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Sample records for arthroplasty

  1. Patellofemoral arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lonner, Jess H

    2007-08-01

    Patellofemoral arthroplasty can be an effective intermediate treatment for the patient with isolated arthritis of the anterior compartment of the knee. In the absence of patellar malalignment, results are optimized when an implant with sound geometric features is used, the prosthesis is appropriately aligned, and the soft tissues are balanced. Although previous prosthesis designs resulted in a relatively high prevalence of failure because of patellofemoral maltracking, patellofemoral catching, and anterior knee pain, newer prosthesis designs show promise in reducing the prevalence of patellofemoral dysfunction. Progressive tibiofemoral cartilage degeneration is another so-called failure mechanism; such progressive degeneration underscores the importance of restricting the procedure to patients who do not have tibiofemoral chondromalacia. Because long-term failure as a result of tibiofemoral degeneration may occur in approximately 25% of patients, patellofemoral arthroplasty may be considered an intermediate procedure for select patients with patellofemoral arthritis.

  2. SHOULDER ARTHROPLASTY RECORDS

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Geraldo Motta; Galvão, Marcus Vinicius; Monteiro, Martim; Cohen, Marcio; Brandão, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The study's objective is to evaluate the characteristics and problems of patients who underwent shoulder arthroplasties between July 2004 and November 2006. Methodology: During the period of the study, 145 shoulder arthroplasties were performed. A prospective protocol was used for every patient; demographic, clinical and surgical procedure data were collected. All gathered data were included in the data base. The patients were divided in three major groups: fractures, degenerative diseases and trauma sequels. Information obtained from the data base was correlated in order to determine patients' epidemiologic, injuries, and surgical procedure profiles. Results: Of the 145 shoulder arthroplasties performed, 37% presented trauma sequels, 30% degenerative diseases, and 33% proximal humerus fracture. 12% of the cases required total arthroplasties and 88% partial arthroplasties. Five major complications were observed on early postoperative period. Conclusion: Shoulder arthroplasties have become a common procedure in orthopaedic practice. Surgical records are important in evidencing progressive evolution and in enabling future clinical outcomes evaluation. PMID:26998463

  3. Total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed Central

    Siopack, J S; Jergesen, H E

    1995-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty, or surgical replacement of the hip joint with an artificial prosthesis, is a reconstructive procedure that has improved the management of those diseases of the hip joint that have responded poorly to conventional medical therapy. In this review we briefly summarize the evolution of total hip arthroplasty, the design and development of prosthetic hip components, and the current clinical indications for this procedure. The possible complications of total hip arthroplasty, its clinical performance over time, and future directions in hip replacement surgery are also discussed. Images PMID:7725707

  4. Cervical Total Disc Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Basho, Rahul; Hood, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration of the cervical spine remains problematic for patients and surgeons alike. Despite advances in surgical techniques and instrumentation, the solution remains elusive. Spurred by the success of total joint arthroplasty in hips and knees, surgeons and industry have turned to motion preservation devices in the cervical spine. By preserving motion at the diseased level, the hope is that adjacent segment degeneration can be prevented. Multiple cervical disc arthroplasty devices have come onto the market and completed Food and Drug Administration Investigational Device Exemption trials. Though some of the early results demonstrate equivalency of arthroplasty to fusion, compelling evidence of benefits in terms of symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration are lacking. In addition, non-industry-sponsored studies indicate that these devices are equivalent to fusion in terms of adjacent segment degeneration. Longer-term studies will eventually provide the definitive answer. PMID:24353955

  5. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Smithers, Christopher J; Young, Allan A; Walch, Gilles

    2011-12-01

    The reverse shoulder arthroplasty emerged as a potential solution for those patients who could not be managed effectively with a conventional total shoulder arthroplasty. Grammont revolutionized the design by medializing and distalizing the center of rotation and utilizing a large convex glenoid surface and concave humeral component with a neck-shaft angle of 155°. This design has been highly successful in cuff deficient shoulders, and indications continue to broaden. Many mid-term studies have improved upon the early encouraging results. Long-term studies are starting to emerge, demonstrating good survivorship, but progressive functional and radiographic deterioration continue to be concerning. Careful patient selection and attention to appropriate technique are required to reduce the current high rate of complications. New prosthesis designs are continuing to develop to address some of these limitations.

  6. Hybrid cervical disc arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Wu, Jau-Ching; Cheng, Henrich; Mummaneni, Praveen V

    2017-01-01

    For patients with multilevel cervical stenosis at nonadjacent segments, one of the traditional approaches has included a multilevel fusion of the abnormal segments as well as the intervening normal segment. In this video we demonstrate an alternative treatment plan with tailored use of a combination of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) with an intervening skipped level. The authors present the case of a 72-year-old woman with myeloradiculopathy and a large disc herniation with facet joint degeneration at C3-4 and bulging disc at C5-6. After nonoperative treatment failed, she underwent a single-level ACDF at C3-4 and single-level arthroplasty at C5-6, which successfully relieved her symptoms. No intervention was performed at the normal intervening C4-5 segment. By using ACDF combined with arthroplasty, the authors have avoided a 3-level fusion for this patient and maintained the range of motion of 2 disc levels. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/OrxcPUBvqLk .

  7. Arthroplasty of a Charcot knee

    PubMed Central

    Babazadeh, Sina; Stoney, James D.; Lim, Keith; Choong, Peter F.M.

    2010-01-01

    The Charcot knee - or neuropathic arthropathy - presents a considerable challenge to the orthopaedic surgeon. Caused by a combination of sensory, motor and autonomic neuropathy, it was originally described as an arthritic sequelae of neurosyphilis. In today's western orthopaedics it is more often caused by diabetes. A Charcot knee is often symptomatically painful and unstable. Traditional management has usually been conservative or arthrodesis, with limited success. Arthroplasty of a Charcot joint has commonly been avoided at all costs. However, in the right patient, using the right technique, arthroplasty can significantly improve the symptoms of a Charcot joint. This article explores the evidence surrounding the role of arthroplasty in the management of a Charcot knee. Arthroplasty is compared to other forms of treatment and specific patient demographics and surgical techniques are explored in an attempt to define the role of arthroplasty in the management of a Charcot knee. PMID:21808708

  8. Arthroplasty in Femoral Head Osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Dong Cheol; Jung, Kwangyoung

    2014-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a destructive joint disease requiring early hip arthroplasty. The polyethylene-metal design using a 22-mm femoral head component, introduced by Charnley in 1950, has been widely used for over half a century. Since then, different materials with the capacity to minimize friction between bearing surfaces and various cement or cementless insert fixations have been developed. Although the outcome of second and third generation designs using better bearing materials and technologies has been favorable, less favorable results are seen with total hip arthroplasty in young patients with osteonecrosis. Selection of appropriate materials for hip arthroplasty is important for any potential revisions that might become inevitable due to the limited durability of a prosthetic hip joint. Alternative hip arthroplasties, which include hemiresurfacing arthroplasty and bipolar hemiarthroplasty, have not been found to have acceptable outcomes. Metal-on-metal resurfacing has recently been suggested as a feasible option for young patients with extra physical demands; however, concerns about complications such as hypersensitivity reaction or pseudotumor formation on metal bearings have emerged. To ensure successful long-term outcomes in hip arthroplasty, factors such as insert stabilization and surfaces with less friction are essential. Understanding these aspects in arthroplasty is important to selection of proper materials and to making appropriate decisions for patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head. PMID:27536561

  9. Cementless total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Risitano, Salvatore; Sabatini, Luigi; Giachino, Matteo; Agati, Gabriele; Massè, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Interest for uncemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has greatly increased in recent years. This technique, less used than cemented knee replacement in the last decades, sees a revival thanks an advance in prosthetic design, instrumentation and operative technique. The related literature in some cases shows conflicting data on survival and on the revision’s rate, but in most cases a success rate comparable to cemented TKA is reported. The optimal fixation in TKA is a subject of debate with the majority of surgeons favouring cemented fixation. PMID:27162779

  10. Early Attempts at Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Pablo F; Morcuende, Jose A

    2005-01-01

    Over the last three centuries, treatment of hip arthritides has evolved from rudimentary surgery to modern total hip arthroplasty (THA), which is considered one of the most successful surgical interventions ever developed. We here review the history of the early hip arthroplasty procedures for hip arthritis that preceded Charley total hip arthroplasty. An evaluation of such past enterprises is relevant, and reminds us of the ephemeral nature of human industriousness, and how medical research and procedures are not isolated developments, but correlate to the social, economical, and cultural framework of their time. PMID:16089067

  11. Tissue sparing total femoral arthroplasty: technical note.

    PubMed

    Willimon, Samuel Clifton; Bolognesi, Michael P; Attarian, David E

    2011-01-01

    It is predicted that the number of revision hip and knee arthroplasties will double by the years 2026 and 2015, respectively. As the burden of end-stage prosthetic disease increases, there will be a greater potential need for total femoral arthroplasty. This report describes a patient with a femoral neck fracture nonunion with an ipsilateral multiply revised failed total knee arthroplasty treated by a tissue sparing total femoral arthroplasty. The technique is described, and potential benefits are reviewed.

  12. The Contribution of Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty to Utilization of Primary Shoulder Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Nitin B.; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Background We assessed the contribution of reverse shoulder arthroplasty to overall utilization of primary shoulder arthroplasty, and present age and sex stratified national rates of shoulder arthroplasty. We also assessed contemporary complication rates, mortality, and indications for shoulder arthroplasty, as well as estimates and indications for revision arthroplasty. Methods We used the Nationwide Inpatient Samples for 2009–2011 to calculate estimates of shoulder arthroplasty and assessed trends using joinpoint regression. Results The cumulative estimated utilization of primary shoulder arthroplasty (total anatomical, hemi, and reverse) increased significantly from 52,397 procedures (95% CI=47,093–57,701) in 2009 to 67,184 cases (95% CI=60,638–73,731) in 2011. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty accounted for 42% of all primary shoulder arthroplasty procedures in 2011. The diagnosis of concomitant diagnosis of osteoarthritis and rotator cuff impairment was found in only 29.8% of reverse shoulder arthroplasty cases. The highest rate of reverse shoulder arthroplasty was in the 75–84 year female sub-group (77; 95% CI=67–87). Revision cases were 8.8% and 8.2% of all shoulder arthroplasties in 2009 and 2011, respectively, and 35% of revision cases were secondary to mechanical complications/loosening while 18% were due to dislocation. Conclusions The utilization of primary shoulder arthroplasty significantly increased in just a three year time span, with a major contribution from reverse shoulder arthroplasty in 2011. Indications appear to have expanded as a large percentage of patients did not have rotator cuff pathology. The burden from revision arthroplasties was also substantial and efforts to optimize outcomes and longevity of primary shoulder arthroplasty are needed. Level of evidence Epidemiology Study, Database Analysis PMID:25304043

  13. Cementless acetabular revision arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rina; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Waddell, James P.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of clinical factors on outcome after acetabular revision with a cementless beaded cup. Design Retrospective case series. Setting Tertiary care referral centre. Patients Forty-one patients who underwent acetabular revision with a cementless cup were followed up for a mean of 3.4 years. Interventions Acetabular revision with a beaded cementless cup in all patients. A morcellized allograft was used in 10 patients. Outcome measures A modified Harris hip score (range of motion measurement omitted), the SF-36 health survey, and the Western Ontario McMaster (WOMAC) osteoarthritis index. Multivariate analysis was used to evaluate the effects of age, gender, morcellized allografting, time to revision from the previous operation, acetabular screw fixation and concurrent femoral revision on outcome. Results Gender accounted for a significant portion of the variation seen in the SF-36 physical component scores (r = 0.36, p = 0.02), with women tending to have worse results. Increasing age was associated with lower WOMAC index function scores (r = 0.36, p = 0.03), whereas concurrent femoral revision tended to have a positive effect on WOMAC index function (r = 0.39, p = 0.01). None of the potential clinical predictors had any significant effect on the SF-36 mental component scores, or WOMAC index pain and stiffness scores. Conclusions In cementless acetabular revision arthroplasty, physical function, as measured by generic and limb-specific scales, may be affected by gender, age and the presence of a concurrent femoral revision. Time to revision from the previous operation, morcellized allografting and screw fixation of the acetabulum did not affect outcomes. This information may provide some prognostic value for patients’ expectations. PMID:10948687

  14. [Winter sports and shoulder arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, C; Imhoff, A B; Hinterwimmer, S

    2008-09-01

    Nowadays, a general negative evaluation of sportive activity regarding different kinds of sport following arthroplasty is at present no more scientifically supported. However, at present no valid guidelines regarding sportive activity of patients after implantation of shoulder joint arthroplasty exist. The question regarding the ability of performing winter sports activities of patients treated with shoulder joint endoprothesis has not been answered so far. Therefore the aim of the presented work was to identify winter sports-specific risks for patients treated with shoulder joint endoprothesis as well as to critically discuss the actual literature in refer to winter sport activities. Criteria for the education of patients with shoulder joint endoprothesis as well as consultation regarding winter sport activities will be provided for the orthopaedic surgeon.

  15. NAVIGATION IN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    da Mota e Albuquerque, Roberto Freire

    2015-01-01

    Navigation was the most significant advance in instrumentation for total knee arthroplasty over the last decade. It provides surgeons with a precision tool for carrying out surgery, with the possibility of intraoperative simulation and objective control over various anatomical and surgical parameters and references. Since the first systems, which were basically used to control the alignment of bone cutting referenced to the mechanical axis of the lower limb, many other surgical steps have been incorporated, such as component rotation, ligament balancing and arranging the symmetry of flexion and extension spaces, among others. Its efficacy as a precision tool with an effective capacity for promoting better alignment of the lower-limb axis has been widely proven in the literature, but the real value of optimized alignment and the impact of navigation on clinical results and the longevity of arthroplasty have yet to be established. PMID:27026979

  16. The Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Register

    PubMed Central

    Robertsson, O.; Ranstam, J.; Sundberg, M.; W-Dahl, A.; Lidgren, L.

    2014-01-01

    We are entering a new era with governmental bodies taking an increasingly guiding role, gaining control of registries, demanding direct access with release of open public information for quality comparisons between hospitals. This review is written by physicians and scientists who have worked with the Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Register (SKAR) periodically since it began. It reviews the history of the register and describes the methods used and lessons learned. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:217–22. PMID:24986492

  17. Humeral windows in revision total elbow arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Peach, Chris A; Salama, Amir; Stanley, David

    2016-04-01

    The use of cortical windows for revision elbow arthroplasty has not previously been widely reported. Their use aids safe revision of a well fixed humeral prosthesis and can be used in the setting of dislocation, periprosthetic fracture or aseptic loosening of the ulnar component. We describe our technique and results of cortical windows in the distal humerus for revision elbow arthroplasty surgery.

  18. Reducing arthroplasty costs via vendor contracts

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, D. William C.; Beaupré, Lauren A.; Davies, Donna M.; Hessels, Rick

    1999-01-01

    Objective To describe a method of reducing the costs of implants in hip and knee arthroplasty. Design Implant costs were compared before and after the implementation of a 2-year contract with implant vendors, providing increased volume for decreased implant cost. An additional 20% of arthroplasties could be done outside the contract for research or special purposes. Setting A regional health authority involving 2 acute care hospitals. Method Costs were obtained for 942 hip and knee arthroplasties performed in 1993/94 and compared with costs of 1656 hip and knee arthroplasties performed in 1996/97. Outcome Measures Implant cost and number of joint arthroplasty procedures performed. Results A 40% decrease in the cost per implant for primary knee arthroplasty and an 18% decrease in the cost per implant for primary hip arthroplasty were achieved. A rebate, calculated as a percentage of volume used, was received from the vendor to support general orthopedic research and education. A new contract for 3 years has recently been signed with 3 vendors designated as primary vendors for 80% of the volume. Conclusion The vendor-contract economic strategy effectively reduced the cost of hip and knee arthroplasty and may be useful at other centres looking for cost reduction methods that maintain adequate patient care and support clinical research and education. PMID:10593246

  19. The Danish Hip Arthroplasty Register

    PubMed Central

    Gundtoft, Per Hviid; Varnum, Claus; Pedersen, Alma Becic; Overgaard, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The aim of the Danish Hip Arthroplasty Register (DHR) is to continuously monitor and improve the quality of treatment of primary and revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) in Denmark. Study population The DHR is a Danish nationwide arthroplasty register established in January 1995. All Danish orthopedic departments – both public and private – report to the register, and registration is compulsory. Main variables The main variables in the register include civil registration number, indication for primary and revision surgery, operation date and side, and postoperative complications. Completeness of primary and revision surgery is evaluated annually and validation of a number of variables has been carried out. Descriptive data A total of 139,525 primary THAs and 22,118 revisions have been registered in the DHR between January 1, 1995 and December 31, 2014. Since 1995, completeness of procedure registration has been high, being 97.8% and 92.0% in 2014 for primary THAs and revisions, respectively. Several risk factors, such as comorbidity, age, specific primary diagnosis and fixation types for failure of primary THAs, and postoperative complications, have been identified through the DHR. Approximately 9,000 primary THAs and 1,500 revisions are reported to the register annually. Conclusion The DHR is important for monitoring and improvement of treatment with THA and is a valuable tool for research in THA surgery due to the high quality of prospective collected data with long-term follow-up and high completeness. The register can be used for population-based epidemiology studies of THA surgery and can be linked to a range of other national databases. PMID:27822092

  20. Malnutrition and Total Joint Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ellsworth, Bridget; Kamath, Atul F.

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition is prevalent in patients undergoing elective total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Malnutrition has been shown to be an independent risk factor for multiple postsurgical complications following TJA in addition to increasing postoperative mortality. In the current healthcare environment, it is important to recognize and correct modifiable risk factors preoperatively to minimize perioperative complications and improve patient outcomes. Recently, multiple studies have been published focusing on the association between malnutrition and perioperative complications following TJA. The findings of these studies are summarized in this review. Further research is required to determine if optimization of nutritional status preoperatively influence surgical outcomes in the elective TJA patient. PMID:27376151

  1. [Resurfacing arthroplasty of the hip].

    PubMed

    Knecht, A; Witzleb, W-C; Günther, K-P

    2005-01-01

    Currently, an increase in resurfacing arthroplasty in the treatment of hip osteoarthritis--especially in young adults--can be observed. New bearing technologies (mainly metal-on-metal surfaces) show better tribologic results than historical designs (e.g. the Wagner cup). At present, it is unclear whether these modifications and a definitively low dislocation rate--due to the large head diameter--can be supported by further good clinical results. The quantity as well as the quality of the available investigations prevents a definite opinion at the moment. Appropriate clinical studies with documented radiographic follow-up are necessary to compare the outcome of these new implants with standard techniques.

  2. Total Ankle Arthroplasty: An Imaging Overview

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Da-Rae; Potter, Hollis G.; Li, Angela E.; Chun, Ka-Young; Jung, Yoon Young; Kim, Jin-Su; Young, Ki-Won

    2016-01-01

    With advances in implant technology, total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) has become an increasingly popular alternative to arthrodesis for the management of end-stage ankle arthritis. However, reports in the literature do not focus on the imaging features of TAA. Through a literature review, we demonstrate basic design features of the current ankle arthroplasty system, and the normal and abnormal postoperative imaging features associated with such devices. Pre- and postoperative evaluations of ankle arthroplasty mainly include radiography; in addition, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging provide further characterization of imaging abnormalities. Familiarization with multimodal imaging features of frequent procedural complications at various postoperative intervals is important in radiological practice. PMID:27134529

  3. Total knee arthroplasty in vascular malformation

    PubMed Central

    Bhende, Harish; Laud, Nanadkishore; Deore, Sandeep; Shashidhar, V

    2015-01-01

    In Klippel–Trenaunay syndrome, vascular malformations are not only in skin and superficial soft tissues but also in deep tissues like muscles bones and joints. It is well documemted that these recurrent intraarticular bleeds can cause early arthritis and joint pain. Performing arthroplasty in such patients is difficult and fraught with complications. We describe such a case where navigated total knee arthroplasty was performed with success to avoid the problems of intra medullary alignment used in the presence of intra medullary vascular malformations. We also suggest certain measures when knee arthroplasty is considered in such patients. PMID:26538765

  4. Implications for rehabilitation after total wrist arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lockard, Margery A

    2004-09-01

    Achieving satisfactory, long-term functional outcomes after total wrist arthroplasty surgery has proved more complicated than with arthroplasties in joints such as the hip or knee. However, improvements in implant design and surgical technique have resulted in recent successes and evidence that wrist arthroplasty may be an appropriate choice to improve function in select patients. This article reviews factors that therapists must consider in planning, implementing, and progressing individual patients' rehabilitation programs after wrist arthroplasty surgery. Therapists must be knowledgeable about the specifics of each patient's surgery so that the rehabilitation program can be customized appropriately and can contribute to achieving pain-free stable wrist movement that allows patients to perform their desired functional activities.

  5. [What's new about total knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Dao Trong, Mai Lang; Helmy, Näder

    2013-10-30

    Osteoarthritis of the knee is one of the most common problems in the orthopedic practice and its surgical technique is still challenging. This Mini-Review presents patient specific cutting blocks for the implantation of a total knee arthroplasty.

  6. Cervical disc arthroplasty: Pros and cons

    PubMed Central

    Moatz, Bradley; Tortolani, P. Justin

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cervical disc arthroplasty has emerged as a promising potential alternative to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) in appropriately selected patients. Despite a history of excellent outcomes after ACDF, the question as to whether a fusion leads to adjacent segment degeneration remains unanswered. Numerous US investigational device exemption trials comparing cervical arthroplasty to fusion have been conducted to answer this question. Methods: This study reviews the current research regarding cervical athroplasty, and emphasizes both the pros and cons of arthroplasty as compared with ACDF. Results: Early clinical outcomes show that cervical arthroplasty is as effective as the standard ACDF. However, this new technology is also associated with an expanding list of novel complications. Conclusion: Although there is no definitive evidence that cervical disc replacement reduces the incidence of adjacent segment degeneration, it does show other advantages; for example, faster return to work, and reduced need for postoperative bracing. PMID:22905327

  7. Tantalum Cones in Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eric G; Patel, Nirav K; Chughtai, Morad; Elmallah, Randa D K; Delanois, Ronald E; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2016-11-01

    The best strategy to address large bony defects in revision total knee arthroplasty has yet to be determined. The relatively recent development of porous tantalum cones and their use to address massive bone loss in knee arthroplasty has shown promising short- and intermediate-term results. The purpose of this review is to present the current literature on: (1) basic science of porous tantalum, (2) classification and treatment for bone loss, (3) clinical results, and (4) evolution of newer generation cones.

  8. CMC Arthroplasty of the Thumb: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ilyas, Asif; Thoder, Joseph J.

    2007-01-01

    Arthritis of the first carpometacarpal (CMC) joint of the hand is a common and often debilitating disease. Diagnosis can be readily made with history, physical exam, and radiographic evaluation. Patients with advanced disease who have failed conservative treatment modalities have multiple surgical options including ligament reconstruction, resection arthroplasty, silicone implantation, tendon interposition, or total joint arthroplasty. This article will describe the variety of approaches to treatment as well as the author’s preferred method. PMID:18780059

  9. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty – A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Aatif; Malal, Joby Jacob George; Waseem, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Professor Grammont revolutionised shoulder surgery with his reverse shoulder arthroplasty design. Patients who had poor results from a conventional shoulder replacement because of cuff deficiency can now be treated effectively. Although designed for cuff tear arthropathy, indications continue to evolve and broaden. The initial results look very promising and the implant has gained much popularity over the years. The article provides an extensive literature review of the indications, results and complications for reverse shoulder arthroplasty. PMID:24082977

  10. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty - a literature review.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Aatif; Malal, Joby Jacob George; Waseem, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Professor Grammont revolutionised shoulder surgery with his reverse shoulder arthroplasty design. Patients who had poor results from a conventional shoulder replacement because of cuff deficiency can now be treated effectively. Although designed for cuff tear arthropathy, indications continue to evolve and broaden. The initial results look very promising and the implant has gained much popularity over the years. The article provides an extensive literature review of the indications, results and complications for reverse shoulder arthroplasty.

  11. Return to sports after shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Christine C; Johnson, Daniel J; Liu, Joseph N; Dines, Joshua S; Dines, David M; Gulotta, Lawrence V; Garcia, Grant H

    2016-09-18

    Many patients prioritize the ability to return to sports following shoulder replacement surgeries, including total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA), reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA), and hemiarthroplasty (HA). While activity levels after hip and knee replacements have been well-established in the literature, studies on this topic in the field of shoulder arthroplasty are relatively limited. A review of the literature regarding athletic activity after shoulder arthroplasty was performed using the PubMed database. All studies relevant to shoulder arthroplasty and return to sport were included. The majority of patients returned to their prior level of activity within six months following TSA, RTSA, and shoulder HA. Noncontact, low demand activities are permitted by most surgeons postoperatively and generally have higher return rates than contact sports or high-demand activities. In some series, patients reported an improvement in their ability to participate in sports following the arthroplasty procedure. The rates of return to sports following TSA (75%-100%) are slightly higher than those reported for HA (67%-76%) and RTSA (75%-85%). Patients undergoing TSA, RTSA, and shoulder HA should be counseled that there is a high probability that they will be able to return to their preoperative activity level within six months postoperatively. TSA has been associated with higher rates of return to sports than RTSA and HA, although this may reflect differences in patient population or surgical indication.

  12. Emerging Indications for Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Urch, Ekaterina; Dines, Joshua S; Dines, David M

    2016-01-01

    Historically, reverse shoulder arthroplasty was reserved for older, low-demand patients in whom rotator cuff arthropathy was diagnosed. Other common indications included sequelae of previously treated proximal humerus fractures, failed anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty, tumor resection, and rheumatoid arthritis in the elderly population. Unpredictable implant durability and high complication rates have limited the use of reverse shoulder arthroplasty to a narrow group of patients. Over the past decade, however, research has led to an improved understanding of the biomechanics behind reverse shoulder prostheses, which has improved implant design and surgical techniques. Consequently, orthopaedic surgeons have slowly begun to expand the indications for reverse shoulder arthroplasty to include a wider spectrum of shoulder pathologies. Recent studies have shown promising results for patients who undergo reverse shoulder arthroplasty for the treatment of acute proximal humerus fractures, massive rotator cuff tears without arthropathy, primary osteoarthritis, and chronic anterior dislocation, as well as for younger patients who have rheumatoid arthritis. These data suggest that, with judicious patient selection, reverse shoulder arthroplasty can be an excellent treatment option for a growing patient cohort.

  13. Lubrication regimes in lumbar total disc arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, A; Shepherd, D E T

    2007-08-01

    A number of total disc arthroplasty devices have been developed. Some concern has been expressed that wear may be a potential failure mode for these devices, as has been seen with hip arthroplasty. The aim of this paper was to investigate the lubrication regimes that occur in lumbar total disc arthroplasty devices. The disc arthroplasty was modelled as a ball-and-socket joint. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication theory was used to calculate the minimum film thickness of the fluid between the bearing surfaces. The lubrication regime was then determined for different material combinations, size of implant, and trunk velocity. Disc arthroplasties with a metal-polymer or metal-metal material combination operate with a boundary lubrication regime. A ceramic-ceramic material combination has the potential to operate with fluid-film lubrication. Disc arthroplasties with a metal-polymer or metal-metal material combination are likely to generate wear debris. In future, it is worth considering a ceramic-ceramic material combination as this is likely to reduce wear.

  14. Return to sports after shoulder arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Christine C; Johnson, Daniel J; Liu, Joseph N; Dines, Joshua S; Dines, David M; Gulotta, Lawrence V; Garcia, Grant H

    2016-01-01

    Many patients prioritize the ability to return to sports following shoulder replacement surgeries, including total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA), reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA), and hemiarthroplasty (HA). While activity levels after hip and knee replacements have been well-established in the literature, studies on this topic in the field of shoulder arthroplasty are relatively limited. A review of the literature regarding athletic activity after shoulder arthroplasty was performed using the PubMed database. All studies relevant to shoulder arthroplasty and return to sport were included. The majority of patients returned to their prior level of activity within six months following TSA, RTSA, and shoulder HA. Noncontact, low demand activities are permitted by most surgeons postoperatively and generally have higher return rates than contact sports or high-demand activities. In some series, patients reported an improvement in their ability to participate in sports following the arthroplasty procedure. The rates of return to sports following TSA (75%-100%) are slightly higher than those reported for HA (67%-76%) and RTSA (75%-85%). Patients undergoing TSA, RTSA, and shoulder HA should be counseled that there is a high probability that they will be able to return to their preoperative activity level within six months postoperatively. TSA has been associated with higher rates of return to sports than RTSA and HA, although this may reflect differences in patient population or surgical indication. PMID:27672564

  15. The Kaiser Permanente Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry

    PubMed Central

    Ake, Christopher F; Burke, Mary F; Singh, Anshuman; Yian, Edward H; Paxton, Elizabeth W; Navarro, Ronald A

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Shoulder arthroplasty is being performed in the United States with increasing frequency. We describe the medium-term findings from a large integrated healthcare system shoulder arthroplasty registry. Patients and methods Shoulder arthroplasty cases registered between January 2005 and June 2013 were included for analysis. The registry included patient characteristics, surgical information, implant data, attrition, and patient outcomes such as surgical site infections, venous thromboembolism, and revision procedures. Results During the study period, 6,336 primary cases were registered. Median follow-up time for all primaries was 3.3 years; 461 cases were lost to follow-up by ending of health plan membership. Primary cases were predominantly female (56%) and white (81%), with an average age of 70 years. The most common reason for surgery was osteoarthritis in 60% of cases, followed by acute fracture (17%) and rotator cuff tear arthropathy (15%). In elective shoulder arthroplasty procedures, 200 all-cause revisions (4%) were reported, with glenoid wear being the most common reason. Interpretation Most arthroplasties were elective procedures: over half performed for osteoarthritis. Glenoid wear was the most common reason for revision of primary shoulder arthroplasty in elective cases. PMID:25727949

  16. Joint Line Reconstruction in Navigated Total Knee Arthroplasty Revision

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-05-16

    Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty Because of; Loosening; Instability; Impingement; or Other Reasons Accepted as Indications for TKA Exchange.; The Focus is to Determine the Precision of Joint Line Restoration in Navigated vs. Conventional Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty

  17. Total hip arthroplasty after lower extremity amputation.

    PubMed

    Amanatullah, Derek F; Trousdale, Robert T; Sierra, Rafael J

    2015-05-01

    There are approximately 1.6 million lower extremity amputees in the United States. Lower extremity amputees are subject to increased physical demands proportional to their level of amputation. Lower extremity amputees have a 6-fold higher risk of developing radiographic osteoarthritis in the ipsilateral hip and a 2-fold risk of developing radiographic osteoarthritis in contralateral hip when compared with the non-amputee population. Additionally, there is a 3-fold increased risk of developing radiographic osteoarthritis in the ipsilateral hip after an above knee amputation when compared with a below knee amputation. The authors retrospectively reviewed 35 total hip arthroplasties after lower extremity amputation. The mean clinical follow-up was 5.3±4.0 years. The mean time from lower extremity amputation to total hip arthroplasty was 12.2±12.8 years after a contralateral amputation and 5.4±6.0 years after an ipsilateral amputation (P=.050). The mean time to total hip arthroplasty was 15.6±15.4 years after an above knee amputation and 6.4±6.1 years after a below knee amputation (P=.021). There was a statistically significant improvement in the mean Harris Hip Score from 35.9±21.8 to 76.8±12.8 with total hip arthroplasty after a contralateral amputation (P<.001). There also was a statistically significant improvement in the mean Harris Hip Score from 25.4±21.7 to 78.6±17.1 with total hip arthroplasty after an ispilateral amputation (P<.001). Three (17.7%) total hip arthroplasties after a contralateral amputation and 2 (11.1%) total hip arthroplasties after an ipsilateral amputation required revision total hip arthroplasty. Patients with an ipsilateral amputation or a below knee amputation progress to total hip arthroplasty faster than those with a contralateral amputation or an above knee amputation, respectively. Lower extremity amputees experience clinically significant improvements with total hip arthroplasty after lower extremity amputation.

  18. Instability following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos

    2011-10-01

    Background Knee prosthesis instability (KPI) is a frequent cause of failure of total knee arthroplasty. Moreover, the degree of constraint required to achieve immediate and long-term stability in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is frequently debated. Questions This review aims to define the problem, analyze risk factors, and review strategies for prevention and treatment of KPI. Methods A PubMed (MEDLINE) search of the years 2000 to 2010 was performed using two key words: TKA and instability. One hundred and sixty-five initial articles were identified. The most important (17) articles as judged by the author were selected for this review. The main criteria for selection were that the articles addressed and provided solutions to the diagnosis and treatment of KPI. Results Patient-related risk factors predisposing to post-operative instability include deformity requiring a large surgical correction and aggressive ligament release, general or regional neuromuscular pathology, and hip or foot deformities. KPI can be prevented in most cases with appropriate selection of implants and good surgical technique. When ligament instability is anticipated post-operatively, the need for implants with a greater degree of constraint should be anticipated. In patients without significant varus or valgus malalignment and without significant flexion contracture, the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) can be retained. However, the PCL should be sacrificed when deformity exists particularly in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, previous patellectomy, previous high tibial osteotomy or distal femoral osteotomy, and posttraumatic osteoarthritis with disruption of the PCL. In most cases, KPI requires revision surgery. Successful outcomes can only be obtained if the cause of KPI is identified and addressed. Conclusions Instability following TKA is a common cause of the need for revision. Typically, knees with deformity, rheumatoid arthritis, previous patellectomy or high tibial osteotomy, and

  19. [Sport activity after hip and knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Keren, Amit; Berkovich, Yaron; Berkovitch, Yaron; Soudry, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Joint arthroplasty is one of the commonest surgical procedures in orthopedic surgery. In recent years there was an increase in the number of procedures, patient satisfaction and implant survival. Originally, these operations were designed for old patients in order to relieve pain and to enable ambulation. Over the past few years, these operations have become common in younger patients which desire to return to activity, including sports activities. The importance of physical activity is a well known fact. In recent years it became clear that with the proper physical activity the outcomes of the operations are better. There are several types of arthroplasty. Many factors influence the outcome of the operation apart from the post-surgery physical activity. These factors include patient factors, surgical technique and type of arthroplasty. This review summarizes the recommendations for sports activities after hip and knee arthroplasties. These activities are evaluated according to surgeons' recommendations, stress applied on the implant and long term outcomes. The recommended sports activities after joint arthroplasties are walking, swimming and cycling. Soccer, basketball and jogging are not advised. Tennis, downhill skiing and horse riding are recommended with previous experience. There are many more sports activities that patients can participate in, and it is important that the patient discuss the different options prior to the operation. Since these operations are so common, many non-orthopedic physicians encounter these patients in their practice. They should be acquainted with the recommendations for sports activities and encourage them.

  20. Arthroplasty for tenosynovial giant cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Verspoor, Floortje G M; Hannink, Gerjon; Scholte, Anouk; Van Der Geest, Ingrid C M; Schreuder, H W Bart

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Tenosynovial giant cell tumors (t-GCTs) can behave aggressively locally and affect joint function and quality of life. The role of arthroplasty in the treatment of t-GCT is uncertain. We report the results of arthroplasty in t-GCT patients. Patients and methods t-GCT patients (12 knee, 5 hip) received an arthroplasty between 1985 and 2015. Indication for arthroplasty, recurrences, complications, quality of life, and functional scores were evaluated after a mean follow-up time of 5.5 (0.2–15) years. Results 2 patients had recurrent disease. 2 other patients had implant loosening. Functional scores showed poor results in almost half of the knee patients. 4 of the hip patients scored excellent and 1 scored fair. Quality of life was reduced in 1 or more subscales for 2 hip patients and for 5 knee patients. Interpretation In t-GCT patients with extensive disease or osteoarthritis, joint arthroplasty is an additional treatment option. However, recurrences, implant loosening, and other complications do occur, even after several years. PMID:27357329

  1. The evaluation of the failed shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wiater, Brett P; Moravek, James E; Wiater, J Michael

    2014-05-01

    As the incidence of shoulder arthroplasty continues to rise, the orthopedic shoulder surgeon will be increasingly faced with the difficult problem of evaluating a failed shoulder arthroplasty. The patient is usually dissatisfied with the outcome of the previous arthroplasty as a result of pain, but may complain of poor function due to limited range of motion or instability. A thorough and systematic approach is necessary so that the most appropriate treatment pathway can be initiated. A comprehensive history and physical examination are the first steps in the evaluation. Diagnostic studies are numerous and include laboratory values, plain radiography, computed tomography, ultrasound imaging, joint aspiration, nuclear scans, and electromyography. Common causes of early pain after shoulder arthroplasty include technical issues related to the surgery, such as malposition or improper sizing of the prosthesis, periprosthetic infection, neurologic injury, and complex regional pain syndrome. Pain presenting after a symptom-free interval may be related to chronic periprosthetic infection, component wear and loosening, glenoid erosion, rotator cuff degeneration, and fracture. Poor range of motion may result from inadequate postoperative rehabilitation, implant-related factors, and heterotopic ossification. Instability is generally caused by rotator cuff deficiency and implant-related factors. Unfortunately, determining the cause of a failed shoulder arthroplasty can be difficult, and in many situations, the source of pain and disability is multifactorial.

  2. Dermabond efficacy in total joint arthroplasty wounds.

    PubMed

    Miller, Adam G; Swank, Michael L

    2010-10-01

    The goals of wound closure are a low infection rate and timely healing. Total joint arthroplasty (TJA) requires mobile recovery, and, therefore, a high-tension wound care environment. We conducted a study to compare the efficacy of high-viscosity Dermabond (Ethicon, Somerville, New Jersey) and the efficacy of surgical staples in healing high-tension, mobile surgical sites of TJA. Of 236 total knee arthroplasties and 223 total hip arthroplasties (459 surgeries total), 250 were performed with Dermabond and 209 with staples. According to χ2 analysis, case and control infection rates were equivalent. Signs of acute inflammation (redness, drainage, dehiscence) also were statistically equivalent. Absence of staples accounted for a significant decrease in tape blisters and skin abscesses. Dermabond is superior to staples in high-tension wound care.

  3. Acute arterial occlusion after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Patricia C; Rogic, Roselyn; Eddington, Carolyn

    2006-11-01

    There are a number of complications associated with total knee-joint arthroplasty. These include deep venous thromboses, peroneal palsy, infection, anemia, and Ogilvie's syndrome. An uncommon but potentially limb-threatening complication is acute arterial occlusion. Approximately 35 cases have been reported in the orthopedic literature. Prompt recognition and treatment intervention are the keys to successful outcome. We describe the case of one patient who had mild peroneal palsy and developed acute arterial occlusion 9 days postoperatively while on the inpatient rehabilitation service. Prompt aggressive management restored arterial circulation to the lower limb. Careful management of patients after total knee arthroplasty requires an understanding that arterial occlusion is a rare limb-threatening complication of surgery, but that it is treatable with prompt, deliberate management. Physiatrists should be aware that this condition exists in postoperative knee-joint arthroplasty patients. They should pay careful attention to any patient with a history of peripheral vascular disease or postoperative peroneal palsy.

  4. Uncommon indications for reverse total shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Yoon Suk; Huri, Gazi; Garbis, Nickolas G; McFarland, Edward G

    2013-12-01

    Total shoulder arthroplasty and shoulder hemiarthroplasty have been the traditional method for treating a variety of shoulder conditions, including arthritis, cuff tear arthropathy, and some fracture types. However, these procedures did not provide consistently good results for patients with torn rotator cuffs. The development of the reverse prosthesis by Grammont in the late 20th century revolutionized the treatment of the rotator-cuff-deficient shoulder with arthritis. The main indication for the reverse prosthesis remains the patient with cuff tear arthropathy who has pain and loss of motion. Because the reverse total shoulder arthroplasty produced such good results in these patients, the indications for the reverse prosthesis have expanded to include other shoulder conditions that have previously been difficult to treat successfully and predictably. This review discusses and critically reviews these newer indications for the reverse total shoulder arthroplasty.

  5. Uncommon Indications for Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Yoon Suk; Huri, Gazi; Garbis, Nickolas G.

    2013-01-01

    Total shoulder arthroplasty and shoulder hemiarthroplasty have been the traditional method for treating a variety of shoulder conditions, including arthritis, cuff tear arthropathy, and some fracture types. However, these procedures did not provide consistently good results for patients with torn rotator cuffs. The development of the reverse prosthesis by Grammont in the late 20th century revolutionized the treatment of the rotator-cuff-deficient shoulder with arthritis. The main indication for the reverse prosthesis remains the patient with cuff tear arthropathy who has pain and loss of motion. Because the reverse total shoulder arthroplasty produced such good results in these patients, the indications for the reverse prosthesis have expanded to include other shoulder conditions that have previously been difficult to treat successfully and predictably. This review discusses and critically reviews these newer indications for the reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. PMID:24340143

  6. Past, present, and future of cervical arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hyun Oh, Chang; Hwan Yoon, Seung

    2013-01-01

    Cervical arthroplasty was developed in an attempt to maintain cervical motion and potentially to avoid or minimize adjacent-segment degeneration. If cervical arthroplasty is successful, the long-term results of surgery for cervical disc disease should improve. However, problems associated with cervical arthroplasty have been reported: these include kyphosis, heterotopic ossification-induced motion limitation, no motion preservation even at the index level, and a higher revision rate in a limited number of cases compared with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). In addition, for degenerative cervical disc disorders, the risk of developing adjacent segment degeneration more than 2 years after surgery is reportedly similar for ACDF and cervical arthroplasty. Cervical disc arthroplasty is an emerging motion-sparing technology and is currently undergoing evaluation in many countries as an alternative to arthrodesis for the treatment of cervical radiculopathy and myelopathy. The decision whether to use arthrodesis or arthroplasty is a difficult one. The achievement of good prosthetic performance demands exacting implantation techniques to ensure correct placement. This fact underlines the increasing importance of special instrumentation and surgical skills that involve an understanding of prosthetic lubrication, wear, and biologic effects and familiarity with currently available information regarding kinematics, basic science, testing, and early clinical results. Fortunately, a number of devices are at the late preclinical study stage or at the early clinical trial stage, and results in many cases are promising. In the near future, it is likely that new designs will be produced to replace spinal discs totally or partially in a pathologic entity-specific manner.

  7. Revision of failed humeral head resurfacing arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Streubel, Philipp N.; Simone, Juan P.; Cofield, Robert H.; Sperling, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to assess the outcomes of a consecutive series of patients who underwent revision surgery after humeral head resurfacing (HHR). Our joint registry was queried for all patients who underwent revision arthroplasty for failed HHR at our institution from 2005 to 2010. Eleven consecutive patients (average age 54 years; range 38-69 years) that underwent revision of 11 resurfacing arthroplasties were identified. The primary indication for resurfacing had been osteoarthritis in six, glenoid dysplasia in two, a chondral lesion in two, and postinstability arthropathy in one patient. The indication for revision was pain in 10 and infection in one patient. Seven patients had undergone an average of 1.9 surgeries prior to resurfacing (range 1-3). Materials and Methods: All patients were revised to stemmed arthroplasties, including one hemiarthroplasty, two reverse, and eight anatomic total shoulder arthroplasties at a mean 33 months after primary resurfacing (range 10-131 months). A deltopectoral approach was used in seven patients; four patients required an anteromedial approach due to severe scarring. Subscapularis attenuation was found in four cases, two of which required reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Bone grafting was required in one glenoid and three humeri. Results: At a mean follow-up of 3.5 years (range 1.6-6.9 years), modified Neer score was rated as satisfactory in five patients and unsatisfactory in six. Abduction and external rotation improved from 73° to 88° (P = 0.32) and from 23° to 32° (P = 0.28) respectively. Reoperation was required in two patients, including one hematoma and one revision for instability. Conclusion: Outcomes of revision of HHR arthroplasty in this cohort did not improve upon those reported for revision of stemmed humeral implants. A comparative study would be required to allow for definitive conclusions to be made. PMID:26980986

  8. Overcoming boundaries of worldwide joint arthroplasty registers: the European Arthroplasty Register minimal dataset.

    PubMed

    Sadoghi, Patrick; Leithner, Andreas; Labek, Gerold

    2013-09-01

    Worldwide joint arthroplasty registers are instrumental to screen for complications or implant failures. In order to achieve comparable results a similar classification dataset is essential. The authors therefore present the European Federation of National Associations of Orthopaedics and Traumatology (EFORT) European Arthroplasty Register (EAR) minimal dataset for primary and revision joint arthroplasty. Main parameters include the following: date of operation, country, hospital ID-code, patient's name and prename, birthday, identification code of the implant, gender, diagnosis, preoperations, type of prosthesis (partial, total), side, cementation technique, use of antibiotics in the cement, surgical approach, and others specifically related to the affected joint. The authors believe that using this minimal dataset will improve the chance for a worldwide comparison of arthroplasty registers and ask future countries for implementation.

  9. PERIPROSTHETIC FRACTURES IN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    de Alencar, Paulo Gilberto Cimbalista; De Bortoli, Giovani; Ventura Vieira, Inácio Facó; Uliana, Christiano Saliba

    2015-01-01

    The increasing number of total knee arthroplasties, in combination with the population's longer life expectancy, has led to a greater number of long-term complications. These add to the poor bone quality of elderly patients and often culminate in periprosthetic fractures. This complex orthopedic problem has a great diversity of clinical presentation. It may affect any of the bones in the knee and, because of the difficulty in finding solutions, may lead to disastrous outcomes. Its treatment requires that orthopedists should have broad knowledge both of arthroplasty techniques and of osteosynthesis, as well as an elaborate therapeutic arsenal including, for example, access to a bone bank. PMID:27022546

  10. Total Elbow Arthroplasty for Distal Humerus Fractures.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Luke S; Sanchez-Sotelo, Joaquin

    2015-11-01

    Total elbow arthroplasty is a good treatment alternative for selected patients with distal humerus fractures. Its attractiveness is related to several factors, including the possibility of performing the procedure; leaving the extensor mechanism intact; faster, easier rehabilitation compared with internal fixation; and overall good outcomes reported in terms of both pain relief and function. Implant failure leading to revision surgery does happen, and patients must comply with certain limitations to extend the longevity of their implant. Development of high-performance implants may allow expanding the indications of elbow arthroplasty for fractures.

  11. Gap balancing in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bottros, John; Gad, Bishoy; Krebs, Viktor; Barsoum, Wael K

    2006-06-01

    It is well known that the success of total knee arthroplasty is collectively dependent on the proper recreation of the joint line, appropriate soft tissue balancing, and respectful management of the extensor mechanism. One of the most decisive factors within the surgeon's control is the reestablishment of proper knee kinematics through both medial-lateral and flexion-extension ligamentous balancing. This can be accomplished only by a comprehensive intraoperative evaluation in full flexion, mid flexion, and full extension to minimize potential gap mismatches. Most of the discussion will focus on this aspect of soft tissue balancing, but this does not undermine the importance of the other aforementioned principles of successful knee arthroplasty.

  12. Medial unicondylar knee arthroplasty: technical pearls

    PubMed Central

    BONIFORTI, FILIPPO

    2015-01-01

    Unicondylar knee arthroplasty implantation is extremely demanding as the prosthesis needs to be integrated in the natural anatomy of the knee. It ensures the integrity of the natural knee kinematic. Some studies and registries data have shown lower success rate in comparison with total knee arthroplasty, and patient-related factors may have an impact on outcome. While, better results have been published by high volume centres. The indications for surgery should be reconsidered critically, even if medial osteoarthritis of the knee remains the most common. This article sets out the diagnostic, and surgical steps in order to fine tuning the unicompartmental replacement of the knee. PMID:26605256

  13. Biomechanics of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Berliner, Jonathan L; Regalado-Magdos, Ashton; Ma, C Benjamin; Feeley, Brian T

    2015-01-01

    Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty is an effective procedure for treatment of glenohumeral joint disease among patients with severe rotator cuff deficiency. Improvements in prosthetic design are the result of an evolved understanding of both shoulder and joint replacement biomechanics. Although modern generations of the reverse shoulder prosthesis vary in specific design details, they continue to adhere to Grammont's core principles demonstrated by his original Delta III prosthesis. This review article discusses the biomechanics of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty with a focus on elements of implant design and surgical technique that may affect stability, postoperative complications, and functional outcomes.

  14. Proprioception and Knee Arthroplasty: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Wodowski, Andrew J; Swigler, Colin W; Liu, Hongchao; Nord, Keith M; Toy, Patrick C; Mihalko, William M

    2016-04-01

    Proprioceptive mechanoreceptors provide neural feedback for position in space and are critical for three-dimensional interaction. Proprioception is decreased with osteoarthritis of the knees, which leads to increased risk of falling. As the prevalence of osteoarthritis increases so does the need for total knee arthroplasty (TKA), and knowing the effect of TKA on proprioception is essential. This article reviews the literature regarding proprioception and its relationship to balance, aging, osteoarthritis, and the effect of TKA on proprioception. Knee arthroplasty involving retention of the cruciate ligaments is also reviewed, as well the evidence of proprioception in the posterior cruciate ligament after TKA.

  15. Gait Analysis of Conventional Total Knee Arthroplasty and Bicruciate Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty Using a Triaxial Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Hidetomo; Aizawa, Toshiaki; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Shimada, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    One component of conventional total knee arthroplasty is removal of the anterior cruciate ligament, and the knee after total knee arthroplasty has been said to be a knee with anterior cruciate ligament dysfunction. Bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty is believed to reproduce anterior cruciate ligament function in the implant and provide anterior stability. Conventional total knee arthroplasty was performed on the right knee and bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty was performed on the left knee in the same patient, and a triaxial accelerometer was fitted to both knees after surgery. Gait analysis was then performed and is reported here. The subject was a 78-year-old woman who underwent conventional total knee arthroplasty on her right knee and bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty on her left knee. On the femoral side with bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty, compared to conventional total knee arthroplasty, there was little acceleration in the x-axis direction (anteroposterior direction) in the early swing phase. Bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty may be able to replace anterior cruciate ligament function due to the structure of the implant and proper anteroposterior positioning. PMID:27648328

  16. Implant Design in Cementless Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Taek

    2016-01-01

    When performing cementless hip arthroplasty, it is critical to achieve firm primary mechanical stability followed by biological fixation. In order to achieve this, it is essential to fully understand characteristics of implant design. In this review, the authors review fixation principles for a variety of implants used for cementless hip replacement and considerations for making an optimal selection. PMID:27536647

  17. Knee Lymphocutaneous Fistula Secondary to Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-de la Fuente, T.; Sandoval, E.; Alonso-Burgos, A.; García-Pardo, L.; Cárcamo, C.; Caballero, O.

    2014-01-01

    Lower limb lymphorrhea secondary to a surgical procedure is a rare but difficult-to-solve complication. In lower limb, this entity is frequently associated with vascular procedures around the inguinal area. We report on a case of a knee lymphocutaneous fistula secondary to a knee revision arthroplasty. To our knowledge, no previous reports regarding this complication have been published. PMID:25580333

  18. Mobile-bearing unicondylar knee arthroplasty: the Oxford experience.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Jason M; Berend, Keith R

    2014-01-01

    With the recent increase in medial unicompartmental arthroplasty, this article reviews the design history, indications, results, and modern technique for the implantation of the Oxford mobile-bearing unicompartmental arthroplasty. The article also discusses how the indications for the Oxford differ from the historical indications for medial unicompartmental arthroplasty and supports this paradigm shift with review of the recent data. A detailed series of surgical pearls is also presented to help surgeons with the surgical nuances of the Oxford partial knee.

  19. Mobile-bearing unicondylar knee arthroplasty: the Oxford experience.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Jason M; Berend, Keith R

    2015-01-01

    With the recent increase in medial unicompartmental arthroplasty, this article reviews the design history, indications, results, and modern technique for the implantation of the Oxford mobile-bearing unicompartmental arthroplasty. The article also discusses how the indications for the Oxford differ from the historical indications for medial unicompartmental arthroplasty and supports this paradigm shift with review of the recent data. A detailed series of surgical pearls is also presented to help surgeons with the surgical nuances of the Oxford partial knee.

  20. Qualifying CT for wrist arthroplasty: extending techniques for total hip arthroplasty to total wrist arthroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcala, Yvonne; Olivecrona, Henrik; Olivecrona, Lotta; Noz, Marilyn E.; Maguire, Gerald Q., Jr.; Zeleznik, Michael P.; Sollerman, Christer

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to extend previous work to detect migration of total wrist arthroplasty non-invasively, and with greater accuracy. Two human cadaverous arms, each with a cemented total wrist implant, were used in this study. In one of the arms, 1 mm tantalum balls were implanted, six in the carpal bones and five in the radius. Five CT scans of each arm were acquired, changing the position of the arm each time to mimic different positions patients might take on repeated examinations. Registration of CT volume data sets was performed using an extensively validated, 3D semi-automatic volume fusion tool in which co-homologous point pairs (landmarks) are chosen on each volume to be registered. Three sets of ten cases each were obtained by placing landmarks on 1) bone only (using only arm one), 2) tantalum implants only, and 3) bone and tantalum implants (both using only arm two). The accuracy of the match was assessed visually in 2D and 3D, and numerically by calculating the distance difference between the actual position of the transformed landmarks and their ideal position (i.e., the reference landmark positions). All cases were matched visually within one width of cortical bone and numerically within one half CT voxel (0.32 mm, p = 0.05). This method matched only the bone/arm and not the prosthetic component per se, thus making it possible to detect prosthetic movement and wear. This method was clinically used for one patient with pain. Loosening of the carpal prosthetic component was accurately detected and this was confirmed at surgery.

  1. Unexpected wear of an unicompartimental knee arthroplasty in oxidized zirconium.

    PubMed

    Luyet, Anais; Fischer, Jean-François; Jolles, Brigitte M; Lunebourg, Alexandre

    2015-12-01

    Unicompartimental knee arthroplasty is a successful procedure for the treatment of localized osteoarthritis to one compartment of the knee with good long-term results. However, several modes of failure of unicompartimental knee arthroplasty have been described, namely aseptic or septic loosening, progression of disease, wear, and instability. Metallosis after unicompartimental knee arthroplasty is rarely reported and is most often related with polyethylene wear or break. We report on a case of rapid failure of unicompartimental knee arthroplasty in oxidized zirconium associated with metallosis secondary to the dislocation of the polyethylene.

  2. Mobile bearings in primary knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Vertullo, C J; Easley, M E; Scott, W N; Insall, J N

    2001-01-01

    Mobile-bearing knee arthroplasty (MBKA) has potential advantages compared with conventional fixed-bearing total knee arthroplasty (TKA). By allowing unconstrained axial rotation, MBKA can offer greater articular conformity without an increased probability of loosening due to increased axial torque. Increased articular conformity minimizes polyethylene contact stresses, thereby reducing linear wear and subsurface fatigue failure. Axial rotation of the platform also enables self-correction of tibial component malrotation. Despite these advantages, the long-term clinical results obtained with current MBKA devices are similar to those obtained with well-designed fixed-bearing TKA prostheses, with no data suggesting their superiority. The disadvantages of MBKA include bearing dislocation and breakage, soft-tissue impingement, a steep technique learning curve, and concerns about volumetric wear. Hypothetically, longer-term follow-up of MBKA results may reveal a significant difference from fixed-bearing TKA results as the fatigue failure threshold of incongruent polyethylene is exceeded.

  3. Bladder tear during revision total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Grauer, Jonathan N; Halim, Andrea; Keggi, Kristaps J

    2014-08-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) and revision total hip arthroplasty are among the most commonly performed orthopedic procedures. There are many reported complications of THA, but intrapelvic complications are a rare subset. Bladder injuries have infrequently been described in association with this common procedure. We present an unusual case of a bladder tear occurring intraoperatively during a revision THA. It is suspected that the patient's history of multiple prior hip procedures caused adhesions of the bladder to the pelvic floor and predisposed the bladder to injury during acetabular revision. Previous reports of bladder injury relating to THA have described thermal necrosis, component migration, and occasional direct perforation. There are no prior case reports describing bladder tears related to adhesions occurring intraoperatively during revision THA. This case report highlights the importance of surgeon awareness of an unusual complication. In this case, intraoperative and postoperative recognition of a hematuria diagnosis led to the appropriate treatment, and this patient had an acceptable outcome.

  4. Postoperative management for PIP joint pyrocarbon arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Feldscher, Sheri B

    2010-01-01

    Although protocols provide therapists with the scaffolding with which to build a treatment program, it is the judgment, knowledge, and skills of the therapist, and how the one uses such information that allows for modification of a protocol when deemed necessary. This therapist outlines how she modified a postsurgical protocol by using anatomy, biomechanics, the literature, and clinical judgment. This article describes the methodical approach used to successfully modify a standard postsurgical protocol after a PIP joint arthroplasty.

  5. Lunate implant arthroplasty. Evaluation of 19 patients.

    PubMed

    Eiken, O; Necking, L E

    1984-01-01

    The results of lunate implant arthroplasty are unpredictable and many untoward postoperative problems are encountered. A retrospective review of 19 patients operated on for lunatomalacia (Kienböck's disease) by Silastic (HP) implant arthroplasty suggests that prevention of postoperative scapholunate dissociation seems to be the key to successful results. Knowledge of the predominant role played by the palmar ulnolunate and radiolunate ligaments is important to the understanding of this mechanism. The intrinsic stability accomplished by the geometry of the carpal bones requires adequate ligamentous support. This restraint, however, may be weakened by pre-existing absence of certain palmar fibres, by the disease process or by the surgery. In the present study three operative methods have been assessed: dorsal approach and implant stem fixation; dorsal approach, removal of implant stem and Kirschner-wire fixation; volar approach, removal of implant stem, no internal fixation but palmar capsuloligamentous reinforcement. Consistently good results have been obtained using the latter technique. It seems as if most of the usual postoperative problems of lunate implant arthroplasty can be avoided by this method which warrants continued trial.

  6. Periprosthetic fractures around total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sarmah, SS; Patel, S; Reading, G; El-Husseiny, M; Douglas, S; Haddad, FS

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The number of total knee arthroplasties performed continues to rise annually and it would be expected that complications, which include periprosthetic fractures, will also therefore become more commonplace. This article reviews the current literature regarding this injury and identifies the treatment principles that enable patients to regain optimal function. METHODS A comprehensive search of the Pubmed and Embase™ databases was performed to identify relevant articles. Keywords and MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) terms included in the search strategy were ‘periprosthetic fracture(s)’, ‘femur’, ‘tibia’, ‘patella(r)’, ‘complication(s)’, ‘failure(s)’, ‘risk(s)’, ‘prevalence’, ‘incidence’, ‘epidemiology’ and ‘classification(s)’. The search was limited to all articles published in English and reference lists from the original articles were reviewed to identify pertinent articles to include in this review. A total number of 43 studies were identified. RESULTS Common treatment aims have been identified when managing patients with a periprosthetic fracture around total knee arthoplasty. The main criterion that determines which option to choose is the degree of remaining bone stock and the amount of fracture displacement. CONCLUSIONS Treatment of a periprosthetic fracture around total knee arthroplasty will either be non-operative, osteosynthesis or revision arthroplasty. It is imperative that a suitable option is chosen and based on the published literature, pathways are outlined to aid the surgeon. PMID:22943223

  7. Prognostic Factors in Arthroplasty in the Rheumatoid Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Nagels, Jochem; Rozing, Maarten P.

    2010-01-01

    Total shoulder arthroplasty is commonly considered a good option for treatment of the rheumatoid shoulder. However, when the rotator cuff and glenoid bone stock are not preserved, the clinical outcome of arthroplasty in the rheumatoid patients remains unclear. Aim of the study is to explore the prognostic value of multiple preoperative and peroperative variables in total shoulder arthroplasty and shoulder hemiarthroplasty in rheumatoid patients. Clinical Hospital for Special Surgery Shoulder score was determined at different time points over a mean period of 6.5 years in 66 rheumatoid patients with total shoulder arthroplasty and 75 rheumatoid patients with shoulder hemiarthroplasty. Moreover, radiographic analysis was performed to assess the progression of humeral head migration and glenoid loosening. Advanced age and erosions or cysts at the AC joint at time of surgery were associated with a lower postoperative Clinical Hospital for Special Surgery Shoulder score. In total shoulder arthroplasty, status of the rotator cuff and its repair at surgery were predictive of postoperative improvement. Progression of proximal migration during the period after surgery was associated with a lower clinical score over time. However, in hemiarthroplasty, no relation was observed between the progression of proximal or medial migration during follow-up and the clinical score over time. Status of the AC joint and age at the time of surgery should be taken into account when considering shoulder arthroplasty in rheumatoid patients. Total shoulder arthroplasty in combination with good cuff repair yields comparable clinical results as total shoulder arthroplasty when the cuff is intact. PMID:21423883

  8. Adjacent-level arthroplasty following cervical fusion.

    PubMed

    Rajakumar, Deshpande V; Hari, Akshay; Krishna, Murali; Konar, Subhas; Sharma, Ankit

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Adjacent-level disc degeneration following cervical fusion has been well reported. This condition poses a major treatment dilemma when it becomes symptomatic. The potential application of cervical arthroplasty to preserve motion in the affected segment is not well documented, with few studies in the literature. The authors present their initial experience of analyzing clinical and radiological results in such patients who were treated with arthroplasty for new or persistent arm and/or neck symptoms related to neural compression due to adjacent-segment disease after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). METHODS During a 5-year period, 11 patients who had undergone ACDF anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and subsequently developed recurrent neck or arm pain related to adjacent-level cervical disc disease were treated with cervical arthroplasty at the authors' institution. A total of 15 devices were implanted (range of treated levels per patient: 1-3). Clinical evaluation was performed both before and after surgery, using a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Radiological outcomes were analyzed using pre- and postoperative flexion/extension lateral radiographs measuring Cobb angle (overall C2-7 sagittal alignment), functional spinal unit (FSU) angle, and range of motion (ROM). RESULTS There were no major perioperative complications or device-related failures. Statistically significant results, obtained in all cases, were reflected by an improvement in VAS scores for neck/arm pain and NDI scores for neck pain. Radiologically, statistically significant increases in the overall lordosis (as measured by Cobb angle) and ROM at the treated disc level were observed. Three patients were lost to follow-up within the first year after arthroplasty. In the remaining 8 cases, the duration of follow-up ranged from 1 to 3 years. None of these 8 patients required surgery for the same vertebral level during the follow

  9. [Revision arthroplasty of the ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Hintermann, B; Barg, A; Knupp, M

    2011-11-01

    In the last 20 years total ankle replacement has become a viable alternative to arthrodesis for end-stage osteoarthritis of the ankle. Numerous ankle prosthesis designs have appeared on the market in the past and attracted by the encouraging intermediate results reported in the literature, many surgeons have started to perform this procedure. With increased availability on the market the indications for total ankle replacement have also increased in recent years. In particular, total ankle replacement may now be considered even in younger patients. Therefore, despite progress in total ankle arthroplasty the number of failures may increase. Up to now, arthrodesis was considered to be the gold standard for salvage of failed ankle prostheses. Because of extensive bone loss on the talar side, in most instances tibiocalcaneal fusion is the only reliable solution. An alternative to such extended hindfoot fusions would be revision arthroplasty. To date, however, there are no reported results of revision arthroplasty for salvage of a failed ankle replacement.Based on our experience prosthetic components with a flat undersurface are most likely to be able to find solid support on remaining bone stock. The first 83 cases (79 patients, 46 males, 33 females, average age 58.9 years, range 30.6-80.7 years) with a average follow-up of 5.4 years (range 2-11 years) showed excellent to good results in 69 cases (83%), a satisfactory result in 12 cases (15%) and a fair result in 2 cases (2%) and 47 patients (56%) were pain free. Primary loosening was noted in three cases and of these two cases were successfully revised by another total ankle replacement and in one case with arthrodesis. Another case with hematogenous infection was also revised by arthrodesis. At the last follow-up control two components were considered to be loose and the overall loosening rate was thus 6%.This series has proven that revision arthroplasty can be a promising option for patients with failed total

  10. Reverse-total shoulder arthroplasty cost-effectiveness: A quality-adjusted life years comparison with total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bachman, Daniel; Nyland, John; Krupp, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare reverse-total shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) cost-effectiveness with total hip arthroplasty cost-effectiveness. METHODS: This study used a stochastic model and decision-making algorithm to compare the cost-effectiveness of RSA and total hip arthroplasty. Fifteen patients underwent pre-operative, and 3, 6, and 12 mo post-operative clinical examinations and Short Form-36 Health Survey completion. Short form-36 Health Survey subscale scores were converted to EuroQual Group Five Dimension Health Outcome scores and compared with historical data from age-matched patients who had undergone total hip arthroplasty. Quality-adjusted life year (QALY) improvements based on life expectancies were calculated. RESULTS: The cost/QALY was $3900 for total hip arthroplasty and $11100 for RSA. After adjusting the model to only include shoulder-specific physical function subscale items, the RSA QALY improved to 2.8 years, and its cost/QALY decreased to $8100. CONCLUSION: Based on industry accepted standards, cost/QALY estimates supported both RSA and total hip arthroplasty cost-effectiveness. Although total hip arthroplasty remains the quality of life improvement “gold standard” among arthroplasty procedures, cost/QALY estimates identified in this study support the growing use of RSA to improve patient quality of life. PMID:26925384

  11. Cervical disk arthroplasty versus ACDF for preoperative reducible kyphosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Wang, Xinwei; Lu, Xuhua; Yang, Haisong; Chen, Deyu

    2013-07-01

    Cervical total disk arthroplasty has proven to be an effective and safe alternative for anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the treatment of cervical disk degenerative disease. However, whether and when cervical disk arthroplasty is indicated for preoperative cervical spine kyphosis is unclear. In the authors' clinical experiences, preoperative kyphosis can generally be divided into reducible and irreducible forms according to the results of dynamic flexion-extension lateral radiographs. Reducible kyphosis is mostly related to local disk prolapse, clinical symptoms, and musculature weakness, but irreducible kyphosis is always associated with significant cervical degeneration or congenital bone malformation. In this study, 32 patients with preoperative reducible kyphosis were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to either single-level total cervical arthroplasty with the Discover cervical disk prosthesis (DePuy Spine, Raynham, Massachusetts) (arthroplasty group) or single-level ACDF with a polyetheretherketone cage and plate (ACDF group). No significant differences existed in clinical and radiological results at 2-year follow-up between the arthroplasty and ACDF groups. The global and functional spinal unit angles of the arthroplasty group were significantly lower than those of the ACDF group 6 months postoperatively, which was consistent with the result of the comparison in Neck Disability Index score. However, the sagittal alignment of the overall cervical spine and the treated segment and the Neck Disability Index score significantly improved after 6 months in the arthroplasty group but not in the ACDF group. Therefore, preoperative reducible kyphosis is not a contraindication for cervical total disk arthroplasty. However, neck strength-building exercises should be emphasized for the postoperative rehabilitation after cervical total disk arthroplasty.

  12. Unmet Needs and Waiting List Prioritization for Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Comas, Mercè; Román, Rubén; Quintana, José Maria

    2009-01-01

    Background There is a high volume of unmet needs for knee arthroplasty in the population despite the increase in surgery rates. Given the long waiting times to have a knee arthroplasty, some governments have proposed prioritization systems for patients on waiting lists based on their level of need. Questions/Purposes We therefore estimated the needs and demand of knee arthroplasty in four regions of Spain during a 5-year period. Methods We developed a discrete event simulation model to reproduce the process of knee arthroplasty. The prioritization system was compared with the usual waiting list management strategy (by waiting time only). Results Under the prioritization system, patients saved an average of 4.5 months (95% confidence interval, 4.4–4.6 months) adjusted by level of need. The proportion of patients who experienced excessive waiting times was small and was associated with low levels of priority. The 5-year projection of the volume of unmet needs for knee arthroplasty remained stable; however, although the volume of need for the first knee arthroplasty decreased by 12%, the volume of need for an arthroplasty in the contralateral knee increased by 50%. Conclusions The data suggested the prioritization system was more beneficial than assigning surgery by waiting time only. The 5-year projection of the volume of unmet needs for knee arthroplasty remained stable, despite the increase in the need for contralateral knee arthroplasty. Level of Evidence Level II, economic and decision analyses. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:19911242

  13. Measured flexion following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mai, Kenny T; Verioti, Christopher A; Hardwick, Mary E; Ezzet, Kace A; Copp, Steven N; Colwell, Clifford W

    2012-10-01

    Postoperative flexion is an important factor in the outcome of total knee arthroplasty. Although normal activities of daily living require a minimum of 105° to 110° of flexion, patients from non-Western cultures often engage in activities such as kneeling and squatting that require higher flexion. The desire to achieve greater flexion serves as the driving force for prosthetic modifications, including high-flexion designs. Techniques used to measure knee flexion and knee position during measurement are not often described or are different depending on the examiner. The purpose of this study was to compare active (self) and passive (assisted) flexion after successful total knee arthroplasty for 5 prostheses (2 standard and 3 high-flexion) using clinical (goniometer) and radiographic (true lateral radiograph) measurement techniques by different independent examiners.At a mean follow-up of 2.7 years (range, 1-5.6 years), a total of 108 patients (144 total knee arthroplasties) had completed the study. Mean postoperative active flexion was 111° clinically and 109° radiographically for the standard designs and 114° clinically and 117° radiographically for the high-flexion designs. Adding passive flexion increased flexion to 115° clinically and 117° radiographically for the standard designs and 119° clinically and 124° radiographically for the high-flexion designs. Flexion differences between the 2 measurement techniques (active vs passive and clinically vs radiographically) were statistically significant (P<.05). These findings demonstrate the importance of describing how flexion is measured in studies and understanding how the method of measurement can affect the findings.

  14. Snapping Pes Syndrome after Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Taketomi, Shuji; Yamagami, Ryota; Tahara, Keitaro; Tanaka, Sakae

    2016-01-01

    Snapping pes syndrome is defined as a snapping sensation in the medial knee caused by pes anserinus and rarely occurs. Snapping pes syndrome after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) has not been reported yet. We experienced two cases with this syndrome after UKA. Conservative treatment was effective in one case, while surgical excision of the gracilis tendon was necessary to relieve painful snapping in the other case. The main cause of the first case might be posteromedial overhang of the tibial tray that reached up to 5 mm. The probable cause of the second case was posteromedial overhang of the mobile bearing. PMID:27274476

  15. Perioperative pain management for total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Baratta, Jaime L; Gandhi, Kishor; Viscusi, Eugene R

    2014-01-01

    Pain management following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) can be challenging. Inadequate pain management following TKA may inhibit rehabilitation, increase morbidity and mortality, decrease patient satisfaction, and lead to chronic persistent postsurgical pain. Traditionally the mainstay of postoperative pain management was opioids; however, the current recommendations to pain management emphasize a multimodal approach and minimizing opioids whenever possible. With careful planning and a multimodal analgesic approach instituted perioperatively, appropriate pain management following TKA can be achieved. Utilizing an extensive review of the literature, this article discusses the analgesic techniques available for the perioperative management of TKA.

  16. Trochanteric osteotomy and fixation during total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Archibeck, Michael J; Rosenberg, Aaron G; Berger, Richard A; Silverton, Craig D

    2003-01-01

    Once used routinely, trochanteric osteotomy in total hip arthroplasty now is usually limited to difficult primary and revision cases. There are three types: the standard trochanteric osteotomy and its variations, the trochanteric slide, and the extended trochanteric osteotomy. Each has unique indications, fixation techniques, and complications. Primary total hip arthroplasty procedures requiring the enhanced exposure provided by trochanteric osteotomy may be needed in patients with hip ankylosis or fusion, protrusio acetabuli, proximal femoral deformities, developmental dysplasia, or abductor muscle laxity. Trochanteric osteotomies in revision arthroplasties, primarily the extended trochanteric osteotomy, facilitate the removal of well-fixed femoral components, provide direct access to the diaphysis for distal fixation, and enhance acetabular exposure.

  17. Dual mobility cups in total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    De Martino, Ivan; Triantafyllopoulos, Georgios Konstantinos; Sculco, Peter Keyes; Sculco, Thomas Peter

    2014-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is considered one of the most successful surgical procedures in orthopaedics. With the increase in the number of THAs performed in the world in the next decades, reducing or preventing medical and mechanical complications such as post-operative THA instability will be of paramount importance, particularly in an emerging health care environment based on quality control and patient outcome. Dual mobility acetabular component (also known as unconstrained tripolar implant) was introduced in France at the end of the 1970s as an alternative to standard sockets, to reduce the risk of THA dislocation in patients undergoing primary THA in France. Dual mobility cups have recently gained wider attention in the United States as an alternative option in the prevention and treatment of instability in both primary and revision THA and offer the benefit of increased stability without compromising clinical outcomes and implant longevity. In this article, we review the use of dual mobility cup in total hip arthroplasty in terms of its history, biomechanics, outcomes and complications based on more than 20 years of medical literature. PMID:25035820

  18. Painful knee arthroplasty: definition and overview

    PubMed Central

    Carulli, Christian; Villano, Marco; Bucciarelli, Giovanni; Martini, Caterina; Innocenti, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Summary Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) is one of the most successful procedures in Orthopaedic Surgery, with good clinical results and high survival rate in more than 90% of the cases at long-term follow-up. Since the increase of population’s mean age, worsening of articular degenerative alterations, and articular sequelae related to previous fractures, there is a persistent growing of the number of knee arthroplasties in every country each year, with expected increase of complications rates. Painful TKA is considered an unusual complication, but several reports focus on this challenging clinical issue. Common causes of painful TKA may be divided as early or late, and in referred, periarticular or intra-articular. Among the early, we recall implant instability (related to surgical and technical mistakes) and problems of extensor mechanism (patella not resurfaced, malalignment of femoral, tibial, or patellar component, tendons failure or degeneration). Late causes of painful TKA are almost related to aseptic loosening and infection, but also, even if unusual, reflex sympathetic dystrophy, synovitis, and hypersensitivity to metal implants are represented. Hypersensitivity to metal is a clinical issue with significative increase, but to date without a specific characterization. The Authors report about incidence, clinical features, and diagnostic pathways of hypersensitivity to metal implants, focusing on the prevention of this challenging problem. PMID:22461811

  19. Assessing hospital cost of joint arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    BONIFORTI, FILIPPO

    2015-01-01

    Purpose total joint replacement is one of the most successful procedures in medicine and cost reimbursements to hospitals for the joint arthroplasty diagnosis-related group are among the largest payments made by a Regional Health Service. Despite the popularity of these procedures, there are few high-quality cost-effectiveness studies on this topic. This study evaluates the cost of total joint arthroplasty performed in a district hospital. Methods direct and indirect costs have been measured and patient procedure pathway was analyzed subdivided into three stages: surgical procedure, inpatient care and outpatient clinic. Results the cost of the surgical procedure stage was calculated as 3,798 euros, while that of the inpatient stage was 2,924 euros. The mean hospital costs per procedure amounted to 6,952 euros. Conclusions although the Health Service tariffs fully reimburse the cost of providing a joint replacement, our data contribute to point out the role of hospital staff’s organization to support sustainable improvements on health care for joint replacement surgery. Level of evidence Level VI, single economic evaluation. PMID:26904524

  20. Total knee arthroplasty in patients with a previous patellectomy.

    PubMed

    Maslow, Jed; Zuckerman, Joseph D; Immerman, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Post-patellectomy patients represent a specific subgroup of patients that may develop arthritis and persistent knee pain and potentially require treatment with total knee arthroplasty. This article reviews the treatment and functional outcomes following total knee arthroplasty in patients with prior patellectomy. A case report is presented as an example of the clinical management of a post-patellectomy patient with significant knee pain and disability treated with total knee arthroplasty. Emphasis will be placed in decision- making, specifically with the use of a posterior stabilized implant. In addition, postoperative strengthening of the quadriceps is essential to compensate for the lack of the patella and increase the success of total knee arthroplasty in this subgroup of patients.

  1. Extended travel after hip arthroplasty surgery. Is it safe?

    PubMed

    Ball, Scott T; Pinsorsnak, Piya; Amstutz, Harlan C; Schmalzried, Thomas P

    2007-09-01

    Hip arthroplasty and extended travel are each recognized as risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE). The safety of travel after hip arthroplasty is currently unknown. Patients who had traveled more than 200 miles within 6 weeks of a hip arthroplasty or hip resurfacing were identified and contacted. All patients received VTE chemoprophylaxis with enoxaparin, dalteparin, fondaparinox, or warfarin. A total of 608 patients traveled an average of 1377 miles at an average of 6.5 days after surgery. Among these patients, 462 traveled by airplane, 143 by car, and 3 by train. There were no deaths, no symptomatic pulmonary embolisms, and only 5 (0.82%) symptomatic deep venous thromboses. Nine (1.5%) patients experienced bleeding complications. With chemical VTE prophylaxis, extended travel within 6 weeks of hip arthroplasty surgery is associated with a low rate of symptomatic deep venous thrombosis, with no known pulmonary embolisms and no deaths.

  2. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty for Trauma: When, Where, and How.

    PubMed

    Szerlip, Benjamin W; Morris, Brent J; Edwards, T Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Reverse shoulder arthroplasty has become increasingly popular for the treatment of complex shoulder injuries, including proximal humerus fractures and fixed glenohumeral dislocation, in the elderly population. The early to midterm results of reverse shoulder arthroplasty for the treatment of proximal humerus fractures are promising compared with the results of unconstrained humeral head replacement, and patients may have more predictable improvement with less dependence on bone healing and rehabilitation. However, long-term follow-up is needed, and surgeons must be familiar with various complications that are specific to reverse shoulder arthroplasty. To achieve optimal patient outcomes for the management of traumatic shoulder injuries, surgeons must have a comprehensive understanding of the current implant options, indications, and surgical techniques for reverse shoulder arthroplasty.

  3. Arthroscopic Interpositional Arthroplasty of the Second Metatarsophalangeal Joint.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-12-01

    Painful degenerative diseases of the second metatarsophalangeal joint are frequently progressive and difficult to treat. Surgical options for the degenerated second metatarsophalangeal joint include joint debridement and synovectomy, drilling and microfracture, core decompression, dorsal closing-wedge metatarsal osteotomies, joint arthroplasty (implant or interpositional), elevation of the depressed articular fragment and bone graft, distraction arthroplasty, osteochondral plug transplantation, osteochondral distal metatarsal allograft reconstruction, and resection arthroplasty (phalangeal base or metatarsal head). This technical note describes the arthroscopic approach of interpositional arthroplasty of the second metatarsophalangeal joint using the extensor digitorum brevis tendon. It is indicated in adult patients with extensive involvement of the metatarsal head cartilage, especially when cartilage degeneration of the proximal phalanx is also present. It is contraindicated if there is significant bone loss of the metatarsal head or the extensor digitorum brevis tendon is flimsy.

  4. Revision surgery after total joint arthroplasty: a complication-based analysis using worldwide arthroplasty registers.

    PubMed

    Sadoghi, Patrick; Liebensteiner, Michael; Agreiter, Mark; Leithner, Andreas; Böhler, Nikolaus; Labek, Gerold

    2013-09-01

    The authors performed a complication-based analysis of total knee (TKA), total hip (THA), and total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) using worldwide arthroplasty registers. We extracted data with respect to reason for revision surgery and pooled causes. The most common causes for revisions in THA were aseptic loosening (55.2%), dislocation (11.8 %), septic loosening (7.5%), periprosthetic fractures (6%), and others. The most common causes in TKA were aseptic loosening (29.8%), septic loosening (14.8%), pain (9.5%), wear (8.2%), and others. The most common causes in TAA were aseptic loosening (38%), technical errors (15%), pain (12%), septic loosening (9.8%), and others. Revisions in TKA and THA differ with respect to type of complication. However, in case of TAA, higher rates of technically related complications are reported.

  5. Primary versus secondary distal femoral arthroplasty for treatment of total knee arthroplasty periprosthetic femur fractures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Antonia F; Choi, Lisa E; Colman, Matthew W; Goodman, Mark A; Crossett, Lawrence S; Tarkin, Ivan S; McGough, Richard L

    2013-10-01

    Current methods of fixing periprosthetic fractures after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are variable, and include open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) via plating, retrograde nailing, or revision using standard revision TKA components or a distal femoral arthroplasty (DFA). The purpose of this study is to compare patients who failed plating techniques requiring subsequent revision to DFA to patients who underwent primary DFA. Of the 13 patients (9.2%) who failed primary ORIF, causes included nonunion (53.8%), infection (30.8%), loosening (7.7%), and refracture (7.7%). There were significantly more surgical procedures for ORIF revision to DFA compared to primary DFA. Complications for patients who underwent primary reconstruction with DFAs included extensor mechanism disruption (8.3%), infection (5.6%), and dislocation (2.8%). Primary reconstruction via ORIF is beneficial for preserving bone stock, but primary DFA may be preferred in osteopenic patients, or those at high risk for nonunion.

  6. Return to Duty and Deployment after Major Joint Arthroplasty

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    a seven-fold increase in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) within the past 40 years [1]. More importantly perhaps is that the incidence over the past...that a higher level of physical activity places individuals at greater risk for developing osteoarthritis (OA) [8–10]. Military service members in...Medical Evaluation Board (MEB), the military disability system equivalent, is OA. After a hip or knee arthroplasty, patients are advised to make

  7. The painful total ankle arthroplasty: a diagnostic and treatment algorithm.

    PubMed

    Vulcano, E; Myerson, M S

    2017-01-01

    The last decade has seen a considerable increase in the use of in total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) to treat patients with end-stage arthritis of the knee. However, the longevity of the implants is still far from that of total knee and hip arthroplasties. The aim of this review is to outline a diagnostic and treatment algorithm for the painful TAA to be used when considering revision surgery. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:5-11.

  8. MIS unicondylar knee arthroplasty: surgical approach and early results.

    PubMed

    Gesell, Mark W; Tria, Alfred J

    2004-11-01

    Unicondylar arthroplasty of the knee has seen a resurgence of interest in the United States. The principles of unicondylar arthroplasty of the knee are different from those for total knee arthroplasty, allowing replacement of only the affected joint compartment with less bone loss. Minimally invasive surgery allows for less soft tissue dissection with the potential for less morbidity. The key question is: will the changes associated with the minimally invasive surgery procedure improve the clinical results of the standard unicondylar arthroplasty of the knee or will the changes make the procedure too difficult and lead to an increasing failure rate? This study reviews the surgical technique and presents the 2 to 4 year results of the minimally invasive unicondylar arthroplasty of the knee 47 knees in 41 patients. The average range of motion increased from 121 degrees -132 degrees . The Knee Society pain score improved from 45-80 and the function score improved from 47-78. Only one knee has been revised. With proper patient selection, minimally invasive unicondylar arthroplasty of the knee allows for results that are at least equal to those of the standard open procedure at 2 to 4 years after the surgery.

  9. Traumatic Migration of the Bryan Cervical Disc Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Scott C; Kang, Daniel G; Helgeson, Melvin D

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Case study. Objective To describe a case of dislodgment and migration of the Bryan Cervical Disc (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, Tennessee, United States) arthroplasty more than 6 months after implantation secondary to low-energy trauma. Methods The inpatient, outpatient, and radiographic medical records of a patient with traumatic migration of the Bryan Cervical Disc arthroplasty were reviewed. The authors have no relevant disclosures to report. Results A 36-year-old man with chronic left upper extremity radiculopathy underwent uncomplicated Bryan Cervical Disc arthroplasty at C5-C6, with complete resolution of his symptoms. Approximately 6 months after his index procedure, he sustained low-energy trauma to the posterior cervical spine, after being struck by a book falling from a shelf. The injury forced his neck into flexion, and though he did not have recurrence of his radiculopathy symptoms, radiographs demonstrated anterior migration of the arthroplasty device. He underwent revision to anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion. Conclusions Although extremely rare, it is imperative that surgeons consider the potential for failure of osseous integration in patients undergoing cervical disk arthroplasty, even beyond 3 to 6 months postoperatively. This concern is especially relevant to press-fit or milled devices like the Bryan Cervical Disc arthroplasty, which lack direct fixation into adjacent vertebral bodies. We are considering modification of our postoperative protocol to improve protection of the device after implantation, even beyond 3 months postoperatively.

  10. Traumatic Migration of the Bryan Cervical Disc Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Scott C.; Kang, Daniel G.; Helgeson, Melvin D.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case study. Objective To describe a case of dislodgment and migration of the Bryan Cervical Disc (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, Tennessee, United States) arthroplasty more than 6 months after implantation secondary to low-energy trauma. Methods The inpatient, outpatient, and radiographic medical records of a patient with traumatic migration of the Bryan Cervical Disc arthroplasty were reviewed. The authors have no relevant disclosures to report. Results A 36-year-old man with chronic left upper extremity radiculopathy underwent uncomplicated Bryan Cervical Disc arthroplasty at C5–C6, with complete resolution of his symptoms. Approximately 6 months after his index procedure, he sustained low-energy trauma to the posterior cervical spine, after being struck by a book falling from a shelf. The injury forced his neck into flexion, and though he did not have recurrence of his radiculopathy symptoms, radiographs demonstrated anterior migration of the arthroplasty device. He underwent revision to anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion. Conclusions Although extremely rare, it is imperative that surgeons consider the potential for failure of osseous integration in patients undergoing cervical disk arthroplasty, even beyond 3 to 6 months postoperatively. This concern is especially relevant to press-fit or milled devices like the Bryan Cervical Disc arthroplasty, which lack direct fixation into adjacent vertebral bodies. We are considering modification of our postoperative protocol to improve protection of the device after implantation, even beyond 3 months postoperatively. PMID:26835211

  11. Total knee arthroplasty in patients with prior ipsilateral hip fusion.

    PubMed

    Romness, D W; Morrey, B F

    1992-03-01

    Sixteen total knee arthroplasties performed between 1977 and 1985 in 13 patients with prior ipsilateral hip arthrodesis or ankylosis were studied to determine the preferred sequence and long-term follow-up of procedures in this clinical setting. Twelve of 16 underwent fusion takedown and total hip arthroplasty prior to knee replacement. The average age at total knee arthroplasty was 52.7 years and the average time from hip fusion to total knee arthroplasty was 36.3 years. Mean follow-up after total knee arthroplasty was 5.5 years (range, 2.3 to 10 years). The Hospital for Special Surgery knee score increased from a mean of 31.8 preoperatively to 72.2 after surgery. In patients who had conversion of the hip fusion prior to knee replacement, knee scores were 28 before and 72.5 after both procedures. Patients who retained their hip fusion had mean scores of 43.5 and 72.1, respectively. None of the knees has been removed and 14 of 16 had no pain at last follow-up. One had mild pain and one had moderate pain attributed to pes anserine bursitis. Although the numbers are small, this experience reveals that takedown of the fusion with total hip arthroplasty is an effective technique before performing the knee replacement. Though successful in some instances, the experience is too small to show that if hip fusion is in good position, knee replacement without fusion takedown is acceptable.

  12. Digital versus analogue preoperative planning of total hip arthroplasties: a randomized clinical trial of 210 total hip arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    The, Bertram; Verdonschot, Nico; van Horn, Jim R; van Ooijen, Peter M A; Diercks, Ron L

    2007-09-01

    The objective of this randomized clinical trial was to compare the clinical and technical results of digital preoperative planning for primary total hip arthroplasties with analogue planning. Two hundred and ten total hip arthroplasties were randomized. All plans were constructed on standardized radiographs by the surgeon who performed the arthroplasty the next day. The main outcome was accuracy of the preoperative plan. Secondary outcomes were operation time and a radiographic assessment of the arthroplasty. Digital preoperative plans were more accurate in planning the cup (P < .05) and scored higher on the postoperative radiologic assessment of cemented cup (P = .03) and stem (P < .01) components. None of the other comparisons reached statistical significance. We conclude that digital plans slightly outperform analogue plans.

  13. Risk assessment tools used to predict outcomes of total hip and total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Konopka, Joseph F; Hansen, Viktor J; Rubash, Harry E; Freiberg, Andrew A

    2015-07-01

    This article reviews recently proposed clinical tools for predicting risks and outcomes in total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty patients. Additionally, we share the Massachusetts General Hospital experience with using the Risk Assessment and Prediction Tool to predict the need for an extended care facility after total joint arthroplasty.

  14. Fatigue fracture of an Austin Moore uncemented hemi-arthroplasty: a case report.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D Martin; Ashford, Robert U; Collier, Andrew M

    2004-09-01

    Prosthetic component failure occurs in total hip arthroplasty infrequently. Fractures of hemi-arthroplasty components are extremely uncommon. A recent case report highlighted two cases of stem failures in hydroxyapatite- (HA) coated implants. Uncemented Austin Moore hemi-arthroplasties typically fail by loosening or periprosthetic fracture. We report a case and the management of a fractured implant.

  15. Dermabond wound closure in primary hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Ashish; Parker, Salim; Goel, Vivek; Alderman, Phillip M

    2008-06-01

    Cyanoacrylate glues have been used in various surgical specialties for primary wound closure or as a supplement to other methods. We assessed the overall results and safety of this technique following primary hip arthroplasty. Ninety-three patients undergoing primary total hip replacement were studied. The surgical wound had been closed with subcuticular vicryl followed by the application of topical dermabond adhesive, without any additional dressings. The mean follow-up was 7.2 months. One patient suffered wound dehiscence on the third post operative day. Two patients had serous oozing from the wound for the initial 3-4 days. This technique provides an immediate water tight seal in a sterile operative environment and provides a barrier to micro organisms. It has good tensile strength, aesthetic value and patient satisfaction.

  16. [CT and MRI of hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Agten, C A; Sutter, R; Pfirrmann, C W A

    2014-07-01

    Metal-induced artifacts impair image quality of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with hip prostheses. Due to new developments in metal artifact reduction both methods can now be used for evaluation of a painful hip prosthesis. Iterative reconstruction algorithms and dual-energy scans are among the newer CT techniques for artifact reduction, while slice-encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC) and multi-acquisition variable-resonance image combination (MAVRIC) have introduced substantial improvements for MRI. Loosening of the hip prosthesis, osteolysis from small wear particles and pseudotumors in metal-on-metal prostheses are specific pathologies in patients with total hip arthroplasty. Other causes of painful hip prostheses are infections, fractures, tendinopathies, tendon ruptures, muscle and nerve alterations and heterotopic ossifications.

  17. Total hip arthroplasty in the ankylosed hip.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Megan A; Huo, Michael H

    2011-12-01

    Altered biomechanics secondary to hip ankylosis often result in degeneration of the lumbar spine, ipsilateral knee, and contralateral hip and knee. Symptoms in these joints may be reduced with conversion total hip arthroplasty (THA) of the ankylosed hip. THA in the ankylosed hip is a technically challenging procedure, and the overall clinical outcome is generally less satisfactory than routine THA performed for osteoarthritis and other etiologies. Functional integrity of the hip abductor muscles is the most important predictor of walking ability following conversion THA. Many patients experience persistent limp, and it can take up to 2 years to fully assess final functional outcome. Risk factors cited for increased risk of failed THA include prior surgical ankylosis and age <50 years at the time of conversion THA.

  18. Blood Management Strategies in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Michael; Martinez Martos, Sara; Beller, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    A perioperative blood management program is one of a number of important elements for successful patient care in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and surgeons should be proactive in its application. The aims of blood conservation are to reduce the risk of blood transfusion whilst at the same time maximizing hemoglobin (Hb) in the postoperative period, leading to a positive effect on outcome and cost. An individualized strategy based on patient specific risk factors, anticipated blood loss and comorbidities are useful in achieving this aim. Multiple blood conservation strategies are available in the preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative periods and can be employed in various combinations. Recent literature has highlighted the importance of preoperative Hb optimization, minimizing blood loss and evidence-based transfusion guidelines. Given TKA is an elective procedure, a zero allogenic blood transfusion rate should be the aim and an achievable goal. PMID:27595070

  19. Total knee arthroplasty closure with barbed sutures.

    PubMed

    Eickmann, Tom; Quane, Erika

    2010-09-01

    Bidirectional barbed sutures, which do not require the tying of knots, have the potential to reduce closure times of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) wounds without adverse effect to wound security, cosmesis, or infection risk. In this retrospective study, data were reviewed from TKAs performed between January 2007 and September 2008. For 88 of these procedures, conventional absorbable sutures were used for interrupted closure of the retinacular and subcutaneous layers and for running closure of the subcuticular layer. For 90 procedures, bidirectional barbed absorbable sutures were used for running closure of the retinacular and subcutaneous layers. Surgeries performed with barbed sutures were significantly faster than those performed with conventional sutures (mean times of 74.3 minutes and 85.8 minutes, respectively, p < 0.001) with no detrimental clinical effects.

  20. [Fracture arthroplasty of femoral neck fractures].

    PubMed

    Braun, K F; Hanschen, M; Biberthaler, P

    2016-04-01

    A paradigm shift in the treatment of elderly patients has recently taken place leading to an increase in joint replacement surgery. The aim of this article is to highlight new developments and to present a treatment algorithm for femoral neck fractures. The age limit must be individually determined considering the comorbidities and perioperative risk profile. Pertrochanteric femoral fractures are nearly exclusively treated by osteosynthesis regardless of age. The situation for femoral neck fractures is more complex. Patients younger than 65 years should generally be treated by osteosynthesis but patients older than 65 years benefit from hemiarthroplasty or total hip arthroplasty. In patients aged between 65 and 75 years with high functional demands and a justifiable perioperative risk, total joint replacement is the treatment of choice. In physically less active patients older than 75 years and poor general condition, preference should be given to hemiarthroplasty.

  1. Fracture Blisters After Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Halawi, Mohamad J

    2015-08-01

    Fracture blisters are tense vesicles that arise on markedly swollen skin overlying traumatized soft tissue. While this relatively uncommon complication has been well described in the trauma literature, this article reports for the first time a case of fracture blisters after primary total knee arthroplasty. The fracture blisters developed within 36 hours of surgery and were associated with profound swelling and erythema. There was no evidence of vascular injury, compartment syndrome, iatrogenic fracture, or deep venous thrombosis. The patient was treated with leg elevation, loosely applied nonadhesive dressings, and a short course of oral antibiotics after skin desquamation. Blood-filled blisters required longer time to reepithelialization than fluid-filled blisters. Knee stiffness developed because of pain and fear of participation with physical therapy, but the patient was able to resume intensive rehabilitation after resolution of the blisters. Patient factors, surgical factors, and review of the literature are discussed.

  2. Minimally invasive total hip arthroplasty: in opposition.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, David S

    2004-06-01

    At the Knee Society Winter Meeting in 2003, Seth Greenwald and I debated about whether there should be new standards (ie, regulations) applied to the release of information to the public on "new developments." I argued for the public's "right to know" prior to the publication of peer-reviewed literature. He argued for regulatory constraint or "proving by peer-reviewed publication" before alerting the public. It is not a contradiction for me to currently argue against the public advertising of minimally invasive (MIS) total hip arthroplasty as not yet being in the best interest of the public. It is hard to remember a concept that has so captured both the public's and the surgical community's fancy as MIS. Patients are "demanding" MIS without knowing why. Surgeons are offering it as the next best, greatest thing without having developed the skill and experience to avoid the surgery's risks. If you put "minimally invasive hip replacement" into the Google search engine (http://www.google.com), you get 5,170 matches. If you put the same words in PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi), referencing the National Library of Medicine database, you get SEVENTEEN; none is really a peer-reviewed article. Most are 1 page papers in orthopedics from medical education meetings. On the other hand, there are over 6,000 peer-reviewed articles on total hip arthroplasty. Dr. Thomas Sculco, my couterpart in this debate, wrote an insightful editorial in the American Journal of Orthopedic Surgery in which he stated: "Although these procedures have generated incredible interest and enthusiasm, I am concerned that they may be performed to the detriment of our patients." I couldn't agree with him more. Smaller is not necessarily better and, when it is worse, it will be the "smaller" that is held accountable.

  3. [Rehabilitation after total knee arthroplasty of hip and knee].

    PubMed

    Jansen, E; Brienza, S; Gierasimowicz-Fontana, A; Matos, C; Reynders-Frederix-Dobre, C; HateM, S M

    2015-09-01

    Numbers of total hip and knee arthroplasties are increasing on a regular basis. Clinical pathways tend to shorten the duration of hospitalization in acute care after surgery. Therefore, the preoperative preparation of the patient and his abilities for postoperative rehabilitation should be carefully addressed. Before the surgical intervention, it is recommended that the patient receives an educational program and a physical preparation. After the surgical intervention, the patient can benefit from a home-based rehabilitation program supervised by a physiotherapist, if there were no preoperative reasons for prolonging the hospital stay and if the surgery took place without complications. Some patients may benefit from postsurgical rehabilitation in a specialized locomotor rehabilitation long-stay care unit. The indications for inpatient multidisciplinary rehabilitation are : two simultaneous arthroplasties, revision of a previous hip or knee arthroplasty, postsurgical complications, advanced age, comorbidities influencing the rehabilitation process, social difficulties, necessity for adaptation of the environment, insufficient or unadapted out-patient (para)medical care. The goals of the rehabilitation treatment depend on the patient's characteristics and environment, on the properties of the prosthesis and on the postsurgical complications. The functional prognosis of a total joint arthroplasty of the knee or hip is excellent, provided that there are no post-surgical complications and that the patient benefits from adequate rehabilitation therapy. The present paper describes the different phases of rehabilitation treatment and the general and specific complications of total hip and knee arthroplasties that may influence the rehabilitation outcome.

  4. Algorithm of physical therapy exercises following total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Stryła, Wanda; Pogorzała, Adam M; Rogala, Piotr; Nowakowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-09

    Authors present a set of exercises for patients after total hip replacement (THR) treated due to idiopathic hip joint osteoarthritis. Outcome of surgical treatment depends largely on physical therapy conducted after the procedure. Physical therapy following total hip arthroplasty involves restoration of proper physical function. Exercises increase the strength of hip girdle muscles and stabilize the involved hip joint. Total postoperative rehabilitation improves the gait esthetics. Restoring patient's full independence in everyday and professional life after total hip arthroplasty is the best test for properly conducted rehabilitation. A rehabilitation algorithm following hip arthroplasty was established based on the data acquired from literature and authors' own studies. Methods of rehabilitation following total arthroplasty was unified with regard to the type of endoprosthesis (cemented and non-cemented). Rehabilitation after revision and cancer arthroplasties were not taken into consideration. Exercises were divided into those performed in supine and standing positions as well as resistance training (using an elastic TheraBand® tape). At a later stage of rehabilitation, marching and walking as well as cycloergometer training were included. Patient's position during the day and in the sleep for two months following THR was taken into account, including some types of exercises that are contraindicated and pose a threat of endoprosthesis luxation.

  5. Fretting and Corrosion in Modular Shoulder Arthroplasty: A Retrieval Analysis.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Johannes A; Mueller, Ulrike; Jaeger, Sebastian; Panzram, Benjamin; Kretzer, J Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Tribocorrosion in taper junctions of retrieved anatomic shoulder arthroplasty implants was evaluated. A comparison of the tribocorrosion between cobalt-chromium and titanium alloy stems was conducted and the observations were correlated with the individual's clinical data. Adverse effects caused by metal debris and subsequent elevated serum metal ion levels are frequently reported in total hip arthroplasty. In total shoulder arthroplasty, to date only a small number of retrieval analyses are available and even fewer address the issue of tribocorrosion at the taper junctions. A total of 36 retrieved hemiarthroplasties and total shoulder arthroplasties were assessed using the modified Goldberg score. The prevalence of fretting and corrosion was confirmed in this cohort. Titanium stems seem to be more susceptible to damage caused by tribocorrosion than cobalt-chromium stems. Furthermore, stemless designs offered less tribocorrosion at the taper junction than stemmed designs. A weak correlation between time to revision and increased levels of tribocorrosion was seen. Whether or not tribocorrosion can lead to adverse clinical reactions and causes failure of shoulder arthroplasties remains to be examined.

  6. A review of ceramic bearing materials in total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bal, B S; Garino, J; Ries, M; Rahaman, M N

    2007-01-01

    Bearings made of ceramics have ultra-low wear properties that make them suitable for total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). When compared to cobalt chrome (CoCr)-on-polyethylene (PE) articulations, ceramics offer drastic reductions in bearing wear rates. Lower wear rates result in fewer wear particles produced by the articulating surfaces. In theory, this should reduce the risk of periprosthetic osteolysis and premature implant loosening, thereby contributing to the longevity of total joints. In addition to ceramics, other alternative bearing couples, such as highly cross-linked PE (XLPE) and metal-on-metal also offer less wear than CoCr-on-PE articulations in total joint arthroplasty. Alumina and zirconia ceramics are familiar to orthopaedic surgeons since both materials have been used in total joints for several decades. While not new in Europe, alumina-on-alumina ceramic total hips have only recently become available for widespread use in the United States from various orthopaedic implant manufacturers. As the search for the ideal total joint bearing material continues, composite materials of existing ceramics, metal-on-ceramic articulations, and new ceramic technologies will offer more choices to the arthroplasty surgeon. The objective of this paper is to present an overview of material properties, clinical applications, evolution, and limitations of ceramic materials that are of interest to the arthroplasty surgeon.

  7. Pain and Function Recovery Trajectories following Revision Hip Arthroplasty: Short-Term Changes and Comparison with Primary Hip Arthroplasty in the ADAPT Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Whitehouse, Michael R.; Wylde, Vikki; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael; Blom, Ashley W.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Patients report similar or better pain and function before revision hip arthroplasty than before primary arthroplasty but worse results are reported after revision surgery than after primary surgery. The trajectory of post-operative recovery during the first months and any differences by type of surgery have received little attention. We explored the trajectories of change in pain and function after revision hip arthroplasty to 12-months post-operatively and compare them with those observed after primary hip arthroplasty. Methods This study is a prospective cohort study of patients undergoing primary (n = 80 with 92% for an indication of osteoarthritis) and revision (n = 43) hip arthroplasties. WOMAC pain and function scores and walking speed were collected pre-operatively, at 3 and 12-months post-operatively. Multilevel regression models were used to chart and compare the trajectories of change (0–3 months and 3–12 months) between types of surgery. Results The improvements in pain and function following revision arthroplasty occurred within the first 3-months with no evidence of further change beyond this initial period. While the pattern of recovery was similar to the one observed after primary arthroplasty, improvements in the first 3-months were smaller after revision compared to primary arthroplasty. Patients listed for revision surgery reported lower pre-operative pain levels but similar post-operative levels compared to those undergoing primary surgery. At 12-months post-operation patients who underwent a revision arthroplasty had not reached the same level of function achieved by those who underwent primary arthroplasty. Conclusion The post-operative improvements in pain and function are larger following primary hip arthroplasty than following revision hip arthroplasty. Irrespectively of surgery type, most of the improvements occur in the first three post-operative months. More research is required to identify whether the recovery

  8. More than 95% completeness of reported procedures in the population-based Dutch Arthroplasty Register

    PubMed Central

    van Steenbergen, Liza N; Spooren, Anneke; van Rooden, Stephanie M; van Oosterhout, Frank J; Morrenhof, Jan W; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose A complete and correct national arthroplasty register is indispensable for the quality of arthroplasty outcome studies. We evaluated the coverage, completeness, and validity of the Dutch Arthroplasty Register (LROI) for hip and knee arthroplasty. Patients and methods The LROI is a nationwide population-based registry with information on joint arthroplasties in the Netherlands. Completeness of entered procedures was validated in 2 ways: (1) by comparison with the number of reimbursements for arthroplasty surgeries (Vektis database), and (2) by comparison with data from hospital information systems (HISs). The validity was examined by conducting checks on missing or incorrectly coded values in the LROI. Results The LROI contains over 300,000 hip and knee arthroplasties performed since 2007. Coverage of all Dutch hospitals (n = 100) was reached in 2012. Completeness of registered procedures was 98% for hip arthroplasty and 96% for knee arthroplasty in 2012, based on Vektis data. Based on comparison with data from the HIS, completeness of registered procedures was 97% for primary total hip arthroplasty and 96% for primary knee arthroplasty in 2013. Completeness of revision arthroplasty was 88% for hips and 90% for knees in 2013. The proportion of missing or incorrectly coded values of variables was generally less than 0.5%, except for encrypted personal identity numbers (17% of which were missing) and ASA scores (10% of which were missing). Interpretation The LROI now contains over 300,000 hip and knee arthroplasty procedures, with coverage of all hospitals. It has a good level of completeness (i.e. more than 95% for primary hip and knee arthroplasty procedures in 2012 and 2013) and the database has high validity. PMID:25758646

  9. [Knee arthroplasty. Mobile- and fixed-bearing design].

    PubMed

    Schunck, J; Jerosch, J

    2003-06-01

    After the introduction of mobile-bearing knee arthroplasty in the late 1970s, he benefits were discussed in comparison to the well-established modular fixed-bearing systems. The hypothetical advantages of mobile-bearing designs are the ability of axial rotation and a greater articular conformity, which reduces significantly fatigue failure of the polyethylene. Biomechanical analyses showed for each system characteristic features, which are not concordant with the aim of restoring normal knee kinematics. In both groups the long-term clinical results were excellent with 10-year survival rates of 95-98%. Ligamentous stability and a perfect operative technique are key factors in mobile-bearing knee arthroplasty. Prospective randomized clinical trials are necessary to find answers concerning backside and volumetric polyethylene wear and the detrimental effects of wear particle size. Before this is accomplished, the indication for a mobile-bearing knee arthroplasty, especially in young patients, should be carefully considered in each case.

  10. Arthroscopic bursectomy for recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis after hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Van Hofwegen, Christopher; Baker, Champ L; Savory, Carlton G; Baker, Champ L

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the use of arthroscopic bursectomy for pain relief in patients with trochanteric bursitis after hip arthroplasty. In this retrospective case series of 12 patients undergoing arthroscopic treatment of recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis after hip arthroplasty, outcomes were assessed via phone interview with a numeric pain rating scale from 1 to 10 and were compared with preoperative pain ratings. Patients were asked the percentage of time they had painless hip function and whether they would have the surgery again. At an average 36-month follow-up (range, 4-85 months), the average numeric pain scale rating improved from 9.3 to 3.3. At an average of 62% of the time, patients had painless use of the hip. Ten of 12 patients in the study felt the pain relief gained was substantial enough to warrant having procedure again. In these patients, arthroscopic bursectomy was a viable option for patients with recalcitrant bursitis after hip arthroplasty.

  11. Conversion to arthroplasty from proximal interphalangeal joint arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Iselin, F; Pradet, G; Gouet, O

    1988-01-01

    Fifteen patients, interested by the functional results of certain arthroplasties and discouraged by those of their arthrodesis, agreed to undergo disarthrodesis. This operation was performed by arthroplasty with Swanson implant under the following 4 conditions: excellent skin cover, an intact flexor system, articular fusion in good position with preservation of the normal length and axis of the finger, the understanding by the patient that an arthroplasty does not mean normal range of movement but, at best, recovery of a limited but functional, stable and pain-free range of movement. 12 cases operated between 1971 and 1984 have been followed for a mean of 39 postoperative months. The mean gain of active movement from a fused joint was 56.8. The postoperative course was always uneventful in these particularly motivated patients and 11 out of 12 were satisfied with their result.

  12. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty for the management of proximal humerus fractures.

    PubMed

    Jobin, Charles M; Galdi, Balazs; Anakwenze, Oke A; Ahmad, Christopher S; Levine, William N

    2015-03-01

    The use of reverse shoulder arthroplasty is becoming increasingly popular for the treatment of complex three- and four-part proximal humerus fractures in the elderly compared with the often unpredictable and poor outcomes provided by open reduction and internal fixation and by hemiarthroplasty. Inferior results with plate osteosynthesis are often a result of complications of humeral head osteonecrosis, loss of fixation, and screw penetration through the humeral head, whereas major concerns with hemiarthroplasty are tuberosity resorption, malunion, and nonunion resulting in pseudoparalysis. Comparative studies support the use of reverse shoulder arthroplasty in elderly patients with complex proximal humerus fractures because the functional outcomes and relief of pain are reliably improved. Repair and union of the greater tuberosity fragment during reverse shoulder arthroplasty demonstrates improved external rotation, clinical outcomes, and patient satisfaction compared with outcomes after tuberosity resection, nonunion, or resorption. Satisfactory results can be obtained with careful preoperative planning and attention to technical details.

  13. Stemless shoulder arthroplasty-current results and designs.

    PubMed

    Churchill, R Sean; Athwal, George S

    2016-03-01

    Stemless shoulder arthroplasty was originally introduced in 2004 by a single manufacturer. Now, over a decade later, numerous designs are available outside the USA, but as yet, only one implant has been cleared by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and is available for use within the USA. Often referred to as "canal sparing," these implants are designed for metaphyseal fixation to minimize humeral bone removal, avoid intraoperative and postoperative humeral fracture complications, and to decrease morbidity associated with revision operations. Recently, the second generation of stemless arthroplasty, a convertible implant allowing use in either anatomic or reverse arthroplasty configuration, was released for use outside the USA. This paper will review the available designs, reported results, and raise potential concerns for this emerging technology.

  14. Avulsive axillary artery injury in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wingert, Nathaniel C; Beck, John D; Harter, G Dean

    2014-01-01

    In addition to neurologic injuries such as peripheral nerve palsy, axillary vessel injury should be recognized as a possible complication of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Limb lengthening associated with Grammont-type reverse total shoulder arthroplasty places tension across the brachial plexus and axillary vessels and may contribute to observed injuries. The Grammont-type reverse total shoulder arthroplasty prosthesis reverses the shoulder ball and socket, shifts the shoulder center of rotation distal and medial, and lengthens the arm. This alteration of native anatomy converts shearing to compressive glenohumeral joint forces while augmenting and tensioning the deltoid lever arm. Joint stability is enhanced; shoulder elevation is enabled in the rotator cuff–deficient shoulder. Arm lengthening associated with reverse total shoulder arthroplasty places a longitudinal strain on the brachial plexus and axillary vessels. Peripheral nerve palsies and other neurologic complications of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty have been documented. The authors describe a patient with rotator cuff tear arthropathy and a history of radioulnar synostosis who underwent reverse total shoulder arthroplasty complicated by intraoperative injury to the axillary artery and postoperative radial, ulnar, and musculocutaneous nerve palsies. Following a seemingly unremarkable placement of reverse shoulder components, brisk arterial bleeding was encountered while approximating the incised subscapularis tendon in preparation for wound closure. Further exploration revealed an avulsive-type injury of the axillary artery. After an unsuccessful attempt at primary repair, a synthetic arterial bypass graft was placed. Reperfusion of the right upper extremity was achieved and has been maintained to date. Postoperative clinical examination and electromyographic studies confirmed ongoing radial, ulnar, and musculocutaneous neuropathies.

  15. Anatomic Versus Mechanically Aligned Total Knee Arthroplasty for Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty Revision

    PubMed Central

    Toliopoulos, Panagiota; LeBlanc, Marc-Andre; Hutt, Jonathan; Lavigne, Martin; Desmeules, Francois; Vendittoli, Pascal-Andre

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the intra-operative benefits and the clinical outcomes from kinematic or mechanical alignment for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in patients undergoing revision of failed unicompartmental kneel arthroplasty (UKA) to TKA. Methods: Ten revisions were performed with a kinematic alignment technique and 11 with a mechanical alignment. Measurements of the hip-knee-ankle angle (HKA), the lateral distal femoral angle (LDFA), and the medial proximal tibial angle (MPTA) were performed using long-leg radiographs. The need for augments, stems, and constrained inserts was compared between groups. Clinical outcomes were compared using the WOMAC score along with maximum distance walked as well as knee range of motion obtained prior to discharge. All data was obtained by a retrospective review of patient files. Results: The kinematic group required less augments, stems, and constrained inserts than the mechanical group and thinner polyethylene bearings. There were significant differences in the lateral distal femoral angle (LDFA) and the medial proximal tibial angle (MPTA) between the two groups (p<0.05). The mean WOMAC score obtained at discharge was better in the kinematic group as was mean knee flexion. At last follow up of 34 months for the kinematic group and 58 months for the mechanical group, no orthopedic complications or reoperations were recorded. Conclusion: Although this study has a small patient cohort, our results suggest that kinematic alignment for TKA after UKA revision is an attractive method. Further studies are warranted. PMID:27563365

  16. Revision reverse shoulder arthroplasty in failed shoulder arthroplasties for rotator cuff deficiency

    PubMed Central

    RANDELLI, PIETRO; RANDELLI, FILIPPO; COMPAGNONI, RICCARDO; CABITZA, PAOLO; RAGONE, VINCENZA; PULICI, LUCA; BANFI, GIUSEPPE

    2015-01-01

    Purpose the aim of this systematic literature review is to report clinical outcomes of reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) used as a revision surgery following failure of the primary implant due to rotator cuff insufficiency. Methods a systematic review was performed using the following key words: revision, shoulder, rotator cuff deficiency, outcome assessment, treatment outcome, complications. Studies eligible for inclusion in the review were clinical trials investigating patients in whom a primary shoulder arthroplasty implant with an incompetent rotator cuff was replaced with a reverse shoulder prosthesis. Results nine articles were identified and further reviewed. The results refer to a total of 226 shoulders that were treated with RSA as revision surgery. The patients in the studies had a mean age ranging from 64 to 72 years and the longest follow-up was 3.8 years. Improvements in function and reduction of pain were shown by many studies, but the mean Constant score ranged from 44.2 to 56. High complication rates (of up to 62%) were recorded, and a mean reoperation rate of 27.5%. Conclusions RSA as revision surgery for patients with rotator cuff deficiency is a valid option, and often the only solution available, but it should be limited to elderly patients with poor function and severe pain. Level of evidence level IV, systematic review of level I–IV studies. PMID:26151037

  17. Oxidized Zirconium Bearing Surfaces in Total Knee Arthroplasty: Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Schüttler, Karl Friedrich; Efe, Turgay; Heyse, Thomas J; Haas, Steven B

    2015-10-01

    Polyethylene wear in total knee arthroplasty is a still unsolved problem resulting in osteolysis and long-term failure of knee joint replacement. To address the problem of polyethylene wear, research aimed for an optimal implant design and for an optimal combination of bearing surfaces. Oxidized zirconium was introduced to minimize surface wear and thus potentially increase long-term implant survival. This review comprises the current literature related to in vitro and in vivo studies evaluating performance of oxidized zirconium total knee arthroplasty and results from retrieval analyses.

  18. Metal Hypersensitivity and Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lachiewicz, Paul F; Watters, Tyler Steven; Jacobs, Joshua J

    2016-02-01

    Metal hypersensitivity in patients with a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a controversial topic. The diagnosis is difficult, given the lack of robust clinical validation of the utility of cutaneous and in vitro testing. Metal hypersensitivity after TKA is quite rare and should be considered after eliminating other causes of pain and swelling, such as low-grade infection, instability, component loosening or malrotation, referred pain, and chronic regional pain syndrome. Anecdotal observations suggest that two clinical presentations of metal hypersensitivity may occur after TKA: dermatitis or a persistent painful synovitis of the knee. Patients may or may not have a history of intolerance to metal jewelry. Laboratory studies, including erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein level, and knee joint aspiration, are usually negative. Cutaneous and in vitro testing have been reported to be positive, but the sensitivity and specificity of such testing has not been defined. Some reports suggest that, if metal hypersensitivity is suspected and nonsurgical measures have failed, then revision to components fabricated of titanium alloy or zirconium coating can be successful in relieving symptoms. Revision should be considered as a last resort, however, and patients should be informed that no evidence-based medicine is available to guide the management of these conditions, particularly for decisions regarding revision. Given the limitations of current testing methods, the widespread screening of patients for metal allergies before TKA is not warranted.

  19. Extensor tendon ruptures after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bonnin, M; Lustig, S; Huten, D

    2016-02-01

    Extensor tendon rupture is a rare but serious complication after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that impairs active knee extension, thereby severely affecting knee function. Surgery is usually required. Surgical options range from simple suturing to allograft reconstruction of the entire extensor mechanism and include intermediate methods such as reconstruction using neighbouring tendons or muscles, synthetic ligament implantation, and partial allograft repair. Simple suturing carries a high failure rate and should therefore be routinely combined with tissue augmentation using a neighbouring tendon or a synthetic ligament. After allograft reconstruction, outcomes are variable and long-term complications common. Salvage procedures for managing the most severe cases after allograft failure involve reconstruction using gastrocnemius or vastus flaps. Regardless of the technique used, suturing must be performed under tension, with the knee fully extended, and rehabilitation must be conducted with great caution. Weaknesses of available case-series studies include small sample sizes, heterogeneity, and inadequate follow-up duration. All treatment options are associated with substantial failure rates. The patient should be informed of this fact and plans made for a salvage option. Here, the main techniques and their outcomes are discussed, and a therapeutic strategy is suggested.

  20. Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty: research models

    PubMed Central

    PETRILLO, STEFANO; LONGO, UMILE GIUSEPPE; GULOTTA, LAWRENCE V.; BERTON, ALESSANDRA; KONTAXIS, ANDREAS; WRIGHT, TIMOTHY; DENARO, VINCENZO

    2016-01-01

    Purpose the past decade has seen a considerable increase in the use of research models to study reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA). Nevertheless, none of these models has been shown to completely reflect real in vivo conditions. Methods we performed a systematic review of the literature matching the following key words: “reverse total shoulder arthroplasty” or “reverse total shoulder replacement” or “reverse total shoulder prosthesis” and “research models” or “biomechanical models” or “physical simulators” or “virtual simulators”. The following databases were screened: Medline, Google Scholar, EMBASE, CINAHIL and Ovid. We identified and included all articles reporting research models of any kind, such as physical or virtual simulators, in which RTSA and the glenohumeral joint were reproduced. Results computer models and cadaveric models are the most commonly used, and they were shown to be reliable in simulating in vivo conditions. Bone substitute models have been used in a few studies. Mechanical testing machines provided useful information on stability factors in RTSA. Conclusion because of the limitations of each individual model, additional research is required to develop a research model of RTSA that may reduce the limitations of those presently available, and increase the reproducibility of this technique in the clinical setting. PMID:28217660

  1. Emerging technologies in arthroplasty: additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samik; Kulesha, Gene; Kester, Mark; Mont, Michael A

    2014-06-01

    Additive manufacturing is an industrial technology whereby three-dimensional visual computer models are fabricated into physical components by selectively curing, depositing, or consolidating various materials in consecutive layers. Although initially developed for production of simulated models, the technology has undergone vast improvements and is currently increasingly being used for the production of end-use components in various aerospace, automotive, and biomedical specialties. The ability of this technology to be used for the manufacture of solid-mesh-foam monolithic and coated components of complex geometries previously considered unmanufacturable has attracted the attention of implant manufacturers, bioengineers, and orthopedic surgeons. Currently, there is a paucity of reports describing this fabrication method in the orthopedic literature. Therefore, we aimed to briefly describe this technology, some of the applications in other orthopedic subspecialties, its present use in hip and knee arthroplasty, and concerns with the present form of the technology. As there are few reports of clinical trials presently available, the true benefits of this technology can only be realized when studies evaluating the clinical and radiographic outcomes of cementless implants manufactured with additive manufacturing report durable fixation, less stress shielding, and better implant survivorship. Nevertheless, the authors believe that this technology holds great promise and may potentially change the conventional methods of casting, machining, and tooling for implant manufacturing in the future.

  2. Shoulder arthroplasty: evolving techniques and indications.

    PubMed

    Walch, Gilles; Boileau, Pascal; Noël, Eric

    2010-12-01

    The development of modern shoulder replacement surgery started over half a century ago with the pioneering work done by CS Neer. Several designs for shoulder prostheses are now available, allowing surgeons to select the best design for each situation. When the rotator cuff is intact, unconstrained prostheses produce reliable and reproducible results, with prosthesis survival rates of 97% after 10 years and 84% after 20 years. In patients with three- or four-part fractures of the proximal humerus, the outcome of shoulder arthroplasty depends largely on healing of the greater tuberosity, which is therefore a major treatment objective. Factors crucial to greater tuberosity union include selection of the optimal prosthesis design, flawless fixation of the tuberosities, and appropriate postoperative immobilization. The reverse shoulder prosthesis developed by Grammont has been recognized since 1991 as a valid option for patients with glenohumeral osteoarthritis. Ten-year prosthesis survival rates are 91% overall (including trauma and revisions) and 94% for glenohumeral osteoarthritis with head migration. These good results are generating interest in the reverse shoulder prosthesis as a treatment option in situations where unconstrained prostheses are unsatisfactory (primary glenohumeral osteoarthritis with marked glenoid cavity erosion; comminuted fractures in patients older than 75 years; post-traumatic osteoarthritis with severe tuberosity malunion or nonunion; massive irreparable rotator cuff tears with pseudoparalysis; failed rotator cuff repair; and proximal humerus tumor requiring resection of the rotator cuff insertions).

  3. Metal Hypersensitivity and Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lachiewicz, Paul F.; Watters, Tyler Steven; Jacobs, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    Metal hypersensitivity in patients with a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a controversial topic. The diagnosis is difficult, given the lack of robust clinical validation of the utility of cutaneous and in vitro testing. Metal hypersensitivity after TKA is quite rare and should be considered after eliminating other causes of pain and swelling, such as low-grade infection, instability, component loosening or malrotation, referred pain, and chronic regional pain syndrome. Anecdotal observations suggest that two clinical presentations of metal hypersensitivity may occur after TKA: dermatitis or a persistent painful synovitis of the knee. Patients may or may not have a history of intolerance to metal jewelry. Laboratory studies, including erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein level, and knee joint aspiration, are usually negative. Cutaneous and in vitro testing have been reported to be positive, but the sensitivity and specificity of such testing has not been defined. Anecdotal reports suggest that, if metal hypersensitivity is suspected and nonsurgical measures have failed, then revision to components fabricated of titanium alloy or zirconium coating can be successful in relieving symptoms. Revision should be considered as a last resort, however, and patients should be informed that no evidence-based medicine is available to guide the management of these conditions, particularly for decisions regarding revision. Given the limitations of current testing methods, the widespread screening of patients for metal allergies before TKA is not warranted. PMID:26752739

  4. Acetabular blood flow during total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    ElMaraghy, Amr W.; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Waddell, James P.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To determine the immediate effect of reaming and insertion of the acetabular component with and without cement on periacetabular blood flow during primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). Design A clinical experimental study. Setting A tertiary referral and teaching hospital in Toronto. Patients Sixteen patients (9 men, 7 women) ranging in age from 30 to 78 years and suffering from arthritis. Intervention Elective primary THA with a cemented (8 patients) and noncemented (8 patients) acetabular component. All procedures were done by a single surgeon who used a posterior approach. Main outcome measure Acetabular bone blood-flow measurements made with a laser Doppler flowmeter before reaming, after reaming and after insertion of the acetabular prosthesis. Results Acetabular blood flow after prosthesis insertion was decreased by 52% in the noncemented group (p < 0.001) and 59% in the cemented group (p < 0.001) compared with baseline (prereaming) values. Conclusion The significance of these changes in periacetabular bone blood flow during THA may relate to the extent of bony ingrowth, periprosthetic remodelling and ultimately the incidence of implant failure because of aseptic loosening. PMID:10851413

  5. Pneumatic compression hemodynamics in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Westrich, G H; Specht, L M; Sharrock, N E; Sculco, T P; Salvati, E A; Pellicci, P M; Trombley, J F; Peterson, M

    2000-03-01

    A crossover study was performed to evaluate the effect of several pneumatic compression devices and active dorsoplantar flexion in 10 patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty. Using the Acuson 128XP/10 duplex ultrasound unit with a 5-MHz linear array probe, peak venous velocity and venous volume were assessed above and below the greater saphenous vein and common femoral vein junction. A computer generated randomization table was used to determine the order of the test conditions. The pneumatic compression devices evaluated included two foot pumps, one foot and calf pump, one calf pump, and three calf and thigh pumps. Statistical analyses included analysis of variance and analysis of variance with covariance between devices and patients. The covariates tested were the baseline measurements and the order in which the devices were tested. Differences between devices relate in part to the frequency and rate of inflation and the location and type of compression. Pulsatile calf and foot and calf pneumatic compression with a rapid inflation time produced the greatest increase in peak venous velocity, whereas compression of the calf and thigh showed the greatest increase in venous volume. Because patient and nursing compliance is essential to the success of mechanical prophylaxis for thromboembolic disease, the more simple, yet efficacious, devices that are easier to apply and less cumbersome appear to have a greater likelihood of success. In the active and alert patient, active dorsoplantar flexion should be encouraged.

  6. Patellar options in revision total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Rorabeck, Cecil H; Mehin, Ramin; Barrack, Robert L

    2003-11-01

    There are numerous options that need to be considered by the surgeon at the time of revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA). One needs to consider the reason for the revision, the type of patella in place, and the length of time the patella has been in place. The surgeon also needs to consider the status of the patellar bone stock, the stability of the patellar component (well-fixed or loose), and the component type (cemented or metal-backed). Assuming that the existing prosthesis is not metal-backed and has minimal PE wear, then it is preferable to retain a well-fixed all-PE cemented patellar button. However, if the button is metal-backed, then it probably is best to remove the button and replace it with an all-PE domed patellar component. Assuming more than 8 mm of patellar bone stock is remaining, it usually is best to cement an all-PE dome-shaped patella. However, if less than 8 mm is remaining, then that patient can be left with a patelloplasty, recognizing that this individual is going to continue with a high likelihood of anterior knee pain, subluxation, and poor functional results. In that situation, it may be preferable to consider a bone stock augmentation.

  7. Shoulder Arthroplasty, from Indications to Complications: What the Radiologist Needs to Know.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dana J; Wong, Tony T; Kazam, Jonathan K

    2016-01-01

    The replaced shoulder is increasingly encountered by the radiologist, both on a dedicated and incidental basis, in this era of the growing population of aging patients wishing to preserve their mobility and function. Knowledge of the normal biomechanics of the glenohumeral joint-particularly the function of the rotator cuff and the unique relationship of the humeral head to the glenoid-is essential for understanding the need for shoulder replacement and its subsequent complications, because the intent of shoulder arthroplasty is to approximate the normal joint as closely as possible. The most common indications for shoulder arthroplasty are osteoarthritis, inflammatory arthritis, proximal humerus fractures, irreparable rotator cuff tears, rotator cuff arthropathy, and avascular necrosis of the humeral head. Knowledge of the key imaging features of these indications helps facilitate a correlative understanding between the initial diagnosis and the choice of which type of arthroplasty is used-total shoulder arthroplasty, reverse total shoulder arthroplasty, or partial joint replacement (humeral head resurfacing arthroplasty or hemiarthroplasty). The preoperative requirements and usual postoperative appearance of each arthroplasty type are summarized, as well as the complications of shoulder arthroplasty, including those unique to or closely associated with each type of arthroplasty and those that can be encountered with any type of shoulder arthroplasty.

  8. Medial pivot knee in primary total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Atzori, Francesco; Salama, Wael; Sabatini, Luigi; Mousa, Shazly; Khalefa, Abdelrahman

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with a medial pivot design was developed in order to mimic normal knee kinematics; the highly congruent medial compartment implant should improve clinical results and decrease contact stresses. Clinical and radiographic mid-term outcomes are satisfactory, but we need other studies to evaluate long-term results and indications for unusual cases.

  9. UNCEMENTED ARTHROPLASTY AFTER HIP METASTATIC DISEASE AND MULTIPLE MYELOMA

    PubMed Central

    Baptista, André Mathias; Meirelles, Sergio Pinheiro de Souza; Rebolledo, Daniel César Seguel; Correia, Luiz Filipe Marques; de Camargo, Olavo Pires

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To describe a case series using a combination of narrative, graphical exploratory analysis and Bayesian Network modeling. Methods: Case series with 34 patients undergoing uncemented and hybrid arthroplasty procedures secondary to hip pain or fracture secondary to metastatic disease or multiple myeloma. Results: The most common tumors included gastrointestinal, multiple myeloma and breast cancer. Most devices were total arthroplasty (n = 16, 84.2%) rather than partial and uncemented arthroplasty (n = 12, 63.2%) rather than hybrid. The average time between surgery and deambulation was 20 days, the average length of hospital stay was 13 days, and the average patient survival was 589 days. Only one infection was reported. Uncemented and hybrid arthroplasty devices did not differ regarding time to walk, as well as the length of hospital stay in this sample. Conclusion: Our model may be used as a prior for the addition of subsequent patient samples, personalizing, thus, its recommendations to other patient populations. Level of Evidence IV, Case series. PMID:28243172

  10. Nationwide trends in total shoulder arthroplasty and hemiarthroplasty for osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Trofa, David; Rajaee, Sean S; Smith, Eric L

    2014-04-01

    Recent literature reports an increase in the rate of shoulder arthroplasties, particularly total shoulder arthroplasties (TSAs), being performed in the United States. However, the national epidemiology of use of hemiarthroplasty (HA) and TSA as treatments for glenohumeral osteoarthritis has not been elucidated. We conducted a study to analyze trends in using HA and TSA as treatments for glenohumeral osteoarthritis from 2000 to 2010, and to compare patient characteristics and inpatient complications. US Nationwide Inpatient Sample patients with a primary inpatient diagnosis of shoulder arthritis and a principal procedure of HA or TSA were identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) procedural codes. From 2000 to 2010 the nationally adjusted population rate of shoulder arthroplasty performed for osteoarthritis increased 3.7-fold. Specifically, the population rate of TSA increased 5.0-fold, and that of HA increased 1.9-fold. In 2010, 80.3% of patients having shoulder arthroplasty for arthritis underwent TSA. TSA patients were older (P < .0001) and had a higher mean number of chronic illnesses (P = .034). TSA-associated discharges had a higher rate of surgical and medical care complications (P = .011) and blood transfusions (P = .041) after adjusting for comorbidities.

  11. Total Arthroplasty in Ankylosed Knees: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Camanho, Gilberto Luiz

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To present nine patients with ankylosis in their knees that were submitted to a total arthroplasty to lessen their pain and improve their functional limitation. For these patients, arthrodesis remained a possibility in the event of arthroplasty failure. INTRODUCTION Ankylosis of the knee is a severe functional limitation that becomes worse when pain is present. Arthrodesis of the knee is a classical indication for such patients, since it resolves the pain; however, the severe functional limitation remains. METHODS In the present study, we evaluated the clinical course of nine patients who underwent total arthroplasty of the knee, and were followed up for at least five years. RESULTS The results demonstrate that all of the patients experienced a significant reduction in pain and some improvement in the degree of knee flexion and extension. CONCLUSION Based on the latest follow-up, there has been no need to perform arthrodesis for any of our patients, showing that a total arthroplasty could be a option for treatment in knee ankylosis. PMID:19330242

  12. Exactech Opteon Femoral Component Fracture 12 Years after Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shaun P.; Antoci, Valentin; Kadzielski, John J.; Vrahas, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Arthroplasty implant fracture is a rare but critical complication that requires difficult revision surgery, often with poor results, patient disability, and significant cost. Several reports show component fracture either at the stem or at the neck interface after a relatively short postoperative course. We report such failure after 12 years, suggesting no safe period after which femoral implant fracture does not occur. PMID:26955493

  13. Calcaneal Insufficiency Fracture after Ipsilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Min; Shin, Sung Jin; Kang, Byoung Youl

    2016-01-01

    Insufficiency fracture of the calcaneus is a rare entity. In the absence of trauma, evaluating a painful ankle in an elderly patient can be difficult and also it might be overlook the insufficiency fracture. We experienced a case of insufficiency calcaneus fracture that occurred after ipsilateral total knee arthroplasty. Here, we report our case with a review of literatures. PMID:26981521

  14. Future Bearing Surfaces in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important issues in the modern total hip arthroplasty (THA) is the bearing surface. Extensive research on bearing surfaces is being conducted to seek an ideal bearing surface for THA. The ideal bearing surface for THA should have superior wear characteristics and should be durable, bio-inert, cost-effective, and easy to implant. However, bearing surfaces that are currently being implemented do not completely fulfill these requirements, especially for young individuals for whom implant longevity is paramount. Even though various new bearing surfaces have been investigated, research is still ongoing, and only short-term results have been reported from clinical trials. Future bearing surfaces can be developed in the following ways: (1) change in design, (2) further improvement of polyethylene, (3) surface modification of the metal, (4) improvement in the ceramic, and (5) use of alternative, new materials. One way to reduce wear and impingement in THA is to make changes in its design by using a large femoral head, a monobloc metal shell with preassembled ceramic liner, dual mobility cups, a combination of different bearing surfaces, etc. Polyethylene has improved over time with the development of highly crosslinked polyethylene. Further improvements can be made by reinforcing it with vitamin E or multiwalled carbon nanotubes and by performing a surface modification with a biomembrane. Surface modifications with titanium nitride or titanium niobium nitride are implemented to try to improve the metal bearings. The advance to the fourth generation ceramics has shown relatively promising results, even in young patients. Nevertheless, further improvement is required to reduce fragility and squeaking. Alternative materials like diamond coatings on surfaces, carbon based composite materials, oxidized zirconium, silicon nitride, and sapphire are being sought. However, long-term studies are necessary to confirm the efficacy of these surfaces after enhancements

  15. Periprosthetic Bone Remodelling in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    GEORGEANU, Vlad; ATASIEI, Tudor; GRUIONU, Lucian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The clinical studies have shown that the displacement of the prosthesis components, especially of the tibial one is higher during the first year, after which it reaches an equilibrum position compatible with a good long term functioning. This displacement takes place due to bone remodelling close to the implant secondary to different loading concentrations over different areas of bone. Material and Method: Our study implies a simulation on a computational model using the finite element analysis. The simulation started taking into account arbitrary points because of non-linear conditions of bone-prosthesis interface and it was iterative.. A hundred consecutive situations corresponding to intermediate bone remodelling phases have been calculated according to given loadings. Bone remodelling was appreciated as a function of time and bone density for each constitutive element of the computational model created by finite element method. For each constitutive element a medium value of stress during the walking cycle was applied. Results: Analyse of proximal epiphysis-prosthesis complex slices showed that bone density increase is maintained all over the stem in the immediately post-operative period. At 10 months, the moment considered to be the end of bone remodelling, areas with increased bone density are fewer and smaller. Meanwhile, their distribution with a concentration toward the internal compartment in the distal metaphysis is preserved. Conclusions: After the total knee arthroplasty the tibial bone suffered a process of remodelling adapted to the new stress conditions. This bone remodelling can influence, sometimes negatively, especially in the cases with tibial component varus malposition, the fixation, respectively the survival of the prosthesis. This process has been demonstrated both by clinical trials and by simulation, using the finite elements method of periprosthetic bone remodelling. PMID:25553127

  16. Future bearing surfaces in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jun-Dong

    2014-03-01

    One of the most important issues in the modern total hip arthroplasty (THA) is the bearing surface. Extensive research on bearing surfaces is being conducted to seek an ideal bearing surface for THA. The ideal bearing surface for THA should have superior wear characteristics and should be durable, bio-inert, cost-effective, and easy to implant. However, bearing surfaces that are currently being implemented do not completely fulfill these requirements, especially for young individuals for whom implant longevity is paramount. Even though various new bearing surfaces have been investigated, research is still ongoing, and only short-term results have been reported from clinical trials. Future bearing surfaces can be developed in the following ways: (1) change in design, (2) further improvement of polyethylene, (3) surface modification of the metal, (4) improvement in the ceramic, and (5) use of alternative, new materials. One way to reduce wear and impingement in THA is to make changes in its design by using a large femoral head, a monobloc metal shell with preassembled ceramic liner, dual mobility cups, a combination of different bearing surfaces, etc. Polyethylene has improved over time with the development of highly crosslinked polyethylene. Further improvements can be made by reinforcing it with vitamin E or multiwalled carbon nanotubes and by performing a surface modification with a biomembrane. Surface modifications with titanium nitride or titanium niobium nitride are implemented to try to improve the metal bearings. The advance to the fourth generation ceramics has shown relatively promising results, even in young patients. Nevertheless, further improvement is required to reduce fragility and squeaking. Alternative materials like diamond coatings on surfaces, carbon based composite materials, oxidized zirconium, silicon nitride, and sapphire are being sought. However, long-term studies are necessary to confirm the efficacy of these surfaces after enhancements

  17. Unicondylar knee arthroplasty: a cementless perspective

    PubMed Central

    Forsythe, Michael E.; Englund, Roy E.; Leighton, Ross K.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To compare the results of cementless unicondylar knee arthroplasty (UKA) with those already reported in a similar study on cemented UKA. Design A case-series cross-sectional study. Setting The Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Dalhousie University, Halifax. Patients Fifty-one patients who underwent a total of 57 UKAs between May 1989 and May 1997. Inclusion criteria were osteoarthritis involving the predominantly the medial compartment of the knee, relative sparing of the other compartments, less than 15° of varus, minimal knee instability, and attendance at the postoperative clinical visit. Intervention Cementless UKA. Main outcome measures Clinical parameters that included pain, range of motion and the Knee Society Clinical Knee Score. Roentgenographic parameters that included α, β, γ and σ angles and the presence of periprosthetic radiolucency or loose beads. Results Age, weight, gender and follow-up interval did not significantly affect the clinical results in terms of pain, range of motion or knee score. Knees with more than 1 mm of radiolucency had significantly lower knee scores than those with no radiolucency. Knees that radiologically had loose beads also had significantly lower knee scores. The clinical outcomes of cementless UKA were comparable to those already reported on cemented UKA. Cementless femurs had less radiolucency than the cemented femurs, whereas cementless tibias had more radiolucency than their cemented counterparts. Conclusions Cementless UKA seems to be as efficacious as cemented UKA. However, there is some concern about the amount of radiolucency in the cementless tibial components. A randomized clinical trial comparing both cementless and cemented tibial components with a cementless femur (hybrid knee) is needed to further assess this controversial issue in UKA. PMID:11129829

  18. Two-Stage Cementless Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty for Infected Primary Hip Arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Camurcu, Yalkin; Sofu, Hakan; Buyuk, Abdul Fettah; Gursu, Sarper; Kaygusuz, Mehmet Akif; Sahin, Vedat

    2015-09-01

    The main purpose of the present study was to analyze the clinical features, the most common infective agents, and the results of two-stage total hip revision using a teicoplanin-impregnated spacer. Between January 2005 and July 2011, 41 patients were included. At the clinical status analysis, physical examination was performed, Harris hip score was noted, isolated microorganisms were recorded, and the radiographic evaluation was performed. The mean Harris hip score was improved from 38.9 ± 9.6 points to 81.8 ± 5.8 points (P<0.05). Infection was eradicated in 39 hips. Radiographic evidence of stability was noted in 37 acetabular revision components, and all femoral stems. Two-stage revision of the infected primary hip arthroplasty is a time-consuming but a reliable procedure with high rates of success.

  19. Gap Arthroplasty versus Interpositional Arthroplasty for Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Junli; Liang, Limin; Jiang, Hua; Gu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Gap arthroplasty (GA) and interpositional arthroplasty (IA) are widely used for the treatment of temporomandibular joint ankylosis (TMJA). However, controversy remains as to whether IA is superior to GA. PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the Web of science and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure were searched for literature regarding these procedures (published from 1946 to July 28, 2014). A study was included in this analysis if it was: (1) a randomized controlled trial or non-randomized observational cohort study; (2) comparing the clinical outcomes between GA and IA with respect to the maximal incisal opening (MIO) and reankylosis; (3) with a follow-up period of at least 12 months. The methodological quality of the included studies was evaluated according to the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale Eight non-randomized observational cohort studies with 272 patients were included. All the statistical analyses were performed using the RevMan 5.3 and Stat 12. The pooled analysis showed no significant difference in the incidence of reankylosis between the IA group (13/120) and the GA group (29/163) (RR= 0.67, 95% CI=0.38 to 1.16; Z=1.43, p=0.15). The IA group showed a significantly larger MIO than the GA group (MD=1.96, 95% CI=0.21 to 3.72, Z=2.19, p=0.03, I2=0%). In conclusion, patients with TMJA could benefit more from IA than GA, with a larger MIO and a similar incidence of reankylosis. IA shows to be an adequate option in the treatment of TMJA based on the results of maximal incisal opening. PMID:26010224

  20. Current Perspectives on Arthroplasty in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Rates, Outcomes, and Adverse Events.

    PubMed

    Kasturi, Shanthini; Goodman, Susan

    2016-09-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic debilitating condition with significant impact on the musculoskeletal system. Arthroplasty may be indicated for damage related to active lupus or its treatment. As therapies for SLE have advanced, morbidity and mortality have declined, while the rate of joint replacement has increased. The age of SLE patients undergoing arthroplasty is increasing, and the indication for surgery is evolving-while avascular necrosis was previously the predominant indication for arthroplasty, osteoarthritis now accounts for a larger proportion of surgeries. Pain and functional outcomes of arthroplasty in SLE patients are comparable to those of the general population with osteoarthritis, but lupus remains an independent risk factor for post-hip arthroplasty complications and mortality. Further research is needed to characterize the impact of lupus disease activity and severity on arthroplasty outcomes.

  1. Different incidences of knee arthroplasty in the Nordic countries

    PubMed Central

    NiemeläInen, Mika J; MäKelä, Keijo T; Robertsson, Otto; W-Dahl, Annette; Furnes, Ove; Fenstad, Anne M; Pedersen, Alma B; Schrøder, Henrik M; Huhtala, Heini; Eskelinen, Antti

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose The annual number of total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) has increased worldwide in recent years. To make projections regarding future needs for primaries and revisions, additional knowledge is important. We analyzed and compared the incidences among 4 Nordic countries Patients and methods Using Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association (NARA) data from 4 countries, we analyzed differences between age and sex groups. We included patients over 30 years of age who were operated with TKA or unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) during the period 1997–2012. The negative binomial regression model was used to analyze changes in general trends and in sex and age groups. Results The average annual increase in the incidence of TKA was statistically significant in all countries. The incidence of TKA was higher in women than in men in all 4 countries. It was highest in Finland in patients aged 65 years or more. At the end of the study period in 2012, Finland’s total incidence was double that of Norway, 1.3 times that of Sweden and 1.4 times that of Denmark. The incidence was lowest in the youngest age groups (< 65 years) in all 4 countries. The proportional increase in incidence was highest in patients who were younger than 65 years. Interpretation The incidence of knee arthroplasty steadily increased in the 4 countries over the study period. The differences between the countries were considerable, with the highest incidence in Finland. Patients aged 65 years or more contributed to most of the total incidence of knee arthroplasty. PMID:28056570

  2. Outcomes following cervical disc arthroplasty: a retrospective review.

    PubMed

    Cody, John P; Kang, Daniel G; Tracey, Robert W; Wagner, Scott C; Rosner, Michael K; Lehman, Ronald A

    2014-11-01

    Cervical disc arthroplasty has emerged as a viable technique for the treatment of cervical radiculopathy and myelopathy, with the proposed benefit of maintenance of segmental range of motion. There are relatively few, non-industry sponsored studies examining the outcomes and complications of cervical disc arthroplasty. Therefore, we set out to perform a single center evaluation of the outcomes and complications of cervical disc arthroplasty. We performed a retrospective review of all patients from a single military tertiary medical center undergoing cervical disc arthroplasty from August 2008 to August 2012. The clinical outcomes and complications associated with the procedure were evaluated. A total of 219 consecutive patients were included in the review, with an average follow-up of 11.2 (±11.0)months. Relief of pre-operative symptoms was noted in 88.7% of patients, and 92.2% of patients were able to return to full pre-operative activity. There was a low rate of complications related to the anterior cervical approach (3.2% with recurrent laryngeal nerve injury, 8.9% with dysphagia), with no device/implant related complications. Symptomatic cervical radiculopathy is a common problem in both the civilian and active duty military populations and can cause significant disability leading to loss of work and decreased operational readiness. There exist several surgical treatment options for appropriately indicated patients. Based on our findings, cervical disc arthroplasty is a safe and effective treatment for symptomatic cervical radiculopathy and myelopathy, with a low incidence of complications and high rate of symptom relief.

  3. Biomechanics of Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty: 
Current Concepts.

    PubMed

    Lorenzetti, Adam J; Stone, Geoffrey P; Simon, Peter; Frankle, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of reverse shoulder arthroplasty has provided surgeons with new solutions for many complex shoulder problems. A primary goal of orthopaedics is the restoration or re-creation of functional anatomy to reduce pain and improve function, which can be accomplished by either repairing injured structures or replacing them as anatomically as possible. If reconstructible tissue is lacking or not available, which is seen in patients who have complex shoulder conditions such as an irreparable rotator cuff-deficient shoulder, cuff tear arthropathy, or severe glenoid bone loss, substantial problems may arise. Historically, hemiarthroplasty or glenoid grafting with total shoulder arthroplasty yielded inconsistent and unsatisfactory results. Underlying pathologies in patients who have an irreparable rotator cuff-deficient shoulder, cuff tear arthropathy, or severe glenoid bone loss can considerably alter the mechanical function of the shoulder and create treatment dilemmas that are difficult to overcome. A better biomechanical understanding of these pathologic adaptations has improved treatment options. In the past three decades, reverse total shoulder arthroplasty was developed to treat these complex shoulder conditions not by specifically re-creating the anatomy but by using the remaining functional tissue to improve shoulder balance. Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty has achieved reliable improvements in both pain and function. Initial implant designs lacked scientific evidence to support the design rationale, and many implants failed because surgeons did not completely understand the forces involved or the pathology being treated. Implant function and clinical results will continue to improve as surgeons' biomechanical understanding of shoulder disease and reverse shoulder arthroplasty implants increases.

  4. UNICOMPARTMENTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY: CURRENT PERSPECTIVES AND TRENDS IN BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Júnior, João Alberto Yazigi; Angelini, Felipe Bertelli; Ferlin, Fernando; Hernandes, Andrea Canizares; Astur, Diego da Costa; Cohen, Moises

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the approaches and procedures used by Brazilian orthopedic surgeons for treating osteoarthrosis by means of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty and high tibial osteotomy of the knee. Methods: A questionnaire with 14 closed questions was developed and applied to Brazilian knee surgeons during the three days of the 43rd Brazilian Congress of Orthopedics and Traumatology. Results: A total of 113 surgeons filled out the questionnaire completely and became part of the sample analyzed. In this study, the majority of the surgeons performed fewer than five unicompartmental knee arthroplasty procedures/year (61.1%) and between 5 and 15 high tibial osteotomy procedures/year (37.2%). Use of computerized navigation systems during surgery remains uncommon in our environment, since only 0.9% of the specialists were using it. 65.5% of the surgeons reported that they had chosen to use total knee arthroplasty rather than partial arthroplasty due to lack of familiarity with the surgical technique. When asked about the possibility that the number of unicompartmental prostheses used in Brazil would grow as surgeons in this country become increasingly familiar with the technique, 80.5% of the respondents believed in this hypothesis. In this sample, we found that the greater the surgeon's experience was, the greater the numbers of unicompartmental prostheses and tibial osteotomies performed annually were (r = 0.550 and r = 0.465, respectively; p < 0.05). Conclusions: There is a clear evolutional trend towards treatment of unicompartmental osteoarthritis using partial knee arthroplasty in Brazil. However, further prospective controlled studies are needed in order to evaluate the clinical and scientific benefits of these trends. PMID:27047891

  5. Shoulder arthroplasty in osteoarthritis: current concepts in biomechanics and surgical technique

    PubMed Central

    Merolla, G; Nastrucci, G; Porcellini, G

    Shoulder arthroplasty is a technically demanding procedure to restore shoulder function in patients with severe osteoarthritis of the glenohumeral joint. The modern prosthetic system exploit the benefits of modularity and the availibility of additional sizes of the prosthetic components. In this paper we describe the biomechanics of shoulder arthroplasty and the technique for shoulder replacement including total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) with all-polyethylene and metal-backed glenoid component, humeral head resurfacing and stemless humeral replacement. PMID:24251240

  6. Shoulder arthroplasty in osteoarthritis: current concepts in biomechanics and surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Merolla, G; Nastrucci, G; Porcellini, G

    2013-01-01

    Shoulder arthroplasty is a technically demanding procedure to restore shoulder function in patients with severe osteoarthritis of the glenohumeral joint. The modern prosthetic system exploit the benefits of modularity and the availibility of additional sizes of the prosthetic components. In this paper we describe the biomechanics of shoulder arthroplasty and the technique for shoulder replacement including total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) with all-polyethylene and metal-backed glenoid component, humeral head resurfacing and stemless humeral replacement.

  7. Revision total hip arthroplasty in a centenarian: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Grey, Monique A; Keggi, Kristaps J

    2006-12-01

    The clinical success of primary total hip arthroplasty in elderly patients is well established. Because of the rapid growth rate of the population aged 85 years and older and the increasing life expectancy of this group of patients, the number of patients in their 8th, 9th, and even 10th decades of life requiring revision total hip arthroplasty will increase. We present the only documented case of revision total hip arthroplasty in a centenarian and a review of the relevant literature.

  8. L5 – S1 Segmental Kinematics After Facet Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Voronov, Leonard I.; Havey, Robert M.; Rosler, David M.; Sjovold, Simon G.; Rogers, Susan L.; Carandang, Gerard; Ochoa, Jorge A.; Yuan, Hansen; Webb, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Background Facet arthroplasty is a motion restoring procedure. It is normally suggested as an alternative to rigid fixation after destabilizing decompression procedures in the posterior lumbar spine. While previous studies have reported successful results in reproducing normal spine kinematics after facet replacement at L4-5 and L3-4, there are no data on the viability of facet replacement at the lumbosacral joint. The anatomy of posterior elements and the resulting kinematics at L5-S1 are distinctly different from those at superior levels, making the task of facet replacement at the lumbosacral level challenging. This study evaluated the kinematics of facet replacement at L5-S1. Methods Six human cadaveric lumbar spines (L1-S1, 46.7 ± 13.0 years) were tested in the following sequence: (1) intact (L1-S1), (2) complete laminectomy and bilateral facetectomy at L5-S1, and (3) implantation of TFAS-LS (Lumbosacral Total Facet Arthroplasty System, Archus Orthopedics, Redmond, Washington) at L5-S1 using pedicle screws. Specimens were tested in flexion (8Nm), extension (6Nm), lateral bending (LB, ± 6Nm), and axial rotation (AR, ± 5Nm). The level of significance was α = .017 after Bonferroni correction for three comparisons: (1) intact vs. destabilized, (2) destabilized vs. reconstructed, and (3) intact vs. reconstructed. Results Laminectomy-facetectomy at L5-S1 increased the L5-S1 angular range of motion (ROM) in all directions. Flexion-extension (F-E) ROM increased from 15.3 ± 2.9 to 18.7 ± 3.5 degrees (P < .017), LB from 8.2 ± 1.8 to 9.3 ± 1.6 degrees (P < .017), and AR from 3.7 ± 2.0 to 5.9 ± 1.8 degrees (P < .017). The facet arthroplasty system decreased ROM compared to the laminectomy-facetectomy condition in all tested directions (P < .017). The facet arthroplasty system restored the L5-S1 ROM to its intact levels in LB and AR (P > .017). F-E ROM after the facet arthroplasty system implantation was smaller than the intact value (10.1 ± 2.2 vs. 15.3 ± 2

  9. Metal-on-Metal Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sehatzadeh, S; Kaulback, K; Levin, L

    2012-01-01

    Background Metal-on-metal (MOM) hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA) is in clinical use as an appropriate alternative to total hip arthroplasty in young patients. In this technique, a metal cap is placed on the femoral head to cover the damaged surface of the bone and a metal cup is placed in the acetabulum. Objectives The primary objective of this analysis was to compare the revision rates of MOM HRA using different implants with the benchmark set by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE). The secondary objective of this analysis was to review the literature regarding adverse biological effects associated with implant material. Review Methods A literature search was performed on February 13, 2012, to identify studies published from January 1, 2009, to February 13, 2012. Results The revision rates for MOM HRA using 6 different implants were reviewed. The revision rates for MOM HRA with 3 implants met the NICE criteria, i.e., a revision rate of 10% or less at 10 years. Two implants had short-term follow-ups and MOM HRA with one of the implants failed to meet the NICE criteria. Adverse tissue reactions resulting in failure of the implants have been reported by several studies. With a better understanding of the factors that influence the wear rate of the implants, adverse tissue reactions and subsequent implant failure can be minimized. Many authors have suggested that patient selection and surgical technique affect the wear rate and the risk of tissue reactions. The biological effects of high metal ion levels in the blood and urine of patients with MOM HRA implants are not known. Studies have shown an increase in chromosomal aberrations in patients with MOM articulations, but the clinical implications and long-term consequences of this increase are still unknown. Epidemiological studies have shown that patients with MOM HRA implants did not have an overall increase in mortality or risk of cancer. There is insufficient clinical data to confirm the

  10. Total Hip Arthroplasty in Patients with Skeletal Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Daniel; Kendoff, Daniel; Omar, Mohamed; Cui, Liang R; Gehrke, Thorsten; Haasper, Carl

    2015-09-01

    127 patients with a height ≤ 150 cm (non metric ≤ 4 feet and 11 inches) who received hip arthroplasty surgery between July 1, 2006 and May 30, 2013 at our institution were enrolled. Retrospective data evaluation was performed for two different times of follow-up (1 year and 5 years respectively). 115 patients were evaluated for 1-year follow up. Out of these, 27 patients were available for 5-year follow up. The mean Harris Hip Score increased from 40 ± 13 on admission to 82 ± 20 (P<0.001) at 1-year follow-up and 79 ± 17 (P<0.001) at 5-year follow-up. Hip arthroplasty can be performed in patients with dwarfism with good clinical benefits. However, survival rates are worse compared to the general population.

  11. In vivo determination of total knee arthroplasty kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Komistek, Richard D; Mahfouz, Mohamed R; Bertin, Kim; Rosenberg, Aaron; Kennedy, William

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if consistent posterior femoral rollback of an asymmetrical posterior cruciate retaining (PCR) total knee arthroplasty was mostly influenced by the implant design, surgical technique, or presence of a well-functioning posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). Three-dimensional femorotibial kinematics was determined for 80 subjects implanted by 3 surgeons, and each subject was evaluated under fluoroscopic surveillance during a deep knee bend. All subjects in this present study having an intact PCL had a well-functioning PCR knee and experienced normal kinematic patterns, although less in magnitude than the normal knee. In addition, a surprising finding was that, on average, subjects without a PCL still achieved posterior femoral rollback from full extension to maximum knee flexion. The findings in this study revealed that implant design did contribute to the normal kinematics demonstrated by subjects having this asymmetrical PCR total knee arthroplasty.

  12. Improved radiographic outcomes with patient-specific total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ivie, Conrad B; Probst, Patrick J; Bal, Amrit K; Stannard, James T; Crist, Brett D; Sonny Bal, B

    2014-11-01

    Patient-specific guides can improve limb alignment and implant positioning in total knee arthroplasty, although not all studies have supported this benefit. We compared the radiographs of 100 consecutively-performed patient-specific total knees to a similar group that was implanted with conventional instruments instead. The patient-specific group showed more accurate reproduction of the theoretically ideal mechanical axis, with fewer outliers, but implant positioning was comparable between groups. Our odds ratio comparison showed that the patient-specific group was 1.8 times more likely to be within the desired +3° from the neutral mechanical axis when compared to the standard control group. Our data suggest that reliable reproduction of the limb mechanical axis may accrue from patient-specific guides in total knee arthroplasty when compared to standard, intramedullary instrumentation.

  13. The trochanter slide osteotomy approach for resurfacing hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Pitto, Rocco P

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to assess the safety and efficacy of the greater trochanter slide osteotomy approach for resurfacing hip arthroplasty. Fifty consecutive hips (47 patients) with degenerative joint disease were enrolled in the study. Serial clinical and radiological assessments were performed after the index operation. At 1-year follow-up, the clinical outcome and patient satisfaction were rated excellent or good in all hips. The radiological assessment showed signs of satisfactory implant alignment. Periprosthetic fractures and non-unions of the greater trochanter were not observed. The greater trochanter slide osteotomy approach for resurfacing hip arthroplasty is a safe procedure and provides optimal exposure of the acetabulum and proximal femur, maintaining the soft-tissue integrity of the hip joint. Blood supply of the proximal femur is not violated using this approach.

  14. Sagittal plane balancing in the total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Manson, Theodore T; Khanuja, Harpal S; Jacobs, Michael A; Hungerford, Marc W

    2009-01-01

    Postoperative stiffness or instability may result from a total knee arthroplasty imbalanced in the sagittal plane. Total knee arthroplasty instrumentation systems differ in the basic strategies used to assure this balance. In an anterior referencing system, changes in femoral size affect flexion gap tightness, and femoral size selection is paramount to assure sagittal plane balance. Conversely, in posterior referencing systems, femoral size changes do not affect the flexion gap but, rather, influence femoral component-patella articulation. Flexion/extension gap systems use calibrated spacer blocks to ensure gap balance but do not guarantee midrange stability; if used incorrectly, they may cause component malposition and joint line elevation. The authors reviewed the strengths and weaknesses of system types and provided system-specific troubleshooting guidelines for clinicians addressing intraoperative sagittal plane imbalance.

  15. Conventional Versus Cross-Linked Polyethylene for Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Surace, Michele F; Monestier, Luca; Vulcano, Ettore; Harwin, Steven F; Cherubino, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    The clinical and radiographic outcomes of 88 patients who underwent primary total hip arthroplasty with either conventional polyethylene or cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) from the same manufacturer were compared. There were no significant differences between the 2 subpopulations regarding average age, gender, side affected, or prosthetic stem and cup size. The average follow-up was 104 months (range, 55 to 131 months). To the authors' knowledge, this is the longest follow-up for this particular insert. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months and then annually. Results showed that XLPE has a significantly greater wear reduction than that of standard polyethylene in primary total hip arthroplasty. At the longest available follow-up for these specific inserts, XLPE proved to be effective in reducing wear.

  16. [Modern tribology in total hip arthroplasty: pros and cons].

    PubMed

    Gómez-García, F

    2014-01-01

    The wear products and adverse reactions that occur on bearing surfaces represent one of the greatest challenges in prosthetic replacements, as the latter experience increasing demands due to the large number of young and older adult patients that have a long life expectancy and remarkable activity. The purpose of this review is to analyze the pros and cons of the new advances in the bearing components of the articular surfaces of current total hip arthroplasties. We also discuss the strategies used historically, their problems, results and the surgeon's role in prescribing the tribologic couple that best fits each patient's needs. We conclude with practical recommendations for the prescription and management of the latest articular couples for total hip arthroplasty.

  17. Hip Arthroplasty Pseudotumors: Pathogenesis, Imaging, and Clinical Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Derik L; Morrison, James J

    2016-01-01

    Pseudotumors are a complication of hip arthroplasty. The goal of this article is to review the clinical presentation, pathogenesis, histology, and the role of diagnostic imaging in clinical decision making for treatment, and surveillance of pseudotumors. We will discuss the multimodal imaging appearances, differential diagnosis, associated complications, treatment, and prognosis of pseudotumors, as an aid to the assessment of orthopedic prostheses at the hip. PMID:27195183

  18. Bone remodelling analysis of the humerus after a shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Quental, Carlos; Folgado, João; Fernandes, Paulo R; Monteiro, Jacinto

    2012-10-01

    The shoulder arthroplasty has become an efficient treatment for some pathologies. However there are complications that can compromise its success. Among them, the stress shielding effect on the humerus has been reported as a possible cause of failure. The objective of this work was to investigate the bone remodelling in the humerus after a shoulder arthroplasty. For this purpose, computational models were developed to analyse the stress shielding contribution to the humeral component failure of shoulder arthroplasties, with a cemented and an uncemented prosthesis. A computational remodelling model was used to characterize the bone apparent density at each site of the humerus. The density distribution was obtained by the solution of a problem that takes into account both structural stiffness and the metabolic cost of bone maintenance. Bone was subjected to 6 load cases that include the glenohumeral reaction force and the action of 10 muscles. In the implanted models, different interface conditions were tested for the bone-implant and the cement-implant interfaces. Moreover, a pathological case defined by a poorer quality of bone was considered. In the healthy situation, the models that better model in vivo conditions showed no significant changes in bone mass. However, the results for the pathological case showed some bone resorption which supports the importance given to the quality of bone in the success of the joint replacement. Bearing in mind the conditions addressed, the results lead to conclude that the stress shielding is not a key factor for the humeral component failure of shoulder arthroplasties in a healthy situation though several issues, including muscle function and bone quality, may heighten its effect.

  19. Changes in knee kinematics following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Akbari Shandiz, Mohsen; Boulos, Paul; Saevarsson, Stefan Karl; Yoo, Sam; Miller, Stephen; Anglin, Carolyn

    2016-04-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) changes the knee joint in both intentional and unintentional, known and unknown, ways. Patellofemoral and tibiofemoral kinematics play an important role in postoperative pain, function, satisfaction and revision, yet are largely unknown. Preoperative kinematics, postoperative kinematics or changes in kinematics may help identify causes of poor clinical outcome. Patellofemoral kinematics are challenging to record since the patella is obscured by the metal femoral component in X-ray and moves under the skin. The purpose of this study was to determine the kinematic degrees of freedom having significant changes and to evaluate the variability in individual changes to allow future study of patients with poor clinical outcomes. We prospectively studied the 6 degrees of freedom patellofemoral and tibiofemoral weightbearing kinematics, tibiofemoral contact points and helical axes of rotation of nine subjects before and at least 1 year after total knee arthroplasty using clinically available computed tomography and radiographic imaging systems. Normal kinematics for healthy individuals were identified from the literature. Significant differences existed between pre-TKA and post-TKA kinematics, with the post-TKA kinematics being closer to normal. While on average the pre-total knee arthroplasty knees in this group displayed no pivoting (only translation), individually only five knees displayed this behaviour (of these, two showed lateral pivoting, one showed medial pivoting and one showed central pivoting). There was considerable variability postoperatively as well (five central, two lateral and two medial pivoting). Both preop and postop, flexion behaviour was more hinge-like medially and more rolling laterally. Helical axes were more consistent postop for this group. An inclusive understanding of the pre-TKA and post-TKA kinematics and changes in kinematics due to total knee arthroplasty could improve implant design, patient diagnosis and

  20. Stress fracture of the proximal fibula after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Vaish, Abhishek; Vaishya, Raju; Agarwal, Amit Kumar; Vijay, Vipul

    2016-04-22

    We report a rare case of proximal fibular fatigue fracture developing 14 years after total knee arthroplasty in a known case of rheumatoid arthritis. A valgus deformity of the knee can put abnormal stress on the upper fibula leading to its failure. We believe that, as the fibula acts as an important lateral strut, its disruption due to a fracture led to rapid progress of the valgus deformity of the knee in this patient.

  1. Weight changes and the risk of knee osteoarthritis requiring arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Manninen, P; Riihimaki, H; Heliovaara, M; Suomalainen, O

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effect of weight changes between 20 and 50 years of age on the risk of severe knee osteoarthritis (OA) requiring arthroplasty. Subjects and methods: Cases were 55–75 year old men and women (n = 220) having had knee arthroplasty for primary osteoarthritis at the Kuopio University Hospital in 1992–93. Controls (n = 415) were randomly selected from the population of Kuopio Province. Weight at the age of 20, 30, 40, and 50 years was collected retrospectively with a postal questionnaire. Results: After adjustment for age, sex, history of physical workload, recreational physical activity, and previous knee injury, weight gain resulting to a shift from normal body mass index (BMI ⩽25 kg/m2) to overweight (BMI >25 kg/m2) was associated with a higher relative risk of knee OA requiring arthroplasty than persistent overweight from 20–50 years of age, compared with those with normal relative weight during the corresponding age period. The odds ratios (OR) were 3.07 (95% confidence interval 1.87 to 5.05) for those with normal weight at the age of 20 years and overweight at two or three of the ages 30, 40 or 50 years, 3.15 (1.85 to 5.36) for those with overweight from the age of 30 years, and 2.37 (1.21 to 4.62) for those with overweight from the age of 20 years, respectively. Conclusion: In adult life, a shift from normal to overweight may carry a higher risk for knee OA requiring arthroplasty than does constant overweight. PMID:15479892

  2. Intraoperative Hypothermia in Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Nicholas B; Pepper, Andrew M; Rooney, Edward; Silverton, Craig

    2016-10-25

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are common and successful orthopedic procedures, and as their frequency continues to increase substantially, the focus on limiting perioperative complications heightens. Intraoperative normothermia is recommended to minimize additional complications, but limited evidence exists regarding the effect of hypothermia on orthopedic patients. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the incidence of perioperative hypothermia in the setting of TKA and THA, and to evaluate its impact on complications and outcomes. The clinical records of 2580 consecutive patients who underwent TKA or THA at a single institution between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2013 were reviewed. After excluding patients with complex or revision procedures, a total of 2397 patients comprised the study population. Patient demographic data, surgery-specific data, postoperative complications, length of hospital stay, and 30-day readmission were recorded. Patients with a mean intraoperative temperature less than 36°C were identified as hypothermic. Statistical analysis evaluated associations with hypothermia and the effect on complications and outcomes. The incidence of mean intraoperative hypothermia was 37%, 43.9%, and 32.6% for arthroplasty, THA, and TKA, respectively. General anesthesia was significantly associated with hypothermia (P<.001). Women and THA patients were at higher risk for hypothermia. In the arthroplasty and THA cohorts, longer operating room time and re-warmer use were associated with hypothermia (P=.010). Overall, hypothermia was associated with increased estimated blood loss, but no increase in associated transfusion was demonstrated (P=.006). Hypothermia was not associated with postoperative complications. [Orthopedics. 201x; xx(x):xx-xx.].

  3. Total Hip Arthroplasty in Paget's Disease A Review.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Vineet; Lajam, Claudette; Deshmukh, Ajit J

    2016-11-01

    Paget's disease of the bone is a chronic osteopathy that leads to structural weakness, hypervascularity, and bone deformities. Rapid bone turnover in patients with Paget's disease may affect outcomes following total hip arthroplasty (THA). Most literature on THA in the setting of Paget's disease is limited to isolated case reports or case series documenting a single institution experience. By completing a comprehensive analysis of the available cases, this study aims to investigate the outcomes and complications of THA in patients with Paget's disease.

  4. Orthopaedic Surgeons’ Cardiovascular Response During Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Orlic, Dubravko

    2008-01-01

    The literature contains limited and contradictory information regarding the amount of physical effort and/or emotional stress needed to perform surgery. We therefore investigated cardiovascular response to psychophysical stress in orthopaedic surgeons while they were performing surgery. We monitored 29 male orthopaedic surgeons from four university centers while they performed total hip arthroplasties. Changes in their cardiovascular parameters were recorded by ambulatory monitoring methods. Exercise stress testing of each participant was used as a control state. We compared the cardiovascular response during surgery to energy requirements of everyday activities. Preoperative and postoperative testing showed lower values of cardiovascular parameters than during physically less difficult parts of the operation; physically more difficult phases of the operation additionally increased the values of parameters. We concluded performing total hip arthroplasty increases surgeons’ cardiovascular parameters because of psychologic stress and physical effort. Excitement of the cardiovascular system during total hip arthroplasty appears similar to the excitement during moderate-intensity daily activities, such as walking the dog, leisurely bicycling, or climbing stairs. PMID:18196425

  5. Orthopaedic surgeons' cardiovascular response during total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bergovec, Marko; Orlic, Dubravko

    2008-02-01

    The literature contains limited and contradictory information regarding the amount of physical effort and/or emotional stress needed to perform surgery. We therefore investigated cardiovascular response to psychophysical stress in orthopaedic surgeons while they were performing surgery. We monitored 29 male orthopaedic surgeons from four university centers while they performed total hip arthroplasties. Changes in their cardiovascular parameters were recorded by ambulatory monitoring methods. Exercise stress testing of each participant was used as a control state. We compared the cardiovascular response during surgery to energy requirements of everyday activities. Preoperative and postoperative testing showed lower values of cardiovascular parameters than during physically less difficult parts of the operation; physically more difficult phases of the operation additionally increased the values of parameters. We concluded performing total hip arthroplasty increases surgeons' cardiovascular parameters because of psychologic stress and physical effort. Excitement of the cardiovascular system during total hip arthroplasty appears similar to the excitement during moderate-intensity daily activities, such as walking the dog, leisurely bicycling, or climbing stairs.

  6. [Periprosthetic humeral fractures: Strategies and techniques of revision arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, C; Beirer, M; Brunner, U

    2016-04-01

    The primary aims when performing revision arthroplasty of periprosthetic humeral fractures (PHF) are preservation of bone stock, achieving fracture healing and preserving a stable prosthesis with the focus on regaining the preoperative shoulder-arm function. The indications for revision arthroplasty are given in PHF in combination with loosening of the stem. In addition, further factors must be independently clarified in the case of an anatomical arthroplasty. In this context secondary glenoid erosion as well as rotator cuff insufficiency are potential factors for an extended revision procedure. For the performance of revision surgery modular revision sets including long stems, revision glenoid and metaglene components as well as plate and cerclage systems are obligatory besides the explantation instrumentation. Despite a loosened prosthesis, a transhumeral removal of the stem along with a subpectoral fenestration are often required. Length as well as bracing of revision stems need to bridge the fracture by at least twice the humeral diameter. Moreover, in many cases a combined procedure using an additional distal open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) plus cable cerclages as well as biological augmentation might be needed. Assuming an adequate preparation, the experienced surgeon is able to achieve a high fracture union rate along with an acceptable or even good shoulder function and to avoid further complications.

  7. [Recovery from total knee arthroplasty through continuous passive motion].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Mayo, B; Rodríguez-Mansilla, J; González Sánchez, B

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to know the effects of continuous passive mobilization in patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty. A search strategy was developed to retrieve all clinical trials, written in English and/or Spanish, published in the electronic search databases PubMed, Cochrane Library Plus, Dialnet, CSIC and PEDro. The inclusion criteria were: clinical trials published from January 2000 until November 2014 in English or Spanish. Out of 537 clinical trials that were potentially relevant, a total of 12 were included in this review. The evaluation of 1,153 patients shows that there is no significant difference in improving the range of the joint, pain, balance, motion, healing and hospital stay using continuous passive mobilization against the regular physiotherapy treatment for total knee arthroplasty. The application of continuous passive mobilization in the long-term does not provide any benefit in terms of the breadth of the range of the joint, pain and improvement of standing and motion in comparison with conventional postoperative physiotherapy treatment in total knee arthroplasty. In the short term an improvement is obtained in the range of joint motion in knee flexion.

  8. DIAGNOSTIC AND THERAPEUTIC ARTHROSCOPY IN SYMPTOMATIC PATIENTS AFTER KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    Severino, Fabricio Roberto; Souza, Clodoaldo José Duarte de; Severino, Nilson Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Assess the worthiness of arthroscopy in investigating and treating knee pain after arthroplasty unexplained by clinical and subsidiary examinations. Methods: Among 402 patients submitted to total or unicompartimental arthroplasty between September 2001 and April 2007 at a public university hospital, 17 presented with pain on prosthetic articulation, without clear diagnosis by clinical, X-ray, laboratory, scintiscan, or nuclear magnetic resonance tests. All patients were submitted to arthroscopy and symptoms were assessed by using the Lysholm scale, comparing pre-and post-arthroscopy periods. Peroperative findings have been recorded. Results: The procedure was effective for pain relief in 14 of 17 patients (82.35%). The median for Lysholm scale climbed from 36 points before arthroscopy to 94 points after the procedure (p < 0.001). Most of the patients (12) were arthroscopically diagnosed with fibrosis known as “cyclop”; on the remaining five patients, anterior synovitis was found. All patients were treated by resection. Conclusions: Knee arthroscopy after arthroplasty in patients presenting unclear persistent pain shows localized arthrofibrosis (“cyclops”) or synovitis, which can be treated by using the same procedure, resulting in pain relief. PMID:27022517

  9. Resection Interposition Arthroplasty for Failed Distal Ulna Resections

    PubMed Central

    Papatheodorou, Loukia K.; Rubright, James H.; Kokkalis, Zinon T.; Sotereanos, Dean G.

    2013-01-01

    The major complications of distal ulna resection, the Darrach procedure, are radioulnar impingement and instability. High failure rates have been reported despite published modifications of the Darrach procedure. Several surgical techniques have been developed to treat this difficult problem and to mitigate the symptoms associated with painful convergence and impingement. No technique has demonstrated clinical superiority. Recently, implant arthroplasty of the distal ulna has been endorsed as an option for the management of the symptomatic patient with a failed distal ulna resection. However, there are concerns for implant longevity, especially in young, active adults. Resection interposition arthroplasty relies on interposition of an Achilles tendon allograft between the distal radius and the resected distal ulna. Although this technique does not restore normal mechanics of the distal radioulnar joint, it can prevent painful convergence of the radius on the ulna. Achilles allograft interposition arthroplasty is a safe and highly effective alternative for failed distal ulna resections, especially for young, active patients, in whom an implant or alternative procedure may not be appropriate. PMID:24436784

  10. Fracture of the Modular Neck in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, A.; Gargallo-Margarit, A.; Barro, V.; Gallardo-Calero, I.; Sallent, A.

    2015-01-01

    Modularity of the components in total hip arthroplasty has had an increase in popularity in the last decades. We present the case of a 53-year-old man with a history of avascular necrosis of the femoral head due to a hypophyseal adenoma. A total hip modular arthroplasty was implanted. Three and a half years after the surgery the patient attended the emergency room due to acute left hip pain with no prior traumatism. Radiological examination confirmed a fracture of the modular neck. A revision surgery was performed finding an important pseudotumoral well-organized periprosthetic tissue reaction. Through an extended trochanteric osteotomy the femoral component was removed, and a straight-stem revision prosthesis implanted. There are several potential advantages when using modularity in total hip arthroplasty that surgeons may benefit from, but complications have arisen and must be addressed. Various circumstances such as large femoral head with a long varus neck, corrosion, patient's BMI, and activity level may participate in creating the necessary environment for fatigue failure of the implant. PMID:26266069

  11. Cost analyses of extended prophylaxis with enoxaparin after hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Friedman, R J; Dunsworth, G A

    2000-01-01

    Venous thromboembolic complications occur in 50% to 70% of patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty if no prophylactic regimen is used. Because enoxaparin and warfarin are useful for extended outpatient prophylaxis, the objective of this study was to determine which of these agents is most cost effective in preventing venous thromboembolic complications. A decision tree analysis was developed to simulate a hypothetical cohort of patients with total hip arthroplasty. The analysis considered home health care services to perform monitoring and compliance verification. Accounting for prophylactic failures and treatment complications, results showed that enoxaparin maintained a cost effective advantage over warfarin for extended prophylaxis in the time after discharge and total hip arthroplasty ranging from 19 to 31 days after the patient was discharged from the hospital. The duration of cost effectiveness of enoxaparin was reduced to 14 to 17 days when home care services were excluded. These results indicated that approximately 3 weeks of outpatient therapy with enoxaparin is cost effective. With the cornerstone of managed care being cost efficiency in the provision of quality care, this conclusion warrants the development of integrated care strategies for the patient having orthopaedic surgery to achieve cost effective patient management.

  12. Metallic radial head arthroplasty improves valgus stability of the elbow.

    PubMed

    King, G J; Zarzour, Z D; Rath, D A; Dunning, C E; Patterson, S D; Johnson, J A

    1999-11-01

    The stabilizing influence of radial head arthroplasty was studied in eight medial collateral ligament deficient anatomic specimen elbows. An elbow testing apparatus, which used computer controlled pneumatic actuators to apply tendon loading, was used to simulate active elbow flexion. The motion pathways of the elbow were measured using an electromagnetic tracking device, with the forearm in supination and pronation. As a measure of stability, the maximum varus to valgus laxity over the range of elbow flexion was determined from the difference between varus and valgus gravity loaded motion pathways. After transection of the medial collateral ligament, the radial head was excised and replaced with either a silicone or one of three metallic radial head prostheses. Medial collateral ligament transection caused a significant increase in the maximum varus to valgus laxity to 18.0 degrees +/- 3.2 degrees. After radial head excision, this laxity increased to 35.6 degrees +/- 10.3 degrees. The silicone implant conferred no increase in elbow stability, with a maximum varus to valgus laxity of 32.5 degrees +/- 15.5 degrees. All three metallic implants improved the valgus stability of the medial collateral ligament deficient elbow, providing stability similar to the intact radial head. The use of silicone arthroplasty to replace the radial head in the medial collateral ligament deficient elbow must be questioned. Metallic radial head arthroplasty provides improved valgus stability, approaching that of an intact radial head.

  13. Oral antibiotics are effective for highly resistant hip arthroplasty infections.

    PubMed

    Cordero-Ampuero, José; Esteban, Jaime; García-Cimbrelo, Eduardo

    2009-09-01

    Infected arthroplasties reportedly have a lower eradication rate when caused by highly resistant and/or polymicrobial isolates and in these patients most authors recommend intravenous antibiotics. We asked whether two-stage revision with interim oral antibiotics could eradicate these infections. We prospectively followed 36 patients (mean age, 71.8 years) with late hip arthroplasty infections. Combinations of oral antibiotics were prescribed according to cultures, biofilm, and intracellular effectiveness. The minimum followup was 1 year (mean, 4.4 years; range, 1-12 years). We presumed eradication in the absence of clinical, serologic, and radiographic signs of infection. Infection was eradicated in all 13 patients with highly resistant bacteria who completed a two-stage protocol (10 with methicillin-resistant Staphylococci) and in eight of 11 patients treated with only the first stage (and six of nine with methicillin-resistant Staphylococci). Infection was eradicated in six of six patients with polymicrobial isolates (of sensitive and/or resistant bacteria) who completed a two-stage protocol and in five of seven with polymicrobial isolates treated with only the first surgery. The Harris hip score averaged 88.1 (range, 70-98) in patients who underwent reimplantation and 56.8 (range, 32-76) in patients who underwent resection arthroplasty. Long cycles of combined oral antibiotics plus a two-stage surgical exchange appear a promising alternative for infections by highly resistant bacteria, methicillin-resistant Staphylococci, and polymicrobial infections.

  14. Late deep venous thrombosis and delayed weightbearing after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Buehler, K O; D'Lima, D D; Petersilge, W J; Colwell, C W; Walker, R H

    1999-04-01

    One hundred ninety-nine patients who underwent primary total hip arthroplasty and used in hospital pneumatic compression stockings and aspirin as thromboembolic prophylaxis were screened for deep venous thrombosis using duplex ultrasonography on the fourth postoperative day. Of the initial 98 patients, 21 underwent noncemented arthroplasty, maintained touchdown weightbearing for 6 weeks after surgery, and then began progressive partial weightbearing. Of the subsequent 101 patients, 28 underwent noncemented arthroplasty and began progressive weightbearing immediately after surgery. All other patients underwent hybrid arthroplasty and began weightbearing to tolerance immediately after surgery. After duplex screening examination, patients with proximal deep venous thrombosis were given anticoagulation therapy, and patients with negative study results were observed clinically. The relative risk of proximal deep venous thrombosis after noncemented arthroplasty using delayed weightbearing was compared with that after noncemented arthroplasty using immediate progressive weightbearing. Of patients with noncemented arthroplasty, the prevalence of proximal deep venous thrombosis was significantly lower in those using progressive weightbearing immediately after surgery (none) than in those using delayed weightbearing rehabilitation (19%). This study showed that patients undergoing noncemented total hip arthroplasty with delayed weightbearing rehabilitation risk greater potential for deep venous thrombosis after hospital discharge. This study suggests consideration for continued thromboembolic prophylaxis or routine deep venous thrombosis surveillance, or both measures, after hospital discharge, unless more rapid progression of weightbearing is allowed.

  15. Loosening of Total Knee Arthroplasty after Brucellosis Infection: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sazegari, Mohammad Ali; Bahramian, Fateme; Mirzaee, Fateme; Zafarani, Zohreh; Aslani, Hamidreza

    2017-01-01

    In this report we describe a 78-year-old man whose total knee arthroplasty showed the symptoms of infection with brucella with radiographic signs of loosening 5 years after the index surgery. The patient was treated successfully after a 2-stage revision arthroplasty surgery along with using rifampicin and doxycycline for 8 weeks. PMID:28271092

  16. Fall Risk Associated with Continuous Peripheral Nerve Blocks Following Knee and Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Finn, Daphna M; Agarwal, Rishi R; Ilfeld, Brian M; Madison, Sarah J; Ball, Scott T; Ferguson, Eliza J; Morgan, Anya C; Morris, Beverly A

    2016-01-01

    Combined scientific advances in pharmaceutical agents, perineural blocks, and pump delivery capabilities such as those used with continuous peripheral nerve blocks have demonstrated advantages in pain management for patients undergoing joint arthroplasty. This report documents the incidence of falls increased after the implementation of a continuous peripheral nerve block program for patients undergoing knee and hip arthroplasty in an academic medical center.

  17. Patellar stress fracture: a complication of knee joint arthroplasty without patellar resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Reed, M R; Farhan, M J; Chaudhuri, C

    1999-04-01

    A case of patellar stress fracture after total knee arthroplasty in a man with gout and previous osteonecrosis of the tali is reported. The combination of fat pad excision and lateral release causing disruption to the patellar blood supply during primary total knee arthroplasty resulted in the development of a patellar fracture. Avascular necrosis, caused by gout, may form part of the pathogenesis.

  18. Patellofemoral Joint Arthroplasty: Our Experience in Isolated Patellofemoral and Bicompartmental Arthritic Knees

    PubMed Central

    Sabatini, L.; Schirò, M.; Atzori, F.; Ferrero, G.; Massè, A.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Isolated patellofemoral (PF) arthritis is rare, and there is no complete agreement about the best surgical treatment. The operative treatments are total knee arthroplasty and patellofemoral replacement (PFR). The incidence of many early complications of PF arthroplasty has decreased with the introduction of newer designs. Nowadays, the main cause of revision surgery is the progression of tibiofemoral osteoarthritis. In the past, PF arthroplasty was contraindicated in patients with evidence of osteoarthritis or pain in medial or lateral tibiofemoral compartments. The improvement in implant designs and surgical techniques has allowed the addition of a monocompartmental arthroplasty for the medial or lateral tibiofemoral compartment. In this work, we evaluate our first experience with PF arthroplasty and its combination with unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. MATERIALS AND METHODS From May 2014 to March 2016, we treated 14 patients. An isolated PF arthroplasty was performed in six knees (five patients), and a combined PF and unicompartmental knee arthroplasty was performed in nine cases. We observed a significant improvement in the clinical and functional Knee Society Scores (KSSs) after surgery in our patients. RESULTS We obtained good results in our cases both for clinical and functional KSSs. Patellar clunk was recorded in one case. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION We are going toward a new attitude in which partial osteoarthritic changes could be treated with partial resurfacing prosthetic solutions such as unicompartmental, bi–unicompartmental or PFR alone, or unicompartmental combined, which respects the cruciates and achieves maximal bone preservation, which is vital, particularly, for young patients. PMID:27891054

  19. Arthroplasty Utilization in the United States is Predicted by Age-Specific Population Groups.

    PubMed

    Bashinskaya, Bronislava; Zimmerman, Ryan M; Walcott, Brian P; Antoci, Valentin

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a common indication for hip and knee arthroplasty. An accurate assessment of current trends in healthcare utilization as they relate to arthroplasty may predict the needs of a growing elderly population in the United States. First, incidence data was queried from the United States Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 1993 to 2009. Patients undergoing total knee and hip arthroplasty were identified. Then, the United States Census Bureau was queried for population data from the same study period as well as to provide future projections. Arthroplasty followed linear regression models with the population group >64 years in both hip and knee groups. Projections for procedure incidence in the year 2050 based on these models were calculated to be 1,859,553 cases (hip) and 4,174,554 cases (knee). The need for hip and knee arthroplasty is expected to grow significantly in the upcoming years, given population growth predictions.

  20. In vivo knee kinematics in patients with bilateral total knee arthroplasty of 2 designs.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Nobukazu; Breslauer, Leigh; Hedley, Anthony K; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Banks, Scott A

    2011-09-01

    Many younger and highly active patients desire to achieve high flexion after total knee arthroplasty. This study's purpose was to determine if a contemporary total knee arthroplasty design improved functional knee flexion compared with a traditional total knee arthroplasty in patients living a Western lifestyle. Ten patients with bilateral total knee arthroplasty of 2 types were studied during weight-bearing lunge, kneeling, and stair activities using fluoroscopic imaging. There were no differences in maximum knee flexion during lunging or kneeling. Statistically significant differences in tibial rotation and condylar translation were observed during the 3 activities. Although several joint kinematic differences were observed, no important functional differences were observed in clinically excellent, high performing subjects with bilateral total knee arthroplasty of 2 types.

  1. General Compared with Spinal Anesthesia for Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Basques, Bryce A.; Toy, Jason O.; Bohl, Daniel D.; Golinvaux, Nicholas S.; Grauer, Jonathan N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Total hip arthroplasty may be performed under general or spinal anesthesia. The purpose of the current study was to compare perioperative outcomes between anesthetic types for patients undergoing primary elective total hip arthroplasty. Methods: Patients who had undergone primary elective total hip arthroplasty from 2010 to 2012 were identified from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. Operating room times, length of stay, thirty-day adverse events, and readmission were compared between patients who had received general anesthesia and those who had received spinal anesthesia. Propensity-adjusted multivariate analysis was used to control for selection bias and baseline patient characteristics. Results: A total of 20,936 patients who had undergone total hip arthroplasty met inclusion criteria for this study. Of these, 12,752 patients (60.9%) had received general anesthesia and 8184 patients (39.1%) had received spinal anesthesia. On propensity-adjusted multivariate analyses, general anesthesia for total hip arthroplasty was associated with increased operative time (+12 minutes [95% confidence interval, +11 to +13 minutes]; p < 0.001) and postoperative room time (+5 minutes [95% confidence interval, +4 to +6 minutes]; p < 0.001). General anesthesia was also associated with the occurrence of any adverse event (odds ratio, 1.31 [95% confidence interval, 1.23 to 1.41]; p < 0.001), prolonged postoperative ventilator use (odds ratio, 5.81 [95% confidence interval, 1.35 to 25.06]; p = 0.018), unplanned intubation (odds ratio, 2.17 [95% confidence interval, 1.11 to 4.29]; p = 0.024), stroke (odds ratio, 2.51 [95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 6.20]; p = 0.046), cardiac arrest (odds ratio, 5.04 [95% confidence interval, 1.15 to 22.07]; p = 0.032), any minor adverse event (odds ratio, 1.35 [95% confidence interval, 1.25 to 1.45]; p = 0.001), and blood transfusion (odds ratio, 1.34 [95% confidence interval, 1.25 to

  2. Patient-reported outcome measures in arthroplasty registries

    PubMed Central

    Eresian Chenok, Kate; Bohm, Eric; Lübbeke, Anne; Denissen, Geke; Dunn, Jennifer; Lyman, Stephen; Franklin, Patricia; Dunbar, Michael; Overgaard, Søren; Garellick, Göran; Dawson, Jill

    2016-01-01

    The International Society of Arthroplasty Registries (ISAR) Steering Committee established the Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) Working Group to convene, evaluate, and advise on best practices in the selection, administration, and interpretation of PROMs and to support the adoption and use of PROMs for hip and knee arthroplasty in registries worldwide. The 2 main types of PROMs include generic (general health) PROMs, which provide a measure of general health for any health state, and specific PROMs, which focus on specific symptoms, diseases, organs, body regions, or body functions. The establishment of a PROM instrument requires the fulfillment of methodological standards and rigorous testing to ensure that it is valid, reliable, responsive, and acceptable to the intended population. A survey of the 41 ISAR member registries showed that 8 registries administered a PROMs program that covered all elective hip or knee arthroplasty patients and 6 registries collected PROMs for sample populations; 1 other registry had planned but had not started collection of PROMs. The most common generic instruments used were the EuroQol 5 dimension health outcome survey (EQ-5D) and the Short Form 12 health survey (SF-12) or the similar Veterans RAND 12-item health survey (VR-12). The most common specific PROMs were the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), the Oxford Hip Score (OHS), the Oxford Knee Score (OKS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), and the University of California at Los Angeles Activity Score (UCLA). PMID:27168175

  3. Patient-reported outcome measures in arthroplasty registries

    PubMed Central

    Bohm, Eric; Franklin, Patricia; Lyman, Stephen; Denissen, Geke; Dawson, Jill; Dunn, Jennifer; Eresian Chenok, Kate; Dunbar, Michael; Overgaard, Søren; Garellick, Göran; Lübbeke, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Abstract — The International Society of Arthroplasty Registries (ISAR) Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) Working Group have evaluated and recommended best practices in the selection, administration, and interpretation of PROMs for hip and knee arthroplasty registries. The 2 generic PROMs in common use are the Short Form health surveys (SF-36 or SF-12) and EuroQol 5-dimension (EQ-5D). The Working Group recommends that registries should choose specific PROMs that have been appropriately developed with good measurement properties for arthroplasty patients. The Working Group recommend the use of a 1-item pain question (“During the past 4 weeks, how would you describe the pain you usually have in your [right/left] [hip/knee]?”; response: none, very mild, mild, moderate, or severe) and a single-item satisfaction outcome (“How satisfied are you with your [right/left] [hip/knee] replacement?”; response: very unsatisfied, dissatisfied, neutral, satisfied, or very satisfied). Survey logistics include patient instructions, paper- and electronic-based data collection, reminders for follow-up, centralized as opposed to hospital-based follow-up, sample size, patient- or joint-specific evaluation, collection intervals, frequency of response, missing values, and factors in establishing a PROMs registry program. The Working Group recommends including age, sex, diagnosis at joint, general health status preoperatively, and joint pain and function score in case-mix adjustment models. Interpretation and statistical analysis should consider the absolute level of pain, function, and general health status as well as improvement, missing data, approaches to analysis and case-mix adjustment, minimal clinically important difference, and minimal detectable change. The Working Group recommends data collection immediately before and 1 year after surgery, a threshold of 60% for acceptable frequency of response, documentation of non-responders, and documentation of incomplete or

  4. Gelatin matrix use reduces postoperative bleeding after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Velyvis, John H

    2015-02-01

    Bleeding after total knee arthroplasty can result in significant morbidity and increases the need for blood transfusion. The proper use of intraoperative adjunctive topical hemostatic agents can enhance hemostasis perioperatively, potentially reducing blood transfusions. In this prospective study, 157 consecutive patients undergoing primary total knee arthroplasty received FLOSEAL (FLOSEAL Hemostatic Matrix; Baxter Healthcare Corporation, Hayward, California), a gelatin thrombin hemostatic matrix, 5 mL (74 patients) or 10 mL (83 patients). All patients received warfarin as thromboprophylaxis starting the day after surgery. Data were extracted via hospital chart review from 100 consecutive patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty and immediately preceded the FLOSEAL groups and did not receive FLOSEAL (control group). Postoperative drainage was significantly lower in the FLOSEAL 5 mL (236.9 mL) and 10 mL (120.5 mL) groups compared with the control group (430.8 mL; P<.0001 for both). The FLOSEAL 10 mL group had significantly less drainage than the FLOSEAL 5 mL group (P<.0001). The predicted probability of transfusion in the FLOSEAL 5 mL group was not significantly different compared with the control group (6.0% vs 7.6%, P=.650). The predicted probability of transfusion was lower in the FLOSEAL 10 mL group compared with the control group (0.5% vs 5.5%; P=.004). Within the FLOSEAL 10 mL group, application of FLOSEAL either before or after tourniquet release had a similarly significant effect on drainage volume and predicted probability of blood transfusion. No differences in outcomes were observed by type of anesthesia used. No adverse events occurred related to FLOSEAL use.

  5. Compartment syndrome after total knee arthroplasty: regarding a clinical case☆

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Ana Alexandra da Costa; Marques, Pedro Miguel Dantas Costa; Sá, Pedro Miguel Gomes; Oliveira, Carolina Fernandes; da Silva, Bruno Pombo Ferreira; de Sousa, Cristina Maria Varino

    2015-01-01

    Although compartment syndrome is a rare complication of total knee arthroplasty, it is one of the most devastating complications. It is defined as a situation of increased pressure within a closed osteofascial space that impairs the circulation and the functioning of the tissues inside this space, thereby leading to ischemia and tissue dysfunction. Here, a clinical case of a patient who was followed up in orthopedic outpatient consultations due to right gonarthrosis is presented. The patient had a history of arthroscopic meniscectomy and presented knee flexion of 10° before the operation, which consisted of total arthroplasty of the right knee. The operation seemed to be free from intercurrences, but the patient evolved with compartment syndrome of the ipsilateral leg after the operation. Since compartment syndrome is a true surgical emergency, early recognition and treatment of this condition through fasciotomy is crucial in order to avoid amputation, limb dysfunction, kidney failure and death. However, it may be difficult to make the diagnosis and cases may not be recognized if the cause of compartment syndrome is unusual or if the patient is under epidural analgesia and/or peripheral nerve block, which thus camouflages the main warning sign, i.e. disproportional pain. In addition, edema of the limb that underwent the intervention is common after total knee arthroplasty operations. This study presents a review of the literature and signals that the possible rarity of cases is probably due to failure to recognize this condition in a timely manner and to placing these patients in other diagnostic groups that are less likely, such as neuropraxia caused by using a tourniquet or peripheral nerve injury. PMID:26401507

  6. Medialized Versus Lateralized Center of Rotation in Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Streit, Jonathan J; Shishani, Yousef; Gobezie, Reuben

    2015-12-01

    Reverse shoulder arthroplasty may be performed using components that medialize or lateralize the center of rotation. The purpose of this prospective study was to directly compare 2 reverse shoulder arthroplasty designs. Two treatment groups and 1 control group were identified. Group I comprised 9 patients using a medialized Grammont-style (GRM) prosthesis with a neck-shaft angle of 155°. Group II comprised 9 patients using a lateralized (LAT) prosthesis with a neck-shaft angle of 135°. Pre- and postoperative assessment of range of motion, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, and visual analog scale pain score were performed. Radiographic measurements of lateral humeral offset and acromiohumeral distance were compared. The GRM prosthesis achieved greater forward flexion (143.9° vs 115.6°; P=.05), whereas the LAT achieved greater external rotation (35.0° vs 28.3°; P=.07). The lateral humeral offset was greater for the LAT prosthesis compared with the GRM prosthesis, but this distance was not significantly different from that found in the control group. The acromiohumeral distance was significantly greater in the GRM prosthesis group compared with both the LAT and the control groups. The results of this study confirm that different reverse shoulder arthroplasty designs produce radiographically different anatomy. Whereas the GRM prosthesis significantly alters the anatomy of the shoulder, the LAT design can preserve some anatomic relationships found in the normal shoulder. The clinical outcomes indicate that this may have an effect on range of motion, with traditional designs achieving greater forward flexion and lateralized designs achieving greater external rotation.

  7. Compartment syndrome after total knee arthroplasty: regarding a clinical case.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Ana Alexandra da Costa; Marques, Pedro Miguel Dantas Costa; Sá, Pedro Miguel Gomes; Oliveira, Carolina Fernandes; da Silva, Bruno Pombo Ferreira; de Sousa, Cristina Maria Varino

    2015-01-01

    Although compartment syndrome is a rare complication of total knee arthroplasty, it is one of the most devastating complications. It is defined as a situation of increased pressure within a closed osteofascial space that impairs the circulation and the functioning of the tissues inside this space, thereby leading to ischemia and tissue dysfunction. Here, a clinical case of a patient who was followed up in orthopedic outpatient consultations due to right gonarthrosis is presented. The patient had a history of arthroscopic meniscectomy and presented knee flexion of 10° before the operation, which consisted of total arthroplasty of the right knee. The operation seemed to be free from intercurrences, but the patient evolved with compartment syndrome of the ipsilateral leg after the operation. Since compartment syndrome is a true surgical emergency, early recognition and treatment of this condition through fasciotomy is crucial in order to avoid amputation, limb dysfunction, kidney failure and death. However, it may be difficult to make the diagnosis and cases may not be recognized if the cause of compartment syndrome is unusual or if the patient is under epidural analgesia and/or peripheral nerve block, which thus camouflages the main warning sign, i.e. disproportional pain. In addition, edema of the limb that underwent the intervention is common after total knee arthroplasty operations. This study presents a review of the literature and signals that the possible rarity of cases is probably due to failure to recognize this condition in a timely manner and to placing these patients in other diagnostic groups that are less likely, such as neuropraxia caused by using a tourniquet or peripheral nerve injury.

  8. Outcome Assessment after Aptis Distal Radioulnar Joint (DRUJ) Implant Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kachooei, Amir Reza; Chase, Samantha M; Jupiter, Jesse B

    2014-01-01

    Background: Conventional treatments after complicated injuries of the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) such as Darrach and Kapandji-Sauvé procedures have many drawbacks, which may eventually lead to a painful unstable distal ulna. The development of DRUJ prosthesis has significantly evolved over the past years. In this study, we assessed the outcome results of patients after DRUJ implant arthroplasty using the Aptis (Scheker) prosthesis. Methods: We identified 13 patients with 14 prosthesis during the past 10 years. Patients underwent DRUJ arthroplasty due to persistent symptoms of instability, chronic pain, and stiffness. Records and follow-up visits were reviewed to find the final post-operative symptoms, pain, range of motion, and grip strength with a mean follow-up of 12 months (range: 2-25 months). Also, patients were contacted prospectively by phone in order to administer the disabilities of the arm shoulder and hand (DASH), patient rated wrist evaluation (PRWE), and visual analogue scale (VAS), and to interview regarding satisfaction and progress in daily activities. Eleven patients out of 13 could be reached with a median follow-up time of 60 months (range: 2 to 102 months). Results: No patient required removal of the prosthesis. Only two patients underwent secondary surgeries in which both required debridement of the screw tip over the radius. The median DASH score, PRWE score, VAS, and satisfaction were 1.3, 2.5, 0, and 10, respectively. The mean range of flexion, extension, supination, and pronation was 62, 54, 51, and 64, respectively. Conclusions: Distal radioulnar joint injuries are disabling and patients usually undergo one or more salvage surgeries prior to receiving an arthroplasty. The Scheker prosthesis has shown satisfactory results with 100% survival rate in all reports. The constrained design of this prosthesis gives enough stability to prevent painful subluxation. PMID:25386579

  9. Definitive Treatment of Infected Shoulder Arthroplasty With a Cement Spacer.

    PubMed

    Mahure, Siddharth A; Mollon, Brent; Yu, Stephen; Kwon, Young W; Zuckerman, Joseph D

    2016-09-01

    Infection in the setting of shoulder arthroplasty can result in significant pain, loss of function, and the need for additional surgery. As the use of shoulder arthroplasty increases, the medical and economic burdens of periprosthetic joint infection increase as well. The ideal management of infected shoulder prostheses has not been established. This report describes 9 patients from a single institution who had an infected shoulder arthroplasty that was definitively managed with a cement spacer. All patients had a minimum of 2 years of follow-up. Of the 9 patients in this study, 6 were men. Mean age was 73±9 years. Of the study patients, 1 had diabetes, 2 presented with Parkinson's disease, and 5 had a history of tobacco use. Average body mass index was 27.9±7 kg/m(2). After mean follow-up of 4 years, none of the patients had clinical or radiographic evidence of infection. Functional outcomes, as measured by American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores, were good or fair in 89% of patients, and the average American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score was 57. A review of recent literature suggested that the current findings were similar to those in studies reporting 1- or 2-stage revision procedures. Although cement spacers are typically used as part of a 2-stage revision procedure, the current findings suggest that cement spacers can be used effectively to eradicate infection and allow for acceptable functional recovery and range of motion in patients who have severe medical comorbidities and cannot tolerate additional surgery. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(5):e924-e930.].

  10. Pain after hip arthroplasty managed by Brennan Healing Science.

    PubMed

    Namavar, Roxanna

    2014-01-01

    A case is presented illustrating the potential effect of Brennan Healing Science on pain following hip arthroplasty for avascular necrosis. A 54-year-old woman experienced anterior groin pain, numbness at the bottom of her foot, and occasional grinding at her hip 22 years after right total hip arthroplasty secondary to avascular necrosis. X-ray films showed signs of osteolysis behind the acetabular cup and asymmetric decreased polyethylene thickness of the acetabular prosthetic. Her orthopedic surgeon advised the patient to follow up every 6-9 months to avoid catastrophic failure of the implant, with plans for surgical revision to be scheduled at the next appointment. The patient sought alternative treatment to avoid an invasive procedure. On presentation, the patient had difficulty walking up the stairs into the treatment room due to pain which she rated a 9/10. She found it painful to rotate, flex, extend her hip, or to sit. Hands-on healing techniques based on the Brennan Healing Science method were initiated, starting at the feet, balancing the energy, and working the way up the joints. Once the work at the hip was completed, the hands-on techniques continued up the centerline of the body and the healing was brought to a close. On completion of a 60-minute healing, the patient was able to stand freely and rated her pain as a 4/10. Flexion, extension, and rotation at the hip were no longer distressing. She was able to walk up and down stairs without distress and denied instability, bursitis, or trochanteric or iliopsoas pain or swelling. Repeat X-rays showed decrease in bone spurs and no hardware problem, and her orthopedic surgeon recommended follow-up after 2 years. It is suggested that Brennan Healing Science techniques could play an effective and cost-efficient role in the treatment of pain following hip arthroplasty.

  11. Physical rehabilitation after total joint arthroplasty in companion animals.

    PubMed

    Marcellin-Little, Denis J; Doyle, Nancy D; Pyke, Joanna Freeman

    2015-01-01

    Patients who have total joint arthroplasty have varying needs related to rehabilitation. In the short term, rehabilitation should be used in all dogs to identify high-risk patients and to minimize the likelihood of postoperative complications. Many patients undergoing total hip replacement recover uneventfully without needing long-term physiotherapy. All patients undergoing total knee replacement and total elbow replacement need rehabilitation to restore limb use and maximize their functional recovery. This article presents rehabilitation considerations for companion animals undergoing total hip replacement, total knee replacement, and total elbow replacement; postoperative complications and how to mitigate risks; and anticipated patient outcomes.

  12. Resection arthroplasty of the hip in paralytic dislocations.

    PubMed

    Kalen, V; Gamble, J G

    1984-06-01

    The chronically dislocated paralytic hip causes postural difficulties, nursing and hygiene problems, and pain. Therapeutic options are limited. This study reviews the results of resection arthroplasty on 18 hips of 15 such patients. This procedure has many complications, including hip ankylosis, heterotopic ossification, abduction contracture and bony overgrowth. Despite this, all of the nursing goals were achieved and most patients had relief of pain. The operation is most successful in the skeletally mature patients, and it relies on soft-tissue interposition between the bony fragments and postoperative positioning to ensure optimum posture.

  13. Excision arthroplasty for management of coxofemoral luxation in pet birds.

    PubMed

    MacCoy, D M

    1989-01-01

    Coxofemoral luxation, although not a common injury, can cause considerable pelvic limb dysfunction in pet birds. Luxation usually is craniodorsal, as it is in dogs. Previously recommended treatments have not always been effective in managing the injury. Sequelae can include dorsolateral deviation of the pelvic limb, with loss of function and bumblefoot in the nonluxated limb, owing to abnormal weight-bearing. Excision arthroplasty combined with a muscular sling constructed from a segment of the iliofibularis muscle was used to treat coxofemoral luxation in a hyacinth macaw, a moluccan cockatoo, and an African gray parrot. The outcome was excellent in 2 of the 3 birds.

  14. Alternate bearing surfaces in total joint arthroplasty: biologic considerations.

    PubMed

    Archibeck, M J; Jacobs, J J; Black, J

    2000-10-01

    The problem of periprosthetic osteolysis is currently the major limiting factor in joint arthroplasty longevity. Because this process has been shown to be primarily a biologic response to wear particles, corrosion products, or both, efforts to reduce particle generation are being undertaken. These efforts include the development of modified polyethylene and alternative articulating surfaces. These alternate bearing surfaces currently include ceramic-on-polyethylene, ceramic-on-ceramic, and metal-on-metal. Although these alternate bearings diminish or eliminate the generation of polyethylene particles, ceramic and metal particles are produced. The purpose of the current review is to discuss the literature that addresses the biologic response to these particles, locally and systemically.

  15. Bilateral total hip arthroplasty in siblings with Stickler Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, D; Anderson, J A; Taveras, N A; González Della Valle, A

    2007-01-01

    Stickler Syndrome is an infrequent autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder. The most prevalent mutation affects type II collagen gene and results in abnormalities in cartilage, vitreous and nucleus pulposus. Orthopaedic manifestations include joint hyper- mobility and pain with early development of secondary osteoarthritis. The condition has a predilection for the femoral head and patients usually present in their third to fourth decade with secondary hip arthritis. We report on two siblings with Stickler Syndrome who presented with hip osteoarthritis in their third decade of life and underwent staged bilateral total hip arthroplasties (THA). The patients experienced pain relief and improved quality of life after surgery.

  16. Acute Failure of a Glenoid Component in Anatomic Shoulder Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Boardman, III, Norman D.

    2016-01-01

    Glenoid loosening is the most common cause of failure in primary total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) and often occurs years after the initial surgery. It is rare for a glenoid component to fail acutely. Several case reports of complete glenoid dissociation appear in the literature. It is important to report these failures to identify technical errors or component design flaws to improve outcomes in TSA. In this case report, we present an unrecognized acute failure of a cemented hybrid glenoid component at the time of surgery. PMID:27555976

  17. Management of gamma nail breakage with bipolar hemi-arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wee, J L H; Sathappan, S S; Yeo, M S W; Low, Y P

    2009-01-01

    Gamma nail breakage is an uncommon occurrence that often arises from fatigue failure of the implant, with a reported incidence ranging from 0.2 to 5.7 percent. We report a 73-year-old woman with a three-part intertrochanteric fracture and who presented two years postoperatively with gamma nail failure secondary to fracture non-union. This patient underwent a revision long-stem bipolar hemi-arthroplasty and has been followed-up for 24 months, with good functional and radiological results.

  18. Shoulder Arthroplasty: Key Steps to Improve Outcomes and Minimize Complications.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Emilie V; Diaz, Roberto; Athwal, George S; Sanchez-Sotelo, Joaquin; Sperling, John W

    2016-01-01

    Advances in shoulder replacement surgery have allowed for the successful treatment of various shoulder conditions. As the elderly population increases and the surgical indications for shoulder replacement surgery continue to expand, the number of shoulder replacements performed annually will continue to increase. Accordingly, the number of complications also will be expected to increase. Successful shoulder replacement outcomes require surgeons to have a thorough understanding of the surgical indications, surgical technique, and potential complications of the procedure. By reviewing the key aspects of shoulder replacement surgery and focusing on the surgical technique and common complications for both anatomic and reverse total shoulder arthroplasty, surgeons can help improve outcomes and minimize complications.

  19. Acute arterial thrombosis after bilateral total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bayne, Christopher O; Bayne, Omar; Peterson, Michael; Cain, Eric

    2008-12-01

    Arterial thrombosis is a rare complication of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The overall incidence of arterial complications after TKA, including arterial occlusion, arteriovenous fistula, arterial aneurysm, and arterial severance, varies between 0.03% and 0.17% in reports published in the orthopedic literature (J Vasc Surg 1994;20:927-932). We report a case of acute popliteal artery thrombosis and its sequelae immediately following bilateral TKA performed sequentially under the same anesthesia. This is the first reported case of a post-TKA popliteal artery thrombosis in a patient younger than 60 years without the commonly accepted risk factors.

  20. PAIN FOLLOWING TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY – A SYSTEMATIC APPROACH

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Wilson Mello; Migon, Eduardo Zaniol; Zabeu, Jose Luis Amim

    2015-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is known to be a successful procedure. The aging of the population and the growing demand for quality of life have greatly increased the indications for the procedure. Nonetheless, TKA presents some complications that still lack definitive resolution. Pain after TKA is caused by a myriad of reasons that need to be systematically studied in order to reach the correct diagnosis and treatment. History, physical examination, laboratory tests and imaging examinations must all be included in the workup and repeated until a plausible reason has been identified, since if pain is the only indication for TKA revision, the results may be catastrophic. PMID:27022583

  1. Treatment of symptomatic greater trochanteric fracture after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Peretz, Jeffrey I; Chuang, Michael J; Cerynik, Douglas L; Johanson, Norman A

    2009-08-01

    Isolated greater trochanter fractures after total hip arthroplasty are associated with major comorbidities such as debilitating weakness, pain, and dislocation. No definitive standard of care has been established for these fracture. However, it is well known that reestablishing osseous union in these patients is strongly associated with return of functional status. We report a case of an elderly patient with multiple hip revision surgeries now presenting with unilateral greater trochanter fracture. Treatment incorporated the use of a trochanteric claw plate, cerclage wiring, and adjuvant demineralized bone matrix allograft to achieve successful osseous union. This is the first reported use of adjuvant demineralized bone matrix for fixing these fractures.

  2. Staged total hip arthroplasty in a patient with hip dysplasia and a large pertrochanteric bone cyst.

    PubMed

    Langston, Joseph R; DeHaan, Alexander M; Huff, Thomas W

    2016-06-01

    Hip arthroplasty in young patients requires thoughtful preoperative planning. Patients with proximal femoral bone loss complicate this planning and may require a staged procedure to optimize implant insertion. We report on a case of a 26-year-old woman with secondary hip arthritis from developmental dysplasia of the hip and a large pertrochanteric bone cyst that was treated with staged total hip arthroplasty. The cyst was decompressed and filled with an osteoconductive and osteoinductive bone graft substitute called EquivaBone. One year later, the patient underwent a successful primary total hip arthroplasty. Fifteen-month follow-up after her hip replacement revealed resolution of postoperative pain and significant functional improvement.

  3. Inflammatory pseudotumor of the hip: a complication of arthroplasty to be recognized by the radiologist*

    PubMed Central

    Boas, Raquel de Melo Santos Vilas; Madeira, Ivana Andrade; Lopes, Alexia Abuhid; Paiva, Edson Barreto; Rodrigues, André Soares

    2015-01-01

    Soft tissue complications following hip arthroplasty may occur either in cases of total hip arthroplasty or in hip resurfacing, a technique that has become popular in cases involving young patients. Both orthopedic and radiological literatures are now calling attention to these symptomatic periprosthetic soft tissue masses called inflammatory pseudotumors or aseptic lymphocytic vasculites-associated lesions. Pseudotumors are associated with pain, instability, neuropathy, and premature loosening of prosthetic components, frequently requiring early and difficult reoperation. Magnetic resonance imaging plays a relevant role in the evaluation of soft tissue changes in the painful hip after arthroplasty, ranging from early periprosthetic fluid collections to necrosis and more extensive tissue damage. PMID:26543283

  4. Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae infection of a total knee arthroplasty an occupational hazard.

    PubMed

    Traer, Emily A; Williams, Mark R; Keenan, Jon N

    2008-06-01

    A 76-year-old man with a medical history of rheumatoid arthritis, lupus intersititial nephritis, and steroid therapy was found at first-stage revision total knee arthroplasty to have Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae (a zoonotic pathogen normally associated with pigs and fish) infection of the arthroplasty. He had a history of potential occupational exposure to the organism. On literature review, we found only 3 other case reports of E rhusiopathiae linked to septic arthritis in humans. This unique case of an infected joint arthroplasty further illustrates the pathogenicity of E rhusiopathiae in humans.

  5. Inflammatory pseudotumor of the hip: a complication of arthroplasty to be recognized by the radiologist.

    PubMed

    Boas, Raquel de Melo Santos Vilas; Madeira, Ivana Andrade; Lopes, Alexia Abuhid; Paiva, Edson Barreto; Rodrigues, André Soares

    2015-01-01

    Soft tissue complications following hip arthroplasty may occur either in cases of total hip arthroplasty or in hip resurfacing, a technique that has become popular in cases involving young patients. Both orthopedic and radiological literatures are now calling attention to these symptomatic periprosthetic soft tissue masses called inflammatory pseudotumors or aseptic lymphocytic vasculites-associated lesions. Pseudotumors are associated with pain, instability, neuropathy, and premature loosening of prosthetic components, frequently requiring early and difficult reoperation. Magnetic resonance imaging plays a relevant role in the evaluation of soft tissue changes in the painful hip after arthroplasty, ranging from early periprosthetic fluid collections to necrosis and more extensive tissue damage.

  6. Hemorrhagic iliopsoas bursitis complicating well-functioning ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung Soon; Diwanji, Sanket R; Kim, Hyung Keun; Song, Eun Kyoo; Yoon, Taek Rim

    2009-08-01

    Iliopsoas bursitis has been increasingly recognized as a complication of total hip arthroplasty and is usually associated with polyethylene wear. Here, the authors report a case of hemorrhagic iliopsoas bursitis complicating an otherwise well-functioning ceramic-on-ceramic arthroplasty performed by minimal invasive modified 2-incision technique. The bursitis in turn resulted in femoral nerve palsy and femoral vein compression. In this report, there was no evidence to support that the bursitis was due to an inflammatory response to ceramic wear particles or any other wear particles originating from the total hip arthroplasty.

  7. Revision total knee arthroplasty using a custom tantalum implant in a patient following multiple failed revisions.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Colin A; Gösthe, Raúl G; Patel, Preetesh D; Sanders, Kristopher C; Huaman, Gustavo; Suarez, Juan C

    2017-03-01

    The number of revision total knee arthroplasty procedures performed annually is increasing and, subsequently, so is the number of patients presenting following a failed revision. Rerevising a total knee arthroplasty after one or more failed revision procedures presents many challenges, including diminished bone stock for prosthetic fixation. "Off the shelf" implants may not offer the best alternative for reconstruction. We present the case of a 55-year-old patient who required a rerevision total knee arthroplasty following multiple failed revisions with severe femoral and tibia bone loss. We describe a novel technique we employed to improve component fixation within the compromised bone stock.

  8. Metal-on-Metal Total Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this review was to assess the safety and effectiveness of metal on metal (MOM) hip resurfacing arthroplasty for young patients compared with that of total hip replacement (THR) in the same population. Clinical Need Total hip replacement has proved to be very effective for late middle-aged and elderly patients with severe degenerative diseases of the hips. As indications for THR began to include younger patients and those with a more active life style, the longevity of the implant became a concern. Evidence suggests that these patients experience relatively higher rates of early implant failure and the need for revision. The Swedish hip registry, for example, has demonstrated a survival rate in excess of 80% at 20 years for those aged over 65 years, whereas this figure was 33% by 16 years in those aged under 55 years. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is a bone-conserving alternative to THR that restores normal joint biomechanics and load transfer. The technique has been used around the world for more than 10 years, specifically in the United Kingdom and other European countries. The Technology Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty is an alternative procedure to conventional THR in younger patients. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is less invasive than THR and addresses the problem of preserving femoral bone stock at the initial operation. This means that future hip revisions are possible with THR if the initial MOM arthroplasty becomes less effective with time in these younger patients. The procedure involves the removal and replacement of the surface of the femoral head with a hollow metal hemisphere, which fits into a metal acetabular cup. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is a technically more demanding procedure than is conventional THR. In hip resurfacing, the femoral head is retained, which makes it much more difficult to access the acetabular cup. However, hip resurfacing arthroplasty has several advantages over a

  9. Difference in clinical outcome between total shoulder arthroplasty and reverse shoulder arthroplasty used in hemiarthroplasty revision surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hartel, Bas Pieter; Alta, Tjarco D.; Sewnath, Miguel E.; Willems, Willem J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The increase of shoulder replacements will lead to a higher revision rate of shoulder arthroplasties. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical results of revision surgery performed in our hospital, distinguish the differences in clinical outcome according to revision indication and differences between total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) and reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) in hemiarthroplasty (HA) revision surgery. Materials and Methods: All patients with an indication for revision of HA were retrospectively included. Clinical evaluation consisted of pre- and post-operative constant scores, disability of arm-shoulder-hand-score (DASH), Dutch translation of the simple shoulder test ((D)SST), Oxford shoulder score test (OSS), short form (SF-36) and the complication rate. Results: From July 1994 to July 2008, 39 patients (40 shoulders) underwent revision arthroplasty. Of 19 patients (19 shoulders) we obtained a complete follow-up. The mean age at revision surgery 69 ± 10 years (range: 46-83) and the mean follow-up 41 ± 31 months (range: 10-113). In 7 cases TSA was used for revision when the cuff was intact, 12 times RSA was performed. The indications for the revision were glenoid erosion (n = 4), humeral component malposition (n = 2), cuff-pathology (n = 12) and infection (n = 1). Postoperative constant score 51.7 ± 11.4 for TSA and 31.1 ± 18.7 for RSA (P = 0.008). The DASH was 48.3 ± 25.1 and 68.7 ± 17.5, respectively (P = 0.09). DSST showed 6 ± 4 and 4 ± 4 (P = 0.414). OSS 41.3 ± 10.1 and 28.1 ± 10.3 (P = 0.017). SF-36 43.3 ± 22.1 and 24.5 ± 12.8 (P = 0.072). Four shoulders (21%) presented four complications. Conclusions: In this study, revision surgery showed poor to reasonable postoperative results and better clinical outcome for TSA. When a revision after HA was needed, and the soft-tissue component of the shoulder was intact, a TSA proved to be a preferable solution. PMID:26288535

  10. Preoperative laxity in osteoarthritis patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Hideo; Matsuda, Yoshikazu; Kiga, Hiroshi; Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Toyabe, Shin-ichi

    2007-01-01

    A preoperative quantitative evaluation of soft tissues is helpful for planning total knee arthroplasty, in addition to the conventional clinical examinations involved in moving the knee manually. We evaluated preoperative coronal laxity with osteoarthritis in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty by applying a force of 150 N with an arthrometer. We examined a consecutive series of 120 knees in 102 patients. The median laxity was 0° in abduction and 8° in adduction. The femorotibial angle on non-weight-bearing standard anteroposterior radiographs was 180° and correlated with both abduction (r = −0.244, p = 0.007) and adduction (r = 0.205, p = 0.025) laxity. The results of a regression analysis suggested that the femorotibial angle is helpful for estimating both laxities. Considering the many reports on how to obtain well-balanced soft tissues, stress radiographs might help to improve the preoperative planning for gaining the optimal laxity deemed appropriate by surgeons. PMID:17938923

  11. Analysis and Treatment of Complications after Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Song; Lee, Jae Il; Kim, Jin Woo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the causes and types of complications after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and determine proper prevention and treatment methods. Materials and Methods A total of 1,576 UKAs were performed for osteoarthritis of the knee from January 2002 to December 2014 at one institution. We analyzed complications after UKA retrospectively and investigated proper methods of treatment. Results A total of 89 complications (5.6%) occurred after UKA. Regarding the type of complications after UKA, there were 42 cases of dislocation of the mobile bearing, 23 cases of loosening of the prosthesis, 6 cases of periprosthetic fracture, 3 cases of polyethylene wear, 3 cases of progression of arthritis in the contralateral compartment, 2 cases of medial collateral ligament injury, 2 cases of impingement, 5 cases of infection, 1 case of arthrofibrosis, and 2 cases of failure due to unexplained pain. The most common complication after UKA was mobile bearing dislocation in the mobile-bearing knees and loosening of the prosthesis in the fixed-bearing knees, but polyethylene wear and progression of arthritis were relatively rare. The complications were treated with conversion to total knee arthroplasty in 58 cases and simple bearing change in 21 cases. Conclusions The most common complication after UKA was dislocation of the mobile bearing. When a complication occurs after UKA, appropriate treatment should be performed after accurate analysis of the cause of complication. PMID:26952551

  12. Lower limb length and offset in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Flecher, X; Ollivier, M; Argenson, J N

    2016-02-01

    Restoration of normal hip biomechanics is a key goal of total hip arthroplasty (THA) and favorably affects functional recovery. Furthermore, a major concern for both the surgeon and the patient is preservation or restoration of limb length equality, which must be achieved without compromising the stability of the prosthesis. Here, definitions are given for anatomic and functional limb length discrepancies and for femoral and hip offset, determined taking anteversion into account. Data on the influence of operated-limb length and offset on patient satisfaction, hip function, and prosthesis survival after THA are reviewed. Errors may adversely impact function, quality of life, and prosthetic survival and may also generate conflicts between the surgeon and patient. Surgeons rely on two- or three-dimensional preoperative templating and on intraoperative landmarks to manage offset and length. Accuracy can be improved by using computer-assisted planning or surgery and the more recently introduced EOS imaging system. The prosthetic's armamentarium now includes varus-aligned and lateralized implants, as well as implants with modular or custom-made necks, which allow restoration of the normal hip geometry, most notably in patients with coxa vara or coxa valga. Femoral anteversion must also receive careful attention. The most common errors are limb lengthening and a decrease in hip offset. When symptoms are caused by an error in length and/or offset, revision arthroplasty may deserve consideration.

  13. Post-operative neuropathy after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Su, E P

    2017-01-01

    Nerve palsy is a well-described complication following total hip arthroplasty, but is highly distressing and disabling. A nerve palsy may cause difficulty with the post-operative rehabilitation, and overall mobility of the patient. Nerve palsy may result from compression and tension to the affected nerve(s) during the course of the operation via surgical manipulation and retractor placement, tension from limb lengthening or compression from post-operative hematoma. In the literature, hip dysplasia, lengthening of the leg, the use of an uncemented femoral component, and female gender are associated with a greater risk of nerve palsy. We examined our experience at a high-volume, tertiary care referral centre, and found an overall incidence of 0.3% out of 39 056 primary hip arthroplasties. Risk factors found to be associated with the incidence of nerve palsy at our institution included the presence of spinal stenosis or lumbar disc disease, age younger than 50, and smoking. If a nerve palsy is diagnosed, imaging is mandatory and surgical evacuation or compressive haematomas may be beneficial. As palsies are slow to recover, supportive care such as bracing, therapy, and reassurance are the mainstays of treatment. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B(1 Supple A):46-9.

  14. Postoperative blood loss prevention in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samik; Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Issa, Kimona; McElroy, Mark J; Khanuja, Harpal S; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2013-12-01

    Blood loss is a serious concern during lower extremity total joint arthroplasty with the estimated reduction in hemoglobin concentration known to vary between 2 and 4 g/dL after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Allogeneic transfusions are commonly used to treat the acute blood loss and postoperative anemia to diminish the potential cardiovascular risks in up to 50% of such cases with a high volume of blood loss. However, these transfusions are associated with the risks of immunologic reactions, immunosuppression, and infection transmission. Multiple blood-saving strategies have been developed to minimize blood loss, to reduce transfusion rates, to decrease complications, and to improve outcomes in the postoperative period. Currently, there are no clear guidelines on the blood management strategies adopted to lessen the blood loss associated with TKA. The aim of this study was to review the literature and provide a broad summary of the efficacy and complications associated with several blood-saving measures that are currently used in the postoperative period. Evidence suggests that simple techniques such as limb elevation, cryotherapy, compression dressings, and drain clamping may reduce external drainage, however, whether these techniques lead to less allogeneic transfusions is currently debatable. Further research on using a combination of these strategies and their cost-effectiveness are needed.

  15. Current cementing techniques in hip hemi-arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Scott, S; McCaskie, A W; Calder, S J; Wildin, C; Gregg, P J

    2001-07-01

    To assess the use of modern cementing techniques in hip hemi-arthroplasty a postal questionnaire was sent during 1998 to all British Orthopaedic Training Association (B.O.T.A.) members regarding use of cement, type of cement, bone preparation and cementing technique. The results of this survey were compared to a similar survey in 1994 to assess any change in practice. Two hundred and eighty-six trainees responded to the 1998 survey, 352 to the 1994 survey. The use of uncemented prostheses had decreased from 31.3 in 1994 to 21.7% in 1998. Normal viscosity Palacos cement remains the most common cement in use, 64.3% in 1998. The use of antibiotic loaded cement has increased from 53.7 in 1994 to 67.9% in 1998. For bone preparation 47.3% of trainees in 1998 used a modern technique (syringe irrigation/pulsed lavage, brushing, gauze packing) compared to 35.1% in 1994. Modern cement insertion (retrograde gun, cement restriction and sustained pressure) was carried out by 39.3% in 1998 compared to 28.5% in 1994. Overall 27.2% of trainees used modern cementing techniques in hip hemi-arthroplasty, compared to 19.4% in 1994. Modern cementing techniques are used by a minority of British orthopaedic trainees, but in comparison to 1994 their use has increased.

  16. Effect of pneumatic compression on fibrinolysis after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Macaulay, William; Westrich, Geoffrey; Sharrock, Nigel; Sculco, Thomas P; Jhon, Peter H; Peterson, Margaret G E; Salvati, Eduardo A

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this prospective randomized clinical study was to investigate the enhanced systemic fibrinolysis mechanism of venous thrombosis prevention by pneumatic compression after total hip arthroplasty. Fifty patients were randomized into one of two groups (one with pneumatic compression [n=25] and one without [n=25]). Blood was drawn from a radial arterial line immediately preoperatively (baseline), at skin closure, and 8 hours and 22 hours after the baseline sample. Serum determinations of antigen of tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 were done using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. These data do not support the enhancement of systemic fibrinolysis mechanism for lowering thromboembolic risk after total hip arthroplasty by pneumatic compression devices. The results of this study showed no differences that were statistically significant between the two groups. The greatest difference was observed 8 hours after surgery for the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 marker, (28.12 with compression versus 22.07 ng/mL without); however, this result was not statistically significant. The beneficial effect of mechanical compression is more likely achieved through increased flow, local fibrinolytic effects, or both.

  17. The accuracy of femoral intramedullary guides in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Reed, S C; Gollish, J

    1997-09-01

    Of the technical factors important in achieving a successful total knee arthroplasty, limb alignment has been demonstrated to be most influential in determining implant survival. Intramedullary femoral guide systems rely on placement of the intramedullary rod along the anatomic axis of the femur. In this article, the accuracy of the femoral intramedullary guide is investigated using radiographs and a mathematical model. The femoral anatomic axis was drawn on 40 consecutive, preoperative, 3-ft standing radiographs. Using a mathematical model, the potential angular error in the distal femoral cut from aberrant placement of the intramedullary rod was estimated. Calculated values correlated with measured values from plain radiographs and an intramedullary guide template. The anatomic axis was found to exit the distal femur at an average of 6.6 mm medial to the center of the femoral notch. Substantial malalignment error resulted from minor malposition of the intramedullary rod. Most books and diagrams demonstrating the use of intramedullary guides indicate that the entry point is at the center of the femoral notch. These results show that the true entry point is medial to the center of the notch, and rod placement error results in excessive valgus alignment. Preoperative drawing of the anatomic axis on a 3-ft or 18-inch anteroposterior radiograph is recommended. The results both demonstrate the importance of correct use of the guide and heighten cognizance among surgeons performing total knee arthroplasty as to the limitations of the intramedullary guides.

  18. Anatomic dimensions of the patella measured during total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, James L; House, C Ken

    2005-02-01

    The anatomic measurements of 92 patellae with normal underlying bony structure were studied during total knee arthroplasty before and after resection of the articular surface. The articular surface of the patella was found to have an oval shape with a width-to-height ratio (46 x 36 mm) of 1.30. The dome was 4.8 mm high and displaced medially 3.6 mm. The medial facet was slightly thicker than the lateral facet (18 vs 17 mm). The lateral facet is 25% wider than the medial facet. Coverage provided by oval patellar prostheses was significantly better than with round prostheses. The patellae in women were significantly smaller than in men. Size differences and deformity need to be taken into account when the patella is prepared for resurfacing. It is recommended that the bony resection should be no greater than one third of the maximum patellar thickness to avoid alteration of normal bony structure. Key words: patella, total knee arthroplasty, anatomy.

  19. The Importance of Bone Mineral Density in Hip Arthroplasty: Results of a Survey Asking Orthopaedic Surgeons about Their Opinions and Attitudes Concerning Osteoporosis and Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kolbow, Kristina; Lazovic, Djordje; Maus, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Objective. In patients scheduled to undergo total joint arthroplasty of the hip, the bone quality around the joint affects the safety of prosthetic implantation. Bone strength is clinically assessed by measuring bone mineral density (BMD); therefore we asked if BMD is important to orthopaedic surgeons performing hip arthroplasty. Methods. In a 14-question survey, we asked about treatment patterns with respect to BMD, osteoporosis work-up, and treatment for patients with low BMD scheduled to undergo hip arthroplasty. Results. 72% of all asked orthopaedics reported to use cementless implants as a standard in hip arthroplasty. Over 60% reported that low BMD is a reason to reconsider operation strategies, but only 4% performed BMD measurement preoperatively. 26% would change their treatment strategy in case of a BMD (T-Score) between −1.5 and −2 and 40% in case of a T-score between −2 and −2.5, and 29% would change their intraoperative strategy if a T-score smaller than −2.5 was measured. Conclusion. The majority of orthopaedic surgeons who responded to the survey reported that they do not perform routine measurement of BMD before arthroplasty. However, most surgeons commented that low bone mineral density will influence their surgical plan and the implant design. PMID:27999686

  20. Perioperative Pain Management in Total Hip Arthroplasty: Korean Hip Society Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Min, Byung-Woo; Kim, Yeesuk; Cho, Hong-Man; Park, Kyung-Soon; Yoon, Pil Whan; Nho, Jae-Hwi; Kim, Sang-Min; Lee, Kyung-Jae; Moon, Kyong-Ho

    2016-03-01

    Effective perioperative pain management techniques and accelerated rehabilitation programs can improve health-related quality of life and functional status of patients after total hip arthroplasty. Traditionally, postoperative analgesia following arthroplasty was provided by intravenous patient-controlled analgesia or epidural analgesia. Recently, peripheral nerve blockade has emerged alternative analgesic approach. Multimodal analgesia strategy combines analgesics with different mechanisms of action to improve pain management. Intraoperative periarticular injection of multimodal drugs is one of the most important procedures in perioperative pain control for total hip arthroplasty. The goal of this review article is to provide a concise overview of the principles of multimodal pain management regimens as a practical guide for the perioperative pain management for total hip arthroplasty.

  1. Automatic assessment of volume asymmetries applied to hip abductor muscles in patients with hip arthroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemt, Christian; Modat, Marc; Pichat, Jonas; Cardoso, M. J.; Henckel, Joahnn; Hart, Alister; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2015-03-01

    Metal-on-metal (MoM) hip arthroplasties have been utilised over the last 15 years to restore hip function for 1.5 million patients worldwide. Althoug widely used, this hip arthroplasty releases metal wear debris which lead to muscle atrophy. The degree of muscle wastage differs across patients ranging from mild to severe. The longterm outcomes for patients with MoM hip arthroplasty are reduced for increasing degrees of muscle atrophy, highlighting the need to automatically segment pathological muscles. The automated segmentation of pathological soft tissues is challenging as these lack distinct boundaries and morphologically differ across subjects. As a result, there is no method reported in the literature which has been successfully applied to automatically segment pathological muscles. We propose the first automated framework to delineate severely atrophied muscles by applying a novel automated segmentation propagation framework to patients with MoM hip arthroplasty. The proposed algorithm was used to automatically quantify muscle wastage in these patients.

  2. Comparison of total hip arthroplasty in osteoarthritis of mechanical and rheumatologic causes

    PubMed Central

    Ejnisman, Leandro; Leonhardt, Nathalia Zalc; Fernandes, Laura Fillipini Lorimier; Leonhardt, Marcos de Camargo; Vicente, José Ricardo Negreiros; Croci, Alberto Tesconi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare the use of uncemented implants in total hip arthroplasty in patients with rheumathologic diseases and mechanical osteoarthrosis. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 196 patients who were operated by the Hip and Arthroplasty Surgery Group of the IOT-HCFMUSP between 2005 and 2009. Patients were divided into two groups: mechanical causes (165 patients) and rheumathologic causes (31 patients). Groups were compared between each other in age, gender and follow-up time. Osseointegration rate and percentage of failure in arthroplasty were evaluated. Results: No statistically significant difference was found in osseointegration rates (in both femoral and acetabular components) in both groups. The rates of revision surgery and implant survival also did not show statistically significant differences. Conclusion: The use of uncemented total hip arthroplasty did not show worse results in rheumathologic patients. Level of Evidence III, Retrospective Case Control Study. PMID:24644419

  3. Malnutrition in Joint Arthroplasty: Prospective Study Indicates Risk of Unplanned ICU Admission

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Atul F.; McAuliffe, Caitlin L.; Kosseim, Laura M.; Pio, Finnah; Hume, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background: Malnutrition has been linked to poor outcomes after elective joint arthroplasty, but the risk of unplanned postoperative intensive care unit (ICU) admission in malnourished arthroplasty patients is unknown. Methods: 1098 patients were followed as part of a prospective risk stratification program at a tertiary, high-volume arthroplasty center. Chronic malnutrition was defined as preoperative albumin <3.5 g/dL. Results: The overall incidence of malnutrition was 16.9% (primary and revision arthroplasty patients). Average BMI was highest for patients in albumin category 3.0-3.5 (BMI 35.7). Preoperative albumin <3.0 and <3.5 g/dL translated to 15.4% and 3.8% rates of unplanned ICU admission, respectively, indicating nutritional status to be a factor in postoperative ICU admission. Conclusion: Patients with poor nutritional status must be counseled on the risks of adverse medical complications. PMID:27200389

  4. Delayed Femoral Nerve Palsy Associated with Iliopsoas Hematoma after Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Femoral nerve neuropathy after total hip arthroplasty is rare but catastrophic complication. Pain and quadriceps muscle weakness caused by this complication can significantly affect the functional outcome. Here we present a case report, describing delayed onset femoral nerve palsy associated with iliopsoas hematoma following pseudoaneurysm of a branch of profunda femoris artery after 3 months of primary total hip arthroplasty in an 80-year-old female patient with single kidney. Hip arthroplasty was done for painful primary osteoarthritis of left hip. Diagnosis of femoral nerve palsy was made by clinical examination and computed tomography imaging of pelvis. Patient was managed by surgical evacuation of hematoma and physiotherapy. The patient's clinical symptoms were improved after surgical evacuation of hematoma. This is the first case report of its kind in English literature regarding delayed onset femoral nerve palsy after primary total hip arthroplasty due to pseudoaneurysm of a branch of profunda femoris artery without any obvious precipitating factor. PMID:27752378

  5. Spontaneous dislocation of the polyethylene component following knee revision arthroplasty: case report.

    PubMed

    Migon, Eduardo Zaniol; de Freitas, Geraldo Luiz Schuck; Rodrigues, Marcos Wainberg; de Oliveira, Gustavo Kaempf; de Almeida, Luis Gustavo Morato Pinto; Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Dislocation of the polyethylene component in knee arthroplasty is a rare complication. The main triggering factor is failure of the locking mechanism, which may result from technical errors of insertion, trauma or even implant failure. Here, a case of dislocation of the polyethylene component from the tibial base, nine years after revision arthroplasty, is reported. It is believed that this is the first such case reported in the Brazilian literature.

  6. Unicompartmental Knee Osteoarthritis (UKOA): Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty (UKA) or High Tibial Osteotomy (HTO)?

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E. Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review article is to analyze the results of high tibial osteotomy compared to unicompartmental knee arthroplasty in patients with unicompartmental knee osteoarthritis. The search engine used was PubMed. The keywords were: “high tibial osteotomy versus unicompartmental knee arthroplasty”. Twenty-one articles were found on 28 February 2015, but only eighteen were selected and reviewed because they strictly focused on the topic. In a meta-analysis the ratio for an excellent outcome was higher in unicompartmental knee arthroplasty than high tibial osteotomy and the risks of revision and complications were lower in the former. A prospective comparative study showed that unicompartmental knee arthroplasty offers better long-term success (77% for unicompartmental knee arthroplasty and 60% for high tibial osteotomy at 7-10 years). However, a review of the literature showed no evidence of superior results of one treatment over the other. A multicenter study stated that unicompartmental knee osteoarthritis without constitutional deformity should be treated with unicompartmental knee arthroplasty while in cases with constitutional deformity high tibial osteotomy should be indicated. A case control study stated that unicompartmental knee arthroplasty offers a viable alternative to high tibial osteotomy if proper patient selection is done. The literature is still controversial regarding the best surgical treatment for unicompartmental knee osteoarthritis (high tibial osteotomy or unicompartmental knee arthroplasty). However, unicompartmental knee arthroplasty utilization is increasing, while high tibial osteotomy utilization is decreasing, and a meta-analysis has shown better outcomes and less risk of revision and complications in the former. A systematic review has found that with correct patient selection, both procedures show effective and reliable results. However, prospective randomized studies are needed in order to answer the question of this article

  7. Editorial Commentary: Shoulder Arthroscopy, Shoulder Hemiarthroplasty, and Total Shoulder Arthroplasty for Glenohumeral Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H

    2015-06-01

    Shoulder arthroscopy offers a safe, effective, and less invasive alternative to arthroplasty in patients under 60 years of age with glenohumeral arthritis. However, indications include joint space of greater than 2 mm. For patients who do not meet arthroscopic indications, total shoulder arthroplasty is more effective than hemiarthroplasty. Performance and publication bias may effect generalizability of these findings. Biologic treatment options seem on the horizon.

  8. Biceps tendinitis as a cause of acute painful knee after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Pandher, Dilbans Singh; Boparai, Randhir Singh; Kapila, Rajesh

    2009-12-01

    The case report highlights an unusual case of posterolateral knee pain after total knee arthroplasty. Tendinitis of the patellar tendon or pes anserinus is a common complication after total knee arthroplasty; however, there is no report in the literature regarding the biceps femoris tendinitis causing acute pain in the early postoperative period. In this case, the biceps tendinitis was diagnosed and treated by ultrasound-guided injection into the tendon sheath.

  9. New options for anticoagulation following total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty: new oral agents on the horizon.

    PubMed

    Amin, Alpesh

    2012-08-01

    Patients undergoing surgery for total hip arthroplasty (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are at particularly high risk for developing venous thromboembolism (VTE). Despite the existence of effective therapies for VTE prevention, THA/TKA patients remain at risk for developing thrombi. Furthermore, the incidence of VTE is predicted to increase as an aging and increasingly obese population experiences joint damage necessitating THA and TKA. Current guidelines recommend the use of a wide range of antithrombotic agents in patients undergoing THA and TKA. These agents include vitamin K antagonists, low-molecular-weight heparins, fondaparinux, and the new oral anticoagulants. However, adherence to guidelines in clinical practice is disappointingly low. The limitations of traditional anticoagulants present management challenges following orthopedic surgery. Vitamin K antagonists present a number of drawbacks, including a narrow therapeutic window and unpredictable pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The subcutaneous route of administration of fondaparinux and low-molecular-weight heparins may make them unacceptable to patients in the outpatient setting. The introduction of a new generation of anticoagulants promises to address many of the drawbacks associated with the traditional agents. Clinical studies have shown the new oral anticoagulants to be as effective as traditional thromboprophylaxis, with good tolerability profiles. Clinical knowledge of these new agents will be essential to ensure that patients receive appropriate care following orthopedic surgery. This article will discuss the prevention of VTE after THA and TKA based on current evidence-based practice guidelines, the limitations of conventional anticoagulants, and the promise of new therapeutics.

  10. Efficacy of a single dose of cefazolin as a prophylactic antibiotic in primary arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tang, W M; Chiu, K Y; Ng, T P; Yau, W P; Ching, P T Y; Seto, W H

    2003-09-01

    We analyzed the wound infection rate of 1,367 primary total hip and knee arthroplasties performed between 1991 and 1999. Two hundred and fifteen arthroplasties were performed with 3 doses (3 x 750 mg) of cefuroxime, and 1,152 arthroplasties were performed with a single preoperative dose (1 x 1 g) of cefazolin as antimicrobial prophylaxis. All wound infections that occurred within 2 years of the index surgery were analyzed. The deep wound infection rate of total hip arthroplasty was 1.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0%-3.3%) in the cefuroxime group and 1.1% (95% CI, 0%-2.2%) in the cefazolin group (Fisher's exact test, P = 1.0). The deep wound infection rate of total knee arthroplasty in the cefuroxime group (1.6%; 95% CI, 0%-3.8%) was not significantly different from the cefazolin group (1.0%; 95% CI, 0.3%-1.7%) (Fisher's exact test, P =.63). We concluded that a single dose (1 g) of cefazolin given at anesthetic induction offered similar protection to 3 doses (3 x 750 mg) of cefuroxime in preventing infection in primary total joint arthroplasty.

  11. Optimizing perioperative outcomes for older patients with rheumatoid arthritis undergoing arthroplasty: emphasis on medication management.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Susan M

    2015-05-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis continue to undergo arthroplasty despite widespread use of potent disease-modifying drugs (DMARDs), including the biologic tumor necrosis-α inhibitors. In fact, over 80 % of RA patients are taking DMARDs or biologics at the time of arthroplasty. While many RA-specific factors including disease activity and disability may contribute to the increase in infection in RA patients undergoing arthroplasty, immunosuppressant medications may also play a role. As the age of patients with RA undergoing arthroplasty is rising, and the incidence of arthroplasty among the older population is increasing, optimal perioperative management of DMARDs and biologics in older patients with RA is an increasing challenge. Although evidence is sparse, most evidence supports withholding tumor necrosis-α inhibitors and other biologics prior to surgery based on the dosing interval, and continuing methotrexate and hydroxychloroquine through the perioperative period. There is no consensus regarding leflunomide, and rituximab risk does not appear related to the interval between infusion and surgery. This paper reviews arthroplasty outcomes including complications in patients with RA, and discusses the rationale for strategies for the optimal medication management of DMARDs and biologics in the perioperative period to minimize complications and improve outcomes.

  12. Characterization of hip and knee arthroplasties and factors associated with infection☆

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Pinto, Cibele Zdebsky; Alpendre, Francine Taporosky; Stier, Christiane Johnscher Niebel; Maziero, Eliane Cristina Sanches; de Alencar, Paulo Gilberto Cimbalista; de Almeida Cruz, Elaine Drehmer

    2015-01-01

    Objective To characterize arthroplasty procedures, calculate the surgical infection rate and identify related risk factors. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study. Data on operations performed between 2010 and 2012 were gathered from documental sources and were analyzed with the aid of statistical software, using Fisher's exact test, Student's t test and the nonparametric Mann–Whitney and Wilcoxon tests. Results 421 total arthroplasty procedures performed on 346 patients were analyzed, of which 208 were on the knee and 213 on the hip. It was found that 18 patients (4.3%) were infected. Among these, 15 (83.33%) were reoperated and 2 (15.74%) died. The prevalence of infection in primary total hip arthroplasty procedures was 3%; in primary total knee arthroplasty, 6.14%; and in revision of total knee arthroplasty, 3.45%. Staphylococcus aureus was prevalent. The length of the surgical procedure showed a tendency toward being a risk factor (p = 0.067). Conclusion The prevalence of infection in cases of primary total knee arthroplasty was greater than in other cases. No statistically significant risk factors for infection were identified. PMID:27218082

  13. Hemiarthroplasty versus reverse total shoulder arthroplasty for acute proximal humerus fractures in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Garrigues, Grant E; Johnston, Peter S; Pepe, Matthew D; Tucker, Bradford S; Ramsey, Matthew L; Austin, Luke S

    2012-05-01

    Proximal humerus fractures are the third most common fracture in elderly patients. Hemiarthroplasty has been the treatment of choice in patients with bone quality and fracture patterns not amenable to open reduction and internal fixation. Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty is a newer option that appears to be less dependent on tuberosity healing than hemiarthroplasty. The authors hypothesized that reverse total shoulder arthroplasty provides improved functional outcomes compared with hemiarthroplasty for fractures in elderly patients.A retrospective review was performed of all patients treated with arthroplasty for acute proximal humerus fractures in an orthopedic practice using a Current Procedural Terminology code search, patient charts, and radiographs. Validated outcome scores were used to assess satisfaction, function, and general well-being. Twenty-three patients were treated for acute proximal humerus fractures (11 reverse total shoulder arthroplasties and 12 hemiarthroplasties). Three patients were lost to follow-up, and 6 patients were deceased. Mean follow-up was 3.6 years (range, 1.3-8 years). Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty outperformed hemiarthroplasty with regard to forward flexion, American Shoulder and Elbow Society score, University of Pennsylvania shoulder score, and Single Assessment Numerical Evaluation score.Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty is a reliable option for acute, proximal humerus fractures that are not amenable to closed treatment or reconstruction in elderly patients. Improved functional outcomes when compared with hemiarthroplasty must be balanced against the increased cost and limited life expectancy of patients with this injury.

  14. Measuring movement symmetry using tibial-mounted accelerometers for people recovering from total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Cory L.; Bade, Michael J.; Paxton, Roger J.; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this investigation was to examine movement symmetry changes over the first 26 weeks following unilateral total knee arthroplasty in community environments using skin-mounted tibial accelerometers. Comparisons to healthy participants of similar age were also made. Methods Patients (N = 24) with unilateral knee osteoarthritis (mean (SD), 65.2 (9.2) years) scheduled to undergo total knee arthroplasty and a control group (N = 19 healthy people; mean (SD), 61.3 (9.2) years) were recruited. The total knee arthroplasty group participated in a standardized course of physical rehabilitation. Tibial acceleration data were recorded during a Stair Climb Test and 6-Minute Walk Test. Tibial acceleration data were reduced to initial peak acceleration for each step. An inter-limb absolute symmetry index of tibial initial peak acceleration values was calculated. Findings The total knee arthroplasty group had greater between limb asymmetry for tibial initial peak acceleration and initial peak acceleration absolute symmetry index values five weeks after total knee arthroplasty, during the Stair Climb Test and the 6-Minute Walk Test. Interpretation Tibial accelerometry is a potential tool for measuring movement symmetry following unilateral total knee arthroplasty in clinical and community environments. Accelerometer-based symmetry outcomes follow patterns similar to published measures of limb loading recorded in laboratory settings. PMID:25979222

  15. Intraoperative passive kinematics of osteoarthritic knees before and after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Siston, Robert A; Giori, Nicholas J; Goodman, Stuart B; Delp, Scott L

    2006-08-01

    Total knee arthroplasty is a successful procedure to treat pain and functional disability due to osteoarthritis. However, precisely how a total knee arthroplasty changes the kinematics of an osteoarthritic knee is unknown. We used a surgical navigation system to measure normal passive kinematics from 7 embalmed cadaver lower extremities and in vivo intraoperative passive kinematics on 17 patients undergoing primary total knee arthroplasty to address two questions: How do the kinematics of knees with advanced osteoarthritis differ from normal knees?; and, Does posterior substituting total knee arthroplasty restore kinematics towards normal? Osteoarthritic knees displayed a decreased screw-home motion and abnormal varus/valgus rotations between 10 degrees and 90 degrees of knee flexion when compared to normal knees. The anterior-posterior motion of the femur in osteoarthritic knees was not different than in normal knees. Following total knee arthroplasty, we found abnormal varus/valgus rotations in early flexion, a reduced screw-home motion when compared to the osteoarthritic knees, and an abnormal anterior translation of the femur during the first 60 degrees of flexion. Posterior substituting total knee arthroplasty does not appear to restore normal passive varus/valgus rotations or the screw motion and introduces an abnormal anterior translation of the femur during intraoperative evaluation.

  16. Cost-Effective Mobile-Based Healthcare System for Managing Total Joint Arthroplasty Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Koutras, George; Heep, Hansjoerg; Koutras, Christos

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Long-term follow-up care after total joint arthroplasty is essential to evaluate hip and knee arthroplasty outcomes, to provide information to physicians and improve arthroplasty performance, and to improve patients' health condition. In this paper, we aim to improve the communication between arthroplasty patients and physicians and to reduce the cost of follow-up controls based on mobile application technologies and cloud computing. Methods We propose a mobile-based healthcare system that provides cost-effective follow-up controls for primary arthroplasty patients through questions about symptoms in the replaced joint, questionnaires (WOMAC and SF-36v2) and the radiological examination of knee or hip joint. We also perform a cost analysis for a set of 423 patients that were treated in the University Clinic for Orthopedics in Essen-Werden. Results The estimation of healthcare costs shows significant cost savings (a reduction of 63.67% for readmission rate 5%) in both the University Clinic for Orthopedics in Essen-Werden and the state of North Rhine-Westphalia when the mobile-based healthcare system is applied. Conclusions We propose a mHealth system to reduce the cost of follow-up assessments of arthroplasty patients through evaluation of diagnosis, self-monitoring, and regular review of their health status. PMID:28261533

  17. Total Hip Arthroplasty in a Girdlestone Hip following a Failed Hemiarthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Purushotham, VJ; Ranganath, BT

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Girdlestone hip arthroplasty, though described as a salvage procedure for infected hip joints, can also be considered for failed Hemiarthroplasty procedures. The functional results of such Girdlestone hip may not be satisfactory. They may require total hip replacement to improve the quality of life, which are technically challenging. Here we are reporting such a case ina 60 year old male patient, with review of literature. Case Report: A 60 year old male patient underwent cemented bipolar hemiarthroplasty for fracture neck of femur which failed, owing to improper implantation. Subsequently he underwent Girdlestone arthroplasty which resulted in persistent painful hip. He presented to us in this situation, where we successfully converted the Girdlestone arthroplasty to a Total Hip arthroplasty. Conclusion: Improper implantation in Hemiarthroplasty fails subsequently. In such cases Girdlestone arthroplasty may be an option to consider, though it may not give requisite relief to patient in some cases. In such situations total hip arthroplasty procedure, though technically challenging will give stable painless hip to the patient. PMID:27299043

  18. Repeat Manipulation Under Anesthesia For Persistent Stiffness After Total Knee Arthroplasty Achieves Functional Range of Motion.

    PubMed

    Ferrel, Jason R; Davis, Richard L; Agha, Obiajulu A J C; Politi, Joel R

    2015-05-01

    Poor range of motion may decrease a patient's ability to participate in activities of daily living after total knee arthroplasty. Manipulation under anesthesia has been shown to improve range of motion; however, some patients have persistent stiffness even after manipulation. The goal of this study was to evaluate the outcomes and complications of patients who underwent a second manipulation under anesthesia for persistent stiffness after total knee arthroplasty. The review of surgical records of two joint arthroplasty surgeons identified 226 knees in 210 patients who underwent a manipulation under anesthesia for poor range of motion after total knee arthroplasty. Of these patients, 16 patients underwent a second manipulation under anesthesia. For patients undergoing two manipulations under anesthesia procedures, at latest follow up (mean 539 days), mean extension improved from 10.50° to 2.50° (p=0.001) and mean flexion improved from 87.50° to 112.69° (p=0.001) respectively. SF-12 scores were available for 12 of 16 knees with a mean score of 34.42. Two of 16 patients (12.5%) experienced a complication. Three of 16 (18.8%) patients who underwent a second manipulation required a revision arthroplasty procedure. In conclusion, a second manipulation under anesthesia can achieve functional range of motion that is sustained after total knee arthroplasty.

  19. Tantalum cones and bone defects in revision total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Boureau, F; Putman, S; Arnould, A; Dereudre, G; Migaud, H; Pasquier, G

    2015-04-01

    Management of bone loss is a major challenge in revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The development of preformed porous tantalum cones offers new possibilities, because they seem to have biological and mechanical qualities that facilitate osseointegration. Compared to the original procedure, when metaphyseal bone defects are too severe, a single tantalum cone may not be enough and we have developed a technique that could extend the indications for this cone in these cases. We used 2 cones to fill femoral bone defects in 7 patients. There were no complications due to wear of the tantalum cones. Radiological follow-up did show any migration or loosening. The short-term results confirm the interest of porous tantalum cones and suggest that they can be an alternative to allografts or megaprostheses in case of massive bone defects.

  20. Mobile bearing and fixed bearing total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Dolfin, Marco; Saccia, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The mobile bearing (MB) concept in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was developed as an alternative to fixed bearing (FB) implants in order to reduce wear and improve range of motion (ROM), especially focused on younger patients. Unfortunately, its theoretical advantages are still controversial. In this paper we exhibit a review of the more recent literature available comparing FB and MB designs in biomechanical and clinical aspects, including observational studies, clinical trials, national and international registries analyses, randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses and Cochrane reviews. Except for some minor aspects, none of the studies published so far has reported a significant improvement related to MBs regarding patient satisfaction, clinical, functional and radiological outcome or medium and long-term survivorship. Thus the presumed superiority of MBs over FBs appears largely inconsistent. The routine use of MB is not currently supported by adequate evidences; implant choice should be therefore made on the basis of other factors, including cost and surgeon experience. PMID:27162777

  1. Head-Neck Taper Corrosion in Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hussenbocus, S.; Kosuge, D.; Solomon, L. B.; Howie, D. W.; Oskouei, R. H.

    2015-01-01

    Modularity at the head-neck junction of the femoral component in THA became popular as a design feature with advantages of decreasing implant inventory and allowing adjustment of leg length, offset, and soft tissue balancing through different head options. The introduction of a new modular interface to femoral stems that were previously monoblock, or nonmodular, comes with the potential for corrosion at the taper junction through mechanically assisted crevice corrosion. The incidence of revision hip arthroplasty is on the rise and along with improved wear properties of polyethylene and ceramic, use of larger femoral head sizes is becoming increasingly popular. Taper corrosion appears to be related to all of its geometric parameters, material combinations, and femoral head size. This review article discusses the pathogenesis, risk factors, clinical assessment, and management of taper corrosion at the head-neck junction. PMID:25954757

  2. The role of offset stems in revision knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Baldini, Andrea; Balato, Giovanni; Franceschini, Vincenzo

    2015-12-01

    Revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA) represents a technically challenging procedure. The use of an offset stem extension can help in addressing some of the difficulties that can be encountered during surgery and, in particular, anatomical mismatch, malalignment, and gap balancing. Different offset stem extensions are available and can be classified according to four parameters: modularity, location of the offset, direction, and size of the displacement. Offset stem extensions can assist with implant alignment on the metaphysis if there is an offset diaphysis, can avoid medial-lateral or anterior-posterior component overhang, can reduce the incidence of coronal or sagittal malalignment, and can help in balancing the flexion and extension spaces by effectively translating the components. The aim of this study is to give an overview of the currently available evidence regarding the use of offset stem extensions in revision TKA as well as some useful surgical tips.

  3. Distal interphalangeal joint implant arthroplasty in a musician.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, D A; Peimer, C A

    1998-01-01

    Degenerative joint disease commonly affects the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joints, causing articular destruction and marginal bone formation. Treatment for pain relief and function is most often done through arthrodesis. The case of a 70-year-old concert violinist with left index finger DIP joint osteoarthritis is presented. Arthritis in the involved joint caused pain and deformity and interfered with the patient's ability to play music. Trial arthrodesis with K-wires proved impossible because of the patient's need for continued mobility. Swanson hinge implant arthroplasty was performed on the affected DIP joint. The patient eventually achieved an excellent result and was able to return to playing the violin professionally. Treatment and therapy guidelines are presented.

  4. Intraoperative Proximal Femoral Fracture in Primary Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ponzio, Danielle Y; Shahi, Alisina; Park, Andrew G; Purtill, James J

    2015-08-01

    Intraoperative proximal femoral fracture is a complication of primary cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA) at rates of 2.95-27.8%. A retrospective review of 2423 consecutive primary cementless THA cases identified 102 hips (96 patients) with fracture. Multivariate analysis compared fracture incidences between implants, Accolade (Stryker Orthopaedics) and Tri-Lock (DePuy Orthopaedics, Inc.), and evaluated potential risk factors using a randomized control group of 1150 cases without fracture. The fracture incidence was 4.4% (102/2423), 3.7% (36/1019) using Accolade and 4.9% using Tri-Lock (66/1404) (P=0.18). Female gender (OR=1.96; 95% CI 1.19-3.23; P=0.008) and smaller stem size (OR=1.64; 95% CI 1.04-2.63; P=0.03) predicted increased odds of fracture. No revisions of the femoral component were required in the fracture cohort.

  5. Factors determining discharge destination for patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sharareh, Behnam; Le, Natasha B; Hoang, Melinda T; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2014-07-01

    Discharge destination to skilled nursing facilities (SNF) following total joint arthroplasty (TJA) plays an important role in healthcare costs. The pre-operative, intra-operative, and post-operative factors of 50 consecutive patients discharged to an SNF following TJA were compared to that of 50 consecutive patients discharged to home. Patients discharged to SNFs had slower pre-operative Get Up and Go scores (TGUG), lower pre-operative EQ-5D scores, higher ASA scores, increased hospital length of stay, increased self-reported post-operative pain, and decreased physical therapy achievements. We believe that the results of this study indicate that patients who get discharged to SNFs fit a certain criteria and this may be used to guide post-operative discharge destination during pre-operative planning, which can help lower costs while helping decrease the length of inpatient stay.

  6. Variations in hospital billing for total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Stryker, Louis S; Odum, Susan M; Fehring, Thomas K

    2014-09-01

    Although regional variations in Medicare spending are known, it is not clear whether regional variations exist in hospital charges for total joint arthroplasty. Data from Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) on Diagnosis Related Groups 469 and 470 (Major Joint with and without Major Complicating or Comorbid Condition) from 2011 were analyzed for variation by region. Drastic variations in charges between institutions were apparent with significant differences between regions for hospital charges and payments. The median hospital charge nationwide was $71,601 and $46,219 for Diagnosis Related Groups 469 and 470, respectively, with corresponding median payments of $21,231 and $13,743. Weak to no correlation was found between hospital charges and payments despite adjustments for wage index, cost of living, low-income care and teaching institution status.

  7. Profunda Femoris Pseudoaneurysm following Total Hip Arthroplasty Revision

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Katharine; Iorio, Justin; Balasubramanian, Easwaran

    2015-01-01

    Vascular injuries following total hip arthroplasty (THA) are very rare, with pseudoaneurysm being a small subset. We report a case of profunda femoris artery (PFA) pseudoaneurysm in a 61-year-old male following a posterior approach revision left THA. Presentation involved continued blood transfusion requirements several weeks postoperatively. Diagnosis of the pseduoaneurysm was made by contrast CT of the lower extremity, with confirmation via IR angiography. Successful embolization was achieved with selective coiling and Gelfoam. Presenting complaints of such complications are often vague and therefore lead to delayed diagnosis. Causes of such complications are not completely understood, particularly with PFA injuries in THA. Possible mechanisms are discussed in this paper. Vascular complications following THA can be difficult to diagnose. High suspicion in the setting of continued postoperative pain or bleeding may allow prompt diagnosis and avoidance of serious limb-threatening complications. PMID:26347839

  8. The relationship between knee arthroplasty and foot loading.

    PubMed

    Voronov, Michael L; Pinzur, Michael S; Havey, Robert M; Carandang, Gerard; Gil, Joseph A; Hopkinson, William J

    2012-02-01

    Surgeons have questioned whether foot deformity applies abnormal loading on a knee implant. A total of 24 patients with mild knee deformity underwent a static recording of foot loading prior to and at 3 months following knee replacement. Of these patients, 13 had a preoperative varus deformity. The recorded postoperative to preoperative loading in all 6 geographic sites was decreased by an average of 10%. The largest changes were observed in the hallux and lesser toe masks, whereas the postoperative to preoperative foot pressure ratio in the metatarsal head (lateral and medial), heel, and midfoot masks was 0.94. This preliminary investigation reveals a minimal change in geographic foot loading following total knee arthroplasty in patients with mild knee deformity.

  9. The difficult primary total knee arthroplasty: a review.

    PubMed

    Baldini, A; Castellani, L; Traverso, F; Balatri, A; Balato, G; Franceschini, V

    2015-10-01

    Primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a reliable procedure with reproducible long-term results. Nevertheless, there are conditions related to the type of patient or local conditions of the knee that can make it a difficult procedure. The most common scenarios that make it difficult are discussed in this review. These include patients with many previous operations and incisions, and those with severe coronal deformities, genu recurvatum, a stiff knee, extra-articular deformities and those who have previously undergone osteotomy around the knee and those with chronic dislocation of the patella. Each condition is analysed according to the characteristics of the patient, the pre-operative planning and the reported outcomes. When approaching the difficult primary TKA surgeons should use a systematic approach, which begins with the review of the existing literature for each specific clinical situation.

  10. Patient sensitivity to polyethylene particles with cemented total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ise, Kentaro; Kawanabe, Keiichi; Matsusaki, Takashi; Shimizu, Motoyuki; Onishi, Eijiro; Nakamura, Takashi

    2007-10-01

    To determine whether sensitivity to polyethylene particles varies among patients, we studied 25 patients who had undergone total hip arthroplasty. We used pelvic radiographs to measure annual polyethylene wear and the area of osteolysis. The ratio of the area of osteolysis to the volumetric polyethylene wear was defined as sensitivity index. Adherent cells from peripheral blood were cocultured with polyethylene particles, and the amount of bone-resorptive cytokines was measured. The amount of interleukin-6, but not of interleukin-1beta or tumor necrosis factor-alpha, released from adherent cells in the in vitro experiment correlated with the in vivo sensitivity indices. This technique appears capable of predicting the development of polyethylene-induced osteolysis, allowing surgeons to avoid using polyethylene as the bearing surface in patients at risk for osteolysis.

  11. Current surgical strategies for total arthroplasty in valgus knee

    PubMed Central

    Nikolopoulos, Dimitrios; Michos, Ioannis; Safos, George; Safos, Petros

    2015-01-01

    The majority of orthopaedic surgeons even currently agree that primary total arthroplasty in valgus knees with a deformity of more than ten degrees may prove challenging. The unique sets of bone and soft tissue abnormalities that must be addressed at the time of the operation make accurate axis restoration, component orientation and joint stability attainment a difficult task. Understanding the specific pathologic anatomic changes associated with the valgus knee is a prerequisite so as to select the proper surgical method, to optimize component position and restore soft-tissue balance. The purpose of this article is to review the valgus knee anatomical variations, to assess the best pre-operative planning and to evaluate how to choose the grade of constraint of the implant. It will also be underlying the up-to-date main approaches and surgical techniques be proposed in the English literature both for bone cuts and soft tissue management of valgus knees. PMID:26191494

  12. [Soft tissue balancing in total condylar knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Trepte, C T; Pfanzelt, K

    2003-01-01

    Soft tissue balancing and correct bone cuts are an entity in correcting malalignment in total knee arthroplasty, and cannot be considered isolated. Distinct bony deformations/deviations need enlarged soft tissue management. The extent of resection of the bone stock has to be planned exactly before the operation. Exact soft tissue balancing is necessary to stabilize the corrected knee. Soft tissue balancing has to be done primarily on the side of the contracture by lengthening of the shortened and contracted structures. After balancing the ligaments should have the same tension in extension and flexion together with the same height of the extension and flexion gap. Because of the classic resection of the tibial head, the femoral resection must follow the Insall-Line, that means 3 degrees to 5 degrees outer rotation in relation to the condyles. Only in this way a symmetric flexion gap can be achieved in combination with ligamentous stability in extension and flexion.

  13. Total knee arthroplasty and fractures of the tibial plateau

    PubMed Central

    Softness, Kenneth A; Murray, Ryan S; Evans, Brian G

    2017-01-01

    Tibial plateau fractures are common injuries that occur in a bimodal age distribution. While there are various treatment options for displaced tibial plateau fractures, the standard of care is open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). In physiologically young patients with higher demand and better bone quality, ORIF is the preferred method of treating these fractures. However, future total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a consideration in these patients as post-traumatic osteoarthritis is a common long-term complication of tibial plateau fractures. In older, lower demand patients, ORIF is potentially less favorable for a variety of reasons, namely fixation failure and the need for delayed weight bearing. In some of these patients, TKA can be considered as primary mode of treatment. This paper will review the literature surrounding TKA as both primary treatment and as a salvage measure in patients with fractures of the tibial plateau. The outcomes, complications, techniques and surgical challenges are also discussed. PMID:28251061

  14. Overview of Total Knee Arthroplasty and Modern Pain Control Strategies.

    PubMed

    Lavie, Lacey Giambelluca; Fox, M Patricia; Dasa, Vinod

    2016-11-01

    Perioperative pain management of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) remains a challenge for physicians and anesthesiologists. Reducing postoperative pain is an essential component of patient satisfaction, functional outcomes, and hospital length of stay. Multimodal pain management regimens have been demonstrated to be superior to monotherapy in achieving adequate pain control, as well as an effective method of limiting side effects of analgesics. In the present investigation, we present literature published over the last year relating to new advancements in perioperative pain management for TKA. While it is widely accepted that methods including peripheral nerve blocks and local anesthetic injections are essential to pain protocols, there is still conflicting evidence over what modalities provide superior relief. The incorporation of cryoneurolysis preoperatively is a new modality which has been incorporated and has been shown to improve pain control in patients undergoing TKA.

  15. INDICATIONS FOR DISTAL RADIOULNAR ARTHROPLASTY: REPORT ON THREE CLINICAL CASES

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Cláudia; Pereira, Alexandre; Sousa, Marco; Trigeuiros, Miguel; Silva, César

    2015-01-01

    Distal radioulnar arthroplasty is an attractive solution for treating various pathological conditions of the distal radioulnar joint because it allows restoration of stability, load transmission and function. The main indications are: radioulnar impingement after partial or complete resection of the distal ulna; and degenerative, inflammatory or post-traumatic arthritis of the distal radioulnar joint. The authors present three clinical cases of distal radioulnar pathological conditions: two patients with post-traumatic sequelae and one case of distal radioulnar impingement after a Sauvé-Kapandji operation. The three cases were treated surgically with a metallic prosthesis to replace the distal ulna (First Choice - Ascension®). The first two were treated with a resurfacing prosthesis and the last one with a modular prosthesis. All of the patients had achieved pain relief and increased movement of the distal radioulnar joint after one year of postoperative follow-up. PMID:27047827

  16. Factors affecting postoperative range of motion after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gatha, Nehal M; Clarke, Henry D; Fuchs, Robin; Scuderi, Giles R; Insall, John N

    2004-10-01

    One hundred thirty five patients with osteoarthritis who underwent total knee arthroplasty (TKA) were evaluated to determine whether specific pre- and postoperative variables were correlated with the postoperative range of motion. Age, sex, pre- and postoperative range of motion, pre- and postoperative Knee Society scores, intraoperative patellar thickness before and after resurfacing, pre- and postoperative radiographic patellar height (as determined by the Insall-Salvati and Blackburn-Peel ratios), and preoperative radiographic alignment were recorded for each patient. Regression analysis was performed to identify whether any variables were correlated with the postoperative range of motion or Knee Society scores. The only variable that was significantly correlated with postoperative range of motion was the preoperative range of motion. This study suggests that among the variables evaluated, the preoperative range of motion was the only significant predictor of postoperative range of motion.

  17. Acute Popliteal Artery Occlusion after Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Ryu; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Takayama, Koji; Kawakami, Yohei; Kamimura, Masato; Matsushita, Takehiko; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Acute arterial occlusions are a rare complication of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, in revision TKA, the risk of such complications is higher and these complications can lead to amputation if not adequately treated. We describe a case of acute popliteal artery occlusion 4 hours after second revision TKA in a patient with a history of several surgical procedures because of periprosthetic infection at a previous hospital. Revascularization was achieved via bypass grafting and amputation was narrowly avoided despite time lag after symptom onset to revascularization. In this case, it was possible that the arterial disease that accompanied the vascular endothelium injury such as pseudoaneurysm had existed since the previous surgery at another hospital and was destroyed by the surgical procedure, which led to the formation of thrombosis and arterial occlusion. Preoperative evaluation of the arterial condition should be considered to avoid acute arterial occlusive disease, especially in patients who had several previous surgical procedures.

  18. Psoas abscess associated with infected total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Buttaro, M; González Della Valle, A; Piccaluga, F

    2002-02-01

    A 65-year-old man with a left uncemented total hip arthroplasty performed 11 years previously was admitted with a history of progressive low back pain, left hip pain, and sepsis that had begun 6 months earlier. On physical examination, a gross, fluctuant mass was palpated in the left thigh. A computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a 6.5 x 3 cm left retrofascial psoas abscess communicating with the hip joint. The patient underwent irrigation and débridement of the hip with removal of the components. The psoas abscess was drained through the iliopsoas bursa. A residual psoas abscess was drained percutaneously under CT guidance. Cultures isolated Escherichia coli, and the patient responded to 6 months of ciprofloxacin therapy. After 1 year, the patient had no evidence of infection. Pathways of infection spread, diagnosis, and treatment of a patient with this rare association are discussed with a review of the literature.

  19. [Management of Flexion Contracture in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Hube, R; Mayr, H O; Pfitzner, T; von Roth, P

    2015-06-01

    Flexion contracture is a common deformity of the arthritic knee. The present publication describes causes, clinical relevance and surgical technique in the presence of flexion contractures in total knee arthroplasty. Flexion contracture can be attributed to different causes. Basically it is a mismatch between flexion and extension gaps. Moderate and severe deformities have to be corrected by additional surgical interventions. In most cases soft tissue techniques with release of contracted structures, the removal of osteophytes and additional distal femoral bone resection are necessary. The goal of these interventions is to achieve full extension of the knee. During rehabilitation attention has to be paid to maintain it with intensive physical therapy. A remaining flexion contracture is associated with inferior functional outcome and persistent pain.

  20. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty complicated by mismatched implant components

    PubMed Central

    Calistri, Alessandro; Campbell, Patricia; Van Der Straeten, Catherine; De Smet, Koen Aimè

    2017-01-01

    Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing has gained popularity as a feasible treatment option for young and active patients with hip osteoarthritis and high functional expectations. This procedure should only be performed by surgeons who have trained specifically in this technique. Preoperative planning is essential for hip resurfacing in order to execute a successful operation and preview any technical problems. The authors present a case of a man who underwent a resurfacing arthroplasty for osteoarthritis of the left hip that was complicated by mismatched implant components that were revised three days afterwards for severe pain and leg length discrepancy. Such mistakes, although rare, can be prevented by educating operating room staff in the size and colour code tables provided by the companies on their prostheses or implant boxes. PMID:28361022

  1. Hip arthroplasty. Part 2: normal and abnormal radiographic findings.

    PubMed

    Pluot, E; Davis, E T; Revell, M; Davies, A M; James, S L J

    2009-10-01

    This review addresses the normal and abnormal radiographic findings that can be encountered during the follow-up of patients with total hip arthroplasty (THA). The relative significance of different patterns of radiolucency, bone sclerosis, and component position is discussed. The normal or pathological significance of these findings is correlated with design, surface, and fixation of the prosthetic components. It is essential to have a good knowledge of expected and unexpected radiological evolution according to the different types of prostheses. This paper emphasizes the importance of serial studies compared with early postoperative radiographs during follow-up in order to report accurately any sign of prosthetic failure and trigger prompt specialist referral. Basic technical guidelines and schedule recommendations for radiological follow-up are summarized.

  2. Hip arthroplasty. Part 1: prosthesis terminology and classification.

    PubMed

    Pluot, E; Davis, E T; Revell, M; Davies, A M; James, S L J

    2009-10-01

    Hip arthroplasty is an extremely common orthopaedic procedure and there is a wide array of implants that are in current use in the UK. The follow-up of patients who have undergone insertion of a hip prosthesis is shifting from a consultant-lead hospital service towards primary care. As this change in patient care continues it becomes increasingly important that an accurate description of the radiographic features is communicated to the primary-care practitioner so appropriate specialist input can be triggered. This review focuses on the terminology and classification of hip prostheses. This acts as a precursor for Part 2 of this series, which describes the normal and abnormal radiographic findings following hip prosthesis insertion.

  3. The Validity of Administrative BMI Data in Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lau, Edmund C; Son, Min-Sun; Mossad, David; Toossi, Nader; Johanson, Norman A; Gonzalez, Mark H; Meller, Menachem M

    2015-10-01

    Identifying BMI via administrative data is a useful way to evaluate outcomes in total joint arthroplasty (TJA) for varying degrees of obesity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the concordance between BMI coding in administrative claims data and actual clinical BMI measurements in the medical record for patients undergoing TJA. Clinical BMI value was shown to be a significant determinant of whether ICD-9 codes were used to report the patient's obesity status (P<0.01). Although a higher clinical BMI strongly increased the likelihood of having either of the ICD-9 diagnosis codes used to identify obesity status, only the accuracy of the V85 code increased with increasing levels of BMI.

  4. [Surgical treatment of hip osteoarthritis: update in total hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Ilizaliturri Sánchez, Víctor M; Mangino Pariente, Gerardo; Camacho Galindo, Javier

    2007-10-01

    Total hip replacement is one of the most successful procedures in orthopaedic surgery. There are two different technologies for implant fixation in total hip replacement: cemented and cementless, both can be combined, which is called Hybrid arthroplasty. Long term implant stability results in long term function. The most important factor that limits longevity of well-fixed implants is the wear of the articular surfaces. Wear of the polyethylene from the acetabulum generates particles that access the implant bone or the implant-cement-bone interface. This produces an inflammatory reaction, osteolysis and implant loosening. Polyethylene of higher resistance to wear and prosthetic articulations without polyethylene (hard on hard bearings), have been introduced to improve wear particle generation. Minimally invasive surgical techniques minimize surgical trauma to sort tissue around the hip joint, facilitating a better and more rapid recovery.

  5. Pseudotumor due to metallosis after total elbow arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Rotini, Roberto; Bettelli, Graziano; Cavaciocchi, Michele; Savarino, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of primary total elbow arthroplasty (TEA) in young patients is increasing. The indications for revision surgery are also rising. Here, we report a rare case of pseudotumor detected in a patient 16 years after TEA. Intraoperative findings revealed a necrotic mass characterized by a conspicuous metallosis in the soft tissues around the prosthesis, which caused ulnar nerve dislocation. Due to this anatomical change, a lesion of the nerve was accidentally produced during revision surgery. The case report emphasizes that the indications for elbow replacement, as well as the patient education about the permanent physical limitations, should be carefully considered. Moreover, the high risks of complications related to the revision procedure and pseudotumor removal need to be addressed before surgery. The technique should be done carefully and a preliminary thorough imaging should be performed, since a newly formed mass can cause significant distortion of the anatomy. PMID:28216759

  6. When is total hip arthroplasty a failure? The patients' perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Hellman, E. J.; Feinberg, J. R.; Capello, W. N.

    1996-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) patients (186 primary, 92 revision) were surveyed regarding their satisfaction, their expectations regarding longevity, of the hip implant, and their perspective on the potential or actual need for revision surgery. The vast majority of patients were glad they had the original THA, would do it again if faced with a similar choice, and would recommend it to others. One-third of patients believed their current implants would last the rest of their life. The most common responses to either potential or actual failure were happiness it lasted as long as it did, accepting it as "one of those things," and disappointment. No primary THA patients and only 7% of revision of THA patients indicated that they would consider the primary THA a failure when revision surgery was indicated. PMID:9129281

  7. Acetabular augmentation for the treatment of unstable total hip arthroplasties.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholl, J. E.; Koka, S. R.; Bintcliffe, I. W.; Addison, A. K.

    1999-01-01

    Twenty-eight unstable total hip arthroplasties were treated with an acetabular augmentation wedge. Of the hips, 23 have had no further dislocations at a mean follow-up of 26 months. Five patients continued to dislocate and have needed further surgery. To our knowledge this is the largest reported series of acetabular augmentation with as good results as those of the most successful reported series of this technique, and a success rate comparable to other methods of treating recurrent dislocation. Careful patient selection, and using a thin augmentation wedge to avoid impingement, are important to the success of a technique which is a useful option in the management of recurrent dislocation. Images Figure 1 PMID:10364973

  8. Ceramic materials as bearing surfaces for total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    D'Antonio, James A; Sutton, Kate

    2009-02-01

    During the past decade, advances in total hip arthroplasty component design have produced implants with reliable clinical results in regard to fixation. The foremost unresolved challenge has been the development of bearing surfaces that can withstand the higher demands of younger and more active patients. New alternative bearings with superior wear characteristics that minimize debris include ceramic-on-ceramic, metal-on-metal, and highly cross-linked polyethylenes in combination with ceramic or metal. Alumina-on-alumina ceramic bearings are extremely hard and scratch resistant and provide superior lubrication and wear resistance compared with other bearing surfaces in clinical use. Survivorship revision for any reason for the alumina ceramic bearings at 10 years was significantly higher compared with metal-on-polyethylene. Bearings currently being studied because of their encouraging wear performance in the laboratory are an alumina matrix (82% alumina, 17% zirconia, 0.3% chromium oxide), zirconium oxide, and ceramic-on-cobalt-chromium.

  9. Physical functioning four years after total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Vissers, M M; Bussmann, J B; de Groot, I B; Verhaar, J A N; Reijman, M

    2013-06-01

    Our previous study showed that 6 months after total hip arthroplasty (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA), patients reported having less difficulty with daily activities, showed better functional capacity, and performed activities in their natural environment faster compared to preoperatively. However, their actual daily activity level was not significantly improved. Six months is a rather short follow-up period and the discrepancy in recovery among different aspects of functioning might be explained by this limited duration of follow-up. The objective of the present study was to examine the recovery of different aspects of physical functioning at a follow-up nearly 4 years after THA/TKA. Special attention was given to the actual daily activity level, and whether it had increased 4 years after THA/TKA compared to 6 months postoperatively. Seventy-seven (35 hip, 42 knee) patients who were measured preoperatively and postoperatively (6 months after surgery) in a previous study were invited to participate; 44 patients (23 hip, 21 knee) agreed to participate. The 4-year follow-up data were compared with the preoperative and 6-month postoperative data. The daily activity level after 4 years was found to be actually lower than at 6 months post-surgery (128 min vs. 138 min activity per 24h; p-value 0.48). However, the patients continued to improve in other aspects of physical functioning. In conclusion, 4-year post-surgery patients continued to improve on perceived physical functioning, capacity, and performance of activities in daily life. However, even in this relatively healthy study population, patients did not adopt a more active lifestyle 4 years after surgery.

  10. Bone cement product and failure in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Birkeland, Øystein; Espehaug, Birgitte; Havelin, Leif I; Furnes, Ove

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose — The bone cement market for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in Norway has been dominated by a few products and distributors. Palacos with gentamicin had a market share exceeding 90% before 2005, but it was then withdrawn from the market and replaced by new slightly altered products. We have compared the survival of TKAs fixated with Palacos with gentamicin with the survival of TKAs fixated with the bone cements that took over the market. Patients and methods — Using data from the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register for the period 1997–2013, we included 26,147 primary TKAs in the study. The inclusion criteria were TKAs fixated with the 5 most used bone cements and the 5 most common total knee prostheses for that time period. 6-year Kaplan-Meier survival probabilities were established for each cement product. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to assess the association between bone cement product and revision risk. Separate analyses were performed with revision for any reason and revision due to deep infection within 1 year postoperatively as endpoints. Adjustments were made for age, sex, diagnosis, and prosthesis brand. Results — Survival was similar for the prostheses in the follow-up period, between the 5 bone cements included: Palacos with gentamicin, Refobacin Palacos R, Refobacin Bone Cement R (Refobacin BCR), Optipac Refobacin Bone Cement R (Optipac Refobacin BCR), and Palacos R + G. Interpretation — According to our findings, the use of the new bone cements led to a survival rate that was as good as with the old bone cement (Palacos with gentamicin). PMID:27841713

  11. Outcome of total hip arthroplasty in small-proportioned patients.

    PubMed

    Rahimtoola, Z O; Finger, S; Imrie, S; Goodman, S B

    2000-01-01

    In a prospective, consecutive series, 41 total hip arthroplasties were performed in 27 small-proportioned patients with small femoral dimensions. The 17 female and 10 male patients averaged 23.6 years (range, 14-47 years), and the mean height and weight were 157 cm (range, 132-183 cm) and 53.5 kg (range, 36-84 kg). The most common preoperative diagnosis was juvenile rheumatoid arthritis in 18 patients (28 hips). Most patients were severely disabled in their daily activity, and 68% of the patients were classified as Charnley functional class C. The femoral implants consisted primarily of the proximally porous-coated miniature Anatomic Medullary Locking femoral component (AML/CDH, Depuy, Warsaw, IN) in 33 hips in 22 patients (average stem diameter, 9.5 mm; range, 8-12.0 mm). A porous ingrowth acetabular cup fixed with screws was used in all procedures. At an average follow-up of 51 months, Harris Hip Scores improved significantly from 34 points (range, 0-65 points) preoperatively to 85 points (range, 33-100 points) after arthroplasty. There were no intraoperative complications. There was 1 revision because of femoral implant loosening. Three cementless femoral components showed evidence of nonprogressive subsidence. One patient had significant bilateral acetabular component polyethylene wear and underwent revision. All other femoral and acetabular components were radiographically stable. The relief of pain and improvement of function were dramatic. The miniature AML/CDH femoral component, combined with an uncemented acetabular cup, provides a promising, off-the-shelf alternative in small-proportioned patients.

  12. Door Opening Affects Operating Room Pressure During Joint Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mears, Simon C; Blanding, Renee; Belkoff, Stephen M

    2015-11-01

    Many resources are expended to ensure a sterile operating room environment. Efforts are made to prevent exposure of patients to personnel and to achieve positive room pressure to keep out airborne contaminants. Foot traffic into and out of the operating room during surgery can undermine these efforts. The authors investigated the number and duration of operating room door openings during hip and knee arthroplasty procedures and the effect of the door openings on room pressure. They tested the hypothesis that door openings defeat positive pressure, permitting air flow into the room. Room pressure and door status were monitored electronically during 191 hip and knee arthroplasty procedures. Operating room staff were unaware that data were being collected. The authors evaluated the data with regression analysis to determine whether the number and duration of door openings had an effect on room pressure. Significance was set at P<.05. Doors were open, on average, 9.5 minutes per case. In 77 of 191 cases, positive pressure was defeated, allowing air flow to reverse into the operating room. Total time with the door open significantly affected the minimum pressure recorded in the room (P<.02), but did not significantly affect average room pressure (P=.7). This finding suggested that the loss of positive pressure was a transient event from which the room recovered. The number and duration of door openings showed a significant association with length of surgery. Door openings threaten positive pressure, potentially jeopardizing operating room sterility. The causes of excessive operating room traffic must be evaluated to identify ways to reduce this traffic and the associated risks.

  13. Traditions and myths in hip and knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Husted, Henrik; Gromov, Kirill; Malchau, Henrik; Freiberg, Andrew; Gebuhr, Peter; Troelsen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose — Traditions are passed on from experienced surgeons to younger fellows and become “the right way to do it”. Traditions associated with arthroplasty surgery may, however, not be evidence-based and may be potentially deleterious to both patients and society, increasing morbidity and mortality, slowing early functional recovery, and increasing cost. Methods — We identified selected traditions and performed a literature search using relevant search criteria (June 2014). We present a narrative review grading the studies according to evidence, and we suggest some lines of future research. Results — We present traditions and evaluate them against the published evidence. Preoperative removal of hair, urine testing for bacteria, use of plastic adhesive drapes intraoperatively, and prewarming of the operation room should be abandoned—as should use of a tourniquet, a space suit, a urinary catheter, and closure of the knee in extension. The safety and efficacy of tranexamic acid is supported by meta-analyses. Postoperatively, there is no evidence to support postponement of showering or postponement of changing of dressings to after 48 h. There is no evidence to recommend routine dental antibiotic prophylaxis, continuous passive motion (CPM), the use of compression stockings, cooling for pain control or reduction of swelling, flexion of at least 90 degrees as a discharge criterion following TKA, or having restrictions after THA. We present evidence supporting the use of NSAIDs, early mobilization, allowing early travel, and a low hemoglobin trigger for transfusion. Interpretation — Revision of traditions and myths surrounding hip and knee arthroplasty towards more contemporary evidence-based principles can be expected to improve early functional recovery, thus reducing morbidity, mortality, and costs. PMID:25285615

  14. MINIMALLY INVASIVE ANTEROLATERAL ACCESS ROUTE FOR TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    Sawaia, Rogério Naim; Galvão, Antonio Felipe Martensen; Oliveira, Fernando Machado; Secunho, Guilherme Rondinelli; Filho, Geraldo Vilela

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to present a minimally invasive anterolateral access route and to ascertain whether this enables total hip replacement without compromising the quality of the implant positioning, while maintaining the integrity of the gluteus muscles. Method: A retrospective study was conducted on 260 patients (186 females and 74 males) with an average age of 62 years. There were 18 bilateral cases, totaling 278 hips. All the patients had osteoarthritis and had undergone non-cemented total hip arthroplasty (metal-metal or metal-polyethylene) between October 2004 and December 2007. A minimally invasive anterolateral access route was used, measuring 7 to 10 cm in length, according to body weight and the size of the femoral head. The patients were assessed clinically regarding age, sex and presence of the Trendelenburg sign, and radiologically regarding acetabular and femoral positioning. Results: The acetabular inclination was between 30° and 40° in 78 patients, between 41° and 50° in 189 patients, and 51° or over in 11 patients. On anteroposterior radiographs to study femoral positioning, the positioning was central in 209 cases, 41 presented valgus deviation and 28 presented varus deviation. On lateral views, 173 were central, 67 anterior and 38 posterior. The mean duration of the procedure was 63 minutes. Regarding complications, there were five cases of infection, three of deep vein thrombosis, two of hip dislocation, 80 of lengthening of the lower limbs and five of shortening of the operated limb. The Trendelenburg sign was present in four cases, of which one showed superior gluteal nerve injury. Conclusion: The minimally invasive anterolateral access route made it possible to perform total hip arthroplasty without compromising the positioning of the implants, thereby maintaining the integrity of the gluteus muscles. PMID:27027008

  15. Intraoperative Manipulation for Flexion Contracture During Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshio; Minoda, Yukihide; Fumiaki, Inori; Nakagawa, Sigeru; Okajima, Yoshiaki; Kobayashi, Akio

    2016-11-01

    Joint gap balancing during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is important for ensuring postoperative joint stability and range of motion. Although the joint gap should be balanced to ensure joint stability, it is not easy to achieve perfect balancing during TKA. In particular, relative extension gap shortening can induce flexion contracture. Intraoperative manipulation is often empirically performed. This study evaluated the tension required for this manipulation and investigated the influence of intraoperative manipulation on the joint gap in cadaveric knees. Total knee arthroplasty was performed in 6 cadaveric knees from whole body cadavers. Flexion contracture was induced using an insert that was 4 mm thicker than the extension gap, and intraoperative manipulation was performed. Study measurements included the changes in the joint gap after manipulation at 6 positions, with the knee bending from extension to 120° flexion, and the manipulation tension that was required to create a 4-mm increase in the gap. The manipulation tension needed to create a 4-mm increase in the extension gap was 303±17 N. The changes in the joint gap after manipulation were 0.4 mm, 0.6 mm, 0.2 mm, -0.2 mm, -0.4 mm, and -0.6 mm at 0°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 90°, and 120° flexion, respectively. Therefore, the joint gap was not significantly changed by the manipulation. Intraoperative manipulation does not resolve flexion contracture. Therefore, if flexion contracture occurs during TKA, treatment with additional bone cutting and soft tissue release is likely more appropriate than manipulation. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1070-e1074.].

  16. Periacetabular bone mineral density changes after resurfacing hip arthroplasty versus conventional total hip arthroplasty. A randomized controlled DEXA study.

    PubMed

    Smolders, José M H; Pakvis, Dean F; Hendrickx, Baudewijn W; Verdonschot, Nico; van Susante, Job L C

    2013-08-01

    A randomized controlled trial was performed to evaluate acetabular bone mineral density (BMD) changes after hip resurfacing (RHA) versus an established conventional total hip arthroplasty (THA). A total of 71 patients were allocated randomly to receive either an RHA press-fit cobalt-chromium cup (n=38) or a THA with a threaded titanium cup and polyethylene-metal-inlay insert (n=33). The BMD in five separate periacetabular regions of interest (ROI) was prospectively quantified preoperative until 24 months. We conclude that, in contrast to our hypothesis, periacetabular BMD was better preserved after RHA than after placement of a conventional THA. Long term follow-up studies are necessary to see whether this benefit in bone preservation sustains over longer time periods and whether it is turned into clinical benefits at future revision surgery.

  17. Early outcomes of twin-peg mobile-bearing unicompartmental knee arthroplasty compared with primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Z. C.; Lombardi, A. V.; Hurst, J. M.; Morris, M. J.; Adams, J. B.; Berend, K. R.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Since redesign of the Oxford phase III mobile-bearing unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) femoral component to a twin-peg design, there has not been a direct comparison to total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Thus, we explored differences between the two cohorts. Patients and Methods A total of 168 patients (201 knees) underwent medial UKA with the Oxford Partial Knee Twin-Peg. These patients were compared with a randomly selected group of 177 patients (189 knees) with primary Vanguard TKA. Patient demographics, Knee Society (KS) scores and range of movement (ROM) were compared between the two cohorts. Additionally, revision, re-operation and manipulation under anaesthesia rates were analysed. Results The mean follow-up for UKA and TKA groups was 5.4 and 5.5 years, respectively. Six TKA (3.2%) versus three UKAs (1.5%) were revised which was not significant (p = 0.269). Manipulation was more frequent after TKA (16; 8.5%) versus none in the UKA group (p < 0.001). UKA patients had higher post-operative KS function scores versus TKA patients (78 versus 66, p < 0.001) with a trend toward greater improvement, but there was no difference in ROM and KS clinical improvement (p = 0.382 and 0.420, respectively). Conclusion We found fewer manipulations, and higher functional outcomes for patients treated with medial mobile-bearing UKA compared with TKA. TKA had twice the revision rate as UKA although this did not reach statistical significance with the numbers available. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B(10 Suppl B):28–33. PMID:27694513

  18. Outcome of total hip arthroplasty, but not of total knee arthroplasty, is related to the preoperative radiographic severity of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tilbury, Claire; Holtslag, Maarten J; Tordoir, Rutger L; Leichtenberg, Claudia S; Verdegaal, Suzan H M; Kroon, Herman M; Fiocco, Marta; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose There is no consensus on the impact of radiographic severity of hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) on the clinical outcome of total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We assessed whether preoperative radiographic severity of OA is related to improvements in functioning, pain, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) 1 year after THA or TKA. Patients and methods This prospective cohort study included 302 THA patients and 271 TKA patients with hip or knee OA. In the THA patients, preoperatively 26% had mild OA and 74% had severe OA; in the TKA patients, preoperatively 27% had mild OA and 73% had severe OA. Radiographic severity was determined according to the Kellgren and Lawrence (KL) classification. Clinical assessments preoperatively and 1 year postoperatively included: sociodemographic characteristics and patient-reported outcomes (PROMs): Oxford hip/knee score, hip/knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (HOOS/KOOS), SF36, and EQ5D. Change scores of PROMs were compared with mild OA (KL 0–2) and severe OA (KL 3–4) using a multivariate linear regression model. Results Adjusted for sex, age, preoperative scores, BMI, and Charnley score, radiographic severity of OA in THA was associated with improvement in HOOS “Activities of daily living”, “Pain”, and “Symptoms”, and SF36 physical component summary (“PCS”) scale. In TKA, we found no such associations. Interpretation The decrease in pain and improvement in function in THA patients, but not in TKA patients, was positively associated with the preoperative radiographic severity of OA. PMID:26484651

  19. Comparison of cervical disc arthroplasty with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion for the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chen; Hong, Ying; Liu, Hao; Shi, Rui; Song, Yueming; Li, Tao

    2013-06-01

    The clinical outcome of cervical disc arthroplasty for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is still controversial. The authors retrospectively compared the intermediate term clinical outcome of cervical disc arthroplasty and traditional anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Seventy-six cases of single-level CSM with a minimum follow-up of two years were retrospectively analyzed. Thirty-seven patients underwent single-level cervical disc arthroplasty (Bryan disc: 12 cases; Prestige LP disc: 25 cases), while the other 39 patients underwent single-level ACDF. Significant improvement in SF-36 physical/ mental component scores and NDI score was found in both groups (p < 0.05); however, the arthroplasty group had significantly greater score improvement at each follow-up time point (p < 0.05). The JOA score and Nurick grade improved significantly at each time point in both groups (p < 0.05), but there were no significant differences between the groups (p > 0.05). The range of motion (surgical level and C2C7) remained unchanged in the arthroplasty group (p > 0.05), whereas it decreased significantly in the ACDF group (p < 0.05). The arthroplasty group had a lower incidence of complications than the ACDF group. The intermediate outcomes of cervical disc arthroplasty compared favourably to those of ACDF. Arthroplasty avoids complications from spinal fusion by preserving mobility.

  20. Can tranexamic acid change preoperative anemia management during total joint arthroplasty?

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Duy L; Rinehart, Joseph B; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the postoperative transfusion and complication rates of anemic and nonanemic total joint arthroplasty patients given tranexamic acid (TXA). METHODS: A cross-sectional prospective study was conducted of primary hip and knee arthroplasty cases performed from 11/2012 to 6/2014. Exclusion criteria included revision arthroplasty, bilateral arthroplasty, acute arthroplasty after fracture, and contraindication to TXA. Patients were screened prior to surgery, with anemia was defined as hemoglobin of less than 12 g/dL for females and of less than 13 g/dL for males. Patients were divided into four different groups, based on the type of arthroplasty (total hip or total knee) and hemoglobin status (anemic or nonanemic). Intraoperatively, all patients received 2 g of intravenous TXA during surgery. Postoperatively, allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) was directed by both clinical symptoms and relative hemoglobin change. Complications were recorded within the first two weeks after surgery and included thromboembolism, infection, and wound breakdown. The differences in transfusion and complication rates, as well as the relative hemoglobin change, were compared between anemic and nonanemic groups. RESULTS: A total of 232 patients undergoing primary joint arthroplasty were included in the study. For the total hip arthroplasty cohort, 21% (18/84) of patients presented with preoperative anemia. Two patients in the anemic group and two patients in the nonanemic group needed ABTs; this was not significantly different (P = 0.20). One patient in the anemic group presented with a deep venous thromboembolism while no patients in the nonanemic group had an acute complication; this was not significantly different (P = 0.21). For nonanemic patients, the average change in hemoglobin was 2.73 ± 1.17 g/dL. For anemic patients, the average change in hemoglobin was 2.28 ± 0.96 g/dL. Between the two groups, the hemoglobin difference of 0.45 g/dL was not significant (P = 0

  1. In vivo knee kinematics during stair and deep flexion activities in patients with bicruciate substituting total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kuroyanagi, Yuji; Mu, Shang; Hamai, Satoshi; Robb, William J; Banks, Scott A

    2012-01-01

    Orthopedic surgeons and their patients continue to seek better functional outcomes after total knee arthroplasty. The bicruciate substituting (BCS) total knee arthroplasty design has been introduced to achieve more natural knee mechanics. The purpose of this study was to characterize kinematics in knees with BCS arthroplasty during deep flexion and stair activities using fluoroscopy and model-image registration. In 20 patients with 25 BCS knees, we observed average implant flexion of 128° during kneeling and consistent posterior condylar translations with knee flexion. Tibial rotations were qualitatively similar to those observed in the arthritic natural knee. Knee kinematics with BCS arthroplasty were qualitatively more similar to arthritic natural knees than knees with either posterior cruciate-retaining or posterior-stabilized arthroplasty.

  2. Tendon interposition arthroplasty versus arthrodesis for the treatment of trapeziometacarpal arthritis: a retrospective comparative follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Mureau, M A; Rademaker, R P; Verhaar, J A; Hovius, S E

    2001-09-01

    Long-term subjective and objective outcomes of 24 tendon interposition arthroplasties in 17 patients and 32 trapeziometacarpal (TMC) arthrodeses in 26 patients were compared retrospectively in a standardized manner. Tendon interposition arthroplasty led to complications less often (27%) than TMC arthrodesis (39%). Patients in the tendon interposition arthroplasty group reported significantly less pain, less temperature intolerance, and better thumb mobility and were more satisfied with pain symptoms than patients in the arthrodesis group. Patients undergoing tendon interposition arthroplasty had better thumb opposition, interphalangeal joint mobility, and radial and palmar TMC joint range of motion. No statistically significant differences were found in tip pinch, key pinch, and grip strength between the 2 groups. Proximal first metacarpal collapse occurred in the tendon interposition patients without affecting subjective or objective outcome. Seven of 25 patients with TMC arthrodesis had pseudarthrosis. Tendon interposition arthroplasty seems to be preferable to TMC joint arthrodesis for the treatment of TMC arthritis.

  3. Bilateral custom-fit total knee arthroplasty in a patient with poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Tardy, Nicolas; Chambat, Pierre; Murphy, Colin G; Fayard, Jean-Marie

    2014-09-01

    In limbs affected by poliomyelitis, total knee arthroplasty results in satisfactory pain relief. However, the risk of failure is high, especially if the preoperative quadriceps power is low. Therefore, treating osteoarthritis in the current patient represented a challenging procedure. A 66-year-old man presented with tricompartmental osteoarthritis of both knees, with valgus deformity of 14° on the left knee and 11° on the right knee. He walked with a bilateral knee recurvatum of 30° and a grade 1 quadriceps power. The authors treated both knees with cemented custom-fit hinged total knee arthroplasty with 30° of recurvatum in the tibial keel. Clinical scores showed good results 1 year postoperatively, especially on the subjective data of quality of life and function. At follow-up, radiographs showed good total knee arthroplasty positioning on the right side and a small mechanical loosening at the end of the tibial keel on the left side. Only 5 studies (Patterson and Insall; Moran; Giori and Lewallen; Jordan et al; and Tigani et al) have reported total knee arthroplasty results in patients with poliomyelitis. This study reports an original case of bilateral custom-fit hinged total knee arthroplasty in a patient with poliomyelitis. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of this type of procedure in the literature. The key point is the degree of recurvatum that is needed to allow walking, avoiding excessive constraints on the implants that can lead to early mechanical failure.

  4. Reverse arthroplasty of the shoulder for treating rotator cuff arthropathy☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, Marcus Vinicius Galvão; de Faria, José Leonardo Rocha; Siqueira, Gláucio; Cohen, Marcio; Brandão, Bruno; Moraes, Rickson; Monteiro, Martim; Motta, Geraldo

    2014-01-01

    Objective to present a retrospective analysis on the clinical-functional results and complications among patients with rotator cuff arthropathy (RCA) who underwent reverse arthroplasty of the shoulder. Methods patients with a diagnosis of RCA associated with pseudoparalysis of anterior elevation who underwent reverse arthroplasty of the shoulder with a minimum follow-up of one year were selected. Results preoperative information was gathered from our shoulder and elbow arthroplasty register, comprising age, sex, laterality, history of previous procedures, Constant's functional scores and the preoperative range of motion as described in the protocol of the American Academy of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery (ASES). After a mean follow-up of 44 months, 17 patients (94%) were satisfied with the result from the procedure. Conclusion reverse arthroplasty for treating RCA in patients with pseudoparalysis of the shoulder was shown to be effective in achieving a statistically significant improvement in range of motion regarding anterior flexion and abduction. However, in this series, there was no improvement in range of motion regarding external and internal rotation. Reverse arthroplasty is a procedure that reestablishes shoulder joint function in patients who previously did not present any therapeutic possibilities. PMID:26229813

  5. A multicenter analysis of axial femorotibial rotation after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Douglas A; Komistek, Richard D; Mahfouz, Mohamed R; Walker, Scott A; Tucker, Abby

    2004-11-01

    A multicenter analysis was done to determine in vivo femorotibial axial rotation magnitudes and patterns in 1,027 knees (normal knees, nonimplanted ACL-deficient knees, and multiple designs of total knee arthroplasty). All knees were analyzed using fluoroscopy and a three-dimensional computer model-fitting technique during a deep knee bend and/or gait. Normal knees showed 16.5 degrees and 5.7 degrees of internal tibial rotation during a deep knee bend and gait, respectively. Rotation magnitudes and the percent having normal axial rotation patterns decreased in all total knee arthroplasty groups during a deep knee bend. During gait, all knee arthroplasty groups had similar rotational patterns (limited magnitudes). Average axial rotational magnitudes in gait and a deep knee bend were similar among major implant categories (ie, fixed-bearing versus mobile-bearing, etc). Average values in normal knees and ACL-retaining total knee arthroplasty patients (16.5 degrees and 8.1 degrees , respectively) were higher than in groups in which the ACL was absent (< 4.0 degrees ). All total knee arthroplasty groups had at least 19% of patients have a reverse axial rotational pattern during a deep knee bend and at least 31% during gait. Normal axial rotation patterns are essential for good patellar tracking, reduction of patellofemoral shear forces, and maximization of knee flexion.

  6. Should a Patients BMI Status be Used to Restrict Access to Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty? Functional Outcomes of Arthroplasty Relative to BMI - Single Centre Retrospective Review

    PubMed Central

    Lash, H.; Hooper, G.; Hooper, N.; Frampton, C.

    2013-01-01

    We reviewed the experience of a dedicated orthopaedic elective service to determine whether we could establish a BMI group where arthroplasty was no longer effective as assessed by the patient’s functional outcome. This was a prospective observational study with retrospective analysis of data collected on 1439 total hip arthroplasty, 934 total knee arthroplasty and 326 unicompartment knee arthroplasty patients. Functional scores (WOMAC, Oxford hip and knee scores and HAAS) were obtained preoperatively and at 12 months post op. Patients had their BMI recorded at the preoperative assessment and were divided into BMI groups (BMI<25, BMI 25-30, BMI 30-35 and BMI > 35). Patients with a BMI of ≤ 30 had significantly better functional scores at 12 months post op compared to those with a BMI of > 35. The absolute gain in functional scores from pre op to 12 months post op did not differ significantly between BMI groups, the only significant difference we found for absolute gain showed patients with a BMI of > 35 have a greater increase in HAAS scores following total hip arthroplasty compared to patients with a BMI of 30 or less (p = 0.0435). Our patients with higher BMI’s had worse preoperative and post operative functional scores but their benefit from surgery measured by the change in functional scores showed no difference compared to patients with lower BMI. We could find no reason on the basis of the 12-month results to limit surgery to obese patients because of an expected poorer functional outcome. PMID:24155808

  7. The role of surgeon volume on patient outcome in total knee arthroplasty: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A number of factors have been identified as influencing total knee arthroplasty outcomes, including patient factors such as gender and medical comorbidity, technical factors such as alignment of the prosthesis, and provider factors such as hospital and surgeon procedure volumes. Recently, strategies aimed at optimizing provider factors have been proposed, including regionalization of total joint arthroplasty to higher volume centers, and adoption of volume standards. To contribute to the discussions concerning the optimization of provider factors and proposals to regionalize total knee arthroplasty practices, we undertook a systematic review to investigate the association between surgeon volume and primary total knee arthroplasty outcomes. Methods We performed a systematic review examining the association between surgeon volume and primary knee arthroplasty outcomes. To be included in the review, the study population had to include patients undergoing primary total knee arthroplasty. Studies had to report on the association between surgeon volume and primary total knee arthroplasty outcomes, including perioperative mortality and morbidity, patient-reported outcomes, or total knee arthroplasty implant survivorship. There were no restrictions placed on study design or language. Results Studies were variable in defining surgeon volume (‘low’: <3 to <52 total knee arthroplasty per year; ‘high’: >5 to >70 total knee arthroplasty per year). Mortality rate, survivorship and thromboembolic events were not found to be associated with surgeon volume. We found a significant association between low surgeon volume and higher rate of infection (0.26% - 2.8% higher), procedure time (165 min versus 135 min), longer length of stay (0.4 - 2.13 days longer), transfusion rate (13% versus 4%), and worse patient reported outcomes. Conclusions Findings suggest a trend towards better outcomes for higher volume surgeons, but results must be interpreted with caution. PMID

  8. Treatment of Humeral Fracture after Shoulder Arthroplasty using Functional Brace: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Terabayashi, Nobuo; Matsumoto, Kazu; Takigami, Iori; Ito, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: A periprosthetic humeral fracture is rare after shoulder arthroplasty, and such cases have considerable problems. Patients with this kind of fracture are often complicated by osteopenia, other types of severe disease, or are elderly. Surgical treatment of this fracture type carries some risk, and surgeons may be unsure about the most appropriate approach to adopt. Case report: The present case occurred in a 78-year-old woman with an osteoporotic humeral bone, and chronic dislocation of shoulder after shoulder arthroplasty. There were many risk factors for revision surgery or ostheosynthesis. Therefore, we decided to treat the patient by functional bracing. Fortunately, complete radiographic union was confirmed at 17 weeks. She returned to daily life with good functional activity. Conclusion: In our opinion, it is acceptable to select functional bracing for periprosthetic humeral fractures after shoulder arthroplasty without stem loosening in elderly patients with an osteoporotic humeral bone. PMID:28111621

  9. Cost minimization analysis of preoperative erythropoietin vs autologous and allogeneic blood donation in total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Green, William Scott; Toy, Pearl; Bozic, Kevin J

    2010-01-01

    Autologous blood donation and erythropoietin (EPO) have been shown to be effective in reducing allogeneic blood transfusion, but the cost-effectiveness of these interventions remains unclear. A cost minimization analysis was performed, comparing the total costs of allogeneic blood transfusion strategy and autologous and allogeneic blood transfusion strategy for 161 primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) and 195 total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients. An EPO cost minimization model was constructed using a previously published algorithm for blood management after total joint arthroplasty. The least costly strategy was autologous blood donation in combination with allogeneic blood for THA and TKA patients at $856 and $892 per patient, respectively. The most costly strategy was allogeneic only at $1769 and $1352 per THA and TKA patient, respectively. The EPO strategy model predicted costs similar to the autologous and allogeneic. A strategy that combines autologous blood donation with EPO for patients who cannot donate autologous blood may provide the greatest cost savings and minimize allogeneic blood transfusion.

  10. Impaction grafting and wire mesh for uncontained defects in revision knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lonner, Jess H; Lotke, Paul A; Kim, Jane; Nelson, Charles

    2002-11-01

    The current authors review the results of 17 revision total knee arthroplasties in 14 patients in whom large uncontained defects were treated with impaction allografting and molded wire mesh for containment. Knee Society clinical scores increased from an average of 47 points to 95 points and function scores increased from 48 points to 73 points at the most recent followup. No patients required revision surgery, although, nonprogressive tibial radiolucency has been observed in three patients. One patient required open reduction and internal fixation of a periprosthetic supracondylar femur fracture. One patient with an acute postoperative infection with Staphylococcus epidermidis was treated successfully with irrigation and debridement with retention of the implant. Impaction grafting with wire mesh containment for large uncontained defects in revision total knee arthroplasty is an effective method of treating massive uncontained bone loss in revision total knee arthroplasty.

  11. Total Knee Arthroplasty in Patients with Blount Disease or Blount-Like Deformity.

    PubMed

    Natoli, Roman M; Nypaver, Chrissy M; Schiff, Adam P; Hopkinson, William J; Rees, Harold W

    2016-01-01

    Blount disease is associated with complex deformity of the proximal tibia, and some patients will develop knee osteoarthritis. Five patients (eight knees) with Blount disease or Blount-like deformity underwent total knee arthroplasty. Mean proximal tibial metaphyseal-diaphyseal angle was 20.75°. Each patient had substantial posteromedial tibial bony defects and six knees required extensive medial releases. Two knees required increased constraint at index procedure. One patient has undergone bilateral revision surgery with rotating hinge prostheses. Mean WOMAC scores were 13.5 and Knee Society scores were 212.5 at average 75.2 month follow-up. Despite technical challenges, patients with these deformities can have successful outcomes after total knee arthroplasty. Surgeons should be prepared to address posteromedial tibial bony defects and consider constrained arthroplasty at the index procedure.

  12. Comparison of arthroplasty trial publications after registration in ClinicalTrials.gov.

    PubMed

    Smith, Holly N; Bhandari, Mohit; Mahomed, Nizar N; Jan, Meryam; Gandhi, Rajiv

    2012-08-01

    In 2005, the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors established a mandatory trial registration before study enrollment for publication in member journals. Our primary objective was to evaluate the publication rates of arthroplasty trials registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (CTG). We further aimed to examine the consistency of registration summaries with that of final publications. We searched CTG for all trials related to joint arthroplasty and conducted a thorough search for publications resulting from registered closed trials. Of 101 closed and completed trials, we found 23 publications, for an overall publication rate of 22.8%. Registration of arthroplasty trials in CTG does not consistently result in publication or disclosure of results. In addition, changes are frequently made to the final presentation of the data that are not reflected in the trial registry.

  13. Patient expectation is the most important predictor of discharge destination after primary total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Halawi, Mohamad J; Vovos, Tyler J; Green, Cindy L; Wellman, Samuel S; Attarian, David E; Bolognesi, Michael P

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify preoperative predictors of discharge destination after total joint arthroplasty. A retrospective study of three hundred and seventy-two consecutive patients who underwent primary total hip and knee arthroplasty was performed. The mean length of stay was 2.9 days and 29.0% of patients were discharged to extended care facilities. Age, caregiver support at home, and patient expectation of discharge destination were the only significant multivariable predictors regardless of the type of surgery (total knee versus total hip arthroplasty). Among those variables, patient expectation was the most important predictor (P < 0.001; OR 169.53). The study was adequately powered to analyze the variables in the multivariable logistic regression model, which had a high concordance index of 0.969.

  14. Surface arthroplasty for osteonecrosis of the hip: hemiresurfacing versus metal-on-metal hybrid resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Beaulé, Paul E; Amstutz, Harlan C; Le Duff, Michel; Dorey, Frederic

    2004-12-01

    Eighty-four hips with Ficat stage III and IV osteonecrosis were treated: 56 with metal-on-metal surface arthroplasty (MMSA) and 28 with hemi-surface arthroplasty (HSA). Average follow-up was 4.9 years. UCLA hip scores were significantly better for MMSA versus HSA for function and activity as well as Harris Hip scores and physical component of the SF-12 scores. In the MMSA group, 2 hips were revised to total hip arthroplasty for femoral loosening, and 5 hips had adverse radiological changes. In the HSA group, 4 hips were revised (1 sepsis and 3 for pain). There was no evidence of any femoral loosening or neck narrowing in the HSA group. Although the functional clinical outcome of MMSA is superior to HSA, long-term follow up of MMSA will determine the reliability of the femoral fixation.

  15. Current Evidence for the Use of Laminar Flow in Reducing Infection Rates in Total Joint Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    James, M; Khan, W.S; Nannaparaju, M.R; Bhamra, J.S; Morgan-Jones, R

    2015-01-01

    Since the introduction of laminar air flow in orthopaedic theatres by Sir John Charnley, it has widely become accepted as the standard during orthopaedic procedures such as joint arthroplasty. We present a review of available current literature for the use of laminar flow operating theatre ventilation during total joint arthroplasty and examines the effectiveness of laminar flow ventilated operating theatres in preventing post-operative wound infection. Results of our findings suggest that while bacterial and air particulate is reduced by laminar air flow systems, there is no conclusive effect on the reduction of post-operative wound infections following total joint arthroplasty. We conclude that a combination of strict aseptic technique, prophylactic antibiotics and good anaesthetic control during surgery remains crucial to reduce post-operative surgical infections. PMID:26587068

  16. Metal-backed versus all-polyethylene unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, M. J.; Nutton, R. W.; Wade, F. A.; Evans, S. L.; Pankaj, P.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Up to 40% of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) revisions are performed for unexplained pain which may be caused by elevated proximal tibial bone strain. This study investigates the effect of tibial component metal backing and polyethylene thickness on bone strain in a cemented fixed-bearing medial UKA using a finite element model (FEM) validated experimentally by digital image correlation (DIC) and acoustic emission (AE). Materials and Methods A total of ten composite tibias implanted with all-polyethylene (AP) and metal-backed (MB) tibial components were loaded to 2500 N. Cortical strain was measured using DIC and cancellous microdamage using AE. FEMs were created and validated and polyethylene thickness varied from 6 mm to 10 mm. The volume of cancellous bone exposed to < -3000 µε (pathological loading) and < -7000 µε (yield point) minimum principal (compressive) microstrain and > 3000 µε and > 7000 µε maximum principal (tensile) microstrain was computed. Results Experimental AE data and the FEM volume of cancellous bone with compressive strain < -3000 µε correlated strongly: R = 0.947, R2 = 0.847, percentage error 12.5% (p < 0.001). DIC and FEM data correlated: R = 0.838, R2 = 0.702, percentage error 4.5% (p < 0.001). FEM strain patterns included MB lateral edge concentrations; AP concentrations at keel, peg and at the region of load application. Cancellous strains were higher in AP implants at all loads: 2.2- (10 mm) to 3.2-times (6 mm) the volume of cancellous bone compressively strained < -7000 µε. Conclusion AP tibial components display greater volumes of pathologically overstrained cancellous bone than MB implants of the same geometry. Increasing AP thickness does not overcome these pathological forces and comes at the cost of greater bone resection. Cite this article: C. E. H. Scott, M. J. Eaton, R. W. Nutton, F. A. Wade, S. L. Evans, P. Pankaj. Metal-backed versus all-polyethylene unicompartmental knee arthroplasty: Proximal

  17. Arthroscopic Resection Arthroplasty of the Radial Column for SLAC Wrist

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Tyson K.; Walden, Anna L.; Wilt, Jessica M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Symptomatic advanced scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) wrists are typically treated with extensive open procedures, including but not limited to scaphoidectomy plus four-corner fusion (4CF) and proximal row carpectomy (PRC). Although a minimally invasive arthroscopic option would be desirable, no convincing reports exist in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to describe a new surgical technique and outcomes on 14 patients who underwent arthroscopic resection arthroplasty of the radial column (ARARC) for arthroscopic stage II through stage IIIB SLAC wrists and to describe an arthroscopic staging classification of the radiocarpal joint for patients with SLAC wrist. Patients and Methods Data were collected prospectively on 17 patients presenting with radiographic stage I through III SLAC wrist who underwent ARARC in lieu of scaphoidectomy and 4CF or PRC. Fourteen patients (12 men and 2 women) subject to 1-year follow-up were included. The average age was 57 years (range 41 to 78). The mean follow-up was 24 months (range 12 to 61). Arthroscopic resection arthroplasty of the radial column is described for varying stages of arthritic changes of the radioscaphoid joint. Midcarpal resection was not performed. Results The mean Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score was 66 preoperatively and 28 at final follow-up. The mean satisfaction (0 = not satisfied, 5 = completely satisfied) at final follow-up was 4.5 (range 3 to 5). The pain level (on 0–10 scale) improved from 6.6 to 1.3. The total arc of motion changed from 124° preoperatively to 142° postoperatively following an ARARC. Grip was 16 kg preoperatively and 18 kg postoperatively. Radiographic stages typically underestimated arthroscopic staging. Although four of our patients appeared to be radiographic stage I, all were found to have arthritis involving some or all of the radioscaphoid articulation at the time of arthroscopy. Clinical Relevance

  18. Efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban thromboprophylaxis after arthroplasty of the hip or knee: retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Hua, A; Patel, S; Gibbons, C; Vizcaychipi, MP

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a potentially fatal complication of hip arthroplasty and knee arthroplasty. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence recommend rivaroxaban for VTE prevention. Amid concerns over bleeding complications, the modified thromboprophylaxis policy of Chelsea and Westminster Hospital (CWH; London, UK) advises enoxaparin given after surgery in the inpatient setting followed by rivaroxaban upon hospital discharge. This retrospective study investigated the efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban in this novel, modified venous-prophylaxis regimen in a surgical orthopaedic cohort at CWH. Methods A total of 479 patients who received modified thromboprophylaxis treatment at CWH after hip arthroplasty or knee arthroplasty between April 2013 and October 2014 formed the study cohort. Seven outcomes based on efficacy and safety while undergoing treatment with rivaroxaban were investigated: symptomatic deep-vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), death, stroke, myocardial infarction (MI), major bleeding episodes (MBEs) and non-major bleeding episodes (NMBEs). Median follow-up was 369 days. Fisher’s exact and Mann–Whitney U-tests were adopted to identify associations with these outcomes. Results Prevalence of symptomatic PE, DVT, death, stroke and MI during treatment was zero. One (0.2%) MBE and nine (1.9%) NMBEs occurred. The MBE (a wound haematoma) required a return to theatre for aspiration. Off-treatment VTEs occurred in four (0.8%) patients after completion of a course of rivaroxaban, and were associated with known risk factors. Conclusions Rivaroxaban is an effective and safe anticoagulant for thromboprophylaxis after hip arthroplasty or knee arthroplasty if used in a modified regimen involving enoxaparin administered in the inpatient setting followed by rivaroxaban upon hospital discharge. PMID:27580310

  19. Long head of the biceps pathology as a cause of anterior shoulder pain after shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tuckman, David V; Dines, David M

    2006-01-01

    The use of shoulder arthroplasty has been increasing over the last decade, with nearly 20,000 shoulder arthroplasties being performed each year. Although many patients have excellent results, there exists a subset of patients in whom anterior catching shoulder pain develops after arthroplasty. The purpose of this study was to examine this group of patients and explore treatment options and outcomes for this condition. We undertook a review of 8 shoulders in 7 patients who were treated for anterior shoulder pain radiating into the biceps muscle after shoulder arthroplasty. Three patients had a hemiarthroplasty for fracture, and five had a total shoulder arthroplasty. All patients had anterior shoulder pain with physical examination findings consistent with biceps tendon pathology. Definitive diagnosis and treatment consisted of either arthroscopy, in 7 of 8 shoulders, or an open procedure, in 1 of 8 shoulders. The range of motion improved in all shoulders. The hemiarthroplasty group showed an increase in flexion of 36 degrees (range, 68 degrees -104 degrees ), external rotation of 23 degrees (range, 11 degrees -34 degrees ), and internal rotation to L4. The total shoulder group demonstrated an increase in flexion of 50 degrees (range, 66 degrees -166 degrees ), external rotation of 27 degrees (range, 22 degrees -39 degrees ), and internal rotation to L3. The Hospital for Special Surgery score improved in all shoulders, with all patients being satisfied with their final outcome. Pain scores improved from a mean of 6.9 (range, 4-9) preoperatively to 1.4 (range, 0.5-2) postoperatively on a scale of 1 to 10, with 10 indicating the most pain. The role of the biceps tendon in the pathology of anterior shoulder pain after shoulder arthroplasty appears to be consistent with fibrosis and inflammation. Initial results, achieved with arthroscopic debridement or tenodesis, were encouraging.

  20. Comparative study of the quality of life between arthrodesis and total arthroplasty substitution of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Esparragoza, Luis; Vidal, Carlos; Vaquero, Javier

    2011-01-01

    Our goal was to compare the health status of patients with primary and secondary arthrosis of the ankle before and after arthrodesis or total substitution arthroplasty, and to determine the improvement in quality of life and whether there is any difference between these techniques. A prospective comparative study of clinical-functional evaluation was performed using the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) scale and quality of life with the short form (SF)-36 questionnaire in patients who underwent arthrodesis (16 cases) or total substitution arthroplasty of the ankle (14 cases) after 2 years (mean, 25.2 months) of follow-up after surgery, in comparison with the baseline preoperative status. In this series of comparable patients, both techniques showed a statistically significant improvement with regard to the clinical evaluation and quality of life after 2 years of follow-up; the arthrodesis group increased from mean AOFAS values of 37.12 to 45.62 (P = .055) and mean SF-36 values of 32.96 to 46.25 (P = .008), whereas in the arthroplasty group the mean values of AOFAS increased from 33 to 62 (P = .024) and SF-36 from 33.62 to 59.84 (P = .001). Nevertheless, in all cases the improvement was statistically greater in patients who underwent arthroplasty than in those who underwent arthrodesis (P = .048 for AOFAS, and P = .026 for SF-36). In conclusion, arthrodesis and arthroplasty represent good options in the surgical treatment of ankle arthrosis, providing both a significant improvement in function and in the health perception and quality of life of the patient. New-generation total ankle substitution arthroplasty provides an improvement in the quality of life and perception of general health of the patient with arthrosis of this joint, when this technique is compared with surgical fusion.

  1. Assessment of asymmetric leg loading before and after total hip arthroplasty using instrumented shoes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Total hip arthroplasty is a successful surgical treatment in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip. Different questionnaires are used by the clinicians to assess functional capacity and the patient's pain, despite these questionnaires are known to be subjective. Furthermore, many studies agree that kinematic and kinetic parameters are crucial to evaluate and to provide useful information about the patient’s evolution for clinicians and rehabilitation specialists. However, these quantities can currently only be obtained in a fully equipped gait laboratory. Instrumented shoes can quantify gait velocity, kinetic, kinematic and symmetry parameters. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the instrumented shoes is a sufficiently sensitive instrument to show differences in mobility performance before and after total hip arthroplasty. Methods In this study, patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty were measured before and 6–8 months after total hip arthroplasty. Both measurement sessions include 2 functional mobility tasks while the subject was wearing instrumented shoes. Before each measurement the Harris Hip Score and the Traditional Western Ontario and McMaster Universities osteoarthritis index were administered as well. Results The stance time and the average vertical ground reaction force measured with the instrumented shoes during walking, and their symmetry index, showed significant differences before and after total hip arthroplasty. However, the data obtained with the sit to stand test did not reveal this improvement after surgery. Conclusions Our results show that inter-limb asymmetry during a walking activity can be evaluated with the instrumented shoes before and after total hip arthroplasty in an outpatient clinical setting. PMID:24581227

  2. [Design of an unconventional interlocked hip arthroplasty system (RIMAG) from Mexican femoral measurement].

    PubMed

    Martínez, Genaro Rico; Domínguez, Víctor H; Muller, José Antonio; Cedillo, Ernesto A Delgado; Roa, Josué Antonio Miranda; Montoya, Roberto C

    2008-01-01

    The need in resolving massive bone losses in hip region caused by tumors, infections, trauma or failed arthroplasties in 17 years of the Bone Tumors Department of the National Rehabilitation Institute, Mexico City, and data obtained from different studies: 1) Biomechanic study of an unconventional hip arthroplasty system, 2) Tridimensional model of a human femur by the finite element method, 3) Biomechanical analysis of a system bone-implant for reconstruction of the proximal third of the femur by the finite element method, 4) Incidence of tumor and pseudotumor bone and soft tissue lesions of the hip, generated the project of designing an unconventional interlocked hip arthroplasty system for femur reconstruction. Two processes were done for adequate manufacturing and dimensioning: Anthropomorphometric study of Mexican femora; 2) Design of an unconventional hip arthroplasty system with the following characteristics: first, the arthroplasty system is constituted by an intramedullar stem, is fixated to femur with interlocking screws, this fixation method was inspired from the design of intramedullar nails of Dr. Fernando Colchero Rosas. The system has a second fixation system in the femur cut region, resolved by a fenestrated support introduced in the cortical wall. Once data was processed, the need for manufacturing 2 models was determined: 1) One for the proximal 11 cm of the femur and 2) other for the 12 distal cm. The height of interlocking screws, 2 models of intracortical proximal support (one fixated and one fixable with an expansible screw), were designed. Diameter, length of the stems, size of spacers and supports were determined for adequate interlocking fixation. We designed the instruments for assembling, impaction and orientation of the arthroplasty system. The system was presented to the Mexican Institute of Industrial Property, at March 15, 1996 and the patent was conceded April 19, 2007 (#245717).

  3. Dynamic splinting for knee flexion contracture following total knee arthroplasty: a case report.

    PubMed

    Finger, Eric; Willis, F Buck

    2008-12-29

    Total Knee Arthroplasty operations are increasing in frequency, and knee flexion contracture is a common pathology, both pre-existing and post-operative. A 61-year-old male presented with knee flexion contracture following a total knee arthroplasty. Physical therapy alone did not fully reduce the contracture and dynamic splinting was then prescribed for daily low-load, prolonged-duration stretch. After 28 physical therapy sessions, the active range of motion improved from -20 degrees to -12 degrees (stiff knee still lacking full extension), and after eight additional weeks with nightly wear of dynamic splint, the patient regained full knee extension, (active extension improved from -12 degrees to 0 degrees ).

  4. Granulomatous Lung Disease: A Novel Complication following Metallosis from Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Georgiadis, Thomas; Grigoris, Peter

    2016-01-01

    A case of a female patient with local and systemic complications of metallosis, following catastrophic wear of a revised hip arthroplasty, is presented. The patient had a history of a fractured ceramic-on-ceramic implant, exchanged with a metal-on-polyethylene prosthesis. Systemic complications included sarcoidosis-like reactions, presenting as granulomatous lung disease, along with chorioretinitis, erythema nodosum, and cardiomyopathy. High local and circulating cobalt and chromium levels established the diagnosis. The patient underwent extensive debridement and implant revision. One year postoperatively, she had no respiratory symptoms or functional impairment. Local and systemic complications of metallosis after hip arthroplasty should be promptly recognized and treated operatively. PMID:28097115

  5. Malassezia species infection of the synovium after total knee arthroplasty surgery

    PubMed Central

    Leylabadlo, Hamed Ebrahimzadeh; Zeinalzadeh, Elham; Akbari, Najibeh Asl Rahnemaii; Kafil, Hossein Samadi

    2016-01-01

    Infection is a serious complication after implantation of total knee-prostheses. However, fungal infection is rarely found in periprosthetic joints, and in most reports, the infecting organism is a Candida species. This is a case report of infection after left knee total arthroplasty caused by Malassezia species. The patient is still undergoing antifungal therapy with voriconazole and is still being followed-up. To the authors’ knowledge, the present case is the first report of Malassezia species in a patient after total knee arthroplasty. PMID:27730027

  6. Late Disassembly of Femoral Head and Neck of A Modular Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Parvej; Kumar, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Modular total hip arthroplasty system are now widely used, as these components increase the flexibility during primary and revision total hip arthoplasty. But this modularity itself associated with some risk of intraoperative and postoperative complications. Case Report: We report a case of late disassembly of a primary total arthroplasty in a 42 years old patient five years after the replacement surgery where the femoral head remained in the acetabular socket. Conclusion: Femoral head should be solidly impacted onto the stem and confirm that it has been assembled correctly before reduction. PMID:27299010

  7. Role of Surgical Dressings in Total Joint Arthroplasty: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Springer, Bryan D; Beaver, Walter B; Griffin, William L; Mason, J Bohannon; Odum, Susan M

    2015-09-01

    We conducted a randomized controlled trial to compare efficacy of an occlusive antimicrobial barrier dressing and a standard surgical dressing in patients who underwent primary total joint arthroplasty. Two hundred sixty-two patients were randomized to receive either an occlusive dressing or a standard dressing. Wounds were closed in identical fashion. Outcomes included wound complications, dressing changes, and patient satisfaction. With use of occlusive dressing (vs standard dressing), wound complications (including skin blistering) were significantly (P = 0.15) reduced; there were significantly (P < .0001) fewer dressing changes; and patient satisfaction was significantly (P < .0001) higher. Use of occlusive dressings can reduce wound complications and promote wound healing after total joint arthroplasty.

  8. Durability of highly cross-linked polyethylene in total hip and total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Dion, Neil T; Bragdon, Charles; Muratoglu, Orhun; Freiberg, Andrew A

    2015-07-01

    This article reviews the history of the development of highly cross-linked polyethylene and provides an in-depth review of the clinical results regarding the durability of highly cross-linked polyethylene (HXLPE) used in total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The use of polyethylene as a bearing surface has contributed to the success of THA and TKA; however, polyethylene wear and osteolysis can lead to failure. Ongoing clinical and retrieval studies are required to analyze outcomes at longer-term follow-up.

  9. Fatal fat embolism following femoral head resection in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Walker, N M; Bateson, T; Reavley, P; Prakash, D

    2008-01-01

    We report a rare complication during primary total hip arthroplasty. A fatal fat pulmonary embolism immediately followed removal of the femoral head, prior to further preparation of the acetabulum or femoral shaft. Fat embolism syndrome is a well-known complication during total joint arthroplasty, usually attributed to preparation of the femoral shaft, particularly intramedullary reaming and insertion of the prosthesis. These risk factors have previously been identified in the literature. We believe that this case highlights the need for further research to establish the intramedullary pressures during the processes of dislocation and resection of the femoral neck and the attendant risk.

  10. Subcutaneous thigh fat necrosis as a result of tourniquet control during total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tamvakopoulos, George S; Toms, Andoni P; Glasgow, Malcolm

    2005-09-01

    The use of a pneumatic tourniquet in total knee arthroplasty has been linked to complications caused by local tissue hypoxia. Fat necrosis is a rare condition that presents as an ill-defined subcutaneous lesion. The clinical features resemble that of a lipoma but histological appearance is characteristic. Ultrasound imaging is helpful in establishing the diagnosis both by sonographic appearance as well as in directing a biopsy if necessary. We present a case of encapsulated fat necrosis caused by the use of a pneumatic tourniquet during total knee arthroplasty.

  11. [Recurrent effusion and granulomatous synovitis following total knee arthroplasty in association with latex allergy].

    PubMed

    Schuh, A; Thomas, P; Hönle, W; Schmickal, T

    2008-02-01

    An increasing number of articles report about allergic reactions in association with total knee arthroplasty. While most studies focus on allergic reactions to metallic components, few reports exist about reactions to bone cement or its ingredients. Allergy to natural rubber latex is a major occupational problem in the health care sector and a problem even in other occupations in which protective gloves are used. The allergic reaction to latex ranges from a minor skin rash to anaphylactic shock. Preventing exposure to latex is the key to managing and preventing this allergy. We report about a patient who developed recurrent effusion and granulomatous synovitis following total knee arthroplasty in association with latex allergy.

  12. Two-level cervical arthroplasty using a "no-distraction" technique.

    PubMed

    Rajakumar, Deshpande; Sharma, Ankit; Hari, Akshay; Konar, Subhas; Krishna, Murali

    2017-01-01

    Cervical arthroplasty is being recognized as an emerging alternative to anterior cervical fusion with comparable or superior outcomes. The authors describe the surgical nuances of 2-level cervical arthroplasty in a case of 2-level degenerative disease. In this surgical technique, conventional vertebral body distraction has been avoided to prevent facet distraction, which can be a cause of persistent postoperative neck pain. Good motion preservation was observed at the 1-year follow-up examination. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/YTpRVRXuZZk .

  13. Revision total hip arthroplasty: the femoral side using cemented implants.

    PubMed

    Holt, Graeme; Hook, Samantha; Hubble, Matthew

    2011-02-01

    Advances in surgical technique and implant technology have improved the ten-year survival after primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). Despite this, the number of revision procedures has been increasing in recent years, a trend which is predicted to continue into the future. Revision THA is a technically demanding procedure often complicated by a loss of host bone stock which may be compounded by the need to remove primary implants. Both cemented and uncemented implant designs are commonly used in the United Kingdom for primary and revision THA and much controversy still exists as to the ideal method of stem fixation. In this article we discuss revision of the femur using cemented components during revision THA. We focus on three clinical scenarios including femoral cement-in-cement revision where the primary femoral cement-bone interface remains well fixed, femoral cement-in-cement revision for peri-prosthetic femoral fractures, and femoral impaction grafting. We discuss the clinical indications, surgical techniques and clinical outcomes for each of these procedures.

  14. Is tantalum protective against infection in revision total hip arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Tokarski, A T; Novack, T A; Parvizi, J

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesised that the use of tantalum (Ta) acetabular components in revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) was protective against subsequent failure due to infection. We identified 966 patients (421 men, 545 women and 990 hips) who had undergone revision THA between 2000 and 2013. The mean follow up was 40.2 months (3 months to 13.1 years). The mean age of the men and women was 62.3 years (31 to 90) and 65.1 years (25 to 92), respectively. Titanium (Ti) acetabular components were used in 536 hips while Ta components were used in 454 hips. In total, 73 (7.3%) hips experienced subsequent acetabular failure. The incidence of failure was lower in the Ta group at 4.4% (20/454) compared with 9.9% (53/536) in the Ti group (p < 0.001, odds ratio 2.38; 95% CI 1.37 to 4.27). Among the 144 hips (64 Ta, 80 Ti) for which revision had been performed because of infection, failure due to a subsequent infection was lower in the Ta group at 3.1% (2/64) compared with 17.5% (14/80) for the Ti group (p = 0.006). Thus, the use of Ta acetabular components during revision THA was associated with a lower incidence of failure from all causes and Ta components were associated with a lower incidence of subsequent infection when used in patients with periprosthetic joint infection.

  15. Cost savings of outpatient versus standard inpatient total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Adrian; Ryu, Jae-Jin; Dervin, Geoffrey

    2017-01-01

    Background With diminishing reimbursement rates and strained public payer budgets, a high-volume inpatient procedure, such as total knee arthroplasty (TKA), is a common target for improving cost efficiencies. Methods This prospective case–control study compared the cost-minimization of same day discharge (SDD) versus inpatient TKA. We examined if and where cost savings can be realized and the magnitude of savings that can be achieved without compromising quality of care. Outcome variables, including detailed case costs, return to hospital rates and complications, were documented and compared between the first 20 SDD cases and 20 matched inpatient controls. Results In every case–control match, the SDD TKA was less costly than the inpatient procedure and yielded a median cost savings of approximately 30%. The savings came primarily from costs associated with the inpatient encounter, such as surgical ward, pharmacy and patient meal costs. At 1 year, there were no major complications and no return to hospital or readmission encounters for either group. Conclusion Our results are consistent with previously published data on the cost savings associated with short stay or outpatient TKA. We have gone further by documenting where those savings were in a matched cohort design. Furthermore, we determined where cost savings could be realized during the patient encounter and to what degree. In carefully selected patients, outpatient TKA is a feasible alternative to traditional inpatient TKA and is significantly less costly. Furthermore, it was deemed to be safe in the perioperative period. PMID:28234591

  16. Medial cortex strain distribution during noncemented total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Elias, J J; Nagao, M; Chu, Y H; Carbone, J J; Lennox, D W; Chao, E Y

    2000-01-01

    Intraoperative proximal femur fractures are a significant concern during noncemented total hip arthroplasty. The current study was performed to investigate the hypothesis that broaching the femur and inserting the stem without using mallet applied impact loads will reduce the risk of intraoperative fracture. Rosette strain gauges were applied to the medial and anteromedial cortex of six human anatomic specimen femurs to compare the strain distribution for broaching and stem insertion. Eight additional femurs were used to compare the strain distribution for stem insertion using impact loading and constant rate stem insertion. For the impact loading stem insertions, the soft tissues surrounding the femur were modeled. Constant rate stem insertions were performed using a mechanical testing machine. The largest strains measured at the medial and anteromedial sites primarily were aligned with the femur hoop axis. The largest strain magnitude, orientation, and sign (tensile or compressive) varied widely among femurs. The stem insertion strains were significantly larger than the broaching strains (two-way analysis of variance with replication). The impact stem insertion strains were not significantly different from the constant rate stem insertion strains. The results indicate that the femur geometry and material properties have a greater influence on the strain distribution than does the implantation technique.

  17. Hip Squeaking after Ceramic-on-ceramic Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guo-Liang; Zhu, Wei; Zhao, Yan; Ma, Qi; Weng, Xi-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The present study aimed to review the characteristics and influencing factors of squeaking after ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) total hip arthroplasty (THA) and to analyze the possible mechanisms of the audible noise. Data Sources: The data analyzed in this review were based on articles from PubMed and Web of Science. Study Selection: The articles selected for review were original articles and reviews found based on the following search terms: “total hip arthroplasty”, “ceramic-on-ceramic”, “hip squeaking”, and “hip noise.” Results: The mechanism of the squeaking remains unknown. The possible explanations included stripe wear, edge loading, a third body, fracture of the ceramic liner, and resonance of the prosthesis components. Squeaking occurrence is influenced by patient, surgical, and implant factors. Conclusions: Most studies indicated that squeaking after CoC THA was the consequence of increasing wear or impingement, caused by prosthesis design, patient characteristics, or surgical factors. However, as conflicts exist among different articles, the major reasons for the squeaking remain to be identified. PMID:27453238

  18. Availability of Total Knee Arthroplasty Implants for Metal Hypersensitivity Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ajwani, Sanil Harji; Charalambous, Charalambos P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To provide information on the type of “hypersensitivity-friendly” components available for primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in the current market. Materials and Methods Implant manufactures were identified using the 2013 National Joint Registries of the United Kingdom and Sweden and contacted to obtain information about the products they offer for patients with metal hypersensitivity. Results Information on 23 TKA systems was provided by 13 implant manufacturers. Of these, 15 systems had options suitable for metal hypersensitivity patients. Two types of “hypersensitivity-friendly” components were identified: 10 implants were cobalt chrome prostheses with a “hypersensitivity-friendly” outer coating and 5 implants were made entirely from non-cobalt chrome alloys. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that several hypersensitivity TKA options exist, some of which provide the same designs and surgical techniques as the conventional implants. The information in this study can guide TKA surgeons in making informed choices about implants and identifying implants that could be examined in future controlled studies comparing outcomes between “hypersensitivity-friendly” and conventional implants. PMID:27894179

  19. Intraoperative passive knee kinematics during total knee arthroplasty surgery.

    PubMed

    Young, Kathryn L; Dunbar, Michael J; Richardson, Glen; Astephen Wilson, Janie L

    2015-11-01

    Surgical navigation systems for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) surgery are capable of capturing passive three-dimensional (3D) angular joint movement patterns intraoperatively. Improved understanding of patient-specific knee kinematic changes between pre and post-implant states and their relationship with post-operative function may be important in optimizing TKA outcomes. However, a comprehensive characterization of the variability among patients has yet to be investigated. The objective of this study was to characterize the variability within frontal plane joint movement patterns intraoperatively during a passive knee flexion exercise. Three hundred and forty patients with severe knee osteoarthritis (OA) received a primary TKA using a navigation system. Passive kinematics were captured prior to (pre-implant), and after prosthesis insertion (post-implant). Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to capture characteristic patterns of knee angle kinematics among patients, to identify potential patient subgroups based on these patterns, and to examine the subgroup-specific changes in these patterns between pre- and post-implant states. The first four extracted patterns explained 99.9% of the diversity within the frontal plane angle patterns among the patients. Post-implant, the magnitude of the frontal plane angle shifted toward a neutral mechanical axis in all phenotypes, yet subtle pattern (shape of curvature) features of the pre-implant state persisted.

  20. Factors affecting polyethylene wear in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kuster, Markus S; Stachowiak, Gwidon W

    2002-02-01

    A complication of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is fatigue-type wear, which can destroy a tibial inlay in <10 years. This deleterious wear mechanism occurs during cyclic loading if the yield stress of polyethylene is exceeded. Because increased stress on and within the polyethylene inlay is associated with increased wear, it is important to reduce the inlay stress by either activity restrictions or conformity changes of design. All stress parameters are more sensitive to conformity changes (eg, design changes) than to load changes (eg, activity restrictions). However, the reduction of stress on and within the polyethylene through increased conformity will increase the stress at the tibial fixation interfaces. An attempt was made to solve this problem with the introduction of mobile-bearing designs. Many mobile-bearing designs exist with good long-term results. One important difference among the various designs is the amount of flexion range with full conformity between the femoral component and the tibial inlay. Although a single radius design reduces polyethylene stress throughout the flexion range, it may be disadvantageous for a revision design to intraoperatively adapt to different degrees of constraint. Aseptic loosening and osteolysis due to small abrasive and adhesive wear particles have also been reported as a cause of failure. The design and material parameters affecting polyethylene wear in TKAs, as well as the potential detrimental effects of wear particle size, are the key issues in defining the life of a TKA.

  1. Ballooning osteolysis in 71 failed total ankle arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gurpal; Reichard, Theresa; Hameister, Rita; Awiszus, Friedemann; Schenk, Katja; Feuerstein, Bernd; Roessner, Albert; Lohmann, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Aseptic loosening is a major cause of failure in total ankle arthroplasty (TAA). In contrast to other total joint replacements, large periarticular cysts (ballooning osteolysis) have frequently been observed in this context. We investigated periprosthetic tissue responses in failed TAA, and performed an element analysis of retrieved tissues in failed TAA. Patients and methods The study cohort consisted of 71 patients undergoing revision surgery for failed TAA, all with hydroxyapatite-coated implants. In addition, 5 patients undergoing primary TAA served as a control group. Radiologically, patients were classified into those with ballooning osteolysis and those without, according to defined criteria. Histomorphometric, immunohistochemical, and elemental analysis of tissues was performed. Von Kossa staining and digital microscopy was performed on all tissue samples. Results Patients without ballooning osteolysis showed a generally higher expression of lymphocytes, and CD3+, CD11c+, CD20+, and CD68+ cells in a perivascular distribution, compared to diffuse expression. The odds of having ballooning osteolysis was 300 times higher in patients with calcium content >0.5 mg/g in periprosthetic tissue than in patients with calcium content ≤0.5 mg/g (p < 0.001). Interpretation There have been very few studies investigating the pathomechanisms of failed TAA and the cause-effect nature of ballooning osteolysis in this context. Our data suggest that the hydroxyapatite coating of the implant may be a contributory factor. PMID:27196532

  2. Short-Term Results of Novel Constrained Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Thomas; Finley, Stephen; Snider, Rebecca; Looper, Jayme; Tanner, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Constrained acetabular components have only been recommended as a salvage option for the persistently unstable total hip arthroplasty (THA), due to limited range of motion and less than satisfactory component failure rates. This is a retrospective review of 137 patients with 154 consecutive primary constrained THAs performed between November 2003 and August 2007. We reviewed serial radiographs, postoperative complications, groin/thigh pain, and compared preoperative and postoperative Harris Hip Scores. With a mean follow-up of 6 years, there was 1.9% dislocation rate, 0% component failure rate, and 2.6% infection rate. Seven patients reported continued groin pain, and three had continued thigh pain. One patient showed radiographic evidence of 1 mm polyethylene wear. Radiographic review showed no evidence of osteolysis or stem subsidence. Harris Hip Scores improved from a mean of 68.8 (range 58-87) preoperatively to 98.9 (range 65-100) at final clinical assessment. This constrained acetabular prosthesis had a dislocation rate of less than 2%, with 0% component failure rate at a minimum of 2 years of follow-up suggesting this prosthesis may be a viable alternative for patients at risk for instability or those known to have recurrent instability. PMID:26330992

  3. Rehabilitative Guidelines after Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Review.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Jaydev B; Elmallah, Randa D K; Bhave, Anil; Chughtai, Morad; Cherian, Jeffrey Jai; McGinn, Tanner; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2016-04-01

    Rehabilitation following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) continues to pose a challenge for both patients and providers. In addition, guidelines vary considerably between institutions, which often leave therapy regimens to the discretion of the provider. The lack of clear guidelines for rehabilitation may contribute to inadequate recovery of strength and range-of-motion, resulting in less optimal functional outcomes. Therefore, the aim of this review was to highlight and discuss a variety of post-TKA rehabilitative modalities currently available and to provide evidence regarding efficacy and practicality. Specifically, we assessed the role of and evidence for exercise therapy, aquatic therapy, balance training, continuous passive motion, cold therapy and compression, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and instrument-assisted soft-tissue therapy. Additionally, we proposed general recommendations for rehabilitation after TKA, and as we specifically described active and obese patients, we have included guidelines for these subsets as well. Our review examines the various rehabilitative modalities to offer suggestions for recovery of strength and range-of-motion after TKA, with a focus on the early incorporation of exercise therapy, balance training, aquatic therapy, cryopneumatic therapy, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. Dedication and commitment to rehabilitation may help patients attain and exceed their preoperative activity levels.

  4. Clinical outcomes of excision arthroplasty for Kienbock's disease.

    PubMed

    Matsuhashi, Tomoya; Iwasaki, Norimasa; Kato, Hiroyuki; Minami, Michio; Minami, Akio

    2011-01-01

    We have carried out a replacement of the lunate in 12 patients with advanced Kienböck's disease, with excision of the lunate and insertion of an iliac bone flap wrapped into palmaris longus. The aims of this study were to determine the effect of this procedure for advanced Kienböck's disease. At a mean follow-up period of 45.3 months, the mean clinical score was excellent in all cases. Radiographically, progression of osteoarthritis (OA) in the radiocarpal joint was found in two patients. At follow-up, the X-ray findings indicated a reduced of osseous core in four patients. On the other hand, carpal height ratio showed no significant change at follow-up. Excision arthroplasty using a tendon ball with osseous core for advanced Kienböck's disease leads to OA progression in some cases. However, clinical results were excellent in all cases. Therefore, this current study provides effective therapeutic procedure for advanced Kienböck's disease.

  5. Indoor and Outdoor Mobility following Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Storey, Ava S.T.; Myrah, Ainslie M.; Bauck, Robyn A.; Brinkman, Danielle M.; Friess, Shawn N.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To determine the relationship between indoor and outdoor mobility capacity in older adults with unilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and, secondarily, to determine walking intensity in the same population and to compare all outcomes to a control group of older adults without knee pathology. Method: In this cross-sectional study, participants (TKA=16, mean 22.9 (SD 9.7) mo post TKA; control=22) completed indoor walking tests and a 580 m outdoor course that included varying terrain (e.g., curbs, grass, sidewalk) and frequent changes in direction. Walking capacity was assessed using stopwatches, global positioning system watches and accelerometers. Results: Outdoor walking time was moderately correlated (p<0.05) with the timed up-and-go (TUG) test (r=0.65), stair-climb test (SCT) (r=0.67 ascending, r=0.79 descending), 10 m walk test (10 mWT) (r=0.73), and 6-minute walk test (6 MWT) (r=−0.75). Based on activity counts, walking intensity levels for participants in both groups were moderate (outdoor walk and 6 MWT). There was no significant difference in walking capacity between groups (TUG, SCT, 10 mWT, 6 MWT, outdoor walk). Conclusions: Common clinical walking tests are moderately correlated with outdoor mobility. Mobility capacity of individuals post TKA was similar to controls in both indoor and outdoor environments, and participants in both groups achieved moderate physical activity levels with walking. PMID:24403699

  6. No clinical benefit of gender-specific total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chen; Wang, Jiaxing; Cheng, Mengqi; Peng, Xiaochun; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Xianlong

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose There is no consensus regarding the clinical relevance of gender-specific prostheses in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We summarize the current best evidence in a comparison of clinical and radiographic outcomes between gender-specific prostheses and standard unisex prostheses in female patients. Methods We used the PubMed, Embase, Cochrane, Science Citation Index, and Scopus databases. We included randomized controlled trials published up to January 2013 that compared gender-specific prostheses with standard unisex prostheses in female patients who underwent primary TKAs. Results 6 trials involving 423 patients with 846 knee joints met the inclusion criteria. No statistically significant differences were observed between the 2 designs regarding pain, range of motion (ROM), knee scores, satisfaction, preference, complications, and radiographic results. The gender-specific design (Gender Solutions; Zimmer Inc, Warsaw, Indiana) reduced the prevalence of overhang. However, it had less overall coverage of the femoral condyles compared to the unisex group. In fact, the femoral prosthesis in the standard unisex group matched better than that in the gender-specific group. Interpretation Gender-specific prostheses do not appear to confer any benefit in terms of clinician- and patient-reported outcomes for the female knee. PMID:24954488

  7. Rotation flaps for coverage after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Pozzobon, Leonardo Rafael; Helito, Camilo Partezani; Guimarães, Tales Mollica; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the results obtained using local myocutaneous rotation flaps in cases of wound dehiscence after total knee arthroplasty. METHODS: Patients undergoing these surgical procedures were selected in the 2000-2012 period. The nine selected cases during this period were subjected to flap coverage due to skin dehiscence associated with infection. In eight cases we used rotation flaps of the medial gastrocnemius, and in one case we used advancing skin. RESULTS: Eighty nine percent of the cases were successful in the coverage of the prosthesis and the viability of the flaps. In four cases it was possible to maintain or review the prosthesis. Four other cases progressed to amputation due to failure on treatment of infections, and one case remained without the prosthesis. The functional evaluation showed an unsatisfactory outcome in 89% of cases. CONCLUSION: Coverage flaps are a good option for the treatment of cases of dehiscence with exposure of the prosthesis and the functional failure was associated with the inability to control the infection and the damage it caused. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:24453672

  8. Polyethylene Oxidation in Total Hip Arthroplasty: Evolution and New Advances

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Barrena, Enrique; Medel, Francisco; Puértolas, José Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) remains the gold standard acetabular bearing material for hip arthroplasty. Its successful performance has shown consistent results and survivorship in total hip replacement (THR) above 85% after 15 years, with different patients, surgeons, or designs. As THR results have been challenged by wear, oxidation, and liner fracture, relevant research on the material properties in the past decade has led to the development and clinical introduction of highly crosslinked polyethylenes (HXLPE). More stress on the bearing (more active, overweighted, younger patients), and more variability in the implantation technique in different small and large Hospitals may further compromise the clinical performance for many patients. The long-term in vivo performance of these materials remains to be proven. Clinical and retrieval studies after more than 5 years of in vivo use with HXLPE in THR are reviewed and consistently show a substantial decrease in wear rate. Moreover, a second generation of improved polyethylenes is backed by in vitro data and awaits more clinical experience to confirm the experimental improvements. Also, new antioxidant, free radical scavengers, candidates and the reinforcement of polyethylene through composites are currently under basic research. Oxidation of polyethylene is today significantly reduced by present formulations, and this forgiving, affordable, and wellknown material is still reliable to meet today’s higher requirements in total hip replacement. PMID:20111694

  9. TOTAL ANKLE ARTHROPLASTY: BRAZILIAN EXPERIENCE WITH THE HINTEGRA PROSTHESIS.

    PubMed

    Nery, Caio; Fernandes, Túlio Diniz; Réssio, Cibele; Fuchs, Mauro Luiz; Godoy Santos, Alexandre Leme de; Ortiz, Rafael Trevisan

    2010-01-01

    Ankle arthrosis is becoming more and more common. The search for solutions that preserve joint function has led to a new generation of prosthesis with three components and more degrees of freedom. This paper presents the results achieved for ten patients treated with the HINTEGRA Prosthesis (Integra, New Deal), through collaborative action between the Foot and Ankle Groups of the Orthopedics and Traumatology divisions of Escola Paulista de Medicina, Unifesp, and the School of Medicine of the University of São Paulo (USP). The ten patients (six women and four men, aged between 29 and 66 years), underwent a surgical procedure consisting of Hintermann's technique, between January and June 2005. They were evaluated at prearranged intervals, and the data were subjected to statistical analysis. The surgery led to a significant improvement in ankle mobility. Radiological evaluation showed no signs of loosening or failure in the prosthetic components in any of the patients studied. Although the complication rate in our sample was high, it was equivalent to the rates found by other authors, and directly represents the learning curve associate with this kind of procedure. Four years after the procedure, it was found that the patients pain levels had significantly decreased, and that their functional patterns had significantly improved, with AOFAS and Hintermann scores indicating results that were excellent for 20%, good for 70% and poor for 10%. Treatment of ankle arthritis by means of total arthroplasty using the HINTEGRA prosthesis was capable of providing good results over an average observation period of four years.

  10. Conversion Total Knee Arthroplasty after Failed High Tibial Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sang Jun; Kim, Kang Il; Lee, Chung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Clinical results of high tibial osteotomy (HTO) deteriorate over time despite the initial satisfactory results. Several knees may require a conversion to total knee arthroplasty (TKA) because of failure such as the progression of degenerative osteoarthritis and the loss of the correction angle. It is important to know the long-term survival rate and common reason of failure in HTO to inform patients of postoperative expectations before surgery and to prevent surgical errors during surgery. In addition, it has been reported that clinical and radiological results, revision rate, and complication rate were poorer than those in patients without a previous HTO. There are few review articles that describe why conversion TKA after HTO is surgically difficult and the results are poor. Surgeons have to avoid the various complications and surgical errors in this specific situation. We would like to present the considering factors and technical difficulties during conversion TKA after HTO with a review of the literature. We could conclude through the review that the correction of deformity, lower amount of tibial bone resection, and sufficient polyethylene insert thickness, restoration of the joint line height, and adequate ligament balancing can be helpful in overcoming the technical challenges encountered during TKA following HTO. PMID:27274465

  11. Gait analysis of elderly women after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lee, Aenon; Park, Junhyuck; Lee, Seungwon

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate ability and muscle activities of elderly women after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and compare them with those of healthy ones. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen female patients with TKA due to advanced degenerative arthritis of the measured on knee joint and 19 healthy elderly females participated. Tibiofemoral angles of TKA patients were using a gait analysis system anterioposterior X-rays of the weight-bearing knee. The knee flexion angle and gait parameters were measured. Muscle activities and prolongation time were EMG system. The gait of the treated limb of each participant was evaluated in three consecutive trials at fast speed and comfortable speed. [Results] The knee flexion angle %stance phase, stride length, step length, speed, cadence, and gait cycle significantly decreased at both the fast speed and comfortable speeds, and the onset and duration time of rectus femoris activity was significantly increased at the comfortable speed in the TKA group. [Conclusion] In conclusion, elderly women who received TKA showed decreased gait ability and muscle activity compared to the healthy elderly women.

  12. Elbow arthroplasty: where are we today? A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Degreef, Ilse

    2016-04-01

    Background The elbow joint is a complex compound articulation, with a linking role within the upper limb kinematics. Its hinge function allows for proper placement of our working instrument (the hand) in the space surrounding us, directed by the shoulder joint. Both reliable mobility and stability are essential elements to allow for consistent bridging of the distance we aim to achieve in common daily activities. Sufficient flexion and extension are required to ensure both the patients' independence and the dignity. Next to the hinge, a radio-ulnar rotation with precise co-operation of forearm and wrist spin enhances the linking function with accurate precision instrument manipulation. Arthritis of the elbow joint or cubarthritis, whether primary or secondary, may not be as highly prevalent as hip or knee arthritis, but its impact on daily live certainly cannot be underestimated. Methods Current treatment options for failing cubarthritis are reviewed. Results Surgical techniques to reconstruct or replace the elbow joint are currently increasingly efficient with mounting long-term outcome reports. Debridement techniques including open or arthroscopic Outerbridge-Kashiwaghi procedure often delays joint replacement. Implants for joint arthroplasty focus on the ulna-humeral joint mostly with semi-constrained linked techniques, but there is a trend towards total joint replacement including the radiocapitellar joint. Conclusion In this independent review article, elbow joint failure due to cubarthritis and an overview of its current state-of-the-art orthopaedic treatment algorithm is presented, with its indications, advantages, risks and outcome.

  13. Surgical Release of Severe Flexion Contracture for Oncologic Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Vincent Y.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Severe postoperative knee contractures after arthroplasty or megaprosthesis reconstruction occur rarely, but are devastating complications. Management of preoperative flexion contractures is well-described, but there is a paucity of literature for surgical treatment of postoperative contractures. A retrospective chart review was performed for a single surgeon of cases between 1996 and 2014. Results: Nine patients (5 of 66 for pediatrics; 4 of 95 for adults) underwent surgical release for severe stiffness after implantation of knee megaprosthesis. The total arc of motion was improved from a preoperative mean of 34° (range, 10° to 70°) to a postoperative mean 89° (63° to 125°). The amount of extension improved by a mean of 27° (range, -3° to +70°) and the amount of flexion improved by a mean of 28° (range, -10° to +75°). Conclusion: Surgical release of severe postoperative knee contracture is a challenging procedure, but in most cases, the amount of extension and flexion can be improved, yielding a greater total arc of motion.

  14. Total reverse shoulder arthroplasty: European lessons and future trends.

    PubMed

    Seebauer, Ludwig

    2007-12-01

    In the late 1980s, Grammont introduced a new reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA), with a hemisphere directly attached to the glenoid surface and with medial positioning of the center of rotation to overcome former shortcomings. Over the past few years, results from several mid- and long-term clinical studies of this new TSA have demonstrated that unexpectedly good functional outcomes and pain relief (Constant-Score, 60-69) could be achieved, even in patients with progressive superior migration, joint destruction, and rotator cuff deficiency. In all these studies, however, limited range of passive internal rotation and no improvement in active external rotation capacity were reported. In addition, glenoid erosion ("inferior glenoid notching") was reported in all these studies as a frequent phenomenon, occurring in 10% to 42%. The clinical impact of inferior notching is the subject of controversy, and its correlation with glenoid component loosening is not clear. In addition, rates of perioperative and postoperative complications (eg, dislocations, infections, hematomas, fractures) seem to be higher with this new TSA than with the conventional TSA. Improvements in prosthesis design and implantation technique (eg, easier and more reproducible surgical technique) should contribute to better range of motion, lower complication rates, and a lower frequency and lesser amount of inferior glenoid notching.

  15. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Edward C.A.; Hanson, Emma K.; Saithna, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anatomical shoulder replacement for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is complicated by a high incidence of rotator cuff tears and glenoid erosion. This can lead to poor function and early failure. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) has gained popularity as an alternative. This systematic review attempts to further define the role of RSA in RA. Methods: A systematic review identified seven studies reporting outcomes of RSA in RA patients. Studies were critically appraised, and data on outcomes, complications and technical considerations were extracted and analysed. Results: One hundred and twenty one shoulders were included (mean follow up 46.9 months). Consistent improvements in the main outcome measures were noted between studies. Ninety five percent of patients described excellent to satisfactory outcomes. The minimum mean forward elevation reported in each study was 115 degrees. Symptomatic glenoid loosening (1.7%), deep infection (3.3%) and revision surgery (5%) rates were no higher than for a population of mixed aetiologies. Discussion: Previous concerns regarding high pre- and peri-operative complication and revision rates in RA patients were not shown to be valid by the results of this review. Although associated cuff tears are common and glenoid bone loss can increase the technical complexity of surgery, RSA provides consistent and predictable improvements in key outcome measures and the revision and complication rates do not appear to be higher than reported in a large population of mixed aetiologies. Conclusion: The contemporary literature shows that RSA is a safe, effective and reliable treatment option in RA patients. PMID:26448802

  16. Acromial and scapular spine fractures after reverse total shoulder arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Simon N; Wright, Warwick; Coghlan, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Acromial and scapular spine fractures after reverse total shoulder arthroplasty occur predominantly as a result of bony insufficiency secondary to patient and intra-operative technical factors. The spectrum of the pathology can range from a stress reaction to an undisplaced or displaced fracture. Prompt diagnosis of these fractures requires a high suspicion in the postoperative patient with a clinical presentation of acute onset of pain along the acromion or scapular spine and/or deterioration of shoulder function. Conventional shoulder radiographs are frequently unreliable in identifying these fractures, especially if they are undisplaced. Computed tomography (CT) and/or single photon emission computed tomography/CT scans are useful imaging modalities for obtaining a definitive diagnosis. Early diagnosis and non-operative treatment of a stress reaction or undisplaced fracture is essential for preventing further displacement and potential disability. The management of displaced fractures is challenging for the orthopaedic surgeon as a result of high rates of mal-union or non-union, decreased functional outcomes, and variable results after open reduction and internal fixation. Strategies for preventing these fractures include optimizing the patient’s bone health, correct glenoid baseplate screw length and position, and avoiding excessive deltoid tension. Further research is required to identify the specific patient and fracture characteristics that will benefit from conservative versus operative management. PMID:27583005

  17. RESULTS FROM BI-CONTACT® TOTAL ELBOW ARTHROPLASTY: MULTICENTER STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Benegas, Eduardo; Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Gracitelli, Mauro Emilio Conforto; de Sousa, Augusto Tadeu Barros; Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Ikemoto, Roberto Yukio; Murachovsky, Joel; Matsumoto, Marcelo Hide; Tamaoki, Marcel Jun Sugawara; Neto, Arnaldo Amado Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe the initial experience of four orthopedic clinics from using Bi-Contact® total elbow arthroplasty (TEA), reporting the results and complications of the procedure. Methods: This was a retrospective study, through analysis on the medical records of patients who underwent primary TEA using a prosthesis model developed in conjunction with IOT-HCFMUSP. Forty-six elbows (45 patients) that were operated at four orthopedic clinics between 2000 and 2009 were evaluated. Results: The majority of the patients were female (74%), and the median age was 62.5 years. The diagnoses encountered were trauma sequelae (47.83%), rheumatoid arthritis (32.61%), primary osteoarthrosis (8.7%), acute fractures (6.52%) and heterotopic ossification (2.17%). The median length of follow-up was 2.08 years (0.25-9). The procedure significantly alleviated pain and improved range of motion. It was observed that at least one complication was present in 69.57% of the cases, and the main ones were infection (28.26%), need for revision (28.26%), intraoperative fracture (15.22%) and aseptic loosening (15.22%). Conclusion: Bi-Contact® TEA provided significant alleviation of pain and improvement of range of motion in the present series. The complication rate was high, and the most frequently observed complications were infection, aseptic loosening and intraoperative fracture. PMID:27027055

  18. Comparison of cementless and hybrid cemented total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lass, Richard; Kubista, Bernd; Holinka, Johannes; Pfeiffer, Martin; Schuller, Spiro; Stenicka, Sandra; Windhager, Reinhard; Giurea, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    Cementless total knee arthroplasty (TKA) implants were designed to provide long-term fixation without the risk of cement-associated complications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of titanium-coated cementless implants compared with hybrid TKA implants with a cemented tibial and a cementless femoral component. The authors performed a case-control, single-center study of 120 TKAs performed between 2003 and 2007, including 60 cementless and 60 hybrid cemented TKAs. The authors prospectively analyzed the radiographic and clinical data and the survivorship of the implants at a minimum follow-up of 5 years. Ninety patients who underwent TKA completed the 5-year assessment. Knee Society Scores increased significantly in both groups (P<.001). In both groups, 2 patients underwent revision due to aseptic tibial component loosening, resulting in a 96% implant survival rate. Radiographs showed significantly less radiolucent lines around the tibial baseplate in the cementless group (n=12) than in the hybrid cemented group (n=26) (P=.009).At 6-year mean follow-up, no significant difference existed between the cementless and hybrid cemented tibial components in TKA in terms of clinical and functional results and postoperative complications. The significantly smaller number of radiolucent lines in the cementless group is an indicator of primary stability with the benefit of long-term fixation durability of TKA.

  19. Total ankle arthroplasty with severe preoperative varus deformity.

    PubMed

    Hanselman, Andrew E; Powell, Brian D; Santrock, Robert D

    2015-04-01

    Advancements in total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) over the past several decades have led to improved patient outcomes and implant survivorship. Despite these innovations, many implant manufacturers still consider a preoperative coronal plane deformity greater than 10° a relative contraindication to TAA. Without proper intraoperative alignment, these implants may experience abnormal wear and hardware failure. Correcting these deformities, often through the use of soft tissue procedures and/or osteotomies, not only increases the difficulty of a case, but also the intraoperative time and radiation exposure. The authors report a case in which a 54-year-old man with a severe right ankle varus deformity of 29° underwent successful TAA using the INBONE II Prophecy total ankle system (Wright Medical Technology, Inc, Memphis, Tennessee) and additional soft tissue reconstruction. Intraoperatively, the patient's coronal deformity was corrected to 1.8°. At 8 months postoperatively, the patient ambulated without restriction and had substantial improvement in validated patient outcome scores, specifically the Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Foot and Ankle Module and the Short Form Health Survey-12 This unique report documents the first time that this particular implant, with an exclusive preoperative computed tomography-derived patient-specific guide, has been used effectively for a severe preoperative varus deformity greater than 20° without the need for an osteotomy. Future studies should be directed toward the prospective evaluation of different total ankle implant systems and their outcomes with severe coronal plane deformity, specifically computed tomography-derived patient-specific guided implants.

  20. Gait analysis of elderly women after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Aenon; Park, Junhyuck; Lee, Seungwon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate ability and muscle activities of elderly women after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and compare them with those of healthy ones. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen female patients with TKA due to advanced degenerative arthritis of the measured on knee joint and 19 healthy elderly females participated. Tibiofemoral angles of TKA patients were using a gait analysis system anterioposterior X-rays of the weight-bearing knee. The knee flexion angle and gait parameters were measured. Muscle activities and prolongation time were EMG system. The gait of the treated limb of each participant was evaluated in three consecutive trials at fast speed and comfortable speed. [Results] The knee flexion angle %stance phase, stride length, step length, speed, cadence, and gait cycle significantly decreased at both the fast speed and comfortable speeds, and the onset and duration time of rectus femoris activity was significantly increased at the comfortable speed in the TKA group. [Conclusion] In conclusion, elderly women who received TKA showed decreased gait ability and muscle activity compared to the healthy elderly women. PMID:25931687

  1. Full versus surface tibial baseplate cementation in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Galasso, Olimpio; Jenny, Jean-Yves; Saragaglia, Dominique; Miehlke, Rolf K

    2013-02-01

    The use of a keel in the tibial component during modern primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has become common, and its cementation may affect the future performance of the prosthesis. Although proponents of cementing the entire tibial component argue that this technique provides better initial fixation and may prevent aseptic loosening, reasons exist to apply cement only to the tibial baseplate. In this study, 232 patients who underwent TKA using full or surface cementation of the tibial baseplate were evaluated at an average 5.6-year follow-up to assess survivorship and clinical results. The cumulative survival rate at 8 years was 97.1%. With revision of either component for any reason considered the endpoint, no significant difference was noted between full and surface cemented groups. Knee Society Score, range of motion, and femoro-tibial mechanical angle significantly increased postoperatively. Multivariate analysis revealed that good preoperative range of motion and Knee Society Scores were related to good postoperative range of motion and Knee Society Scores. Follow-up length was a negative predictor of postoperative Knee Society Score. The use of full or surface cementation of the baseplate was unrelated to the postoperative clinical outcomes. Clinical outcomes did not differ according to the tibial component cementation technique. The results of this study suggest that cementing the keel of the tibial component during primary TKA has no advantage for patients. Longer-term follow-up and proper patient randomization are required to confirm these findings.

  2. Patient-specific instruments for total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lachiewicz, Paul F; Henderson, Robert A

    2013-09-01

    The use of patient-specific instruments for total knee arthroplasty shifts computer navigation for bone landmark registration and implant positioning from the intraoperative to the preoperative setting. Each system requires preoperative MRI or CT, with specifications determined by the instrument manufacturer. The marketed advantages of patient-specific instruments include greater accuracy in coronal alignment with fewer outliers, no need for instrumentation of the intramedullary canal, reduced surgical time, lower hospital costs, and improved clinical outcomes. The few published results of these instruments suggest minimal gains obtained in hospital logistics variables and minimal evidence of improvement in either alignment or patient outcomes. Disadvantages of patient-specific instruments include increased costs for imaging and instrument fabrication as well as increased preoperative time required for surgical planning and reviewing the instrument plans, and the learning curve for the surgeon to work with the engineers and use these instruments intraoperatively. It is also necessary to have a set of standard instruments available in case the patient-specific instruments do not work properly. Additional data are required before deciding whether these instruments should be recommended.

  3. Japanese acrylic hemi-arthroplasty of the hip with a 45-year follow-up without revision.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Kazuo; Nojiri, Hidetoshi; Mogami, Atsuhiko; Uta, Souichi; Iwase, Hideaki; Kurosawa, Hisashi

    2002-06-01

    We report the case of a patient who underwent acrylic hemi-arthroplasty of the hip and survived 45 years without revision. The patient had undergone hemi-arthroplasty of the hip at the age of 17 years following failure of a previous hemi-arthroplasty at the age of 12 years. We saw her 45 years later and carried out physical examination, standard radiographs of the hip as well as computed tomography. In addition, we reviewed the literature concerning the acrylic prosthesis and discussed the reasons for long-term durability.

  4. Effect of postoperative use of nasal oxygen catheter supplementation in wound healing following total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Junqueira, Jader Joel Machado; Gobbi, Ricardo Gomes; Angelini, Fábio Janson; Rezende, Marcia Uchoa; Tírico, Luis Eduardo Passarelli; Demange, Marco Kawamura; da Mota e Albuquerque, Roberto Freire; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Healing is an event that is fundamental to the success of total knee arthroplasty. The aims of the present study were to compare the rates of complications related to wound healing between two groups of volunteers submitted to total knee arthroplasty and to evaluate the effects of postoperative oxygen supplementation by means of a nasal catheter. METHOD: A total of 109 patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty were randomized into two groups, namely, groups that did and did not receive postoperative oxygen supplementation via a nasal catheter. The surgical wound was monitored every day during the hospital stay and on the 7th, 14th, 21st, 30th and 42nd postoperative days. Characteristics related to healing were observed, including hyperemia, dehiscence, necrosis, phlyctenules and deep and superficial infection. RESULTS: There were no cases of deep infection. Hyperemia was statistically correlated with the total number of complications in the groups, with oxygen demonstrated to be a protective factor against hyperemia. Approximately 30% of the patients who exhibited hyperemia had other complications, independent of oxygen supplementation. CONCLUSION: Oxygen supplementation following total knee arthroplasty was shown to be effective in diminishing hyperemia around the operative wound. The development of hyperemia was a precursor to other complications, irrespective of whether oxygen supplementation was used. PMID:25518030

  5. Venous thromboembolic disease after hybrid hip arthroplasty with negative duplex screening.

    PubMed

    Beuhler, K O; D'Lima, D D; Colwell, C W; Otis, S M; Walker, R H

    1999-04-01

    Postoperative duplex ultrasonography screening after total hip arthroplasty has been shown to identify patients who may require treatment or additional monitoring for venous thromboembolic disease. The potential for manifestation of venous thromboembolic disease subsequent to screening remains a concern. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of symptomatic venous thromboembolic disease after total hip arthroplasty and after inhospital prophylaxis, inhospital screening with negative results for proximal deep venous thrombosis, and no posthospitalization venous thromboembolic disease prophylaxis. One hundred fifty patients undergoing primary hybrid total hip arthroplasty and using pneumatic compression stockings and aspirin as prophylaxis against venous thromboembolic disease were screened for deep venous thrombosis with duplex ultrasonography on the fourth day after surgery. Duplex ultrasonography screening revealed 17 (11.3%) patients with asymptomatic proximal deep venous thrombosis. In response to duplex ultrasonography screening, these patients with proximal deep venous thrombosis received therapeutic anticoagulation. Of 133 patients with a duplex screen with negative results for proximal deep venous thrombosis, 131 (98.5%) continued to have no symptoms of venous thromboembolic disease and two (1.5%) began to have symptoms for venous thromboembolic disease (one with proximal deep venous thrombosis, one with nonfatal pulmonary embolism) during 12 months of clinical followup after total hip arthroplasty. The overall prevalence of venous thromboembolic disease requiring anticoagulation was 19 of 150 (12.6%) patients. The remaining 131 (87.4%) were not exposed to the risks of postoperative anticoagulation and did not have subsequent symptomatic venous thromboembolic disease.

  6. Formation of a pseudotumor in total hip arthroplasty using a tribological metal-polyethylene pair.

    PubMed

    Fagotti, Lorenzo; Vicente, José Ricardo Negreiros; Miyahara, Helder Souza; de Oliveira, Pedro Vitoriano; Bernabé, Antônio Carlos; Croci, Alberto Tesconi

    2015-01-01

    The aim here was to report a case of a young adult patient who evolved with tumor formation in the left thigh, 14 years after revision surgery on hip arthroplasty. Davies in 2005 made the first description of this disease in patients undergoing metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty. Over the last decade, however, pseudotumors around metal-on-polyethylene surfaces have become more prevalent. Our patient presented with increased volume of the left thigh 8 years after hip arthroplasty revision surgery. Two years before the arising of the tumor in the thigh, a nodule in the inguinal region was investigated to rule out a malignant neoplastic process, but the results were inconclusive. The main preoperative complaints were pain, functional limitation and marked reduction in the range of motion of the left hip. Plain radiographs showed loosening of acetabular and femoral, and a large mass between the muscle planes was revealed through magnetic resonance imaging of the left thigh. The surgical procedure consisted of resection of the lesion and removal of the components through lateral approach. In respect of total hip arthroplasty, pseudotumors are benign neoplasms in which the bearing surface consists of metal-on-metal, but they can also occur in different tribological pairs, as presented in this case.

  7. The use of highly cross-linked polyethylene in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lachiewicz, Paul F; Geyer, Mark R

    2011-03-01

    Polyethylene wear, with resultant particle-induced osteolysis, is a cause of late failure of total knee arthroplasty. The causes of both wear and osteolysis are multifactorial; still, improvements in the polyethylene liner have been investigated. Available highly cross-linked polyethylene tibial liners and patellar prostheses differ greatly in the amount and method of irradiation, thermal treatments, and sterilization techniques they undergo. Several varieties of highly cross-linked polyethylene reduce the gravimetric and volumetric wear of tibial liners in knee simulator studies. However, reduced fracture toughness and the generation of smaller and possibly more reactive particles also have been reported with some varieties of polyethylene. Clinical studies of the use of highly cross-linked polyethylene in total knee arthroplasty are limited. Two nonrandomized trials of highly cross-linked polyethylene in total knee arthroplasty have reported a nonsignificant decrease in radiolucent lines at 2 and 5 years, respectively. The risks of using highly cross-linked polyethylene include fracture of the liner or of a posterior-stabilized tibial post, liner dislodgement or locking mechanism disruption, and possibly more osteolysis. Highly cross-linked polyethylene tibial liners may be considered for younger, more active patients. However, until additional clinical results are available, a cautious approach is warranted to the widespread use of highly cross-linked polyethylene in total knee arthroplasty.

  8. Simultaneous bilateral total knee and ankle arthroplasty as a single surgical procedure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Simultaneous osteoarthritis (OA) of the ankle joint complicates primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In such cases, rehabilitation of TKA is limited by debilitating ankle pain, but varus or valgus ankle arthritis may even compromise placement of knee prosthetic components. Case presentation We present a patient with simultaneous bilateral valgus and patellofemoral OA of the knees and bilateral varus OA of the ankle joints that equally contributed to overall disability. This 63 years old, motivated and otherwise healthy patient was treated by simultaneous bilateral total knee and ankle arthroplasty (quadruple total joint arthroplasty, TJA) during the same anesthesia. Two years outcome showed excellent alignment and function of all four replaced joints. Postoperative time for rehabilitation, back to work (6th week) and hospital stay (12 days) of this special patient was markedly reduced compared to the usual course of separate TJA. Conclusions Simultaneous quadruple TJA in equally disabling OA of bilateral deformed knees and ankles resulted in a better functional outcome and faster recovery compared to the average reported results after TKA and TAA in literature. However, careful preoperative planning, extensive patient education, and two complete surgical teams were considered essential for successful performance. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case report in literature about quadruple major total joint arthroplasty implanted during the same anesthesia in the same patient. PMID:21995682

  9. Total knee arthroplasty in a pseudoachondroplastic dwarfism patient with bilateral patellar dislocation.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kwang-Jun; Yoon, Jung-Ro; Yang, Jae-Hyuk

    2013-01-01

    Late presentation of congenital patellar dislocation with advanced osteoarthritis is rare. This article presents a case of a 59-year-old man with underlying pseudoachondroplastic dwarfism. Advanced osteoarthritis due to bilateral neglected congenital patellar dislocation was treated with total knee arthroplasty without patella relocation surgery. Two years later, the patient had an improvement in Knee Society scores, painless function, and stability.

  10. Total Limb Rotation after Unilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty: Side-to-Side Discrepancy.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kwang-Jun; Yoon, Seok-Tae; Ko, Young-Bong

    2016-08-01

    Total limb rotation, an important anatomical feature of the lower limb, is defined as any rotation of the lower limb on its longitudinal axis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the discrepancies of rotational profiles of total limb between nonoperated and operated limb following unilateral total knee arthroplasty. We conducted an analysis of the computed tomography (CT) data from 32 patients undergoing primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty. Using these CT scan, rotational profiles of total limb, such as femoral neck anteversion angle expressed as femoral torsion angle (FTA), tibial torsion angle (TTA), knee joint rotation angle (KJRA), and total limb rotation (TLR) were measured. There were significant discrepancies of FTA and KJRA between operated and nonoperated limb following unilateral total knee arthroplasty. The mean difference of operated and nonoperated side for FTA and KJRA were -6.51 ± 11.88 degrees (p = 0.0041) and -6.83 ± 5.04 degrees (p < 0.001), respectively. However, there were no significant discrepancies of TLR, TTA. These results are due to the compensation effect of KJRA. However, excessive external rotation of the femoral component beyond the compensation effect of prosthetic knee joint can lead to a total limb rotational discrepancy in patient undergoing unilateral total knee arthroplasty.

  11. Transition from nerve blocks to periarticular injections and emerging techniques in total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Springer, Bryan D

    2014-10-01

    The emergence of procedure-specific multimodal pain management regimens that provide effective control of postoperative pain, while markedly reducing the amount of opioid medication required, has been one of the most important advances in hip and knee replacement in recent years. When peripheral nerve blockade first became widely available for inclusion in multimodal regimens, it was viewed as a revolution in the management of postoperative pain. This approach, however, is costly and has some important limitations, including an increased incidence of falls. For many patients, peripheral nerve blocks can now be replaced by a periarticular injection with EXPAREL® (bupivacaine liposome injectable suspension), an extended-release anesthetic infiltrated by the surgeon as part of a multimodal pain regimen. EXPAREL® offers some important clinical and administrative benefits over nerve blocks. Preliminary data from a pilot study comparing the relative effectiveness of EXPAREL® versus sciatic nerve blockade has shown a noticeable reduction in average pain scores at rest with EXPAREL® following both hip and knee arthroplasty, as well as a reduction in the 6- to 12-hour pain score following hip arthroplasty. There was also a significant reduction in opioid use with EXPAREL®, as well as a $411 reduction in the cost of total knee arthroplasty and a $348 reduction in the cost of total hip arthroplasty.

  12. Relationship between Improvements in Physical Measures and Patient Satisfaction in Rehabilitation after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazzal, Mahmoud I.; Bashaireh, Khaldoon H.; Alomari, Mahmoud A.; Nazzal, Mohammad S.; Maayah, Mikhled F.; Mesmar, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine patient satisfaction with rehabilitation after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Fifty-six patients, aged 45-77 years, were enrolled in a post-TKA comprehensive therapy program focusing on knee strengthening and functional activities. The program lasted 3 months and was conducted for 1 h, twice a day, 5 days per…

  13. Lower Limbs Function and Pain Relationships after Unilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tali, Maie; Maaroos, Jaak

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate gait characteristics, lower limbs joint function, and pain relationships associated with knee osteoarthritis of female patients before and 3 months after total knee arthroplasty at an outpatient clinic rehabilitation department. Gait parameters were registered, the active range of lower extremity joints was…

  14. Bilateral extensor mechanism disruption after total knee arthroplasty in two morbidly obese patients.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Zachary H; Yi, Paul H; Haughom, Bryan D; Hellman, Michael D; Levine, Brett R

    2015-05-01

    Disruption of the extensor mechanism as a result of patellar tendon or quadriceps tendon rupture is an uncommon but devastating complication after total knee arthroplasty. Treating a disrupted extensor mechanism can be challenging, particularly in patients who are morbidly obese, due to an increased risk of postoperative complications. Therefore, despite the debilitating nature of extensor mechanism disruption, many community surgeons do not feel comfortable pursuing more complex cases like revision total knee arthroplasty with extensor mechanism allograft on morbidly obese patients, and consequently many of these patients are referred to tertiary-care centers for reconstruction secondary to the complexity of this patient cohort. The authors report 2 cases of bilateral extensor mechanism disruption after total knee arthroplasty in patients who are morbidly obese. One patient experienced trauma leading to her initial rupture; however, her contralateral atraumatic disruption was subsequently diagnosed at a later date. The second patient did not experience trauma leading to either of her extensor mechanism disruptions. Despite substantial medical comorbidities and morbid obesity, revision total knee arthroplasties with extensor mechanism allografts were recommended in both cases in a staged bilateral fashion. The surgical technique is described and the unique challenges afforded by the marked obesity are detailed. The current literature on this subject is reviewed. Despite early complications related to recumbency, this report serves as an example of successful repairs of extensor mechanism disruptions in patients who are morbidly obese, suggesting that extensor mechanism allograft is viable even in patients with high risk of complications.

  15. Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis after total hip or knee arthroplasty: a survey of Canadian orthopedic surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Michael; Anderson, David R.; Nagpal, Seema; O’Brien, Bernie

    1999-01-01

    Objective To determine the pharmacologic and physical modalities used by orthopedic surgeons in Canada to prevent venous thromboembolism (deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism) after total hip or knee arthroplasty. Design Mail survey sent to all members of the Canadian Orthopaedic Association. Setting A nation-wide study. Methods A total of 828 questionnaires, designed to identify the type and frequency of prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism that were used after hip and knee arthroplasty were mailed to orthopedic surgeons. Outcome measures Demographic data and the frequency and type of thromboprophylaxis. Results Of the 828 surveys mailed 445 (54%) were returned, and 397 were included in this analysis. Of the respondents, 97% used prophylaxis routinely for patients who undergo total hip or knee arthroplasty. Three of the 397 (0.8%) did not use any method of prophylaxis. Warfarin was the most common agent used (46%), followed by low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) (36%). Combination therapy with both mechanical and pharmacologic methods were used in 39% of patients. Objective screening tests were not frequently performed before discharge. Extended prophylaxis beyond the duration of hospitalization was used by 36% of physicians. Conclusion Prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism with warfarin or LMWH has become standard care after total hip or knee arthroplasty in Canada. PMID:10593248

  16. Revision to reverse shoulder arthroplasty with retention of the humeral component

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Revision in failed shoulder arthroplasty often requires removal of the humeral component with a significant risk of fracture and bone loss. Newer modular systems allow conversion from anatomic to reverse shoulder arthroplasty with retention of a well-fixed humeral stem. We report on a prospectively evaluated series of conversions from hemiarthroplasty to reverse shoulder arthroplasty. Methods In 14 cases of failed hemiarthroplasty due to rotator cuff deficiency and painful pseudoparalysis (in 13 women), revision to reverse shoulder arthroplasty was performed between October 2006 and 2010, with retention of the humeral component using modular systems. Mean age at the time of operation was 70 (56–80) years. Pre- and postoperative evaluation followed a standardized protocol including Constant score, range of motion, and radiographic analysis. Mean follow-up time was 2.5 (2–5.5) years. Results Mean Constant score improved from 9 (2–16) to 41 (17–74) points. Mean lengthening of the arm was 2.6 (0.9–4.7) cm without any neurological complications. One patient required revision due to infection. Interpretation Modular systems allow retainment of a well-fixed humeral stem with good outcome. There is a risk of excessive humeral lengthening. PMID:24032523

  17. Grammont reverse total shoulder arthroplasty in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and nonreconstructible rotator cuff lesions.

    PubMed

    Rittmeister, M; Kerschbaumer, F

    2001-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether patients with severe rheumatoid arthritis and irreparable rotator cuff rupture can be treated successfully with the Grammont shoulder arthroplasty. Seven patients with rheumatoid arthritis (8 shoulders) with nonreconstructible rotator cuff lesions and Larsen stage-V radiographic changes of the glenoid and the humeral head underwent a Grammont reverse shoulder arthroplasty. The Constant score improved from a mean of 17 points (range 4 to 25) preoperatively to a mean of 63 points (range 41 to 79) at a mean of 54 months (range 48 to 73) after shoulder arthroplasty. The mean strength at 90 degrees of abduction measured 3.6 kg (range 1 to 6). Shoulder instability was not observed. Complications included septic implant loosening (1 shoulder), aseptic glenoid loosening (2), and failed acromion osteosynthesis following the transacromial approach (3). These data of Grammont arthroplasty are encouraging with respect to restoration of stability and satisfactory function in rheumatoid, cuff-deficient shoulders. However, glenoid loosening remained a serious problem, and transacromial approaches were complicated by failure of acromial fixation.

  18. Bryan total disc arthroplasty: a replacement disc for cervical disc disease

    PubMed Central

    Wenger, Markus; Markwalder, Thomas-Marc

    2010-01-01

    Total disc arthroplasty is a new option in the treatment of cervical degenerative disc disease. Several types of cervical disc prostheses currently challenge the gold-standard discectomy and fusion procedures. This review describes the Bryan Cervical Disc System and presents the Bryan prosthesis, its indications, surgical technique, complications, and outcomes, as given in the literature. PMID:22915917

  19. Hemi-arthroplasty of the hip followed by ipsilateral fracture of the femoral shaft.

    PubMed

    Barfod, G; Steen Jensen, J; Hansen, D; Larsen, E; Menck, H; Olsen, B; Rosenklint, A

    1986-03-01

    In a series of 74 ipsilateral fractures of the femoral shaft in relation to hemi-arthroplasties, treatment by a cemented long-stem total hip replacement was found to be superior to conservative treatment or internal fixation without removal of the prosthesis. Acceptable clinical results were obtained in 89 per cent of these cases.

  20. Lower-limb joint mechanics after total hip arthroplasty during sitting and standing tasks.

    PubMed

    Lamontagne, Mario; Beaulieu, Mélanie L; Varin, Daniel; Beaulé, Paul E

    2012-10-01

    While the effect of total hip arthroplasty on the operated limb mechanics is well documented, little is known on its effect on the contralateral limb. The purpose of this study was to measure the joint mechanics of both lower limbs during the tasks of sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit. Twenty total hip arthroplasty patients and 20 control participants performed three trials of each task from which 3D lower-limb joint kinematics and kinetics were obtained. Total hip arthroplasty patients exhibited lower operated-hip joint flexion, extension moments, and power, occurring most frequently near seat-on and seat-off. Despite these reduced kinetic variables in the operated hip, the joints of the non-operated limb generated similar joint kinetics as the matched control participants. These results indicated the patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty could adopt a strategy that allowed them to reduce moments and power generated at the operated lower-limb joints without overcompensating with the non-operated leg. Although such a strategy may be desirable given that higher loads can increase friction and accelerate wear of the prosthesis, reduced loading may be an indication of inadequate muscle strength that needs to be addressed.

  1. Single-dose radiation therapy for prevention of heterotopic ossification after total hip arthroplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, W.L.; Lo, T.C.; Covall, D.J.; Pfeifer, B.A.; Wasilewski, S.A. )

    1990-12-01

    Single-dose radiation therapy was prospectively evaluated for its efficacy in prevention of heterotopic ossification in patients at high risk after total hip arthroplasty. Thirty-one patients (34 hips) were treated between 1981 and 1988. Risk factors for inclusion in the protocol included prior evidence of heterotopic ossification, ankylosing spondylitis, and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. Patients with hypertrophic osteoarthritis or traumatic arthritis with osteophytes were not included. Operations on 34 hips included 19 primary total and 11 revision total hip arthroplasties and 4 excisions of heterotopic ossification. All patients received radiotherapy to the hip after operation with a single dose of 700 centigray. Radiotherapy is recommended on the first postoperative day. After this single-dose radiation treatment, no patient had clinically significant heterotopic ossification. Recurrent disease developed in two hips (6%), as seen on radiography (grades 2 and 3). This series documents a 100% clinical success rate and a 94% radiographic success rate in preventing heterotopic ossification in patients at high risk after total hip arthroplasty. Single-dose radiotherapy is as effective as other radiation protocols in preventing heterotopic ossification after total hip arthroplasty. It is less expensive and easier to administer than multidose radiotherapy.

  2. Solid organ transplant patients experience high rates of infection and other complications after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Brian A; Steele, G Daxton; Fedorka, Catherine J; Sánchez, Alvaro I; Chen, Antonia F; Crossett, Lawrence S

    2013-06-01

    Survival after solid organ transplants in the United States is increasing, and there is a need to understand the complications in knee arthroplasty patients who underwent organ transplantation. A retrospective study was conducted from 1993-2008 on 19 patients (23 knee arthroplasties) with previous successful solid organ transplants. Eleven knee arthroplasties were performed after renal transplantation, and 12 after nonrenal solid organ transplant (seven liver, four heart, one lung). Complications occurred in 9/23 patients (39.1%) and infections occurred in 4/23 patients (17.3%). Of the infected knees, two had MRSA, one had MSSA, and one Escherichia coli. Noninfectious complications (5/24, 21.7%) include aseptic loosening, quadriceps rupture, femoral fracture, hemarthrosis, and arthrofibrosis. All patients with complications were on immunosuppressant medications at the time of arthroplasty. There was a significantly higher rate of infection in the renal group compared to the non-renal group (P = 0.022). There was also a higher overall complication rate in the renal group however this did not reach significance.

  3. Surgical treatment of developmental dysplasia of the hip in adults: II. Arthroplasty options.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Sotelo, Joaquin; Berry, Daniel J; Trousdale, Robert T; Cabanela, Miguel E

    2002-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is the procedure of choice for most patients with symptomatic end-stage coxarthrosis secondary to hip dysplasia. The anatomic abnormalities associated with the dysplastic hip increase the complexity of hip arthroplasty. When pelvic bone stock allows, it is desirable to reconstruct the socket at or near the normal anatomic acetabular location. To obtain sufficient bony coverage of the acetabular component, the socket can be medialized or elevated, or a lateral bone graft can be applied. Uncemented acetabular components allow biologic fixation with potentially improved results compared with cemented cups, especially in young patients. The location of the acetabular reconstruction and the desired leg length influence the type of femoral reconstruction. Cemented and uncemented implants can be used in femoral reconstruction, depending on the clinical situation. Femoral shortening is required in some cases and can be performed by metaphyseal resection with a greater trochanteric osteotomy and advancement or by a shortening subtrochanteric osteotomy. The results of total hip arthroplasty demonstrate a high rate of pain relief and functional improvement. The long-term durability of cemented total hip arthroplasty reconstruction in these patients is inferior to that in the general population. The results of uncemented implants are promising, but only limited early and midterm data are available.

  4. Walking ability following knee arthroplasty: a prospective pilot study of factors affecting the maximal walking distance in 18 patients before and 6 months after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, N; Nierenberg, G; Lenger, R; Soudry, M

    2007-12-01

    Functional assessment of patients before and after prosthetic knee arthroplasty is based on clinical examination, which is usually summarized in various knee scores. The present study proposes a different and more subject orientated assessment for functional grading of these patients by measuring their maximal distance of walking ability, which is not apparent from the conventional outcome scores. Eighteen consecutive patients with knee osteoarthritis were evaluated for their knee and knee functional scores (The Knee Society clinical rating system) and for the maximal distance of their walking ability before and 6 months after knee arthroplasty. Specially designed walking ability grading was used for evaluation of walking on walkway. The pre- and post-operative knee scores and maximal walking distance and grading were statistically compared. A significant improvement in the knee and functional scores following surgery was observed. But the maximal walking ability grades and distances did not change significantly following surgery, showing a high relation between pre- and post-operative values. The limitation in post-operative walking was due to the revealed additional health disabilities, not related to the affected knee. Therefore we suggest that pre-operative evaluation of walking abilities should be taken into consideration both for patients' selection and timing of surgery and also for matching of patients' expectation from outcome of prosthetic knee arthroplasty.

  5. Analysis of Femoral Components of Cemented Total Hip Arthroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Shantanu; Harsha, A. P.

    2016-10-01

    There have been continuous on-going revisions in design of prosthesis in Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA) to improve the endurance of hip replacement. In the present work, Finite Element Analysis was performed on cemented THA with CoCrMo trapezoidal, CoCrMo circular, Ti6Al4V trapezoidal and Ti6Al4V circular stem. It was observed that cross section and material of femoral stem proved to be critical parameters for stress distribution in femoral components, distribution of interfacial stress and micro movements. In the first part of analysis, designs were investigated for micro movements and stress developed, for different stem materials. Later part of the analysis focused on investigations with respect to different stem cross sections. Femoral stem made of Titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) resulted in larger debonding of stem at cement-stem interface and increased stress within the cement mantle in contrast to chromium alloy (CoCrMo) stem. Thus, CoCrMo proved to be a better choice for cemented THA. Comparison between CoCrMo femoral stem of trapezium and circular cross section showed that trapezoidal stem experiences lesser sliding and debonding at interfaces than circular cross section stem. Also, trapezium cross section generated lower peak stress in femoral stem and cortical femur. In present study, femur head with diameter of 36 mm was considered for the analysis in order to avoid dislocation of the stem. Also, metallic femur head was coupled with cross linked polyethylene liner as it experiences negligible wear compared to conventional polyethylene liner and unlike metallic liner it is non carcinogenic.

  6. Use of tranexamic acid in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    MARRA, FRANCESCO; ROSSO, FEDERICA; BRUZZONE, MATTEO; BONASIA, DAVIDE EDOARDO; DETTONI, FEDERICO; ROSSI, ROBERTO

    2016-01-01

    Purpose different strategies have been developed to reduce blood loss in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The efficacy of both systemic and local tranexamic acid (TXA) administration is demonstrated in the literature. The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of systemic, local and combined (systemic + local) administration of TXA in reducing blood loss after TKA. Methods we enrolled all patients submitted to a primary TKA in our department between November 2014 and August 2015. They were divided into three groups corresponding to the method of TXA administration used: intravenous (IV), intra-articular (IA), and a combination of the two. Demographic data, as well as preoperative hemoglobin and platelet levels, were collected. The primary outcome was the maximum hemoglobin loss, while the secondary outcomes were the amount of blood in the drain (cc/hour) and the rate of transfusions; postoperative pain was also assessed. Student’s t-test or a χ2 test was used to evaluate between-group differences, using p<0.05 as the cut-off for statistically significant differences. Results the sample comprised 34 patients: IV, 10 cases; IA, 15 cases, and combined (IV + IA), 9 cases. The average age of the patients was 71.1±6.4 years. No significant differences in the outcome measures were found between the groups, with the exception of a significantly lower maximum hemoglobin loss in the combined versus the IV group (p=0.02). There were no differences between the groups in the amount of blood in the drain or the rate of transfusions. Conclusions the data from this preliminary study, as well as data from the literature, confirm that TXA administration is safe and effective in reducing total blood loss in TKA, and no administration protocol seems to be superior to the others. Level of evidence Level II, prospective comparative study. PMID:28217656

  7. Patient satisfaction with mobile compression devices following total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    McAsey, Craig J; Gargiulo, Jeanine M; Parks, Nancy L; Hamilton, William G

    2014-08-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate patient satisfaction with the use of a mobile compression device after anterior total hip arthroplasty. Two hundred forty-seven patients used the mobile compression device for 10 days after surgery with recommended adjunctive 325 mg aspirin therapy. The device has a rechargeable battery pack that weighs 1.65 lb and is attached to compression sleeves worn over the calves of both lower extremities. It delivers sequential compression to the sleeves at a pressure of 50 mm Hg for about 10 seconds at a cycle of 1/min and is synchronized to the patient's venous blood flow pulses. A questionnaire was administered to all patients at 1-month follow-up to gauge patient perception of the device. There were 14 questions about comfort, noise, cost, pain, skin breakdown, rash, and falls related to the device. Overall, 234 of 247 (94.7%) patients stated that they would use the device again. The most common complaint from patients was that the mobile compression device was cumbersome (63.6%). Twenty-five patients (10.1%) reported having a fall while using the device, although no fall-related injuries were documented. Therefore, the authors recommend counseling patients about fall risk and reminding them to use caution while moving about with the device. Despite the limitations described in this study, the data confirmed that patients who used the device had an overall positive response to the system and would choose to use the device again rather than using chemical agents for deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis.

  8. Intraoperative measurement of limb lengthening during total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Dimitrios Vasileiou; Koulouvaris, Panagiotis; Aggelidakis, Georgios Charalambos; Tsantes, Andreas Georgios; Lykissas, Marios Georgios; Mavrodontidis, Alexandros

    2017-01-01

    Background: Limb length discrepancy (LLD) after total hip arthroplasty (THA) is a common problem which cannot be completely resolved. Many techniques have been described in order to minimize postoperative LLD, but most of these techniques are difficult to apply. Ideal technique must be simple and accurate. The most simple technique using a suture tied on the skin has well-known limitations, but its accuracy has not been evaluated before. Materials and Methods: Sixty THAs in sixty patients (mean age 71 years, 1:1 male to female ratio) with hip osteoarthritis (37 cases in the right, and 23 cases in the left side) were studied in this prospective study. In all surgeries, the intraoperataive measurement of limb lengthening was performed using a suture tied on the skin of the lateral pelvis. The accuracy of this technique and correlation between intraoperative and postoperative radiological measurements of lengthening were evaluated. Results: The mean preoperative LLD was –7.5 mm while the mean postoperative LLD was 1.58 mm. The accuracy of this technique, defined as the mean difference between the intraoperative and postoperative measurements was 1.8 mm. A strong correlation between these two measurements was noticed (r = 0.86). Conclusion: The accuracy and correlation index of this simple technique were similar to those of other techniques. The studied technique is quite accurate when attention is given to certain details, such as the amount of tension applied on the suture, the position of the tied point on the skin, and the position of the leg during measurements.

  9. Periprosthetic tibial bone mineral density changes after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jaroma, Antti; Soininvaara, Tarja; Kröger, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may cause postoperative periprosthetic bone loss due to stress shielding. Bone also adapts to mechanical alterations such as correction of malalignment. We investigated medium-term changes in bone mineral density (BMD) in tibial periprosthetic bone after TKA. Patients and methods 86 TKA patients were prospectively measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), the baseline measurement being within 1 week after TKA and the follow-up measurements being at 3 and 6 months, and at 1, 2, 4, and 7 years postoperatively. Long standing radiographs were taken and clinical evaluation was done with the American Knee Society (AKS) score. Results The baseline BMD of the medial tibial metaphyseal region of interest (ROI) was higher in the varus aligned knees (25%; p < 0.001). Medial metaphyseal BMD decreased in subjects with preoperatively varus aligned knees (13%, p < 0.001) and in those with preoperatively valgus aligned knees (12%, p = 0.02) between the baseline and 7-year measurements. No statistically significant changes in BMD were detected in lateral metaphyseal ROIs. No implant failures or revision surgery due to tibial problems occurred. Interpretation Tibial metaphyseal periprosthetic bone is remodeled after TKA due to mechanical axis correction, resulting in more balanced bone stock below the tibial tray. The diaphyseal BMD remains unchanged after the initial drop, within 3–6 months. This remodeling process was related to good component survival, as there were no implant failures or revision operations due to tibial problems in this medium-term follow-up. PMID:27120266

  10. Are static and dynamic kinematics comparable after total knee arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Saevarsson, Stefan K; Romeo, Carolina I; Anglin, Carolyn

    2013-04-05

    Knee kinematics provide information about how the femoral, tibial and patellar bones or prosthetic components move relative to each other. Accurate knowledge of kinematics is valuable for implant design, comparisons between designs or surgical techniques, and to identify differences between patients with good and poor outcomes. Both static and dynamic imaging techniques have been used to evaluate kinematics. In general, static imaging is used to capture better quality images or to capture views that cannot be acquired by dynamic imaging, whereas dynamic imaging is used to capture real-life movements. How well static kinematics represent dynamic kinematics is subject to frequent debate and has not been adequately addressed, especially after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We compared the static and dynamic weightbearing kinematics of 10 female subjects after TKA. Using the same clinical scanner for both methods, static images were taken using our standard protocol, sequential-biplane radiographs at multiple flexion angles, as well as with dynamic video fluoroscopy during a step up activity. The static method can reliably measure all 12 degrees of freedom (DOF) after TKA, however only seven were compared due to the poorer out-of-plane reliability in the single-plane dynamic imaging. No differences were found between the static and dynamic kinematics for nine out of ten subjects. For one subject, however, a difference of 5-8° in internal/external tibial rotation was found. The research question, study purpose and the advantages and disadvantages of each method need to be considered when determining which imaging method to use.

  11. Proximal Scaphoid Arthroplasty Using the Medial Femoral Trochlea Flap

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, James P.; Burger, Heinze K.

    2013-01-01

    Background The medial trochlea of the femur (medial femoral trochlea, MFT) provides a source of convex osteocartilaginous vascularized bone that has been demonstrated to have a similar contour to the proximal scaphoid. This provides a potential solution for difficult recalcitrant proximal pole scaphoid nonunions. Materials and Methods Sixteen consecutive patients who underwent MFT proximal scaphoid arthroplasty were reviewed. Follow-up data were recorded at a minimum of 6 months, with an average of 14 months. The results of this cohort were previously reported in detail but are summarized herein. Description of Technique The ability to reconstruct both bone and cartilage of the nonunion enables the surgeon to resect the nonunited proximal pole to prepare for scaphoid reconstruction. A segment of osteocartilaginous MFT is harvested in dimensions required by the scaphoid defect. The MFT segment is harvested on the transverse branch of the descending geniculate vessels. Fixation may be achieved with ease due to the size of the reconstructed segment. Results Computed tomography imaging demonstrated 15 of 16 reconstructed scaphoids achieving osseous union. Follow-up range of motion (ROM) of the wrist averaged 46.0° extension (range 28-80°) and 43.8° flexion (range 10-80°), which was similar to preoperative (average 45.7° extension and 43.0° flexion). Scapholunate angles remained unaffected (51.6° preoperatively and 48.6° postoperatively), indicating preservation of carpal relationships. Conclusions Vascularized MFT flaps provide a useful tool in the treatment of difficult proximal pole scaphoid nonunions. Early follow-up demonstrates high rate of achieving union with acceptable ROM and good pain relief. PMID:24436821

  12. Comparative responsiveness of outcome measures for total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Giesinger, K.; Hamilton, D.F.; Jost, B.; Holzner, B.; Giesinger, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective The aim of this study was to compare the responsiveness of various patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) and clinician-reported outcomes following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) over a 2-year period. Methods Data were collected in a prospective cohort study of primary TKA. Patients who had completed Forgotten Joint Score-12 (FJS-12), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) osteoarthritis (OA) index, EQ-5D, Knee Society Score and range of movement (ROM) assessment were included. Five time points were assessed: pre-operative, 2 months, 6 months, 1 year and 2 years post-operative. Results Data from 98 TKAs were available for analysis. Largest effect sizes (ES) for change from pre-operative to 2-month follow-up were observed for the Knee Society Score (KSS) Knee score (1.70) and WOMAC Total (−1.50). For the period from 6 months to 1 year the largest ES for change were shown by the FJS-12 (0.99) and the KSS Function Score (0.88). The EQ-5D showed the strongest ceiling effect at 1-year follow-up with 84.4% of patients scoring the maximum score. ES for the time from 1- to 2-year follow-up were largest for the FJS-12 (0.50). All other outcome measures showed ES equal or below 0.30. Conclusion Outcome measures differ considerably in responsiveness, especially beyond one year post-operatively. Joint-specific outcome measures are more responsive than clinician-reported or generic health outcome tools. The FJS-12 was the most responsive of the tools assessed; suggesting that joint awareness may be a more discerning measure of patient outcome than traditional PROMs. PMID:24262431

  13. Daptomycin-loaded polymethylmethacrylate bone cement for joint arthroplasty surgery.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yuan-Ming; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Wei, Yu-Hong; Fang, Hsu-Wei; Hou, Hsiang-Huan; Chen, Chia-Chun; Chang, Chih-Hung

    2014-06-01

    Antibiotic-loaded acrylic bone cement has been frequently used as an infection prophylaxis or antibiotic-loaded spacer in infected arthroplasty. In addition, daptomycin has been used recently against broad spectrum Gram-positive organisms. The goal of this in vitro study is to investigate the bacteriacidal and mechanical properties of daptomycin-incorporated polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement and evaluate its feasibility for clinical use. Daptomycin (0.5, 1, or 2 g) was premixed with 40 g of PMMA bone cement powder before curing. The mechanical properties of the daptomycin-loaded acrylic bone cement (DLABC) were estimated following standard guidance, and the release profile and kinetics of daptomycin from PMMA were analyzed. The antimicrobial efficacy of DLABC was determined with a zone of inhibition (ZOI) assay against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermis, Enterococcus faecalis, and Enterococcus faecium, respectively. The results showed that the compressive strength, of PMMA bone cement, which was higher than 100 MPa in all groups, was sufficient according to ISO 5833 after incorporation of daptomycin. The encapsulated daptomycin was released for 2 weeks with a 9.59 ± 0.85%, 15.25 ± 0.69%, and 20.64 ± 20.33% released percentage on the first day in the low, mid, and high groups, respectively. According to the calculated release kinetics, incorporated daptomycin should be 3.3 times the original dose to double its release. Although all recipes of DLABC had a microbial inhibitory effect, the effect with a higher encapsulated amount of daptomycin was more significant. Therefore, we believe that daptomycin can be locally delivered from PMMA bone cement at the surgical site as a prophylactic or treatment for osteomyelitis against Gram-positive organisms with intact cement function.

  14. Multilevel cervical arthroplasty: current evidence. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Joaquim, Andrei F; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) has been demonstrated to be an effective treatment modality for single-level cervical radiculopathy or myelopathy. Its advantages over an anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) include motion preservation and decreased reoperations at the index and adjacent segments up to 7 years postoperatively. Considering the fact that many patients have multilevel cervical disc degeneration (CDD), the authors performed a systematic review of the clinical studies evaluating patients who underwent multilevel CDA (2 or more levels). METHODS A systematic review in the MEDLINE database was performed. Clinical studies including patients who had multilevel CDA were selected and included. Case reports and literature reviews were excluded. Articles were then grouped according to their main study objective: 1) studies comparing multilevel CDA versus ACDF; 2) studies comparing single-level CDA versus multilevel CDA; and 3) multilevel CDA after a previous cervical spine surgery. RESULTS Fourteen articles met all inclusion criteria. The general conclusions were that multilevel CDA was at least as safe and effective as ACDF, with preservation of cervical motion when compared with ACDF and potentially with fewer reoperations expected in most of the studies. Multilevel CDAs are clinically effective as single-level surgeries, with good clinical and radiological outcomes. Some studies reported a higher incidence of heterotopic ossification in multilevel CDA when compared with single-level procedures, but without clinical relevance during the follow-up period. A CDA may be indicated even after a previous cervical surgery in selected cases. CONCLUSIONS The current literature supports the use of multilevel CDA. Caution is necessary regarding the more restrictive indications for CDA when compared with ACDF. Further prospective, controlled, multicenter, and randomized studies not sponsored by the device manufactures are desirable to prove the

  15. Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery in Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Elmallah, Randa K; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Jauregui, Julio J; Padden, David A; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2015-05-01

    Complications following total hip arthroplasty (THA), such as dislocation, component loosening and wear, continue to be common indications for revision surgery. Multiple studies have attributed some of these problems to poor acetabular cup alignment and placement outside of the purported radiographic safe zone. In addition, it has been shown that conventional manually performed acetabular cup placement may not lead to optimal alignment, regardless of surgical experience. Additionally, incorrect leg length and offset can lead to dissatisfaction and instability. Therefore, robotic-arm assisted surgery has been introduced to improve accuracy of cup placement and leg length, and to offset with the aim of reducing the risk of hip instability and improving satisfaction after primary THA. Our aim was to prospectively review the use of robotic-arm assisted surgery in 224 patients and to assess whether the pre-operatively determined radiographic targets were achieved post-operatively and the proportion of acetabular cups outside of the safe zone. Pre-determined anteversion and inclination were 15 and 40 degrees, respectively. Our results have shown that the use of robotic-arm assisted surgery resulted in a post-operative mean inclination of 40 degrees (range, 34 to 51 degrees) and a mean anteversion of 16 degrees (range, 9 to 25 degrees). Ninety-nine percent of the patients remained within the pre-designated safe zone. Evidence has shown that robotic-arm assisted surgery may have improved accuracy in cup placement when compared to conventional surgery and possibly to computer-assisted surgery. When compared to the literature on robotic-arm assisted surgery, our results were comparable. We believe that this surgical technique may aid in reducing post-operative THA complications, such as aseptic loosening and dislocations, but further prospective studies are needed to evaluate clinical outcomes and long-term results.

  16. Thrombin-Based Hemostatic Agent in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xin; Tian, Peng; Xu, Gui-Jun; Sun, Xiao-Lei; Ma, Xin-Long

    2017-02-01

    The present meta-analysis pooled the results from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to identify and assess the efficacy and safety of thrombin-based hemostatic agent in primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Potential academic articles were identified from the Cochrane Library, Medline (1966-2015.5), PubMed (1966-2015.5), Embase (1980-2015.5), and ScienceDirect (1966-2015.5). Relevant journals and the recommendations of expert panels were also searched by using Google search engine. RCTs assessing the efficacy and safety of thrombin-based hemostatic agent in primary TKA were included. Pooling of data was analyzed by RevMan 5.1 (The Cochrane Collaboration, Oxford, UK). A total of four RCTs met the inclusion criteria. The meta-analysis revealed significant differences in postoperative hemoglobin decline (p < 0.00001), total blood loss (p < 0.00001), drainage volume (p = 0.01), and allogenic blood transfusion (p = 0.01) between the treatment group and the control group. No significant differences were found regarding incidence of infection (p = 0.45) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT; p = 0.80) between the groups. Meta-analysis indicated that the application of thrombin-based hemostatic agent before wound closure decreased postoperative hemoglobin decline, drainage volume, total blood loss, and transfusion rate and did not increase the risk of infection, DVT, or other complications. Therefore, the reviewers believe that thrombin-based hemostatic agent is effective and safe in primary TKA.

  17. TOTAL ANKLE ARTHROPLASTY: BRAZILIAN EXPERIENCE WITH THE HINTEGRA PROSTHESIS

    PubMed Central

    Nery, Caio; Fernandes, Túlio Diniz; Réssio, Cibele; Fuchs, Mauro Luiz; Godoy Santos, Alexandre Leme de; Ortiz, Rafael Trevisan

    2015-01-01

    Ankle arthrosis is becoming more and more common. The search for solutions that preserve joint function has led to a new generation of prosthesis with three components and more degrees of freedom. This paper presents the results achieved for ten patients treated with the HINTEGRA Prosthesis (Integra, New Deal), through collaborative action between the Foot and Ankle Groups of the Orthopedics and Traumatology divisions of Escola Paulista de Medicina, Unifesp, and the School of Medicine of the University of São Paulo (USP). The ten patients (six women and four men, aged between 29 and 66 years), underwent a surgical procedure consisting of Hintermann's technique, between January and June 2005. They were evaluated at prearranged intervals, and the data were subjected to statistical analysis. The surgery led to a significant improvement in ankle mobility. Radiological evaluation showed no signs of loosening or failure in the prosthetic components in any of the patients studied. Although the complication rate in our sample was high, it was equivalent to the rates found by other authors, and directly represents the learning curve associate with this kind of procedure. Four years after the procedure, it was found that the patients pain levels had significantly decreased, and that their functional patterns had significantly improved, with AOFAS and Hintermann scores indicating results that were excellent for 20%, good for 70% and poor for 10%. Treatment of ankle arthritis by means of total arthroplasty using the HINTEGRA prosthesis was capable of providing good results over an average observation period of four years. PMID:27022527

  18. Postoperative pain treatment after total knee arthroplasty: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Wetterslev, Mik; Hansen, Signe Elisa; Hansen, Morten Sejer; Mathiesen, Ole; Dahl, Jørgen B.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this systematic review was to document efficacy, safety and quality of evidence of analgesic interventions after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods This PRISMA-compliant and PROSPERO-registered review includes all-language randomized controlled trials of medication-based analgesic interventions after TKA. Bias was evaluated according to Cochrane methodology. Outcomes were opioid consumption (primary), pain scores at rest and during mobilization, adverse events, and length of stay. Interventions investigated in three or more trials were meta-analysed. Outcomes were evaluated using forest plots, Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE), L’Abbe Plots and trial sequential analysis. Results The included 113 trials, investigating 37 different analgesic interventions, were characterized by unclear/high risk of bias, low assay sensitivity and considerable differences in pain assessment tools, basic analgesic regimens, and reporting of adverse events. In meta-analyses single and continuous femoral nerve block (FNB), intrathecal morphine, local infiltration analgesia, intraarticular injection of local anaesthetics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and gabapentinoids demonstrated significant analgesic effects. The 24-hour morphine-sparing effects ranged from 4.2 mg (CI: 1.3, 7.2; intraarticular local anaesthetics), to 16.6 mg (CI: 11.2, 22; single FNB). Pain relieving effects at rest at 6 hours ranged from 4 mm (CI: -10, 2; gabapentinoids), to 19 mm (CI: 8, 31; single FNB), and at 24 hours from 3 mm (CI: -2, 8; gabapentinoids), to 16 mm (CI: 8, 23; continuous FNB). GRADE-rated quality of evidence was generally low. Conclusion A low quality of evidence, small sample sizes and heterogeneity of trial designs prohibit designation of an optimal procedure-specific analgesic regimen after TKA. PMID:28273133

  19. Analysis of complications of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    RUSSO, RAFFAELE; ROTONDA, GIUSEPPE DELLA; CICCARELLI, MICHELE; CAUTIERO, FABIO

    2015-01-01

    Purpose the aim of this study was to analyze complications of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA) used to treat different shoulder diseases. Methods from March 2000 to March 2013, 195 RTSA were implanted by the senior Author. The indications for reverse prosthesis surgery were secondary osteoarthritis (OA) in 49 cases, irreparable rotator cuff tear (RCT) in 48 cases, and complex humeral fractures in 75 cases, while 19 were patients requiring surgical revision for first prosthesis implant. We used different prostheses with different designs. Results the clinical and radiological results of all the patients were analyzed retrospectively at an average follow-up of 7 years. The cases were divided into four groups on the basis of the diagnosis and complications were classified as perioperative, postoperative, or late. The mean total Constant score improved from 28 to 69 points in the OA group; from 21 to 70.8 points in the irreparable RCT group, to 76.4 in the fracture group, and from 16.6 to 59.8 points in the revision group. Scapular notching was observed in 59 cases (30.2%). Thirty-three other complications (16.9%) were observed, namely: hematomas (n=3), instability of the humeral component (n=1), scapular spine fractures (n=2), ulnar nerve deficit (n=2), long thoracic nerve palsy (n=2), deep infections (n=2), periprosthetic fractures (n=6), glenoid fractures (n=2), implant loosening (n=2), anterior deltoid muscle deficiency (n=2) and periarticular heterotopic calcifications (n=9). Conclusions the rates of complications, especially fractures, reported in the present study were lower than those reported in the current literature. Level of evidence Level IV, therapeutic case series. PMID:26605252

  20. Complications with reverse total shoulder arthroplasty and recent evolutions.

    PubMed

    Scarlat, Marius M

    2013-05-01

    Since its description by Paul Grammont from Dijon, France, several tens of thousands of reverse total shoulder arthroplasties (RTSA) have been performed for diverse conditions. The purpose of this analysis is to identify the complications of this procedure in the literature and in clinical practice. A total of 240 papers concerning RTSA published between 1996 and 2012 have been identified. Over 80 papers describe complications associated with this type of implant. A list of prostheses satisfying European and US standards, CE and FDA approved, has been produced on the basis of information provided by the manufacturers. Data from the literature do not support a meta-analysis. The inventory of best practices shows excellent results in the short and medium term in specific indications, while the number of complications varies between 10 and 65 % in long-term series. Complications can be classified into (A) non-specific including infections (superficial and deep), phlebitis, haematoma, neurological complications of the suprascapular, radial and axillary nerves and (B) specific complications associated with RTSA including (1) on the glenoid side: intraoperative fracture of the glenoid and acromion, late fracture of the scapula, impingement at the scapular neck (notching), glenoid loosening, dissociation of the glenoid component (snatching of the glenosphere) and fractures of the glenoid baseplate; (2) on the humeral side: metaphyseal deterioration, humeral loosening, instability of the shoulder, stiffness with limitation of external and/or internal rotation; and (3) muscular complications with fatty degeneration of the deltoid. Additionally we have identified specific situations related to the type of implant such as the disassembly of the humeral or the glenoid component, dissociation of the polyethylene humeral plate, dissociation of the metaphysis and osteolysis of the tuberosities. The integration of results from different clinical series is difficult because of the

  1. Impingement and Dislocation in Total HIP Arthroplasty: Mechanisms and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Thomas D; Elkins, Jacob M; Pedersen, Douglas R; Callaghan, John J

    2014-01-01

    In contemporary total hip arthroplasty, instability has been a complication in approximately 2% to 5% of primary surgeries and 5% to 10% of revisions. Due to the reduction in the incidence of wear-induced osteolysis that has been achieved over the last decade, instability now stands as the single most common reason for revision surgery. Moreover, even without frank dislocation, impingement and subluxation are implicated in a set of new concerns arising with advanced bearings, associated with the relatively unforgiving nature of many of those designs. Against that backdrop, the biomechanical factors responsible for impingement, subluxation, and dislocation remain under-investigated relative to their burden of morbidity. This manuscript outlines a 15-year program of laboratory and clinical research undertaken to improve the scientific basis for understanding total hip impingement and dislocation. The broad theme has been to systematically evaluate the role of surgical factors, implant design factors, and patient factors in predisposing total hip constructs to impinge, sublux, and/or dislocate. Because this class of adverse biomechanical events had not lent itself well to study with existing approaches, it was necessary to develop (and validate) a series of new research methodologies, relying heavily on advanced finite element formulations. Specific areas of focus have included identifying the biomechanical challenges posed by dislocation-prone patient activities, quantifying design parameter effects and component surgical positioning effects for conventional metal-on-polyethylene implant constructs, and the impingement/dislocation behavior of non-conventional constructs, quantifying the stabilizing role of the hip capsule (and of surgical repairs of capsule defects), and systematically studying impingement and edge loading of hard-on-hard bearings, fracture of ceramic liners, confounding effects of patient obesity, and subluxation-mediated worsening of third body

  2. Myofascial pain in patients waitlisted for total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Richard; Cahill, Catherine M; Wood, Gavin; Hroch, Jennifer; Wilson, Rosemary; Cupido, Tracy; VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knee pain is one of the major sources of pain and disability in developed countries, particularly in aging populations, and is the primary indication for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). OBJECTIVES: To determine the presence of myofascial pain in OA patients waitlisted for TKA and to determine whether their knee pain may be alleviated by trigger point injections. METHODS: Following ethics approval, 25 participants were recruited from the wait list for elective unilateral primary TKA at the study centre. After providing informed consent, all participants were examined for the presence of active trigger points in the muscles surrounding the knee and received trigger point injections of bupivacaine. Assessments and trigger point injections were implemented on the first visit and at subsequent visits on weeks 1, 2, 4 and 8. Outcome measures included the Timed Up and Go test, Brief Pain Inventory, Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire. RESULTS: Myofascial trigger points were identified in all participants. Trigger point injections significantly reduced pain intensity and pain interference, and improved mobility. All participants had trigger points identified in medial muscles, most commonly in the head of the gastrocnemius muscle. An acute reduction in pain and improved functionality was observed immediately following intervention, and persisted over the eight-week course of the investigation. CONCLUSION: All patients had trigger points in the vastus and gastrocnemius muscles, and 92% of patients experienced significant pain relief with trigger point injections at the first visit, indicating that a significant proportion of the OA knee pain was myofascial in origin. Further investigation is warranted to determine the prevalence of myofascial pain and whether treatment delays or prevents TKA. PMID:23061082

  3. Causes of Aseptic Persistent Pain after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hong-An; Seon, Jong-Keun; Park, Kyung-Soon; Shin, Young-Joo; Yang, Hong-Yeol

    2017-01-01

    Background Persistent pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is dissatisfying to the patient and frustrating to the surgeon. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the aseptic causes and clinical course of intractable pain following TKA. Methods Of the total 2,534 cases of primary TKA reviewed, 178 cases were classified as having aseptic persistent pain that was not resolved within 1 year after surgery. Except for the cases with periprosthetic fracture (56 knees), 122 cases of aseptic painful TKA were divided into two groups: intra-articular group (83 knees) and extra-articular group (39 knees). Results In the intra-articular group, the main reasons for pain were aseptic loosening (n = 40), polyethylene wear (n = 16), instability (n = 10), recurrent hemarthrosis (n = 5), patellar maltracking (n = 4), tendon ruptures (n = 4), and stiffness (n = 2). In the extraarticular group, 10 knees (25.6%) were found to have nerve entrapment in the spine, 6 knees (15.4%) were found to have hip osteoarthritis or femoral head avascular necrosis. The reasons for persistent knee pain in the remaining 23 knees (59.0%) still remain elusive. Conclusions Persistent pain after TKA originated from pathology of extra-articular origin in a considerable number of cases in this study. Therefore, it is important to perform thorough preoperative evaluations to reduce pain resulting from extra-articular causes. Furthermore, meticulous surgical procedures and optimal alignment are required to reduce pain of intra-articular origin related to implant wear, instability, and patellar maltracking. PMID:28261427

  4. Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty and Work-Related Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Grant H; Taylor, Samuel A; Mahony, Gregory T; DePalma, Brian J; Grawe, Brian M; Nguyen, Joseph; Dines, Joshua S; Dines, David M; Warren, Russell F; Craig, Edward V; Gulotta, Lawrence V

    2016-01-01

    The average retirement age is increasing, and the indications for reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA) are being broadened. The goal of the current study was to determine objective findings for rate of return to work and time to return to work after RTSA. The authors performed retrospective data collection for consecutive patients who underwent RTSA at their institution between 2007 and 2013. All patients were asked to complete a questionnaire about their work history and their ability to participate in work-related activities. A total of 40 patients reported working before surgery. Average patient age was 74.7 years (range, 56-82 years). Average follow-up was 2.6 years (range, 1-4.7 years). Average American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score improved from 34.0 to 81.7 (P<.001). Average visual analog scale pain score decreased from 6.5 to 0.7 (P<.001). Most patients (65.4%) classified their job as sedentary, 34.6% classified their job as light work, and no patients classified their job as heavy work. Of patients who worked preoperatively, 65% (n=26) returned to work after RTSA. Only a previous diagnosis of heart disease affected return to work (P=.04). Overall, average time to return to work was 2.3 months (range, 0.5-11 months). Patients with sedentary jobs returned to work more quickly (1.4 months) than those with light work (4.0 months). A total of 96.2% of patients reported good to excellent surgical outcomes. Of patients who worked before RTSA, 65% were still working at final follow-up. Only 5% of patients retired for reasons attributed to the operated shoulder. On average, patients returned to work less than 3 months after surgery.

  5. Evolution of trochlear compartment geometry in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Demey, Guillaume; Nover, Luca; Dejour, David

    2016-01-01

    Background The study aimed to compare trochlear profiles in recent total knee arthroplasty (TKA) models and to determine whether they feature improvements compared to their predecessors. The hypothesis was that recent TKA models have more anatomic trochlear compartments and would display no signs of trochlear dysplasia. Methods The authors analyzed the geometry of the 6 following TKA models using engineering software: PFC and Attune (DePuy), NexGen and Persona (Zimmer), Noetos and KneeTec (Tornier). The mediolateral trochlear profiles were plotted at various flexion angles (0°, 15°, 30° and 45°) to deduce the sulcus angle. Results Analysis of sulcus angles reveals general convergence of recent designs towards anatomic values. At 0° of flexion, sulcus angles of recent implant models were between 156.0–157.4°, while those of previous generation models between 154.5–165.5°. At 30° of flexion, sulcus angles of recent models also lie within 145.7–148.6°, but those of previous models are between 149.5–152.0°. All three manufacturers deepened their trochlear profile at 30° of flexion in recent models compared to earlier designs. Sulcus angles converge towards anatomic values but still exceed radiologic signs of dysplasia by 2–5°. Conclusions Recent TKA designs have more anatomic trochlear geometries than earlier TKA models by the same manufacturers, but trochlear compartments still exceed radiologic signs of trochlear dysplasia by 2° to 5°. The hypothesis that recent TKA models display no signs of trochlear dysplasia is therefore refuted. Surgeons should be aware of design limitations to optimize choice of implant and extensor mechanisms alignment. Level of evidence: IV geometric implant analysis. PMID:26855943

  6. Nonvascularized Bone Grafting Defers Joint Arthroplasty in Hip Osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Seyler, Thorsten M.; Marker, David R.; Ulrich, Slif D.; Fatscher, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    A variety of nonvascularized bone grafting techniques have been proposed with varying degrees of success as treatment alternatives for osteonecrosis of the femoral head. The success of these procedures may be enhanced using ancillary growth and differentiation factors. We retrospectively reviewed 33 patients (39 hips) with osteonecrosis of the hip who had nonvascularized bone grafting procedures with supplemental OP-1. We compared the outcomes in this cohort to similar patients treated nonoperatively or with other nonvascularized bone grafting procedures. We used a trapdoor to make a window at the head-neck junction to remove necrotic bone and packed the excavated area with autogenous cancellous bone graft, marrow, and OP-1. The minimum followup was 24 months (mean, 36 months; range, 24–50 months). We performed no further surgery in 25 of 30 small- and medium-sized lesions (80%) but did in two of nine large lesions. Hips with Ficat Stage II disease were not reoperated in 18 of 22 cases during the followup periods. Our short-term results compare similarly to nonoperative treatment and other reports of nonvascularized bone grafting. With the addition of ancillary growth factors, these procedures effectively reduce donor site morbidity and may defer joint arthroplasty in selected patients. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11999-008-0211-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18351424

  7. Calcar Preservation Arthroplasty for Unstable Intertrochanteric Femoral Fractures in Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Togrul, Emre; Kose, Ozkan

    2015-01-01

    Background The treatment of unstable intertrochanteric fractures in elderly is still controversial. The purpose of this study is to present treatment strategies for unstable intertrochanteric fractures with hemiarthroplasty using standard uncemented collared femoral stems and at the same time preserving the fractured calcar fragment. Methods Fifty-four patients aged 75 years or older with unstable intertrochanteric fractures were included in this prospective cohort study. All patients were treated with calcar preserving hemiarthroplasty using cementless collored femoral stems. Fractured calcar fragment was stabilized either by compaction between the implant and femur or fixed with cable grip system. Follow-up evaluations were performed at least 24 months and later. Palmer and Parker mobility score and visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score were assessed. We also analyzed radiographs of the operated hip at each follow-up visit. Results The patients were 15 males and 39 females with a mean age of 81.3 years (range, 75 to 93 years). The average operative time was 86.6 minutes. The mean transfused blood units were 1.2 units. The average duration of hospital stay was 5.3 days. The preoperative mean mobility score was 6.20. This score was found to be 4.96 on postoperative third day and 5.90 at 24 months postoperatively. The results of the statistical analysis revealed significant increase in the mobility scores at each follow-up after three days. Radiological interpretation revealed no loosening in the cable-grip systems, and no significant subsidence (> 5 mm) of prosthesis was observed. Conclusions Calcar preservation arthroplasty is a good option for elderly patients with severe osteoporosis, frail constitution and the patients who are at higher risk for second operation due to unstable intertrochanteric fractures. PMID:26640625

  8. Postoperative cognitive changes after total knee arthroplasty under regional anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Young-Tae; Kim, Byung-Gun; Park, Young Ho; Sohn, Hye-Min; Kim, Jungeun; Kim, Seung Chan; An, Seong Soo; Kim, SangYun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The type of postoperative cognitive decline after surgery under spinal anesthesia is unknown. We investigated the type of postoperative cognitive decline after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Neuropsychological testing was conducted and the changes in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers after surgery were evaluated. Methods: Fifteen patients who required bilateral TKA at a 1-week interval under spinal anesthesia were included. Neuropsychological tests were performed twice, once the day before the first operation and just before the second operation (usually 1 week after the first test) to determine cognitive decline. Validated neuropsychological tests were used to examine 4 types of cognitive decline: memory, frontal-executive, language-semantic, and others. Concentrations of CSF amyloid peptide, tau protein, and S100B were measured twice during spinal anesthesia at a 1-week interval. The patients showed poor performance in frontal-executive function (forward digit span, semantic fluency, letter-phonemic fluency, and Stroop color reading) at the second compared to the first neuropsychological assessment. Results: S100B concentration decreased significantly 1 week after the operation compared to the basal value (638 ± 178 vs 509 ± 167 pg/mL) (P = 0.019). Amyloid protein β1–42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau concentrations tended to decrease but the changes were not significant. Conclusion: Our results suggest that frontal-executive function declined 1 week after TKA under spinal anesthesia. The CSF biomarker analysis indicated that TKA under regional anesthesia might not cause neuronal damage. PMID:28033253

  9. Endoplasmic reticulum stress activation during total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hocker, Austin D; Boileau, Ryan M; Lantz, Brick A; Jewett, Brian A; Gilbert, Jeffrey S; Dreyer, Hans C

    2013-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the most common remediation for knee pain from osteoarthritis (OA) and is performed 650,000 annually in the U.S. A tourniquet is commonly used during TKA which causes ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) to the lower limb but the effects of I/R on muscle are not fully understood. Previous reports suggest upregulation of cell stress and catabolism and downregulation of markers of cap-dependent translation during and after TKA. I/R has also been shown to cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and induce the unfolded protein response (UPR). We hypothesized that the UPR would be activated in response to ER stress during TKA. We obtained muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis at baseline, before TKA; at maximal ischemia, prior to tourniquet deflation; and during reperfusion in the operating room. Phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 and AKT decreased during ischemia (−28%, P < 0.05; −20%, P < 0.05, respectively) along with an increase in eIF2α phosphorylation (64%, P < 0.05) suggesting decreased translation initiation. Cleaved ATF6 protein increased in ischemia (39%, P = 0.056) but returned to baseline during reperfusion. CASP3 activation increased during reperfusion compared to baseline (23%, P < 0.05). XBP1 splicing assays revealed an increase in spliced transcript during ischemia (31%, P < 0.05) which diminished during reperfusion. These results suggest that in response to I/R during TKA all three branches of the ER stress response are activated. PMID:24159375

  10. Wear products of total hip arthroplasty: The case of polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Massin, P; Achour, S

    2017-03-01

    Among the bearing surfaces involved in a total hip arthroplasty, ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is the weak link. It is submitted to the friction of a harder bearing, producing wear particles, which, in turn, initiate an inflammatory reaction ultimately leading to osteolysis. This kind of bone deterioration sometimes turns out to an aggressive granuloma and may provoke implant loosening. Wear resistance of UHMWPE depends on its molecular weight and crystallinity. Some steps of the manufacturing process were improved to optimize its tribological properties and to slow down degradation resulting from mechanical (abrasion) and chemical (oxidation) phenomena. Its preparation and conservation must be performed in an inert atmosphere, i.e. without ambient oxygen. Its resistance to abrasion depends on its cross-linking degree. Its cross-linking rate was observed to increase proportionally to the irradiation doses, improving its wear resistance. However, its mechanical properties are impaired and moreover, it becomes oxidation sensitive. It is therefore necessary to submit it to a thermal treatment to eliminate free radicals that were produced during irradiation. More recently impregnation by vitamin E, a powerful anti-oxidant product, was proposed to preserve the polymer from in vivo oxidation while maintaining its mechanical properties. We raised the hypothesis that last-generation UHMWPE could offer the same wear resistance as the most performing bearings (ceramic-on-ceramic). Recent clinical results confirm the tribological performance of highly crosslinked UHMWPE in vivo. However, it remains to be seen whether this excellent wear resistance would persist under eccentric load such as edge loading, and if, in the long run, this kind of bearing proves capable of reducing the risk of osteolysis in young and active patients.

  11. Diagnosis and management of the infected total joint arthroplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Cuckler, J.M.; Star, A.M.; Alavi, A.; Noto, R.B. )

    1991-07-01

    The preoperative diagnosis of the infected orthopedic implant is complicated by lack of a single precise test to forewarn patient and surgeon of the presence of microorganisms. Given the overall limitation of accuracy of preoperative diagnosis to approximately 80% when 111In scanning, preoperative aspiration, and ESR are considered, it would seem prudent to approach each revision surgery with the possibility in mind of subclinical sepsis as the cause for failure of the implant. The essentials of surgical technique including thorough debridement of the wound and removal of all existing foreign bodies, especially including PMMA bone cement, are critical to minimizing the risk for occurrence or persistence of sepsis. Although the use of antibiotic impregnated bone cement may enhance the treatment of orthopedic sepsis, the data available to date lead to the conclusion that two-stage revision surgery in the face of known sepsis remains the cornerstone of surgical therapy for the infected implant, along with aggressive and rational antibiotic treatment. The surgeon is offered the following guidelines in the management of the septic total hip arthroplasty. 1. Preoperative evaluation including ESR, 111In WBC scan, and aspiration for culture and sensitivity (fluoroscopically guided for the hip) will produce on average approximately 80% accuracy. 2. Intraoperative cultures at the time of revision surgery should be obtained prior to administration of systemic antibiotics; three tissue specimens (hip capsule, femoral membrane, acetabular membrane) should be submitted for culture and sensitivity determination. 3. Careful debridement of the surgical site of granulation tissue and all foreign bodies (e.g., PMMA) should be performed within the limits of patient safety to maximize the likelihood of success. 37 refs.

  12. Functional outcome after successful internal fixation versus salvage arthroplasty of patients with a femoral neck fracture

    PubMed Central

    Zielinski, Stephanie M.; Keijsers, Noël L.; Praet, Stephan F.E.; Heetveld, Martin J.; Bhandari, Mohit; Wilssens, Jean Pierre; Patka, Peter; Van Lieshout, Esther M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine patient independency, health-related and disease-specific quality of life (QOL), gait pattern, and muscle strength in patients after salvage arthroplasty for failed internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture. Design Secondary cohort study to a randomized controlled trial. Setting Multicenter trial in the Netherlands, including 14 academic and non-academic hospitals Patients Patients after salvage arthroplasty for failed internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture were studied. A comparison was made with patients who healed uneventfully after internal fixation. Intervention None (observatory study) Main outcome measurements Patient characteristics, SF-12, and WOMAC scores were collected. Gait parameters were measured using plantar pressure measurement. Maximum isometric forces of the hip muscles were measured using a handheld dynamometer. Differences between the fractured and contralateral leg were calculated. Groups were compared using univariate analysis. Results Of 248 internal fixation patients (median age 72 years), salvage arthroplasty was performed in 68 patients (27%). Salvage arthroplasty patients had a significantly lower WOMAC score (median 73 versus 90, P=0.016) than patients who healed uneventfully after internal fixation. Health-related QOL (SF-12) and patient independency did not differ significantly between the groups. Gait analysis showed a significantly impaired progression of the center of pressure in the salvage surgery patients (median ratio −8.9 versus 0.4, P=0.013) and a significant greater loss of abduction strength (median −25.4 versus −20.4 N, P=0.025). Conclusion Despite a similar level of dependency and QOL, salvage arthroplasty patients have inferior functional outcome than patients who heal after internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture. PMID:24835623

  13. Analgesic drug consumption increases after knee arthroplasty: a pharmacoepidemiological study investigating postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Fuzier, Régis; Serres, Isabelle; Bourrel, Robert; Palmaro, Aurore; Montastruc, Jean-Louis; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse

    2014-07-01

    Knee arthroplasty remains the gold standard in the treatment of severe osteoarthritis. Chronic postoperative pain has been reported with a prevalence ranging from 15% to 47%. The aim of this study was to compare analgesic drug consumption before and after surgery as an indicator of pain after knee surgery. A pharmacoepidemiological method comparing analgesics and antineuropathic issues 1 year before and 1 year after surgery was used. All patients who underwent knee arthroplasty in the Midi-Pyrenees region (2.5 million inhabitants) were identified through the Health Insurance System Database. Increase of drug issues (all analgesics, antineuropathic drugs, strong opioids) was calculated and compared between several periods surrounding the surgery (12 months, 2 months, and 10 months before and after the knee arthroplasty). A multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify factors associated with chronic postoperative pain. The study included 1939 patients. An increase in analgesic, antineuropathic, and opioid drug consumption was observed the year after the surgery in 47.3%, 8.6%, and 5.6% of patients, respectively. Multivariate analysis found a significant association between type of surgery (total knee vs unicompartmental arthroplasty) and analgesic consumption 1 year after surgery, and between preoperative pain and psychiatric vulnerability and increase in neuropathic drug dispensing. Conversely, older age was considered as a protective factor. This study revealed that an increase in the issue of different analgesic drugs is present in half of patients 1 year after knee arthroplasty. Several associated factors of drug consumption (preoperative pain, type of surgery, and psychiatric disorder) were identified.

  14. Total knee arthroplasty following tibial plateau fracture: a matched cohort study.

    PubMed

    Scott, C E H; Davidson, E; MacDonald, D J; White, T O; Keating, J F

    2015-04-01

    Radiological evidence of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) after fracture of the tibial plateau is common but end-stage arthritis which requires total knee arthroplasty is much rarer. The aim of this study was to examine the indications for, and outcomes of, total knee arthroplasty after fracture of the tibial plateau and to compare this with an age and gender-matched cohort of TKAs carried out for primary osteoarthritis. Between 1997 and 2011, 31 consecutive patients (23 women, eight men) with a mean age of 65 years (40 to 89) underwent TKA at a mean of 24 months (2 to 124) after a fracture of the tibial plateau. Of these, 24 had undergone ORIF and seven had been treated non-operatively. Patients were assessed pre-operatively and at 6, 12 and > 60 months using the Short Form-12, Oxford Knee Score and a patient satisfaction score. Patients with instability or nonunion needed total knee arthroplasty earlier (14 and 13.3 months post-injury) than those with intra-articular malunion (50 months, p < 0.001). Primary cruciate-retaining implants were used in 27 (87%) patients. Complication rates were higher in the PTOA cohort and included wound complications (13% vs 1% p = 0.014) and persistent stiffness (10% vs 0%, p = 0.014). Two (6%) PTOA patients required revision total knee arthroplasty at 57 and 114 months. The mean Oxford knee score was worse pre-operatively in the cohort with primary osteoarthritis (18 vs 30, p < 0.001) but there were no significant differences in post-operative Oxford knee score or patient satisfaction (primary osteoarthritis 86%, PTOA 78%, p = 0.437). Total knee arthroplasty undertaken after fracture of the tibial plateau has a higher rate of complications than that undertaken for primary osteoarthritis, but patient-reported outcomes and satisfaction are comparable. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2015;97-B:532-8.

  15. Internal fixation versus arthroplasty for displaced femoral neck fractures: what is the evidence?

    PubMed

    Heetveld, Martin J; Rogmark, Cecilia; Frihagen, Frede; Keating, John

    2009-07-01

    A review of the current evidence for internal fixation versus hemiarthroplasty versus primary total hip arthroplasty for displaced femoral neck fractures was undertaken. At the meta-analysis level no difference in postoperative pain, function, or quality of life can yet be demonstrated. A significant difference in mortality has also not been found, but a trend towards higher mortality after primary arthroplasty is possible. Internal fixation (IF) has less morbidity, but a higher risk of revision and less cost-effectiveness. Independent adjudication for IF technique is rare in studies and bias towards higher revision rates due to technical failure is an issue. Randomized trials comparing IF with arthroplasty remain underpowered in specific subgroups of patients, in which IF revision rates could be acceptable. In hemiarthroplasty the data suggest minimal differences in outcome between the prosthesis types. The cementless Austin-Moore prosthesis is out-dated. Currently a cemented unipolar or bipolar, depending on costs, hemi-arthroplasty is the treatment of choice for an elderly patient with functional limitations before the fracture. The role of modern, uncemented hemiarthroplasty designs are uncertain until more data are published. Total hip arthroplasty (THA) should be considered in any active older patient with a displaced femoral neck fracture. Patients with concomitant osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or renal failure do poorly with other treatment options and should be treated with THA. Randomized trials have shown THA to be a cost-effective treatment with lower revision rates than IF. THA may also appear to be superior to hemiarthroplasty in specific subgroups, but larger trials are needed to confirm this observation.

  16. Incidence, Causes and Predictors of 30-Day Readmission After Shoulder Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Westermann, Robert W; Anthony, Chris A.; Duchman, Kyle R.; Pugely, Andrew J.; Gao, Yubo; Hettrich, Carolyn M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Service has identified several quality metrics, including unplanned readmission within 30 days of surgery, to assess and compare surgeons and hospitals. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence, causes and risk factors for unplanned 30-day readmission after total shoulder arthroplasty. Methods We identified patients undergoing primary elective shoulder arthroplasty performed at American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) participating hospitals in 2013. Cases were stratified by readmission status. Univariate and multivariate analyses were employed to assess patient demographics, comorbidities and operative variables predicting unplanned readmission. Results 2779 patients undergoing shoulder arthroplasty were identified, with 74 (2.66%) requiring unplanned readmissions within 30 days of surgery. The most common surgical causes for unplanned readmission were surgical site infections (18.6%), dislocations (16.3%) and venous thromboembolism (14.0%). Medical causes for readmission were responsible for 51% of unplanned readmissions. Multivariate analysis identified patient age >75 (OR 2.62, 95% CI: 1.27 - 5.41), and ASA class of 3 (OR 1.79, 95% CI: 1.01 - 3.18) or 4 (OR 3.63, 95% CI: 1.31 - 10.08) as independent risk factors for unplanned readmission. Predictive modeling estimated that patients with ASA class of 4 and age >75 are 17.4 times more likely (95% CI 1.77-171.09) to be readmitted within 30 days of shoulder arthroplasty. Conclusion Unplanned readmission after shoulder arthroplasty is infrequent and medical complications account for more than 50% of occurrences. The risk of readmission exponentially increases when age and preoperative comorbidity burden are increased. PMID:27528839

  17. Effect of training level on accuracy of digital templating in primary total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Andrew R; Kim, Jeffrey D; Bhatia, Sanjeev; Levine, Brett R

    2012-02-17

    The use of digital radiography and templating software continues to become more prevalent in orthopedics as the number of total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) procedures increases every year. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of training level on the accuracy of digital templating for primary THA and TKA. Digital radiographs of 97 patients undergoing primary THA (49 cases) and TKA (48 cases) were retrospectively templated using OrthoView digital planning software (OrthoView LLC, Jacksonville, Florida). Anteroposterior hip and lateral knee radiographs were digitally templated and compared with the actual size of the implants used intraoperatively. An implant sales representative, physician assistant, medical student (J.D.K.), resident (A.R.H.), and fellowship-trained arthroplasty surgeon (B.R.L.) templated all cases independently after a standardized orientation and were blinded to the actual component sizes used for surgery. The medical student, resident, and arthroplasty surgeon retemplated the same 97 cases 1 month later to determine intraobserver reliability. Digital templating was accurate in predicting the correct implant size in 33% of THAs and 54% of TKAs. In 73% of THAs and 92% of TKAs, digital templating was within 1 size of the actual implant used, and in 88% of THAs and 99% of TKAs, templating was within 2 sizes of the final components. In no cases did the templated implant size vary by >3 sizes from the final components. Interobserver reliability for templating THAs and TKAs showed good reliability as measured by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) (ICC(THA)=.70; ICC(TKA)=.86). Intraobserver reliability for templating THAs had excellent reliability for the resident and arthroplasty surgeon, with a kappa coefficient (κ) of 0.92, and good reliability for the medical student (κ=0.78). Intraobserver reliability for templating TKAs showed excellent reliability among all examiners (κ=0.90).

  18. Research evidence for the use of preoperative exercise in patients preparing for total hip or total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Barbay, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    Preoperative exercise/rehabilitation is currently being considered to improve outcomes for orthopaedic surgery. This article presents an evidence-based practice review of the current research literature from 1998 to 2008 to determine whether preoperative exercise alone will be beneficial to patients preparing for total knee or hip arthroplasty. Only 3 studies met the inclusion criteria of preoperative exercise as the sole intervention. Each of these studies indicated that preoperative exercise had some postoperative benefit to total knee or hip arthroplasty patients. In general, the results are inconclusive due to the lack of strong research evidence, and only a pragmatic recommendation for preoperative exercise prior to total hip or knee arthroplasty is supported. More research is needed in the area of preoperative exercise for persons preparing for total hip or knee arthroplasty.

  19. [Osteoarthritis of the knee in the young patient--who should receive total knee arthroplasty and who should not?].

    PubMed

    Dornacher, D; Kappe, T; Reichel, H

    2014-06-01

    The incidence of total knee arthroplasty in young patients continues to rise in certain countries despite evidence of decreased patient satisfaction and increased likelihood for revision in patients 55 years of age or less. As long as sufficient pain relief and functional improvement can be obtained by alternative means, total knee arthroplasty should be avoided whenever possible. In young patients with unicompartmental osteoarthritis, and a partially conserved joint space, correctional osteotomy around the knee accompanied by cartilage surgery should be preferred in the presence of the respective deformity. In cases of advanced unicompartmental arthritis, unicompartmental arthroplasty should be considered even in younger patients. Only if advanced arthritic changes in more than one compartment or accompanying tibiofemoral instability are present in younger patients, is total knee arthroplasty indicated in selected cases. The strongest predictor of satisfaction even in younger patients is, however, a realistic expectation about the outcome of surgery.

  20. Lunate silicone replacement arthroplasty in Kienböck's disease: a long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Alexander, A H; Turner, M A; Alexander, C E; Lichtman, D M

    1990-05-01

    We report a long-term follow-up (average, 5 years) of 10 patients who had lunate silicone replacement arthroplasty for treatment of Kienböck's disease. Clinical results were assessed on relief of pain, return to normal occupation, and range of motion. At 18- to 20-months follow-up, eight patients had satisfactory results, whereas at final follow-up only five of the patients had satisfactory results. Three of five patients with radiographs averaging 57 months after operation had evidence of particulate synovitis. Contrary to our previous publications on silicone replacement arthroplasty, it was concluded that the success rate for silicone replacement arthroplasty and the incidence of particulate synovitis do not warrant the continued use of silicone replacement arthroplasty as a primary treatment modality for Kienböck's disease.

  1. A resident survey study of orthopedic fellowship specialty decision making and views on arthroplasty as a career.

    PubMed

    Hariri, Sanaz; York, Sally C; O'Connor, Mary I; Parsley, Brian S; McCarthy, Joseph C

    2011-09-01

    A dramatic shortage of total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) surgeons has been projected because fewer residents enter arthroplasty fellowships, and the demand for THAs/TKAs is rising. The purposes of this study were to ascertain the future supply of THA/TKA surgeons, to identify the criteria residents use to choose their fellowship specialty, and to assess resident perceptions of an arthroplasty career. Four hundred ninety-eight post-graduate year 3 and above residents completed the online survey. Residents most highly prioritize intellectual factors and role models/mentors in determining their fellowship specialty. In the face of a looming patient access-to-care crisis, the data from this study support a policy of highlighting the intellectual challenges and satisfaction of THA/TKA as a career and encouraging mentorship early in a resident's training.

  2. Comparison between intravenous and intra-articular regimens of tranexamic acid in reducing blood loss during total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Soni, Ashwani; Saini, Raghav; Gulati, Anmol; Paul, Rajesh; Bhatty, Shiraj; Rajoli, Sreekanth Reddy

    2014-08-01

    Tranexamic acid is an antifibrinolytic drug used widely to prevent bleeding. Its use in reducing bleeding during total knee arthroplasty surgery is well proven but there is no final consensus regarding the regimen. The purpose of our study was to compare the effectiveness of intravenous and intra-articular regimen of tranexamic acid during the total knee arthroplasty surgery. A total of 40 patients were received three doses of intravenous tranexamic acid during total knee arthroplasty surgery. Intra-articular tranexamic acid was used in 40 patients during the surgery. We concluded that intra-articular tranexamic acid is equally effective as three dose intravenous regimen in reducing blood loss during total knee arthroplasty surgery.

  3. Arthroscopic Scar Resection for the Treatment of Anteromedial Knee Pain after Oxford Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Kohei; Michishita, Kazuhiko; Manabe, Takeshi; Akasaka, Yoshiyuki; Kaminaga, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: It has been reported that the unicompartmental knee arthroplasty has good long-term outcomes for Western and Japanese patients. Alternatively, several reports have described reoperations after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty because of post-operative knee pain and sometimes it is difficult to diagnose the cause of pain. Case Report: We treated a patient with anteromedial knee pain caused by intra-articular scar tissue that contained residual cement fragments on the anterior surface of a femoral implant following Oxford unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. After arthroscopic resection of the scar tissue and removal of the 3 mm residual cement covered with the scar tissue, the patient’s post-operative symptoms were considerably alleviated. Conclusion: This is the first report describing a case of painful intra-articular scar tissue following unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. PMID:28164064

  4. Outcomes Study of the TM Reverse Shoulder System Used in Primary or Revision Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-10

    Osteoarthritis; Rheumatoid Arthritis; Post-traumatic Arthritis; Ununited Humeral Head Fracture; Irreducible 3-and 4-part Proximal Humeral Fractures; Avascular Necrosis; Gross Rotator Cuff Deficiency; Failed Total Shoulder Arthroplasty (Both Glenoid and Humeral Components Require Revision

  5. Severe Pelvic Obliquity Affects Femoral Offset in Patients with Total Hip Arthroplasty but Not Leg-Length Inequality.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Xianlong; Chen, Yunsu; Peng, Xiaochun; Mao, Yuanqing; Yang, Yang; Fu, Beigang; Wang, Xiuhui; Tang, Tingting

    2015-01-01

    Leg-length inequality is an extensively studied complication of total hip arthroplasty in normal patients. However, few studies have focused on the pelvic obliquity of coronal pelvic malrotation. We hypothesized that pelvic obliquity with a fixed abduction/adduction contracture deformity of the hip may intraoperatively affect the release of soft tissues, ultimately resulting in a leg-length inequality. This study also investigated whether the femoral and vertical offsets of total hip arthroplasty were correlated with pelvic obliquity. This prospective study divided 98 patients into six groups based on the inclination of pelvic obliquity before total hip arthroplasty. Leg-length inequality, variation of pelvic obliquity, offset, and vertical offset were measured after total hip arthroplasty. Leg-length inequality and vertical offset were not significantly different among groups, whereas the variation of pelvic obliquity was significantly higher in type IIC pelvic obliquity than in other groups. Type IC pelvic obliquity had a significantly shorter offset than did the other groups, which may have been an important factor leading to type IC pelvic obliquity. Pelvic obliquity exhibited no significant effect on leg-length inequality in patients with total hip arthroplasty. A shorter offset may be caused by the higher tension of the abductor in the operated hip, which may result in the formation of type IC pelvic obliquity. Releasing the abductor contracture and restoring femoral offset are important for increasing hip stability and maintaining pelvic balance following total hip arthroplasty.

  6. Effects of Neuromuscular Reeducation on Hip Mechanics and Functional Performance in Patients after Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Judd, Dana L.; Winters, Joshua D.; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E.; Christiansen, Cory L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Following total hip arthroplasty, patients demonstrate compensatory movement strategies during activities of daily living such as walking and stair climbing. Movement compensations are important markers of functional decline in older adults and are related to poor functional capacity. Despite increased utilization of hip arthroplasty, persistent movement compensation, and functional performance deficits, no consensus on postoperative rehabilitation exists. Neuromuscular reeducation techniques offer a strategy to improve movement quality by emphasizing hip abductor performance and pelvic stability. This case series illustrates changes in movement strategy around the hip in response to targeted neuromuscular reeducation techniques after hip arthroplasty. Methods Five participants received an 8-week exercise program following total hip arthroplasty, emphasizing targeted neuromuscular reeducation techniques hallmarked by specific, weight-bearing exercise to improve hip abductor performance and pelvic stability. Five additional participants were supervised and followed for comparison. Findings Participants in the neuromuscular reeducation program improved their internal hip abductor moments and vertical ground reaction forces during walking and stair climbing. They also improved their functional performance and hip abductor strength outcomes. Interpretation Targeted neuromuscular reeducation techniques after total hip arthroplasty provided a positive effect on biomechanical outcomes, functional performance, and muscle strength. Through focused use of the hip abductor muscles, increased internal hip abductor moments were observed. This intervention potentially promotes pelvic stability, and may contribute to improved performance on tasks such as stair climbing, fast walking, and balance. The results suggest that neuromuscular reeducation offers a unique effect on movement strategy and function for patients following total hip arthroplasty. PMID:26802531

  7. Changes in foot function, disease activity, and disability after forefoot resection arthroplasty in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sawachika, Fusakazu; Uemura, Hirokazu; Katsuura-Kamano, Sakurako; Yamaguchi, Miwa; Bahari, Tirani; Miki, Keisuke; Todo, Satoshi; Inoo, Masayuki; Onishi, Ikuko; Kurata, Noriyuki; Arisawa, Kokichi

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in foot function, disease activity, and disability in patients with RA after resection arthroplasty of the forefoot (arthroplasty). Arthroplasty was performed on 11 patients with RA. All study patients underwent clinical assessment to measure disease activity (Disease Activity Score in 28 Joints-C-reactive protein, DAS28-CRP), disability (Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index, HAQ-DI) and foot function (Foot Function Index, FFI) at the following stages: preoperatively and 1, 3, and 12 months after surgery. Following arthroplasty, foot function improved significantly, as assessed by FFI total and subscales (pain, disability, and limitation of activity) (P<0.001, P<0.001, P<0.001, and P=0.002, respectively). Disease activity was significantly improved in relation to DAS28-CRP and its subscales of number of swollen joints and patient global assessment (PtGA) (P=0.033, P=0.008, and P=0.038, respectively). There was no significant difference in disability, as assessed by the HAQ-DI and its subscale, HAQ-walking (P=0.150 and P=0.597, respectively). Foot function improved significantly after arthroplasty, and was maintained at 12 months postoperatively. Additionally, our study showed that disease activity and its subscale PtGA improved after arthroplasty.

  8. Severe Pelvic Obliquity Affects Femoral Offset in Patients with Total Hip Arthroplasty but Not Leg-Length Inequality

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Xianlong; Chen, Yunsu; Peng, Xiaochun; Mao, Yuanqing; Yang, Yang; Fu, Beigang; Wang, Xiuhui; Tang, Tingting

    2015-01-01

    Leg-length inequality is an extensively studied complication of total hip arthroplasty in normal patients. However, few studies have focused on the pelvic obliquity of coronal pelvic malrotation. We hypothesized that pelvic obliquity with a fixed abduction/adduction contracture deformity of the hip may intraoperatively affect the release of soft tissues, ultimately resulting in a leg-length inequality. This study also investigated whether the femoral and vertical offsets of total hip arthroplasty were correlated with pelvic obliquity. This prospective study divided 98 patients into six groups based on the inclination of pelvic obliquity before total hip arthroplasty. Leg-length inequality, variation of pelvic obliquity, offset, and vertical offset were measured after total hip arthroplasty. Leg-length inequality and vertical offset were not significantly different among groups, whereas the variation of pelvic obliquity was significantly higher in type IIC pelvic obliquity than in other groups. Type IC pelvic obliquity had a significantly shorter offset than did the other groups, which may have been an important factor leading to type IC pelvic obliquity. Pelvic obliquity exhibited no significant effect on leg-length inequality in patients with total hip arthroplasty. A shorter offset may be caused by the higher tension of the abductor in the operated hip, which may result in the formation of type IC pelvic obliquity. Releasing the abductor contracture and restoring femoral offset are important for increasing hip stability and maintaining pelvic balance following total hip arthroplasty. PMID:26673427

  9. Two-Year Incidence and Predictors of Future Knee Arthroplasty in Persons with Symptomatic Knee Osteoarthritis: Preliminary Analysis of Longitudinal Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangrong; Jiranek, William A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective There is little evidence to guide physicians when discussing future likelihood of knee arthroplasty with patients who have symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. Data from Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) was used to determine the incidence of and predictors for knee arthroplasty. Methods OAI data were collected on a sample of 778 persons aged 45 to 79 years with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. An extensive set of measurements were obtained at baseline and persons were followed for 2 years to identify who underwent knee arthroplasty. Random forest analysis was used to identify optimal variables that discriminate among those who did and those who did not undergo knee arthroplasty. Results The two year incidence of knee arthroplasty in the cohort was 3.7% (95%CI, 2.6%, 5.3%). Because of the low number of knee arthroplasty procedures, the predictor analysis was preliminary in nature. The analysis identified several variables that could be used to assist in identifying patients at future risk for knee arthroplasty. Conclusion For persons at high risk of knee arthroplasty, the two year incidence of knee arthroplasty is very low. The most powerful predictors were those that accounted for disease severity and functional loss. These data could assist physicians in advising patients with knee osteoarthritis on future surgical care. PMID:19419874

  10. Durability of cervical disc arthroplasties and its influence factors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chao; Zhang, Xiaolin; Ma, Xinlong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The durability of cervical disc arthroplasties (CDA) may vary significantly because of different designs and implanting techniques of the devices. Nevertheless, the comparative durability remains unknown. Objectives: We aimed to assess the durability of CDAs in at least 2-year follow-up. We analyzed the classifications and causes of secondary surgical procedures, as well as the structural designs of the devices that might influence the durability. Methods: PubMed, Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched from the inception of each database to September 2015 using the following Keywords: “cervical disc replacement” OR “cervical disc arthroplasty” AND “randomized controlled trial (RCT).” Publication language was restricted to English. The primary outcome was the rate of secondary surgical procedures following CDA or anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF). Pairwise meta-analysis and a Bayesian network meta-analysis were carried out using Review Manager v5.3.5 and WinBUGS version 1.4.3, respectively. Quality of evidence was appraised by Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology. Results: Twelve RCTs that met the eligibility criteria were included. Follow-up ranged from 2 years to 7 years. A total of 103 secondary surgical procedures were performed. The most frequent classification of secondary surgical procedures was reoperation (48/103) and removal (47/103). Revision (3/103) and supplementary fixation (2/103) were rare. Adjacent-level diseases were the most common cause of reoperations. The rates of secondary surgical procedures were significantly lower in Mobi-C, Prestige, Prodisc-C, Secure-C group than in ACDF group. No significant difference was detected between Bryan, PCM, Kineflex-C, Discover, and ACDF. Mobi-C, Secure-C, and Prodisc-C ranked the best, the second best, the third best, respectively. Conclusions: We concluded that Mobi-C, Secure

  11. Resource utilization and costs before and after total joint arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare pre- and post-surgical healthcare costs in commercially insured total joint arthroplasty (TJA) patients with osteoarthritis (OA) in the United States (U.S.). Methods Using a large healthcare claims database, we identified patients over age 39 with hip or knee OA who underwent unilateral primary TJA (hip or knee) between 1/1/2006 and 9/30/2007. Utilization of healthcare services and costs were aggregated into three periods: 12 months "pre-surgery," 91 days "peri-operative," and 3 to 15 month "follow-up," Mean total pre-surgery costs were compared with follow-up costs using Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results 14,912 patients met inclusion criteria for the study. The mean total number of outpatient visits declined from pre-surgery to follow-up (18.0 visits vs 17.1), while the percentage of patients hospitalized increased (from 7.5% to 9.8%) (both p < 0.01). Mean total costs during the follow-up period were 18% higher than during pre-surgery ($11,043 vs. $9,632, p < 0.01), largely due to an increase in the costs of inpatient care associated with hospital readmissions ($3,300 vs. $1,817, p < 0.01). Pharmacotherapy costs were similar for both periods ($2013 [follow-up] vs. $1922 [pre-surgery], p = 0.33); outpatient care costs were slightly lower in the follow-up period ($4338 vs. $4571, p < 0.01). Mean total costs for the peri-operative period were $36,553. Conclusions Mean total utilization of outpatient healthcare services declined slightly in the first year following TJA (exclusive of the peri-operative period), while mean total healthcare costs increased during the same time period, largely due to increased costs associated with hospital readmissions. Further study is necessary to determine whether healthcare costs decrease in subsequent years. PMID:22443109

  12. Monoblock versus modular polyethylene insert in uncemented total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Mikkel Rathsach; Winther, Nikolaj; Lind, Thomas; SchrøDer, Henrik; Flivik, Gunnar; Petersen, Michael Mørk

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — Backside wear of the polyethylene insert in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) can produce clinically significant levels of polyethylene debris, which can lead to loosening of the tibial component. Loosening due to polyethylene debris could theoretically be reduced in tibial components of monoblock polyethylene design, as there is no backside wear. We investigated the effect of 2 different tibial component designs, monoblock and modular polyethylene, on migration of the tibial component in uncemented TKA. Patients and methods — In this randomized study, 53 patients (mean age 61 years), 32 in the monoblock group and 33 in the modular group, were followed for 2 years. Radiostereometric analysis (RSA) was done postoperatively after weight bearing and after 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. The primary endpoint of the study was comparison of the tibial component migration (expressed as maximum total point motion (MTPM)) of the 2 different implant designs. Results — We did not find any statistically significant difference in MTPM between the groups at 3 months (p = 0.2) or at 6 months (p = 0.1), but at 12 and 24 months of follow-up there was a significant difference in MTPM of 0.36 mm (p = 0.02) and 0.42 mm (p = 0.02) between groups, with the highest amount of migration (1.0 mm) in the modular group. The difference in continuous migration (MTPM from 12 and 24 months) between the groups was 0.096 mm (p = 0.5), and when comparing MTPM from 3–24 months, the difference between the groups was 0.23 mm (p = 0.07). Interpretation — In both study groups, we found the early migration pattern expected, with a relatively high initial amount of migration from operation to 3 months of follow-up, followed by stabilization of the implant with little migration thereafter. However, the modular implants had a statistically significantly higher degree of migration compared to the monoblock. We believe that the greater stiffness of the modular implants was the

  13. Monoblock versus modular polyethylene insert in uncemented total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mikkel Rathsach; Winther, Nikolaj; Lind, Thomas; SchrøDer, Henrik; Flivik, Gunnar; Petersen, Michael Mørk

    2016-12-01

    Background and purpose - Backside wear of the polyethylene insert in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) can produce clinically significant levels of polyethylene debris, which can lead to loosening of the tibial component. Loosening due to polyethylene debris could theoretically be reduced in tibial components of monoblock polyethylene design, as there is no backside wear. We investigated the effect of 2 different tibial component designs, monoblock and modular polyethylene, on migration of the tibial component in uncemented TKA. Patients and methods - In this randomized study, 53 patients (mean age 61 years), 32 in the monoblock group and 33 in the modular group, were followed for 2 years. Radiostereometric analysis (RSA) was done postoperatively after weight bearing and after 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. The primary endpoint of the study was comparison of the tibial component migration (expressed as maximum total point motion (MTPM)) of the 2 different implant designs. Results - We did not find any statistically significant difference in MTPM between the groups at 3 months (p = 0.2) or at 6 months (p = 0.1), but at 12 and 24 months of follow-up there was a significant difference in MTPM of 0.36 mm (p = 0.02) and 0.42 mm (p = 0.02) between groups, with the highest amount of migration (1.0 mm) in the modular group. The difference in continuous migration (MTPM from 12 and 24 months) between the groups was 0.096 mm (p = 0.5), and when comparing MTPM from 3-24 months, the difference between the groups was 0.23 mm (p = 0.07). Interpretation - In both study groups, we found the early migration pattern expected, with a relatively high initial amount of migration from operation to 3 months of follow-up, followed by stabilization of the implant with little migration thereafter. However, the modular implants had a statistically significantly higher degree of migration compared to the monoblock. We believe that the greater stiffness of the modular implants was the main

  14. Can segmental mobility be increased by cervical arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsuan-Kan; Chang, Chih-Chang; Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Wu, Jau-Ching; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Fay, Li-Yu; Chang, Peng-Yuan; Wu, Ching-Lan; Cheng, Henrich

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Many reports have successfully demonstrated that cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) can preserve range of motion after 1- or 2-level discectomy. However, few studies have addressed the extent of changes in segmental mobility after CDA or their clinical correlations. METHODS Data from consecutive patients who underwent 1-level CDA were retrospectively reviewed. Indications for surgery were medically intractable degenerative disc disease and spondylosis. Clinical outcomes, including visual analog scale (VAS)-measured neck and arm pain, Neck Disability Index (NDI), and Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores, were analyzed. Radiographic outcomes, including C2-7 Cobb angle, the difference between pre- and postoperative C2-7 Cobb angle (ΔC2-7 Cobb angle), sagittal vertical axis (SVA), the difference between pre- and postoperative SVA (ΔSVA), segmental range of motion (ROM), and the difference between pre- and postoperative ROM (ΔROM), were assessed for their association with clinical outcomes. All patients underwent CT scanning, by which the presence and severity of heterotopic ossification (HO) were determined during the follow-up. RESULTS A total of 50 patients (mean age 45.6 ± 9.33 years) underwent a 1-level CDA (Prestige LP disc) and were followed up for a mean duration of 27.7 ± 8.76 months. All clinical outcomes, including VAS, NDI, and JOA scores, improved significantly after surgery. Preoperative and postoperative ROM values were similar (mean 9.5° vs 9.0°, p > 0.05) at each indexed level. The mean changes in segmental mobility (ΔROM) were -0.5° ± 6.13°. Patients with increased segmental mobility after surgery (ΔROM > 0°) had a lower incidence of HO and HO that was less severe (p = 0.048) than those whose ΔROM was < 0°. Segmental mobility (ROM) was significantly lower in patients with higher HO grade (p = 0.012), but it did not affect the clinical outcomes. The preoperative and postoperative C2-7 Cobb angles and SVA remained similar

  15. Essential amino acid supplementation in patients following total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Dreyer, Hans C.; Strycker, Lisa A.; Senesac, Hilary A.; Hocker, Austin D.; Smolkowski, Keith; Shah, Steven N.; Jewett, Brian A.

    2013-01-01

    Background. By the year 2030, 3.48 million older U.S. adults are projected to undergo total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Following this surgery, considerable muscle atrophy occurs, resulting in decreased strength and impaired functional mobility. Essential amino acids (EAAs) have been shown to attenuate muscle loss during periods of reduced activity and may be beneficial for TKA patients. Methods. We used a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial with 28 older adults undergoing TKA. Patients were randomized to ingest either 20 g of EAAs (n = 16) or placebo (n = 12) twice daily between meals for 1 week before and 2 weeks after TKA. At baseline, 2 weeks, and 6 weeks after TKA, an MRI was performed to determine mid-thigh muscle and adipose tissue volume. Muscle strength and functional mobility were also measured at these times. Results. TKA patients receiving placebo exhibited greater quadriceps muscle atrophy, with a –14.3 ± 3.6% change from baseline to 2 weeks after surgery compared with –3.4 ± 3.1% for the EAA group (F = 5.16, P = 0.036) and a –18.4 ± 2.3% change from baseline to 6 weeks after surgery for placebo versus –6.2 ± 2.2% for the EAA group (F = 14.14, P = 0.001). EAAs also attenuated atrophy in the nonoperated quadriceps and in the hamstring and adductor muscles of both extremities. The EAA group performed better at 2 and 6 weeks after surgery on functional mobility tests (all P < 0.05). Change in quadriceps muscle atrophy was significantly associated with change in functional mobility (F = 5.78, P = 0.021). Conclusion. EAA treatment attenuated muscle atrophy and accelerated the return of functional mobility in older adults following TKA. Trial registration. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00760383. Funding. Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), Office of the Director (OD), and the National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS), NIH grant K01HD057332, and the Medical

  16. Cementless total hip arthroplasty in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun; Zeng, Min; Xie, Jie; Wen, Ting; Hu, Yihe

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Controversies on the surgical protocols and efficacies of total hip arthroplasty (THA) in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) still exist. The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze the perioperative managements and their outcomes related to performing THA on patients with AS. Data of 54 AS patients who underwent 81 THAs between 2008 and 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Clinical and imaging data were collected preoperatively, postoperatively, and during the follow-up period for surgical efficacy. Using posterolateral approach, cementless prostheses were selected in all cases. Mean follow-up period was 3.6 years (range, 2–8 years). Inclinations and anteversions of acetabular cups were 36.3°±4.5° (range, 30°–50°) and 12.3°±4.9° (range, 0°–25°) respectively. Mean visual analog scale (VAS) score decreased from 6.7 ± 2.1 (range, 4–10) preoperatively to 1.5 ± 1.0 (range, 0–4) at final follow-up, and mean Harris hip score (HHS) improved from 31.2 ± 11.6 (range, 15–45) to 86.1 ± 4.3 (range, 80–95) (P < 0.05). Postoperative range of motion (ROM) in flexion was improved from 6.7°±13.5° (range, 0°–50°) preoperatively to 82.5°±6.4° (range, 70°–100°) at final follow-up, and ROM in extension was improved from 1.8°±5.7°(range, 0°–15°) to 15.4°±2.6° (range, 10°–20°) (P < 0.05). Heterotopic ossification (HO) was documented in 9 hips (11.1%). Signs of stable fibrous ingrowth and bone ingrowth were detected in 52 and 29 hips, respectively. Sciatic never injury was occurred in 3 cases, and treated conservatively. There were no signs of periprosthetic fractures, dislocation, or prosthesis loosening. Surgical efficacies of THA for AS patients with severe hip involvement are satisfactory. PMID:28121928

  17. The use of a modular system to convert an anatomical total shoulder arthroplasty to a reverse shoulder arthroplasty: Clinical and radiological results.

    PubMed

    Weber-Spickschen, T S; Alfke, D; Agneskirchner, J D

    2015-12-01

    If a modular convertible total shoulder system is used as a primary implant for an anatomical total shoulder arthroplasty, failure of the prosthesis or the rotator cuff can be addressed by converting it to a reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA), with retention of the humeral stem and glenoid baseplate. This has the potential to reduce morbidity and improve the results. In a retrospective study of 14 patients (15 shoulders) with a mean age of 70 years (47 to 83) we reviewed the clinical and radiological outcome of converting an anatomical shoulder arthroplasty (ASA) to a RSA using a convertible prosthetic system (SMR system, Lima, San Daniele, Italy). The mean operating time was 64 minutes (45 to 75). All humeral stems and glenoid baseplates were found to be well-fixed and could be retained. There were no intra-operative or early post-operative complications and no post-operative infection. The mean follow-up was 43 months (21 to 83), by which time the mean visual analogue scale for pain had decreased from 8 pre-operatively to 1, the mean American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Score from 12 to 76, the mean Oxford shoulder score from 3 to 39, the mean Western Ontario Osteoarthritis of the Shoulder Score from 1618 to 418 and the mean Subjective shoulder value from 15 to 61. On radiological review, one patient had a lucency around the humeral stem, two had stress shielding. There were no fatigue fractures of the acromion but four cases of grade 1 scapular notching. The use of a convertible prosthetic system to revise a failed ASA reduces morbidity and minimises the rate of complications. The mid-term clinical and radiological results of this technique are promising.

  18. Preclinical computational models: predictors of tibial insert damage patterns in total knee arthroplasty: AAOS exhibit selection.

    PubMed

    Morra, Edward A; Heim, Christine S; Greenwald, A Seth

    2012-09-19

    Computational models that predict clinical surface damage of the tibial insert during activities of daily living are emerging as powerful tools to assess the safety and efficacy of contemporary total knee arthroplasty designs. These models have the advantage of quickly determining the performance of new designs at low cost, and they allow direct comparison with the performance of classic, clinically successful designs. This study validated finite element and kinematic modeling predictions through comparison with preclinical physical testing results, damage patterns on retrieved tibial inserts, and clinically measured knee motion. There is a mounting body of evidence to support the role of computational modeling as a preclinical tool that enables the optimization of total knee arthroplasty designs and the auditing of component quality control before large-scale manufacturing is undertaken.

  19. Total Hip Arthroplasty for Implant Rupture after Surgery for Atypical Subtrochanteric Femoral Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, Yu; Ochi, Hironori; Watari, Taiji; Matsumoto, Mikio; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Treatment methods for delayed union and nonunion of atypical femoral fracture are still controversial. Moreover, no treatment method has been established for implant rupture caused by delayed union and nonunion. We encountered a 74-year-old female in whom nonunion-induced implant rupture occurred after treatment of atypical subtrochanteric femoral fracture with internal fixation using a long femoral nail. It was unlikely that sufficient fixation could be obtained by repeating osteosynthesis alone. Moreover, the patient was elderly and early weight-bearing activity was essential for early recovery of ADL. Based on these reasons, we selected one-stage surgery with total hip arthroplasty and osteosynthesis with inverted condylar locking plate as salvage procedures. Bone union was achieved at 6 months after surgery. This case illustrated that osteosynthesis-combined one-staged total hip arthroplasty could be considered as one of the options for nonunion-induced implant rupture of atypical femoral subtrochanteric fracture. PMID:27818818

  20. Change in preoperative expectations in patients undergoing staged bilateral primary total knee or total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Poultsides, Lazaros A; Ghomrawi, Hassan M K; Lyman, Stephen; Aharonoff, Gina B; Mancuso, Carol A; Sculco, Thomas P

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare preoperative expectation scores between stages in patients with bilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA) using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). For patients with TKA (57), ICC was 0.449, indicating fair agreement between stages; expectations did not change for 31% of patients, whereas 40% had higher and 29% had lower expectations. For patients with THA (55), ICC was 0.663, indicating moderate agreement; expectations did not change for 42% of patients, whereas 38% had higher and 20% had lower expectations. In multivariable analyses controlling for first expectation score, second expectation score was associated with better Western Ontario McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index stiffness score for TKA and with worse Western Ontario McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index function score for patients with THA. For most patients, expectations changed between staged bilateral TKA and THA, but the direction of change was not uniform.

  1. Patient perspective survey of total hip vs total knee arthroplasty surgery.

    PubMed

    de Beer, Justin; Petruccelli, Danielle; Adili, Anthony; Piccirillo, Liz; Wismer, David; Winemaker, Mitch

    2012-06-01

    A 42-item survey was developed and administered to determine patient perception of and satisfaction with total hip arthroplasty (THA) vs total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A total of 153 patients who had both primary THA and TKA for osteoarthritis with 1-year follow-up were identified. Survey response rate was 72%. Patients were more satisfied with THA meeting expectations for improvement in function and quality of life (P < .05), whereas pain relief expectations were equivalent. Most patients (70.9%) reported that TKA required more physiotherapy. One-year Oxford score and improvement in Oxford score from preoperative to 1 year were superior for THAs (P = .000). Despite equivalent pain relief, THAs trend toward higher satisfaction compared with TKAs. THA is more likely to "feel normal" with greater improvement in Oxford score. Recovery from TKA requires more physiotherapy and a longer time to achieve a satisfactory recovery status. Patients should be counseled accordingly.

  2. Consensus Statement on Indications and Contraindications for Medial Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Berend, Keith R; Berend, Michael E; Dalury, David F; Argenson, Jean-Noel; Dodd, Chris A; Scott, Richard D

    2015-01-01

    Previous work, now nearly 30 years dated, is frequently cited as the "gold standard" for the indications and contraindications for medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). The purpose of this article is to review current literature on the indications and contraindications to UKA and develop a consensus statement based on those data. Six surgeons with a combined experience of performing more than 8,000 partial knee arthroplasties were surveyed. Surgeons then participated in a discussion, emerging proposal, collaborative modification, and final consensus phase. The final consensus on primary indications and contraindications is presented. Notably, the authors provide consensus on previous contraindications, which are no longer considered to be contraindications. The authors provide an updated and concise review of the current indications and contraindications for medial UKA using scientifically based consensus-building methodology.

  3. Knee arthrodesis as limb salvage for complex failures of total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kuchinad, Raul; Fourman, Mitchell S; Fragomen, Austin T; Rozbruch, S Robert

    2014-11-01

    Patients with multiple failures of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are challenging limb salvage cases. Twenty one patients over the last 10 years were referred to our service for knee fusion by arthroplasty surgeons who felt they were not candidates for revision TKA. Active infection was present in 76.2% and total bone loss averaged 6.6 cm. Lengthening was performed in 7/22 patients. Total time in Ilizarov frames was 9 months, with 93.3% union. Patients treated with IM fusion nails had 100% union. Average LLD increased from 3.6 to 4.5 cm following intervention, while those with concurrent lengthening improved to 1.6 cm. Findings suggest that bone loss and the soft-tissue envelope dictate knee fusion method, and multiple techniques may be needed. A treatment algorithm is presented.

  4. Continuous Quadratus Lumborum Block for Postoperative Pain in Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hockett, Margaret M; Hembrador, Sheena; Lee, Alex

    2016-09-15

    A 69-year-old man with a history of chronic pain and opioid use presented for total hip arthroplasty. In the interests of ensuring early mobilization and pain control, we chose a continuous quadratus lumborum block technique, a novel ultrasound-guided block that has not yet been described for total hip arthroplasty, hypothesizing that it would be motor-sparing. While the perineural catheter was infused, the patient required no IV opioids. He was able to ambulate on the first postoperative day, reporting pain scores between 0 and 3/10. The quadratus lumborum block is a promising technique that, in our patient, was motor-sparing and provided excellent pain control.

  5. Lumbar total disc arthroplasty: coronal midline definition and optimal TDA placement.

    PubMed

    Marshman, Laurence A G; Friesem, Tai; Rampersaud, Y Raja; Le Huec, Jean-Charles; Krishna, Manoj; Reddy, Guru R

    2008-01-01

    It is a general principle with arthroplasty insertion that precise implant centering is critical for long term function and outcome. Whilst some authors have proclaimed that lumbar total disc arthroplasty (TDA) may be different, and that off -centre placement may be functionally well tolerated, these claims are premature: significantly worse clinical results have already been reported with poorly placed TDA at 2 years. Accurate TDA placement requires a precise and consistent definition of the desired coronal midline target (which is currently lacking), as well as a procedural mechanism to optimize placement at that target. We summarize our experience, as well as others', in achieving these two requirements. Long-term outcomes after lumbar TDA insertion should only be compared with results from fusion where TDAs have been implanted accurately.

  6. Effect of Polyethylene Crosslinking and Bearing Design on Wear of Unicompartmental Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Netter, Jonathan; Hermida, Juan C; D'Alessio, Jerry; Kester, Mark; D'Lima, Darryl D

    2015-08-01

    Wear and polyethylene damage continue to be important factors affecting outcomes of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. We compared two design rationales for unicompartmental arthroplasty: fully congruent mobile bearings; or moderately conforming fixed bearings using experimental and computational wear simulation. Experimental wear rates were 3.89 (±0.12) mg/million cycles for the highly crosslinked Triathlon PKR fixed bearing compared to 18.35 (±0.19) mg/million cycles for the low crosslinked Oxford mobile bearing. Finite element analysis was used to calculate the effect of crosslinking and backside wear. Increase in polyethylene crosslinking reduced wear by 68% while backside wear comprised 46% of the total wear in the mobile bearing. Increasing conformity may not be the sole predictor of wear performance and highly crosslinked fixed-bearing polyethylene insert can also provide high wear performance.

  7. Double bundle tendon graft for rotational stabilization of lunate implant arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Henry, Mark

    2011-03-01

    Kienbock's disease can lead to unsalvageable collapse of the lunate due to avascular necrosis but with reasonably intact cartilage surfaces preserved at the head of the capitate and lunate fossa of the radius. An emerging alternative to traditional treatments for this stage is lunate implant arthroplasty with a hard material. Although, the problem of osteolysis previously seen with silicone implant arthroplasty is expected to be overcome, stabilization of both the implant and the carpus as a whole remains a challenge. The described surgical technique uses a double bundle tendon graft to stabilize the lunate implant against both excessive translational as well as sagittal plane rotational motions. The strategy also stabilizes the scaphoid and the carpus against intercalated segment instability and collapse.

  8. [Locomotive syndrome and frailty. Total knee arthroplasty supports active life of the elderly].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Toshifumi; Sekiya, Ichiro; Muneta, Takeshi

    2012-04-01

    For a society with an aging population, it is important to extend healthy life expectancy. Knee arthroplasty is one of the most successful and beneficial treatments for osteoarthritic knees, helping the elderly improve their activities of daily life. Previous reports have proved health-related quality of life improves dramatically with this surgery. In particular, pain and physical functioning scores improve significantly. Although the preoperative physical activity of each patient does affect the postoperative activity level, sufficient improvements can be expected for this procedure on the elderly. These effective improvements make the number of knee arthroplasties increase year to year. The elderly have high risks of postoperative medical complications. However, long term results are comparable or superior to those in younger patients. In elderly patients, pre-existing conditions should be carefully controlled, and postoperative complications, including infection and thrombosis, should be treated prophylactically to promote safety and postoperative recovery.

  9. Effect of immediate postoperative physical therapy on length of stay for total joint arthroplasty patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Antonia F; Stewart, Melissa K; Heyl, Alma E; Klatt, Brian A

    2012-06-01

    The isolated effect of physical therapy (PT) on total joint arthroplasty hospital length of stay (LOS) has not been studied. A prospective cohort study was conducted on 136 primary total joint arthroplasties (58 hips, 78 knees). The LOS was determined by the operative start time until the time of discharge. On postoperative day (POD) 0, 60 joints remained in bed, 51 moved to a chair, and 25 received PT (22 ambulated, 3 moved to a chair). Length of stay differed for patients receiving PT on POD 0 (2.8 ± 0.8 days) compared with POD 1 (3.7 ± 1.8 days) (P = .02). There was no difference in PT treatment based on nausea/vomiting, pain levels, or discharge location. Isolated PT intervention on POD 0 shortened hospital LOS, regardless of the intervention performed.

  10. The impact of blood management on length of stay after primary total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Monsef, Jad B; Della Valle, Alejandro G; Mayman, David J; Marx, Robert G; Ranawat, Amar S; Boettner, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    The current study investigates the impact of patient factors, surgical factors, and blood management on postoperative length of stay (LOS) in 516 patients who underwent primary total knee arthroplasty. Age, gender, type of anticoagulation, but not body mass index (BMI) were found to be highly significant predictors of an increased LOS. Allogeneic transfusion and the number of allogeneic units significantly increased LOS, whereas donation and/or transfusion of autologous blood did not. Hemoglobin levels preoperatively until 48 hours postoperatively were negatively correlated with LOS. After adjusting for confounding factors through Poisson regression, age (p = 0.001) and allogeneic blood transfusion (p = 0.002) were the most significant determinants of LOS. Avoiding allogeneic blood plays an essential role in reducing the overall length of stay after primary total knee arthroplasty.

  11. Translational and rotational knee joint stability in anterior and posterior cruciate-retaining knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lo, JiaHsuan; Müller, Otto; Dilger, Torsten; Wülker, Nikolaus; Wünschel, Markus

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated passive translational and rotational stability properties of the intact knee joint, after bicruciate-retaining bi-compartmental knee arthroplasty (BKA) and after posterior cruciate retaining total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Fourteen human cadaveric knee specimens were used in this study, and a robotic manipulator with six-axis force/torque sensor was used to test the joint laxity in anterior-posterior translation, valgus-varus, and internal-external rotation. The results show the knee joint stability after bicruciate-retaining BKA is similar to that of the native knee. On the other hand, the PCL-retaining TKA results in inferior joint stability in valgus, varus, external rotation, anterior and, surprisingly, posterior directions. Our findings suggest that, provided functional ligamentous structures, bicruciate-retaining BKA is a biomechanically attractive treatment for joint degenerative disease.

  12. Enhanced recovery protocol and hidden blood loss in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Dhawan, Rohit; Rajgor, Harshadkumar; Yarlagadda, Rathan; John, John; Graham, Niall M

    2017-01-01

    Background: Perioperative blood loss and postoperative pain following total knee arthroplasty prevent early mobilisation of patients. The Enhanced Recovery Protocol (ERP) followed for patients in our institute aims at reducing post operative pain, blood loss and length of stay. Materials and Methods: 50 consecutive patients that underwent ERP following total knee arthroplasty with another group of 70 patients that underwent the same surgery without ERP were compared in terms of hidden blood loss and length of hospital stay. Hidden blood loss was calculated according to previously described method. Results: Reduction in blood loss was found in both males (305 ml) and females (150 ml) following ERP. Length of stay reduced by 1.5 days in both genders. Regression analysis showed a significant correlation between body weight and blood loss in females. Conclusion: Enhanced recovery protocol could be a useful tool to reduce patient morbidity and reduce length of inpatient stay.

  13. Animal-associated bacteria, Erysipelotrix rhusiopathiae, as the cause of infection in a total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Troelsen, Andres; Møller, Jens K; Bolvig, Lars; Prynø, Thomas; Pedersen, Lisbeth N; Søballe, Kjeld

    2010-04-01

    Invasive infection with animal-associated bacteria, Erysipelotrix rhusiopathiae, is unusual and has, to our knowledge, never been described as the cause of infected total hip arthroplasty. We describe how an infected total hip arthroplasty caused by these bacteria is eradicated using standard surgical and antibiotic treatment. Before 2-stage revision surgery, the patient had persistent groin pain, elevated C-reactive protein, radiographic periprosthetic osteolysis, excessive intra-articular fluid, and periprosthetic activity accumulation on the white cell scan. The patient was treated with benzylpenicillin after confirmed sensitivity of E rhusiopathiae diagnosed by culture of five tissue samples and polymerase chain reaction of the prosthetic sonicate sample. Sixteen weeks after the last stage of revision surgery, there were no signs of reoccurring infection.

  14. Comparison between closed suction drainage and nondrainage in total knee arthroplasty: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi-dong; Guo, Wan-shou; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Zhao-hui; Cheng, Li-ming; Li, Zi-rong

    2011-12-01

    From individual randomized studies, it is not clear whether a closed suction drainage should be used after total knee arthroplasty. Our meta-analysis compares the clinical outcomes of closed suction drainage with nondrainage after total knee arthroplasty in randomized controlled trials reported between January 1966 and May 2010. Fifteen eligible trials involving 1361 knee incisions (686 knees with closed suction drainage and 675 knees without drainage) satisfied the inclusion criteria for our meta-analysis. The result of the meta-analysis indicates that closed suction drainage reduces the incidence of soft tissue ecchymosis and requirement for dressing reinforcement, but increases the rate of homologous blood transfusion. No significant difference between drainage and nondrainage was observed in the incidence of infection, deep venous thrombosis, or postoperative range of motion.

  15. Femoral quadriceps neuromuscular electrical stimulation after total knee arthroplasty: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Volpato, Helena Bruna Bettoni; Szego, Paulo; Lenza, Mario; Milan, Silvia Lefone; Talerman, Claudia; Ferretti, Mario

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation in patients submitted to total knee arthroplasty. This was a systematic review with no language or publication status restriction. Our search was made in Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Embase and LILACS. Randomized or quasi-randomized clinical trials evaluating neuromuscular electrical stimulation after total knee arthroplasty were included. Four studies with moderate risk of bias and low statistical power were included, totalizing 376 participants. There was no statistically significant difference in knee function, pain and range of motion during 12 month follow-up. This review concluded that neuromuscular electrical stimulation was less effective than traditional rehabilitation in function, muscular strength and range of motion. However, this technique was useful for quadriceps activation during the first days after surgery. PMID:26537511

  16. The effect of obesity on mechanical failure after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Fessy, Michel-Henri

    2015-01-01

    “Increased aseptic tibial failures in patients with a BMI ≥35 and well-aligned total knee arthroplasties” published in The Journal of Arthroplasty on July 2, 2015 draws the conclusion that the risk of revision total knee arthroplasties (TKA) due to aseptic tibial component loosening is two times greater in patients with a BMI ≥35 kg/m2, independent of age or limb alignment. This result confirms that obese patients are at a higher risk of mechanical complications after performing TKA, independently from the risk of infection. This study suggests that the management of obese patients for TKA must be meticulous, careful, and should inspire from great bone deformations in valgus of varus when choosing implants. PMID:26697470

  17. Partial transmalleolar approach for lateral impingement after total ankle arthroplasty: a case report.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takumi; Nakamura, Ichiro; Miura, Ayumi; Momoyama, Gen; Ito, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    Advances in implant technology have made total ankle arthroplasty an increasingly popular alternative to arthrodesis for the management of ankle arthritis. However, a frequent complication of the procedure is nerve impingement related to either to heterotrophic bone growth or the prosthesis itself. Successful resolution of this complication presents a challenge to clinicians. We present a case of lateral impingement following total ankle arthroplasty that was successfully treated using a partial transmalleolar approach to effect a partial osteotomy of the lateral malleolus and create a fragment attached to the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments. This approach provides a good operative field in the lateral gutter with minimal soft tissue impairment. It also facilitates curettage, and resolution of tissue impingement. The osteotomy site healed fully by 3 months postoperative, and the pain around the lateral malleolus resolved. Furthermore, the patient's score on the Japanese Society for Surgery of the Foot Ankle/Hindfoot Scale improved from 33 preoperatively to 82 at 6 months postoperative.

  18. Posterior shoulder instability following anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty: A case report and review of management

    PubMed Central

    Galvin, Joseph W.; Eichinger, Josef K.; Boykin, Robert E.; Szöllösy, Gregor; Lafosse, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of posterior shoulder instability following anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA). In addition, we present guidelines to aid in the management of posterior instability after TSA. A 50-year-old male underwent anatomic TSA for glenohumeral osteoarthritis. Postoperatively, the patient developed posterior instability secondary to glenoid retroversion. He did not improve despite conservative treatment. He underwent an arthroscopic posterior bone block procedure, 4-month after his index arthroplasty. At 14-month follow-up, the patient had regained near full motion and strength, and radiographs demonstrated osseous integration with no evidence of component loosening. Posterior instability following TSA is a relatively rare complication and challenging to manage. The posterior, arthroscopic iliac crest bone block grafting procedure represents a treatment option for posterior instability in the setting of a stable glenoid prosthesis following TSA. PMID:26622130

  19. The Classic: Modular Total Knee-Replacement Arthroplasty. A Review of Eighty-nine Patients

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Fifty-eight osteoarthritic and thirty-one rheumatoid patients underwent modular total knee-replacement arthroplasty. The major indication for the operation was relief of pain. Contraindications to this resurfacing arthroplasty included varus-valgus instability of over 20 degrees, combined varus-valgus instability with flexion contracture of over 40 degrees, marked recurvatum, and predominant patellofemoral symptoms. In 59 per cent of the osteoarthritic and 58 per cent of the rheumatoid patients, complete relief of pain was evident when they were evaluated twenty-four months after surgery, while another 35 per cent of each group had only mild pain related to inclement weather. Their ability to walk long distances without support or limp was increased. Range of motion and ability to climb stairs were not significantly improved. PMID:18795387

  20. Secondary Patellar Resurfacing after Primary Bicondylar Knee Arthroplasty did Not Meet Patients’ Expectations

    PubMed Central

    Correia, João; Sieder, Marc; Kendoff, Daniel; Citak, Mustafa; Gehrke, Thorsten; Klauser, Wolfgang; Haasper, Carl

    2012-01-01

    Secondary patella resurfacing is a controversial procedure which is applied in patients with anterior knee pain after a bicondylar knee arthroplasty (with unresurfaced patella). A group of 46 patients were submitted to this procedure and their satisfaction, range of motion and pain improvement was evaluated. 52.2% of the patients were satisfied with the procedure, with an improvement in pain (Visual Analogue Scale) of 65% and an improvement in range of motion in 56,5%, with roundabout half of the patients having no resolution to their complaints. Whilst an improvement was not achieved in all patients, as it was initially hypothesised, this procedure should be considered when a revision knee arthroplasty is performed with an unresurfaced patella. PMID:23002412

  1. Secondary Patellar Resurfacing after Primary Bicondylar Knee Arthroplasty did Not Meet Patients' Expectations.

    PubMed

    Correia, João; Sieder, Marc; Kendoff, Daniel; Citak, Mustafa; Gehrke, Thorsten; Klauser, Wolfgang; Haasper, Carl

    2012-01-01

    Secondary patella resurfacing is a controversial procedure which is applied in patients with anterior knee pain after a bicondylar knee arthroplasty (with unresurfaced patella). A group of 46 patients were submitted to this procedure and their satisfaction, range of motion and pain improvement was evaluated. 52.2% of the patients were satisfied with the procedure, with an improvement in pain (Visual Analogue Scale) of 65% and an improvement in range of motion in 56,5%, with roundabout half of the patients having no resolution to their complaints. Whilst an improvement was not achieved in all patients, as it was initially hypothesised, this procedure should be considered when a revision knee arthroplasty is performed with an unresurfaced patella.

  2. Blastomycosis infection of the knee treated with staged total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    MacLean, Ian S; Day, Shandra R; Moore, Christopher C; Browne, James A

    2015-12-01

    Blastomycosis is a rare fungal disease that can cause intraarticular infection and joint destruction requiring surgical reconstruction. We describe a patient who presented with destruction of the knee joint of unknown etiology. The patient was initially treated with debridement and spacer placement followed by antifungal therapy after cultures grew blastomycosis. Following adequate treatment of the infection, the patient was taken back to the operating room for reconstruction with a total knee arthroplasty. The patient had a successful outcome with no evidence of infection at two years following surgery. To our knowledge, this case report represents the first documented case in which a blastomycotic infection of a native knee was successfully treated with a two-stage total knee arthroplasty.

  3. Effect of patellar thickness on knee flexion in total knee arthroplasty: a biomechanical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Abolghasemian, Mansour; Samiezadeh, Saeid; Sternheim, Amir; Bougherara, Habiba; Barnes, C Lowry; Backstein, David J

    2014-01-01

    A biomechanical computer-based model was developed to simulate the influence of patellar thickness on passive knee flexion after arthroplasty. Using the computer model of a single-radius, PCL-sacrificing knee prosthesis, a range of patella-implant composite thicknesses was simulated. The biomechanical model was then replicated using two cadaveric knees. A patellar-thickness range of 15 mm was applied to each of the knees. Knee flexion was found to decrease exponentially with increased patellar thickness in both the biomechanical and experimental studies. Importantly, this flexion loss followed an exponential pattern with higher patellar thicknesses in both studies. In order to avoid adverse biomechanical and functional consequences, it is recommended to restore patellar thickness to that of the native knee during total knee arthroplasty.

  4. Predictors and complications of blood transfusion in total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Nicholas B; Wessell, Nolan M; Charters, Michael A; Yu, Stephen; Jeffries, James J; Silverton, Craig D

    2014-09-01

    Perioperative patient optimization can minimize the need for blood transfusions in patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to determine predictors and complications of transfusions. This retrospective review analyzed 1795 patients who underwent primary THA and TKA at our institution between January 2011 and December 2012. Of the 1573 patients ultimately included the rates of transfusion were 9.27% in TKA and 26.6% in THA. Significant predictors for transfusion include: preoperative hemoglobin, age, female gender, body mass index, creatinine, TKA, operating room time, operative blood loss, and intra-operative fluids. The DVT rate was comparable, but deep surgical site infection rate among transfused patients was 2.4% compared to 0.5% in non-transfused patients (P = 0.0065).

  5. Accuracy and efficacy of osteotomy in total knee arthroplasty with patient-specific navigational template

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Yudong; Ding, Jing; Xu, Yongqing; Hou, Chunlin

    2015-01-01

    This study develops and validates a novel patient-specific navigational template for total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A total of 70 patients who underwent TKA were randomized and divided into conventional method group and navigational template group. In the navigational template group, the patient-specific navigational templates were designed and used intraoperatively to assist 35 patients with knee arthroplasty. Information on operation time and blood loss was recorded. After surgery, the positions of the prosthesis were evaluated using CT scan and X-rays. Analysis showed significant differences in errors between the two techniques. In addition, mean operation time and mean blood loss were statistically and significantly lower in the navigational template group than in the conventional group. Overall, the navigational template method showed a high degree of accuracy and efficacy. PMID:26550129

  6. Presentation of calcinosis cutis universalis in mixed connective tissue disorder: an encounter during hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Munis; Gopikrishnan, Krishnanunni; Umamahesvaran, Balaji; Sambandam, Senthil Nathan

    2017-03-13

    A woman aged 23 years with a diagnosis of mixed connective tissue disorder presented with left groin pain extending over 6 months. Workup revealed avascular necrosis of the femoral head (Grade 3) secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus and chronic steroid intake. An uncemented total hip arthroplasty was considered as the patient was only in the third decade of life. During the preop workup, careful clinical assessment had revealed multiple subcutaneous nodules affecting the extensor musculature limited to the gluteal region, anterior and posterior aspects of the thigh. The diagnosis of calcinosis cutis universalis was made after a CT revealed calcified nodules in the subcutaneous, subfascial and muscular planes. A total hip arthroplasty using the posterior approach was performed with minimal trauma to the calcified nodules and thereby preventing a source of persistent drainage and reducing morbidity due to infection.

  7. Challenges with health-related quality of life assessment in arthroplasty patients: problems and solutions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jasvinder; Sloan, Jeff A; Johanson, Norman A

    2010-02-01

    Assessment of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) using patient-reported outcomes in arthroplasty has become popular because it provides a unique perspective on successful elective procedures. However, challenges exist in the assessment of HRQOL in clinical practice and in clinical research. Patient compliance with multiple and sometimes lengthy HRQOL assessments administered at multiple follow-up visits is problematic. Many well-validated HRQOL instruments are available, and progress has been made in defining the minimal clinically important difference in hip and knee arthroplasty that denotes the minimal change perceived to be important by patients. Challenges in understanding the literature are attributable to the use of various HRQOL scales, with different scoring ranges and scoring algorithms, different interpretations of highest score, and differences in the presentation of raw versus transformed scores.

  8. Femoral cement within cement technique in carefully selected aseptic revision arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Lucas; Buttaro, Martin; Comba, Fernando; Piccaluga, Francisco

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological results in a group of patients who underwent aseptic revision hip arthroplasty using the cement within cement (CWC) technique. Between 1999 and 2005, 37 aseptic revision hip operations were performed. There were 30 women and five men, with an average age of 68 years. The reasons for revision were femoral stem fracture, cup failure, acetabular protrusion after hemi-arthroplasty and recurrent dislocation. At an average follow-up of 46 months, none of the patients required further femoral revision. The average post-operative Merle D'Aubigne score was 16.6 points (p<0.05). No evidence of radiological stem failure was observed and no femoral component was considered to be at risk for loosening. In this series of patients, the CWC technique provided consistent with high functional outcomes. This valid and effective alternative should be considered in carefully selected aseptic cases.

  9. Delayed catastrophic failure of a ceramic head in hybrid total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Imran; Bhatnagar, Gauraang; Atrah, Salah

    2009-01-01

    Catastrophic failure of ceramic implants is a rare but known complication of total hip arthroplasty where such implants have been used. We report an unusual case of a 67-year-old woman who underwent bilateral hybrid total hip arthroplasty using ceramic-on-polyethylene bearings. Seven years later, she presented with left-sided hip pain in the absence of any trauma. She was found to have a completely shattered ceramic head, with subsequent erosion of the metal taper of the femoral stem through the polyethylene insert, its metal shell, and into the pelvis. This complicated subsequent revision surgery, as removal of the acetabular component resulted in a large pelvic defect that required an acetabular reinforcement ring and bone grafting. She recovered well after the revision procedure.

  10. Management of the Biconcave (B2) Glenoid in Shoulder Arthroplasty: Technical Considerations.

    PubMed

    Hendel, Michael D; Werner, Brian C; Camp, Christopher L; Gulotta, Lawrence V; Walch, Gilles; Dines, David M; Dines, Joshua S

    2016-01-01

    Reconstruction of the biconcave (B2) glenoid presents a challenging clinical problem that has been associated with poor clinical outcomes and implant survivorship. The high failure rate from glenoid component loosening and subsequent premature implant failure can be substantially decreased with accurate glenoid component positioning and appropriate correction of the pathologic glenoid retroversion. Careful preoperative planning is essential for accurate preparation and execution of the optimal surgical plan. There are many surgical strategies to address the B2 glenoid, but no consensus on the optimal method exists, as the technique should be uniquely customized to the individual's pathology and surgeon preference. Cases with mild deformity may be corrected with eccentric reaming and total shoulder arthroplasty, while the more severe deformities may require posterior glenoid bone grafting, and/or augmented implants to restore native version. Finally, the reverse shoulder arthroplasty is a reliable option to restore stability and address bone deficiency for the severe B2 glenoid in an older, lower demand patient.

  11. 1-stage primary arthroplasty of mechanically failed internally fixated of hip fractures with deep wound infection

    PubMed Central

    Klatte, Till O; O’Loughlin, Padraigh F; Citak, Mustafa; Rueger, Johannes M; Gehrke, Thorsten; Kendoff, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose Mechanically failed internal fixation following hip fracture is often treated by salvage arthroplasty. If deep wound infection is present, a 2-stage procedure is often used. We have used a 1-stage procedure in infected cases, and we now report the outcome. Patients and methods We reviewed 16 cases of deep wound infection after mechanically failed hip fracture fixation, treated between 1994 and 2010. In all patients, a joint prosthesis was implanted in a 1-stage procedure. Results After an average follow-up period of 12 (2–18) years, no reinfection was detected. In 4 cases, a hip dislocation occurred and 3 of these needed further surgery. Interpretation A 1-stage procedure for arthroplasty of an infected, mechanically failed hip fracture fixation is feasible and carries a low risk of infection. PMID:23799345

  12. Accuracy of knee range of motion assessment after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lavernia, Carlos; D'Apuzzo, Michele; Rossi, Mark D; Lee, David

    2008-09-01

    Measurement of knee joint range of motion (ROM) is important to assess after total knee arthroplasty. Our objective was to determine level of agreement and accuracy between observers with different knowledge on total ROM after total knee arthroplasty. Forty-one patients underwent x-ray of active and passive knee ROM (gold standard). Five different raters evaluated observed and measured ROM: orthopedic surgeon, clinical fellow, physician assistant, research fellow, and a physical therapist. A 1-way analysis of variance was used to determine differences in ROM between raters over both conditions. Limit of agreement for each rater for both active and passive total ROM under both conditions was calculated. Analysis of variance indicated a difference between raters for all conditions (range, P = .004 to P < or =.0001). The trend for all raters was to overestimate ROM at higher ranges. Assessment of ROM through direct observation without a goniometer provides inaccurate findings.

  13. Physical Function and Physical Activity in Obese Adults After Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Smith, Webb A; Zucker-Levin, Audrey; Mihalko, William M; Williams, Michael; Loftin, Mark; Gurney, James G

    2017-04-01

    Obese patients are more likely to have osteoarthritis and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). This investigation sought to evaluate physical function, activity level, and quality of life (QOL). Obese participants near 1-year postsurgical follow-up appointment were recruited. Evaluation included QOL and activity questionnaire, medical histories, anthropometrics, strength, and aerobic capacity. Sixty participants completed assessments. Obese TKA patients have physical performance limitations and low physical activity levels 1 year after surgery and completion of postoperative rehabilitation.

  14. Long-term outcome of low contact stress total knee arthroplasty with different mobile bearing designs

    PubMed Central

    SOLARINO, GIUSEPPE; SPINARELLI, ANTONIO; CARROZZO, MASSIMILIANO; PIAZZOLLA, ANDREA; VICENTI, GIOVANNI; MORETTI, BIAGIO

    2014-01-01

    Purpose to evaluate the differences in clinical outcome and survivorship of three different mobile bearings for total knee arthroplasty. Methods a retrospective study was conducted in 60 patients (53 females, 7 males, mean age: 68 years and 5 months) each submitted to total knee replacement using one of the three different mobile bearings of the LCS system (Depuy Johnson & Johnson, Warsaw, IN). The diagnosis was knee osteoarthritis in 57 cases and rheumatoid arthritis in three cases. Three different groups of 20 cases each were identified: total knee arthroplasties with mobile menisci (group 1); total knee arthroplasties with the rotating platform (group 2); and total knee arthroplasties with the anteroposterior glide platform (group 3). As regards the component fixation, 33 implants were cementless, three were cemented, and in 24 only the tibial component was cemented. The patella was not replaced. Results although the duration of follow-up differed between the three groups, the clinical and radiological results at final follow-up showed no revision of femoral and/or tibial components for mechanical or septic reasons, and no signs of impending failure. One meniscal bearing, showing polyethylene wear after 17 years, was successfully replaced. Conclusions the present retrospective study confirmed the long-term effectiveness of knee implants with mobile bearings, in which the congruity of the surfaces makes it possible to overcome the problem of high contact stresses that may result in polyethylene wear and osteolysis; at the same time, these implants eliminate constraint forces thereby reducing the risk of mechanical loosening. Level of evidence Level III, retrospective comparative study. PMID:25606553

  15. The effects of knee arthroplasty on walking speed: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with knee osteoarthritis patients have problems with walking, and tend to walk slower. An important aim of knee arthroplasty is functional recovery, which should include a post-operative increase in walking speed. Still, there are several problems with measuring walking speed in groups of knee osteoarthritis patients. Nevertheless, test-retest reliability of walking speed measurements is high, and when the same investigators monitor the same subjects, it should be possible to assess the walking speed effects of knee arthroplasty. The present study reports a meta-analysis of these effects. Methods A total of 16 independent pre-post arthroplasty comparisons of walking speed were identified through MEDLINE, Web of Science, and PEDro, in 12 papers, involving 419 patients. Results For 0.5–5 months post-operatively, heterogeneity was too large to obtain a valid estimate of the overall effect-size. For 6–12 and 13–60 months post-operatively, heterogeneity was absent, low, or moderate (depending on estimated pre-post correlations). During these periods, subjects walked on average 0.8 standard-deviations faster than pre-operatively, which is a large effect. Meta-regression analysis revealed significant effects of time and time squared, suggesting initial improvement followed by decline. Conclusion This meta-analysis revealed a large effect of arthroplasty on walking speed 6–60 months post-operatively. For the first 0.5–5 months, heterogeneity of effect-sizes precluded a valid estimate of short-term effects. Hence, patients may expect a considerable improvement of their walking speed, which, however, may take several months to occur. Meta-regression analysis suggested a small decline from 13 months post-operatively onwards. PMID:22559793

  16. Preoperative autologous blood donation in total-hip arthroplasty. A cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Healy, J C; Frankforter, S A; Graves, B K; Reddy, R L; Beck, J R

    1994-04-01

    Preoperative autologous blood donation is employed with increasing frequency, particularly in patients undergoing elective orthopedic procedures. While autologous transfusion decreases the incidence of postoperative infections and other complications, the cost-effectiveness of this therapy has not been fully investigated. We constructed a decision analytic model to study the cost-effectiveness of preoperative autologous blood donation of packed red blood cells compared with allogeneic packed red blood cells in primary hip arthroplasty. We used data from 73 patients presenting at our blood center with a prescription for 2 U of autologous red blood cells prior to hip arthroplasty to establish probabilities for the number of units that would be donated. Patients were able to donate an average of 1.9 U (range, 0 to 2 U) of autologous blood. We also reviewed the charts of 56 patients who underwent primary hip arthroplasty to model the number of units given during hospitalization (1.5 U given; range, 0 to 5 U). We applied the model to a 65-year-old patient undergoing primary hip arthroplasty. Estimates for the incidence of posttransfusion hepatitis, chronic active hepatitis, human immunodeficiency virus infection, postoperative bacterial infection, and fatal hemolytic transfusion reaction were derived from the literature. Patient utility was measured in life-years. Costs included the cost of preoperative autologous blood donation, blood administration, and medical care costs associated with the complications of transfusion. Costs were derived from local data and the literature. Future earnings lost were not modeled. In the baseline analysis, autologous transfusion results in a net cost savings compared with allogeneic blood over a wide range of complication rates, patient ages, and transfusion requirements. The dominant factor in the analysis is the effect of postoperative bacterial infection on length of hospital stay and the resultant increase in costs. The effect of

  17. Symposium on Surface Replacement Arthroplasty of the Hip. Biomechanics: mutifactorial design choices--an essential compromise?

    PubMed

    Clarke, I C

    1982-10-01

    The main flaws to be overcome in realizing the potential success of the double-cup arthroplasty procedure are failures due to femoral cup loosening, acetabular cup loosening, and femoral-neck fractures. The clinical uncertainties include the selection of a suitable patient with adequate bone stock and the technical difficulties associated with (I) reaming the acetabulum adequately, (2) reaming down onto the neck without violating it, and (3) anchoring the components securely by interdigitation of acrylic cement. The higher frictional torques of the double-cup arthroplasty designs are not a clinical loosening issue--the resulting acetabular cement-bone shear stresses are very low. Computer models of both the femoral and acetabular components predict significant stress shielding of the cancellous bone under metal femoral shells. At the rim of the femoral cup, the stresses are increased by a factor of 3 owing to the stress concentration effect and can rise to a factor of 10 if cystic or osteoporotic changes are present. This finding if confirmed in the three-dimensional models may explain some of the femoral neck fractures. The thin polyethylene acetabular cups may also cause a stress concentration effect on the underlying cement and bone. This may explain the higher incidence of radiographic loosening around the acetabulum in double-cup arthroplasty designs compared with total hip replacements. Metal-backed sockets may reduce cancellous bone stresses and appear advantageous. There is no clinical evidence of unusual wear or wear-related problems. However, new material formulations are now either in use or being planned for the double-cup arthroplasty designs. As yet, there have been no published data on hip simulator wear for the efficacy of any of the current or proposed changes. Biologic fixation appears to be the theme for the 1980s. However, the combination of technology, design instrumentation, and patient selection will be critical in achieving success with this

  18. Management strategies for infected total hip arthroplasty. A critical appreciation of problems and techniques.

    PubMed

    Karachalios, Theofilos; Koutalos, Antonios; Komnos, George

    2014-10-02

    Infection is a devastating complication of total hip arthroplasty (THA). Risk factors have been recognised and prevention is possible. The nature of the disease is heterogeneous and for satisfactory management one has to weigh factors related to pathogen, host, local soft tissue, bone stock, surgeon experience and financial resources. Available data in the current literature is of poor quality and there is a lack of data comparing different techniques. Referral of patients to dedicated departments with the appropriate facilities may be more appropriate.

  19. Bone loss of vertebral bodies at the operative segment after cervical arthroplasty: a potential complication?

    PubMed

    Heo, Dong Hwa; Lee, Dong Chan; Oh, Jong Yang; Park, Choon Keun

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Bony overgrowth and spontaneous fusion are complications of cervical arthroplasty. In contrast, bone loss or bone remodeling of vertebral bodies at the operation segment after cervical arthroplasty has also been observed. The purpose of this study is to investigate a potential complication-bone loss of the anterior portion of the vertebral bodies at the surgically treated segment after cervical total disc replacement (TDR)-and discuss the clinical significance. METHODS All enrolled patients underwent follow-up for more than 24 months after cervical arthroplasty using the Baguera C disc. Clinical evaluations included recording demographic data and measuring the visual analog scale and Neck Disability Index scores. Radiographic evaluations included measurements of the functional spinal unit's range of motion and changes such as bone loss and bone remodeling. The grading of the bone loss of the operative segment was classified as follows: Grade 1, disappearance of the anterior osteophyte or small minor bone loss; Grade 2, bone loss of the anterior portion of the vertebral bodies at the operation segment without exposure of the artificial disc; or Grade 3, significant bone loss with exposure of the anterior portion of the artificial disc. RESULTS Forty-eight patients were enrolled in this study. Among them, bone loss developed in 29 patients (Grade 1 in 15 patients, Grade 2 in 6 patients, and Grade 3 in 8 patients). Grade 3 bone loss was significantly associated with postoperative neck pain (p < 0.05). Bone loss was related to the motion preservation effect of the operative segment after cervical arthroplasty in contrast to heterotopic ossification. CONCLUSIONS Bone loss may be a potential complication of cervical TDR and affect early postoperative neck pain. However, it did not affect mid- to long-term clinical outcomes or prosthetic failure at the last follow-up. Also, this phenomenon may result in the motion preservation effect in the operative segment

  20. Comparative Study of Peripheral Rim Fixation Using Jumbo Cup in Revisional Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Woo-Lam; Im, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Seung-Chan; Kwon, Soon-Yong; Kim, Yong-Sik

    2017-01-01

    Purpose It is challenging procedure to revise acetabular component in acetabulum with severe bone defect or deformity. The jumbo cup is good option for revisional arthroplasty in large bone defect. The purpose of this study is to compare the prognosis of revisional total hip arthroplasty using jumbo cup with peripheral rim fixation and no rim fixation. Materials and Methods We included the patients who had performed acetabular revisional total hip arthroplasty from January 2002 to March 2015 in our institute. Total of 51 hips (51 patients) were included. The mean follow up period was 51 months (range, 12 to 154 months) and mean age was 60.7 years (range, 30 to 81 years). We divided into two groups (peripheral rim fixation group and no rim fixation group) by anteroposterior and lateral plain radiograph. We compared survival rate, hip center change and clinical outcomes between two groups. Results There were 37 patients in peripheral rim fixation group and 14 patients in no rim fixation group. There was one patient who had aseptic loosening necessary to re-revision in rim fixation group and 3 patients in no rim fixation group. And one patient had superficial infection in rim fixation group and one patient had periprosthetic fracture in no rim fixation group. Survival rate was higher in the peripheral rim fixation group (97.3%) than no rim fixation group (78.6%, P=0.028) Conclusion Based on our findings, peripheral rim fixation might be recommended to improve short-term outcome after revision total hip arthroplasty using jumbo cup. PMID:28316959

  1. Acetabular Fractures in the Elderly: Midterm Outcomes of Column Stabilisation and Primary Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Briones, A.; Smith, S.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Interest in arthroplasty techniques for periarticular or intra-articular fractures in the elderly/osteoporotic patient continues to rise, including for geriatric acetabular fractures. In line with this, many acetabular fracture surgeons are now undertaking acute total hip arthroplasty in elderly/osteoporotic patients. Little is known however of the outcomes of this procedure, beyond the first year after surgery. Questions/Purposes. We determined the clinical outcomes of a series of elderly osteoporotic patients (mean age at surgery 77.4 years) treated for acetabular fractures with column fixation and simultaneous total hip arthroplasty, at a mean of 49 months after surgery. Methods. 24 patients (25 hips) were reviewed at a mean of 49 months after surgery. The surgical technique employed has previously been described. Radiographs were obtained, and clinical outcomes were assessed using Harris Hip Scores and the Merle d'Aubigné score. Results. 14 hips were available for assessment (9 deceased, 2 lost to follow-up). No patient suffered any complications beyond the perioperative period, no acetabular components were loose clinically or on latest radiographs, and the mean Harris Hip Score was 92. All but one patient scored good or excellent on the Merle d'Aubigné score. Conclusions. Column fixation and simultaneous total hip arthroplasty are a viable option for complex geriatric acetabular fractures, with encouraging midterm results. We conclude that THR is a viable long-term solution in this situation provided that the acetabular columns are stabilised prior to implantation, but more research is needed to aid in overall management decision making. PMID:28194414

  2. Navigated Acetabular Cup Fixation for Acetabular Deformity or Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jung-Ro; Yu, Jung Jin; Seo, Hyo-Sung

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the usefulness of navigated acetabular cup fixation for total hip arthroplasty in patients with acetabular deformity or revision total hip arthroplasty. Materials and Methods This study enrolled 28 patients with at least 12 months' follow-up. The safe zone of the acetabular cup was defined as 40°±10°in inclination and 15°±10°in anteversion. The authors used the navigation and radiographic data to determine whether the acetabular cup was located within the safe zone or not. To evaluate the clinical outcomes, preoperative and last follow-up Harris hip scores were checked, and the occurrence of complications was evaluated. Results According to the navigation data, the mean inclination and anteversion were 38.5°±4.7°(range, 32°-50°) and 16.6°±4.0°(range, 8°-23°), respectively. According to the radiographic data the mean inclination and anteversion were 40.5°±4.6°(range, 32°-50°) and 19.4°±4.2°(range, 8°-25°), respectively. In both cases, all values were within the safe zone. Harris hip score was improved in all patients from preoperative 52.3±14.4 points (range, 29-87 points) to 88.0±9.0 points (range, 65-99 points) at the last follow-up. There was no dislocation or loosening of both cases. Conclusion Navigated acetabular cup fixation is a useful technique for total hip arthroplasty in patients with acetabular deformity or revision total hip arthroplasty because it prevents the malposition and related complications. PMID:27536573

  3. A novel surgical tool for the revision hip arthroplasty due to neck stem’s fracture

    PubMed Central

    Grivas, TB; Magnissalis, E; Papadakis, S

    2015-01-01

    During revision surgery of total hip arthroplasties, surgeons may come across the challenging complication of a proximally fractured femoral stem, which however maintains sufficient distal fixation. Such cases, although rare, are extremely demanding due to lack of available attachments that would assist surgical explantation of the broken implant. It is herein presented a metal sterilisable surgical tool designed for the removal of the femoral stem broken at the level of the “neck”. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (4): 352-355. PMID:27688701

  4. Silicone Arthroplasty After Ankylosis of Proximal Interphalangeal Joints in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Awan, Hisham M; Imbriglia, Joseph E

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) can cause severe disability of the hand and fingers. Ankylosis of the finger joints is a known yet underreported manifestation of RA of the hand. We report the case of a patient who had RA and developed autofusion of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints. At presentation, the PIP joints were fused in 15° of flexion. Silicone PIP arthroplasty was performed. Function improved with 60° of PIP joint motion and no pain.

  5. Early outcomes of arthroplasty of the first carpometacarpal joint using pyrocarbon spherical implants

    PubMed Central

    Bengezi, Omar; Vo, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The first carpometacarpal joint (CMC) is the most common hand joint to develop osteoarthritis. A survey found that many hand surgeons have revisited implant arthroplasty because it preserves critical structures. However, there is currently no implant with an ideal design and material composition. The present study was the first to use and evaluate early outcomes of pyrocarbon spherical implants for arthroplasty of the first CMC in patients with Eaton-Littler stage II and III osteoarthritis. A single surgeon performed 24 arthroplasties (23 patients [20 women, three men] with a mean age of 56 years [range 46 to 75 years]) of the first CMC (nine right hands and 15 left hands) using pyrocarbon spherical implants from May 2010 to April 2013. All patients failed conservative management. At a mean (± SD) of 18.5±11.16 months postoperatively (range 4.3 to 38.9 months), the mean Kapandji score was 8.8 of 10 (range 7 to 10), the average pre- and postoperative values on the visual pain scale were 8.96±0.64 of 10 (range 8 to 10) and 1.13±1.22 of 10 (range 0 to 4), respectively. All patients were either very satisfied (score = 5) or satisfied (score = 4) with the procedure, with a mean satisfaction score of 4.76±0.44 of 5.00 (range 4 to 5). The mean postoperative Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score was 11.79±14.29 (range 0 to 49.17). The most recent radiographic evaluations confirmed that all implants were stable with no erosion of nearby cancellous bone. There were no implant subluxations, dislocations or revisions. Early outcomes show promising results and support continued use of this implant for arthroplasty. However, longer-term follow-up will be needed to confirm these results. PMID:25114617

  6. Comprehensive Operative Note Templates for Primary and Revision Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Electricwala, Ali J.; Amanatullah, Derek F.; Narkbunnam, Rapeepat I.; Huddleston, James I.; Maloney, William J.; Goodman, Stuart B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adequate preoperative planning is the first and most crucial step in the successful completion of a revision total joint arthroplasty. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the availability, adequacy and accuracy of operative notes of primary surgeries in patients requiring subsequent revision and to construct comprehensive templates of minimum necessary information required in the operative notes to further simplify re-operations, if they should become necessary. Methods: The operative notes of 144 patients (80 revision THA’s and 64 revision TKA’s) who underwent revision total joint arthroplasty at Stanford Hospital and Clinics in the year 2013 were reviewed. We assessed the availability of operative notes and implant stickers prior to revision total joint arthroplasty. The availability of implant details within the operative notes was assessed against the available surgical stickers for adequacy and accuracy. Statistical comparisons were made using the Fischer-exact test and a P-value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The primary operative note was available in 68 of 144 revisions (47%), 39 of 80 revision THAs (49%) and 29 of 66 revision TKAs (44%, p = 0.619). Primary implant stickers were available in 46 of 144 revisions (32%), 26 of 80 revision THAs (32%) and 20 of 66 revision TKAs (30%, p = 0.859). Utilizing the operative notes and implant stickers combined identified accurate primary implant details in only 40 of the 80 revision THAs (50%) and 34 of all 66 revision TKAs (52%, p = 0.870). Conclusion: Operative notes are often unavailable or fail to provide the necessary information required which makes planning and execution of revision hip and knee athroplasty difficult. This emphasizes the need for enhancing the quality of operative notes and records of patient information. Based on this information, we provide comprehensive operative note templates for primary and revision total hip and knee

  7. Postoperative osteomyelitis following implant arthroplasty of the foot: diagnosis with indium-111 white blood cell scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Bakst, R.H.; Kanat, I.O.

    1987-11-01

    Many complications can occur following insertion of silicone elastomer implants into the foot. Postoperative infection may be difficult to distinguish from other conditions such as dislodgment, fracture, ectopic and heterotopic new bone formation, synovitis, and bursitis. White blood cell scintigraphy, in conjunction with the clinical scenario, may prove to be an invaluable tool in the diagnosis of postoperative osteomyelitis, subsequent to implant arthroplasties. 32 references.

  8. Fabella Fractures after Total Knee Arthroplasty with Correction of Valgus Malalignment

    PubMed Central

    Heggelman, Ben; Gaasbeek, Robert; Nix, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of fabella fractures is considered to be extremely low. This report presents two patients with femorotibial osteoarthritis and considerable preoperative valgus malalignment, who developed a fracture of the fabella (as demonstrated by radiography) after total knee arthroplasty with intraoperative correction of the valgus malalignment. Special attention should be paid to the fabella for not missing a fabella fracture in these patients. PMID:27340579

  9. Computerized management of oral anticoagulant therapy: experience in major joint arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, Denis; Bhalla, Pearl; Cass, William; Gollish, Jeff; Brighton, Roger; Gorenstein, Frayda; Vitunjski, Joseph; Ng, Peggy

    2002-01-01

    Objective Evaluation of the safety and potential cost savings of a computerized, laboratory-based program to manage inpatient warfarin thromboprophylaxis after major joint arthroplasty. Design A consecutive-case study of adults. Setting A tertiary care orthopedic institution. Patients Patients requiring joint arthroplasty who had no recent episodes of thromboembolic disease, no mechanical heart valve, atrial fibrillation, severe liver disease or baseline international normalized ratio [INR] greater than 1.3 admitted over a 54-month period (July 1994–December 1998). All patients received a standard regimen of warfarin beginning on the evening after the operation. Four hundred and thirty randomly selected patients managed by the program were followed up by telephone survey 3 months after discharge. Patients exhibiting erratic responses to warfarin were withdrawn from the program and managed individually thereafter. Intervention Major joint arthroplasty with warfarin therapy administered through the computerized program. Main outcome measures Test results maintained within the desired therapeutic range (INR 2.0–3.0), clinically severe bleeding episodes, readmission rates, clinically symptomatic and venographically proven episodes of venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. Results Over the study period 5629 patients underwent joint arthroplasty; 5372 patients were considered for the program; 332 patients were ineligible and were managed individually; 311 entered patients did not complete the program. This left 4729 patients who completed the program. In 2932 (62%) patients test results were maintained in the desired therapeutic range. The major bleeding rate was less than 0.5%, the readmission rate was 3.8%, the deep venous thrombosis rate was 3.7% and the pulmonary embolism rate was 0.2% with no thromboembolic related deaths in the small sample cohort. Conclusions The majority of patients requiring warfarin thromboprophylaxis can be safely and effectively managed

  10. Fixed- versus mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasty: technical issues and surgical tips.

    PubMed

    Crossett, Lawrence S

    2002-02-01

    Mobile-bearing knee arthroplasties have been used clinically for 25 years. The success of this technology depends on strict adherence to the principles of flexion-extension gap technique. The use of the fixed femoral landmarks for the rotational positioning of the femoral component (measured resection technique) is not acceptable if bearing dislocation is to be avoided. The principles of flexion-extension gap balancing, as well as the surgical technique, are reviewed in this article.

  11. Total knee arthroplasty for posttraumatic osteoarthritis in military personnel under age 50.

    PubMed

    Murtha, Andrew S; Johnson, Anthony E; Buckwalter, Joseph A; Rivera, Jessica C

    2016-05-13

    United States military personnel frequently suffer knee injuries. The resulting progressive post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) causes significant disability in these young high-demand patients for which total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the only effective treatment of their pain and impairment. Yet the use of this option for treatment of PTOA has not been studied. This retrospective review identified 74 knees in 64 U.S. military personnel who underwent TKA at ≤ 50 years-of-age during an eight year period at a tertiary-care, academic, military medical center. Fifty-five knees (74.3%) experienced one or more prior ligamentous, meniscal, or chondral injuries prior to arthroplasty. Only one subject had a history of osteochondral intra-articular fracture. The average at injury was 29.2 years (95% CI of ± 2.50) with an average age at arthroplasty of 44.3 years (± 1.11). The most common injury was anterior cruciate ligament rupture (n = 19) with a mean time to TKA of 23.1 years (± 10.54) and 18.8 years (± 7.01) when concomitant meniscal pathology was noted. Nineteen patients were noted to have radiographic and symptomatic end-stage osteoarthritis without a specified etiology at 41.4 years (± 1.47) and underwent subsequent TKA. This is the first study to evaluate treatment of end-stage PT OA in young people treated with TKA, finding that the incidence of PTOA as an indication for arthroplasty is significantly higher than among civilians. In this otherwise healthy, high-demand patient population, the rate of OA progression following knee injury is accelerated and the long term implications can be career and life-altering. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Diabetes mellitus, hemoglobin A1C, and the incidence of total joint arthroplasty infection.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Richard; Williams, Kelly M; Marcantonio, Andrew J; Specht, Lawrence M; Tilzey, John F; Healy, William L

    2012-05-01

    Patients with diabetes have a higher incidence of infection after total joint arthroplasty (TJA) than patients without diabetes. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels are a marker for blood glucose control in diabetic patients. A total of 3468 patients underwent 4241 primary or revision total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty at one institution. Hemoglobin A1c levels were examined to evaluate if there was a correlation between the control of HbA1c and infection after TJA. There were a total of 46 infections (28 deep and 18 superficial [9 cellulitis and 9 operative abscesses]). Twelve (3.43%) occurred in diabetic patients (n = 350; 8.3%) and 34 (0.87%) in nondiabetic patients (n = 3891; 91.7%) (P < .001). There were 9 deep (2.6%) infections in diabetic patients and 19 (0.49%) in nondiabetic patients. In noninfected, diabetic patients, HbA1c level ranged from 4.7% to 15.1% (mean, 6.92%). In infected diabetic patients, HbA1c level ranged from 5.1% to 11.7% (mean, 7.2%) (P < .445). The average HbA1c level in patients with diabetes was 6.93%. Diabetic patients have a significantly higher risk for infection after TJA. Hemoglobin A1c levels are not reliable for predicting the risk of infection after TJA.

  13. Effectiveness of an Acetabular Positioning Device in Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hendrix, Stephen L.; Mologne, Timothy S.; Peterson, Drew A.; Holley, Keith A.

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a commercially available acetabular positioning device, we performed a prospective evaluation of 40 consecutive patients undergoing primary total hip arthroplasty. All surgery was performed by the same surgeon, in the same operating room, and on the same operating table. The acetabular positioning device was designed to place the component in 45° of abduction. At 6 weeks, all radiographs were evaluated by 3 investigators not involved with the surgery. Each radiograph was evaluated by each reviewer on 3 separate occasions, blinded to the findings of the other reviewer to assess interobserver and intraobserver variability. The mean cup abduction angle was 42.1°, with a range from 23° to 57° (SD 8.3°). Intraobserver and interobserver variability were 0.2 and 0.3°, respectively. The findings of this study demonstrate a wide variability in acetabular cup placement in primary total hip arthroplasty. We believe this is due to movement of the pelvis, which may occur during preparation, draping, and retracting during surgery. We feel surgeons should not rely solely on positioning devices when implanting the acetabular component in total hip arthroplasty. Identification of bone landmarks and determination of superolateral implant coverage noted on preoperative templating is advocated to improve the precision of component position. PMID:18751812

  14. The management of extensor mechanism complications in total knee arthroplasty. AAOS exhibit selection.

    PubMed

    Nam, Denis; Abdel, Matthew P; Cross, Michael B; LaMont, Lauren E; Reinhardt, Keith R; McArthur, Benjamin A; Mayman, David J; Hanssen, Arlen D; Sculco, Thomas P

    2014-03-19

    Complications involving the knee extensor mechanism and patellofemoral joint occur in 1% to 12% of patients following total knee arthroplasty and have major negative effects on patient outcomes and satisfaction. The surgeon must be aware of intraoperative, postoperative, and patient-related factors that can increase the rate of these problems. This review focuses on six of the most commonly encountered problems: patellar tendon disruption, quadriceps tendon rupture, patellar crepitus and soft-tissue impingement, periprosthetic patellar fracture, patellofemoral instability, and osteonecrosis of the patella. The goals of this report are to (1) review the relevant anatomy of the knee extensor mechanism, (2) present risk factors that may lead to extensor mechanism complications, (3) provide a diagnostic and treatment algorithm for each of the aforementioned problems, and (4) review the specific surgical techniques of Achilles tendon allograft reconstruction and synthetic mesh augmentation. Extensor mechanism disorders following total knee arthroplasty remain difficult to manage effectively. Although various surgical techniques have been used, the results in patients with a prior total knee arthroplasty are inferior to the results in the young adult without such a prior procedure. Surgical attempts at restoration of the knee extensor mechanism are usually warranted; however, the outcomes of treatment of these complications are often poor, and management of patient expectations is important.

  15. One-stage Exchange Arthroplasty for Periprosthetic Hip and Knee Joint Infections

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Manny; Sukeik, Mohamed; Zahar, Akos; Nizam, Ikram; Haddad, Fares Sami

    2016-01-01

    Background: Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a devastating complication of joint replacement surgery. In an aging population of the developed world, the increasing numbers of hip and knee replacements will inevitably lead to increasing incidence of PJI, carrying with (it) significant patient morbidity and cost to the health care system. Two-stage exchange arthroplasty is currently the gold standard but it is associated with multiple operations, prolonged hospitalization and impaired functionality. One-stage exchange arthroplasty is similar to the two-stage procedure but the interval between removal of the prosthesis and reimplantation of a new one is only a few minutes. It has the theoretical benefits of a single anesthetic, shorter hospitalization, less cost and improved function. Methods: We reviewed the current literature regarding the outcomes of one-stage exchange arthroplasties focusing on re-infection rates and functional outcomes. Results: Current themes around the one-stage exchange procedure include the indications for the procedure, definition of re-infection, surgical techniques used to provide fixation and differences in approach for hip and knee replacements. Conclusion: The current literature on one-stage exchange procedure is promising, with comparable results to two-stage revisions for hips and knees in selected patients. However, there is a great need for a large multi-centred randomized control trial, focusing on re-infection rates and functional scores postoperatively, to provide concrete guidelines in managing this complex condition. PMID:28144374

  16. [Case report of a patient with ochronosis and arthroplasty of the hip and both knees].

    PubMed

    Moslavac, Aleksandra; Moslavac, Sasa; Cop, Renata

    2003-01-01

    Alkaptonuria is a rare hereditary metabolic disorder characterised by absence of the enzyme homogentisic acid oxidase. As a result of this defect homogentisic acid accumulates and is excreted in the urine. The term ochronosis is used to describe bluish-black pigmentation of connective tissue. Ochronotic arthropathy results from the pigmented deposits in the joints of the appendicular and axial skeleton. Findings simulate those of uncomplicated degenerative joint disease, with effusion, articular space narrowing, and bony sclerosis. Our patient is a 70-year old male with ochronotic arthropathy. He has typical ears and sclera discoloration, and had arthroplasty of knees 7 and 4 years ago, respectively. In year 2002, he had undergone total right hip arthroplasty and has been admitted for rehabilitation 14th postoperative day. Individually designed rehabilitation regimen included kinesitherapy, hydrokinesitherapy, and ambulation training with gradual increase in weight bearing exercises and electro-analgesia of associated low back pain. In course of rehabilitation our patient improved his endurance with satisfying range of motion of right hip (flexion 90 degrees, abduction 40 degrees) and strength of hip and thigh musculature. The patient was able to walk with crutches without limitation. We conclude that joint destruction followed by painful locomotion due to ochronotic arthropathy is best treated by total joint arthroplasty, as described in our patient.

  17. Patient compliance with extended low molecular weight heparin injections following hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Deakin, Dan E; Mishreki, Andrew; Aslam, Nadim; Docker, Charles

    2010-01-01

    The use of extended duration thromboprophylaxis following hip and knee arthroplasty is becoming widespread. The aim of our study was to determine patient compliance with extended duration thromboprophylaxis using low molecular weight (LMWH) injections following hip and knee arthroplasty. 42 consecutive patients undergoing hip and knee arthroplasty were prospectively contacted during their fifth post operative week. A fully anonymised questionnaire was completed by each patient. All patients responded. One was excluded having been prescribed warfarin for pre existing atrial fibrillation. Twenty nine (71%) patients were discharged with the intention of self administering LMWH injections. Eight (20%) and four (9%) patients were discharged with the intention of administration by a relative or district nurse respectively. No patient required the person administering the injections to be changed after discharge from hospital. 90% (n=37) of patients reported not missing any doses. 10% (n=2) of patients missed one dose and 10% (n=2) missed two doses. Patient compliance with extended duration thromboprophylaxis using LMWH injections is extremely high. Oral thromboprophylaxis may be useful in the minority of patients requiring daily visits by a nurse to administer injections.

  18. Enhancing Postoperative Rehabilitation Following Knee Arthroplasty Using a New Cryotherapy Product

    PubMed Central

    Pavlou, Paul; Barrett, Matthew; Thurston, Benjamin; Garrett, Simon

    2015-01-01

    To compare a novel cooling product, Physicool (P, Physicool Ltd, London, England, UK) with a well-established cryotherapy system, Cryocuff (C, Aircast, DJO Global, Vista, California, USA) using pain scores, range of movement (ROM), and cost as outcome measures in the early phase following total knee arthroplasty. We prospectively studied 90 consecutive patients undergoing unilateral total knee arthroplasty by a single surgeon. Following exclusions, 40 patients were recruited to each group. Visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain and ROM before and after application of cooling device was recorded at 24 and 48 hours after surgery. The cost of treatment per patient was also calculated. The VAS were significantly reduced in P on day 1 postsurgery (p = 0.013) and day 2 (p = 0.001) compared to C. A significant increase in ROM was recorded in P at 24 hours (p = 0.004) and at 48 hours (p = 0.009) postsurgery compared to C. The cost benefit of using P over C was approximately £25 per patient. The Physicool system is a safe and effective cooling method for improving pain and ROM in the early postoperative phase following total knee arthroplasty. Furthermore, it offers substantial cost savings. PMID:26623168

  19. Can Total Wrist Arthroplasty Be an Option in the Treatment of the Severely Destroyed Posttraumatic Wrist?

    PubMed Central

    Boeckstyns, Michel E. H.; Herzberg, Guillaume; Sørensen, Allan Ibsen; Axelsson, Peter; Krøner, Karsten; Liverneaux, Philippe A.; Obert, Laurent; Merser, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Background Severely destroyed posttraumatic wrists are usually treated by partial or total wrist fusion or proximal row carpectomy. The indications for and longevity of total wrist arthroplasty (TWA) are still unclear. Case Description The aim of this study was to analyze a series in which one last-generation total wrist arthroplasty was used as a salvage procedure for wrists with severe arthritis due to traumatic causes. The data were prospectively recorded in a web-based registry. Seven centers participated. Thirty-five cases had a minimum follow-up time of 2 years. Average follow-up was 39 (24–96) months. Pain had improved significantly at follow-up, mobility remained unchanged. The total revision rate was 3.7%, and the implant survival was 92% at 4–8 years. Literature Review Very few studies have described specific results after TWA in posttraumatic cases and almost none using classical “third-generation” implants. The number of cases and the follow-up in the published series are small. Clinical Relevance Although painful posttraumatic wrists with severe joint destruction can be salvaged by partial or total fusion, we found that, evaluated at short- to midterm, total wrist arthroplasty can be an alternative procedure and gives results that are comparable to those obtained in rheumatoid cases. Level IV Case series PMID:24436837

  20. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty for proximal humeral fractures: update on indications, technique, and results.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Daniel C; Vanbeek, Corinne; Lazarus, Mark D; Williams, Gerald R; Abboud, Joseph A

    2014-02-01

    The introduction of the reverse shoulder arthroplasty has provided shoulder surgeons with more options for the treatment of complex proximal humeral fractures in the elderly. Early reported results suggest that the average functional outcome may be better than hemiarthroplasty in certain patients and specific clinical scenarios. In addition, these results seem to be reached more quickly with less dependence on rehabilitation. The reverse prosthesis may be particularly useful in patients aged older than 70 years, especially those with severely comminuted fractures in osteopenic bone. These factors likely have a negative impact on the results of hemiarthroplasty and internal fixation. Despite the potential benefits of reverse arthroplasty for fracture, there is a significant learning curve with the use of this prosthesis, and it has its own set of complications. The surgeon must show appropriate judgment when selecting a reverse arthroplasty in the setting of a proximal humeral fracture and, furthermore, be well acquainted with the surgical technique and prosthetic options at the time of surgery. Although the longevity of this prosthesis remains unknown, midterm outcomes are promising.

  1. Forced-Air Warmers and Surgical Site Infections in Patients Undergoing Knee or Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Austin, Paul N

    2017-01-01

    The majority of the evidence indicates preventing inadvertent perioperative hypothermia reduces the incidence of many perioperative complications. Among the results of inadvertent perioperative hypothermia are increased bleeding, myocardial events, impaired wound healing, and diminished renal function. Most researchers agree there is an increased incidence of surgical site infections in patients who experience inadvertent perioperative hypothermia. Forced-air warming is effective in preventing inadvertent perioperative hypothermia. Paradoxically, forced-air warmers have been implicated in causing surgical site infections in patients undergoing total knee or hip arthroplasty. The results of investigations suggest these devices harbor pathogens and cause unwanted airflow disturbances. However, no significant increases in bacterial counts were found when forced-air warmers were used according to the manufacturer's directions. The results of one study suggested the incidence of surgical site infections in patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty was increased when using a forced-air warmer. However these researchers did not control for other factors affecting the incidence of surgical site infections in these patients. Current evidence does not support forced-air warmers causing surgical site infections in patients undergoing total knee or hip arthroplasty. Clinicians must use and maintain these devices as per the manufacturer's directions. They may consider using alternative warming methods. Well-conducted studies are needed to help determine the role of forced-air warmers in causing infections in these patients.

  2. The five-year radiological results of the uncemented Oxford medial compartment knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hooper, N; Snell, D; Hooper, G; Maxwell, R; Frampton, C

    2015-10-01

    This study reports on the first 150 consecutive Oxford cementless unicompartmental knee arthroplasties (UKA) performed in an independent centre (126 patients). All eligible patients had functional scores (Oxford knee score and high activity arthroplasty score) recorded pre-operatively and at two- and five-years of follow-up. Fluoroscopically aligned radiographs were taken at five years and analysed for any evidence of radiolucent lines (RLLs), subsidence or loosening. The mean age of the cohort was 63.6 years (39 to 86) with 81 (53.1%) males. Excellent functional scores were maintained at five years and there were no progressive RLLs demonstrated on radiographs. Two patients underwent revision to a total knee arthroplasty giving a revision rate of 0.23/100 (95% confidence interval 0.03 to 0.84) component years with overall component survivorship of 98.7% at five years. There were a further four patients who underwent further surgery on the same knee, two underwent bearing exchanges for dislocation and two underwent lateral UKAs for disease progression. This was a marked improvement from other UKAs reported in New Zealand Joint Registry data and supports the designing centre's early results.

  3. Intra-articular infusion: a direct approach to treatment of infected total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, L A; Roy, M E; Nayfeh, T A

    2016-01-01

    Bactericidal levels of antibiotics are difficult to achieve in infected total joint arthroplasty when intravenous antibiotics or antibiotic-loaded cement spacers are used, but intra-articular (IA) delivery of antibiotics has been effective in several studies. This paper describes a protocol for IA delivery of antibiotics in infected knee arthroplasty, and summarises the results of a pharmacokinetic study and two clinical follow-up studies of especially difficult groups: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and failed two-stage revision. In the pharmacokinetic study, the mean synovial vancomycin peak level was 9242 (3956 to 32 150; sd 7608 μg/mL) among the 11 patients studied. Serum trough level ranged from 4.2 to 25.2 μg/mL (mean, 12.3 μg/mL; average of 9.6% of the joint trough value), which exceeded minimal inhibitory concentration. The success rate exceeded 95% in the two clinical groups. IA delivery of antibiotics is shown to be safe and effective, and is now the first option for treatment of infected total joint arthroplasty in our institution.

  4. STIFF ELBOW TREATMENT BY INTERPOSING ARTHROPLASTY ASSOCIATED TO HINGED EXTERNAL FIXATOR

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; Silva, Luciana Andrade da; Junior, Nelson Gennaro; Checchia, Sergio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Assess the results of the elbow/fascia lata interposing arthroplasty technique associated to the use of a hinged external fixator in the treatment of stiff elbow. Methods: Between 2001 and 2006, five cases of stiff elbow were operated and followed up by the Shoulder and Elbow Group of the Santa Casa Misericórdia de São Paulo Medical Sciences School, establishing the following as inclusion criteria: patients with below-functional elbow range of motion associated to degeneration on that joint, for whom total prosthesis had not been indicated. Patients' ages ranged from 21 to 55 years (mean: 38). Male gender was prevalent (four cases), and, in all cases, the dominant side was operated. Concerning etiology, two cases of infectious arthritis sequels, one post-trauma sequel, and two rheumatoid arthritis were found. Preoperative range of motion ranged from 20° to 30° of flexion-extension; in two cases, fixed contracture existed in flexion at 30° and 65°. The patients were assessed according to Bruce-modified AMA criteria. Results: The mean follow up time was 54 months. All patients showed improvement of the Bruce index, which, preoperatively, was 43.5, increasing to 88.2 postoperatively. We found two excellent cases, one good, one fair, and one poor. Conclusion: Fascia lata interposing arthroplasty associated to the use of a dynamic external fixator on stiff elbows is a feasible alternative for patients not indicated to total elbow arthroplasty. PMID:27022516

  5. Comparison of pain perception between open and minimally invasive surgery in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Biagio; Vitale, Elsa; Esposito, Antonio; Colella, Antonio; Cassano, Maria; Notarnicola, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was a well-established procedure that had shown excellent long-term results in terms of reduced pain and increased mobility. Pain was one of the most important outcome measures that contributed to patient dissatisfaction after TKA. After a computerized search of the Medline and Embase databases, we considered articles from January 1st, 1997 to October 31st, 2009 that underlined the impact on patient pain perception of either standard open total knee arthroplasty or minimally invasive total knee arthroplasty. We included articles that used the visual analog scale (VAS), Western Ontario and McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), Knee Score, Hospital for Special Surgery Score (HSS), Oxford Knee Score (OKS) as postoperative pain indicators, and we included studies with a minimum follow-up period of two months. We excluded studies that monitored only functional postoperative knee activities. It was shown that TKA with the open technique was a better treatment for knees with a positive effect on pain and function than the minimally invasive technique. PMID:21042568

  6. Total Hip Arthroplasty Using S-ROM Prosthesis for Dysplastic Hip

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kyoung Ho; Kim, Ryuh Sup; Park, Seung Rim; Lee, Jung Sun; Shin, Sang Hyun

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological results of total hip arthroplasty using a proximal modular femoral stem in patients who had secondary coxarthrosis associated with a dysplastic hip. Materials and Methods Forty-two patients (45 hips) with secondary coxarthrosis were evaluated after undergoing primary total hip arthroplasty using an S-ROM proximal modular femoral stem. The average follow-up was 80 months (range: 60 to 96 months). Clinical and radiological assessments were performed based on the Harris hip score and the radiological changes around the prosthesis. Results The average Harris hip score improved from 52.2 points to 88.5 points. All femoral stems showed stable fixation; there were 37 cases by bony ingrowth and 8 cases by stable fibrous ingrowth. Neither osteolysis nor progressive radiolucent lines around the femoral stem were found at the last follow-up. Forty-one hips (91.9%) revealed excellent or good clinical results at the most recent follow-up. Conclusion For advanced secondary coxarthrosis, total hip arthroplasty with the use of the proximal modular femoral stem yielded good mid-term results with respect to the clinical and radiological criteria. PMID:21623609

  7. MEDIUM-TERM ASSESSMENT OF TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY WITH IMPLANT MADE IN BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    Barretto, João Maurício; Malta, Márcio; e Albuquerque, Rodrigo Pires; de Assis, Daniel Pinho; Campos, André Siqueira

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed 47 patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with implants manufactured in Brazil, with a mean follow-up of five years. Methods: This was a retrospective study at Santa Casa de Misericordia Hospital in Rio de Janeiro, from January 1993 to December 2002. The sample comprised 47 patients (44 females and three males) who underwent TKA, totaling 58 knees. The patients’ ages ranged from 46 to 83 years. A diagnosis of osteoarthritis or rheumatic disease was confirmed in all the patients. Results: In this investigation, all the patients underwent cemented TKA with preservation of the posterior cruciate ligament. The length of follow-up ranged from 5 to 17 years. The functional assessment criterion used was the one of the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS), and this yielded an average of 87 points after the operation. The radiographic criterion used was the Knee Society Total Knee Arthroplasty Roentgenographic Evaluation and Scoring System. We had three cases with a radiolucent line without implant loosening, which were asymptomatic from a clinical standpoint. Conclusion: The total knee arthroplasty procedures using an implant made in Brazil were performed by a trained and experienced team. To date, over the clinical follow-up on these patients with knee osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis, the results have been seen to be satisfactory. PMID:27027051

  8. THE INFLUENCE OF THE SURGICAL APPROACH CONCERNING DISLOCATION IN TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    Vicente, José Ricardo Negreiros; Pires, André Fernandes; Lee, Bruno Takasaki; Leonhardt, Marcos Camargo; Ejnisman, Leandro; Croci, Alberto Tesconi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Our primary aim was to evaluate the occurrence of dislocation of non-cemented total hip arthroplasty, when using the posterior and the direct lateral approaches. Methods: We performed a comparative retrospective study with 232 patients submitted to non-cemented total hip arthroplasty, due to the diagnosis of primary or secondary osteoarthritis. The posterior approach was used in 105 patients while direct lateral approach was used in 127 patients. There was only one prosthesis model and the same rehabilitation program and post-operative care was used for all patients. We checked the occurrence of dislocation, the acetabular positioning and also the size of the components. Results: There was only one case of dislocation, treated with closed reduction successfully. This was a 47 year-old female, submitted to direct lateral approach. The mean follow-up time for both groups was 23.7 months, ranging from six to 42 months. Conclusion: The authors conclude that the prevalence of total hip arthroplasty dislocation is similar for both approaches, and educational measures besides the use of a higher femoral offset seem to reduce the risk of this complication. PMID:27077060

  9. In-home telerehabilitation for post-knee arthroplasty: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tousignant, Michel; Boissy, Patrick; Corriveau, Hélène; Moffet, Hélène; Cabana, Francois

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of in-home telerehabilitation as an alternative to conventional rehabilitation services following knee arthroplasty. Five community-living elders who had knee arthroplasty were recruited prior to discharge from an acute care hospital. A pre/post-test design without a control group was used for this pilot study. Telerehabilitation sessions (16) were conducted by two trained physiotherapists from a service center to the patient's home using H264 videoconference CODECs (Tandberg 550 MXP) connected at 512 Kb\\s. Disability (range of motion, balance and lower body strength) and function (locomotor performance in walking and functional autonomy) were measured in face-to-face evaluations prior to and at the end of the treatments by a neutral evaluator. The satisfaction of the health care professional and patient was measured by questionnaire. Results are as follows. One participant was lost during follow-up. Clinical outcomes improved for all subjects and improvements were sustained two months post-discharge from in-home telerehabilitation. The satisfaction of the participants with in-home telerehabilitation services was very high. The satisfaction of the health care professionals with the technology and the communication experience during the therapy sessions was similar or slightly lower. In conclusion, telerehabilitation for post-knee arthroplasty is a realistic alternative for dispensing rehabilitation services for patients discharged from an acute care hospital.

  10. Metal hypersensitivity in total knee arthroplasty: revision surgery using a ceramic femoral component - a case report.

    PubMed

    Bergschmidt, Philipp; Bader, Rainer; Mittelmeier, Wolfram

    2012-03-01

    We present a case involving the revision of a total knee arthroplasty with a metal femoral component using a ceramic implant due to metal hypersensitivity. A 58-year-old female patient underwent total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with a standard metal bicondylar knee system. She suffered from persistent pain and strong limitations in her range of motion (ROM) associated with flexion during the early postoperative period. Arthroscopic arthrolysis of the knee joint and intensive active and passive physical treatment, in combination with a cortisone regime, temporarily increased the ROM and reduced pain. No signs of low grade infection or other causes of implant failure were evident. Histology of synovial tissue revealed lymphoplasmacellular fibrinous tissue, consistent with a type IV allergic reaction. Allergometry (skin reaction) revealed type IV hypersensitivity against nickel-II-sulfate and palladium chloride. Revision surgery of the metal components was performed with a cemented ceramic femoral component (same bicondylar design) and a cemented titanium alloy tibial component. Postoperative evaluations were performed 10days, and 3 and 12months after the revision surgery. There was an increased ROM in flexion to 90° at the 12month follow-up. No swelling or effusion was observed at all clinical examinations after the revision surgery. No pain at rest and moderate walking pain were evident. The presented case demonstrates that ceramic implants are a promising solution for patients suffering from hypersensitivity to metal ions in total knee arthroplasty.

  11. Blood, bugs, and motion - what do we really know in regard to total joint arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Glassner, Philip J; Slover, James D; Bosco, Joseph A; Zuckerman, Joseph D

    2011-01-01

    In total joint arthroplasty, it is often necessary to formulate decisions that are not clearly evidence-based. This review presents some current controversial topics in total joint arthroplasty, including preoperative autologous blood donation versus erythropoietin (EPO) usage, preoperative screening and treatment for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and the use of continuous passive motion (CPM) following total knee arthroplasty, providing an evidence-based guide for the treating orthopaedic surgeon. Our review shows that preoperative autologous blood donation is over utilized, with EPO being under utilized. Surgeons are encouraged to develop patient-specific strategies, which have been shown to decrease transfusion rates, reduce wasted autologous blood, and increase EPO use. Definitive conclusions regarding MRSA screening for orthopaedic patients cannot be drawn; but due to the significant cost and morbidity associated with a postoperative MRSA infection, we believe a screen and treat protocol should be considered for all patients being admitted to the hospital for elective or emergent surgery. Short-term (3 to 5 days) inpatient use of CPM is recommended at this time. It is low-cost, has minimal risk, and may be a factor in decreasing the length of stay, potentially leading to significant cost savings. However, no long-term benefits of CPM use have been established.

  12. Fungal periprosthetic joint infection in total knee arthroplasty: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jakobs, Oliver; Schoof, Benjamin; Klatte, Till Orla; Schmidl, Stefan; Fensky, Florian; Guenther, Daniel; Frommelt, Lars; Gehrke, Thorsten; Gebauer, Matthias

    2015-03-03

    Fungal periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a rare but devastating complication following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A standardized procedure regarding an accurate treatment of this serious complication of knee arthroplasty is lacking. In this systematic review, we collected data from 36 studies with a total of 45 reported cases of a TKA complicated by a fungal PJI. Subsequently, an analysis focusing on diagnostic, medicaments and surgical procedures in the pre-, intra- and postoperative period was performed. Candida spp. accounts for about 80% (36 out of 45 cases) of fungal PJIs and is therefore the most frequently reported pathogen. A systemic antifungal therapy was administered in all but one patient whereas a local antifungal therapy, e.g. the use of an impregnated spacer, is of inferior relevance. Resection arthroplasty with delayed re-implantation (two-stage revision) was the surgical treatment of choice. However, in 50% of all reported cases the surgical therapy was heterogeneous. The outcome under a combined therapy was moderate with recurrent fungal PJI in 11 patients and subsequent bacterial PJI as a main complication in 5 patients. In summary, this systematic review integrates data from up to date 45 reported cases of a fungal PJI of a TKA. On the basis of the current literature strategies for the treatment of this devastating complication after TKA are discussed.

  13. Preoperative Acute Inflammatory Markers as Predictors for Postoperative Complications in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Gustavo; Sumarriva, Gonzalo; Ochsner, J. Lockwood; Chimento, George; Schmucker, Dana; Dasa, Vinod; Meyer, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background: C-reactive protein (CRP) has been suggested as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular pathology in the nonsurgical setting. While postoperative CRP and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) have an established role in aiding the diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infections, some authors suggest a link between preoperative CRP and postoperative complications in patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 351 patients who underwent unilateral primary total knee arthroplasty by a single surgeon during a 28-month period (January 2013 through April 2015). Patient medical records were reviewed for the following complications occurring within 90 days postoperatively: myocardial infarction, arrhythmia, pulmonary embolism, wound infection, acute renal failure, and reoperation. Results: We found no statistically significant link between postoperative complications and preoperative CRP levels (P=0.5005) or ESR levels (P=0.1610). Conclusion: The results of this study do not support the routine inclusion of CRP and ESR analysis as part of the preoperative evaluation for elective total knee arthroplasty. PMID:27999506

  14. Effect of clearance on cartilage tribology in hip hemi-arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lizhang, Jia; Taylor, Simon D; Jin, Zhongmin; Fisher, John; Williams, Sophie

    2013-12-01

    Hemi-arthroplasty of the hip (an artificial femoral head articulating against the natural acetabulum) is used to treat fractured necks of femur; however, there is evidence that articulation causes erosion of the cartilage, resulting in pain for the patient. Parameters that may influence this cartilage erosion include head material and roughness, clearance between the head and acetabulum and activity levels of the patient. This study has assessed the effect of clearance of hemi-arthroplasty articulations on the contact stress, friction and cartilage deformation in an in vitro tribological simulation of the hemi-arthroplasty joint that applied dynamic loads and motion. It has been demonstrated that peak contact stress increased from 5.6 to 10.6 MPa as radial clearance increased from small (<0.6 mm) to extra-large (>1.8 mm). In all samples, friction factor increased with time and was significantly less with extra-large clearances compared to small (<0.6 mm), medium (0.6-1.2 mm) and large (1.2-1.8 mm) clearances. The cartilage deformation observed was significantly greater in acetabulum samples paired to give small or extra-large clearances compared to those with medium or large clearances.

  15. Glass ionomer as an expander of allograft in revision arthroplasty of the hip.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, J D J; Cunningham, J L; Samuels, A; Blunn, G W; Lawes, T J; Learmonth, I D; Goodship, A E

    2003-02-01

    The use of glass ionomer as a bone graft expander was investigated in an in vivo model of revision hip arthroplasty. Bone grafts of pure allograft and allograft + glass ionomer particles in a 50:50 by weight mixture were implanted in an ovine hemi-arthroplasty model. Post-operative assessments of locomotor function, radiographic appearance and quantitative changes in mineralisation around the graft were made at 2, 4 and 6 months. Post-mortem assessments of radiographic and histologic appearance of the grafts were made at 6 months. No significant differences were noted in any of the measured or assessed parameters between the two graft types. The glass ionomer particles seemed to be well tolerated within the matrix of new bone, smaller sized particles appearing to be better incorporated than larger ones. The use of particles of glass ionomer as a bone graft expander, in this in vivo model of revision hip arthroplasty, would therefore appear to offer no detriment in performance over pure allograft in the short to medium term.

  16. Total knee arthroplasty in patient with paraplegia after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Zietek, P; Dobiecki, K

    2015-01-01

    The clinical management of paraplegic patients is more complex than in able-bodied subjects. Spinal cord injury (SCI) affects younger, active people more often than the elderly during high-energy fall or traffic accidents. In order to return to work after suffering an SCI, patients need to regain their functional independence, especially their ability to drive. The literature lacks strong evidence addressing the surgical solutions in severe knee arthrosis in paralyzed patients after SCI. We present a favourable outcome of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) of a stiff knee in extension in a man with T12 grade C paraplegia after SCI. We describe an effective rehabilitation protocol after knee arthroplasty in patient with damage to the spinal cord. Several factors should be taken into account before performing surgery: 1. ability of regaining some of spinal cord locomotor function through intensive gait rehabilitation in SCI patients, 2. presence of muscle imbalance and knee contractures combined with a risk of bone fracture resulting from intensive postoperative rehabilitation, 3. the impaired microvasculature of the skin and subcutaneous tissues and increased risk of occlusion occurrence of the capillaries and small vessels of the leg, 4. higher prevalence of secondary infections via urinary entry sites in patients after SCI, 5. patient's strong determination and willingness to undergo the arthroplasty procedure. TKA might be considered in selected paralyzed patients after SCI, especially in those with severe arthrosis as well as significant knee contractures. Our study reveals the advantage of performing TKA in improving functional state in patients with cord injury.

  17. Arthroscopic sternoclavicular joint resection arthroplasty: a technical note and illustrated case report.

    PubMed

    Warth, Ryan J; Lee, Jared T; Campbell, Kevin J; Millett, Peter J

    2014-02-01

    Open resection arthroplasty of the sternoclavicular (SC) joint has historically provided good long-term results in patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis of the SC joint. However, the procedure is rarely performed because of the risk of injury to vital mediastinal structures and concern regarding postoperative joint instability. Arthroscopic decompression of the SC joint has therefore emerged as a potential treatment option because of many recognized advantages including minimal tissue dissection, maintenance of joint stability, avoidance of posterior SC joint dissection, expeditious recovery, and improved cosmesis. There are, however, safety concerns given the proximity of neurovascular structures. In this article we demonstrate a technique for arthroscopic SC joint resection arthroplasty in a 26-year-old active man with bilateral, painful, idiopathic degenerative SC joint osteoarthritis. This case also highlights the pearls and pitfalls of arthroscopic resection arthroplasty for the SC joint. There were no perioperative complications. Four months postoperatively, the patient had returned to full activities, including weightlifting, without pain or evidence of SC joint instability. One year postoperatively, the patient showed substantial improvements in the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score; Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation score; Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score; and Short Form 12 Physical Component Summary score over preoperative baseline values.

  18. Liposomal Bupivacaine vs Interscalene Nerve Block for Pain Control After Shoulder Arthroplasty: A Retrospective Cohort Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Casey V; Albrecht, Matthew J; Petersen, Steve A; Srikumaran, Uma

    The aim of this study was to compare liposomal bupivacaine and interscalene nerve block (ISNB) for analgesia after shoulder arthroplasty. We compared 37 patients who received liposomal bupivacaine vs 21 who received ISNB after shoulder arthroplasty by length of hospital stay (LOS), opioid consumption, and postoperative pain. Pain was the same in both groups for time intervals of 1 hour and 8 to 14 hours postoperatively. Compared with ISNB patients, liposomal bupivacaine patients reported less pain at 18 to 24 hours (P = .001) and 27 to 36 hours (P = .029) and had lower opioid consumption on postoperative days 2 (P = .001) and 3 (P = .002). Mean LOS for liposomal bupivacaine patients was 46 ± 20 hours vs 57 ± 14 hours for ISNB patients (P = .012). Sixteen of 37 liposomal bupivacaine patients vs 2 of 21 ISNB patients were discharged on the first postoperative day (P = .010). Liposomal bupivacaine was associated with less pain, less opioid consumption, and shorter hospital stays after shoulder arthroplasty compared with ISNB.

  19. Persistent pain after total knee or hip arthroplasty: differential study of prevalence, nature, and impact

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Patrícia R; McIntyre, Teresa; Ferrero, Ramón; Araújo-Soares, Vera; Almeida, Armando

    2013-01-01

    This study compares the incidence, nature, and impact of persistent post-surgical pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA) and investigates differences between these procedures, with the focus on potential presurgical and post-surgical issues that could be related to the distinct persistent post-surgical pain outcomes between these two groups. A consecutive sample of 92 patients was assessed prospectively 24 hours before, 48 hours, and 4–6 months after surgery. The data show that TKA patients had a higher likelihood of developing persistent post-surgical pain, of reporting higher pain levels, and of using more neuropathic descriptors when classifying their pain. In addition, TKA patients more often reported interference from pain on functional domains, including general activity, walking ability, and normal work. Demographic factors, like gender and age, along with presurgical clinical factors like disease onset, existence of medical comorbidities, and other pain problems, may have contributed to these differences, whereas baseline psychologic factors and functionality levels did not seem to exert an influence. Heightened acute post-surgical pain experience among TKA patients could also be related to distinct outcomes for persistent post-surgical pain. Future prospective studies should therefore collect TKA and THA samples wherein patients are homogeneous for demographic and presurgical clinical issues. Overall, these findings contribute to a small but growing body of literature documenting persistent post-surgical pain after major arthroplasty, conducted in different countries and across different health care settings. PMID:24072977

  20. Manipulation for stiffness following total knee arthroplasty: when and how often to do it?

    PubMed

    Desai, Aravind S; Karmegam, Anand; Dramis, Asterios; Board, Tim N; Raut, Videsh

    2014-10-01

    Stiffness following total knee arthroplasty is a disabling complication. One of the management options of stiffness includes manipulation under anaesthesia, but no real consensus exist on appropriate timing of intervention, and the timing and results of the manipulation under anaesthesia (MUA) are under debate in the literature. Our aim was to determine the efficacy of single and multiple manipulations under anaesthesia following total knee arthroplasty and to determine the most appropriate timing for manipulation. We retrospectively reviewed 86 patients who underwent manipulation for stiffness following primary total knee replacement with at least 1-year follow-up. Range of motion before surgery, at the time of the MUA, immediately after MUA and at 6 weeks and 1 year post-MUA were recorded. At the end of 1 year post-manipulation, manipulations performed at less than 20 weeks, following primary total knee arthroplasty, showed 31° of flexion gain as compared to only 1.5° of flexion gain when manipulation was undertaken after 20 weeks. Of the 86 patients, 21 had multiple manipulations with no significant difference in flexion gain after the second manipulation. Patients on warfarin (26%) had an increased incidence of stiffness and poor flexion gain. This study showed that better results were achieved when manipulation was performed at less than 20 weeks (particularly between 12 and 14 weeks) from primary surgery with no added benefit from re-manipulations.