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Sample records for arthroscopic bankart repair

  1. Revision arthroscopic Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Abouali, Jihad Alexander Karim; Hatzantoni, Katerina; Holtby, Richard; Veillette, Christian; Theodoropoulos, John

    2013-09-01

    Failed anterior shoulder stabilization procedures have traditionally been treated with open procedures. Recent advances in arthroscopic techniques have allowed for certain failed stabilization procedures to be treated by arthroscopic surgery. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the outcomes of revision arthroscopic Bankart repair. We searched Medline, Embase, and CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature) for articles on revision arthroscopic Bankart repairs. Key words included shoulder dislocation, anterior shoulder instability, revision surgery, and arthroscopic Bankart repair. Two reviewers selected studies for inclusion, assessed methodologic quality, and extracted data. We included 16 studies comprising 349 patients. All studies were retrospective (1 Level II study and 15 Level IV studies). The mean incidence of recurrent instability after revision arthroscopic Bankart repair was 12.7%, and the mean follow-up period was 35.4 months. The most common cause for failure of the primary surgeries was a traumatic injury (62.1%), and 85.1% of patients returned to playing sports. The reasons for failure of revision cases included glenohumeral bone loss, hyperlaxity, and return to contact sports. With proper patient selection, the outcomes of revision arthroscopic Bankart repair appear similar to those of revision open Bankart repair. Prospective, randomized clinical trials are required to confirm these findings. Level IV, systematic review of Level II and Level IV studies. Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Arthroscopic revision of Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Neri, Brian R; Tuckman, David V; Bravman, Jonathan T; Yim, Duke; Sahajpal, Deenesh T; Rokito, Andrew S

    2007-01-01

    The success of revision surgery for failed Bankart repair is not well known. This purpose of this study was to report the success rates achieved using arthroscopic techniques to revise failed Bankart repairs. Twelve arthroscopic revision Bankart repairs were performed on patients with recurrent unidirectional shoulder instability after open or arthroscopic Bankart repair. Follow-up was available on 11 of the 12 patients at a mean of 34.4 months (range, 25-56 months). The surgical findings, possible modes of failure, shoulder scores (Rowe score, University of California Los Angeles [UCLA], Simple Shoulder Test), and clinical outcome were evaluated. Various modes of failure were recognized during revision arthroscopic Bankart repairs. Good-to-excellent results were obtained in 8 patients (73%) undergoing revision stabilization according to Rowe and UCLA scoring. A subluxation or dislocation event occurred in 3 (27%) of the 11 patients at a mean of 8.7 months (range, 6-12 months) postoperatively. Arthroscopic revision Bankart repairs are technically challenging procedures but can be used to achieve stable, pain-free, functional shoulders with return to prior sport. Owing to limited follow-up and the small number of patients in this study, we were unable to conclude any pattern of failure or selection criteria for this procedure.

  3. Arthroscopic Transosseous Bony Bankart Repair

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Matthew D.; Burns, Joseph P.; Snyder, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Restoration of glenoid bony integrity is critical to minimizing the risk of recurrence and re-creating normal kinematics in the setting of anterior glenohumeral instability. We present an arthroscopic suture anchor–based technique for treating large bony Bankart fractures in which the fragment is secured to the intact glenoid using mattress sutures placed through the bony fragment and augmented with soft-tissue repair proximal and distal to the bony lesion. This straightforward technique has led to excellent fragment reduction and good outcomes in our experience. PMID:25973373

  4. Revision of failed arthroscopic bankart repairs.

    PubMed

    Sisto, Domenick J

    2007-04-01

    The results following open revision surgery following a failed arthroscopic Bankart procedure are not well documented. To evaluate the results of patients with a failed arthroscopic Bankart repair treated with a traditional, open Bankart repair. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Thirty patients (28 male and 2 female) who had a mean age of 24 years (range 15-36) at the time of operation were evaluated. The mean interval from the time of the operation to the final follow-up was 46 months (range 24-55). The rating systems of Rowe and the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) were recorded preoperatively and at the time of the final evaluation. After open repair, mean modified Rowe scores improved from 25 preoperatively to 84.2 points. The results were excellent in 2 (6.7%), good in 24 (80%), and fair in 4 (13.3%); there were no poor results. The UCLA shoulder score improved from a mean of 17 points preoperatively to 29 points (P = .001 for all comparisons). Twenty-six patients (87%) did not have an anchor placement inferior to the 4-o'clock position for a right shoulder or the 8-o'clock position for the left shoulder after the index arthroscopic repair. There were no rotator interval closures performed at the index arthroscopic Bankart repair, and 10 patients (33%) required an interval closure at the open revision procedure. Twenty-five patients (83%) immobilized the operated arm in a sling for less than 2 weeks following the index arthroscopic repair. Patients with failed arthroscopic Bankart repairs can be successfully treated with a revision, open Bankart repair. Inadequate postoperative immobilization, large rotator intervals, and improper anchor placement are possible risk factors that may increase the incidence of failure of an arthroscopic Bankart repair.

  5. Arthroscopic and open Bankart repairs provide similar outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tjoumakaris, Fotios P; Abboud, Joseph A; Hasan, Syed A; Ramsey, Matthew L; Williams, Gerald R

    2006-05-01

    Recurrent instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair has decreased, largely because of improvements in surgical technique. We wanted to know whether there were differences in functional outcomes (using a validated outcomes measure) in patients who had arthroscopic Bankart repair or open Bankart repair for recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability. We retrospectively reviewed 106 patients who had a Bankart repair for recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability from 1998-2001. Of the 93 patients included, 69 patients had arthroscopic Bankart repair and 24 patients had open Bankart repair. The indications for surgery in the two groups were similar. The average age of the patients was 29.9 years (arthroscopic Bankart repair, 31 years; open Bankart repair, 28 years). The followup ranged from 24-77 months. The average modified American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score (PENN score) for pain, satisfaction, and function were 26.3, 8.5, and 55.1, respectively, in the arthroscopic Bankart repair group and 26.6, 8.8, and 54.2, respectively, in the open Bankart repair group. The total score was 90 in the arthroscopic Bankart repair group and 89.5 in the open Bankart repair group. Recurrent instability occurred in one patient in each group. We found no difference in outcomes between the arthroscopic and open Bankart repair groups using patient-assessed outcomes. Therapeutic Study, Level III (retrospective comparative study). See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  6. ORV Arthroscopic Transosseous Bony Bankart Repair.

    PubMed

    Myer, Daniel M; Caldwell, Paul E

    2012-12-01

    The arthroscopic treatment of the "bony Bankart lesion" continues to evolve. We present a novel technique that we developed at Orthopaedic Research of Virginia, the "transosseous bony Bankart repair," which incorporates several essential concepts to provide for optimal healing and rehabilitation. We promote arthroscopic repair emphasizing bone preservation, a fracture interface without interposing sutures, the ability to reduce capsular volume, and multiple points of stable glenolabral fixation. Our technique positions suture anchors within the subchondral bone of the intact glenoid to allow for an anatomic reduction of the bony fragment. By use of an arthroscopic drill, spinal needle, and nitinol suture passing wire, the sutures are passed in a retrograde fashion through the bony Bankart fragment and anterior capsule in a mattress configuration. Additional inferior and superior anchors are placed to further provide stability and reduce capsular volume. While maximizing fracture surface area and optimizing bony healing, the end result is an anatomic reduction of the bony fragment and the glenoid articular surface.

  7. Randomized controlled trial of arthroscopic electrothermal capsulorrhaphy with Bankart repair and isolated arthroscopic Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    McRae, Sheila; Leiter, Jeff; Subramanian, Kanthalu; Litchfield, Robert; MacDonald, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Electrothermal arthroscopic capsulorrhaphy (ETAC) was introduced as an adjunct to shoulder stabilization surgery to address capsular laxity in the treatment of traumatic anterior dislocation. No previous RCT has compared arthroscopic Bankart repair with ETAC of the medial glenohumeral ligament and anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament versus undergoing arthroscopic Bankart repair alone. Our hypothesis was that there would be no difference in quality of life between these two groups. Complication/failure rates were also compared. Eighty-eight patients were randomly assigned to receive arthroscopic Bankart repair with (n = 44) or without ETAC (n = 44). Post-operative visits occurred at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months with WOSI, ASES, and Constant scores completed, and rates of dislocation/subluxation were determined. Data on 74 patients were analysed, with the rest lost to follow-up. There were no differences between groups at any post-surgery time points for WOSI, ASES, or Constant scores (n.s.). Eight patients in the no-ETAC group and 7 in the ETAC group were considered failures (n.s.). No benefits in patient-reported outcome or recurrence rates using ETAC were found. Mean WOSI scores 2 years post-surgery were virtually identical for the two groups. ETAC could not be shown to provide benefit or detriment when combined with arthroscopic labral repair for traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder. II.

  8. Incapacity of work after arthroscopic Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Tobias M; Freude, Thomas; Fiedler, Sebastian; Schröter, Steffen; Stöckle, Ulrich; Ateschrang, Atesch

    2015-10-01

    The incapacity with respect to work following anterior-inferior shoulder dislocation and subsequent Bankart repair has not been previously examined. The objective of this study was to examine a patient's incapacity according to the classification by the REFA Association. The recovery time was measured and the outcome of patients with heavy workload was compared to those with lower workloads. A total of 74 patients who underwent isolated arthroscopic Bankart repair fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The Constant-Murley Score, UCLA Shoulder Score and ROWE Score for Shoulder Instability were recorded for clinical assessment. The mean follow-up time was 43.1 months (SD ± 17.4; 24-110 months) with a mean age of 34.7 years (SD ± 12.6). Workload was classified as per the REFA Association classification system. Postoperative duration of a patient's incapacity with respect to work and other subjective ratings were provided by the patients themselves. The mean incapacity of work was 2.73 months (95 % CI 1.19-5.36). The incapacity of work was 2.06 months (95 % CI 1.55-2.68) in the group with low physical strains at work (REFA 0-1) and 3.40 months (95 % CI 2.70-4.24) in the group with heavy workload (REFA 2-4/p = 0.005). Overall, the mean Constant-Murley Score was 87.7 (SD ± 13.5). The average UCLA Shoulder Score summed up to 31.9 (SD ± 3.87) and the mean ROWE Score was 87.6 (SD ± 21.7). 13 (17.5 %) patients had problems to compete in their jobs. Three patients had to change the job postoperatively. In this study, a relationship between the time of incapacity of work and the workload was observed; patients with low physical strains returned significantly earlier to work after arthroscopic Bankart repair (p = 0.005). In general, the clinical results as measured in the Constant/UCLA/Rowe score were comparable to other studies.

  9. Isolated HAGL lesion after arthroscopic Bankart repair in a professional soccer player.

    PubMed

    Celik, Haluk; Seckin, Mustafa Faik; Kara, Adnan; Akman, Senol

    2017-05-01

    Post-traumatic anterior shoulder instability commonly occurs following an avulsion of capsulolabral complex from glenoid (Bankart lesion) or rarely after humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligaments (HAGL lesion). Arthroscopic Bankart repair offers high success rates of healing. However, trauma following the treatment may cause implant failure or re-avulsion of the treated tissue. We aim to present the diagnosis and treatment of an isolated HAGL lesion in a professional soccer player who had previously undergone arthroscopic Bankart repair.

  10. Open Latarjet procedure for failed arthroscopic Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Flinkkilä, T; Sirniö, K

    2015-02-01

    This retrospective study assessed the functional results of open Latarjet operation for recurrence of instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair in a consecutive series of patients. Fifty two patients (mean age 28.4 [range 17-62] years, 45 men) were operated on using open Latarjet operation after one (n=46) or two (n=6) failed arthroscopic Bankart repairs. The indication for revision surgery was recurrent dislocation or subluxation. Fifty patients had a Hill-Sachs lesion and 32 patients had glenoid bone lesions on plain radiographs. No attempt was made to grade the severity of bony pathology. Functional outcome and stability of 49 shoulders were assessed after an average follow-up of 38 (range 24-85) months using Western Ontario Shoulder Instability (WOSI) score, Oxford shoulder instability score, and subjective shoulder value (SSV). Forty-two patients had a stable shoulder at follow-up. Seven of 49 (14%) had symptoms of instability; one patient had recurrent dislocation, and six patients had subluxations. Mean WOSI, Oxford, and SSV scores were 83.9, 19.9, and 84.9, respectively. All scores were significantly better in patients who had a stable shoulder compared with those who had an unstable shoulder (WOSI 86.8 vs. 64.3; Oxford 18.2 vs. 30.8; and SSV 88.3 vs. 61.7; P<0.01). One patient needed a reoperation. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. Open Latarjet operation is a good option for failed arthroscopic Bankart repair. The instability recurrence rate is acceptable and the reoperation rate was low. Level IV, retrospective case series. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Fuctional outcome after open and arthroscopic bankart repair for traumatic shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Lützner, Jörg; Krummenauer, F; Lübke, J; Kirschner, S; Günther, K-P; Bottesi, M

    2009-01-28

    Both open and arthroscopic Bankart repair are established procedures in the treatment of anterior shoulder instability. While the open procedure is still considered as the "golden standard" functional outcome is supposed to be better in the arthroscopic procedure. The aim of this retrospective study was to compare the functional outcome between open and arthroscopic Bankart repair. In 199 patients a Bankart procedure with suture anchors was performed, either arthroscopically in presence of an detached, but not elongated capsulolabral complex (40) or open (159). After a median time of 31 months (12 to 67 months) 174 patients were contacted and agreed to follow-up, 135 after open and 39 after arthroscopic Bankart procedure. Re-dislocations occurred in 8% after open and 15% after arthroscopic Bankart procedure. After open surgery 4 of the 11 re-dislocations occurred after a new adequate trauma and 1 of the 6 re-dislocations after arthroscopic surgery. Re-dislocations after arthroscopic procedure occurred earlier than after open Bankart repair. An external rotation lag of 20 degrees or more was observed more often (16%) after open than after arthroscopic surgery (3%). The Rowe score demonstrated "good" or "excellent" functional results in 87% after open and in 80% patients after arthroscopic treatment. In this retrospective investigation the open Bankart procedure demonstrated good functional results. The arthroscopic treatment without capsular shift resulted in a better range of motion, but showed a tendency towards more frequently and earlier recurrence of instability. Sensitive patient selection for arthroscopic Bankart repair is recommended especially in patients with more than five dislocations.

  12. Arthroscopic Repair of Posterior Bony Bankart Lesion and Subscapularis Remplissage.

    PubMed

    Luedke, Colten; Tolan, Stefan J; Tokish, John M

    2017-06-01

    Posterior shoulder instability with glenoid bone loss has only a fraction of the prevalence of anterior instability. Unlike the latter, there is a paucity of literature regarding the treatment of posterior bony Bankart lesions and even less with concomitant reverse Hill-Sachs lesions. This combination of pathology leads to a difficult situation regarding treatment options. We present our technique for arthroscopic repair of a posterior bony Bankart lesion and reverse Hill-Sachs lesion. The importance of proper portal placement cannot be overstated. By use of the lateral position and strategically placed portals, the posterior bony Bankart lesion and attached labral complex were appropriately mobilized. We reduced the glenoid bone, with the attached capsulolabral complex, to the glenoid rim and performed fixation using a knotless suture anchor. We then placed 2 double-loaded suture anchors into the reverse Hill-Sachs lesion. The sutures were passed creating horizontal mattress configurations that were tied at the end of the procedure, effectively externalizing the humeral head defect. Our technique results in satisfactory fragment reduction, as well as appropriate capsular tension, and effectively prevents the reverse Hill-Sachs lesion from engaging.

  13. Arthroscopic Repair of a Posterior Bony Bankart Lesion.

    PubMed

    Poehling-Monaghan, Kirsten L; Krych, Aaron J; Dahm, Diane L

    2015-12-01

    Posterior bony defects of the glenoid rim, particularly those associated with instability, are often a frustrating challenge for arthroscopists because of the defects' inaccessibility from standard portals. This challenge is enhanced when the lesion is chronic and fibrous malunion of the fragment makes mobilization difficult. We present our technique for arthroscopic repair of the relatively uncommon chronic posterior bony Bankart lesion. By use of lateral positioning and a standard anterior viewing portal and posterior working portal, as well as a strategically placed posterolateral accessory portal, the lesion is first freed from its malreduced position and ultimately repaired using suture anchor fixation of the bony fragment along with its associated labrum directly to the remaining glenoid rim. This technique, facilitated by precise portal placement, results in satisfactory fragment reduction, appropriate capsular tension, and restoration of anatomy.

  14. Arthroscopic Repair of a Posterior Bony Bankart Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Poehling-Monaghan, Kirsten L.; Krych, Aaron J.; Dahm, Diane L.

    2015-01-01

    Posterior bony defects of the glenoid rim, particularly those associated with instability, are often a frustrating challenge for arthroscopists because of the defects' inaccessibility from standard portals. This challenge is enhanced when the lesion is chronic and fibrous malunion of the fragment makes mobilization difficult. We present our technique for arthroscopic repair of the relatively uncommon chronic posterior bony Bankart lesion. By use of lateral positioning and a standard anterior viewing portal and posterior working portal, as well as a strategically placed posterolateral accessory portal, the lesion is first freed from its malreduced position and ultimately repaired using suture anchor fixation of the bony fragment along with its associated labrum directly to the remaining glenoid rim. This technique, facilitated by precise portal placement, results in satisfactory fragment reduction, appropriate capsular tension, and restoration of anatomy. PMID:26870644

  15. Sporting Activity After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair for Chronic Glenohumeral Instability.

    PubMed

    Plath, Johannes E; Feucht, Matthias J; Saier, Tim; Minzlaff, Philipp; Seppel, Gernot; Braun, Sepp; Imhoff, Andreas B

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to collect detailed data on postoperative sporting activity after arthroscopic Bankart repair for chronic shoulder instability. Of 113 patients who underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair between February 2008 and August 2010, 81 met the inclusion criteria and were surveyed by a specially designed postal sport-specific questionnaire. Of these 81 patients, 66 (82%) were available for evaluation. All previously active patients performed some activity at follow-up. Of 9 patients (56%) who had been inactive, 5 took up new activities postoperatively. Forty-four patients (66%) stated that surgery had (strongly) improved their sporting proficiency. Seventeen patients (26%) reported no impact, and 5 patients (8%) reported a further deterioration compared with preoperatively. The improvement in sporting proficiency was negatively correlated with the preoperative risk level (ρ = 0.42, P < .001), preoperative performance level (ρ = 0.31, P = .012), and preoperative Tegner scale (ρ = 0.36, P = .003), as well as hours of sporting activity per week (ρ = 0.25, P = .042), whereas age showed a positive correlation (ρ = 0.28, P = .023). There was no change in duration, frequency, number of disciplines, Tegner activity scale, risk category, or performance level. Arthroscopic Bankart repair provides a high rate of return to activity among patients treated for chronic shoulder instability. A number of previously inactive patients returned to activity postoperatively. However, one-third of patients reported no benefit from surgery in terms of sporting activity. The improvement in sporting proficiency was highly dependent on the demands on the shoulder in sports, as well as the age of the patient. Overall, there was no significant increase in duration, frequency, number of disciplines, Tegner activity scale, or performance level between preoperative and follow-up evaluation and no increased return to high-risk activities. Level IV, therapeutic

  16. Arthroscopic bony bankart repair using double-threaded headless screw: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kokubu, Takeshi; Nagura, Issei; Mifune, Yutaka; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    We present a case of arthroscopic fixation for bony Bankart lesion using a double-threaded cannulated screw. A 39-year-old man sustained a left shoulder injury from a motorcycle accident. Radiographs showed bony Bankart lesion and CT revealed 40% defect of glenoid articular surface. Arthroscopic fixation was performed using double-threaded cannulated screw after the bony fragment was reduced by suturing the labrum at the edge with a suture anchor. Arthroscopic bony Bankart repair using double-threaded cannulated screw fixation is effective because compression force could be applied between bony fragments and the screw head is not exposed in the glenohumeral joint.

  17. Muscle strength after anterior shoulder stabilization: arthroscopic versus open Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Yong Girl; Lim, Chan Teak; Cho, Nam Su

    2007-11-01

    A number of reports have been made on the muscle strength at the last follow-up after arthroscopic or open Bankart repairs. Few have analyzed the change over time in muscle strength and compared the changes between different operative methods. Muscle strength recovers faster after arthroscopic Bankart repair than after open Bankart repair, and the final muscle strength is not different between the 2 procedures. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Sixty patients with anterior shoulder instability and an isolated Bankart lesion were enrolled for this study. Thirty patients underwent open Bankart repair (open group), and 30 patients went through arthroscopic Bankart repair (arthroscopic group). The open group demonstrated markedly weaker muscle strength during forward elevation than did the arthroscopic group up to 3 months after surgery, but the difference narrowed to about 5% at 6 months (P = .074). At 6 months after surgery, the muscle strength of the open group measured 85.8% +/- 11.5% in forward elevation, 89.5% +/- 10.3% in external rotation, and 89.3% +/- 13.3% in internal rotation. The corresponding figures of the arthroscopic group were 90.6% +/- 8.6%, 92.1% +/- 9.1%, and 92.1% +/- 11.7%. As for external and internal rotations, the open group demonstrated markedly weaker muscle strength 6 weeks after surgery, but the differences were reduced to about 6% and 4%, respectively, at 3 months (P = .092 and .163, respectively). There was no statistically significant difference in final muscle strength 12 months after the operation between the 2 groups (P = .503, .468, and .659, respectively). Muscle strength recovered faster with an arthroscopic procedure than with an open procedure during the early postoperative periods, and strength was restored to the level of the unaffected side at 6 months postoperatively. In the group with open Bankart repairs, the muscle strength during forward elevation recovered slower than did external and internal rotation muscle

  18. Arthroscopic repair of combined Bankart and SLAP lesions: operative techniques and clinical results.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyung Lae; Lee, Choon Key; Hwang, Tae Hyok; Suh, Kuen Tak; Park, Jong Won

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate the clinical results and operation technique of arthroscopic repair of combined Bankart and superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesions, all of which had an anterior-inferior Bankart lesion that continued superiorly to include separation of the biceps anchor in the patients presenting recurrent shoulder dislocations. From May 2003 to January 2006, we reviewed 15 cases with combined Bankart and SLAP lesions among 62 patients with recurrent shoulder dislocations who underwent arthroscopic repair. The average age at surgery was 24.2 years (range, 16 to 38 years), with an average follow-up period of 15 months (range, 13 to 28 months). During the operation, we repaired the unstable SLAP lesion first with absorbable suture anchors and then also repaired Bankart lesion from the inferior to superior fashion. We analyzed the preoperative and postoperative results by visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain, the range of motion, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeon (ASES) and Rowe shoulder scoring systems. We compared the results with the isolated Bankart lesion. VAS for pain was decreased from preoperative 4.9 to postoperative 1.9. Mean ASES and Rowe shoulder scores were improved from preoperative 56.4 and 33.7 to postoperative 91.8 and 94.1, respectively. There were no specific complication and no significant limitation of motion more than 10 degree at final follow-up. We found the range of motions after the arthroscopic repair in combined lesions were gained more slowly than in patients with isolated Bankart lesions. In recurrent dislocation of the shoulder with combined Bankart and SLAP lesion, arthroscopic repair using absorbable suture anchors produced favorable clinical results. Although it has technical difficulty, the concomitant unstable SLAP lesion should be repaired in a manner that stabilizes the glenohumeral joint, as the Bankart lesion can be repaired if the unstable SLAP lesion is repaired first.

  19. Arthroscopic Repair of Combined Bankart and SLAP Lesions: Operative Techniques and Clinical Results

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyung Lae; Lee, Choon Key; Hwang, Tae Hyok; Park, Jong Won

    2010-01-01

    Background To evaluate the clinical results and operation technique of arthroscopic repair of combined Bankart and superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesions, all of which had an anterior-inferior Bankart lesion that continued superiorly to include separation of the biceps anchor in the patients presenting recurrent shoulder dislocations. Methods From May 2003 to January 2006, we reviewed 15 cases with combined Bankart and SLAP lesions among 62 patients with recurrent shoulder dislocations who underwent arthroscopic repair. The average age at surgery was 24.2 years (range, 16 to 38 years), with an average follow-up period of 15 months (range, 13 to 28 months). During the operation, we repaired the unstable SLAP lesion first with absorbable suture anchors and then also repaired Bankart lesion from the inferior to superior fashion. We analyzed the preoperative and postoperative results by visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain, the range of motion, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeon (ASES) and Rowe shoulder scoring systems. We compared the results with the isolated Bankart lesion. Results VAS for pain was decreased from preoperative 4.9 to postoperative 1.9. Mean ASES and Rowe shoulder scores were improved from preoperative 56.4 and 33.7 to postoperative 91.8 and 94.1, respectively. There were no specific complication and no significant limitation of motion more than 10 degree at final follow-up. We found the range of motions after the arthroscopic repair in combined lesions were gained more slowly than in patients with isolated Bankart lesions. Conclusions In recurrent dislocation of the shoulder with combined Bankart and SLAP lesion, arthroscopic repair using absorbable suture anchors produced favorable clinical results. Although it has technical difficulty, the concomitant unstable SLAP lesion should be repaired in a manner that stabilizes the glenohumeral joint, as the Bankart lesion can be repaired if the unstable SLAP lesion is repaired first. PMID

  20. Comparison of Time to Recurrence of Instability After Open and Arthroscopic Bankart Repair Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Mandeep S.; Manzo, Richard L.; Cote, Mark; Ware, James K.; Mazzocca, Augustus D.; Nissen, Carl W.; Shea, Kevin P.; Arciero, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The results of open and arthroscopic instability repairs have been shown to be equivalent in recent literature. Purpose: To compare the time to recurrence (TTR) of instability and disease-specific outcome measures in patients undergoing open and arthroscopic Bankart repair. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Patients with recurrent traumatic anterior shoulder instability and a Bankart lesion on diagnostic arthroscopy underwent either open Bankart repair (OB) or arthroscopic Bankart and suture capsulorrhaphy (ABSC) using suture anchors. There was a minimum follow-up of 24 months. The primary outcome measures included Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI) score and time to recurrence of instability (dislocation or subluxation). Rowe score, Simple Shoulder Test, Constant score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, and Short Form–12 (SF-12) score were also compared. Results: A total of 82 shoulders in 80 patients (ABSC, n = 58; OB, n = 24) were evaluated at a mean of 39 months postoperatively. There were 4 clinical failures in the OB group (4 dislocations) and 7 clinical failures in the ABSC group (2 dislocations and 5 subluxations; P = .72 vs OB). The mean time to recurrence of postoperative instability was significantly shorter in the ABSC group (12.6 ± 2.7 months) compared with the OB group (34.2 ± 12 months; P = .04). The WOSI score in the OB group (265 ± 48.1) was better but not statistically significantly compared with the ABSC group (449.8 ± 63.8; P = .06). Conclusion: The time to recurrence of instability after open Bankart repair is significantly longer compared with arthroscopic Bankart repair. Clinical Relevance: Delayed time to recurrence after open Bankart repair suggests that the open technique may be more suited to withstand the high stress and demands of a heavy-duty profession (contact athletes and heavy manual labor). PMID:27570783

  1. Comparison of Time to Recurrence of Instability After Open and Arthroscopic Bankart Repair Techniques.

    PubMed

    Virk, Mandeep S; Manzo, Richard L; Cote, Mark; Ware, James K; Mazzocca, Augustus D; Nissen, Carl W; Shea, Kevin P; Arciero, Robert A

    2016-06-01

    The results of open and arthroscopic instability repairs have been shown to be equivalent in recent literature. To compare the time to recurrence (TTR) of instability and disease-specific outcome measures in patients undergoing open and arthroscopic Bankart repair. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Patients with recurrent traumatic anterior shoulder instability and a Bankart lesion on diagnostic arthroscopy underwent either open Bankart repair (OB) or arthroscopic Bankart and suture capsulorrhaphy (ABSC) using suture anchors. There was a minimum follow-up of 24 months. The primary outcome measures included Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI) score and time to recurrence of instability (dislocation or subluxation). Rowe score, Simple Shoulder Test, Constant score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, and Short Form-12 (SF-12) score were also compared. A total of 82 shoulders in 80 patients (ABSC, n = 58; OB, n = 24) were evaluated at a mean of 39 months postoperatively. There were 4 clinical failures in the OB group (4 dislocations) and 7 clinical failures in the ABSC group (2 dislocations and 5 subluxations; P = .72 vs OB). The mean time to recurrence of postoperative instability was significantly shorter in the ABSC group (12.6 ± 2.7 months) compared with the OB group (34.2 ± 12 months; P = .04). The WOSI score in the OB group (265 ± 48.1) was better but not statistically significantly compared with the ABSC group (449.8 ± 63.8; P = .06). The time to recurrence of instability after open Bankart repair is significantly longer compared with arthroscopic Bankart repair. Delayed time to recurrence after open Bankart repair suggests that the open technique may be more suited to withstand the high stress and demands of a heavy-duty profession (contact athletes and heavy manual labor).

  2. Results of arthroscopic capsulolabral repair: Bankart lesion versus anterior labroligamentous periosteal sleeve avulsion lesion.

    PubMed

    Ozbaydar, Mehmet; Elhassan, Bassem; Diller, David; Massimini, Daniel; Higgins, Laurence D; Warner, Jon J P

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of arthroscopic capsulolabral repair for traumatic anterior shoulder instability and to compare the outcome in patients who have Bankart lesions versus those with anterior labroligamentous periosteal sleeve avulsion (ALPSA) lesions. This study included 99 patients (93 shoulders), 72 male and 17 female, with a mean age of 32 years, who underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair for traumatic, recurrent anterior shoulder instability, by use of suture anchors. In 67 shoulders (72%) a discrete Bankart lesion was repaired, and in 26 shoulders (28%) an ALPSA lesion was repaired. The 2 groups were analyzed with regard to the number of preoperative dislocations and number of postoperative recurrences. At a mean follow-up of 47 months (range, 24 to 98 months), recurrence of instability was documented in 10 shoulders (10.7%). Of the shoulders, 5 had Bankart lesions (7.4%) and 5 had ALPSA lesions (19.2%) (P = .0501). The mean number of dislocations or subluxations before the index surgery was significantly higher in the ALPSA group (mean, 12.3 [range, 2 to 57]) than in the Bankart group (mean, 4.9 [range, 2 to 24]) (P < .05). However, there were no significant differences in the number of anchors used, incidence of minor glenoid erosion, or incidence of bony Bankart lesions between the groups (P > .05 for all). Patients with ALPSA lesions present with a higher number of recurrent dislocations than those with discrete Bankart lesions. In addition, the failure rate after arthroscopic capsulolabral repair is higher in the ALPSA group than in the Bankart group. Level IV, therapeutic case series.

  3. Revision open Bankart surgery after arthroscopic repair for traumatic anterior shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nam Su; Yi, Jin Woong; Lee, Bong Gun; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2009-11-01

    Only a few studies have provided homogeneous analysis of open revision surgery after a failed arthroscopic Bankart procedure. Open Bankart revision surgery will be effective in a failed arthroscopic anterior stabilization but inevitably results in a loss of range of motion, especially external rotation. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Twenty-six shoulders that went through traditional open Bankart repair as revision surgery after a failed arthroscopic Bankart procedure for traumatic anterior shoulder instability were enrolled for this study. The mean patient age at the time of revision surgery was 24 years (range, 16-38 years), and the mean duration of follow-up was 42 months (range, 25-97 months). The preoperative mean range of motion was 173 degrees in forward flexion and 65 degrees in external rotation at the side. After revision surgery, the ranges measured 164 degrees and 55 degrees, respectively (P = .024 and .012, respectively). At the last follow-up, the mean Rowe score was 81 points, with 88.5% of the patients reporting good or excellent results. After revision surgery, redislocation developed in 3 shoulders (11.5%), all of which had an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion and associated hyperlaxity (2+ or greater laxity on the sulcus sign). Open revision Bankart surgery for a failed arthroscopic Bankart repair can provide a satisfactory outcome, including a low recurrence rate and reliable functional return. In open revision Bankart surgery after failed stabilization for traumatic anterior shoulder instability, the surgeon should keep in mind the possibility of a postoperative loss of range of motion and a thorough examination for not only a Bankart lesion but also other associated lesions, including a bone defect or hyperlaxity, to lower the risk of redislocation.

  4. The Influence of Arthroscopic Remplissage for Engaging Hill-Sachs Lesions Combined with Bankart Repair on Redislocation and Shoulder Function Compared with Bankart Repair Alone

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Sang-Hun; Cha, Jae-Ryong; Hwang, Il-Yeong; Choe, Chang-Gyu; Kim, Min-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Background Recurrence of glenohumeral dislocation after arthroscopic Bankart repair can be associated with a large osseous defect in the posterosuperior part of the humeral head. Our hypothesis is that remplissage is more effective to prevent recurrence of glenohumeral instability without a severe motion deficit. Methods Engaging Hill-Sachs lesions were observed in 48 of 737 patients (6.5%). Twenty-four patients underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair combined with remplissage (group I) and the other 24 patients underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair alone (group II). Clinical outcomes were prospectively evaluated by assessing the range of motion. Complications, recurrence rates, and functional results were assessed utilizing the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, Rowe score, and the Korean Shoulder Score for Instability (KSSI) score. Capsulotenodesis healing after remplissage was evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging. Results The average ASES, Rowe, and KSSI scores were statistically significantly higher in group I than group II. The frequency of recurrence was statistically significantly higher in group II. The average loss in external rotation measured with the arm positioned at the side of the trunk was greater in group II and that in abduction was also higher in group II. Conclusions Compared to single arthroscopic Bankart repair, the remplissage procedure combined with arthroscopic Bankart repair was more effective to prevent the recurrence of anterior shoulder instability without significant impact on shoulder mobility in patients who had huge Hill-Sachs lesions. PMID:27904726

  5. The Influence of Arthroscopic Remplissage for Engaging Hill-Sachs Lesions Combined with Bankart Repair on Redislocation and Shoulder Function Compared with Bankart Repair Alone.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sang-Hun; Cha, Jae-Ryong; Lee, Chae-Chil; Hwang, Il-Yeong; Choe, Chang-Gyu; Kim, Min-Seok

    2016-12-01

    Recurrence of glenohumeral dislocation after arthroscopic Bankart repair can be associated with a large osseous defect in the posterosuperior part of the humeral head. Our hypothesis is that remplissage is more effective to prevent recurrence of glenohumeral instability without a severe motion deficit. Engaging Hill-Sachs lesions were observed in 48 of 737 patients (6.5%). Twenty-four patients underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair combined with remplissage (group I) and the other 24 patients underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair alone (group II). Clinical outcomes were prospectively evaluated by assessing the range of motion. Complications, recurrence rates, and functional results were assessed utilizing the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, Rowe score, and the Korean Shoulder Score for Instability (KSSI) score. Capsulotenodesis healing after remplissage was evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging. The average ASES, Rowe, and KSSI scores were statistically significantly higher in group I than group II. The frequency of recurrence was statistically significantly higher in group II. The average loss in external rotation measured with the arm positioned at the side of the trunk was greater in group II and that in abduction was also higher in group II. Compared to single arthroscopic Bankart repair, the remplissage procedure combined with arthroscopic Bankart repair was more effective to prevent the recurrence of anterior shoulder instability without significant impact on shoulder mobility in patients who had huge Hill-Sachs lesions.

  6. Functional and imaging outcomes of arthroscopic simultaneous rotator cuff repair and bankart repair after shoulder dislocations.

    PubMed

    Shields, Edward; Mirabelli, Mark; Amsdell, Simon; Thorsness, Robert; Goldblatt, John; Maloney, Michael; Voloshin, Ilya

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies have investigated outcomes of simultaneous rotator cuff (RC) repair and superior labral injury repair; however, there is limited information in the literature on outcomes of simultaneous RC repair and Bankart lesion repair after acute shoulder dislocations. To determine functional and imaging outcomes of simultaneous arthroscopic RC repair and Bankart repair after acute shoulder dislocations and to compare functional outcomes to contralateral, asymptomatic shoulders. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopic simultaneous RC repair and Bankart repair with a minimum of 2 years' follow-up were recruited. All patients had suffered an acute shoulder dislocation. The American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), Constant-Murley, and Short Form (SF)-36 scores were obtained. The affected shoulder also underwent ultrasound imaging to assess the integrity of the RC. Thirteen patients (mean age, 58.8 ± 11.2 years; mean follow-up, 38.5 ± 12.3 months) were recruited. In a comparison of the affected versus unaffected shoulder, there were no significant differences in the mean ASES score (89.7 ± 12.6 vs 95.0 ± 6.7, respectively), mean Constant score (80.5 ± 18.9 vs 86.8 ± 7.9, respectively), or mean abduction strength (15.4 ± 6.4 lb vs 15.4 ± 5.2 lb, respectively) (P > .05). The mean SF-36 physical component summary was 48.4. According to ultrasound imaging, there were persistent/recurrent full-thickness tears in 4 patients, and 1 patient had a new full-thickness tear. At follow-up, patients with full-thickness RC tears in the affected shoulder compared with their unaffected shoulder showed similar mean ASES scores (90.9 ± 11.8 vs 97.6 ± 4.3, respectively), mean Constant scores (77.8 ± 20.3 vs 84.8 ± 7.2, respectively), and mean abduction strength (11.5 ± 5.3 lb vs 12.6 ± 4.5 lb, respectively) (P > .05). After simultaneous arthroscopic repair of the RC and a Bankart lesion in patients after shoulder

  7. Arthroscopic Double-Row Anterior Stabilization and Bankart Repair for the “High-Risk” Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Cathal J.; Fabricant, Peter D.; Kang, Richard; Cordasco, Frank A.

    2014-01-01

    In addition to operative intervention for the patient with recurrent shoulder instability, current literature suggests that younger athletic patients unwilling to modify their activities may benefit from an early surgical shoulder stabilization procedure. Although open shoulder stabilization clearly has a role to play in some cases, we believe that further optimization of arthroscopic fixation techniques may allow us to continue to refine the indications for open stabilization. In particular, when an arthroscopic approach is used for capsulolabral repair in relatively high-risk groups, it may be beneficial to use a double-row repair technique. We describe our technique for shoulder stabilization through double-row capsulolabral repair of a soft-tissue Bankart lesion in the high-risk patient with shoulder instability or the patient with a small osseous Bankart lesion. PMID:24749044

  8. Arthroscopic double-row anterior stabilization and bankart repair for the "high-risk" athlete.

    PubMed

    Moran, Cathal J; Fabricant, Peter D; Kang, Richard; Cordasco, Frank A

    2014-02-01

    In addition to operative intervention for the patient with recurrent shoulder instability, current literature suggests that younger athletic patients unwilling to modify their activities may benefit from an early surgical shoulder stabilization procedure. Although open shoulder stabilization clearly has a role to play in some cases, we believe that further optimization of arthroscopic fixation techniques may allow us to continue to refine the indications for open stabilization. In particular, when an arthroscopic approach is used for capsulolabral repair in relatively high-risk groups, it may be beneficial to use a double-row repair technique. We describe our technique for shoulder stabilization through double-row capsulolabral repair of a soft-tissue Bankart lesion in the high-risk patient with shoulder instability or the patient with a small osseous Bankart lesion.

  9. Clinical Outcome of Arthroscopic Bankart Repair Combined With Simultaneous Capsular Repair.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Shigeto; Iuchi, Ryo; Mae, Tatsuo; Mizuno, Naoko; Take, Yasuhiro

    2017-05-01

    A capsular tear and humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament lesion are not uncommon findings in association with a Bankart lesion. However, there have been few reports regarding the prevalence of such capsular lesions and the postoperative recurrence after capsular repair. Purpose/Hypothesis: This study investigated the prevalence of capsular lesions and clarified their influence on the postoperative recurrence of instability. In addition, factors were identified that were associated with the occurrence of capsular lesions and the postoperative recurrence of instability. We hypothesized that clinical outcomes would be improved by combining arthroscopic Bankart repair with simultaneous capsular repair. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Capsular lesions were retrospectively examined through operative records, still pictures, and videos in 172 shoulders with traumatic anterior instability. First, the prevalence of capsular lesions and their severity were investigated. Then, postoperative recurrence was determined in shoulders observed for a minimum of 2 years. Finally, factors were assessed that were associated with the occurrence of capsular lesions and the postoperative recurrence of instability. A capsular lesion was recognized in 37 shoulders (21.5%), being severe and mild in 20 and 17, respectively. All were repaired simultaneously with the arthroscopic Bankart procedure. After follow-up for at least 2 years, recurrence of instability was detected in 10 of 34 shoulders (29.4%), including 6 (31.6%) with severe capsular lesions and 4 (26.7%) with mild lesions. The recurrence rate was significantly higher in shoulders with a capsular lesion than in shoulders without a capsular lesion (18 of 120, 15%; P = .013), but there was no significant difference between severe and mild lesions. Regardless of the sport played, capsular lesions were significantly more frequent in patients ≥30 years old, patients with complete dislocation, and patients with a coexisting

  10. Traumatic anterior instability of the pediatric shoulder: a comparison of arthroscopic and open bankart repairs.

    PubMed

    Shymon, Stephen J; Roocroft, Joanna; Edmonds, Eric W

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopic and open Bankart repairs have proven efficacy in adults with recurrent anterior shoulder instability. Although studies have included children in their analysis, none have previously compared functional outcomes or redislocation rates between these 2 methodologies for anteroinferior glenoid labrum repair in this young population. We hypothesize that open and arthroscopic Bankart repair in children will have similar functional outcomes and redislocation rates, but differing results from adults treated in a similar manner. A retrospective chart review was performed on all Bankart repairs performed between 2006 and 2010 at a tertiary care children's hospital. A shift in treatment modalities occurred in 2008 creating 2 cohorts, open and arthroscopic. Brachial plexus injury, congenital soft-tissue disorder, or incomplete charts were excluded. Demographics, age at surgery, follow-up length, and sport were recorded. Telephone interviews were then performed obtaining the most current QuickDASH (Disability Arm, Shoulder, or Hand), WOSI (Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index), SF-12 (Short Form 12), SANE (Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation), and verbal pain scores; as well as, inquiring about recurrent dislocation and further surgery. Ninety-nine children (16.9±1.5 y) were included (28 open, 71 arthroscopic). There were no differences in preoperative demographics. Fifty-one patients completed the questionnaires (11 open, 40 arthroscopic). No significant differences in the outcomes scores were seen between the 2 groups. Of the 99 patients, 21 (21%) had redislocation or secondary surgery; there was no significant difference in failure rate between groups (4 open, 17 arthroscopic). A plotted survival curve demonstrated that the adolescent shoulder undergoing Bankart repair for recurrent traumatic anterior instability has a 2-year survival of 86% and a 5-year survival of only 49%, regardless of technique. In adolescents, there is no significant difference in

  11. Anterior shoulder instability with engaging Hill-Sachs defects: a comparison of arthroscopic Bankart repair with and without posterior capsulodesis.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nam Su; Yoo, Jae Hyun; Juh, Hyung Suk; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical results of isolated arthroscopic Bankart repair and those of arthroscopic Bankart repair with posterior capsulodesis for anterior shoulder instability with engaging Hill-Sachs lesions. Thirty-five shoulders that underwent isolated arthroscopic Bankart repair (Bankart group) and 37 shoulders that underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair with posterior capsulodesis (remplissage group) for anterior shoulder instability with engaging Hill-Sachs lesions were evaluated retrospectively. The mean age at the time of the surgery was 26.1 ± 7.0 years in the Bankart group and 24.8 ± 9.0 years in the remplissage group. At the final follow-up, the Rowe and UCLA scores significantly improved in both the Bankart and remplissage groups (P < 0.001, in both groups). The post-operative mean deficit in external rotation at the side was 3° ± 10° in the Bankart group and 8° ± 23° in the remplissage group (P = n.s. and P = 0.044, respectively). There was no decrease in muscle strength in either group. The recurrence rate was 25.7 % in the Bankart group and 5.4 % in the remplissage group (P = 0.022). Arthroscopic Bankart repair with posterior capsulodesis demonstrated good clinical outcomes with a low recurrence rate in the treatment for anterior shoulder instability with an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion. Although a limitation in external rotation was observed, there was no significant limitation of any other motion and no decrease in muscle strength after the remplissage procedure. Posterior capsulodesis alone for remplissage should be considered as a surgical technique that can replace the conventional method. Case-control study, Level III.

  12. The open latarjet procedure is more reliable in terms of shoulder stability than arthroscopic bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Bessière, Charles; Trojani, Christophe; Carles, Michel; Mehta, Saurabh S; Boileau, Pascal

    2014-08-01

    Arthroscopic Bankart repair and open Latarjet bone block procedure are widely considered mainstays for surgical treatment of recurrent anterior shoulder instability. The choice between these procedures depends mainly on surgeon preference or training rather than published evidence. We compared patients with recurrent posttraumatic anterior shoulder instability treated with arthroscopic Bankart or open Latarjet procedure in terms of (1) frequency and timing of recurrent instability, (2) risk factors for recurrent instability, and (3) patient-reported outcomes. In this retrospective comparative study, we paired 93 patients undergoing open Latarjet procedures with 93 patients undergoing arthroscopic Bankart repairs over the same period for posttraumatic anterior shoulder instability by one of four surgeons at the same center. Both groups were comparable except that patients in the Latarjet group had more glenoid lesions and more instability episodes preoperatively. Minimum followup was 4 years (mean, 6 years; range, 4-10 years). Patients were assessed with a questionnaire, including stability, Rowe score, and return to sports. Recurrent instability was defined as at least one episode of recurrent dislocation or subluxation. Return to sports was evaluated using a 0% to 100% scale that patients completed after recovery from surgery. Various risk factors for recurrent instability were also analyzed. At latest followup, 10% (nine of 93) in the Latarjet group and 22% (20 of 93) in the Bankart group demonstrated recurrent instability (p = 0.026; odds ratio, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.17-0.91). Ten recurrences in the Bankart group (50%) occurred after 2 years, compared to only one (11%) in the Latarjet group. Reoperation rate was 6% and 7% in the Bankart and Latarjet groups, respectively. In both groups, patients younger than 20 years had higher recurrence risk (p = 0.019). In the Bankart group, independent factors predictive for recurrence were practice of competitive sports and

  13. Arthroscopic autologous bone graft with arthroscopic Bankart repair for a large bony defect lesion caused by recurrent shoulder dislocation.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Yu; Hachisuka, Hiroki; Kashiwagi, Kenji; Oomae, Hiromichi; Yokoya, Shin; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2007-06-01

    Many clinicians believe that a large bony defect of the glenoid must be treated with bone grafting when a Bankart procedure is performed. Various types of bone graft, such as open bone graft, Eden-Hybinnette, J-bone graft, coracoid transfer, and Latarjet, have been used. These require open procedures that are difficult to perform arthroscopically. We performed an arthroscopic autologous bone graft and an arthroscopic Bankart repair at the same time to treat a patient with recurrent dislocation of the shoulder joint and a large bony Bankart lesion. We harvested from the lateral site of the acromion 2 bones that were 2.7 mm in cylindrical diameter. We transplanted these bones to the large bony defect of the anteroinferior area of the glenoid and placed anchors between the 2 plugs. During the 30 months since the surgery was performed, the patient has not experienced dislocation or apprehension about the shoulder. A 3-dimensional computed tomography scan showed enlargement of the glenoid surface. Our surgical procedure offers promise for treatment of patients with recurrent dislocation of the shoulder joint and a large bony Bankart lesion because it allows the surgeon to alter the size and the grafted site of the cylindrical bone according to the size of the defect.

  14. Analysis of the functional results of arthroscopic Bankart repair in posttraumatic recurrent anterior dislocations of shoulder.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Amit; Sharma, Pulak; Chaudhary, Deepak

    2012-11-01

    The Bankart lesion represents the most common form of labro-ligamentous injury in patients with traumatic dislocations of the shoulder leading to shoulder instability. We report the clinical outcome of arthroscopic repair of Bankart lesion in 50 patients. Sixty five patients with posttraumatic anterior dislocation of shoulder were treated by arthroscopic repair from Jan 2005 to Nov 2008. Fifty patients, with an average age of 26.83 years (range 18-45 years), were reviewed in the study. The average followup period was 27 months (range 24-36 months). University of California Los Angeles shoulder rating scale was used to determine the outcome after surgery. The recurrence rates, range of motion, as well as postoperative function and return to sporting activities were evaluated. Thirty six patients (72.0%) had excellent results, whereas seven patients (14.0%) had good results. The mean pre- and postoperative range of external rotation was 80.38° and 75.18°, respectively. Eighty-six percent patients had stability compared with the normal sided shoulder and were able to return to sports. There were no cases of redislocation observed in this study; however, three cases had mild laxity of the joint. Arthroscopic Bankart repair with the use of suture anchors is a reliable treatment method, with good clinical outcomes, excellent postoperative shoulder motion and low recurrence rates.

  15. Analysis of the functional results of arthroscopic Bankart repair in posttraumatic recurrent anterior dislocations of shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Amit; Sharma, Pulak; Chaudhary, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    Background: The Bankart lesion represents the most common form of labro-ligamentous injury in patients with traumatic dislocations of the shoulder leading to shoulder instability. We report the clinical outcome of arthroscopic repair of Bankart lesion in 50 patients. Materials and Methods: Sixty five patients with posttraumatic anterior dislocation of shoulder were treated by arthroscopic repair from Jan 2005 to Nov 2008. Fifty patients, with an average age of 26.83 years (range 18-45 years), were reviewed in the study. The average followup period was 27 months (range 24-36 months). University of California Los Angeles shoulder rating scale was used to determine the outcome after surgery. The recurrence rates, range of motion, as well as postoperative function and return to sporting activities were evaluated. Results: Thirty six patients (72.0%) had excellent results, whereas seven patients (14.0%) had good results. The mean pre- and postoperative range of external rotation was 80.38° and 75.18°, respectively. Eighty-six percent patients had stability compared with the normal sided shoulder and were able to return to sports. There were no cases of redislocation observed in this study; however, three cases had mild laxity of the joint. Conclusion: Arthroscopic Bankart repair with the use of suture anchors is a reliable treatment method, with good clinical outcomes, excellent postoperative shoulder motion and low recurrence rates. PMID:23325970

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging appearance of a repaired capsulolabral complex after arthroscopic bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jae Chul; Lee, Yong Seuk; Tae, Suk Kee; Park, Jung Ho; Park, Jong Woong; Ha, Hae Chan

    2008-12-01

    Revision Bankart operations frequently show capsulolabral buttress loss and recurrent soft tissue Bankart lesion. Capsulolabral augmentation is designed to increase glenohumeral stability by 2 separate mechanisms: deepening the glenoid concavity and reducing capsular laxity. This is accomplished by shifting the capsule to buttress the glenoid labrum. A retained capsulolabral buttress may show loss of height and slope at a certain period after surgery, regardless of stability. Thus, the authors wanted to confirm the importance of an intraoperative establishment of capsulolabral buttress in terms of stability. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Arthroscopically repaired Bankart lesions in 21 consecutive shoulders that showed no frank dislocation were evaluated using axial and oblique coronal T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging at 3 timepoints (preoperative period, average postoperative week 6 and a nearly full range of motion recovery, and postoperative month 6 with a return to daily activity). The authors measured 2 parameters (height and slope) on axial (mainly capsulolabral containment) and oblique coronal images (mainly inferior glenohumeral ligament) at the anteroinferior portion of the glenoid (5 mm above the most inferior anchor). In addition, they compared the above-mentioned parameters at postoperative month 6 by magnetic resonance imaging in 21 controls and in 21 patients whose instability recurred after surgery (not included in the prospective study). There was a significant increase between the preoperative period and postoperative week 6 in all 4 parameters (P < .0001). There was also a significant increase between the preoperative period and postoperative month 6 in all 4 parameters (P < .0001). However, no statistically significant difference was observed between postoperative week 6 and postoperative month 6 in all 4 parameters (P > .1). Furthermore, significant differences were observed between normal controls and patients with recurrent

  17. Combined arthroscopic repair of a type IV SLAP tear and Bankart lesion.

    PubMed

    Baker, Champ L; Romeo, Anthony A

    2009-09-01

    Lesions of the superior labrum can be a source of significant shoulder pain and disability. SLAP (superior labrum anterior-posterior) tears have been classified into many different types. A type IV SLAP tear is a bucket-handle tear of the superior labrum with extension into the biceps tendon. This relatively uncommon SLAP tear, if present, has been shown to be frequently associated with other pathology including Bankart lesions. We present an arthroscopic technique for combined repair of a type IV SLAP tear and Bankart lesion. Steps include initial reduction of the bucket-handle portion of the superior labral injury, repair of the anterior-inferior labral detachment, and, finally, repair of the superior labrum and biceps tendon split.

  18. Arthroscopic remplissage with Bankart repair for the treatment of glenohumeral instability with Hill-Sachs defects.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Jung; Tjoumakaris, Fotios P; Garcia, Grant; Patel, Amit; Kelly, John D

    2011-09-01

    To determine whether arthroscopic remplissage with Bankart repair is an effective treatment strategy for patients with Bankart lesions and large Hill-Sachs defects. Between 2006 and 2008, 20 patients underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair with remplissage for the treatment of recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability and large Hill-Sachs defects. Preoperative imaging in all patients identified avulsion of the anterior inferior glenohumeral ligament with an associated Hill-Sachs defect that involved greater than 25% of the humeral head. Patients were followed up postoperatively with the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability score, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, and the Penn Shoulder Score. Recurrent subluxation or dislocation was documented. There were 15 male patients and 5 female patients. The mean age of the patients was 27.3 years. The mean length of follow-up in this series was 29.2 months (range, 24.3 to 37.7 months). At final follow-up, 3 patients reported recurrence of instability, which spontaneously reduced in all cases. The mean American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score was 92.5 (pain, 47.3; function, 45.3). The mean Penn score was 90 of 100 (pain, 27.3 of 30; satisfaction, 8.5 of 10; function, 54.3 of 60). The mean total Western Ontario Shoulder Instability score was 72.74% (mean physical symptom score, 77.10%; mean sports and recreation score, 70.25%; mean lifestyle score, 75%; mean emotions score, 58.50%). Using an all-arthroscopic remplissage technique with Bankart repair, we were able to restore function, diminish pain, and yield satisfaction in 85% of the patients in this study. Our results compare favorably with historic controls with similar pathology at early- to intermediate-term follow-up in terms of recurrence. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2011 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The kinematics and kinetics of slipknots for arthroscopic Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Hughes, P J; Hagan, R P; Fisher, A C; Holt, E M; Frostick, S P

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus has been developed to enable the in vitro measurement of the kinematics and kinetics of a slipknot, both while the knot is being tightened and with the knot in place and the tension removed. During tightening, the apparatus provides a linearly increasing resistance, which may be considered analogous to the resistance experienced when the labrum is drawn toward and apposed to the edge of the glenoid cavity during a Bankart repair. The tension to close the knot is measured with a tensiometer, in tandem with the closure of the capsule model onto the bone anchor, which is measured with a datalogger. The tightening tension was limited to 25 N and intraoperator and interoperator comparisons were made for four knots tied by six participants. Failure of a knot was taken to be reverse slippage of 2 mm. A second criterion of ease of slide was used to assess each knot. We found wide interoperator variability with regard to slipknot tying. A methodology for quality control of slipknot tying is presented.

  20. Outcomes After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair in Adolescent Athletes Participating in Collision and Contact Sports

    PubMed Central

    Saper, Michael G.; Milchteim, Charles; Zondervan, Robert L.; Andrews, James R.; Ostrander, Roger V.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Literature on arthroscopic stabilization in adolescent patients participating in collision and contact sports is limited, as most studies include adolescents within a larger sample group comprised primarily of adults. Purpose: To review the outcomes of arthroscopic Bankart repair for anterior shoulder instability in an adolescent population participating in collision and contact sports. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: This retrospective review included 39 shoulders in 37 adolescent (≤19 years) athletes who underwent primary arthroscopic Bankart repair using suture anchors with at least 2-year follow-up. All patients had a history of trauma to their shoulder resulting in an anterior dislocation. Outcome measures included patient satisfaction, the visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, and Rowe score. Recurrence of dislocation and return to sporting activity were also assessed. Results: The mean age at the time of surgery was 16.9 years (range, 15-19 years), and the mean follow-up was 6.3 years (range, 4.3-10.0 years); 58.6% of patients participated in collision sports. Time to surgery after the initial dislocation episode was 9.2 months (range, 0.5-36.2 months). Four shoulders (10.3%) had dislocation events postoperatively. The majority (78.1%) of patients returned to sports at the same level of competition. Mean VAS was 0.49 ± 1.0, and the mean ASES and Rowe scores were 92.8 ± 12.6 and 85.0 ± 24.2, respectively. Univariate analyses demonstrated that subjective functional outcomes were negatively correlated with recurrence (ASES, P = .005; Rowe, P = .001) and failure to return to sport (ASES, P = .016; Rowe, P = .004). Independent variables shown to have no significant relationship to functional outcomes included age, follow-up, number of preoperative dislocations, time to surgery, sport classification, competition level, tear extent, number of anchors, concurrent Hill

  1. Outcomes After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair in Adolescent Athletes Participating in Collision and Contact Sports.

    PubMed

    Saper, Michael G; Milchteim, Charles; Zondervan, Robert L; Andrews, James R; Ostrander, Roger V

    2017-03-01

    Literature on arthroscopic stabilization in adolescent patients participating in collision and contact sports is limited, as most studies include adolescents within a larger sample group comprised primarily of adults. To review the outcomes of arthroscopic Bankart repair for anterior shoulder instability in an adolescent population participating in collision and contact sports. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. This retrospective review included 39 shoulders in 37 adolescent (≤19 years) athletes who underwent primary arthroscopic Bankart repair using suture anchors with at least 2-year follow-up. All patients had a history of trauma to their shoulder resulting in an anterior dislocation. Outcome measures included patient satisfaction, the visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, and Rowe score. Recurrence of dislocation and return to sporting activity were also assessed. The mean age at the time of surgery was 16.9 years (range, 15-19 years), and the mean follow-up was 6.3 years (range, 4.3-10.0 years); 58.6% of patients participated in collision sports. Time to surgery after the initial dislocation episode was 9.2 months (range, 0.5-36.2 months). Four shoulders (10.3%) had dislocation events postoperatively. The majority (78.1%) of patients returned to sports at the same level of competition. Mean VAS was 0.49 ± 1.0, and the mean ASES and Rowe scores were 92.8 ± 12.6 and 85.0 ± 24.2, respectively. Univariate analyses demonstrated that subjective functional outcomes were negatively correlated with recurrence (ASES, P = .005; Rowe, P = .001) and failure to return to sport (ASES, P = .016; Rowe, P = .004). Independent variables shown to have no significant relationship to functional outcomes included age, follow-up, number of preoperative dislocations, time to surgery, sport classification, competition level, tear extent, number of anchors, concurrent Hill-Sachs lesion, and repair of a superior labral anterior

  2. Arthroscopic repair of small and medium-sized bony Bankart lesions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Kyu; Cho, Seung-Hyun; Son, Won-Su; Moon, Sung-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    There has been no study about treatment guidelines for arthroscopic repair according to the size of bony Bankart lesions of less than 25% of the glenoid width. To evaluate the results of arthroscopic repair for bony Bankart lesions managed with different repair techniques based on their size. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Between March 2005 and February 2009, 44 of 52 consecutive patients with bony Bankart lesions with a size of less than 25% of the entire glenoid were managed with an arthroscopic approach. Of those patients, 34 (77%) were available for outcome analysis at a minimum 24 months' follow-up (mean, 34 months; range, 24-60 months). The size of the fragment was measured by computed tomography (CT) and classified as small (<12.5% of the inferior glenoid width) and medium (12.5%-25%). Sixteen lesions were classified as small (small group), and 18 were classified as medium (medium group). For small lesions, capsulolabral repair using suture anchors without excision of the bony fragment was performed. For medium lesions, anatomic reduction and fixation using suture anchors was performed, and the adequacy of reduction was assessed by CT postoperatively. The visual analog scale (VAS) for pain score and modified Rowe score for bony Bankart repair were compared and the postoperative recurrence rate investigated. One patient from the small group (6.3%) and 1 patient without anatomic reduction of the bony fragment in the medium group (5.6%) experienced traumatic redislocations. The mean VAS score improved from 1.7 preoperatively to 0.5 at final follow-up, and the mean Rowe score improved from 59 to 91 (both P < .001). The mean postoperative Rowe scores increased from 58 to 92 in the small group and from 60 to 91 in the medium group (both P < .001). Residual joint incongruity measuring ≤2 mm on both axial and coronal scans, which was considered an anatomic reduction, was present in 14 cases (77.8%) in the medium group. In the medium group, the mean

  3. Arthroscopic Double-Row Suture Anchor Repair of Acute Posterior Bony Bankart Lesion.

    PubMed

    Ly, Justin A; Coleman, Erin M; Kropf, Eric J

    2016-08-01

    The treatment of anterior shoulder instability is well described with various techniques, including arthroscopic double-row repair, an alternative to open stabilization procedures in high-risk groups. The surgical management of posterior instability in high-risk and athletic populations is a less-explored entity. We describe our technique for an all arthroscopic double-row suture anchor repair of a large posterior bony Bankart lesion. We prefer this technique over percutaneous cannulated screw fixation because the double-row suture technique allows for incorporation of capsular plication with bony fixation in an effort to better restore normal anatomy for capsulolabral complex. Double-row repair capsulolabral repair or fixation of the bony Bankart is performed via a suture-bridge technique. Medial row anchors are placed down the glenoid neck and shuttled around the bony fragment and labrum. The lateral-row anchor is placed at the rim of the native glenoid. This repair technique has been shown to increase the surface area for healing and more closely reconstruct the native anatomic capsulolabral complex footprint, improve force distribution, and potentially impart enhanced posterior stability to the glenohumeral joint.

  4. Large Hill-Sachs Lesion: a Comparative Study of Patients Treated with Arthroscopic Bankart Repair with or without Remplissage.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Grant H; Park, Min Jung; Zhang, Clare; Kelly, John D; Huffman, G Russell

    2015-07-01

    There is little comparative long-term clinical data comparing Bankart repair alone to the addition of remplissage. Our purpose was to compare results of patients with significant humeral head lesions and who underwent either isolated arthroscopic Bankart repair or remplissage. This is a retrospective cohort study of 14 isolated arthroscopic Bankart and 10 remplissage repairs all with large engaging Hill-Sachs (HS) lesions. Average follow-up was 40.72 months (26.3-51.1) in the Bankart group and 31.55 months (24.1-39.9) in the remplissage group. Surgical failure was defined as a dislocation or subluxation. Groups were matched on handedness, age within 3 years, and HS lesion size. Glenoid bone loss and HS size were measured on MRI. Additionally, WOSI and DASH scores were obtained. The average age at surgery was 26.0 years (17.8-41.1) of the isolated Bankart patient and 24.4 years (16.4-38.3) in the remplissage group. The average HS lesion volume was 310.22 mm(3) in the Bankart group and 283.79 mm(3) in the remplissage group. The failure rate for the Bankart group was 8 out of 14 patients (57.14%). For the remplissage group, the failure rate was 2 out of 10 patients (20.0%). Average WOSI scores were 73.72 in the Bankart group and 79.54 in the remplissage group. For DASH scores, the average Disability/Symptoms Scores were 16.23 for the Bankart group and 12.05 for the remplissage patients. In comparison to isolated Bankart repair, remplissage was a superior option for recurrent instability patients with large Hill-Sachs lesions as seen by diminished failure rates and improved outcome scores.

  5. Postoperative Recurrence of Instability Due to New Anterior Glenoid Rim Fractures After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Shigeto; Hirose, Takehito; Tachibana, Yuta; Iuchi, Ryo; Mae, Tatsuo

    2017-10-01

    Computed tomography (CT) sometimes reveals a new fracture of the anterior glenoid rim in patients with postoperative recurrence of instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair using suture anchors, but there have been few previous reports about such fractures. The placement of a large number of suture anchors during arthroscopic Bankart repair might be associated with a new glenoid rim fracture. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Screw-in metal suture anchors were used until June 2011 and suture-based soft anchors from July 2011. A follow-up of at least 2 years was conducted for 128 shoulders treated using metal anchors (metal anchor group) and 129 shoulders treated using soft anchors (soft anchor group). The frequency and features of new glenoid rim fractures were investigated, and the influence of the number of suture anchors and other factors on fractures was also assessed. There were 19 shoulders (14.8%) with postoperative recurrence in the metal anchor group and 23 shoulders (17.8%) in the soft anchor group. Among 37 shoulders evaluated by CT at recurrence, a new glenoid rim fracture was detected in 13 shoulders (35.1%; 5 shoulders in the metal anchor group and 8 shoulders in the soft anchor group). A fracture at the anchor insertion site was recognized in 4 shoulders from the metal anchor group and 6 shoulders from the soft anchor group, although linear fractures connecting several anchor holes were only seen in the soft anchor group. While new glenoid fractures occurred regardless of the number of suture anchors used, new fractures were significantly more frequent in teenagers at surgery and in junior high school or high school athletes. Such fractures did not only occur in contact athletes but were also found in overhead athletes. Postoperative recurrence of instability associated with a new glenoid rim fracture along the suture anchor insertion site was frequent after arthroscopic Bankart repair. These fractures might be related to placing multiple soft

  6. Management of an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion: arthroscopic remplissage with Bankart repair versus Latarjet procedure.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nam Su; Yoo, Jae Hyun; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2016-12-01

    This study compared the clinical outcomes of arthroscopic remplissage with Bankart repair and Latarjet operation in patients with a large engaging Hill-Sachs lesion. Thirty-seven shoulders subjected to arthroscopic remplissage with a Bankart repair (group A) and 35 shoulders subjected to a Latarjet operation (group B), for a large engaging Hill-Sachs lesion without significant glenoid bone loss, were retrospectively evaluated. Each group was followed up for a mean more than 2-year period. At the last follow-up, postoperative pain, shoulder mobility, muscle strength, Rowe score, and UCLA score revealed no significant difference between the two groups. The postoperative mean deficit in external rotation at the side (ERs) was 8° ± 23° in group A (P = 0.044). In group B, the mean deficits in ERs, external rotation at 90° of abduction, and internal rotation to the posterior were 10° ± 20°, 7° ± 16°, and 1.9° ± 4°, respectively (P = 0.004, 0.022, and 0.009, respectively). The recurrence rate was 5.4 % (two shoulders) in group A and 5.7 % (two shoulders) in group B (n.s.). The overall complication rate was significantly higher in group B (14.3 %) than in group A (0 %) (P = 0.017). For recurrent anterior shoulder instability with a large engaging Hill-Sachs lesion, both arthroscopic remplissage with Bankart repair and the Latarjet procedure were safe and reliable techniques with a low recurrence rate. However, the Latarjet group had a significantly higher postoperative complication rate than the remplissage group. Case-control study, Level III.

  7. Long term results of arthroscopic Bankart repair for traumatic anterior shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Ee, Gerard W W; Mohamed, Sedeek; Tan, Andrew H C

    2011-06-14

    The arthroscopic method offers a less invasive technique of Bankart repair for traumatic anterior shoulder instability. We would like to report the 2 year clinical outcomes of bio-absorbable suture anchors used in traumatic anterior dislocations of the shoulder. Data from 79 shoulders in 74 patients were collected over 4 years (2004-2008). Each patient was followed-up over a period of 2 years. The patients underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair using bio-absorbable suture anchors for their shoulder instability. These surgeries were performed at a single institution by a single surgeon over the time period. The patients were assessed with two different outcome measurement tools. The University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) shoulder rating scale and the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) score. The scores were calculated before surgery and at the 2-year follow-up. The recurrence rates, range of motion as well post-operative function and return to sporting activities were evaluated. SST results from the 12 domains showed a significant improvement from a mean of 6.1 ± 3.1 to 11.1 ± 1.8 taken at the 2-year follow-up (p < 0.0001). Data from the UCLA scale showed a Pre and Post Operative Mean of 20.2 ± 5.0 and 32.4 ± 4.6 respectively (p < 0.0001). 34 had excellent post-operative scores, 35 had good scores, 1 had fair score and 3 had poor scores. 75% of the patients returned to sports while 7.6% developed a recurrence of shoulder dislocation or subluxation. Arthroscopic Bankart repair with the use of suture anchors is a reliable treatment method, with good clinical outcomes, excellent post-operative shoulder motion and low recurrence rates.

  8. Long term results of arthroscopic bankart repair for traumatic anterior shoulder instability

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The arthroscopic method offers a less invasive technique of Bankart repair for traumatic anterior shoulder instability. We would like to report the 2 year clinical outcomes of bio-absorbable suture anchors used in traumatic anterior dislocations of the shoulder. Methods Data from 79 shoulders in 74 patients were collected over 4 years (2004 - 2008). Each patient was followed-up over a period of 2 years. The patients underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair using bio-absorbable suture anchors for their shoulder instability. These surgeries were performed at a single institution by a single surgeon over the time period. The patients were assessed with two different outcome measurement tools. The University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) shoulder rating scale and the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) score. The scores were calculated before surgery and at the 2-year follow-up. The recurrence rates, range of motion as well post-operative function and return to sporting activities were evaluated. Results SST results from the 12 domains showed a significant improvement from a mean of 6.1 ± 3.1 to 11.1 ± 1.8 taken at the 2-year follow-up (p < 0.0001). Data from the UCLA scale showed a Pre and Post Operative Mean of 20.2 ± 5.0 and 32.4 ± 4.6 respectively (p < 0.0001). 34 had excellent post-operative scores, 35 had good scores, 1 had fair score and 3 had poor scores. 75% of the patients returned to sports while 7.6% developed a recurrence of shoulder dislocation or subluxation. Conclusion Arthroscopic Bankart repair with the use of suture anchors is a reliable treatment method, with good clinical outcomes, excellent post-operative shoulder motion and low recurrence rates. PMID:21672187

  9. Functional outcome and the structural integrity of arthroscopic Bankart repair: a prospective trial

    PubMed Central

    Young, Simon W; Pinto, Clinton; Poon, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    Background Recurrent anterior shoulder dislocations are common in young patients with Bankart lesions. Arthroscopic repair is an established treatment; however, recurrent instability occurs in up to 35% of patients. It is unclear whether recurrence is the result of a failure of the surgical repair to heal or a repeat injury. The aim of the present pilot study was to assess radiographic healing of Bankart lesions 6 months post surgical repair and identify any correlations between radiographic findings and subsequent recurrent dislocations. Methods Eighteen patients underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair for recurrent instability. Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrograms were obtained both pre-operatively and 6 months postoperatively. Standard T1 and T2 views were obtained along with an abduction and external rotation (ABER) view. Patients were followed for a minimum of 4 years for the risk of recurrence, and functional outcomes were obtained, including the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Subjective Shoulder Scale, Ontario Shoulder Instability Index, Oxford Shoulder Instability Score and 12-Item Short Form Health Survey. Scores were correlated with pre-operative and postoperative MR findings. Results Six of 18 patients developed recurrent instability. We could not identify correlations between reconstructed labrum (labral bumper) position, failure at suture sites and ABER findings with recurrent instability or functional outcome. Paradoxically, there was a nonstatistically significant trend for patients with no clefts between the labrum and the glenoid at any points along the repair to have worse outcomes than patients with partial or complete clefts. Conclusions In our pilot study, MR arthrogram was used to evaluate the labrum in detail 6 months postoperatively. Despite its proven ability to detect labral lesions, we were unable to demonstrate any features on postoperative MR arthrogram that predicted either functional outcome or recurrent instability. At 6 months

  10. Functional outcome and the structural integrity of arthroscopic Bankart repair: a prospective trial.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mark; Young, Simon W; Pinto, Clinton; Poon, Peter C

    2015-04-01

    Recurrent anterior shoulder dislocations are common in young patients with Bankart lesions. Arthroscopic repair is an established treatment; however, recurrent instability occurs in up to 35% of patients. It is unclear whether recurrence is the result of a failure of the surgical repair to heal or a repeat injury. The aim of the present pilot study was to assess radiographic healing of Bankart lesions 6 months post surgical repair and identify any correlations between radiographic findings and subsequent recurrent dislocations. Eighteen patients underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair for recurrent instability. Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrograms were obtained both pre-operatively and 6 months postoperatively. Standard T1 and T2 views were obtained along with an abduction and external rotation (ABER) view. Patients were followed for a minimum of 4 years for the risk of recurrence, and functional outcomes were obtained, including the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Subjective Shoulder Scale, Ontario Shoulder Instability Index, Oxford Shoulder Instability Score and 12-Item Short Form Health Survey. Scores were correlated with pre-operative and postoperative MR findings. Six of 18 patients developed recurrent instability. We could not identify correlations between reconstructed labrum (labral bumper) position, failure at suture sites and ABER findings with recurrent instability or functional outcome. Paradoxically, there was a nonstatistically significant trend for patients with no clefts between the labrum and the glenoid at any points along the repair to have worse outcomes than patients with partial or complete clefts. In our pilot study, MR arthrogram was used to evaluate the labrum in detail 6 months postoperatively. Despite its proven ability to detect labral lesions, we were unable to demonstrate any features on postoperative MR arthrogram that predicted either functional outcome or recurrent instability. At 6 months post operation, functional recovery and

  11. Mid-term results of arthroscopic Bankart repair: A review of 31 cases.

    PubMed

    Tordjman, D; Vidal, C; Fontès, D

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the overall function (Walch-Duplay score), stability, time and because it is time of return to sport and level of return to sport, and satisfaction of patients who underwent an arthroscopic Bankart repair for chronic anterior shoulder instability at 5 years' follow-up. In addition, the potential correlation between the postoperative Walch-Duplay score and the presence of risk factors for recurrence, the ISIS score, associated labral lesions discovered intraoperatively and clinical presentation was determined. This was a retrospective, single-centre study of 30 patients (31 arthroscopic Bankart procedures) operated between January 2003 and December 2012. The Walch-Duplay score, recurrence rate (dislocation or subluxation), return to sports and subjective satisfaction were evaluated. The mean postoperative Duplay score was 77.4 points (100-15)±30.6. At review, 25.8% of patients had recurrence of the preoperative symptoms, including 16.1% glenohumeral dislocation and 9.7% subluxation. Patients requiring revision surgery (Bristow-Latarjet procedure) had no additional instability episodes. Among the athletes, 16 (66.6%) returned to their pre-injury level, four (16.6%) changed to a different sport and four stopped participating (16.6%). The subjective evaluation of the procedure was satisfactory in 75% of cases. No risk factors for recurrence were significantly related to the Walch-Duplay score. Despite satisfactory Walch-Duplay scores and subjective results, this mid-term follow-up study revealed a significant number of patients with recurrent instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair, confirming published data. Careful patient selection is essential prior to proposing this procedure and patients should be informed of the potential risk of revision surgery. Level IV, retrospective study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Concomitant SLAP repair does not influence the surgical outcome for arthroscopic Bankart repair of traumatic shoulder dislocations.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Nuri; Unal, Mehmet Bekir; Asansu, Mustafa; Tok, Okan

    2017-01-01

    Prior studies revealed the presence of superior labrum anterior-to-posterior (SLAP) injury together with Bankart lesions in some patients. The purpose of the study is to compare the clinical results of isolated Bankart repairs with the clinical results of Bankart repairs when performed with concomitant SLAP repairs. The patients who underwent arthroscopic surgery for treatment of anterior glenohumeral instability were evaluated retrospectively. Group 1 consisted of 19 patients who had arthroscopic SLAP repair together with Bankart repair. The mean age of the patients was 23. Group 2 consisted of 38 patients who underwent isolated Bankart repair. The mean age was 24. Knotless anchors were used in both groups. The mean follow-up was 34 months (range: 26-72). In group 1, the mean preoperative Constant score was 84 (range: 74-90, standard deviation (SD): 5.91) and Rowe score was 64.1 (range: 40-70, SD: 8.14). In group 2, the preoperative Constant score was 84.4 (range: 70-96, SD: 5.88) and Rowe score was 60 (range: 45-70, SD: 7.95). In group 1, the postoperative mean Constant score raised to 96.8 (range: 88-100, SD: 2.91) and the mean Rowe score raised to 92.3 (range: 85-100, SD: 5.17). In group 2, the postoperative mean Constant score was 94.9 (range: 88-100, SD: 3.70) and the mean Rowe score was 94.2 (range: 80-100, SD: 4.71). The difference between the scores of two groups was insignificant ( p > 0.05). When the numbers of redislocations and range of motion were compared, no significant difference was found ( p > 0.05). Accompanying SLAP repair in surgical treatment with Bankart repair for shoulder instability does not affect the results negatively. Properly repaired labral tears extending from anterior inferior to the posterior superior of the glenoid in instability treatment have the same outcome in overall results as repaired isolated Bankart lesions.

  13. Glenoid rim fracture through anchor points after arthroscopic Bankart repair for shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Young; Lee, Seung-Jun; Oh, Se-Kwan; Oh, KyungSoo; Noh, YoungMin; Suh, Kuen-Tak

    2015-02-01

    We studied the incidence of postoperative glenoid rim fractures and analysed the relationships of glenoid rim fracture with osteolysis, fracture pattern, number of anchors and postoperative activity after arthroscopic Bankart repair with suture anchor fixation. Among 570 patients of the Bankart repair group, nine patients who had undergone revision arthroscopy for glenoid rim fracture after initial Bankart repair with at least two years post-revision follow-up were enrolled. Mean age was 28.8 years (range, 18-49 years), and mean follow-up was 36.4 months (range, 25-64 months). The mean time from Bankart repair to failure of initial surgery following trauma was 27.3 months (range, four to-84 months). Initial suture anchors were made of bioabsorbable composites (poly-D-L-lactic acid, PDLLA) without ceramic osteo-filler (seven cases) and metals (two cases). PDLLA without ceramic osteo-filler suture anchors were used for revision surgery. We reviewed 570 patients for relationship between osteolysis and glenoid rim fracture. Five patients including three and two with bioabsorbable and metal suture anchors, respectively, experienced glenoid rim fracture at more than two years postoperatively. Osteolysis around initial suture anchors groups showed higher glenoid rim fracture incidence compared with the control group (odd ratio =4.186 [95 % CI, 1.108-15.818]; p = 0.037). Osteolysis related to insertion of metal or PLDDA suture anchors may lead to glenoid rim fracture. Remnant metal or bioabsorbable suture anchors without ceramic composite could be a stress riser at two years postoperatively.

  14. A Meta-Analysis of Arthroscopic versus Open Repair for Treatment of Bankart Lesions in the Shoulder.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Yaosheng; Su, Xiuyun; Liu, Shubin

    2015-10-08

    The optimal treatment for Bankart lesion remains controversial. Therefore, we performed this meta-analysis to compare the clinical outcomes of patients managed with open Bankart repair versus arthroscopic Bankart repair. After systematic review of online databases, a total of 11 trials with 1022 subjects were included. The methodological quality of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was assessed using the PEDro critical appraisal tool, and non-RCTs were evaluated by Newcastle-Ottawa (NO) quality assessment tool. Outcomes of shoulder stability, range of motion (ROM), functional scales, and surgical times were analyzed. Data synthesis showed significant differences between the two strategies, with regards to stability of the shoulder (P=0.008, RR=0.94, 95% CI: 0.89 to 0.98), and ROM (P<0.001, SMD=-0.47, 95% CI: -0.72 to -0.22). Open Bankart repair produced a more stable shoulder but had a relatively poor shoulder motion, compared with arthroscopic Bankart repair, for the treatment of Bankart lesion.

  15. A Meta-Analysis of Arthroscopic versus Open Repair for Treatment of Bankart Lesions in the Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Yaosheng; Su, Xiuyun; Liu, Shubin

    2015-01-01

    Background The optimal treatment for Bankart lesion remains controversial. Therefore, we performed this meta-analysis to compare the clinical outcomes of patients managed with open Bankart repair versus arthroscopic Bankart repair. Material/Methods After systematic review of online databases, a total of 11 trials with 1022 subjects were included. The methodological quality of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was assessed using the PEDro critical appraisal tool, and non-RCTs were evaluated by Newcastle-Ottawa (NO) quality assessment tool. Outcomes of shoulder stability, range of motion (ROM), functional scales, and surgical times were analyzed. Results Data synthesis showed significant differences between the two strategies, with regards to stability of the shoulder (P=0.008, RR=0.94, 95% CI: 0.89 to 0.98), and ROM (P<0.001, SMD=−0.47, 95% CI: −0.72 to −0.22). Conclusions Open Bankart repair produced a more stable shoulder but had a relatively poor shoulder motion, compared with arthroscopic Bankart repair, for the treatment of Bankart lesion. PMID:26446430

  16. Anatomic Bankart repair compared with nonoperative treatment and/or arthroscopic lavage for first-time traumatic shoulder dislocation.

    PubMed

    Chahal, Jaskarndip; Marks, Paul H; Macdonald, Peter B; Shah, Prakesh S; Theodoropoulos, John; Ravi, Bheeshma; Whelan, Daniel B

    2012-04-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to determine the efficacy of anatomic Bankart repair in patients with a first-time shoulder dislocation compared with either arthroscopic lavage or traditional sling immobilization. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Web of Science, LILACS, and a clinical trials registry for ongoing and completed randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials comparing anatomic Bankart repair with either rehabilitation or arthroscopic lavage. Two reviewers selected studies for inclusion, assessed methodologic quality, and extracted data. Pooled analyses were performed by use of a random-effects model, and risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed. We included 3 randomized trials and 1 quasi-randomized trial comprising 228 patients. Of the included trials, 2 compared anatomic Bankart repair with sling immobilization whereas 2 compared Bankart repair with arthroscopic lavage. A meta-analysis of all 4 trials showed that the rate of recurrent instability was significantly lower among participants undergoing anatomic Bankart repair compared with those undergoing either immobilization or arthroscopic lavage (RR, 0.18; 95% CI, 0.10 to 0.33). Subgroup analysis showed that this effect persisted when Bankart repair was compared with arthroscopic lavage alone (2 studies) (RR, 0.14; 95% CI, 0.06 to 0.31) or sling immobilization alone (2 studies) (RR, 0.26; 95% CI, 0.10 to 0.67). Western Ontario Shoulder Instability scores were better with anatomic Bankart repair compared with either arthroscopic lavage or immobilization (2 studies) (mean difference, -232; 95% CI, -317 to -146). There is evidence to suggest treatment of young patients with a first-time shoulder dislocation with anatomic Bankart repair with the goal of lowering the rate of recurrent instability over the long-term and improving short-term quality of life. Level II, systematic review of Level I and II studies

  17. Outcomes of Bankart Repairs Using Modern Arthroscopic Technique in an Athletic Population.

    PubMed

    Milchteim, Charles; Tucker, Scott A; Nye, Darin D; Lamour, Richard J; Liu, Wei; Andrews, James R; Ostrander, Roger V

    2016-07-01

    To report a large number of highly active patients who underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair at our institution over the last decade. A retrospective analysis of patients who underwent primary and revision arthroscopic Bankart repairs using bioabsorbable anchors was performed. Outcome measures included recurrence of dislocation, American Shoulder and Elbow Scores (ASES), Rowe, visual analog scale (VAS), return to sports, and satisfaction scores. A total of 94 shoulders met the inclusion criteria. The recurrence rate was 6/94 (6.4%) at a mean follow-up of 5 years (range, 3 to 8.3). The mean postoperative scores were as follows: ASES = 91.5/100; Rowe = 84.3/100; VAS = 0.8/10; satisfaction = 8.8/10. In those who attempted to return to sports, 82.5% were able to return to the same level of competition. Statistical analyses revealed a significant increase in risk of recurrence among high school and recreational athletes. No recurrences were observed among professional or college-level athletes. No significant difference in recurrence rates was observed in regards to age, time to surgery, type of athlete (collision v limited contact), repair of SLAP lesion, number of anchors, or revision surgery. Although several repair techniques exist for traumatic anterior shoulder instability, arthroscopic repair remains a viable option even in a highly active patient population. This study uniquely identified high school and recreational athletes at higher risk for recurrence. This is perhaps due to inferior shoulder development and technique as well as to limited access to postoperative physical therapy. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Restoration of joint congruency and the glenoidal labrum after arthroscopic revision Bankart repair: a MRI match-paired analysis comparing primary Bankart repair and the uninjured labrum.

    PubMed

    Stein, T; Buckup, J; Mehling, A P; Hoffmann, R; Efe, T; von Eisenhart-Rothe, R; Welsch, F

    2014-08-01

    The restoration of joint congruency and labrum slope and height after arthroscopic revision Bankart repair (RB) compared to the primary arthroscopic Bankart repair (PB) remain unclear. Twenty-three consecutive patients after RB with minor glenoid deficits were matched to 23 patients after PB and retrospectively followed by a score system and native 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment. Bankart repair surgeries were performed using double-loaded knotless suture anchors. The glenoidal (GAA) and labral articulation arc (LAA), labrum slope, height index and morphology were assessed separately for the anterior and inferior glenoid and compared to 23 healthy volunteers [radiologic control group (RC)]. Arthroscopic revision Bankart repair showed 28.0 months post-operative equivalent anterior labral congruency (LAA, 9.3°/PB 9.9°/RC 10.1°) and inferior (LAA 9.9°/PB 9.6°/RC 10.5°). The anterior GAA remain decreased (54.6°/PB 55.7°/RC 58.0°) with an original inferior GAA (85.1°/PB 83.2°/RC 83.8°). The RB labrum was slightly decreased anteriorly (slope 22.9°/PB 23.9°/RC 24.6°; height index 2.4/PB 3.0/RC 3.2). The inferior portion had an equivalent labrum slope (23.8°/PB 24.7°/RC 25.1°), but a decreased height index (2.1/PB 2.2/RC 2.3). Morphologic labrum analysis revealed significant changes between all three groups. The clinical outcome after revision surgery was good-to-excellent, but inferior to the primary stabilization and without influence of joint congruency and labrum morphology to the clinical outcome. A properly applied arthroscopic revision of a Bankart repair generates sufficient restoration of the anteroinferior labral joint congruency and good clinical results. Case series.

  19. [Arthroscopic Bankart repair with suture anchors: results and risk factors of recurrence of instability].

    PubMed

    Yan, Hui; Cui, Guo-Qing; Wang, Jian-Quan; Yin, Yu; Tian, De-Xiang; Ao, Ying-Fang

    2011-07-01

    To evaluate retrospectively the results of arthroscopic Bankart repair using suture anchors for recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation with a minimum 1-year follow-up and to assess risk factors for recurrence. From March 2002 to March 2010, 259 patients with recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair with suture anchors. And 188 patients (50 athletes, 138 nonathletes) were available for follow-up. The mean age at the time of surgery was 25.3 years (range, 13 - 58 years). The mean follow-up was 38.6 months (range, 12 - 110 months). All of the 188 patients were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively with the American Shoulder and Elbow Society (ASES) shoulder score and Rowe score system. The rate of recurrent instability, range of motion, and risk factors for postoperative recurrence were evaluated. The ASES score was 72.6 preoperatively, and Rowe score was 33.4. The ASES scores improved significantly to 91.9 postoperatively (P < 0.001). The Rowe scores improved to 81.9 postoperatively (P < 0.001). And 152 patients were greatly satisfied with the results, 16 satisfied and 20 unsatisfied. The satisfactory rate was 89.4%. 24 patients (12.8%) suffered a recurrence after surgery, 14 athletes and 10 nonathletes. The recurrence rates were 28.0% in the athlete group and 7.2% in the nonathlete group. On average there was no significant loss of external rotation postoperatively (average, 75.2° preoperatively and 67.2° postoperatively). Patients under age 20, and athlete patients were associated with recurrence (P < 0.05). Other factors including length of time until surgery, type of anchors, number of anchors, presence of bony Bankart lesion, presence of a superior labrum, anterior and posterior tear, presence of posterior or inferior labrum lesion, presence of rotator cuff tear, ligamentous laxity and rotator interval closure did not influence the recurrence rate (P > 0.05). Arthroscopic Bankart repair is a good option for the

  20. Long-Term Restoration of Anterior Shoulder Stability: A Retrospective Analysis of Arthroscopic Bankart Repair Versus Open Latarjet Procedure.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Stefan M; Scheyerer, Max J; Farshad, Mazda; Catanzaro, Sabrina; Rahm, Stefan; Gerber, Christian

    2016-12-07

    Various operative techniques are used for treating recurrent anterior shoulder instability, and good mid-term results have been reported. The purpose of this study was to compare shoulder stability after treatment with the 2 commonly performed procedures, the arthroscopic Bankart soft-tissue repair and the open coracoid transfer according to Latarjet. A comparative, retrospective case-cohort analysis of 360 patients (364 shoulders) who had primary repair for recurrent anterior shoulder instability between 1998 and 2007 was performed. The minimum duration of follow-up was 6 years. Reoperations, overt recurrent instability (defined as recurrent dislocation or subluxation), apprehension, the subjective shoulder value (SSV), sports participation, and overall satisfaction were recorded. An open Latarjet procedure was performed in 93 shoulders, and an arthroscopic Bankart repair was done in 271 shoulders. Instability or apprehension persisted or recurred after 11% (10) of the 93 Latarjet procedures and after 41.7% (113) of the 271 arthroscopic Bankart procedures. Overt instability recurred after 3% of the Latarjet procedures and after 28.4% (77) of the Bankart procedures. In the Latarjet group, 3.2% of the patients were not satisfied with their result compared with 13.2% in the Bankart group (p = 0.007). Kaplan-Meier analysis of survivorship, with apprehension (p < 0.001), redislocation (p = 0.01), and operative revision (p < 0.001) as the end points, documented the substantial superiority of the Latarjet procedure and the decreasing effectiveness of the arthroscopic Bankart repair over time. Twenty percent of the first recurrences after arthroscopic Bankart occurred no earlier than 91 months postoperatively, as opposed to the rare recurrences after osseous reconstruction, which occurred in the early postoperative period, with only rare late failures. In this retrospective cohort study, the arthroscopic Bankart procedure was inferior to the open Latarjet procedure for

  1. Biomechanical effectiveness of an arthroscopic posterior bankart repair versus an open bone block procedure for posterior shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Wellmann, Mathias; Bobrowitsch, Evgenij; Khan, Nicklas; Patzer, Thilo; Windhagen, Henning; Petersen, Wolf; Bohnsack, Michael

    2011-04-01

    The most effective surgical treatment for traumatic posterior shoulder instability remains unclear. An arthroscopic posterior Bankart repair is as effective as an open posterior bone block-capsulorrhaphy procedure regarding the restoration of humeral displacement with posterior and inferior forces. Controlled laboratory study. Biomechanical testing of 16 human shoulders was performed in 3 testing conditions: after ventilation (intact joint), after creation of a posteroinferior Bankart lesion with an additional cut of the posterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament, and after surgical shoulder stabilization. The shoulder stabilization was performed either by an open posterior bone block procedure and glenoid-based T-capsulorrhaphy or by an arthroscopic Bankart repair. Testing was performed in 2 positions-the sulcus test position and the jerk test position-with a passive humerus load of 50 N applied in the posterior, posteroinferior, and inferior directions. After the arthroscopic repair, there was no significant difference between the translation and the intact state for all tested directions. The bone block repair-capsulorrhaphy caused a significant decrease of posterior translation (sulcus test and jerk test positions) and posteroinferior translation (jerk test position). But the resulting posterior and posteroinferior translation was even significantly lower than the translation measured for the intact joints. However, the reduction of inferior translation, compared with that of the defect condition, was not significant after the bone block repair (sulcus test and jerk test positions). Compared with that of the intact joint, inferior translation after the bone block repair was significantly higher. The posterior bone block repair-capsulorrhaphy overcorrects posterior translation and does not effectively restore inferior stability, whereas the arthroscopic posterior Bankart repair restores posterior and inferior laxity of the intact joint. An arthroscopic

  2. Follow-up computed tomography arthrographic evaluation of bony Bankart lesions after arthroscopic repair.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Young; Lee, Seung-Jun; Lhee, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Suk-Ha

    2012-04-01

    The follow-up results of bony union after an arthroscopic bony Bankart repair have not been reported. We studied follow-up computed tomography (CT) arthrograms to evaluate radiographic healing of bony Bankart fragments. Among 41 patients who underwent arthroscopy for a bony Bankart lesion between July 2006 and May 2009, 31 cases in 30 patients who had undergone sequential follow-up CT arthrography preoperatively, at 3 months postoperatively, and at 1 year postoperatively were enrolled. Radiologic patterns of fracture healing were classified into bony healing and fibrous healing. The mean age was 23.4 years, and the mean follow-up was 30.5 months. The mean interval from the first trauma to surgery was 32.5 months, and the mean preoperative dislocation number was 12.1. The mean preoperative glenoid defect was 14.1%. The fracture healing patterns included 26 bony and 5 fibrous unions. There was a significant positive relation between the total dislocation number and the preoperative glenoid defect (P = .003). The proportion of the mean fragment dimension to a circle drawn through the outer cortex of the inferior glenoid was 8.4% preoperatively, 6.6% at 3 months postoperatively, and 6.2% at 1 year postoperatively. The fragment size decreased from that measured preoperatively to the size measured 3 months after surgery (P < .05). However, the fragment size was maintained between 3 months and 1 year postoperatively (P > .05). The mean Rowe score at 1 year postoperatively was 97.2. Follow-up CT arthrographic evaluation showed that small bony Bankart fragments survived without resorption until 1 year postoperatively, even with fibrous union, and that reattached bone fragment fixation to the anatomic position with the labrum could survive. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2012 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Arthroscopic Bankart repair using knot-tying versus knotless suture anchors: is there a difference?

    PubMed

    Ng, Dennis Zhaowen; Kumar, V Prem

    2014-04-01

    To compare the clinical outcome between the use of knotless sutures versus knot-tying sutures in arthroscopic Bankart repairs. Between January 2007 and January 2011, 87 patients who underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair with the use of knot-tying suture anchors or knotless suture anchors were evaluated, with 45 patients in the knot-tying suture group and 42 patients in the knotless group. Patients were assigned to either group, with odd-numbered patients going to the knot-tying suture arm and even-numbered patients assigned to the knotless arm. Outcomes included the Constant score, the visual analog scale (VAS) score, patient satisfaction score, and range of motion in forward flexion and external rotation with the arm in adduction. Redislocations or subluxations with the 2 techniques was also studied. Both groups showed a statistically significant improvement between the preoperative and postoperative VAS scores and Constant scores. In the knot-tying suture group, the VAS score improved from 2.5 ± 2.3 to 0.7 ± 0.5 (P < .05) and the Constant score improved from 64 ± 7 to 92 ± 10 (P < .05). In the knotless group, the VAS score improved from 2.8 ± 2.5 to 0.9 ± 0.6 (P < .05), and the Constant score improved from 62 ± 6 to 89 ± 9 (P < .05). The patient satisfaction scores were 6.9 and 7.1 for the knot tying and knotless groups, respectively. No statistically significant differences were found when comparing the outcomes between the 2 groups. The change in the range of forward flexion and external rotation was also similar in the 2 groups. There was also no difference in recurrence or redislocation rates. Both the knot-tying and knotless suture anchors groups showed statistically significant and similar improvement in VAS and Constant scores. Both anchors provided reasonable outcomes. The knotless suture anchor is a good alternative to knot-tying suture anchors so that arthroscopic Bankart repairs can be performed without knot tying. Level II, prospective

  4. Minimum 10-year follow-up of arthroscopic intra-articular Bankart repair using bioabsorbable tacks.

    PubMed

    Privitera, David M; Bisson, Leslie J; Marzo, John M

    2012-01-01

    There are few long-term studies evaluating functional outcomes and rates of arthrosis after arthroscopic Bankart repair with bioabsorbable tacks. We evaluated the clinical and radiographic results of arthroscopic Bankart repair using intra-articular bioabsorbable tacks at a minimum of 10 years' follow-up. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Thirty-two consecutive patients were retrospectively identified. Twenty patients (63%) were evaluated at a mean follow-up of 13.5 years (range, 10.75-17.5 years) and average age of 43 years (range, 28-73 years). The surgical shoulder (SS) was compared with a healthy control shoulder (CS) in 15 of 20 patients. Outcome tools included the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI) and Disabilities of the Shoulder, Arm, and Hand (DASH). Blinded, independent evaluators performed physical examinations and reviewed radiographs. Thirteen patients (65%) had stable shoulders, 5 of 7 (25%) failed by dislocation, and 2 of 7 (10%) failed by signs of anterior instability on examination. Three patients underwent revision stabilization surgery. Average time to failure was 4.2 years (range, 0.25-14.7 years). Average WOSI and DASH scores were 80% and 7.3, respectively. The CS faired better than SS in WOSI scores (97% vs 83%, respectively; P = .008), main DASH scores (0.39 vs 6.79, respectively; P = .024), and the DASH sports module (0.00 vs 10.94, respectively; P = .043). Patients lost 5.9° of passive forward flexion (P = .031) and 4.3° of passive external rotation (P = .001). Forty percent returned to their preoperative sports level. Higher grades of arthrosis were seen in the SS (20% absent, 40% mild, 25% moderate, and 15% severe) versus CS (P = .002). At long-term follow-up, 65% of patients treated with an arthroscopic Bankart repair using bioabsorbable tacks had a well-functioning, stable shoulder. Disability scores were greatest with sports; however, the majority of patients had well-preserved ranges of motion and good functional

  5. Biomechanical Comparison of Arthroscopic Single- and Double-Row Repair Techniques for Acute Bony Bankart Lesions.

    PubMed

    Spiegl, Ulrich J; Smith, Sean D; Todd, Jocelyn N; Coatney, Garrett A; Wijdicks, Coen A; Millett, Peter J

    2014-08-01

    Single- and double-row arthroscopic reconstruction techniques for acute bony Bankart lesions have been described in the literature. The double-row fixation technique would provide superior reduction and stability of a simulated bony Bankart lesion at time zero in a cadaveric model compared with the single-row technique. Controlled laboratory study. Testing was performed on 14 matched pairs of glenoids with simulated bony Bankart fractures with a defect width of 25% of the glenoid diameter. Half of the fractures were repaired with a double-row technique, while the contralateral glenoids were repaired with a single-row technique. The quality of fracture reduction was measured with a coordinate measuring machine. To determine the biomechanical stability of the repairs, specimens were preconditioned with 10 sinusoidal cycles between 5 and 25 N at 0.1 Hz and then pulled to failure in the anteromedial direction at a rate of 5 mm/min. Loads at 1 mm and 2 mm of fracture displacement were determined. The double-row technique required significantly higher forces to achieve fracture displacements of 1 mm (mean, 60.6 N; range, 39.0-93.3 N; P = .001) and 2 mm (mean, 94.4 N; range, 43.4-151.2 N; P = .004) than the single-row technique (1 mm: mean, 30.2 N; range, 14.0-54.1 N and 2 mm: mean, 63.7 N; range, 26.6-118.8 N). Significantly reduced fracture displacement was seen after double-row repair for both the unloaded condition (mean, 1.1 mm; range, 0.3-2.4 mm; P = .005) and in response to a 10-N anterior force applied to the defect (mean, 1.6 mm; range, 0.5-2.7 mm; P = .001) compared with single-row repair (unloaded: mean, 2.1 mm; range, 1.3-3.4 mm and loaded: mean, 3.4 mm; range, 1.9-4.7 mm). The double-row fixation technique resulted in improved fracture reduction and superior stability at time zero in this cadaveric model. This information may influence the surgical technique used to treat large osseous Bankart fractures and the postoperative rehabilitation protocols

  6. Effectiveness and safety of arthroscopic versus open Bankart repair for recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation: a meta-analysis of clinical trial data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Xu, Zhao; Peng, Jing; Xing, Fei; Wang, Hong; Xiang, Zhou

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of arthroscopic and open Bankart repair for recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation using meta-analysis of data from clinical trials. Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, PUBMED and EMBASE were used to search and identify clinical trials that evaluated arthroscopic and open Bankart repair for recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation. Methodological qualities of studies were assessed by Cochrane Collaboration tool for assessing risk of bias and Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Publication bias was detected using Begg's test and Egger's test. Sixteen trials involving 827 shoulders were included in the study. Based on Cochrane Collaboration tool for assessing risk of bias, three studies were rated as high quality and one study was rated as moderate quality among the randomized controlled trials. Another twelve case-control studies were rated as high quality based on Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. No significant publication bias was detected by Begg's test or Egger's test. Meta-analysis results indicated that arthroscopic repair has a significantly better recovery rate for external rotation at 90° of abduction, external rotation at side (P > 0.05) and forward flexion. However, arthroscopic repair had higher rates of recurrence and reoperation than open Bankart repair. Meta-analysis of available randomized controlled trials and case-control studies demonstrated that arthroscopic repair and open Bankart repair were similar in safety. Arthroscopic repair resulted in better recovery of range of motion, but recurrence and reoperation rates were higher than open Bankart repair.

  7. A long-term clinical follow-up study after arthroscopic intra-articular Bankart repair using absorbable tacks.

    PubMed

    Elmlund, Anna; Kartus, Catarina; Sernert, Ninni; Hultenheim, Ingrid; Ejerhed, Lars

    2008-07-01

    The aim of the study was to perform an independent long-term evaluation after arthroscopic Bankart repair using absorbable tacks. We hypothesise that arthroscopic Bankart repair using absorbable tacks will result in stable shoulders. Eighty-one consecutive patients (84 shoulders) with symptomatic, recurrent, anterior, post-traumatic shoulder instability were included in the study. All the patients had a Bankart lesion. The age of the patients was 28 (15-62) years. The number of dislocations prior to surgery was five (sublux-50). The operation was performed 28 (3-360) months after the index injury by one of three surgeons with a special interest in shoulder surgery using an intra-articular arthroscopic Bankart procedure involving absorbable Suretac fixators. Seventy-six/84 (90%) of the shoulders (50 male, 23 female patients) were re-examined by two independent observers, after a follow-up period of 98 (46-129) months. In the long-term, the failure rate in terms of stability was 8/76 (11%) dislocations and a further 6/76 (8%) had experienced or had clinical signs of subluxation. The Rowe score was 91 (38-98) points at follow-up and the Constant score was 90 (56-100) points. The Constant score for the contralateral shoulder was 93 (69-100) points (P < 0.001). In the long-term, the arthroscopic Bankart procedure using Suretac fixators resulted in stable, well-functioning shoulders in the majority of patients. Eighteen per cent of the patients had experienced signs of instability during the follow-up period in terms of dislocations or subluxations.

  8. Risk Factors for the Postoperative Recurrence of Instability After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Shigeto; Mae, Tatsuo; Sato, Seira; Okimura, Shinichiro; Kuroda, Miki

    2017-01-01

    Background: Several risk factors for the postoperative recurrence of instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair have been reported, but there have been few detailed investigations of the specific risk factors in relation to the type of sport. Purpose: This study investigated the postoperative recurrence of instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair without additional reinforcement procedures in competitive athletes, including athletes with a large glenoid defect. The purpose of this study was to investigate risk factors related to the postoperative recurrence of instability in athletes. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 115 athletes (123 shoulders) were classified into 5 groups according to type of sport: rugby (41 shoulders), American football (32 shoulders), other collision sports (18 shoulders), contact sports (15 shoulders), and overhead sports (17 shoulders). First, the recurrence rate in each sporting category was investigated, with 113 shoulders followed up for a minimum of 2 years. Then, factors related to postoperative recurrence were investigated in relation to the type of sport. Results: Postoperative recurrence of instability was noted in 23 of 113 shoulders (20.4%). The recurrence rate was 33.3% in rugby, 17.2% in American football, 11.1% in other collision sports, 14.3% in contact sports, and 12.5% in overhead sports. The most frequent cause of recurrence was tackling, and recurrence occurred with tackling in 12 of 16 athletes playing rugby or American football. Reoperation was completed in 11 shoulders. By univariate analysis, significant risk factors for postoperative recurrence of instability included playing rugby, age between 10 and 19 years at surgery, preoperative glenoid defect, small bone fragment of bony Bankart lesion, and capsular tear. However, by multivariate analysis, the most significant factor was not the type of sport but younger age at operation and a preoperative glenoid defect with

  9. Risk Factors for the Postoperative Recurrence of Instability After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Shigeto; Mae, Tatsuo; Sato, Seira; Okimura, Shinichiro; Kuroda, Miki

    2017-09-01

    Several risk factors for the postoperative recurrence of instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair have been reported, but there have been few detailed investigations of the specific risk factors in relation to the type of sport. This study investigated the postoperative recurrence of instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair without additional reinforcement procedures in competitive athletes, including athletes with a large glenoid defect. The purpose of this study was to investigate risk factors related to the postoperative recurrence of instability in athletes. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 115 athletes (123 shoulders) were classified into 5 groups according to type of sport: rugby (41 shoulders), American football (32 shoulders), other collision sports (18 shoulders), contact sports (15 shoulders), and overhead sports (17 shoulders). First, the recurrence rate in each sporting category was investigated, with 113 shoulders followed up for a minimum of 2 years. Then, factors related to postoperative recurrence were investigated in relation to the type of sport. Postoperative recurrence of instability was noted in 23 of 113 shoulders (20.4%). The recurrence rate was 33.3% in rugby, 17.2% in American football, 11.1% in other collision sports, 14.3% in contact sports, and 12.5% in overhead sports. The most frequent cause of recurrence was tackling, and recurrence occurred with tackling in 12 of 16 athletes playing rugby or American football. Reoperation was completed in 11 shoulders. By univariate analysis, significant risk factors for postoperative recurrence of instability included playing rugby, age between 10 and 19 years at surgery, preoperative glenoid defect, small bone fragment of bony Bankart lesion, and capsular tear. However, by multivariate analysis, the most significant factor was not the type of sport but younger age at operation and a preoperative glenoid defect with small or no bone fragment. Compared with the other

  10. [Arthroscopic Bankart lesion repair by double-row vertical mattress suture with anchors for anteroinferior glenohumeral instability].

    PubMed

    Tang, Kang-Lai; Chen, Guang-Xing; Guo, Lin; Gong, Ji-Cheng; Zhou, Bing-Hua; Yang, Hui-Feng; Gu, Ling-Chuan; Li, Hong-Zhi; Yang, Liu; Xu, Jian-Zhong

    2007-10-15

    To introduce a new arthroscopic Bankart repair by vertical mattress suture with anchors, and to evaluate its clinical effectiveness. A new arthroscopic Bankart repair by vertical mattress suture with anchors was performed, including to insert only 2 anchors at 3 o'clock and 5 o'clock position and make vertical mattress suture of labrum-ligament complex at 2, 4 and 6 o'clock of labrum, and to shift up the anterior-inferior capsule. Nine cases of anterior glenohumeral instability without severe glenoid bone defect were followed-up for an average period of 14 months (range from 6 to 26 months). The average surgery age was 28 years (range from 21 to 46 years). The average surgery time was 51 min (40 - 75 min). Clinical scores as evaluated by the modified Rowe score advanced from 40 +/- 16 points to 92 +/- 19 points (75 - 94). There was no any recurrence and complication. External rotation was reduced by 5 degrees at 0 degrees adduction and by 3 degrees at 90 degrees of abduction. The arthroscopic Bankart repair by vertical mattress suture with anchors for anteroinferior glenohumeral instability is favorable as an easy, short-time surgery with excellent clinical results in short-term follow-up.

  11. The surgical outcome of immediate arthroscopic Bankart repair for first time anterior shoulder dislocation in young active patients.

    PubMed

    Law, Billy Kan-Yip; Yung, Patrick Shu-Hang; Ho, Eric Po-Yan; Chang, Joseph Jeremy Hsi-Tse; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2008-02-01

    This study evaluated the surgical outcomes of young active patients with arthroscopic Bankart repair within 1 month after first-time anterior shoulder dislocation. From July 2002-October 2004, patients presented with first-time traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation and treated with arthroscopic stabilization within 1 month of injury were retrospectively reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography were performed before the operation in all cases. Cases with contralateral shoulder multidirectional instability or glenoid bone loss of more than 30% on preoperative computed tomography on the injury side were excluded. All patients were treated with arthroscopic Bankart repair, using metallic suture anchors or soft tissue bio-absorbable anchors by a same group of surgeons and followed the same rehabilitation protocol. Recurrence, instability signs, range of motion, WOSI score, Rowe score and complications were assessed. Thirty-eight patients were recruited: the average age was 21 (16-30). All patients had definite trauma history. Radiologically, all patients had Bankart/Hill-Sachs lesion. All the operations were done within 1 month after injury (6-25 days). The average hospital stay was 1.2 days (1-5 days). The average follow-up was 28 months (24-48 months). There were two cases of posttraumatic re-dislocation (5.2%). The average external rotation lag was 5 degrees (0-15) in 90 degrees shoulder abduction when compared with contralateral side. 95% of patients had excellent or good Rowe score. The average WOSI score was 83%. There was one case of transient ulnar nerve palsy and one case of superficial wound infection. This study concluded that immediate arthroscopic Bankart repair with an accelerated rehabilitation program is an effective and safe technique for treating young active patients with first-time traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation.

  12. Arthroscopic Bankart repair and capsular shift for recurrent anterior shoulder instability: functional outcomes and identification of risk factors for recurrence.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Issaq; Ashton, Fiona; Robinson, Christopher Michael

    2012-07-18

    Arthroscopic Bankart repair and capsular shift is a well-established technique for the treatment of anterior shoulder instability. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes following arthroscopic Bankart repair and capsular shift and to identify risk factors that are predictive of recurrence of glenohumeral instability. We performed a retrospective review of a prospectively collected database consisting of 302 patients who had undergone arthroscopic Bankart repair and capsular shift for the treatment of recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability. The prevalence of patient and injury-related risk factors for recurrence was assessed. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the predicted probability of recurrence within two years. The chief outcome measures were the risk of recurrence and the two-year functional outcomes assessed with the Western Ontario shoulder instability index (WOSI) and disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) scores. The rate of recurrent glenohumeral instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair and capsular shift was 13.2%. The median time to recurrence was twelve months, and this complication developed within one year in 55% of these patients. The risk of recurrence was independently predicted by the patient's age at surgery, the severity of glenoid bone loss, and the presence of an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion (all p < 0.001). These variables were incorporated into a model to provide an estimate of the risk of recurrence after surgery. Varying the cutoff level for the predicted probability of recurrence in the model from 50% to lower values increased the sensitivity of the model to detect recurrences but decreased the positive predictive value of the model to correctly predict failed repairs. There was a significant improvement in the mean WOSI and DASH scores at two years postoperatively (both p < 0.001), but the mean scores in the group with recurrence were significantly lower than those in the group

  13. Do nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs affect the outcome of arthroscopic Bankart repair?

    PubMed Central

    Blomquist, J; Solheim, E; Liavaag, S; Baste, V; Havelin, L I

    2014-01-01

    To achieve pain control after arthroscopic shoulder surgery, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a complement to other analgesics. However, experimental studies have raised concerns that these drugs may have a detrimental effect on soft tissue-to-bone healing and, thus, have a negative effect on the outcome. We wanted to investigate if there are any differences in the clinical outcome after the arthroscopic Bankart procedure for patients who received NSAIDs prescription compared with those who did not. 477 patients with a primary arthroscopic Bankart procedure were identified in the Norwegian shoulder instability register and included in the study. 32.5% received prescription of NSAIDs post-operatively. 370 (78%) of the patients answered a follow-up questionnaire containing the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability index (WOSI). Mean follow-up was 21 months. WOSI at follow-up were 75% in the NSAID group and 74% in the control group. 12% of the patients in the NSAID group and 14% in the control group reported recurrence of instability. The reoperation rate was 5% in both groups. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups. Prescription of short-term post-operative NSAID treatment in the post-operative period did not influence on the functional outcome after arthroscopic Bankart procedures. PMID:24750379

  14. [Clinical and functional course of patients after arthroscopic repair of a Bankart lesion].

    PubMed

    Barrios-Moyano, Antonio; Negrete-Corona, Jorge; Chávez-Hinojosa, Edgard

    2009-01-01

    Show the experience of the Orthopedics Service at Lic. Adolfo López Mateos Regional ISSSTE Hospital, in the management of anterior unidirectional shoulder instability with an arthroscopic technique consisting of reattaching the labrum in the glenoid with anchored sutures and capsular tightening with radiofrequency. Twenty-six patients with anterior unidirectional shoulder instability who were operated-on between August 2006 and November 2008 were included. Twelve patients underwent capsular retightening with radiofrequency and in 14 patients the latter was combined with sutured anchors. The patients selected had a history of relapsing glenohumeral dislocations and subluxations with anterior instability, with or without associated Bankart lesions, and all of them were young. The results were assessed basically with the functional UCLA scale and considering the occurrence of any instability-related event during the postoperative follow-up; from this perspective, there were no cases of recurrent instability. Two cases reported severe postoperative pain, and one had irritation of the sutures; 6 patients had residual limitation of combined lateral rotation and abduction movements, with a mean of 10 degrees compared with the sound contralateral limb. The most frequent incident was infiltration of solutions into the soft tissues due to the operative time. Capsular retightening with radiofrequency, whether combined or not with other repair techniques, has proven highly satisfactory from the perspective of the glenohumeral stabilization for anterior unidirectional instability. The arthroscopic approach offers the known advantages of being less aggressive to the soft tissues and a shorter time to resume work activities when rehabilitation therapy and exercises are followed.

  15. COMPARATIVE STUDY on the MANAGEMENT of GLENOHUMERAL JOINT DISLOCATION. Closed Reduction vs. Arthroscopic Remplissage with Bankart Lesion Repair.

    PubMed

    Fakih, Riad; Hamie, Muhieddine Rada; Yassine, Mahmoud Sami

    2016-01-01

    Conservative treatment of posttraumatic anteroinferior shoulder instability leads to a high failure rate and consequently high recurrence in young and active population. Each recurrence can increase the structural damage of both bony structures and soft tissues (Hill-Sachs lesion, Bankart lesion). Remplissage technique combined with Bankart repair have been proposed as a treatment option. Early arthroscopic treatment for shoulder dislocation will result in better outcome and lower recurrence rate than nonoperative management. We retrospectively reviewed 60 cases from 2010 to 2015 treated by remplissage technique with Bankart repair or closed reduction for anterior shoulder dislocation. All surgeries and closed reductions were done by the same surgeon. Mean age of patients was 30 years, most of them males having experienced one or more recurrent dislocations; mean follow-up was 2 years. Patients with Hill-Sachs lesions < 40% on the articular surface and < 20% of bone defect in the glenoid cavity were included. Exclusion criteria were: glenohumeral arthritis or other inflammation, fracture around the shoulder joint, elderly patients with osteoporosis. All patients included in the study were followed up after 6, 12 and 24 months. Rowe score was used to assess the stability of the shoulders and goniometry to assess the range of motion of the glenohumeral joints. The results confirm that the remplissage technique with Bankart repair takes the upper hand over the conservative management and does not produce any severe adverse effect on postoperative shoulder range of motion. A slight restriction (≈10º) observed in external rotation did not prevent 69% of patients from resuming their preinjury sports activities. At the last follow-up, 90% of patients had a stable shoulder. Conservative management was associated with high rate of recurrence limiting the daily activity of our patients and interfering with their return to sports activities. Except from the recurrence of

  16. Hill-Sachs Off-track Lesions as Risk Factor for Recurrence of Instability After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair.

    PubMed

    Locher, Joel; Wilken, Frauke; Beitzel, Knut; Buchmann, Stefan; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Denaro, Vincenzo; Imhoff, Andreas B

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of "off-track" Hill-Sachs lesions, according to the glenoid track concept, as a risk factor for recurrent instability and need for revision surgery after arthroscopic Bankart repair. We retrospectively reviewed 254 patients with anteroinferior glenohumeral instability who were managed with an arthroscopic stabilization procedure between 2006 and 2013. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography scans were available for 100 of these patients to calculate the glenoid track and the presence of "on-track" or off-track Hill-Sachs lesions. Recurrence of instability was evaluated at a mean follow-up of 22.4 months. Of 100 patients whose magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography scans were available, 88 had an on-track Hill-Sachs lesion and 12 had an off-track Hill-Sachs lesion. Revision surgery for recurrent instability was performed in 5 patients (6%) with an on-track Hill-Sachs lesion and in 4 patients (33%) with an off-track Hill-Sachs lesion (odds ratio, 8.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.85-37.26; P = .006). An off-track Hill-Sachs lesion is a significant and important risk factor for recurrence of instability and need for revision surgery after arthroscopic Bankart repair when compared with an on-track Hill-Sachs lesion. Level IV, prognostic case series. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Arthroscopic Bankart repair with knotless suture anchor for traumatic anterior shoulder instability: results of short-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Kenji; Yoneda, Minoru; Mizuno, Naoko; Fukushima, Sunao; Nakagawa, Shigeto

    2006-06-01

    To assess the clinical results of arthroscopic Bankart repair with the knotless suture anchor for traumatic recurrent anterior shoulder instability. A total of 47 patients with traumatic recurrent anterior shoulder instability and without severe glenoid bone defect who underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair with knotless suture anchors and were followed-up for longer than 2 years were included in the present study. The average age at surgery was 26 years (range, 16 to 49 years), with an average follow-up period of 28 months (range, 24 to 38 months). Clinical score as evaluated by the modified Rowe score advanced from 31 points to 91 points. In all, 35 patients were scored as excellent and 6 as good; the success rate was 87% (41 of 47), and the recurrence rate was 6.4% (3 of 47). External rotation was reduced by 8 degrees at adduction and by 6 degrees at 90 degrees of abduction. Of 12 patients, 7 (58%) returned completely to collision sports at preinjury levels, and 2 of 12 (17%) returned at a lower level. We experienced anchor-related trouble in 3 cases. One was the backwardness of the anchor at 2 months after operation. Breakage of the anchor loop occurred during the procedures in 2 cases. The clinical results of arthroscopic Bankart repair with knotless suture anchor were favorable; however, some pitfalls, such as the backwardness of the anchor and cutting of the anchor loop, were experienced. When using this anchor, its properties should be well recognized. Level IV, therapeutic case series.

  18. Arthrosis of glenohumeral joint after arthroscopic Bankart repair: a long-term follow-up of 13 years.

    PubMed

    Kavaja, Lauri; Pajarinen, Jarkko; Sinisaari, Ilkka; Savolainen, Vesa; Björkenheim, Jan-Magnus; Haapamäki, Ville; Paavola, Mika

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to establish radiologic and clinical occurrence of glenohumeral arthrosis after arthroscopic Bankart repair. Between January 1994 and December 1998, an arthroscopic Bankart repair was performed in 187 patients at our institution. We were able to assess clinical and radiologic glenohumeral arthrosis in 72 of the 101 patients who met the inclusion criteria (74 shoulders) (71%) after a 13-year follow-up. An additional 9 patients were interviewed by telephone. Radiologic arthrosis was evaluated with the Samilson-Prieto classification and clinical arthrosis with an arthrosis-specific quality-of-life questionnaire (Western Ontario Osteoarthritis of the Shoulder test). In addition, functional impairment was assessed with the Constant score and subjective satisfaction with a questionnaire. Radiologic arthrosis was diagnosed in 50 of 74 shoulders (68%), with 40 (80%) of them classified as mild. The mean score on the Western Ontario Osteoarthritis of the Shoulder questionnaire was 280 points (85% of the best possible score), which is considered relatively good. The mean Constant score was 78 points, and 75% of the patients were extremely satisfied or satisfied with the final results of operative treatment. The radiologic evaluation and self-assessment of the patients imply that the incidence of glenohumeral arthrosis after arthroscopic Bankart repair is quite common but the symptoms are generally mild and comparable to nonoperative treatment. Arthrosis rarely causes more than minor subjective symptoms or a minor objectively perceived disadvantage during 13 years' follow-up. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Arthroscopic Bankart repair augmented by plication of the inferior glenohumeral ligament via horizontal mattress suturing for traumatic shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kong Hwee; Soeharno, Henry; Chew, Chee Ping; Lie, Denny

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the two-year clinical outcomes of arthroscopic Bankart repair augmented by plication of the inferior glenohumeral ligament (IGHL) via horizontal mattress suturing. This study was a retrospective analysis of 76 arthroscopic Bankart repairs by a single surgeon from 2004 to 2008. Bioabsorbable suture anchors were used, with anchors placed at the 5:30, 4 and 3 o'clock positions of the right shoulder (correspondingly at the 6:30, 8 and 9 o'clock positions for the left shoulder). The lower most anchor was tied via horizontal mattress suture with plication of the IGHL, while the remaining two anchors were tied using simple sutures. The patients were postoperatively assessed, clinically and using the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) shoulder rating scale. The mean age of the patients at the time of presentation was 24.09 ± 7.98 years, and the mean duration of follow-up was 28.7 months. The postoperative recurrence rate of dislocation was 7.89% (six shoulders), of which five shoulders required revision surgeries. Excluding the revision cases, clinical assessment of the strength of the supraspinatus and the range of motion of the operated shoulders at two years post operation were either maintained or full in all patients. Analysis of the UCLA results showed pre- and postoperative mean scores of 25.94 ± 3.43 and 33.77 ± 3.07, respectively (p < 0.05). Arthroscopic Bankart repair augmented by plication of the IGHL and anchored via horizontal mattress suturing is a safe and reliable treatment for shoulder instability, with good clinical outcomes and low recurrence rates.

  20. Risk factors for shoulder re-dislocation after arthroscopic Bankart repair

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown effective clinical results after arthroscopic Bankart repair (ABR) but have shown several risk factors for re-dislocation after surgery. We evaluated whether patients are at a risk for re-dislocation during the first year after ABR, examined the recurrence rate after ABR, and sought to identify new risk factors. Methods We performed ABR using bioabsorbable suture anchors in 102 consecutive shoulders (100 patients) with traumatic anterior shoulder instability. Average patient age and follow-up period was 25.7 (range, 14–40) years and 67.5 (range, 24.5–120) months, respectively. We evaluated re-dislocation after ABR using patient telephone interviews (follow-up rate, 100%) and correlated re-dislocation with several risk factors. Results Re-dislocation after ABR occurred in nine shoulders (8.8%), of which seven sustained re-injuries within the first year with the arm elevated at 90° and externally rotated at 90°. Of the remaining 93 shoulders without re-dislocation, 8 had re-injury under the same conditions within the first year. Thus, re-injury within the first year was a risk for re-dislocation after ABR (P < 0.001, chi-squared test). Using multivariate analysis, large Hill-Sachs lesions (odds ratio, 6.77, 95% CI, 1.24–53.6) and <4 suture anchors (odds ratio, 9.86, 95% CI, 2.00–76.4) were significant risk factors for re-dislocation after ABR. Conclusions The recurrence rate after ABR is not associated with the time elapsed and that repair strategies should augment the large humeral bone defect and use >3 anchors during ABR. PMID:24993404

  1. Risk factors for shoulder re-dislocation after arthroscopic Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Hideaki; Gotoh, Masafumi; Mitsui, Yasuhiro; Kai, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Hidehiro; Kanazawa, Tomonoshin; Okawa, Takahiro; Higuchi, Fujio; Shirahama, Masahiro; Shiba, Naoto

    2014-07-04

    Recent studies have shown effective clinical results after arthroscopic Bankart repair (ABR) but have shown several risk factors for re-dislocation after surgery. We evaluated whether patients are at a risk for re-dislocation during the first year after ABR, examined the recurrence rate after ABR, and sought to identify new risk factors. We performed ABR using bioabsorbable suture anchors in 102 consecutive shoulders (100 patients) with traumatic anterior shoulder instability. Average patient age and follow-up period was 25.7 (range, 14-40) years and 67.5 (range, 24.5-120) months, respectively. We evaluated re-dislocation after ABR using patient telephone interviews (follow-up rate, 100%) and correlated re-dislocation with several risk factors. Re-dislocation after ABR occurred in nine shoulders (8.8%), of which seven sustained re-injuries within the first year with the arm elevated at 90° and externally rotated at 90°. Of the remaining 93 shoulders without re-dislocation, 8 had re-injury under the same conditions within the first year. Thus, re-injury within the first year was a risk for re-dislocation after ABR (P < 0.001, chi-squared test). Using multivariate analysis, large Hill-Sachs lesions (odds ratio, 6.77, 95% CI, 1.24-53.6) and <4 suture anchors (odds ratio, 9.86, 95% CI, 2.00-76.4) were significant risk factors for re-dislocation after ABR. The recurrence rate after ABR is not associated with the time elapsed and that repair strategies should augment the large humeral bone defect and use >3 anchors during ABR.

  2. Arthroscopic Bristow-Latarjet combined with bankart repair restores shoulder stability in patients with glenoid bone loss.

    PubMed

    Boileau, Pascal; Thélu, Charles-Édouard; Mercier, Numa; Ohl, Xavier; Houghton-Clemmey, Robert; Carles, Michel; Trojani, Christophe

    2014-08-01

    Arthroscopic Bankart repair alone cannot restore shoulder stability in patients with glenoid bone loss involving more than 20% of the glenoid surface. Coracoid transposition to prevent recurrent shoulder dislocation according to Bristow-Latarjet is an efficient but controversial procedure. We determined whether an arthroscopic Bristow-Latarjet procedure with concomitant Bankart repair (1) restored shoulder stability in this selected subgroup of patients, (2) without decreasing mobility, and (3) allowed patients to return to sports at preinjury level. We also evaluated (4) bone block positioning, healing, and arthritis and (5) risk factors for nonunion and coracoid screw pullout. Between July 2007 and August 2010, 79 patients with recurrent anterior instability and bone loss of more than 20% of the glenoid underwent arthroscopic Bristow-Latarjet-Bankart repair; nine patients (11%) were either lost before 2-year followup or had incomplete data, leaving 70 patients available at a mean of 35 months. Postoperative radiographs and CT scans were evaluated for bone block positioning, healing, and arthritis. Any postoperative dislocation or any subjective complaint of occasional to frequent subluxation was considered a failure. Physical examination included ROM in both shoulders to enable comparison and instability signs (apprehension and relocation tests). Rowe and Walch-Duplay scores were obtained at each review. Patients were asked whether they were able to return to sports at the same level and practice forced overhead sports. Potential risk factors for nonhealing were assessed. At latest followup, 69 of 70 (98%) patients had a stable shoulder, external rotation with arm at the side was 9° less than the nonoperated side, and 58 (83%) returned to sports at preinjury level. On latest radiographs, 64 (91%) had no osteoarthritis, and bone block positioning was accurate, with 63 (90%) being below the equator and 65 (93%) flush to the glenoid surface. The coracoid graft

  3. Results of Arthroscopic Bankart Repair for Anterior-Inferior Shoulder Instability at 13-Year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Aboalata, Mohamed; Plath, Johannes E; Seppel, Gernot; Juretzko, Julia; Vogt, Stephan; Imhoff, Andreas B

    2017-03-01

    Anterior-inferior shoulder instability is a common injury in young patients, particularly those practicing overhead-throwing sports. Long-term results after open procedures are well studied and evaluated. However, the long-term results after arthroscopic repair and risk factors of recurrence require further assessment. Arthroscopic Bankart repair results are comparable with those of open repair as described in the literature. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A total of 180 shoulders with anterior-inferior shoulder instability were stabilized arthroscopically, met the inclusion criteria and the patients were able to be contacted at a minimum of 10-year follow-up. Of these patients, 143 agreed to participate in the study. Assessment was performed clinically in 104 patients using the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, Constant score, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons score, Rowe score, and the Dawson 12-item questionnaire. The Samilson-Prieto score was used to assess degenerative arthropathy in radiographs available for 100 shoulders. Additionally, 15 patients participated through a specific questionnaire and 24 patients through a telephone survey. The overall redislocation rate was 18.18%. Redislocation rates for the different types of fixation devices were as follows: FASTak/Bio-FASTak, 15.1% (17/112); SureTac, 26.3% (5/19); and Panalok, 33.3% (4/12). Concomitant superior labral anterior-posterior repair had no effect on clinical outcome. Redislocation rate was significantly affected by the patient's age and duration of postoperative rehabilitation. Redislocation rate tended to be higher if there had been more than 1 dislocation preoperatively ( P = .098). Severe dislocation arthropathy was observed in 12% of patients, and degenerative changes were significantly correlated with the number of preoperative dislocations, patient age, and number of anchors. The patient satisfaction rate was 92.3%, and return to the preinjury sport level was possible in

  4. Ten-year follow-up of acute arthroscopic Bankart repair for initial anterior shoulder dislocation in young patients.

    PubMed

    Chapus, V; Rochcongar, G; Pineau, V; Salle de Chou, É; Hulet, C

    2015-12-01

    Early treatment of initial anterior glenohumeral dislocation in young patients is controversial and the interest of surgery, and notably arthroscopic stabilization, has not been demonstrated. A prospective study was therefore performed to assess (1) short-to-medium-term recurrence rate, (2) functional outcome, and (3) and medium-term osteoarthritis rate. Early arthroscopic stabilization by anterior capsule-labrum reinsertion after initial anterior shoulder dislocation is associated with low recurrence rate. Twenty-one patients with initial anterior dislocation were included between June 2002 and February 2004. All patients underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair within 30 days of dislocation. Patients were followed up prospectively, with clinical (Duplay and Constant scores) and radiological assessment (osteoarthritis). There were 5 recurrent dislocations (25%); 2 patients reported sensations of subluxation: i.e., 7 failures (35%). Mean Walch-Duplay score at 10 years was 88±1 (range, 30-100) and mean Rowe score 86±22 (range, 35-100). There was significant internal rotation deficit of one vertebral level between operated and contralateral shoulder (P < 0.005). At 10 years, 3 shoulders (15%) showed Samilson grade 1 centered glenohumeral osteoarthritis. Early arthroscopic capsule-labrum reinsertion by the Bankart technique in the month following initial anterior dislocation of the shoulder in patients under 25 years of age provided a low recurrence rate (35%) compared to the literature, including dislocation (25%) and subluxation (10%). Functional outcome was satisfactory, and osteoarthritis rate was low (15% Samilson grade 1). IV, prospective non-comparative study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Shoulder sport-specific impairments after arthroscopic Bankart repair: a prospective longitudinal assessment.

    PubMed

    Stein, Thomas; Linke, Ralf Dieter; Buckup, Johannes; Efe, Turgay; von Eisenhart-Rothe, Rudiger; Hoffmann, Reinhard; Jäger, Alwin; Welsch, Frederic

    2011-11-01

    Reports of return to shoulder-dependent sport after surgical stabilization previously underestimated impairments, which were not reflected in the score systems used. Return to shoulder-dependent sport depends on the type of sport performed. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Forty-seven athletes (26.9 years of age at surgery) who underwent isolated arthroscopic Bankart repair were longitudinally monitored by shoulder-dependent sport-specific activity (Shoulder Sport Activity Score [SSAS]) and ability (Athletic Shoulder Outcome Scoring System [ASOSS]) scores and visual analog scales for reachieved proficiency level, sport-specific shoulder pain, and functional deficits. Data were assessed at 4 points of treatment: preoperatively, and postoperatively after 6, 16, and 32 months (P0-P3). Athletes were analyzed separately according to shoulder sport: noncollision/nonoverhead (G1), collision (G2), overhead (G3), and martial arts (G4). The G1 and G2 athletes had re-achieved the preinjury sport activity and sport proficiency status and excellent ASOSS scores after 32 months (SSAS(G1) = 7.2, SSAS(G2) = 8.1, ASOSS(G1) = 94.4, ASOSS(G2) = 95.2), whereas G3 and G4 athletes remained at an inferior activity level (SSAS(G3) = 8.0, SSAS(G4) = 8.3) and proficiency level. The ASOSS documented a prolonged period of shoulder rehabilitation for G3 and G4 athletes to reach a good shoulder-dependent sport ability outcome after 32 months (ASOSS(G3) = 89.0, ASOSS(G4) = 93.1). All groups recorded persisting limitations in visual analog scales for sport-specific shoulder function and pain. The established scores (Rowe = 95.9, Walch-Duplay = 93.3, Constant = 94.0) did not reflect these sport-specific impairments. Athletes with 5 or more preoperative dislocations had significantly longer surgery-to-sport resumption intervals with a prolonged proficiency recovery. The athletes' shoulder stabilization resulted in a prolonged rehabilitation depending on the functional demand of the performed

  6. Arthroscopic repair of chronic bony bankart lesion using a low anterior portal.

    PubMed

    Brand, Jefferson C; Westerberg, Paul

    2012-12-01

    We describe the repair of a chronic bony Bankart lesion in a case with recurrent instability using standard techniques and equipment for addressing anteroinferior glenohumeral instability. A 25-year-old man with recurrent instability and a chronic bony Bankart lesion with a Hill-Sachs lesion was treated. The inferior 2 sutures and knotless anchors are placed through a low anterior portal, which improves the angle of approach to the inferior portion of the glenoid that is fractured. The knotless anchors are impacted through the low anterior portal, just superior to the level of the suture, as the fragment tends to retract medially and inferiorly, with the drill guide slightly on the face of the glenoid. The superior-anterior portal adjacent to the biceps tendon gives a better view of the glenoid articular cartilage position of the anchors required to restore the anatomic location of the fracture fragment. The low anterior portal improved and simplified the reduction of the fracture fragment to the glenoid neck by allowing access to the anterior-inferior bony Bankart lesion that was repairable with suture and knotless anchors using standardized techniques.

  7. Arthroscopic Repair of Chronic Bony Bankart Lesion Using a Low Anterior Portal

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Jefferson C.; Westerberg, Paul

    2012-01-01

    We describe the repair of a chronic bony Bankart lesion in a case with recurrent instability using standard techniques and equipment for addressing anteroinferior glenohumeral instability. A 25-year-old man with recurrent instability and a chronic bony Bankart lesion with a Hill-Sachs lesion was treated. The inferior 2 sutures and knotless anchors are placed through a low anterior portal, which improves the angle of approach to the inferior portion of the glenoid that is fractured. The knotless anchors are impacted through the low anterior portal, just superior to the level of the suture, as the fragment tends to retract medially and inferiorly, with the drill guide slightly on the face of the glenoid. The superior-anterior portal adjacent to the biceps tendon gives a better view of the glenoid articular cartilage position of the anchors required to restore the anatomic location of the fracture fragment. The low anterior portal improved and simplified the reduction of the fracture fragment to the glenoid neck by allowing access to the anterior-inferior bony Bankart lesion that was repairable with suture and knotless anchors using standardized techniques. PMID:23766999

  8. How Satisfied Are Patients with Arthroscopic Bankart Repair? A 2-Year Follow-up on Quality-of-Life Outcome.

    PubMed

    Saier, Tim; Plath, Johannes E; Waibel, Sabrina; Minzlaff, Philipp; Feucht, Matthias J; Herschbach, Peter; Imhoff, Andreas B; Braun, Sepp

    2017-06-29

    To report general life and health satisfaction after arthroscopic Bankart repair in patients with post-traumatic recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability and to investigate postoperative time lost to return to work at 2-year follow-up. Between 2011 and 2013 patients treated with arthroscopic Bankart repair in the beach chair position for acute shoulder instability were included in this study. Questions on Life Satisfaction Modules (FLZ(M)) and the Short Form 12 (SF-12) were used as quality-of-life outcome scales. Oxford Instability Score (OIS), Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (QuickDASH), and self-reported American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) shoulder index were used as functional outcome scales. Return to work (months) was monitored and analyzed depending on physical workload. Data were assessed the day before surgery and prospectively monitored until 24 months postoperatively. Quality-of-life outcome was correlated with functional shoulder outcome and compared with normative age-adjusted data. Paired t-test, Wilcoxon test, Mann-Whitney U-Test, and Spearman's correlation coefficient were used for statistical analysis. Fifty-three patients were prospectively included. The mean age at surgery was 29.4 years. Satisfaction with general life and satisfaction with health (FLZ(M)) as well as physical component scale (SF-12) improved significantly to values above normative data within 6 to 12 months after surgery (each P < .001). OIS, QuickDASH, and ASES improved significantly from baseline until 24 months after surgery (each P < .001). For ASES, improvement above minimal clinically important difference was shown. There was a positive correlation between quality of life and functional outcome scores (P < .05; rho, 0.3-0.4). Mean time to return to work was 2 months (range, 0-10; standard deviation, 1.9), with significantly longer time intervals observed in patients with heavy physical workload (3.1 months; range, 0 to 10

  9. Structural and clinical integrity of the rotator cuff in athletes after arthroscopic Bankart repair using the three-portal technique.

    PubMed

    Stein, T; Buckup, J; Efe, T; von Eisenhart-Rothe, R; Hoffmann, R; Zimmermann, E; Welsch, F

    2015-03-01

    Muscular recovery of structural integrity after arthroscopic Bankart repair using the para- and trans-musculotendinous three-portal technique has not been investigated. Twenty-seven athletes [mean age 26.9 years, (group 1; G1)] were prospectively and longitudinally monitored after arthroscopic Bankart repair using the three-portal technique by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and specific clinical muscular testing. The muscular integrity was assessed at the subscapularis (SSC) for the para-tendinous anteroinferior portal, the supraspinatus (SSP) for the trans-tendinous suprabicipital portal, and the infraspinatus (ISP) for the trans-tendinous posterior portal. Muscular atrophy was assessed by standardized ratios of transverse and vertical diameters for the SSC and ISP, as defined by cross-sectional area ratios for the SSP. Fatty infiltration was assessed by signal intensity analysis for the upper and lower SSC, SSP, and upper ISP as a ratio with the lower ISP. These parameters were analyzed for pre-operative (T0), 1-year (T1), and 2-year status (T2), and compared to 27 healthy volunteers [mean age 29.4 years, (group 2, G2)]. The structural integrity assessments were performed after 14.8 (T1) and 32.0 months (T2). The SSC analysis revealed no muscular impairments in the upper and lower portions between T0 and T2 or compared to G2. MRI analysis for SSP and ISP showed full muscular recovery without any changes between T0 and T2 or deficits compared to G2. The number of pre-operative dislocations had no influence on the muscular integrity. MR analysis detected signs of overuse syndrome in 15 % at T0, 41 % at T1, and 63 % at T2; 77, 22, and 26 % of patients at T0, T1, and T2, respectively, were symptomatic. Arthroscopic Bankart repair using the three-portal technique prevents full muscular integrity for para-tendinous anteroinferior portals at the SSC, the trans-tendinous suprabicipital portal through the SSP, and the trans-tendinous portal through the ISP.

  10. Arthroscopic Bankart Repair Versus Open Bristow-Latarjet for Shoulder Instability: A Matched-Pair Multicenter Study Focused on Return to Sport.

    PubMed

    Blonna, Davide; Bellato, Enrico; Caranzano, Francesco; Assom, Marco; Rossi, Roberto; Castoldi, Filippo

    2016-12-01

    The arthroscopic Bankart repair and open Bristow-Latarjet procedure are the 2 most commonly used techniques to treat recurrent shoulder instability. To compare in a case control-matched manner the 2 techniques, with particular emphasis on return to sport after surgery. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A study was conducted in 2 hospitals matching 60 patients with posttraumatic recurrent anterior shoulder instability with a minimum follow-up of 2 years (30 patients treated with arthroscopic Bankart procedure and 30 treated with open Bristow-Latarjet procedure). Patients with severe glenoid bone loss and revision surgeries were excluded. In one hospital, patients were treated with arthroscopic Bankart repair using anchors; in the other, patients underwent the Bristow-Latarjet procedure. Patients were matched according to age at surgery, type and level of sport practiced before shoulder instability (Degree of Shoulder Involvement in Sports [DOSIS] scale), and number of dislocations. The primary outcomes were return to sport (Subjective Patient Outcome for Return to Sports [SPORTS] score), rate of recurrent instability, Oxford Shoulder Instability Score (OSIS), Subjective Shoulder Value (SSV), Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI), and range of motion (ROM). After a mean follow-up of 5.3 years (range, 2-9 years), patients who underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair obtained better results in terms of return to sport (SPORTS score: 8 vs 6; P = .02) and ROM in the throwing position (86° vs 79°; P = .01), and they reported better subjective perception of the shoulder (SSV: 86% vs 75%; P = .02). No differences were detectable using the OSIS or WOSI. The rate of recurrent instability was not statistically different between the 2 groups (Bankart repair 10% vs Bristow-Latarjet 0%; P = .25), although the study may have been underpowered to detect a clinically important difference in this parameter. The multiple regression analysis showed that the independent

  11. Prevalence of and Risk Factors for Dislocation Arthropathy: Radiological Long-term Outcome of Arthroscopic Bankart Repair in 100 Shoulders at an Average 13-Year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Plath, Johannes E; Aboalata, Mohamed; Seppel, Gernot; Juretzko, Julia; Waldt, Simone; Vogt, Stephan; Imhoff, Andreas B

    2015-05-01

    Glenohumeral osteoarthritis is a well-documented, long-term complication of open stabilization procedures. However, there is a lack of knowledge about long-term radiographic outcome after arthroscopic Bankart procedures. Glenohumeral osteoarthritis will develop less frequently in arthroscopic Bankart repair compared with open repairs reported in the literature. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. The inclusion criteria for this study were (1) all-arthroscopic Bankart repair for a (2) symptomatic anteroinferior shoulder instability and (3) a minimum follow-up of 10 years. True anteroposterior and lateral radiographs were obtained to evaluate the prevalence and grade of osteoarthritis according to the Samilson classification. Patients were assessed by the Constant score and examined for passive external rotation deficits. Of 165 shoulders that fulfilled the inclusion criteria, 100 were available for evaluation. The median Constant score at an average±SD 156.2±18.5 months after Bankart repair was 94 (range, 46-100). Twenty-one shoulders (21%) sustained a recurrent dislocation. Overall, 31% of shoulders showed no evidence of glenohumeral osteoarthritis; 41% showed mild, 16% moderate, and 12% severe degenerative changes. Osteoarthritis did not correlate with Constant score results (P=.427). The grade of osteoarthritis was significantly associated with the number of preoperative dislocations (P=.016), age at initial dislocation (P=.005) and at surgery (P=.002), and the number of anchors used (P=.001), whereas time from initial dislocation to surgery (P=.854) and external rotation deficit at 0° and 90° of abduction (P=.104 and .348, respectively) showed no significant correlation. Recurrent dislocation did not affect the presence or grade of osteoarthritis (P=.796 and .665, respectively). At an average 13 years after arthroscopic Bankart repair, osteoarthritic changes are a common finding and, overall, are comparable with reports in the literature regarding open

  12. A novel flexible drill device enabling arthroscopic transosseous repair of Bankart lesions.

    PubMed

    Won, Y-Y; Park, J S; Choi, S J; Hong, S I

    2017-06-01

    We have developed a flexible drill device that makes arthroscopic transosseous repair possible, and report preliminary results. Twelve patients with post-traumatic anterior inferior glenohumeral instability were selected. the flexible drill device is inserted into the shoulder joint through the posterior portal and the guide pipe unit is placed 5mm posterior to the margin of the anterior glenoid rim. The flexible drill is driven through the glenoid with the power drill, creating a hole in the glenoid. A non-absorbable suture is passed through the hole and a sliding knot tying is performed over the capsule and labrum after completing stitches with the suture hook loaded. The same procedures are repeated in the 2, 3 and 4 o'clock positions of the glenoid. There was no recurrence of dislocation at the mean follow-up period of 52.3 months. The mean Rowe score was 89.5. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Results of arthroscopic Bankart repair with Hill-Sachs remplissage for anterior shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Bonnevialle, Nicolas; Azoulay, Vadim; Faraud, Amélie; Elia, Fanny; Swider, Pascal; Mansat, Pierre

    2017-05-11

    The aim of this study was to evaluate mid-term outcomes of Bankart repair with Hill-Sachs remplissage (BHSR) and to highlight prognostic factors of failure. Thirty-four patients operated on for anterior shoulder instability with BHSR were enrolled in a prospective non-randomised study. Clinical and radiographic evaluation was performed at 1.5, three, six months and yearly thereafter. Outcome measures included Rowe and Walch-Duplay score. At mean follow-up of 35 months (24-63), the Rowe and Walch-Duplay scores reached respectively 92.7 and 88.2 points. The mean deficit in external rotation was 6° in ER1 and 1° in ER2 (p = 0.4, p = 0.9 respectively). Five patients (14.7%) had a recurrence of instability and three others had a persistent anterior apprehension. In the failure group, the Hill-Sachs lesion was deeper (26% vs 19% of the humeral diameter; p = 0.04) and range of motion at 1.5 months postoperatively was greater. Age at surgery, pre-operative instability severity index score (ISIS), hyperlaxity, type and level of sport, amount of glenoid bone loss had no correlation with failure rate. The rate of failure at mid-term follow-up of BHSR was higher than commonly reported. The premature recovery of range of motion seems to be a clinical sign of failure at follow-up. Moreover, in case of deep Hill-Sachs lesion (>20%) an alternative procedure should be considered. Level IV.

  14. Morphological Characteristics of the Repaired Labrum According to Glenoid Location and Its Clinical Relevance After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair: Postoperative Evaluation With Computed Tomography Arthrography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Yoon; Chung, Seok Won; Kwak, Joo Young

    2014-06-01

    There have been no studies on the postoperative morphological characteristics of the restored labrum at different glenoid locations and its clinical relevance after arthroscopic Bankart repair with suture anchors. To analyze the morphological characteristics of the restored labrum at different locations of the glenoid and their relevance to clinical outcomes as well as affecting factors and to trace the inserted suture anchors after arthroscopic Bankart repair using computed tomography arthrography (CTA). Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A total of 46 patients (mean age, 26.5 ± 6.8 years) who underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair with absorbable suture anchors were enrolled in this study. Patients underwent CTA preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively as well as functional outcome evaluation preoperatively and at the last follow-up (>24 months) with the Rowe score and visual analog scale for pain. Labral height and width were measured on conventional axial CTA images at the 3-, 4-, and 5-o'clock positions twice by 2 raters. The postoperative measurements were also compared with those of the healthy anterior labrum, acquired from the same CTA examination of 32 consecutive patients (mean age, 26.5 ± 8.5 years) with superior labral lesions in the same study period. The postoperative difference in the measurements and between clock positions, and the relationship between the measurements and the clinical factors and functional outcomes, were evaluated. In addition, the locations of all suture anchors were traced on each CTA image, and outcomes according to the locations of the most inferior suture anchors were assessed. The interobserver and intraobserver reliabilities of measurements at each location were excellent (Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.773-0.988). Of the 46 patients, 2 (4.35%) had redislocations after surgery. Postoperative labral height and width were significantly increased at all locations (all P < .001) up to a level similar to the healthy

  15. Clinical Outcome and Glenoid Morphology After Arthroscopic Repair of Chronic Osseous Bankart Lesions: A Five to Eight-Year Follow-up Study.

    PubMed

    Kitayama, Soichiro; Sugaya, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Norimasa; Matsuki, Keisuke; Kawai, Nobuaki; Tokai, Morihito; Ohnishi, Kazutomo; Ueda, Yusuke; Hoshika, Shota; Kitamura, Nobuto; Yasuda, Kazunori; Moriishi, Joji

    2015-11-18

    Arthroscopic osseous Bankart repair for shoulders with chronic recurrent anterior instability has been reported as an effective procedure with promising short-term outcomes. However, to date, we know of no report describing longer-term outcomes and glenoid morphologic change. The purpose of the present study was to report intermediate to long-term outcomes and glenoid morphologic change after arthroscopic osseous Bankart repair in patients with substantial glenoid bone loss. A consecutive series of eighty-five patients with traumatic anterior glenohumeral instability associated with a chronic osseous Bankart lesion underwent arthroscopic repair from January 2005 through December 2006. Forty-six patients with bone loss of >15% of the inferior glenoid diameter relative to the assumed inferior circle regardless of the fragment size were selected as candidates for this study. Thirty-eight patients (83%), including thirty-four male and four female patients, with a mean age of 23.4 years (range, fifteen to thirty-six years) at the time of surgery, were available for final follow-up at a mean of 6.2 years (range, 5.0 to 8.1 years) after surgery. One patient had a redislocation during a traffic accident five months after surgery before obtaining an osseous union. The mean Rowe score and the mean Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index improved significantly from 30.7 points preoperatively to 95.4 points postoperatively and from 26.5% to 81.5%, respectively. Although the mean preoperative fragment size was measured as only 4.7%, the mean glenoid bone loss improved from 20.4% preoperatively to -1.1% postoperatively. Arthroscopic osseous Bankart repair is an effective primary treatment for shoulders with substantial glenoid bone loss as it provides successful outcomes without recurrence of instability once osseous union is obtained. Glenoid morphology can be normalized during the intermediate to long-term postoperative period, even in shoulders with a smaller fragment

  16. Bone fragment union and remodeling after arthroscopic bony bankart repair for traumatic anterior shoulder instability with a glenoid defect: influence on postoperative recurrence of instability.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Shigeto; Ozaki, Ritsuro; Take, Yasuhiro; Mae, Tatsuo; Hayashida, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    Although good clinical outcomes have been reported after arthroscopic bony Bankart repair, the extent of bone union is still unclear. To investigate bone union after arthroscopic bony Bankart repair and its influence on postoperative recurrence of instability. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Among 113 consecutive shoulders that underwent arthroscopic bony Bankart repair, postoperative evaluation of bone union by computed tomography (CT) was performed at various times in 81 shoulders. Bone union was investigated during 3 periods: 3 to 6 months postoperatively (first period), 7 to 12 months postoperatively (second period), and 13 months or more postoperatively (third period). The influence of the size of the preoperative glenoid defect and the size of the bone fragment on bone union was investigated, as well as the influence of bone union on postoperative recurrence of instability. In shoulders with bone union, bone fragment remodeling and changes in the glenoid defect size were also investigated. The bone union rate was 30.5% in the first period, 55.3% in the second period, and 84.6% in the third period. Among 53 shoulders with CT evaluation in the second period or later and follow-up for a minimum of 1 year, there was complete union in 33 shoulders (62.3%), partial union in 3 (5.7%), nonunion in 8 (15.1%), and no fragment on CT in 9 (17.0%). The complete union rate was 50% for 22 shoulders with small bone fragments (<5% of the glenoid diameter), 56.3% for 16 shoulders with medium fragments (5%-10%), and 86.7% for 15 shoulders with large fragments (>10%). The recurrence rate for postoperative instability was only 6.1% for shoulders with complete union, while it was 50% for shoulders with partial union, nonunion, no fragment, and no fragment on CT. The recurrence rate was significantly higher (36.4%) in shoulders with small fragments, but it was significantly lower in shoulders with bone union. In shoulders with bone union, the bone fragment frequently became

  17. Postoperative evaluation of drill holes for arthroscopic Bankart repair with suture anchors by the use of computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masahito; Goto, Hideyuki; Nozaki, Masahiro; Nishimori, Yasuhiro; Takenaga, Tetsuya; Murase, Atsunori; Nagaya, Yuko; Iguchi, Hirotaka; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Sugimoto, Katsumasa; Otsuka, Takanobu

    2015-05-01

    Here we investigated the angle and placement of bone holes for suture anchors using postoperative computed-tomography scapula scans. The study group comprised 20 shoulders from 20 consecutive patients (13 males and seven females; mean age 23.4 years) who underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair. All anchors were inserted through the anterior portal after establishing a bone hole at the edge of the glenoid articular surface using a drill. Computed tomography images of the scapula were taken 1 month postoperatively and used to create three-dimensional scapula models with Mimics and Magics software. Bone holes in the anterior-inferior (3:00-6:00) position were assigned either to the non-perforated group if they were positioned entirely inside the glenoid bone or to the perforated group if the far cortex of the glenoid was penetrated by the drill. The angle between the glenoid articular surface and the bone hole was measured in the oblique coronal and transverse plane views. The length of the bone hole was also assessed. Of the 85 bone holes investigated, 42 were in the 3:00-6:00 position. Perforation was detected in 16 of these 42 holes (38.2%). The angle in the oblique coronal plane view and the length of the bone hole were significantly larger in the non-perforated group than in the perforated group; however, the angle in the transverse plane view did not significantly differ between the two groups. Before inserting an implant in the anterior-inferior area, the angle between the drill guide and the glenoid surface in the oblique coronal plane view should be carefully checked to ensure that the length of the hole inside the glenoid bone is adequate.

  18. Arthroscopic Bankart repair and subscapularis augmentation: an alternative technique treating anterior shoulder instability with bone loss.

    PubMed

    Maiotti, Marco; Russo, Raffaele; Zanini, Antonio; Schröter, Steffen; Massoni, Carlo; Bianchedi, Diana

    2016-06-01

    This study presents the preliminary results of a new arthroscopic technique consisting of the association of 2 procedures, capsulolabral repair and subscapularis augmentation tenodesis, in the treatment of traumatic anterior shoulder instability with both glenoid bone loss and a Hill-Sachs lesion. Eighty-nine patients engaged in sports were enrolled in this retrospective case-series study with 2 to 5 years' follow-up. All patients underwent a computed tomography scan to assess the percentage of glenoid bone loss by the Pico method. A prior stabilization procedure had failed in 20 patients, who were then segregated into a different group. Visual analog scale (VAS), Rowe, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores were used to assess the results. Only 3 of 89 patients had a post-traumatic redislocation. The mean length of follow-up was 31.5 months (range, 25-60 months). The VAS, Rowe, and ASES scores showed significant improvements: The VAS score decreased from a mean of 3.1 to 0.5 (P = .0157), the Rowe score increased from 58.9 to 94.1 (P = .0215), and the ASES score increased from 68.5 to 95.5 (P = .0197). The mean deficit of external rotation was 6° with the arm at the side of the trunk, and the mean deficit was 3° with the arm in 90° of abduction. The described procedure is a reproducible and effective technique used to restore joint stability in patients engaged in sports who have incurred anterior recurrent shoulder dislocation associated with glenoid bone loss (<25%) and a Hill-Sachs lesion. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Arthroscopic Bankart repair associated with subscapularis augmentation (ASA) versus open Latarjet to treat recurrent anterior shoulder instability with moderate glenoid bone loss: clinical comparison of two series.

    PubMed

    Russo, R; Della Rotonda, G; Cautiero, F; Ciccarelli, M; Maiotti, M; Massoni, C; Di Pietto, F; Zappia, M

    2017-04-01

    The treatment of chronic anterior shoulder instability with glenoid bone loss is still debated. The purpose of this study is to compare short-term results of two techniques treating chronic shoulder instability with moderate glenoid bone loss: bone block according to open Latarjet-Patte procedure and arthroscopic Bankart repair in association with subscapularis augmentation. Ninety-one patients with moderate anterior glenoid bone loss underwent from 2011 to 2015. From these patients, two groups of 20 individuals each have been selected. The groups were homogeneous in terms of age, gender, dominance and glenoid bone loss. In group A, an open Latarjet procedure has been performed, and in group B, an arthroscopic Bankart repair associated with subscapularis augmentation has been performed. The mean follow-up in group A was 21 months (20-39 months), while in group B was 20 months (15-36 months). QuickDash score, Constant and Rowe shoulder scores, were used for evaluations of results. The mean preoperative rate of QuickDash score was 3.6 for group A and 4.0 for group B; Rowe Score was 50.0 for group A and 50.0 for group B. Preoperative mean Constant score was 56.2 for Latarjet-Patte and 55.2 for Bankart plus ASA. Postoperative mean QuickDash score was in group A 1.8 and 1.7 in group B; Rowe Score was 89.8 and 91.6; Constant Score was 93.3 and 93.8. No complications related to surgery have been observed for both procedures. Not statistically significant difference was reported between the two groups (p > .05). Postoperatively, the mean deficit of external rotation in ER1 was -9° in group A and -8 in group B; In ER2, the mean deficit was -5° in both groups (p = .0942). Arthroscopic subscapularis augmentation of Bankart repair is an effective procedure for the treatment of recurrent anterior shoulder instability with glenoid bone loss without any significant difference in comparison with the well-known open Latarjet procedure.

  20. Revision of Failed Artroscopic Bankart Repairs

    PubMed Central

    Muiño, José María Silberberg; Gimenez, Martín Alejandro; Salvucci, Mauro Gabriel Maroa; Ferro, Diego; Rullan, Ramón Muiña

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To present our functional outcomes from patients treated arthroscopically for a failed Bankart repair, using suture anchors and capsulolabral tissue only. Methods: Series of 22 patients presented with a recurrence of instability after a previous stabilization surgery (3 Latarjet, Bankart 19). We treated them by a an all-arthroscopic procedure, avoiding bone grafts, when glenoid track was found to be enough to proceed. The failure was associated with trauma in 11 patients, a non-anatomic repair in 6 patients, capsular laxity in 4 patients and a non-union of the coracoid graft in 1 patient. Revision surgery included: Bankart repair with anchors in 17 cases, a posterior-inferior capsulo-labral plication in one case, and 5 remplissages. In 4 cases subscapularis augmentation was used because of poor capsular quality. Screw removal was necessary when treating the non-union case. Patients were followed-up by a minimum of 23 months (range 23-26), and evaluated by the UCLA Test, SS test and Rowe score. Results: Thirteen patients had an excellent result, 6 good, 2 satisfactory and one bad result, according to UCLA score. The mean Rowe score was 90.4, at final follow up. The Simple Shoulder Test went from an 8 preoperative to an 11 postoperative, mean scores. 19 of 22 patients returned to the same level of activity prior to the injury. Complications: recurrence in 2 cases, subluxation in 2 and one shoulder stiffness that required an arthrolysis. Conclusion: An arthroscopic revision surgery, after a failed Bankart repair, presents satisfactory results in selected patients. Arthroscopic vision allows a correct diagnosis of injuries as possible causes of failure and subsequent treatment.

  1. A Qualitative Investigation of Return to Sport After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair: Beyond Stability.

    PubMed

    Tjong, Vehniah K; Devitt, Brian M; Murnaghan, M Lucas; Ogilvie-Harris, Darrell J; Theodoropoulos, John S

    2015-08-01

    Arthroscopic shoulder stabilization is known to have excellent functional results, but many patients do not return to their preinjury level of sport, with return to play rates reported between 48% and 100% despite good outcome scores. To understand specific subjective psychosocial factors influencing a patient's decision to return to sport after arthroscopic shoulder stabilization. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted with patients aged 18 to 40 years who had undergone primary arthroscopic shoulder stabilization and had a minimum 2-year follow-up. All patients participated in sport before surgery without any further revision operations or shoulder injuries. Qualitative data analysis was performed in accordance with the Strauss and Corbin theory to derive codes, categories, and themes. Preinjury and current sport participation was defined by type, level of competition, and the Brophy/Marx shoulder activity score. Patient-reported pain and shoulder function were also obtained. A total of 25 patients were interviewed, revealing that fear of reinjury, shifts in priority, mood, social support, and self-motivation were found to greatly influence the decision to return to sport both in patients who had and had not returned to their preinjury level of play. Patients also described fear of sporting incompetence, self-awareness issues, recommendations from physical therapists, and degree of confidence as less common considerations affecting their return to sport. In spite of excellent functional outcomes, extrinsic and intrinsic factors such as competing interests, kinesiophobia, age, and internal stressors and motivators can have a major effect on a patient's decision to return to sport after arthroscopic shoulder stabilization. The qualitative methods used in this study provide a unique patient-derived perspective into postoperative recovery and highlight the necessity to recognize and address subjective and psychosocial

  2. Can we improve the indication for Bankart arthroscopic repair? A preliminary clinical study using the ISIS score.

    PubMed

    Thomazeau, H; Courage, O; Barth, J; Pélégri, C; Charousset, C; Lespagnol, F; Nourissat, G; Audebert, S; Guillo, S; Toussaint, B; Lafosse, L; Bradel, J; Veillard, D; Boileau, P

    2010-12-01

    The objectives of this study on arthroscopic treatment of chronic anterior shoulder instability were the collection of the current practices for this indication, their development as reported in the literature, and the analysis of preliminary results on a multicenter prospective series of Bankart arthroscopic procedures undertaken using a common technique on patients selected based on the Instability Severity Index Score (ISIS). This procedure predominates in the English-speaking world, whereas the Latarjet protocol is preferred in France. The choice between the two seems to be cultural since neither technique could be demonstrated to be superior in an analysis of 171 responses to an Internet questionnaire in this study. The literature reports disappointing results in the Bankart arthroscopic procedure and recent articles have researched the predictive factors for its failure. Eleven centers prospectively included 125 patients from 1 December 2007 to 30 November 2008. The inclusion criteria were recurrence of anterior instability and an ISIS less than or equal to four points out of 10. All the selected patients underwent capsuloligamentous reinsertion with a common minimal technique of at least three anchors and four sutures with the same postoperative protocol. At a mean follow-up of 18 months, four patients (3.2%) had experienced recurrence. For the 84 patients reexamined at 1 year, the Walch-Duplay and Rowe scores were, respectively, 88.4 and 87.8 points out of 100. Subjectively, 88.1% of the patients declared they were satisfied and would undergo the intervention again. This study confirmed the use of the ISIS as a consultation tool. Only continuation of the study with a minimum follow-up of 3 years will allow us to validate the lower limit of the ISIS below which this technique could be proposed provided that it respects the technical prerequisite of at least four capsuloligamentous sutures. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. The "bony Bankart bridge" procedure: a new arthroscopic technique for reduction and internal fixation of a bony Bankart lesion.

    PubMed

    Millett, Peter J; Braun, Sepp

    2009-01-01

    Arthroscopic treatment of bony Bankart lesions can be challenging. We present a new easy and reproducible technique for arthroscopic reduction and suture anchor fixation of bony Bankart fragments. A suture anchor is placed medially to the fracture on the glenoid neck, and its sutures are passed around the bony fragment through the soft tissue including the inferior glenohumeral ligament complex. The sutures of this anchor are loaded in a second anchor that is placed on the glenoid face. This creates a nontilting 2-point fixation that compresses the fragment into its bed. By use of the standard technique, additional suture anchors are used superiorly and inferiorly to the bony Bankart piece to repair the labrum and shift the joint capsule. We call this the "bony Bankart bridge" procedure.

  4. A prospective, comparative, radiological, and clinical study of the influence of the "remplissage" procedure on shoulder range of motion after stabilization by arthroscopic Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Nourissat, Geoffroy; Kilinc, Alexandre Sahin; Werther, Jean Roger; Doursounian, Levon

    2011-10-01

    Certain failures of arthroscopic Bankart repairs seem to be related to the presence of a Hill-Sachs defect. It has been suggested that Hill-Sachs lesions can be treated by "remplissage" (filling in) of the defect. The effect of this procedure on the mobility of the shoulder is not known. To determine if filling in the Hill-Sachs defect with rotator cuff tendon would modify the range of motion of the operated shoulder. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. A prospective study of 2 patient populations (arthroscopic Bankart repair alone vs Bankart and remplissage) was undertaken after selecting patients using the Instability Severity Index Score (ISIS). Patients with a Hill-Sachs lesion seen on anteroposterior radiographs had a remplissage procedure if this procedure allowed them to obtain an ISIS lower than 4. The main clinical outcome was the range of motion (external rotation at the side [ER1], external rotation in abduction [ER2], internal rotation [IR], and forward elevation), assessed by the difference between each shoulder at 1 and 2 years' follow-up. Complications, recurrence, and the Walch-Duplay scores were noted at the same time. Minimum follow-up was 2 years. No significant statistical difference was noted in the range of motion between each group: ER1, difference of 4° (P = .22); ER2, difference of 3° (P = .49); anterior elevation, difference of 5° (P = .35); and internal rotation, 2 vertebrae (P = .22). The rate of recurrence was identical in both groups (6.25%). For patients without redislocation, the Walch-Duplay score was excellent (14/17) or good (3/17) in the first group and excellent (12/15) or good (3/15) in the second group. Posterosuperior pain during forceful movements or when tired was noted in one third of patients having undergone remplissage. The remplissage technique did not alter the range of motion of the shoulder compared with Bankart procedure alone; however, one third of patients did experience posterosuperior pain.

  5. Combined Arthroscopic Bankart Repair and Coracoid Process Transfer to Anterior Glenoid for Shoulder Dislocation in Rugby Players: Evaluation Based on Ability to Perform Sport-Specific Movements Effectively.

    PubMed

    Tasaki, Atsushi; Morita, Wataru; Yamakawa, Akira; Nozaki, Taiki; Kuroda, Eishi; Hoshikawa, Yoshimitsu; Phillips, Barry B

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the outcomes of a combination of an arthroscopic Bankart repair and an open Bristow procedure in relation to the subjective quality of performance in movements that are typical in rugby. Forty shoulders in 38 players who underwent surgery for traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder were reviewed. In all cases, arthroscopic Bankart repair was followed by a Bristow procedure, with preservation of the repaired capsular ligaments, during the same operation. The mean age at the time of surgery was 21 years. Patients were asked to describe common rugby maneuvers (tackle, hand-off, jackal, and saving) preoperatively and postoperatively as "no problem," "insufficient," or "impossible." There were no recurrent dislocations at a mean follow-up of 30.5 months. The mean Rowe score improved significantly from 65.0 (range, 55 to 75) to 97.5 (range, 95 to 100) (P < .001) after surgery. Preoperatively, regarding the tackling motion, none of the patients reported having no problem, whereas the ability was described as insufficient for 23 shoulders and impossible for 17 shoulders. Postoperatively, no problem with tackling was reported for 36 shoulders, whereas insufficiency was reported for 4. The results for the hand-off, jackal, and saving maneuvers were similar (P < .001). No patient rated any of the motions as impossible postoperatively. This combined surgical procedure clearly is effective in preventing recurrent dislocation in rugby players; however, some players complained of insufficiency in the quality of their play when they were tackling or performing other rugby-specific movements. Level IV, case series. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Outcomes of arthroscopic Hill-Sachs remplissage and anterior Bankart repair: a retrospective controlled study including ultrasound evaluation of posterior capsulotenodesis and infraspinatus strength assessment.

    PubMed

    Merolla, Giovanni; Paladini, Paolo; Di Napoli, Giuseppe; Campi, Fabrizio; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2015-02-01

    Hill-Sachs lesions are compression fractures that result from shoulder dislocation. They involve "engaging" the humeral head on the anterior glenoid rim when the arm is abducted and externally rotated. The defect grows as the number of dislocations increases. Arthroscopic remplissage and anterior Bankart repair do not significantly affect infraspinatus strength while ensuring healing of the capsulotenodesis. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Sixty-one patients with traumatic anterior shoulder instability treated by arthroscopic Bankart repair and Hill-Sachs remplissage at least 24 months previously were compared with a control group of 40 healthy participants. Preoperative imaging included magnetic resonance imaging for Bankart lesion identification and computed tomography to quantify the humeral head defect. Active range of motion and clinical scores (Walch-Duplay, Constant-Murley, and Rowe) were assessed. External rotation (ER) and internal rotation (IR) were measured with arm at the side (ER1 and IR1) and abducted at 90° (ER2 and IR2). Infraspinatus strength was assessed with the scapula free (infraspinatus strength test [IST]) and retracted (infraspinatus scapula retraction test [ISRT]). Infraspinatus tenodesis and posterior capsulodesis healing were evaluated by ultrasound (US). The follow-up median was 39.5 months (range, 24-56 months). One patient experienced a recurrence of instability at 34 months. In the remplissage patients, ER1 was significantly lower in the affected compared with the unaffected shoulder (P < .001). Mean IST and ISRT strength values did not show differences between sides. The mean Constant-Murley score rose from 62.9 ± 7.1 to 90 ± 5.2 (P < .0001). The Walch-Duplay and Rowe scores were excellent in 23 (78.6%), good in 6 (17.8%), and poor in 1 patient (both scores). The remplissage group had significantly lower ER1 (P < .001), ER2 (P < .001), and IR2 (P < .01) values compared with the control group. Differences in IST and ISRT

  7. Evaluation of the Instability Severity Index Score and the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index as predictors of failure following arthroscopic Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Bouliane, M; Saliken, D; Beaupre, L A; Silveira, A; Saraswat, M K; Sheps, D M

    2014-12-01

    In this study we evaluated whether the Instability Severity Index Score (ISIS) and the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI) could detect those patients at risk of failure following arthroscopic Bankart repair. Between April 2008 and June 2010, the ISIS and WOSI were recorded pre-operatively in 110 patients (87 male, 79%) with a mean age of 25.1 years (16 to 61) who underwent this procedure for recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability. A telephone interview was performed two-years post-operatively to determine whether patients had experienced a recurrent dislocation and whether they had returned to pre-injury activity levels. In all, six (5%) patients had an ISIS > 6 points (0 to 9). Of 100 (91%) patients available two years post-operatively, six (6%) had a recurrent dislocation, and 28 (28%) did not return to pre-injury activity. No patient who dislocated had an ISIS > 6 (p = 1.0). There was no difference in the mean pre-operative WOSI in those who had a re-dislocation and those who did not (p = 0.99). The pre-operative WOSI was significantly lower (p = 0.02) in those who did not return to pre-injury activity, whereas the ISIS was not associated with return to pre-injury activity (p = 0.13). In conclusion, neither the pre-operative ISIS nor WOSI predicted recurrent dislocation within two years of arthroscopic Bankart repair. Patients with a lower pre-operative WOSI were less likely to return to pre-injury activity. ©2014 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  8. The Effect of Subcritical Bone Loss and Exposure on Recurrent Instability After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair in Intercollegiate American Football.

    PubMed

    Dickens, Jonathan F; Owens, Brett D; Cameron, Kenneth L; DeBerardino, Thomas M; Masini, Brendan D; Peck, Karen Y; Svoboda, Steven J

    2017-07-01

    There is no consensus on the optimal method of stabilization (arthroscopic or open) in collision athletes with anterior shoulder instability. To examine the effect of "subcritical" bone loss and football-specific exposure on the rate of recurrent shoulder instability after arthroscopic stabilization in an intercollegiate American football population. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Fifty intercollegiate football players underwent primary arthroscopic stabilization for anterior shoulder instability and returned to football for at least a single season. Preoperatively, 32 patients experienced recurrent subluxations, and 18 patients experienced a single or recurrent dislocation. Shoulders with glenoid bone loss >20%, an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion, an off-track lesion, and concomitant rotator cuff repair were excluded from the study. The primary outcome of interest was the ability to return to football without subsequent instability. Patients were followed for time to a subsequent instability event after return to play using days of exposure to football and total follow-up time after arthroscopic stabilization. Fifty consecutive patients returned to American football for a mean 1.5 seasons (range, 1-3) after arthroscopic stabilization. Three of 50 (6%; 95% CI, 1.3%-16.5%) patients experienced recurrent instability. There were no subsequent instability events after a mean 3.2 years of military service. All shoulders with glenoid bone loss >13.5% (n = 3) that underwent arthroscopic stabilization experienced recurrent instability upon returning to sport, while none of the shoulders with <13.5% glenoid bone loss (n = 47) sustained a recurrent instability event during football ( X(2) = 15.80, P < .001). Shoulders with >13.5% glenoid bone loss had an incidence rate of 5.31 cases of recurrent instability per 1000 athlete-exposures of football. In 72,000 athlete-exposures to football with <13.5% glenoid bone loss, there was no recurrent instability. Significantly

  9. Arthroscopic Bankart repair combined with remplissage technique for the treatment of anterior shoulder instability with engaging Hill-Sachs lesion: a report of 49 cases with a minimum 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yi-Ming; Lu, Yi; Zhang, Jin; Shen, Jie-Wei; Jiang, Chun-Yan

    2011-08-01

    Engaging Hill-Sachs lesions are known to be a risk factor for recurrence dislocation after arthroscopic repair in patients with anterior shoulder instability. For a large engaging Hill-Sachs lesion, arthroscopic remplissage is a solution. Arthroscopic Bankart repair combined with the Hill-Sachs remplissage technique can achieve good results without significant impairment of shoulder function. Case Series; Level of evidence, 4. Forty-nine consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair and Hill-Sachs remplissage for anterior shoulder instability were followed up for a mean duration of 29.0 months (range, 24-35 months). There were 42 males and 7 females with a mean age of 28.4 years (range, 16.7-54.7 years). All patients had diagnosed traumatic unidirectional anterior shoulder instability with a bony lesion of glenoid and an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion. Physical examination, radiographs, and magnetic resonance imaging were performed during postoperative follow-up. The American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, Constant score, and Rowe score were used to evaluate shoulder function. The active forward elevation increased a mean of 8.0° (range, -10° to 80°) postoperatively. However, the patients lost 1.9° (range, -40° to 30°) of external rotation to the side. Significant improvement was detected with regard to the ASES score (84.7 vs 96.0, P < .001), Constant score (93.3 vs 97.8, P = .005), and Rowe score (36.8 vs 89.8, P < .001).There were 1 redislocation, 2 subluxations, and 1 patient with a positive apprehension test; the overall failure rate was 8.2% (4 of 49). Successful healing of the infraspinatus tendon within the Hill-Sachs lesion was shown by magnetic resonance imaging. Arthroscopic Bankart repair combined with Hill-Sachs remplissage can restore shoulder stability without significant impairment of shoulder function in patients with engaging Hill-Sachs lesions.

  10. Comparison of 30-Day Morbidity and Mortality After Arthroscopic Bankart, Open Bankart, and Latarjet-Bristow Procedures: A Review of 2864 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Bokshan, Steven L.; DeFroda, Steven F.; Owens, Brett D.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Surgical intervention for anterior shoulder instability is commonly performed and is highly successful in reducing instances of recurrent instability. Purpose: To determine and compare the incidence of 30-day complications and patient and surgical risk factors for complications for arthroscopic Bankart, open Bankart, and Latarjet-Bristow procedures. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: All arthroscopic Bankart, open Bankart, and Latarjet-Bristow procedures from 2005 to 2014 from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) prospective database were analyzed. Baseline patient variables were assessed, including the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI). Outcomes measures included length of operation, length of hospital stay, need for hospital admission, 30-day readmission, and 30-day return to the operating room. Binary logistic regression was performed for the presence of any complications after all 3 procedures. Results: There were 2864 surgical procedures (410 open Bankart, 163 Latarjet-Bristow, and 2291 arthroscopic Bankart) included. There was no significant difference with regard to age (P = .11), body mass index (P = .17), American Society of Anesthesiologists class (P = .423), or CCI (P = .479) for each group. The Latarjet-Bristow procedure had the highest overall complication rate (5.5%) compared with open (1.0%) and arthroscopic (0.6%) Bankart repairs. The Latarjet-Bristow procedure had significantly longer mean operative times (P < .001) in addition to the highest 30-day return rate to the operating room (4.3%; 95% confidence interval, 1.2%-7.4%). Smoking status was an independent predictor of a postoperative complication (P = .05; odds ratio, 8.0) after Latarjet-Bristow. Conclusion: Surgical intervention for anterior shoulder instability has a low rate of complication (arthroscopic Bankart, 0.6%; open Bankart, 1.0%; Latarjet-Bristow, 5.5%) in the early postoperative period, with

  11. Comparison of 30-Day Morbidity and Mortality After Arthroscopic Bankart, Open Bankart, and Latarjet-Bristow Procedures: A Review of 2864 Cases.

    PubMed

    Bokshan, Steven L; DeFroda, Steven F; Owens, Brett D

    2017-07-01

    Surgical intervention for anterior shoulder instability is commonly performed and is highly successful in reducing instances of recurrent instability. To determine and compare the incidence of 30-day complications and patient and surgical risk factors for complications for arthroscopic Bankart, open Bankart, and Latarjet-Bristow procedures. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. All arthroscopic Bankart, open Bankart, and Latarjet-Bristow procedures from 2005 to 2014 from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) prospective database were analyzed. Baseline patient variables were assessed, including the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI). Outcomes measures included length of operation, length of hospital stay, need for hospital admission, 30-day readmission, and 30-day return to the operating room. Binary logistic regression was performed for the presence of any complications after all 3 procedures. There were 2864 surgical procedures (410 open Bankart, 163 Latarjet-Bristow, and 2291 arthroscopic Bankart) included. There was no significant difference with regard to age (P = .11), body mass index (P = .17), American Society of Anesthesiologists class (P = .423), or CCI (P = .479) for each group. The Latarjet-Bristow procedure had the highest overall complication rate (5.5%) compared with open (1.0%) and arthroscopic (0.6%) Bankart repairs. The Latarjet-Bristow procedure had significantly longer mean operative times (P < .001) in addition to the highest 30-day return rate to the operating room (4.3%; 95% confidence interval, 1.2%-7.4%). Smoking status was an independent predictor of a postoperative complication (P = .05; odds ratio, 8.0) after Latarjet-Bristow. Surgical intervention for anterior shoulder instability has a low rate of complication (arthroscopic Bankart, 0.6%; open Bankart, 1.0%; Latarjet-Bristow, 5.5%) in the early postoperative period, with the most common being surgical site infection, deep vein thrombosis

  12. Outcome of Bankart repair in contact versus non-contact athletes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, N; Kijima, H; Nagamoto, H; Kurokawa, D; Takahashi, H; Sano, H; Itoi, E

    2015-06-01

    The clinical results of arthroscopic Bankart repair for contact athletes varies according to published reports. The purposes of this study were to analyze the clinical outcome of open or arthroscopic Bankart repair and to investigate the results in contact and non-contact athletes. Clinical outcome of arthroscopic Bankart repair is similar to that of open procedure. One hundred patients with recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation without a large bony defect were retrospectively reviewed. Fifty-one contact and 49 non-contact athletes were found with a mean follow-up of 17 months. Forty-nine shoulders underwent arthroscopic Bankart repairs; 51 shoulders had open Bankart repairs. In non-contact athletes, there was a 5% (1/22 cases) recurrence rate in the open group and 4% (1/27 cases) in the arthroscopic group. In contrast, in contact athletes, there was a 10% (3/29 cases) recurrence rate in the open group and 14% (3/22 cases) in the arthroscopic group. There was no significant difference in the recurrence rate between contact and non-contact athletes, although contact athletes showed two to three times a higher recurrence rate than that of non-contact athletes. The Rowe score and Constant score showed no significant difference between the two procedures and between the contact and non-contact athletes. The rate of the complete return to sports showed no significant difference between contact and non-contact athletes. The recurrence rate of Bankart repair in the contact athletes was 2 times higher in the open group and 3 times higher in the arthroscopic group than in the non-contact athletes. Clinical outcome of arthroscopic Bankart repair was similar to that of open procedure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Bankart repair versus Bankart repair plus remplissage: an in vitro biomechanical comparative study.

    PubMed

    Grimberg, Jean; Diop, Amadou; Bou Ghosn, Rony; Ghosn, Rosny Bou; Lanari, Dimitri; Canonne, Adrien; Maurel, Nathalie

    2016-02-01

    To biomechanically compare Bankart lesion repair alone and Bankart lesion repair associated with infraspinatus capsulotenodesis described as «remplissage», in the treatment of combined Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions. Seven pairs (right and left) of cadaveric shoulders have been tested, first without any lesion and then after performing a combined Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions. For each pair, the specimens were then randomly assigned for Bankart lesion repair alone on one side or for Bankart lesion repair associated with remplissage on the other side. During tests, the shoulder was placed at 90° of abduction and at maximal external rotation, which value was recorded. A 50 N postero-anterior load was then applied to the proximal humerus, and the stiffness was calculated from the obtained load-displacement curve. Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions significantly (p < 0.05) decreased joint stiffness compared with intact joint. Bankart lesion repair alone did not restore stiffness to the level of intact, while adding the remplissage to the Bankart lesion repair did. External rotation was significantly increased after creation of the Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesion; Bankart repair restored the external rotation to the level of intact, while Bankart lesion repair associated with remplissage significantly decreased external rotation compared with intact and to Bankart lesion repair alone. In cadaveric shoulders with combined Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions, Bankart lesion repair associated with remplissage restored intact joint stiffness contrary to Bankart lesion repair alone. This increase in stiffness was associated with a decrease in external rotation.

  14. Long-term outcomes of the Bankart and Latarjet repairs: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rollick, Natalie C; Ono, Yohei; Kurji, Hafeez M; Nelson, Atiba A; Boorman, Richard S; Thornton, Gail M; Lo, Ian Ky

    2017-01-01

    The most common surgical techniques for the treatment of recurrent anterior shoulder instability include the arthroscopic Bankart repair, the open Bankart repair and the open Latarjet procedure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the long-term outcomes following these procedures. A systematic review of modern procedures with a minimum follow-up of 5 years was completed. The objective outcome measures evaluated were post-operative dislocation and instability rate, the Rowe score, radiographic arthritis and complications. Twenty-eight studies with a total of 1652 repairs were analyzed. The estimated re-dislocation rate was 15.1% following arthroscopic Bankart repair, 7.7% following open Bankart repair and 2.7% following Latarjet repair, with the comparison between arthroscopic Bankart and open Latarjet reaching statistical significance (p<0.001). The rates of subjective instability and radiographic arthritis were consistently high across groups, with no statistical difference between groups. Estimated complication rates were statistically higher in the open Latarjet repair (9.4%) than in the arthroscopic Bankart (0%; p=0.002). The open Latarjet procedure yields the most reliable method of stabilization but the highest complication rate. There are uniformly high rates of post-operative subjective instability symptoms and radiographic arthritis at 5 years regardless of procedure choice.

  15. Long-term outcomes of the Bankart and Latarjet repairs: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Rollick, Natalie C; Ono, Yohei; Kurji, Hafeez M; Nelson, Atiba A; Boorman, Richard S; Thornton, Gail M; Lo, Ian KY

    2017-01-01

    The most common surgical techniques for the treatment of recurrent anterior shoulder instability include the arthroscopic Bankart repair, the open Bankart repair and the open Latarjet procedure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the long-term outcomes following these procedures. A systematic review of modern procedures with a minimum follow-up of 5 years was completed. The objective outcome measures evaluated were post-operative dislocation and instability rate, the Rowe score, radiographic arthritis and complications. Twenty-eight studies with a total of 1652 repairs were analyzed. The estimated re-dislocation rate was 15.1% following arthroscopic Bankart repair, 7.7% following open Bankart repair and 2.7% following Latarjet repair, with the comparison between arthroscopic Bankart and open Latarjet reaching statistical significance (p<0.001). The rates of subjective instability and radiographic arthritis were consistently high across groups, with no statistical difference between groups. Estimated complication rates were statistically higher in the open Latarjet repair (9.4%) than in the arthroscopic Bankart (0%; p=0.002). The open Latarjet procedure yields the most reliable method of stabilization but the highest complication rate. There are uniformly high rates of post-operative subjective instability symptoms and radiographic arthritis at 5 years regardless of procedure choice. PMID:28450792

  16. Surgical trends in Bankart repair: an analysis of data from the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery certification examination.

    PubMed

    Owens, Brett D; Harrast, John J; Hurwitz, Shepard R; Thompson, Terry L; Wolf, Jennifer Moriatis

    2011-09-01

    Arthroscopic Bankart repair emerged in the 1990s as a minimally invasive alternative to open repair. The optimal technique of surgical stabilization of the unstable glenohumeral joint remains controversial. A review of the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery (ABOS) data would show a trend toward an increasing number of arthroscopic versus open Bankart procedures. Descriptive epidemiology study. A query of the ABOS database for all cases of open or arthroscopic Bankart repair from 2003 through 2008 was performed, as the CPT (Current Procedural Terminology) codes for arthroscopic repair were introduced in 2003. All cases coded with CPT codes for arthroscopic Bankart repair (29806) or open Bankart repair (23455) were reviewed. Additional data were obtained on the surgeons (year of procedure, geographic location, fellowship training, subspecialty examination area) as well as the patients (age, gender, follow-up length, complications, objective outcome measures [pain, deformity, function, and satisfaction]). From 2003 to 2008, a total of 4562 Bankart repair cases were reported, composing 8.6% of the total number of shoulder surgery cases in the ABOS database. From 2003 to 2005, 71.2% of Bankart repairs were arthroscopic, compared with 87.7% between 2006 and 2008 (P < .0001). Surgeons having obtained subspecialty training in sports medicine performed the majority (65.3%) of Bankart repairs. Over the entire period, sports-trained surgeons also performed a higher proportion of arthroscopic repairs (84.1%) compared with surgeons without this training (71.9%) (P < .0001). However, by 2008 both non-fellowship-trained and sports medicine fellowship-trained surgeons performed arthroscopic repair in 90% of cases. Surgeons in the Northeast region performed a significantly greater proportion of arthroscopic Bankart repairs (84.7%) than did surgeons in other regions (78.6%) (P < .0001) from 2003 to 2008. The most commonly reported complications were nerve palsy/injury and

  17. Arthroscopic Subscapularis Augmentation of Bankart Repair in Chronic Anterior Shoulder Instability With Bone Loss Less Than 25% and Capsular Deficiency: Clinical Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Maiotti, Marco; Massoni, Carlo; Russo, Raffaele; Schroter, Steffen; Zanini, Antonio; Bianchedi, Diana

    2017-05-01

    To assess the short-term outcomes of the arthroscopic subscapularis augmentation (ASA) technique, consisting of a tenodesis of the upper third of the subscapularis tendon and a Bankart repair, and its effect on shoulder external rotation. Patients selected for this study were involved in contact sports, with a history of traumatic recurrent shoulder dislocations and a minimum of 2-year follow-up. Inclusion criteria were patients with glenoid bone loss (GBL) ranging from 5% to 25%, anterior capsular deficiency, and Hill-Sachs lesion who underwent ASA technique. Exclusion criteria were GBL >25%, multidirectional instability, preexisting osteoarthritis, and overhead sports activities. Visual analog scale (VAS) scale for pain, Rowe score, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores were used to assess results. Loss of shoulder external rotation was measured with the arm at the side (ER1 position) or 90° in abduction (ER2 position). Analysis of variance and Fisher tests were used for data evaluation. Significance was established at P ≤ .05. One hundred ten patients (84 men and 26 women, mean age 27 years) were evaluated with a mean follow-up of 40.5 months (range: 24 to 65 months). In 98 patients, a Hill-Sachs lesion was observed and in 57 patients a capsular deficiency was present. Three patients (2.7%) had a traumatic redislocation. At final follow-up, the mean scores were as follows: VAS scale decreased from a mean of 3.5 to 0.5 (P = .015), Rowe score increased from 57.4 to 95.3 (P = .035), and ASES score increased from 66.5 to 96.5 (P = .021). The mean deficit of external rotation was 8° ± 2.5° in the ER1 position and 4° ± 1.5° in the ER2 position. The ASA procedure has been shown to be effective in restoring joint stability in patients practicing sports, affected by chronic anterior shoulder instability associated with anterior GBL (<25%), capsular deficiency, and Hill-Sachs lesions, with mild restriction of external rotation. Level IV

  18. Risk of motion loss with combined Bankart and SLAP repairs.

    PubMed

    Takase, Katsumi

    2009-08-01

    We have performed arthroscopic Bankart procedures using absorbable or metallic suture anchors for traumatic anterior shoulder instability for over a decade. This article describes the frequency, pathology, and therapeutic results of patients treated for superior labrum anterior and posterior (SLAP) lesions concomitant with Bankart lesions. Twenty patients (Group A) had a mean age of 33.8 years at the time of surgery. On arthroscopic findings, SLAP lesions were classified type 2 in 15 patients and type 4 in 5, based on Snyder's criteria. In addition, intra-articular free bodies were present in 2 SLAP lesions, and a capsular tear was present in 1. We performed debridement (Group A1) or reattachment (Group A2) to the superior glenoid edge of these lesions, considering whether they communicated to Bankart lesions. The therapeutic results were evaluated according to the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score and Japan Shoulder Society (JSS) shoulder instability score. Mean JOA and JSS shoulder instability scores were 95.1 and 90.8 points, respectively. All Group A patients remained pain free, and no instability recurred in any patient. Meanwhile, mean JSS shoulder instability function and range of motion scores were 18.9 and 15.1 points, respectively, in Group A1, and 17.5 and 10.1 points, respectively, in Group A2. A significant correlation in range of motion was observed in Groups A1 and A2 (P=.04). Regarding postoperative limitation in external rotation with the arm at the side, the difference in range from that on the healthy side was 9.8 degrees in Group A (7.0 degrees in Group A1 and 12.6 degrees in Group A2). When SLAP lesions communicated to Bankart lesions, we had satisfactory results without SLAP repair; therefore, unnecessary repairs for the concomitant pathology should be avoided, and different postoperative care should be performed for patients with Bankart repair with reattachment of a SLAP lesion.

  19. Redislocation risk after an arthroscopic Bankart procedure in collision athletes: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Alkaduhimi, Hassanin; van der Linde, Just A; Willigenburg, Nienke W; Paulino Pereira, Nuno Rui; van Deurzen, Derek F P; van den Bekerom, Michel P J

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this review was to determine the redislocation risk for collision athletes after an arthroscopic Bankart repair and to compare the redislocation rate between collision athletes and noncollision athletes after an arthroscopic Bankart repair. A PubMed and Embase query was performed, screening all relevant literature of arthroscopic Bankart procedures mentioning redislocation rates in collision athletes. Studies with a follow-up <2 years or lacking information on redislocation rates in collision athletes were excluded. We used the modified Coleman Methodology Score to assess the quality of included studies. Finally, the data in all the studies were combined and analyzed. There were 1012 studies screened on title and abstract, of which 111 studies were full-text screened, and finally 20 studies were included. Four studies reported on collision athletes only, whereas 16 compared collision with noncollision athletes. Fourteen studies reported increased redislocation rates for collision athletes in comparison to noncollision athletes (absolute risk difference varying from 0.4% to 28.6%), whereas 2 studies reported decreased rates (absolute risk differences of -6% and -2.4%). A combined analysis revealed that collision athletes have an increased absolute risk of 8.09 with 95% CI from 3.61 to 12.57% for development of postoperative instability in comparison to noncollision athletes (P = .001). Collision athletes have an increased risk for redislocation in comparison to noncollision athletes after an arthroscopic Bankart repair, although there were no differences in return to sport. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Editorial Commentary: The Debate Over Double-Row Continues: Shoulder Arthroscopic Capsulolabral and Bankart Repair for Shoulder Instability.

    PubMed

    Weber, Stephen C

    2016-11-01

    In an in vitro cadaver study, the mechanical properties of capsulolabral repair were significantly improved with the authors' double-row technique over single-row repair. Whether this time zero improvement in mechanical properties will translate into improved clinical outcomes remains to be seen, and there are concerns, including risks of increased costs and complications, with the clinical application of the technique. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Arthroscopic posteroinferior capsular plication and rotator interval closure after Bankart repair in patients with traumatic anterior glenohumeral instability—A minimum follow-up of 5 years.

    PubMed

    Chiang, En-Rung; Wang, Jung-Pan; Wang, Shih-Tien; Ma, Hsiao-Li; Liu, Chien-Lin; Chen, Tain-Hsiung

    2010-10-01

    Shoulder joint laxity over anteroinferior and posteroinferior labral–capsular structure inpatients with traumatic anterior glenohumeral instability was reported in the previous literature. The purpose of this study was to report our experience in arthroscopic treatment of traumatic anterior–inferior shoulder instability by Bankart lesion stabilisation with rotator interval closure and posteroinferior capsular plication. From August 2000 to November 2004, 45 patients with traumatic anterior–inferior shoulder instability were retrospectively enrolled. Each shoulder was treated with absorbable suture for rotator interval closure and posteroinferior capsular plication after anteroinferior stabilisation. The assessments were performed using the Rowe score, the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) shoulder rating scale, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score) and shoulder range of motion (ROM). With the average follow-up time of 77.1 months, all shoulder scores improved after surgery(P < 0.001). The average ROM deficit of the operated shoulders was not significant (P > 0.05) as compared with the healthy side. A total of 42 shoulders remained stable (93.3%) and there were three recurrences (6.6%). All patients without recurrence returned to their pre-injury levels of athletic activity. In patients with anterior glenohumeral instability, arthroscopic stabilisation of anteroinferior capsulolabral structure with rotator interval closure and posteroinferior capsular plication provided a reasonable result without significant loss of ROM at a minimum follow-up of 5 years. 2010 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Arthroscopic Bony Bankart Fixation Using a Modified Sugaya Technique

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Anil K.; McCormick, Frank M.; Abrams, Geoffrey D.; Harris, Joshua D.; Bach, Bernard R.; Romeo, Anthony A.; Verma, Nikhil N.

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopic fixation of bony Bankart lesions in the setting of anterior shoulder instability has had successful long-term results. Key factors such as patient positioning, portal placement, visualization, mobilization of bony/soft tissues, and anatomic reduction and fixation are crucial to yield such results. We present a modified Sugaya technique that is reproducible and based on such key principles. This technique facilitates ease of anchor and suture placement to allow for anatomic reduction and fixation. PMID:24265994

  3. Recurrent Instability After Arthroscopic Bankart Reconstruction, a Systematic Review of Surgical Technical Factors.

    PubMed

    Brown, Landon; Rothermel, Shane; Joshi, Rajat; Dhawan, Aman

    2017-08-30

    Recurrent instability remains of concern after arthroscopic Bankart reconstruction. We evaluated various technical factors including anchor design, anchor material, number of anchors used, and interval closure on risk of recurrent instability after arthroscopic Bankart reconstruction. A systematic review of MEDLINE and Cochrane databases was conducted, following PRISMA guidelines. Extracted data were recorded on a standardized form. Methodological index for non-randomized studies (MINORS) and Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS) were used to assess study quality and risk bias. Because of study heterogeneity and low levels of evidence, meta-analysis was not possible. Pooled weighted means were calculated and individual study evaluation and comparisons (qualitative analysis) were performed for systematic review. Of 2097 studies identified, 26 met criteria for systematic review. Pooled weighted means revealed 11.4% versus 15% recurrent instability with 3 or more suture anchors versus fewer than 3 anchors, 10.1% versus 7.8% with absorbable versus nonabsorbable suture anchors, respectively, and 8.0% versus 9.4% with knotless versus standard anchors, respectively. Interval closure did not qualitatively decrease recurrent instability or decrease range of motion. Our systematic review reveals that despite individual study, and previous systematic reviews pointing to the contrary, the composite contemporary published literature would support no difference in the risk of recurrent instability after arthroscopic Bankart reconstruction with rotator interval closure, differing numbers of anchors used for the repair, use of knotless versus standard anchors, or use of bioabsorbable versus nonabsorbable anchors. We recommend surgeons focus on factors that have been shown to modify the risk factors after arthroscopic Bankart reconstruction, such as patient selection. Level IV, systematic review of Level III and IV studies. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America

  4. Open Bankart repair for revision of failed prior stabilization: outcome analysis at a mean of more than 10 years.

    PubMed

    Neviaser, Andrew S; Benke, Michael T; Neviaser, Robert J

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the outcome of open Bankart repair for failed stabilization surgery at a mean follow-up of >10 years. Thirty patients underwent revision open Bankart repair by a single surgeon for failed prior stabilization surgery, with a standard technique and postoperative rehabilitation. All patients were referred by other surgeons. Evaluation was by an independent examiner, at a mean follow-up of 10.2 years. Evaluation included a history, physical examination for range of motion, outcome scores, recurrence, return to athletics, and radiographic examination. All cases had persistent Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions. Failures included 14 patients with a failed single arthroscopic Bankart repair; 1 patient with 2 failed arthroscopic Bankart repairs; 1 patient with an arthroscopic failure and an open Bankart repair; 7 patients with failed open Bankart repairs; and 1 patient with a failed open Bankart repair, then a failed arthroscopic attempt. Two patients had had thermal capsulorrhaphy; 2 others had staple capsulorrhaphy, 1 with an open capsular shift and 1 after a failed arthroscopic Bankart repair, an open Bankart repair, and then a coracoid transfer. All arthroscopic Bankart repairs had anchors placed medial and superior on the glenoid neck. Mean motion loss compared with the normal contralateral side was as follows: elevation 1.15°, abduction 4.2°, external rotation at the side 3.2°, external rotation in abduction 5.1°, and internal rotation 0.6 vertebral levels (NS). No patient had an apprehension sign, pain, or instability. Of 23 who played sports, 22 resumed after. Outcomes scores were as follows: American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, 89.44; Rowe, 86.67; Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index, 476.26. On radiographic examination, there were 13 normal radiographs and 7 with mild, 2 with moderate, and 0 with severe arthritic changes. The open Bankart repair offers a reliable, consistently successful option for revision of

  5. An analysis of technical aspects of the arthroscopic Bankart procedure as performed in the United States.

    PubMed

    Burks, Robert T; Presson, Angela P; Weng, Hsin-Yi

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the intersurgeon variation in technical aspects of performing an arthroscopic Bankart repair. A unique approach with experienced equipment representatives from 3 different arthroscopic companies was used. Experienced representatives were identified by DePuy Mitek, Smith & Nephew, and Arthrex and filled out questionnaires on how their surgeons performed arthroscopic Bankart procedures. This was performed in a blinded fashion with no knowledge of the identities of the specific surgeons or representatives by us. A video on different aspects of the procedure was observed by each representative before filling out the questionnaire to help standardize responses. Data were collected using REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture). Data were analyzed as an infrequent observation with 0% to 30% of representatives reporting the observation; sometimes, 31% to 70% reporting the observation; and often, greater than 70% of representatives reporting. Seventy-six percent of representatives had 6 or more years of arthroscopic experience. Forty-three percent of representatives reported that their surgeons use 3 portals for the procedure often. Forty-four percent reported that viewing was performed exclusively from the posterior portal while the surgeon was performing the repair. Seventy-three percent reported that the Hill-Sachs lesion was observed often, and 61% reported that the posterior labrum was evaluated often before the repair. Only 25% of representatives reported that the Bankart lesion was extensively released and mobilized often. Thirty-three percent reported 3 anchors as being used often. Seventy-five percent reported biocomposite anchors as being used often. Single-loaded anchors were reported as being used often by 47%. Eighty-one percent reported that sutures were placed in a simple fashion. Eighty-three percent reported the use of any posterior sutures or anchors for additional plication as infrequent. There is significant

  6. Anatomic and Biomechanical Comparison of Traditional Bankart Repair With Bone Tunnels and Bankart Repair Utilizing Suture Anchors

    PubMed Central

    Judson, Christopher H.; Charette, Ryan; Cavanaugh, Zachary; Shea, Kevin P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Traditional Bankart repair using bone tunnels has a reported failure rate between 0% and 5% in long-term studies. Arthroscopic Bankart repair using suture anchors has become more popular; however, reported failure rates have been cited between 4% and 18%. There have been no satisfactory explanations for the differences in these outcomes. Hypothesis: Bone tunnels will provide increased coverage of the native labral footprint and demonstrate greater load to failure and stiffness and decreased cyclic displacement in biomechanical testing. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Twenty-two fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders were used. For footprint analysis, the labral footprint area was marked and measured using a Microscribe technique in 6 specimens. A 3-suture anchor repair was performed, and the area of the uncovered footprint was measured. This was repeated with traditional bone tunnel repair. For the biomechanical analysis, 8 paired specimens were randomly assigned to bone tunnel or suture anchor repair with the contralateral specimen assigned to the other technique. Each specimen underwent cyclic loading (5-25 N, 1 Hz, 100 cycles) and load to failure (15 mm/min). Displacement was measured using a digitized video recording system. Results: Bankart repair with bone tunnels provided significantly more coverage of the native labral footprint than repair with suture anchors (100% vs 27%, P < .001). Repair with bone tunnels (21.9 ± 8.7 N/mm) showed significantly greater stiffness than suture anchor repair (17.1 ± 3.5 N/mm, P = .032). Mean load to failure and gap formation after cyclic loading were not statistically different between bone tunnel (259 ± 76.8 N, 0.209 ± 0.064 mm) and suture anchor repairs (221.5 ± 59.0 N [P = .071], 0.161 ± 0.51 mm [P = .100]). Conclusion: Bankart repair with bone tunnels completely covered the footprint anatomy while suture anchor repair covered less than 30% of the native footprint. Repair using bone tunnels

  7. Results of Arthroscopic Bankart Lesion Repair in Patients with Post-Traumatic Anterior Instability of the Shoulder and a Non-Engaging Hill-Sachs Lesion with a Suture Anchor after a Minimum of 6-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Szyluk, Karol; Jasiński, Andrzej; Widuchowski, Wojciech; Mielnik, Michał; Koczy, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    Background Shoulder instability is an important clinical problem. Arthroscopic surgery is an established treatment modality in shoulder instability, but it continues to be associated with a high rate of recurrences and complications. The purpose of the study was to analyze late outcomes of arthroscopic repair of Bankart lesions in patients with post-traumatic anterior shoulder instability and non-engaging Hill-Sachs lesion, with special focus on the incidence and causes of recurrences and complications. Material/Methods We investigated 92 patients (92 shoulders) who underwent surgery on account of post-traumatic anterior shoulder instability. The duration of follow-up ranged from 6 to 12.5 years (mean: 8.2 years). All patients were operated on in the lateral decubitus position using FASTak 2.8-mm suture anchors (FASTak, Arthrex, Naples, Florida). Treatment outcomes were evaluated using the Rowe and University of California at Los Angeles rating system (UCLA). Results According to Rowe scores, there were 71 (81.5%) excellent, 12 (12.6%) good, 5 (5.3%) satisfactory, and 2 (2.1%) poor results. Rowe scores improved in a statistically significant manner (p=0.00) post-surgery, to a mean of 90 (range: 25–100). Treatment outcomes measured as UCLA scores improved in a statistically significant manner (p=0.00), reaching post-operative levels of 12–35 (mean: 33.5). There were 9 recurrences, 1 case of axillary nerve praxia, and 1 case of anchor loosening. Conclusions With rigorous criteria for qualifying patients for surgery, arthroscopic treatment of post-traumatic anterior shoulder instability produces good outcomes and low recurrence and complication rates irrespective of the number of previous dislocations, age, or sex. PMID:26256225

  8. Results of Arthroscopic Bankart Lesion Repair in Patients with Post-Traumatic Anterior Instability of the Shoulder and a Non-Engaging Hill-Sachs Lesion with a Suture Anchor after a Minimum of 6-Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Szyluk, Karol; Jasiński, Andrzej; Widuchowski, Wojciech; Mielnik, Michał; Koczy, Bogdan

    2015-08-10

    Shoulder instability is an important clinical problem. Arthroscopic surgery is an established treatment modality in shoulder instability, but it continues to be associated with a high rate of recurrences and complications. The purpose of the study was to analyze late outcomes of arthroscopic repair of Bankart lesions in patients with post-traumatic anterior shoulder instability and non-engaging Hill-Sachs lesion, with special focus on the incidence and causes of recurrences and complications. We investigated 92 patients (92 shoulders) who underwent surgery on account of post-traumatic anterior shoulder instability. The duration of follow-up ranged from 6 to 12.5 years (mean: 8.2 years). All patients were operated on in the lateral decubitus position using FASTak 2.8-mm suture anchors (FASTak, Arthrex, Naples, Florida). Treatment outcomes were evaluated using the Rowe and University of California at Los Angeles rating system (UCLA). According to Rowe scores, there were 71 (81.5%) excellent, 12 (12.6%) good, 5 (5.3%) satisfactory, and 2 (2.1%) poor results. Rowe scores improved in a statistically significant manner (p=0.00) post-surgery, to a mean of 90 (range: 25-100). Treatment outcomes measured as UCLA scores improved in a statistically significant manner (p=0.00), reaching post-operative levels of 12-35 (mean: 33.5). There were 9 recurrences, 1 case of axillary nerve praxia, and 1 case of anchor loosening. With rigorous criteria for qualifying patients for surgery, arthroscopic treatment of post-traumatic anterior shoulder instability produces good outcomes and low recurrence and complication rates irrespective of the number of previous dislocations, age, or sex.

  9. A new "double-pulley" dual-row technique for arthroscopic fixation of bony Bankart lesion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Jiang, Chunyan

    2011-09-01

    The double-row technique is a new concept for arthroscopic treatment of bony Bankart lesion in shoulder instability. It presents a new and reproducible technique for arthroscopic fixation of bony Bankart fragments with suture anchors. This technique creates double-mattress sutures which compress the fragment against its bone bed and restores better bony anatomy of the anterior glenoid rim with stable and non-tilting fixation that may improve healing.

  10. The Use of Accessory Portals in Bankart Repair With Posterior Extension in the Lateral Decubitus Position.

    PubMed

    Cvetanovich, Gregory L; Hamamoto, Jason T; Campbell, Kevin J; McCarthy, Mark; Higgins, John D; Verma, Nikhil N

    2016-10-01

    The Bankart lesion, in which the anteroinferior labrum is detached from the glenoid, is the critical anatomic lesion in the majority of patients with anterior glenohumeral instability. Some patients with anterior glenohumeral instability will have Bankart lesions with posterior extension beyond the 6-o'clock position, and achieving anatomic labral repair in these cases can present a technical challenge. In our experience, the lateral decubitus position and use of accessory portals allow superior visualization of the inferior half of the glenohumeral joint for glenoid and labral preparation, anchor placement, and suture management. The use of double-loaded suture anchors at the inferior glenoid provides multiple points of fixation at this challenging location while limiting the number of anchors required. The purpose of this article is to present a simple and reproducible technique for arthroscopic repair of Bankart lesions with posterior extension, emphasizing the use of accessory 5-o'clock trans-subscapularis and 7-o'clock portals.

  11. Return to Play After Open Bankart Repair

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Geoffrey P.; Pearsall, Albert W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Results of open Bankart repair have been well reported. However, less information is available outlining the timetable for return to play (RTP) in athletes after this procedure. Purpose: To review the current literature regarding (1) the timetable recommended for athletes to RTP after an open Bankart repair and (2) the objective criteria on which the decision to allow an athlete to RTP is based. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was conducted of all relevant English-language articles using the electronic databases OVID and PubMed between the years 1947 and 2012 to identify open Bankart repair. Two reviewers screened articles for eligibility based on the following criteria: (1) an open Bankart repair, (2) a minimum follow-up of at least 8 months, (3) any report that described the procedure in athletes, and (4) any report that described the time for an athlete to RTP. All relevant data were collected and analyzed with regard to number of patients; mean follow-up; Rowe, Constant, and American Shoulder and Elbow (ASES) scores; redislocation rate; and return-to-sport timing. Results: In all, 559 relevant citations were identified, of which 29 articles met the inclusion criteria. The mean follow-up was 51.7 months (range, 8-162 months), and the mean age was 25.9 years (range, 21-31 years). The average Rowe score for all studies was 86.9 (range, 63-90). The average redislocation rate was 5.3%. Twenty-six of 29 studies cited a specific timetable for unrestricted RTP, with an average of 23.2 weeks (range, 12-36 weeks). Only 38% of authors reported sport-specific criteria for return to competition, with the majority allowing return to noncontact sports at 12 to 16 weeks, and the resumption of throwing/contact sports by 24 weeks. Three reports described specific functional parameters for RTP. Conclusion: The current review summarized return-to-play guidelines for athletic competition after open

  12. Arthroscopic repair for combined Bankart and superior labral anterior posterior lesions: a comparative study between primary and recurrent anterior dislocation in the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Kim, Doo-Sup; Yi, Chang-Ho; Yoon, Yeu-Seung

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare clinical outcomes between a primary dislocation group (group P) and a recurrent dislocation group (group R) with combined lesion of Bankart and type II SLAP lesions (type V SLAP lesion) and to evaluate incidence of type V SLAP lesion. In addition, the authors evaluated clinical outcomes of these patients by dividing two groups according to the sequence for Bankart and SLAP lesion suture. From May 2000 to May 2005, 310 patients who gave informed consent, underwent the diagnostic arthroscopy and magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA). One hundred and ten patients met the following criteria: (1) post-traumatic primary or recurrent anterior shoulder instability, (2) a normal contralateral shoulder, (3) a type V SLAP lesion, and (4) minimum follow-up of two years. Group P included 42 patients, and group R, 68 patients. Among all patients, 58 patients who had Bankart lesions sutured first were included in group B, and 52 who had their SLAP lesions sutured beforehand, group S. Visual analogue scale, range of motion, Rowe and Constant score were used to compare results between group P and group R, also group B and group S. The incidence rates of type V SLAP lesion were 42.8% in group P and 32.0% in group R. The overall treatment results in our study were good. Even if the difference between the two groups was statistically insignificant, group P showed greater recovery of range of motion than group R in external rotation. No significant difference was found between the two different operative methods according to suture sequence. The incidence rates of type V SLAP lesion were 42.8% in the primary dislocation group and 32.0% in the recurrent dislocation group. The overall treatment results in our study were good. Although there was no statistical significance in surgical time between the two groups, when both SLAP and Bankart lesions are present, the Bankart lesion must be sutured first to reduce surgical time.

  13. Kinematic effect of MGHL incorporation into Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Garber, Alexander C; Argintar, Evan; Shin, Sang-Jin; McGarry, Michelle H; Tibone, James E; Lee, Thay Q

    2013-05-01

    Surgical treatment for traumatic shoulder instability has progressed in tandem with the evolution of the current understanding of the anatomy and biomechanics of the shoulder. Proponents of incorporating the middle glenohumeral ligament (MGHL) in Bankart repair believe this technique could increase repair strength. The purpose of this biomechanical study was to compare the range of motion and humeral head kinematic changes that result from including the MGHL in a Bankart repair in an effort to identify possible changes in shoulder biomechanics as a result of this addition in surgical repair.Six cadaveric shoulders were tested in 4 conditions: intact, Bankart lesion, repair excluding the MGHL, and repair including the MGHL. Each condition was tested for range of motion, glenohumeral translation, and humeral head apex position. Standard Bankart repair and repair with MGHL inclusion resulted in decreased range of motion, but no statistically significant difference was found between the 2 repair types (P=.846). Anterior translation was significantly reduced with both the Bankart repair (4.8 ± .9; P=.049) and included MGHL repair (4.6 ± 0.9; P=.029). No statistically significant difference was found between both repairs (P=.993). Although both repairs showed posterior displacement of the humeral head apex when in external rotation, this trend only reached statistical significance when compared with the Bankart lesion in 90° of external rotation (P=.0456); however, no significant difference was found between the 2 repairs (P=.999). Inclusion or exclusion of the MGHL in a Bankart repair does not significantly affect the range of motion, translation, or kinematics of the glenohumeral joint. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. [Medium-term results of arthroscopic repair of relapsing anteroinferior glenohumeral instability].

    PubMed

    García-Rodríguez, R; Díez-Nicolás, E; Vilá-y-Rico, J; Martín-López, C M; Cano-Egea, J M

    2011-01-01

    Arthroscopic repair of Bankart lesion has become the treatment of choice of anterior shoulder instability. Our objective is to analyze the medium-term results of arthroscopic Bankart repair. Between January 1999 and November 2007, 86 shoulders of 85 patients with diagnosis of relapsing shoulder dislocation were treated arthroscopically. After a mean 62-month follow-up (minimum 24 months) the results obtained were retrospectively assessed according the Rowe and Constant functional scales. A statistical analysis was done of the relation between functional results and age, sex, the side operated, capsulorrhaphy, rehabilitation and postoperative immobilization in our series. Moreover, the validity of MRI for diagnosing Bankart lesion was assessed. Eighty-five percent of patients had good or excellent results according to the Rowe scale. The mean Constant scale score was 90.6. There-dislocation rate in our series was 9%. The statistical analysis showed that female sex and immobilization time were related with worse results according to the Constant scale. In our hands, arthroscopic Bankart repair provides results similar to those in other published series. MRI is a useful diagnostic test in our setting, albeit its important implications for the diagnosis of Bankart lesion. Female sex and prolonged immobilization were related with worse functional results.

  15. A novel technique for advancing the inferior labrum in a bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Adams, Brook A; Garrett, William H; Wright, Garth B; Khan, Maher W; Taylor, Jonathon B; Nord, Keith D

    2013-05-01

    Passing suture during a Bankart repair can be a difficult task. A key component of a Bankart repair involves shifting the anteroinferior capsule and labrum superiorly. This technical note describes a new technique of reaching the inferior aspect of the Bankart lesion from posterior. Typical suture passers push the tissue further away. Using a SutureLasso through the low posterolateral portal allows one to push the tissue from inferior toward the suture anchor, making it simpler to advance the capsulolabral complex. Three suture anchors are used in the anteroinferior quadrant. The lowest suture anchor is the critical anchor for advancing the capsule and labrum. The SutureLasso is placed into the axillary recess through the low posterolateral portal, and the nitinol wire is advanced through the capsule and labrum, retrieving the suture and pulling it back through the tissue for tying with a sliding locking knot. This ensures good superior advancement of the tissue and helps obtain an optimal arthroscopic result in Bankart repair. Additional anchors are placed, and suture passage for the middle and superior anchors is then completed from anterior. The advancement and restoration of the tissue tightness provide the optimal components for an excellent result.

  16. Arthroscopic Suture Anchor Fixation of Bony Bankart Lesions: Clinical Outcome, Magnetic Resonance Imaging Results, and Return to Sports.

    PubMed

    Plath, Johannes E; Feucht, Matthias J; Bangoj, Robert; Martetschläger, Frank; Wörtler, Klaus; Seppel, Gernot; Aboalata, Mohamed; Tischer, Thomas; Imhoff, Andreas B; Vogt, Stephan

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome, return to sporting activity, and postoperative articular cartilage and bony morphology of shoulders that underwent arthroscopic suture anchor repair of bony Bankart lesions. The inclusion criteria for this retrospective study were anterior glenoid rim fractures after traumatic shoulder instability that were treated with arthroscopic suture anchor repair. Patients were surveyed by a questionnaire including sport-specific outcome, Rowe score, Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index, and Oxford Instability Score. Three-tesla magnetic resonance imaging could be performed in 30 patients to assess osseous integration, glenoid reconstruction, and signs of osteoarthritis. From November 1999 to April 2010, 81 patients underwent an anterior bony Bankart repair in our department (50 arthroscopic suture anchor repairs, 5 arthroscopic screw fixations, and 26 open repairs). The 55 arthroscopic repairs comprised a consecutive cohort of patients treated by a single surgeon. Of the 50 patients in the suture anchor group, 45 (90%) were available for evaluation. At 82 ± 31 months postoperatively, the mean Rowe score was 85.9 ± 20.5 points, the mean Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index score was 89.4% ± 14.7%, and the mean Oxford Instability Score was 13.6 ± 5.4 points. Compared with the contralateral shoulder, all scores showed a significantly reduced outcome (P < .001, P < .001, and P < .001, respectively). A redislocation occurred in 3 patients (6.6%). Regarding satisfaction, 35 patients (78%) were very satisfied, 9 (20%) were satisfied, and 1 was partly satisfied. Overall, 95% of patients returned to any sporting activity after surgery. The number of sports disciplines (P < .001), duration (P = .005), level (P = .02), and risk category (P = .013) showed a significant reduction compared with the pretrauma condition. However, only 19% of patients reported that shoulder complaints were the reason for the reduction

  17. Muscle strength and function of shoulders with Bankart lesion after successful arthroscopic treatment: interlimb comparison 24 months after surgery.

    PubMed

    Tahta, Mesut; Akmeşe, Ramazan; Özberk, Zekiye Nisa; Coşkun, Ozlem Oner; Işik, Çetin; Korkusuz, Feza; Bozkurt, Murat

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine outcomes following arthroscopic Bankart repair with the focus on strength after the repair. 56 shoulders with Bankart lesion were operated on arthroscopically. Gender, mechanism of the first dislocation, number of dislocations, dominant side, operated side and the number of anchors used for surgery were recorded. DASH and Oxford instability scoring systems were applied preoperatively and compared to scores at the 24-month follow-up. The scoring systems were also applied to contralateral shoulders at the 24th month of follow-up. Range of motion was measured with a goniometer. Muscle strength was analyzed with a dynamometer simultaneously with the muscle activity of four perishoulder muscles. The data were recorded with surface EMG. Range of motion, muscle strength and activity were evaluated according to the contralateral shoulder at the 24th month of follow-up. Male/female ratio was 42/14 with a mean age of 32 years. The mean number of dislocations was 3 ± 1 and all were traumatic dislocations. The number of mean anchors used was 3.1 and the mean follow-up period was 24 months. In clinical evaluation, the preoperative and postoperative results of the DASH and Oxford instability scores of the unstable shoulders were significantly different. In the comparison between the operated and contralateral shoulders, there was no significant difference in DASH and Oxford instability scores at the 24th month of follow-up. There was no significant loss of range of motion. Only internal rotation strength was significantly reduced and there was no significant change in the EMG patterns. Although good clinical results can be achieved, internal rotation strength is reduced after arthroscopic surgery, but daily activities are not affected. There is no guarantee for patients of excellent recovery. Level III cohort study.

  18. [Bankart repair. Comparative study with and without suction drainage to assess shoulder pain and functional limitation].

    PubMed

    Godino, M; Vides, M; Benítez, N; Guerado, E

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare two patient cohorts with Bankart lesion, one with intraarticular drainage after surgery and another group without drainage. We designed a study cohort for patients with Bankart repair due to relapsing shoulder dislocation; they underwent arthroscopy and were stabilized with suture anchors; intraarticular drainage was used in one group and no drainage was used in a control patient cohort. Thirty-one consecutive patients were operated by the same team. All patients were evaluated at the office using the Rowe, Constant and UCLA scales. The statistical tests used included chi-square, the student-t test or the Wilcoxon rank sum test (nonparametric version). The UCLA median value was 35 (34.5-35) in group B and 33 (32.5 -35) in group A, with p = 0.13. The Rowe test score was 100 (95;100) in group B and 100 in group A (85;100), with p = 0.913. The Constant test score was 96 (88.8-98) in group B and 96 (90.5-100) in group A with p = 0.535 and no differences. This comparative study includes two groups that underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair, one with drainage and another one without drainage. Good results were obtained in both groups. In this study the placement of a postoperative intraarticular drainage did not improve clinical results, as no statistically significant differences were observed between both groups.

  19. [The role of capsulolabral complex in Bankart lesion repair using Mitek anchors].

    PubMed

    Holibka, R; Pach, M; Kalina, R

    2007-08-01

    The reconstructions of Bankart lesions, carried out according to the procedure recommended by the Mitek company, showed a high rate of recurrent dislocation. Therefore, based on operative experience, anatomical studies and reconstructive surgery on cadaver shoulders, we developed a new surgical technique that provided good shoulder stability and better operative outcomes. The results are reported here. Between 1997 and 2005, arthroscopic Bankart repair with use of Mitek anchors was performed on 368 shoulders at the Department of Orthopedics, Faculty of Medicine, Palacky University in Olomouc. The average age of the patients was 22 years (range, 16 to 56 years). The patients were allocated to two groups according to the surgical technique used. Group 1, which comprised 100 shoulders, was treated by the Bankart repair procedure recommended by the Mitek Company. Group 2, which included 268 shoulders, underwent Bankart reconstruction by the technique developed at our department. In group 1, anchors were inserted in the anterior glenoid rim, as recommended by the Mitek company. In group 2, implants were inserted into the superior region, with surface reduced to spongious bone, of the anterior glenoid rim. This allowed for creation of a more robust capsulolabral complex preventing the humeral head from dislocation. The results were assessed by the UCLA (University of California at Los Angeles) shoulder score system and statistical evaluation was performed at the Department of Medical Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, Palacky University in Olomouc. In group 1 (Mitek procedure), the UCLA shoulder score evaluation was as follows: 22 (22 %) excellent, 28 (28 %) good, 22 (22 %) satisfactory, and 28 (28 %) poor outcomes. In group 2 (our technique), the results included 199 (74 %) excellent, 66 (24.6 %) good, two (0.8 %) satisfactory and one (0.6 %) poor outcomes. The difference between the groups was statistically significant (Chi-square, p 0.0001). The method of Bankart lesion

  20. Comparison of Bristow procedure and Bankart arthroscopic method as the treatment of recurrent shoulder instability

    PubMed Central

    Zarezade, Abolghasem; Dehghani, Mohammad; Rozati, Ali Reza; Banadaki, Hossein Saeid; Shekarchizade, Neda

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anterior shoulder dislocation is the most common major joint dislocation. In patients with recurrent shoulder dislocation, surgical intervention is necessary. In this study, two methods of treatment, Bankart arthroscopic method and open Bristow procedure, were compared. Materials and Methods: This clinical trial survey had been done in the orthopedic department of Alzahra and Kashani hospitals of Isfahan during 2008-2011. Patients with recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation who were candidates for surgical treatment were randomly divided into two groups, one treated by Bankart arthroscopic technique and the other treated by Bristow method. All the patients were assessed after the surgery using the criteria of ROWE, CONSTANT, UCLA, and ASES. Data were analyzed by SPSS software. Results: Six patients (16.22%) had inappropriate condition with ROWE score (score less than 75); of them, one had been treated with Bristow and five with Bankart (5.26 vs. 27.78). Nine patients (24.32%) had appropriate condition, which included six from Bristow group and three treated by Bankart technique (31.58 vs. 16.67). Finally, 22 patients (59.46%) showed great improvement with this score, which included 12 from Bristow and 10 from Bankart groups (63.16 vs. 55.56). According to Fisher's exact test, there were no significant differences between the two groups (P = 0.15). Conclusion: The two mentioned techniques did not differ significantly, although some parameters such as level of performance, pain intensity, use of analgesics, and range of internal rotation showed more improvement in Bristow procedure. Therefore, if there is no contraindication for Bristow procedure, it is preferred to use this method. PMID:25590034

  1. [Clinical results after all arthroscopic reduction and fixation of bony Bankart lesion].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yi-Ming; Jiang, Chun-Yan; Lu, Yi; Xue, Qing-Yun

    2011-07-01

    To investigate the shoulder function after arthroscopic reduction and internal fixation in patients with bony Bankart lesion. Between May 2004 and May 2008, 45 patients with bony Bankart lesion who were treated with all arthroscopic reduction and internal fixation with metal anchors were included in this study. Among them 40 patients were male and 5 patients were female. The average age at the surgery was 27.6 years (16.5 - 50.1 years). The average duration of follow-up was 29.7 months (24.8 - 49.0 months). A history of recurrent dislocation of affected shoulder was found in all patients. Metal anchors were used to fix the bony Bankart lesion during the surgery. Hill-Sachs remplissage technique was used to treat the Engaging Hill-Sachs lesion. The preoperative American Shoulder and Elbow Society (ASES) score, Constant-Murley score, Rowe score and the VAS score for instability were 84 ± 14, 95.1 ± 4.6, 39.4 ± 2.9 and 5 ± 3 respectively. No significant change was found regarding active forward elevation, external rotation and internal rotation after the surgery. The ASES score, Constant-Murley score, Rowe score and the VAS score of stability were 95 ± 7, 98.3 ± 2.2, 84.5 ± 22.0 and 1 ± 2, improved significantly higher after the surgery (P < 0.01). One subluxation and 3 redislocation were happened during follow-up. The overall failure rate was 8.9% (4/45). All arthroscopic reduction and fixation of bony Bankart lesion can achieve a good result.

  2. Results of arthroscopic meniscal repair

    PubMed Central

    Orlowski, María Belén; Arroquy, Damián; Chahla, Jorge; Guiñazú, Jorge; Bisso, Martín Carboni; Vilaseca, Tomás

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Currently the arthroscopic treatment of meniscal pathology has become one of the most common procedures in orthopedic practice and although in most cases meniscectomy is done, meniscal sutures are the treatment of choice when a reparable lesion is diagnosed, especially in young patients. It has been reported that the meniscal repair leads to a lower incidence of developing degenerative changes in the long-term when compared with meniscectomy and nonsurgical treatment of meniscal injuries. The aim of this study was to determine the success rate of meniscal repair achieved in our sports medicine practice. Methods: Between 2006 and 2015, 62 meniscal tears in 58 patients with a mean age of 31 years (range 15-58) were repaired. Mean follow-up was 52 months (range 6-120 months). In 16 patients (28%) was associated with arthroscopic ACL reconstruction. The repair techniques used included outside-in sutures, inside-out sutures, all-inside sutures and a combination of techniques. Failure of the repair was defined by the requirement for repeat knee arthroscopy and partial or subtotal meniscectomy. The indication of arthroscopic revision was based on the presence of mechanical symptoms, after the suture. Results: Failure of meniscus repair occurred in four patients (failure rate: 6.45%), one case was associated with ACL reconstruction (failure rate: 6.25%) and 3 had undergone isolated meniscal suture (failure rate: 8%). The average time for the reoperation was 15 months (4-24). We had no intraoperative complications. Conclusion: The reported failure rate of meniscal repair in stable knees varies between 12% and 43%, with reports that demonstrate a clinical success rate of 100%. In this study, we obtained a success rate of 93.5%. These results are slightly higher than those in the literature, which can be attributed to careful selection of patients and the fact that clinical success tends to be better than the assessed arthroscopically. In summary, we consider the

  3. [Curative effect of arthroscopic suture anchor fixation on shoulder bankart injury].

    PubMed

    Li, Anping; Chen, You; Huang, Guoliang; Huang, Tianlong

    2013-03-01

    To determine the curative effect of arthroscopic suture anchor fixation on shoulder bankart injury. Sixteen patients with shoulder recurrent dislocation and diagnosed bankart injury were treated with suture anchor fixed by shoulder arthroscopy. Both shoulders of the patients had X-ray, MRI, physical examination before the operation. Suture anchors were used to fix the lesion labrum by shoulder arthroscopy. University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) score and visual analogue scale (VAS) score were adopted for the final evaluation at the latest follow-up. All patients were followed for a period of 25 (7-68) months. At the latest follow-up, no redislocation and instability occured. The pre- and post-operation UCLA score was (20.8 ± 0.8) vs (32.9 ± 1.5), excellent in 6, good in 10, with no poor score, while the pre- and post-operation VAS score was (3.3 ± 0.8) vs (0.6 ± 0.5). Suture anchor fixation guided by arthroscopy is good for bankart injury caused by recurrent shoulder dislocation, which has many advantages, such as mini-invasion, rapid recovery and a satisfactory outcome in function and motion.

  4. Do reduction and healing of the bony fragment really matter in arthroscopic bony Bankart reconstruction?: a prospective study with clinical and computed tomography evaluations.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chun-Yan; Zhu, Yi-Ming; Liu, Xin; Li, Feng-Long; Lu, Yi; Wu, Guan

    2013-11-01

    Bony Bankart lesions can be treated with arthroscopic repair. However, few studies have evaluated the importance of bony fragment reduction and healing to stability of the glenohumeral joint after arthroscopic bony Bankart repair. To evaluate functional results after surgery and determine the correlation between reduction and healing of the fracture and postoperative stability of the glenohumeral joint. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A total of 50 patients (47 men, 3 women; average age, 27.6 years; range, 16.5-50.1 years) with bony Bankart lesions and recurrent anterior shoulder dislocations were treated with arthroscopic reduction and internal fixation with suture anchors. The average follow-up period was 32.5 months (range, 24.3-61.2 months). Preoperative and postoperative range of motion and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), Constant-Murley, and Rowe scores were compared to evaluate the results of the surgeries. Sequential 3-dimensional computed tomography (CT) scans were available for 37 patients and were analyzed to investigate the effect of the bony defect of the glenoid and the correlation between the success of the surgery and reduction and healing of the bony fragment. After surgery, active forward elevation was significantly improved (P < .05). No significant differences were found regarding external and internal rotations after surgery. The ASES, Constant-Murley, and Rowe scores improved significantly after surgery. Redislocations occurred in 3 patients, and a positive anterior apprehension sign was detected in 1 patient during follow-up. The overall failure rate was 8.0% (4/50). The CT scans during the follow-up period showed a nonunion of the bony fragment in 13.5% of cases (5/37). The reconstructed size of the glenoid was <80% in 3 of the 4 failure cases but >80% in all of the successful cases. Arthroscopic reduction and fixation of a bony Bankart lesion can achieve good results in selected cases. The size of the reconstructed glenoid

  5. Factors affecting capsular volume changes and association with outcomes after Bankart repair and capsular shift.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Young; Chung, Seok Won; Kumar, Gurudeo; Oh, Kyung-Soo; Choi, Jin Hyeok; Lee, Deukhee; Park, Sehyung

    2015-02-01

    Capsular laxity is a main contributing factor in recurrent shoulder instability and is suggested to be correlated with increased capsular volume. Arthroscopic capsular shift combined with Bankart repair can reduce the capsular volume and reinforce the redundant capsule; however, as the capsuloligamentous structure has viscoelastic properties, it is possible for the shifted and tensioned capsule of the glenohumeral joint to slowly stretch out again over time, resulting in an increase in capsular volume. To analyze changes in capsular volume of the glenohumeral joint over time after arthroscopic Bankart repair and capsular shift, the factors associated with these changes, and their relevance to outcomes. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Included in this study were 105 patients (mean age, 25.8 ± 8.2 years) who underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair and capsular shift for anterior shoulder instability and computed tomography arthrography (CTA) at 3 months and 1 year postoperatively and whose various functional outcomes were evaluated preoperatively and at the last follow-up (>12 months). Among these patients, 27 also had preoperative CTA. These 27 patients were used to make comparisons between preoperative and 3-month postoperative CTA measurements, and all 105 patients were used for all other comparisons. Two raters measured the separate anterior and posterior capsular volume and cross-sectional area at the 5-o'clock position using 3-dimensional (3D) Slicer software. These measurements were subsequently adjusted for each glenoid size. The changes in capsular volume and cross-sectional area at the 5-o'clock position over time, the factors related to higher change in anterior capsular volume, and their correlation with outcomes were evaluated. Three months postoperatively, the total and anterior capsular volume and anterior cross-sectional area significantly decreased; however, these values increased again at 1 year postoperatively (all P < .01). The inter- and

  6. Open Bankart repair with suture anchors for traumatic recurrent anterior shoulder instability: comparison of results between small and large Bankart lesions.

    PubMed

    Lai, Davy; Ma, Hsiao-Li; Hung, Shih-Chieh; Chen, Tain-Hsiung; Wu, Jiunn-Jer

    2006-01-01

    This retrospective study was to demonstrate the clinical outcome of open Bankart repair with suture anchors for recurrent anterior shoulder instability, and to compare surgical results of small (<3 clock units) and large (>3 clock units) Bankart lesions. With an average follow-up of 55.6 months (2-8 years), there were 82 patients (60 right, 22 left shoulders) with the mean age of 27 years accepting open Bankart repair with suture anchors and capsular shift procedure by the same team. According to surgical findings, these patients were grouped into small (<3 clock units) and large (>3 clock units) Bankart lesions. Subjective outcomes were recorded according to the Bankart scoring system of Rowe. Rowe scores averaged 85.9+/-12.9 (range 25-100). The patients, 92-7 %, had objectively excellent or good results. Twenty nine patients (35.4%) had small Bankart lesions and 53 patients had large Bankart lesions. The Rowe scores in small Bankart lesions were better than that in large Bankart lesions (93.5+/-6.8 vs. 81.8+/-13.6, Wilcoxon rank sum test, P<0.001). Mean scores of stability (Wilcoxon rank sum test, P=0.043), motion (Wilcoxon rank sum test, P=0.037), and function (Wilcoxon rank sum test, P<0.001) in small lesions also had superior outcomes than in large lesions. Four patients (4.9%) got fair results and two (2.4%) patients got poor results at the end of follow-up. The average loss of external rotation is 10 degrees . Open Bankart repair with the aid of suture anchors still got satisfactory results in the treatment of traumatic recurrent anterior instability of the shoulder. The size of the Bankart lesion was a factor affecting surgical outcome. Small Bankart lesions usually got better results than large Bankart lesions.

  7. Arthroscopic Bankart shoulder stabilization in athletes: return to sports and functional outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gerometta, Antoine; Rosso, Claudio; Klouche, Shahnaz; Hardy, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate return to sports after arthroscopic Bankart stabilization. This is a retrospective study including all athletes aged <50 years who underwent arthroscopic stabilization in 2010 and 2011 (m, 36; f, 10; mean age 28.9 ± 8.1 years; follow-up 24.4 ± 7.7 months). Sixteen patients were practicing competitive sports and 30 recreational sports. Level and delay of return to sports, sports classification according to Allain, Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI) score, patient satisfaction, apprehension level and avoidance behaviour were noted. 95.7 % returned to the same level after an average of 9.8 ± 5.4 months. Sports level was unchanged or better in 82.6 %, lower in 8.7, and 4.5 % changed sport because of their shoulder. Patients with more than 10 dislocations returned to sports and to their preoperative level later than patients with <10. Male athletes returned to preoperative sports levels faster than female athletes (p < 0.001). The WOSI score and also its item "sports" were worse in those who had not returned (p = 0.0002 and 0.006, respectively). Satisfaction correlated with the WOSI score (p = 0.0004) while 93.3 % were satisfied/very satisfied. The decrease in the apprehension level was significant (p < 0.00001). 36.9 % still experienced avoidance behaviour. Most athletes resumed their main sport often at the same level, but the threshold of 10 dislocations should be considered a risk factor for longer return to sports at any level. The WOSI score is a valuable outcome score after Bankart stabilization. Postoperative avoidance should be distinguished from apprehension. IV.

  8. Results of 45 arthroscopic Bankart procedures: Does the ISIS remain a reliable prognostic assessment after 5 years?

    PubMed

    Boughebri, Omar; Maqdes, Ali; Moraiti, Constantina; Dib, Choukry; Leclère, Franck Marie; Valenti, Philippe

    2015-05-01

    The Instability Severity Index Score (ISIS) includes preoperative clinical and radiological risk factors to select patients who can benefit from an arthroscopic Bankart procedure with a low rate of recurrence. Patients who underwent an arthroscopic Bankart for anterior shoulder instability with an ISIS lower than or equal to four were assessed after a minimum of 5-year follow-up. Forty-five shoulders were assessed at a mean of 79 months (range 60-118 months). Average age was 29.4 years (range 17-58 years) at the time of surgery. Postoperative functions were assessed by the Walch and Duplay and the Rowe scores for 26 patients; an adapted telephonic interview was performed for the 19 remaining patients who could not be reassessed clinically. A failure was defined by the recurrence of an anterior dislocation or subluxation. Patients were asked whether they were finally very satisfied, satisfied or unhappy. The mean Walch and Duplay score at last follow-up was 84.3 (range 35-100). The final result for these patients was excellent in 14 patients (53.8 %), good in seven cases (26.9 %), poor in three patients (11.5 %) and bad in two patients (7.7 %). The mean Rowe score was 82.6 (range 35-100). Thirty-nine patients (86.7 %) were subjectively very satisfied or satisfied, and six (13.3 %) were unhappy. Four patients (8.9 %) had a recurrence of frank dislocation with a mean delay of 34 months (range 12-72 months). Three of them had a Hill-Sachs lesion preoperatively. Two patients had a preoperative ISIS at 4 points and two patients at 3 points. The selection based on the ISIS allows a low rate of failure after an average term of 5 years. Lowering the limit for indication to 3 points allows to avoid the association between two major risk factors for recurrence, which are valued at 2 points. The existence of a Hill-Sachs lesion is a stronger indicator for the outcome of instability repair. Level IV, Retrospective Case Series, Treatment Study.

  9. Recurrent Shoulder Instability After Primary Bankart Repair.

    PubMed

    Donohue, Michael A; Mauntel, Timothy C; Dickens, Jonathan F

    2017-09-01

    The glenohumeral joint is one of the most frequently dislocated joints and occurs with increasing frequency in collision and contact athletes, especially those in sports that repeatedly place the glenohumeral joint in a position of vulnerability. Nonoperative management of shoulder instability especially in young contact athletes results in unacceptably high recurrence rates; thus, early surgical stabilization has become commonplace. Surgical stabilization typically yields acceptable outcomes. However, recurrent anterior instability may occur following a previous stabilization procedure at rates of 7% to 12%. Recurrent glenohumeral instability represents a treatment challenge for orthopedic surgeons as it not only has the potential to result in subsequent surgery, therapy, and missed activity time, but also has been associated with long-term degenerative joint changes. Thus, recurrent instability requires close examination to determine underlying pathology leading to failure. Evaluation of underlying pathology requires consideration of patient activity-related factors, hyperlaxity and multidirectional instability, glenoid bone loss, glenoid track lesions, and other pathologic lesions. Revision surgical stabilization approaches include arthroscopic and open stabilization, as well as glenoid osseous augmentation procedures. Postoperative rehabilitation and release to sports and activity must be tailored to protect the shoulder from continued instability. Understanding that risk of recurrent glenohumeral instability and the risk factors associated with it are essential so that these factors may be mitigated and recurrent instability prevented.

  10. The biomechanical effect of shoulder remplissage combined with Bankart repair for the treatment of engaging Hill-Sachs lesions.

    PubMed

    Argintar, Evan; Heckmann, Nathanael; Wang, Lawrence; Tibone, James E; Lee, Thay Q

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the biomechanical effects of the remplissage repair combined with Bankart repair for engaging Hill-Sachs lesions on range of motion (ROM), translation, and glenohumeral kinematics. Six cadaveric shoulders were tested using a custom shoulder testing system. ROM, kinematics, and anterior-posterior (AP) and superior-inferior glenohumeral translations were quantified at 0° and 60° glenohumeral abduction. Six conditions were tested: intact, Bankart lesion, Bankart with 40 % Hill-Sachs lesion, Bankart repair, Bankart repair with remplissage, and remplissage repair alone. Humeral external rotation (ER) and total range of motion increased significantly after the creation of the Bankart lesion at both 0° and 60° abduction. The Bankart repair restored ER to intact values at 0° and 60° abduction, and the addition of the remplissage repair did not significantly alter range of motion from the Bankart repair alone. AP translation increased following the creation of the Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions and was restored with the Bankart repair; the remplissage did not alter translation from the Bankart repair alone. At maximum ER at 60° abduction, the apex of the humeral head shifted posteriorly and inferiorly with remplissage repair. The addition of the remplissage procedure combined with Bankart repair for treatment of large Hill-Sachs lesions had no statistically significant effect on ROM or translation, but altered the kinematics of the glenohumeral joint. Thus, by addressing the humeral bone defect following an anterior shoulder dislocation, the remplissage technique with concurrent Bankart repair may be a relatively minimally invasive option for converting engaging Hill-Sachs lesions to non-engaging and promoting shoulder stability, though further biomechanical and clinical studies are warranted.

  11. Evaluation of functional results from shoulders after arthroscopic repair of complete rotator cuff tears associated with traumatic anterior dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Glaydson Gomes; Freitas, José Márcio Alves; de Oliveira França, Flávio; Santos, Flávio Márcio Lago; de Simoni, Leandro Furtado; Godinho, Pedro Couto

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical outcome of arthroscopic rotator cuff fixation and, when present, simultaneous repair of the Bankart lesion caused by traumatic dislocation; and to assess whether the size of the rotator cuff injury caused by traumatic dislocation has any influence on the postoperative clinical outcomes. Methods Thirty-three patients with traumatic shoulder dislocation and complete rotator cuff injury, with at least two years of follow up, were retrospectively evaluated. For analysis purposes, the patients were divided into groups: presence of fixed Bankart lesion or absence of this lesion, and rotator cuff lesions smaller than 3.0 cm (group A) or greater than or equal to 3.0 cm (group B). All the patients underwent arthroscopic repair of the lesions and were evaluated postoperatively by means of the UCLA (University of California at Los Angeles) score and strength measurements. Results The group with Bankart lesion repair had a postoperative UCLA score of 33.96, while the score of the group without Bankart lesion was 33.7, without statistical significance (p = 0.743). Group A had a postoperative UCLA score of 34.35 and group B, 33.15, without statistical significance (p = 0.416). Conclusion The functional outcomes of the patients who only presented complete rotator cuff tearing after traumatic shoulder dislocation, which underwent arthroscopic repair, were similar to the outcomes of those who presented an associated with a Bankart lesion that was corrected simultaneously with the rotator cuff injury. The extent of the original rotator cuff injury did not alter the functional results in the postoperative evaluation. PMID:27069884

  12. FUNCTIONAL ASSESSMENT OF ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR FOR RECURRENT ANTERIOR SHOULDER INSTABILITY

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Filho, Ildeu Afonso; de Castro Veado, Marco Antônio; Fim, Márcio; da Silva Corrêa, Lincoln Vargas; de Carvalho Junior, Antônio Enéas Rangel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To clinically and radiologically evaluate patients who underwent arthroscopic surgical treatment for anterior shoulder instability by means of the Bankart technique, using metal anchors. Methods: This was a retrospective study on 49 patients who underwent arthroscopic repair of anterior shoulder instability between 2002 and 2007. The patients were evaluated using the Carter-Rowe score and the Samilson and Prieto classification. The mean age at the time of surgery was 30 years. The mean length of follow-up was 42.7 months (ranging from 18 to 74). 85% of the patients were male. Results: The mean Carter-Rowe score was 83 points (ranging from 30 to 100) including 31 excellent results, 7 good, 3 fair and 8 poor. Recurrent dislocation was observed in 16% (8 patients), and 37.5% of them were of traumatic origin. Joint degeneration was present in 32.5% of the cases, including 5 cases of grade 1, 6 cases of grade 2 and 2 cases of grade 3. The average loss of external rotation was 12° and the loss of anterior elevation was 8°. There was a statistically significant relationship (p < 0.05) between arthritis and age at first dislocation, age at surgery and crackling. 92% of the patients reported high degrees of satisfaction after the procedure. Among the complications, there were two cases of stiff shoulder, one patient with prominence of the synthesis material and one case of anchor loosening. Conclusion: Arthroscopic repair of anterior shoulder instability using metal anchors was shown to be effective, with a low complication rate. PMID:27042624

  13. A systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical and patient-reported outcomes following two procedures for recurrent traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder: Latarjet procedure vs. Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    An, Vincent Vinh Gia; Sivakumar, Brahman Shankar; Phan, Kevin; Trantalis, John

    2016-05-01

    The Bankart repair and Latarjet procedure are both viable surgical options for recurrent traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder joint. The anatomic repair is the more popular option, with 90% of surgeons internationally choosing the Bankart repair as the initial treatment. There has been no previous review directly comparing the 2 techniques. Hence, we aimed to systematically review studies to compare the outcomes of Bankart repairs vs. the Latarjet procedure for recurrent instability of the shoulder. Six electronic databases were searched for original, English-language studies comparing the Bankart and Latarjet procedures. Studies were critically appraised using the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) checklist. Data were extracted from the text, tables, and figures of the selected studies. Eight comparative studies were identified with 795 shoulders; 416 of them underwent open or arthroscopic Bankart repairs, and 379 were repaired by the open Latarjet procedure. Primary and revision procedures were studied. The Latarjet procedure conferred significantly lower risk of recurrence and redislocation. There was no significant difference in the rates of complication requiring reoperation between the two procedures. Rowe scores were higher and loss of external rotation lower in the Latarjet group compared with the Bankart repair group. Our studies demonstrate that the Latarjet procedure is a viable and possibly superior alternative to the Bankart repair, offering greater stability with no significant increase in complication rate. However, the studies identified were retrospective and of limited quality, and therefore randomized controlled trials with large populations of patients or prospective assessment of national orthopedic registries should be employed to confirm our findings. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Arthroscopic subscapularis bankart technique as a salvage procedure for failed anterior shoulder stabilization.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Salma; Delos, Demetris; Dines, Joshua S; Altchek, David W; Dodson, Christopher C; Newman, Ashley M; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2014-02-01

    Shoulder instability is a relatively common problem. Even with contemporary surgical techniques, instability can recur following both open and arthroscopic fixation. Surgical management of capsular insufficiency in anterior shoulder stabilization represents a significant challenge, particularly in young, active patients. There are a limited number of surgical treatment options. The Laterjet technique can present with a number of intraoperative challenges and postoperative complication. We report an arthroscopic subscapularis tenodesis technique as a salvage procedure for challenging glenohumeral instability cases. Sutures are passed through the subscapularis tendon and capsule before they are tied as one in the subdeltoid psace. The rotator interval is closed with superior and medial advancement of anterior and inferior tissue. This technical note carefully describes this procedure with useful technical tips, illustrations, and diagrams. Two clinical cases are described involving patients with recurrent instability following failed surgery who were successfully managed with this procedure. Both cases described resulted in improved shoulder stability, range of motion, and function following management with this surgical technique. This arthroscopic subscapularis tenodesis procedure is proposed as a useful alternative repair technique for cases of recurrent instability after failed surgery with isolated capsular insufficiency. It is believed that this arthroscopic subscapularis tenodesis technique can potentially provide similar outcomes to open bone block stabilization procedures, while reducing the risks associated with those procedures.

  15. The results of Bankart repair without capsular plication in patients with recurrent traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation.

    PubMed

    Kalkar, İsmail; Esenyel, Cem Zeki; Saygılı, Mehmet Selçuk; Esenyel, Ayşın; Gürbüz, Hakan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of patients with recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation, who had been treated with repair of the Bankart lesion without capsuler plication. The study included 22 shoulders of 22 patients (16 males and 6 females) with a mean age of 28 years, who underwent Bankart repair between 2011 and 2014. Patients with bilateral shoulder instability, multiple instability, >25% glenoid bone loss, and those with a history of shoulder surgery were not included in the study. The average follow-up time was 21.2 months. Evaluation was made of the preoperative number of dislocations, postoperative recurrence, functional status, and daily activity performance of the patients. Shoulder range of motion was measured. The results were evaluated using the Rowe shoulder score and the Oxford shoulder instability score. Recurrence was observed in only one patient who had a shoulder dislocation after trauma, thus giving a recurrence rate of 4.5%. Shoulder range of motion was full in all except that one patient. The mean Rowe shoulder score was 95.5 (excellent) and Oxford shoulder stability score was 44.6 (excellent). No recurrent shoulder dislocation was observed in patients who underwent Bankart repair surgery. Plication was not performed with the Bankart repair. Close to full range of motion was obtained in all patients. In conclusion, Bankart repair alone can be considered to be sufficient for the treatment of traumatic recurrent anterior shoulder instability.

  16. Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Indication and Technique.

    PubMed

    Gilotra, Mohit; O'Brien, Michael J; Savoie, Felix H

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder arthroscopy and rotator cuff repair techniques are frequently used by most practicing orthopaedic surgeons. A thorough patient history and physical examination can often confirm the presence of a rotator cuff tear, and imaging can be used to evaluate the extent of the injury. The indication for rotator cuff repair is a painful shoulder refractory to nonsurgical management. Arthroscopic techniques, including capsular and coracohumeral ligament releases to decrease tension on the repair, facilitate successful rotator cuff repair. Biomechanically, a double-row transosseous-equivalent rotator cuff repair provides excellent results for medium-size rotator cuff tears. Larger, retracted rotator cuff tears may be better repaired with oblique convergence sutures and a medial single-row rotator cuff repair. The biology of healing, the preservation of blood supply, and the trephination of the bony healing bed are essential parts of all rotator cuff repair procedures. Protection of the rotator cuff repair with an abduction sling for 4 to 8 weeks postoperatively and the delay of active motion until early healing has occurred will improve outcomes.

  17. A Proficiency-Based Progression Training Curriculum Coupled With a Model Simulator Results in the Acquisition of a Superior Arthroscopic Bankart Skill Set.

    PubMed

    Angelo, Richard L; Ryu, Richard K N; Pedowitz, Robert A; Beach, William; Burns, Joseph; Dodds, Julie; Field, Larry; Getelman, Mark; Hobgood, Rhett; McIntyre, Louis; Gallagher, Anthony G

    2015-10-01

    To determine the effectiveness of proficiency-based progression (PBP) training using simulation both compared with the same training without proficiency requirements and compared with a traditional resident course for learning to perform an arthroscopic Bankart repair (ABR). In a prospective, randomized, blinded study, 44 postgraduate year 4 or 5 orthopaedic residents from 21 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-approved US orthopaedic residency programs were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 skills training protocols for learning to perform an ABR: group A, traditional (routine Arthroscopy Association of North America Resident Course) (control, n = 14); group B, simulator (modified curriculum adding a shoulder model simulator) (n = 14); or group C, PBP (PBP plus the simulator) (n = 16). At the completion of training, all subjects performed a 3 suture anchor ABR on a cadaveric shoulder, which was videotaped and scored in blinded fashion with the use of previously validated metrics. The PBP-trained group (group C) made 56% fewer objectively assessed errors than the traditionally trained group (group A) (P = .011) and 41% fewer than group B (P = .049) (both comparisons were statistically significant). The proficiency benchmark was achieved on the final repair by 68.7% of participants in group C compared with 36.7% in group B and 28.6% in group A. When compared with group A, group B participants were 1.4 times, group C participants were 5.5 times, and group C(PBP) participants (who met all intermediate proficiency benchmarks) were 7.5 times as likely to achieve the final proficiency benchmark. A PBP training curriculum and protocol coupled with the use of a shoulder model simulator and previously validated metrics produces a superior arthroscopic Bankart skill set when compared with traditional and simulator-enhanced training methods. Surgical training combining PBP and a simulator is efficient and effective. Patient safety could be improved if

  18. Chronic ankle instability: Arthroscopic anatomical repair.

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Hernández, M; Mellado-Romero, M; Páramo-Díaz, P; García-Lamas, L; Vilà-Rico, J

    Ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries. Despite appropriate conservative treatment, approximately 20-40% of patients continue to have chronic ankle instability and pain. In 75-80% of cases there is an isolated rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament. A retrospective observational study was conducted on 21 patients surgically treated for chronic ankle instability by means of an arthroscopic anatomical repair, between May 2012 and January 2013. There were 15 men and 6 women, with a mean age of 30.43 years (range 18-48). The mean follow-up was 29 months (range 25-33). All patients were treated by arthroscopic anatomical repair of anterior talofibular ligament. Four (19%) patients were found to have varus hindfoot deformity. Associated injuries were present in 13 (62%) patients. There were 6 cases of osteochondral lesions, 3 cases of posterior ankle impingement syndrome, and 6 cases of peroneal pathology. All these injuries were surgically treated in the same surgical time. A clinical-functional study was performed using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score. The mean score before surgery was 66.12 (range 60-71), and after surgery it increased up to a mean of 96.95 (range 90-100). All patients were able to return to their previous sport activity within a mean of 21.5 weeks (range 17-28). Complications were found in 3 (14%) patients. Arthroscopic anatomical ligament repair technique has excellent clinical-functional results with a low percentage of complications, and enables patients to return to their previous sport activity within a short period of time. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Arthroscopic knotless peripheral ulnar-sided TFCC repair.

    PubMed

    Geissler, William B

    2011-08-01

    Peripheral ulnar-sided tears of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) are common injuries and are amenable to arthroscopic repair. This article describes an all-arthroscopic knotless technique for TFCC repair. This technique has the advantage of being all arthroscopic using 3 portals, has the ability to repair both the superficial and deep layers of the articular disk, repairs the articular disk directly back to bone, and does not require any suture knots that may irritate the surrounding soft tissues. The surgical technique is described in detail. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Open Bankart Repair for Traumatic Anterior Shoulder Instability in Teenage Athletes.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Mark D; Hennrikus, William L

    2016-03-03

    Traumatic anterior shoulder instability from recurrent dislocations or subluxations is a debilitating problem for the teenage athlete. The risk of recurrent instability is high in this adolescent population. We performed a retrospective case series analysis of adolescent athletes with recurrent instability treated with open Bankart repair and evaluated functional outcomes as well as redislocation rates. The retrospective study included 21 teenage patients with Bankart lesions and recurrent anterior shoulder instability. There were 19 males (90%) and 2 females (10%) with an average age of 16 years (range, 14 to 18 y). Patients were evaluated based on Rowe and UCLA shoulder scores, return to previous level of sport, external rotation, and recurrence. The average number of anchors used to repair the Bankart lesion was 3 (range, 2 to 5). One patient was lost to follow-up at 6 months after surgery. The remaining 20 patients all had at least 2-year follow-up. The recurrent instability rate was zero. In total, 100% of patients had an excellent result based on an average Rowe score of 96.5 points of 100 points (a score of 90 to 100 is an excellent result). In total, 100% of patients had good/excellent result based on an average UCLA shoulder score of 34 of 35 (a score >27 is a good/excellent result). At final follow-up, 7 patients (34%) had lost an average of 11 degrees of external rotation (range, 5 to 20 degrees) on the injured shoulder with the arm at the side compared with the noninjured shoulder. Contact teenage athletes with recurrent anterior shoulder instability can be treated with open Bankart repair with a low recurrence, excellent functional shoulder outcomes, and return to sport. A small amount of external rotation may be lost with this technique. Care must be taken when considering this method with throwing athletes (ie, quarterback or pitcher). The open Bankart should remain a viable alternative for the adolescent population with recurrent anterior

  1. Arthroscopic Repair of Inferior Labrum From Anterior to Posterior Lesions Associated With Multidirectional Instability of the Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Burt, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Multidirectional instability (MDI) of the shoulder may arise spontaneously; however, recent evidence suggests that traumatic events may play a role in this syndrome. Variable degrees of injury around the circumference of the glenoid have been reported, ranging from Bankart and Kim lesions to 270° of injury and even 360° of injury. Hyperabduction injury may cause inferior subluxation of the shoulder and result in traumatic isolated injury to the inferior labrum from anterior to posterior. This particular lesion spans approximately 180° of the inferior hemisphere and may lead to symptomatic MDI. In contrast to open or arthroscopic plication procedures for atraumatic MDI without labral injury, the goal in these cases is anatomic arthroscopic repair of the inferior labrum tear without the need for capsular plication, volume reduction, or rotator interval closure. PMID:25685683

  2. Four-Quadrant Approach to Capsulolabral Repair: An Arthroscopic Road Map to the Glenoid

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    lesions ,6 as well as the superior extent of Bankart lesions and access to the subscapu- laris (Fig 2). Although this quadrant is not frequently used for...repair. Access to the posteroinferior glenoid, between 6:30 and 8:30, is required for reverse Bankart lesions , mul- tidirectional instability cases...posterior Bankart lesion . Sutures from anchors in this portion of the glenoid can be retrieved through the posterior cannula to ease suture manage

  3. Does the "bumper" created during Bankart repair contribute to shoulder stability?

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Muraki, Takayuki; Sperling, John W; Steinmann, Scott P; Itoi, Eiji; Cofield, Robert H; An, Kai-Nan

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the optimal repair configuration for anterior shoulder instability after a labral tear. Nine fresh, frozen shoulders were used. With a 50-N axial force, the humeral head was translated anteriorly, and the translational force was measured. The measurement was performed with the capsule intact, after creating a Bankart lesion, and after the Bankart repair at 5 different positions: glenoid rim, glenoid surface-2 mm (on the glenoid surface 2 mm from the glenoid rim), glenoid surface-5 mm, scapular neck-2 mm (on the scapular neck 2 mm from the glenoid rim), and scapular neck-5 mm. Glenoid rim fixation was done with and without a "bumper." The "bumper" was created by plicating the capsule to form a thickened mass of tissue. The translational force was restored to the intact level after the glenoid rim fixation. However, there was no significant difference in force after the Bankart repair with and without a "bumper" nor after the glenoid rim fixation and glenoid surface-2 mm. The force significantly decreased after scapular neck-2 mm and scapular neck-5 mm compared with the glenoid rim fixation. The anchor fixation on the glenoid face does not increase the translational force compared with the glenoid rim placement, but the placement on the scapular neck decreases the translational force. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A biomechanical study of bankart lesion fixation - biodegradable ArthroRivet tack vs. suture repair.

    PubMed

    Collins, Kevin J; Mukherjee, Debi P; Ogden, Alan L; Sadasivan, Kalia K; Albright, James A; Pietrzak, William S

    2007-01-01

    Bioabsorbable fixation is commonly used in soft tissue procedures performed in the shoulder. ArthroRivettrade mark tacks (referred to as rivets here), made from a copolymer of 82% poly-L-lactic acid and 18% polyglycolic acid, were developed for the Bankart procedure. Although a previous in vivo study demonstrated favorable comparison of the fixation strength and absorption characteristics of this device with that of polyglyconate bioabsorbable tacks, there have been no published biomechanical studies of this rivet in the shoulder. Fourteen shoulders were harvested from fresh-frozen cadavers of average age 74 years (46-89). Biomechanical testing was performed by measuring the energy, or work, required to anteriorly displace the humeral head 6 mm from the glenoid. Each shoulder was tested intact, vented, and before and after repair of a simulated Bankart lesion at 0, 45, and 90 degrees of abduction with and without maximal external rotation. Overall, the average work required ranged from 54.7 N-mm to 178.27 N-mm. Although the biomechanical performance of the rivet, based on resistance to anterior displacement of the humeral head, was indistinguishable from that of the suture repair, the statistical power of the test was low due to the large variance in the cadaver specimens. The results, in general, correlated well with those of previously published studies, suggesting the suitability of the bioabsorbable rivet for use in Bankart repair.

  5. Simple versus horizontal suture anchor repair of Bankart lesions: which better restores labral anatomy?

    PubMed

    Hagstrom, Lindsey S; Marzo, John M

    2013-02-01

    The goal of this study was to determine which suture repair technique better restores glenoid labrum height: horizontal sutures or simple sutures. Sixteen cadaveric glenoids, 8 per repair technique, were used to measure native labral height at the 3:00 to 6:00 positions in half-hour increments. A Bankart lesion was then created from 3:00 to 6:30. Height measurements at each time point were again taken after creation of the Bankart lesion. Repair with a 3-mm knotted suture anchor was then performed at 3:30, 4:30, and 5:30 with either a simple or horizontal suture technique, and postrepair heights were measured across all time points. Significant decreases in height, as compared with native height, were observed at 3:30, 4:30, and 5:30 in the simple repair group. Decreases in height of 1.4 mm (P = .044), 2.1 mm (P = .030), and 1.1 (P = .034) were observed at 3:30, 4:30, and 5:30. There was no significant decrease in height at these respective time points in the horizontal repair group. The in vitro horizontal mattress suture technique better restores labral height and anatomy when compared with a simple suture technique in the repair of acute Bankart lesions. Compared with the simple suture technique, horizontal suture repair may provide increased stability to the glenohumeral construct. Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Ankle instability and arthroscopic lateral ligament repair.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Jorge I; Mangone, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Over the last 50 years, the surgical management of chronic lateral ankle ligament insufficiency has focused on 2 main categories: local soft-tissue reconstruction and tendon grafts/transfer procedures. There is an increasing interest in the arthroscopic solutions for chronic instability of the ankle. Recent biomechanical studies suggest the at least one of the arthroscopic techniques can provide equivalent results to current open local soft-tissue reconstruction (such as the modified Brostrom technique). Arthroscopic lateral ankle ligament reconstruction is becoming an increasingly acceptable method for the surgical management of chronic lateral ankle instability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Complications Following Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Tear Repair

    PubMed Central

    Audigé, Laurent; Blum, Raphael; Müller, Andreas M.; Flury, Matthias; Durchholz, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Background Valid comparison of outcomes after surgical procedures requires consensus on which instruments and parameters should be used, including the recording and evaluation of surgical complications. An international standard outlining the terminology and definitions of surgical complications in orthopaedics is lacking. Purpose This study systematically reviewed the literature for terms and definitions related to the occurrence of negative events or complications after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR) with specific focus on shoulder stiffness. Study Design Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and Scopus databases were searched for reviews, clinical studies, and case reports of complications associated with ARCR. Reference lists of selected articles were also screened. The terminology of complications and their definitions were extracted from all relevant original articles by a single reviewer and verified by a second reviewer. Definitions of shoulder stiffness or equivalent terms were tabulated. Results Of 654 references published after 2007 and obtained from the search, 233 full-text papers (44 reviews, 155 studies, 31 case reports, and 3 surgical technique presentations) were reviewed. Twenty-two additional references cited for a definition were checked. One report defined the term surgical complication. There were 242 different terms used to describe local events and 64 to describe nonlocal events. Furthermore, 16 definitions of terms such as frozen shoulder, shoulder stiffness, or stiff painful shoulder were identified. Diagnosis criteria for shoulder stiffness differed widely; 12 various definitions for restriction in range of motion were noted. One definition included a gradation of stiffness severity, whereas another considered the patient’s subjective assessment of motion. Conclusion The literature does not consistently report on complications after ARCR, making valid comparison of the incidence of

  8. The Factors Affecting Pain Pattern after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Wan; Kim, Dong-Gyun

    2014-01-01

    Background We evaluated the factors that affect pain pattern after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Methods From June 2009 to October 2010, 210 patients underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair operations. Of them, 84 patients were enrolled as subjects of the present study. The evaluation of postoperative pain was conducted by visual analog scale (VAS) scores during postoperative outpatient interviews at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months. The factors that were thought to affect postoperative pain were evaluated by dividing into three categories: preoperative, operative, and postoperative. Results Pain after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair surgery showed a strictly decreasing pain pattern. In single analysis and multiple regression tests for factors influencing the strictly decreasing pain pattern, initial VAS and pain onset were shown to be statistically significant factors (p = 0.012, 0.012, 0.044 and 0.028, respectively). With regard to the factors influencing lower than average intensity pain pattern for each period, the stiffness of internal rotation at 3 months postoperatively was shown to be a statistically significant factor in single and multiple regression tests (p = 0.017 and p = 0.004, respectively). Conclusions High initial VAS scores and the acute onset of pain affected the strictly decreasing postoperative pain pattern. Additionally, stiffness of internal rotation at postoperative 3 months affected the higher than average intensity pain pattern for each period after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. PMID:25436062

  9. Ambulatory open Bankart repair under a single general anesthesia: a prospective study of the immediate outcome.

    PubMed

    Molina, Véronique; Gagey, Olivier; Langloÿs, Joel

    2006-01-01

    The interscalenic block technique is widely used for ambulatory shoulder surgery despite a substantial number of failures and adverse effects. We prospectively evaluated satisfaction in 40 consecutive patients who underwent open Bankart repair under a single general anesthesic performed in an ambulatory care unit. The mean age of the patients was 23 years. There were 29 men and 11 women. Patients were evaluated postoperatively with a visual analog scale of pain (in the recovery room, at the time of discharge, and the day after and 1 week after surgery) via a home assessment questionnaire that included the following: effectiveness of oral pain medication, ability to perform activities of daily life, and overall satisfaction. One patient failed to be discharged because of a feeling of faintness not related to pain. None of the 39 patients would have preferred an overnight hospital stay. This study confirms that the open Bankart procedure is feasible as a same-day technique and indicates that a single anesthesic with proper management of analgesia is a reliable technique for major shoulder surgery in an ambulatory care unit.

  10. Complications Associated With Arthroscopic Labral Repair Implants: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Felder, Jerrod J; Elliott, Michael P; Mair, Scott D

    2015-07-01

    Arthroscopic labral repair in the shoulder has become commonplace in recent years. A variety of implants have evolved in parallel with arthroscopic techniques. Any orthopedic implant that is placed in close proximity to the joint has the potential to cause subsequent damage to the articular surface if it is left prominent or dislodges secondary to improper surgical technique. This article focuses on a series of implant-related complications of labral surgery and their subsequent management. Additionally, correct patient selection and surgical technique are discussed. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Arthroscopy for shoulder instability and a technique for arthroscopic repair.

    PubMed

    Wiley, A M

    1988-01-01

    At this time the principal role of the arthroscope in the management of dislocating shoulder seems to be the identification of the intra-articular pathology. The findings should enable a surgeon to carry out an appropriate open repair, and the results of such surgery are excellent. Is there a place for arthroscopic repair? Some patients sometimes request it; others have had a failed open repair, or wish to avoid a scar. The author has devised a removable "Rivet," which fixes a loose labrum and the inferior glenohumeral ligament back on to a roughened glenoid margin. Use of this technique avoids some of the hazards that occur with implanting a staple or similar device in the joint. The "Rivet" is removed after 4-6 weeks. Ten patients have been so treated, with a follow-up of 6 months to 2 years. There was one failure, with a return of dislocation.

  12. Arthroscopic Transosseous Rotator Cuff Repair: Technical Note, Outcomes, and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Black, Eric M.; Lin, Albert; Srikumaran, Uma; Jain, Nitin; Freehill, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to review the authors’ initial experience with arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair. Thirty-one patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears underwent arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair over a 15-month period. Preoperatively, demographics and subjective scores were recorded. Postoperatively, pain levels, subjective shoulder values, satisfaction scores, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores, complications, and reoperations were noted with a minimum 2-year follow-up. The relationships between pre- and intraoperative variables and outcome scores were determined with univariate analysis. Average patient age was 56 years, and 23 patients (74%) were men. Twenty patients (65%) underwent primary rotator cuff repair, and 11 patients (35%) underwent revision repair. Average time to follow-up was 26 months. Average preoperative pain level and subjective shoulder value were 5.1 of 10 and 35%, respectively. Average postoperative scores included pain level of 0.9 of 10, subjective shoulder value of 84%, satisfaction score of 90.6 of 100, and ASES score of 86.3 of 100. There were 3 (9.7%) major and 2 (6%) minor complications. Patients undergoing revision rotator cuff repair had significantly worse outcomes (pain level, subjective shoulder value, ASES score; P<.05) compared with those undergoing primary repair, and cortical augmentation did not significantly affect outcome. Overall, outcomes after arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair are good, although patients undergoing revision repair do not have the same outcomes as those undergoing primary cuff repair. The procedure is not without complications (9.7% major, 6% minor complications). Cortical augmentation may be used to supplement fixation, although it does not necessarily affect outcomes. Patients without such augmentation may be at increased risk for suture cutout through the bone. PMID:25970360

  13. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in patients older than 60 years.

    PubMed

    Rebuzzi, Enrico; Coletti, Nicolò; Schiavetti, Stefano; Giusto, Fernando

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze results by age, tear size, and type of suture repair (margin convergence by side-to-side suture, direct tendon-to-bone repair with suture anchor, or side-to-side plus suture anchor) of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in patients older than 60 years (average, 67.7 years). Retrospective case series. From January 1999 to January 2001, 64 patients (64 shoulders) older than 60 years had an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair performed by the same surgical team. Fifty-four patients (84.3%) were available for follow-up (average, 27 months); 54 shoulders were evaluated using the UCLA rating scale (0-35 points). Tears were categorized according to size. The pattern of tears determined the repair technique: crescent-shaped tears were repaired in a direct tendon-to-bone fashion and U-shaped tears by margin convergence with or without suture anchor. The mean of postoperative UCLA score improved from 10.4 (range, 8.2-20 points) to 30.5 (range, 21-35 points) (P < .0001). Sixteen patients (29.6%) had excellent results (34-35 points), 28 (51.8%) had good results (28-33 points), 10 (18.5%) had fair results (21-27 points), and none had poor results. There were no statistical differences between postoperative UCLA score and groups by age (P = .53), suture technique (P = .06), and tear size (P = .5). The correlation between technique of repair, age, and postoperative score has not shown statistical differences between margin convergence with or without suture anchor and direct tendon-to-bone repair with suture anchor in the 61- to 65-year-old patients. Patients older than 65 years achieved the best results with margin convergence by side-to-side suture. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in the elderly achieves satisfactory results in a large percentage of cases regardless of the patient's age, tear size, and type of suture repair. These results are comparable to those of traditional open repair. We believe that arthroscopic evaluation allows an

  14. Arthroscopic double-pulley remplissage technique for engaging Hill-Sachs lesions in anterior shoulder instability repairs.

    PubMed

    Koo, Samuel S; Burkhart, Stephen S; Ochoa, Eloy

    2009-11-01

    We present a modified arthroscopic technique used to treat anterior shoulder instability associated with mild glenoid bone loss and a large Hill-Sachs lesion. The procedure aims to convert a bony intra-articular defect into an extra-articular defect by insetting the infraspinatus into the Hill-Sachs lesion. The arthroscopic procedure is performed with the patient in the lateral decubitus position, and the same portals used for anterior instability repair are used for this technique. The sequence of steps involves placing and passing the glenoid anchors and sutures and then waiting to tie the anterior sutures until after the humeral suture anchors have been placed. The subacromial bursa is cleared; then 2 transtendon suture anchors are placed in the Hill-Sachs lesion. Next, the previously placed Bankart repair sutures are tied, and finally, the remplissage sutures are tied in the subacromial space over the infraspinatus by use of the transtendon double-pulley technique. This technique uses the eyelets of the 2 suture anchors as pulleys and creates a double-mattress suture.

  15. Treatment of chronic anterior shoulder dislocation by open reduction and simultaneous Bankart lesion repair.

    PubMed

    Rouhani, Alireza; Navali, Amirmohammad

    2010-06-16

    Untreated chronic shoulder dislocation eventually leads to functional disability and pain. Open reduction with different fixation methods have been introduced for most chronic shoulder dislocation. We hypothesized that open reduction and simultaneous Bankart lesion repair in chronic anterior shoulder dislocation obviates the need for joint fixation and leads to better results than previously reported methods. Eight patients with chronic anterior dislocation of shoulder underwent open reduction and capsulolabral complex repair after an average delay of 10 weeks from injury. Early motion was allowed the day after surgery in the safe position and the clinical and radiographic results were analyzed at an average follow-up of one year. The average Rowe and Zarin's score was 86 points. Four out of eight shoulders were graded as excellent, three as good and one as fair (Rowe and Zarins system). All patients were able to perform their daily activities and they had either mild or no pain. Anterior active forward flexion loss averaged 18 degrees, external active rotation loss averaged 17.5 degrees and internal active rotation loss averaged 3 vertebral body levels. Mild degenerative joint changes were noted in one patient. The results show that the overall prognosis for this method of operation is more favorable than the previously reported methods and we recommend concomitant open reduction and capsulolabral complex repair for the treatment of old anterior shoulder dislocation. Therapeutic study, Level IV (case series [no, or historical, control group]).

  16. Arthroscopic Knotless Peripheral Ulnar-Sided TFCC Repair

    PubMed Central

    Geissler, William B.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the indications and technique for all-arthroscopic knotless repair of a peripheral tear to the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC). The advantage of this technique is that it allows repair of the articular disk back to the fovea of the ulna without any suture knots to irritate the patient. The learning curve is steep, but once learned, this technique can be performed very quickly and is faster. There are no knots to irritate the patient, and in the author's opinion, there is quicker pain relief than with other techniques. PMID:25945301

  17. Arthroscopic Knotless Peripheral Ulnar-Sided TFCC Repair.

    PubMed

    Geissler, William B

    2015-05-01

    This article describes the indications and technique for all-arthroscopic knotless repair of a peripheral tear to the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC). The advantage of this technique is that it allows repair of the articular disk back to the fovea of the ulna without any suture knots to irritate the patient. The learning curve is steep, but once learned, this technique can be performed very quickly and is faster. There are no knots to irritate the patient, and in the author's opinion, there is quicker pain relief than with other techniques.

  18. Arthroscopic foveal repair of the triangular fibrocartilage complex.

    PubMed

    Atzei, Andrea; Luchetti, Riccardo; Braidotti, Federica

    2015-02-01

    Background Foveal disruption of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) is associated with distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability. TFCC fixation onto the fovea is the suitable treatment, which is not achieved by conventional arthroscopic techniques. We describe an all-inside arthroscopic technique that uses a suture anchor through distal DRUJ arthroscopy for foveal repair of the TFCC. Materials and Methods Forty-eight patients with TFCC foveal tear and DRUJ instability were selected according to the Atzei-European Wrist Arthroscopy Society (EWAS) algorithm of treatment. Retrospective evaluation included pain, DRUJ instability, range of motion (ROM), grip strength, Modified Mayo Wrist Score (MMWS), and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) Score. Description of Technique DRUJ arthroscopy was performed to débride the TFCC and the foveal area. Under arthroscopic guidance, a suture anchor was inserted via the distal foveal portal to repair the TFCC onto the fovea. Sutures were tied on the radiocarpal surface of the TFCC. Postoperative immobilization of forearm rotation was maintained for 4 weeks. Heavy tasks were allowed after 3 months. Results After a mean follow-up of 33 months, pain improved significantly but remained moderate in four patients, severe in one. DRUJ instability resolved in 44 patients. Wrist ROM increased. Grip strength, MMWS, and DASH score improved significantly. Excellent and good MMWS equaled 83.3%. Forty-one patients (85.5%) resumed previous work and sport activities. As a postoperative complication, five patients experienced neuroapraxia of the dorsal sensory branch of the ulnar nerve (DSBUN) with full spontaneous recovery. Conclusions With appropriate indications and patient selection, arthroscopic foveal repair of the TFCC may restore DRUJ stability and provide satisfactory results without significant complications.

  19. Arthroscopic Foveal Repair of the Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex

    PubMed Central

    Atzei, Andrea; Luchetti, Riccardo; Braidotti, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Background Foveal disruption of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) is associated with distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability. TFCC fixation onto the fovea is the suitable treatment, which is not achieved by conventional arthroscopic techniques. We describe an all-inside arthroscopic technique that uses a suture anchor through distal DRUJ arthroscopy for foveal repair of the TFCC. Materials and Methods Forty-eight patients with TFCC foveal tear and DRUJ instability were selected according to the Atzei–European Wrist Arthroscopy Society (EWAS) algorithm of treatment. Retrospective evaluation included pain, DRUJ instability, range of motion (ROM), grip strength, Modified Mayo Wrist Score (MMWS), and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) Score. Description of Technique DRUJ arthroscopy was performed to débride the TFCC and the foveal area. Under arthroscopic guidance, a suture anchor was inserted via the distal foveal portal to repair the TFCC onto the fovea. Sutures were tied on the radiocarpal surface of the TFCC. Postoperative immobilization of forearm rotation was maintained for 4 weeks. Heavy tasks were allowed after 3 months. Results After a mean follow-up of 33 months, pain improved significantly but remained moderate in four patients, severe in one. DRUJ instability resolved in 44 patients. Wrist ROM increased. Grip strength, MMWS, and DASH score improved significantly. Excellent and good MMWS equaled 83.3%. Forty-one patients (85.5%) resumed previous work and sport activities. As a postoperative complication, five patients experienced neuroapraxia of the dorsal sensory branch of the ulnar nerve (DSBUN) with full spontaneous recovery. Conclusions With appropriate indications and patient selection, arthroscopic foveal repair of the TFCC may restore DRUJ stability and provide satisfactory results without significant complications. PMID:25709875

  20. Midterm clinical outcomes following arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair

    PubMed Central

    Flanagin, Brody A.; Garofalo, Raffaele; Lo, Eddie Y.; Feher, LeeAnne; Castagna, Alessandro; Qin, Huanying; Krishnan, Sumant G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Arthroscopic transosseous (TO) rotator cuff repair has recently emerged as a new option for surgical treatment of symptomatic rotator cuff tears. Limited data is available regarding outcomes using this technique. This study evaluated midterm clinical outcomes following a novel arthroscopic TO (anchorless) rotator cuff repair technique. Materials and Methods: A consecutive series of 107 patients and 109 shoulders underwent arthroscopic TO (anchorless) rotator cuff repair for a symptomatic full-thickness tear. Pre and postoperative range of motion (ROM) was compared at an average of 11.8 months. Postoperative outcome scores were obtained at an average of 38.0 months. Statistical analysis was performed to compare pre and postoperative ROM data. Univariate analysis was performed using Student's t-test to compare the effect of other clinical characteristics on final outcome. Results: Statistically significant improvements were noted in forward flexion, external rotation and internal rotation (P < 0.0001). Average postoperative subjective shoulder value was 93.7, simple shoulder test 11.6, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score 94.6. According to ASES scores, results for the 109 shoulders available for final follow-up were excellent in 95 (87.1%), good in 8 (7.3%), fair in 3 (2.8%), and poor in 3 (2.8%). There was no difference in ROM or outcome scores in patients who underwent a concomitant biceps procedure (tenodesis or tenotomy) compared with those who did not. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in outcome between patients who underwent either biceps tenodesis or tenotomy. Age, history of injury preceding the onset of pain, tear size, number of TO tunnels required to perform the repair, and presence of fatty infiltration did not correlate with postoperative ROM or subjective outcome measures at final follow-up. Two complications and four failures were noted. Conclusions: Arthroscopic TO rotator cuff repair technique leads to

  1. [The isolated subscapularis tendon tear: arthroscopic and open repair].

    PubMed

    Minzlaff, P; Bartl, C; Imhoff, A B

    2012-11-01

    Arthroscopic or open reconstruction of isolated subscapularis tendon tears with the use of suture anchors to restore the glenohumeral function and joint biomechanics. Traumatic full-thickness tears, chronic tears with a functional deficit or decentration of the humerus head, anterosuperior rotator cuff insufficiency, symptomatic reruptures after prior arthroscopic or open surgical procedures. Frozen shoulder, atrophy > grade II (Thomazeau) or fatty infiltration > grade III (Goutallier/Fox) of the muscle, high-grade omarthrosis. Diagnostic arthroscopy and careful tendon release. If the inferior edge of the rupture is reliable visible and the tendon-mobilisation works proper, the repair is performed arthroscopically. The footprint is decorticated lightly and 1-4 suture anchors (depending on the lesion-size) are placed from inferior to superior. Knots are tied starting from caudal in a modified Mason-Allen technique (alternative: single or double mattress stitches) with a slipknot and three half hitches in opposite directions. In case of larger tears, a double-row technique for better reconstruction of the trapezoidal footprint is performed. For open reconstruction, a deltopectoral approach is used to reattache the tendon in an analogous fashion. Arthroscopic or open repair of isolated subscapularis tendon tears (Fox type II-IV) was performed in 35 patients. The Constant score increased significantly after 36 m, with no difference between these two groups. The majority of subscapularis tests were postoperatively negative, 6% in both groups showed a rerupture. A symptomatic period of > 6 m prior to the operation and a high grade atrophy and fatty infiltration of the muscle was correlated with poorer results.

  2. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in the weight-bearing shoulder.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Jacek; Borbas, Paul; Meyer, Dominik C; Gerber, Christian; Buitrago Téllez, Carlos; Wieser, Karl

    2015-12-01

    In wheelchair-dependent individuals, pain often develops because of rotator cuff tendon failure and/or osteoarthritis of the glenohumeral joint. The purposes of this study were to investigate (1) specific rotator cuff tear patterns, (2) structural healing, and (3) clinical outcomes after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in a cohort of wheelchair-dependent patients. Forty-six shoulders with a mean follow-up of 46 months (range, 24-82 months; SD, 13 months) from a consecutive series of 61 shoulders in 56 patients (46 men and 10 women) undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were available for analysis. Clinical outcome analysis was performed using the Constant-Murley score, the Subjective Shoulder Value, and the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score. The integrity of the repair was analyzed by ultrasound. Of the shoulders, 87% had supraspinatus involvement, 70% had subscapularis involvement, and 57% had an anterosuperior lesion involving both the supraspinatus and subscapularis. Despite an overall structural failure rate of 33%, the patients showed improvements in the Constant-Murley score from 50 points (range, 22-86 points; SD, 16 points) preoperatively to 80 points (range, 40-98 points; SD, 12 points) postoperatively and in the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score from 56 points (range, 20-92 points; SD, 20 points) preoperatively to 92 points (range, 53-100 points; SD, 10 points) postoperatively, with a mean postoperative Subjective Shoulder Value of 84% (range, 25%-100%; SD, 17%). Failure of the rotator cuff in weight-bearing shoulders occurs primarily anterosuperiorly. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair leads to a structural failure rate of 33% but satisfactory functional results with high patient satisfaction at midterm follow-up. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Satisfaction, function and repair integrity after arthroscopic versus mini-open rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Barnes, L A Fink; Kim, H M; Caldwell, J-M; Buza, J; Ahmad, C S; Bigliani, L U; Levine, W N

    2017-02-01

    Advances in arthroscopic techniques for rotator cuff repair have made the mini-open approach less popular. However, the mini-open approach remains an important technique for repair for many surgeons. The aims of this study were to compare the integrity of the repair, the function of the shoulder and satisfaction post-operatively using these two techniques in patients aged > 50 years. We identified 22 patients treated with mini-open and 128 patients treated with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair of July 2007 and June 2011. The mean follow-up was two years (1 to 5). Outcome was assessed using the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) and Simple Shoulder Test (SST) scores, and satisfaction. The integrity of the repair was assessed using ultrasonography. A power analysis ensured sufficient enrolment. There was no statistically significant difference between the age, function, satisfaction, or pain scores (p > 0.05) of the two groups. The integrity of the repair and the mean SST scores were significantly better in the mini-open group (91% of mini-open repairs were intact versus 60% of arthroscopic repairs, p = 0.023; mean SST score 10.9 (standard deviation (sd) 1.3) in the mini-open group; 8.9 (sd 3.5) in arthroscopic group; p = 0.003). The ASES scores were also higher in the mini-open group (mean ASES score 91.0 (sd 10.5) in mini-open group; mean 82.70 (sd 19.8) in the arthroscopic group; p = 0.048). The integrity of the repair and function of the shoulder were better after a mini-open repair than after arthroscopic repair of a rotator cuff tear in these patients. The functional difference did not translate into a difference in satisfaction. Mini-open rotator cuff repair remains a useful technique despite advances in arthroscopy. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:245-9. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  4. Establishing Maximal Medical Improvement After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Zuke, William A; Leroux, Timothy S; Gregory, Bonnie P; Black, Austin; Forsythe, Brian; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2017-06-01

    As health care transitions from a pay-for-service to a pay-for-performance infrastructure, the value of orthopaedic care must be defined accurately. Significant efforts have been made in defining quality and cost in arthroplasty; however, there remains a lag in ambulatory orthopaedic care. Two-year follow-up has been a general requirement for reporting outcomes after rotator cuff repair. However, this time requirement has not been established scientifically and is of increasing importance in the era of value-based health care. Given that arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is a common ambulatory orthopaedic procedure, the purpose of this study was to establish a time frame for maximal medical improvement (the state when improvement has stabilized) after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Systematic review. A systematic review of the literature was conducted, identifying studies reporting sequential patient-reported outcomes up to a minimum of 2 years after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The primary clinical outcome was patient-reported outcomes at 3-month, 6-month, 1-year, and 2-year follow-up. Secondary clinical outcomes included range of motion, strength, retears, and complications. Clinically significant improvement was determined between various time intervals by use of the minimal clinically important difference. The review included 19 studies including 1370 patients who underwent rotator cuff repair. Clinically significant improvement in patient-reported outcomes was seen up to 1 year after rotator cuff repair, but no clinical significance was noted from 1 year to 2 years. The majority of improvement in strength and range of motion was seen up to 6 months, but no clinically meaningful improvement was seen thereafter. All reported complications and the majority of retears occurred within 6 months after rotator cuff repair. After rotator cuff repair, a clinically significant improvement in patient-reported outcomes, range of motion, and strength was seen up to 1

  5. Traumatic shoulder dislocation with combined bankart lesion and humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament in a professional basketball player: three-year follow-up of surgical stabilization.

    PubMed

    Shah, Aakash A; Selesnick, F Harlan

    2010-10-01

    Traumatic anterior shoulder instability has been well documented to have associated lesions such as a Bankart tear, humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament (HAGL), Hill-Sachs lesion, fracture, and nerve injury. To our knowledge, the combined Bankart and HAGL injury in a single acute anterior shoulder dislocation has not yet been reported. We describe a traumatic first-time anterior-inferior shoulder dislocation in a professional basketball player with a combined Bankart and HAGL lesion. The patient underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair followed by open repair of the HAGL lesion with an open capsular shift reconstruction. At 3 years' follow-up, the patient had returned to an elite level of play, with an excellent outcome.

  6. Revision Arthroscopic Repair Versus Latarjet Procedure in Patients With Recurrent Instability After Initial Repair Attempt: A Cost-Effectiveness Model.

    PubMed

    Makhni, Eric C; Lamba, Nayan; Swart, Eric; Steinhaus, Michael E; Ahmad, Christopher S; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2016-09-01

    To compare the cost-effectiveness of arthroscopic revision instability repair and Latarjet procedure in treating patients with recurrent instability after initial arthroscopic instability repair. An expected-value decision analysis of revision arthroscopic instability repair compared with Latarjet procedure for recurrent instability followed by failed repair attempt was modeled. Inputs regarding procedure cost, clinical outcomes, and health utilities were derived from the literature. Compared with revision arthroscopic repair, Latarjet was less expensive ($13,672 v $15,287) with improved clinical outcomes (43.78 v 36.76 quality-adjusted life-years). Both arthroscopic repair and Latarjet were cost-effective compared with nonoperative treatment (incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of 3,082 and 1,141, respectively). Results from sensitivity analyses indicate that under scenarios of high rates of stability postoperatively, along with improved clinical outcome scores, revision arthroscopic repair becomes increasingly cost-effective. Latarjet procedure for failed instability repair is a cost-effective treatment option, with lower costs and improved clinical outcomes compared with revision arthroscopic instability repair. However, surgeons must still incorporate clinical judgment into treatment algorithm formation. Level IV, expected value decision analysis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Functional outcomes after bilateral arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Aleem, Alexander W; Syed, Usman Ali M; Wascher, Jocelyn; Zoga, Adam C; Close, Koby; Abboud, Joseph A; Cohen, Steven B

    2016-10-01

    Arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tears is a common procedure performed by orthopedic surgeons. There is a well-known incidence of up to 35% of bilateral rotator cuff tear disease in patients who have a known unilateral tear. The majority of the literature focuses on outcomes after unilateral surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine if there are clinical differences in shoulders of patients who underwent staged bilateral rotator cuff repairs during their lifetime. A retrospective review of all patients who underwent staged bilateral arthroscopic rotator cuff surgery at our institution was performed. All patients had at least 2 years of follow-up. Clinical outcome scores including the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation, and Rowe measures were obtained. A subset of patients returned for clinical and ultrasound evaluation performed by an independent fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologist. Overall, 110 shoulders in 55 patients, representing 68% of all eligible patients, participated. No clinical or statistical difference was found in any outcome measure. ASES scores averaged 86.5 (36.7-100) in the dominant shoulder compared with 89.6 (23.3-100) in the nondominant shoulder (P = .42). Ultrasound was available on 34 shoulders and showed complete healing rate of 88%. The shoulders with retearing of the rotator cuff (12%) demonstrated clinically relevant lower ASES scores (72.5) compared with shoulders with confirmed healed repairs (86.2; P = .2). Patients who undergo staged bilateral rotator cuff repair can expect to have similarly good clinical outcomes regardless of hand dominance or chronologic incidence with excellent healing rates in both shoulders. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The strength of suture configurations in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    White, Clive D; Bunker, Timothy D; Hooper, Robert M

    2006-08-01

    This study evaluated the strength of different suture configurations with the use of a recently introduced arthroscopic suture passer (ExpressSew; Surgical Solutions, Valencia, CA). The ultimate tensile strength and mode of failure of each suture configuration were repeatedly tested on a validated porcine rotator cuff tendon model, with the use of standard suture material (No. 2 FiberWire [Arthrex, Naples, FL]) passed with ExpressSew and tested on a Hounsfield digital tensiometer type H20K-W (Tinius Olsen, Hersham, PA). The strongest construct was 2 mattress sutures (mean, 169 N; standard deviation, 56.1 N); this was followed in strength by a single modified Kessler suture (mean, 161 N; standard deviation, 16.9 N), 4 simple sutures (mean, 155 N; standard deviation, 27.3 N), and finally, a single Mason-Allen suture (mean, 140 N; standard deviation, 28.6 N). Study results show little difference in strength for varying complexities of suture configurations. In simple terms, no demonstrable difference was seen in the strength of construct, whether the surgeon used 4 simple sutures, 2 mattress sutures, or 1 grasping suture. This study allows the surgeon to justify use of the simplest configuration of suture passage that works in his hands, for the purpose of attaining a reliable and repeatable repair of the rotator cuff through arthroscopic methods.

  9. Treatment of Bankart lesions in traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder: a randomized controlled trial comparing arthroscopy and open techniques.

    PubMed

    Archetti Netto, Nicola; Tamaoki, Marcel Jun Sugawara; Lenza, Mario; dos Santos, João Baptista Gomes; Matsumoto, Marcelo Hide; Faloppa, Flavio; Belloti, João Carlos

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the functional assessments of arthroscopy and open repair for treating Bankart lesion in traumatic anterior shoulder instability. Fifty adult patients, aged less than 40 years, with traumatic anterior shoulder instability and the presence of an isolated Bankart lesion confirmed by diagnostic arthroscopy were included in the study. They were randomly assigned to receive open or arthroscopic treatment of an isolated Bankart lesion. In all cases of both groups, the lesion was repaired with metallic suture anchors. The primary outcomes included the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire. After a mean follow-up period of 37.5 months, 42 patients were evaluated. On the DASH scale, there was a statistically significant difference favorable to the patients treated with the arthroscopic technique, but without clinical relevance. There was no difference in the assessments by University of California, Los Angeles and Rowe scales. There was no statistically significant difference regarding complications and failures, as well as range of motion, for the 2 techniques. On the basis of this study, the open and arthroscopic techniques were effective in the treatment of traumatic anterior shoulder instability. The arthroscopic technique showed a lower index of functional limitation of the upper limb, as assessed by the DASH questionnaire; this, however, was not clinically relevant. Copyright © 2012 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Combined posterior Bankart lesion and posterior humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligaments associated with recurrent posterior shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Hill, J David; Lovejoy, John F; Kelly, Robert A

    2007-03-01

    Recurrent posterior glenohumeral instability is uncommon and is often misdiagnosed. Damage to the posterior capsule, posteroinferior glenohumeral ligament, and posterior labrum have all been implicated as sources of traumatic posterior instability. We describe a case of traumatic recurrent posterior instability resulting from a posterior Bankart lesion accompanied by posterior humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligaments. The Bankart lesion was repaired using a single arthroscopic suture anchor at the glenoid articular margin. The posterior humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligaments was addressed with 3 suture anchors placed at the capsular origin at the posterior humeral head. Using these anchors, the posterior capsule was advanced laterally and superiorly for a secure repair. Arthroscopic anatomic reconstruction of both lesions resulted in an excellent clinical outcome.

  11. Vascular Complications in Arthroscopic Repair Of Posterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Agotegaray, Juan Ignacio; Comba, Ignacio; Bisiach, Luciana; Grignaffini, María Emilia

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Posterior cruciate ligament is the primary stabilizer of the knee. Among the potential complications in arthroscopic repair of this ligament, there are vascular lesions, due to laceration, thrombosis and injury of the intima of the popliteal artery. We used one case to show the vascular complications that may arise in arthroscopic repair of the posterior cruciate ligament, how to handle it and the results. Methods: One patient, 33 years old, with a history of traffic accident. In a physical exam the patient shows pain and swelling of the knee, positive posterior drawer test and positive Godfrey test. X-rays on the knee show posterior tibial translation and MRI a complete fibers rupture at the middle third of the posterior cruciate ligament. An arthroscopic repair surgery was scheduled three weeks after trauma, with PCL reconstruction using simple band technique.After surgical intervention, hemostatic cuff was released, no peripheral pulse, paleness and coldness of the member was confirmed. An arteriography was carried out, which confirmed absences of distal vascular filling in the popliteal artery. An urgent referral was carried out with Vascular Surgery Services, who had been informed of the surgery previously (a notification that is part of our routine for this kind of interventions). Arteriorrhaphy and venorrhaphy of the popliteal arteries was fulfilled 12 hours later, with a leg fasciotomy. Daily monitoring was performed, and after 72 hours, muscle necrosis is seen with wound drainage, analysis shows presence of gram-negative bacilli, Proteus Mirabilis-Pseudomonas spp and the lab results showed leukocytes: 8.700/ml, ESR: 58, CRP: 48. A new surgery is performed with complete resection of the anterior external compartment of the leg, and a system of continuous cleansing is applied with physiological saline solution and boric acid for 14 days until drainage is eliminated. Vancomycin and ceftazidime EV was indicated for 14 days and, after a good

  12. Arthroscopic proximal versus open subpectoral biceps tenodesis with arthroscopic repair of small- or medium-sized rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Yi, Young; Lee, Jong-Myoung; Kwon, Seok Hyun; Kim, Jeong-Woo

    2016-12-01

    The study was aimed to compare arthroscopic proximal biceps tenodesis and open subpectoral biceps tenodesis in repair of small or medium rotator cuff tears. Eighty-five patients underwent biceps tenodesis with arthroscopic repair of a rotator cuff tear, and 66 patients were followed for median of 26.8 (18-42) months with ultrasonography were reviewed. The arthroscopic biceps tenodesis group included 34 cases, and the open subpectoral biceps group included 32 cases. Patients were evaluated using visual analogue scale (VAS), American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), and constant scores. Rotator cuff repair and fixation of the biceps tendon were assessed by ultrasonography. Fixation failure and degree of deformity were evaluated by the pain in the bicipital groove and biceps apex distance (BAD). VAS score and tenderness at the bicipital groove decreased significantly in the open subpectoral group at 3 months postoperative. In both groups, the range of motion, ASES score, and constant score increased significantly (P < 0.05). Rotator cuff retear occurred in three cases (8.8 %) in the arthroscopic group and two cases in the open subpectoral group (6.2 %). There was no significant difference in BAD between the two groups. There was no difference between open subpectoral tenodesis and arthroscopic proximal tenodesis at the time of the final follow-up; however, open subpectoral tenodesis showed encouraging results at 3-month follow-up. This early result of subpectoral tenodesis was related to removing most part of biceps tendinitis and using intra-bicipital groove tenodesis technique. III.

  13. Alterations of the Deltoid Muscle After Open Versus Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nam Su; Cha, Sang Won; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2015-12-01

    Open repair can be more useful than arthroscopic repair for immobile and severely retracted, large to massive rotator cuff tears. However, it is not known whether the deltoid muscle is altered after open repair or to what extent the deltoid origin remains detached after surgery. To compare postoperative alterations of the deltoid muscle in open versus arthroscopic repair for severely retracted, large to massive rotator cuff tears. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Enrolled in this study were 135 patients who underwent surgical repair for severely retracted, large to massive rotator cuff tears and who had routine follow-up MRIs at least 6 months after surgery. Open repairs were performed in 56 cases and arthroscopic repairs in 79 cases. The detachment and thickness of the deltoid muscle at its proximal origin were recorded in 5 zones on MRI. The alterations of the deltoid muscle and postoperative integrity of the repaired rotator cuff were evaluated. Partial detachment of the deltoid occurred in 1 patient (1.8%) in the open group and in 2 patients (2.5%) in the arthroscopic group (P = .80). All the partial detachments occurred in zones 2 and 3. Attenuation of the proximal origin of the deltoid was found in 3 patients (5.4%) in the open group and in 4 patients (5.1%) in the arthroscopic group (P = .87). Atrophy of the deltoid muscle was shown in 3 patients (5.4%) in the open group and 4 patients (5.1%) in the arthroscopic group (P = .61). The retear rate of the repaired cuff was 30.4% (17/56) in the open group and 38.0% (30/79) in the arthroscopic group (P = .74). Between open and arthroscopic repair for severely retracted, large to massive rotator cuff tears, there was no significant difference in detachment of the deltoid origin and alterations of the deltoid muscle after repair. Postoperative alterations of the deltoid occurred in arthroscopic surgery as well as in open surgery. For immobile massive rotator cuff tear, open repair is an acceptable technique

  14. BiPOD Arthroscopic Acromioclavicular Repair Restores Bidirectional Stability.

    PubMed

    De Beer, Joe; Schaer, Michael; Latendresse, Kim; Raniga, Sumit; Moor, Beat K; Zumstein, Matthias A

    2016-09-19

    Stabilizing the acromioclavicular joint in the vertical and horizontal planes is challenging, and most current techniques do not reliably achieve this goal. The BiPOD repair is an arthroscopically assisted procedure performed with image intensifier guidance that reconstructs the coracoclavicular ligaments as well as the acromioclavicular ligaments to achieve bidirectional stability. Repair is achieved with a combination of 2-mm FiberTape (Arthrex, Naples, Florida) and 20-mm Poly-Tape (Neoligaments, Leeds, England) to achieve rigid repair, prevent bone abrasion, and promote tissue ingrowth. This study is a prospective review of the first 6 patients treated for high-grade acute acromioclavicular injury with the BiPOD technique. The study included 6 men who were 21 to 36 years old (mean, 27 years). At 6-month follow-up, complications were recorded and radiographic analysis was used to determine the coracoclavicular distance for vertical reduction and the amount of acromioclavicular translation on the Alexander axillary view was used to determine horizontal reduction. One patient had a superficial infection over the tape knot. The difference in coracoclavicular distance between the operated side and the uninvolved side was 9±2 mm preoperatively and 0.3±2 mm at 6-month follow-up. On Alexander axillary view, all 6 patients showed stable reduction, which is defined as a clavicle that is in line with the acromion. The findings show that BiPOD acromioclavicular reconstruction restores bidirectional stability of the acromioclavicular joint at 6 months. [Orthopedics. 201x; xx(x):exx-exx.].

  15. EXTENSIVE ROTATOR CUFF INJURIES: AN EVALUATION OF ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR OUTCOMES

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; Silva, Luciana Andrade; Eduardo, Cesar Moreira Mariz Pinto Rodrigo Tormin Ortiz; Checchia, Sergio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    To assess the outcomes of the surgical treatment of extensive rotator cuff injuries through arthroscopy. Methods: Between June 1998 and October 2006, 61 patients with extensive rotator cuff injuries and submitted to surgical arthroscopy technique by the Shoulder and Elbow Group of the Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Santa Casa de Misericórdia Medical School were reassessed. The study included all patients with at least two tendons affected or with retraction at least on two tendons up to the glenoidal cavity edge and with at least 12 months of follow-up. Results: According to UCLA's evaluation criteria, 54 (89%) patients showed excellent or good outcomes; no fair outcome in none of the patients; and seven (11%) poor outcomes. A satisfaction rate of 92% was reported. Postoperative joint motion went from a mean lifting value of 93° to 141°, the mean lateral rotation went from 32° to 48° and the mean medial rotation went from L1 to T10. These differences were regarded as statistically significant. Conclusion: The arthroscopic repair of extensive rotator cuff injuries leads to satisfactory outcomes for most of the patients, with a high satisfaction degree. PMID:26998466

  16. EXTENSIVE ROTATOR CUFF INJURIES: AN EVALUATION OF ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR OUTCOMES.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; Silva, Luciana Andrade; Eduardo, Cesar Moreira Mariz Pinto Rodrigo Tormin Ortiz; Checchia, Sergio Luiz

    2009-01-01

    To assess the outcomes of the surgical treatment of extensive rotator cuff injuries through arthroscopy. Between June 1998 and October 2006, 61 patients with extensive rotator cuff injuries and submitted to surgical arthroscopy technique by the Shoulder and Elbow Group of the Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Santa Casa de Misericórdia Medical School were reassessed. The study included all patients with at least two tendons affected or with retraction at least on two tendons up to the glenoidal cavity edge and with at least 12 months of follow-up. According to UCLA's evaluation criteria, 54 (89%) patients showed excellent or good outcomes; no fair outcome in none of the patients; and seven (11%) poor outcomes. A satisfaction rate of 92% was reported. Postoperative joint motion went from a mean lifting value of 93° to 141°, the mean lateral rotation went from 32° to 48° and the mean medial rotation went from L1 to T10. These differences were regarded as statistically significant. The arthroscopic repair of extensive rotator cuff injuries leads to satisfactory outcomes for most of the patients, with a high satisfaction degree.

  17. Arthroscopic outside-in meniscal repair through a needle hole.

    PubMed

    Laupattarakasem, Wiroon; Sumanont, Sermsak; Kesprayura, Suraphol; Kasemkijwattana, Channarong

    2004-07-01

    This article describes an alternative method for outside-in repair of a longitudinal meniscal tear through a needle hole, which will produce an almost negligible cutaneous scar. The procedure is performed under arthroscopic set-up using an 18-gauge needle preloaded with appropriate suture material. Insert the needle twice through the same cutaneous entry hole to form a mattress loop across the torn meniscal segments. The first insertion penetrates both segments and forms a loop. The second insertion then engages the outer segment and forms another loop. Draw the free end of this second loop into the joint and feed it into the first loop. Pull the first loop out from the joint together with the trapped portion near the free end, until the whole suture becomes a vertical mattress. Finally, tie a slipknot and several half hitches to close the meniscal gap under the stitch. In a large bucket-handle tear, stitches should be started at the middle and then alternating anteriorly and posteriorly 3 to 4 mm apart. To ensure that no significant extracapsular structures are trapped in each stitch, a 13-gauge needle can be used as a cannula sheath. This technique is economical and technically safe and simple for reparable meniscal lesions, including the posterior horn.

  18. Intra-articular Loose Body with Concomitant Bankart Lesion after a Traumatic Shoulder Dislocation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jason B T; Tan, Andrew H C

    2017-01-01

    The spectrum of pathoanatomic lesions encountered in anterior shoulder dislocation is broad. There could be a presence of loose bodies, chondral and osteochondral, in the shoulder joint and also concomitant rotator cuff partial tears resulting from acute and chronic shoulder instability. We present one case report of a 46-year-old male Chinese with an uncommon case of Bankart lesion, with a full thickness chondral defect over the superior glenoid articular surface manifesting as a large intra-articular loose cartilaginous body. The patient presented with persistent shoulder pain with signs of shoulder instability. He underwent arthroscopic repair of his Bankart lesion with the removal of intra-articular loose body. We aim to discuss the diagnosis, radiological imaging, as well as, arthroscopic treatment of loose body in the glenohumeral joint due to anterior shoulder dislocation in our report. In our case report, we highlight the importance to identify other associated injuries from the history and examination after an episode of traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation. Arthroscopic treatment is a useful minimally invasive option to remove the large fragment of intra-articular loose body and also repair the Bankart lesion in the same setting. Both of these lesions must be treated as they are crucial for pain relief, as well as stabilizing the shoulder, to prevent further episodes of dislocation.

  19. Prognostic factors for recovery after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a prognostic study.

    PubMed

    Fermont, Anouk J; Wolterbeek, Nienke; Wessel, Ronald N; Baeyens, Jean-Pierre; de Bie, Rob A

    2015-08-01

    Studies concerning prognostic factors of recovery after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair mostly focus on tendon integrity or functional recovery as an outcome. Little is known about how they influence quality of life after surgery. We therefore tried to identify prognostic factors having an impact on quality of life after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. This study included 30 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. We assessed Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index as primary outcome and RAND-36, Constant-Murley score, and a shoulder hindrance score as secondary outcomes. Patients were repeatedly measured: once preoperatively and 4 times postoperatively. Preoperative range of motion, obesity, fatty infiltration, and cuff retraction were preselected as prognostic factors. Patients were significantly improved at 3 months and 6 months after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. In multiple regression analysis, none of the preselected factors could be identified as a prognostic factor influencing quality of life after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (measured with the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index). For the outcome variables RAND-36 (6 months, 1 year) and shoulder hindrance score (1 year), fatty infiltration Goutallier stages 1 and 2 and retraction grades II, III, and IV were significant predictors. Although fatty infiltration and retraction grade predict the RAND-36 and shoulder hindrance score, this study could not support preoperative range of motion, obesity, fatty infiltration, or retraction of the cuff as a prognostic factor for quality of life after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. This study shows that if selection of patients is done properly, these factors do not influence a successful outcome. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The effect of the arthroscopic augmentation of the subscapularis tendon on shoulder instability and range of motion: A biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Schröter, S; Krämer, M; Welke, B; Hurschler, C; Russo, R; Herbst, M; Stöckle, U; Ateschrang, A; Maiotti, M

    2016-10-01

    Anterior shoulder dislocation is common. The treatment of recurrence with glenoid bone defect is still considered controversial. A new arthroscopic subscapularis augmentation has recently been described that functions to decrease the anterior translation of the humeral head. The purpose of the presented study was to examine the biomechanical effect on glenohumeral joint motion and stability. Eight fresh frozen cadaver shoulders were studied by use of a force guided industrial robot fitted with a six-component force-moment sensor to which the humerus was attached. The testing protocol includes measurement of glenohumeral translation in the anterior, anterior-inferior and inferior directions at 0°, 30° and 60° of glenohumeral abduction, respectively, with a passive humerus load of 30N in the testing direction. The maximum possible external rotation was measured at each abduction angle applying a moment of 1Nm. Each specimen was measured in a physiologic state, as well as after Bankart lesion with an anterior bone defect of 15-20% of the glenoid, after arthroscopic subscapularis augmentation and after Bankart repair. The arthroscopic subscapularis augmentation decreased the anterior and anterior-inferior translation. The Bankart repair did not restore the mechanical stability compared to the physiologic shoulder group. External rotation was decreased after arthroscopic subscapularis augmentation compared to the physiologic state, however, the limitation of external rotation was decreased at 60° abduction. The arthroscopic subscapularis augmentation investigated herein was observed to restore shoulder stability in an experimental model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Incidence and treatment of postoperative stiffness following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Huberty, David P; Schoolfield, John D; Brady, Paul C; Vadala, Antonio P; Arrigoni, Paolo; Burkhart, Stephen S

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of clinically significant postoperative stiffness following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. This study also sought to determine the clinical and surgical factors that were associated with higher rates of postoperative stiffness. Finally, we analyzed the result of arthroscopic lysis of adhesions and capsular release for treatment of patients who developed refractory postoperative stiffness 4 to 19 months (median, 8 months) following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. A retrospective review of a consecutive series of arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs was conducted. During a 3-year time period, the senior author (S.S.B.) performed 489 arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs. The operative indications, technique of the rotator cuff repair, and the rehabilitation protocol were essentially unchanged during this time period. Demographic data, comorbid medical conditions, rotator cuff tear description, technique of repair, and concomitant surgical procedures were evaluated for their effect on stiffness. All office evaluations were reviewed to determine the pre- and postoperative motion, pain scores, functional strength, and patient satisfaction. Patients who were dissatisfied because of the development of postoperative stiffness underwent secondary arthroscopic lysis of adhesions. The final result of the secondary lysis of adhesions and capsular release were analyzed. In total, 24 patients (4.9%) were dissatisfied with the result of their procedure because of the development of postoperative stiffness, which was more likely (P < .05) to develop in patients with Workers' Compensation insurance (8.6%), patients younger than 50 years of age (8.6%), those with a coexisting diagnosis of calcific tendonitis (16.7%) or adhesive capsulitis (15.0%) requiring additional postoperative therapy, partial articular-sided tendon avulsion (PASTA) type rotator cuff tear (13.5%), or concomitant labral repair (11.0%). Patients with

  2. Optimal suture anchor direction in arthroscopic lateral ankle ligament repair.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Ichiro; Hagio, Tomonobu; Noda, Masahiro; Kanazawa, Kazuki; Minokawa, So; Yamamoto, Takuaki

    2017-05-26

    In this study, the distance between the insertion point of the suture anchors and posterior surface of the fibula during arthroscopic lateral ankle ligament repair was investigated on computed tomography (CT) images. The hypothesis of this study was that there is an optimal insertional direction of the suture anchor to avoid anchor-related complications. One hundred eleven ankles of 98 patients who had undergone three-dimensional CT scans for foot or ankle disorders without deformity of the fibula were assessed (59 males, 52 females; median age 25.5 years; age range 12-78 years). The shortest distance from the insertion point of the suture anchor to the deepest point of the fossa/top of the convex aspect of the fibula was measured on the axial plane, tilting from the longitudinal axis of the fibula at 90°, 75°, 60°, and 45°. The distance from the insertion point of the suture anchor to the posterior surface of the fibula was also measured in a direction parallel to the sagittal plane of the lateral surface of the talus on the axial plane, tilting from the longitudinal axis of the fibula at 90°, 75°, 60°, and 45°. The posterior fossa was observed in all cases on the 90° and 75° images. The distance from the insertion point to the posterior surface of the fibula in the parallel direction was 15.0 ± 3.4 mm at 90°, 17.5 ± 3.2 mm at 75°, 21.7 ± 3.3 mm at 60°, and 25.7 ± 3.6 mm at 45°. The posterior points in the parallel direction were located on the posterior fossa in 36.0% of cases at 90°, in 12.6% at 75°, and in 0.0% at 60° and 45°. The suture anchor should be directed from anterior to posterior at an angle of <45° to the longitudinal axis of the fibula, parallel to the lateral surface of the talus, to avoid passing through the fibula. Cohort study, Level III.

  3. Early passive motion versus immobilization after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Riboh, Jonathan C; Garrigues, Grant E

    2014-08-01

    To provide a synthesis of the highest-quality literature available comparing early passive motion (EPM) with strict sling immobilization during the first 4 to 6 weeks after surgery. The Medline, Cochrane, and Embase databases were searched for eligible studies. We reviewed 886 citations, and 5 randomized clinical trials (RCTs) (Level II) met the inclusion criteria for meta-analysis. Four RCTs contributed to the analysis of range of motion, and 5 contributed to the analysis of retear rates. A single Level IV study was available for qualitative review. Random-effects models were used for meta-analysis, computing mean differences for continuous variables and risk ratios for dichotomous variables. EPM resulted in improved shoulder forward flexion at 3 months (mean difference, 14.70°; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.52° to 23.87°; P = .002), 6 months (mean difference, 4.31°; 95% CI, 0.17° to 8.45°; P = .04), and 12 months (mean difference, 4.18°; 95% CI, 0.36° to 8.00°; P = .03). External rotation at the side was only superior with EPM at 3 months (mean difference, 10.43°; 95% CI, 4.51° to 16.34°; P = .0006). Rotator cuff retear rates (16.3% for immobilization v 21.1% for EPM; risk ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.57 to 1.20; P = .31) were not significantly different between EPM and immobilization at a minimum of 1 year of follow-up. A small number of RCTs with low to moderate risks of bias are currently available. Meta-analysis suggests that after primary arthroscopic rotator cuff repair of small to medium tears, EPM results in 15° of improved forward flexion at 3 months and approximately 5° at 6 and 12 months. External rotation is improved by 10° with EPM at 3 months only. The clinical importance of these differences has yet to be determined. Retear rates at a minimum of 1 year of follow-up are not clearly affected by type of rehabilitation. Level II, meta-analysis of Level II studies and qualitative review of Level IV study. Copyright © 2014 Arthroscopy

  4. Editorial Commentary: Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair--Infection Rate After Rotator Cuff Repair With Arthroscopic, Open, and Mini-open Techniques.

    PubMed

    Brand, Jefferson C

    2016-03-01

    In "Risk Factors for Infection After Rotator Cuff Repair," B. G. Vopat et al. report a lower rate of postoperative infection with an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair than with an open or mini-open approach. Although there were only 14 infections (infection rate of 0.77%), the reason for the preponderance of male patients, 13 of the 14 infections, needs further research to determine effective preventive strategies. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of Repair Tension in Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Does It Really Matter to the Integrity of the Rotator Cuff?

    PubMed

    Kim, Do Hoon; Jang, Young Hoon; Choi, Young Eun; Lee, Hwa-Ryeong; Kim, Sae Hoon

    2016-11-01

    Repair tension of a torn rotator cuff can affect healing after repair. However, a measurement of the actual tension during arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is not feasible. The relationship between repair tension and healing of a rotator cuff repair remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of repair tension on healing at the repair site. The hypothesis was that repair tension would be a major factor in determining the anatomic outcome of rotator cuff repair. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs (132 patients) for full-thickness rotator cuff tears were analyzed. An intraoperative model was designed for the estimation of repair tension using a tensiometer. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed approximately 1 year (mean [±SD], 12.7 ± 3.2 months) postoperatively for the evaluation of healing at the repair site. Multivariable analysis was performed for tear size, amount of retraction, and fatty degeneration (FD) of rotator cuff muscles. The mean repair tension measured during the arthroscopic procedure was 28.5 ± 23.1 N. There was a statistically significant correlation between tension and tear size (Pearson correlation coefficient [PCC], 0.529; P < .001), amount of retraction (PCC, 0.619; P < .001), and FD of the supraspinatus (Spearman correlation coefficient [SCC], 0.308; P < .001) and infraspinatus (SCC, 0.332; P < .001). At the final follow-up (12.7 ± 3.2 months), healing failure was observed in 18.2% (24/132), and repair tension also showed a significant inverse correlation with healing at the repair site (SCC, 0.195; P = .025). However, when sex, age, tear size, amount of retraction, tendon quality, and FD of rotator cuff muscles were included for multivariable logistic regression analysis, only FD of the infraspinatus showed an association with the anatomic outcome of repair (Exp(B) = 0.596; P = .010). Our intraoperative model for the estimation of rotator cuff repair tension showed an

  6. A laboratory comparison of a new arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair to a double row transosseous equivalent rotator cuff repair using suture anchors.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Frederick J; Hahn, Michael; Day, Michael; Meislin, Robert J; Jazrawi, Laith M

    2013-01-01

    Because current instrumentation makes it possible to perform an arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair, we performed a biomechanical comparison of a double-row transosseous equivalent rotator cuff repair using suture anchors to an arthroscopic, transosseous rotator cuff repair to determine if they provided similar fixation stability. Six pairs of shoulders were used. One of each pair had a standard double row, transosseous equivalent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair using a suture-bridge technique with suture anchors, and the other had an arthroscopic transosseous repair using an Xbox technique. The repairs were cycled at 150 N for 10,000 cycles with movement of the lateral cuff edge recorded and then tested to failure. The total cuff edge displacement at 10,000 cycles in the anchor group (transosseous equivalent repair) was 7.9 mm and 6.3 mm for the bone tunnel group (transosseous repair); these were not significantly different (p=0.19). The anchor group failed at an average of 309 N and the bone tunnel group at an average of 339 N (p=0.22). Biomechanical testing suggests that arthroscopic, transosseous rotator cuff repair using a Xbox suture configuration is similar in strength and stability to an arthroscopic transosseous equivalent suture-bridge repair. Both techniques demonstrated difficulty in maintaining the lateral position of the tendon.

  7. Arthroscopic repair of the subscapularis tendon: indications, limits and technical features.

    PubMed

    Osti, Leonardo; Soldati, Francesco; Buono, Angelo Del; Buda, Matteo

    2013-08-11

    The rationale to anatomically repair this tendon is to restore the functional biomechanics of the shoulder. Clinical and imaging assessment are required before undertaking arthroscopy. In this way, associated pathologies of the biceps and labrum may be successfully addressed. The arthroscopic repair of the tendon implies to use suture anchors and reinsert the tendon itself over the footprint. Results after arthroscopy are comparable to those observed after open procedures.

  8. Arthroscopic repair of the subscapularis tendon: indications, limits and technical features

    PubMed Central

    Osti, Leonardo; Soldati, Francesco; Del Buono, Angelo; Buda, Matteo

    2013-01-01

    Summary The rationale to anatomically repair this tendon is to restore the functional biomechanics of the shoulder. Clinical and imaging assessment are required before undertaking arthroscopy. In this way, associated pathologies of the biceps and labrum may be successfully addressed. The arthroscopic repair of the tendon implies to use suture anchors and reinsert the tendon itself over the footprint. Results after arthroscopy are comparable to those observed after open procedures. PMID:24367783

  9. Postoperative pain after arthroscopic versus open rotator cuff repair. A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Pham, T T; Bayle Iniguez, X; Mansat, P; Maubisson, L; Bonnevialle, N

    2016-02-01

    Although the arthroscopic technique is becoming the gold standard for rotator cuff tendon repair, there is no proof that this technique results in less postoperative pain compared to open repair. The aim of this study was to prospectively compare the postoperative pain level after arthroscopic or open rotator cuff repair and to define factors that could influence its course. Between January 2012 and January 2013, 95 patients were operated for a rotator cuff tear: 45 using an arthroscopic technique and 50 an open technique. Daily analgesic use and self-evaluation of pain level using a visual analogic scale were recorded preoperatively and twice a day postoperatively during the first 6 weeks. These data were compared between the two groups and analyzed according to patients' demographic data and preoperative evaluation of the tear. The preoperative pain level was equivalent in the two groups (P=0.22). Postoperatively, level-2 analgesic medication use was greater in the arthroscopic group after the 4th week (P=0.01). A pain-free shoulder was obtained before the 6th week in 75% and 66% of the patients after arthroscopic or open repair, respectively (P=0.34). There was a positive correlation between the preoperative and postoperative pain level (r=0.25; P=0.02). Work compensation patients experienced more pain postoperatively (P=0.08). Level-III analgesic medication use was greater for patients with massive rotator cuff tear (P=0.001). No evidence was found on the superiority of arthroscopy versus open repair of rotator cuff tear concerning the postoperative pain level. The choice of the surgical technique should not be based on this argument. II. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Functional evaluation of patient after arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rohit; Jadhav, Umesh

    2014-06-01

    Rotator cuff tear is a common problem either after trauma or after degenerative tear in old age group. Arthroscopic repair is the current concept of rotator cuff repair. Here, we are trying to evaluate the functional outcome after arthroscopic repair of full thickness rotator cuff tear (single row) in Indian population. Twenty five patients (14 males and 11 females) who underwent arthroscopic repair of full thickness rotator cuff tear at a single institution were included in the study. Postoperatively patient's shoulder was rated according to UCLA score, pain was graded according to the visual analog score. The range of motion was analysed and documented. The mean age of the patients were 50.48 years. The preoperative VAS score mode was 7 and post operative VAS was 1 (p value <0.001). The UCLA grading was good in 80% (n = 20), fair in 12% (n = 3), excellent in 8% (n = 2) and poor results were seen in none of the patients. The mean UCLA improved from a score of 15.84 to 30.28 with a p value <0.001. Mean postoperative forward flexion was 161.6°, mean abduction was 147.6° and mean external rotation was 45.4°. Arthroscopic repair is a good procedure for full thickness rotator cuff tear with minimal complications. The newer double row repair claims to be biomechanically superior with faster healing rates without functional advantages, hence we used a single row repair considering the Indian population and the cost effectiveness of the surgery with good to excellent results.

  11. Orthopedic resident's learning curve for arthroscopic subscapularis tendon repair: short-term clinical and radiographic outcomes.

    PubMed

    Visonà, E; Vio, S; Franceschi, G; Maron, A; Corona, K; Cerciello, S; Merolla, G; Berizzi, A; Aldegheri, R

    2017-07-29

    Arthroscopic subscapularis (SSC) repair is a technically demanding procedure with a long learning curve. As effective completion of resident's practical experience remains controversial, a prospective clinical study was performed to assess the functional and anatomical outcomes of subscapularis (SSC) arthroscopic repair by orthopedic residents. The pathological anatomy of the tears, the surgical approach and the difficulties encountered at the beginning of the learning curve were reported. Between June 2009 and June 2010, 30 patients with rotator cuff tear were preoperatively evaluated with clinical exam, Constant and UCLA scores. Surgery was performed under arthroscopy by a team of three orthopedic surgeons in training. A SSC tear, if present, was recorded and treated. The same clinical exam and functional scores were repeated at minimum 6 months of follow-up. Subscapularis strength recovery and tendon healing were investigated with arthromagnetic resonance imaging. A SSC tear was observed in 11 cases out of 30 and treated arthroscopically. The clinical scores improved in all patients: the average Constant score increased from 34 ± 14 to 77 ± 11 and the UCLA score from 11 ± 5 to 29 ± 3. The SSC tests were negative in all patients with the exception of one. Tendon healing was observed in 10 out of 11 cases. Arthroscopic SSC repair performed by educated residents is possible and leads to good clinical and anatomical results. Surgery duration progressively improved as the learning curve advanced. Level 2.

  12. Arthroscopic Preparation 0f the Posterior and Posteroinferior Glenoid Labrum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    bankart repair. Ar- throscopy.2003; 19:672-677. 2. Costouros lG, Cia vert P, War- ner JJ. Trans-cuff portal for arthroscopic posterior capsu...La lK, Burkhart SS. Triple labral lesions : pathology and surgical repair technique-report of seven cases. Arrhroscopy. 2005; 2 lot 86- I 93. 7...1471. 13. Kim SH, Ha KI, Yoo lC, Noh KC. J(jm ’s lesion : an incom- plete and concealed avulsion of the posteroinferior labrum in {Xlsterior or

  13. Comparison of implant cost and surgical time in arthroscopic transosseous and transosseous equivalent rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Black, Eric M; Austin, Luke S; Narzikul, Alexa; Seidl, Adam J; Martens, Kelly; Lazarus, Mark D

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the cost savings associated with arthroscopic transosseous (anchorless) double-row rotator cuff repair compared with double-row anchored (transosseous-equivalent [TOE]) repair. All patients undergoing double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair from 2009 to 2012 by a single surgeon were eligible for inclusion. The study included 2 consecutive series of patients undergoing anchorless or TOE repair. Excluded from the study were revision repairs, subscapularis repairs, patients with poor tendon quality or excursion requiring medialized repair, and partial repairs. Rotator cuff implant costs (paid by the institution) and surgical times were compared between the 2 groups, controlling for rotator cuff tear size and additional procedures performed. The study included 344 patients, 178 with TOE repairs and 166 with anchorless repairs. Average implant cost for TOE repairs was $1014.10 ($813.00 for small, $946.67 for medium, $1104.56 for large, and $1507.29 for massive tears). This was significantly more expensive compared with anchorless repairs, which averaged $678.05 ($659.75 for small, $671.39 for medium, $695.55 for large, and $716.00 for massive tears). Average total operative time in TOE and anchorless groups was not significantly different (99 vs. 98 minutes). There was larger (although not statistically significant) case time variation in the TOE group. Compared with TOE repair, anchorless rotator cuff repair provides substantial implant-related cost savings, with no significant differences in surgical time for medium and large rotator cuff tears. Case time for TOE repair varied more with extremes in tear size. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Reversal of suprascapular neuropathy following arthroscopic repair of massive supraspinatus and infraspinatus rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Costouros, John G; Porramatikul, Mason; Lie, Denny T; Warner, Jon J P

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to study the prevalence of suprascapular neuropathy (SSN) in the setting of massive rotator cuff tears and to determine if arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, even if partial, was associated with reversal of SSN and clinical improvement in pain and function. Over a 13-month period, 26 of 216 patients with rotator cuff tears treated operatively were identified to have massive tears associated with retraction and moderate to severe fatty infiltration of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles. All patients had pain and marked weakness in abduction and external rotation which did not improve with conservative treatment. Electrodiagnostic electromyographic/nerve conduction velocity (EMG/NCV) evaluation, as well as pre- and postoperative questionnaire and physical examination, were performed. An arthroscopic repair, either partial or complete, was performed on patients identified to have a massive rotator cuff tear in association with SSN. Fourteen of 26 patients with massive rotator cuff tears (54%) were identified to have a peripheral nerve injury. Seven of these 26 (38%) had isolated suprascapular nerve injury, 4 had axillary nerve injury, 2 had an associated upper trunk brachial plexus injury, and 1 had a cervical radiculopathy. All 7 patients with isolated suprascapular injury underwent arthroscopic treatment, 1 of which was not technically reparable at the time of surgery. In the 6 patients who underwent either partial or complete arthroscopic repair, follow-up EMG/NCV after 6 months demonstrated partial or full recovery of the suprascapular nerve palsy that correlated with complete pain relief and marked improvement in function. SSN is found in a significant proportion of patients with massive rotator cuff tears, and is associated with pain and dysfunction. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair can result in reversal of SSN, which may correlate with substantial improvement in pain and function. Level IV, case series.

  15. Arthroscopic Direct Repair for a Complete Radial Tear of the Posterior Root of the Medial Meniscus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kook Hyun; Hwang, Dae Hee; Cho, Jin Ho; Changale, Sachin D.; Woo, Sung Jong

    2011-01-01

    We report here on a new arthroscopic direct repair technique for a radial tear of the posterior root of the medial meniscus (PRMM) using a posterior trans-septal portal. Radial tears of the PRMM are commonly observed in the elderly population of Korea and Japan, and the life style of these people requires squatting and kneeling down in daily life. A radial tear of the PRMM results in the loss of hoop tension and this accelerates degenerative changes in the knee joint and causes early osteoarthritis. Several reports in the medical literature have focused on various repair techniques for these tears by using pull out sutures. These techniques result in nonanatomic fixation of the meniscus, which may lead to disturbed meniscal excursion and failure to restore hoop tension. Arthroscopic direct repair may contribute to restoring hoop tension and preventing accelerated degenerative changes in the knee joint of these patients. PMID:22162797

  16. Arthroscopic vs mini-open rotator cuff repair. A quality of life impairment study

    PubMed Central

    Osti, Leonardo; Papalia, Rocco; Paganelli, Massimo; Denaro, Enzo

    2009-01-01

    We compared the clinical and quality of life related outcome of rotator cuff repair performed using either a mini-open or an arthroscopic technique for rotator cuff tears of less than 3 cm. The records of 64 patients who underwent rotator cuff repair between September 2003 and September 2005 were evaluated. Thirty-two patients underwent a mini-open rotator cuff repair, and 32 patients underwent an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The mean follow-up period was 31 months in the mini-open group and 30.6 months in the arthroscopic group (P > 0.05). The UCLA rating system, range of motion examination and the self-administered SF-36 used for postoperative evaluation showed a statistically significant improvement from the preoperative to the final score for both groups (P < 0.05). No statistically significant difference in the total UCLA scores was found when comparing the two repair techniques (P > 0.05). This study suggests that there is no difference in terms of subjective and objective outcomes between the two surgical procedures studied if patients have rotator cuff tears of less than 3 cm. PMID:19424692

  17. Arthroscopic vs mini-open rotator cuff repair. A quality of life impairment study.

    PubMed

    Osti, Leonardo; Papalia, Rocco; Paganelli, Massimo; Denaro, Enzo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2010-03-01

    We compared the clinical and quality of life related outcome of rotator cuff repair performed using either a mini-open or an arthroscopic technique for rotator cuff tears of less than 3 cm. The records of 64 patients who underwent rotator cuff repair between September 2003 and September 2005 were evaluated. Thirty-two patients underwent a mini-open rotator cuff repair, and 32 patients underwent an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The mean follow-up period was 31 months in the mini-open group and 30.6 months in the arthroscopic group (P > 0.05). The UCLA rating system, range of motion examination and the self-administered SF-36 used for postoperative evaluation showed a statistically significant improvement from the preoperative to the final score for both groups (P < 0.05). No statistically significant difference in the total UCLA scores was found when comparing the two repair techniques (P > 0.05). This study suggests that there is no difference in terms of subjective and objective outcomes between the two surgical procedures studied if patients have rotator cuff tears of less than 3 cm.

  18. Infections following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: incidence, risk factors, and prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Pauzenberger, Leo; Grieb, Annemarie; Hexel, Michael; Laky, Brenda; Anderl, Werner; Heuberer, Philipp

    2017-02-01

    The primary aim of the present study was to determine the incidence of infections following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in a single department over a 10-year period. Secondary goals included the evaluation of potential risk factors for infections and to investigate the efficacy of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis in the reduction of infectious complications. A retrospective evaluation of 3294 all-arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs performed between 2004 and 2014 at a single institution was conducted to determine the rate of infection in all-arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs. Detailed data including demographics, co-morbidities, initial surgical procedure, time from index surgery to infection, clinical presentation, isolated pathogens, and subsequent treatment were recorded of patients with infections. Univariate logistic regression was performed, and a multivariate model was developed to identify variables that were predictive of infections following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The rate of infection was 8.5/1000 in whom rotator cuff repairs were performed (95 % CI 0.58-1.23 %) during the study period. The most commonly identified pathogen was Staphylococcus epidermidis (n = 11, 39.3 %), followed by Propionibacterium acnes (n = 8, 28.6 %) and Staphylococcus aureus (n = 2, 7.1 %). Patients presented at our institution with signs of infection an average of 28.9 ± 14.7 days after the index surgery. The leading symptom that was present in all patients was diffuse or localized shoulder pain, followed by local signs of infection in 19 (67.9 %), secretion in 14 (50 %), and fever in 9 (32.1 %) patients, respectively. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified the male gender, age over 60, and duration of surgery over 90 min as predictive factors for infection. Administration of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis was an independent mitigating factor for postoperative infection and reduced the infection rate from 1.54 % (95 % CI 0

  19. Use of a shoulder abduction brace after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: A study on gait performance and falls.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Yuma; Nishioka, Takashi; Nakajima, Ryo; Imai, Shinji; Vigers, Piers; Kawasaki, Taku

    2017-03-01

    Fall prevention is essential in patients after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair because of the high risk of re-rupture. However, there are no reports related to falls that occur during the early postoperative period, while the affected limb is immobilized. This study assessed gait performance and falls in patients using a shoulder abduction brace after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Prospective cohort and postoperative repeated measures. This study included 29 patients (mean age, 67.1 ± 7.4 years) who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair followed by rehabilitation. The timed up and go test, Geriatric Depression Scale, and Falls Efficacy Scale were measured, and the numbers of falls were compared between those shoulder abduction brace users and patients who had undergone total hip or knee arthroplasty. In arthroscopic rotator cuff repair patients, there were significant improvements in timed up and go test and Geriatric Depression Scale, but no significant differences in Falls Efficacy Scale, between the second and fifth postoperative weeks ( p < 0.05). Additionally, arthroscopic rotator cuff repair patients fell more often than patients with total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty during the same period. The findings suggest that rehabilitation in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair patients is beneficial, but decreased gait performance due to the immobilizing shoulder abduction brace can lead to falls. Clinical relevance Although rehabilitation helps motor function and mental health after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, shoulder abduction brace use is associated with impaired gait performance, high Falls Efficacy Scale scores, and risk of falls, so awareness of risk factors including medications and lower limb dysfunctions is especially important after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

  20. Identifiable risk factors for thirty-day complications following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Heyer, Jessica H; Kuang, Xiangyu; Amdur, Richard L; Pandarinath, Rajeev

    2017-10-11

    Shoulder arthroscopy has increased in frequency over the past decade, with rotator cuff repair comprising the majority of cases performed. Prior studies have detailed risk factors for 30-day complications and readmission rates after arthroscopic shoulder surgery using the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database, but no study has specifically looked at arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the risk factors for 30-day complications following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair using the NSQIP database. The NSQIP database was queried for all patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair from 2006-2015. Demographics and thirty-day outcomes for these patients were analyzed using univariate analyses and multivariate regression analysis to determine the risk factors for complications. 21,143 patients underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, with 147 patients (0.70%) having a complication within 30-days. Univariate analysis found age >65 (p = 0.0028), male gender (p = 0.0053), elevated BMI (p = 0.0054), ASA class >2 (p < 0.0001), history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (p < 0.0001), hypertension (p < 0.0002), dyspnea (p < 0.0001), steroid use (p = 0.0350), and operative time >90 min (p = 0.0316) to be associated with increased risk of complications. Multivariate analysis found female sex to be protective or complication (OR 0.56, p = 0.0017), while American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) class >2 (OR 1.51, p = 0.0335) and history of COPD (OR 2.41, p = 0.0030) and dyspnea (OR 1.89, p = 0.0359) to be risk factors for complication. The most common complication is venothromboembolic events, accounting for 36.7% of all complications. Male sex, ASA class > 2, and history of COPD and dyspnea were independent risk factors for thirty-day complications following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. IV.

  1. Simultaneous Rotator Cuff Repair and Arthroscopic Biceps Tenodesis Using Lateral Row Anchor

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Jonathan C.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of concomitant long head of the biceps pathology in the setting of rotator cuff repair is often required. When a tenodesis of the biceps is used, additional anchors and surgical dissection are typically required. This adds additional surgical time, morbidity of additional surgical dissection, and additional anchor load and cost. We describe a novel technique for arthroscopic biceps tenodesis that uses the anterior lateral row anchor of a double-row rotator cuff repair to simultaneously secure the biceps tenodesis and rotator cuff tear. This technique provides a simple, reproducible, cost-effective means of performing a simultaneous biceps tenodesis and double-row rotator cuff repair. PMID:23766961

  2. Open Bankart Repair for the Treatment of Anterior Shoulder Instability without Substantial Osseous Glenoid Defects: Results After a Minimum Follow-up of Twenty Years.

    PubMed

    Moroder, Philipp; Odorizzi, Marco; Pizzinini, Severino; Demetz, Ernst; Resch, Herbert; Moroder, Peter

    2015-09-02

    Neglected osseous glenoid defects are thought to be one of the reasons for the reported high rates of recurrent instability at long-term follow-up after Bankart repair. We hypothesized that open Bankart repair for the treatment of anterior glenohumeral instability in the absence of a substantial osseous glenoid defect would result in a lower long-term recurrence rate than has been reported in previous long-term studies. Forty-seven patients were treated with a primary modified open Bankart repair for recurrent anterior shoulder instability between 1989 and 1994. Double-contrast computed tomography scanning was used to exclude patients with a substantial osseous glenoid defect. Forty patients (85.1%) were available for subjective and objective follow-up at a minimum of twenty years (maximum, twenty-five years). Twenty-six patients (65%) underwent clinical examination as well as bilateral shoulder radiography, and fourteen (35%) completed a self-assessment questionnaire and were interviewed by telephone. Seven patients (17.5%) had a recurrence of instability, and six of them had the instability occur after more than eight years without symptoms. The mean Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index score (and standard deviation) was 256.7 ± 284.8 points; the mean Rowe score, 88.7 ± 12.0 points; and the mean Subjective Shoulder Value, 90.1% ± 10.5%.The mean range of motion of the affected shoulder was decreased by 4° of abduction (p = 0.009), two levels of internal rotation (p = 0.003), 5° of internal rotation in 90° of abduction (p = 0.005), 7° of external rotation in neutral position (p < 0.001), and 7° of external rotation in 90° of abduction (p = 0.004) compared with the contralateral side. The collective instability arthropathy (CIA) index was 0.92 for the affected side and 0.35 for the contralateral side. Open Bankart repair provides good results twenty years after surgery in terms of subjective and objective outcome measurements. However, the long

  3. Arthroscopic knotless anchor repair of triangular fibrocartilage in distal radius fracture.

    PubMed

    García-Ruano, Á A; Najarro-Cid, F; Jiménez-Martín, A; Gómez de los Infantes-Troncoso, J G; Sicre-González, M

    2015-01-01

    Lesions of triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) are associated with distal radioulnar joint instability. Arthroscopic treatment of these lesions improves functional outcome of affected patients. The aim of the present work is to evaluate functional and occupational outcome of TCF repair using an arthroscopic knotless anchor device in patients with associated distal radius fracture. An observational, descriptive study was carried out between November 2011 and January 2014 including 21 patients with distal radius fracture and Palmer 1B lesions of TCF (Atzei class 2 and 3) that were treated by arthroscopic knotless anchor (PopLok® 2,8mm, ConMed, USA). Mean follow-up was 18 months. Functional (Mayo Wrist Score) and occupational outcome results were analyzed. Mean age of the group was 43.0±8.8 years, with 19% of the patients being female. There was an associated scapholunate lesion in 5 cases. Functional results reached a mean of 83.4±16.1 points onMayo Wrist Score. Mean sick-leave time was 153.16±48.5 days. Complete occupational reintegration was reached in 89.5% of cases. There were no postoperative complications. Arthroscopic knotless anchor repair of 1B TFC tears is a minimally invasive method of treatment that improves tension of fixation, avoiding subsequent loosen, in our experience, with few complications and good functional and occupational results. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Early postoperative fluoroquinolone use is associated with an increased revision rate after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Cancienne, Jourdan M; Brockmeier, Stephen F; Rodeo, Scott A; Young, Chris; Werner, Brian C

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the association of postoperative fluoroquinolone use following arthroscopic primary rotator cuff repair with failure requiring revision rotator cuff repair. An insurance database was queried for patients undergoing rotator cuff repair from 2007 to 2015. These patients were divided into three groups: (1) patients prescribed fluoroquinolones within 6 months postoperatively (divided into 0-2, 2-4, and 4-6 months), (2) a matched negative control cohort of patients not prescribed fluoroquinolones, and (3) a matched positive control cohort of patients prescribed fluoroquinolones between 6 and 18 months following rotator cuff repair. Rates of failure requiring revision rotator cuff repair were compared within 2 years. A total of 1292 patients were prescribed fluoroquinolones within 6 months after rotator cuff repair, including 442 within 2 months, 433 within 2 to 4 months, and 417 within 4 to 6 months, and were compared to 5225 matched negative controls and 1597 matched positive controls. The rate of revision rotator cuff repair was significantly higher in patients prescribed fluoroquinolones within 2 months (6.1 %) compared to matched negative (2.2 %, P = 0.0009) and positive controls (2.4 %, P = 0.0026). There were no significant differences in the rate of revision rotator cuff repair when fluoroquinolones were prescribed >2 months after rotator cuff repair. Early use of fluoroquinolones following rotator cuff repair was independently associated with significantly increased rates of failure requiring revision rotator cuff repair. This is the first clinical study examining the association of postoperative fluoroquinolone use with failure following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. III.

  5. Multimodal analgesia for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial.

    PubMed

    Jo, Chris Hyunchul; Shin, Ji Sun; Huh, Jin

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether a multimodal analgesia (MMA) protocol reduces postoperative pain and opioids consumption in patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Fifty-four patients scheduled for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were randomly assigned to either the MMA group or the control group. The primary outcome was visual analog scale (VAS) for pain. Secondary outcome measures included the time required for the VAS pain to reduce to that of a blood draw, (PCA) consumption, rescue morphine consumption, night awakening, and opioid-related side effects. The MMA group showed significantly less postoperative pain at postoperative 5 h, and 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. at 4th postoperative day (P < 0.001, = 0.040, and 0.013, respectively). MMA also shortened the time for postoperative pain to reduce down to the blood draw pain level from 5 days in the control group to 2 days in the MMA group. MMA also significantly reduced PCA consumption for up to 24 h postoperatively (P = 0.038) and rescue morphine consumption during the first 6 h and between 48 and 60 h postoperatively (P = 0.036 and 0.044, respectively). No significant differences were observed between the MMA and control groups with respect to side effects. The MMA protocol used in this study was found to reduce postoperative pain and opioid consumption during the acute postoperative period after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair without increasing side effects after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

  6. Common peroneal nerve neuropraxia after arthroscopic inside-out lateral meniscus repair.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Anthony W; LaPrade, Robert F

    2009-01-01

    Common peroneal nerve injury caused by suture entrapment is a complication of arthroscopic inside-out lateral meniscus repair. In the literature, the treatment of this complication has been described as immediate reexploration. We present a case of recovery after late neurolysis performed 7 months postoperatively for a common peroneal nerve neuropraxia. In addition to describing return of function after late exploration, we discuss the management and prevention of this complication.

  7. Effectiveness of open and arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (UKUFF): a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Carr, A; Cooper, C; Campbell, M K; Rees, J; Moser, J; Beard, D J; Fitzpatrick, R; Gray, A; Dawson, J; Murphy, J; Bruhn, H; Cooper, D; Ramsay, C

    2017-01-01

    The appropriate management for patients with a degenerative tear of the rotator cuff remains controversial, but operative treatment, particularly arthroscopic surgery, is increasingly being used. Our aim in this paper was to compare the effectiveness of arthroscopic with open repair of the rotator cuff. A total of 273 patients were recruited to a randomised comparison trial (136 to arthroscopic surgery and 137 to open surgery) from 19 teaching and general hospitals in the United Kingdom. The surgeons used their usual preferred method of repair. The Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS), two years post-operatively, was the primary outcome measure. Imaging of the shoulder was performed at one year after surgery. The trial is registered with Current Controlled Trials, ISRCTN97804283. The mean OSS improved from 26.3 (standard deviation (sd) 8.2) at baseline, to 41.7 (sd 7.9) two years post-operatively for arthroscopic surgery and from 25.0 (sd 8.0) to 41.5 (sd 7.9) for open surgery. Intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis showed no statistical difference between the groups at two years (difference in OSS score -0.76; 95% confidence interval (CI) -2.75 to 1.22; p = 0.452). The confidence interval excluded the pre-determined clinically important difference in the OSS of three points. The rate of re-tear was not significantly different between the two groups (46.4% for arthroscopic and 38.6% for open surgery; 95% CI -6.9 to 25.8; p = 0.256). Healed repairs had the most improved OSS. These findings were the same when analysed per-protocol. There is no evidence of difference in effectiveness between open and arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tears. The rate of re-tear is high in both groups, for all sizes of tear and ages and this adversely affects the outcome. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:107-15. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  8. The global percutaneous shuttling technique tip for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Vopat, Bryan G; Murali, Jothi; Gowda, Ashok L; Kaback, Lee; Blaine, Theodore

    2014-04-22

    Most arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs utilize suture passing devices placed through arthroscopic cannulas. These devices are limited by the size of the passing device where the suture is passed through the tendon. An alternative technique has been used in the senior author's practice for the past ten years, where sutures are placed through the rotator cuff tendon using percutaneous passing devices. This technique, dubbed the global percutaneous shuttling technique of rotator cuff repair, affords the placement of sutures from nearly any angle and location in the shoulder, and has the potential advantage of larger suture bites through the tendon edge. These advantages may increase the area of tendon available to compress to the rotator cuff footprint and improve tendon healing and outcomes. The aim of this study is to describe the global percutaneous shuttling (GPS) technique and report our results using this method. The GPS technique can be used for any full thickness rotator cuff tear and is particularly useful for massive cuff tears with poor tissue quality. We recently followed up 22 patients with an average follow up of 32 months to validate its usefulness. American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores improved significantly from 37 preoperatively to 90 postoperatively (P<0.0001). This data supports the use of the GPS technique for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Further biomechanical studies are currently being performed to assess the improvements in tendon footprint area with this technique.

  9. Comparison of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in healthy patients over and under 65 years of age.

    PubMed

    Osti, Leonardo; Papalia, Rocco; Del Buono, Angelo; Denaro, Vincenzo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2010-12-01

    We compared the outcomes of arthroscopically repaired rotator cuff tears in 28 patients older than 65 years (the over 65 group: median age 70 years) with a control group of 28 patients younger than 65 years (the under 65 group: median age 57 years). The groups were similar in regard to sex distribution, surgical technique, and post-operative rehabilitation programmes, but different in age. After careful arthroscopic evaluation of the full-thickness rotator cuff tear, rotator cuff repair and biceps tenotomy were performed in all patients. Pre- and post-operatively, each patient was evaluated for range of motion, shoulder score (UCLA), and SF-36 self-administered questionnaire. Comparing pre- versus post-operative status at a minimum 24 months follow-up, forward elevation, internal and external rotation, modified UCLA rating system scores, and SF-36 scores improved significantly in both groups, with no significant difference between the groups. At the last follow-up, strength improved significantly in both groups, with non-significant intergroup difference. The Popeye sign was detected in 13/28 (46%) of the patients in the over 65 group and in 11/28 (39%) in the under 65 group (χ = 0.29) with non-significant difference between the two groups. In selected active patients older than 65, arthroscopic rotator cuff repair associated with biceps tenotomy (when necessary) can yield clinical and related quality of life outcomes similar to those of patients younger than 65 years.

  10. RESULTS FROM ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR OF ISOLATED TEARS OF THE SUBSCAPULARIS TENDON

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Glaydson Gomes; de Oliveira França, Flávio; Freita, José Márcio Alves; Santos, Flávio Márcio Lago; dos Santos, Ricardo Barreto Monteiro; Taglietti, Thiago Martins; Guevara, Carlos Leonidas Escobar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the functional and clinical outcomes and identify prognostic factors in patients undergoing arthroscopic repair of isolated tears of the subscapularis tendon. Methods: Between January 2003 and May 2009, we identified 18 shoulders with isolated tears or deinsertions that were complete or affected at least one third of the subscapularis tendon and underwent arthroscopic repair. Results: Three shoulders (17%) showed lesions in the upper third of the subscapularis; nine shoulders (50%) showed lesions in the upper two thirds; and six shoulders (33%) presented complete tears. In comparing the range of lateral rotation of the injured shoulder between before surgery and the time of the reevaluation, there was no statistical difference (p = 0.091). The LHBT was damaged in 11 shoulders (61%). According to the Constant score validation, we had excellent and good results in 83% of the cases and 17% were reasonable. The reevaluations on three patients showed re-tearing on MRI. Acromioplasty was performed on ten patients and this procedure did not represent statistical differences in the final results (p = 0.57). Conclusions: There was no statistically significant difference in relation to preoperative lateral rotation between the injured shoulder and the contralateral side. There was no significant loss of lateral rotation after surgery. The LHBT may be normal in deinsertions of the subscapularis tendon. Acromioplasty did not influence the results. The re-tearing rate for arthroscopic repair of the subscapularis tendon was 16.6%. PMID:27042642

  11. Is clinical evaluation alone sufficient for the diagnosis of a Bankart lesion without the use of magnetic resonance imaging?

    PubMed

    Loh, Bryan; Lim, Jason Beng Teck; Tan, Andrew Hwee Chye

    2016-11-01

    Imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance arthrogram (MRA) offer great utility in diagnosing Bankart lesions but they are associated with a high degree of intra and interobserver variability. This study aims to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of clinical evaluation and imaging modalities in Bankart lesions such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MRA of the shoulder. Between February 2004 to January 2015, a retrospectively review of the surgical records at a tertiary hospital identified a total of 250 patients treated with a shoulder arthroscopy for Bankart repair. All patients were thoroughly investigated preoperatively in which a detailed history were obtained, relevant physical examinations were performed (Load and Shift/Anterior Apprehension test) and pre-operative radiographs taken. Some patients subsequently underwent either an MRI or an MRA scan if the initial clinical evaluation was equivocal. Anterior Shoulder Apprehension test and the Load and Shift test identified 214 of 227 Bankart tears, with a sensitivity of 94% [95% confidence interval (CI), 90-97%]. MRI correctly identified 23 of 26 Bankart tears, with a sensitivity of 89% (95% CI, 70-98%). Out of the five superior labrum anterior-posterior (SLAP) tears identified on MRI, only three were confirmed during arthroscopic surgery. MRA correctly identified 84 of 89 Bankart tears, for a sensitivity of 94% (95% CI, 87-98%). In our study, we report that clinical evaluation with focused history-taking and anterior apprehension, load and shift clinical examination can diagnose anterior shoulder instability as reliably as MR imaging. For patients with equivocal clinical findings, MR imaging can aid in the diagnosis.

  12. Is clinical evaluation alone sufficient for the diagnosis of a Bankart lesion without the use of magnetic resonance imaging?

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jason Beng Teck; Tan, Andrew Hwee Chye

    2016-01-01

    Background Imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance arthrogram (MRA) offer great utility in diagnosing Bankart lesions but they are associated with a high degree of intra and interobserver variability. This study aims to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of clinical evaluation and imaging modalities in Bankart lesions such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MRA of the shoulder. Methods Between February 2004 to January 2015, a retrospectively review of the surgical records at a tertiary hospital identified a total of 250 patients treated with a shoulder arthroscopy for Bankart repair. All patients were thoroughly investigated preoperatively in which a detailed history were obtained, relevant physical examinations were performed (Load and Shift/Anterior Apprehension test) and pre-operative radiographs taken. Some patients subsequently underwent either an MRI or an MRA scan if the initial clinical evaluation was equivocal. Results Anterior Shoulder Apprehension test and the Load and Shift test identified 214 of 227 Bankart tears, with a sensitivity of 94% [95% confidence interval (CI), 90–97%]. MRI correctly identified 23 of 26 Bankart tears, with a sensitivity of 89% (95% CI, 70–98%). Out of the five superior labrum anterior-posterior (SLAP) tears identified on MRI, only three were confirmed during arthroscopic surgery. MRA correctly identified 84 of 89 Bankart tears, for a sensitivity of 94% (95% CI, 87–98%). Conclusions In our study, we report that clinical evaluation with focused history-taking and anterior apprehension, load and shift clinical examination can diagnose anterior shoulder instability as reliably as MR imaging. For patients with equivocal clinical findings, MR imaging can aid in the diagnosis. PMID:27942510

  13. Factors affecting healing after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair

    PubMed Central

    Abtahi, Amir M; Granger, Erin K; Tashjian, Robert Z

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff repair has been shown to have good long-term results. Unfortunately, a significant proportion of repairs still fail to heal. Many factors, both patient and surgeon related, can influence healing after repair. Older age, larger tear size, worse muscle quality, greater muscle-tendon unit retraction, smoking, osteoporosis, diabetes and hypercholesterolemia have all shown to negatively influence tendon healing. Surgeon related factors that can influence healing include repair construct-single vs double row, rehabilitation, and biologics including platelet rich plasma and mesenchymal stem cells. Double-row repairs are biomechanically stronger and have better healing rates compared with single-row repairs although clinical outcomes are equivalent between both constructs. Slower, less aggressive rehabilitation programs have demonstrated improved healing with no negative effect on final range of motion and are therefore recommended after repair of most full thickness tears. Additionally no definitive evidence supports the use of platelet rich plasma or mesenchymal stem cells regarding improvement of healing rates and clinical outcomes. Further research is needed to identify effective biologically directed augmentations that will improve healing rates and clinical outcomes after rotator cuff repair. PMID:25793161

  14. Direct Cost Analysis of Outpatient Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair in Medicare and Non-Medicare Populations

    PubMed Central

    Narvy, Steven J.; Didinger, Tracey C.; Lehoang, David; Vangsness, C. Thomas; Tibone, James E.; Hatch, George F. Rick; Omid, Reza; Osorno, Felipe; Gamradt, Seth C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Providing high-quality care while also containing cost is a paramount goal in orthopaedic surgery. Increasingly, insurance providers in the United States, including government payers, are requiring financial and performance accountability for episodes of care, including a push toward bundled payments. Hypothesis: The direct cost of outpatient arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was assessed to determine whether, due to an older population, rotator cuff surgery was more costly in Medicare-insured patients than in patients covered by other insurers. We hypothesized that operative time, implant cost, and overall higher cost would be observed in Medicare patients. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Billing and operative reports from 184 outpatient arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs performed by 5 fellowship-trained arthroscopic surgeons were reviewed. Operative time, number and cost of implants, hospital reimbursement, surgeon reimbursement, and insurance type were determined from billing records and operative reports. Patients were stratified by payer (Medicare vs non-Medicare), and these variables were compared. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in the number of suture anchors used, implant cost, surgical duration, or overall cost of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair between Medicare and other insurers. Reimbursement was significantly higher for other payers when compared with Medicare, resulting in a mean per case deficit of $263.54 between billing and reimbursement for Medicare patients. Conclusion: Operating room time, implant cost, and total procedural cost was the same for Medicare patients as for patients with private payers. Further research needs to be conducted to understand the patient-specific factors that affect the cost of an episode of care for rotator cuff surgery. PMID:27826595

  15. Arthroscopic Repair for Chronic Massive Rotator Cuff Tears: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Henry, Patrick; Wasserstein, David; Park, Sam; Dwyer, Tim; Chahal, Jaskarndip; Slobogean, Gerard; Schemitsch, Emil

    2015-12-01

    To systematically review the available evidence for arthroscopic repair of chronic massive rotator cuff tears and identify patient demographics, pre- and post-operative functional limitations, reparability and repair techniques, and retear rates. Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched to identify all clinical papers describing arthroscopic repair of chronic massive rotator cuff tears. Papers were excluded if a definition of "massive" was not provided, if the definition of "massive" was considered inappropriate by agreement between the 2 reviewers, or if patients with smaller tears were also included in the study population. Study quality and clinical outcome data were pooled and summarized. There were 18 papers that met the eligibility criteria; they involved 954 patients with a mean age of 63 (range, 37 to 87), 48% of whom were female. There were 5 prospective and 13 retrospective study designs. The overall study quality was poor according to the Modified Coleman Methodology Score. Of the 954 repairs, 81% were complete repairs and 19% were partial repairs. The follow-up range was between 33 and 52 months, and the mean duration between symptom onset and surgery was 24 months. Single-row repairs were performed in 56% or patients, and double-row repairs were performed in 44%. A pooled analysis demonstrated an improvement in visual analog scale from 5.9 to 1.7, active range of motion from 125° to 169°, and the Constant-Murley score from 49 to 74. The pooled retear rate was 79%. Arthroscopic repair of chronic massive rotator cuff tears is associated with complete repair in the majority of cases and consistently improves pain, range of motion, and functional outcome scores; however, the retear rate is high. Existing research on massive rotator cuff repair is limited to poor- to fair-quality studies. Level IV, systematic review including Level IV studies. Copyright © 2015

  16. Results of arthroscopic partial repair of large retracted rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Wellmann, Mathias; Lichtenberg, Sven; da Silva, Gaspar; Magosch, Petra; Habermeyer, Peter

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the midterm results of partial rotator cuff repair using the Constant score and the acromiohumeral radiographic measurement. Thirty-eight patients with a mean age of 65 years and a large retracted rotator cuff tear (at least 2 tendons) were included in the study. Patients underwent clinical examination, standard radiography, and isometric strength testing at a mean follow-up of 47 months. The rotator cuff tears were classified as posterosuperior, anterosuperior, or global tears (≥3 tendons), and an arthroscopic partial repair was performed. The mean Constant score significantly increased from 56 points before surgery to 71 points after surgery (P = .041); the mean age- and sex-adjusted Constant score significantly improved from 63% to 90% at a mean follow-up of 47 months after arthroscopic partial rotator cuff repair (P = .003); and the subcategories pain and activity significantly improved (P = .001, P = .014, respectively). The active range of motion improved from 133° of flexion and 111° of abduction before surgery to 163° of forward flexion and 156° of abduction after surgery (P < .001). However, the active range of external rotation decreased from 44° before surgery to 36° after surgery. Further, there was a trend toward a decrease in the mean acromiohumeral distance from 7.0 mm before surgery to 5.6 mm after surgery. The abduction strength did not significantly improve after surgery (4.2 kg before surgery and 4.8 kg after surgery; P = .116). An arthroscopic partial repair of the rotator cuff is an effective tool to improve the Constant score by restoring active forward flexion and abduction and through pain relief. Further, we found that a pathologically decreased acromiohumeral distance cannot be reversed by a partial rotator cuff repair. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Combined “Double Pulley”–Simple Knot Technique for Arthroscopic Shoulder Posterior Labral Repair and Capsular Shift

    PubMed Central

    Parnes, Nata; Carey, Paul; Morman, Monica; Carr, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Posterior shoulder instability is more prevalent than traditionally believed. Surgical repairs of posterior shoulder instability have overall good success rates. However, in elite overhead and throwing athletes, a low rate of return to the preinjury level of play after repair remains a challenge. The 2 goals of posterior shoulder stabilization surgery are secure fixation of the labrum to the glenoid and retensioning of the posterior capsulolabral complex. Recent studies have shown significant advantages of arthroscopic anatomic repair over open nonanatomic techniques. We report a combined double pulley–simple knot technique for arthroscopic fixation of posterior labral tears and capsular shift. The technique incorporates several advantages of this hybrid fixation method. PMID:27069863

  18. Anterior dislocation of the shoulder associated with Bankart lesion in a patient with Poland's syndrome: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zwolak, P; Schnurr, C; Hackenbroch, M; Eysel, P; Michael, J W-P

    2010-02-01

    Poland's syndrome is a rare congenital entity characterized by unilateral partial or total hypoplasia of the major pectoralis muscle, breast and/or ipsilateral hand abnormalities. It has been reported in association with various structural and functional abnormalities. We report about a 23-year-old male kick-boxer with Poland's syndrome who presented in our department the history of two traumatic anterior shoulder dislocations due to boxing and self-reductions. Physical examination showed an instability of the left shoulder, and the MRI scans demonstrated a Bankart lesion. The patient had been treated with an arthroscopic Bankart repair; reattachment of the detached antero-inferior labrum down to the glenoid and repairing of the inferior gleno-humeral ligament complex. To our knowledge this is a first case report of a patient presenting with traumatic anterior shoulder dislocations due to kick-boxing associated with Poland's syndrome.

  19. Effect of Bankart repair on the loss of range of motion and the instability of the shoulder joint for recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation.

    PubMed

    Shibano, Koji; Koishi, Hayato; Futai, Kazuma; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Sugamoto, Kazuomi

    2014-06-01

    Bankart repair postoperative complications include loss of shoulder motion and shoulder instability. The primary reason that postoperative complications develop may be excessive imbrication of the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament (AIGHL) or inadequate repair position. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate the influence of inadequate repair by computer simulation for a normal shoulder joint. Magnetic resonance images of 10 normal shoulder joints were acquired for 7 positions every 30° from the maximum internal rotation to the maximum external rotation with the arm abducted at 90°. The shortest 3-dimensional path of the AIGHL in each rotational orientation was calculated. We used computer simulations to anticipate the loss of motion and instability by changing the AIGHL length and insertion sites on the glenoid. The AIGHL length measured 50 ± 5 mm at the maximum external shoulder rotation. AIGHL shortening by 3, 6, and 9 mm made the angle of maximum external rotation 80°, 68°, and 54°, respectively. A superior deviation of 3, 6, and 9 mm on the glenoid insertion resulted in a maximum external rotation angle of 85°, 79°, and 77°. An inferior deviation of 3, 6, and 9 mm produced humeral head translation of 1.7, 2.9, and 3.6 mm. Simulation of both excessive imbrication and deviation of the insertion position led to quantitative prediction of the resulting loss of motion and instability. These findings will be useful for anticipating complications after Bankart repair. Basic science study, computer modeling, imaging. Copyright © 2014. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  20. Outcome of arthroscopic subscapularis tendon repair: Are the results improving with improved techniques and equipment?: A retrospective case series

    PubMed Central

    Arun, G R; Kumar, Pradeep; Patnaik, Sarthak; Selvaraj, Karthik; Rajan, David; Singh, Anant; Kumaraswamy, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff tears are a common cause of shoulder pain and dysfunction. More recently, there has been a renewed interest in understanding the subscapularis tears. There are multiple articles in the literature showing the short term results of isolated subscapularis tendon repair. However, the midterm and long term outcome studies for arthroscopic subscapularis repair are few. This study evaluates the functional outcome after arthroscopic subscapularis repair. Materials and Methods: The records of 35 patients who underwent an arthroscopic subscapularis repair between May 2008 and June 2012 were included in this retrospective study. The records of all patients were reviewed. There were 22 males and 13 female patients with mean age of 58.2 years (range 41-72 years). All patients had a complete history, physical examination, and radiographs of their shoulders. Visual analogue scale (VAS), range of movements, power of cuff muscles, and modified University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) score were assessed. Results: The mean followup was 2.8 years (range 2-4 year). Functional outcome after arthroscopic subscapularis repair has an excellent outcome as analysed by clinical outcome, VAS score and UCLA score. Results were analyzed and had statistically significant values. The VAS for pain improved significantly (P < 0.001), and the mean modified UCLA score improved significantly (P < 0.001) from 14.24 ± 4.72 preoperatively to 33.15 ± 2.29 at 2 years postoperative. According to the UCLA system, there were 22 excellent, 11 good, and 2 fair results. Around 95% of patients returned to their usual work after surgery. Conclusion: At a median followup of 2 years, 95% of patients had a good to excellent result after an arthroscopic subscapularis tendon repair. We conclude that the midterm results show that arthroscopic subscapularis repair remains a good option for the treatment of patients with subscapularis tendon repair. PMID:27293291

  1. Interstitial Tear of the Subscapularis Tendon, Arthroscopic Findings and Technique of Repair

    PubMed Central

    Saremi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Tears of the subscapularis tendon have been significantly recognized as a source of shoulder pain and dysfunction in the past decade, thanks to arthroscopic evaluation of the shoulder and biomechanical and anatomical studies of the tendon. Current classification of subscapularis tendon tear is based on insertion site of the tendon. Recently, a classification for non-insertional types of subscapularis tendon tear has been published. Interstitial tear of subscapularis tendon has not been described in classifications available in the literature. This report describes significant interstitial tear of the subscapularis tendon. This tear looks normal in superior, bursal and articular sides. Then its specific arthroscopic findings as “Air bag sign” and repair technique of the pathology is explained. PMID:27200399

  2. Arthroscopic Repair of Superomedial Spring Ligament by Talonavicular Arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2017-02-01

    A spring ligament tear can occur because of failure of the tibialis posterior tendon in adult-acquired flatfoot deformity or as an isolated injury with a normal tibialis posterior tendon. The superomedial spring ligament is the most common site of rupture. Compromise of this ligament is a primary causative factor of peritalar subluxation, and a functioning tibialis posterior tendon cannot prevent or correct a planovalgus foot deformity. Therefore, the spring ligament should be repaired in addition to treatment of tibialis posterior tendon abnormalities. The purpose of this technical note is to describe a minimally invasive approach for repair of the superomedial spring ligament by talonavicular arthroscopy.

  3. Long-term Results After Arthroscopic Repair of Isolated Subscapularis Tears.

    PubMed

    Seppel, Gernot; Plath, Johannes E; Völk, Christopher; Seiberl, Wolfgang; Buchmann, Stefan; Waldt, Simone; Imhoff, Andreas B; Braun, Sepp

    2017-03-01

    Although some reports have presented short- to midterm results after arthroscopic repair of isolated subscapularis (SSC) tendon tears, long-term evaluation is still lacking. Long-term results after arthroscopic repair of isolated SSC tears are comparable with the functional and radiological short- to midterm outcomes described in the literature. Case series, Level of evidence, 4. This study assessed 17 patients (5 females and 12 males; mean age, 45.6 years) with isolated SSC tears (Fox and Romeo classification types 2-4) who underwent all-arthroscopic suture anchor repair. The mean interval from symptom onset to the time of surgery was 5.3 months in 16 patients (94.1%). One patient (5.9%) was symptomatic for a prolonged period (104 months) before surgery. All patients were assessed with a clinical examination preoperatively. SSC function was investigated using specific clinical tests and common scoring systems, including Constant, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH), and Simple Shoulder Test (SST) scores. At follow-up, muscular strength was evaluated using an electronic force-measuring plate. Structural integrity of the repair was assessed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). At a mean follow-up of 98.4 ± 19.9 months, the mean Constant score improved from 47.8 preoperatively to 74.2 postoperatively ( P = .001). Higher Constant ( P = .010) and ASES ( P = .001) scores were significantly associated with a shorter time from symptom onset to surgery. The size of the SSC lesion did not correlate with any clinical score outcome ( P = .476, .449, .985, and .823 for Constant, ASES, DASH, and SST scores, respectively). Three patients (17.6%) had persistent positive clinical test results (belly-press/lift-off). Compared with the uninjured contralateral side, SSC strength was significantly reduced in the belly-press position ( P = .031), although active internal ( P = .085) and external ( P = .093) rotation was not

  4. Shoulder Bankart lesion with posterior instability: A case report of ultrasound detection.

    PubMed

    Arai, Ryuzo; Ito, Taisuke; Okudaira, Shuzo; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2017-08-01

    Minor instability of the shoulder has recently drawn attention as a cause of shoulder pain in athletes. However, it is difficult to correctly diagnose the direction in which the humeral head translates and subluxates, and to clarify the pathology of the instability. We present a case of a 20-year-old male with an unstable shoulder who could not raise his left arm due to pain. Since 6 years prior to the onset of pain, the patient could asymptomatically perform voluntary subluxation, but it was slight and the direction of the subluxation could not be confirmed. On physical examination, the conventional apprehension test and Castagna test were positive, but the jerk test was negative. Imaging studies including arthroscopy showed a Bankart lesion associated with anterior labrum detachment. There was no posterior Bankart lesion. Due to painful anterior shoulder instability, arthroscopic Bankart repair was successfully done; however, 9 months later the patient began experiencing symptomatic subluxation of the shoulder. At this time, the conventional apprehension test and Castagna test were both negative. It was difficult to detect the direction of the subluxation, just like in the preoperative condition. We performed an ultrasonographic examination from the posterior side; this clearly revealed the posterior subluxation mechanism as posterior slide of the humeral head and anterior shift of the glenoid. Based on these findings, we modified the rehabilitation and the subluxation resolved. This case suggests that ultrasound imaging can be an effective practical option for evaluating shoulder instability, especially in cases of slight posterior subluxation.

  5. Isolated arthroscopic meniscal repair: a long-term outcome study (more than 10 years).

    PubMed

    Johnson, M J; Lucas, G L; Dusek, J K; Henning, C E

    1999-01-01

    A single surgeon's consecutive series of 50 arthroscopically repaired meniscal tears in 48 patients was retrospectively reviewed. None of these patients had concomitant ligament damage to the knee. The average follow-up period was 10 years, 9 months. Criteria for clinical success included 1) history of pain of grade 1 or less and absence of locking, catching, or giving way; 2) a physical examination demonstrating no significant effusion and a painless and negative jump sign; and 3) no subsequent surgical procedures on the repaired meniscus. Patient satisfaction was quite high, although clinical confirmation was possible in only 38 knees, indicating a clinical success rate of 76%. Bilateral standing radiographs were obtained on these 38 operated knees and were evaluated using Fairbank's classification. Evaluation of the radiographs revealed that 8% of the operated knees had minimal joint changes, as compared with 3% in the contralateral, nonoperated knee. This study demonstrates that arthroscopic meniscal repair in knees with isolated meniscal tears has the potential for a long-term successful clinical and radiographic outcome.

  6. Arthroscopic-assisted repair of triangular fibrocartilage complex foveal avulsion in distal radioulnar joint injury

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Sung Jong; Jegal, Midum; Park, Min Jong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Disruption of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) foveal insertion can lead to distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability accompanied by ulnar-sided pain, weakness, snapping, and limited forearm rotation. We investigated the clinical outcomes of patients with TFCC foveal tears treated with arthroscopic-assisted repair. Materials and Methods: Twelve patients underwent foveal repair of avulsed TFCC with the assistance of arthroscopy between 2011 and 2013. These patients were followed up for an average of 19 months (range 14–25 months). The avulsed TFCC were reattached to the fovea using a transosseous pull-out suture or a knotless suture anchor. At the final followup, the range of motion, grip strength and DRUJ stability were measured as objective outcomes. Subjective outcomes were assessed using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain, patient rated wrist evaluation (PRWE), Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (DASH score) and return to work. Results: Based on the DRUJ stress test, 5 patients had normal stability and 7 patients showed mild laxity as compared with the contralateral side. Postoperatively, the mean range of pronation supination increased from 141° to 166°, and the mean VAS score for pain decreased from 5.3 to 1.7 significantly. The PRWE and DASH questionnaires also showed significant functional improvement. All patients were able to return to their jobs. However, two patients complained of persistent pain. Conclusions: Arthroscopically assisted repair of TFCC foveal injury can provide significant pain relief, functional improvement and restoration of DRUJ stability. PMID:27293286

  7. Effects of slow and accelerated rehabilitation protocols on range of motion after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Düzgün, İrem; Baltacı, Gül; Turgut, Elif; Atay, O Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of the early initiation of passive and active range of motion exercises following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The study included 40 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Patients were quasi-randomly assigned into accelerated (ACCEL) protocol (n=19) and slow (SLOW) protocol (n=21) groups. Patients in both groups were treated with the same protocol. Active range of motion was begun at the 3rd week in the ACCEL group and the 6th week in the SLOW group. Range of motion was recorded at postoperative weeks 3, 5, 8, 12, and 24. While active range of motion for all measurements improved across weeks, there were no differences between groups, with the exception of active total elevation which was greater at all time point measurements in the ACCEL group (p<0.05). The early initiation of passive and gentle controlled active motion exercise following rotator cuff repairs does not appear to affect range of motion in the first 6 postoperative months.

  8. Arthroscopic Versus Open Rotator Cuff Repair: Which Has a Better Complication and 30-Day Readmission Profile?

    PubMed

    Baker, Dustin K; Perez, Jorge L; Watson, Shawna L; McGwin, Gerald; Brabston, Eugene W; Hudson, Parke W; Ponce, Brent A

    2017-10-01

    To provide a comparative 30-day postoperative analysis of complications and unplanned readmission rates, using the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database, after open or arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (RCR). The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was reviewed for postoperative complications after open or arthroscopic RCR over an 8-year period, from 2007 through 2014. Patients were identified by use of Current Procedural Terminology codes. The open group contained 3,590 cases (21.8%) and the arthroscopic group had 12,882 cases (78.2%), for a total of 16,472 patients undergoing RCR. The risk of complications was compared between the 2 groups, along with patient demographic characteristics, operative time, length of stay, and unplanned readmission within 30 days. We compared dichotomous variables using the Fisher exact test and continuous variables with 1-way analysis of variance. Relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated when appropriate. The open RCR group had a higher prevalence of patients aged 65 years or older and comorbidities such as hypertension, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, smoking, and alcoholism (P < .05). Patients undergoing open RCR had a higher risk of any adverse event when compared with arthroscopic RCR patients (1.48% vs 0.84%; RR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.05-1.30; P = .0010). They were also at higher risk of return to the operating room within 30 days (0.70% vs 0.26%; RR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.09-1.69; P = .0004). Open RCR was associated with a longer average hospital stay (0.48 ± 2.7 days vs 0.23 ± 4.2 days, P = .0007), whereas arthroscopic RCR had a longer average operative time (90 ± 45 minutes vs 79 ± 45 minutes, P < .0001). Although both open and arthroscopic approaches to RCR had low morbidity, arthroscopy was associated with lower risks of any adverse event and return to the operating room during the initial 30-day postoperative

  9. Single-Versus Double-Row Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair in Massive Tears

    PubMed Central

    Wang, EnZhi; Wang, Liang; Gao, Peng; Li, ZhongJi; Zhou, Xiao; Wang, SongGang

    2015-01-01

    Background It is a challenge for orthopaedic surgeons to treat massive rotator cuff tears. The optimal management of massive rotator cuff tears remains controversial. Therefore, the goal of this study was to compare arthroscopic single- versus double-row rotator cuff repair with a larger sample size. Material/Methods Of the subjects with massive rotator cuff tears, 146 were treated using single-row repair, and 102 were treated using double-row repair. Pre- and postoperative functional outcomes and radiographic images were collected. The clinical outcomes were evaluated for a minimum of 2 years. Results No significant differences were shown between the groups in terms of functional outcomes. Regarding the integrity of the tendon, a lower rate of post-treatment retear was observed in patients who underwent double-row repair compared with single-row repair. Conclusions The results suggest that double-row repair is relatively superior in shoulder ROM and the strength of tendon compared with single-row repair. Future studies involving more patients in better-designed randomized controlled trials will be required. PMID:26017641

  10. Does slower rehabilitation after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair lead to long-term stiffness?

    PubMed

    Parsons, Bradford O; Gruson, Konrad I; Chen, Darwin D; Harrison, Alicia K; Gladstone, James; Flatow, Evan L

    2010-10-01

    Conservative rehabilitation after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair does not result in long-term stiffness and improves rates of tendon healing. We retrospectively evaluated 43 patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears who underwent a standardized, conservative protocol of full-time sling immobilization without formal therapy for 6 weeks after arthroscopic repair. At 6 to 8 weeks of follow-up, we categorized patients as "stiff" if they demonstrated forward elevation of less than 100° and external rotation of less than 30° passively; all others were designated "nonstiff." Active range of motion in forward elevation, external rotation, and internal rotation was assessed at 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year. American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) and Constant-Murley scores were assessed at 1 year. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was obtained in all patients to assess tendon healing. Ten patients (23%) were considered stiff after rotator cuff surgery. At 1 year, there was no difference in mean forward elevation (166° vs 161°, P = .2), external rotation (62° vs. 58.4°, P = .5), or internal rotation (T7.4 vs T8.2, P = .07) between the stiff and nonstiff groups, respectively. There were no differences in final ASES (83 vs 79, P = .57) and Constant-Murley scores (77 vs. 74, P = .5). Repeat MRI suggested a trend toward a lower retear rate among the stiff patients (70% intact in stiff group vs 36% in nonstiff group, P = .079). Two clinically significant cuff retears occurred in the nonstiff cohort. Concerns for recalcitrant stiffness have led some to favor early postoperative therapy. We found that early restriction of motion did not lead to long-term stiffness after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, even in patients who were clinically stiff in the early postoperative period. Sling immobilization for 6 weeks after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair does not result in increased long-term stiffness and may improve the rate of tendon healing. Copyright

  11. A prospective, randomized evaluation of acellular human dermal matrix augmentation for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Barber, F Alan; Burns, Joseph P; Deutsch, Allen; Labbé, Marc R; Litchfield, Robert B

    2012-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate the safety and effectiveness of arthroscopic acellular human dermal matrix augmentation of large rotator cuff tear repairs. A prospective, institutional review board-approved, multicenter series of patients undergoing arthroscopic repair of 2-tendon rotator cuff tears measuring greater than 3 cm were randomized by sealed envelopes opened at the time of surgery to arthroscopic single-row rotator cuff repair with GraftJacket acellular human dermal matrix (Wright Medical Technology, Arlington, TN) augmentation (group 1) or without augmentation (group 2). Preoperative and postoperative functional outcome assessments were obtained by use of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), Constant, and University of California, Los Angeles scales. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of these repairs was obtained at a mean of 14.5 months (range, 12 to 24 months). Adverse events were recorded. There were 22 patients in group 1 and 20 in group 2 with a mean age of 56 years. The mean follow-up was 24 months (range, 12 to 38 months). The ASES score improved from 48.5 to 98.9 in group 1 and from 46.0 to 94.8 in group 2. The scores in group 1 were statistically better than those in group 2 (P = .035). The Constant score improved from 41.0 to 91.9 in group 1 and from 45.8 to 85.3 in group 2. The scores in group 1 were statistically better than those in group 2 (P = .008). The University of California, Los Angeles score improved from 13.3 to 28.2 in group 1 and from 15.9 to 28.3 in group 2 (P = .43). Gadolinium-enhanced MRI scans showed intact cuffs in 85% of repairs in group 1 and 40% in group 2 (P < .01). No adverse events were attributed to the presence of the matrix grafts. Acellular human dermal matrix augmentation of large (>3 cm) cuff tears involving 2 tendons showed better ASES and Constant scores and more frequent intact cuffs as determined by gadolinium-enhanced MRI. Intact repairs were found in 85% of the augmented

  12. [Clinical-ultrasonographic assessment in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair after 1-year follow-up].

    PubMed

    Cruz López, Francisco; Gómez Espíndola, Juan Carlos; Almazán Díaz, Arturo; Pineda Villaseñor, Carlos; Briseño Estrada, César Arcadio; Pérez Jiménez, Francisco; Ibarra Ponce de León, José Clemente

    2009-01-01

    Arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff have shown have shown encouraging clinical results. However, few authors have assessed integrity of repair with ultrasound. The presence of re-rupture by ultrasonography in a rotator cuff repair may not relate to the patient's functional status. We used ultrasonography to assess the prevalence of re-rupture in rotator cuff repairs and its clinical relevance with minimum 1 year postoperatively. Evidence level IV (Case series). We evaluated 27 shoulders that underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Clinical evaluation was performed using UCLA functional scale, visual analogue scale (UCLA, VAS). Post-operative ultrasound was performed at least 1 year postoperatively. Statistical analysis was done with the SPSS 11.0 software. We examined 27 shoulders, mean age 56.4 (41-78), mean postoperative follow-up 19.6 (12 m-88 m). Clinical assessment with UCLA functional scale results were: good-excellent (77.4%); fair (22.2%). VAS results showed that 44.4% reported VAS of 0; in the range of 1-3 VAS was 55.5% of the patients. Ultrasound evaluation showed no injury in 37%; partial lesion 51.9%, and a total lesion 11.1%. Thirty-three % of the patients with VAS of 0 showed no injury when evaluated by ultrasonography, injury by ultrasound 33.3% with VAS (1-3) 22.2%. UCLA (good-excellent) without injury by ultrasound 33.3% with a 44.4% degree of injury, UCLA (Fair) without injury 3.7%, with some degree of lesion 18.5%. Results no statistically significant difference (p > 0.05). In our series, we find that integrity of rotator cuff postoperative ultrasound, it has no effect on the functional status of patients with postoperative follow-up of at least 1 year, with UCLA and VAS.

  13. Validation of the western ontario rotator cuff index in patients with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: A study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is described as being a successful procedure. These results are often derived from clinical general shoulder examinations, which are then classified as 'excellent', 'good', 'fair' or 'poor'. However, the cut-off points for these classifications vary and sometimes modified scores are used. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is performed to improve quality of life. Therefore, disease specific health-related quality of life patient-administered questionnaires are needed. The WORC is a quality of life questionnaire designed for patients with disorders of the rotator cuff. The score is validated for rotator cuff disease, but not for rotator cuff repair specifically. The aim of this study is to investigate reliability, validity and responsiveness of WORC in patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Methods/Design An approved translation of the WORC into Dutch is used. In this prospective study three groups of patients are used: 1. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair; 2. Disorders of the rotator cuff without rupture; 3. Shoulder instability. The WORC, SF-36 and the Constant Score are obtained twice before therapy is started to measure reliability and validity. Responsiveness is tested by obtaining the same tests after therapy. PMID:21453470

  14. Evaluation of Factors Affecting Acute Postoperative Pain Levels After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Cuff, Derek J; O'Brien, Kathleen C; Pupello, Derek R; Santoni, Brandon G

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate multiple preoperative and operative factors that may be predictive of and correlate with acute postoperative pain levels after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. One hundred eighty-one patients underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff surgery along with subacromial decompression and met the inclusion criteria for this study. Postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) scores were obtained on postoperative days 1, 7, and 90. Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to correlate postoperative VAS scores with multiple independent factors, including preoperative subjective pain tolerance, preoperative VAS score, preoperative narcotic use, sex, smoking status, number of suture anchors used, tear size, single- or double-row repair, and patient age. Preoperative subjective pain tolerance, notably those patients rating themselves as having an extremely high pain tolerance, was the most significant predictor of high VAS pain scores on both postoperative day 1 (P = .0001) and postoperative day 7 (P < .0001). Preoperative narcotic use was also significantly predictive (P = .010) of high pain scores on postoperative day 1 and day 7 (P = .019), along with nonsmokers (P = .008) and younger patients (P = .006) being predictive on day 7. There were no patient factors that were predictive of VAS scores 3 months postoperatively (P = .567). Preoperative subjective pain tolerance, notably those patients rating themselves as having an extremely high pain tolerance, was the strongest factor predicting high acute pain levels after arthroscopic rotator cuff surgery. Preoperative narcotic use, smokers, and younger patients were also predictive of higher pain levels during the first postoperative week. Level IV, prognostic case series. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Functional evaluation of arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff injuries in patients with pseudoparalysis☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Neto, Douglas Lobato Lopes; Muchiuti Junior, Melvis; Checchia, Sergio Luiz

    2014-01-01

    Objective to evaluate the functional result from arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff injuries in patients with pseudoparalysis, defined as incapacity to actively raise the arm above 90°, while complete passive elevation was possible. Methods we reevaluated 38 patients with a mean follow-up of 51 months (minimum of 24). We analyzed the pseudoparalysis reversion rate and the functional result obtained. Results according to the assessment criteria of the University of California in Los Angeles (UCLA), 31 (82%) patients had good and excellent results, two (5%) had fair results and five (13%) had poor results. The mean active elevation went from 39° before the operation to 139° after the operation (p < 0.05); the mean active lateral rotation went from 30° to 48° (p < 0.05) and the mean active medial rotation went from level L3 to T12 (p < 0.05). Conclusion arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff injuries produced good and excellent results in 82% of the cases and a statistically significant improvement of active range of motion, with reversion of the pseudoparalysis in 97.4% of the cases. It is therefore a good treatment option. PMID:26229796

  16. Labrum repair combined with arthroscopic reduction of capsular volume in shoulder instability

    PubMed Central

    Belangero, William Dias

    2006-01-01

    We performed arthroscopic treatment of traumatic anterior and anteroinferior shoulder instability combining three procedures— labrum repair, reduction of capsular volume and suture of the rotator cuff interval—with the aim of analysing the results with regard to stability and function. Between January 1999 and December 2003, 27 patients underwent arthroscopic treatment for labrum repair with metal anchors, reduction of capsular volume through thermal capsulorrhaphy and suture of rotator cuff interval. These patients were evaluated in the pre- and postoperative period using the UCLA and Rowe scales and in the postoperative period using the ASES scale. During a mean follow-up period of 32.4 months (range 22–74 months) all shoulders remained stable. Using the UCLA scale, there was improvement from the preoperative period, with a mean score of 24.7, to the postoperative period, with a mean of 32.81. Improvement was also shown by the Rowe scale, with a mean score of 39.81 in the preoperative period and 90.74 in the postoperative period. On the ASES scale the mean score was 92.22. All shoulders remained stable and there was marked functional improvement in the patients who were treated. These results are comparable to those obtained with open surgery, observing similar patient selection criteria. PMID:16715457

  17. Effect of a sleep aid in analgesia after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chul-Hyun; Lee, Si-Wook; Lee, Young-Kuk; Shin, Hong-Kwan; Hwang, Ilseon

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects and safety of a sleep aid for postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Seventy-eight patients were prospectively assigned to either the zolpidem group (multimodal analgesia+zolpidem; 39 patients) or the control group (multimodal analgesia; 39 patients). Self-rated pain levels were assessed twice a day using a visual analog scale (VAS). The need for additional rescue analgesic, duration of functional recovery, and adverse effects were assessed for the first 5 days after surgery. The mean number of times that additional rescue analgesic was required during 5 days after surgery was 2.1±2.0 in the zolpidem group and 3.3±2.8 in the control group, a significant difference. There were no significant differences between the two groups in mean VAS pain scores during the first 5 days after surgery, although the zolpidem group had lower VAS pain scores than the control group. Additionally, there were no significant differences in duration of functional recovery and adverse effects between the two groups. The use of zolpidem for analgesia after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair provided a significant reduction in the need for rescue analgesic without increasing adverse effects. Nevertheless, mean VAS pain scores during the first 5 days after surgery did not differ between the zolpidem group and the control group.

  18. Rehabilitation following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a review of current literature.

    PubMed

    Ross, David; Maerz, Tristan; Lynch, Jamie; Norris, Sarah; Baker, Kevin; Anderson, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Physical rehabilitation following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has conventionally involved a 4- to 6-week period of immobilization; there are two schools of thought regarding activity level during this period. Some authors encourage early, more aggressive rehabilitation along with the use of a continuous passive motion device; others propose later, more conservative rehabilitation. Although some studies report trends in improved early range of motion, pain relief, and outcomes scores with aggressive rehabilitation following rotator cuff repair, no definitive consensus exists supporting a clinical difference resulting from rehabilitation timing in the early stages of healing. Rehabilitation timing does not affect outcomes after 6 to 12 months postoperatively. Given the lack of information regarding which patient groups benefit from aggressive rehabilitation, individualized patient care is warranted.

  19. Functional outcomes of traumatic and non-traumatic rotator cuff tears after arthroscopic repair

    PubMed Central

    Abechain, José Jorge Kitagaki; Godinho, Glaydson Gomes; Matsunaga, Fabio Teruo; Netto, Nicola Archetti; Daou, Julia Pozzetti; Tamaoki, Marcel Jun Sugawara

    2017-01-01

    AIM To compare the functional outcomes of traumatic and non-traumatic rotator cuff tears after arthroscopic repair. METHODS Eighty-seven patients with rotator cuff tears following arthroscopic treatment were divided into traumatic and non-traumatic tear groups. Postoperative muscle strength and outcomes using the modified University of California, Los Angeles score were evaluated. Sex, age, affected limb and dominant limb were correlated between groups. Muscle strength of the repaired and unaffected shoulders was compared. Rotator cuff injury size was measured. RESULTS Of the 87 patients who underwent rotator cuff repairs, 35 had traumatic tears and 52 had non-traumatic tears. In patients with non-traumatic tears, the average age was 59 years, 74.5% were female, 96.1% were right-hand dominant and 92.3% had their dominant shoulder affected. Patients with traumatic tears were 59.5 years old on average, 51.4% were female, 91.4% were right-hand dominant and 88.5% had their dominant shoulder affected. No difference existed in the mean modified University of California, Los Angeles score between patients with traumatic tears (33.7) compared with those with non-traumatic tears (32.8). No strength differences were observed between groups: The strength difference between the non-affected and affected sides was 1.21 kg in the non-traumatic group and 1.39 kg in the traumatic group (P = 0.576), while the strength ratio between the non-affected/affected sides was 0.805 in the non-traumatic group and 0.729 in the traumatic group (P = 0.224). CONCLUSION The functional results of traumatic rotator cuff repairs are similar to non-traumatic tears. Both outcomes are satisfactory. PMID:28875129

  20. The Relationship Between Intraoperative Tear Dimensions and Postoperative Pain in 1624 Consecutive Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repairs.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Daniel Y T; Walton, Judie R; Lam, Patrick; Murrell, George A C

    2017-03-01

    Rotator cuff repair often results in significant pain postoperatively, the cause of which is undetermined. Purpose/Hypothesis: The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between rotator cuff tear area and postoperative pain in patients who had undergone arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. We hypothesized that larger tears would be more painful because of elevated repair tension at 1 week postoperatively but that smaller tears would be more painful because of a greater healing response, especially from 6 weeks postoperatively. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 1624 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were included in this study. Exclusion criteria were moderate to severe osteoarthritis, isolated subscapularis repair, calcific tendinitis, synthetic patch repair, revision surgery, and retears on ultrasound at 6 months after surgery. Rotator cuff tears were subdivided into groups based on the tear size and retear rate found for each group. A modified L'Insalata questionnaire was given before surgery and at 1 week, 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after surgery. Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficient tests were performed between rotator cuff tear areas and pain scores. Intraoperative rotator cuff tear areas did not correlate with pain scores preoperatively or at 1 week after surgery. A smaller tear area was associated with more frequent and severe pain with overhead activities, at rest, and during sleep as well as a poorer perceived overall shoulder condition at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after repair ( r = 0.11-0.23, P < .0001). Patients who were younger, had partial-thickness tears, and had occupational injuries experienced more pain postoperatively ( r = 0.10-0.28, P < .0001). Larger tears did not have more pain at 1 week after surgery. The retear rate was 7% in tears <2 cm(2) but reached 44% in tears >8 cm(2). There were fewer retears with smaller tears, but they were more painful than large tears postoperatively

  1. [Bony Bankart lesions].

    PubMed

    Spiegl, U J; Braun, S; Euler, S A; Warth, R J; Millett, P J

    2014-12-01

    Fractures of the anteroinferior glenoid rim, termed bony Bankart lesions, have been reported to occur in up to 22% of first time anterior shoulder dislocations. The primary goal of treatment is to create a stable glenohumeral joint and a good shoulder function. Options for therapeutic intervention are largely dependent on the chronicity of the lesion, the activity level of the patient and postreduction fracture characteristics, such as the size, location and number of fracture fragments. Non-operative treatment can be successful for small, acute fractures, which are anatomically reduced after shoulder reduction. However, in patients with a high risk profile for recurrent instability initial Bankart repair is recommended. Additionally, bony fixation is recommended for acute fractures that involve more than 15-20% of the inferior glenoid diameter. On the other hand chronic fractures are generally managed on a case-by-case basis depending on the amount of fragment resorption and bony erosion of the anterior glenoid with high recurrence rates under conservative therapy. When significant bone loss of the anterior glenoid is present, anatomical (e.g. iliac crest bone graft and osteoarticular allograft) or non-anatomical (e.g. Latarjet and Bristow) reconstruction of the anterior glenoid is often indicated.

  2. Serial MRI evaluation following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in double-row technique.

    PubMed

    Stahnke, Katharina; Nikulka, Constanze; Diederichs, Gerd; Haneveld, Hendrik; Scheibel, Markus; Gerhardt, Christian

    2016-05-01

    So far, recurrent rotator cuff defects are described to occur in the early postoperative period after arthroscopic repair. The aim of this study was to evaluate the musculotendinous structure of the supraspinatus, as well as bone marrow edema or osteolysis after arthroscopic double-row repair. Therefore, magnetic resonance (MR) images were performed at defined intervals up to 2 years postoperatively. Case series; Level of evidence, 3. MR imaging was performed within 7 days, 3, 6, 12, 26, 52 and 108 weeks after surgery. All patients were operated using an arthroscopic modified suture bridge technique. Tendon integrity, tendon retraction ["foot-print-coverage" (FPC)], muscular atrophy and fatty infiltration (signal intensity analysis) were measured at all time points. Furthermore, postoperative bone marrow edema and signs of osteolysis were assessed. MR images of 13 non-consecutive patients (6f/7m, ∅ age 61.05 ± 7.7 years) could be evaluated at all time points until ∅ 108 weeks postoperatively. 5/6 patients with recurrent defect at final follow-up displayed a time of failure between 12 and 24 months after surgery. Predominant mode of failure was medial cuff failures in 4/6 cases. The initial FPC increased significantly up to 2 years follow-up (p = 0.004). Evaluations of muscular atrophy or fatty infiltration were not significant different comparing the results of all time points (p > 0.05). Postoperative bone marrow edema disappeared completely at 6 months after surgery, whereas signs of osteolysis appeared at 3 months follow-up and increased to final follow-up. Recurrent defects after arthroscopic reconstruction of supraspinatus tears in modified suture bridge technique seem to occur between 12 and 24 months after surgery. Serial MRI evaluation shows good muscle structure at all time points. Postoperative bone marrow edema disappears completely several months after surgery. Signs of osteolysis seem to appear caused by bio-absorbable anchor

  3. Ultrasonographic evaluation of the Bankart lesion.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Katsumasa

    2004-01-01

    The Bankart lesion is an essential finding of traumatic anterior shoulder instability. The purpose of this study was to clarify the reliability of diagnosis by ultrasonography (US) of the Bankart lesion when using an axillary approach. Six cadaveric shoulders were examined by US from the axilla. The shoulders were then dissected along the plane of the ultrasonic beam. The labrum at the 4-o'clock position of all 6 cadavers was present along the ultrasonic plane; there were no obstacles from the skin to the glenoid rim, and all cases had a normal labrum at the 4-o'clock position. US images of the normal labrum showed that the labrum was continuously connected to the glenoid rim with no borderline (low-echo line) between them. Preoperative US from the axilla was performed in 75 patients who underwent arthroscopic surgery. Anteroinferior labra were classified preoperatively from the US images as normal, detached (low-echo line between glenoid rim and labrum), or displaced (labrum displaced from glenoid rim), with a diagnosis of a Bankart lesion being made for the latter two types. US findings were correlated with arthroscopic observations. This revealed that for the detection of Bankart lesions, US had a sensitivity of 88.6%, a specificity of 77.4%, an accuracy of 84.0%, a positive predictive value of 84.8%, and a negative predictive value of 82.8%. These results demonstrate that US with an axillary approach is useful in the diagnosis of Bankart lesions of the shoulder.

  4. Arthroscopic suture bridge rotator cuff repair: functional outcome, repair integrity, and preoperative factors related to postoperative outcome.

    PubMed

    Rimmke, Nathan; Maerz, Tristan; Cooper, Ross; Yadavalli, Sailaja; Anderson, Kyle

    2016-01-01

    To assess the retear rate, retear size and location, the clinical impact of a retear, and preoperative patient factors related to postoperative outcome after arthroscopic suture bridge rotator cuff repair. Fifty six patients with an isolated, full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear who underwent arthroscopic suture bridge rotator cuff repair were retrospectively identified. Patients were evaluated and rotator cuff integrity was assessed using ultrasonography. Visual analog score (VAS), the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeon (ASES) score, shoulder range of motion and strength were used for clinical evaluation. Retears were assessed for size and location on ultrasonography. Forty two patients (75%) aged a mean 59.7 ± 8.6 years (range 41-79 years) were available for follow-up at a mean 13.5 months. Postoperative evaluation indicated significant improvements in ASES score (49.76 ± 18.2 to 86.57 ± 13.4, P < 0.001), VAS pain score (4.69 ± 2.17 to 0.63 ± 1.29, P < 0.001), forward elevation range of motion (144.1° ± 29.9 to 159.69° ± 13.9, P = 0.002), and internal rotation ROM (44.13° ± 12.0 to 52.09° ± 12.0, P = 0.003). The retear rate was 14.28% (6/42). Patients with retears were not older (P = 0.526) but had a larger preoperative tear size (3.25 cm ± 0.5 vs. 2.05 cm ± 0.48, P < 0.001). Preoperative tear size was significantly associated with a postoperative retear (P < 0.001). The duration of preoperative symptoms was significantly associated with pain (P = 0.029), pain improvement (P = 0.013), internal rotation ROM (P = 0.002), and internal rotation strength (P = 0.004). Arthroscopic suture bridge repair provides good clinical results with a low retear rate. The duration of preoperative symptoms was associated with postoperative outcome, indicating that delaying surgery may result in inferior outcomes. IV, Case Series.

  5. What Is the Critical Value of Glenoid Bone Loss at Which Soft Tissue Bankart Repair Does Not Restore Glenohumeral Translation, Restricts Range of Motion, and Leads to Abnormal Humeral Head Position?

    PubMed

    Shin, Sang-Jin; Koh, Yong Won; Bui, Christopher; Jeong, Woong Kyo; Akeda, Masaki; Cho, Nam Su; McGarry, Michelle H; Lee, Thay Q

    2016-11-01

    A general consensus has been formed that glenoid bone loss greater than 20% to 25% is the critical amount at which bony augmentation procedures are needed; however, recent clinical results suggest that the critical levels must be reconsidered to lower values. This study aimed to find the critical value of anterior glenoid bone loss when a soft tissue repair is not adequate to restore anterior-inferior glenohumeral translation, rotational range of motion, or humeral head position using a biomechanical anterior shoulder instability model. Controlled laboratory study. Eight cadaveric shoulders were tested with a customized shoulder testing system. Range of motion, translation, and humeral head position were measured at 60° of glenohumeral abduction in the scapular plane under a total of 40-N rotator cuff muscle loading in the following 11 conditions: intact; soft tissue Bankart lesion and repair; Bankart lesion with 10%, 15%, 20%, and 25% glenoid bone defects based on the largest anteroposterior width of the glenoid; and soft tissue Bankart repair for each respective glenoid defect. Serial osteotomies for each percentage of bone loss were made parallel to the long axis of the glenoid. There was significantly decreased external rotation (121.2° ± 2.8° to 113.5° ± 3.3°; P = .004), increased anteroinferior translation with an externally applied load (3.0 ± 1.2 mm to 7.5 ± 1.1 mm at 20 N; P = .008), and increased posterior (0.2 ± 0.6 mm to 2.7 ± 0.8 mm; P = .049) and inferior shift (2.9 ± 0.7 mm to 6.6 ± 1.1 mm; P = .018) of the humeral head apex in the position of maximum external rotation after soft tissue Bankart repair of a 15% glenoid defect compared with the repair of a Bankart lesion without a glenoid defect, respectively. Glenoid defects of 15% or more of the largest anteroposterior glenoid width should be considered the critical bone loss amount at which soft tissue repair cannot restore glenohumeral translation, restricts rotational range of motion

  6. PROSPECTIVE AND COMPARATIVE STUDY ON FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES AFTER OPEN AND ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR OF ROTATOR CUFF TEARS

    PubMed Central

    de Castro Veado, Marco Antônio; Castilho, Rodrigo Simões; Maia, Philipe Eduardo Carvalho; Rodrigues, Alessandro Ulhôa

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To prospectively assess the surgical results from patients undergoing repairs to rotator cuff injuries via open and arthroscopic procedures, with regard to functional and clinical features, and by means of ultrasound examinations, and to compare occurrences of renewed tearing. Methods: Sixty patients underwent operations performed by the same surgeon (29 via open surgery and 31 via arthroscopy), to repair complete rotator cuff tears. The procedures were performed at Hospital Governor Israel Pinheiro (HGIP) and Mater Dei Hospital in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, between August 2007 and February 2009. The patients were assessed functionally by means of the UCLA score before and after the operation, and magnetic resonance imaging was done before the operation. All the patients were reassessed at least 12 months after the operation, and an ultrasound examination was also performed at this time. Results: Out of the 29 patients who underwent open surgery, 27 (93.1%) presented good or excellent results, with a mean UCLA score of 32 after the operation. Their mean follow-up was 14 months. Three patients presented renewed tearing on ultrasound, of whom one remained asymptomatic. Out of the 31 patients who underwent arthroscopic procedures, 29 (93.5%) presented good or excellent results, with a mean UCLA score of 33 after the operation. Their mean follow-up was 19 months. Two patients presented renewed tearing, of whom one remained asymptomatic and one evolved with loosening of an anchor, with an unsatisfactory result. Conclusion: The repairs on rotator cuff injuries presented good results by means of both open surgery and arthroscopy, with similar functional results in the two groups and similar rates of renewed tearing. PMID:27027052

  7. Response shift of the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff index in patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Hollman, Freek; Wessel, Ronald N; Wolterbeek, Nienke

    2016-12-01

    This study determined the response shift in patients undergoing rotator cuff repair using the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff index (WORC), a disease-specific quality of life questionnaire. We hypothesized there would be a response shift with a positive recalibration (overestimated their preoperative disability) on the WORC and increases over time. The study prospectively included 36 patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. At baseline, 3 months (T1), and 1 year (T2) after surgery the WORC, EuroQol (EQ)-5D-3L, and the patient's level of satisfaction after surgery were scored. To evaluate the response shift, patients also completed the WORC at 3 months (Pre-T1) and 1 year (Pre-T2) as how they perceived themselves to have been before surgery. The result on Pre-T1 and Pre-T2 results revealed that patients retrospectively rated their overall WORC score comparable with the baseline WORC score (Pre-T0; T0 = 40.5 ± 18.4, Pre-T1 = 45.0 ± 22.7, Pre-T2 = 34.3 ± 21.3). No response shift was observed on all domains except a negative recalibrated response shift for emotional disability on T1 (P = .04). No significant group-level response shift was observed using the WORC, except for the subdomain emotional disability at 3 months after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. With the absence of any shift in patient's perception on the self-administered quality of life-related WORC questionnaire, this study suggests one could retrospectively reliably conduct group-level preoperative baseline information on quality of life up to 1 year after surgery. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Arthroscopic transtendinous repair of articular-sided pasta (partial articular supraspinatus tendon avulsion) injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Lu, Liangyu; Lu, Zhe; Xiao, Lei; Kang, Yifan; Wang, Zimin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate clinical efficacy of arthroscopic transtendinous repair of partial articular-sided PASTA (partial articular supraspinatus tendon avulsion) injury. Methods: From February 2011 to July 2014, 12 cases of PASTA, aged 29 to 72 years with an average of 52.9 ± 13.3 years, were treated arthoscopically. To repair PASTA, articular-sided rotator cuff tear was explored, injury site was punctured and labeled with PDS absorbable monofilament suture (Ethicon, Somerville, NJ, USA) suture, subacromial bursa was cleaned up with acromioplasty, and integrity of bursa-side rotator cuff was assessed. Then with arthroscope in glenohumeral joint, footprint of the bursa-side supraspinatus tendon was preserved, rivets were introduced into the joint through supraspinatus tendon, joint-side partial tear was sutured, and anatomical reconstruction of the rotator cuff footprint was established. The patients were followed up post-operatively for 12-36 months, average 22 ± 7.3 months. The clinical outcomes were emulated with ASES (American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons) Shoulder Score system and UCLA (University of California at Los Angeles) Shoulder rating scale. Results: The post-operative ASES score was 89.7 ± 5.6, higher than the pre-operative one 49.8 ± 9.8 (t = 12.25, P <0.0001). While UCLA scale increased from the pre-operative 17.3, ± 3.3 to the post-operative 30.4 ± 3.2 points (t = 9.87, P <0.0001), with a satisfaction rate of 11/12 (91.7%). Conclusion: Trans-tendon repair is ideal for PASTA with advantage of maximal preservation of the normal rotator cuff tissue, anatomical reconstruction of the rotator cuff footprint and stable fixation of tendon-bone interface. PMID:25784979

  9. REHABILITATION AFTER ARTHROSCOPIC ROTATOR CUFF REPAIR: CURRENT CONCEPTS REVIEW AND EVIDENCE-BASED GUIDELINES

    PubMed Central

    Westgard, Paul; Chandler, Zachary; Gaskill, Trevor R.; Kokmeyer, Dirk; Millett, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To provide an overview of the characteristics and timing of rotator cuff healing and provide an update on treatments used in rehabilitation of rotator cuff repairs. The authors' protocol of choice, used within a large sports medicine rehabilitation center, is presented and the rationale behind its implementation is discussed. Background: If initial nonsurgical treatment of a rotator cuff tear fails, surgical repair is often the next line of treatment. It is evident that a successful outcome after surgical rotator cuff repair is as much dependent on surgical technique as it is on rehabilitation. To this end, rehabilitation protocols have proven challenging to both the orthopaedic surgeon and the involved physical therapist. Instead of being based on scientific rationale, traditionally most rehabilitation protocols are solely based on clinical experience and expert opinion. Methods: A review of currently available literature on rehabilitation after arthroscopic rotator cuff tear repair on PUBMED / MEDLINE and EMBASE databases was performed to illustrate the available evidence behind various postoperative treatment modalities. Results: There is little high-level scientific evidence available to support or contest current postoperative rotator cuff rehabilitation protocols. Most existing protocols are based on clinical experience with modest incorporation of scientific data. Conclusion: Little scientific evidence is available to guide the timing of postsurgical rotator cuff rehabilitation. To this end, expert opinion and clinical experience remains a large facet of rehabilitation protocols. This review describes a rotator cuff rehabilitation protocol that incorporates currently available scientific literature guiding rehabilitation. PMID:22530194

  10. Arthroscopic tenodesis versus tenotomy of the long head of biceps tendon in simultaneous rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Meraner, Dominik; Sternberg, Christoph; Vega, Jordi; Hahne, Julia; Kleine, Michael; Leuzinger, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Full thickness rotator cuff tears are a common cause of shoulder pain and disability. While the role of the rotator cuff seems to be well known, the clinical significance of the biceps tendon for shoulder function has still been a subject of controversy. The aim of this study was to evaluate differences between tenodesis or tenotomy in simultaneous rotator cuff repair. For this retrospective study 53 consecutive patients (25f/28m, Ø age 58 years) undergoing arthroscopic double row rotator cuff reconstruction and suture bridge repair were included. The LHB was treated with tenodesis (n = 24) or tenotomy (n = 29). Clinical examination was carried out for all patients after an average of 34 months (range 27–38) following arthroscopic surgery. The Constant score, level of pain, range of motion in flexion and abduction, and isometric force for the operated and healthy shoulder in flexion and abduction were recorded. Patients in the tenodesis and tenotomy group reached similar good result regarding the Constant score (86.6 ± 11.9 vs. 81.3 ± 12.2; P = 0.120), pain (median 0, range 0–8 vs. Median 0, range 0–10; P = 0.421), and range of motion (flexion: median 180°, range 90°–180° vs. median 180°, range 90°–180°; P = 0.833; abduction: median 180°, range 90°–180° vs. median 180°, range 120°–180°; P = 0.472). Postoperative popeye sign was found only in one patient (1.9 %). At the time of postoperative follow-up, no patient reported cramping of the biceps. Isometric forces in abduction of the tenotomy group (mean 4.7 ± 2.9 kg; maximum 5.5 ± 2.8 kg) was significant lower compared to the tenodesis group (mean 6.6 ± 3.0 kg, P = 0.019; maximum 7.7 ± 2.9 kg, P = 0.007) and compared to healthy shoulders (mean 6.1 ± 3.0 kg P = 0.004; maximum 7.4 ± 3.1 kg, P = 0.001), all other measurements were similar. According to our results arthroscopic biceps tenodesis and tenotomy are valuable procedures in simultaneous rotator cuff repair regarding function

  11. Reversibility of Supraspinatus Muscle Atrophy in Tendon-Bone Healing After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong Bok; Ryu, Ho Young; Hong, Jin Ho; Ko, Young Hoo; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2016-04-01

    To date, there are few reports of the definite reversibility of rotator cuff muscle atrophy after repair. To evaluate the reversibility of rotator cuff muscle atrophy after successful arthroscopic repair. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Included in this study were 47 patients (mean age, 61.2 ± 7.3 years; range, 49-73 years) who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) preoperatively and at 6-month and last follow-up. Patients who had confirmed rotator cuff healing (grades 1-3 according to the Sugaya classification) on both series of postoperative MRI were enrolled in the study. The mean time from the onset of symptoms to surgery was 24.7 ± 25.6 months (range, 3-120 months). The minimum follow-up was 2 years, and the mean follow-up duration was 41.8 ± 14.4 months. Serial changes in the supraspinatus muscle area on the most matching MRI scans (sagittal-oblique view) were evaluated. The area was measured by 2 independent observers. Both independent observers reported no significant difference in the area of the supraspinatus muscle between the preoperative time point and 6-month follow-up (observer 1: P = .135; observer 2: P = .189). However, there was a significant difference between the 6-month and last follow-up (mean, 41.8 months; observers 1 and 2: P < .001). The serial changes in the area preoperatively and at 6-month and last follow-up were 419.41 ± 122.97 mm(2), 431.76 ± 104.27 mm(2), and 466.73 ± 121.42 mm(2), respectively (observer 1), and 421.01 ± 116.61 mm(2), 432.56 ± 100.78 mm(2), and 469.84 ± 113.80 mm(2), respectively (observer 2). The intraclass correlation coefficient between the 2 observers was 0.988. At final follow-up, the area increase on the medial and lateral aspects of the sagittal-oblique view compared with preoperatively was 13.9% (P < .001) and 11.3% (P < .001), respectively. Fatty infiltration did not change from preoperatively to 6-month follow-up (P > .999) or from 6-month to

  12. Are the good functional results from arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff injuries maintained over the long term?☆

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Checchia, Sérgio Luiz; Yonamine, Alexandre Maris

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether the good and excellent functional results from arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff tears are maintained over the long term. Methods From the sample of the study conducted by our group in 2006, in which we evaluated the functional results from arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff tears, 35 patients were reassessed, 8 years after the first evaluation. The inclusion criteria were that these patients with massive rotator cuff tears operated by means of an arthroscopic technique, who participated in the previous study and achieved good or excellent outcomes according to the UCLA criteria. Patients whose results were not good or excellent in the first evaluation according to the UCLA criteria were excluded. Results Among the 35 patients reassessed, 91% of them continued to present good and excellent results (40% excellent and 51% good), while 3% presented fair results and 6% poor results. The time interval between the first and second evaluations was 8 years and the minimum length of follow-up since the immediate postoperative period was 9 years (range: 9–17 years), with an average of 11.4 years. Conclusion The good and excellent results from arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff tears were mostly maintained (91%), with the same level of function and satisfaction, even though 8 years had passed since the first assessment, with a follow-up period averaging 11.4 years. PMID:26962491

  13. Rare coexistence of gouty and septic arthritis after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ichiseki, Toru; Ueda, Shusuke; Matsumoto, Tadami

    2015-01-01

    Coexistence of septic arthritis and gouty arthritis is rare. In particular, no reports have described the development of both gouty and septic arthritis after arthroscopic shoulder surgery. The patient was an 83-year-old man who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. He had a history of diabetes mellitus (HbA1c: 7.4%), but not of gout, and the GFR was decreased (GFR=46). During the postoperative course fever suddenly developed and joint fluid retention was found. Uric acid crystals were detected when the joint fluid was aspirated, after which when the culture results became available sepsis due to methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) was diagnosed. On the 2(nd) day after fever onset, lavage and debridement were performed under arthroscopy, with the subsequent course uneventful with no recurrence of the infection or gouty arthritis and no joint destruction. When uric acid crystals are found in aspirated joint fluid, gouty arthritis tends to be diagnosed, but like in the present case if infection also supervenes, joint destruction and a poor general state may result if appropriate intervention is not initiated swiftly. Accordingly, even if uric acid crystals are found, the possibility of coexistence of septic arthritis and gouty arthritis should be kept in mind.

  14. The antero-inferior (transmuscular) approach for arthroscopic repair of the Bankart lesion: an anatomic and clinical study.

    PubMed

    Resch, H; Wykypiel, H F; Maurer, H; Wambacher, M

    1996-06-01

    In order to find a direct approach to the antero-inferior third of the glenoid rim, an anatomic study was performed on a total of 89 shoulders (48 cadavers). To obtain defined reference points for the anterior inferior third of the glenoid cavity, it was compared with the hour markings on a clock face. The 4:30 position on the right shoulder and the 7:30 position on the left shoulder were defined as the relevant reference points. The average distance between the palpable end of the coracoid process and the 4:30 and 7:30 positions was 19 mm. The average distance to the point of intersection of the musculocutaneous nerve with the medial margin of the conjoined tendon was more than 5 cm, and was never less than 2 cm. The average distance of the axillary nerve from the 4:30 position was 2.5 cm in the horizontal plane, with a minimum of 1.5 cm. Radially, the average distance of the axillary nerve was 1.7 cm, with a minimum of 1.3 cm. The anatomic study was followed by a clinical study of 264 patients. An antero-inferior portal located maximum 2 cm distal from the palpable coracoid tip was selected for the introduction of a trocar sheath and blunt trocar, passing through the subscapularis muscle to access the antero-inferior area of the glenoid rim. As additional protection for the musculocutaneous nerve, the direction of the trocar was adjusted during introduction. Reattachment of the labrum-capsule complex was performed extra-articularly. In all cases, at least one implant was located inferior to the 4:30 or 7:30 position. No neurovascular complications arose out of the choice of portal. Out of the 264 patients, the first 100 shoulders (98 patients) were followed-up after an average time of 35 months (18 to 62 months). The recurrence rate was 9%. Excluding the first 30 shoulders (30 patients) from the development phase of the technique, the recurrence rate is only 5.7%. The rate of return to overhead sports activities was 62% and to collision sports activities 70%.

  15. Efficacy of multimodal analgesia injection combined with corticosteroids after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Perdreau, A; Joudet, T

    2015-12-01

    Although arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is minimally invasive, there is still considerable postoperative pain, especially during the first 48 hours. The present study assessed the short-term efficacy and safety of multimodal analgesic (MMA) injection associated to corticosteroids in arthroscopic rotator cuff tear surgery. A single-center prospective randomized study included 50 patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff tear surgery. The study group received subacromial injection of a mixture of morphine, ropivacaine and methylprednisolone associated to intra-articular injection of morphine plus methylprednisolone; the control group received only isotonic saline. All patients had had 24 hours self-administered morphine associated to standard analgesia. Postoperative data were recorded at 30 minutes and 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, 18 and 24 hours: pain intensity, morphine intake and side effects, and also time to first morphine bolus and additional analgesic intake. Constant, ASES and SST functional scores were recorded at 3 months. Postoperative pain was significantly less intense in the MMA group than in controls at 30 min, H1, H4, H6, H12, H18 and H24 (P<0.05). A rebound at D10 occurred in both groups. During the first 24 hours, MMA significantly reduced cumulative resort to morphine (P<0.05 at H1/2, P<0.001 at H1-24). Mean time to first bolus was significantly longer in the MMA group (71.6 vs. 33 min; P<0.05). The rate of opioid-related side effects was similar between groups. At last follow-up, functional scores were similar between groups. There were no cases of infection or delayed skin healing. MMA associated to corticosteroids after arthroscopic rotator cuff tear surgery provided immediate benefit in terms of analgesia and morphine sparing, without apparent risk of infection. The practice is presently little known in France and deserves longer-term assessment, especially as regards functional rehabilitation and tendon healing. 2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson

  16. Arthroscopic Anatomic Glenoid Reconstruction Without Subscapularis Split

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ivan H.; Urquhart, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The role of bone loss from the anterior glenoid in recurrent shoulder instability has been well established. We present a completely arthroscopic technique for reconstructing the anterior glenoid with distal tibial allograft and without a subscapularis split. We perform the arthroscopy in the lateral position. We measure and size an allograft distal tibial graft and place it arthroscopically. We use an inside-out medial portal to introduce the graft into the shoulder, passing it through the rotator interval and above the subscapularis. A double-cannula system is used to pass the graft, which is temporarily fixed with K-wires and held in place with cannulated screws. We then perform a Bankart-like repair of the soft tissues to balance the shoulder and augment our repair. Our technique is not only anatomic in the re-creation of the glenoid surface but also anatomic in the preservation of the coracoid and subscapularis tendon and repair of the capsulolabral complex. PMID:26697303

  17. Arthroscopic Removal and Tendon Repair for Refractory Rotator Cuff Calcific Tendinitis of the Shoulder.

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, Hiroshi; Iwashita, Satoshi; Okubo, Atsushi; Takai, Shinro

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical and radiological outcomes of arthroscopic treatment for refractory rotator cuff calcific tendinitis of the shoulder. Subjects were 37 patients (35 women and 2 men; mean age, 47.8 years; age range 34-61 years) who had undergone arthroscopic treatment for calcific tendinitis of the shoulder. Despite sufficient nonsurgical treatments, all patients had residual calcific deposit with persistent or recurrent pain. Before surgery, all patients underwent 3-directional radiographs of the shoulder and three-dimensional computed tomography to determine the location and size of calcific deposit. Arthroscopic surgery was performed with the patient under general anesthesia in the lateral decubitus position. A 2-cm single longitudinal incision was made with a radiofrequency hook blade on the tendon surface above calcific deposit. Calcific deposit was removed as much as possible with a curette and a motorized shaver. The incised tendon was repaired with a side-to-side suture with strong sutures. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association shoulder score was used to evaluate clinical outcomes. The extent of calcific deposit removal was evaluated with radiographs obtained before surgery, 1 week after the surgery and at the final follow-up examination. The mean follow-up duration was 30.4 (range, 13-72) months. The mean shoulder score significantly improved from 69.7 (range, 58-80) points before surgery to 97.8 (range, 89-100) points at the final follow-up examination. Postoperative radiographs in all patients, showed that the calcific deposit was resolved or reduced and those from 1 week after surgery to the final examination showed no evidence of recurrence or enlargement of calcific deposit. The calcific deposit had completely resolved in 34 patients but remained in 3 patients. When treating calcific tendinitis of the shoulder, it is important to accurately determine the size and location of calcific deposit by radiographs and 3

  18. Predictors of Outcomes after Arthroscopic Double-row Rotator Cuff Repair in 155 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Katthagen, Jan Christoph; Millett, Peter J.; Espinoza-Ervin, Christopher; Horan, Marilee P.; Ho, Charles P.; Warth, Ryan J.; Dornan, Grant

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to analyze predictors of clinical outcomes of knotted versus knotless double-row self-reinforcing rotator cuff repairs of full-thickness rotator cuff tears with propensity score matching. Methods: Patients with arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears involving the supraspinatus tendon using either a knotted or knotless linked, self-reinforcing double-row technique were included in the study. Preoperative subjective evaluation was performed using the ASES and SF-12 PCS scores. After a minimum two-year follow-up period, ASES and SF-12 PCS scores were collected again along with the SANE score, the QuickDASH score, and patient satisfaction. All data were collected prospectively and retrospectively reviewed. Postoperative ASES and SF-12 PCS scores were then modeled using inverse propensity score weighting in a multiple linear regression model (MLR) with multiple imputations. Age, sex, baseline ASES score, length of follow-up, number of anchors, worker’s compensation, previous cuff repair, and double-row repair technique (knotted or knotless) were the covariates used in this model. Results: 155 shoulders in 151 patients (109 men, 42 women; mean age at time of surgery 59±10 years) were eligible for inclusion. Outcomes data were available for 130 of 148 shoulders (87.8%) after exclusion of seven shoulders (4.5%) that underwent revision rotator cuff repair before final follow up (n=33/39 in the knotted group [84.6%]; n=97/109 [88.9%] in the knotless group).The mean follow-up was 2.9 years (range, 2.0-5.4 years). Overall, postoperative outcomes scores were significantly improved when compared to preoperative baselines (p<0.05), with a median postoperative ASES score of 97 for the entire cohort. Our model showed that previous rotator cuff repair had a significant negative effect on postoperative ASES (β = -12.7, p<0.001) and SF-12 PCS scores (β = -5.0, p = 0.036). A workers’ compensation claim (β = -10.6, p

  19. Quantitative analysis of peak torque and power-velocity characteristics of shoulder rotator muscles after arthroscopic labral repair.

    PubMed

    Szuba, Łukasz; Markowska, Iga; Czamara, Andrzej; Noga, Henryk

    2016-10-01

    We aimed to use biomechanical testing to assess differences in the power and strength of patients who participated in a short-term, home-based rehabilitation program following arthroscopic labral repair compared with a healthy control group. The functional outcomes of patients who underwent arthroscopic labral repair followed by self-directed short-term rehabilitation at home were compared with age- and body mass index (BMI)-matched healthy controls. Group I included 20 male patients who had undergone arthroscopic labral repair after being diagnosed with recurrent anterior glenohumeral joint instability without bony lesions of the humeral head or glenoid. Postoperatively, they participated in physical therapy for 17±4 appointments, followed by self-guided home-based exercises. Group II included 25 males without injuries. The two groups were matched for age and BMI. The orthopaedic examination, functional tests, and biomechanical measurements were performed under isokinetic conditions at an average of 16±3 months postoperatively. Significant differences were observed in range of shoulder rotation on the operative shoulder compared with the unaffected side and in the dominant arms of the control group. The patients were also found to have significant deficits in biomechanical parameters such as power and peak torque angle. Significant deficits in peak torque, power, and peak torque angle during external and internal shoulder rotation remained up to 16 months after arthroscopic labral repair. Further research is needed to understand the changes in shoulder power assessment after labral repair. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A pulled sutures technique for bony Bankart lesion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung Ill; Choi, Hyung Suk; Min, Kyung Dae; Kwon, Sai Won; Kim, Jun Bum; Kim, Yong-Beom; Chun, Dong-Il

    2014-05-01

    In an attempt to present a new surgical technique for arthroscopic bony Bankart fixation, the authors developed the pulled sutures technique. In executing the new method, the authors first passed several non-absorbable sutures through labroligamentous tissue with displaced articular fragment by mimicking transglenoid suture technique. Aimed at achieving a safe and stable fixation, using a knotless anchor rather than transglenoid suture, was deployed. Overall, this pulled sutures technique was shown to be effective with the result of direct reduction, stable, and safe fixation for bony Bankart's lesion.

  1. Quality of Life and Functional Results of Arthroscopic Partial Repair of Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tears.

    PubMed

    Galasso, Olimpio; Riccelli, Daria Anna; De Gori, Marco; De Benedetto, Massimo; Orlando, Nicola; Gasparini, Giorgio; Castricini, Roberto

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the minimum 2-year results and possible outcomes of arthroscopic partial repair in different patterns of irreparable rotator cuff tears (RCTs). Patients suffering from an irreparable supraspinatus and a reparable infraspinatus tendons who underwent arthroscopic partial repair with a minimum 24-month follow-up were included in this study. The Constant and Murley score (CMS) was used to assess patients' functionality pre- and postoperatively. Postoperative patient assessment included the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) and the Short Form Health Survey questionnaire (SF-36). A postoperative range of motion, CMS, and strength were compared with the contralateral side. Postoperative SF-36 was compared with age- and sex-matched norms. Ninety patients (95 shoulders) were reviewed after a mean follow-up of 7 (range 2-12) years. The subscapularis tendon was intact in 80 shoulders and torn but completely reparable in the remaining 15 shoulders. The CMS improved from 39.1 ± 8.4 (10-61) to 76.3 ± 9.7 (32-93) (P < .001). The mean postoperative SST was 9.1 ± 2.2 (1-12). Although the patients had lower postoperative abduction and internal rotation, strength in abduction and CMS in comparison with the measurements from the contralateral side, the median postoperative SF-36 physical and mental component summaries were 98% and 100% of the matched norms. No significant differences were found in postoperative outcomes according to the RCT pattern. Males showed significantly higher strengths in abduction (B = -1.384, 95% confidence interval [CI] -2.144 to -0.624, η(2) = 0.123, P < .001, 95% power), external rotation (B = -3.646, 95% CI -5.2 to -2.092, η(2) = 0.189, P < .001, 100% power), and internal rotation (B = -3.867, 95% CI -5.676 to -2.057, η(2) = 0.162, P < .001, 99% power) than females. Significantly higher ranges of abduction (η(2) = 0.431, P = .019, 98% power) and external rotation (η(2) = 0.417, P < .03, 97% power) were noted in younger

  2. Biomechanical evaluation of the simple cinch stitch for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Hawi, Nael; Dratzidis, Antonios; Kraemer, Manuel; Suero, Eduardo M; Liodakis, Emmanouil; Hurschler, Christof; Krettek, Christian; Hawi, Ahmed; Meller, Rupert

    2016-07-01

    The tissue-suture interface is described as the most vulnerable and susceptible area in the muscle-tendon-bone construction of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Various stitching techniques have been described to enhance the strength, fixation and stability of the repair, but technical and biomechanical challenges remain. Purpose was to examine the biomechanical properties of the simple cinch stitch in comparison to other stitches commonly used for rotator cuff repair. Infraspinatus tendons were harvested from sheep and split in half. The tendons were randomized into five different stitch configuration groups for biomechanical testing: simple stitch; horizontal stitch; FiberChain®; simple cinch stitch; and modified Mason-Allen stitch. Each specimen was first cyclically loaded on a universal materials testing machine under force control from 5 to 30N at 0.25Hz for twenty cycles. Then, each specimen was loaded to failure under displacement control at a rate of 1mm/s. Cyclic elongation, peak-to-peak displacement and ultimate tensile load were measured. The type of failure was recorded. No differences in cyclic elongation or peak-to-peak displacement were seen between stitch configurations. In the load-to-failure test, the simple cinch stitch demonstrated significantly higher ultimate load than the simple and the horizontal stitch configurations. The comparison to the FiberChain® Suture revealed no statistical significant differences. The FiberChain® Suture demonstrated significantly higher ultimate load than the simple stitch. No statistical significance could be demonstrated in comparison to the horizontal stitch or the simple cinch stitch. The ultimate tensile load of the modified Mason-Allen stitch was significantly higher than that of the other stitch configurations. The simple cinch stitch has an ultimate tensile load comparable to the FiberChain® suture and is superior to the simple stitch and the horizontal stitch. The major advantage of the simple cinch

  3. Is posterior delamination in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair hidden to the posterior viewing portal?

    PubMed

    Han, Yung; Shin, Jin-Hyup; Seok, Chang-Woo; Lee, Chang-Hyun; Kim, Seung-Ho

    2013-11-01

    The purposes of this study were (1) to examine whether posterior delamination is hidden to the most commonly used posterior viewing portal compared with differential rotator cuff portals and (2) to observe posterior delamination patterns so that a treatment-based classification system may be proposed. One-hundred thirty consecutive patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair by 4 different surgeons were evaluated for the presence of posterior delamination viewable through the posterior, posterolateral, and lateral portals. Randomized arthroscopic pictures were viewed by 2 independent blinded observers, and the Fleiss κ was used to assess inter-reliability agreement. In addition, patterns of posterior delamination and surgical treatment were assessed. The incidence of posterior delamination was 88%. Only 11% of cases were visualized through the posterior portal, whereas 70% and 100% were visualized through the posterolateral and lateral portals, respectively. The Fleiss κ was 0.78 (95% confidence interval, 0.73 to 0.83), indicating substantial agreement. Three general patterns of posterior delamination with specific surgical repair strategies were identified and subclassified into 5 types: type A1, full-thickness tears with extensive posterior delamination separating the rotator cuff into 2 layers and sometimes with dissociation of the rotator cable; type A2, bursal-sided partial-thickness tears with posterior delamination; type B1, delamination with an L-shaped bursal layer tear and crescent-shaped articular layer tear; type B2, a partial-thickness articular-sided tear with extensive posterior delamination; and type C, extensive degeneration with multiple longitudinal bursal-sided tears. The incidence of posterior delamination is extremely high, and most of these lesions are missed if one is viewing from just the posterior portal. Differential rotator cuff portals are needed to appreciate and treat posterior delamination. Patterns of delamination can be

  4. [Controversies in the therapy of rotator cuff tears. Operative or nonoperative treatment, open or arthroscopic repair?].

    PubMed

    Lorbach, O

    2016-02-01

    Rotator cuff tears are a common cause of shoulder pain that may lead to severe impairment of shoulder function with significant limitation of the quality of life. Furthermore, they are associated with high direct and indirect costs.Conservative therapy and various surgical procedures for rotator cuff repair are all possible treatment options. Therefore, the correct treatment for a symptomatic rotator cuff tear is important.The conservative therapy may be considered as an alternative treatment option for a symptomatic rotator cuff tear in patients with small or incomplete tears with no fatty atrophy or tendon retraction, with only slight pain, and in older patients with few functional demands. Surgical treatment is recommended after failed conservative treatment lasting 3-6 months, with the corresponding psychological strain. Moreover, surgical treatment should be considered as a primary treatment option for a symptomatic rotator cuff tear in young patients with high functional demands, patients with a high level of physical strain in their jobs, large tears, and tears where there is already significant muscle atrophy or tendon retraction.Arthroscopic treatment is considered to be the gold standard because of the better cosmetic results and treatment of concomitant pathological conditions, the lower levels of postoperative pain, the potentially lower risk of shoulder stiffness, and more focused adhesiolysis. However, arthroscopy does not improve clinical results. Because of the current financial situation, however, open rotator cuff repair is still a viable alternative.

  5. Results of Arthroscopic Repair of Peripheral Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Tear With Exploration of Dorsal Sensory Branch of Ulnar Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Alvin Chao-Yu; Weng, Chun-Jui; Chiu, Chih-Hao; Chang, Shih-Sheng; Cheng, Chun-Ying; Chan, Yi-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Background: Ulnar-sided approach in arthroscopic triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) repair may jeopardize treatment success by exposing the dorsal sensory branch of ulnar nerve (DSBUN) in risk of injury. We aim to conduct a follow-up assessment of arthroscopic outside-in TFCC repair and efficacy of sensory nerve exploration. Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of 58 patients (59 wrists) who received arthroscopic repair of the peripheral attachment of the TFCC. Ulnar-sided skin incision and exploration of DSBUN were performed before arthroscopy setting. Arthroscopic outside-in repair through pullout suture ligation was performed. Functional survey at 6 months and 1 year postoperatively was based on Mayo Modified Wrist Score (MMWS), and compared to the preoperative assessment. A p-value of less than 0.05 was considered significant as calculated using paired t-test. Results: Postoperative MMWS averaged 74.32±11.50 at 6 months, and 84.41±9.52 at one year; both showed significant difference as compared to preoperative status. Significant improvement was noted in all 4 individual items except motion retrieval between 6 months and 1 year. Totally, 45 (76%) cases achieved good or excellent results at one year; however, less patients resumed pre-injury activity level when treatment delay was more than 6 months than those treated earlier (41% vs. 57%). Complication included 6 transient paresthesia; 1 anchor migration and 1 distal radioulnar arthrosis. No more nerve complication was found after modification of perineural dissection. Conclusion: Arthroscopy is effective in obtaining both correct diagnosis and treatment of peripheral TFCC tear. Modified perineural dissection can minimize sensory nerve complications. PMID:28694892

  6. Locked bucket-handle type bony Bankart lesion resulting from manipulation.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yon Sik; Song, Hyun Seok

    2016-06-01

    A patient who underwent manipulation for stiffness accompanying a rotator cuff tear experienced a complication consisting of a bony Bankart lesion connected to the superior and inferior labrum. This lesion was displaced posteriorly, locked behind the humeral head and blocking the reduction. Attachment of the labrum to this fragment made reduction and fixation easier. This bony Bankart lesion was fixed successfully by arthroscopic placement of knotless suture anchors. Level of evidence Case report, Level IV.

  7. Outcomes following arthroscopic transosseous equivalent suture bridge double row rotator cuff repair: a prospective study and short-term results

    PubMed Central

    Imam, Mohamed Abdelnabi; Abdelkafy, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Background: The transosseous-equivalent cross bridge double row (TESBDR) rotator cuff (RC) repair technique has been developed to optimize healing biology at a repaired RC tendon insertion. It has been shown in the laboratory to improve pressurized contact area and mean foot print pressure when compared with a double row anchor technique. Pressure has been shown to influence healing between tendon and bone, and the tendon compression vector provided by the transosseous-equivalent suture bridges may enhance healing. The purpose was to prospectively evaluate the outcomes of arthroscopic TESBDR RC repair. Methods: Single center prospective case series study. Sixty-nine patients were selected to undergo arthroscopic TESBDR RC repair and were included in the current study. Primary outcome measures included the Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS), the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) score, the Constant-Murley (CM) Score and Range of motion (ROM). Secondary outcome measures included a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for pain, another VAS for patient satisfaction from the operative procedure, EuroQoL 5-Dimensions Questionnaire (EQ-5D) for quality of life assessment. Results: At 24 months post-operative, average OSS score was 44, average UCLA score was 31, average CM score was 88, average forward flexion was 145°, average internal rotation was 35°, average external rotation was 79°, average abduction was 150°, average EQ-5D score was 0.73, average VAS for pain was 2.3, and average VAS for patient satisfaction was 9.2. Conclusion: Arthroscopic TESBDR RC repair is a procedure with good post-operative functional outcome and low re-tear rate based on a short term follow-up. PMID:27163096

  8. Arthroscopic Partial Repair of Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tears: Preoperative Factors Associated With Outcome Deterioration Over 2 Years.

    PubMed

    Shon, Min Soo; Koh, Kyoung Hwan; Lim, Tae Kang; Kim, Won Ju; Kim, Kyung Cheon; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2015-08-01

    Arthroscopic partial repair is a treatment option in irreparable large-to-massive rotator cuff tears without arthritic changes. However, there are indications that arthroscopic partial repair does not yield satisfactory outcomes. To report the clinical and radiographic results of arthroscopic partial repairs in patients with irreparable large-to-massive cuff tears. In addition, an analysis was performed regarding preoperative factors that may influence patient outcomes and patient-rated satisfaction over time. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. From 2005 to 2011, a total of 31 patients who underwent arthroscopic partial repair for irreparable large-to-massive cuff tears were retrospectively evaluated. Partial repair was defined as posterior cuff tissue repair with or without subscapularis tendon repair to restore the transverse force couple of the cuff. Pain visual analog scale (PVAS), questionnaire results (American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons [ASES] and Simple Shoulder Test [SST]), and radiographic changes (acromiohumeral distance and degenerative change) were assessed preoperatively, at first follow-up (roughly 1 year postoperatively), and at final follow-up (>2 years postoperatively). Patients rated their satisfaction level at each postoperative follow-up as well. Preoperative factors that might influence outcomes, such as patient demographics, tear size, and fatty infiltration, were investigated. The preoperative, first follow-up, and final follow-up results for mean PVAS (5.13, 2.13, and 3.16, respectively) and questionnaires (ASES: 41.97, 76.37, and 73.78; SST: 3.61, 6.33, and 6.07, respectively) improved significantly (all P < .05). Radiographic evaluation showed no difference compared with preoperative status. Nevertheless, patient-rated satisfaction at final evaluation was inferior: 16 good responses ("very satisfied" and "satisfied") and 15 poor responses ("rather the same" and "dissatisfied"). Despite initial improvements in both groups (P < .05

  9. The results of arthroscopic versus mini-open repair for rotator cuff tears at mid-term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Pearsall, Albert W; Ibrahim, Khalid A; Madanagopal, Sudhakar G

    2007-01-01

    Background To prospectively evaluate patients who underwent a "mini-open" repair versus a completely arthroscopic technique for small to large size rotator cuff tears. Methods Fifty-two patients underwent "mini-open" or all arthroscopic repair of a full thickness tear of the rotator cuff. Patients who complained of shoulder pain and/or weakness and who had failed a minimum of 6 weeks of physical therapy and had at least one sub-acromial injection were surgical candidates. Pre and post-operative clinical evaluations included the following: 1) demographics; 2) Simple Shoulder Test (SST); 3) University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) rating scale; 4) visual analog pain assessment (VAS); and 5) pre-op SF12 assessment. Descriptive analysis was performed for patient demographics and for all variables. Pre and post outcome scores, range of motion and pain scale were compared using paired t-tests. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to evaluate any effect between dependent and independent variables. Significance was set at p is less than or equal to 0.05. Results There were 31 females and 21 males. The average follow-up was 50.6 months (27 – 84 months). The average age was similar between the two groups [arthroscopic x = 55 years/mini-open x = 58 years, p = 0.7]. Twenty-seven patients underwent arthroscopic repair and 25 underwent repair with a mini-open incision. The average rotator cuff tear size was 3.1 cm (range: 1–5 centimeters). There was no significant difference in tear size between the two groups (arthroscopic group = 2.9 cm/mini-open group = 3.2 cm, p = 0.3). Overall, there was a significant improvement from pre-operative status in shoulder pain, shoulder function as measured on the Simple Shoulder test and UCLA Shoulder Form. Visual analog pain improved, on average, 4.4 points and the most recent Short Shoulder Form and UCLA scores were 8 and 26 respectively. Both active and passive glenohumeral joint range of motion improved significantly from pre

  10. Carotid sinus hypersensitivity due to shoulder sling pressure after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a case report.

    PubMed

    Canbora, Mehmet Kerem; Polat, Atilla; Subaşı, Ferhunde Dilek; Ulkü, Tekin Kerem

    2012-01-01

    The beach chair position is one of the most commonly used positions in arthroscopic shoulder surgery because of its anatomical nature and easy modifiability to open surgery. Despite these advantages, thromboembolic and neurologic complications have been reported. We report a case of carotid sinus hypersensitivity due to shoulder sling pressure after arthroscopic shoulder surgery.

  11. Tape Versus Suture in Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Biomechanical Analysis and Assessment of Failure Rates at 6 Months.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui Wen; Lam, Patrick Hong; Shepherd, Henry M; Murrell, George A C

    2017-04-01

    Rotator cuff retears after surgical repair are associated with poorer subjective and objectives clinical outcomes than intact repairs. The aims of this study were to (1) examine the biomechanical differences between rotator cuff repair using No. 2 suture and tape in an ovine model and (2) compare early clinical outcomes between patients who had rotator cuff repair with tape and patients who had repair with No. 2 suture. Controlled laboratory study and cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Biomechanical testing of footprint contact pressure and load to failure were conducted with 16 ovine shoulders using a tension band repair technique with 2 different types of sutures (No. 2 suture [FiberWire; Arthrex] and tape [FiberTape; Arthrex]) with the same knotless anchor system. A retrospective study of 150 consecutive patients (tape, n = 50; suture, n = 100) who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair by a single surgeon with tear size larger than 1.5 × 1 cm was conducted. Ultrasound was used to evaluate the repair integrity at 6 months postsurgery. Rotator cuff repair using tape had greater footprint contact pressure (mean ± standard error of the mean, 0.33 ± 0.03 vs 0.11 ± 0.3 MPa; P < .0001) compared with repair using No. 2 sutures at 0° abduction with a 30-N load applied across the repaired tendon. The ultimate failure load of the tape repair was greater than that for suture repair (217 ± 28 vs 144 ± 14 N; P < .05). The retear rate was similar between the tape (16%; 8/50) and suture groups (17%; 17/100). Rotator cuff repair with the wider tape compared with No. 2 suture did not affect the retear rate at 6 months postsurgery, despite having superior biomechanical properties.

  12. Perfusion of the Rotator Cuff Tendon According to the Repair Configuration Using an Indocyanine Green Fluorescence Arthroscope: A Preliminary Report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sae Hoon; Cho, Won-Sang; Joung, Ho-Yun; Choi, Young Eun; Jung, Minwoong

    2017-03-01

    The disturbance of rotator cuff tendon perfusion has been connected with the suture-bridge configuration repair (SBCR) technique; however, in vivo assessments of the tendon blood supply have been problematic with other modalities. An evaluation of tissue perfusion by an indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence arthroscope has been developed to counteract this difficulty. To verify the hindrance of perfusion in SBCR, we used an ICG fluorescence camera to compare parallel-type transosseous repair (PTR) and SBCR in rabbits immediately and at 3 days after rotator cuff repair. Controlled laboratory study. Acute rotator cuff repair was performed on the shoulders of 10 rabbits. Both shoulders were repaired using either PTR or SBCR. For PTR, simple repair was performed through 2 parallel transosseous tunnels created using a microdrill. For SBCR, 2 additional crisscross transosseous tunnels were added to mimic arthroscopic SBCR. Immediately after repair, ICG was injected through the ear vein, and images were recorded using an ICG fluorescence camera. Tendon perfusion was compared by measuring fluorescence intensity using ImageJ software in both methods. At 3 days after rotator cuff repair, a reassessment of ICG fluorescence was performed. In addition, as a subsidiary study, a comparison of each repair method and a healthy tendon was performed (PTR vs healthy tendon and SBCR vs healthy tendon). Six rabbits (3 for each comparison) were included. Immediately after rotator cuff repair, the mean (±SD) grayscale intensity of ICG fluorescence was weaker in SBCR than PTR in 10 specimens (65.9 ± 47.6 vs 84.3 ± 53.4 per pixel, respectively; P = .003). At 3 days after repair, 8 specimens were included in the analysis because suture strands failed in 2 specimens in SBCR. The mean intensity of fluorescence was still weaker in SBCR compared with PTR (52.5 ± 13.7 vs 60.2 ± 22.7 per pixel, respectively; P = .077). The mean fluorescence intensity compared with a healthy tendon was 83.2%

  13. Long head BIceps TEnodesis or tenotomy in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: BITE study protocol.

    PubMed

    van Deurzen, Derek Friedrich Petrus; Scholtes, Vanessa Antoinet Bernice; Willigenburg, Nienke Willemien; Gurnani, Navin; Verweij, Lukas Pieter Eduard; van den Bekerom, Michel Pieter Jozef

    2016-08-30

    Optimal treatment of the diseased long head of the biceps (LHB) tendon during rotator cuff repair remains a topic of debate: tenotomy or tenodesis. A recent meta analysis revealed no difference in strength or functional outcome between treatments. The included studies varied in methodological quality, and only two were randomized controlled trials (RCTs). As strong evidence in favor of either tenotomy or tenodesis is still lacking, we designed this randomized controlled trial to compare functional outcomes after tenotomy and tenodesis when performed in adjunct to arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Patients older than 50 years with a supraspinatus and/or infraspinatus tendon rupture sized smaller than 3 cm, who are encountered with LHB pathology, will be randomized to either LHB tenotomy or LHB tenodesis. Clinical and patient-reported data will be collected pre-operatively, 6 weeks, 3 months and 1 year after surgery. Primary outcome is overall shoulder function evaluated with the Constant score at 1 year after surgery. As additional measures of shoulder function, two patient reported outcomes (the Dutch Oxford Shoulder Test and the Disabilities of the Arm Shoulder and Hand questionnaire) will be assessed. Other evaluations include cosmetic appearance evaluated by the "Popeye" deformity, elbow flexion strength, arm cramping pain, MRI-based location of the biceps tendon, quality of life, and duration of surgery. To detect non-inferiority with a one-sided, two-sample t-test with 80 % power and a significance level (alpha) of 0.025, the required sample size is 98 patients. Treatment of LHB tendon lesions is performed differently around the world and meta analyses do not provide conclusive evidence in favor of one of these treatments. This study will strengthen evidence on the risks and benefits of LHB tenotomy and tenodesis in adjunct to a rotator cuff repair, which is important for managing patient expectations. Dutch Trial Register ( NTR3255 ) January 12, 2012

  14. Absorption of the bone fragment in shoulders with bony Bankart lesions caused by recurrent anterior dislocations or subluxations: when does it occur?

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Shigeto; Mizuno, Naoko; Hiramatsu, Kunihiko; Tachibana, Yuta; Mae, Tatsuo

    2013-06-01

    Recently, bony defects of the glenoid in patients with traumatic anterior shoulder instability have been increasingly noticed. The bone fragment of a bony Bankart lesion is often utilized for Bankart repair, but the fragment is at times smaller than the glenoid defect. The reason for this mismatch in size is unknown. The bone fragment of a bony Bankart lesion might gradually be absorbed over time. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A total of 163 shoulders were prospectively examined by computed tomography. In shoulders with bony Bankart lesions, glenoid defects and bone fragment absorption were assessed, and findings were compared with the time elapsed after the primary traumatic episode. When a bone fragment was not detected despite loss of the normal contour of the glenoid rim, the findings were classified as erosions if the rim appeared round and slightly compressed and classified as complete bone fragment absorption if the rim appeared straight and sharp. There were no glenoid defects in 55 shoulders, erosions in 16 shoulders, and glenoid defects in 92 shoulders. The size of the glenoid defect was 0% to 10% in 15 shoulders, 10% to 20% in 44, 20% to 30% in 26, 30% to 40% in 6, and 40% to 50% in 1. The average defect size was 7.9% in shoulders scanned at <1 year, 10.7% between 1 and 2 years, and 11.3% at >2 years, indicating no relationship with time after trauma. Regarding bone fragment absorption, all 92 shoulders with glenoid defects showed absorption to some extent. The extent of absorption was <50% in 32 shoulders, >50% in 45, and 100% in 15. The average extent of absorption was 51.9% in shoulders scanned at <1 year, 65.3% between 1 and 2 years, and 70.0% at >2 years, indicating a significant relationship with time after trauma. Bone fragment absorption was seen in all of the shoulders with bony Bankart lesions. Most bone fragments showed severe absorption within 1 year after the primary traumatic episode. Before arthroscopic Bankart repair, not only

  15. Isolated avulsion of the medial head of the triceps tendon: an anatomic study and arthroscopic repair in 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Athwal, George S; McGill, Robert J; Rispoli, Damian M

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the area and characteristics of the triceps tendon footprint on the olecranon, with special attention to the medial head insertion. The secondary goal was to report 2 cases of isolated avulsions of the medial head of the triceps tendon treated successfully with arthroscopic repair. Fifteen cadaveric upper extremities were examined to investigate the triceps tendon insertion, and two case reports of an arthroscopic repair technique are described. In 8 specimens (53%) there was a separate insertion of the medial head of the triceps tendon on the olecranon, which was deep to the long and lateral head insertions. The mean area of the medial head insertion was 44 mm(2), and the mean area of the combined long and lateral head insertions was 115 mm(2). In 7 specimens (47%) the long, lateral, and medial heads of the triceps inserted together and had a mean area of 134 mm(2). Although the 3 heads of the triceps inserted together, the medial head tendon fiber orientation was still directed deep to the long and lateral heads. At 2 years' follow-up, both patients described no pain, had better strength, and had improved Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand scores and Mayo Elbow Performance Scores. We have determined the characteristics of the distal triceps tendon footprint and the insertional orientation on the olecranon. For cases with an isolated avulsion of the medial head of the triceps tendon, an arthroscopic repair technique is described. Level IV, anatomic study and therapeutic case series.

  16. Efficacy of direct arthroscopy-guided suprascapular nerve block after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Jun; Yoo, Yon-Sik; Hwang, Jung-Taek; Kim, Do-Young; Jeon, Seong-Jae; Hwang, Sung Mi; Jang, Ji Su

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of arthroscopy-guided direct suprascapular nerve block performed after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. In the present prospective, randomized, double-blinded clinical study, 30 patients were divided into two groups: 15 patients (group I) were treated with arthroscopy-guided suprascapular nerve block using 10 mL 0.5 % ropivacaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine, and 15 patients (group II) were treated with placebo using 10 mL 0.9 % saline after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Patient pain levels were measured using the visual analog scale (VAS) at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 h post-operatively. Additionally, the number of boluses and total amount of fentanyl dispensed by patient-controlled analgesia administration during the 24-h post-operative period were evaluated. VAS scores did not differ significantly between groups I and II during the 24-h post-operative period, but mean fentanyl bolus consumption was significantly less in group I compared with group II (p = 0.015). Arthroscopy-guided suprascapular nerve block at the end of a rotator cuff repair was safe and less time-consuming than expected. Although this procedure did not significantly reduce the post-operative pain, the post-operative need for fentanyl boluses as analgesia was reduced significantly, and it would be beneficial if this procedure involved a sensory branch of axillary nerve block or was performed at the beginning of the arthroscopic procedure. Prospective, randomized, double-blinded clinical trial, Level I.

  17. Arthroscopic Management of Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears in Major League Baseball Pitchers: The Lateralized Footprint Repair Technique.

    PubMed

    Dines, Joshua S; Jones, Kristofer; Maher, Patrick; Altchek, David

    2016-01-01

    Clinical outcomes of surgical management of full-thickness rotator cuff tears in professional baseball players have been uniformly poor. We conducted a study to investigate return-to-play data and functional performance using a novel arthroscopic repair technique. We hypothesized that arthroscopic rotator cuff repair would result in a high rate of return to professional pitching and favorable functional outcomes. We identified 6 consecutive Major League Baseball (MLB) pitchers who underwent surgical repair of full-thickness rotator cuff injuries using the lateralized footprint repair technique. At most recent follow-up, patients were evaluated to determine their ability to return to athletic activity. Functional outcomes were also assessed using player performance statistics. By mean follow-up of 66.7 months (range, 23.2-94.6 months), 5 (83%) of the 6 pitchers had returned to their preinjury level of competition for at least 1 full season. Despite the high rate of return to MLB play, few pitchers resumed pitching productivity at their preoperative level; mean number of innings pitched decreased from 1806.5 to 183.7. A slight performance reduction was also found in a comparison of preoperative and postoperative pitching statistics. Of note, the return rate was higher for players over age 30 years than for those under 30 years. Overhead athletes require a delicate balance of shoulder mobility and stability to meet functional demands. Anatomical adaptations at the glenohumeral joint should be considered when performing rotator cuff repair in these patients in order to preserve peak functional performance. This novel repair technique affords a high rate of return to MLB play, though elite overhead throwers should be counseled that pitching productivity might decrease after surgery.

  18. Platelet-rich fibrin in arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff tears: a prospective randomized pilot clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Antuña, Samuel; Barco, Raúl; Martínez Diez, José M; Sánchez Márquez, José Miguel

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate the feasibility of a large- scale project on the influence of local application of Platelet Rich Fibrin (PRF) on the functional outcome and integrity of the arthroscopically repaired tendons in patients with massive tears of the rotator cuff. A prospective, randomized pilot clinical trial was performed on 28 patients (22 females, 6 males) with an average age of 65 years (range: 53 to 77) undergoing complete arthroscopic repair of a massive rotator cuff tear. After the repair was completed, 6 ml PRF (Vivostat) was locally applied to the repair site in 14 patients; no similar action was done in the other 14 patients. All patients underwent a clinical examination and an arthro-MRI to evaluate the integrity of the repair, one year after the operation. They were followed clinically for a minimum of 2 years. Functional outcome was evaluated with the Constant and DASH scores. There were no reported complications in either group. None of the patients was lost to follow-up. Globally, the Constant score improved from 45 preoperatively (range: 25 to 65) to 64 at one year (range: 20 to 79) (p < 0.001), with no significant change at two years (mean 63, range: 20 to 77). The VAS for pain improved from 5.6/10 preoperatively to 1.7/10 at the most recent examination (p < 0.001). All but two patients were satisfied. With the numbers of patients available, we could not detect a significant difference in the preoperative (46 vs. 43; p = 037) or postoperative Constant score (61 vs. 68; p = 0.125) between the control group and the PRF group. On arthro-MRI, 19 of the 28 patients (68%) were found to have a large re-tear : 10/14 in the PRF group and 9/14 in the control group. Local application of autologous PRF to the repair site of massive rotator cuffs fully reconstructed arthroscopically failed to improve the clinical outcome and the healing rate, compared with a standard repair. However, a large-scale study would be necessary to

  19. Low Serum Vitamin D Is Not Correlated With the Severity of a Rotator Cuff Tear or Retear After Arthroscopic Repair.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Keun Jung; Kim, Bang Hyun; Lee, Yohan; Dan, Jinmyoung; Kim, Jae Hwa

    2015-07-01

    Despite the essential role of vitamin D in muscle function, the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency has been reported to be very high. Recently, low vitamin D level was found to correlate with fatty degeneration of the rotator cuff tendon in humans and to negatively affect early healing at the rotator cuff repair site in an animal study. However, the effects of vitamin D level on severity of rotator cuff tear and healing after surgical repair have not been documented. To evaluate (1) the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among patients who underwent arthroscopic repair for a full-thickness rotator cuff tear, (2) the relationship of vitamin D level with severity of the rotator cuff tear, and (3) surgical outcomes after repair. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. A consecutive series of 91 patients (age, 50-65 years) who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for full-thickness, small-sized to massive tears were evaluated. Preoperative serum vitamin D levels (25-hydroxyvitamin) were analyzed to detect correlations with the features of a preoperative rotator cuff tear as well as postoperative structural and functional outcomes. All patients were followed clinically for a minimum of 1 year. Preoperative vitamin D levels were deficient (<20 ng/mL) in 80 subjects (88%), insufficient (20-30 ng/mL) in 8 subjects (9%), and normal (>30 ng/mL) in 3 subjects (3%). No correlation was found between preoperative tear size (P = .23), extent of retraction (P = .60), degree of fatty infiltration of each cuff muscle (P > .50 each), or the global fatty infiltration index (P = .32). Similarly, no correlations were detected between vitamin D level and postoperative Sugaya type (P = .66) or any of the functional outcome scores (P > .50 each). Low serum vitamin D level was not related to tear size, extent of retraction, or the degree of fatty infiltration in cuff muscles. It also had no significant relationships with postoperative structural integrity and functional outcomes after

  20. EVALUATION OF THE RESULTS FROM ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR ON ROTATOR CUFF INJURIES AMONG PATIENTS UNDER 50 YEARS OF AGE

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Santos, Ruy Mesquita Maranhão; de Souza, Adriano; Checchia, Sérgio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the results from arthroscopic surgical treatment of rotator cuff injuries among patients under 50 years of age. Methods: Sixty-three patients with rotator cuff injuries who underwent arthroscopic surgical treatment performed by the Shoulder and Elbow Group of the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, in the Fernandinho Simonsen wing of Santa Casa Medical School, São Paulo, between August 1998 and December 2007, were reassessed. The study included all patients with rotator cuff injuries who were under 50 years of age and had been followed up postoperatively for at least 24 months. Results: According to the UCLA evaluation criteria, 59 patients (92%) showed excellent and good results; five (8%) showed fair results; and none showed poor results. The postoperative evaluation showed that the mean range of motion was 145° for elevation, 47° for lateral rotation and T10 for medial rotation. Unsatisfactory results were associated with prolonged duration of the injury, with a statistically significant relationship. Conclusion: Arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff injuries in young patients produces excellent or good results for most patients. PMID:27047819

  1. Trans-tendon arthroscopic repair for partial-thickness articular side tears of the rotator cuff.

    PubMed

    Seo, Young-Jin; Yoo, Yon-Sik; Kim, Do-Young; Noh, Kyu-Cheol; Shetty, Nagraj S; Lee, Jae-Hyung

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a modified trans-tendon method of repairing partial articular surface lesions, which restored the footprint of the rotator cuff anatomically. The 24 consecutive patients with modified trans-tendon method which allowed a wider pressurized contact area by use of additional knotless anchor were included in this study. All patients were evaluated with ASES score and visual analog scale (VAS) preoperatively, postoperative 3 and 12 months. The strength was measured using Isobex digital strength analyzer preoperatively and postoperative 12 months. The ASES scores significantly improved from preoperative 38 ± 13 to 63 ± 5 at 3 months, and 89 ± 5 at 12 months postoperatively. The VAS scores also significantly improved from preoperative 6.6 ± 1.1 to 2 ± 0.7 at 3 months, 0.6 ± 0.7 at 12 months. The strengths significantly increased postoperatively, and there were no significant differences between affected and unaffected shoulders at 12 months postoperatively (P > 0.05). The 22 of 24 patients were either satisfied or very satisfied with postoperative result at 12 months postoperatively. This arthroscopic-modified trans-tendon suture bridge technique for partial-thickness articular side tears of the rotator cuff has shown excellent functional results and very high satisfaction rate of patient during the 12-month follow-up period. Evidence therapeutic study, Level IV.

  2. Delaminated rotator cuff tear: extension of delamination and cuff integrity after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Gwak, Heui-Chul; Kim, Chang-Wan; Kim, Jung-Han; Choo, Hye-Jeung; Sagong, Seung-Yeob; Shin, John

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extension of delamination and the cuff integrity after arthroscopic repair of delaminated rotator cuff tears. Sixty-five patients with delaminated rotator cuff tears were retrospectively reviewed. The delaminated tears were divided into full-thickness delaminated tears and partial-thickness delaminated tears. To evaluate the medial extension, we calculated the coronal size of the delaminated portion. To evaluate the posterior extension, we checked the tendon involved. Cuff integrity was evaluated by computed tomography arthrography. The mean medial extension in the full-thickness and partial-thickness delaminated tears was 18.1 ± 6.0 mm and 22.7 ± 6.3 mm, respectively (P = .0084). The posterior extension into the supraspinatus and the infraspinatus was 36.9% and 32.3%, respectively, in the full-thickness delaminated tears, and it was 27.7% and 3.1%, respectively, in the partial-thickness delaminated tears (P = .0043). With regard to cuff integrity, 35 cases of anatomic healing, 10 cases of partial healing defects, and 17 cases of retear were detected. Among the patients with retear and partial healing of the defect, all the partially healed defects showed delamination. Three retear patients showed delamination, and 14 retear patients did not show delamination; the difference was statistically significant (P = .0001). The full-thickness delaminated tears showed less medial extension and more posterior extension than the partial-thickness delaminated tears. Delamination did not develop in retear patients, but delamination was common in the patients with partially healed defects. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Particulate-steroid betamethasone added to ropivacaine in interscalene brachial plexus block for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair improves postoperative analgesia.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kunitaro; Tokumine, Joho; Yorozu, Tomoko; Moriyama, Kumi; Sakamoto, Hideaki; Inoue, Tetsuo

    2016-10-04

    Dexamethasone added to local anesthetic for brachial plexus block improves postoperative pain after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, as compared with the use of local anesthetic alone. Dexamethasone is present in non-particulate form in local anesthetic solution, while betamethasone is partially present in particulate form. The particulate betamethasone gradually decays and is expected to cause its longer-lasting effect. This study investigated the postoperative analgesic effect of betamethasone added to ropivacaine for brachial plexus block in patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. This was a prospective, randomized, triple-blind study of 44 patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair surgery. Ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block, involving 20 mL of 0.375 % ropivacaine (group R) or 19 mL of 0.375 % ropivacaine with 4 mg (1 mL) of betamethasone (group BR), was administered and surgery was performed under general anesthesia. After surgery, the pain score was recorded at 12 h after surgery, and on the first, second, and seventh postoperative day. Analgesia duration, offset time of motor block, frequency of rescue analgesic administration, postoperative nausea/vomiting, and sleep disturbance during the night after surgery were recorded. The numerical values were expressed as median [interquartile range]. P values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. The duration of analgesia was significantly prolonged in group BR (group BR: 19.1 h [16.6, 20.9 h], group R: 13.3 h [11.6, 16.5 h], p < 0.001). The pain scores at 12 h after surgery and on the first and seventh day after surgery were significantly lower in group BR than in group R. The duration of motor block was significantly prolonged in group BR. The frequency of rescue analgesic administration and the sleep disturbance rate were significantly lower in group BR. There was no difference in postoperative nausea/vomiting between the two groups

  4. Recovery of Muscle Strength After Intact Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair According to Preoperative Rotator Cuff Tear Size.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sang-Jin; Chung, Jaeyoon; Lee, Juyeob; Ko, Young-Won

    2016-04-01

    The recovery of muscle strength after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair based on the preoperative tear size has not yet been well described. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the recovery period of muscle strength by a serial assessment of isometric strength after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair based on the preoperative tear size. The hypothesis was that muscle strength in patients with small and medium tears would recover faster than that in those with large-to-massive tears. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 164 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were included. Isometric strength in forward flexion (FF), internal rotation (IR), and external rotation (ER) was evaluated preoperatively and at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after surgery. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging scans were assessed to evaluate the quality of the rotator cuff muscle, including fatty infiltration, occupation ratio, and tangent sign. Patient satisfaction as well as visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), and Constant scores were assessed at every follow-up. Muscle strength demonstrated the slowest recovery in pain relief and the restoration of shoulder function. To reach the strength of the uninjured contralateral shoulder in all 3 planes of motion, recovery took 6 months in patients with small tears and 18 months in patients with medium tears. Patients with large-to-massive tears showed continuous improvement in strength up to 18 months; however, they did not reach the strength of the contralateral shoulder at final follow-up. At final follow-up, mean strength in FF, IR, and ER was 113.0%, 118.0%, and 112.6% of the contralateral shoulder in patients with small tears, respectively; 105.0%, 112.1%, and 102.6% in patients with medium tears, respectively; and 87.6%, 89.5%, and 85.2% in patients with large-to-massive tears, respectively. Muscle strength in any direction did not significantly correlate with

  5. RESULTS FROM FILLING “REMPLISSAGE” ARTHROSCOPIC TECHNIQUE FOR RECURRENT ANTERIOR SHOULDER DISLOCATION

    PubMed Central

    Gracitelli, Mauro Emilio Conforto; Helito, Camilo Partezani; Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Neto, Arnaldo Amado Ferreira; Benegas, Eduardo; Prada, Flávia de Santis; de Sousa, Augusto Tadeu Barros; Assunção, Jorge Henrique; Sunada, Edwin Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical result from the filling (“remplissage”) technique in association with Bankart lesion repair for treating recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation. Methods: Nine patients (10 shoulders), with a mean follow-up of 13.7 months, presented traumatic recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation. All of them had a Bankart lesion, associated with a Hill-Sachs lesion showing the “engaging” sign. The Hill-Sachs lesion defect was measured and showed an average bone loss of 17.3% (7.7% to 26.7%) in relation to the diameter of the humeral head. All the cases underwent arthroscopic repair of the Bankart lesion, together with filling of the Hill-Sachs lesion by means of tenodesis of the infraspinatus. Results: The Rowe score ranged from 22.5 (10 to 45) before the operation to 80.5 (5 to 100) after the operation (p > 0.001). The UCLA score ranged from 18.0 (8 to 29) to 31.1 (21 to 31) (p > 0.001). The measurements of external and internal rotation at abduction of 90° after the operation were 63.5° (45° to 90°) and 73° (50° to 92°) respectively. Two patients presented recurrence (one with dislocation and the other with subluxation). None of the patients presented pain in the region of the infraspinatus tendon after the operation. Conclusion: Over the short term, the filling (“remplissage”) arthroscopic technique produced improvements in functional scores and a low complication rate when used for treating glenohumeral instability associated with Hill-Sachs lesions. PMID:27027073

  6. Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair With Absorbable Sutures in the Medial-Row Anchors.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Makoto; Hayashida, Kenji; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Kakiuchi, Masaaki

    2015-11-01

    To report the retear rate and retear pattern after double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (DR-ARCR) with the use of absorbable sutures as medial anchor sutures and to address the advantage of the use of absorbable sutures in medial-row anchors. Fifty-seven shoulders (22 male and 35 female patients; mean age, 66.1 years) with complete rotator cuff tears treated with DR-ARCR using absorbable mattress sutures as medial-row anchor sutures were included in the study. They included 35 medium, 17 large, and 5 massive tears. For the medial row, medial anchor sutures were replaced with absorbable mattress sutures. High-strength simple sutures were used for the lateral anchors. We evaluated retear patterns by magnetic resonance imaging examinations performed at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year postoperatively. The clinical conditions of all patients preoperatively and 2 years postoperatively were assessed by the University of California, Los Angeles rating scale and the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons shoulder index. A complete retear of the tendon at the footprint was observed in 5 shoulders. Complete discontinuity at the middle of the tendon around the medial-row anchors with a footprint remnant was observed in 1 shoulder. A thinned repaired rotator cuff was observed in 2 shoulders because of a partial retear of the deep layer. The overall retear rate was 14%. From before to after surgery, the University of California, Los Angeles score significantly improved from 18.4 to 32.9 (P < .0001) and the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons index improved from 55.1 to 87.7 (P < .0001). No complications were observed. The retear rates after DR-ARCR with absorbable sutures as medial-row anchors were 8.8% for complete retears of the tendon at the footprint and 1.7% for complete discontinuity of tendon around the medial-row anchors. This procedure provided a low retear rate around the medial-row anchors. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2015

  7. Prognostic Factors Affecting Rotator Cuff Healing After Arthroscopic Repair in Small to Medium-sized Tears.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Soon; Park, Hyung Jun; Kim, Sae Hoon; Oh, Joo Han

    2015-10-01

    Small and medium-sized rotator cuff tears usually have good clinical and anatomic outcomes. However, healing failure still occurs in some cases. To evaluate prognostic factors for rotator cuff healing in patients with only small to medium-sized rotator cuff tears. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Data were prospectively collected from 339 patients with small to medium-sized rotator cuff tears who underwent arthroscopic repair by a single surgeon between March 2004 and August 2012 and who underwent magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomographic arthrography at least 1 year after surgery. The mean age of the patients was 59.8 years (range, 39-80 years), and the mean follow-up time was 20.8 months (range, 12-66 months). The functional evaluation included the visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, Constant-Murley score, and Simple Shoulder Test. Postoperative VAS for pain and functional scores improved significantly compared with preoperative values (P < .001). Forty-five healing failures occurred (13.3%), and fatty degeneration of the infraspinatus muscle, tear size (anteroposterior dimension), and age were significant factors affecting rotator cuff healing (P < .001, = .018, and = .011, respectively) in multivariate logistic regression analysis. Grade II and higher infraspinatus fatty degeneration correlated with a higher failure rate. The failure rate was also significantly higher in patients with a tear >2 cm in size (34.2%) compared with patients with a tear ≤2 cm (10.6%) (P < .001). A receiver operating characteristic curve was used to determine the predictive cut-off value for the oldest age and the largest tear size for successful healing, which were calculated as 69 years and 2 cm, respectively, with a specificity of 90%. In small to medium-sized rotator cuff tears, grade II fatty degeneration of the infraspinatus muscle according to the Goutallier classification could be a reference point for successful

  8. Long-term Correction in Sleep Disturbance Is Sustained After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Horneff, John G; Tjoumakaris, Fotios; Wowkanech, Charles; Pepe, Matthew; Tucker, Bradford; Austin, Luke

    2017-06-01

    Sleep disturbance is a major complaint of patients with rotator cuff disease that often leads them to seek treatment. The authors previously reported a prospective analysis of patients who underwent rotator cuff repair and found that sleep disturbance significantly improved at 3 months after surgery. That improvement in sleep was maintained at 6 months. In the current study, the authors sought to gain medium-term data on this same population at greater than 2 years. The hypotheses were that improvement in sleep disturbance after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is maintained at 2-year follow-up and that the continued use of narcotic pain medication has a negative effect on sleep quality at 2-year follow-up. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. The original cohort of patients was contacted at a minimum of 24 months after their surgery. Thirty-seven of the 56 patients (66%) involved in the original study were available. Patient outcomes were scored using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Simple Shoulder Test (SST), visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, and Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE). The newly obtained scores were compared with prior scores, which ranged from preoperatively to 6 months postoperatively. The statistically significant improvement of the PSQI score demonstrated in our prior analysis at 6 months postoperatively was maintained, with a mean PSQI score of 5.5 for the 37 patients followed beyond 24 months. Of those patients, 41% still had a PSQI score >5, indicative of sleep disturbance. However, even those patients in our study with a PSQI score >5, indicative of sleep disturbance, had an improved mean score of 9.3 at greater than 24 months compared with those patients with a PSQI score >5 at 6 months, who had a mean PSQI score of 11.5 ( P = .13). Both the SST and VAS scores displayed continued improvement at greater than 24 months, with both displaying moderate strength correlation to the PSQI score (VAS: Spearman rho = 0.479, P < .001

  9. Does autologous leukocyte-platelet-rich plasma improve tendon healing in arthroscopic repair of large or massive rotator cuff tears?

    PubMed

    Charousset, Christophe; Zaoui, Amine; Bellaïche, Laurence; Piterman, Michel

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) outcome of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with the use of leukocyte-platelet-rich plasma (L-PRP) in patients with large or massive rotator cuff tears. A comparative cohort of patients with large or massive rotator cuff tears undergoing arthroscopic repair was studied. Two consecutive groups of patients were included: rotator cuff repairs with L-PRP injection (group 1, n = 35) and rotator cuff repairs without L-PRP injection (group 2, n = 35). A double-row cross-suture cuff repair was performed by a single surgeon with the same rehabilitation protocol. Patients were clinically evaluated with the Constant score; Simple Shoulder Test score; University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) score; and strength measurements by use of a handheld dynamometer. Rotator cuff healing was evaluated by postoperative MRI using the Sugaya classification (type 1 to type 5). We prospectively evaluated the 2 groups at a minimum 2-year follow-up. The results did not show differences in cuff healing between the 2 groups (P = .16). The size of recurrent tears (type 4 v type 5), however, was significantly smaller in group 1 (P = .008). There was no statistically significant difference in the recurrent tear rate (types 4 and 5) between the 2 groups (P = .65). There was no significant difference between group 1 and group 2 in terms of University of California, Los Angeles score (29.1 and 30.3, respectively; P = .90); Simple Shoulder Test score (9.9 and 10.2, respectively; P = .94); Constant score (77.3 and 78.1, respectively; P = .82); and strength (7.5 and 7.0, respectively; P = .51). In our study the use of autologous L-PRP did not improve the quality of tendon healing in patients undergoing arthroscopic repair of large or massive rotator cuff tears based on postoperative MRI evaluation. The only significant advantage was that the L-PRP patients had smaller iterative tears. However, the functional outcome was similar in

  10. Early Incorporation of an Evidence-Based Aquatic-Assisted Approach to Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair Rehabilitation: Prospective Case Study.

    PubMed

    Burmaster, Chris; Eckenrode, Brian J; Stiebel, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Both traditional and progressive rotator cuff repair rehabilitation protocols often delay active motion of the shoulder for 6 weeks or more. The early inclusion of a comprehensive aquatic-assisted exercise program presents a unique approach to postoperative management. The purpose of this case study is to describe a comprehensive evidence-based, aquatic-assisted rehabilitation program following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. A 73-year-old woman with a nonretracted, medium-size, full-thickness tear (2.5 cm) of the supraspinatus tendon underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair and was referred for postoperative physical therapy. The rehabilitation program was initiated at 2 weeks postoperatively and consisted of concurrent land- and aquatic-based interventions over 6 weeks for a total of 18 physical therapy visits. Improvements were made in all 5 patient-reported outcome measures that were recorded weekly over the course of care. Improvements reached or exceeded minimal detectable change levels for the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index and the Penn Shoulder Score. Her numeric pain rating scale score at rest decreased from 4/10 at the initial evaluation to 2/10 at 8 weeks postoperatively and with activity decreased from 9/10 to 6/10. Shoulder strength and range of motion values also exhibited improvement over the course of care. No adverse events occurred during the case study. This case study illustrates the safe inclusion of low-stress aquatic exercises as an early adjunct to traditional land-based rotator cuff repair rehabilitation programs in small- to medium-size repairs. Further studies are needed to determine the long-term effectiveness of adding aquatic therapy to traditional postoperative programs. © 2016 American Physical Therapy Association.

  11. Arthroscopic biceps tenodesis compared with repair of isolated type II SLAP lesions in patients older than 35 years.

    PubMed

    Denard, Patrick J; Lädermann, Alexandre; Parsley, B K; Burkhart, Stephen S

    2014-03-01

    This study compared arthroscopic biceps tenodesis with biceps repair for isolated type II superior labrum anterior and posterior (SLAP) lesions in patients older than 35 years. The authors identified isolated type II SLAP lesions that were surgically managed over a 5-year period. Minimum 2-year follow-up data were available for 22 patients who underwent biceps repair (repair group) and for 15 patients who underwent a primary biceps tenodesis (tenodesis group). Mean age at surgery was 45.2±5.5 years in the repair group and 52.0±8.0 years in the tenodesis group. In the repair group, functional outcome improved from baseline to final follow-up using the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) (47.5 to 87.4, respectively; P<.0001) and University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) scores (18.5 to 31.2, respectively; P<.0001). In the tenodesis group, similar findings were observed for the ASES (43.4 to 89.9, respectively; P<.0001) and UCLA scores (19.0 to 32.7, respectively; P<.0001). No difference was found in functional outcome between the groups. Full range of motion recovery was delayed by approximately 3 months in the repair group compared with the tenodesis group (P=.0631). Two patients in the repair group required a secondary capsular release. Seventy-seven percent of patients in the repair group and 100% of patients in the tenodesis group were satisfied and returned to normal activity (P=.0673). In the current study, individuals older than 35 years with an isolated type II SLAP lesion had a shorter postoperative recovery, a more predictable functional outcome, and a higher rate of satisfaction and return to activity with a biceps tenodesis compared with a biceps repair. Based on these observations, biceps tenodesis is preferable to biceps repair for isolated type II SLAP lesions in nonoverhead athletes older than 35 years. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Editorial Commentary: Anatomical Vandalism of the Hip? Hip Capsular Repair Seems a Sound Adjunct to Hip Arthroscopic Surgery.

    PubMed

    van Arkel, Richard J; Jeffers, Jonathan R T; Amis, Andrew A

    2017-02-01

    The study "Contribution of the Pubofemoral Ligament to Hip Stability: A Biomechanical Study" by Martin, Khoury, Schröder, Johnson, Gómez-Hoyos, Campos, and Palmer found that cutting the hip capsular ligament allowed a large increase in femoral internal rotation, particularly in the flexed hip, causing subluxation to occur. In addition to providing new data on the role of the pubofemoral ligament, it raises the question of whether hip joint surgeons should repair the capsule-what are the likely consequences?-and whether any beneficial effects persist in long-term clinical follow-ups. For now, hip capsular repair seems a sound adjunct to hip arthroscopic surgery. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Perioperative Serum Lipid Status and Statin Use Affect the Revision Surgery Rate After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Cancienne, Jourdan M; Brockmeier, Stephen F; Rodeo, Scott A; Werner, Brian C

    2017-08-01

    Recent animal studies have demonstrated that hyperlipidemia is associated with poor tendon-bone healing after rotator cuff repair; however, these findings have not been substantiated in human studies. To examine any association between hyperlipidemia and the failure of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair requiring revision surgery and to investigate whether the use of statin lipid-lowering agents had any influence on observed associations. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. From a national insurance database, patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with perioperative lipid levels (total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein [LDL], and triglycerides) recorded were reviewed. For each lipid test, patients were stratified into normal, moderate, and high groups based on published standards. For the total cholesterol and LDL cohorts, a subgroup analysis of patients stratified by statin use was performed. The primary outcome measure was ipsilateral revision rotator cuff surgery, including revision repair or debridement. A logistic regression analysis controlling for patient demographics and comorbidities was utilized for comparison. There were 30,638 patients included in the study. The rate of revision rotator cuff surgery was significantly increased in patients with moderate (odds ratio [OR], 1.20; 95% CI, 1.03-1.40; P = .022) and high total cholesterol levels (OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.10-1.55; P = .006) compared with patients with normal total cholesterol levels perioperatively. Within each of these groups, patients without statin use had significantly higher rates of revision surgery, while those with statin prescriptions did not. The absolute risk reduction for statin use ranged from 0.24% to 1.87% when stratified by the total cholesterol level, yielding a number needed to treat from 54 to 408 patients. The rate of revision surgery was significantly increased in patients with moderate (OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.10-1.41; P = .001) and high LDL levels (OR, 1.46; 95

  14. Arthroscopic First Metatarsophalangeal Arthrodesis for Repair of Fixed Hallux Varus Deformity.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopic first metatarsophalangeal arthrodesis for fixed hallux varus deformity can be very difficult because narrowing of the medial joint space results in difficult access. The abductor hallucis tendon and the medial capsule can be released through a small proximal plantar medial incision. This will convert the deformity into a flexible one and open up the medial joint space. This allows arthroscopic arthrodesis using the standard dorsolateral and medial portals. The plantar medial incision can also be used for arthroscopy of the metatarsosesamoid compartment and insertion of a screw for first metatarsophalangeal arthrodesis.

  15. Single-row vs. double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: clinical and 3 Tesla MR arthrography results.

    PubMed

    Tudisco, Cosimo; Bisicchia, Salvatore; Savarese, Eugenio; Fiori, Roberto; Bartolucci, Dario A; Masala, Salvatore; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2013-01-27

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has become popular in the last few years because it avoids large skin incisions and deltoid detachment and dysfunction. Earlier arthroscopic single-row (SR) repair methods achieved only partial restoration of the original footprint of the tendons of the rotator cuff, while double-row (DR) repair methods presented many biomechanical advantages and higher rates of tendon-to-bone healing. However, DR repair failed to demonstrate better clinical results than SR repair in clinical trials. MR imaging at 3 Tesla, especially with intra-articular contrast medium (MRA), showed a better diagnostic performance than 1.5 Tesla in the musculoskeletal setting. The objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the clinical and 3 Tesla MRA results in two groups of patients operated on for a medium-sized full-thickness rotator cuff tear with two different techniques. The first group consisted of 20 patients operated on with the SR technique; the second group consisted of 20 patients operated on with the DR technique. All patients were evaluated at a minimum of 3 years after surgery. The primary end point was the re-tear rate at 3 Tesla MRA. The secondary end points were the Constant-Murley Scale (CMS), the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) scores, surgical time and implant expense. The mean follow-up was 40 months in the SR group and 38.9 months in the DR group. The mean postoperative CMS was 70 in the SR group and 68 in the DR group. The mean SST score was 9.4 in the SR group and 10.1 in the DR group. The re-tear rate was 60% in the SR group and 25% in the DR group. Leakage of the contrast medium was observed in all patients. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on 3 Tesla MRA in the evaluation of two different techniques of rotator cuff repair. DR repair resulted in a statistically significant lower re-tear rate, with longer surgical time and higher implant expense, despite no difference in clinical outcomes. We think that

  16. Impact of Platelet-Rich Plasma on Arthroscopic Repair of Small- to Medium-Sized Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Holtby, Richard; Christakis, Monique; Maman, Eran; MacDermid, Joy C.; Dwyer, Tim; Athwal, George S.; Faber, Kenneth; Theodoropoulos, John; Woodhouse, Linda J.; Razmjou, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increased interest in using platelet-rich plasma (PRP) as an augment to rotator cuff repair warrants further investigation, particularly in smaller rotator cuff tears. Purpose: To examine the effectiveness of PRP application in improving perioperative pain and function and promoting healing at 6 months after arthroscopic repair of small- or medium-sized rotator cuff tears. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. Methods: This was a double-blinded randomized controlled trial of patients undergoing arthroscopic repair of partial- or full-thickness rotator cuff tears of up to 3 cm who were observed for 6 months. Patients were randomized to either repair and PRP application (study group) or repair only (control group) groups. The patient-oriented outcome measures utilized were the visual analog scale (VAS), the Short Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (ShortWORC), the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) form, and the Constant-Murley Score (CMS). Range of motion (ROM) and inflammatory and coagulation markers were measured before and after surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging was used at 6 months to assess retear and fatty infiltration rate. Results: Eighty-two patients (41 males) with a mean age of 59 ± 8 years were enrolled; 41 patients were included in each group. Both the PRP and control groups showed a significant improvement in their pain level based on the VAS within the first 30 days (P < .0001), with the PRP group reporting less pain than the control group (P = .012), which was clinically significantly different from days 8 through 11. The PRP group reported taking less painkillers (P = .026) than the control group within the first 30 days. All outcome measure scores and ROM improved significantly after surgery (P < .0001), with no between-group differences. No differences were observed between groups in inflammatory or coagulation marker test results (P > .05), retear (14% vs 18% full retear; P = .44), or fatty

  17. Preservation of bursal-sided tendon in partial-thickness articular-sided rotator cuff tears: a novel arthroscopic transtendon anatomic repair technique.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sang-Jin; Jeong, Jae-Hoon; Jeon, Yoon Sang; Kim, Rag Gyu

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to introduce a novel arthroscopic transtendon anatomic repair technique that spares the intact bursal-sided tendon in articular-sided partial-thickness rotator cuff tears (PTRCT) and to present shoulder functional outcomes in patients with symptomatic articular-sided PCRCT that involves more than 50 % of its thickness after arthroscopic repair using a novel technique. Eighteen patients with symptomatic articular-sided PCRCT involving more than 50 % of the tendon's thickness underwent arthroscopic repair using a devised technique. The devised technique restores only the torn articular portion of the rotator cuff at the anatomical footprint using a suture anchor, and preserves the integrity of the corresponding bursal-sided tendon by tying knots at the most lateral bursal side on the subacromial space. Clinical and functional outcome using ASES and Constant scores were evaluated. The structural integrity of the rotator cuff was evaluated by MRI at 6 months postoperatively. Pain relief and shoulder functional outcomes were encouraging during the recovery phase after operation. ASES (preoperative 54.0 ± 10.3 to postoperative 92.6 ± 8.0), Constant score (61.2 ± 8.5-88.0 ± 5.3), VAS for pain (4.9 ± 2.6-0.6 ± 0.7) improved significantly after arthroscopic transtendon anatomic repair (p < 0.001). No patients had rotator cuff retears on 6-month MRI. No complications related to surgical procedures had occurred. The devised technique of arthroscopic transtendon repair provided satisfactory functional outcomes without postoperative discomforts. This technique minimizes over-tightening of the articular layer and reduces tension mismatches between the articular and bursal layers, which are considered as important factors for improvement of postoperative shoulder motion.

  18. Efficacy of platelet-rich plasma in arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Cai, You-zhi; Zhang, Chi; Lin, Xiang-jin

    2015-12-01

    The use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an innovative clinical therapy, especially in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical improvement and tendon-to-bone healing with and without PRP therapy in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. A systematic search was done in the major medical databases to evaluate the studies using PRP therapy (PRP+) or with no PRP (PRP-) for the treatment of patients with rotator cuff tears. We reviewed clinical scores such as the Constant score, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) Shoulder Rating Scale, the Simple Shoulder Test, and the failure-to-heal rate by magnetic resonance imaging between PRP+ and PRP- groups. Five studies included in this review were used for a meta-analysis based on data availability. There were no statistically significant differences between PRP+ and PRP- groups for overall outcome scores (P > .05). However, the PRP+ group exhibited better healing rates postoperatively than the PRP- group (P = .03) in small/moderate full-thickness tears. The use of PRP therapy in full-thickness rotator cuff repairs showed no statistically significant difference compared with no PRP therapy in clinical outcome scores, but the failure-to-heal rate was significantly decreased when PRP was used for treatment of small-to-moderately sized tears. PRP therapy may improve tendon-to-bone healing in patients with small or moderate rotator cuff tears. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Platelet-rich plasma for arthroscopic repair of medium to large rotator cuff tears: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jo, Chris Hyunchul; Shin, Ji Sun; Shin, Won Hyoung; Lee, Seung Yeon; Yoon, Kang Sup; Shin, Sue

    2015-09-01

    Two main questions about the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for regeneration purposes are its effect on the speed of healing and the quality of healing. Despite recent numerous studies, evidence is still lacking in this area, especially in a representative patient population with medium to large rotator cuff tears. To assess the efficacy of PRP augmentation on the speed and quality of healing in patients undergoing arthroscopic repair for medium to large rotator cuff tears. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. A total of 74 patients scheduled for arthroscopic repair of medium to large rotator cuff tears were randomly assigned to undergo either PRP-augmented repair (PRP group) or conventional repair (conventional group). In the PRP group, 3 PRP gels (3 × 3 mL) were applied to each patient between the torn end and the greater tuberosity. The primary outcome was the Constant score at 3 months after surgery. Secondary outcome measures included the visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, range of motion (ROM), muscle strength, overall satisfaction and function, functional scores, retear rate, and change in the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the supraspinatus muscle. There was no difference between the 2 groups in the Constant score at 3 months (P > .05). The 2 groups had similar results on the VAS for pain, ROM, muscle strength, overall satisfaction and function, and other functional scores (all P > .05) except for the VAS for worst pain (P = .043). The retear rate of the PRP group (3.0%) was significantly lower than that of the conventional group (20.0%) (P = .032). The change in 1-year postoperative and immediately postoperative CSAs was significantly different between the 2 groups: -36.76 ± 45.31 mm(2) in the PRP group versus -67.47 ± 47.26 mm(2) in the conventional group (P = .014). Compared with repairs without PRP augmentation, the current PRP preparation and application methods for medium to large rotator cuff repairs significantly improved the

  20. Arthroscopic repair of large U-shaped rotator cuff tears without margin convergence versus repair of crescent- or L-shaped tears.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Young; Jung, Seok Won; Jeon, Seung-Hyub; Cho, Hyoung-Weon; Choi, Jin-Ho; Oh, Kyung-Soo

    2014-01-01

    For large-sized tears of the rotator cuff, data according to the tear shape have not yet been reported for repair methodology, configuration, and subsequent integrity. The retear rate after the repair of large mobile tears, such as crescent- or L-shaped tears, is believed to be lower compared with retear rates after the repair of large U-shaped tears that are accompanied by anterior or posterior leaves of the rotator cuff. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Data were collected and analyzed from 95 consecutive patients with a large-sized rotator cuff tear who underwent arthroscopic suture-bridge repair. Patients were divided into 2 groups: those having crescent- or L-shaped tears (mobile tear group, 53 patients) and those having U-shaped tears (U-shaped tear group, 42 patients). The integrity of the repaired constructs was determined by ultrasonography at 4.5, 12, and 24 months. Moreover, clinical evaluations were performed by using the Constant score, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, and muscle strength at intervals of 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. On ultrasonography at 4.5, 12, and 24 months, a retear was detected in 6, 2, and 1 patients in the mobile tear group and in 5, 2, and 1 patients in the U-shaped tear group, respectively. Significant differences in retear rates were not detected between the groups overall or at each time point. Moreover, clinical scores were similar between groups, except for the presence of a temporarily higher Constant score at 12 months in the mobile tear group. With regard to shoulder strength, between-group comparisons indicated no statistically significant difference, either in abduction or external rotation, except for the presence of temporarily higher external rotation strength at 3 months in the mobile tear group. Arthroscopic repair of large-sized rotator cuff tears yielded substantial improvements in shoulder function, regardless of tear retraction, during midterm follow-up. Moreover, the

  1. Functional status and failed rotator cuff repair predict outcomes after arthroscopic-assisted latissimus dorsi transfer for irreparable massive rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Castricini, Roberto; De Benedetto, Massimo; Familiari, Filippo; De Gori, Marco; De Nardo, Pasquale; Orlando, Nicola; Gasparini, Giorgio; Galasso, Olimpio

    2016-04-01

    Arthroscopic-assisted latissimus dorsi tendon transfer (LDTT) has been recently introduced for treatment of irreparable, posterosuperior massive rotator cuff tears. We sought to evaluate the functional outcomes of this technique and to check for possible outcome predictors. The study reviewed 86 patients (aged 59.8 ± 5.9 years) who underwent an arthroscopic-assisted latissimus dorsi tendon transfer after 36.4 ± 9 months of follow-up. Of these, 14 patients (16.3%) sustained an irreparable massive rotator cuff tear after a failed arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The Constant and Murley score (CMS) was used to assess patients' functionality preoperatively and at follow-up. As a group, the CMS improved with surgery from 35.5 ± 6.1 to 69.5 ± 12.3 (P < .001). A lower preoperative CMS and a previous failed rotator cuff repair resulted in lower postoperative range of motion (P = .044 and P = .007, respectively) and CMS (P = .042 and P = .018, respectively). A previous rotator cuff repair resulted in lower satisfaction with surgery (P = .009). Gender and age did not affect the clinical outcomes. Our results support the effectiveness of arthroscopic-assisted LDTT in the treatment of patients with an irreparable, posterosuperior massive rotator cuff tears in pain relief, functional recovery, and postoperative satisfaction. Patients with lower preoperative CMS and a history of failed rotator cuff repair have a greater likelihood of having a lower clinical result. However, the favorable values of summary postoperative scores do not exclude these patients as candidates for arthroscopic-assisted LDTT. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The Relationship Between Shoulder Stiffness and Rotator Cuff Healing: A Study of 1,533 Consecutive Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repairs.

    PubMed

    McNamara, William J; Lam, Patrick H; Murrell, George A C

    2016-11-16

    Retear and stiffness are not uncommon outcomes of rotator cuff repair. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between rotator cuff repair healing and shoulder stiffness. A total of 1,533 consecutive shoulders had an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair by a single surgeon. Patients assessed their shoulder stiffness using a Likert scale preoperatively and at 1, 6, 12, and 24 weeks (6 months) postoperatively, and examiners evaluated passive range of motion preoperatively and at 6, 12, and 24 weeks postoperatively. Repair integrity was determined by ultrasound evaluation at 6 months. After rotator cuff repair, there was an overall significant loss of patient-ranked and examiner-assessed shoulder motion at 6 weeks compared with preoperative measurements (p < 0.0001), a partial recovery at 12 weeks, and a full recovery at 24 weeks. Shoulders that were stiff before surgery were more likely to be stiff at 6, 12, and, to a lesser extent, 24 weeks after surgery (r = 0.10 to 0.31; p < 0.0001). A stiffer shoulder at 6 and 12 weeks (but not 24 weeks) postoperatively correlated with better rotator cuff integrity at 6 months postoperatively (r = 0.11 to 0.18; p < 0.001). The retear rate of patients with ≤20° of external rotation at 6 weeks postoperatively was 7%, while the retear rate of patients with >20° of external rotation at 6 weeks was 15% (p < 0.001). In patients who developed stiffness after surgery, a rotator cuff repair was more likely to heal. Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. Copyright © 2016 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  3. Preliminary Results of a Consecutive Series of Large & Massive Rotator Cuff Tears Treated with Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repairs Augmented with Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Consigliere, Paolo; Polyzois, Ioannis; Sarkhel, Tanaya; Gupta, Rohit; Levy, Ofer; Narvani, A. Ali

    2017-01-01

    Background: Recurrence rate of rotator cuff tears is still high despite the improvements of surgical techniques, materials used and a better knowledge of the healing process of the rotator cuff tendons. Large to massive rotator cuff tears are particularly associated with a high failure rate, especially in elderly. Augmentation of rotator cuff repairs with extracellular matrix or synthetic patches has gained popularity in recent years with the aim of reducing failure. The aim of this study was to investigate the outcome of rotator cuff repairs augmented with denatured extracellular matrix in a series of patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for large to massive tears. Methods: Ten consecutive patients, undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with extracellular matrix augment for large and massive tears, were prospectively enrolled into this single surgeon study. All repairs were performed arthroscopically with a double row technique augmented with extracellular matrix. Oxford Shoulder Score, Constant Score and pain visual analogue scale (VAS) were used to monitor the shoulder function and outcome pre-operatively and at three, six and 12-month follow-up. Minimum follow up was three months. Mean follow up was 7 months. Results: Mean Constant score improved from 53 (SD=4) pre-operatively to 75 (SD=11) at final follow up. Mean Oxford score also increased from 30 (SD=8) pre-operatively to 47 (SD=10) at the final follow up. The visual analogue scale (VAS) improved from seven out of 10 (SD=2) preoperatively to 0.6 (SD=0.8) at final follow up. Additionally, there was significant improvement at three months mark in Constant score. Conclusion: Arthroscopic repair and augmentation of large and massive rotator cuff tears with extracellular matrix patch has good early outcome. PMID:28271082

  4. Preliminary Results of a Consecutive Series of Large & Massive Rotator Cuff Tears Treated with Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repairs Augmented with Extracellular Matrix.

    PubMed

    Consigliere, Paolo; Polyzois, Ioannis; Sarkhel, Tanaya; Gupta, Rohit; Levy, Ofer; Narvani, A Ali

    2017-01-01

    Recurrence rate of rotator cuff tears is still high despite the improvements of surgical techniques, materials used and a better knowledge of the healing process of the rotator cuff tendons. Large to massive rotator cuff tears are particularly associated with a high failure rate, especially in elderly. Augmentation of rotator cuff repairs with extracellular matrix or synthetic patches has gained popularity in recent years with the aim of reducing failure. The aim of this study was to investigate the outcome of rotator cuff repairs augmented with denatured extracellular matrix in a series of patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for large to massive tears. Ten consecutive patients, undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with extracellular matrix augment for large and massive tears, were prospectively enrolled into this single surgeon study. All repairs were performed arthroscopically with a double row technique augmented with extracellular matrix. Oxford Shoulder Score, Constant Score and pain visual analogue scale (VAS) were used to monitor the shoulder function and outcome pre-operatively and at three, six and 12-month follow-up. Minimum follow up was three months. Mean follow up was 7 months. Mean Constant score improved from 53 (SD=4) pre-operatively to 75 (SD=11) at final follow up. Mean Oxford score also increased from 30 (SD=8) pre-operatively to 47 (SD=10) at the final follow up. The visual analogue scale (VAS) improved from seven out of 10 (SD=2) preoperatively to 0.6 (SD=0.8) at final follow up. Additionally, there was significant improvement at three months mark in Constant score. Arthroscopic repair and augmentation of large and massive rotator cuff tears with extracellular matrix patch has good early outcome.

  5. Cartilage T2 assessment: differentiation of normal hyaline cartilage and reparative tissue after arthroscopic cartilage repair in equine subjects.

    PubMed

    White, Lawrence M; Sussman, Marshall S; Hurtig, Mark; Probyn, Linda; Tomlinson, George; Kandel, Rita

    2006-11-01

    To prospectively assess T2 mapping characteristics of normal articular cartilage and of cartilage at sites of arthroscopic repair, including comparison with histologic results and collagen organization assessed at polarized light microscopy (PLM). Study protocol was compliant with the Canadian Council on Animal Care Guidelines and approved by the institutional animal care committee. Arthroscopic osteochondral autograft transplantation (OAT) and microfracture arthroplasty (MFx) were performed in knees of 10 equine subjects (seven female, three male; age range, 3-5 years). A site of arthroscopically normal cartilage was documented in each joint as a control site. Joints were harvested at 12 (n = 5) and 24 (n = 5) weeks postoperatively and were imaged at 1.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) with a 10-echo sagittal fast spin-echo acquisition. T2 maps of each site (21 OAT harvest, 10 MFx, 12 OAT plug, and 10 control sites) were calculated with linear least-squares curve fitting. Cartilage T2 maps were qualitatively graded as "organized" (normal transition of low-to-high T2 signal from deep to superficial cartilage zones) or "disorganized." Quantitative mean T2 values were calculated for deep, middle, and superficial cartilage at each location. Results were compared with histologic and PLM assessments by using kappa analysis. T2 maps were qualitatively graded as organized at 20 of 53 sites and as disorganized at 33 sites. Perfect agreement was seen between organized T2 and histologic findings of hyaline cartilage and between disorganized T2 and histologic findings of fibrous reparative tissue (kappa = 1.0). Strong agreement was seen between organized T2 and normal PLM findings and between disorganized T2 and abnormal PLM findings (kappa = .92). Quantitative assessment of the deep, middle, and superficial cartilage, respectively, showed mean T2 values of 53.3, 58.6, and 54.9 msec at reparative fibrous tissue sites and 40.7, 53.6, and 61.6 msec at hyaline cartilage sites. A

  6. Reduction of postoperative stiffness after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: results of a customized physical therapy regimen based on risk factors for stiffness.

    PubMed

    Koo, Samuel S; Parsley, B K; Burkhart, Stephen S; Schoolfield, John D

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the benefits of a modified rehabilitation protocol (incorporating early closed-chain overhead stretching) in reducing the risk of postoperative stiffness after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. During a 17-month period, we performed primary arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs in 152 patients. After surgery, patients with risk factors identified in the previous study (calcific tendonitis, adhesive capsulitis, PASTA [partial articular surface tendon avulsion]-type rotator cuff repair, concomitant labral repair, or single-tendon cuff repair) were enrolled in a modified rehabilitation protocol that added early overhead closed-chain passive motion exercises to our standard protocol; alternatively, patients without risk factors received a standard conservative rehabilitation program. Historical controls were used and comprised patients in the senior author's practice who all received the conservative rehabilitation protocol. The prevalence of postoperative stiffness was compared between the historical cohort and current study patients by use of Fisher exact tests. Among the 152 patients studied, 79 were positive for at least 1 of the specified risk factors and received the modified protocol. Postoperative stiffness developed in none of the 79 patients enrolled in the modified program. This finding represented a significant improvement (Fisher exact test, P = .004) over the historical controls, in which 18 of the 231 at-risk patients had significant postoperative stiffness develop. In at-risk patients (with calcific tendonitis, adhesive capsulitis, PASTA repair, concomitant labral repair, and single-tendon repair), a postoperative rehabilitation regimen that incorporates early closed-chain passive overhead motion can reduce the incidence of postoperative stiffness after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Copyright © 2011 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessment of the Postoperative Appearance of the Rotator Cuff Tendon Using Serial Sonography After Arthroscopic Repair of a Rotator Cuff Tear.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hye Jin; Choi, Ja-Young; Hong, Sung Hwan; Kang, Yusuhn; Park, Jina; Kim, Sae Hoon; Kang, Heung Sik

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate serial changes in sonographic findings of a rotator cuff tendon after rotator cuff repair. Sixty-five arthroscopically repaired rotator cuff tears (43 full-thickness tears and 22 partial-thickness tears) were retrospectively included in this study. Serial sonographic examinations were performed at 5 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after surgery. The sonographic findings of the repaired tendon were assessed for a recurrent tear, tendon thickness, morphologic tendon characteristics, vascularity, and bursitis at each time point. Four recurrent tears occurred within 3 months of surgery. The postoperative tendon thickness decreased from 5 weeks to 6 months after surgery (P = .001). There were significant changes in the morphologic tendon characteristics, including the echo texture, fibrillar pattern, and surface irregularity of the repaired tendon, from 5 weeks to 6 months after surgery (P < .001). Additionally, subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis and the vascularity of the repaired tendon decreased postoperatively over time. Serial sonography after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was useful for monitoring the postoperative changes in a repaired tendon. The morphologic appearance of the repaired tendon and peritendinous soft tissue changes improved over time and nearly normalized within 6 months of surgery. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  8. Fatty degeneration and atrophy of the rotator cuff muscles after arthroscopic repair: does it improve, halt or deteriorate?

    PubMed

    Deniz, Gokmen; Kose, Ozkan; Tugay, Ali; Guler, Ferhat; Turan, Adil

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in fatty degeneration and atrophy of rotator cuff muscles after arthroscopic repair. We further assessed the factors affecting the functional outcomes and integrity of the rotator cuff. One hundred and two prospectively followed patients who underwent single-row arthroscopic repair for full-thickness rotator cuff tears between 2008 and 2010 in our institution were included. All patients underwent shoulder MRI examination before the arthroscopic repair and at the final follow-up at least 2 years after the surgical repair. Supraspinatus muscle atrophy was measured and evaluated according to the Thomazeau classification. The fatty degeneration of the cuff muscles was graded according to the Goutallier classification. Functional outcomes were assessed with the Constant shoulder score. The changes in fatty degeneration and atrophy were analyzed during the treatment period. Correlation coefficients (Pearson r) and stepwise, multiple linear regression were used to determine the relationship between the outcome variables (final Constant score and integrity of the cuff), and the predictor variables, age, sex, follow-up duration, initial muscle atrophy, final muscle atrophy, initial fatty degeneration and final fatty degeneration. Of the 102 patients reviewed, 87 patients responded and concluded the final clinical follow-up and MRI examination (85.2 % follow-up rate). There were 67 females and 20 males with a mean age of 62.5 ± 8.3 years (range 40-80 years). Mean follow-up period was 30.1 ± 5.8 months (range 24-43 months). At the final follow-up, the mean Constant shoulder score was 94.2 ± 8.2 (range 70-100), and 66 (75.9 %) patients rated as excellent, 14 (16.1 %) as good, and 7 (8.0 %) as fair. No patient had poor results. There was re-rupture in 26 (29.9 %) patients on final MRI examination. No patient had improvement in muscle atrophy and fatty degeneration. The atrophic changes between intact tendon and re

  9. Does Pure Platelet-Rich Plasma Affect Postoperative Clinical Outcomes After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair? A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Flury, Matthias; Rickenbacher, Dominik; Schwyzer, Hans-Kaspar; Jung, Christian; Schneider, Marco M; Stahnke, Katharina; Goldhahn, Jörg; Audigé, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    The exact role of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in rotator cuff tendon reconstruction remains unclear. This study investigated whether an intraoperative pure PRP injection, compared with a local anesthetic injection, improves patient-reported outcomes at 3 and 6 months after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The hypothesis was that pure PRP improves patient-reported outcomes (Oxford Shoulder Score [OSS]) at 3 and 6 months after surgery and has the same pain-reducing effect compared with a postoperative subacromial local anesthetic (ropivacaine) injection. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. Between January 2011 and November 2012, a total of 120 patients who underwent arthroscopic double-row repair of a supraspinatus tendon rupture were randomized to receive either pure PRP by an injection at the footprint (PRP group; n = 60) or ropivacaine injected in the subacromial region (control group; n = 60). Seventy-eight percent of patients had other concomitant tears. All patients, surgeons, and follow-up investigators were blinded. Clinical parameters and various outcome scores (Constant-Murley shoulder score; OSS; patient American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score; quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score; EuroQol 5 dimensions) were documented preoperatively and at 3, 6, and 24 months postoperatively. The repair integrity was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging or ultrasound at 24 months. Furthermore, a pain diary was completed within the first 10 postoperative days, and adverse events were recorded. Group outcome differences were analyzed using t tests, Fisher exact tests, and mixed models. The final follow-up rate was 91%. An associated tear of the subscapularis tendon was diagnosed in 23% of PRP-treated patients and 36% of control patients. Three months after surgery, the mean (±SD) OSS was 32.9 ± 8.6 in PRP-treated patients and 30.7 ± 10.0 in control patients (P = .221). No significant differences were noted for other outcome

  10. Progression of function and pain relief as indicators for returning to sports after arthroscopic isolated type II SLAP repair-a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Boesmueller, Sandra; Tiefenboeck, Thomas M; Hofbauer, Marcus; Bukaty, Adam; Oberleitner, Gerhard; Huf, Wolfgang; Fialka, Christian

    2017-06-13

    One of the currently used surgical techniques in isolated type II SLAP lesions is arthroscopic SLAP repair. Postoperatively, patients tend to suffer from a prolonged period of pain and are restricted in their sports activities for at least 6 months. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the clinical outcome as well as the postoperative course of pain after arthroscopic type II SLAP repair. Outcome measures were assessed using the Individual Relative Constant Score (CSindiv), the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) Score, the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), and the Short Form 36 (SF-36). Data were collected preoperatively, as well as at 3, 6, 12 and >24 months postoperatively. Eleven patients with an average age of 31.8 years (range: 22.8-49.8 years) underwent arthroscopic repair of isolated type II SLAP lesions. Mean follow-up time was 41.9 months (range: 36.1-48.4 months). 6 months after surgery, there was a statistically significant improvement of function according to the CSindiv (p = 0.004), the ASES Score (p = 0.006), and the SF-36 subscale "physical functioning" (p = 0.014) and a statistically significant decrease of pain according to the VAS (p = 0.007) and the SF-36 subscale "bodily pain" (p = 0.022) compared to preoperative levels. Arthroscopic repair of isolated type II SLAP lesions with suture anchors leads to a satisfactory functional outcome and return to pre-injury sports levels, with delayed, but significant pain relief observed 6 months after surgery. Thus, a return to sports should not be allowed earlier than 6 months after surgery, when patients have reached pain-free function and recovered strength. Researchregistry1761 (UIN).

  11. The development of a quantitative scoring system to predict whether a large-to-massive rotator cuff tear can be arthroscopically repaired.

    PubMed

    Kim, S-J; Park, J-S; Lee, K-H; Lee, B-G

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a quantitative scoring system to predict whether a large-to-massive rotator cuff tear was arthroscopically reparable prior to surgery. We conducted a retrospective review of the pre-operative MR imaging and surgical records of 87 patients (87 shoulders) who underwent arthroscopic repair of a large-to-massive rotator cuff tear. Patients were divided into two groups, based on the surgical outcome of the repair. Of the 87 patients, 53 underwent complete repair (Group I) and 34 an incomplete repair (Group II). Pre-operative MR images were reviewed to quantify several variables. Between-group differences were evaluated and multiple logistic regression analysis was used to calculate the predictive value of significant variables. The reparability index (RI) was constructed using the odds ratios of significant variables and a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis performed to identify the optimal RI cutoff to differentiate between the two groups. The following variables were identified as independent predictors of arthroscopic reparability: the size of the defect with medial-lateral diameter (cutoff, 4.2 cm) and anterior-posterior diameter (cutoff, 3.7cm); Patte's grade of muscle atrophy (cutoff, grade 3) and Goutallier grade of fatty degeneration (cutoff, grade 3). An RI cutoff value of 2.5 provided the highest differentiation between groups I and II, with an area under the curve of 0.964, and a sensitivity of 73.5% and specificity of 96.2%. The RI developed in our study may prove to be an efficient clinical scoring system to predict whether a large-to-massive rotator cuff tear is arthroscopically reparable. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:1656-61. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  12. Effects of one-month continuous passive motion after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: results at 1-year follow-up of a prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Raffaele; Conti, Marco; Notarnicola, Angela; Maradei, Leonardo; Giardella, Antonio; Castagna, Alessandro

    2010-05-01

    The study included 100 patients who underwent an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. All patients suffered about a rotator cuff tear that was repaired arthroscopically with a suture anchor technique. Immediately postoperatively, patients were randomly allocated to one of two different postoperative physiotherapy regimens: passive self-assisted range of motion exercise (controls: 46 patients) versus passive self-assisted range of motion exercise associated with use of continuous passive motion (CPM) for a total of 2 h per day (experimental group: 54 patients), for 4 weeks. After this time, all the patients of both groups underwent the same physical therapy protocol. An independent examiner assessed the patients at 2.5, 6 and 12 months particularly about pain with the VAS scale (0-10) and the range of motion (ROM). Our findings show that postoperative treatment of an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with passive self-assisted exercises associated with 2-h CPM a day provides a significant advantage in terms of ROM improvement and pain relief when compared to passive self-assisted exercise alone, at the short-term follow-up. No significant differences between the two groups were observed at 1 year postoperatively.

  13. Arthroscopic repair of anterosuperior (supraspinatus/subscapularis) rotator cuff tears: a prospective cohort with 2- to 4-year follow-up. Classification of biceps subluxation/instability.

    PubMed

    Bennett, William F

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of patients who underwent arthroscopic repair of anterosuperior rotator cuff tears. The null hypothesis, that there was no difference between preoperative scores and postoperative scores, was tested statistically. A cohort study. The preoperative and postoperative status of patients with anterosuperior rotator cuff tears was analyzed using the Constant score, American Shoulder and Elbow Society Index (ASES Index), a visual analog pain scale (VAS), a single question of percent function compared with the opposite unaffected extremity, and a single question reflecting satisfaction, "would you undergo the surgery and the postoperative rehabilitation to achieve the result you have today." There were also 2 groups compared: 1 that had a "tac" used for repair of the subscapularis tendon, and the other that used a "tie" technique for subscapularis repair. All supraspinatus tendon tears were complete and were repaired using a soft-tissue fixation device. There was a statistically significant difference for all outcome measures except for the objective Constant score of the tie group, P =.58. Follow-up was 2 to 4 years. There were no differences based on sex or type of fixation device used for repair of the subscapularis tendon. There were no reruptures, clinically. The arthroscopic repair of anterosuperior rotator cuff tears provides reliable expectation for improvement in function, decreases in pain, decreases in clinical findings of biceps subluxation and inflammation, improvement in shoulder scores, and the improvement of clinical findings of subscapularis insufficiency.

  14. Arthroscopic treatment of rotator cuff tear in the over-60s: repair is preferable to isolated acromioplasty-tenotomy in the short term.

    PubMed

    Dezaly, C; Sirveaux, F; Philippe, R; Wein-Remy, F; Sedaghatian, J; Roche, O; Molé, D

    2011-10-01

    The principal study objective was to compare clinical results for arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tear and acromioplasty-tenotomy in patients aged over 60 years. Repair provides better clinical results than isolated acromioplasty-tenotomy. Shoulder function is improved when healing is obtained. One hundred and forty-two patients aged over 60 years (mean age, 67 years) presenting with reparable supraspinatus tear, extending to a greater or lesser degree to the infraspinatus, agreed to take part in a randomized prospective study. Fifteen were excluded from statistical analysis. All underwent acromioplasty and biceps tenotomy. They were randomly assigned to arthroscopic rotator-cuff repair (CR group) or not (AT group). The principal evaluation criterion was mean weighted Constant score at one year's follow-up. Healing in the CR group was assessed on ultrasound at one year. The complications rate was 7.9%. Mean weighted Constant score was significantly better in group CR: 75.8%, versus 68.8% in AT. In the CR group, the 1-year healing rate was 67.6%. Healing significantly impacted mean weighted Constant score: 80% with healing, versus 66.9% in iterative tearing. Whatever the size of the tear, mean weighted Constant score was significantly better in patients with than without (no repair or iterative tear) tendon healing. The study demonstrated the interest of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in patients aged over 60 years. The benefit of repair compared to isolated acromioplasty-tenotomy depended on tendon healing. Randomized prospective study, level II. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of open and arthroscopic rotator cuff repair [the UK Rotator Cuff Surgery (UKUFF) randomised trial].

    PubMed

    Carr, Andrew J; Cooper, Cushla D; Campbell, Marion K; Rees, Jonathan L; Moser, Jane; Beard, David J; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Gray, Alastair; Dawson, Jill; Murphy, Jacqueline; Bruhn, Hanne; Cooper, David; Ramsay, Craig R

    2015-10-01

    Uncertainty exists regarding the best management of patients with degenerative tears of the rotator cuff. To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of arthroscopic and open rotator cuff repair in patients aged ≥ 50 years with degenerative rotator cuff tendon tears. Two parallel-group randomised controlled trial. Nineteen teaching and district general hospitals in the UK. Patients (n = 273) aged ≥ 50 years with degenerative rotator cuff tendon tears. Arthroscopic surgery and open rotator cuff repair, with surgeons using their usual and preferred method of arthroscopic or open repair. Follow-up was by telephone questionnaire at 2 and 8 weeks after surgery and by postal questionnaire at 8, 12 and 24 months after randomisation. The Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS) at 24 months was the primary outcome measure. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of the shoulder was made at 12 months after surgery to assess the integrity of the repair. The mean OSS improved from 26.3 [standard deviation (SD) 8.2] at baseline to 41.7 (SD 7.9) at 24 months for arthroscopic surgery and from 25.0 (SD 8.0) at baseline to 41.5 (SD 7.9) at 24 months for open surgery. When effect sizes are shown for the intervention, a negative sign indicates that an open procedure is favoured. For the intention-to-treat analysis, there was no statistical difference between the groups, the difference in OSS score at 24 months was -0.76 [95% confidence interval (CI) -2.75 to 1.22; p = 0.452] and the CI excluded the predetermined clinically important difference in the OSS of 3 points. There was also no statistical difference when the groups were compared per protocol (difference in OSS score -0.46, 95% CI -5.30 to 4.39; p = 0.854). The questionnaire response rate was > 86%. At 8 months, 77% of participants reported that shoulder problems were much or slightly better, and at 24 months this increased to 85%. There were no significant differences in mean cost between the arthroscopic group and

  16. The influence of intraoperative factors and postoperative rehabilitation compliance on the integrity of the rotator cuff after arthroscopic repair.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shahrulazua; Haber, Mark; Bokor, Desmond J

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine when cuff re-tear commonly occurs in the postoperative period and to investigate the clinical factors that might predispose to an early cuff re-tear. All patients with rotator cuff (supraspinatus ± infraspinatus) tear that required arthroscopic repair during the period between June 1, 2010, and May 31, 2012, with completed serial ultrasound examinations at 6 weeks, 12 weeks, and 26 weeks postoperatively were included. Intraoperative findings were noted. Functional clinical outcomes were assessed by Constant score, Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index, and Oxford score. Compliance of patients with postoperative rehabilitation was established. There were 127 cases; the mean age of patients was 60 years. Overall re-tear rate was 29.1%. The percentage of new re-tears was significantly higher in the first 12 weeks than in the second 12 weeks postoperatively (25.2% and 3.9%, respectively). The patient's postoperative compliance was a significant prognostic factor for re-tearing. Significant associations were also found between re-tear and primary tear size, tendon quality, repair tension, cuff retraction, and footprint coverage. Poor compliance of patients was highest (17.3%) during the second 6 weeks postoperatively. Better functional outcomes were noted in patients who had re-torn their cuffs at the 12-week period (Oxford mean scores, P = .04). Understanding of the predisposing factors will assist in predicting the prognosis of the repaired rotator cuff. Despite the progress of patients' functions postoperatively, an early significant improvement of the clinical outcome should be a warning sign to a surgeon that the patient's compliance may be suboptimal, resulting in an increased risk of the cuff's re-tearing. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical Relevance of Classifying Massive Rotator Cuff Tears: Results Based on Functional and Radiological Findings After Arthroscopic Repair.

    PubMed

    Ok, Hyun Soo; Kim, Byung Guk; Choi, Won Chul; Hong, Chul Gie; Kim, Jee Woong; Kim, Jae Hwa

    2017-01-01

    Studies on the results of arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff tears have reported widely varied prognoses. Among other factors, the sizable discrepancy can be attributable to the fact that the current definition of massive rotator cuff tears covers an extensive area of tendons. Functional and radiological results according to subgroups would show significant inter-subgroup differences preoperatively and postoperatively. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. A total of 104 patients who required arthroscopic repair for massive rotator cuff tears were prospectively evaluated. The patients were allocated into 3 groups according to tendon involvement as diagnosed by preoperative magnetic resonance imaging: group 1 (anterosuperior type involving the subscapularis and supraspinatus), group 2 (posterosuperior type involving the infraspinatus and supraspinatus), and group 3 (anteroposterior type involving the subscapularis, supraspinatus, and infraspinatus). We compared functional results (at 2 years postoperatively) and radiological findings (at 1 year postoperatively) for each group. There were 34 patients in group 1, 54 in group 2, and 16 in group 3. In all 3 groups, functional results significantly improved after surgery. There were no statistically significant intergroup differences in functional results among the 3 groups. On the radiological evaluations, each group (groups 1, 2, and 3) showed a significantly different result in the preoperative acromiohumeral distance (AHD) (7.19, 5.44, and 5.22 mm, respectively), tear size (38.8, 39.3, and 46.4 mm, respectively), extent of retraction (33.9, 40.0, and 41.4 mm, respectively), postoperative AHD (8.92, 7.37, and 6.71 mm, respectively), and retear rate (23.5%, 51.9%, and 56.2%, respectively) ( P < .001 for all). Massive rotator cuff tears can be divided into 3 types: anterosuperior (group 1), posterosuperior (group 2), and anteroposterior (group 3). Each group has distinctive characteristics and shows different

  18. Combined arthroscopic tenodesis of the long head of biceps and rotator cuff repair in antero-superior cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Uschok, S; Herrmann, S; Pauly, S; Perka, C; Greiner, S

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluates the functional and cosmetic results following fixation of the long head of the biceps (LHB) tendon at the antero-medial footprint anchor of a rotator cuff reconstruction, using the "lasso-loop" technique. 39 patients with a mean age of 62 years with a rotator cuff tear and associated lesion of the LHB tendon were included in this study. Besides rotator cuff repair in an arthroscopic anchor technique, all patients received additional LHB tenodeses using the lasso-loop technique. Clinical follow-up consisted of the Constant score (CS), LHB score, DASH score, and WORC index. Relevant sub-items, such as elbow flexion strength and cosmesis, were compared to the contralateral arm. At an average follow-up of 22 months (11-39 months), the CS resulted in an average of 81 points. The biceps-specific LHB score showed a mean value of 89 points. The analysis of the DASH score showed an average of 16.9 points and the analysis of the WORC index showed an average result of 79.7 %. Distalization of the biceps muscle was objectively in three cases (7.7 %) (as observed by the examiner) and subjectively in one of those cases (as noted by the patient). There was a loss in elbow flexion strength compared to the contralateral side; however, this loss was not statistically significant and not associated with clinical apparent re-tear or insufficiency of the tenodesis. The arthroscopic lasso-loop tenodesis of the LHB tendon is a time and cost-efficient technique. No additional anchor is needed when included in the rotator cuff repair. Functional and cosmetical results as well as results from the biceps-specific LHB score were good to excellent. The loss in elbow flexion strength is most likely associated with concomitant rotator cuff lesion. The lasso-loop fixation technique of the LHB tendon using the antero-medial footprint anchor in rotator cuff tears is a reliable and cost-efficient procedure. III.

  19. Epinephrine Diluted Saline-Irrigation Fluid in Arthroscopic Shoulder Surgery: A Significant Improvement of Clarity of Visual Field and Shortening of Total Operation Time. A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    van Montfoort, Douwe O; van Kampen, Paulien M; Huijsmans, Pol E

    2016-03-01

    To determine the influence of epinephrine saline irrigation in therapeutic shoulder arthroscopy procedures on the clarity of arthroscopic view. Three subgroups were analyzed; (1) Bankart/SLAP repairs; (2) rotator cuff repairs; and (3) subacromial procedures without rotator cuff repair. Secondary objectives were to evaluate the influence on total operating time and potential cardiovascular adverse reactions. The design of the study was a prospective, randomized, double-blind controlled trial. A total of 101 patients were included. Pressure pump-controlled regular saline irrigation fluid was used in the control group. In the epinephrine group, epinephrine (0.33 mg/L) was added to the saline-irrigation fluid. Visual clarity was rated by a Numeric Rating Scale. Total operation time, total use of irrigation fluid, increases in pump pressure, heart rate, blood pressure, and electrocautery use were registered. Visual clarity (P = .002) was significantly better and total operating time (P = .008) significantly shorter in the epinephrine group. Total irrigation fluid used was significantly lower in the epinephrine group (P = .001). The greatest effect on visual clarity and shortening of operation time up to 15 minutes was seen in Bankart and SLAP repairs. No significant effect of the addition of epinephrine on heart rate and blood pressure was observed. The addition of epinephrine (0.33 mg/L) to irrigation fluid significantly improves visual clarity in most common types of therapeutic shoulder arthroscopy. A significant reduction in total operating time and use of irrigation fluid was observed. The greatest effect on visual clarity and shortening of operation time was seen in Bankart and SLAP group. Therefore, one of our initial hypotheses that the greatest effect would be observed in subacromial and rotator cuff repair procedures was not supported by the data presented. No cardiovascular adverse reactions were seen. Level 1, Randomized controlled trial. Copyright

  20. Is the American Society of Shoulder and Elbow Therapists' rehabilitation guideline better than standard care when applied to Bankart-operated patients? A controlled study.

    PubMed

    Damkjær, Lars; Petersen, Tom; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit

    2015-02-01

    To determine whether there is a difference in shoulder-related physical function and quality of life between postoperative rehabilitation patients receiving standard care and those receiving care according to the American Society of Shoulder and Elbow Therapists' rehabilitation guideline for arthroscopic anterior capsulolabral repair of the shoulder. Descriptive studies with comparison between a retrospective and a prospective cohort. Municipal outpatient rehabilitation centre. A total of 96 arthroscopic Bankart-operated patients. A total of 52 patients received standard care; 44 patients underwent rehabilitation according to the American Society of Shoulder and Elbow Therapists' rehabilitation guideline. Primary outcome variable was Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index. Secondary outcome measures were Patient-Specific Functional Scale, shoulder range of motion, return to work, return to sports, and costs. There was no significant difference in adjusted mean change scores between the standard care group and the guideline group in the primary outcome variable (Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index total = 574.85 vs. 644.48) or the secondary outcomes (Patient-Specific Functional Scale = 4.6 vs. 5.0; range of motion in forward flexion = 46.49° vs. 49.58°; external rotation in adduction = 28.58° vs. 34.18°; external rotation in abduction = 51.29° vs. 47.55°; weeks until return to work = 5.2 vs. 6.9; weeks until return to sports =13.9 vs. 13.1; costs = number of visits; 18.5 vs. 15.9). There were no significant between-group differences in shoulder-related physical function and quality of life between the standard care group and the guideline group, following Bankart operations. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Excellent healing rates and patient satisfaction after arthroscopic repair of medium to large rotator cuff tears with a single-row technique augmented with bone marrow vents.

    PubMed

    Dierckman, Brian D; Ni, Jake J; Karzel, Ronald P; Getelman, Mark H

    2017-06-24

    This study evaluated the repair integrity and patient clinical outcomes following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair of medium to large rotator cuff tears using a single-row technique consisting of medially based, triple-loaded anchors augmented with bone marrow vents in the rotator cuff footprint lateral to the repair. This is a retrospective study of 52 patients (53 shoulders) comprising 36 males and 16 females with a median age of 62 (range 44-82) with more than 24-month follow-up, tears between 2 and 4 cm in the anterior-posterior dimension and utilizing triple-loaded anchors. Mann-Whitney test compared Western Ontario Rotator Cuff (WORC) outcome scores between patients with healed and re-torn cuff repairs. Multivariate logistic regression analysed association of variables with healing status and WORC score. Cuff integrity was assessed on MRI, read by a musculoskeletal fellowship-trained radiologist. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated an intact repair in 48 of 53 shoulders (91%). The overall median WORC score was 95.7 (range 27.6-100.0). A significant difference in WORC scores were seen between patients with healed repairs 96.7 (range 56.7-100.0) compared with a re-tear 64.6 (27.6-73.8), p < 0.00056. Arthroscopic repair of medium to large rotator cuff tears using a triple-loaded single-row repair augmented with bone marrow vents resulted in a 91% healing rate by MRI and excellent patient reported clinical outcomes comparable to similar reported results in the literature. IV.

  2. Target range of motion at 3 months after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair and its effect on the final outcome.

    PubMed

    Tonotsuka, Hisahiro; Sugaya, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Norimasa; Kawai, Nobuaki; Sugiyama, Hajime; Marumo, Keishi

    2017-01-01

    The postoperative protocol after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR) is still controversial. Some surgeons recommend slower rehabilitation in order to improve the integrity of the repair, while others prefer early range-of-motion (ROM) exercise to avoid postoperative stiffness. The purpose of this study was to determine target ROM (T-ROM) measurements at 3 months after ARCR that are predictive of eventual full recovery without structural failure. The cases consisted of 374 shoulders in 360 patients who underwent primary ARCR and were followed up for at least 2 years. Forward flexion (FF) and side-lying external rotation (ER) were measured preoperatively at 3, 6, 9, 12, and 24 months after surgery, and the patients were divided into six subgroups according to the values for each type of ROM at 3 months (ROM-3M). In each subgroup, the final ROM at 24 months after surgery was compared to determine the T-ROM. The average ROMs with time and re-tear rate were then compared between the under-T-ROM and over-T-ROM groups. The only significant difference in FF was between the 120-129° and 110-119° ROM-3M groups. Therefore, the T-ROM for FF was determined to be 120°. Similarly, the T-ROM for ER was determined to be 20°. Each ROM in the over-T-ROM group was significantly better than that in the under-T-ROM group at all assessments. There was no significant difference in the re-tear rate between the groups. To acquire sufficient ROM in 2 years without high re-tear rate, a target FF of 120° and ER of 20° should be achieved within 3 months after surgery.

  3. Prospective randomized study of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair using an early versus delayed postoperative physical therapy protocol.

    PubMed

    Cuff, Derek J; Pupello, Derek R

    2012-11-01

    This study evaluated patient outcomes and rotator cuff healing after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair using a postoperative physical therapy protocol with early passive motion compared with a delayed protocol that limited early passive motion. The study enrolled 68 patients (average age, 63.2 years) who met inclusion criteria. All patients had a full-thickness crescent-shaped tear of the supraspinatus that was repaired using a transosseous equivalent suture-bridge technique along with subacromial decompression. In the early group, 33 patients were randomized to passive elevation and rotation that began at postoperative day 2. In the delayed group, 35 patients began the same protocol at 6 weeks. Patients were monitored clinically for a minimum of 12 months, and rotator cuff healing was assessed using ultrasound imaging. Both groups had similar improvements in preoperative to postoperative American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores (early group: 43.9 to 91.9, P < .0001; delayed group: 41.0 to 92.8, P < .0001) and Simple Shoulder Test scores (early group: 5.5 to 11.1, P < .0001; delayed group: 5.1 to 11.1, P < .0001). There were no significant differences in patient satisfaction, rotator cuff healing, or range of motion between the early and delayed groups. Patients in the early group and delayed group both demonstrated very similar outcomes and range of motion at 1 year. There was a slightly higher rotator cuff healing rate in the delayed passive range of motion group compared with the early passive range of motion group (91% vs 85%). Copyright © 2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Arthroscopic repair of partial-thickness and small full-thickness rotator cuff tears: tendon quality as a prognostic factor for repair integrity.

    PubMed

    Chung, Seok Won; Kim, Jae Yoon; Yoon, Jong Pil; Lyu, Seong Hwa; Rhee, Sung Min; Oh, Se Bong

    2015-03-01

    The healing failure rate is high for partial-thickness or small full-thickness rotator cuff tears. To retrospectively evaluate and compare outcomes after arthroscopic repair of high-grade partial-thickness and small full-thickness rotator cuff tears and factors affecting rotator cuff healing. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Included in the study were 55 consecutive patients (mean age, 57.9 ± 7.2 years) who underwent arthroscopic repair for high-grade partial-thickness (n = 34) and small full-thickness (n = 21) rotator cuff tears. The study patients also underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) preoperatively and computed tomography arthrography (CTA) at least 6 months postoperatively, and their functional outcomes were evaluated preoperatively and at the last follow-up (>24 months). All partial-thickness tears were repaired after being converted to full-thickness tears; thus, the repair process was almost the same as for small full-thickness tears. The tendinosis of the torn tendon was graded from the MRI images using a 4-point scale, and the reliabilities were assessed. The outcomes between high-grade partial-thickness tears that were converted to small full-thickness tears and initially small full-thickness tears were compared, and factors affecting outcomes were evaluated. The inter- and intraobserver reliabilities of the tendinosis grade were good (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.706 and 0.777, respectively). Failure to heal as determined by CTA was observed in 12 patients with a high-grade partial-thickness tear (35.3%; complete failure in 4 and partial failure in 8) and in 3 patients with a small full-thickness tear (14.3%; complete failure in 1 and partial failure in 2). The patients with high-grade partial-thickness rotator cuff tears showed a higher tendinosis grade than did those with small full-thickness tears (P = .014), and the severity of the tendinosis was related to the failure to heal (P = .037). Tears with a higher tendinosis grade

  5. [Arthroscopic repair of anterior relapsing shoulder dislocation. Is there a learning curve?].

    PubMed

    García-Lamas L; Bravo-Giménez B; Mellado-Romero M; García-Rodríguez, R; Martín-López, C M; Cano-Egea, J M; Vilá y Rico, J

    2014-01-01

    We reviewed the first cases that underwent arthroscopic surgery at our center due to relapsing glenohumeral stability of the shoulder. The objective of this paper is to analyze the influence of the learning curve on the results obtained. We analyzed 137 patients who underwent surgery at Hospital 12 de Octubre in Madrid, Spain between.February 1999 and March 2010. A total of 101 patients met the inclusion criteria, and these patients were divided into two groups using a chronological order, the first 50 patients and the second 50 patients. There were no statistically significant differences in sex, age and laterality between both groups (p = 0.51, p = 0.15 and p = 0.23, respectively), so the groups were comparable. We compared the following between both groups: clinical outcomes, number of dislocations, reoperations and complications, i.e., implant migration, arthrosis and axillary nerve neuropathy. We also compared the functional results, which were measured using the Constant and Rowe scales. Four episodes of redislocation occurred in group 1 and 6 in group 2. Three reoperations were performed in group 1 and 6 in group 2. No statistically significant differences were found in the number of redislocations and reoperations (p = 50 and p = 0.48, respectively).

  6. Arthroscopic treatment of chronic calcific tendinitis with complete removal and rotator cuff tendon repair.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jae Chul; Park, Won Hah; Koh, Kyoung Hwan; Kim, Sang Min

    2010-12-01

    Relatively large calcific materials on radiographs of shoulders with persistent symptoms after extended periods of conservative treatment are candidates for operative treatment. But complete removal of calcific materials sometimes leaves a large defect in the rotator cuff tendon, and tendon repair might be essential if defects are large. We evaluated the clinical results of complete removal of calcific deposits with or without repair of the rotator cuff tendon in 35 consecutive patients. Eighteen patients underwent calcific material removal, which resulted in a complete tear in the rotator cuff tendon, and suture anchor repair. And the other 17 patients received either side-to-side repair or simple debridement. Clinical outcomes improved at a median 31 (range 24-45) months after surgery, and pain relief was achieved within 6 months of surgery in 30 of 35. However, ten patients developed a secondary stiff shoulder. Repair with or without suture anchor after complete removal of calcific material provides good clinical results and earlier pain relief when it was compared to previous literatures of minimal removal technique.

  7. Biomechanics of open Bankart and coracoid abutment procedures in a human cadaveric shoulder model.

    PubMed

    Clavert, Philippe; Kempf, Jean-François; Kahn, Jean-Luc

    2009-01-01

    The specific aims of this experiment were (1) to develop a clinically relevant model of anteroinferior shoulder dislocation in the apprehension position to compare the biomechanics of the intact anterior capsuloligamentous structures, and (2) to evaluate the initial strength of an open Bankart and of a coracoid abutment procedure. Fifteen shoulders from deceased donors were used. For the intact shoulders, mean peak load was 486 N, and stiffness was 26,7 N/mm. For the Bankart repair, the mean peak load was 264 N, and mean stiffness was 14.1 N/mm. Transosseous repairs failed by suture pullout through soft tissues. For the coracoid abutment repair, the mean peak load was 607 N and stiffness was 25.57 N/mm. This study reveals that the biomechanical performance of the Bankart and coracoid abutment repairs fails to reproduce the properties of the natural intact state.

  8. Transtendon arthroscopic repair of high grade partial-thickness articular surface tears of the rotator cuff with biceps tendon augmentation: technical note and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jong-Hun; Shafi, Mohamed; Jeong, Jae-Jung; Lee, Yeon Soo; McFarland, Edward G; Kim, Tae-Kwen; Chung, Jun-Young

    2012-03-01

    Partial articular surface of the rotator cuff tendon tears has been recognized as a source of treatable shoulder pain and a precursory pathology for full-thickness tendon tears. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is a possible surgical method of treatment. Recent data have shown that the treating partial-thickness rotator cuff repairs with transtendon technique shows good clinical outcome. The use of this technique enables the reconstitution of the tendon with complete reconstruction of its footprint without damaging its intact bursal part. In cases of high grade partial articular-sided degenerative rotator cuff tears (involving >50% of the tendon) in older patients, there is a possibility of poor healing or re-tear of the rotator cuff repair, which may be associated with poor tendon quality and substantial thinning of the rotator cuff, subsequently revision surgery in these patients will be demanding. To mitigate these problems, we describe here a new arthroscopic transtendon repair technique with tenotomized long head biceps tendon augmentation for high grade partial articular rotator cuff tear with the goal of providing increase tendon healing, as well as to minimize the probability of failure of the construct and to improve the clinical outcomes. The clinical results of the first 39 consecutive patients are reported showing significant decrease in pain and improved shoulder scores, as well as the post-operative range of motion and with no cases of re-tear of the rotator cuff tendon.

  9. Modified arthroscopic Brostrom procedure.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-09-01

    The open modified Brostrom anatomic repair technique is widely accepted as the reference standard for lateral ankle stabilization. However, there is high incidence of intra-articular pathologies associated with chronic lateral ankle instability which may not be addressed by an isolated open Brostrom procedure. Arthroscopic Brostrom procedure with suture anchor has been described for anatomic repair of chronic lateral ankle instability and management of intra-articular lesions. However, the complication rates seemed to be higher than open Brostrom procedure. Modification of the arthroscopic Brostrom procedure with the use of bone tunnel may reduce the risk of certain complications.

  10. Technical guide and tips on the all-arthroscopic Latarjet procedure.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Claudio; Bongiorno, Vito; Samitier, Gonzalo; Dumont, Guillaume D; Szöllösy, Gregor; Lafosse, Laurent

    2016-02-01

    Shoulder dislocation and subsequent anterior instability is a common problem in young athletes. The arthroscopic Bankart repair was originally described by Morgan et al. in 1987. The procedure has benefited from many technical advancements over the past 25 years and currently remains the most commonly utilized procedure in the treatment of anterior glenohumeral instability without glenoid bone loss. Capsulolabral repair alone may not be sufficient for treatment of patients with poor capsular tissue quality and significant bony defects. In the presence of chronic anterior glenoid bony defects, a bony reconstruction should be considered. The treatment of anterior shoulder instability with transfer of the coracoid and attached conjoint tendon such as the Latarjet procedure has provided reliable results. The arthroscopic Latarjet procedure was described in 2007 by the senior author, who has now performed the procedure over 450 times. The initial surgical technique has evolved considerably since its introduction, and this article presents a comprehensive update on this demanding but well-defined procedure. This article reviews technical tips to help the surgeon perform the surgery more smoothly, navigate through challenging situations, and avoid potential complications. Level of evidence V.

  11. Longitudinal Long-term Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Clinical Follow-up After Single-Row Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Clinical Superiority of Structural Tendon Integrity.

    PubMed

    Heuberer, Philipp R; Smolen, Daniel; Pauzenberger, Leo; Plachel, Fabian; Salem, Sylvia; Laky, Brenda; Kriegleder, Bernhard; Anderl, Werner

    2017-05-01

    The number of arthroscopic rotator cuff surgeries is consistently increasing. Although generally considered successful, the reported number of retears after rotator cuff repair is substantial. Short-term clinical outcomes are reported to be rarely impaired by tendon retears, whereas to our knowledge, there is no study documenting long-term clinical outcomes and tendon integrity after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. To investigate longitudinal long-term repair integrity and clinical outcomes after arthroscopic rotator cuff reconstruction. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Thirty patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with suture anchors for a full-tendon full-thickness tear of the supraspinatus or a partial-tendon full-thickness tear of the infraspinatus were included. Two and 10 years after initial arthroscopic surgery, tendon integrity was analyzed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) score and Constant score as well as subjective questions regarding satisfaction with the procedure and return to normal activity were used to evaluate short- and long-term outcomes. At the early MRI follow-up, 42% of patients showed a full-thickness rerupture, while 25% had a partial rerupture, and 33% of tendons remained intact. The 10-year MRI follow-up (129 ± 11 months) showed 50% with a total rerupture, while the other half of the tendons were partially reruptured (25%) or intact (25%). The UCLA and Constant scores significantly improved from preoperatively (UCLA total: 50.6% ± 20.2%; Constant total: 44.7 ± 10.5 points) to 2 years (UCLA total: 91.4% ± 16.0% [ P < .001]; Constant total: 87.8 ± 15.3 points [ P < .001]) and remained significantly higher after 10 years (UCLA total: 89.7% ± 15.9% [ P < .001]; Constant total: 77.5 ± 15.6 points [ P < .001]). The Constant total score and Constant strength subscore, but not the UCLA score, were also significantly better at 10 years postoperatively in patients

  12. Assessment of Kinematics and Electromyography Following Arthroscopic Single-Tendon Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Jessica M; Inawat, Ryan R; Slavens, Brooke A; McGuire, John R; Ziegler, Dean W; Tarima, Sergey S; Grindel, Steven I; Harris, Gerald F

    2017-05-01

    The increasing demand for rotator cuff (RC) repair patients to return to work as soon as they are physically able has led to exploration of when this is feasible. Current guidelines from our orthopedic surgery clinic recommend a return to work at 9 weeks postoperation. To more fully define capacity to return to work, the current study was conducted using a unique series of quantitative tools. To date, no study has combined 3-dimensional (3D) motion analysis with electromyography (EMG) assessment during activities of daily living (ADLs), including desk tasks, and commonly prescribed rehabilitation exercise. To apply a quantitative, validated upper extremity model to assess the kinematics and muscle activity of the shoulder following repair of the supraspinatus RC tendon compared to that in healthy shoulders. A prospective, cross-sectional comparison study. All participants were evaluated during a single session at the Medical College of Wisconsin Department of Orthopaedic Surgery's Motion Analysis Laboratory. Ten participants who were 9-12 weeks post-operative repair of a supraspinatus RC tendon tear and 10 participants with healthy shoulders (HS) were evaluated. All participants were evaluated with 3D motion analysis using a validated upper extremity model and synchronized EMG. Data from the 2 groups were compared using multivariate Hotelling T(2) tests with post hoc analyses based on Welch t-tests. Participants' thoracic and thoracohumeral joint kinematics, temporal-spatial parameters, and RC muscle activity were measured by applying a quantitative upper extremity model during 10 ADLs and 3 rehabilitation exercises. These included tasks of hair combing, drinking, writing, computer mouse use, typing, calling, reaching to back pocket, pushing a door open, pulling a door closed, external rotation, internal rotation, and rowing. There were significant differences of the thoracohumeral joint motion in only a few of the tested tasks: comb maximal flexion angle (P = .004

  13. Arthroscopic, histological and MRI analyses of cartilage repair after a minimally invasive method of transplantation of allogeneic synovial mesenchymal stromal cells into cartilage defects in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Tomomasa; Sekiya, Ichiro; Muneta, Takeshi; Hatsushika, Daisuke; Horie, Masafumi; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Kawarasaki, Tatsuo; Watanabe, Atsuya; Hishikawa, Shuji; Fujimoto, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Hozumi; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    Background aims Transplantation of synovial mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) may induce repair of cartilage defects. We transplanted synovial MSCs into cartilage defects using a simple method and investigated its usefulness and repair process in a pig model. Methods The chondrogenic potential of the porcine MSCs was compared in vitro. Cartilage defects were created in both knees of seven pigs, and divided into MSCs treated and non-treated control knees. Synovial MSCs were injected into the defect, and the knee was kept immobilized for 10 min before wound closure. To visualize the actual delivery and adhesion of the cells, fluorescence-labeled synovial MSCs from transgenic green fluorescent protein (GFP) pig were injected into the defect in a subgroup of two pigs. In these two animals, the wounds were closed before MSCs were injected and observed for 10 min under arthroscopic control. The defects were analyzed sequentially arthroscopically, histologically and by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for 3 months. Results Synovial MSCs had a higher chondrogenic potential in vitro than the other MSCs examined. Arthroscopic observations showed adhesion of synovial MSCs and membrane formation on the cartilage defects before cartilage repair. Quantification analyses for arthroscopy, histology and MRI revealed a better outcome in the MSC-treated knees than in the non-treated control knees. Conclusions Leaving a synovial MSC suspension in cartilage defects for 10 min made it possible for cells to adhere in the defect in a porcine cartilage defect model. The cartilage defect was first covered with membrane, then the cartilage matrix emerged after transplantation of synovial MSCs. PMID:22309371

  14. Repair integrity and functional outcome after arthroscopic conversion to a full-thickness rotator cuff tear: articular- versus bursal-side partial tears.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Cheon; Shin, Hyun Dae; Cha, Soo Min; Park, Jun Yeong

    2014-02-01

    A few studies have compared high-grade partial-thickness articular- and bursal-side rotator cuff tears postoperatively. To compare the clinical and radiological outcomes of high-grade partial-thickness rotator cuff tears treated with arthroscopic conversion to full-thickness tears, followed by repair. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Forty-three consecutive shoulders with high-grade partial-thickness rotator cuff tears (20 articular- and 23 bursal-side lesions) treated with arthroscopic conversion to full-thickness tears, followed by repair using the suture-bridge technique, were evaluated. The final functional evaluation was conducted at a mean of 35.53 months (range, 24-54 months). Radiological outcomes were evaluated at a minimum of 1 year postoperatively. The following outcome measures were used in this study: the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Shoulder Rating Scale, the Constant score, and range of motion. At the final follow-up, the mean ASES, UCLA, and Constant scores improved significantly to 91.80, 32.70, and 75.85, respectively, in the articular-side group (all P < .001). The mean ASES, UCLA, and Constant scores improved significantly to 90.80, 32.52, and 83.00, respectively, in the bursal-side group (all P < .001). The UCLA and ASES scores did not differ significantly between the 2 groups (P = .821 and .869, respectively), while the Constant scores did (P = .048). The retear rate was 0% in the articular-side group and 9.5% in the bursal-side group; this difference was not significant (P = .204). The arthroscopic repair of partial-thickness bursal-side tears resulted in comparable or superior postoperative functional outcomes compared with that of articular-side tears. However, the postoperative retear rate did not differ significantly between the 2 groups.

  15. Complications associated with arthroscopic rotator cuff tear repair: definition of a core event set by Delphi consensus process.

    PubMed

    Audigé, Laurent; Flury, Matthias; Müller, Andreas M; Durchholz, Holger

    2016-12-01

    The literature does not consistently report on complications associated with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR). Valid comparison of the occurrence of complications between ARCR interventions requires standardization. This project was implemented to define a core set of negative (untoward) events associated with ARCR along with their terms and definitions, which should be systematically documented and reported in routine care and clinical research. A Delphi consensus process was applied. An international panel of experienced shoulder surgeons was nominated through professional societies and personal contacts. On the basis of a systematic review of terms and definitions, an organized list of relevant events associated with ARCR was developed and reviewed by panel members. Between each survey, all comments and suggestions were considered to revise the proposed core set, including local event groups along with definitions, specifications, and timing of occurrence. Consensus was defined as at least two-thirds agreement. Three successive online surveys were implemented involving 84 surgeons. Consensus with over 86% agreement was reached for a core list of local events including 3 intraoperative event groups (device, osteochondral, and soft tissue) and 9 postoperative event groups (device, osteochondral, pain, rotator cuff, surgical-site infection, peripheral neurologic, vascular, superficial soft tissue, and deep soft tissue). Experts agreed on a period for documentation of each event or group of events ranging from 3 to 24 months after ARCR. A structured core set of local events associated with ARCR has been developed by international consensus. Further evaluation and validation in the context of clinical studies are required. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Patient Preference Before and After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Which Is More Important, Pain Relief or Strength Return?

    PubMed

    Virk, Mandeep S; Levy, David M; Kuhns, Benjamin D; Krecher, James S; Parsley, Billy K; Burkhart, Stephen S; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N; Cole, Brian J

    Our understanding of patients' desired outcomes and expectations of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR) is limited, particularly regarding the importance of pain relief and strength return relative to each other. We conducted a study of patient's ratings of the importance of pain relief and strength return after ARCR. Before undergoing surgery, 60 patients completed a shoulder questionnaire on which they assessed severity of symptoms and rated, on a 10-point scale, the importance of postoperative improvements in pain relief and strength return. After surgery, they completed the same questionnaire, again rating the importance of pain relief and strength return. About 50% of the patients valued pain relief and strength return equally before and after ARCR. However, overall patient ratings were higher for strength return over pain relief, both before surgery, mean (SD), 9.2 (2.1) vs 8.6 (2.3) (P = .02), and afterward, at a follow-up of 5.2 (0.2) years, 8.9 (1.9) vs 8.2 (3.1) (P = .03). This significant preference for strength return held irrespective of sex, age, active sports involvement, preoperative self-assessed pain score, and subjective shoulder weakness. Before surgery, increasing age was associated with a stronger preference for pain relief (r = 0.33, P = .01), and retirees preferred pain relief over strength return. These results show the patterns of patient preference for pain relief and strength return after ARCR. Improved understanding of these patients' expectations will allow meaningful changes in patient satisfaction.

  17. Arthroscopically guided navigation for repair of acromioclavicular joint dislocations: a safe technique with reduced intraoperative radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Theopold, Jan; Marquass, Bastian; von Dercks, Nikolaus; Mütze, Maria; Henkelmann, Ralf; Josten, Christoph; Hepp, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Accuracy evaluation of navigated image free placement of double cortical fixation buttons for coracoclavicular tunnel position in comparison to conventional drill guide based placement. Twenty-six patients with acute acromioclavicular joint instability were included in this non-randomized cohort study. All patients were treated with a Double- TightRope technique. In 13 cases the conventional drill guide based placement was used (group 1). In 13 patients surgery was performed as a navigated procedure with a fluoro-free optoelectronic system (group 2). The number of coracoclavicular drillings per patient (First pass accuracy; FPA (%)) was documented, the subcoracoidal position of the fixation buttons has been evaluated and graded as "intended position achieved (IPA)" or "intended position not achieved (IPnA)". In group 1 drilling had to be repeated in four patients (30.8 %) to achieve proper placement of the subcoracoidal fixation buttons. 100 % first pass accuracy was observed in group 2 (p = 0.03). In group 1, the intended position of the subcoracoid buttons was not achieved (IPnA) in six patients (46.2 %). In group 2 all intended positions were achieved (p = 0.005). Arthroscopic controlled fluoro-free navigated coracoclavicular drilling for the repair of acromioclavicular joint dislocation has higher first pass accuracy in comparison to conventional drill guide based placement. Therefore the navigation enables a precise position of the drill holes, may reduce the risk of an iatrogenic coracoid fracture and migration of fixation devices. Local institutional review board No. 061-14-10032014.

  18. Passive mobilization after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is not detrimental in the early postoperative period.

    PubMed

    De Roo, Pieter-Jan; Muermans, Stijn; Maroy, Mathieu; Linden, Patrick; Van den Daelen, Luc

    2015-09-01

    This prospective randomized study compares the clinical results of immediate passive mobilization versus delayed mobilization in the rehabilitation of rotator cuff repair during the early postoperative period. The mobilization group (79 patients) received immediate daily passive mobilization. The immobilization group (51 patients) was immobilized for 4 weeks until physiotherapy was started. Passive range of motion was noted preoperatively, at 6 weeks and 4 months. Strength was measured preoperatively and at 4 months. Constant-Murley, Simple Shoulder Test, SPADI and UCLA scores were noted at baseline and at 4 months. Ultrasonography was performed at 6 weeks to exclude early failures of repair. We noted no significant difference between the two groups regarding range of motion at 6 weeks and range of motion, strength and functional outcome scores at 4 months. Ultrasound didn't show a difference in healing at 6 w in either of both groups. Both rehabilitation protocols seem applicable as well as safe in the early post-operative phase.

  19. Influence of patient and diagnostic parameters on reported retear rates after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Müller, Andreas M; Flury, Matthias; Alsayed, Hasan N; Audigé, Laurent

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this meta-analysis was to investigate patient and diagnostic parameters influencing the reported rates of recurrent rotator cuff defects after ARCR. PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library and Scopus databases were searched for clinical studies on tendon defects after ARCR. Imaging modalities, definitions, detection time points, and other known patient risk factors (patient age, tear severity, grade of fatty infiltration, repair technique) as well as reported defect rates were extracted. A meta-analysis of proportion and meta-regression analysis were used to investigate independent variables influencing reported defect rates. Of 109 articles reviewed, the diagnostic studies used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) only (n = 56), ultrasound (US) only (n = 28), MRI or computed tomography (CT) arthrography (CTA, n = 14) or a combination of US, MRI and CTA (n = 11) up to 57 months after ARCR. Definitions of tendon defects were highly variable, including those of partial tendon healing with insufficient thickness defined as either an acceptable outcome (n = 72) or a recurrent defect (n = 22). Reported defect rates demonstrated highly significant heterogeneity between studies and groups. Follow-up time and the evaluation of partial tendon healing were independent factors of the defect rate alongside age, tear severity and repair technique. The type of imaging did not significantly alter defect rates. A number of specific factors significantly alter the rates of rotator cuff defects reported after ARCR. Standardized protocols in clinical practice are required for consistent diagnosis of recurrent defects after ARCR. IV.

  20. Arthroscopic Findings in Anterior Shoulder Instability

    PubMed Central

    Hantes, Michael; Raoulis, Vasilios

    2017-01-01

    Background: In the last years, basic research and arthroscopic surgery, have improved our understanding of shoulder anatomy and pathology. It is a fact that arthroscopic treatment of shoulder instability has evolved considerably over the past decades. The aim of this paper is to present the variety of pathologies that should be identified and treated during shoulder arthroscopy when dealing with anterior shoulder instability cases. Methods: A review of the current literature regarding arthroscopic shoulder anatomy, anatomic variants, and arthroscopic findings in anterior shoulder instability, is presented. In addition, correlation of arthroscopic findings with physical examination and advanced imaging (CT and MRI) in order to improve our understanding in anterior shoulder instability pathology is discussed. Results: Shoulder instability represents a broad spectrum of disease and a thorough understanding of the pathoanatomy is the key for a successful treatment of the unstable shoulder. Patients can have a variety of pathologies concomitant with a traditional Bankart lesion, such as injuries of the glenoid (bony Bankart), injuries of the glenoid labrum, superiorly (SLAP) or anteroinferiorly (e.g. anterior labroligamentous periosteal sleeve avulsion, and Perthes), capsular lesions (humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament), and accompanying osseous-cartilage lesions (Hill-Sachs, glenolabral articular disruption). Shoulder arthroscopy allows for a detailed visualization and a dynamic examination of all anatomic structures, identification of pathologic findings, and treatment of all concomitant lesions. Conclusion: Surgeons must be well prepared and understanding the normal anatomy of the glenohumeral joint, including its anatomic variants to seek for the possible pathologic lesions in anterior shoulder instability during shoulder arthroscopy. Patient selection criteria, improved surgical techniques, and implants available have contributed to the enhancement of

  1. All-arthroscopic versus mini-open repair of small or moderate-sized rotator cuff tears: A protocol for a randomized trial [NCT00128076

    PubMed Central

    MacDermid, Joy C; Holtby, Richard; Razmjou, Helen; Bryant, Dianne

    2006-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff tears are the most common source of shoulder pain and disability. Only poor quality studies have compared mini-open to arthroscopic repair, leaving surgeons with inadequate evidence to support optimal, minimally-invasive repair. Methods/Design This randomized, multi-centre, national trial will determine whether an arthroscopic or mini-open repair provides better quality of life for patients with small or moderate-sized rotator cuff tears. A national consensus meeting of investigators in the Joint Orthopaedic Initiative for National Trials of the Shoulder (JOINTS Canada) identified this question as the top priority for shoulder surgeons across Canada. The primary outcome measure is a valid quality-of-life scale (Western Ontario Rotator Cuff (WORC)) that addresses 5 domains of health affected by rotator cuff disease. Secondary outcomes will assess rotator cuff functionality (ROM, strength, Constant score), secondary dimensions of health (general health status (SF-12) and work limitations), and repair integrity (MRI). Outcomes are measured at baseline, at 6 weeks, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months post-operatively by blinded research assistants and musculoskeletal radiologists. Patients (n = 250) with small or medium-sized cuff tears identified by clinical examination and MRI who meet eligibility criteria will be recruited. This sample size will provide 80% power to statistically detect a clinically important difference of 20% in WORC scores between procedures after controlling for baseline WORC score (α = 0.05). A central methods centre will manage randomization, data management, and monitoring under supervision of experienced epidemiologists. Surgeons will participate in either conventional or expertise-based designs according to defined criteria to avoid biases from differential surgeon expertise. Mini-open or all-arthroscopic repair procedures will be performed according to a standardized protocol. Central Adjudication (of cases), Trial Oversight

  2. Ultrasound evaluation of the distal migration of the long head of biceps tendon following tenotomy in patients undergoing arthroscopic repair of tears of the rotator cuff.

    PubMed

    Karataglis, D; Papadopoulos, P; Boutsiadis, A; Fotiadou, A; Ditsios, K; Hatzokos, I; Christodoulou, A

    2012-11-01

    This study evaluates the position of the long head of biceps tendon using ultrasound following simple tenotomy, in patients with arthroscopically repaired rotator cuff tears. In total, 52 patients with a mean age of 60.7 years (45 to 75) underwent arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff and simple tenotomy of the long head of biceps tendon. At two years post-operatively, ultrasound revealed that the tendon was inside the bicipital groove in 43 patients (82.7%) and outside in nine (17.3%); in six of these it was lying just outside the groove and in the remaining three (5.8%) it was in a remote position with a positive Popeye Sign. A dynamic ultrasound scan revealed that the tenotomised tendons had adhered to the surrounding tissues (autotenodesis).The initial condition of the tendon influenced its final position (p < 0.0005). The presence of a Popeye sign was statistically influenced by the pre-operative co-existence of supraspinatus and subscapularis tears (p < 0.0001). It appears that the natural history of the tenotomised long head of biceps tendon is to tenodese itself inside or just outside the bicipital groove, while its pre-operative condition and coexistent subscapularis tears play a significant role in the occurrence of a Popeye sign.

  3. Comparison of clinical outcomes in all-arthroscopic versus mini-open repair of rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin; Fan, Lin; Zhu, Yingbo; Yu, Haotong; Xu, Tianyang; Li, Guodong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The aim of the study was to compare the clinical outcomes of patients undergoing all-arthroscopic (AA) or mini-open (MO) rotator cuff repair. Methods: The present study evaluated 50 patients who had undergone AA repair and 50 patients who had undergone MO repair with a minimum 1-year follow-up. Every patient was asked to complete the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) and visual analog scale (VAS) questionnaires. Constant–Murley score (CMS) and active ranges, forward flexion and external rotation, were also evaluated and documented. One year after surgery, ultrasound evaluation was done to determine the integrity of the rotator cuff for each patient. Results: The average age of enrolled patients at the time of surgery was 53.0 years (range, 40–59 years), and average follow-up was 16.6 months (range, 12–24 months). At 2 weeks, the range of forward flexion in the AA group was larger than that in the MO group (136.5 ± 10.2 vs 132.5 ± 7.7, P = 0.03). On postoperative day 1, the VAS in the MO group was significantly higher than that in the AA group (6.5 ± 0.6 vs 6.1 ± 0.6, P < 0.01). At 1 month, the difference in VAS between both groups reappeared (2.9 ± 0.6 vs 2.6 ± 0.6, P = 0.03). At 1 month, the CMS score of patients in the AA group was higher than that in the MO group (52.8 ± 3.6 vs 50.9 ± 5.0, P = 0.03). At 3 and 6 months, the DASH score of patients in the AA group was lower than that in the MO group (43.8 ± 8.2 vs 47.8 ± 4.4, P < 0.01 and 38.6 ± 4.3 vs 42.7 ± 9.9, P < 0.01, respectively). Mean operative time was longer in the AA group compared with that in the MO group (71.9 ± 17.6 vs 64.7 ± 12.7 minutes, P < 0.01). Five patients (10.0%) in the AA group and 4 patients (8.2%) in the MO group had rotator cuff retear, and 6 patients (12.0%) in the AA group and 8 patients (16.3%) in the MO group had adhesive capsulitis by the end

  4. ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR OF SMALL AND MEDIUM TEARS OF THE SUPRASPINATUS MUSCLE TENDON: EVALUATION OF THE CLINICAL AND FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES AFTER TWO YEARS OF FOLLOW-UP

    PubMed Central

    Ikemoto, Roberto Yukio; Murachovsky, Joel; Nascimento, Luís Gustavo Prata; Bueno, Rogério Serpone; Almeida, Luis Henrique; Strose, Eric; Castiglia, Marcello Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical and functional outcomes from arthroscopic repairs on small and medium-sized tears of the supraspinatus muscle tendon. Methods: 129 cases of isolated small and medium tears of the supraspinatus muscle tendon were evaluated retrospectively. The average duration of pain was 29 months. The average joint range of motion comprised active elevation of 136°, lateral rotation of 58° and medial rotation at T12 level; and the preoperative functional UCLA score averaged 17 points. In all the cases, complete repair could be achieved. Results: The average score on the UCLA functional scale in the postoperative period was 32 points. The average length of follow-up was 39 months. Seventy-five cases (58%) had excellent results and 42 (32%) had good results. The average final active elevation was 156° with an average gain of 20°, and the average final lateral rotation was 57° with an average gain of 9°. Both of these were statistically significant (P < 0.05). The patients who underwent tenotomy of the long head of the biceps (LHB), with or without tenodesis, did not present statistically inferior functional outcomes, in comparison with the patients who only underwent decompression and lesion repair (P = 1.00). Fourteen cases (10.8%) presented complications during the postoperative period. Six (4.6%) developed adhesive capsulitis and four (3.1%) presented re-rupture of the tendon, proven by means of magnetic resonance imaging. Conclusions: Arthroscopic repair of small and medium tears of the supraspinatus muscle tendon provided a functional clinical improvement, with good and excellent results in 90% of the cases. PMID:27047846

  5. Arthroscopic surgery of irreparable large or massive rotator cuff tears with low-grade fatty degeneration of the infraspinatus: patch autograft procedure versus partial repair procedure.

    PubMed

    Mori, Daisuke; Funakoshi, Noboru; Yamashita, Fumiharu

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to compare the arthroscopic patch graft procedure and partial repair for irreparable large or massive rotator cuff tears (RCTs) in shoulders with low-grade fatty degeneration of the infraspinatus (stage 1 or 2 according to Goutallier et al.) in terms of the functional and structural outcomes. This study included 24 patients who underwent the patch graft procedure (group A) and 24 patients who underwent partial repair (group B) for irreparable large or massive RCTs. Clinical outcomes were evaluated at a mean of 35.5 months postoperatively in group A and 35.7 months in group B. The clinical findings were significantly improved at the final follow-up in both groups (P < .001). A significant difference was found between groups A and B in terms of postoperative Constant and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores (P = .001 and P = .021, respectively). There was a significant difference in the retear rate for the infraspinatus tendon (ISP) between the 2 groups (2 patients [8.3%] in group A v 10 patients [41.7%] in group B, P = .015). At the final follow-up, there was a significant difference in the affected side-versus-unaffected side muscle strength ratios for abduction and external rotation between group A and group B (P < .001 for both). Shoulders with retears of the ISP showed significantly inferior clinical outcomes compared with those without retears (P < .001). In arthroscopic surgery for irreparable large or massive RCTs with low-grade fatty degeneration of the infraspinatus, the patch graft procedure showed an 8.3% retear rate for the repaired ISP with both improved clinical scores and recovery of muscle strength, whereas the partial repair had a retear rate of 41.7% (P = .015). Level Ш, retrospective comparative study. Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Trauma versus no trauma: an analysis of the effect of tear mechanism on tendon healing in 1300 consecutive patients after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Tan, Martin; Lam, Patrick H; Le, Brian T N; Murrell, George A C

    2016-01-01

    Patients with rotator cuff tears often recall a specific initiating event (traumatic), whereas many cannot (nontraumatic). It is unclear how important a history of trauma is to the outcomes of rotator cuff repair. This question was addressed in a study cohort of 1300 consecutive patients who completed a preoperative questionnaire regarding their shoulder injury and had a systematic evaluation of shoulder range of motion and strength, a primary arthroscopic rotator cuff repair performed by a single surgeon, an ultrasound scan, and the same subjective and objective measurements made of their shoulder 6 months after surgery. Post hoc, this cohort was separated into 2 groups: those who reported no history of trauma on presentation (n = 489) and those with a history of traumatic injury (n = 811). The retear rate in the group with no history of trauma was 12%, whereas that of the group with a history of trauma was 14% (P = .36). Those patients with a history of shoulder trauma who waited longer than 24 months had higher retear rates (20%) than those who had their surgery earlier (13%) (P = .040). Recollection of a traumatic initiating event had little effect on the outcome of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Duration of symptoms was important in predicting retears if patients recalled a specific initiating event but not in patients who did not recall any specific initiating event. Patients with a history of trauma should be encouraged to have their rotator cuff tear repaired within 2 years. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Are pelvic anatomical structures in danger during arthroscopic acetabular labral repair? Definition of safe bone depth.

    PubMed

    Gereli, Arel; Kocaoglu, Baris; Ulku, Kerem Tekin; Veli Ismailoglu, Abdul; Silay, Sena; Karahan, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate safe depth for suture anchor insertion during acetabular labral repair and to determine the neighbouring structures at risk during drilling and anchor insertion. Ten human cadaveric hips (six males and four females) were obtained. Acetabular labral surface was prepared and marked for right hips as 12, 1 and 3 o'clock positions, for left hips 12, 11 and 9 o'clock positions. Those were defined as anterior, anterior-superior and superior zones, respectively. These labral positions were drilled at defined zones. After measurements, depth of the bone at 10° and 20° drill angles on zones was compared statistically. Acetabular bone widths at investigated labral insertion points did not statistically differ. A total of 14 injuries in 60 penetrations occurred (23.3 %) with free drill penetrations, and no injuries occurred with stopped drill penetrations. The bone depth was gradually decreasing from 10° to 20° drill angles and from anterior to superior inserting zones without significant importance. The risk of perforation to the pelvic cavity started with 20 mm drill depth, and the mean depth for all insertions was calculated as 31.7 mm (SD 2.6). It is anatomically possible that some pelvic structures sustain iatrogenic injury during acetabular drilling for anchor placement. Being aware of mean pelvic vault is important in which drilling after excessive pincer rim trimming could easily decrease the depth of acetabular bone without a standard. Careful drilling by using stopped drill bit is crucial to prevent iatrogenic injury.

  8. Correlation between Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions in anterior shoulder dislocation.

    PubMed

    Widjaja, Audi B; Tran, Anh; Bailey, Michael; Proper, Stewart

    2006-06-01

    Bankart lesions and Hill-Sachs lesions are commonly associated with anterior shoulder dislocations. The presence of Bankart lesion indicates the need for surgical repair. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be sensitive in detecting these two lesions. The aim of this study is to investigate the correlation between Bankart lesions and Hill-Sachs lesions on MRI for patients with traumatic anterior shoulder dislocations. Between 2003 and 2005, 61 patients from Alfred and Sandringham Hospitals had an MRI as part of the investigation for traumatic anterior shoulder dislocations. The MRI scans were reviewed and subsequently confirmed by a radiologist to show the presence or absence of Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions. The data were then analysed by a statistician. Although patients with one of these lesions were more than two-and-a-half times as likely to have the other, small study numbers precluded this result from achieving statistical significance. (odds ratio, 2.67 (0.83-8.61), P = 0.10). Younger age was a strong predictor of a recurrence of shoulder dislocation (odds ratio, 0.93 (0.89-0.98), P = 0.005). The presence of Bankart or Hill-Sachs lesions on MRI for the primary shoulder dislocation group was similar to the recurrent group (73% vs. 72% for Bankart lesion and 67% vs. 70% for Hill-Sachs lesion). There is a strong correlation between both lesions. This apparent trend can be useful in predicting the presence of a Bankart lesion when a Hill-Sachs lesion is identified on a plain radiograph. This study suggests the consideration of surgical repair after identification of a Hill-Sachs lesion on plain radiographs, especially for younger patients where the rate of re-dislocation is high.

  9. Comparison of Clinical and Radiological Results in the Arthroscopic Repair of Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears With and Without the Anterior Attachment of the Rotator Cable.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nam Su; Moon, Seong Cheol; Hong, Se Jung; Bae, Seong Hae; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2017-09-01

    The anterior rotator cable is critical in force transmission of the rotator cuff. However, few clinical studies have examined the correlation between the integrity of the anterior supraspinatus tendon and surgical outcomes in patients with rotator cuff tears. To compare the clinical and structural outcomes of the arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears with and without anterior disruption of the supraspinatus tendon. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. One hundred eighty-one shoulders available for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at least 6 months after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, with a minimum 1-year follow-up, were enrolled. The anterior attachment of the rotator cable was disrupted in 113 shoulders (group A) and intact in 68 shoulders (group B). The mean age at the time of surgery in groups A and B was 59.6 and 59.2 years, respectively, and the mean follow-up period was 24.2 and 25.1 months, respectively. There were statistically significant differences in the preoperative tear size and pattern and muscle fatty degeneration between the 2 groups ( P = .004, P = .008, and P < .001, respectively). At final follow-up, the mean visual analog scale (VAS) for pain score during motion was 1.31 ± 0.98 and 1.24 ± 0.90 in groups A and B, respectively ( P = .587). The mean Constant score was 77.5 ± 11.2 and 78.0 ± 11.9 points in groups A and B, respectively ( P = .875). The mean University of California, Los Angeles score was 30.5 ± 4.1 and 31.0 ± 3.0 points in groups A and B, respectively ( P = .652). In assessing the repair integrity on postoperative MRI, the retear rate was 23.9% and 14.7% in groups A and B, respectively ( P = .029). Irrespective of involvement in the anterior attachment of the rotator cable, the mean 24-month follow-up demonstrated excellent pain relief and improvement in the ability to perform activities of daily living after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. However, tears with anterior disruption of the rotator cable

  10. Dual-window subscapularis-sparing approach: a new surgical technique for combined reconstruction of a glenoid bone defect or bankart lesion associated with a HAGL lesion in anterior shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Deepak N

    2012-03-01

    Combined bankart lesion and humeral avulsion of glenohumeral ligament lesion (HAGL) is a well-described pathologic complex in anterior shoulder instability; open surgical approaches with and without arthroscopic assistance have been suggested for simultaneous 1-stage repair of these lesions. Presence of a significant glenoid bone defect (inverted-pear glenoid) adds to the complexity of the problem and necessitates a bony reconstruction procedure. Open surgical approaches described for management of this combined lesion complex in anterior shoulder instability necessitate a subscapularis-cutting approach; suboptimal healing of the tenotomized subscapularis and subsequent delayed rehabilitation predisposes to late subscapularis dysfunction, and this compromises clinical outcomes. This study describes a new surgical technique that utilizes a dual-window approach through the subscapularis muscle; the dual window enables access to the glenoid and humeral lesions without the need for a subscapularis tenotomy. The approach can be used to perform a congruent-arc Latarjet procedure (for glenoid bone defects) or a Bankart repair (for capsulolabral lesions), in combination with a HAGL repair. Preliminary arthroscopy is essential to identify significant bone defects and HAGL lesions. The dual-window approach for reconstruction of the lesions involves (1) a lateral "subscapularis-sparing" window to identify and repair the HAGL lesion; (2) a medial "subscapularis muscle-splitting" window to perform either a glenoid capsulolabral reconstruction or a congruent-arc Latarjet procedure; and (3) a balanced inferior capsular shift and lateralization procedure of the glenohumeral capsule. Technical tips and guidelines to avoid complications are discussed, and a rehabilitation protocol is presented.

  11. Loss of passive external rotation at 90 degrees abduction is predictive of a medially healed Bankart lesion.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Allen; Ramsey, Matthew L; Williams, Gerald R

    2006-07-01

    This prospective study correlates passive range of external rotation with arthroscopic findings in patients with anterior instability for the purpose of defining criteria that can be used to detect a medially healed Bankart lesion. External rotation at 90 degrees abduction (ER90) was assessed on examination with the patient under anesthesia in bilateral shoulders of 46 consecutive patients with unidirectional, anterior glenohumeral instability. Arthroscopy was used to identify 22 patients with a detached Bankart lesion (group I) and 24 patients with a medially healed Bankart lesion (group II). Differences in ER90 between symptomatic and asymptomatic shoulders for both groups were compared. The t test and the Wilcoxon rank-sum test measured significance. In group I, mean ER90 in the symptomatic shoulder was 5 degrees greater than in the asymptomatic shoulder; in group II, mean ER90 in the symptomatic shoulder was 7.4 degrees less than in the asymptomatic shoulder (P < .001). Loss of ER90 was highly sensitive (92%) and specific (95%), with a positive predictive value of 96% for detection of a medially healed Bankart lesion. If a loss of 5 degrees or more of ER90 in the affected shoulder is found on examination under anesthesia, one should have a high degree of suspicion for the presence of a medially healed Bankart lesion. Level II, development of diagnostic criteria on basis of consecutive patients.

  12. Ultrasound evaluation of arthroscopic full-thickness supraspinatus rotator cuff repair: single-row versus double-row suture bridge (transosseous equivalent) fixation. Results of a prospective, randomized study.

    PubMed

    Gartsman, Gary M; Drake, Gregory; Edwards, T Bradley; Elkousy, Hussein A; Hammerman, Steven M; O'Connor, Daniel P; Press, Cyrus M

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the structural outcomes of a single-row rotator cuff repair and double-row suture bridge fixation after arthroscopic repair of a full-thickness supraspinatus rotator cuff tear. We evaluated with diagnostic ultrasound a consecutive series of ninety shoulders in ninety patients with full-thickness supraspinatus tears at an average of 10 months (range, 6-12) after operation. A single surgeon at a single hospital performed the repairs. Inclusion criteria were full-thickness supraspinatus tears less than 25 mm in their anterior to posterior dimension. Exclusion criteria were prior operations on the shoulder, partial thickness tears, subscapularis tears, infraspinatus tears, combined supraspinatus and infraspinatus repairs and irreparable supraspinatus tears. Forty-three shoulders were repaired with single-row technique and 47 shoulders with double-row suture bridge technique. Postoperative rehabilitation was identical for both groups. Ultrasound criteria for healed repair included visualization of a tendon with normal thickness and length, and a negative compression test. Eighty-three patients were available for ultrasound examination (40 single-row and 43 suture-bridge). Thirty of 40 patients (75%) with single-row repair demonstrated a healed rotator cuff repair compared to 40/43 (93%) patients with suture-bridge repair (P = .024). Arthroscopic double-row suture bridge repair (transosseous equivalent) of an isolated supraspinatus rotator cuff tear resulted in a significantly higher tendon healing rate (as determined by ultrasound examination) when compared to arthroscopic single-row repair. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Return to recreational sport and clinical outcomes with at least 2years follow-up after arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Antoni, M; Klouche, S; Mas, V; Ferrand, M; Bauer, T; Hardy, P

    2016-09-01

    The main objective of the study was to assess return to sports in recreational athletes after arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tear (RCT). A retrospective single-center study included all recreational athletes operated between 2008 and 2012 for arthroscopic repair of RCT, with regular sports activity, and aged less than 70 years. All were recontacted at a minimum follow-up of 2 years. The main outcome was return to sports (yes/no). The secondary criteria were return to sports, time to return to sports, number of hours per week of sports activity, and at the last follow-up the subjective assessment of sports level, patient satisfaction, and the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff (WORC) Index. Seventy-six patients (37 females, 39 males) with a mean age of 57.0±7.3 years were included. Of these 76 patients, 53 (69.7%) patients participated in a sport that specifically involved the upper limb. The mean follow-up was 45±14 months. Postoperatively, 67 of 76 (88.2%) patients returned to a sports activity, the same sport for 52 out of 76 (68.4%). The mean time to return to sports was 6±4.9 months. For patients who had taken up their sport again, the mean number of hours a week was not significantly modified (P=0.58). At the last follow-up, the subjective sports level was judged better or identical to the preoperative level by 52 of 67 (77.6%) patients. The factors significantly associated with absence of return to the previous sport were pain symptoms evolving for more than 9 months before surgery (OR=3.6 [1.01-12.5], P=0.04) and preoperative sports intensity less than 2h/week (OR=4.1 [1.4-12.3], P=0.01). At the last follow-up, the functional improvement evaluated by the WORC Index was strongly significant (P<0.00001) and 73 of 76 (96%) patients were satisfied. The majority of the recreational athletes returned to sports after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, most often at the same level and with equivalent intensity compared to before surgery. IV, retrospective

  14. Comparison of functional gains after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in patients over 70 years of age versus patients under 50 years of age: a prospective multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Moraiti, Constantina; Valle, Pablo; Maqdes, Ali; Boughebri, Omar; Dib, Chourky; Giakas, Giannis; Kany, Jean; Elkholti, Kamil; Garret, Jérôme; Katz, Denis; Leclère, Franck Marie; Valenti, Philippe

    2015-02-01

    To assess rotator cuff rupture characteristics and evaluate healing and the functional outcome after arthroscopic repair in patients older than 70 years versus patients younger than 50 years. We conducted a multicenter, prospective, comparative study of 40 patients younger than 50 years (group A) and 40 patients older than 70 years (group B) treated with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Patients older than 70 years were operated on only if symptoms persisted after 6 months of conservative treatment, whereas patients younger than 50 years were operated on regardless of any persistent symptoms. Imaging consisted of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and postoperative ultrasound. Preoperative and postoperative function was evaluated with Constant and modified Constant scores. Patient satisfaction was also assessed. The evaluations were performed at least 1 year postoperatively. No patient was lost to follow-up. The incidence of both supraspinatus and infraspinatus tears was greater in group B. Greater retraction in the frontal plane and greater fatty infiltration were observed in group B. The Constant score was significantly improved in both groups (51 ± 12.32 preoperatively v 77.18 ± 11.02 postoperatively in group A and 48.8 ± 10.97 preoperatively v 74.6 ± 12.02 postoperatively in group B, P < .05). The improvement was similar in both groups. The modified Constant score was also significantly improved in both groups (57.48 ± 18.23 preoperatively v 81.35 ± 19.75 postoperatively in group A and 63.09 ± 14.96 preoperatively v 95.62 ± 17.61 postoperatively in group B, P < .05). The improvement was greater for group B (P < .05). Partial rerupture of the rotator cuff occurred in 2 cases in group A and 5 cases in group B. Complete rerupture was observed in 2 patients in group B. In group A, 29 patients (72.5%) were very satisfied, 8 (20%) were satisfied, and 3 (7.5%) were less satisfied. In group B, 33 patients (82.5%) were very satisfied, 6 (15%) were

  15. Effect of ultrasonographically guided axillary nerve block combined with suprascapular nerve block in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Jun; Kim, Do-Young; Hwang, Jung-Taek; Lee, Sang-Soo; Hwang, Sung Mi; Kim, Gi Ho; Jo, Yoon-Geol

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the results of ultrasonographically guided axillary nerve block (ANB) combined with suprascapular nerve block (SSNB) with those of SSNB alone on postoperative pain and satisfaction within the first 48 hours after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Forty-two patients with rotator cuff tears who had undergone arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were enrolled in this study. Among them, 21 patients were randomly allocated to group 1 and received both SSNB and ANB with 10 mL ropivacaine. The other 21 patients were allocated to group 2 and received SSNB with 10 mL 0.75% ropivacaine and ANB with 10 mL saline. Visual analog scale (VAS) pain score, patient satisfaction (SAT), and lateral pain index (LPI) was checked at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 36, and 48 hours postoperatively. Group 1 showed a significantly lower mean VAS score at postoperative 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 hours compared with group 2 (5.1 < 7.6, 4.4 < 6.3, 3.7 < 5.3, 3.2 < 4.5, 2.7 < 4.0, and 2.7 < 3.4, respectively). A significantly high mean SAT and low mean LPI was observed in group 1 at postoperative 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 hours (4.9 > 2.4, 5.9 > 3.7, 6.3 > 5.0, 6.8 > 5.7, 7.3 > 6.2, 7.5 > 6.6, and 7.7 > 7.0, respectively), (1.1 < 3.0, 0.8 < 2.5, 0.7 < 2.0, 0.7 < 1.6, 0.6 < 1.3, 0.6 < 1.0, and 0.4 < 0.7, respectively). The frequency of rebound pain decreased in group 1 compared with group 2 (P = .032). In addition, rebound phenomenon showed a correlation with ANB on univariate logistic regression (P = .034; odds ratio, 0.246). Ultrasonographically guided ANB combined with SSNB in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair showed an improved mean VAS in the first 24 hours after surgery compared with SSNB alone. The mean SAT and LPI of the combined blocks were better than those of the single block within the first 36 hours. Ultrasonographically guided ANB combined with SSNB also decreased the rebound phenomenon. Level I, randomized controlled trial. Copyright © 2014

  16. Return to sports after arthroscopic capsulolabral repair using knotless suture anchors for anterior shoulder instability in soccer players: minimum 5-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Álvarez-Díaz, Pedro; Doblas, Jesús; Steinbacher, Gilbert; Seijas, Roberto; Ares, Oscar; Boffa, Juan José; Cuscó, Xavier; Cugat, Ramón

    2016-02-01

    To report the return to sports and recurrence rates in competitive soccer players after arthroscopic capsulolabral repair using knotless suture anchors at a minimum of 5 years of follow-up. All competitive soccer players with anterior glenohumeral instability treated by arthroscopic capsulolabral repair using knotless suture anchors between 2002 and 2009 were retrospectively identified through the medical records. Inclusion criteria were: no previous surgical treatment of the involved shoulder, absence of glenoid or tuberosity fractures, absence of large Hill-Sachs or glenoid bone defect, minimum follow-up of 5 years, instability during soccer practice or games, and failure of non-surgical treatment. The charts of included players were reviewed, and a phone call was performed in a cross-sectional manner to obtain information on: current soccer, return to soccer, recurrence of instability, shoulder function (Rowe score), and disability [Quick-Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score and Quick-DASH Sports/Performing Arts Module]. Fifty-seven young male soccer players were finally included with a median (range) follow-up of 8 (5-10) years. Forty-nine (86 %) of the soccer players were able to return to soccer and 36 of them (73 %) at the same pre-injury level. There were 6 (10.5 %) re-dislocations in the 57 players, all of them of traumatic origin produced during soccer and other unrelated activities. The main reasons to not return to soccer were: knee injuries (two players), changes in personal life (two players), and job-related (three players). None of the players quit playing soccer because of their shoulder instability injury. The median (range) Rowe score, Quick-DASH score, and Quick-DASH sports score were 80 (25-100), 2.3 (0-12.5), and 0 (0-18.8), respectively. Competitive soccer players undergoing arthroscopic capsulolabral repair with knotless suture anchors for shoulder instability without significant bone loss demonstrate excellent return to

  17. One-year Patient-reported Outcomes After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair Do Not Correlate With Mild to Moderate Psychological Distress.

    PubMed

    Potter, Michael Q; Wylie, James D; Granger, Erin K; Greis, Patrick E; Burks, Robert T; Tashjian, Robert Z

    2015-11-01

    Patients with shoulder and rotator cuff pathology who exhibit greater levels of psychological distress report inferior preoperative self-assessments of pain and function. In several other areas of orthopaedics, higher levels of distress correlate with a higher likelihood of persistent pain and disability after recovery from surgery. To our knowledge, the relationship between psychological distress and outcomes after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has not been similarly investigated. (1) Are higher levels of preoperative psychological distress associated with differences in outcome scores (visual analog scale [VAS] for pain, Simple Shoulder Test, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score) 1 year after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair? (2) Are higher levels of preoperative psychological distress associated with less improvement in outcome scores (VAS for pain, Simple Shoulder Test, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score) 1 year after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair? (3) Does the prevalence of psychological distress in a population with full-thickness rotator cuff tears change when assessed preoperatively and 1 year after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair? Eighty-five patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears were prospectively enrolled; 70 patients (82%) were assessed at 1-year followup. During the study period, the three participating surgeons performed 269 rotator cuff repairs; in large part, the low overall rate of enrollment was related to two surgeons enrolling only two patients total in the initial 14 months of the study. Psychological distress was quantified using the Distress Risk Assessment Method questionnaire, and patients completed self-assessments including the VAS for pain, the Simple Shoulder Test, and the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score preoperatively and 1 year after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Fifty of 85 patients (59%) had normal levels of distress, 26 of 85 (31%) had moderate levels of distress, and nine of 85

  18. Consequences of a Perthes-Bankart lesion in twenty cadaver shoulders.

    PubMed

    Pouliart, Nicole; Gagey, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated whether an anteroinferior capsulolabral lesion is sufficient to allow the humeral head to dislocate and whether a limited inferior approach for creating the lesions influenced the results compared with an all-arthroscopic approach. Four ligamentous zones of the glenohumeral capsule were sequentially detached from the glenoid neck and labrum in 20 cadaver shoulders through an inferior approach. Before and after each resection step, inferior stability was tested using a sulcus test and anterior stability using a drawer test and an apprehension maneuver. Dislocation was only possible when at least 3 zones were cut. This study confirmed that superior and posterior extension of the classic anteroinferior Perthes-Bankart lesion is necessary before the capsular restraint in external rotation and abduction is overcome and dislocation occurs. Lesions other than the Perthes-Bankart need to be investigated when recurrent dislocation is treated, because this anteroinferior injury is most probably not the sole factor responsible for the instability.

  19. Fiber-optics couple arthroscope to TV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franke, J. M.; Rhodes, D. B.

    1981-01-01

    Convenient, hand-held coupler images output of arthroscope onto coherent fiber bundle. Arthroscope allows surgeons to examine internal organs through any small opening in body. Coupler is also used for engine inspection, instrument repair, and around-corner visual inspection. Image from arthroscope travels along flexible bundle and appears at other cable end where it is recollimated by lens. Image is read from lens or projected on color TV camera.

  20. Arthroscopic Treatment for Shoulder Instability with Glenoid Bone Loss Using Distal Tibia Allograft Augmentation - Short Term Results

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ivan; Amar, Eyal; Coady, Catherine M.; Dilman, Daryl B.; Smith, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Background: The results of arthroscopic anterior labral (Bankart) repair have been shown to have high failure rate in patients with significant glenoid bone loss. Several reconstruction procedures using bone graft have been described to overcome the bone loss, including autogenous coracoid transfer to the anterior glenoid (Latarjet procedure) as well as iliac crest autograft and tibial allografts. In recent years, trends toward minimally invasive shoulder surgery along with improvements in technology and technique have led surgeons to expand the application of arthroscopic treatment. Purpose: This study aims to perform a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data to evaluate the clinical and radiological follow up of patient who underwent anatomic glenoid reconstruction using distal tibia allograft for the treatment of shoulder instability with glenoid bone loss at 1-year post operation time point. Methods: Between December 2011 and January 2015, 55 patients underwent arthroscopic stabilization of the shoulder by means of capsule-labral reattachment to glenoid ream and bony augmentation of glenoid bone loss with distal tibial allograft for recurrent instability of the shoulder. Preoperative and postoperative evaluation included general assessment by the western Ontario shoulder instability index (WOSI) questionnaire, preoperative and postoperative radiographs and CT scans. Results: Fifty-five patients have been evaluated with mean age of 29.73 years at time of the index operation. There were 40 males (mean age of 29.66) and 15 female (mean age of 29.93). Minimum follow up time was 12 months. The following adverse effects were recorded: none suffered from recurrent dislocation, 2 patients suffered from bone resorption but without overt instability, 1 patient had malunion due to screw fracture, none of the patients had nonunion. The mean pre-operative WOSI score was 36.54 and the mean postoperative WOSI score was 61.0. Conclusion: Arthroscopic

  1. A Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial Evaluating the Effectiveness of Daily Vibration After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Lam, Patrick H; Hansen, Kaitlyn; Keighley, Geffrey; Hackett, Lisa; Murrell, George A C

    2015-11-01

    Rotator cuff repair is a common method to treat rotator cuff tears; however, retear rates remain high. High-frequency, low-magnitude vibration has been demonstrated to promote new bone formation in both animal models and in humans. This type of mechanical stimulation applied postoperatively will enhance tendon-to-bone healing and reduce postoperative retear rates. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted to investigate the effects of 5 minutes of 80-Hz vibration applied daily after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for 6 months on postoperative rotator cuff healing. The primary outcome was ultrasound-assessed repair integrity at 6 months after repair. Recruited patients were randomized into 2 groups: one group received a vibration device that oscillated at 80 Hz, and the other group received a placebo device. The postoperative retear rates of both groups were similar (9.1% [5/55] in the vibration group, and 9.3% [5/54] in the placebo group) at 6 months as determined by ultrasound imaging. Vibration did provide acute pain relief at 6 weeks after surgery (visual analog scale [VAS] score, 2.24 ± 0.29 cm) compared with placebo (VAS score, 3.67 ± 0.48 cm) (P < .003). Six months after surgery, both groups had significant reductions in pain during overhead activities, at rest, and during sleep and overall shoulder pain compared with before surgery (P < .001). Both the vibration and placebo groups had significant increases in shoulder strength with abduction in the scapular plane, adduction, liftoff, internal rotation, and external rotation 6 months after surgery. Statistical analysis showed that vibration was not a contributing factor at improving these parameters in these periods. High-frequency, low-magnitude vibration did provide acute pain relief on application 6 weeks after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair surgery. However, vibration did not improve tendon-to-bone healing

  2. High altitude is an independent risk factor for venous thromboembolism following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a matched case-control study in Medicare patients.

    PubMed

    Cancienne, Jourdan M; Burrus, M Tyrrell; Diduch, David R; Werner, Brian C

    2017-01-01

    Although the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) following elective shoulder arthroscopy is low, the large volume of procedures performed each year yields a significant annual burden of patients with thromboembolic complications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association of high procedural altitude with the incidence of postoperative VTE following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. A Medicare database was queried for all patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair from 2005 to 2012. All patients with procedures performed at an altitude of 4000 feet or higher were grouped into the "high-altitude" study cohort. Patients with procedures performed at an altitude of 100 feet or lower were then matched to patients in the high-altitude cohort on the basis of age, gender, and medical comorbidities. The rate of VTE was then assessed for both the high-altitude and matched low-altitude cohorts within 90 days postoperatively. The rates of combined VTE (odds ratio [OR], 2.6; P < .0001), pulmonary embolism (OR, 4.3; P < .0001), and lower extremity deep venous thrombosis within 90 days (OR, 2.2; P = .029) were all significantly higher in patients with procedures performed at high altitude compared with matched patients with the same procedures performed at low altitude. Procedural altitude >4000 feet is associated with significantly increased rates of postoperative VTE, including deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, compared with age-, gender-, and comorbidity-matched patients undergoing the same procedures at altitudes <100 feet. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A comparison of functional outcomes in patients undergoing revision arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff tears with and without arthroscopic suprascapular nerve release

    PubMed Central

    Savoie, Felix H; Zunkiewicz, Mark; Field, Larry D; Replogle, William H; O’Brien, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to compare functional outcomes in patients undergoing revision repair of massive rotator cuff tears (retracted medial to the glenoid) with Goutallier Grade 4 atrophy and concomitant release of the suprascapular nerve to a similar group of patients with Grade 3 atrophy undergoing revision rotator cuff repair (RTCR) without nerve release. We hypothesized that patients undergoing nerve release would have more favorable functional outcomes as measured by the Modified University of California at Los Angeles shoulder rating scale (UCLA). Patients and methods Twenty-two patients underwent revision repair of massive rotator cuff tears with release of the suprascapular nerve at the suprascapular notch. We compared total preoperative, postoperative, and change in UCLA score in these patients to a similar group of 22 patients undergoing revision RTCR without suprascapular nerve release. Additionally, UCLA subscores between the two groups were compared preoperatively and at final follow-up. Results The average preoperative UCLA score in the nerve-release group was 7.91, and final follow-up average was 27.86; average 3.05 grades of strength were recovered. In the comparison group, average preoperative UCLA score was 11.77, and final follow-up average was 29.09; average 1.32 grades of strength were recovered. The average preoperative UCLA score was significantly worse in the nerve-release group (P=0.007). The average postoperative UCLA score was not significantly different (P=0.590) between the groups, indicating a better improvement in the nerve-release group with significantly greater improvement in active forward flexion, strength, and pain relief. Conclusion Patients who underwent concomitant release of the suprascapular nerve during revision RTCR had greater overall improvement as noted in pain relief, active forward flexion, and strength, than a comparable group without nerve release. PMID:27799834

  4. The Clinical Effect of a Rotator Cuff Retear: A Meta-analysis of Arthroscopic Single-Row and Double-Row Repairs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jeffrey; Robbins, Matthew; Reilly, Jordan; Maerz, Tristan; Anderson, Kyle

    2017-03-01

    The clinical effect of a retear after rotator cuff repair remains unclear. While some studies have indicated clinical deficits due to a retear, others have stated that a retear does not detrimentally affect outcomes. To conduct a meta-analysis comparing clinical outcomes between intact and retorn rotator cuffs after arthroscopic repair. Meta-analysis. A literature search using the terms "arthroscopic," "rotator cuff," "repair," "retear," "re-tear," "defect," "single-row," "double-row," "clinical outcomes," and "functional outcomes" was conducted. Article inclusion criteria were an adequate description of the surgical technique, stratification of outcomes by intact rotator cuff versus retear with a minimum of 1 year of follow-up, and documentation of the presence/absence of a full-thickness retear using imaging. Exclusion criteria were isolated subscapularis tears/repairs, labral repairs, infections, postoperative fractures, insufficient data or statistical indications, and postoperative data not stratified by retear versus intact rotator cuff. A meta-analysis was performed using a random-effects model on variables that had comparisons from at least 3 studies. Single-row (SR) and double-row (DR) studies were analyzed both separately and together in an "all arthroscopic repairs" (AAR) comparison. The calculated effect was considered significant at a P value <.05. Within the SR group, patients with a rotator cuff retear had a significantly lower Constant score (mean difference [95% CI], -6.79 [-8.94 to -4.65]; P < .001) and lower University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) score (-3.21 [-5.27 to -1.15]; P = .002) but not higher pain (0.071 [-0.34 to 0.49]; P = .739). Within the DR group, patients with a rotator cuff retear had a significantly lower Constant score (mean difference [95% CI], -9.35 [-12.2 to -6.50]; P < .001), lower American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score (-12.1 [-17.1 to -7.26]; P < .001), lower UCLA score (-3.07 [-4.85 to -1.29]; P < .001

  5. Does Additional Biceps Augmentation Improve Rotator Cuff Healing and Clinical Outcomes in Anterior L-Shaped Rotator Cuff Tears? Clinical Comparisons With Arthroscopic Partial Repair.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yoon Sang; Lee, Juyeob; Kim, Rag Gyu; Ko, Young-Won; Shin, Sang-Jin

    2017-08-01

    The repair of anterior L-shaped tears is usually difficult because of the lack of anterior rotator cuff tendon to cover the footprint. The biceps tendon is usually exposed from the retracted anterolateral corner of the torn tendon and can be easily used to augment rotator cuff repair. Hypothesis/Purpose: This study compared the clinical outcomes of the biceps augmentation technique with those of partial tendon repair for the arthroscopic treatment of large anterior L-shaped rotator cuff tears to evaluate the role of additional biceps augmentation in tendon healing. We hypothesized that the biceps augmentation technique would lead to a lower rotator cuff tendon retear rate and provide satisfactory functional outcomes. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. This study included 64 patients with anterior L-shaped rotator cuff tears who underwent arthroscopic repair. Patients were divided into 2 groups: group A (31 patients) underwent repair of an anterior L-shaped tear combined with biceps augmentation, and group B (33 patients) had a partially repaired tendon whose footprint was exposed after repair without undue tension on the retracted tendon. Clinical evaluations were performed using the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, Constant score, muscle strength, visual analog scale for pain, and patient satisfaction. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed for tendon integrity at 6 months postoperatively. The mean period of follow-up was 29.1 ± 3.5 months (range, 24-40 months). The mean ASES and Constant scores significantly improved from 52.8 ± 10.6 and 43.2 ± 9.9 preoperatively to 88.2 ± 6.9 and 86.8 ± 6.2 at final follow-up in group A ( P < .001) and from 53.0 ± 11.8 and 44.3 ± 11.3 preoperatively to 87.4 ± 7.2 and 87.9 ± 7.3 at final follow-up in group B ( P < .001). Overall muscle strength (given as % of the other side's strength) significantly increased from preoperatively to final follow-up in group A (forward flexion [FF]: 62.0 ± 8

  6. Autologous collagen induced chondrogenesis (ACIC: Shetty-Kim technique) - A matrix based acellular single stage arthroscopic cartilage repair technique.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Asode Ananthram; Kim, Seok Jung; Shetty, Vishvas; Jang, Jae Deog; Huh, Sung Woo; Lee, Dong Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The defects of articular cartilage in the knee joint are a common degenerative disease and currently there are several established techniques to treat this problem, each with their own advantages and shortcomings. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is the current gold standard but the technique is expensive, time-consuming and most versions require two stage procedures and an arthrotomy. Autologous collagen induced chondrogenesis (ACIC) is a single-stage arthroscopic procedure and we developed. This method uses microfracture technique with atelocollagen mixed with fibrin gel to treat articular cartilage defects. We introduce this ACIC techniques and its scientific background.

  7. Treatment of the Bullet, Traversing Femoral Neck, Lodged in Hip Joint: Initial Arthroscopic Removal and Subsequent Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Çatma, Mehmet Faruk; Ünlü, Serhan; Ersan, Önder; Öztürk, Alper

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: There have been several reports on arthroscopically assisted removal of the bullet imbedded in hip joint in the literature. Similarly, in this case, a bullet lodged in acetabulum was extracted with arthroscopic technique. What makes this case unique in the literature is that the bullet removed from the acetabulum traversed the femoral neck. Case Report: Male patient aged 32 years with a low-velocity gunshot wound was referred to the emergency room on August 28, 2012. The projectile was lodged in acetabular side of the hip joint transversing through the femoral neck. A hip arthroscopy was performed for bullet removal. Two years after surgery, the patient had groin pain and underwent a safe dislocation for femoral chondral injury. In the last follow-up in the second post-operative year, the patient had no clinical complaint. Conclusion: Hip arthroscopy is a minimally invasive and proper procedure for removal of foreign materials such as a bullet in the hip joint. Arthrotomy can be reserved for further complications such as chondral injury as in this case. PMID:28164046

  8. Effectiveness of arthroscopic versus open surgical stabilisation for the management of traumatic anterior glenohumeral instability.

    PubMed

    Ng, Choong; Bialocerkowski, Andrea; Hinman, Rana

    2007-06-01

    Background  Anterior instability is a frequent complication following a traumatic glenohumeral dislocation. Frequently the underlying pathology associated with recurrent instability is a Bankart lesion. Surgical correction of Bankart lesions and other associated pathology is the key to successful treatment. Open surgical glenohumeral stabilisation has been advocated as the gold standard because of consistently low postoperative recurrent instability rates. However, arthroscopic glenohumeral stabilisation could challenge open surgical repair as the gold standard treatment for traumatic anterior glenohumeral instability. Objectives  Primary evidence that compared the effectiveness of arthroscopic versus open surgical glenohumeral stabilisation was systematically collated regarding best-practice management for adults with traumatic anterior glenohumeral instability. Search strategy  A systematic search was performed using 14 databases: MEDLINE, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL), Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED), ISI Web of Science, Expanded Academic ASAP, Proquest Medical Library, Evidence Based Medicine Reviews, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, TRIP Database, PubMed, ISI Current Contents Connect, Proquest Digital Dissertations, Open Archives Initiative Search Engine, Australian Digital Thesis Program. Studies published between January 1984 and December 2004 were included in this review. No language restrictions were applied. Selection criteria  Eligible studies were those that compared the effectiveness of arthroscopic versus open surgical stabilisation for the management of traumatic anterior glenohumeral instability, which had more than 2 years of follow up and used recurrent instability and a functional shoulder questionnaire as primary outcomes. Studies that used non-anatomical open repair techniques, patient groups that were specifically 40 years or older, or had multidirectional instability or other concomitant

  9. Arthroscopic repair of anterosuperior rotator cuff tears: in-continuity technique vs. disruption of subscapularis-supraspinatus tear margin: comparison of clinical outcomes and structural integrity between the two techniques.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Jung, Min; Lee, Jae-Hoo; Kim, Chul; Chun, Yong-Min

    2014-12-17

    The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes and structural integrity after two techniques of arthroscopic anterosuperior rotator cuff repair: in continuity and disruption of the tear margin. This study included fifty-nine patients who underwent arthroscopic repair of an anterosuperior rotator cuff tear that was done either by disrupting the margin between the subscapularis and supraspinatus tears (Group A) or by performing the repair in continuity without disrupting the margin (Group B). Clinical outcomes were assessed on the basis of a visual analog scale (VAS) pain score, subjective shoulder value (SSV), American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) shoulder score, and active range of motion of the shoulder. Subscapularis strength was assessed with use of the modified belly-press test. Magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) or computed tomographic arthrography (CTA) was performed at six months after surgery to assess the structural integrity of the repair. At the two-year follow-up evaluation, VAS pain scores, SSVs, ASES scores, UCLA shoulder scores, subscapularis strength, and active range of motion improved significantly in both groups compared with preoperatively (p < 0.001). There were no significant differences between groups for any of these follow-up measurements. On follow-up MRA or CTA, the overall retear rate did not differ significantly different between Group A (22%; five of twenty-three) and Group B (19%; six of thirty-two). In conclusion, in patients treated with arthroscopic repair of anterosuperior full-thickness subscapularis and supraspinatus tears of the rotator cuff, the technique of in-continuity repair did not produce better clinical outcomes or structural integrity than the technique involving disruption of the tear margin. If the muscle in an anterosuperior rotator cuff tear is of good quality, it does not appear to matter whether the tear margin between the

  10. Knowing the speed limit: weighing the benefits and risks of rehabilitation progression after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Thigpen, Charles A; Shaffer, Michael A; Kissenberth, Michael J

    2015-04-01

    Rotator cuff repairs have increased. Although clinical trials have examined the effect of immobilization and timing of passive range of motion (ROM) on patient outcomes and structural integrity, there is controversy as to the timing and progression for therapy. Primary goals are restoring function while maintaining the structural integrity of the repair. We advocate for a protocol of 4 to 6 weeks of immobilization, followed by protected passive ROM, which is followed by a gradual progression to active ROM and then appropriate resistance exercise program for most all rotator cuff repairs. The rate of progression should be adjusted individually.

  11. Arthroscopic repair of traumatic isolated subscapularis tendon lesions (Lafosse Type III or IV): a prospective magnetic resonance imaging-controlled case series with 1 year of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Grueninger, Patrick; Nikolic, Nikola; Schneider, Joerg; Lattmann, Thomas; Platz, Andreas; Chmiel, Corinne; Meier, Christoph

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively assess the efficacy of arthroscopic repair of isolated high-grade subscapularis (SSC) tend