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Sample records for arthroscopic bankart repair

  1. Physical Therapy Protocols for Arthroscopic Bankart Repair.

    PubMed

    DeFroda, Steven F; Mehta, Nabil; Owens, Brett D

    Outcomes after arthroscopic Bankart repair can be highly dependent on compliance and participation in physical therapy. Additionally, there are many variations in physician-recommended physical therapy protocols. The rehabilitation protocols of academic orthopaedic surgery departments vary widely despite the presence of consensus protocols. Descriptive epidemiology study. Level 3. Web-based arthroscopic Bankart rehabilitation protocols available online from Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited orthopaedic surgery programs were included for review. Individual protocols were reviewed to evaluate for the presence or absence of recommended therapies, goals for completion of ranges of motion, functional milestones, exercise start times, and recommended time to return to sport. Thirty protocols from 27 (16.4%) total institutions were identified out of 164 eligible for review. Overall, 9 (30%) protocols recommended an initial period of strict immobilization. Variability existed between the recommended time periods for sling immobilization (mean, 4.8 ± 1.8 weeks). The types of exercises and their start dates were also inconsistent. Goals to full passive range of motion (mean, 9.2 ± 2.8 weeks) and full active range of motion (mean, 12.2 ± 2.8 weeks) were consistent with other published protocols; however, wide ranges existed within the reviewed protocols as a whole. Only 10 protocols (33.3%) included a timeline for return to sport, and only 3 (10%) gave an estimate for return to game competition. Variation also existed when compared with the American Society of Shoulder and Elbow Therapists' (ASSET) consensus protocol. Rehabilitation protocols after arthroscopic Bankart repair were found to be highly variable. They also varied with regard to published consensus protocols. This discrepancy may lead to confusion among therapists and patients. This study highlights the importance of attending surgeons being very clear and specific with

  2. Open Latarjet procedure for failed arthroscopic Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Flinkkilä, T; Sirniö, K

    2015-02-01

    This retrospective study assessed the functional results of open Latarjet operation for recurrence of instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair in a consecutive series of patients. Fifty two patients (mean age 28.4 [range 17-62] years, 45 men) were operated on using open Latarjet operation after one (n=46) or two (n=6) failed arthroscopic Bankart repairs. The indication for revision surgery was recurrent dislocation or subluxation. Fifty patients had a Hill-Sachs lesion and 32 patients had glenoid bone lesions on plain radiographs. No attempt was made to grade the severity of bony pathology. Functional outcome and stability of 49 shoulders were assessed after an average follow-up of 38 (range 24-85) months using Western Ontario Shoulder Instability (WOSI) score, Oxford shoulder instability score, and subjective shoulder value (SSV). Forty-two patients had a stable shoulder at follow-up. Seven of 49 (14%) had symptoms of instability; one patient had recurrent dislocation, and six patients had subluxations. Mean WOSI, Oxford, and SSV scores were 83.9, 19.9, and 84.9, respectively. All scores were significantly better in patients who had a stable shoulder compared with those who had an unstable shoulder (WOSI 86.8 vs. 64.3; Oxford 18.2 vs. 30.8; and SSV 88.3 vs. 61.7; P<0.01). One patient needed a reoperation. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. Open Latarjet operation is a good option for failed arthroscopic Bankart repair. The instability recurrence rate is acceptable and the reoperation rate was low. Level IV, retrospective case series. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Back to Sports After Arthroscopic Revision Bankart Repair

    PubMed Central

    Buckup, Johannes; Welsch, Frederic; Gramlich, Yves; Hoffmann, Reinhard; Roessler, Philip P.; Schüttler, Karl F.; Stein, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Background: Recurrent instability following primary arthroscopic stabilization of the shoulder is a common complication. Young, athletic patients are at the greatest risk of recurring instability. To date, the literature contains insufficient description regarding whether return to sports is possible after revision arthroscopic Bankart repair. Hypothesis: Patients presenting with recurrent instability after primary arthroscopic stabilization should expect limitations in terms of their ability to partake in sporting activities after revision surgery. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Twenty athletes who underwent arthroscopic revision stabilization of the shoulder after failed primary arthroscopic Bankart repair were included in the study after completing inclusion and exclusion criteria surveys. Athletic Shoulder Outcome Scoring System (ASOSS), Shoulder Sport Activity Score (SSAS), and the Subjective Patient Outcome for Return to Sports (SPORTS) scores were determined to assess the participants’ ability to partake in sporting activities. Furthermore, sport type and sport level were classified and recorded. To assess function and stability, Rowe, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, Constant-Murley, and Walch-Duplay scores were measured and recorded. Results: Follow-up consultations were carried out after a mean of 28.7 months. The mean age at follow-up examination was 27.75 years. At the time of follow-up, 70% of the patients were able to return to their original sporting activities at the same level. However, 90% of patients described a limitation in their shoulder when participating in their sports. At 28.7 months after surgery, the mean ASOSS score was 76.8; the SSAS score decreased from 7.85 before first-time dislocation to 5.35 at follow-up (P < .005). The SPORTS score was 5.2 out of 10 at the follow-up consultation. Function- and instability-specific scores showed good to excellent results. The mean external rotational deficit for

  4. Back to Sports After Arthroscopic Revision Bankart Repair.

    PubMed

    Buckup, Johannes; Welsch, Frederic; Gramlich, Yves; Hoffmann, Reinhard; Roessler, Philip P; Schüttler, Karl F; Stein, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    Recurrent instability following primary arthroscopic stabilization of the shoulder is a common complication. Young, athletic patients are at the greatest risk of recurring instability. To date, the literature contains insufficient description regarding whether return to sports is possible after revision arthroscopic Bankart repair. Patients presenting with recurrent instability after primary arthroscopic stabilization should expect limitations in terms of their ability to partake in sporting activities after revision surgery. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Twenty athletes who underwent arthroscopic revision stabilization of the shoulder after failed primary arthroscopic Bankart repair were included in the study after completing inclusion and exclusion criteria surveys. Athletic Shoulder Outcome Scoring System (ASOSS), Shoulder Sport Activity Score (SSAS), and the Subjective Patient Outcome for Return to Sports (SPORTS) scores were determined to assess the participants' ability to partake in sporting activities. Furthermore, sport type and sport level were classified and recorded. To assess function and stability, Rowe, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, Constant-Murley, and Walch-Duplay scores were measured and recorded. Follow-up consultations were carried out after a mean of 28.7 months. The mean age at follow-up examination was 27.75 years. At the time of follow-up, 70% of the patients were able to return to their original sporting activities at the same level. However, 90% of patients described a limitation in their shoulder when participating in their sports. At 28.7 months after surgery, the mean ASOSS score was 76.8; the SSAS score decreased from 7.85 before first-time dislocation to 5.35 at follow-up ( P < .005). The SPORTS score was 5.2 out of 10 at the follow-up consultation. Function- and instability-specific scores showed good to excellent results. The mean external rotational deficit for high external rotation was 9.25°, and for low external

  5. Revision open Bankart surgery after arthroscopic repair for traumatic anterior shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nam Su; Yi, Jin Woong; Lee, Bong Gun; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2009-11-01

    Only a few studies have provided homogeneous analysis of open revision surgery after a failed arthroscopic Bankart procedure. Open Bankart revision surgery will be effective in a failed arthroscopic anterior stabilization but inevitably results in a loss of range of motion, especially external rotation. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Twenty-six shoulders that went through traditional open Bankart repair as revision surgery after a failed arthroscopic Bankart procedure for traumatic anterior shoulder instability were enrolled for this study. The mean patient age at the time of revision surgery was 24 years (range, 16-38 years), and the mean duration of follow-up was 42 months (range, 25-97 months). The preoperative mean range of motion was 173 degrees in forward flexion and 65 degrees in external rotation at the side. After revision surgery, the ranges measured 164 degrees and 55 degrees, respectively (P = .024 and .012, respectively). At the last follow-up, the mean Rowe score was 81 points, with 88.5% of the patients reporting good or excellent results. After revision surgery, redislocation developed in 3 shoulders (11.5%), all of which had an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion and associated hyperlaxity (2+ or greater laxity on the sulcus sign). Open revision Bankart surgery for a failed arthroscopic Bankart repair can provide a satisfactory outcome, including a low recurrence rate and reliable functional return. In open revision Bankart surgery after failed stabilization for traumatic anterior shoulder instability, the surgeon should keep in mind the possibility of a postoperative loss of range of motion and a thorough examination for not only a Bankart lesion but also other associated lesions, including a bone defect or hyperlaxity, to lower the risk of redislocation.

  6. The Influence of Arthroscopic Remplissage for Engaging Hill-Sachs Lesions Combined with Bankart Repair on Redislocation and Shoulder Function Compared with Bankart Repair Alone.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sang-Hun; Cha, Jae-Ryong; Lee, Chae-Chil; Hwang, Il-Yeong; Choe, Chang-Gyu; Kim, Min-Seok

    2016-12-01

    Recurrence of glenohumeral dislocation after arthroscopic Bankart repair can be associated with a large osseous defect in the posterosuperior part of the humeral head. Our hypothesis is that remplissage is more effective to prevent recurrence of glenohumeral instability without a severe motion deficit. Engaging Hill-Sachs lesions were observed in 48 of 737 patients (6.5%). Twenty-four patients underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair combined with remplissage (group I) and the other 24 patients underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair alone (group II). Clinical outcomes were prospectively evaluated by assessing the range of motion. Complications, recurrence rates, and functional results were assessed utilizing the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, Rowe score, and the Korean Shoulder Score for Instability (KSSI) score. Capsulotenodesis healing after remplissage was evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging. The average ASES, Rowe, and KSSI scores were statistically significantly higher in group I than group II. The frequency of recurrence was statistically significantly higher in group II. The average loss in external rotation measured with the arm positioned at the side of the trunk was greater in group II and that in abduction was also higher in group II. Compared to single arthroscopic Bankart repair, the remplissage procedure combined with arthroscopic Bankart repair was more effective to prevent the recurrence of anterior shoulder instability without significant impact on shoulder mobility in patients who had huge Hill-Sachs lesions.

  7. Outcomes After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair in Adolescent Athletes Participating in Collision and Contact Sports

    PubMed Central

    Saper, Michael G.; Milchteim, Charles; Zondervan, Robert L.; Andrews, James R.; Ostrander, Roger V.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Literature on arthroscopic stabilization in adolescent patients participating in collision and contact sports is limited, as most studies include adolescents within a larger sample group comprised primarily of adults. Purpose: To review the outcomes of arthroscopic Bankart repair for anterior shoulder instability in an adolescent population participating in collision and contact sports. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: This retrospective review included 39 shoulders in 37 adolescent (≤19 years) athletes who underwent primary arthroscopic Bankart repair using suture anchors with at least 2-year follow-up. All patients had a history of trauma to their shoulder resulting in an anterior dislocation. Outcome measures included patient satisfaction, the visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, and Rowe score. Recurrence of dislocation and return to sporting activity were also assessed. Results: The mean age at the time of surgery was 16.9 years (range, 15-19 years), and the mean follow-up was 6.3 years (range, 4.3-10.0 years); 58.6% of patients participated in collision sports. Time to surgery after the initial dislocation episode was 9.2 months (range, 0.5-36.2 months). Four shoulders (10.3%) had dislocation events postoperatively. The majority (78.1%) of patients returned to sports at the same level of competition. Mean VAS was 0.49 ± 1.0, and the mean ASES and Rowe scores were 92.8 ± 12.6 and 85.0 ± 24.2, respectively. Univariate analyses demonstrated that subjective functional outcomes were negatively correlated with recurrence (ASES, P = .005; Rowe, P = .001) and failure to return to sport (ASES, P = .016; Rowe, P = .004). Independent variables shown to have no significant relationship to functional outcomes included age, follow-up, number of preoperative dislocations, time to surgery, sport classification, competition level, tear extent, number of anchors, concurrent Hill

  8. Concomitant SLAP repair does not influence the surgical outcome for arthroscopic Bankart repair of traumatic shoulder dislocations.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Nuri; Unal, Mehmet Bekir; Asansu, Mustafa; Tok, Okan

    2017-01-01

    Prior studies revealed the presence of superior labrum anterior-to-posterior (SLAP) injury together with Bankart lesions in some patients. The purpose of the study is to compare the clinical results of isolated Bankart repairs with the clinical results of Bankart repairs when performed with concomitant SLAP repairs. The patients who underwent arthroscopic surgery for treatment of anterior glenohumeral instability were evaluated retrospectively. Group 1 consisted of 19 patients who had arthroscopic SLAP repair together with Bankart repair. The mean age of the patients was 23. Group 2 consisted of 38 patients who underwent isolated Bankart repair. The mean age was 24. Knotless anchors were used in both groups. The mean follow-up was 34 months (range: 26-72). In group 1, the mean preoperative Constant score was 84 (range: 74-90, standard deviation (SD): 5.91) and Rowe score was 64.1 (range: 40-70, SD: 8.14). In group 2, the preoperative Constant score was 84.4 (range: 70-96, SD: 5.88) and Rowe score was 60 (range: 45-70, SD: 7.95). In group 1, the postoperative mean Constant score raised to 96.8 (range: 88-100, SD: 2.91) and the mean Rowe score raised to 92.3 (range: 85-100, SD: 5.17). In group 2, the postoperative mean Constant score was 94.9 (range: 88-100, SD: 3.70) and the mean Rowe score was 94.2 (range: 80-100, SD: 4.71). The difference between the scores of two groups was insignificant ( p > 0.05). When the numbers of redislocations and range of motion were compared, no significant difference was found ( p > 0.05). Accompanying SLAP repair in surgical treatment with Bankart repair for shoulder instability does not affect the results negatively. Properly repaired labral tears extending from anterior inferior to the posterior superior of the glenoid in instability treatment have the same outcome in overall results as repaired isolated Bankart lesions.

  9. Accelerated rehabilitation after arthroscopic Bankart repair for selected cases: a prospective randomized clinical study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Ho; Ha, Kwon-Ick; Jung, Min-Wook; Lim, Moon-Sup; Kim, Young-Min; Park, Jong-Hyuk

    2003-09-01

    Increased stress within a certain limit enhances ligament healing and improves joint function. In this prospective randomized clinical trial, we compared the clinical results of early motion versus conventional immobilization after arthroscopic Bankart repair in a selected patient population. Prospective randomized clinical trial. We performed an arthroscopic Bankart repair using suture anchors in 62 patients with traumatic recurrent anterior instability of the shoulder. Patients were randomized into 2 groups; group 1 (28 patients; mean age, 28 years) was managed with 3 weeks of immobilization using an abduction sling and conventional rehabilitation program, and group 2 (34 patients; mean age, 29 years) was managed with an accelerated rehabilitation program that consisted of staged range of motion and strengthening exercises from the immediate postoperative day. Selection criteria were nonathletes with recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation and a classic Bankart lesion with a robust labrum limited to 1 cm from the midglenoid notch. The patients were followed up for a mean of 31 months (range, 27 to 45 months; standard deviation, 9 months). Analysis of outcome included pain scores at 6 weeks and at final follow-up evaluation, range of motion, return to activity, recurrence rate, patient satisfaction with each rehabilitation program, and shoulder scores assessed by the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Shoulder Index, the rating system of the University of California at Los Angeles, and another scoring system. The recurrence rate was not different between the 2 groups (P =.842). None of the groups developed recurrent dislocation. Two patients from each group were positive for anterior apprehension signs. Patients who underwent accelerated rehabilitation resumed functional range of motion faster (P <.001) and returned earlier to the functional level of activity (P <.001). Accelerated rehabilitation decreased postoperative pain (P =.013), and more patients were

  10. Biomechanical Comparison of Arthroscopic Single- and Double-Row Repair Techniques for Acute Bony Bankart Lesions.

    PubMed

    Spiegl, Ulrich J; Smith, Sean D; Todd, Jocelyn N; Coatney, Garrett A; Wijdicks, Coen A; Millett, Peter J

    2014-08-01

    Single- and double-row arthroscopic reconstruction techniques for acute bony Bankart lesions have been described in the literature. The double-row fixation technique would provide superior reduction and stability of a simulated bony Bankart lesion at time zero in a cadaveric model compared with the single-row technique. Controlled laboratory study. Testing was performed on 14 matched pairs of glenoids with simulated bony Bankart fractures with a defect width of 25% of the glenoid diameter. Half of the fractures were repaired with a double-row technique, while the contralateral glenoids were repaired with a single-row technique. The quality of fracture reduction was measured with a coordinate measuring machine. To determine the biomechanical stability of the repairs, specimens were preconditioned with 10 sinusoidal cycles between 5 and 25 N at 0.1 Hz and then pulled to failure in the anteromedial direction at a rate of 5 mm/min. Loads at 1 mm and 2 mm of fracture displacement were determined. The double-row technique required significantly higher forces to achieve fracture displacements of 1 mm (mean, 60.6 N; range, 39.0-93.3 N; P = .001) and 2 mm (mean, 94.4 N; range, 43.4-151.2 N; P = .004) than the single-row technique (1 mm: mean, 30.2 N; range, 14.0-54.1 N and 2 mm: mean, 63.7 N; range, 26.6-118.8 N). Significantly reduced fracture displacement was seen after double-row repair for both the unloaded condition (mean, 1.1 mm; range, 0.3-2.4 mm; P = .005) and in response to a 10-N anterior force applied to the defect (mean, 1.6 mm; range, 0.5-2.7 mm; P = .001) compared with single-row repair (unloaded: mean, 2.1 mm; range, 1.3-3.4 mm and loaded: mean, 3.4 mm; range, 1.9-4.7 mm). The double-row fixation technique resulted in improved fracture reduction and superior stability at time zero in this cadaveric model. This information may influence the surgical technique used to treat large osseous Bankart fractures and the postoperative rehabilitation protocols

  11. Arthroscopic Bankart repair and capsular shift for recurrent anterior shoulder instability: functional outcomes and identification of risk factors for recurrence.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Issaq; Ashton, Fiona; Robinson, Christopher Michael

    2012-07-18

    Arthroscopic Bankart repair and capsular shift is a well-established technique for the treatment of anterior shoulder instability. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes following arthroscopic Bankart repair and capsular shift and to identify risk factors that are predictive of recurrence of glenohumeral instability. We performed a retrospective review of a prospectively collected database consisting of 302 patients who had undergone arthroscopic Bankart repair and capsular shift for the treatment of recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability. The prevalence of patient and injury-related risk factors for recurrence was assessed. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the predicted probability of recurrence within two years. The chief outcome measures were the risk of recurrence and the two-year functional outcomes assessed with the Western Ontario shoulder instability index (WOSI) and disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) scores. The rate of recurrent glenohumeral instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair and capsular shift was 13.2%. The median time to recurrence was twelve months, and this complication developed within one year in 55% of these patients. The risk of recurrence was independently predicted by the patient's age at surgery, the severity of glenoid bone loss, and the presence of an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion (all p < 0.001). These variables were incorporated into a model to provide an estimate of the risk of recurrence after surgery. Varying the cutoff level for the predicted probability of recurrence in the model from 50% to lower values increased the sensitivity of the model to detect recurrences but decreased the positive predictive value of the model to correctly predict failed repairs. There was a significant improvement in the mean WOSI and DASH scores at two years postoperatively (both p < 0.001), but the mean scores in the group with recurrence were significantly lower than those in the group

  12. Do nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs affect the outcome of arthroscopic Bankart repair?

    PubMed

    Blomquist, J; Solheim, E; Liavaag, S; Baste, V; Havelin, L I

    2014-12-01

    To achieve pain control after arthroscopic shoulder surgery, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a complement to other analgesics. However, experimental studies have raised concerns that these drugs may have a detrimental effect on soft tissue-to-bone healing and, thus, have a negative effect on the outcome. We wanted to investigate if there are any differences in the clinical outcome after the arthroscopic Bankart procedure for patients who received NSAIDs prescription compared with those who did not. 477 patients with a primary arthroscopic Bankart procedure were identified in the Norwegian shoulder instability register and included in the study. 32.5% received prescription of NSAIDs post-operatively. 370 (78%) of the patients answered a follow-up questionnaire containing the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability index (WOSI). Mean follow-up was 21 months. WOSI at follow-up were 75% in the NSAID group and 74% in the control group. 12% of the patients in the NSAID group and 14% in the control group reported recurrence of instability. The reoperation rate was 5% in both groups. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups. Prescription of short-term post-operative NSAID treatment in the post-operative period did not influence on the functional outcome after arthroscopic Bankart procedures. © 2014 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Do nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs affect the outcome of arthroscopic Bankart repair?

    PubMed Central

    Blomquist, J; Solheim, E; Liavaag, S; Baste, V; Havelin, L I

    2014-01-01

    To achieve pain control after arthroscopic shoulder surgery, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a complement to other analgesics. However, experimental studies have raised concerns that these drugs may have a detrimental effect on soft tissue-to-bone healing and, thus, have a negative effect on the outcome. We wanted to investigate if there are any differences in the clinical outcome after the arthroscopic Bankart procedure for patients who received NSAIDs prescription compared with those who did not. 477 patients with a primary arthroscopic Bankart procedure were identified in the Norwegian shoulder instability register and included in the study. 32.5% received prescription of NSAIDs post-operatively. 370 (78%) of the patients answered a follow-up questionnaire containing the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability index (WOSI). Mean follow-up was 21 months. WOSI at follow-up were 75% in the NSAID group and 74% in the control group. 12% of the patients in the NSAID group and 14% in the control group reported recurrence of instability. The reoperation rate was 5% in both groups. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups. Prescription of short-term post-operative NSAID treatment in the post-operative period did not influence on the functional outcome after arthroscopic Bankart procedures. PMID:24750379

  14. How Satisfied Are Patients with Arthroscopic Bankart Repair? A 2-Year Follow-up on Quality-of-Life Outcome.

    PubMed

    Saier, Tim; Plath, Johannes E; Waibel, Sabrina; Minzlaff, Philipp; Feucht, Matthias J; Herschbach, Peter; Imhoff, Andreas B; Braun, Sepp

    2017-10-01

    To report general life and health satisfaction after arthroscopic Bankart repair in patients with post-traumatic recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability and to investigate postoperative time lost to return to work at 2-year follow-up. Between 2011 and 2013 patients treated with arthroscopic Bankart repair in the beach chair position for acute shoulder instability were included in this study. Questions on Life Satisfaction Modules (FLZ M ) and the Short Form 12 (SF-12) were used as quality-of-life outcome scales. Oxford Instability Score (OIS), Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (QuickDASH), and self-reported American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) shoulder index were used as functional outcome scales. Return to work (months) was monitored and analyzed depending on physical workload. Data were assessed the day before surgery and prospectively monitored until 24 months postoperatively. Quality-of-life outcome was correlated with functional shoulder outcome and compared with normative age-adjusted data. Paired t-test, Wilcoxon test, Mann-Whitney U-Test, and Spearman's correlation coefficient were used for statistical analysis. Fifty-three patients were prospectively included. The mean age at surgery was 29.4 years. Satisfaction with general life and satisfaction with health (FLZ M ) as well as physical component scale (SF-12) improved significantly to values above normative data within 6 to 12 months after surgery (each P < .001). OIS, QuickDASH, and ASES improved significantly from baseline until 24 months after surgery (each P < .001). For ASES, improvement above minimal clinically important difference was shown. There was a positive correlation between quality of life and functional outcome scores (P < .05; rho, 0.3-0.4). Mean time to return to work was 2 months (range, 0-10; standard deviation, 1.9), with significantly longer time intervals observed in patients with heavy physical workload (3.1 months; range, 0 to 10

  15. Arthroscopic Bankart Repair Versus Open Bristow-Latarjet for Shoulder Instability: A Matched-Pair Multicenter Study Focused on Return to Sport.

    PubMed

    Blonna, Davide; Bellato, Enrico; Caranzano, Francesco; Assom, Marco; Rossi, Roberto; Castoldi, Filippo

    2016-12-01

    The arthroscopic Bankart repair and open Bristow-Latarjet procedure are the 2 most commonly used techniques to treat recurrent shoulder instability. To compare in a case control-matched manner the 2 techniques, with particular emphasis on return to sport after surgery. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A study was conducted in 2 hospitals matching 60 patients with posttraumatic recurrent anterior shoulder instability with a minimum follow-up of 2 years (30 patients treated with arthroscopic Bankart procedure and 30 treated with open Bristow-Latarjet procedure). Patients with severe glenoid bone loss and revision surgeries were excluded. In one hospital, patients were treated with arthroscopic Bankart repair using anchors; in the other, patients underwent the Bristow-Latarjet procedure. Patients were matched according to age at surgery, type and level of sport practiced before shoulder instability (Degree of Shoulder Involvement in Sports [DOSIS] scale), and number of dislocations. The primary outcomes were return to sport (Subjective Patient Outcome for Return to Sports [SPORTS] score), rate of recurrent instability, Oxford Shoulder Instability Score (OSIS), Subjective Shoulder Value (SSV), Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI), and range of motion (ROM). After a mean follow-up of 5.3 years (range, 2-9 years), patients who underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair obtained better results in terms of return to sport (SPORTS score: 8 vs 6; P = .02) and ROM in the throwing position (86° vs 79°; P = .01), and they reported better subjective perception of the shoulder (SSV: 86% vs 75%; P = .02). No differences were detectable using the OSIS or WOSI. The rate of recurrent instability was not statistically different between the 2 groups (Bankart repair 10% vs Bristow-Latarjet 0%; P = .25), although the study may have been underpowered to detect a clinically important difference in this parameter. The multiple regression analysis showed that the independent

  16. Arthroscopic Bankart repair and subscapularis augmentation: an alternative technique treating anterior shoulder instability with bone loss.

    PubMed

    Maiotti, Marco; Russo, Raffaele; Zanini, Antonio; Schröter, Steffen; Massoni, Carlo; Bianchedi, Diana

    2016-06-01

    This study presents the preliminary results of a new arthroscopic technique consisting of the association of 2 procedures, capsulolabral repair and subscapularis augmentation tenodesis, in the treatment of traumatic anterior shoulder instability with both glenoid bone loss and a Hill-Sachs lesion. Eighty-nine patients engaged in sports were enrolled in this retrospective case-series study with 2 to 5 years' follow-up. All patients underwent a computed tomography scan to assess the percentage of glenoid bone loss by the Pico method. A prior stabilization procedure had failed in 20 patients, who were then segregated into a different group. Visual analog scale (VAS), Rowe, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores were used to assess the results. Only 3 of 89 patients had a post-traumatic redislocation. The mean length of follow-up was 31.5 months (range, 25-60 months). The VAS, Rowe, and ASES scores showed significant improvements: The VAS score decreased from a mean of 3.1 to 0.5 (P = .0157), the Rowe score increased from 58.9 to 94.1 (P = .0215), and the ASES score increased from 68.5 to 95.5 (P = .0197). The mean deficit of external rotation was 6° with the arm at the side of the trunk, and the mean deficit was 3° with the arm in 90° of abduction. The described procedure is a reproducible and effective technique used to restore joint stability in patients engaged in sports who have incurred anterior recurrent shoulder dislocation associated with glenoid bone loss (<25%) and a Hill-Sachs lesion. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Bone fragment union and remodeling after arthroscopic bony bankart repair for traumatic anterior shoulder instability with a glenoid defect: influence on postoperative recurrence of instability.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Shigeto; Ozaki, Ritsuro; Take, Yasuhiro; Mae, Tatsuo; Hayashida, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    Although good clinical outcomes have been reported after arthroscopic bony Bankart repair, the extent of bone union is still unclear. To investigate bone union after arthroscopic bony Bankart repair and its influence on postoperative recurrence of instability. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Among 113 consecutive shoulders that underwent arthroscopic bony Bankart repair, postoperative evaluation of bone union by computed tomography (CT) was performed at various times in 81 shoulders. Bone union was investigated during 3 periods: 3 to 6 months postoperatively (first period), 7 to 12 months postoperatively (second period), and 13 months or more postoperatively (third period). The influence of the size of the preoperative glenoid defect and the size of the bone fragment on bone union was investigated, as well as the influence of bone union on postoperative recurrence of instability. In shoulders with bone union, bone fragment remodeling and changes in the glenoid defect size were also investigated. The bone union rate was 30.5% in the first period, 55.3% in the second period, and 84.6% in the third period. Among 53 shoulders with CT evaluation in the second period or later and follow-up for a minimum of 1 year, there was complete union in 33 shoulders (62.3%), partial union in 3 (5.7%), nonunion in 8 (15.1%), and no fragment on CT in 9 (17.0%). The complete union rate was 50% for 22 shoulders with small bone fragments (<5% of the glenoid diameter), 56.3% for 16 shoulders with medium fragments (5%-10%), and 86.7% for 15 shoulders with large fragments (>10%). The recurrence rate for postoperative instability was only 6.1% for shoulders with complete union, while it was 50% for shoulders with partial union, nonunion, no fragment, and no fragment on CT. The recurrence rate was significantly higher (36.4%) in shoulders with small fragments, but it was significantly lower in shoulders with bone union. In shoulders with bone union, the bone fragment frequently became

  18. A Qualitative Investigation of Return to Sport After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair: Beyond Stability.

    PubMed

    Tjong, Vehniah K; Devitt, Brian M; Murnaghan, M Lucas; Ogilvie-Harris, Darrell J; Theodoropoulos, John S

    2015-08-01

    Arthroscopic shoulder stabilization is known to have excellent functional results, but many patients do not return to their preinjury level of sport, with return to play rates reported between 48% and 100% despite good outcome scores. To understand specific subjective psychosocial factors influencing a patient's decision to return to sport after arthroscopic shoulder stabilization. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted with patients aged 18 to 40 years who had undergone primary arthroscopic shoulder stabilization and had a minimum 2-year follow-up. All patients participated in sport before surgery without any further revision operations or shoulder injuries. Qualitative data analysis was performed in accordance with the Strauss and Corbin theory to derive codes, categories, and themes. Preinjury and current sport participation was defined by type, level of competition, and the Brophy/Marx shoulder activity score. Patient-reported pain and shoulder function were also obtained. A total of 25 patients were interviewed, revealing that fear of reinjury, shifts in priority, mood, social support, and self-motivation were found to greatly influence the decision to return to sport both in patients who had and had not returned to their preinjury level of play. Patients also described fear of sporting incompetence, self-awareness issues, recommendations from physical therapists, and degree of confidence as less common considerations affecting their return to sport. In spite of excellent functional outcomes, extrinsic and intrinsic factors such as competing interests, kinesiophobia, age, and internal stressors and motivators can have a major effect on a patient's decision to return to sport after arthroscopic shoulder stabilization. The qualitative methods used in this study provide a unique patient-derived perspective into postoperative recovery and highlight the necessity to recognize and address subjective and psychosocial

  19. Can we improve the indication for Bankart arthroscopic repair? A preliminary clinical study using the ISIS score.

    PubMed

    Thomazeau, H; Courage, O; Barth, J; Pélégri, C; Charousset, C; Lespagnol, F; Nourissat, G; Audebert, S; Guillo, S; Toussaint, B; Lafosse, L; Bradel, J; Veillard, D; Boileau, P

    2010-12-01

    The objectives of this study on arthroscopic treatment of chronic anterior shoulder instability were the collection of the current practices for this indication, their development as reported in the literature, and the analysis of preliminary results on a multicenter prospective series of Bankart arthroscopic procedures undertaken using a common technique on patients selected based on the Instability Severity Index Score (ISIS). This procedure predominates in the English-speaking world, whereas the Latarjet protocol is preferred in France. The choice between the two seems to be cultural since neither technique could be demonstrated to be superior in an analysis of 171 responses to an Internet questionnaire in this study. The literature reports disappointing results in the Bankart arthroscopic procedure and recent articles have researched the predictive factors for its failure. Eleven centers prospectively included 125 patients from 1 December 2007 to 30 November 2008. The inclusion criteria were recurrence of anterior instability and an ISIS less than or equal to four points out of 10. All the selected patients underwent capsuloligamentous reinsertion with a common minimal technique of at least three anchors and four sutures with the same postoperative protocol. At a mean follow-up of 18 months, four patients (3.2%) had experienced recurrence. For the 84 patients reexamined at 1 year, the Walch-Duplay and Rowe scores were, respectively, 88.4 and 87.8 points out of 100. Subjectively, 88.1% of the patients declared they were satisfied and would undergo the intervention again. This study confirmed the use of the ISIS as a consultation tool. Only continuation of the study with a minimum follow-up of 3 years will allow us to validate the lower limit of the ISIS below which this technique could be proposed provided that it respects the technical prerequisite of at least four capsuloligamentous sutures. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. The Effect of Subcritical Bone Loss and Exposure on Recurrent Instability After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair in Intercollegiate American Football.

    PubMed

    Dickens, Jonathan F; Owens, Brett D; Cameron, Kenneth L; DeBerardino, Thomas M; Masini, Brendan D; Peck, Karen Y; Svoboda, Steven J

    2017-07-01

    There is no consensus on the optimal method of stabilization (arthroscopic or open) in collision athletes with anterior shoulder instability. To examine the effect of "subcritical" bone loss and football-specific exposure on the rate of recurrent shoulder instability after arthroscopic stabilization in an intercollegiate American football population. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Fifty intercollegiate football players underwent primary arthroscopic stabilization for anterior shoulder instability and returned to football for at least a single season. Preoperatively, 32 patients experienced recurrent subluxations, and 18 patients experienced a single or recurrent dislocation. Shoulders with glenoid bone loss >20%, an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion, an off-track lesion, and concomitant rotator cuff repair were excluded from the study. The primary outcome of interest was the ability to return to football without subsequent instability. Patients were followed for time to a subsequent instability event after return to play using days of exposure to football and total follow-up time after arthroscopic stabilization. Fifty consecutive patients returned to American football for a mean 1.5 seasons (range, 1-3) after arthroscopic stabilization. Three of 50 (6%; 95% CI, 1.3%-16.5%) patients experienced recurrent instability. There were no subsequent instability events after a mean 3.2 years of military service. All shoulders with glenoid bone loss >13.5% (n = 3) that underwent arthroscopic stabilization experienced recurrent instability upon returning to sport, while none of the shoulders with <13.5% glenoid bone loss (n = 47) sustained a recurrent instability event during football ( X 2 = 15.80, P < .001). Shoulders with >13.5% glenoid bone loss had an incidence rate of 5.31 cases of recurrent instability per 1000 athlete-exposures of football. In 72,000 athlete-exposures to football with <13.5% glenoid bone loss, there was no recurrent instability. Significantly more

  1. Arthroscopic Subscapularis Augmentation of Bankart Repair in Chronic Anterior Shoulder Instability With Bone Loss Less Than 25% and Capsular Deficiency: Clinical Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Maiotti, Marco; Massoni, Carlo; Russo, Raffaele; Schroter, Steffen; Zanini, Antonio; Bianchedi, Diana

    2017-05-01

    To assess the short-term outcomes of the arthroscopic subscapularis augmentation (ASA) technique, consisting of a tenodesis of the upper third of the subscapularis tendon and a Bankart repair, and its effect on shoulder external rotation. Patients selected for this study were involved in contact sports, with a history of traumatic recurrent shoulder dislocations and a minimum of 2-year follow-up. Inclusion criteria were patients with glenoid bone loss (GBL) ranging from 5% to 25%, anterior capsular deficiency, and Hill-Sachs lesion who underwent ASA technique. Exclusion criteria were GBL >25%, multidirectional instability, preexisting osteoarthritis, and overhead sports activities. Visual analog scale (VAS) scale for pain, Rowe score, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores were used to assess results. Loss of shoulder external rotation was measured with the arm at the side (ER1 position) or 90° in abduction (ER2 position). Analysis of variance and Fisher tests were used for data evaluation. Significance was established at P ≤ .05. One hundred ten patients (84 men and 26 women, mean age 27 years) were evaluated with a mean follow-up of 40.5 months (range: 24 to 65 months). In 98 patients, a Hill-Sachs lesion was observed and in 57 patients a capsular deficiency was present. Three patients (2.7%) had a traumatic redislocation. At final follow-up, the mean scores were as follows: VAS scale decreased from a mean of 3.5 to 0.5 (P = .015), Rowe score increased from 57.4 to 95.3 (P = .035), and ASES score increased from 66.5 to 96.5 (P = .021). The mean deficit of external rotation was 8° ± 2.5° in the ER1 position and 4° ± 1.5° in the ER2 position. The ASA procedure has been shown to be effective in restoring joint stability in patients practicing sports, affected by chronic anterior shoulder instability associated with anterior GBL (<25%), capsular deficiency, and Hill-Sachs lesions, with mild restriction of external rotation. Level IV

  2. Open Bankart repair for revision of failed prior stabilization: outcome analysis at a mean of more than 10 years.

    PubMed

    Neviaser, Andrew S; Benke, Michael T; Neviaser, Robert J

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the outcome of open Bankart repair for failed stabilization surgery at a mean follow-up of >10 years. Thirty patients underwent revision open Bankart repair by a single surgeon for failed prior stabilization surgery, with a standard technique and postoperative rehabilitation. All patients were referred by other surgeons. Evaluation was by an independent examiner, at a mean follow-up of 10.2 years. Evaluation included a history, physical examination for range of motion, outcome scores, recurrence, return to athletics, and radiographic examination. All cases had persistent Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions. Failures included 14 patients with a failed single arthroscopic Bankart repair; 1 patient with 2 failed arthroscopic Bankart repairs; 1 patient with an arthroscopic failure and an open Bankart repair; 7 patients with failed open Bankart repairs; and 1 patient with a failed open Bankart repair, then a failed arthroscopic attempt. Two patients had had thermal capsulorrhaphy; 2 others had staple capsulorrhaphy, 1 with an open capsular shift and 1 after a failed arthroscopic Bankart repair, an open Bankart repair, and then a coracoid transfer. All arthroscopic Bankart repairs had anchors placed medial and superior on the glenoid neck. Mean motion loss compared with the normal contralateral side was as follows: elevation 1.15°, abduction 4.2°, external rotation at the side 3.2°, external rotation in abduction 5.1°, and internal rotation 0.6 vertebral levels (NS). No patient had an apprehension sign, pain, or instability. Of 23 who played sports, 22 resumed after. Outcomes scores were as follows: American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, 89.44; Rowe, 86.67; Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index, 476.26. On radiographic examination, there were 13 normal radiographs and 7 with mild, 2 with moderate, and 0 with severe arthritic changes. The open Bankart repair offers a reliable, consistently successful option for revision of

  3. Anatomic and Biomechanical Comparison of Traditional Bankart Repair With Bone Tunnels and Bankart Repair Utilizing Suture Anchors

    PubMed Central

    Judson, Christopher H.; Charette, Ryan; Cavanaugh, Zachary; Shea, Kevin P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Traditional Bankart repair using bone tunnels has a reported failure rate between 0% and 5% in long-term studies. Arthroscopic Bankart repair using suture anchors has become more popular; however, reported failure rates have been cited between 4% and 18%. There have been no satisfactory explanations for the differences in these outcomes. Hypothesis: Bone tunnels will provide increased coverage of the native labral footprint and demonstrate greater load to failure and stiffness and decreased cyclic displacement in biomechanical testing. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Twenty-two fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders were used. For footprint analysis, the labral footprint area was marked and measured using a Microscribe technique in 6 specimens. A 3-suture anchor repair was performed, and the area of the uncovered footprint was measured. This was repeated with traditional bone tunnel repair. For the biomechanical analysis, 8 paired specimens were randomly assigned to bone tunnel or suture anchor repair with the contralateral specimen assigned to the other technique. Each specimen underwent cyclic loading (5-25 N, 1 Hz, 100 cycles) and load to failure (15 mm/min). Displacement was measured using a digitized video recording system. Results: Bankart repair with bone tunnels provided significantly more coverage of the native labral footprint than repair with suture anchors (100% vs 27%, P < .001). Repair with bone tunnels (21.9 ± 8.7 N/mm) showed significantly greater stiffness than suture anchor repair (17.1 ± 3.5 N/mm, P = .032). Mean load to failure and gap formation after cyclic loading were not statistically different between bone tunnel (259 ± 76.8 N, 0.209 ± 0.064 mm) and suture anchor repairs (221.5 ± 59.0 N [P = .071], 0.161 ± 0.51 mm [P = .100]). Conclusion: Bankart repair with bone tunnels completely covered the footprint anatomy while suture anchor repair covered less than 30% of the native footprint. Repair using bone tunnels

  4. Anatomic and Biomechanical Comparison of Traditional Bankart Repair With Bone Tunnels and Bankart Repair Utilizing Suture Anchors.

    PubMed

    Judson, Christopher H; Charette, Ryan; Cavanaugh, Zachary; Shea, Kevin P

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Bankart repair using bone tunnels has a reported failure rate between 0% and 5% in long-term studies. Arthroscopic Bankart repair using suture anchors has become more popular; however, reported failure rates have been cited between 4% and 18%. There have been no satisfactory explanations for the differences in these outcomes. Bone tunnels will provide increased coverage of the native labral footprint and demonstrate greater load to failure and stiffness and decreased cyclic displacement in biomechanical testing. Controlled laboratory study. Twenty-two fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders were used. For footprint analysis, the labral footprint area was marked and measured using a Microscribe technique in 6 specimens. A 3-suture anchor repair was performed, and the area of the uncovered footprint was measured. This was repeated with traditional bone tunnel repair. For the biomechanical analysis, 8 paired specimens were randomly assigned to bone tunnel or suture anchor repair with the contralateral specimen assigned to the other technique. Each specimen underwent cyclic loading (5-25 N, 1 Hz, 100 cycles) and load to failure (15 mm/min). Displacement was measured using a digitized video recording system. Bankart repair with bone tunnels provided significantly more coverage of the native labral footprint than repair with suture anchors (100% vs 27%, P < .001). Repair with bone tunnels (21.9 ± 8.7 N/mm) showed significantly greater stiffness than suture anchor repair (17.1 ± 3.5 N/mm, P = .032). Mean load to failure and gap formation after cyclic loading were not statistically different between bone tunnel (259 ± 76.8 N, 0.209 ± 0.064 mm) and suture anchor repairs (221.5 ± 59.0 N [P = .071], 0.161 ± 0.51 mm [P = .100]). Bankart repair with bone tunnels completely covered the footprint anatomy while suture anchor repair covered less than 30% of the native footprint. Repair using bone tunnels resulted in significantly greater stiffness than repair with suture

  5. An analysis of technical aspects of the arthroscopic Bankart procedure as performed in the United States.

    PubMed

    Burks, Robert T; Presson, Angela P; Weng, Hsin-Yi

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the intersurgeon variation in technical aspects of performing an arthroscopic Bankart repair. A unique approach with experienced equipment representatives from 3 different arthroscopic companies was used. Experienced representatives were identified by DePuy Mitek, Smith & Nephew, and Arthrex and filled out questionnaires on how their surgeons performed arthroscopic Bankart procedures. This was performed in a blinded fashion with no knowledge of the identities of the specific surgeons or representatives by us. A video on different aspects of the procedure was observed by each representative before filling out the questionnaire to help standardize responses. Data were collected using REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture). Data were analyzed as an infrequent observation with 0% to 30% of representatives reporting the observation; sometimes, 31% to 70% reporting the observation; and often, greater than 70% of representatives reporting. Seventy-six percent of representatives had 6 or more years of arthroscopic experience. Forty-three percent of representatives reported that their surgeons use 3 portals for the procedure often. Forty-four percent reported that viewing was performed exclusively from the posterior portal while the surgeon was performing the repair. Seventy-three percent reported that the Hill-Sachs lesion was observed often, and 61% reported that the posterior labrum was evaluated often before the repair. Only 25% of representatives reported that the Bankart lesion was extensively released and mobilized often. Thirty-three percent reported 3 anchors as being used often. Seventy-five percent reported biocomposite anchors as being used often. Single-loaded anchors were reported as being used often by 47%. Eighty-one percent reported that sutures were placed in a simple fashion. Eighty-three percent reported the use of any posterior sutures or anchors for additional plication as infrequent. There is significant

  6. Borderline Glenoid Bone Defect in Anterior Shoulder Instability: Latarjet Procedure Versus Bankart Repair.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yoon Sang; Jeong, Ho Yeon; Lee, Dong Ki; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2018-06-01

    The optimal procedure for anterior shoulder instability with a borderline (15%-20%) bone defect on the anterior rim of the glenoid is still controversial. To compare the clinical outcome and recurrence rate between the arthroscopic Bankart repair and Latarjet procedure among patients with recurrent anterior shoulder instability and a borderline glenoid bone defect. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. The authors retrospectively reviewed cases of arthroscopic Bankart repair and the Latarjet procedure for recurrent anterior shoulder instability with a borderline (15%-20%) glenoid bone defect. Enrollment comprised 149 patients (Bankart group, n = 118; Latarjet group, n = 31). The mean follow-up and age at operation were 28.9 ± 7.3 months (range, 24-73 months) and 26 ± 5 years (range, 16-46 years), respectively. Rowe and UCLA (University of California, Los Angeles) shoulder scores significantly improved from 42.0 ± 14.3 and 22.9 ± 3.2 preoperatively to 90.9 ± 15.4 and 32.5 ± 3.3 postoperatively in the Bankart group ( P < .001) and from 41.0 ± 17.9 and 22.3 ± 3.4 to 91.1 ± 16.1 and 32.3 ± 3.4 in the Latarjet group ( P < .001), respectively. There were no significant between-group differences in Rowe ( P = .920) or UCLA ( P = .715) scores at the final follow-up. Mean postoperative loss of motion during forward flexion, external rotation in abduction, and internal rotation to the posterior was 3.0° ± 6.2°, 11.6° ± 10.2°, and 0.6 spinal segment in the Bankart group and 3.7° ± 9.8°, 10.3° ± 12.8°, and 0.9 spinal segment in the Latarjet group, respectively. These differences were not significant. However, the loss of external rotation at the side was significantly greater in the Bankart group (13.3° ± 12.9°) than in the Latarjet group (7.3° ± 18.1°, P = .034). The overall recurrence rate was significantly higher in the Bankart group (22.9%) than in the Latarjet group (6.5%), ( P = .040). The Latarjet procedure and arthroscopic Bankart repair both

  7. Arthroscopic Suture Anchor Fixation of Bony Bankart Lesions: Clinical Outcome, Magnetic Resonance Imaging Results, and Return to Sports.

    PubMed

    Plath, Johannes E; Feucht, Matthias J; Bangoj, Robert; Martetschläger, Frank; Wörtler, Klaus; Seppel, Gernot; Aboalata, Mohamed; Tischer, Thomas; Imhoff, Andreas B; Vogt, Stephan

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome, return to sporting activity, and postoperative articular cartilage and bony morphology of shoulders that underwent arthroscopic suture anchor repair of bony Bankart lesions. The inclusion criteria for this retrospective study were anterior glenoid rim fractures after traumatic shoulder instability that were treated with arthroscopic suture anchor repair. Patients were surveyed by a questionnaire including sport-specific outcome, Rowe score, Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index, and Oxford Instability Score. Three-tesla magnetic resonance imaging could be performed in 30 patients to assess osseous integration, glenoid reconstruction, and signs of osteoarthritis. From November 1999 to April 2010, 81 patients underwent an anterior bony Bankart repair in our department (50 arthroscopic suture anchor repairs, 5 arthroscopic screw fixations, and 26 open repairs). The 55 arthroscopic repairs comprised a consecutive cohort of patients treated by a single surgeon. Of the 50 patients in the suture anchor group, 45 (90%) were available for evaluation. At 82 ± 31 months postoperatively, the mean Rowe score was 85.9 ± 20.5 points, the mean Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index score was 89.4% ± 14.7%, and the mean Oxford Instability Score was 13.6 ± 5.4 points. Compared with the contralateral shoulder, all scores showed a significantly reduced outcome (P < .001, P < .001, and P < .001, respectively). A redislocation occurred in 3 patients (6.6%). Regarding satisfaction, 35 patients (78%) were very satisfied, 9 (20%) were satisfied, and 1 was partly satisfied. Overall, 95% of patients returned to any sporting activity after surgery. The number of sports disciplines (P < .001), duration (P = .005), level (P = .02), and risk category (P = .013) showed a significant reduction compared with the pretrauma condition. However, only 19% of patients reported that shoulder complaints were the reason for the reduction

  8. Results of 45 arthroscopic Bankart procedures: Does the ISIS remain a reliable prognostic assessment after 5 years?

    PubMed

    Boughebri, Omar; Maqdes, Ali; Moraiti, Constantina; Dib, Choukry; Leclère, Franck Marie; Valenti, Philippe

    2015-05-01

    The Instability Severity Index Score (ISIS) includes preoperative clinical and radiological risk factors to select patients who can benefit from an arthroscopic Bankart procedure with a low rate of recurrence. Patients who underwent an arthroscopic Bankart for anterior shoulder instability with an ISIS lower than or equal to four were assessed after a minimum of 5-year follow-up. Forty-five shoulders were assessed at a mean of 79 months (range 60-118 months). Average age was 29.4 years (range 17-58 years) at the time of surgery. Postoperative functions were assessed by the Walch and Duplay and the Rowe scores for 26 patients; an adapted telephonic interview was performed for the 19 remaining patients who could not be reassessed clinically. A failure was defined by the recurrence of an anterior dislocation or subluxation. Patients were asked whether they were finally very satisfied, satisfied or unhappy. The mean Walch and Duplay score at last follow-up was 84.3 (range 35-100). The final result for these patients was excellent in 14 patients (53.8 %), good in seven cases (26.9 %), poor in three patients (11.5 %) and bad in two patients (7.7 %). The mean Rowe score was 82.6 (range 35-100). Thirty-nine patients (86.7 %) were subjectively very satisfied or satisfied, and six (13.3 %) were unhappy. Four patients (8.9 %) had a recurrence of frank dislocation with a mean delay of 34 months (range 12-72 months). Three of them had a Hill-Sachs lesion preoperatively. Two patients had a preoperative ISIS at 4 points and two patients at 3 points. The selection based on the ISIS allows a low rate of failure after an average term of 5 years. Lowering the limit for indication to 3 points allows to avoid the association between two major risk factors for recurrence, which are valued at 2 points. The existence of a Hill-Sachs lesion is a stronger indicator for the outcome of instability repair. Level IV, Retrospective Case Series, Treatment Study.

  9. An Anatomic and Biomechanical Comparison of Bankart Repair Configurations.

    PubMed

    Judson, Christopher H; Voss, Andreas; Obopilwe, Elifho; Dyrna, Felix; Arciero, Robert A; Shea, Kevin P

    2017-11-01

    Suture anchor repair for anterior shoulder instability can be performed using a number of different repair techniques, but none has been proven superior in terms of anatomic and biomechanical properties. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose was to compare the anatomic footprint coverage and biomechanical characteristics of 4 different Bankart repair techniques: (1) single row with simple sutures, (2) single row with horizontal mattress sutures, (3) double row with sutures, and (4) double row with labral tape. The hypotheses were as follows: (1) double-row techniques would improve the footprint coverage and biomechanical properties compared with single-row techniques, (2) horizontal mattress sutures would increase the footprint coverage compared with simple sutures, and (3) repair techniques with labral tape and sutures would not show different biomechanical properties. Controlled laboratory study. Twenty-four fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens were dissected. The native labrum was removed and the footprint marked and measured. Repair for each of the 4 groups was performed, and the uncovered footprint was measured using a 3-dimensional digitizer. The strength of the repair sites was assessed using a servohydraulic testing machine and a digital video system to record load to failure, cyclic displacement, and stiffness. The double-row repair techniques with sutures and labral tape covered 73.4% and 77.0% of the footprint, respectively. These percentages were significantly higher than the footprint coverage achieved by single-row repair techniques using simple sutures (38.1%) and horizontal mattress sutures (32.8%) ( P < .001). The footprint coverage of the simple suture and horizontal mattress suture groups was not significantly different ( P = .44). There were no significant differences in load to failure, cyclic displacement, or stiffness between the single-row and double-row groups or between the simple suture and horizontal mattress suture techniques. Likewise, there was

  10. The "Floating Labrum": Bankart Lesion Repair With Anterior Capsular Extension Using 2 Anterior Working Portals.

    PubMed

    Rao, Allison J; Verma, Nikhil N; Trenhaile, Scott W

    2017-10-01

    Surgical repair of a Bankart lesion requires thorough recognition of the capsulolabral attachment and adequate visualization for suture anchor repair. The glenoid labrum usually detaches from its capsule and bony attachment anteriorly and inferiorly; however, the labral and capsule detachment can sometimes extend beyond this zone of injury. Identification and repair may require additional viewing and working portals to allow for ease of suture passage and anchor placement. This technique guide describes a case scenario of a Bankart lesion with anterior extension of the capsular tear, repaired with use of 2 anterior working portals.

  11. Subsequent Shoulder Surgery After Isolated Arthroscopic SLAP Repair.

    PubMed

    Mollon, Brent; Mahure, Siddharth A; Ensor, Kelsey L; Zuckerman, Joseph D; Kwon, Young W; Rokito, Andrew S

    2016-10-01

    To quantify the incidence of and identify the risk factors for subsequent shoulder procedures after isolated SLAP repair. New York's Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System database was searched between 2003 and 2014 to identify individuals with the sole diagnosis of a SLAP lesion who underwent isolated arthroscopic SLAP repair. Patients were longitudinally followed up for a minimum of 3 years to analyze for subsequent ipsilateral shoulder procedures. Between 2003 and 2014, 2,524 patients met our inclusion criteria. After 3 to 11 years of follow-up, 10.1% of patients (254 of 2,524) underwent repeat surgical intervention on the same shoulder as the initial SLAP repair. The mean time to repeat shoulder surgery was 2.3 ± 2.1 years. Subsequent procedures included subacromial decompression (35%), debridement (26.7%). repeat SLAP repair (19.7%), and biceps tenodesis or tenotomy (13.0%). After isolated SLAP repair, patients aged 20 years or younger were more likely to undergo arthroscopic Bankart repair (odds ratio [OR], 2.91; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.36-6.21; P = .005), whereas age older than 30 years was an independent risk factor for subsequent acromioplasty (OR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.4-3.7; P < .001) and distal clavicle resection (OR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.1-5.5; P = .030). The need for a subsequent procedure was significantly associated with Workers' Compensation cases (OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.7-3.2; P < .001). We identified a 10.1% incidence of subsequent surgery after isolated SLAP repair, often related to an additional diagnosis, suggesting that clinicians should consider other potential causes of shoulder pain when considering surgery for patients with SLAP lesions. In addition, the number of isolated SLAP repairs performed has decreased over time, and management of failed SLAP repair has shifted toward biceps tenodesis or tenotomy over revision SLAP repair in more recent years. Level III, case-control study. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of

  12. Arthroscopic trans-osseous rotator cuff repair

    PubMed Central

    Chillemi, Claudio; Mantovani, Matteo

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background: Mechanical factors are at the basis of any tendon healing process, being pressure an aspect able to positively influence it. For this reason transosseous rotator cuff repair represents the gold standard procedure for patients affected by a cuff tear, maximizing the tendon footprint contact area and reducing motion at the tendon to bone interface. Methods: The Authors present an all arthroscopic suture bridge-like transosseous repair with the preparation of a single transosseous tunnel perfor med thanks to a precise dedicated instrument (Compasso®) and one implant (Elite-SPK®) with the use of only 3 suture wires. In addition this technique permits to accurately prepare the bony side of the lesion without any risk or complication, such as anchor pull-out and greater tuberosity bone osteolysis. Conclusions: However, even if this technique seems less demanding, the arthroscopic transosseous repair is still an advanced procedure, and should be performed only by well prepared arthroscopic shoulder surgeons. Level of evidence: V. PMID:28717607

  13. Arthroscopic repair of chronic lateral ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Corte-Real, Nuno M; Moreira, Rodrigo M

    2009-03-01

    The current "gold standard'' for treatment of chronic lateral ankle instability is the Broström-Gould procedure. Most authors recommend this type of operation even after an arthroscopic inspection of the joint. We review our results with an arthroscopic method of lateral ankle ligament repair. A method of arthroscopic lateral ligament repair with an anchor placed in the fibula is described. We used this technique on 31 consecutive patients (28 were available for followup). Twenty-one patients had work or traffic accidents, four suffered casual falls. and three had sport-related lesions. The patients were evaluated after 24.5 month average followup. The average postoperative AOFAS score was 85.3 (82.3 in the workers-compensation group and 94.4 in the others) and average satisfaction was 3.8 (3.5 to workers-compensation and 4.6 for the others). Complications occurred in nine patients (29%), but only three cases had ongoing problems. We had two recurrences (another sprain without instability on the stress radiograph). Three patients had some wound healing problems and three had injuries of the superficial peroneal nerve, one of which is persistent. One patient developed a deep venous thrombosis postoperatively. With this method, we achieved good clinical results. We had several complications but most of them were minor. It was a simple procedure with less morbidity to most patients. We believe it produced an anatomical repair of the lateral ligament with clinical and functional results similar to other techniques.

  14. Chronic ankle instability: Arthroscopic anatomical repair.

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Hernández, M; Mellado-Romero, M; Páramo-Díaz, P; García-Lamas, L; Vilà-Rico, J

    Ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries. Despite appropriate conservative treatment, approximately 20-40% of patients continue to have chronic ankle instability and pain. In 75-80% of cases there is an isolated rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament. A retrospective observational study was conducted on 21 patients surgically treated for chronic ankle instability by means of an arthroscopic anatomical repair, between May 2012 and January 2013. There were 15 men and 6 women, with a mean age of 30.43 years (range 18-48). The mean follow-up was 29 months (range 25-33). All patients were treated by arthroscopic anatomical repair of anterior talofibular ligament. Four (19%) patients were found to have varus hindfoot deformity. Associated injuries were present in 13 (62%) patients. There were 6 cases of osteochondral lesions, 3 cases of posterior ankle impingement syndrome, and 6 cases of peroneal pathology. All these injuries were surgically treated in the same surgical time. A clinical-functional study was performed using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score. The mean score before surgery was 66.12 (range 60-71), and after surgery it increased up to a mean of 96.95 (range 90-100). All patients were able to return to their previous sport activity within a mean of 21.5 weeks (range 17-28). Complications were found in 3 (14%) patients. Arthroscopic anatomical ligament repair technique has excellent clinical-functional results with a low percentage of complications, and enables patients to return to their previous sport activity within a short period of time. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Arthroscopic Triple Labral Repair in an Adolescent.

    PubMed

    Cotter, Eric J; Frank, Rachel M; Trenhaile, Scott W

    2017-10-01

    Traumatic glenohumeral dislocations often result in significant injury to the anterior-inferior labrum, most commonly leading to recurrent anterior instability. While in skeletally immature patients, shoulder trauma more commonly results in fracture versus a true dislocation, shoulder instability does occur and can be difficult to manage in the setting of open physes. In any event, the goal of treatment is to reduce the risk of recurrence and allow full participation in activities, including sports. Arthroscopic stabilization has been shown to be an effective treatment option for young patients, with good return to sport rates; however, the vast majority of literature on shoulder instability in the youth patient population focuses on anterior instability. Concomitant lesions of the anterior, posterior, and superior labrum have been rarely described in youth athletes and present a formidable clinical challenge, particularly in skeletally immature patients. In this Technical Note, we describe the authors' preferred technique for arthroscopic repair of a traumatic triple labral tear, including anterior, posterior, and type IV SLAP components, in adolescent patients.

  16. Infection Rates in Arthroscopic Versus Open Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Jonathan D; Hughes, Jessica L; Bartley, Justin H; Hamilton, William P; Brennan, Kindyle L

    2017-07-01

    The prevalence of rotator cuff repair continues to rise, with a noted transition from open to arthroscopic techniques in recent years. One reported advantage of arthroscopic repair is a lower infection rate. However, to date, the infection rates of these 2 techniques have not been directly compared with large samples at a single institution with fully integrated medical records. To retrospectively compare postoperative infection rates between arthroscopic and open rotator cuff repair. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. From January 2003 until May 2011, a total of 1556 patients underwent rotator cuff repair at a single institution. These patients were divided into an arthroscopic repair group and an open group. A Pearson chi-square test and Fisher exact test were used, with a subgroup analysis to segment the open repair group into mini-open and open procedures. The odds ratio and 95% CI of developing a postoperative infection was calculated for the 2 groups. A multiple-regressions model was then utilized to identify predictors of the presence of infection. Infection was defined as only those treated with surgical intervention, thus excluding superficial infections treated with antibiotics alone. A total of 903 patients had an arthroscopic repair, while 653 had open repairs (600 mini-open, 53 open). There were 4 confirmed infections in the arthroscopic group and 16 in the open group (15 mini-open, 1 open), resulting in postoperative infection rates of 0.44% and 2.45%, respectively. Subgroup analysis of the mini-open and open groups demonstrated a postoperative infection rate of 2.50% and 1.89%, respectively. The open group had an odds ratio of 5.645 (95% CI, 1.9-17.0) to develop a postoperative infection compared with the arthroscopic group. Patients undergoing open rotator cuff repair had a significantly higher rate of postoperative infection compared with those undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

  17. Cost-effectiveness of open versus arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Adla, Deepthi N; Rowsell, Mark; Pandey, Radhakant

    2010-03-01

    Economic evaluation of surgical procedures is necessary in view of more expensive newer techniques emerging in an increasingly cost-conscious health care environment. This study compares the cost-effectiveness of open rotator cuff repair with arthroscopic repair for moderately size tears. This was a prospective study of 30 consecutive patients, of whom 15 had an arthroscopic repair and 15 had an open procedure. Clinical effectiveness was assessed using Oxford and Constant shoulder scores. Costs were estimated from departmental and hospital financial data. At last follow-up, no difference Oxford and Constant shoulder scores was noted between the 2 methods of repair. There was no significant difference between the groups in the cost of time in the operating theater, inpatient time, amount of postoperative analgesia, number of postoperative outpatient visits, physiotherapy costs, and time off work. The incremental cost of each arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was pound675 ($1248.75) more than the open procedure. This was mainly in the area of direct health care costs, instrumentation in particular. Health care policy makers are increasingly demanding evidence of cost-effectiveness of a procedure. This study showed both methods of repair provide equivalent clinical results. Open cuff repair is more cost-effective than arthroscopic repair and is likely to have lower cost-utility ratio. In addition, the tariff for the arthroscopic procedure in some health care systems is same as open repair. Copyright 2010 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Arthroscopic therapy of recurrent anterior luxation of the shoulder by capsular repair.

    PubMed

    Landsiedl, F

    1992-01-01

    Sixty-five cases of recurrent anterior unidirectional dislocation of the shoulder were treated by arthroscopic capsular repair. In this approach, the arthroscope is inserted through a posterior portal. Using mostly an anterior portal, a 5-mm hole is drilled across the neck of the glenoid, between the 3 and 4 o'clock positions. A 5-mm working cannula is passed from the posterior portal into the joint. Mostly through the anterior portal, four to six retention U-sutures are placed in the labrum, the middle and inferior glenohumeral ligament, and the subscapularis tendon. A 25-cm-long, 2.0-mm K-wire with an eye is used. The sutures are pulled out posteriorly through the cannula and tied on the fascia of the infraspinatus muscle. The goal of the procedure is to reattach the detached labrum-ligament complex (LLC) and achieve a capsulorrhaphy in a medial-lateral and superior-inferior direction. There were nine redislocations during a follow-up period of 24-60 months (average, 35.3 months). Reasons for redislocation were (a) fewer than four sutures; (b) no sutures of the LLC; (c) placement of the drill hole in the top third of the glenoid; (d) nontraumatic dislocation; (e) no Bankart or Hill-Sachs lesion; (f) transverse tear of the LLC; or (g) technical errors. Redislocation was more common in male patients.

  19. Arthroscopic repair of lateral ankle ligament complex by suture anchor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingwei; Hua, Yinghui; Chen, Shiyi; Li, Hongyun; Zhang, Jian; Li, Yunxia

    2014-06-01

    Arthroscopic repair of the lateral ligament complex with suture anchors is increasingly used to treat chronic ankle instability (CAI). Our aims are (1) to analyze and evaluate the literature on arthroscopic suture anchor repair of the anterior talofibular ligament and (2) to conduct a systematic review of the clinical evidence on the reported outcomes and complications of treating CAI with this technique. We performed a systematic review of the literature using PubMed, Ovid, Elsevier ScienceDirect, Web of Science-Conference Proceedings Citation Index, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from 1987 to September 2013. Clinical studies using the arthroscopic suture anchor technique to treat CAI were included. Outcome measures consisted of clinical assessment of postoperative ligament stability and complications. In addition, the methodologic quality of the included studies was assessed by use of the modified Coleman Methodology Score. After reviewing 371 studies, we identified 6 studies (5 retrospective case series and 1 prospective case series, all Level IV) that met the inclusion criteria, with a mean Coleman Methodology Score of 71.8 ± 7.52 (range, 63 to 82). In these studies 178 patients (179 ankles) underwent arthroscopic suture anchor repair of the anterior talofibular ligament with a mean follow-up period of 38.9 months (range, 6 to 117.6 months). All patients were reported to have subjective improvement of their ankle instability, with complications in 31 cases. Studies of arthroscopic suture anchor technique to treat CAI are sparse, with moderate mean methodologic quality. The included studies suggest that the arthroscopic technique is a feasible procedure to restore ankle stability; however, on the basis of our review, this technique seems to be associated with a relatively high complication rate. Extensive cadaveric studies, clinical trials, and comparative studies comparing arthroscopic and open repair should be performed in the future. Level

  20. Analysis of Direct Costs of Outpatient Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Narvy, Steven J; Ahluwalia, Avtar; Vangsness, C Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff surgery is one of the most commonly performed orthopedic surgical procedures. We conducted a study to calculate the direct cost of arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tears confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Twenty-eight shoulders in 26 patients (mean age, 54.5 years) underwent primary rotator cuff repair by a single fellowship-trained arthroscopic surgeon in the outpatient surgery center of a major academic medical center. All patients had interscalene blocks placed while in the preoperative holding area. Direct costs of this cycle of care were calculated using the time-driven activity-based costing algorithm. Mean time in operating room was 148 minutes; mean time in recovery was 105 minutes. Calculated surgical cost for this process cycle was $5904.21. Among material costs, suture anchor costs were the main cost driver. Preoperative bloodwork was obtained in 23 cases, adding a mean cost of $111.04. Our findings provide important preliminary information regarding the direct economic costs of rotator cuff surgery and may be useful to hospitals and surgery centers negotiating procedural reimbursement for the increased cost of repairing complex tears.

  1. Midterm clinical outcomes following arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair

    PubMed Central

    Flanagin, Brody A.; Garofalo, Raffaele; Lo, Eddie Y.; Feher, LeeAnne; Castagna, Alessandro; Qin, Huanying; Krishnan, Sumant G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Arthroscopic transosseous (TO) rotator cuff repair has recently emerged as a new option for surgical treatment of symptomatic rotator cuff tears. Limited data is available regarding outcomes using this technique. This study evaluated midterm clinical outcomes following a novel arthroscopic TO (anchorless) rotator cuff repair technique. Materials and Methods: A consecutive series of 107 patients and 109 shoulders underwent arthroscopic TO (anchorless) rotator cuff repair for a symptomatic full-thickness tear. Pre and postoperative range of motion (ROM) was compared at an average of 11.8 months. Postoperative outcome scores were obtained at an average of 38.0 months. Statistical analysis was performed to compare pre and postoperative ROM data. Univariate analysis was performed using Student's t-test to compare the effect of other clinical characteristics on final outcome. Results: Statistically significant improvements were noted in forward flexion, external rotation and internal rotation (P < 0.0001). Average postoperative subjective shoulder value was 93.7, simple shoulder test 11.6, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score 94.6. According to ASES scores, results for the 109 shoulders available for final follow-up were excellent in 95 (87.1%), good in 8 (7.3%), fair in 3 (2.8%), and poor in 3 (2.8%). There was no difference in ROM or outcome scores in patients who underwent a concomitant biceps procedure (tenodesis or tenotomy) compared with those who did not. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in outcome between patients who underwent either biceps tenodesis or tenotomy. Age, history of injury preceding the onset of pain, tear size, number of TO tunnels required to perform the repair, and presence of fatty infiltration did not correlate with postoperative ROM or subjective outcome measures at final follow-up. Two complications and four failures were noted. Conclusions: Arthroscopic TO rotator cuff repair technique leads to

  2. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in the weight-bearing shoulder.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Jacek; Borbas, Paul; Meyer, Dominik C; Gerber, Christian; Buitrago Téllez, Carlos; Wieser, Karl

    2015-12-01

    In wheelchair-dependent individuals, pain often develops because of rotator cuff tendon failure and/or osteoarthritis of the glenohumeral joint. The purposes of this study were to investigate (1) specific rotator cuff tear patterns, (2) structural healing, and (3) clinical outcomes after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in a cohort of wheelchair-dependent patients. Forty-six shoulders with a mean follow-up of 46 months (range, 24-82 months; SD, 13 months) from a consecutive series of 61 shoulders in 56 patients (46 men and 10 women) undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were available for analysis. Clinical outcome analysis was performed using the Constant-Murley score, the Subjective Shoulder Value, and the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score. The integrity of the repair was analyzed by ultrasound. Of the shoulders, 87% had supraspinatus involvement, 70% had subscapularis involvement, and 57% had an anterosuperior lesion involving both the supraspinatus and subscapularis. Despite an overall structural failure rate of 33%, the patients showed improvements in the Constant-Murley score from 50 points (range, 22-86 points; SD, 16 points) preoperatively to 80 points (range, 40-98 points; SD, 12 points) postoperatively and in the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score from 56 points (range, 20-92 points; SD, 20 points) preoperatively to 92 points (range, 53-100 points; SD, 10 points) postoperatively, with a mean postoperative Subjective Shoulder Value of 84% (range, 25%-100%; SD, 17%). Failure of the rotator cuff in weight-bearing shoulders occurs primarily anterosuperiorly. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair leads to a structural failure rate of 33% but satisfactory functional results with high patient satisfaction at midterm follow-up. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Establishing Maximal Medical Improvement After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Zuke, William A; Leroux, Timothy S; Gregory, Bonnie P; Black, Austin; Forsythe, Brian; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2018-03-01

    As health care transitions from a pay-for-service to a pay-for-performance infrastructure, the value of orthopaedic care must be defined accurately. Significant efforts have been made in defining quality and cost in arthroplasty; however, there remains a lag in ambulatory orthopaedic care. Two-year follow-up has been a general requirement for reporting outcomes after rotator cuff repair. However, this time requirement has not been established scientifically and is of increasing importance in the era of value-based health care. Given that arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is a common ambulatory orthopaedic procedure, the purpose of this study was to establish a time frame for maximal medical improvement (the state when improvement has stabilized) after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Systematic review. A systematic review of the literature was conducted, identifying studies reporting sequential patient-reported outcomes up to a minimum of 2 years after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The primary clinical outcome was patient-reported outcomes at 3-month, 6-month, 1-year, and 2-year follow-up. Secondary clinical outcomes included range of motion, strength, retears, and complications. Clinically significant improvement was determined between various time intervals by use of the minimal clinically important difference. The review included 19 studies including 1370 patients who underwent rotator cuff repair. Clinically significant improvement in patient-reported outcomes was seen up to 1 year after rotator cuff repair, but no clinical significance was noted from 1 year to 2 years. The majority of improvement in strength and range of motion was seen up to 6 months, but no clinically meaningful improvement was seen thereafter. All reported complications and the majority of retears occurred within 6 months after rotator cuff repair. After rotator cuff repair, a clinically significant improvement in patient-reported outcomes, range of motion, and strength was seen up to 1

  4. Satisfaction, function and repair integrity after arthroscopic versus mini-open rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Barnes, L A Fink; Kim, H M; Caldwell, J-M; Buza, J; Ahmad, C S; Bigliani, L U; Levine, W N

    2017-02-01

    Advances in arthroscopic techniques for rotator cuff repair have made the mini-open approach less popular. However, the mini-open approach remains an important technique for repair for many surgeons. The aims of this study were to compare the integrity of the repair, the function of the shoulder and satisfaction post-operatively using these two techniques in patients aged > 50 years. We identified 22 patients treated with mini-open and 128 patients treated with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair of July 2007 and June 2011. The mean follow-up was two years (1 to 5). Outcome was assessed using the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) and Simple Shoulder Test (SST) scores, and satisfaction. The integrity of the repair was assessed using ultrasonography. A power analysis ensured sufficient enrolment. There was no statistically significant difference between the age, function, satisfaction, or pain scores (p > 0.05) of the two groups. The integrity of the repair and the mean SST scores were significantly better in the mini-open group (91% of mini-open repairs were intact versus 60% of arthroscopic repairs, p = 0.023; mean SST score 10.9 (standard deviation (sd) 1.3) in the mini-open group; 8.9 (sd 3.5) in arthroscopic group; p = 0.003). The ASES scores were also higher in the mini-open group (mean ASES score 91.0 (sd 10.5) in mini-open group; mean 82.70 (sd 19.8) in the arthroscopic group; p = 0.048). The integrity of the repair and function of the shoulder were better after a mini-open repair than after arthroscopic repair of a rotator cuff tear in these patients. The functional difference did not translate into a difference in satisfaction. Mini-open rotator cuff repair remains a useful technique despite advances in arthroscopy. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:245-9. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  5. Indications, techniques, and outcomes of arthroscopic repair of scapholunate ligament and triangular fibrocartilage complex.

    PubMed

    Mathoulin, C L

    2017-07-01

    This review includes updated understanding of the roles of intrinsic and extrinsic carpal ligaments in scapholunate instability and details the author's experience of indications, arthroscopic repair methods, and outcomes of treating the instability. A classification on triangular fibrocartilage complex injuries is reviewed, followed by author's indications, methods, and outcomes of arthroscopic repair of triangular fibrocartilage complex injuries.

  6. Does arthroscopic rotator cuff repair improve patients' activity levels?

    PubMed

    Baumgarten, Keith M; Chang, Peter S; Dannenbring, Tasha M; Foley, Elaine K

    2018-06-04

    Rotator cuff repair decreases pain, improves range of motion, and increases strength. Whether these improvements translate to an improvement in a patient's activity level postoperatively remains unknown. The Shoulder Activity Level is a valid and reliable outcomes survey that can be used to measure a patient's shoulder-specific activity level. Currently, there are no studies that examine the effect of rotator cuff repair on shoulder activity level. Preoperative patient-determined outcomes scores collected prospectively on patients undergoing rotator cuff repair were compared with postoperative scores at a minimum of 2 years. These scores included the Shoulder Activity Level, Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Standardized Shoulder Assessment Form, Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation, and simple shoulder test. Inclusion criteria were patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Included were 281 shoulders from 273 patients with a mean follow-up of 3.7 years. The postoperative median Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (42 vs. 94), American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (41 vs. 95), Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (30 vs. 95), and simple shoulder test (4 vs. 11) scores were statistically significantly improved compared with preoperative scores (P < .0001). The postoperative median Shoulder Activity Level score decreased compared with the preoperative score (12 vs. 11; P < .0001). Patients reported a statistically significant deterioration of their Shoulder Activity Level score after rotator cuff repair compared with their preoperative scores, although disease-specific and joint-specific quality of life scores all had statistically significantly improvement. This study suggests that patients generally have (1) significant improvements in their quality of life and (2) small deteriorations in activity level after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Copyright © 2018 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of

  7. Arthroscopic isolated posterior labral repair in rugby players

    PubMed Central

    Badge, Ravi; Tambe, Amol; Funk, Lennard

    2009-01-01

    Background The shoulder is the second most frequently injured joint after the knee in rugby players and labral tears appear to be common. There is limited data available in the literature regarding the mechanisms of posterior labral injury in rugby players and the management of these injuries. Objective The aim of this study is to report the clinical presentation, arthroscopic findings, surgical technique for repair, and the functional outcome in elite English rugby players with isolated posterior labral injuries. Study Design Case series (level IV evidence) Materials and Methods Over a 5-year period we surgically treated 142 elite rugby players, of whom 11 (7.8%) had isolated posterior labral injuries. All these 11 patients had significant contact injury. Only three (24%) patients had a true posterior shoulder dislocation. Pre- and postoperative assessment included Constant score, Oxford shoulder score, and Oxford instability score. We also assessed the time taken to return to preinjury level of fitness and the complications of surgery. Results Average follow-up was for 32 months (range 17–54 months). The mean Constant score improved from 66 to 99. The Oxford score indicated improvement, decreasing from 33 to 18; similarly, the Oxford instability score also decreased from 52.2 to 12.3. Return to playing rugby at peak level was at a mean of 4.3 months after arthroscopic repair. Conclusion Successful clinical results and rapid return to play can be achieved by appropriate early arthroscopic repair and supervised accelerated rehabilitation for posterior labral tears in elite rugby players. PMID:20616949

  8. Revision Arthroscopic Repair Versus Latarjet Procedure in Patients With Recurrent Instability After Initial Repair Attempt: A Cost-Effectiveness Model.

    PubMed

    Makhni, Eric C; Lamba, Nayan; Swart, Eric; Steinhaus, Michael E; Ahmad, Christopher S; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2016-09-01

    To compare the cost-effectiveness of arthroscopic revision instability repair and Latarjet procedure in treating patients with recurrent instability after initial arthroscopic instability repair. An expected-value decision analysis of revision arthroscopic instability repair compared with Latarjet procedure for recurrent instability followed by failed repair attempt was modeled. Inputs regarding procedure cost, clinical outcomes, and health utilities were derived from the literature. Compared with revision arthroscopic repair, Latarjet was less expensive ($13,672 v $15,287) with improved clinical outcomes (43.78 v 36.76 quality-adjusted life-years). Both arthroscopic repair and Latarjet were cost-effective compared with nonoperative treatment (incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of 3,082 and 1,141, respectively). Results from sensitivity analyses indicate that under scenarios of high rates of stability postoperatively, along with improved clinical outcome scores, revision arthroscopic repair becomes increasingly cost-effective. Latarjet procedure for failed instability repair is a cost-effective treatment option, with lower costs and improved clinical outcomes compared with revision arthroscopic instability repair. However, surgeons must still incorporate clinical judgment into treatment algorithm formation. Level IV, expected value decision analysis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Arthroscopic undersurface rotator cuff repair versus conventional arthroscopic double-row rotator cuff repair - Comparable results at 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Ang, Benjamin Fu Hong; Chen, Jerry Yongqiang; Yeo, William; Lie, Denny Tijauw Tjoen; Chang, Paul Chee Cheng

    2018-01-01

    The aim of our study is to compare the improvement in clinical outcomes after conventional arthroscopic double-row rotator cuff repair and arthroscopic undersurface rotator cuff repair. A consecutive series of 120 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was analysed. Sixty-one patients underwent conventional double-row rotator cuff repair and 59 patients underwent undersurface rotator cuff repair. Several clinical outcomes, including numerical pain rating scale (NPRS), constant shoulder score (CSS), Oxford shoulder score (OSS) and University of California Los Angeles shoulder score (UCLASS), were prospectively recorded by a trained healthcare professional preoperatively and at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after surgery. Comparing both groups, there were no differences in age, gender and preoperative NPRS, CSS, OSS and UCLASS. However, the tear size was 0.7 ± 0.2 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.3-1.1) cm larger in the conventional group ( p = 0.002). There was no difference in the improvement of NPRS, CSS, OSS and UCLASS at all time points of follow-up, that is, at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after surgery. The duration of operation was shorter by 35 ± 3 (95% CI 28-42) min in the undersurface group ( p < 0.001). Both arthroscopic undersurface rotator cuff repair and conventional arthroscopic double-row rotator cuff repair showed marked improvements in clinical scores when compared preoperatively, and there was no difference in improvements between both groups. Arthroscopic undersurface rotator cuff repair is a faster technique compared to the conventional arthroscopic double-row rotator cuff repair.

  10. Functional outcomes after bilateral arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Aleem, Alexander W; Syed, Usman Ali M; Wascher, Jocelyn; Zoga, Adam C; Close, Koby; Abboud, Joseph A; Cohen, Steven B

    2016-10-01

    Arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tears is a common procedure performed by orthopedic surgeons. There is a well-known incidence of up to 35% of bilateral rotator cuff tear disease in patients who have a known unilateral tear. The majority of the literature focuses on outcomes after unilateral surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine if there are clinical differences in shoulders of patients who underwent staged bilateral rotator cuff repairs during their lifetime. A retrospective review of all patients who underwent staged bilateral arthroscopic rotator cuff surgery at our institution was performed. All patients had at least 2 years of follow-up. Clinical outcome scores including the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation, and Rowe measures were obtained. A subset of patients returned for clinical and ultrasound evaluation performed by an independent fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologist. Overall, 110 shoulders in 55 patients, representing 68% of all eligible patients, participated. No clinical or statistical difference was found in any outcome measure. ASES scores averaged 86.5 (36.7-100) in the dominant shoulder compared with 89.6 (23.3-100) in the nondominant shoulder (P = .42). Ultrasound was available on 34 shoulders and showed complete healing rate of 88%. The shoulders with retearing of the rotator cuff (12%) demonstrated clinically relevant lower ASES scores (72.5) compared with shoulders with confirmed healed repairs (86.2; P = .2). Patients who undergo staged bilateral rotator cuff repair can expect to have similarly good clinical outcomes regardless of hand dominance or chronologic incidence with excellent healing rates in both shoulders. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Speed of recovery after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Kurowicki, Jennifer; Berglund, Derek D; Momoh, Enesi; Disla, Shanell; Horn, Brandon; Giveans, M Russell; Levy, Jonathan C

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to delineate the time taken to achieve maximum improvement (plateau of recovery) and the degree of recovery observed at various time points (speed of recovery) for pain and function after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. An institutional shoulder surgery registry query identified 627 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair between 2006 and 2015. Measured range of motion, patient satisfaction, and patient-reported outcome measures were analyzed for preoperative, 3-month, 6-month, 1-year, and 2-year intervals. Subgroup analysis was performed on the basis of tear size by retraction grade and number of anchors used. As an entire group, the plateau of maximum recovery for pain, function, and motion occurred at 1 year. Satisfaction with surgery was >96% at all time points. At 3 months, 74% of improvement in pain and 45% to 58% of functional improvement were realized. However, only 22% of elevation improvement was achieved (P < .001). At 6 months, 89% of improvement in pain, 81% to 88% of functional improvement, and 78% of elevation improvement were achieved (P < .001). Larger tears had a slower speed of recovery for Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation scores, forward elevation, and external rotation. Smaller tears had higher motion and functional scores across all time points. Tear size did not influence pain levels. The plateau of maximum recovery after rotator cuff repair occurred at 1 year with high satisfaction rates at all time points. At 3 months, approximately 75% of pain relief and 50% of functional recovery can be expected. Larger tears have a slower speed of recovery. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Biomechanical Analysis of an Arthroscopic Broström Ankle Ligament Repair and a Suture Anchor-Augmented Repair.

    PubMed

    Giza, Eric; Whitlow, Scott R; Williams, Brady T; Acevedo, Jorge I; Mangone, Peter G; Haytmanek, C Thomas; Curry, Eugene E; Turnbull, Travis Lee; LaPrade, Robert F; Wijdicks, Coen A; Clanton, Thomas O

    2015-07-01

    Secondary surgical repair of ankle ligaments is often indicated in cases of chronic lateral ankle instability. Recently, arthroscopic Broström techniques have been described, but biomechanical information is limited. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the biomechanical properties of an arthroscopic Broström repair and augmented repair with a proximally placed suture anchor. It was hypothesized that the arthroscopic Broström repairs would compare favorably to open techniques and that augmentation would increase the mean repair strength at time zero. Twenty (10 matched pairs) fresh-frozen foot and ankle cadaveric specimens were obtained. After sectioning of the lateral ankle ligaments, an arthroscopic Broström procedure was performed on each ankle using two 3.0-mm suture anchors with #0 braided polyethylene/polyester multifilament sutures. One specimen from each pair was augmented with a 2.9-mm suture anchor placed 3 cm proximal to the inferior tip of the lateral malleolus. Repairs were isolated and positioned in 20 degrees of inversion and 10 degrees of plantarflexion and loaded to failure using a dynamic tensile testing machine. Maximum load (N), stiffness (N/mm), and displacement at maximum load (mm) were recorded. There were no significant differences between standard arthroscopic repairs and the augmented repairs for mean maximum load and stiffness (154.4 ± 60.3 N, 9.8 ± 2.6 N/mm vs 194.2 ± 157.7 N, 10.5 ± 4.7 N/mm, P = .222, P = .685). Repair augmentation did not confer a significantly higher mean strength or stiffness at time zero. Mean strength and stiffness for the arthroscopic Broström repair compared favorably with previous similarly tested open repair and reconstruction methods, validating the clinical feasibility of an arthroscopic repair. However, augmentation with an additional proximal suture anchor did not significantly strengthen the repair. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. The temporal outcomes of open versus arthroscopic knotted and knotless rotator cuff repair over 5 years

    PubMed Central

    Lucena, Thomas R; Lam, Patrick H; Millar, Neal L

    2015-01-01

    Background The present study aimed to determine how repair technique influenced structural and clinical outcomes at 5 years post-surgery. Methods Three cohorts of patients had repair of a symptomatic rotator cuff tear using (i) an open double-row mattress repair technique (n = 25); (ii) arthroscopic single-row simple suture knotted technique (n = 25); or (iii) arthroscopic single-row inverted mattress knotless technique (n = 36) by one surgeon. Standardized patient- and examiner-determined outcomes were obtained pre-operatively and postoperatively with a validated protocol, ultrasound were also performed at the same time. Results Retear occurred more often after open repair (48%) at 5 years than after arthroscopic knotted (33%) and arthroscopic knotless (26%) repair. Retear was associated with increasing age, pre-operative tear size and weaker pre-operative and 5 years postoperative cuff strength. Between 2 years and 5 years, the open repair group experienced an increase in the frequency of pain during activity, as well as in the difficulty experienced and the severity of pain during overhead activities (p < 0.05) and, at 5 years, also experienced more difficulty with overhead activities, compared to the arthroscopic knotless repair group. Conclusions At 5-year follow-up, arthroscopic rotator cuff repair techniques resulted in fewer retears and better outcomes compared to an open double-row technique. PMID:27582985

  14. The effect of the arthroscopic augmentation of the subscapularis tendon on shoulder instability and range of motion: A biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Schröter, S; Krämer, M; Welke, B; Hurschler, C; Russo, R; Herbst, M; Stöckle, U; Ateschrang, A; Maiotti, M

    2016-10-01

    Anterior shoulder dislocation is common. The treatment of recurrence with glenoid bone defect is still considered controversial. A new arthroscopic subscapularis augmentation has recently been described that functions to decrease the anterior translation of the humeral head. The purpose of the presented study was to examine the biomechanical effect on glenohumeral joint motion and stability. Eight fresh frozen cadaver shoulders were studied by use of a force guided industrial robot fitted with a six-component force-moment sensor to which the humerus was attached. The testing protocol includes measurement of glenohumeral translation in the anterior, anterior-inferior and inferior directions at 0°, 30° and 60° of glenohumeral abduction, respectively, with a passive humerus load of 30N in the testing direction. The maximum possible external rotation was measured at each abduction angle applying a moment of 1Nm. Each specimen was measured in a physiologic state, as well as after Bankart lesion with an anterior bone defect of 15-20% of the glenoid, after arthroscopic subscapularis augmentation and after Bankart repair. The arthroscopic subscapularis augmentation decreased the anterior and anterior-inferior translation. The Bankart repair did not restore the mechanical stability compared to the physiologic shoulder group. External rotation was decreased after arthroscopic subscapularis augmentation compared to the physiologic state, however, the limitation of external rotation was decreased at 60° abduction. The arthroscopic subscapularis augmentation investigated herein was observed to restore shoulder stability in an experimental model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. BiPOD Arthroscopic Acromioclavicular Repair Restores Bidirectional Stability.

    PubMed

    De Beer, Joe; Schaer, Michael; Latendresse, Kim; Raniga, Sumit; Moor, Beat K; Zumstein, Matthias A

    2017-01-01

    Stabilizing the acromioclavicular joint in the vertical and horizontal planes is challenging, and most current techniques do not reliably achieve this goal. The BiPOD repair is an arthroscopically assisted procedure performed with image intensifier guidance that reconstructs the coracoclavicular ligaments as well as the acromioclavicular ligaments to achieve bidirectional stability. Repair is achieved with a combination of 2-mm FiberTape (Arthrex, Naples, Florida) and 20-mm Poly-Tape (Neoligaments, Leeds, England) to achieve rigid repair, prevent bone abrasion, and promote tissue ingrowth. This study is a prospective review of the first 6 patients treated for high-grade acute acromioclavicular injury with the BiPOD technique. The study included 6 men who were 21 to 36 years old (mean, 27 years). At 6-month follow-up, complications were recorded and radiographic analysis was used to determine the coracoclavicular distance for vertical reduction and the amount of acromioclavicular translation on the Alexander axillary view was used to determine horizontal reduction. One patient had a superficial infection over the tape knot. The difference in coracoclavicular distance between the operated side and the uninvolved side was 9±2 mm preoperatively and 0.3±2 mm at 6-month follow-up. On Alexander axillary view, all 6 patients showed stable reduction, which is defined as a clavicle that is in line with the acromion. The findings show that BiPOD acromioclavicular reconstruction restores bidirectional stability of the acromioclavicular joint at 6 months. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(1):e35-e43.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Alterations of the Deltoid Muscle After Open Versus Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nam Su; Cha, Sang Won; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2015-12-01

    Open repair can be more useful than arthroscopic repair for immobile and severely retracted, large to massive rotator cuff tears. However, it is not known whether the deltoid muscle is altered after open repair or to what extent the deltoid origin remains detached after surgery. To compare postoperative alterations of the deltoid muscle in open versus arthroscopic repair for severely retracted, large to massive rotator cuff tears. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Enrolled in this study were 135 patients who underwent surgical repair for severely retracted, large to massive rotator cuff tears and who had routine follow-up MRIs at least 6 months after surgery. Open repairs were performed in 56 cases and arthroscopic repairs in 79 cases. The detachment and thickness of the deltoid muscle at its proximal origin were recorded in 5 zones on MRI. The alterations of the deltoid muscle and postoperative integrity of the repaired rotator cuff were evaluated. Partial detachment of the deltoid occurred in 1 patient (1.8%) in the open group and in 2 patients (2.5%) in the arthroscopic group (P = .80). All the partial detachments occurred in zones 2 and 3. Attenuation of the proximal origin of the deltoid was found in 3 patients (5.4%) in the open group and in 4 patients (5.1%) in the arthroscopic group (P = .87). Atrophy of the deltoid muscle was shown in 3 patients (5.4%) in the open group and 4 patients (5.1%) in the arthroscopic group (P = .61). The retear rate of the repaired cuff was 30.4% (17/56) in the open group and 38.0% (30/79) in the arthroscopic group (P = .74). Between open and arthroscopic repair for severely retracted, large to massive rotator cuff tears, there was no significant difference in detachment of the deltoid origin and alterations of the deltoid muscle after repair. Postoperative alterations of the deltoid occurred in arthroscopic surgery as well as in open surgery. For immobile massive rotator cuff tear, open repair is an acceptable technique

  17. Arthroscopic suture anchor repair of the lateral ligament ankle complex: a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Giza, Eric; Shin, Edward C; Wong, Stephanie E; Acevedo, Jorge I; Mangone, Peter G; Olson, Kirstina; Anderson, Matthew J

    2013-11-01

    Operative treatment of mechanical ankle instability is indicated for patients with multiple sprains and continued episodes of instability. Open repair of the lateral ankle ligaments involves exposure of the attenuated ligaments and advancement back to their anatomic insertions on the fibula using bone tunnels or suture implants. Open and arthroscopic fixation are equal in strength to failure for anatomic Broström repair. Controlled laboratory study. Seven matched pairs of human cadaveric ankle specimens were randomized into 2 groups of anatomic Broström repair: open or arthroscopic. The calcaneofibular ligament and anterior talofibular ligament were excised from their origin on the fibula. In the open repair group, 2 suture anchors were used to reattach the ligaments to their anatomic origins. In the arthroscopic repair group, identical suture anchors were used for repair via an arthroscopic technique. The ligaments were cyclically loaded 20 times and then tested to failure. Torque to failure, degrees to failure, initial stiffness, and working stiffness were measured. A matched-pair analysis was performed. Power analysis of 0.8 demonstrated that 7 pairs needed to show a difference of 30%, with a 15% standard error at a significance level of α = .05. There was no difference in the degrees to failure, torque to failure, or stiffness for the repaired ligament complex. Nine of 14 specimens failed at the suture anchor. There is no statistical difference in strength or stiffness of a traditional open repair as compared with an arthroscopic anatomic repair of the lateral ligaments of the ankle. An arthroscopic technique can be considered for lateral ligament stabilization in patients with mild to moderate mechanical instability.

  18. Postoperative pain control after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Uquillas, Carlos A; Capogna, Brian M; Rossy, William H; Mahure, Siddharth A; Rokito, Andrew S

    2016-07-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR) can provide excellent clinical results for patients who fail to respond to conservative management of symptomatic rotator cuff tears. ARCR, however, can be associated with severe postoperative pain and discomfort that requires adequate analgesia. As ARCR continues to shift toward being performed as an outpatient procedure, it is incumbent on physicians and ambulatory surgical centers to provide appropriate pain relief with minimal side effects to ensure rapid recovery and safe discharge. Although intravenous and oral opioids are the cornerstone of pain management after orthopedic procedures, they are associated with drowsiness, nausea, vomiting, and increased length of hospital stay. As health care reimbursements continue to become more intimately focused on quality, patient satisfaction, and minimizing of complications, the need for adequate pain control with minimal complications will continue to be a principal focus for providers and institutions alike. We present a review of alternative modalities for pain relief after ARCR, including cryotherapy, intralesional anesthesia, nerve blockade, indwelling continuous nerve block catheters, and multimodal anesthesia. In choosing among these modalities, physicians should consider patient- and system-based factors to allow the efficient delivery of analgesia that optimizes recovery and improves patient satisfaction. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Validation of a Dry Model for Assessing the Performance of Arthroscopic Hip Labral Repair.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Lisa; Cheung, Jeffrey J H; Whelan, Daniel B; Murnaghan, Michael Lucas; Chahal, Jas; Theodoropoulos, John; Ogilvie-Harris, Darrell; Macniven, Ian; Dwyer, Tim

    2017-07-01

    Arthroscopic hip labral repair is a technically challenging and demanding surgical technique with a steep learning curve. Arthroscopic simulation allows trainees to develop these skills in a safe environment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of a combination of assessment ratings for the performance of arthroscopic hip labral repair on a dry model. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 47 participants including orthopaedic surgery residents (n = 37), sports medicine fellows (n = 5), and staff surgeons (n = 5) performed arthroscopic hip labral repair on a dry model. Prior arthroscopic experience was noted. Participants were evaluated by 2 orthopaedic surgeons using a task-specific checklist, the Arthroscopic Surgical Skill Evaluation Tool (ASSET), task completion time, and a final global rating scale. All procedures were video-recorded and scored by an orthopaedic fellow blinded to the level of training of each participant. The internal consistency/reliability (Cronbach alpha) using the total ASSET score for the procedure was high (intraclass correlation coefficient > 0.9). One-way analysis of variance for the total ASSET score demonstrated a difference between participants based on the level of training ( F 3,43 = 27.8, P < .001). A good correlation was seen between the ASSET score and previous exposure to arthroscopic procedures ( r = 0.52-0.73, P < .001). The interrater reliability for the ASSET score was excellent (>0.9). The results of this study demonstrate that the use of dry models to assess the performance of arthroscopic hip labral repair by trainees is both valid and reliable. Further research will be required to demonstrate a correlation with performance on cadaveric specimens or in the operating room.

  20. Immediate costs of mini-open versus arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in an Asian population.

    PubMed

    Hui, Yik Jing; Teo, Alex Quok An; Sharma, Siddharth; Tan, Bryan Hsi Ming; Kumar, V Prem

    2017-01-01

    While there has been increasing interest in minimally invasive surgery, the expenses incurred by patients undergoing this form of surgery have not been comprehensively studied. The authors compared the costs borne by patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with the standard mini-open repair at a tertiary hospital in an Asian population. This was a retrospective cohort study. The authors studied the inpatient hospital bills of patients following rotator cuff tear repair between January 2010 and October 2014 via the hospital electronic medical records system. 148 patients had arthroscopic repair and 78 had mini-open repair. The cost of implants, consumables, and the total cost of hospitalization were analyzed. Operative times and length of stay for both procedures were also studied. Constant scores and American Shoulder Elbow Scores (ASES) were recorded preoperatively and at 1 year postoperatively. Three fellowship-trained surgeons performed arthroscopic repairs and one performed the mini-open repair. The cost of implants and consumables was significantly higher with arthroscopic repair. The duration of surgery was also significantly longer with that technique. There was no difference in length of stay between the two techniques. There was also no difference in Constant scores or ASES scores, both preoperatively and at 1 year postoperatively. The immediate costs of mini-open repair of rotator cuff tears are significantly less than that of arthroscopic repair. Most of the difference arises from the cost of implants and consumables. Equivalent functional outcomes from both techniques suggest that mini-open repair may be more cost-effective.

  1. The Burden of Craft in Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Where Have We Been and Where We Are Going.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Stephen S

    2015-08-01

    The rather turbulent history of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair went through stages of innovation, conflict, disruption, assimilation, and transformation that might be anticipated when a new and advanced technology (arthroscopic cuff repair) displaces an entrenched but outdated discipline (open cuff repair). The transition from open to arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has been a major paradigm shift that has greatly benefited patients. However, this technical evolution/revolution has also imposed a higher "burden of craft" on the practitioners of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Technological advancements in surgery demand that surgeons accept this burden of craft and master the advanced technology for the benefit of their patients. This article outlines the author's involvement in the development of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, and it also explores the surgeon's obligation to accept the burden of craft that is imposed by this discipline.

  2. Arthroscopic Repair of Ankle Instability With All-Soft Knotless Anchors.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Hélder; Vuurberg, Gwen; Gomes, Nuno; Oliveira, Joaquim Miguel; Ripoll, Pedro L; Reis, Rui Luís; Espregueira-Mendes, João; Niek van Dijk, C

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, arthroscopic and arthroscopically assisted techniques have been increasingly used to reconstruct the lateral ligaments of the ankle. Besides permitting the treatment of several comorbidities, arthroscopic techniques are envisioned to lower the amount of surgical aggression and to improve the assessment of anatomic structures. We describe our surgical technique for arthroscopic, two-portal ankle ligament repair using an all-soft knotless anchor, which is made exclusively of suture material. This technique avoids the need for classic knot-tying methods. Thus it diminishes the chance of knot migration caused by pendulum movements. Moreover, it avoids some complications that have been related to the use of metallic anchors and some currently available biomaterials. It also prevents prominent knots, which have been described as a possible cause of secondary complaints.

  3. Optimal suture anchor direction in arthroscopic lateral ankle ligament repair.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Ichiro; Hagio, Tomonobu; Noda, Masahiro; Kanazawa, Kazuki; Minokawa, So; Yamamoto, Takuaki

    2017-05-26

    In this study, the distance between the insertion point of the suture anchors and posterior surface of the fibula during arthroscopic lateral ankle ligament repair was investigated on computed tomography (CT) images. The hypothesis of this study was that there is an optimal insertional direction of the suture anchor to avoid anchor-related complications. One hundred eleven ankles of 98 patients who had undergone three-dimensional CT scans for foot or ankle disorders without deformity of the fibula were assessed (59 males, 52 females; median age 25.5 years; age range 12-78 years). The shortest distance from the insertion point of the suture anchor to the deepest point of the fossa/top of the convex aspect of the fibula was measured on the axial plane, tilting from the longitudinal axis of the fibula at 90°, 75°, 60°, and 45°. The distance from the insertion point of the suture anchor to the posterior surface of the fibula was also measured in a direction parallel to the sagittal plane of the lateral surface of the talus on the axial plane, tilting from the longitudinal axis of the fibula at 90°, 75°, 60°, and 45°. The posterior fossa was observed in all cases on the 90° and 75° images. The distance from the insertion point to the posterior surface of the fibula in the parallel direction was 15.0 ± 3.4 mm at 90°, 17.5 ± 3.2 mm at 75°, 21.7 ± 3.3 mm at 60°, and 25.7 ± 3.6 mm at 45°. The posterior points in the parallel direction were located on the posterior fossa in 36.0% of cases at 90°, in 12.6% at 75°, and in 0.0% at 60° and 45°. The suture anchor should be directed from anterior to posterior at an angle of <45° to the longitudinal axis of the fibula, parallel to the lateral surface of the talus, to avoid passing through the fibula. Cohort study, Level III.

  4. Incidence and treatment of postoperative stiffness following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Huberty, David P; Schoolfield, John D; Brady, Paul C; Vadala, Antonio P; Arrigoni, Paolo; Burkhart, Stephen S

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of clinically significant postoperative stiffness following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. This study also sought to determine the clinical and surgical factors that were associated with higher rates of postoperative stiffness. Finally, we analyzed the result of arthroscopic lysis of adhesions and capsular release for treatment of patients who developed refractory postoperative stiffness 4 to 19 months (median, 8 months) following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. A retrospective review of a consecutive series of arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs was conducted. During a 3-year time period, the senior author (S.S.B.) performed 489 arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs. The operative indications, technique of the rotator cuff repair, and the rehabilitation protocol were essentially unchanged during this time period. Demographic data, comorbid medical conditions, rotator cuff tear description, technique of repair, and concomitant surgical procedures were evaluated for their effect on stiffness. All office evaluations were reviewed to determine the pre- and postoperative motion, pain scores, functional strength, and patient satisfaction. Patients who were dissatisfied because of the development of postoperative stiffness underwent secondary arthroscopic lysis of adhesions. The final result of the secondary lysis of adhesions and capsular release were analyzed. In total, 24 patients (4.9%) were dissatisfied with the result of their procedure because of the development of postoperative stiffness, which was more likely (P < .05) to develop in patients with Workers' Compensation insurance (8.6%), patients younger than 50 years of age (8.6%), those with a coexisting diagnosis of calcific tendonitis (16.7%) or adhesive capsulitis (15.0%) requiring additional postoperative therapy, partial articular-sided tendon avulsion (PASTA) type rotator cuff tear (13.5%), or concomitant labral repair (11.0%). Patients with

  5. Early versus delayed rehabilitation following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Brian P; Bishop, Meghan E; Tjoumakaris, Fotios P; Freedman, Kevin B

    2015-05-01

    Early passive range of motion (ROM) following arthroscopic cuff repair is thought to decrease postoperative stiffness and improve functionality. However, early aggressive rehabilitation may compromise repair integrity. Our purpose was to perform a systematic review to determine if there are differences between early and delayed rehabilitation after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in terms of clinical outcomes and healing. We performed a literature search with the terms 'arthroscopic rotator cuff', 'immobilization', 'early', 'delayed', 'late', and 'rehabilitation' using PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and EMBASE. Selection criteria included: level I/II evidence ≤ 6 months in duration, comparing early versus delayed rehabilitation following arthroscopic repair. Data regarding demographics, sample sizes, duration, cuff pathology, surgery, rehabilitation, functional outcomes, pain, ROM and anatomic assessment of healing were analyzed. PRIMSA criteria were followed. We identified six articles matching our criteria. Three reported significantly increased functional scores within the first 3-6 months with early rehabilitation compared to the delayed group, only one of which continued to observe a difference at a final follow-up of 15 months. Four articles showed improved ROM in the first 3-6 months post-operatively with early rehabilitation. One noted transient differences in pain scores. Only one study noted significant differences in ROM at final follow-up. No study reported any significant difference in rates of rotator cuff re-tear. However, two studies noted a trend towards increased re-tear with early rehabilitation that did not reach significance. This was more pronounced in studies including medium-large tears. Early rehabilitation after arthroscopic cuff repair is associated with some initial improvements in ROM and function. Ultimately, similar clinical and anatomical outcomes between groups existed at 1 year. While there was no

  6. Editorial Commentary: Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair--Infection Rate After Rotator Cuff Repair With Arthroscopic, Open, and Mini-open Techniques.

    PubMed

    Brand, Jefferson C

    2016-03-01

    In "Risk Factors for Infection After Rotator Cuff Repair," B. G. Vopat et al. report a lower rate of postoperative infection with an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair than with an open or mini-open approach. Although there were only 14 infections (infection rate of 0.77%), the reason for the preponderance of male patients, 13 of the 14 infections, needs further research to determine effective preventive strategies. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Biomechanical comparison of single-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair technique versus transosseous repair technique.

    PubMed

    Tocci, Stephen L; Tashjian, Robert Z; Leventhal, Evan; Spenciner, David B; Green, Andrew; Fleming, Braden C

    2008-01-01

    This study determined the effect of tear size on gap formation of single-row simple-suture arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR) vs transosseous Mason-Allen suture open RCR (ORCR) in 13 pairs of human cadaveric shoulders. A massive tear was created in 6 pairs and a large tear in 7. Repairs were cyclically tested in low-load and high-load conditions, with no significant difference in gap formation. Under low-load, gapping was greater in massive tears. Under high-load, there was a trend toward increased gap with ARCR for large tears. All repairs of massive tears failed in high-load. Gapping was greater posteriorly in massive tears for both techniques. Gap formation of a modeled RCR depends upon the tear size. ARCR of larger tears may have higher failure rates than ORCR, and the posterior aspect appears to be the site of maximum gapping. Specific attention should be directed toward maximizing initial fixation of larger rotator cuff tears, especially at the posterior aspect.

  8. Evaluation of Repair Tension in Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Does It Really Matter to the Integrity of the Rotator Cuff?

    PubMed

    Kim, Do Hoon; Jang, Young Hoon; Choi, Young Eun; Lee, Hwa-Ryeong; Kim, Sae Hoon

    2016-11-01

    Repair tension of a torn rotator cuff can affect healing after repair. However, a measurement of the actual tension during arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is not feasible. The relationship between repair tension and healing of a rotator cuff repair remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of repair tension on healing at the repair site. The hypothesis was that repair tension would be a major factor in determining the anatomic outcome of rotator cuff repair. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs (132 patients) for full-thickness rotator cuff tears were analyzed. An intraoperative model was designed for the estimation of repair tension using a tensiometer. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed approximately 1 year (mean [±SD], 12.7 ± 3.2 months) postoperatively for the evaluation of healing at the repair site. Multivariable analysis was performed for tear size, amount of retraction, and fatty degeneration (FD) of rotator cuff muscles. The mean repair tension measured during the arthroscopic procedure was 28.5 ± 23.1 N. There was a statistically significant correlation between tension and tear size (Pearson correlation coefficient [PCC], 0.529; P < .001), amount of retraction (PCC, 0.619; P < .001), and FD of the supraspinatus (Spearman correlation coefficient [SCC], 0.308; P < .001) and infraspinatus (SCC, 0.332; P < .001). At the final follow-up (12.7 ± 3.2 months), healing failure was observed in 18.2% (24/132), and repair tension also showed a significant inverse correlation with healing at the repair site (SCC, 0.195; P = .025). However, when sex, age, tear size, amount of retraction, tendon quality, and FD of rotator cuff muscles were included for multivariable logistic regression analysis, only FD of the infraspinatus showed an association with the anatomic outcome of repair (Exp(B) = 0.596; P = .010). Our intraoperative model for the estimation of rotator cuff repair tension showed an

  9. No difference in outcome for open versus arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a prospective comparative trial.

    PubMed

    Bayle, Xavier; Pham, Thuy-Trang; Faruch, Marie; Gobet, Aurelie; Mansat, Pierre; Bonnevialle, Nicolas

    2017-12-01

    Arthroscopic techniques tend to become the gold standard in rotator cuff repair. However, little data are reported in the literature regarding the improvement of postoperative outcomes and re-tear rate relative to conventional open surgery. The aim of this study was to compare clinical outcomes and cuff integrity after arthroscopic versus open cuff repair. We prospectively assessed clinical outcomes and cuff integrity after an arthroscopic or open rotator cuff repair with a minimum follow-up of 12 months. Clinical evaluation was based on Constant score, Simple Shoulder Value (SSV) and American Shoulder and Elbow Score (ASES). Rotator cuff healing was explored with ultrasound. 44 patients in arthroscopic group A (mean age 56-year-old) and 43 in open group O (mean age 61-year-old) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Tendons were repaired with a single row technique associated with biceps tenodesis and subacromial decompression. All objective clinical scores significantly improved postoperatively in both groups. No statistical difference was identified between group A and O regarding, respectively, Constant score (72 vs 75 points; p = 0.3), ASES score (88 vs 91 points; p = 0.3), and SSV (81 vs 85%). The overall rate of re-tear (Sugaya type IV or V) reached 7 and 9%, respectively, in group A and O (p = 0.8). This study did not prove any difference of arthroscopic over open surgery in case of rotator cuff repair regarding clinical outcome and cuff integrity at 1-year follow-up. Prospective comparative study.

  10. Clinical Outcomes of Conservative Treatment and Arthroscopic Repair of Rotator Cuff Tears: A Retrospective Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo Hyung; Do, Hyun Kyung; Lee, Joong Hoon; Kim, Bo Ram; Noh, Jee Hyun; Choi, Soo Hyun; Chung, Sun Gun; Lee, Shi-Uk; Choi, Ji Eun; Kim, Seihee; Kim, Min Jee; Lim, Jae-Young

    2016-04-01

    To compare the clinical outcomes following conservative treatment and arthroscopic repair in patients with a rotator cuff tear. In this retrospective study, patients aged >50 years with a symptomatic rotator cuff tear were reviewed. The rotator cuff tendons were evaluated using ultrasonography, shoulder magnetic resonance imaging or MR arthrography, and the patients with either a high-grade partial-thickness or small-to-medium-sized (≤3 cm) full-thickness tear were included in this study. The primary outcome measures were a pain assessment score and range of motion (ROM) at 1-year follow-up. The secondary outcomes were the rate of tear progression or retear along with the rate of symptom aggravation after the treatments. A total of 357 patients were enrolled, including 183 patients that received conservative treatment and 174 patients who received an arthroscopic repair. The pain assessment score (p<0.001) and the ROM in forward flexion (p<0.001) were significantly improved in both groups. The ROM in internal rotation did not significantly change after conservative treatment and arthroscopic repair. The pain assessment score and ROM were not significantly different between the two groups. Retear was observed in 9.6% of patients who had an arthroscopic repair and tear progression was found in 6.7% of those who underwent conservative treatment. The proportion of aggravation for pain and ROM did not significantly differ between the two groups. The effectiveness of conservative treatment is not inferior to arthroscopic repair for patients >50 years old with a less than medium-sized rotator cuff tear in a 1-year follow-up period. Further study is warranted to find the optimal combination of conservative treatment for a symptomatic rotator cuff tear.

  11. Functional evaluation of patient after arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rohit; Jadhav, Umesh

    2014-06-01

    Rotator cuff tear is a common problem either after trauma or after degenerative tear in old age group. Arthroscopic repair is the current concept of rotator cuff repair. Here, we are trying to evaluate the functional outcome after arthroscopic repair of full thickness rotator cuff tear (single row) in Indian population. Twenty five patients (14 males and 11 females) who underwent arthroscopic repair of full thickness rotator cuff tear at a single institution were included in the study. Postoperatively patient's shoulder was rated according to UCLA score, pain was graded according to the visual analog score. The range of motion was analysed and documented. The mean age of the patients were 50.48 years. The preoperative VAS score mode was 7 and post operative VAS was 1 (p value <0.001). The UCLA grading was good in 80% (n = 20), fair in 12% (n = 3), excellent in 8% (n = 2) and poor results were seen in none of the patients. The mean UCLA improved from a score of 15.84 to 30.28 with a p value <0.001. Mean postoperative forward flexion was 161.6°, mean abduction was 147.6° and mean external rotation was 45.4°. Arthroscopic repair is a good procedure for full thickness rotator cuff tear with minimal complications. The newer double row repair claims to be biomechanically superior with faster healing rates without functional advantages, hence we used a single row repair considering the Indian population and the cost effectiveness of the surgery with good to excellent results.

  12. Factors affecting healing rates after arthroscopic double-row rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Tashjian, Robert Z; Hollins, Anthony M; Kim, Hyun-Min; Teefey, Sharlene A; Middleton, William D; Steger-May, Karen; Galatz, Leesa M; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2010-12-01

    Double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs were developed to improve initial biomechanical strength of repairs to improve healing rates. Despite biomechanical improvements, failure of healing remains a clinical problem. To evaluate the anatomical results after double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with ultrasound to determine postoperative repair integrity and the effect of various factors on tendon healing. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Forty-eight patients (49 shoulders) who had a complete arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (double-row technique) were evaluated with ultrasound at a minimum of 6 months after surgery. Outcome was evaluated at a minimum of 1-year follow-up with standardized history and physical examination, visual analog scale for pain, active forward elevation, and preoperative and postoperative shoulder scores according to the system of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons and the Simple Shoulder Test. Quantitative strength was measured postoperatively. Ultrasound and physical examinations were performed at a minimum of 6 months after surgery (mean, 16 months; range, 6 to 36 months) and outcome questionnaire evaluations at a minimum of 12 months after surgery (mean, 29 months; range, 12 to 55 months). Of 49 repairs, 25 (51%) were healed. Healing rates were 67% in single-tendon tears (16 of 24 shoulders) and 36% in multitendon tears (9 of 25 shoulders). Older age and longer duration of follow-up were correlated with poorer tendon healing (P < .03). Visual analog scale for pain, active forward elevation, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores, and Simple Shoulder Test scores all had significant improvement from baseline after repair (P < .0001). Increased age and longer duration of follow-up were associated with lower healing rates after double-row rotator cuff repair. The biological limitation at the repair site, as reflected by the effects of age on healing, appears to be the most important factor influencing tendon healing

  13. Comparison of implant cost and surgical time in arthroscopic transosseous and transosseous equivalent rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Black, Eric M; Austin, Luke S; Narzikul, Alexa; Seidl, Adam J; Martens, Kelly; Lazarus, Mark D

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the cost savings associated with arthroscopic transosseous (anchorless) double-row rotator cuff repair compared with double-row anchored (transosseous-equivalent [TOE]) repair. All patients undergoing double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair from 2009 to 2012 by a single surgeon were eligible for inclusion. The study included 2 consecutive series of patients undergoing anchorless or TOE repair. Excluded from the study were revision repairs, subscapularis repairs, patients with poor tendon quality or excursion requiring medialized repair, and partial repairs. Rotator cuff implant costs (paid by the institution) and surgical times were compared between the 2 groups, controlling for rotator cuff tear size and additional procedures performed. The study included 344 patients, 178 with TOE repairs and 166 with anchorless repairs. Average implant cost for TOE repairs was $1014.10 ($813.00 for small, $946.67 for medium, $1104.56 for large, and $1507.29 for massive tears). This was significantly more expensive compared with anchorless repairs, which averaged $678.05 ($659.75 for small, $671.39 for medium, $695.55 for large, and $716.00 for massive tears). Average total operative time in TOE and anchorless groups was not significantly different (99 vs. 98 minutes). There was larger (although not statistically significant) case time variation in the TOE group. Compared with TOE repair, anchorless rotator cuff repair provides substantial implant-related cost savings, with no significant differences in surgical time for medium and large rotator cuff tears. Case time for TOE repair varied more with extremes in tear size. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Arthroscopic Direct Repair for a Complete Radial Tear of the Posterior Root of the Medial Meniscus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kook Hyun; Hwang, Dae Hee; Cho, Jin Ho; Changale, Sachin D.; Woo, Sung Jong

    2011-01-01

    We report here on a new arthroscopic direct repair technique for a radial tear of the posterior root of the medial meniscus (PRMM) using a posterior trans-septal portal. Radial tears of the PRMM are commonly observed in the elderly population of Korea and Japan, and the life style of these people requires squatting and kneeling down in daily life. A radial tear of the PRMM results in the loss of hoop tension and this accelerates degenerative changes in the knee joint and causes early osteoarthritis. Several reports in the medical literature have focused on various repair techniques for these tears by using pull out sutures. These techniques result in nonanatomic fixation of the meniscus, which may lead to disturbed meniscal excursion and failure to restore hoop tension. Arthroscopic direct repair may contribute to restoring hoop tension and preventing accelerated degenerative changes in the knee joint of these patients. PMID:22162797

  15. Arthroscopic direct repair for a complete radial tear of the posterior root of the medial meniscus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kook Hyun; Hwang, Dae Hee; Cho, Jin Ho; Changale, Sachin D; Woo, Sung Jong; Nha, Kyung Wook

    2011-12-01

    We report here on a new arthroscopic direct repair technique for a radial tear of the posterior root of the medial meniscus (PRMM) using a posterior trans-septal portal. Radial tears of the PRMM are commonly observed in the elderly population of Korea and Japan, and the life style of these people requires squatting and kneeling down in daily life. A radial tear of the PRMM results in the loss of hoop tension and this accelerates degenerative changes in the knee joint and causes early osteoarthritis. Several reports in the medical literature have focused on various repair techniques for these tears by using pull out sutures. These techniques result in nonanatomic fixation of the meniscus, which may lead to disturbed meniscal excursion and failure to restore hoop tension. Arthroscopic direct repair may contribute to restoring hoop tension and preventing accelerated degenerative changes in the knee joint of these patients.

  16. All-inside arthroscopic lateral collateral ligament repair for ankle instability with a knotless suture anchor technique.

    PubMed

    Vega, Jordi; Golanó, Pau; Pellegrino, Alexandro; Rabat, Eduard; Peña, Fernando

    2013-12-01

    Recently, arthroscopic-assisted techniques have been described to treat lateral ankle instability with excellent results. However, complications including neuritis of the superficial peroneal or sural nerve, and pain or discomfort due to a prominent anchor or suture knot have been reported. The aim of this study was to describe a novel technique, the "all-inside arthroscopic lateral collateral ankle ligament repair," and its results for treating patients with ankle instability. Sixteen patients (10 men and 6 women, mean age 29.3 years, 17-46) with lateral ankle instability were treated with an arthroscopic procedure. Using a suture passer and a knotless anchor, the ligaments were repaired with an all-inside technique. The right ankle was affected in 10 cases. Mean follow-up was 22.3 (12-35) months. On arthroscopic examination, 13 patients had an isolated anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) injury, and in 3 patients, both the ATFL and calcaneofibular ligament (CFL) were affected. All-inside arthroscopic anatomic repair of the lateral collateral ligament complex was performed in all cases. All patients reported subjective improvement of their ankle instability. The mean AOFAS score increased from 67 preoperatively to 97 at final follow-up. No major complications were reported. The all-inside arthroscopic ligament repair was a safe, reliable, and reproducible technique that both provided an anatomic repair of the lateral collateral ligament complex and restored ankle stability while preserving all the advantages of an arthroscopic technique. Level IV, retrospective case series.

  17. Use of a shoulder abduction brace after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: A study on gait performance and falls.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Yuma; Nishioka, Takashi; Nakajima, Ryo; Imai, Shinji; Vigers, Piers; Kawasaki, Taku

    2018-04-01

    Fall prevention is essential in patients after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair because of the high risk of re-rupture. However, there are no reports related to falls that occur during the early postoperative period, while the affected limb is immobilized. This study assessed gait performance and falls in patients using a shoulder abduction brace after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Prospective cohort and postoperative repeated measures. This study included 29 patients (mean age, 67.1 ± 7.4 years) who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair followed by rehabilitation. The timed up and go test, Geriatric Depression Scale, and Falls Efficacy Scale were measured, and the numbers of falls were compared between those shoulder abduction brace users and patients who had undergone total hip or knee arthroplasty. In arthroscopic rotator cuff repair patients, there were significant improvements in timed up and go test and Geriatric Depression Scale, but no significant differences in Falls Efficacy Scale, between the second and fifth postoperative weeks ( p < 0.05). Additionally, arthroscopic rotator cuff repair patients fell more often than patients with total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty during the same period. The findings suggest that rehabilitation in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair patients is beneficial, but decreased gait performance due to the immobilizing shoulder abduction brace can lead to falls. Clinical relevance Although rehabilitation helps motor function and mental health after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, shoulder abduction brace use is associated with impaired gait performance, high Falls Efficacy Scale scores, and risk of falls, so awareness of risk factors including medications and lower limb dysfunctions is especially important after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

  18. Arthroscopic knotless anchor repair of triangular fibrocartilage in distal radius fracture.

    PubMed

    García-Ruano, Á A; Najarro-Cid, F; Jiménez-Martín, A; Gómez de los Infantes-Troncoso, J G; Sicre-González, M

    2015-01-01

    Lesions of triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) are associated with distal radioulnar joint instability. Arthroscopic treatment of these lesions improves functional outcome of affected patients. The aim of the present work is to evaluate functional and occupational outcome of TCF repair using an arthroscopic knotless anchor device in patients with associated distal radius fracture. An observational, descriptive study was carried out between November 2011 and January 2014 including 21 patients with distal radius fracture and Palmer 1B lesions of TCF (Atzei class 2 and 3) that were treated by arthroscopic knotless anchor (PopLok® 2,8mm, ConMed, USA). Mean follow-up was 18 months. Functional (Mayo Wrist Score) and occupational outcome results were analyzed. Mean age of the group was 43.0±8.8 years, with 19% of the patients being female. There was an associated scapholunate lesion in 5 cases. Functional results reached a mean of 83.4±16.1 points onMayo Wrist Score. Mean sick-leave time was 153.16±48.5 days. Complete occupational reintegration was reached in 89.5% of cases. There were no postoperative complications. Arthroscopic knotless anchor repair of 1B TFC tears is a minimally invasive method of treatment that improves tension of fixation, avoiding subsequent loosen, in our experience, with few complications and good functional and occupational results. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Arthroscopic in Situ Repair of Partial Bursal Rotator Cuff Tears Without Acromioplasty.

    PubMed

    Ranalletta, Maximiliano; Rossi, Luciano A; Atala, Nicolas A; Bertona, Agustin; Maignon, Gastón D; Bongiovanni, Santiago L

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate functional outcomes and complications in a consecutive group of patients with partial bursal rotator cuff tears (PBRCTs) treated with insitu repair without acromioplasty. Seventy-four patients who had undergone an arthroscopic single row in situ repair for bursal-sided rotator cuff tears were evaluated. Clinical assessment consisted of glenohumeral range of motion measurement, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, and the University of California at Los Angeles score. Pain was recorded using a visual analog scale. Postoperative complications were also assessed. Mean age was 55.2 years (±6.3) with a minimum of 2-year follow-up. After arthroscopic repair, all active range of motion parameters improved significantly (P < .0001). The American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores improved from 42.5 to 86.1; the University of California at Los Angeles scores improved from 15.8 to 31.4, and the visual analog scale scores improved from 6.6 to 0.7 (P < .0001). Only 3 patients developed a postoperative adhesive capsulitis that responded to physical therapy. In the midterm follow-up (42 months), arthroscopic in situ repair of PBRCTs without acromioplasty is a reliable procedure that produces significant functional improvements and pain relief. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical outcomes of arthroscopic single and double row repair in full thickness rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jong-Hun; Shafi, Mohamed; Kim, Weon-Yoo; Kim, Young-Yul

    2010-07-01

    There has been a recent interest in the double row repair method for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair following favourable biomechanical results reported by some studies. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical results of arthroscopic single row and double row repair methods in the full-thickness rotator cuff tears. 22 patients of arthroscopic single row repair (group I) and 25 patients who underwent double row repair (group II) from March 2003 to March 2005 were retrospectively evaluated and compared for the clinical outcomes. The mean age was 58 years and 56 years respectively for group I and II. The average follow-up in the two groups was 24 months. The evaluation was done by using the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) rating scale and the shoulder index of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES). In Group I, the mean ASES score increased from 30.48 to 87.40 and the mean ASES score increased from 32.00 to 91.45 in the Group II. The mean UCLA score increased from the preoperative 12.23 to 30.82 in Group I and from 12.20 to 32.40 in Group II. Each method has shown no statistical clinical differences between two methods, but based on the sub scores of UCLA score, the double row repair method yields better results for the strength, and it gives more satisfaction to the patients than the single row repair method. Comparing the two methods, double row repair group showed better clinical results in recovering strength and gave more satisfaction to the patients but no statistical clinical difference was found between 2 methods.

  1. Clinical outcomes of arthroscopic single and double row repair in full thickness rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Jong-Hun; Shafi, Mohamed; Kim, Weon-Yoo; Kim, Young-Yul

    2010-01-01

    Background: There has been a recent interest in the double row repair method for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair following favourable biomechanical results reported by some studies. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical results of arthroscopic single row and double row repair methods in the full-thickness rotator cuff tears. Materials and Methods: 22 patients of arthroscopic single row repair (group I) and 25 patients who underwent double row repair (group II) from March 2003 to March 2005 were retrospectively evaluated and compared for the clinical outcomes. The mean age was 58 years and 56 years respectively for group I and II. The average follow-up in the two groups was 24 months. The evaluation was done by using the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) rating scale and the shoulder index of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES). Results: In Group I, the mean ASES score increased from 30.48 to 87.40 and the mean ASES score increased from 32.00 to 91.45 in the Group II. The mean UCLA score increased from the preoperative 12.23 to 30.82 in Group I and from 12.20 to 32.40 in Group II. Each method has shown no statistical clinical differences between two methods, but based on the sub scores of UCLA score, the double row repair method yields better results for the strength, and it gives more satisfaction to the patients than the single row repair method. Conclusions: Comparing the two methods, double row repair group showed better clinical results in recovering strength and gave more satisfaction to the patients but no statistical clinical difference was found between 2 methods. PMID:20697485

  2. Early postoperative fluoroquinolone use is associated with an increased revision rate after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Cancienne, Jourdan M; Brockmeier, Stephen F; Rodeo, Scott A; Young, Chris; Werner, Brian C

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the association of postoperative fluoroquinolone use following arthroscopic primary rotator cuff repair with failure requiring revision rotator cuff repair. An insurance database was queried for patients undergoing rotator cuff repair from 2007 to 2015. These patients were divided into three groups: (1) patients prescribed fluoroquinolones within 6 months postoperatively (divided into 0-2, 2-4, and 4-6 months), (2) a matched negative control cohort of patients not prescribed fluoroquinolones, and (3) a matched positive control cohort of patients prescribed fluoroquinolones between 6 and 18 months following rotator cuff repair. Rates of failure requiring revision rotator cuff repair were compared within 2 years. A total of 1292 patients were prescribed fluoroquinolones within 6 months after rotator cuff repair, including 442 within 2 months, 433 within 2 to 4 months, and 417 within 4 to 6 months, and were compared to 5225 matched negative controls and 1597 matched positive controls. The rate of revision rotator cuff repair was significantly higher in patients prescribed fluoroquinolones within 2 months (6.1 %) compared to matched negative (2.2 %, P = 0.0009) and positive controls (2.4 %, P = 0.0026). There were no significant differences in the rate of revision rotator cuff repair when fluoroquinolones were prescribed >2 months after rotator cuff repair. Early use of fluoroquinolones following rotator cuff repair was independently associated with significantly increased rates of failure requiring revision rotator cuff repair. This is the first clinical study examining the association of postoperative fluoroquinolone use with failure following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. III.

  3. Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Tear Transosseous Repair System: The Sharc-FT Using the Taylor Stitcher.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Andrea; Lunini, Enricomaria; Rebuzzi, Manuela; Verdano, Michele; Baudi, Paolo; Ceccarelli, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Transosseous rotator cuff tear repair was first described in 1944. Over the years, it has represented the gold standard for such lesions. Through open and mini-open approaches, as well as the arthroscopic approach, the transosseous repair system represents one of the most reliable surgical techniques from a biological and mechanical perspective. Nevertheless, further improvements are required. This article describes an arthroscopic rotator cuff tear transosseous repair system, developed in collaboration with NCS Lab (Carpi, Italy): the Sharc-FT using the Taylor Stitcher. Our first experience in the clinical application of the arthroscopic technique using the transosseous suture system has shown encouraging clinical outcomes, confirming its efficacy. The patient satisfaction rate was high, and no patient expressed concern about the implant. The complication rate was very low. By improving the suture technique in the treatment of rotator cuff tears, a remarkable increase in the success rate in the treatment of this pathology could be reached; nevertheless, complications such as retears of the rotator cuff still occur.

  4. Arthroscopic Double-Row Transosseous Equivalent Rotator Cuff Repair with a Knotless Self-Reinforcing Technique.

    PubMed

    Mook, William R; Greenspoon, Joshua A; Millett, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are a significant cause of shoulder morbidity. Surgical techniques for repair have evolved to optimize the biologic and mechanical variables critical to tendon healing. Double-row repairs have demonstrated superior biomechanical advantages to a single-row. The preferred technique for rotator cuff repair of the senior author was reviewed and described in a step by step fashion. The final construct is a knotless double row transosseous equivalent construct. The described technique includes the advantages of a double-row construct while also offering self reinforcement, decreased risk of suture cut through, decreased risk of medial row overtensioning and tissue strangulation, improved vascularity, the efficiency of a knotless system, and no increased risk for subacromial impingement from the burden of suture knots. Arthroscopic knotless double row rotator cuff repair is a safe and effective method to repair rotator cuff tears.

  5. Arthroscopic Double-Row Transosseous Equivalent Rotator Cuff Repair with a Knotless Self-Reinforcing Technique

    PubMed Central

    Mook, William R.; Greenspoon, Joshua A.; Millett, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff tears are a significant cause of shoulder morbidity. Surgical techniques for repair have evolved to optimize the biologic and mechanical variables critical to tendon healing. Double-row repairs have demonstrated superior biomechanical advantages to a single-row. Methods: The preferred technique for rotator cuff repair of the senior author was reviewed and described in a step by step fashion. The final construct is a knotless double row transosseous equivalent construct. Results: The described technique includes the advantages of a double-row construct while also offering self reinforcement, decreased risk of suture cut through, decreased risk of medial row overtensioning and tissue strangulation, improved vascularity, the efficiency of a knotless system, and no increased risk for subacromial impingement from the burden of suture knots. Conclusion: Arthroscopic knotless double row rotator cuff repair is a safe and effective method to repair rotator cuff tears. PMID:27733881

  6. Editorial Commentary: The Wake of the Dragon: Will the Orthopaedic Community Adopt the Shoulder Arthroscopic Latarjet Procedure as We Adopted the Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair?

    PubMed

    Boileau, Pascal; Saliken, David

    2017-12-01

    The Latarjet procedure is a complex and difficult operation when performed both with an open approach and arthroscopically. The difficulties come from the fact that it is a combined intra- and extra-articular procedure, and that working close to the brachial plexus may be frightening for surgeons. Because of the high complication and reoperation rates reported in the literature, this procedure is, at the moment, rejected by a large part of the orthopaedic community, specifically in North America. The Chinese experience shows, after the European one, that arthroscopic Latarjet is an efficient and irreplaceable option for the treatment of recurrent anterior shoulder instability in the context of capsular and/or glenoid deficiency. A recent study shows that the arthroscopic procedure provides accurate bone block positioning and high rates of healing, excellent clinical results (no recurrence of instability at 2-year follow-up), and low rates of complications (no neurovascular injury). Although the arthroscopic Latarjet should be approached with caution, the learning curve should not be thought of as prohibitive. To learn how to perform an arthroscopic Latarjet, surgeons should visit an experienced surgeon and take a course to practice on cadavers first. Although it will take time and effort to learn and perform this operation correctly, we should command our Chinese colleagues to encourage us to follow their path. There is no reason that in the near future the orthopaedic community does not adopt the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure, as we adopted the arthroscopic rotator cuff repair and other complex surgical procedures. Among the strongest reasons to perform the Latarjet procedure arthroscopically are the accuracy of graft placement, the safety for neurovascular structures provided by direct visualization and magnification, and the excellent clinical results allowing young people to go back to sport, including high-risk (contact, overhead) sports. Copyright © 2017

  7. Factors affecting healing after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair

    PubMed Central

    Abtahi, Amir M; Granger, Erin K; Tashjian, Robert Z

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff repair has been shown to have good long-term results. Unfortunately, a significant proportion of repairs still fail to heal. Many factors, both patient and surgeon related, can influence healing after repair. Older age, larger tear size, worse muscle quality, greater muscle-tendon unit retraction, smoking, osteoporosis, diabetes and hypercholesterolemia have all shown to negatively influence tendon healing. Surgeon related factors that can influence healing include repair construct-single vs double row, rehabilitation, and biologics including platelet rich plasma and mesenchymal stem cells. Double-row repairs are biomechanically stronger and have better healing rates compared with single-row repairs although clinical outcomes are equivalent between both constructs. Slower, less aggressive rehabilitation programs have demonstrated improved healing with no negative effect on final range of motion and are therefore recommended after repair of most full thickness tears. Additionally no definitive evidence supports the use of platelet rich plasma or mesenchymal stem cells regarding improvement of healing rates and clinical outcomes. Further research is needed to identify effective biologically directed augmentations that will improve healing rates and clinical outcomes after rotator cuff repair. PMID:25793161

  8. Advantages of Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair With a Transosseous Suture Technique: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Randelli, Pietro; Stoppani, Carlo Alberto; Zaolino, Carlo; Menon, Alessandra; Randelli, Filippo; Cabitza, Paolo

    2017-07-01

    Rotator cuff tear is a common finding in patients with painful, poorly functioning shoulders. The surgical management of this disorder has improved greatly and can now be fully arthroscopic. To evaluate clinical and radiological results of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair using 2 different techniques: single-row anchor fixation versus transosseous hardware-free suture repair. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. Sixty-nine patients with rotator cuff tears were enrolled: 35 patients were operated with metal anchors and 34 with standardized transosseous repair. The patients were clinically evaluated before surgery, during the 28 days after surgery, and at least 1 year after the operation by the use of validated rating scores (Constant score, QuickDASH, and numerical rating scale [NRS]). Final follow-up was obtained at more than 3 years by a QuickDASH evaluation to detect any difference from the previous follow-up. During the follow-up, rotator cuff integrity was determined through magnetic resonance imaging and was classified according to the 5 Sugaya categories. Patients operated with the transosseous technique had significantly less pain, especially from the 15th postoperative day: In the third week, the mean NRS value for the anchor group was 3.00 while that for transosseous group was 2.46 ( P = .02); in the fourth week, the values were 2.44 and 1.76, respectively ( P < .01). No differences in functional outcome were noted between the 2 groups at the final evaluation. In the evaluation of rotator cuff repair integrity, based on Sugaya magnetic resonance imaging classification, no significant difference was found between the 2 techniques in terms of retear rate ( P = .81). No significant differences were found between the 2 arthroscopic repair techniques in terms of functional and radiological results. However, postoperative pain decreased more quickly after the transosseous procedure, which therefore emerges as a possible improvement in the surgical

  9. Augmentation of the Pullout Repair of a Medial Meniscus Posterior Root Tear by Arthroscopic Centralization.

    PubMed

    Koga, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Toshifumi; Horie, Masafumi; Katagiri, Hiroki; Otabe, Koji; Ohara, Toshiyuki; Katakura, Mai; Sekiya, Ichiro; Muneta, Takeshi

    2017-08-01

    The meniscus roots are critical for meniscus function in preserving correct knee kinematics and avoiding meniscus extrusion and, consequently, in the progression of osteoarthritis. Several techniques exist for medial meniscus posterior root tear repair; however, current surgical techniques have been proved to fail to reduce meniscus extrusion, which has been shown to be associated with development of osteoarthritis, although significant improvements in the postoperative clinical findings have been achieved. This Technical Note describes an arthroscopic technique for the medial meniscus posterior root tear in which a pullout repair is augmented by a centralization technique to restore and maintain the medial meniscus function by efficiently reducing meniscus extrusion.

  10. Biomechanical evaluation of arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs: double-row compared with single-row fixation.

    PubMed

    Ma, C Benjamin; Comerford, Lyn; Wilson, Joseph; Puttlitz, Christian M

    2006-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs can have higher rates of failure than do open repairs. Current methods of rotator cuff repair have been limited to single-row fixation of simple and horizontal stitches, which is very different from open repairs. The objective of this study was to compare the initial cyclic loading and load-to-failure properties of double-row fixation with those of three commonly used single-row techniques. Ten paired human supraspinatus tendons were split in half, yielding four tendons per cadaver. The bone mineral content at the greater tuberosity was assessed. Four stitch configurations (two-simple, massive cuff, arthroscopic Mason-Allen, and double-row fixation) were randomized and tested on each set of tendons. Specimens were cyclically loaded between 5 and 100 N at 0.25 Hz for fifty cycles and then loaded to failure under displacement control at 1 mm/sec. Conditioning elongation, peak-to-peak elongation, ultimate tensile load, and stiffness were measured with use of a three-dimensional tracking system and compared, and the failure type (suture or anchor pull-out) was recorded. No significant differences were found among the stitches with respect to conditioning elongation. The mean peak-to-peak elongation (and standard error of the mean) was significantly lower for the massive cuff (1.1 +/- 0.1 mm) and double-row stitches (1.1 +/- 0.1 mm) than for the arthroscopic Mason-Allen stitch (1.5 +/- 0.2 mm) (p < 0.05). The ultimate tensile load was significantly higher for double-row fixation (287 +/- 24 N) than for all of the single-row fixations (p < 0.05). Additionally, the massive cuff stitch (250 +/- 21 N) was found to have a significantly higher ultimate tensile load than the two-simple (191 +/- 18 N) and arthroscopic Mason-Allen (212 +/- 21 N) stitches (p < 0.05). No significant differences in stiffness were found among the stitches. Failure mechanisms were similar for all stitches. Rotator cuff repairs in the

  11. Comparison of Arthroscopically Guided Suprascapular Nerve Block and Blinded Axillary Nerve Block vs. Blinded Suprascapular Nerve Block in Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sang Hun; Cho, Sung Do; Lee, Chae Chil; Choi, Jang Kyu; Kim, Han Wook; Park, Seon Jae; Bae, Mun Hee; Cha, Jae Ryong

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the results of arthroscopically guided suprascapular nerve block (SSNB) and blinded axillary nerve block with those of blinded SSNB in terms of postoperative pain and satisfaction within the first 48 hours after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Forty patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for medium-sized full thickness rotator cuff tears were included in this study. Among them, 20 patients were randomly assigned to group 1 and preemptively underwent blinded SSNB and axillary nerve block of 10 mL 0.25% ropivacaine and received arthroscopically guided SSNB with 10 mL of 0.25% ropivacaine. The other 20 patients were assigned to group 2 and received blinded SSNB with 10 mL of 0.25% ropivacaine. Visual analog scale (VAS) score for pain and patient satisfaction score were assessed 4, 8, 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours postoperatively. The mean VAS score for pain was significantly lower 4, 8, 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours postoperatively in group 1 (group 1 vs. group 2; 5.2 vs. 7.4, 4.1 vs. 6.1, 3.0 vs. 5.1, 2.1 vs. 4.2, 0.9 vs. 3.9, and 1.3 vs. 3.3, respectively). The mean patient satisfaction score was significantly higher at postoperative 4, 8, 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours in group 1 (group 1 vs. group 2; 6.7 vs. 3.9, 7.4 vs. 5.1, 8.8 vs. 5.9, 9.2 vs. 6.7, 9.5 vs. 6.9, and 9.0 vs. 7.2, respectively). Arthroscopically guided SSNB and blinded axillary nerve block in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for medium-sized rotator cuff tears provided more improvement in VAS for pain and greater patient satisfaction in the first 48 postoperative hours than blinded SSNB.

  12. Direct Cost Analysis of Outpatient Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair in Medicare and Non-Medicare Populations.

    PubMed

    Narvy, Steven J; Didinger, Tracey C; Lehoang, David; Vangsness, C Thomas; Tibone, James E; Hatch, George F Rick; Omid, Reza; Osorno, Felipe; Gamradt, Seth C

    2016-10-01

    Providing high-quality care while also containing cost is a paramount goal in orthopaedic surgery. Increasingly, insurance providers in the United States, including government payers, are requiring financial and performance accountability for episodes of care, including a push toward bundled payments. The direct cost of outpatient arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was assessed to determine whether, due to an older population, rotator cuff surgery was more costly in Medicare-insured patients than in patients covered by other insurers. We hypothesized that operative time, implant cost, and overall higher cost would be observed in Medicare patients. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Billing and operative reports from 184 outpatient arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs performed by 5 fellowship-trained arthroscopic surgeons were reviewed. Operative time, number and cost of implants, hospital reimbursement, surgeon reimbursement, and insurance type were determined from billing records and operative reports. Patients were stratified by payer (Medicare vs non-Medicare), and these variables were compared. There were no statistically significant differences in the number of suture anchors used, implant cost, surgical duration, or overall cost of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair between Medicare and other insurers. Reimbursement was significantly higher for other payers when compared with Medicare, resulting in a mean per case deficit of $263.54 between billing and reimbursement for Medicare patients. Operating room time, implant cost, and total procedural cost was the same for Medicare patients as for patients with private payers. Further research needs to be conducted to understand the patient-specific factors that affect the cost of an episode of care for rotator cuff surgery.

  13. Arthroscopic Repair for Chronic Massive Rotator Cuff Tears: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Henry, Patrick; Wasserstein, David; Park, Sam; Dwyer, Tim; Chahal, Jaskarndip; Slobogean, Gerard; Schemitsch, Emil

    2015-12-01

    To systematically review the available evidence for arthroscopic repair of chronic massive rotator cuff tears and identify patient demographics, pre- and post-operative functional limitations, reparability and repair techniques, and retear rates. Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched to identify all clinical papers describing arthroscopic repair of chronic massive rotator cuff tears. Papers were excluded if a definition of "massive" was not provided, if the definition of "massive" was considered inappropriate by agreement between the 2 reviewers, or if patients with smaller tears were also included in the study population. Study quality and clinical outcome data were pooled and summarized. There were 18 papers that met the eligibility criteria; they involved 954 patients with a mean age of 63 (range, 37 to 87), 48% of whom were female. There were 5 prospective and 13 retrospective study designs. The overall study quality was poor according to the Modified Coleman Methodology Score. Of the 954 repairs, 81% were complete repairs and 19% were partial repairs. The follow-up range was between 33 and 52 months, and the mean duration between symptom onset and surgery was 24 months. Single-row repairs were performed in 56% or patients, and double-row repairs were performed in 44%. A pooled analysis demonstrated an improvement in visual analog scale from 5.9 to 1.7, active range of motion from 125° to 169°, and the Constant-Murley score from 49 to 74. The pooled retear rate was 79%. Arthroscopic repair of chronic massive rotator cuff tears is associated with complete repair in the majority of cases and consistently improves pain, range of motion, and functional outcome scores; however, the retear rate is high. Existing research on massive rotator cuff repair is limited to poor- to fair-quality studies. Level IV, systematic review including Level IV studies. Copyright © 2015

  14. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy is not useful after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Yoon; Lee, Jae Sung; Park, Chi Woo

    2012-12-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is known to accelerate the healing of musculoskeletal tissue. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that ESWT stimulates rotator cuff healing after arthroscopic repair. Seventy-one consecutive patients with a small- to large-sized rotator cuff tear underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The patients were randomized into two groups: 35 patients underwent ESWT at 6 weeks after surgery (ESWT group) and 36 patients did not (control group). Cuff integrity was evaluated with computed tomographic arthrography at 6 months after surgery. Constant and UCLA scores were measurable outcomes. All patients were available for a minimum one-year follow-up. The mean age of the ESWT and control groups was 59.4 (SD: 7.7) and 58.6 years (SD: 7.8) (n.s.). There were no significant differences in tear size and repair method between the two groups (n.s.). The mean Constant and UCLA scores, respectively, increased from 54.6 to 90.6 (P < 0.001) and from 18.5 to 27.4 (P < 0.001) in the ESWT group, and from 58.9 to 89.3 (P < 0.001) and 18.5 to 27.4 in the control group. Computed tomographic arthrography was performed in 26 patients from the ESWT group and 24 from the control group, and cuff integrity was maintained in 46 out of 50 patients. Definite re-tear was observed in two patients of the ESWT group and four of the controls. There were no complications associated with ESWT. This study failed to prove that ESWT stimulates rotator cuff healing after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Additional ESWT after rotator cuff repair could theoretically be advantageous, and it was proven to be safe in this study. II.

  15. Upper airway compromise by extravasated fluid: a rare complication after arthroscopic repair of atrophic cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Venkat, Gorthi; Moon, Young Lae; Na, Woong Chae; So, Keum Young

    2009-10-01

    During arthroscopic procedures, leakage of irrigation fluid into surrounding tissue planes is a frequently noticed phenomenon usually clinically asymptomatic and resolving within 12 hours postoperatively. Although rare, this fluid may produce life-threatening complications such as airway compromise. This article describes a case of upper airway obstruction in a 60-year-old man undergoing arthroscopic repair for an atrophic rotator cuff tear. The patient presented with a 6-month history of pain and weakness in the left shoulder. Magnetic resonance imaging studies revealed a massive rotator cuff tear with significant retraction and fatty degeneration of cuff musculature. Perioperatively, all vital cardiorespiratory parameters were within normal limits. Postoperatively, immediately on extubation, he was dyspneic, and examination revealed a diffuse swelling extending from the left shoulder up to the neck and face. He was reintubated and sent to the recovery room, where he recovered 12 hours later. This article highlights the possibility of respiratory compromise due to the extravasation of irrigation fluid into the neck and chest during arthroscopic repair of massive and atrophied cuff tears, even with shorter surgical time as is this case. The widened suprascapular space will offer less resistance to the spread of fluid into the neck and chest from the shoulder. We advocate monitoring the patient continuously to prevent this serious complication from becoming life-threatening.

  16. Medial-row failure after arthroscopic double-row rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Yamakado, Kotaro; Katsuo, Shin-ichi; Mizuno, Katsunori; Arakawa, Hitoshi; Hayashi, Seigaku

    2010-03-01

    We report 4 cases of medial-row failure after double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR) without arthroscopic subacromial decompression (ASAD), in which there was pullout of mattress sutures of the medial row and knots were caught between the cuff and the greater tuberosity. Between October 2006 and January 2008, 49 patients underwent double-row ARCR. During this period, ASAD was not performed with ARCR. Revision arthroscopy was performed in 8 patients because of ongoing symptoms after the index operation. In 4 of 8 patients the medial rotator cuff failed; the tendon appeared to be avulsed at the medial row, and there were exposed knots on the bony surface of the rotator cuff footprint. It appeared that the knots were caught between the cuff and the greater tuberosity. Three retear cuffs were revised with the arthroscopic transtendon technique, and one was revised with a single-row technique after completing the tear. ASAD was performed in all patients. Three of the four patients showed improvement of symptoms and returned to their preinjury occupation. Impingement of pullout knots may be a source of pain after double-row rotator cuff repair. Copyright 2010 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of the Trends, Concomitant Procedures, and Complications With Open and Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repairs in the Medicare Population.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Andrew R; Cha, Peter S; Devana, Sai K; Ishmael, Chad; Di Pauli von Treuheim, Theo; D'Oro, Anthony; Wang, Jeffrey C; McAllister, David R; Petrigliano, Frank A

    2017-10-01

    Medicare insures the largest population of patients at risk for rotator cuff tears in the United States. To evaluate the trends in incidence, concomitant procedures, and complications with open and arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs in Medicare patients. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. All Medicare patients who had undergone open or arthroscopic rotator cuff repair from 2005 through 2011 were identified with a claims database. Annual incidence, concomitant procedures, and postoperative complications were compared between these 2 groups. In total, 372,109 rotator cuff repairs were analyzed. The incidence of open repairs decreased (from 6.0 to 4.3 per 10,000 patients, P < .001) while the incidence of arthroscopic repairs increased (from 4.5 to 7.8 per 10,000 patients, P < .001) during the study period. Patients in the arthroscopic group were more likely to have undergone concomitant subacromial decompression than those in the open group (87% vs 35%, P < .001), and the annual incidence of concomitant biceps tenodesis increased for both groups (from 3.8% to 11% for open and 2.2% to 16% for arthroscopic, P < .001). While postoperative complications were infrequent, patients in the open group were more likely to be diagnosed with infection within 6 months (0.86% vs 0.37%, P < .001) but no more likely to undergo operative debridement (0.43% vs 0.26%, P = .08). Additionally, patients in the open group were more likely to undergo intervention for shoulder stiffness within 1 year (1.4% vs 1.1%, P = .01). In the Medicare population, arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs have increased in incidence and now represent the majority of rotator cuff repair surgery. Among concomitant procedures, subacromial decompression was most commonly performed despite evidence suggesting a lack of efficacy. Infections and stiffness were rare complications that were slightly but significantly more frequent in open rotator cuff repairs.

  18. Evaluation of the Trends, Concomitant Procedures, and Complications With Open and Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repairs in the Medicare Population

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Andrew R.; Cha, Peter S.; Devana, Sai K.; Ishmael, Chad; Di Pauli von Treuheim, Theo; D’Oro, Anthony; Wang, Jeffrey C.; McAllister, David R.; Petrigliano, Frank A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Medicare insures the largest population of patients at risk for rotator cuff tears in the United States. Purpose: To evaluate the trends in incidence, concomitant procedures, and complications with open and arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs in Medicare patients. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: All Medicare patients who had undergone open or arthroscopic rotator cuff repair from 2005 through 2011 were identified with a claims database. Annual incidence, concomitant procedures, and postoperative complications were compared between these 2 groups. Results: In total, 372,109 rotator cuff repairs were analyzed. The incidence of open repairs decreased (from 6.0 to 4.3 per 10,000 patients, P < .001) while the incidence of arthroscopic repairs increased (from 4.5 to 7.8 per 10,000 patients, P < .001) during the study period. Patients in the arthroscopic group were more likely to have undergone concomitant subacromial decompression than those in the open group (87% vs 35%, P < .001), and the annual incidence of concomitant biceps tenodesis increased for both groups (from 3.8% to 11% for open and 2.2% to 16% for arthroscopic, P < .001). While postoperative complications were infrequent, patients in the open group were more likely to be diagnosed with infection within 6 months (0.86% vs 0.37%, P < .001) but no more likely to undergo operative debridement (0.43% vs 0.26%, P = .08). Additionally, patients in the open group were more likely to undergo intervention for shoulder stiffness within 1 year (1.4% vs 1.1%, P = .01). Conclusion: In the Medicare population, arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs have increased in incidence and now represent the majority of rotator cuff repair surgery. Among concomitant procedures, subacromial decompression was most commonly performed despite evidence suggesting a lack of efficacy. Infections and stiffness were rare complications that were slightly but significantly more frequent in open rotator cuff

  19. Outcome of arthroscopic subscapularis tendon repair: Are the results improving with improved techniques and equipment?: A retrospective case series

    PubMed Central

    Arun, G R; Kumar, Pradeep; Patnaik, Sarthak; Selvaraj, Karthik; Rajan, David; Singh, Anant; Kumaraswamy, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff tears are a common cause of shoulder pain and dysfunction. More recently, there has been a renewed interest in understanding the subscapularis tears. There are multiple articles in the literature showing the short term results of isolated subscapularis tendon repair. However, the midterm and long term outcome studies for arthroscopic subscapularis repair are few. This study evaluates the functional outcome after arthroscopic subscapularis repair. Materials and Methods: The records of 35 patients who underwent an arthroscopic subscapularis repair between May 2008 and June 2012 were included in this retrospective study. The records of all patients were reviewed. There were 22 males and 13 female patients with mean age of 58.2 years (range 41-72 years). All patients had a complete history, physical examination, and radiographs of their shoulders. Visual analogue scale (VAS), range of movements, power of cuff muscles, and modified University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) score were assessed. Results: The mean followup was 2.8 years (range 2-4 year). Functional outcome after arthroscopic subscapularis repair has an excellent outcome as analysed by clinical outcome, VAS score and UCLA score. Results were analyzed and had statistically significant values. The VAS for pain improved significantly (P < 0.001), and the mean modified UCLA score improved significantly (P < 0.001) from 14.24 ± 4.72 preoperatively to 33.15 ± 2.29 at 2 years postoperative. According to the UCLA system, there were 22 excellent, 11 good, and 2 fair results. Around 95% of patients returned to their usual work after surgery. Conclusion: At a median followup of 2 years, 95% of patients had a good to excellent result after an arthroscopic subscapularis tendon repair. We conclude that the midterm results show that arthroscopic subscapularis repair remains a good option for the treatment of patients with subscapularis tendon repair. PMID:27293291

  20. A biomechanical comparison of single and double-row fixation in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Smith, Christopher D; Alexander, Susan; Hill, Adam M; Huijsmans, Pol E; Bull, Anthony M J; Amis, Andrew A; De Beer, Joe F; Wallace, Andrew L

    2006-11-01

    The optimal method for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is not yet known. The hypothesis of the present study was that a double-row repair would demonstrate superior static and cyclic mechanical behavior when compared with a single-row repair. The specific aims were to measure gap formation at the bone-tendon interface under static creep loading and the ultimate strength and mode of failure of both methods of repair under cyclic loading. A standardized tear of the supraspinatus tendon was created in sixteen fresh cadaveric shoulders. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs were performed with use of either a double-row technique (eight specimens) or a single-row technique (eight specimens) with nonabsorbable sutures that were double-loaded on a titanium suture anchor. The repairs were loaded statically for one hour, and the gap formation was measured. Cyclic loading to failure was then performed. Gap formation during static loading was significantly greater in the single-row group than in the double-row group (mean and standard deviation, 5.0 +/- 1.2 mm compared with 3.8 +/- 1.4 mm; p < 0.05). Under cyclic loading, the double-row repairs failed at a mean of 320 +/- 96.9 N whereas the single-row repairs failed at a mean of 224 +/- 147.9 N (p = 0.058). Three single-row repairs and three double-row repairs failed as a result of suture cut-through. Four single-row repairs and one double-row repair failed as a result of anchor or suture failure. The remaining five repairs did not fail, and a midsubstance tear of the tendon occurred. Although more technically demanding, the double-row technique demonstrates superior resistance to gap formation under static loading as compared with the single-row technique. A double-row reconstruction of the supraspinatus tendon insertion may provide a more reliable construct than a single-row repair and could be used as an alternative to open reconstruction for the treatment of isolated tears.

  1. Second-look arthroscopic findings after repairs of posterior root tears of the medial meniscus.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hee-Soo; Lee, Su-Chan; Jung, Kwang-Am

    2011-01-01

    A posterior root tear of the medial meniscus disrupts hoop tension and causes extrusion of the meniscus, which results in progressive cartilage degeneration. To identify the structural integrity of healing after arthroscopic repair of a posterior root tear of the medial meniscus by second-look arthroscopy and to determine the clinical relevance of the findings. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. From December 2006 to August 2008, 21 consecutive patients underwent arthroscopic pullout suture repair for a posterior root tear of the medial meniscus. Eleven were available for second-look arthroscopy evaluation (mean, 13.4 months; range, 10 to 22 months). The healing status of the repaired meniscus was classified as complete healing, lax healing, scar tissue healing, and failed healing. Chondral lesions were reviewed using arthroscopic photographs, and clinical evaluation was based on the Lysholm knee scores and the Hospital for Special Surgery scores. There was no case with complete healing. Five knees had lax healing (symptomatic in 2 and asymptomatic in 3); 4, scar tissue healing (asymptomatic in all 4); and 2, failed healing (symptomatic in 1 and asymptomatic in 1). Progression of the chondral lesion was found in 1 case. Mean Lysholm scores improved from 56.1 preoperatively (range, 41 to 71) to 83.0 at follow-up (range, 69 to 91; P = .003); mean Hospital for Special Surgery score also significantly increased, from 64.1 (range, 50 to 76) to 87.4 (range, 77 to 95; P = .003). Complete healing was not observed in this retrospective case series of posterior horn meniscus repairs performed by 2 surgeons using a single technique. Further research is needed to clarify why all patients showed clinical improvement despite findings of incomplete or failed healing on second-look arthroscopy. Treatment modalities for managing posterior root tears of the medial meniscus require further investigation to determine their efficacy.

  2. Revision versus primary arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a 2-year analysis of outcomes in 360 patients.

    PubMed

    Shamsudin, Aminudin; Lam, Patrick H; Peters, Karin; Rubenis, Imants; Hackett, Lisa; Murrell, George A C

    2015-03-01

    Symptomatic rotator cuff tears are often treated surgically. However, there is a paucity of information regarding the outcomes of revision arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs. To evaluate the outcome of revision arthroscopic rotator cuff surgery when compared with primary arthroscopic rotator cuff surgery in a large cohort of patients. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A consecutive series of 50 revision arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs performed by a single surgeon, with minimum 2-year follow-up, were retrospectively reviewed using prospectively collected data. As a comparison, 3 primary arthroscopic rotator cuff repair cases (primary group; n = 310) were chosen immediately before each revision case, and 3 were chosen after. Standardized patient-ranked outcomes, examiner-determined assessments, and ultrasound-determined rotator cuff integrity were assessed preoperatively at 6 months and at a minimum of 2 years after surgery. The revision group was older (mean age, 63 years; range, 43-80 years) compared with the primary group (mean age, 60 years; range, 18-88 years) (P < .05) and had larger tear size (mean ± SEM) (4.1 ± 0.5 cm(2)) compared with the primary group (3.0 ± 0.2 cm(2)) (P < .05). Two years after surgery, the primary group reported less pain at rest (P < .02), during sleep (P < .05), and with overhead activity (P < .01) compared with the revision group. The primary group had better passive forward flexion (+13°; P < .05), abduction (+18°; P < .01), internal rotation (+2 vertebral levels; P < .001) and also significantly greater supraspinatus strength (+15 N; P < .001), lift-off strength (+9.3 N; P < .05), and adduction strength (+20 N; P < .01) compared with the revision group at 2 years. When compared with the primary group, the revision group was more satisfied with the overall shoulder function before surgery but was less satisfied with their shoulder function than the primary group at 2 years (P < .005). The retear rate for primary rotator cuff

  3. Transtendon, Double-Row, Transosseous-Equivalent Arthroscopic Repair of Partial-Thickness, Articular-Surface Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Dilisio, Matthew F.; Miller, Lindsay R.; Higgins, Laurence D.

    2014-01-01

    Arthroscopic transtendinous techniques for the arthroscopic repair of partial-thickness, articular-surface rotator cuff tears offer the advantage of minimizing the disruption of the patient's remaining rotator cuff tendon fibers. In addition, double-row fixation of full-thickness rotator cuff tears has shown biomechanical advantages. We present a novel method combining these 2 techniques for transtendon, double-row, transosseous-equivalent arthroscopic repair of partial-thickness, articular-surface rotator cuff tears. Direct visualization of the reduction of the retracted articular tendon layer to its insertion on the greater tuberosity is the key to the procedure. Linking the medial-row anchors and using a double-row construct provide a stable repair that allows early shoulder motion to minimize the risk of postoperative stiffness. PMID:25473606

  4. Transtendon, double-row, transosseous-equivalent arthroscopic repair of partial-thickness, articular-surface rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Dilisio, Matthew F; Miller, Lindsay R; Higgins, Laurence D

    2014-10-01

    Arthroscopic transtendinous techniques for the arthroscopic repair of partial-thickness, articular-surface rotator cuff tears offer the advantage of minimizing the disruption of the patient's remaining rotator cuff tendon fibers. In addition, double-row fixation of full-thickness rotator cuff tears has shown biomechanical advantages. We present a novel method combining these 2 techniques for transtendon, double-row, transosseous-equivalent arthroscopic repair of partial-thickness, articular-surface rotator cuff tears. Direct visualization of the reduction of the retracted articular tendon layer to its insertion on the greater tuberosity is the key to the procedure. Linking the medial-row anchors and using a double-row construct provide a stable repair that allows early shoulder motion to minimize the risk of postoperative stiffness.

  5. PLATELET-RICH PLASMA IN ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIRS OF COMPLETE TEARS OF THE ROTATOR CUFF.

    PubMed

    Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Gracitelli, Mauro Emilio Conforto; Sunada, Edwin Eiji; Benegas, Eduardo; de Santis Prada, Flavia; Neto, Raul Bolliger; Rodrigues, Marcelo Bordalo; Neto, Arnaldo Amado Ferreira; de Camargo, Olavo Pires

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate shoulder functional results and the retear rate of arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff augmented with platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Prospective case series with single-row arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff augmented with PRP. Only cases of isolated supraspinatus tears with retraction of less than 3 cm were included in this series. The PRP used was obtained by apheresis. It was applied on liquid consistency in its activated form, with the addition of autologous thrombin. Patients were evaluated after 12 months of the surgical procedure. The Constant-Murley, UCLA and VAS scales were used, and the retear rate was assessed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Fourteen patients were evaluated (14 shoulders). The mean Constant-Murley score was 45.64 ± 12.29 before the operation and evolved to 80.78 ± 13.22 after the operation (p < 0.001). The UCLA score increased from 13.78 ± 5.66 to 31.43 ± 3.9 (p < 0.001). The patients' pain level decreased from a median of 7.5 (p25% = 6, p75% = 8) to 0.5 (p25% = 0, p75% = 3) (p = 0.0013) according to the VAS score. None of the patients presented complete retear. Three patients (21.4%) showed partial retear, without transfixation. Only one patient developed complications (adhesive capsulitis). Patients submitted to arthroscopic rotator cuff repair augmented with PRP showed significant functional improvement and none of them had complete retearing.

  6. PLATELET-RICH PLASMA IN ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIRS OF COMPLETE TEARS OF THE ROTATOR CUFF

    PubMed Central

    Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Gracitelli, Mauro Emilio Conforto; Sunada, Edwin Eiji; Benegas, Eduardo; de Santis Prada, Flavia; Neto, Raul Bolliger; Rodrigues, Marcelo Bordalo; Neto, Arnaldo Amado Ferreira; de Camargo, Olavo Pires

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate shoulder functional results and the retear rate of arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff augmented with platelet-rich plasma (PRP).Methods: Prospective case series with single-row arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff augmented with PRP. Only cases of isolated supraspinatus tears with retraction of less than 3 cm were included in this series. The PRP used was obtained by apheresis. It was applied on liquid consistency in its activated form, with the addition of autologous thrombin. Patients were evaluated after 12 months of the surgical procedure. The Constant-Murley, UCLA and VAS scales were used, and the retear rate was assessed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results: Fourteen patients were evaluated (14 shoulders). The mean Constant-Murley score was 45.64 ± 12.29 before the operation and evolved to 80.78 ± 13.22 after the operation (p < 0.001). The UCLA score increased from 13.78 ± 5.66 to 31.43 ± 3.9 (p < 0.001). The patients’ pain level decreased from a median of 7.5 (p25% = 6, p75% = 8) to 0.5 (p25% = 0, p75% = 3) (p = 0.0013) according to the VAS score. None of the patients presented complete retear. Three patients (21.4%) showed partial retear, without transfixation. Only one patient developed complications (adhesive capsulitis). Conclusion: Patients submitted to arthroscopic rotator cuff repair augmented with PRP showed significant functional improvement and none of them had complete retearing. PMID:27047894

  7. [Arthroscopic repair of meniscus injury with Fast-fix under local anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiang-tao; Liu, Yu-jie; Wang, Jun-liang; Qu, Feng; Yuan, Bang-tuo; Zhao, Gang; Shen, Xue-zhen; Zhu, Juan-li; Liu, Yang

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the clinical outcome of arthroscopic repair method of meniscus injury with Fast-fix under local anesthesia. From October 2005 to September 2012,106 patients with meniscus injuries admitted into our - hospital were studied, including 74 males and 32 females, ranging in age from 13 to 71 years old, averaged 27.6 years old. The duration of the disease ranged from 15 days to 5 years. The main clinical manifestations included knee joint pain after exercise, joint locking, pressing pain of knee joint and positive McMurray signs. The MRI showed meniscus tear or degeneration. Arthroscopic repairing surgeries were performed with Fast-fix under local anesthesia. Each patient was assessed with VAS pain evaluation and Lysholm knee-joint score system before and after operation. All the patients were followed up more than 1 year. One hundred and 2 patients were followed up by recording subjective symptoms, clinical examinations and questions naires for an average of 2.6 years (ranged, 1.1 to 8 years), and 4 patients lost follow-up. All the 102 patients had no anesthetic complications. Ninety-six patients had normal subjective symptom and clinical examinations. Four patients had a mild ache with activities,2 patients had moderate pain after activities with joint space pressing pain. VAS pain evaluation and Lysholm knee-joint score after operation both were much better than that before operation. onclusion: Local anesthesia can provide nice circumstances for surgeries. Arthroscopic repair using Fast-fix is an idea method for meniscus injury, especially for the posterior horn tear of medial meniscus, which is simple and convenient with less complications, and satisfactory results.

  8. Hyperlipidemia increases the risk of retear after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Grant H; Liu, Joseph N; Wong, Alexandra; Cordasco, Frank; Dines, David M; Dines, Joshua S; Gulotta, Lawrence V; Warren, Russell

    2017-12-01

    Hyperlipidemia (HL) has been identified as a risk factor for rotator cuff tear, but no studies have evaluated its effects on healing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of HL and statin use on rotator cuff healing after arthroscopic repair. This was a retrospective review of 85 patients (86 shoulders) who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with postoperative ultrasound evaluation. Ultrasound findings were graded no retear, partial-thickness retear (PT), or full-thickness retear (FT). Average age was 62.1 years (45.3-74.3 years). On ultrasound evaluation, 65 shoulders (75.5%) had no retear, 14 (16.3%) had PT, and 7 (8.1%) had FT. There was no significant difference in retear rate by age, technique, or tissue quality. There were 33 patients (38.8%) who had the diagnosis of HL, and all were taking a statin medication. Compared with patients without HL, patients with HL had significantly higher rates of FT (18.1% vs. 1.9%; P < .001) and PT (27.2% vs. 9.4%; P < .001). The total retear rate (PT and FT) for HL patients was significantly higher at 45.5% (15/33) compared with the patients without HL at 11.3% (6/53), with an odds ratio of 6.5 (P < .001). There was no difference in retear rate by dosage or type of statin mediation. After arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, HL was a risk factor for retear. Further investigation is warranted on this topic, and these results may help in managing expectations after surgery. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of slow and accelerated rehabilitation protocol after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: pain and functional activity.

    PubMed

    Düzgün, Irem; Baltacı, Gül; Atay, O Ahmet

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we sought to compare the effects of the slow and accelerated protocols on pain and functional activity level after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The study included 29 patients (3 men, 26 women) who underwent arthroscopic repair of stage 2 and 3 rotator cuff tears. Patients were randomized in two groups: the accelerated protocol group (n=13) and slow protocol group (n=16). Patients in the accelerated protocol group participated in a preoperative rehabilitation program for 4-6 weeks. Patients were evaluated preoperatively and for 24 weeks postoperatively. Pain was assessed by visual analog scale, and functional activity level was assessed by The Disabilities of The Arm Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire. The active range of motion was initiated at week 3 after surgery for the accelerated rehabilitation protocol and at week 6 for the slow protocol. The rehabilitation program was completed by the 8th week with the accelerated protocol and by the 22nd week with the slow protocol. There was no significant difference between the slow and accelerated protocols with regard to pain at rest (p>0.05). However, the accelerated protocol was associated with less pain during activity at weeks 5 and 16, and with less pain at night during week 5 (p<0.05). The accelerated protocol was superior to the slow protocol in terms of functional activity level, as determined by DASH at weeks 8, 12, and 16 after surgery (p<0.05). The accelerated protocol is recommended to physical therapists during rehabilitation after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair to prevent the negative effects of immobilization and to support rapid reintegration to daily living activities.

  10. Arthroscopic-assisted repair of triangular fibrocartilage complex foveal avulsion in distal radioulnar joint injury

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Sung Jong; Jegal, Midum; Park, Min Jong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Disruption of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) foveal insertion can lead to distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability accompanied by ulnar-sided pain, weakness, snapping, and limited forearm rotation. We investigated the clinical outcomes of patients with TFCC foveal tears treated with arthroscopic-assisted repair. Materials and Methods: Twelve patients underwent foveal repair of avulsed TFCC with the assistance of arthroscopy between 2011 and 2013. These patients were followed up for an average of 19 months (range 14–25 months). The avulsed TFCC were reattached to the fovea using a transosseous pull-out suture or a knotless suture anchor. At the final followup, the range of motion, grip strength and DRUJ stability were measured as objective outcomes. Subjective outcomes were assessed using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain, patient rated wrist evaluation (PRWE), Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (DASH score) and return to work. Results: Based on the DRUJ stress test, 5 patients had normal stability and 7 patients showed mild laxity as compared with the contralateral side. Postoperatively, the mean range of pronation supination increased from 141° to 166°, and the mean VAS score for pain decreased from 5.3 to 1.7 significantly. The PRWE and DASH questionnaires also showed significant functional improvement. All patients were able to return to their jobs. However, two patients complained of persistent pain. Conclusions: Arthroscopically assisted repair of TFCC foveal injury can provide significant pain relief, functional improvement and restoration of DRUJ stability. PMID:27293286

  11. Effects of slow and accelerated rehabilitation protocols on range of motion after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Düzgün, İrem; Baltacı, Gül; Turgut, Elif; Atay, O Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of the early initiation of passive and active range of motion exercises following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The study included 40 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Patients were quasi-randomly assigned into accelerated (ACCEL) protocol (n=19) and slow (SLOW) protocol (n=21) groups. Patients in both groups were treated with the same protocol. Active range of motion was begun at the 3rd week in the ACCEL group and the 6th week in the SLOW group. Range of motion was recorded at postoperative weeks 3, 5, 8, 12, and 24. While active range of motion for all measurements improved across weeks, there were no differences between groups, with the exception of active total elevation which was greater at all time point measurements in the ACCEL group (p<0.05). The early initiation of passive and gentle controlled active motion exercise following rotator cuff repairs does not appear to affect range of motion in the first 6 postoperative months.

  12. Outcomes of single-row and double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Saridakis, Paul; Jones, Grant

    2010-03-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is a common procedure that is gaining wide acceptance among orthopaedic surgeons because it is less invasive than open repair techniques. However, there is little consensus on whether to employ single-row or double-row fixation. The purpose of the present study was to systematically review the English-language literature to see if there is a difference between single-row and double-row fixation techniques in terms of clinical outcomes and radiographic healing. PubMed, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and EMBASE were reviewed with the terms "arthroscopic rotator cuff," "single row repair," and "double row repair." The inclusion criteria were a level of evidence of III (or better), an in vivo human clinical study on arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, and direct comparison of single-row and double-row fixation. Excluded were technique reports, review articles, biomechanical studies, and studies with no direct comparison of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair techniques. On the basis of these criteria, ten articles were found, and a review of the full-text articles identified six articles for final review. Data regarding demographic characteristics, rotator cuff pathology, surgical techniques, biases, sample sizes, postoperative rehabilitation regimens, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores, University of California at Los Angeles scores, Constant scores, and the prevalence of recurrent defects noted on radiographic studies were extracted. Confidence intervals were then calculated for the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, University of California at Los Angeles, and Constant scores. Quality appraisal was performed by the two authors to identify biases. There was no significant difference between the single-row and double-row groups within each study in terms of postoperative clinical outcomes. However, one study divided each of the groups into patients with small-to-medium tears (< 3 cm in length) and those with

  13. The PASTA Bridge: A Technique for the Arthroscopic Repair of PASTA Lesions.

    PubMed

    Hirahara, Alan M; Andersen, Wyatt J

    2017-10-01

    PASTA (partial articular supraspinatus tendon avulsion) lesions of greater than 50% thickness are usually repaired, whereas those of less than 50% thickness receive subacromial decompression and debridement. However, tears of greater than 25% thickness of the tendon result in increased strain of the adjacent, intact tendon fibers. Re-creating the tendon footprint at the greater tuberosity is the goal of a repair. Transtendon repairs have been considered the gold standard in repair but have shown varying outcomes and are technically difficult procedures. This report details the PASTA bridge-a technique for the arthroscopic, percutaneous repair of PASTA lesions. The PASTA bridge uses a spinal needle to ensure the repair includes the leading edge of the good tissue and is at the appropriate angle and area. Most procedures use a knife or trocar blindly to access the joint to place anchors, which has the potential to damage surrounding tissues and result in poor anchor and suture placement. The PASTA bridge is a safe, reliable procedure that is easily reproducible and appropriate for surgeons of all experience levels and should be strongly considered when repairing PASTA lesions.

  14. Single-Versus Double-Row Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair in Massive Tears

    PubMed Central

    Wang, EnZhi; Wang, Liang; Gao, Peng; Li, ZhongJi; Zhou, Xiao; Wang, SongGang

    2015-01-01

    Background It is a challenge for orthopaedic surgeons to treat massive rotator cuff tears. The optimal management of massive rotator cuff tears remains controversial. Therefore, the goal of this study was to compare arthroscopic single- versus double-row rotator cuff repair with a larger sample size. Material/Methods Of the subjects with massive rotator cuff tears, 146 were treated using single-row repair, and 102 were treated using double-row repair. Pre- and postoperative functional outcomes and radiographic images were collected. The clinical outcomes were evaluated for a minimum of 2 years. Results No significant differences were shown between the groups in terms of functional outcomes. Regarding the integrity of the tendon, a lower rate of post-treatment retear was observed in patients who underwent double-row repair compared with single-row repair. Conclusions The results suggest that double-row repair is relatively superior in shoulder ROM and the strength of tendon compared with single-row repair. Future studies involving more patients in better-designed randomized controlled trials will be required. PMID:26017641

  15. A comparative clinical evaluation of arthroscopic single-row versus double-row supraspinatus tendon repair.

    PubMed

    Buess, Eduard; Waibl, Bernhard; Vogel, Roger; Seidner, Robert

    2009-10-01

    Cadaveric studies and commercial pressure have initiated a strong trend towards double-row repair in arthroscopic cuff surgery. The objective of this study was to evaluate if the biomechanical advantages of a double-row supraspinatus tendon repair would result in superior clinical outcome and higher abduction strength. A retrospective study of two groups of 32 single-row and 33 double-row repairs of small to medium cuff tears was performed. The Simple Shoulder Test (SST) and a visual analog scale for pain were used to evaluate the outcome. The participation rate was 100%. A subset of patients was further investigated with the Constant Score (CS) including electronic strength measurement. The double-row repair patients had significantly more (p = 0.01) yes answers in the SST than the single-row group, and pain reduction was slightly better (p = 0.03). No difference was found for the relative CS (p = 0.86) and abduction strength (p = 0.74). Patient satisfaction was 100% for double-row and 97% for single-row repair. Single- and double-row repairs both achieved excellent clinical results. Evidence of superiority of double-row repair is still scarce and has to be balanced against the added complexity of the procedure and higher costs.

  16. Factors affecting rotator cuff healing after arthroscopic repair: osteoporosis as one of the independent risk factors.

    PubMed

    Chung, Seok Won; Oh, Joo Han; Gong, Hyun Sik; Kim, Joon Yub; Kim, Sae Hoon

    2011-10-01

    The prognostic factors associated with structural outcome after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair have not yet been fully determined. The hypothesis of this study was that bone mineral density (BMD) is an important prognostic factor affecting rotator cuff healing after arthroscopic cuff repair. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Among 408 patients who underwent arthroscopic repair for full-thickness rotator cuff tear between January 2004 and July 2008, 272 patients were included whose postoperative cuff integrity was verified by computed tomography arthrography (CTA) or ultrasonography (USG) and simultaneously who were evaluated by various functional outcome instruments. The mean age at the time of operation was 59.5 ± 7.9 years. Postoperative CTA or USG was performed at a mean 13.0 ± 5.1 months after surgery, and the mean follow-up period was 37.2 ± 10.0 months (range, 24-65 months). The clinical, structural, and surgery-related factors affecting cuff integrity including BMD were analyzed using both univariate and multivariate analysis. Evaluation of postoperative cuff integrity was performed by musculoskeletal radiologists who were unaware of the present study. The failure rate of rotator cuff healing was 22.8% (62 of 272). The failure rate was significantly higher in patients with lower BMD (P < .001); older age (P < .001); female gender (P = .03); larger tear size (P < .001); higher grade of fatty infiltration (FI) of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and subscapularis (all P < .001); diabetes mellitus (P = .02); shorter acromiohumeral distance (P < .001); and associated biceps procedure (P < .001). However, in the multivariate analysis, only BMD (P = .001), FI of the infraspinatus (P = .01), and the amount of retraction (P = .03) showed a significant relationship with cuff healing failure following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Bone mineral density, as well as FI of the infraspinatus and amount of retraction, was an independent determining factor

  17. Arthroscopic Broström repair with Gould augmentation via an accessory anterolateral port for lateral instability of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Kentaro; Takao, Masato; Miyamoto, Wataru; Innami, Ken; Matsushita, Takashi

    2014-10-01

    Although several arthroscopic surgical techniques for the treatment of lateral instability of the ankle have been introduced recently, some concern remains over their procedural complexity, complications, and unclear clinical outcomes. We have simplified the arthroscopic technique of Broström repair with Gould augmentation. This technique requires only two small skin incisions for two ports (medial midline and accessory anterolateral ports), without needing a percutaneous procedure or extension of the skin incisions. The anterior talofibular ligament is reattached to its anatomical footprint on the fibula with suture anchor, under arthroscopic view. The inferior extensor retinaculum is directly visualized through the accessory anterolateral port and is attached to the fibula with another suture anchor under arthroscopic view via the anterolateral port. The use of two small ports offers a procedure that is simple to perform and less morbid for patients.

  18. Sleep disturbance associated with rotator cuff tear: correction with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Austin, Luke; Pepe, Matthew; Tucker, Bradford; Ong, Alvin; Nugent, Robert; Eck, Brandon; Tjoumakaris, Fotios

    2015-06-01

    Sleep disturbance is a common complaint of patients with a rotator cuff tear. Inadequate and restless sleep, along with pain, is often a driving symptom for patients to proceed with rotator cuff repair. To date, no studies have examined sleep disturbance in patients undergoing rotator cuff repair, and there is no evidence that surgery improves sleep disturbance. Sleep disturbance is prevalent in patients with a symptomatic rotator cuff tear, and sleep disturbance improves after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A total of 56 patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for full-thickness tears were enrolled in a prospective study. Patients were surveyed preoperatively and postoperatively at intervals of 2, 6, 12, 18, and 24 weeks. Patient outcomes were scored using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Simple Shoulder Test (SST), visual analog scale for pain (VAS), and single assessment numeric evaluation (SANE). Demographic and surgical factors were also collected for analysis. Preoperative PSQI scores indicative of sleep disturbance were reported in 89% of patients. After surgery, a statistically significant improvement in PSQI was achieved at 3 months (P = .0012; 91% follow-up) and continued through 6 months (P = .0179; 93% follow-up). Six months after surgery, only 38% of patients continued to have sleep disturbance. Multivariable linear regression of all surgical and demographic factors versus PSQI was performed and demonstrated that preoperative and prolonged postoperative narcotic use negatively affected sleep. Sleep disturbance is common in patients undergoing rotator cuff repair. After surgery, sleep disturbance improves to levels comparable with those of the general public. Preoperative and prolonged postoperative use of narcotic pain medication negatively affects sleep. © 2015 The Author(s).

  19. Arthroscopic suture anchor repair versus pullout suture repair in posterior root tear of the medial meniscus: a prospective comparison study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hwa; Chung, Ju-Hwan; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Yoon-Seok; Kim, Jung-Ryul; Ryu, Keun-Jung

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate functional and radiographic results of arthroscopic suture anchor repair for posterior root tear of the medial meniscus (PRTMM) and compare with pullout suture repair. From December 2006 to August 2008, 51 consecutive patients underwent arthroscopic repair of PRTMM at our hospital. The repair technique was switched over time from pullout suture repair (group 1) to suture anchor repair (group 2). Of the patients, 6 were lost to follow-up, leaving a study population of 45 patients, with 22 menisci (48.9%) in group 1 and 23 (51.1%) menisci in group 2. The mean follow-up duration was 25.9 months (range, 24 to 27 months) in group 1 and 26.8 months (range, 24 to 28 months) in group 2. Compared variables included International Knee Documentation Committee criteria, Kellgren-Lawrence grade, gap distance at PRTMM, structural healing, meniscal extrusion, and cartilage degeneration of the medial femoral condyle. At 2 years postoperatively, both groups showed significant improvements in function (P < .05) and did not show significant differences in Kellgren-Lawrence grade (P > .05) compared with preoperatively. On magnetic resonance imaging, the gap distance at PRTMM was 3.2 ± 1.1 mm in group 1 and 2.9 ± 0.9 mm in group 2 preoperatively (P > .05). Complete structural healing was seen in 11 cases in group 1 and 12 cases in group 2 (P > .05). Mean meniscal extrusion of 4.3 ± 0.9 mm (group 1) and 4.1 ± 1.0 mm (group 2) preoperatively was significantly decreased to 2.1 ± 1.0 mm (group 1) and 2.2 ± 0.8 mm (group 2) postoperatively (P < .05). Regardless of repair technique, incompletely healed cases showed progression of cartilage degeneration (4 cases in group 1 and 2 cases in group 2). For PRTMM, our results show significant functional improvement in both the suture anchor repair and pullout suture repair groups. Reduction of meniscal extrusion seems to be appropriate to preserve its protective role against progression of cartilage degeneration after complete

  20. Evaluation of Factors Affecting Acute Postoperative Pain Levels After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Cuff, Derek J; O'Brien, Kathleen C; Pupello, Derek R; Santoni, Brandon G

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate multiple preoperative and operative factors that may be predictive of and correlate with acute postoperative pain levels after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. One hundred eighty-one patients underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff surgery along with subacromial decompression and met the inclusion criteria for this study. Postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) scores were obtained on postoperative days 1, 7, and 90. Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to correlate postoperative VAS scores with multiple independent factors, including preoperative subjective pain tolerance, preoperative VAS score, preoperative narcotic use, sex, smoking status, number of suture anchors used, tear size, single- or double-row repair, and patient age. Preoperative subjective pain tolerance, notably those patients rating themselves as having an extremely high pain tolerance, was the most significant predictor of high VAS pain scores on both postoperative day 1 (P = .0001) and postoperative day 7 (P < .0001). Preoperative narcotic use was also significantly predictive (P = .010) of high pain scores on postoperative day 1 and day 7 (P = .019), along with nonsmokers (P = .008) and younger patients (P = .006) being predictive on day 7. There were no patient factors that were predictive of VAS scores 3 months postoperatively (P = .567). Preoperative subjective pain tolerance, notably those patients rating themselves as having an extremely high pain tolerance, was the strongest factor predicting high acute pain levels after arthroscopic rotator cuff surgery. Preoperative narcotic use, smokers, and younger patients were also predictive of higher pain levels during the first postoperative week. Level IV, prognostic case series. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Arthroscopic anterior talofibular ligament repair for chronic ankle instability with a suture anchor technique.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eung Soo; Lee, Kyung Tai; Park, Jun Sic; Lee, Young Koo

    2011-04-11

    The goal of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the clinical outcomes of arthroscopic repair for chronic ankle instability using a bioabsorbable anchor with 2 sutures. We evaluated the results of 28 ankles treated with arthroscopic anterior talofibular ligament repair using bioabsorbable anchors with a FiberWire and TigerWire suture (Arthrex, Inc, Naples, Florida) placed on the fibula from March 2008 to January 2009. Average follow-up was 15.9 months (range, 13-25 months). Patients were evaluated using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot ankle score and stress radiographs. Mean AOFAS hindfoot ankle score was 92.48 ± 6.14 at last follow-up compared to the mean preoperative score of 60.78 ± 16.38 (P=.041). Mean postoperative anterior draw test score difference between 2 ankles was 0.61 ± 0.75 compared to the mean preoperative score difference of 3.59 ± 0.68 (P=.00). There was a 14% complication rate, including 3 cases of portal site irritation and 1 case of superficial infection. Stress radiographs revealed 3 cases of anterior displacement >3 mm compared to the other side. All patients returned to their previous activity level.Arthroscopic ligament reconstruction for chronic lateral ankle instability using suture anchors is effective in returning patients to their preinjury function levels. Good clinical results were obtained with some minor complications. This minimally invasive technique is a reasonable alternative to other open surgical procedures for chronic ankle instability. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Retear rate in the late postoperative period after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hwa; Hong, In Tae; Ryu, Keun Jung; Bong, Sun Tae; Lee, Yoon Seok; Kim, Jang Hwan

    2014-11-01

    Few clinical studies have evaluated the integrity of repaired tendons and identified the timing of retears through the use of serial imaging. Retears after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair are uncommon in the late postoperative period (after 3 months). Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Among 221 arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs that were performed at a single hospital between May 2010 and February 2012, 61 were involved in this study. Rotator cuff tears consisted of 12 small, 31 medium, 8 large, and 6 massive rotator cuff tears. Additionally, 4 isolated subscapularis tears were included. For clinical evaluation, all patients were assessed both preoperatively and postoperatively by use of the University of California-Los Angeles Shoulder Rating Scale, absolute and relative Constant scores, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score; active range of motion was assessed as well. For radiological evaluation, all 61 patients had a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation at 3 months postoperatively. Among them, 23 patients were evaluated for repaired tendon integrity on postoperative MRI at a minimum of 1 year after surgery (mean, 14.1 months; range, 12-19 months), and results were classified according to the Sugaya classification: type I, sufficient thickness with homogeneously low intensity on each image; type II, sufficient thickness, partial high-intensity area; type III, less than half the thickness without discontinuity; type IV, minor discontinuity; and type V, major discontinuity. The remaining 38 patients, who refused to undergo MRI again for financial reasons, were evaluated through ultrasound. Statistically significant clinical improvements were observed after surgery. The MRI conducted at 3 months postoperatively identified 9 patients with Sugaya type I, 28 patients with type II, and 24 patients with type III repairs. No patients showed Sugaya type IV or V repairs at postoperative 3 months. Thirty-seven patients who had shown Sugaya type I or II

  3. Does diabetes affect outcome after arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff?

    PubMed

    Clement, N D; Hallett, A; MacDonald, D; Howie, C; McBirnie, J

    2010-08-01

    We compared the outcome of arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff in 32 diabetic patients with the outcome in 32 non-diabetic patients matched for age, gender, size of tear and comorbidities. The Constant-Murley score improved from a mean of 49.2 (24 to 80) pre-operatively to 60.8 (34 to 95) post-operatively (p = 0.0006) in the diabetic patients, and from 46.4 (23 to 90) pre-operatively to 65.2 (25 to 100) post-operatively (p = 0.0003) in the non-diabetic patients at six months. This was significantly greater (p = 0.0002) in non-diabetic patients (18.8) than in diabetics (11.6). There was no significant change in the mean mental component of the Short-Form 12, but the mean physical component increased from 35 to 41 in non-diabetics (p = 0.0001), and from 37 to 39 (p = 0.15) in diabetics. These trends were observed at one year. Patients with diabetes showed improvement of pain and function following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in the short term, but less than their non-diabetic counterparts.

  4. A Load-Sharing Rip-Stop Fixation Construct for Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Denard, Patrick J.; Burkhart, Stephen S.

    2012-01-01

    Despite advancements in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair techniques, achieving tendon-to-bone healing can be difficult in the setting of poor-quality tendon. Moreover, medial tendon tears or tears with lateral tendon loss may preclude standard techniques. Rip-stop suture configurations have been shown to improve load to failure compared with simple or mattress stitch patterns and may be particularly valuable in these settings. The purpose of this report is to describe a technical modification of a rip-stop rotator cuff repair that combines the advantages of a rip-stop suture (by providing resistance to tissue cutout) and a double row of load-sharing suture anchors (minimizing the load per anchor and therefore the load per suture within each anchor). PMID:23766972

  5. Early return to work in workers' compensation patients after arthroscopic full-thickness rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Sanjeev; Piasecki, Dana P; Nho, Shane Jay; Romeo, Anthony A; Cole, Brian J; Nicholson, Gregory P; Boniquit, Nicole; Verma, Nikhil N

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of patients to return to their preoperative work level and to identify functional prognostic factors in a group of Workers' Compensation (WC) patients after arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears at a minimum follow-up of 1 year. Seventy-eight consecutive WC patients underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR) and were retrospectively reviewed. Potential predictors of occupational outcomes were recorded. The primary outcomes included work level at the time of discharge, time to maximum medical improvement (MMI), and failures requiring revision rotator cuff repair. Secondary outcomes including physical examination and subjective scoring scales were also recorded. Overall, 88.5% of patients (n = 69) returned to their preoperative level of work at a mean time to MMI of 7.6 +/- 2.6 months. Of the WC patients, 55 (70.5%) were followed up for purposes of assessing shoulder function, with a mean follow-up of 33.6 +/- 13.9 months. The mean American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score at this time was 82.3 +/- 20.9, and the mean score on a visual analog scale was 1.7 +/- 2.3. An association was found between patients who underwent ARCR with open biceps tenodesis and delay in MMI (P = .01). WC patients undergoing ARCR may expect a high likelihood of return to full duty at a mean time to MMI of 7.6 months. At the time of follow-up, patients reported good outcomes using validated scoring scales, but subjective outcomes remained inferior to non-WC patients based on historical controls. Alcohol use was the only prognostic factor to show a significant association with return to restricted-duty employment and repair failure. Level IV, therapeutic case series. 2010 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Functional outcomes of traumatic and non-traumatic rotator cuff tears after arthroscopic repair

    PubMed Central

    Abechain, José Jorge Kitagaki; Godinho, Glaydson Gomes; Matsunaga, Fabio Teruo; Netto, Nicola Archetti; Daou, Julia Pozzetti; Tamaoki, Marcel Jun Sugawara

    2017-01-01

    AIM To compare the functional outcomes of traumatic and non-traumatic rotator cuff tears after arthroscopic repair. METHODS Eighty-seven patients with rotator cuff tears following arthroscopic treatment were divided into traumatic and non-traumatic tear groups. Postoperative muscle strength and outcomes using the modified University of California, Los Angeles score were evaluated. Sex, age, affected limb and dominant limb were correlated between groups. Muscle strength of the repaired and unaffected shoulders was compared. Rotator cuff injury size was measured. RESULTS Of the 87 patients who underwent rotator cuff repairs, 35 had traumatic tears and 52 had non-traumatic tears. In patients with non-traumatic tears, the average age was 59 years, 74.5% were female, 96.1% were right-hand dominant and 92.3% had their dominant shoulder affected. Patients with traumatic tears were 59.5 years old on average, 51.4% were female, 91.4% were right-hand dominant and 88.5% had their dominant shoulder affected. No difference existed in the mean modified University of California, Los Angeles score between patients with traumatic tears (33.7) compared with those with non-traumatic tears (32.8). No strength differences were observed between groups: The strength difference between the non-affected and affected sides was 1.21 kg in the non-traumatic group and 1.39 kg in the traumatic group (P = 0.576), while the strength ratio between the non-affected/affected sides was 0.805 in the non-traumatic group and 0.729 in the traumatic group (P = 0.224). CONCLUSION The functional results of traumatic rotator cuff repairs are similar to non-traumatic tears. Both outcomes are satisfactory. PMID:28875129

  7. The Relationship Between Intraoperative Tear Dimensions and Postoperative Pain in 1624 Consecutive Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repairs.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Daniel Y T; Walton, Judie R; Lam, Patrick; Murrell, George A C

    2017-03-01

    Rotator cuff repair often results in significant pain postoperatively, the cause of which is undetermined. Purpose/Hypothesis: The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between rotator cuff tear area and postoperative pain in patients who had undergone arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. We hypothesized that larger tears would be more painful because of elevated repair tension at 1 week postoperatively but that smaller tears would be more painful because of a greater healing response, especially from 6 weeks postoperatively. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 1624 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were included in this study. Exclusion criteria were moderate to severe osteoarthritis, isolated subscapularis repair, calcific tendinitis, synthetic patch repair, revision surgery, and retears on ultrasound at 6 months after surgery. Rotator cuff tears were subdivided into groups based on the tear size and retear rate found for each group. A modified L'Insalata questionnaire was given before surgery and at 1 week, 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after surgery. Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficient tests were performed between rotator cuff tear areas and pain scores. Intraoperative rotator cuff tear areas did not correlate with pain scores preoperatively or at 1 week after surgery. A smaller tear area was associated with more frequent and severe pain with overhead activities, at rest, and during sleep as well as a poorer perceived overall shoulder condition at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after repair ( r = 0.11-0.23, P < .0001). Patients who were younger, had partial-thickness tears, and had occupational injuries experienced more pain postoperatively ( r = 0.10-0.28, P < .0001). Larger tears did not have more pain at 1 week after surgery. The retear rate was 7% in tears <2 cm 2 but reached 44% in tears >8 cm 2 . There were fewer retears with smaller tears, but they were more painful than large tears postoperatively

  8. Arthroscopic versus mini-open rotator cuff repair: a prospective, randomized study with 24-month follow-up.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenxiang; Gu, Beibei; Zhu, Wei; Zhu, Lixian; Li, Qingsong

    2014-08-01

    This prospective, randomized study was performed to evaluate the results of mini-open and arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in a comparative case series of patients followed for 24 months. A total of 125 patients were randomized to mini-open (Group I) or arthroscopic (Group II) rotator cuff repair at the time of surgical intervention. The University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) score, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) index, and muscle strength were measured to evaluate the clinical results, while magnetic resonance arthrography was used at 24-month follow-up to investigate the postoperative rotator cuff integrity. Fifty-three patients in Group I and 55 patients in Group II were available for evaluation at 24-month follow-up. At 24-month follow-up, the UCLA score, the ASES index, and muscle strength were statistically significantly increased in both groups postoperatively, while no significant difference was detected between the 2 groups. Intact rotator cuffs were investigated in 42 patients in Group I and 35 in Group II, and there was a significant difference in postoperative structural integrity between the two groups (P < 0.05). When analysis was limited to the patients with full-thickness tear, the muscle strength of the shoulder was significantly better in Group II, and the retearing rate was significantly higher in Group II. Based on the results obtained from this study, it can be indicated that arthroscopic and mini-open rotator cuff repair displayed substantially equal outcomes, except for higher retearing rate in the arthroscopic repair group. While for patients with full-thickness tear, arthroscopic rotator cuff repair displayed better shoulder strength and significantly higher retearing rate as compared to mini-open rotator cuff repair at 24-month follow-up.

  9. Serial MRI evaluation following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in double-row technique.

    PubMed

    Stahnke, Katharina; Nikulka, Constanze; Diederichs, Gerd; Haneveld, Hendrik; Scheibel, Markus; Gerhardt, Christian

    2016-05-01

    So far, recurrent rotator cuff defects are described to occur in the early postoperative period after arthroscopic repair. The aim of this study was to evaluate the musculotendinous structure of the supraspinatus, as well as bone marrow edema or osteolysis after arthroscopic double-row repair. Therefore, magnetic resonance (MR) images were performed at defined intervals up to 2 years postoperatively. Case series; Level of evidence, 3. MR imaging was performed within 7 days, 3, 6, 12, 26, 52 and 108 weeks after surgery. All patients were operated using an arthroscopic modified suture bridge technique. Tendon integrity, tendon retraction ["foot-print-coverage" (FPC)], muscular atrophy and fatty infiltration (signal intensity analysis) were measured at all time points. Furthermore, postoperative bone marrow edema and signs of osteolysis were assessed. MR images of 13 non-consecutive patients (6f/7m, ∅ age 61.05 ± 7.7 years) could be evaluated at all time points until ∅ 108 weeks postoperatively. 5/6 patients with recurrent defect at final follow-up displayed a time of failure between 12 and 24 months after surgery. Predominant mode of failure was medial cuff failures in 4/6 cases. The initial FPC increased significantly up to 2 years follow-up (p = 0.004). Evaluations of muscular atrophy or fatty infiltration were not significant different comparing the results of all time points (p > 0.05). Postoperative bone marrow edema disappeared completely at 6 months after surgery, whereas signs of osteolysis appeared at 3 months follow-up and increased to final follow-up. Recurrent defects after arthroscopic reconstruction of supraspinatus tears in modified suture bridge technique seem to occur between 12 and 24 months after surgery. Serial MRI evaluation shows good muscle structure at all time points. Postoperative bone marrow edema disappears completely several months after surgery. Signs of osteolysis seem to appear caused by bio-absorbable anchor

  10. Hip Arthroscopic Synovectomy and Labral Repair in a Patient With Rheumatoid Arthritis With a 2-Year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Nobuyuki; Iguchi, Hirotaka; Mitsui, Hiroto; Tawada, Kaneaki; Murakami, Satona; Otsuka, Takanobu

    2014-01-01

    The arthroscopic surgical procedures reported previously for a rheumatic hip joint have been primarily performed as diagnostic procedures. Only a few studies have reported the success of arthroscopic surgery in hip joint preservation. We encountered a special case in which joint remodeling was seen in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis treated with biological drugs after hip arthroscopic synovectomy and labral repair. We report the case of a 39-year-old woman with rheumatism, which was controlled with tocilizumab, prednisolone, and tacrolimus. The hip joint showed Larsen grade 3 destruction, and the Harris Hip Score was 55 points. Because of the patient's strong desire to undergo a hip preservation operation, we performed hip arthroscopic synovectomy and repair of a longitudinal labral tear. After 2.5 years, the joint space had undergone rebuilding with improvement to Larsen grade 2, and the Harris Hip Score had improved to 78 points; the patient was able to return to work with the use of 1 crutch. It is possible to perform hip arthroscopic surgery for rheumatoid arthritis with a hip preservation operation with biological drugs. PMID:25276611

  11. Reliability and Validity of the Arthroscopic International Cartilage Repair Society Classification System: Correlation With Histological Assessment of Depth.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Tim; Martin, C Ryan; Kendra, Rita; Sermer, Corey; Chahal, Jaskarndip; Ogilvie-Harris, Darrell; Whelan, Daniel; Murnaghan, Lucas; Nauth, Aaron; Theodoropoulos, John

    2017-06-01

    To determine the interobserver reliability of the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) grading system of chondral lesions in cadavers, to determine the intraobserver reliability of the ICRS grading system comparing arthroscopy and video assessment, and to compare the arthroscopic ICRS grading system with histological grading of lesion depth. Eighteen lesions in 5 cadaveric knee specimens were arthroscopically graded by 7 fellowship-trained arthroscopic surgeons using the ICRS classification system. The arthroscopic video of each lesion was sent to the surgeons 6 weeks later for repeat grading and determination of intraobserver reliability. Lesions were biopsied, and the depth of the cartilage lesion was assessed. Reliability was calculated using intraclass correlations. The interobserver reliability was 0.67 (95% confidence interval, 0.5-0.89) for the arthroscopic grading, and the intraobserver reliability with the video grading was 0.8 (95% confidence interval, 0.67-0.9). A high correlation was seen between the arthroscopic grading of depth and the histological grading of depth (0.91); on average, surgeons graded lesions using arthroscopy a mean of 0.37 (range, 0-0.86) deeper than the histological grade. The arthroscopic ICRS classification system has good interobserver and intraobserver reliability. A high correlation with histological assessment of depth provides evidence of validity for this classification system. As cartilage lesions are treated on the basis of the arthroscopic ICRS classification, it is important to ascertain the reliability and validity of this method. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Arthroscopic suture bridge rotator cuff repair: functional outcome, repair integrity, and preoperative factors related to postoperative outcome.

    PubMed

    Rimmke, Nathan; Maerz, Tristan; Cooper, Ross; Yadavalli, Sailaja; Anderson, Kyle

    2016-01-01

    To assess the retear rate, retear size and location, the clinical impact of a retear, and preoperative patient factors related to postoperative outcome after arthroscopic suture bridge rotator cuff repair. Fifty six patients with an isolated, full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear who underwent arthroscopic suture bridge rotator cuff repair were retrospectively identified. Patients were evaluated and rotator cuff integrity was assessed using ultrasonography. Visual analog score (VAS), the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeon (ASES) score, shoulder range of motion and strength were used for clinical evaluation. Retears were assessed for size and location on ultrasonography. Forty two patients (75%) aged a mean 59.7 ± 8.6 years (range 41-79 years) were available for follow-up at a mean 13.5 months. Postoperative evaluation indicated significant improvements in ASES score (49.76 ± 18.2 to 86.57 ± 13.4, P < 0.001), VAS pain score (4.69 ± 2.17 to 0.63 ± 1.29, P < 0.001), forward elevation range of motion (144.1° ± 29.9 to 159.69° ± 13.9, P = 0.002), and internal rotation ROM (44.13° ± 12.0 to 52.09° ± 12.0, P = 0.003). The retear rate was 14.28% (6/42). Patients with retears were not older (P = 0.526) but had a larger preoperative tear size (3.25 cm ± 0.5 vs. 2.05 cm ± 0.48, P < 0.001). Preoperative tear size was significantly associated with a postoperative retear (P < 0.001). The duration of preoperative symptoms was significantly associated with pain (P = 0.029), pain improvement (P = 0.013), internal rotation ROM (P = 0.002), and internal rotation strength (P = 0.004). Arthroscopic suture bridge repair provides good clinical results with a low retear rate. The duration of preoperative symptoms was associated with postoperative outcome, indicating that delaying surgery may result in inferior outcomes. IV, Case Series.

  13. Arthroscopic transtendinous repair of articular-sided pasta (partial articular supraspinatus tendon avulsion) injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Lu, Liangyu; Lu, Zhe; Xiao, Lei; Kang, Yifan; Wang, Zimin

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate clinical efficacy of arthroscopic transtendinous repair of partial articular-sided PASTA (partial articular supraspinatus tendon avulsion) injury. From February 2011 to July 2014, 12 cases of PASTA, aged 29 to 72 years with an average of 52.9 ± 13.3 years, were treated arthoscopically. To repair PASTA, articular-sided rotator cuff tear was explored, injury site was punctured and labeled with PDS absorbable monofilament suture (Ethicon, Somerville, NJ, USA) suture, subacromial bursa was cleaned up with acromioplasty, and integrity of bursa-side rotator cuff was assessed. Then with arthroscope in glenohumeral joint, footprint of the bursa-side supraspinatus tendon was preserved, rivets were introduced into the joint through supraspinatus tendon, joint-side partial tear was sutured, and anatomical reconstruction of the rotator cuff footprint was established. The patients were followed up post-operatively for 12-36 months, average 22 ± 7.3 months. The clinical outcomes were emulated with ASES (American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons) Shoulder Score system and UCLA (University of California at Los Angeles) Shoulder rating scale. The post-operative ASES score was 89.7 ± 5.6, higher than the pre-operative one 49.8 ± 9.8 (t = 12.25, P <0.0001). While UCLA scale increased from the pre-operative 17.3, ± 3.3 to the post-operative 30.4 ± 3.2 points (t = 9.87, P <0.0001), with a satisfaction rate of 11/12 (91.7%). Trans-tendon repair is ideal for PASTA with advantage of maximal preservation of the normal rotator cuff tissue, anatomical reconstruction of the rotator cuff footprint and stable fixation of tendon-bone interface.

  14. Arthroscopic medial meniscal repair with or without concurrent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A subgroup analysis.

    PubMed

    Uzun, Erdal; Misir, Abdulhamit; Kizkapan, Turan Bilge; Ozcamdalli, Mustafa; Akkurt, Soner; Guney, Ahmet

    2018-01-01

    There are few large-scale, long-term studies comparing medial meniscal repairs with or without concurrent anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. A total of 140 patients who underwent arthroscopic medial meniscal repair were divided into two groups: Group A, meniscus repair only and Group B, meniscus repair with concurrent ACL reconstruction. Clinical assessments in- cluded physical examination findings, Lysholm score, and the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) form. Barret criteria were used for the clinical assessment of healing status. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)was obtained to confirmhealing and failure. Subgroups of participants were compared in terms of suture technique, type of tear, and location of tear. KT-2000 arthrometer testing was used for objective evaluation of anterior-posterior knee movement. Mean follow-up duration was 61 (34-85) months. Clinical outcomes in both groups were significantly improved compared to baseline (P=0.001 vs. P=0.001); however, there was no significant between-group difference in postoperative Lysholm and IKDC scores (P=0.830). The outcomes of three participants (seven percent) in Group A and 11 (11.3%) in Group B were considered as treatment failures (P=0.55). Red-red zone tears had higher scores. Mean postoperative KT2000 arthrometer values of failed participants in Groups A and B were 4.66mm (range, four to six) and 5.2mm (range, two to seven), respectively. Concurrentmedialmeniscus repair and ACL reconstruction did not have clinical superiority over meniscus repair alone. Repairs in the red-red zone appeared to be associated with better outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Ventricular tachycardia during arthroscopic shoulder surgery: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seung Hyun; Yi, Jin Woong; Kwack, Yoon Ho; Park, Sung Wook; Kim, Mi Kyeong; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2010-03-01

    We routinely have performed arthroscopic shoulder surgery under general anesthesia in the beach chair position using epinephrine (0.33 mg/L) saline irrigation. At a 2-week interval, two patients, a 19-year-old man scheduled to undergo an arthroscopic Bankart repair for left traumatic anterior instability and a 49-year-old woman scheduled for an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for a left rotator cuff tear, were resuscitated by chest compression and defibrillation due to a sudden developed cardiogenic shock following ventricular tachycardia at the time of arthroscopic shoulder surgery. They were transferred to the intensive care unit because their emergent echocardiogram showed significantly decreased cardiac functions. They were fully recovered and then discharged. Epinephrine was considered to be the cause of ventricular tachycardia because the two patients showed no anaphylactic reaction to drugs or symptoms of air embolism related to the beach chair position. In addition, according to our observation of epinephrine flow patterns, it was more likely that highly concentrated epinephrine was rapidly infused into the body. This complication is very rare. However, thorough understanding of the side effects and their development of epinephrine during arthroscopic shoulder surgery should neither be overemphasized nor disregarded.

  16. Arthroscopic tenodesis versus tenotomy of the long head of biceps tendon in simultaneous rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Meraner, Dominik; Sternberg, Christoph; Vega, Jordi; Hahne, Julia; Kleine, Michael; Leuzinger, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Full thickness rotator cuff tears are a common cause of shoulder pain and disability. While the role of the rotator cuff seems to be well known, the clinical significance of the biceps tendon for shoulder function has still been a subject of controversy. The aim of this study was to evaluate differences between tenodesis or tenotomy in simultaneous rotator cuff repair. For this retrospective study 53 consecutive patients (25f/28m, Ø age 58 years) undergoing arthroscopic double row rotator cuff reconstruction and suture bridge repair were included. The LHB was treated with tenodesis (n = 24) or tenotomy (n = 29). Clinical examination was carried out for all patients after an average of 34 months (range 27–38) following arthroscopic surgery. The Constant score, level of pain, range of motion in flexion and abduction, and isometric force for the operated and healthy shoulder in flexion and abduction were recorded. Patients in the tenodesis and tenotomy group reached similar good result regarding the Constant score (86.6 ± 11.9 vs. 81.3 ± 12.2; P = 0.120), pain (median 0, range 0–8 vs. Median 0, range 0–10; P = 0.421), and range of motion (flexion: median 180°, range 90°–180° vs. median 180°, range 90°–180°; P = 0.833; abduction: median 180°, range 90°–180° vs. median 180°, range 120°–180°; P = 0.472). Postoperative popeye sign was found only in one patient (1.9 %). At the time of postoperative follow-up, no patient reported cramping of the biceps. Isometric forces in abduction of the tenotomy group (mean 4.7 ± 2.9 kg; maximum 5.5 ± 2.8 kg) was significant lower compared to the tenodesis group (mean 6.6 ± 3.0 kg, P = 0.019; maximum 7.7 ± 2.9 kg, P = 0.007) and compared to healthy shoulders (mean 6.1 ± 3.0 kg P = 0.004; maximum 7.4 ± 3.1 kg, P = 0.001), all other measurements were similar. According to our results arthroscopic biceps tenodesis and tenotomy are valuable procedures in simultaneous rotator cuff repair regarding function

  17. Efficacy of a Subacromial Corticosteroid Injection for Persistent Pain After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sang-Jin; Do, Nam-Hoon; Lee, Juyeob; Ko, Young-Won

    2016-09-01

    Corticosteroid injections have been widely used for reducing shoulder pain. However, catastrophic complications induced by corticosteroid such as infections and tendon degeneration have made surgeons hesitant to use a corticosteroid injection as a pain control modality, especially during the postoperative recovery phase. To determine the effectiveness and safety of a subacromial corticosteroid injection for persistent pain control during the recovery period and to analyze the factors causing persistent pain after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 458 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were included in this study. Patient-specific parameters, tear size and pattern, and pain intensity were reviewed. Seventy-two patients were administered a postoperative subacromial corticosteroid injection under ultrasound guidance. The corticosteroid injection was administered to patients who awakened overnight because of constant severe shoulder pain or whose pain was exacerbated at the time of rehabilitation exercises within 8 weeks after surgery. Pain intensity, patient satisfaction, and functional outcomes using the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) and Constant scores were compared between the patients with and without a subacromial corticosteroid injection. The retear rate was evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging at 6 months postoperatively. In patients with an injection, the mean (±SD) visual analog scale for pain (pVAS) score was 7.7 ± 1.2 at the time of the injection. This significantly decreased to 2.3 ± 1.4 at the end of the first month after the injection, demonstrating a 70.2% reduction in pain (P < .01). At 3 months after the injection, the mean pVAS score was 1.2 ± 1.8. Functional outcomes at final follow-up showed no significant differences between patients with and without an injection (ASES score: 90.1 ± 14.6 with injection, 91.9 ± 8.2 without injection [P = .91]; Constant

  18. Reversibility of Supraspinatus Muscle Atrophy in Tendon-Bone Healing After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong Bok; Ryu, Ho Young; Hong, Jin Ho; Ko, Young Hoo; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2016-04-01

    To date, there are few reports of the definite reversibility of rotator cuff muscle atrophy after repair. To evaluate the reversibility of rotator cuff muscle atrophy after successful arthroscopic repair. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Included in this study were 47 patients (mean age, 61.2 ± 7.3 years; range, 49-73 years) who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) preoperatively and at 6-month and last follow-up. Patients who had confirmed rotator cuff healing (grades 1-3 according to the Sugaya classification) on both series of postoperative MRI were enrolled in the study. The mean time from the onset of symptoms to surgery was 24.7 ± 25.6 months (range, 3-120 months). The minimum follow-up was 2 years, and the mean follow-up duration was 41.8 ± 14.4 months. Serial changes in the supraspinatus muscle area on the most matching MRI scans (sagittal-oblique view) were evaluated. The area was measured by 2 independent observers. Both independent observers reported no significant difference in the area of the supraspinatus muscle between the preoperative time point and 6-month follow-up (observer 1: P = .135; observer 2: P = .189). However, there was a significant difference between the 6-month and last follow-up (mean, 41.8 months; observers 1 and 2: P < .001). The serial changes in the area preoperatively and at 6-month and last follow-up were 419.41 ± 122.97 mm(2), 431.76 ± 104.27 mm(2), and 466.73 ± 121.42 mm(2), respectively (observer 1), and 421.01 ± 116.61 mm(2), 432.56 ± 100.78 mm(2), and 469.84 ± 113.80 mm(2), respectively (observer 2). The intraclass correlation coefficient between the 2 observers was 0.988. At final follow-up, the area increase on the medial and lateral aspects of the sagittal-oblique view compared with preoperatively was 13.9% (P < .001) and 11.3% (P < .001), respectively. Fatty infiltration did not change from preoperatively to 6-month follow-up (P > .999) or from 6-month to

  19. Repair Integrity in Patients Returning for an Unscheduled Visit After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Retorn or Not?

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Syed Mohammed Taif; Lam, Patrick; Murrell, George A C

    2018-06-01

    After rotator cuff repair, some patients have ongoing problems significant enough to warrant presentation to a clinic for reassessment. The purpose of this study was to determine whether this cohort of patients was more likely to have a healed rotator cuff. We hypothesized that patients who had an unscheduled postoperative visit were more likely to have a healed rotator cuff than those who did not have an unscheduled postoperative visit. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 321 consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were evaluated; of these, 50 patients had an unscheduled return to clinic that included an ultrasound assessment of the cuff repair within 4 months postoperatively. Repair integrity was evaluated in all patients at 6 months postoperatively via ultrasonography. The failure-to-heal rate was greater in patients who had an unscheduled assessment (8/50; 16%) than in those who did not (14/275; 5%) ( P = .01). The patients most likely to have a repair failure were those who were assessed before 2 weeks and after 12 weeks (7/18; 39%) compared with those who were assessed between 3 and 12 weeks (1/32; 3%) ( P = .001). The failure-to-heal rate was very low in patients who had an unscheduled assessment with a tear size smaller than 4 cm 2 (0/34; 0%) compared with those with tear sizes greater than 4 cm 2 (8/16; 50%) ( P < .0001, Fisher exact text). Patients who had an unscheduled clinic visit after rotator cuff repair had a 16% chance of a failed healing response, whereas those who did not have an unscheduled visit had a 5% rate of failed healing. The risk of a failed healing response was greater if the tear was larger than 4 cm 2 , if patients presented within 2 weeks following surgery, or if they presented after 12 weeks postsurgery.

  20. Arthroscopic Labral Base Repair in the Hip: 5-Year Minimum Clinical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Domb, Benjamin G; Yuen, Leslie C; Ortiz-Declet, Victor; Litrenta, Jody; Perets, Itay; Chen, Austin W

    2017-10-01

    Arthroscopic labral base repair (LBR) in the hip is a previously described technique designed to restore the native functional anatomy of the labrum by reproducing its seal against the femoral head. LBR has been shown to have good short-term outcomes. Hypothesis/Purpose: The purpose was to evaluate clinical outcomes of an LBR cohort with a minimum 5-year follow-up. It was hypothesized that patients who underwent LBR would continue to have significant improvement from their preoperative scores and maintain scores similar to their 2-year outcomes. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Data for patients undergoing primary hip arthroscopic surgery with LBR from February 2008 to May 2011 with a minimum 5-year follow-up were prospectively collected and retrospectively reviewed. Patients with preoperative Tonnis osteoarthritis grade ≥2, previous hip conditions (slipped capital femoral epiphysis, avascular necrosis, Legg-Calv-Perthes disease), severe dysplasia (lateral center-edge angle <18°), or previous ipsilateral hip surgery were excluded. Statistical equivalence tests evaluated patient-reported outcomes (PROs) including the modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), Non-Arthritic Hip Score (NAHS), Hip Outcome Score-Sport-Specific Subscale (HOS-SSS), visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, and patient satisfaction (0-10 scale; 10 = very satisfied). Of the 70 patients (74 hips) who met inclusion and exclusion criteria, 60 (85.7%) patients (64 hips) were available at a minimum 5-year follow-up. All PRO scores significantly improved from preoperative values with a mean follow-up of 67.8 ± 7.4 months (range, 60.0-89.7 months). The mean mHHS increased from 64.4 ±13.8 to 85.3 ± 17.7 ( P < .001), the mean NAHS from 63.7 ± 17.0 to 87.0 ± 14.7 ( P < .001), and the mean HOS-SSS from 47.1 ± 23.2 to 76.5 ± 25.9 ( P < .001). The mean VAS score decreased from 5.9 ± 2.4 to 2.0 ± 2.1 ( P < .001). The mean patient satisfaction score was 8.1 ± 2.0. The improvement in PRO scores was

  1. Arthroscopic Anterior and Posterior Labral Repair After Traumatic Hip Dislocation: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Shindle, Michael K.; Kelly, Bryan T.

    2010-01-01

    With the improvements in flexible instrumentation, hip arthroscopy is being increasingly used to treat a variety of hip pathology, including labral tears. However, up to this point, there has not been a case report of an anterior and a posterior labral tear successfully repaired arthroscopically. We present a case report of a 27-year-old male firefighter who presented to our institution with an anterior and posterior labral tear, as well as a cam lesion and loose body, following a traumatic hip dislocation. The purpose of this case report is to illustrate that both anterior and posterior labral tears can be repaired using hip arthroscopy. Anterior and posterior labral tears can be caused by a traumatic hip dislocation, and both can be successfully repaired using arthroscopic techniques. PMID:21886540

  2. Does immobilization after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair increase tendon healing? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chong; Tang, Zhi-Hong; Hu, Jun-Zu; Zou, Guo-Yao; Xiao, Rong-Chi; Yan, Dong-Xue

    2014-09-01

    To determine whether immobilization after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair improved tendon healing compared with early passive motion. A systematic electronic literature search was conducted to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing early passive motion with immobilization after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The primary outcome assessed was tendon healing in the repaired cuff. Secondary outcome measures were range of motion (ROM) and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) shoulder scale, Simple Shoulder Test (SST), Constant, and visual analog scale (VAS) for pain scores. Pooled analyses were performed using a random effects model to obtain summary estimates of treatment effect with 95% confidence intervals. Heterogeneity among included studies was quantified. Three RCTs examining 265 patients were included. Meta-analysis revealed no significant difference in tendon healing in the repaired cuff between the early-motion and immobilization groups. A significant difference in external rotation at 6 months postoperatively favored early motion over immobilization, but no significant difference was observed at 1 year postoperatively. In one study, Constant scores were slightly higher in the early-motion group than in the immobilization group. Two studies found no significant difference in ASES, SST, or VAS score between groups. We found no evidence that immobilization after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was superior to early-motion rehabilitation in terms of tendon healing or clinical outcome. Patients in the early-motion group may recover ROM more rapidly. Level II; systematic review of levels I and II studies.

  3. The use of small (2.7 mm) screws for arthroscopically guided repair of carpal chip fractures.

    PubMed

    Wright, I M; Smith, M R W

    2011-05-01

    Removal of large chip fractures of the carpal bones and the osteochondral deficits that result, have been associated with a worse prognosis than removal of small fragments in similar locations. Reducing the articular defects by repair of large osteochondral fragments may have advantages over removal. Horses with osteochondral chip fractures that were of sufficient size and infrastructure to be repaired with small (2.7 mm diameter) AO/ASIF cortex screws were identified and repair effected by arthroscopically guided internal fixation. Thirty-three horses underwent surgery to repair 35 fractures of the dorsodistal radial carpal bone (n = 25), the dorsal margin of the radial facet of the third carpal bone (n = 9) and the intermediate facet of the distal radius (n = 1). There were no surgical complications and fractures healed satisfactorily in 26 of 28 horses and 23 horses returned to racing performance. Arthroscopically guided repair of carpal chip fractures with small diameter cortex screws is technically feasible and experiences with 33 cases suggest that this may have advantages over fragment removal in managing such cases. Surgeons treating horses with large chip fractures of the carpal bones should consider arthroscopically guided internal fixation as an alternative to removal. © 2010 EVJ Ltd.

  4. Arthroscopic Repair of the Medial Meniscus Radial/Oblique Tear Prevents the Progression of Meniscal Extrusion in Mildly Osteoarthritic Knees.

    PubMed

    Furumatsu, Takayuki; Kodama, Yuya; Kamatsuki, Yusuke; Hino, Tomohito; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2017-10-01

    Extrusion of the medial meniscus (MM) is associated with knee joint pain in osteoarthritic knees. The relationships among MM radial/oblique tears, MM extrusion (MME), and the effect of arthroscopic meniscal repair are not established. Here we evaluated the effects of arthroscopic all-inside MM repair on MME and the clinical outcomes in patients with radially oriented MM tears and mildly osteoarthritic knees. Twenty patients with a symptomatic radial or oblique tear of the MM posterior segment, MME ≥2.5 mm, and mildly osteoarthritic knees were treated using FasT-Fix 360 All-inside Meniscal Suture devices. We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure the patients' MM body width (MMBW), absolute MME, and relative MME. The Japanese Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, Lysholm, Tegner, IKDC Subjective Knee Evaluation, and Visual Analogue Scale scores were obtained. Arthroscopic all-inside MM repair prevented increases of absolute and relative MME. The preoperative and 3- and 12-month MRI-based MMBW values were similar. Over a 24-month follow-up after the MM repairs, the clinical scores showed significant improvements. Our results suggest that all-inside meniscal repairs would be useful in preventing the progression of MME in patients suffering from symptomatic MM radial/oblique tears associated with mildly osteoarthritic knees.

  5. Arthroscopic Removal and Tendon Repair for Refractory Rotator Cuff Calcific Tendinitis of the Shoulder.

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, Hiroshi; Iwashita, Satoshi; Okubo, Atsushi; Takai, Shinro

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical and radiological outcomes of arthroscopic treatment for refractory rotator cuff calcific tendinitis of the shoulder. Subjects were 37 patients (35 women and 2 men; mean age, 47.8 years; age range 34-61 years) who had undergone arthroscopic treatment for calcific tendinitis of the shoulder. Despite sufficient nonsurgical treatments, all patients had residual calcific deposit with persistent or recurrent pain. Before surgery, all patients underwent 3-directional radiographs of the shoulder and three-dimensional computed tomography to determine the location and size of calcific deposit. Arthroscopic surgery was performed with the patient under general anesthesia in the lateral decubitus position. A 2-cm single longitudinal incision was made with a radiofrequency hook blade on the tendon surface above calcific deposit. Calcific deposit was removed as much as possible with a curette and a motorized shaver. The incised tendon was repaired with a side-to-side suture with strong sutures. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association shoulder score was used to evaluate clinical outcomes. The extent of calcific deposit removal was evaluated with radiographs obtained before surgery, 1 week after the surgery and at the final follow-up examination. The mean follow-up duration was 30.4 (range, 13-72) months. The mean shoulder score significantly improved from 69.7 (range, 58-80) points before surgery to 97.8 (range, 89-100) points at the final follow-up examination. Postoperative radiographs in all patients, showed that the calcific deposit was resolved or reduced and those from 1 week after surgery to the final examination showed no evidence of recurrence or enlargement of calcific deposit. The calcific deposit had completely resolved in 34 patients but remained in 3 patients. When treating calcific tendinitis of the shoulder, it is important to accurately determine the size and location of calcific deposit by radiographs and 3

  6. Drilling through lateral transmuscular portal lowers the risk of suprascapular nerve injury during arthroscopic SLAP repair.

    PubMed

    Kocaoglu, Baris; Ulku, Tekin Kerem; Sayilir, Safiye; Ozbaydar, Mehmet Ugur; Bayramoglu, Alp; Karahan, Mustafa

    2017-10-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the risk of medial glenoid perforation and possible injury to suprascapular nerve during arthroscopic SLAP repair using lateral transmuscular portal. Ten cadaveric shoulder girdles were isolated and drilled at superior glenoid rim from both anterior-superior portal (1 o'clock) and lateral transmuscular portal (12 o'clock) for SLAP repairs. Drill hole depth was determined by the manufacturer's drill stop (20 mm), and any subsequent drill perforations through the medial bony surface of the glenoid were directly confirmed by dissection. The bone tunnel depth and subsequent distance to the suprascapular nerve, scapular height and width, were compared for investigated locations. Four perforations out of ten (40 %) occurred through anterior-superior portal with one associated nerve injury. One perforation out of ten (10 %) occurred through lateral transmuscular portal without any nerve injury. The mean depth was calculated as 17.6 mm (SD 3) for anterior-superior portal and 26.5 mm (SD 3.6) for lateral transmuscular portal (P < 0.001). It is anatomically possible that suprascapular nerve could sustain iatrogenic injury during labral anchor placement during SLAP repair. However, lateral transmuscular portal at 12 o'clock drill entry location has lower risk of suprascapular nerve injury compared with anterior-superior portal at 1 o'clock drill entry location.

  7. The cost-effectiveness of single-row compared with double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Genuario, James W; Donegan, Ryan P; Hamman, Daniel; Bell, John-Erik; Boublik, Martin; Schlegel, Theodore; Tosteson, Anna N A

    2012-08-01

    Interest in double-row techniques for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has increased over the last several years, presumably because of a combination of literature demonstrating superior biomechanical characteristics and recent improvements in instrumentation and technique. As a result of the increasing focus on value-based health-care delivery, orthopaedic surgeons must understand the cost implications of this practice. The purpose of this study was to examine the cost-effectiveness of double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair compared with traditional single-row repair. A decision-analytic model was constructed to assess the cost-effectiveness of double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair compared with single-row repair on the basis of the cost per quality-adjusted life year gained. Two cohorts of patients (one with a tear of <3 cm and the other with a tear of ≥3 cm) were evaluated. Probabilities for retear and persistent symptoms, health utilities for the particular health states, and the direct costs for rotator cuff repair were derived from the orthopaedic literature and institutional data. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for double-row compared with single-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was $571,500 for rotator cuff tears of <3 cm and $460,200 for rotator cuff tears of ≥3 cm. The rate of radiographic or symptomatic retear alone did not influence cost-effectiveness results. If the increase in the cost of double-row repair was less than $287 for small or moderate tears and less than $352 for large or massive tears compared with the cost of single-row repair, then double-row repair would represent a cost-effective surgical alternative. On the basis of currently available data, double-row rotator cuff repair is not cost-effective for any size rotator cuff tears. However, variability in the values for costs and probability of retear can have a profound effect on the results of the model and may create an environment in which double-row repair

  8. Outcomes of arthroscopic revision rotator cuff repair with acellular human dermal matrix allograft augmentation.

    PubMed

    Hohn, Eric A; Gillette, Blake P; Burns, Joseph P

    2018-05-01

    The purpose was to assess the minimum 2-year patient-reported outcomes and failure rate of patients who underwent revision arthroscopic rotator cuff repair augmented with acellular human dermal matrix (AHDM) allograft for repairable retears. From 2008-2014, patients who underwent revision rotator cuff repair augmented with AHDM with greater than 2 years' follow-up by a single surgeon were retrospectively reviewed. Data regarding surgical history, demographic characteristics, and medical comorbidities were collected. Outcome data included American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) and Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE) scores, as well as rotator cuff healing on magnetic resonance imaging or ultrasound. Retears and subsequent surgical procedures were characterized. A total of 28 patients met our inclusion criteria, and 23 (82%) were available for follow-up at 2 years. The mean age was 60.1 ± 9.3 years (range, 43-79 years), with a mean follow-up period of 48 ± 23 months. All patients had at least 1 prior rotator cuff repair. Of the 23 patients, 13 (56%) underwent postoperative imaging, and 4 of these 13 (31%) had a retear. A reoperation was performed in 3 of 23 patients (13%). Among the 6 patients with both preoperative and postoperative outcome scores, we saw improvement in the ASES score from 56 to 85 (P = .03) and in the SANE score from 42 to 76 (P = .03). The full cohort's mean postoperative ASES and SANE scores were 77 and 69, respectively. AHDM allograft augmentation is a safe and effective treatment method for patients with full-thickness rotator cuff retears. Further research is needed with larger studies to confirm these findings from our small cohort of patients. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Arthroscopic meniscal repair with use of the outside-in technique.

    PubMed

    Rodeo, S A

    2000-01-01

    The outside-in technique of arthroscopic repair is effective for repair of most meniscal tears. The overall indications for the use of this technique are similar to those for the commonly used inside-out technique. The outside-in technique is especially useful for suturing the anterior horn of the meniscus as well as for suturing meniscal replacement devices such as a collagen meniscal implant or a meniscal allograft. Other specific advantages of this technique include the ability to predictably avoid neurovascular injury without the need for a large posterior incision. A particular disadvantage is the difficulty of achieving perpendicular orientation of sutures when a tear is adjacent to the site of attachment of the posterior horn. Use of the inside-out technique or an all-inside implant is suggested for these tears. The use of this suturing technique is facilitated by attention to several technical points. The knee should be maintained in flexion for repair of tears of the lateral meniscus (to avoid injury to the peroneal nerve) and in nearly full extension for repair of the posterior aspect of the medial meniscus (to avoid injury to the saphenous nerve and its branches). Care must be taken to avoid tying the sutures around a branch of the saphenous nerve during repair of the medial meniscus. The sutures should be retrieved through a cannula in the anterior portal to avoid the entrapment of the sutures in soft tissue. A probe can be used to prevent displacement of the inner fragment of a bucket handle tear when the needles are placed across the tear, as the entering needles may push the torn fragment into the knee. A vertical suture orientation is preferred in order to evenly co-apt the meniscus to the capsule. If knot-end sutures (so-called Mulberry knots) are used, 2 sutures can be vertically stacked, with 1 on each surface of the meniscus. If a mattress suture is used, a vertical orientation is easily achieved with the outside-in technique. Use of an

  10. Comparison of arthroscopic medial meniscal suture repair techniques: inside-out versus all-inside repair.

    PubMed

    Choi, Nam-Hong; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Victoroff, Brian N

    2009-11-01

    There are no reports comparing meniscal healing between inside-out and all-inside repairs using sutures. No difference in healing rate exists between meniscal repairs with inside-out and all-inside suture repair in conjunction with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with hamstring tendon. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Forty-eight consecutive patients underwent meniscal repairs of longitudinal tears of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus combined with anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. All-inside repair was attempted when the tears were located in the red-red zone or the ramp area of the meniscus. If a tear that was in the ramp area or red-red zone extended to the midbody of the meniscus, or if there was a tear in red-white zone, the inside-out repair technique was used. Fourteen patients had all-inside meniscal repairs, and 34 patients had inside-out meniscal repairs with absorbable sutures. Identical postoperative rehabilitation protocols were used. Postoperative evaluations included Lysholm knee scoring scale, Tegner activity levels, Lachman and pivot-shift tests, and KT-1000 arthrometer. Assessment of meniscal status was performed using joint line tenderness, McMurray test, and range of motion. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging scans were obtained on all patients. Mean follow-up was 35.7 months. No patient had joint line tenderness or reported pain or clicking on McMurray test. There was no significant difference in range of motion between groups. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging scans demonstrated that 10 (71.4%) menisci were healed and 4 (28.6%) partially healed in the all-inside group; 24 (70.6%) menisci were healed and 10 (29.4%) partially healed in the inside-out group. There was no significant difference in meniscal healing between groups. There were no differences in Lachman test, KT-1000 arthrometer side-to-side differences measurements, Lysholm scores, and Tegner activity scales. There was a significant difference in

  11. Morphologic Risk Factors in Predicting Symptomatic Structural Failure of Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repairs: Tear Size, Location, and Atrophy Matter.

    PubMed

    Gasbarro, Gregory; Ye, Jason; Newsome, Hillary; Jiang, Kevin; Wright, Vonda; Vyas, Dharmesh; Irrgang, James J; Musahl, Volker

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate whether morphologic characteristics of rotator cuff tear have prognostic value in determining symptomatic structural failure of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair independent of age or gender. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair cases performed by five fellowship-trained surgeons at our institution from 2006 to 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Data extraction included demographics, comorbidities, repair technique, clinical examination, and radiographic findings. Failure in symptomatic patients was defined as structural defect on postoperative magnetic resonance imaging or pseudoparalysis on examination. Failures were age and gender matched with successful repairs in a 1:2 ratio. A total of 30 failures and 60 controls were identified. Supraspinatus atrophy (P = .03) and tear size (18.3 mm failures v 13.9 mm controls; P = .02) were significant risk factors for failure, as was the presence of an infraspinatus tear greater than 10 mm (62% v 17%, P < .01). Single-row repair (P = .06) and simple suture configuration (P = .17) were more common but similar between groups. Diabetes mellitus and active tobacco use were not significantly associated with increased failure risk but psychiatric medication use was more frequent in the failure group. This study confirms previous suspicions that tear size and fatty infiltration are associated with failure of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair but independent of age or gender in symptomatic patients. There is also a quantitative cutoff on magnetic resonance imaging for the size of infraspinatus involvement that can be used clinically as a predicting factor. Although reported in the literature, smoking and diabetes were not associated with failure. Level III, retrospective case control. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Long-term successful arthroscopic repair of large and massive rotator cuff tears with a functional and degradable reinforcement device.

    PubMed

    Proctor, Christopher S

    2014-10-01

    Rotator cuff repair is a procedure with varying outcomes, and there has been subsequent interest in devices that reinforce the repair and enhance structural and functional outcomes. The objective of this study was to determine these outcomes for arthroscopic repair of large and massive rotator cuff tears augmented with a synthetic absorbable mesh designed specifically for reinforcement of tendon repair by imaging and clinical assessments. Consecutive arthroscopic repairs were performed on 18 patients with large to massive rotator cuff tears by use of a poly-l-lactic acid synthetic patch as a reinforcement device and fixation with 4 sutures. Patients were assessed preoperatively and at 6 months, 12 months, and a mean of 42 months after surgery by the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) shoulder score to evaluate clinical performance and at 12 months by ultrasound to assess structural repair. Ultrasound showed that 15 of 18 patients had intact rotator cuff repair at 12 months; at 42 months, an additional patient had a failed repair. Patients showed improvement in the ASES shoulder score from 25 preoperatively to 71 at 12 months and 70 at 42 months after surgery. Patients with intact rotator cuff (n = 14) at 42 months had an ASES shoulder score of 82. The poly-l-lactic acid bioabsorbable patch designed specifically to reinforce the surgical repair of tendons supported successful repair of large to massive rotator cuff tears in 83% of patients at 12 months after surgery and 78% of patients at 42 months after surgery, with substantial functional improvement. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Arthroscopic repair of circumferential lesions of the glenoid labrum: surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Tokish, John M; McBratney, Colleen M; Solomon, Daniel J; Leclere, Lance; Dewing, Christopher B; Provencher, Matthew T

    2010-09-01

    Symptomatic pan-labral or circumferential (360°) tears of the glenohumeral labrum are an uncommon injury. The purpose of the present study was to report the results of surgical treatment of circumferential lesions of the glenoid labrum with use of validated outcome instruments. From July 2003 to May 2006, forty-one shoulders in thirty-nine patients (thirty-four men and five women) with a mean age of 25.1 years were prospectively enrolled in a multicenter study and were managed for a circumferential (360°) lesion of the glenoid labrum. All patients had a primary diagnosis of pain and recurrent shoulder instability, and all underwent arthroscopic repair of the circumferential labral tear with a mean of 7.1 suture anchors. The outcomes for thirty-nine of the forty-one shoulders were assessed after a mean duration of follow-up of 31.8 months on the basis of the rating of pain and instability on a scale of 0 to 10, a physical examination, and three outcome instruments (the Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation score, the modified American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, and the Short Form-12 score). Significant improvement was noted in terms of the mean pain score (from 4.3 to 1.1), the mean instability score (from 7.3 to 0.2), the mean modified American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score (from 55.5 to 89.6), the mean Short Form-12 score (from 75.7 to 90.0), and the mean Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation score (from 36.7 to 88.5). Six shoulders required revision surgery because of recurrent instability (two), recalcitrant biceps tendinitis (two), or postoperative tightness (two). All patients returned to their preinjury activity level. Pan-labral or circumferential lesions are an uncommon yet extensive injury of the glenohumeral joint that may result in recurrent instability and pain. The present study demonstrates that arthroscopic capsulolabral repair with suture anchor fixation can restore the stability of the glenohumeral joint and can provide a reliable

  14. Multicenter Analysis of Midterm Clinical Outcomes of Arthroscopic Labral Repair in the Hip: Minimum 5-Year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Hevesi, Mario; Krych, Aaron J; Johnson, Nick R; Redmond, John M; Hartigan, David E; Levy, Bruce A; Domb, Benjamin G

    2018-02-01

    The technique of hip arthroscopic surgery is advancing and becoming more commonly performed. However, most current reported results are limited to short-term follow-up, and therefore, the durability of the procedure is largely unknown. To perform a multicenter analysis of mid-term clinical outcomes of arthroscopic hip labral repair and determine the risk factors for patient outcomes. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Prospectively collected data of primary hip arthroscopic labral repair performed at 4 high-volume centers between 2008 and 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. Patients were assessed preoperatively and postoperatively with the visual analog scale (VAS), modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), and Hip Outcome Score-Sports-Specific Subscale (HOS-SSS) at a minimum of 5 years' follow-up. Factors including age, body mass index (BMI), Tönnis grade, and cartilage grade were analyzed in relation to outcome scores, and revision rates were determined. Failure was defined as subsequent ipsilateral hip surgery, including revision arthroscopic surgery and open hip surgery. A total of 303 patients (101 male, 202 female) with a mean age of 32.0 years (range, 10.7-58.9 years) were followed for a mean of 5.7 years (range, 5.0-7.9 years). Patients achieved mean improvements in VAS of 3.5 points, mHHS of 20.1 points, and HOS-SSS of 29.3 points. Thirty-seven patients (12.2%) underwent revision arthroscopic surgery, and 12 (4.0%) underwent periacetabular osteotomy, resurfacing, or total hip arthroplasty during the study period. Patients with a BMI >30 kg/m 2 had a mean mHHS score 9.5 points lower and a mean HOS-SSS score 15.9 points lower than those with a BMI ≤30 kg/m 2 ( P < .01). Patients aged >35 years at surgery had a mean mHHS score 4.5 points lower and a HOS-SSS score 6.7 points lower than those aged ≤35 years ( P = .03). Patients with Tönnis grade 2 radiographs demonstrated a 12.5-point worse mHHS score ( P = .02) and a 23.0-point worse HOS-SSS score ( P < .01

  15. Arthroscopic Partial Repair of Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tears: Preoperative Factors Associated With Outcome Deterioration Over 2 Years.

    PubMed

    Shon, Min Soo; Koh, Kyoung Hwan; Lim, Tae Kang; Kim, Won Ju; Kim, Kyung Cheon; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2015-08-01

    Arthroscopic partial repair is a treatment option in irreparable large-to-massive rotator cuff tears without arthritic changes. However, there are indications that arthroscopic partial repair does not yield satisfactory outcomes. To report the clinical and radiographic results of arthroscopic partial repairs in patients with irreparable large-to-massive cuff tears. In addition, an analysis was performed regarding preoperative factors that may influence patient outcomes and patient-rated satisfaction over time. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. From 2005 to 2011, a total of 31 patients who underwent arthroscopic partial repair for irreparable large-to-massive cuff tears were retrospectively evaluated. Partial repair was defined as posterior cuff tissue repair with or without subscapularis tendon repair to restore the transverse force couple of the cuff. Pain visual analog scale (PVAS), questionnaire results (American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons [ASES] and Simple Shoulder Test [SST]), and radiographic changes (acromiohumeral distance and degenerative change) were assessed preoperatively, at first follow-up (roughly 1 year postoperatively), and at final follow-up (>2 years postoperatively). Patients rated their satisfaction level at each postoperative follow-up as well. Preoperative factors that might influence outcomes, such as patient demographics, tear size, and fatty infiltration, were investigated. The preoperative, first follow-up, and final follow-up results for mean PVAS (5.13, 2.13, and 3.16, respectively) and questionnaires (ASES: 41.97, 76.37, and 73.78; SST: 3.61, 6.33, and 6.07, respectively) improved significantly (all P < .05). Radiographic evaluation showed no difference compared with preoperative status. Nevertheless, patient-rated satisfaction at final evaluation was inferior: 16 good responses ("very satisfied" and "satisfied") and 15 poor responses ("rather the same" and "dissatisfied"). Despite initial improvements in both groups (P < .05

  16. Is the American Society of Shoulder and Elbow Therapists' rehabilitation guideline better than standard care when applied to Bankart-operated patients? A controlled study.

    PubMed

    Damkjær, Lars; Petersen, Tom; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit

    2015-02-01

    To determine whether there is a difference in shoulder-related physical function and quality of life between postoperative rehabilitation patients receiving standard care and those receiving care according to the American Society of Shoulder and Elbow Therapists' rehabilitation guideline for arthroscopic anterior capsulolabral repair of the shoulder. Descriptive studies with comparison between a retrospective and a prospective cohort. Municipal outpatient rehabilitation centre. A total of 96 arthroscopic Bankart-operated patients. A total of 52 patients received standard care; 44 patients underwent rehabilitation according to the American Society of Shoulder and Elbow Therapists' rehabilitation guideline. Primary outcome variable was Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index. Secondary outcome measures were Patient-Specific Functional Scale, shoulder range of motion, return to work, return to sports, and costs. There was no significant difference in adjusted mean change scores between the standard care group and the guideline group in the primary outcome variable (Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index total = 574.85 vs. 644.48) or the secondary outcomes (Patient-Specific Functional Scale = 4.6 vs. 5.0; range of motion in forward flexion = 46.49° vs. 49.58°; external rotation in adduction = 28.58° vs. 34.18°; external rotation in abduction = 51.29° vs. 47.55°; weeks until return to work = 5.2 vs. 6.9; weeks until return to sports =13.9 vs. 13.1; costs = number of visits; 18.5 vs. 15.9). There were no significant between-group differences in shoulder-related physical function and quality of life between the standard care group and the guideline group, following Bankart operations. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Single anterior portal: A better option for arthroscopic treatment of traumatic anterior shoulder instability?

    PubMed

    Çiçek, Hakan; Tuhanioğlu, Ümit; Oğur, Hasan Ulaş; Seyfettinoğlu, Fırat; Çiloğlu, Osman; Beyzadeoğlu, Tahsin

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare single and double anterior portal techniques in the arthroscopic treatment of traumatic anterior shoulder instability. A total of 91 cases who underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair for anterior shoulder instability were reviewed. The patients were divided into 2 groups as Group 1 (47 male and 2 female; mean age: 25.8 ± 6.8) for arthroscopic single anterior portal approach and Group 2 (41 male and 1 female; mean age: 25.4 ± 6.6) for the classical anterior double portal approach. The groups were compared for clinical scores, range of motion, analgesia requirement, complications, duration of surgery, cost and learning curve according to a short questionnaire completed by the relevant healthcare professionals. No statistically significant difference was found between the 2 groups in terms of pre-operative and post-operative Constant and Rowe Shoulder Scores, range of motion and complications (p > 0.05). In Group 2 patients, the requirement for post-operative analgesics was significantly higher (p < 0.001), whereas the duration of surgery was statistically significantly shorter in Group 1 (p < 0.001). In the assessment of the questionnaire, it was seen that a single portal anterior approach was preferred at a higher ratio (p = 0.035). The cost analysis revealed that the cost was 5.7% less for patients with a single portal. In the arthroscopic treatment of traumatic anterior shoulder instability accompanied by a Bankart lesion, the anterior single portal technique is as successful in terms of clinical results as the conventional double portal approach. The single portal technique has advantages such as less postoperative pain, a shorter surgical learning curve and lower costs. Level III, Therapeutic study. Copyright © 2017 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Tape Versus Suture in Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Biomechanical Analysis and Assessment of Failure Rates at 6 Months

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui Wen; Lam, Patrick Hong; Shepherd, Henry M.; Murrell, George A. C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff retears after surgical repair are associated with poorer subjective and objectives clinical outcomes than intact repairs. Purpose: The aims of this study were to (1) examine the biomechanical differences between rotator cuff repair using No. 2 suture and tape in an ovine model and (2) compare early clinical outcomes between patients who had rotator cuff repair with tape and patients who had repair with No. 2 suture. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study and cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Biomechanical testing of footprint contact pressure and load to failure were conducted with 16 ovine shoulders using a tension band repair technique with 2 different types of sutures (No. 2 suture [FiberWire; Arthrex] and tape [FiberTape; Arthrex]) with the same knotless anchor system. A retrospective study of 150 consecutive patients (tape, n = 50; suture, n = 100) who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair by a single surgeon with tear size larger than 1.5 × 1 cm was conducted. Ultrasound was used to evaluate the repair integrity at 6 months postsurgery. Results: Rotator cuff repair using tape had greater footprint contact pressure (mean ± standard error of the mean, 0.33 ± 0.03 vs 0.11 ± 0.3 MPa; P < .0001) compared with repair using No. 2 sutures at 0° abduction with a 30-N load applied across the repaired tendon. The ultimate failure load of the tape repair was greater than that for suture repair (217 ± 28 vs 144 ± 14 N; P < .05). The retear rate was similar between the tape (16%; 8/50) and suture groups (17%; 17/100). Conclusion: Rotator cuff repair with the wider tape compared with No. 2 suture did not affect the retear rate at 6 months postsurgery, despite having superior biomechanical properties. PMID:28451619

  19. Cost-Effectiveness of Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty Versus Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair for Symptomatic Large and Massive Rotator Cuff Tears.

    PubMed

    Makhni, Eric C; Swart, Eric; Steinhaus, Michael E; Mather, Richard C; Levine, William N; Bach, Bernard R; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2016-09-01

    To compare the cost-effectiveness within the United States health care system of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair versus reverse total shoulder arthroplasty in patients with symptomatic large and massive rotator cuff tears without cuff-tear arthropathy. An expected-value decision analysis was constructed comparing the costs and outcomes of patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair and reverse total shoulder arthroplasty for large and massive rotator cuff tears (and excluding cases of cuff-tear arthropathy). Comprehensive literature search provided input data to extrapolate costs and health utility states for these outcomes. The primary outcome assessed was that of incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty versus rotator cuff repair. For the base case, both arthroscopic rotator cuff repair and reverse total shoulder were superior to nonoperative care, with an ICER of $15,500/quality-adjusted life year (QALY) and $37,400/QALY, respectively. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was dominant over primary reverse total shoulder arthroplasty, with lower costs and slightly improved clinical outcomes. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was the preferred strategy as long as the lifetime progression rate from retear to end-stage cuff-tear arthropathy was less than 89%. However, when the model was modified to account for worse outcomes when reverse shoulder arthroplasty was performed after a failed attempted rotator cuff repair, primary reverse total shoulder had superior outcomes with an ICER of $90,000/QALY. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair-despite high rates of tendon retearing-for patients with large and massive rotator cuff tears may be a more cost-effective initial treatment strategy when compared with primary reverse total shoulder arthroplasty and when assuming no detrimental impact of previous surgery on outcomes after arthroplasty. Clinical judgment should still be prioritized when formulating treatment plans for these

  20. Delaminated rotator cuff tear: extension of delamination and cuff integrity after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Gwak, Heui-Chul; Kim, Chang-Wan; Kim, Jung-Han; Choo, Hye-Jeung; Sagong, Seung-Yeob; Shin, John

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extension of delamination and the cuff integrity after arthroscopic repair of delaminated rotator cuff tears. Sixty-five patients with delaminated rotator cuff tears were retrospectively reviewed. The delaminated tears were divided into full-thickness delaminated tears and partial-thickness delaminated tears. To evaluate the medial extension, we calculated the coronal size of the delaminated portion. To evaluate the posterior extension, we checked the tendon involved. Cuff integrity was evaluated by computed tomography arthrography. The mean medial extension in the full-thickness and partial-thickness delaminated tears was 18.1 ± 6.0 mm and 22.7 ± 6.3 mm, respectively (P = .0084). The posterior extension into the supraspinatus and the infraspinatus was 36.9% and 32.3%, respectively, in the full-thickness delaminated tears, and it was 27.7% and 3.1%, respectively, in the partial-thickness delaminated tears (P = .0043). With regard to cuff integrity, 35 cases of anatomic healing, 10 cases of partial healing defects, and 17 cases of retear were detected. Among the patients with retear and partial healing of the defect, all the partially healed defects showed delamination. Three retear patients showed delamination, and 14 retear patients did not show delamination; the difference was statistically significant (P = .0001). The full-thickness delaminated tears showed less medial extension and more posterior extension than the partial-thickness delaminated tears. Delamination did not develop in retear patients, but delamination was common in the patients with partially healed defects. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Arthroscopic Lateral Ligament Repair Through Two Portals in Chronic Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Jorge Pablo; del Vecchio, Jorge Javier; Patthauer, Luciano; Ocampo, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Injury to the lateral ligament complex of the ankle is one of the most common sports-related injury. Usually lateral ankle evolves with excellent clinical recovery with non surgical treatment, however, near about 30% develop a lateral chronic instability sequela. Several open and arthroscopic surgical techniques have been described to treat this medical condition. Material and Methods: Of the 22 patients who were treated; 18 males and 4 females, and aged from 17-42 years (mean 28 years). All patients presented a history of more than three ankle sprains in the last two years and presented positive anterior drawer and talar tilt test of the ankle in the physical examination. We perform an anterior arthroscopy of the ankle in order to treat asociated disease and then we performed “All inside¨ lateral ligament repair through two portals (anteromedial and anterolateral) using an anchor knotless suture. Results: Clinical outcome evaluations were performed at a mean follow up of 25 months. (R: 17-31). Overall results has been shown by means of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS). Mean AOFAS scores improved from 63 points (range 52–77) preoperatively to 90 points (range 73–100) at final follow up. No recurrences of ankle instability were found in the cases presented. Conclusion: Several surgical procedures have been described during the last years in order to treat chronic ankle instability. ¨All inside¨ lateral ligament reconstruction presents lower local morbidity than open procedures with few complications. Moreover, it is a reproductible technique, with high clinical success rate, few complications and relatively quick return to sports activities. A high knowledge of the anatomic landmarks should be essential to avoid unwated injuries. PMID:29081860

  2. Arthroscopic Lateral Ligament Repair Through Two Portals in Chronic Ankle Instability.

    PubMed

    Batista, Jorge Pablo; Del Vecchio, Jorge Javier; Patthauer, Luciano; Ocampo, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Injury to the lateral ligament complex of the ankle is one of the most common sports-related injury. Usually lateral ankle evolves with excellent clinical recovery with non surgical treatment, however, near about 30% develop a lateral chronic instability sequela. Several open and arthroscopic surgical techniques have been described to treat this medical condition. Of the 22 patients who were treated; 18 males and 4 females, and aged from 17-42 years (mean 28 years). All patients presented a history of more than three ankle sprains in the last two years and presented positive anterior drawer and talar tilt test of the ankle in the physical examination. We perform an anterior arthroscopy of the ankle in order to treat asociated disease and then we performed "All inside¨ lateral ligament repair through two portals (anteromedial and anterolateral) using an anchor knotless suture. Clinical outcome evaluations were performed at a mean follow up of 25 months. (R: 17-31). Overall results has been shown by means of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS). Mean AOFAS scores improved from 63 points (range 52-77) preoperatively to 90 points (range 73-100) at final follow up. No recurrences of ankle instability were found in the cases presented. Several surgical procedures have been described during the last years in order to treat chronic ankle instability. ¨All inside¨ lateral ligament reconstruction presents lower local morbidity than open procedures with few complications. Moreover, it is a reproductible technique, with high clinical success rate, few complications and relatively quick return to sports activities. A high knowledge of the anatomic landmarks should be essential to avoid unwated injuries.

  3. Arthroscopic repair of delaminated acetabular articular cartilage using fibrin adhesive. Results at one to three years.

    PubMed

    Stafford, Giles H; Bunn, Jonathan R; Villar, Richard N

    2011-01-01

    We describe one- to three-year results of a novel use of fibrin glue in the treatment of cartilage damage by arthroscopy in the hip. This technique uses the microfracture technique and fibrin adhesive to bond delaminated articular cartilage to the underlying subchondral bone. This is generally performed in conjunction with treatment of underlying pathology such as femoroacetabular impingement. Patients were assessed using the modified Harris Hip Score (MHHS) pre- and post-operatively, and statistical significance determined by Student's t-test. We report the mid-term results of 43 patients with femoroacetabular impingement who have undergone this technique for re-attachment of delaminated chondral flaps. There was a statistically significant improvement in MHHS at a mean of 28 months (16 to 42 months) after surgery (p<0.0001). The MHHS for pain improved significantly from 21.8 (95% CI 19.0 to 24.7) pre-operatively to 35.8 (95% CI 32.6 to 38.9) post-operatively (p<0.0001). The MHHS for function also showed significant, although more modest, improvements from 40.0 (95% CI 37.7 to 42.3) pre-operatively to 43.6 (95% CI 41.4 to 45.8) post-operatively (p=0.0006). There were three patients who had early (within 12 months of the index procedure) revision arthroscopy for iliopsoas pathology. Arthroscopic repair of delaminated acetabular articular cartilage using fibrin adhesive is a useful technique in the treatment of early cartilage damage. We have seen encouraging mid-term results, although further studies are warranted.

  4. Platelet-rich plasma in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jia-Guo; Zhao, Li; Jiang, Yan-Xia; Wang, Zeng-Liang; Wang, Jia; Zhang, Peng

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to appraise the retear rate and clinical outcomes of platelet-rich plasma use in patients undergoing arthroscopic full-thickness rotator cuff repair. We searched the Cochrane Library, PubMed, and EMBASE databases for randomized controlled trials comparing the outcomes of arthroscopic rotator cuff surgery with or without the use of platelet-rich plasma. Methodological quality was assessed by the Detsky quality scale. When there was no high heterogeneity, we used a fixed-effects model. Dichotomous variables were presented as risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), and continuous data were measured as mean differences with 95% CIs. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system was used to assess the quality of evidence for each individual outcome. Eight randomized controlled trials were included, with the sample size ranging from 28 to 88. Overall methodological quality was high. Fixed-effects analysis showed that differences were not significant between the 2 groups in retear rate (RR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.70 to 1.25; P = .66), Constant score (mean difference, 1.12; 95% CI, -1.38 to 3.61; P = .38), and University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) score (mean difference, -0.68; 95% CI, -2.00 to 0.65; P = .32). The strength of GRADE evidence was categorized respectively as low for retear, moderate for Constant score, and low for UCLA shoulder score. Our meta-analysis does not support the use of platelet-rich plasma in the arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears over repairs without platelet-rich plasma because of similar retear rates and clinical outcomes. Level II, meta-analysis of Level I and II randomized controlled trials. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical experience with arthroscopically-assisted repair of peripheral triangular fibrocartilage complex tears in adolescents--technique and results.

    PubMed

    Farr, Sebastian; Zechmann, Ulrike; Ganger, Rudolf; Girsch, Werner

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to report our preliminary results after arthroscopically-assisted repair of peripheral triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) tears in adolescent patients. All children and adolescents who underwent arthroscopically-assisted repair of a Palmer 1B tear were identified and prospectively evaluated after a mean follow-up of 1.3 years. The postoperative assessment included documentation of clinical parameters, pain score (visual analogue scale, VAS), grip strength and completion of validated outcome scores (Modified Mayo Wrist Score, MMWS; Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Inventory, DASH). A total of 12 patients (four males, eight females) with a mean age of 16.3 years at the time of surgery were evaluated. The mean VAS decreased significantly from 7.0 to 1.7 after the procedure. We observed a significant increase of the MMWS after surgery; however, MMWS was still significantly lower at final follow-up when compared to the contralateral side. A mean postoperative DASH score of 16 indicated an excellent outcome after the procedure. DASH Sports and Work Modules showed fair and good overall outcomes in the short-term, respectively. Grip strength averaged 86 % of the contralateral side at final follow-up, with no significant difference being found between both sides. Arthroscopically-assisted repair of peripheral TFCC tears in adolescents provided predictable pain relief and markedly improved functional outcome scores. Concomitant pathologies may have to be addressed at the same time to eventually achieve a satisfactory outcome. Sports participation, however, may be compromised in the short-term and should therefore be resumed six months postoperatively.

  6. The American Society of Shoulder and Elbow Therapists' consensus statement on rehabilitation following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Thigpen, Charles A; Shaffer, Michael A; Gaunt, Bryce W; Leggin, Brian G; Williams, Gerald R; Wilcox, Reg B

    2016-04-01

    This is a consensus statement on rehabilitation developed by the American Society of Shoulder and Elbow Therapists. The purpose of this statement is to aid clinical decision making during the rehabilitation of patients after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The overarching philosophy of rehabilitation is centered on the principle of the gradual application of controlled stresses to the healing rotator cuff repair with consideration of rotator cuff tear size, tissue quality, and patient variables. This statement describes a rehabilitation framework that includes a 2-week period of strict immobilization and a staged introduction of protected, passive range of motion during weeks 2-6 postoperatively, followed by restoration of active range of motion, and then progressive strengthening beginning at postoperative week 12. When appropriate, rehabilitation continues with a functional progression for return to athletic or demanding work activities. This document represents the first consensus rehabilitation statement developed by a multidisciplinary society of international rehabilitation professionals specifically for the postoperative care of patients after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Biomechanical Analysis of All-Inside, Arthroscopic Suture Repair Versus Extensor Retinaculum Capsulorrhaphy for Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Tears With Instability.

    PubMed

    Patel, Amar A; Alhandi, Ali A; Milne, Edward; Dy, Christopher J; Latta, Loren L; Ouellette, E Anne

    2016-03-01

    To assess ulnocarpal joint stability after treatment of a peripheral triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) injury with all-inside arthroscopic suture repair (SR), extensor retinaculum capsulorrhaphy with the Herbert sling (HS), and a combination of both (SR+HS). Twelve fresh-frozen, age-matched, upper-extremity specimens intact from the distal humerus were prepared. Nondestructive mechanical testing was performed to assess native ulnocarpal joint stability and load-displacement curves were recorded. A peripheral, ulnar-sided TFCC injury was created with arthroscopic assistance, and mechanical testing was performed. Each specimen was treated with SR or HS and testing was repeated. The 6 specimens treated with SR were then treated with HS (SR+HS), and testing was repeated. We used paired Student t tests for statistical analysis within cohorts. For all cohorts, there was an average increase in ulnar translation after the creation of a peripheral TFCC injury and an average decrease after repair. Herbert sling decreased translation by 21%, SR decreased translation by 12%, and SR+HS decreased translation by 26%. Suture repair plus HS and HS reduce ulnar translation the most after a peripheral TFCC injury, followed by SR alone. Ulnocarpal joint stability should be assessed clinically in patients with peripheral TFCC injury, and consideration should be made for using extensor capsulorrhaphy in isolation or as an adjunct to SR as a treatment option. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Single-row versus double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in small- to medium-sized tears.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Nuri; Kocaoglu, Baris; Guven, Osman

    2010-07-01

    Double-row rotator cuff repair leads to superior cuff integrity and clinical results compared with single-row repair. The study enrolled 68 patients with a full-thickness rotator cuff tear who were divided into 2 groups of 34 patients according to repair technique. The patients were followed-up for at least 2 years. The results were evaluated by Constant score. Despite the biomechanical studies and cadaver studies that proved the superiority of double-row fixation over single-row fixation, our clinical results show no difference in functional outcome between the two methods. It is evident that double-row repair is more technically demanding, expensive, and time-consuming than single-row repair, without providing a significant improvement in clinical results. Comparison between groups did not show significant differences. At the final follow-up, the Constant score was 82.2 in the single-row group and 78.8 in the double-row group. Functional outcome was improved in both groups after surgery, but the difference between the 2 groups was not significant. At long-term follow-up, arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with the double-row technique showed no significant difference in clinical outcome compared with single-row repair in small to medium tears. 2010 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The clinical and radiological results of arthroscopic versus arthroscopy assisted mini-open repair of rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Özcan, Muhammed Sefa; Sezer, Hasan Basri; Eren, Osman Tuğrul; Armağan, Raffi; Kanar, Muharrem

    2017-01-01

    In this study we reported retrospectively the comperative clinical and radiological results of the two most common surgical procedures in rotator cuff tear repair of shoulder, the golden standart arthroscopic and alternative arthroscopically assisted mini-open surgery. We included 58 patients who admitted to our clinic for rotator cuff tear and treated surgically between january 2013 and august 2015. The two groups were composed of arthroscopically treated 29 patients and 29 patients who were treated with arthroscopically assisted mini open surgery. The arthroscopy group included 18 females and 11 males, the mini-open group included 10 females and 19 males. The mean age was 56,0 (39,0-73,0) years, in arthroscopic and 55,0 (40,0-70,0) years in mini-open surgery group. 6 patients in the arthroscopy group(20,7%) and 10 patients in the mini-open group(34,5%) were defining trauma before the beginning of their complaints. The postoperative follow up was 28,9 months in arthroscopy group and 22,6 months in the mini-open surgery group. Preoperative physical or medical treatments were documented. Any additional surgical procedures like biceps long head tenotomy, subacromial decompression and bursectomy were also noted. Patients were evaluated with ASES and Constant shoulder scales before and after the surgery. Patients were evaluated radiologically with MRI at the last follow up for healing and tendon quality. The type 2 acromion was the dominant in both groups constituting the 44,8% of the total number of patients. 24 (82,8%)patients in the arthroscopically treated patients and 18(62,1%) patients in the mini-open group were undergone at least one of the additional surgical treatments. The mean length of the surgical scar was 3,4(3-5) cm in mini open group. None of the patients complained of the surgical scar. 16 patients in the arthroscopy group and 17 patients in the mini-open group had supraspinatus tendon pathology(either tear or degeneration) in the MRI control at the

  10. The clinical effect of rehabilitation following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: A meta-analysis of early versus delayed passive motion.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuxiang; Sun, Han; Luo, Xiaomin; Wang, Kun; Wu, Guofeng; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Peng; Sun, Xiaoliang

    2018-01-01

    The argument on the recommended rehabilitation protocol following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair remains to be resolved. So this meta-analysis was presented to evaluate the differences of clinical effects between the 2 distinct rehabilitation protocols after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The PubMed, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and EMBASE were systematically searched. Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published up to July 25, 2017, comparing early passive motion (EPM) versus delayed passive motion (DPM) rehabilitation protocols following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were identified. The primary outcomes included range of motion and healing rate, while the secondary outcomes were Constant score, American Shoulder and Elbow Society (ASES) score, and Simple Shoulder Test (SST) score. The exclusion criteria contained biochemical trials, reviews, case reports, retrospective studies, without mention about passive motion exercise, no assessment of outcomes mentioned above, and no comparison of EPM and DPM rehabilitation protocols. Eight RCTs with 671 patients were enrolled in this study. The EPM resulted in improved shoulder forward flexion at short term, mid-term, and long-term follow-ups. The EPM group was superior to the DPM group in terms of external rotation (ER) at short-term and mid-term follow-ups. However, the DPM performed better long-term ASES score. These 2 protocols were equivalent in terms of ER at long term, ASES score at mid-term, SST score, Constant score, and healing rate. After excluding 2 RCTs that examined only small- and medium-sized tears, the pooled results of healing rate decreased from 82.4% to 76.6% in the EPM and 86.9% to 85.9% in the DPM. The meta-analysis suggests that the EPM protocol results in superior ROM recovery after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair but may adversely affect the shoulder function, which should be supported by further research. The healing rate at long-term follow-up is not clearly affected by the

  11. Comparison of epidemiology and outcomes of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for anterosuperior and posterosuperior rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Teratani, Takeshi

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence, epidemiology, and outcomes of anterosuperior (A group) rotator cuff tears (RCTs) and posterosuperior (P group) RCTs treated by arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR). A total of 67 A group patients and 14 P group patients were included in the study. The prevalence of the A group (82.3%) was significantly higher than that of the P group (17.7%). The outcomes in both groups were good, even though the A group had a higher rate of injury to the LHB than the P group. Level III, case-control Study, treatment study.

  12. Critical Shoulder Angle and Acromial Index Do Not Influence 24-Month Functional Outcome After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Lee, Merrill; Chen, Jerry Yongqian; Liow, Ming Han Lincoln; Chong, Hwei Chi; Chang, Paul; Lie, Denny

    2017-11-01

    Recent studies have shown a correlation between scapular geometry and the development of atraumatic rotator cuff tears. However, a paucity of literature is available on the effects of critical shoulder angle (CSA) and acromial index (AI) on functional outcomes after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Hypothesis/Purpose: The purpose was to investigate the influence of CSA and AI on 24-month functional outcomes after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The hypothesis was that a larger CSA or AI would result in poorer postoperative outcomes. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. The study included 147 patients who underwent arthroscopic double-row rotator cuff repair for radiologically documented full-thickness supraspinatus tears. An independent reviewer measured the CSA and AI on preoperative radiographs. These patients were prospectively enrolled and were evaluated preoperatively as well as at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Functional outcome was assessed with the Constant Shoulder Score (CSS), Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS), and University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) Shoulder Rating Scale. The patients were first divided based on CSA: (1) ≤35° (control CSA) and (2) >35° (increased CSA); and then based on AI: (1) ≤0.7 and (2) >0.7. The Student unpaired t test, Pearson chi-square test, and Pearson correlation were performed to examine the influence of CSA and AI on postoperative functional outcome scores. At 6 months of follow-up, the CSS, OSS, and UCLA Shoulder Rating Scale were 10 ± 1, 4 ± 2, and 3 ± 1 points poorer in the increased CSA group compared with the control CSA group ( P = .005, P = .030, and P = .035, respectively). These scores were not significantly different between both AI groups. By 24 months of follow-up, all outcome scores were comparable between both CSA groups as well as between both AI groups. No significant correlation was found between either CSA or AI when compared with CSS, OSS, or UCLA Shoulder Rating Scale at 24

  13. Recovery of Muscle Strength After Intact Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair According to Preoperative Rotator Cuff Tear Size.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sang-Jin; Chung, Jaeyoon; Lee, Juyeob; Ko, Young-Won

    2016-04-01

    The recovery of muscle strength after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair based on the preoperative tear size has not yet been well described. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the recovery period of muscle strength by a serial assessment of isometric strength after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair based on the preoperative tear size. The hypothesis was that muscle strength in patients with small and medium tears would recover faster than that in those with large-to-massive tears. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 164 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were included. Isometric strength in forward flexion (FF), internal rotation (IR), and external rotation (ER) was evaluated preoperatively and at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after surgery. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging scans were assessed to evaluate the quality of the rotator cuff muscle, including fatty infiltration, occupation ratio, and tangent sign. Patient satisfaction as well as visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), and Constant scores were assessed at every follow-up. Muscle strength demonstrated the slowest recovery in pain relief and the restoration of shoulder function. To reach the strength of the uninjured contralateral shoulder in all 3 planes of motion, recovery took 6 months in patients with small tears and 18 months in patients with medium tears. Patients with large-to-massive tears showed continuous improvement in strength up to 18 months; however, they did not reach the strength of the contralateral shoulder at final follow-up. At final follow-up, mean strength in FF, IR, and ER was 113.0%, 118.0%, and 112.6% of the contralateral shoulder in patients with small tears, respectively; 105.0%, 112.1%, and 102.6% in patients with medium tears, respectively; and 87.6%, 89.5%, and 85.2% in patients with large-to-massive tears, respectively. Muscle strength in any direction did not significantly correlate with

  14. The effect of platelet-rich plasma on arthroscopic double-row rotator cuff repair: a clinical study with 12-month follow-up.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenxiang; Wang, Yong; Sun, Junying

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the effect of platelet-rich plasma on arthroscopic double-row rotator cuff repair. The study included 60 patients with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Thirthy patients (mean age: 57.2±7.4; 16 males and 14 females) underwent arthroscopic double-row repair alone (Group 1), another 30 (mean age: 56.9±6.0; 15 males and 15 females) had an injection of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) (Group 2). The groups were compared with DASH as a primary outcome score and Constant-Murley score, visual analog scale, measurement of active forward flexion, and external and internal rotation as secondary outcome measures. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess the integrity of the repair at 12 months postoperatively. Primary and secondary outcome measures statistically improved in both groups postoperatively (p<0.05). Overall mean primary and secondary postoperative outcome measures were not significantly different between the 2 groups. A retear was seen in 9 subjects (30%) in Group 1 and 4 subjects (14%) in Group 2 (p<0.05). The local injection of PRP into a primary arthroscopic double-row cuff repair resulted in lower recurrence rates than repairs without the novel biological augmentation material.

  15. Long-term Correction in Sleep Disturbance Is Sustained After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Horneff, John G; Tjoumakaris, Fotios; Wowkanech, Charles; Pepe, Matthew; Tucker, Bradford; Austin, Luke

    2017-06-01

    Sleep disturbance is a major complaint of patients with rotator cuff disease that often leads them to seek treatment. The authors previously reported a prospective analysis of patients who underwent rotator cuff repair and found that sleep disturbance significantly improved at 3 months after surgery. That improvement in sleep was maintained at 6 months. In the current study, the authors sought to gain medium-term data on this same population at greater than 2 years. The hypotheses were that improvement in sleep disturbance after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is maintained at 2-year follow-up and that the continued use of narcotic pain medication has a negative effect on sleep quality at 2-year follow-up. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. The original cohort of patients was contacted at a minimum of 24 months after their surgery. Thirty-seven of the 56 patients (66%) involved in the original study were available. Patient outcomes were scored using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Simple Shoulder Test (SST), visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, and Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE). The newly obtained scores were compared with prior scores, which ranged from preoperatively to 6 months postoperatively. The statistically significant improvement of the PSQI score demonstrated in our prior analysis at 6 months postoperatively was maintained, with a mean PSQI score of 5.5 for the 37 patients followed beyond 24 months. Of those patients, 41% still had a PSQI score >5, indicative of sleep disturbance. However, even those patients in our study with a PSQI score >5, indicative of sleep disturbance, had an improved mean score of 9.3 at greater than 24 months compared with those patients with a PSQI score >5 at 6 months, who had a mean PSQI score of 11.5 ( P = .13). Both the SST and VAS scores displayed continued improvement at greater than 24 months, with both displaying moderate strength correlation to the PSQI score (VAS: Spearman rho = 0.479, P < .001

  16. Prognostic Factors Affecting Rotator Cuff Healing After Arthroscopic Repair in Small to Medium-sized Tears.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Soon; Park, Hyung Jun; Kim, Sae Hoon; Oh, Joo Han

    2015-10-01

    Small and medium-sized rotator cuff tears usually have good clinical and anatomic outcomes. However, healing failure still occurs in some cases. To evaluate prognostic factors for rotator cuff healing in patients with only small to medium-sized rotator cuff tears. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Data were prospectively collected from 339 patients with small to medium-sized rotator cuff tears who underwent arthroscopic repair by a single surgeon between March 2004 and August 2012 and who underwent magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomographic arthrography at least 1 year after surgery. The mean age of the patients was 59.8 years (range, 39-80 years), and the mean follow-up time was 20.8 months (range, 12-66 months). The functional evaluation included the visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, Constant-Murley score, and Simple Shoulder Test. Postoperative VAS for pain and functional scores improved significantly compared with preoperative values (P < .001). Forty-five healing failures occurred (13.3%), and fatty degeneration of the infraspinatus muscle, tear size (anteroposterior dimension), and age were significant factors affecting rotator cuff healing (P < .001, = .018, and = .011, respectively) in multivariate logistic regression analysis. Grade II and higher infraspinatus fatty degeneration correlated with a higher failure rate. The failure rate was also significantly higher in patients with a tear >2 cm in size (34.2%) compared with patients with a tear ≤2 cm (10.6%) (P < .001). A receiver operating characteristic curve was used to determine the predictive cut-off value for the oldest age and the largest tear size for successful healing, which were calculated as 69 years and 2 cm, respectively, with a specificity of 90%. In small to medium-sized rotator cuff tears, grade II fatty degeneration of the infraspinatus muscle according to the Goutallier classification could be a reference point for successful

  17. Does autologous leukocyte-platelet-rich plasma improve tendon healing in arthroscopic repair of large or massive rotator cuff tears?

    PubMed

    Charousset, Christophe; Zaoui, Amine; Bellaïche, Laurence; Piterman, Michel

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) outcome of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with the use of leukocyte-platelet-rich plasma (L-PRP) in patients with large or massive rotator cuff tears. A comparative cohort of patients with large or massive rotator cuff tears undergoing arthroscopic repair was studied. Two consecutive groups of patients were included: rotator cuff repairs with L-PRP injection (group 1, n = 35) and rotator cuff repairs without L-PRP injection (group 2, n = 35). A double-row cross-suture cuff repair was performed by a single surgeon with the same rehabilitation protocol. Patients were clinically evaluated with the Constant score; Simple Shoulder Test score; University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) score; and strength measurements by use of a handheld dynamometer. Rotator cuff healing was evaluated by postoperative MRI using the Sugaya classification (type 1 to type 5). We prospectively evaluated the 2 groups at a minimum 2-year follow-up. The results did not show differences in cuff healing between the 2 groups (P = .16). The size of recurrent tears (type 4 v type 5), however, was significantly smaller in group 1 (P = .008). There was no statistically significant difference in the recurrent tear rate (types 4 and 5) between the 2 groups (P = .65). There was no significant difference between group 1 and group 2 in terms of University of California, Los Angeles score (29.1 and 30.3, respectively; P = .90); Simple Shoulder Test score (9.9 and 10.2, respectively; P = .94); Constant score (77.3 and 78.1, respectively; P = .82); and strength (7.5 and 7.0, respectively; P = .51). In our study the use of autologous L-PRP did not improve the quality of tendon healing in patients undergoing arthroscopic repair of large or massive rotator cuff tears based on postoperative MRI evaluation. The only significant advantage was that the L-PRP patients had smaller iterative tears. However, the functional outcome was similar in

  18. Early Incorporation of an Evidence-Based Aquatic-Assisted Approach to Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair Rehabilitation: Prospective Case Study.

    PubMed

    Burmaster, Chris; Eckenrode, Brian J; Stiebel, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Both traditional and progressive rotator cuff repair rehabilitation protocols often delay active motion of the shoulder for 6 weeks or more. The early inclusion of a comprehensive aquatic-assisted exercise program presents a unique approach to postoperative management. The purpose of this case study is to describe a comprehensive evidence-based, aquatic-assisted rehabilitation program following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. A 73-year-old woman with a nonretracted, medium-size, full-thickness tear (2.5 cm) of the supraspinatus tendon underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair and was referred for postoperative physical therapy. The rehabilitation program was initiated at 2 weeks postoperatively and consisted of concurrent land- and aquatic-based interventions over 6 weeks for a total of 18 physical therapy visits. Improvements were made in all 5 patient-reported outcome measures that were recorded weekly over the course of care. Improvements reached or exceeded minimal detectable change levels for the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index and the Penn Shoulder Score. Her numeric pain rating scale score at rest decreased from 4/10 at the initial evaluation to 2/10 at 8 weeks postoperatively and with activity decreased from 9/10 to 6/10. Shoulder strength and range of motion values also exhibited improvement over the course of care. No adverse events occurred during the case study. This case study illustrates the safe inclusion of low-stress aquatic exercises as an early adjunct to traditional land-based rotator cuff repair rehabilitation programs in small- to medium-size repairs. Further studies are needed to determine the long-term effectiveness of adding aquatic therapy to traditional postoperative programs. © 2016 American Physical Therapy Association.

  19. Clinical outcomes and repair integrity after arthroscopic full-thickness rotator cuff repair: suture-bridge versus double-row modified Mason-Allen technique.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Won; Yang, Dae Suk; Lee, Gyu Sang; Ma, Chang Hyun; Choy, Won Sik

    2018-05-23

    This retrospective study compared the clinical and radiologic outcomes of patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs by the suture-bridge and double-row modified Mason-Allen techniques. From January 2012 to May 2013, 76 consecutive cases of full-thickness rotator cuff tear, 1 to 4 cm in the sagittal plane, for which arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was performed, were included. The suture-bridge technique was used in 37 consecutive shoulders; and the double-row modified Mason-Allen technique, in 39 consecutive shoulders. Clinical outcomes at a minimum of 2 years (mean, 35.7 months) were evaluated postoperatively using the visual analog scale; University of California, Los Angeles Shoulder Scale; American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Subjective Shoulder Scale; and Constant score. Postoperative cuff integrity was evaluated at a mean of 17.7 months by magnetic resonance imaging. At the final follow-up, the clinical outcomes improved in both groups (all P < .001) but with no significant differences between the 2 groups (all P > .05). The retear rate was 18.9% in the shoulders subjected to suture-bridge repair and 12.8% in the double-row modified Mason-Allen group; the difference was not significant (P = .361). Despite the presence of fewer suture anchors, the patients who underwent double-row modified Mason-Allen repair had comparable shoulder functional outcomes and a comparable retear rate with those who underwent suture-bridge repair. Therefore, the double-row modified Mason-Allen repair technique can be considered an effective treatment for patients with medium- to large-sized full-thickness rotator cuff tears. Copyright © 2018 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Arthroscopic Transtibial Pullout Repair for Posterior Medial Meniscus Root Tears: A Systematic Review of Clinical, Radiographic, and Second-Look Arthroscopic Results.

    PubMed

    Feucht, Matthias J; Kühle, Jan; Bode, Gerrit; Mehl, Julian; Schmal, Hagen; Südkamp, Norbert P; Niemeyer, Philipp

    2015-09-01

    To systematically review the results of arthroscopic transtibial pullout repair (ATPR) for posterior medial meniscus root tears. A systematic electronic search of the PubMed database and the Cochrane Library was performed in September 2014 to identify studies that reported clinical, radiographic, or second-look arthroscopic outcomes of ATPR for posterior medial meniscus root tears. Included studies were abstracted regarding study characteristics, patient demographic characteristics, surgical technique, rehabilitation, and outcome measures. The methodologic quality of the included studies was assessed with the modified Coleman Methodology Score. Seven studies with a total of 172 patients met the inclusion criteria. The mean patient age was 55.3 years, and 83% of patients were female patients. Preoperative and postoperative Lysholm scores were reported for all patients. After a mean follow-up period of 30.2 months, the Lysholm score increased from 52.4 preoperatively to 85.9 postoperatively. On conventional radiographs, 64 of 76 patients (84%) showed no progression of Kellgren-Lawrence grading. Magnetic resonance imaging showed no progression of cartilage degeneration in 84 of 103 patients (82%) and showed reduced medial meniscal extrusion in 34 of 61 patients (56%). On the basis of second-look arthroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging in 137 patients, the healing status was rated as complete in 62%, partial in 34%, and failed in 3%. Overall, the methodologic quality of the included studies was fair, with a mean modified Coleman Methodology Score of 63. ATPR significantly improves functional outcome scores and seems to prevent the progression of osteoarthritis in most patients, at least during a short-term follow-up. Complete healing of the repaired root and reduction of meniscal extrusion seem to be less predictable, being observed in only about 60% of patients. Conclusions about the progression of osteoarthritis and reduction of meniscal extrusion are limited by

  1. Perioperative Serum Lipid Status and Statin Use Affect the Revision Surgery Rate After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Cancienne, Jourdan M; Brockmeier, Stephen F; Rodeo, Scott A; Werner, Brian C

    2017-11-01

    Recent animal studies have demonstrated that hyperlipidemia is associated with poor tendon-bone healing after rotator cuff repair; however, these findings have not been substantiated in human studies. To examine any association between hyperlipidemia and the failure of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair requiring revision surgery and to investigate whether the use of statin lipid-lowering agents had any influence on observed associations. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. From a national insurance database, patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with perioperative lipid levels (total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein [LDL], and triglycerides) recorded were reviewed. For each lipid test, patients were stratified into normal, moderate, and high groups based on published standards. For the total cholesterol and LDL cohorts, a subgroup analysis of patients stratified by statin use was performed. The primary outcome measure was ipsilateral revision rotator cuff surgery, including revision repair or debridement. A logistic regression analysis controlling for patient demographics and comorbidities was utilized for comparison. There were 30,638 patients included in the study. The rate of revision rotator cuff surgery was significantly increased in patients with moderate (odds ratio [OR], 1.20; 95% CI, 1.03-1.40; P = .022) and high total cholesterol levels (OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.10-1.55; P = .006) compared with patients with normal total cholesterol levels perioperatively. Within each of these groups, patients without statin use had significantly higher rates of revision surgery, while those with statin prescriptions did not. The absolute risk reduction for statin use ranged from 0.24% to 1.87% when stratified by the total cholesterol level, yielding a number needed to treat from 54 to 408 patients. The rate of revision surgery was significantly increased in patients with moderate (OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.10-1.41; P = .001) and high LDL levels (OR, 1.46; 95

  2. [Case-control study on polymer polylactic acid absorbable medical film for preventing acromion adhesion after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair].

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei; Xu, Huan; Xing, Hai-Lin; Zheng, Rong-Zong; Ying, Jin-He

    2018-03-25

    To study effect of shoulder joint function after rotator cuff repair of polylactic acid absorbable membrane. From September 2015 to December 2016, 50 patients diagnosed with rotator cuff tear were selected and divided into treatment group and control group. There were 25 patients in control group, including 12 males and 13 females, with an average age of (48.7±3.5) years old, who received simple arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. There were 25 patients in treatment group, including 11 males and 14 females, with an average age of(49.2±4.1) years old, who performed arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with implanting polylactic acid absorbable membraneon shoulder of rotator cuff. Preoperative and postoperative VAS score, ASES score and UCLA score were recorded and compared between two groups. At 6 months after operation, preoperative VAS score in control group was 5.48±1.12, and decreased as 1.28±0.84 after operation; ASES score before operation was 52.24±4.64, and improved to 86.92±3.20 after operation;preoperative UCLA score improved from 14.36±1.89 before operation to 30.72±1.28 after operation. In treatment group, VAS score decreased from 5.36±1.32 before operation to 1.40±0.71 after operation;preoperative ASES score was 51.04±4.09, and improved to 88.96±2.79 after operation; UCLA score improved from 15.12±1.81 before operation to 32.12±1.33 after operation. There was no significant difference in VAS score between two groups, and ASES score, UCLA score in treatment group was obviously better than control group. Application of polylactic acid absorbable medical membrane could obviously improve shoulder function, and effectively prevent acromion adhesion after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Copyright© 2018 by the China Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology Press.

  3. [Effectiveness of rotator cuff repair with manipulation release and arthroscopic debridement for rotator cuff tear with shoulder stiffness].

    PubMed

    Tang, Xin; Huang, Fuguo; Chen, Gang; Li, Qi; Fu, Weili; Li, Jian

    2018-01-01

    To investigate effectiveness of rotator cuff repair with manipulation release and arthroscopic debridement for rotator cuff tear with shoulder stiffness. A retrospectively study was performed on the data of 15 patients with rotator cuff tear combined with shoulder stiffness (stiff group) and 24 patients without stiffness (non-stiff group) between January 2014 and December 2015. The patients in the stiff group underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with manipulation release and arthroscopic debridement while the patients in the non-stiff group only received arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The patients in the stiff group were older than the patients in the non-stiff group, showing significant difference ( P <0.05). There was no significant difference in gender, type of rotator cuff tear, side of rotator cuff tear, and combined with diabetes between 2 groups ( P >0.05). The visual analogue scale (VAS) score, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, and range of motion (ROM) were used to evaluate the effectiveness after operation. All incisions healed by first intention without any complication after operation. The patients were followed up 13-31 months in the stiff group (mean, 19.2 months) and 13-23 months in the non-stiff group (mean, 20.3 months). There was no significant difference in follow- up time between 2 groups ( t =-0.573, P =0.570). The VAS score in the stiff group was higher than that in the non-stiff group before operation ( t =-2.166, P =0.037); there was no significant difference between 2 groups at 3, 6, 12 months and last follow-up ( P >0.05). The forward flexion and external rotation were significantly lower in the stiff group than those in the non-stiff group before operation and at 3 months after operation ( P <0.05); there was no significant difference between 2 groups at 6, 12 months and last follow-up ( P >0.05). At last follow-up, the internal rotation was beyond L 3 level in 2

  4. Impact of Platelet-Rich Plasma on Arthroscopic Repair of Small- to Medium-Sized Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Holtby, Richard; Christakis, Monique; Maman, Eran; MacDermid, Joy C.; Dwyer, Tim; Athwal, George S.; Faber, Kenneth; Theodoropoulos, John; Woodhouse, Linda J.; Razmjou, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increased interest in using platelet-rich plasma (PRP) as an augment to rotator cuff repair warrants further investigation, particularly in smaller rotator cuff tears. Purpose: To examine the effectiveness of PRP application in improving perioperative pain and function and promoting healing at 6 months after arthroscopic repair of small- or medium-sized rotator cuff tears. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. Methods: This was a double-blinded randomized controlled trial of patients undergoing arthroscopic repair of partial- or full-thickness rotator cuff tears of up to 3 cm who were observed for 6 months. Patients were randomized to either repair and PRP application (study group) or repair only (control group) groups. The patient-oriented outcome measures utilized were the visual analog scale (VAS), the Short Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (ShortWORC), the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) form, and the Constant-Murley Score (CMS). Range of motion (ROM) and inflammatory and coagulation markers were measured before and after surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging was used at 6 months to assess retear and fatty infiltration rate. Results: Eighty-two patients (41 males) with a mean age of 59 ± 8 years were enrolled; 41 patients were included in each group. Both the PRP and control groups showed a significant improvement in their pain level based on the VAS within the first 30 days (P < .0001), with the PRP group reporting less pain than the control group (P = .012), which was clinically significantly different from days 8 through 11. The PRP group reported taking less painkillers (P = .026) than the control group within the first 30 days. All outcome measure scores and ROM improved significantly after surgery (P < .0001), with no between-group differences. No differences were observed between groups in inflammatory or coagulation marker test results (P > .05), retear (14% vs 18% full retear; P = .44), or fatty

  5. Arthroscopic double row cuff repair with suture-bridging and autologous conditioned plasma injection: Functional and structural results.

    PubMed

    Werthel, Jean-David; Pelissier, Alexandre; Massin, Philippe; Boyer, Patrick; Valenti, Philippe

    2014-10-01

    The double row cuff repair with suture bridging is commonly used for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (RCR). Despite its biomechanical qualities, the rate of iterative tears with this technique is important. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of autologous conditioned plasma (ACP) on functional results and on the rate of iterative tears after RCR by suture bridging. A consecutive series of 65 patients who underwent arthroscopic double-row suture bridge (Speed-Bridge, Arthrex) primary cuff repair of symptomatic full-thickness supraspinatus tear (retraction <3 in the Patte classification) were evaluated. Mean patient age was 60 (+/-8). The supraspinatus was repaired by knot-less bridging (SwiveLock, Arthrex) with suture tape material. 2 homogenous groups were created (A: 33 patients, B: 32 patients). In group A, all patients received, besides the cuff repair, an intra-tendinous ACP injection. Constant scores and Simple Shoulder Tests (SST) were measured pre-operatively and after a minimum follow-up period of 12 months post-operatively. Structural integrity of the repairs was evaluated by MRI according to the Sugaya classification. Sugaya >4 were considered as iterative tears. Mean follow-up was 19 months (+/-42) in the 2 groups. The mean quantity of ACP injected was 6ml. (+/-1.5) and no specific complication of the injection was found. Mean preoperative Constant-Murley scores were 41,2 (±7,7) and 38 (±11)in group B. Mean normalized Constant-Murley score increased from 41 points (±7) pre-operatively to 70 points (±8) post-operatively in group A and from 38 points (±11) to 73 points (±11) in group B. There were no significative differences between the two groups (P > 0.05). In group A, 31 repairs were Sugaya 1-3 (94%), vs. 30 in group B (93%), and 1 was type 4 in group A (5%) vs. 2 in group B (8%). In both groups, RCR with suture bridging gave successful functional outcomes, with a low rate of iterative tear. In this preliminary study, the adjuvant

  6. Single-row vs. double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: clinical and 3 Tesla MR arthrography results

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has become popular in the last few years because it avoids large skin incisions and deltoid detachment and dysfunction. Earlier arthroscopic single-row (SR) repair methods achieved only partial restoration of the original footprint of the tendons of the rotator cuff, while double-row (DR) repair methods presented many biomechanical advantages and higher rates of tendon-to-bone healing. However, DR repair failed to demonstrate better clinical results than SR repair in clinical trials. MR imaging at 3 Tesla, especially with intra-articular contrast medium (MRA), showed a better diagnostic performance than 1.5 Tesla in the musculoskeletal setting. The objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the clinical and 3 Tesla MRA results in two groups of patients operated on for a medium-sized full-thickness rotator cuff tear with two different techniques. Methods The first group consisted of 20 patients operated on with the SR technique; the second group consisted of 20 patients operated on with the DR technique. All patients were evaluated at a minimum of 3 years after surgery. The primary end point was the re-tear rate at 3 Tesla MRA. The secondary end points were the Constant-Murley Scale (CMS), the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) scores, surgical time and implant expense. Results The mean follow-up was 40 months in the SR group and 38.9 months in the DR group. The mean postoperative CMS was 70 in the SR group and 68 in the DR group. The mean SST score was 9.4 in the SR group and 10.1 in the DR group. The re-tear rate was 60% in the SR group and 25% in the DR group. Leakage of the contrast medium was observed in all patients. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on 3 Tesla MRA in the evaluation of two different techniques of rotator cuff repair. DR repair resulted in a statistically significant lower re-tear rate, with longer surgical time and higher implant expense, despite no

  7. Single-row vs. double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: clinical and 3 Tesla MR arthrography results.

    PubMed

    Tudisco, Cosimo; Bisicchia, Salvatore; Savarese, Eugenio; Fiori, Roberto; Bartolucci, Dario A; Masala, Salvatore; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2013-01-27

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has become popular in the last few years because it avoids large skin incisions and deltoid detachment and dysfunction. Earlier arthroscopic single-row (SR) repair methods achieved only partial restoration of the original footprint of the tendons of the rotator cuff, while double-row (DR) repair methods presented many biomechanical advantages and higher rates of tendon-to-bone healing. However, DR repair failed to demonstrate better clinical results than SR repair in clinical trials. MR imaging at 3 Tesla, especially with intra-articular contrast medium (MRA), showed a better diagnostic performance than 1.5 Tesla in the musculoskeletal setting. The objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the clinical and 3 Tesla MRA results in two groups of patients operated on for a medium-sized full-thickness rotator cuff tear with two different techniques. The first group consisted of 20 patients operated on with the SR technique; the second group consisted of 20 patients operated on with the DR technique. All patients were evaluated at a minimum of 3 years after surgery. The primary end point was the re-tear rate at 3 Tesla MRA. The secondary end points were the Constant-Murley Scale (CMS), the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) scores, surgical time and implant expense. The mean follow-up was 40 months in the SR group and 38.9 months in the DR group. The mean postoperative CMS was 70 in the SR group and 68 in the DR group. The mean SST score was 9.4 in the SR group and 10.1 in the DR group. The re-tear rate was 60% in the SR group and 25% in the DR group. Leakage of the contrast medium was observed in all patients. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on 3 Tesla MRA in the evaluation of two different techniques of rotator cuff repair. DR repair resulted in a statistically significant lower re-tear rate, with longer surgical time and higher implant expense, despite no difference in clinical outcomes. We think that

  8. Arthroscopic management of posterior instability: evolution of technique and results.

    PubMed

    Savoie, Felix H; Holt, M Shaun; Field, Larry D; Ramsey, J Randall

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of arthroscopic posterior shoulder reconstruction. We treated 136 shoulders in 131 patients with a diagnosis of primary posterior instability who failed 6 months of vigorous rehabilitation by operative stabilization between 1989 and 2001. Inclusion criterion was primary posterior instability that failed an extensive rehabilitative program with functional impairment and pain. Exclusion criterion was less than 12 months of follow-up and Suretac (Smith & Nephew, Andover, MA) or laser stabilization, leaving 92 shoulders in 90 patients available for the study (69 male, 21 female). Follow-up ranged from 12 to 132 months (average, 28 months). Each patient underwent diagnostic arthroscopy and surgical repair at the same time using one of several primary procedures. The procedure used was based on the pathologic entity noted at the time of surgery. At an average follow-up of 28 months, 97% of the shoulders were stable and considered a success based on the Neer-Foster rating scale. Posterior pathology varied, and a reverse Bankart lesion alone was found 51% of the time, a stretched posterior capsule 67% of the time, and a combination of a reverse Bankart lesion and capsular stretching 16% of the time. The rotator interval was obviously damaged in 61% of cases. Multiple accompanying lesions were found, including anterior-superior labral tears and SLAP tears (20%), superior glenohumeral ligament injury (7%), middle glenohumeral ligament injury (38%), anteroinferior glenohumaral ligament injury (37%), and an enlarged axillary pouch (20%). No essential lesion is present for posterior instability. Multiple varied pathologies will be present in a shoulder presenting with posterior instability. Arthroscopic surgery allows inspection of the joint and anatomic-specific repairs based on pathology. Careful attention to all the supporting structures of the shoulder, including the rotator interval, the anterior-superior labrum

  9. Do postoperative platelet-rich plasma injections accelerate early tendon healing and functional recovery after arthroscopic supraspinatus repair? A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wang, Allan; McCann, Philip; Colliver, Jess; Koh, Eamon; Ackland, Timothy; Joss, Brendan; Zheng, Minghao; Breidahl, Bill

    2015-06-01

    Tendon-bone healing after rotator cuff repair directly correlates with a successful outcome. Biological therapies that elevate local growth-factor concentrations may potentiate healing after surgery. To ascertain whether postoperative and repeated application of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to the tendon repair site improves early tendon healing and enhances early functional recovery after double-row arthroscopic supraspinatus repair. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. A total of 60 patients underwent arthroscopic double-row supraspinatus tendon repair. After randomization, half the patients received 2 ultrasound-guided injections of PRP to the repair site at postoperative days 7 and 14. Early structural healing was assessed with MRI at 16 weeks, and cuff appearances were graded according to the Sugaya classification. Functional scores were recorded with the Oxford Shoulder Score; Quick Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand; visual analog scale for pain; and Short Form-12 quality-of-life score both preoperatively and at postoperative weeks 6, 12, and 16; isokinetic strength and active range of motion were measured at 16 weeks. PRP treatment did not improve early functional recovery, range of motion, or strength or influence pain scores at any time point after arthroscopic supraspinatus repair. There was no difference in structural integrity of the supraspinatus repair on MRI between the PRP group (0% full-thickness retear; 23% partial tear; 77% intact) and the control group (7% full-thickness retear; 23% partial tear; 70% intact) at 16 weeks postoperatively (P = .35). After arthroscopic supraspinatus tendon repair, image-guided PRP treatment on 2 occasions does not improve early tendon-bone healing or functional recovery. © 2015 The Author(s).

  10. Efficacy of platelet-rich plasma in arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Cai, You-zhi; Zhang, Chi; Lin, Xiang-jin

    2015-12-01

    The use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an innovative clinical therapy, especially in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical improvement and tendon-to-bone healing with and without PRP therapy in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. A systematic search was done in the major medical databases to evaluate the studies using PRP therapy (PRP+) or with no PRP (PRP-) for the treatment of patients with rotator cuff tears. We reviewed clinical scores such as the Constant score, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) Shoulder Rating Scale, the Simple Shoulder Test, and the failure-to-heal rate by magnetic resonance imaging between PRP+ and PRP- groups. Five studies included in this review were used for a meta-analysis based on data availability. There were no statistically significant differences between PRP+ and PRP- groups for overall outcome scores (P > .05). However, the PRP+ group exhibited better healing rates postoperatively than the PRP- group (P = .03) in small/moderate full-thickness tears. The use of PRP therapy in full-thickness rotator cuff repairs showed no statistically significant difference compared with no PRP therapy in clinical outcome scores, but the failure-to-heal rate was significantly decreased when PRP was used for treatment of small-to-moderately sized tears. PRP therapy may improve tendon-to-bone healing in patients with small or moderate rotator cuff tears. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Arthroscopic Removal and Rotator Cuff Repair Without Acromioplasty for the Treatment of Symptomatic Calcifying Tendinitis of the Supraspinatus Tendon.

    PubMed

    Ranalletta, Maximiliano; Rossi, Luciano Andrés; Bongiovanni, Santiago Luis; Tanoira, Ignacio; Piuzzi, Nicolas; Maignon, Gastón

    2015-04-01

    Calcified rotator cuff tendinitis is a common cause of chronic shoulder pain that leads to significant pain and functional limitations. Although most patients respond well to conservative treatment, some eventually require surgical treatment. To evaluate the clinical outcome with arthroscopic removal of calcific deposit and rotator cuff repair without acromioplasty for the treatment of calcific tendinitis of the supraspinatus tendon. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. This study retrospectively evaluated 30 consecutive patients with a mean age of 49.2 years. The mean follow-up was 35 months (range, 24-88 months). Pre- and postoperative functional assessment was performed using the Constant score, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) score, and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH). Pain was assessed by visual analog scale (VAS). Radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed to evaluate the recurrence of calcifications and the indemnity of the supraspinatus tendon repair. Significant improvement was obtained for pain (mean VAS, 8.7 before surgery to 0.8 after; P < .001). The mean Constant score increased from 23.9 preoperatively to 85.3 postoperatively (P < .001), the mean Quick DASH score decreased from 47.3 preoperatively to 8.97 postoperatively (P < .001), and the UCLA score increased from 15.8 preoperatively to 32.2 postoperatively (P < .001). MRI examination at last follow-up (70% of patients) showed no tendon tears, and 96.2% of patients were satisfied with their results. Arthroscopic removal and rotator cuff repair without acromioplasty can lead to good results in patients with symptomatic calcifying tendonitis of the supraspinatus tendon.

  12. Preservation of bursal-sided tendon in partial-thickness articular-sided rotator cuff tears: a novel arthroscopic transtendon anatomic repair technique.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sang-Jin; Jeong, Jae-Hoon; Jeon, Yoon Sang; Kim, Rag Gyu

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to introduce a novel arthroscopic transtendon anatomic repair technique that spares the intact bursal-sided tendon in articular-sided partial-thickness rotator cuff tears (PTRCT) and to present shoulder functional outcomes in patients with symptomatic articular-sided PCRCT that involves more than 50 % of its thickness after arthroscopic repair using a novel technique. Eighteen patients with symptomatic articular-sided PCRCT involving more than 50 % of the tendon's thickness underwent arthroscopic repair using a devised technique. The devised technique restores only the torn articular portion of the rotator cuff at the anatomical footprint using a suture anchor, and preserves the integrity of the corresponding bursal-sided tendon by tying knots at the most lateral bursal side on the subacromial space. Clinical and functional outcome using ASES and Constant scores were evaluated. The structural integrity of the rotator cuff was evaluated by MRI at 6 months postoperatively. Pain relief and shoulder functional outcomes were encouraging during the recovery phase after operation. ASES (preoperative 54.0 ± 10.3 to postoperative 92.6 ± 8.0), Constant score (61.2 ± 8.5-88.0 ± 5.3), VAS for pain (4.9 ± 2.6-0.6 ± 0.7) improved significantly after arthroscopic transtendon anatomic repair (p < 0.001). No patients had rotator cuff retears on 6-month MRI. No complications related to surgical procedures had occurred. The devised technique of arthroscopic transtendon repair provided satisfactory functional outcomes without postoperative discomforts. This technique minimizes over-tightening of the articular layer and reduces tension mismatches between the articular and bursal layers, which are considered as important factors for improvement of postoperative shoulder motion.

  13. Arthroscopic pullout suture repair of posterior root tear of the medial meniscus: radiographic and clinical results with a 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju Hong; Lim, Young Jin; Kim, Ki Bum; Kim, Kyu Hyung; Song, Ji Hun

    2009-09-01

    This study was undertaken to document the short-term clinical efficacy of arthroscopic pullout suture repair in treating posterior root tears of the medial meniscus. From March 2004 to August 2006, 26 patients (27 knees) with posterior root tears of the medial meniscus were treated with arthroscopic pullout suture repair surgery by the senior author. Of these, 20 consecutive patients (21 knees) with a minimum of 2 years' follow-up treated by arthroscopic pullout suture repair were analyzed. Clinical results by use of the Lysholm knee and Hospital for Special Surgery scores and radiographic grade were evaluated, both preoperatively and at final follow-up. In addition, the second-look arthroscopic findings for 10 knees were analyzed. A radiographic evaluation using the criteria of Kellgren and Lawrence at final follow-up showed an increase in radiographic grade by 1 grade in only 1 knee. On the second-look arthroscopies performed in 10 knees (47.6%), all repaired menisci had healed completely without additional chondral lesions in the knee. The mean Hospital for Special Surgery scores improved from 61.1 preoperatively to 93.8 at final follow-up (P < .0001), and the mean preoperative Lysholm knee scores improved from 57.0 to 93.1 at final follow-up (P < .0001). Retear was found in 1 knee at the 6-month follow-up, and reoperation was performed with the same procedure used for the index surgery. Arthroscopic pullout suture repair is an effective treatment for alleviating meniscal symptoms in patients with a symptomatic posterior root tear of the medial meniscus with degenerated articular cartilage of less than grade III. In addition, no discernable degenerative arthritic changes were found in terms of radiographic features with our limited short-term follow-up. Level IV, therapeutic case series.

  14. Platelet-rich plasma for arthroscopic repair of medium to large rotator cuff tears: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jo, Chris Hyunchul; Shin, Ji Sun; Shin, Won Hyoung; Lee, Seung Yeon; Yoon, Kang Sup; Shin, Sue

    2015-09-01

    Two main questions about the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for regeneration purposes are its effect on the speed of healing and the quality of healing. Despite recent numerous studies, evidence is still lacking in this area, especially in a representative patient population with medium to large rotator cuff tears. To assess the efficacy of PRP augmentation on the speed and quality of healing in patients undergoing arthroscopic repair for medium to large rotator cuff tears. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. A total of 74 patients scheduled for arthroscopic repair of medium to large rotator cuff tears were randomly assigned to undergo either PRP-augmented repair (PRP group) or conventional repair (conventional group). In the PRP group, 3 PRP gels (3 × 3 mL) were applied to each patient between the torn end and the greater tuberosity. The primary outcome was the Constant score at 3 months after surgery. Secondary outcome measures included the visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, range of motion (ROM), muscle strength, overall satisfaction and function, functional scores, retear rate, and change in the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the supraspinatus muscle. There was no difference between the 2 groups in the Constant score at 3 months (P > .05). The 2 groups had similar results on the VAS for pain, ROM, muscle strength, overall satisfaction and function, and other functional scores (all P > .05) except for the VAS for worst pain (P = .043). The retear rate of the PRP group (3.0%) was significantly lower than that of the conventional group (20.0%) (P = .032). The change in 1-year postoperative and immediately postoperative CSAs was significantly different between the 2 groups: -36.76 ± 45.31 mm(2) in the PRP group versus -67.47 ± 47.26 mm(2) in the conventional group (P = .014). Compared with repairs without PRP augmentation, the current PRP preparation and application methods for medium to large rotator cuff repairs significantly improved the

  15. A Midterm Evaluation of Postoperative Platelet-Rich Plasma Injections on Arthroscopic Supraspinatus Repair: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Jay R; Wang, Allan; Smith, Anne; Nairn, Robert; Breidahl, William; Zheng, Ming Hao; Ackland, Timothy

    2017-11-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been applied as an adjunct to rotator cuff repair to improve tendon-bone healing and potentially reduce the incidence of subsequent tendon retears. To investigate whether the midterm clinical and radiographic outcomes of arthroscopic supraspinatus repair are enhanced after repeated postoperative applications of PRP. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. A total of 60 patients (30 control; 30 PRP) were initially randomized to receive 2 ultrasound-guided injections of PRP to the tendon repair site at 7 and 14 days after double-row arthroscopic supraspinatus repair or not. A total of 55 patients (91.7%) underwent a clinical review and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at a mean of 3.5 years after surgery (range, 36-51 months). Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) included the Constant score, Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (QuickDASH) questionnaire, Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS), and visual analog scale (VAS) for pain. Global rating of change (GRC) scale and patient satisfaction scores were evaluated. Structural integrity of the surgical repair was assessed via MRI using the Sugaya classification system. At the midterm review, there was no difference between the groups for any of the PROMs. No differences between the groups were demonstrated for the subjective and range of motion subscales of the Constant score, although a significantly higher Constant strength subscale score was observed in the PRP group (3.3 points; 95% CI, 1.0-5.7; P = .006). There was no evidence for any group differences in MRI scores or retear rates, with 66.7% of PRP patients and 64.3% of control patients rated as Sugaya grade 1. Two control patients had symptomatic retears (both full thickness) within the first 16 weeks after surgery compared with 2 PRP patients, who suffered symptomatic retears (both partial thickness) between 16 weeks and a mean 3.5-year follow-up. Significant postoperative clinical improvements and high levels

  16. Evaluation of 5 knots and 2 suture materials for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: very strong sutures can still slip.

    PubMed

    Abbi, Gaurav; Espinoza, Luis; Odell, Timothy; Mahar, Andrew; Pedowitz, Robert

    2006-01-01

    To compare a standard suture material with a newer material using multiple arthroscopic knot configurations and to evaluate the biomechanical performance of a new sliding-locking knot compared with 4 surgical standards. Controlled laboratory study. Five knots were evaluated (Weston, Tennessee, Duncan, SMC, and the new San Diego knot) using 2 suture materials, No. 2 Ethibond (Ethicon, Somerville, NJ) or No. 2 Fiberwire (Arthrex, Naples, FL). Eight samples were tested for each knot-suture configuration. Samples were pretensioned to 10 N and then loaded from 10 to 45 N for 1,000 cycles. Intact knots were loaded to failure. Fiberwire had significantly higher load-to-failure (276 +/- 24 N) compared with Ethibond (111 +/- 13 N) (P < .001), although there was no significant difference as a function of knot configuration. Of the 40 Fiberwire knots, 3 failed by early slippage during cyclic loading and 8 slipped at very low tension during load-to-failure. None of the Ethibond knots and none of the San Diego knots failed by early slippage. Surface characteristics and suture construction affect the tendency for knot slippage. Surgeons should understand the impact of handling characteristics, frictional properties, and ultimate failure load when selecting suture materials and knots for arthroscopic repair.

  17. Arthroscopic pullout repair of a complete radial tear of the tibial attachment site of the medial meniscus posterior horn.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Mo; Rhee, Kwang-Jin; Lee, June-Kyu; Hwang, Deuk-Soo; Yang, Jun-Young; Kim, Sung-Jae

    2006-07-01

    We developed an effective arthroscopic pullout technique for repairing complete radial tears of the tibial attachment site of the medial meniscus posterior horn (MMPH). In our technique, the torn meniscus is reattached to the tibial plateau immediately medial or anteromedial to the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) using two No. 2 Ethibond sutures (Ethicon, Somerville, NJ). After a complete radial tear of the tibial attachment site of the MMPH and its reparability were confirmed, using a Caspari suture loaded with a suture shuttle, one No. 2 Ethibond suture is placed through the meniscus, through the red-red zone, 3 to 5 mm medial to the torn edge of the MMPH, and the other is passed through the meniscocapsular junction 3 to 5 mm medial to the torn edge of the meniscus. Then, a tibial tunnel, 5-mm in diameter, is made from the anteromedial aspect of the proximal tibia to the previously prepared tibial plateau, immediately medial or anteromedial to the PCL, and the two No. 2 Ethibond sutures are pulled out through the tibial tunnel and then fixed to the proximal tibia using a 3.5-mm cortical screw and washer. Firm reattachment of the torn meniscus was confirmed arthroscopically.

  18. The Relationship Between Shoulder Stiffness and Rotator Cuff Healing: A Study of 1,533 Consecutive Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repairs.

    PubMed

    McNamara, William J; Lam, Patrick H; Murrell, George A C

    2016-11-16

    Retear and stiffness are not uncommon outcomes of rotator cuff repair. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between rotator cuff repair healing and shoulder stiffness. A total of 1,533 consecutive shoulders had an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair by a single surgeon. Patients assessed their shoulder stiffness using a Likert scale preoperatively and at 1, 6, 12, and 24 weeks (6 months) postoperatively, and examiners evaluated passive range of motion preoperatively and at 6, 12, and 24 weeks postoperatively. Repair integrity was determined by ultrasound evaluation at 6 months. After rotator cuff repair, there was an overall significant loss of patient-ranked and examiner-assessed shoulder motion at 6 weeks compared with preoperative measurements (p < 0.0001), a partial recovery at 12 weeks, and a full recovery at 24 weeks. Shoulders that were stiff before surgery were more likely to be stiff at 6, 12, and, to a lesser extent, 24 weeks after surgery (r = 0.10 to 0.31; p < 0.0001). A stiffer shoulder at 6 and 12 weeks (but not 24 weeks) postoperatively correlated with better rotator cuff integrity at 6 months postoperatively (r = 0.11 to 0.18; p < 0.001). The retear rate of patients with ≤20° of external rotation at 6 weeks postoperatively was 7%, while the retear rate of patients with >20° of external rotation at 6 weeks was 15% (p < 0.001). In patients who developed stiffness after surgery, a rotator cuff repair was more likely to heal. Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. Copyright © 2016 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  19. Arthroscopic all-inside repair for a tear of posterior root of the medial meniscus: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Choi, Nam-Hong; Son, Kyung-Mo; Victoroff, Brian N

    2008-09-01

    This technical note describes a new arthroscopic technique to repair a tear of posterior root of the medial meniscus. Cartilage at the insertion area of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus (PHMM) was removed using a curved curette inserted through an anteromedial portal. A metal anchor loaded with two FiberWires (Arthrex, Naples, FL) was placed at the insertion area of the PHMM through a high posteromedial portal. A PDS suture was passed the PHMM by curved suture hook through the anteromedial portal. Two limbs of the PDS were then used to pass two limbs of the FiberWire through the meniscus. The same procedure was repeated for the second FiberWire suture. The sutures were tied, achieving secure fixation of the posterior meniscal root at the anatomic insertion.

  20. Functional status and failed rotator cuff repair predict outcomes after arthroscopic-assisted latissimus dorsi transfer for irreparable massive rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Castricini, Roberto; De Benedetto, Massimo; Familiari, Filippo; De Gori, Marco; De Nardo, Pasquale; Orlando, Nicola; Gasparini, Giorgio; Galasso, Olimpio

    2016-04-01

    Arthroscopic-assisted latissimus dorsi tendon transfer (LDTT) has been recently introduced for treatment of irreparable, posterosuperior massive rotator cuff tears. We sought to evaluate the functional outcomes of this technique and to check for possible outcome predictors. The study reviewed 86 patients (aged 59.8 ± 5.9 years) who underwent an arthroscopic-assisted latissimus dorsi tendon transfer after 36.4 ± 9 months of follow-up. Of these, 14 patients (16.3%) sustained an irreparable massive rotator cuff tear after a failed arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The Constant and Murley score (CMS) was used to assess patients' functionality preoperatively and at follow-up. As a group, the CMS improved with surgery from 35.5 ± 6.1 to 69.5 ± 12.3 (P < .001). A lower preoperative CMS and a previous failed rotator cuff repair resulted in lower postoperative range of motion (P = .044 and P = .007, respectively) and CMS (P = .042 and P = .018, respectively). A previous rotator cuff repair resulted in lower satisfaction with surgery (P = .009). Gender and age did not affect the clinical outcomes. Our results support the effectiveness of arthroscopic-assisted LDTT in the treatment of patients with an irreparable, posterosuperior massive rotator cuff tears in pain relief, functional recovery, and postoperative satisfaction. Patients with lower preoperative CMS and a history of failed rotator cuff repair have a greater likelihood of having a lower clinical result. However, the favorable values of summary postoperative scores do not exclude these patients as candidates for arthroscopic-assisted LDTT. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Arthroscopic pullout repair of posterior root tear of the medial meniscus: the anterior approach using medial collateral ligament pie-crusting release.

    PubMed

    Park, Young-Sik; Moon, Hong-Kyo; Koh, Yong-Gon; Kim, Yong-Chan; Sim, Dong-Sik; Jo, Seung-Bae; Kwon, Se-Kwang

    2011-08-01

    Posterior root tears of the medial meniscus are frequently encountered and should be repaired if possible to prevent osteoarthritis of the medial compartment. Various surgical techniques have been proposed to repair posterior root tears. The anterior arthroscopic approach can cause an iatrogenic chondral injury due to the narrow medial joint space. The posterior approaches might be technically unfamiliar to many surgeons because they require the establishment of a posteromedial or trans-septal portal. This paper describes the medial collateral ligament pie-crusting release technique for arthroscopic double transosseous pullout repair of posterior root tears of the medial meniscus through the anterior approach to provide the good visualization of the footprint and sufficient working space.

  2. Factors associated with clinical and structural outcomes after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with a suture bridge technique in medium, large, and massive tears.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sungwook; Kim, Myung Ku; Kim, Gyeong Min; Roh, Young-Ho; Hwang, Im Kyung; Kang, Hyunseong

    2014-11-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate clinical outcomes, maintenance of repair integrity, and retear rate after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair by a suture bridge technique among patients with medium, large, and massive rotator cuff tears. We evaluated 147 patients who had undergone arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Clinical and functional evaluations were performed with the Constant and University of California-Los Angeles scores. All patients were confirmed to have magnetic resonance imaging evidence of tendon healing at least 12 months postoperatively. The average postoperative time to follow-up magnetic resonance imaging was 23.4 months (range, 12-48 months). A total of 25 (17.0%) retears were observed. All clinical outcome scores were improved significantly at follow-up. Larger intraoperative tear sizes were correlated with higher retear rates. The incidence of retear was also higher in cases in which the preoperative fatty degeneration grade was higher. The incidence of retear increased with age and in the heavy worker group (e.g., farmers, carriers, car mechanics) but was not statistically significant. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair by a suture bridge technique yields improvements in clinical outcome measures and a relatively high degree of patient satisfaction despite the fact that repair integrity is not maintained in many cases. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The role of platelet-rich plasma in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a systematic review with quantitative synthesis.

    PubMed

    Chahal, Jaskarndip; Van Thiel, Geoffrey S; Mall, Nathan; Heard, Wendell; Bach, Bernard R; Cole, Brian J; Nicholson, Gregory P; Verma, Nikhil N; Whelan, Daniel B; Romeo, Anthony A

    2012-11-01

    Despite the theoretic basis and interest in using platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to improve the potential for rotator cuff healing, there remains ongoing controversy regarding its clinical efficacy. The objective of this systematic review was to identify and summarize the available evidence to compare the efficacy of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears who were concomitantly treated with PRP. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Medline, Embase, and PubMed for eligible studies. Two reviewers selected studies for inclusion, assessed methodologic quality, and extracted data. Pooled analyses were performed using a random effects model to arrive at summary estimates of treatment effect with associated 95% confidence intervals. Five studies (2 randomized and 3 nonrandomized with comparative control groups) met the inclusion criteria, with a total of 261 patients. Methodologic quality was uniformly sound as assessed by the Detsky scale and Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Quantitative synthesis of all 5 studies showed that there was no statistically significant difference in the overall rate of rotator cuff retear between patients treated with PRP and those treated without PRP (risk ratio, 0.77; 95% confidence interval, 0.48 to 1.23). There were also no differences in the pooled Constant score; Simple Shoulder Test score; American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score; University of California, Los Angeles shoulder score; or Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation score. PRP does not have an effect on overall retear rates or shoulder-specific outcomes after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Additional well-designed randomized trials are needed to corroborate these findings. Level III, systematic review of Level I, II, and III studies. Copyright © 2012 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cartilage T2 assessment: differentiation of normal hyaline cartilage and reparative tissue after arthroscopic cartilage repair in equine subjects.

    PubMed

    White, Lawrence M; Sussman, Marshall S; Hurtig, Mark; Probyn, Linda; Tomlinson, George; Kandel, Rita

    2006-11-01

    To prospectively assess T2 mapping characteristics of normal articular cartilage and of cartilage at sites of arthroscopic repair, including comparison with histologic results and collagen organization assessed at polarized light microscopy (PLM). Study protocol was compliant with the Canadian Council on Animal Care Guidelines and approved by the institutional animal care committee. Arthroscopic osteochondral autograft transplantation (OAT) and microfracture arthroplasty (MFx) were performed in knees of 10 equine subjects (seven female, three male; age range, 3-5 years). A site of arthroscopically normal cartilage was documented in each joint as a control site. Joints were harvested at 12 (n = 5) and 24 (n = 5) weeks postoperatively and were imaged at 1.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) with a 10-echo sagittal fast spin-echo acquisition. T2 maps of each site (21 OAT harvest, 10 MFx, 12 OAT plug, and 10 control sites) were calculated with linear least-squares curve fitting. Cartilage T2 maps were qualitatively graded as "organized" (normal transition of low-to-high T2 signal from deep to superficial cartilage zones) or "disorganized." Quantitative mean T2 values were calculated for deep, middle, and superficial cartilage at each location. Results were compared with histologic and PLM assessments by using kappa analysis. T2 maps were qualitatively graded as organized at 20 of 53 sites and as disorganized at 33 sites. Perfect agreement was seen between organized T2 and histologic findings of hyaline cartilage and between disorganized T2 and histologic findings of fibrous reparative tissue (kappa = 1.0). Strong agreement was seen between organized T2 and normal PLM findings and between disorganized T2 and abnormal PLM findings (kappa = .92). Quantitative assessment of the deep, middle, and superficial cartilage, respectively, showed mean T2 values of 53.3, 58.6, and 54.9 msec at reparative fibrous tissue sites and 40.7, 53.6, and 61.6 msec at hyaline cartilage sites. A

  5. Prognostic factors of arthroscopic pull-out repair for a posterior root tear of the medial meniscus.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hong-Kyo; Koh, Yong-Gon; Kim, Yong-Chan; Park, Young-Sik; Jo, Seung-Bae; Kwon, Sae-Kwang

    2012-05-01

    Repair of a posterior root tear of the medial meniscus (MRT) decreases peak contact pressure by restoring hoop tension and is expected to prevent progression to osteoarthritis. The purposes of this study were (1) to report the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results of arthroscopic pull-out repair of the MRT and (2) to identify prognostic factors of poor outcome. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Fifty-one patients (47 women, 4 men) who underwent arthroscopic pull-out repair of the MRT by a single surgeon were enrolled. Mean follow-up after surgery was 33 months (range, 24-44 months). To identify factors affecting final outcome, patient-specific factors, such as gender, age, body mass index, meniscus extrusion, extrusion increase, subchondral edema, degree of varus alignment (<5° or >5°), and cartilage status in the medial compartment (Outerbridge grade 1 or 2 lesion vs grade 3 or 4 lesion), were investigated. Final clinical outcomes were determined using a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and patient satisfaction scores, American Knee Society (AKS) scores, and Lysholm scores, and MRI outcomes were determined by evaluating meniscus extrusion and articular cartilage status. Multiple regression analysis was performed to identify variables that independently affected clinical and MRI-determined outcomes. All clinical outcome measures significantly improved after surgery. Patients with Outerbridge grade 3 or 4 chondral lesions had poorer results than those with grade 1 or 2 lesions in terms of AKS function and Lysholm scores. Patients with varus alignment of >5° had poorer results than those with varus alignment of <5° in terms of VAS satisfaction, AKS function, and Lysholm scores. Mean meniscus extrusion increased from 3.6 mm preoperatively to 5.0 mm postoperatively. Chondral lesions progressed in 3 (9.7%) of 31 patients. Preoperative meniscus extrusion was found to be positively correlated with final extrusion. At a mean follow-up of 33 months

  6. Functional and structural comparisons of the arthroscopic knotless double-row suture bridge and single-row repair for anterosuperior rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Ide, Junji; Karasugi, Tatsuki; Okamoto, Nobukazu; Taniwaki, Takuya; Oka, Kiyoshi; Mizuta, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    We compared the outcomes of knotless double-row suture bridge and single-row repairs in patients undergoing arthroscopic repair for anterosuperior rotator cuff tears. We included 61 full-thickness anterosuperior rotator cuff tears treated by arthroscopic repair, namely, single-row repair (group 1: 25 shoulders; mean patient age, 64 years) and the knotless double-row suture bridge repair (group 2: 36 shoulders; mean patient age, 62 years). Preoperative and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging was performed for all shoulders. Clinical outcomes were evaluated for mean follow-up periods of 81 months (range, 72-96 months) in group 1 and 34 months (range, 24-42 months) in group 2, using the University of California, Los Angeles and Japanese Orthopaedic Association assessments. At the final follow-up, both groups showed improvement in the average University of California, Los Angeles and Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores and range of motion, although no intergroup differences were observed. Both groups showed improved abduction strength, and the average score was higher in group 2 (P = .0112). The lift-off and belly-press test results were improved in both groups. Postoperatively, the incidence of positive lift-off tests tended to be lower (P = .075) and that of positive belly-press tests was lower in group 2, P = .049). The repair failure rate tended to be lower in group 2 (14% [5 of 36]) than in group 1 (32% [8 of 25]; P = .0839). Arthroscopic knotless double-row suture bridge repair of anterosuperior rotator cuff tears yielded functional outcomes equivalent to those of single-row repair and may be useful for improving subscapularis function, abduction strength, and tendon healing. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Does Pure Platelet-Rich Plasma Affect Postoperative Clinical Outcomes After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair? A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Flury, Matthias; Rickenbacher, Dominik; Schwyzer, Hans-Kaspar; Jung, Christian; Schneider, Marco M; Stahnke, Katharina; Goldhahn, Jörg; Audigé, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    The exact role of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in rotator cuff tendon reconstruction remains unclear. This study investigated whether an intraoperative pure PRP injection, compared with a local anesthetic injection, improves patient-reported outcomes at 3 and 6 months after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The hypothesis was that pure PRP improves patient-reported outcomes (Oxford Shoulder Score [OSS]) at 3 and 6 months after surgery and has the same pain-reducing effect compared with a postoperative subacromial local anesthetic (ropivacaine) injection. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. Between January 2011 and November 2012, a total of 120 patients who underwent arthroscopic double-row repair of a supraspinatus tendon rupture were randomized to receive either pure PRP by an injection at the footprint (PRP group; n = 60) or ropivacaine injected in the subacromial region (control group; n = 60). Seventy-eight percent of patients had other concomitant tears. All patients, surgeons, and follow-up investigators were blinded. Clinical parameters and various outcome scores (Constant-Murley shoulder score; OSS; patient American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score; quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score; EuroQol 5 dimensions) were documented preoperatively and at 3, 6, and 24 months postoperatively. The repair integrity was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging or ultrasound at 24 months. Furthermore, a pain diary was completed within the first 10 postoperative days, and adverse events were recorded. Group outcome differences were analyzed using t tests, Fisher exact tests, and mixed models. The final follow-up rate was 91%. An associated tear of the subscapularis tendon was diagnosed in 23% of PRP-treated patients and 36% of control patients. Three months after surgery, the mean (±SD) OSS was 32.9 ± 8.6 in PRP-treated patients and 30.7 ± 10.0 in control patients (P = .221). No significant differences were noted for other outcome

  8. A Double-Blinded Placebo Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluating Short-term Efficacy of Platelet-Rich Plasma in Reducing Postoperative Pain After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hak, Alisha; Rajaratnam, Krishan; Ayeni, Olufemi R.; Moro, Jaydeep; Peterson, Devin; Sprague, Sheila; Bhandari, Mohit

    2015-01-01

    Background: We aimed to determine whether patients with arthroscopically repaired rotator cuff (RC) tears would have reduced pain and improved function after ultrasound-guided platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections compared with placebo injection. Hypothesis: PRP compared with placebo (saline) was more effective in reducing pain at the site of an RC injury that has undergone arthroscopic repair. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial. Level of Evidence: Level 2. Methods: We conducted a 2-centered, blinded, randomized controlled trial comparing the level of pain in patients undergoing arthroscopic repair. Patients were randomized to either PRP or saline (placebo). They received 2 ultrasound-guided injections of the randomized product: 1 intraoperatively and 1 at 4 weeks postoperatively. The primary outcome measure was shoulder pain demonstrated using a visual analog scale (VAS) at 6 weeks postoperatively. Secondary outcomes included the EuroQol-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D); the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (WORC); and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand Score (DASH), as well as adverse events and revision surgeries. Patients were assessed clinically preoperatively and at 2, 4, and 6 weeks postsurgery. A prespecified interim analysis was conducted after 50% of patients were recruited and followed. Results: We recruited 25 patients when interim power analysis led to an early trial termination. Follow-up was 96%. The mean difference between groups was not statistically significant (–1.81; 95% CI, –4.3 to 1.2; P = 0.16). The EQ-5D, WORC, and DASH scores also did not show significant differences between groups at week 6 (P = 0.5, 0.99, and 0.9, respectively). There were no revision surgeries, and 4 adverse events (3 PRP, 1 saline). Conclusion: There was no statistical difference in outcome measures when augmenting arthroscopically repaired RC tears with PRP. Clinical Relevance: Identifying therapies that improve outcomes in patients with RC tears remains

  9. Progression of function and pain relief as indicators for returning to sports after arthroscopic isolated type II SLAP repair-a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Boesmueller, Sandra; Tiefenboeck, Thomas M; Hofbauer, Marcus; Bukaty, Adam; Oberleitner, Gerhard; Huf, Wolfgang; Fialka, Christian

    2017-06-13

    One of the currently used surgical techniques in isolated type II SLAP lesions is arthroscopic SLAP repair. Postoperatively, patients tend to suffer from a prolonged period of pain and are restricted in their sports activities for at least 6 months. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the clinical outcome as well as the postoperative course of pain after arthroscopic type II SLAP repair. Outcome measures were assessed using the Individual Relative Constant Score (CS indiv ), the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) Score, the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), and the Short Form 36 (SF-36). Data were collected preoperatively, as well as at 3, 6, 12 and >24 months postoperatively. Eleven patients with an average age of 31.8 years (range: 22.8-49.8 years) underwent arthroscopic repair of isolated type II SLAP lesions. Mean follow-up time was 41.9 months (range: 36.1-48.4 months). 6 months after surgery, there was a statistically significant improvement of function according to the CS indiv (p = 0.004), the ASES Score (p = 0.006), and the SF-36 subscale "physical functioning" (p = 0.014) and a statistically significant decrease of pain according to the VAS (p = 0.007) and the SF-36 subscale "bodily pain" (p = 0.022) compared to preoperative levels. Arthroscopic repair of isolated type II SLAP lesions with suture anchors leads to a satisfactory functional outcome and return to pre-injury sports levels, with delayed, but significant pain relief observed 6 months after surgery. Thus, a return to sports should not be allowed earlier than 6 months after surgery, when patients have reached pain-free function and recovered strength. Researchregistry1761 (UIN).

  10. Arthroscopic, histological and MRI analyses of cartilage repair after a minimally invasive method of transplantation of allogeneic synovial mesenchymal stromal cells into cartilage defects in pigs.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tomomasa; Sekiya, Ichiro; Muneta, Takeshi; Hatsushika, Daisuke; Horie, Masafumi; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Kawarasaki, Tatsuo; Watanabe, Atsuya; Hishikawa, Shuji; Fujimoto, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Hozumi; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2012-03-01

    Transplantation of synovial mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) may induce repair of cartilage defects. We transplanted synovial MSCs into cartilage defects using a simple method and investigated its usefulness and repair process in a pig model. The chondrogenic potential of the porcine MSCs was compared in vitro. Cartilage defects were created in both knees of seven pigs, and divided into MSCs treated and non-treated control knees. Synovial MSCs were injected into the defect, and the knee was kept immobilized for 10 min before wound closure. To visualize the actual delivery and adhesion of the cells, fluorescence-labeled synovial MSCs from transgenic green fluorescent protein (GFP) pig were injected into the defect in a subgroup of two pigs. In these two animals, the wounds were closed before MSCs were injected and observed for 10 min under arthroscopic control. The defects were analyzed sequentially arthroscopically, histologically and by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for 3 months. Synovial MSCs had a higher chondrogenic potential in vitro than the other MSCs examined. Arthroscopic observations showed adhesion of synovial MSCs and membrane formation on the cartilage defects before cartilage repair. Quantification analyses for arthroscopy, histology and MRI revealed a better outcome in the MSC-treated knees than in the non-treated control knees. Leaving a synovial MSC suspension in cartilage defects for 10 min made it possible for cells to adhere in the defect in a porcine cartilage defect model. The cartilage defect was first covered with membrane, then the cartilage matrix emerged after transplantation of synovial MSCs.

  11. Arthroscopic Repair of Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears With and Without Acromioplasty: Randomized Prospective Trial With 2-Year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Geoffrey D; Gupta, Anil K; Hussey, Kristen E; Tetteh, Elizabeth S; Karas, Vasili; Bach, Bernard R; Cole, Brian J; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2014-06-01

    Acromioplasty is commonly performed during arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, but its effect on short-term outcomes is debated. To report the short-term clinical outcomes of patients undergoing arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears with and without acromioplasty. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 2. Patients undergoing arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears were randomized into acromioplasty or nonacromioplasty groups. The Simple Shoulder Test (SST), American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, Constant score, University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA) score, and Short Form-12 (SF-12) health assessment were collected along with physical examination including range of motion and dynamometer strength testing. Intraoperative data including tear size, repair configuration, and concomitant procedures were recorded. Follow-up examination was performed at regular intervals up to 2 years. Preoperative imaging was reviewed to classify the acromial morphologic type, acromial angle, and lateral acromial angulation. A total of 114 patients were initially enrolled in the study, and 95 (83%; 43 nonacromioplasty, 52 acromioplasty) were available for a minimum 2-year follow-up. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics, including number of tendons torn, repair configuration, concomitant procedures, and acromion type and angles. Within groups, there was a significant (P < .001) improvement in all functional outcome scores from preoperatively to all follow-up time points, including 2 years, for the nonacromioplasty and acromioplasty groups (ASES score: 55.1-91.5, 48.8-89.0; Constant score: 48.3-75.0, 51.9-78.7, respectively). There were no significant differences in functional outcomes between nonacromioplasty and acromioplasty groups or between subjects with different acromial features at any time point. The results of this study demonstrate no difference in clinical outcomes after rotator cuff repair

  12. Proximity of the Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex to Key Surrounding Structures and Safety Assessment of an Arthroscopic Repair Technique: A Cadaveric Study.

    PubMed

    Kuremsky, Marshall A; Habet, Nahir; Peindl, Richard D; Gaston, R Glenn

    2016-12-01

    To quantify the distance of the dorsal ulnar sensory branch, floor of the extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) subsheath, and ulnar neurovascular bundles from the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), and secondarily to assess the safety of an all-inside arthroscopic repair of the TFCC with a commonly used meniscal repair device with respect to the aforementioned structures. A custom K-wire with 1-mm gradation was used to determine the distance of at-risk structures from the periphery of the TFCC in 13 above-elbow human cadaver specimens. An all-inside repair of the TFCC at the location of a Palmer 1B tear was then performed using a commonly employed meniscal repair device. The distance from the deployed devices to the structure in closest proximity was then measured using digital calipers. The mean distance from the deployed device to the nearest structure of concern for iatrogenic injury was 9.4 mm (range, 5-15 mm). The closest structure to iatrogenic injury was usually, but not always, the dorsal ulnar sensory nerve in 9 of 13 wrists (69.2%) at 9.3 mm (range, 5-15 mm); on 3 occasions it was instead the ulnar nerve (23.1%) at 9.5 mm (range, 9-10 mm), and on 1 occasion 6 mm from the flexor digitorum profundus to the little finger (7.7%). Forearm rotation had no significant effect on measured distances (ulnar nerve: P = .98; dorsal sensory: P = .89; ECU: P = .90). The largest influence of forearm rotation was a 0.4-mm difference between pronation and supination with respect to the distance of the TFCC periphery on the ECU subsheath. An all-inside arthroscopic TFCC repair using a commonly used meniscal repair device appears safe with respect to nearby neurovascular structures and tendons under typical arthroscopic conditions. An all-inside arthroscopic TFCC repair using a commonly employed meniscal repair device appears safe in terms of proximity to important structures although further clinical investigation is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy

  13. Arthroscopic suture anchor repair of posterior root attachment injury in medial meniscus: technical note.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hwa; Shin, Dong-Eun; Dan, Jin-Myong; Nam, Ki-Shik; Ahn, Tae-Keun; Lee, Dong-Hoon

    2009-08-01

    A root attachment injury (root tear) of the meniscus can abolish the ability of the meniscus to bear hoop stress and predispose to increase articular contact stress which contribute to femorotibial degenerative changes. A pull out suture technique to repair the root tear has been described, but the procedure making the tibial tunnel may be difficult and troublesome. This article describes a repair technique using a suture anchor and posterior trans-septal portal.

  14. Arthroscopically assisted percutaneous repair of fresh closed achilles tendon rupture by Kessler's suture.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kang-lai; Thermann, Hajo; Dai, Gang; Chen, Guang-xing; Guo, Lin; Yang, Liu

    2007-04-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures are difficult to repair, and the healing rate is low due to this structure's anatomic and physiological characteristics. It is essential to develop new techniques to increase the healing rate and decrease the rate of complications. To propose and evaluate a new percutaneous method of repairing fresh closed Achilles tendon ruptures by Kessler's suture under arthroscopy. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Twenty patients were followed at least 12 months in this study. First, the torn ends of the Achilles tendon were debrided during arthroscopy. Then percutaneous repair of the Achilles tendon was performed using Kessler's suture by an inside-out technique. All cases were followed up for an average range of 21 months (range, 12-36 months). All patients were evaluated by clinical examination, magnetic resonance imaging, and the Lindholm scale. The torn ends were well aligned and sutured after the debridement under arthroscopy. According to the Lindholm scale, excellent results were seen in 15 cases and good in 5 cases. No patients had complications such as nerve injury, infection, or re-rupture at follow-up. Magnetic resonance imaging results showed that the ruptured Achilles tendons were repaired and remodeled very well in all patients. The present method is an effective surgical technique for repair of a closed rupture of the Achilles tendon. The short-term follow-up results were good, and recovery time was short. Few complications were found in our study cases.

  15. Biomechanical evaluation of different suture techniques for arthroscopic transtibial pull-out repair of posterior medial meniscus root tears.

    PubMed

    Feucht, Matthias J; Grande, Eduardo; Brunhuber, Johannes; Burgkart, Rainer; Imhoff, Andreas B; Braun, Sepp

    2013-12-01

    A tear of the posterior medial meniscus root (PMMR) is increasingly recognized as a serious knee joint injury. Several suture techniques for arthroscopic transtibial pull-out repair have been described; however, only limited data about the biomechanical properties of these techniques are currently available. There are significant differences between the tested suture techniques, with more complex suture configurations providing superior biomechanical properties. Controlled laboratory study. A total of 40 porcine medial menisci were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups (10 specimens each) according to suture technique: two simple stitches (TSS), horizontal mattress suture (HMS), modified Mason-Allen suture (MMA), and two modified loop stitches (TLS). Meniscus-suture constructs were subjected to cyclic loading followed by load-to-failure testing in a servohydraulic material testing machine. During cyclic loading, the HMS and TLS groups showed a significantly higher displacement after 100, 500, and 1000 cycles compared with the TSS and MMA groups. After 1000 cycles, the highest displacement was found for the TLS group, with significant differences compared with all other groups. During load-to-failure testing, the highest maximum load and yield load were observed for the MMA group, with statistically significant differences compared with the TSS and TLS groups. With regard to stiffness, the TSS and MMA groups showed significantly higher values compared with the HMS and TLS groups. The MMA technique provided the best biomechanical properties with regard to cyclic loading and load-to-failure testing. The TSS technique seems to be a valuable alternative. Both the HMS and TLS techniques have the disadvantage of lower stiffness and higher displacement during cyclic loading. Using a MMA technique may improve healing rates and avoid progressive extrusion of the medial meniscus after transtibial pull-out repair of PMMR tears. The TSS technique may be used as an alternative that

  16. Prospective randomized study of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair using an early versus delayed postoperative physical therapy protocol.

    PubMed

    Cuff, Derek J; Pupello, Derek R

    2012-11-01

    This study evaluated patient outcomes and rotator cuff healing after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair using a postoperative physical therapy protocol with early passive motion compared with a delayed protocol that limited early passive motion. The study enrolled 68 patients (average age, 63.2 years) who met inclusion criteria. All patients had a full-thickness crescent-shaped tear of the supraspinatus that was repaired using a transosseous equivalent suture-bridge technique along with subacromial decompression. In the early group, 33 patients were randomized to passive elevation and rotation that began at postoperative day 2. In the delayed group, 35 patients began the same protocol at 6 weeks. Patients were monitored clinically for a minimum of 12 months, and rotator cuff healing was assessed using ultrasound imaging. Both groups had similar improvements in preoperative to postoperative American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores (early group: 43.9 to 91.9, P < .0001; delayed group: 41.0 to 92.8, P < .0001) and Simple Shoulder Test scores (early group: 5.5 to 11.1, P < .0001; delayed group: 5.1 to 11.1, P < .0001). There were no significant differences in patient satisfaction, rotator cuff healing, or range of motion between the early and delayed groups. Patients in the early group and delayed group both demonstrated very similar outcomes and range of motion at 1 year. There was a slightly higher rotator cuff healing rate in the delayed passive range of motion group compared with the early passive range of motion group (91% vs 85%). Copyright © 2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Excellent healing rates and patient satisfaction after arthroscopic repair of medium to large rotator cuff tears with a single-row technique augmented with bone marrow vents.

    PubMed

    Dierckman, Brian D; Ni, Jake J; Karzel, Ronald P; Getelman, Mark H

    2018-01-01

    This study evaluated the repair integrity and patient clinical outcomes following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair of medium to large rotator cuff tears using a single-row technique consisting of medially based, triple-loaded anchors augmented with bone marrow vents in the rotator cuff footprint lateral to the repair. This is a retrospective study of 52 patients (53 shoulders) comprising 36 males and 16 females with a median age of 62 (range 44-82) with more than 24-month follow-up, tears between 2 and 4 cm in the anterior-posterior dimension and utilizing triple-loaded anchors. Mann-Whitney test compared Western Ontario Rotator Cuff (WORC) outcome scores between patients with healed and re-torn cuff repairs. Multivariate logistic regression analysed association of variables with healing status and WORC score. Cuff integrity was assessed on MRI, read by a musculoskeletal fellowship-trained radiologist. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated an intact repair in 48 of 53 shoulders (91%). The overall median WORC score was 95.7 (range 27.6-100.0). A significant difference in WORC scores were seen between patients with healed repairs 96.7 (range 56.7-100.0) compared with a re-tear 64.6 (27.6-73.8), p < 0.00056. Arthroscopic repair of medium to large rotator cuff tears using a triple-loaded single-row repair augmented with bone marrow vents resulted in a 91% healing rate by MRI and excellent patient reported clinical outcomes comparable to similar reported results in the literature. IV.

  18. Arthroscopic repair of partial-thickness and small full-thickness rotator cuff tears: tendon quality as a prognostic factor for repair integrity.

    PubMed

    Chung, Seok Won; Kim, Jae Yoon; Yoon, Jong Pil; Lyu, Seong Hwa; Rhee, Sung Min; Oh, Se Bong

    2015-03-01

    The healing failure rate is high for partial-thickness or small full-thickness rotator cuff tears. To retrospectively evaluate and compare outcomes after arthroscopic repair of high-grade partial-thickness and small full-thickness rotator cuff tears and factors affecting rotator cuff healing. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Included in the study were 55 consecutive patients (mean age, 57.9 ± 7.2 years) who underwent arthroscopic repair for high-grade partial-thickness (n = 34) and small full-thickness (n = 21) rotator cuff tears. The study patients also underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) preoperatively and computed tomography arthrography (CTA) at least 6 months postoperatively, and their functional outcomes were evaluated preoperatively and at the last follow-up (>24 months). All partial-thickness tears were repaired after being converted to full-thickness tears; thus, the repair process was almost the same as for small full-thickness tears. The tendinosis of the torn tendon was graded from the MRI images using a 4-point scale, and the reliabilities were assessed. The outcomes between high-grade partial-thickness tears that were converted to small full-thickness tears and initially small full-thickness tears were compared, and factors affecting outcomes were evaluated. The inter- and intraobserver reliabilities of the tendinosis grade were good (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.706 and 0.777, respectively). Failure to heal as determined by CTA was observed in 12 patients with a high-grade partial-thickness tear (35.3%; complete failure in 4 and partial failure in 8) and in 3 patients with a small full-thickness tear (14.3%; complete failure in 1 and partial failure in 2). The patients with high-grade partial-thickness rotator cuff tears showed a higher tendinosis grade than did those with small full-thickness tears (P = .014), and the severity of the tendinosis was related to the failure to heal (P = .037). Tears with a higher tendinosis grade

  19. Large Critical Shoulder Angle Has Higher Risk of Tendon Retear After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Chen, Yuzhou; Chen, Jiwu; Hua, Yinghui; Chen, Shiyi

    2018-05-01

    The critical shoulder angle (CSA) is the angle created between the superior and inferior bone margins of the glenoid and the most lateral border of the acromion. A few studies recently investigated the relation between CSA and functional outcomes after rotator cuff repair. However, there is a lack of research investigating the effect of CSA on postoperative tendon integrity after rotator cuff repair. To assess the effects of the CSA on postoperative tendon integrity after rotator cuff repair. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. All patients who underwent rotator cuff repair for full-thickness supraspinatus tears by 1 senior surgeon between January 2010 and January 2014 were included in this study. All patients had standardized anteroposterior shoulder radiographs the day before surgery. CSA and acromial index (AI) were measured. AI was derived by measuring the distance from the glenoid plane to the lateral border of the acromion and dividing it by the distance from the glenoid plane to the lateral aspect of the humeral head. Functional scores-including American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons shoulder evaluation form, modified University of California at Los Angeles score, Constant-Murley score, and visual analog scale for pain-were used to evaluate shoulder function at a minimum follow-up of 2 years. Meanwhile, magnetic resonance imaging examinations were performed to evaluate rotator cuff integrity according to the Sugaya method and the signal/noise quotient (SNQ) of the rotator cuff tendon. A total of 90 patients were included in this study: 42 patients with a single-row repair and 48 with a double-row repair. There was a significant positive correlation between CSA or AI and tendon SNQ. On the basis of CSA, the patients were divided into 2 groups: large CSA (>38°) and control (CSA ≤38°). At final follow-up, the large CSA group and the control CSA group demonstrated no significant differences in American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, University of California at

  20. Arthroscopic Findings in Anterior Shoulder Instability

    PubMed Central

    Hantes, Michael; Raoulis, Vasilios

    2017-01-01

    Background: In the last years, basic research and arthroscopic surgery, have improved our understanding of shoulder anatomy and pathology. It is a fact that arthroscopic treatment of shoulder instability has evolved considerably over the past decades. The aim of this paper is to present the variety of pathologies that should be identified and treated during shoulder arthroscopy when dealing with anterior shoulder instability cases. Methods: A review of the current literature regarding arthroscopic shoulder anatomy, anatomic variants, and arthroscopic findings in anterior shoulder instability, is presented. In addition, correlation of arthroscopic findings with physical examination and advanced imaging (CT and MRI) in order to improve our understanding in anterior shoulder instability pathology is discussed. Results: Shoulder instability represents a broad spectrum of disease and a thorough understanding of the pathoanatomy is the key for a successful treatment of the unstable shoulder. Patients can have a variety of pathologies concomitant with a traditional Bankart lesion, such as injuries of the glenoid (bony Bankart), injuries of the glenoid labrum, superiorly (SLAP) or anteroinferiorly (e.g. anterior labroligamentous periosteal sleeve avulsion, and Perthes), capsular lesions (humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament), and accompanying osseous-cartilage lesions (Hill-Sachs, glenolabral articular disruption). Shoulder arthroscopy allows for a detailed visualization and a dynamic examination of all anatomic structures, identification of pathologic findings, and treatment of all concomitant lesions. Conclusion: Surgeons must be well prepared and understanding the normal anatomy of the glenohumeral joint, including its anatomic variants to seek for the possible pathologic lesions in anterior shoulder instability during shoulder arthroscopy. Patient selection criteria, improved surgical techniques, and implants available have contributed to the enhancement of

  1. Biomechanical Comparison of Single- Versus Double-Row Capsulolabral Repair for Shoulder Instability: A Review.

    PubMed

    Yousif, Matthew John; Bicos, James

    2017-12-01

    The glenohumeral joint is the most commonly dislocated joint in the body. Failure rates of capsulolabral repair have been reported to be approximately 8%. Recent focus has been on restoration of the capsulolabral complex by a double-row capsulolabral repair technique in an effort to decrease redislocation rates after arthroscopic capsulolabral repair. To present a review of the biomechanical literature comparing single- versus double-row capsulolabral repairs and discuss the previous case series of double-row fixation. Narrative review. A simple review of the literature was performed by PubMed search. Only biomechanical studies comparing single- versus double-row capsulolabral repair were included for review. Only those case series and descriptive techniques with clinical results for double-row repair were included in the discussion. Biomechanical comparisons evaluating the native footprint of the labrum demonstrated significantly superior restoration of the footprint through double-row capsulolabral repair compared with single-row repair. Biomechanical comparisons of contact pressure at the repair interface, fracture displacement in bony Bankart lesion, load to failure, and decreased external rotation (suggestive of increased load to failure) were also significantly in favor of double- versus single-row repair. Recent descriptive techniques and case series of double-row fixation have demonstrated good clinical outcomes; however, no comparative clinical studies between single- and double-row repair have assessed functional outcomes. The superiority of double-row capsulolabral repair versus single-row repair remains uncertain because comparative studies assessing clinical outcomes have yet to be performed.

  2. Platelet-rich plasma supplementation in arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    D'Ambrosi, R; Palumbo, F; Paronzini, A; Ragone, V; Facchini, R M

    2016-12-01

    Results on the effectiveness of PRP supplementation in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair are conflicting, making it difficult to draw definitive conclusions. This was a prospective, randomized, and double-blind study with two groups of 20 patients each (PRP group and control group). Degenerative supraspinatus full-thickness tears grade C2-C3 were subjected to arthroscopic repair; PRP supplementation was given to patients in the PRP group. The outcomes were assessed by DASH, Constant scales, and ultrasound before and 6 months after surgery. Pain measured by VAS was evaluated preoperatively and 7 and 30 days after surgery. The two groups did not differ significantly by age, sex, and dominance of the affected side. In all surgical procedures, a long head of the biceps tenotomy and single-row repair were performed. The preoperative VAS was 5.6 ± 2.4 in PRP group and 6.4 ± 1.5 in the control group (p > 0.05). The group supplemented with PRP reported a VAS significantly better in the first week (2.5 ± 1.9 vs 5.3 ± 2.1, p < 0.05) and during the first month after surgery (1.5 ± 1.0 vs 3.2 ± 1.7, p < 0.05) compared to the control group. The preoperative Constant and DASH scores were 39.95 ± 12 and 51 ± 15.2, respectively, in the PRP group and 41 ± 11 (p > 0.05) and 45 ± 12.6 (p > 0.05) in the control group. The average Constant score improved significantly after 6 months to 81 ± 11.2 (p < 0.05) in the PRP group and 78.5 ± 9 (p < 0.05) in the control group. No differences were noted between the two groups (p > 0.05). The DASH score after 6 months was 17.4 ± 8 (p < 0.05) for the treatment group (the PRP group) and 21 ± 8.4 (p < 0.05) for the control group. No statistically significant differences were found as regards the DASH score in the two groups after 6 months (p > 0.05). The two groups showed no differences in the ultrasound evaluation after 6 months either. No re-ruptures occurred in either group. PRP

  3. Arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff: prospective study of tendon healing after 70 years of age in 145 patients.

    PubMed

    Flurin, P-H; Hardy, P; Abadie, P; Boileau, P; Collin, P; Deranlot, J; Desmoineaux, P; Duport, M; Essig, J; Godenèche, A; Joudet, T; Kany, J; Sommaire, C; Thelu, C-E; Valenti, P

    2013-12-01

    The level of activity of patients older than 70 years is tending to increase, as are their expectations in terms of joint function recuperation. It has not been proven that rotator cuff repair healing is satisfactory in the elderly. The main hypothesis of this study was: repair of supraspinous lesions in patients older than 70 years is reliable in terms of both clinical results and healing. The secondary hypothesis was: tendon healing is significantly correlated with the Constant, ASES, and SST scores as well as with age, tendon retraction, and fatty infiltration. Multicenter prospective study on 145 patients older than 70 years, with 135 patients reviewed at 1 year (93%). The mean age was 73.9 years. Full-thickness tears of the supraspinatus extended at most to the upper third of the infraspinatus and retraction limited to Patte stages 1 and 2 were included. Clinical assessment was carried out in accordance with the Constant, ASES, and SST scores. Healing was evaluated with ultrasound. A significant improvement was noted in the Constant (44/76)+31.5 (P<0.0001), ASES (35/90)+54.4 (P<0.0001), and SST (3.5/10)+6.6 (P>0.0001) scores at 1 year of follow-up. The healing rate was 89% with 15 re-tears, nine of which were stage 1 and six stage 2. The clinical result was not correlated with patient age (Constant, P=0.24; ASES, P=0.38; SST, P=0.83) nor with the retraction stage (Constant, P=0.71; ASES, P=0.35; SST, P=0.69) or the stage of fatty infiltration (P>0.7). Healing was correlated with the quality of the clinical result (Constant, P=0.02; ASES, P=0.03) and age (P=0.01) but was not correlated with retraction or the fatty infiltration stage (P>0.3). Arthroscopic repair significantly improves the clinical results, even in patients older than 70 years. The clinical results are not correlated with age (but deterioration of the result was not noted after 75 years) or frontal retraction (but the study only included retractions limited to stages 1 and 2). The healing rate is

  4. Longitudinal Long-term Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Clinical Follow-up After Single-Row Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Clinical Superiority of Structural Tendon Integrity.

    PubMed

    Heuberer, Philipp R; Smolen, Daniel; Pauzenberger, Leo; Plachel, Fabian; Salem, Sylvia; Laky, Brenda; Kriegleder, Bernhard; Anderl, Werner

    2017-05-01

    The number of arthroscopic rotator cuff surgeries is consistently increasing. Although generally considered successful, the reported number of retears after rotator cuff repair is substantial. Short-term clinical outcomes are reported to be rarely impaired by tendon retears, whereas to our knowledge, there is no study documenting long-term clinical outcomes and tendon integrity after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. To investigate longitudinal long-term repair integrity and clinical outcomes after arthroscopic rotator cuff reconstruction. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Thirty patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with suture anchors for a full-tendon full-thickness tear of the supraspinatus or a partial-tendon full-thickness tear of the infraspinatus were included. Two and 10 years after initial arthroscopic surgery, tendon integrity was analyzed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) score and Constant score as well as subjective questions regarding satisfaction with the procedure and return to normal activity were used to evaluate short- and long-term outcomes. At the early MRI follow-up, 42% of patients showed a full-thickness rerupture, while 25% had a partial rerupture, and 33% of tendons remained intact. The 10-year MRI follow-up (129 ± 11 months) showed 50% with a total rerupture, while the other half of the tendons were partially reruptured (25%) or intact (25%). The UCLA and Constant scores significantly improved from preoperatively (UCLA total: 50.6% ± 20.2%; Constant total: 44.7 ± 10.5 points) to 2 years (UCLA total: 91.4% ± 16.0% [ P < .001]; Constant total: 87.8 ± 15.3 points [ P < .001]) and remained significantly higher after 10 years (UCLA total: 89.7% ± 15.9% [ P < .001]; Constant total: 77.5 ± 15.6 points [ P < .001]). The Constant total score and Constant strength subscore, but not the UCLA score, were also significantly better at 10 years postoperatively in patients

  5. Arthroscopic, histological and MRI analyses of cartilage repair after a minimally invasive method of transplantation of allogeneic synovial mesenchymal stromal cells into cartilage defects in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Tomomasa; Sekiya, Ichiro; Muneta, Takeshi; Hatsushika, Daisuke; Horie, Masafumi; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Kawarasaki, Tatsuo; Watanabe, Atsuya; Hishikawa, Shuji; Fujimoto, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Hozumi; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    Background aims Transplantation of synovial mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) may induce repair of cartilage defects. We transplanted synovial MSCs into cartilage defects using a simple method and investigated its usefulness and repair process in a pig model. Methods The chondrogenic potential of the porcine MSCs was compared in vitro. Cartilage defects were created in both knees of seven pigs, and divided into MSCs treated and non-treated control knees. Synovial MSCs were injected into the defect, and the knee was kept immobilized for 10 min before wound closure. To visualize the actual delivery and adhesion of the cells, fluorescence-labeled synovial MSCs from transgenic green fluorescent protein (GFP) pig were injected into the defect in a subgroup of two pigs. In these two animals, the wounds were closed before MSCs were injected and observed for 10 min under arthroscopic control. The defects were analyzed sequentially arthroscopically, histologically and by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for 3 months. Results Synovial MSCs had a higher chondrogenic potential in vitro than the other MSCs examined. Arthroscopic observations showed adhesion of synovial MSCs and membrane formation on the cartilage defects before cartilage repair. Quantification analyses for arthroscopy, histology and MRI revealed a better outcome in the MSC-treated knees than in the non-treated control knees. Conclusions Leaving a synovial MSC suspension in cartilage defects for 10 min made it possible for cells to adhere in the defect in a porcine cartilage defect model. The cartilage defect was first covered with membrane, then the cartilage matrix emerged after transplantation of synovial MSCs. PMID:22309371

  6. Early Versus Delayed Passive Range of Motion Exercise for Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ke-Vin; Hung, Chen-Yu; Han, Der-Sheng; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Wang, Tyng-Guey; Chien, Kuo-Liong

    2015-05-01

    Postoperative shoulder stiffness complicates functional recovery after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. To compare early passive range of motion (ROM) exercise with a delayed rehabilitation protocol with regard to the effectiveness of stiffness reduction and functional improvements and rates of improper healing in patients undergoing arthroscopic repair for torn rotator cuffs. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing both rehabilitation approaches were identified in PubMed and Scopus. Between-group differences in shoulder function were transformed to effect sizes for comparisons, whereas the effectiveness against stiffness and the risk of tendon failure were reported using standardized mean differences of ROM degrees and odds ratios (ORs) of recurrent tears, respectively. Six RCTs were included, consisting of 482 patients. No significant difference in shoulder function existed across both protocols. The early ROM group demonstrated more improvement in shoulder forward flexion than the delayed rehabilitation group, with a standardized mean difference of 7.45° (95% CI, 3.20°-11.70°) at 6 months and 3.51° (95% CI, 0.31°-6.71°) at 12 months. Early ROM exercise tended to cause a higher rate of recurrent tendon tears (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 0.90-2.28), and the effect became statistically significant (OR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.04-3.60) after excluding 2 RCTs that recruited only those patients with small to medium-sized tears. Early ROM exercise accelerated recovery from postoperative stiffness for patients after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair but was likely to result in improper tendon healing in shoulders with large-sized tears. The choice of either protocol should be based on an accommodation of the risks of recurrent tears and postoperative shoulder stiffness. © 2014 The Author(s).

  7. Arthroscopic repair of a chondrolabral lesion associated with anterior glenohumeral dislocation.

    PubMed

    Page, Richard; Bhatia, Deepak N

    2010-12-01

    Chondrolabral lesions are uncommon after anteroinferior glenohumeral dislocations. This report describes a new dual-lesion complex that involved an avulsion of the anteroinferior glenoid labrum and a flap tear of the adjacent articular cartilage [glenoid labral tear and articular cartilage flap (GLAF) lesion]. The chondral component involved a large undermined region of the anterior half of the lower glenoid articular cartilage, and the labral component involved an avulsion from the 2.30-6 o'clock position on the glenoid. The labral tear was reconstructed with 3 suture anchors to form a neo-labrum in an attempt to overlap and stabilize the periphery of the chondral flap. A meniscal repair device was used to place a mattress stitch in the cartilage periphery to further stabilize the flap. This technique resulted in a secure repair without any chondral damage, and this remained intact on an MRI performed at a 3-month follow-up. A final 12-month follow-up showed complete recovery, as assessed by the Oxford shoulder instability score and Rowe score, and by a return to the pre-injury sporting level.

  8. Arthroscopic pubic symphysis debridement and adductor enthesis repair in athletes with athletic pubalgia: technical note and video illustration.

    PubMed

    Hopp, Sascha; Tumin, Masjudin; Wilhelm, Peter; Pohlemann, Tim; Kelm, Jens

    2014-11-01

    We elaborately describe our novel arthroscopic technique of the symphysis pubis in athletes with osteitis pubis and concomitant adductor enthesopathy who fail to conservative treatment modalities. The symphysis pubis is debrided arthroscopically and the degenerated origin of adductor tendon (enthesis) is excised and reattached. With our surgical procedure the stability of the symphysis pubis is successfully preserved and the adductor longus enthesopathy simultaneously addressed in the same setting.

  9. Arthroscopic repair of massive contracted rotator cuff tears: aggressive release with anterior and posterior interval slides do not improve cuff healing and integrity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Lee, Su-Keon; Seo, Jae-Wan; Chun, Yong-Min

    2013-08-21

    Few studies of large-to-massive contracted rotator cuff tears have examined the arthroscopic complete repair obtained by a posterior interval slide and whether the clinical outcomes or structural integrity achieved are better than those after partial repair without the posterior interval slide. The study included forty-one patients with large-to-massive contracted rotator cuff tears, not amenable to complete repair with margin convergence alone. The patients underwent either arthroscopic complete repair with a posterior interval slide and side-to-side repair of the interval slide edge (twenty-two patients; Group P) or partial repair with margin convergence (nineteen patients; Group M). The patient assignment was not randomized. The Simple Shoulder Test (SST), American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) shoulder score, and range of motion were used to compare the functional outcomes. Preoperative and six-month postoperative magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) images were compared within or between groups. At the two-year follow-up evaluation, the SST, ASES score, UCLA score, and range of motion had significantly improved (p < 0.001 for all) in both groups. However, no significant differences were detected between groups. Even though the difference in preoperative tear size on MRA images was not significant, follow-up MRA images identified a retear in twenty patients (91%) in Group P and a significant difference in tear size between groups (p = 0.007). The complete repair group with an aggressive release had no better clinical or structural outcomes compared with the partial repair group with margin convergence alone for large-to-massive contracted rotator cuff tears. In addition, the complete repair group had a 91% retear rate and a greater defect on follow-up MRA images. Even though this study had a relatively short-term follow-up, a complete repair of large-to-massive contracted rotator cuff tears, with an

  10. Platelet rich plasma in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a prospective RCT study, 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Randelli, Pietro; Arrigoni, Paolo; Ragone, Vincenza; Aliprandi, Alberto; Cabitza, Paolo

    2011-06-01

    Local application of autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP) improves tendon healing in patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Prospective, randomized, controlled, double blind study; considering an alpha level of 5%, a power of 80%, 22 patients for group are needed. Fifty-three patients who underwent shoulder arthroscopy for the repair of a complete rotator cuff tear were randomly divided into 2 groups, using a block randomization procedure. A treatment group (N = 26) consisted of those who received an intraoperative application of PRP in combination with an autologous thrombin component. A control group (N = 27) consisted of those who did not receive that treatment. Patients were evaluated with validated outcome scores. A magnetic resonance image (MRI) was performed in all cases at more than 1 year post-op. All patients had the same accelerated rehabilitation protocol. The 2 groups were homogeneous. The pain score in the treatment group was lower than the control group at 3, 7, 14, and 30 days after surgery (P < .05). On the Simple Shoulder Test (SST), University of California (UCLA), and Constant scores, strength in external rotation, as measured by a dynamometer, were significantly higher in the treatment group than the control group at 3 months after surgery (strength in external rotation [SER]: 3 ± 1.6 vs 2.1 ± 1.3 kg; SST: 8.9 ± 2.2 vs 7.1 ± 2.7; UCLA: 26.9 ± 3 vs 24.2 ± 4.9; Constant: 65 ± 9 vs 57.8 ± 11; P < .05). There was no difference between the 2 groups after 6, 12, and 24 months. The follow-up MRI showed no significant difference in the healing rate of the rotator cuff tear. In the subgroup of grade 1 and 2 tears, with less retraction, SER in the PRP group was significant higher at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperative (P < .05). The results of our study showed autologous PRP reduced pain in the first postoperative months. The long-term results of subgroups of grade 1 and 2 tears suggest that PRP positively affected cuff rotator

  11. Postoperative New-Onset Pseudoparalysis: A Retrospective Analysis of 430 Consecutive Arthroscopic Repairs for Large to Massive Rotator Cuff Tears.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyeon Jang; Rhee, Sung Min; Oh, Joo Han

    2018-04-01

    The authors have sometimes encountered postoperative new-onset pseudoparalysis (PONP) after arthroscopic repair for large to massive rotator cuff tear (ARCR). As there are insufficient data regarding PONP, the authors aimed to determine whether such a condition is characterized by obvious risk factors, as well as to assess the conditions under which it can be reversed. To evaluate the predictors of PONP development after ARCR and its reversal and to integrate these predictors into a scoring system that can be applied in clinical practice. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. The authors retrospectively analyzed 430 consecutive ARCRs performed between March 2010 and May 2016. Patients were stratified according to the occurrence of PONP. To determine the risk factors of PONP, the authors compared the PONP and control groups (patients who did not experience PONP) in terms of demographic, clinical, and operative characteristics. Results were expressed in terms of odds ratios (ORs). The incidence of PONP was 6.0% (26 of 430). Predictors of PONP included torn subscapularis (OR, 7.875; 95% CI, 1.780-34.956; P = .007), ≥30-mm retraction of the torn supraspinatus (OR, 4.657; 95% CI, 1.537-14.203; P = .007), age ≥65 years (OR, 3.865; 95% CI, 1.465-10.040; P = .006), and preoperative stiffness (OR, 2.954; 95% CI, 1.212-7.159; P = .017). The reversal rate of PONP was 65.4% (17 of 26), and the mean time to PONP reversal was 10 months. The occurrence and reversal of PONP were not related to retear. Fatty infiltration of the supraspinatus lower than Goutallier grade 3 was the sole predictor of reversal (OR, 22.000; 95% CI, 1.857-260.648; P = .014). Although the incidence of PONP after ARCR was low (6.0%), the risk of PONP was higher in patients with a torn subscapularis, larger supraspinatus tear size, older age, and preoperative stiffness. The mean time from PONP onset to reversal was 10 months, and PONP reversal was affected solely by fatty infiltration of the

  12. Trauma versus no trauma: an analysis of the effect of tear mechanism on tendon healing in 1300 consecutive patients after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Tan, Martin; Lam, Patrick H; Le, Brian T N; Murrell, George A C

    2016-01-01

    Patients with rotator cuff tears often recall a specific initiating event (traumatic), whereas many cannot (nontraumatic). It is unclear how important a history of trauma is to the outcomes of rotator cuff repair. This question was addressed in a study cohort of 1300 consecutive patients who completed a preoperative questionnaire regarding their shoulder injury and had a systematic evaluation of shoulder range of motion and strength, a primary arthroscopic rotator cuff repair performed by a single surgeon, an ultrasound scan, and the same subjective and objective measurements made of their shoulder 6 months after surgery. Post hoc, this cohort was separated into 2 groups: those who reported no history of trauma on presentation (n = 489) and those with a history of traumatic injury (n = 811). The retear rate in the group with no history of trauma was 12%, whereas that of the group with a history of trauma was 14% (P = .36). Those patients with a history of shoulder trauma who waited longer than 24 months had higher retear rates (20%) than those who had their surgery earlier (13%) (P = .040). Recollection of a traumatic initiating event had little effect on the outcome of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Duration of symptoms was important in predicting retears if patients recalled a specific initiating event but not in patients who did not recall any specific initiating event. Patients with a history of trauma should be encouraged to have their rotator cuff tear repaired within 2 years. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. All-Arthroscopic Autologous Matrix-Induced Chondrogenesis-Aided Repair of a Patellar Cartilage Defect Using Dry Arthroscopy and a Retraction System.

    PubMed

    Sadlik, Boguslaw; Puszkarz, Mariusz; Kosmalska, Lidia; Wiewiorski, Martin

    2017-11-01

    The technique of all-arthroscopic autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC)-aided repair of patellar cartilage lesions using a retraction system and dry arthroscopy has been recently described. We report the first clinical and radiological data at a short-term follow-up. Twelve patients underwent AMIC-aided cartilage repair for a patellar lesion. All steps of the procedure were performed arthroscopically, which include the use of an intra-articularly placed retraction plate for distraction of the patellofemoral joint and evacuation of saline solution for collagen matrix insertion and fixation. Clinical assessment performed before surgery and at a mean follow-up time of 38 months (range: 24-70) included the following scores: Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), and visual analog scale (VAS). Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at the follow-up examination, including the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) score. The mean KOOS and IKDC scores increased significantly ( p  < 0.01) from 50.3 and 37.4 points preoperatively to 90.1 and 79.4 postoperatively. The VAS score decreased from 7.8 to 2.3 points. Mean MOCART score at follow-up was 58.3 points. Cartilage repair of patellar lesions aided by a retraction system in a dry arthroscopy setup is a promising approach. Further studies are needed to evaluate this procedure and compare it to existing matrix implantation techniques. The level of evidence for the study is 4 (case series). Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  14. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for postoperative pain relief after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a prospective double-blinded randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Mahure, Siddharth A; Rokito, Andrew S; Kwon, Young W

    2017-09-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR) can be associated with significant postoperative pain. Concern for opioid abuse has led surgeons to identify alternative, efficacious methods of postoperative analgesia. To determine whether transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) can have a similarly beneficial effect after shoulder procedures, we conducted a prospective double-blinded randomized trial in patients undergoing outpatient ARCR. All patients undergoing ARCR of a full-thickness rotator cuff tear by the senior authors were identified. Patients with a history of recent narcotic use or prior narcotic abuse and those under management of a pain control specialist were excluded. Patients were randomized into 2 groups, active or placebo TENS, and used the device for 4 sessions/day for 45 minutes/session for the first postoperative week. All patients received Percocet 5/325 mg (oxycodone/acetaminophen) for use as rescue pain pills. One-week narcotic consumption and visual analog scale pain scores were compared between groups. The final analysis included 37 patients (21 active,16 placebo). Baseline and procedural differences were not different between groups. At 1 week postoperatively, patients in the active group had significantly lower pain scores (3.6 ± 2.1 vs. 5.8 ± 1.2; P= .008). Postoperative Percocet consumption during the initial 48 hours (12.8 ± 4.7 vs. 17.2 ± 6.3; P = .020) and during the first week (25.2 ± 9.9 vs. 33.8 ± 14.3; P = .037) was also significantly lower in the active group. Results from this prospective double-blinded randomized trial demonstrate that compared with placebo TENS, active TENS can result in significantly less pain and reduced opioid use in the immediate postoperative period after ARCR, suggesting that TENS may be potentially useful in a multimodal approach to managing postoperative pain. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier

  15. Comparison of Clinical and Radiological Results in the Arthroscopic Repair of Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears With and Without the Anterior Attachment of the Rotator Cable.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nam Su; Moon, Seong Cheol; Hong, Se Jung; Bae, Seong Hae; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2017-09-01

    The anterior rotator cable is critical in force transmission of the rotator cuff. However, few clinical studies have examined the correlation between the integrity of the anterior supraspinatus tendon and surgical outcomes in patients with rotator cuff tears. To compare the clinical and structural outcomes of the arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears with and without anterior disruption of the supraspinatus tendon. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. One hundred eighty-one shoulders available for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at least 6 months after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, with a minimum 1-year follow-up, were enrolled. The anterior attachment of the rotator cable was disrupted in 113 shoulders (group A) and intact in 68 shoulders (group B). The mean age at the time of surgery in groups A and B was 59.6 and 59.2 years, respectively, and the mean follow-up period was 24.2 and 25.1 months, respectively. There were statistically significant differences in the preoperative tear size and pattern and muscle fatty degeneration between the 2 groups ( P = .004, P = .008, and P < .001, respectively). At final follow-up, the mean visual analog scale (VAS) for pain score during motion was 1.31 ± 0.98 and 1.24 ± 0.90 in groups A and B, respectively ( P = .587). The mean Constant score was 77.5 ± 11.2 and 78.0 ± 11.9 points in groups A and B, respectively ( P = .875). The mean University of California, Los Angeles score was 30.5 ± 4.1 and 31.0 ± 3.0 points in groups A and B, respectively ( P = .652). In assessing the repair integrity on postoperative MRI, the retear rate was 23.9% and 14.7% in groups A and B, respectively ( P = .029). Irrespective of involvement in the anterior attachment of the rotator cable, the mean 24-month follow-up demonstrated excellent pain relief and improvement in the ability to perform activities of daily living after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. However, tears with anterior disruption of the rotator cable

  16. Impact of Platelet-Rich Plasma on Arthroscopic Repair of Small- to Medium-Sized Rotator Cuff Tears: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Holtby, Richard; Christakis, Monique; Maman, Eran; MacDermid, Joy C; Dwyer, Tim; Athwal, George S; Faber, Kenneth; Theodoropoulos, John; Woodhouse, Linda J; Razmjou, Helen

    2016-09-01

    Increased interest in using platelet-rich plasma (PRP) as an augment to rotator cuff repair warrants further investigation, particularly in smaller rotator cuff tears. To examine the effectiveness of PRP application in improving perioperative pain and function and promoting healing at 6 months after arthroscopic repair of small- or medium-sized rotator cuff tears. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. This was a double-blinded randomized controlled trial of patients undergoing arthroscopic repair of partial- or full-thickness rotator cuff tears of up to 3 cm who were observed for 6 months. Patients were randomized to either repair and PRP application (study group) or repair only (control group) groups. The patient-oriented outcome measures utilized were the visual analog scale (VAS), the Short Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (ShortWORC), the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) form, and the Constant-Murley Score (CMS). Range of motion (ROM) and inflammatory and coagulation markers were measured before and after surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging was used at 6 months to assess retear and fatty infiltration rate. Eighty-two patients (41 males) with a mean age of 59 ± 8 years were enrolled; 41 patients were included in each group. Both the PRP and control groups showed a significant improvement in their pain level based on the VAS within the first 30 days (P < .0001), with the PRP group reporting less pain than the control group (P = .012), which was clinically significantly different from days 8 through 11. The PRP group reported taking less painkillers (P = .026) than the control group within the first 30 days. All outcome measure scores and ROM improved significantly after surgery (P < .0001), with no between-group differences. No differences were observed between groups in inflammatory or coagulation marker test results (P > .05), retear (14% vs 18% full retear; P = .44), or fatty infiltration rate (P = .08). The PRP biological

  17. Results of arthroscopic repair of type II superior labral anterior posterior lesions in overhead athletes: assessment of return to preinjury playing level and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Brian J; Boisvert, C Brittany; Reiter, Brian; Lawson, Kevin; Ciccotti, Michael G; Cohen, Steven B

    2011-09-01

    The majority of the literature on surgical outcomes of superior labral anterior posterior (SLAP) repairs has focused on short-term follow-up of 1 to 2 years, not allowing adequate time for full rehabilitation and return to maximum level of competition for all types of athletes. Also, previous studies have concentrated on using questionnaires that primarily evaluate patients' activities of daily living, which do not focus on sport-specific performance. To determine the midterm results of type II SLAP repairs in overhead athletes, focusing primarily on athletic performance as well as activities of daily living. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A retrospective review of 30 overhead athletes, who underwent an arthroscopic superior labral repair for a symptomatic type II SLAP tear between 2002 and 2007, was performed. Our study population included 22 male and 8 female patients with a mean age at the time of surgery of 24 years. Twenty-one patients participated in baseball or softball, and the remainder of patients were involved in javelin throwing or tennis. The average follow-up was 3.5 years. The outcome of treatment was evaluated using the American Shoulder and Elbow Society (ASES) scoring system, assessing activities of daily living, and the Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic Shoulder and Elbow (KJOC) score, assessing sport-specific performance. In addition, the length of time to return to sport and the degree of successful performance were evaluated. Repairs resulted in ASES scores comparable with those from prior published studies (average ASES score, 87.9). The KJOC score averaged 73.6. The athletes' perception was that they returned to approximately 84.1% of their preinjury level of function with a mean time to return to play of 11.7 months. There was a significant drop in the ASES to KJOC score for the baseball/softball players (87.9 ± 14.94 and 72 ± 19.24, respectively; P = .006). Patients reported an overall satisfaction rate of 93.3% with the procedure, with

  18. Effect of preemptive intra-articular morphine and ketamine on pain after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Khashan, M; Dolkart, O; Amar, E; Chechik, O; Sharfman, Z; Mozes, G; Maman, E; Weinbroum, A A

    2016-02-01

    Rotator cuff tear is a leading etiology of shoulder pain and disability. Surgical treatment is indicated in patients with persistent pain who fail a trial of non-surgical treatment. Pain reduction following rotator cuff repair, particularly within the first 24-48 h, is a major concern to both doctors and patients. This study aimed to compare the postoperative antinociceptive additive effects of pre-incisional intra-articular (IA) ketamine when combined with morphine with two times the dose of morphine or saline. In this prospective, randomized, double blind, controlled trial patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff tear repair (ARCR) under general anesthesia were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to one of the three intervention groups. Twenty minutes prior to incision, morphine (20 mg/10 ml), ketamine (50 mg + morphine 10 mg/10 ml), or saline (0.9 % 10 ml) (n = 15/group), were administered to all patients. First 24 h postoperative analgesia consisted of intravenous patient controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) morphine and oral rescue paracetamol 1000 mg or oxycodone 5 mg. 24-h, 2-week and 3-month patient rated pain numeric rating scale (NRS) and analgesics consumption were documented. Patients' demographic and perioperative data were similar among all groups. The 24-h and the 2-week NRSs were significantly (p < 0.05) lower in both treatment groups compared to placebo, but were not significantly different between the two intervention groups. PCA-morphine and oral analgesics were consumed similarly among the groups throughout the study phases. Pre-incisional intra-articular morphine reduced pain in the first 2 weeks after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Further research is warranted to elucidate the optimal timing and dosing of IA ketamine and morphine for postoperative analgesic effects.

  19. Comparison of functional gains after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in patients over 70 years of age versus patients under 50 years of age: a prospective multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Moraiti, Constantina; Valle, Pablo; Maqdes, Ali; Boughebri, Omar; Dib, Chourky; Giakas, Giannis; Kany, Jean; Elkholti, Kamil; Garret, Jérôme; Katz, Denis; Leclère, Franck Marie; Valenti, Philippe

    2015-02-01

    To assess rotator cuff rupture characteristics and evaluate healing and the functional outcome after arthroscopic repair in patients older than 70 years versus patients younger than 50 years. We conducted a multicenter, prospective, comparative study of 40 patients younger than 50 years (group A) and 40 patients older than 70 years (group B) treated with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Patients older than 70 years were operated on only if symptoms persisted after 6 months of conservative treatment, whereas patients younger than 50 years were operated on regardless of any persistent symptoms. Imaging consisted of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and postoperative ultrasound. Preoperative and postoperative function was evaluated with Constant and modified Constant scores. Patient satisfaction was also assessed. The evaluations were performed at least 1 year postoperatively. No patient was lost to follow-up. The incidence of both supraspinatus and infraspinatus tears was greater in group B. Greater retraction in the frontal plane and greater fatty infiltration were observed in group B. The Constant score was significantly improved in both groups (51 ± 12.32 preoperatively v 77.18 ± 11.02 postoperatively in group A and 48.8 ± 10.97 preoperatively v 74.6 ± 12.02 postoperatively in group B, P < .05). The improvement was similar in both groups. The modified Constant score was also significantly improved in both groups (57.48 ± 18.23 preoperatively v 81.35 ± 19.75 postoperatively in group A and 63.09 ± 14.96 preoperatively v 95.62 ± 17.61 postoperatively in group B, P < .05). The improvement was greater for group B (P < .05). Partial rerupture of the rotator cuff occurred in 2 cases in group A and 5 cases in group B. Complete rerupture was observed in 2 patients in group B. In group A, 29 patients (72.5%) were very satisfied, 8 (20%) were satisfied, and 3 (7.5%) were less satisfied. In group B, 33 patients (82.5%) were very satisfied, 6 (15%) were

  20. Return to recreational sport and clinical outcomes with at least 2years follow-up after arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Antoni, M; Klouche, S; Mas, V; Ferrand, M; Bauer, T; Hardy, P

    2016-09-01

    The main objective of the study was to assess return to sports in recreational athletes after arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tear (RCT). A retrospective single-center study included all recreational athletes operated between 2008 and 2012 for arthroscopic repair of RCT, with regular sports activity, and aged less than 70 years. All were recontacted at a minimum follow-up of 2 years. The main outcome was return to sports (yes/no). The secondary criteria were return to sports, time to return to sports, number of hours per week of sports activity, and at the last follow-up the subjective assessment of sports level, patient satisfaction, and the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff (WORC) Index. Seventy-six patients (37 females, 39 males) with a mean age of 57.0±7.3 years were included. Of these 76 patients, 53 (69.7%) patients participated in a sport that specifically involved the upper limb. The mean follow-up was 45±14 months. Postoperatively, 67 of 76 (88.2%) patients returned to a sports activity, the same sport for 52 out of 76 (68.4%). The mean time to return to sports was 6±4.9 months. For patients who had taken up their sport again, the mean number of hours a week was not significantly modified (P=0.58). At the last follow-up, the subjective sports level was judged better or identical to the preoperative level by 52 of 67 (77.6%) patients. The factors significantly associated with absence of return to the previous sport were pain symptoms evolving for more than 9 months before surgery (OR=3.6 [1.01-12.5], P=0.04) and preoperative sports intensity less than 2h/week (OR=4.1 [1.4-12.3], P=0.01). At the last follow-up, the functional improvement evaluated by the WORC Index was strongly significant (P<0.00001) and 73 of 76 (96%) patients were satisfied. The majority of the recreational athletes returned to sports after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, most often at the same level and with equivalent intensity compared to before surgery. IV, retrospective

  1. Return to sports after arthroscopic capsulolabral repair using knotless suture anchors for anterior shoulder instability in soccer players: minimum 5-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Álvarez-Díaz, Pedro; Doblas, Jesús; Steinbacher, Gilbert; Seijas, Roberto; Ares, Oscar; Boffa, Juan José; Cuscó, Xavier; Cugat, Ramón

    2016-02-01

    To report the return to sports and recurrence rates in competitive soccer players after arthroscopic capsulolabral repair using knotless suture anchors at a minimum of 5 years of follow-up. All competitive soccer players with anterior glenohumeral instability treated by arthroscopic capsulolabral repair using knotless suture anchors between 2002 and 2009 were retrospectively identified through the medical records. Inclusion criteria were: no previous surgical treatment of the involved shoulder, absence of glenoid or tuberosity fractures, absence of large Hill-Sachs or glenoid bone defect, minimum follow-up of 5 years, instability during soccer practice or games, and failure of non-surgical treatment. The charts of included players were reviewed, and a phone call was performed in a cross-sectional manner to obtain information on: current soccer, return to soccer, recurrence of instability, shoulder function (Rowe score), and disability [Quick-Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score and Quick-DASH Sports/Performing Arts Module]. Fifty-seven young male soccer players were finally included with a median (range) follow-up of 8 (5-10) years. Forty-nine (86 %) of the soccer players were able to return to soccer and 36 of them (73 %) at the same pre-injury level. There were 6 (10.5 %) re-dislocations in the 57 players, all of them of traumatic origin produced during soccer and other unrelated activities. The main reasons to not return to soccer were: knee injuries (two players), changes in personal life (two players), and job-related (three players). None of the players quit playing soccer because of their shoulder instability injury. The median (range) Rowe score, Quick-DASH score, and Quick-DASH sports score were 80 (25-100), 2.3 (0-12.5), and 0 (0-18.8), respectively. Competitive soccer players undergoing arthroscopic capsulolabral repair with knotless suture anchors for shoulder instability without significant bone loss demonstrate excellent return to

  2. Ultrasound evaluation of arthroscopic full-thickness supraspinatus rotator cuff repair: single-row versus double-row suture bridge (transosseous equivalent) fixation. Results of a prospective, randomized study.

    PubMed

    Gartsman, Gary M; Drake, Gregory; Edwards, T Bradley; Elkousy, Hussein A; Hammerman, Steven M; O'Connor, Daniel P; Press, Cyrus M

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the structural outcomes of a single-row rotator cuff repair and double-row suture bridge fixation after arthroscopic repair of a full-thickness supraspinatus rotator cuff tear. We evaluated with diagnostic ultrasound a consecutive series of ninety shoulders in ninety patients with full-thickness supraspinatus tears at an average of 10 months (range, 6-12) after operation. A single surgeon at a single hospital performed the repairs. Inclusion criteria were full-thickness supraspinatus tears less than 25 mm in their anterior to posterior dimension. Exclusion criteria were prior operations on the shoulder, partial thickness tears, subscapularis tears, infraspinatus tears, combined supraspinatus and infraspinatus repairs and irreparable supraspinatus tears. Forty-three shoulders were repaired with single-row technique and 47 shoulders with double-row suture bridge technique. Postoperative rehabilitation was identical for both groups. Ultrasound criteria for healed repair included visualization of a tendon with normal thickness and length, and a negative compression test. Eighty-three patients were available for ultrasound examination (40 single-row and 43 suture-bridge). Thirty of 40 patients (75%) with single-row repair demonstrated a healed rotator cuff repair compared to 40/43 (93%) patients with suture-bridge repair (P = .024). Arthroscopic double-row suture bridge repair (transosseous equivalent) of an isolated supraspinatus rotator cuff tear resulted in a significantly higher tendon healing rate (as determined by ultrasound examination) when compared to arthroscopic single-row repair. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison between open and arthroscopic-assisted foveal triangular fibrocartilage complex repair for post-traumatic distal radio-ulnar joint instability.

    PubMed

    Luchetti, R; Atzei, A; Cozzolino, R; Fairplay, T; Badur, N

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the objective and subjective functional outcomes after foveal reattachment of proximal or complete ulnar-sided triangular fibrocartilage complex lesions by two surgical procedures: an open technique or an arthroscopically assisted repair. The study was done prospectively on 49 wrists affected by post-traumatic distal radio-ulnar joint instability. Twenty-four patients were treated with the open technique (Group 1) and 25 by the arthroscopically assisted technique (Group 2). Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a clear foveal detachment of the triangular fibrocartilage complex in 67% of the cases. Arthroscopy showed a positive ulnar-sided detachment of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (positive hook test) in all cases. Distal radio-ulnar joint stability was obtained in all but five patients at a mean follow-up of 6 months. Both groups had improvement of all parameters with significant differences in wrist pain scores, Mayo wrist score, Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire and Patient-Rated Wrist/Hand Evaluation questionnaire scores. There were no significant post-operative differences between the two groups in the outcome parameters except for the Disability of the Arm Shoulder and Hand questionnaire score, which was significantly better in Group 2 (p < 0.001). © The Author(s) 2013.

  4. Fiber-optics couple arthroscope to TV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franke, J. M.; Rhodes, D. B.

    1981-01-01

    Convenient, hand-held coupler images output of arthroscope onto coherent fiber bundle. Arthroscope allows surgeons to examine internal organs through any small opening in body. Coupler is also used for engine inspection, instrument repair, and around-corner visual inspection. Image from arthroscope travels along flexible bundle and appears at other cable end where it is recollimated by lens. Image is read from lens or projected on color TV camera.

  5. A Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial Evaluating the Effectiveness of Daily Vibration After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Lam, Patrick H; Hansen, Kaitlyn; Keighley, Geffrey; Hackett, Lisa; Murrell, George A C

    2015-11-01

    Rotator cuff repair is a common method to treat rotator cuff tears; however, retear rates remain high. High-frequency, low-magnitude vibration has been demonstrated to promote new bone formation in both animal models and in humans. This type of mechanical stimulation applied postoperatively will enhance tendon-to-bone healing and reduce postoperative retear rates. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted to investigate the effects of 5 minutes of 80-Hz vibration applied daily after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for 6 months on postoperative rotator cuff healing. The primary outcome was ultrasound-assessed repair integrity at 6 months after repair. Recruited patients were randomized into 2 groups: one group received a vibration device that oscillated at 80 Hz, and the other group received a placebo device. The postoperative retear rates of both groups were similar (9.1% [5/55] in the vibration group, and 9.3% [5/54] in the placebo group) at 6 months as determined by ultrasound imaging. Vibration did provide acute pain relief at 6 weeks after surgery (visual analog scale [VAS] score, 2.24 ± 0.29 cm) compared with placebo (VAS score, 3.67 ± 0.48 cm) (P < .003). Six months after surgery, both groups had significant reductions in pain during overhead activities, at rest, and during sleep and overall shoulder pain compared with before surgery (P < .001). Both the vibration and placebo groups had significant increases in shoulder strength with abduction in the scapular plane, adduction, liftoff, internal rotation, and external rotation 6 months after surgery. Statistical analysis showed that vibration was not a contributing factor at improving these parameters in these periods. High-frequency, low-magnitude vibration did provide acute pain relief on application 6 weeks after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair surgery. However, vibration did not improve tendon-to-bone healing

  6. Effects of arthroscopy-guided suprascapular nerve block combined with ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Jun; Hwang, Jung-Taek; Kim, Do-Young; Lee, Sang-Soo; Hwang, Sung Mi; Lee, Na Rea; Kwak, Byung-Chan

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the pain relieving effect of ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block (ISB) combined with arthroscopy-guided suprascapular nerve block (SSNB) with that of ultrasound-guided ISB alone within the first 48 h after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Forty-eight patients with rotator cuff tears who had undergone arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were enrolled. The 24 patients in group 1 received ultrasound-guided ISB and arthroscopy-guided SSNB; the remaining 24 patients in group 2 underwent ultrasound-guided ISB alone. Visual analogue scale pain score and patient satisfaction score were checked at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 48 h post-operatively. Group 1 had a lower visual analogue scale pain score at 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 48 h post-operatively (1.7 < 2.6, 1.6 < 4.0, 3.5 < 5.8, 3.6 < 5.2, 3.2 < 4.2, 1.3 < 2.0), and a higher patient satisfaction score at 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 h post-operatively than group 2 (7.8 > 6.0, 6.2 > 4.3, 6.4 > 5.1, 6.9 > 5.9, 7.9 > 7.1). Six patients in group 1 developed rebound pain twice, and the others in group 1 developed it once. All of the patients in group 2 had one rebound phenomenon each (p = 0.010). The mean timing of rebound pain in group 1 was later than that in group 2 (15.5 > 9.3 h, p < 0.001), and the mean size of rebound pain was smaller in group 1 than that in group 2 (2.5 > 4.0, p = 0.001). Arthroscopy-guided SSNB combined with ultrasound-guided ISB resulted in lower visual analogue scale pain scores at 3-24 and 48 h post-operatively, and higher patient satisfaction scores at 6-36 h post-operatively with the attenuated rebound pain compared to scores in patients who received ultrasound-guided ISB alone after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The combined blocks may relieve post-operative pain more effectively than the single block within 48 h after arthroscopic cuff repair. Randomized controlled trial, Level I. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier

  7. All-Arthroscopic Revision Eden-Hybinette Procedure for Failed Instability Surgery: Technique and Preliminary Results.

    PubMed

    Giannakos, Antonios; Vezeridis, Peter S; Schwartz, Daniel G; Jany, Richard; Lafosse, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    To describe the technique of an all-arthroscopic Eden-Hybinette procedure in the revision setting for treatment of a failed instability procedure, particularly after failed Latarjet, as well as to present preliminary results of this technique. Between 2007 and 2011, 18 shoulders with persistent instability after failed instability surgery were treated with an arthroscopic Eden-Hybinette technique using an autologous bicortical iliac crest bone graft. Of 18 patients, 12 (9 men, 3 women) were available for follow-up. The average follow-up was 28.8 months (range, 15 to 60 months). A Latarjet procedure was performed as an index surgery in 10 patients (83%). Two patients (17%) had a prior arthroscopic Bankart repair. Eight patients (67%) obtained a good or excellent result, whereas 4 patients (33%) reported a fair or poor result. Seven patients (58%) returned to sport activities. A positive apprehension test persisted in 5 patients (42%), including 2 patients (17%) with recurrent subluxations. The Rowe score increased from 30.00 to 78.33 points (P < .0001). The Walch-Duplay score increased from 11.67 to 76.67 points (P < .0001). The Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index score showed a good result of 28.71% (603 points). The average anterior flexion was 176° (range, 150° to 180°), and the average external rotation was 66° (range, 0° to 90°). Two patients (16.67%) showed a progression of glenohumeral osteoarthritic changes, with each patient increasing by one stage in the Samilson-Prieto classification. All 4 patients (33%) with a fair or poor result had a nonunion identified on postoperative computed tomography scan. An all-arthroscopic Eden-Hybinette procedure in the revision setting for failed instability surgery, although technically demanding, is a safe, effective, and reproducible technique. Although the learning curve is considerable, this procedure offers all the advantages of arthroscopic surgery and allows reconstruction of glenoid defects and

  8. High altitude is an independent risk factor for venous thromboembolism following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a matched case-control study in Medicare patients.

    PubMed

    Cancienne, Jourdan M; Burrus, M Tyrrell; Diduch, David R; Werner, Brian C

    2017-01-01

    Although the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) following elective shoulder arthroscopy is low, the large volume of procedures performed each year yields a significant annual burden of patients with thromboembolic complications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association of high procedural altitude with the incidence of postoperative VTE following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. A Medicare database was queried for all patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair from 2005 to 2012. All patients with procedures performed at an altitude of 4000 feet or higher were grouped into the "high-altitude" study cohort. Patients with procedures performed at an altitude of 100 feet or lower were then matched to patients in the high-altitude cohort on the basis of age, gender, and medical comorbidities. The rate of VTE was then assessed for both the high-altitude and matched low-altitude cohorts within 90 days postoperatively. The rates of combined VTE (odds ratio [OR], 2.6; P < .0001), pulmonary embolism (OR, 4.3; P < .0001), and lower extremity deep venous thrombosis within 90 days (OR, 2.2; P = .029) were all significantly higher in patients with procedures performed at high altitude compared with matched patients with the same procedures performed at low altitude. Procedural altitude >4000 feet is associated with significantly increased rates of postoperative VTE, including deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, compared with age-, gender-, and comorbidity-matched patients undergoing the same procedures at altitudes <100 feet. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of low-dose spinal anesthesia and single-shot femoral block combination with conventional dose spinal anesthesia in outpatient arthroscopic meniscus repair.

    PubMed

    Turhan, K S Cakar; Akmese, R; Ozkan, F; Okten, F F

    2015-04-01

    In the current prospective, randomized study, we aimed to compare the effects of low dose selective spinal anesthesia with 5 mg of hyperbaric bupivacaine and single-shot femoral nerve block combination with conventional dose selective spinal anesthesia in terms of intraoperative anesthesia characteristics, block recovery characteristics, and postoperative analgesic consumption. After obtaining institutional Ethics Committee approval, 52 ASA I-II patients aged 25-65, undergoing arthroscopic meniscus repair were randomly assigned to Group S (conventional dose selective spinal anesthesia with 10 mg bupivacaine) and Group FS (low-dose selective spinal anesthesia with 5mg bupivacaine +single-shot femoral block with 0.25% bupivacaine). Primary endpoints were time to reach T12 sensory block level, L2 regression, and complete motor block regression. Secondary endpoints were maximum sensory block level (MSBL); time to reach MSBL, time to first urination, time to first analgesic consumption and pain severity at the time of first mobilization. Demographic characteristics were similar in both groups (p > 0.05). MSBL and time to reach T12 sensory level were similar in both groups (p > 0.05). Time to reach L2 regression, complete motor block regression, and time to first micturition were significantly shorter; time to first analgesic consumption was significantly longer; and total analgesic consumption and severity of pain at time of first mobilization were significantly lower in Group FS (p < 0.05). The findings of the current study suggest that addition of single-shot femoral block to low dose spinal anesthesia could be an alternative to conventional dose spinal anesthesia in outpatient arthroscopic meniscus repair. NCT02322372.

  10. Modified arthroscopic Brostrom procedure.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-09-01

    The open modified Brostrom anatomic repair technique is widely accepted as the reference standard for lateral ankle stabilization. However, there is high incidence of intra-articular pathologies associated with chronic lateral ankle instability which may not be addressed by an isolated open Brostrom procedure. Arthroscopic Brostrom procedure with suture anchor has been described for anatomic repair of chronic lateral ankle instability and management of intra-articular lesions. However, the complication rates seemed to be higher than open Brostrom procedure. Modification of the arthroscopic Brostrom procedure with the use of bone tunnel may reduce the risk of certain complications. Copyright © 2015 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Platelet-rich plasma for arthroscopic repair of large to massive rotator cuff tears: a randomized, single-blind, parallel-group trial.

    PubMed

    Jo, Chris Hyunchul; Shin, Ji Sun; Lee, Young Gil; Shin, Won Hyoung; Kim, Hyang; Lee, Seung Yeon; Yoon, Kang Sup; Shin, Sue

    2013-10-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is expected to have a biological augmentation potential in the healing of various diseases and injuries, including rotator cuff tears. However, few evaluations have been performed specifically for large to massive tears. To assess the efficacy of PRP augmentation in patients undergoing arthroscopic repair for large to massive rotator cuff tears. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. A total of 48 patients scheduled for arthroscopic repair of large to massive rotator cuff tears were randomly assigned to receive either PRP-augmented (PRP group) or conventional treatment (conventional group). In the PRP group, 3 PRP gels (3 × 3 mL) were applied to each patient between the torn end and the greater tuberosity. The primary outcome measure was the retear rate assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomographic arthrography (CTA) at a minimum of 9 months after surgery. Secondary outcome measures included pain, range of motion, muscle strength, overall satisfaction, functional scores, and the change in cross-sectional area (CSA) of the supraspinatus. The retear rate of the PRP group (20.0%) was significantly lower than that of the conventional group (55.6%) (P = .023). Clinical outcomes showed no statistical difference between the 2 groups (all P > .05) except for the overall function (P = .043). The change in 1-year postoperative and immediately postoperative CSA was significantly different between the 2 groups: -15.54 ± 94.34 mm² in the PRP group versus -85.62 ± 103.57 mm² in the conventional group (P = .047). The application of PRP for large to massive rotator cuff repairs significantly improved structural outcomes, as evidenced by a decreased retear rate and increased CSA of the supraspinatus compared with repairs without PRP augmentation. While there was no significant difference in clinical outcomes except the overall shoulder function after 1-year follow-up, better structural outcomes in the PRP group

  12. Does Additional Biceps Augmentation Improve Rotator Cuff Healing and Clinical Outcomes in Anterior L-Shaped Rotator Cuff Tears? Clinical Comparisons With Arthroscopic Partial Repair.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yoon Sang; Lee, Juyeob; Kim, Rag Gyu; Ko, Young-Won; Shin, Sang-Jin

    2017-11-01

    The repair of anterior L-shaped tears is usually difficult because of the lack of anterior rotator cuff tendon to cover the footprint. The biceps tendon is usually exposed from the retracted anterolateral corner of the torn tendon and can be easily used to augment rotator cuff repair. Hypothesis/Purpose: This study compared the clinical outcomes of the biceps augmentation technique with those of partial tendon repair for the arthroscopic treatment of large anterior L-shaped rotator cuff tears to evaluate the role of additional biceps augmentation in tendon healing. We hypothesized that the biceps augmentation technique would lead to a lower rotator cuff tendon retear rate and provide satisfactory functional outcomes. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. This study included 64 patients with anterior L-shaped rotator cuff tears who underwent arthroscopic repair. Patients were divided into 2 groups: group A (31 patients) underwent repair of an anterior L-shaped tear combined with biceps augmentation, and group B (33 patients) had a partially repaired tendon whose footprint was exposed after repair without undue tension on the retracted tendon. Clinical evaluations were performed using the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, Constant score, muscle strength, visual analog scale for pain, and patient satisfaction. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed for tendon integrity at 6 months postoperatively. The mean period of follow-up was 29.1 ± 3.5 months (range, 24-40 months). The mean ASES and Constant scores significantly improved from 52.8 ± 10.6 and 43.2 ± 9.9 preoperatively to 88.2 ± 6.9 and 86.8 ± 6.2 at final follow-up in group A ( P < .001) and from 53.0 ± 11.8 and 44.3 ± 11.3 preoperatively to 87.4 ± 7.2 and 87.9 ± 7.3 at final follow-up in group B ( P < .001). Overall muscle strength (given as % of the other side's strength) significantly increased from preoperatively to final follow-up in group A (forward flexion [FF]: 62.0 ± 8

  13. Predictors of outcomes after arthroscopic transosseous equivalent rotator cuff repair in 155 cases: a propensity score weighted analysis of knotted and knotless self-reinforcing repair techniques at a minimum of 2 years.

    PubMed

    Millett, Peter J; Espinoza, Chris; Horan, Marilee P; Ho, Charles P; Warth, Ryan J; Dornan, Grant J; Christoph Katthagen, J

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the outcomes of two commonly used transosseous-equivalent (TOE) arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (RCR) techniques for full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears (FTST) using a robust multi-predictor model. 155 shoulders in 151 patients (109 men, 42 women; mean age 59 ± 10 years) who underwent arthroscopic RCR of FTST, using either a knotted suture bridging (KSB) or a knotless tape bridging (KTB) TOE technique were included. ASES and SF-12 PCS scores assessed at a minimum of 2 years postoperatively were modeled using propensity score weighting in a multiple linear regression model. Patients able to return to the study center underwent a follow-up MRI for evaluation of rotator cuff integrity. The outcome data were available for 137 shoulders (88%; n = 35/41 KSB; n = 102/114 KTB). Seven patients (5.1%) that underwent revision rotator cuff surgery were considered failures. The median postoperative ASES score of the remaining 130 shoulders was 98 at a mean follow-up of 2.9 years (range 2.0-5.4 years). A higher preoperative baseline outcome score and a longer follow-up had a positive effect, whereas a previous RCR and workers' compensation claims (WCC) had a negative effect on final ASES or SF 12 PCS scores. The repair technique, age, gender and the number of anchors used for the RCR had no significant influence. Fifty-two patients returned for a follow-up MRI at a mean of 4.4 years postoperatively. Patients with a KSB RCR were significantly more likely to have an MRI-diagnosed full-thickness rotator cuff re-tear (p < 0.05). Excellent outcomes can be achieved at a minimum of 2 years following arthroscopic KSB or KTB TOE RCR of FTST. The preoperative baseline outcome score, a prior RCR, WCC and the length of follow-up significantly influenced the outcome scores. The repair technique did not affect the final functional outcomes, but patients with KTB TOE RCR were less likely to have a full-thickness rotator cuff re-tear. Level III, Retrospective

  14. The effect of deep shoulder infections on patient outcomes after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a retrospective comparative study.

    PubMed

    Atesok, Kivanc; MacDonald, Peter; Leiter, Jeff; McRae, Sheila; Singh, Mandip; Stranges, Greg; Old, Jason

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of deep shoulder infections after RCR on patient outcomes. A retrospective chart review was conducted involving all patients with deep shoulder infections after arthroscopic RCR (study group). Another group of patients who were matched with the study group by age, gender and rotator cuff tear size, and did not develop deep shoulder infections after arthroscopic RCR were randomly identified (control group). The two groups were compared in terms of time to start physiotherapy, shoulder function, and delay in return to work. There were 10 patients in each group. The mean time to start physiotherapy after surgery was 145.3 (SD=158.8) days for the study group and 40.0 (SD=13.7) days for the control group (p=.051). The average forward elevation of the operated shoulder was 133 (SD=33.4) degrees for the study group, and 172 (SD=12.0) degrees for the control group (p=0.003). The average time to return to work at preoperative level was 5.6 months for the study group and 3 months for the control group. Deep shoulder infections after RCR significantly impedes time to start physiotherapy, shoulder function, and patients' ability to return to work. III b [retrospective comparative (case-control) study].

  15. Single-row modified mason-allen versus double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a biomechanical and surface area comparison.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Cory O; Sileo, Michael J; Grossman, Mark G; Serra-Hsu, Frederick

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the time-zero biomechanical strength and the surface area of repair between a single-row modified Mason-Allen rotator cuff repair and a double-row arthroscopic repair. Six matched pairs of sheep infraspinatus tendons were repaired by both techniques. Pressure-sensitive film was used to measure the surface area of repair for each configuration. Specimens were biomechanically tested with cyclic loading from 20 N to 30 N for 20 cycles and were loaded to failure at a rate of 1 mm/s. Failure was defined at 5 mm of gap formation. Double-row suture anchor fixation restored a mean surface area of 258.23 +/- 69.7 mm(2) versus 148.08 +/- 75.5 mm(2) for single-row fixation, a 74% increase (P = .025). Both repairs had statistically similar time-zero biomechanics. There was no statistical difference in peak-to-peak displacement or elongation during cyclic loading. Single-row fixation showed a higher mean load to failure (110.26 +/- 26.4 N) than double-row fixation (108.93 +/- 21.8 N). This was not statistically significant (P = .932). All specimens failed at the suture-tendon interface. Double-row suture anchor fixation restores a greater percentage of the anatomic footprint when compared with a single-row Mason-Allen technique. The time-zero biomechanical strength was not significantly different between the 2 study groups. This study suggests that the 2 factors are independent of each other. Surface area and biomechanical strength of fixation are 2 independent factors in the outcome of rotator cuff repair. Maximizing both factors may increase the likelihood of complete tendon-bone healing and ultimately improve clinical outcomes. For smaller tears, a single-row modified Mason-Allen suture technique may provide sufficient strength, but for large amenable tears, a double row can provide both strength and increased surface area for healing.

  16. A biomechanical analysis of a single-row suture anchor fixation of a large bony bankart lesion.

    PubMed

    Dyskin, Evgeny; Marzo, John M; Howard, Craig; Ehrensberger, Mark

    2014-12-01

    This study was conducted to assess whether a single-row suture anchor repair of a bony Bankart lesion comprising 19% of the glenoid length restores peak translational force and glenoid depth compared with the intact shoulder. Nine thawed adult cadaveric shoulders were dissected and mounted in 45° of abduction and 30° of external rotation. A bony Bankart lesion was simulated with an anterior longitudinal osteotomy, parallel to the superoinferior axis of the glenoid, equivalent to 19% of the glenoid length. The humeral head was displaced 10 mm anteriorly at a speed of 2 mm/s with a 50-N compressive load applied. Testing was performed with the glenoid intact, a simulated lesion, and the lesion repaired with 3 single-row suture anchors. Median (interquartile range [IQR]) peak translational force and glenoid depth were reported. The Friedman test and post hoc comparisons with the Wilcoxon signed rank test were used for between-group analyses. Peak translational force decreased after osteotomy (13.7 N; IQR, 9.6 to 15.5 N; P = .01) and increased after the repair (18.3 N; IQR, 18.3 to 20.6 N; P = .01) compared with the intact shoulder (23.7 N; IQR, 16.4 to 29.9 N). Glenoid depth significantly decreased after the osteotomy (0.2 mm; IQR, -0.6 to 0.7 mm) compared with baseline (1.7 mm; IQR, 1.3 to 2.0 mm; P = .01) and increased after repair (0.8 mm; IQR, 0.1 to 1.0 mm; P = .03) compared with the osteotomized shoulder. The glenoid depth of the repair was less than the baseline value (P = .01). Repair of an anterior bony Bankart lesion equivalent to 19% of the glenoid length with 3 suture anchors restored the peak translational force needed to anteriorly displace the humerus relative to the glenoid; however, this technique failed to restore the natural glenoid depth in a laboratory setting. Our findings describe the inability of a single-row suture anchor repair to provide anatomic fixation of the bony Bankart lesion equivalent to 19% of the glenoid length

  17. A Double-Blinded Placebo Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluating Short-term Efficacy of Platelet-Rich Plasma in Reducing Postoperative Pain After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Hak, Alisha; Rajaratnam, Krishan; Ayeni, Olufemi R; Moro, Jaydeep; Peterson, Devin; Sprague, Sheila; Bhandari, Mohit

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to determine whether patients with arthroscopically repaired rotator cuff (RC) tears would have reduced pain and improved function after ultrasound-guided platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections compared with placebo injection. PRP compared with placebo (saline) was more effective in reducing pain at the site of an RC injury that has undergone arthroscopic repair. Randomized controlled trial. Level 2. We conducted a 2-centered, blinded, randomized controlled trial comparing the level of pain in patients undergoing arthroscopic repair. Patients were randomized to either PRP or saline (placebo). They received 2 ultrasound-guided injections of the randomized product: 1 intraoperatively and 1 at 4 weeks postoperatively. The primary outcome measure was shoulder pain demonstrated using a visual analog scale (VAS) at 6 weeks postoperatively. Secondary outcomes included the EuroQol-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D); the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (WORC); and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand Score (DASH), as well as adverse events and revision surgeries. Patients were assessed clinically preoperatively and at 2, 4, and 6 weeks postsurgery. A prespecified interim analysis was conducted after 50% of patients were recruited and followed. We recruited 25 patients when interim power analysis led to an early trial termination. Follow-up was 96%. The mean difference between groups was not statistically significant (-1.81; 95% CI, -4.3 to 1.2; P = 0.16). The EQ-5D, WORC, and DASH scores also did not show significant differences between groups at week 6 (P = 0.5, 0.99, and 0.9, respectively). There were no revision surgeries, and 4 adverse events (3 PRP, 1 saline). There was no statistical difference in outcome measures when augmenting arthroscopically repaired RC tears with PRP. Identifying therapies that improve outcomes in patients with RC tears remains a challenge and deserves ongoing investigation.

  18. Meta-analysis of Clinical and Radiographic Outcomes After Arthroscopic Single-Row Versus Double-Row Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Perser, Karen; Godfrey, David; Bisson, Leslie

    2011-05-01

    Double-row rotator cuff repair methods have improved biomechanical performance when compared with single-row repairs. To review clinical outcomes of single-row versus double-row rotator cuff repair with the hypothesis that double-row rotator cuff repair will result in better clinical and radiographic outcomes. Published literature from January 1980 to April 2010. Key terms included rotator cuff, prospective studies, outcomes, and suture techniques. The literature was systematically searched, and 5 level I and II studies were found comparing clinical outcomes of single-row and double-row rotator cuff repair. Coleman methodology scores were calculated for each article. Meta-analysis was performed, with treatment effect between single row and double row for clinical outcomes and with odds ratios for radiographic results. The sample size necessary to detect a given difference in clinical outcome between the 2 methods was calculated. Three level I studies had Coleman scores of 80, 74, and 81, and two level II studies had scores of 78 and 73. There were 156 patients with single-row repairs and 147 patients with double-row repairs, both with an average follow-up of 23 months (range, 12-40 months). Double-row repairs resulted in a greater treatment effect for each validated outcome measure in 4 studies, but the differences were not clinically or statistically significant (range, 0.4-2.2 points; 95% confidence interval, -0.19, 4.68 points). Double-row repairs had better radiographic results, but the differences were also not statistically significant (P = 0.13). Two studies had adequate power to detect a 10-point difference between repair methods using the Constant score, and 1 study had power to detect a 5-point difference using the UCLA (University of California, Los Angeles) score. Double-row rotator cuff repair does not show a statistically significant improvement in clinical outcome or radiographic healing with short-term follow-up.

  19. Arthroscopic single-row modified mason-allen repair versus double-row suture bridge reconstruction for supraspinatus tendon tears: a matched-pair analysis.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Christian; Hug, Konstantin; Pauly, Stephan; Marnitz, Tim; Scheibel, Markus

    2012-12-01

    Arthroscopic double-row fixation of supraspinatus tendon tears compared with single-row techniques is still a matter of debate. Arthroscopic double-row rotator cuff repair using the suture bridge technique provides better clinical results and lower retear rates than does single-row repair using a modified Mason-Allen stitch technique. Cohort study; Level of evidence 3. Forty patients underwent either an arthroscopic single-row modified Mason-Allen stitch (SR) (n = 20; mean age ± SD, 61.5 ± 7.4 y) or a modified suture bridge double-row repair (DR) (n = 20; age, 61.2 ± 7.5 y). The anteroposterior extension was classified as Bateman I in 10% and Bateman II in 90% of patients in the SR group and as Bateman II in 80% and Bateman III in 20% of patients in the DR group. Patients were matched for sex and age. The subjective shoulder value (SSV), Constant-Murley score (CS), and Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (WORC) were used for clinical follow-up. Furthermore, MRI scans were conducted for analysis of tendon integrity, muscle atrophy, and fatty infiltration via semiquantitative signal intensity analysis. In addition, re-defect patterns were evaluated. The mean follow-up time in the SR group was 16.8 ± 4.6 months. The mean SSV was 91.0% ± 8.8%, mean CS was 82.2 ± 8.1 (contralateral side, 88.8 ± 5.3), and mean WORC score was 96.5% ± 3.2%. The mean follow-up time in the DR group was 23.4 ± 2.9 months, with patients achieving scores of 92.9% ± 9.6% for the SSV, 77.0 ± 8.6 for the CS (contralateral side, 76.7 ± 17.1), and 90.7% ± 12.6% for the WORC (P > .05). No significant differences were detected in the clinical outcome between groups. Tendon integrity was as follows. Type 1, none in either group; type 2, 4 SR and 5 DR; type 3, 9 SR and 10 DR; type 4, 3 SR and 3 DR; and type 5, 3 SR and 2 DR. The failure rate was 31.6% (n = 6) in the SR group and 25% (n = 5) in the DR group (P > .05). No significant differences were obtained for muscular atrophy or fatty

  20. A novel arthroscopic all-inside suture technique using the Fast-Fix 360 system for repairing horizontal meniscal tears in young athletes

    PubMed Central

    Atsumi, Satoru; Hara, Kunio; Arai, Yuji; Yamada, Manabu; Mizoshiri, Naoki; Kamitani, Aguri; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Considering the risk of osteoarthritis following resection of a horizontally torn meniscus of the knee, repairing and preserving the meniscus as much as possible is preferred. We report 3 cases of restoration of horizontally torn menisci using a novel arthroscopic method we have called “all-inside interleaf vertical suture” that afforded preservation. Patient concerns: The 3 patients (aged 14, 17, and 21 years) had knee pain through sports activity. Diagnoses: All patients had horizontal tears in the posteromedial part of the meniscus. Interventions: The method uses Fast-Fix, whereby a first anchor is inserted from the tibial surface of the tear's superior leaflet and a second anchor is inserted from the femoral surface of the tear's inferior leaflet, and the 2 leaflets are closed using vertical suture. In all cases, the suture knots were embedded between the superior leaflet and inferior leaflet, avoiding contact with the articular cartilage, and superior leaflet and inferior leaflet crimping was good. Outcomes: All 3 were able to resume competing in sport and ≥ 1 year after surgery they had no pain and their postoperative mean Lysholm scores were 99.7. There were no complications or recurrence. On magnetic resonance imaging, the signal intensity of all the horizontal tears was high before surgery but low after surgery, suggesting that the repaired tear was healing. Lessons: The all-inside interleaf vertical suture procedure is a new surgical technique that can repair posteromedial horizontal meniscal tears of the knee of young people by easy crimping of the superior and inferior leaflets without the suture knots causing complications. PMID:29443758

  1. Rotator cuff repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... techniques are used to repair a rotator cuff tear: During open repair, a surgical incision is made ... repair is done for large or more complex tears. During arthroscopy, the arthroscope is inserted through small ...

  2. Meta-analysis of Clinical and Radiographic Outcomes After Arthroscopic Single-Row Versus Double-Row Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Perser, Karen; Godfrey, David; Bisson, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    Context: Double-row rotator cuff repair methods have improved biomechanical performance when compared with single-row repairs. Objective: To review clinical outcomes of single-row versus double-row rotator cuff repair with the hypothesis that double-row rotator cuff repair will result in better clinical and radiographic outcomes. Data Sources: Published literature from January 1980 to April 2010. Key terms included rotator cuff, prospective studies, outcomes, and suture techniques. Study Selection: The literature was systematically searched, and 5 level I and II studies were found comparing clinical outcomes of single-row and double-row rotator cuff repair. Coleman methodology scores were calculated for each article. Data Extraction: Meta-analysis was performed, with treatment effect between single row and double row for clinical outcomes and with odds ratios for radiographic results. The sample size necessary to detect a given difference in clinical outcome between the 2 methods was calculated. Results: Three level I studies had Coleman scores of 80, 74, and 81, and two level II studies had scores of 78 and 73. There were 156 patients with single-row repairs and 147 patients with double-row repairs, both with an average follow-up of 23 months (range, 12-40 months). Double-row repairs resulted in a greater treatment effect for each validated outcome measure in 4 studies, but the differences were not clinically or statistically significant (range, 0.4-2.2 points; 95% confidence interval, –0.19, 4.68 points). Double-row repairs had better radiographic results, but the differences were also not statistically significant (P = 0.13). Two studies had adequate power to detect a 10-point difference between repair methods using the Constant score, and 1 study had power to detect a 5-point difference using the UCLA (University of California, Los Angeles) score. Conclusions: Double-row rotator cuff repair does not show a statistically significant improvement in clinical

  3. Biomechanical Comparison of Single- Versus Double-Row Capsulolabral Repair for Shoulder Instability: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Yousif, Matthew John; Bicos, James

    2017-01-01

    Background: The glenohumeral joint is the most commonly dislocated joint in the body. Failure rates of capsulolabral repair have been reported to be approximately 8%. Recent focus has been on restoration of the capsulolabral complex by a double-row capsulolabral repair technique in an effort to decrease redislocation rates after arthroscopic capsulolabral repair. Purpose: To present a review of the biomechanical literature comparing single- versus double-row capsulolabral repairs and discuss the previous case series of double-row fixation. Study Design: Narrative review. Methods: A simple review of the literature was performed by PubMed search. Only biomechanical studies comparing single- versus double-row capsulolabral repair were included for review. Only those case series and descriptive techniques with clinical results for double-row repair were included in the discussion. Results: Biomechanical comparisons evaluating the native footprint of the labrum demonstrated significantly superior restoration of the footprint through double-row capsulolabral repair compared with single-row repair. Biomechanical comparisons of contact pressure at the repair interface, fracture displacement in bony Bankart lesion, load to failure, and decreased external rotation (suggestive of increased load to failure) were also significantly in favor of double- versus single-row repair. Recent descriptive techniques and case series of double-row fixation have demonstrated good clinical outcomes; however, no comparative clinical studies between single- and double-row repair have assessed functional outcomes. Conclusion: The superiority of double-row capsulolabral repair versus single-row repair remains uncertain because comparative studies assessing clinical outcomes have yet to be performed. PMID:29230427

  4. Arthroscopic repair of traumatic isolated subscapularis tendon lesions (Lafosse Type III or IV): a prospective magnetic resonance imaging-controlled case series with 1 year of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Grueninger, Patrick; Nikolic, Nikola; Schneider, Joerg; Lattmann, Thomas; Platz, Andreas; Chmiel, Corinne; Meier, Christoph

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively assess the efficacy of arthroscopic repair of isolated high-grade subscapularis (SSC) tendon lesions by means of clinical follow-up combined with magnetic resonance imaging investigations. Between January 2008 and September 2010, 11 patients (9 men and 2 women; mean age, 45 ± 10 years) with Lafosse type III or IV traumatic isolated SSC tendon lesions underwent arthroscopic repair including tenodesis of the long head of the biceps tendon. All patients were preoperatively assessed by clinical examination (Constant-Murley score [CMS]) and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance arthrography. At 1 year of follow-up, specific clinical SSC tests, the CMS, and the loss of external rotation were evaluated. A native magnetic resonance investigation was performed to assess the structural integrity of the repair. The SSC muscle was compared with its preoperative condition regarding fatty infiltration and size (cross-sectional area). Patient satisfaction was graded from 1 (poor) to 4 (excellent). The mean time interval from trauma to surgery was 3.7 months. A concomitant lesion of the biceps tendon was observed in 10 patients (91%). The mean CMS improved from 44 to 89 points (P < .001). The functional tests showed a significant increase in strength (P < .05) (belly-press test, 4.8 v 2.9; lift-off test, 4.8 v 2.9). The mean loss of external rotation at 0° of abduction was 10° compared with the contralateral side (P < .05). Patient satisfaction was high. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation showed complete structural integrity of the tendon repair in all studies. The SSC showed a significant decrease in fatty infiltration and increase in the cross-sectional area. Arthroscopic repair of higher-grade isolated SSC lesions provides reliable tendon healing accompanied by excellent functional results 1 year after surgery. Level IV, prospective therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2014 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published

  5. Effect of sodium hyaluronate/carboxymethyl cellulose (Guardix-sol) on retear rate and postoperative stiffness in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair patients: A prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jeung Yeol; Chung, Pill Ku; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2017-01-01

    Hyaluronate-based anti-adhesive agents are expected to enhance rotator cuff healing; however, their effect on the incidence and extent of postoperative complications such as stiffness and retears has not been investigated. From July 2012 to February 2013, 80 patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair surgery were prospectively enrolled. Forty patients were assigned to the control group, while the other 40 were assigned to the injection group and received a Guardix-sol injection immediately after surgery. Passive range of motion, pain visual analog scale, and functional score were assessed at 8 weeks, 6 months, and 24 months postoperatively. Gliding motion between the deltoid muscle and the greater tuberosity of the proximal humerus was evaluated using ultrasonography at 2 and 8 weeks postoperatively, and tendon integrity was evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging at 6 months postoperatively. We found no significant difference between the groups regarding gliding motion at 2 weeks postoperatively. However, at 8 weeks, the incidence of poor gliding motion was 2.5% and 15% for the injected patients and control group, respectively, which was statistically significant. At 6 months after surgery, the retear rate between the two groups was not statistically significant. We found no statistically significant difference between the two groups regarding retear rate and clinical score throughout the follow-up period. We noted no complications related to the use of Guardix-sol. Patients who received the Guardix-sol injection showed improved gliding motion between the deltoid muscle and the greater tuberosity in the early postoperative period.

  6. Return to Sport and Clinical Outcomes After Hip Arthroscopic Labral Repair in Young Amateur Athletes: Minimum 2-Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Rohith; Johnson, Nick R; Hevesi, Mario; Gibbs, Christopher M; Levy, Bruce A; Krych, Aaron J

    2017-09-01

    To determine the rate of return of young amateur athletes to sport after hip arthroscopy, their clinical outcomes, and pathologic risk factors for worse outcomes 2 years after surgery. This study included all patients between age 13 and 23 who participated in a sport prior to surgery with intent to return who underwent hip arthroscopy after failure of comprehensive nonoperative management for whom 2-year outcome scores were available. Outcomes collected retrospectively included modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS) and the Hip Outcome Scores (HOS) subscales for activities of daily living (ADL) and sport (HOS Sport). In addition, sport played, return to sport rates, and Tegner Scores were measured preinjury and postoperatively. Descriptive statistics were used to present demographic data. A priori analysis was used to determine the sample size needed to show minimal clinically important differences for mHHS, HOS ADL, and HOS Sport. The study population included 50 patients with a mean age of 17.8 years. Athletes returned to sport at a rate of 92% (46/50). At a mean follow-up of 34 months, the mean mHHS, HOS ADL, and HOS Sport outcome scores were 85, 91, and 80 for the entire study group; 87, 92, and 84 for the group that returned to sport; and 67, 82, and 41 for the group that did not return to sport, respectively. Median preinjury and postoperative Tegner levels were 8 and 7, respectively. Labral takedown and reattachment was associated with lower HOS ADL (P = .01) and HOS Sport scores (P = .02). Athletes returned to sport at a high rate (92%; 46/50) after hip arthroscopy and perform activities at near preinjury levels. In this group of athletes, arthroscopic labral repair with chondrolabral preservation, which reflected less severe chondrolabral pathology, performed better than labral repair with takedown and reattachment. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Arthroscopic repair of anterior-inferior glenohumeral instability using a portal at the 5:30-o'clock position: analysis of the effects of age, fixation method, and concomitant shoulder injury on surgical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Imhoff, Andreas B; Ansah, Patrick; Tischer, Thomas; Reiter, Christoph; Bartl, Christoph; Hench, Maximilian; Spang, Jeffrey T; Vogt, Stephan

    2010-09-01

    Traumatic anterior-inferior shoulder joint dislocations are common injuries among the young athletic population. The aim of this study was to assess which factors, including concomitant injury (rotator cuff tears, superior labral anterior posterior [SLAP] lesions), patient age, and fixation methods, led to redislocation after arthroscopic stabilization. There are several risk factors for the outcome after arthroscopic anterior-inferior glenohumeral stabilization. Cohort Study; Level of evidence, 3. Between 1996 and 2000, 221 patients were treated with arthroscopic stabilization for anterior-inferior shoulder dislocation. Of these 221 consecutive patients, 190 (140 male, 50 female) with an average age of 28.0 years (range, 14.4-59.2 years) were available for follow-up (average follow-up, 37.4 +/- 15.8 months). Fixation methods were FASTak (n = 138), Suretac (n = 28), or Panalok (n = 24) anchors. Concomitant SLAP lesions were seen in 38 of 190 cases (20%). Redislocation rates varied between anchor systems (FASTak, 6.5%; Suretac, 25%; Panalok, 16.8%). Superior labral anterior posterior lesions, when treated, did not influence clinical outcomes or redislocation rate. A concomitant rotator cuff tear did not influence redislocation rate. Postoperative outcomes (Rowe score, Constant score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons [ASES] shoulder index, 12-item questionnaire) in patients with a partial tear were also not altered. On the other hand, the redislocation rate correlated with patient age and number of prior dislocations. Return to sports at preinjury level was possible in 80% of cases. Arthroscopic repair of anterior-inferior instability using the 5:30-o'clock portal is dependent on anchor type and can show good to excellent results. Because of several coinjuries in anterior-inferior instability, an arthroscopic approach may be required to identify and treat such lesions.

  8. Arthroscopic repair of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus with opening wedge high tibial osteotomy: surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwang Am; Kim, Sung Jae; Lee, Su Chan; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Song, Moon Bok; Lee, Choon Key

    2009-07-01

    Simultaneous repair of a radial tear at the tibial attachment site of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus under special circumstances requiring tibial valgus osteotomy is technically difficult. First, most patients who need an osteotomy have a narrowed medial tibiofemoral joint space. In such a situation, the pull-out suture technique is more difficult to perform than in a normal joint space. Second, pulling out suture strands that penetrate the posterior horn of the medial meniscus to the anterior tibial cortex increases the risk of transection during osteotomy. We performed a meniscus repair combined with an opening wedge tibial valgus osteotomy without complications and present our technique as a new method for use in selective cases necessitating both meniscus repair of a complete radial tear and opening wedge tibial osteotomy.

  9. Arthroscopic repair of the posterior root of the medial meniscus using knotless suture anchor: A technical note.

    PubMed

    Eun, Sang Soo; Lee, Sang Ho; Sabal, Luigi Andrew

    2016-08-01

    There are numerous methods for repairing posterior root tears of the medial meniscus (PRTMM). Repair techniques using suture anchors through a high posteromedial portal have been reported. The present study found that using a knotless suture anchor instead of suture anchor seemed easier and faster because it avoided passing the sutures through the meniscus and tying a knot in a small space. This study describes a knotless suture anchor technique through a high posteromedial portal, and its clinical results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Platelet-rich fibrin matrix in the management of arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff: a prospective, randomized, double-blinded study.

    PubMed

    Weber, Stephen C; Kauffman, Jeffrey I; Parise, Carol; Weber, Sophia J; Katz, Stephen D

    2013-02-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has a high rate of patient satisfaction. However, multiple studies have shown significant rates of anatomic failure. Biological augmentation would seem to be a reasonable technique to improve clinical outcomes and healing rates. To represent a prospective, double-blinded, randomized study to assess the use of platelet-rich fibrin matrix (PRFM) in rotator cuff surgery. Randomized controlled trial; level of evidence, 1. Prestudy power analysis demonstrated that a sample size of 30 patients in each group (PRFM vs control) would allow recognition of a 20% difference in perioperative pain scores. Sixty consecutive patients were randomized to either receive a commercially available PRFM product or not. Preoperative and postoperative range of motion (ROM), University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA), and simple shoulder test (SST) scores were recorded. Surgery was performed using an arthroscopic single-row technique. Visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores were obtained upon arrival to the recovery room and 1 hour postoperatively, and narcotic consumption was recorded and converted to standard narcotic equivalents. The SST and ROM measurements were taken at 3, 6, 9, and 12 weeks postoperatively, and final (1 year) American shoulder and elbow surgeons (ASES) shoulder and UCLA shoulder scores were assessed. There were no complications. Randomization created comparable groups except that the PRFM group was younger than the control group (mean ± SD, 59.67 ± 8.16 y vs 64.50 ± 8.59 y, respectively; P < .05). Mean surgery time was longer for the PRFM group than for the control group (83.28 ± 17.13 min vs 73.28 ± 17.18 min, respectively; P < .02). There was no significant difference in VAS scores or narcotic use between groups and no statistically significant differences in recovery of motion, SST, or ASES scores. Mean ASES scores were 82.48 ± 8.77 (PRFM group) and 82.52 ± 12.45 (controls) (F(1,56) = 0.00, P > .98). Mean UCLA shoulder scores

  11. Arthroscopic Repair of Massive Cuff Tears With Large Subscapularis Tendon Ruptures (Lafosse III/IV): A Prospective Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Controlled Case Series of 26 Cases With a Minimum Follow-up of 1 Year.

    PubMed

    Grueninger, Patrick; Nikolic, Nikola; Schneider, Joerg; Lattmann, Thomas; Platz, Andreas; Chmiel, Corinne; Meier, Christoph

    2015-11-01

    To prospectively assess arthroscopic repair of massive cuff tears (MCT) in a highly selective patient group with large subscapularis (SSC) tendon tears by means of clinical results and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies. Between April 2009 and December 2010, 26 patients with MCT were treated with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Only lesions involving a large tear of the SSC tendon (Lafosse III or IV) in combination with a complete tear of the supraspinatus (SSP) tendon and a tear of at least the anterior third of the infraspinatus (ISP) tendon were included. Minimum follow-up was 1 year. Pre- and postoperative assessment included a standardized clinical examination, subjective patient outcome, and MRI (structural integrity, fatty muscle infiltration, and muscular mass). Mean follow-up was 17 months (range, 12 to 34 months). MRI was performed in 25 patients. In 21 (84%) the cuff repair was intact. A partial retear of the SSC was found in 2 patients (8%). In 2 patients (8%) a full-thickness retear of the posterosuperior cuff was observed (1 SSP, 1 SSP/ISP). A significant increase of the muscle mass and decrease of fatty infiltration was observed for the SSC and SSP but not for the ISP. The mean Constant-Murley score improved from 36 to 86 points (P < .001) with all its subscores as well (P < .001). Muscular strength improved for the SSC (4.9 v 3.0, P < .001), SSP (4.6 v 2.9, P < .001), and ISP (4.8 v 3.4, P < .001). Overall patient satisfaction was high (3.6 ± 0.8). Arthroscopic repair of MCT involving the ISP, SSP, and large tears of the SSC provides a reliable tendon healing, in particular for the SSC tendon, combined with good functional results. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Arthroscopic labral repair of the hip, using a through-labral double-stranded single-pass suture technique.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ken; Singh, Parminder J

    2014-10-01

    The normal labrum is crucial to the biomechanical function of the hip joint, not only increasing the surface area and depth of the acetabulum but also maintaining a suction seal to assist in normal synovial fluid flow from the peripheral to the central compartment. Simple loop suture repairs of the labrum may evert the labrum, thus losing the optimal seal, as well as causing abrasion of the articular cartilage. Vertical mattress suture and labral base fixation techniques aim to leave the free edge of the labrum intact and undisturbed, therefore improving the contact of the labrum to the femoral head and neck to improve the seal of the acetabulum. We aim to describe a double-stranded single-pass vertical mattress suture technique that may allow greater versatility to the surgeon in repairing thinner labrums while still achieving a free and continuous free edge.

  13. Costs, quality of life and cost-effectiveness of arthroscopic and open repair for rotator cuff tears: an economic evaluation alongside the UKUFF trial.

    PubMed

    Murphy, J; Gray, A; Cooper, C; Cooper, D; Ramsay, C; Carr, A

    2016-12-01

    A trial-based comparison of the use of resources, costs and quality of life outcomes of arthroscopic and open surgical management for rotator cuff tears in the United Kingdom NHS was performed using data from the United Kingdom Rotator Cuff Study (UKUFF) randomised controlled trial. Using data from 273 patients, healthcare-related use of resources, costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were estimated at 12 months and 24 months after surgery on an intention-to-treat basis with adjustment for covariates. Uncertainty about the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for arthroscopic versus open management at 24 months of follow-up was incorporated using bootstrapping. Multiple imputation methods were used to deal with missing data. There were no significant differences between the arthroscopic and open groups in terms of total mean use and cost of resources or QALYs at any time post-operatively. Open management dominated arthroscopic management in 59.8% of bootstrapped cost and effect differences. The probability that arthroscopic management was cost-effective compared with open management at a willingness-to-pay threshold of £20 000 per QALY gained was 20.9%. There was no significant overall difference in the use or cost of resources or quality of life between arthroscopic and open management in the trial. There was uncertainty about which strategy was most cost-effective. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:1648-55. ©2016 Gray et al.

  14. Does concomitant acromioplasty facilitate arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears? A meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Song, Lei; Miao, Ling; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Wen-Liang

    2016-01-01

    essence for demonstrating whether functional or structural differences exist in patients undergoing arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears with or without acromioplasty.

  15. Does the Use of Platelet-Rich Plasma at the Time of Surgery Improve Clinical Outcomes in Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair When Compared With Control Cohorts? A Systematic Review of Meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Saltzman, Bryan M; Jain, Akshay; Campbell, Kirk A; Mascarenhas, Randy; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N; Cole, Brian J

    2016-05-01

    The aims of the study were as follows: (1) to perform a systematic review of meta-analyses evaluating platelet-rich plasma (PRP) use at the time of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair surgery and to determine its effect on retear rates and clinical outcomes; (2) to provide a framework for the analysis and interpretation of the best currently available evidence; and (3) to identify gaps within the literature where suggestions for continued investigational efforts would be valid. Literature searches were performed to identify meta-analyses examining arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs augmented with PRP versus control (no PRP). Clinical data were extracted and meta-analysis quality was assessed using the Quality of Reporting of Meta-analyses and Oxman-Guyatt scales. Seven meta-analyses met inclusion and exclusion criteria. All were considered as being of similar quality with Quality of Reporting of Meta-analyses scores >15 and Oxman scores of 7. A total of 3,193 overlapping patients treated were included with mean follow-up from 12 to 31 months. When compared with control patients, use of PRP at the time of rotator cuff repair did not result in significantly lower overall retear rates or improved clinical outcome scores. The following postoperative functional scores comparing PRP versus control were reported: Constant (no significant difference demonstrated with PRP use in 5 of 6 reporting meta-analyses), University of California - Los Angeles (no difference, 6 of 6), American Shoulder and Elbow Society (no difference, 4 of 4), and Simple Shoulder Test (no difference, 3 of 5). Subgroup analysis performed by 3 meta-analyses showed evidence of improved outcomes with solid PRP matrix versus liquid, small- and/or medium-sized versus large and/or massive tears, PRP application at the tendon-bone interface versus over tendon, and in the setting of double-row versus single-row rotator cuff. The current highest level of evidence suggests that PRP use at the time of arthroscopic

  16. Pseudoparalysis From a Massive Rotator Cuff Tear Is Reliably Reversed With an Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair in Patients Without Preoperative Glenohumeral Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Denard, Patrick J; Lädermann, Alexandre; Brady, Paul C; Narbona, Pablo; Adams, Christopher R; Arrigoni, Paolo; Huberty, Dave; Zlatkin, Michael B; Sanders, Timothy G; Burkhart, Stephen S

    2015-10-01

    Pseudoparalysis is defined as active forward flexion less than 90° with full passive motion. There is controversy about the ideal surgical management of a massive rotator cuff tear with pseudoparalysis. The purpose of this study was to prospectively analyze the ability to reverse pseudoparalysis with an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR). The hypothesis was that in the absence of substantial glenohumeral arthritis, preoperative fatty infiltration of grade 3 or higher and an acromiohumeral interval (AHI) of less than 7 mm would not prevent reversal of pseudoparalysis with an ARCR. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A prospective multicenter study of ARCR performed for preoperative pseudoparalysis was conducted. The minimum follow-up was 1 year. The mean patient age was 63 years, and pseudoparalysis was present for a mean of 4.2 months preoperatively. Preoperative radiographic evaluation included plain film evaluation of the AHI and Hamada classification and MRI evaluation of fatty degeneration and rotator cuff retraction. Functional outcome was determined by the Simple Shoulder Test (SST), American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) Shoulder Score, visual analog scale (VAS), and subjective shoulder value (SSV). Of the 58 patients enrolled, 56 had at least 1 year of follow-up. Mean active forward flexion improved from 47° preoperatively to 159° postoperatively (P < .001). Statistically significant improvements were seen in the SST (from 2.8 preoperatively to 10.1 postoperatively), SSV (from 28 to 83), ASES Shoulder Score (from 37 to 88), and VAS (from 5.7 to 1.1) (P < .001). Pseudoparalysis was reversed in 53 of 56 patients (95%). There was no difference in the rate of reversal of pseudoparalysis between those patients with an AHI of less than 7 mm (88.2%) and those with an AHI of 7 mm or more (96.9%) (P =.289). Pseudoparalysis was reversed in all 8 of the patients with fatty degeneration of grade 3 or higher in 1 or more of the rotator cuff muscles. ARCR can

  17. Are Platelet-Rich Products Necessary during the Arthroscopic Repair of Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Ge, Heng’an; Zhou, Jiaojiao; Cheng, Biao

    2013-01-01

    Background Platelet-rich products (PRP) are widely used for rotator cuff tears. However, whether platelet-rich products produce superior clinical or radiological outcomes is controversial. This study aims to use meta-analysis to compare clinical and radiological outcomes between groups with or without platelet-rich products. Methods The Pubmed, Embase, and Cochrane library databases were searched for relevant studies published before April 20, 2013. Studies were selected that clearly reported a comparison between the use or not of platelet-rich products. The Constant, ASES, UCLA, and SST scale systems and the rotator cuff retear rate were evaluated. The weighted mean differences and relative risks were calculated using a fixed-effects model. Results Seven studies were enrolled in this meta-analysis. No significant differences were found for the Constant scale (0.73, 95% CI, −1.82 to 3.27, P = 0.58), ASES scale (−2.89, 95% CI, −6.31 to 0.53, P = 0.1), UCLA scale (−0.79, 95% CI, −2.20 to 0.63, P = 0.28), SST scale (0.34, 95% CI, −0.01 to 0.69, P = 0.05), and the overall rotator cuff retear rate (0.71, 95% CI, 0.48 to 1.05, P = 0.08). Subgroup analysis according to the initial tear size showed a lower retear rate in small- and medium-sized tears (0.33, 95% CI, 0.12 to 0.91, P = 0.03) after platelet-rich product application but no difference for large- and massive-sized tears (0.86, 95% CI, 0.60 to 1.23, P = 0.42). Conclusion In conclusion, the meta-analysis suggests that the platelet-rich products have no benefits on the overall clinical outcomes and retear rate for the arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears. However, a decrease occurred in the rate of retears among patients treated with PRP for small- and medium-sized rotator cuff tears but not for large- and massive-sized tears. Level of Evidence Level II PMID:23874991

  18. Editorial Commentary: Put Down Your Saw and Pick Up Your Scope! Or, Why Burn Down the Bridge When the Road Ahead Is Full of Potholes? Reverse Total Shoulder Replacement Versus Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Tauro, Joseph C

    2018-04-01

    Are we doing too many reverse total shoulder replacements and not fixing enough repairable rotator cuff tears? A convincing argument can be made for attempting to repair most, not all, very large rotator cuff tears in patients who do not have a significant arthritic change in the shoulder. My experience over more than 25 years of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR) is that the only good way to know if it is repairable is to try. But some patients really do not pass my "eyeball test" as to whether they can rehabilitate and heal enough to make an ARCR reasonable. Magnetic resonance imaging scans are useful, mostly to help me with tear pattern recognition, how much time and skill I might need for the repair, and to help me council my patients as to their ultimate functional recovery. I have had surprises both ways: some ARCRs that I thought would be easy turned out to be very challenging and others that I thought would be "mission impossible" turned out to be "mission accomplished"! The rationale for jumping ahead primarily to reverse total shoulder replacements reminds me of certain tax cut plans I have heard talk of lately. Sounds great now (well, maybe the complication rate is a little high) but there might be a price to pay down the road. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Modified Arthroscopic Brostrom Procedure With Bone Tunnels.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-08-01

    The open anatomic repair of the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments (modified Brostrom procedure) is widely accepted as the standard surgical stabilization procedure for lateral ankle instability that does not respond to conservative measures. Arthroscopic Brostrom procedures with a suture anchor have been reported to achieve both anatomic repair of the lateral ankle ligaments and management of the associated intra-articular lesions. However, the complication rates are higher than open Brostom procedures. Many of these complications are associated with the use of a suture anchor. We report a modified arthroscopic Brostrom procedure in which the anterolateral ankle capsule is anchored to the lateral malleolus through small bone tunnels instead of suture anchors.

  20. [Arthroscopic therapy of the unstable shoulder joint--acceptance and critical considerations].

    PubMed

    Jerosch, J

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document and to present the acceptance of arthroscopically performed stabilising procedures of the glenohumeral joint. In a nationwide survey of instructors of the association of arthroscopy, members of the arthroscopy group of the german orthopedic society, and orthopedic and trauma surgeons with special interest in joint surgery we evaluated the current treatment modalities for patients with unstable shoulder joints. After an average of 2.09 +/- 1.0 shoulder redislocations surgery is recommended. The Bankart-operation (63.4%) is the favourite procedure for open surgery. In a descended order the Weber rotation-osteotomie, the Putti-Platt operation, the Max-Lange procedure, and in a minimal amount of the cases the Bristow-procedure are performed. Looking at the arthroscopic procedures, the distribution is much more equal. The Caspari technique is used by 27.6% and the Morgan technique by 25.1%. Bone anchors are used by 20.4% and the Suretac is used by 18.9% of the surgeons. The anchor knot technique (8%) is only rarely performed. In case of an elongated capsule the majority of the surgeons would not perform arthroscopic surgery. 42.4% of the surgeons judge the arthroscopic technique less secure. However, 38.9% do not see any difference to open procedures. Taking the available information, arthroscopic stabilising procedures seems to have slightly inferior results compared to standard open surgery. The Bankart procedure with or without a capsular shift is still the golden standard.

  1. Does application of moderately concentrated platelet-rich plasma improve clinical and structural outcome after arthroscopic repair of medium-sized to large rotator cuff tear? A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Vivek; Bandi, Atul; Madi, Sandesh; Agarwal, Lipisha; Acharya, Kiran K V; Maddukuri, Satish; Sambhaji, Charudutt; Willems, W Jaap

    2016-08-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has the potential to improve tendon-bone healing. The evidence is still controversial as to whether PRP application after repair of medium-sized to large cuff tears leads to superior structural and clinical outcome, especially after single-row repair. In a randomized study, 102 patients (PRP group, 52 patients; control group, 50 patients) with medium-sized and large degenerative posterosuperior tears were included for arthroscopic repair with a minimum follow-up of 2 years. Patients were evaluated with clinical scores (visual analog scale score, Constant-Murley score, University of California-Los Angeles score, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score) and ultrasound to assess retear and vascularity pattern of the cuff. Visual analog scale scores were significantly lower in the PRP group than in controls at 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months but not later. Constant-Murley scores were significantly better in the PRP group compared with controls at 12 and 24 months, whereas University of California-Los Angeles scores were significantly higher in the PRP group at 6 and 12 months (P < .05). The American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score in both groups was comparable at all the times. At 24 months, retear in the PRP group (n = 2; 3.8%) was significantly lower than in the control group (n = 10; 20%; P = .01). The retear difference was significant only for large tears (PRP:control group, 1:6; P = .03). Doppler ultrasound examination showed significant vascularity in the PRP group repair site at 3 months postoperatively (P < .05) and in peribursal tissue until 12 months. Application of moderately concentrated PRP improves clinical and structural outcome in large cuff tears. PRP also enhances vascularity around the repair site in the early phase. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of Preoperative Fatty Degeneration of the Rotator Cuff Muscles on the Clinical Outcome of Patients With Intact Tendons After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair of Large/Massive Cuff Tears.

    PubMed

    Ohzono, Hiroki; Gotoh, Masafumi; Nakamura, Hidehiro; Honda, Hirokazu; Mitsui, Yasuhiro; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki; Okawa, Takahiro; Shiba, Naoto

    2017-11-01

    Fatty degeneration of the rotator cuff muscles is associated not only with postoperative retear but also with postoperative muscle weakness; therefore, fatty changes in the muscles may affect the clinical outcome even in patients with these tears who have intact tendons after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR). To evaluate the effect of fatty infiltration on the clinical outcome in patients with intact tendons after arthroscopic repair of large/massive cuff tears. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. One hundred fifty-five consecutive patients with large/massive rotator cuff tears underwent ARCR. Of these, 55 patients (mean ± SD age, 64.4 ± 9.1 years) in whom intact tendons after surgery were confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging at final follow-up (mean ± SD, 2.5 ± 1.4 years) were included in this study. Depending on their University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) score at the final follow-up, they were assigned to either the unsatisfactory group (score ≤27; n = 12) or the satisfactory group (score >27; n = 43). Various clinical parameters affecting the clinical outcome were examined through univariate and multivariate analyses. The UCLA score of all patients significantly improved from 18.1 ± 4.4 points preoperatively to 29.8 ± 4.5 points postoperatively ( P < .0001). The mean preoperative UCLA scores were not significantly different between the satisfactory and unsatisfactory groups ( P = .39). Multivariate analysis showed that the preoperative Goutallier stages of the infraspinatus (odds ratio [OR], 8.87; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.51-52.0; P = .016) and/or subscapularis (OR, 7.53; 95% CI, 1.58-35.9; P = .011) were significantly associated with outcome. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed a cutoff value of Goutallier stage 1 in both muscles, with area under the curve values of 0.79 (sensitivity 91% and specificity 51%) and 0.84 (sensitivity 100% and specificity 54%) in the infraspinatus and subscapularis

  3. Both Posterior Root Lateral-Medial Meniscus Tears With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Rupture: The Step-by-Step Systematic Arthroscopic Repair Technique.

    PubMed

    Chernchujit, Bancha; Prasetia, Renaldi

    2017-10-01

    The occurrence of posterior root tear of both the lateral and medial menisci, combined with anterior cruciate ligament rupture, is rare. Problems may be encountered such as the difficulty to access the medial meniscal root tear, the confusing circumstances about which structure to repair first, and the possibility of the tunnel for each repair to become taut inside the tibial bone. We present the arthroscopy technique step by step to overcome the difficulties in an efficient and time-preserving manner.

  4. Analysis of Two Different Arthroscopic Broström Repair Constructs for Treatment of Chronic Lateral Ankle Instability in 110 Patients: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Cottom, James M; Baker, Joseph; Plemmons, Britton S

    Chronic lateral ankle instability is a common condition treated by most foot and ankle surgeons. Once conservative treatment has failed, patients often undergo surgical reconstruction, either anatomic or nonanatomic. The present retrospective cohort study compared the clinical outcomes of 2 different arthroscopic Broström procedures. A total of 110 patients (83 females [75.5%] and 27 males [24.5%]) were treated with 1 of the 2 lateral ankle stabilization techniques from October 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015. Of the 110 patients, 75 were included in the arthroscopic lateral ankle stabilization group with an additional suture anchor used proximally and 35 were included in the arthroscopic lateral ankle stabilization group using the knotless design. The age of the cohort was 46.05 ± 17.89 (range 12 to 83) years. The body mass index was 30.03 ± 7.42 (range 18.3 to 52.5) kg/m 2 . Of the 110 patients, 25 (22.7%) had undergone concomitant procedures during lateral ankle stabilization. Overall, postoperative complications occurred in 14 patients (12.7%). No statistically significant differences were found between the 2 groups regarding the complication rates, use of concomitant procedures, and the presence of diabetes and workers compensation claims. No statistically significant differences were found in the mean age, body mass index, or gender distribution between the 2 groups. The preoperative American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Ankle-Hindfoot scores were 50.85 ± 13.56 (range 18 to 76) and 51.26 ± 13.32 (range 18 to 69) in groups 1 and 2, respectively. The postoperative AOFAS Ankle-Hindfoot scores were 88.19 ± 10.72 (range 54 to 100) and 84 ± 15.41 (range 16 to 100) in groups 1 and 2, respectively. No statistically significant difference was found between these 2 groups. The preoperative visual analog scale score was 7.45 ± 1.39 (range 3 to 10) and 6.97 ± 1.25 (range 5 to 10), which had improved to 1.12 ± 1.38 (range 0 to 5) and

  5. Axillary nerve monitoring during arthroscopic shoulder stabilization.

    PubMed

    Esmail, Adil N; Getz, Charles L; Schwartz, Daniel M; Wierzbowski, Lawrence; Ramsey, Matthew L; Williams, Gerald R

    2005-06-01

    This study evaluated the ability of a novel intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring method used to locate the axillary nerve, predict relative capsule thickness, and identify impending injury to the axillary nerve during arthroscopic thermal capsulorrhaphy of the shoulder. Prospective cohort study. Twenty consecutive patients with glenohumeral instability were monitored prospectively during arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Axillary nerve mapping and relative capsule thickness estimates were recorded before the stabilization portion of the procedure. During labral repair and/or thermal capsulorrhaphy, continuous and spontaneous electromyography recorded nerve activity. In addition, trans-spinal motor-evoked potentials of the fourth and fifth cervical roots and brachial plexus electrical stimulation, provided real-time information about nerve integrity. Axillary nerve mapping and relative capsule thickness were recorded in all patients. Continuous axillary nerve monitoring was successfully performed in all patients. Eleven of the 20 patients underwent thermal capsulorrhaphy alone or in combination with arthroscopic labral repair. Nine patients underwent arthroscopic labral repair alone. In 4 of the 11 patients who underwent thermal capsulorrhaphy, excessive spontaneous neurotonic electromyographic activity was noted, thereby altering the pattern of heat application by the surgeon. In 1 of these 4 patients, a small increase in the motor latency was noted after the procedure but no clinical deficit was observed. There were no neuromonitoring or clinical neurologic changes observed in the labral repair group without thermal application. At last follow-up, no patient in either group had any clinical evidence of nerve injury or complications from neurophysiologic monitoring. We successfully evaluated the use of intraoperative nerve monitoring to identify axillary nerve position, capsule thickness, and provide real-time identification of impending nerve injury and

  6. The Impact of Re-tear on the Clinical Outcome after Rotator Cuff Repair Using Open or Arthroscopic Techniques – A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Galanopoulos, Ilias; Ilias, Aslanidis; Karliaftis, Konstantinos; Papadopoulos, Dimitrios; Ashwood, Neil

    2017-01-01

    Background: It is generally accepted that rotator cuff repair gives satisfactory results in the long term, although most studies have so far shown a fairly high rate of structural failure or re-tear. The purpose of this review study is to assess whether failure of the repaired cuff to heal could negatively affect the functional outcome. Methods: This article includes an extensive Internet PubMed based research in the current English-language literature including level I to level V studies as well as systematic reviews. Results: According to this extended study research, the results are mixed; certain reports show that patients with a healed rotator cuff repair have improved function and strength compared to those with structural failure, whereas other studies support the generally perceived concept that tendon re-tear does not lead to inferior clinical outcome. Conclusion: Further high-level prospective studies with larger numbers of patients and longer follow up are needed to overcome the current debate over function between healed and failed rotator cuff repairs. PMID:28400878

  7. Pathologic changes associated with shoulder dislocations. Arthroscopic and physical examination findings in first-time, traumatic anterior dislocations.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D C; Arciero, R A

    1997-01-01

    This prospective observational study was performed on young patients, less than 24 years old, with first-time, traumatic anterior shoulder dislocations. These patients were offered either arthroscopic or nonoperative treatment. Fifty-three patients chose nonoperative treatment. Sixty-three patients elected to have arthroscopic procedures. The average patient age was 19.6 years. There were 59 men and 4 women. All procedures were performed within 10 days of dislocation. All 63 patients had hemarthrosis. Sixty-one of 63 (97%) patients treated surgically had complete detachment of the capsuloligamentous complex from the glenoid rim and neck (Perthes-Bankart lesion), with no gross evidence of intracapsular injury. Of the other two patients, one had an avulsion of the inferior glenohumeral ligament from the neck of the humerus, and one had an interstitial capsular tear adjacent to the intact glenoid labrum. Fifty-seven patients had Hill-Sachs lesions; none were large. There were six superior labral anterior posterior lesions, two with detachment of the biceps tendon. There were no rotator cuff tears. Of the 53 nonoperatively treated patients, 48 (90%) have developed recurrent instability. In this population, the capsulolabral avulsion appeared to be the primary gross pathologic lesion after a first-time dislocation. These findings, associated with the 90% nonoperative recurrence rate, suggest a strong association between recurrent instability and the Perthes-Bankart lesion in this population.

  8. Compressive cryotherapy versus ice-a prospective, randomized study on postoperative pain in patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair or subacromial decompression.

    PubMed

    Kraeutler, Matthew J; Reynolds, Kirk A; Long, Cyndi; McCarty, Eric C

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of compressive cryotherapy (CC) vs. ice on postoperative pain in patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy for rotator cuff repair or subacromial decompression. A commercial device was used for postoperative CC. A standard ice wrap (IW) was used for postoperative cryotherapy alone. Patients scheduled for rotator cuff repair or subacromial decompression were consented and randomized to 1 of 2 groups; patients were randomized to use either CC or a standard IW for the first postoperative week. All patients were asked to complete a "diary" each day, which included visual analog scale scores based on average daily pain and worst daily pain as well as total pain medication usage. Pain medications were then converted to a morphine equivalent dosage. Forty-six patients completed the study and were available for analysis; 25 patients were randomized to CC and 21 patients were randomized to standard IW. No significant differences were found in average pain, worst pain, or morphine equivalent dosage on any day. There does not appear to be a significant benefit to use of CC over standard IW in patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy for rotator cuff repair or subacromial decompression. Further study is needed to determine if CC devices are a cost-effective option for postoperative pain management in this population of patients. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair With Graft Augmentation of 3-Dimensional Biological Collagen for Moderate to Large Tears: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Cai, You-Zhi; Zhang, Chi; Jin, Ri-Long; Shen, Tong; Gu, Peng-Cheng; Lin, Xiang-Jin; Chen, Jian-De

    2018-05-01

    Due to the highly organized tissue and avascular nature of the rotator cuff, rotator cuff tears have limited ability to heal after the tendon is reinserted directly on the greater tubercle of the humerus. Consequently, retears are among the most common complications after rotator cuff repair. Augmentation of rotator cuff repairs with patches has been an active area of research in recent years to reduce retear rate. Graft augmentation with 3D collagen could prevent retears of the repaired tendon and improve tendon-bone healing in moderate to large rotator cuff tears. Randomized controlled study; Level of evidence, 2. A prospective, randomized controlled study was performed in a consecutive series of 112 patients age 50 to 85 years who underwent rotator cuff repair with the suture-bridge technique (58 patients, control group) or the suture-bridge technique augmented with 3-dimensional (3D) collagen (54 patients, study group). All patients were followed for 28.2 months (range, 24-36 months). Visual analog scale score for pain, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) shoulder score, and Constant score were determined. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed pre- and postoperatively (at a minimum of 24 months) to evaluate the integrity of the rotator cuff and the retear rate of the repaired tendon. Three patients in each group had biopsies at nearly 24 months after surgery with histological assessment and transmission electron microscopy. A total of 104 patients completed the final follow-up. At the 12-month follow-up, the UCLA shoulder score was 28.1 ± 1.9 in the study group, which was significantly better than that in the control group (26.9 ± 2.1, P = .002). The Constant score was also significantly better in the study group (87.1 ± 3.2) than in the control group (84.9 ± 4.2, P = .003). However, at the final follow-up, no significant differences were found in the UCLA shoulder scores (29.4 ± 1.9 in the control group and 30.0 ± 1.6 in the study group, P

  10. Arthroscopic partial wrist fusion.

    PubMed

    Ho, Pak-Cheong

    2008-12-01

    The wide intraarticular exposure of the wrist joint under arthroscopic view provides an excellent ground for various forms of partial wrist fusion. Combining with percutaneous fixation technique, arthroscopic partial wrist fusion can potentially generate the best possible functional outcome by preserving the maximal motion pertained with each type of partial wrist fusion because the effect of extraarticular adhesion associated with open surgery can be minimized. From November 1997 to May 2008, the author had performed 12 cases of arthroscopic partial wrist fusion, including scaphotrapeziotrapezoid fusion in 3, scaphoidectomy and 4-corner fusion in 4, radioscapholunate fusion in 3, radiolunate fusion in 1, and lunotriquetral fusion in 1 case. Through the radiocarpal or midcarpal joint, the corresponding articular surfaces were denuded of cartilage using arthroscopic burr and curette. Carpal bones involved in the fusion process were then transfixed with K wires percutaneously after alignment corrected and confirmed under fluoroscopic control. Autogenous cancellous bone graft or bone substitute were inserted and impacted to the fusion site through cannula under direct arthroscopic view. Final fixation could be by multiple K wires or cannulated screw system. Early mobilization was encouraged. Surgical complications were minor, including pin tract infection, skin burn, and delay union in 1 case. Uneventful radiologic union was obtained in 9 cases, stable fibrous union in 2, and nonunion in 1. The average follow-up period was 70 months. Symptom was resolved or improved, and functional motion was gained in all cases. All surgical scars were almost invisible, and aesthetic outcome was excellent.

  11. Bone mineral decreases in the calcanei in men after arthroscopic shoulder surgery: a prospective study over 5 years.

    PubMed

    Elmlund, Anna O; Kartus, Jüri; Ejerhed, Lars

    2016-12-01

    It is well known that injuries and surgical procedures in the lower extremities affect bone mineral both in the injured limb and in the contralateral limb. The possible effect on bone mineral after upper extremity surgery is not well studied, and the aim of this study was to study the effect on bone mineral in the calcanei after arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Twenty-two men scheduled for arthroscopic shoulder surgery underwent bone mineral area (BMA) mass measurements in both calcanei using the Calscan DXL device prior to surgery and after 6, 18, 36 and 60 months. On every occasion, the Tegner activity score and EuroQoL 5-dimensions (EQ-5D) were assessed. During 5 years, there was a significant decrease in the BMA in both calcanei (p = 0.003). The Tegner activity score decreased from preinjury to the operation and did not increase significantly after the operation. The EQ-5D increased significantly after the operation. The bone mineral in the calcanei in men during the 5-year study period decreased more than the expected age-dependent decline after arthroscopic shoulder surgery. There was an increase in health-related quality of life as measured with the EQ-5D after arthroscopic Bankart reconstruction. Case-control study, Level III.

  12. Clinical and structural outcomes after arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears with and without platelet-rich product supplementation: a meta-analysis and meta-regression.

    PubMed

    Warth, Ryan J; Dornan, Grant J; James, Evan W; Horan, Marilee P; Millett, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic review, meta-analysis, and meta-regression of all Level I and Level II studies comparing the clinical or structural outcomes, or both, after rotator cuff repair with and without platelet-rich product (PRP) supplementation. A literature search of the PubMed and EMBASE databases was performed to identify all Level I or II studies comparing the clinical or structural outcomes, or both, after arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears with (PRP+ group) and without (PRP- group) PRP supplementation. Data included outcome scores (American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons [ASES], University of California Los Angeles [UCLA], Constant, Simple Shoulder Test [SST] and visual analog scale [VAS] scores) and retears diagnosed with imaging studies. Meta-analyses compared preoperative, postoperative, and gain in outcome scores and relative risk ratios for retears. Meta-regression compared the effect of PRP treatment on outcome scores and retear rates according to 6 covariates. Minimum effect sizes that were detectable with 80% power were also calculated for each study. Eleven studies were included in this review and a maximum of 8 studies were used for meta-analyses according to data availability. There were no statistically significant differences between the PRP+ and PRP- groups for overall outcome scores or retear rates (P > .05). Overall gain in the Constant score was decreased when liquid PRP was injected over the tendon surface compared with PRP application at the tendon-bone interface (-6.88 points v +0.78 points, respectively; P = .046); however, this difference did not reach the previously reported minimum clinically important difference (MCID) for Constant scores. When the initial tear size was greater than 3 cm in anterior-posterior length, the PRP+ group exhibited decreased retear rates after double-row repairs when compared with the PRP- group (25.9% v 57.1%, respectively; P = .046). Sensitivity power

  13. Outcomes of Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair in Patients Who Are 70 Years of Age or Older Versus Under 70 Years of Age: A Sex- and Tear Size-Matched Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Gwark, Ji-Yong; Sung, Chang-Meen; Na, Jae-Boem; Park, Hyung Bin

    2018-05-19

    To compare the structural and clinical outcomes after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR) of a case group aged 70 and above with those of a control group younger than 70, with the 2 groups matched for sex and tear size. The case group, comprising 53 patients 70 or older, and the control group, comprising 159 patients younger than 70, all received ARCR to 1 shoulder with symptomatic full-thickness rotator cuff tear. The case and the control subjects, who were matched for sex and tear size to minimize bias related to tendon healing, received ARCR during the same period. The mean age was 71.8 ± 2.6 years in the case group and 59.3 ± 7.1 years in the control group. The minimum follow-up period was 1 year in both groups. Cuff integrity was evaluated using ultrasonography. Structural and clinical outcomes of the 2 groups were compared. Regarding structural outcomes, the complete healing, partial-thickness retear, and full-thickness retear rates were 66% (35/53), 15% (8/53), and 19% (10/53) in the case group, and 68% (108/159), 19% (30/159), and 13% (21/159), respectively, in the control group. The 2 groups had no significantly different retear rates (P = .52). Regarding clinical outcomes, the mean improvements in range of motion, pain, muscle strength, and age- and sex-matched Constant scores were not significantly different between the 2 groups (P > .37). The preoperative tear size was significantly associated with retear in both studied groups (P = .02). The clinical and structural outcomes of ARCR in patients 70 or older with symptomatic full-thickness rotator cuff tear are comparable with those in patients younger than 70 with at least 1-year follow-up. Preoperative tear size, a biological factor, is a strong predictor for retear. Level III, a retrospective comparative (case-control) study. Copyright © 2018 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ankle Arthroscopic Reconstruction of Lateral Ligaments (Ankle Anti-ROLL)

    PubMed Central

    Takao, Masato; Glazebrook, Mark; Stone, James; Guillo, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Ankle instability is a condition that often requires surgery to stabilize the ankle joint that will improve pain and function if nonoperative treatments fail. Ankle stabilization surgery may be performed as a repair in which the native existing anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both) is imbricated or reattached. Alternatively, when native ankle ligaments are insufficient for repair, a reconstruction of the ligaments may be performed in which an autologous or allograft tendon is used to reconstruct the anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both). Currently, ankle stabilization surgery is most commonly performed through an open incision, but arthroscopic ankle stabilization using repair techniques has been described and is being used more often. We present our technique for anatomic ankle arthroscopic reconstruction of the lateral ligaments (anti-ROLL) performed in an all–inside-out manner that is likely safe for patients and minimally invasive. PMID:26900560

  15. Arthroscopic release of the long head of the biceps tendon: functional outcome and clinical results.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Anne M; Drakos, Mark C; Fealy, Stephen; Taylor, Samuel A; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2005-02-01

    Treatment of chronic, refractory biceps tendinitis remains controversial. The authors sought to evaluate clinical and functional outcomes of arthroscopic release of the long head of the biceps tendon. In specific cases of refractory biceps tendinitis, site-specific release of the long head of the biceps tendon may yield relief of pain and symptoms. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Fifty-four patients diagnosed with biceps tendinitis underwent arthroscopic release of the long head of the biceps tendon as an isolated procedure or as part of a concomitant shoulder procedure over a 2-year period. Patients were not excluded for concomitant shoulder abnormality, including degenerative joint disease, rotator cuff tears, Bankart lesions, or instability. Nine of 40 patients had an isolated arthroscopic release of the biceps tendon. At a minimum of 2 years, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons; the University of California, Los Angeles; and the L'Insalata shoulder questionnaires as well as ipsilateral and contralateral metrics were used for evaluation. The L'Insalata; University of California, Los Angeles; and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores were 77.6, 27.6, and 75.6, respectively. Seventy percent had a Popeye sign at rest or during active elbow flexion; 82.7% of men and 36.5% of women had a positive Popeye sign (P < .05); 68% were rated as good, very good, or excellent. No patient reported arm pain at rest distally or proximally; 38% of patients complained of fatigue discomfort (soreness) isolated to the biceps muscle after resisted elbow flexion. Arthroscopic release of the long head of the biceps tendon is an appropriate and reliable intervention for patients with chronic, refractory biceps tendinitis. Cosmetic deformity presenting as a positive Popeye sign and fatigue discomfort were the primary complaints. Although tenotomy is not the ideal intervention for patients of all ages with various shoulder abnormalities, data suggest that it may be an

  16. Arthroscopic Hip Revision Surgery for Residual Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI): Surgical Outcomes Compared With a Matched Cohort After Primary Arthroscopic FAI Correction.

    PubMed

    Larson, Christopher M; Giveans, M Russell; Samuelson, Kathryn M; Stone, Rebecca M; Bedi, Asheesh

    2014-08-01

    There are limited data reporting outcomes after revision arthroscopic surgery for residual femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). (1) Revision arthroscopic FAI correction results in improved outcomes, but they are inferior to those of primary arthroscopic FAI correction. (2) Improved postrevision radiographic parameters are predictive of better outcomes. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Patients who underwent arthroscopic hip revision for residual FAI were reviewed. Pathomorphological findings, intraoperative findings, and preoperative and postoperative modified Harris Hip Score (MHHS), Short Form-12 (SF-12), and pain on a visual analog scale (VAS) values were evaluated. Outcomes after revision arthroscopic FAI correction were compared with outcomes of a matched cohort who underwent primary arthroscopic FAI correction. A total of 79 patients (85 hips) with a mean age of 29.5 years underwent arthroscopic revision FAI correction (mean follow-up, 26 months). The labrum was debrided (27 hips), repaired (49 hips), or reconstructed (7 hips). Two labrums were stable and required no treatment. The results of revision arthroscopic FAI correction were compared with those of 220 age- and sex-matched patients (237 hips) who underwent primary arthroscopic FAI correction (mean follow-up, 23 months). The mean improvement in outcome scores after revision FAI correction was 17.8 (MHHS), 12.5 (SF-12), and 1.4 (VAS) points compared with 23.4 (MHHS), 19.7 (SF-12), and 4.6 (VAS) points after primary arthroscopic FAI correction. The mean improvement was significantly better in the primary cohort compared with the revision cohort (P < .01 for MHHS, SF-12, and VAS values). Good/excellent results were achieved in 81.7% of the primary cohort and 62.7% of the revision cohort (P < .01). Greater postoperative head-neck offset (P = .024), subspine/anterior inferior iliac spine (AIIS) decompression (P = .014), labral repair/reconstruction (P = .009), and capsular plication (P = .032) were

  17. Subjective and objective outcome after revision arthroscopic stabilization for recurrent anterior instability versus initial shoulder stabilization.

    PubMed

    Krueger, David; Kraus, Natascha; Pauly, Stephan; Chen, Jianhai; Scheibel, Markus

    2011-01-01

    The value of arthroscopic revision shoulder stabilization after failed instability repair is still a matter of debate. Arthroscopic revision shoulder stabilization using suture anchors provides equivalent subjective and objective results compared with initial arthroscopic instability repair. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Twenty consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopic revision shoulder stabilization using suture anchors (group 2) were matched for age, gender, and handedness (dominant or nondominant) with 20 patients who had initial arthroscopic instability repair using the same technique (group 1). At the time of follow-up, a complete physical examination of both shoulders and evaluation with the Rowe score, Walch-Duplay score, Melbourne Instability Shoulder Score, Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index, and the Subjective Shoulder Value were performed. In addition, standard radiographs (true AP and axillary views) were taken to evaluate signs of osteoarthritis. After a minimum follow-up of 24 months, no recurrent dislocations were observed in either group. The apprehension sign was positive in 2 cases of revision surgery (0 vs 2; P > .05). No significant differences in the Rowe score (89 vs 81.8 points) were found between groups 1 and 2 (P > .05). However, group 2 revealed significantly lower scores in the Walch-Duplay score (85.3 vs 75.5 points), Melbourne Instability Shoulder Score (90.2 vs 73.7 points), Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (89.8% vs 68.9%), and Subjective Shoulder Value (91.8% vs 69.2%) (P < .05). Signs of instability arthropathy were found more often in patients with arthroscopic revision surgery (2 vs 5; P > .05). Arthroscopic revision shoulder stabilization is associated with a lower subjective outcome compared with initial arthroscopic stabilization. The objective results found in this study may overestimate the clinical outcome in this patient population.

  18. Arthroscopic excision of ganglion cysts.

    PubMed

    Bontempo, Nicholas A; Weiss, Arnold-Peter C

    2014-02-01

    Arthroscopy is an advancing field in orthopedics, the applications of which have been expanding over time. Traditionally, excision of ganglion cysts has been done in an open fashion. However, more recently, studies show outcomes following arthroscopic excision to be as good as open excision. Cosmetically, the incisions are smaller and heal faster following arthroscopy. In addition, there is the suggested benefit that patients will regain function and return to work faster following arthroscopic excision. More prospective studies comparing open and arthroscopic excision of ganglion cysts need to be done in order to delineate if there is a true functional benefit. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF ACROMIOCLAVICULAR JOINT DISLOCATION BY TIGHT ROPE TECHNIQUE (ARTHREX®)

    PubMed Central

    GÓmez Vieira, Luis Alfredo; Visco, Adalberto; Daneu Fernandes, Luis Filipe; GÓmez Cordero, Nicolas Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Presenting the arthroscopic treatment by Tight Rope - Arthrex® system for acute acromioclavicular dislocation and to evaluate results obtained with this procedure. Methods: Between August 2006 and May 2007, 10 shoulders of 10 patients with acute acromioclavicular dislocation were submitted to arthroscopic repair using the Tight Rope - Arthrex® system. Minimum follow-up was 12 months, with a mean of 15 months. Age ranged from 26 to 42, mean 34 years. All patients were male. Radiology evaluation was made by trauma series x-ray. The patients were assisted in the first month weekly and after three months after the procedure. Clinical evaluation was based on the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) criteria. Results: All patients were satisfied after the arthroscopic procedure and the mean UCLA score was 32,5. Conclusion: The arthroscopic treatment by Tight Rope – Arthrex® system for acute acromioclavicular dislocation showed to be an efficient technique. PMID:26998453

  20. Arthroscopic Management of Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Foveal Injury.

    PubMed

    Fujio, Keiji

    2017-11-01

    The deep component of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) inserts onto the fovea of the ulnar head. This component is critical to provide distal radioulnar joint stability. The surgical techniques and results of transosseous inside-out TFCC foveal repair are discussed. The rewarding results encouraged the repair of TFCC to the fovea arthroscopically. Although the results are good, the factors of age (traumatic or degenerative) and quality of stump and TFCC proper, which relate to the results should be considered in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Biomechanical Comparison of an Open vs Arthroscopic Approach for Lateral Ankle Instability.

    PubMed

    Drakos, Mark C; Behrens, Steve B; Paller, Dave; Murphy, Conor; DiGiovanni, Christopher W

    2014-08-01

    The current clinical standard for the surgical treatment of ankle instability remains the open modified Broström procedure. Modern advents in arthroscopic technology have allowed physicians to perform certain foot and ankle procedures arthroscopically as opposed to traditional open approaches. Twenty matched lower extremity cadaver specimens were obtained. Steinman pins were inserted into the tibia and talus with 6 sensors affixed to each pin. Specimens were placed in a Telos ankle stress apparatus in an anteroposterior and then lateral position, while a 1.7 N-m load was applied. For each of these tests, movement of the sensors was measured in 3 planes using the Optotrak Computer Navigation System. Changes in position were calculated and compared with the unloaded state. The anteriortalofibular ligament and the calcaneofibular ligament were thereafter sectioned from the fibula. The aforementioned measurements in the loaded and unloaded states were repeated on the specimens. The sectioned ligaments were then repaired using 2 corkscrew anchors. Ten specimens were repaired using a standard open Broström-type repair, while the matched pairs were repaired using an arthroscopic technique. Measurements were repeated and compared using a paired t test. There was a statistically significant difference between the sectioned state and the other 3 states (P < .05). There were no statistically significant differences between the intact state and either the open or arthroscopic state (P > .05). There were no significant differences between the open and arthroscopic repairs with respect to translation and total combined motion during the talar tilt test (P > .05). Statistically significant differences were demonstrated between the 2 methods in 3 specific axes of movement during talar tilt (P = .04). Biomechanically effective ankle stabilization may be amenable to a minimally invasive approach. A minimally invasive, arthroscopic approach can be considered for treating patients

  2. Incidence of acute postoperative infections requiring reoperation after arthroscopic shoulder surgery.

    PubMed

    Yeranosian, Michael G; Arshi, Armin; Terrell, Rodney D; Wang, Jeffrey C; McAllister, David R; Petrigliano, Frank A

    2014-02-01

    An acute infection after arthroscopic shoulder surgery is a rare but serious complication. Previous studies estimating the incidence of infections after arthroscopic surgery have been conducted, but the majority of these had either relatively small study groups or were not specific to shoulder arthroscopic surgery. To investigate the incidence of acute infections after arthroscopic shoulder surgery and compare infection rates by age group, sex, geographic region, and specific procedures. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A retrospective review of a large insurance company database was performed for all shoulder arthroscopic surgeries performed in the United States between 2004 and 2009 that required additional surgery for infections within 30 days. The data were stratified by sex, age group, and region. Data were also stratified for specific procedures (capsulorrhaphy, treatment for superior labrum anterior-posterior tears, claviculectomy, decompression, and rotator cuff repair) and used to assess the variation in the incidence of infections across different arthroscopic shoulder procedures. Linear regression was used to determine the significance of differences in the data from year to year. χ(2) analysis was used to assess the statistical significance of variations among all groups. Poisson regression analysis with exposure was used to determine significant differences in a pairwise comparison between 2 groups. The total number of arthroscopic shoulder surgeries performed was 165,820, and the number of infections requiring additional surgery was 450, resulting in an overall infection rate of 0.27%. The incidence of infections varied significantly across age groups (P < .001); the infection rate was highest in the ≥60-year age group (0.36%) and lowest in the 10- to 39-year age group (0.18%). The incidence of infections also varied by region (P < .001); the incidence was highest in the South (0.37%) and lowest in the Midwest (0.11%). The incidence of infection

  3. 21 CFR 888.1100 - Arthroscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Arthroscope. 888.1100 Section 888.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 888.1100 Arthroscope. (a) Identification. An arthroscope is an...

  4. 21 CFR 888.1100 - Arthroscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Arthroscope. 888.1100 Section 888.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 888.1100 Arthroscope. (a) Identification. An arthroscope is an...

  5. 21 CFR 888.1100 - Arthroscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arthroscope. 888.1100 Section 888.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 888.1100 Arthroscope. (a) Identification. An arthroscope is an...

  6. 21 CFR 888.1100 - Arthroscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Arthroscope. 888.1100 Section 888.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 888.1100 Arthroscope. (a) Identification. An arthroscope is an...

  7. 21 CFR 888.1100 - Arthroscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Arthroscope. 888.1100 Section 888.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 888.1100 Arthroscope. (a) Identification. An arthroscope is an...

  8. Arthroscopic Management of Elbow Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kroonen, Leo T; Piper, Samantha L; Ghatan, Andrew C

    2017-08-01

    The incidence of osteoarthritis in the general population is low, but it can be seen in manual laborers, throwing athletes, and people dependent on crutches and wheelchairs. Patients often complain of pain at the terminal extents of motion, and imaging shows osteophyte formation at the tips of the coronoid and olecranon processes as well as thickening of the bone between the coronoid and the olecranon fossae. Recent advances in arthroscopic instrumentation and techniques have led to a growing interest in the arthroscopic treatment of elbow osteoarthritis. This article provides a review of basic arthroscopic elbow anatomy and the most common procedures, including diagnostic arthroscopy, loose body removal, and arthroscopic osteocapsular and ulnohumeral arthroplasty. As techniques advance, there might be interest in further procedures including arthroscopic-assisted interpositional arthroplasty. Although complications such as persistent drainage and nerve injury are frequently mentioned with elbow arthroscopy, the actual incidence of such complications remains low. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Arthroscopic Ultrasound Assessment of Articular Cartilage in the Human Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Kaleva, Erna; Virén, Tuomas; Saarakkala, Simo; Sahlman, Janne; Sirola, Joonas; Puhakka, Jani; Paatela, Teemu; Kröger, Heikki; Kiviranta, Ilkka; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Töyräs, Juha

    2011-01-01

    Objective: We tested whether an intra-articular ultrasound (IAUS) method could be used to evaluate cartilage status arthroscopically in human knee joints in vivo. Design: Seven patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery of the knee were enrolled in this study. An ultrasonic examination was conducted using the same portals as in the arthroscopic surgery. A high-frequency (40-MHz) ultrasound transducer (diameter = 1 mm) was directed to the desired location on the articular surface under arthroscopic control. In addition to ultrasound data, an IAUS video and optical video through the arthroscope were recorded. Classification of cartilage injuries according to International Cartilage Repair Society, as conducted by the orthopedic surgeon, provided reference data for comparison with the IAUS. Results: The IAUS method was successful in imaging different characteristics of the articular surfaces (e.g., intact surface, surface fibrillation, and lesions of varying depth). In some cases, also the subchondral bone and abnormal internal cartilage structure were visible in the IAUS images. Specifically, using the IAUS, a local cartilage lesion of 1 patient was found to be deeper than estimated arthroscopically. Conclusions: The IAUS method provided a novel arthroscopic method for quantitative imaging of articular cartilage lesions. The IAUS provided quantitative information about the cartilage integrity and thickness, which are not available in conventional arthroscopy. The present equipment is already approved by the Food and Drug Administration for intravascular use and might be transferred to intra-articular use. The invasiveness of the IAUS method might restrict its wider clinical use but combined with arthroscopy, ultrasonic assessment may enlarge the diagnostic potential of arthroscopic surgery. PMID:26069583

  10. Rehabilitation after Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Nikolaidou, Ourania; Migkou, Stefania; Karampalis, Christos

    2017-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are a very common condition that is often incapacitating. Whether non-surgical or surgical, successful management of rotator cuff disease is dependent on appropriate rehabilitation. If conservative management is insufficient, surgical repair is often indicated. Postsurgical outcomes for patients having had rotator cuff repair can be quite good. A successful outcome is much dependent on surgical technique as it is on rehabilitation. Numerous rehabilitation protocols for the management of rotator cuff disease are based primarily on clinical experience and expert opinion. This article describes the different rehabilitation protocols that aim to protect the repair in the immediate postoperative period, minimize postoperative stiffness and muscle atrophy. A review of currently available literature on rehabilitation after arthroscopic rotator cuff tear repair was performed to illustrate the available evidence behind various postoperative treatment modalities. There were no statistically significant differences between a conservative and an accelerated rehabilitation protocol . Early passive range of motion (ROM) following arthroscopic cuff repair is thought to decrease postoperative stiffness and improve functionality. However, early aggressive rehabilitation may compromise repair integrity. The currently available literature did not identify any significant differences in functional outcomes and relative risks of re-tears between delayed and early motion in patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs. A gentle rehabilitation protocol with limits in range of motion and exercise times after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair would be better for tendon healing without taking any substantial risks. A close communication between the surgeon, the patient and the physical therapy team is important and should continue throughout the whole recovery process.

  11. Arthroscopic excision of heterotopic calcification in a chronic rectus femoris origin injury: a case report

    PubMed Central

    El-Husseiny, M; Sukeik, M; Haddad, FS

    2012-01-01

    Rectus femoris origin injuries in adult athletes are uncommon. In the acute phase, conservative treatment seems to have a favourable outcome, with surgical repair reserved for unsuccessful cases only. However, a group of patients may develop chronic pain and disability after recovery from the acute phase due to heterotopic calcification occurring at the site of injury. Open and arthroscopic excision of such calcifications has been described in the literature although arthroscopic excision of large calcified lesions in the rectus femoris has not been reported previously. A relevant case is presented and discussed. PMID:22507710

  12. [Arthroscopic knee arthrodesis: 4 cases].

    PubMed

    Acquitter, Y; Hulet, C; Souquet, D; Pierre, A; Locker, B; Vielpeau, C

    2004-02-01

    Arthroscopic arthrodesis of the knee joint is an alternative to classical surgery, which retains a few exceptional indications. We report the first four cases of our experience, describing the technical modalities and indications. The four patients had undergone multiple operations for severe trauma. All four had persistent severe pain with a very limited walking distance. Before the procedure, the IKS score ranged from 11 to 44 and the mean function score was 20 to 45 points. Arthroscopic arthrodesis was proposed after several consultations and took into account the young age of the patient and a positive brace test. The successive arthroscopic times were: exploration and adherence release, complete extramural meniscectomy, joint surface avivement. Traction was not necessary. Careful avivement spared the anatomic curvatures of the condyles and slightly scraped out the plateaus. Finally, the arthrodesis was fixed in correct position under fluoroscopy using a single tube external fixator. The fixation was maintained until fusion (satisfactory x-ray and no pain). A drain was inserted only for the first patient. There were no cutaneous complications. Patients were discharged after 3 days on the average with immediate simulated weight bearing using two crutches. The external fixator was dynamized at two months (mean) and removed at five months. The functional gain was considerable in four patients, assessed at two years, with a mean IKS score of 75 and a mean function score of 80. The four patients walked without crutches and without pain. Single leg stance was stable. Final leg shortening was 1 to 2 cm. The arthroscopic approach provides several benefits: uneventful postoperative period, little bleeding, no cutaneous complications, shorter hospital stay. The time to fusion appears to be shorter than with classical techniques, but cannot be demonstrated clearly because of the diversity of the series reported in the literature. Arthroscopic arthrodesis does not require

  13. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF FEMOROACETABULAR IMPINGEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Polesello, Giancarlo C.; Queiroz, Marcelo C.; Ono, Nelson K.; Honda, Emerson K.; Guimarāes, Rodrigo P; Junior, Walter Ricioli

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the short-term follow-up results of arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement. Our hypothesis is that arthroscopic treatment results are favorable. Methods: Between August 2003 and August 2007, 28 hips had femoroacetabular impingement treated by hip arthroscopy. The mean age was 34 years, with mean follow-up period of 27 months. Clinical results were graded with the modified Harris hip score, which was measured pre- and postoperatively. Patients had also their internal rotation analyzed. These parameters were calculated by using Wilcoxon's t test for analysis of nonparametric paired samples performed. Results: The mean preoperative Harris Hip Score was 54.2, improving to 94.8 postoperatively (p<0,001). The mean increase was 37.5 points. We had 4 good results (15%) and 24 excellent results (85%). Preoperatively, the patients had a mean internal rotation of 17°, and, postoperatively, 36°. The average internal rotation increase was 19° (p<0,001). Conclusions: The arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement presents satisfactory results. PMID:27004177

  14. Arthroscopic findings after shoulder dislocation.

    PubMed

    Hintermann, B; Gächter, A

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate prospectively the arthroscopic findings of the unstable shoulder, to provide insights into the causes and mechanisms of shoulder instability, and to establish a rationale for using special surgical procedures. Arthroscopic examination was performed on 212 patients who had at least 1 documented shoulder dislocation. Of these 212 patients, 184 (87%) patients had anterior glenoid labral tears, 168 (79%) patients had ventral capsule insufficiency, 144 (68%) patients had Hill-Sachs compression fractures, 116 (55%) patients had glenohumeral ligament insufficiency, 30 (14%) patients had complete rotator cuff tendon tears, 26 (12%) patients had posterior glenoid labral tears, 14 (7%) patients had superior labrum anterior and inferior lesions. As this prospective study shows, multiple morphologic changes are associated with instability of the glenohumeral joint; there is no single cause for an unstable shoulder. Arthroscopic examination of the shoulder before surgery revealed a significant amount of information that would have been undetected without the aid of expensive diagnostic tools. For instance, the labrum and rim of the anteroinferior glenoid showed typical abnormalities corresponding to different entities of anterior instability.

  15. Arthroscopic biceps tenodesis: a new technique using bioabsorbable interference screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Boileau, Pascal; Krishnan, Sumant G; Coste, Jean-Sebastien; Walch, Gilles

    2002-01-01

    To report a new technique of arthroscopic biceps tenodesis using bioabsorbable interference screw fixation and the early results. Prospective, nonrandomized study. The principle of arthroscopic biceps tenodesis is simple: after biceps tenotomy, the tendon is exteriorized and doubled on a suture; the biceps tendon is then pulled into a humeral socket (7 or 8 mm x 25 mm) drilled at the top of the bicipital groove, and fixed using a bioabsorbable interference screw (8 or 9 mm x 25 mm) under arthroscopic control. 43 patients treated with this technique between 1997 and 1999 were followed-up for at least 1 year. The technique was indicated in 3 clinical situations: (1) with arthroscopic cuff repair (3 cases), (2) in case of isolated pathology of the biceps tendon with an intact cuff (6 cases), and (3) as an alternative to biceps tenotomy in patients with massive, degenerative and irreparable cuff tears (34 cases). The biceps pathology was tenosynovitis (4 cases), prerupture (15 cases), subluxation (11 cases), and luxation (13 cases). The absolute Constant score improved from 43 points preoperatively to 79 points at review (P <.005). There was no loss of elbow movement and biceps strength was 90% of the strength of the other side. Two patients, operated on early in the series, presented with a rupture of the tenodesis. In both cases the bicipital tendon was very friable and the diameter of the screw proved to be insufficient (7 mm). No neurologic or vascular complications occurred. Arthroscopic biceps tenodesis using bioabsorbable screw fixation is technically possible and gives good clinical results. This technique can be used in cases of isolated pathologic biceps tendon or a cuff tear. A very thin, fragile, almost ruptured biceps tendon is the technical limit of this arthroscopic technique.

  16. In vitro biomechanical comparison of three different types of single- and double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs: analysis of continuous bone-tendon contact pressure and surface during different simulated joint positions.

    PubMed

    Grimberg, Jean; Diop, Amadou; Kalra, Kunal; Charousset, Christophe; Duranthon, Louis-Denis; Maurel, Nathalie

    2010-03-01

    We assessed bone-tendon contact surface and pressure with a continuous and reversible measurement system comparing 3 different double- and single-row techniques of cuff repair with simulation of different joint positions. We reproduced a medium supraspinatus tear in 24 human cadaveric shoulders. For the 12 right shoulders, single-row suture (SRS) and then double-row bridge suture (DRBS) were used. For the 12 left shoulders, DRBS and then double-row cross suture (DRCS) were used. Measurements were performed before, during, and after knot tying and then with different joint positions. There was a significant increase in contact surface with the DRBS technique compared with the SRS technique and with the DRCS technique compared with the SRS or DRBS technique. There was a significant increase in contact pressure with the DRBS technique and DRCS technique compared with the SRS technique but no difference between the DRBS technique and DRCS technique. The DRCS technique seems to be superior to the DRBS and SRS techniques in terms of bone-tendon contact surface and pressure. Copyright 2010 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Arthroscopic Medial Meniscus Posterior Root Reconstruction Using Auto-Gracilis Tendon.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dhong Won; Haque, Russel; Chung, Kyu Sung; Kim, Jin Goo

    2017-08-01

    There have been several techniques to repair the medial meniscus posterior root tears (MMPRTs) with the goal of restoring the anatomic and firm fixation of the meniscal root to bone. Many anatomic studies about the menisci also have been developed, so a better understanding of the anatomy could help surgeons perform correct fixation of the MMPRTs. The meniscal roots have ligament-like structures that firmly attach the menisci to the tibial plateau, and this structural concept is important to restore normal biomechanics after anatomic root repair. We present arthroscopic transtibial medial meniscus posterior root reconstruction using auto-gracilis tendon.

  18. Outcome after failed traumatic anterior shoulder instability repair with and without surgical revision.

    PubMed

    Marquardt, Björn; Garmann, Stefan; Schulte, Tobias; Witt, Kai-Axel; Steinbeck, Jörn; Pötzl, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence and reasons of recurrent instability in patients with traumatic anterior shoulder instability and to document the clinical results with regard to the number of stabilizing procedures. Twenty-four patients with failed primary open or arthroscopic anterior shoulder stabilization were followed for a mean of 68 (36-114) months. Following recurrence of shoulder instability, eight patients chose not to be operated on again, whereas 16 underwent repeat stabilization. A persistent or recurrent Bankart lesion was found in all 16 patients and concomitant capsular redundancy in 4. After the first revision surgery, further instability occurred in 8 patients, and 6 of them were stabilized a third time. Only 7 patients (29%) achieved a good or excellent result according to the Rowe score. All shoulder scores improved after revision stabilization. However, the number of stabilizing procedures adversely affected the outcome scores, as well as postoperative range of motion and patient satisfaction. Recurrent instability after a primary stabilization procedure represents a difficult diagnostic and surgical challenge, and careful attention should be paid to address persistent or recurrent Bankart lesions and concomitant capsular reduncancy. A satisfying functional outcome can be expected mainly in patients with one revision surgery. Further stabilization attempts are associated with poorer objective and subjective results.

  19. Arthroscopic Synovectomy of Wrist in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jae Woo; Park, Min Jong

    2017-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disorder affecting multiple joints. Wrist involvement is common. Patients with persistent symptoms despite medical management are candidates for surgery. Synovectomy can provide pain relief and functional improvement for rheumatoid wrist. Arthroscopic synovectomy is a safe and reliable method, with minimal postoperative morbidity. This article reviews the role, technique, and results of arthroscopic synovectomy in the rheumatoid wrist. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Arthroscopic training resources in orthopedic resident education.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Ryan; John, Tamara; Lawler, Jeffrey; Moorman, Claude; Nicandri, Gregg

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of use, perceived effectiveness, and preference for arthroscopic surgical skill training resources. An electronic survey was sent to orthopedics residents, residency program directors, and orthopedic sports medicine attending physicians in the United States. The frequency and perceived effectiveness of 10 types of adjunctive arthroscopic skills training was assessed. Residents and faculty members were asked to rate their confidence in resident ability to perform common arthroscopic procedures. Surveys were completed by 40 of 152 (26.3%) orthopedic residency program directors, 70 of 426 (16.4%) sports medicine faculty, and 235 of 3,170 (7.4%) orthopedic residents. The use of adjunctive methods of training varied from only 9.8% of programs with virtual reality training to 80.5% of programs that used reading of published materials to develop arthroscopic skill. Practice on cadaveric specimens was viewed as the most effective and preferred adjunctive method of training. Residents trained on cadaveric specimens reported increased confidence in their ability to perform arthroscopic procedures. The resources for developing arthroscopic surgical skill vary considerably across orthopedic residency programs in the United States. Adjunctive training methods were perceived to be effective at supplementing traditional training in the operating room. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  1. Arthroscopically assisted acromioclavicular joint reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Baumgarten, Keith M; Altchek, David W; Cordasco, Frank A

    2006-02-01

    Arthroscopically assisted acromioclavicular joint reconstruction avoids the large incisions necessary with open reconstructions. This acromioclavicular joint reconstruction technique via the subacromial space does not violate the rotator interval or require screw removal. The patient is placed in a modified beach-chair position. The arthroscope is placed into the subacromial space, and a bursectomy is performed through a lateral subacromial portal. The coracoacromial ligament is released from the acromion with an electrocautery and an arthroscopic elevator. A nonabsorbable suture is passed through the coracoacromial ligament with a suture passer, and an arthroscopic suture grasper is used to deliver both ends of the suture out through the lateral portal. The coracoid is identified and isolated using a radiofrequency ablator placed through the anterior portal while visualizing through the lateral portal. A percutaneous shuttle device is passed through the skin superomedial to the coracoid. The shuttle is visualized entering superior to the coracoid and is passed just medial to the coracoid. Once the tip of the shuttle can be visualized in the recess inferior to the coracoid, the shuttle loop is advanced. A suture grasper is used to deliver both ends of the shuttle out through the anterior portal. A semitendinosus allograft is used to reconstruct the coracoclavicular ligament. A nonabsorbable suture is passed through both ends of the allograft. Three strands of nonabsorbable suture are braided together. The tendon and the braided suture are shuttled around the coracoid. At this point, both the braided suture and the allograft tendon enter the anterior portal, wrap around the coracoid base, and exit the anterior portal. A 3-cm incision is made over the distal clavicle. A hole is drilled through the clavicle with a 5-mm drill. A loop of 22-gauge wire is passed through the hole in the clavicle, and a looped suture is shuttled through the hole. A curved clamp is used to

  2. The Arthroscopic Surgical Skill Evaluation Tool (ASSET).

    PubMed

    Koehler, Ryan J; Amsdell, Simon; Arendt, Elizabeth A; Bisson, Leslie J; Braman, Jonathan P; Bramen, Jonathan P; Butler, Aaron; Cosgarea, Andrew J; Harner, Christopher D; Garrett, William E; Olson, Tyson; Warme, Winston J; Nicandri, Gregg T

    2013-06-01

    Surgeries employing arthroscopic techniques are among the most commonly performed in orthopaedic clinical practice; however, valid and reliable methods of assessing the arthroscopic skill of orthopaedic surgeons are lacking. The Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool (ASSET) will demonstrate content validity, concurrent criterion-oriented validity, and reliability when used to assess the technical ability of surgeons performing diagnostic knee arthroscopic surgery on cadaveric specimens. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Content validity was determined by a group of 7 experts using the Delphi method. Intra-articular performance of a right and left diagnostic knee arthroscopic procedure was recorded for 28 residents and 2 sports medicine fellowship-trained attending surgeons. Surgeon performance was assessed by 2 blinded raters using the ASSET. Concurrent criterion-oriented validity, interrater reliability, and test-retest reliability were evaluated. Content validity: The content development group identified 8 arthroscopic skill domains to evaluate using the ASSET. Concurrent criterion-oriented validity: Significant differences in the total ASSET score (P < .05) between novice, intermediate, and advanced experience groups were identified. Interrater reliability: The ASSET scores assigned by each rater were strongly correlated (r = 0.91, P < .01), and the intraclass correlation coefficient between raters for the total ASSET score was 0.90. Test-retest reliability: There was a significant correlation between ASSET scores for both procedures attempted by each surgeon (r = 0.79, P < .01). The ASSET appears to be a useful, valid, and reliable method for assessing surgeon performance of diagnostic knee arthroscopic surgery in cadaveric specimens. Studies are ongoing to determine its generalizability to other procedures as well as to the live operating room and other simulated environments.

  3. [Clinical research of arthroscopic separate double-layer suture bridge technique for delaminated rotator cuff tear].

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiangtao; Xu, Cong; Liu, Xianglin; Wang, Jiansong; Li, Zhihuai; Lü, Yongming

    2017-10-01

    To explore the effectiveness of the arthroscopic separate double-layer suture bridge technique in treatment of the delaminated rotator cuff tear. Between May 2013 and May 2015, 54 patients with the delaminated rotator cuff tears were recruited in the study. They were randomly allocated into 2 groups to receive repair either using arthroscopic separate double-layer suture bridge technique (trial group, n =28) or using arthroscopic whole-layer suture bridge technique (control group, n =26). There was no significant difference in gender, age, injured side, tear type, and preoperative visual analogue scale (VAS) score, Constants score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) score, and the range of motion of shoulder joint between 2 groups ( P >0.05). Postoperative functional scores, range of motion, and recurrence rate of tear in 2 groups were observed and compared. The operation time was significant longer in trial group than in control group ( t =8.383, P =0.000). All incisions healed at stage Ⅰ without postoperative complication. All the patients were followed up 12 months. At 12 months postoperatively, the UCLA score, ASES score, VAS score, Constant score, and the range of motion were significantly improved when compared with the preoperative values in 2 groups ( P <0.05). However there was no significant difference in above indexes between 2 groups ( P >0.05). Four cases (14.3%) of rotator cuff tear recurred in trial group while 5 cases (19.2%) in control group, showing no significant difference ( χ 2 =0.237, P =0.626). Compared with the arthroscopic whole-layer suture bridge technique, arthroscopic separate double-layer suture bridge technique presents no significant difference in the shoulder function score, the range of motion, and recurrence of rotator cuff tear, while having a longer operation time.

  4. Meniscus root repair.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Dharmesh; Harner, Christopher D

    2012-06-01

    Root tears are a subset of meniscal injuries that result in significant knee joint pathology. Occurring on either the medial or lateral side, root tears are defined as radial tears or avulsions of the posterior horn attachment to bone. After a root tear, there is a significant increase in tibio-femoral contact pressure concomitant with altered knee joint kinematics. Previous cadaver studies from our institution have shown that root repair of the medial meniscus is successful in restoring joint biomechanics to within normal limits. Indications for operative management of meniscal root tears include (1) a symptomatic medial meniscus root tear with minimal arthritis and having failed non-operative treatment, and (2) a lateral root tear in associated with an ACL tear. In this review, we describe diagnosis, imaging, patient selection, and arthroscopic surgical technique of medial and lateral meniscus root injuries. In addition we highlight the pearls of repair technique, associated complications, post-operative rehabilitation regimen, and expected outcomes.

  5. Arthroscopic treatment of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation by coracoclavicular ligament augmentation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xudong; Huangfu, Xiaoqiao; Zhao, Jinzhong

    2015-05-01

    Coracoclavicular (CC) ligament augmentation has been a method to treat acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation in recent years. The purpose of this paper is to describe our arthroscopic CC ligament augmentation technique in treating type III and V acute AC joint dislocations and to report the early clinical and radiological results. From 2010 to 2011, twelve patients suffering from acute type III or V AC joint dislocations were arthroscopically treated in our department, by CC ligament augmentation after AC joint reduction. The post-operative outcomes were assessed through physical examination, radiographic examination and the Constant-Murley Shoulder Score. All patients post-operatively experienced anatomical reduction in their AC joint dislocation. No intraoperative complications occurred. At a mean follow-up at 24 months (ranging from 18 to 32 months), the mean Constant-Murley Shoulder Score significantly improved from 24.3 pre-operatively to 91.1 post-operatively. No neurovascular complications or secondary degenerative changes of the AC joint were detected in any of the patients. In one case, a second dislocation occurred 1 month post-operation because the patient had had another traumatic injury. This patient accepted a revision operation, but his AC joint eventually fixated into a subluxated position after his second injury. Based on the resultant successful repair in all cases, the arthroscopic CC ligament augmentation method has thus far proven to be a safe and reliable technique for treatment of acute type III or V AC joint dislocation. The arthroscopic CC ligament augmentation with a flip button/polyethylene belt repair is an efficient method to treat acute type III and V AC joint dislocations which should be popularized. IV.

  6. Excimer laser in arthroscopic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koort, Hans J.

    1991-05-01

    The development of efficient high-power lasersystems for use in surgery, especially in arthroscopic fields, leads to a new push for all endoscopic techniques. Both techniques, laser and endoscope, complete each other in an ideal way and allow applications which could not be reached with conventional techniques. One of the newer laser types is the excimer laser, which will be a good choice for surface treatment because of its very considerate interaction with tissue. One example is the ablation or smoothing of articular cartilage and meniscal shaving in orthopaedics. On the other hand, the power of this laser system is high enough to cut tissue, for instance in the lateral release, and offers therefore an alternative to the mechanical and electrical instruments. All lasers can only work fine with effective delivery systems. Sometimes there is only a single fiber, which becomes very stiff at diameters of more than 800 micrometers . This fiber often allows only the tangential treatment of tissue, most of the laser power is lost in the background. New fiber systems with many, sometimes hundreds of very thin single fibers, could offer a solution. Special handpieces and fibersystems offer distinct advantages in small joint arthroscopy, especially those for use with excimer lasers will be discussed.

  7. Arthroscopic fixation of the clavicle shaft fracture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yang-Soo; Lee, Hyo-Jin; Kim, Jong-Ick; Yang, Hyo; Jin, Hong-Ki; Patel, Hiren Kirtibhai; Kim, Jong-Ho; Park, In

    2017-01-01

    This article describes an arthroscopic technique for the fixation of clavicle shaft fractures. A viewing portal is made 2 cm anterior to the fracture site, and a working portal is made 2 cm lateral to the fracture site. The guide wire for a 4.0-mm cannulated screw is inserted through the fracture site to the medial fracture fragment under arthroscopic guidance. Through the medial fragment, the guide wire is delivered through the skin anteriorly. The fracture is reduced, and then, the guide wire is drilled back across the fracture site to the lateral fracture fragment. After confirming the reduction under arthroscopy, the appropriately sized cannulated screw is inserted after reaming. This arthroscopic technique would be useful for the precise reduction and minimal invasive fixation of clavicle shaft fractures. Preliminary results are encouraging, and further studies with long-term follow-up are needed to determine the precise indications and limitations of the procedure.

  8. Arthroscopic-Assisted Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chu-Kay Mak, Michael; Ho, Pak-Cheong

    2017-11-01

    Injury of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) is a common cause of ulnar-sided wrist pain. Volar and dorsal radioulnar ligaments and their foveal insertion are the most important stabilizing components of the TFCC. In irreparable tears, anatomic reconstruction of the TFCC aims to restore normal biomechanics and stability of the distal radioulnar joint. We proposed a novel arthroscopic-assisted technique using a palmaris longus tendon graft. Arthroscopic-assisted TFCC reconstruction is a safe and effective approach with outcomes comparable to conventional open reconstruction and may result in a better range of motion from minimizing soft tissue dissection and subsequent scarring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Augmented virtuality for arthroscopic knee surgery.

    PubMed

    Li, John M; Bardana, Davide D; Stewart, A James

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a computer system to visualize the location and alignment of an arthroscope using augmented virtuality. A 3D computer model of the patient's joint (from CT) is shown, along with a model of the tracked arthroscopic probe and the projection of the camera image onto the virtual joint. A user study, using plastic bones instead of live patients, was made to determine the effectiveness of this navigated display; the study showed that the navigated display improves target localization in novice residents.

  10. The internal validity of arthroscopic simulators and their effectiveness in arthroscopic education.

    PubMed

    Slade Shantz, Jesse Alan; Leiter, Jeff R S; Gottschalk, Tania; MacDonald, Peter Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to identify standard procedures for the validation of arthroscopic simulators and determine whether simulators improve the surgical skills of users. Arthroscopic simulator validation studies and randomized trials assessing the effectiveness of arthroscopic simulators in education were identified from online databases, as well as, grey literature and reference lists. Only validation studies and randomized trials were included for review. Study heterogeneity was calculated and where appropriate, study results were combined employing a random effects model. Four hundred and thirteen studies were reviewed. Thirteen studies met the inclusion criteria assessing the construct validity of simulators. A pooled analysis of internal validation studies determined that simulators could discriminate between novice and experts, but not between novice and intermediate trainees on time of completion of a simulated task. Only one study assessed the utility of a knee simulator in training arthroscopic skills directly and demonstrated that the skill level of simulator-trained residents was greater than non-simulator-trained residents. Excessive heterogeneity exists in the literature to determine the internal and transfer validity of arthroscopic simulators currently available. Evidence suggests that simulators can discriminate between novice and expert users, but discrimination between novice and intermediate trainees in surgical education should be paramount. International standards for the assessment of arthroscopic simulator validity should be developed to increase the use and effectiveness of simulators in orthopedic surgery.

  11. Second-Look Arthroscopic Evaluation of Cartilage Lesions After Mesenchymal Stem Cell Implantation in Osteoarthritic Knees.

    PubMed

    Koh, Yong Gon; Choi, Yun Jin; Kwon, Oh Ryong; Kim, Yong Sang

    2014-07-01

    Cartilage regenerative procedures have been receiving increased interest because of their potential to alter the progression of osteoarthritis (OA). The application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been proposed as a new treatment option for OA based on the ability of these cells to differentiate into chondrocytes. To investigate the clinical and second-look arthroscopic outcomes of MSC implantation and to identify prognostic factors associated with this treatment. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. This study retrospectively evaluated 37 knees examined using second-look arthroscopic surgery after MSC implantation for cartilage lesions in OA knees. Clinical outcomes were evaluated according to the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score and Tegner activity scale, and cartilage repair was assessed using International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) grading. Statistical analyses were performed to identify various prognostic factors associated with the clinical and second-look arthroscopic outcomes. The mean patient age was 57.4 years (range, 48-69 years), the mean follow-up period was 26.5 months (range, 24-34 months), the mean body mass index (BMI) was 26.3 kg/m2 (range, 19.8-31.2 kg/m2), and the mean lesion size was 5.4 ± 2.9 cm2 (range, 2.3-8.9 cm2). The mean IKDC and Tegner activity scale scores were significantly improved from 38.0 ± 7.8 to 61.0 ± 11.0 and from 2.5 ± 0.5 to 3.6 ± 0.7, respectively (P < .001 for both). According to the ICRS overall repair grades at second-look arthroscopic surgery, 2 of the 37 lesions (5%) were grade I (normal), 7 (19%) were grade II (near normal), 20 (54%) were grade III (abnormal), and 8 (22%) were grade IV (severely abnormal). In terms of overall patient satisfaction with the operation, 33 (94%) patients reported good to excellent satisfaction. High BMI (≥27.5 kg/m2) and large lesion size (≥5.4 cm2) were found to be significant predictors of poor clinical and arthroscopic outcomes (P < .05 for both

  12. Imaging of the shoulder with arthroscopic correlation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pranshu; Morrison, William B; Cohen, Steven

    2013-07-01

    Shoulder pain with or without trauma is a common complaint. MRI is often the most useful imaging study for evaluating the shoulder. This review provides an overview of various modalities and their role in evaluating various clinical issues in shoulder pathologies. Imaging and arthroscopic correlation of common conditions are provided. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Arthroscopic Diagnosis of the Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Foveal Tear: A Cadaver Assessment.

    PubMed

    Trehan, Samir K; Wall, Lindley B; Calfee, Ryan P; Shen, Tony S; Dy, Christopher J; Yannascoli, Sarah M; Goldfarb, Charles A

    2018-01-25

    To determine whether the arthroscopic hook and trampoline tests are accurate and reliable diagnostic tests for foveal triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) detachment. Wrist arthroscopy was performed on 10 cadaveric upper extremities. Arthroscopic hook and trampoline tests were performed and videos recorded (baseline). The deep foveal TFCC insertion was then sharply detached. Arthroscopic hook and trampoline tests were repeated. Subsequently, the foveal detachment was repaired via an ulnar tunnel technique and the hook test was repeated for a third time. Videos were independently reviewed at 2 time points by 2 fellowship-trained hand surgeons and 1 hand surgery fellow in a randomized and blinded fashion. Hook and trampoline tests were graded as positive or negative. Proportions of categorical variables were compared via 2-tailed Fisher exact test. Inter- and intraobserver reliabilities were assessed via Cohen kappa coefficient. The sensitivity and specificity of the hook test for foveal detachment diagnosis were 90% and 90%, respectively. There was 90% agreement among all 3 observers for the baseline and foveal detachment hook tests. Cohen kappa coefficients for the inter- and intraobserver reliabilities of the hook test were 0.87 and 0.81, respectively. Seventeen percent of trampoline tests were positive at baseline versus 43% after foveal detachment. The trampoline test had 45% agreement between the 3 observers. Cohen kappa coefficients for the inter- and intraobserver reliabilities of the trampoline test were 0.16 and 0.63, respectively. Following ulnar tunnel repair, 20% of hook tests were positive. The hook test is highly sensitive, specific, and reliable for the diagnosis of isolated TFCC foveal detachment. The trampoline test has insufficient reliability to assess foveal detachment. A TFCC foveal repair using an ulnar tunnel technique returns the hook test to baseline. The hook test is a sensitive, specific, and reliable test for the diagnosis of

  14. The meniscal ossicle revisited: etiology and an arthroscopic technique for treatment.

    PubMed

    Raustol, Ole A; Poelstra, Kornelis A; Chhabra, Annikar; Diduch, David R

    2006-06-01

    We describe a new arthroscopic technique for repair of meniscal ossicles in support of the theory that meniscal ossicles are traumatic in nature. Using a standard inferolateral portal, the arthroscope is passed under the posterior cruciate ligament to permit visualization of the "root" of the medial meniscus with a matching donor lesion on the tibia. A limited debridement should be performed of the donor site as well as the posterior horn of the meniscus if it has healed over with fibrocartilage to allow bone-to-bone healing. A posteromedial working portal is made at an angle amenable to the repair and a 6-mm cannula is placed. A Beath passing pin commonly used for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is used to pass suture for the outside-inside-out repair. The pin is passed through the cannula in the posterior medial portal. The root of the medial meniscus and the avulsed ossicle are pierced with the Beath pin and tensioned, after which the pin is drilled into the matching donor site and out through the tibia. Two passes are used to create a mattress suture through the ossicle, and the suture is tied over a bone bridge on the anterolateral tibia.

  15. Arthroscopically Assisted Latissimus Dorsi Tendon Transfer in Beach-Chair Position

    PubMed Central

    Jermolajevas, Viktoras; Kordasiewicz, Bartlomiej

    2015-01-01

    Irreparable rotator cuff tears remain a surgical problem. The open technique of latissimus dorsi (LD) tendon transfer to “replace” the irreparable rotator cuff is already well known. The aim of this article is to present a modified arthroscopically assisted LD tendon transfer technique. This technique was adopted to operate on patients in the beach-chair position with several improvements in tendon harvesting and fixation. It can be divided into 6 steps, and only 1 step—LD muscle and tendon release—is performed open. The advantages of the arthroscopic procedure are sparing of the deltoid muscle, the possibility of repairing the subscapularis tendon, and the ability to visualize structures at risk while performing tendon harvesting (radial nerve) and passing into the subacromial space (axillary nerve). It is performed in a similar manner to standard rotator cuff surgery—the beach-chair position does not need any modification, and no sophisticated equipment for either the open or arthroscopic part of the procedure is necessary. Nevertheless, this is a challenging procedure and should only be attempted after training, as well as extensive practice. PMID:26759777

  16. Arthroscopic modified Mason-Allen technique for large U- or L-shaped rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sung-Weon; Kim, Dong-Hee; Kang, Seung-Hoon; Lee, Ji-Heon

    2017-07-01

    While a conventional single- or double-row repair technique could be applied for repair of C-shaped tears, a different surgical strategy should be considered for repair of U- or L-shaped tears because they typically have complex patterns with anterior, posterior, or both mobile leaves. This study was performed to examine the outcomes of the modified Mason-Allen technique for footprint restoration in the treatment of large U- or L-shaped rotator cuff tears. Thirty-two patients who underwent an arthroscopic modified Mason-Allen technique for large U- or L-shaped rotator cuff tears between January 2012 and December 2013 were included in this study. Margin convergence was first performed to reduce the tear gap and tension, and then, an arthroscopic Mason-Allen technique was performed to restore the rotator cuff footprint in a side-to-end repair fashion. All patients were evaluated preoperatively and for a minimum of 2 years of follow-up with a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, Constant score, and ultrasonography. There was significant improvement in all VAS and Constant scores compared with the preoperative values (P < 0.001). Functional results by Constant scores included 9 cases that were classified as excellent, 11 cases as good, 8 cases as fair, and 2 cases as poor. Binary logistic regression analysis revealed that heavy work, pseudoparalysis, joint space narrowing, fatty degeneration of the SST and IST, and a positive tangent sign were found to significantly correlate with functional outcomes. Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that only fatty degeneration of the SST was a risk factor for fair/poor clinical outcomes. Complications occurred in 5 of the 32 patients (15.6 %), and the reoperation rate due to complications was 6.3 % (2 of 32 patients). An arthroscopic modified Mason-Allen technique was sufficient to restore the footprint of the rotator cuff in our data. Overall satisfactory results were achieved in most patients, with the

  17. Complications in posteromedial arthroscopic suture of the medial meniscus.

    PubMed

    Jan, N; Sonnery-Cottet, B; Fayard, J-M; Kajetanek, C; Thaunat, M

    2016-12-01

    All-inside posteromedial suture for lesions of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repair provides effective freshening and good healing. The posteromedial portal provides satisfactory healing rates without increasing morbidity or complications rates. Intra- and postoperative complications were collected for a consecutive single-center series of 132 patients undergoing posteromedial hook suture of the medial meniscus in ACL repair. Meniscal healing was assessed as the rate of recurrence of symptomatic medial meniscus lesions (Barret criteria) and on revision surgery, if any, in terms of the aspect and extent of the iterative lesion. The severity of any sensory disorder was assessed by questionnaire. The intraoperative complications rate was 1.5% (2 saphenous vein punctures). At a mean 31months (range, 28-35months), there was no loss to follow-up. Twelve patients (9%) showed symptomatic recurrence of the medial meniscus lesion, requiring 10 repeat surgeries. In 6 cases (4.5%), the iterative lesion involved a smaller, more central part of the meniscus anterior to the sutures, of "postage-stamp" effect, possibly implicating the suture hook and/or non-absorbable sutures. There were no cases of infection or fistula. Postoperative hematoma occurred in 7% of patients. In total, 1.8% reported dysesthesia areas equal to or greater than the size of a credit card (45cm 2 ). Some retears, or "partial failures", may implicate a new lesion caused by the suture hook and possibly prolonged by non-resorbable sutures. Hematoma and sensory disorder rates were comparable to those reported in isolated ACL repair without posteromedial portal. The present results show that posteromedial arthroscopic hook suture in posterior medial meniscus tear provides good healing rates without increased morbidity due to the supplementary portal. IV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Arthroscopic-assisted Broström-Gould for chronic ankle instability: a long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Nery, Caio; Raduan, Fernando; Del Buono, Angelo; Asaumi, Inacio Diogo; Cohen, Moises; Maffulli, Nicola

    2011-11-01

    Lateral ankle sprains account for 85% of ankle lesions. Combined open and arthroscopic procedures could improve the diagnosis and management of intra-articular lesions and allow surgeons to perform minimally invasive anatomic reconstruction of the lateral ligament complex. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Forty consecutive patients underwent ankle arthroscopy for recurrent (2 or more episodes) lateral ankle instability unresponsive to nonoperative measures. The clinical diagnosis of mechanical instability was confirmed at imaging (plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) and arthroscopic assessment. All patients underwent arthroscopic Broström-Gould repair for management of lateral ankle instability; secondary lesions were also managed. Postoperatively, the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) score was administered to assess the functional status; clinical examination and conventional radiographs were performed in all patients. Thirty-eight patients were reviewed at an average postoperative follow-up of 9.8 years. The mean AOFAS score was 90 (range, 44-100) at the last follow-up. No significantly different outcomes were found in patients who had undergone microfractures for management of grade III to IV cartilage lesions compared with patients with no cartilage lesions. Postoperative AOFAS scores were graded as excellent and good in almost all patients (94.7%). Concerning failure rate, 2 patients (5.3%) reported a low AOFAS score: one patient underwent soft tissue removal for anterior impingement, and one received simultaneous medial ankle instability repair. The arthroscopic Broström-Gould-assisted technique could be a viable alternative to the gold-standard Broström-Gould procedure for anatomic repair of chronic lateral ankle instability and management of intra-articular lesions. Prospective randomized controlled trials are needed.

  19. Current Biomechanical Concepts for Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    For the past few decades, the repair of rotator cuff tears has evolved significantly with advances in arthroscopy techniques, suture anchors and instrumentation. From the biomechanical perspective, the focus in arthroscopic repair has been on increasing fixation strength and restoration of the footprint contact characteristics to provide early rehabilitation and improve healing. To accomplish these objectives, various repair strategies and construct configurations have been developed for rotator cuff repair with the understanding that many factors contribute to the structural integrity of the repaired construct. These include repaired rotator cuff tendon-footprint motion, increased tendon-footprint contact area and pressure, and tissue quality of tendon and bone. In addition, the healing response may be compromised by intrinsic factors such as decreased vascularity, hypoxia, and fibrocartilaginous changes or aforementioned extrinsic compression factors. Furthermore, it is well documented that torn rotator cuff muscles have a tendency to atrophy and become subject to fatty infiltration which may affect the longevity of the repair. Despite all the aforementioned factors, initial fixation strength is an essential consideration in optimizing rotator cuff repair. Therefore, numerous biomechanical studies have focused on elucidating the strongest devices, knots, and repair configurations to improve contact characteristics for rotator cuff repair. In this review, the biomechanical concepts behind current rotator cuff repair techniques will be reviewed and discussed. PMID:23730471

  20. Arthroscopic approach and anatomy of the hip.

    PubMed

    Aprato, Alessandro; Giachino, Matteo; Masse, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Hip arthroscopy has gained popularity among the orthopedic community and a precise assessment of indications, techniques and results is constantly brought on. In this chapter the principal standard entry portals for central and peripheral compartment are discussed. The description starts from the superficial landmarks for portals placement and continues with the deep layers. For each entry point an illustration of the main structures encountered is provided and the principal structures at risk for different portals are accurately examined. Articular anatomical description is carried out from the arthroscope point of view and sub-divided into central and peripheral compartment. The two compartments are systematically analyzed and the accessible articular areas for each portal explained. Moreover, some anatomical variations that can be found in the normal hip are reported. The anatomical knowledge of the hip joint along with a precise notion of the structures encountered with the arthroscope is an essential requirement for a secure and successful surgery. Level of evidence: V.

  1. The Arthroscopic Surgical Skill Evaluation Tool (ASSET)

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Ryan J.; Amsdell, Simon; Arendt, Elizabeth A; Bisson, Leslie J; Braman, Jonathan P; Butler, Aaron; Cosgarea, Andrew J; Harner, Christopher D; Garrett, William E; Olson, Tyson; Warme, Winston J.; Nicandri, Gregg T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Surgeries employing arthroscopic techniques are among the most commonly performed in orthopaedic clinical practice however, valid and reliable methods of assessing the arthroscopic skill of orthopaedic surgeons are lacking. Hypothesis The Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool (ASSET) will demonstrate content validity, concurrent criterion-oriented validity, and reliability, when used to assess the technical ability of surgeons performing diagnostic knee arthroscopy on cadaveric specimens. Study Design Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3 Methods Content validity was determined by a group of seven experts using a Delphi process. Intra-articular performance of a right and left diagnostic knee arthroscopy was recorded for twenty-eight residents and two sports medicine fellowship trained attending surgeons. Subject performance was assessed by two blinded raters using the ASSET. Concurrent criterion-oriented validity, inter-rater reliability, and test-retest reliability were evaluated. Results Content validity: The content development group identified 8 arthroscopic skill domains to evaluate using the ASSET. Concurrent criterion-oriented validity: Significant differences in total ASSET score (p<0.05) between novice, intermediate, and advanced experience groups were identified. Inter-rater reliability: The ASSET scores assigned by each rater were strongly correlated (r=0.91, p <0.01) and the intra-class correlation coefficient between raters for the total ASSET score was 0.90. Test-retest reliability: there was a significant correlation between ASSET scores for both procedures attempted by each individual (r = 0.79, p<0.01). Conclusion The ASSET appears to be a useful, valid, and reliable method for assessing surgeon performance of diagnostic knee arthroscopy in cadaveric specimens. Studies are ongoing to determine its generalizability to other procedures as well as to the live OR and other simulated environments. PMID:23548808

  2. Arthroscopic Treatment of Discoid Lateral Meniscus Tears in Children With Achondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Atanda, Alfred; Wallace, Maegen; Bober, Michael B; Mackenzie, William

    2016-01-01

    Achondroplasia is the most common form of skeletal dysplasia that presents to the pediatric orthopaedist. More than half of achondroplasia patients are affected with knee pain. It is thought that the majority of this pain may be due to spinal stenosis, hip pathology, or knee malalignment. Discoid menisci can be a source of lateral knee joint pain in skeletally immature patients in general. We present the first case series of patients with achondroplasia who had symptomatic discoid lateral menisci treated with arthroscopic knee surgery. The charts of 6 patients (8 knees) with achondroplasia who underwent arthroscopic knee surgery for symptomatic discoid lateral menisci were collected. History and physical examination data, magnetic resonance imaging findings, and operative reports were reviewed. Meniscal tear configuration and treatment type (meniscectomy vs. repair) were noted. Each patient was found to have a tear of the discoid meniscus. All menisci were treated with saucerization. In addition, meniscal repair was performed in 2 cases, partial meniscectomy in 3 cases, and subtotal meniscectomy in 3 cases. Two patients had bilateral discoid meniscal tears which were treated. Average follow-up was 2.4 years (range, 1 to 4.5 y) and the average pediatric International Knee Documentation Committee (pedi-IKDC) score was 85.3% (range, 75% to 95.4%). At final follow-up, all patients were pain free and able to return to full activities. Discoid meniscus tears may be a source of lateral joint line pain in patients with achondroplasia. These injuries can be successfully treated with arthroscopic surgery in this patient population. Future studies need to be done to determine the exact incidence of discoid menisci in achondroplasia patients and also to determine whether there is a genetic relationship between the 2 conditions. Level IV-case series.

  3. Clinical factors that affect perceived quality of life in arthroscopic reconstruction for acromioclavicular joint dislocation.

    PubMed

    Abat, F; Gich, I; Natera, L; Besalduch, M; Sarasquete, J

    To analyse the results of arthroscopic repair of acromioclavicular dislocation in terms of health-related quality of life. Prospective study of patients with acromioclavicular dislocation Rockwood grade iii-v, treated arthroscopically with a mean follow up of 25.4 months. The demographics of the series were recorded and evaluations were performed preoperatively, at 3 months and 2 years with validated questionnaires as Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36), visual analogue scale (VAS), The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH), Constant-Murley Shoulder Outcome Score (Constant) and Walch-Duplay Score (WD). Twenty patients, 17 men and 3 women with a mean age of 36.1 years, were analysed. According to the classification of Rockwood, 3 patients were grade iii, 3 grade iv and 14 grade v. Functional and clinical improvement was detected in all clinical tests (SF-36, VAS and DASH) at 3 months and 2 years follow up (P<.001). The final Constant score was 95.3±2.4 and the WD was 1.8±0.62. It was not found that the health-related quality of life was affected by any variable studied except the evolution of DASH. The health-related quality of life (assessed by SF-36) in patients undergoing arthroscopic repair of acromioclavicular joint dislocation grades iii-v was not influenced by gender, age, grade, displacement, handedness, evolution of the VAS, scoring of the Constant or by the WD. However, it is correlated with the evolution in the DASH score. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Early arthroscopic release in stiff shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Sabat, Dhananjaya; Kumar, Vinod

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the results of early arthroscopic release in the patients of stiff shoulder Methods: Twenty patients of stiff shoulder, who had symptoms for at least three months and failed to improve with steroid injections and physical therapy of 6 weeks duration, underwent arthroscopic release. The average time between onset of symptoms and the time of surgery was 4 months and 2 weeks. The functional outcome was evaluated using ASES and Constant and Murley scoring systems. Results: All the patients showed significant improvement in the range of motion and relief of pain by end of three months following the procedure. At 12 months, mean improvement in ASES score is 38 points and Constant and Murley score is 4O.5 points. All patients returned to work by 3-5 months (average -4.5 months). Conclusion: Early arthroscopic release showed promising results with reliable increase in range of motion, early relief of symptoms and consequent early return to work. So it is highly recommended in properly selected patients. Level of evidence: Level IV PMID:20300309

  5. Arthroscopic Decompression for a Giant Meniscal Cyst.

    PubMed

    Ohishi, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Daisuke; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    The authors report the case of a giant medial meniscal cyst in an osteoarthritic knee of an 82-year-old woman that was successfully treated with only arthroscopic cyst decompression. The patient noticed a painful mass on the medial side of the right knee that had been gradually growing for 5 years. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an encapsulated large medial cystic mass measuring 80×65×40 mm that was adjacent to the medial meniscus. An accompanying horizontal tear was also detected in the middle and posterior segments of the meniscus. The medial meniscus was resected up to the capsular attachment to create bidirectional flow between the joint and the cyst with arthroscopic surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging performed 14 months postoperatively showed that the cyst had completely disappeared, and no recurrence was observed during a 2-year follow-up period. An excellent result could be obtained by performing limited meniscectomy to create a channel leading to the meniscal cyst, even though the cyst was large. Among previously reported cases of meniscal cysts, this case is the largest to be treated arthroscopically without open excision. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Characteristics and Outcomes of Arthroscopic Femoroacetabular Impingement Surgery in the National Football League.

    PubMed

    Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Bedi, Asheesh; Premkumar, Ajay; Draovitch, Pete; Kelly, Bryan T

    2018-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that hip abnormalities may account for 10% of injuries in professional football players. The effect of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and arthroscopic FAI surgery in National Football League (NFL) athletes has not been well studied. To investigate the effect of arthroscopic FAI surgery on return to play (RTP) and RTP performance in NFL players. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. NFL athletes undergoing arthroscopic FAI surgery at a single institution between 2006 and 2014 were identified. Medical records were reviewed for demographic, clinical, and operative variables. RTP and RTP performance were assessed based on a review of publicly available NFL player statistics. RTP and RTP performance data included time to RTP; games played before and after the injury; yearly total yards and touchdowns for offensive players; and yearly total tackles, sacks, and interceptions for defensive players. The offensive power rating (OPR = [total yards/10] + [total touchdowns × 6]) and defensive power rating (DPR = total tackles + [total sacks × 2] + [total interceptions × 2]) were calculated. Paired t tests comparing preinjury and postinjury seasons were performed. A matched cohort of NFL players was created to compare trends for OPR, DPR, and career longevity. Forty-eight hips in 40 NFL players (mean age, 25.6 years) with symptomatic FAI were included; 8 players underwent staged bilateral hip arthroscopic procedures. The majority of players were offensive (n = 24; 60.0%), with offensive lineman (n = 11; 27.5%) being the most common of all positions. Of the 48 included hips, all had labral tears, and 41 (85.4%) underwent labral repair. Forty-two of the 48 hips (87.5%) underwent cam decompression, and 10 (20.8%) underwent rim decompression. Of the 40 included players, 37 (92.5%) achieved RTP to professional competition after their hip arthroscopic surgery at a mean of 6.0 months. Before the injury, included patients played in a mean of 11

  7. Arthroscopic Management of Tibial Spine Avulsion Fractures: Principles and Techniques.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Eric J; Kaplan, Daniel James; Weinberg, Maxwell E; Egol, Jonathan; Jazrawi, Laith M

    2018-05-15

    Tibial spine fractures are uncommon injuries affecting the insertion of the anterior cruciate ligament on the tibia. They typically occur in skeletally immature patients aged 8 to 14 years and result from hyperextension of the knee with a valgus or rotational force. Diagnosis is based on history, physical examination, and standard radiographs. The use of MRI can identify entrapped soft tissue that may prevent reduction. Open or arthroscopic repair is indicated in patients with partially displaced fractures (>5 mm) with one third to one half of the avulsed fragment elevated, in patients who have undergone unsuccessful nonsurgical reduction and long leg casting or bracing, and in patients with completely displaced fractures. Arthroscopy offers reduced invasiveness and decreased morbidity. Suture fixation and screw fixation have produced successful results. Suture fixation can eliminate the risk of fracture fragment comminution during screw insertion, the risk of neurovascular injury, and the need for hardware removal. Suture fixation is ideal in cases in which existing comminution prevents screw fixation.

  8. Analysis of Arthroscopic Therapy for hip Pathologies.

    PubMed

    Przybył, Michał; Walenczak, Krzysztof; Lebiedziński, Radosław; Domżalski, Marcin

    2017-05-10

    [b]Background. [/b]This paper analyses the outcomes of treatment of avascular necrosis (AVN), femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), hip labral tear (HLT) and snapping hip syndrome (SHS). Moreover, the results of individual groups are also compared. The study group consisted of 70 persons (surgeries of 72 hips). AVN - 14 patients, FAI - 38 patients (39 hips), HLT - 12 patients (13 hips), SHS - 6 patients. Two questionnaires, namely the MHHS (Modified Harris Hip Score) and NAHS (Non Arthritic Hip Score), were used to evaluate the patients before the surgery and at 6- and 12-month follow-up.[b]Results. [/b]AVN : local improvement was recorded at both 6 and 12 months, FAI: local improvement was recorded at both 6 and 12 months, HLT: local improvement was recorded at both 6 and 12 months, SHS: local improvement was recorded at both 6 and 12 months. Comparison of the results between the groups showed that: At baseline, local status in AVN was poorer than in FAI. At 6- and 12-month follow-up, local status in AVN was poorer than in FAI, HLT and SHS.[b]Conclusions.[/b] AVN Group 1. The study demonstrates that arthroscopic treatment of avascular necrosis produced fairly good outcomes at 6 and 12 months after the surgery. 2. Treatment of avascular necrosis showed significantly poorer results than therapy of femoroacetabular impingement, hip labral tear and snapping hip syndrome at 6 and 12 months. FAI Group 1. Arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement produced good outcomes at 6 and 12 months after the surgery. HLT Group 1. Arthroscopic treatment of hip labral tear produced excellent outcomes at 6 and 12 months after the surgery. SHS Group 1. Arthroscopic treat ment of snapping hip syndrome produced excellent outcomes at 6 and 12 months after the surgery.Additional conclusions. 1. Studies showing long-term effect of arthroscopic treatment of selected conditions are necessary to further assess the effectiveness of this treatment. 2. It is necessary to evaluate the

  9. Total knee arthroplasty fibrosis following arthroscopic intervention

    PubMed Central

    Churchill, Jessica L.; Sodhi, Nipun; Khlopas, Anton; Piuzzi, Nicolas S.; Dalton, Sarah E.; Chughtai, Morad; Sultan, Assem A.; Jones, Steven; Williams, Nick; Mont, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Although arthroscopy is generally considered to be a relatively benign procedure with limited trauma to periarticular soft tissues, post-arthroscopic bleeding as well as osmolality differences between the normal saline used to irrigate and the native synovial fluid (282 vs. 420 mOs) can lead to capsular reactions. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate whether capsular reaction occurred after knee arthroscopy, by comparing a matched cohort of patients who either did or did not undergo prior arthroscopic surgery. Specifically, we compared histological features such as: (I) synovial thickness; (II) cellularity; and (III) the amount of fibrous tissue for each cohort. Methods Prior to their total knee arthroplasty (TKA), 40 consecutive patients who had previously undergone arthroscopy were matched to 40 consecutive patients who had not. During each patient’s TKA, a biopsy of the capsule and fat pad was taken and formalin sections were sent to pathology to assess for synovial thickness, cellularity, and the amount of fibrous tissue. The pathologist was blinded to the groupings. Findings for all histologic features were classified as equivocal, slight to moderate, and moderate to severe. Results There were a significantly higher proportion of patients who had increased synovial thickness in the prior arthroscopy group as compared to the no-prior arthroscopy group (97.5% vs. 0%, P<0.001). Additionally, there were a significantly higher proportion of patients who had increased cellularity in the prior arthroscopy group as compared to the no-prior arthroscopy group (60.0% vs. 0%, P<0.001). There were also a significantly higher proportion of patients who had increased fibrous tissue in the prior arthroscopy group as compared to the no-prior arthroscopy group (95% vs. 62.5%, P<0.001). Conclusions Arthroscopic surgery may have long-term effects on capsular tissue as surgical observations of patients with prior arthroscopic surgery from this study

  10. Arthroscopic suture bridge technique for intratendinous tear of rotator cuff in chronically painful calcific tendinitis of the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jong-Hun; Shafi, Mohamed; Moon, Chang-Yun; Park, Sang-Eun; Kim, Yeon-Jun; Kim, Sung-Eun

    2013-11-01

    Arthroscopic removal, now the main treatment option, has almost replaced open surgery for treatment of resistant calcific tendinitis. In some cases of chronic calcific tendinitis of the shoulder, the calcific materials are hard and adherent to the tendon. Removal of these materials can cause significant intratendinous tears between the superficial and deep layers of the degenerated rotator cuff. Thus far, there are no established surgical techniques for removing the calcific materials while ensuring cuff integrity. Good clinical results for rotator cuff repair were achieved by using an arthroscopic suture bridge technique in patients with long-standing calcific tendinitis. Intact rotator cuff integrity and recovery of signal change on follow-up magnetic resonance imaging scans were confirmed. This is a technical note about a surgical technique and its clinical results with a review of relevant published reports. © 2013 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Arthroscopic Assessment and Treatment of Dancers' Knee Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Daniel M.; Campbell, Pat

    1985-01-01

    Arthroscopic examination of 16 dancers with dance-related knee injuries which defied conservative treatment showed 15 meniscal tears and 4 cases of chondromalacia patellae. Partial arthroscopic meniscectomy was used to treat the tears. The results were excellent, with 13 of the 16 returning to preoperative levels of dance activity. (MT)

  12. Is the arthroscopic modified tension band suture technique suitable for all full-thickness rotator cuff tears?

    PubMed

    Bae, Kyu Hwan; Kim, Jeong Woo; Kim, Tae Kyun; Kweon, Seok Hyun; Kang, Hong Je; Kim, Jong Yun; Joo, Min Su; Kim, Dong Moon

    2016-09-01

    We aimed to identify the clinical and structural outcomes after arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears of all sizes with a modified tension band suture technique. Among 63 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for a full-thickness rotator cuff tear with the modified tension band suture technique at a single hospital between July 2011 and March 2013, 47 were enrolled in this study. The mean follow-up period was 29 months. Visual analog scale scores, range of motion, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores, Constant scores, and Shoulder Strength Index were measured preoperatively and at the final follow-up. For radiologic evaluation, we conducted magnetic resonance imaging 6 months postoperatively and ultrasonography at the final follow-up. We allocated the small and medium tears to group A and the large and massive tears to group B and then compared clinical outcomes and repair integrity. Postoperative clinical outcomes at the final follow-up showed significant improvements compared with those seen during preoperative evaluations (P < .001). However, group B showed worse clinical results than group A. Evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging performed 6 months postoperatively and ultrasonography taken at the final follow-up revealed that group B showed a significantly higher retear rate than did group A (69% vs. 6%, respectively; P < .001). Arthroscopic repair with the modified tension band suture technique for rotator cuff tears was a more suitable method for small to medium tears than for large to massive tears. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Arthroscopic treatment for intratendinous rotator cuff tear results in satisfactory clinical outcomes and structural integrity.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Sang Jin; Lee, Hyo Yeol; Jeon, Woong Ki

    2018-04-20

    This study aimed to evaluate the clinical outcomes and structural integrity of arthroscopic repair of intratendinous rotator cuff tear. Patients who were diagnosed with an intratendinous tear but in whom conservative treatment failed were selected and underwent arthroscopic repair. Between 2008 and 2014, a total of 30 patients (6 men, 24 women; mean age, 59 ± 3.7 years) met the inclusion criteria and were followed up. The mean follow-up period was 26.3 ± 0.7 months. The results were evaluated using the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) score, the Society of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons rating scale (ASES) questionnaire, and the visual analog scale (VAS) and range of motion (ROM) were measured preoperatively and at final follow-up. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed preoperatively and at 6.7 ± 0.2 months postoperatively. Postoperative MRI was performed on 27 out of 30 patients and analysed using the Sugaya classification. Corresponding to the preoperative MRI findings, arthroscopic findings of intratendinous tears were observed in all 30 patients. The mean active forward elevation ROM was 137.3° ± 15.4° before surgery and 168.8° ± 15.2° at the final follow-up. The internal and external rotations at abduction were 31.7° ± 5.1° and 63.0° ± 11.6° before surgery, respectively, and 60.5° ± 8.0° and 75.2° ± 10.8° after surgery, respectively. The UCLA score improved from of 20.1 ± 7.4 points preoperative to 28.4 ± 5.5 points at the final follow-up. The ASES score improved from 55.7 ± 15.3 points preoperative to 82.6 ± 9.7 points postoperatively. The VAS for pain score decreased from 6.4 ± 1.2 points preoperative to 1.6 ± 0.9 points postoperative. Satisfactory outcomes (excellent/good) in terms of UCLA and ASES scores were observed in 29 of 30 patients. Based on Sugaya classification, grades I, II, and III structural integrities were observed in 9

  14. Second-look arthroscopic assessment and clinical results of modified pull-out suture for posterior root tear of the medial meniscus.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jin-Ho; Song, Jae-Gwang

    2014-06-01

    To identify the structural integrity of the healing site after arthroscopic repair of a posterior root tear of the medial meniscus by second-look arthroscopy and to determine the clinical relevance of the findings. From January 2005 to December 2010, 20 consecutive patients underwent arthroscopic modified pull-out suture repair for a posterior root tear of the medial meniscus. Thirteen patients were available for second-look arthroscopic evaluation. The healing status of the medial meniscus was classified as complete healing, lax healing, scar tissue healing, and failed healing. We evaluated the correlation between the clinical symptoms and second-look arthroscopic findings. Clinical evaluation was based on the Lysholm knee scores and Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) scores. There were 4 cases of complete healing, 4 lax healing, 4 scar tissue healing, and 1 failed healing. The healing status of the repaired meniscus appeared to be related to the clinical symptoms. Patients who achieved complete tissue healing had no complaint. The healing status exhibited no relationship with age, mechanical axis, degree of subluxation, and symptom duration. The mean Lysholm score improved from 34.7 preoperatively to 75.6 at follow-up and the mean HSS score also significantly increased from 33.5 to 82.2. We achieved 4 complete and 8 partial healing (lax or scar) of the medial meniscus in this retrospective case series of posterior horn meniscus root repairs performed by 1 surgeon. Further research is needed to clarify why all patients showed clinical improvement despite findings of partial healing on second-look arthroscopy.

  15. Second-Look Arthroscopic Assessment and Clinical Results of Modified Pull-Out Suture for Posterior Root Tear of the Medial Meniscus

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jae-Gwang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To identify the structural integrity of the healing site after arthroscopic repair of a posterior root tear of the medial meniscus by second-look arthroscopy and to determine the clinical relevance of the findings. Materials and Methods From January 2005 to December 2010, 20 consecutive patients underwent arthroscopic modified pull-out suture repair for a posterior root tear of the medial meniscus. Thirteen patients were available for second-look arthroscopic evaluation. The healing status of the medial meniscus was classified as complete healing, lax healing, scar tissue healing, and failed healing. We evaluated the correlation between the clinical symptoms and second-look arthroscopic findings. Clinical evaluation was based on the Lysholm knee scores and Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) scores. Results There were 4 cases of complete healing, 4 lax healing, 4 scar tissue healing, and 1 failed healing. The healing status of the repaired meniscus appeared to be related to the clinical symptoms. Patients who achieved complete tissue healing had no complaint. The healing status exhibited no relationship with age, mechanical axis, degree of subluxation, and symptom duration. The mean Lysholm score improved from 34.7 preoperatively to 75.6 at follow-up and the mean HSS score also significantly increased from 33.5 to 82.2. Conclusions We achieved 4 complete and 8 partial healing (lax or scar) of the medial meniscus in this retrospective case series of posterior horn meniscus root repairs performed by 1 surgeon. Further research is needed to clarify why all patients showed clinical improvement despite findings of partial healing on second-look arthroscopy. PMID:24944976

  16. Characteristics and Outcome of Arthroscopic Femoroacetabular Impingement Surgery in the National Football League

    PubMed Central

    Nwachukwu, Benedict U.; Premkumar, Ajay; Fader, Ryan; Bedi, Asheesh; Kelly, Bryan T.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: There is an increased understanding of hip injury and femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) in elite athlete. Previous evidence suggests that hip pathology accounts for 10% of injuries in football players. The impact of FAI and arthroscopic FAI surgery has not been previously studied for National Football League (NFL) players. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of arthroscopic FAI surgery on return to play (RTP) and RTP performance in NFL players. Methods: NFL players undergoing arthroscopic FAI surgery between 2006 and 2014 by two surgeons were identified. Medical records were reviewed for demographic, clinical and operative variables. RTP and RTP performance was assessed based on a review of publically available NFL player statistics. RTP and RTP performance data included time to return to play, games played pre and post season of injury, yearly total yards and touchdowns for offensive players, and yearly total tackles, sacks, and interceptions for defensive players. Offensive power ratings (OPR = [total yards/10] + [total touchdowns × 6]) and defensive power ratings (DPR = total tackles + [total sacks × 2] + [total interceptions × 2]) were calculated for the pre-injury season and the post injury season. Paired t-tests comparing pre and post injury seasons were performed. Results: Forty-eight hips in 40 NFL players were included; eight players underwent bilateral hip arthroscopies. Included players underwent surgery at mean 25.6 years (SD+4.6) and had a mean body mass index of 31.3 (SD+4.6). The majority of players were offensive (N=24; 60%) with the offensive line (N=11; 27.5%) being the most common of all positions. Of the 48 included hips, all had labral tears and 41 (85.4%) underwent labral repair while the remainder had a debridement. Forty-two of the 48 hips (87.5%) underwent CAM decompression, 28 (58.3%) received Subspine decompression and ten (20.8%) underwent rim decompression. The capsule was repaired in 35 of the 48 (72

  17. The Grapefruit: An Alternative Arthroscopic Tool Skill Platform.

    PubMed

    Molho, David A; Sylvia, Stephen M; Schwartz, Daniel L; Merwin, Sara L; Levy, I Martin

    2017-08-01

    To establish the construct validity of an arthroscopic training model that teaches arthroscopic tool skills including triangulation, grasping, precision biting, implant delivery and ambidexterity and uses a whole grapefruit for its training platform. For the grapefruit training model (GTM), an arthroscope and arthroscopic instruments were introduced through portals cut in the grapefruit skin of a whole prepared grapefruit. After institutional review board approval, participants performed a set of tasks inside the grapefruit. Performance for each component was assessed by recording errors, achievement of criteria, and time to completion. A total of 19 medical students, orthopaedic surgery residents, and fellowship-trained orthopaedic surgeons were included in the analysis and were divided into 3 groups based on arthroscopic experience. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the post hoc Tukey test were used for statistical analysis. One-way ANOVA showed significant differences in both time to completion and errors between groups, F(2, 16) = 16.10, P < .001; F(2, 16) = 17.43, P < .001. Group A had a longer time to completion and more errors than group B (P = .025, P = .019), and group B had a longer time to completion and more errors than group C (P = .023, P = .018). The GTM is an easily assembled and an alternative arthroscopic training model that bridges the gap between box trainers, cadavers, and virtual reality simulators. Our findings suggest construct validity when evaluating its use for teaching the basic arthroscopic tool skills. As such, it is a useful addition to the arthroscopic training toolbox. There is a need for validated low-cost arthroscopic training models that are easily accessible. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Arthroscopic approach and anatomy of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Aprato, Alessandro; Giachino, Matteo; Masse, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Hip arthroscopy has gained popularity among the orthopedic community and a precise assessment of indications, techniques and results is constantly brought on. Methods In this chapter the principal standard entry portals for central and peripheral compartment are discussed. The description starts from the superficial landmarks for portals placement and continues with the deep layers. For each entry point an illustration of the main structures encountered is provided and the principal structures at risk for different portals are accurately examined. Articular anatomical description is carried out from the arthroscope point of view and sub-divided into central and peripheral compartment. The two compartments are systematically analyzed and the accessible articular areas for each portal explained. Moreover, some anatomical variations that can be found in the normal hip are reported. Conclusion The anatomical knowledge of the hip joint along with a precise notion of the structures encountered with the arthroscope is an essential requirement for a secure and successful surgery. Level of evidence: V. PMID:28066735

  19. Pseudoaneurysm after arthroscopic procedure in the knee☆

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Edmar Stieven; Isolani, Guilherme Rufini; Baracho, Filipe Ribas; de Oliveira Franco, Ana Paula Gebert; Ridder Bauer, Luiz Antônio; Namba, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review all cases of pseudoaneurysm in the literature, in predominantly arthroscopic procedures on the knee, and to report on a case of pseudoaneurysm that we treated. A bibliographic search was conducted for scientific articles published in Brazilian and foreign periodicals over the last 23 years. Forty-seven cases were found, in 40 articles. In addition to these 47 cases, there was the case that we treated, which was also included in the data. Among the operations that progressed with formation of a pseudoaneurysm, 60% were cases of meniscal injuries and 23%, anterior cruciate ligament injuries. In 46% of the cases, the artery affected with the popliteal, and in 21%, the inferomedial genicular artery. The commonest clinical symptom was pain (37%), followed by pulsating tumor (31%), edema of the calf (12%) and hemarthrosis (11%). The median time taken to make the diagnosis was 11 days, but it ranged from one day to 10 weeks after the procedure. Although rare, pseudoaneurysms are a risk that is inherent to arthroscopic surgery. All patients should be made aware of the vascular risks, even in small-scale procedures. PMID:26229905

  20. The diabetic frozen shoulder: arthroscopic release.

    PubMed

    Ogilvie-Harris, D J; Myerthall, S

    1997-02-01

    Seventeen patients who were diabetics developed frozen shoulders which failed to respond to conservative management. They had persistent pain, stiffness, and limited function. An arthroscopic release was performed by progressively releasing the anterior structures from superior to inferior. Starting from the interval area we progressed to the anterior superior glenohumeral ligament, the intra-articular portion of the subscapularis, the anterior capsule, and the inferior capsule. Postoperatively physiotherapy was carried out daily to maintain the range of movement. At a follow up of 1 to 5 years the patients were assessed using the American Shoulder Society scheme. In addition the patients were assessed preoperatively and postoperatively on four criteria; pain, external rotation, abduction, and function. We found that the patients were statistically significantly improved in all four categories. Thirteen of the 17 patients had no pain, full range of motion compared with the opposite side, and full function. There was one poor result with no improvement. The remaining three patients had improved but still had residual abnormalities. We consider arthroscopic release to be an effective treatment for the resistant diabetic frozen shoulder.

  1. Arthroscopic suture retrievers and shuttles: a biomechanical investigation of the force required for tendon penetration and defect size.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Christopher G; Wieser, Karl; Lajtai, Georg; Meyer, Dominik C

    2015-11-17

    To compare instruments designed for arthroscopic suture handling during arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, to assess the force needed to penetrate the tendon, and to evaluate the residual defect size. Twenty-one instruments were each tested ten times on thawed sheep infraspinatus tendons. The force needed to pierce the tendon with each instrument was measured using a custom setup. Bone wax plates were used to make the perforation marks visible and to quantify the lesions each instrument created. The force to pierce a tendon had a range of 5.6-18.5 N/mm. Within the group of suture retrievers, the angled instruments required in average 85 % higher forces than straight instruments. The lesion area had a range of 2-7 mm(2). Suture retrievers produced significantly larger lesion sizes compared with suture shuttles. For the identical task of passing a suture through a tendon, differences exist regarding the ease of tendon penetration and potential damage to the tendon for different tools. The design, function, and resulting lesion size may be relevant and important for surgical handling and to avoid excess structural damage to the tendon. These results suggest that choosing the most appropriate tools for arthroscopic suture stitching influences the ease of handling and final integrity of the tissue.

  2. [SPECIFIC DIAGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF "RIPPLE SIGN" OF MEDIAL FEMORAL CONDYLE UNDER ARTHROSCOPE IN MEDIAL LONGITUDINAL MENISCAL TEARS].

    PubMed

    Ren Shiyou; Sun, Limang; Chen, Guofei; Jiang, Changqing; Zhang, Xintao; Zhang Wentao

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the reliability of the "ripple sign" on the upper surface of the medial femoral condyle in the diagnosis of medial longitudinal meniscal tears under arthroscope. Between June 2013 and June 2014, 56 patients with knee injuries were included. There were 35 males and 21 females with an average age of 22.2 years (range, 12-38 years). The causes of injury were sports in 40 cases, falling in 10 cases, and traffic accident in 6 cases. The injury was located at the left knee in 22 cases and at the right knee in 34 cases. The disease duration was 10-40 days (mean, 20.2 days). Of 56 patients, 15 cases had simple medial meniscal injury; 41 cases had combined injuries, including anterior cruciate ligament injury in 38 cases, posterior cruciate ligament injury in 2 cases, and patellar dislocation in 1 case. The "ripple sign" was observed under arthroscope before operation. Repair of medial meniscal injury and reconstruction of cruciate ligament were performed. The positive "ripple sign" was seen under arthroscope in all patients, who were diagnosed to have longitudinal meniscal tears, including 23 cases of mild "ripple sign" , 28 cases of moderate "ripple sign", and 5 cases of severe "ripple sign". The "ripple sign" on the upper surface of the medial femoral condyle is a reliable diagnostic evidence of medial longitudinal meniscal tears.

  3. Proximity of arthroscopic ankle stabilization procedures to surrounding structures: an anatomic study.

    PubMed

    Drakos, Mark; Behrens, Steve B; Mulcahey, Mary K; Paller, David; Hoffman, Eve; DiGiovanni, Christopher W

    2013-06-01

    To examine the anatomy of the lateral ankle after arthroscopic repair of the lateral ligament complex (anterior talofibular ligament [ATFL] and calcaneofibular ligament [CFL]) with regard to structures at risk. Ten lower extremity cadaveric specimens were obtained and were screened for gross anatomic defects and pre-existing ankle laxity. The ATFL and CFL were sectioned from the fibula by an open technique. Standard anterolateral and anteromedial arthroscopy portals were made. An additional portal was created 2 cm distal to the anterolateral portal. The articular surface of the fibula was identified, and the ATFL and CFL were freed from the superficial and deeper tissues. Suture anchors were placed in the fibula at the ATFL and CFL origins and were used to repair the origin of the lateral collateral structures. The distance from the suture knot to several local anatomic structures was measured. Measurements were taken by 2 separate observers, and the results were averaged. Several anatomic structures lie in close proximity to the ATFL and CFL sutures. The ATFL sutures entrapped 9 of 55 structures, and no anatomic structures were inadvertently entrapped by the CFL sutures. The proximity of the peroneus tertius and the extensor tendons to the ATFL makes them at highest risk of entrapment, but the proximity of the intermediate branch of the superficial peroneal nerve (when present) is a risk with significant morbidity. Our results indicate that the peroneus tertius and extensor tendons have the highest risk for entrapment and show the smallest mean distances from the anchor knot to the identified structure. Careful attention to these structures, as well as the superficial peroneal nerve, is mandatory to prevent entrapment of tendons and nerves when one is attempting arthroscopic lateral ankle ligament reconstruction. Defining the anatomic location and proximity of the intervening structures adjacent to the lateral ligament complex of the ankle may help clarify the

  4. A Biomechanical Comparison of 3 Different Arthroscopic Lateral Ankle Stabilization Techniques in 36 Cadaveric Ankles.

    PubMed

    Cottom, James M; Baker, Joseph S; Richardson, Phillip E; Maker, Jared M

    Arthroscopic lateral ankle stabilization has become an increasingly popular option among foot and ankle surgeons to address lateral ankle instability, because it combines a modified Broström-Gould procedure with the ability to address any intra-articular pathologic findings at the same session. The present study evaluated 3 different constructs in a cadaveric model. Thirty-six fresh frozen cadaver limbs were used, and the anterior talofibular ligament was identified and sectioned. The specimens were then placed into 1 of 3 groups. Group 1 received a repair with a single-row, 2-suture anchor construct; group 2 received repair with a novel, double-row, 4-anchor knotless construct; and group 3 received repair with a double-row, 3-anchor construct. Specimens were then tested for stiffness and load to ultimate failure using a customized jig. Stiffness was measured in each of the groups and was 12.10 ± 5.43 (range 5.50 to 22.24) N/mm for group 1, 13.40 ± 7.98 (range 6.71 to 36.28) N/mm for group 2, and 12.55 ± 4.00 (range 6.48 to 22.14) N/mm for group 3. No significant differences were found among the 3 groups in terms of stiffness (p = .939, 1-way analysis of variance, ɑ = 0.05). The groups were tested to failure, with observed force measurements of 156.43 ± 30.39 (range 83.69 to 192.00) N for group 1, 206.62 ± 55.62 (range 141.37 to 300.29) N for group 2, and 246.82 ± 82.37 (range 164.26 to 384.93) N for group 3. Statistically significant differences were noted between groups 1 and 3 (p = .006, 1-way analysis of variance, ɑ = 0.05). The results of the present study have shown that a previously reported arthroscopic lateral ankle stabilization procedure, when modified with an additional proximal suture anchor into the fibula, results in a statistically significant increase in strength in terms of the maximum load to failure. Additionally, we have described a previously unreported, knotless technique for arthroscopic lateral ankle

  5. Arthroscopic Surgical Technique for an Acute Talar Dome Osteochondral Lesion in a Professional Rugby League Player.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Martin; Fraser, Ethan J; Linklater, James; Harris, Craig; Morgan, Kieran

    2017-06-01

    Talar osteochondral lesions represent challenging clinical entities, particularly in high-demand athletes. Surgical treatment of large lesions often requires a 2-step procedure, or the use of osteotomy in the case of autologous osteochondral transfer, which can delay return to sport. A professional rugby league player underwent surgery for a complex injury to the ankle. A talar osteochondral lesion with a maximal diameter of 15 mm was treated in an arthroscopic fashion using the cartilage taken from the completely displaced osteochondral fragment. Cartilage was cut into chips and combined with bone graft product containing platelet-derived growth factor and a porous collagen scaffold. Autologous cartilage was then reimplanted arthroscopically. The patient was allowed full ankle motion from 2 weeks postoperatively, and weightbearing was commenced at 6 weeks. Follow-up imaging and functional outcomes, including return to sport, were assessed at regular intervals. The patient was able to return to professional rugby league by 23 weeks postoperatively. Magnetic resonance imaging at 16 months postoperatively showed restoration of the subchondral plate and osseous infill. At final follow-up, the patient remained pain free and was playing at preinjury level. This report describes good outcomes using a novel, 1-step cartilage repair technique to treat a large talar osteochondral lesion in a professional athlete. Level V: Expert opinion.

  6. Arthroscopic treatment options for irreparable rotator cuff tears of the shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Anley, Cameron M; Chan, Samuel KL; Snow, Martyn

    2014-01-01

    The management of patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears remains a challenge for orthopaedic surgeons with the final treatment option in many algorithms being either a reverse shoulder arthroplasty or a tendon transfer. The long term results of these procedures are however still widely debated, especially in younger patients. A variety of arthroscopic treatment options have been proposed for patients with an irreparable rotator cuff tear without the presence of arthritis of the glenohumeral joint. These include a simple debridement with or without a biceps tenotomy, partial rotator cuff repair with or without an interval slide, tuberplasty, graft interposition of the rotator cuff, suprascapular nerve ablation, superior capsule reconstruction and insertion of a biodegradable spacer (Inspace) to depress the humeral head. These options should be considered as part of the treatment algorithm in patients with an irreparable rotator cuff and could be used as either as an interim procedure, delaying the need for more invasive surgery in the physiologically young and active, or as potential definitive procedures in the medically unfit. The aim of this review is to highlight and summarise arthroscopic procedures and the results thereof currently utilised in the management of these challenging patients. PMID:25405083

  7. Arthroscopic procedures and therapeutic results of anatomical reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments for acromioclavicular Joint dislocation.

    PubMed

    Takase, K; Yamamoto, K

    2016-09-01

    Surgical treatment is recommended for type 5 acromioclavicular joint dislocation on Rockwood's classification. We believe that anatomic repair of the coracoclavicular ligaments best restores the function of the acromioclavicular joint. We attempted to correctly reconstruct the anatomy of the coracoclavicular ligaments under arthroscopy, and describe the minimally invasive arthroscopic procedure. There were 22 patients; mean age at surgery, 38.1 years. Mean time to surgery was 13.2 days. Mean follow-up was 3 years 2 months. The palmaris longus tendon was excised from the ipsilateral side to replace the conoid ligament, while artificial ligament was used for reconstructing the trapezoid ligament. Both ligament reconstructions were performed arthroscopically. No temporary fixation of the acromioclavicular joint was performed. On postoperative radiographic evaluation, 4 patients showed subluxation and 2 showed dislocation of the acromioclavicular joint; the other 16 patients had maintained reduction at the final consultation. MR images 1year after surgery clearly revealed the reconstructed ligaments in 19 patients. Only 1 patient showed osteoarthritis of the acromioclavicular joint. Although it requires resection of the ipsilateral palmaris longus for grafting, we believe that anatomic reconstruction of both coracoclavicular ligaments best restores the function of the acromioclavicular joint. 4. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Arthroscopic Anatomic Reconstruction of the Lateral Ligaments of the Ankle With Gracilis Autograft

    PubMed Central

    Guillo, Stéphane; Archbold, Pooler; Perera, Anthony; Bauer, Thomas; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    Lateral ankle sprains are common; if conservative treatment fails and chronic instability develops, stabilization surgery is indicated. Numerous surgical procedures have been described, but those that most closely reproduce normal ankle lateral ligament anatomy and kinematics have been shown to have the best outcomes. Arthroscopy is a common adjunct to open ligament surgery, but it is traditionally only used to improve the diagnosis and the management of any associated intra-articular lesions. The stabilization itself is performed open because standard anterior ankle arthroscopy provides only partial visualization of the anterior talofibular ligament from above and the calcaneofibular ligament attachments cannot be seen at all. However, lateral ankle endoscopy can provide a view of this area that is superior to open surgery. We have developed a technique of ankle endoscopy that enables anatomic positioning of the repair or fixation of the graft. In this article we describe a safe and reproducible arthroscopic anatomic reconstruction of the lateral ligaments of the ankle using a gracilis autograft. The aim of this procedure is to obtain a more physiological reconstruction while maintaining all the advantages of an arthroscopic approach. PMID:25473613

  9. Comparison of clinical efficacy among remifentanil, nicardipine, and remifentanil plus nicardipine continuous infusion for hypotensive anesthesia during arthroscopic shoulder surgery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon Yub; Song, Seong Hun; Cho, Jae Ho; Cho, Hyung Rae

    2017-01-01

    Hypotensive anesthesia is crucial during arthroscopic shoulder surgery to reduce bleeding and allow for clear visibility. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical efficacy of continuous infusion of remifentanil, nicardipine, and remifentanil plus nicardipine to control hypotensive anesthesia in arthroscopic shoulder surgery. For this study, we enrolled 45 consecutive patients who were scheduled to have arthroscopic rotator cuff repair surgery and randomly allocated them into remifentanil (group R, n = 15), nicardipine (group N, n = 15), and remifentanil plus nicardipine (group RN, n = 15) groups. During the surgeries, these drugs were administered with continuous infusion. We analyzed the mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate during surgery, stay time in the recovery room, visual analogue scale (VAS) scores, use of antiemetics in the recovery room, and postoperative blood urea nitrogen and creatinine changes. The VAS score in the recovery room was higher for group R (mean 5.6, SD 1.4) than for groups N (mean 3.9, SD 0.9) and RN (mean 4.0, SD 1.1; p = 0.000). There were no statistical differences regarding other clinical variables among the three groups (all p > 0.05) except for MAP at 120 min of surgery between groups N and RN (N: 84.67 (SD 10.7) mmHg, RN: 65.4 (SD 9.2) mmHg, p = 0.027). The continuous infusion of remifentanil plus nicardipine appeared to be advantageous for maintaining hypotensive anesthesia until 120 min of arthroscopic shoulder surgery without rebound pain in a postanesthesia care unit.

  10. The Biomechanical Role of Scaffolds in Augmented Rotator Cuff Tendon Repairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    failure loads of a human dermal allograft rotator cuff augmentation. Arthroscopy 2008;24:20-4. doi:10.1016/j.arthro.2007.07.013 5. Bartolozzi A...of the cuff. J Bone Joint Surg Am 1991;73-A:982-9. 17. Ide J, Maeda S, Takagi K. A comparison of arthroscopic and open rotator cuff repair. Arthroscopy

  11. Prospective study of the " Inside-Out" arthroscopic ankle ligament technique: Preliminary result.

    PubMed

    Nery, Caio; Fonseca, Lucas; Raduan, Fernando; Moreno, Marcus; Baumfeld, Daniel

    2017-03-22

    Lateral ankle ligament injury is among the most common orthopedic injuries. The objective of this study is to present the preliminary prospective results of treatment using the "Inside-Out" variant of the fully arthroscopic Broström-Gould technique. Twenty six patients were included: 20 male and 6 female, aged 19-60 years, mean 41 years. All patients had positive "anterior drawer" and "talar tilt" tests. When necessary, cartilage injuries were treated with microfracture and arthroscopic resection for anterior impingement; three patients had hindfoot varus, on whom Dwyer osteotomy was performed; one patient had peroneal tendinopathy and was treated with tendoscopic debridement and another one had partial injury of the deltoid ligament, which was treated by direct repair. Two arthroscopic surgery portals were used; the anteromedial and anterolateral. After careful inspection of the joint, the anterior surface of the fibula was cleaned to resect the remains of the anterior talo-fibular ligament. An anchor with two sutures was placed on the anterior aspect of the fibula, 1cm from the distal apex of the malleolus. The sutures were passed through the remnant of the anterior talo-fibular ligament as well as the extensor retinaculum using special curved needles. Duncan knots were used to tie the ligament and the inferior extensor retinaculum while the ankle was kept in a neutral position. Patients were kept immobilized non-weight bearing for 2 weeks and were then allowed to start weight bearing in a removable protective boot for 4 weeks. The patients were able to return to sporting activities 6 months after surgery. After a mean follow-up of 27 months (range 21-36 months), patients were functionally evaluated using the American Orthopedics Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle score. The mean preoperative value was 58 points, while the mean postoperative value increased to 90 points. One patient had paresthesia in the superficial fibular nerve area, which resolved

  12. Effects of Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields on Return to Sports After Arthroscopic Debridement and Microfracture of Osteochondral Talar Defects: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter Trial.

    PubMed

    Reilingh, Mikel L; van Bergen, Christiaan J A; Gerards, Rogier M; van Eekeren, Inge C; de Haan, Rob J; Sierevelt, Inger N; Kerkhoffs, Gino M M J; Krips, Rover; Meuffels, Duncan E; van Dijk, C N; Blankevoort, Leendert

    2016-05-01

    Osteochondral defects (OCDs) of the talus usually affect athletic patients. The primary surgical treatment consists of arthroscopic debridement and microfracture. Various possibilities have been suggested to improve the recovery process after debridement and microfracture. A potential solution to obtain this goal is the application of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs), which stimulate the repair process of bone and cartilage. The use of PEMFs after arthroscopic debridement and microfracture of an OCD of the talus leads to earlier resumption of sports and an increased number of patients that resume sports. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. A total of 68 patients were randomized to receive either PEMFs (n = 36) or placebo (n = 32) after arthroscopic treatment of an OCD of the talus. The primary outcomes (ie, the number of patients who resumed sports and time to resumption of sports) were analyzed with Kaplan-Meier curves as well as Mann-Whitney U, chi-square, and log-rank tests. Secondary functional outcomes were assessed with questionnaires (American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score, Foot and Ankle Outcome Score, EuroQol, and numeric rating scales for pain and satisfaction) at multiple time points up to 1-year follow-up. To assess bone repair, computed tomography scans were obtained at 2 weeks and 1 year postoperatively. Almost all outcome measures improved significantly in both groups. The percentage of sport resumption (PEMF, 79%; placebo, 80%; P = .95) and median time to sport resumption (PEMF, 17 weeks; placebo, 16 weeks; P = .69) did not differ significantly between the treatment groups. Likewise, there were no significant between-group differences with regard to the secondary functional outcomes and the computed tomography results. PEMF does not lead to a higher percentage of patients who resume sports or to earlier resumption of sports after arthroscopic debridement and microfracture of talar OCDs. Furthermore, no

  13. Arthroscopy Techniques: The Premier Arthroscopic Video Library.

    PubMed

    Leland, J Martin; Lubowitz, James H; Provencher, Matthew T

    2016-12-01

    Arthroscopy has always been focused on its roots-providing practical, clinically relevant information for the practicing arthroscopist. In the digital age, there is a need for publication platforms dedicated to multimedia presentations, hence the birth of Arthroscopy Techniques, Arthroscopy's online video companion. With over 700 videos, our library is filled with an exceptional collection of arthroscopic educational material, with topics ranging from the basics of arthroscopy to the most complex surgical procedures. One series, published this month, explores elbow arthroscopy with specific attention to describing various elbow portals, patient positioning, and tricks of elbow arthroscopy known only to the masters. If you have yet to view Arthroscopy Techniques, experience the future of arthroscopy today at www.ArthroscopyTechniques.org! Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Arthroscopically Assisted Reconstruction of Acute Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocations: Anatomic AC Ligament Reconstruction With Protective Internal Bracing—The “AC-RecoBridge” Technique

    PubMed Central

    Izadpanah, Kaywan; Jaeger, Martin; Ogon, Peter; Südkamp, Norbert P.; Maier, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    An arthroscopically assisted technique for the treatment of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocations is presented. This pathology-based procedure aims to achieve anatomic healing of both the acromioclavicular ligament complex (ACLC) and the coracoclavicular ligaments. First, the acromioclavicular joint is reduced anatomically under macroscopic and radiologic control and temporarily transfixed with a K-wire. A single-channel technique using 2 suture tapes provides secure coracoclavicular stabilization. The key step of the procedure consists of the anatomic repair of the ACLC (“AC-Reco”). Basically, we have observed 4 patterns of injury: clavicular-sided, acromial-sided, oblique, and midportion tears. Direct and/or transosseous ACLC repair is performed accordingly. Then, an X-configured acromioclavicular suture tape cerclage (“AC-Bridge”) is applied under arthroscopic assistance to limit horizontal clavicular translation to a physiological extent. The AC-Bridge follows the principle of internal bracing and protects healing of the ACLC repair. The AC-Bridge is tightened on top of the repair, creating an additional suture-bridge effect and promoting anatomic ACLC healing. We refer to this combined technique of anatomic ACLC repair and protective internal bracing as the “AC-RecoBridge.” A detailed stepwise description of the surgical technique, including indications, technical pearls and pitfalls, and potential complications, is given. PMID:26052493

  15. Arthroscopic knee anatomy in young achondroplasia patients

    PubMed Central

    del Pilar Duque Orozco, M.; Record, N. C.; Rogers, K. J; Bober, M. B.; Mackenzie, W. G.; Atanda, A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Purpose Achondroplasia is the most common form of skeletal dysplasia, affecting more than 250 000 individuals worldwide. In these patients, the developing knee undergoes multiple anatomical changes. The purpose of this study was to characterise the intra-articular knee anatomy in children with achondroplasia who underwent knee arthroscopy. Methods Records of achondroplasia patients who underwent knee arthroscopy between 2009 and 2014 were reviewed. Demographic data, operative reports, follow-up notes, MRI and arthroscopy images were reviewed. Bony, cartilaginous and ligamentous changes were noted. The trochlea sulcus angle was measured from intra-operative arthroscopic images. Results A total of 12 knee arthroscopies in nine patients were performed. The mean age at surgery was 16.9 years (12 to 22). In all patients, the indication for surgery was knee pain and/or mechanical symptoms that were refractory to non-operative treatment. Three anatomical variations involving the distal femur were found in all knees: a deep femoral trochlea; a high A-shaped intercondylar notch; and a vertically oriented anterior cruciate ligament. The average trochlea sulcus angle measured 123°. Pathology included: synovial plica (one knee); chondral lesions (three knees); discoid lateral meniscus (11 knees); and meniscal tears (six knees). All patients were pain-free and returned to normal activity at final follow-up. Conclusion Children with achondroplasia have characteristic distal femur anatomy noted during knee arthroscopy. These variations should be considered normal during knee arthroscopy in these patients. Arthroscopic findings confirmed previous MRI findings within this specific population with the addition of a deep trochlear groove which was not previously reported. PMID:28828058

  16. Part II: arthroscopic treatment of tibial plateau fractures: intercondylar eminence avulsion fractures.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H; Elson, Wylie S; Guttmann, Dan

    2005-01-01

    Arthroscopic reduction and internal fixation (ARIF) of tibial intercondylar eminence fractures is the emerging state-of-the-art. ARIF is recommended for displaced type III fractures and should be considered for all cases of displaced type II fractures. Fractures without displacement after closed reduction require careful evaluation to rule out meniscal entrapment. Subjective results of ARIF are uniformly excellent, despite reports of objective anteroposterior laxity. Early range-of-motion exercises are essential to prevent loss of extension. Repair using nonabsorbable suture fixation, when of adequate strength to allow early range-of-motion, has the advantages of eliminating the risks of comminution of the fracture fragment, posterior neurovascular injury, and need for hardware removal, compared with ARIF using screws.

  17. Chiropractic Management of a Patient With Perineal Numbness After Arthroscopic Hip Surgery: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Olson, Harold M; Zetocha, Andrew J; Olson, Courtney A

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this case report is to describe the chiropractic management of a patient with postoperative perineal numbness as a result of hip arthroscopy. A female patient presented to a chiropractic clinic with 7 weeks of ongoing perineal numbness after right hip arthroscopic surgery with labral repair. The patient reported lack of sensation during urination, sexual intercourse, and the insertion and removal of female hygienic products into the vagina. Conservative care included myofascial therapy to the psoas and obturator internus muscles and instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization over the obturator internus. Manual manipulation to the pelvis was also performed. The patient reported complete resolution of perineal numbness after 3 chiropractic treatments. With conservative chiropractic management, full resolution of sensation for this patient was achieved.

  18. Arthroscopic treatment of femoral nerve paresthesia caused by an acetabular paralabral cyst.

    PubMed

    Kanauchi, Taira; Suganuma, Jun; Mochizuki, Ryuta; Uchikawa, Shinichi

    2014-05-01

    This report describes a rare case of femoral nerve paresthesia caused by an acetabular paralabral cyst of the hip joint. A 68-year-old woman presented with a 6-month history of right hip pain and paresthesia along the anterior thigh and radiating down to the anterior aspect of the knee. Radiography showed osteoarthritis with a narrowed joint space in the right hip joint. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a cyst with low T1- and high T2-weighted signal intensity arising from a labral tear at the anterior aspect of the acetabulum. The cyst was connected to the joint space and displaced the femoral nerve to the anteromedial side. The lesion was diagnosed as an acetabular paralabral cyst causing femoral neuropathy. Because the main symptom was femoral nerve paresthesia and the patient desired a less invasive procedure, arthroscopic labral repair was performed to stop synovial fluid flow to the paralabral cyst that was causing the femoral nerve paresthesia. After surgery, the cyst and femoral nerve paresthesia disappeared. At the 18-month follow-up, the patient had no recurrence. There have been several reports of neurovascular compression caused by the cyst around the hip joint. To the authors' knowledge, only 3 cases of acetabular paralabral cysts causing sciatica have been reported. The current patient appears to represent a rare case of an acetabular paralabral cyst causing femoral nerve paresthesia. The authors suggest that arthroscopic labral repair for an acetabular paralabral cyst causing neuropathy can be an option for patients who desire a less invasive procedure. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Sports-specific differences in postsurgical infections after arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Krutsch, Werner; Zellner, Johannes; Zeman, Florian; Nerlich, Michael; Koch, Matthias; Pfeifer, Christian; Angele, Peter

    2017-12-01

    Post-operative infection after arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a rare but severe complication, particularly for young and active patients. It is unclear whether the prevalence of knee infection is correlated with the type of sports or the level of performance. From 2008 to 2012, the internal single-centre ACL registry of the FIFA Medical Centre of Excellence Regensburg was retrospectively screened for sex, age, time between isolated primary ACL rupture and surgery, surgical technique, rate of infection after ACL reconstruction and the type of sports practised. In total, 4801 ACL reconstructions had been conducted over 5 years, 4579 in amateur and 221 in professional athletes. After application of the exclusion criteria, 1809 athletes with ACL reconstruction were analysed regarding postsurgical infection and the type of sports practised. Professionals and amateurs did not significantly differ with regard to infection rates (n.s.) but in the timing of ACL repair (p < 0.001). Eleven of 1130 football players had developed postsurgical infection after ACL reconstruction (1.0%) in contrast to 557 skiers and snowboarders without infection (p = 0.02). The timing of ACL repair did not differ between the different types of sports (n.s.). Staphylococcus aureus and epidermidis were the predominant detected bacteria. All patients were hospitalised and successfully treated with arthroscopic lavage and antibiotic medication. ACL infections showed sports-related differences. Athletes practising summer outdoor sports such as football had a significantly higher risk of infection after ACL reconstruction than winter sports athletes. No difference was found between professional and amateur athletes. Relevant prevention strategies for postsurgical ACL infections should consider influencing patient factors such as the type of sports activity and attendant circumstances. III.

  20. Evaluation of footprint contact area and pressure using a triple-row modification of the suture-bridge technique for rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Ostrander, Roger V; McKinney, Bart I

    2012-10-01

    Studies suggest that arthroscopic repair techniques may have high recurrence rates for larger rotator cuff tears. A more anatomic repair may improve the success rate when performing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. We hypothesized that a triple-row modification of the suture-bridge technique for rotator cuff repair would result in significantly more footprint contact area and pressure between the rotator cuff and the humeral tuberosity. Eighteen ovine infraspinatus tendons were repaired using 1 of 3 simulated arthroscopic techniques: a double-row repair, the suture-bridge technique, and a triple-row repair. The triple-row repair technique is a modification of the suture-bridge technique that uses an additional reducing anchor between the medial and lateral rows. Six samples were tested per group. Pressure-indicating film was used to measure the footprint contact area and pressure after each repair. The triple-row repair resulted in significantly more rotator cuff footprint contact area and contact pressure compared with the double-row technique and the standard suture-bridge technique. No statistical difference in contact area or contact pressure was found between the double-row technique and the suture-bridge technique. The triple-row technique for rotator cuff repair results in significantly more footprint contact area and contact pressure compared with the double-row and standard suture-bridge techniques. This more anatomic repair may improve the healing rate when performing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Combined Fluoroscopic and Arthroscopic Detection and Removal of a Foreign Body Lost During Elective Shoulder Arthroscopy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Schmiddem, Uli; Hawi, N; Suero, E M; Meller, R

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of a lost metal platelet from a radiofrequency ablation probe (VAPR VUE Radiofrequency System, Cool Pulse 90, DePuy, Synthes, Switzerland) in the shoulder joint during elective arthroscopic cuff repair. To the best of our knowledge, this kind of an incident during elective arthroscopy has not been described in the literature so far. In addition, we present an algorithm on how to deal with such an incident. A 69-year-old woman underwent an arthroscopic subacromial decompression and rotator cuff repair for a torn supraspinatus tendon. While performing the subacromial decompression and after swapping the portals from lateral to posterior, the metal platelet of the electrocautery device got detached from the instrument and lost in the operation field. Several attempts to visualize the lost platelet with the camera failed. Finally, intraoperative fluoroscopic imaging was used to detect the platelet. To confirm the definitive whereabouts of the platelet, two spinal needles were positioned perpendicular to another under x-ray control, both pointing at the missing platelet. After determining the exact location, the platelet could finally be visualized with the camera and removed. Due to this incident, the operation time was extended extensively, and the patient as well as the theatre team was exposed to an unnecessary amount of radiation. This report indicates that an extraordinary incident such as the detachment of a component of the arthroscopic equipment during surgery is possible and should be kept in mind by the surgeon. Therefore, we believe that it is essential to perform a test of integrity at least at the end of every operation. In addition, we are presenting an algorithm on how to deal with the situation of a lost foreign body during arthroscopy, which can be applied to any joint.

  2. [Diagnostic significance of "bay sign" of medial meniscus under arthroscope in medial collateral ligament rupture of knee].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wentao; Zhang, Xintao; Huang, Wei

    2012-03-01

    When knee medial collateral ligament (MCL) rupture, the upper surface of medial meniscus is exposed totally, like the gulf panoramic, which is called "panoramic views of the bay sign" or the "bay sign". To investigate the reliability and significance of the "bay sign" in diagnosis of knee MCL rupture under arthroscope. Between March 2007 and March 2011, 127 patients with knees injuries were divided into the observation group (n = 59) and control group (n = 68) based on the MRI results. In the observation group, 59 patients had MCL rupture by MRI, including 12 cases of MCL injury alone, 16 cases of MCL injury with lateral meniscus torn, 27 cases of MCL injury with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, 3 cases of MCL injury with ACL and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury, and 1 case of MCL injury with patellar dislocation; there were 38 males and 21 females with an average age of 23.2 years (range, 16-39 years). In the control group, 68 patients had no MCL rupture by MRI, including 38 cases of ACL injury, 4 cases of ACL and PCL injury, and 26 cases of ACL and lateral meniscus injury; there were 45 males and 23 females with an average age of 31.8 years (range, 25-49 years). The "bay sign" was observed under arthroscope in 2 groups before and after operation. The positive "bay sign" was seen under arthroscope in the patients of the observation group before MCL repair; the "bay sign" disappeared after repair. No "bay sign" was seen in patients of the control group before and after ACL reconstruction. The "bay sign" is a reliable diagnostic evidence of MCL injury. It can be used as a basis to judge the success of MCL reconstruction during operation.

  3. Arthroscopic Treatment of a Displaced Nonunion of the Anterior Inferior Iliac Spine Causing Extra-articular Impingement.

    PubMed

    Shibahara, Motoi; Ohnishi, Yasuo; Honda, Eisaburo; Matsuda, Dean K; Uchida, Soshi

    2017-07-01

    This report describes a case of nonunion of an anterior inferior iliac spine (AIIS) apophyseal avulsion fracture with resultant subspine impingement combined with symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). A 16-year-old male soccer player presented with a 6-month history of right groin pain exacerbated by kicking and running. The patient was diagnosed with a displaced nonunion of the AIIS apophysis avulsion fracture causing secondary extra-articular impingement beyond cam-type FAI by physical examination and radiological findings. The authors performed arthroscopic AIIS decompression, with concurrent FAI correction and labral repair and capsular closure. At 4 months after surgery, a radiograph and a computed tomography scan showed complete bony union of the AIIS apophyseal nonunion. Modified Harris Hip Sore and Nonarthritic Hip Score improved from 74.8 and 61, respectively, to 100 for both at final follow-up. The effectiveness of arthroscopic decompression of the AIIS as part of a comprehensive minimally invasive surgery including FAI correction and labral repair resulted in complete union of the AIIS and pain-free return to sport and bony union. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(4):e725-e728.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Rotator cuff repair with all-suture anchors: a midterm magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of repair integrity and cyst formation.

    PubMed

    Van der Bracht, Hans; Van den Langenbergh, Tom; Pouillon, Marc; Verhasselt, Skrallan; Verniers, Philippe; Stoffelen, Danny

    2018-05-22

    This study investigated the feasibility and safety of all-suture anchors in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. All patients were diagnosed with a rotator cuff tear by ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients with partial tears, massive tears, subscapularis tears, or previous shoulder surgery, were excluded. MRI and clinical outcome were investigated in all patients at 1.58 years (range, 1.0-2.0 years) after rotator cuff repair with all-suture anchors (prospective case series). Integrity of the cuff repair, cyst formation (encapsulated fluid signal around the anchor), ingrowth of the bone into the anchor, and integrity of the bone tunnel border were evaluated for 47 anchors. Clinical results were evaluated using the Constant-Murley score. An MRI evaluation was performed in 20 patients at 1.58 years (range, 1.0-2.0 years) after rotator cuff repair with all-suture anchors. MRI evaluation showed a very small rim of fluid around 10% of the anchors. None of the anchors showed cyst formation with fluid diameter more than twice the anchor diameter. In approximately 90% of the anchors, no fluid could be detected between the anchors and the edge of the bony tunnel. Full rotator cuff integrity was seen in 19 patients. Only 1 patient sustained a retear. Clinical results comparable with an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair using classic anchors were seen. This prospective clinical cohort study shows promising early radiographic and clinical results after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair using all-suture anchors. Copyright © 2018 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Medical Malpractice Litigation Following Arthroscopic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kalpit N; Eltorai, Adam E M; Perera, Sudheesha; Durand, Wesley M; Shantharam, Govind; Owens, Brett D; Daniels, Alan H

    2018-04-10

    Our study aims to analyze a variety of factors involving malpractice lawsuits following arthroscopy, focusing on reasons for lawsuit and establishing predictors for the outcome of the lawsuit. Two legal databases, VerdictSearch and Westlaw, were queried for arthroscopic cases in adult patients. For all included cases, clinical and demographic data were recorded. The effects of plaintiff demographics, joint involved, lawsuit allegation, case ruling, and size of indemnity payments were assessed. Of the 240 included cases, 62 (26%) resulted in plaintiff verdict, 160 (67%) resulted in defense verdict, and 18 (8%) were settled without trial. Plaintiff demographics (age and sex) had no effect on the case ruling. There was no statistical difference between indemnity awards for plaintiff verdicts ($1,013,494) and settled cases ($848,331; P = .13). Patient death was noted in 20 cases (8.3%); a significantly higher proportion of these cases were settled versus went to trial (P = .0022), including 19 patients (95%) who had knee arthroscopy and 16 deaths (80%) resulting from a pulmonary embolus. Plaintiff verdict or settlement were seen significantly more frequently for vascular complications and wrong-sided surgery. Alternatively, defense verdicts followed lawsuits alleging surgeon technical error. Wrong-sided surgery, retained instruments, deep venous thrombosis, and postoperative infections were seen at a significantly higher proportion after knee arthroscopy than after arthroscopy of other joints. Similarly, neurological injury was significantly associated with elbow and hip arthroscopy, while allegations of technical error by the surgeon and block-related complications were associated with shoulder arthroscopy. Plaintiff verdict or settlement were seen for vascular complications and wrong-sided surgery, while defense verdicts followed lawsuits alleging surgeon technical error and block-related complications. We also identified types of allegations that were associated

  6. Arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis with intra-articular distraction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyong Nyun; Jeon, June Young; Noh, Kyu Cheol; Kim, Hong Kyun; Dong, Quanyu; Park, Yong Wook

    2014-01-01

    Arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis has shown high rates of union comparable to those with open arthrodesis but with substantially less postoperative morbidity, shorter operative times, less blood loss, and shorter hospital stays. To easily perform arthroscopic resection of the articular cartilage, sufficient distraction of the joint is necessary to insert the arthroscope and instruments. However, sometimes, standard noninvasive ankle distraction will not be sufficient in post-traumatic ankle arthritis, with the development of arthrofibrosis and joint contracture after severe ankle trauma. In the present report, we describe a technique to distract the ankle joint by inserting a 4.6-mm stainless steel cannula with a blunt trocar inside the joint. The cannula allowed sufficient intra-articular distraction, and, at the same time, a 4.0-mm arthroscope can be inserted through the cannula to view the joint. Screws can be inserted to fix the joint under fluoroscopic guidance without changing the patient's position or removing the noninvasive distraction device and leg holder, which are often necessary during standard arthroscopic arthrodesis with noninvasive distraction. Copyright © 2014 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Using the arthroscopic surgery skill evaluation tool as a pass-fail examination.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Ryan J; Nicandri, Gregg T

    2013-12-04

    Examination of arthroscopic skill requires evaluation tools that are valid and reliable with clear criteria for passing. The Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool was developed as a video-based assessment of technical skill with criteria for passing established by a panel of experts. The purpose of this study was to test the validity and reliability of the Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool as a pass-fail examination of arthroscopic skill. Twenty-eight residents and two sports medicine faculty members were recorded performing diagnostic knee arthroscopy on a left and right cadaveric specimen in our arthroscopic skills laboratory. Procedure videos were evaluated with use of the Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool by two raters blind to subject identity. Subjects were considered to pass the Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool when they attained scores of ≥ 3 on all eight assessment domains. The raters agreed on a pass-fail rating for fifty-five of sixty videos rated with an interclass correlation coefficient value of 0.83. Ten of thirty participants were assigned passing scores by both raters for both diagnostic arthroscopies performed in the laboratory. Receiver operating characteristic analysis demonstrated that logging more than eighty arthroscopic cases or performing more than thirty-five arthroscopic knee cases was predictive of attaining a passing Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool score on both procedures performed in the laboratory. The Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool is valid and reliable as a pass-fail examination of diagnostic arthroscopy of the knee in the simulation laboratory. This study demonstrates that the Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool may be a useful tool for pass-fail examination of diagnostic arthroscopy of the knee in the simulation laboratory. Further study is necessary to determine whether the Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool can be used for the assessment of multiple

  8. Simulation of arthroscopic surgery using MRI data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heller, Geoffrey; Genetti, Jon

    1994-01-01

    With the availability of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technology in the medical field and the development of powerful graphics engines in the computer world the possibility now exists for the simulation of surgery using data obtained from an actual patient. This paper describes a surgical simulation system which will allow a physician or a medical student to practice surgery on a patient without ever entering an operating room. This could substantially lower the cost of medial training by providing an alternative to the use of cadavers. This project involves the use of volume data acquired by MRI which are converted to polygonal form using a corrected marching cubes algorithm. The data are then colored and a simulation of surface response based on springy structures is performed in real time. Control for the system is obtained through the use of an attached analog-to-digital unit. A remote electronic device is described which simulates an imaginary tool having features in common with both arthroscope and laparoscope.

  9. Arthroscopic Anatomy of the Ankle Joint.

    PubMed

    Ray, Ronald G

    2016-10-01

    There are a number of variations in the intra-articular anatomy of the ankle which should not be considered pathological under all circumstances. The anteromedial corner of the tibial plafond (between the anterior edge of the tibial plafond and the medial malleolus) can have a notch, void of cartilage and bone. This area can appear degenerative arthroscopically; it is actually a normal variant of the articular surface. The anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (AITF) can possess a lower, accessory band which can impinge on the anterolateral edge of the talar dome. In some cases it can cause irritation along this area of the talus laterally. If it is creating local irritation it can be removed since it does not provide any additional stabilization to the syndesmosis. There is a beveled region at the anterior leading edge of the lateral and dorsal surfaces of the talus laterally. This triangular region is void of cartilage and subchondral bone. The lack of talar structure in this region allows the lower portion of the AITF ligament to move over the talus during end range dorsiflexion of the ankle, preventing impingement. The variation in talar anatomy for this area should not be considered pathological. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Arthroscopic debridement for soft tissue ankle impingement.

    PubMed

    Brennan, S A; Rahim, F; Dowling, J; Kearns, S R

    2012-06-01

    To assess the response to treatment in patients with soft tissue impingement of the ankle managed with arthroscopic debridement. Forty-one ankle arthroscopies were performed for soft tissue impingement between April 2007 and April 2009. There were 26 men and 15 women and the mean age was 30.1 years. Arthroscopy was performed on an average of 21 months after injury. The Visual-Analogue-Scale Foot and Ankle (VASFA) score and Meislin's criteria were used to assess the response to treatment. The mean pre-operative VASFA score was 44.5. This increased to 78.3 postoperatively (p < 0.0001). According to Meislin's criteria, there were 34 good or excellent results, five fair and two poor results. Pre-operative magnetic resonance imaging was useful in detecting tears of the anterior talofibular ligament and excluding osteochondral defects; however, synovitis and soft tissue impingement was under-reported. Arthroscopy is an effective method for the diagnoses and treatment of soft tissue impingement of the ankle joint. This condition is under-reported on MRI.

  11. Arthroscopic bursectomy for recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis after hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Van Hofwegen, Christopher; Baker, Champ L; Savory, Carlton G; Baker, Champ L

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the use of arthroscopic bursectomy for pain relief in patients with trochanteric bursitis after hip arthroplasty. In this retrospective case series of 12 patients undergoing arthroscopic treatment of recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis after hip arthroplasty, outcomes were assessed via phone interview with a numeric pain rating scale from 1 to 10 and were compared with preoperative pain ratings. Patients were asked the percentage of time they had painless hip function and whether they would have the surgery again. At an average 36-month follow-up (range, 4-85 months), the average numeric pain scale rating improved from 9.3 to 3.3. At an average of 62% of the time, patients had painless use of the hip. Ten of 12 patients in the study felt the pain relief gained was substantial enough to warrant having procedure again. In these patients, arthroscopic bursectomy was a viable option for patients with recalcitrant bursitis after hip arthroplasty.

  12. The spiral glenohumeral ligament: an open and arthroscopic anatomy study.

    PubMed

    Merila, Mati; Heliö, Harri; Busch, Lüder C; Tomusk, Hannes; Poldoja, Elle; Eller, Aalo; Kask, Kristo; Haviko, Tiit; Kolts, Ivo

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to visualize arthroscopically and to describe the micro- and macroscopic anatomy of the poorly known ligament of the anterior capsule of the glenohumeral joint: the so-called ligamentum glenohumerale spirale (spiral GHL). Twenty-two fresh shoulder joints were dissected, and the anatomy of the anterior capsular structures (the spiral GHL, the middle glenohumeral ligament [MGHL], and the anterior band as well as the axillary part of the inferior glenohumeral ligament [AIGHL and AxIGHL, respectively]) was investigated. For arthroscopic visualization, 30 prospective arthroscopic clinical cases and 19 retrospective video clips of the patients who had an arthroscopic shoulder procedure with a normal subscapularis tendon, labrum, and anterior joint capsule were evaluated. The spiral GHL and the AxIGHL were present in all 22 shoulder specimens. The AIGHL was not recognizable on the extra-articular side of the joint capsule. The MGHL was absent in 3 shoulder specimens (13.6%). Arthroscopically, the spiral GHL was found in 22 (44.9%), the MGHL in 43 (87.8%), and the AIGHL in 46 (93.9%) of the cases. The spiral GHL arose from the infraglenoid tubercle and the triceps tendon and inserted together with subscapularis tendon onto the lesser tubercle of the humerus. Our results suggest that extra-articular structure of the spiral GHL is consistently recognizable, the upper part of which can be arthroscopically identified. Advanced anatomic knowledge of the spiral GHL helps the clinician better understand the normal anatomy of the shoulder joint and also helps to differentiate it from pathologic findings of the patient. The biomechanical importance of the spiral GHL and its connection with shoulder pathology remains to be determined in further studies.

  13. CO2 laser arthroscopy-through the arthroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrick, James G.

    1990-06-01

    Orthopedists have been among the last of the specialists to utilize lasers in surgery. Even today, laser usage in orthopedics is almost exclusively limited to arthroscopy procedures. Although other types of lasers have been approved for use in orthopedics, nearly all laser-assisted arthroscopic procedures have involved the carbon dioxide laser in the knee. These techniques involve skills and problems not previously encountered. In an attempt to simplify the usage and circumvent some of the problems, we describe a means of laser energy delivery through the arthroscope.

  14. Arthroscopic Decompression of a Type III Subspine Impingement.

    PubMed

    Ilizaliturri, Víctor M; Arriaga Sánchez, Rubén; Suarez-Ahedo, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    Extra-articular hip impingement refers to a variety of hip disorders causing pain and limited function in young, non-arthritic patients. Recently, there has been an increased focus on analyzing the degree of anterior inferior iliac spine (AIIS) dysmorphism and its correlation with subspine impingement (SSI), defined as abutment between a prominent distal aspect of the AIIS and the anterior aspect of the femoral head-neck junction. Arthroscopic decompression of the AIIS is recognized as an effective treatment for SSI. However, there may be some inherent risks of performing this procedure arthroscopically that require further investigation.

  15. Arthroscopic skills assessment and use of box model for training in arthroscopic surgery using Sawbones – “FAST” workstation

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Saumitra; Radi, Mohamed Abdel; Ramadan, Islam Karam-allah; Said, Hatem Galal

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Arthroscopic skills training outside the operative room may decrease risks and errors by trainee surgeons. There is a need of simple objective method for evaluating proficiency and skill of arthroscopy trainees using simple bench model of arthroscopic simulator. The aim of this study is to correlate motor task performance to level of prior arthroscopic experience and establish benchmarks for training modules. Methods: Twenty orthopaedic surgeons performed a set of tasks to assess a) arthroscopic triangulation, b) navigation, c) object handling and d) meniscus trimming using SAWBONES “FAST” arthroscopy skills workstation. Time to completion and the errors were computed. The subjects were divided into four levels; “Novice”, “Beginner”, “Intermediate” and “Advanced” based on previous arthroscopy experience, for analyses of performance. Results: The task performance under transparent dome was not related to experience of the surgeon unlike opaque dome, highlighting the importance of hand-eye co-ordination required in arthroscopy. Median time to completion for each task improved as the level of experience increased and this was found to be statistically significant (p < .05) e.g. time for maze navigation (Novice – 166 s, Beginner – 135.5 s, Intermediate – 100 s, Advance – 97.5 s) and the similar results for all tasks. Majority (>85%) of subjects across all the levels reported improvement in performance with sequential tasks. Conclusion: Use of the arthroscope requires visuo-spatial coordination which is a skill that develops with practice. This simple box model can reliably differentiate the arthroscopic skills based on experience and can be used to monitor progression of skills of trainees in institutions. PMID:27801643

  16. Fundamentals of Arthroscopic Surgery Training Program Improves Knee Arthroscopy Simulator Performance in Arthroscopic Trainees.

    PubMed

    Cychosz, Chris C; Tofte, Josef N; Johnson, Alyssa; Gao, Yubo; Phisitkul, Phinit

    2018-05-01

    To determine the effectiveness of a nonanatomic simulator in developing basic arthroscopy motor skills transferable to an anatomic model. Forty-three arthroscopy novice individuals currently enrolled in medical school were recruited to perform a diagnostic knee arthroscopy using a high-fidelity virtual reality arthroscopic simulator providing haptic feedback after viewing a video of an expert performing an identical procedure. Students were then randomized into an experimental or control group. The experimental group then completed a series of self-guided training modules using the fundamentals of arthroscopy simulator training nonanatomic modules including camera centering, tracking, periscoping, palpation, and collecting stars in a three-dimensional space. Both groups completed another diagnostic knee arthroscopy between 1 and 2 weeks later. Camera path length, time, tibia and femur cartilage damage, as well as a composite score were recorded by the simulator on each attempt. The experimental group (n = 22) showed superior performance in composite score (30.09 vs 24, P = .046) and camera path length (71.51 cm vs 109.07 cm, P = .0274) at the time of the second diagnostic knee arthroscope compared with the control group (n = 21). The experimental group also showed significantly greater improvement in composite score between the first and second arthroscopes compared with the control group (14.27 vs 4.95, P < .01). Femoral and tibial cartilage damage were not significantly improved between arthroscopy attempts (-0.86% vs -1.45%, P = .40) and (-1.10 vs -1.27%, P = .83), respectively. The virtual reality-based fundamentals of arthroscopy simulator training nonanatomic simulator is beneficial in developing basic motor skills in arthroscopy novice individuals resulting in significantly greater composite performance in an anatomic knee model. Based on the results of this study, it appears that there may be benefit from nonanatomic simulators in general as part

  17. Arthroscopically assisted elbow interposition arthroplasty without hinged external fixation: surgical technique and patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Aakash; Palmer, Bradley A; Baratz, Mark E

    2015-06-01

    Total elbow arthroplasty is successful in older, lower demand patients but not in the younger, more active individual with severe elbow arthritis. Interposition arthroplasty is an alternative for younger patients who hope to minimize the degree to which arm use is restricted. Interposition arthroplasty traditionally involves release of all ligaments and capsule. As a result, the postoperative care included the use of a hinged external fixator of the elbow to apply distraction and to permit motion during the early phases of healing. We describe a novel surgical technique without a hinged external fixator that allows secure fixation of the interposition graft through arthroscopic assistance and maintains the integrity of the medial collateral ligament with only a takedown and repair of the lateral collateral ligament complex. A retrospective chart review was performed to analyze 4 patients with an average age of 57 years who underwent surgery between 2007 and 2011. The patients were also contacted to assess elbow-specific American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand scores. The average follow-up was 3.6 years (range, 2.5-6 years), and 1 patient was converted to a total elbow arthroplasty after 2.5 years because of persistent pain. The remaining 3 patients have done well with regard to pain control, stability, and functional use of the operative extremity. There were no postoperative complications. On the basis of our small series of patients, an arthroscopically assisted elbow interposition arthroplasty without hinged external fixation can provide satisfactory medium-term outcomes as a salvage procedure for a difficult condition with limited options. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Haptic feedback can provide an objective assessment of arthroscopic skills.

    PubMed

    Chami, George; Ward, James W; Phillips, Roger; Sherman, Kevin P

    2008-04-01

    The outcome of arthroscopic procedures is related to the surgeon's skills in arthroscopy. Currently, evaluation of such skills relies on direct observation by a surgeon trainer. This type of assessment, by its nature, is subjective and time-consuming. The aim of our study was to identify whether haptic information generated from arthroscopic tools could distinguish between skilled and less skilled surgeons. A standard arthroscopic probe was fitted with a force/torque sensor. The probe was used by five surgeons with different levels of experience in knee arthroscopy performing 11 different tasks in 10 standard knee arthroscopies. The force/torque data from the hand and tool interface were recorded and synchronized with a video recording of the procedure. The torque magnitude and patterns generated were analyzed and compared. A computerized system was used to analyze the force/torque signature based on general principles for quality of performance using such measures as economy in movement, time efficiency, and consistency in performance. The results showed a considerable correlation between three haptic parameters and the surgeon's experience, which could be used in an automated objective assessment system for arthroscopic surgery. Level II, diagnostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  19. Systematic arthroscopic investigation of the bovine stifle joint.

    PubMed

    Hagag, U; Tawfiek, M G; Brehm, W

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to establish a protocol for arthroscopic exploration of the bovine stifle joint using craniomedial, caudolateral and caudomedial approaches. An anatomic and arthroscopic study using 26 cadaveric limbs from 13 non-lame adult dairy cows was performed. The craniomedial approach was created between the middle and medial patellar ligaments to investigate the cranial pouches of the stifle joint. The inter-condylar eminence, the proximal aspect of the medial femoral trochlear ridge and the lateral aspect of the lateral femoral condyle were used as starting points for systematic examination of the medial femorotibial, the femoropatellar and the lateral femorotibial joints, respectively. The observed structures were: the suprapatellar pouch, articular surfaces of the patella, femoral trochlear ridges, cruciate ligaments, menisci, and the meniscotibial ligaments. The arthroscopic portal for the caudomedial femorotibial pouch was about 6-8 cm caudal to the medial collateral ligament. The proximal and distal caudolateral femorotibial pouches were explored 3 cm and 1.5 cm caudal to the ipsilateral collateral ligament, respectively. The observed structures were the caudal aspect of femoral condyles, menisci, caudal cruciate ligament, popliteal tendon and the meniscofemoral ligament. Restricted joint size and risk of common peroneal nerve damage were the major limitations for exploration of the caudal femorotibial compartments. The study described the arthroscopic portals and normal intra-articular anatomy of the bovine stifle joint but further investigations are warranted to validate these techniques in clinical cases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Success of Meniscal Repair at ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Toman, Charles; Spindler, Kurt P.; Dunn, Warren R.; Amendola, Annunziata; Andrish, Jack T.; Bergfeld, John A.; Flanigan, David; Jones, Morgan; Kaeding, Christopher C.; Marx, Robert G.; Matava, Matthew J.; McCarty, Eric C.; Parker, Richard D.; Wolcott, Michelle; Vidal, Armando; Wolf, Brian R.; Huston, Laura J.; Harrell, Frank E.; Wright, Rick W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Meniscal repair is performed in an attempt to prevent posttraumatic arthritis resulting from meniscal dysfunction after meniscal tears. The socioeconomic implications of premature arthritis are significant in the young patient population. Investigations and techniques focusing on meniscus preservation and healing are now at the forefront of orthopaedic sports medicine. Hypothesis Concomitant meniscal repair with ACL reconstruction is a durable and successful procedure at two year follow-up. Study Design Case Series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods All unilateral primary ACL reconstructions entered in 2002 in a prospective cohort who had meniscal repair at the time of ACLR were evaluated. Validated patient oriented outcome instruments were completed preoperatively and then again at the two-year postoperative time point. Reoperation after the index procedure was also documented and confirmed by operative reports. Results 437 unilateral primary ACL reconstructions were performed with 86 concomitant meniscal repairs (57 medial, 29 lateral) in 84 patients during the study period. Patient follow-up was obtained on 94% (81/86) of the meniscal repairs, allowing confirmation of meniscal repair success (defined as no repeat arthroscopic procedure) or failure. The overall success rate for meniscal repairs was 96% (76/79 patients) at two-year follow-up. Conclusions Meniscal repair is a successful procedure in conjunction with ACL reconstruction. When confronted with a “repairable” meniscal tear at the time of ACL reconstruction, orthopaedic surgeons can expect an estimated >90% clinical success rate at two-year follow-up using a variety of methods as shown in our study. PMID:19465734

  1. Assessing Arthroscopic Skills Using Wireless Elbow-Worn Motion Sensors.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Georgina S J; Guyver, Paul; Strickland, Louise; Alvand, Abtin; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Hargrove, Caroline; Lo, Benny P L; Rees, Jonathan L

    2015-07-01

    Assessment of surgical skill is a critical component of surgical training. Approaches to assessment remain predominantly subjective, although more objective measures such as Global Rating Scales are in use. This study aimed to validate the use of elbow-worn, wireless, miniaturized motion sensors to assess the technical skill of trainees performing arthroscopic procedures in a simulated environment. Thirty participants were divided into three groups on the basis of their surgical experience: novices (n = 15), intermediates (n = 10), and experts (n = 5). All participants performed three standardized tasks on an arthroscopic virtual reality simulator while wearing wireless wrist and elbow motion sensors. Video output was recorded and a validated Global Rating Scale was used to assess performance; dexterity metrics were recorded from the simulator. Finally, live motion data were recorded via Bluetooth from the wireless wrist and elbow motion