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Sample records for arthroscopic anterior cruciate

  1. [Rehabilitation after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Smékal, D; Kalina, R; Urban, J

    2006-12-01

    Rehabilitation is an important part of therapy in patients who have had arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. A well-designed rehabilitation program avoids potential graft damage and speeds up patients' return to their full function level. The course of rehabilitation depends on the type of surgery, mode of fixation and possible co-existing injury to the knee's soft tissues. The rehabilitation program presented here is based on the present-day knowledge of neurophysiological and biomechanical principles and is divided into five phases. In the pre-operative phase (I), the main objective is to prepare patients for surgery in terms of maximum muscle strength and range of motion. It also includes providing full information on the procedure. In the early post-operative phase (II) we are concerned with pain alleviation and reduction of knee edema. After suture removal we begin with soft techniques for the patella and post-operative physical therapy to reduce scarring. In the next post-operative phase (III) patients are able to walk with their full weight on the extremity operated on, and we continue doing exercises that improve flexor/extensor co-contraction. In this phase we also begin with exercises improving the patient's proprioceptive and sensorimotor functions. In the late post-operative phase (IV) we go on with exercises promoting proprioception of both lower extremities with the aim of increasing muscle control of the knee joints. In the convalescent phase (V) patients gradually return to their sports activities.

  2. Arthroscopically assisted combined anterior and posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, G C; Giannotti, B F; Edson, C J

    1996-02-01

    This article presents the minimum 2-year results (range, 24 to 48 months) of 20 arthroscopically assisted combined anterior cruciate ligament/posterior cruciate ligament (ACL/PCL) reconstructions, evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively using the Tegner, Lysholm, and Hospital for Special Surgery knee ligament rating scales, and the KT 1000 knee ligament arthrometer (Medmetric Corp, San Diego, CA). There were 16 men or boys, 4 women or girls; 9 right, 11 left; 10 acute, and 10 chronic knee injuries. Ligament injuries included 1 ACL/PCL tear, 2 ACL/PCL/medial collateral ligament (MCL)/posterior lateral corner tears. 7 ACL/PCL/MCL tears, and 10 ACL/PCL/posterior lateral corner tears. ACLs were reconstructed using autograft or allograft patellar tendons. PCLs were reconstructed using allograft Achilles tendon, or autograft patellar tendon. MCL tears were successfully treated with bracing. Posterior lateral instability was successfully treated with long head of the biceps femoris tendon tenodesis. Tegner, Lysholm, and Hospital for Special Surgery knee ligament rating scales significantly improved preoperatively to postoperatively (P = .0001). Corrected anterior KT 1000 measurements improved from preoperative to postoperative status (P = .0078).

  3. Arthroscopic 4-Point Suture Fixation of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tibial Avulsion Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Boutsiadis, Achilleas; Karataglis, Dimitrios; Agathangelidis, Filon; Ditsios, Konstantinos; Papadopoulos, Pericles

    2014-01-01

    Tibial eminence avulsion fractures are rare injuries occurring mainly in adolescents and young adults. When necessary, regardless of patient age, anatomic reduction and stable internal fixation are mandatory for fracture healing and accurate restoration of normal knee biomechanics. Various arthroscopically assisted fixation methods with sutures, anchors, wires, or screws have been described but can be technically demanding, thus elongating operative times. The purpose of this article is to present a technical variation of arthroscopic suture fixation of anterior cruciate ligament avulsion fractures. Using thoracic drain needles over 2.4-mm anterior cruciate ligament tibial guidewires, we recommend the safe and easy creation of four 2.9-mm tibial tunnels at different angles and at specific points. This technique uses thoracic drain needles as suture passage cannulas and offers 4-point fixation stability, avoiding potential complications of bony bridge fracture and tunnel connection. PMID:25685674

  4. Bilateral Medial Tibial Plateau Fracture after Arthroscopic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Chul Hyun; Lee, Kyung Jae; Jeon, Jong Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Tibial plateau fractures after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction are rare, and only isolated cases have been reported. The authors describe a case of bilateral medial tibial plateau fracture following a minor motorcycle accident in a patient who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction in the past. Two years and four months before the accident, the patient underwent an arthroscopically assisted ACL reconstruction using double-bundle technique on his left knee at a hospital. He had the same surgery using single-bundle technique on his right knee about eight months ago at another hospital. The fractures in his both involved knees occurred through the tibial tunnel and required open reduction with internal fixation. At three weeks after fixation, a second-look arthroscopy revealed intact ACLs in both knees. At five months follow-up, he was able to walk without instability on physical examination. Follow-up radiographs of the patient showed callus formations with healed fractures. PMID:26060613

  5. Intraligamentous ganglion cysts of the anterior cruciate Ligament: MR findings with clinical and arthroscopic correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Do-Dai, D.D.; Youngberg, R.A.; Lanchbury, F.D.; Pitcher, J.D. Jr.; Garver, T.H.

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic resonance findings with clinical and arthroscopic correlation of intraligamentous cysts of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are presented. Three cases of intraligamentous cysts of the ACL were identified out of 681 knee MRI examinations over a 2-year period. Arthroscopy and postoperative MRI were performed in all three patients, each of whom experienced knee pain with extreme flexion and extension. In all three cases the intraligamentous cyst was homogeneously hypointense on T1-weighted imaging and hyperintense on T2-weighted imaging relative to the ACL. Two of the three ACL cysts required a 70{degrees} scope for adequate visualization and establishment of posteromedial and posterolateral portals for arthroscopic treatment. One cyst could not be visualized arthroscopically and probing of the ACL from the anterior portal resulted in drainage of the cyst. No patient had presence of ACL cyst on follow-up MRI or recurrence of symptoms at a mean of 24 months. Intraligamentous cyst of ACL is a rare cause of knee pain. It should be suspected in patients having chronic pain with extremes of motion. Magnetic resonance findings are diagnostic and help to guide arthroscopy. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Graft infection following arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a report of four cases.

    PubMed

    Wee, James; Lee, Keng Thiam

    2014-04-01

    Septic arthritis following arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL) is a rare complication and associated with severe morbidity. Its risk factors include (1) concomitant procedures during the reconstruction, (2) previous knee surgery, (3) allograft usage, (4) peri-operative wound contamination, and (5) presence of intra-articular foreign bodies. We present a series of 3 men and one woman aged 22 to 35 years who developed septic arthritis following ACL reconstruction. The risk factors identified were local infection (n=2), previous ipsilateral knee surgery (n=2), and the use of an allograft (n=1). All patients underwent emergency knee washout and debridement with graft retention within 24 hours, together with a course of intravenous antibiotic therapy. All the patients achieved eradication of their infections (with intact ACL grafts) and satisfactory functional outcome at a mean follow-up of 32 (range, 25-45) months.

  7. Graft infection following arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a report of four cases.

    PubMed

    Wee, James; Lee, Keng Thiam

    2014-04-01

    Septic arthritis following arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL) is a rare complication and associated with severe morbidity. Its risk factors include (1) concomitant procedures during the reconstruction, (2) previous knee surgery, (3) allograft usage, (4) peri-operative wound contamination, and (5) presence of intra-articular foreign bodies. We present a series of 3 men and one woman aged 22 to 35 years who developed septic arthritis following ACL reconstruction. The risk factors identified were local infection (n=2), previous ipsilateral knee surgery (n=2), and the use of an allograft (n=1). All patients underwent emergency knee washout and debridement with graft retention within 24 hours, together with a course of intravenous antibiotic therapy. All the patients achieved eradication of their infections (with intact ACL grafts) and satisfactory functional outcome at a mean follow-up of 32 (range, 25-45) months. PMID:24781628

  8. Massive bone loss from fungal infection after anterior cruciate ligament arthroscopic reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Muscolo, D Luis; Carbo, Lisandro; Aponte-Tinao, Luis A; Ayerza, Miguel A; Makino, Arturo

    2009-09-01

    Although there are numerous reports of septic pyogenic arthritis after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, there is limited information regarding the outcomes of fungal infection. We determined the outcomes of six patients with mycotic infection after regular ACL reconstruction. There were four males and two females with a mean age of 33 years. We determined the number of procedures performed, bone loss originating to control infection, and final reconstruction in these patients. An average of five arthroscopic lavage procedures had been performed at the referring centers. Fungal infection was diagnosed based on pathologic samples; five infections were the result of mucormycosis and one was Candida. After final débridement, the mean segmental bone loss was 12.8 cm. All patients were treated with intravenous antifungal coverage and cement spacers before final reconstruction. At final followup, all patients were free of clinical infection. Three had reconstruction with an allograft-prosthesis composite, two with hemicylindrical allografts, and one with an intercalary allograft arthrodesis. Despite the extremely unusual presentation of this complication, surgeons should be aware of potential and catastrophic consequences of this severe complication after ACL reconstruction.

  9. Massive bone loss from fungal infection after anterior cruciate ligament arthroscopic reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Muscolo, D Luis; Carbo, Lisandro; Aponte-Tinao, Luis A; Ayerza, Miguel A; Makino, Arturo

    2009-09-01

    Although there are numerous reports of septic pyogenic arthritis after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, there is limited information regarding the outcomes of fungal infection. We determined the outcomes of six patients with mycotic infection after regular ACL reconstruction. There were four males and two females with a mean age of 33 years. We determined the number of procedures performed, bone loss originating to control infection, and final reconstruction in these patients. An average of five arthroscopic lavage procedures had been performed at the referring centers. Fungal infection was diagnosed based on pathologic samples; five infections were the result of mucormycosis and one was Candida. After final débridement, the mean segmental bone loss was 12.8 cm. All patients were treated with intravenous antifungal coverage and cement spacers before final reconstruction. At final followup, all patients were free of clinical infection. Three had reconstruction with an allograft-prosthesis composite, two with hemicylindrical allografts, and one with an intercalary allograft arthrodesis. Despite the extremely unusual presentation of this complication, surgeons should be aware of potential and catastrophic consequences of this severe complication after ACL reconstruction. PMID:19190972

  10. [Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament using double anteromedial and posterolateral bundles].

    PubMed

    Franceschi, J P; Sbihi, A; Champsaur, P

    2002-11-01

    We propose a method for repairing the anterior cruciate ligament which takes advantage of the multifascular nature of the ligament to achieve better physiological anteroposterior and rotational stability compared with conventional methods. Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anteromedial and posterolateral bundles of the ligament closely reproduces normal anatomy. We have used this technique in 92 patients with anterior cruciate ligament laxity and present here the mid-term results. The hamstring tendons (gracilis and semitendinosus) are harvested carefully to obtain good quality grafts. Arthroscopic preparation of the notch allows careful cleaning of the axial aspect of the lateral condyle; it is crucial to well visualize the region over the top and delimit the 9 h-12 h zone for the right knee or the 12-15 h zone for the left knee. The femoral end of the anteromedial tunnel lies close to the floor of the intercondylar notch, 5 to 10 mm in front of the posterior border of the lateral condyle, at 13 h for the left knee and 11 h for the right knee. The femoral end of the posterolateral tunnel lies more anteriorly, at 14 h for the left knee and 10 h for the right knee. The tibial end of the posterolateral tunnel faces the anterolateral spike of the tibia. The tibial end of the anteromedial tunnel lies in front of the apex of the two tibial spikes half way between the anteromedial spike and the anterolateral spike, 8 mm in front of the protrusion of the posteriolateral pin. The posterolateral graft is run through the femoral and tibial tunnels first. A cortical fixation is used for the femoral end. The femoral end of the anteromedial graft is then fixed in the same way. The tibial fixation begins with the posterolateral graft with the knee close to full extension. The anteromedial graft is fixed with the knee in 90 degrees flexion. Thirty patients were reviewed at least six months after the procedure. Mean age was 28.2 years. Mean overall IKDC score was 86% (36% A and

  11. Arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with the tibial-remnant preserving technique using a hamstring graft.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Ill; Min, Kyung-Dae; Choi, Hyung-Suk; Kim, Jun-Bum; Kim, Seong-Tae

    2006-03-01

    We propose that the tibial remnant of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is able to enhance the revascularization and cellular proliferation of the graft, to preserve proprioceptive function, and to be able to acquire anatomic placement of the graft without roof impingement. Therefore, it seems reasonable to assume that preserving the tibial remnant as much as possible as a source of reinnervation, if technically possible without causing impingement, would be of potential benefit to the patient. Our surgical technique was developed to maximize the preservation of the tibial remnant. The distally attached semitendinosus and gracilis tendons are harvested using the tendon stripper. After satisfactory placement of 2 guide pins convergently, a closed-end socket in the lateral femoral condyle is created using an adequately sized curved curette. For anatomic placement of the graft, the tibial tunnel should be positioned within the boundaries of the normal ACL tibial remnant. The reamer must be advanced very carefully to minimize injury to the residual remnant at the intra-articular margin of the tibial tunnel. Penetration should stop at the base of the stump. The folded grafts are then pulled intra-articularly through the tibial tunnel, the tibial remnant, and the femoral socket by pulling sutures under arthroscopic visualization. The ACL tibial remnant is compacted by the tendon passage. The graft is secured proximally by tying sutures in the lateral femoral condyle and distally at the tibia with double staples by a belt-buckle method. The advantages of our technique include maximal preservation of the tibial remnant, no roof impingement caused by intrasynovial anatomic placement of the graft, the simplicity of the procedure, the minimal need for hardware or special instruments, the economic benefit, and the potential prevention of tibial tunnel enlargement by preventing synovial fluid leakage. PMID:16517320

  12. Arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with quadriceps tendon autograft: clinical outcome in 4-7 years.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Hwa; Chuang, Tai-Yuan; Wang, Kun-Chuang; Chen, Wen-Jer; Shih, Chun-Hsiung

    2006-11-01

    Surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is indicated in the ACL-deficient knee with symptomatic instability and multiple ligaments injuries. In the present study, we describe the clinical results of quadriceps tendon-patellar bone autograft for ACL reconstruction. From 1996 to 1998, the graft has been used in 38 patients. Thirty-four patients with complete final follow-up for 4-7 years were analyzed. The average follow-up time was 62 (48-84) months. Thirty-two patients (94%) achieved good or excellent results by Lysholm knee rating. Twenty-six patients (76%) could return to moderate or strenuous activity after reconstruction. Twenty-eight patients (82%) had ligament laxity of less than 2 mm. Finally; 31 patients (91%) were assessed as normal or nearly normal rating by IKDC guideline. Twenty-five patients (73%) had less than 10 mm difference in thigh girth between their reconstructed and normal limbs. Thirty-two (94%) and 31 (91%) patients could achieve recovery of the extensor and flexor muscle strength in the reconstructed knee to 80% or more of normal knee strength, respectively. A statistically significant difference exists in thigh girth difference, extensor strength ratio, and flexor strength ratio before and after reconstruction. Tunnel expansion with more than 1 mm was identified in 2 (6%) tibial tunnels. Our study revealed satisfactory clinical subjective and objective results at 4-7 years follow-up. Quadriceps tendon autograft has the advantage of being self-available, relatively easier arthroscopic technique, and having a suitable size, making it an acceptable graft choice for ACL reconstruction. There is little quadriceps muscle strength loss after quadriceps harvest. A quadriceps tendon-patellar autograft is an adequate graft choice to ACL reconstruction.

  13. A modified arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament double-bundle reconstruction technique with autogenous quadriceps tendon graft: remnant-preserving technique.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Jo, Seung-Bae; Kim, Tai-Won; Chang, Ji-Hoon; Choi, Heon-Sik; Oh, Kyung-Soo

    2009-03-01

    Several techniques of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) double-bundle reconstruction have been introduced to improve the functional outcome and restore normal kinematics of the knee. Meanwhile, a remnant-preserving technique was developed to preserve the proprioception and to enhance the revascularization of the reconstructed ACL. We developed double-bundle ACL reconstruction technique using autogenous quadriceps tendon graft while preserving the remnant. With this technique, two femoral sockets and one tibial tunnel are made. To preserve the remnant of the ACL, the rotational direction of the reamer was set to counterclockwise just before perforation of the tibial tunnel. To pass the graft more easily without disturbance of the remnant, the graft passage was achieved through the tibial tunnel. We suggest that the remnant-preserving technique could be an effective alternative considering its mechanical stability as well as the proprioception and vascularization recovery in arthroscopic double-bundle ACL reconstruction.

  14. The arthroscopical and radiological corelation of lever sign test for the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Deveci, Alper; Cankaya, Deniz; Yilmaz, Serdar; Özdemir, Güzelali; Arslantaş, Emrah; Bozkurt, Murat

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate the sensitivity of the lever sign test and the widely used basic tests of the Lachman, anterior drawer and pivot shift tests, both under anaesthesia and without anaesthesia, according to the gold standard diagnostic arthroscopic results in patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The study included 117 patients, diagnosed with ACL tear which was definitively determined during an arthroscopic surgical procedure applied. Before anaesthesia and while under anaesthesia, the Lachman, anterior drawer, pivot shift and lever sign tests were applied to all patients. Evaluation was made of MR images for each patient and documented. The patients comprised 96 males and 21 females, witha mean age of 25.8 ± 5.9 years (range, 17-45 years). Total tear was determined in 82 cases, anteromedial (AM) bundle in 14, posterolateral (PL) bundle in 13 and elongation in 8. Pre-anaesthesia positivity was found in lever sign at 94.2 %, Lachman at 80.5 %, pivot shift at 62.3 % and anterior drawer at 60.1 %. These rates were determined after anaesthesia as lever sign 98.4 %, Lachman 88.7 %, pivot shift 88.3 % and anterior drawer 84.2 %. The lever sign test can be easily applied clinically and it seems to have higher sensitivity than the Lachman test which is the basis of classic information, it should be included in routine clinical practice. In the light of the results of this study, further studies are required to review the accepted view that the Lachmann test is the most reliable test.

  15. Arthroscopic treatment for tibial "Peel off" tears in anterior cruciate ligament-case report.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jin Hwan; Han, Kye Young; Yu, In Sang; Koh, Kyoung Hwan

    2013-11-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury was very common, and its reconstruction is one of the most commonly performed orthopaedic surgeries. A standard treatment option for ACL complete rupture in active young patients is debridement of remnant tissue and reconstruction with various types of tendon graft. However, "A tibial peel off tear" of ACL without bony avulsion can be treated using preservation of original ACL and trans-osseous pullout suture repair. The IKDC subjective score was 90, the objective score was A, and the Lysholm score was 95 at 24 months after surgery. KT-2000 arthrometer showed 2 mm side-to-side difference. Pivot shift test and Lachman test were negative, and there was no limitation in range of motion. Patient returned to full activities including sports and satisfied with the surgical results. In the postoperative MRI at 6 months after the surgery, the continuity of ACL was well maintained without any Cyclops lesion. We believe that trans-osseous pullout suture repair could be included as an alternative method in this "tibial peel off" type ACL injury instead of the usual removal of remnant tissue and reconstruction with a graft. PMID:23412240

  16. Arthroscopic anatomical double bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A prospective longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Devgan, Ashish; Singh, Amanpreet; Gogna, Paritosh; Singla, Rohit; Magu, Narender Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Reetadyuti

    2015-01-01

    Background: Single bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has been the current standard of treatment for ACL deficiency. However, a significant subset of patients continue to report residual symptoms of instability with a poor pivot control. Cadaveric biomechanical studies have shown double bundle (DB) ACL reconstructions to restore the knee kinematics better. This study evaluates the outcome of DB ACL reconstruction. Materials and Methods: 30 consecutive patients who underwent anatomic DB ACL reconstruction were included in this prospective longitudinal study. There were all males with a mean age of 25 ± 7.45 years. All patients were prospectively evaluated using GeNouRoB (GNRB) arthrometer, functional knee scores (International Knee Documentation Committee [IKDC] and Lysholm) and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for comparing the graft orientation and footprint of the reconstructed ACL with that of the normal knee. Results: The average followup was 36.2 months. At the time of final followup the mean Lysholm score was 93.13 ± 3.31. As per the objective IKDC score, 26 patients (86.6%) were in Group A while 4 patients (13.3%) were in Group B. The mean differential anterior tibial translation by GNRB, arthrometer was 1.07 ± 0.8 mm (range 0.1-2.3 mm). All cases had a negative pivot shift test. MRI scans of operated and the contralateral normal knee showed the mean sagittal ACL tibial angle coronal ACL tibial angle and tibial ACL footprint to be in accordance with the values of the contralateral, normal knee. Conclusion: The study demonstrates that DB ACL reconstruction restores the ACL anatomically in terms of size and angle of orientation. However, long term studies are needed to further substantiate its role in decreasing the incidence of early osteoarthritic changes compared to the conventional single bundle reconstructions. PMID:26015600

  17. Efficacy of magnesium as an adjuvant to bupivacaine in 3-in-1 nerve block for arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament repair

    PubMed Central

    Muthiah, Thilaka; Arora, Mahesh K; Trikha, Anjan; Sunder, Rani A; Prasad, Ganga; Singh, Preet M

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Three-in-one and femoral nerve blocks are proven modalities for postoperative analgesia following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of magnesium (Mg) as an adjuvant to bupivacaine in 3-in-1 block for ACL reconstruction. Methods: Sixty patients undergoing arthroscopic ACL reconstruction were randomly allocated to Group I (3-in-1 block with 30 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine preceded by 1.5 ml of intravenous [IV] saline), Group II (3-in-1 block with 30 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine preceded by 1.5 ml of solution containing 150 mg Mg IV) or Group III (3-in-1 block with 30 ml containing 0.25% bupivacaine and 150 mg of Mg as adjuvant preceded by 1.5 ml of IV saline). Post-operatively, patients received morphine when visual analogue scale (VAS) score was ≥4. Quantitative parameters were compared using one-way ANOVA and Kruskal–Wallis test and qualitative data were analysed using Chi-square test. Results: Demographics, haemodynamic parameters, intra-operative fentanyl requirement, post-operative VAS scores and total morphine requirement were comparable between groups. Time to first analgesic requirement was significantly prolonged in Group III (789 ± 436) min compared to Group I (466 ± 290 min) and Group II (519 ± 274 min), (P = 0.02 and 0.05). Significantly less number of patients in Group III (1/20) received morphine in the first 6 h post-operatively, compared to Group I (8/20) and Group II (6/20) (P = 0.008 and 0.03). No side effects were observed. Conclusion: Mg as an adjuvant to bupivacaine in 3-in-1 block for ACL reconstruction significantly prolongs the time to first analgesic requirement and reduces the number of patients requiring morphine in the immediate post-operative period. PMID:27512165

  18. Outcome of Simultaneous Arthroscopic Anterior Cruciate Ligament and Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Hamstring Tendon Autograft: A Multicenter Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Panigrahi, Ranajit; Kumari Mahapatra, Amita; Priyadarshi, Ashok; Singha Das, Dibya; Palo, Nishit; Ranjan Biswal, Manas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multiligamentous injuries of knee are a complex problem in orthopaedics. Combined ACL-PCL injuries are uncommon, usually associated with knee dislocations. Extremity vascular status is essential because of possible arterio-venous compromise. These complex injuries require a systematic evaluation and treatment. Single setting simultaneous arthroscopic ACL and PCL reconstruction or a staged approach can be adopted to treat these cases. Objectives: To evaluate functional outcome of simultaneous arthroscopic ACL and PCL reconstruction with hamstring tendon autograft in multiligamentous knee injuries. Patients and Methods: This prospective study was performed on 20 patients with combined ACL-PCL injuries who underwent simultaneous arthroscopic ACL-PCL reconstruction with hamstring tendon. Evaluation of functional outcome was by IKDC and Lysholm-Tegner scores. Results: In 20 patients, mean age 34 years, return to full-time work and to full sports was 8 weeks and 6.2 months respectively. All patients had full range of motion except 2 patients with < 5 degrees flexion loss; 90% had negative Lachmann test; 95% had negative pivot shift and 10% patients had mild posterior drawer at 90 degrees (1+) at final follow up. Mean IKDC score was 90 (range 81 - 94); mean Tegner activity score was 7 and mean Lysholm knee score was 89. 85% returned to preinjury activity level and a 90% satisfaction rate. Conclusions: Simultaneous arthroscopic ACL and PCL reconstructions using hamstring tendon for combined ACL and PCL injuries is a clinically effective, safe, time saving and cost-effective procedure with better patient compliance and reproducible for a timely return of motion, strength, and function with favorable outcome. PMID:27217932

  19. [Arthroscopic fracture fixation of intercondylar eminence in children using instrumentarium for the reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament].

    PubMed

    Sleczka, Paweł; Krzywoń, Jerzy; Ambrozy, Wojciech

    2010-01-01

    In our article we introduce a proposal of intercondylar tibial eminence fracture in children management. When dealing with II and III type fracture according to Mes and McKeever classification, we would like to suggest artroscopic fracture fixation with the help of a tension band wiring technique using single bundle reconstruction set of anterior cruciate ligament.The method mentioned above was presented on two cases managed in our ward. Stable fixation of this type fracture allows for quick mobilization and physiotherapy of a patient. It appears to be the key element to full recovery in articular surface fracture. PMID:21648155

  20. Arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft without wound drainage: short- to middle-term outcome

    PubMed Central

    Witoński, Dariusz; Kęska, Rafał; Cyranowski, Rafał

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Several studies have suggested that anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) without wound drainage has no impact on long-term follow-up. Aim To investigate a prospective patient series as measured by the patient-administered disease-specific questionnaire Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). Material and methods The study included 101 consecutive patients (71 men and 30 women) with a mean age of 30 years (SD 10, range: 15–62 years), who had undergone primary single incision arthroscopic bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft (BPTB) ACLR without wound drainage. All patients completed KOOS questionnaires, preoperatively and at a mean follow-up of 1.4 years (range: 0.4–3.4). Satisfactory clinical outcome (function recovery – FR) was defined as the lower threshold for the 95% CI of 18–34-year old males and corresponded to a KOOS score > 90 for Pain, 84 for Symptoms, 91 for Activities of Daily Living (ADL), 80 for Sports/Recreation, and 81 for Quality of Life (QOL). A non-satisfactory result was defined as treatment failure (TF) and corresponded to a QOL score < 44. Results All patients achieved 90° of knee flexion on the first postoperative day and full extension 2 weeks postoperatively. A full range of motion was achieved in less than 6 weeks postoperatively. No postoperative complications were reported. Score improvement at follow-up was observed in the KOOS subscales Pain, Symptoms and ADL. Criteria for FR were fulfilled by 52% of patients for Pain, 47% for Symptoms, 62% for ADL, 34% for Sports/Recreation and 15% for QOL, whereas criteria for TF were fulfilled by 29% of patients. Conclusions The study demonstrated that the primary ACLRs without wound drainage did not have any negative impact for patient-reported recovery. PMID:27458486

  1. Bioengineered anterior cruciate ligament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altman, Gregory (Inventor); Kaplan, David (Inventor); Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana (Inventor); Martin, Ivan (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for producing an anterior cruciate ligament ex vivo. The method comprises seeding pluripotent stem cells in a three dimensional matrix, anchoring the seeded matrix by attachment to two anchors, and culturing the cells within the matrix under conditions appropriate for cell growth and regeneration, while subjecting the matrix to one or more mechanical forces via movement of one or both of the attached anchors. Bone marrow stromal cells are preferably used as the pluripotent cells in the method. Suitable matrix materials are materials to which cells can adhere, such as a gel made from collagen type I. Suitable anchor materials are materials to which the matrix can attach, such as Goinopra coral and also demineralized bone. Optimally, the mechanical forces to which the matrix is subjected mimic mechanical stimuli experienced by an anterior cruciate ligament in vivo. This is accomplished by delivering the appropriate combination of tension, compression, torsion, and shear, to the matrix. The bioengineered ligament which is produced by this method is characterized by a cellular orientation and/or matrix crimp pattern in the direction of the applied mechanical forces, and also by the production of collagen type I, collagen type III, and fibronectin proteins along the axis of mechanical load produced by the mechanical forces. Optimally, the ligament produced has fiber bundles which are arranged into a helical organization. The method for producing an anterior cruciate ligament can be adapted to produce a wide range of tissue types ex vivo by adapting the anchor size and attachment sites to reflect the size of the specific type of tissue to be produced, and also adapting the specific combination of forces applied, to mimic the mechanical stimuli experienced in vivo by the specific type of tissue to be produced. The methods of the present invention can be further modified to incorporate other stimuli experienced in vivo by the

  2. Seating of TightRope RT Button Under Direct Arthroscopic Visualization in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction to Prevent Potential Complications.

    PubMed

    Nag, Hira L; Gupta, Himanshu

    2012-09-01

    The ACL TightRope RT (Arthrex, Naples, FL) is a recently introduced fixation device. The adjustable graft loop allows the surgeon some freedom in terms of the length of the femoral socket, eliminates the need for bothersome intraoperative calculations for selecting loop length, ensures that the socket is completely filled with graft, and provides the possibility of tensioning the graft even after graft fixation. However, the device can be associated with the same complications that have been described with EndoButton (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy, Andover, MA) fixation. For example, in our experience, sometimes the button of the TightRope RT may not flip, may become jammed inside the femoral canal, or may flip in the substance of the vastus lateralis. To prevent this, we have introduced 2 additional steps in our procedure: (1) direct visualization of the TightRope RT button in the femoral socket with the arthroscope during its passage and (2) a controlled push directly on the button with the help of a guide pin. Thus proper seating of the button is ensured by direct visualization and the crucial push helps in flipping and seating of the button.

  3. Cold bupivacaine versus magnesium sulfate added to room temperature bupivacaine in sonar-guided femoral and sciatic nerve block in arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery

    PubMed Central

    Alzeftawy, Ashraf Elsayed; El-Daba, Ahmad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cooling of local anesthetic potentiates its action and increases its duration. Magnesium sulfate (MgSo4) added to local anesthetic prolongs the duration of anesthesia and postoperative analgesia with minimal side effects. Aim: The aim of this prospective, randomized, double-blind study was to compare the effect of cold to 4°C bupivacaine 0.5% and Mg added to normal temperature (20–25°C) bupivacaine 0.5% during sonar-guided combined femoral and sciatic nerve blocks on the onset of sensory and motor block, intraoperative anesthesia, duration of sensory and motor block, and postoperative analgesia in arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery. Patients and Methods: A total of 90 American Society of Anesthesiologists classes I and II patients who were scheduled to undergo elective ACL reconstruction were enrolled in the study. The patients were randomly allocated to 3 equal groups to receive sonar-guided femoral and sciatic nerve blocks. In Group I, 17 ml of room temperature (20–25°C) 0.5% bupivacaine and 3 ml of room temperature saline were injected for each nerve block whereas in Group II, 17 ml of cold (4°C) 0.5% bupivacaine and 3 ml of cold saline were injected for each nerve block. In Group III, 17 ml of room temperature 0.5% bupivacaine and 3 ml of MgSo4 5% were injected for each nerve block. The onset of sensory and motor block was evaluated every 3 min for 30 min. Surgery was started after complete sensory and motor block were achieved. Intraoperatively, the patients were evaluated for heart rate and mean arterial pressure, rescue analgesic and sedative requirements plus patient and surgeon satisfaction. Postoperatively, hemodynamics, duration of analgesia, resolution of motor block, time to first analgesic, total analgesic consumption, and the incidence of side effects were recorded. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in demographic data, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and duration of

  4. Incidental Anterior Cruciate Ligament Calcification: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Hisami; Fischer, Hans

    2016-01-01

    The calcification of knee ligaments is a finding noted only in a handful of case reports. The finding of an anterior cruciate ligament calcification has been reported once in the literature. Comparable studies involving the posterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament and an ossicle within the anterior cruciate ligament are likewise discussed in reports of symptomatic patients. We report a case of incidentally discovered anterior cruciate ligament calcification. We discuss the likely etiology and clinical implications of this finding. PMID:27200163

  5. Incidental Anterior Cruciate Ligament Calcification: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hisami; Fischer, Hans

    2016-03-01

    The calcification of knee ligaments is a finding noted only in a handful of case reports. The finding of an anterior cruciate ligament calcification has been reported once in the literature. Comparable studies involving the posterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament and an ossicle within the anterior cruciate ligament are likewise discussed in reports of symptomatic patients. We report a case of incidentally discovered anterior cruciate ligament calcification. We discuss the likely etiology and clinical implications of this finding.

  6. Anterior cruciate ligament - updating article.

    PubMed

    Luzo, Marcus Vinicius Malheiros; Franciozi, Carlos Eduardo da Silveira; Rezende, Fernando Cury; Gracitelli, Guilherme Conforto; Debieux, Pedro; Cohen, Moisés

    2016-01-01

    This updating article on the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has the aim of addressing some of the most interesting current topics in this field. Within this stratified approach, it contains the following sections: ACL remnant; anterolateral ligament and combined intra and extra-articular reconstruction; fixation devices; and ACL femoral tunnel creation techniques. PMID:27517015

  7. Anterior cruciate ligament - updating article.

    PubMed

    Luzo, Marcus Vinicius Malheiros; Franciozi, Carlos Eduardo da Silveira; Rezende, Fernando Cury; Gracitelli, Guilherme Conforto; Debieux, Pedro; Cohen, Moisés

    2016-01-01

    This updating article on the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has the aim of addressing some of the most interesting current topics in this field. Within this stratified approach, it contains the following sections: ACL remnant; anterolateral ligament and combined intra and extra-articular reconstruction; fixation devices; and ACL femoral tunnel creation techniques.

  8. Comparison of arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction by bone-patellar tendon-bone graft with or without using interferential screw in general population.

    PubMed

    Arifeen, K N; Chowdhury, A Z; Sakeb, N; Joarder, A I; Salek, A K; Selimullah, A M

    2015-01-01

    Rupture of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) is common, resulting reduced quality of life, increasing the meniscal injury risk, knee instability and early degenerative joint disease. Bone-Patellar Tendon-Bone (BPTB) became the gold standard surgery where conservative management failed. Adding interferential screw provides rigid fixation which is important for early accelerated rehabilitation program in athletes but we have carried out this prospective interventional study in Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) and our private settings from January 2007 to December 2011 to assess whether interferential screws provide any clinical and functional advantage in general population. Sixty six male patients of 21-40 years age, with ACL deficient knees were reconstructed with BPTB graft where 40 cases were augmented by interferential screws and 26 cases without and followed up for minimum 2 years. The clinical and functional outcome (by Lysholm Knee Scoring), post-operative knee stability (by clinical tests) and complications were assessed and recorded. There was significant (p<0.05, paired 't' test) improvement of knee function (limp, walking, stair climbing, squatting, thigh atrophy) in both groups but no significant difference between them (p>0.05, chi squared test) regarding clinical, functional outcome and knee stability. The complications were insignificant (p>0.05, chi squared test) in both groups but there were few cases of screw related complications with augmentation and pronounced anterior knee laxity without it. So, ACL reconstruction by BPTB grafts with or without augmentation results consistent and comparable outcome in general population. PMID:25725669

  9. Mucoid Degeneration of Posterior Cruciate Ligament with Secondary Impingement of Anterior Cruciate Ligament: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joon Ho; Jangir, Rajat R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Mucoid degeneration of cruciate ligament is well known entity, but symptomatic lesions are rare. It is even rarer to find a symptomatic posterior cruciate ligament mucoid degeneration than anterior cruciate ligament. Case Report: A 65-years-old female presented to our hospital complaining of pain in right knee joint on terminal extension since 6 months. On clinical examination, there was a flexion deformity of 5 degree and a further flexion of 150 degree with mild pain exacerbated by extension. MRI of the right knee joint showed a diffusely thickened posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) with increased intra ligamentous signal intensity on T2-weighted images. The arthroscopic findings of grossly thickened PCL with a yellowish hue are characteristic and the PCL was filled with a yellowish substance. We excised the yellowish substance from the PCL as precisely as possible not to damage the remaining PCL fiber (Limited Debulking). We did notchplasty of lateral wall and roof to accommodate the Anterior Cruciate Ligament and avoid impingement. Conclusion: Posterior cruciate ligament may enlarge significantly and may push the Anterior Cruciate Ligament in the notch and may lead to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) impingement symptoms. Partial Debulking of Posterior Cruciate Ligament and notchplasty is effective treatment with immediate postoperative pain relief and good functional results. PMID:27299097

  10. Clinical outcomes of second-look arthroscopic evaluation after anterior cruciate ligament augmentation: comparison with single- and double-bundle reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Nakamae, A; Ochi, M; Deie, M; Adachi, N; Shibuya, H; Ohkawa, S; Hirata, K

    2014-10-01

    We report the clinical outcome and findings at second-look arthroscopy of 216 patients (mean age 25 years (11 to 58)) who underwent anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction or augmentation. There were 73 single-bundle ACL augmentations (44 female, 29 male), 82 double-bundle ACL reconstructions (35 female, 47 male), and 61 single-bundle ACL reconstructions (34 female, 27 male). In 94 of the 216 patients, proprioceptive function of the knee was evaluated before and 12 months after surgery using the threshold to detect passive motion test. Second-look arthroscopy showed significantly better synovial coverage of the graft in the augmentation group (good: 60 (82%), fair: 10 (14%), poor: 3 (4%)) than in the other groups (p = 0.039). The mean side-to-side difference measured with a KT-2000 arthrometer was 0.4 mm (-3.3 to 2.9) in the augmentation group, 0.9 mm (-3.2 to 3.5) in the double-bundle group, and 1.3 mm (-2.7 to 3.9) in the single-bundle group: the result differed significantly between the augmentation and single-bundle groups (p = 0 .013). No significant difference in the Lysholm score or pivot-shift test was seen between the three groups (p = 0.09 and 0.65, respectively). In patients with good synovial coverage, three of the four measurements used revealed significant improvement in proprioceptive function (p = 0.177, 0.020, 0.034, and 0.026). We conclude that ACL augmentation is a reasonable treatment option for patients with favourable ACL remnants.

  11. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Arcuri, Francisco; Barclay, Fernando; Nacul, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The most recent advances in ACL reconstruction try to reproduce the anatomic femoral and tibial footprints as close as possible. Creating independent tunnels would allow an optimal of the entry point and the femoral tunnel obliquity, and together with an adequate reamer diameter they wouldreproduce with greater certainty the anatomy. Objective: To compare the radiographic parameters of the femoral and tibial tunnel positions in two groups of patients, one operated with a transtibial and other with transportal anatomic techniques. Materials and Methods: From December 2012 to December 2013, 59 patients with a primary ACL reconstruction divided in two groups, a trans tibial technique (TT), 19 patients, and an transportal one (TP) with 40 patients were prospectively evaluated with AP and lateral X-rays. The femoral tunnel angle, the insertion site with respect of the Blumensaat line, the trans osseous distance, the tibial tunnel position as a percentage of the tibial plateau in the AP and lateral views. And finally the tibial tunnel angle in the AP and Lateral views. Results: The femoral tunnel angle was in the TP group of 45,92º and in the TT one 24,53º, p 0,002. The insertion site percentage of the Blumensaat line was of 20,96 in TP and 20,74 in the TT, p 0,681.Trans osseous distance was in the TP of 3,43 cm and in the TT of 4,79 cm, p <0,000. The tibial tunnel position as a percentage in the AP tibial plateau was of 44,35 in TP and of 40,80 TT with a p of 0,076. The tibial tunnel position as a percentage of the lateral tibial plateau was of 28,70 in TP and 34,53 in TT with a p 0,367. Tibial tunnel angle in the AP was of 73,48º in TP and 62,81 in TT with a p of 0,002, and in the lateral plateau of 114,69º in TP and 112,79º in TT with a p of 0,427. Conclusion: It is possible to create tibial and femoral tunnel in optimal positions but not equal between both groups. Creating independent tunnels allow a more anterior and vertical tibial tunnel

  12. Anatomical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: a logical approach

    PubMed Central

    Gali, Julio Cesar

    2015-01-01

    We describe the surgical approach that we have used over the last years for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, highlighting the importance of arthroscopic viewing through the anteromedial portal (AMP) and femoral tunnel drilling through an accessory anteromedial portal (AMP). The AMP allows direct view of the ACL femoral insertion site on the medial aspect of the lateral femoral condyle, does not require guides for anatomic femoral tunnel reaming, prevents an additional lateral incision in the distal third of the thigh (as would be unavoidable when the outside-in technique is used) and also can be used for double-bundle ACL reconstruction. PMID:26417571

  13. Injury to the Anterior Tibial Artery during Bicortical Tibial Drilling in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Bum; Lim, Jin Woo; Seo, Jeong Gook; Ha, Jeong Ku

    2016-03-01

    Many complications have been reported during or after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, including infection, bleeding, tibial tunnel widening, arthrofibrosis, and graft failure. However, arterial injury has been rarely reported. This paper reports a case of an anterior tibial arterial injury during bicortical tibial drilling in arthroscopic ACL reconstruction, associated with an asymptomatic occlusion of the popliteal artery. The patient had a vague pain which led to delayed diagnosis of compartment syndrome and delayed treatment with fasciotomy. All surgeons should be aware of these rare but critical complications because the results may be disastrous like muscle necrosis as in this case. PMID:26929808

  14. Injury to the Anterior Tibial Artery during Bicortical Tibial Drilling in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Bum; Lim, Jin Woo; Seo, Jeong Gook

    2016-01-01

    Many complications have been reported during or after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, including infection, bleeding, tibial tunnel widening, arthrofibrosis, and graft failure. However, arterial injury has been rarely reported. This paper reports a case of an anterior tibial arterial injury during bicortical tibial drilling in arthroscopic ACL reconstruction, associated with an asymptomatic occlusion of the popliteal artery. The patient had a vague pain which led to delayed diagnosis of compartment syndrome and delayed treatment with fasciotomy. All surgeons should be aware of these rare but critical complications because the results may be disastrous like muscle necrosis as in this case. PMID:26929808

  15. Rehabilitation of anterior cruciate ligament injuries.

    PubMed

    Halling, A H; Howard, M E; Cawley, P W

    1993-04-01

    Rehabilitation of the anterior cruciate ligament absent or reconstructed knee is becoming a true artform. Accelerated, but controlled rehabilitation, is becoming more commonplace. Scientific-based data along with clinical experiences are the basis of the rehabilitation guidelines brought forth in this article. Anterior cruciate ligament strain and implications for exercise, continuous passive motion, proprioceptive exercise, and the role of knee bracing are all discussed in relation to the overall rehabilitation program.

  16. Surgical Treatment of a Rare Isolated Bilateral Agenesis of Anterior and Posterior Cruciate Ligaments

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The isolated bilateral agenesis of both cruciate ligaments is a rare congenital disorder. A 17-year-old male came to our attention due to an alteration in gait pattern, pain, and tendency to walk on the forefoot with his knee flexed. The patient did not recall previous injuries. Upon physical examination anterior and posterior chronic instability were observed. Radiographic examination of both knees showed hypoplasia of the tibial eminence, a hypoplastic lateral femoral condyle, and a narrow intercondylar notch. MRI brought to light a bilateral agenesis of both posterior cruciate ligaments. Arthroscopic evaluation confirmed bilateral isolated agenesis of both cruciate ligaments. We recommended a rehabilitation program to prepare the patient for the arthroscopic construction of both cruciate ligaments. PMID:25197599

  17. Surgical treatment of a rare isolated bilateral agenesis of anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments.

    PubMed

    Cerulli, G; Amanti, A; Placella, G

    2014-01-01

    The isolated bilateral agenesis of both cruciate ligaments is a rare congenital disorder. A 17-year-old male came to our attention due to an alteration in gait pattern, pain, and tendency to walk on the forefoot with his knee flexed. The patient did not recall previous injuries. Upon physical examination anterior and posterior chronic instability were observed. Radiographic examination of both knees showed hypoplasia of the tibial eminence, a hypoplastic lateral femoral condyle, and a narrow intercondylar notch. MRI brought to light a bilateral agenesis of both posterior cruciate ligaments. Arthroscopic evaluation confirmed bilateral isolated agenesis of both cruciate ligaments. We recommended a rehabilitation program to prepare the patient for the arthroscopic construction of both cruciate ligaments.

  18. Anterior cruciate ligament tunnel placement.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Brian R; Ramme, Austin J; Britton, Carla L; Amendola, Annunziato

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this cadaveric study was to analyze variation in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tunnel placement between surgeons and the influence of preferred surgical technique and surgeon experience level using three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT). In this study, 12 surgeons drilled ACL tunnels on six cadaveric knees each. Surgeons were divided by experience level and preferred surgical technique (two-incision [TI], medial portal [MP], and transtibial [TT]). ACL tunnel aperture locations were analyzed using 3D CT scans and compared with radiographic ACL footprint criteria. The femoral tunnel location from front to back within the notch demonstrated a range of means of 16% with the TI tunnels the furthest back. A range of means of only 5% was found for femoral tunnel low to high positions by technique. The anterior to posterior tibial tunnel measure demonstrated wider variation than the medial to lateral position. The mean tibial tunnel location drilled by TT surgeons was more posterior than surgeons using the other techniques. Overall, 82% of femoral tunnels and 78% of tibial tunnels met all radiographic measurement criteria. Slight (1-7%) differences in mean tunnel placement on the femur and tibia were found between experienced and new surgeons. The location of the femoral tunnel aperture in the front to back plane relative to the notch roof and the anterior to posterior position on the tibia were the most variable measures. Surgeon experience level did not appear to significantly affect tunnel location. This study provides background information that may be beneficial when evaluating multisurgeon and multicenter collaborative ACL studies.

  19. Rehabilitation concerns following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Frndak, P A; Berasi, C C

    1991-11-01

    Rehabilitation following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is a subject of controversy in the orthopaedic and rehabilitation literature. With an increasing number of these operations currently being performed and with the advent of arthroscopically assisted ACL reconstruction over the past several years, particular rehabilitation needs and problems have been identified in association with these patients. Various authors have stressed one or a combination of a few basic themes which outline the basic rehabilitation concerns following ACL reconstruction. The most fundamental concern is the need to initiate motion very soon after surgery. Prolonged postoperative immobilisation is known to cause serious complications after ACL reconstruction which can be avoided by early motion. Positions or activities which may apply excessive stress to a newly reconstructed ACL must also be considered. The amount of protection required by the graft will vary depending upon the type of graft used and the quality of fixation obtained intraoperatively. Most authors agree that nonweightbearing, active resistive quadriceps exercises should be avoided for an extended period, while closed chain exercises may be initiated much earlier. Strength recovery is obviously important for the quadriceps postoperatively, but maximal strength returns of all of the muscles about the knee must be pursued. Hamstring strength is of particular concern as this may provide an active support to the reconstructed ACL. Sensory loss in the knee after ACL disruption should also be addressed during rehabilitation, prior to a patient's return to full athletic activity. Progressive neuromuscular re-education exercises which rely on sensory input from intact pericapsular structures are encouraged. A final concern is the role of bracing after ACL reconstruction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1763251

  20. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with fresh-frozen patellar tendon allografts.

    PubMed

    Valenti, J R; Sala, D; Schweitzer, D

    1994-01-01

    A prospective study was performed on 30 patients who underwent an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with fresh-frozen patellar tendon allograft. An arthroscopic technique alone was used in 10 patients, and in the other 20 patients this was combined with a miniarthrotomy. After a mean follow up of 35 months, the overall functional results were satisfactory in 85%. There were no cases of infection, disease transmission or tissue rejection. Fresh-frozen patellar tendon allografts are a good method of anterior cruciate reconstruction.

  1. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with fresh-frozen patellar tendon allografts.

    PubMed

    Valenti, J R; Sala, D; Schweitzer, D

    1994-01-01

    A prospective study was performed on 30 patients who underwent an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with fresh-frozen patellar tendon allograft. An arthroscopic technique alone was used in 10 patients, and in the other 20 patients this was combined with a miniarthrotomy. After a mean follow up of 35 months, the overall functional results were satisfactory in 85%. There were no cases of infection, disease transmission or tissue rejection. Fresh-frozen patellar tendon allografts are a good method of anterior cruciate reconstruction. PMID:8002109

  2. Surgical treatment of anterior cruciate ligament injury in adults.

    PubMed

    Alazzawi, Sulaiman; Sukeik, Mohamed; Ibrahim, Mazin; Haddad, Fares S

    2016-04-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament injury is among the most common soft tissue injuries of the knee joint and reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament is the gold standard treatment for young active symptomatic patients. This review summarizes the surgical treatment of anterior cruciate ligament injury.

  3. Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Jeffrey; Bedi, Asheesh; Altchek, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most common surgical procedures, with more than 200,000 ACL tears occurring annually. Although primary ACL reconstruction is a successful operation, success rates still range from 75% to 97%. Consequently, several thousand revision ACL reconstructions are performed annually and are unfortunately associated with inferior clinical outcomes when compared with primary reconstructions. Evidence Acquisition: Data were obtained from peer-reviewed literature through a search of the PubMed database (1988-2013) as well as from textbook chapters and surgical technique papers. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: The clinical outcomes after revision ACL reconstruction are largely based on level IV case series. Much of the existing literature is heterogenous with regard to patient populations, primary and revision surgical techniques, concomitant ligamentous injuries, and additional procedures performed at the time of the revision, which limits generalizability. Nevertheless, there is a general consensus that the outcomes for revision ACL reconstruction are inferior to primary reconstruction. Conclusion: Excellent results can be achieved with regard to graft stability, return to play, and functional knee instability but are generally inferior to primary ACL reconstruction. A staged approach with autograft reconstruction is recommended in any circumstance in which a single-stage approach results in suboptimal graft selection, tunnel position, graft fixation, or biological milieu for tendon-bone healing. Strength-of-Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT): Good results may still be achieved with regard to graft stability, return to play, and functional knee instability, but results are generally inferior to primary ACL reconstruction: Level B. PMID:25364483

  4. Causes of anterior cruciate ligament injuries.

    PubMed

    Ristić, Vladimir; Ninković, Srdan; Harhaji, Vladimir; Milankov, Miroslav

    2010-01-01

    In order to prevent anterior cruciate ligament injuries it is necessary to define risk factors and to analyze the most frequent causes of injuries--that being the aim of this study. The study sample consisted of 451 surgically treated patients, including 400 sportsmen (65% of them being active and 35% recreational sportsmen), 29% female and 71% male; of whom 90% were younger than 35. Sports injuries, as the most frequent cause of anterior cruciate ligament injuries, were recorded in 88% of patients (non-contact ones in 78% and contact ones in 22%), injuries occurring in everyday activities in 11% and in traffic in 1%. Among sportsmen, reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament was most frequently performed in football players (48%), then in handball players (22%), basketball players (13%), volleyball players (8%), martial arts fighters (4%). However, the injury incidence was the highest among the active basketball players (1 injured among 91 active players). Type of footwear, warming up before the activity, genetic predisposition and everyday therapy did not have a significant influence on getting injured. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries happened three times more often during matches, in the middle and at the end of a match and training session (79%), at landing after the jump or when changing direction of movement (75%) without a contact with other competitors, on dry surfaces (79%), among not so well prepared sportsmen.

  5. Transient Superficial Peroneal Nerve Palsy After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Alrowaili, Majed

    2016-04-26

    A 19-year-old male subject was diagnosed with medial meniscal, lateral meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. The symptoms did not subside after 4 months of physical therapy, and he underwent arthroscopic partial medial and lateral meniscectomy and ACL reconstruction. Immediately after the patient woke up from general anesthesia, he started experience loss of sensation in the area of superficial peroneal nerve with inverted dorsiflexion of foot and ankle. Instantly, the bandage and knee brace was removed and a diagnosis of compartment syndrome was ruled out. After eight hours, post-operatively, the patient started receiving physiotherapy. He complained of numbness and tingling in the same area. After 24 h, post-operatively, the patient started to regain dorsiflexion and eversion gradually. Two days after the surgery, the patient exhibited complete recovery of neurological status.

  6. Transient Superficial Peroneal Nerve Palsy After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A 19-year-old male subject was diagnosed with medial meniscal, lateral meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. The symptoms did not subside after 4 months of physical therapy, and he underwent arthroscopic partial medial and lateral meniscectomy and ACL reconstruction. Immediately after the patient woke up from general anesthesia, he started experience loss of sensation in the area of superficial peroneal nerve with inverted dorsiflexion of foot and ankle. Instantly, the bandage and knee brace was removed and a diagnosis of compartment syndrome was ruled out. After eight hours, post-operatively, the patient started receiving physiotherapy. He complained of numbness and tingling in the same area. After 24 h, post-operatively, the patient started to regain dorsiflexion and eversion gradually. Two days after the surgery, the patient exhibited complete recovery of neurological status. PMID:27478579

  7. Arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with allograft versus autograft

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiujiang; Zhang, Jianfeng; Qu, Xiaoyi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to compare and analyze retrospectively the outcomes of arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with autograft versus allograft. Material and methods Seventy-one patients who underwent arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with an autograft or allograft met our inclusion criteria. There were 36 patients in the autograft group and 35 patients in the allograft group. All the patients were evaluated by physical examination and a functional ligament test. Comparative analysis was done in terms of operation time, incision length, fever time, postoperative infection rate, incidence of numbness and dysesthesia around the incision, as well as a routine blood test. Results The average follow-up of the autograft group was 3.2 ±0.2 years and that of the allograft group was 3.3 ±0.6 years; there was no significant difference (p > 0.05). No differences existed in knee range of motion, Lysholm scores, International Knee Documentation Committee standard evaluation form and Tegner activity score at final follow-up (p > 0.05), except that patients in the allograft group had a shorter operation time and incision length and a longer fever time (p < 0.05). We found a difference in posterior drawer test and KT-2000 arthrometer assessment (p < 0.05). The posterior tibia displacement averaged 3.8 ±1.5 mm in the autograft group and 4.8 ±1.7 mm in the allograft group (p < 0.05). The incidence of numbness and dysesthesia around the incision in the autograft group was higher than that in the allograft group (p < 0.05). There was no infection postoperatively. The white blood cells and neutrophils in the allograft group increased more than those in the autograft group postoperatively (p < 0.05). Conclusions Both groups of patients had satisfactory outcomes after the operation. However, in the instrumented posterior laxity test, the autograft gave better results than the allograft. No differences in functional scores

  8. Return to Play Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Morris, Ryan C; Hulstyn, Michael J; Fleming, Braden C; Owens, Brett D; Fadale, Paul D

    2016-10-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions are commonly performed in an attempt to return an athlete to sports activities. Accelerated rehabilitation has made recovery for surgery more predictable and shortened the timeline for return to play. Despite success with and advancements in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions, some athletes still fail to return to play. PMID:27543405

  9. Management of anterior cruciate ligament injury: pathophysiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Alazzawi, Sulaiman; Sukeik, Mohamed; Ibrahim, Mazin; Haddad, Fares S

    2016-04-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament injury, a common soft tissue injury of the knee joint, is increasing in incidence particularly in young active people. It causes instability of the knee that leads to meniscal tears, cartilage defects and early osteoarthritis. This review summarizes aspects of anterior cruciate ligament injury management.

  10. All-inside anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Blackman, Andrew J; Stuart, Michael J

    2014-10-01

    All-inside anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has undergone a series of modifications over the past 20 years. Current techniques offer the advantages of improved cosmesis, less postoperative pain, decreased bone removal, and gracilis preservation. Few all-inside ACL reconstruction outcome studies are available; therefore, additional research is necessary to compare the results to conventional techniques. The purpose of this article is to review the evolution of all-inside ACL reconstruction, the advantages and disadvantages, our preferred technique, and clinical experience to date.

  11. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in patients older than 35 years.

    PubMed

    El-Sallakh, Sameh; Pastides, Philip; Thomas, Panos

    2014-12-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is an increasingly established method even in patients older than 35 years. Our hypothesis is that functional outcome after ACL reconstruction is comparable in patients younger and older than 35 years. A total of 28 patients (5 women and 23 men) with average age of 41.5 years (36-68) were retrospectively evaluated. The average follow-up period was 33 months. All of them were treated operatively with arthroscopic single-bundle four-strand hamstring tendon autograft. The functional outcome was determined by clinical scores (Tegner activity scale and Lysholm knee score). The median values for the Lysholm knee score were preoperatively 77 and postoperatively 96 points (range, 90-100) with significant improvement (p < 0.05) and that for the Tegner activity scale were preoperatively 4.6 points (range, 3-6), which is the same pre- and postoperatively with an overall return to baseline for all patients. No significant correlation between functional outcome and patients' age was present and no reported significant complications. The good results and a high level of patient satisfaction show that ACL reconstruction is justified even in patients (older than 35 years) with symptomatic anterior knee instability. We commonly propose surgical treatment in symptomatic patients who express the need to restore their preinjury activity levels, regardless of their age.

  12. Arthroscopic Bone Graft Procedure for Anterior Inferior Glenohumeral Instability

    PubMed Central

    Taverna, Ettore; D'Ambrosi, Riccardo; Perfetti, Carlo; Garavaglia, Guido

    2014-01-01

    There are many described surgical techniques for the treatment of recurrent anterior shoulder instability. Numerous authors have performed anterior bone block procedures with good results for the treatment of anterior shoulder instability with glenoid bone loss. The benefits of using arthroscopic procedures for surgical stabilization of the shoulder include smaller incisions with less soft-tissue dissection, better visualization of the joint, better repair accessibility, and the best possible outcome for external rotation. We describe an arthroscopic anteroinferior shoulder stabilization technique with an iliac crest tricortical bone graft and capsulolabral reconstruction. It is an all-arthroscopic technique with the advantage of not using fixation devices, such as screws, but instead using special buttons to fix the bone graft. The steps of the operation are as follows: precise placement of a specific posterior glenoid guide that allows the accurate positioning of the bone graft on the anterior glenoid neck; fixation of the graft flush with the anterior glenoid rim using specific buttons under arthroscopic control; and finally, subsequent capsular, labral, and ligament reconstruction on the glenoid rim using suture anchors and leaving the graft as an extra-articular structure. PMID:25685669

  13. Preoperative cryotherapy use in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Koyonos, Loukas; Owsley, Kevin; Vollmer, Emily; Limpisvasti, Orr; Gambardella, Ralph

    2014-12-01

    Unrelieved postoperative pain may impair rehabilitation, compromise functional outcomes, and lead to patient dissatisfaction. Preemptive multimodal analgesic techniques may improve outcomes after surgery. We hypothesized that patients using preoperative cryotherapy plus a standardized postoperative treatment plan will have lower pain scores and require less pain medication compared with patients receiving a standardized postoperative treatment plan alone after arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). A total of 53 consecutive patients undergoing arthroscopically assisted ACLR performed by one of seven surgeons were randomly assigned to one of two groups. Group 1 received no preoperative cryotherapy and group 2 received 30 to 90 minutes of preoperative cryotherapy to the operative leg using a commercial noncompressive cryotherapy unit. Visual analog scale pain scores and narcotic use were recorded for the first 4 days postoperatively. Total hours of cold therapy and continuous passive motion (CPM) use and highest degree of flexion achieved were recorded as well. Group 1 consisted of 26 patients (15 allograft Achilles tendon and 11 autograft bone patellar tendon bone [BPTB]), and group 2 consisted of 27 patients (16 allograft Achilles tendon and 11 autograft BPTB). Group 2 patients reported less pain (average 1.3 units, p < 0.02) and used less narcotic use (average 1.7 tablets, p < 0.02) for the first 36 hours compared with group 1. No statistically significant differences were identified between the two groups with regard to demographics, hours of postoperative cryotherapy, hours of CPM use, or maximum knee flexion achieved. Complications did not occur in either group. This is the first report we are aware of showing the postoperative effects of preoperative cryotherapy. Our results support the safety and efficacy of preoperative cryotherapy in a multimodal pain regimen for patients undergoing ACL reconstruction.

  14. Risk Factors for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Helen C.; Vacek, Pamela; Johnson, Robert J.; Slauterbeck, James R.; Hashemi, Javad; Shultz, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee are immediately debilitating and can cause long-term consequences, including the early onset of osteoarthritis. It is important to have a comprehensive understanding of all possible risk factors for ACL injury to identify individuals who are at risk for future injuries and to provide an appropriate level of counseling and programs for prevention. Objective: This review, part 1 of a 2-part series, highlights what is known and still unknown regarding anatomic and neuromuscular risk factors for injury to the ACL from the current peer-reviewed literature. Data Sources: Studies were identified from MEDLINE (1951–March 2011) using the MeSH terms anterior cruciate ligament, knee injury, and risk factors. The bibliographies of relevant articles and reviews were cross-referenced to complete the search. Study Selection: Prognostic studies that utilized the case-control and prospective cohort study designs to evaluate risk factors for ACL injury were included in this review. Results: A total of 50 case-control and prospective cohort articles were included in the review, and 30 of these studies focused on neuromuscular and anatomic risk factors. Conclusions: Several anatomic and neuromuscular risk factors are associated with increased risk of suffering ACL injury—such as female sex and specific measures of bony geometry of the knee joint, including decreased intercondylar femoral notch size, decreased depth of concavity of the medial tibial plateau, increased slope of the tibial plateaus, and increased anterior-posterior knee laxity. These risk factors most likely act in combination to influence the risk of ACL injury; however, multivariate risk models that consider all the aforementioned risk factors in combination have not been established to explore this interaction. PMID:23016072

  15. Complications of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Papakonstantinou, Olympia; Chung, Christine B; Chanchairujira, Kullanuch; Resnick, Donald L

    2003-05-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using autografts or allografts is being performed with increasing frequency, particularly in young athletes. Although the procedure is generally well tolerated, with good success rates, early and late complications have been documented. As clinical manifestations of graft complications are often non-specific and plain radiographs cannot directly visualize the graft and the adjacent soft tissues, MR imaging has a definite role in the diagnosis of complications after ACL reconstruction and may direct subsequent therapeutic management. Our purpose is to review the normal MR imaging of the ACL graft and present the MR imaging findings of a wide spectrum of complications after ACL reconstruction, such as graft impingement, graft rupture, cystic degeneration of the graft, postoperative infection of the knee, diffuse and localized (i.e., cyclops lesion) arthrofibrosis, and associated donor site abnormalities. Awareness of the MR imaging findings of complications as well as the normal appearances of the normal ACL graft is essential for correct interpretation.

  16. Osteonecrosis of the Knee After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lansdown, Drew A.; Shaw, Jeremy; Allen, Christina R.; Ma, C. Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is performed commonly, with a low risk of complication. Osteonecrosis of the knee is a potentially devastating condition and has been observed both spontaneously and after meniscectomy, although osteonecrosis has not been described as a complication after ACL reconstruction. Purpose: To describe the development of osteonecrosis of the knee in 5 patients after arthroscopic ACL reconstruction. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: This study involved 5 patients (mean age, 33.2 years) who developed osteonecrosis of the knee after ACL reconstruction. A retrospective chart review was performed to identify clinical characteristics and surgical factors present in each of the 5 cases. Results: In 4 cases, the pathologic changes were present in both the medial and lateral femoral condyles, with isolated lateral condyle changes in the other case. The mean time to diagnosis was 11.6 months. These patients underwent an average of 1.8 additional surgical procedures after the diagnosis of osteonecrosis. Conclusion: Osteonecrosis of the knee is a rare outcome after ACL reconstruction. We are unable to identify clear risk factors for the development of this complication, although we hope the presentation of these cases will help promote the identification of other cases in future studies. PMID:26665035

  17. Extracellular matrix content of ruptured anterior cruciate ligament tissue.

    PubMed

    Young, Kate; Samiric, Tom; Feller, Julian; Cook, Jill

    2011-08-01

    Anterior cruciate ligaments (ACLs) can rupture with simple movements, suggesting that structural changes in the ligament may reduce the loading capacity of the ligament. We aimed to investigate if proteoglycan and collagen levels were different between ruptured and non-ruptured ACLs. We also compared changes in ruptured tissue over time. During arthroscopic knee reconstruction surgery 24 ruptured ACLs were collected from participants (10 females; 14 males; mean age 24 years). Four non-ruptured ACLs were obtained from participants undergoing total knee replacement surgery (one female, three males; mean age 66 years). Western blot analysis was used to characterise core proteins of aggrecan, versican, decorin and biglycan and glycosaminoglycan assays were also conducted. Collagen levels were measured by hydroxyproline (OHPr) assays. Significantly lower levels of collagen, were found in ruptured ACL compared to non-ruptured ACL (p=0.004). Lower levels of both small and large proteoglycans were found in ruptured than non-ruptured ACLs. No correlation was found between time since rupture and proteoglycan or collagen levels. Ruptured ACLs had less collagen and proteoglycans than non-ruptured ACLs. These changes indicate either extracellular matrix protein levels were reduced prior to rupture or levels decreased immediately after rupture. It is possible that the composition and structure of ACLs that rupture are different to normal ACLs, potentially reducing the tissue's ability to withstand loading. An enhanced understanding of the aetiology of ACL injury could help identify individuals who may be predisposed to rupture.

  18. Partial tearing of the anterior cruciate ligament: diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Temponi, Eduardo Frois; de Carvalho Júnior, Lúcio Honório; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Chambat, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Partial tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are common and represent 10–27% of the total. The main reasons for attending to cases of non-torn bundles are biomechanical, vascular and proprioceptive. Continued presence of the bundle also serves as protection during the healing process. There is controversy regarding the definition of these injuries, which is based on anatomy, clinical examination, translation measurements, imaging examinations and arthroscopy. The way in which it is treated will depend on the existing laxity and instability. Conservative treatment is optional for cases without instability, with a focus on motor rehabilitation. Surgical treatment is a challenge, since it requires correct positioning of the bone tunnels and conservation of the remnants of the torn bundle. The pivot shift test under anesthesia, the magnetic resonance findings, the previous level and type of sports activity and the arthroscopic appearance and mechanical properties of the remnants will aid the orthopedist in the decision-making process between conservative treatment, surgical treatment with strengthening of the native ACL (selective reconstruction) and classical (anatomical) reconstruction. PMID:26229890

  19. Partial tearing of the anterior cruciate ligament: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Temponi, Eduardo Frois; de Carvalho Júnior, Lúcio Honório; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Chambat, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Partial tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are common and represent 10-27% of the total. The main reasons for attending to cases of non-torn bundles are biomechanical, vascular and proprioceptive. Continued presence of the bundle also serves as protection during the healing process. There is controversy regarding the definition of these injuries, which is based on anatomy, clinical examination, translation measurements, imaging examinations and arthroscopy. The way in which it is treated will depend on the existing laxity and instability. Conservative treatment is optional for cases without instability, with a focus on motor rehabilitation. Surgical treatment is a challenge, since it requires correct positioning of the bone tunnels and conservation of the remnants of the torn bundle. The pivot shift test under anesthesia, the magnetic resonance findings, the previous level and type of sports activity and the arthroscopic appearance and mechanical properties of the remnants will aid the orthopedist in the decision-making process between conservative treatment, surgical treatment with strengthening of the native ACL (selective reconstruction) and classical (anatomical) reconstruction.

  20. Complications of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Papakonstantinou, Olympia; Chung, Christine B; Chanchairujira, Kullanuch; Resnick, Donald L

    2003-05-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using autografts or allografts is being performed with increasing frequency, particularly in young athletes. Although the procedure is generally well tolerated, with good success rates, early and late complications have been documented. As clinical manifestations of graft complications are often non-specific and plain radiographs cannot directly visualize the graft and the adjacent soft tissues, MR imaging has a definite role in the diagnosis of complications after ACL reconstruction and may direct subsequent therapeutic management. Our purpose is to review the normal MR imaging of the ACL graft and present the MR imaging findings of a wide spectrum of complications after ACL reconstruction, such as graft impingement, graft rupture, cystic degeneration of the graft, postoperative infection of the knee, diffuse and localized (i.e., cyclops lesion) arthrofibrosis, and associated donor site abnormalities. Awareness of the MR imaging findings of complications as well as the normal appearances of the normal ACL graft is essential for correct interpretation. PMID:12695835

  1. Arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament surgery: results of autogenous patellar tendon graft versus the Leeds-Keio synthetic graft five year follow-up of a prospective randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ghalayini, S R A; Helm, A T; Bonshahi, A Y; Lavender, A; Johnson, D S; Smith, R B

    2010-10-01

    We conducted a prospective, randomised controlled trial comparing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using middle third patellar tendon graft (PT) to synthetic Leeds-Keio (LK) ligament. The patients were randomised (26 PT, 24 LK). Subjective knee function was classified (Lysholm, Tegner activity, IKDC scores), laxity was measured (Lachman test, Stryker laxometer), and functional ability was assessed (one-hop test). There were no significant differences between Lysholm or IKDC scores at any stage by 5 years. Significant differences were found between the groups at 2 years for Tegner activity scores, laxity and one-hop testing. By 5 years there were no significant differences. Clinical equivalence was demonstrated between the two groups for the Lysholm score and one-hop test but not for the Tegner activity score at 5 years. The use of the LK ligament has been largely abandoned due to reports of its insufficiency. Our results demonstrate that it is not as inferior as one might expect. We conclude that the results of LK ligament ACL reconstruction are as acceptable as those using PT. It may provide an additional means of reconstruction where no suitable alternative is present.

  2. Anterior cruciate ligament tears: reconstruction and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mary Atkinson; Smith, W Todd; Kosko, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are common knee injuries experienced by athletes and people with active lifestyles. It is important for members of the healthcare team to take an evidence-based approach to the diagnosis, surgical management, and postoperative rehabilitation of patients with an ACL-deficient knee. Mechanism of ACL injury and diagnostic testing is consistent throughout the literature. Patients frequently opt for ACL reconstruction, and many surgical techniques for ACL reconstruction are available with no clear consensus regarding superiority. Surgeon preference dictates the type of reconstruction and graft choice utilized. No standardized pre- and postoperative rehabilitation protocol exists. However, rehabilitation plays an important role in functional outcomes. A comprehensive rehabilitation program is needed pre- and postoperatively to produce positive patient outcomes.

  3. Infections in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Stucken, Charlton; Garras, David N.; Shaner, Julie L.; Cohen, Steven B.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a safe, common, and effective method of restoring stability to the knee after injury, but evolving techniques of reconstruction carry inherent risk. Infection after ACL reconstruction, while rare, carries a high morbidity, potentially resulting in a poor clinical outcome. Evidence Acquisition: Data were obtained from previously published peer-reviewed literature through a search of the entire PubMed database (up to December 2012) as well as from textbook chapters. Results: Treatment with culture-specific antibiotics and debridement with graft retention is recommended as initial treatment, but with persistent infection, consideration should be given to graft removal. Graft type likely has no effect on infection rates. Conclusion: The early diagnosis of infection and appropriate treatment are necessary to avoid the complications of articular cartilage damage and arthrofibrosis. PMID:24427432

  4. Individualized anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    van Eck, Carola F; Widhalm, Harrald; Murawski, Christopher; Fu, Freddie H

    2015-02-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are often seen in young participants in sports such as soccer, football, and basketball. Treatment options include conservative management as well as surgical intervention, with the goal of enabling the patient to return to cutting and pivoting sports and activities. Individualized anatomic ACL reconstruction is a surgical technique that tailors the procedure to the individual patient using preoperative measurements on plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging and intraoperative measurement to map the patients' native ACL anatomy in order to replicate it as closely as possible. Anatomic ACL reconstruction, therefore, is defined as reconstruction of the ACL to its native dimensions, collagen orientation, and insertion site. The surgical reconstruction is followed by a specific rehabilitation protocol that is designed to enable the patient to regain muscle strength and proprioception while facilitating healing of the reconstructed ACL prior to the patient's returning to sports activities.

  5. Essentials of anterior cruciate ligament rupture management.

    PubMed

    Klinge, Stephen A; Sawyer, Gregory A; Hulstyn, Michael J

    2013-05-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a common knee injury and an understanding of current medical knowledge regarding its management is essential. Accurate and prompt diagnosis requires an awareness of injury mechanisms and risk factors, common symptoms and physical/radiologic findings. Early mobilization and physical therapy improves outcomes regardless of treatment modality. Many older patients regain sufficient stability and function after non-operative rehabilitation. Early ACL reconstruction is appropriate for younger patients and those who engage in activities requiring frequent pivoting and rapid direction changes. ACL surgery involves reconstruction of the torn ligament tissue with various replacement graft options, each with advantages and disadvantages. The guidance of a knowledgeable and experienced therapist is required throughout an intensive and prolonged rehabilitation course. Generally excellent outcomes and low complication rates are expected, but treatment does not prevent late osteoarthritis.

  6. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries: etiology and prevention.

    PubMed

    Brophy, Robert H; Silvers, Holly J; Mandelbaum, Bert R

    2010-03-01

    The relatively high risk of noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture among female athletes has been a major impetus for investigation into the etiology of this injury. A number of risk factors have been identified, both internal and external to the athlete, including neuromuscular, anatomical, hormonal, shoe-surface interaction, and environmental, such as weather. The anatomic and neuromuscular risk factors, often gender related, are the focus of most ACL injury prevention programs. Although studies have shown that biomechanic- centered prevention programs can reduce the risk of ACL injury, many questions remain unanswered. More research is needed to increase our understanding of the risk factors for ACL injury; how injury prevention programs work and can the clinical application of such programs be optimized. PMID:20160623

  7. Stress radiography in the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament deficiency.

    PubMed

    Garcés, G L; Perdomo, E; Guerra, A; Cabrera-Bonilla, R

    1995-01-01

    A prospective study was carried out to test the sensitivity and specificity of stress radiography in detecting anterior cruciate ligament deficiency in both knees of 116 patients using the Telos device. In 47 of these a total or partial rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament was diagnosed by arthroscopy, while the ligament was intact in the remaining 69 patients. The mean difference in radiological translation between the injured and the normal knee was greater than 5 mm (p < 0.001) in those with anterior cruciate deficiency, and less than 3 mm in the others. A differential displacement of up to 3 mm was considered normal. The sensitivity of the method was less than 67% and the specificity was 100%. Clinical diagnosis had a sensitivity of 70.2% and a specificity of 98.5%. Our findings suggest that, although a differential translation of more than 3 mm can be diagnostic, smaller differences do not rule out anterior cruciate deficiency.

  8. Digital infrared thermal imaging following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Barker, Lauren E; Markowski, Alycia M; Henneman, Kimberly

    2012-03-01

    This case describes the selective use of digital infrared thermal imaging for a 48-year-old woman who was being treated by a physical therapist following left anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with a semitendinosus autograft. PMID:22383168

  9. The 5-Strand Hamstring Graft in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Rushyuan Jay; Ganley, Theodore J.

    2014-01-01

    The use of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in the pediatric and adolescent population has been increasing in recent years. Autograft hamstring graft is favored in this population, but these patients often have smaller hamstring tendons that yield smaller final graft constructs. These smaller grafts are associated with an increased need for revision surgery. We describe a technique for obtaining a larger-diameter anterior cruciate ligament graft construct from autologous hamstring graft without allograft supplementation. PMID:25473619

  10. [Chondroblastoma in the anterior cruciate ligament origo: a case report].

    PubMed

    Aydin, Hafız; Turhan, Ahmet Uğur; Karataş, Metin; Onay, Atilgan; Yildiz, Kadriye

    2012-01-01

    Chondroblastoma is a rarely seen cartilage originated tumor. It is mostly localized in the epiphysis of long bones. In this article, we present an 18-year-old male case in whom the tumor was located in the right distal femoral lateral condyle and destroyed anterior cruciate ligament origo. The tumor was curetted and the cavity was filled with cement. Anterior cruciate ligament resection was mandatory for this treatment. The patient had no complaint in the postoperative period.

  11. [Chondroblastoma in the anterior cruciate ligament origo: a case report].

    PubMed

    Aydin, Hafız; Turhan, Ahmet Uğur; Karataş, Metin; Onay, Atilgan; Yildiz, Kadriye

    2012-01-01

    Chondroblastoma is a rarely seen cartilage originated tumor. It is mostly localized in the epiphysis of long bones. In this article, we present an 18-year-old male case in whom the tumor was located in the right distal femoral lateral condyle and destroyed anterior cruciate ligament origo. The tumor was curetted and the cavity was filled with cement. Anterior cruciate ligament resection was mandatory for this treatment. The patient had no complaint in the postoperative period. PMID:22765492

  12. Quadriceps muscle contraction protects the anterior cruciate ligament during anterior tibial translation.

    PubMed

    Aune, A K; Cawley, P W; Ekeland, A

    1997-01-01

    The proposed skiing injury mechanism that suggests a quadriceps muscle contraction can contribute to anterior cruciate ligament rupture was biomechanically investigated. The effect of quadriceps muscle force on a knee specimen loaded to anterior cruciate ligament failure during anterior tibial translation was studied in a human cadaveric model. In both knees from six donors, average age 41 years (range, 31 to 65), the joint capsule and ligaments, except the anterior cruciate ligament, were cut. The quadriceps tendon, patella, patellar tendon, and menisci were left intact. One knee from each pair was randomly selected to undergo destructive testing of the anterior cruciate ligament by anterior tibial translation at a displacement rate of 30 mm/sec with a simultaneously applied 889 N quadriceps muscle force. The knee flexion during testing was 30 degrees. As a control, the contralateral knee was loaded correspondingly, but only 5 N of quadriceps muscle force was applied. The ultimate load for the knee to anterior cruciate ligament failure when tested with 889 N quadriceps muscle force was 22% +/- 18% higher than that of knees tested with 5 N of force. The linear stiffness increased by 43% +/- 30%. These results did not support the speculation that a quadriceps muscle contraction contributes to anterior cruciate ligament failure. In this model, the quadriceps muscle force protected the anterior cruciate ligament from injury during anterior tibial translation.

  13. Graft impingement in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Iriuchishima, Takanori; Shirakura, Kenji; Fu, Freddie H

    2013-03-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft impingement is one of the most troubling complications in ACL reconstruction. In the previous strategy of isometric "non-anatomical" ACL reconstruction, posterior tibial tunnel placement and notchplasty were recommended to avoid graft impingement. Recently, the strategy of ACL reconstruction is shifting towards "anatomical" reconstruction. In anatomical ACL reconstruction, the potential risk of graft impingement is higher than in non-anatomical reconstruction because the tibial tunnel is placed at a more anterior portion on the tibia. However, there have been few studies reporting on graft impingement in anatomical ACL reconstruction. This study will provide a review of graft impingement status in both non-anatomical and the more recent anatomical ACL reconstruction techniques. In conclusion, with the accurate creation of bone tunnels within ACL native footprint, the graft impingement might not happen in anatomical ACL reconstruction. For the clinical relevance, to prevent graft impingement, surgeons should pay attention of creating correct anatomical tunnels when they perform ACL reconstruction. Level of evidence IV.

  14. Features extraction in anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments analysis.

    PubMed

    Zarychta, P

    2015-12-01

    The main aim of this research is finding the feature vectors of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (ACL and PCL). These feature vectors have to clearly define the ligaments structure and make it easier to diagnose them. Extraction of feature vectors is obtained by analysis of both anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments. This procedure is performed after the extraction process of both ligaments. In the first stage in order to reduce the area of analysis a region of interest including cruciate ligaments (CL) is outlined in order to reduce the area of analysis. In this case, the fuzzy C-means algorithm with median modification helping to reduce blurred edges has been implemented. After finding the region of interest (ROI), the fuzzy connectedness procedure is performed. This procedure permits to extract the anterior and posterior cruciate ligament structures. In the last stage, on the basis of the extracted anterior and posterior cruciate ligament structures, 3-dimensional models of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligament are built and the feature vectors created. This methodology has been implemented in MATLAB and tested on clinical T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) slices of the knee joint. The 3D display is based on the Visualization Toolkit (VTK).

  15. Effects of neuromuscular training on knee joint stability after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jae-Kwang; Choi, Ho-Suk; Shin, Jun-Ho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of neuromuscular training on knee joint stability after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 16 adults who underwent arthroscopic anterior cruciate reconstruction and neuromuscular training. The Lysholm scale was used to assess functional disorders on the affected knee joint. A KT-2000 arthrometer was used to measure anterior displacement of the tibia against the femur. Surface electromyography was used to detect the muscle activation of the vastus medialis oblique, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, and semitendinosus before and after neuromuscular training. [Results] There was significant relaxation in tibial anterior displacement of the affected and sound sides in the supine position before neuromuscular training. Furthermore, the difference in the tibial anterior displacement of the affected knee joints in the standing position was reduced after neuromuscular training. Moreover, the variation of the muscle activation evoked higher muscle activation of the vastus medialis oblique, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, and semitendinosus. [Conclusion] Neuromuscular training may improve functional joint stability in patients with orthopedic musculoskeletal injuries in the postoperative period. PMID:26834316

  16. Effects of neuromuscular training on knee joint stability after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jae-Kwang; Choi, Ho-Suk; Shin, Jun-Ho

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of neuromuscular training on knee joint stability after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 16 adults who underwent arthroscopic anterior cruciate reconstruction and neuromuscular training. The Lysholm scale was used to assess functional disorders on the affected knee joint. A KT-2000 arthrometer was used to measure anterior displacement of the tibia against the femur. Surface electromyography was used to detect the muscle activation of the vastus medialis oblique, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, and semitendinosus before and after neuromuscular training. [Results] There was significant relaxation in tibial anterior displacement of the affected and sound sides in the supine position before neuromuscular training. Furthermore, the difference in the tibial anterior displacement of the affected knee joints in the standing position was reduced after neuromuscular training. Moreover, the variation of the muscle activation evoked higher muscle activation of the vastus medialis oblique, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, and semitendinosus. [Conclusion] Neuromuscular training may improve functional joint stability in patients with orthopedic musculoskeletal injuries in the postoperative period.

  17. Arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using four-strand hamstring tendon graft and interference screws.

    PubMed

    Pinczewski, L A; Thuresson, P; Otto, D; Nyquist, F

    1997-10-01

    We describe an arthroscopic technique for reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) using a four-strand hamstring tendon graft. The femoral tunnel is drilled via the anterolateral portal and the tibial tunnel through the skin incision from the graft harvest. The graft is pulled through the tunnels with pullout sutures and fastened with interference screws. The results to date are good and the procedure can often be performed as day surgery. PMID:9343661

  18. Principles of postoperative anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Saka, Tolga

    2014-09-18

    It is known that anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction needs to be combined with detailed postoperative rehabilitation in order for patients to return to their pre-injury activity levels, and that the rehabilitation process is as important as the reconstruction surgery. Literature studies focus on how early in the postoperative ACL rehabilitation period rehabilitation modalities can be initiated. Despite the sheer number of studies on this topic, postoperative ACL rehabilitation protocols have not been standardized yet. Could common, "ossified" knowledge or modalities really prove themselves in the literature? Could questions such as "is postoperative brace use really necessary?", "what are the benefits of early restoration of the range of motion (ROM)?", "to what extent is neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) effective in the protection from muscular atrophy?", "how early can proprioception training and open chain exercises begin?", "should strengthening training start in the immediate postoperative period?" be answered for sure? My aim is to review postoperative brace use, early ROM restoration, NMES, proprioception, open/closed chain exercises and early strengthening, which are common modalities in the very comprehensive theme of postoperative ACL rehabilitation, on the basis of several studies (Level of Evidence 1 and 2) and to present the commonly accepted ways they are presently used. Moreover, I have presented the objectives of postoperative ACL rehabilitation in tables and recent miscellaneous studies in the last chapter of the paper.

  19. Principles of postoperative anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Saka, Tolga

    2014-09-18

    It is known that anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction needs to be combined with detailed postoperative rehabilitation in order for patients to return to their pre-injury activity levels, and that the rehabilitation process is as important as the reconstruction surgery. Literature studies focus on how early in the postoperative ACL rehabilitation period rehabilitation modalities can be initiated. Despite the sheer number of studies on this topic, postoperative ACL rehabilitation protocols have not been standardized yet. Could common, "ossified" knowledge or modalities really prove themselves in the literature? Could questions such as "is postoperative brace use really necessary?", "what are the benefits of early restoration of the range of motion (ROM)?", "to what extent is neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) effective in the protection from muscular atrophy?", "how early can proprioception training and open chain exercises begin?", "should strengthening training start in the immediate postoperative period?" be answered for sure? My aim is to review postoperative brace use, early ROM restoration, NMES, proprioception, open/closed chain exercises and early strengthening, which are common modalities in the very comprehensive theme of postoperative ACL rehabilitation, on the basis of several studies (Level of Evidence 1 and 2) and to present the commonly accepted ways they are presently used. Moreover, I have presented the objectives of postoperative ACL rehabilitation in tables and recent miscellaneous studies in the last chapter of the paper. PMID:25232521

  20. Principles of postoperative anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Saka, Tolga

    2014-01-01

    It is known that anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction needs to be combined with detailed postoperative rehabilitation in order for patients to return to their pre-injury activity levels, and that the rehabilitation process is as important as the reconstruction surgery. Literature studies focus on how early in the postoperative ACL rehabilitation period rehabilitation modalities can be initiated. Despite the sheer number of studies on this topic, postoperative ACL rehabilitation protocols have not been standardized yet. Could common, “ossified” knowledge or modalities really prove themselves in the literature? Could questions such as “is postoperative brace use really necessary?”, “what are the benefits of early restoration of the range of motion (ROM)?”, “to what extent is neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) effective in the protection from muscular atrophy?”, “how early can proprioception training and open chain exercises begin?”, “should strengthening training start in the immediate postoperative period?” be answered for sure? My aim is to review postoperative brace use, early ROM restoration, NMES, proprioception, open/closed chain exercises and early strengthening, which are common modalities in the very comprehensive theme of postoperative ACL rehabilitation, on the basis of several studies (Level of Evidence 1 and 2) and to present the commonly accepted ways they are presently used. Moreover, I have presented the objectives of postoperative ACL rehabilitation in tables and recent miscellaneous studies in the last chapter of the paper. PMID:25232521

  1. Failure of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Samitier, Gonzalo; Marcano, Alejandro I; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Cugat, Ramon; Farmer, Kevin W; Moser, Michael W

    2015-10-01

    The present review classifies and describes the multifactorial causes of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery failure, concentrating on preventing and resolving such situations. The article particularly focuses on those causes that require ACL revision due to recurrent instability, without neglecting those that affect function or produce persistent pain. Although primary ACL reconstruction has satisfactory outcome rates as high as 97%, it is important to identify the causes of failure, because satisfactory outcomes in revision surgery can drop to as much as 76%. It is often possible to identify a primary or secondary cause of ACL surgery failure; even the most meticulous planning can give rise to unexpected findings during the intervention. The adopted protocol should therefore be sufficiently flexible to adapt to the course of surgery. Preoperative patient counseling is essential. The surgeon should limit the patient's expectations for the outcome by explaining the complexity of this kind of procedure. With adequate preoperative planning, close attention to details and realistic patient expectations, ACL revision surgery may offer beneficial and satisfactory results for the patient. PMID:26550585

  2. Gait patterns after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bulgheroni, P; Bulgheroni, M V; Andrini, L; Guffanti, P; Giughello, A

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse the changes in select gait parameters following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The study was performed on 15 subjects who underwent ACL reconstruction by the bone-patellar tendon-bone technique. Gait analysis was performed using the Elite three-dimensional (3D) optoelectronic system (BTS), a Kistler force platform and the Telemg telemetric electromyograph (BTS). Kinematic data were recorded for the principal lower limb joints (hip, knee and ankle). The examined muscles include vastus lateralis, rectus femoris, biceps femoris and semitendinosus. The results obtained from the operated subjects were compared with those of 10 untreated subjects and 5 subjects without ACL damage. In the operated subjects the knee joint angular values regained a normal flexion pattern for the injured limb during the stance phase. The analysis of joint moments shows: (a) sagittal plane: recovery of the knee flexion moment at loading response and during preswing; (b) frontal plane: recovery of the normal patterns for both hip and knee adduction-abduction moments during the entire stance phase. The examination of ground reaction forces reveals the recovery of frontal component features. The EMG traces show the normal biphasic pattern for the operated subjects as compared to the untreated subjects. The results suggest that the gait parameters shift towards normal value patterns.

  3. Failure of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Samitier, Gonzalo; Marcano, Alejandro I.; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Cugat, Ramon; Farmer, Kevin W; Moser, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    The present review classifies and describes the multifactorial causes of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery failure, concentrating on preventing and resolving such situations. The article particularly focuses on those causes that require ACL revision due to recurrent instability, without neglecting those that affect function or produce persistent pain. Although primary ACL reconstruction has satisfactory outcome rates as high as 97%, it is important to identify the causes of failure, because satisfactory outcomes in revision surgery can drop to as much as 76%. It is often possible to identify a primary or secondary cause of ACL surgery failure; even the most meticulous planning can give rise to unexpected findings during the intervention. The adopted protocol should therefore be sufficiently flexible to adapt to the course of surgery. Preoperative patient counseling is essential. The surgeon should limit the patient’s expectations for the outcome by explaining the complexity of this kind of procedure. With adequate preoperative planning, close attention to details and realistic patient expectations, ACL revision surgery may offer beneficial and satisfactory results for the patient. PMID:26550585

  4. Return to work in miners following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tiftikci, Ugur; Serbest, Sancar; Kilinc, Cem Yalin; Karabicak, Gül Öznur; Vergili, Özge

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study is retrospectively investigated durations for returning to work following anatomic ACL reconstruction by hamstring autograft in miners and the reasons in patients who were delayed to return to work. Methods Miners with symptomatic anterior cruciate ligament rupture underwent arthroscopic reconstruction. Patients were evaluated in terms of range of motion (ROM) values; Lysholm, Cincinati and Tegner activity scales; laxity testing and complications. By modifying the method used by Fitzgerald et al. we decided for the criteria returning to work. Results Thirty three patients were evaluated with mean followup of 22.7 ± 8.3 months (range 13-46 months). Mean age at the surgery was 27.8 (18-38) years. Lysholm, Cincinati and Tegner activity scales were signifi cantly higher from preoperative scores (Lysholm scores: preoperative: 60.7 ± 12.5, postoperative: 90.3 ± 4.8 (P < 0.001); Tegner activity scores: Preoperative 3.5 ± 1.4, postoperative: 6.2 ± 1.5 (P < 0.001); Cincinati scores: Preoperative: 14.8 ± 5.3, postoperative: 26.9 ± 1.6 (P < 0.001). The average time for returning to work was determined as 15,3 ± 4 weeks. There was no significant difference for knee scores and time for returning to work between patients with meniscal injuries and don't have meniscus lesions. Conclusion The reasons for delays in returning to work was work accident. Hematoma or effusion and pain inside the knee were the most significant reason which affected returning to work. PMID:26918069

  5. Psychological Aspects of Recovery Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Christino, Melissa A; Fantry, Amanda J; Vopat, Bryan G

    2015-08-01

    Recovery following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is an arduous process that requires a significant mental and physical commitment to rehabilitation. Orthopaedic research in recent years has focused on optimizing anterior cruciate ligament surgical techniques; however, despite stable anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions, many athletes still never achieve their preinjury ability or even return to sport. Psychological factors associated with patient perceptions and functional outcomes following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction are important to acknowledge and understand. Issues related to emotional disturbance, motivation, self-esteem, locus of control, and self-efficacy can have profound effects on patients' compliance, athletic identity, and readiness to return to sport. The psychological aspects of recovery play a critical role in functional outcomes, and a better understanding of these concepts is essential to optimize the treatment of patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, particularly those who plan to return to sport. Identifying at-risk patients, encouraging a multidisciplinary approach to patient care, and providing early referral to a sports psychologist may improve patient outcomes and increase return-to-play rates among athletes.

  6. FUNCTIONAL ASSESSMENT OF ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR FOR RECURRENT ANTERIOR SHOULDER INSTABILITY

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Filho, Ildeu Afonso; de Castro Veado, Marco Antônio; Fim, Márcio; da Silva Corrêa, Lincoln Vargas; de Carvalho Junior, Antônio Enéas Rangel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To clinically and radiologically evaluate patients who underwent arthroscopic surgical treatment for anterior shoulder instability by means of the Bankart technique, using metal anchors. Methods: This was a retrospective study on 49 patients who underwent arthroscopic repair of anterior shoulder instability between 2002 and 2007. The patients were evaluated using the Carter-Rowe score and the Samilson and Prieto classification. The mean age at the time of surgery was 30 years. The mean length of follow-up was 42.7 months (ranging from 18 to 74). 85% of the patients were male. Results: The mean Carter-Rowe score was 83 points (ranging from 30 to 100) including 31 excellent results, 7 good, 3 fair and 8 poor. Recurrent dislocation was observed in 16% (8 patients), and 37.5% of them were of traumatic origin. Joint degeneration was present in 32.5% of the cases, including 5 cases of grade 1, 6 cases of grade 2 and 2 cases of grade 3. The average loss of external rotation was 12° and the loss of anterior elevation was 8°. There was a statistically significant relationship (p < 0.05) between arthritis and age at first dislocation, age at surgery and crackling. 92% of the patients reported high degrees of satisfaction after the procedure. Among the complications, there were two cases of stiff shoulder, one patient with prominence of the synthesis material and one case of anchor loosening. Conclusion: Arthroscopic repair of anterior shoulder instability using metal anchors was shown to be effective, with a low complication rate. PMID:27042624

  7. Compartment syndrome with mononeuropathies after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kindle, Brett J; Murthy, Naveen; Stolp, Kathryn

    2015-05-01

    Compartment syndrome rarely follows anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. However, when it does, it may result in mononeuropathies that are amenable to neurolysis. The authors of this study present an 18-yr-old woman who sustained a right anterior cruciate ligament tear and underwent uneventful anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using femoral and popliteal nerve blocks. Postoperatively, she developed compartment syndrome requiring emergent fasciotomies. At 11 wks after fasciotomy, results of electrophysiologic tests showed evidence of severe fibular and tibial neuropathies. Magnetic resonance images showed extensive tricompartmental myonecrosis. Fibular and tibial neurolysis as well as decompression were performed, followed by intensive outpatient rehabilitation. At the 6-mo follow-up, she reported resolution of pain as well as significant improvement in sensation, strength, and function. Early recognition and intervention are crucial to prevent serious neurologic damage. Excessive tourniquet pressure and anesthetic nerve blocks may have been responsible.

  8. Prevention of anterior cruciate ligament injuries.

    PubMed

    Hewett, T E; Myer, G D; Ford, K R

    2001-12-01

    Numerous studies have found that female athletes who participate in jumping and pivoting sports are four to six times more likely to sustain a knee ligament injury, such as anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, than male athletes participating in the same sports [1-8]. A widening gender gap in the number of serious knee ligament injuries exists due to geometric growth in female athletic participation, coupled with the four- to sixfold higher injury rate. More than 50,000 serious knee injuries are projected to occur in female varsity intercollegiate and high school athletics each year [9, 10]. Most ACL injuries occur by noncontact mechanisms, often during landing from a jump or making a lateral pivot while running [2, 11]. Knee instability, due to ligament dominance (decreased medial-lateral neuromuscular control of the joint), quadriceps dominance (increased quadriceps recruitment and decreased hamstring recruitment and strength), and leg dominance (side-to-side differences in strength, flexibility, and coordination) are possible contributing factors to the increased incidence of knee injury in female athletes [5, 6]. In this review, dynamic neuromuscular analysis (DNA) training is defined, and a rationale is presented for correcting the neuromuscular imbalances that may result in dynamic knee instability during sports play. Dynamic neuromuscular training has been shown to increase knee stability and decrease knee injury rates in female athletes [5, 12.., 13.]. Preliminary research on athlete screening and injury prediction based on the three aforementioned imbalances also is presented with recommendations for developing screening protocols for the identification of high-risk athletes.

  9. Arthroscopic Management of Anterior, Posterior, and Multidirectional Shoulder Instabilities.

    PubMed

    Field, Larry D; Ryu, Richard K N; Abrams, Jeffrey S; Provencher, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Arthroscopic shoulder stabilization offers several potential advantages compared with open surgery, including the opportunity to more accurately evaluate the glenohumeral joint at the time of diagnostic assessment; comprehensively address multiple pathologic lesions that may be identified; and avoid potential complications unique to open stabilization, such as postoperative subscapularis failure. A thorough understanding of normal shoulder anatomy and biomechanics, along with the pathoanatomy responsible for anterior, posterior, and multidirectional shoulder instability patterns, is very important in the management of patients who have shoulder instability. The treating physician also must be familiar with diagnostic imaging and physical examination maneuvers that are required to accurately diagnose shoulder instability.

  10. Clinical Outcomes After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tibor, Lisa M.; Long, Joy L.; Schilling, Peter L.; Lilly, Ryan J.; Carpenter, James E.; Miller, Bruce S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Clinical outcomes of autograft and allograft anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions are mixed, with some reports of excellent to good outcomes and other reports of early graft failure or significant donor site morbidity. Objective: To determine if there is a difference in functional outcomes, failure rates, and stability between autograft and allograft ACL reconstructions. Data Sources: Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Evidence Based Medicine Reviews Collection), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Web of Science, CINAHL, and SPORTDiscus were searched for articles on ACL reconstruction. Abstracts from annual meetings of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, and Arthroscopy Association of North America were searched for relevant studies. Study Selection: Inclusion criteria for studies were as follows: primary unilateral ACL injuries, mean patient age less than 41 years, and follow-up for at least 24 months postreconstruction. Exclusion criteria for studies included the following: skeletally immature patients, multiligament injuries, and publication dates before 1990. Data Extraction: Joint stability measures included Lachman test, pivot-shift test, KT-1000 arthrometer assessment, and frequency of graft failures. Functional outcome measures included Tegner activity scores, Cincinnati knee scores, Lysholm scores, and IKDC (International Knee Documentation Committee) total scores. Results: More than 5000 studies were identified. After full text review of 576 studies, 56 were included, of which only 1 directly compared autograft and allograft reconstruction. Allograft ACL reconstructions were more lax when assessed by the KT-1000 arthrometer. For all other outcome measures, there was no statistically significant difference between autograft and allograft ACL reconstruction. For all outcome measures, there was strong evidence of statistical heterogeneity between

  11. Nocardia Septic Arthritis Complicating an Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Elaine Y. L.; Boutlis, Craig S.; Chen, Darren B.; Liu, Eunice Y.-T.

    2015-01-01

    Nocardia infection following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) allograft reconstruction is a rare occurrence. We report a case of Nocardia infection of an allograft ACL reconstruction and septic arthritis of the knee joint due to an organism most similar to the novel Nocardia species Nocardia aobensis. PMID:26041900

  12. Nocardia Septic Arthritis Complicating an Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair.

    PubMed

    Yong, Elaine X L; Cheong, Elaine Y L; Boutlis, Craig S; Chen, Darren B; Liu, Eunice Y-T; McKew, Genevieve L

    2015-08-01

    Nocardia infection following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) allograft reconstruction is a rare occurrence. We report a case of Nocardia infection of an allograft ACL reconstruction and septic arthritis of the knee joint due to an organism most similar to the novel Nocardia species Nocardia aobensis.

  13. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Patients with Generalized Joint Laxity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Kumar, Praveen

    2010-01-01

    Generalized joint laxity is a genetically determined component of overall joint flexibility. The incidence of joint laxity in the overall population is approximately 5% to 20%, and its prevalence is higher in females. Recently it was noticed that individuals with generalized joint laxity are not only prone to anterior cruciate ligament injuries but also have inferior results after a reconstruction. Therefore, an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in patients with generalized laxity should be undertaken with caution due to the higher expected failure rate from the complexity of problems associated with this condition. It is also necessary to identify the risk factors for the injury as well as for the post operative outcome in this population. A criterion that includes all the associated components is necessary for the proper screening of individuals for generalized joint laxity. Graft selection for an anterior cruciate reconstruction in patients with ligament laxity is a challenge. According to the senior author, a hamstring autograft is an inferior choice and a double bundle reconstruction with a quadriceps tendon-bone autograft yields better results than a single bundle bone-patella tendon-bone autograft. Future studies comparing the different grafts available might be needed to determine the preferred graft for this subset of patients. Improved results after an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction can be achieved by proper planning and careful attention to each step beginning from the clinical examination to the postoperative rehabilitation. PMID:20808583

  14. Nocardia Septic Arthritis Complicating an Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair.

    PubMed

    Yong, Elaine X L; Cheong, Elaine Y L; Boutlis, Craig S; Chen, Darren B; Liu, Eunice Y-T; McKew, Genevieve L

    2015-08-01

    Nocardia infection following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) allograft reconstruction is a rare occurrence. We report a case of Nocardia infection of an allograft ACL reconstruction and septic arthritis of the knee joint due to an organism most similar to the novel Nocardia species Nocardia aobensis. PMID:26041900

  15. Editorial Commentary: Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Auto or Allo?

    PubMed

    Verma, Nikhil N

    2016-01-01

    Considerable controversy exists regarding appropriate graft choice for patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Allografts pretreated with high-dose irradiation should be avoided. Otherwise, multiple factors should be considered to individualize patient decision making, including patient age and activity level, graft type, and fixation type. PMID:26743418

  16. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in patients with generalized joint laxity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Kumar, Praveen; Kim, Sung-Hwan

    2010-09-01

    Generalized joint laxity is a genetically determined component of overall joint flexibility. The incidence of joint laxity in the overall population is approximately 5% to 20%, and its prevalence is higher in females. Recently it was noticed that individuals with generalized joint laxity are not only prone to anterior cruciate ligament injuries but also have inferior results after a reconstruction. Therefore, an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in patients with generalized laxity should be undertaken with caution due to the higher expected failure rate from the complexity of problems associated with this condition. It is also necessary to identify the risk factors for the injury as well as for the post operative outcome in this population. A criterion that includes all the associated components is necessary for the proper screening of individuals for generalized joint laxity. Graft selection for an anterior cruciate reconstruction in patients with ligament laxity is a challenge. According to the senior author, a hamstring autograft is an inferior choice and a double bundle reconstruction with a quadriceps tendon-bone autograft yields better results than a single bundle bone-patella tendon-bone autograft. Future studies comparing the different grafts available might be needed to determine the preferred graft for this subset of patients. Improved results after an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction can be achieved by proper planning and careful attention to each step beginning from the clinical examination to the postoperative rehabilitation.

  17. Editorial Commentary: Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Auto or Allo?

    PubMed

    Verma, Nikhil N

    2016-01-01

    Considerable controversy exists regarding appropriate graft choice for patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Allografts pretreated with high-dose irradiation should be avoided. Otherwise, multiple factors should be considered to individualize patient decision making, including patient age and activity level, graft type, and fixation type.

  18. Arthroscopic Assessment of Stifle Synovitis in Dogs with Cranial Cruciate Ligament Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Little, Jeffrey P.; Bleedorn, Jason A.; Sutherland, Brian J.; Sullivan, Ruth; Kalscheur, Vicki L.; Ramaker, Megan A.; Schaefer, Susan L.; Hao, Zhengling; Muir, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CR) is a degenerative condition in dogs that typically has a non-contact mechanism. Subsequent contralateral rupture often develops in dogs with unilateral CR. Synovitis severity is an important factor that promotes ligament degradation. Consequently, we wished to evaluate the utility of arthroscopy for assessment of stifle synovitis in dogs with CR. Herein, we report results of a prospective study of 27 dogs with unilateral CR and bilateral radiographic osteoarthritis. Arthroscopic images and synovial biopsies from the lateral and medial joint pouches were obtained bilaterally and graded for synovial hypertrophy, vascularity, and synovitis. Synovial tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive (TRAP+) macrophages, CD3+ T lymphocytes, Factor VIII+ blood vessels, and synovial intima thickness were quantified histologically and related to arthroscopic observations. Risk of subsequent contralateral CR was examined using survival analysis. We found that arthroscopic scores were increased in the index stifle, compared with the contralateral stifle (p<0.05). Numbers of CD3+ T lymphocytes (SR = 0.50, p<0.05) and TRAP+ cells in joint pouches (SR = 0.59, p<0.01) were correlated between joint pairs. Arthroscopic grading of vascularity and synovitis was correlated with number density of Factor VIII+ vessels (SR>0.34, p<0.05). Arthroscopic grading of villus hypertrophy correlated with numbers of CD3+ T lymphocytes (SR = 0.34, p<0.05). Synovial intima thickness was correlated with arthroscopic hypertrophy, vascularity, and synovitis (SR>0.31, p<0.05). Strong intra-observer and moderate inter-observer agreement for arthroscopic scoring was found. Dog age and arthroscopic vascularity significantly influenced risk of contralateral CR over time. We conclude that arthroscopic grading of synovitis is a precise tool that correlates with histologic synovitis. Arthroscopy is useful for assessment of stifle synovitis in client-owned dogs

  19. Current Arthroscopic Concepts in Repairing Posterior Cruciate Ligament Tibial-Sided Avulsions.

    PubMed

    Malempati, Chaitu; Felder, Jerrod; Elliott, Michael; Brunkhorst, Joseph; Miller, Mark; Johnson, Darren L

    2015-09-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries are extremely rare and most commonly occur in the trauma setting. They can lead to instability, pain, diminished function, and eventual arthrosis. Several techniques of arthroscopic PCL repair for tibial-sided bony avulsions have been described in the literature; however, no single technique has emerged as the gold standard to predictably restore posterior knee stability, PCL function, and knee biomechanics. The authors believe that the best results will come from procedures that re-create the normal human anatomy and knee kinematics. In this article, 3 arthroscopic methods of PCL avulsion repairs performed at 2 academic institutions are analyzed. The techniques described here provide good options for the treatment of these injuries.

  20. Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Enhancing Biologic Healing after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ki-Mo; Lim, Hong Chul; Bae, Ji Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using tendon grafts is the current gold standard for the treatment of ACL tears in active patients. However, many patients still experience residual knee instability, knee pain and progressive cartilage degeneration following ACL reconstruction. Recent developments in mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based approaches for treating musculoskeletal injuries have led to the application of MSCs for enhancing healing after ACL injuries. The purpose of this article is to review recent pre-clinical and clinical studies using MSCs for the enhancement of biologic healing of ACL injuries. Because of the success of pre-clinical studies, MSC-based approaches are now thought to be promising treatment options for enhancing biologic healing of ACL grafts and restoring the functional properties to the levels of the native ACL, and ultimately improving clinical outcomes.

  1. Septic arthritis following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a comprehensive review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Scully, William F; Fisher, Susan G; Parada, Stephen A; Arrington, Edward D; Arrington, Edward A

    2013-01-01

    Septic arthritis following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is an uncommon but potentially serious complication. The incidence of infection is approximately 0.44%. Staphylococcus and streptococcus strains are the most common infectious pathogens. Infection is typically via direct inoculation. Articular cartilage damage is primarily the result of the unregulated host inflammatory response. The timing of presentation is typically <2 months following surgery. Presenting symptoms commonly mirror normal postoperative findings, making diagnosis difficult. Although laboratory inflammatory markers are often elevated, knee arthrocentesis is the gold standard for diagnosis. Treatment involves serial arthroscopic or open irrigation and debridement procedures and antibiotic management. Graft retention is often possible, although fixation implants may require removal or exchange. Successful results have been reported following infection eradication in both graft retention and early revision ACL reconstruction scenarios.

  2. RANDOMIZED PROSPECTIVE STUDY COMPARING TRANSVERSE AND EXTRACORTICAL FIXATION IN ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Guarilha, Eduardo; de Andrade Fígaro Caldeira, Paulo Roberto; de Almeida Lira Neto, Ozorio; Navarro, Marcelo Schmidt; Milani, Antonio; Filho, Mario Carneiro

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study had the objective of prospectively comparing transverse fixation (Cross-Pin™) with extracortical fixation (EZLoc™) for the femur, in surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament, from a clinical, biomechanical and functional point of view. Methods: Between April 2007 and November 2009, 50 patients with acute or chronic anterior cruciate ligament injuries underwent arthroscopic reconstruction using the homologous flexor tendons (gracilis and semitendinosus). Randomization of the femoral fixation method was done by means of a draw at the time of the procedure. Patients were excluded if they presented multiple ligament lesions, fractures, previous surgery, autoimmune disease and impairment of the contralateral knee. The Lysholm scale, SF36 quality-of-life questionnaire and KT1000™ arthrometer were used. Results: After a mean follow-up of 18.1 months, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups regarding the Lysholm scale and KT1000™ measurements. However, the SF36 questionnaire showed a statistical difference such that transverse fixation was superior regarding pain and vitality. Conclusion: Both techniques were shown to be efficient for transfemoral fixation, but with almost no statistically significant difference between them. We believe that new studies will be necessary for better understanding of these differences. PMID:27042646

  3. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Autologous Hamstring

    PubMed Central

    Grawe, Brian M.; Williams, Phillip N.; Burge, Alissa; Voigt, Marcia; Altchek, David W.; Hannafin, Jo A.; Allen, Answorth A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recent clinical investigations have identified inadequate autograft hamstring graft diameter (<8 mm) to be predictive of failure after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Purpose/Hypothesis: The objective of this study was to determine the utility of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) variables of the hamstring tendons for the prediction of graft diameter at the time of surgery. The hypothesis was that cross-sectional area (CSA) of the hamstring tendon measured on MRI could accurately predict graft diameter, and threshold measurements could be established to predict graft diameter at the time of surgery. Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods: A total of 84 consecutive skeletally mature patients prospectively enrolled in our ACL reconstruction patient registry were identified for study purposes. Patients were included if they underwent an MRI of the affected knee at our institution prior to ACL reconstruction with hamstring (HT) autograft. Graft preparation was performed via a standard quadrupled hamstring technique after harvesting both the gracilis and semitendinosus (4-GST). The smallest diameter end of the HT autograft was then utilized for measurement analysis. Total CSA was calculated for both hamstring tendons using the “region of interest tool” on the corresponding proton density–weighted axial image of the knee at the widest condylar dimension. Three independent reviewers measured the MRI scans so that intra- and interrater reliability of the measurements could be determined. A trend analysis was then undertaken to establish correlations between the MRI CSA and graft diameter. Predictive analysis was then performed to establish threshold MRI measurement values for specific graft diameters and determine whether any patient-specific factors would affect graft diameter (age, sex, and body mass index). Results: Mean patient age at the time of surgery was 36 years (range, 11

  4. Popliteal pseudoaneurysm after arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    van Dorp, Karin B; Breugem, Stefan J M; Driessen, Marcel J M

    2014-09-01

    This report presents the case of a 30-year-old motocross (BMX) cyclist with a third-degree posterior cruciate ligament rupture. The technique used for reconstruction was the transtibial single-bundle autologous hamstring technique. Unfortunately, the procedure was complicated by a popliteal pseudoaneurysm, which was located in line with the tibial canal. The pseudoaneurysm was treated with an end-to-end anastomosis and the patient recovered without further complaints. In this case, the popliteal artery was damaged most probably by the edge of the reamer or the guide wire during removal. Vascular complications can be limb- and life-threatening. This case report aims to increase the awareness of this serious complication with a review of the literature. PMID:25229050

  5. Correlation of anthropometric measurements, strength, anterior cruciate ligament size, and intercondylar notch characteristics to sex differences in anterior cruciate ligament tear rates.

    PubMed

    Anderson, A F; Dome, D C; Gautam, S; Awh, M H; Rennirt, G W

    2001-01-01

    We performed a prospective study based on the hypothesis that physiologic differences exist between men and women in strength after adjustments for body weight; that the size of the anterior cruciate ligament is proportionate to the strength of its antagonists, the quadriceps muscles; and that women have a relatively small anterior cruciate ligament, thus predisposing them to a disproportionate number of anterior cruciate ligament injuries. One hundred matched high school basketball players, 50 male and 50 female, were evaluated with anthropometric measurements, body fat analysis, muscle strength evaluation, and magnetic resonance imaging measurements of the intercondylar notch and cross-sectional area of the anterior cruciate ligament at the outlet. The male players were taller and heavier than their female counterparts, although they had 11% less body fat. Male players had statistically greater quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength than female players, even when adjustments were made for body weight. With adjustments for body weight, the size of the anterior cruciate ligament in girls was found to be statistically smaller than in boys. There was no statistically significant difference in the notch width index between the sexes. The study data support our hypothesis that sex differences in anterior cruciate ligament tear rates are caused primarily by several interrelated intrinsic factors. Most importantly, stiffness and muscular strength increase stress on the anterior cruciate ligament in female athletes. The anterior cruciate ligament, when adjustments have been made for body weight, is smaller in female athletes, and therefore, probably does not compensate for the lack of stiffness and strength.

  6. Replacement of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee with deep frozen bone-tendon-bone allografts.

    PubMed

    Than, P; Bálint, L; Domán, I; Szabó, G

    1999-01-01

    Surgical treatment of the torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and consequent knee instability showed great development over the last decade. Arthroscopic techniques and the use of different allogenic tissues became a routine. Between 1995 and 1998, 31 knees in 30 patients underwent ACL reconstruction of the knee with fresh-frozen allografts at the Department of Orthopedics, Medical University of Pécs, Hungary. The operations were performed with arthroscopic technique. This paper retrospectively assesses the outcomes with an average follow up of 28 months, which showed good results in most of the cases. The authors reviewed the literature emphasizing advantages and disadvantages of the method with special interest to possible complications resulting from the use of allografts: graft rejection, graft re-rupture, transmission of infection and synovitis evoked by immune response.

  7. Replacement of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee with deep frozen bone-tendon-bone allografts.

    PubMed

    Than, P; Bálint, L; Domán, I; Szabó, G

    1999-01-01

    Surgical treatment of the torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and consequent knee instability showed great development over the last decade. Arthroscopic techniques and the use of different allogenic tissues became a routine. Between 1995 and 1998, 31 knees in 30 patients underwent ACL reconstruction of the knee with fresh-frozen allografts at the Department of Orthopedics, Medical University of Pécs, Hungary. The operations were performed with arthroscopic technique. This paper retrospectively assesses the outcomes with an average follow up of 28 months, which showed good results in most of the cases. The authors reviewed the literature emphasizing advantages and disadvantages of the method with special interest to possible complications resulting from the use of allografts: graft rejection, graft re-rupture, transmission of infection and synovitis evoked by immune response. PMID:10853785

  8. Ligamentous injuries of the knee: anterior cruciate, medial collateral, posterior cruciate, and posterolateral corner injuries.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Vincent; Bright, Crystal; Fields, Ashley

    2013-06-01

    This article discusses athletic injuries of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), medial collateral ligament (MCL), and posterolateral corner. Best evidence to date validates that conservative management of ACL ruptures is a reasonable strategy. Current data also seem to advocate nonoperative management of PCL injuries. All isolated MCL injuries, regardless of grade, are usually treated with a brief period of immobilization and symptomatic management. Although the surgical literature often advocates surgical treatment of posterolateral corner injuries, there have been no randomized trials substantiating that these injuries are best treated surgically.

  9. Arthroscopic All-Inside Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Overcoming the "Killer Turn".

    PubMed

    Vasdev, Attique; Rajgopal, Ashok; Gupta, Himanshu; Dahiya, Vivek; Tyagi, Vipin Chand

    2016-06-01

    One of the most challenging arthroscopic surgical procedures is posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction. PCL injuries account for 20% of all knee ligament-related injuries. These may be isolated or occur as part of poly-ligament injuries. With the possibility of PCL reconstruction with the all-inside technique, there has been a surge in interest in treating PCL injuries. With the PCL being one of the strongest ligaments in the body and a primary restraint to posterior translation of the tibia, the need for PCL reconstruction is being more and more recognized. Surgeons often find it difficult to negotiate the so-called killer turn while attempting arthroscopic PCL reconstruction. We describe the use of the GraftLink graft construct through the posteromedial portal in 7 patients (6 male and 1 female patient) with isolated PCL injuries, which we believe not only allows us to perform the all-inside PCL reconstruction but also does away with the difficulty of the killer turn encountered while performing the arthroscopic PCL reconstruction.

  10. Current Rehabilitation Concepts for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Surgery in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Malempati, Chaitu; Jurjans, John; Noehren, Brian; Ireland, Mary L; Johnson, Darren L

    2015-11-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament is the most commonly disrupted ligament in the knee in high-performance athletes. Most recently, advancements in surgical technique and graft fixation have enabled athletes to participate in early postoperative rehabilitation, focusing on range of motion and progressing to patellar mobilization, strengthening, and neuromuscular control. Several rehabilitation protocols exist with variations in specific exercises, progression through phases, and key components. The ultimate goal of rehabilitation is to return the athlete to preinjury performance level, including motion and strength, without injuring or elongating the graft. Each athlete is unique; thus, safe return to play should be individualized rather than follow a particular postoperative month or time line. This article provides an overview of the application and the scientific basis for formulating a rehabilitation protocol prior to and following anterior cruciate ligament surgery.

  11. Controversies in Knee Rehabilitation: Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Failla, Mathew J.; Arundale, Amelia J.H.; Logerstedt, David S.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Controversy in management of athletes exists after anterior cruciate ligament injury and reconstruction. Consensus criteria for evaluating successful outcomes following ACL injury include no re-injury or recurrent giving way, no joint effusion, quadriceps strength symmetry, restored activity level and function, and returning to pre-injury sports. Using these criterions, we will review the success rates of current management strategies after ACL injury and provide recommendations for the counseling of athletes after ACL injury. PMID:25818715

  12. Tibial cyst formation following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zabala, Ibon López; Solsona, Sergi Sastre

    2014-10-01

    The patient was a 31-year-old man who had undergone anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction of the right knee 2 years prior using a hamstring autograft, with tibial fixation achieved using a bioabsorbable interference screw. Evaluation of the region by radiography revealed widening of the tibial tunnel, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed cystic formation in the tibial tunnel and the fragmentation of the bioabsorbable interference screw. PMID:25098192

  13. Anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with quadriceps tendon autograft.

    PubMed

    Rabuck, Stephen J; Musahl, Volker; Fu, Freddie H; West, Robin V

    2013-01-01

    A multitude of graft options exist including both allograft and autograft sources for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. With recent concerns regarding the early graft failure and cost-effectiveness of allograft sources, more attention has been directed toward autograft options. However, autograft harvest has been associated with specific morbidity that can result in suboptimal outcomes. The quadriceps tendon is an excellent biomechanical and biologic option.

  14. Anterior cruciate ligament injury in indoor ball games.

    PubMed

    Ebstrup, J F; Bojsen-Møller, F

    2000-04-01

    Three videorecorded incidents of knee injuries inflicted during indoor ball games are reported. Injuries and especially anterior cruciate ligament ruptures seemed to be triggered in varus loaded knees by femural external rotation, or in valgus loaded knees by femural internal rotation with the pivot shifted to the lateral femurotibial compartment. The observations suggest that it may be to the players' advantage to be trained in not letting their knees sag medially or laterally during side-stepping or sudden changes in speed.

  15. Controversies in knee rehabilitation: anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    PubMed

    Failla, Mathew J; Arundale, Amelia J H; Logerstedt, David S; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2015-04-01

    Controversy in management of athletes exists after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and reconstruction. Consensus criteria for evaluating successful outcomes following ACL injury include no reinjury or recurrent giving way, no joint effusion, quadriceps strength symmetry, restored activity level and function, and returning to preinjury sports. Using these criteria, the success rates of current management strategies after ACL injury are reviewed and recommendations are provided for the counseling of athletes after ACL injury.

  16. Basketball knee injuries and the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Emerson, R J

    1993-04-01

    Basketball arguably may present the greatest risk for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury because it is well known that ACL injuries may occur with external or internal rotation of the tibia with or without hyperextension. All of these mechanical phenomena occur repetitively in a running, jumping, and cutting sport such as basketball. This article discusses the diagnosis and mechanism of injury as well as treatment of ACL injury.

  17. Knee functions and a return to sports activity in competitive athletes following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Y; Shirai, Y; Narita, T; Mori, A; Kobayashi, K

    2000-06-01

    We investigated knee functions and a return to sports in 50 competitive athlete patients treated with arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using double-looped STG augmented by woven polyester at a 1-year follow-up. There were 25 males and 25 females with a mean age of 24.3 years (range: 19-39 years). The majority of preinjury sports were basketball, volleyball and soccer. Athletic rehabilitation including agility training and sports-specific training was started at 12 weeks. Fourty patients (80%) was rated as normal or nearly normal on the assessment of International Knee Documentation Commitee postoperatively. Fourty-eight patients (96%) obtained full range of motion, and the mean quadriceps muscle strength of the injured side was 91.3%of that of the uninjured side. As for a return to sports, 46 patients (92%) were able to do fully competitive sports at a mean of 8.1 postoperative months. These results suggest that arthroscopic reconstruction using augmented double-looped STG allows early athletic rehabilitation, and lead satisfactory outcome as well as a reliable and early return to preinjury level of sport activity for the majority of the competitive athlete patients.

  18. Bone tunnel enlargement on anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Leonardi, Adriano Barros de Aguiar; Duarte, Aires; Severino, Nilson Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess the presence of tibial bone tunnel enlargement after surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament using quadruple graft of the flexor tendons and correlate the functional results in their presence. Methods: The studied lasted six months and included 25 patients, with ages ranging from 18 to 43 years old. Assessment was based on radiographs taken immediately postoperatively and at the third and sixth month of follow up in the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Reconstruction of ligaments was performed with tendon grafts of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscle fixated in the femur with transverse metal screw and in the tibia with interference screws. Patients were evaluated objectively by tests ligament, graded from zero to four crosses and subjectively by the Lysholm method preoperative and after sixth month follow up. Results: Significant increase in the tunnels diameters were observed, 20.56% for radiographs in the anteroposterior view, 26.48% in profile view and 23.22% in computed tomography. Descriptive statistics showed significant improvement in subjective and objective clinical parameters. Conclusions: The bone tunnel enlargement is a phenomenon found in the first months after surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament and it has no implications on clinical outcomes in the short term. Level of Evidence II, Prospective Study. PMID:25328430

  19. Intercondylar notch size and anterior cruciate ligament injuries in athletes. A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Souryal, T O; Freeman, T R

    1993-01-01

    Published reports agree that there is a strong association between intercondylar notch stenosis and anterior cruciate ligament injuries. In a previously published retrospective study on bilateral anterior cruciate ligament injuries and associated intercondylar notch stenosis, we formulated the notch width index to measure and compare intercondylar notch width. The purpose of this prospective study was to establish a normal range for the notch width index and to correlate intercondylar notch size and anterior cruciate ligament injuries. We gathered data on 902 high school athletes, including range of motion, thigh girth, ligament stability and intercondylar notch width using the notch width index. The population was then followed prospectively and anterior cruciate ligament injuries were recorded and correlated with notch width index in a blind manner. Two-year results showed that the overall anterior cruciate ligament injury rate was 3%. The normal intercondylar notch ratio was 0.231 +/- 0.044. Intercondylar notch width index for men was larger than that for women. Athletes sustaining noncontact anterior cruciate ligament tears have statistically significant intercondylar notch stenosis (notch width index, 0.189). Ten of 14 athletes with noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injuries had a notch width index that was at least 1 SD below the mean. Athletes with contact anterior cruciate ligament injuries had a mean of 0.233. We conclude that athletes with a stenotic intercondylar notch are at significantly greater risk for sustaining noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury.

  20. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with preservation of remnant bundle using hamstring autograft: technical note.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jin Hwan; Lee, Yong Seuk; Ha, Hae Chan

    2009-08-01

    During an arthroscopic examination for an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, there is a relatively thick remnant ACL tibial stump attached to the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) or rarely remained between the femur origin and the tibia insertion. We thought that preservation of the remnant ACL original bundle might promote graft healing or be helpful in preserving the proprioception and function to stabilize the knee. Therefore, we established a remnant preservation procedure without additional instruments during an ACL reconstruction using a bio-cross pin (RIGIDfix system: Mitek, Johnson & Johnson, USA) for the femoral tunnel fixation. The remnant ACL was sutured (usually three stitches) using a suture hook (Linvatec, Largo, FL), and both ends of the sutures were pulled to the far anteromedial (AM) portal. These sutures protected the remnant tissue during the ACL reconstruction because medial traction of these sutures can provide a wide view during the reconstruction. After the femoral and tibial tunnel formation, these sutures were pulled out to the inferior sleeve of the cross pin using a previously inserted wire loop via an inferior sleeve. After graft passage, a superior cross pin was first fixed and tibial fixation was then performed. Finally, inferior cross pin fixation was performed and ties were made at the entrance of the inferior cross pin. PMID:18299859

  1. The effect of immediate weightbearing after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tyler, T F; McHugh, M P; Gleim, G W; Nicholas, S J

    1998-12-01

    Immediate weightbearing has been advocated after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and is thought to enhance the return of quadriceps muscle activity and knee extension range of motion without jeopardizing graft integrity. This study examined the effect of immediate weightbearing after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction on the return of vastus medialis oblique electromyography activity, knee extension range of motion, knee stability, physical examination, Lysholm score, and anterior knee pain. Forty-nine patients (24 men and 25 women) undergoing endoscopic central third patella tendon autograft reconstruction were randomized prospectively into two groups. Group 1 patients underwent immediate weightbearing as tolerated. Group 2 patients were kept nonweightbearing for 2 weeks. All measurements were taken before surgery, 2 weeks after surgery, and between 6 and 14 months (average, 7.3 months) followup. There was no effect of weightbearing on knee extension range of motion or vastus medialis oblique function at followup. In addition, knee stability was not compromised after surgery. Seven of 20 (35%) nonweightbearing patients and only two of 25 (8%) immediate weightbearing patients reported anterior knee pain at followup. Overall, immediate weightbearing did not compromise knee joint stability and resulted in a better outcome with a decreased incidence of anterior knee pain.

  2. Kinematic analysis of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hua-Wei; Ni, Ming; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Qiang; Chai, Wei; Zhou, Yong-Gang; Chen, Ji-Ying; Liu, Yu-Liang; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aims to retain normal knee kinematics after knee replacement surgeries by reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament during total knee arthroplasty. Method: We use computational simulation tools to establish four dynamic knee models, including normal knee model, posterior cruciate ligament retaining knee model, posterior cruciate ligament substituting knee model, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstructing knee model. Our proposed method utilizes magnetic resonance images to reconstruct solid bones and attachments of ligaments, and assemble femoral and tibial components according representative literatures and operational specifications. Dynamic data of axial tibial rotation and femoral translation from full-extension to 135 were measured for analyzing the motion of knee models. Findings: The computational simulation results show that comparing with the posterior cruciate ligament retained knee model and the posterior cruciate ligament substituted knee model, reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament improves the posterior movement of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation through a full range of flexion. The maximum posterior translations of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knee are 15.3 mm, 4.6 mm and 20.6 at 135 of flexion. Interpretation: Reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament in total knee arthroplasty has been approved to be an more efficient way of maintaining normal knee kinematics comparing to posterior cruciate ligament retained and posterior cruciate ligament substituted total knee arthroplasty. PMID:27347334

  3. Biomechanical Measures During Landing and Postural Stability Predict Second Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Return to Sport

    PubMed Central

    Paterno, Mark V.; Schmitt, Laura C.; Ford, Kevin R.; Rauh, Mitchell J.; Myer, Gregory D.; Huang, Bin; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Athletes who return to sport participation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) have a higher risk of a second anterior cruciate ligament injury (either reinjury or contralateral injury) compared with non–anterior cruciate ligament–injured athletes. Hypotheses Prospective measures of neuromuscular control and postural stability after ACLR will predict relative increased risk for a second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Study Design Cohort study (prognosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods Fifty-six athletes underwent a prospective biomechanical screening after ACLR using 3-dimensional motion analysis during a drop vertical jump maneuver and postural stability assessment before return to pivoting and cutting sports. After the initial test session, each subject was followed for 12 months for occurrence of a second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Lower extremity joint kinematics, kinetics, and postural stability were assessed and analyzed. Analysis of variance and logistic regression were used to identify predictors of a second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Results Thirteen athletes suffered a subsequent second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Transverse plane hip kinetics and frontal plane knee kinematics during landing, sagittal plane knee moments at landing, and deficits in postural stability predicted a second injury in this population (C statistic = 0.94) with excellent sensitivity (0.92) and specificity (0.88). Specific predictive parameters included an increase in total frontal plane (valgus) movement, greater asymmetry in internal knee extensor moment at initial contact, and a deficit in single-leg postural stability of the involved limb, as measured by the Biodex stability system. Hip rotation moment independently predicted second anterior cruciate ligament injury (C = 0.81) with high sensitivity (0.77) and specificity (0.81). Conclusion Altered neuromuscular control of the hip and knee during a dynamic landing task

  4. A Technique of Improved Medial Meniscus Visualization by Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Placement in Chronic Anterior Cruciate Deficient Knees.

    PubMed

    Vertullo, Christopher J; Wijenayake, Lahann; Grayson, Jane E

    2016-04-01

    It is customary to perform medial meniscus repair before anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft placement when undertaken as a combined procedure. However, in chronic ACL-deficient knees, intraoperative anterior tibiofemoral translation can cause the medial meniscus repair to be more technically challenging. Intraoperative anterior tibiofemoral translation can both reduce the visualization of the medial meniscus and make its reduction unstable. An operative sequence alteration of ACL graft placement and tensioning before medial meniscal repair improves medial meniscus visualization in chronically ACL-deficient knees by using the ACL graft's ability to prevent anterior tibiofemoral translation. The technique sequence is as follows: (a) the medial meniscus is reduced, (b) ACL reconstruction is undertaken using a hamstring graft without final tibia fixation, PMID:27354950

  5. A long-term study of anterior cruciate ligament allograft reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Almqvist, K F; Willaert, Pieter; De Brabandere, S; Criel, K; Verdonk, R

    2009-07-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the long-term clinical outcome of unilateral arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) allograft reconstruction. From October 1995 to December 1997, 64 arthroscopic ACL reconstructions were performed. Multiligamentous knee injuries and ACL injuries in polytrauma patients were excluded and out of the remaining 60 patients 55 were available for follow-up. Three patients had suffered a rerupture caused by major trauma. One patient had a rerupture without significant trauma and one failure was caused by deep infection. These five patients were revised. Fifty patients (36 males, 14 females) were included in the final follow-up. At the time of evaluation, the mean duration of follow-up was 10 years and 6 months. All patients were examined by an independent examiner. Seven patients had an extension lag (<5 degrees) and all patients had a knee flexion of at least 120 degrees, with a mean flexion of 135 +/- 5 degrees compared to 135 +/- 8 degrees. At the time of follow-up, the median IKDC score was 97 (74-100). The Lysholm scoring scale had a median value of 95 (76-100). The median sports level on the Tegner scale was 6 (4-9). The one-leg-hop test showed a mean value of 95 +/- 5%. One patient did not perform the one-leg-hop test because of recent surgery to the Achilles tendon. In conclusion, the tibialis anterior or tibialis posterior tendon allograft ACL reconstruction produced good clinical results in the majority of patients at long-term follow-up.

  6. A long-term study of anterior cruciate ligament allograft reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Almqvist, K F; Willaert, Pieter; De Brabandere, S; Criel, K; Verdonk, R

    2009-07-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the long-term clinical outcome of unilateral arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) allograft reconstruction. From October 1995 to December 1997, 64 arthroscopic ACL reconstructions were performed. Multiligamentous knee injuries and ACL injuries in polytrauma patients were excluded and out of the remaining 60 patients 55 were available for follow-up. Three patients had suffered a rerupture caused by major trauma. One patient had a rerupture without significant trauma and one failure was caused by deep infection. These five patients were revised. Fifty patients (36 males, 14 females) were included in the final follow-up. At the time of evaluation, the mean duration of follow-up was 10 years and 6 months. All patients were examined by an independent examiner. Seven patients had an extension lag (<5 degrees) and all patients had a knee flexion of at least 120 degrees, with a mean flexion of 135 +/- 5 degrees compared to 135 +/- 8 degrees. At the time of follow-up, the median IKDC score was 97 (74-100). The Lysholm scoring scale had a median value of 95 (76-100). The median sports level on the Tegner scale was 6 (4-9). The one-leg-hop test showed a mean value of 95 +/- 5%. One patient did not perform the one-leg-hop test because of recent surgery to the Achilles tendon. In conclusion, the tibialis anterior or tibialis posterior tendon allograft ACL reconstruction produced good clinical results in the majority of patients at long-term follow-up. PMID:19421736

  7. Intraarticular iliotibial band reconstruction for anterior cruciate ligament insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Yost, J G; Chekofsky, K; Schoscheim, P; Nolan, P; Slovin, H; Scott, W N

    1981-01-01

    Intraarticular reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament by transferring the distal aspect and insertion of the iliotibial band has been clinically successful. Our surgical technique theoretically retains normal neurovascular supply, and thus, the potential for dynamic repair exists. Thirty-five patients, 28 men and 7 women, underwent this reconstruction. The average age was 24 years, with a range from 18 to 46. There were 27 chronic and 8 acute injuries. Pathological findings included an absent anterior cruciate (14 knees), severe stretching (13), failed reconstruction or repair (4), midportion tears (3), and avulsion (1). Postoperative patients were evaluated according to the Kennedy criteria. An anterior drawer of 2+ was not observed in any patient. There were no cases of 2+ rotary instability, and no pivot shifts. The possibility of a dynamic or proprioceptive repair was assessed by electromyography. While no evidence of electrical activity was recorded on the gluteus maximus on 60 normal knee examinations, all 10 tested postoperative iliotibial band patients had electrical activity. The failed results of the series showed no evidence of activity.

  8. All-arthroscopic treatment of tibial avulsion fractures of the posterior cruciate ligament

    PubMed Central

    Gwinner, Clemens; Hoburg, Arnd; Wilde, Sophie; Schatka, Imke; Krapohl, Björn Dirk; Jung, Tobias M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) avulsion fracture from its tibial insertion is a rare condition. Despite the further technical advent in refixation of avulsion fractures, the reported failure rate of current approaches remains high and the optimal surgical technique has not been elucidated yet. The purpose of the current study is to present an all-inside arthroscopic reconstruction technique for bony tibial avulsion fractures of the PCL and initial clinical outcomes. Methods: Patients underwent a thorough clinical and radiological examination of both knees at 3, 6, 12, 18, and if possible also at 24 months. Clinical evaluation included subjective and objective IKDC 2000, Lysholm score, and KOOS score. Radiographic imaging studies included CT scans for assessment of osseous integration and anatomic reduction of the bony avulsion. In addition to that posterior stress radiographs of both knees using the Telos device (Arthrex, Naples, USA) were conducted to measure posterior tibial translation. Results: A total of four patients (1 female, 3 male; ø 38 (± 18) years), who underwent arthroscopic refixation of a PCL avulsion fracture using the Tight Rope device were enrolled in this study. Mean follow up was 22 [18–24] months. The mean subjective IKDC was 72.6% (± 9.9%). Regarding the objective IKDC three patients accounted for grade A, one patient for grade C. The Lysholm score yielded 82 (± 6.9) points. The KOOS score reached 75% (± 13%; symptoms 76%, pain 81%, function 76%, sports 66%, QoL 64%). All patients showed complete osseous integration and anatomic reduction of the bony avulsion. The mean posterior tibial translation at final follow up was 2.8 [0–7] mm. Conclusions: All-arthroscopic treatment of tibial avulsion fractures of the posterior cruciate ligament provides satisfactory clinical results in a preliminary patient cohort. It is a reproducible technique, which minimizes soft tissue damage and obviates a second surgery for hardware

  9. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fabricant, Peter D; Kocher, Mininder S

    2016-10-01

    Dramatic increases in youth competitive athletic activity, early sport specialization, and year-round training and competition, along with increased awareness of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in children, have led to a commensurate increase in the frequency of ACL tears in the skeletally immature. Recent understanding of the risks of nonoperative treatment and surgical delay have supported a trend toward early operative treatment. This article discusses treatment strategies for ACL injuries in children and adolescents, and offers our preferred treatment strategy for skeletally immature youth athletes with ACL tears. PMID:27637664

  10. Anterior Cruciate Ligament: Structure, Injuries and Regenerative Treatments.

    PubMed

    Negahi Shirazi, Ali; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Khademhosseini, Ali; Dehghani, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most vulnerable ligaments of the knee. ACL impairment results in episodic instability, chondral and meniscal injury and early osteoarthritis. The poor self-healing capacity of ACL makes surgical treatment inevitable. Current ACL reconstructions include a substitution of torn ACL via biological grafts such as autograft, allograft. This review provides an insight of ACL structure, orientation and properties followed by comparing the performance of various constructs that have been used for ACL replacement. New approaches, undertaken to induce ACL regeneration and fabricate biomimetic scaffolds, are also discussed. PMID:26545750

  11. Anterior Cruciate Ligament: Structure, Injuries and Regenerative Treatments.

    PubMed

    Negahi Shirazi, Ali; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Khademhosseini, Ali; Dehghani, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most vulnerable ligaments of the knee. ACL impairment results in episodic instability, chondral and meniscal injury and early osteoarthritis. The poor self-healing capacity of ACL makes surgical treatment inevitable. Current ACL reconstructions include a substitution of torn ACL via biological grafts such as autograft, allograft. This review provides an insight of ACL structure, orientation and properties followed by comparing the performance of various constructs that have been used for ACL replacement. New approaches, undertaken to induce ACL regeneration and fabricate biomimetic scaffolds, are also discussed.

  12. Posterior Wall Blowout in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Justin J.; Dean, Chase S.; Chahla, Jorge; Menge, Travis J.; Cram, Tyler R.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Violation of the posterior femoral cortex, commonly referred to as posterior wall blowout, can be a devastating intraoperative complication in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and lead to loss of graft fixation or early graft failure. If cortical blowout occurs despite careful planning and adherence to proper surgical technique, a thorough knowledge of the anatomy and alternative fixation techniques is imperative to ensure optimal patient outcomes. This article highlights anatomic considerations for femoral tunnel placement in ACL reconstruction and techniques for avoidance and salvage of a posterior wall blowout. PMID:27335885

  13. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Williams, John; Hutt, Jonathan; Rickman, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This report details the reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament in an 18-year-old man with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). The reduced mechanical properties of the tissue in EDS can pose a challenge to the orthopaedic surgeon. In this case, we describe the use of a hamstring autograft combined with a Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System (LARS). There was a good radiographical, clinical, and functional outcome after two years. This technique gave a successful outcome in the reconstruction of the ACL in a patient with EDS and therefore may help surgeons faced with the same clinical scenario. PMID:26221555

  14. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Choices: A Review of Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Dheerendra, Sujay K; Khan, Wasim S; Singhal, Rohit; Shivarathre, Deepak G; Pydisetty, Ravi; Johnstone, David

    2012-01-01

    The graft choice for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction continues to be controversial. There are several options available for the treating surgeon, including Bone Patellar Tendon Bone (BPTB) grafts, Hamstring tendon (HT) grafts, allografts and synthetic grafts. Within the last decade there have been several comparative trials and meta-analysis, which have failed to provide an answer with regards to the best graft available. The aim of this review is to understand the current concepts in graft choices for ACL reconstruction. PMID:22888379

  15. Outcome of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with emphasis on sex-related differences.

    PubMed

    Ahldén, M; Sernert, N; Karlsson, J; Kartus, J

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to compare the results after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using the four-strand semitendinosus-gracilis (ST/G) autograft in male (n=141) vs female (n=103) patients. The patients were operated on between 1996 and 2005, using interference screw fixation and drilling the femoral tunnel through the anteromedial portal. The pre-operative assessments and demographics, apart from age (males 29 years, females 26 years; P=0.02), were comparable at the time of surgery. At 25 (23-36) months post-operatively, no significant differences were found between the study groups in terms of anterior side-to-side knee laxity, manual Lachman test, Tegner activity level, Lysholm knee score, range of motion or donor-site morbidity. Both study groups improved significantly in most clinical assessments and functional scores compared with their pre-operative values. Two years after ACL reconstruction using ST/G autografts, there were no significant differences between male and female patients in terms of clinical outcome or functional scores.

  16. A Comparison between Clinical Results of Selective Bundle and Double Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Yon-Sik; Song, Si Young; Yang, Cheol Jung; Ha, Jong Mun; Kim, Yoon Sang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of arthroscopic anatomical double bundle (DB) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with either selective anteromedial (AM) or posterolateral (PL) bundle reconstruction while preserving a relatively healthy ACL bundle. Materials and Methods The authors evaluated 98 patients with a mean follow-up of 30.8±4.0 months who had undergone DB or selective bundle ACL reconstructions. Of these, 34 cases underwent DB ACL reconstruction (group A), 34 underwent selective AM bundle reconstruction (group B), and 30 underwent selective PL bundle reconstructions (group C). These groups were compared with respect to Lysholm and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, side-to-side differences of anterior laxity measured by KT-2000 arthrometer at 30 lbs, and stress radiography and Lachman and pivot shift test results. Pre- and post-operative data were objectively evaluated using a statistical approach. Results The preoperative anterior instability measured by manual stress radiography at 90° of knee flexion in group A was significantly greater than that in groups B and C (all p<0.001). At last follow-up, mean side-to-side instrumented laxities measured by the KT-2000 and manual stress radiography were significantly improved from preoperative data in all groups (all p<0.001). There were no significant differences between the three groups in anterior instability measured by KT-2000 arthrometer, pivot shift, or functional scores. Conclusion Selective bundle reconstruction in partial ACL tears offers comparable clinical results to DB reconstruction in complete ACL tears. PMID:27401652

  17. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries in the female athlete. Potential risk factors.

    PubMed

    Huston, L J; Greenfield, M L; Wojtys, E M

    2000-03-01

    In the general population, an estimated one in 3000 individuals sustains an anterior cruciate ligament injury per year in the United States, corresponding to an overall injury rate of approximately 100,000 injuries annually. This national estimate is low for women because anterior cruciate ligament injury rates are reported to be two to eight times higher in women than in men participating in the same sports, presenting a sizable health problem. With the growing participation of women in athletics and the debilitating nature of anterior cruciate ligament injuries, a better understanding of mechanisms of injury in women sustaining anterior cruciate ligament injuries is essential. Published studies strongly support noncontact mechanisms for anterior cruciate ligament tears in women, which make these injuries even more perplexing. Speculation on the possible etiology of anterior cruciate ligament injuries in women has centered on anatomic differences, joint laxity, hormones, and training techniques. Investigators have not agreed on causal factors for this injury, but they have started to profile the type of athlete who is at risk. In the current study the most recent scientific studies of intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors thought to be contributing to the high rate of female anterior cruciate ligament injuries will be reviewed, important differences will be highlighted, and recommendations proposed to alleviate or minimize these risk factors among female athletes will be reported where appropriate.

  18. Lower Extremity Malalignments and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury History

    PubMed Central

    Hertel, Jay; Dorfman, Jennifer H.; Braham, Rebecca A.

    2004-01-01

    To identify if lower extremity malalignments were associated with increased propensity of a history of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures in males and females using a case control design. Twenty subjects (10 males, 10 females) had a history of ACL injury and twenty (10 males, 10 females) had no history of ACL injury. Subjects were assessed for navicular drop, quadriceps angle, pelvic tilt, hip internal and external rotation range of motion, and true and apparent leg length discrepancies. Statistical analysis was performed to identify differences in these measures in regard to injury history and gender, and to identify if any of these measures were predictive of ACL injury history. Increased navicular drop and anterior pelvic tilt were found to be statistically significant predictors of ACL injury history regardless of gender. Limbs that had previously suffered ACL ruptures were found to have increased navicular drop and anterior pelvic tilt compared to uninjured limbs. Based on the results of this retrospective study, the lower extremity malalignments examined do not appear to predispose females to tearing their ACLs more than males. Key Points Hyperpronation and greater anterior pelvic tilt were the two malalignments most associated with history of ACL injury. Females had larger quadriceps angles than males, but this measure was not significantly related to ACL injury history. Not all structural differences between genders help explain the increased risk of ACL injuries in female athletes. PMID:24624006

  19. Enhanced Bone-Tendon-Bone Approach for Open Anterior Cruciate Ligament Replacement With Conservation of the Joint Capsule

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Sebastian Gottfried; Thomas, Tom Sascha; Tafuro, Luca; Thomas, Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopic procedures for ruptured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are a common standard. However, there are strong alternatives to this standard. The purpose of this study is to present a precise, fast, and minimally invasive but open procedure for reconstruction of the ruptured ACL. The torn ACL is substituted by a widely used bone–patellar tendon–bone (BPTB) autograft. After the BPTB graft has been harvested, the Hoffa body is exposed and mobilized ventrally. The surgeon then has a free view of the remnants of the torn ACL, which are to be removed completely. Through the tibial and femoral footprints of the ACL, a tunnel is drilled under a direct view, thus ensuring optimal anatomic positioning of the BPTB graft. The described approach is simple in handling and advantageous because all steps are performed under a direct view, which improves overall precision and intraoperative functional control. PMID:26900562

  20. Femoral Condyle Fracture during Revision of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Case Report and a Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Keyhani, Sohrab; Vaziri, Arash Sharafat; shafiei, Hossein; Mardani-Kivi, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    A rare and devastating complication following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) revision reconstruction is femoral fracture. A 35-year old male soccer player with a history of ACL tear from one year ago, who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction and functioned well until another similar injury caused ACL re-rupture. Revision of ACL reconstruction was performed and after failure of graft tension during the pumping, a fluoroscopic assessment showed a femoral condyle fracture. The patient referred to our knee clinic and was operated on in two stages first fixation of the fracture and then ACL re-revision after fracture healing was complete. Not inserting multiple guide pins, keeping a safe distance from the posterior cortex and giving more attention during graft tensioning, especially in revision surgeries, are all small points that can reduce the risk of fracture during the revision of ACL reconstruction. PMID:26110183

  1. Ligament-muscle reflex arc after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: electromyographic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Biedert, R M; Zwick, E B

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a ligament-muscle reflex arc exists between the bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and the hamstring muscle group. We studied four patients, average age 34.2 years (range 32-36 years). The mean time between the ACL reconstruction and the study examination was 56.2 months (range 5-108 months). All patients underwent a second-look arthroscopy for meniscal injuries, cyclops lesions, or adhesions. Five patients with a normal ACL served as a control group before we performed an arthroscopic meniscectomy. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was measured using fine wire electrodes under two different testing conditions. No unequivocal EMG activity could be detected in the ACL-reconstructed knees when we pulled on the graft or in the controls. Three of four patients and all controls felt pain when we touched the graft or normal ACL or applied strain on it with the hook. In conclusion, the ACL autograft presents a noxious sensory innervation, the Lachman test maneuver stimulates a reflex arc with hamstrings activation, and an unequivocal ligament-muscle reflex arc from the graft to the hamstring muscle group could not be demonstrated. PMID:9833113

  2. Pre-tibial synovial cyst after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: case report.

    PubMed

    Bulisani, Luís Eduardo Pedigoni; Bulisani, Erickson

    2014-01-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament has been modernized through new surgical techniques and new materials. When tibial fixation is performed using an absorbable screw, complications may occur, such as formation of a pre-tibial cyst. The case described here is about a patient who presented an anteromedial synovial cyst in his right knee, three years after having undergone ACL reconstruction. The patient did not present any pain nor any complaints other than a mass that progressively increased in size, worsened after physical activities. Imaging examinations were requested: simple radiography of the knee and magnetic resonance. Anteromedial imaging of the knee showed a mass with well-delimited borders and internal fluid content, suggestive of a synovial cyst, with communication with the joint cavity through the tibial tunnel, without presenting enlargement or absorption of the bone tunnel. The cyst was surgically resected and the tibial tunnel occlusion was performed using a bone plug. The diagnosis of a synovial cyst was subsequently confirmed through the results from the anatomopathological examination. The patient presented good clinical evolution, with disappearance of the symptoms and a return to physical activities. PMID:26229880

  3. [Peculiarities of early rehabilitation of mountain ski athletes after plastic reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament].

    PubMed

    Sidorenko, E V; Preobrazhenskiĭ, V Iu; Vnukov, D V; Preobrazhenskaia, M V

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective of the present study was to estimate the effectiveness of the new methods of physical rehabilitation for mountain ski athletes designed to optimize and accelerate restoration of their professional capabilities after arthroscopic plastic reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). This open controlled prospective study involved 26 alpine skiers aged from 18 to 25 who were recruited into the regular follow up program based at our Centre during the last 3 years. The athletes proved able to start balance training on the Biodex platform 4 weeks earlier than with the use of the conventional approach. These exercises were supplemented by the training of speed endurance on the Speed Courte tensor platform and Sky Teck ski simulators. Control studies were carried out on the 16th and 24th weeks of the rehabilitation period. Their results were compared with the results shown by the same athletes before injury. It was found that the early introduction of exercises designed to normalize proprioception into the rehabilitative treatment allowed the injured mountain ski athletes to restore the strength of femoral muscles and specific professional skills by the 4th month of the rehabilitation period. It is concluded that the combination of classical rehabilitative techniques with balance training, Speed Court training, and training on the alpine ski simulator makes it possible to begin special of alpine ski training on the snow 2 months earlier than with the use of conventkional methods.

  4. A Simple Radiographic Sign of Vertical Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tunnel Placement.

    PubMed

    Farrow, Lutul Dashaun; Morris, Parisa M; Huston, Kellen L; Hall, Evan Tyler; Kaar, Scott

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe a novel radiographic sign indicative of vertical tunnel placement following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. We reviewed 190 consecutive ACL reconstructions. Operative records, patient charts, arthroscopic images, and preoperative and postoperative orthogonal plain radiographic images were reviewed. We made special note of the operative technique. Note was made of tunnel position and whether the posterior (proximal) aspect of Blumensaat line was violated on standard lateral knee radiographic images. Of 190 patients, 17 patients did not have postoperative imaging and were excluded. Of the 173 remaining knees, 163 were primary ACL reconstructions and 10 were revision ACL reconstructions. We found that no anatomically placed ACL femoral tunnel violated Blumensaat line. In all revision cases exhibiting violation of Blumensaat line, a new femoral tunnel was able to be drilled while completely avoiding the previously placed, nonanatomic ACL femoral tunnel. The principal findings of our study demonstrate that violation of Blumensaat line following ACL reconstruction is an indicator of vertical, nonanatomic femoral tunnel placement. Furthermore, presence of this radiographic sign indicates that an anatomically placed femoral tunnel may be drilled while completely avoiding the existing femoral tunnel during cases of revision ACL reconstruction.

  5. Snow skiing combined anterior cruciate ligament/medial collateral ligament disruptions.

    PubMed

    Barber, F A

    1994-02-01

    Recent reports indicate that combined anterior cruciate ligament/medial collateral ligament (ACL/MCL) knee injuries are usually associated with a lateral meniscus tear. In our center, snow skiing is the athletic activity most frequently associated with this double-ligament injury complex. A sports-specific analysis was undertaken to evaluate the hypothesis that the snow skiing ligament injury is different from similar injuries caused by other athletic activities. Of a total of 64 acute arthroscopically confirmed tears of both the MCL and ACL, 23 were caused by snow skiing and 41 by nonskiing activities. There were fewer lateral meniscus tears in skiers (43%) when compared with the nonskiers (88%). Skiers also had fewer medial meniscus tears (13%) than did nonskiers (37%). No medial meniscus tears occurred in the absence of a lateral meniscus tear. Although 78% of the skiers were women, only 12% of the nonskiers were women. Skiers were older (average age 35 years) than the nonskiers (average age 28 years). The right knee was injured almost twice as frequently as the left. These data suggest that the double (ACL/MCL) ligament injury in skiers might be distinctly different from that in nonskiers.

  6. Pre-tibial synovial cyst after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: case report.

    PubMed

    Bulisani, Luís Eduardo Pedigoni; Bulisani, Erickson

    2014-01-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament has been modernized through new surgical techniques and new materials. When tibial fixation is performed using an absorbable screw, complications may occur, such as formation of a pre-tibial cyst. The case described here is about a patient who presented an anteromedial synovial cyst in his right knee, three years after having undergone ACL reconstruction. The patient did not present any pain nor any complaints other than a mass that progressively increased in size, worsened after physical activities. Imaging examinations were requested: simple radiography of the knee and magnetic resonance. Anteromedial imaging of the knee showed a mass with well-delimited borders and internal fluid content, suggestive of a synovial cyst, with communication with the joint cavity through the tibial tunnel, without presenting enlargement or absorption of the bone tunnel. The cyst was surgically resected and the tibial tunnel occlusion was performed using a bone plug. The diagnosis of a synovial cyst was subsequently confirmed through the results from the anatomopathological examination. The patient presented good clinical evolution, with disappearance of the symptoms and a return to physical activities.

  7. Knee extension and flexion: MR delineation of normal and torn anterior cruciate ligaments

    SciTech Connect

    Niitsu, Mamoru; Ikeda, Kotaroh; Fukubayashi, Tohru; Anno, Izumi; Itai, Yuji

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to assess the effect of joint position of semiflexed and extended knees in MR delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). With a mobile knee brace and a flexible surface coil, the knee joint was either fully extended or bent to a semiflexed position (average 45{degrees} of flexion) within the magnet bore. Sets of oblique sagittal MR images were obtained for both extended and flexed knee positions. Thirty-two knees with intact ACLs and 43 knees with arthroscopically proven ACL tears were evaluated. Two observers compared paired MR images of both extended and flexed positions and rated them by a relative three point scale. Anatomic correlation in MR images was obtained by a cadaveric knee with incremental flexion. The MR images of flexed knees were more useful than of extended knees in 53% of the case reviews of femoral attachments and 36% of reviews of midportions of normal ACLs. Compared with knee extensions, the MR images for knee flexion provided better clarity in 48% of reviews of disrupted sites and 52% of residual bundles of torn ACLs. Normal ACL appeared taut in the knee extension and lax in semiflexion. Compared with MR images of knees in extension, MR images of knees in flexion more clearly delineate the femoral side of the ligament with wider space under the intercondylar roof and with decreased volume-averaging artifacts, providing superior visualization of normal and torn ACLs. 13 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  8. [Anterior cruciate ligament-plasty using the "U-dos" technique].

    PubMed

    Morales-Trevizo, C; Paz-García, M; Leal-Berumen, I; Leal-Contreras, C; Berumen-Nafarrate, E

    2013-01-01

    The knee is a compound diarthrodial joint, vulnerable to serious injuries such as ligament injuries of: medial collateral ligament, lateral collateral ligament, anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament, as cruciate ligaments limit rotation movement in the joint. The purpose of our study was to create a new technique to treat injuries of the anterior cruciate ligament, which is composed of two bundles--anteromedial and posterolateral--trying to achieve an anatomical reconstruction that allows for a normal biomechanical recovery. This technique reduces the use of fixation material and costs. The diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament injuries was made with the pivot shift test. There are currently two repair methods for anterior cruciate ligament injuries: single bundle or double bundle repair; none of these techniques is considered as the gold standard, as their results are very similar. This paper describes a technique used for the treatment of anterior cruciate ligament injuries, known as "U-dos", and its clinical results. Cross-sectional, observational study that enrolled 20 patients with total anterior cruciate ligament injuries who underwent anterior cruciate ligament plasty using the "U-dos" technique between June 2009 and June 2010. The technique requires the use of bone bank allograft, in this case of the anterior tibial ligament. Patients were assessed using the Lysholm scale and the pivot shift test. Our results show that all the pivot shift tests were negative and assessments according to the Lysholm scale were from normal to excellent in 95% of cases (19/20). Only one failure was reported, with avulsion of the graft attachment which required a surgical intervention.

  9. Outcome of double bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using crosspin and aperture fixation

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Deepak; Jain, Vineet; Goyal, Ankit; Bahl, Vibhu; Modi, Prashant; Chaudhary, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    Background: Double bundle anterior cruciate ligament (DBACL) reconstruction is said to reproduce the native anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) anatomy better than single bundle anterior cruciate ligament, whether it leads to better functional results is debatable. Different fixation methods have been used for DBACL reconstruction, the most common being aperture fixation on tibial side and cortical suspensory fixation on the femoral side. We present the results of DBACL reconstruction technique, wherein on the femoral side anteromedial (AM) bundle is fixed with a crosspin and aperture fixation was done for the posterolateral (PL) bundle. Materials and Methods: Out of 157 isolated ACL injury patients who underwent ACL reconstruction, 100 were included in the prospective study. Arthroscopic DBACL reconstruction was done using ipsilateral hamstring autograft. AM bundle was fixed using Transfix (Arthrex, Naples, FL, USA) on the femoral side and bio interference screw (Arthrex, Naples, FL, USA) on the tibial side. PL bundle was fixed on femoral as well as on tibial side with a biointerference screw. Patients were evaluated using KT-1000 arthrometer, Lysholm score, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Score and isokinetic muscle strength testing. Methods: Out of 157 isolated ACL injury patients who underwent ACL reconstruction, 100 were included in the prospective study. Arthroscopic DBACL reconstruction was done using ipsilateral hamstring autograft. AM bundle was fixed using Transfix (Arthrex, Naples, FL, USA) on the femoral side and bio interference screw (Arthrex, Naples, FL, USA) on the tibial side. PL bundle was fixed on femoral as well as on tibial side with a biointerference screw. Patients were evaluated using KT-1000 arthrometer, Lysholm score, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Score and isokinetic muscle strength testing. Results: The KT-1000 results were evaluated using paired t test with the P value set at 0.001. At the end of 1

  10. A Comparison of Anterior and Posterior Cruciate Ligament Laxity Between Female and Male Basketball Players.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weesner, Carol L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament laxity of 90 uninjured male and female high school players were measured. No significant differences were found, indicating that the greater female injury rate may be due to inadequate conditioning, not greater knee ligament laxity. (Author/MT)

  11. Noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injuries: risk factors and prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Griffin, L Y; Agel, J; Albohm, M J; Arendt, E A; Dick, R W; Garrett, W E; Garrick, J G; Hewett, T E; Huston, L; Ireland, M L; Johnson, R J; Kibler, W B; Lephart, S; Lewis, J L; Lindenfeld, T N; Mandelbaum, B R; Marchak, P; Teitz, C C; Wojtys, E M

    2000-01-01

    An estimated 80,000 anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears occur annually in the United States. The highest incidence is in individuals 15 to 25 years old who participate in pivoting sports. With an estimated cost for these injuries of almost a billion dollars per year, the ability to identify risk factors and develop prevention strategies has widespread health and fiscal importance. Seventy percent of ACL injuries occur in noncontact situations. The risk factors for non-contact ACL injuries fall into four distinct categories: environmental, anatomic, hormonal, and biomechanical. Early data on existing neuromuscular training programs suggest that enhancing body control may decrease ACL injuries in women. Further investigation is needed prior to instituting prevention programs related to the other risk factors.

  12. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries in the female athlete.

    PubMed

    Toth, A P; Cordasco, F A

    2001-01-01

    With the participation of women in athletics growing rapidly over the last two decades, a disturbing gender-specific pre-disposition has emerged regarding anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries of the knee. Female athletes have a two- to eightfold higher incidence of ACL injury than their male counterparts. It is estimated that 38,000 women sustain ACL tears per year. The majority of ACL injuries in female athletes occur through noncontact mechanisms, most often during deceleration activities, such as landing from a jump or cutting. The risk factors for noncontact ACL injuries can be categorized as intrinsic (anatomic and hormonal) and extrinsic (environmental and biomechanical). This article will discuss these risk factors that are thought to contribute to the higher incidence of ACL injuries in women, the development of prevention strategies, and the outcomes of ACL reconstruction in women.

  13. Anterior cruciate ligament and medial collateral ligament injuries.

    PubMed

    Bollier, Matthew; Smith, Patrick A

    2014-10-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of combined anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and medial collateral ligament (MCL) injuries have evolved over the past 30 years. A detailed physical examination along with careful review of the magnetic resonance imaging and stress radiographs will guide decision making. Early ACL reconstruction and acute MCL repair are recommended when there is increased medial joint space opening with valgus stress in extension, a significant meniscotibial deep MCL injury (high-riding medial meniscus), or a displaced tibial-sided superficial MCL avulsion (stener lesion of the knee). Delayed ACL reconstruction to allow for MCL healing is advised when increased valgus laxity is present only at 30 degrees of flexion and not at 0 degree. However, at the time of ACL surgery, medial stability has to be re-assessed after the reconstruction is completed. In patients with neutral alignment in the chronic setting, graft reconstruction of both the ACL and MCL is recommended.

  14. Anterior cruciate ligament tear prevention in the female athlete.

    PubMed

    Silvers, Holly J; Giza, Eric R; Mandelbaum, Bert R

    2005-12-01

    This paper examines the effectiveness of implementing neuromuscular and proprioceptive training programs in female athletes and their ability to decrease the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. The relationship of sex, age, and training on the incidence of ACL injury is pivotal in developing a comprehensive neuromuscular and proprioceptive training program to decrease ACL injuries occurring in female athletes. Based on the 2-year results, ACL incidence has remained consistently lower in the intervention group versus the control group. A prophylactic neuromuscular and proprioceptive training program may have a direct benefit in decreasing the number of ACL injuries incurred by female athletes. This research foundation endorses further epidemiologic and biomechanic studies to determine the exact mechanism of ACL injury and the most effective intervention that will effectively decrease ACL injuries in this high-risk population. PMID:16282037

  15. Current Trends in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Review.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Agarwal, Amit Kumar; Ingole, Sachin; Vijay, Vipul

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is an accepted and established surgical technique for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries and is now being practiced across the globe in increasing numbers. Although most patients get good to excellent results in the short-term after ACLR, its consequences in the long-term in prevention or acceleration of knee osteoarthritis (OA) are not yet well-defined. Still, there are many debatable issues related to ACLR, such as the appropriate timing of surgery, graft selection, fixation methods of the graft, operative techniques, rehabilitation after surgery, and healing augmentation techniques. Most surgeons prefer not to wait long after an ACL injury to do an ACLR, as delayed reconstruction is associated with secondary damages to the intra- and periarticular structures of the knee. Autografts are the preferred choice of graft in primary ACLR, and hamstring tendons are the most popular amongst surgeons. Single bundle ACLR is being practiced by the majority, but double bundle ACLR is getting popular due to its theoretical advantage of providing more anatomical reconstruction. A preferred construct is the interference fixation (Bio-screw) at the tibial site and the suspensory method of fixation at the femoral site. In a single bundle hamstring graft, a transportal approach for creating a femoral tunnel has recently become more popular than the trans-tibial technique. Various healing augmentation techniques, including the platelet rich plasma (PRP), have been tried after ACLR, but there is still no conclusive proof of their efficacy. Accelerated rehabilitation is seemingly more accepted immediately after ACLR. PMID:26697280

  16. Characteristics of anterior cruciate ligament injuries in Australian football.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, Jodie L; Lloyd, David G; Buttfield, Alec; Seward, Hugh; McGivern, Jeanne

    2007-04-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are the most costly injuries in football at both professional and amateur levels (Orchard J, Seward H, McGivern J, Hood S. Intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors for anterior cruciate ligament injury in Australian footballers. Am J Sports Med 2001;29:196-200.). In this study video analysis of 34 ACL injuries in Australian football was performed to investigate the causes of these injuries. Factors that may have contributed to the cause of the injury were analysed, rated and reported. The factors analysed were: type of manoeuvre, direction the knee 'gave way', running speed, knee angle, cutting angle and if the player was accelerating or decelerating. The majority of the injuries analysed occurred in non-contact situations (56%). Of these 37% occurred during sidestepping manoeuvres, 32% in landing, 16% land and step, 10% stopping/slowing and 5% crossover cut manoeuvres. Ninety-two percent of the non-contact injuries occurred at extended knee angles of 30 degrees or less, which is also commonly known to place stress on the ACL and reduce the protective role of hamstrings. Over half (54%) of non-contact injuries occurred whilst decelerating. It would be expected that greater speed and angle cut too would increase the frequency of ACL injury. The results could not confirm this with most injuries occurring at running speeds of slow jogging to running and equal number of injuries occurred at cutting to angles of the ranges 15-45 degrees and 45-75 degrees. These results give greater understanding into potential causes or contributors of ACL injury and information to assist in the development of knee injury prevention programs. PMID:16807104

  17. Two-Stage Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Brandon J; Cvetanovich, Gregory; Waliullah, Khalid; Khair, Michael; Smith, Patrick; Bach, Bernard; Sherman, Seth

    2016-05-01

    The number of primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears is rapidly increasing. In patients who wish to return to their preoperative level of function, specifically as it pertains to participation in sports, the gold standard of treatment following an ACL tear remains an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Despite a majority of good/excellent results following primary ACL reconstruction, there is a growing subset of patients with persistent or recurrent functional instability who require revision ACL reconstruction. Preoperative planning for revision ACL reconstruction requires a careful understanding of the root cause of ACL failure, including possible technical causes of primary ACL failure and the presence of combined knee pathology that was not addressed at the index ACL reconstruction. The decision to perform 2-stage revision ACL reconstruction is multifactorial and is reached by technical considerations that may make a 1-stage revision less optimal, including tunnel widening, arthrofibrosis, active infection, and others. Concomitant knee pathology such as meniscal deficiency, malalignment (including an increase in posterior tibial slope), chondral lesions, and other ligamentous laxity may also require a staged approach to treatment. This evidence-based review covers the indications for 2-stage revision ACL reconstruction, surgical techniques, evidence for and technique of bone grafting prior ACL tunnels, and outcomes of 2-stage revision stratified by initial cause of ACL reconstruction failure. With proper preoperative planning and an understanding of the cause of failure following the primary ACL reconstruction, revision ACL reconstruction can offer excellent outcomes in the motivated patient. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e456-e464.]. PMID:27045480

  18. Current Trends in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Ingole, Sachin; Vijay, Vipul

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is an accepted and established surgical technique for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries and is now being practiced across the globe in increasing numbers. Although most patients get good to excellent results in the short-term after ACLR, its consequences in the long-term in prevention or acceleration of knee osteoarthritis (OA) are not yet well-defined. Still, there are many debatable issues related to ACLR, such as the appropriate timing of surgery, graft selection, fixation methods of the graft, operative techniques, rehabilitation after surgery, and healing augmentation techniques. Most surgeons prefer not to wait long after an ACL injury to do an ACLR, as delayed reconstruction is associated with secondary damages to the intra- and periarticular structures of the knee. Autografts are the preferred choice of graft in primary ACLR, and hamstring tendons are the most popular amongst surgeons. Single bundle ACLR is being practiced by the majority, but double bundle ACLR is getting popular due to its theoretical advantage of providing more anatomical reconstruction. A preferred construct is the interference fixation (Bio-screw) at the tibial site and the suspensory method of fixation at the femoral site. In a single bundle hamstring graft, a transportal approach for creating a femoral tunnel has recently become more popular than the trans-tibial technique. Various healing augmentation techniques, including the platelet rich plasma (PRP), have been tried after ACLR, but there is still no conclusive proof of their efficacy. Accelerated rehabilitation is seemingly more accepted immediately after ACLR. PMID:26697280

  19. Gait patterns before and after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Zsolt; Kocsis, László; Kiss, Rita M

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine how selected gait parameters may change as a result of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency and following ACL reconstruction. The study was performed on 25 ACL-deficient subjects prior to and 6 weeks, 4 months, 8 months and 12 months after ACL reconstructive surgery by the bone-patellar tendon-bone technique. Gait analysis was performed using the zebris three-dimensional ultrasound-based system with surface electromyograph (zebris Medizintechnik GmbH, Germany). Kinematic data were recorded for the lower limb. The muscles examined include vastus lateralis and medialis, biceps femoris and adductor longus. The results obtained from the injured subjects were compared with those of 51 individuals without ACL damage. The acute ACL-deficient patients exhibited a quadriceps avoidance pattern prior to and 6 weeks after surgery. The quadriceps avoidance phenomenon does not develop in chronic ACL-deficient patients. In the individuals operated on, the spatial-temporal parameters and the knee angle had already regained a normal pattern for the ACL-deficient limb during gait 4 months after surgery. However, the relative ACL movement parameter-which describes the tibial translation into the direction of ACL-and the EMG traces show no significant statistical difference compared with the values of healthy control group just 8 months after surgery. The results suggest that: (1) development of a quadriceps avoidance pattern is less common than previously reported, (2) anterior cruciate ligament deficiency and reconstruction significantly alter the lower extremity gait pattern, (3) the gait parameters shift towards the normal value pattern, and (4) the re-establishment of pre-injury gait patterns--including the normal biphase of muscles--takes at least 8 months to occur.

  20. Iliotibial band irritation caused by the EndoButton after anatomic double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Taketomi, Shuji; Inui, Hiroshi; Hirota, Jinso; Nakamura, Kensuke; Sanada, Takaki; Masuda, Hironari; Tanaka, Sakae; Nakagawa, Takumi

    2013-08-01

    Two patients underwent arthroscopic anatomic double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using the EndoButton for femoral fixation. The femoral tunnels were created by the inside-out technique through a far anteromedial portal. The patients postoperatively developed moderate lateral knee pain without instability. At the second-look arthroscopic evaluation, the two EndoButtons were removed. Both patients were completely asymptomatic several months after implant removal, implying that the EndoButtons caused the mechanical irritation in the iliotibial band. This is the first report describing removal of EndoButtons because of pain caused by friction with the iliotibial band. In anatomic ACL reconstruction, if the femoral tunnel exit is positioned near the lateral femoral epicondyle, care should be taken to prevent iliotibial band friction syndrome that could result because of the EndoButton.

  1. Preparing a female collegiate athlete for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Leech, Edward

    2003-01-01

    An anterior cruciate ligament injury is common among athletes involved in sports where cutting or sudden changes of position occur. This is a case study of a female collegiate athlete who sustained an anterior cruciate ligament injury, with a small meniscus tear, and decides on a course of surgery. Questions she has about the initial injury, as well as subsequent questions concerning reconstructive surgery using a patellar graft and the course of rehabilitation, are answered. A chart of her rehabilitation protocol is provided.

  2. Treatment of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries by Major League Soccer Team Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Farber, Joseph; Harris, Joshua D.; Kolstad, Kaare; McCulloch, Patrick C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The treatment and rehabilitation procedures of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in elite soccer players are controversial. Points of debate include surgical timing, technique, graft choice, rehabilitation, and return-to-sport criteria and timing. Purpose: To identify practice preferences among current Major League Soccer (MLS) team orthopaedic surgeons for ACL injuries. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: The survey was administered at the MLS team physician annual meeting in January 2013. At least 1 orthopaedic surgeon representative from each of the 19 clubs (16 from the United States, 3 from Canada) was in attendance. Teams with more than 1 affiliated orthopaedic surgeon were given an additional survey to be completed either at the meeting or returned via e-mail. Descriptive statistics, Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney (return-to-play parameters, running, and ball drills), and Fisher exact tests (graft selection, bracing, continuous passive motion) were applied to the various data sets from the survey responses. Results: A 100% survey participation rate was achieved (22 team orthopaedic surgeons representing 19 MLS teams). A single-incision, arthroscopically assisted, single-bundle reconstruction was the most common technique (91%). Surgeons were split regarding femoral tunnel drilling (50% transtibial, 46% accessory medial). Autograft bone–patellar tendon–bone (BPTB) was the most common preferred graft choice (68%). The biggest concerns about BPTB autograft and hamstring autograft were anterior knee pain (76%) and hamstring weakness (46%), respectively. Most surgeons did not recommend postoperative continuous passive motion (64%) or functional bracing (68%). Most surgeons permitted return to sport without restrictions at 6 to 8 months following surgery (82%). Surgeons who routinely used functional bracing after ACL surgery more frequently used hamstring autograft than those who used BPTB autograft (P = .04

  3. Anterior Tibial Translation in Collegiate Athletes with Normal Anterior Cruciate Ligament Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Rosene, John M.; Fogarty, Tracey D.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To examine differences in anterior tibial translation (ATT) among sports, sex, and leg dominance in collegiate athletes with normal anterior cruciate ligament integrity. Design and Setting: Subjects from various athletic teams were measured for ATT in right and left knees. Subjects: Sixty subjects were measured for ATT with a KT-1000 knee arthrometer. Measurements: Statistical analyses were computed for each sex and included a 2 × 3 × 4 mixed-factorial analysis of variance (ANOVA) for anterior cruciate ligament displacement, right and left sides, and force and sport. A 2 × 2 × 3 mixed-factorial ANOVA was computed to compare means for sex and force. A 2 × 3 mixed-factorial ANOVA was computed to compare sex differences across 3 forces. Results: For males and females, no significant interactions were found among leg, force, and sport for mean ATT, for leg and sport or leg and force, or for translation values between dominant and nondominant legs. Males had a significant interaction for force and sport, and a significant difference was found for side of body, since the right side had less translation than the left side. Females had greater ATT than males at all forces. Conclusions: Sex differences exist for ATT, and differences in ATT exist among sports for both sexes. Differences between the right and left sides of the body should be expected when making comparisons of ligamentous laxity. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 3.Figure 5. PMID:16558565

  4. Results of the surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Zelić, Zoran; Jovanović, Savo; Wertheimer, Vjekoslav; Sarić, Gordan; Biuk, Egon; Gulan, Gordan

    2012-03-01

    Results of the surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), using as a graft fourfold hamstring tendons (gracilis and semitendinosus) and middle third of the patellar ligament, were compared. In all patients that were participating in this study clinical examination and magnetic resonance showed ACL rupture, and apart from the choice of the graft, surgical technique was identical. We evaluated 112 patients with implemented patellar ligament graft and fourfold hamstring tendons graft six months after the procedure. Both groups were similar according to age, sex, activity level, knee instability level and rehabilitation program. The results showed that there was no significant difference between groups regarding Lysholm Knee score, IKDC 2000 score, activity level, musculature hypotrophy, and knee joint stability 6 months after the surgery. Anterior knee pain incidence is significantly higher in the group with patellar ligament graft (44% vs. 21%). Both groups had a significant musculature hypotrophy of the upper leg of the knee joint that was surgically treated, six months after the procedure. Both grafts showed good subjective and objective results.

  5. Arthroscopic fixation of an avulsion fracture of the tibia involving the posterior cruciate ligament: a modified technique in a series of 22 cases.

    PubMed

    Chen, L B; Wang, H; Tie, K; Mohammed, A; Qi, Y J

    2015-09-01

    A total of 22 patients with a tibial avulsion fracture involving the insertion of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) with grade II or III posterior laxity were reduced and fixed arthroscopically using routine anterior and double posteromedial portals. A double-strand Ethibond suture was inserted into the joint and wrapped around the PCL from anterior to posterior to secure the ligament above the avulsed bony fragment. Two tibial bone tunnels were created using the PCL reconstruction guide, aiming at the medial and lateral borders of the tibial bed. The ends of the suture were pulled out through the bone tunnels and tied over the tibial cortex between the openings of the tunnels to reduce and secure the bony fragment. Satisfactory reduction of the fracture was checked arthroscopically and radiographically. The patients were followed-up for a mean of 24.5 months (19 to 28). Bone union occurred six weeks post-operatively. At final follow-up, all patients had a negative posterior drawer test and a full range of movement. KT-1000 arthrometer examination showed that the mean post-operative side-to-side difference improved from 10.9 mm (standard deviation (sd) 0.7) pre-operatively to 1.5 mm (sd 0.6) (p = 0.001). The mean Tegner and the International Knee Documentation Committee scores improved significantly (p = 0.001). The mean Lysholm score at final follow-up was 92.0 (85 to 96). We conclude that this technique is convenient, reliable and minimally invasive and successfully restores the stability and function of the knee.

  6. Type III tibial avulsion fracture with associated anterior cruciate ligament injury: Report of two cases in adults.

    PubMed

    Levy, H J; Fowble, V A

    2001-05-01

    Tibial spine avulsion fractures are more common in children than adults. Many reports have provided classification and treatment options, including fixation for displaced type III fractures. However, long-term follow-up on injury to the anterior cruciate ligament and knee joint stability in adults is not well documented. We present 2 cases of type III tibial avulsion fractures in adults with associated interstitial injury to the anterior cruciate ligament. Primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction was performed in both patients.

  7. Arthroscopic Conjoint Tendon Transfer: A Technique for Revision Anterior Shoulder Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Tennent, Duncan; Colaço, Henry B; Arnander, Magnus; Pearse, Eyiyemi

    2016-02-01

    Revision anterior stabilization of the shoulder presents a challenge to the surgeon and carries a higher risk of recurrent dislocation than primary repair. The Latarjet procedure may be more reliable than revision soft-tissue repair but may not be indicated in patients without significant glenoid bone loss. We describe an arthroscopic technique of conjoint tendon transfer using a combination of suspensory and interference screw fixation for patients without significant glenoid bone loss (<15%). The arthroscopic approach to this procedure allows intra-articular visualization to assist in mobilization of the conjoint tendon, accurate bone tunnel placement, and subsequent labral repair. It avoids the additional steps of bone block preparation and the larger portals required for arthroscopic Latarjet techniques, in addition to eliminating potential complications due to coracoid bone block resorption. PMID:27274454

  8. Does bone debris in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction really matter? A cohort study of a protocol for bone debris debridement

    PubMed Central

    Imam, Mohamed A.; Abdelkafy, Ashraf; Dinah, Feroz; Adhikari, Ajeya

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of the current study was to determine whether a systematic five-step protocol for debridement and evacuation of bone debris during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) reduces the presence of such debris on post-operative radiographs. Methods: A five-step protocol for removal of bone debris during arthroscopic assisted ACLR was designed. It was applied to 60 patients undergoing ACLR (Group 1), and high-quality digital radiographs were taken post-operatively in each case to assess for the presence of intra-articular bone debris. A control group of 60 consecutive patients in whom no specific bone debris protocol was applied (Group 2) and their post-operative radiographs were also checked for the presence of intra-articular bone debris. Results: In Group 1, only 15% of post-operative radiographs showed residual bone debris, compared to 69% in Group 2 (p < 0.001). Conclusion: A five-step systematic protocol for bone debris removal during arthroscopic assisted ACLR resulted in a significant decrease in residual bone debris seen on high-quality post-operative radiographs. PMID:27163060

  9. Return to sport following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Feller, Julian; Webster, Kate E

    2013-02-01

    Rates of return to pre-injury sport following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction are less than might be expected from standard outcome measures and there appears to be a rapid decline in sporting participation after two to three years. There are many factors that influence whether an individual will return to sport following this type of surgery. They include not only surgical details and rehabilitation, but also social and psychological factors, as well as demographic characteristics. Age is of particular importance with older patients being less likely to resume their pre-injury sport. It is important that future research clearly identify the pre-injury characteristics of the study cohort when investigating return to sport, and also that there is consistent and precise terminology used to report rates of return to sporting activities. Little is known about how to determine when it is safe to return to sport following ACL reconstruction or how to predict whether an athlete will be able to successfully return to sport. Finally, it needs to be recognised that return to sport following ACL reconstruction is associated with a risk of further injury and the development of osteoarthritis.

  10. Rehabilitation and recovery after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: patients' experiences.

    PubMed

    Heijne, A; Axelsson, K; Werner, S; Biguet, G

    2008-06-01

    The aim was to explore patients' experiences of the rehabilitation process after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Ten participants were enrolled in the study. Semi-structured interviews were performed, focusing on challenges during the post-operative rehabilitation to 1 year after ACL reconstruction. The participants perceived no real choice between operative and non-operative treatment. Only surgery symbolized a full return to the pre-injury level of sports, and surgery was understood as the only way to become a completely restored "functional human being." A major source of frustration was that the meaning of and progress during the rehabilitation did not match their expectations. Three different responses to the challenge of a prolonged rehabilitation were expressed: "going for it,"being ambivalent," and "giving in." Fear of re-injury was common; however, some participants decided not to return to their pre-injury level of sports due to reasons other than physical limitations or fear of re-injury. From a patient perspective, it seems important that the choice of operative or non-operative treatment should be discussed in terms of the meaning and extent of the post-operative rehabilitation and the expected outcomes. There also seems to be a need for more guidance in realistic goal setting and coaching throughout the rehabilitation process.

  11. Anterior cruciate ligament rupture: differences between males and females.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Karen M; Bullock, James Montgomery

    2013-01-01

    The rate of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is three times higher in female athletes than in male athletes. Intrinsic factors such as increased quadriceps angle and increased posterior tibial slope may predispose girls and women to ACL injury. Compared with males, females have smaller notch widths and smaller ACL cross-sectional area; however, no conclusive correlation between ACL size and notch dimension exists, especially in relation to risk of ACL injury. Female athletes who land with the knees in inadequate flexion and in greater-than-normal valgus and external rotation are at increased risk of ACL injury. No conclusive link has been made between ACL injury and the menstrual cycle. Neuromuscular intervention protocols have been shown to reduce the rate of injury in girls and women. Females are more likely than males to have a narrow A-shaped intercondylar notch, and special surgical considerations are required in such cases. Following ACL reconstruction, female athletes are more likely than male athletes to rupture the contralateral ACL; however, males and females are equally likely to rupture the reconstructed knee. Although self-reported outcomes in the first 2 years following reconstruction are worse for females than for males, longer-term studies demonstrate no difference between males and females.

  12. Adolescent Segond fracture with an intact anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Deepak; Alexander, Reginald; Hussain, Waqas M; Leland, J Martin

    2012-07-01

    Segond fractures, or avulsion fractures of the proximal lateral tibial plateau, have been well documented and studied since their original description in 1878. Segond fractures have a widely recognized pathognomonic association with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries and often prompt orthopedic surgeons to consider reconstruction following radiographic and clinical evaluation. Adolescent patients are particularly vulnerable to these fractures due to the relative weakness of their physeal growth plates compared with the strength of their accompanying ligamentous structures. This article describes a case of a 13-year-old boy who sustained a Segond fracture that was not coupled with an ACL avulsion or tear. The patient sustained a twisting injury to his knee. He presented to the emergency room with an effusion and radiographic findings consistent with a Segond fracture. On follow-up examination 1 week after injury, the ACL was intact. The patient was followed for 5 months of conservative treatment. At final follow-up, the patient had reestablished his previous level of activity. This article describes the history, physical examination, and radiographic findings necessary to care for patients who present with a Segond fracture. Although considered pathognomonic for an associated ACL injury, this article describes a Segond fracture that occurred in isolation. PMID:22784911

  13. Anterior cruciate ligament allograft transplantation for intraarticular ligamentous reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Goertzen, M; Dellmann, A; Gruber, J; Clahsen, H; Bürrig, K F

    1992-01-01

    A multiplicity of surgical operations have been developed in an attempt to achieve satisfactory function after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repair. None of these procedures have been able to reproduce the fiber organization anatomy of attachment site, vascularity, or function of the ACL. Twenty-nine foxhounds received a deep-frozen bone-ACL-bone allograft and a ligament augmentation device (LAD). Biomechanical, microvascular, and histological changes were evaluated 3, 6, and 12 months following implantation. The maximum loads of the allograft/LADs were 34.3% (387.2 N) after 3 months, 49.3% (556.6 N) after 6 months, and 61.1% (698.8 N) after a year. The maximum load was 69.1% (780 N). In general, after 6 months the allografts showed normal collagen orientation. The allografts demonstrated no evidence of infection or immune reaction. No bone ingrowth into the LAD was observed. Polarized light microscopy and periodic acid-schiff staining showed that the new bone-ligament substance interface had intact fiber orientation at the area of the ligament insertion. Microvascular examination using the Spalteholtz technique revealed revascularization and the importance of an infrapatellar fat pad for the nourishment of ACL allografts.

  14. Adaptation Strategies of Individuals With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Roper, Jaimie A.; Terza, Matthew J.; Tillman, Mark D.; Hass, Chris J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the strong implications for rehabilitation design, the capability of individuals with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) to adapt and store novel gait patterns have not been well studied. Purpose: To investigate how reconstructive surgery may affect the ability to adapt and store novel gait patterns in persons with ACLR while walking on a split-belt treadmill. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Gait adaptation was compared between 20 participants with ACLR and 20 healthy controls during split-belt treadmill walking. Gait adaptation was assessed in slow- and fast-adapting parameters by (1) the magnitude of symmetry during late adaptation and (2) the amount of the asymmetry during de-adaptation. Results: Healthy individuals adapted a new walking pattern and stored the new walking pattern equally in both the dominant and nondominant limbs. Conversely, individuals with ACLR displayed impairments in both slow-adapting and fast-adapting derived gait adaptation and significant differences in behavior between the reconstructed and uninjured limb. Conclusion: While surgical reconstruction and physical therapy are aimed at improving mechanical stability to the knee, the study data suggest that fundamental features of motor control remain altered. After ACLR, participants display an altered ability to learn and store functional gait patterns. PMID:26894200

  15. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and rehabilitation: predictors of functional outcome

    PubMed Central

    DELLA VILLA, FRANCESCO; RICCI, MARGHERITA; PERDISA, FRANCESCO; FILARDO, GIUSEPPE; GAMBERINI, JACOPO; CAMINATI, DANIELE; DELLA VILLA, STEFANO

    2015-01-01

    Surgical reconstruction of an injured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) leads to full recovery of function and sports activity in a high percentage of cases. The aim of the present study was to analyze variables related to the patient, the surgical technique and the post-surgical rehabilitation methods, seeking to identify predictors of outcome and recovery time after ACL reconstruction. One hundred and four patients (81 M, 23 F) undergoing a step-based rehabilitation protocol after ACL reconstruction were evaluated. 43.2% of them had an isolated ACL lesion, whereas 56.8% had one or more concurrent injuries. Data relating to personal characteristics, surgery and post-operative management were collected and analyzed for correlation. Clinical outcome was evaluated with IKDC subjective score and the Tegner score, and the time to reach full recovery was noted as well. Young patients with a higher pre-injury Tegner activity level or who practice sport at professional level, no concurrent capsular lesions and no postoperative knee bracing had better clinical results and took shorter time to recover. Also, a higher percentage of on-the-field rehabilitation sessions, and absence of significant muscle strength deficits at the first knee isokinetic test emerged as rehabilitation-related factors leading to a better post-surgical outcome. Personal, surgical and rehabilitation factors should be considered in order to optimize patient management and maximize the expected results. Further studies are needed to find the strongest factors in different patients. Level of evidence Level IV, retrospective study. PMID:26904523

  16. Anterior cruciate ligament injury: diagnosis, management, and prevention.

    PubMed

    Cimino, Francesca; Volk, Bradford Scott; Setter, Don

    2010-10-15

    There are an estimated 80,000 to 100,000 anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repairs in the United States each year. Most ACL tears occur from noncontact injuries. Women experience ACL tears up to nine times more often than men. Evaluation of the ACL should be performed immediately after an injury if possible, but is often limited by swelling and pain. When performed properly, a complete knee examination is more than 80 percent sensitive for an ACL injury. The Lachman test is the most accurate test for detecting an ACL tear. Magnetic resonance imaging is the primary study used to diagnose ACL injury in the United States. It can also identify concomitant meniscal injury, collateral ligament tear, and bone contusions. Treatment consists of conservative management or surgical intervention, with the latter being the better option for patients who want to return to a high level of activity. Patients who undergo surgery must commit to appropriate rehabilitation for the best outcome. Long-term sequelae of ACL injury include knee osteoarthritis in up to 90 percent of patients. Primary prevention of ACL injury includes specific proprioceptive and neuromuscular training exercises to improve knee stability.

  17. Management of anterior cruciate ligament injuries in skeletally immature individuals.

    PubMed

    Moksnes, Håvard; Engebretsen, Lars; Risberg, May Arna

    2012-03-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in skeletally immature individuals remain a challenge for the child, the parents, orthopaedic surgeons, and physical therapists. The main challenges are the potential risk of recurrent instability, secondary injuries following nonoperative treatment, and the risks involved with surgical treatment due to the vulnerability of the epiphyseal growth plates. We first present the physiological background for considerations that must be made when advising on treatment alternatives for skeletally immature individuals after ACL injury. The implications of continuous musculoskeletal development for treatment decisions are emphasized. No randomized controlled trials have been performed to investigate outcomes of different treatment algorithms. There is no consensus in the literature on clinical treatment decision criteria for whether a skeletally immature child should undergo transphyseal ACL reconstruction, physeal sparing ACL reconstruction, or nonoperative treatment. Additionally, well-described rehabilitation programs designed for either nonoperative treatment or postoperative rehabilitation have not been published. Based on the currently available evidence, we propose a treatment algorithm for the management of ACL injuries in skeletally immature individuals. Finally, we suggest directions for future prospective studies, which should include development of valid and reliable outcome measures and specific rehabilitation programs. PMID:21891880

  18. Anterior cruciate ligament allograft transplantation for intraarticular ligamentous reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Goertzen, M; Dellmann, A; Gruber, J; Clahsen, H; Bürrig, K F

    1992-01-01

    A multiplicity of surgical operations have been developed in an attempt to achieve satisfactory function after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repair. None of these procedures have been able to reproduce the fiber organization anatomy of attachment site, vascularity, or function of the ACL. Twenty-nine foxhounds received a deep-frozen bone-ACL-bone allograft and a ligament augmentation device (LAD). Biomechanical, microvascular, and histological changes were evaluated 3, 6, and 12 months following implantation. The maximum loads of the allograft/LADs were 34.3% (387.2 N) after 3 months, 49.3% (556.6 N) after 6 months, and 61.1% (698.8 N) after a year. The maximum load was 69.1% (780 N). In general, after 6 months the allografts showed normal collagen orientation. The allografts demonstrated no evidence of infection or immune reaction. No bone ingrowth into the LAD was observed. Polarized light microscopy and periodic acid-schiff staining showed that the new bone-ligament substance interface had intact fiber orientation at the area of the ligament insertion. Microvascular examination using the Spalteholtz technique revealed revascularization and the importance of an infrapatellar fat pad for the nourishment of ACL allografts. PMID:1389780

  19. Ring-shaped lateral meniscus with hypoplasic anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Esteves, Cátia; Castro, Ricardo; Cadilha, Rui; Raposo, Frederico; Melão, Lina

    2015-12-01

    Knee joint lesions can be solitary or occur concomitantly with other lower limb abnormalities. Ring-shaped lateral meniscus (RSM) and hypoplasic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are two rare malformations. The therapeutic management of such abnormalities is not consensual, and highly depends on clinical symptomatology. We report a case of a 25-year-old girl with progressive knee pain whose MRI demonstrated a continuous segment of lateral meniscus situated along the medial aspect of the lateral compartment, continuous with the otherwise normal-appearing lateral meniscus, compatible with an RSM. This anatomic variant can be mistaken by a displaced meniscal fragment, like a bucket-handle tear, a central tear of a discoid meniscus, or incomplete discoid meniscus, as previously reported. Her MRI examination also showed a thinned ACL with anomalous lateral course. This abnormality may be mistaken for an ACL rupture and/or a meniscofemoral ligament with agenesis of ACL. Multiple images in different planes as well as following the course of meniscal and ligaments are critical clues to avoid misdiagnosis. As a result, the diagnosis of an RSM along with hypoplasic ACL with abnormal attachment was assumed based on MRI and confirmed during arthroscopy. The patient was treated conservatively with clinical outcome improvement.

  20. Patellar tendon or hamstring graft anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions in patients aged above 50 years

    PubMed Central

    Bali, Tarun; Nagraj, Raghu; Kumar, Malhar N; Chandy, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background: The treatment of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury consists of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon or hamstring graft. Satisfactory results have been reported so far in the younger age group. Dilemma arises regarding the suitability of ACL reconstruction in patients aged 50 years and above. This retrospective analyses the outcome of ACL reconstruction in patients aged 50 years and above. Materials and Methods: 55 patients aged 50 years and above presented to our institution with symptomatic ACL tear and were managed with arthroscopic reconstruction with patellar tendon/hamstring graft. 22 patients underwent ACL reconstruction with bone- patellar tendon-bone graft and the remaining 33 with a hamstring graft. Evaluation of functional outcome was performed using International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) and Lysholm scoring in the preoperative period, at the end of 1 year and at the final followup. Radiographic evaluation was performed using the Kellgren–Lawrence grading system. Results: The mean preoperative IKDC score was 39.7 ± 3.3. At the end of 1-year following the operation, the mean IKDC score was 73.6 ± 4.9 and at the final followup was 67.8 ± 7.7. The mean preoperative Lysholm score was 40.4 ± 10.3. At the end of 1-year following the intervention, the mean Lysholm score was 89.7 ± 2.1 and at final followup was 85.3 ± 2.5. Overall, 14 out of 42 patients who underwent radiographic assessment showed progression of osteoarthritis changes at the final followup after the intervention. Conclusion: In our study, there was a statistically significant improvement in the IKDC and Lysholm scores following the intervention. There was a slight deterioration in the scores at the final followup but the overall rate of satisfaction was still high and most of the patients were able to do their routine chores and light exercises suitable for their age group. Around one-third of patients show progression of radiographic changes

  1. Rates of Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolus After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Brandon J.; Saltzman, Bryan M.; Campbell, Kirk A.; Fillingham, Yale A.; Harris, Joshua D.; Gupta, Anil K.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Venous thromboembolic (VTE) disease is thought to be an uncommon but serious problem after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Rates of VTE after ACL reconstruction are not well documented. Objective: To determine the rates of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and symptomatic pulmonary emboli (PE) after ACL reconstruction. Data Sources: Five publicly available databases (PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Scopus, Embase, and CINAHL Complete) were utilized. Study Selection: All studies that screened patients for DVT and reported rates of DVT and PE after ACL reconstruction were eligible for inclusion. Level 5 evidence, cadaver, biomechanical, and basic science studies; studies reporting only multiligament reconstruction outcomes; studies where rates of DVT and PE could not be separated out from patients undergoing other types of arthroscopic knee procedures; and classification studies were excluded. Study Design: Systematic review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Data Extraction: All study, subject, and surgical data were analyzed. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Results: Six studies met the inclusion criteria, with a mean Modified Colman Methodology Score of 30 ± 8.22. A total of 692 patients (488 men [70.5%]; mean age, 31.6 ± 2.82 years; mean follow-up, 7 ± 18.4 months) underwent ACL reconstruction using either semitendinosus-gracilis autograft (77.6%), bone–patellar tendon–bone (BTB) autograft (22%), or allograft (0.4%). No patient received postoperative pharmacological anticoagulation. Fifty-eight patients (8.4%) had a DVT (81% below knee and 19% above knee), while only 1 patient (0.2%) had a symptomatic PE. When reported, 27% of DVT episodes were symptomatic. Conclusion: The rate of DVT after ACL reconstruction in patients who did not receive postoperative pharmacological anticoagulation is 8.4%, while the rate of symptomatic PE is 0.2%. Of the DVT episodes that occurred, 73% were asymptomatic. PMID:26131305

  2. Reduced Anterior Cruciate Ligament Vascularization Is Associated With Chondral Knee Lesions.

    PubMed

    Hetsroni, Iftach; Manor, Amir; Finsterbush, Alex; Lowe, Joseph; Mann, Gideon; Palmanovich, Ezequiel

    2016-07-01

    This study tested the association between periligamentous vascularization of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and the presence of chondral knee lesions via retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from 702 consecutive knee arthroscopic procedures. In each case, the ACL periligamentous envelope was documented as follows: (1) vascular, where the ACL was covered with blood vessels along its entire length; (2) centrally avascular, where the central third of the ACL was not covered but peripheral vascularized coverage was present; and (3) avascular, where there was no blood vessel coverage of the ACL. Inclusion criteria for the study were as follows: (1) age older than 18 years and (2) normal knee ligament laxity. Univariate analysis and multiple logistic regression were used to test the association between chondral lesions and each of the variables: sex, age, meniscus tear, decreased ACL vascularity, and concomitant chondral lesion in another knee compartment. The cohort included 516 knees. In the univariate analysis, all variables were associated with a chondral lesion, but only older age and decreased ACL vascularity were associated with chondral lesions in each knee compartment. In the regression model, only decreased ACL vascularity was associated with chondral lesions in each knee compartment. For avascular knees, the odds ratio was 2.84 for medial femoral condyle lesions (95% confidence interval, 1.73-4.68; P=.000), 2.44 for lateral femoral condyle lesions (95% confidence interval, 1.19-5.03; P=.015), and 2.48 for patellofemoral lesions (95% confidence interval, 1.55-3.97; P=.000). The findings showed that decreased ACL periligamentous vascularization is associated with chondral lesions of the femoral condyles in knees with preserved ACL laxity. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e737-e743.]. PMID:27111071

  3. Comparing Transtibial and Anteromedial Drilling Techniques for Single-bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sukur, Erhan; Akman, , Yunus Emre; Senel, , Ahmet; Unkar, Ethem Ayhan; Topcu, , Huseyin Nevzat; Ozturkmen, , and Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    Background: Among the many factors that determine the outcome following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, the position of the femoral tunnel is known to be critically important and is still the subject of extensive research. Objective: We aimed to retrospectively compare the outcomes of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction using transtibial (TT) or anteromedial (AMP) drilling techniques for femoral tunnel placement. Methods: ACL reconstruction was performed using the TT technique in 49 patients and the AMP technique in 56 patients. Lachman and pivot-shift tests, the Lysholm Knee Scale, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, Tegner activity scale and visual analog scale (VAS) were used for the clinical and functional evaluation of patients. Time to return to normal life and time to jogging were assessed in addition to the radiological evaluation of femoral tunnel placement. Results: In terms of the Lysholm, IKDC, Tegner score, and stability tests, no significant differences were found between the two groups (p > 0.05). Statistical analysis revealed reduced time to return to normal life and jogging in the AMP group (p < 0.05). The VAS score was also significantly reduced in the AMP group (p < 0.05). The position of the femoral tunnel was anatomically appropriate in 51 patients in the AMP group and 5 patients in the TT group. Conclusion: The AMP technique is superior to the TT technique in creating anatomical femoral tunnel placement during single-bundle ACL reconstruction and provides faster recovery in terms of return to normal life and jogging at short-term follow-up. PMID:27733884

  4. Comparison of Clinical Outcome of Autograft and Allograft Reconstruction for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yu-Hua; Sun, Peng-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hamstring (HS) autograft and bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft are the most common choice for reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). There was a little report about the clinical outcome and difference of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction using allograft and autograft. This study aimed to compare the clinical outcome of autograft and allograft reconstruction for ACL tears. Methods: A total of 106 patients who underwent surgery because of ACL tear were included in this study. The patients were randomly divided into two groups, including 53 patients in each group. The patients in group I underwent standard ACL reconstruction with HS tendon autografts, while others in group II underwent reconstruction with bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft. All the patients were followed up and analyzed; the mean follow-up was 81 months (range: 28–86 months). Clinical outcomes were evaluated using the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), Lysholm scores, physical instability tests, and patient satisfaction questionnaires. The complication rates of both groups were compared. Tibial and femoral tunnel widening were assessed using lateral and anteroposterior radiographs. Results: At the end of follow-up, no significant differences were found between the groups in terms of IKDC, Lysholm scores, physical instability tests, patient satisfaction questionnaires, and incidences of arthrofibrosis. Tibial and femoral tunnel widening was less in the HS tendon autografts. This difference was more significant on the tibial side. Conclusions: In the repair of ACL tears, allograft reconstruction is as effective as the autograft reconstruction, but the allograft can lead to more tunnel widening evidently in the tibial tunnel, particularly. PMID:26612290

  5. LARS Artificial Ligament Versus ABC Purely Polyester Ligament for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Iliadis, Dimitrios Ph.; Bourlos, Dimitrios N.; Mastrokalos, Dimitrios S.; Chronopoulos, Efstathios; Babis, George C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Graft choice for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is of critical importance. Various grafts have been used so far, with autografts long considered the optimal solution for the treatment of ACL-deficient knees. Limited data are available on the long-term survivorship of synthetic grafts. Purpose: To compare the functional outcome and survivorship of ACL reconstructions performed using the LARS (ligament augmentation and reconstruction system) ligament and the ABC (active biosynthetic composite) purely polyester ligament. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: The results of 72 patients who underwent primary arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with the LARS ligament and 31 cases with an ABC purely polyester ligament were reviewed. The mean follow-up periods for the LARS and ABC groups were 9.5 and 5.1 years, respectively. A survivorship analysis of the 2 synthetic grafts was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method with a log-rank test (Mantel-Cox, 95% CI). Lysholm, Tegner activity, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores as well as laxity measurements obtained using a KT-1000 arthrometer were recorded for all intact grafts, and a Mann-Whitney U test was used for comparison reasons. Results: The rupture rates for LARS and ABC grafts were 31% (95% CI, 20%-42%) and 42% (95% CI, 25%-59%), respectively. For intact grafts, the mean Lysholm score was good for both groups (90 for the LARS group and 89 for the ABC group), with the majority of patients returning to their preinjury level of activities, and the mean IKDC score was 90 for the LARS group and 86 for the ABC group. Conclusion: The rupture rates of both LARS and ABC grafts were both high. However, the LARS ligament provided significantly better survivorship compared with the ABC ligament at short- to midterm follow-up (95% CI). PMID:27453894

  6. Long-term Outcomes After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Patients 60 Years and Older

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Champ L.; Jones, Jaclyn C.; Zhang, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Background: Studies evaluating the benefit of surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in middle-aged patients have shown promising results, but study populations were limited primarily to patients who were 40 to 60 years old. Some authors have suggested that surgery may benefit these older patients. Hypothesis: Patients aged ≥60 years with functional instability after ACL injury would benefit from ACL reconstruction. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Medical records from 1984 through 2010 were searched for patients aged ≥60 years who had undergone primary arthroscopic ACL reconstruction at a single institution. Fifteen patients (15 knees) were identified as meeting the above criteria. All patients were contacted for a telephone interview, and they completed Short Form–36 and modified Cincinnati Knee Score forms. One patient was deceased, and 1 had undergone revision to total knee arthroplasty. Among the remaining 13 patients, the mean age at surgery was 63.5 years (range, 60-73 years), and the mean patient age at the time of follow-up was 73 years (range, 65-85 years). Preoperative radiographs showed no obvious evidence of arthritis in 10 (77%) of the 13 patients; small osteophytes without loss of joint space were seen in 3 (23%) patients. The mean length of follow up was 115.7 months (range, 53-193 months). Results: At their last clinic visits, all 13 patients had regained full range of motion and returned to sports or exercise, such as tennis, golf, gym exercise, and yoga. Twelve patients reported no joint laxity. Conclusion: Patients aged ≥60 years with symptomatic instability from ACL injury can have good to excellent subjective outcomes with surgical reconstruction. Clinical Relevance: Physicians who treat active patients older than 60 years should not exclude ACL reconstruction based on the patient’s age alone. PMID:26535289

  7. Specialized core stability exercise: a neglected component of anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation programs.

    PubMed

    Shi, Dong-liang; Li, Jing-long; Zhai, Hua; Wang, Hui-fang; Meng, Han; Wang, Yu-bin

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injury has continued to increase over the last two decades. This injury is associated with abnormal gait patterns and osteoarthritis of the knee. In order to accelerate recovery, the introduction of core stability exercises into the rehabilitation program is proposed. The theory underlying the use of core stability exercise relates to the neuroplasticity that follows anterior cruciate ligament injury. Neuroplasticity in lumbar, thoracic, cervical and brain regions diminish activation in the contralateral thalamus, postparietal cortex, SM1, basal ganglia-external globus pallidus, SII, cingulated motor area, premotor cortex, and in the ipsilateral cerebellum and SM1 and increase activation in pre-SMA, SIIp, and pITG, indicating modifications of the CNS. In addition, the neuroplasticity can regulate the movement of trunk muscles, for example, sternocleidomastoid and lower trapezius muscles. Core stability also demonstrates a negative correlation with the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injury. Therefore, we propose that core stability exercises may improve the rehabilitation of anterior cruciate ligament injuries by increasing core motor control. Specialized core stability exercises aimed at rectifying biomechanical problems associated with gait and core stability may play a key role in the management of anterior cruciate ligament injury.

  8. Can anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction be performed routinely in day clinic?

    PubMed

    De Beule, J; Vandenneucker, H; Claes, S; Bellemans, J

    2014-09-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is performed as an outpatient procedure in selected cases. Whether it can be safely performed on a routine basis in day clinic remains unclear. Our hypothesis was that routinely performing outpatient anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction would be equally safe as compared to inpatient procedures. A cohort of 355 patients who underwent outpatient primary reconstruction was analysed at an average follow-up of 3.8 years. Four patients (1.1%) could not be discharged or were readmitted within 24 hours. The 1-month readmission rate was 1.4%. The overall complication rate was 12.1% (43 cases) of which 4.2% (15 patients) occurred within the first 30 days. Performing anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions routinely in day clinic is associated with almost negligible readmission rates and has similar complication rates as for standard in-hospital anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. Outpatient anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions can therefore be safely performed without specific preoperative patient selection protocols.

  9. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided aspiration of an anterior cruciate ligament ganglion cyst: description of technique and case presentation.

    PubMed

    Krill, Michael; Peck, Evan

    2014-12-01

    An anterior cruciate ligament ganglion cyst is an infrequent but potentially clinically significant cause of knee pain. Although the cyst may be removed surgically, percutaneous ultrasound-guided anterior cruciate ligament ganglion cyst aspiration and injection is feasible. To our knowledge, we present the first reported case description of the utilization of ultrasound guidance to perform this procedure with a successful clinical outcome.

  10. The Impact of the Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) Research on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Orthopaedic Practice

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, T. Sean; Parker, Richard D.; Patel, Ronak M.; Andrish, Jack T.; Spindler, Kurt P.

    2015-01-01

    With an estimated 200,000 anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions performed annually in the United States, there is an emphasis on determining patient-specific information to help educate patients on expected clinically relevant outcomes. The Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network consortium was created in 2002 to enroll and longitudinally follow a large population cohort of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. The study group has enrolled >4,400 anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions from seven institutions to establish the large level I prospective anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction outcomes cohort. The group has become more than a database with information regarding anterior cruciate ligament injuries; it has helped to establish a new benchmark for conducting multicenter, multisurgeon orthopaedic research. The changes in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction practice resulting from the group include the use of autograft for high school, college, and competitive athletes in their primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. Other modifications include treatment options for meniscus and cartilage injuries, as well as lifestyle choices made after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. PMID:25667401

  11. The Impact of the Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) Research on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Orthopaedic Practice.

    PubMed

    Lynch, T Sean; Parker, Richard D; Patel, Ronak M; Andrish, Jack T; Spindler, Kurt P; Amendola, Annunziata; Brophy, Robert H; Dunn, Warren R; Flanigan, David C; Huston, Laura J; Jones, Morgan H; Kaeding, Christopher C; Marx, Robert G; Matava, Matthew J; McCarty, Eric C; Pedroza, Angela D; Reinke, Emily K; Wolf, Brian R; Wright, Rick W

    2015-03-01

    With an estimated 200,000 anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions performed annually in the United States, there is an emphasis on determining patient-specific information to help educate patients on expected clinically relevant outcomes. The Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network consortium was created in 2002 to enroll and longitudinally follow a large population cohort of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. The study group has enrolled >4,400 anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions from seven institutions to establish the large level I prospective anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction outcomes cohort. The group has become more than a database with information regarding anterior cruciate ligament injuries; it has helped to establish a new benchmark for conducting multicenter, multisurgeon orthopaedic research. The changes in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction practice resulting from the group include the use of autograft for high school, college, and competitive athletes in their primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. Other modifications include treatment options for meniscus and cartilage injuries, as well as lifestyle choices made after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

  12. Simultaneous rupture of the patellar tendon and the anterior cruciate ligament: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Chow, Francis Y; Wun, Yiu-Chung; Chow, Yuk-Yin

    2006-10-01

    We report a case of simultaneous rupture of the patellar tendon and the anterior cruciate ligament. This condition was rarely reported in the literature and clinical diagnosis can be difficult. It is frequently associated with injuries of other knee structures. The preferred treatment is immediate primary repair of the patellar tendon and delayed reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament.

  13. Open reduction of a lateral femoral notch associated with an acute anterior cruciate ligament tear.

    PubMed

    Garth, W P; Wilson, T

    2001-10-01

    The lateral notch is a radiographic sign that describes a depression in the lateral femoral condyle near the terminal sulcus. The sign was first described in association with chronic instability in an anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knee. Recently, the senior author, after a prospective study, reported that these lateral notches might occur acutely at the time of anterior cruciate ligament injury. We report such a case in which the lateral femoral condylar depression fracture resulted in symptoms of lateral compartment incongruity. Open reduction and internal fixation were required. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction was performed as a staged procedure 2 months after fracture reduction. The postoperative result has been excellent for over 5 years. This case is an example that lateral femoral notches may be acute and a source of symptoms. In some cases, reduction and fixation of significant depressions in association with ligament reconstruction can alleviate these symptoms and may improve the patient's long-term result.

  14. Current Australian trends in rehabilitation following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Feller, Julian A; Cooper, Randall; Webster, Kate E

    2002-05-01

    This study documented the current approaches to rehabilitation following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction by Australian orthopaedic surgeons. A two-page questionnaire was mailed to the 40 members of the Australian Knee Society to obtain information regarding (1) pre-operative requirements; (2) immediate post-operative requirements; and (3) the timing of the introduction of rehabilitation phases and return to sport following ACL reconstruction. The response rate of practising surgeons was 95%. Twenty-two surgeons (61%) regularly performed both hamstring tendon (HS) and patellar tendon (PT) ACL reconstruction. Eighty-three percent had a standard rehabilitation protocol, and of these, 23% had separate protocols for the two graft types. There were no significant differences between the responses for the two graft types for any question. Approximately three-quarters of surgeons (HS: 75%, PT: 78%) had specific pre-operative requirements. Most surgeons (HS: 96%, PT: 93%) had specific post-operative requirements. Physiotherapy was routinely used by 96% and 93% of surgeons for HS and PT grafts, respectively, commencing at a mean of 2 weeks post-operatively for HS grafts and a mean of 1.5 weeks for PT grafts. Progression through rehabilitation and the timing of return to various levels of sporting activity was similar for both graft types. Few surgeons used strength testing (HS: 25%, PT: 23%) or knee arthrometry (HS: 22%, PT: 17%) prior to return to sport and the use of a brace was rarely recommended for return to sport (HS: 7%, PT: 3%). The results of this survey indicate little variation in the post-operative management of HS and PT ACL reconstruction among members of the Australian Knee Society. Future research should, however, be directed towards the rate of progression through rehabilitation, as this was shown to be more conservative than other recent reports.

  15. Evidence-based rehabilitation following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    van Grinsven, S; van Cingel, R E H; Holla, C J M; van Loon, C J M

    2010-08-01

    Following a bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft (BPTB) or four-stranded semitendinosus/gracilis tendons autograft (ST/G) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, the speed and safety with which an athlete returns to sports (or regains the pre-injury level of function) depends on the rehabilitation protocol. Considering the large differences in clinical and outpatient protocols, there is no consensus regarding the content of such a rehabilitation program. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review to develop an optimal evidence-based rehabilitation protocol to enable unambiguous, practical and useful treatment after ACL reconstruction. The systematic literature search identified 1,096 citations published between January 1995 and December 2006. Thirty-two soundly based rehabilitation programs, randomized clinical trials (RCT's) and reviews were included in which common physical therapy modalities (instruction, bracing, cryotherapy, joint mobility training, muscle-strength training, gait re-education, training of neuromuscular function/balance and proprioception) or rehabilitation programs were evaluated following ACL reconstruction with a BPTB or ST/G graft. Two reviews were excluded because of poor quality. Finally, the extracted data were combined with information from background literature to develop an optimal evidence-based rehabilitation protocol. The results clearly indicated that an accelerated protocol without postoperative bracing, in which reduction of pain, swelling and inflammation, regaining range of motion, strength and neuromuscular control are the most important aims, has important advantages and does not lead to stability problems. Preclinical sessions, clear starting times and control of the rehabilitation aims with objective and subjective tests facilitate an uncomplicated rehabilitation course. Consensus about this evidence-based accelerated protocol will not only enhance the speed and safety with which an athlete returns to sports, but

  16. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using a Flexible Reamer System

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Judd; Saluan, Paul; Richter, Dustin L.; Huff, Nathan; Schenck, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Anatomic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has been shown to improve stability of the knee, particularly rotational stability, potentially leading to superior clinical outcomes and a shorter return to sport. Nonanatomic ACL reconstruction has been linked to graft failure and abnormal cartilage loading thought to contribute to progression of degenerative joint disease. Use of the far anteromedial portal (FAMP) to uncouple the tibial and femoral tunnels has led to improved reproduction of the femoral footprint and facilitates drilling of the femoral tunnel in an anatomic position. The use of the FAMP and straight reamer systems introduces its own set of potential complications, including short femoral tunnels and peroneal nerve injury. These potential complications have been addressed by drilling the femoral tunnel in a hyperflexed position, which can lead to difficulty with positioning the operative extremity, visualization, and identification of anatomic landmarks. The purpose of this case report was to review the advantages and technical aspects of using a flexible reamer system and the FAMP to achieve an anatomic ACL reconstruction while avoiding potential complications and pitfalls. Flexible reamer systems allow an additional way of uncoupling the tibial and femoral tunnels to clearly visualize and establish an anatomic starting point within the femoral footprint of the native ACL while avoiding the complications associated with knee hyperflexion and straight reamers with the far anteromedial portal. In the authors’ experience, an anatomic reconstruction of the ACL can be achieved safely using flexible reamers while avoiding some of the difficulties seen with straight reamers used in conjunction with an uncoupled, far anteromedial approach. PMID:26673860

  17. Long Term Gait Deviations in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstructed Females

    PubMed Central

    Noehren, Brian; Wilson, Hilary; Miller, Casey; Lattermann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Little is known of the potential long term gait alterations that occur after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. In particular, variables such as impact loading which have been previously associated with joint deterioration have not been studied in walking and running after an ACL reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to define the alterations in impact forces, loading rates, and the accompanying sagittal plane kinematic and kinetic mechanics at the time of impact between the ACL reconstructed group and a healthy control group. Methods 40 females (20 ACL reconstruction, 20 controls) participated in the study. An instrumented gait analysis was performed on all subjects. Between group and limb comparisons were made for initial vertical impact force, loading rate, sagittal plane knee and hip angles as well as moments. Results During walking and running the ACL cohort had significantly greater initial vertical impact force (p=0.002 and p= 0.001), and loading rates (p=0.03 and p= 0.01), as well as a smaller knee extensor moment and hip angle during walking (p=0.000 and p=0.01). There was a trend towards a smaller knee moment and hip angle during running (p=0.08 and p=0.06) as well as a larger hip extensor moment during walking (p=0.06) in the ACL group. No differences were found for hip extensor moment during running, knee angles between groups during walking or running. Lastly, no between limb differences were found for any variable. Conclusion Gait deviations such as elevated impact loading and loading rates do not resolve long term after the individual has resumed previous activity levels and may contribute to the greater risk of early joint degeneration in this population. PMID:23568090

  18. Factors Associated with Infection Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Brophy, Robert H.; Wright, Rick W.; Huston, Laura J.; Nwosu, Samuel K.; Spindler, Kurt P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although rare, infection can be devastating after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to test the association between infection after ACL reconstruction and potential risk factors such as age, body mass index (BMI), smoking, diabetes, and graft choice. Methods: We reviewed the Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) cohort from 2002 to 2005 to identify patients with a postoperative infection. The age, BMI, smoking status, history of diabetes, and graft choice were recorded for each patient. A multivariable regression analysis was constructed to examine which baseline risk factors were independently associated with postoperative infection after ACL reconstruction requiring surgical intervention. Results: There were 2198 eligible patients in the cohort, with seventeen (0.8%) reporting a postoperative infection. Diabetes was found to be a significant risk factor for infection (odds ratio [OR] = 18.8; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.8 to 94.0; p < 0.001). Compared with bone-tendon-bone autograft, both hamstring autograft and other grafts (e.g., the majority of allografts, with some that were both autograft and allograft) also increased the risk of infection (OR = 4.6 [95% CI = 1.2 to 17.9; p = 0.026] for hamstrings and 4.3 [95% CI = 1.0 to 18.1; p = 0.047] for other grafts). Although the OR for infection in smokers was 2.5, this finding did not reach significance. Conclusions: Patients with diabetes undergoing ACL reconstruction have a significantly elevated risk of postoperative infection (18.8-times higher odds) compared with that for patients without diabetes. Use of bone-tendon-bone autograft is associated with a lower risk of infection after ACL reconstruction. Level of Evidence: Prognostic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:25788300

  19. Autograft versus allograft in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Shun-Li; Yuan, Zhi-Fang; Ning, Guang-Zhi; Yang, Bo; Li, Hai-Liang; Sun, Jing-Cheng; Feng, Shi-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is considered as the standard surgical procedure for the treatment of ACL tear. However, there is a crucial controversy in terms of whether to use autograft or allograft in ACL reconstruction. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to compare autograft with allograft for patients undergoing ACL reconstruction. Methods: PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were searched for randomized controlled trials that compared autograft with allograft in ACL reconstruction up to January 31, 2016. The relative risk or mean difference with 95% confidence interval was calculated using either a fixed- or random-effects model. The risk of bias for individual studies according to the Cochrane Handbook. The trial sequential analysis was used to test the robustness of our findings and get more conservative estimates. Results: Thirteen trials were included, involving 1636 participants. The results of this meta-analysis indicated that autograft brought about lower clinical failure, better overall International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) level, better pivot-shift test, better Lachman test, greater Tegner score, and better instrumented laxity test (P < 0.05) than allograft. Autograft was not statistically different from allograft in Lysholm score, subjective IKDC score, and Daniel 1-leg hop test (P > 0.05). Subgroup analyses demonstrated that autograft was superior to irradiated allograft for patients undergoing ACL reconstruction in clinical failure, Lysholm score, pivot-shift test, Lachman test, Tegner score, instrumented laxity test, and subjective IKDC score (P < 0.05). Moreover, there were no significant differences between autograft and nonirradiated allograft. Conclusions: Autograft is superior to irradiated allograft for patients undergoing ACL reconstruction concerning knee function and laxity, but there are no significant differences between autograft and nonirradiated allograft. However

  20. Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Balazs, George C; Grimm, Patrick D; Donohue, Michael A; Keblish, David J; Rue, John-Paul

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to report the clinical and functional outcomes of revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in a young, active duty military population. Patients undergoing revision ACL reconstruction were enrolled in an institutional clinical database and followed prospectively. The primary outcomes were patients' scores on a timed run, as compared with recorded scores before reinjury. Secondary outcomes included scores on the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), the International Knee Documentation Committee subjective (IKDC subjective), the Short Form - 36 health survey (SF-36) version 2, the Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE), and the Tegner activity scale. A total of 13 patients were identified who met the inclusion criteria and had complete follow-up. The mean age at revision ACL reconstruction was 20.5 years (range, 19-22 years), and mean follow-up was 40.2 months (range, 13-66 months). All patients underwent a single stage revision ACL reconstruction with ipsilateral bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft, ipsilateral hamstring autograft, or bone-tendon-bone allograft. Mean physical readiness test (PRT) score at final follow-up was not statistically different than documented preinjury PRT score (77.9 vs. 85.5, p > 0.05), nor was the mean run time (7:12 vs. 6:43/mile, p > 0.05). Significant improvements exceeding published minimal clinically important differences were seen in SANE score, SF-36 physical component summary score, KOOS sports and recreation, KOOS quality of life, WOMAC pain score, and WOMAC function score. Patients undergoing revision ACL reconstruction at our facility show good recovery of baseline physical performance as measured by the semiannual PRT and timed run test, and significant improvements in patient-reported outcome scores. Level of Evidence Level IV, case series.

  1. Biologic agents for anterior cruciate ligament healing: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Di Matteo, Berardo; Loibl, Markus; Andriolo, Luca; Filardo, Giuseppe; Zellner, Johannes; Koch, Matthias; Angele, Peter

    2016-01-01

    AIM To systematically review the currently available literature concerning the application of biologic agents such as platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and stem cells to promote anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) healing. METHODS A systematic review of the literature was performed on the use of biologic agents (i.e., PRP or stem cells) to favor ACL healing during reconstruction or repair. The following inclusion criteria for relevant articles were used: Clinical reports of any level of evidence, written in English language, on the use of PRP or stem cells during ACL reconstruction/repair. Exclusion criteria were articles written in other languages, reviews, or studies analyzing other applications of PRP/stem cells in knee surgery not related to promoting ACL healing. RESULTS The database search identified 394 records that were screened. A total of 23 studies were included in the final analysis: In one paper stem cells were applied for ACL healing, in one paper there was a concomitant application of PRP and stem cells, whereas in the remaining 21 papers PRP was used. Based on the ACL injury pattern, two papers investigated biologic agents in ACL partial tears whereas 21 papers in ACL reconstruction. Looking at the quality of the available literature, 17 out of 21 studies dealing with ACL reconstruction were randomized controlled trials. Both studies on ACL repair were case series. CONCLUSION There is a paucity of clinical trials investigating the role of stem cells in promoting ACL healing both in case of partial and complete tears. The role of PRP is still controversial and the only advantage emerging from the literature is related to a better graft maturation over time, without documenting beneficial effects in terms of clinical outcome, bone-graft integration and prevention of bony tunnel enlargement.

  2. Defending Puts the Anterior Cruciate Ligament at Risk During Soccer

    PubMed Central

    Brophy, Robert H.; Stepan, Jeffrey G.; Silvers, Holly J.; Mandelbaum, Bert R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Soccer athletes are at risk for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. To date, there are limited studies on the mechanisms of ACL injuries in soccer athletes and no video-based analysis or sex-based comparison of these mechanisms. Hypothesis: There is no difference in ACL injury mechanisms among soccer athletes by sex. Study design: Case series. Level of evidence: Level 4. Methods: Fifty-five videos of ACL injuries in 32 male and 23 female soccer players were reviewed. Most athletes were professionals (22 males, 4 females) or collegiate players (8 males, 14 females). Visual analysis of each case was performed to describe the injury mechanisms in detail (game situation, player behavior, and lower extremity alignment). Results: The majority of ACL injuries occurred when the opposing team had the ball and the injured athlete was defending (73%). Females were more likely to be defending when they injured their ACLs (87% vs 63% for males, P = 0.045). The most common playing action was tackling (51%), followed by cutting (15%). Most injuries occurred due to a contact mechanism (56%) with no significant difference for sex. Females were more likely to suffer a noncontact injury in their left knee (54%) than males (33%) (P = 0.05). Conclusion: Soccer players are at greatest risk for ACL injury when defending, especially when tackling the opponent in an attempt to win possession of the ball. Females are more likely to injure their ACLs when defending and are at greater risk for noncontact injuries in their left lower extremity. Clinical Relevance: Soccer ACL injury prevention programs should include proper defending and tackling techniques, particularly for female athletes. PMID:26131302

  3. Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Balazs, George C; Grimm, Patrick D; Donohue, Michael A; Keblish, David J; Rue, John-Paul

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to report the clinical and functional outcomes of revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in a young, active duty military population. Patients undergoing revision ACL reconstruction were enrolled in an institutional clinical database and followed prospectively. The primary outcomes were patients' scores on a timed run, as compared with recorded scores before reinjury. Secondary outcomes included scores on the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), the International Knee Documentation Committee subjective (IKDC subjective), the Short Form - 36 health survey (SF-36) version 2, the Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE), and the Tegner activity scale. A total of 13 patients were identified who met the inclusion criteria and had complete follow-up. The mean age at revision ACL reconstruction was 20.5 years (range, 19-22 years), and mean follow-up was 40.2 months (range, 13-66 months). All patients underwent a single stage revision ACL reconstruction with ipsilateral bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft, ipsilateral hamstring autograft, or bone-tendon-bone allograft. Mean physical readiness test (PRT) score at final follow-up was not statistically different than documented preinjury PRT score (77.9 vs. 85.5, p > 0.05), nor was the mean run time (7:12 vs. 6:43/mile, p > 0.05). Significant improvements exceeding published minimal clinically important differences were seen in SANE score, SF-36 physical component summary score, KOOS sports and recreation, KOOS quality of life, WOMAC pain score, and WOMAC function score. Patients undergoing revision ACL reconstruction at our facility show good recovery of baseline physical performance as measured by the semiannual PRT and timed run test, and significant improvements in patient-reported outcome scores. Level of Evidence Level IV, case series. PMID:26524090

  4. Biologic agents for anterior cruciate ligament healing: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Di Matteo, Berardo; Loibl, Markus; Andriolo, Luca; Filardo, Giuseppe; Zellner, Johannes; Koch, Matthias; Angele, Peter

    2016-01-01

    AIM To systematically review the currently available literature concerning the application of biologic agents such as platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and stem cells to promote anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) healing. METHODS A systematic review of the literature was performed on the use of biologic agents (i.e., PRP or stem cells) to favor ACL healing during reconstruction or repair. The following inclusion criteria for relevant articles were used: Clinical reports of any level of evidence, written in English language, on the use of PRP or stem cells during ACL reconstruction/repair. Exclusion criteria were articles written in other languages, reviews, or studies analyzing other applications of PRP/stem cells in knee surgery not related to promoting ACL healing. RESULTS The database search identified 394 records that were screened. A total of 23 studies were included in the final analysis: In one paper stem cells were applied for ACL healing, in one paper there was a concomitant application of PRP and stem cells, whereas in the remaining 21 papers PRP was used. Based on the ACL injury pattern, two papers investigated biologic agents in ACL partial tears whereas 21 papers in ACL reconstruction. Looking at the quality of the available literature, 17 out of 21 studies dealing with ACL reconstruction were randomized controlled trials. Both studies on ACL repair were case series. CONCLUSION There is a paucity of clinical trials investigating the role of stem cells in promoting ACL healing both in case of partial and complete tears. The role of PRP is still controversial and the only advantage emerging from the literature is related to a better graft maturation over time, without documenting beneficial effects in terms of clinical outcome, bone-graft integration and prevention of bony tunnel enlargement. PMID:27672573

  5. Autograft Versus Nonirradiated Allograft Tissue for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mariscalco, Michael W.; Magnussen, Robert A.; Mehta, Divyesh; Hewett, Timothy E.; Flanigan, David C.; Kaeding, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Background An autograft has traditionally been the gold standard for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR), but the use of allograft tissue has increased in recent years. While numerous studies have demonstrated that irradiated allografts are associated with increased failure rates, some report excellent results after ACLR with nonirradiated allografts. The purpose of this systematic review was to determine whether the use of nonirradiated allograft tissue is associated with poorer outcomes when compared with autografts. Hypothesis Patients undergoing ACLR with autografts versus nonirradiated allografts will demonstrate no significant differences in graft failure risk, laxity on postoperative physical examination, or differences in patient-oriented outcome scores. Study Design Systematic review. Methods A systematic review was performed to identify prospective or retrospective comparative studies (evidence level 1, 2, or 3) of autografts versus nonirradiated allografts for ACLR. Outcome data included graft failure based on clinical findings and instrumented laxity, postoperative laxity on physical examination, and patient-reported outcome scores. Studies were excluded if they did not specify whether the allograft had been irradiated. Quality assessment and data extraction were performed by 2 examiners. Results Nine studies comparing autografts and nonirradiated allografts were included. Six of the 9 studies compared bone– patellar tendon–bone (BPTB) autografts with BPTB allografts. Two studies compared hamstring tendon autografts to hamstring tendon allografts, and 1 study compared hamstring tendon autografts to tibialis anterior allografts. The mean patient age in 7 of 9 studies ranged from 24.5 to 32 years, with 1 study including only patients older than 40 years and another not reporting patient age. The mean follow-up duration was 24 to 94 months. Six of 9 studies reported clinical graft failure rates, 8 of 9 reported postoperative instrumented

  6. Management of septic arthritis following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a review of current practices and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Cadet, Edwin R; Makhni, Eric C; Mehran, Nima; Schulz, Brian M

    2013-11-01

    Septic arthritis following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is a rare and potentially devastating complication that often leads to articular destruction and adverse clinical outcomes. Because of its rare occurrence, best practices for diagnosis and management have yet to be established. However, graft retention and favorable outcomes are possible with early diagnosis, surgical intervention, and appropriate antibiotic management. Clinicians must be familiar with the diagnostic criteria and management options for septic arthritis. Most patients require multiple procedures to effectively eradicate infection. When the original reconstructed graft cannot be salvaged, a staged anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction revision is required.

  7. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Screw Fixation in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chizari, Mahmoud; Wang, Bin; Snow, Martyn; Barrett, Mel

    2008-09-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental and finite element analysis of tibial screw fixation in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The mechanical properties of the bone and tendon graft are obtained from experiments using porcine bone and bovine tendon. The results of the numerical study are compared with those from mechanical testing. Analysis shows that the model may be used to establish the optimum placement of the tunnel in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction by predicting mechanical parameters such as stress, strain and displacement at regions in the tunnel wall.

  8. Arthroscopic Remplissage for Engaging Hill-Sachs Lesions in Patients With Anterior Shoulder Instability

    PubMed Central

    Camp, Christopher L.; Dahm, Diane L.; Krych, Aaron J.

    2015-01-01

    Anterior shoulder instability is often accompanied by a Hill-Sachs defect on the humeral head that can contribute to recurrent instability if not addressed at the time of surgery. We describe a method of performing arthroscopic remplissage to treat engaging Hill-Sachs lesions in patients with glenohumeral instability. It has the benefits of being an efficient procedure that can be performed with minimal technical difficulty and can be used to augment other stabilization procedures such as labral repair. The indications for this technique include the presence of an engaging Hill-Sachs defect in patients will little or no glenoid bone loss. In appropriately selected patients, arthroscopic remplissage has shown reduced rates of recurrent instability. PMID:26697311

  9. Modified Arthroscopic Latarjet Procedure With Coracoid Exteriorization for Treatment of Anterior Glenohumeral Instability

    PubMed Central

    Ranne, Juha O.; Kainonen, Terho U.; Lehtinen, Janne T.; Heinonen, Olli J.

    2013-01-01

    The Latarjet procedure for treating anterior glenohumeral instability includes transfer of the coracoid and biceps tendon to the anterior glenoid. A modified method for the arthroscopic procedure was developed to facilitate the procedure and minimize the risk of injury to the brachial plexus. The detached coracoid was exteriorized through the anteroinferior portal for drilling and shaping. A Coracoid Drill Guide (Arthrex, Naples, FL) was used to help cut the coracoid to the desired size and make 2 drill holes in the coracoid for fixation to the glenoid. The Coracoid Transfer Instrument (Acierart, Masku, Finland) was designed to facilitate coracoid transfer and serve as a pin guide for fixation. Ten patients with severe anterior glenohumeral instability were treated with this technique. They had only mild to moderate postoperative pain. There were no postoperative infections or recurrent dislocations. The safety of this operation was similar to that of other operations on the coracoid process in the proximity of the brachial plexus. The modified arthroscopic Latarjet procedure may be applied successfully to the treatment of anterior glenohumeral instability, with good patient satisfaction and functional outcome. PMID:24400183

  10. Comparison of the operation of arthroscopic tibial inlay and traditional tibial inlay for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Daifeng; Xiao, Mochao; Lian, Yongyun; Zhou, Yong; Liu, Xuefeng

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To perform dual-bundle reconstruction of posterior cruciate ligament using full arthroscopic tibial inlay technology with self-designed tibia tunnel drilling system and to compare the effect of arthroscopic tibial inlay versus traditional technique for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Material and methods: 32 patients were randomly divided into experiment group (improved tibial inlay, n = 17) and control group (traditional tibial inlay, n = 15). Self-designed tibia tunnel drill system was used to produce intraoperative deep-limited bone tunnel. During follow-up, the location of the bone block and the healing situation were checked by knee X-ray and spiral CT scan. Blood loss, operation time and nerve vascular injuries were evaluated. Results: Mean intraoperative blood loss was 123.53 ± 74.05 ml in the improved tibial inlay group compared with 332 ± 114.26 ml in the traditional tibial inlay group (t = 6.12, P < 0.05). Mean operation time was 235.27 ± 58.88 min in the improved tibial inlay group compared with 346.37 ± 59.67 min in the traditional tibial inlay group (t = 5.19, P < 0.05). Posterior drawer test were negative in 15 cases, slight positive in 2 with improved tibial inlay technique compared with 14 negative cases and 2 positive cases of traditional tibial Inlay technique. The X-ray and spiral CT scan showed the location of the bone block were perfect and healed well with the patent who received improved tibial inlay technology after 12 weeks postoperatively. Conclusion: Accurate depth-limited bone tunnel can be produced by the tibia tunnel drill system with minor trauma, less bleeding and reducing of nerves or vessels and the recent clinical effects of PCL reconstruction were pretty good. PMID:25419349

  11. Transphyseal anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in a skeletally immature knee using anterior tibialis allograft.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yool; Jang, Soo-Jin; Son, Jung-Hwan

    2011-05-18

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in the skeletally immature individual is being recognized with increasing frequency. Nonoperative treatment of ACL injuries in skeletally immature patients have not been favorable. Surgical treatment options for complete ACL tears include primary ligament repair, extraarticular tenodesis, transphyseal reconstruction, partial transphyseal reconstruction, and physeal-sparing reconstruction. The advantage of transphyseal reconstruction is placement of the graft tissue in an isometric position, which provides better results, according to the literature. The potential disadvantage is angular or limb-length discrepancy caused by physeal violation. Controversy exists in allograft selection about whether bone or soft tissue passes into physes. The use of standard tunnels provides reliable results, but carries the risk of iatrogenic growth disturbance from physeal injury.This article presents 4 cases of transphyseal ACL reconstruction using anterior tibialis allograft in skeletally immature patients that had satisfactory functional outcomes with no growth disturbances. This is the first report of transphyseal ACL reconstruction using anterior tibialis allograft in skeletally immature patients in the English-speaking literature. All patients underwent transphyseal ACL reconstruction using anterior tibialis tendon allograft. None of the patients had angular deformities. No early physeal arrest was measured between the preoperative and postoperative radiographs. At last follow-up, the results of the Lachman test were normal for 3 patients and nearly normal for 1 patient. All patients demonstrated full range of knee motion (comparing the reconstructed knee to the contralateral knee). The results of the pivot-shift test were normal for 3 patients and nearly normal for 1 patient. No patients reported giving way.

  12. Surgical treatment of acute and chronic anterior and posterior cruciate ligament and lateral side injuries of the knee.

    PubMed

    Levy, Bruce A; Boyd, Joel L; Stuart, Michael J

    2011-06-01

    Combined anterior cruciate ligament, posterior cruciate ligament, and lateral-sided injuries of the knee most often occurs secondary to a forced varus moment or after knee dislocation. Management controversies include the optimal timing of surgery, operative techniques, and postoperative rehabilitation. Recent systematic literature reviews have demonstrated higher rates of failure with repair of the lateral and posterolateral corner structures, as opposed to reconstruction. However, the ideal ligament reconstruction techniques remain unclear. This chapter will review the combined anterior cruciate ligament/posterior cruciate ligament/lateral-sided injury pattern, including the physical examination findings, imaging, timing of surgery, graft selection, operative techniques, and postoperative rehabilitation protocols.

  13. Fifty most-cited articles in anterior cruciate ligament research.

    PubMed

    Voleti, Pramod B; Tjoumakaris, Fotios P; Rotmil, Gayle; Freedman, Kevin B

    2015-04-01

    The number of times an article has been cited in the peer-reviewed literature is indicative of its impact on its respective medical specialty. No study has used citation analysis to determine the most influential studies pertaining to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The primary aims of this study were to identify the classic works in ACL research using citation analysis and to characterize these articles to determine which types of studies have had the most influence on the field. A systematic query of ISI Web of Science (Thomson Reuters, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) was performed for articles pertaining to the ACL, and the 50 most-cited articles were selected for evaluation. The following characteristics were determined for each article: number of citations, citation density, journal, publication year, country of origin, language, article type, article subtype, and level of evidence. The number of citations ranged from 219 to 1073 (mean, 326), and the citation densities ranged from 4.9 to 55.6 citations per year (mean, 18.2). All articles were published in 1 of 11 journals, with the most being published in The American Journal of Sports Medicine (46%) and The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery American (30%). The most common decades of publication were the 1990s (34%), 1980s (28%), and 2000s (26%). The majority (68%) of articles originated from the United States, and all were written in English. By article type, 42% were basic science, and 58% were clinical. Of the clinical articles, 3% were Level I, 17% were Level II, 28% were Level III, and 52% were Level IV. The articles were heterogeneous with regard to article type, article subtype, and level of evidence and tended to have the following characteristics: high-impact journal of publication, recent publication year, US origin, English language, and low level of evidence. These works represent some of the most popular scientific contributions to ACL research. This list may aid residency and fellowship

  14. Societal and Economic Impact of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears

    PubMed Central

    Mather, Richard C.; Koenig, Lane; Kocher, Mininder S.; Dall, Timothy M.; Gallo, Paul; Scott, Daniel J.; Bach, Bernard R.; Spindler, Kurt P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: An anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear is a common knee injury, particularly among young and active individuals. Little is known, however, about the societal impacts of ACL tears, which could be large given the typical patient age and increased lifetime risk of knee osteoarthritis. This study evaluates the cost-effectiveness of ACL reconstruction compared with structured rehabilitation only. Methods: A cost-utility analysis of ACL reconstruction compared with structured rehabilitation only was conducted with use of a Markov decision model over two time horizons: the short to intermediate term (six years), on the basis of Level-I evidence derived from the KANON Study and the Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) database; and the lifetime, on the basis of a comprehensive literature review. Utilities were assessed with use of the SF-6D. Costs (in 2012 U.S. dollars) were estimated from the societal perspective and included the effects of the ACL tear on work status, earnings, and disability. Effectiveness was expressed as quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained. Results: In the short to intermediate term, ACL reconstruction was both less costly (a cost reduction of $4503) and more effective (a QALY gain of 0.18) compared with rehabilitation. In the long term, the mean lifetime cost to society for a typical patient undergoing ACL reconstruction was $38,121 compared with $88,538 for rehabilitation. ACL reconstruction resulted in a mean incremental cost savings of $50,417 while providing an incremental QALY gain of 0.72 compared with rehabilitation. Effectiveness gains were driven by the higher probability of an unstable knee and associated lower utility in the rehabilitation group. Results were most sensitive to the rate of knee instability after initial rehabilitation. Conclusions: ACL reconstruction is the preferred cost-effective treatment strategy for ACL tears and yields reduced societal costs relative to rehabilitation once indirect cost

  15. Psychological Factors Associated With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Christino, Melissa A.; Fleming, Braden C.; Machan, Jason T.; Shalvoy, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Psychological factors may have underappreciated effects on surgical outcomes after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction; however, few studies have investigated the relationship between specific psychological factors, objective clinical data, and patient-oriented outcomes. Purpose: Psychological factors are significantly associated with patient perceptions and functional outcomes after ACL reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate relationships between self-esteem, health locus of control, and psychological distress with objective clinical outcomes, patient-oriented outcomes, and return to sport. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Twenty-seven patients who were 6 to 24 months post–computer-assisted ACL reconstruction by a single surgeon consented to participate in the study (52% response rate). Participants had a 1-time visit with a physician consisting of: a physical examination, a single-leg hop test, KT-1000 arthrometer measurements, and survey completion. Psychological measures included the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and Brief Profile of Mood States. Outcome measures included the Tegner activity scale, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Subjective Knee Score, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score–Quality of Life subscale (KOOS-QOL), and Short Form–36 (SF-36). Patient charts were also reviewed for pertinent operative details. Results: The mean age of patients (±SD) was 25.7 ± 8.4 years, and the mean duration of time since surgery was 16.5 ± 5.9 months. The majority (89%) of the patients identified themselves as athletes, and of these, 65% reported returning to sports at a competitive level. Sport returners were found to have higher levels of self-esteem (P = .002) and higher reported KOOS-QOL scores (P = .02). Self-esteem was significantly associated with IKDC scores (r = 0.46, P < .05), KOOS-QOL scores (r = 0

  16. Subsequent Surgery after Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ding, David; Group, Mars

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Failure or reinjury after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction can lead to recurrent instability and concomitant intra-articular injuries. While revision ACL reconstruction (rACLR) can be performed to restore knee stability and improve patient activity level, outcomes after these surgeries are reported to be inferior to primary ACL reconstruction. Further reoperation after rACLR can have an even more profound effect on patient satisfaction and outcome. Yet, there is a current lack of information regarding the rate and risk factors for subsequent surgery after rACLR. Methods: 1205 patients who underwent rACLR were enrolled between 2006 and 2011, comprising the prospective cohort. Two-year questionnaire follow-up was obtained on 989 (82%), while telephone follow-up was obtained on 1112 (92%). If a patient reported having a subsequent surgery, operative reports detailing the subsequent procedure(s) were obtained and categoriezed. A repeated meaures ANOVA was used to reveal significatnt differences in patient reported outcomes. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to determine independent risk factors for reoperation. Results: One hundred and twenty-two patients (10.1%) underwent a total of 172 subsequent procedures on the ipsilateral knee at 2-year follow-up. Of the reoperation procedures, 26.7% were meniscus procedures (69% meniscectomy, 26% repair), 18.6% were subsequent rACLR, 17.4% were cartilage procedures (61% chondroplasty, 17% microfracture, and 13% mosaicplasty), 10% hardware removal, and 9.3% were procedures for arthrofibrosis such has lysis of adhesions and synovectomy. Patients who had reoperations had significantly lower IKDC, KOOS symptoms and pain scores, and WOMAC stiffness scores at two-year follow up. Multivariate analysis revealed that patients under 20 years old were 2.1 times more likely than patients aged 20-29 to have a reoperation. Use of allograft at the time of rACLR and staged revision (bone grafting of

  17. Predictors of Revision Surgery After Primary Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yabroudi, Mohammad A.; Björnsson, Haukur; Lynch, Andrew D.; Muller, Bart; Samuelsson, Kristian; Tarabichi, Majd; Karlsson, Jón; Fu, Freddie H.; Harner, Christopher D.; Irrgang, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery occurs in 5% to 15% of individuals undergoing ACL reconstruction. Identifying predictors for revision ACL surgery is of essence in the pursuit of creating adequate prevention programs and to identify individuals at risk for reinjury and revision. Purpose: To determine predictors of revision ACL surgery after failed primary ACL reconstruction. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 251 participants (mean age ± SD, 26.1 ± 9.9 years) who had undergone primary ACL reconstruction 1 to 5 years earlier completed a comprehensive survey to determine predictors of revision ACL surgery at a mean 3.4 ± 1.3 years after the primary ACL reconstruction. Potential predictors that were assessed included subject characteristics (age at the time of surgery, time from injury to surgery, sex, body mass index, preinjury activity level, return to sport status), details of the initial injury (mechanism; concomitant injury to other ligaments, menisci, and cartilage), surgical details of the primary reconstruction (Lachman and pivot shift tests under anesthesia, graft type, femoral drilling technique, reconstruction technique), and postoperative course (length of rehabilitation, complications). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify factors that predicted the need for revision ACL surgery. Results: Overall, 21 (8.4%) subjects underwent revision ACL surgery. Univariate analysis showed that younger age at the time of surgery (P = .003), participation in sports at a competitive level (P = .023), and double-bundle ACL reconstruction (P = .024) predicted increased risk of revision ACL surgery. Allograft reconstructions also demonstrated a trend toward greater risk of revision ACL surgery (P = .076). No other variables were significantly associated with revision ACL surgery. Multivariate analysis revealed that revision ACL surgery was

  18. Functional Performance Testing After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Geoffrey D.; Harris, Joshua D.; Gupta, Anil K.; McCormick, Frank M.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Cole, Brian J.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: When to allow an athlete to return to unrestricted sporting activity after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction remains controversial. Purpose: To report the results of functional performance testing reported in the literature for individuals at differing time points following ACL reconstruction and to examine differences between graft types. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A systematic review of Medline, Scopus, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials was performed using PRISMA guidelines. Inclusion criteria were English-language studies that examined any functional rehabilitation test from 6 months to 2 years following ACL reconstruction. All patient-, limb-, and knee-specific demographics were extracted from included investigations. All functional rehabilitation tests were analyzed and compared when applicable. Results: The search term returned a total of 890 potential studies, with 88 meeting inclusion and exclusion criteria. A total of 4927 patients were included, of which 66% were male. The mean patient age was 26.5 ± 3.4 years. The predominant graft choices for reconstruction were bone–patellar tendon–bone (BPTB) autograft (59.8%) and hamstring autograft (37.9%). The most commonly reported functional tests were the hop tests. The results of these functional tests, as reported in the Limb Symmetry Index (LSI), improved with increasing time, with nearly all results greater than 90% at 1 year following primary ACL reconstruction. At 6 months postoperatively, a number of isokinetic strength measurements failed to reach 80% LSI, most commonly isokinetic knee extension testing in both BPTB and hamstring autograft groups. The knee flexion strength deficit was significantly less in the BPTB autograft group as compared with those having hamstring autograft at 1 year postoperatively, while no significant differences were found in isokinetic extension strength between the 2 groups. Conclusion: Hop

  19. Anterior Medial Meniscal Root Tears: A Novel Arthroscopic All Inside Repair

    PubMed Central

    Osti, L.; Del Buono, A.; Maffulli, N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Management of tears of the anterior and posterior roots of the meniscus is still controversial. We wish to propose a simple technique of suture anchor to repair tears of the anterior root of the medial meniscus. Methods Twelve patients, active males, underwent arthroscopic repair of the anterior meniscal horn between 2009 and 2011. All were assessed postoperatively at an average follow-up of 1 year after the index operation. Results At the last appointment, the average Lysholm scores was improved from a pre-operative average value of 48±17 to a postoperative value of 91±7 (P<0.001); five patients (45.3%) were scored as excellent (≥95), and 7 (54.6%) as good (85–94). At the last appointment, 8 of 9 active patients practiced sport at the same preoperative level, 1 (8.5%) had changed to lower level of activity. No technique related complications were evident. PMID:26535186

  20. Arterial complications, venous thromboembolism and deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Rob Paulus Augustinus; Reijman, Max; Janssen, Daan Martijn; van Mourik, Jan Bernardus Antonius

    2016-01-01

    AIM To summarize the current knowledge on vascular complications and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. METHODS A systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, Web of Science, CINAHL, PubMed publisher, and Google scholar medical literature databases were searched up to November 10, 2015. Any arthroscopic surgical method of primary or revision intra-articular ACL reconstruction of all graft types in humans was included. A risk of bias assessment was determined. RESULTS Fourty-seven studies were included in the review. Pseudaneurysms were the most frequently reported arterial complication after ACL reconstruction, irrespective of graft type or method of graft fixation with an incidence of 0.3%. The time to diagnosis of arterial complications after ACL reconstruction varied from days to mostly weeks but even years. After ACL reconstruction without thromboprophylaxis, the incidence of DVT was 9.7%, of which 2.1% was symptomatic. The incidence of pulmonary embolism was 0.1%. Tourniquet time > 2 h was related to venous thromboembolism. Thromboprophylaxis is indicated in patients with risk factors for venous thromboembolism. CONCLUSION After ACL reconstruction, the incidence of arterial complications, symptomatic DVT and pulmonary embolism was 0.3%, 2.1% and 0.1% respectively. Arterial complications may occur with all types of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction, methods of graft fixation as well as any type of graft. Patients considered to be at moderate or high risk of venous thromboembolism should routinely receive thromboprophylaxis after ACL reconstruction.

  1. Arterial complications, venous thromboembolism and deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Rob Paulus Augustinus; Reijman, Max; Janssen, Daan Martijn; van Mourik, Jan Bernardus Antonius

    2016-01-01

    AIM To summarize the current knowledge on vascular complications and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. METHODS A systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, Web of Science, CINAHL, PubMed publisher, and Google scholar medical literature databases were searched up to November 10, 2015. Any arthroscopic surgical method of primary or revision intra-articular ACL reconstruction of all graft types in humans was included. A risk of bias assessment was determined. RESULTS Fourty-seven studies were included in the review. Pseudaneurysms were the most frequently reported arterial complication after ACL reconstruction, irrespective of graft type or method of graft fixation with an incidence of 0.3%. The time to diagnosis of arterial complications after ACL reconstruction varied from days to mostly weeks but even years. After ACL reconstruction without thromboprophylaxis, the incidence of DVT was 9.7%, of which 2.1% was symptomatic. The incidence of pulmonary embolism was 0.1%. Tourniquet time > 2 h was related to venous thromboembolism. Thromboprophylaxis is indicated in patients with risk factors for venous thromboembolism. CONCLUSION After ACL reconstruction, the incidence of arterial complications, symptomatic DVT and pulmonary embolism was 0.3%, 2.1% and 0.1% respectively. Arterial complications may occur with all types of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction, methods of graft fixation as well as any type of graft. Patients considered to be at moderate or high risk of venous thromboembolism should routinely receive thromboprophylaxis after ACL reconstruction. PMID:27672574

  2. Early histologic, metabolic, and vascular assessment of anterior cruciate ligament autografts

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiner, J.B.; Amiel, D.; Harwood, F.L.; Akeson, W.H.

    1989-01-01

    A rabbit model for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using autogenous patellar tendon was utilized to study the early events of autograft cellular dynamics. Biochemical, autoradiographic, histological, and vascular injection techniques demonstrated that the native autograft cell population rapidly necroses. This repopulation occurs without a vascular contribution; cells entering the autograft are reliant upon synovial fluid nutrition.

  3. Editorial Commentary: Anatomy of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament - Are We Up to Date?

    PubMed

    Provencher, Matthew T

    2016-01-01

    This systematic review demonstrates that knee anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) anatomic landmarks continue to be better defined, but debate as to the precise location of the ACL femoral and tibial footprints persists. The ACL anatomy of an individual patient may ultimately be impossible to determine using generalized research data, but current research probably gets us pretty close.

  4. Implementation of Open and Closed Kinetic Chain Quadriceps Strengthening Exercises after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Michael D.; Denegar, Craig R.; Winzenried, Jay A.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the effects of open kinetic chain (OKC) and closed kinetic chain (CKC) exercise on anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) strain and patellofemoral joint stress, suggesting a combination of the two for quadriceps strengthening after ACL reconstruction. Both OKC and CKC exercises may be modified and implemented for quadriceps strengthening after…

  5. Training for Women's Basketball: A Biomechanical Emphasis for Preventing Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettitt, Robert W.; Bryson, Erin R.

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes proposed variables linked with higher incidences of anterior cruciate ligament tears in females and the biomechanical aspects of the lower extremity during the performance of common basketball skills, focusing on gender differences in knee joint stability and neuromuscular control, biomechanical aspects of lower extremity skills in…

  6. How to overcome severed sutures of the tibial bone peg in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Yip, Daniel K H; Wong, Jimmy W K; Chien, Eric P

    2002-03-01

    We report a case of severed sutures of the tibial bone peg during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The graft retracted proximally in the bone tunnel. We describe a simple and aesthetically acceptable method to salvage this rare complication by use of a small arthrotomy through the defect in the remaining patellar tendon.

  7. What would you do? Acute extension block caused by anterior cruciate ligament tear: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pedowitz, R A; Garrett, W E

    1996-08-01

    Acute knee locking is usually attributed to a displaced meniscus tear. This case involved late diagnosis of mechanical extension block caused by anterior displacement of a torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) with impingement in extension. Definitive reconstruction was delayed after debridement of the ACL stump to improve preoperative range of motion. Despite this, the patient still had difficulty regaining extension after surgery. Early treatment of mechanical extension block may facilitate motion recovery after ACL reconstruction.

  8. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries in female athletes: Part 2, a meta-analysis of neuromuscular interventions aimed at injury prevention.

    PubMed

    Hewett, Timothy E; Ford, Kevin R; Myer, Gregory D

    2006-03-01

    Female athletes have a 4 to 6 times higher incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injury than do male athletes participating in the same landing and pivoting sports. This greater risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury, coupled with a geometric increase in participation (doubling each decade), has led to a significant rise in anterior cruciate ligament injuries in female athletes. The gender gap in anterior cruciate ligament injury, combined with evidence that the underpinnings of this serious health problem are neuromuscular in nature, leads to the development of neuromuscular interventions designed to prevent injury. A systematic review of the published literature yielded 6 published interventions targeted toward anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention in female athletes. Four of 6 significantly reduced knee injury incidence, and 3 of 6 significantly reduced anterior cruciate ligament injury incidence in female athletes. A meta-analysis of these 6 studies demonstrates a significant effect of neuromuscular training programs on anterior cruciate ligament injury incidence in female athletes (test for overall effect, Z = 4.31, P < .0001). Examination of the similarities and differences between the training regimens gives insight into the development of more effective and efficient interventions. The purpose of this "Current Concepts" review is to highlight the relative effectiveness of these interventions in reducing anterior cruciate ligament injury rates and to evaluate the common training components between the training studies. In addition, the level of rigor of these interventions, the costs and the difficulty of implementation, the compliance with these interventions, and the performance benefits are discussed. This review summarizes conclusions based on evidence from the common components of the various interventions to discuss their potential to reduce anterior cruciate ligament injury risk and assess their potential for combined use in more effective

  9. Pre-tibial synovial cyst after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: case report☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Bulisani, Luís Eduardo Pedigoni; Bulisani, Erickson

    2014-01-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament has been modernized through new surgical techniques and new materials. When tibial fixation is performed using an absorbable screw, complications may occur, such as formation of a pre-tibial cyst. The case described here is about a patient who presented an anteromedial synovial cyst in his right knee, three years after having undergone ACL reconstruction. The patient did not present any pain nor any complaints other than a mass that progressively increased in size, worsened after physical activities. Imaging examinations were requested: simple radiography of the knee and magnetic resonance. Anteromedial imaging of the knee showed a mass with well-delimited borders and internal fluid content, suggestive of a synovial cyst, with communication with the joint cavity through the tibial tunnel, without presenting enlargement or absorption of the bone tunnel. The cyst was surgically resected and the tibial tunnel occlusion was performed using a bone plug. The diagnosis of a synovial cyst was subsequently confirmed through the results from the anatomopathological examination. The patient presented good clinical evolution, with disappearance of the symptoms and a return to physical activities. PMID:26229880

  10. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with fresh-frozen patellar tendon allografts: sixty cases with 2 years' minimum follow-up.

    PubMed

    Nín, J R; Leyes, M; Schweitzer, D

    1996-01-01

    A prospective study was performed on 101 patients who underwent an arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with fresh-frozen patellar tendon allograft (bone-patellar tendon-bone). We present the results of the first 60 patients with a minimum follow-up of 2 years. Thirty-four were men and 26 women with a mean age of 23. In 45 patients, a postoperative arthroscopy was performed, and tissue biopsies of the reconstructed ACL were obtained. Patients were evaluated according to the International Knee Documentation Committee evaluation form. After a mean follow-up of 47 months, the overall results were normal or nearly normal in 85%. Under postoperative arthroscopy, the macroscopic appearance of the implant was similar to that of a normal ligament. The ACL allograft was covered with a normal, well-vascularized synovium. There were no cases of infection, disease transmission or tissue rejection. We conclude that the use of fresh-frozen patellar tendon allografts is a good method of ACL reconstruction.

  11. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with fresh-frozen patellar tendon allografts: sixty cases with 2 years' minimum follow-up.

    PubMed

    Nín, J R; Leyes, M; Schweitzer, D

    1996-01-01

    A prospective study was performed on 101 patients who underwent an arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with fresh-frozen patellar tendon allograft (bone-patellar tendon-bone). We present the results of the first 60 patients with a minimum follow-up of 2 years. Thirty-four were men and 26 women with a mean age of 23. In 45 patients, a postoperative arthroscopy was performed, and tissue biopsies of the reconstructed ACL were obtained. Patients were evaluated according to the International Knee Documentation Committee evaluation form. After a mean follow-up of 47 months, the overall results were normal or nearly normal in 85%. Under postoperative arthroscopy, the macroscopic appearance of the implant was similar to that of a normal ligament. The ACL allograft was covered with a normal, well-vascularized synovium. There were no cases of infection, disease transmission or tissue rejection. We conclude that the use of fresh-frozen patellar tendon allografts is a good method of ACL reconstruction. PMID:8961227

  12. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction by using otogenous [correction of otogeneous] hamstring tendons with home-based rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Ugutmen, E; Ozkan, K; Kilincoglu, V; Ozkan, F U; Toker, S; Eceviz, E; Altintas, F

    2008-01-01

    We investigated patients undergoing arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using otogenous hamstring tendons with a cross-pin technique to compare a post-operative home-based rehabilitation programme with a clinic-based programme. ACL reconstruction was performed on 104 patients (103 male) by the same surgeon. The mean age of the patients was 31.5 years (range 18 - 43 years) and the mean time interval between injury and operation was 34.3 months. Patients were randomly allocated to either a home-based (n = 52) or clinic-based rehabilitation programme (n = 52). Mean follow-up was 31.1 months (range 12 - 66 months). Patients underwent a series of examinations before and after surgery in order to evaluate functional recovery of their injured knee. The results demonstrated that using otogeneous hamstring tendons for ACL reconstruction was safe and produced satisfactory results. The study also demonstrated that a home-based rehabilitation programme was as effective as a clinic-based programme.

  13. Association Between Meniscal and Chondral Lesions and Timing of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    de Campos, Gustavo Constantino; Nery, Wilton; Teixeira, Paulo Eduardo Portes; Araujo, Paulo Henrique; Alves, Wilson de Mello

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a common sports injury and is known to be associated with an increased risk of knee osteoarthritis. Several studies have indicated that the risk of additional injuries to the menisci and articular cartilage increases with delays in the treatment of ACL tears. However, no consensus has been reached regarding the ideal timing for ACL reconstruction in terms of preventing secondary lesions. Purpose: To determine how the time elapsed between an ACL lesion and its reconstruction affects the incidence of meniscal and chondral lesions. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Medical records of 764 patients who underwent primary ACL reconstruction were reviewed. Data from arthroscopic findings that included information about meniscal lesions and full-thickness articular cartilage lesions at the time of surgery were collected. The association between time elapsed between ACL lesion and reconstruction surgery and incidence of articular cartilage and meniscal lesions was analyzed by chi-square or Fisher exact test. The risk of secondary lesion was calculated by odds ratios (ORs) obtained from simple logistic regression analysis. Results: A positive correlation was observed between time after injury and the presence of any articular lesions (P = .003), cartilage lesions (P = .01), and medial meniscus lesions (P < .001). When analyzing the risk of secondary lesion relative to the reference period (<2 months), it was observed that the odds of finding any articular injury at the time of ACL reconstruction increased when the time from ACL injury to surgery was between 12 and 24 months (OR = 2.62) and >24 months (OR = 5.88). Furthermore, the odds of lesions on the medial meniscus increased when the timing between injury and surgery was 6 to 12 months (OR = 2.71) and continued to increase when the timing was 12 to 24 months (OR = 3.78) and >24 months (OR = 9.07). Conclusion: Associated articular lesions

  14. A review of ultrasonographic methods for the assessment of the anterior cruciate ligament in patients with knee instability – diagnostics using a posterior approach

    PubMed Central

    Kielar, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Aim The purpose of the study was to improve the ultrasonographic assessment of the anterior cruciate ligament by an inclusion of a dynamic element. The proposed functional modification aims to restore normal posterior cruciate ligament tension, which is associated with a visible change in the ligament shape. This method reduces the risk of an error resulting from subjectively assessing the shape of the posterior cruciate ligament. It should be also emphasized that the method combined with other ultrasound anterior cruciate ligament assessment techniques helps increase diagnostic accuracy. Methods Ultrasonography is used as an adjunctive technique in the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament injury. The paper presents a sonographic technique for the assessment of suspected anterior cruciate ligament insufficiency supplemented by the use of a dynamic examination. This technique can be recommended as an additional procedure in routine ultrasound diagnostics of anterior cruciate ligament injuries. Results Supplementing routine ultrasonography with the dynamic assessment of posterior cruciate ligament shape changes in patients with suspected anterior cruciate ligament injury reduces the risk of subjective errors and increases diagnostic accuracy. This is important especially in cases of minor anterior knee instability and bilateral anterior knee instability. Conclusions An assessment of changes in posterior cruciate ligament using a dynamic ultrasound examination effectively complements routine sonographic diagnostic techniques for anterior cruciate ligament insufficiency.

  15. A review of ultrasonographic methods for the assessment of the anterior cruciate ligament in patients with knee instability – diagnostics using a posterior approach

    PubMed Central

    Kielar, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Aim The purpose of the study was to improve the ultrasonographic assessment of the anterior cruciate ligament by an inclusion of a dynamic element. The proposed functional modification aims to restore normal posterior cruciate ligament tension, which is associated with a visible change in the ligament shape. This method reduces the risk of an error resulting from subjectively assessing the shape of the posterior cruciate ligament. It should be also emphasized that the method combined with other ultrasound anterior cruciate ligament assessment techniques helps increase diagnostic accuracy. Methods Ultrasonography is used as an adjunctive technique in the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament injury. The paper presents a sonographic technique for the assessment of suspected anterior cruciate ligament insufficiency supplemented by the use of a dynamic examination. This technique can be recommended as an additional procedure in routine ultrasound diagnostics of anterior cruciate ligament injuries. Results Supplementing routine ultrasonography with the dynamic assessment of posterior cruciate ligament shape changes in patients with suspected anterior cruciate ligament injury reduces the risk of subjective errors and increases diagnostic accuracy. This is important especially in cases of minor anterior knee instability and bilateral anterior knee instability. Conclusions An assessment of changes in posterior cruciate ligament using a dynamic ultrasound examination effectively complements routine sonographic diagnostic techniques for anterior cruciate ligament insufficiency. PMID:27679732

  16. Surgery for anterior cruciate ligament deficiency: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Oliver S

    2012-01-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has entertained scientific minds since the Weber brothers provided biomechanical insight into the importance of the ACL in maintaining normal knee kinematics. Robert Adams described the first clinical case of ACL rupture in 1837 some 175 years to date, followed by Mayo-Robson of Leeds who performed the first ACL repair in 1895. At that time, most patients presented late and clinicians started to appreciate signs and symptoms and disabilities associated with such injuries. Hey Groves of Bristol provided the initial description of an ACL reconstruction with autologous tissue graft in 1917, almost as we know it today. His knowledge and achievements were, however, not uniformly appreciated during his life time. What followed was a period of startling ingenuity which created an amazing variety of different surgical procedures often based more on surgical fashion and the absence of a satisfactory alternative than any indication that continued refinements were leading to improved results. It is hence not surprising that real inventors were forgotten, good ideas discarded and untried surgical methods adopted with uncritical enthusiasm only to be set aside without further explanation. Over the past 100 years, surgeons have experimented with a variety of different graft sources including xenograft, and allografts, whilst autologous tissue has remained the most popular choice. Synthetic graft materials enjoyed temporary popularity in the 1980 and 1990s, in the misguided belief that artificial ligaments may be more durable and better equipped to withstand stresses and strains. Until the 1970s, ACL reconstructions were considered formidable procedures, often so complex and fraught with peril that they remained reserved for a chosen few, never gaining the level of popularity they are enjoying today. The increasing familiarity with arthroscopy, popularised through Jackson and Dandy, and enhancements in surgical technology firmly established

  17. Neural Excitability Alterations After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Pietrosimone, Brian G.; Lepley, Adam S.; Ericksen, Hayley M.; Clements, Amy; Sohn, David H.; Gribble, Phillip A.

    2015-01-01

    Context Neuromuscular dysfunction is common after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R). However, little is known about quadriceps spinal-reflex and descending corticomotor excitability after ACL-R. Understanding the effects of ACL-R on spinal-reflex and corticomotor excitability will help elucidate the origins of neuromuscular dysfunction. Objective To determine whether spinal-reflex excitability and corticomotor excitability differed between the injured and uninjured limbs of patients with unilateral ACL-R and between these limbs and the matched limbs of healthy participants. Design Case-control study. Setting Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants A total of 28 patients with unilateral ACL-R (9 men, 19 women; age = 21.28 ± 3.79 years, height = 170.95 ± 10.04 cm, mass = 73.18 ± 18.02 kg, time after surgery = 48.10 ± 36.17 months) and 29 participants serving as healthy controls (9 men, 20 women; age = 21.55 ± 2.70 years, height = 170.59 ± 8.93 cm, mass = 71.89 ± 12.70 kg) volunteered. Main Outcome Measure(s) Active motor thresholds (AMTs) were collected from the vastus medialis (VM) using transcranial magnetic stimulation. We evaluated VM spinal reflexes using the Hoffmann reflex normalized to maximal muscle responses (H : M ratio). Voluntary quadriceps activation was measured with the superimposed-burst technique and calculated using the central activation ratio (CAR). We also evaluated whether ACL-R patients with high or low voluntary activation had different outcomes. Results The AMT was higher in the injured than in the uninjured limb in the ACL-R group (t27 = 3.32, P = .003) and in the matched limb of the control group (t55 = 2.05, P = .04). The H : M ratio was bilaterally higher in the ACL-R than the control group (F1,55 = 5.17, P = .03). The quadriceps CAR was bilaterally lower in the ACL-R compared with the control group (F1,55 = 10.5, P = .002). The ACL-R group with low voluntary activation (CAR < 0.95) had higher AMT than

  18. Preliminary report on the Jones, Ellison, Slocum (JES) repair for symptomatic anterior cruciate deficient knees.

    PubMed

    Ritter, M A; Leaming, E S; McCarroll, J R

    1983-01-01

    A modified Jones intraarticular anterior cruciate reconstruction was combined with a distal iliotibial band transfer (Ellison) and a pes anserinus transfer (Slocum) for patients with symptomatic anterior cruciate deficient knees. The procedure was performed on 15 young (average age, 22.5 years) athletes, in a single operation through a long, straight, anterior, midline incision. Preoperatively, all 15 patients (15 knees) had symptomatic instability and all but one had a positive pivot shift. At follow up (averaging 39 month range 24-60 months) 13 (93%) had the pivot shift eliminated and only one, with 36 months followup, had instability on return to sports. Postoperatively, patients were immobilized 3 weeks and then were started on a physical therapy program which ended in return to sports at 1 year.

  19. Increased Compliance With Supervised Rehabilitation Improves Functional Outcome and Return to Sport After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Recreational Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Fucai; Banerjee, Anirban; Shen, Liang; Krishna, Lingaraj

    2015-01-01

    Background: Successful return to sport is an important outcome measure after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and a reason for patients’ decisions to elect surgery. Rehabilitation programs supervised by physical therapists are routinely prescribed after ACL reconstruction surgery. However, the added advantage of supervised physical therapy after ACL reconstruction is still debatable. Hypothesis: Attending more supervised physical therapy sessions after arthroscopic ACL reconstruction in recreational athletes increases their chance of successful return to sport. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: The authors analyzed 93 recreational athletes who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction. After arthroscopic single-bundle ACL reconstruction, patients were advised to attend 20 supervised physical therapy sessions. Patients’ demographics, surgical details, and outcome measures (Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score [KOOS], Lysholm scale, and Short Form–36 Health Survey [SF-36]) were recorded presurgery and at 1-year follow-up. Ability to return to sports was documented through patients’ self-report. The attendance at physical therapy by each patient was obtained by examining database records and assessed as fully compliant (>15 sessions), moderately compliant (6-15 sessions), or noncompliant (<6 sessions). Results: Patients in the fully compliant group had significantly greater odds (odds ratio [OR], 18.5; 95% CI, 1.9-184.5; P = .013) of a successful return to sport as compared with the noncompliant group. Patients in the moderately compliant group also had greater odds of returning to sport as compared with the noncompliant group (OR, 4.2; 95% CI, 1.0-16.6; P = .043). Patients in the fully compliant group had significantly greater scores on the Lysholm (P < .001), KOOS Sports and Recreation subscale (P = .021), KOOS Symptoms subscale (P = .040), and SF-36 physical component summary (PCS) (P = .012) as compared with

  20. The Results of All-Inside Meniscus Repair Using the Viper Repair System Simultaneously with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hong Je; Kim, Kwang Mee; Cho, Hang Hwan; Espinosa, Johnsel C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Meniscus tears are commonly associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures. It is essential to repair meniscal tears as much as possible to prevent early osteoarthritis and to gain additional stability in the knee joint. We evaluated the results of arthroscopic all-inside repair using the Meniscal Viper Repair System (Arthrex) on meniscus tears simultaneously with ACL reconstruction. Methods Nineteen out of 22 patients who were treated with arthroscopic all-inside repair using the Meniscal Viper Repair System for meniscus tear associated with ACL rupture were evaluated. ACL reconstructions were performed at the same period. The mean follow-up period was 16.5 months (range, 12 to 24 months). The clinical results of the meniscus repair were evaluated by symptoms (such as catching or locking), tenderness, effusion, range of motion limitation, and the McMurray test. Clinical success was defined by negative results in all five categories. The Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) score was evaluated. Objective results were evaluated with secondary look arthroscopy or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI results were categorized as completely repaired, incompletely repaired, and failure by Henning's classification. The results of second-look arthroscopy were evaluated with the criteria of meniscal healing. Results The clinical success rate was 95.4% and the HSS scores were 93.9 ± 5.4 at the final follow-up. According to Henning's classification, 15 out of 18 cases showed complete healing (83.3%) and two cases (11.1%) showed incomplete healing. Seventeen out of 18 cases that underwent second-look arthroscopy showed complete healing (94.4%) according to the criteria of meniscal healing. Only one case showed failure and the failure was due to a re-rupture at the sutured area. Complications of ACL reconstruction or meniscus repair were not present. Conclusions The results demonstrate that arthroscopic all-inside repair using the Meniscal Viper Repair

  1. RISKS AND CONSEQUENCES OF USING THE TRANSPORTAL TECHNIQUE IN RECONSTRUCTING THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT: RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN THE FEMORAL TUNNEL, LATERAL SUPERIOR GENICULAR ARTERY AND LATERAL EPICONDYLE OF THE FEMORAL CONDYLE

    PubMed Central

    Astur, Diego Costa; Aleluia, Vinicius; Santos, Ciro Veronese; Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Badra, Ricardo; Oliveira, Saulo Gomes; Kaleka, Camila Cohen; Cohen, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Define a security zone to avoid possibles vascular and ligamentar complications during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Methods: Arthroscopic reconstruction using the transtibial and transportal technique in cadaver knees was performed followed by dissection and measurement of the distance between the femoral tunnel and the proximal attachment of the lateral collateral ligament and the femoral tunnel and the lateral superior genicular artery. Results: The measure of the analysed distances show us an aproximation between the major branch of the lateral superior genicular artery and the femoral insertion of the colateral lateral ligament and the femoral tunnel during the transportal technique. Conclusion: We realize that the use of technical ship it to arthroscopic ACL reconstruction has a higher probability of injury to the lateral geniculate artery and insertion of the lateral collateral ligament, promoting post-surgical complications such as instability of the knee, osteonecrosis of the femoral condyle and ligamentização graft. PMID:27047873

  2. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided aspiration of an anterior cruciate ligament ganglion cyst: description of technique and case presentation.

    PubMed

    Krill, Michael; Peck, Evan

    2014-12-01

    An anterior cruciate ligament ganglion cyst is an infrequent but potentially clinically significant cause of knee pain. Although the cyst may be removed surgically, percutaneous ultrasound-guided anterior cruciate ligament ganglion cyst aspiration and injection is feasible. To our knowledge, we present the first reported case description of the utilization of ultrasound guidance to perform this procedure with a successful clinical outcome. PMID:25088315

  3. Arthroscopic Latarjet and Capsular Shift (ALCS) procedure: a new "freehand" technique for anterior shoulder instability associated with significant bone defects.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Deepak N

    2015-03-01

    Anterior shoulder instability associated with significant bone loss has been described as "bony-instability," and this condition is usually treated with an anterior glenoid bone grafting procedure (Latarjet procedure). The Latarjet procedure involves transfer of the horizontal limb of the coracoid process along with the conjoint tendon to the anterior glenoid rim, and is traditionally performed as an open surgical procedure. Recently, an arthroscopic technique for the Latarjet procedure has been described; the technique necessitates the use of specialized instrumentation and involves excision of the entire anterior capsule to facilitate coracoid fixation. We describe a new "freehand" arthroscopic technique for the Latarjet procedure, and, in addition, a simultaneous capsular shift to further optimize mid and end range stability. This technique eliminates the use of additional instrumentation and can be done using routine arthroscopic instruments. Preliminary experience with this technique suggests that the arthroscopic Latarjet and capsular shift is a technically demanding procedure. Glenohumeral capsule can be preserved, and this should be attempted wherever possible to optimize stability. Additional specialized instrumentation would probably reduce surgical time; however, the procedure can be performed with routine instruments.

  4. One step arthroscopically assisted Latarjet and posterior bone-block, for recurrent posterior instability and anterior traumatic dislocation.

    PubMed

    D'Ambrosi, Riccardo; Perfetti, Carlo; Garavaglia, Guido; Taverna, Ettore

    2015-01-01

    This case presents the challenges of the surgical management for a patient with a history of recurrent posterior shoulder instability and subsequently traumatic anterior dislocation. The patient was already on the waiting list for an arthroscopic posterior stabilization with anchors, when a car accident caused an additional anterior shoulder dislocation. This traumatic anterior dislocation created a bone loss with a glenoid fracture and aggravated the preexisting posterior instability. In order to address both problems, we decided to perform an arthroscopically assisted Latarjet procedure for anterior instability and to stabilize with a bone graft for posterior instability. To our best knowledge, this type of surgical procedure has so far never been reported in the literature. The purpose of this report is to present the surgical technique and to outline the decision making process.

  5. One step arthroscopically assisted Latarjet and posterior bone-block, for recurrent posterior instability and anterior traumatic dislocation

    PubMed Central

    D’Ambrosi, Riccardo; Perfetti, Carlo; Garavaglia, Guido; Taverna, Ettore

    2015-01-01

    This case presents the challenges of the surgical management for a patient with a history of recurrent posterior shoulder instability and subsequently traumatic anterior dislocation. The patient was already on the waiting list for an arthroscopic posterior stabilization with anchors, when a car accident caused an additional anterior shoulder dislocation. This traumatic anterior dislocation created a bone loss with a glenoid fracture and aggravated the preexisting posterior instability. In order to address both problems, we decided to perform an arthroscopically assisted Latarjet procedure for anterior instability and to stabilize with a bone graft for posterior instability. To our best knowledge, this type of surgical procedure has so far never been reported in the literature. The purpose of this report is to present the surgical technique and to outline the decision making process. PMID:26288539

  6. The effect of the menstrual cycle on anterior cruciate ligament injuries in women as determined by hormone levels.

    PubMed

    Wojtys, Edward M; Huston, Laura J; Boynton, Melbourne D; Spindler, Kurt P; Lindenfeld, Thomas N

    2002-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament injury rates are reported to be two to eight times higher in women than in men within the same sport. Because the menstrual cycle with its monthly hormonal fluctuations is one of the most basic differences between men and women, we investigated the association between the distribution of confirmed anterior cruciate ligament tears and menstrual cycle phase. Sixty-nine female athletes who sustained an acute anterior cruciate ligament injury were studied within 24 hours of injury at four centers. The mechanism of injury, menstrual cycle details, use of oral contraceptives, and history of previous injury were recorded. Urine samples were collected to validate menstrual cycle phase by measurement of estrogen, progesterone, and luteinizing hormone metabolites and creatinine levels at the time of the anterior cruciate ligament tear. Results from the hormone assays indicate that the women had a significantly greater than expected percentage of anterior cruciate ligament injuries during midcycle (ovulatory phase) and a less than expected percentage of those injuries during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Oral contraceptive use diminished the significant association between anterior cruciate ligament tear distribution and the ovulatory phase.

  7. Single-leg postural stability deficits following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in pediatric and adolescent athletes.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Dai; Howell, David R; Micheli, Lyle J; Meehan, William P

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the postural stability of pediatric and adolescent athletes without anterior cruciate ligament injury with those who underwent anterior cruciate reconstruction (ACLR). Postural stability ratings derived from a video-force plate system during the three stances of the modified Balance Error Scoring System were collected from pediatric and adolescent athletes who underwent ACLR (N=24; mean 1.2 years after surgery) and from uninjured controls (N=479). The postural control rating was calculated as the mean of the displacement and variance of the torso and center of pressure data, normalized on a scale from 0 to 100. A higher rating indicates greater postural stability. Participants who underwent ACLR showed lower postural stability ratings during single-leg stance compared with uninjured controls (40.0 vs. 48.7; P=0.037). ACLR is associated with deficits in postural stability.

  8. Massage Therapy Protocol for Post–Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Zalta, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Background: The intent of the present study was to determine the effectiveness of massage therapy in the rehabilitation of post–anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction patellofemoral pain syndrome. The primary complications following surgical repair of the anterior cruciate ligament—classified as patellofemoral pain syndrome—are hamstring flexion contracture and quadriceps weakness, leading to patellofemoral dysfunction and retropatellar pain. Methods: Treatment included lymphatic drainage, myofascial release, neuromuscular techniques including trigger point release, muscle energy techniques and cross-fiber friction. Orthopedic physical assessment tests were used to chart changes in patellofemoral function and changes in range of motion in the knee during the course of the massage interventions. Subjective reporting on pain level and function were also documented. Results: A decrease in pain level, hamstring flexion contracture and lateral tracking of the patella were documented. Conclusion: Massage therapy was determined to be an effective complementary therapy in the treatment of patellofemoral pain syndrome. PMID:21589717

  9. The immediate intervention effects of robotic training in patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Ye, Miao

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate effects of robot-assisted therapy on functional activity level after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] Participants included 10 patients (8 males and 2 females) following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects participated in robot-assisted therapy and treadmill exercise on different days. The Timed Up-and-Go test, Functional Reach Test, surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis, and maximal extensor strength of isokinetic movement of the knee joint were evaluated in both groups before and after the experiment. [Results] The results for the Timed Up-and-Go Test and the 10-Meter Walk Test improved in the robot-assisted rehabilitation group. Surface electromyography of the vastus medialis muscle showed significant increases in maximum and average discharge after the intervention. [Conclusion] The results suggest that walking ability and muscle strength can be improved by robotic training. PMID:27512258

  10. Free Bone Plug Quadriceps Tendon Harvest and Suspensory Button Attachment for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Todor, Adrian; Caterev, Sergiu; Nistor, Dan Viorel; Khallouki, Youssef

    2016-06-01

    The most commonly used autografts for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction are the bone-patellar tendon-bone and hamstring tendons. Each has its advantages and limitations. The bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft can lead to more donor-site morbidity, and the hamstring autograft can be unpredictable in size. The quadriceps tendon, with or without a bone block, has been described as an alternative graft source and has been used especially in revision cases, but in recent years, it has attracted attention even for primary cases. We report a technique for harvesting a free bone quadriceps tendon graft and attaching an extracortical button for femoral fixation for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. PMID:27656375

  11. Anatomic All-Inside Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Quadriceps Tendon Autograft.

    PubMed

    Crall, Timothy S; Gilmer, Brian B

    2015-12-01

    All-inside anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction has recently gained popularity, in part because of its bone-sparing socket preparation and reported lower pain levels after surgery. However, because this technique uses suture loops and cortical suspension buttons for graft fixation, it has mostly been limited to looped graft constructs (e.g., hamstring autograft, peroneus longus allograft). Quadriceps tendon autograft offers several advantages in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction but, until recently, has not been compatible with suture-loop and cortical suspensory fixation. We describe a technique that allows a relatively short (<75 mm) quadriceps tendon autograft (without bone block) to be used with established all-inside anatomic techniques. PMID:27284521

  12. The immediate intervention effects of robotic training in patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Ye, Miao

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate effects of robot-assisted therapy on functional activity level after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] Participants included 10 patients (8 males and 2 females) following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects participated in robot-assisted therapy and treadmill exercise on different days. The Timed Up-and-Go test, Functional Reach Test, surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis, and maximal extensor strength of isokinetic movement of the knee joint were evaluated in both groups before and after the experiment. [Results] The results for the Timed Up-and-Go Test and the 10-Meter Walk Test improved in the robot-assisted rehabilitation group. Surface electromyography of the vastus medialis muscle showed significant increases in maximum and average discharge after the intervention. [Conclusion] The results suggest that walking ability and muscle strength can be improved by robotic training. PMID:27512258

  13. Long-term interventions effects of robotic training on patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Zhou, Yue; Gu, Rui; Ye, Miao; Ge, Meng; Xu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the long-term interventions effects of robot-assisted therapy rehabilitation on functional activity levels after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 8 patients (6 males and 2 females) who received anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects participated in robot-assisted therapy lasting for one month. The Timed Up-and-Go test, 10-Meter Walk test, Functional Reach Test, surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis, and extensor strength of isokinetic movement of the knee joint were evaluated before and after the intervention. [Results] The average value of the of vastus medialis EMG, Functional Reach Test, and the maximum and average extensor strength of the knee joint isokinetic movement increased significantly, and the time of the 10-Meter Walk test decreased significantly. [Conclusion] These results suggest that walking ability and muscle strength can be improved by robotic walking training as a long-term intervention.

  14. The immediate intervention effects of robotic training in patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Ye, Miao

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate effects of robot-assisted therapy on functional activity level after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] Participants included 10 patients (8 males and 2 females) following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects participated in robot-assisted therapy and treadmill exercise on different days. The Timed Up-and-Go test, Functional Reach Test, surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis, and maximal extensor strength of isokinetic movement of the knee joint were evaluated in both groups before and after the experiment. [Results] The results for the Timed Up-and-Go Test and the 10-Meter Walk Test improved in the robot-assisted rehabilitation group. Surface electromyography of the vastus medialis muscle showed significant increases in maximum and average discharge after the intervention. [Conclusion] The results suggest that walking ability and muscle strength can be improved by robotic training.

  15. Long-term interventions effects of robotic training on patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Zhou, Yue; Gu, Rui; Ye, Miao; Ge, Meng; Xu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the long-term interventions effects of robot-assisted therapy rehabilitation on functional activity levels after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 8 patients (6 males and 2 females) who received anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects participated in robot-assisted therapy lasting for one month. The Timed Up-and-Go test, 10-Meter Walk test, Functional Reach Test, surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis, and extensor strength of isokinetic movement of the knee joint were evaluated before and after the intervention. [Results] The average value of the of vastus medialis EMG, Functional Reach Test, and the maximum and average extensor strength of the knee joint isokinetic movement increased significantly, and the time of the 10-Meter Walk test decreased significantly. [Conclusion] These results suggest that walking ability and muscle strength can be improved by robotic walking training as a long-term intervention.

  16. Inner Synovial Membrane Footprint of the Anterior Elbow Capsule: An Arthroscopic Boundary

    PubMed Central

    Kamineni, Srinath; Bachoura, Abdo; Sasaki, Koichi; Reilly, Danielle; Harris, Kate N.; Sinai, Anthony; Deane, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The purpose of this study is to describe the inner synovial membrane (SM) of the anterior elbow capsule, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Materials and Methods. Twenty-two cadaveric human elbows were dissected and the distal humerus and SM attachments were digitized using a digitizer. The transepicondylar line (TEL) was used as the primary descriptor of various landmarks. The distance between the medial epicondyle and medial SM edge, SM apex overlying the coronoid fossa, the central SM nadir, and the apex of the SM insertion overlying the radial fossa and distance from the lateral epicondyle to lateral SM edge along the TEL were measured and further analyzed. Gender and side-to-side statistical comparisons were calculated. Results. The mean age of the subjects was 80.4 years, with six male and five female cadavers. The SM had a distinctive double arched attachment overlying the radial and coronoid fossae. No gender-based or side-to-side quantitative differences were noted. In 18 out of 22 specimens (81.8%), an infolding extension of the SM was observed overlying the medial aspect of the trochlea. The SM did not coincide with the outer fibrous attachment in any specimen. Conclusion. The humeral footprint of the synovial membrane of the anterior elbow capsule is more complex and not as capacious as commonly understood from the current literature. The synovial membrane nadir between the two anterior fossae may help to explain and hence preempt technical difficulties, a reduction in working arthroscopic volume in inflammatory and posttraumatic pathologies. This knowledge should allow the surgeon to approach this aspect of the anterior elbow compartment space with the confidence that detachment of this synovial attachment, to create working space, does not equate to breaching the capsule. Alternatively, stripping the synovial attachment from the anterior humerus does not constitute an anterior capsular release. PMID:26380112

  17. Re-Tensioning Technique to Cover the Graft With Remnant in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Jung Ho; Yoon, Kyoung Ho; Song, Sang Jun; Roh, Young Hak

    2014-01-01

    A number of remnant-preserving techniques to restore proprioceptive function in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction have been described. However, they might not cover the significant amount of the graft with the synovium of the remnant in many cases. We introduce a simple technique that can cover nearly the entire graft with the synovium by re-tensioning the remnant, which might enhance synovialization of the graft and restoration of proprioception. PMID:25685673

  18. Clinically-Relevant Measures Associated with Altered Contact Forces in Patients with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gardinier, Emily S.; Manal, Kurt; Buchanan, Thomas S.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Background Knee joint contact forces are altered after anterior cruciate ligament injury during walking and may be related to clinically-relevant measures of impairments or self-reported function. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of several clinically-relevant measures with altered knee contact forces in patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury. Methods Data for this study represent a cross-sectional observational analysis of thirty-seven (23 M, 14 F) patients with complete unilateral anterior cruciate ligament injury. Gait analysis with electromyography was used to obtain estimates of tibiofemoral joint contact force using an electromyography-driven musculoskeletal model. Multivariable linear regression was used to identify measures associated with tibiofemoral joint contact force. Findings Involved knee extensor muscle strength and patient-reported knee function on the Global Rating Scale of Perceived Function were significantly associated with peak tibiofemoral contact force for the involved limb. Patients who were stronger and who perceived higher knee function walked with greater contact forces on their involved knees. After controlling for walking speed, involved extensor strength explained 8.9% of the variance in involved peak tibiofemoral contact force and score on the Global Rating Scale explained an additional 9.4% of the variance. Interpretation Improvements in involved quadriceps strength and overall function as measured by patient self-report may be important for increasing involved limb contact forces, thereby restoring loading symmetry in these patients who demonstrate decreased involved limb loading after injury. These results highlight the potential value of studying the recovery of strength, self-reported function and joint loading symmetry in patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury. PMID:24746854

  19. Septic arthritis following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using tendon allografts--Florida and Louisiana, 2000.

    PubMed

    2001-12-01

    In the United States, approximately 50,000 knee surgeries are performed each year for repairing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Tissue allografts frequently are used for ACL reconstruction, and septic arthritis is a rare complication of such procedures. This report describes four patients who acquired postsurgical septic arthritis probably associated with contaminated bone-tendon-bone allografts used for ACL reconstruction. Effective sterilization methods that do not functionally alter musculoskeletal tissue are needed to prevent allograft-related infections.

  20. Clinical outcomes of allograft versus autograft in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Baer, Geoffrey S; Harner, Christopher D

    2007-10-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are the most common complete ligamentous injury to the knee. The optimal graft should be able to reproduce the anatomy and biomechanics of the ACL, be incorporated rapidly with strong initial fixation, and cause low graft-site morbidity. This article reviews the literature comparing the clinical outcomes following allograft and autograft ACL reconstruction and examines current issues regarding graft choice.

  1. Results of meniscectomy and meniscal repair in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    DELEDDA, DAVIDE; ROSSO, FEDERICA; COTTINO, UMBERTO; BONASIA, DAVIDE EDOARDO; ROSSI, ROBERTO

    2015-01-01

    Meniscal tears are commonly associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. A deficient medial meniscus results in knee instability and could lead to higher stress forces on the ACL reconstruction. Comparison of results in meniscectomy and meniscal repairs revealed worse clinical outcomes in meniscectomy, but higher re-operation rates in meniscal repairs. Our aim was to review the results of ACL reconstruction associated with meniscectomy or meniscal repair. PMID:26889472

  2. Risk factors and prevention strategies of non-contact anterior cruciate ligament injuries.

    PubMed

    Laible, Catherine; Sherman, Orrin H

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the number of women playing sports has increased significantly. The passage of Title IX in 1972 had a significant effect in encouraging female participation in sports. This increase in women's sports participation also led to a rise in noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. As ACL injuries in young female athletes have be- come a public health issue, much research has been done on risk factors and prevention strategies.

  3. Clinical outcomes of allograft versus autograft in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Baer, Geoffrey S; Harner, Christopher D

    2007-10-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are the most common complete ligamentous injury to the knee. The optimal graft should be able to reproduce the anatomy and biomechanics of the ACL, be incorporated rapidly with strong initial fixation, and cause low graft-site morbidity. This article reviews the literature comparing the clinical outcomes following allograft and autograft ACL reconstruction and examines current issues regarding graft choice. PMID:17920959

  4. Septic arthritis following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using tendon allografts--Florida and Louisiana, 2000.

    PubMed

    2001-12-01

    In the United States, approximately 50,000 knee surgeries are performed each year for repairing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Tissue allografts frequently are used for ACL reconstruction, and septic arthritis is a rare complication of such procedures. This report describes four patients who acquired postsurgical septic arthritis probably associated with contaminated bone-tendon-bone allografts used for ACL reconstruction. Effective sterilization methods that do not functionally alter musculoskeletal tissue are needed to prevent allograft-related infections. PMID:11770503

  5. Acute simultaneous ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament and patellar tendon.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Hwi; Lee, Gwang Chul; Park, Sung-Hae

    2014-03-01

    Acute simultaneous rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and patellar tendon is a rare injury. We present a case report of a 32-year-old male patient with ruptured ACL and ipsilateral patellar tendon rupture sustained while playing baseball. Surgery was performed on the patellar tendon and the ACL simultaneously. The clinical and radiological outcomes of the treatment were successful. We present this case with a review of the literatures.

  6. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries in female athletes: why are women more susceptible?

    PubMed

    Moeller, J L; Lamb, M M

    1997-04-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries occur most frequently in planting and cutting sports such as basketball, soccer, and volleyball. National Collegiate Athletic Association injury data show that female athletes injure the ACL more frequently than their male counterparts do. The greater incidence of ACL injuries in women probably stems from complex, interrelated factors, possibly including hamstring-quadriceps strength imbalances, joint laxity, and the use of ankle braces. Successful treatment often includes surgery.

  7. Prevention of knee instability. Experimental model for prosthetic anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Rubin, R M; Marshall, J L; Wang, J

    1975-01-01

    Loss of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in the dog results in a predictable type of arthritis. This condition can be prevented by successful prosthetic substitution of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The condition is a practical model, and a sensitive index of success and failure for evaluation of prototype prostheses. Changes in the joint can be differentiated on the basis of cruciate insufficiency and reaction to the synthetic implant. The model was defined by replacing the ACL with a mesh or tape Dacron prosthesis in 16 Beagle dogs. Gait and anterior drawer sign are unreliable parameters of ACL insufficiency in dogs. At sacrifice up to 3 years postoperatively, 8 joints out of 32 joints were without arthritic changes. Arthritis developed in all joints in which the prosthesis elongated or broke. Failure always occurred intra-articularly at the mouth of a bone tunnel. Successes were inconsistent even with a single material and animal breed. The drillhole techniques used in ACL reconstructions are difficult to standardize. Variability in placement of the prosthesis is compounded by cutting action of bone edges. Porous mesh did not provide a lattice for true ligament regeneration through the joint. Fixation was not a problem in this series. PMID:1192669

  8. Knee shape might predict clinical outcome after an anterior cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Eggerding, V; van Kuijk, K S R; van Meer, B L; Bierma-Zeinstra, S M A; van Arkel, E R A; Reijman, M; Waarsing, J H; Meuffels, D E

    2014-06-01

    We have investigated whether shape of the knee can predict the clinical outcome of patients after an anterior cruciate ligament rupture. We used statistical shape modelling to measure the shape of the knee joint of 182 prospectively followed patients on lateral and Rosenberg view radiographs of the knee after a rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament. Subsequently, we associated knee shape with the International Knee Documentation Committee subjective score at two years follow-up. The mean age of patients was 31 years (21 to 51), the majority were male (n = 121) and treated operatively (n = 135). We found two modes (shape variations) that were significantly associated with the subjective score at two years: one for the operatively treated group (p = 0.002) and one for the non-operatively treated group (p = 0.003). Operatively treated patients who had higher subjective scores had a smaller intercondylar notch and a smaller width of the intercondylar eminence. Non-operatively treated patients who scored higher on the subjective score had a more pyramidal intercondylar notch as opposed to one that was more dome-shaped. We conclude that the shape of the femoral notch and the intercondylar eminence is predictive of clinical outcome two years after a rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament.

  9. RESULTS FROM FILLING “REMPLISSAGE” ARTHROSCOPIC TECHNIQUE FOR RECURRENT ANTERIOR SHOULDER DISLOCATION

    PubMed Central

    Gracitelli, Mauro Emilio Conforto; Helito, Camilo Partezani; Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Neto, Arnaldo Amado Ferreira; Benegas, Eduardo; Prada, Flávia de Santis; de Sousa, Augusto Tadeu Barros; Assunção, Jorge Henrique; Sunada, Edwin Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical result from the filling (“remplissage”) technique in association with Bankart lesion repair for treating recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation. Methods: Nine patients (10 shoulders), with a mean follow-up of 13.7 months, presented traumatic recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation. All of them had a Bankart lesion, associated with a Hill-Sachs lesion showing the “engaging” sign. The Hill-Sachs lesion defect was measured and showed an average bone loss of 17.3% (7.7% to 26.7%) in relation to the diameter of the humeral head. All the cases underwent arthroscopic repair of the Bankart lesion, together with filling of the Hill-Sachs lesion by means of tenodesis of the infraspinatus. Results: The Rowe score ranged from 22.5 (10 to 45) before the operation to 80.5 (5 to 100) after the operation (p > 0.001). The UCLA score ranged from 18.0 (8 to 29) to 31.1 (21 to 31) (p > 0.001). The measurements of external and internal rotation at abduction of 90° after the operation were 63.5° (45° to 90°) and 73° (50° to 92°) respectively. Two patients presented recurrence (one with dislocation and the other with subluxation). None of the patients presented pain in the region of the infraspinatus tendon after the operation. Conclusion: Over the short term, the filling (“remplissage”) arthroscopic technique produced improvements in functional scores and a low complication rate when used for treating glenohumeral instability associated with Hill-Sachs lesions. PMID:27027073

  10. Dynamic musculotendinous transfer to replace the anterior cruciate ligament in the dog.

    PubMed

    Adelaar, R S; Zuelzer, W; Anthony, S; Cardea, J A; Lurie, H I

    1983-11-01

    Dynamic muscle-tendon substitution for acute anterior cruciate deficiency in the dog was studied using the semimembranosus muscle-tendon. Nineteen mongrel dogs each had a semimembranosus transfer in one knee; as a control, the anterior cruciate ligament and the semimembranosus were released in the opposite knee. No postoperative immobilisation was used. The anterior drawer sign was assessed before and after operation and when the dogs were killed five months later. Dogs were excluded from the study if they developed infections or contractures of the hind legs. At five months, 11 dogs were available for study. The operated knees were examined histologically and evaluated using a reproducible index of arthritis based on: the macroscopic discoloration of the articular cartilage, the cellularity of the cartilage, the microscopic appearance of the articular surface, the loss of proteoglycans, the formation of osteophytes and the degree of subchondral osteosclerosis. There was no significant difference in the anterior drawer sign or the degree of arthritic changes between knees with a semimembranous transfer and the controls. Examination showed that a muscle-tendon transfer into the tibia was equivalent to transferring the muscle into the posterior capsule--the intra-articular tendon being weak but histologically viable. The transfer did not prevent the anterior drawer sign becoming positive nor the development of osteoarthritis. A second control group, in which three dogs had an arthrotomy and semimembranosus release in both their hind legs, showed that a semimembranosus release alone did not cause osteoarthritis. PMID:6643572

  11. Evaluation of static and dynamic balance in athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury – A controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Tiago Lazzaretti; Felix, Ellen Cristina Rodrigues; Bessa, Felipe; Luna, Natália MS; Sugimoto, Dai; Greve, Júlia Maria D’Andrea; Hernandez, Arnaldo José

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Anterior cruciate ligament injury leads to adaptive responses to maintain postural control. However, there is no consensus regarding whether leg dominance also affects postural control in athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury. The purpose of this study was to evaluate dynamic and static postural control among athletes with and without anterior cruciate ligament injury to the dominant leg. METHODS: Twenty-eight athletes, twenty-one males and seven females aged 15-45 years, were allocated to one of two groups: the anterior cruciate ligament injury group (26±3 years) or the control group without anterior cruciate ligament injury (25±6.5 years). All subjects performed one legged stance tests under eyes open and eyes closed conditions and squat and kick movement tests using a postural control protocol (AccuSwayPlus force platform, Massachusetts). The center of pressure displacement and speed were measured by the force platform. In addition, the distance traveled on the single-leg hop test was assessed as an objective measure of function. RESULTS: Significantly greater mediolateral sway was found under the eyes closed condition (p=0.04) and during squat movement (p=0.01) in the anterior cruciate ligament injury group than in the control group. Analysis of the single-leg hop test results showed no difference between the groups (p=0.73). CONCLUSION: Athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury had greater mediolateral displacement of the center of pressure toward the dominant leg under the eyes closed condition and during squat movement compared to control athletes.

  12. Changes in dynamic medial tibiofemoral contact mechanics and kinematics after injury of the anterior cruciate ligament: a cadaveric model.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Asheesh; Chen, Tony; Santner, Thomas J; El-Amin, Saadiq; Kelly, Natalie H; Warren, Russell F; Maher, Suzanne A

    2013-09-01

    The effects of tears of the anterior cruciate ligament on knee kinematics and contact mechanics during dynamic everyday activities, such as gait, remains unclear. The objective of this study was to characterize anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knee contact mechanics and kinematics during simulated gait. Nine human cadaveric knees were each augmented with a sensor capable of measuring dynamic normal contact stresses on the tibial plateau, mounted on a load-controlled simulator, and subjected to physiological, multidirectional, dynamic loads to mimic gait. Using a mixed model with random knee identifiers, confidence intervals were constructed for contact stress before and after anterior cruciate ligament transection at two points in the gait cycle at which axial force peaked (14% and 45% of the gait cycle). Kinematic and contact mechanics changes after anterior cruciate ligament transection were highly variable across knees. Nonetheless, a statistically significant increase in contact stress in the posterior-central aspect of the medial tibial plateau at 45% of the gait cycle was identified, the location of which corresponds to the location of degenerative changes that are frequently found in patients with chronic anterior cruciate ligament injury. The variability in the contact stress in other regions of the medial plateau at 45% of the gait cycle was partly explained by the variations in osseous geometry across the nine knees tested. At 14% of gait, there was no significant change in peak contact stress after anterior cruciate ligament transection in any of the four quadrants, and none of the possible explanatory variables showed statistical significance. Understanding the variable effect of anterior cruciate ligament injury on contact mechanics based on geometric differences in osseous anatomy is of paramount clinical importance and may be invaluable to select the best reconstruction techniques and counsel patients on their individual risk of subsequent

  13. Changes in dynamic medial tibiofemoral contact mechanics and kinematics after injury of the anterior cruciate ligament: A cadaveric model

    PubMed Central

    Bedi, Asheesh; Chen, Tony; Santner, Thomas J; El-Amin, Saadiq; Kelly, Natalie H; Warren, Russell F; Maher, Suzanne A

    2014-01-01

    The effects of tears of the anterior cruciate ligament on knee kinematics and contact mechanics during dynamic everyday activities, such as gait, remains unclear. The objective of this study was to characterize anterior cruciate ligament–deficient knee contact mechanics and kinematics during simulated gait. Nine human cadaveric knees were each augmented with a sensor capable of measuring dynamic normal contact stresses on the tibial plateau, mounted on a load-controlled simulator, and subjected to physiological, multidirectional, dynamic loads to mimic gait. Using a mixed model with random knee identifiers, confidence intervals were constructed for contact stress before and after anterior cruciate ligament transection at two points in the gait cycle at which axial force peaked (14% and 45% of the gait cycle). Kinematic and contact mechanics changes after anterior cruciate ligament transection were highly variable across knees. Nonetheless, a statistically significant increase in contact stress in the posterior–central aspect of the medial tibial plateau at 45% of the gait cycle was identified, the location of which corresponds to the location of degenerative changes that are frequently found in patients with chronic anterior cruciate ligament injury. The variability in the contact stress in other regions of the medial plateau at 45% of the gait cycle was partly explained by the variations in osseous geometry across the nine knees tested. At 14% of gait, there was no significant change in peak contact stress after anterior cruciate ligament transection in any of the four quadrants, and none of the possible explanatory variables showed statistical significance. Understanding the variable effect of anterior cruciate ligament injury on contact mechanics based on geometric differences in osseous anatomy is of paramount clinical importance and may be invaluable to select the best reconstruction techniques and counsel patients on their individual risk of subsequent

  14. Evaluation of static and dynamic balance in athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury – A controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Tiago Lazzaretti; Felix, Ellen Cristina Rodrigues; Bessa, Felipe; Luna, Natália MS; Sugimoto, Dai; Greve, Júlia Maria D’Andrea; Hernandez, Arnaldo José

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Anterior cruciate ligament injury leads to adaptive responses to maintain postural control. However, there is no consensus regarding whether leg dominance also affects postural control in athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury. The purpose of this study was to evaluate dynamic and static postural control among athletes with and without anterior cruciate ligament injury to the dominant leg. METHODS: Twenty-eight athletes, twenty-one males and seven females aged 15-45 years, were allocated to one of two groups: the anterior cruciate ligament injury group (26±3 years) or the control group without anterior cruciate ligament injury (25±6.5 years). All subjects performed one legged stance tests under eyes open and eyes closed conditions and squat and kick movement tests using a postural control protocol (AccuSwayPlus force platform, Massachusetts). The center of pressure displacement and speed were measured by the force platform. In addition, the distance traveled on the single-leg hop test was assessed as an objective measure of function. RESULTS: Significantly greater mediolateral sway was found under the eyes closed condition (p=0.04) and during squat movement (p=0.01) in the anterior cruciate ligament injury group than in the control group. Analysis of the single-leg hop test results showed no difference between the groups (p=0.73). CONCLUSION: Athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury had greater mediolateral displacement of the center of pressure toward the dominant leg under the eyes closed condition and during squat movement compared to control athletes. PMID:27626471

  15. Immunohistochemical study of mechanoreceptors in the tibial remnant of the ruptured anterior cruciate ligament in human knees.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung Ill; Min, Kyung Dae; Choi, Hyung Suk; Kwon, Sai Won; Chun, Dong Il; Yun, Eun Soo; Lee, Dong Wha; Jin, So Young; Yoo, Jae Ho

    2009-09-01

    This study was performed to identify the mechanoreceptors in the tibial remnants of ruptured human anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) by immunohistochemical staining. Thirty-six specimens of tibial ACL remnants were obtained from patients with ACL ruptures during arthroscopic ACL reconstruction. As control, two normal ACL specimens were taken from healthy knee amputated at thigh level due to trauma. The specimen was serially sectioned at 40 mum. In control group, the average number of sections per specimen was 132, and a total of 264 slices were available. In remnant group, the average number of sections per specimen was 90, and a total of 3,251 slices were available. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to detect the neural element of mechanoreceptors. Histologic examinations were performed under a light microscope and interpreted by a pathologist. Nineteen (8 Ruffini, 11 Golgi) mechanoreceptors were identified in the two normal ACLs, which were evenly distributed at both tibial and femoral attachments. In the remnant group, mechanoreceptors were observed in 12 out of 36 cases (33%), and a total of 17 (6 Ruffini and 11 Golgi) mechanoreceptors observed. No significant differences in the harvest volume, number of sections, age, or time between injury to surgery was observed between the 12 mechanoreceptor-present and the 24 mechanoreceptor-absent ones. The presence of mechanoreceptor at the tibial remnants of torn ACLs was verified. The immunohistochemical staining methodology proved useful, but requires further refinement. Although the mechanoreceptors were detected relatively less frequently than expected, the authors consider that it does not negate the necessity of remnant-preserving ACL reconstruction.

  16. Functional results from reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament using the central third of the patellar ligament and flexor tendons☆

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Leao, Marcos George; Pampolha, Abelardo Gautama Moreira; Orlando Junior, Nilton

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate knee function in patients undergoing reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using the central third of the patellar ligament or the medial flexor tendons of the knee, i.e. quadruple ligaments from the semitendinosus and gracilis (ST-G), by means of the Knee Society Score (KSS) and the Lysholm scale. Methods This was a randomized prospective longitudinal study on 40 patients who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction between September 2013 and August 2014. They comprised 37 males and three females, with ages ranging from 16 to 52 years. The patients were numbered randomly from 1 to 40: the even numbers underwent surgical correction using the ST-G tendons and the odd numbers, using the patellar tendon. Functional evaluations were made using the KSS and Lysholm scale, applied in the evening before the surgical procedure and six months after the operation. Results From the statistical analysis, it could be seen that the patients’ functional capacity was significantly greater after the operation than before the operation. There was strong evidence that the two forms of therapy had similar results (p = >0.05), in all the comparisons. Conclusions The results from the ACL reconstructions were similar with regard to functional recovery of the knee and improvement of quality of life, independent of the type of graft. It was not possible to identify the best method of surgical treatment. The surgeon's clinical and technical experience and the patient are the factors that determine the choice of graft type for use in ACL surgery. PMID:27218084

  17. Effect of malpositioned anterior cruciate ligament replacement on knee joint structures: a biomechanical model.

    PubMed

    Horas, Uwe; Meissner, Stefan A; Kraus, Ralf; Heiss, Christian; Schnettler, Reinhard

    2011-12-01

    Any sort of malpositioning of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) replacement leads to an overload of single fibers of the ACL replacement. As long as this does not result in a tear of these fibers so that isometry of the ACL replacement is restored, the abnormal forces acting in and on the ACL replacement are transmitted from the ACL replacement to the remainder of the knee joint structures. We assumed that the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is notably affected. The present biomechanical model illustrates the relevant force vectors and reveals the extent of the effect of malpositioned ACL replacement on knee joint structures, particularly the PCL. Further investigations are needed to find out if the presumably occurring overload of a malpositioned ACL replacement can be calculated from its position on an individual basis. This may help deduce recommendations for ACL replacement procedures in the future.

  18. A Comparison of Anterior and Posterior Cruciate Ligament Laxity Between Female and Male Basketball Players.

    PubMed

    Weesner, C L; Albohm, M J; Ritter, M A

    1986-05-01

    In brief: The incidence and severity of knee injuries is greater in female than male basketball players. To gain insight into this phenomenon, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) laxity of 90 noninjured female and male high school basketball players were tested with an arthrometer and compared. With leg flexion of 25° ± 5° and 70° ± 5°, no statistically significant differences were found in ACL laxity, nor were significant right-left differences found. Differences in PCL laxity were not consistent. Thus, inadequate conditioning rather than laxity may be the major factor responsible for the higher incidence of knee injuries in female basketball players. If so, adequate preseason and inseason conditioning programs need to be implemented to correct this deficiency.

  19. Spontaneous Healing of the Ruptured Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Justin; Salmon, Lucy; Waller, Alison; Linklater, James; Pinczewski, Leo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: It is widely believed that ACL tears are incapable of healing. However, there are anecdotal experiences of the healed ACL and sporadic case reports and series documenting either clinical or radiographic evidence of healed ACL tears. A truly healed ACL would demonstrate a clinically stable knee on Lachman and pivot shift testing, normal return to function and MRI and/or arthroscopic documentation of a continuous ligament. This is in contrast to “copers” who have an ACL deficient knee but lack instability either because of good neuromuscular control or non-participation in activities which are heavily ACL dependent. In this prospective series we report on the presentation and 5 year follow-up of patients with both clinical and radiographically healed ACLs. Methods: 19 patients who presented between July 2007 and April 2010 within 6 weeks of injury with clinical laxity and MRI confirmed ACL rupture. Patients subsequently demonstrated clinical knee stability at 8-12 weeks after pre-habilitation to obtain a pain free mobile joint. Prospective data was collected on these patients with MRI at 12 months, IKDC clinical and subjective scores, KT1000 instrumental laxity testing and Lysholm knee score at 12, 24 and 60 months. Results: At one year follow-up MRI 18/19 patients demonstrated a healed ACL with normal signal, normal trajectory and continuity of fibres. Remainder 1 patient demonstrated bridging of ACL tear with scar tissue and abnormal trajectory of fibers. 5 of 19 patients re-ruptured within 5 years of follow-up. At 5 years follow-up, intact healed ACL patients had a mean IKDC score of 88, mean Lysholm score of 92 and mean KT1000 score of 1.7 mm. 100% reported regular participation in strenuous sport. Conclusion: Although rare, spontaneous healing of the ACL is possible. The mechanism by which this occurs in unknown. It is recommended that reassessment of knee stability should be performed in the non-acute phase after an appropriate prehabilitation

  20. ANATOMICAL RECONSTRUCTION OF ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT OF THE KNEE: DOUBLE BAND OR SINGLE BAND?

    PubMed Central

    Zanella, Luiz Antonio Zanotelli; Junior, Adair Bervig; Badotti, Augusto Alves; Michelin, Alexandre Froes; Algarve, Rodrigo Ilha; de Quadros Martins, Cesar Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the double-band and single-band techniques for anatomical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee and demonstrate that the double-band technique not only provides greater anterior stability but also causes less pain and a better subjective patient response. Methods: We selected 42 patients who underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, by means of either the single-band anatomical reconstruction technique, using flexor tendon grafts with two tunnels, or the double-band anatomical reconstruction technique, using four tunnels and grafts from the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons. All fixations were performed using interference screws. There was no variation in the sample. Before the operation, the objective and subjective IKDC scores, Lysholm score and length of time with the injury were evaluated. All these variables were reassessed six months later, and the KT-1000 correlation with the contralateral knee was also evaluated. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups in subjective evaluations, but the single-band group showed better results in relation to range of motion and objective evaluations including KT-1000 (with statistical significance). Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that there was no difference between the two groups in subjective evaluations, but better results were found using the single-band anatomical technique, in relation to objective evaluations. PMID:27042621

  1. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. A prospective randomized study of three surgical methods.

    PubMed

    Anderson, A F; Snyder, R B; Lipscomb, A B

    2001-01-01

    A prospective randomized study was performed to determine the differences in results between three methods of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: autogenous bone-patellar tendon-bone graft (group 1), semitendinosus and gracilis tendon graft reconstruction combined with an extraarticular procedure (group 2), and semitendinosus and gracilis tendon graft reconstruction alone (group 3). Preoperatively, there were no significant differences between groups. At a mean of 35.4 +/- 11.6 months postoperatively, 102 patients returned for evaluation. International Knee Documentation Committee knee evaluation revealed no significant differences in symptoms, function, return to pre-injury activity, harvest site abnormalities, or limitation of motion between groups 1 and 3. Patients in group 2 had a higher incidence of patellofemoral crepitation and loss of motion than did patients in group 3. The mean manual maximum KT-1000 arthrometer side-to-side difference was 2.1 +/- 2.0 mm in group 1, which was statistically significantly better than the difference in group 3 (3.1 +/- 2.3 mm). Final knee rating showed that 34 of 35 patients in group 1, 23 of 34 patients in group 2, and 26 of 33 patients in group 3 had a normal or nearly normal overall knee rating. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with a semitendinosus and gracilis or a patellar tendon autograft may yield similar subjective results; however, the patellar tendon autograft may provide better objective stability in the long term. In addition, there appears to be no benefit to combining an intraarticular anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with an extraarticular procedure.

  2. ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT INJURY: TREATMENT AND REHABILITATION. CURRENT PERSPECTIVES AND TRENDS

    PubMed Central

    Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Astur, Diego da Costa; Kanas, Michel; Kaleka, Camila Cohen; Cohen, Moises

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the procedures used by knee surgeons in Brazil for treating and rehabilitating anterior cruciate ligament injuries. Methods: A questionnaire consisting of 21 closed questions was developed, addressing topics relating to treatment and rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The questionnaire was applied to Brazilian knee surgeons during the three days of the 42nd Brazilian Congress of Orthopedics and Traumatology in 2010. Results: A total of 226 surgeons filled out the questionnaire completely. The most commonly used types of graft were hamstrings tendons and the central third of the ipsilateral patellar tendon, which were used by 82.3% and 53.5% of the sample, respectively. The technique of reconstruction with a single transtibial band was the first preference and was used by 66.4% of the participants. A period of 1 to 4 weeks between injury and surgical procedure was considered ideal by most participants (52.65%). Complaints from patients that the knee was ‘giving way’ or unstable and presence of a positive pivot shift maneuver were the most decisive factors considered in making the decision to operate the patient. Patient satisfaction and absence of complaints of instability during the postoperative period were the criteria deemed to be most important for the surgery to be considered a success. Conclusions: There are clearly evolving trends in treating and rehabilitating the anterior cruciate ligament in Brazil. However, more prospective controlled studies are needed in order to evaluate the clinical and scientific benefits of these trends. PMID:27042620

  3. Gait adaptation in ACL deficient patients before and after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Zsolt; Kiss, Rita M; Kocsis, László

    2004-06-01

    The objective of this study is to determine how kinematical parameters and electromyography data of selected muscles may change as a result of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency and following ACL reconstruction. The study was conducted on 25 anterior cruciate ligament deficient subjects prior to and 6 weeks, 4 months, 8 months and 12 months following ACL reconstructive surgery using the bone-patellar tendon-bone technique. Gait analysis was performed by applying the zebris three-dimensional ultrasound-based system with surface electromyograph (zebris). Kinematic data were recorded for the lower limb. The muscles surveyed include vastus lateralis and medialis, biceps femoris and adductor longus. The results obtained from the injured subjects were compared with those of 51 individuals without any ACL damage whatsoever. Acute ACL deficient patients exhibited a quadriceps avoidance pattern prior to and 6 weeks following surgery. No quadriceps avoidance phenomenon develops in chronic ACL deficient patients. In operated individuals, tempo-spatial parameters and the knee angle regained a normal pattern for the ACL-deficient limb during gait as early as 4 months following surgery. However, the relative ACL movement parameter, which describes the tibial translation into the direction of ACL, and the EMG traces show no significant statistical difference compared with the same values of the healthy control group just 8 months following surgery. The analysis of spatial-temporal parameters and EMG traces show that the development of a quadriceps avoidance pattern is less common than previously reported. These data suggest that anterior cruciate ligament deficiency and reconstruction produce considerable changes in the lower extremity gait pattern. The results suggest that gait parameters tend to shift towards a normal value pattern; and the re-establishment of pre-injury gait patterns-including the normal biphase of muscles-takes at least 8 months to occur.

  4. Reducing the risk of noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injuries in the female athlete.

    PubMed

    Barber-Westin, Sue D; Noyes, Frank R; Smith, Stephanie Tutalo; Campbell, Thomas M

    2009-10-01

    High school and collegiate female athletes have a significantly increased risk of sustaining a noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury compared with male athletes participating in the same sport. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the risk factors hypothesized to influence this problem, and the neuromuscular training programs designed to correct certain biomechanical problems noted in female athletes. The risk factors include a genetic predisposition for sustaining a knee ligament injury, environmental factors, anatomical indices, hormonal influences, and neuromuscular factors. The greatest amount of research in this area has studied differences between female and male athletes in movement patterns during athletic tasks; muscle strength, activation, and recruitment patterns; and knee joint stiffness under controlled, preplanned, and reactive conditions in the laboratory. Neuromuscular retraining programs have been developed in an attempt to reduce these differences. The successful programs teach athletes to control the upper body, trunk, and lower body position; lower the center of gravity by increasing hip and knee flexion during activities; and develop muscular strength and techniques to land with decreased ground reaction forces. In addition, athletes are taught to preposition the body and lower extremity prior to initial ground contact to obtain the position of greatest knee joint stability and stiffness. Two published programs have significantly reduced the incidence of noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injuries in female athletes participating in basketball, soccer, and volleyball. Other programs were ineffective, had a poor study design, or had an insufficient number of participants, which precluded a true reduction in the risk of this injury. In order to determine which risk factors for noncontact anterior cruciate ligament ruptures are significant, future investigations should include larger cohorts of athletes in multiple sports

  5. Inter-Segmental Coordination Pattern in Patients with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Deficiency during a Single-Step Descent

    PubMed Central

    Nematollahi, Mohammadreza; Razeghi, Mohsen; Mehdizadeh, Sina; Tabatabaee, Hamidreza; Piroozi, Soraya; Rojhani Shirazi, Zahra; Rafiee, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament injury is a debilitating pathology which may alter lower limb coordination pattern in both intact and affected lower extremities during activities of daily living. Emerging evidence supports the notion that kinematic variables may not be a good indicator to differentiate patients with anterior cruciate ligament deficiency during step descent task. The aim of the present study was to examine alterations in kinematics as well as coordination patterns and coordination variability of both limbs of these patients during a single step descent task. Continuous relative phase technique was used to measure coordination pattern and coordination variability between a group of anterior cruciate ligament deficient (n = 23) and a healthy control group (n = 23). A third order polynomial Curve fitting was utilized to provide a curve that best fitted to the data points of coordination pattern and coordination variability of the healthy control group. This was considered as a reference to compare to that of patient group using nonlinear regression analysis. The results of the present study demonstrated an altered coordination pattern of the supporting shank-thigh and the stepping foot-shank couplings in anterior cruciate ligament deficient subjects. It was further noticed that there was an increased coordination variability in foot-shank and shank-thigh couplings of both supporting and stepping legs. There was no significant difference in the hip, knee and ankle joints kinematics in either side of these patients. Anterior cruciate ligament deficient individuals showed altered strategies in both intact and affected legs, with increased coordination variability. Kinematic data did not indicate any significant difference between the two groups. It could be concluded that more sophisticated dynamic approach such as continuous relative phase would uncover discrepancies between the healthy and anterior cruciate ligament deficient individuals. PMID:26900698

  6. Inter-Segmental Coordination Pattern in Patients with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Deficiency during a Single-Step Descent.

    PubMed

    Nematollahi, Mohammadreza; Razeghi, Mohsen; Mehdizadeh, Sina; Tabatabaee, Hamidreza; Piroozi, Soraya; Rojhani Shirazi, Zahra; Rafiee, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament injury is a debilitating pathology which may alter lower limb coordination pattern in both intact and affected lower extremities during activities of daily living. Emerging evidence supports the notion that kinematic variables may not be a good indicator to differentiate patients with anterior cruciate ligament deficiency during step descent task. The aim of the present study was to examine alterations in kinematics as well as coordination patterns and coordination variability of both limbs of these patients during a single step descent task. Continuous relative phase technique was used to measure coordination pattern and coordination variability between a group of anterior cruciate ligament deficient (n = 23) and a healthy control group (n = 23). A third order polynomial Curve fitting was utilized to provide a curve that best fitted to the data points of coordination pattern and coordination variability of the healthy control group. This was considered as a reference to compare to that of patient group using nonlinear regression analysis. The results of the present study demonstrated an altered coordination pattern of the supporting shank-thigh and the stepping foot-shank couplings in anterior cruciate ligament deficient subjects. It was further noticed that there was an increased coordination variability in foot-shank and shank-thigh couplings of both supporting and stepping legs. There was no significant difference in the hip, knee and ankle joints kinematics in either side of these patients. Anterior cruciate ligament deficient individuals showed altered strategies in both intact and affected legs, with increased coordination variability. Kinematic data did not indicate any significant difference between the two groups. It could be concluded that more sophisticated dynamic approach such as continuous relative phase would uncover discrepancies between the healthy and anterior cruciate ligament deficient individuals. PMID:26900698

  7. Inter-Segmental Coordination Pattern in Patients with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Deficiency during a Single-Step Descent.

    PubMed

    Nematollahi, Mohammadreza; Razeghi, Mohsen; Mehdizadeh, Sina; Tabatabaee, Hamidreza; Piroozi, Soraya; Rojhani Shirazi, Zahra; Rafiee, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament injury is a debilitating pathology which may alter lower limb coordination pattern in both intact and affected lower extremities during activities of daily living. Emerging evidence supports the notion that kinematic variables may not be a good indicator to differentiate patients with anterior cruciate ligament deficiency during step descent task. The aim of the present study was to examine alterations in kinematics as well as coordination patterns and coordination variability of both limbs of these patients during a single step descent task. Continuous relative phase technique was used to measure coordination pattern and coordination variability between a group of anterior cruciate ligament deficient (n = 23) and a healthy control group (n = 23). A third order polynomial Curve fitting was utilized to provide a curve that best fitted to the data points of coordination pattern and coordination variability of the healthy control group. This was considered as a reference to compare to that of patient group using nonlinear regression analysis. The results of the present study demonstrated an altered coordination pattern of the supporting shank-thigh and the stepping foot-shank couplings in anterior cruciate ligament deficient subjects. It was further noticed that there was an increased coordination variability in foot-shank and shank-thigh couplings of both supporting and stepping legs. There was no significant difference in the hip, knee and ankle joints kinematics in either side of these patients. Anterior cruciate ligament deficient individuals showed altered strategies in both intact and affected legs, with increased coordination variability. Kinematic data did not indicate any significant difference between the two groups. It could be concluded that more sophisticated dynamic approach such as continuous relative phase would uncover discrepancies between the healthy and anterior cruciate ligament deficient individuals.

  8. Short-term recovery after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a prospective comparison of three autografts.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Michael; Fulkerson, John; Nissen, Carl; Sheehan, T Joseph

    2006-03-01

    Sixty-four patients with three different autografts were prospectively evaluated following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction for motion return, thigh girth, quadriceps activity, assistive device usage, and duration of pain medication usage. The quadriceps tendon group achieved knee extension sooner than the patellar tendon group. The hamstring group used assistive devices for less time than the patellar tendon group. The quadriceps group required less pain medication than either of the groups. There are significant differences in short-term pain medication requirements and restoration of function among patients following ACL reconstruction using different autografts.

  9. Anterior cruciate ligament rupture secondary to a 'heel hook': a dangerous martial arts technique.

    PubMed

    Baker, Joseph F; Devitt, Brian M; Moran, Ray

    2010-01-01

    The 'heel hook' is a type of knee lock used in some forms of martial arts to stress the knee and cause opponent to concede defeat. While the knee is in a flexed and valgus disposition, an internal rotation force is applied to the tibia. Reports are lacking on serious knee trauma as a result of this technique. We report the case of a 32-year-old Mixed Martial Arts exponent who sustained complete anterior cruciate ligament rupture and an medial collateral ligament injury from the use of a 'heel hook'. PMID:19629437

  10. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Prevention and Rehabilitation: Let's Get It Right.

    PubMed

    Wilk, Kevin E

    2015-10-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are among the most common and functionally disabling conditions in orthopaedics and sports medicine. As professionals, we need to do a better job of screening individuals to determine who is at greatest risk of sustaining an ACL injury, as well as implementing injury prevention programs. We also need to do a better job with programs that return individuals to their preinjury activity levels, including implementing thorough functional testing to determine if a patient is ready to return to sports or strenuous activities post-ACLR.

  11. Anterior cruciate ligament rupture secondary to a 'heel hook': a dangerous martial arts technique.

    PubMed

    Baker, Joseph F; Devitt, Brian M; Moran, Ray

    2010-01-01

    The 'heel hook' is a type of knee lock used in some forms of martial arts to stress the knee and cause opponent to concede defeat. While the knee is in a flexed and valgus disposition, an internal rotation force is applied to the tibia. Reports are lacking on serious knee trauma as a result of this technique. We report the case of a 32-year-old Mixed Martial Arts exponent who sustained complete anterior cruciate ligament rupture and an medial collateral ligament injury from the use of a 'heel hook'.

  12. Reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament and anterolateral ligament using interlinked hamstrings - technical note.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Marcio de Castro; Zidan, Flavio Ferreira; Miduati, Francini Belluci; Fortuna, Caio Cesar; Mizutani, Bruno Moreira; Abdalla, Rene Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Recent anatomical and biomechanical studies on the anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee have shown that this structure has an important function in relation to joint stability, especially when associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. However, the criteria for its reconstruction have not yet been fully established and the surgical techniques that have been described present variations regarding anatomical points and fixation materials. This study presents a reproducible technique for ALL and ACL reconstruction using hamstring tendons, in which three interference screws are used for fixation.

  13. Reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament and anterolateral ligament using interlinked hamstrings - technical note.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Marcio de Castro; Zidan, Flavio Ferreira; Miduati, Francini Belluci; Fortuna, Caio Cesar; Mizutani, Bruno Moreira; Abdalla, Rene Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Recent anatomical and biomechanical studies on the anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee have shown that this structure has an important function in relation to joint stability, especially when associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. However, the criteria for its reconstruction have not yet been fully established and the surgical techniques that have been described present variations regarding anatomical points and fixation materials. This study presents a reproducible technique for ALL and ACL reconstruction using hamstring tendons, in which three interference screws are used for fixation. PMID:27517028

  14. Embolism of the popliteal artery after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Sala, H. A. G. M.

    2007-01-01

    Arterial complications after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) are rare. We present a case report of a 44-year-old male patient with a subtotal occlusion of the popliteal artery, with sensory loss in the foot, 17 days after ACLR. Embolectomy and anticoagulant therapy led to full recovery of the peripheral arterial circulation. The sensory loss of the foot also fully recovered. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of an embolus of the popliteal artery after ACLR without relation to graft fixation. A literature review on vascular complications after ACLR is presented. PMID:17579836

  15. Quadriceps tendon-patellar bone autograft for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, Francesco; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Ruzzini, Laura; Papalia, Rocco; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2008-01-01

    The quadriceps tendon autograft can be used for primary and revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Despite several successful clinical reports, graft fixation issues remain, and the ideal technique for fixation continues to be controversial. We present a technique of ACL reconstruction with quadriceps tendon autograft (QTA) using a patellar bone block. The tendon end is fixed in the femoral tunnel and the bone plug in the tibial tunnel using reabsorbable interference screws. The advantages of this technique are related to the increase in stiffness of the graft, the achievement of a more anatomic fixation, and a reduction in synovial fluid leakage.

  16. Surgical treatment of simultaneous rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament and the patellar tendon.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Kyohei; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Hino, Kazunori; Watanabe, Seiji; Yamaoka, Gotaro; Shirakata, Haruo; Fujii, Yuko; Miura, Hiromasa

    2013-12-01

    Although the rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a common sports injury, a simultaneous rupture of the patellar tendon (PT) is relatively rare. We experienced a case in which a patient simultaneously ruptured the ACL, the medial collateral ligament (MCL), and the PT while sliding during a baseball game. We sutured the PT and MCL during the acute stage, and 7 months later we conducted a double-bundle reconstruction of the ACL. To our knowledge, this is the first report of PT repair using only fiber wire thread, and two-phase double-bundle ACL reconstruction.

  17. The modified bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft in single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kang, Huijun; Wang, Fei

    2011-06-01

    Bone-patellar tendon-bone graft has been an attractive option for single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in clinical practice. However, the graft-tunnel mismatch in the proximal part of the tibial tunnel and the ultimate strength after postoperative ligamentization process have been potential problems for the traditional 10-mm wide graft. We modified the traditional bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft to make it double-layer, as an ideal substitute graft for single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with better graft-tunnel match and higher initial graft strength.

  18. An electromyographic analysis of the knee during functional activities. II. The anterior cruciate ligament-deficient and -reconstructed profiles.

    PubMed

    Ciccotti, M G; Kerlan, R K; Perry, J; Pink, M

    1994-01-01

    This study compared the electromyographic activity of normal (N = 22), rehabilitated anterior cruciate ligament-deficient (N = 8), and -reconstructed knees (N = 10) while subjects performed activities. Each subject had evaluation of 8 muscles during 7 functional activities. Sixty-seven percent of the differences in the quadriceps muscle reflected increased activity in the vastus lateralis muscle of the rehabilitated group; 75% of the differences in the hamstrings muscles noted increased biceps femoris muscle activity in the rehabilitated group; 56% of the differences in the lower leg musculature showed increased tibialis anterior muscle activity in the rehabilitated group. Eighty-six percent of the statistically different intervals involved rehabilitated subjects demonstrating increased activity over reconstructed or normal subjects or both. The presence of a quadriceps-hamstrings muscles coordinated response was identified consistently in all 3 groups in each activity. This study supports surgical reconstruction for the anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knee. It also demonstrates the importance of the vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, and tibialis anterior musculature in the rehabilitation of the anterior cruciate ligament-deficient patient. The presence of a quadriceps-hamstrings muscles coordinated response indicates that mechanoreceptors mediating this reflex arc exist in structures other than the cruciate ligament.

  19. Translational and rotational knee joint stability in anterior and posterior cruciate-retaining knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lo, JiaHsuan; Müller, Otto; Dilger, Torsten; Wülker, Nikolaus; Wünschel, Markus

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated passive translational and rotational stability properties of the intact knee joint, after bicruciate-retaining bi-compartmental knee arthroplasty (BKA) and after posterior cruciate retaining total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Fourteen human cadaveric knee specimens were used in this study, and a robotic manipulator with six-axis force/torque sensor was used to test the joint laxity in anterior-posterior translation, valgus-varus, and internal-external rotation. The results show the knee joint stability after bicruciate-retaining BKA is similar to that of the native knee. On the other hand, the PCL-retaining TKA results in inferior joint stability in valgus, varus, external rotation, anterior and, surprisingly, posterior directions. Our findings suggest that, provided functional ligamentous structures, bicruciate-retaining BKA is a biomechanically attractive treatment for joint degenerative disease.

  20. Partial tears of the anterior cruciate ligament. Progression to complete ligament deficiency.

    PubMed

    Noyes, F R; Mooar, L A; Moorman, C T; McGinniss, G H

    1989-11-01

    In a prospective seven-year study, we treated 32 patients with partial ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) verified by arthroscopy. Twelve knees (38%) progressed to complete ACL deficiency with positive pivot shift tests and increased anteroposterior translation on tests with the KT-1000 arthrometer. Patients with partial ACL tears frequently had limitation for strenuous sports, while those developing ACL deficiency had additional functional limitations involving recreational activities. Three factors were statistically significant in predicting which partial tears would develop complete ACL deficiency: the amount of ligament tearing--one-fourth tears infrequently progressed, one-half tears progressed in 50% and three-fourth tears in 86%; a subtle increase in initial anterior translation; and the occurrence of a subsequent re-injury with giving-way.

  1. Prognosis of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a data-driven approach

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Abhijit; Kar, Oliva; Wu, Kuan-Chuen; Hall, Michelle; Gillette, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Individuals who suffer anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury are at higher risk of developing knee osteoarthritis (OA) and almost 50% display symptoms 10–20 years post injury. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) often does not protect against knee OA development. Accordingly, a multi-scale formulation for data-driven prognosis (DDP) of post-ACLR is developed. Unlike traditional predictive strategies that require controlled off-line measurements or ‘training’ for determination of constitutive parameters to derive the transitional statistics, the proposed DDP algorithm relies solely on in situ measurements. The proposed DDP scheme is capable of predicting onset of instabilities. As the need for off-line testing (or training) is obviated, it can be easily implemented for ACLR, where such controlled a priori testing is almost impossible to conduct. The DDP algorithm facilitates hierarchical handling of the large dataset and can assess the state of recovery in post-ACLR conditions based on data collected from stair ascent and descent exercises of subjects. The DDP algorithm identifies inefficient knee varus motion and knee rotation as primary difficulties experienced by some of the post-ACLR population. In such cases, levels of energy dissipation rate at the knee, and its fluctuation may be used as measures for assessing progress after ACL reconstruction. PMID:27547072

  2. 3D Printing Surgical Implants at the clinic: A Experimental Study on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Liu, An; Xue, Guang-huai; Sun, Miao; Shao, Hui-feng; Ma, Chi-yuan; Gao, Qing; Gou, Zhong-ru; Yan, Shi-gui; Liu, Yan-ming; He, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Desktop three-dimensional (3D) printers (D3DPs) have become a popular tool for fabricating personalized consumer products, favored for low cost, easy operation, and other advantageous qualities. This study focused on the potential for using D3DPs to successfully, rapidly, and economically print customized implants at medical clinics. An experiment was conducted on a D3DP-printed anterior cruciate ligament surgical implant using a rabbit model. A well-defined, orthogonal, porous PLA screw-like scaffold was printed, then coated with hydroxyapatite (HA) to improve its osteoconductivity. As an internal fixation as well as an ideal cell delivery system, the osteogenic scaffold loaded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were evaluated through both in vitro and in vivo tests to observe bone-ligament healing via cell therapy. The MSCs suspended in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel on PLA/HA screw-like scaffold showed the highest cell proliferation and osteogenesis in vitro. In vivo assessment of rabbit anterior cruciate ligament models for 4 and 12 weeks showed that the PLA/HA screw-like scaffold loaded with MSCs suspended in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel exhibited significant bone ingrowth and bone-graft interface formation within the bone tunnel. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that fabricating surgical implants at the clinic (fab@clinic) with D3DPs can be feasible, effective, and economical. PMID:26875826

  3. Rationale and implementation of anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention warm-up programs in female athletes.

    PubMed

    Bien, Daniel P

    2011-01-01

    The sex disparity in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk and the subsequent adverse effects on knee joint health, psychosocial well-being, and financial costs incurred have produced a surge in research on risk factors and interventions designed to decrease this disparity and overall incidence. Biomechanical and neuromuscular differences have been identified throughout the trunk and lower extremity that may increase noncontact ACL injury risk in female athletes. Evidence demonstrates that many risk factors are modifiable with intervention programs and that athletic performance measures can be enhanced. No universally accepted ACL injury prevention program currently exists, and injury prevention programs are diverse. Anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention programs introduced in a warm-up format offer multiple benefits, primarily, improved compliance based on improved practicality of implementation. However, drawbacks of warm-up style formats also exist, most notably that a lack of equipment and resources may preclude measurable improvements in athletic performance that foster improved compliance among participants. The purpose of this review is to analyze the current literature researching possible biomechanical and neuromuscular risk factors in noncontact ACL injury in female athletes and the most effective means of implementing critical elements of a program to decrease ACL injury risk in female athletes while improving athletic performance. Hip and hamstring training, core stabilization, plyometrics, balance, agility, neuromuscular training with video and verbal feedback to modify technique, and stretching appear to be essential components of these programs. Further research is critical to determine ideal training program volume, intensity, duration, and frequency.

  4. Evaluation of 3 Fixation Devices for Tibial-Sided Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Backup Fixation.

    PubMed

    Verioti, Christopher A; Sardelli, Matthew C; Nguyen, Tony

    2015-07-01

    We conducted a study to biomechanically evaluate 3 methods of tibial-sided fixation for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: fully threaded interference screw only, interference screw backed with 4.75-mm SwiveLock anchor, and fully threaded bio-interference screw backed with 4.5-mm bicortical screw (all Arthrex). Thirty skeletally mature porcine tibiae were used. The first group was prepared by graft fixation within the tibial tunnel using only an interference screw. The second and third groups included an interference screw with 2 types of secondary fixation: 4.5-mm bicortical post and SwiveLock anchor. Mechanical testing consisted of 500 cycles between 50 and 250 N at 1 Hz, followed by a pull to failure conducted at 20 mm per minute. Ultimate load-to-failure testing demonstrated the largest mean (SD) load tolerated in the post/washer group, 1148 (186) N, versus the SwiveLock group, 1007 (176) N, and the screw-only group, 778 (139) N. There was no statistical difference between the 2 backup fixation groups. Use of a SwiveLock anchor as backup fixation at the tibial side in soft-tissue anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is a safe, effective alternative to a bicortical post and provides statistically equivalent pullout strength with unlikely requirement for future hardware removal.

  5. Long-term interventions effects of robotic training on patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Zhou, Yue; Gu, Rui; Ye, Miao; Ge, Meng; Xu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the long-term interventions effects of robot-assisted therapy rehabilitation on functional activity levels after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 8 patients (6 males and 2 females) who received anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects participated in robot-assisted therapy lasting for one month. The Timed Up-and-Go test, 10-Meter Walk test, Functional Reach Test, surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis, and extensor strength of isokinetic movement of the knee joint were evaluated before and after the intervention. [Results] The average value of the of vastus medialis EMG, Functional Reach Test, and the maximum and average extensor strength of the knee joint isokinetic movement increased significantly, and the time of the 10-Meter Walk test decreased significantly. [Conclusion] These results suggest that walking ability and muscle strength can be improved by robotic walking training as a long-term intervention. PMID:27630396

  6. Long-term interventions effects of robotic training on patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Zhou, Yue; Gu, Rui; Ye, Miao; Ge, Meng; Xu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the long-term interventions effects of robot-assisted therapy rehabilitation on functional activity levels after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 8 patients (6 males and 2 females) who received anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects participated in robot-assisted therapy lasting for one month. The Timed Up-and-Go test, 10-Meter Walk test, Functional Reach Test, surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis, and extensor strength of isokinetic movement of the knee joint were evaluated before and after the intervention. [Results] The average value of the of vastus medialis EMG, Functional Reach Test, and the maximum and average extensor strength of the knee joint isokinetic movement increased significantly, and the time of the 10-Meter Walk test decreased significantly. [Conclusion] These results suggest that walking ability and muscle strength can be improved by robotic walking training as a long-term intervention. PMID:27630396

  7. 3D Printing Surgical Implants at the clinic: A Experimental Study on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, An; Xue, Guang-huai; Sun, Miao; Shao, Hui-feng; Ma, Chi-yuan; Gao, Qing; Gou, Zhong-ru; Yan, Shi-gui; Liu, Yan-ming; He, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Desktop three-dimensional (3D) printers (D3DPs) have become a popular tool for fabricating personalized consumer products, favored for low cost, easy operation, and other advantageous qualities. This study focused on the potential for using D3DPs to successfully, rapidly, and economically print customized implants at medical clinics. An experiment was conducted on a D3DP-printed anterior cruciate ligament surgical implant using a rabbit model. A well-defined, orthogonal, porous PLA screw-like scaffold was printed, then coated with hydroxyapatite (HA) to improve its osteoconductivity. As an internal fixation as well as an ideal cell delivery system, the osteogenic scaffold loaded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were evaluated through both in vitro and in vivo tests to observe bone-ligament healing via cell therapy. The MSCs suspended in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel on PLA/HA screw-like scaffold showed the highest cell proliferation and osteogenesis in vitro. In vivo assessment of rabbit anterior cruciate ligament models for 4 and 12 weeks showed that the PLA/HA screw-like scaffold loaded with MSCs suspended in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel exhibited significant bone ingrowth and bone-graft interface formation within the bone tunnel. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that fabricating surgical implants at the clinic (fab@clinic) with D3DPs can be feasible, effective, and economical. PMID:26875826

  8. 3D Printing Surgical Implants at the clinic: A Experimental Study on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Liu, An; Xue, Guang-huai; Sun, Miao; Shao, Hui-feng; Ma, Chi-yuan; Gao, Qing; Gou, Zhong-ru; Yan, Shi-gui; Liu, Yan-ming; He, Yong

    2016-02-15

    Desktop three-dimensional (3D) printers (D3DPs) have become a popular tool for fabricating personalized consumer products, favored for low cost, easy operation, and other advantageous qualities. This study focused on the potential for using D3DPs to successfully, rapidly, and economically print customized implants at medical clinics. An experiment was conducted on a D3DP-printed anterior cruciate ligament surgical implant using a rabbit model. A well-defined, orthogonal, porous PLA screw-like scaffold was printed, then coated with hydroxyapatite (HA) to improve its osteoconductivity. As an internal fixation as well as an ideal cell delivery system, the osteogenic scaffold loaded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were evaluated through both in vitro and in vivo tests to observe bone-ligament healing via cell therapy. The MSCs suspended in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel on PLA/HA screw-like scaffold showed the highest cell proliferation and osteogenesis in vitro. In vivo assessment of rabbit anterior cruciate ligament models for 4 and 12 weeks showed that the PLA/HA screw-like scaffold loaded with MSCs suspended in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel exhibited significant bone ingrowth and bone-graft interface formation within the bone tunnel. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that fabricating surgical implants at the clinic (fab@clinic) with D3DPs can be feasible, effective, and economical.

  9. The anterior cruciate ligament-lateral meniscus complex: A histological study.

    PubMed

    Furumatsu, Takayuki; Kodama, Yuya; Maehara, Ami; Miyazawa, Shinichi; Fujii, Masataka; Tanaka, Takaaki; Inoue, Hiroto; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    The anterior root of the lateral meniscus (LM) dives underneath the tibial attachment of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Although the distinct role of meniscal attachments has been investigated, the relationship between the LM anterior insertion (LMAI) and ACL tibial insertion (ACLTI) remains unclear. This study histologically analyzed the LMAI and ACLTI. Samples were divided into four regions in an anterior-to-posterior direction. Histological measurements of these insertion sites were performed using safranin O-stained coronal sections. Distribution and signal densities of type I and II collagen were quantified. The ACLTI and LMAI formed the ACL-LM complex via fiber connections. The anterior part of the ACLTI had a widespread attachment composed of dense fibers. Attachment fibers of the LMAI became dense and wide gradually at the middle-to-posterior region. The ACL-LM transition zone (ALTZ) was observed between the LMAI and the lateral border of the ACLTI at the middle part of the ACL tibial footprint. Type II collagen density of the LMAI was higher than that of the ACLTI and ALTZ. Our results can help create an accurate tibial bone tunnel within the dense ACL attachment during ACL reconstruction surgery.

  10. A Comparison of Arthroscopically Assisted Single and Double Bundle Tibial Inlay Reconstruction for Isolated Posterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Chul; Park, Chul Hyun; Kim, Won Ho; Jung, Kwang Am

    2010-01-01

    Background This study evaluated the clinical results of arthroscopically assisted single and double bundle tibial inlay reconstructions of an isolated posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury. Methods This study reviewed the data for 14 patients who underwent a single bundle tibial inlay PCL reconstruction (Group A) and 16 patients who underwent a double bundle tibial inlay PCL reconstruction (Group B) between August 1999 and August 2002. The mean follow-up period in groups A and B was 90.5 months and 64 months, respectively. Results The Lysholm knee scores in groups A and B increased from an average of 43.3 ± 7.04 and 44.7 ± 5.02 preoperatively to 88.1 ± 7.32 and 88.7 ± 9.11 points at the final follow-up, respectively. In group A, stress radiography using a Telos device showed that the preoperative mean side-to-side differences (SSDs) of 9.5 ± 1.60 mm at 30° of flexion and 9.8 ± 1.70 mm at 90° of flexion were improved to 2.8 ± 1.19 mm and 3.0 ± 1.1 mm, respectively. In group B, the preoperative SSDs of 10.4 ± 1.50 mm at 30° of flexion and 10.7 ± 1.60 mm at 90° of flexion improved to 2.7 ± 1.15 mm and 2.6 ± 0.49 mm, respectively. There was no significant difference in the clinical scores and radiologic findings between the two groups. Conclusions Single bundle and double bundle PCL reconstructions using the tibial inlay technique give satisfactory clinical results in patients with an isolated PCL injury, and there are no significant differences in the clinical and radiological results between the two techniques. These results suggest that it is unnecessary to perform the more technically challenging double bundle reconstruction using the tibial inlay technique in an isolated PCL injury. PMID:20514264

  11. Does graft construct lengthening at the fixations cause an increase in anterior laxity following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in vivo?

    PubMed

    Smith, Conrad K; Hull, M L; Howell, S M

    2010-08-01

    A millimeter-for-millimeter relation between an increase in length of an anterior cruciate ligament graft construct and an increase in anterior laxity has been demonstrated in multiple in vitro studies. Based on this relation, a 3 mm increase in length of the graft construct following surgery could manifest as a 3 mm increase in anterior laxity in vivo, which is considered clinically unstable. Hence, the two primary objectives were to determine whether the millimeter-for-millimeter relation exists in vivo for slippage-resistant fixation of a soft-tissue graft and, if it does not exist, then to what extent the increase in stiffness caused by biologic healing of the graft to the bone tunnel offsets the potential increase in anterior laxity resulting from lengthening at the sites of fixation. Sixteen subjects were treated with a fresh-frozen, nonirradiated, nonchemically processed tibialis allograft. Tantalum markers were injected into the graft, fixation devices, and bones. On the day of surgery and at 1, 2, 3, and 4 months, Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis was used to compute anterior laxity at 150 N of anterior force and the total slippage from both sites of fixation. A simple linear regression was performed to determine whether the millimeter-for-millimeter relation existed and a springs-in-series model of the graft construct was used to determine the extent to which the increase in stiffness caused by biological healing of the graft to the bone tunnel offset the increase in anterior laxity resulting from lengthening at the sites of fixation. There was no correlation between lengthening at the sites of fixation and the increase in anterior laxity at 1 month (R(2)=0.0, slope=0.2). Also, the increase in stiffness of the graft construct caused by biologic healing of the graft to the bone tunnel offset 0.7 mm of the 1.5 mm potential increase in anterior laxity resulting from lengthening at the sites of fixation. This relatively large offset of nearly 50

  12. Knee stiffness following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: the incidence and associated factors of knee stiffness following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Robertson, G A J; Coleman, S G S; Keating, J F

    2009-08-01

    We reviewed 100 patients retrospectively following primary ACL reconstruction with quadruple hamstring autografts to evaluate the incidence and factors associated with postoperative stiffness. Stiffness was defined as any loss of motion using the contra-lateral leg as a control. The median delay between injury and operation was 15 months. The incidence of stiffness was 12% at 6 months post-reconstruction. Both incomplete attendance at physiotherapy (p<0.005) and previous knee surgery (p<0.005) were the strongest predictors of the stiffness. Anterior knee pain was also associated with the stiffness (p<0.029). Factors that failed to show a significant association with the stiffness included associated MCL sprain at injury (p=0.32), post-injury stiffness (p=1.00) and concomitant menisectomy at reconstruction (p=0.54). Timing of surgery also did not appear to influence the onset of stiffness (median delays: 29 months for stiff patients; 14 months for non-stiff patients). The rate of stiffness fell to 5% at 12 months postreconstruction, without operative intervention.

  13. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with BPTB autograft, irradiated versus non-irradiated allograft: a prospective randomized clinical study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kang; Tian, Shaoqi; Zhang, Jihua; Xia, Changsuo; Zhang, Cailong; Yu, Tengbo

    2009-05-01

    The effect of using gamma irradiation to sterilize bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) allograft on the clinical outcomes of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with irradiated allograft remains controversial. Our study was aimed to analyze the clinical outcomes of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with irradiated BPTB allograft compared with non-irradiated allograft and autograft. All BPTB allografts were obtained from a single tissue bank and the irradiated allografts were sterilized with 2.5 Mrad of irradiation prior to distribution. A total of 102 patients undergoing arthroscopic ACL reconstruction were prospectively randomized consecutively into three groups. The same surgical technique was used in all operations done by the same senior surgeon. Before surgery and at the average of 31 months follow-up (range 24-47 months) patients were evaluated by the same observer according to objective and subjective clinical evaluations. Of these patients, 99 (autograft 33, non-irradiated allograft 34, irradiated allograft 32) were available for full evaluation. When compared the irradiated allograft group to non-irradiated allograft group or autograft group at 31 months follow-up by the Lachman test, ADT, pivot shift test and KT-2000 arthrometer testing, statistically significant differences were found. Most importantly, 87.8% of patients in the Auto group, 85.3% in the Non-Ir-Auto group and just only 31.3% in the Ir-Allo group had a side-to-side difference of less than 3 mm according to KT-2000. The failure rate of the ACL reconstruction with irradiated allograft (34.4%) was higher than that with autograft (6.1%) and non-irradiated allograft (8.8%). The anterior and rotational stability decreased significantly in the irradiated allograft group. According to the overall IKDC, functional, subjective evaluations and activity level testing, no statistically significant differences were found between the three groups. However, there was a trend that the functional and

  14. The relationship between intercondylar notch width of the femur and the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament tears. A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Shelbourne, K D; Davis, T J; Klootwyk, T E

    1998-01-01

    For 714 consecutive patients who underwent autogenous patellar tendon graft anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions we intraoperatively measured intercondylar notch width. We prospectively recorded height, weight, sex, and which patients subsequently tore their contralateral anterior cruciate ligament or the 10-mm autograft. The patients were divided into two groups based on notch width (group 1, < or = 15 mm; group 2, > or = 16mm. The mean notch width was 13.9 +/- 2.2 mm for women and 15.9 +/- 2.5 mm for men. There was no statistically significant difference in notch width between height groups for women or men. Analysis showed that, with height and weight as covariates, women had statistically significantly narrower notches than men. Twenty-three of 388 patients in group 1 and 4 of 326 patients in group 2 tore their contralateral anterior cruciate ligaments. Within groups, no statistically significant differences in contralateral tear rates existed between men and women. Once the men and women had reconstructions with equally sized 10-mm autografts, there was no difference in graft tear rate between groups or between men and women. Our results show that patients with narrower notches have a higher incidence of tearing their contralateral anterior cruciate ligament. After reconstruction with a 10-mm autograft, the incidence of graft rupture is the same for men and women.

  15. The relative incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injury in men and women at the United States Naval Academy.

    PubMed

    Gwinn, D E; Wilckens, J H; McDevitt, E R; Ross, G; Kao, T C

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relative risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury in female versus male midshipmen at the United States Naval Academy. From 1991 to 1997, we recorded the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injury during intercollegiate athletics, intramural athletics, and military training. The subjects were male and female varsity athletes, coed intramural athletes, and participants in military training consisting of the obstacle course and instructional wrestling. All patient data were collected at the time of injury. Records filed at the intramural sports office, along with a questionnaire completed by coaches and trainers, were used to estimate midshipmen exposures. Results showed that in intercollegiate soccer, basketball, and rugby, women had a relative injury risk of 3.96 compared with men. In coed soccer, basketball, softball, and volleyball, the women's relative injury risk was 1.40 compared with men. In military training, women had a relative injury risk of 9.74 compared with men. In comparing overall annual anterior cruciate ligament injury rates among midshipmen, we found that women had a relative injury risk of 2.44 compared with men. We concluded that female midshipmen have an increased relative risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury as compared with men in intercollegiate athletics, basic military training, and throughout their service academy career. This increase was not statistically significant at the intramural level of athletics.

  16. Tibial translation and muscle activation during rehabilitation exercises 5 weeks after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tagesson, S; Oberg, B; Kvist, J

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare different rehabilitation exercises with respect to dynamic anterior tibial translation and muscle activation 5 weeks after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Another aim was to compare the ACL-reconstructed knee with the ACL-injured and the uninjured knees for differences in anterior tibial translation and muscle activation during the exercises. Sagittal tibial translation and muscle activation were measured during the Lachman test (static translation) and during seven rehabilitation exercises (dynamic translation) in 19 patients. Results obtained 5 weeks after ACL reconstruction were compared with those obtained before the ACL reconstruction (ACL-deficient and uninjured knee). After ACL reconstruction the seated knee extension produced more anterior tibial translation than the straight leg raise and standing on one leg. The ACL reconstruction reduced the static and the dynamic tibial translation and the tibial translations measured in ACL-reconstructed knees were similar to those measured in uninjured knees. After ACL reconstruction, the patients used a joint stiffening strategy that used more hamstring activation and reduced the dynamic tibial translation. Although all exercises tested are suitable for rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction, to protect the graft from excessive strain, the straight leg raise and squat on one leg are preferable for quadriceps training in the early phase of rehabilitation.

  17. Anatomy of the anterior cruciate ligament with regard to its two bundles.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Wolf; Zantop, Thore

    2007-01-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) consists of two major fiber bundles, namely the anteromedial and posterolateral bundle. When the knee is extended, the posterolateral bundle (PL) is tight and the anteromedial (AM) bundle is moderately lax. As the knee is flexed, the femoral attachment of the ACL becomes a more horizontal orientation; causing the AM bundle to tighten and the PL bundle to relax. There is some degree of variability for the femoral origin of the anterome-dial and posterolateral bundle. The anteromedial bundle is located proximal and anterior in the femoral ACL origin (high and deep in the notch when the knee is flexed at 90 degrees ); the posterolateral bundle starts in the distal and posterior aspect of the femoral ACL origin (shallow and low when the knee is flexed at 90 degrees ). In the frontal plane the anteromedial bundle origin is in the 10:30 clock position and the postero-lateral bundle origin in the 9:30 clock position. At the tibial insertion the ACL fans out to form the foot region. The anteromedial bundle insertion is in the anterior part of the tibial ACL footprint, the posterolateral bundle in the posterior part. While the anteromedial bundle is the primary restraint against anterior tibial translation, the posterolateral bundle tends to stabilize the knee near full extension, particularly against rotatory loads.

  18. Risk factors for anterior cruciate ligament injury in high school and college athletes.

    PubMed

    Woodford-Rogers, B; Cyphert, L; Denegar, C R

    1994-12-01

    The anterior cruciate (ACL) is the most frequently ruptured ligament of the knee. Some authors have suggested that excessive internal tibial rotation concomitant with hyperpronation of the subtalar joint during stance and inherent knee joint laxity may predispose an athlete to knee injury. Over a period of 2 years, we identified 14 ACL-injured football players and eight ACL-injured female basketball players and gymnasts. We matched them by sport, team, position, and level of competition with 22 athletes without history of ACL injury. Measures of navicular drop, calcaneal alignment, and anterior knee joint laxity with a KT-1000 were obtained from the uninjured knee of the ACL-injured athletes and compared with measures obtained from the ACL-noninjured athletes. ACL-injured athletes had greater amounts of navicular drop, suggesting greater subtalar pronation and greater anterior knee joint laxity. Discriminant analysis and multiple regression indicated that these variables correctly predicted injury status for 87.5% of the females and for 70.5% of all cases. These results suggest that the more an athlete pronates and the greater the anterior knee joint laxity, the greater the association with ACL injury.

  19. Arthroscopically confirmed femoral button deployment.

    PubMed

    Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Rezende, Fernando C; Martins Neto, Ayrton; Fayard, Jean M; Thaunat, Mathieu; Kader, Deiary F

    2014-06-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament TightRope RT (Arthrex, Naples, FL) is a graft suspension device for cruciate ligament reconstruction. It is an adjustable-length graft loop cortical fixation device designed to eliminate the requirement for loop length calculation and to facilitate complete graft fill of short femoral sockets that are common with anatomic anterior cruciate ligament placement. The adjustable loop length means "one size fits all," thus removing the need for multiple implant sizes and allowing graft tensioning even after fixation. However, the device has been associated with the same complications that have been described with EndoButton (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy, Andover, MA) fixation. The button of the TightRope RT may remain in the femoral tunnel rather than flipping outside of the tunnel to rest on the lateral femoral cortex, or it may become jammed inside the femoral canal. Conversely, the button may be pulled too far off the femoral cortex into the overlying soft tissue and flip in the substance of the vastus lateralis. We describe a new and simple arthroscopic technique to directly visualize the deployment and seating of the TightRope button on the lateral cortex of the femur to avoid all the aforementioned complications. PMID:25126492

  20. Arthroscopically confirmed femoral button deployment.

    PubMed

    Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Rezende, Fernando C; Martins Neto, Ayrton; Fayard, Jean M; Thaunat, Mathieu; Kader, Deiary F

    2014-06-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament TightRope RT (Arthrex, Naples, FL) is a graft suspension device for cruciate ligament reconstruction. It is an adjustable-length graft loop cortical fixation device designed to eliminate the requirement for loop length calculation and to facilitate complete graft fill of short femoral sockets that are common with anatomic anterior cruciate ligament placement. The adjustable loop length means "one size fits all," thus removing the need for multiple implant sizes and allowing graft tensioning even after fixation. However, the device has been associated with the same complications that have been described with EndoButton (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy, Andover, MA) fixation. The button of the TightRope RT may remain in the femoral tunnel rather than flipping outside of the tunnel to rest on the lateral femoral cortex, or it may become jammed inside the femoral canal. Conversely, the button may be pulled too far off the femoral cortex into the overlying soft tissue and flip in the substance of the vastus lateralis. We describe a new and simple arthroscopic technique to directly visualize the deployment and seating of the TightRope button on the lateral cortex of the femur to avoid all the aforementioned complications.

  1. The outcome at 15 years of endoscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using hamstring tendon autograft for 'isolated' anterior cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Bourke, H E; Gordon, D J; Salmon, L J; Waller, A; Linklater, J; Pinczewski, L A

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the outcome of 'isolated' anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures treated with anatomical endoscopic reconstruction using hamstring tendon autograft at a mean of 15 years (14.25 to 16.9). A total of 100 consecutive men and 100 consecutive women with 'isolated' ACL rupture underwent four-strand hamstring tendon reconstruction with anteromedial portal femoral tunnel drilling and interference screw fixation by a single surgeon. Details were recorded pre-operatively and at one, two, seven and 15 years post-operatively. Outcomes included clinical examination, subjective and objective scoring systems, and radiological assessment. At 15 years only eight of 118 patients (7%) had moderate or severe osteo-arthritic changes (International Knee Documentation Committee Grades C and D), and 79 of 152 patients (52%) still performed very strenuous activities. Overall graft survival at 15 years was 83% (1.1% failure per year). Patients aged < 18 years at the time of surgery and patients with > 2 mm of laxity at one year had a threefold increase in the risk of suffering a rupture of the graft (p = 0.002 and p = 0.001, respectively). There was no increase in laxity of the graft over time. ACL reconstructive surgery in patients with an 'isolated' rupture using this technique shows good results 15 years post-operatively with respect to ligamentous stability, objective and subjective outcomes, and does not appear to cause osteoarthritis.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Intra-articular Findings After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Ice Hockey Versus Other Sports

    PubMed Central

    Kluczynski, Melissa A.; Kang, Jeansol V.; Marzo, John M.; Bisson, Leslie J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of comorbid knee pathology has been examined for sports-related anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, but it has not been examined in ice hockey players. Purpose: To compare concomitant bone bruising, collateral ligament injuries, and intra-articular injuries in ACL injuries suffered during ice hockey versus other sports. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 20 patients with ACL injuries sustained during ice hockey were identified from a prospective registry, of which 95% were male and 90% had a contact mechanism of injury (MOI). Thirteen cases and 46 controls who sustained ACL injuries from ice hockey and other sports, respectively, were included. Inclusion criteria for cases and controls were male sex, contact MOI, no prior knee surgery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) within 6 weeks of injury, and surgery within 3 months of injury. Age, body mass index (BMI), MRI findings (bone bruising, medial and lateral collateral ligament [MCL, LCL] injuries), and arthroscopic findings (meniscus tears, chondral injuries) were compared for cases versus controls using t tests or exact chi-square tests. Results: Age (22.9 ± 8.8 vs 23.4 ± 10.4 years, P = .88) and BMI ≥25 kg/m2 (50% vs 65.9%, P = .66) did not differ between cases and controls. Cases had less lateral bone bruising (lateral femoral condyle: 54.6% vs 93%, P = .01; lateral tibial plateau: 72.7% vs 93%, P = .09) and no medial bone bruising (medial femoral condyle: 0% vs 7%, P = .06; medial tibial plateau: 0% vs 32.6%, P = .05) compared with controls. Cases had less frequent lateral meniscus tears than controls (23.1% vs 58.5%, P = .05). There were no significant differences in MCL (40% vs 31.2%, P = .77), LCL (0% vs 3.9%, P > .999), medial meniscus tears (7.7% vs 37%, P = .08), and chondral injuries (10% vs 9.4%, P > .999) for cases versus controls. Conclusion: Male ice hockey players with ACL injuries had less lateral femoral condyle and

  3. Surgical treatment of acute and chronic anterior and posterior cruciate ligament and medial-side injuries of the knee.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Mark G; Stannard, James P

    2011-06-01

    KD-IIIM knee injuries are challenging injuries that can do well when anatomic reconstruction techniques are used. This article describes the authors preferred reconstructions, timing of surgery, and rehabilitation techniques. The reconstructions are generally initiated 3 or 4 weeks after the injury when the local soft tissue injury allows and associated fractures have already been stabilized. The posterior cruciate ligament, posteromedial corner, and meniscus injuries are addressed in the initial operation. The corresponding author prefers to come back 6 weeks later and reconstruct the anterior cruciate ligament and assure that acceptable progress has been made regarding knee motion.

  4. Biomechanical Consequences of Anterior Femoral Notching in Cruciate-Retaining Versus Posterior-Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jethanandani, Rishabh; Patwary, Mahbubul B; Shellito, Adam D; Meehan, John P; Amanatullah, Derek F

    2016-01-01

    Anterior femoral notching during total knee arthroplasty is a potential risk factor for periprosthetic supracondylar femur fracture. We conducted a study to determine if the design of the femoral implant changes the risk for periprosthetic supracondylar femur fractures after anterior cortical notching. An anterior cortical defect was created in 12 femoral polyurethane models. Six femora were instrumented with cruciate-retaining implants and 6 with posterior-stabilized implants. Each femur was loaded in external rotation along the anatomical axis. Notch depth and distance from anterior cortical notch to implant were recorded before loading, and fracture pattern was recorded after failure. There were no statistically significant differences in notch depth, distance from notch to implant, torsional stiffness, torque at failure, final torque, or fracture pattern between cruciate-retaining and posterior-stabilized femoral component designs. Periprosthetic fracture after anterior femoral notching is independent of the bone removed from the intercondylar notch. After notching, there likely is no significant difference in femoral strength in torsion between cruciate-retaining and posterior-stabilized designs.

  5. Biomechanical Consequences of Anterior Femoral Notching in Cruciate-Retaining Versus Posterior-Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jethanandani, Rishabh; Patwary, Mahbubul B; Shellito, Adam D; Meehan, John P; Amanatullah, Derek F

    2016-01-01

    Anterior femoral notching during total knee arthroplasty is a potential risk factor for periprosthetic supracondylar femur fracture. We conducted a study to determine if the design of the femoral implant changes the risk for periprosthetic supracondylar femur fractures after anterior cortical notching. An anterior cortical defect was created in 12 femoral polyurethane models. Six femora were instrumented with cruciate-retaining implants and 6 with posterior-stabilized implants. Each femur was loaded in external rotation along the anatomical axis. Notch depth and distance from anterior cortical notch to implant were recorded before loading, and fracture pattern was recorded after failure. There were no statistically significant differences in notch depth, distance from notch to implant, torsional stiffness, torque at failure, final torque, or fracture pattern between cruciate-retaining and posterior-stabilized femoral component designs. Periprosthetic fracture after anterior femoral notching is independent of the bone removed from the intercondylar notch. After notching, there likely is no significant difference in femoral strength in torsion between cruciate-retaining and posterior-stabilized designs. PMID:27552464

  6. X-ray computed tomography of the anterior cruciate ligament and patellar tendon

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Tom; Rawson, Shelley; Castro, Simon Joseph; Balint, Richard; Bradley, Robert Stephen; Lowe, Tristan; Vila-Comamala, Joan; Lee, Peter David; Cartmell, Sarah Harriet

    2014-01-01

    Summary The effect of phosphotungstic acid (PTA) and iodine solution (IKI) staining was investigated as a method of enhancing contrast in the X-ray computed tomography of porcine anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) and patellar tendons (PT). We show that PTA enhanced surface contrast, but was ineffective at penetrating samples, whereas IKI penetrated more effectively and enhanced contrast after 70 hours of staining. Contrast enhancement was compared when using laboratory and synchrotron based X-ray sources. Using the laboratory source, PT fascicles were tracked and their alignment was measured. Individual ACL fascicles could not be identified, but identifiable features were evident that were tracked. Higher resolution scans of fascicle bundles from the PT and ACL were obtained using synchrotron imaging techniques. These scans exhibited greater contrast between the fascicles and matrix in the PT sample, facilitating the identification of the fascicle edges; however, it was still not possible to detect individual fascicles in the ACL. PMID:25332942

  7. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction best practice: A review of graft choice

    PubMed Central

    Shaerf, Daniel A; Pastides, Philip S; Sarraf, Khaled M; Willis-Owen, Charles A

    2014-01-01

    There is much literature about differing grafts used in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Much of this is of poor quality and of a low evidence base. We review and summarise the literature looking at the four main classes of grafts used in ACL reconstruction; bone-patella tendon-bone, hamstrings, allograft and synthetic grafts. Each graft has the evidence for its use reviewed and then compared, where possible, to the others. We conclude that although there is no clear “best” graft, there are clear differences between the differing graft choices. Surgeon’s need to be aware of the evidence behind these differences, in order to have appropriate discussions with their patients, so as to come to an informed choice of graft type to best suit each individual patient and their requirements. PMID:24649411

  8. Tibial Tunnel Cyst Formation after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using a Non-Bioabsorbable Interference Screw.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Yogesh V; Bhaskar, Deepu; Phaltankar, Padmanabh M; Charalambous, Charalambos P

    2015-12-01

    Tibial cyst formation following the use of bioabsorbable interference screws in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is well-described; however, cyst formation after the use of metallic interference screws is not well-documented. We describe a case of osteolytic lesion of the proximal tibia presenting to us 20 years after ACL reconstruction using an autologous bone-tendon-bone graft. The original graft fixation technique was interference fixation with a metal screw in the tibial and femoral tunnels. A two-stage revision reconstruction of the ACL was undertaken with curettage and bone grafting of the tibial lesion in the first stage and reconstruction using a four-strand hamstring tendon in the second stage. The patient recovered satisfactorily with complete healing of the cyst and returned to pre-injury level of activities. We have reviewed case reports and case series that describe the aetiology of intra-osseous cyst formation following ACL reconstruction. PMID:26673117

  9. Military movement training program improves jump-landing mechanics associated with anterior cruciate ligament injury risk.

    PubMed

    Owens, Brett D; Cameron, Kenneth L; Duffey, Michele L; Vargas, Donna; Duffey, Michael J; Mountcastle, Sally B; Padua, Darin; Nelson, Bradley J

    2013-01-01

    As part of the physical education program at the United States Military Academy, all cadets complete a movement training course designed to develop skills and improve performance in military-related physical tasks as well as obstacle navigation. The purpose of this study was to determine if completion of this course would also result in changes in jump-landing technique that reduce the risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Analysis of landing mechanics on a two-footed jump landing from a height of 30 cm with a three-dimensional motion capture system synchronized with two force plates revealed both positive and negative changes. Video assessment using the Landing Error Scoring System (LESS) revealed an overall improved landing technique (p=.001) when compared to baseline assessments. The studied military movement course appears to elicit mixed but overall improved lower extremity jump-landing mechanics associated with risk for ACL injury. PMID:23449058

  10. Anterior cruciate ligament augmentation for rotational instability following primary reconstruction with an accelerated physical therapy protocol.

    PubMed

    Carey, Timothy; Oliver, David; Pniewski, Josh; Mueller, Terry; Bojescul, John

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to present the results of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) augmentation for patients having rotational instability despite an intact vertical graft in lieu of conventional revision ACL reconstruction. ACL augmentation surgery with a horizontal graft was performed to augment a healed vertical graft on five patients and an accelerated rehabilitation protocol was instituted. Functional outcomes were assessed by the Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS) and the Modified Cincinnati Rating System (MCRS). All patients completed physical therapy within 5 months and were able to return to full military duty without limitation. LEFS and MCRS were significantly improved. ACL augmentation with a horizontal graft provides an excellent alternative to ACL revision reconstruction for patients with an intact vertical graft, allowing an earlier return to duty for military service members.

  11. Lessons learnt from an atypical mycobacterium infection post-anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ng, Stacy W L; Yee Han, Dave Lee

    2015-03-01

    Infections following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction are rare, with no previous reports citing Mycobacterium abscessus as the culprit pathogen. A 22-year-old man presented twice over three years with a painful discharging sinus over his right tibia tunnel site necessitating repeated arthroscopy and washout, months of antibiotic therapy, and ultimately culminating in the removal of the implants. In both instances, M. abscessus was present in the wound cultures, along with a coinfection of Staphyloccocus aureus during the second presentation. Though rare, M. abscessus is an important pathogen to consider in postoperative wounds presenting with chronic discharging sinuses, even in healthy non-immunocompromised patients. This case illustrates how the organism can cause an indolent infection, and how the removal of implants can be necessary to prevent the persistence of infection. Coinfection with a second organism is not uncommon and necessitates a timely change in treatment regime as well.

  12. Biomechanics of the anterior cruciate ligament: Physiology, rupture and reconstruction techniques.

    PubMed

    Domnick, Christoph; Raschke, Michael J; Herbort, Mirco

    2016-02-18

    The influences and mechanisms of the physiology, rupture and reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) on kinematics and clinical outcomes have been investigated in many biomechanical and clinical studies over the last several decades. The knee is a complex joint with shifting contact points, pressures and axes that are affected when a ligament is injured. The ACL, as one of the intra-articular ligaments, has a strong influence on the resulting kinematics. Often, other meniscal or ligamentous injuries accompany ACL ruptures and further deteriorate the resulting kinematics and clinical outcomes. Knowing the surgical options, anatomic relations and current evidence to restore ACL function and considering the influence of concomitant injuries on resulting kinematics to restore full function can together help to achieve an optimal outcome.

  13. Minimally Invasive Anterolateral Ligament Reconstruction in the Setting of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury.

    PubMed

    Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Barbosa, Nuno Camelo; Tuteja, Sanesh; Daggett, Matt; Kajetanek, Charles; Thaunat, Mathieu

    2016-02-01

    Recent evidence on the anatomy, function, and biomechanical properties of the anterolateral ligament has led to the recognition of the importance of this structure in the rotational control of the knee. This article describes a technique that allows for minimally invasive anterolateral ligament reconstruction as a complement to most techniques of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. A gracilis tendon autograft is harvested and prepared in a double-strand, inverted V-shaped graft. The graft is percutaneously placed through a femoral stab incision, and each strand is then passed deep to the iliotibial band, emerging through each tibial stab incision. After the femoral-end loop graft is fixed, the tibial fixation of each strand is performed in full extension for optimal isometry. PMID:27274456

  14. Post-operative imaging of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction techniques across the spectrum of skeletal maturity.

    PubMed

    Zbojniewicz, Andrew M; Meyers, Arthur B; Wall, Eric J

    2016-04-01

    Due to an increased frequency of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in young patients and improved outcomes in athletic performance following ACL reconstruction, surgery is increasingly being performed across the spectrum of skeletal maturity. We present a review of the range of reconstruction techniques performed in skeletally immature patients (physeal sparing techniques, which may involve epiphyseal tunnels or the utilization of an iliotibial band autograft), those performed in patients nearing skeletal maturity (transphyseal techniques), and the more conventional ACL reconstruction techniques performed in skeletally mature adolescents. It is important that radiologists be aware of the range of techniques being performed throughout the spectrum of skeletal maturity in order to accurately characterize the expected post-operative appearance as well as to identify complications, including those unique to this younger population. PMID:26646675

  15. Anatomic Single-Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Remnant Preservation Using Outside-In Technique

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung-Ill; Kwon, Sai-Won; Choi, Hyung-Suk; Chun, Dong-Il; Kim, Yong-Beom; Kim, Byoung-Min

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a modified anatomic single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction technique using the FlipCutter guide pin (Arthrex, Naples, FL) as a retrograde drill and a cortical suspensory fixation device (TightRope; Arthrex) with an adjustable graft loop length. Preservation of the ACL remnant as a biological sleeve for the graft is an important issue from the viewpoints of acceleration of revascularization and ligamentization, preservation of the proprioceptive nerve fibers, enhancement of the biological environment for healing, and maintenance of the anchor point at the native tibial attachment, in addition to yielding a lower incidence of tibial bone tunnel enlargement. The goal of our technique is to obtain some advantages of the remnant-preserving technique through an anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction, which is performed to minimize damage to the ACL tibial remnant. PMID:26759771

  16. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries in snowboarders: a quadriceps-induced injury.

    PubMed

    Davies, Hywel; Tietjens, Barry; Van Sterkenburg, Maayke; Mehgan, Andrew

    2009-09-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in snowboarders are rare. However, in expert boarders landing big jumps, ACL injuries are occurring more frequently. We identified 35 snowboarders with an identical injury mechanism. All these patients were landing from a jump. All described a flat landing on a flexed knee with significant knee compression. In 31 of 35 boarders, it was the front knee that was injured. Only two riders felt there was any twisting component to their injury. We postulate that the ACL rupture is due to maximal eccentric quadriceps contraction, as the boarder resists a compressive landing. Internal tibial rotation of the front knee in the snowboarding stance results in preloading of the ACL predisposing to injury.

  17. Biomechanics of the anterior cruciate ligament: Physiology, rupture and reconstruction techniques

    PubMed Central

    Domnick, Christoph; Raschke, Michael J; Herbort, Mirco

    2016-01-01

    The influences and mechanisms of the physiology, rupture and reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) on kinematics and clinical outcomes have been investigated in many biomechanical and clinical studies over the last several decades. The knee is a complex joint with shifting contact points, pressures and axes that are affected when a ligament is injured. The ACL, as one of the intra-articular ligaments, has a strong influence on the resulting kinematics. Often, other meniscal or ligamentous injuries accompany ACL ruptures and further deteriorate the resulting kinematics and clinical outcomes. Knowing the surgical options, anatomic relations and current evidence to restore ACL function and considering the influence of concomitant injuries on resulting kinematics to restore full function can together help to achieve an optimal outcome. PMID:26925379

  18. Anatomic Single-Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Remnant Preservation Using Outside-In Technique.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Ill; Kwon, Sai-Won; Choi, Hyung-Suk; Chun, Dong-Il; Kim, Yong-Beom; Kim, Byoung-Min

    2015-08-01

    This report describes a modified anatomic single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction technique using the FlipCutter guide pin (Arthrex, Naples, FL) as a retrograde drill and a cortical suspensory fixation device (TightRope; Arthrex) with an adjustable graft loop length. Preservation of the ACL remnant as a biological sleeve for the graft is an important issue from the viewpoints of acceleration of revascularization and ligamentization, preservation of the proprioceptive nerve fibers, enhancement of the biological environment for healing, and maintenance of the anchor point at the native tibial attachment, in addition to yielding a lower incidence of tibial bone tunnel enlargement. The goal of our technique is to obtain some advantages of the remnant-preserving technique through an anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction, which is performed to minimize damage to the ACL tibial remnant. PMID:26759771

  19. PERI-INCISIONAL DYSESTHESIA FOLLOWING ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION USING CENTRAL THIRD OF PATELLAR TENDON

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho Júnior, Lúcio Honório; Machado, Soares Luiz Fernando; Gonçalves, Matheus Braga Jacques; Júnior, Paulo Randal Pires; Baumfeld, Daniel Soares; Pereira, Marcelo Lobo; Lessa, Rodrigo Rosa; Costa, Lincoln Paiva; Bisinoto, Henrique Barra

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the prevalence and type of dysesthesia around the incision used to obtain the patellar tendon for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery. Methods: Out of a population of 1368 ACL reconstructions using the central third of the patellar tendon, 102 patients (111 knees) were evaluated by means of telephone interview. Results: The mean follow-up was 52 months (ranging from 12 to 88 months). The patients' ages ranged from 16 to 58 years (mean: 34.7 years). There was some degree of peri-incisional dysesthesia in 66 knees (59.46%). In 40.54% of the knees, this condition was not found. In all the cases of dysesthesia, the type encountered was Highet's type II. Conclusion: Peri-incisional dysesthesia following ACL reconstruction using the central third of the patellar tendon is highly prevalent. It affected more than half of the cases in this series. PMID:27026983

  20. ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION USING THE DOUBLE-BUNDLE TECHNIQUE – EVALUATION IN THE BIOMECHANICS LABORATORY

    PubMed Central

    D'Elia, Caio Oliveira; Bitar, Alexandre Carneiro; Castropil, Wagner; Garofo, Antônio Guilherme Padovani; Cantuária, Anita Lopes; Orselli, Maria Isabel Veras; Luques, Isabela Ugo; Duarte, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to describe the methodology of knee rotation analysis using biomechanics laboratory instruments and to present the preliminary results from a comparative study on patients who underwent anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using the double-bundle technique. Methods: The protocol currently used in our laboratory was described. Three-dimensional kinematic analysis was performed and knee rotation amplitude was measured on eight normal patients (control group) and 12 patients who were operated using the double-bundle technique, by means of three tasks in the biomechanics laboratory. Results: No significant differences between operated and non-operated sides were shown in relation to the mean amplitudes of gait, gait with change in direction or gait with change in direction when going down stairs (p > 0.13). Conclusion: The preliminary results did not show any difference in the double-bundle ACL reconstruction technique in relation to the contralateral side and the control group. PMID:27027003

  1. Factors affecting return to play after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a review of the current literature.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Matthew; Feeley, Brian T; Wawrzyniak, John R; Pinkowsky, Gregory; Gallo, Robert A

    2014-11-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction has been reported to produce normal or near-normal knee results in > 90% of patients. A recent meta-analysis suggested that, despite normal or near-normal knees, many athletes do not return to sports. Rates and timing of return to competitive athletics are quite variable depending on the graft type, the age of the patient, the sport, and the level of play. Even when athletes do return to play, often they do not return to their previous level. Graft failure, subjective physical factors, and psychological factors, including fear of reinjury and lack of motivation, appear to play a large role in patients' ability to return to sporting activities. PMID:25419890

  2. Early rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction under regional analgesia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Al-Nasser, Bassam; Palacios, Jean Luc; Lapasset, Lionel; Hattée, Bernard; Leroy, Frédéric

    2004-02-01

    Patients undergoing major knee surgery may experience postoperative pain, which could be exacerbated by early postoperative continuous passive motion or active mobilization. This pain may result in poor functional recovery. Use of regional analgesia techniques to achieve more consistent pain relief and to facilitate rapid rehabilitation can play an important role in optimizing postoperative outcome after anterior cruciate ligament repair (ACLR). This case study concerns a 20-year-old male soldier, otherwise healthy, who underwent ACLR. We inserted a catheter in the fascia iliaca compartment and performed postoperative analgesia with low-concentration ropivacaine by using an elastomeric pump. The patient started early rehabilitation under fascia iliaca compartment analgesia. We discuss the case and the influence of regional analgesia techniques on postoperative and clinical outcomes. PMID:14966725

  3. Two-Stage Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Bone Grafting Technique Using an Allograft Bone Matrix.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S; Cram, Tyler R; Civitarese, David; O'Brien, Luke; Moulton, Samuel G; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-02-01

    Outcomes of primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction have been reported to be far superior to those of revision reconstruction. However, as the incidence of ACL reconstruction is rapidly increasing, so is the number of failures. The subsequent need for revision ACL reconstruction is estimated to occur in up to 13,000 patients each year in the United States. Revision ACL reconstruction can be performed in one or two stages. A two-stage approach is recommended in cases of improper placement of the original tunnels or in cases of unacceptable tunnel enlargement. The aim of this study was to describe the technique for allograft ACL tunnel bone grafting in patients requiring a two-stage revision ACL reconstruction. PMID:27274452

  4. Regeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament: Current strategies in tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Nau, Thomas; Teuschl, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Recent advancements in the field of musculoskeletal tissue engineering have raised an increasing interest in the regeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). It is the aim of this article to review the current research efforts and highlight promising tissue engineering strategies. The four main components of tissue engineering also apply in several ACL regeneration research efforts. Scaffolds from biological materials, biodegradable polymers and composite materials are used. The main cell sources are mesenchymal stem cells and ACL fibroblasts. In addition, growth factors and mechanical stimuli are applied. So far, the regenerated ACL constructs have been tested in a few animal studies and the results are encouraging. The different strategies, from in vitro ACL regeneration in bioreactor systems to bio-enhanced repair and regeneration, are under constant development. We expect considerable progress in the near future that will result in a realistic option for ACL surgery soon. PMID:25621217

  5. Combined anterolateral ligament and anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction of the knee.

    PubMed

    Smith, James O; Yasen, Sam K; Lord, Breck; Wilson, Adrian J

    2015-11-01

    Although anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is established for the surgical treatment of anterolateral knee instability, there remains a significant cohort of patients who continue to experience post-operative instability. Recent advances in our understanding of the anatomic, biomechanical and radiological characteristics of the native anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee have led to a resurgent interest in reconstruction of this structure as part of the management of knee instability. This technical note describes our readily reproducible combined minimally invasive technique to reconstruct both the ACL and ALL anatomically using autologous semitendinosus and gracilis grafts. This method of ALL reconstruction can be easily integrated with all-inside ACL reconstruction, requiring minimal additional operative time, equipment and expertise. Level of evidence V.

  6. Two-Stage Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Bone Grafting Technique Using an Allograft Bone Matrix.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S; Cram, Tyler R; Civitarese, David; O'Brien, Luke; Moulton, Samuel G; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-02-01

    Outcomes of primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction have been reported to be far superior to those of revision reconstruction. However, as the incidence of ACL reconstruction is rapidly increasing, so is the number of failures. The subsequent need for revision ACL reconstruction is estimated to occur in up to 13,000 patients each year in the United States. Revision ACL reconstruction can be performed in one or two stages. A two-stage approach is recommended in cases of improper placement of the original tunnels or in cases of unacceptable tunnel enlargement. The aim of this study was to describe the technique for allograft ACL tunnel bone grafting in patients requiring a two-stage revision ACL reconstruction.

  7. State-of-the-art anterior cruciate ligament tears: A primer for primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Salzler, Matt; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Rosas, Samuel; Nguyen, Chau; Law, Tsun Yee; Eberle, Thomas; McCormick, Frank

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide primary care physicians and other members of the medical community with an updated, general review on the subject of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears. We aim to enhance awareness of these injuries and to prepare those practicing in the primary care setting to address these injuries. Because ACL injuries are quite common, it is very likely that a primary care physician will encounter these injuries and need to address them acutely. The current literature is replete with new concepts and controversies regarding ACL injuries, and this article provides a concise review for our target audience in regard to the care of a patient with an ACL injury. This article is composed of an overview with current epidemiologic data, basic anatomy and physiology, clinical presentation, physical examination findings, imaging modalities, and treatment options. After reading this short article, a medical care provider should understand ACL injuries and their appropriate management.

  8. Differences among mechanoreceptors in healthy and injured anterior cruciate ligaments and their clinical importance

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Mandeep Sing; Bali, Kamal; Prabhakar, Sharad

    2012-01-01

    Summary Mechanoreceptors in an intact Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) contribute towards functional stability of the knee joint. Injury to the ACL not only causes mechanical instability, but also leads to a disturbance in the neuromuscular control of the injured knee due to loss or damage to mechanoreceptors. ACL reconstruction restores proprioceptive potential of the knee to some extent, but the results vary. Although the remnant ACL contains residual mechanoreceptors, the number and functionality of these receptors is dependent, to some extent, on the physical characteristics of the remnant and duration of injury. Remnants, especially that adherent to the PCL, may actually act as a possible source of reinnervation of the graft. These remnants are worth preserving during ACL reconstruction and can play an important role in restoration of proprioception of knee following ACL reconstruction. PMID:23738272

  9. Anterolateral Ligament of the Knee: Back to the Future in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; D’Amelio, Andrea; Pellegrino, Pietro; Rosso, Federica; Rossi, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Although the importance of the anterolateral stabilizing structures of the knee in the setting of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries has been recognized since many years, most of orthopedic surgeons do not take into consideration the anterolateral structures when performing an ACL reconstruction. Anatomic single or double bundle ACL reconstruction will improve knee stability, but a small subset of patients may experience some residual anteroposterior and rotational instability. For this reason, some researchers have turned again towards the anterolateral aspect of the knee and specifically the anterolateral ligament. The goal of this review is to summarize the existing knowledge regarding the anterolateral ligament of the knee, including anatomy, histology, biomechanics and imaging. In addition, the most common anterolateral reconstruction/tenodesis techniques are described together with their respective clinical outcomes. PMID:26330991

  10. Anterior cruciate ligament anatomy: a review of the anteromedial and posterolateral bundles.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Jeffrey R; Kilcoyne, Kelly G; Rue, John-Paul H

    2009-04-01

    Critical evaluations of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction failure modes have shown that the most common cause for failure is aberrant femoral tunnel placement. Regardless of the surgical reconstruction technique, it is imperative to have a thorough understanding of the anatomy and function of the anteromedial (AM) and posterolateral (PL) bundles of the native ACL to successfully restore the stability and motion of the injured knee. Similar to the observation that anatomic reduction is critical to successful fracture management, ACL reconstruction techniques must focus on restoring the normal anatomy of the ACL. This article reviews the anatomy of the AM and PL bundles of the ACL, including landmarks for identifying their femoral and tibial footprints.

  11. Ultrastructure of periprosthetic Dacron knee ligament tissue. Two cases of ruptured anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Salvi, M; Velluti, C; Misasi, M; Bartolozzi, P; Quacci, D; Dell'Orbo, C

    1991-04-01

    Light- and electron-microscopic investigations were performed on two failed Dacron ligaments that had been removed from 2 patients shortly after failure of the implant 2-3 years after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. Two different cell populations and matrices were correlated with closeness to the Dacron threads. Fibroblasts surrounded by connective tissue with collagen fibrils were located far from the Dacron threads. Roundish cells, appearing to be myofibroblasts surrounded by a more lax connective tissue and elastic fibers, were found close to the Dacron threads. The presence of myofibroblasts and the matrix differentiation could be attributed to the different mechanical forces acting on the Dacron and on the connective tissue because of their different coefficients of elasticity. The sparse occurrence of inflammatory cells in the synovial membrane and in the connective tissue surrounding the Dacron supports the biologic inertness of this artificial material. However, the repair tissue was not structured to resist tension stresses.

  12. A survey of injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee in female basketball players.

    PubMed

    Gray, J; Taunton, J E; McKenzie, D C; Clement, D B; McConkey, J P; Davidson, R G

    1985-12-01

    This study surveyed 76 female basketball-related injuries that occurred during a 30-month period at the B.C. Sports Medicine Clinic. The knee was the most common site of injury (72%), and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture accounted for 25% of all basketball injuries seen. A total of 19 ACL ruptures in females were seen as compared to only 4 ACL ruptures in male basketball players during the same time period. During this time period a total of 151 males and 76 female basketball players were seen. Each patient was assessed as to age, height, weight, and alignment and questioned as to mechanism of injury, playing position, experience, and training plus previous injuries. Possible etiological factors postulated included player position, joint laxity, weak quadriceps mechanism, and a possible hormonal basis.

  13. A dynamic test of lower extremity function following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Juris, P M; Phillips, E M; Dalpe, C; Edwards, C; Gotlin, R S; Kane, D J

    1997-10-01

    It is essential to assess the functional status of patients with surgically reconstructed and rehabilitated anterior cruciate ligaments prior to discharge. This study established a testing paradigm for functional force production and absorption. Data were obtained from 100 healthy subjects for maximal hops, controlled leaps, and hopping and leaping symmetry. Only 10% of symptomatic patients met maximal hopping criteria, while 15% achieved controlled leaping norms. Ninety-five percent of these patients failed to reach both hopping and leaping symmetry norms. Asymptomatic patients were 63% successful in meeting hopping criteria, and 57% were successful in meeting leaping criteria. Hop symmetry and leap symmetry were achieved at rates of 70% and 60%, respectively. The performance of both groups fell significantly below that of normal subjects (p < .05). Data suggest that this protocol does accurately assess functional and dysfunctional knees, and that force absorption may be more critical than force production in the determination of functional capacity.

  14. Biomechanical Characterization of a Model of Noninvasive, Traumatic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Maerz, Tristan; Kurdziel, Michael D; Davidson, Abigail A; Baker, Kevin C; Anderson, Kyle; Matthew, Howard W T

    2015-10-01

    The onset of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) remains prevalent following traumatic joint injury such as anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture, and animal models are important for studying the pathomechanisms of PTOA. Noninvasive ACL injury using the tibial compression model in the rat has not been characterized, and it may represent a more clinically relevant model than the common surgical ACL transection model. This study employed four loading profiles to induce ACL injury, in which motion capture analysis was performed, followed by quantitative joint laxity testing. High-speed, high-displacement loading repeatedly induces complete ACL injury, which causes significant increases in anterior-posterior and varus laxity. No loading protocol induced valgus laxity. Tibial internal rotation and anterior subluxation occurs up to the point of ACL failure, after which the tibia rotates externally as it subluxes over the femoral condyles. High displacement was more determinative of ACL injury compared to high speed. Low-speed protocols induced ACL avulsion from the femoral footprint whereas high-speed protocols caused either midsubstance rupture, avulsion, or a combination injury of avulsion and midsubstance rupture. This repeatable, noninvasive ACL injury protocol can be utilized in studies assessing PTOA or ACL reconstruction in the rat.

  15. Injury patterns in patients presenting with a recurrent anterior cruciate ligament tear following primary reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sayampanathan, Andrew A.; Bin Abd Razak, Hamid Rahmatullah; Chong, Hwei Chi; Tan, Hwee-Chye Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Background An anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft rupture or a primary ACL injury in the contralateral knee is one of the greatest concerns of patients following primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). Our study describes the epidemiology and presence of concomitant meniscal injuries of patients with a graft rupture following primary ACLR or a primary rupture of the contralateral ACL following primary ACLR of the ipsilateral knee. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 42 patients who underwent a second ACLR. ACLR was performed using the ipsilateral semitendinosus and gracilis autograft. Variables extracted included the presence of concomitant MM and LM injuries intra-operatively, the patients’ level of intensity of sport (light, moderate, strenuous), duration of rehabilitation and mechanism of injury (contact, non-contact). Results Twenty-four (57.1%) patients had graft rupture of a previously reconstructed ACL of which 20 (83.3%) were male and 18 (42.9%) patients had a primary ACL tear of the contralateral knee following ACLR of the ipsilateral knee of which 18 (100%) were male. Patient who sustained a graft rupture were younger (29.5 vs. 31.9 years), had a higher body mass index (BMI) (26.42 vs. 25.10 kg/m2) and had a longer time before re-injury (6.18 vs. 4.94 years). Concomitant meniscal injury rates were comparable in both groups and the medial meniscus was injured more often. Conclusions This study describes the demographics of 2nd ACL injuries in the Asian population. Additional studies that investigate the differences in knee anatomy of Asians and Caucasians and their impact on ACL injuries should be performed. PMID:27429958

  16. Mechanical stretch increases CCN2/CTGF expression in anterior cruciate ligament-derived cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, Yoshiaki; Furumatsu, Takayuki; Kubota, Satoshi; Kawata, Kazumi; Ozaki, Toshifumi; Takigawa, Masaharu

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} CCN2/CTGF localizes to the ligament-to-bone interface, but is not to the midsubstance region of human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). {yields} Mechanical stretch induces higher increase of CCN2/CTGF gene expression and protein secretion in ACL interface cells compared with ACL midsubstance cells. {yields} CCN2/CTGF treatment stimulates the proliferation of ACL interface cells. -- Abstract: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-to-bone interface serves to minimize the stress concentrations that would arise between two different tissues. Mechanical stretch plays an important role in maintaining cell-specific features by inducing CCN family 2/connective tissue growth factor (CCN2/CTGF). We previously reported that cyclic tensile strain (CTS) stimulates {alpha}1(I) collagen (COL1A1) expression in human ACL-derived cells. However, the biological function and stress-related response of CCN2/CTGF were still unclear in ACL fibroblasts. In the present study, CCN2/CTGF was observed in ACL-to-bone interface, but was not in the midsubstance region by immunohistochemical analyses. CTS treatments induced higher increase of CCN2/CTGF expression and secretion in interface cells compared with midsubstance cells. COL1A1 expression was not influenced by CCN2/CTGF treatment in interface cells despite CCN2/CTGF stimulated COL1A1 expression in midsubstance cells. However, CCN2/CTGF stimulated the proliferation of interface cells. Our results suggest that distinct biological function of stretch-induced CCN2/CTGF might regulate region-specific phenotypes of ACL-derived cells.

  17. Variables Associated With Return to Sport Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Czuppon, Sylvia; Racette, Brad A.; Klein, Sandra E.; Harris-Hayes, Marcie

    2014-01-01

    Background As one of the purposes of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is to return athletes to their pre-injury activity level, it is critical to understand variables influencing return to sport. Associations between return to sport and variables representing knee impairment, function and psychological status have not been well studied in athletes following ACLR. Purpose The purpose of this review is to summarize the literature reporting on variables proposed to be associated with return to sport following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Study Design Systematic Review Methods Medline, Embase, CINAHL and Cochrane databases were searched for articles published before November 2012. Articles included in this review met these criteria: 1) included patients with primary ACLR, 2) reported at least one knee impairment, function or psychological measure, 3) reported a return to sport measure and 4) analyzed the relationship between the measure and return to sport. Results Weak evidence existed in sixteen articles suggesting variables associated with return to sport included higher quadriceps strength, less effusion, less pain, greater tibial rotation, higher Marx Activity score, higher athletic confidence, higher pre-operative knee self-efficacy, lower kinesiophobia and higher pre-operative self-motivation. Conclusion Weak evidence supports an association between knee impairment, functional, and psychological variables and return to sport. Current return to sport guidelines should be updated to reflect all variables associated with return to sport. Utilizing evidence-based return to sport guidelines following ACLR may ensure athletes are physically and psychologically capable of sports participation, which may reduce re-injury rates and the need for subsequent surgery. PMID:24124040

  18. Allograft tissue irradiation and failure rate after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Dashe, Jesse; Parisien, Robert L; Cusano, Antonio; Curry, Emily J; Bedi, Asheesh; Li, Xinning

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate whether anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) allograft irradiation is effective for sterility without compromising graft integrity and increasing failure rate. METHODS: A literature search was conducted using PubMed, Cochrane, and Google. The following search terms were used: “Gamma irradiation AND anterior cruciate ligament AND allograft” with a return of 30 items. Filters used included: English language, years 1990-2015. There were 6 hits that were not reviewed, as there were only abstracts available. Another 5 hits were discarded, as they did not pertain to the topic of interest. There were 9 more articles that were excluded: Three studies were performed on animals and 6 studies were meta-analyses. Therefore, a total of 10 articles were applicable to review. RESULTS: There is a delicate dosing crossover where gamma irradiation is both effective for sterility without catastrophically compromising the structural integrity of the graft. Of note, low dose irradiation is considered less than 2.0 Mrad, moderate dose is between 2.1-2.4 Mrad, and high dose is greater than or equal to 2.5 Mrad. Based upon the results of the literature search, the optimal threshold for sterilization was found to be sterilization at less than 2.2 Mrad of gamma irradiation with the important caveat of being performed at low temperatures. The graft selection process also must include thorough donor screening and testing as well as harvesting the tissue in a sterile fashion. Utilization of higher dose (≥ 2.5 Mrad) of irradiation causes greater allograft tissue laxity that results in greater graft failure rate clinically in patients after ACL reconstruction. CONCLUSION: Allograft ACL graft gamma irradiated with less than 2.2 Mrad appears to be a reasonable alternative to autograft for patients above 25 years of age. PMID:27335815

  19. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Biomechanics During Robotic and Mechanical Simulations of Physiologic and Clinical Motion Tasks: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Nathaniel A.; Myer, Gregory D.; Shearn, Jason T.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Investigators use in vitro joint simulations to invasively study the biomechanical behaviors of the anterior cruciate ligament. The aims of these simulations are to replicate physiologic conditions, but multiple mechanisms can be used to drive in vitro motions, which may influence biomechanical outcomes. The objective of this review was to examine, summarize, and compare biomechanical evidence related to anterior cruciate ligament function from in vitro simulations of knee motion. A systematic review was conducted (2004 to 2013) in Scopus, PubMed/Medline, and SPORTDiscus to identify peer-reviewed studies that reported kinematic and kinetic outcomes from in vitro simulations of physiologic or clinical tasks at the knee. Inclusion criteria for relevant studies were articles published in English that reported on whole-ligament anterior cruciate ligament mechanics during the in vitro simulation of physiologic or clinical motions on cadaveric knees that were unaltered outside of the anterior-cruciate-ligament-intact, -deficient, and -reconstructed conditions. A meta-analysis was performed to synthesize biomechanical differences between the anterior-cruciate-ligament-intact and reconstructed conditions. 77 studies met our inclusion/exclusion criteria and were reviewed. Combined joint rotations have the greatest impact on anterior cruciate ligament loads, but the magnitude by which individual kinematic degrees of freedom contribute to ligament loading during in vitro simulations is technique-dependent. Biomechanical data collected in prospective, longitudinal studies corresponds better with robotic-manipulator simulations than mechanical-impact simulations. Robotic simulation indicated that the ability to restore intact anterior cruciate ligament mechanics with anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions was dependent on loading condition and degree of freedom examined. PMID:25547070

  20. Anterior cruciate ligament biomechanics during robotic and mechanical simulations of physiologic and clinical motion tasks: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bates, Nathaniel A; Myer, Gregory D; Shearn, Jason T; Hewett, Timothy E

    2015-01-01

    Investigators use in vitro joint simulations to invasively study the biomechanical behaviors of the anterior cruciate ligament. The aims of these simulations are to replicate physiologic conditions, but multiple mechanisms can be used to drive in vitro motions, which may influence biomechanical outcomes. The objective of this review was to examine, summarize, and compare biomechanical evidence related to anterior cruciate ligament function from in vitro simulations of knee motion. A systematic review was conducted (2004 to 2013) in Scopus, PubMed/Medline, and SPORTDiscus to identify peer-reviewed studies that reported kinematic and kinetic outcomes from in vitro simulations of physiologic or clinical tasks at the knee. Inclusion criteria for relevant studies were articles published in English that reported on whole-ligament anterior cruciate ligament mechanics during the in vitro simulation of physiologic or clinical motions on cadaveric knees that were unaltered outside of the anterior-cruciate-ligament-intact, -deficient, and -reconstructed conditions. A meta-analysis was performed to synthesize biomechanical differences between the anterior-cruciate-ligament-intact and reconstructed conditions. 77 studies met our inclusion/exclusion criteria and were reviewed. Combined joint rotations have the greatest impact on anterior cruciate ligament loads, but the magnitude by which individual kinematic degrees of freedom contribute to ligament loading during in vitro simulations is technique-dependent. Biomechanical data collected in prospective, longitudinal studies corresponds better with robotic-manipulator simulations than mechanical-impact simulations. Robotic simulation indicated that the ability to restore intact anterior cruciate ligament mechanics with anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions was dependent on loading condition and degree of freedom examined.

  1. Arthroscopy-assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with patellar tendon or hamstring autografts.

    PubMed

    Doral, M N; Leblebicioglu, G; Atay, O A; Baydar, M L; Tetik, O; Atik, S

    2000-01-01

    Isolated ACL reconstructions were performed in 138 patients between 1994 and 1998. Patellar bone-patellar tendon-bone, and hamstring tendon autografts were used in 88 patients, and allografts were used in 50 patients. Eighty-eight knees of 88 patients with autograft reconstructions (17 female, 71 male) were included in this study and evaluation of the patients with allograft reconstruction reported separately. The mean age at the time of the operation was 32 years. All ACL reconstructions were performed arthroscopically. Twenty-seven bone-patellar tendon-bone, and 61 hamstring tendon autografts were used. The mean follow-up was 29 months. In the postoperative course the Lachman test was negative in 62 patients, 1+ in 22 patients, and 2+ in 4 patients. In 17 patients, anterior drawer sign were 1+ in comparison to the contralateral side. Pivot shift test was moderately positive only in 5 cases in the bone-patellar tendon-bone and hamstring tendon autograft groups postoperatively. There were 3 patients with subjective "giving way" symptoms. Second look arthroscopy revealed rupture of the neo-ligament. Arthroscopic washout and debridement were performed, and no revision ligamentoplasties were performed. Two of these patients improved with accelerated proprioceptive physical therapy, and one had to decrease his previous level of activity. There were no cases of arthrofibrosis, infection, or extension lag. Clinical results of patellar bone-tendon-bone and hamstring groups did not show any significant clinical difference. Avoiding the disturbance of the extensor mechanism of the knee is probably the most significant advantage of the hamstring autograft.

  2. Secondary damage to the knee after isolated injury of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Finsterbush, A; Frankl, U; Matan, Y; Mann, G

    1990-01-01

    Between 1978 and 1984, we examined and performed arthroscopy on 1000 consecutive patients. Ninety-eight of the 1000 had isolated ACL damage. These cases do not include patients with initial ACL injuries combined with other intraarticular damage. Diagnosis was by physical and arthroscopic examination. Examination took place an average 13.6 months after injury. Of the 98 isolated ACL injuries, 56 were complete ruptures and 42 were partial ruptures. In most cases of partial rupture, the clinical diagnosis was wrong. "Meniscal damage" was the usual diagnosis in these cases; the true diagnosis was made only by arthroscopic examination. Thirty-four of the 98 patients with isolated ACL injuries (30 men and 4 women) developed further intraarticular damage. Of these 34, 20 had complete ACL rupture and 14 had partial ACL rupture. Treatment after primary injury included physiotherapy in all patients and bracing in those whose knee was unstable during daily activities. Reconstructive surgical procedures were not performed in those patients. The time lapse from the primary to the secondary injury varied from 1 month to 20 years, with an average of 28 months. The secondary damage was caused by a secondary injury that was mild (22 cases) or developed insidiously (12 cases). Five types of secondary damage were observed: partial ACL tears that became complete--11 cases; meniscal tear--8 cases; loosening and subluxation of the anterior horn of the medial meniscus--14 cases; and fracture or damage to the articular condylar cartilage, with or without bone involvement--11 cases. It should be emphasized that the secondary damages were at times combined.

  3. Arthroscopy-assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with patellar tendon or hamstring autografts.

    PubMed

    Doral, M N; Leblebicioglu, G; Atay, O A; Baydar, M L; Tetik, O; Atik, S

    2000-01-01

    Isolated ACL reconstructions were performed in 138 patients between 1994 and 1998. Patellar bone-patellar tendon-bone, and hamstring tendon autografts were used in 88 patients, and allografts were used in 50 patients. Eighty-eight knees of 88 patients with autograft reconstructions (17 female, 71 male) were included in this study and evaluation of the patients with allograft reconstruction reported separately. The mean age at the time of the operation was 32 years. All ACL reconstructions were performed arthroscopically. Twenty-seven bone-patellar tendon-bone, and 61 hamstring tendon autografts were used. The mean follow-up was 29 months. In the postoperative course the Lachman test was negative in 62 patients, 1+ in 22 patients, and 2+ in 4 patients. In 17 patients, anterior drawer sign were 1+ in comparison to the contralateral side. Pivot shift test was moderately positive only in 5 cases in the bone-patellar tendon-bone and hamstring tendon autograft groups postoperatively. There were 3 patients with subjective "giving way" symptoms. Second look arthroscopy revealed rupture of the neo-ligament. Arthroscopic washout and debridement were performed, and no revision ligamentoplasties were performed. Two of these patients improved with accelerated proprioceptive physical therapy, and one had to decrease his previous level of activity. There were no cases of arthrofibrosis, infection, or extension lag. Clinical results of patellar bone-tendon-bone and hamstring groups did not show any significant clinical difference. Avoiding the disturbance of the extensor mechanism of the knee is probably the most significant advantage of the hamstring autograft. PMID:10983256

  4. The effect of graft choice on functional outcome in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sajovic, Matjaz; Strahovnik, Andrej; Komadina, Radko; Dernovsek, Mojca Z

    2008-08-01

    A prospective, randomised, 5-year follow-up study was designed to compare the functional results between patellar tendon and hamstring tendon autografts after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Primary reconstruction was performed in 32 patients using the central third of the patellar ligament and in 32 patients using double-looped semitendinosus and gracilis tendons. All reconstructions were performed by a single surgeon, with identical surgical technique and rehabilitation protocol. Of the total 64 patients in the study, 54 (85%) were available for the 5-year follow-up. No statistically significant differences were seen with respect to Lysholm score, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) classification, clinical and KT-2000 arthrometer laxity testing, single-legged hop test and anterior knee pain. Graft rupture occurred in two patients (8%) in the patellar tendon group and in two patients (7%) in the hamstring tendon group; 23 patients (88%) in the patellar tendon group and 23 patients (82%) in the hamstring tendon group returned to their pre-injury activity level. Good subjective outcome and stability can be obtained by using either graft; no statistically significant differences were found in functional outcome between the grafts.

  5. Anterior cruciate ligament ganglion causing flexion restriction: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Thean Howe Bryan; Lee, Keng Thiam

    2016-01-01

    Ganglion cysts originating from the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are uncommon. Often asymptomatic, they infrequently present with non-specific symptoms such as knee pain, stiffness, clicks, locking or restriction of knee extension. However, the patient we report presented with knee flexion restriction. A 37-year-old Chinese gentleman, with no history of knee trauma, presented with left knee pain. Left knee range of motion (ROM) was from 0 to 110 degrees. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan revealed a 1.5 cm × 3.3 cm × 1.7 cm cyst located in the intercondylar region arising from the ACL and extending predominantly posteriorly. Arthroscopy confirmed an intrasubstance ACL ganglion cyst, which was extending posteriorly. Complete excision of the cyst was performed. At 1-year follow-up, the patient regained knee flexion of 130 degrees. We describe one of the largest ACL ganglion cysts. Such cysts often extend anteriorly and impinge onto the roof of the intercondylar notch during knee extension, thus restricting extension. The restriction in knee motion in our patient was in flexion instead; this was because the cyst took an unusual course of extension predominantly in the posterior direction. Although rare, it must be included as a possible differential diagnosis when patients present with such knee symptoms. PMID:27386493

  6. Proximal anterior cruciate ligament tears: the healing response technique versus conservative treatment.

    PubMed

    Wasmaier, Johann; Kubik-Huch, Rahel; Pfirrmann, Christian; Grehn, Holger; Bieg, Christian; Eid, Karim

    2013-08-01

    The healing response technique (HRT) is a nonreconstructive method to promote healing in proximal anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears. The study reviews clinical and radiological long-term results. Thirty patients (average age 31 years) were treated according to the protocol described by Steadman et al. For comparison, an age- and gender-matched control group of conservatively treated patients (CST; n = 127) was selected. At follow-up (mean: 4 years), all patients were evaluated using Kneelax-3-arthrometer, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and by clinical examination. Two HRT patients were lost to follow-up and 10 (36%) patients needed definitive ACL reconstruction. The rate of secondary ACL reconstruction in the initial CST group was 56% (71 of 127). Nineteen of the conservatively treated patients were selected according to above-mentioned criteria. The average Lysholm score in the HRT group was 91 (CST group = 90), and the Orthopaedische Arbeitsgemeinschaft Knie score was 93 (CST group = 92). Tegner score decreased from 6.8 before injury to 5.7 at the time of follow-up (CST group: 6.0 to 5.1). Kneelax-3-arthrometer showed a significant higher anterior knee laxity compared with the noninjured side in both groups. MRI showed improvement of the ACL in both groups. HRT in adult patients is associated with a high revision rate of 36% secondary ACL reconstruction, comparable with primary conservative treatment (p = 0.056). For the remaining patients (64%), HRT did not result in better outcomes than conservative treatment.

  7. Nutrition of the anterior cruciate ligament. Effects of continuous passive motion

    SciTech Connect

    Skyhar, M.J.; Danzig, L.A.; Hargens, A.R.; Akeson, W.H.

    1985-11-01

    Twelve freshly killed mature male rabbits were used to study the effects of continuous passive motion (CPM) on regional and overall nonvascular nutritional pathways of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). One hundred fifty microcuries of /sup 35/S-sulfate was injected intraarticularly into each knee joint. The right knee underwent CPM for 1 hour, while the left knee remained immobilized. Both knee joints were then isolated and immediately frozen. The ACLs were removed while still mostly frozen, and sectioned into anterior, middle, and posterior thirds for the six rabbits in Group 1, and proximal, middle, and distal thirds for the six rabbits in Group 2. In addition, quadriceps tendon samples were harvested from each limb of three rabbits. After appropriate processing, all samples were counted in a scintillation counter, and counts per minute per milligram of tissue were calculated. There was significantly higher uptake in rest extremity ACLs compared to CPM extremity ACLs (P = 0.0001). No significant difference was demonstrated in regional uptake comparing respective thirds of the ACL in either Group 1 or Group 2. Quadriceps tendon uptake trended higher in the limbs exposed to CPM compared to those maintained at rest (P = 0.14). The ACL uses diffusion as a primary nutrient pathway. CPM does not increase nutrient uptake by the ACL in this avascular model, but CPM may facilitate transport of metabolites out of the joint. No regional differences in uptake within the ACL occurred in either group.

  8. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury: Compensation during Gait using Hamstring Muscle Activity

    PubMed Central

    Catalfamo, Paola Formento; Aguiar, Gerardo; Curi, Jorge; Braidot, Ariel

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has shown that an increase in hamstring activation may compensate for anterior tibial transalation (ATT) in patients with anterior cruciate ligament deficient knee (ACLd); however, the effects of this compensation still remain unclear. The goals of this study were to quantify the activation of the hamstring muscles needed to compensate the ATT in ACLd knee during the complete gait cycle and to evaluate the effect of this compensation on quadriceps activation and joint contact forces. A two dimensional model of the knee was used, which included the tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints, knee ligaments, the medial capsule and two muscles units. Simulations were conducted to determine the ATT in healthy and ACLd knee and the hamstring activation needed to correct the abnormal ATT to normal levels (100% compensation) and to 50% compensation. Then, the quadriceps activation and the joint contact forces were calculated. Results showed that 100% compensation would require hamstring and quadriceps activations larger than their maximum isometric force, and would generate an increment in the peak contact force at the tibiofemoral (115%) and patellofemoral (48%) joint with respect to the healthy knee. On the other hand, 50% compensation would require less force generated by the muscles (less than 0.85 of maximum isometric force) and smaller contact forces (peak tibiofemoral contact force increased 23% and peak patellofemoral contact force decreased 7.5% with respect to the healthy knee). Total compensation of ATT by means of increased hamstring activity is possible; however, partial compensation represents a less deleterious strategy. PMID:20721326

  9. Anatomical Single-bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using a Freehand Transtibial Technique

    PubMed Central

    Nha, Kyung-Wook; Han, Jae-Hwi; Kwon, Jae-Ho; Kang, Kyung-Woon; Park, Hyung-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In anatomical single-bundle (SB) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, the traditional transtibial approach can limit anatomical placement of the femoral tunnel. Surgical Technique We present a novel three-point freehand technique that allows for anatomic SB ACL reconstruction with the transtibial technique. Materials and Methods Between January 2012 and December 2012, 55 ACL reconstructions were performed using the three-point freehand technique. All the patients were followed for a minimum of 12 months post-operatively. Clinical evaluation was done using the Lysholm score and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) grade. All patients were analyzed by 3-dimensional computed tomography (3D CT) at 1 week after surgery. Results The mean Lysholm score improved from 68.2±12.7 points preoperatively to 89.2±8.2 points at final follow-up. At final follow-up, the IKDC grade was normal in 42 patients and nearly normal in 13 patients. None of the patients had a positive pivot shift test, anterior drawer test and Lachman test at final follow-up. The anatomical position of the femoral tunnel was confirmed on 3D CT scans. Conclusions The three-point freehand technique for SB transtibial ACL reconstruction is a simple, anatomic technique showing good clinical results. PMID:26060611

  10. [Plastic surgery of the anterior cruciate ligament: experimental study of intra-articular aramid fibers in dogs].

    PubMed

    Passuti, N; Daculsi, G; Gouin, F; Martin, S; Vigneron, M

    1989-01-01

    The authors explored the possibility of replacing an anterior cruciate ligament with an aramid fiber (Kevlar) implant. This study was performed in intra-articular site in 9 dogs and the average implantation period was 5 months. Studies were carried out by macroscopic, photon microscopy, and electron microscopy examination of the samples obtained at the time the animals were sacrificed. Clinical and radiographic studies of the knees were performed in order to assess functional consequences. Overall, the results showed a partial or complete rupture of 10 neoligaments out of the 17 studied ligaments; on the other hand, osseous anchorage and reintegration in the intra-articular zone appeared satisfactory. Kevlar fiber only partially meets the performance specifications for an artificial ligament intended to serve as an anterior cruciate ligament substitute. Some positive results have encouraged the authors to carry on further this experimental study.

  11. Anatomical study of the human anterior cruciate ligament stump's tibial insertion footprint.

    PubMed

    Tállay, András; Lim, Mui-Hong; Bartlett, John

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study is to define the topographical relationship of the anatomical bundles of the human anterior cruciate ligament's (ACL) stump over the tibial insertion site. Between January and April 2007, a total of 36 resected tibial plateaus were retrieved from patients who underwent total knee replacements. These samples had intact cruciate ligaments with no major osteophyte around the ACL tibial insertion footprint. The anatomical bundles of the ACL were identified and mapped, based on the topographical relationship over the tibial insertion footprint. Measurements of the dimensions of the ACL tibial footprint and tibial plateau were performed. The mean width and midsagittal depth of the tibia plateau was 78.7 +/- 6.5 and 46.4 +/- 5.0 mm, respectively. The mean width and midsagittal depth of the ACL tibial footprint was 10.3 +/- 1.9 and 19.5 +/- 2.6 mm, respectively. Out of the 36 freshly dissected ACL stumps, it was not possible to distinguish separate bundles in 14 (38.9%) cases. The average distance between the centers of the two bundles was 9.3 +/- 1.8 mm. The mean AP alignment of the tibial footprint was 89.6 degrees +/- 26.4 degrees , with a very wide range of 23 degrees -158 degrees . Of the 22 specimens with separate anatomical bundles, the alignment of the tibial footprint was AM-PL in six (27.3%), sagittal (85 degrees -95 degrees ) in five (22.7), AL-PM in nine (40.9%), and lateral-medial (L-M) in two (9.1%) cases. This study provides new information about the topographical anatomy of the ACL tibial insertion footprint. Based on gross anatomy, separate anatomical bundles of the ACL can be distinguished in 61.1% [22] of the specimens. The topographical alignment of the separate bundles is varied on a very wide range.

  12. Combined Intra- and Extra-articular Reconstruction of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament: The Reconstruction of the Knee Anterolateral Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; da Mota e Albuquerque, Roberto Freire; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis; Demange, Marco Kawamura

    2015-01-01

    We present a new technique for the combined intra- and extra-articular reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. Intra-articular reconstruction is performed in an outside-in manner according to the precepts of the anatomic femoral tunnel technique. Extra-articular reconstruction is performed with the gracilis tendon while respecting the anatomic parameters of the origin and insertion points and the path described for the knee anterolateral ligament. PMID:26258037

  13. Unilateral aplasia of both cruciate ligaments

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Aplasia of both cruciate ligaments is a rare congenital disorder. A 28-year-old male presented with pain and the feeling of instability of his right knee after trauma. The provided MRI and previous arthroscopy reports did not indicate any abnormalities except cruciate ligament tears. He was referred to us for reconstruction of both cruciate ligaments. The patient again underwent arthroscopy which revealed a hypoplasia of the medial trochlea and an extremely narrow intercondylar notch. The tibia revealed a missing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) footprint and a single bump with a complete coverage with articular cartilage. There was no room for an ACL graft. A posterior cruciate ligament could not be identified. The procedure was ended since a ligament reconstruction did not appear reasonable. A significant notch plasty if not a partial resection of the condyles would have been necessary to implant a ligament graft. It is most likely that this would not lead to good knee stability. If the surgeon would have retrieved the contralateral hamstrings at the beginning of the planned ligament reconstruction a significant damage would have occurred to the patient. Even in seemingly clear diagnostic findings the arthroscopic surgeon should take this rare abdnormality into consideration and be familiar with the respective radiological findings. We refer the abnormal finding of only one tibial spine to as the "dromedar-sign" as opposed to the two (medial and a lateral) tibial spines in a normal knee. This may be used as a hint for aplasia of the cruciate ligaments. PMID:20184748

  14. HOW CAN BONE TUNNEL ENLARGEMENT IN ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION SURGERY BE MEASURED? DESCRIPTION OF A TECHNIQUE

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar Leonardi, Adriano Barros de; Severino, Nilson Roberto; Junior, Aires Duarte

    2015-01-01

    To assess the presence of tibial bone tunnel enlargement after surgery to reconstruct the anterior cruciate ligament using quadruple flexor tendon grafts, and to propose a new technique for its measurement. Methods: The study involved 25 patients aged 18-43 years over a six-month period. The assessment was based on radiographs taken immediately postoperatively and in the third and sixth months of evolution after operations to reconstruct the anterior cruciate ligament using grafts from the tendons of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles, fixed in the femur with a transverse metal screw and in the tibia with an interference screw. The radiographs were evaluated in terms of the relative value between the diameter of the tunnel and the bone, both at 2 cm below the medial tibial condyle. Results: There were significant increases in tunnel diameters: 20.56% for radiographs in anteroposterior view and 26.48% in lateral view. Enlargement was present in 48% of anteroposterior and lateral radiographs, but was present in both views in only 16% of the cases. Conclusions: Bone tunnel enlargement is a phenomenon found in the first months after surgery to reconstruct the anterior cruciate ligament. The measurement technique proposed in this study was sufficient to detect it. PMID:27027030

  15. Single bundle anterior cruciate reconstruction does not restore normal knee kinematics at six months: an upright MRI study.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, J A; Sutherland, A G; Smith, F W

    2011-10-01

    Abnormal knee kinematics following reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament may exist despite an apparent resolution of tibial laxity and functional benefit. We performed upright, weight-bearing MR scans of both knees in the sagittal plane at different angles of flexion to determine the kinematics of the knee following unilateral reconstruction (n = 12). The uninjured knee acted as a control. Scans were performed pre-operatively and at three and six months post-operatively. Anteroposterior tibial laxity was determined using an arthrometer and patient function by validated questionnaires before and after reconstruction. In all the knees with deficient anterior cruciate ligaments, the tibial plateau was displaced anteriorly and internally rotated relative to the femur when compared with the control contralateral knee, particularly in extension and early flexion (mean lateral compartment displacement: extension 7.9 mm (sd 4.8), p = 0.002 and 30° flexion 5.1 mm (sd 3.6), p = 0.004). In all ten patients underwent post-operative scans. Reconstruction reduced the subluxation of the lateral tibial plateau at three months, with resolution of anterior displacement in early flexion, but not in extension (p = 0.015). At six months, the reconstructed knee again showed anterior subluxation in both the lateral (mean: extension 4.2 mm (sd 4.2), p = 0.021 and 30° flexion 3.2 mm (sd 3.3), p = 0.024) and medial compartments (extension, p = 0.049). Our results show that despite improvement in laxity and functional benefit, abnormal knee kinematics remain at six months and actually deteriorate from three to six months following reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament.

  16. Assessment and Evaluation of Predisposing Factors to Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bonci, Christine M.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: Injury to the knee, specifically the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), constitutes one of the most serious disabling injuries in sports. Women are reportedly at an increased risk. Prevention depends on identifying possible risk factors that may contribute to an athlete's susceptibility to injury. The major objective of this article is to lay the groundwork for standardization of a screening protocol (1) by providing rationale for the use of selected variables that might be good predictors of noncontact ACL injury and (2) by describing appropriate measurement indices to further investigate their predictive power. Standardization of a screening protocol is the first step in developing both a reliable and valid assessment tool with predictive value for injury and outcome strategies to meet the special needs of patients. Data Sources: MEDLINE was searched from 1980 to 1998 using the terms “anterior cruciate ligament injury,” “knee joint stability,” “postural malalignments” “structural abnormalities,” “static structural measures,” “musculoskeletal strength imbalances,” “isokinetic testing,” and “functional performance tests.” Data Synthesis: Many different factors, both extrinsic and intrinsic, have been investigated in the search for predictors of noncontact ACL injuries. Based on a literature review, 3 factors in particular have garnered considerable attention from clinicians and researchers: static postural malalignments with special reference to excessive foot pronation, knee recurvatum, and external tibial torsion; lower extremity musculoskeletal strength; and neuromuscular control considerations. However, much of the information known about the predictive value of these variables is inconclusive and conflicting at best, prompting the need for additional investigation. Conclusions/Recommendations: Screening evaluations are routinely employed as part of clinical work-ups when athletes are healthy and in top form. The data

  17. Hamstrings Stiffness and Landing Biomechanics Linked to Anterior Cruciate Ligament Loading

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, J. Troy; Norcross, Marc F.; Cannon, Lindsey N.; Zinder, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Greater hamstrings stiffness is associated with less anterior tibial translation during controlled perturbations. However, it is unclear how hamstrings stiffness influences anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) loading mechanisms during dynamic tasks. Objective: To evaluate the influence of hamstrings stiffness on landing biomechanics related to ACL injury. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 36 healthy, physically active volunteers (18 men, 18 women; age = 23 ± 3 years, height = 1.8 ± 0.1 m, mass = 73.1 ± 16.6 kg). Intervention(s): Hamstrings stiffness was quantified via the damped oscillatory technique. Three-dimensional lower extremity kinematics and kinetics were captured during a double-legged jump-landing task via a 3-dimensional motion-capture system interfaced with a force plate. Landing biomechanics were compared between groups displaying high and low hamstrings stiffness via independent-samples t tests. Main Outcome Measure(s): Hamstrings stiffness was normalized to body mass (N/m·kg−1). Peak knee-flexion and -valgus angles, vertical and posterior ground reaction forces, anterior tibial shear force, internal knee-extension and -varus moments, and knee-flexion angles at the instants of each peak kinetic variable were identified during the landing task. Forces were normalized to body weight, whereas moments were normalized to the product of weight and height. Results: Internal knee-varus moment was 3.6 times smaller in the high-stiffness group (t22 = 2.221, P = .02). A trend in the data also indicated that peak anterior tibial shear force was 1.1 times smaller in the high-stiffness group (t22 = 1.537, P = .07). The high-stiffness group also demonstrated greater knee flexion at the instants of peak anterior tibial shear force and internal knee-extension and -varus moments (t22 range = 1.729–2.224, P < .05). Conclusions: Greater hamstrings stiffness was associated with landing

  18. Three-dimensional characterization of the anterior cruciate ligament's femoral footprint.

    PubMed

    Westermann, Robert; Sybrowsky, Christian; Ramme, Austin; Amedola, Annuziati; Wolf, Brian R

    2014-02-01

    There is increasing use of three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) for researching anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions and tunnel placement. However, there is limited 3D CT data on the ACL footprint. The purpose of this study is to define the native ACL femoral footprint using 3D surface reconstructions of computed tomography (CT) imaging of cadaveric knees. The femoral insertion of the ACL was meticulously dissected and marked with drill holes in seven cadaveric knees. CT scans were performed on each specimen, and 3D computer models were created. Distance from the condyle edges to the margins of the footprint were referenced to the total condylar size. This was performed both parallel and perpendicular to the femoral axis as well as the intercondylar notch. The mean condylar depth (c/C) ratios along the axis of the femur were 0.45 ± 0.06 for the anterior border, 0.44 ± 0.08 for the posterior border, 0.26 ± 0.07 for the proximal border, and 0.63 ± 0.08 for the distal border. The mean notch (n/N) ratios for the four margins were 0.37 ± 0.04 for the anterior border, 0.67 ± 0.08 for the posterior border, 0.49 ± 0.07 for the proximal margin, and 0.50 ± 0.06 for the distal border. The mean c/C ratios parallel the intercondylar notch measured 0.23 ± 0.03 for the anterior border, 0.27 ± 0.04 for the posterior border, 0.37 ± 0.04 for the proximal border, and 0.12 ± 0.02 for the distal border. The mean n/N ratios perpendicular to the intercondylar notch measured 0.11 ± 0.06 for the anterior border, 0.52 ± 0.09 the posterior border, 0.29 ± 0.06 for the proximal border, and 0.30 ± 0.06 for the distal border. This study provides reference measures of the femoral footprint of the ACL using 3D CT. It will assist future studies that use advanced imaging to evaluate accuracy of ACL reconstruction.

  19. Repair of a torn medial meniscus with an anteromedial meniscofemoral ligament in an anterior cruciate ligament-injured knee.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Masayuki; Miyama, Takahide; Nagayama, Yoshihiro; Shino, Konsei

    2011-05-01

    We report a rare case of longitudinal tear of the anterior segment of the medial meniscus in association with the anteromedial meniscofemoral ligament (AMMFL) in an anterior cruciate ligament-injured knee. The tear was repaired, and the anterior horn was transferred to the tibia using the pull-out technique after excising the AMMFL. Repeat arthroscopy performed 7 months postoperatively revealed that the medial meniscus had completely healed and the anterior horn was firmly fixed to the tibia. Two years after the surgery, the patient could play basketball without any symptom. A posteroanterior flexion weight-bearing radiograph did not show any narrowing of the medial joint space. Considering the excellent healing observed in this case, preservation of the meniscus should be considered despite an association between a torn meniscus and an anomalous insertion.

  20. Trends in primary and revision anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction among National Basketball Association team physicians.

    PubMed

    Mall, Nathan A; Abrams, Geoffrey D; Azar, Frederick M; Traina, Steve M; Allen, Answorth A; Parker, Richard; Cole, Brian J

    2014-06-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are common in athletes. Techniques and methods of treatment for these injuries continue to vary among surgeons. Thirty National Basketball Association (NBA) team physicians were surveyed during the NBA Pre-Draft Combine. Survey questions involved current and previous practice methods of primary and revision ACL reconstruction, including technique, graft choice, rehabilitation, and treatment of combined ACL and medial collateral ligament injuries. Descriptive parametric statistics, Fisher exact test, and logistic regression were used, and significance was set at α = 0.05. All 30 team physicians completed the survey. Eighty-seven percent indicated they use autograft (81% bone-patellar tendon-bone) for primary ACL reconstruction in NBA athletes, and 43% indicated they use autograft for revision cases. Fourteen surgeons (47%) indicated they use an anteromedial portal (AMP) for femoral tunnel drilling, whereas 5 years earlier only 4 (13%) used this technique. There was a significant (P = .009) positive correlation between fewer years in practice and AMP use. NBA team physicians' use of an AMP for femoral tunnel drilling has increased over the past 5 years.

  1. Ability of a new hop test to determine functional deficits after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Augustsson, Jesper; Thomeé, Roland; Karlsson, Jon

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of a new hop test to determine functional deficits after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The test consists of a pre-exhaustion exercise protocol combined with a single-leg hop. Nineteen male patients with ACL reconstruction (mean time after operation 11 months) who exhibited normal single-leg hop symmetry values (> or =90% compared with the non-involved extremity) were tested for one-repetition maximum (1 RM) strength of a knee-extension exercise. The patients then performed single-leg hops following a standardised pre-exhaustion exercise protocol, which consisted of unilateral weight machine knee-extensions until failure at 50% of 1 RM. Although no patients displayed abnormal hop symmetry when non-fatigued, 68% of the patients showed abnormal hop symmetry for the fatigued test condition. Sixty-three per cent exhibited 1 RM strength scores of below 90% of the non-involved leg. Eighty-four percent of the patients exhibited abnormal symmetry in at least one of the tests. Our findings indicate that patients are not fully rehabilitated 11 months after ACL reconstruction. It is concluded that the pre-exhaustion exercise protocol, combined with the single-leg hop test, improved testing sensitivity when evaluating lower-extremity function after ACL reconstruction. For a more comprehensive evaluation of lower-extremity function after ACL reconstruction, it is therefore suggested that functional testing should be performed both under non-fatigued and fatigued test conditions.

  2. Fear of re-injury: a hindrance for returning to sports after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kvist, Joanna; Ek, Anna; Sporrstedt, Katja; Good, Lars

    2005-07-01

    Unrestricted participation in sports activities and return to the pre-injury level is often reported as an indicator of the success of ACL reconstruction. The athletes' choice not to return to their pre-injury level may depend on the knee function, but some times, social reasons or psychological hindrances such as fear of re-injury may influence their return to sports. The aim of this study was to investigate whether fear of re-injury due to movement is of significance for returning to previous level of activity in patients who have undergone anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (TSK), the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and some general questions were mailed to 87 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction 3-4 years before the study was conducted. Sixty-two patients (74%) answered the questionnaires (34 men and 28 women). Fifty-three percent of the patients returned to their pre-injury activity level. The patients who did not return to their pre-injury activity level had more fear of re-injury, which was reflected in the TSK. In addition, high fear of re-injury was correlated with low knee-related quality of life. Fear of re-injury must be considered in the rehabilitation and evaluation of the effects of an ACL reconstruction.

  3. The relationship between knee strength and functional stability before and after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Keays, S L; Bullock-Saxton, J E; Newcombe, P; Keays, A C

    2003-03-01

    Functional stability of the knee is dependent on an intact ligamentous system and the timely and efficient contraction of supporting musculature. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between muscle strength and functional stability in 31 patients pre- and post-operatively, following a unilateral anterior cruciate ligament rupture. All subjects underwent reconstructive surgery using semitendonosis and gracilis tendons. Isokinetic strength assessment of quadriceps and hamstring muscles was performed at a rate of movement of 60 degrees /s and 120 degrees /s. Functional stability was determined by performance during five functional stability tests that included the shuttle run, side step, carioca, single and triple hop tests. Pearson's correlation coefficient statistics were applied to pre-operative and post-operative data respectively. These analyses demonstrated a significant positive correlation between quadriceps strength indices at both testing speeds and the two hop tests pre-operatively (p's<0.007) and between quadriceps strength indices at both speeds and all five functional tests post-operatively (p's<0.01). Assessed using Steiger's formula, there was a significant increase in the correlation between quadriceps strength indices and three functional tests post-operatively compared to pre-operatively (p<0.05). No significant correlation between hamstring strength indices and functional scores existed pre- or post-operatively. This study has shown a significant correlation exists between quadriceps strength indices and functional stability both before and after surgery, this relationship does not reach significance between hamstring strength indices and functional stability.

  4. Isokinetic Identification of Knee Joint Torques before and after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Czaplicki, Adam; Jarocka, Marta; Walawski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the serial change of isokinetic muscle strength of the knees before and after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) in physically active males and to estimate the time of return to full physical fitness. Extension and flexion torques were measured for the injured and healthy limbs at two angular velocities approximately 1.5 months before the surgery and 3, 6, and 12 months after ACLR. Significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) in peak knee extension and flexion torques, hamstring/quadriceps (H/Q) strength ratios, uninvolved/involved limb peak torque ratios, and the normalized work of these muscles between the four stages of rehabilitation were identified. Significant differences between extension peak torques for the injured and healthy limbs were also detected at all stages. The obtained results showed that 12 months of rehabilitation were insufficient for the involved knee joint to recover its strength to the level of strength of the uninvolved knee joint. The results helped to evaluate the progress of the rehabilitation and to implement necessary modifications optimizing the rehabilitation training program. The results of the study may also be used as referential data for physically active males of similar age. PMID:26646385

  5. Suggestions from the field for return to sports participation following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: American football.

    PubMed

    Verstegen, Mark; Falsone, Susan; Orr, Russell; Smith, Steve

    2012-04-01

    Returning an American football player to sport after an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is challenging on several fronts. First, there are approximately 15 different positions a football player could play, depending on how specifically you define the positions on the field. Each of these positions has specific demands for optimal size, strength, power, body composition, cardiovascular fitness, and movement. Understanding all of these factors is paramount to returning a football player not only to his sport but also to his specific position. Second, the chaotic, contact-rich nature of the sport requires that heavy demands be placed on the lower extremities to attenuate external contact forces from other players and from ground reaction forces associated with accelerating, decelerating, quick stops and starts, and changing direction. Finally, return to a competitive level of performance is further influenced by playing surface, shoe selection, the equipment the player wears, and various potential psychosocial factors. It is the responsibility of the clinician to provide a progressive and systematic rehabilitation program by first introducing preprogrammed movements that, once mastered, are progressed with elements of more reactive and random movement patterns. The precise nature of this systematic progression of advanced rehabilitation is key in developing return-to-play criteria and, ultimately, in readying an American football player for eventual return to sport and a particular position.

  6. Muscle strength and function before and after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using semitendonosus and gracilis.

    PubMed

    Keays, S L; Bullock-Saxton, J; Keays, A C; Newcombe, P

    2001-10-01

    This study assessed the quadriceps and hamstring strength before and 6 months after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructive surgery using the hamstrings and related the findings to functional performance. Six months after surgery is a critical time for assessment as this is when players are returning to sport. Maximum isokinetic strength of 31 patients with complete unilateral ACL ruptures was measured at speeds of 60 degrees and 120 degrees per second. Functional assessment included the single hop, the triple hop, the shuttle run, side-step and carioca tests. All patients underwent a controlled quadriceps emphasized home-based physiotherapy program both before and after surgery. Results show that before surgery there was a 7.3% quadriceps strength deficit at 60 degrees per second compared to the uninjured leg but no hamstring strength deficit. After surgery there was a statistically significant but relatively small loss of muscle strength. The quadriceps strength deficit had increased to 12% and there was a 10% hamstring deficit. Post-operatively there was an 11% and 6.3% improvement in the hop tests, a 9% (P < 0.01) improvement in the shuttle run, a 15% (P < 0.001) improvement in the side step and a 24% (P < 0.001) improvement in the carioca tests (P < 0.001) despite the loss of muscle strength.

  7. The strength of the anterior cruciate ligament in humans and Rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Noyes, F R; Grood, E S

    1976-12-01

    The mechanical properties of anterior cruciate bone-ligament-bone specimens from humans and rhesus monkeys were determined in tension to failure under high strain-rate conditions. The age range of the human specimens was from sixteen to eighty-six years. The values fro human specimens obtained from young adults with regard to elastic modulus, ultimate tensile stress, and strain energy to failure were approximately two to three times those for specimens from humans in the sixth decade and older. The major mode of failure was ligament disruption in the specimens from young adult humans and avulsion of bone beneath the ligament insertion site in the specimens from older humans. The difference in mode of failure correlated with histological observations of decreased bone mass at the site of ligament attachment in the specimens from older humans. Rhesus monkey specimens had higher values for elastic modulus, failure stress, and strain energy. Significant reductions in strength and stiffness properties of ligament units were shown to occur with advancing age to a greater degree than expected. All experiments in which specimens from older human cadavera are used should be interpreted with caution when the results are applied to mechanisms of ligament failure for younger or athletic individuals.

  8. Evaluation of manual test for anterior cruciate ligament injury using a body-mounted sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, R.; Sagawa, K.; Tsukamoto, T.; Ishibashi, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Diagnosis method of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using body-mounted sensor is discussed. A wide variety of diagnosis method such as Pivot Shift Test (PST), Lachman Test and monitoring of jump motion (JT) are applied to examine the injured ACL. These methods, however, depend on the ability and the experience of examiner. The proposed method numerically provides three dimensional translation and rotation of the knee by using a newly developed 3D sensor. The 3D sensor is composed of three accelerometers and three gyroscopes. Measured acceleration of the knee during the examination is converted to the fixed system of coordinate according the acceleration of gravity and 3D rotation of the sensor, and is numerically integrated to derive 3D trajectory and rotation angle around the tibia. The experimental results of JT suggest that unsymmetrical movement of rotation angle of the tibia and sudden movement of estimated 3D trajectory show instability of knee joint. From the results of PST analysis, it is observed that the tibial angular velocity around the flexed position changes 41.6 [deg/s] at the injured side and 21.7 [deg/s] at the intact side. This result suggests the reposition of injured knee from subluxation.

  9. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Hamstring Tendon Autograft With Preserved Insertions.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ravi; Bahadur, Raj; Malhotra, Anubhav; Masih, Gladson David; Gupta, Parmanand

    2016-04-01

    We present a technique for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using hamstring tendon autograft with preserved tibial insertions. The tendons, harvested with an open-ended tendon stripper while their tibial insertions are preserved, are looped around to prepare a quadrupled graft. The femoral tunnel is drilled independently through a transportal technique, whereas the tibial tunnel is drilled in a standard manner. The length of the quadrupled graft and loop of the RetroButton is adjusted so that it matches the calculated length of both tunnels and the intra-articular part of the proposed ACL graft. After the RetroButton is flipped, the graft is manually tensioned with maximal stretch on the free end, which is then sutured to the other end with preserved insertions. We propose that preserving the insertions is more biological and may provide better proprioception. The technique eliminates the need for a tibial-side fixation device, thus reducing the cost of surgery. Furthermore, tibial-side fixation of the free graft is the weakest link in the overall stiffness of the reconstructed ACL, and this technique circumvents this problem. Postoperative mechanical stability and functional outcome with this technique need to be explored and compared with those of ACL reconstruction using free hamstring autograft. PMID:27354946

  10. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Remnant–Preserving Reconstruction Using a “Lasso-Loop” Knot Configuration

    PubMed Central

    Boutsiadis, Achilleas; Karampalis, Christos; Tzavelas, Anastasios; Vraggalas, Vasileios; Christodoulou, Pavlos; Bisbinas, Ilias

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture predisposes to altered kinematics and possible knee joint degeneration. Graft fiber maturation and ligamentization may eliminate this risk during ACL reconstruction procedures. ACL remnant–sparing techniques support the theory that the preserved tissue enhances revascularization, preserves the mechanoreceptors, and leads to anatomic remodeling. The purpose of this article is to present a simple and reproducible technique of tensioning the preserved ACL remnant over the femur. A nonabsorbable suture is passed through the ACL remnant with a “lasso-loop” technique using a curved rotator cuff hook. Femoral and tibial tunnel preparation is performed according to a standard surgical technique for the EndoButton device (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy, Andover, MA). The free ends of the ACL remnant suture are retrieved through the tibial tunnel and passed through each outside hole of the EndoButton device. The hamstring graft is passed through the tibial and femoral tunnels and fixed to the femoral cortex by flipping the EndoButton and to the tibia by an interference screw. Finally, non-sliding half-stitch locking knots are made to secure the ACL remnant suture on the EndoButton device, by use of a knot pusher. This technique offers simple and secure tensioning of the ACL remnant on the fixation device. PMID:26870656

  11. A review of systematic reviews on anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Lobb, Ryan; Tumilty, Steve; Claydon, Leica S

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this systematic review of systematic reviews was to critically appraise systematic reviews on Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction rehabilitation to determine which interventions are supported by the highest quality evidence. Electronic searches were undertaken, of MEDLINE, AMED, EMBASE, EBM reviews, PEDro, Scopus, and Web of Science to identify systematic reviews of ACL rehabilitation. Two reviewers independently selected the studies, extracted data, and applied quality criteria. Study quality was assessed using PRISMA and a best evidence synthesis was performed. Five systematic reviews were included assessing eight rehabilitation components. There was strong evidence (consistent evidence from multiple high quality randomised controlled trials (RCTs)) of no added benefit of bracing (0-6 weeks post-surgery) compared to standard treatment in the short term. Moderate evidence (consistent evidence from multiple low quality RCTs and/or one high quality RCT) supported no added benefit of continuous passive motion to standard treatment for increasing range of motion. There was moderate evidence of equal effectiveness of closed versus open kinetic chain exercise and home versus clinic based rehabilitation, on a range of short term outcomes. There was inconsistent or limited evidence for some interventions. Recommendations for clinical practice are made at specific time points for specific outcomes. PMID:23068905

  12. Systematic Review of Biological Modulation of Healing in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Sai-Chuen; Cheuk, Yau-Chuk; Yung, Shu-Hang; Rolf, Christer Gustav; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Background: Whether biological modulation is effective to promote healing in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction remains unclear. Purpose: To perform a systematic review of both clinical and experimental evidence of preclinical animal studies on biological modulation to promote healing in ACL reconstruction. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: A systematic search was performed using the PubMed, Ovid, and Scopus search engines. Inclusion criteria were clinical and animal studies involving subjects with ACL injury with the use of biological modulation to promote healing outcomes. Methodological quality of clinical studies was evaluated using the Critical Appraisal Skill Programme (CASP) appraisal tool, and animal studies were evaluated by a scoring system based on a published checklist of good animal studies. Results: Ten clinical studies and 50 animal studies were included. Twenty-five included studies were regarded as good quality, with a methodological score ≥5. These studies suggested that transforming growth factor–beta (TGF-β), mesenchymal stem cells, osteogenic factors, and modalities that reduce local inflammation may be beneficial to promote graft healing in ACL reconstruction. Conclusion: This systematic review suggests that biological modulation is able to promote healing on top of surgical treatment for ACL injuries. This treatment strategy chiefly works through promotion of healing at the tunnel-graft interface, but the integrity of the intra-articular midsubstance of the graft would be another target for biological modulation. PMID:26535311

  13. Review of evolution of tunnel position in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Rayan, Faizal; Nanjayan, Shashi Kumar; Quah, Conal; Ramoutar, Darryl; Konan, Sujith; Haddad, Fares S

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is one of the commonest knee sport injuries. The annual incidence of the ACL injury is between 100000-200000 in the United States. Worldwide around 400000 ACL reconstructions are performed in a year. The goal of ACL reconstruction is to restore the normal knee anatomy and kinesiology. The tibial and femoral tunnel placements are of primordial importance in achieving this outcome. Other factors that influence successful reconstruction are types of grafts, surgical techniques and rehabilitation programmes. A comprehensive understanding of ACL anatomy has led to the development of newer techniques supplemented by more robust biological and mechanical concepts. In this review we are mainly focussing on the evolution of tunnel placement in ACL reconstruction, focusing on three main categories, i.e., anatomical, biological and clinical outcomes. The importance of tunnel placement in the success of ACL reconstruction is well researched. Definite clinical and functional data is lacking to establish the superiority of the single or double bundle reconstruction technique. While there is a trend towards the use of anteromedial portals for femoral tunnel placement, their clinical superiority over trans-tibial tunnels is yet to be established. PMID:25793165

  14. Current practice variations in the management of anterior cruciate ligament injuries in Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Mahnik, Alan; Mahnik, Silvija; Dimnjakovic, Damjan; Curic, Stjepan; Smoljanovic, Tomislav; Bojanic, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate current preferences and opinions on the diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in Croatia. METHODS: The survey was conducted using a questionnaire which was sent by e-mail to all 189 members of the Croatian Orthopaedic and Traumatology Association. Only respondents who had performed at least one ACL reconstruction during 2011 were asked to fill out the questionnaire. RESULTS: Thirty nine surgeons responded to the survey. Nearly all participants (95%) used semitendinosus/gracilis tendon autograft for reconstruction and only 5% used bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft. No other graft type had been used. The accessory anteromedial portal was preferred over the transtibial approach (67% vs 33%). Suspensory fixation was the most common graft fixation method (62%) for the femoral side, followed by the cross-pin (33%) and bioabsorbable interference screw (5%). Almost all respondents (97%) used a bioabsorbable interference screw for tibial side graft fixation. CONCLUSION: The results show that ACL reconstruction surgery in Croatia is in step with the recommendations from latest world literature. PMID:24147268

  15. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Remnant-Preserving Reconstruction Using a "Lasso-Loop" Knot Configuration.

    PubMed

    Boutsiadis, Achilleas; Karampalis, Christos; Tzavelas, Anastasios; Vraggalas, Vasileios; Christodoulou, Pavlos; Bisbinas, Ilias

    2015-12-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture predisposes to altered kinematics and possible knee joint degeneration. Graft fiber maturation and ligamentization may eliminate this risk during ACL reconstruction procedures. ACL remnant-sparing techniques support the theory that the preserved tissue enhances revascularization, preserves the mechanoreceptors, and leads to anatomic remodeling. The purpose of this article is to present a simple and reproducible technique of tensioning the preserved ACL remnant over the femur. A nonabsorbable suture is passed through the ACL remnant with a "lasso-loop" technique using a curved rotator cuff hook. Femoral and tibial tunnel preparation is performed according to a standard surgical technique for the EndoButton device (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy, Andover, MA). The free ends of the ACL remnant suture are retrieved through the tibial tunnel and passed through each outside hole of the EndoButton device. The hamstring graft is passed through the tibial and femoral tunnels and fixed to the femoral cortex by flipping the EndoButton and to the tibia by an interference screw. Finally, non-sliding half-stitch locking knots are made to secure the ACL remnant suture on the EndoButton device, by use of a knot pusher. This technique offers simple and secure tensioning of the ACL remnant on the fixation device. PMID:26870656

  16. The Weak Link in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: What is the Evidence for Graft Fixation Devices?

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kirk A; Looze, Christopher; Bosco, Joseph A; Strauss, Eric J

    2016-03-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a common injury that mostly affects young adults. The mechanisms of injury and surgical treatment have been extensively studied in both the laboratory and clinical arenas; however, great controversy still exists in regards to the best surgical technique, graft choice, and graft fixation device. In the area graft fixation, multiple breakthroughs have occurred in terms of fixation devices. These devices generally fall within the broad categories of interference screw, cross-pins, or cortical-based devices. Furthermore, some of these devices are available in either metal or bioabsorbable materials, which adds to the already great variety of options. Although biomechanically these devices have been shown to be able to withstand the typical forces experienced by the ACL graft during the early phases of rehabilitation before the graft has fully incorporated into the bone, little is known about the clinical outcomes. It is well recognized that graft fixation is the weakest link in the early postoperative period after ACL reconstruction. This review of the outcomes of ACL fixation devices explores some of the evidence available for the different devices. PMID:26977545

  17. Outcome of combined autologous chondrocyte implantation and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Dhinsa, Baljinder S; Nawaz, Syed Z; Gallagher, Kieran R; Skinner, John; Briggs, Tim; Bentley, George

    2015-01-01

    Background: Instability of the knee joint, after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, is contraindication to osteochondral defect repair. This prospective study is to investigate the role of combined autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) with ACL reconstruction. Materials and Methods: Three independent groups of patients with previous ACL injuries undergoing ACI were identified and prospectively followed up. The first group had ACI in combination with ACL reconstruction (combined group); the 2nd group consisted of individuals who had an ACI procedure having had a previously successful ACL reconstruction (ACL first group); and the third group included patients who had an ACI procedure to a clinically stable knee with documented nonreconstructed ACL disruption (No ACL group). Their outcomes were assessed using the modified cincinnati rating system, the Bentley functional (BF) rating system (BF) and a visual analog scale (VAS). Results: At a mean followup of 64.24 months for the ACL first group, 63 months for combined group and 78.33 months for the No ACL group; 60% of ACL first patients, 72.73% of combined group and 83.33% of the No ACL group felt their outcome was better following surgery. There was no significant difference demonstrated in BF and VAS between the combined and ACL first groups. Results revealed a significant affect of osteochondral defect size on outcome measures. Conclusion: The study confirms that ACI in combination with ACL reconstruction is a viable option with similar outcomes as those patients who have had the procedures staged. PMID:26015603

  18. No correlation of height or gender with anterior cruciate ligament footprint size.

    PubMed

    Wu, Eileen; Chen, Michael; Cooperman, Daniel; Victoroff, Brian; Goodfellow, Donald; Farrow, Lutul D

    2011-03-01

    Recently, there has been much interest in anatomic double-bundle reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Double-bundle reconstruction of the ACL requires adequate footprint size to place two femoral tunnels. The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a correlation between lateral intercondylar ridge length and gender and/ or height. We measured the femoral attachment of the ACL to determine if patient sex and/or height could be used to predict ACL femoral footprint size. We measured the length of the lateral intercondylar ridge in 65 skeletally mature human femora. Gender and height was recorded for each individual. We used bivariate regression analysis to determine correlations between both height and gender and the length of the lateral intercondylar ridge. The principal findings of our study demonstrate that there is no correlation between ACL femoral footprint size and gender or footprint size and height. Our study demonstrates that patient height and gender cannot be used for preoperative planning when deciding whether a given patient has adequate footprint size to support double-bundle reconstruction of the ACL.

  19. Evaluation of open and closed kinetic chain exercises in rehabilitation following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Uçar, Mehmet; Koca, Irfan; Eroglu, Mehmet; Eroglu, Selma; Sarp, Umit; Arik, Hasan Onur; Yetisgin, Alparslan

    2014-12-01

    [Purpose] To compare outcomes of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction after open kinetic chain (OKC) exercises and closed kinetic chain (CKC) exercises. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects comprised 11 female and 47 male patients who are randomly divided into two groups: which performed a CKC exercise program Group I and Group II which performed an OKC exercise program. Pain intensity was evaluated using visual analogue scale (VAS). Knee flexion was evaluated using a universal goniometer, and thigh circumference measurements were taken with a tape measure at baseline and at 3 months and 6 months after the treatment. Lysholm scores were used to assess knee function. [Results] There were no significant differences between the two groups at baseline. Within each group, VAS values and knee flexion were improved after the surgery. These improvements were significantly higher in the CKC group than in the OKC group. There were increases in thigh circumference difference at the 3 and 6 month assessments post-surgery. A greater improvement in the Lysholm score was observed in the CKC group at 6 months. [Conclusion] The CKC exercise program was more effective than OKC in improving the knee functions of patients with ACL reconstruction. PMID:25540486

  20. Glucosamine supplementation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in athletes: a randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Eraslan, Ali; Ulkar, Bulent

    2015-01-01

    Although glucosamine is commonly consumed by athletes, its effectiveness in sports injuries is still under debate. We aimed to investigate the effects of glucosamine to the rehabilitation outcomes of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructed athletes. Glucosamine-sulfate (1000 mg daily, for 8 weeks) was administered to half of the cohort of 30 male athletes, the other half used a placebo. Both groups received the same rehabilitation protocol. Knee pain and functions were evaluated by a visual analogue scale (VAS), International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) and Lysholm scores before and after oral administration. Additionally, an isokinetic test was performed after the administration period. The scores revealed significant improvements in both groups after 8 weeks, but no significant difference was detected between groups in any of the parameters. Glucosamine supplementation did not improve the rehabilitation outcomes of athletes after ACL reconstruction. This is the first study investigating this topic. Further studies will help to obtain clear evidence about glucosamine efficacy on ACL injured or ACL reconstructed athletes.

  1. Neuromuscular training techniques to target deficits before return to sport after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Myer, Gregory D; Paterno, Mark V; Ford, Kevin R; Hewett, Timothy E

    2008-05-01

    Surgical intervention and early-phase rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction have undergone a relatively rapid and global evolution over the past 25 years. Despite the advances that have significantly improved outcomes, decreases in healthcare coverage (limited visits allowed for physical therapy) have increased the role of the strength and conditioning specialist in the rehabilitation of athletes returning to sport after ACL reconstruction. In addition, there is an absence of standardized, objective criteria to accurately assess an athlete's ability to progress through the end stages of rehabilitation and safely return to sport. The purpose of this Scientific Commentary is to present an example of a progressive, end-stage return to sport protocol that is targeted to measured deficits of neuromuscular control, strength, power, and functional symmetry that are rehabilitative landmarks after ACL reconstruction. The proposed return to sport training protocol incorporates quantitative measurement tools that will provide the athlete with objective feedback and targeted goal setting. Objective feedback and targeted goal setting may aid the strength and conditioning specialist with exercise selection and progression. In addition, a rationale for exercise selection is outlined to provide the strength and conditioning specialist with a flexible decision-making approach that will aid in the modification of return to sport training to meet the individual athlete's abilities and to target objectively measured deficits. This algorithmic approach may improve the potential for athletes to return to sport after ACL reconstruction at the optimal performance level and with minimized risk of reinjury.

  2. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, rehabilitation, and return to play: 2015 update

    PubMed Central

    Nyland, John; Mattocks, Alma; Kibbe, Shane; Kalloub, Alaa; Greene, Joe W; Caborn, David N M

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical discoveries and a growing appreciation of the knee as a complex organ are driving innovations in patient care decision-making following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Surgeons are increasing their efforts to restore combined mechanical-neurosensory ACL function and placing more consideration on when to reconstruct versus repair native anatomical structures. Surgical options now include primary repair with or without reinforcing the injured ACL with suture-based internal bracing, and growing evidence supports biological augmentation using platelet-rich plasma and mesenchymal stem cells to enhance tissue healing. Physical therapists and athletic trainers are increasing their efforts to facilitate greater athlete cognitive engagement during therapeutic exercise performance to better restore nonimpaired neuromuscular control activation amplitude and timing. Knee brace design and use needs to evolve to better match these innovations and their influence on the rehabilitation plan timetable. There is a growing appreciation for the multifaceted characteristics of the rehabilitation process and how they influence neuromuscular, educational, and psychobehavioral treatment goal achievement. Multiple sources may influence the athlete during the return to sports process and clinical outcome measures need to be refined to better evaluate these influences. This update summarizes contemporary ACL surgical, medical, and rehabilitation interventions and future trends. PMID:26955296

  3. Assessing post-anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction ambulation using wireless wearable integrated sensors.

    PubMed

    Arosha Senanayake, S M N; Ahmed Malik, Owais; Mohammad Iskandar, Pg; Zaheer, Dansih

    2013-11-01

    Abstract A hardware/software co-design for assessing post-Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction ambulation is presented. The knee kinematics and neuromuscular data during walking (2-6 km h(-1)) have been acquired using wireless wearable motion and electromyography (EMG) sensors, respectively. These signals were integrated by superimposition and mixed signals processing techniques in order to provide visual analyses of bio-signals and identification of the recovery progress of subjects. Monitoring overlapped signals simultaneously helps in detecting variability and correlation of knee joint dynamics and muscles activities for an individual subject as well as for a group. The recovery stages of subjects have been identified based on combined features (knee flexion/extension and EMG signals) using an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). The proposed system has been validated for 28 test subjects (healthy and ACL-reconstructed). Results of ANFIS showed that the ambulation data can be used to distinguish subjects at different levels of recuperation after ACL reconstruction. PMID:24117351

  4. An Ambulatory Method of Identifying Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstructed Gait Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Matthew R.; Delahunt, Eamonn; Sweeney, Kevin T.; Caulfield, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The use of inertial sensors to characterize pathological gait has traditionally been based on the calculation of temporal and spatial gait variables from inertial sensor data. This approach has proved successful in the identification of gait deviations in populations where substantial differences from normal gait patterns exist; such as in Parkinsonian gait. However, it is not currently clear if this approach could identify more subtle gait deviations, such as those associated with musculoskeletal injury. This study investigates whether additional analysis of inertial sensor data, based on quantification of gyroscope features of interest, would provide further discriminant capability in this regard. The tested cohort consisted of a group of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed (ACL-R) females and a group of non-injured female controls, each performed ten walking trials. Gait performance was measured simultaneously using inertial sensors and an optoelectronic marker based system. The ACL-R group displayed kinematic and kinetic deviations from the control group, but no temporal or spatial deviations. This study demonstrates that quantification of gyroscope features can successfully identify changes associated with ACL-R gait, which was not possible using spatial or temporal variables. This finding may also have a role in other clinical applications where small gait deviations exist. PMID:24451464

  5. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Changes in Human Joint in Aging and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Akihiko; Otsuki, Shuhei; Pauli, Chantal; Miyaki, Shigeru; Patil, Shantanu; Steklov, Nikolai; Kinoshita, Mitsuo; Koziol, James; D’Lima, Darryl D.; Lotz, Martin K.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The development and patterns of spontaneous aging-related changes in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and their relationship to articular cartilage degeneration are not well characterized. The aim of this study was to investigate the types and temporal sequence of aging-related ACL changes and establish the correlation with cartilage lesion patterns at all stages of OA development in human knee joints without prior joint trauma. Methods Human knee joints (n=120; 65 donors; age 23-92) were obtained at autopsy and ACL and cartilage were graded macroscopically and histologically. Inflammation surrounding the ACL was assessed separately. Results Histological ACL substance scores and ligament sheath inflammation scores increased with aging. Collagen fiber disorganization was the earliest and most prevalent change. The severity of mucoid degeneration and chondroid metaplasia in the ACL increased with development of cartilage lesions. A correlation between ACL and cartilage degeneration was observed, especially in the medial compartment of the knee joint. Conclusion ACL degeneration is highly prevalent in knees with cartilage defects, and may even precede cartilage changes. Hence, ACL deficiencies may not only be important in post-traumatic OA, but also a feature associated with knee OA pathogenesis in general. PMID:22006159

  6. Accuracy of predicting maximal quadriceps force from submaximal effort contractions after anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    PubMed

    Farquhar, Sara J; Chmielewski, Terese L; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2005-10-01

    Weakness and failure of voluntary activation of the quadriceps femoris muscles often occur after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Side-to-side strength comparisons are used as a measure of progress, and are inaccurate if the quadriceps has activation failure. Burst superimposition testing is commonly used to assess quadriceps strength and activation during a maximal volitional isometric contraction (MVIC), using the central activation ratio (CAR) calculation. A recently developed mathematical model predicts the MVIC from submaximal efforts. The purpose of this study was to compare the CAR calculation to the mathematical model. We hypothesized that the model would be a more accurate predictor of strength than the CAR calculation when voluntary activation failure is present. Data from the involved and uninvolved quadriceps muscles of 100 consecutive subjects with complete, isolated ACL rupture were retrospectively evaluated. Subjects who required multiple trials to produce an MVIC with full activation (true MVIC) were used to compare the CAR calculation, the mathematical model, and this true MVIC. Subjects unable to produce a true MVIC with multiple trials were used to compare the mathematical model to the CAR calculation. Results demonstrate that both methods reliably and accurately estimate the quadriceps weakness associated with ACL rupture. We recommend use of the CAR calculation to provide estimations of true quadriceps strength to facilitate clinical decisions about progress in rehabilitation after ACL rupture.

  7. Sex differences in knee strength deficit 1 year after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Kyung; Park, Won Hah

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Little is known about the outcome differences between men and women after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Therefore, the present study aimed to compare knee muscle strength between men and women 1 year after ACL reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] Retrospective and outcome study. Between 2012 and 2015, 35 males (mean age, 29.7 ± 010.7 years) and 35 females (mean age, 28.2 ± 11.3 years) who had undergone primary ACL reconstruction were recruited from Samsung medical centers. We assessed the strength deficit in the quadriceps (extensor) and hamstrings (flexor) at 60°/sec and 180°/sec with isokinetic testing equipment. Statistical analysis was conducted with a t-test to determine if sex differences existed in knee strength deficit. [Results] Significant differences were noted between men and women with respect to extensor muscle strength deficit. Women reported less extensor muscle strength than men did, at the angular velocities 60°/sec and 180°/sec. However, no significant sex differences were found at either velocity with respect to the strength deficit of the knee flexor muscles. [Conclusion] Compared to male patients, female patients reported significantly less extensor muscle strength and less improvement 1 year after reconstruction. PMID:26834366

  8. A Systematic Summary of Systematic Reviews on the Topic of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Michael J.; Browning, William M.; Urband, Christopher E.; Kluczynski, Melissa A.; Bisson, Leslie J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There has been a substantial increase in the amount of systematic reviews and meta-analyses published on the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Purpose: To quantify the number of systematic reviews and meta-analyses published on the ACL in the past decade and to provide an overall summary of this literature. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A systematic review of all ACL-related systematic reviews and meta-analyses published between January 2004 and September 2014 was performed using PubMed, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Database. Narrative reviews and non-English articles were excluded. Results: A total of 1031 articles were found, of which 240 met the inclusion criteria. Included articles were summarized and divided into 17 topics: anatomy, epidemiology, prevention, associated injuries, diagnosis, operative versus nonoperative management, graft choice, surgical technique, fixation methods, computer-assisted surgery, platelet-rich plasma, rehabilitation, return to play, outcomes assessment, arthritis, complications, and miscellaneous. Conclusion: A summary of systematic reviews on the ACL can supply the surgeon with a single source for the most up-to-date synthesis of the literature. PMID:27047983

  9. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, rehabilitation, and return to play: 2015 update.

    PubMed

    Nyland, John; Mattocks, Alma; Kibbe, Shane; Kalloub, Alaa; Greene, Joe W; Caborn, David N M

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical discoveries and a growing appreciation of the knee as a complex organ are driving innovations in patient care decision-making following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Surgeons are increasing their efforts to restore combined mechanical-neurosensory ACL function and placing more consideration on when to reconstruct versus repair native anatomical structures. Surgical options now include primary repair with or without reinforcing the injured ACL with suture-based internal bracing, and growing evidence supports biological augmentation using platelet-rich plasma and mesenchymal stem cells to enhance tissue healing. Physical therapists and athletic trainers are increasing their efforts to facilitate greater athlete cognitive engagement during therapeutic exercise performance to better restore nonimpaired neuromuscular control activation amplitude and timing. Knee brace design and use needs to evolve to better match these innovations and their influence on the rehabilitation plan timetable. There is a growing appreciation for the multifaceted characteristics of the rehabilitation process and how they influence neuromuscular, educational, and psychobehavioral treatment goal achievement. Multiple sources may influence the athlete during the return to sports process and clinical outcome measures need to be refined to better evaluate these influences. This update summarizes contemporary ACL surgical, medical, and rehabilitation interventions and future trends. PMID:26955296

  10. Evaluation, management, rehabilitation, and prevention of anterior cruciate ligament injury: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Micheo, William; Hernández, Liza; Seda, Carlos

    2010-10-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is essential for both static and dynamic stability of the knee. It is commonly injured during sports activities by noncontact mechanisms that include landing with the knee in valgus and extension, sudden deceleration, change of direction, and rotation. Several modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors predispose athletes to this injury, especially women. Early diagnosis, treatment directed to protect secondary knee structures, and rehabilitation play an important role in the management of ACL injury. Despite a lack of scientifically validated and published guidelines to help clinicians decide between conservative or surgical treatment, criteria such as pain, recurrent instability, injury to secondary structures, and desired level of activity should be considered. Accelerated rehabilitation protocols for patients who have and have not undergone an operation are available and recommended with goals of reducing complications such as recurrent injury, loss of motion, residual weakness, and associated osteoarthritis. However, injury prevention protocols could be the next big step in management of ACL injury with emphasis on reducing modifiable risk factors in susceptible individuals who participate in sports.

  11. Growth Factors and Stem Cells for the Management of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears

    PubMed Central

    Rizzello, Giacomo; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Petrillo, Stefano; Lamberti, Alfredo; Khan, Wasim Sardar; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is fundamental for the knee joint stability. ACL tears are frequent, especially during sport activities, occurring mainly in young and active patients. Nowadays, the gold standard for the management of ACL tears remains the surgical reconstruction with autografts or allografts. New strategies are being developed to resolve the problems of ligament grafting and promote a physiological healing process of ligamentous tissue without requiring surgical reconstruction. Moreover, these strategies can be applicable in association surgical reconstruction and may be useful to promote and accelerate the healing process. The use of growth factors and stem cells seems to offer a new and fascinating solution for the management of ACL tears. The injection of stem cell and/or growth factors in the site of ligamentous injury can potentially enhance the repair process of the physiological tissue. These procedures are still at their infancy, and more in vivo and in vitro studies are required to clarify the molecular pathways and effectiveness of growth factors and stem cells therapy for the management of ACL tears. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge in the field of growth factors and stem cells for the management of ACL tears. PMID:23248722

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A practical guide

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Alberto; Bailey, James R; Signorelli, Cecilia; Carbone, Giuseppe; Tchonang Wakam, Andy; Lucidi, Gian Andrea; Zaffagnini, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is one of the most common orthopedic procedures performed worldwide. In this regard, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) represents a useful pre-operative tool to confirm a disruption of the ACL and to assess for potential associated injuries. However, MRI is also valuable post-operatively, as it is able to identify, in a non-invasive way, a number of aspects and situations that could suggest potential problems to clinicians. Graft signal and integrity, correct tunnel placement, tunnel widening, and problems with fixation devices or the donor site could all compromise the surgical outcomes and potentially predict the failure of the ACL reconstruction. Furthermore, several anatomical features of the knee could be associated to worst outcomes or higher risk of failure. This review provides a practical guide for the clinician to evaluate the post-surgical ACL through MRI, and to analyze all the parameters and features directly or indirectly related to ACL reconstruction, in order to assess for normal or pathologic conditions. PMID:27795945

  13. Mechanical evaluation of a soft tissue interference screw in free tendon anterior cruciate ligament graft fixation.

    PubMed

    Nagarkatti, D G; McKeon, B P; Donahue, B S; Fulkerson, J P

    2001-01-01

    In this study of bioabsorbable screw fixation of free tendon grafts used in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, we performed load-to-failure and cyclic loading of tendon fixation in porcine bone. Bone density measurements from dual photon absorptometry scans were obtained to correlate bone density with fixation failure. The average density of porcine bone (1.42 g/cm2) was similar to that of young human bone (1.30 g/cm2) and significantly higher than that of elderly human cadaveric bone specimens (0.30 g/cm2). Cyclic loading was performed on free tendon grafts fixed with a bioabsorbable screw alone and on grafts fixed with a bioabsorbable screw and an anchor (polylactic acid ball or cortical bone disk). Stiffness of fixation increased substantially with the addition of a cortical bone disk anchor or polylactic acid ball compared with the interference screw alone. Tensile fixation strength of central quadriceps free tendon and hamstring tendon grafts were significantly superior in porcine bone of density similar to young human bone than in elderly human cadaveric bone. The bioabsorbable interference screw yielded loads at failure comparable with traditional bone-tendon-bone and hamstring tendon fixation when controlled for bone density. The addition of a cortical bone disk anchor provided the most optimal fixation of free tendon with the bioabsorbable screw and reduced slippage with cyclic loading to a very low level.

  14. Stereoscopic filming for investigating evasive side-stepping and anterior cruciate ligament injury risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Marcus J. C.; Bourke, Paul; Alderson, Jacqueline A.; Lloyd, David G.; Lay, Brendan

    2010-02-01

    Non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are serious and debilitating, often resulting from the performance of evasive sides-stepping (Ssg) by team sport athletes. Previous laboratory based investigations of evasive Ssg have used generic visual stimuli to simulate realistic time and space constraints that athletes experience in the preparation and execution of the manoeuvre. However, the use of unrealistic visual stimuli to impose these constraints may not be accurately identifying the relationship between the perceptual demands and ACL loading during Ssg in actual game environments. We propose that stereoscopically filmed footage featuring sport specific opposing defender/s simulating a tackle on the viewer, when used as visual stimuli, could improve the ecological validity of laboratory based investigations of evasive Ssg. Due to the need for precision and not just the experience of viewing depth in these scenarios, a rigorous filming process built on key geometric considerations and equipment development to enable a separation of 6.5 cm between two commodity cameras had to be undertaken. Within safety limits, this could be an invaluable tool in enabling more accurate investigations of the associations between evasive Ssg and ACL injury risk.

  15. Lubricin distribution in the torn human anterior cruciate ligament and meniscus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dafang; Cheriyan, Thomas; Martin, Scott D; Gomoll, Andreas H; Schmid, Thomas M; Spector, Myron

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to: (1) determine the distribution of lubricin in the human torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and meniscus; (2) determine the distribution of lubricin in the human intact ACL and meniscus; (3) and identify potential cellular sources of lubricin in these tissues. Ten torn ACLs and six torn menisci were obtained from surgeries; for comparison, 11 intact ACLs and 13 intact menisci were obtained from total knee replacements. Samples were formalin fixed and processed for immunohistochemical staining with a monoclonal antibody for lubricin. In torn ACLs and menisci, lubricin was generally found as a discrete layer covering the torn surface. No surface lubricin staining was found on the transected edges produced during excision. Lubricin was also found on the native surfaces of intact ACLs and menisci. In all tissues, lubricin was found in the matrix and intracellularly. The surface layer of lubricin coating torn edges of ACLs and menisci may interfere with the integrative healing process needed for repair.

  16. An ambulatory method of identifying anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed gait patterns.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Matthew R; Delahunt, Eamonn; Sweeney, Kevin T; Caulfield, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The use of inertial sensors to characterize pathological gait has traditionally been based on the calculation of temporal and spatial gait variables from inertial sensor data. This approach has proved successful in the identification of gait deviations in populations where substantial differences from normal gait patterns exist; such as in Parkinsonian gait. However, it is not currently clear if this approach could identify more subtle gait deviations, such as those associated with musculoskeletal injury. This study investigates whether additional analysis of inertial sensor data, based on quantification of gyroscope features of interest, would provide further discriminant capability in this regard. The tested cohort consisted of a group of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed (ACL-R) females and a group of non-injured female controls, each performed ten walking trials. Gait performance was measured simultaneously using inertial sensors and an optoelectronic marker based system. The ACL-R group displayed kinematic and kinetic deviations from the control group, but no temporal or spatial deviations. This study demonstrates that quantification of gyroscope features can successfully identify changes associated with ACL-R gait, which was not possible using spatial or temporal variables. This finding may also have a role in other clinical applications where small gait deviations exist.

  17. Glucosamine supplementation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in athletes: a randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Eraslan, Ali; Ulkar, Bulent

    2015-01-01

    Although glucosamine is commonly consumed by athletes, its effectiveness in sports injuries is still under debate. We aimed to investigate the effects of glucosamine to the rehabilitation outcomes of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructed athletes. Glucosamine-sulfate (1000 mg daily, for 8 weeks) was administered to half of the cohort of 30 male athletes, the other half used a placebo. Both groups received the same rehabilitation protocol. Knee pain and functions were evaluated by a visual analogue scale (VAS), International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) and Lysholm scores before and after oral administration. Additionally, an isokinetic test was performed after the administration period. The scores revealed significant improvements in both groups after 8 weeks, but no significant difference was detected between groups in any of the parameters. Glucosamine supplementation did not improve the rehabilitation outcomes of athletes after ACL reconstruction. This is the first study investigating this topic. Further studies will help to obtain clear evidence about glucosamine efficacy on ACL injured or ACL reconstructed athletes. PMID:25630243

  18. Immediate effects of neuromuscular joint facilitation intervention after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the immediate effects of neuromuscular joint facilitation (NJF) on the functional activity level after rehabilitation of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] Ten young subjects (8 males and 2 females) who underwent ACL reconstruction were included in the study. The subjects were divided into two groups, namely, knee joint extension muscle strength training (MST) group and knee joint extension outside rotation pattern of NJF group. Extension strength was measured in both groups before and after the experiment. Surface electromyography (sEMG) of the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis muscles and joint position error (JPE) test of the knee joint were also conducted. [Results] JPE test results and extension strength measurements in the NJF group were improved compared with those in the MST group. Moreover, the average discharge of the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis muscles on sEMG in the NJF group was significantly increased after MST and NJF treatments. [Conclusion] The obtained results suggest that NJF training in patients with ACL reconstruction can improve knee proprioception ability and muscle strength. PMID:27512270

  19. Isokinetic Identification of Knee Joint Torques before and after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Czaplicki, Adam; Jarocka, Marta; Walawski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the serial change of isokinetic muscle strength of the knees before and after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) in physically active males and to estimate the time of return to full physical fitness. Extension and flexion torques were measured for the injured and healthy limbs at two angular velocities approximately 1.5 months before the surgery and 3, 6, and 12 months after ACLR. Significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) in peak knee extension and flexion torques, hamstring/quadriceps (H/Q) strength ratios, uninvolved/involved limb peak torque ratios, and the normalized work of these muscles between the four stages of rehabilitation were identified. Significant differences between extension peak torques for the injured and healthy limbs were also detected at all stages. The obtained results showed that 12 months of rehabilitation were insufficient for the involved knee joint to recover its strength to the level of strength of the uninvolved knee joint. The results helped to evaluate the progress of the rehabilitation and to implement necessary modifications optimizing the rehabilitation training program. The results of the study may also be used as referential data for physically active males of similar age.

  20. Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament with carbon fibres: unsatisfactory results after 8 years.

    PubMed

    Mäkisalo, S E; Visuri, T; Viljanen, A; Jokio, P

    1996-01-01

    A total of 37 patients were operated on for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insufficiency between 1980 and 1989 using two types of carbon fibre ligament substitutes. The average age of the population was 23.6 years. The carbon fibre prostheses were covered with either a strip of medial joint capsule or lyophilized dura. Follow-up averaged 8.1 years (range 4-13 years), most of the operations being done from 1983 to 1985. Evaluation included a questionnaire, physical examination, Lysholm scoring, radiographs and cruciometer testing. The operated ACLs were looser than those in the contralateral healthy knees. The Lysholm scoring system gave acceptable results (excellent and good) in 43.5%, fair in 31.4% and poor in 24.1% of cases. Acceptable results provided better stability and muscle strength. During the follow-up there was an evident deterioration in stability as well as in Lysholm score. The results between the two types of ligaments did not become statistically different. Osteoarthrosis increased in all the knees examined radiographically (28/37). The results indicate that the ACL reconstructions using these types of carbon fibre prostheses lead to unacceptable results in the long-term follow-up.

  1. Immediate effects of neuromuscular joint facilitation intervention after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the immediate effects of neuromuscular joint facilitation (NJF) on the functional activity level after rehabilitation of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] Ten young subjects (8 males and 2 females) who underwent ACL reconstruction were included in the study. The subjects were divided into two groups, namely, knee joint extension muscle strength training (MST) group and knee joint extension outside rotation pattern of NJF group. Extension strength was measured in both groups before and after the experiment. Surface electromyography (sEMG) of the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis muscles and joint position error (JPE) test of the knee joint were also conducted. [Results] JPE test results and extension strength measurements in the NJF group were improved compared with those in the MST group. Moreover, the average discharge of the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis muscles on sEMG in the NJF group was significantly increased after MST and NJF treatments. [Conclusion] The obtained results suggest that NJF training in patients with ACL reconstruction can improve knee proprioception ability and muscle strength. PMID:27512270

  2. Long-term outcomes of allograft reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Lenehan, Eric A; Payne, W Barrett; Askam, Brad M; Grana, William A; Farrow, Lutul D

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies have found higher rates of failed reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) with use of allograft when compared with autograft reconstruction. To evaluate the long-term outcomes of allograft ACL reconstruction, we retrospectively reviewed the cases of all patients who underwent allograft (n=99) or autograft (n=24) ACL reconstruction by 2 senior surgeons at a single institution over an 8-year period. Seventeen (17%) of the 99 allograft reconstructions required additional surgery. Reoperation and revision ACL reconstruction rates (30.8% and 20.5%, respectively) were much higher for patients 25 years of age or younger than for patients older than 25 years. In our cohort of NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) Division I athletes, the revision ACL reconstruction rate was 62% for allograft ACL reconstruction and 0% for autograft reconstruction. Our study found that reoperation and revision rates for irradiated soft-tissue allograft ACL reconstruction were higher than generally quoted for autograft reconstruction. Given the extremely high graft failure rates in patients younger than 25 years, we recommend against routine use of irradiated soft-tissue allograft for ACL reconstruction in younger patients. PMID:25950536

  3. Allograft Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Patients Younger than 25 Years.

    PubMed

    Carter, Thomas R; Rabago, Michael T

    2016-05-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes for patients younger than 25 years who had anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions with allograft tissue. Methods A total of 52 ACL reconstructions performed with fresh-frozen, nonirradiated tibialis or Achilles allografts in active patients younger than 25 years. Outcome evaluations included the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) objective and subjective forms, KT-1000 arthrometry and Lysholm. Results Forty-two patients were available for follow-up at an average follow-up of 65 months (range, 33-99 months). The average age at surgery was 17 years and 7 months (range, 11 years 10 months-24 years 8 months). Objective and subjective data were obtained from 37 patients with 1 requiring revision, and 5 patients had only subjective data. IKDC objective results were 29-A and 5-B. KT-1000 differences were 0 mm for 4 patients, 1 mm for 23, 2 mm for 8, 3 mm for 1, and > 5 mm for 1 patient. The average IKDC subjective score was 90.2 ± 15.0 and average Lysholm score was 90.0 ± 11. Conclusion The result of our study found that using nonirradiated Achilles or tibialis tendon allografts for ACL reconstructions in active patients younger than 25 years can achieve good outcomes, with a low rate of failure. PMID:26227787

  4. Athymic rat model for evaluation of engineered anterior cruciate ligament grafts.

    PubMed

    Leong, Natalie L; Kabir, Nima; Arshi, Armin; Nazemi, Azadeh; Wu, Ben M; McAllister, David R; Petrigliano, Frank A

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a common ligamentous injury that often requires surgery because the ACL does not heal well without intervention. Current treatment strategies include ligament reconstruction with either autograft or allograft, which each have their associated limitations. Thus, there is interest in designing a tissue-engineered graft for use in ACL reconstruction. We describe the fabrication of an electrospun polymer graft for use in ACL tissue engineering. This polycaprolactone graft is biocompatible, biodegradable, porous, and is comprised of aligned fibers. Because an animal model is necessary to evaluate such a graft, this paper describes an intra-articular athymic rat model of ACL reconstruction that can be used to evaluate engineered grafts, including those seeded with xenogeneic cells. Representative histology and biomechanical testing results at 16 weeks postoperatively are presented, with grafts tested immediately post-implantation and contralateral native ACLs serving as controls. The present study provides a reproducible animal model with which to evaluate tissue engineered ACL grafts, and demonstrates the potential of a regenerative medicine approach to treatment of ACL rupture. PMID:25867958

  5. Choosing a Graft for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Surgeon Influence Reigns Supreme.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Matthew; Kraeutler, Matthew J; Freedman, Kevin B; Tucker, Brad S; Salvo, John P; Ciccotti, Michael G; Cohen, Steven B

    2016-01-01

    Selection of a graft type is an important decision for patients undergoing reconstructive surgery for a ligamentous injury. The purpose of this study was to determine the weight of key factors affecting patient selection of graft type for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and to assess patients' knowledge of their particular graft type. We prospectively enrolled 304 patients who underwent primary ACL reconstruction. Patients filled out questionnaires at their first follow-up appointment after surgery and at least 1 year postoperatively. Questionnaires asked which type of graft was used and why they chose that graft. At their first postoperative appointment, 88% of autograft patients and 71% of allograft patients were accurate in stating their graft type and harvest location. The most common factor influencing graft selection was physician recommendation (81.6%). At the time of follow-up, 96% of patients were satisfied with their graft choice. There is a high rate of accuracy with which patients remember the type of graft used for their ACL reconstruction. The majority of patients undergoing ACL reconstruction are primarily influenced by the physician's recommendation. PMID:27327925

  6. Hybrid Graft Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Predictable Graft for Knee Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Pinzon, Andres M; Barksdale, Leticia; Krill, Michael K; Leo, Brian M

    2015-06-01

    Trauma to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a season-ending injury and involves months of activity modification and rehabilitation. The annual incidence of ACL tears in the United States is approximately 200,000, which allows for a broad range of individualized treatment options. Various surgical techniques, including transtibial and independent tunnel drilling, allograft and autograft tissue, and various implants, have been described in the literature. This article describes the indications and technique for a hybrid soft tissue graft for ACL reconstruction. Autologous grafts eliminate the risk of disease transmission and have recently been shown to have a lower rerupture rate, particularly in younger, active patients; however, the harvesting of autologous hamstring grafts carries a risk of donor-site morbidity, iatrogenic injury of the graft, and inadequate graft size. In contrast to a traditional autologous soft tissue graft, the hybrid graft allows for graft size customization for a desired reconstruction, especially in cases where autograft hamstrings may be iatrogenically damaged or of inadequate size when harvested. The goal of a hybrid graft ACL reconstruction is to provide a favorable-sized graft with clinical outcomes comparable with autologous soft tissue grafts. In contrast to a traditional autologous soft tissue graft, this technique provides another option in the event of unforeseen deficiencies or complications associated with harvesting and preparation of the autologous gracilis and semitendinosis soft tissue graft. PMID:26091219

  7. Joint infection unique to hamstring tendon harvester used during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery.

    PubMed

    Tuman, Jeffrey; Diduch, David R; Baumfeld, Joshua A; Rubino, L Joseph; Hart, Joseph M

    2008-05-01

    Joint infection after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a rare but important clinical issue that must be resolved quickly to prevent secondary joint damage and preserve the graft. After careful analysis, we observed 3 infection cases within a 12-month period after ACL reconstruction, which represented an abnormally elevated risk. All reconstructions were performed by the same surgeon and used hamstring tendon allograft. For each surgery, the Target Tendon Harvester (DePuy Mitek, Raynham, MA) was used to harvest hamstring tendons. Through our review, we learned that this instrument was sterilized while assembled. It is our belief that ineffective sterilization of this hamstring graft harvester served as the origin for these infections. We have determined that appropriate sterilization technique involves disassembly of this particular hamstring tendon harvester before sterilization because of the tube-within-a-tube configuration. We have since continued to use the Target Tendon Harvester, disassembling it before sterilization. There have been no infections in the ensuing 12 months during which the surgeon performed over 40 primary ACL reconstructions via hamstring autograft. The information from this report is intended to provide arthroscopists with information about potential sources of infection after ACL reconstruction surgery. PMID:18442698

  8. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with synthetic grafts. A review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Alberto; Terzaghi, Clara; Borgo, Enrico; Albisetti, Walter

    2010-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture, one of the most common knee injuries in sports, results in anteroposterior laxity, which often leads to an unstable knee. Traditional ACL reconstruction is performed with autograft; disadvantages of this technique are donor site morbidity and a long rehabilitation period. In the 1980s, artificial ligaments became an attractive alternative to biological grafts. The initial enthusiasm surrounding their introduction stemmed from their lack of donor morbidity, their abundant supply and significant strength, immediate loading and reduced postoperative rehabilitation. Synthetic grafts made of different materials such as carbon fibers, polypropylene, Dacron and polyester have been utilised either as a prosthesis or as an augmentation for a biological ACL graft substitute. Nevertheless, every material presented serious drawbacks: cross-infections, immunological responses, breakage, debris dispersion leading to synovitis, chronic effusions, recurrent instability and knee osteoarthritis. Recently, a resurgence of interest in the use of synthetic prostheses has occurred and studies regarding new artificial grafts have been reported. Although many experimental studies have been made and much effort has been put forth, currently no ideal prosthesis mimicking natural human tissue has been found. PMID:20157811

  9. Evaluation of hamstring muscle strength and morphology after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Y; Kuramochi, R; Fukubayashi, T

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to clarify the relationship between knee flexor strength and hamstring muscle morphology after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using the semitendinosus (ST) tendon and to determine the causative factors of decreased knee flexor muscle strength. Fourteen male and ten female patients who resumed sports activities after surgery participated in the experiment. Isometric knee flexion torque was measured at 30°, 45°, 60°, 90°, and 105° of knee flexion. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to calculate ST muscle length and hamstring muscle volume, and to confirm the status of ST tendon regeneration. The correlation between the MRI findings and flexor strength was analyzed. Regenerated ST tendon was confirmed in 21 of the 24 patients, but muscle volume (87.6%) and muscle length (74.5%) of the ST in the operated limb were significantly smaller than those in the normal limb. The percentage of the knee flexion torque of the operated limb compared with that of the normal was apparently lower at 105° (69.1%) and 90° (68.6%) than at 60° (84.4%). Tendon regeneration, ST muscle shortening, and ST muscle atrophy correlated with decreased knee flexion torque. These results indicated that preserving the morphology of the ST muscle-tendon complex is important.

  10. Bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft versus LARS artificial ligament for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoyun; Wen, Hong; Wang, Lide; Ge, Tichi

    2013-10-01

    The optimized graft for use in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is still in controversy. The bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) autograft has been accepted as the gold standard for ACL reconstruction. However, donor site morbidities cannot be avoided after this treatment. The artificial ligament of ligament advanced reinforcement system (LARS) has been recommended for ACL reconstruction. The purpose of this study is to compare the midterm outcome of ACL reconstruction using BPTB autografts or LARS ligaments. Between July 2004 and March 2006, the ACL reconstruction using BPTB autografts in 30 patients and LARS ligaments in 32 patients was performed. All patients were followed up for at least 4 years and evaluated using the Lysholm knee score, Tegner score, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, and KT-1000 arthrometer test. There were no significant differences between the two groups with respect to the data of Lysholm scores, Tegner scores, IKDC scores, and KT-1000 arthrometer test at the latest follow-up. Our study demonstrates that the similarly good clinical results are obtained after ACL reconstruction using BPTB autografts or LARS ligaments at midterm follow-up. In addition to BPTB autografts, the LARS ligament may be a satisfactory treatment option for ACL rupture.

  11. Telemetry system for monitoring anterior cruciate ligament graft forces in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, Eric L.; Hull, Maury L.; Howell, Stephen M.

    1997-02-01

    Quantifying changes in the tension of an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft in vivo during rehabilitative exercises is vital for developing the optimal rehabilitation for patients who have had reconstructive surgery. The purpose of this project was to design, built, and test a telemetry system that can measure the in vivo ACL graft tension postoperatively. A commercially available fixation device was modified to sense the graft tension, house electronic components, transmit an output signal, and pass the power generating signal. A transcutaneous inductive link was used to power the implanted telemetry electronics. The current difference technique was used to measure changes in two strain gages that monitored shear strain developed on the femoral fixation device by the ACL graft. This current regulated a frequency modulated output signal and transmitted it, by using the ionic properties of body tissue as the medium, to external EMG surface electrodes. A signal conditioning board detected and converted the output to an analog voltage for collection by a computer data acquisition system. A performance evaluation demonstrated that the telemetry system either met or exceeded al of the criteria necessary for the application.

  12. Long-term outcomes of allograft reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Lenehan, Eric A; Payne, W Barrett; Askam, Brad M; Grana, William A; Farrow, Lutul D

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies have found higher rates of failed reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) with use of allograft when compared with autograft reconstruction. To evaluate the long-term outcomes of allograft ACL reconstruction, we retrospectively reviewed the cases of all patients who underwent allograft (n=99) or autograft (n=24) ACL reconstruction by 2 senior surgeons at a single institution over an 8-year period. Seventeen (17%) of the 99 allograft reconstructions required additional surgery. Reoperation and revision ACL reconstruction rates (30.8% and 20.5%, respectively) were much higher for patients 25 years of age or younger than for patients older than 25 years. In our cohort of NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) Division I athletes, the revision ACL reconstruction rate was 62% for allograft ACL reconstruction and 0% for autograft reconstruction. Our study found that reoperation and revision rates for irradiated soft-tissue allograft ACL reconstruction were higher than generally quoted for autograft reconstruction. Given the extremely high graft failure rates in patients younger than 25 years, we recommend against routine use of irradiated soft-tissue allograft for ACL reconstruction in younger patients.

  13. Assessment of the quality and content of information on anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction on the internet.

    PubMed

    Bruce-Brand, Robert A; Baker, Joseph F; Byrne, Damien P; Hogan, Niall A; McCarthy, Tom

    2013-06-01

    The Internet has become a major source of health information for the public. However, there are concerns regarding the quality, accuracy, and currency of medical information available online. We assessed the quality of information about anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction on the first 60 websites returned by the 4 most popular search engines. Each site was categorized by type and assessed for quality and validity using the DISCERN score, the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) benchmark criteria, and a novel ACL reconstruction-specific content score. The presence of the Health On the Net Code (HONcode), a purported quality assurance marker, was noted. The quality of information on ACL reconstruction available online is variable, with many websites omitting basic information regarding treatment options, risks, and prognosis. Commercial websites predominate. Academic and allied health professional websites attained the highest DISCERN and JAMA benchmark scores, whereas physician sites achieved the highest content scores. Sites that bore the HONcode seal obtained higher DISCERN and ACL reconstruction content scores than those without this certification. The HONcode seal is a reliable indicator of website quality, and we can confidently advise our patients to search for this marker. PMID:23582738

  14. Kinematic motion of the anterior cruciate ligament deficient knee during functionally high and low demanding tasks.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kentaro; Hasegawa, Takayuki; Kiriyama, Yoshimori; Matsumoto, Hideo; Otani, Toshiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Nagura, Takeo

    2014-07-18

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether mechanical adaptations were present in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-deficient knees during high-demand activities. Twenty-two subjects with unilateral ACL deficiency (11 males and 11 females, 19.6 months after injury) performed five different activities at a comfortable speed (level walking, ascending and descending steps, jogging, jogging to a 90-degree side cutting toward the opposite direction of the tested side). Three-dimensional knee kinematics for the ACL-deficient knees and uninjured contralateral knees were evaluated using the Point Cluster Technique. There was no significant difference in knee flexion angle, but an offset toward the knee in less valgus and more external tibial rotation was observed in the ACL-deficient knee. The tendency was more obvious in high demand motions, and a significant difference was clearly observed in the side cutting motions. These motion patterns, with the knee in less valgus and more external tibial rotation, are proposed to be an adaptive movement to avoid pivot shift dynamically, and reveal evidence in support of a dynamic adaptive motion occurring in ACL-deficient knees.

  15. Hybrid Graft Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Predictable Graft for Knee Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Pinzon, Andres M; Barksdale, Leticia; Krill, Michael K; Leo, Brian M

    2015-06-01

    Trauma to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a season-ending injury and involves months of activity modification and rehabilitation. The annual incidence of ACL tears in the United States is approximately 200,000, which allows for a broad range of individualized treatment options. Various surgical techniques, including transtibial and independent tunnel drilling, allograft and autograft tissue, and various implants, have been described in the literature. This article describes the indications and technique for a hybrid soft tissue graft for ACL reconstruction. Autologous grafts eliminate the risk of disease transmission and have recently been shown to have a lower rerupture rate, particularly in younger, active patients; however, the harvesting of autologous hamstring grafts carries a risk of donor-site morbidity, iatrogenic injury of the graft, and inadequate graft size. In contrast to a traditional autologous soft tissue graft, the hybrid graft allows for graft size customization for a desired reconstruction, especially in cases where autograft hamstrings may be iatrogenically damaged or of inadequate size when harvested. The goal of a hybrid graft ACL reconstruction is to provide a favorable-sized graft with clinical outcomes comparable with autologous soft tissue grafts. In contrast to a traditional autologous soft tissue graft, this technique provides another option in the event of unforeseen deficiencies or complications associated with harvesting and preparation of the autologous gracilis and semitendinosis soft tissue graft.

  16. Allograft Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Patients Younger than 25 Years.

    PubMed

    Carter, Thomas R; Rabago, Michael T

    2016-05-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes for patients younger than 25 years who had anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions with allograft tissue. Methods A total of 52 ACL reconstructions performed with fresh-frozen, nonirradiated tibialis or Achilles allografts in active patients younger than 25 years. Outcome evaluations included the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) objective and subjective forms, KT-1000 arthrometry and Lysholm. Results Forty-two patients were available for follow-up at an average follow-up of 65 months (range, 33-99 months). The average age at surgery was 17 years and 7 months (range, 11 years 10 months-24 years 8 months). Objective and subjective data were obtained from 37 patients with 1 requiring revision, and 5 patients had only subjective data. IKDC objective results were 29-A and 5-B. KT-1000 differences were 0 mm for 4 patients, 1 mm for 23, 2 mm for 8, 3 mm for 1, and > 5 mm for 1 patient. The average IKDC subjective score was 90.2 ± 15.0 and average Lysholm score was 90.0 ± 11. Conclusion The result of our study found that using nonirradiated Achilles or tibialis tendon allografts for ACL reconstructions in active patients younger than 25 years can achieve good outcomes, with a low rate of failure.

  17. Quadriceps strength and weight acceptance strategies continue to improve two years after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Roewer, Ben D; Di Stasi, Stephanie L; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2011-07-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the most commonly-injured knee ligament during sporting activities. After injury, most individuals experience episodes of the knee giving way during daily activities (non-copers). Non-copers demonstrate asymmetrical quadriceps strength and movement patterns, which could have long-term deleterious effects on the integrity of the knee joint. The purpose of this study was to determine if non-copers resolve their strength and movement asymmetries within two years after surgery. 26 Non-copers were recruited to undergo pre-operative quadriceps strength testing and 3-dimensional gait analysis. Subjects underwent surgery to reconstruct the ligament followed by physical therapy focused on restoring normal range of motion, quadriceps strength, and function. Subjects returned for quadriceps strength testing and gait analysis six months and two years after surgery. Acutely after injury, quadriceps strength was asymmetric between limbs, but resolved six months after surgery. Asymmetric knee angles, knee moments, and knee and hip power profiles were also observed acutely after injury and persisted six months after surgery despite subjects achieving symmetrical quadriceps strength. Two years after surgery, quadriceps strength in the involved limb continued to improve and most kinematic and kinetic asymmetries resolved. These findings suggest that adequate quadriceps strength does not immediately resolve gait asymmetries in non-copers. They also suggest that non-copers have the capacity to improve their quadriceps strength and gait symmetry long after ACL reconstruction.

  18. Muscle activity amplitudes and co-contraction during stair ambulation following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hall, Michelle; Stevermer, Catherine A; Gillette, Jason C

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare muscle activity amplitudes and co-contraction in those with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction to healthy controls during stair negotiation. Eighteen participants with unilateral ACL reconstruction and 17 healthy controls performed stair ascent and descent while surface electromyography was recorded from knee and hip musculature. During stair ascent, the ACL group displayed higher gluteus maximus activity (1-50% stance, p = 0.02), higher vastus lateralis:biceps femoris co-contraction (51-100% stance, p = 0.01), and higher vastus lateralis:vastus medialis co-contraction (51-100% stance, p = 0.05). During stair descent, the ACL group demonstrated higher gluteus maximus activity (1-50% stance, p = 0.01; 51-100% stance, p < 0.01), lower rectus femoris activity (1-50% stance, p = 0.04), higher semimembranosus activity (1-50% stance, p=0.01), higher gluteus medius activity (51-100% stance, p = 0.01), and higher vastus medialis:semimembranosus co-contraction (1-50% stance, p = 0.02). While the altered muscle activity strategies observed in the ACL group may act to increase joint stability, these strategies may alter joint loading and contribute to post-traumatic knee osteoarthritis often observed in this population. Our results warrant further investigation to determine the longterm effects of altered muscle activity on the knee joint following ACL reconstruction.

  19. Relationship between quadriceps femoris muscle volume and muscle torque after anterior cruciate ligament repair.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Y; Ikeda, K; Nishino, A; Sunaga, M; Aihara, Y; Fukubayashi, T

    2007-12-01

    This study was performed to obtain evidence regarding bilateral hindrance of motor unit (MU) recruitment in the quadriceps femoris (QF) of patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The subjects included 70 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction and 35 healthy subjects. To identify the muscle torque per unit volume (MTPUV), the peak torque of each velocity of isokinetic performance was divided by muscle volume of the QF measured by a series of cross-sectional images obtained by magnetic resonance imaging scans. Tests revealed that the mean MTPUV of the uninjured (0.113+/-0.03 N m/cm3 at 60 degrees /s, 0.081+/-0.02 N m/cm3 at 180 degrees /s) and injured sides (0.109+/-0.03 N m/cm3 at 60 degrees /s, 0.079+/-0.023 N m/cm3 at 180 degrees /s) were significantly lower than those of the control group (0.144+/-0.05 N m/cm3 at 60 degrees /s, 0.096+/-0.04 N m/cm3 at 180 degrees /s). Previous studies suggested that MU recruitment in the QF of patients with ACL injury was hindered bilaterally. However, the design of their studies could not provide evidence of bilateral hindrance of MU recruitment in the QF. The results of the present study demonstrated that the MTPUV of both injured and uninjured sides of patients were significantly lower than those of the control group.

  20. Mechanism of quadriceps femoris muscle weakness in patients with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Y; Fukubayashi, T; Takeshita, D

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate gamma loop function in the quadriceps femoris muscle in patients who with less than 6 month-history of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. For this purpose, we compared the response to vibration stimulation in 10 patients with ACL repair and 12 normal healthy subjects, by measuring the maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) and integrated electromyograms (I-EMG) of the quadriceps muscles. Pre-vibration data were obtained from each subject by measuring the MVC of the knee extension and the I-EMG from the vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, and rectus femoris muscles. Vibration stimulation was applied to the infrapatellar tendons, followed immediately by repeating the MVC and I-EMG recording. Prolonged vibration resulted in a significant decrease of both MVC and I-EMG in the control group. In contrast, the same stimulus failed to elicit changes in ACL-repair group. Our results suggest the presence of abnormal gamma loop function in the quadriceps femoris muscle of patients with ACL repair, which may explain the muscle weakness often described in such patients.

  1. Immediate effects of neuromuscular joint facilitation intervention after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the immediate effects of neuromuscular joint facilitation (NJF) on the functional activity level after rehabilitation of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] Ten young subjects (8 males and 2 females) who underwent ACL reconstruction were included in the study. The subjects were divided into two groups, namely, knee joint extension muscle strength training (MST) group and knee joint extension outside rotation pattern of NJF group. Extension strength was measured in both groups before and after the experiment. Surface electromyography (sEMG) of the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis muscles and joint position error (JPE) test of the knee joint were also conducted. [Results] JPE test results and extension strength measurements in the NJF group were improved compared with those in the MST group. Moreover, the average discharge of the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis muscles on sEMG in the NJF group was significantly increased after MST and NJF treatments. [Conclusion] The obtained results suggest that NJF training in patients with ACL reconstruction can improve knee proprioception ability and muscle strength.

  2. EMG profiles of knee joint musculature during walking: changes induced by anterior cruciate ligament deficiency.

    PubMed

    Limbird, T J; Shiavi, R; Frazer, M; Borra, H

    1988-01-01

    A tear of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) disrupts the delicate balance of static stabilizers of the knee, leading to significant alterations in joint kinematics. Little is known about the dynamic compensatory responses of the patient to these kinematic alterations. This lack of quantitative information on the muscle synergy patterns has limited the surgeon's ability to evaluate various operative and rehabilitative techniques. Twelve subjects with documented ACL deficiency for at least 1 year and 15 normal participants were studied. Each subject was asked to walk at free and fast speeds on a 12 m walkway. The right and left foot contact patterns and the linear envelopes from the surface electromyogram (EMG) patterns of the gastrocnemius, medial and lateral hamstrings, rectus femoris, and vastus lateralis were measured. Significant differences were found in the muscle synergy patterns during walking. During the swing-to-stance transition, the ACL-deficient subjects showed significantly less activity in the quadriceps and gastrocnemius muscles and more activity in the biceps femoris than in the normal group. During early swing, the vastus lateralis is more active than normal, and during midstance and terminal stance, the hamstrings appear to be less active than normal subjects. These dynamic compensatory mechanisms suggest that use of the hamstring tendons in reconstructive procedures may alter important compensatory mechanisms about the knee joint. Application of dynamic EMG techniques to the study of reconstructive procedures should provide additional information that will assist the clinician in the rational choice of a surgical procedure.

  3. The main factor causing prolonged reaction time on force producing process following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, F; Onari, K; Kawaguchi, K; Tsukisaka, K

    2000-12-01

    This study investigated the electromechanical properties of atrophied human quadriceps femoris muscle during a voluntarily elicited maximal isometric contraction (MVC) and a peripherally stimulated twitch contraction. Nineteen patients were recruited 2-3 months following a unilateral anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Both the involved leg as well as the uninvolved leg were studied. Maximal twitch response was elicited and surface electromyograms (EMG) were recorded from the vastus lateralis. Total reaction time (TRT) for both MVC and twitch on involved leg was prolonged (251.47 msec, 26.01 msec). This prolongation suggests an extended lag in avoiding injury such as during sports. Pre-motor time during both MVC and twitch (PMTmvc, PMTtwitch) did not differ between both groups. Electromechanical delay during MVC (EMDmvc) was prolonged on involved leg (53.42 msec), and also evoked twitch EMD (EMDtwitch) (20.04 msec) as compared to the opposite side. Prolonged EMDtwitch may be due to a decrease in stiffness of the series elastic component, changes of peripheral muscle composition to containing more slow type muscle fibers, or a decrease in function of the excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling process. A prolonged EMDtwitch can also explain the prolonged EMDmvc. These findings also suggested that prolonged TRTmvc to visual stimulus during MVC in atrophied human quadriceps femoris muscle after disuse was principally due to prolongation of EMDmvc. Prolonged EMDmvc may have resulted from decreased muscle stiffness, which was evident in the prolongation of the EMDtwitch.

  4. Increased muscle activation following motor imagery during the rehabilitation of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Lebon, Florent; Guillot, Aymeric; Collet, Christian

    2012-03-01

    Motor imagery (MI) is the mental representation of an action without any concomitant movement. MI has been used frequently after peripheral injuries to decrease pain and facilitate rehabilitation. However, little is known about the effects of MI on muscle activation underlying the motor recovery. This study aimed to assess the therapeutic effects of MI on the activation of lower limb muscles, as well as on the time course of functional recovery and pain after surgery of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Twelve patients with a torn ACL were randomly assigned to a MI or control group, who both received a series of physiotherapy. Electromyographic activity of the quadriceps, pain, anthropometrical data, and lower limb motor ability were measured throughout a 12-session therapy. The data provided evidence that MI elicited greater muscle activation, even though imagery practice did not result in pain decrease. Muscle activation increase might originate from a redistribution of the central neuronal activity, as there was no anthropometric change in lower limb muscles after imagery practice. This study confirmed the effectiveness of integrating MI in a rehabilitation process by facilitating muscular properties recovery following motor impairment. MI may thus be considered a reliable adjunct therapy to help injured patients to recover motor functions after reconstructive surgery of ACL.

  5. Joint infection unique to hamstring tendon harvester used during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery.

    PubMed

    Tuman, Jeffrey; Diduch, David R; Baumfeld, Joshua A; Rubino, L Joseph; Hart, Joseph M

    2008-05-01

    Joint infection after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a rare but important clinical issue that must be resolved quickly to prevent secondary joint damage and preserve the graft. After careful analysis, we observed 3 infection cases within a 12-month period after ACL reconstruction, which represented an abnormally elevated risk. All reconstructions were performed by the same surgeon and used hamstring tendon allograft. For each surgery, the Target Tendon Harvester (DePuy Mitek, Raynham, MA) was used to harvest hamstring tendons. Through our review, we learned that this instrument was sterilized while assembled. It is our belief that ineffective sterilization of this hamstring graft harvester served as the origin for these infections. We have determined that appropriate sterilization technique involves disassembly of this particular hamstring tendon harvester before sterilization because of the tube-within-a-tube configuration. We have since continued to use the Target Tendon Harvester, disassembling it before sterilization. There have been no infections in the ensuing 12 months during which the surgeon performed over 40 primary ACL reconstructions via hamstring autograft. The information from this report is intended to provide arthroscopists with information about potential sources of infection after ACL reconstruction surgery.

  6. Biomechanical analysis on transverse tibial fixation in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions☆

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Edmar Stieven; Mendes, Mariane Henseler Damaceno; Claudino, Stephanie; Baracho, Filipe; Borges, Paulo César; da Cunha, Luiz Antonio Munhoz

    2015-01-01

    Objective To verify whether the combination of tibial cross pin fixation and femoral screw fixation presents biomechanical advantages when compared to femoral cross pin fixation and tibial screw fixation for the reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Methods Thirty-eight porcine knees and bovine extensor digitorum tendons were used as the graft materials. The tests were performed in three groups: (1) standard, used fourteen knees, and the grafts were fixated with the combination of femoral cross pin and a tibial screw; (2) inverted, used fourteen knees with an inverted combination of tibial cross pin and a femoral screw; (3) control, ten control tests performed with intact ACL. After the grafts fixation, all the knees were subjected to tensile testing to determine yield strength and ultimate strength. Results There was no statistically significant difference in survival techniques in regard to strength, yield load and tension. There was a higher survival compared in the standard curves of yield stress (p < 0.05). Conclusion There is no biomechanical advantage, observed in animal models testing, in the combination of tibial cross pin fixation and femoral screw when compared to femoral cross pin fixation and tibial screw. PMID:26229913

  7. Electromyographic biofeedback and recovery of quadriceps femoris muscle function following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Draper, V

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of biofeedback-facilitated exercise with exercise alone on the recovery rate of quadriceps femoris muscle function following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Functional measures included 1) a dynamometric test of quadriceps femoris muscle isometric peak torque during the 12th postoperative week and 2) the number of days post-operatively that a patient achieved full active extension of the knee. Twenty-two patients with acute ACL injury were randomly assigned to a Treatment (biofeedback) Group (n = 11) or a Control (nonfeedback) Group (n = 11) during the first therapy session one week after reconstructive surgery. After the patients had completed the 12-week exercise program, the quadriceps femoris muscle isometric peak torque in the operative limb was compared with that in the nonoperative limb at three angles (90 degrees, 60 degrees, and 45 degrees) of extension. An analysis of variance revealed significant differences between the Treatment and Control Groups at all three angles. Mean recovery time was calculated for each group, and a t test for independent samples indicated a significant difference between the groups. These results demonstrate that the addition of biofeedback to muscle strengthening exercises facilitates the rate of recovery of quadriceps femoris muscle function following ACL reconstruction.

  8. In vivo evaluation of electrospun polycaprolactone graft for anterior cruciate ligament engineering.

    PubMed

    Petrigliano, Frank A; Arom, Gabriel A; Nazemi, Azadeh N; Yeranosian, Michael G; Wu, Benjamin M; McAllister, David R

    2015-04-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is critical for the structural stability of the knee and its injury often requires surgical intervention. Because current reconstruction methods using autograft or allograft tissue suffer from donor-site morbidity and limited supply, there has been emerging interest in the use of bioengineered materials as a platform for ligament reconstruction. Here, we report the use of electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds as a candidate platform for ACL reconstruction in an in vivo rodent model. Electrospun PCL was fabricated and laser cut to facilitate induction of cells and collagen deposition and used to reconstruct the rat ACL. Histological analysis at 2, 6, and 12 weeks postimplantation revealed biological integration, minimal immune response, and the gradual infiltration of collagen in both the bone tunnel and intra-articular regions of the scaffold. Biomechanical testing demonstrated that the PCL graft failure load and stiffness at 12 weeks postimplantation (13.27±4.20N, 15.98±5.03 N/mm) increased compared to time zero testing (3.95±0.33N, 1.95±0.35 N/mm). Taken together, these results suggest that electrospun PCL serves as a biocompatible graft for ACL reconstruction with the capacity to facilitate collagen deposition.

  9. Ultrastructural and morphological characteristics of human anterior cruciate ligament and hamstring tendons.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jingxian; Zhang, Xin; Ma, Yong; Zhou, Chunyan; Ao, Yingfang

    2012-09-01

    Hamstring tendons are a commonly used substitute for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Ligaments and tendons are similar in composition but the ACL is more complex than hamstring tendons in function and gross morphology, which are highly dependent on its structure and ultrastructure. The purpose of this study was to compare the morphology and ultrastructure of normal human ACL and hamstring tendons, including the cell type and arrangement, expression level of proteoglycans, diameter, and density of collagen fibrils. Twenty semitendinosus or gracilis tendons and 20 ACL specimens were harvested from patients with ACL rupture or osteoarthritis undergoing routine total knee arthroplasty. The specimens were examined histologically and the ultrastructure was observed using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Semitendinosus and gracilis tendons showed a homogeneous arrangement of collagen fibers and cell type. They had lower fibril density and more widely distributed fibril diameters. In the ACL, there was a more complex arrangement of collagen fibers, distribution of proteoglycans and different cell types. Electronic microscopy demonstrated a combination of parallel, helical and nonlinear networks of ACL fibrils, and fibril diameters were smaller and more nonuniform. This study compared the anatomy of normal human ACL and hamstring tendons, which may provide a standard for evaluating hamstring tendons grafts after ACL reconstruction and may facilitate the application of hamstring tendons in clinical applications.

  10. Alterations to movement mechanics can greatly reduce anterior cruciate ligament loading without reducing performance.

    PubMed

    Myers, Casey A; Hawkins, David

    2010-10-19

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are one of the most common and potentially debilitating sports injuries. Approximately 70% of ACL injuries occur without contact and are believed to be preventable. Jump stop movements are associated with many non-contact ACL injuries. It was hypothesized that an athlete performing a jump stop movement can reduce their peak tibial shear force (PTSF), a measure of ACL loading, without compromising performance, by modifying their knee flexion angle, shank angle, and foot contact location during landing. PTSF was calculated for fourteen female basketball players performing jump stops using their normal mechanics and mechanics modified to increase their knee flexion angle, decrease their shank angle relative to vertical and land more on their toes during landing. Every subject tested experienced drastic reductions in their PTSF (average reduction=56.4%) using modified movement mechanics. The athletes maintained or improved their jump height with the modified movement mechanics (an average increase in jump height of 2.5cm). The hypothesis was supported: modifications to jump stop movement mechanics greatly reduced PTSF and therefore ACL loading without compromising performance. The results from this study identify crucial biomechanical quantities that athletes can easily modify to reduce ACL loading and therefore should be targeted in any physical activity training programs designed to reduce non-contact ACL injuries.

  11. Suggestions from the field for return to sports participation following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: basketball.

    PubMed

    Waters, Eric

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to outline the final, functional phases of rehabilitation that address exercises, drills, and return-to-play criteria for the sport of basketball, following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. ACL injuries can be debilitating and affect the quality of life for recreational and elite athletes alike. Tears of the ACL are common in both male and female basketball players, with a higher incidence rate in females. Incidence of a retear to the existing graft or contralateral knee within 5 years of ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon autograft in young (less than 18 to 25 years of age), active basketball players can be as high as 52%. Reducing the number of ACL injuries or reinjury, of which there are an estimated 80 000 per year at an associated cost of over a billion dollars, can have significant potential long-term fiscal and health benefits. Following surgical reconstruction of the ACL, implementing a tailored rehabilitation protocol can ensure a successful return to sport. When searching the literature for such protocols, clinicians may struggle to find specific exercises, drills, and return-to-play criteria for particular sports. The intent of this manuscript is to present such a rehabilitation protocol for basketball.

  12. Functional Outcome Following Arthroscopic ACL Reconstruction with Rigid Fix: A Retrospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Shervegar, Satish; Nagaraj, Prashanth; Grover, Amit; DJ, Niranthara Ganesh; Ravoof, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Background: No uniform consensus exists to decide type of fixation for arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Hypothsis: There is similar functional outcome after rigid fix compared to other methods of fixation which has been published. Study design: Retrospective observational study. Methods: A total of 50 patients underwent arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with hamstring tendons using femoral Rigid fix cross-pin and interference screw tibial fixation. The evaluation methods were clinical examination, IKDC scores, Lysholm and pre injury and post reconstruction Tegner score. Patients were followed up from minimum of 6 months to 4 year seven months. Results: C In our study of sample size 50 we found that mean age of patients was 30.8 Years with male preponderance. Mean post operative IKDC and Lysholm score has been 75.6 and 84.4 respectively. Mean Tegner pre-injury score and post reconstruction score has been 5.4 and 4.26. Box plot comparison of pre injury and post operativeTegner score reveals a statistically significant difference with respect to paired t test P<0.001. Conclusions: Arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with femoral rigid fix cross pins and tibial interference screws results in comparable short term to midterm functional results compared to other types of fixation PMID:26550591

  13. Effect of Perturbing a Simulated Motion on Knee and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Herfat, Safa T.; Boguszewski, Daniel V.; Nesbitt, Rebecca J.

    2013-01-01

    Current surgical treatments for common knee injuries do not restore the normal biomechanics. Among other factors, the abnormal biomechanics increases the susceptibility to the early onset of osteoarthritis. In pursuit of improving long term outcome, investigators must understand normal knee kinematics and corresponding joint and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) kinetics during the activities of daily living. Our long term research goal is to measure in vivo joint motions for the ovine stifle model and later simulate these motions with a 6 degree of freedom (DOF) robot to measure the corresponding 3D kinetics of the knee and ACL-only joint. Unfortunately, the motion measurement and motion simulation technologies used for our project have associated errors. The objective of this study was to determine how motion measurement and motion recreation error affect knee and ACL-only joint kinetics by perturbing a simulated in vivo motion in each DOF and measuring the corresponding intact knee and ACL-only joint forces and moments. The normal starting position for the motion was perturbed in each degree of freedom by four levels (−0.50, −0.25, 0.25, and 0.50 mm or degrees). Only translational perturbations significantly affected the intact knee and ACL-only joint kinetics. The compression-distraction perturbation had the largest effect on intact knee forces and the anterior-posterior perturbation had the largest effect on the ACL forces. Small translational perturbations can significantly alter intact knee and ACL-only joint forces. Thus, translational motion measurement errors must be reduced to provide a more accurate representation of the intact knee and ACL kinetics. To account for the remaining motion measurement and recreation errors, an envelope of forces and moments should be reported. These force and moment ranges will provide valuable functional tissue engineering parameters (FTEPs) that can be used to design more effective ACL treatments. PMID:23083204

  14. Lower Limb Kinematics and Dynamic Postural Stability in Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Reconstructed Female Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Delahunt, Eamonn; Chawke, Mark; Kelleher, Judy; Murphy, Katie; Prendiville, Anna; Sweeny, Lauren; Patterson, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Context: Deficits in lower limb kinematics and postural stability are predisposing factors to the development of knee ligamentous injury. The extent to which these deficits are present after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is still largely unknown. The primary hypothesis of the present study was that female athletes who have undergone ACL reconstruction and who have returned to sport participation would exhibit deficits in dynamic postural stability as well as deficiencies in hip- and knee-joint kinematics when compared with an age-, activity-, and sex-matched uninjured control group. Objective: To investigate dynamic postural stability as quantified by the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) and simultaneous hip- and knee-joint kinematic profiles in female athletes who have undergone ACL reconstruction. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Setting: University motion-analysis laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Fourteen female athletes who had previously undergone ACL reconstruction (ACL-R) and 17 age- and sex-matched uninjured controls. Intervention(s): Each participant performed 3 trials of the anterior, posterior-medial, and posterior-lateral directional components of the SEBT. Main Outcome Measure(s): Reach distances for each directional component were quantified and expressed as a percentage of leg length. Simultaneous hip- and knee-joint kinematic profiles were recorded using a motion-analysis system. Results: The ACL-R group had decreased reach distances on the posterior-medial (P < .01) and posterior-lateral (P < .01) directional components of the SEBT. During performance of the directional components of the SEBT, ACL-R participants demonstrated altered hip-joint frontal-, sagittal-, and transverse-plane kinematic profiles (P < .05), as well as altered knee-joint sagittal-plane kinematic profiles (P < .05). Conclusions: Deficits in dynamic postural stability and concomitant altered hip- and knee-joint kinematics are present after ACL

  15. Radiographic Findings in Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstructions from the MARS Cohort

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The Multicenter ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) Revision Study (MARS) group was developed to investigate revision ACL reconstruction outcomes. An important part of this is obtaining and reviewing radiographic studies. The goal for this radiographic analysis is to establish radiographic findings for a large revision ACL cohort to allow comparison with future studies. The study was designed as a cohort study. Various established radiographic parameters were measured by three readers. These included sagittal and coronal femoral and tibial tunnel position, joint space narrowing, and leg alignment. Inter- and intraobserver comparisons were performed. Femoral sagittal position demonstrated 42% were more than 40% anterior to the posterior cortex. On the sagittal tibia tunnel position, 49% demonstrated some impingement on full-extension lateral radiographs. Limb alignment averaged 43% medial to the medial edge of the tibial plateau. On the Rosenberg view (45-degree flexion view), the minimum joint space in the medial compartment averaged 106% of the opposite knee, but it ranged down to a minimum of 4.6%. Lateral compartment narrowing at its minimum on the Rosenberg view averaged 91.2% of the opposite knee, but it ranged down to a minimum of 0.0%. On the coronal view, verticality as measured by the angle from the center of the tibial tunnel aperture to the center of the femoral tunnel aperture measured 15.8 degree ± 6.9% from vertical. This study represents the radiographic findings in the largest revision ACL reconstruction series ever assembled. Findings were generally consistent with those previously demonstrated in the literature. PMID:23404491

  16. Can a post-operative brace in slight hyperextension prevent extension deficit after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction? A prospective randomised study.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, C; Cerulli, G; Lorenzini, M; Bergstrand, G; Werner, S

    2003-09-01

    It has been our observation that post-operative anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) braces together with the post-operative bandages do not always allow the knee to reach full extension. In ten uninjured knees with known hyperextension, the knees were bandaged in the same way as after an ACL-reconstruction. The knees were then studied radiologically in a Hypex brace set at 0 degrees, -5 degrees and -10 degrees of knee extension. Not a single knee was found to be straight in the brace set at 0 degrees. At -5 degrees most of the knees were straight or in slight hyperextension. It took -10 degrees to get all knees straight or in hyperextension. In a prospective randomised study 44 patients who underwent an arthroscopic ACL-reconstruction with a bone patellar tendon bone graft were randomised to use either a brace set at -5 degrees or a straight brace (0 degrees ) for at least the first three postoperative weeks. Before and three months after surgery range of motion was determined, using a goniometer with long arms, and sagittal knee laxity was measured with a KT-2000 arthrometer at manual max. Pre- and post-operative pain was evaluated with the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). The same examiner (blindfolded to what type of brace was used) performed all the measurements. At three months, two of the 22 patients with the brace set at -5 degrees and twelve of the 22 patients with the straight brace had a loss of full extension of 2 degrees or more ( p<0.001). No significant differences were found between the groups in terms of knee flexion, sagittal knee laxity or post-operative pain. Although extension deficit after ACL-reconstruction can be prevented also in other ways, a Hypex brace set at -5 degrees seems to be an easy way of ensuring full knee extension.

  17. [Suture protection of acute ruptured anterior cruciate ligament by the Pet-band (Trevira extra strong). Indications, technique results of a five-year study].

    PubMed

    Letsch, R; Stürmer, K M; Kock, H J; Schmit-Neuerburg, K P

    1993-10-01

    In a prospective clinical study 56 acute tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) were treated between 1986 and 1991 by reinsertion and protection of the suture by means of a PET ligament (Trevira hochfest). The patients concerned were 31 men and 23 women (1 man and 1 woman had both knees operated on), with an average age of 39.7 years; 28 left and 28 right knees were affected. In 19 cases the ACL tear occurred in isolation, while in 37 concomitant intraarticular lesions were present. Nine patients had suffered multiple injury, and 3 had additional fractures distant from the knee. Haemarthrosis was encountered in 34 cases, and a clear effusion in 3 cases. The main causes of ACL rupture were sports injuries (n = 32), followed by traffic accidents (n = 14), activities of daily life (n = 6), and work accidents (n = 4). The preoperative diagnosis of ACL rupture was made correctly in 54 cases. After injury, 37 knees were operated on within the first 2 weeks, and 19 between the 3 and the 8 week. After arthroscopic repair of the concomitant lesions the alloplastic ligament was implanted isometrically by arthrotomy or miniarthrotomy through two bone tunnels and fixed to the bone with staples. Postoperative treatment included immediate continuous passive motion (CPM) and early weight-bearing with the protection of a brace. The patients were followed up at yearly intervals. At the last follow up, 6 years after the beginning of the study, 50 patients were examined clinically and radiologically, and the mean follow-up interval in these 50 was 40.2 months (12-79 months).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Effects of femoral tunnel placement on knee laxity and forces in an anterior cruciate ligament graft.

    PubMed

    Markolf, Keith L; Hame, Sharon; Hunter, D Monte; Oakes, Daniel A; Zoric, Bojan; Gause, Paul; Finerman, Gerald A M

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the effects of variation in placement of the femoral tunnel upon knee laxity, graft pretension required to restore normal anterior-posterior (AP) laxity and graft forces following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Two variants in tunnel position were studied: (1) AP position along the medial border of the lateral femoral condyle (at a standard 11 o'clock notch orientation) and (2) orientation along the arc of the femoral notch (o'clock position) at a fixed distance of 6-7 mm anterior to the posterior wall. AP laxity and forces in the native ACL were measured in fresh frozen cadaveric knee specimens during passive knee flexion-extension under the following modes of tibial loading: no external tibial force, anterior tibial force, varus-valgus moment, and internal-external tibial torque. One group (15 specimens) was used to determine effects of AP tunnel placement, while a second group (14 specimens) was used to study variations in o'clock position of the femoral tunnel within the femoral notch. A bone-patellar tendon-bone graft was placed into a femoral tunnel centered at a point 6-7 mm anterior to the posterior wall at the 11 o'clock position in the femoral notch. A graft pretension was determined such that AP laxity of the knee at 30 deg of flexion was restored to within 1 mm of normal; this was termed the laxity match pretension. All tests were repeated with a graft in the standard 11 o'clock tunnel, and then with a graft in tunnels placed at other selected positions. Varying placement of the femoral tunnel 1 h clockwise or counterclockwise from the 11 o'clock position did not significantly affect any biomechanical parameter measured in this study, nor did placing the graft 2.5 mm posteriorly within the standard 11 o'clock femoral tunnel. Placing the graft in a tunnel 5.0 mm anterior to the standard 11 o'clock tunnel increased the mean laxity match pretension by 16.8 N (62%) and produced a knee which was on

  19. Histological characteristics and ultrastructure of polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament after the reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shao-Bin; Yang, Rong-Hua; Zuo, Zhong-Nan; Dong, Qi-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament were the remnant of LARS ligament used for repairing posterior cruciate ligament obtained from operation. We want to study histological characteristics and ultrastructure of polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament after the reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament in rabbits. Therefore, we replaced the original ACL with polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament which was covering with the remnant of ACL in 9 rabbits (L-LARS group), while just only polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament were transplanted in 3 rabbits (LARS group) with the remnant of ACL. Compared with group LARS, inflammatory cell reaction and foreign body reaction were more significant in group L-LARS. Moreover, electron microscopy investigation showed the tissue near LARS fibers was highly cellular with a matrix of thin collagen fibrils (50-100 nm) in group L-LARS. These above findings suggest the polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament possess the high biocompatibility, which contributes to the polyethylene terephthalate LARS covered with recipient connective tissues. PMID:25356104

  20. A Cadaver Study of the Structures and Positions of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Moghaddam, Ahmad Bagheri; Torkaman, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background: The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the major knee structures. It consists of anteromedial bundle (AMB) and posterolateral bundle (PLB). Rupture of the ACL is one of the most prevalent traumas among athletes. There are two ways to reconstruct the rupture; Single–bundle and double–bundle (DB) reconstruction. Precise study on bundles anatomy, the exact number of attachments and knee flexion angle with an appropriate place of bundles and also choosing the best angle for the grafts are so important in successful reconstructing of the bundles. In this research, the general attempt was to assess anatomy and the act of the ACL is and bundles in Iranian population. Methods: We obtained twelve fresh-frozen cadaver knees (two females, ten males). The average age of them was 30 years; they were mostly between 27 and 34 years old. Initially, skin, muscles, and patellar and articular capsule were removed. Then, bundle attachments, knee movements in flexion angle, extension and stiffness of both bundles were evaluated. Thereafter, on 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 180° angle knee flexion the bundles degree stiffness evaluated in different directions. During the process, to measure bundles size, digital camera for photography, oblique for measuring the angles, and micrometer were utilized. From all next of kin written consent testimonial form was obtained. Results: In all knees, two bundles were identified as distinct. AMB attachment location in the anterior region observed as semi-lunate and in one case, it was rounded. In all cases, two bundles of full knee extension were paralleled, and the AMB was anterior to the PLB; with increasing flexion angle, femoral attachment location of AMB was in back direction and femoral attachment location of PLB moved toward the front direction. Two bundles were in the most amount of cross state, which the angle was 90°. From the stiffness point of view in all 6 samples, the PLB had the most tension in extension state, and

  1. Healing of the goat anterior cruciate ligament after a new suture repair technique and bioscaffold treatment.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, D Tan; Geel, Jurre; Schulze, Martin; Raschke, Michael J; Woo, Savio L-Y; van Dijk, C Niek; Blankevoort, Leendert

    2013-10-01

    Primary suture repair of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has been used clinically in an attempt to heal the ruptured ACL. The results, however, were not satisfactory, which in retrospect can be attributed to the used suturing technique and the suboptimal healing conditions. These constraining conditions can be improved by introducing a new suturing technique and by using small intestinal submucosa (SIS) as a bioscaffold. It is hypothesized that the suturing technique keep the torn ends together and that SIS enhance and promote the healing of the ACL. The goat was used as the study model. In the Suture group, the left ACL was transected and suture repaired with a new locking suture repair technique (n=5) allowing approximation and fixation under tension. The Suture-SIS group underwent the same procedure with the addition of SIS (n=5). The right ACL served as control. After 12 weeks of healing, anterior-posterior translation and in situ force of the healing ACL were measured, followed by the measurement of the cross-sectional area and structural stiffness. Routine histology was performed on tissue samples. Gross morphology showed that the healing ACL was continuous with collagenous tissue in both groups. The cross-sectional area of the Suture and the Suture-SIS group was 35% and 50% of the intact control, respectively. The anterior-posterior translations at different flexion angles were statistically not different between the Suture group and the Suture-SIS group. Only the in situ force at 30° in the Suture-SIS group was higher than in the Suture group. Tensile tests showed that the stiffness for the Suture group was not different from the Suture-SIS group (31.1±8.1 N/mm vs. 41.9±18.0 N/mm [p>0.05]). Histology showed longitudinally aligned collagen fibers from origo to insertion. More fibroblasts were present in the healing tissue than in the control intact tissue. The study demonstrated the proof of concept of ACL repair in a goat model with a new suture

  2. The influence of graft placement on clinical outcome in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    PADUA, ROBERTO; ALVITI, FEDERICA; VENOSA, MICHELE; MAZZOLA, CARLO; PADUA, LUCA

    2016-01-01

    Purpose the aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of graft tunnel position on both clinical outcome and instrumental knee stability in patients submitted to arthroscopic ACL reconstruction using a bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) graft. Methods thirty patients (24 men and 6 women) who underwent ACL reconstruction performed using an autologous bone-patellar tendon-bone graft were studied at a mean follow-up of 18 months. Clinical outcome was assessed on the basis of the Lysholm score, Tegner activity level, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective form and the Short Form-36. Clinical outcomes were correlated with both femoral and tibial tunnel placement measured on standard anteroposterior and lateral knee radiographs, in accordance with established guidelines. Results tibial tunnel position on the lateral view correlated significantly with both the IKDC subjective form (r = −0.72; p<0.05) and the Lysholm score (r=−0.73; p<0.05). Tibial tunnel position on the lateral view also correlated with stability measured using a KT-1000 arthrometer at 30N of force (r=0.57; p<0.05). No correlation was found between α angle and anteroposterior (AP) laxity measured by KT-1000 arthrometer. No significant correlation was found between femoral tunnel position (on either view) and Lysholm score, IKDC score and Tegner activity level. Similarly, no correlation was found between AP laxity measured by KT-1000 arthrometer and femoral tunnel position. Conclusions these results suggest that the more anterior the placement of the tibial tunnel, the better the clinical outcome will be. On the basis of literature data and our findings, we discuss the hypothesis that there exists a “correct area” for tunnel placement, making it possible to obtain the best results. Level of evidence Level IV, case series. PMID:27386442

  3. Neuromuscular and biomechanical landing performance subsequent to ipsilateral semitendinosus and gracilis autograft anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Vairo, Giampietro L; Myers, Joseph B; Sell, Timothy C; Fu, Freddie H; Harner, Christopher D; Lephart, Scott M

    2008-01-01

    The hamstrings musculature is a vital component of an intricate dynamic knee joint restraint mechanism. However, there is evidence based on research studies suggesting potential deficits to this complex mechanism due to donor site morbidity resulting from harvest of the ipsilateral semitendinosus and gracilis autograft (ISGA) for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). The purpose of this retrospective research study was to investigate the effects of ISGA ACLR on neuromuscular and biomechanical performance during a single-leg vertical drop landing (VDL), a functional task and associated mechanism of anterior cruciate ligament disruption during physical activity. Fourteen physically active participants 22.5 +/- 4.1 years of age and 21.4 +/- 10.7 months post ISGA ACLR underwent bilateral neuromuscular, biomechanical and isokinetic strength and endurance evaluations matched to 14 control participants by sex, age, height and mass. Kinetic and kinematic data was obtained with 3-D motion analyses utilizing inverse dynamics while performing single-leg VDLs from a height of 30 cm. Integrated surface electromyography (SEMG) assessments of the quadriceps, hamstrings and gastrocnemius musculature were also conducted. Additionally, knee joint flexion strength (60 degrees s(-1)) and endurance (240 degrees s(-1)) measurements were tested via isokinetic dynamometry. No significant differences existed in hip and net summated extensor moments within or between groups. The ISGA ACLR participants recorded significantly decreased peak vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) landing upon the involved lower extremity compared to uninvolved (P = 0.028) and matched (P < 0.0001) controls. Participants having undergone ISGA ACLR also displayed greater peak hip joint flexion angles landing upon the involved lower extremity compared to uninvolved (P = 0.020) and matched (P = 0.026) controls at initial ground contact. The ISGA ACLR group furthermore exhibited increased peak hip joint

  4. Gold and Hydroxyapatite Nano-Composite Scaffolds for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: In Vitro Characterization.

    PubMed

    Smith, S E; White, R A; Grant, D A; Grant, S A

    2016-01-01

    Current anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft replacement materials often fail due to the lack of biological integration. While many newly developed extracellular matrix based scaffolds show good biocompatibility they often do not entice cellular remodeling and the rebuilding of a functional ligament. We have proposed the conjugation of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) and hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nano-HAp) to acellular tissue to enhance cell attachment and proliferation while maintaining an improved degradation resistance and open microstructure. We are the first to investigate the double conjugation of AuNP and nano-HAp onto decellularized tissue to improve the tissue remodeling response. Decellularized porcine diaphragm was crosslinked with two types of nano-HAp and amine-functionalized AuNP with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethlaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) crosslinker. Scaffolds were characterized using electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and fibroblast assays. Results demonstrated that scaffolds with nano-HAp have increased thermal stability at low levels of crosslinking. The open microstructure of the scaffold was not compromised allowing for cell migration while still providing increased degradation resistance. The addition of < 200 nm nano-HAp decreased cell viability compared to scaffolds without nanoparticles, but the addition of AuNP to scaffolds showed enhanced cell viability in the presence of < 200 nm nano-HAp. The addition of < 40 nm nano-HAp showed an increase in cell viability compared to scaffolds crosslinked without nanoparticles. It is concluded that attaching AuNP and < 40nm nano-HAp to extracellular matrices may improve overall properties. PMID:27398580

  5. Factors influencing the implementation of anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention strategies by girls soccer coaches.

    PubMed

    Joy, Elizabeth A; Taylor, John R; Novak, Melissa A; Chen, Michael; Fink, Barbara P; Porucznik, Christina A

    2013-08-01

    Women are 3 times more likely to injure their anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) while playing soccer than men. ACL injury prevention programs (IPPs) involving stretching and strengthening drills can reduce the incidence of ACL injury when incorporated into routine training. The rate of implementation among coaches is largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the rate of implementation of ACL IPP, to identify factors that influence implementation, and to acquire information to assist in design dissemination and implementation strategies. Study subjects were coaches of woman soccer players aged 11-22 years in Utah (n = 756). Data were gathered using a Web-based survey followed by a qualitative study in which "best practice coaches"-coaches who met criteria for successful implementation of ACL IPP-were interviewed via telephone. A minority of survey respondents, 19.8% (27/136), have implemented ACL IPP. Factors associated with successful implementation include length of coaching experience and presence of additional support staff such as a strength and conditioning coach or athletic trainer. Best practice coaches (14/136) unanimously agreed on the following: (a) there are performance-enhancing benefits of ACL IPP, (b) education on ACL injury prevention should be required for licensure, and (c) dissemination and implementation will require soccer associations to enact policies that require IPPs. In conclusion, a minority of girls soccer coaches have implemented ACL IPP and those that have do so because they believe that prevention improves performance and that soccer organizations should enact policies requiring ACL injury prevention education and implementation. Efforts to implement ACL IPP should be driven by soccer organizations, emphasize performance-enhancing benefits, and engage additional coaching staff.

  6. Modulation of inflammation by vitamin E and C supplementation prior to anterior cruciate ligament surgery.

    PubMed

    Barker, Tyler; Leonard, Scott W; Trawick, Roy H; Martins, Thomas B; Kjeldsberg, Carl R; Hill, Harry R; Traber, Maret G

    2009-03-01

    Muscle atrophy commonly follows anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and surgery. Proinflammatory cytokines can induce and exacerbate oxidative stress, potentiating muscle atrophy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of prior antioxidant (AO) supplementation on circulating cytokines following ACL surgery. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in men undergoing ACL surgery, who were randomly assigned to either: (1) AO (200 IU of vitamin E (50% d-alpha-tocopheryl acetate and 50% d-alpha-tocopherol) and 500 mg ascorbic acid), or (2) matching placebos (PL). Subjects took supplements twice daily for 2 weeks prior to and up to 12 weeks after surgery. Each subject provided five blood samples: (1) baseline (Bsl, prior to supplementation and approximately 2 weeks prior to surgery), (2) presurgery (Pre), (3) 90 min, (4) 72 h, and (5) 7 days postsurgery. Following surgery, inflammation and muscle damage increased in both groups, as assessed by increased circulating IL-6, C-reactive protein, and creatine kinase. During AO supplementation, plasma alpha-T and AA increased while gamma-T concentrations decreased significantly (P< 0.05). At 90 min the AO group displayed a significant decrease in AA, an inverse correlation between AA and (interleukin) IL-8 (r(2)= 0.50, P< 0.05), and a significantly lower IL-10 response than that of the PL group. IL-10 was significantly elevated at 90 min and 72 h in the PL group. In summary, our findings show that circulating inflammatory cytokines increase and AO supplementation attenuated the increase in IL-10 in patients post-ACL surgery.

  7. A phenomenological contact model: Understanding the graft-tunnel interaction in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Salehghaffari, Shahab; Dhaher, Yasin Y

    2015-07-16

    In this paper, we sought to expand the fidelity of a validated model of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) procedure by incorporating a stick-slip contact model with linear pressure-overclosure relationship at the interface. The suggested model is characterized by three unknown parameters, friction coefficient, shear stress softening and contact stiffness. In the absence of any isolated experiments exploring the graft-tunnel interactions during an aggregate joint load, the calibration data used in this study are derived from a reported biomechanical study. A Bayesian calibration procedure was employed to find the unknown probability distribution function (PDF) of these contact parameters. Initially, the response surface approximations of the predicted graft forces from laxity test simulations was adopted to estimate the likelihood of noisy experimental data reported in the literature. Then, the wide domain of contact parameters was sampled sequentially based on the Marcov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method with acceptance-rejection criteria to search for population of samples in significantly narrower domain of unknown parameters that are associated with the highest occurrence likelihood of noisy experimental data. Our simulations with calibrated contact parameters indicate that pre-tensioning applied at 30° of flexion leads to larger graft force after the joint is fully extended compared to the graft force when the same pre-tensioning force is applied at full extension. Moreover, regardless of the pre-tensioning force, the graft-tunnel contact pressure is larger when the fixation of the graft is performed at full extension, increasing with the pre-tensioning force.

  8. Effects of 4 weeks preoperative exercise on knee extensor strength after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Kyung; Hwang, Ji Hye; Park, Won Hah

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] After an anterior cruciate ligament injury and subsequent reconstruction, quadriceps muscle weakness and disruption of proprioceptive function are common. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a 4 weeks preoperative exercise intervention on knee strength power and function post-surgery. [Subjects and Methods] Eighty male patients (27.8±5.7 age), scheduled for reconstruction surgery, were randomly assigned to two groups, the preoperative exercise group (n=40) and a no preoperative exercise group (n=40). The preoperative exercise group participated in a 4-week preoperative and 12-week post-operative programs, while the no preoperative exercise group participated only in the 12-week postoperative exercise program. Isokinetic measured of quadriceps strength were obtained at 4 weeks before and 3 months after surgery. [Results] The knee extensor strength deficits measured at 60°/s and 180°/s was significantly lower in the preoperative exercise group compared with the no preoperative exercise group. At 3 months after surgery, the extensor strength deficit was 28.5±9.0% at 60°/sec and 23.3±9.0% at 180°/sec in the preoperative exercise group, whereas the no preoperative exercise group showed extensor strength deficits of 36.5±10.7% and 27.9±12.6% at 60°/sec and 180°/sec, respectively. The preoperative exercise group demonstrated significant improvement the single-leg hop distance. [Conclusion] Four week preoperative exercise may produce many positive effects post reconstruction surgery, including faster recovery of knee extensor strength and function, as measured by single-leg hop ability. PMID:26504270

  9. Anatomical anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: transtibial versus outside-in technique

    PubMed Central

    MATASSI, FABRIZIO; SIRLEO, LUIGI; CARULLI, CHRISTIAN; INNOCENTI, MASSIMO

    2015-01-01

    Purpose the aim of this study was to compare clinical results and location of the femoral tunnel with transtibial (TT) and outside-in (OI) techniques in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using in vivo 3D CT analysis. Methods we prospectively followed up 40 ACL reconstructions in which femoral tunnel placement was performed using two different techniques: TT [20] and OI [20]. Clinical evaluation was based on IKDC and KOOS scores and radiographic analysis with specific 3D CT scans. Tunnel coordinates were calculated using the Bernard-Hertel quadrant method to define the insertion point of the ACL. Results excellent clinical results were achieved in both groups, which showed comparable IKDC and KOOS scores. Two failures were recorded, both in the TT group. In the high-to-low direction, the position of the femoral tunnel, as measured using the quadrant method, was too high in the TT group, compared to what was observed in the OI group: 10.5 ± 6.9% (0–29%) and 30.2 ± 5.4% (19–42%), (p=0.043). Conclusions we found that with the TT technique, compared with the OI technique, the femoral tunnel was located higher in the high-to-low direction and was in a slightly shallower position in the deep-to-shallow direction. Using the OI technique the femoral tunnel was in a position closer to the anatomical ACL footprint than with the TT technique. A femoral tunnel position far from the anatomical footprint of the native ACL would result in a higher failure rate. Level of evidence level II, prospective comparative study. PMID:26151033

  10. A phenomenological contact model: Understanding the graft-tunnel interaction in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Salehghaffari, Shahab; Dhaher, Yasin Y

    2015-07-16

    In this paper, we sought to expand the fidelity of a validated model of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) procedure by incorporating a stick-slip contact model with linear pressure-overclosure relationship at the interface. The suggested model is characterized by three unknown parameters, friction coefficient, shear stress softening and contact stiffness. In the absence of any isolated experiments exploring the graft-tunnel interactions during an aggregate joint load, the calibration data used in this study are derived from a reported biomechanical study. A Bayesian calibration procedure was employed to find the unknown probability distribution function (PDF) of these contact parameters. Initially, the response surface approximations of the predicted graft forces from laxity test simulations was adopted to estimate the likelihood of noisy experimental data reported in the literature. Then, the wide domain of contact parameters was sampled sequentially based on the Marcov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method with acceptance-rejection criteria to search for population of samples in significantly narrower domain of unknown parameters that are associated with the highest occurrence likelihood of noisy experimental data. Our simulations with calibrated contact parameters indicate that pre-tensioning applied at 30° of flexion leads to larger graft force after the joint is fully extended compared to the graft force when the same pre-tensioning force is applied at full extension. Moreover, regardless of the pre-tensioning force, the graft-tunnel contact pressure is larger when the fixation of the graft is performed at full extension, increasing with the pre-tensioning force. PMID:26100464

  11. Force Production and Reactive Strength Capabilities After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Eamonn P; Galvin, Lorcan; Harrison, Andrew J

    2008-01-01

    Context: Ambiguity exists in the literature regarding whether individuals can restore function to 100% after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The response of force production and reactive strength in stretch-shortening cycle activities after surgery has not been established. Objective: To compare reactive strength and force production capabilities between the involved and uninvolved legs of participants who had undergone ACL reconstruction and rehabilitation with the reactive strength and force production capabilities of a control group. Design: Repeated measures, cross-sectional. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Ten participants with ACL reconstructions who had returned to their chosen sports and 10 age-matched and activity-matched control subjects. Intervention(s): We screened the ACL group with the International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Evaluation Form and functional performance tests to measure a basic level of function. We assessed force production capabilities and reactive strength using squat, countermovement, drop, and rebound jump protocols on a force sledge apparatus. Main Outcome Measure(s): The dependent variables were flight time, peak vertical ground reaction force, leg spring stiffness, and reactive strength index. Results: No participant in the ACL group exhibited functional deficits in comparison with normative values or the control group. Using the force sledge apparatus, we found no notable differences in force production capabilities and reactive strength in the ACL group when comparing the involved with uninvolved legs or the degree of difference between legs with the control group. Conclusions: After ACL reconstruction, rehabilitated participants did not exhibit deficits in force production or reactive strength capabilities. Our results suggest that force production and reactive strength capabilities can be restored to levels comparable with the uninjured control limb and may not

  12. Prevention and Screening Programs for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Young Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Swart, Eric; Redler, Lauren; Fabricant, Peter D.; Mandelbaum, Bert R.; Ahmad, Christopher S.; Wang, Y. Claire

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are common among young athletes. Biomechanical studies have led to the development of training programs to improve neuromuscular control and reduce ACL injury rates as well as screening tools to identify athletes at higher risk for ACL injury. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of these training methods and screening strategies for preventing ACL injuries. Methods: A decision-analysis model was created to evaluate three strategies for a population of young athletes participating in organized sports: (1) no training or screening, (2) universal neuromuscular training, and (3) universal screening, with neuromuscular training for identified high-risk athletes only. Risk of injury, risk reduction from training, and sensitivity and specificity of screening were based on published data from clinical trials. Costs of training and screening programs were estimated on the basis of the literature. Sensitivity analyses were performed on key model parameters to evaluate their effect on base case conclusions. Results: Universal neuromuscular training of all athletes was the dominant strategy, with better outcomes and lower costs compared with screening. On average, the implementation of a universal training program would save $100 per player per season, and would reduce the incidence of ACL injury from 3% to 1.1% per season. Screening was not cost-effective within the range of reported sensitivity and specificity values. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance: Given its low cost and ease of implementation, neuromuscular training of all young athletes represents a cost-effective strategy for reducing costs and morbidity from ACL injuries. While continued innovations on inexpensive and accurate screening methods to identify high-risk athletes remain of interest, improving existing training protocols and implementing neuromuscular training into routine training for all young athletes is warranted. PMID

  13. Fresh Versus Frozen Engineered Bone–Ligament–Bone Grafts for Sheep Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingam, Vasudevan D.; Behbahani-Nejad, Nilofar; Ronan, Elizabeth A.; Olsen, Tyler J.; Smietana, Michael J.; Wojtys, Edward M.; Wellik, Deneen M.; Arruda, Ellen M.

    2015-01-01

    Surgical intervention is often required to restore knee instability in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. The most commonly used grafts for ACL reconstruction are tendon autografts or allografts. These current options, however, have shown failure rates requiring revision and continued instability in the long term. The mismatched biomechanical properties of the current tendon grafts compared with native ACL tissue are thought to contribute to these poor outcomes and potential risk of early onset osteoarthritis. As a possible solution to these issues, our laboratory has fabricated tissue-engineered ligament constructs that exhibit structural and functional properties similar to those of native ACL tissue after 6 months implantation. In addition, these tissue-engineered grafts achieve vascular and neural development that exceeds those of patellar tendon grafts. However, the utility of our tissue-engineered grafts is limited by the labor-intensive method required to produce the constructs and the need to use the constructs fresh, directly from the cell culturing system. Ideally, these constructs would be fabricated and stored until needed. Thus, in this study, we investigated the efficacy of freezing our tissue-engineered constructs as a method of preservation before use for ACL reconstruction. We hypothesized that frozen constructs would have similar histological and biomechanical outcomes compared with our fresh model. Our results showed that 6 months postimplantation as an ACL replacement graft, both our tissue-engineered fresh and frozen grafts demonstrated similar mechanical and histological outcomes, indicating that freezing is a suitable method for preserving and storing our graft before ACL reconstruction. The ability to use frozen constructs significantly increases the versatility of our graft technology expanding the clinical utility of our graft. PMID:25397990

  14. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Pediatric Athletes Presenting to Sports Medicine Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Stracciolini, Andrea; Stein, Cynthia J.; Zurakowski, David; Meehan, William P.; Myer, Gregory D.; Micheli, Lyle J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Limited data exist regarding the effect of the growth process on anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk in male versus female children. Hypothesis: The proportion of ACL injuries/sports injuries presenting to clinic will vary by age, sex, and body mass index (BMI). Study Design: Cross-sectional epidemiologic study. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Methods: The study group consisted of a randomly selected 5% probability sample of all children 5 to 17 years of age presenting to a sports medicine clinic from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2009; 2133 charts were reviewed. Data collected included demographics, height and weight, injury mechanism, diagnosis, treatment, previous injury, and organized sports. Results: A total of 206 ACL tears were analyzed (104 girls, 102 boys). Girls were slightly older than boys (15.1 ± 1.7 vs 14.3 ± 2.1 years; P < 0.01). Male-female comparison of ACL injury/total injury by age revealed that girls had a steeper increase by age than boys. Among 5- to 12-year-olds, boys had a higher ACL injury/total injury ratio than girls (all P < 0.01). Children 13 to 17 years of age showed no significant difference for sex in ACL injury/total injury ratio. As age advanced, the proportion of ACL injuries/total injuries increased for both girls (P < 0.01) and boys (P = 0.04). BMI was independently associated with an ACL injury (P < 0.01). Conclusion: The proportion of ACL injuries/total injuries was similar for boys and girls aged 13 to 17 years. Girls showed a significantly steeper increase in ACL injury proportion versus boys through puberty. Clinical Relevance: This study will increase clinician awareness of ACL injury occurrence in young male and female athletes 5 to 12 years of age. Injury prevention efforts should target young girls before the onset of puberty and before injury occurs. PMID:25984258

  15. Effect of knee angle on quadriceps strength and activation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Theuerkauf, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Quadriceps strength and activation deficits after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury or surgery are typically evaluated at joint positions that are biomechanically advantageous to the quadriceps muscle. However, the effect of knee joint position and the associated changes in muscle length on strength and activation is currently unknown in this population. Here, we examined the effect of knee angle on quadriceps strength, activation, and electrically evoked torque in individuals with ACL reconstruction. Furthermore, we evaluated whether knee angle mediated the relationship between quadriceps weakness and functional performance after ACL reconstruction. Knee strength and activation were tested bilaterally at 90° and 45° of knee flexion in 11 subjects with ACL reconstruction using an interpolated triplet technique. The magnitude of electrically evoked torque at rest was used to quantify peripheral muscle contractile property changes, and the single-leg hop for distance test was used to evaluate functional performance. The results indicated that although quadriceps strength deficits were similar between knee angles, voluntary activation deficits were significantly higher in the reconstructed leg at 45° of knee flexion. On the contrary, the side-to-side evoked torque at rest ratio [i.e., (reconstructed/nonreconstructed) × 100] was significantly lower at 90° than at 45° of knee flexion. The association between quadriceps strength and functional performance was stronger at 45° of knee flexion. The results provide novel evidence that quadriceps activation is selectively affected at 45° of knee flexion and emphasize the importance of assessing quadriceps strength and activation at this position when feasible because it better captures activation deficits. PMID:25997949

  16. Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infections Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Michael V; Du, Dongyi Tony; Hua, Wei; Cortez, Karoll J; Butler, Melissa G; Davis, Robert L; DeCoster, Thomas A; Johnson, Laura; Li, Lingling; Nakasato, Cynthia; Nordin, James D; Ramesh, Mayur; Schum, Michael; Von Worley, Ann; Zinderman, Craig; Platt, Richard; Klompas, Michael

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of graft choice (allograft, bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft, or hamstring autograft) on deep tissue infections following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study. SETTING AND POPULATION Patients from 6 US health plans who underwent ACL reconstruction from January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2008. METHODS We identified ACL reconstructions and potential postoperative infections using claims data. A hierarchical stratified sampling strategy was used to identify patients for medical record review to confirm ACL reconstructions and to determine allograft vs autograft tissue implanted, clinical characteristics, and infection status. We estimated infection rates overall and by graft type. We used logistic regression to assess the association between infections and patients' demographic characteristics, comorbidities, and choice of graft. RESULTS On review of 1,452 medical records, we found 55 deep wound infections. With correction for sampling weights, infection rates varied by graft type: 0.5% (95% CI, 0.3%-0.8%) with allografts, 0.6% (0.1%-1.5%) with bone-patellar tendon-bone autografts, and 2.5% (1.9%-3.1%) with hamstring autograft. After adjusting for potential confounders, we found an increased infection risk with hamstring autografts compared with allografts (odds ratio, 5.9; 95% CI, 2.8-12.8). However, there was no difference in infection risk among bone-patellar tendon-bone autografts vs allografts (odds ratio, 1.2; 95% CI, 0.3-4.8). CONCLUSIONS The overall risk for deep wound infections following ACL reconstruction is low but it does vary by graft type. Infection risk was highest in hamstring autograft recipients compared with allograft recipients and bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft recipients. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:827-833.

  17. Histological and biochemical characteristics of the rabbit anterior cruciate ligament in comparison to potential autografts.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Mariann; Meier, Carola; Kohl, Benjamin; Lohan, Anke; Kokozidou, Maria; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula

    2016-08-01

    Tissue engineering of an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) implant with ACL cells requires detailed analysis of the tissue characteristics that should be mimicked. Therefore, we studied the histological and biochemical properties of rabbit derived ACLs in comparison to other knee-associated tendons that are used as autografts in men. Rabbit derived ACLs and Musculus (M.) semimembranosus, M. semitendinosus tendons and patellar ligaments were explanted from adult New Zealand white rabbits and analyzed histologically for tissue organization (e.g. cellularity, nuclear shapes, elastic fibers), total collagen and sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) contents. Gene expression analysis was performed for the main extracellular matrix (ECM) components type I collagen, decorin and the glycoprotein tenomodulin. The ACLs had a dimension of 1.39x0.39x0.1 cm in situ. They were characterized by high sGAG content in comparison to the other tendons/ligaments, whereas the total collagen content did not differ. ACLs possessed higher cellularity and lower feret diameter of the cell nuclei compared with the investigated rabbit-derived tendons. In ACLs long elastic fibers were observed. Concerning the gene expression level, lower transcription of tenomodulin was detected in the ACL compared with the other tendons, without significant difference in the decorin gene expression. The M. semitendinosus tendon had a significantly higher type I collagen expression than the ACL and the other investigated tendons. This phenotypical characterization of the lapine ACL presented in this study provides some key standards to evaluate tissue engineered ACL constructs to be tested in the rabbit model.

  18. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with a novel porcine xenograft: the initial Italian experience

    PubMed Central

    ZAFFAGNINI, STEFANO; GRASSI, ALBERTO; MUCCIOLI, GIULIO MARIA MARCHEGGIANI; DI SARSINA, TOMMASO ROBERTI; RAGGI, FEDERICO; BENZI, ANDREA; MARCACCI, MAURILIO

    2015-01-01

    At the current state of the art in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, multiple techniques have been presented but none has given clearly defined and improved results. One of the main issues concerns the choice of graft. The concept of using xenograft tissue, defined as a graft tissue from one species and destined for implantation in an unlike species, was introduced in order to try to overcome the mechanical and biological concerns associated with synthetic materials and the safety and quality concerns and availability problems of allograft tissue. Xenograft tissue carries the risk of producing an immunological reaction. In order to try to overcome or attenuate the immune response against porcine xenograft tissue, the Z-Process® (Aperion Biologics Inc, San Antonio, Texas, USA) has been developed and used to produce the Z-Lig® family of devices for ACL reconstruction procedures. Z-Lig® is a tendon graft with or without bone blocks, sourced from animal tissue in a manner consistent with what has normally been sourced from human tissue, and processed to overcome anti-Gal-mediated rejection and to attenuate other immunological recognition in humans. All this while ensuring sterility, viral inactivation and preservation of mechanical proprieties appropriate for an ACL reconstruction device. The Z-Lig® device has been tested in skeletally mature monkeys and given interesting and promising results from the preclinical performance and safety profile point of view. On this basis, it was possible to proceed with the first clinical trial involving humans, which gave similar encouraging results. The Z-Lig® device has also been implanted in Italy at the Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute in Bologna, as a part of international multicenter prospective randomized blinded controlled study aimed at comparing xenograft with allograft tissue. PMID:26605257

  19. Mechanoreceptor Reinnervation of Autografts Versus Allografts After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Young, Simon W.; Valladares, Roberto D.; Loi, Florence; Dragoo, Jason L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Loss of proprioceptive function occurs after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Clinical, motor, and proprioceptive function is known to improve after ACL reconstruction but does not return to normal. While histological studies of human ACL allografts have been unable to demonstrate mechanoreceptor reinnervation, animal data suggest that reinnervation may occur when an autograft is used. Purpose: To compare the presence or absence of mechanoreceptors between allograft versus autograft after ACL reconstruction in humans. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Ten patients with previous ACL reconstruction presenting for either revision ACL surgery or knee arthroscopy for other reasons were enrolled in a prospective, comparative study. Five patients had a previous autograft ACL and 5 patients had an allograft. Biopsies, either from intact or ruptured grafts, were taken from identical locations as close to the femoral and tibial insertions as possible. Specimens were stained with hematoxylin-eosin (H-E) and monoclonal antibodies against neurofilament protein (NFP), known to be present in mechanoreceptor tissue. Immunohistochemical examination was carried out, and the number of NFP+ neural tissue analogs was counted and compared with that of native ACL tissue. Results: The mean time between original graft and biopsy was 6.9 years (range, 0.5-15 years). Histological examination showed significantly less NFP+ neural analogs in allograft and autograft patients than control tissue (mean number of NFP+ analogs per high-power field, 0.7 ± 0.9 [allograft] and 0.5 ± 0.8 [autograft] vs 4.7 ± 0.9 [controls]; P < .0001). There was no significant difference in NFP analogs between autograft and allograft tissue. Conclusion: We found a reduced concentration of NFP+ neural analogs in ACL grafts compared with native ACL tissue. This deficit exists irrespective of whether allograft or autograft is used. These findings may explain the continued

  20. Quadriceps Muscle Function After Rehabilitation With Cryotherapy in Patients With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Joseph M.; Kuenze, Christopher M.; Diduch, David R.; Ingersoll, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Persistent muscle weakness after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction may be due to underlying activation failure and arthrogenic muscle inhibition (AMI). Knee-joint cryotherapy has been shown to improve quadriceps function transiently in those with AMI, thereby providing an opportunity to improve quadriceps muscle activation and strength in patients with a reconstructed ACL. Objective: To compare quadriceps muscle function in patients with a reconstructed ACL who completed a 2-week intervention including daily cryotherapy (ice bag), daily exercises, or both. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 30 patients with reconstructed ACLs who were at least 6 months post-index surgery and had measurable quadriceps AMI. Intervention(s): The patients attended 4 supervised visits over a 2-week period. They were randomly assigned to receive 20 minutes of knee-joint cryotherapy, 1 hour of therapeutic rehabilitation exercises, or cryotherapy followed by exercises. Main Outcome Measure(s): We measured quadriceps Hoffmann reflex, normalized maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque, central activation ratio using the superimposed-burst technique, and patient-reported outcomes before and after the intervention period. Results: After the 2-week intervention period, patients who performed rehabilitation exercises immediately after cryotherapy had higher normalized maximal voluntary isometric contraction torques (P = .002, Cohen d effect size = 1.4) compared with those who received cryotherapy alone (P = .16, d = 0.58) or performed exercise alone (P = .16, d = 0.30). Conclusions: After ACL reconstruction, patients with AMI who performed rehabilitation exercises immediately after cryotherapy experienced greater strength gains than those who performed cryotherapy or exercises alone. PMID:25299442

  1. Transcription factor Mohawk and the pathogenesis of human anterior cruciate ligament degradation

    PubMed Central

    Nakahara, Hiroyuki; Hasegawa, Akihiko; Otabe, Koji; Ayabe, Fumiaki; Matsukawa, Tetsuya; Onizuka, Naoko; Ito, Yoshiaki; Ozaki, Toshifumi; Lotz, Martin K.; Asahara, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression and function of Mohawk (MKX) in human adult anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tissues and ligament cells from normal and osteoarthritis-affected knees. Methods Knee joints were obtained at autopsy within 24-48 hours postmortem from 13 normal donors (age 36.9±11.0 years), 16 OA donors (age 79.7±11.4 years) and 8 old donors without OA (age 76.9±12.9 years). All cartilage surfaces were graded macroscopically. MKX expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR. ACL-derived cells were used to study regulation of MKX expression by IL-1β. MKX was knocked down by siRNA to analyze function of MKX in extracellular matrix (ECM) production and differentiation in ACL-derived cells. Results The expression of MKX was significantly decreased in ACL-derived cells from OA knees compared with normal knees. Consistent with this finding, immunohistochemistry showed that MKX positive cells were significantly reduced in ACL tissues from OA donors in particular in cells located in disorientated fibers. In ACL-derived cells, IL-1β strongly suppressed MKX gene expression and reduced ligament ECM genes, COL1A1 and TNXB. On the other hand, SOX9, chondrocyte master transcription factor, was up regulated by IL-1β treatment. Importantly, knock down of MKX expression by siRNA upregulated SOX9 expression in ACL-derived cells, whereas the expression of COL1A1 and TNXB were decreased. Conclusion Reduced expression of MKX is a feature of degenerated ACL in OA-affected joints and this may be in part mediated by IL-1β. MKX appears necessary to maintain the tissue specific cellular differentiation status and ECM production in adult human tendons and ligaments. PMID:23686683

  2. Cellular and extracellular matrix changes in anterior cruciate ligaments during human knee aging and osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) degeneration is observed in most osteoarthritis (OA)-affected knee joints. However, the specific spatial and temporal relations of these changes and their association with extracellular matrix (ECM) degeneration are not well understood. The objective of this study was to characterize the patterns and relations of aging-related and OA-associated changes in ACL cells and the ECM. Methods Human knee joints from 80 donors (age 23 through 94) were obtained at autopsy. ACL degeneration was assessed histologically by using a quantitative scoring system. Tissue sections were analyzed for cell density, cell organization, ECM components, ECM-degrading enzymes and markers of differentiation, proliferation, and stem cells. Results Total cell number in normal ACL decreased with aging but increased in degenerated ACL, because of the formation of perivascular cell aggregates and islands of chondrocyte-like cells. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, -3, and -13 expression was reduced in aging ACL but increased in degenerated ACL, mainly in the chondrocyte-like cells. Collagen I was expressed throughout normal and degenerated ACL. Collagen II and X were detected only in the areas with chondroid metaplasia, which also expressed collagen III. Sox9, Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), and scleraxis expression was increased in the chondrocyte-like cells in degenerated ACL. Alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), a marker of myofibroblasts and the progenitor cell marker STRO-1, decreased with aging in normal ACL. In degenerated ACL, the new cell aggregates were positive for α-SMA and STRO-1. Conclusions ACL aging is characterized by reduced cell density and activation. In contrast, ACL degeneration is associated with cell recruitment or proliferation, including progenitor cells or myofibroblasts. Abnormally differentiated chondrocyte-like cell aggregates in degenerated ACL produce abnormal ECM and may predispose to mechanical failure

  3. Reactive Neuromuscular Training for the Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Deficient Knee: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Gray; Burton, Lee; Fields, Keith

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate the response to a proprioceptive training model during a 1-week rehabilitation regime. The techniques were demonstrated on a college-aged female basketball player who had injured her anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) several weeks earlier. The athlete was tested, trained, and then retested during her semester break. Background: The ACL injury has become a fairly common occurrence in the world of athletics. Knowing this, the athletic trainer is constantly searching for ways to improve the rehabilitative process. New research demonstrates that rehabilitation should be based on proprioception. The ACL not only serves a mechanical role by limiting passive knee mobility but also serves a sensory role through the mechanoreceptors deep in its tissue, which communicate with the neuromuscular system to provide proprioceptive feedback during training and competition. Differential Diagnosis: Partial or complete tear of the ACL. Treatment: The athlete was treated with a rehabilitation protocol based on proprioception, which uses reactive neuromuscular training. Uniqueness: Our rehabilitation focused on the muscular imbalances about the hip, knee, and ankle. The athlete achieved dramatic decreases in muscular imbalances about the hip and knee in only 1 week of rehabilitation through reactive neuromuscular training. Conclusions: The athlete had significant gains in strength over her brief period of therapy. However, these gains can be viewed only as neuromuscular changes and not strictly as gains in strength. The athlete returned to postseason competition under the supervision of her surgeon, who later recommended surgical reconstruction at the completion of the basketball season with rehabilitation during the offseason. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11.Figure 12. PMID:16558562

  4. Is anterior cruciate ligament surgery technique important in rehabilitation and activity scores?

    PubMed Central

    Kilinc, Bekir Eray; Kara, Adnan; Celik, Haluk; Oc, Yunus; Camur, Savas

    2016-01-01

    To compare the two different anterior cruciate ligament surgery techniques’ effect in rehabilitation and activity performance. Fifty-five patients were evaluated. Twenty-seven patients with transtibial technique (TT), 28 with anatomic single-bundle technique (AT) included. Tegner Activity Scale (TAS) was performed at preoperation and follow-up. The returning time of the sport and work was evaluated at follow-up. Single-leg hop test was performed at follow-up. Outcomes were compared between the two groups. The determined length difference between the operated knee and the intact knee was compared between the two groups. Average age of TT and AT was 27.9±6.4 yr, 28.3±6 yr, respectively. There was a significant difference between the two groups in duration of returning to sport. TT group had higher duration to return to sport (P<0.01). No difference between the two groups in duration of returning to work (P>0.05). There was a significant difference between the two groups. TT group had significantly higher values than AT group (P<0.01). No difference in TAS between the two techniques at preoperation and at last follow-up (P>0.05). The increase of TAS in patients who had AT was higher than the patients who had TT (P>0.05). No difference in single-leg hop test at 55%–65%, 65%–75%, and 85%–95% level (P>0.05). In this test at 75%–85% TT group had higher values than AT group (P<0.05), AT group had higher values at 95%–105% level (P<0.05). Good short and long-term knee outcome scores depend on rehabilitation protocol after surgery. Surgery technique should provide the adequate stability in rehabilitation period. AT obtains better outcomes in rehabilitation. PMID:27419120

  5. The incidence of secondary pathology after anterior cruciate ligament rupture in 5086 patients requiring ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sri-Ram, K; Salmon, L J; Pinczewski, L A; Roe, J P

    2013-01-01

    We reviewed 5086 patients with a mean age of 30 years (9 to 69) undergoing primary reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in order to determine the incidence of secondary pathology with respect to the time between injury and reconstruction. There was an increasing incidence of medial meniscal tears and chondral damage, but not lateral meniscal tears, with increasing intervals before surgery. The chances of requiring medial meniscal surgery was increased by a factor of two if ACL reconstruction was delayed more than five months, and increased by a factor of six if surgery was delayed by > 12 months. The effect of delaying surgery on medial meniscal injury was also pronounced in the patients aged < 17 years, where a delay of five to 12 months doubled the odds of medial meniscal surgery (odds ratio (OR) 2.0, p = 0.001) and a delay of > 12 months quadrupled the odds (OR 4.3, p = 0.001). Increasing age was associated with a greater odds of chondral damage (OR 4.6, p = 0.001) and medial meniscal injury (OR 2.9, p = 0.001), but not lateral meniscal injury. The gender split (3251 men, 1835 women) revealed that males had a greater incidence of both lateral (34% (n = 1114) vs 20% (n = 364), p = 0.001) and medial meniscal tears (28% (n = 924) vs 25% (n = 457), p = 0.006), but not chondral damage (35% (n = 1152) vs 36% (n = 665), p = 0.565). We conclude that ideally, and particularly in younger patients, ACL reconstruction should not be delayed more than five months from injury.

  6. MRI measurement on intercondylar notch after anterior cruciate ligament rupture and its correlation

    PubMed Central

    OUYANG, XIAO; WANG, YU HAO; WANG, JIAN; HONG, SHI DONG; XIN, FENG; WANG, LIN; YANG, XIAO WEI; WANG, JING RONG; WANG, LI MING; WEI, BO; WANG, QING; CUI, WEI DING; FU, XING LI

    2016-01-01

    The knee joint is extremely susceptible to injury, which is usually identified by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In the present study, MRI was applied to quantitatively detect the association between anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture and anatomic morphologic changes of the intercondylar notch. Forty patients with unilateral ACL rupture who were treated between July, 2013 and October, 2014 were enrolled in the present study. The patients were divided into the observation (affected side) and control (healthy side) groups. MRI measurements were undertaken based on parameters associated with intercondylar notch of double knee joints. The results showed that intercondylar notch width (ICW) in the observation group was significantly smaller than that in the control group, and differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). Differences on the intercondylar notch height and femoral condyle width [epicondylar width (EW)] between the two groups were not statistically significant (P>0.05). Notch width index (NWI) and notch shape index (NSI) in the observation group were significantly less than those in the control group and differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). Differences of Lysholm and Tegner scoring between the two groups were not statistically significant (P>0.05). The differential value of ICW in the observation group was 2.6±1.3 mm and the ACL rupture time of the affected knee was 20.4±1.3 months on average. The correlation was statistically significant (P<0.05). The correlation of Lysholm scoring, Tegner scoring and intercondylar notch stenosis degree on the affected knee was not statistically significant (P>0.05). In conclusion, after ACL rupture, ICW on the affected knee had significant stenosis, NSI and NWI were significantly reduced and the stenosis degree was aggravated with the prolongation of course. By contrast, Lysholm and Tegner scoring of patients with different degrees of stenosis had no correlation. PMID:27073436

  7. Adaptations in single-leg hop biomechanics following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Orishimo, Karl F; Kremenic, Ian J; Mullaney, Michael J; McHugh, Malachy P; Nicholas, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    When a patient performs a clinically normal hop test based on distance, it cannot be assumed that the biomechanics are similar between limbs. The objective was to compare takeoff and landing biomechanics between legs in patients who have undergone anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Kinematics and ground reaction forces were recorded as 13 patients performed the single-leg hop on each leg. Distance hopped, joint range of motion, peak joint kinetics and the peak total extensor moment were compared between legs during both takeoff and landing. Average hop distance ratio (involved/noninvolved) was 93 ± 4%. Compared to the noninvolved side, knee motion during takeoff on the involved side was significantly reduced (P = 0.008). Peak moments and powers on the involved side were lower at the knee and higher at the ankle and hip compared with the noninvolved side (Side by Joint P = 0.011; P = 0.003, respectively). The peak total extensor moment was not different between legs (P = 0.305) despite a decrease in knee moment and increases in ankle and hip moments (Side by Joint P = 0.015). During landing, knee motion was reduced (P = 0.043), and peak power absorbed was decreased at the knee and hip and increased at the ankle on the involved side compared to the noninvolved side (P = 0.003). The compensations by other joints may indicate protective adaptations to avoid overloading the reconstructed knee.

  8. Prediction of quadruple hamstring graft diameter for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction by anthropometric measurements

    PubMed Central

    Asif, Naiyer; Ranjan, Rahul; Ahmed, Sohail; Sabir, Aamir B; Jilani, Latif Z; Qureshi, Owais A

    2016-01-01

    Background: The literature is scanty regarding the anthropometric predictors on the diameter of quadruple hamstring graft obtained in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in Indian population. Minimum diameter of the graft for ACL reconstruction should be >7 mm to preclude failure. The objective of this study was to assess the prediction of the hamstring graft diameter by several anthropometric parameters including age, thigh circumference, weight, height and body mass index (BMI). Materials and Methods: 46 consecutive patients who had undergone ACL reconstruction by the same surgeon using quadruple hamstring grafts were evaluated. The age, thigh circumference of the normal side, height, weight and BMI were recorded preoperatively and Pearson correlation was done using these parameters with graft diameter measured intraoperatively. Regression analysis in a stepwise manner was undertaken to assess the influence of individual anthropometric parameters on the graft diameter. Results: There were 44 males and 2 females. Mean age was 29.4 years, mean height was 172.6 cm, mean weight was 70.9 kg, mean BMI was 23.8 kg/m2, mean thigh circumference was 47.1 cm and mean graft diameter was 7.9 mm. There was a positive correlation individually between the thigh circumference and graft diameter obtained (r = 0.8, P < 0.01, n = 46), and between the height and graft diameter (r = 0.8, P < 0.01, n = 46). On the regression analysis thigh circumference and height were found to be significant predictors of graft diameter giving the following equation: Graft diameter (mm) = 0. 079 height (cm) +0.068 thigh circumference (cm) −9.031. Conclusion: Preoperatively using the above equation if graft diameter came out to be <7 mm then alternate options of graft material must be kept in mind in order to prevent failure. PMID:26955176