIV-infected patients. Certain underlying conditions have been associated with AA, including a decreased CD4:CD8 ratio related to the progression of HIV infection, some opportunistic infections, and syphilis. Several antiretroviral drugs, such as zidovudine, indinavir, indinavir/ritonavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, and atazanavir/ritonavir have been implicated in the development of AA. At present, the occurrence of AA has not been associated with abacavir use. We cannot exclude that the use of abacavir and the development of AA could be coincidental. Nevertheless, patients given abacavir should be monitored for hair loss and the drug discontinued promptly if such signs appear.

  3. Involvement of Mechanical Stress in Androgenetic Alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Tellez-Segura, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Context: Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is a frequent disorder characterized by progressive hair miniaturization in a very similar pattern among all affected men. The pathogenesis is related to androgen-inducible overexpression of transforming growth factor β-1 from balding dermal papilla cells, which is involved in epithelial inhibition and perifollicular fibrosis. Recent research shows that hair follicle androgen sensitivity is regulated by Hic-5, an androgen receptor co-activator which may be activated by the mechanical stimulation. Moreover, the dermis of scalp susceptible to be affected by AGA is firmly bounded to the galea aponeurotica, so the physical force exerted by the occipitofrontalis muscle is transmitted to the scalp skin. Aims: To know whether mechanical stress supported by hair follicles is involved in AGA phenomenon. Materials and Methods: It is performed with a finite element analysis of a galea model and a schematic representation of AGA progression according to Hamilton–Norwood scale in order to establish the correlation between elastic deformation in scalp and clinical progression of male pattern baldness. Results: The result was a highly significant correlation (r: −0.885, P < 0.001) that clearly identifies a mechanical factor in AGA development. Conclusions: All these data suggest that mechanical stress determines AGA patterning and a stretch-induced and androgen-mediated mechanotransduction in dermal papilla cells could be the primary mechanism in AGA pathogenesis. PMID:26622151

  4. Alopecia in bats from Tabasco, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bello-Gutiérrez, Joaquín; Suzán, Gerardo; Hidalgo-Mihart, Mircea G; Salas, Gerardo

    2010-07-01

    We report alopecic syndrome (hair loss in areas of the body, including chest, abdomen, and back) in four frugivorous bat species (Artibeus jamaicensis, Artibeus lituratus, Sturnira lilium, and Sturnira ludovici) within urban and periurban areas of Villahermosa, Tabasco, México, during 2007 and 2008. The overall prevalence of alopecic syndrome was 5.25% (135/2,567 bats). The highest prevalence was found in A. lituratus (5.6%; 62/1,105), followed by A. jamaicensis (5%; 3/1,462). We found a higher prevalence in the dry season, when more than 90% of the alopecic individuals (n=122) were captured. Higher prevalence of alopecia was recorded in urban areas (80% of captured alopecic bats, n=108) than in periurban areas (20%, n=27). Histopathologic studies revealed no evidence of infectious agents. The syndrome may be related to nutritional or endocrinal deficiencies. Spatial and seasonal aggregation in urban areas suggests that anthropogenic activities may interfere with nutritional processes. Further studies are needed to confirm the etiology of the syndrome as well as its impact on population dynamics. This is the first report of alopecic syndrome in sylvatic bats.

  5. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Activity in Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Namazi, Mohammad Reza; Handjani, Farhad; Eftekhar, Ebrahim; Kalafi, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Background. Alopecia areata (AA) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the hair follicle. The exact pathogenesis of AA remains unknown, although recent studies support a T-cell mediated autoimmune process. On the other hand, some studies have proposed that the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) may play a role in autoimmunity. Therefore, we assessed serum activity of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), a component of this system, in AA. Methods. ACE activity was measured in the sera of 19 patients with AA and 16 healthy control subjects. In addition, the relationship between severity and duration of the disease and ACE activity was evaluated. Results. Serum ACE activity was higher in the patient group (55.81 U/L) compared to the control group (46.41 U/L), but the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.085). Also, there was no correlation between ACE activity and severity (P = 0.13) and duration of disease (P = 0.25) in the patient group. Conclusion. The increased serum ACE activity found in this study may demonstrate local involvement of the RAAS in the pathogenesis of AA. Assessment of ACE in a study with a larger sample size as well as in tissue samples is recommended in order to further evaluate the possible role of RAAS in AA. PMID:25349723

  6. Alopecia Areata Associated with Abacavir Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Sung

    2014-01-01

    Abacavir is a nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor that has been approved for use in combination with other retroviral agents in the treatment of HIV infection. Common adverse reactions include headache, fatigue, nausea, and rash. A fatal hypersensitivity reaction may occur in 5% of patients receiving abacavir; therefore, screening for HLA-B5701 should be performed before starting abacavir. Alopecia areata (AA) is infrequently reported in HIV-infected patients. Certain underlying conditions have been associated with AA, including a decreased CD4:CD8 ratio related to the progression of HIV infection, some opportunistic infections, and syphilis. Several antiretroviral drugs, such as zidovudine, indinavir, indinavir/ritonavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, and atazanavir/ritonavir have been implicated in the development of AA. At present, the occurrence of AA has not been associated with abacavir use. We cannot exclude that the use of abacavir and the development of AA could be coincidental. Nevertheless, patients given abacavir should be monitored for hair loss and the drug discontinued promptly if such signs appear. PMID:25024872

  7. Ichthyosis follicularis, alopecia, and photophobia (IFAP) syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The IFAP syndrome is a rare X-linked genetic disorder reported in nearly 40 patients. It is characterized by the triad of Ichthyosis Follicularis, Alopecia, and Photophobia from birth. Other features such as short stature, intellectual disability, and seizures may develop in the first few years of life. Skin histopathology is non-specific and consists of dilated hair follicles with keratin plugs extending above the surface of the skin, decreased or absent sebaceous glands, and decreased desmosomes in number and size. The disorder results from mutations in the MBTPS2 gene that impairs cholesterol homeostasis and the ability to cope with endoplasmic reticulum stress. Follicular hyperkeratosis can be treated using topical keratolytics, emollients and urea preparations. A moderate response to acitretin therapy has been noted in some patients. Intensive lubrication of the ocular surface is essential. Life expectancy in patients with IFAP syndrome can vary from death in the neonatal period to normal surviving. Cardiopulmonary complications remain the major cause of death. PMID:21600032

  8. A practical approach to fibromyalgia.

    PubMed Central

    Cymet, Tyler Childs

    2003-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is the name given to a collection of symptoms with no clear physiologic cause, The constellation of symptoms are clearly recognizable as a distinct pathologic entity. The diagnosis is made through clinical observations made by the examiner. Differential diagnosis must include other somatic syndromes as well as disease entities like hepatitis, hypothyroidism, diabetes mellitus, electrolyte imbalance, multiple sclerosis, and cancer. Diagnostic criteria are given as guidelines for the diagnosis, not as absolute requirements. Treatment of this condition remains individualized and relies heavily on having a therapeutic relationship with a provider. Treatment of this syndrome needs to be looked at as an ongoing process. Goal oriented treatment aimed at maintaining specific functions can be directed at helping a patient get restorative sleep, alleviating the somatic pains that ail the patient, keeping a person productive, regulating schedules or through goal oriented agreements made with the patient. Since this syndrome is chronic and may effect all areas of a persons functioning the family and social support system of the person being treated need to be evaluated. Patients often seek alternative medical treatments for this problem including diet therapy, acupuncture, and herbal therapy. Treatment must involve more than just the symptoms presented and the patient can only be treated successfully if they are willing to work at changing their own perceptions, and ways of relating to stressors in their world. PMID:12749618

  9. Fibromyalgia: clinical and occupational aspects.

    PubMed

    Helfenstein Jr, Milton; Goldenfum, Marco Aurélio; Siena, César Augusto Fávaro

    2012-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a clinical syndrome commonly observed in daily medical practice and its etiopathogenesis is still unclear. As it is characterized by chronic musculoskeletal pain associated with several symptoms, FM may be confused with several other rheumatic and nonrheumatic diseases when they course with pictures of diffuse pain and chronic fatigue. FM treatment should be multidisciplinary, individualized, count on active participation of the patient, and based on combined pharmacological and nonpharmacological modalities. It is found both in work and non-work settings, and there is no scientific evidence in the literature showing that FM might be caused by occupation. FM seldom leads to incapacity to work. In cases where pain or fatigue do not respond to appropriate treatment, reaching significant levels, a short period away from work can be considered. As FM is a relevant subject, this review article was based on exploratory, qualitative, and bibliographic investigation, aiming to study the main clinical and occupational aspects of FM, emphasizing the theoretical-conceptual background and the experience of specialists.

  10. Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Choy, Ernest; Clauw, Daniel J.; Goldenberg, Don L.; Harris, Richard E.; Helfenstein, Milton; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Noguchi, Koichi; Silverman, Stuart L.; Ushida, Takahiro; Wang, Guochun

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript, developed by a group of chronic pain researchers and clinicians from around the world, aims to address the state of knowledge about fibromyalgia (FM) and identify ongoing challenges in the field of FM and other chronic pain syndromes that may be characterized by pain centralization/amplification/hypersensitivity. There have been many exciting developments in research studies of the pathophysiology and treatment of FM and related syndromes that have the potential to improve the recognition and management of patients with FM and other conditions with FM-like pain. However, much of the new information has not reached all clinicians, especially primary care clinicians, who have the greatest potential to use this new knowledge to positively impact their patients’ lives. Furthermore, there are persistent misconceptions about FM and a lack of consensus regarding the diagnosis and treatment of FM. This paper presents a framework for future global efforts to improve the understanding and treatment of FM and other associated chronic pain syndromes, disseminate research findings, identify ways to enhance advocacy for these patients, and improve global efforts to collaborate and reach consensus about key issues related to FM and chronic pain in general. PMID:27022674

  11. A practical approach to fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Cymet, Tyler Childs

    2003-04-01

    Fibromyalgia is the name given to a collection of symptoms with no clear physiologic cause, The constellation of symptoms are clearly recognizable as a distinct pathologic entity. The diagnosis is made through clinical observations made by the examiner. Differential diagnosis must include other somatic syndromes as well as disease entities like hepatitis, hypothyroidism, diabetes mellitus, electrolyte imbalance, multiple sclerosis, and cancer. Diagnostic criteria are given as guidelines for the diagnosis, not as absolute requirements. Treatment of this condition remains individualized and relies heavily on having a therapeutic relationship with a provider. Treatment of this syndrome needs to be looked at as an ongoing process. Goal oriented treatment aimed at maintaining specific functions can be directed at helping a patient get restorative sleep, alleviating the somatic pains that ail the patient, keeping a person productive, regulating schedules or through goal oriented agreements made with the patient. Since this syndrome is chronic and may effect all areas of a persons functioning the family and social support system of the person being treated need to be evaluated. Patients often seek alternative medical treatments for this problem including diet therapy, acupuncture, and herbal therapy. Treatment must involve more than just the symptoms presented and the patient can only be treated successfully if they are willing to work at changing their own perceptions, and ways of relating to stressors in their world.

  12. Creating meaning in fibromyalgia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Madden, Sue; Sim, Julius

    2006-12-01

    Gaining a diagnosis is considered to legitimate a person's illness, to both the self and the wider social world, while also giving hope that treatments, and possibly a cure, will be found. A further function of diagnosis from the patient's perspective is to give meaning to the illness experience, which is often uncertain and confusing. To do so, a diagnosis must itself have meaning. This paper explores the creation of meaning in a medically unexplained disorder, fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). Semi-structured interviews, in which the diagnostic process was explored, were conducted with 17 people diagnosed with FMS in the United Kingdom, selected from a hospital database (16 women, 1 man). Documentary analysis was also undertaken on information available from support groups and health professionals. Although initially an acceptable diagnosis to sufferers, FMS was viewed as a mysterious label, which provided no meaning at the time of diagnosis. The sought information was accessed in an attempt to resolve its meaninglessness, but this proved problematic due to the ambiguous definition of FMS within the medical and support group literature, the invisible nature of the illness, and the lack of an environment where these uncertainties could be openly discussed. Informants varied in the degree of longer-term acceptance of a diagnosis of FMS, in relation to the concordance they achieved between the diagnosis and their experience of illness.

  13. Juvenile fibromyalgia: Guidance for management.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Shumpei; Kikuchi, Masako; Miyamae, Takako

    2013-08-01

    Juvenile fibromyalgia (JFM) is a disease in which patients complain of acute and chronic severe pain, an overt primary cause for which cannot be found or surmised. Although patients with JFM mainly complain of systemic pain or allodynia in the medical interview and physical examination, the concept of the disease is the total sum of painful illness, chronic fatigue, hypothermia and many other autonomic symptoms and signs. Many issues are interacting including individual traits (personality, temperament, sensitivity, memory of pain; age: early adolescence), individual states (self-esteem, anxiety, developmental level), and external stressors (parent especially mother, school environment). JFM is diagnosed on the combination of disease history, physical examination to determine the 18 tender points and allodynia, pain from gently touching their hair, and negative results of blood tests (inflammatory markers, thyroid function, myogenic enzymes). The goals of treatment are the following: restoration of function and relief of pain. Psychological support is advocated. Although the exact number of patients with JFM is still to be elucidated, it seems to be growing because pediatric rheumatologists in Japan encounter children with a wide variety of musculoskeletal pains. This guideline describes how to diagnose JFM in children and how to treat them appropriately.

  14. Juvenile Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of providers usually treats JA. Medicines and physical therapy can help maintain movement and reduce swelling and pain. They may also help prevent and treat complications. NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... also cause side effects, such as easy bruising, bone thinning, cataracts and diabetes. Antirheumatic (say: "anti-roo-mat-ick") medicines can help fight RA. If these medicines are started early ... arthritis, osteoarthritis, RA, rheumatic disease, rheumatoid nodules, ...

  16. Infectious Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... something that has bacteria on it. To diagnose infectious arthritis, your health care provider may do tests of your blood, urine, and joint fluid. Treatment includes medicines and sometimes surgery.

  17. Thumb Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... arthritis can cause severe pain, swelling, and decreased strength and range of motion, making it difficult to ... tenderness at the base of your thumb Decreased strength when pinching or grasping objects Decreased range of ...

  18. Oral ruxolitinib induces hair regrowth in patients with moderate-to-severe alopecia areata

    PubMed Central

    Mackay-Wiggan, Julian; Nguyen, Nhan; Cerise, Jane E.; Clark, Charlotte; Ulerio, Grace; Furniss, Megan; Vaughan, Roger; Clynes, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Alopecia areata (AA) is a common autoimmune disease with a lifetime risk of 1.7%; there are no FDA-approved treatments for AA. We previously identified a dominant IFN-γ transcriptional signature in cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in human and mouse AA skin and showed that treatment with JAK inhibitors induced durable hair regrowth in mice by targeting this pathway. Here, we investigated the use of the oral JAK1/2 inhibitor ruxolitinib in the treatment of patients with moderate-to-severe AA. METHODS. We initiated an open-label clinical trial of 12 patients with moderate-to-severe AA, using oral ruxolitinib, 20 mg twice per day, for 3–6 months of treatment followed by 3 months follow-up off drug. The primary endpoint was the proportion of subjects with 50% or greater hair regrowth from baseline to end of treatment. RESULTS. Nine of twelve patients (75%) demonstrated a remarkable response to treatment, with average hair regrowth of 92% at the end of treatment. Safety parameters remained largely within normal limits, and no serious adverse effects were reported. Gene expression profiling revealed treatment-related downregulation of inflammatory markers, including signatures for CTLs and IFN response genes and upregulation of hair-specific markers. CONCLUSION. In this pilot study, 9 of 12 patients (75%) treated with ruxolitinib showed significant scalp hair regrowth and improvement of AA. Larger randomized controlled trials are needed to further assess the safety and efficacy of ruxolitinib in the treatment of AA. TRIAL REGISTRATION. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01950780. FUNDING. Locks of Love Foundation, the Alopecia Areata Initiative, NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), and the Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research/Columbia University Medical Center Clinical and Translational Science Award (CUMC CTSA). PMID:27699253

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients ...

  20. Chemotherapy-induced alopecia: advice and support for hair loss.

    PubMed

    Roe, Helen

    This article provides insight into the growth cycle of a hair follicle and the potential impact chemotherapy agents can have on this process, which often results in hair loss (alopecia). It explores the psychological consequences of chemotherapy-induced alopecia for an individual as a result of the perceptions of others as well as an individual's perception of his or her self-image. Despite the development of various forms of scalp cooling, chemotherapy-induced alopecia remains a major side effect for patients receiving chemotherapy; however, there have been improvements in wig provision and changing public opinion relating to baldness. Although chemotherapy-induced alopecia affects both males and females and all age groups, this article focuses on the potential impact for patients receiving chemotherapy as a form of treatment for breast cancer. As professionals we need to understand the social significance of hair in relation to a person's outward presentation and social interactions, along with the possible psychological implications of a person losing his or her bodily hair, and not just the head hair. We must aim to minimize the distress alopecia can cause by: ensuring we provide patients with up-to-date verbal and written information to enable them to prepare for losing their hair; helping them to preserve their self-image and minimize the psychological consequences of hair loss while receiving chemotherapy; and preparing them for their hair re-growth following completion of chemotherapy.

  1. Fibromyalgia patients show an abnormal dopamine response to pain.

    PubMed

    Wood, Patrick B; Schweinhardt, Petra; Jaeger, Erik; Dagher, Alain; Hakyemez, Helene; Rabiner, Eugenii A; Bushnell, M Catherine; Chizh, Boris A

    2007-06-01

    Fibromyalgia is characterized by chronic widespread pain and bodily tenderness and is often accompanied by affective disturbances. Accumulating evidence indicates that fibromyalgia may involve a dysfunction of modulatory systems in the brain. While brain dopamine is best known for its role in pleasure, motivation and motor control, recent evidence suggests that it is also involved in pain modulation. Because dopamine is implicated in both pain modulation and affective processing, we hypothesized that fibromyalgia may involve a disturbance of dopaminergic neurotransmission. Fibromyalgia patients and matched healthy control subjects were subjected to deep muscle pain produced by injection of hypertonic saline into the anterior tibialis muscle. In order to determine the endogenous release of dopamine in response to painful stimulation, we used positron emission tomography to examine binding of [(11)C]-raclopride (D2/D3 ligand) in the brain during injection of painful hypertonic saline and nonpainful normal saline. Fibromyalgia patients experienced the hypertonic saline as more painful than healthy control subjects. Control subjects released dopamine in the basal ganglia during the painful stimulation, whereas fibromyalgia patients did not. In control subjects, the amount of dopamine release correlated with the amount of perceived pain but in fibromyalgia patients no such correlation was observed. These findings provide the first direct evidence that fibromyalgia patients have an abnormal dopamine response to pain. The disrupted dopaminergic reactivity in fibromyalgia patients could be a critical factor underlying the widespread pain and discomfort in fibromyalgia and suggests that the therapeutic effects of dopaminergic treatments for this intractable disorder should be explored.

  2. Fibromyalgia: Presentation and management with a focus on pharmacological treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sumpton, Janice E; Moulin, Dwight E

    2008-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a condition with widespread muscle pain. Prevalence studies showed that 2% to 7% of the population have fibromyalgia, which affects approximately one million Canadians. Fibromyalgia is most common in women, but it also involves men and children. As with most chronic illnesses, the causes of fibromyalgia are unknown. However, recent research supports underlying abnormalities in the central nervous system, which supports fibromyalgia as a chronic disease state and valid clinical entity. Pain is the primary symptom, often accompanied by overwhelming fatigue, sleep dysfunction and cognitive impairment. In 1990, the American College of Rheumatology developed diagnostic criteria for the diagnosis of fibromyalgia. Lifestyle changes, including pacing of activities and aerobic exercise, are very important in managing fibromyalgia symptoms. Emotional and behavioural therapy can also be helpful. Controlled trials of antidepressants, gabapentinoids, tramadol, zopiclone and sodium oxybate have shown effectiveness in fibromyalgia patients. Pregabalin and duloxetine were recently approved in the United States. Effective management of fibromyalgia is complex and requires a multidisciplinary treatment approach. Response and tolerance of different therapeutic interventions vary from patient to patient. Recent advances in the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia offer hope for new and improved therapies in the management of this disabling condition. PMID:19225604

  3. Viral arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Michael; Marks, Jonathan L

    2016-01-01

    Acute-onset arthritis is a common clinical problem facing both the general clinician and the rheumatologist. A viral aetiology is though to be responsible for approximately 1% of all cases of acute arthritis with a wide range of causal agents recognised. The epidemiology of acute viral arthritis continues to evolve, with some aetiologies, such as rubella, becoming less common due to vaccination, while some vector-borne viruses have become more widespread. A travel history therefore forms an important part of the assessment of patients presenting with an acute arthritis. Worldwide, parvovirus B19, hepatitis B and C, HIV and the alphaviruses are among the most important causes of virally mediated arthritis. Targeted serological testing may be of value in establishing a diagnosis, and clinicians must also be aware that low-titre autoantibodies, such as rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody, can occur in the context of acute viral arthritis. A careful consideration of epidemiological, clinical and serological features is therefore required to guide clinicians in making diagnostic and treatment decisions. While most virally mediated arthritides are self-limiting some warrant the initiation of specific antiviral therapy. PMID:27037381

  4. Prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia in rodent models

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Joaquin J.; Roberts, Stephen M.; Mejia, Jessica; Mauro, Lucia M.; Munson, John W.; Elgart, George W.; Connelly, Elizabeth Alvarez; Chen, Qingbin; Zou, Jiangying; Goldenberg, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Alopecia (hair loss) is experienced by thousands of cancer patients every year. Substantial-to-severe alopecia is induced by anthracyclines (e.g., adriamycin), taxanes (e.g., taxol), alkylating compounds (e.g., cyclophosphamide), and the topisomerase inhibitor etoposide, agents that are widely used in the treatment of leukemias and breast, lung, ovarian, and bladder cancers. Currently, no treatment appears to be generally effective in reliably preventing this secondary effect of chemotherapy. We observed in experiments using different rodent models that localized administration of heat or subcutaneous/intradermal injection of geldanamycin or 17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin induced a stress protein response in hair follicles and effectively prevented alopecia from adriamycin, cyclophosphamide, taxol, and etoposide. Model tumor therapy experiments support the presumption that such localized hair-saving treatment does not negatively affect chemotherapy efficacy. PMID:18347939

  5. Pharmacogenomics in clinical drug development and potential for alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Warner, Amelia W

    2013-12-01

    Alopecia areata, alopecia totalis, and alopecia universalis likely represent a constellation of related diseases with similar, yet distinct heritability markers. There is currently no known curative therapy that works universally for all patients. Pharmacogenomic research enables the pharmaceutical industry to understand variability of patient responses to drugs during clinical drug development and during post-marketing surveillance. Understanding the genetic basis for patient response/non-response can enable the development of individualized therapies for those patients with an inherited basis for altered response to drug therapy. There are multiple examples of drugs that now contain a recommendation for genetic testing before dosing in their drug labels, directing clinicians to obtain genetic information for each individual patient in order to help direct drug therapy.

  6. Is fibromyalgia caused by a glycolysis impairment?

    PubMed

    1994-07-01

    Glycolysis was studied in people with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), hypothyroidism (HO), chronic osteoarticular pain (OACP), and normal control subjects. Comparisons between the controls and the three study groups revealed increased pyruvate and increased lactate (L) production in FMS and HO; decreased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and lactase dehydrogenase (LDH) isoenzymes in FMS only; and no glycolytic impairment in OACP.

  7. Temporomandibular disorders and fibromyalgia: comorbid conditions?

    PubMed

    Sollecito, Thomas P; Stoopler, Eric T; DeRossi, Scott S; Silverton, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and fibromyalgia (FM) are two clinical conditions prevalent in today's society. Many individuals suffer from chronic pain in various muscle groups, including the muscles of mastication. Previously, TMDs and FM were thought to be separate, unrelated clinical entities. New research has shown a possible link between the two conditions; this article sheds light on possible correlations between them.

  8. Fibromyalgia Pathogenesis and Treatment Options Update.

    PubMed

    Chinn, Steven; Caldwell, William; Gritsenko, Karina

    2016-04-01

    This review article presents and summarizes up-to-date literature on the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, pathophysiological mechanisms, and treatment options for fibromyalgia patients. First, the most recent diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia, as put forth by the American College of Rheumatology will be summarized. Clinical features, including chronic widespread pain, hyperalgesia, mood disorders, anxiety, and disturbed sleep patterns will be explored in-depth. The pathogenesis and pathophysiology of fibromyalgia involves alterations in multiple ascending and descending central nervous system pathways, as well as peripheral pathways, leading to heightened pain sensitivity. Risk factors have been studied extensively, and the most recent research focuses on various genetic influences and the contributions of stress and poor sleep. Lastly, the discussion in this article focuses on treatment options for fibromyalgia; some have been mainstay options for many years. Pharmacological agents include tricyclic antidepressants, anti-epileptic drugs, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, norepinephrine/serotonin reuptake inhibitors, as well as some investigational agents. The evidence behind non-pharmacologic treatments, including massage therapy, exercise, and acupuncture, are discussed.

  9. Amitriptyline for the treatment of fibromyalgia: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Rico-Villademoros, Fernando; Slim, Mahmoud; Calandre, Elena P

    2015-10-01

    Fibromyalgia is characterized by chronic generalized pain accompanied by a wide range of clinical manifestations. Most clinical practice guidelines recommend multidisciplinary treatment using a combination of pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies. The tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline has been most thoroughly studied in fibromyalgia. Amitriptyline has been evaluated in placebo-controlled studies, and it has served as an active comparator to other therapeutic interventions in the treatment of fibromyalgia. In addition, several systematic reviews and meta-analyses have evaluated its efficacy and safety for the treatment of fibromyalgia. Data from individual studies as well as from systematic reviews indicate that low doses (10-75 mg/day) of amitriptyline are effective for the treatment of fibromyalgia and, despite the limited quality of the data, they do not seem to be associated with relevant tolerability or safety issues. Consistent with some clinical guidelines, we believe amitriptyline in low doses should be considered a first-line drug for the treatment of fibromyalgia.

  10. Alopecia With Endocrine Therapies in Patients With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saggar, Vishal; Wu, Shenhong; Dickler, Maura N.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Whereas the frequency of alopecia to cytotoxic chemotherapies has been well described, the incidence of alopecia during endocrine therapies (i.e., anti-estrogens, aromatase inhibitors) has not been investigated. Endocrine agents are widely used in the treatment and prevention of many solid tumors, principally those of the breast and prostate. Adherence to these therapies is suboptimal, in part because of toxicities. We performed a systematic analysis of the literature to ascertain the incidence and risk for alopecia in patients receiving endocrine therapies. Methods. An independent search of citations was conducted using the PubMed database for all literature as of February 2013. Phase II–III studies using the terms “tamoxifen,” “toremifene,” “raloxifene,” “anastrozole,” “letrozole,” “exemestane,” “fulvestrant,” “leuprolide,” “flutamide,” “bicalutamide,” “nilutamide,” “fluoxymesterone,” “estradiol,” “octreotide,” “megestrol,” “medroxyprogesterone acetate,” “enzalutamide,” and “abiraterone” were searched. Results. Data from 19,430 patients in 35 clinical trials were available for analysis. Of these, 13,415 patients had received endocrine treatments and 6,015 patients served as controls. The incidence of all-grade alopecia ranged from 0% to 25%, with an overall incidence of 4.4% (95% confidence interval: 3.3%–5.9%). The highest incidence of all-grade alopecia was observed in patients treated with tamoxifen in a phase II trial (25.4%); similarly, the overall incidence of grade 2 alopecia by meta-analysis was highest with tamoxifen (6.4%). The overall relative risk of alopecia in comparison with placebo was 12.88 (p < .001), with selective estrogen receptor modulators having the highest risk. Conclusion. Alopecia is a common yet underreported adverse event of endocrine-based cancer therapies. Their long-term use heightens the importance of this condition on patients' quality of life

  11. Late-onset alopecia areata: descriptive analysis of 30 cases*

    PubMed Central

    Lazzarini, Rosana; Oliari, Camila Bilac; Erthal, Ana Luisa Nasser

    2016-01-01

    Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disease characterized by non-scaring hair loss. The onset in over 50-year-old patients is rare and has barely been studied. Cases of this disease have been retrospectively analyzed – according to clinical forms, extension, and associated diseases – to assess alopecia areata characteristics in a group of patients whose disease onset was after the age of 50. 30 patients were studied; a few of them presented with autoimmune-related diseases or family history. The disease onset after the age of 50 seems to have different characteristics from those found in young people. PMID:28099618

  12. A kindred with alopecia, keratosis, pilaris, cataracts, and psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Appell, M L; Sherertz, E F

    1987-01-01

    Three members of a family with numerous ectodermal abnormalities are described. These anomalies primarily include patchy alopecia beginning in childhood, premature cataracts, widespread keratosis pilaris, and psoriasis. The alopecia and premature cataracts appear to follow an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern with incomplete penetrance and appear to be linked. Psoriasis also occurs in several members of this family and probably represents a separate but possibly related genodermatosis. This kindred has features of both keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans and ichthyosis follicularis, and the disorder seems to fit into the group of follicular hyperkeratosis disorders.

  13. Rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Scott, David L; Wolfe, Frederick; Huizinga, Tom W J

    2010-09-25

    Rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by persistent synovitis, systemic inflammation, and autoantibodies (particularly to rheumatoid factor and citrullinated peptide). 50% of the risk for development of rheumatoid arthritis is attributable to genetic factors. Smoking is the main environmental risk. In industrialised countries, rheumatoid arthritis affects 0·5-1·0% of adults, with 5-50 per 100 000 new cases annually. The disorder is most typical in women and elderly people. Uncontrolled active rheumatoid arthritis causes joint damage, disability, decreased quality of life, and cardiovascular and other comorbidities. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), the key therapeutic agents, reduce synovitis and systemic inflammation and improve function. The leading DMARD is methotrexate, which can be combined with other drugs of this type. Biological agents are used when arthritis is uncontrolled or toxic effects arise with DMARDs. Tumour necrosis factor inhibitors were the first biological agents, followed by abatacept, rituximab, and tocilizumab. Infections and high costs restrict prescription of biological agents. Long-term remission induced by intensive, short-term treatment selected by biomarker profiles is the ultimate goal.

  14. Quality of life assessment in patients with alopecia areata and androgenetic alopecia in the People’s Republic of China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Min; Zhang, Nan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction In medical terms, alopecia is considered a relatively mild dermatological condition that nevertheless is a serious condition, but it causes major depression in many sufferers. Alopecia areata (AA) and androgenetic alopecia (AGA) are the main types of hair loss. This study assessed the quality of life (QoL) of Chinese patients with AA and AGA using the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) questionnaire. Methods A total of 178 AA and AGA patients were enrolled in this study, and DLQI was used to evaluate the QoL of the patients. The DLQI used 10 items regarding symptoms and feelings, daily activities, leisure, work and school, personal relationships, and treatment as dimensions of life. Each was scored on a 0–3 scale. The total DLQI score equaled 0–30; higher scores showed greater impact on QoL. Results The DLQI scores of the 178 patients ranged from 0 to 28, with a mean score of 6.3. Higher DLQI scores were reported by younger patients (P<0.05) and by those who had hair loss for a duration of >12 months (P<0.05). The DLQI score of AA patients was significantly higher than that of AGA patients (P<0.05). QoL was not affected by gender, marital status, educational level, past history of alopecia, family history of alopecia, or severity of alopecia. Conclusion AA and AGA moderately affected the QoL of the patients. A higher DLQI score was significantly associated with younger age, hair loss for a duration of >12 months, and AA. Both AA and AGA moderately affected the QoL of the patients not only in physiological aspects but also in their emotional and social aspects. The bio-psycho-social aspects of disease need to be addressed in patients with AA and AGA, even though these conditions are not life-threatening. PMID:28203058

  15. The role of sex hormones on fibromyalgia pain mediators.

    PubMed

    Bramwell, Bethany L

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the role of the sex hormones in the pain mechanisms and various effects on nociceptors is imperative to managing potential underlying hormone disruptions in chronic pain syndromes. The myriad of overlapping symptoms between mid-life hormone imbalances and mid-life onset of fibromyalgia syndrome in women indicates a role for sex hormones in the etiology of fibromyalgia syndrome, which is, as of yet, unsupported by the literature. However, fibromyalgia treatment should be tailored to the individual needs of the patient, and adrenal, thyroid, and ovarian hormone support can lessen the painful burden of fibromyalgia through the modulation of various hormone-regulated pain-production pathways.

  16. TNF inhibitor induced alopecia: an unusual form of psoriasiform alopecia that breaks the Renbök mold.

    PubMed

    Craddock, Lauren N; Cooley, David M; Endo, Justin O; Longley, B Jack; Caldera, Freddy

    2017-03-15

    TNF-α-inhibitors are known to induce skin adverseeffects including psoriasis and alopecia areata. Here, wedescribe a unique pattern of hair loss that has psoriaticand alopecia areata-like features. Diagnosis requiresclinical-pathologic correlation and is supportedby increased catagen/telogen hairs, psoriasiformepidermal hyperplasia, perifollicular lymphocyticinfiltrate, and the presence of eosinophils and plasmacells. Although there are no treatment consensusguidelines, management options include stoppingtherapy, switching to a different TNF-α inhibitor orustekinumab (in severe cases), or continuing TNF-αinhibitor therapy with addition of topical, intralesional,or systemic immunosuppressants.

  17. Fibromyalgia: poorly understood; treatments are disappointing.

    PubMed

    2009-08-01

    (1) Fibromyalgia is characterised by a range of symptoms that include muscle pain, fatigue and sleep disorders. Anxiety and depression are often also present. The cause is unknown. More women than men are affected; (2) The following review focuses on differential diagnoses and available treatments for fibromyalgia, based on a review of the literature using the standard Prescrire methodology; (3) Fibromyalgia is mainly diagnosed by excluding other possibilities. The principal differential diagnoses are rheumatic involvement of the spine, systemic inflammatory disorders, and hypothyroidism. Unlike these other conditions, fibromyalgia is not associated with radiological or laboratory abnormalities; (4) Paracetamol has not been compared with other treatments in fibromyalgia. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs have no specific effect; (5) The only two trials assessing tramadol showed little effect; in one study the average pain score was 53 mm in the tramadol group versus 65 mm in the placebo group, on a scale ranging from 0 to 100 mm. The adverse effects of tramadol are those of opiates in general, mainly nausea and dependence. Tramadol interacts with numerous other drugs; (6) The efficacy of tricyclic antidepressants is also difficult to quantify. Their limited superiority over placebo lasts no more than a few months. The efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants (fluoxetine, paroxetine and citalopram), serotonin and nonadrenaline reuptake inhibitors (duloxetine and milnacipran) is even less well established. Duloxetine has been tested in four placebo-controlled trials with unconvincing results; (7) Pregabalin and gabapentin, two antiepileptic drugs, appear to be more effective than placebo but have only been tested in short-term trials. In one trial 44% of patients in the pregabalin group said they felt better after 13 weeks versus 35% of patients in the placebo group. However, adverse effects are frequent and sometimes troublesome

  18. Psychological effect, pathophysiology, and management of androgenetic alopecia in men.

    PubMed

    Stough, Dow; Stenn, Kurt; Haber, Robert; Parsley, William M; Vogel, James E; Whiting, David A; Washenik, Ken

    2005-10-01

    Androgenetic alopecia In men, or male pattern baldness, is recognized increasingly as a physically and psychologically harmful medical condition that can be managed effectively by generalist clinicians. This article discusses the clinical manifestations, epidemiology, physical and psychosocial importance, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of androgenetic alopecia in men. Androgenetic alopecia affects at least half of white men by the age of 50 years. Although androgenetic alopecia does not appear to cause direct physical harm, hair loss can result in physical harm because hair protects against sunburn, cold, mechanical injury, and ultraviolet light. Hair loss also can psychologically affect the balding individual and can Influence others' perceptions of him. A progressive condition, male pattern baldness is known to depend on the presence of the androgen dihydrotestosterone and on a genetic predisposition for this condition, but its pathophysiology has not been elucidated fully. Pharmacotherapy, hair transplantation, and cosmetic aids have been used to manage male pattern baldness. Two US Food and Drug Administration-approved hair-loss pharmacotherapies-the potassium channel opener minoxidil and the dihydrotestosterone synthesis inhibitor finasteride--are safe and effective for controlling male pattern baldness with long-term daily use. Regardless of which treatment modality is chosen for male pattern baldness, defining and addressing the patient's expectations regarding therapy are paramount in determining outcome.

  19. Hair restoration approaches for early onset male androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Hammad A; Basra, Mohammad K A; Patel, Girish K

    2013-09-01

    Society places great emphasis on the presence of hair. Some degree of hair loss is accepted as a normal part of the aging process, in line with the observation that more than 50% of men will develop androgenetic alopecia by the age of 50 years. However, it is possible to understand the psychosocial isolation and distress felt by men with a strong familial predisposition to androgenetic alopecia, who tend to display hair loss in their late teens or twenties. There are currently two drugs which have been licensed for the treatment of male androgenetic alopecia: oral finasteride and topical minoxidil solution which are effective to some extent. Furthermore, upon discontinuing treatment, any gain that has been achieved is quickly lost. Added to which there is an entire market of unproven over the counter products: advertised in the electronic media, local hair salons, and various departmental stores. In this review, we highlight the important advances in the management of male androgenetic alopecia with emphasis on approaches that can lead to more successful and long-term hair restoration for young adults. In particular, we discuss the evidence supporting the use of the follicular unit grafting technique in conjunction with medical treatment before and after the procedure. Moreover, some other alterations of this most popular state of the art hair restoration technique have been mentioned briefly. As a result, patients and physicians seem equally satisfied from this procedure for its naturally looking results which are cosmetically more acceptable and esthetically pleasing for longer period of time.

  20. Alopecia areata and humpy-back syndrome in suckling piglets

    PubMed Central

    Drolet, Richard; Denicourt, Martine; D’Allaire, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    This report describes an uncommon variant of humpy-back syndrome associated with multiple rib fractures and multisystemic vasculitis in several nursing piglets and, for the first time, a skin disease in swine consistent with alopecia areata. Both conditions were observed concurrently on the farm and occasionally in the same piglets. PMID:23372194

  1. Three-Quarters of Persons in the US Population Reporting a Clinical Diagnosis of Fibromyalgia Do Not Satisfy Fibromyalgia Criteria: The 2012 National Health Interview Survey

    PubMed Central

    Walitt, Brian; Katz, Robert S.; Bergman, Martin J.; Wolfe, Frederick

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Although fibromyalgia criteria have been in effect for decades, little is known about how the fibromyalgia diagnosis is applied and understood by clinicians and patients. We used the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) to determine the prevalence of self-reported clinician diagnosed fibromyalgia and then compared demographics, symptoms, disability and medical utilization measures of persons with a clinical diagnosis of fibromyalgia that did not meet diagnostic criteria (false-positive or prior [F/P] fibromyalgia) to persons with and without criteria-positive fibromyalgia. Methods The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) collected information about both clinical diagnosis and symptoms of fibromyalgia that was appropriately weighted to represent 225,726,257 US adults. Surrogate NHIS diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia were developed based on the level of polysymptomatic distress (PSD) as characterized in the 2011 modified American College of Rheumatology criteria (ACR) for fibromyalgia. Persons with F/P fibromyalgia were compared with persons who do not have fibromyalgia and those meeting surrogate NHIS fibromyalgia criteria. Results Of the 1.78% of persons reporting a clinical diagnosis, 73.5% did not meet NHIS fibromyalgia criteria. The prevalence of F/P fibromyalgia is 1.3%. F/P fibromyalgia is associated with a mild degree of polysymptomatic distress (NHIS PSD score 6.2) and characterized by frequent but not widespread pain and insomnia. Measures of work disability and medical utilization in F/P fibromyalgia were equal to that seen with NHIS criteria positive fibromyalgia and were 6-7x greater in F/P fibromyalgia than in non-fibromyalgia persons. F/P fibromyalgia was best predicted by being female (Odds Ratio [OR] 8.81), married (OR 3.27), and white (OR 1.96). In contrast, being a white, married woman was only modestly predictive of NHIS (criteria positive) fibromyalgia (OR 2.1). Conclusions The majority of clinically diagnosed fibromyalgia

  2. 78 FR 58313 - Fibromyalgia Public Meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Fibromyalgia Public Meeting on Patient-Focused Drug... public comment on Patient-Focused Drug Development for fibromyalgia. Patient-Focused Drug Development is... fibromyalgia on daily life as well as the available therapies for fibromyalgia. DATES: The public meeting...

  3. Development of a self-reporting tool to obtain a Combined Index of Severity of Fibromyalgia (ICAF*)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia is a syndrome with heterogeneous symptoms. The evaluation in the clinical setting usually fails to cover the complexity of the syndrome. This study aims to determine how different aspects of fibromyalgia are inter-related when measured by means of a self-reporting tool. The objective is to develop a more complete evaluation model adjusted to the complexity and multi-dimensional nature of the syndrome. Methods Application was made of the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Brief Pain Inventory, the Fatigue Assessment Scale, the Health Assessment Questionnaire, the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28), the Chronic Pain Coping Inventory, the Arthritis Self-efficacy Scale and the Sleep Quality Scale. An assessment was made, on the basis of clinical interviews, case histories and specific tests, of the patient sociodemographic data, comorbidity, physical exploration and other clinical indexes. An exploratory factor analysis was made, with comparisons of the clinical index scores in extreme groups of patients. Results The ICAF composed of 59 items was obtained, offering four factors that explain 64% of the variance, and referred to as Emotional Factor (33.7%), Physical-Activity (15%), Active Coping (9%) and Passive Coping (6.3%). A t-test between the extreme scores of these factors in the 301 patients revealed statistically significant differences in occupational status, medically unexplained syndromes, number of tender points, the six-minutes walk test, comorbidity and health care costs. Conclusions This study offers a tool allowing more complete and rapid evaluation of patients with fibromyalgia. The test intrinsically evaluates the emotional aspects: anxiety and depression, and their impact upon social aspects. It also evaluates patient functional capacity, fatigue, sleep quality, pain, and the way in which the patient copes with the disease. This is achieved by means of a self

  4. Fungal arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Fungal Infections Infectious Arthritis Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare ... for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D. ...

  5. Grammatical Arthritis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Don

    1994-01-01

    Discusses grammatical arthritis (an internal buildup of rules that hinders writing flexibility); four new "rules" (concerning "data is,""none are,""hopefully," and the restrictive "which"); attitudes toward English grammar; how to be a helpful editor; and where to learn about grammar. (SR)

  6. Ghrelin plasmatic levels in patients with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Otero, Miguel; Nogueiras, Ruben; Lago, Francisca; Meijide, Juan; Amarelo, Juan; Mera, Antonio; Gomez-Reino, Juan; Gualillo, Oreste

    2005-01-01

    Ghrelin is a recently discovered 28 amino acid peptide that regulates GH secretion and energy homeostasis. In fibromyalgia (FM) there are alterations in the pituitary-hypothalamic axis, particularly in the growth hormone (GH) secretion pattern. Whether this anomalous secretion of GH pertains to abnormal levels of ghrelin is still unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate plasma ghrelin levels in patients with fibromyalgia (FM) compared with healthy controls. Plasmatic ghrelin concentrations were determined by a double antibody radioimmunoassay in 19 patients with FM and 14 healthy controls. Compared with controls, patients with FM did not show any significant differences of ghrelin plasmatic levels. In conclusion, FM is not associated with deviation in ghrelin concentrations. Existing alterations in FM with respect to GH are unlikely due to circulating ghrelin.

  7. Vegetarian diet in the treatment of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Azad, K A; Alam, M N; Haq, S A; Nahar, S; Chowdhury, M A; Ali, S M; Ullah, A K

    2000-08-01

    Brain tryptophan is low in fibromyalgia. Intake of protein rich in large neutral amino acids is reported to lower brain tryptophan. This study was undertaken to assess whether any reduction of such proteins by exclusion of animal protein from the diet reduced pain and morbidity in fibromyalgia patients. It was an open, randomized controlled trial. 37 subjects with fibromyalgia were enrolled in the vegetarian diet and 41 in the amitriptyline groups. The outcome was assessed with the help of frequencies of fatigue, insomnia & non-restorative sleep, pain score on a 10-point VAS and tender point count. Fatigue, insomnia and non-restorative sleep were present in 41, 26 and 32 subjects before and in 3, 0 and 0 subjects respectively at six weeks of treatment in the amitriptyline group. The pain score and tender point count were 6.2 +/- 1.9 & 16.1 +/- 2.3 before and 2.3 +/- 1.3 & 6.4 +/- 3.0 after treatment. All these differences were significant (P < 0.001). In the vegetarian diet group, fatigue, insomnia and non-restorative sleep were present in 36, 24 and 27 subjects before and in 34, 29 and 29 subjects at six weeks of treatment. The pain score and tender point count were 5.7 +/- 1.8 and 15.7 +/- 2.4 before and 5.0 +/- 1.8 & 14.7 +/- 3.6 after treatment. All these differences were insignificant except that in the pain score. The decrease in the pain score, though significant, was much smaller than that in the amitriptyline group. So, it may be concluded that vegetarian diet is a poor option in the treatment of fibromyalgia.

  8. Patient-Reported Outcomes and Fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Williams, David A; Kratz, Anna L

    2016-05-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is classified as a chronic pain condition accompanied by symptoms of fatigue, sleep problems, problems with cognition, negative mood, limited functional status, and the presence of other chronic overlapping pain conditions. Comprehensive assessment of all of these components can be challenging. This paper provides an overview of patient-reported approaches that can be taken to assess FM in the contexts of diagnosis, symptom monitoring, phenotyping/characterization, and for purposes of clinical trials.

  9. Physical activity levels in the treatment of juvenile fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Sherry, David D

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity is paramount in the treatment of juvenile fibromyalgia, although some interventions use indirect methods to increase activity levels rather than address physical dysfunction head-on. New research explores the effects of a psychotherapeutic approach on levels of physical activity in adolescents with fibromyalgia.

  10. Arthritis of the Wrist

    MedlinePlus

    ... is caused by just two types: osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive condition that ... other, it results in pain, stiffness, and weakness. Rheumatoid Arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease that ...

  11. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) KidsHealth > For Teens > Juvenile Idiopathic ... can affect people under age 17. What Is Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis? Arthritis doesn't affect young people ...

  12. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... rule out other conditions or infections, such as Lyme disease , that may cause similar symptoms or occur along ... ESR) Bones, Muscles, and Joints Evaluate Your Child's Lyme Disease Risk Word! Arthritis Arthritis Lupus Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis ( ...

  13. What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 57 KB Audio Version Time: 10:20 Size: 9.7 MB November 2014 What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of Publications for the Public Rheumatoid arthritis is ...

  14. Forms of Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... stiffness, inflammation, swelling and, sometimes, destruction of joints. Gout — a form of arthritis that occurs when uric ... the joints. Some 2.1 million Americans have gout. Lupus — a form of arthritis, like rheumatoid arthritis, ...

  15. [Fibromyalgia (fibrositis) syndrome--a case report].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Iijima, K; Tanaka, M; Tamura, N; Hashimoto, H; Hirose, S

    1991-04-01

    A 25-year-old woman was admitted in our hospital with back pain and both hip joint pain. Pain was abruptly occurred from the beginning of March 1990. Physical examination revealed wide spread pain (occipital area, both shoulder, lumber area, bilateral gluteal area, inguinal area, both Achilles-plantar area) and more than 12 tender points (occiput, trapezius, second rib, supraspinatus, gluteal, greater trochanter, hip joints, pubic bone). Laboratory examination showed no abnormal findings except ANF (1:160). Any examination including X-ray, bone scintigraphy, CT and MRI did not disclose spondylitis, sacroiliitis and enthesopathy. She was diagnosed as primary fibromyalgia/fibrositis syndrome. Treatment with maprotine hydrochloride (30 mg/day) and phenobarbital (120 mg/day) brought approximately 1/3 reduction of pain and tenderness. Psychoanalysis revealed that she had psychological conflicts against her parents and her colleagues at the work. EEG showed a borderline record with irregular basic pattern and 14 & 6 Hz positive burst at the sleep stage. Although the newly proposed criteria for the classification of fibromyalgia was proposed by ACR, fibromyalgia/fibrositis syndrome has been seldom discussed in the Japanese literature. As this syndrome is frequently associated with various rheumatic diseases, hypothyroidism and malignant diseases, we should pay much more attention to understand this syndrome.

  16. Low Dose Naltrexone in the Treatment of Fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Metyas, Samy K; Yeter, Karen; Solyman, John; Arkfeld, Daniel

    2017-03-21

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain disorder characterized by diffuse musculoskeletal pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance and cognitive impairment. A significant number of fibromyalgia patients do not respond adequately to the current drugs (pregabalin, milnacipran, duloxetine) approved for fibromyalgia treatment by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Thus, there is still a need for adjunctive therapies. Naltrexone is an opioid receptor antagonist used to treat alcohol and opioid dependence. It is hypothesized that low dose naltrexone causes transient blockade of opioid receptors centrally resulting in a rebound of endorphin function which may attenuate pain in fibromyalgia. Treatment with low dose naltrexone may be an effective, highly tolerable and inexpensive treatment for fibromyalgia. Further controlled trials are needed.

  17. Neurogenic neuroinflammation in fibromyalgia and complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Littlejohn, Geoffrey

    2015-11-01

    Although fibromyalgia and complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) have distinct clinical phenotypes, they do share many other features. Pain, allodynia and dysaesthesia occur in each condition and seem to exist on a similar spectrum. Fibromyalgia and CRPS can both be triggered by specific traumatic events, although fibromyalgia is most commonly associated with psychological trauma and CRPS is most often associated with physical trauma, which is frequently deemed routine or minor by the patient. Fibromyalgia and CRPS also seem to share many pathophysiological mechanisms, among which the most important are those involving central effects. Nonetheless, peripheral effects, such as neurogenic neuroinflammation, are also important contributors to the clinical features of each of these disorders. This Review highlights the differing degrees to which neurogenic neuroinflammation might contribute to the multifactorial pathogenesis of both fibromyalgia and CRPS, and discusses the evidence suggesting that this mechanism is an important link between the two disorders, and could offer novel therapeutic targets.

  18. Common questions about the diagnosis and management of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Kodner, Charles

    2015-04-01

    Fibromyalgia has a distinct pathophysiology involving central amplification of peripheral sensory signals. Core symptoms are chronic widespread pain, fatigue, and sleep disturbance. Most patients with fibromyalgia have muscle pain and tenderness, forgetfulness or problems concentrating, and significant functional limitations. Fibromyalgia is diagnosed using an updated set of clinical criteria that no longer depend on tender point examination; laboratory testing may rule out other disorders that commonly present with fatigue, such as anemia and thyroid disease. Patients with fibromyalgia should be evaluated for comorbid functional pain syndromes and mood disorders. Management of fibromyalgia should include patient education, symptom relief, and regular aerobic physical activity. Serotoninnorepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, antiepileptics, and muscle relaxants have the strongest evidence of benefit for improving pain, fatigue, sleep symptoms, and quality of life. Multiple complementary and alternative medicine therapies have been used but have limited evidence of effectiveness. Opioids should be used to relieve pain in carefully selected patients only if alternative therapies are ineffective.

  19. Emotional modulation of pain and spinal nociception in fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Rhudy, Jamie L.; DelVentura, Jennifer L.; Terry, Ellen L.; Bartley, Emily J.; Olech, Ewa; Palit, Shreela; Kerr, Kara L.

    2013-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is characterized by widespread pain, as well as affective disturbance (e.g., depression). Given that emotional processes are known to modulate pain, a disruption of emotion and emotional modulation of pain and nociception may contribute to FM. The present study used a well-validated affective picture-viewing paradigm to study emotional processing and emotional modulation of pain and spinal nociception. Participants were 18 individuals with FM, 18 individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and 19 healthy pain-free controls (HC). Mutilation, neutral, and erotic pictures were presented in four blocks; two blocks assessed only physiological-emotional reactions (i.e., pleasure/arousal ratings, corrugator EMG, startle modulation, skin conductance) in the absence of pain and two blocks assessed emotional reactivity and emotional modulation of pain and the nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR, a physiological measure of spinal nociception) evoked by suprathreshold electric stimulations over the sural nerve. In general, mutilation pictures elicited displeasure, corrugator activity, subjective arousal, and sympathetic activation, whereas erotic pictures elicited pleasure, subjective arousal, and sympathetic activation. However, FM was associated with deficits in appetitive activation (e.g., reduced pleasure/arousal to erotica). Moreover, emotional modulation of pain was observed in HC and RA, but not FM, even though all three groups evidenced modulation of NFR. Additionally, NFR thresholds were not lower in the FM group, indicating a lack of spinal sensitization. Together, these results suggest that FM is associated with a disruption of supraspinal processes associated with positive affect and emotional modulation of pain, but not brain-to-spinal cord circuitry that modulates spinal nociceptive processes. PMID:23622762

  20. Emotional modulation of pain and spinal nociception in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Rhudy, Jamie L; DelVentura, Jennifer L; Terry, Ellen L; Bartley, Emily J; Olech, Ewa; Palit, Shreela; Kerr, Kara L

    2013-07-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is characterized by widespread pain, as well as affective disturbance (eg, depression). Given that emotional processes are known to modulate pain, a disruption of emotion and emotional modulation of pain and nociception may contribute to FM. The present study used a well-validated affective picture-viewing paradigm to study emotional processing and emotional modulation of pain and spinal nociception. Participants were 18 individuals with FM, 18 individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and 19 healthy pain-free controls (HC). Mutilation, neutral, and erotic pictures were presented in 4 blocks; 2 blocks assessed only physiological-emotional reactions (ie, pleasure/arousal ratings, corrugator electromyography, startle modulation, skin conductance) in the absence of pain, and 2 blocks assessed emotional reactivity and emotional modulation of pain and the nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR, a physiological measure of spinal nociception) evoked by suprathreshold electric stimulations over the sural nerve. In general, mutilation pictures elicited displeasure, corrugator activity, subjective arousal, and sympathetic activation, whereas erotic pictures elicited pleasure, subjective arousal, and sympathetic activation. However, FM was associated with deficits in appetitive activation (eg, reduced pleasure/arousal to erotica). Moreover, emotional modulation of pain was observed in HC and RA, but not FM, even though all 3 groups evidenced modulation of NFR. Additionally, NFR thresholds were not lower in the FM group, indicating a lack of spinal sensitization. Together, these results suggest that FM is associated with a disruption of supraspinal processes associated with positive affect and emotional modulation of pain, but not brain-to-spinal cord circuitry that modulates spinal nociceptive processes.

  1. Music as a sleep aid in fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Picard, Larry M; Bartel, Lee R; Gordon, Allan S; Cepo, Davor; Wu, Qi; Pink, Leah R

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Interventions to improve sleep in fibromyalgia may generalize to improvements in multiple symptom domains. Delta-embedded music, pulsating regularly within the 0.25 Hz to 4 Hz frequency band of brain wave activity, has the potential to induce sleep. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of a delta-embedded music program over four weeks for sleep induction in patients with fibromyalgia. METHODS: The present unblinded, investigator-led pilot study used a within-subject design. Analysis was based on 20 individuals with fibromyalgia who completed the study, of the 24 recruited into the study. The primary outcome variables were the change from baseline in Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) and Jenkins Sleep Scale scores. A patient global impression of change was measured on a seven-point Likert scale. Secondary outcome measures, comprised of items 5, 6 and 7 of the FIQ, were used as indicators of pain, tiredness and being tired on awakening. RESULTS: The FIQ median score of 76.4 (95% CI 61.3 to 82.1) at baseline improved to 60.3 (95% CI 53.1 to 72.0; P=0.004). The Jenkins Sleep Scale median value of 17.5 (95% CI 15.5 to 18.5) at baseline fell to 12.5 (95% CI 8.5 to 14.5; P=0.001) at study completion. The outcomes of the patient global impression of change ratings were mostly positive (P=0.001). Being tired on awakening declined significantly from a median of 9.0 (95% CI 8.0 to 10.0) to 8.0 (95% CI 5.5 to 9.0; P=0.021). However, there was no significant improvement in pain level (baseline median 7.5 [95% CI 7.0 to 8.5] versus study completion median 7.0 [95% CI 6.5 to 8.0]; P=0.335) or tiredness (baseline median 9.0 [95% CI 8.0 to 9.5] versus study completion median 8.0 [95% CI 6.0 to 8.5]; P=0.061). There were no serious adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: Delta-embedded music is a potential alternative therapy for fibromyalgia. PMID:24555178

  2. Rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Smolen, Josef S; Aletaha, Daniel; McInnes, Iain B

    2016-10-22

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory joint disease, which can cause cartilage and bone damage as well as disability. Early diagnosis is key to optimal therapeutic success, particularly in patients with well-characterised risk factors for poor outcomes such as high disease activity, presence of autoantibodies, and early joint damage. Treatment algorithms involve measuring disease activity with composite indices, applying a treatment-to-target strategy, and use of conventional, biological, and newz non-biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. After the treatment target of stringent remission (or at least low disease activity) is maintained, dose reduction should be attempted. Although the prospects for most patients are now favourable, many still do not respond to current therapies. Accordingly, new therapies are urgently required. In this Seminar, we describe current insights into genetics and aetiology, pathophysiology, epidemiology, assessment, therapeutic agents, and treatment strategies together with unmet needs of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. Scalp cooling has no place in the prevention of alopecia in adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tollenaar, R A; Liefers, G J; Repelaer van Driel, O J; van de Velde, C J

    1994-01-01

    35 patients were studied to determine the effectiveness of scalp hypothermia in the prevention of alopecia caused by adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. Scalp hypothermia was induced by the newly developed Theracool cooling machine. The chemotherapeutic regimen consisted of one perioperative course of doxorubicin 50 mg/m2, cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m2 and 5-fluorouracil 600 mg/m2 (EORTC protocol 10854). Only 4 (11%) patients showed acceptable hair preservation (no or minor alopecia). 12 patients (34%) had moderate alopecia, all requiring a wig. 19 patients (54%) had complete alopecia. No scalp metastases were observed after scalp cooling. These results and a review of the literature suggest that scalp hypothermia to prevent alopecia may only be effective in a cytotoxic regimen containing an anthracycline as the sole alopecia-inducing agent. With current adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer, in which a combination of cyclophosphamide and an anthracycline is often used, there is no place for scalp hypothermia.

  4. Linear Non Scarring Alopecia of the Scalp: A Rare Manifestation of Lupus Panniculitis

    PubMed Central

    Kshetrimayum, Sandhyarani; Thokchom, Nandakishore; Hmar, Vanlalhriatpuii

    2016-01-01

    Alopecia in a linear pattern is very rare with only a few cases reported in the medical literature. We report a case of linear non scarring alopecia involving the scalp in a 17-year-old boy with a histological diagnosis of lupus panniculitis. We report this case because of its rarity and also the inclusion of this entity as one of the rare differential of non scarring alopecia. PMID:27688465

  5. Transversely sectioned biopsies in the diagnosis of end-stage traction alopecia.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Jeff C; Mirmirani, Paradi

    2013-04-15

    The pathogenesis of scarring alopecia in African American women remains poorly understood. Furthermore, the overlapping clinical and histological features present diagnostic challenges. The diagnosis of end stage traction alopecia secondary to traumatic hair styling practices can sometimes present particular challenges. We present a young African American woman with a scarring alopecia. As we describe, a scalp biopsy processed by transverse sections enabled rapid diagnosis and presented advantages over a biopsy processed with vertical sections.

  6. Frontal fibrosing alopecia in association with Sjögren's syndrome: more than a simple coincidence*

    PubMed Central

    Furlan, Karina Colossi; Kakizaki, Priscila; Chartuni, Juliana Cabral Nunes; Valente, Neusa Yuriko Sakai

    2016-01-01

    Frontal fibrosing alopecia is a distinctive form of scarring alopecia considered to be a clinical variant of lichen planopilaris. It predominantly occurs in postmenopausal women and has a slowly progressive course. It was first described by Kossard in 1994. Since then the number of reported cases has increased significantly. Coexistence of frontal fibrosing alopecia and autoimmune disorders - such as discoid erythematosus lupus and Sjögren's syndrome - may suggest a common pathogenic background among the diseases. PMID:28300881

  7. Psychosocial reaction patterns to alopecia in female patients with gynecological cancer undergoing chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kazuko; Ishida, Junko; Kiyoko, Kanda

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to clarify the psychosocial reactions of female patients with gynecological cancer undergoing chemotherapy and in the process of suffering from alopecia and to examine their nursing support. The target group comprised female patients who had received two or more cycles of chemotherapy, were suffering from alopecia, and were aged 30-65. Data were collected from semi-structured interviews, conducted from the time the patients were informed by their doctors that they might experience alopecia due to chemotherapy to the time they actually experienced alopecia and until they were able to accept the change. Inductive qualitative analysis was employed to close in on the subjective experiences of the cancer patients. The results showed the existence of six phases in the psychosocial reactions in the process of alopecia: phase one was the reaction after the doctor's explanation; phase two was the reaction when the hair starts to fall out; phase three was the reaction when the hair starts to intensely fall out; phase four was the reaction when the hair has completely fallen out; phase five was the reaction to behavior for coping with alopecia; and phase six was the reaction to change in interpersonal human relationships. The results also made it clear that there are five types of reaction patterns as follows: 1) treatment priority interpersonal relationship maintenance type; 2) alopecia agitated interpersonal relationship maintenance type; 3) alopecia agitated interpersonal relationship reduction type; 4) alopecia denial interpersonal relationship reduction type; and 5) alopecia denial treatment interruption type. It is important to find out which of the five types the patients belong to early during treatment and provide support so that nursing intervention that suits each individual can be practiced. The purpose of this study is to make clear the process in which patients receiving chemotherapy come to accept alopecia and to examine evidence-based nursing

  8. Gómez-López-Hernández Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Bilateral Nonscarring Alopecia.

    PubMed

    Saricam, Merve Hatun; Tekin, Burak; Unver, Olcay; Ekinci, Gazanfer; Ergun, Tulin

    2015-01-01

    Gómez-López-Hernández syndrome is a rare neurocutaneous disorder characterized by the triad of rhombencephalosynapsis, parietal alopecia, and trigeminal anesthesia. We report a 16-year-old girl with bilateral parietotemporal alopecia in whom cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed rhombencephalosynapsis, suggesting a diagnosis of Gómez-López-Hernández syndrome. Neurologic examination and neuroimaging may be warranted in select patients with parietal alopecia to exclude this uncommon entity.

  9. Frontal Fibrosing Alopecia and Vitiligo: Coexistence or True Association?

    PubMed

    Katoulis, Alexandros C; Diamanti, Konstantina; Sgouros, Dimitrios; Liakou, Aikaterini I; Alevizou, Antigoni; Bozi, Evangelia; Damaskou, Vasileia; Panayiotides, Ioannis; Rigopoulos, Dimitrios

    2017-01-01

    Frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA) is a primary lymphocytic cicatricial alopecia characterized by a progressive band-like recession of the frontotemporal hairline and frequent loss of the eyebrows. It predominantly affects postmenopausal women. Coexistence of FFA and vitiligo is rarely reported in the literature. We retrospectively studied 20 cases diagnosed with FFA in a 14-month period in our Department. Among them, there were 2 cases, a 72-year-old woman and a 48-year-old man, who developed FFA on preexisting vitiligo of the forehead. Anatomical colocalization of the two dermatoses supports the notion that a causal link may exist and their association may not be coincidental. We suggest that interrelated immunologic events and pathologic processes may underlie both these skin conditions.

  10. Promising therapies for treating and/or preventing androgenic alopecia.

    PubMed

    McElwee, K J; Shapiro, J S

    2012-06-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) may affect up to 70% of men and 40% of women at some point in their lifetime. While men typically present with a distinctive alopecia pattern involving hairline recession and vertex balding, women normally exhibit a diffuse hair thinning over the top of their scalps. The treatment standard in dermatology clinics continues to be minoxidil and finasteride with hair transplantation as a surgical option. Here we briefly review current therapeutic options and treatments under active investigation. Dutasteride and ketoconazole are also employed for AGA, while prostaglandin analogues latanoprost and bimatoprost are being investigated for their hair growth promoting potential. Laser treatment products available for home use and from cosmetic clinics are becoming popular. In the future, new cell mediated treatment approaches may be available for AGA. While there are a number of potential treatment options, good clinical trial data proving hair growth efficacy is limited.

  11. DHEA and frontal fibrosing alopecia: molecular and physiopathological mechanisms*

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Neide Kalil

    2016-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGFβ1) promotes fibrosis, differentiating epithelial cells and quiescent fibroblasts into myofibroblasts and increasing expression of extracellular matrix. Recent investigations have shown that PPAR (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor*) is a negative regulator of fibrotic events induced by TGFβ1. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is an immunomodulatory hormone essential for PPAR functions, and is reduced in some processes characterized by fibrosis. Although scarring alopecia characteristically develops in the female biological period in which occurs decreased production of DHEA, there are no data in the literature relating its reduction to fibrogenic process of this condition. This article aims to review the fibrogenic activity of TGFβ1, its control by PPAR and its relation with DHEA in the frontal fibrosing alopecia. PMID:28099600

  12. Bimatoprost in the Treatment of Eyelash Universalis Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Teresa Ojeda; Camacho Martinez, Francisco M

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate topical bimatoprost for eyelash growth in patients with alopecia areata (AA). Design: A 1-year retrospective study, bilateral eyelash alopecia. Materials and Methods: Forty-one subjects with AA universalis without ocular disease applied 0.03% bimatoprost to the eyelid margin once a day over the course of 1 year. Results: Thirty-seven subjects completed the study, one patient was eliminated due to conjunctivitis at the beginning of treatment, two patients developed conjunctivitis after 6 months of treatment, and a fourth did not follow directions. Researchers evaluated patients’ eyelash growth every 4 months. We observed complete growth in 24.32%, moderate growth in 18.91%, slight growth in 27.02% and without response in 29.72%. Conclusion: Bimatoprost may be effective and safe in the treatment of eyelash AA. 43.24% of the patients had an acceptable cosmetic response (total and moderate growth). Limitations: Design without control. PMID:21712909

  13. [Hormonal assessment in a woman with acne and alopecia].

    PubMed

    Faure, M; Drapier-Faure, E

    1992-06-01

    Acne, androgenogenetic alopecia, hyperseborrhea and hirsutism may result from hyperandrogenism in women. This may be peripheral "idiopathic" hyperandrogenism due to cutaneous metabolism of steroids, but in some cases hyperandrogenism is due to abnormal production or input of steroids with androgenic activity (hyperplasia, endocrine tumors, cysts, consumption of progestogens or other hormones with androgenic activity, menopause...). An assessment is useful only in cases of acne or alopecia if they are accompanied by other signs of peripheral hyperandrogenism and/or disturbed menstruation. The treatment is based on the administration of an anti-androgen (in France, usually cyproterone acetate), combined with other local or systemic treatments for the problem, depending on the age, dermatological signs and context.

  14. Frontal Fibrosing Alopecia and Vitiligo: Coexistence or True Association?

    PubMed Central

    Katoulis, Alexandros C.; Diamanti, Konstantina; Sgouros, Dimitrios; Liakou, Aikaterini I.; Alevizou, Antigoni; Bozi, Evangelia; Damaskou, Vasileia; Panayiotides, Ioannis; Rigopoulos, Dimitrios

    2017-01-01

    Frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA) is a primary lymphocytic cicatricial alopecia characterized by a progressive band-like recession of the frontotemporal hairline and frequent loss of the eyebrows. It predominantly affects postmenopausal women. Coexistence of FFA and vitiligo is rarely reported in the literature. We retrospectively studied 20 cases diagnosed with FFA in a 14-month period in our Department. Among them, there were 2 cases, a 72-year-old woman and a 48-year-old man, who developed FFA on preexisting vitiligo of the forehead. Anatomical colocalization of the two dermatoses supports the notion that a causal link may exist and their association may not be coincidental. We suggest that interrelated immunologic events and pathologic processes may underlie both these skin conditions. PMID:28232924

  15. Postoperative alopecia: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Boyer, J D; Vidmar, D A

    1994-11-01

    Postoperative alopecia is the temporary or permanent loss of hair that occurs following prolonged immobilization during general anesthesia and intubation. The clinical and histopathologic aspects of a typical case are described and the literature reviewed. Localized pressure-induced ischemia is the likely cause. Patients at highest risk for permanent hair loss include those subject to cardiac or gynecologic surgical procedures where the combined intraoperative and postoperative intubation time exceeds twenty-four hours. Frequent intraoperative and postoperative head repositioning provides excellent prophylaxis.

  16. Concomitant alopecia areata and hypertrichosis after infliximab therapy: rara avis.

    PubMed

    Akarsu, Selim; Tok, Fatih; Tekin, Levent

    2013-01-01

    We present a 37 year-old man with HLA-B27 positive ankylosing spondylitis for the last 3 years. Interestingly, he developed both alopecia areata and hypertrichosis simultaneously following infliximab treatment. Reporting this interesting patient of ours -to our best notice for the first time in the literature- we call attention of clinicians to the contradistinctive effects of anti-TNF-α agents on hair growth cycle.

  17. [Frontal fibrosing alopecia: case series and literature review].

    PubMed

    Tinoco-Fragoso, Fátima; Domínguez-Cherit, Judith; Méndez-Flores, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Frontal fibrosing alopecia is a disease characterized by a symmetric and progressive loss of hair in the fronto-temporal and fronto-parietal lines that generally affects postmenopausal women. It is considered a variant of lichen planus pilaris for its clinical and histopathological features; although, its etiopathology is still unknown. In this report, we analyzed 4 cases of this disease and we discussed its clinical and histopathological characteristics, as well as their course after initiating treatment.

  18. Treatment of androgenic disorders in women: acne, hirsutism, and alopecia.

    PubMed

    Redmond, G P; Bergfeld, W F

    1990-01-01

    Androgen excess disorders--acne, alopecia, and hirsutism--can be treated effectively with endocrine therapy such as androgen receptor blockers or antagonists, or with androgen suppression. Spironolactone, estrogen, and dexamethasone are considered the most effective approaches to treatment. Whatever the modality, careful planning is key to success, with recognition that response rates vary from patient to patient. A treatment regimen generally continues for at least 2 years.

  19. Diagnostic Clues to Frontal Fibrosing Alopecia in Patients of African Descent

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Sophia D.; Obayan, Olubusayo; Mcclellan, Liza; Sperling, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    Importance: Frontal fibrosing alopecia has previously been reported as rare among patients of African descent. The authors present 18 cases of frontal fibrosing alopecia affecting African American patients and review all published cases of frontal fibrosing alopecia involving patients of African descent. Observations: Since 2010, there have been 66 published cases of frontal fibrosing alopecia among patients of African descent; 59 women, five men, and two cases of unknown gender. Frontal fibrosing alopecia is not uncommon among patients of African descent. In this study, the authors find that female African American patients may have fewer symptoms and unique clinical presentations. Conclusion and relevance: Frontal fibrosing alopecia is an entity that can be seen in patients with many different ethnic backgrounds, often with varying presentations. The diagnosis of frontal fibrosing alopecia must be considered in any patient of African descent who presents with frontotemporal alopecia. In the authors’ patient population, there was a younger age of presentation. The presence of perifollicular hyperpigmentation along the hairline and concomitant facial hyperpigmentation may aid in making the diagnosis and distinguishing this entity from traction alopecia. PMID:27721910

  20. Alopecia following oral acyclovir for the treatment of herpes simplex keratitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashok; Mohan, Kanwar; Sharma, Rajan; Nirankari, Verinder S

    2014-01-01

    The authors report acyclovir-induced alopecia in a patient treated for herpetic keratouveitis. A 32-years-old female was diagnosed with herpetic keratouveitis. She was placed on prednisolone acetate (1%) suspension four times a day, atropine sulfate (1%) thrice a day, and oral acyclovir 400 mg twice-daily. Three weeks following oral acylovir, keratouveitis improved, but she developed alopecia without any drug eruptions. Oral acyclovir was discontinued. Three months later, alopecia completely resolved. Alopecia may be considered a possible complication following oral acyclovir.

  1. Low-power laser use in the treatment of alopecia and crural ulcers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciuchita, Tavi; Usurelu, Mircea; Antipa, Ciprian; Vlaiculescu, Mihaela; Ionescu, Elena

    1998-07-01

    The authors tried to verify the efficacy of Low Power Laser (LPL) in scalp alopecia and crural ulcers of different causes. Laser used was (red diode, continuous emission, 8 mW power, wave length 670 nm spot size about 5 mm diameter on some points 1 - 2 minutes per point. We also use as control classical therapy. Before, during and after treatment, histological samples were done for alopecia. For laser groups (alopecia and ulcers) the results were rather superior and in a three or twice time shorter than control group. We conclude that LPL therapy is a very useful complementary method for the treatment of scalp alopecia and crural ulcers.

  2. Drug discovery for alopecia: gone today, hair tomorrow

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Zenildo; Avci, Pinar; Hamblin, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hair loss or alopecia affects the majority of the population at some time in their life, and increasingly, sufferers are demanding treatment. Three main types of alopecia (androgenic [AGA], areata [AA] and chemotherapy-induced [CIA]) are very different, and have their own laboratory models and separate drug-discovery efforts. Areas covered In this article, the authors review the biology of hair, hair follicle (HF) cycling, stem cells and signaling pathways. AGA, due to dihydrotesterone, is treated by 5-α reductase inhibitors, androgen receptor blockers and ATP-sensitive potassium channel-openers. AA, which involves attack by CD8+NK group 2D-positive (NKG2D+) T cells, is treated with immunosuppressives, biologics and JAK inhibitors. Meanwhile, CIA is treated by apoptosis inhibitors, cytokines and topical immunotherapy. Expert opinion The desire to treat alopecia with an easy topical preparation is expected to grow with time, particularly with an increasing aging population. The discovery of epidermal stem cells in the HF has given new life to the search for a cure for baldness. Drug discovery efforts are being increasingly centered on these stem cells, boosting the hair cycle and reversing miniaturization of HF. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the immune attack in AA will yield new drugs. New discoveries in HF neogenesis and low-level light therapy will undoubtedly have a role to play. PMID:25662177

  3. [Androgenetic alopecia. Current aspects of a common phenotype].

    PubMed

    Hanneken, S; Ritzmann, S; Nöthen, M M; Kruse, R

    2003-08-01

    Androgenetic alopecia is the most common type of hair loss in men and women. The disorder represents a quantitative phenotype with an underlying genetic disposition. So far none of the causative genes have been identified. Under the influence of androgens there is a shortening of the anagen phase as well as a reduction of the cellular hair matrix volume in the involved scalp area. This results in the transformation of thick terminal hair follicles into thin vellus-like hair follicles. Clinically, patients present with an alopecia that follows a defined pattern (pattern baldness) and progresses continuously but in varying degrees. In advanced cases, men may develop baldness with remaining hair exclusively in the temporal and occipital regions. Women are prone to exhibit a more diffuse type of hair loss with pronounced thinning in the parietal region. Whereas the diagnosis of androgenetic alopecia is easy, its treatment is often difficult. The physician is commonly confronted with high patients' expectations regarding hair regrowth. Today, with minoxidil and finasteride, effective therapies are available which can lead to cessation of hair loss. The identification of underlying genes will make a more specific therapy easier to achieve.

  4. Review of overlap between thermoregulation and pain modulation in fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Alice A.; Pardo, José V.; Pasley, Jeffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is characterized by widespread pain that is exacerbated by cold and stress but relieved by warmth. We review the points along thermal and pain pathways where temperature may influence pain. We also present evidence addressing the possibility that brown adipose tissue activity is linked to the pain of fibromyalgia given that cold initiates thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue via adrenergic activity, while warmth suspends thermogenesis. Although females have a higher incidence of fibromyalgia as well as more resting thermogenesis, they are less able to recruit brown adipose tissue in response to chronic stress than males. In addition, conditions that are frequently comorbid with fibromyalgia compromise brown adipose activity making it less responsive to sympathetic stimulation. This results in lower body temperatures, lower metabolic rates, and lower circulating cortisol/corticosterone in response to stress - characteristics of fibromyalgia. In the periphery, sympathetic nerves to brown adipose also project to surrounding tissues, including tender points characterizing fibromyalgia. As a result, the musculoskeletal hyperalgesia associated with conditions like fibromyalgia may result from referred pain in the adjacent muscle and skin. PMID:23887348

  5. Monosodium glutamate and aspartame in perceived pain in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Vellisca, María Y; Latorre, José I

    2014-07-01

    Our aim was to assess the effect of dietary elimination of monosodium glutamate (MSG) and aspartame on perceived pain in fibromyalgia. A total of 72 female patients with fibromyalgia were randomized to discontinuation of dietary MSG and aspartame (n = 36) or waiting list (n = 36). Patients were requested to rate their pain using a seven-point scale. Comparisons between both groups showed no significant differences on pain referred during the baseline or after the elimination of dietary MSG and aspartame. The discontinuation of dietary MSG and aspartame did not improve the symptoms of fibromyalgia.

  6. Temporal preparation and inhibitory deficit in fibromyalgia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Correa, Angel; Miró, Elena; Martínez, M Pilar; Sánchez, Ana I; Lupiáñez, Juan

    2011-04-01

    Cognitive deficits in fibromyalgia may be specifically related to controlled processes, such as those measured by working memory or executive function tasks. This hypothesis was tested here by measuring controlled temporal preparation (temporal orienting) during a response inhibition (go no-go) task. Temporal orienting effects (faster reaction times for targets appearing at temporally attended vs. unattended moments) and response inhibition were impaired in fibromyalgia compared to the control group. It is concluded that frontal networks underlying attentional control (temporal orienting and response inhibition) can be a dysfunctional neurocognitive mechanism in fibromyalgia.

  7. Fibromyalgia Syndrome: An Overview of Pathophysiology, Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Jahan, Firdous; Nanji, Kashmira; Qidwai, Waris; Qasim, Rizwan

    2012-01-01

    Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS) is a chronic condition causing pain, stiffness, and tenderness of the muscles, tendons, and joints. It is also characterized by restless sleep, tiredness, fatigue, anxiety, depression, and disturbances in bowel functions. The etiology of fibromyalgia remains unknown, but recent advances and discoveries have helped to unravel some of the mysteries of this disease. Research highlights some of the biochemical, metabolic, and immunoregulatory abnormalities associated with fibromyalgia. Management of FMS at the present time is very difficult as it has multiple etiological factors and psychological predispositions; however, a patient centered approach is essential to handle this problem. PMID:22811766

  8. Thyroid function in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Neeck, G; Riedel, W

    1992-07-01

    Thyroid function was tested in 13 female patients with primary fibromyalgia syndrome (FS) and 10 healthy age matched controls by intravenous injection of 400 micrograms thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH). Basal thyroid hormone levels of both groups were in the normal range. However, patients with primary FS responded with a significantly lower secretion of thyrotropin and thyroid hormones to TRH, within an observation period of 2 h, and reacted with a significantly higher increase of prolactin. Total and free serum calcium and calcitonin levels were significantly lower in patients with primary FS, while both groups exhibited parathyroid hormone levels in the normal range.

  9. Fibromyalgia as a sympathetically maintained pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Lavin, Manuel

    2004-10-01

    Abnormal activity of the sympathetic nervous system may be involved in the pathogenesis of chronic pain syndromes. This article reviews the animal studies of sympathetically induced pain behavior, the controversy of sympathetically maintained pain in clinical practice, and the dysautonomic nature of fibromyalgia (FM). FM has neuropathic pain features (stimuli-independent pain state accompanied by allodynia and paresthesias). The proposal of FM as a sympathetically maintained pain syndrome is based on the controlled studies showing that patients with FM display signs of relentless sympathetic hyperactivity and that the pain is submissive to sympathetic blockade and is rekindled by norepinephrine injections. Dysautonomia also may explain the multisystem features of FM.

  10. Gonococcal arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cucurull, E; Espinoza, L R

    1998-05-01

    Disseminated gonococcal infection is the most common systemic complication of acute gonorrhea and occurs in 0.5% to 3.0% of patients with untreated mucosal infection. It is also the most common cause of septic arthritis in patients less than 30 years of age. Fortunately, the incidence of gonorrhea is decreasing dramatically in the United States and Western Europe, although it is still high in developing countries. Increasing resistance to antibiotics requires continuous surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibilities to determine the efficacy of current therapeutic measures.

  11. Spiritual Needs in Patients Suffering from Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Offenbaecher, M.; Kohls, N.; Toussaint, L. L.; Sigl, C.; Winkelmann, A.; Hieblinger, R.; Walther, A.; Büssing, A.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess spiritual needs of patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and to evaluate correlations with disease and health associated variables. Using a set of standardized questionnaires (i.e., Spiritual Needs Questionnaire, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, SF-36's Quality of Life, Brief Multidimensional Life Satisfaction Scale, etc.), we enrolled 141 patients (95% women, mean age 58 ± 10 years). Here, needs for inner peace and giving/generativity scored the highest, while existential needs and religious needs scored lowest. Particularly inner peace needs and existential needs correlated with different domains of reduced mental health, particularly with anxiety, the intention to escape from illness, and psychosocial restrictions. Thirty-eight percent of the patients stated needs to be forgiven and nearly half to forgive someone from their past life. Therefore, the specific spiritual needs of patients with chronic diseases should be addressed in clinical care in order to identify potential therapeutic avenues to support and stabilize their psychoemotional situation. PMID:24348691

  12. [Pharmacologic treatment of fibromyalgia: Towards chemical neuromodulation].

    PubMed

    Collado, Antonio; Conesa, Arantxa

    2009-08-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic pathology and its main symptom is pain which usually does not respond to traditional analgesia. Its clinical characteristics and the diverse neurophysiologic findings in these patients point to a central sensitization process of the nociceptive system as the central physiopathologic axis in this disease. The knowledge of the nociceptive system functioning and its behavior in this disease has led, in the past few years, to new possibilities for the therapeutic approach. In that way, drugs with a differential mechanism of action, allowing a modulation of the nociceptive system capable of producing analgesia where other medications have failed are being developed. Different drugs with the capacity increasing the activity of biologically active amines implicated in the nociceptive inhibition process and others which are destined to reduce the excitability of the system through ion channels, are being tested with some benefit in Fibromyalgia patients and may constitute a more rational neuromodulating drug profile for this disease. This article reviews the different pharmacological strategies supported by scientific evidence and points to some future research lines that fortifies the therapeutic change taking place in the treatment approach of these patients.

  13. Aerobic exercise in fibromyalgia: a practical review.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Eric N; Blotman, Francis

    2010-07-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the current evidence to support guidelines for aerobic exercise (AE) and fibromyalgia (FM) in practice, and to outline specific research needs in these areas. Data sources consisted of a PubMed search, 2007 Cochrane Data Base Systematic review, 2008 Ottawa panel evidence-based clinical practice guidelines, as well as additional references found from the initial search. Study selection included randomized clinical trials that compared an aerobic-only exercise intervention (land or pool based) with an untreated control, a non-exercise intervention or other exercise programs in patients responding to the 1990 American College of Rheumatology criteria for FM. The following outcome data were obtained: pain, tender points, perceived improvement in FM symptoms such as the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire total score (FIQ), physical function, depression (e.g., Beck Depression Inventory, FIQ subscale for depression), fatigue and sleep were extracted from 19 clinical trials that considered the effects of aerobic-only exercise in FM patients. Data synthesis shows that there is moderate evidence of important benefit of aerobic-only exercise in FM on physical function and possibly on tender points and pain. It appears to be sufficient evidence to support the practice of AE as a part of the multidisciplinary management of FM. However, future studies must be more adequately sized, homogeneously assessed, and monitored for adherence, to draw definitive conclusions.

  14. Anticonvulsant Drugs for Nerve Pain, Bipolar Disorder and Fibromyalgia

    MedlinePlus

    Anticonvulsant Drugs for Nerve Pain, Bipolar Disorder &Fibromyalgia: Choosing What’sRight for You What are anticonvulsant drugs? Anticonvulsants are drugs used to treat seizures. They are also used to treat bipolar ...

  15. The relationship between fibromyalgia and major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Hudson, J I; Pope, H G

    1996-05-01

    Looking at the results of the seven types of studies discussed previously, it appears that there is strong evidence for an association between fibromyalgia and major depressive disorder on the basis of (1) overlapping symptomatology, (2) similar pattern of comorbid disorders, and (3) high rates of major depressive disorder among relatives of patients with fibromyalgia. There is additional support for an association on the basis of responses to psychological tests and rating scales and the high lifetime rates of mood disorders in fibromyalgia. Two lines of evidence, (1) response to antidepressant medications and (2) response to biologic tests, offer little evidence either for or against an association. On balance, then the weight of the evidence favors an association between fibromyalgia and major depressive disorder. We therefore turn to an analysis of the nature of the association.

  16. [Scalp hypothermia as a preventive of alopecia in patients receiving combined chemotherapy including anthracyclines].

    PubMed

    Perevodchikova, N I; Denisov, L E; Orel, N F; Trofimova, N B; Iarygin, L M

    1987-01-01

    Scalp cooling to prevent alopecia was used in 47 patients treated with anthracyclines for various tumors. Good results were obtained though the course included cyclophosphamide which also causes alopecia. Total beneficial (good + satisfactory) effect was recorded in 36 patients (74.4%) who did not need a wig.

  17. Clinical and histological study of permanent alopecia after bone marrow transplantation*

    PubMed Central

    Basilio, Flávia Machado Alves; Brenner, Fabiane Mulinari; Werner, Betina; Rastelli, Graziela Junges Crescente

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Permanent alopecia after bone marrow transplantation is rare, but more and more cases have been described, typically involving high doses of chemotherapeutic agents used in the conditioning regimen for the transplant. Busulfan, classically described in cases of irreversible alopecia, remains associated in recent cases. The pathogenesis involved in hair loss is not clear and there are few studies available. In addition to chemotherapeutic agents, another factor that has been implicated as a cause is chronic graft-versus-host disease. However, there are no histopathological criteria for defining this diagnosis yet. OBJECTIVE the study aims to evaluate clinical and histological aspects in cases of permanent alopecia after bone marrow transplantation, identifying features of permanent alopecia induced by myeloablative chemotherapy and alopecia as a manifestation of chronic graft-versus-host disease. METHODS data were collected from medical records of 7 patients, with description of the clinical features and review of slides and paraffin blocks of biopsies. RESULTS Two distinct histological patterns were found: one similar to androgenetic alopecia, non-scarring pattern, and other similar to lichen planopilaris, scarring alopecia. CONCLUSION The first pattern corroborates the literature cases of permanent alopecia induced by chemotherapeutic agents, and the second is compatible with manifestation of chronic graft-versus-host disease on scalp, that has never been described yet. The results contribute to the elucidation of the factors involved in these cases, including the development of therapeutic methods PMID:26734861

  18. Early-onset alopecia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Fondell, Elinor; Fitzgerald, Kathryn C; Falcone, Guido J; O'Reilly, Eilis J; Ascherio, Alberto

    2013-10-01

    A recent meta-analysis of 7 genome-wide association studies on early balding (alopecia) revealed single nucleotide polymorphism variants in the region of the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) gene TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TARDBP/TDP-43). We therefore explored the association of early-onset alopecia and ALS in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, a large cohort of 51,529 US men. In 1992, the participants (then aged 46-81 years) were asked to report their hair line pattern at age 45 years. During the follow-up period (1992-2008), 42 men were diagnosed with ALS. Of those, 13 had reported no alopecia, 18 had reported moderate alopecia, and 11 had reported extensive alopecia at age 45 years. Those who reported extensive alopecia had an almost 3-fold increased risk of ALS compared with those who reported no alopecia (relative risk = 2.74, 95% confidence interval: 1.23, 6.13). Furthermore, we observed a linear trend of increased risk of ALS with increasing level of balding at age 45 years (Ptrend = 0.02). In conclusion, men with early-onset alopecia seem to have a higher risk of ALS. The mechanisms underlying this association deserve further investigation.

  19. Keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans: a rare cause of scarring alopecia in two young Indian girls.

    PubMed

    Maheswari, Uma G; Chaitra, V; Mohan, Subbiah S

    2013-01-01

    Keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans (KFSD) is an X-linked xenodermatosis characterized by scarring alopecia and follicular hyperkeratosis. This condition mainly affects males with females being carriers and will have milder symptoms. We present two sisters with severe form of KFSD, progressing to scarring alopecia.

  20. Keratosis Follicularis Spinulosa Decalvans: A Rare Cause of Scarring Alopecia in Two Young Indian Girls

    PubMed Central

    Maheswari, Uma G; Chaitra, V; Mohan, Subbiah S

    2013-01-01

    Keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans (KFSD) is an X-linked xenodermatosis characterized by scarring alopecia and follicular hyperkeratosis. This condition mainly affects males with females being carriers and will have milder symptoms. We present two sisters with severe form of KFSD, progressing to scarring alopecia. PMID:23960394

  1. Hyperleptinemia independent of body adiposity in women with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Homann, Diogo; Carvalho, Humberto Moreira; Stefanello, Joice Mara Facco; Góes, Suelen Meira; Lopes, André Luiz; de Oliveira, Alvaro Reischak; Leite, Neiva

    2014-11-01

    The prevalence of overweight and obesity in patients with fibromyalgia is high, which makes these patients more likely to trigger metabolic changes. It is also uncertain whether the clinical manifestations of fibromyalgia alter the metabolism in these patients. This study investigates the influence of adiposity indicators and presence of fibromyalgia on leptin and acylated ghrelin levels, which are hormones responsible for controlling energy homeostasis. Seventeen women with fibromyalgia (patients) and fifteen healthy women (controls) were evaluated. Pain intensity, physical activity level characteristics and leptin and acylated ghrelin levels were assessed. General linear models, using a main-effects model, were used to test the effect of fibromyalgia (patients vs. controls) on the relationship of leptin and acylated ghrelin with anthropometric indicators [body mass index, waist circumference (WC) and WC by height]. Patients showed higher leptin levels (controls: 9.1 ± 6.7 vs. patients: 22.4 ± 10.6 ng/mL; p < 0.01) and lower acylated ghrelin levels (controls: 188.7 ± 103.4 vs. patients: 126.7 ± 47.8 pg/mL; p = 0.04). The anthropometric variables, entered into linear models as independent variables, significantly influenced both leptin and acylated ghrelin levels (p < 0.01). The explained variance (R(2)) of the models containing leptin was higher (R(2) = 0.52-0.61) compared to the models containing acylated ghrelin (R(2) = 0.24-0.27). When analyzing the influence of the presence of fibromyalgia (study group: women with fibromyalgia vs. healthy women), only the leptin levels were influenced. High leptin levels independent of adiposity in women with fibromyalgia may be associated with the clinical condition of this syndrome.

  2. Efficacy of platelet-rich plasma in treatment of androgenic alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Parul; Agarwal, Sachin; Dhot, Paramjeet Singh; Sayal, Satish K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has shown remarkable beneficial effects without any major adverse reactions in the treatment of androgenic alopecia. The growth factors in activated autologous PRP induce the proliferation of dermal papilla cells. Objectives: The objective was to investigate the clinical efficacy of PRP in treatment of androgenic alopecia. Materials and Methods: Ten patients were given autologous PRP injections on the affected area of alopecia over a period of 3 months at interval of 2-3 weeks and results were assessed. Results: Three months after the treatment, the patients presented clinical improvement in the hair counts, hair thickness, hair root strength, and overall alopecia. Conclusion: PRP appears to be a cheap, effective, and promising therapy for androgenic alopecia with no major adverse effects. PMID:26420936

  3. Alopecia in Rhesus macaques correlates with immunophenotypic alterations in dermal inflammatory infiltrates consistent with hypersensitivity etiology

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Joshua; Fahey, Michele; Santos, Rosemary; Carville, Angela; Wachtman, Lynn; Mansfield, Keith

    2010-01-01

    Background Although alopecia is a commonly recognized problem affecting many captive Rhesus macaque colonies, there is no consensus as to the underlying etiology or appropriate course of management. Methods and Results We performed skin biopsies on a group of Rhesus macaques and demonstrate that alopecia is associated with superficial dermal perivascular mononuclear cell infiltrates and skin pathology consistent with chronic hypersensitivity dermatitis. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the inflammation is primarily composed of CD4+ cells admixed with histiocytes and mast cells. Inflammation is correlated with degree of alopecia. Further analysis in different groups of macaques revealed that animals born outdoors or infected with lung mites had reduced dermal inflammatory cell infiltrates and a lower incidence of alopecia. Conclusions These findings support a hypothesis that an altered housing status resulting in decreased pathogen burden in Rhesus macaque colonies may contribute to dermal immunophenotypic alterations and subsequent development of dermatitis with resultant alopecia. PMID:20102458

  4. Dose-dependent valproate-induced alopecia in patients with mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Takashi; Goto, Hidekazu; Yoshida, Tadashi; Tanaka, Katsuya; Sumiya, Kenji; Kohda, Yukinao

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced hair loss may occur as a side effect in patients treated with valproate. However, few studies have reported a relationship between the blood levels of valproate and the occurrence of hair loss. We report three cases of alopecia that occurred in patients who received sodium valproate for mental disorders. In all three cases, alopecia appeared after long-term valproate exposure with a plasma concentration of 100 µg/ml approximately. However, the alopecia resolved in all cases after dose reduction or treatment discontinuation. Therefore, alopecia may develop in patients with chronic exposure to high plasma concentrations of valproate. Based on these findings, we believe that patients with high plasma concentrations of valproate should be closely monitored for the occurrence of side effects, particularly alopecia.

  5. Alopecia secondary to anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha therapy.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Lara Beatriz Prata; Rego, Juliana Carlos Gonçalves; Estrada, Bruna Duque; Bastos, Paula Raso; Piñeiro Maceira, Juan Manuel; Sodré, Celso Tavares

    2015-01-01

    Biologic drugs represent a substantial progress in the treatment of chronic inflammatory immunologic diseases. However, its crescent use has revealed seldom reported or unknown adverse reactions, mainly associated with anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF). Psoriasiform cutaneous reactions and few cases of alopecia can occur in some patients while taking these drugs. Two cases of alopecia were reported after anti-TNF therapy. Both also developed psoriasiform lesions on the body. This is the second report about a new entity described as 'anti-TNF therapy-related alopecia', which combines clinical and histopathological features of both alopecia areata and psoriatic alopecia. The recognition of these effects by specialists is essential for the proper management and guidance of these patients.

  6. Beyond pain in fibromyalgia: insights into the symptom of fatigue

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue is a disabling, multifaceted symptom that is highly prevalent and stubbornly persistent. Although fatigue is a frequent complaint among patients with fibromyalgia, it has not received the same attention as pain. Reasons for this include lack of standardized nomenclature to communicate about fatigue, lack of evidence-based guidelines for fatigue assessment, and a deficiency in effective treatment strategies. Fatigue does not occur in isolation; rather, it is present concurrently in varying severity with other fibromyalgia symptoms such as chronic widespread pain, unrefreshing sleep, anxiety, depression, cognitive difficulties, and so on. Survey-based and preliminary mechanistic studies indicate that multiple symptoms feed into fatigue and it may be associated with a variety of physiological mechanisms. Therefore, fatigue assessment in clinical and research settings must consider this multi-dimensionality. While no clinical trial to date has specifically targeted fatigue, randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses indicate that treatment modalities studied in the context of other fibromyalgia symptoms could also improve fatigue. The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Fibromyalgia Working Group and the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) have been instrumental in propelling the study of fatigue in fibromyalgia to the forefront. The ongoing efforts by PROMIS to develop a brief fibromyalgia-specific fatigue measure for use in clinical and research settings will help define fatigue, allow for better assessment, and advance our understanding of fatigue. PMID:24289848

  7. Low-level laser therapy to treat fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Ruaro, J A; Fréz, A R; Ruaro, M B; Nicolau, R A

    2014-11-01

    Several clinical treatments have been proposed to manage symptoms of fibromyalgia. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) may be a useful tool to treat this dysfunction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of LLLT in patients with fibromyalgia. A placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial was carried out with 20 patients divided randomly into either an LLLT group (n = 10) or a placebo group (n = 10). The LLLT group was treated with a GaAlAs laser (670 nm, 4 J/cm(2) on 18 tender points) three times a week over 4 weeks. Before and after treatment, patients were evaluated with the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), McGill Pain Questionnaire, and visual analog scale (VAS). Data from the FIQ and McGill questionnaire for the treated and control groups were analyzed by paired t tests, and Wilcoxon tests were used to analyze data from the VAS. After LLLT or sham treatment, the number of tender points was significantly reduced in both groups (LLLT, p < 0.0001; placebo, p = 0.0001). However, all other fibromyalgia symptoms showed significant improvements after LLLT compared to placebo (FIQ, p = 0.0003; McGill, p = 0.0078; and VAS, p = 0.0020). LLLT provided relief from fibromyalgia symptoms in patients and should be further investigated as a therapeutic tool for management in fibromyalgia.

  8. 78 FR 63223 - Fibromyalgia Public Meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Fibromyalgia Public Meeting on Patient-Focused Drug... public meeting entitled ``Fibromyalgia Public Meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development''...

  9. Menstrual arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    McDonagh, J E; Singh, M M; Griffiths, I D

    1993-01-01

    The menstrual cycle is characterised by variations in the absolute and relative concentrations of the hormones of the hypothalamic pituitary ovarian axis, which in turn affect cell function and cytokine and heat shock protein production. Menstruation involves the shedding of the secretory endometrium, which is part of the mucosal associated lymphoid tissue and hence is rich in immunologically competent cells such as CD8 T cells and macrophages. The case is reported here of a patient presenting with a recurrent but transient symmetrical inflammatory polyarthritis which only occurred at menstruation with no residual damage. The disease was suppressed by danazol. Endometrial degradation products are suggested as the trigger of this 'menstrual arthritis'. PMID:8427519

  10. Is there a relationship between androgenic alopecia and benign prostatic hyperplasia?

    PubMed

    Dastgheib, Ladan; Shirazi, Mehdi; Moezzi, Iman; Dehghan, Saber; Sadati, Maryam-Sadat

    2015-01-01

    Androgenic alopecia as a physiologic process and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) as a pathologic process in the older population are androgen-dependent processes influenced by 5-alpha reductase enzyme which converts testosterone to dihydrotestosterone. This cross sectional study was done to evaluate the relationship between androgenic alopecia and BPH. 150 men older than 50 years old, who presented to the free prostate screening clinic, were included. They were asked about urinary symptoms. PSA level, prostate volume with sonography and alopecia grading using Hamilton-Norwood classification (grade I to VII) were evaluated. Analysis was done by SPSS statistical method. 59.6% of men had mild alopecia (grade I, II, III), 34.1% had moderate alopecia (grade IV, V) and 6.3% had severe alopecia (grade VI, VII).The mean PSA level was 1.37 ± 1.48 ng/ml. The minimum PSA level was 0.1 ng/ml, and the maximum level was 6.8 ng/ml. The mean prostate volume was 37.85 ± 21.85cc. The minimum prostate size was 10 ml, and the maximum volume was 173 ml. The mean international prostate symptom score (IPSS) was 7.6 ± 6.11 with the minimum score 0 and the maximum score 27. However, no relationship between these parameters and androgenic alopecia was detected. This study showed that there is no relationship between androgenic alopecia, PSA level, IPSS, and prostate volume. Occurrence of alopecia in younger age and a positive family history correlated with a higher grade of alopecia.

  11. Adriamycin alopecia prevented by cold air scalp cooling.

    PubMed

    Symonds, R P; McCormick, C V; Maxted, K J

    1986-10-01

    Preliminary studies are reported on the effectiveness of cold air scalp cooling to prevent alopecia in patients receiving Adriamycin. Cold air produced in a novel way using a vortex refrigeration tube was applied to the scalp for 15 min before and 30 min after the administration of Adriamycin and other cytotoxic agents. Sixteen of 26 patients had no hair loss, four had slight hair loss, and six required a wig. Two subgroups fared particularly well. Four of four patients treated with ABVD for Hodgkin's disease and nine of 13 treated with Adriamycin (40 mg/m2) and vincristine (2 mg) for breast cancer had no hair loss.

  12. Central scalp alopecia photographic scale in African American women.

    PubMed

    Olsen, E A; Callender, V; Sperling, L; McMichael, A; Anstrom, K J; Bergfeld, W; Durden, F; Roberts, J; Shapiro, J; Whiting, D A

    2008-01-01

    Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA) is a common but poorly understood cause of hair loss in African American women. A photographic scale was developed that captures the pattern and severity of the central hair loss seen with CCCA in order to help identify this problem in the general community and to potentially correlate clinical data with hair loss. The utility and reproducibility of this photographic scale was determined in a group of 150 African American women gathered for a health and beauty day who were evaluated by both four investigators experienced in the diagnosis of hair disorders and by the subjects themselves.

  13. Neem oil: an herbal therapy for alopecia causes dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Reutemann, Patricia; Ehrlich, Alison

    2008-01-01

    For more than 2,000 years, the neem tree has been considered one of the most useful and versatile plants in the world. Neem oil has been used for both homeopathic remedies and as a pesticide. Both systemic and contact reactions have occurred with the use of neem oil. We report a patient who presented with an acute case of contact dermatitis on the scalp and face after the use of neem oil for alopecia and present a review of the literature regarding its uses, toxicity, and regulation.

  14. The frequency of thyroid antibodies in fibromyalgia patients and their relationship with symptoms.

    PubMed

    Pamuk, Omer Nuri; Cakir, Necati

    2007-01-01

    We determined the frequency of thyroid autoantibodies in fibromyalgia (FM) patients and the relationship between FM symptoms and these antibodies. Euthyroid 128 FM patients, 64 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, and 64 healthy control subjects were included in the study. The sociodemographic features and the clinical features of FM patients were determined. By using a visual analog scale, patients were questioned about the severity of FM-related symptoms. All patients were administered with Duke-Anxiety Depression (Duke-AD) scale, the physical function items of the fibromyalgia impact questionnaire scale. Thyroid autoimmunity was defined as the presence of detectable antithyroglobulin (TgAb) and/or antithyroid peroxidase (TPOAb) antibodies by the immunometric methods. Patients with a connective tissue disorder, hypo- or hyperthyroidism, and patients who had psychiatric treatment within the last 6 months were not included into the study. The frequencies of thyroid autoimmunity in FM (34.4%) and RA (29.7%) patients were significantly higher than controls (18.8%) (p<0.05). Twenty-six (20.3%) FM patients had positive TgAb and 31 (24.2%) had positive TPOAb. When patients with thyroid autoimmunity were compared to others, it was seen that the mean age, the percentage of postmenopausal patients, the frequency of dryness of the mouth, and the percentage of patients with a previous psychiatric treatment were higher in this group (p<0.05). FM patients had thyroid autoimmunity similar to the frequency in RA and higher than controls. Age and postmenopausal status seemed to be associated with thyroid autoimmunity in FM patients. The presence of thyroid autoimmunity had no relationship with the depression scores of FM patients.

  15. Determinants of quality of life in patients with fibromyalgia: A structural equation modeling approach

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong-Won; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Park, Dong-Jin; Kim, Seong-Ho; Nah, Seong-Su; Lee, Ji Hyun; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Lee, Yeon-Ah; Hong, Seung-Jae; Kim, Hyun-Sook; Lee, Hye-Soon; Kim, Hyoun Ah; Joung, Chung-Il; Kim, Sang-Hyon

    2017-01-01

    Objective Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with fibromyalgia (FM) is lower than in patients with other chronic diseases and the general population. Although various factors affect HRQOL, no study has examined a structural equation model of HRQOL as an outcome variable in FM patients. The present study assessed relationships among physical function, social factors, psychological factors, and HRQOL, and the effects of these variables on HRQOL in a hypothesized model using structural equation modeling (SEM). Methods HRQOL was measured using SF-36, and the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) was used to assess physical dysfunction. Social and psychological statuses were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), the Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale (ASES), and the Social Support Scale. SEM analysis was used to test the structural relationships of the model using the AMOS software. Results Of the 336 patients, 301 (89.6%) were women with an average age of 47.9±10.9 years. The SEM results supported the hypothesized structural model (χ2 = 2.336, df = 3, p = 0.506). The final model showed that Physical Component Summary (PCS) was directly related to self-efficacy and inversely related to FIQ, and that Mental Component Summary (MCS) was inversely related to FIQ, BDI, and STAI. Conclusions In our model of FM patients, HRQOL was affected by physical, social, and psychological variables. In these patients, higher levels of physical function and self-efficacy can improve the PCS of HRQOL, while physical function, depression, and anxiety negatively affect the MCS of HRQOL. PMID:28158289

  16. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for fibromyalgia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Walitt, Brian; Urrútia, Gerard; Nishishinya, María Betina; Cantrell, Sarah E; Häuser, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia is a clinically well-defined chronic condition with a biopsychosocial aetiology. Fibromyalgia is characterized by chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain, sleep problems, cognitive dysfunction, and fatigue. Patients often report high disability levels and poor quality of life. Since there is no specific treatment that alters the pathogenesis of fibromyalgia, drug therapy focuses on pain reduction and improvement of other aversive symptoms. Objectives The objective was to assess the benefits and harms of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the treatment of fibromyalgia. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 5), MEDLINE (1966 to June 2014), EMBASE (1946 to June 2014), and the reference lists of reviewed articles. Selection criteria We selected all randomized, double-blind trials of SSRIs used for the treatment of fibromyalgia symptoms in adult participants. We considered the following SSRIs in this review: citalopram, fluoxetine, escitalopram, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline. Data collection and analysis Three authors extracted the data of all included studies and assessed the risks of bias of the studies. We resolved discrepancies by discussion. Main results The quality of evidence was very low for each outcome. We downgraded the quality of evidence to very low due to concerns about risk of bias and studies with few participants. We included seven placebo-controlled studies, two with citalopram, three with fluoxetine and two with paroxetine, with a median study duration of eight weeks (4 to 16 weeks) and 383 participants, who were pooled together. All studies had one or more sources of potential major bias. There was a small (10%) difference in patients who reported a 30% pain reduction between SSRIs (56/172 (32.6%)) and placebo (39/171 (22.8%)) risk difference (RD) 0.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.01 to 0.20; number needed to treat for an additional

  17. Reliability and validity of the Turkish version of the fibromyalgia rapid screening tool (FiRST)

    PubMed Central

    Celiker, Reyhan; Altan, Lale; Rezvani, Aylin; Aktas, Ilknur; Tastekin, Nurettin; Dursun, Erbil; Dursun, Nigar; Sarıkaya, Selda; Ozdolap, Senay; Akgun, Kenan; Zateri, Coskun; Birtane, Murat

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] An easy-to-use, psychometrically validated screening tool for fibromyalgia is needed. This study aims to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Turkish version of the Fibromyalgia Rapid Screening Tool by correlating it with 2013 American College of Rheumatology alternative diagnostic criteria and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were 269 Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation clinic outpatients. Patients completed a questionnaire including the Fibromyalgia Rapid Screening Tool (twice), 2013 American College of Rheumatology alternative diagnostic criteria, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Scale reliability was examined by test-retest. The 2013 American College of Rheumatology alternative diagnostic criteria was used for comparison to determine criterion validity. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative likelihood ratios were calculated according to 2013 American College of Rheumatology alternative diagnostic criteria. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to find the confounding effect of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale on Fibromyalgia Rapid Screening Tool to distinguish patients with fibromyalgia syndrome. [Results] The Fibromyalgia Rapid Screening Tool was similar to the 2013 American College of Rheumatology alternative diagnostic criteria in defining patients with fibromyalgia syndrome. Fibromyalgia Rapid Screening Tool score was correlated with 2013 American College of Rheumatology alternative diagnostic criteria subscores. Each point increase in Fibromyalgia Rapid Screening Tool global score meant 10 times greater odds of experiencing fibromyalgia syndrome. [Conclusion] The Turkish version of the Fibromyalgia Rapid Screening Tool is reliable for identifying patients with fibromyalgia. PMID:28265170

  18. Reliability and validity of the Turkish version of the fibromyalgia rapid screening tool (FiRST).

    PubMed

    Celiker, Reyhan; Altan, Lale; Rezvani, Aylin; Aktas, Ilknur; Tastekin, Nurettin; Dursun, Erbil; Dursun, Nigar; Sarıkaya, Selda; Ozdolap, Senay; Akgun, Kenan; Zateri, Coskun; Birtane, Murat

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] An easy-to-use, psychometrically validated screening tool for fibromyalgia is needed. This study aims to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Turkish version of the Fibromyalgia Rapid Screening Tool by correlating it with 2013 American College of Rheumatology alternative diagnostic criteria and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were 269 Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation clinic outpatients. Patients completed a questionnaire including the Fibromyalgia Rapid Screening Tool (twice), 2013 American College of Rheumatology alternative diagnostic criteria, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Scale reliability was examined by test-retest. The 2013 American College of Rheumatology alternative diagnostic criteria was used for comparison to determine criterion validity. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative likelihood ratios were calculated according to 2013 American College of Rheumatology alternative diagnostic criteria. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to find the confounding effect of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale on Fibromyalgia Rapid Screening Tool to distinguish patients with fibromyalgia syndrome. [Results] The Fibromyalgia Rapid Screening Tool was similar to the 2013 American College of Rheumatology alternative diagnostic criteria in defining patients with fibromyalgia syndrome. Fibromyalgia Rapid Screening Tool score was correlated with 2013 American College of Rheumatology alternative diagnostic criteria subscores. Each point increase in Fibromyalgia Rapid Screening Tool global score meant 10 times greater odds of experiencing fibromyalgia syndrome. [Conclusion] The Turkish version of the Fibromyalgia Rapid Screening Tool is reliable for identifying patients with fibromyalgia.

  19. 77 FR 43640 - Social Security Ruling, SSR 12-2p; Titles II and XVI: Evaluation of Fibromyalgia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... ADMINISTRATION Social Security Ruling, SSR 12-2p; Titles II and XVI: Evaluation of Fibromyalgia AGENCY: Social... determinable impairment of fibromyalgia, and how we evaluate fibromyalgia in disability claims and continuing... Interpretation Ruling Titles II and XVI: Evaluation of Fibromyalgia Purpose: This Social Security Ruling...

  20. Rheumatoid arthritis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks itself. The pattern of joints ... other joints and is worse in the morning. Rheumatoid arthritis is also a systemic disease, involving other body ...

  1. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... joints. This form of JIA may turn into rheumatoid arthritis. It may involve five or more large and ... no known prevention for JIA. Alternative Names Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ...

  2. Arthritis in America

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis makes it harder to manage heart disease, diabetes or obesity. About half of adults with heart disease (49%) ... adults with arthritis who also have heart disease, diabetes or obesity, have some limitation of their normal activities because ...

  3. Fibromyalgia Syndrome in Need of Effective Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Tsilioni, Irene; Arbetman, Lauren; Panagiotidou, Smaro; Stewart, Julia M.; Gleason, Rae M.; Russell, Irwin J.

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a chronic, idiopathic condition of widespread musculoskeletal pain, affecting primarily women. It is clinically characterized by chronic, nonarticular pain and a heightened response to pressure along with sleep disturbances, fatigue, bowel and bladder abnormalities, and cognitive dysfunction. The diagnostic criteria have changed repeatedly, and there is neither a definitive pathogenesis nor reliable diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers. Clinical and laboratory studies have provided evidence of altered central pain pathways. Recent evidence suggests the involvement of neuroinflammation with stress peptides triggering the release of neurosenzitizing mediators. The management of FMS requires a multidimensional approach including patient education, behavioral therapy, exercise, and pain management. Here we review recent data on the pathogenesis and propose new directions for research and treatment. PMID:26306765

  4. Alopecia in mice infected with murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV).

    PubMed Central

    Mims, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    When mouse cytomegalovirus was injected subcutaneously into 4-12 day old CDI mice there was infection of dermal cells and the dermal papillae of hair follicles. Infected cells were never seen in the epidermis nor in the epithelium of hair follicles. When larger doses of virus (5 X 10(4) pfu) were given, dermal infection led to gross necrosis of the skin, ulceration, scabbing and healing with alopecia. Smaller doses (10(4) pfu) did not cause gross necrosis but damage to follicles resulted in alopecia or sparse hair growth. Skin lesions were not seen after infection of 4-8 week old mice, even when the inoculated skin area had been epilated, or when hyaluronidase was mixed with the virus inoculum. These experiments show that cytomegalovirus, in contrast to herpes simplex and varicella-zoster viruses, infects dermal but not epidermal cells, and that dermal tropism is age-restricted. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:3002414

  5. Current understanding of androgenetic alopecia. Part I: etiopathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, R; Happle, R

    2000-06-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is the most common type of hair loss in men and women. This continuous process results in a type of alopecia that follows a definite pattern in those individuals who are genetically predisposed. At present the predisposing genes are unknown but the relatively strong concordance of the degree of baldness in fathers and sons is not consistent with a simple Mendelian trait and a polygenic basis is therefore most likely. AGA can be defined as a DHT-dependent process with continuous miniaturization of sensitive HF. Today we do not understand the molecular steps involved in androgen-dependent beard growth versus androgen-dependent hair loss in AGA. However, recent experimental and clinical advances enable us to explain some pathogenetic steps leading to androgenetic hair loss. Among other steroidogenic isoenzymes such as 17b- and 3b- hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases, the type 2 5a-reductase within the dermal papilla plays a central role by the intrafollicular conversion of T to DHT.

  6. Induction of alopecia in mice exposed to cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    D'Agostini, F; Balansky, R; Pesce, C; Fiallo, P; Lubet, R A; Kelloff, G J; De Flora, S

    2000-04-03

    Besides being responsible for a high proportion of those chronic degenerative diseases that are the leading causes of death in the population, tobacco smoking has been associated with skin diseases. Smoke genotoxicants are metabolized in hair follicle cells, where they form DNA adducts and cause DNA damage. The suspicion was raised that, in humans, a link may exist between smoking and both premature grey hair and hair loss. In order to check this hypothesis, we carried out a study in C57BL/6 mice exposed whole-body to a mixture of sidestream and mainstream cigarette smoke. After 3 months exposure, most mice developed areas of alopecia and grey hair, while no such lesions occurred either in sham-exposed mice or in smoke-exposed mice receiving the chemopreventive agent N-acetylcysteine with drinking water. Cell apoptosis occurred massively in the hair bulbs at the edge of alopecia areas. Smoke-exposed mice had extensive atrophy of the epidermis, reduced thickness of the subcutaneous tissue, and scarcity of hair follicles. On the whole, exposure to smoke genotoxic components appears to alter the hair cycle with a dystrophic anagen pattern. Although this mechanism is different from that of genotoxic cytostatic drugs, N-acetylcysteine appears to exert protective effects in both conditions.

  7. Multi-therapies in androgenetic alopecia: review and clinical experiences.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Alfredo; Anzalone, Alessia; Fortuna, Maria Caterina; Caro, Gemma; Garelli, Valentina; Pranteda, Giulia; Carlesimo, Marta

    2016-11-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is a genetically determined progressive hair-loss condition which represents the most common cause of hair loss in men. The use of the medical term androgenetic alopecia reflects current knowledge about the important role of androgens and genetic factors in its etiology. In addition to androgen-dependent changes in the hair cycle, sustained microscopic follicular inflammation contributes to its onset. Furthermore, Prostaglandins have been demonstrated to have the ability in modulating hair follicle cycle; in particular, PGD2 inhibits hair growth while PGE2/F2a promote growth. Due to the progressive nature of AGA, the treatment should be started early and continued indefinitely, since the benefit will not be maintained upon ceasing therapy. To date, only two therapeutic agents have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency for the treatment of AGA: topical minoxidil and oral finasteride. Considering the many pathogenetic mechanisms involved in AGA, various treatment options are available: topical and systemic drugs may be used and the choice depends on various factors including grading of AGA, patients' pathological conditions, practicability, costs and risks. So, the treatment for AGA should be based on personalized therapy and targeted at the different pathophysiological aspects of AGA.

  8. Association between thyroid autoimmunity and fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Suk, J H; Lee, J H; Kim, J M

    2012-07-01

    Evidence exists that autoimmune thyroiditis is present in a high percentage of fibromyalgia (FM) and associated with the presence of typical symptoms of FM. However, the role of thyroperoxidase antibody (TPO Ab) in the manifestation of FM is still unclear. The goal of this study was to investigate the prevalence of positive TPO Ab in euthyroid FM patients, and whether TPO Ab positivity is associated with the clinical manifestations in euthyroid FM patients.Thyroid assessment was done by free T4, TSH and TPO Ab. The clinical parameters including Fibromyalgia Impact questionnaire (FIQ), pain visual analogical scale (VAS) and tender point counts were evaluated in euthyroid primary FM patients, not associated with autoimmune rheumatic disease. The immunologic tests including rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody were measured. We compared the prevalence of positive TPO Ab between FM patients, and healthy control. We also compared clinical and laboratory parameter in FM patients according to the presence of TPO Ab.149 patients of FM, 68 healthy controls were recruited. FM patients showed higher prevalence of positive TPO Ab than healthy controls (28 out of 149 patients, 19%; 5 out of 68 healthy controls, 7%; P=0.04). There was no difference of clinical and laboratory parameters in FM patients between 2 groups subdivided by the presence of TPO Ab.In our study, euthyroid FM patients showed significantly higher prevalence of positive TPO Ab, as compared to age and sex matched healthy control. However, TPO Ab positivity was relatively low and not associated with the clinical manifestations in euthyroid FM patients. This finding support thyroid autoimmunity may influence the development of FM, but the evidence which support that FM is related to autoimmune etiology is not clear, and FM severity may not be affected by the presence of thyroid autoantibody.

  9. Effects of Stanger bath therapy on fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Eksioglu, Emel; Yazar, Duygu; Bal, Ajda; Usan, Hicran Demir; Cakci, Aytul

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of Stanger bath on the treatment of fibromyalgia (FM). Fifty women with FM were randomly divided into two groups. The first group (n=25) was treated with amitriptyline, 10 mg/day for 8 weeks, and Stanger bath, 20 min daily for ten sessions. The second group (n=25) only had amitriptyline, 10 mg/day for 8 weeks. In the first group the assessment parameters were measured before (t1), at the end (t2), and 2 months after the hydrotherapy (t3). In the second group these parameters were examined before (T1) and 2 months after the treatment (T2). Patients were evaluated by number of tender points and Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) scores. There was significant improvement in number of tender points between t1 and t2 (P<0.01) and t1 and t3 (P<0.001) in the Stanger bath group. In addition, there was significant improvement in FIQ scores between t1 and t2 (P<0.001) and t1 and t3 (P<0.01) in the Stanger bath group. In the second group we observed significant improvement in FIQ scores and tender point numbers between T1 and T2 (P=0.00). We did not find any difference between groups in tender point number percent change (p=0.074). However, we observed statistically significant improvement in percent change of FIQ scores in Stanger bath group (-30+/-16.7) when compared to group 2 (-19.3+/-13) (p=0.016). We conclude that Stanger bath therapy when combined with amitriptyline has a long lasting effect and better outcome in FM patients.

  10. Heart Rate Variability for Quantification of Autonomic Dysfunction in Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jin Ho; Hong, Seok Hyun; Lee, Chang Hyun; Choi, Byoong Yong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To quantify autonomic dysfunction in fibromyalgia patients compared to healthy controls using heart rate variability (HRV). Methods Sixteen patients with fibromyalgia and 16 healthy controls were recruited in this case control study. HRV was measured using the time-domain method incorporating the following parameters: total heartbeats, the mean of intervals between consecutive heartbeats (R-R intervals), the standard deviation of normal to normal R-R intervals (SDNN), the square root of the mean squared differences of successive R-R intervals (RMSSD), ratio of SDNN to RMSSD (SDNN/RMSSD), and difference between the longest and shortest R-R interval under different three conditions including normal quiet breathing, rate controlled breathing, and Valsalva maneuver. The severity of autonomic symptoms in the group of patients with fibromyalgia was measured by Composite Autonomic Symptom Scale 31 (COMPASS 31). Then we analyzed the difference between the fibromyalgia and control groups and the correlation between the COMPASS 31 and aforementioned HRV parameters in the study groups. Results Patients with fibromyalgia had significantly higher SDNN/RMSSD values under both normal quiet breathing and rate controlled breathing compared to controls. Differences between the longest and shortest R-R interval under Valsalva maneuver were also significantly lower in patients with fibromyalgia than in controls. COMPASS 31 score was negatively correlated with SDNN/RMSSD values under rate controlled breathing. Conclusion SDNN/RMSSD is a valuable parameter for autonomic nervous system function and can be used to quantify subjective autonomic symptoms in patients with fibromyalgia. PMID:27152281

  11. Pattern Alopecia during Hormonal Anticancer Therapy in Patients with Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin; Kim, Ju-Ik; Yun, Seok-Kweon; Kim, Han-Uk; Ihm, Chull-Wan

    2014-12-01

    We report five cases of pattern alopecia in female patients who are undergoing hormonal anticancer therapy for the prevention of recurrence of breast cancer after surgery. Three patients demonstrated male pattern alopecia with receding frontal hairlines, and two patients demonstrated female pattern alopecia without receding hairlines. The detailed clinical history showed that the pattern alopecia of the patients developed after the full recovery of global hair loss of the entire scalp due to previous cytotoxic chemotherapy. All of the adjuvant hormonal anticancer drugs that were used in the patients are antiestrogenic agents, either aromatase inhibitors or selective estrogen receptor modulators. Considering androgen effect on the hair follicles of the fronto-parietal scalp, the androgen-estrogen imbalance caused by the drugs was thought to be the reason for the onset of pattern alopecia in the patients. In general, alopecia that develops during cytotoxic chemotherapy is well known to both physicians and patients; however, the diagnosis of pattern alopecia during hormonal anticancer therapy in breast cancer patients seems to be overlooked.

  12. Alopecia in Outdoor Group- and Corral-Housed Baboons (Papio hamadryas spp.).

    PubMed

    Lutz, Corrine K; Sharp, R Mark

    2015-07-01

    Alopecia has been reported to occur in several species of captive NHP. Much of this research has focused on macaque monkeys; whether other primate species such as baboons are affected similarly is unknown. Because alopecia can be a focus of inspectors and a possible marker of wellbeing, the purpose of the current study was to survey the occurrence of alopecia in 2 baboon populations and to identify potential risk factors. Subjects were 262 group-housed and 279 corral-housed baboons. Alopecia was assessed cage-side (group-housed) and on sedated animals (corral-housed). Although alopecia was mild in both populations, there were significant effects of season and sex. Alopecia was greater in the winter (group-housed) and the fall (corral-housed) and in female baboons. In addition, the group-housed baboons showed a significant negative effect of age and a lesser effect of group size on alopecia. These results demonstrate that variables other than those associated with animal management practices can affect hair loss in baboons.

  13. Frontal Fibrosing Alopecia Coexisting with Lupus Erythematosus: Poor Response to Hydroxychloroquine.

    PubMed

    Contin, Letícia Arsie; Martins da Costa Marques, Elisa Raquel; Noriega, Leandro

    2017-01-01

    Lupus erythematosus, especially the discoid form, and lichen planopilaris may be associated and can occur in different topographies (coexistence) or in the same lesion (lupus eythematosus/lichen planus overlap syndrome). Frontal fibrosing alopecia is considered a variant form of lichen planopilaris and is characterized by frontotemporal hairline and eyebrow involvement. Of the association with lupus erythematosus we have only a few descriptions. Hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine diphosphate are antimalarial drugs described as viable treatment options for both diseases, due to an antilymphocytic effect. The association between frontal fibrosing alopecia and lupus erythematosus (discoid or systemic) is reported in this article, showing a progressive alopecia in the frontotemporal hairline despite treatment with hydroxychloroquine.

  14. Gonococcal and nongonococcal arthritis.

    PubMed

    García-De La Torre, Ignacio; Nava-Zavala, Arnulfo

    2009-02-01

    Acute bacterial arthritis usually is caused by gonococcal or nongonococcal infection of the joints. Nongonococcal and gonococcal arthritis are the most potentially dangerous and destructive forms of acute arthritis. These bacterial infections of the joints are usually curable with treatment, but morbidity and mortality are still significant in patients who have underlying rheumatoid arthritis, patients who have prosthetic joints, elderly patients, and patients who have severe and multiple comorbidities. This article reviews the risk factors, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of nongonococcal and gonococcal arthritis.

  15. Current status of atypical antipsychotics for the treatment of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Rico-Villademoros, F; Calandre, E P; Slim, M

    2014-06-01

    The treatment of fibromyalgia requires pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies. The pharmacological treatment of fibromyalgia is limited to a few drugs that have been demonstrated to be moderately effective in some but not all dimensions of the disease. Therefore, the search for new drugs to treat this condition is warranted. Atypical antipsychotics offered an attractive alternative because they had been shown to be active against several key symptoms of fibromyalgia. The results of open-label studies, however, appear to indicate that atypical antipsychotics are poorly tolerated in patients with fibromyalgia, and only quetiapine XR has been studied in randomized controlled trials. Quetiapine XR has demonstrated effectiveness in treating comorbid major depression, anxiety and sleep disturbance. However, in two randomized controlled trials, quetiapine XR was not differentiated from placebo and failed to demonstrate noninferiority to amitriptyline in terms of improving overall symptomatology. The effect of quetiapine XR on pain and its usefulness as part of a combination pharmacological regimen should be further evaluated. Overall, the use of quetiapine (initiated at a low dose and slowly titrated) in fibromyalgia should be limited to patients with comorbid major depression or patients who are currently receiving other treatments and have unresolved and disabling depressive and/or anxiety symptoms.

  16. The Occupational Profile of Women with Fibromyalgia Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pérez-de-Heredia-Torres, Marta; Huertas Hoyas, Elisabet; Sánchez-Camarero, Carlos; Pérez-Corrales, Jorge; Fernández de-Las-Peñas, César

    2016-06-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the functional level of women with fibromyalgia; to investigate the differences in the occupational activities between women with fibromyalgia and healthy women; and to analyse the perceived importance of occupational performance during self-care, productivity and leisure activities. A cross-sectional case control study was performed. Twenty women with fibromyalgia and 20 healthy women completed the Functional Independence Measure (FIM), the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM), a Numerical Pain Rating Scale, the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire and the SF-36 health survey. The Chi-square test (χ2), the Student's t test and the Spearman's test were used on the data. The FIM revealed significant differences regarding several activities: personal hygiene, bathing and memory (p < 0.01). The COPM scores did not reveal significant differences between groups (p > 0.10). Women with fibromyalgia had higher disability and reduced quality of life and required greater assistance to perform specific activities of daily living, i.e. hygiene, than healthy women. This highlights the specific occupational therapy needs these women have for performing many basic activities and for improving their quality of life. Limitations of the study include the small sample size, the exclusion of male participants and the possible influence of the women's psychological status on the assessments performed. Findings should be generalized with caution. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Psychological Resilience, Affective Mechanisms, and Symptom Burden in a Tertiary Care Sample of Patients with Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Samantha J; Vincent, Ann; Hassett, Afton L; Whipple, Mary O; Oh, Terry H; Benzo, Roberto P; Toussaint, Loren L

    2014-01-01

    Research demonstrates that patients with fibromyalgia who have higher positive and lower negative affect have lower symptom burden. Affect has been shown to be associated with resilience. This study examined the relationship between affect, resilience, and fibromyalgia symptom burden in a clinical sample of patients with fibromyalgia. We hypothesized that (a) positive and negative affect would be associated with fibromyalgia symptom burden; (b) resilience would be associated with positive and negative affect; (c) resilience would be associated with fibromyalgia symptom burden; and (d) the connection between resilience and fibromyalgia symptom burden would be mediated by both positive and negative affect. A sample of 858 patients with fibromyalgia completed questionnaires. Mediation modeling revealed statistically significant direct effects of resilience on fibromyalgia symptom burden (β =−.10, P < .001) and statistically significant indirect effects of resilience on fibromyalgia symptom burden through affect (β =−.36, P < .001), suggesting that both resilience and affect influence fibromyalgia symptom burden. Our results suggest that improving affect through resiliency training could be studied as a modality for improving fibromyalgia symptom burden. PMID:24376184

  18. [Gonococcus-associated arthritis].

    PubMed

    Bodmer, K

    1989-04-01

    The various forms of arthritis associated with a gonococcus infection are pathogenetically and clinically differentiated. Whereas an infectious systemic process with different clinical symptoms is said to be underlying the arthritis-dermatitis syndrome as well as the septic GO-arthritis, the third form is para-infectious reactive arthritis. It is often difficult to diagnose an infectious GO-arthritis, as direct evidence of the virus found in joint and blood is rarely positive, so that the diagnosis can be affirmed or negated on the basis of clinical facts of the reaction of arthritis after an appropriate antibiotic therapy. Differential diagnostic considerations may help to find the correct diagnosis in view of an acute urethritis arthritis.

  19. Exercise reduces depressive symptoms in adults with arthritis: Evidential value

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, George A; Kelley, Kristi S

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine whether evidential value exists that exercise reduces depression in adults with arthritis and other rheumatic conditions. METHODS Utilizing data derived from a prior meta-analysis of 29 randomized controlled trials comprising 2449 participants (1470 exercise, 979 control) with fibromyalgia, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosus, a new method, P-curve, was utilized to assess for evidentiary worth as well as dismiss the possibility of discriminating reporting of statistically significant results regarding exercise and depression in adults with arthritis and other rheumatic conditions. Using the method of Stouffer, Z-scores were calculated to examine selective-reporting bias. An alpha (P) value < 0.05 was deemed statistically significant. In addition, average power of the tests included in P-curve, adjusted for publication bias, was calculated. RESULTS Fifteen of 29 studies (51.7%) with exercise and depression results were statistically significant (P < 0.05) while none of the results were statistically significant with respect to exercise increasing depression in adults with arthritis and other rheumatic conditions. Right-skew to dismiss selective reporting was identified (Z = −5.28, P < 0.0001). In addition, the included studies did not lack evidential value (Z = 2.39, P = 0.99), nor did they lack evidential value and were P-hacked (Z = 5.28, P > 0.99). The relative frequencies of P-values were 66.7% at 0.01, 6.7% each at 0.02 and 0.03, 13.3% at 0.04 and 6.7% at 0.05. The average power of the tests included in P-curve, corrected for publication bias, was 69%. Diagnostic plot results revealed that the observed power estimate was a better fit than the alternatives. CONCLUSION Evidential value results provide additional support that exercise reduces depression in adults with arthritis and other rheumatic conditions. PMID:27489782

  20. Scalp cooling: management option for chemotherapy-induced alopecia.

    PubMed

    Roe, Helen

    Chemotherapy is increasingly being administered as a treatment for cancer and with it are a number of possible side effects. One, which has a negative impact on a patient's quality of life and their self-esteem, is that of chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA). A side effect of which, for some, could be prevented by the use of scalp cooling, dependent on the regimen being administered and patient choice. This article explores the issue of CIA from the patient's perspective and scalp cooling as a preventative measure, along with a review of the evidence around the risk associated with developing scalp metastases following scalp cooling. It also discusses why scalp cooling should be available for both male and female patients; along with the potential impact scalp cooling may have on clinical areas delivering chemotherapy.

  1. Utility of Periodontal exploration in patients with Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Santos-García, Rocío; Sánchez-Domínguez, Benito; Cordero, Mario D.; Rios-Santos, José V.; Jaramillo-Santos, María R.; Climent, Mariano H.

    2012-01-01

    Objetive: Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain syndrome with unknown etiology, which affects predominantly women. Mitochondrial alteration could have a role in the pathophysilogical mechanisms of inflammatory conditions as FM and periodontitis. The aim of the present study was assay the relationship between both diseases and mitochondrial dysfunction. Patient and Methods: We study the presence of periodontitis in twelve patients diagnosed of FM and mitochondrial dysfunction described. The diagnosis of FM was established according to ACR criteria and clinical symptoms were evaluated using the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Results: Only one patients of twelve included and agreed to participate in the study were diagnosed with periodontitis. Conclusions: Pending studies with larger numbers of patients, we can conclude that mitochondrial dysfunction in FM is a itself event not related with periodontitis. Periodontitis could be considered a exclusion criterion in all studies about mitochondrial dysfunction in patients. Key words:Peridontitis, fibromyalgia, mitocondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress. PMID:24558523

  2. A framework for fibromyalgia management for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Lesley M; Clauw, Daniel J; Dunegan, L Jean; Turk, Dennis C

    2012-05-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic widespread pain disorder commonly associated with comorbid symptoms, including fatigue and nonrestorative sleep. As in the management of other chronic medical disorders, the approach for fibromyalgia management follows core principles of comprehensive assessment, education, goal setting, multimodal treatment including pharmacological (eg, pregabalin, duloxetine, milnacipran) and nonpharmacological therapies (eg, physical activity, behavioral therapy, sleep hygiene, education), and regular education and monitoring of treatment response and progress. Based on these core management principles, this review presents a framework for primary care providers through which they can develop a patient-centered treatment program for patients with fibromyalgia. This proactive and systematic treatment approach encourages ongoing education and patient self-management and is designed for use in the primary care setting.

  3. Controllability and hippocampal activation during pain expectation in fibromyalgia syndrome.

    PubMed

    González-Roldán, Ana María; Bomba, Isabelle C; Diesch, Eugen; Montoya, Pedro; Flor, Herta; Kamping, Sandra

    2016-12-01

    To examine the role of perceived control in pain perception, fibromyalgia patients and healthy controls participated in a reaction time experiment under different conditions of pain controllability. No significant differences between groups were found in pain intensity and unpleasantness ratings. However, during the expectation of uncontrollable pain, patients compared to controls showed higher hippocampal activation. In addition, hippocampal activity during the pain expectation period predicted activation of the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), precuneus and hippocampus during pain stimulation in fibromyalgia patients. The increased activation of the hippocampus during pain expectation and subsequent activation of the PCC/precuneus during the lack of control phase points towards an influence of pain perception through heightening of alertness and anxiety responses to pain in fibromyalgia patients.

  4. Free amino acids in fibromyalgia syndrome: relationship with clinical picture.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Valeria; Mura, Massimiliano; Cacace, Enrico; Era, Benedetta; Peri, Marcella; Sanna, Giuseppina; Fais, Antonella

    2017-04-01

    The objectives of our study were to evaluate free amino acid (FAA) concentrations in the serum of patients affected by fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and to determine the relationships between FAA levels and FMS clinical parameters. Thus, serum amino acid concentrations were quantified (HPLC analysis) in 23 females with fibromyalgia (according to the American College of Rheumatology classification criteria) and 20 healthy females. The results showed significantly higher serum concentrations of aspartate, cysteine, glutamate, glycine, isoleucine, leucine, methionine, ornithine, phenylalanine, sarcosine, serine, taurine, tyrosine and valine in FMS patients vs. healthy controls. Patients with higher Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) scores showed increased levels of alanine, glutamine, isoleucine, leucine, phenylalanine, proline and valine. In conclusion, our results indicate an imbalance in some FAAs in FMS patients. Increased Glu is particularly interesting, as it could explain the deficit in monoaminergic transmission involved in pain.

  5. High-dose thiamine improves the symptoms of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Antonio; Pala, Maria Immacolata; Tundo, Silvia; Matteucci, Pietro

    2013-05-20

    Living with fibromyalgia means living with chronic pain, fatigue, sleep disorders and other associated key symptoms. To date, pharmacotherapy generally produces modest benefits. Some observations indicate that the large majority of symptoms of fibromyalgia could be the clinical manifestation of a mild thiamine deficiency due to a dysfunction of the active transport of thiamine from the blood to the mitochondria or to enzymatic abnormalities. Between June and July 2011, we recruited three female patients affected by fibromyalgia. We proceeded with the study of the patients' history, a physical examination, an evaluation of chronic widespread pain using the Visual Numeric Scale and an evaluation of the fatigue using the Fatigue Severity Scale were also performed. The levels of thiamine and thiamine pyrophosphate in the blood were determined. After the therapy with high doses of thiamine, in the patients, there was an appreciable improvement of the symptoms.

  6. Fibromyalgia--from syndrome to disease. Overview of pathogenetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Karl G

    2003-05-01

    According to the classification criteria proposed by the American College of Rheumatology, fibromyalgia is a long-standing multifocal pain condition combined with generalised allodynia/hyperalgesia. It is the generalised allodynia/hyperalgesia that distinguishes fibromyalgia from other conditions with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Central sensitisation of nociceptive neurons in the dorsal horn due to activation of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptors and disinhibition of pain due to deficient function of the descending inhibitory system are probable pathogenic factors for allodynia/hyperalgesia. Furthermore, chronic pain is a chronic emotional and physical stressor. Chronic stress and chronic sleep disturbance are not specific for fibromyalgia but could be the causes of symptoms like fatigue, cognitive difficulties and other stress-related symptoms. They may also cause neuroendocrinological and immunological aberrations.

  7. Culture, science and the changing nature of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Frederick; Walitt, Brian

    2013-12-01

    Fibromyalgia is a common but contested illness. Its definition and content have changed repeatedly in the 110 years of its existence. The most important change was the requirement for multiple tender points and extensive pain that arose in the 1980s, features that were not required previously. By 2010, a second shift occurred that excluded tender points, allowed less extensive pain, and placed reliance on patient-reported somatic symptoms and cognitive difficulties ('fibro fog') that had never been part of past definitions or content. Fibromyalgia is closely allied with and often indistinguishable from neurasthenia, a disorder of the late 19th and early 20th centuries that lost favour when it was perceived as being a psychological illness. Fibromyalgia's status as a 'real disease', rather than a psychocultural illness, is buttressed by social forces that include support from official criteria, patient and professional organizations, pharmaceutical companies, disability access, and the legal and academic communities.

  8. Platelet-rich Plasma as a Potential Treatment for Noncicatricial Alopecias

    PubMed Central

    Maria-Angeliki, Gkini; Alexandros-Efstratios, Kouskoukis; Dimitris, Rigopoulos; Konstantinos, Kouskoukis

    2015-01-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) and alopecia areata (AA) are common hair loss disorders affecting both men and women. Despite available therapeutic options, search for new, more effective treatment is constant. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) could be effective in promoting hair growth: (1) To present PRP and its mechanism of action in promoting hair growth and (2) to evaluate its preparation methods and its therapeutic potential in noncicatrial alopecias in a systematic review. An international bibliography search, through five databases, was conducted to find articles regarding PRP's action on hair loss. Growth factors in platelets’ granules of PRP bind in the bulge area of hair follicle, promoting hair growth. In our systematic review, 14 articles matched our criteria, including 12 articles for AGA and two for AA. PRP is a potential useful therapeutic tool for alopecias, without major adverse effects. Nevertheless, due to the small number of conducted trials, further studies are required to investigate its efficacy. PMID:26180449

  9. The Frequency Distribution of Celiac Autoantibodies in Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Mokhtari, Fatemeh; Panjehpour, Tayebeh; Naeini, Farahnaz Fatemi; Hosseini, Sayed Mohsen; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Matin, Marzieh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Alopecia areata (AA) is a noncicatricial (nonscarring) alopecia. The association between AA and celiac disease (CD) is debatable. Several studies declare the relationship between AA and CD as measurement of celiac autoantibodies (anti-gliadin IgA and anti-gliadin IgG), but a few studies consider anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency distribution of celiac autoantibodies (all of them) in patients with AA compared with controls. Methods: This study is a case–control study. Thirty-five patients entered in each group. Anti-gliadin IgA, anti-gliadin IgG, and anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA were tested in all patients. Samples were examined in ELISA method with binding site's kits, and the result was reported as positive/negative. Finally, the frequency distribution of autoantibodies was examined. Results: The age average did not show a significant difference between two groups (P = 0.62). In addition, there was no significant difference between the two groups based on gender (P = 0.15). The prevalence of antibody in case and control groups was 2.85% and 0%, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.31). Conclusions: There may be a relationship between CD and AA, but the absence of statistical association between AA and CD does not mean that there is no relationship between gluten and AA in certain patients. Thus, we have shown here that the biological tests to search for CD do not bring information and proof enough, and it is why we recommend another approach to disclose gluten intolerance in AA patients. PMID:27833723

  10. Interdisciplinary consensus document for the treatment of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    de Miquel, C Alegre; Campayo, J García; Flórez, M Tomás; Arguelles, J M Gómez; Tarrio, E Blanco; Montoya, M Gobbo; Martin, Á Pérez; Salio, A Martínez; Fuentes, J Vidal; Alberch, E Altarriba; de la Cámara, A Gómez

    2010-01-01

    Backgrounds. The elevated prevalence and enormous clinical and social impact of fibromyalgia, together with the complexity of its treatment, require action consensuses that guide health care professionals. Although there are some similar documents in our language, most have been made from the perspective of a single discipline.Objective. To develop a consensus on the treatment of fibromyalgia made by selected representatives and supported by the principal medical associations that intervene in its treatment (rheumatology, neurology, psychiatry,rehabilitation and family medicine) and representatives of the associations of patients. On the other hand, understanding the disease not as a homogenous disorders but also as the sum of different clinical subtypes,having specific symptomatic characteristics and different therapeutic needs is stressed. This approach represented a need perceived by the clinicians and a novelty regarding previous consensuses.Methods. The different clinical classifications proposed in fibromyalgia and the scientific evidence of the treatments used in this disease were reviewed. For the selection of the classification used and performance of the therapeutic recommendations, some of the usual techniques to obtain the consensus (nominal group and brainstorming) were used.Conclusion. The classification of Giesecke of fibromyalgia into 3 subgroups seems to have the greatest scientific evidence and the most useful for the clinician. The guide offers a series of general recommendations for all the patients with fibromyalgia. However, in addition, for each subgroup, there are a series of specific pharmacological and psychological-type recommendations and those of modification of the environment, which will make it possible to have a personalized approach to the patient with fibromyalgia in accordance with their individual clinical characteristics (pain, catastrophizing levels, etc.).

  11. Hairpin-induced alopecia: case reports and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ntuen, Edidiong; Stein, Sarah L

    2010-05-01

    Traumatic hair loss is a scalp injury that can cause secondary scarring alopecia. It can result from different types of physical and chemical injury. Hair loss induced by certain hair-styling techniques has been discussed, but we describe a preceding ulcerative process. We describe 3 black adolescent girls with hairpin-induced alopecia that started with an ulcer and ended with a scar. We also review the dermatologic literature.

  12. Reconstruction of large alopecia with old technique: V-Y-S plasty.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Baris

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of alopecia following burns, trauma or tumour surgery is challenging. Local flaps for small or medium sized defects and tissue expansion for larger defects is the common approach. Tissue expansion is a two-stage procedure and the inflation process causes difficulty for patients. V-Y-S plasty is safe and one-stage method of tissue reconstruction for scalp, face and other parts of the body. We performed this method safely for very large alopecia reconstructions in the scalp.

  13. Serenoa Repens: Does It have Any Role in the Management of Androgenetic Alopecia?

    PubMed Central

    Murugusundram, Sundaram

    2009-01-01

    Serenoa repens is one among the many naturally occurring 5 alpha reductase (5aR) inhibitors which has gained popularity as a magical remedy for androgenetic alopecia. It is widely advertised on the web and sold by direct marketing. Used as a self-medication, there is a risk of missing the early detection of prostate cancer. There is little evidence to support its efficacy, warranting larger clinical trials on androgenetic alopecia. PMID:20300369

  14. [Fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Galanopoulos, Ng; Kampakis, Gp; Ladopoulou, Kf

    2007-04-01

    Fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome are quite common affections in children and adolescents. The clinical symptoms include various manifestations such as diffuse musculoskeletal pain, feeling of fatigue, depressive symptoms, headache, sleep disturbances etc. Physiological, enetic, psychological/psychosocial and environmental factors are involved in the pathogenesis of the disorders. Fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome may cause significant deterioration of the functional capacity with severe consequences for the child/adolescent's family and social life as well as his/her development. There is need for early diagnosis, open discussion with the child/adolescent and his/her family and therapeutic intervention including drug treatment, physical therapy and psychotherapy.

  15. Prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia using an effective scalp cooling system.

    PubMed

    Katsimbri, P; Bamias, A; Pavlidis, N

    2000-04-01

    Alopecia is a distressing side-effect of cancer treatment. Taxanes (TX), anthracyclines (ANR) and etoposide (ET) have been consistently associated with significant alopecia. We studied an effective scalp cooling system, the Penguin Cold Cap system, for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia in 70 patients receiving chemotherapy, including one of the following major alopecia-causing agents: Group A, TX-based regimes (without ANR); Group B, TX+ANR; Group C, ANR-based regimes (without TX); Group D, ET-based regimes. Protection from hair loss was achieved by maintaining scalp temperatures below 15 degrees C before, during and after chemotherapy by frequent changing of the caps. Assessment was carried out using a grading system from 0 to 4. Grades 0-2 were considered as satisfactory hair protection, whilst Grades 3-4 were considered failures. 57 patients were evaluable for assessment. An overall 81% protection was achieved. In groups C and D 11 of 12 patients (92%) had no alopecia, whilst 30 of 34 patients (88%) treated with taxanes had adequate hair protection. In Group B, 4 of 11 patients (36%) had adequate hair protection. The system was well tolerated and is a very effective method for protection from hair loss caused by TX, ANR and ET. Our results are comparable with and, in most cases, better than those reported in other studies using various alopecia preventive methods.

  16. Simulative evaluation of taurine against alopecia caused by stress in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyemin; Chang, Hyunsook; Lee, Dong-Hee

    2013-01-01

    Hair loss or alopecia has been portrayed as a modern malady which is aggravated by stressful conditions. Major cases of alopecia were found among individuals of 40s-50s, nowadays, even among the 20s-30s. This study characterized taurine's potential against alopecia caused by chemical stress agents based on the comparison with other commercially available anti-alopecia agents using Caenorhabditis elegans. The criteria used are their effects on the expression of stress markers and measurements of vital signs: lifespan comparison, progeny number, and mobility. C. elegans showed the typical stress symptoms under treatment with tunicamycin, endoplasmic reticulum stress agent. Hsp-70 protein expression increased, while worm's lifespan and per capita progeny number significantly decreased along with an unusually retarded movement. A positive response was shown when worms were treated with taurine along with astressin-B and finasteride. Between the treatments, finasteride showed better outcomes in terms of stress-reducing effects. Taurine helped worms recover more effectively from adverse influence of stress. In conclusion, there is strong evidence that taurine has a great potential as anti-alopecia effect especially against the one caused by the chemical stress. The present study implies that taurine might strongly work against hair loss when used in combination with other commercially available -anti-alopecia agents.

  17. Effect of Citrullus colocynthis Schrad fruits on testosterone-induced alopecia.

    PubMed

    Dhanotia, Renuka; Chauhan, Nagendra Singh; Saraf, Dinesh K; Dixit, Vinod K

    2011-09-01

    Alopecia is a psychologically distressing phenomenon. Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is the most common form of alopecia, which affects millions of men and women worldwide, and is an androgen driven disorder. Here, the Citrullus colocynthis Schrad fruit is evaluated for hair growth activity in androgen-induced alopecia. Petroleum ether extract of C. colocynthis was applied topically for its hair growth-promoting activity. Alopecia was induced in albino mice by testosterone administration intramuscularly for 21 days. Its inhibition by simultaneous administration of extract was evaluated using follicular density, anagen/telogen (A/T) ratio and microscopic observation of skin sections. Finasteride (5α-reductase inhibitor) solution was applied topically and served as positive control. Petroleum ether extract of C. colocynthis exhibited promising hair growth-promoting activity, as reflected from follicular density, A/T ratio and skin sections. The treatment was also successful in bringing a greater number of hair follicles in anagenic phase than the standard finasteride. The result of treatment with 2 and 5% petroleum ether extracts were comparable to the positive control finasteride. The petroleum ether extract of C. colocynthis and its isolate is useful in the treatment of androgen-induced alopecia.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions rheumatoid arthritis rheumatoid arthritis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Rheumatoid arthritis is a disease that causes chronic abnormal inflammation, ...

  19. Arthritis of the hand - Rheumatoid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Guide Journal of Hand Surgery (JHS) Home Anatomy Rheumatoid Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... tendons causes pressure on the nearby nerve. How Rheumatoid Arthritis is Diagnosed The diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis is ...

  20. Infectious arthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Mateo Soria, L; Miquel Nolla Solé, J; Rozadilla Sacanell, A; Valverde García, J; Roig Escofet, D

    1992-01-01

    Eleven cases of infectious arthritis occurring in patients with rheumatoid arthritis are reported. Staphylococcus aureus was the causative organism in eight patients. Streptococcus anginosus and Streptococcus agalactiae in one patient each, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in two patients. The mean duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 16 days in patients with pyogenic arthritis. The diagnosis of joint infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis was especially delayed (57 days). Four patients died; they were found to have a longer time to diagnosis and two of them had multiple joint infection. Although Staphylococcus aureus is the microorganism most often affecting patients with rheumatoid arthritis, infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis must also be considered in such patients. PMID:1575593

  1. How undifferentiated arthritis evolves into chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    van der Woude, D; Toes, R E M; Scherer, H U

    2014-08-01

    Undifferentiated arthritis (UA) is a frequently occurring clinical presentation with a variable outcome. While some forms of UA will spontaneously remit, other forms will progress to chronic arthritis; an outcome that would preferably be prevented. Which immunological factors are normally at the basis of resolution of inflammation, and what, on the other hand, causes inflammation to persist? This review provides an overview of the immunological mechanisms involved in these two scenarios, including specific examples of how these mechanisms apply, or can be influenced in rheumatic diseases. Furthermore, what do we know about risk factors for chronic arthritis, such as the development of autoantibodies? The recent years have provided many insights concerning risk factors for autoantibody-positive versus autoantibody-negative rheumatoid arthritis, which are discussed along with a possible pathophysiological model incorporating autoantibodies into the larger process of disease development. Finally, the evolution of the autoantibody response over time is described.

  2. Physical therapy modalities in management of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Gur, Ali

    2006-01-01

    The etiology of fibromyalgia syndrome (FM) is uncertain and the prognosis for symptomatic recovery is generally poor. A wide variety of interventions are used in the management of FM. There is, however, no clear consensus on the treatment of choice and FM remains relatively refractory to treatment. Therefore, prevention, causal therapy and rehabilitation are not possible. FM patients frequently use alternative therapies, indicating dissatisfaction or ineffectiveness of traditional medical therapy. Alternative therapies are generally perceived to be more "natural" and as a result, to have fewer adverse effects. Despite the positive results found, the number of publications related to the application of physical therapy modalities such as acupuncture, transcutaneous electrical stimulation, laser, biofeedback, electrotherapy and magnetic field is still scant, especially concerning FM treatment. The demonstration of a long-term effective intervention for managing the symptoms associated with FM is needed. Multidisciplinary approaches to management include physical and medical therapeutic strategies. Treatment modalities should be individualised for patients based on target symptoms and impairment in functioning. Patience and positive attitude on part of the physician and active involvement of patients and their families in treatment are likely to enhance improvement. It can be concluded that there is a need for larger, more systematic and methodologically sound randomised controlled clinical trials to evaluate the effectiveness of physical therapy modalities of managing FM. We will review some of the existing studies of physical therapy relevant in the treatment of FM and give some practical advice for their use.

  3. Analysing Biological Rhythms in Fibromyalgia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ucar, M; Sarp, Ü; Gül, Aİ; Tanik, N; Yetisgin, A; Arik, HO; Nas, O; Yılmaz, YK

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: This study evaluated biological rhythm disorders in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). Methods: The study enrolled 82 patients with FMS and 82 controls. Pain intensity was evaluated using a visual analogue scale (VAS). The psychological conditions of the patients were evaluated using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The Biological Rhythms Interview of Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (BRIAN) was used to assess disturbances in biological rhythms (ie sleep, activity, social and eating patterns). Results: There was no difference between the two groups at baseline (all p > 0.05). The BDI, BRIAN total, sleep, activity, social, and eating scores were higher in patients with FMS than in the controls (all p < 0.001). Further, a significant correlation was found between biological rhythms and BDI scores (p < 0.001) and there were positive correlations between the VAS score and BRIAN total, sleep, and eating and BDI in patients with FMS (all p < 0.001). Conclusion: There are marked biological rhythm disturbances in FMS. There is an important relationship between rhythm disorders and FMS. The disturbances in sleep, functional activities, social participation, and disordered rhythms like eating patterns show the need for a multidisciplinary approach to treating patients with FMS. PMID:26426177

  4. [Diagnosis and therapy of fibromyalgia syndrome].

    PubMed

    Köllner, V; Bernardy, K; Sommer, C; Häuser, W

    2009-05-01

    The meaningfulness of the term fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), possible diagnostic criteria, and the therapeutic procedure, were for a long time points of contention between different professional associations. In an interdisciplinary S3 guideline on the definition, pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapy of FMS, it has now been possible to work out a consensus that is accepted by all involved professional associations and patient representatives on the basis of the available evidence. The most important results for clinical practice are presented and discussed here using case examples. The number of FMS patients in Germany is estimated to lie at 1.6 million (2% of the population), and 80-90% of those affected are women. FMS is classified under the functional somatic syndromes of the diseases of the musculoskeletal system and of the connective tissue (ICD 10 M 79.7). Comorbidities with other functional somatic syndromes and mental disorders are frequent. The clinical diagnosis of an FMS can ensue both by examining the tender points and also based on symptoms. Basic therapy includes elucidation and psychoeducation, aerobic endurance training adapted to the individual performance capability, operant behavioural therapy, and as a drug-based therapy option, amitriptyline 25-50mg/d (all level of evidence 1a). A graded therapeutic procedure which includes the patients in the decision-making is recommended.

  5. Prevalence of fibromyalgia: literature review update.

    PubMed

    Marques, Amelia Pasqual; Santo, Adriana de Sousa do Espírito; Berssaneti, Ana Assumpção; Matsutani, Luciana Akemi; Yuan, Susan Lee King

    2016-12-18

    The present study aimed to update the literature review on the prevalence of fibromyalgia (FM) published in 2006. A bibliographical survey was carried out from 2005 to 2014 in the MEDLINE, Web of Science, Embase, LILACS and SciELO databases and 3274 records were identified. Five researchers selected the studies, following the inclusion criteria: studies that obtained the prevalence of FM. FM studies in associated diseases were excluded. When screening by title and abstract, 2073 irrelevant articles were excluded. The full texts of 210 articles were evaluated for eligibility and this review included 39 studies, described in 41 articles. The selected studies were grouped into four categories: a) prevalence of FM in the general population; B) prevalence of FM in women; C) prevalence of FM in rural and urban areas; D) prevalence of FM in special populations. The literature shows values of FM prevalence in the general population between 0.2 and 6.6%, in women between 2.4 and 6.8%, in urban areas between 0.7 and 11.4%, in rural areas between 0.1 and 5.2%, and in special populations values between 0.6 and 15%. This literature review update shows a significant increase in FM prevalence studies in the world. The new 2010 American College of Rheumatology criteria have not been widely used yet and the COPCORD (Community-oriented program for control of Rheumatic Diseases) methodology has increased the quality of studies on the prevalence of rheumatic diseases in general.

  6. Review of pharmacological therapies in fibromyalgia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This review addresses the current status of drug therapy for the management of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and is based on interdisciplinary FMS management guidelines, meta-analyses of drug trial data, and observational studies. In the absence of a single gold-standard medication, patients are treated with a variety of drugs from different categories, often with limited evidence. Drug therapy is not mandatory for the management of FMS. Pregabalin, duloxetine, milnacipran, and amitriptyline are the current first-line prescribed agents but have had a mostly modest effect. With only a minority of patients expected to experience substantial benefit, most will discontinue therapy because of either a lack of efficacy or tolerability problems. Many drug treatments have undergone limited study and have had negative results. It is unlikely that these failed pilot trials will undergo future study. However, medications, though imperfect, will continue to be a component of treatment strategy for these patients. Both the potential for medication therapy to relieve symptoms and the potential to cause harm should be carefully considered in their administration. PMID:24433463

  7. Milnacipran for the management of fibromyalgia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ormseth, Michelle J; Eyler, Anne E; Hammonds, Cara L; Boomershine, Chad S

    2010-03-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a widespread pain condition associated with fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, sleep disturbance, depression, anxiety, and stiffness. Milnacipran is one of three medications currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration in the United States for the management of adult FMS patients. This review is the second in a three-part series reviewing each of the approved FMS drugs and serves as a primer on the use of milnacipran in FMS treatment including information on pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability. Milnacipran is a mixed serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor thought to improve FMS symptoms by increasing neurotransmitter levels in descending central nervous system inhibitory pathways. Milnacipran has proven efficacy in managing global FMS symptoms and pain as well as improving symptoms of fatigue and cognitive dysfunction without affecting sleep. Due to its antidepressant activity, milnacipran can also be beneficial to FMS patients with coexisting depression. However, side effects can limit milnacipran tolerability in FMS patients due to its association with headache, nausea, tachycardia, hyper- and hypotension, and increased risk for bleeding and suicidality in at-risk patients. Tolerability can be maximized by starting at low dose and slowly up-titrating if needed. As with all medications used in FMS management, milnacipran works best when used as part of an individualized treatment regimen that includes resistance and aerobic exercise, patient education and behavioral therapies.

  8. Is fibromyalgia a distinct clinical syndrome?

    PubMed

    Rau, C L; Russell, I J

    2000-01-01

    The validity of the fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) as a distinct clinical entity has been challenged for several reasons. Many skeptics express concern about the subjective nature of chronic pain, the subjectivity of the tender point (TeP) examination, the lack of a gold standard laboratory test, and the absence of a clear pathogenic mechanism by which to define FMS. Another expressed concern has been the relative nature of the pain-distress relationship in the rheumatology clinic. The apparently continuous relationship between TePs and somatic distress across a variety of clinical disorders is said to argue against FMS as a separate clinical disorder. The most aggressive challenges of the FMS concept have been from legal defenses of insurance carriers motivated by economic concerns. Other forms of critique have presented as psychiatric dogma, uninformed posturing, suspicion of malingering, ignorance of nociceptive physiology, and occasionally have resulted from honest misunderstanding. It is not likely that a few paragraphs of data and logic will cause an unbeliever to change an ingrained opinion. Therefore, this review describes the clinical manifestations of FMS, responds to some of the theoretic arguments against it, and discusses some possible pathophysiologic mechanisms by which FMS may develop and persist as a unique syndrome.

  9. Infections and arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Ashish Jacob; Ravindran, Vinod

    2014-12-01

    Bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites can all cause arthritis of either acute or chronic nature, which can be divided into infective/septic, reactive, or inflammatory. Considerable advances have occurred in diagnostic techniques in the recent decades resulting in better treatment outcomes in patients with infective arthritis. Detection of emerging arthritogenic viruses has changed the epidemiology of infection-related arthritis. The role of viruses in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory arthritides such as rheumatoid arthritis is increasingly being recognized. We discuss the various causative agents of infective arthritis and emphasize on the approach to each type of arthritis, highlighting the diagnostic tests, along with their statistical accuracy. Various investigations including newer methods such as nucleic acid amplification using polymerase chain reaction are discussed along with the pitfalls in interpreting the tests.

  10. When is arthritis reactive?

    PubMed Central

    Hamdulay, S S; Glynne, S J; Keat, A

    2006-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an important cause of lower limb oligoarthritis, mainly in young adults. It is one of the spondyloarthropathy family; it is distinguishable from other forms of inflammatory arthritis by virtue of the distribution of affected sites and the high prevalence of characteristic extra‐articular lesions. Many terms have been used to refer to this and related forms of arthritis leading to some confusion. Reactive arthritis is precipitated by an infection at a distant site and genetic susceptibility is marked by possession of the HLA‐B27 gene, although the mechanism remains uncertain. Diagnosis is a two stage process and requires demonstration of a temporal link with a recognised “trigger” infection. The identification and management of “sexually acquired” and “enteric” forms of reactive arthritis are considered. Putative links with HIV infection are also discussed. The clinical features, approach to investigation, diagnosis, and management of reactive arthritis are reviewed. PMID:16822921

  11. A Rare Association of Childhood Alopecia Areata and Blepharophimosis-Ptosis-Epicanthus Inversus Syndrome: Successfully Treated with Diphenylcyclopropenone

    PubMed Central

    Jagadeesan, Soumya; Balasubramanian, Pradeep; Panicker, Vinitha Varghese; Anjaneyan, Gopikrishnan; Thomas, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    The genetic background of alopecia areata has only recently begun to get unraveled. We report the association of a case of pediatric alopecia areata with a rare genetic syndrome-blepharophimosis-ptosis-epicanthus inversus syndrome (BPES), which responded well to topical immunotherapy with diphenylcyclopropenone. In the background of increasing evidence surfacing on the genetic basis of alopecia areata, this association may be of significance. PMID:26180454

  12. Fibromyalgia Is Correlated with Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thinning

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Martin, Elena; Garcia-Campayo, Javier; Puebla-Guedea, Marta; Ascaso, Francisco J.; Roca, Miguel; Gutierrez-Ruiz, Fernando; Vilades, Elisa; Polo, Vicente; Larrosa, Jose M.; Pablo, Luis E.; Satue, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether fibromyalgia induces axonal damage in the optic nerve that can be detected using optical coherence tomography (OCT), as the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) is atrophied in patients with fibromyalgia compared with controls. Methods Fibromyalgia patients (n = 116) and age-matched healthy controls (n = 144) were included in this observational and prospective cohort study. All subjects underwent visual acuity measurement and structural analysis of the RNFL using two OCT devices (Cirrus and Spectralis). Fibromyalgia patients were evaluated according to Giesecke’s fibromyalgia subgroups, the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), and the European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ5D) scale. We compared the differences between fibromyalgia patients and controls, and analyzed the correlations between OCT measurements, disease duration, fibromyalgia subgroups, severity, and quality of life. The impact on quality of life in fibromyalgia subgroups and in patients with different disease severity was also analyzed. Results A significant decrease in the RNFL was detected in fibromyalgia patients compared with controls using the two OCT devices: Cirrus OCT ganglion cell layer analysis registered a significant decrease in the minimum thickness of the inner plexiform layer (74.99±16.63 vs 79.36±3.38 μm, respectively; p = 0.023), nasal inferior, temporal inferior and temporal superior sectors (p = 0.040; 0.011 and 0.046 respectively). The Glaucoma application of the Spectralis OCT revealed thinning in the nasal, temporal inferior and temporal superior sectors (p = 0.009, 0.006, and 0.002 respectively) of fibromyalgia patients and the Axonal application in all sectors, except the nasal superior and temporal sectors. The odds ratio (OR) to estimate the size effect of FM in RNFL thickness was 1.39. RNFL atrophy was detected in patients with FIQ scores <60 (patients in early disease stages) compared with controls in the temporal inferior sector (78

  13. Pelvic Floor and Urinary Distress in Women with Fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kim Dupree; Maxwell, Charlene; Mist, Scott D; King, Virginia; Denman, Mary Anna; Gregory, W Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) patients were recently found to have more symptom burden from bothersome pelvic pain syndromes that women seeking care for pelvic floor disease at a urogynecology clinic. We sought to further characterize pelvic floor symptoms in a larger sample of FM patients using of validated questionnaires. Female listserv members of the Fibromyalgia Information Foundation completed an online survey of three validated questionnaires: the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory 20 (PFDI-20), the Pelvic Pain, Urgency and Frequency Questionnaire (PUF), and the Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR). Scores were characterized using descriptive statistics. Patients (n = 204 with complete data on 177) were on average 52.3 ± 11.4 years with a mean parity of 2.5 ± 1.9. FM severity based on FIQR score (57.2 ± 14.9) positively correlated with PFDI-20 total 159.08 ± 55.2 (r = .34, p < .001) and PUF total 16.54 ± 7 (r = .36, p < .001). Women with FM report significantly bothersome pelvic floor and urinary symptoms. Fibromyalgia management should include evaluation and treatment of pelvic floor disorders recognizing that pelvic distress and urinary symptoms are associated with more severe FM symptoms. Validated questionnaires, like the ones used in this study, are easily incorporated into clinical practice.

  14. Temporomandibular disorders in fibromyalgia syndrome: a short-communication.

    PubMed

    Gui, Maísa Soares; Pimentel, Marcele Jardim; Rizzatti-Barbosa, Célia Marisa

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a chronic painful syndrome and the coexistence of a painful condition caused by Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) and FMS has been frequently raised for several studies, however, more likely hypothesis is that a set of FMS characteristics may lead to the onset of TMD symptoms and they are not merely coexisting conditions. Therefore, our aim is presenting a review of literature about the relation between fibromyalgia and the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. For this purpose, a bibliographic search was performed of the period of 1990-2013, in the Medline, Pubmed, Lilacs and Scielo databases, using the keywords fibromyalgia, temporomandibular disorders and facial pain. Here we present a set of findings in the literature showing that fibromyalgia can lead to TMD symptoms. These studies demonstrated greater involvement of the stomatognathic system in FMS and myogenic disorders of masticatory system are the most commonly found in those patients. FMS appears to have a series of characteristics that constitute predisposing and triggering factors for TMD.

  15. Mitochondrial myopathy presenting as fibromyalgia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction To the best of our knowledge, we describe for the first time the case of a woman who met the diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia, did not respond to therapy for that disorder, and was subsequently diagnosed by biochemical and genetic studies with a mitochondrial myopathy. Treatment of the mitochondrial myopathy resulted in resolution of symptoms. This case demonstrates that mitochondrial myopathy may present in an adult with a symptom complex consistent with fibromyalgia. Case presentation Our patient was a 41-year-old Caucasian woman with symptoms of fatigue, exercise intolerance, headache, and multiple trigger points. Treatment for fibromyalgia with a wide spectrum of medications including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antidepressants, gabapentin and pregabalin had no impact on her symptoms. A six-minute walk study demonstrated an elevated lactic acid level (5 mmol/L; normal < 2 mmol/L). Biochemical and genetic studies from a muscle biopsy revealed a mitochondrial myopathy. Our patient was started on a compound of coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinone) 200 mg, creatine 1000 mg, carnitine 200 mg and folic acid 1 mg to be taken four times a day. She gradually showed significant improvement in her symptoms over a course of several months. Conclusions This case demonstrates that adults diagnosed with fibromyalgia may have their symptom complex related to an adult onset mitochondrial myopathy. This is an important finding since treatment of mitochondrial myopathy resulted in resolution of symptoms. PMID:22325469

  16. Using mirror visual feedback and virtual reality to treat fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, V S; Seckel, Elizabeth L

    2010-12-01

    Fibromyalgia is a condition characterized by long term body-wide pain and tender points in joints, muscles and soft tissues. Other symptoms include chronic fatigue, morning stiffness, and depression. It is well known that these symptoms are exacerbated under periods of high stress. When pain becomes severe enough, the mind can enter what is known as a dissociative state, characterized by depersonalization - the feeling of detachment from one's physical body and the illusion of watching one's physical body from outside. In evolutionary terms, dissociative states are thought to be an adaptive mechanism to mentally distance oneself from pain, often during trauma. Similar dissociative experiences are reported by subjects who have used psychoactive drugs such as ketamine. We have previously used non-invasive mirror visual feedback to treat subjects with chronic pain from phantom limbs and suggested its use for complex regional pain syndrome: once considered intractable pain. We wondered whether such methods would work to alleviate the chronic pain of fibromyalgia. We tested mirror visual feedback on one fibromyalgia patient. On 15 trials, the patient's lower limb pain rating (on a scale from 1 to 10) decreased significantly. These preliminary results suggest that non-invasive dissociative anesthetics such as VR goggles, ketamine, and mirror visual feedback could be used to alleviate chronic pain from fibromyalgia. This would furnish us with a better understanding of the mechanism by which external visual feedback interacts with the internal physical manifestation of pain.

  17. Effects of Reflexology on Pain in Patients With Fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Akin Korhan, Esra; Uyar, Meltem; Eyigör, Can; Yönt, Gülendam Hakverdioğlu; Khorshid, Leyla

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of reflexology on pain intensity in patients with fibromyalgia, using an experimental repeated-measures design, and a convenience sample of 30 fibromyalgia inpatients. Thirty patients aged 18 to 70 years with fibromyalgia and hospitalized in the algology clinic were taken as a convenience sample. Patients received a total of 12 60-minute sessions of reflexology over a period of 6 consecutive weeks. Reflexology was carried out bilaterally on the hands and feet of patients at the reflex points relating to their pain at a suitable intensity and angle. Subjects had pain scores taken immediately before the intervention (0 minute), and at the 60th minute of the intervention. Data were collected over a 10-month period in 2012. The patients' mean pain intensity scores were reduced by reflexology, and this decrease improved progressively in the first and sixth weeks of the intervention, indicating a cumulative dose effect. The results of this study implied that the inclusion of reflexology in the routine care of patients with fibromyalgia could provide nurses with an effective practice for reducing pain intensity in these patients.

  18. Effects of muscle strengthening versus aerobic exercise program in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Bircan, Ciğdem; Karasel, Seide Alev; Akgün, Berrin; El, Ozlem; Alper, Serap

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of aerobic training with a muscle-strengthening program in patients with fibromyalgia. Thirty women with fibromyalgia were randomized to either an aerobic exercise (AE) program or a strengthening exercise (SE) program for 8 weeks. Outcome measures included the intensity of fibromyalgia-related symptoms, tender point count, fitness (6-min walk distance), hospital anxiety and depression (HAD) scale, and short-form health survey (SF-36). There were significant improvements in both groups regarding pain, sleep, fatigue, tender point count, and fitness after treatment. HAD-depression scores improved significantly in both groups while no significant change occurred in HAD-anxiety scores. Bodily pain subscale of SF-36 and physical component summary improved significantly in the AE group, whereas seven subscales of SF-36, physical component summary, and mental component summary improved significantly in the SE group. When the groups were compared after treatment, there were no significant differences in pain, sleep, fatigue, tender point count, fitness, HAD scores, and SF-36 scores. AE and SE are similarly effective at improving symptoms, tender point count, fitness, depression, and quality of life in fibromyalgia.

  19. Fibromyalgia Syndrome Symptoms and Effects: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince, Alice; Bernard, Amy L.; Edsall, Patricia A.

    2000-01-01

    Surveyed fibromyalgia syndrome support group members about characteristics of the disease and how it affected their lives. Respondents had symptoms for many years before being diagnosed. Symptoms varied tremendously on a daily and yearly basis, so disease management was in a constant state of flux. Most symptoms significantly impacted quality of…

  20. Temporal Preparation and Inhibitory Deficit in Fibromyalgia Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correa, Angel; Miro, Elena; Martinez, M. Pilar; Sanchez, Ana I.; Lupianez, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive deficits in fibromyalgia may be specifically related to controlled processes, such as those measured by working memory or executive function tasks. This hypothesis was tested here by measuring controlled temporal preparation (temporal orienting) during a response inhibition (go no-go) task. Temporal orienting effects (faster reaction…

  1. [The (putative) pathological impact of fibromyalgia on the orofacial system].

    PubMed

    de Baat, C; Gerritsen, A E; de Baat-Ananta, M; de Baat, P

    2016-03-01

    Fibromyalgia is a syndrome without apparent aetiology, characterised by pain, fatigue, memory disorders, mood disorders, and sleep disturbances. The syndrome is considered to be one of the rheumatic diseases. In the general population, the prevalence varies from 2 to 8%, with a women-men ratio of about 2:1. Suspicion of fibromyalgia arises when a patient has pain at multiple locations that cannot be attributed to trauma or inflammation, and when the pain is especially musculoskeletal. Primary management includes explaining the syndrome and offering reassurance. In addition, one can also attempt to increase mobility, avoid overloading, and improve physical condition and the level of activity, and to activate problem-solving skills. Subsequently, behavioural therapy and pharmacotherapy may be considered. The most important manifestations of fibromyalgia in the orofacial and occlusal system seem to be temporomandibular dysfunction, headache, xerostomia, hyposalivation, burning mouth and dysgeusia. However, with respect to the precise relation of fibromyalgia with the orofacial system, much needs to be elucidated.

  2. Increased risk of a suicide event in patients with primary fibromyalgia and in fibromyalgia patients with concomitant comorbidities: A nationwide population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lan, Chen-Chia; Tseng, Chun-Hung; Chen, Jiunn-Horng; Lan, Joung-Liang; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Tsay, Gregory J; Hsu, Chung-Yi

    2016-11-01

    An increased risk of suicide ideation and death has been reported in patients with fibromyalgia. This study aimed to evaluate the risk of a suicide event in patients with primary fibromyalgia and in fibromyalgia patients with comorbidities. We used the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database, a subset of the national insurance claim dataset, which enrolled 1 million Taiwanese people from 2000 to 2005, to identify 95,150 patients with incident fibromyalgia (ICD-9-CM 729.0-729.1) and 190,299 reference subjects matched by sex, age, and index date of diagnosis, with a mean of 8.46 ± 2.37 years of follow-up until 2011. The risk of a suicide event (ICD-9-CM, External-Cause Codes 950-959) was analyzed with a Cox proportional hazards model. Stratification analysis was performed by separating fibromyalgia patients and reference subjects with respect to each comorbidity to determine the risk of suicide in fibromyalgia patients with or without comorbidity relative to subjects who had neither fibromyalgia nor comorbidity. In this Taiwanese dataset, there were 347 suicide events in patients with fibromyalgia (4.16 per 10 person-years) and 424 in matched reference subjects (2.63 per 10 person-years) with a significant crude hazard ratio (HR) of 1.58 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.38-1.83) and an adjusted HR of 1.38 (95% CI 1.17-1.71) for fibromyalgia patients relative to the matched reference subjects. According to the 2 × 2 stratification analysis, we found that fibromyalgia patients without comorbidity had an independent but mild risk of a suicide event with adjusted HRs ranging from 1.33 to 1.69 relative to subjects with neither fibromyalgia nor comorbidity. Meanwhile, fibromyalgia patients with comorbidity led to a markedly enhanced risk of a suicide event relative to the matched reference subjects, with adjusted HRs ranging from 1.51 to 8.23. Our analysis confirmed a mild-to-moderate risk of a suicide event in patients with primary fibromyalgia. Attention should

  3. Routine use of punch biopsy to diagnose small fiber neuropathy in fibromyalgia patients.

    PubMed

    Levine, Todd D; Saperstein, David S

    2015-03-01

    Fibromyalgia is a clinical syndrome that currently does not have any specific pathological finding to aid in diagnosis. Therefore, fibromyalgia is most likely a heterogeneous group of diseases with similar symptoms. Identifying and understanding the pathological basis of fibromyalgia will allow physicians to better categorize patients, increasing prospective treatment options, and improving potential therapeutic endeavors. Recent work has demonstrated that approximately 50% of patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia have damage to their small unmyelinated nerve fibers. A skin punch biopsy is a sensitive and specific diagnostic test for this damage as a reduction in nerve fiber density allows for the diagnosis of small fiber neuropathy. Small fiber neuropathy is a disease with symptoms similar to fibromyalgia, but it often has a definable etiology. Identifying small fiber neuropathy and its underlying cause in fibromyalgia patients provides them with a succinct diagnosis, increases treatment options, and facilitates more specific studies for future therapeutics.

  4. OBJECTIVE MEASURES OF DISORDERED SLEEP IN FIBROMYALGIA

    PubMed Central

    Chervin, Ronald D.; Teodorescu, Mihaela; Kushwaha, Ramesh; Deline, Andrea M.; Brucksch, Christine B.; Ribbens-Grimm, Christine; Ruzicka, Deborah L.; Stein, Phyllis K.; Clauw, Daniel J.; Crofford, Leslie J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) complain of inadequate sleep, which could contribute to common symptoms including sleepiness, fatigue, or pain. However, measures that consistently and objectively distinguish FMS patients remain elusive. Methods Fifteen women with FMS and 15 age- and gender-matched controls underwent 3 nights of polysomnography; Multiple Sleep Latency Tests to assess sleepiness; testing of auditory arousal thresholds during non-REM stage 2 and stage 4 sleep; overnight assessment of urinary free-cortisol; and analysis of 24-hour heart rate variability. Results On the second night of polysomnography, women with FMS in comparison to controls showed more stage shifts (p=0.04) but did not differ significantly on any other standard polysomnographic measure or on the Multiple Sleep Latency Tests. Alpha EEG power during deep non-REM sleep, alone or as a proportion of alpha power during remaining sleep stages, also failed to distinguish the groups, as did auditory arousal thresholds. Urinary free cortisol did not differ between FMS and control subjects in a consistent manner. However, decreased short-term heart rate variability and especially ratio-based HRV among FMS subjects suggested diminished parasympathetic and increased sympathetic activity, respectively. Other HRV measures suggested decreased complexity of HRV among the FMS subjects. Conclusions Standard measures of sleep, a gold-standard measure of sleepiness, quantified alpha-delta EEG power, auditory arousal thresholds, and urinary free cortisol largely failed to distinguish FMS and control subjects. However, HRV analyses showed more promise, as they suggested both increased sympathetic activity and decreased complexity of autonomic nervous system function in FMS. PMID:19684146

  5. Exteroceptive and Interoceptive Body-Self Awareness in Fibromyalgia Patients.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela-Moguillansky, Camila; Reyes-Reyes, Alejandro; Gaete, María I

    2017-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a widespread chronic pain disease characterized by generalized musculoskeletal pain and fatigue. It substantially affects patients' relationship with their bodies and quality of life, but few studies have investigated the relationship between pain and body awareness in fibromyalgia. We examined exteroceptive and interoceptive aspects of body awareness in 30 women with fibromyalgia and 29 control participants. Exteroceptive body awareness was assessed by a body-scaled action-anticipation task in which participants estimated whether they could pass through apertures of different widths. Interoceptive sensitivity (IS) was assessed by a heartbeat detection task where participants counted their heartbeats during different time intervals. Interoceptive awareness was assessed by the Multidimensional Assessment of Interoceptive Awareness (MAIA). The "passability ratio" (the aperture size for a 50% positive response rate, divided by shoulder width), assessed by the body-scaled action-anticipation task, was higher for fibromyalgia participants, indicating disrupted exteroceptive awareness. Overestimating body size correlated positively with pain and its impact on functionality, but not with pain intensity. There was no difference in IS between groups. Fibromyalgia patients exhibited a higher tendency to note bodily sensations and decreased body confidence. In addition, the passability ratio and IS score correlated negatively across the whole sample, suggesting an inverse relationship between exteroceptive and interoceptive body awareness. There was a lower tendency to actively listen to the body for insight, with higher passability ratios across the whole sample. Based on our results and building on the fear-avoidance model, we outline a proposal that highlights possible interactions between exteroceptive and interoceptive body awareness and pain. Movement based contemplative practices that target sensory-motor integration and foster non

  6. Pain characteristics in fibromyalgia: understanding the multiple dimensions of pain.

    PubMed

    Plazier, Mark; Ost, Jan; Stassijns, Gaëtane; De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven

    2015-04-01

    Fibromyalgia is a common disease with a high economic burden. The etiology of this disease remains unclear, as there are no specific abnormalities on clinical or technical examinations. Evidence suggests that central pain sensitization at the brain pain matrix might be involved. Understanding the pain characteristics of this disease is of importance both for diagnosis and treatment. The authors present their findings of pain characteristics in a Belgium population of fibromyalgia patients. Data of 65 patients (57 male and 8 female patients) were analyzed in this study (mean age 46.86, SD = +8.79). Patients filled out the following questionnaires: visual analogue scale, fibromyalgia impact questionnaire, pain-catastrophizing scale, pain vigilance and awareness questionnaire, modified fatigue impact scale, the Beck depression inventory, the short form 36 and the Dutch shortened profile of mood states. Statistical analysis was performed making use of a factor analysis and a hierarchical cluster analysis. We were able to define pain characteristics in this group of patients. The reciprocal effects of mood and fatigue on pain experience could be identified within the data, catastrophizing scores show a high correlation with overall life quality and pain experience. We have performed a cluster analysis on the fibromyalgia patients, based on the four main principal components defining the overall disease burden. Mood explained most of the variance in symptoms, followed by mental health state, fatigue, and catastrophizing. Three clusters of patients could be revealed by these components. Clusters: 1 high scores on mood disorders, pain, and decreased mental health, 2 high scores on fatigue and physical health, and 3 a mixture of these two groups. This data suggest that different subgroups of fibromyalgia patients could be identified and based on that, treatment strategies and results might be adapted.

  7. Prevalence of fibromyalgia in a low socioeconomic status population

    PubMed Central

    Assumpção, Ana; Cavalcante, Alane B; Capela, Cristina E; Sauer, Juliana F; Chalot, Suellen D; Pereira, Carlos AB; Marques, Amélia P

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of fibromyalgia, as well as to assess the major symptoms of this syndrome in an adult, low socioeconomic status population assisted by the primary health care system in a city in Brazil. Methods We cross-sectionally sampled individuals assisted by the public primary health care system (n = 768, 35–60 years old). Participants were interviewed by phone and screened about pain. They were then invited to be clinically assessed (304 accepted). Pain was estimated using a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Fibromyalgia was assessed using the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), as well as screening for tender points using dolorimetry. Statistical analyses included Bayesian Statistics and the Kruskal-Wallis Anova test (significance level = 5%). Results From the phone-interview screening, we divided participants (n = 768) in three groups: No Pain (NP) (n = 185); Regional Pain (RP) (n = 388) and Widespread Pain (WP) (n = 106). Among those participating in the clinical assessments, (304 subjects), the prevalence of fibromyalgia was 4.4% (95% confidence interval [2.6%; 6.3%]). Symptoms of pain (VAS and FIQ), feeling well, job ability, fatigue, morning tiredness, stiffness, anxiety and depression were statically different among the groups. In multivariate analyses we found that individuals with FM and WP had significantly higher impairment than those with RP and NP. FM and WP were similarly disabling. Similarly, RP was no significantly different than NP. Conclusion Fibromyalgia is prevalent in the low socioeconomic status population assisted by the public primary health care system. Prevalence was similar to other studies (4.4%) in a more diverse socioeconomic population. Individuals with FM and WP have significant impact in their well being. PMID:19505321

  8. Exteroceptive and Interoceptive Body-Self Awareness in Fibromyalgia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela-Moguillansky, Camila; Reyes-Reyes, Alejandro; Gaete, María I.

    2017-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a widespread chronic pain disease characterized by generalized musculoskeletal pain and fatigue. It substantially affects patients' relationship with their bodies and quality of life, but few studies have investigated the relationship between pain and body awareness in fibromyalgia. We examined exteroceptive and interoceptive aspects of body awareness in 30 women with fibromyalgia and 29 control participants. Exteroceptive body awareness was assessed by a body-scaled action-anticipation task in which participants estimated whether they could pass through apertures of different widths. Interoceptive sensitivity (IS) was assessed by a heartbeat detection task where participants counted their heartbeats during different time intervals. Interoceptive awareness was assessed by the Multidimensional Assessment of Interoceptive Awareness (MAIA). The “passability ratio” (the aperture size for a 50% positive response rate, divided by shoulder width), assessed by the body-scaled action-anticipation task, was higher for fibromyalgia participants, indicating disrupted exteroceptive awareness. Overestimating body size correlated positively with pain and its impact on functionality, but not with pain intensity. There was no difference in IS between groups. Fibromyalgia patients exhibited a higher tendency to note bodily sensations and decreased body confidence. In addition, the passability ratio and IS score correlated negatively across the whole sample, suggesting an inverse relationship between exteroceptive and interoceptive body awareness. There was a lower tendency to actively listen to the body for insight, with higher passability ratios across the whole sample. Based on our results and building on the fear-avoidance model, we outline a proposal that highlights possible interactions between exteroceptive and interoceptive body awareness and pain. Movement based contemplative practices that target sensory-motor integration and foster non

  9. Assessment of sleep in patients with fibromyalgia: qualitative development of the fibromyalgia sleep diary

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Sleep disturbance is a common experience in fibromyalgia (FM). The field lacks a sleep specific patient reported outcome (PRO) measure developed and validated in a FM population. The study objective is to gain an in-depth understanding of sleep in FM and to develop a PRO measure of it. Methods Research involved the following stages: 1) A literature review conducted to identify key concepts associated with FM patient experience of sleep and PRO measures that have been used to assess this; 2) Qualitative interviews with therapeutic area experts; 3) Focus groups with FM patients who experienced sleep disturbance; 4) Development of a conceptual framework and the Fibromyalgia Sleep Diary (FMSD); and 5) Cognitive interviews with patients to explore content validity of the FMSD. Results The literature review and expert interviews supported sleep disturbance being an important aspect of the FM patient experience, and underscored the need for a new FM specific sleep PRO measure. Results from the focus groups demonstrated that FM patients experience sleep disturbances that they attribute to their FM symptoms, such as pain and stiffness, confirming the importance of understanding more about sleep changes. Aspects of sleep raised by FM patients included poor sleep quality and insufficient quantity including difficulty with falling asleep, getting comfortable, and staying asleep; restlessness; light sleep; not feeling rested upon awakening; and difficulty starting the day. Cognitive interview results showed that the 8-item FMSD, developed to reflect the concepts identified above, was relevant to FM patients with content that was interpreted as intended. Conclusions The FMSD was developed in line with the recommendations of the FDA PRO guidance and ISPOR PRO Task Force. The qualitative evidence generated thus far strongly supports the content validity of the FMSD as a PRO measure of sleep disturbance in FM populations. Psychometric evaluation of the FMSD to

  10. Living with Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... someone might fall or be injured in a car accident. Then, years after the individual’s knee has apparently healed, he might get arthritis in his knee joint. Rheumatoid arthritis happens when the body’s own defense system doesn’t work properly. It affects joints and bones (often of ...

  11. Evaluation of Clinical Significance of Dermoscopy in Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Guttikonda, Akhila Sai; Aruna, Chintaginjala; Ramamurthy, D V S B; Sridevi, K; Alagappan, Senthil Kumar L

    2016-01-01

    Background: Alopecia areata (AA) is a common, chronic inflammatory disease characterized by nonscarring hair loss on the scalp or any hair-bearing area of the body. Recently, dermoscopy, a noninvasive diagnostic procedure, has been employed for the diagnosis of AA. Aim: To evaluate various dermoscopic patterns in AA and correlate these patterns with the disease activity and severity. Materials and Methods: Dermoscopy was performed on AA patients using DL1 dermoscope (magnification ×10 was used). The dermoscopic patterns recorded were analyzed to identify any correlation with the disease activity and severity. Results: A total of fifty patients of AA were recruited in the study. Female outnumbered males with the ratio being 1.173:1. Mean age of the patients was 25.06 years. Mean duration of disease was 14 months. The most common site involved was scalp (80%) and type noted was patchy (84%). Various dermoscopic patterns noted were yellow dots (YD) (88%), short vellus hair (66%), black dots (BD) (58%), broken hairs (BHs) (56%), tapering hair (TH) (26%), Coudability hairs (14%), pigtail hair (14%), and Pohl-Pinkus constrictions (2%). Statistically significant correlation was observed between BD, BHs, THs, and disease activity. No significant correlation was found between severity and any of the dermoscopic features. Conclusion: The most common dermoscopic pattern in our study was YD. Presence of BDs, BHs, and THs indicate active disease. Dermoscopic patterns were not affected by severity of the disease. PMID:27904180

  12. Alopecia Areata in the Elderly: A 10-Year Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yong Hyun; Park, Kyung Hea; Kim, Sang Lim; Lim, Hyun Jung; Lee, Weon Ju; Lee, Seok-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Background Alopecia areata (AA) is an organ-specific autoimmune disease that typically occurs in young adults. AA in the elderly is relatively rare, thus little data have been reported. Objective This study aimed to understand the clinical characteristics of AA in the elderly. Methods We performed a 10-year retrospective study of AA in the elderly who visited our dermatologic clinic from January 2002 to December 2011. A clinical review of medical records and telephone interviews were performed by two dermatologists. Results Among 1,761 patients with newly diagnosed AA, 61 (3.5%) were older than 60 years at the first visit. Among those who completed a telephone interview, 74.3% (26/35) had less than 50% of scalp-localized hair loss. There was no association between the extent of AA and hair graying (p=0.679). Favorable therapeutic response was observed in 62.9% (22/35) of cases. Conclusion AA in the elderly shows mild disease severity and favorable treatment response. There is no association between graying and the extent of AA. However, the influence of aging on the pathogenesis of AA in the elderly deserves further investigation. PMID:26273157

  13. Excimer laser: a module of the alopecia areata common protocol.

    PubMed

    McMichael, Amy J

    2013-12-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is an autoimmune condition characterized by T cell-mediated attack of the hair follicle. The inciting antigenic stimulus is unknown. A dense perbulbar lymphocytic infiltrate and reproducible immunologic abnormalities are hallmark features of the condition. The cellular infiltrate primarily consists of activated T lymphocytes and antigen-presenting Langerhans cells. The xenon chloride excimer laser emits its total energy at the wavelength of 308 nm and therefore is regarded as a "super-narrowband" UVB light source. Excimer laser treatment is highly effective in psoriasis, another T cell-mediated disorder that shares many immunologic features with AA. The excimer laser is superior in inducing T cell apoptosis in vitro compared with narrowband UVB, with paralleled improved clinical efficacy. The excimer laser has been used successfully in patients with AA. In this context, evaluation of the potential benefit of 308-nm excimer laser therapy in the treatment of AA is clinically warranted. Herein, the use of a common treatment protocol with a specifically designed module to study the outcome of excimer laser treatment on moderate-to-severe scalp AA in adults is described.

  14. Endogenous retinoids in the pathogenesis of alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Duncan, F Jason; Silva, Kathleen A; Johnson, Charles J; King, Benjamin L; Szatkiewicz, Jin P; Kamdar, Sonya P; Ong, David E; Napoli, Joseph L; Wang, Jinshan; King, Lloyd E; Whiting, David A; McElwee, Kevin J; Sundberg, John P; Everts, Helen B

    2013-02-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is an autoimmune disease that attacks anagen hair follicles. Gene array in graft-induced C3H/HeJ mice revealed that genes involved in retinoic acid (RA) synthesis were increased, whereas RA degradation genes were decreased in AA compared with sham controls. This was confirmed by immunohistochemistry in biopsies from patients with AA and both mouse and rat AA models. RA levels were also increased in C3H/HeJ mice with AA. C3H/HeJ mice were fed a purified diet containing one of the four levels of dietary vitamin A or an unpurified diet 2 weeks before grafting and disease progression followed. High vitamin A accelerated AA, whereas mice that were not fed vitamin A had more severe disease by the end of the study. More hair follicles were in anagen in mice fed high vitamin A. Both the number and localization of granzyme B-positive cells were altered by vitamin A. IFNγ was also the lowest and IL13 highest in mice fed high vitamin A. Other cytokines were reduced and chemokines increased as the disease progressed, but no additional effects of vitamin A were seen. Combined, these results suggest that vitamin A regulates both the hair cycle and immune response to alter the progression of AA.

  15. Doxorubicin-induced alopecia is associated with sebaceous gland degeneration.

    PubMed

    Selleri, Silvia; Seltmann, Holger; Gariboldi, Silvia; Shirai, Yuri F; Balsari, Andrea; Zouboulis, Christos C; Rumio, Cristiano

    2006-04-01

    Alopecia, accompanied by skin dryness, is one of the distressing side effects often occurring in chemotherapy-treated cancer patients. Little is known of the effects of chemotherapy on sebaceous glands, despite their importance in hair follicle homeostasis. This study investigates sebaceous gland morphology and the response of SZ95 sebaceous gland cell line to doxorubicin (DXR) treatment. The morphology of sebaceous glands during intraperitoneal DXR treatment was investigated by optical and electron microscopy in a 7-day-old rat model and further confirmed in an adult mouse model. Moreover, in vitro studies using the SZ95 sebaceous gland cell line were performed to assess the response of sebocytes to DXR in terms of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and necrosis. DXR treatment induced sebaceous gland regression and occasionally caused their complete disappearance. This observed damage and disappearance preceded DXR-induced hair loss. In vitro experiments using the SZ95 sebaceous gland cell line indicated that DXR treatment induced a differentiation process leading to premature sebocytes apoptosis. Owing to the importance of the sebaceous gland in hair follicle homeostasis, DXR-induced involution of this gland might be related to subsequent hair loss.

  16. Jet cryotherapy vs clobetasol proprionate lotion in alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Faghihi, Gita; Radan, Mohammadreza

    2014-01-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is a common disease of hair follicles. Cryotherapy has been employed to stimulate hair regrowth. The current investigation evaluated the efficacy of this method in patchyAA. Forty patients older than 5 years and with 120 recalcitrant patches were enrolled in the study. AA covered less than 50% of the patients' scalps. In each individual, one lesion was treated with N2 jet cryotherapy once a week for a period of 12 weeks, while another lesion was treated with topical 0.05% clobetasol proprionate lotion. All patients were followed from weeks 2 to 16. Thirty-eight of 40 patients completed therapy. The overall response rate of patches was 80% in the cryotherapy group and 91.5% in the clobetasol group. Complete recovery (>95% terminal hair growth) was not obtained in any patient. Results from chi-square test showed no significant difference between improvements in AA in the two groups (reliability 95%). Pearson measurement showed a significant reverse relationship between diameter and duration of patches and the improvement rate in both groups. Liquid nitrogen jet cryotherapy can be a helpful modality in the treatment of AA.

  17. Pathologic diagnosis of central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia on horizontal sections.

    PubMed

    Miteva, Mariya; Tosti, Antonella

    2014-11-01

    The pathologic findings in Central Centrifugal Cicatricial Alopecia (CCCA) have not been studied systematically in horizontal sections. Our objective was to establish the pathologic features, and their frequency in horizontal sections of scalp biopsies obtained from patients with clinically and histologically proven CCCA. Serial horizontal sections of 51 cases were evaluated retrospectively. All biopsies were assessed at 4 levels and at least on 24 horizontal sections. The most common pathologic findings were follicular miniaturization (81% of the cases); premature desquamation of the inner root sheath (96%), focal preservation of the sebaceous glands (94%), which in most of these cases appeared as surrounding "in a hug" an intact vellus follicle; compound follicular structures with perifollicular fibrosis and/or inflammation (89%), lamellar hyperkeratosis/parakeratosis in the hair canal (79%), absent or mild inflammation (77%), and naked hair shafts (68%). Horizontal sections are useful in CCCA to identify early or focal disease and to provide the clinician with better information on the presence of follicular miniaturization, inflammation, and scarring, which can be used to tailor the treatment to the individual patient.

  18. Physical fitness reference standards in fibromyalgia: The al-Ándalus project.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Gallardo, I C; Carbonell-Baeza, A; Segura-Jiménez, V; Soriano-Maldonado, A; Intemann, T; Aparicio, V A; Estévez-López, F; Camiletti-Moirón, D; Herrador-Colmenero, M; Ruiz, J R; Delgado-Fernández, M; Ortega, F B

    2016-10-17

    We aimed (1) to report age-specific physical fitness levels in people with fibromyalgia of a representative sample from Andalusia; and (2) to compare the fitness levels of people with fibromyalgia with non-fibromyalgia controls. This cross-sectional study included 468 (21 men) patients with fibromyalgia and 360 (55 men) controls. The fibromyalgia sample was geographically representative from southern Spain. Physical fitness was assessed with the Senior Fitness Test battery plus the handgrip test. We applied the Generalized Additive Model for Location, Scale and Shape to calculate percentile curves for women and fitted mean curves using a linear regression for men. Our results show that people with fibromyalgia reached worse performance in all fitness tests than controls (P < 0.001) in all age ranges (P < 0.001). This study provides a comprehensive description of age-specific physical fitness levels among patients with fibromyalgia and controls in a large sample of patients with fibromyalgia from southern of Spain. Physical fitness levels of people with fibromyalgia from Andalusia are very low in comparison with age-matched healthy controls. This information could be useful to correctly interpret physical fitness assessments and helping health care providers to identify individuals at risk for losing physical independence.

  19. Current treatments to counter sleep dysfunction as a pathogenic stimulus of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Choy, Ernest H

    2016-05-01

    Fibromyalgia is characterized by chronic widespread pain, fatigue and nonrestorative sleep. Polysomnography showed reduced short-wave sleep and abnormal alpha rhythms during nonrapid eye movement sleep in patients with fibromyalgia. However, sleep dysfunction might be pathogenic in fibromyalgia since myalgia and fatigue could be induced in healthy individuals by disrupting sleep. Poor sleep quality was a major risk factor for the subsequent development of chronic widespread pain in healthy pain-free individuals. Sleep disruption leads to impairment of the descending pain inhibition pathways. Aside from good sleep, hygiene, exercise can promote sleep. Among currently available pharmacological treatments, evidence suggests amitriptyline and pregabalin can improve sleep in fibromyalgia.

  20. Autonomic nervous system profile in fibromyalgia patients and its modulation by exercise: a mini review.

    PubMed

    Kulshreshtha, Poorvi; Deepak, Kishore K

    2013-03-01

    This review imparts an impressionistic tone to our current understanding of autonomic nervous system abnormalities in fibromyalgia. In the wake of symptoms present in patients with fibromyalgia (FM), autonomic dysfunction seems plausible in fibromyalgia. A popular notion is that of a relentless sympathetic hyperactivity and hyporeactivity based on heart rate variability (HRV) analyses and responses to various physiological stimuli. However, some exactly opposite findings suggesting normal/hypersympathetic reactivity in patients with fibromyalgia do exist. This heterogeneous picture along with multiple comorbidities accounts for the quantitative and qualitative differences in the degree of dysautonomia present in patients with FM. We contend that HRV changes in fibromyalgia may not actually represent increased cardiac sympathetic tone. Normal muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and normal autonomic reactivity tests in patients with fibromyalgia suggest defective vascular end organ in fibromyalgia. Previously, we proposed a model linking deconditioning with physical inactivity resulting from widespread pain in patients with fibromyalgia. Deconditioning also modulates the autonomic nervous system (high sympathetic tone and a low parasympathetic tone). A high peripheral sympathetic tone causes regional ischaemia, which in turn results in widespread pain. Thus, vascular dysregulation and hypoperfusion in patients with FM give rise to ischaemic pain leading to physical inactivity. Microvascular abnormalities are also found in patients with FM. Therapeutic interventions (e.g. exercise) that result in vasodilatation and favourable autonomic alterations have proven to be effective. In this review, we focus on the vascular end organ in patients with fibromyalgia in particular and its modulation by exercise in general.

  1. Alopecia induced by lopinavir plus ritonavir therapy in an HIV patient.

    PubMed

    Chrysos, George; Mikros, Sotirios; Kokkoris, Stelios; Pastelli, Androula; Kontochristopoulos, George

    2007-07-01

    The most commonly reported side effects related to lopinavir/ritonavir are diarrhea, vomiting, headache, nausea, and increased serum triglycerides and cholesterol levels. About 4% of the patients prescribed lopinavir/ritonavir stop taking it because of side effects. Alopecia, generally involving the scalp, has been reported in patients with HIV infection treated with indinavir but not with lopinavir/ritonavir. We present a 62-year-old man with HIV infection, stage B2, who experienced alopecia totalis of his scalp, eyebrows, and eyelashes beginning 18 months after initiating antiretroviral treatment including lopinavir/ritonavir. No hair loss on the arms, legs, and pubic area was observed. Our patient's drug regimen consisted of lopinavir/ritonavir, efavirenz, and stavudine; in addition, the patient was receiving treatment for diabetes with glivenclamide and metformin for the last 3 years. These drugs have not been shown to cause alopecia. Alopecia reversed completely 2 months after substituting nelfinavir for lopinavir/ritonavir without any other change of treatment and his eyelashes and eyebrows grew back as well. To our knowledge, this is the second case of lopinavir/ritonavir-associated alopecia totalis reported in the international literature.

  2. Maternal IL-6 can cause T-cell-mediated juvenile alopecia by non-scarring follicular dystrophy in mice.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen E P; Maus, Rachel L G; Davis, Tessa R; Sundberg, John P; Gil, Diana; Schrum, Adam G

    2016-03-01

    Aiming to decipher immunological mechanisms of the autoimmune disorder alopecia areata (AA), we hypothesized that interleukin-6 (IL-6) might be associated with juvenile-onset AA, for which there is currently no experimental model. Upon intramuscular transgenesis to overexpress IL-6 in pregnant female C57BL/6 (B6) mice, we found that the offspring displayed an initial normal and complete juvenile hair growth cycle, but developed alopecia around postnatal day 18. This alopecia was patchy and reversible (non-scarring) and was associated with upregulation of Ulbp1 expression, the only mouse homolog of the human AA-associated ULBP3 gene. Alopecia was also associated with inflammatory infiltration of hair follicles by lymphocytes, including alpha-beta T cells, which contributed to surface hair loss. Despite these apparently shared traits with AA, lesions were dominated by follicular dystrophy that was atypical of human AA disease, sharing some traits consistent with B6 alopecia and dermatitis. Additionally, juvenile-onset alopecia was followed by complete, spontaneous recovery of surface hair, without recurrence of hair loss. Prolonging exposure to IL-6 prolonged the time to recovery, but once recovered, repeating high-dose IL-6 exposure de novo did not re-induce alopecia. These data suggest that although substantial molecular and cellular pathways may be shared, functionally similar alopecia disorders can occur via distinct pathological mechanisms.

  3. Effects of music on pain in patients with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Alparslan, Güler Balcı; Babadağ, Burcu; Özkaraman, Ayşe; Yıldız, Pınar; Musmul, Ahmet; Korkmaz, Cengiz

    2016-05-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a chronic syndrome characterized by diffuse musculoskeletal system pain and painful tender points in certain areas of the body. The aim of the investigation was to determine the effects of music on pain in fibromyalgia patients. This randomized clinical trial was carried out with 37 fibromyalgia outpatients as an experimental group (n = 21) and control group (n = 16) at a University Hospital Internal Medicine and Rheumatology Clinic between 1 June and 1 December 2014. The research instruments used were descriptive characteristics questionnaire, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), music CD which includes water and wave sounds recommended by the Turkish Psychological Association for psychological relaxation, and pain evaluation form. According to the findings, the average age of patients was 43.59 years ± 10.30, 94.6 % were women and 81.1 % were married. The fibromyalgia patients had the disease ranged from 1 month to 20 years, the average of disease duration was 23.6 ± 45.5 months, and the average of pain intensity was 6.89 ± 1.64 on the VAS. Average pain was reported in the experimental group in VAS on day 1 (5.45 ± 2.73), day 7 (4.57 ± 2.71), and day 14 (4.14 ± 2.45), and significant reduction in pain in the listening music group was seen (p = 0.026). A repeated measure analysis of variance controlling for differences between days demonstrated a significant decrease in pain between day 1 and day 14 (p = 0.022). There was no significant decrease in pain among control group participants. The effect of music has been found to control pain in fibromyalgia patients. Music therapy should be suggested in pain management for fibromyalgia patients as an non-pharmacologic nursing intervention.

  4. Challenges in Fibromyalgia Management: A Study of Anxiety, Depression, and Motivation Using Distance Learning and Social Networking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caines, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    Patients with fibromyalgia have difficulty managing symptoms (e.g., fatigue, chronic pain). The challenges in fibromyalgia management may vary from patient to patient, from painful physical exercise to pharmaceutical side-effects. Since the management of fibromyalgia greatly varies, there seems to be an individualist or personal component to…

  5. Frontal Fibrosing Alopecia Coexisting with Lupus Erythematosus: Poor Response to Hydroxychloroquine

    PubMed Central

    Contin, Letícia Arsie; Martins da Costa Marques, Elisa Raquel; Noriega, Leandro

    2017-01-01

    Lupus erythematosus, especially the discoid form, and lichen planopilaris may be associated and can occur in different topographies (coexistence) or in the same lesion (lupus eythematosus/lichen planus overlap syndrome). Frontal fibrosing alopecia is considered a variant form of lichen planopilaris and is characterized by frontotemporal hairline and eyebrow involvement. Of the association with lupus erythematosus we have only a few descriptions. Hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine diphosphate are antimalarial drugs described as viable treatment options for both diseases, due to an antilymphocytic effect. The association between frontal fibrosing alopecia and lupus erythematosus (discoid or systemic) is reported in this article, showing a progressive alopecia in the frontotemporal hairline despite treatment with hydroxychloroquine. PMID:28232926

  6. Frontal Alopecia after Repeated Botulinum Toxin Type A Injections for Forehead Wrinkles: An Underestimated Entity?

    PubMed Central

    Di Pietro, Antonino; Piraccini, Bianca Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background Injections of botulinum toxin type A in the forehead have never been reported to cause hair side effects. Objective The aim of this paper is to report a new type of alopecia, which we have seen in women undergoing periodic injections of botulinum toxin type A for forehead wrinkles, and to differentiate it from other types of hair loss. Methods We conducted an observational study on 5 females recruited from a private and an institutional practice who complained of progressive recession of the hairline after periodic injections of botulinum toxin type A in the forehead. Results Alopecia of the frontal hairline was evident in all 5 patients, with absence of skin atrophy or scarring and progressive hair miniaturization at trichoscopy. Conclusion Dermatologists should be aware of the possible occurrence of frontal alopecia after repeated injections of botulinum toxin type A for forehead wrinkles. PMID:27843928

  7. Prevention of doxorubicin-induced alopecia by scalp cooling in patients with advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J E; Hunt, J M; Smith, I E

    1981-01-01

    Scalp cooling with gel packs was used to try to prevent alopecia in 31 patients being treated with doxorubicin (Adriamycin), 29 for advanced breast carcinoma and two for carcinoid tumour. Twenty-eight of the 31 patients tolerated the procedure well, and 22 of these had either no hair loss or only slight loss which remained acceptable and did not require a wig. The main factor limiting success was biochemical impairment of liver function, which occurred in nine patients; of these, six had severe or total alopecia despite scalp cooling. Conversely, the technique was successful in all 19 patients with normal liver function. Carried out properly, this simple and effective technique greatly diminishes socially unacceptable alopecia associated with doxorubicin, and merits wider use. PMID:6780057

  8. Prevention of doxorubicin-induced alopecia by scalp cooling in patients with advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J E; Hunt, J M; Smith, I E

    1981-02-07

    Scalp cooling with gel packs was used to try to prevent alopecia in 31 patients being treated with doxorubicin (Adriamycin), 29 for advanced breast carcinoma and two for carcinoid tumour. Twenty-eight of the 31 patients tolerated the procedure well, and 22 of these had either no hair loss or only slight loss which remained acceptable and did not require a wig. The main factor limiting success was biochemical impairment of liver function, which occurred in nine patients; of these, six had severe or total alopecia despite scalp cooling. Conversely, the technique was successful in all 19 patients with normal liver function. Carried out properly, this simple and effective technique greatly diminishes socially unacceptable alopecia associated with doxorubicin, and merits wider use.

  9. A review on laser and light-based therapies for alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Mlacker, Stephanie; Aldahan, Adam Souhail; Simmons, Brian James; Shah, Vidhi; McNamara, Colin Andrew; Samarkandy, Sahal; Nouri, Keyvan

    2017-04-01

    Alopecia areata is a form of non-scarring alopecia that results from a hyperactive immune response of T cells against hair follicles. Many patients with visible hair loss experience psychological and emotional distress, as a result of their cosmetic disfigurement, and frequently seek treatment. However, existing treatment methods, such as corticosteroids, topical irritants, sensitizing agents, immunosuppressants, and psoralen plus ultraviolet light A, may result in various adverse effects and often lack efficacy. Laser and light treatments offer a safe and effective alternative. This review aims to provide clinicians with a comprehensive summary of laser and light-based modalities used for the treatment of alopecia areata. Currently, the excimer laser is the most widely studied device and has shown positive results thus far. However, the development of future randomized controlled clinical trials will help determine the appropriate treatment protocols necessary, in order to achieve superior clinical outcomes.

  10. Trichotillomania: a case report with clinical and dermatoscopic differential diagnosis with alopecia areata*

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Ana Cecília Versiani Duarte; de Andrade, Tatiana Cristina Pedro Cordeiro; de Brito, Fernanda Freitas; da Silva, Gardênia Viana; Cavalcante, Maria Lopes Lamenha Lins; Martelli, Antonio Carlos Ceribelli

    2017-01-01

    Trichotillomania is a psychodermatologic disorder characterized by uncontrollable urge to pull one's own hair. Differential diagnoses include the most common forms of alopecia such as alopecia areata. It is usually associated with depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Trichotillomania treatment standardization is a gap in the medical literature. Recent studies demonstrated the efficacy of N-acetylcysteine (a glutamate modulator) for the treatment of the disease. We report the clinical case of a 12-year-old female patient who received the initial diagnosis of alopecia areata, but presented with clinical and dermoscopic features of trichotillomania. She was treated with the combination of psychotropic drugs and N-acetylcysteine with good clinical response. Due to the chronic and recurring nature of trichotillomania, more studies need to be conducted for the establishment of a formal treatment algorithm. PMID:28225970

  11. Age-related hair changes in men: mechanisms and management of alopecia and graying.

    PubMed

    Mirmirani, Paradi

    2015-01-01

    The appearance of human scalp hair is often tied to perceptions of youth and virility, especially in men. Hair loss, or alopecia and hair graying are commonly associated with advancing age and are frequently a source for emotional distress and anxiety. Our understanding of the complex molecular signals and mechanisms that regulate and influence the hair follicle has expanded in recent years. By harnessing this understanding we are poised to address the esthetic concerns of aging hair. Additionally, changes in the hair follicle may be a reflection of systemic senescent signals, thus because of its accessibility, the hair follicle may serve as an important research tool in gerontology. In this review, the most current knowledge and research regarding mechanisms of androgenetic alopecia, senescent alopecia, and graying are discussed, as are extrinsic factors that may contribute to hair changes with age. Evidence based management strategies for treatment of age-related hair changes are also reviewed.

  12. Septic arthritis after ureteroneocystostomy.

    PubMed

    Allen, W R

    1979-04-01

    Acute infectious arthritis is an uncommon disease that is most commonly caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae or gram-positive cocci. Gram-negative bacteria are an infrequent and highly virulent cause of septic arthritis and most commonly enter the circulation through the urinary tract, as in this case after ureteroneocystostomy. The resulting arthritis carries a mortality of 25% and a morbidity of 80%. Early recognition and treatment with appropriate antibiotics and mechanical drainage is imperative. Needle drainage of the affected joint has been shown superior to open surgical drainage.

  13. Psoriasis and arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cats, A

    1990-10-01

    The exact association between psoriasis and arthritis remains an enigma. Some investigators consider that the two disorders constitute a disease entity, psoriatic arthritis, while others support the thesis that psoriasis and arthritis are common diseases and occur simultaneously by chance. The author upholds the latter view as viable. To underscore his viewpoint he presents a comprehensive overview of the controversial opinions through an historical perspective as well as reporting on his epidemiologic and clinical findings from large population studies in the Netherlands. Therapeutic regimens for the management of both skin and joint problems are presented.

  14. Sensor-controlled scalp cooling to prevent chemotherapy-induced alopecia in female cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Fehr, M.K.; Welter, J.; Sell, W.; Jung, R.; Felberbaum, R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Scalp cooling has been used since the 1970s to prevent chemotherapy-induced alopecia, one of the most common and psychologically troubling side effects of chemotherapy. Currently available scalp cooling systems demonstrate varying results in terms of effectiveness and tolerability. Methods For the present prospective study, 55 women receiving neoadjuvant, adjuvant, or palliative chemotherapy were enrolled. The aim was to assess the effectiveness of a sensor-controlled scalp cooling system (DigniCap: Sysmex Europe GmbH, Norderstedt, Germany) to prevent chemotherapy-induced alopecia in breast or gynecologic cancer patients receiving 1 of 7 regimens. Clinical assessments, satisfaction questionnaires, and alopecia evaluations [World Health Organization (who) grading for toxicity] were completed at baseline, at each cycle, and at completion of chemotherapy. Results Of the 55 patients, 78% underwent scalp cooling until completion of chemotherapy. In multivariate analysis, younger women and those receiving paclitaxel weekly or paclitaxel–carboplatin experienced less alopecia. The compound successful outcome (“no head covering” plus “who grade 0/1”) was observed in all patients 50 years of age and younger receiving 4 cycles of docetaxel–cyclophosphamide or 6 cycles of paclitaxel–carboplatin. Conversely, alopecia was experienced by all women receiving triplet polychemotherapy (6 cycles of docetaxel–doxorubicin–cyclophosphamide). For women receiving sequential polychemotherapy regimens (3 cycles of fluorouracil–epirubicin–cyclophosphamide followed by 3 cycles of docetaxel or 4 cycles of doxorubicin–cyclophosphamide followed by 4 cycles of docetaxel), the subgroup 50 years of age and younger experienced a 43% success rate compared with a 10% rate for the subgroup pf older women receiving the same regimens. Conclusions The ability of scalp cooling to prevent chemotherapy-induced alopecia varies with the chemotherapy regimen and the age of the

  15. A humanized mouse model of hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-resistant rickets without alopecia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seong Min; Goellner, Joseph J; O'Brien, Charles A; Pike, J Wesley

    2014-11-01

    The syndrome of hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-resistant rickets (HVDRR) is a genetic disease of altered mineral homeostasis due to mutations in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene. It is frequently, but not always, accompanied by the presence of alopecia. Mouse models that recapitulate this syndrome have been prepared through genetic deletion of the Vdr gene and are characterized by the presence of rickets and alopecia. Subsequent studies have revealed that VDR expression in hair follicle keratinocytes protects against alopecia and that this activity is independent of the protein's ability to bind 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3]. In the present study, we introduced into VDR-null mice a human VDR (hVDR) bacterial artificial chromosome minigene containing a mutation that converts leucine to serine at amino acid 233 in the hVDR protein, which prevents 1,25(OH)2D3 binding. We then assessed whether this transgene recreated features of the HVDRR syndrome without alopecia. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis in one strain showed an appropriate level of mutant hVDR expression in all tissues examined including skin. The hVDR-L233S mutant failed to rescue the aberrant systemic and skeletal phenotype characteristic of the VDR null mouse due to the inability of the mutant receptor to activate transcription after treatment with 1,25(OH)2D3. Importantly, however, neither alopecia nor the dermal cysts characteristic of VDR-null mice were observed in the skin of these hVDR-L233S mutant mice. This study confirms that we have created a humanized mouse model of HVDRR without alopecia that will be useful in defining additional features of this syndrome and in identifying potential novel functions of the unoccupied VDR.

  16. Female sexual dysfunction in androgenetic alopecia: Case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Sancak, Eyup Burak; Oguz, Sevilay; Akbulut, Tugba; Uludag, Aysegul; Akbas, Alpaslan; Kurt, Omer; Akbulut, Mehmet Fatih

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: We sought to evaluate the association of female sexual dysfunction (FSD) with androgenetic alopecia (AGA) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in premenopausal women. Methods: From December 2013 to June 2015, we performed a case-control, prospective study of 115 patients with AGA and 97 age-matched control patients without AGA from among premenopausal women who visited dermatology clinics of the two reference hospitals. Comprehensive history, anthropometric measurements, and questionnaire administration were performed for each of the total of 212 women. The Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) was used to assess the key dimensions of female sexual function. AGA was assessed and graded by an experienced dermatologist according to Ludwig’s classification. The MetS assessment was made according to the NCEP-ATP III criteria. Results: In univariate analysis, age, weight, waist circumference, hip circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, body mass index (BMI), AGA, MetS, cardiovascular event, marital status, hypertension, high fasting plasma glucose, high triglyceride, large waist, total testosterone, and free testosterone were associated with presence of FSD. In logistic regression analysis, age (odds ratio [OR] 1.21, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13–1.30; p<0.001), AGA (OR 3.42, 95% CI 1.31–8.94; p=0.017), MetS (OR 5.39, 95% CI 1.34–21.62; p=0.012), and free testosterone (OR 0.18, 95% CI 0.09–0.37; p<0.001) were independently associated with FSD. Conclusions: Our study suggests that age, AGA, MetS, and free testosterone may have strong impact on sexual function in premenopausal women. Further studies with population-based and longitudinal design should be conducted to confirm this finding. PMID:28255417

  17. Preventing chemotherapy-induced alopecia in cancer patients: is scalp cooling worthwhile?

    PubMed

    Tierney, A J

    1987-05-01

    Alopecia (hair loss) is often singled out as the most distressing side-effect of cancer chemotherapy treatment. This paper provides a comprehensive and critical review of the research literature on scalp cooling, a procedure introduced to prevent chemotherapy-induced alopecia. In spite of a considerable amount of research (both nursing and medical) over a 15-year period, the evidence on scalp cooling is inconclusive. Although concerned with a specialist issue, this paper may interest the general reader as it illustrates the value of a literature review in raising questions about current practice and in identifying issues for future research.

  18. Treatment of permanent chemotherapy-induced alopecia with low dose oral minoxidil.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinyi; Thai, Keng-Ee

    2015-05-13

    Chemotherapy-induced alopecia is a well-established cause of major distress to patients. Permanent chemotherapy-induced alopecia (PCIA) is the absence of or incomplete hair regrowth lasting longer than 6 months after the cessation of chemotherapy and it does not respond to standard treatments of scalp cooling or topical minoxidil. The increasing numbers of reports of PCIA highlight the need for research into an effective treatment. We report a case of a 39 year-old woman with cosmetically significant regrowth after continuous therapy with oral minoxidil.

  19. A genome-wide association study of chemotherapy-induced alopecia in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Chemotherapy-induced alopecia is one of the most common adverse events caused by conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy, yet there has been very little progress in the prevention or treatment of this side effect. Although this is not a life-threatening event, alopecia is very psychologically difficult for many women to manage. In order to improve the quality of life for these women, it is important to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of chemotherapy-induced alopecia and develop ways to effectively prevent and/or treat it. To identify the genetic risk factors associated with chemotherapy-induced alopecia, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using DNA samples from breast cancer patients who were treated with chemotherapy. Methods We performed a case-control association study of 303 individuals who developed grade 2 alopecia, and compared them with 880 breast cancer patients who did not show hair loss after being treated with conventional chemotherapy. In addition, we separately analyzed a subset of patients who received specific combination therapies by GWASs and applied the weighted genetic risk scoring (wGRS) system to investigate the cumulative effects of the associated SNPs. Results We identified an SNP significantly associated with drug-induced grade 2 alopecia (rs3820706 in CACNB4 (calcium channel voltage-dependent subunit beta 4) on 2q23, P = 8.13 × 10-9, OR = 3.71) and detected several SNPs that showed some suggestive associations by subgroup analyses. We also classified patients into four groups on the basis of wGRS analysis and found that patients who classified in the highest risk group showed 443 times higher risk of antimicrotubule agents-induced alopecia than the lowest risk group. Conclusions Our study suggests several associated genes and should shed some light on the molecular mechanism of alopecia in chemotherapy-treated breast cancer patients and hopefully will contribute to development of interventions that will

  20. Low-energy laser in the treatment of alopecia of the scalp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciuchita, Tavi; Usurelu, Mircea; Antipa, Ciprian

    1997-12-01

    The authors tried to verify the efficacy of low energy laser (LEL) in scalp alopecia. Sixty patients were divided in two groups: A) laser group, 33 patients treated with both LEL and classical therapy; B) control group, 27 patients treated only with classical therapy, Before, during and after treatment, historical samples were done. For the group A the results were rather superior but in a twice shorter time shorter time than group B. The maintenance of the good results needed classical therapy for a long period. We conclude that LEL therapy could have a useful complementary method for the treatment of scalp alopecia.

  1. [Using a laser based program in patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia].

    PubMed

    Fernández García, Rubén; Suárez Holgado, José Damián; Formieles Ortiz, Israel; Zurita Ortega, Félix; Valverde Cepeda, Matías; Fernández Sánchez, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the benefits of a program of treatment by laser were evaluated on the improvement of symptoms associated with fibromyalgia. A total of 31 participants took part in the study, all of them women, randomized into two groups: intervention with laser and placebo. The intervention with girlase E11010 consisted of the individual application of six frequencies on seven anatomical zones of the body. The results were statistically significant differences for "weariness" and "difficulty sleeping" variables. In the rest of the variables, we did not find any statistical significance. One of the conclusions from the present study is the need for development of new research to verify the influence of girlase E1.1010 in the improvement of symptoms associated with fibromyalgia.

  2. [Fibromyalgia and laboral activities on the Spain legislation].

    PubMed

    Vicente-Herrero, María Teófila; Terradillos-García, María Jesús; Capdevila-García, Luisa M; Ramírez-Iñiguez de la Torre, María Victoria; López-González, Angel Arturo

    2011-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a pain disorder listed in the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) of the World Health Organization under the code 729.1. It is a controversial disease that affects young people in many cases during their working years, posing a social and labour problem, in addition to the complexity of its diagnosis, which is based almost exclusively on clinical criteria as few objective data can be obtained from physical examination or additional tests. Nowadays, the criteria for clinical diagnosis of fibromyalgia are established and periodically revised by an Expert Consensus Panel; the most recent document is dated May, 2010. The occupational status of these patients attains an important significance due to the labour costs resulting from this disease and the difficulty in establishing clear and concise parameters for assessing the personal disability of the patients by the legally authorized organizations.

  3. The role of antipsychotics in the management of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Calandre, Elena P; Rico-Villademoros, Fernando

    2012-02-01

    Fibromyalgia is a syndrome characterized by chronic generalized pain associated with different somatic symptoms, such as sleep disturbances, fatigue, stiffness, balance problems, hypersensitivity to physical and psychological environmental stimuli, depression and anxiety. It has been estimated to affect roughly the 2-4% of the general population in most countries studied, and it has been shown to be much more prevalent in women than in men. Although its pathophysiology is not yet fully understood, it is known that both genetic and environmental factors are involved in its development. Fibromyalgia shares a high degree of co-morbidity with other conditions, including chronic headache, temporomandibular disorder, irritable bowel syndrome, major depression, anxiety disorders and chronic fatigue syndrome. Therefore, this is a syndrome difficult to treat for which multimodal treatments including physical exercise, psychological therapies and pharmacological treatment are recommended. Although different kinds of drugs have been studied for the treatment of fibromyalgia, the most widely used drugs that have the higher degree of evidence for efficacy include the α(2)δ ligands pregabalin and gabapentin, and the tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) and serotonin noradrenaline (norepinephrine) reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). However, there is a need to look for newer additional therapeutic pharmacological options for the treatment of this complex and disabling disease. First- and second-generation antipsychotics have shown analgesic properties both in an experimental setting and in humans, although most of the available evidence for the treatment of human pain concerns older antipsychotics and involves clinical trials performed several decades ago. In addition, several second-generation antipsychotics, risperidone, olanzapine and quetiapine, have shown efficacy in the treatment of some anxiety disorders. Some second-generation antipsychotics, mainly quetiapine, aripiprazole and

  4. Fibromyalgia and Myofascial Pain Syndrome-A Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Chandola, H C; Chakraborty, Arunangshu

    2009-01-01

    Summary Pain and fatigue associated to the musculoskeletal system are among the leading causes of patients to visit their physicians and nearly one-third of such patients suffer from fibromyalgia. Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a chronic debilitating disorder characterized by widespread pain with tenderness in specific areas, leading to fatigue, headache and sleep disorder. Myofascial Pain Syndrome (MPS), is also a localized musculoskeletal pain producing condition whose diagnostic and management criteria differ from FMS but still considered by many only a subtype of FMS. Till date no exact cause has been held responsible for these painful conditions, therefore treatment of these disorders is always a challenge. The therapies are not precise but multimodal including pharmacological and alternative approaches. This article describes the existing knowledge pertaining to these conditions in regard of causative factors diagnosis and management. PMID:20640108

  5. Adjudication of fibromyalgia syndrome: Challenges in the medicolegal arena

    PubMed Central

    Fitzcharles, Mary-Ann; Ste-Marie, Peter A; Mailis, Angela; Shir, Yoram

    2014-01-01

    The medicolegal challenges surrounding fibromyalgia (FM) arise from the subjectivity of symptoms, causal attribution and reported symptoms sufficiently severe to cause disablement. In the present article, the authors have endeavoured to provide clarification of some current issues by referencing the current literature, including the 2012 Canadian Fibromyalgia Guidelines. While FM is accepted as a valid condition, its diagnosis is vulnerable to misuse due to the subjectivity of symptoms. Without a defining cause, a physical or psychological event may be alleged to trigger FM, but adjudication of causation must be prudent. Although some individuals may experience severe symptoms, the prevalent societal concept of disablement due to FM must be tempered with the knowledge that working contributes to psychosocial wellbeing. Evidence provided in the present report may assist the courts in reaching decisions concerning FM. PMID:25479148

  6. Juvenile Fibromyalgia: Different from the Adult Chronic Pain Syndrome?

    PubMed

    Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; King, Christopher; Ting, Tracy V; Arnold, Lesley M

    2016-04-01

    While a majority of research has focused on adult fibromyalgia (FM), recent evidence has provided insights into the presence and impact of FM in children and adolescents. Commonly referred as juvenile fibromyalgia (JFM), youths, particularly adolescent girls, present with persistent widespread pain and cardinal symptoms observed in adult FM. A majority of youth with JFM continue to experience symptoms into adulthood, which highlights the importance of early recognition and intervention. Some differences are observed between adult and juvenile-onset FM syndrome with regard to comorbidities (e.g., joint hypermobility is common in JFM). Psychological comorbidities are common but less severe in JFM. Compared to adult FM, approved pharmacological treatments for JFM are lacking, but non-pharmacologic approaches (e.g., cognitive-behavioral therapy and exercise) show promise. A number of conceptual issues still remain including (1) directly comparing similarities and differences in symptoms and (2) identifying shared and unique mechanisms underlying FM in adults and youths.

  7. Bayesian analysis of factors associated with fibromyalgia syndrome subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayawardana, Veroni; Mondal, Sumona; Russek, Leslie

    2015-01-01

    Factors contributing to movement-related fear were assessed by Russek, et al. 2014 for subjects with Fibromyalgia (FM) based on the collected data by a national internet survey of community-based individuals. The study focused on the variables, Activities-Specific Balance Confidence scale (ABC), Primary Care Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder screen (PC-PTSD), Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (TSK), a Joint Hypermobility Syndrome screen (JHS), Vertigo Symptom Scale (VSS-SF), Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder (OCPD), Pain, work status and physical activity dependent from the "Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire" (FIQR). The study presented in this paper revisits same data with a Bayesian analysis where appropriate priors were introduced for variables selected in the Russek's paper.

  8. Evaluation and management of endocrine dysfunction in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Geenen, Rinie; Jacobs, Johannes W G; Bijlsma, Johannes W J

    2002-05-01

    Fibromyalgia-like symptoms such as muscle pain and tenderness, exhaustion, reduced exercise capacity, and cold intolerance, resemble symptoms associated with endocrine dysfunction like hypothyroidism, and adrenal or growth hormone insufficiency. To investigate the potential of management of endocrine abnormalities for relieve of symptoms of patients with fibromyalgia, we reviewed experimental and clinical studies of endocrine functioning and endocrine treatment. Serum GH, androgen, and 24-hour urinary cortisol levels of patients with fibromyalgia tend to be in the lower part of the normal range, while serum levels of thyroid hormone, female sex hormones, prolactin, and melatonin are normal. With exception of GH, these conclusions are based on studies in small samples. With respect to dynamic responsiveness of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, the dexamethasone suppression test and stimulation with ACTH show normal results, while patients show marked ACTH hypersecretion in response to severe acute stressors, perhaps indicative of chronic CRH hyposecretion. This finding and slightly altered responsiveness of growth hormone, thyroid hormone, and prolactin in pharmacologic stimulation tests suggest a central rather than peripheral origin of endocrine deviations. Because hormone level deviations were not severe, occurred in subgroups of patients only, and few controlled clinical trials were performed, there is--unless future research shows otherwise--little support for hormone supplementation as a general therapy in the common patient with fibromyalgia. In patients with clinically overt hormone deficiency, hormonal supplementation is an option. In patients with hormone levels that are in the lower part of the normal range, interventions aimed at pain, fatigue, sleep or mood disturbance, and physical deconditioning may indirectly improve endocrine functioning.

  9. MP Joint Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... arthritis. The x-ray shows narrowing of the space between the bones, which is a sign that cartilage has been lost. Your doctor may also order blood tests or imaging studies to confirm the diagnosis. Treatment There are many ...

  10. Arthritis in hip (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Cartilage normally protects the joint, allowing for smooth movement. Cartilage also absorbs shock when pressure is placed on ... like when walking. Arthritis involves the breakdown of cartilage. Without the usual amount of cartilage, the bones ...

  11. Juvenile chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Southwood, T R; Woo, P

    1995-05-01

    The nomenclature and classification criteria for arthritis in children should be dealt with initially as separate issues, although they are undoubtedly intertwined. The classification criteria should aim to delineate homogeneous patient populations, yet should be flexible enough to incorporate advances in disease knowledge. It should be recognized that arriving at an international consensus for classification criteria will merely provide a set of operational definitions to facilitate research, and not a set of diagnostic criteria. Indeed the only point to obtaining consensus is to begin a process of systematic ongoing review of the criteria. The labels attached to any of these diseases should facilitate accurate communication. In view of the heterogeneous nature of childhood arthritis, consideration should be given to using a broad umbrella term such as juvenile or childhood arthritis only for communicating with the lay public. Medical nomenclature should be formulated to reflect accurately homogeneous subgroups of arthritis, and should not artificially proscribe a relationship between paediatric and adult disease.

  12. Arthritis and the Feet

    MedlinePlus

    ... for months, or years, then abate, sometimes permanently. Gout (gouty arthritis) : Gout is a condition caused by a buildup of ... sauces, shellfish, and brandy is popularly associated with gout, there are other protein compounds in foods such ...

  13. Fibromyalgia, infection and vaccination: two more parts in the etiological puzzle.

    PubMed

    Ablin, Jacob N; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Buskila, Dan

    2006-11-01

    As the pathogenesis of fibromyalgia continues to raise debate, multiple putative triggers have been implicated. The current review summarizes the available data linking fibromyalgia to either infection or vaccination. Multiple infectious agents have been associated with the development of either full-blown fibromyalgia (e.g. hepatits C), or with symptom complexes extensively overlapping with that syndrome (e.g. chronic Lyme disease). The cases of Lyme disease, mycoplasma, hepatits C and HIV are detailed. Despite the described associations, no evidence is available demonstrating the utility of antibiotic or anti-viral treatment in the management of fibromyalgia. Possible mechanistic links between fibromyalgia and HIV are reviewed. Associations have been described between various vaccinations and symptom complexes including fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome. The case of Gulf War syndrome, a functional multisystem entity sharing many clinical characteristics with fibromyalgia is discussed, with emphasis on the possibility of association with administration of multiple vaccinations during deployment in the Persian Gulf and the interaction with stress and trauma. Based on this example a model is proposed, wherein vaccinations function as co-triggers for the development of functional disorders including fibromyalgia, in conjunction with additional contributing factors.

  14. Fibromyalgia at an Educational Facility--Is There a Link to Indoor Air Quality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Emily J.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses whether it is biologically plausible for an environmental laboratory contaminant to cause fibromyalgia. Presents a study of two populations which indicated that fibromyalgia was occurring at an elevated rate in a building where ventilation was deemed inadequate for laboratory activities. (Author/WRM)

  15. Psychological factors mediate key symptoms of fibromyalgia through their influence on stress.

    PubMed

    Malin, Katrina; Littlejohn, Geoffrey Owen

    2016-09-01

    The clinical features of fibromyalgia are associated with various psychological factors, including stress. We examined the hypothesis that the path that psychological factors follow in influencing fibromyalgia symptoms is through their direct effect on stress. Ninety-eight females with ACR 1990 classified fibromyalgia completed the following questionnaires: The Big 5 Personality Inventory, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, Perceived Stress Scale, Profile of Mood States, Mastery Scale, and Perceived Control of Internal States Scale. SPSS (PASW version 22) was used to perform basic t tests, means, and standard deviations to show difference between symptom characteristics. Pathway analysis using structural equation modelling (Laavan) examined the effect of stress on the relationships between psychological factors and the elements that define the fibromyalgia phenotype. The preferred model showed that the identified path clearly linked the psychological variables of anxiety, neuroticism and mastery, but not internal control, to the three key elements of fibromyalgia, namely pain, fatigue and sleep (p < 0.001), via the person's perceived stress. Confusion, however, did not fit the preferred model. This study confirms that stress is a necessary link in the pathway between certain identified, established and significant psychological factors and key fibromyalgia symptoms. This has implications for the understanding of contributing mechanisms and the clinical care of patients with fibromyalgia.

  16. Concomitance of fibromyalgia syndrome and cervical disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Güler, Mustafa; Aydın, Teoman; Akgöl, Erdal; Taşpınar, Özgür

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and cervical disc herniation (CDH) are a common diseases commonly encountered in physical therapy clinics. There are also patients who have both of these diseases. In this study we aim to investigated whether FMS is a risk factor for cervical disc herniation and the frequency of their coincident occurrence. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-five patients having a primary FMS diagnosis according to the American Rheumatism Association criteria are taken into consideration and a control group were the subjects of this study. The two groups were compared with respect to cervical disc hernia using cervical region MRI. [Results] The distribution of disc hernia of 6 fibromyalgia patients who had cervical discopathy was: 16.6% C2–3, 16.6% C5–6, 16.6% C6–7, 33.3% C4–5, C5–6 (two levels in two patients) and 16.6% C4–5, C5–6, C7–1 (three levels in one patient) . The herniation directions were given as: central in 5 levels, right paramedian in 1 level, and left paramedian disc hernia in 1 level. There were 4 cervical disk hernia in the control group. The herniation direction were central in two, right paramedian in one, and left paramedian in one patient. [Conclusion] In this study, the existence of cervical disc herniation in fibromyalgia patients was found to be not different from the normal population. PMID:25931731

  17. Is there a new finding added to the fibromyalgia syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Sarifakioglu, Banu; Guzelant, Aliye Yildirim; Alpsoy, Seref; Topcu, Birol; Unsal, Cuneyt; Sahin, Nilay

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to examine depression and anxiety related arrhytmia risk in fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). METHODS: Fifty-nine patients with the diagnosis of FMS and 20 control participants were included in the study. Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), Visual Pain Scale (VPS) surveys were applied to determine the severity of the disease. Beck Anxiety (BAS) and Beck Depression scales (BDS) were applied to all participants. Electrocardiograms were obtained from all participants. P-wave dispersions (Pd) were estimated to determine the risk of the atrial arrhythmia, and QT wave dispersion (QTd) and corrected QT(QTdd) values were used to predict the risk of ventricular arrhythmia. RESULTS: BAS and BDS results were significantly higher in the patient group compared to the control group (p˂0001). In the patient group, Pd was significantly longer (p=0.034). Other clinical, and demographic data did not differ significantly between groups. CONCLUSION: In this study, the risk of arrhythmia in FMS was evaluated and increased Pd in patients with FMS compared to the control group was detected. This finding shows increased risk of atrial fibrilation (AF) in patients with FMS. If we consider that patients with fibromyalgia consist relatively of young patients together with the increased risk of AF with age, it is important to follow-up these patients in later ages for AF risk. PMID:28058295

  18. Exercise and cognitive-behavioural treatment in fibromyalgia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kurtais, Yesim; Kutlay, Sehim; Ergin, Süreyya

    2006-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is a nonarticular rheumatic disorder characterised by diffuse musculoskeletal pain, stiffness, fatigue, disturbed sleep and tender points. The pathophysiology is not well understood and treatment remains a challenge. Although pharmacological therapy is still the primary treatment choice, a long-term effective intervention has not been demonstrated yet. Thus, besides pharmacotherapy, other multimodal interventions are often used. Exercise and cognitive-behavioural treatments which exist in the multimodal approach and encompass largely self-managed strategy, are reviewed in this article. Although, there is a great number of exercise studies, the large diversity of outcome measures and measurement instruments that have been used in studies, varying intensity and types of exercises, small sample sizes, high attrition rates, large variability in baseline function, symptom severity and psychosocial status limit to come to a conclusion about the efficacy of exercise in the treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome. There are also inconclusive results about the efficacy of cognitive-behavioural treatment because of limited number of studies with small sample sizes of patients with fibromyalgia syndrome. However, the results of the trials overall demonstrate the beneficial effects of both different types of exercise and cognitive-behavioural treatment, on the other hand, there is still a need for larger, more systematic and randomised controlled trials to evaluate the effectiveness.

  19. Rehabilitation in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lubrano, Ennio; Spadaro, Antonio; Parsons, Wendy J; Atteno, Mariangela; Ferrara, Nicola

    2009-08-01

    This article summarizes the state of the art of rehabilitation in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Very little evidence was available to assess the efficacy of rehabilitation. Some data were borrowed from studies on ankylosing spondylitis. Covering certain aspects of the disease by the standard measure of functioning was difficult. However, rehabilitation was considered by the GRAPPA Group (Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis), as part of treatment of axial PsA.

  20. Osteoporosis and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Del Puente, Antonio; Esposito, Antonella; Parisi, Anna; Atteno, Mariangela; Montalbano, Simona; Vitiello, Maria; Esposito, Carmela; Bertolini, Nicoletta; Foglia, Francesca; Costa, Luisa; Scarpa, Raffaele

    2012-07-01

    Osteoporosis (OP) is a skeletal disorder characterized by compromised bone strength that predisposes to an increased risk of fracture. The prevalence of OP in the general population is very high as established in several studies, and OP represents one of the possible aspects of bone involvement in arthritis. In psoriatic arthritis this involvement is particularly complex because it affects not only mechanisms of bone loss but also of bone formation. We will discuss these aspects and the available epidemiological data.

  1. If fibromyalgia did not exist, we should have invented it. A short history of a controversial syndrome.

    PubMed

    Perrot, S

    2012-09-28

    Fibromyalgia is a recent disease, and some physicians remain doubtful about its reality. The history of fibromyalgia is a story of controversies: the fight between subjectivity and cartesianism, and between old mind and body concepts. Fibromyalgia represents the emblematic condition of unexplained medical symptoms, far from well-defined diseases with objective biomarkers. In this review we will follow the fibromyalgia story along the ages and sciences to better understand this complex pain disorder, between soma and psyche, and between medicine and psycho-sociology and to demonstrate that fibromyalgia exist, we have not invented it.

  2. [Arthritis and infections].

    PubMed

    Cimaz, R; Meregalli, E; Biggioggero, M; Casadei, A; Careddu, P

    2005-08-01

    Arthritis caused by infectious agents can be secondary to direct invasion of the joint space or to immune mechanisms (subsequent to or concomitant to an infection). Septic arthritis refers to a situation when bacteria can be cultured in synovial fluid. Arthritis can complicate for example meningococcemia or infection by Neisseria gonorrhoeae or Haemophilus influenzae. Reactive (postinfectious) arthritides are an important diagnostic category within a pediatric rheumatology practice. Yersinia and, less frequently, Salmonella, play an important role in postdiarrheal disorders. The arthritis that can ensue is usually oligoarticular and occurs 1-2 weeks after the enteric infection. Reiter's syndrome, rare in the pediatric age, is characterized by the triad urethritis-conjunctivitis-arthritis. Postviral arthritides can occur after a variety of viral infections, including Parvovirus B19, rubella, and others (e.g. hepatitis B, Epstein-Barr virus, chickenpox, mumps). Especially in patients with acute arthritis, the presence of preceding infections should always be investigated. Although the majority of postinfectious arthritides are self-limiting in nature and do not require specific treatment, conditions such as Lyme borreliosis and rheumatic fever can be associated with significant morbidity, and sometimes can be even lethal.

  3. Fibromyalgia and non-celiac gluten sensitivity: a description with remission of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Isasi, Carlos; Colmenero, Isabel; Casco, Fernando; Tejerina, Eva; Fernandez, Natalia; Serrano-Vela, José I; Castro, Maria J; Villa, Luis F

    2014-11-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) syndrome is a disabling clinical condition of unknown cause, and only symptomatic treatment with limited benefit is available. Gluten sensitivity that does not fulfill the diagnostic criteria for celiac disease (CD) is increasingly recognized as a frequent and treatable condition with a wide spectrum of manifestations that overlap with the manifestations of FM, including chronic musculoskeletal pain, asthenia, and irritable bowel syndrome. The aim of this report was to describe 20 selected patients with FM without CD who improved when placed on a gluten-free diet. An anti-transglutaminase assay, duodenal biopsy, and HLA typing were performed in all cases. CD was ruled out by negative anti-transglutaminase assay results and absence of villous atrophy in the duodenal biopsy. All patients had intraepithelial lymphocytosis without villous atrophy. Clinical response was defined as achieving at least one of the following scenarios: remission of FM pain criteria, return to work, return to normal life, or the discontinuation of opioids. The mean follow-up period was 16 months (range 5-31). This observation supports the hypothesis that non-celiac gluten sensitivity may be an underlying cause of FM syndrome.

  4. Validation of the Arabic version of the revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR_A) on Jordanian females with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Abu-Dahab, Sana; AbuRuz, Salah M; Mustafa, Khader; Sarhan, Yusef

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to translate and validate the Arabic version of the Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR_A). Translation of the FIQR followed a worldwide-recognized approach to ensure the accuracy and equivalency of the translation from the English version of the FIQR. Following the translation of the FIQR, 92 women with fibromyalgia completed the FIQR_A, the Arabic Research ANd Development Short Form Health Survey (RAND SF-36), and the Arabic Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales (HADS). The FIQR_A significantly correlated with RAND SF-36 domains and HADS. The correlations ranged from fair to moderate. For selected outcomes, Bland-Altman plots were consistent with Spearman's correlations. Test-retest intraclass correlation coefficients were all significant and ranged from moderate to excellent. Internal consistency was found to be excellent. These observations suggest that the FIQR_A is a valid and reliable tool for both clinical practice and research purposes with Arabic speakers globally.

  5. Juvenile fibromyalgia in an adolescent patient with sickle cell disease presenting with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Ramprakash, Stalin; Fishman, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Juvenile fibromyalgia in children with sickle cell disease has not been reported in the literature. We report an adolescent patient with sickle cell whose pain symptoms progressed from having recurrent acute sickle cell pain crisis episodes to a chronic pain syndrome over several years. He was eventually diagnosed with juvenile fibromyalgia based on the clinical history and myofascial tender points and his pain symptoms responded better to multidisciplinary strategies for chronic fibromyalgia pain. Chronic pain in sickle cell disease is an area of poor research, and in addition there is inconsistency in the definition of chronic pain in sickle cell disease. Central sensitisation to pain is shown to occur after recurrent painful stimuli in a genetically vulnerable individual. In a chronic pain condition such as fibromyalgia central sensitisation is thought to play a key role. Fibromyalgia should be considered as one of the main differential diagnosis in any sickle cell patient with chronic pain.

  6. Fibromyalgia in patients with axial spondyloarthritis: epidemiological profile and effect on measures of disease activity.

    PubMed

    Salaffi, Fausto; De Angelis, Rossella; Carotti, Marina; Gutierrez, Marwin; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo; Atzeni, Fabiola

    2014-08-01

    To determine the prevalence of fibromyalgia (FM) in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) or psoriatic arthritis (PsA) characterized by axial involvement (axial-PsA), and to assess the discriminative ability of different versions of the Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS) and the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Activity Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) in measuring disease activity in three different cohorts of patients with axial spondyloarthritis (axial-SpA), FM, or both (axial-SpA + FM), this study was divided into two phases: (1) 402 patients with definite AS or axial-PsA were examined to diagnose FM and estimate its prevalence; and (2) 419 patients (111 with axial-SpA, 248 with FM, and 60 with aSpA + FM) were evaluated using the different versions of the ASDAS and BASDAI to assess the effect on disease activity. The overall prevalence of FM in the axial-SpA population was 14.9 %, significantly higher among women (p < 0.0001); the estimated prevalence in AS was 12.7 % and in axial-PsA was 17.2 %. Although the BASDAI scores correlated with those of ASDAS-C-reactive protein (CRP) and ASDAS-erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (p < 0.0001), only ASDAS had sufficient discriminatory ability to assess disease activity. The addition of only one marker of inflammation led to an adequate level of significance (ASDAS-CRP, p = 0.0018; ASDAS-ESR, p = 0.003). FM is common in axial-SpA and more prevalent in female patients. Our findings suggest that ASDAS is better than BASDAI in distinguishing patients with disease activity from those with functional impairment. The use of ASDAS may be very useful in clinical practice as it allows treating patients with the most appropriate therapy.

  7. Psychological Resilience, Affective Mechanisms and Symptom Burden in a Tertiary-care Sample of Patients with Fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Samantha J; Vincent, Ann; Hassett, Afton L; Whipple, Mary O; Oh, Terry H; Benzo, Roberto P; Toussaint, Loren L

    2015-10-01

    Research demonstrates that patients with fibromyalgia who have higher positive and lower negative affect have lower symptom burden. Affect has been shown to be associated with resilience. This study examined the relationship between affect, resilience and fibromyalgia symptom burden in a clinical sample of patients with fibromyalgia. We hypothesized that (a) positive and negative affect would be associated with fibromyalgia symptom burden; (b) resilience would be associated with positive and negative affect; (c) resilience would be associated with fibromyalgia symptom burden; and (d) the connection between resilience and fibromyalgia symptom burden would be mediated by both positive and negative affect. A sample of 858 patients with fibromyalgia completed questionnaires. Mediation modelling revealed statistically significant direct effects of resilience on fibromyalgia symptom burden (β = -0.10, P < 0.001) and statistically significant indirect effects of resilience on fibromyalgia symptom burden through affect (β = -0.36, P < 0.001), suggesting that both resilience and affect influence fibromyalgia symptom burden. Our results suggest that improving affect through resiliency training could be studied as a modality for improving fibromyalgia symptom burden.

  8. Reactive arthritis mimicking inflammatory bowel disease arthritis: a challenging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Trabulo, D; Mangualde, J; Cremers, I; Oliveira, A P

    2014-01-01

    Reactive arthritis comprises a subgroup of infection-associated arthritis which occurs after genitourinary or gastrointestinal tract infection in genetically susceptible hosts. Studies have proposed Salmonella, Shigella or Yersinia infection as the microorganisms responsible for the post-dysenteric form. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 is a well recognised best-known predisposing factor. We report a case of HLA-B27-associated reactive arthritis after Salmonella goldcoast enteritis, mimicking inflammatory bowel disease arthritis.

  9. Diffuse nonscarring alopecia of scalp: an indicator of early infantile scurvy?

    PubMed

    Ragunatha, Shivanna; Inamadar, Arun C; Palit, Aparna; Sampagavi, Vishwanath V; Deshmukh, Niranjan S

    2008-01-01

    An infant with diffuse nonscarring alopecia of scalp and radiologic features of scurvy responded dramatically to oral vitamin C therapy. The characteristic cutaneous manifestations of scurvy are usually not seen in infancy. The manifestations of initial stage of scurvy that are not related to collagen synthesis, as in the present case, should alert to the possibility of this potentially fatal condition.

  10. Advances in the treatment of male androgenetic alopecia: a brief review of finasteride studies.

    PubMed

    Whiting, D A

    2001-01-01

    Finasteride is a type 2 5a-reductase inhibitor and therefore mimics the biochemical profile of inherited type 2 5a-reductase deficiency in men. It was developed to grow hair in androgenetic alopecia and shrink benign prostatic hyperplasia. Various clinical trials of finasteride have confirmed its beneficial effects in androgenetic alopecia in males, but not in females. It can produce visible hair growth in up to 66% of men with mild to moderate alopecia, but importantly can stop hair loss in 91% of patients. In long-term finasteride studies, placebo patients were characterized by significant and progressive hair loss. It can be concluded that finasteride prevents further hair loss by actually continuing to grow enough hair to preserve scalp coverage. This is confirmed by the loss of hair following withdrawal of finasteride in such cases. The proven preservative effect of finasteride, in addition to its restorative effect, is a strong indication for prescribing it in early cases of androgenetic alopecia before much hair has been lost.

  11. UV laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and laser Doppler flowmetry in the diagnostics of alopecia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skomorokha, Diana P.; Pigoreva, Yulia N.; Salmin, Vladimir V.

    2016-04-01

    Development of optical biopsy methods has a great interest for medical diagnostics. In clinical and experimental studies it is very important to analyze blood circulation quickly and accurately, thereby laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is widely used. UV laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (UV LIFS) is express highly sensitive and widely-spread method with no destructive impact, high excitation selectivity and the possibility to use in highly scattering media. The goal of this work was to assess a correlation of UV laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and laser Doppler flowmetry parameters, and a possibility to identify or to differentiate various types of pathological changes in tissues according to their autofluorescence spectra. Three groups of patients with diffuse (symptomatic) alopecia, androgenic alopecia, and focal alopecia have been tested. Each groups consisted of not less than 20 persons. The measurements have been done in the parietal and occipital regions of the sculls. We used the original automated spectrofluorimeter to record autofluorescence spectra, and standard laser Doppler flowmeter BLF-21 (Transonic Systems, Inc., USA) to analyze the basal levels of blood circulation. Our results show that UV LIFS accurately distinguishes the zones with different types of alopecia. We found high correlation of the basal levels of blood circulation and the integrated intensity of autofluorescence in the affected tissue.

  12. Preventive effects of cedrol against alopecia in cyclophosphamide-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Yan; Lu, Qiu-Li; Lin, Zhe; Zhao, Yuqing

    2016-09-01

    Although numerous hypotheses have been proposed to prevent chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA), effective pharmaceuticals have yet to be developed. In our study, the back hairs of C57BL/6 mice were factitiously removed. These mice were then treated with cedrol or minoxidil daily. Mice with early-stage anagen VI hair follicles were treated with cyclophosphamide (CYP, 125mg/kg) to induce alopecia. The CYP-damaged hair follicles were observed and quantified by using a digital photomicrograph. The results demonstrated that the minoxidil-treated mice suffered from complete alopecia similar to the model 6days after CYP administration. Simultaneously, the cedrol-treated (200mg/kg) mice manifested mild alopecia with 40% suppression. Histological observation revealed that anagen hair follicles of the cedrol-pretreated mice (82.5%) likely provided from damage compared with the sparse and dystrophic hair follicles of the model mice (37.0%). Therefore, the use of topical cedrol can prevent hair follicle dystrophy and provide local protection against CIA.

  13. The spotted lunula. A neglected nail sign associated with alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Shelley, W B

    1980-05-01

    Three patients with alopecia areata were observed to have spotty absence of t4e whiteness of the lunulae of their nails. This was ascribed to defects in the tongue of matrical epithelium which lies under the nail plate and accounts for the lunula. An analogy is drawn with Wickham's striae.

  14. Illness perception and fibromyalgia impact on female patients from Spain and the Netherlands: do cultural differences exist?

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Montero, Pedro J; Van Wilgen, C Paul; Segura-Jiménez, Victor; Carbonell-Baeza, Ana; Delgado-Fernández, Manuel

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the differences in illness perception and overall impact on fibromyalgia females from Spain and the Netherlands. A total of 325 fibromyalgia females from Spain (54.3 ± 7.1 years) and the Netherlands (51.8 ± 7.2 years) participated in the study. Illness perception and impact of fibromyalgia were assessed by the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire and the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, respectively. Spanish fibromyalgia females perceived more symptoms related to their fibromyalgia (identity) such as nausea, breathlessness, wheezing or fatigue (P < 0.001) and had greater emotional representation (P < 0.01). Dutch fibromyalgia females experienced less timeline (acute/chronic) and consequences (all, P < 0.05), had a better cyclical timeline, personal control, treatment control and illness coherence (all, P < 0.001). Spanish fibromyalgia females reported higher impact of fibromyalgia than Dutch females (61.2 + 14.8 vs. 54.9 + 16.4, respectively; P < 0.001), but the effect size was small (Cohen's d = 0.41) . Impact of fibromyalgia and negative views of fibromyalgia were higher in Spanish fibromyalgia females, whereas Dutch fibromyalgia females presented higher score of positive beliefs about the controllability of the illness. Psychological interventions which help patients to cope with their illness perception might lead to an improvement of the impact of the disease on fibromyalgia females.

  15. The relationship between disease activity, sleep, psychiatric distress and pain sensitivity in rheumatoid arthritis: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Despite recent advances in anti-inflammatory therapy, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients continue to rate pain as a priority. The etiology of RA pain is likely multifactorial, including both inflammatory and non-inflammatory components. In this study, we examine the association between disease activity, sleep, psychiatric distress and pain sensitivity in RA. Methods Fifty-nine female RA patients completed questionnaires and underwent pressure pain threshold testing to assess hyperalgesia/allodynia at joint and non-joint sites. Blood samples were taken to measure C-reactive protein (CRP). The association between disease activity, sleep problems, psychiatric distress and pain threshold was assessed using Pearson/Spearman correlations and multivariable linear regression. Disease activity levels, sleep problems and psychiatric distress were compared between RA patients with fibromyalgia and RA patients without fibromyalgia. Results In unadjusted analyses, CRP was not correlated with pain threshold, but tender joint count was inversely correlated with pain threshold at all sites (P ≤ 0.004). Sleep problems were associated with low pain threshold at all sites (P ≤ 0.0008). Psychiatric distress was associated with low pain threshold at the wrist and thumbnail (P ≤ 0.006). In multivariable linear regression models, CRP was inversely associated with wrist pain threshold (P = 0.003). Sleep problems were inversely associated with pain threshold at all sites (P ≤ 0.01), but psychiatric distress was not. Despite differences in pain threshold, CRP levels and sleep problems between RA patients with fibromyalgia and those without fibromyalgia, associations between these variables did not change when patients with fibromyalgia were excluded. Conclusions Multivariable models are essential in analyses of pain. Among RA patients, inflammation is associated with heightened pain sensitivity at joints. In contrast, poor sleep is associated with diffuse pain

  16. Two mouse mutations mapped to chromosome 11 with differing morphologies but similar progressive inflammatory alopecia.

    PubMed

    Wood, Geoffrey A; Flenniken, Ann; Osborne, Lucy; Fleming, Craig; Vukobradovic, Igor; Morikawa, Lily; Xu, Qiang; Porter, Rebecca; Adamson, S Lee; Rossant, Janet; McKerlie, Colin

    2005-05-01

    Alopecia is a common dermatological condition in humans and other mammals. Here, we present two similar but histologically distinct mouse models of scarring alopecia. Both mutant lines were generated using random genome-wide N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis, and both harbor dominant mutations on chromosome 11. In both mutants, there is an early onset of alopecia that progresses to nearly complete pelage hair loss in both males and females by 20 weeks of age. Histologically, there is an increased dermal cellularity due to inflammatory cell infiltration at 7-10 days of age. By 3 weeks of age, the epidermis is acanthotic and the dermis is approximately twice as thick as in control mice due to a substantial, mostly mononuclear, inflammatory cell infiltrate. This infiltrate becomes more perifollicular by 4-5 weeks of age but is localized differently in the two mutants. In alopecia 1 (Alo-1), the perifollicular infiltrate is confined to the portion of the follicle within the dermis, whereas in Alo-2, the infiltrate extends the full length of the follicle. Expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I on the follicular epithelium in the two mutants is much greater than that in non-mutants. Furthermore, MHC class I expression is localized differently in the two mutant lines and mirrors the pattern of the inflammatory infiltrate. Despite these differences, the clinical progression of alopecia is identical in both mutants. The early onset of the disease, predictable progression, and differences in inflammatory cell localization between the two mutants make these mice particularly useful models for inflammatory hair loss and autoimmune diseases in general.

  17. Cachexia in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Walsmith, Joseph; Roubenoff, Ronenn

    2002-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a debilitating, chronic, systemic, autoimmune disease of unknown etiology that causes destruction of joint cartilage and bone. It generally occurs between the fourth and sixth decades of life, and affects two to three times more women than men. It is characterized by joint stiffness, pain, and swelling, and is accompanied by a loss of body cell mass. This loss of cell mass, known as rheumatoid cachexia, predominates in skeletal muscle, but also occurs in the viscera and immune system. Thus, rheumatoid cachexia leads to muscle weakness and a loss of functional capacity, and is believed to accelerate morbidity and mortality in rheumatoid arthritis. Currently there is no established mechanism for rheumatoid cachexia, but it is accompanied by elevated resting energy expenditure, accelerated whole-body protein catabolism, and excess production of the inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1beta. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha is probably the central mediator of muscle wasting in rheumatoid arthritis, and is known to act synergistically with interleukin-1beta to promote cachexia. In general, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1beta are thought to alter the balance between protein degradation and protein synthesis in rheumatoid arthritis to cause muscle wasting. The precise mechanism by which they do this is not known. Reduced peripheral insulin action and low habitual physical activity are important consequences of rheumatoid arthritis, and have also been implicated as mediators of rheumatoid cachexia. Insulin inhibits muscle protein degradation. Consequently, reduced peripheral insulin action in rheumatoid arthritis is thought to be permissive to cytokine-driven muscle loss. The cause of reduced peripheral insulin action in rheumatoid arthritis is not known, but tumor necrosis factor-alpha has been shown to interfere with insulin receptor signaling and is probably an important contributor. Low habitual physical

  18. Acute septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Shirtliff, Mark E; Mader, Jon T

    2002-10-01

    Acute septic arthritis may develop as a result of hematogenous seeding, direct introduction, or extension from a contiguous focus of infection. The pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis is multifactorial and depends on the interaction of the host immune response and the adherence factors, toxins, and immunoavoidance strategies of the invading pathogen. Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus are used in discussing the host-pathogen interaction in the pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis. While diagnosis rests on isolation of the bacterial species from synovial fluid samples, patient history, clinical presentation, laboratory findings, and imaging studies are also important. Acute nongonococcal septic arthritis is a medical emergency that can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, prompt recognition, rapid and aggressive antimicrobial therapy, and surgical treatment are critical to ensuring a good prognosis. Even with prompt diagnosis and treatment, high mortality and morbidity rates still occur. In contrast, gonococcal arthritis is often successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy alone and demonstrates a very low rate of complications and an excellent prognosis for full return of normal joint function. In the case of prosthetic joint infections, the hardware must be eventually removed by a two-stage revision in order to cure the infection.

  19. An insight into the gastrointestinal component of fibromyalgia: clinical manifestations and potential underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Slim, Mahmoud; Calandre, Elena Pita; Rico-Villademoros, Fernando

    2015-03-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is characterized by chronic generalized pain accompanied by a broad symptomatologic spectrum. Besides chronic fatigue, sleep disturbances, headaches and cognitive dysfunction that are extensively described in the literature, a considerable proportion of patients with fibromyalgia experience gastrointestinal symptoms that are commonly overlooked in the studies that are not specifically dedicated to evaluate these manifestations. Nevertheless, various attempts were undertaken to explore the gastrointestinal dimension of fibromyalgia. Several studies have demonstrated an elevated comorbidity of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) among patients with fibromyalgia. Other studies have investigated the frequency of presentation of gastrointestinal symptoms in fibromyalgia in a nonspecific approach describing several gastrointestinal complaints frequently reported by these patients such as abdominal pain, dyspepsia and bowel changes, among others. Several underlying mechanisms that require further investigation could serve as potential explanatory hypotheses for the appearance of such manifestations. These include sensitivity to dietary constituents such as gluten, lactose or FODMAPs or alterations in the brain-gut axis as a result of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth or subclinical enteric infections such as giardiasis. The gastrointestinal component of fibromyalgia constitutes a relevant element of the multidisciplinary pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying fibromyalgia that need to be unveiled, as this would contribute to the adequate designation of relevant treatment alternatives corresponding to these manifestations.

  20. A protocol and pilot study for managing fibromyalgia with yoga and meditation.

    PubMed

    Hennard, Janet

    2011-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic syndrome characterized by widespread pain, sleep disturbance, stiffness, fatigue, headache, and mood disorders. Recent research has resulted in an improved understanding of fibromyalgia and its possible causes. This article highlights some of the current research, discusses a strategy for using yoga and meditation as a therapy for fibromyalgia sufferers, and presents the results of a preliminary 8-week study using yoga and meditation to help manage fibromyalgia symptoms. The study of 11 participants found significant improvement in the overall health status of the participants and in symptoms of stiffness, anxiety, and depression. Significant improvements were also seen in the reported number of days "felt good" and number of days "missed work" because of fibromyalgia. Nonsignificant improvements were seen in measures of pain, fatigue, and how one felt in the morning. Effect sizes were medium to large for most tested areas. This study supports the benefits of yoga and meditation for individuals with fibromyalgia and encourages further research to explore their use as standard therapies for fibromyalgia.

  1. Clinical utility, safety, and efficacy of pregabalin in the treatment of fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Bhusal, Santosh; Diomampo, Sherilyn; Magrey, Marina N

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic debilitating medical syndrome with limited therapeutic options. Pregabalin, an anticonvulsant and α-2-Δ subunit receptor ligand, is one of the anchor drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of fibromyalgia. The drug has shown clinically meaningful benefits across multiple symptom domains of fibromyalgia. Efficacy of pregabalin in fibromyalgia pain has been evaluated in at least five high-quality randomized trials, two long-term extension studies, a meta-analysis, a Cochrane database systematic review, and several post hoc analyses. These studies also hint towards a meaningful benefit on sleep, functioning, quality of life, and work productivity. Side effects of pregabalin, although common, are mild to moderate in intensity. They are noted early during therapy, improve or disappear with dose reduction, and are not usually life- or organ threatening. In most patients, tolerance develops to the most common side effects, dizziness, and somnolence, with time. With close clinical monitoring at initiation or dose titration, pregabalin can be effectively used in primary care setting. Pregabalin is cost saving with long-term use and its cost-effectiveness profile is comparable, if not better, to that of other drugs used in fibromyalgia. In the present era of limited therapeutic options, pregabalin undoubtedly retains its role as one of cardinal drugs used in the treatment of fibromyalgia. This review intends to discuss the clinical utility of pregabalin in the management of fibromyalgia with a focus on efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness. PMID:26937205

  2. Effects of low sleep quality on sexual function, in women with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Amasyali, A S; Taştaban, E; Amasyali, S Y; Turan, Y; Kazan, E; Sari, E; Erol, B; Cengiz, M; Erol, H

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common experience in women with fibromyalgia. However, the physiopathology of this association is unclear. We aimed to evaluate whether sleep disturbance has an influence on sexual function in women with fibromyalgia. Fifty-four sexually active premenopausal women with fibromyalgia were enrolled in the study. The following questionnaires were used: the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Appropriate statistical analyses were used by using SPSS 18. The mean FSFI score was 25.344 ± 6.52 and showed no correlation with age, body mass index, BDI or duration of fibromyalgia. However, a positive correlation between sexual dysfunction and low sleep quality was found (r=0.43; P=0.001). In addition, the median FSFI score was 29.2 (27.2-32.4) in patients with higher sleep quality (PSQI⩽5), whereas it was 21.4 (18.9-25.3) in patients with lower sleep quality (PSQI>5) (P<0.001). There was a positive correlation between sexual dysfunction and symptoms of fibromyalgia as indicated by a higher FIQ score (r=0.37; P=0.006). Sexual dysfunction in female patients with fibromyalgia may be due to low sleep quality. Treatment of the sleep disorder may improve female sexual function.

  3. Fibrofog and fibromyalgia: a narrative review and implications for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Kravitz, Howard M; Katz, Robert S

    2015-07-01

    Patients with fibromyalgia often report forgetfulness as well as declines in cognitive function, memory, and mental alertness-symptoms that have been termed "fibrofog" in popular and electronic media as well as in professional literature. "Fibrofog" is the subjectively experienced cognitive dysfunction associated with fibromyalgia and is a clinically important yet comparatively less well-studied aspect of the disorder; it includes loss of mental clarity (mental fogginess) as well as attention and memory impairment. Although until recently cognitive symptoms have been largely ignored, these symptoms can be more disturbing than the widespread pain and can change these patients' lives, sometimes dramatically so. Whereas widespread musculoskeletal pain, tenderness, and fatigue may be the hallmark symptoms of fibromyalgia, patients rank cognitive dysfunction highly in terms of disease impact. This review addresses (1) the prevalence of self-reported cognitive disturbances in fibromyalgia, (2) the clinical presentation of fibrofog, (3) neuropsychological test performance, with particular attention to discrepancies between self-report and test results, (3) clinical correlates of impaired cognitive function in fibromyalgia, (4) neurobiology relevant to cognitive disturbances in fibromyalgia, and (5) clinical management of fibrofog. Although the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia remains an enigma, evidence suggests that it may be a brain disorder, with cognitive deficits ("fibrofog") reflecting disturbed centrally mediated processes.

  4. Effects of 12-week combined exercise therapy on oxidative stress in female fibromyalgia patients.

    PubMed

    Sarıfakıoğlu, Banu; Güzelant, Aliye Yıldırım; Güzel, Eda Celik; Güzel, Savaş; Kızıler, Ali Rıza

    2014-10-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the effect of exercise therapy on the oxidative stress in fibromyalgia patients and relationship between oxidative stress and fibromyalgia symptoms. Thirty women diagnosed with fibromyalgia according to the American College of Rheumatology preliminary criteria, and 23 healthy women whose age- and weight-matched women were enrolled the study. Pain intensity with visual analog scale (VAS), the number of tender points, the fibromyalgia impact questionnaire (FIQ), the Beck depression inventory (BDI) were evaluated. The oxidative stress parameters thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, protein carbonyls, and nitric oxide, and antioxidant parameters thiols and catalase were investigated in patients and control group. After, combined aerobic and strengthen exercise regimen was given to fibromyalgia group. Exercise therapy consisted of a warming period of 10 min, aerobic exercises period of 20 min, muscle strengthening exercises for 20 min, and 10 min cooling down period. Therapy was lasting 1 h three times per week over a 12-week period. All parameters were reevaluated after the treatment in the patient group. The oxidative stress parameters levels were significantly higher, and antioxidant parameters were significantly lower in patients with fibromyalgia than in the controls. VAS, FIQ, and BDI scores decreased significantly with exercise therapy. The exercise improved all parameters of oxidative stress and antioxidant parameters. Also, all clinical parameters were improved with exercise. We should focus on oxidative stress in the treatment for fibromyalgia with the main objective of reducing oxidative load.

  5. Frequency, severity and related factors of androgenetic alopecia in dermatology outpatient clinic: hospital-based cross-sectional study in Turkey*

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Kubra Esen; Altunay, Ilknur Kivanc; Kucukunal, Nihal Asli; Cerman, Asli Aksu

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is a patterned hair loss occurring due to systemic androgen and genetic factors. It is the most common cause of hair loss in both genders. In recent years, many studies investigating the relation between systemic diseases and androgenetic alopecia presented controversial results. OBJECTIVES In this study we aimed to investigate the frequency of androgenetic alopecia, the presence of accompanying systemic diseases, the relation between body mass index and androgenetic alopecia severity and the association of hyperandrogenemia signs with androgenetic alopecia in patients who referred to our outpatient clinic. METHODS Patients who referred to our clinic between October 2013 and May 2014 were included in the study. Diagnosis of androgenetic alopecia was made upon clinical findings. Presence of seborrhea and acne in both genders, and hirsutism in women, were examined. Age, gender, smoking habit and alcohol consumption, age of onset of androgenetic alopecia, family history, accompanying systemic diseases and abnormalities of menstrual cycle were recorded. RESULTS 954 patients (535 women, 419 men) were included in the study. Androgenetic alopecia prevalence found was 67.1% in men and 23.9% in women. Androgenetic alopecia prevalence and severity were correlated with age in both genders (p=0,0001). Frequency of accompanying systemic diseases were not significantly different between patients with and without androgenetic alopecia (p=0,087), except for hypertension, which was significantly more frequent in men with androgenetic alopecia aged between 50 and 59 years. Study limitations: Despite the exclusion of other causes of alopecia, differentiation of Ludwig grade 1 AGA from telogen effluvium based on clinical features alone is difficult. CONCLUSIONS In our study the rate of androgenetic alopecia was found to be higher than the other studies made in Asian and Caucasian populations. PMID:28225954

  6. [Arthritis and clinical history].

    PubMed

    Silva, Lígia; Sampaio, Luzia; Pinto, José; Ventura, Francisco S

    2011-01-01

    In front of a patient with arthritis, clinical good-sense tells that the most probable diagnosis are the most prevalent ones. Nevertheless, we have to exclude a multiplicity of other aetiologies, less frequent, but with highest implications in the therapeutic conduct. Infections by Brucella and by Borrelia are rare causes of chronic arthritis, yet are diagnosis to consider, even when the clinical manifestations aren't the most typical, as there still exist endemic areas in Portugal. Here we report two clinical cases about patients with arthritis for more than one year, subject to ineffective exams ant treatments. Only the clinical history could put on evidence clinical-epidemiological data, suggestive of Brucellosis and Lyme Disease, namely the professional contact with infected animals, and the history of probable erythema migrans, that pointed toward the correct diagnosis. So, with directed therapeutic, there was complete resolution of the inflammatory symptoms.

  7. Arthritis in Roman Britain.

    PubMed Central

    Thould, A K; Thould, B T

    1983-01-01

    The pattern of arthritis in Roman Britain was investigated by examining the skeletons of 416 adults from the Roman cemetery at Poundbury Camp near Dorchester, Dorset. The mean height of the people was not much less than that of the current British population, and the prevalence of right handedness was similar to our own. There was a high prevalence of osteoarthritis for such a relatively young community, with particularly severe changes in the vertebral column. The pattern of joints affected by osteoarthritis was different from that seen now, but the prevalence of vertebral ankylosing hyperostosis was much the same. Rheumatoid arthritis was seen as often as the expected rat would indicate, given that the population died young, but it was rare. Other forms of arthritis, including gout and ankylosing spondylitis, were not seen. Images FIG 1 FIG 2 FIG 3 FIG 4 PMID:6418269

  8. Neonatal septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Dan, M

    1983-11-01

    To assess and correlate the microbiology of neonatal septic arthritis with the clinical presentation, we reviewed the records of nine infants with neonatal septic arthritis (NSA) diagnosed at Edmonton hospitals between 1964 and 1981, and evaluated 92 other cases reported in the English literature since 1960. Our analysis revealed that the microbiology of NSA seemed to be dependent on whether it was hospital or community acquired. In the hospital-acquired cases, staphylococci were the predominant isolates (62%), followed by Candida species (17%) and gram-negative enteric bacilli (15%). Community-acquired arthritis was caused most often by streptococci (52%), followed by staphylococci (26%) and gonococci (17%). Since 1970, the relative infrequency of staphylococcal (5%) in favor of streptococcal (75%) isolates in community-acquired NSA is even more pronounced.

  9. Dermatoglyphics in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, Roopa; Shubha, R; Nagesh, H V; Johnson, Job; Rajangam, Sayee

    2003-10-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have been referred to Division of Human Genetics for counselling. Qualitative dermatoglyphics comprising of finger print pattern, interdigital pattern, hypothenar pattern and palmar crease were studied on 26 female and 11 male rheumatoid arthritis patients. Comparison between patient male and control male; and patient female and control female has been done. 'Chi' square test was performed. In male patients, with hands together, arches were increased, loops/ whorls were decreased. Partial Simian crease was significantly increased. In the right hand, patterns were increased in the 3rd interdigital area. On the other hand, in female patients there was a significant increase in whorls and decrease in loops on the first finger on both the hands, increase in arches on the 3rd finger; both arches and whorls on the 4th finger of left hand. Present study has emphasized that dermatoglyphics could be applied as a diagnostic tool to patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  10. Vitiligo and alopecia areata associated with subclinical/clinical hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Virendra N

    2011-01-01

    /dL (86-186); total thyroxine (T4), 6.54 microg/dL (4.5-12.5 microg/dL); and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), 0.32 microIU/mL (0.3-5.6 microIU/mL), supplemented by antithyroid microsomal peroxidase antibodies (thyroid microsomal antibody and thyroid peroxidase), 21.9 IU/mL (1-40 IU/mL), and antithyroglobulin antibodies, 78.1 U/mL (1-100 U/mL). During the patient's treatment period, 4 other patients with clinical symptoms and signs of long-standing hypothyroidism developed vitiligo, the duration of which was variable in each patient (Table I). All of the patients were taking thyroxin. Thyroid and lipid profiles were performed periodically to evaluate the progress (Table I). These patients were also treated with PUVA therapy and thyroxin. During the course of treatment, 2 of the patients noticed asymptomatic, progressive, localized, and well-circumscribed hair loss at the temporal region of the scalp that extended to involve the vertex, conforming to findings of alopecia areata (Figure 2A and Figure 2B).

  11. Traumatic experiences, major life stressors, and self-reporting a physician-given fibromyalgia diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Haviland, Mark G; Morton, Kelly R; Oda, Keiji; Fraser, Gary E

    2010-05-30

    The contribution of stress to the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia has been the subject of considerable debate. The primary purpose of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between traumatic and major life stressors and a fibromyalgia diagnosis in a large group of older women and men. Data were from the federally funded Biopsychosocial Religion and Health Study, and subjects were 10,424 of the 10,988 survey respondents-two-thirds women and one-third men-providing responses to a fibromyalgia question. Average age was 61.0+/-13.5 years. A physician-given fibromyalgia diagnosis in a subject's lifetime was reported by 3.7% of the sample, 4.8% of the women and 1.3% of the men. In two multivariable logistic regression models (all respondents and women only, controlling for age, sex, race/ethnicity, and education), two traumatic experience types (sexual and physical assault/abuse) were associated with a fibromyalgia diagnosis. Two other trauma types (life-threatening and emotional abuse/neglect) and major life stress experiences were not. The highest odds ratios in both models were those for sexual assault/abuse followed by physical assault/abuse. The relationship between age and fibromyalgia was curvilinear in both models (odds ratios rising until approximately age 63 and declining thereafter). In the all-subjects model, being a woman increased the odds of a fibromyalgia diagnosis, and in both models, fibromyalgia was associated with being White (versus non-White) and lower education. We recommend that researchers investigate the relationship between stress and fibromyalgia in concert with genetic and biomarker studies.

  12. Implementation of Health Information Technology in Routine Care for Fibromyalgia: Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Toni; Kawi, Jennifer; Menzel, Nancy Nivison; Hartley, Kendall

    2016-02-01

    Fibromyalgia management remains complicated and challenging. Health information technology is an evidence-based, nonpharmacological self and symptom management strategy, but few studies have evaluated its feasibility for managing fibromyalgia patients in clinical practice. FibroGuide is an example of an evidence-based, interactive, and computer-based program comprised of 10 educational modules on fibromyalgia. Study aims were to: (1) develop a process for implementing FibroGuide into the routine care of patients with fibromyalgia, (2) evaluate the overall impact on fibromyalgia before and after a 12-week implementation, and (3) assess patient perspectives on using FibroGuide health information technology to assist in self-management. In this pilot study, 35 participants with fibromyalgia were recruited from an Advanced Practice Registered Nurse's outpatient clinic. Using a descriptive design, quantitative data analysis was employed to address study aims. Based on data collection pre- and post-intervention using paired samples testing, a statistically significant change (p = .017) was observed in overall fibromyalgia impact (improved symptom severity, activity, and function). Majority felt that FibroGuide was helpful as part of their routine care, and nearly half reported that it assisted in their self-management. Although 65% noted that technology was an effective and efficient way to receive education for fibromyalgia management, 57% preferred talking to healthcare providers. Larger longitudinal studies are needed on the use of health information technology in fibromyalgia, evaluating both statistical and clinical significance, while decreasing barriers to participant use for this promising adjunct to clinical management. Providers need to be well educated on supporting self-management strategies and health information technology.

  13. Surgical Methods for Full-Thickness Skin Grafts to Induce Alopecia Areata in C3H/HeJ Mice

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Kathleen A; Sundberg, John P

    2013-01-01

    Alopecia areata is a cell-mediated autoimmune disease of humans and many domestic and laboratory animal species. C3H/HeJ inbred mice spontaneously develop alopecia areata at a low frequency (approximately 20% by 12 mo of age). Transferring full-thickness skin grafts from affected, older mice to young mice of the same strain reliably reproduces alopecia areata, thus enabling investigators to study disease pathogenesis or intervention with a variety of therapeutic approaches. We here describe in detail how to perform full-thickness skin grafts and the follow-up procedures necessary to consistently generate mice with alopecia areata. These engrafted mice can be used to study the pathogenesis of cell-mediated autoimmune disease and for drug-efficacy trials. This standard protocol can be used for many other purposes when studying abnormal skin phenotypes in laboratory mice. PMID:24210015

  14. Fibromyalgia in a Patient with Cushing's Disease Accompanied by Central Hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Nobumasa; Katada, Shinichi; Yamada, Takaho; Mezaki, Naomi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Akiko; Hanyu, Osamu; Yoneoka, Yuichiro; Kawachi, Izumi; Shimohata, Takayoshi; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Sone, Hirohito

    A 39-year-old woman with a 3-year history of a rounded face developed widespread myalgia. Detailed examinations revealed no disorders that could explain the pain other than concomitant Cushing's disease and central hypothyroidism. Both the hypercortisolemia and hypothyroidism completely resolved after the patient underwent surgery to treat Cushing's disease, but she continued to experience unresolved myalgia and met the diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia. Few studies have so far investigated patients with fibromyalgia associated with Cushing's syndrome. In our case, the hypothyroidism caused by Cushing's disease probably played an important role in triggering and exacerbating fibromyalgia. This highlights the need to examine the endocrine function in patients with muscle pain.

  15. Fibromyalgia, myofascial pain, tender points and trigger points: splitting or lumping?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Myofascial trigger points (MTPs) have long been a contentious issue in relation to fibromyalgia, and poorly defined pain complaints in general. Can MTPs be reproducibly identified? Do MTPs have valid objective findings, such as spontaneous electromyographic activity, muscle microdialysis evidence for an inflammatory milieu or visualization with newer ultrasound techniques? Is fibromyalgia a syndrome of multiple MTPs, or is focal muscle tenderness a manifestation of central sensitization? These issues are discussed with relevance to a recent paper reporting that manual palpation of active MTPs elicits the spontaneous pain experienced by fibromyalgia patients. PMID:21722339

  16. Piriformis syndrome in fibromyalgia: clinical diagnosis and successful treatment.

    PubMed

    Siddiq, Md Abu Bakar; Khasru, Moshiur Rahman; Rasker, Johannes J

    2014-01-01

    Piriformis syndrome is an underdiagnosed extraspinal association of sciatica. Patients usually complain of deep seated gluteal pain. In severe cases the clinical features of piriformis syndrome are primarily due to spasm of the piriformis muscle and irritation of the underlying sciatic nerve but this mysterious clinical scenario is also described in lumbar spinal canal stenosis, leg length discrepancy, piriformis myofascial pain syndrome, following vaginal delivery, and anomalous piriformis muscle or sciatic nerve. In this paper, we describe piriformis and fibromyalgia syndrome in a 30-year-old young lady, an often missed diagnosis. We also focus on management of the piriformis syndrome.

  17. Complementary and alternative exercise for fibromyalgia: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Mist, Scott David; Firestone, Kari A; Jones, Kim Dupree

    2013-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine includes a number of exercise modalities, such as tai chi, qigong, yoga, and a variety of lesser-known movement therapies. A meta-analysis of the current literature was conducted estimating the effect size of the different modalities, study quality and bias, and adverse events. The level of research has been moderately weak to date, but most studies report a medium-to-high effect size in pain reduction. Given the lack of adverse events, there is little risk in recommending these modalities as a critical component in a multimodal treatment plan, which is often required for fibromyalgia management.

  18. Rational treatment of fibromyalgia for a solo practitioner.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Eduardo S; Jones, Kim Dupree

    2010-06-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a challenging condition, but the management of patients with FM is becoming facilitated by new medications that act in what are thought to be some of most important pathophysiological features in this syndrome. However, it is of pivotal importance that an interdisciplinary approach is used to improve pain, fatigue, sleep and other domains to improve quality of life. Here, we present elements of management that the solo practitioner can tackle, focussing in the formally approved drugs for FM and other drugs commonly used in this condition. Further, the elements of an ideal multidisciplinary team are presented, and on how to incorporate their recommendations for the treatment of FM.

  19. [A case of fibromyalgia treated with medical and autogenic training].

    PubMed

    Goto, Fumiyuki; Asama, Youji; Nakai, Kimiko

    2005-12-01

    Fibromyalgia, which is relatively rare, may include symptoms of dizziness, vertigo and tinnitus. Subject was 38 years old woman reporting vertigo and whole body pain. Cochleovestibular function was normal. Pain was gradually intensified during her outpatient clinic and she was admitted. Treatments including intramusclular injection of botulinus toxin and intravenous injection of steroid were applied. Psychological counseling and autogenic training were effective in relieving her pain and vertigo. During her admission, several spells of vertigo occurred but no nystagmus was found. The abnormality in proprioception and neural disintegration may be related to vertigo. Treatment should start as early as possible together with psychological therapy.

  20. Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy for Gallbladder Calculosis in Fibromyalgia Patients: Impact on Musculoskeletal Pain, Somatic Hyperalgesia and Central Sensitization.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Raffaele; Affaitati, Giannapia; Massimini, Francesca; Tana, Claudio; Innocenti, Paolo; Giamberardino, Maria Adele

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia, a chronic syndrome of diffuse musculoskeletal pain and somatic hyperalgesia from central sensitization, is very often comorbid with visceral pain conditions. In fibromyalgia patients with gallbladder calculosis, this study assessed the short and long-term impact of laparoscopic cholecystectomy on fibromyalgia pain symptoms. Fibromyalgia pain (VAS scale) and pain thresholds in tender points and control areas (skin, subcutis and muscle) were evaluated 1week before (basis) and 1week, 1,3,6 and 12months after laparoscopic cholecystectomy in fibromyalgia patients with symptomatic calculosis (n = 31) vs calculosis patients without fibromyalgia (n. 26) and at comparable time points in fibromyalgia patients not undergoing cholecystectomy, with symptomatic (n = 27) and asymptomatic (n = 28) calculosis, and no calculosis (n = 30). At basis, fibromyalgia+symptomatic calculosis patients presented a significant linear correlation between the number of previously experienced biliary colics and fibromyalgia pain (direct) and muscle thresholds (inverse)(p<0.0001). After cholecystectomy, fibromyalgia pain significantly increased and all thresholds significantly decreased at 1week and 1month (1-way ANOVA, p<0.01-p<0.001), the decrease in muscle thresholds correlating linearly with the peak postoperative pain at surgery site (p<0.003-p<0.0001). Fibromyalgia pain and thresholds returned to preoperative values at 3months, then pain significantly decreased and thresholds significantly increased at 6 and 12months (p<0.05-p<0.0001). Over the same 12-month period: in non-fibromyalgia patients undergoing cholecystectomy thresholds did not change; in all other fibromyalgia groups not undergoing cholecystectomy fibromyalgia pain and thresholds remained stable, except in fibromyalgia+symptomatic calculosis at 12months when pain significantly increased and muscle thresholds significantly decreased (p<0.05-p<0.0001). The results of the study show that biliary colics from

  1. What Is Juvenile Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the possible causes of juvenile arthritis. They are studying genetic and environmental factors that they think are involved. They are also trying to improve current treatments and find new medicines that will work better with fewer side effects. Research supported by ...

  2. Dapsone in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chang, D J; Lamothe, M; Stevens, R M; Sigal, L H

    1996-06-01

    Dapsone, a synthetic sulfone with chemical similarities to sulfapyridine, has been used for a number of years to treat leprosy and dermatitis herpetiformis. Recently, a number of prospective, randomized, double-blind trials have shown their success in the management of rheumatoid arthritis, with dapsone being superior to placebo and comparable to chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine. Its mode of anti-inflammatory actions in rheumatoid arthritis is not clearly understood, but modulation of neutrophil activity or inhibition of neutrophil inflammatory product formation or release appear to play a role. The major limiting side effect is hemolytic anemia, which may be mitigated through careful patient selection, conservative drug dosing, close monitoring, and possibly, concurrent administration of antioxidants or cytochrome P450 inhibitors. Methemoglobinemia is another common finding among patients receiving dapsone therapy, but rarely does it result in prominent symptoms other than transient pallor. Less common adverse events to dapsone include the idiosyncratic reactions of leukopenia and agranulocytosis, cutaneous eruptions, peripheral neuropathy, psychosis, toxic hepatitis, cholestatic jaundice, nephrotic syndrome, renal papillary necrosis, severe hypoalbuminemia without proteinuria, an infectious mononucleosis-like syndrome, and minor neurological and gastrointestinal complaints. In this report, two patients with advanced rheumatoid arthritis, who were safely and effectively treated with dapsone after failure with other second-line agents, are described and the literature is reviewed. We suggest that dapsone is an effective second-line agent in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. Neonatal septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Halder, D; Seng, Q B; Malik, A S; Choo, K E

    1996-09-01

    Neonatal septic arthritis has always been considered as separate from its counterpart in older children. The condition is uncommon but serious. Affected neonates usually survive, but with permanent skeletal deformities. Ten cases of neonatal septic arthritis were diagnosed between January 1989 and December 1993 in the neonatal intensive care units of two referral hospitals in the state of Kelantan, Malaysia. All except one neonate was born prematurely. The mean age of presentation was 15.6 days. Joint swelling (10/10), increased warmth (7/10) and erythema of the overlying skin (7/10) were the common presenting signs. Vague constitutional symptoms preceded the definitive signs of septic arthritis in all cases. The total white cell counts were raised with shift to the left. The knee (60%) was not commonly affected, followed by the hip (13%) and ankle (13%). Three neonates had multiple joint involvement. Coexistence of arthritis with osteomyelitis was observed in seven neonates. The commonest organism isolated was methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (9/10). Needle aspiration was performed in nine neonates and one had incision with drainage. Follow up data was available for five neonates and two of these had skeletal morbidity. Early diagnosis by frequent examination of the joints, prompt treatment and control of nosocomial infection are important for management.

  4. Arthritis of the Hand

    MedlinePlus

    ... If arthritis is due to damaged ligaments, the support structures of the joint may be unstable or “loose.” ... dominant hand is affected • Your personal goals, home support structure, and ability to understand the treatment and comply ...

  5. Scalp cooling to prevent alopecia after chemotherapy can be considered safe in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    van den Hurk, C J G; van de Poll-Franse, L V; Breed, W P M; Coebergh, J W W; Nortier, J W R

    2013-10-01

    With modern scalp cooling equipment cytotoxic damage of hair root cells can be prevented in half of the patients with cancer at high risk of alopecia. However, traditionally doubt has existed whether scalp cooling might facilitate hiding and disseminating scalp skin metastases and thus decrease survival. We discuss this risk using frequency data on metastases in breast cancer from observational and autopsy studies and the Munich cancer registry. They showed the incidence of scalp skin metastases to be very low and not differ between scalp-cooled (0.04-1%) and non scalp-cooled (0.03-3%) patients with breast cancer and in need of chemotherapy. We found it rather unlikely that the incidence of scalp skin metastases might increase at all after scalp cooling, whereas a very small proportion of patients receiving chemotherapy are at risk to develop metastases at this site. Scalp cooling can thus safely be offered to patients treated with alopecia-inducing chemotherapy.

  6. Protection against chemotherapy-induced alopecia: targeting ATP-binding cassette transporters in the hair follicle?

    PubMed

    Haslam, Iain S; Pitre, Aaron; Schuetz, John D; Paus, Ralf

    2013-11-01

    Currently, efficacious treatments for chemotherapy-induced alopecia (hair loss) are lacking, and incidences of permanent hair loss following high-dose chemotherapy are on the increase. In this article, we describe mechanisms by which the pharmacological defense status of the hair follicle might be enhanced, thereby reducing the accumulation of cytotoxic cancer drugs and preventing or reducing hair loss and damage. We believe this could be achieved via the selective increase in ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter expression within the hair follicle epithelium, following application of topical agonists for regulatory nuclear receptors. Clinical application would require the development of hair follicle-targeted formulations, potentially utilizing nanoparticle technology. This novel approach has the potential to yield entirely new therapeutic options for the treatment and management of chemotherapy-induced alopecia, providing significant psychological and physical benefit to cancer patients.

  7. The role of iron and zinc in chemotherapy-induced alopecia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyukavci, Mustafa; Gurol, Ali; Karabulut, Abdulhalik; Budak, Gokhan; Karacan, Mehmet

    2005-10-01

    Chemotherapy-induced alopecia is a common and distressing side effect in children with cancer. Iron and zinc are the well known trace elements which are associated with hair shedding. In this study, we investigated the hair content of iron and zinc in children with cancer consists of two groups: group A, newly diagnosed patients; group B, the patients received a course of chemotherapy. We compared the results between each others and healthy controls. Hair content of iron and zinc was not different between the patient groups. Iron concentrations of patient samples, either at diagnosis or after chemotherapy, were significantly lower than healthy controls. However, there was no statistically significant difference between the groups regarding the zinc values. In conclusion, hair content of iron and zinc do not have a role in chemotherapy-induced alopecia.

  8. QT dispersion and P wave dispersion in patients with fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Yolbaş, Servet; Yıldırım, Ahmet; Düzenci, Deccane; Karakaya, Bülent; Dağlı, Mustafa Necati; Koca, Süleyman Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Objective Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic disease characterized by widespread pain. Somatic complaints associated with the cardiovascular system, such as chest pain and palpitations, are frequently seen in FM patients. P and QT dispersions are simple and inexpensive measurements reflecting the regional heterogeneity of atrial and ventricular repolarization, respectively. QT dispersion can cause serious ventricular arrhythmias. The aim of the present study was to evaluate QT dispersion and P wave dispersion in patients with FM. Material and Methods The study involved 48 FM patients who fulfilled the established criteria and 32 healthy controls (HC). A standard 12-lead electrocardiogram was performed on all participants. QT dispersion was defined as the difference between the longest and the shortest QT intervals. Similarly, the differences between the shortest and longest P waves were defined as P wave dispersion. Results The QT dispersion and corrected QT dispersion were shorter in the FM group compared with the HC group (p<0.001 for both). In terms of the P wave dispersion value, there was no significant difference between the FM and HC groups (p=0.088). Conclusion Longer QT and P wave dispersions are not problems in patients with FM. Therefore, it may be concluded that fibromyalgia does not include an increased risk of atrial and/or ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:28149660

  9. Fibromyalgia and chronic widespread pain in autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Jowairiyya; Tagoe, Clement E

    2014-07-01

    Fibromyalgia and chronic widespread pain syndromes are among the commonest diseases seen in rheumatology practice. Despite advances in the management of these conditions, they remain significant causes of morbidity and disability. Autoimmune thyroid disease is the most prevalent autoimmune disorder, affecting about 10 % of the population, and is a recognized cause of fibromyalgia and chronic widespread pain. Recent reports are shedding light on the mechanisms of pain generation in autoimmune thyroid disease-associated pain syndromes including the role of inflammatory mediators, small-fiber polyneuropathy, and central sensitization. The gradual elucidation of these pain pathways is allowing the rational use of pharmacotherapy in the management of chronic widespread pain in autoimmune thyroid disease. This review looks at the current understanding of the prevalence of pain syndromes in autoimmune thyroid disease, their likely causes, present appreciation of the pathogenesis of chronic widespread pain, and how our knowledge can be used to find lasting and effective treatments for the pain syndromes associated with autoimmune thyroid disease.

  10. Juvenile fibromyalgia: current status of research and future developments

    PubMed Central

    Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; Ting, Tracy V.

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile-onset fibromyalgia (JFM) is a poorly understood chronic pain condition most commonly affecting adolescent girls. The condition is characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain and other associated symptoms, including fatigue, nonrestorative sleep, headaches, irritable bowel symptoms, dysautonomia and mood disorders such as anxiety and/or depression. In the past few years, there has been a greater focus on understanding JFM in adolescents. Research studies have provided insight into the clinical characteristics of this condition and its effect on both short-term and long-term psychosocial and physical functioning. The importance of early and effective intervention is being recognized, as research has shown that symptoms of JFM tend to persist and do not resolve over time as was previously believed. Efforts to improve treatments for JFM are underway, and new evidence strongly points to the potential benefits of cognitive–behavioural therapy on improving mood and daily functioning. Research into pharmacotherapy and other nonpharmacological options is in progress. Advancements in the understanding of adult fibromyalgia have paved the way for future studies on diagnosis, assessment and management of JFM. This Review focuses on our current knowledge of the condition, provides an update of the latest research advances, and highlights areas for further study. PMID:24275966

  11. Effect of aerobic exercise on patients with primary fibromyalgia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Salek, A K; Khan, M M; Ahmed, S M; Rashid, M I; Emran, M A; Mamun, M A

    2005-07-01

    Sixty eight adult patients of fibromyalgia were included in this prospective study from the Outpatient Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka during the period of January 2003 to June 2003. Study samples were assigned into two treatment groups: Group A (n = 38) with exercise by static bicycle and aerobic walking in addition to tricyclic antidepressant and analgesic and Group B (n = 30) was non exercise group, treated with tricyclic antidepressant and analgesic only. The total duration of treatment was 16 weeks. Pre-treatment (week 0) and post treatment (week 16) evaluation was performed in both groups. Evaluation parameters included pain grade, number of trigger points, occurrence of arousal at night, frequency of micturition and global evaluation by the physician. After 16 weeks, mean improvement of exercise group and non exercise group was 48% and 39% respectively but this difference was not statistically significant. Therefore, from this study it was observed that aerobic exercise showed no significant benefit to fibromyalgia patients.

  12. Characteristics and incidence of fibromyalgia in patients who receive worker's compensation.

    PubMed

    Bathaii, Seyed Mehdi; Tabaddor, Khosrow

    2006-10-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the incidence of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) in patients with work-related injuries, the potential risk factors for and causes of FMS, and the disabilities associated with FMS.

  13. Mindful Yoga Pilot Study Shows Modulation of Abnormal Pain Processing in Fibromyalgia Patients.

    PubMed

    Carson, James W; Carson, Kimberly M; Jones, Kim D; Lancaster, Lindsay; Mist, Scott D

    2016-09-01

    Published findings from a randomized controlled trial have shown that Mindful Yoga training improves symptoms, functional deficits, and coping abilities in individuals with fibromyalgia and that these benefits are replicable and can be maintained 3 months post-treatment. The aim of this study was to collect pilot data in female fibromyalgia patients (n = 7) to determine if initial evidence indicates that Mindful Yoga also modulates the abnormal pain processing that characterizes fibromyalgia. Pre- and post-treatment data were obtained on quantitative sensory tests and measures of symptoms, functional deficits, and coping abilities. Separation test analyses indicated significant improvements in heat pain tolerance, pressure pain threshold, and heat pain after-sensations at post-treatment. Fibromyalgia symptoms and functional deficits also improved significantly, including physical tests of strength and balance, and pain coping strategies. These findings indicate that further investigation is warranted into the effect of Mindful Yoga on neurobiological pain processing.

  14. Mindful Yoga Pilot Study Shows Modulation of Abnormal Pain Processing in Fibromyalgia Patients.

    PubMed

    Carson, James W; Carson, Kimberly M; Jones, Kim D; Lancaster, Lindsay; Mist, Scott D

    2016-01-01

    Published findings from a randomized controlled trial have shown that Mindful Yoga training improves symptoms, functional deficits, and coping abilities in individuals with fibromyalgia and that these benefits are replicable and can be maintained 3 months post-treatment. The aim of this study was to collect pilot data in female fibromyalgia patients (n = 7) to determine if initial evidence indicates that Mindful Yoga also modulates the abnormal pain processing that characterizes fibromyalgia. Pre- and post-treatment data were obtained on quantitative sensory tests and measures of symptoms, functional deficits, and coping abilities. Separation test analyses indicated significant improvements in heat pain tolerance, pressure pain threshold, and heat pain after-sensations at post-treatment. Fibromyalgia symptoms and functional deficits also improved significantly, including physical tests of strength and balance, and pain coping strategies. These findings indicate that further investigation is warranted into the effect of Mindful Yoga on neurobiological pain processing.

  15. Is there a role for opioids in the treatment of fibromyalgia?

    PubMed

    Littlejohn, Geoffrey O; Guymer, Emma K; Ngian, Gene-Siew

    2016-05-01

    The use of opioids for chronic pain has increased significantly due to a combination of the high patient burden of pain and the more widespread availability of a range of long-acting opioid preparations. This increased opioid use has translated into the care of many patients with fibromyalgia. The pain mechanism in fibromyalgia is complex but does not seem to involve disturbance of opioid analgesic functions. Hence, there is general concern about the harms in the absence of benefits of opioids in this setting. There is no evidence that pure opioids are effective in fibromyalgia but there is some evidence that opioids with additional actions on the norepinephrine-related pain modulatory pathways, such as tramadol, can be clinically useful in some patients. Novel actions of low-dose opioid antagonists may lead to better understanding of the role of opioid function in fibromyalgia.

  16. Fibromyalgia comorbid with anxiety disorders and depression: combined medical and psychological treatment.

    PubMed

    Bernik, Marcio; Sampaio, Thiago P A; Gandarela, Lucas

    2013-09-01

    Fibromyalgia is associated with high level of pain and suffering. Lack of diagnosis leads to onerous indirect economic costs. Recent data indicate that fibromyalgia; anxiety disorders, and depression tend to occur as comorbid conditions. They also share some common neurochemical dysfunctions and central nervous system alterations such as hypofunctional serotonergic system and altered reactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Conversely, functional neuroimaging findings point to different patterns of altered pain processing mechanisms between fibromyalgia and depression. There is no cure for fibromyalgia, and treatment response effect size is usually small to moderate. Treatment should be based on drugs that also target the comorbid psychiatric condition. Combined pharmacotherapy and cognitive-behavior therapy should ideally be offered to all patients. Lifestyle changes, such as physical exercise should be encouraged. The message to patients should be that all forms of pain are true medical conditions and deserve proper care.

  17. Regrowth of black hair in two red-haired alopecia areata patients.

    PubMed

    Ramot, Yuval; Sinclair, Rodney D; Zlotogorski, Abraham

    2012-11-01

    The occurrence of alopecia areata (AA) in a red-haired individual is considered to be rare. We report two cases of red-haired men who were afflicted with patch-type AA. Astonishingly, the hair regrowth was coloured black, in contrast to the surrounding red hair, an event which has been reported only once in the past after cyclophosphamide administration. This phenomenon raises some interesting questions regarding the significance of pigmentation and the melanocortin-1 receptor in AA pathogenesis.

  18. Determination of the most effective cooling temperature for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia

    PubMed Central

    EKWALL, EVA M.; NYGREN, LISA M.L.; GUSTAFSSON, ANDERS O.; SORBE, BENGT G.

    2013-01-01

    Computer-controlled scalp cooling to prevent alopecia is currently available for patients undergoing chemo-therapy. Previous studies have suggested that the temperature should be <22°C at a depth of 1–2 mm in the scalp to prevent alopecia. However, the optimal pre-set temperature of the coolant medium to achieve this temperature requires further investigation. A pre-study was conducted to investigate which pre-set coolant temperature of 3 and 8°C was the most effective in achieving a scalp temperature of <22°C. The temperature variations at different sites of the scalp and variations within and among the participants at baseline and during the cooling procedure were also evaluated. A randomized main study was then performed to compare the efficacy and side effects of the two temperature levels during paclitaxel/carboplatin chemotherapy. A group of 5 healthy female volunteers participated in a series of scalp temperature measurements during cooling with 3 and 8°C of the coolant medium. In the randomized main study, a total of 47 patients were included, of whom 43 were evaluable after the first cycle. A pre-set temperature of 3°C tended to be the most efficient in achieving a hair follicle temperature of <22°C. The top of the head was less responsive to scalp cooling. There were no significant differences in the prevention of alopecia between the two temperatures in the main study. However, headache and a feeling of coldness were more common in the 3°C group. A coolant temperature of 3°C was more effective in achieving a subcutaneous temperature of <22°C. However, this finding was not reflected by a significant difference in the prevention of alopecia in this study, although a higher incidence of side effects was associated with a lower temperature level. PMID:24649294

  19. An Evaluation of a Computer Imaging Program to Prepare Women for Chemotherapy-related Alopecia

    PubMed Central

    McGarvey, Elizabeth L.; Leon-Verdin, MaGuadalupe; Baum, Lora; Bloomfield, Karen; Brenin, David R.; Koopman, Cheryl; Acton, Scot; Clark, Brian; Parker, B. Eugene

    2009-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to evaluate a computer-imaging program called HAAIR (Help with Adjustment to Alopecia by Image Recovery) that was developed to provide educational support and reduce distress in women with hair loss following chemotherapy. Methods Forty-five women who had been diagnosed with cancer and anticipated alopecia following treatment were randomly assigned to either the Computer Imagining Intervention group (IG) or Standardized Care group (SCG). Patients in the IG used a computer imaging program that created the patient’s image on a screen to simulate baldness and use of wigs while patients in the SCG were directed to a resource room at the Cancer Center established for women with chemotherapy-related alopecia. Assessment data using the Brief Symptom Inventory, Importance of Hair Questionnaire, and the Brief Cope were completed at baseline (T1), before chemotherapy and hair loss, following hair loss (T2), and 3 months follow-up (T3). Results All women were able to successfully use the touch screen computerized imaging program and reported that using the computer was a positive, helpful experience, thus establishing acceptability and usability. Women in both the IG and the SCG group showed significantly lower Hair Loss Distress scores at T2 after hair loss than at T1 with T3 distress scores increasing in the SCG and decreasing in the IG. Those with avoidance coping reported more distress. Conclusions This evaluation demonstrates that the HAAIR program is a patient-endorsed educational and supportive complement to care for women facing chemotherapy-related alopecia. PMID:19998333

  20. Determination of the most effective cooling temperature for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia.

    PubMed

    Ekwall, Eva M; Nygren, Lisa M L; Gustafsson, Anders O; Sorbe, Bengt G

    2013-11-01

    Computer-controlled scalp cooling to prevent alopecia is currently available for patients undergoing chemo-therapy. Previous studies have suggested that the temperature should be <22°C at a depth of 1-2 mm in the scalp to prevent alopecia. However, the optimal pre-set temperature of the coolant medium to achieve this temperature requires further investigation. A pre-study was conducted to investigate which pre-set coolant temperature of 3 and 8°C was the most effective in achieving a scalp temperature of <22°C. The temperature variations at different sites of the scalp and variations within and among the participants at baseline and during the cooling procedure were also evaluated. A randomized main study was then performed to compare the efficacy and side effects of the two temperature levels during paclitaxel/carboplatin chemotherapy. A group of 5 healthy female volunteers participated in a series of scalp temperature measurements during cooling with 3 and 8°C of the coolant medium. In the randomized main study, a total of 47 patients were included, of whom 43 were evaluable after the first cycle. A pre-set temperature of 3°C tended to be the most efficient in achieving a hair follicle temperature of <22°C. The top of the head was less responsive to scalp cooling. There were no significant differences in the prevention of alopecia between the two temperatures in the main study. However, headache and a feeling of coldness were more common in the 3°C group. A coolant temperature of 3°C was more effective in achieving a subcutaneous temperature of <22°C. However, this finding was not reflected by a significant difference in the prevention of alopecia in this study, although a higher incidence of side effects was associated with a lower temperature level.

  1. Combination therapy with finasteride and low-dose dutasteride in the treatment of androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Boyapati, Ann; Sinclair, Rodney

    2013-02-01

    We report on a 47-year-old man who was initially treated with finasteride for androgenetic alopecia. Despite continuous treatment, after year 4 his hair density was not as good as at year 2, and low-dose dutasteride at 0.5 mg/week was added to the finasteride therapy. This resulted in a dramatic increase in his hair density, demonstrating that combined therapy with finasteride and dutasteride can improve hair density in patients already taking finasteride.

  2. A Case of Frontal Fibrosing Alopecia in a Patient with Primary Biliary Cirrhosis and Polymyalgia Rheumatica

    PubMed Central

    Eginli, Ariana N.; Bagayoko, Courtney W.; McMichael, Amy J.

    2016-01-01

    Frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA) is a form of scarring hair loss that is characterized by hair follicle destruction in a fronto-temporo-parietal distribution. Its etiology is unknown; however, most authors presently favor an immune pathogenesis. Associated autoimmune connective tissue diseases have been reported in patients with FFA. We present a case of FFA in a woman with primary biliary cirrhosis and polymyalgia rheumatica, suggesting an association between these clinical entities and supporting a potential autoimmune etiology of FFA. PMID:27843932

  3. Evidence of Signs and Symptoms of Craniomandibular Disorders in Fibromyalgia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Corsalini, Massimo; Daniela, Di Venere; Biagio, Rapone; Gianluca, Stefanachi; Alessandra, Laforgia; Francesco, Pettini

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to highlight the evidence of signs and symptoms of craniomandibular disorders (CMD) in patients suffering from fibromyalgia. Materials and Method: The study has been carried out from May 2011 to May 2015, recruiting a sample of fibromyalgia patients at the Department of Neurophysiopathology at the hospital Policlinico in Bari. Among the 150 examined patients, 60 of them have been diagnosed to suffer from fibromyalgia and 27 accepted to be investigated with a gnathologic examination at the Dental School at the University of Bari. Results: 24 patients (88.9%) were women and 3 (11.1%) men; from 26 to 66 years old (average age, 39). 14 patients (51.9%) were affected by primary fibromyalgia, the remaining 13 (48.1%) by secondary fibromyalgia, mainly associated with hypothyroidism (29.6%). VAS average score was about 8 ± 1.85. The frequency of pain was daily in 15 patients (55.6%); twice a week in 10 patients (37.03%) and a few times a month in 2 patients (7.4%). 11 patients (40.7%) attributed the onset of fibromyalgia to a specific instigating event. In addition, from the gnathologic anamnesis, 11 patients (40,7%) reported a painful symptom in the head-neck region, especially in the frontal region, in the neck, in the masseter muscle and ATM. VAS average score was 3.4 ± 2.8, significantly lower than the one referring to the fibromyalgia pain. The gnathological examination found CMD signs and symptoms in 18 patients (66.7%). Concerning the prevalence of CMD, in type I fibromyalgia, myofascial pain was more frequent (5 patients), whereas in type II fibromyalgia, what was more frequent was a dislocation with reduction (3 patients). Conclusion: Based on clinic experience, we can affirm that some patients with CMD report pain in other regions. It is difficult to distinguish the CMD forms directly correlated to fibromyalgia from those engendered by parafunctional activities; hence the need is to resolve the fibromyalgia syndrome

  4. Durability of Benefit From Repeated Intravenous Lidocaine Infusions in Fibromyalgia Patients: A Case Series and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Marks, David M.; Newhouse, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a painful disorder with no curative treatments, and available medications typically provide partial relief of pain. Reported here is the effective use of serial intravenous lidocaine infusions for the chronic management of 3 patients with fibromyalgia. The details of the infusion procedure are described, and relevant literature is reviewed. Lidocaine infusions should be considered in fibromyalgia patients who are refractory to other treatments, and a positive response to 1 infusion may justify repeated infusions for chronic management. PMID:26835161

  5. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Lungs?

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis: Can it affect the lungs? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect your lungs? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Although rheumatoid arthritis primarily affects joints, it sometimes causes lung disease ...

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Eyes?

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis: Can it affect the eyes? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect the eyes? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that primarily affects ...

  7. Objective evidence that small-fiber polyneuropathy underlies some illnesses currently labeled as fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Oaklander, Anne Louise; Herzog, Zeva Daniela; Downs, Heather; Klein, Max M.

    2013-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a common, disabling, syndrome that includes chronic widespread pain plus other diverse symptoms. No specific objective abnormalities have been identified, precluding definitive testing, disease-modifying treatments, and identification of causes. In contrast, small-fiber polyneuropathy (SFPN), despite causing similar symptoms, is definitionally a disease caused by dysfunction and degeneration of peripheral small-fiber neurons. SFPN has established etiologies, some diagnosable and definitively treatable, e.g., diabetes. To evaluate the hypothesis that some patients labeled with “fibromyalgia” have unrecognized SFPN causing their illness symptoms, we analyzed SFPN-associated symptoms, signs, and pathological and physiological markers in 27 fibromyalgia patients and 30 matched normal controls. Fibromyalgia subjects had to satisfy American College of Rheumatology criteria plus present documented evidence of a physician’s actual fibromyalgia diagnosis. Study instruments comprised the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI), the Utah Early Neuropathy Scale (UENS), distal-leg neurodiagnostic skin biopsies, plus autonomic-function testing (AFT). 41% of skin biopsies from fibromyalgia subjects vs. 3% of biopsies from control subjects were diagnostic for SFPN, and MNSI and UENS scores were higher among fibromyalgia than control subjects (all P ≤ 0.001). Abnormal AFTs were equally prevalent suggesting that fibromyalgia-associated SFPN is primarily somatic. Blood tests from all 13 fibromyalgia subjects with SFPN-diagnostic skin biopsies provided insights into etiologies. All glucose tolerance tests were normal, but eight subjects had dysimmune markers, 2 had hepatitis C serologies, and one family had apparent genetic causality. These findings suggest that some patients with chronic pain labeled as “fibromyalgia” have unrecognized small-fiber polyneuropathy, a distinct disease that can be objectively tested for and sometimes definitively

  8. Treatment of cervical myelopathy in patients with the fibromyalgia syndrome: outcomes and implications.

    PubMed

    Heffez, Dan S; Ross, Ruth E; Shade-Zeldow, Yvonne; Kostas, Konstantinos; Morrissey, Mary; Elias, Dean A; Shepard, Alan

    2007-09-01

    Some patients with fibromyalgia also exhibit the neurological signs of cervical myelopathy. We sought to determine if treatment of cervical myelopathy in patients with fibromyalgia improves the symptoms of fibromyalgia and the patients' quality of life. A non-randomized, prospective, case control study comparing the outcome of surgical (n = 40) versus non-surgical (n = 31) treatment of cervical myelopathy in patients with fibromyalgia was conducted. Outcomes were compared using SF-36, screening test for somatization, HADS, MMPI-2 scale 1 (Hypochondriasis), and self reported severity of symptoms 1 year after treatment. There was no significant difference in initial clinical presentation or demographic characteristics between the patients treated by surgical decompression and those treated by non-surgical means. There was a striking and statistically significant improvement in all symptoms attributed to the fibromyalgia syndrome in the surgical patients but not in the non-surgical patients at 1 year following the treatment of cervical myelopathy (P fibromyalgia can result in a significant improvement in a wide array of symptoms usually attributed to fibromyalgia with attendant measurable improvements in the quality of life. We recommend detailed neurological and neuroradiological evaluation of

  9. A famciclovir + celecoxib combination treatment is safe and efficacious in the treatment of fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Pridgen, William L; Duffy, Carol; Gendreau, Judy F; Gendreau, R Michael

    2017-01-01

    Objective Infections and other stressors have been implicated in the development of fibromyalgia. We hypothesized that these stressors could result in recurrent reactivations of latent herpes virus infections, which could lead to the development of fibromyalgia. This study evaluated a famciclovir + celecoxib drug combination (IMC-1), active against suspected herpes virus reactivation and infection, for the treatment of fibromyalgia. Methods A total of 143 fibromyalgia patients were enrolled at 12 sites in a 16-week, double-blinded, placebo-controlled proof-of-concept trial. Randomized patients received either IMC-1 or placebo in a 1:1 ratio. Outcome measures included a 24-hour recall pain Numerical Rating Scale, the Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ-R), the Patient’s Global Impression of Change (PGIC) questionnaire, the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory, the NIH Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS), and the Beck Depression Inventory-II conducted at baseline and weeks 6, 12, and 16 of the study. Results A significant decrease in fibromyalgia-related pain was observed for patients on IMC-1 treatment versus placebo. PGIC response rates were significantly improved with IMC-1 treatment. Overall, patient self-reported functioning, as measured by the FIQ-R, was significantly improved. Fatigue was also significantly improved as measured by the PROMIS fatigue inventory. The safety profile was encouraging. Despite the celecoxib component of IMC-1, gastrointestinal and nervous system treatment emergent adverse events were reported less frequently in the IMC-1 group, and study completion rates favored IMC-1 treatment. Conclusion IMC-1 was efficacious and safe in treating symptoms of fibromyalgia, supporting the hypothesis that herpes virus infections may contribute to this syndrome. Improved retention rates, decreased adverse event rates, and evidence of efficacy on a broad spectrum of outcome measures are suggestive that IMC-1 may

  10. [Finasteride: a new drug for the treatment of male hirsutism and androgenetic alopecia?].

    PubMed

    Spinucci, G; Pasquali, R

    1996-06-01

    Finasteride is a drug which inhibits the transformation of testosterone into its active metabolite, dihydrotestosterone, in the target organs, i.e. the skin, the scalp, the liver and the prostate. In the pathogenic mechanism of hirsutism and androgenetic alopecia, and important role is presumably played by alterations of the mechanisms which transform testosterone into dihydrotestosterone. In some conditions an increase in dihydrotestosterone has been demonstrated, due to increased activity of the enzyme 5 alpha-reductase. The effect of finasteride develops above all at the level of type II 5 alpha-reductase. Recent studies have evaluated the effect of finasteride in patients of both sexes with hirsutism and androgenetic alopecia. In women with various forms of hyperandrogenism, the use of the drug at the doses commonly used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia seems to have induced a significant reduction in the degree of hirsutism. Furthermore, both in animals and men with alopecia, the drug seems to have led to an increase in the number and an improvement in the shape of the follicles in the anagen phase, and a simultaneous decrease of dehydrotestosterone at the level of the scalp. This study represents a review of the main results obtained over the last two years and reports the prospects which the use of finasteride may have in this context.

  11. Five-year efficacy of finasteride in 801 Japanese men with androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Yoshitake, Toshihiro; Takeda, Akira; Ohki, Kensaku; Inoue, Yuko; Yamawaki, Takanori; Otsuka, Saori; Akimoto, Minekatsu; Nemoto, Mitsuru; Shimakura, Yasuhito; Sato, Akio

    2015-07-01

    Finasteride is standard medical treatment for androgenetic alopecia; however, no large studies with 5 years or more of follow up have been performed in Japan. The authors followed Japanese men with androgenetic alopecia treated with finasteride for 5 years to evaluate long-term treatment efficacy. Of 903 men treated with finasteride (1 mg/day), 801 patients were evaluated over 5 years by modified global photographic assessment. Although the proportion of improvement was high (99.4%), modified global photographic assessment scores after 5 years of treatment were lower in patients with more advanced disease as measured by the modified Norwood-Hamilton scale. After separating patients into "sufficient" and "insufficient" efficacy groups according to the modified global photographic assessment score after 5 years (scores ≥6 and <6, respectively), multivariate analysis showed that independent risk factors of insufficient efficacy were age at start of treatment of 40 years or more (P = 0.021) and classification on the modified Norwood-Hamilton scale (P < 0.001), whereas presence of stress at start of treatment was a negative predictor (P = 0.025). In conclusion, continuous finasteride treatment for 5 years improved androgenetic alopecia with sustained effect among Japanese. Younger age and less advanced disease at start of treatment were the key predictors of higher finasteride efficacy.

  12. Comparitive effectiveness of finasteride vs Serenoa repens in male androgenetic alopecia: a two-year study.

    PubMed

    Rossi, A; Mari, E; Scarno, M; Garelli, V; Maxia, C; Scali, E; Iorio, A; Carlesimo, M

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this open label study is to determine the effectiveness of Serenoa repens in treating male androgenetic alopecia (AGA), by comparing its results with finasteride. For this purpose, we enrolled 100 male patients with clinically diagnosed mild to moderate AGA. One group received Serenoa repens 320 mg every day for 24 months, while the other received finasteride 1 mg every day for the same period. In order to assess the efficacy of the treatments, a score index based on the comparison of the global photos taken at the beginning (T0) and at the end (T24) of the treatment, was used. The results showed that only 38% of patients treated with Serenoa repens had an increase in hair growth, while 68% of those treated with finasteride noted an improvement. Moreover finasteride was more effective for more than half of the patients (33 of 50, i.e. 66%), with level II and III alopecia. We can summarize our results by observing that Serenoa repens could lead to an improvement of androgenetic alopecia, while finasteride confirmed its efficacy. We also clinically observed, that finasteride acts in both the front area and the vertex, while Serenoa repens prevalently in the vertex. Obviously other studies will be necessary to clarify the mechanisms that cause the different responses of these two treatments.

  13. Pathogenetic difference between collagen arthritis and adjuvant arthritis

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Daily treatment with cyclosporin at a dose of 25 mg/kg for 14 d gave complete suppression of the development of collagen arthritis and adjuvant arthritis in Sprague-Dawley rats during an observation period of 45 d. To study whether the immunologic unresponsiveness produced by cyclosporin is antigen specific, we rechallenged the cyclosporin- protected rats with either type II collagen or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) after discontinuation of cyclosporin treatment. Type II collagen-immunized, cyclosporin-protected rats did not develop arthritis in response to reimmunization with type II collagen, but, they did develop arthritis in response to a subsequent injection of CFA. Similarly, CFA-injected, cyclosporin-protected rats showed a suppressed arthritogenic reaction in response to reinjection of CFA, whereas their response to a subsequent immunization with type II collagen was unaffected. On the other hand, the rats that were treated with cyclosporin without any prior antigenic challenge could develop arthritis in response to a subsequent injection of CFA or type II collagen after cessation of cyclosporin treatment. These results indicate that specific immunologic unresponsiveness can be induced by cyclosporin in the two experimental models of polyarthritis, collagen arthritis and adjuvant arthritis, and that there is no cross-reactivity between type II collagen and the mycobacterial cell wall components. The results further indicate that immunity to type II collagen plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of collagen arthritis but that its pathogenetic role in adjuvant arthritis is insignificant. PMID:6201583

  14. Advances in diagnostic and treatment options in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gur, Ali; Oktayoglu, Pelin

    2009-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is characterized as a chronic, painful, noninflammatory syndrome affecting the musculoskeletal system. In addition to pain, common co-morbid symptoms associated with FM include sleep disturbances, fatigue, morning stiffness, affective disorders, chronic daily headache, dyscognition, irritable bowel syndrome, and irritable bladder. Fibromyalgia is usually classified by application of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria. Although these criteria are accepted among investigators who agree with the concept of fibromyalgia, they do so with some reservations. Tender points and widespread pain alone does not describe the esence of fibromyalgia. New diagnostic tools including either clinical or radiological components are studied to diminish these problems. Although various pharmacological solutions have been studied for treating fibromyalgia, no single drug or groups of drugs have proved to be useful in treating fibromyalgia patients. Recently, three drugs, pregabalin, duloxetine and milnacipran, were approved for the treatment of FM by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Novel therapeutic approaches to the management of FM include cannabinoids, sodium channel blockade and new generation antiepileptics. This review evaluates both new diagnostic tools, including clinical or radiological regimes, and tries to highlight the efficacy of medicinal and nonmedicinal treatments with new therapeutic approaches in the management of FM with a wide perspective. PMID:27789991

  15. The association between borderline personality disorder, fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Penfold, Sarah; St. Denis, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Background Overlap of aetiological factors and demographic characteristics with clinical observations of comorbidity has been documented in fibromyalgia syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and borderline personality disorder (BPD). Aims The purpose of this study was to assess the association of BPD with fibromyalgia syndrome and CFS. The authors reviewed literature on the prevalence of BPD in patients with fibromyalgia or CFS and vice versa. Methods A search of five databases yielded six eligible studies. A hand search and contact with experts yielded two additional studies. We extracted information pertaining to study setting and design, demographic information, diagnostic criteria and prevalence. Results We did not identify any studies that specifically assessed the prevalence of fibromyalgia or CFS in patients with BPD. Three studies assessed the prevalence of BPD in fibromyalgia patients and reported prevalence of 1.0, 5.25 and 16.7%. Five studies assessed BPD in CFS patients and reported prevalence of 3.03, 1.8, 2.0, 6.5 and 17%. Conclusions More research is required to clarify possible associations between BPD, fibromyalgia and CFS. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) license. PMID:27703787

  16. Mutations in the c-erbA beta 1 gene: do they underlie euthyroid fibromyalgia?

    PubMed

    Lowe, J C; Cullum, M E; Graf, L H; Yellin, J

    1997-02-01

    Fibromyalgia, a chronic condition of widespread pain, stiffness, and fatigue, has proven unresponsive to drugs, the use of which is based on the 'serotonin-deficiency hypothesis'. An alternative hypothesis-failed transcription regulation by thyroid hormone-can explain the serotonin deficiency and other objective findings and symptoms of euthyroid fibromyalgia. Virtually every feature of fibromyalgia corresponds to signs or symptoms associated with failed transcription regulation by thyroid hormone. In hypothyroid fibromyalgia, failed transcription regulation would result from thyroid-hormone deficiency. In euthyroid fibromyalgia, failed transcription regulation may result from low-affinity thyroid hormone receptors coded by a mutated c-erbA beta 1 gene, yielding partial peripheral resistance to thyroid hormone. The hypothesis of this paper is that, in euthyroid fibromyalgia, a mutant c-erbA beta 1 gene (or alternately, the c-erbA alpha 1 gene) results in low-affinity thyroid-hormone receptors that prevent normal thyroid hormone regulation of transcription. As in hypothyroidism, this would cause a shift toward alpha-adrenergic dominance and increases in both cyclic adenosine 3'-5'-phosphate phosphodiesterase and inhibitory Gi proteins. The result would be tissue-specific hypothyroid-like symptoms despite normal circulating thyroid-hormone levels.

  17. Influence of Craniosacral Therapy on Anxiety, Depression and Quality of Life in Patients with Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Matarán-Peñarrocha, Guillermo A.; Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida María; García, Gloria Carballo; Moreno-Lorenzo, Carmen; Carreño, Tesifón Parrón; Zafra, María Dolores Onieva

    2011-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is considered as a combination of physical, psychological and social disabilities. The causes of pathologic mechanism underlying fibromyalgia are unknown, but fibromyalgia may lead to reduced quality of life. The objective of this study was to analyze the repercussions of craniosacral therapy on depression, anxiety and quality of life in fibromyalgia patients with painful symptoms. An experimental, double-blind longitudinal clinical trial design was undertaken. Eighty-four patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia were randomly assigned to an intervention group (craniosacral therapy) or placebo group (simulated treatment with disconnected ultrasound). The treatment period was 25 weeks. Anxiety, pain, sleep quality, depression and quality of life were determined at baseline and at 10 minutes, 6 months and 1-year post-treatment. State anxiety and trait anxiety, pain, quality of life and Pittsburgh sleep quality index were significantly higher in the intervention versus placebo group after the treatment period and at the 6-month follow-up. However, at the 1-year follow-up, the groups only differed in the Pittsburgh sleep quality index. Approaching fibromyalgia by means of craniosacral therapy contributes to improving anxiety and quality of life levels in these patients. PMID:19729492

  18. Influence of craniosacral therapy on anxiety, depression and quality of life in patients with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Matarán-Peñarrocha, Guillermo A; Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida María; García, Gloria Carballo; Moreno-Lorenzo, Carmen; Carreño, Tesifón Parrón; Zafra, María Dolores Onieva

    2011-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is considered as a combination of physical, psychological and social disabilities. The causes of pathologic mechanism underlying fibromyalgia are unknown, but fibromyalgia may lead to reduced quality of life. The objective of this study was to analyze the repercussions of craniosacral therapy on depression, anxiety and quality of life in fibromyalgia patients with painful symptoms. An experimental, double-blind longitudinal clinical trial design was undertaken. Eighty-four patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia were randomly assigned to an intervention group (craniosacral therapy) or placebo group (simulated treatment with disconnected ultrasound). The treatment period was 25 weeks. Anxiety, pain, sleep quality, depression and quality of life were determined at baseline and at 10 minutes, 6 months and 1-year post-treatment. State anxiety and trait anxiety, pain, quality of life and Pittsburgh sleep quality index were significantly higher in the intervention versus placebo group after the treatment period and at the 6-month follow-up. However, at the 1-year follow-up, the groups only differed in the Pittsburgh sleep quality index. Approaching fibromyalgia by means of craniosacral therapy contributes to improving anxiety and quality of life levels in these patients.

  19. Suicidal ideation in patients with fibromyalgia: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Calandre, Elena P; Navajas-Rojas, M Angustias; Ballesteros, Javier; Garcia-Carrillo, Jocelyne; Garcia-Leiva, Juan M; Rico-Villademoros, Fernando

    2015-02-01

    Chronic pain, sleep disturbances, and depression, which are relevant symptoms of fibromyalgia syndrome, have been demonstrated to be associated with an increased likelihood of suicidal behaviors. Mortality from suicide has been shown to be greater among patients with fibromyalgia. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of suicidal ideation among a sample of patients with fibromyalgia and to evaluate its relationship with the clinical symptomatology of fibromyalgia. Baseline data from fibromyalgia patients willing to participate in different clinical studies were collected. Outcome measures included the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, the Beck Depression Inventory, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Brief Pain Inventory, and the SF-12 Health Survey. The scores for these scales were compared between patients with and without suicidal ideation. The presence of suicidal ideation was assessed using the answer provided to item 9 of the Beck Depression Inventory. The results were adjusted by age, sex, total comorbidity, and time since diagnosis with multiple linear regression. The sample comprised 373 patients of whom one hundred and seventy-nine (48%) reported suicidal ideation: 148 (39.7%) reported passive suicidal ideation and 31 (8.3%) active suicidal ideation. Suicidal ideation was markedly associated with depression, anxiety, sleep quality, and global mental health, whereas only weak relationships were observed between suicidal ideation and both pain and general physical health.

  20. Oxidation in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hitchon, Carol A; El-Gabalawy, Hani S

    2004-01-01

    Oxygen metabolism has an important role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the course of cellular oxidative phosphorylation, and by activated phagocytic cells during oxidative bursts, exceed the physiological buffering capacity and result in oxidative stress. The excessive production of ROS can damage protein, lipids, nucleic acids, and matrix components. They also serve as important intracellular signaling molecules that amplify the synovial inflammatory–proliferative response. Repetitive cycles of hypoxia and reoxygenation associated with changes in synovial perfusion are postulated to activate hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and nuclear factor-κB, two key transcription factors that are regulated by changes in cellular oxygenation and cytokine stimulation, and that in turn orchestrate the expression of a spectrum of genes critical to the persistence of synovitis. An understanding of the complex interactions involved in these pathways might allow the development of novel therapeutic strategies for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:15535839