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Sample records for arthroscopic bankart repair

  1. Revision arthroscopic Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Abouali, Jihad Alexander Karim; Hatzantoni, Katerina; Holtby, Richard; Veillette, Christian; Theodoropoulos, John

    2013-09-01

    Failed anterior shoulder stabilization procedures have traditionally been treated with open procedures. Recent advances in arthroscopic techniques have allowed for certain failed stabilization procedures to be treated by arthroscopic surgery. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the outcomes of revision arthroscopic Bankart repair. We searched Medline, Embase, and CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature) for articles on revision arthroscopic Bankart repairs. Key words included shoulder dislocation, anterior shoulder instability, revision surgery, and arthroscopic Bankart repair. Two reviewers selected studies for inclusion, assessed methodologic quality, and extracted data. We included 16 studies comprising 349 patients. All studies were retrospective (1 Level II study and 15 Level IV studies). The mean incidence of recurrent instability after revision arthroscopic Bankart repair was 12.7%, and the mean follow-up period was 35.4 months. The most common cause for failure of the primary surgeries was a traumatic injury (62.1%), and 85.1% of patients returned to playing sports. The reasons for failure of revision cases included glenohumeral bone loss, hyperlaxity, and return to contact sports. With proper patient selection, the outcomes of revision arthroscopic Bankart repair appear similar to those of revision open Bankart repair. Prospective, randomized clinical trials are required to confirm these findings. Level IV, systematic review of Level II and Level IV studies. Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Isolated HAGL lesion after arthroscopic Bankart repair in a professional soccer player.

    PubMed

    Celik, Haluk; Seckin, Mustafa Faik; Kara, Adnan; Akman, Senol

    2017-05-01

    Post-traumatic anterior shoulder instability commonly occurs following an avulsion of capsulolabral complex from glenoid (Bankart lesion) or rarely after humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligaments (HAGL lesion). Arthroscopic Bankart repair offers high success rates of healing. However, trauma following the treatment may cause implant failure or re-avulsion of the treated tissue. We aim to present the diagnosis and treatment of an isolated HAGL lesion in a professional soccer player who had previously undergone arthroscopic Bankart repair.

  3. Back to Sports After Arthroscopic Revision Bankart Repair

    PubMed Central

    Buckup, Johannes; Welsch, Frederic; Gramlich, Yves; Hoffmann, Reinhard; Roessler, Philip P.; Schüttler, Karl F.; Stein, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Background: Recurrent instability following primary arthroscopic stabilization of the shoulder is a common complication. Young, athletic patients are at the greatest risk of recurring instability. To date, the literature contains insufficient description regarding whether return to sports is possible after revision arthroscopic Bankart repair. Hypothesis: Patients presenting with recurrent instability after primary arthroscopic stabilization should expect limitations in terms of their ability to partake in sporting activities after revision surgery. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Twenty athletes who underwent arthroscopic revision stabilization of the shoulder after failed primary arthroscopic Bankart repair were included in the study after completing inclusion and exclusion criteria surveys. Athletic Shoulder Outcome Scoring System (ASOSS), Shoulder Sport Activity Score (SSAS), and the Subjective Patient Outcome for Return to Sports (SPORTS) scores were determined to assess the participants’ ability to partake in sporting activities. Furthermore, sport type and sport level were classified and recorded. To assess function and stability, Rowe, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, Constant-Murley, and Walch-Duplay scores were measured and recorded. Results: Follow-up consultations were carried out after a mean of 28.7 months. The mean age at follow-up examination was 27.75 years. At the time of follow-up, 70% of the patients were able to return to their original sporting activities at the same level. However, 90% of patients described a limitation in their shoulder when participating in their sports. At 28.7 months after surgery, the mean ASOSS score was 76.8; the SSAS score decreased from 7.85 before first-time dislocation to 5.35 at follow-up (P < .005). The SPORTS score was 5.2 out of 10 at the follow-up consultation. Function- and instability-specific scores showed good to excellent results. The mean external rotational deficit for

  4. Prospective evaluation of arthroscopic bankart repairs for anterior instability.

    PubMed

    Voos, James E; Livermore, Ryan W; Feeley, Brian T; Altchek, David W; Williams, Riley J; Warren, Russell F; Cordasco, Frank A; Allen, Answorth A

    2010-02-01

    Arthroscopic treatment has evolved to become the primary surgical option in the management of anterior shoulder instability as studies show comparable outcomes between open and arthroscopic techniques. To evaluate prospectively the results of our institutional database for arthroscopic Bankart repairs at a minimum 2-year follow-up for patients with anterior instability treated with suture anchors. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Eighty-three consecutive patients underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair with suture anchors. The mean age at the time of surgery was 33 years (range, 15-55 years). At an average follow-up of 33 months (range, 24-49 months), 73 patients (61 males, 12 females) were assessed with outcomes scores including the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, L'Insalata, and visual analog scores. The rate of recurrent instability, range of motion, and risk factors for postoperative recurrence were evaluated. Thirteen patients (18%) suffered a recurrence after surgery. Seven patients (10%) had a subsequent dislocation and 6 (8%) a subluxation event or apprehension. Six of the 13 had a traumatic event that resulted in recurrent episodes of instability. Revision surgery was needed for 2 patients (3%) for instability and 2 for postoperative shoulder stiffness. On average there was no significant loss of external rotation postoperatively (average, 71 degrees pre- and postoperatively). The American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons and L'Insalata scores improved from 75.4 to 94.9 and 66.5 to 90.9, respectively (P <.0001). The visual analog score improved from 2.4 to 0.4 (P <.001). Patient age under 25, ligamentous laxity, and the presence of a large (>250 mm(3)) Hill-Sachs lesion were associated with recurrence (P <.05). Patients under age 20 had a 37.5% recurrence rate. In the arthroscopic treatment of anterior instability, identification of risk factors for recurrence allows for appropriate patient counseling and consideration of open stabilization. In our series

  5. Comparison of Time to Recurrence of Instability After Open and Arthroscopic Bankart Repair Techniques.

    PubMed

    Virk, Mandeep S; Manzo, Richard L; Cote, Mark; Ware, James K; Mazzocca, Augustus D; Nissen, Carl W; Shea, Kevin P; Arciero, Robert A

    2016-06-01

    The results of open and arthroscopic instability repairs have been shown to be equivalent in recent literature. To compare the time to recurrence (TTR) of instability and disease-specific outcome measures in patients undergoing open and arthroscopic Bankart repair. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Patients with recurrent traumatic anterior shoulder instability and a Bankart lesion on diagnostic arthroscopy underwent either open Bankart repair (OB) or arthroscopic Bankart and suture capsulorrhaphy (ABSC) using suture anchors. There was a minimum follow-up of 24 months. The primary outcome measures included Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI) score and time to recurrence of instability (dislocation or subluxation). Rowe score, Simple Shoulder Test, Constant score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, and Short Form-12 (SF-12) score were also compared. A total of 82 shoulders in 80 patients (ABSC, n = 58; OB, n = 24) were evaluated at a mean of 39 months postoperatively. There were 4 clinical failures in the OB group (4 dislocations) and 7 clinical failures in the ABSC group (2 dislocations and 5 subluxations; P = .72 vs OB). The mean time to recurrence of postoperative instability was significantly shorter in the ABSC group (12.6 ± 2.7 months) compared with the OB group (34.2 ± 12 months; P = .04). The WOSI score in the OB group (265 ± 48.1) was better but not statistically significantly compared with the ABSC group (449.8 ± 63.8; P = .06). The time to recurrence of instability after open Bankart repair is significantly longer compared with arthroscopic Bankart repair. Delayed time to recurrence after open Bankart repair suggests that the open technique may be more suited to withstand the high stress and demands of a heavy-duty profession (contact athletes and heavy manual labor).

  6. Comparison of Time to Recurrence of Instability After Open and Arthroscopic Bankart Repair Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Mandeep S.; Manzo, Richard L.; Cote, Mark; Ware, James K.; Mazzocca, Augustus D.; Nissen, Carl W.; Shea, Kevin P.; Arciero, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The results of open and arthroscopic instability repairs have been shown to be equivalent in recent literature. Purpose: To compare the time to recurrence (TTR) of instability and disease-specific outcome measures in patients undergoing open and arthroscopic Bankart repair. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Patients with recurrent traumatic anterior shoulder instability and a Bankart lesion on diagnostic arthroscopy underwent either open Bankart repair (OB) or arthroscopic Bankart and suture capsulorrhaphy (ABSC) using suture anchors. There was a minimum follow-up of 24 months. The primary outcome measures included Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI) score and time to recurrence of instability (dislocation or subluxation). Rowe score, Simple Shoulder Test, Constant score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, and Short Form–12 (SF-12) score were also compared. Results: A total of 82 shoulders in 80 patients (ABSC, n = 58; OB, n = 24) were evaluated at a mean of 39 months postoperatively. There were 4 clinical failures in the OB group (4 dislocations) and 7 clinical failures in the ABSC group (2 dislocations and 5 subluxations; P = .72 vs OB). The mean time to recurrence of postoperative instability was significantly shorter in the ABSC group (12.6 ± 2.7 months) compared with the OB group (34.2 ± 12 months; P = .04). The WOSI score in the OB group (265 ± 48.1) was better but not statistically significantly compared with the ABSC group (449.8 ± 63.8; P = .06). Conclusion: The time to recurrence of instability after open Bankart repair is significantly longer compared with arthroscopic Bankart repair. Clinical Relevance: Delayed time to recurrence after open Bankart repair suggests that the open technique may be more suited to withstand the high stress and demands of a heavy-duty profession (contact athletes and heavy manual labor). PMID:27570783

  7. Variability of Outcome Reporting Following Arthroscopic Bankart Repair in Adolescent Athletes: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Kasik, Connor; Saper, Michael G

    2018-04-01

    To conduct a systematic review of the literature to assess the variability of the reporting of outcome measures after arthroscopic Bankart repair for traumatic anterior shoulder instability in the adolescent population. A systematic review was conducted investigating all studies reporting outcomes after arthroscopic Bankart repair in the adolescent population. Four databases (Medline, EMBASE, Ovid, and Google Scholar) were screened for clinical studies involving the arthroscopic management of anterior shoulder instability in adolescents. A full-text review of eligible studies was conducted. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied to the searched studies. A quality assessment was completed for each included study using the Methodological Index for Nonrandomized Studies instrument and the Center for Evidence-Based Medicine's Levels of Evidence Scale. We identified 8 eligible studies involving 274 patients (282 shoulders). There was considerable variation with regard to reported outcomes after arthroscopic Bankart repair for anterior shoulder instability in the adolescent population. The most common patient-reported outcomes included the Rowe Score (50%), Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (37.5%), American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Shoulder Outcome Score (25%), and the Constant Score (25%). Clinical outcomes reported included recurrence (100%), return to sport (62.5%), patient satisfaction (37.5%), stability (37.5%), pain scores (37.5%), and range of motion (12.5%). There is considerable variation in reported clinical outcome measurements after arthroscopic Bankart repair for traumatic shoulder instability in the adolescent population. This study supports the need for standardized outcome reporting after arthroscopic anterior shoulder instability surgery in adolescents. Level IV, systematic review of Level II-IV studies. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The open latarjet procedure is more reliable in terms of shoulder stability than arthroscopic bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Bessière, Charles; Trojani, Christophe; Carles, Michel; Mehta, Saurabh S; Boileau, Pascal

    2014-08-01

    Arthroscopic Bankart repair and open Latarjet bone block procedure are widely considered mainstays for surgical treatment of recurrent anterior shoulder instability. The choice between these procedures depends mainly on surgeon preference or training rather than published evidence. We compared patients with recurrent posttraumatic anterior shoulder instability treated with arthroscopic Bankart or open Latarjet procedure in terms of (1) frequency and timing of recurrent instability, (2) risk factors for recurrent instability, and (3) patient-reported outcomes. In this retrospective comparative study, we paired 93 patients undergoing open Latarjet procedures with 93 patients undergoing arthroscopic Bankart repairs over the same period for posttraumatic anterior shoulder instability by one of four surgeons at the same center. Both groups were comparable except that patients in the Latarjet group had more glenoid lesions and more instability episodes preoperatively. Minimum followup was 4 years (mean, 6 years; range, 4-10 years). Patients were assessed with a questionnaire, including stability, Rowe score, and return to sports. Recurrent instability was defined as at least one episode of recurrent dislocation or subluxation. Return to sports was evaluated using a 0% to 100% scale that patients completed after recovery from surgery. Various risk factors for recurrent instability were also analyzed. At latest followup, 10% (nine of 93) in the Latarjet group and 22% (20 of 93) in the Bankart group demonstrated recurrent instability (p = 0.026; odds ratio, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.17-0.91). Ten recurrences in the Bankart group (50%) occurred after 2 years, compared to only one (11%) in the Latarjet group. Reoperation rate was 6% and 7% in the Bankart and Latarjet groups, respectively. In both groups, patients younger than 20 years had higher recurrence risk (p = 0.019). In the Bankart group, independent factors predictive for recurrence were practice of competitive sports and

  9. A prospective outcome evaluation of arthroscopic Bankart repairs: minimum 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Dominic S; Mazzocca, Augustus D; Oryhon, Jeremy; Brown, Frederick M; Hayden, Jennifer K; Romeo, Anthony A

    2006-05-01

    Arthroscopic treatment of anterior shoulder dislocation has become possible through improvements in instruments and techniques. To prospectively evaluate results of arthroscopic Bankart repairs at a minimum 2-year follow-up for patients with histories of shoulder dislocation and an anterior-inferior labral tear at the time of diagnostic arthroscopy. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A consecutive series of 85 patients (70 men, 15 women; mean age, 26 years) with Bankart lesions were treated with arthroscopic repair using suture anchors; 18 patients (27%) had extension of the labral injury into the superior labrum affecting some or all of the biceps anchor. Anchors were loaded with no. 2 nonabsorbable braided suture and placed 2 mm into the edge of the glenoid surface. A low anterior (5-o'clock) portal through the subscapularis tendon was used in all patients; 72 patients were evaluated at a minimum of 2 years postoperatively (mean, 46 months). Seven patients (10%) experienced recurrent instability after repair. Four patients had redislocations; 3 experienced recurrent subluxations. One patient had pain with the apprehension test without a clear history of recurrent instability. Of 18 collision athletes, 2 had dislocations at 22 and 60 months postoperatively. There were no complications, including no neurologic deficits. Clinical strength testing of the subscapularis muscle was normal in all patients. The mean Rowe score was 88 of 100 points, with 90% excellent or good results. Simple Shoulder Test responses improved from 66% positive preoperatively to 88% positive postoperatively. The American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scoring index averaged 92 of 100 points postoperatively. Pain analog scales improved from 5.5 preoperatively to 0.35 postoperatively on a 10-point scale. SF-12 scores improved for physical function. Patient satisfaction was rated 8.9 on a 10-point visual analog scale. Bankart repairs performed arthroscopically using properly implanted suture

  10. Accelerated rehabilitation after arthroscopic Bankart repair in professional footballers.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Jo; Kerss, Jim; Morgan, Chris; Brownson, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Advances in arthroscopic surgery have resulted in biomechanically stronger repairs that might allow for accelerated rehabilitation protocols and hence faster return to play. Evidence for such regimes in the shoulder, particularly in elite athletes, is lacking. This prospective single surgeon (PB) series included 34 professional footballers undergoing an accelerated rehabilitation programme following arthroscopic soft tissue stabilization subsequent to traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation. Data were collected on time to regain elevation range, external rotation range, return to play and rate of recurrence. Mean follow-up time was 4.8 years (range 2 years to 10 years). Full range of forward elevation was regained at a mean of 5 weeks (range 3 weeks to 7 weeks) and external rotation range (in neutral) at a mean of 6 weeks (range 4 weeks to 8 weeks). Mean return to play time was 11 weeks (range 9 weeks to 14 weeks). Three players (9%) reported a recurrent episode of dislocation at a mean of 19 months. An accelerated rehabilitation programme resulted in a return to play time of 11 weeks compared to previously reported times of between 5 months and 9 months in the contact sports population. A recurrence rate of 9% compares favourably to other published studies following similar surgery (5.1% to 28.6%) but which employed more conservative postoperative rehabilitation regimes.

  11. Accelerated rehabilitation after arthroscopic Bankart repair in professional footballers

    PubMed Central

    Kerss, Jim; Morgan, Chris; Brownson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Advances in arthroscopic surgery have resulted in biomechanically stronger repairs that might allow for accelerated rehabilitation protocols and hence faster return to play. Evidence for such regimes in the shoulder, particularly in elite athletes, is lacking. Methods This prospective single surgeon (PB) series included 34 professional footballers undergoing an accelerated rehabilitation programme following arthroscopic soft tissue stabilization subsequent to traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation. Data were collected on time to regain elevation range, external rotation range, return to play and rate of recurrence. Results Mean follow-up time was 4.8 years (range 2 years to 10 years). Full range of forward elevation was regained at a mean of 5 weeks (range 3 weeks to 7 weeks) and external rotation range (in neutral) at a mean of 6 weeks (range 4 weeks to 8 weeks). Mean return to play time was 11 weeks (range 9 weeks to 14 weeks). Three players (9%) reported a recurrent episode of dislocation at a mean of 19 months. Conclusions An accelerated rehabilitation programme resulted in a return to play time of 11 weeks compared to previously reported times of between 5 months and 9 months in the contact sports population. A recurrence rate of 9% compares favourably to other published studies following similar surgery (5.1% to 28.6%) but which employed more conservative postoperative rehabilitation regimes. PMID:27660661

  12. Outcomes After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair in Adolescent Athletes Participating in Collision and Contact Sports

    PubMed Central

    Saper, Michael G.; Milchteim, Charles; Zondervan, Robert L.; Andrews, James R.; Ostrander, Roger V.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Literature on arthroscopic stabilization in adolescent patients participating in collision and contact sports is limited, as most studies include adolescents within a larger sample group comprised primarily of adults. Purpose: To review the outcomes of arthroscopic Bankart repair for anterior shoulder instability in an adolescent population participating in collision and contact sports. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: This retrospective review included 39 shoulders in 37 adolescent (≤19 years) athletes who underwent primary arthroscopic Bankart repair using suture anchors with at least 2-year follow-up. All patients had a history of trauma to their shoulder resulting in an anterior dislocation. Outcome measures included patient satisfaction, the visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, and Rowe score. Recurrence of dislocation and return to sporting activity were also assessed. Results: The mean age at the time of surgery was 16.9 years (range, 15-19 years), and the mean follow-up was 6.3 years (range, 4.3-10.0 years); 58.6% of patients participated in collision sports. Time to surgery after the initial dislocation episode was 9.2 months (range, 0.5-36.2 months). Four shoulders (10.3%) had dislocation events postoperatively. The majority (78.1%) of patients returned to sports at the same level of competition. Mean VAS was 0.49 ± 1.0, and the mean ASES and Rowe scores were 92.8 ± 12.6 and 85.0 ± 24.2, respectively. Univariate analyses demonstrated that subjective functional outcomes were negatively correlated with recurrence (ASES, P = .005; Rowe, P = .001) and failure to return to sport (ASES, P = .016; Rowe, P = .004). Independent variables shown to have no significant relationship to functional outcomes included age, follow-up, number of preoperative dislocations, time to surgery, sport classification, competition level, tear extent, number of anchors, concurrent Hill

  13. Management of an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion: arthroscopic remplissage with Bankart repair versus Latarjet procedure.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nam Su; Yoo, Jae Hyun; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2016-12-01

    This study compared the clinical outcomes of arthroscopic remplissage with Bankart repair and Latarjet operation in patients with a large engaging Hill-Sachs lesion. Thirty-seven shoulders subjected to arthroscopic remplissage with a Bankart repair (group A) and 35 shoulders subjected to a Latarjet operation (group B), for a large engaging Hill-Sachs lesion without significant glenoid bone loss, were retrospectively evaluated. Each group was followed up for a mean more than 2-year period. At the last follow-up, postoperative pain, shoulder mobility, muscle strength, Rowe score, and UCLA score revealed no significant difference between the two groups. The postoperative mean deficit in external rotation at the side (ERs) was 8° ± 23° in group A (P = 0.044). In group B, the mean deficits in ERs, external rotation at 90° of abduction, and internal rotation to the posterior were 10° ± 20°, 7° ± 16°, and 1.9° ± 4°, respectively (P = 0.004, 0.022, and 0.009, respectively). The recurrence rate was 5.4 % (two shoulders) in group A and 5.7 % (two shoulders) in group B (n.s.). The overall complication rate was significantly higher in group B (14.3 %) than in group A (0 %) (P = 0.017). For recurrent anterior shoulder instability with a large engaging Hill-Sachs lesion, both arthroscopic remplissage with Bankart repair and the Latarjet procedure were safe and reliable techniques with a low recurrence rate. However, the Latarjet group had a significantly higher postoperative complication rate than the remplissage group. Case-control study, Level III.

  14. Long-Term Restoration of Anterior Shoulder Stability: A Retrospective Analysis of Arthroscopic Bankart Repair Versus Open Latarjet Procedure.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Stefan M; Scheyerer, Max J; Farshad, Mazda; Catanzaro, Sabrina; Rahm, Stefan; Gerber, Christian

    2016-12-07

    Various operative techniques are used for treating recurrent anterior shoulder instability, and good mid-term results have been reported. The purpose of this study was to compare shoulder stability after treatment with the 2 commonly performed procedures, the arthroscopic Bankart soft-tissue repair and the open coracoid transfer according to Latarjet. A comparative, retrospective case-cohort analysis of 360 patients (364 shoulders) who had primary repair for recurrent anterior shoulder instability between 1998 and 2007 was performed. The minimum duration of follow-up was 6 years. Reoperations, overt recurrent instability (defined as recurrent dislocation or subluxation), apprehension, the subjective shoulder value (SSV), sports participation, and overall satisfaction were recorded. An open Latarjet procedure was performed in 93 shoulders, and an arthroscopic Bankart repair was done in 271 shoulders. Instability or apprehension persisted or recurred after 11% (10) of the 93 Latarjet procedures and after 41.7% (113) of the 271 arthroscopic Bankart procedures. Overt instability recurred after 3% of the Latarjet procedures and after 28.4% (77) of the Bankart procedures. In the Latarjet group, 3.2% of the patients were not satisfied with their result compared with 13.2% in the Bankart group (p = 0.007). Kaplan-Meier analysis of survivorship, with apprehension (p < 0.001), redislocation (p = 0.01), and operative revision (p < 0.001) as the end points, documented the substantial superiority of the Latarjet procedure and the decreasing effectiveness of the arthroscopic Bankart repair over time. Twenty percent of the first recurrences after arthroscopic Bankart occurred no earlier than 91 months postoperatively, as opposed to the rare recurrences after osseous reconstruction, which occurred in the early postoperative period, with only rare late failures. In this retrospective cohort study, the arthroscopic Bankart procedure was inferior to the open Latarjet procedure for

  15. Effectiveness and safety of arthroscopic versus open Bankart repair for recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation: a meta-analysis of clinical trial data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Xu, Zhao; Peng, Jing; Xing, Fei; Wang, Hong; Xiang, Zhou

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of arthroscopic and open Bankart repair for recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation using meta-analysis of data from clinical trials. Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, PUBMED and EMBASE were used to search and identify clinical trials that evaluated arthroscopic and open Bankart repair for recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation. Methodological qualities of studies were assessed by Cochrane Collaboration tool for assessing risk of bias and Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Publication bias was detected using Begg's test and Egger's test. Sixteen trials involving 827 shoulders were included in the study. Based on Cochrane Collaboration tool for assessing risk of bias, three studies were rated as high quality and one study was rated as moderate quality among the randomized controlled trials. Another twelve case-control studies were rated as high quality based on Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. No significant publication bias was detected by Begg's test or Egger's test. Meta-analysis results indicated that arthroscopic repair has a significantly better recovery rate for external rotation at 90° of abduction, external rotation at side (P > 0.05) and forward flexion. However, arthroscopic repair had higher rates of recurrence and reoperation than open Bankart repair. Meta-analysis of available randomized controlled trials and case-control studies demonstrated that arthroscopic repair and open Bankart repair were similar in safety. Arthroscopic repair resulted in better recovery of range of motion, but recurrence and reoperation rates were higher than open Bankart repair.

  16. Risk Factors for the Postoperative Recurrence of Instability After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Shigeto; Mae, Tatsuo; Sato, Seira; Okimura, Shinichiro; Kuroda, Miki

    2017-01-01

    Background: Several risk factors for the postoperative recurrence of instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair have been reported, but there have been few detailed investigations of the specific risk factors in relation to the type of sport. Purpose: This study investigated the postoperative recurrence of instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair without additional reinforcement procedures in competitive athletes, including athletes with a large glenoid defect. The purpose of this study was to investigate risk factors related to the postoperative recurrence of instability in athletes. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 115 athletes (123 shoulders) were classified into 5 groups according to type of sport: rugby (41 shoulders), American football (32 shoulders), other collision sports (18 shoulders), contact sports (15 shoulders), and overhead sports (17 shoulders). First, the recurrence rate in each sporting category was investigated, with 113 shoulders followed up for a minimum of 2 years. Then, factors related to postoperative recurrence were investigated in relation to the type of sport. Results: Postoperative recurrence of instability was noted in 23 of 113 shoulders (20.4%). The recurrence rate was 33.3% in rugby, 17.2% in American football, 11.1% in other collision sports, 14.3% in contact sports, and 12.5% in overhead sports. The most frequent cause of recurrence was tackling, and recurrence occurred with tackling in 12 of 16 athletes playing rugby or American football. Reoperation was completed in 11 shoulders. By univariate analysis, significant risk factors for postoperative recurrence of instability included playing rugby, age between 10 and 19 years at surgery, preoperative glenoid defect, small bone fragment of bony Bankart lesion, and capsular tear. However, by multivariate analysis, the most significant factor was not the type of sport but younger age at operation and a preoperative glenoid defect with

  17. Risk Factors for the Postoperative Recurrence of Instability After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Shigeto; Mae, Tatsuo; Sato, Seira; Okimura, Shinichiro; Kuroda, Miki

    2017-09-01

    Several risk factors for the postoperative recurrence of instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair have been reported, but there have been few detailed investigations of the specific risk factors in relation to the type of sport. This study investigated the postoperative recurrence of instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair without additional reinforcement procedures in competitive athletes, including athletes with a large glenoid defect. The purpose of this study was to investigate risk factors related to the postoperative recurrence of instability in athletes. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 115 athletes (123 shoulders) were classified into 5 groups according to type of sport: rugby (41 shoulders), American football (32 shoulders), other collision sports (18 shoulders), contact sports (15 shoulders), and overhead sports (17 shoulders). First, the recurrence rate in each sporting category was investigated, with 113 shoulders followed up for a minimum of 2 years. Then, factors related to postoperative recurrence were investigated in relation to the type of sport. Postoperative recurrence of instability was noted in 23 of 113 shoulders (20.4%). The recurrence rate was 33.3% in rugby, 17.2% in American football, 11.1% in other collision sports, 14.3% in contact sports, and 12.5% in overhead sports. The most frequent cause of recurrence was tackling, and recurrence occurred with tackling in 12 of 16 athletes playing rugby or American football. Reoperation was completed in 11 shoulders. By univariate analysis, significant risk factors for postoperative recurrence of instability included playing rugby, age between 10 and 19 years at surgery, preoperative glenoid defect, small bone fragment of bony Bankart lesion, and capsular tear. However, by multivariate analysis, the most significant factor was not the type of sport but younger age at operation and a preoperative glenoid defect with small or no bone fragment. Compared with the other

  18. Arthroscopic Bankart repair of anterior detachments of the glenoid labrum. A prospective study.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, D B

    1999-10-01

    -two shoulders (54 percent) had a full range of motion in all planes, and eighteen (44 percent) had no strength deficit in any position on isokinetic testing. With the numbers available for study, no significant association was found between the presence of a Hill-Sachs or an osseous Bankart lesion on preoperative radiographs and the overall score on the scale of Rowe and Zarins or the scale of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons; however, there was a significant association between the range of motion and an osseous Bankart lesion on preoperative radiographs (p = 0.002) and between decreased strength on isokinetic testing and a Hill-Sachs lesion on preoperative radiographs and an osseous lesion on postoperative radiographs (p = 0.022). There also was a significant association between a decreased range of motion (p < 0.002) and decreased strength (p = 0.014) and the arthroscopic finding of loose bodies. Muscle strength also was affected by arm dominance and the number of preoperative dislocations. Arthroscopic transglenoid repair of isolated anterior labral detachments restored stability of the shoulder and led to a favorable outcome in thirty-nine (95 percent) of the forty-one athletes. Only the two football players who had postoperative subluxation had a score of less than 80 points according to the scale of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons.

  19. Hill-Sachs Off-track Lesions as Risk Factor for Recurrence of Instability After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair.

    PubMed

    Locher, Joel; Wilken, Frauke; Beitzel, Knut; Buchmann, Stefan; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Denaro, Vincenzo; Imhoff, Andreas B

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of "off-track" Hill-Sachs lesions, according to the glenoid track concept, as a risk factor for recurrent instability and need for revision surgery after arthroscopic Bankart repair. We retrospectively reviewed 254 patients with anteroinferior glenohumeral instability who were managed with an arthroscopic stabilization procedure between 2006 and 2013. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography scans were available for 100 of these patients to calculate the glenoid track and the presence of "on-track" or off-track Hill-Sachs lesions. Recurrence of instability was evaluated at a mean follow-up of 22.4 months. Of 100 patients whose magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography scans were available, 88 had an on-track Hill-Sachs lesion and 12 had an off-track Hill-Sachs lesion. Revision surgery for recurrent instability was performed in 5 patients (6%) with an on-track Hill-Sachs lesion and in 4 patients (33%) with an off-track Hill-Sachs lesion (odds ratio, 8.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.85-37.26; P = .006). An off-track Hill-Sachs lesion is a significant and important risk factor for recurrence of instability and need for revision surgery after arthroscopic Bankart repair when compared with an on-track Hill-Sachs lesion. Level IV, prognostic case series. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Arthroscopic Repair of Chronic Bony Bankart Lesion Using a Low Anterior Portal

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Jefferson C.; Westerberg, Paul

    2012-01-01

    We describe the repair of a chronic bony Bankart lesion in a case with recurrent instability using standard techniques and equipment for addressing anteroinferior glenohumeral instability. A 25-year-old man with recurrent instability and a chronic bony Bankart lesion with a Hill-Sachs lesion was treated. The inferior 2 sutures and knotless anchors are placed through a low anterior portal, which improves the angle of approach to the inferior portion of the glenoid that is fractured. The knotless anchors are impacted through the low anterior portal, just superior to the level of the suture, as the fragment tends to retract medially and inferiorly, with the drill guide slightly on the face of the glenoid. The superior-anterior portal adjacent to the biceps tendon gives a better view of the glenoid articular cartilage position of the anchors required to restore the anatomic location of the fracture fragment. The low anterior portal improved and simplified the reduction of the fracture fragment to the glenoid neck by allowing access to the anterior-inferior bony Bankart lesion that was repairable with suture and knotless anchors using standardized techniques. PMID:23766999

  1. Traumatic glenohumeral bone defects and their relationship to failure of arthroscopic Bankart repairs: significance of the inverted-pear glenoid and the humeral engaging Hill-Sachs lesion.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, S S; De Beer, J F

    2000-10-01

    Our goal was to analyze the results of 194 consecutive arthroscopic Bankart repairs (performed by 2 surgeons with an identical suture anchor technique) in order to identify specific factors related to recurrence of instability. Case series. We analyzed 194 consecutive arthroscopic Bankart repairs by suture anchor technique performed for traumatic anterior-inferior instability. The average follow-up was 27 months (range, 14 to 79 months). There were 101 contact athletes (96 South African rugby players and 5 American football players). We identified significant bone defects on either the humerus or the glenoid as (1) "inverted-pear" glenoid, in which the normally pear-shaped glenoid had lost enough anterior-inferior bone to assume the shape of an inverted pear; or (2) "engaging" Hill-Sachs lesion of the humerus, in which the orientation of the Hill-Sachs lesion was such that it engaged the anterior glenoid with the shoulder in abduction and external rotation. There were 21 recurrent dislocations and subluxations (14 dislocations, 7 subluxations). Of those 21 shoulders with recurrent instability, 14 had significant bone defects (3 engaging Hill-Sachs and 11 inverted-pear Bankart lesions). For the group of patients without significant bone defects (173 shoulders), there were 7 recurrences (4% recurrence rate). For the group with significant bone defects (21 patients), there were 14 recurrences (67% recurrence rate). For contact athletes without significant bone defects, there was a 6.5% recurrence rate, whereas for contact athletes with significant bone defects, there was an 89% recurrence rate. (1) Arthroscopic Bankart repairs give results equal to open Bankart repairs if there are no significant structural bone deficits (engaging Hill-Sachs or inverted-pear Bankart lesions). (2) Patients with significant bone deficits as defined in this study are not candidates for arthroscopic Bankart repair. (3) Contact athletes without structural bone deficits may be treated by

  2. Arthroscopic Bankart Repair Versus Open Bristow-Latarjet for Shoulder Instability: A Matched-Pair Multicenter Study Focused on Return to Sport.

    PubMed

    Blonna, Davide; Bellato, Enrico; Caranzano, Francesco; Assom, Marco; Rossi, Roberto; Castoldi, Filippo

    2016-12-01

    The arthroscopic Bankart repair and open Bristow-Latarjet procedure are the 2 most commonly used techniques to treat recurrent shoulder instability. To compare in a case control-matched manner the 2 techniques, with particular emphasis on return to sport after surgery. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A study was conducted in 2 hospitals matching 60 patients with posttraumatic recurrent anterior shoulder instability with a minimum follow-up of 2 years (30 patients treated with arthroscopic Bankart procedure and 30 treated with open Bristow-Latarjet procedure). Patients with severe glenoid bone loss and revision surgeries were excluded. In one hospital, patients were treated with arthroscopic Bankart repair using anchors; in the other, patients underwent the Bristow-Latarjet procedure. Patients were matched according to age at surgery, type and level of sport practiced before shoulder instability (Degree of Shoulder Involvement in Sports [DOSIS] scale), and number of dislocations. The primary outcomes were return to sport (Subjective Patient Outcome for Return to Sports [SPORTS] score), rate of recurrent instability, Oxford Shoulder Instability Score (OSIS), Subjective Shoulder Value (SSV), Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI), and range of motion (ROM). After a mean follow-up of 5.3 years (range, 2-9 years), patients who underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair obtained better results in terms of return to sport (SPORTS score: 8 vs 6; P = .02) and ROM in the throwing position (86° vs 79°; P = .01), and they reported better subjective perception of the shoulder (SSV: 86% vs 75%; P = .02). No differences were detectable using the OSIS or WOSI. The rate of recurrent instability was not statistically different between the 2 groups (Bankart repair 10% vs Bristow-Latarjet 0%; P = .25), although the study may have been underpowered to detect a clinically important difference in this parameter. The multiple regression analysis showed that the independent

  3. Results of arthroscopic Bankart repair with Hill-Sachs remplissage for anterior shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Bonnevialle, Nicolas; Azoulay, Vadim; Faraud, Amélie; Elia, Fanny; Swider, Pascal; Mansat, Pierre

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate mid-term outcomes of Bankart repair with Hill-Sachs remplissage (BHSR) and to highlight prognostic factors of failure. Thirty-four patients operated on for anterior shoulder instability with BHSR were enrolled in a prospective non-randomised study. Clinical and radiographic evaluation was performed at 1.5, three, six months and yearly thereafter. Outcome measures included Rowe and Walch-Duplay score. At mean follow-up of 35 months (24-63), the Rowe and Walch-Duplay scores reached respectively 92.7 and 88.2 points. The mean deficit in external rotation was 6° in ER1 and 1° in ER2 (p = 0.4, p = 0.9 respectively). Five patients (14.7%) had a recurrence of instability and three others had a persistent anterior apprehension. In the failure group, the Hill-Sachs lesion was deeper (26% vs 19% of the humeral diameter; p = 0.04) and range of motion at 1.5 months postoperatively was greater. Age at surgery, pre-operative instability severity index score (ISIS), hyperlaxity, type and level of sport, amount of glenoid bone loss had no correlation with failure rate. The rate of failure at mid-term follow-up of BHSR was higher than commonly reported. The premature recovery of range of motion seems to be a clinical sign of failure at follow-up. Moreover, in case of deep Hill-Sachs lesion (>20%) an alternative procedure should be considered. Level IV.

  4. Arthroscopic Bankart repair associated with subscapularis augmentation (ASA) versus open Latarjet to treat recurrent anterior shoulder instability with moderate glenoid bone loss: clinical comparison of two series.

    PubMed

    Russo, R; Della Rotonda, G; Cautiero, F; Ciccarelli, M; Maiotti, M; Massoni, C; Di Pietto, F; Zappia, M

    2017-04-01

    The treatment of chronic anterior shoulder instability with glenoid bone loss is still debated. The purpose of this study is to compare short-term results of two techniques treating chronic shoulder instability with moderate glenoid bone loss: bone block according to open Latarjet-Patte procedure and arthroscopic Bankart repair in association with subscapularis augmentation. Ninety-one patients with moderate anterior glenoid bone loss underwent from 2011 to 2015. From these patients, two groups of 20 individuals each have been selected. The groups were homogeneous in terms of age, gender, dominance and glenoid bone loss. In group A, an open Latarjet procedure has been performed, and in group B, an arthroscopic Bankart repair associated with subscapularis augmentation has been performed. The mean follow-up in group A was 21 months (20-39 months), while in group B was 20 months (15-36 months). QuickDash score, Constant and Rowe shoulder scores, were used for evaluations of results. The mean preoperative rate of QuickDash score was 3.6 for group A and 4.0 for group B; Rowe Score was 50.0 for group A and 50.0 for group B. Preoperative mean Constant score was 56.2 for Latarjet-Patte and 55.2 for Bankart plus ASA. Postoperative mean QuickDash score was in group A 1.8 and 1.7 in group B; Rowe Score was 89.8 and 91.6; Constant Score was 93.3 and 93.8. No complications related to surgery have been observed for both procedures. Not statistically significant difference was reported between the two groups (p > .05). Postoperatively, the mean deficit of external rotation in ER1 was -9° in group A and -8 in group B; In ER2, the mean deficit was -5° in both groups (p = .0942). Arthroscopic subscapularis augmentation of Bankart repair is an effective procedure for the treatment of recurrent anterior shoulder instability with glenoid bone loss without any significant difference in comparison with the well-known open Latarjet procedure.

  5. A Qualitative Investigation of Return to Sport After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair: Beyond Stability.

    PubMed

    Tjong, Vehniah K; Devitt, Brian M; Murnaghan, M Lucas; Ogilvie-Harris, Darrell J; Theodoropoulos, John S

    2015-08-01

    Arthroscopic shoulder stabilization is known to have excellent functional results, but many patients do not return to their preinjury level of sport, with return to play rates reported between 48% and 100% despite good outcome scores. To understand specific subjective psychosocial factors influencing a patient's decision to return to sport after arthroscopic shoulder stabilization. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted with patients aged 18 to 40 years who had undergone primary arthroscopic shoulder stabilization and had a minimum 2-year follow-up. All patients participated in sport before surgery without any further revision operations or shoulder injuries. Qualitative data analysis was performed in accordance with the Strauss and Corbin theory to derive codes, categories, and themes. Preinjury and current sport participation was defined by type, level of competition, and the Brophy/Marx shoulder activity score. Patient-reported pain and shoulder function were also obtained. A total of 25 patients were interviewed, revealing that fear of reinjury, shifts in priority, mood, social support, and self-motivation were found to greatly influence the decision to return to sport both in patients who had and had not returned to their preinjury level of play. Patients also described fear of sporting incompetence, self-awareness issues, recommendations from physical therapists, and degree of confidence as less common considerations affecting their return to sport. In spite of excellent functional outcomes, extrinsic and intrinsic factors such as competing interests, kinesiophobia, age, and internal stressors and motivators can have a major effect on a patient's decision to return to sport after arthroscopic shoulder stabilization. The qualitative methods used in this study provide a unique patient-derived perspective into postoperative recovery and highlight the necessity to recognize and address subjective and psychosocial

  6. Can we improve the indication for Bankart arthroscopic repair? A preliminary clinical study using the ISIS score.

    PubMed

    Thomazeau, H; Courage, O; Barth, J; Pélégri, C; Charousset, C; Lespagnol, F; Nourissat, G; Audebert, S; Guillo, S; Toussaint, B; Lafosse, L; Bradel, J; Veillard, D; Boileau, P

    2010-12-01

    The objectives of this study on arthroscopic treatment of chronic anterior shoulder instability were the collection of the current practices for this indication, their development as reported in the literature, and the analysis of preliminary results on a multicenter prospective series of Bankart arthroscopic procedures undertaken using a common technique on patients selected based on the Instability Severity Index Score (ISIS). This procedure predominates in the English-speaking world, whereas the Latarjet protocol is preferred in France. The choice between the two seems to be cultural since neither technique could be demonstrated to be superior in an analysis of 171 responses to an Internet questionnaire in this study. The literature reports disappointing results in the Bankart arthroscopic procedure and recent articles have researched the predictive factors for its failure. Eleven centers prospectively included 125 patients from 1 December 2007 to 30 November 2008. The inclusion criteria were recurrence of anterior instability and an ISIS less than or equal to four points out of 10. All the selected patients underwent capsuloligamentous reinsertion with a common minimal technique of at least three anchors and four sutures with the same postoperative protocol. At a mean follow-up of 18 months, four patients (3.2%) had experienced recurrence. For the 84 patients reexamined at 1 year, the Walch-Duplay and Rowe scores were, respectively, 88.4 and 87.8 points out of 100. Subjectively, 88.1% of the patients declared they were satisfied and would undergo the intervention again. This study confirmed the use of the ISIS as a consultation tool. Only continuation of the study with a minimum follow-up of 3 years will allow us to validate the lower limit of the ISIS below which this technique could be proposed provided that it respects the technical prerequisite of at least four capsuloligamentous sutures. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Combined Arthroscopic Bankart Repair and Coracoid Process Transfer to Anterior Glenoid for Shoulder Dislocation in Rugby Players: Evaluation Based on Ability to Perform Sport-Specific Movements Effectively.

    PubMed

    Tasaki, Atsushi; Morita, Wataru; Yamakawa, Akira; Nozaki, Taiki; Kuroda, Eishi; Hoshikawa, Yoshimitsu; Phillips, Barry B

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the outcomes of a combination of an arthroscopic Bankart repair and an open Bristow procedure in relation to the subjective quality of performance in movements that are typical in rugby. Forty shoulders in 38 players who underwent surgery for traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder were reviewed. In all cases, arthroscopic Bankart repair was followed by a Bristow procedure, with preservation of the repaired capsular ligaments, during the same operation. The mean age at the time of surgery was 21 years. Patients were asked to describe common rugby maneuvers (tackle, hand-off, jackal, and saving) preoperatively and postoperatively as "no problem," "insufficient," or "impossible." There were no recurrent dislocations at a mean follow-up of 30.5 months. The mean Rowe score improved significantly from 65.0 (range, 55 to 75) to 97.5 (range, 95 to 100) (P < .001) after surgery. Preoperatively, regarding the tackling motion, none of the patients reported having no problem, whereas the ability was described as insufficient for 23 shoulders and impossible for 17 shoulders. Postoperatively, no problem with tackling was reported for 36 shoulders, whereas insufficiency was reported for 4. The results for the hand-off, jackal, and saving maneuvers were similar (P < .001). No patient rated any of the motions as impossible postoperatively. This combined surgical procedure clearly is effective in preventing recurrent dislocation in rugby players; however, some players complained of insufficiency in the quality of their play when they were tackling or performing other rugby-specific movements. Level IV, case series. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Degradation of Cylindrical Poly-Lactic Co-Glycolide/Beta-Tricalcium Phosphate Biocomposite Anchors After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Keisuke; Sugaya, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Norimasa; Kawasaki, Takayuki; Yoshimura, Hideya; Kenmoku, Tomonori

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine widening and ossification of anchor holes after arthroscopic Bankart repair with the use of cylindrical biocomposite anchors made of 70% poly-L-lactide-co-glycolide acid (PLGA) and 30% beta-tricalcium phosphate (ß-TCP). Twenty-two patients were enrolled in a clinical trial to acquire marketing approval of a PLGA/ß-TCP biocomposite suture anchor in Japan and underwent arthroscopic Bankart repairs with the anchors. Eleven of 22 patients had computed tomography scans after 2-year follow-up. Three surgeons independently evaluated width and ossification of anchor holes in 4 grades using computed tomography scans. When the evaluations disagreed, the final grade was determined based on the 3 surgeons' consensus. Seven men and 4 women were evaluated at a mean of 30 months (range, 28-32 months) after surgery, and a total of 47 anchors were implanted. Anchor holes were narrowed in 39 (83%) of 47 anchor sites and were almost or completely filled in (type 3 or 4) in 21 (45%) of 47 anchor sites. Ossification was seen in 46 (98%) of 47 anchor sites and was nearly complete or complete (type 3 or 4) in 16 (34%) of 47 anchor sites. There were no significant differences in both anchor hole width and ossification score on comparison of the anteroinferior (4- to 6-o'clock positions in the right shoulder) with other anchor sites. Cylindrical biocomposite anchors made of 70% PLGA/30% ß-TCP showed a low incidence of anchor hole widening and excellent ossification regardless of anchor site. [Orthopedics. 201x; xx(x):xx-xx.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. The Effect of Subcritical Bone Loss and Exposure on Recurrent Instability After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair in Intercollegiate American Football.

    PubMed

    Dickens, Jonathan F; Owens, Brett D; Cameron, Kenneth L; DeBerardino, Thomas M; Masini, Brendan D; Peck, Karen Y; Svoboda, Steven J

    2017-07-01

    There is no consensus on the optimal method of stabilization (arthroscopic or open) in collision athletes with anterior shoulder instability. To examine the effect of "subcritical" bone loss and football-specific exposure on the rate of recurrent shoulder instability after arthroscopic stabilization in an intercollegiate American football population. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Fifty intercollegiate football players underwent primary arthroscopic stabilization for anterior shoulder instability and returned to football for at least a single season. Preoperatively, 32 patients experienced recurrent subluxations, and 18 patients experienced a single or recurrent dislocation. Shoulders with glenoid bone loss >20%, an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion, an off-track lesion, and concomitant rotator cuff repair were excluded from the study. The primary outcome of interest was the ability to return to football without subsequent instability. Patients were followed for time to a subsequent instability event after return to play using days of exposure to football and total follow-up time after arthroscopic stabilization. Fifty consecutive patients returned to American football for a mean 1.5 seasons (range, 1-3) after arthroscopic stabilization. Three of 50 (6%; 95% CI, 1.3%-16.5%) patients experienced recurrent instability. There were no subsequent instability events after a mean 3.2 years of military service. All shoulders with glenoid bone loss >13.5% (n = 3) that underwent arthroscopic stabilization experienced recurrent instability upon returning to sport, while none of the shoulders with <13.5% glenoid bone loss (n = 47) sustained a recurrent instability event during football ( X 2 = 15.80, P < .001). Shoulders with >13.5% glenoid bone loss had an incidence rate of 5.31 cases of recurrent instability per 1000 athlete-exposures of football. In 72,000 athlete-exposures to football with <13.5% glenoid bone loss, there was no recurrent instability. Significantly more

  10. Comparison of 30-Day Morbidity and Mortality After Arthroscopic Bankart, Open Bankart, and Latarjet-Bristow Procedures: A Review of 2864 Cases.

    PubMed

    Bokshan, Steven L; DeFroda, Steven F; Owens, Brett D

    2017-07-01

    Surgical intervention for anterior shoulder instability is commonly performed and is highly successful in reducing instances of recurrent instability. To determine and compare the incidence of 30-day complications and patient and surgical risk factors for complications for arthroscopic Bankart, open Bankart, and Latarjet-Bristow procedures. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. All arthroscopic Bankart, open Bankart, and Latarjet-Bristow procedures from 2005 to 2014 from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) prospective database were analyzed. Baseline patient variables were assessed, including the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI). Outcomes measures included length of operation, length of hospital stay, need for hospital admission, 30-day readmission, and 30-day return to the operating room. Binary logistic regression was performed for the presence of any complications after all 3 procedures. There were 2864 surgical procedures (410 open Bankart, 163 Latarjet-Bristow, and 2291 arthroscopic Bankart) included. There was no significant difference with regard to age ( P = .11), body mass index ( P = .17), American Society of Anesthesiologists class ( P = .423), or CCI ( P = .479) for each group. The Latarjet-Bristow procedure had the highest overall complication rate (5.5%) compared with open (1.0%) and arthroscopic (0.6%) Bankart repairs. The Latarjet-Bristow procedure had significantly longer mean operative times ( P < .001) in addition to the highest 30-day return rate to the operating room (4.3%; 95% confidence interval, 1.2%-7.4%). Smoking status was an independent predictor of a postoperative complication ( P = .05; odds ratio, 8.0) after Latarjet-Bristow. Surgical intervention for anterior shoulder instability has a low rate of complication (arthroscopic Bankart, 0.6%; open Bankart, 1.0%; Latarjet-Bristow, 5.5%) in the early postoperative period, with the most common being surgical site infection, deep vein

  11. Comparison of 30-Day Morbidity and Mortality After Arthroscopic Bankart, Open Bankart, and Latarjet-Bristow Procedures: A Review of 2864 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Bokshan, Steven L.; DeFroda, Steven F.; Owens, Brett D.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Surgical intervention for anterior shoulder instability is commonly performed and is highly successful in reducing instances of recurrent instability. Purpose: To determine and compare the incidence of 30-day complications and patient and surgical risk factors for complications for arthroscopic Bankart, open Bankart, and Latarjet-Bristow procedures. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: All arthroscopic Bankart, open Bankart, and Latarjet-Bristow procedures from 2005 to 2014 from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) prospective database were analyzed. Baseline patient variables were assessed, including the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI). Outcomes measures included length of operation, length of hospital stay, need for hospital admission, 30-day readmission, and 30-day return to the operating room. Binary logistic regression was performed for the presence of any complications after all 3 procedures. Results: There were 2864 surgical procedures (410 open Bankart, 163 Latarjet-Bristow, and 2291 arthroscopic Bankart) included. There was no significant difference with regard to age (P = .11), body mass index (P = .17), American Society of Anesthesiologists class (P = .423), or CCI (P = .479) for each group. The Latarjet-Bristow procedure had the highest overall complication rate (5.5%) compared with open (1.0%) and arthroscopic (0.6%) Bankart repairs. The Latarjet-Bristow procedure had significantly longer mean operative times (P < .001) in addition to the highest 30-day return rate to the operating room (4.3%; 95% confidence interval, 1.2%-7.4%). Smoking status was an independent predictor of a postoperative complication (P = .05; odds ratio, 8.0) after Latarjet-Bristow. Conclusion: Surgical intervention for anterior shoulder instability has a low rate of complication (arthroscopic Bankart, 0.6%; open Bankart, 1.0%; Latarjet-Bristow, 5.5%) in the early postoperative period, with

  12. Long-term outcomes of the Bankart and Latarjet repairs: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Rollick, Natalie C; Ono, Yohei; Kurji, Hafeez M; Nelson, Atiba A; Boorman, Richard S; Thornton, Gail M; Lo, Ian KY

    2017-01-01

    The most common surgical techniques for the treatment of recurrent anterior shoulder instability include the arthroscopic Bankart repair, the open Bankart repair and the open Latarjet procedure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the long-term outcomes following these procedures. A systematic review of modern procedures with a minimum follow-up of 5 years was completed. The objective outcome measures evaluated were post-operative dislocation and instability rate, the Rowe score, radiographic arthritis and complications. Twenty-eight studies with a total of 1652 repairs were analyzed. The estimated re-dislocation rate was 15.1% following arthroscopic Bankart repair, 7.7% following open Bankart repair and 2.7% following Latarjet repair, with the comparison between arthroscopic Bankart and open Latarjet reaching statistical significance (p<0.001). The rates of subjective instability and radiographic arthritis were consistently high across groups, with no statistical difference between groups. Estimated complication rates were statistically higher in the open Latarjet repair (9.4%) than in the arthroscopic Bankart (0%; p=0.002). The open Latarjet procedure yields the most reliable method of stabilization but the highest complication rate. There are uniformly high rates of post-operative subjective instability symptoms and radiographic arthritis at 5 years regardless of procedure choice. PMID:28450792

  13. Long-term outcomes of the Bankart and Latarjet repairs: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rollick, Natalie C; Ono, Yohei; Kurji, Hafeez M; Nelson, Atiba A; Boorman, Richard S; Thornton, Gail M; Lo, Ian Ky

    2017-01-01

    The most common surgical techniques for the treatment of recurrent anterior shoulder instability include the arthroscopic Bankart repair, the open Bankart repair and the open Latarjet procedure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the long-term outcomes following these procedures. A systematic review of modern procedures with a minimum follow-up of 5 years was completed. The objective outcome measures evaluated were post-operative dislocation and instability rate, the Rowe score, radiographic arthritis and complications. Twenty-eight studies with a total of 1652 repairs were analyzed. The estimated re-dislocation rate was 15.1% following arthroscopic Bankart repair, 7.7% following open Bankart repair and 2.7% following Latarjet repair, with the comparison between arthroscopic Bankart and open Latarjet reaching statistical significance ( p <0.001). The rates of subjective instability and radiographic arthritis were consistently high across groups, with no statistical difference between groups. Estimated complication rates were statistically higher in the open Latarjet repair (9.4%) than in the arthroscopic Bankart (0%; p =0.002). The open Latarjet procedure yields the most reliable method of stabilization but the highest complication rate. There are uniformly high rates of post-operative subjective instability symptoms and radiographic arthritis at 5 years regardless of procedure choice.

  14. Chronic anterior shoulder instability with significant Hill-Sachs lesion: Arthroscopic Bankart with remplissage versus open Latarjet procedure.

    PubMed

    Bah, A; Lateur, G M; Kouevidjin, B T; Bassinga, J Y S; Issa, M; Jaafar, A; Beaudouin, E

    2018-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare short-term shoulder stability after arthroscopic Bankart repair with remplissage versus the open Latarjet procedure in patients who had chronic anterior shoulder instability with a significant Hill-Sachs lesion. The dislocation recurrence rate is higher after Bankart repair with remplissage than after open Latarjet. An observational non-randomised retrospective cohort study was conducted at two surgical centres in patients treated for chronic anterior shoulder instability with a significant Hill-Sachs defect between January 2009 and July 2014. The study compared 43 patients managed by arthroscopic Bankart repair and remplissage and 43 patients managed with open Latarjet. The two groups were matched on age at surgery and on follow-up duration. All patients were evaluated by independent observers based on a questionnaire including recurrences, range of motion, and functional outcomes (Shoulder Subjective Value [SSV], Walch-Duplay score, and Rowe score). Mean follow-up was 47.3 months (range, 24-67 months). The recurrence rate at last follow-up was not significantly different between the two groups (9.3% versus 11.2%; P=0.67). The Bankart group had significantly greater loss of external rotation and a significantly higher proportion of patients with residual pain (21% versus 9%, P=0.023). The SSV, Walch-Duplay score, and Rowe score values were similar between groups. In patients who had chronic anterior shoulder instability with a significant Hill-Sachs lesion, arthroscopic Bankart repair with remplissage and open Latarjet were reliable and safe procedures associated with low and similar recurrence rates. However, loss of external rotation and residual pain were significantly more common with the combined Bankart-remplissage procedure. III; comparative retrospective study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Anatomic and Biomechanical Comparison of Traditional Bankart Repair With Bone Tunnels and Bankart Repair Utilizing Suture Anchors

    PubMed Central

    Judson, Christopher H.; Charette, Ryan; Cavanaugh, Zachary; Shea, Kevin P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Traditional Bankart repair using bone tunnels has a reported failure rate between 0% and 5% in long-term studies. Arthroscopic Bankart repair using suture anchors has become more popular; however, reported failure rates have been cited between 4% and 18%. There have been no satisfactory explanations for the differences in these outcomes. Hypothesis: Bone tunnels will provide increased coverage of the native labral footprint and demonstrate greater load to failure and stiffness and decreased cyclic displacement in biomechanical testing. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Twenty-two fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders were used. For footprint analysis, the labral footprint area was marked and measured using a Microscribe technique in 6 specimens. A 3-suture anchor repair was performed, and the area of the uncovered footprint was measured. This was repeated with traditional bone tunnel repair. For the biomechanical analysis, 8 paired specimens were randomly assigned to bone tunnel or suture anchor repair with the contralateral specimen assigned to the other technique. Each specimen underwent cyclic loading (5-25 N, 1 Hz, 100 cycles) and load to failure (15 mm/min). Displacement was measured using a digitized video recording system. Results: Bankart repair with bone tunnels provided significantly more coverage of the native labral footprint than repair with suture anchors (100% vs 27%, P < .001). Repair with bone tunnels (21.9 ± 8.7 N/mm) showed significantly greater stiffness than suture anchor repair (17.1 ± 3.5 N/mm, P = .032). Mean load to failure and gap formation after cyclic loading were not statistically different between bone tunnel (259 ± 76.8 N, 0.209 ± 0.064 mm) and suture anchor repairs (221.5 ± 59.0 N [P = .071], 0.161 ± 0.51 mm [P = .100]). Conclusion: Bankart repair with bone tunnels completely covered the footprint anatomy while suture anchor repair covered less than 30% of the native footprint. Repair using bone tunnels

  16. Outcomes of the Latarjet Procedure Compared With Bankart Repair for Recurrent Traumatic Anterior Shoulder Instability.

    PubMed

    Bliven, Kellie C Huxel; Parr, Gail P

    2018-02-01

    = 416) were included in this review. Using the National Health and Medical Research Council's level of evidence, the authors scored 7 of the studies at level III and 1 study at level II. All Latarjet procedures were performed using an open technique, whereas the Bankart procedure was performed open in 6 studies and arthroscopically in 2 studies. The demographics of the patients (age, proportion of males to females, proportion with surgery on the dominant side, and proportion of revisions) were similar between the 2 surgical procedures. Four groups reported that patients who underwent the Latarjet procedure had fewer recurrences than patients in the Bankart repair group (11.6% versus 21.1%, respectively), irrespective of whether the Bankart was performed open or arthroscopically. Similarly, 4 groups observed that the Latarjet procedure resulted in fewer postsurgical redislocations (5.0%) than the Bankart (9.5%) procedure, irrespective of whether the repair was open or arthroscopic. The authors of 7 studies noted no differences between the 2 procedures in revision rates (Latarjet: 3.4%, Bankart: 4.5%), and 8 studies demonstrated no differences in complications requiring reoperation (Latarjet: 5.0%, Bankart: 3.1%). Investigators in 7 studies used the Rowe score to measure patient-reported satisfaction and function; patients who underwent the Latarjet procedure reported better Rowe scores postsurgically than patients who underwent the Bankart repair (scores: 79.0 and 85.4, respectively). Researchers in 4 studies reported a loss of external-rotation range of motion, which was less in the Latarjet (11.5°) compared with the Bankart (20.9°) procedure. Of the 5 groups that reported return to function, a trend suggested that a greater proportion of patients who underwent the Latarjet procedure returned to work, sport, and throwing activities compared with those who underwent the Bankart repair.   The Latarjet procedure produced fewer recurrences, better patient

  17. The cost-effectiveness of the arthroscopic Bankart versus open Latarjet in the treatment of primary shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyong; Fedorka, Catherine; Solberg, Muriel J; Shaha, Steven H; Higgins, Laurence D

    2018-01-04

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis of the arthroscopic Bankart and the open Latarjet in the treatment of primary shoulder instability. This cost-effectiveness study used a Markov decision chain and Monte-Carlo simulation. Existing literature was reviewed to determine the survivorship and complication rates of these procedures. Health utility states (EQ-5D and quality-adjusted life-years) of the Bankart and Latarjet were prospectively collected. Using these variables, the Monte-Carlo simulation was modeled 100,000 times. In reviewing the literature, the overall recurrence rate is 14% after the arthroscopic Bankart and 8% after the open Latarjet. Postoperative health utility states were equal between the 2 procedures (mean EQ-5D, 0.930; P = .775). The Monte-Carlo simulation showed that the Bankart had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $4214 and the Latarjet had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $4681 (P < .001). Both the arthroscopic Bankart and open Latarjet are highly cost-effective; however, the Bankart is more cost-effective than the Latarjet, primarily because of a lower health utility state after a failed Latarjet. Ultimately, the clinical scenario may favor Latarjet (ie, critical glenoid bone loss) in certain circumstances, and decisions should be made on a case by case basis. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. All rights reserved.

  18. Results of 45 arthroscopic Bankart procedures: Does the ISIS remain a reliable prognostic assessment after 5 years?

    PubMed

    Boughebri, Omar; Maqdes, Ali; Moraiti, Constantina; Dib, Choukry; Leclère, Franck Marie; Valenti, Philippe

    2015-05-01

    The Instability Severity Index Score (ISIS) includes preoperative clinical and radiological risk factors to select patients who can benefit from an arthroscopic Bankart procedure with a low rate of recurrence. Patients who underwent an arthroscopic Bankart for anterior shoulder instability with an ISIS lower than or equal to four were assessed after a minimum of 5-year follow-up. Forty-five shoulders were assessed at a mean of 79 months (range 60-118 months). Average age was 29.4 years (range 17-58 years) at the time of surgery. Postoperative functions were assessed by the Walch and Duplay and the Rowe scores for 26 patients; an adapted telephonic interview was performed for the 19 remaining patients who could not be reassessed clinically. A failure was defined by the recurrence of an anterior dislocation or subluxation. Patients were asked whether they were finally very satisfied, satisfied or unhappy. The mean Walch and Duplay score at last follow-up was 84.3 (range 35-100). The final result for these patients was excellent in 14 patients (53.8 %), good in seven cases (26.9 %), poor in three patients (11.5 %) and bad in two patients (7.7 %). The mean Rowe score was 82.6 (range 35-100). Thirty-nine patients (86.7 %) were subjectively very satisfied or satisfied, and six (13.3 %) were unhappy. Four patients (8.9 %) had a recurrence of frank dislocation with a mean delay of 34 months (range 12-72 months). Three of them had a Hill-Sachs lesion preoperatively. Two patients had a preoperative ISIS at 4 points and two patients at 3 points. The selection based on the ISIS allows a low rate of failure after an average term of 5 years. Lowering the limit for indication to 3 points allows to avoid the association between two major risk factors for recurrence, which are valued at 2 points. The existence of a Hill-Sachs lesion is a stronger indicator for the outcome of instability repair. Level IV, Retrospective Case Series, Treatment Study.

  19. An Anatomic and Biomechanical Comparison of Bankart Repair Configurations.

    PubMed

    Judson, Christopher H; Voss, Andreas; Obopilwe, Elifho; Dyrna, Felix; Arciero, Robert A; Shea, Kevin P

    2017-11-01

    Suture anchor repair for anterior shoulder instability can be performed using a number of different repair techniques, but none has been proven superior in terms of anatomic and biomechanical properties. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose was to compare the anatomic footprint coverage and biomechanical characteristics of 4 different Bankart repair techniques: (1) single row with simple sutures, (2) single row with horizontal mattress sutures, (3) double row with sutures, and (4) double row with labral tape. The hypotheses were as follows: (1) double-row techniques would improve the footprint coverage and biomechanical properties compared with single-row techniques, (2) horizontal mattress sutures would increase the footprint coverage compared with simple sutures, and (3) repair techniques with labral tape and sutures would not show different biomechanical properties. Controlled laboratory study. Twenty-four fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens were dissected. The native labrum was removed and the footprint marked and measured. Repair for each of the 4 groups was performed, and the uncovered footprint was measured using a 3-dimensional digitizer. The strength of the repair sites was assessed using a servohydraulic testing machine and a digital video system to record load to failure, cyclic displacement, and stiffness. The double-row repair techniques with sutures and labral tape covered 73.4% and 77.0% of the footprint, respectively. These percentages were significantly higher than the footprint coverage achieved by single-row repair techniques using simple sutures (38.1%) and horizontal mattress sutures (32.8%) ( P < .001). The footprint coverage of the simple suture and horizontal mattress suture groups was not significantly different ( P = .44). There were no significant differences in load to failure, cyclic displacement, or stiffness between the single-row and double-row groups or between the simple suture and horizontal mattress suture techniques. Likewise, there was

  20. A systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical and patient-reported outcomes following two procedures for recurrent traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder: Latarjet procedure vs. Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    An, Vincent Vinh Gia; Sivakumar, Brahman Shankar; Phan, Kevin; Trantalis, John

    2016-05-01

    The Bankart repair and Latarjet procedure are both viable surgical options for recurrent traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder joint. The anatomic repair is the more popular option, with 90% of surgeons internationally choosing the Bankart repair as the initial treatment. There has been no previous review directly comparing the 2 techniques. Hence, we aimed to systematically review studies to compare the outcomes of Bankart repairs vs. the Latarjet procedure for recurrent instability of the shoulder. Six electronic databases were searched for original, English-language studies comparing the Bankart and Latarjet procedures. Studies were critically appraised using the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) checklist. Data were extracted from the text, tables, and figures of the selected studies. Eight comparative studies were identified with 795 shoulders; 416 of them underwent open or arthroscopic Bankart repairs, and 379 were repaired by the open Latarjet procedure. Primary and revision procedures were studied. The Latarjet procedure conferred significantly lower risk of recurrence and redislocation. There was no significant difference in the rates of complication requiring reoperation between the two procedures. Rowe scores were higher and loss of external rotation lower in the Latarjet group compared with the Bankart repair group. Our studies demonstrate that the Latarjet procedure is a viable and possibly superior alternative to the Bankart repair, offering greater stability with no significant increase in complication rate. However, the studies identified were retrospective and of limited quality, and therefore randomized controlled trials with large populations of patients or prospective assessment of national orthopedic registries should be employed to confirm our findings. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in elite rugby players

    PubMed Central

    Tambe, Amol; Badge, Ravi; Funk, Lennard

    2009-01-01

    Background Rugby is an increasingly popular collision sport. A wide spectrum of injuries can be sustained during training and match play. Rotator cuff injury is uncommon in contact sports and there is little published literature on the treatment of rotator cuff tears in rugby players. Aims We therefore reviewed the results and functional outcomes of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in elite rugby players. Materials and Methods Eleven professional rugby players underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair at our hospital over a 2-year period. We collected data on these patients from the operative records. The patients were recalled for outcome scoring and ultrasound scans. Results There were seven rugby league players and four rugby union players, including six internationals. Their mean age was 25.7 years. All had had a traumatic episode during match play and could not return to the game after the injury. The mean time to surgery was 5 weeks. The mean width of the cuff tear was 1.8 cm. All were full- thickness cuff tears. Associated injuries included two Bankart lesions, one bony Bankart lesion, one posterior labral tear, and two 360° labral tears. The biceps was involved in three cases. Two were debrided and a tenodesis was performed in one. Repair was with suture anchors. Following surgery, all patients underwent a supervised accelerated rehabilitation programme. The final follow-up was at 18 months (range: 6–31 months) post surgery. The Constant scores improved from 44 preoperatively to 99 at the last follow-up. The mean score at 3 months was 95. The Oxford shoulder score improved from 34 to 12, with the mean third month score being 18. The mean time taken to return to full match play at the preinjury level was 4.8 months. There were no complications in any of the patients and postoperative scans in nine patients confirmed that the repairs had healed. Conclusion We conclude that full-thickness rotator cuff tears in the contact athlete can be addressed

  2. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in elite rugby players.

    PubMed

    Tambe, Amol; Badge, Ravi; Funk, Lennard

    2009-01-01

    Rugby is an increasingly popular collision sport. A wide spectrum of injuries can be sustained during training and match play. Rotator cuff injury is uncommon in contact sports and there is little published literature on the treatment of rotator cuff tears in rugby players. We therefore reviewed the results and functional outcomes of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in elite rugby players. Eleven professional rugby players underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair at our hospital over a 2-year period. We collected data on these patients from the operative records. The patients were recalled for outcome scoring and ultrasound scans. There were seven rugby league players and four rugby union players, including six internationals. Their mean age was 25.7 years. All had had a traumatic episode during match play and could not return to the game after the injury. The mean time to surgery was 5 weeks. The mean width of the cuff tear was 1.8 cm. All were full- thickness cuff tears. Associated injuries included two Bankart lesions, one bony Bankart lesion, one posterior labral tear, and two 360 degrees labral tears. The biceps was involved in three cases. Two were debrided and a tenodesis was performed in one. Repair was with suture anchors. Following surgery, all patients underwent a supervised accelerated rehabilitation programme. The final follow-up was at 18 months (range: 6-31 months) post surgery. The Constant scores improved from 44 preoperatively to 99 at the last follow-up. The mean score at 3 months was 95. The Oxford shoulder score improved from 34 to 12, with the mean third month score being 18. The mean time taken to return to full match play at the preinjury level was 4.8 months. There were no complications in any of the patients and postoperative scans in nine patients confirmed that the repairs had healed. We conclude that full-thickness rotator cuff tears in the contact athlete can be addressed successfully by arthroscopic repair, with a rapid return to

  3. Evaluation of functional results from shoulders after arthroscopic repair of complete rotator cuff tears associated with traumatic anterior dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Glaydson Gomes; Freitas, José Márcio Alves; de Oliveira França, Flávio; Santos, Flávio Márcio Lago; de Simoni, Leandro Furtado; Godinho, Pedro Couto

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical outcome of arthroscopic rotator cuff fixation and, when present, simultaneous repair of the Bankart lesion caused by traumatic dislocation; and to assess whether the size of the rotator cuff injury caused by traumatic dislocation has any influence on the postoperative clinical outcomes. Methods Thirty-three patients with traumatic shoulder dislocation and complete rotator cuff injury, with at least two years of follow up, were retrospectively evaluated. For analysis purposes, the patients were divided into groups: presence of fixed Bankart lesion or absence of this lesion, and rotator cuff lesions smaller than 3.0 cm (group A) or greater than or equal to 3.0 cm (group B). All the patients underwent arthroscopic repair of the lesions and were evaluated postoperatively by means of the UCLA (University of California at Los Angeles) score and strength measurements. Results The group with Bankart lesion repair had a postoperative UCLA score of 33.96, while the score of the group without Bankart lesion was 33.7, without statistical significance (p = 0.743). Group A had a postoperative UCLA score of 34.35 and group B, 33.15, without statistical significance (p = 0.416). Conclusion The functional outcomes of the patients who only presented complete rotator cuff tearing after traumatic shoulder dislocation, which underwent arthroscopic repair, were similar to the outcomes of those who presented an associated with a Bankart lesion that was corrected simultaneously with the rotator cuff injury. The extent of the original rotator cuff injury did not alter the functional results in the postoperative evaluation. PMID:27069884

  4. Chronic ankle instability: Arthroscopic anatomical repair.

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Hernández, M; Mellado-Romero, M; Páramo-Díaz, P; García-Lamas, L; Vilà-Rico, J

    Ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries. Despite appropriate conservative treatment, approximately 20-40% of patients continue to have chronic ankle instability and pain. In 75-80% of cases there is an isolated rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament. A retrospective observational study was conducted on 21 patients surgically treated for chronic ankle instability by means of an arthroscopic anatomical repair, between May 2012 and January 2013. There were 15 men and 6 women, with a mean age of 30.43 years (range 18-48). The mean follow-up was 29 months (range 25-33). All patients were treated by arthroscopic anatomical repair of anterior talofibular ligament. Four (19%) patients were found to have varus hindfoot deformity. Associated injuries were present in 13 (62%) patients. There were 6 cases of osteochondral lesions, 3 cases of posterior ankle impingement syndrome, and 6 cases of peroneal pathology. All these injuries were surgically treated in the same surgical time. A clinical-functional study was performed using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score. The mean score before surgery was 66.12 (range 60-71), and after surgery it increased up to a mean of 96.95 (range 90-100). All patients were able to return to their previous sport activity within a mean of 21.5 weeks (range 17-28). Complications were found in 3 (14%) patients. Arthroscopic anatomical ligament repair technique has excellent clinical-functional results with a low percentage of complications, and enables patients to return to their previous sport activity within a short period of time. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Complications associated with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Randelli, P; Spennacchio, P; Ragone, V; Arrigoni, P; Casella, A; Cabitza, P

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this literature review was to report complications associated with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (RCR). A computerized search of articles published between 200 and 2009 was performed using MEDLINE and PubMed. We included clinical studies (Level 1-4): (a) investigating patients with rotator cuff tears, managed by a completely arthroscopic RCR technique; (b) reported data about complications. Data about arthroscopic-assisted techniques were excluded. Articles that meet criteria inclusion were analytically examined. Complications were classified into general complications and specific complications related to arthroscopic RCR. We found 414 complications in 2,890 patients; most of them were specific complications related to arthroscopic RCR. Re-rupture was the most frequently encountered complication: re-tear rate ranged between 11.4 and 94%. Stiffness and hardware-related complications were observed in 74 and 12 patients, respectively. Eleven less common complications were also reported: 5 neurovascular, 3 septic, 2 thromboembolic events, and 1 anesthesiological complication. This review stated that arthroscopic RCR is a low-risk surgical procedure. Anatomical failure of the repair is the most common complication encountered in the literature.

  6. Arthroscopic repair techniques for massive rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Jeffrey S; Song, Frederick S

    2012-01-01

    Patients with massive rotator cuff tears present with pain, weakness, and loss of function. Candidates for arthroscopic repair include symptomatic, young, active patients; those with an acute tear or tears with early changes of atrophy; and patients willing to comply with recovery and rehabilitation processes after surgery. As massive rotator cuff tears extend, the glenohumeral articulation is destabilized, allowing superior migration. Repair of the force couples and reinforcement of the anterosuperior rotator cuff cable can restore functional elevation via the deltoid. Muscle changes, including rotator cuff atrophy and fatty infiltration, will affect shoulder strength and function. As chronic changes become more extensive (such as the absence of the acromiohumeral interval and degenerative joint changes), other repair options may be more durable. Other arthroscopic options, including partial rotator cuff closure, graft to augment the repair, and use of the long head of the biceps tendon, have been helpful in pain relief and functional gains.

  7. Complications Associated With Arthroscopic Labral Repair Implants: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Felder, Jerrod J; Elliott, Michael P; Mair, Scott D

    2015-07-01

    Arthroscopic labral repair in the shoulder has become commonplace in recent years. A variety of implants have evolved in parallel with arthroscopic techniques. Any orthopedic implant that is placed in close proximity to the joint has the potential to cause subsequent damage to the articular surface if it is left prominent or dislodges secondary to improper surgical technique. This article focuses on a series of implant-related complications of labral surgery and their subsequent management. Additionally, correct patient selection and surgical technique are discussed. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Isolated meniscal injuries in paediatric patients: outcomes after arthroscopic repair.

    PubMed

    Lucas, G; Accadbled, F; Violas, P; Sales de Gauzy, J; Knörr, J

    2015-04-01

    The management of isolated meniscal tears in paediatric patients is poorly standardised, and few published data are available. Nevertheless, there is widespread agreement that meniscectomy, even when partial, produces poor outcomes including the premature development of osteoarthritis. Arthroscopic repair of isolated meniscal tears in paediatric patients yields good outcomes and should be attempted routinely. We retrospectively assessed 19 arthroscopic repair procedures performed between 2006 and 2010 by a single surgeon in 17 patients with a mean age of 14 years. In every case, the knee was stable and the meniscus normal before the meniscal tear, which was the only injury. Mean follow-up was 22 months. In all 19 cases, the evaluation included a physical examination, pre-operative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and determination of the Tegner and Lysholm scores. Post-operative MRI was performed in 10 cases. The outcome was good in 12/17 (70%) patients with significant improvements in the mean Tegner score, from 3.9 to 7.1, and mean Lysholm score, from 55.9 to 85.4, between the pre-operative and post-operative assessments. The clinical outcomes were not significantly associated with time to arthroscopic repair, gender, lesion site, or lesion type. Neither was any correlation demonstrated between clinical outcomes and meniscal healing as assessed by MRI. The known poor outcomes after meniscectomy in paediatric patients, the results of our study, and previously published data support routine arthroscopic repair of isolated meniscal tears in this age group, regardless of the site and type of injury. In addition, in asymptomatic patients, clinical follow-up is sufficient and post-operative MRI unnecessary. Level IV. Retrospective study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Open and arthroscopic techniques for the treatment of traumatic anterior shoulder instability in Australian rules football players.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S N; Taylor, D E; Brown, J N; Hayes, M G; Saies, A

    1999-01-01

    Australian Rules football (ARF) is a potentially violent, overhead, body-contact sport. We reviewed 56 shoulders in patients who sustained their initial traumatic anterior subluxation or dislocation during ARF and who underwent reconstructive surgery for traumatic anterior instability, whether by arthroscopic or by open techniques. Patients were followed up for a mean of 29.4 months after operation, and clinical evaluation was performed with the Rowe grading system. Three types of surgical procedures were performed: arthroscopic suture repair, arthroscopic Bankart repair with an absorbable polyglyconate tack, and open capsular shift with repair of the Bankart lesion. Shoulders treated with arthroscopic suture repair had a 70% rate of recurrent subluxation or dislocation on return to ARF Dislocations treated arthroscopically with the biodegradable tack had a 38% rate of recurrence of instability; three fourths of the recurrences were after minimal to moderate trauma. Shoulders treated with an open capsular shift and Bankart procedure had a 30% rate of recurrent instability, with half of the recurrences caused by violent trauma. In the open group there were no failures in patients who did not return to ARF. We suggest that arthroscopic repair in shoulders with anterior instability and recurrent dislocation does not adequately address the plastic deformation of the anterior capsule that may occur after repeated episodes of dislocation. We advocate open shoulder procedures in ARF athletes to address all areas of the capsulolabral pathologic condition and to provide the most secure repair possible with minimal chance of recurrence.

  10. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in the weight-bearing shoulder.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Jacek; Borbas, Paul; Meyer, Dominik C; Gerber, Christian; Buitrago Téllez, Carlos; Wieser, Karl

    2015-12-01

    In wheelchair-dependent individuals, pain often develops because of rotator cuff tendon failure and/or osteoarthritis of the glenohumeral joint. The purposes of this study were to investigate (1) specific rotator cuff tear patterns, (2) structural healing, and (3) clinical outcomes after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in a cohort of wheelchair-dependent patients. Forty-six shoulders with a mean follow-up of 46 months (range, 24-82 months; SD, 13 months) from a consecutive series of 61 shoulders in 56 patients (46 men and 10 women) undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were available for analysis. Clinical outcome analysis was performed using the Constant-Murley score, the Subjective Shoulder Value, and the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score. The integrity of the repair was analyzed by ultrasound. Of the shoulders, 87% had supraspinatus involvement, 70% had subscapularis involvement, and 57% had an anterosuperior lesion involving both the supraspinatus and subscapularis. Despite an overall structural failure rate of 33%, the patients showed improvements in the Constant-Murley score from 50 points (range, 22-86 points; SD, 16 points) preoperatively to 80 points (range, 40-98 points; SD, 12 points) postoperatively and in the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score from 56 points (range, 20-92 points; SD, 20 points) preoperatively to 92 points (range, 53-100 points; SD, 10 points) postoperatively, with a mean postoperative Subjective Shoulder Value of 84% (range, 25%-100%; SD, 17%). Failure of the rotator cuff in weight-bearing shoulders occurs primarily anterosuperiorly. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair leads to a structural failure rate of 33% but satisfactory functional results with high patient satisfaction at midterm follow-up. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Revision Arthroscopic Repair Versus Latarjet Procedure in Patients With Recurrent Instability After Initial Repair Attempt: A Cost-Effectiveness Model.

    PubMed

    Makhni, Eric C; Lamba, Nayan; Swart, Eric; Steinhaus, Michael E; Ahmad, Christopher S; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2016-09-01

    To compare the cost-effectiveness of arthroscopic revision instability repair and Latarjet procedure in treating patients with recurrent instability after initial arthroscopic instability repair. An expected-value decision analysis of revision arthroscopic instability repair compared with Latarjet procedure for recurrent instability followed by failed repair attempt was modeled. Inputs regarding procedure cost, clinical outcomes, and health utilities were derived from the literature. Compared with revision arthroscopic repair, Latarjet was less expensive ($13,672 v $15,287) with improved clinical outcomes (43.78 v 36.76 quality-adjusted life-years). Both arthroscopic repair and Latarjet were cost-effective compared with nonoperative treatment (incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of 3,082 and 1,141, respectively). Results from sensitivity analyses indicate that under scenarios of high rates of stability postoperatively, along with improved clinical outcome scores, revision arthroscopic repair becomes increasingly cost-effective. Latarjet procedure for failed instability repair is a cost-effective treatment option, with lower costs and improved clinical outcomes compared with revision arthroscopic instability repair. However, surgeons must still incorporate clinical judgment into treatment algorithm formation. Level IV, expected value decision analysis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Speed of recovery after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Kurowicki, Jennifer; Berglund, Derek D; Momoh, Enesi; Disla, Shanell; Horn, Brandon; Giveans, M Russell; Levy, Jonathan C

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to delineate the time taken to achieve maximum improvement (plateau of recovery) and the degree of recovery observed at various time points (speed of recovery) for pain and function after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. An institutional shoulder surgery registry query identified 627 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair between 2006 and 2015. Measured range of motion, patient satisfaction, and patient-reported outcome measures were analyzed for preoperative, 3-month, 6-month, 1-year, and 2-year intervals. Subgroup analysis was performed on the basis of tear size by retraction grade and number of anchors used. As an entire group, the plateau of maximum recovery for pain, function, and motion occurred at 1 year. Satisfaction with surgery was >96% at all time points. At 3 months, 74% of improvement in pain and 45% to 58% of functional improvement were realized. However, only 22% of elevation improvement was achieved (P < .001). At 6 months, 89% of improvement in pain, 81% to 88% of functional improvement, and 78% of elevation improvement were achieved (P < .001). Larger tears had a slower speed of recovery for Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation scores, forward elevation, and external rotation. Smaller tears had higher motion and functional scores across all time points. Tear size did not influence pain levels. The plateau of maximum recovery after rotator cuff repair occurred at 1 year with high satisfaction rates at all time points. At 3 months, approximately 75% of pain relief and 50% of functional recovery can be expected. Larger tears have a slower speed of recovery. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Knotless Arthroscopic Repair of Subscapularis Tendon Tears Using Looped Suture.

    PubMed

    Gilmer, Brian B; Crall, Timothy S; Guttmann, Dan

    2015-06-01

    Subscapularis tendon tears present a technical challenge because both diagnosis and arthroscopic treatment can be difficult. One difficulty is the limited visualization and working space of the anterior shoulder. Although most tears of the subscapularis are partial- or full-thickness tears of the upper third of the tendon, occasionally, larger or more retracted tears are encountered. Various techniques have been developed to treat a wide variety of tear patterns. We present a simple technique using a looped suture that remains easy to use in the limited working space of the anterior shoulder; can be easily modified to accommodate a broad spectrum of subscapularis pathology, from partial to full and retracted tears; and uses familiar viewing and working portals. This technique creates a single-row, knotless repair. Traction on the superior suture improves visualization and ease of passing more inferior sutures. Risks include unintentional over-tensioning of the repair and medialization of the femoral footprint, which can be avoided with appropriate exposure and arm positioning during repair. Postoperative care includes restriction of external rotation for 3 to 6 weeks and strengthening at 3 months.

  14. Mid-term to long-term outcome of the open Bankart repair for recurrent traumatic anterior dislocation of the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Neviaser, Robert J; Benke, Michael T; Neviaser, Andrew S

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the long-term outcome of the open Bankart repair for traumatic, recurrent anterior dislocation of the shoulder by evaluation of recurrence, range of motion, return to sports, arthritis, patient satisfaction, and outcome measures. Of 162 patients, 127 patients (mean age, 31 years) were evaluated at a mean follow-up of 17.1 years (5-24) after undergoing an open Bankart repair using suture anchors. An independent orthopedic surgeon obtained a history and examined each for range of motion. Radiographs for arthritis and osteolysis were obtained unless the patient refused. Questionnaires including return to sports and function as well as satisfaction and outcome measures were completed by all patients. There was 1 recurrent dislocation (0.8%) and 1 recurrent subluxation (0.8%) but no pain or apprehension. All remaining shoulders were stable. Compared with the normal shoulder, there was statistical difference in external rotation in abduction and at the side as well as in internal rotation but not in forward elevation or abduction. However, no patient considered any measurable loss functionally significant. Of 107 patients who participated in sports, 98 returned to the sport; 7 of the remaining 9 discontinued for reasons other than the shoulder. There were 91 patients who agreed to radiography; 48 had normal findings, 34 had mild arthrosis, 9 had moderate arthrosis, and none had severe arthrosis. Mean postoperative outcome scores were as follows: American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, 93.53; Rowe, 91.41; and Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index, 327.7. There were 125 patients who were satisfied and would undergo the procedure again. The open Bankart procedure remains the standard by which other techniques can be measured for treatment of recurrent, traumatic anterior dislocation of the shoulder. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Arthroscopic proximal versus open subpectoral biceps tenodesis with arthroscopic repair of small- or medium-sized rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Yi, Young; Lee, Jong-Myoung; Kwon, Seok Hyun; Kim, Jeong-Woo

    2016-12-01

    The study was aimed to compare arthroscopic proximal biceps tenodesis and open subpectoral biceps tenodesis in repair of small or medium rotator cuff tears. Eighty-five patients underwent biceps tenodesis with arthroscopic repair of a rotator cuff tear, and 66 patients were followed for median of 26.8 (18-42) months with ultrasonography were reviewed. The arthroscopic biceps tenodesis group included 34 cases, and the open subpectoral biceps group included 32 cases. Patients were evaluated using visual analogue scale (VAS), American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), and constant scores. Rotator cuff repair and fixation of the biceps tendon were assessed by ultrasonography. Fixation failure and degree of deformity were evaluated by the pain in the bicipital groove and biceps apex distance (BAD). VAS score and tenderness at the bicipital groove decreased significantly in the open subpectoral group at 3 months postoperative. In both groups, the range of motion, ASES score, and constant score increased significantly (P < 0.05). Rotator cuff retear occurred in three cases (8.8 %) in the arthroscopic group and two cases in the open subpectoral group (6.2 %). There was no significant difference in BAD between the two groups. There was no difference between open subpectoral tenodesis and arthroscopic proximal tenodesis at the time of the final follow-up; however, open subpectoral tenodesis showed encouraging results at 3-month follow-up. This early result of subpectoral tenodesis was related to removing most part of biceps tendinitis and using intra-bicipital groove tenodesis technique. III.

  16. Alterations of the Deltoid Muscle After Open Versus Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nam Su; Cha, Sang Won; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2015-12-01

    Open repair can be more useful than arthroscopic repair for immobile and severely retracted, large to massive rotator cuff tears. However, it is not known whether the deltoid muscle is altered after open repair or to what extent the deltoid origin remains detached after surgery. To compare postoperative alterations of the deltoid muscle in open versus arthroscopic repair for severely retracted, large to massive rotator cuff tears. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Enrolled in this study were 135 patients who underwent surgical repair for severely retracted, large to massive rotator cuff tears and who had routine follow-up MRIs at least 6 months after surgery. Open repairs were performed in 56 cases and arthroscopic repairs in 79 cases. The detachment and thickness of the deltoid muscle at its proximal origin were recorded in 5 zones on MRI. The alterations of the deltoid muscle and postoperative integrity of the repaired rotator cuff were evaluated. Partial detachment of the deltoid occurred in 1 patient (1.8%) in the open group and in 2 patients (2.5%) in the arthroscopic group (P = .80). All the partial detachments occurred in zones 2 and 3. Attenuation of the proximal origin of the deltoid was found in 3 patients (5.4%) in the open group and in 4 patients (5.1%) in the arthroscopic group (P = .87). Atrophy of the deltoid muscle was shown in 3 patients (5.4%) in the open group and 4 patients (5.1%) in the arthroscopic group (P = .61). The retear rate of the repaired cuff was 30.4% (17/56) in the open group and 38.0% (30/79) in the arthroscopic group (P = .74). Between open and arthroscopic repair for severely retracted, large to massive rotator cuff tears, there was no significant difference in detachment of the deltoid origin and alterations of the deltoid muscle after repair. Postoperative alterations of the deltoid occurred in arthroscopic surgery as well as in open surgery. For immobile massive rotator cuff tear, open repair is an acceptable technique

  17. Is clinical evaluation alone sufficient for the diagnosis of a Bankart lesion without the use of magnetic resonance imaging?

    PubMed

    Loh, Bryan; Lim, Jason Beng Teck; Tan, Andrew Hwee Chye

    2016-11-01

    Imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance arthrogram (MRA) offer great utility in diagnosing Bankart lesions but they are associated with a high degree of intra and interobserver variability. This study aims to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of clinical evaluation and imaging modalities in Bankart lesions such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MRA of the shoulder. Between February 2004 to January 2015, a retrospectively review of the surgical records at a tertiary hospital identified a total of 250 patients treated with a shoulder arthroscopy for Bankart repair. All patients were thoroughly investigated preoperatively in which a detailed history were obtained, relevant physical examinations were performed (Load and Shift/Anterior Apprehension test) and pre-operative radiographs taken. Some patients subsequently underwent either an MRI or an MRA scan if the initial clinical evaluation was equivocal. Anterior Shoulder Apprehension test and the Load and Shift test identified 214 of 227 Bankart tears, with a sensitivity of 94% [95% confidence interval (CI), 90-97%]. MRI correctly identified 23 of 26 Bankart tears, with a sensitivity of 89% (95% CI, 70-98%). Out of the five superior labrum anterior-posterior (SLAP) tears identified on MRI, only three were confirmed during arthroscopic surgery. MRA correctly identified 84 of 89 Bankart tears, for a sensitivity of 94% (95% CI, 87-98%). In our study, we report that clinical evaluation with focused history-taking and anterior apprehension, load and shift clinical examination can diagnose anterior shoulder instability as reliably as MR imaging. For patients with equivocal clinical findings, MR imaging can aid in the diagnosis.

  18. Is clinical evaluation alone sufficient for the diagnosis of a Bankart lesion without the use of magnetic resonance imaging?

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jason Beng Teck; Tan, Andrew Hwee Chye

    2016-01-01

    Background Imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance arthrogram (MRA) offer great utility in diagnosing Bankart lesions but they are associated with a high degree of intra and interobserver variability. This study aims to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of clinical evaluation and imaging modalities in Bankart lesions such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MRA of the shoulder. Methods Between February 2004 to January 2015, a retrospectively review of the surgical records at a tertiary hospital identified a total of 250 patients treated with a shoulder arthroscopy for Bankart repair. All patients were thoroughly investigated preoperatively in which a detailed history were obtained, relevant physical examinations were performed (Load and Shift/Anterior Apprehension test) and pre-operative radiographs taken. Some patients subsequently underwent either an MRI or an MRA scan if the initial clinical evaluation was equivocal. Results Anterior Shoulder Apprehension test and the Load and Shift test identified 214 of 227 Bankart tears, with a sensitivity of 94% [95% confidence interval (CI), 90–97%]. MRI correctly identified 23 of 26 Bankart tears, with a sensitivity of 89% (95% CI, 70–98%). Out of the five superior labrum anterior-posterior (SLAP) tears identified on MRI, only three were confirmed during arthroscopic surgery. MRA correctly identified 84 of 89 Bankart tears, for a sensitivity of 94% (95% CI, 87–98%). Conclusions In our study, we report that clinical evaluation with focused history-taking and anterior apprehension, load and shift clinical examination can diagnose anterior shoulder instability as reliably as MR imaging. For patients with equivocal clinical findings, MR imaging can aid in the diagnosis. PMID:27942510

  19. EXTENSIVE ROTATOR CUFF INJURIES: AN EVALUATION OF ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR OUTCOMES

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; Silva, Luciana Andrade; Eduardo, Cesar Moreira Mariz Pinto Rodrigo Tormin Ortiz; Checchia, Sergio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    To assess the outcomes of the surgical treatment of extensive rotator cuff injuries through arthroscopy. Methods: Between June 1998 and October 2006, 61 patients with extensive rotator cuff injuries and submitted to surgical arthroscopy technique by the Shoulder and Elbow Group of the Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Santa Casa de Misericórdia Medical School were reassessed. The study included all patients with at least two tendons affected or with retraction at least on two tendons up to the glenoidal cavity edge and with at least 12 months of follow-up. Results: According to UCLA's evaluation criteria, 54 (89%) patients showed excellent or good outcomes; no fair outcome in none of the patients; and seven (11%) poor outcomes. A satisfaction rate of 92% was reported. Postoperative joint motion went from a mean lifting value of 93° to 141°, the mean lateral rotation went from 32° to 48° and the mean medial rotation went from L1 to T10. These differences were regarded as statistically significant. Conclusion: The arthroscopic repair of extensive rotator cuff injuries leads to satisfactory outcomes for most of the patients, with a high satisfaction degree. PMID:26998466

  20. Arthroscopic suture repair of peripheral tears of triangular fibrocartilage complex using a volar portal.

    PubMed

    Chen, Alvin Chao-Yu; Hsu, Kuo-Yau; Chang, Chung-Hsun; Chan, Yi-Sheng

    2005-11-01

    Surgical repair of a Palmer type IB triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) tear can be difficult using conventional dorsal portals and it may need special repair kits. The authors describe an arthroscopic technique using an additional volar portal that allows quick access and a secure purchase of peripheral TFCC tears as well as a distinct approach to dorsal wrist structures.

  1. Circulating substance P levels and shoulder joint contracture after arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, F; Longo, U G; Ruzzini, L; Morini, S; Battistoni, F; Dicuonzo, G; Maffulli, N; Denaro, V

    2008-09-01

    To determine the plasma levels of substance P (SP) in patients with postoperative stiffness after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Plasma samples were obtained at 15 months from surgery from two groups of patients who underwent arthroscopic repair of a rotator cuff tear. In group 1, 30 subjects (14 men, 16 women; mean age 64.6 years, range 47 to 78) with shoulder stiffness 15 months after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were recruited. In group 2, 30 patients (11 men, 19 women; mean age 57.8 years, range 45 to 77) were evaluated 15 months after successful arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Immunoassays were performed with commercially available assay kits to measure the plasma levels of SP. Plasma levels of SP in patients with postoperative stiffness were significantly greater than those in the control group (mean 81.06 (SD 27.76) versus 23.49 (5.64), p<0.05). The plasma concentrations of substance P in patients with shoulder stiffness after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair are higher compared with plasma levels of SP in patients with a good postoperative outcome. The neuronal upregulation of SP shown in the plasma of patients with postoperative shoulder stiffness may underlie not only the symptoms but also its development of adhesive capsulitis.

  2. The Burden of Craft in Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Where Have We Been and Where We Are Going.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Stephen S

    2015-08-01

    The rather turbulent history of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair went through stages of innovation, conflict, disruption, assimilation, and transformation that might be anticipated when a new and advanced technology (arthroscopic cuff repair) displaces an entrenched but outdated discipline (open cuff repair). The transition from open to arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has been a major paradigm shift that has greatly benefited patients. However, this technical evolution/revolution has also imposed a higher "burden of craft" on the practitioners of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Technological advancements in surgery demand that surgeons accept this burden of craft and master the advanced technology for the benefit of their patients. This article outlines the author's involvement in the development of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, and it also explores the surgeon's obligation to accept the burden of craft that is imposed by this discipline.

  3. Editorial Commentary: Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair--Infection Rate After Rotator Cuff Repair With Arthroscopic, Open, and Mini-open Techniques.

    PubMed

    Brand, Jefferson C

    2016-03-01

    In "Risk Factors for Infection After Rotator Cuff Repair," B. G. Vopat et al. report a lower rate of postoperative infection with an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair than with an open or mini-open approach. Although there were only 14 infections (infection rate of 0.77%), the reason for the preponderance of male patients, 13 of the 14 infections, needs further research to determine effective preventive strategies. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Arthroscopic repair of the subscapularis tendon: indications, limits and technical features.

    PubMed

    Osti, Leonardo; Soldati, Francesco; Buono, Angelo Del; Buda, Matteo

    2013-08-11

    The rationale to anatomically repair this tendon is to restore the functional biomechanics of the shoulder. Clinical and imaging assessment are required before undertaking arthroscopy. In this way, associated pathologies of the biceps and labrum may be successfully addressed. The arthroscopic repair of the tendon implies to use suture anchors and reinsert the tendon itself over the footprint. Results after arthroscopy are comparable to those observed after open procedures.

  5. Arthroscopic repair of the subscapularis tendon: indications, limits and technical features

    PubMed Central

    Osti, Leonardo; Soldati, Francesco; Del Buono, Angelo; Buda, Matteo

    2013-01-01

    Summary The rationale to anatomically repair this tendon is to restore the functional biomechanics of the shoulder. Clinical and imaging assessment are required before undertaking arthroscopy. In this way, associated pathologies of the biceps and labrum may be successfully addressed. The arthroscopic repair of the tendon implies to use suture anchors and reinsert the tendon itself over the footprint. Results after arthroscopy are comparable to those observed after open procedures. PMID:24367783

  6. Time Interval between Trauma and Arthroscopic Meniscal Repair Has No Influence on Clinical Survival.

    PubMed

    van der Wal, Robert J P; Thomassen, Bregje J W; Swen, Jan-Willem A; van Arkel, Ewoud R A

    2016-07-01

    Arthroscopic meniscal repair is the gold standard for longitudinal peripheral meniscal tears. The time interval between trauma and meniscal repair remains controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate failure rates and clinical outcome of arthroscopic meniscal repair in relation to chronicity of injury. A total of 238 meniscal repairs were performed in 234 patients. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) was reconstructed in almost all ACL-deficient knees (130 out of 133). Time interval between injury and repair was divided into acute (< 2 weeks), subacute (> 2 to < 12 weeks), and chronic (> 12 weeks). Patients completed postal questionnaires to evaluate clinical outcome and failure rates. Study instruments included Lysholm, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), and Tegner scoring systems. At a median follow-up of 41 months (interquartile range [IQR], 34-53 months) 55 medial and 10 lateral meniscal repairs failed (overall failure rate, 27%). There was a significant higher failure rate for medial meniscal repair (p < 0.05) and ACL-deficient knees without ACL reconstruction. Functional outcome scores showed only significant differences on the KOOS subscale "function in daily living" (95% confidence interval, 1.05-15.27, p < 0.05). No significant difference was found for any interval between trauma and repair. The interval between trauma and arthroscopic meniscal repair has no influence on the failure rate. Differences in survival rate of meniscal repair are more dependent on location of the lesion and ACL status, rather than chronicity of injury. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  7. Comparison of implant cost and surgical time in arthroscopic transosseous and transosseous equivalent rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Black, Eric M; Austin, Luke S; Narzikul, Alexa; Seidl, Adam J; Martens, Kelly; Lazarus, Mark D

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the cost savings associated with arthroscopic transosseous (anchorless) double-row rotator cuff repair compared with double-row anchored (transosseous-equivalent [TOE]) repair. All patients undergoing double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair from 2009 to 2012 by a single surgeon were eligible for inclusion. The study included 2 consecutive series of patients undergoing anchorless or TOE repair. Excluded from the study were revision repairs, subscapularis repairs, patients with poor tendon quality or excursion requiring medialized repair, and partial repairs. Rotator cuff implant costs (paid by the institution) and surgical times were compared between the 2 groups, controlling for rotator cuff tear size and additional procedures performed. The study included 344 patients, 178 with TOE repairs and 166 with anchorless repairs. Average implant cost for TOE repairs was $1014.10 ($813.00 for small, $946.67 for medium, $1104.56 for large, and $1507.29 for massive tears). This was significantly more expensive compared with anchorless repairs, which averaged $678.05 ($659.75 for small, $671.39 for medium, $695.55 for large, and $716.00 for massive tears). Average total operative time in TOE and anchorless groups was not significantly different (99 vs. 98 minutes). There was larger (although not statistically significant) case time variation in the TOE group. Compared with TOE repair, anchorless rotator cuff repair provides substantial implant-related cost savings, with no significant differences in surgical time for medium and large rotator cuff tears. Case time for TOE repair varied more with extremes in tear size. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Arthroscopic vs mini-open rotator cuff repair. A quality of life impairment study.

    PubMed

    Osti, Leonardo; Papalia, Rocco; Paganelli, Massimo; Denaro, Enzo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2010-03-01

    We compared the clinical and quality of life related outcome of rotator cuff repair performed using either a mini-open or an arthroscopic technique for rotator cuff tears of less than 3 cm. The records of 64 patients who underwent rotator cuff repair between September 2003 and September 2005 were evaluated. Thirty-two patients underwent a mini-open rotator cuff repair, and 32 patients underwent an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The mean follow-up period was 31 months in the mini-open group and 30.6 months in the arthroscopic group (P > 0.05). The UCLA rating system, range of motion examination and the self-administered SF-36 used for postoperative evaluation showed a statistically significant improvement from the preoperative to the final score for both groups (P < 0.05). No statistically significant difference in the total UCLA scores was found when comparing the two repair techniques (P > 0.05). This study suggests that there is no difference in terms of subjective and objective outcomes between the two surgical procedures studied if patients have rotator cuff tears of less than 3 cm.

  9. Comparison of Short-term Complications After Rotator Cuff Repair: Open Versus Arthroscopic.

    PubMed

    Day, Molly; Westermann, Robert; Duchman, Kyle; Gao, Yubo; Pugely, Andrew; Bollier, Matthew; Wolf, Brian

    2018-04-01

    To define and compare the incidence and risk factors for short-term complications after arthroscopic and open rotator cuff repair (RTCR), and to identify independent risk factors for complications after RTCR. All patients who underwent open or arthroscopic RTCR from 2005 to 2013 were identified in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. Short-term complications were categorized as surgical, medical, mortality, and unplanned 30-day readmission. Univariate analysis allowed the comparison of patient demographics and comorbidities. Propensity score matching was used to control for demographic differences between arthroscopic and open RTCR patient groups. Independent risk factors for complication were identified using multivariate logistic regression. Overall, 11,314 RTCRs were identified (24% open, 76% arthroscopic). The mean operative time for open RTCR was 78 minutes compared with 91 minutes for arthroscopic repairs (P < .001). The overall complication rate was 1.3%, with the highest complication unplanned return to the operating room (41 patients, 0.36%). The 30-day readmission was 1.16% (76/6,560 patients) and the mortality rate was 0.03% (3 patients). Total 30-day complications in the propensity-score-matched patient group were higher after open versus arthroscopic repair (1.79% vs 1.17%; P = .006). The overall infection rate after RTCR was 0.56%, with deep wound infection higher in the open repair patient group (P = .003). Multivariate analysis identified age >65 years (odds ratio [OR] 1.6; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-2.3), operative time >90 minutes (OR 1.5; CI 1.1-2.1), and open RTCR (OR 1.6; CI 1.1-2.3) as independent risk factors for complications. Short-term complications after RTCR are rare. Total complications are higher after open RTCR in propensity-matched patient groups and in multivariate analysis. Risk factors for complications include patient age >65, operative time >90 minutes, and open

  10. Comparison of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in healthy patients over and under 65 years of age.

    PubMed

    Osti, Leonardo; Papalia, Rocco; Del Buono, Angelo; Denaro, Vincenzo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2010-12-01

    We compared the outcomes of arthroscopically repaired rotator cuff tears in 28 patients older than 65 years (the over 65 group: median age 70 years) with a control group of 28 patients younger than 65 years (the under 65 group: median age 57 years). The groups were similar in regard to sex distribution, surgical technique, and post-operative rehabilitation programmes, but different in age. After careful arthroscopic evaluation of the full-thickness rotator cuff tear, rotator cuff repair and biceps tenotomy were performed in all patients. Pre- and post-operatively, each patient was evaluated for range of motion, shoulder score (UCLA), and SF-36 self-administered questionnaire. Comparing pre- versus post-operative status at a minimum 24 months follow-up, forward elevation, internal and external rotation, modified UCLA rating system scores, and SF-36 scores improved significantly in both groups, with no significant difference between the groups. At the last follow-up, strength improved significantly in both groups, with non-significant intergroup difference. The Popeye sign was detected in 13/28 (46%) of the patients in the over 65 group and in 11/28 (39%) in the under 65 group (χ = 0.29) with non-significant difference between the two groups. In selected active patients older than 65, arthroscopic rotator cuff repair associated with biceps tenotomy (when necessary) can yield clinical and related quality of life outcomes similar to those of patients younger than 65 years.

  11. Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Tear Transosseous Repair System: The Sharc-FT Using the Taylor Stitcher.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Andrea; Lunini, Enricomaria; Rebuzzi, Manuela; Verdano, Michele; Baudi, Paolo; Ceccarelli, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Transosseous rotator cuff tear repair was first described in 1944. Over the years, it has represented the gold standard for such lesions. Through open and mini-open approaches, as well as the arthroscopic approach, the transosseous repair system represents one of the most reliable surgical techniques from a biological and mechanical perspective. Nevertheless, further improvements are required. This article describes an arthroscopic rotator cuff tear transosseous repair system, developed in collaboration with NCS Lab (Carpi, Italy): the Sharc-FT using the Taylor Stitcher. Our first experience in the clinical application of the arthroscopic technique using the transosseous suture system has shown encouraging clinical outcomes, confirming its efficacy. The patient satisfaction rate was high, and no patient expressed concern about the implant. The complication rate was very low. By improving the suture technique in the treatment of rotator cuff tears, a remarkable increase in the success rate in the treatment of this pathology could be reached; nevertheless, complications such as retears of the rotator cuff still occur.

  12. Editorial Commentary: The Wake of the Dragon: Will the Orthopaedic Community Adopt the Shoulder Arthroscopic Latarjet Procedure as We Adopted the Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair?

    PubMed

    Boileau, Pascal; Saliken, David

    2017-12-01

    The Latarjet procedure is a complex and difficult operation when performed both with an open approach and arthroscopically. The difficulties come from the fact that it is a combined intra- and extra-articular procedure, and that working close to the brachial plexus may be frightening for surgeons. Because of the high complication and reoperation rates reported in the literature, this procedure is, at the moment, rejected by a large part of the orthopaedic community, specifically in North America. The Chinese experience shows, after the European one, that arthroscopic Latarjet is an efficient and irreplaceable option for the treatment of recurrent anterior shoulder instability in the context of capsular and/or glenoid deficiency. A recent study shows that the arthroscopic procedure provides accurate bone block positioning and high rates of healing, excellent clinical results (no recurrence of instability at 2-year follow-up), and low rates of complications (no neurovascular injury). Although the arthroscopic Latarjet should be approached with caution, the learning curve should not be thought of as prohibitive. To learn how to perform an arthroscopic Latarjet, surgeons should visit an experienced surgeon and take a course to practice on cadavers first. Although it will take time and effort to learn and perform this operation correctly, we should command our Chinese colleagues to encourage us to follow their path. There is no reason that in the near future the orthopaedic community does not adopt the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure, as we adopted the arthroscopic rotator cuff repair and other complex surgical procedures. Among the strongest reasons to perform the Latarjet procedure arthroscopically are the accuracy of graft placement, the safety for neurovascular structures provided by direct visualization and magnification, and the excellent clinical results allowing young people to go back to sport, including high-risk (contact, overhead) sports. Copyright © 2017

  13. Combined Bankart and HAGL lesion associated with anterior shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Warner, J J; Beim, G M

    1997-12-01

    Traumatic anterior shoulder instability has been shown to be associated with a spectrum of capsulolabral pathology, including separation of the labrum (Bankart lesion), capsular rupture, and humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligaments (HAGL lesion). We describe a case of combined Bankart and HAGL lesions, a condition that has not been described before. Careful anatomic repair of both components of this bipolar capsular injury resulted in an excellent outcome.

  14. Arthroscopic Scapholunate Capsuloligamentous Repair: Suture With Dorsal Capsular Reinforcement for Scapholunate Ligament Lesion.

    PubMed

    Carratalá, Vicente; Lucas, Francisco J; Miranda, Ignacio; Sánchez Alepuz, Eduardo; González Jofré, Christian

    2017-02-01

    Scapholunate ligament (SLL) injury is the most frequent injury of the intrinsic carpal ligaments. The dorsal part of the SLL is the most important part for the stability of the scapholunate joint, and tears of this part and at least one of its secondary capsular attachments cause scapholunate dissociation. The arthroscopic technique most frequently used for acute injuries is reduction and fixation with Kirschner wires, and techniques that involve a primary repair of the injured ligament are performed by open surgery with efficient results. However, they lead to significant stiffness of the wrist due to injury to the soft tissue caused by damage to the secondary dorsal stabilizers; the dorsal blood supply; and in many cases, the proprioceptive innervation of the posterior interosseous nerve. We present an all-arthroscopic technique for the direct repair of acute injuries of the dorsal part of the SLL using bone anchors, complemented by a dorsal arthroscopic plication that reconstructs the dorsal capsulo-scapholunate septum of the scapholunate complex.

  15. Evaluation of the Trends, Concomitant Procedures, and Complications With Open and Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repairs in the Medicare Population

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Andrew R.; Cha, Peter S.; Devana, Sai K.; Ishmael, Chad; Di Pauli von Treuheim, Theo; D’Oro, Anthony; Wang, Jeffrey C.; McAllister, David R.; Petrigliano, Frank A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Medicare insures the largest population of patients at risk for rotator cuff tears in the United States. Purpose: To evaluate the trends in incidence, concomitant procedures, and complications with open and arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs in Medicare patients. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: All Medicare patients who had undergone open or arthroscopic rotator cuff repair from 2005 through 2011 were identified with a claims database. Annual incidence, concomitant procedures, and postoperative complications were compared between these 2 groups. Results: In total, 372,109 rotator cuff repairs were analyzed. The incidence of open repairs decreased (from 6.0 to 4.3 per 10,000 patients, P < .001) while the incidence of arthroscopic repairs increased (from 4.5 to 7.8 per 10,000 patients, P < .001) during the study period. Patients in the arthroscopic group were more likely to have undergone concomitant subacromial decompression than those in the open group (87% vs 35%, P < .001), and the annual incidence of concomitant biceps tenodesis increased for both groups (from 3.8% to 11% for open and 2.2% to 16% for arthroscopic, P < .001). While postoperative complications were infrequent, patients in the open group were more likely to be diagnosed with infection within 6 months (0.86% vs 0.37%, P < .001) but no more likely to undergo operative debridement (0.43% vs 0.26%, P = .08). Additionally, patients in the open group were more likely to undergo intervention for shoulder stiffness within 1 year (1.4% vs 1.1%, P = .01). Conclusion: In the Medicare population, arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs have increased in incidence and now represent the majority of rotator cuff repair surgery. Among concomitant procedures, subacromial decompression was most commonly performed despite evidence suggesting a lack of efficacy. Infections and stiffness were rare complications that were slightly but significantly more frequent in open rotator cuff

  16. Two-Year Outcomes After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair in Recreational Athletes Older Than 70 Years.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Sanjeev; Greenspoon, Joshua A; Horan, Marilee P; Warth, Ryan J; Millett, Peter J

    2015-07-01

    Outcomes after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in recreational athletes older than 70 years are not widely reported. To evaluate clinical outcomes after arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears in recreational athletes aged 70 years or older. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Institutional review board approval was obtained before initiation of this study. Data were collected prospectively and were retrospectively reviewed. From December 2005 to August 2012, patients who were at least 70 years of age, who described themselves as recreational athletes, and who underwent a primary or revision arthroscopic repair of full-thickness supraspinatus tears by a single surgeon were identified from a surgical registry. Demographic data, surgical data, and the following pre- and postoperative clinical outcomes scores were collected: American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (QuickDASH), Short Form-12 Physical Component Summary (SF-12 PCS), and Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE). Acromiohumeral distance and Goutallier classifications were recorded. Patient satisfaction (range, 1-10, 10 = best) and reasons for activity modification were collected at final follow-up. Forty-nine shoulders (44 patients) were included. The mean age was 73 years (range, 70-82 years). There were 33 men and 11 women (5 bilateral). The mean preoperative acromiohumeral distance was 9.2 mm (range, 3.0-15.9 mm). All patients had Goutallier classifications of 0, 1, or 2. Mean follow-up was 3.6 years (range, 2.0-6.9 years) in 43 of 49 (88%) shoulders. No rotator cuff repairs were revised, however, 1 patient had surgical treatment for stiffness. All postoperative outcomes measures demonstrated significant improvements when compared with their preoperative baselines. The mean ASES score was 90.3 (range, 60-100), the mean SANE score was 85.1 (range, 29-100), the mean QuickDASH score was 11.3 (0-50), and the mean SF-12 PCS score was

  17. Factors Affecting the Outcomes of Arthroscopically Repaired Traumatic Vertical Longitudinal Medial Meniscal Tears

    PubMed Central

    Uzun, Erdal; Misir, Abdulhamit; Kizkapan, Turan Bilge; Ozcamdalli, Mustafa; Akkurt, Soner; Guney, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    Background: Although numerous studies have assessed arthroscopic medial meniscal repairs, few studies have focused on factors affecting outcomes of vertical longitudinal and bucket-handle repairs. Purpose: To evaluate the factors affecting clinical outcomes of arthroscopically repaired traumatic vertical longitudinal and bucket-handle medial meniscal tears. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A total of 223 patients underwent arthroscopic repair for medial meniscal tears between 2007 and 2012; 140 patients had isolated tears or concurrent anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, and 80 patients (76 men, 4 women; mean age, 29.1 years; range, 18-49 years) had vertical longitudinal tears and were included in the study. Pre- and postoperative functional status was assessed using physical examinations with Lysholm and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores. Barrett criteria were used for clinical assessment of meniscal healing, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used as the radiologic assessment method. The effects of tear location, length, chronicity, and type; suturing technique; concurrent ACL reconstruction; and patient age, sex, and smoking habits were also investigated. Results: The mean follow-up period was 51.2 ± 9.4 months (range, 34-85 months). The mean Lysholm and IKDC scores improved at final follow-up (both Ps <.001). According to clinical scores, Barrett criteria, and MRI, failure was noted in 12 patients (15%). There were no significant differences in age, tear length, tear type, concurrent ACL rupture, suturing technique, or location of the meniscal repair between the success and failure groups. Failure rates were higher for red-white zone tears than for red-red zone tears (10/30, 33.3% vs 2/50, 4%; P = .004). Tear chronicity significantly affected failure rates. Early repairs had higher healing rates than late repairs (100% vs 73.4%; P = .008). Failure rates were higher for smokers than for

  18. Factors Affecting the Outcomes of Arthroscopically Repaired Traumatic Vertical Longitudinal Medial Meniscal Tears.

    PubMed

    Uzun, Erdal; Misir, Abdulhamit; Kizkapan, Turan Bilge; Ozcamdalli, Mustafa; Akkurt, Soner; Guney, Ahmet

    2017-06-01

    Although numerous studies have assessed arthroscopic medial meniscal repairs, few studies have focused on factors affecting outcomes of vertical longitudinal and bucket-handle repairs. To evaluate the factors affecting clinical outcomes of arthroscopically repaired traumatic vertical longitudinal and bucket-handle medial meniscal tears. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A total of 223 patients underwent arthroscopic repair for medial meniscal tears between 2007 and 2012; 140 patients had isolated tears or concurrent anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, and 80 patients (76 men, 4 women; mean age, 29.1 years; range, 18-49 years) had vertical longitudinal tears and were included in the study. Pre- and postoperative functional status was assessed using physical examinations with Lysholm and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores. Barrett criteria were used for clinical assessment of meniscal healing, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used as the radiologic assessment method. The effects of tear location, length, chronicity, and type; suturing technique; concurrent ACL reconstruction; and patient age, sex, and smoking habits were also investigated. The mean follow-up period was 51.2 ± 9.4 months (range, 34-85 months). The mean Lysholm and IKDC scores improved at final follow-up (both P s <.001). According to clinical scores, Barrett criteria, and MRI, failure was noted in 12 patients (15%). There were no significant differences in age, tear length, tear type, concurrent ACL rupture, suturing technique, or location of the meniscal repair between the success and failure groups. Failure rates were higher for red-white zone tears than for red-red zone tears (10/30, 33.3% vs 2/50, 4%; P = .004). Tear chronicity significantly affected failure rates. Early repairs had higher healing rates than late repairs (100% vs 73.4%; P = .008). Failure rates were higher for smokers than for nonsmokers (9/24, 37.5% vs 3/56, 5.3%; P = .008). Peripheral

  19. Septic arthritis following arthroscopic meniscus repair: a cluster of three cases.

    PubMed

    Blevins, F T; Salgado, J; Wascher, D C; Koster, F

    1999-01-01

    Three cases of Staphylococcus epidermidis septic arthritis following inside-out arthroscopic meniscus repair within a 4-day period at the same facility are described. All three patients responded to surgical debridement and 4 to 6 weeks of intravenous antibiotics. In each instance, the meniscus and repair sutures were left intact; 12- to 38-month follow-up revealed no evidence of infection or meniscal symptoms. Epidemiological investigation implicated the meniscus repair cannulas as one of the few factors common to all three cases. Molecular typing of bacterial DNA revealed that two of the three isolated organisms showed identical pulsed-field gel electrophoretic patterns, implying a common source of inoculation. Experimental contamination of the cannulas revealed that only sterilization involving ultrasonification, lumen washing by water jet, and steam sterilization resulted in clean and sterile cannulas.

  20. Arthroscopic repair of acute traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation in young athletes.

    PubMed

    Larrain, M V; Botto, G J; Montenegro, H J; Mauas, D M

    2001-04-01

    To compare the results of arthroscopic repair in acute anterior shoulder traumatic dislocation with those of nonoperative treatment. A prospective nonrandomized study was performed. Between August 1989 and April 1997, 46 patients were seen after a first episode of traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation. The average age was 21 years (range, 17 to 27 years). Most dislocations were in rugby players (36 patients). There were 18 patients treated by nonoperative methods and 28 patients treated by acute arthroscopic repair; 22 patients using transglenoid suture and 6 patients with bone anchor suture fixation. Of the patients treated nonoperatively, 94.5% suffered a redislocation between 4 and 18 months (average, 6 months). In the operative group, 96% of the patients (27) obtained excellent results according to the Rowe scale. Only 1 patient suffered a redislocation 1 year after surgery. Three different types of lesions were found during surgery: group I, capsular tear with no labrum lesion (4%); group II, capsular tear with partial labrum detachment (32%); and group III, capsular tear and full anterior labrum detachment (64%). The average follow-up was 67.4 months (range, 28 to 120). There were no surgical complications. The operative group obtained 96% excellent results, but the nonoperative group only obtained 5.5% excellent results, according to the Rowe scale. The nonoperative group showed a high incidence of redislocation (94.5%) compared with the operative group (4%). Based on the findings of this study, we recommend using an arthroscopic evaluation and repair after an initial anterior traumatic shoulder dislocation in young athletes.

  1. Reverse passage of the suture lasso in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    George, Michael S

    2009-12-01

    Suture passage in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair can be technically difficult. The suture lasso is typically passed antegrade from the bursal side of the rotator cuff. Antegrade passage of the suture lasso can be particularly difficult when visualization is limited. Reverse passage of the suture lasso from the undersurface can be used to place sutures in technically challenging circumstances. The suture lasso is placed retrograde through the undersurface of the rotator cuff and used as a suture shuttle to bring sutures back through the rotator cuff. This technique is easily reproducible and cost-effective, and it requires only 2 working arthroscopy portals.

  2. Arthroscopic repair of horizontal meniscal cleavage tears with marrow-stimulating technique.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ji-Hyun; Kwon, Oh-Jin; Nam, Tae-Seok

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate patients after arthroscopic repair of meniscal horizontal tears with a marrow-stimulating technique through clinical signs and second-look arthroscopy. We retrospectively reviewed a consecutive series of 32 meniscal repairs with horizontal cleavage tears and evaluated them through clinical assessment and second-look arthroscopic examinations. Arthroscopic meniscal repair and a marrow-stimulating technique were performed. Functional outcomes were evaluated using the visual analog scale (VAS) pain score, Lysholm knee scoring scale, and Tegner activity scale. Assessment of meniscal healing was evaluated clinically by the presence of meniscal signs; second-look arthroscopy was performed in 11 patients. Correlation between chronicity of a meniscal lesion (time from initial symptom [TFIS]) and meniscal healing was evaluated. The mean follow-up period was 45.6 ± 13.9 months. Improvements in mean VAS scores from 6.7 to 1.9 (P < .001) were observed. The Lysholm score increased from 48.0 ± 14.4 to 92.0 ± 6.3 (P < .001). The Tegner activity score increased from 3.3 ± 1.1 to 6.8 ± 0.8 (P < .001). At the last follow-up, 29 of 32 patients (91%) were evaluated as healing in the clinical assessment. Of the 11 patients who underwent second-look arthroscopy, 8 (73%) showed complete healing, 2 (18%) had incomplete healing, and 1 (9%) failed to heal. Correlation between TFIS and meniscal healing was clinically significant (P = .001) but arthroscopically insignificant (P = .085) on second-look arthroscopy. The meniscal repair procedure for horizontal cleavage tears in the present study suggests an alternative treatment option to approach the treatment of meniscal tears extending into the avascular zone and degenerative tissue. The marrow-stimulating technique using a cannulated reamer can be considered as an alternative method for the augmentation of meniscal healing. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy

  3. Clinical and radiological evaluation after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair using suture bridge technique.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Won; Seo, Dong Wook; Bae, Kyoung Wan; Choy, Won Sik

    2013-12-01

    We retrospectively assessed the clinical outcomes and investigated risk factors influencing retear after arthroscopic suture bridge repair technique for rotator cuff tear through clinical assessment and magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA). Between January 2008 and April 2011, sixty-two cases of full-thickness rotator cuff tear were treated with arthroscopic suture bridge repair technique and follow-up MRA were performed. The mean age was 56.1 years, and mean follow-up period was 27.4 months. Clinical and functional outcomes were assessed using range of motion, Korean shoulder score, Constant score, and UCLA score. Radiological outcome was evaluated with preoperative and follow-up MRA. Potential predictive factors that influenced cuff retear, such as age, gender, geometric patterns of tear, size of cuff tear, acromioplasty, fatty degeneration, atrophy of cuff muscle, retraction of supraspinatus, involved muscles of cuff and osteolysis around the suture anchor were evaluated. Thirty cases (48.4%) revealed retear on MRA. In univariable analysis, retear was significantly more frequent in over 60 years age group (62.5%) than under 60 years age group (39.5%; p = 0.043), and also in medium to large-sized tear than small-sized tear (p = 0.003). There was significant difference in geometric pattern of tear (p = 0.015). In multivariable analysis, only age (p = 0.036) and size of tear (p = 0.030) revealed a significant difference. The mean active range of motion for forward flexion, abduction, external rotation at the side and internal rotation at the side were significantly improved at follow-up (p < 0.05). The mean Korean shoulder score, Constant score, and UCLA score increased significantly at follow-up (p < 0.01). The range of motion, Korean shoulder score, Constant score, and UCLA score did not differ significantly between the groups with retear and intact repairs (p > 0.05). The locations of retear were insertion site in 10 cases (33.3%) and musculotendinous junction

  4. Functional evaluation of arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff injuries in patients with pseudoparalysis☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Neto, Douglas Lobato Lopes; Muchiuti Junior, Melvis; Checchia, Sergio Luiz

    2014-01-01

    Objective to evaluate the functional result from arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff injuries in patients with pseudoparalysis, defined as incapacity to actively raise the arm above 90°, while complete passive elevation was possible. Methods we reevaluated 38 patients with a mean follow-up of 51 months (minimum of 24). We analyzed the pseudoparalysis reversion rate and the functional result obtained. Results according to the assessment criteria of the University of California in Los Angeles (UCLA), 31 (82%) patients had good and excellent results, two (5%) had fair results and five (13%) had poor results. The mean active elevation went from 39° before the operation to 139° after the operation (p < 0.05); the mean active lateral rotation went from 30° to 48° (p < 0.05) and the mean active medial rotation went from level L3 to T12 (p < 0.05). Conclusion arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff injuries produced good and excellent results in 82% of the cases and a statistically significant improvement of active range of motion, with reversion of the pseudoparalysis in 97.4% of the cases. It is therefore a good treatment option. PMID:26229796

  5. Acute femoral "peel-off" tears of the posterior cruciate ligament: technique for arthroscopic anatomical repair.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Brian D; Dehaven, Kenneth E; Maloney, Michael D

    2011-05-01

    Management of posterior cruciate ligament injuries remains a topic of discussion among treating physicians. Injury severity, anatomical location, and presence of concomitant associated knee injuries are important factors that may be used to guide treatment strategies. Various subtypes of posterior cruciate ligament injury have been identified. Each has unique properties that affect treatment design. Among these subtypes is the acute femoral "peel-off" tear, which represents a distinct pattern of injury that consistently has demonstrated a favorable capacity for healing with repair rather than reconstruction. In this article, we present an arthroscopic anatomical repair technique that has been used with success at our institution. It is important to properly identify such injuries in a timely manner so that appropriate treatment is initiated and the patient may be spared a lengthier and more technically complex reconstruction procedure.

  6. The Relationship Between Intraoperative Tear Dimensions and Postoperative Pain in 1624 Consecutive Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repairs.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Daniel Y T; Walton, Judie R; Lam, Patrick; Murrell, George A C

    2017-03-01

    Rotator cuff repair often results in significant pain postoperatively, the cause of which is undetermined. Purpose/Hypothesis: The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between rotator cuff tear area and postoperative pain in patients who had undergone arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. We hypothesized that larger tears would be more painful because of elevated repair tension at 1 week postoperatively but that smaller tears would be more painful because of a greater healing response, especially from 6 weeks postoperatively. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 1624 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were included in this study. Exclusion criteria were moderate to severe osteoarthritis, isolated subscapularis repair, calcific tendinitis, synthetic patch repair, revision surgery, and retears on ultrasound at 6 months after surgery. Rotator cuff tears were subdivided into groups based on the tear size and retear rate found for each group. A modified L'Insalata questionnaire was given before surgery and at 1 week, 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after surgery. Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficient tests were performed between rotator cuff tear areas and pain scores. Intraoperative rotator cuff tear areas did not correlate with pain scores preoperatively or at 1 week after surgery. A smaller tear area was associated with more frequent and severe pain with overhead activities, at rest, and during sleep as well as a poorer perceived overall shoulder condition at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after repair ( r = 0.11-0.23, P < .0001). Patients who were younger, had partial-thickness tears, and had occupational injuries experienced more pain postoperatively ( r = 0.10-0.28, P < .0001). Larger tears did not have more pain at 1 week after surgery. The retear rate was 7% in tears <2 cm 2 but reached 44% in tears >8 cm 2 . There were fewer retears with smaller tears, but they were more painful than large tears postoperatively

  7. Combined arthroscopic all-inside repair of lateral and medial ankle ligaments is an effective treatment for rotational ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Vega, Jordi; Allmendinger, Jörg; Malagelada, Francesc; Guelfi, Matteo; Dalmau-Pastor, Miki

    2017-10-05

    When the anterior fascicle of the deltoid ligament is injured in patients with chronic ankle instability, the diagnosis of rotational ankle instability is supported. The aim of this study was to report the results of an all-arthroscopic technique to concomitantly repair the lateral collateral and deltoid ligaments to treat patients with rotational ankle instability. Thirteen patients [12 men and 1 woman, median age 32 (15-54) years] with rotational ankle instability were treated by arthroscopic means after failing non-operative management. Median follow-up was 35 (18-42) months. Using a suture passer and knotless anchors, the ligaments were repaired with an arthroscopic all-inside technique. During diagnostic arthroscopy, 12 patients showed an isolated anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) injury, and in one patient, both the ATFL and calcaneofibular ligament were affected. Arthroscopic examination of the deltoid ligament demonstrated a tear affecting the anterior area of the ligament in all cases. The tear was described as an "open book" tear, because the ligament was separated from the medial malleolus when applying passive internal rotation of the tibio-talar joint. This gap was closed when the tibio-talar joint was in neutral rotation or externally rotated. All patients reported subjective improvement in their ankle instability after the arthroscopic all-inside ligaments repair. The median AOFAS score increased from 70 (44-77) preoperatively to 100 (77-100) at final follow-up. Rotational ankle instability can be successfully treated by an arthroscopic all-inside repair of the lateral and medial ligaments of the ankle. Level IV, retrospective case series.

  8. Reliability and Validity of the Arthroscopic International Cartilage Repair Society Classification System: Correlation With Histological Assessment of Depth.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Tim; Martin, C Ryan; Kendra, Rita; Sermer, Corey; Chahal, Jaskarndip; Ogilvie-Harris, Darrell; Whelan, Daniel; Murnaghan, Lucas; Nauth, Aaron; Theodoropoulos, John

    2017-06-01

    To determine the interobserver reliability of the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) grading system of chondral lesions in cadavers, to determine the intraobserver reliability of the ICRS grading system comparing arthroscopy and video assessment, and to compare the arthroscopic ICRS grading system with histological grading of lesion depth. Eighteen lesions in 5 cadaveric knee specimens were arthroscopically graded by 7 fellowship-trained arthroscopic surgeons using the ICRS classification system. The arthroscopic video of each lesion was sent to the surgeons 6 weeks later for repeat grading and determination of intraobserver reliability. Lesions were biopsied, and the depth of the cartilage lesion was assessed. Reliability was calculated using intraclass correlations. The interobserver reliability was 0.67 (95% confidence interval, 0.5-0.89) for the arthroscopic grading, and the intraobserver reliability with the video grading was 0.8 (95% confidence interval, 0.67-0.9). A high correlation was seen between the arthroscopic grading of depth and the histological grading of depth (0.91); on average, surgeons graded lesions using arthroscopy a mean of 0.37 (range, 0-0.86) deeper than the histological grade. The arthroscopic ICRS classification system has good interobserver and intraobserver reliability. A high correlation with histological assessment of depth provides evidence of validity for this classification system. As cartilage lesions are treated on the basis of the arthroscopic ICRS classification, it is important to ascertain the reliability and validity of this method. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Hip Arthroscopic Synovectomy and Labral Repair in a Patient With Rheumatoid Arthritis With a 2-Year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Nobuyuki; Iguchi, Hirotaka; Mitsui, Hiroto; Tawada, Kaneaki; Murakami, Satona; Otsuka, Takanobu

    2014-08-01

    The arthroscopic surgical procedures reported previously for a rheumatic hip joint have been primarily performed as diagnostic procedures. Only a few studies have reported the success of arthroscopic surgery in hip joint preservation. We encountered a special case in which joint remodeling was seen in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis treated with biological drugs after hip arthroscopic synovectomy and labral repair. We report the case of a 39-year-old woman with rheumatism, which was controlled with tocilizumab, prednisolone, and tacrolimus. The hip joint showed Larsen grade 3 destruction, and the Harris Hip Score was 55 points. Because of the patient's strong desire to undergo a hip preservation operation, we performed hip arthroscopic synovectomy and repair of a longitudinal labral tear. After 2.5 years, the joint space had undergone rebuilding with improvement to Larsen grade 2, and the Harris Hip Score had improved to 78 points; the patient was able to return to work with the use of 1 crutch. It is possible to perform hip arthroscopic surgery for rheumatoid arthritis with a hip preservation operation with biological drugs.

  10. PROSPECTIVE AND COMPARATIVE STUDY ON FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES AFTER OPEN AND ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR OF ROTATOR CUFF TEARS

    PubMed Central

    de Castro Veado, Marco Antônio; Castilho, Rodrigo Simões; Maia, Philipe Eduardo Carvalho; Rodrigues, Alessandro Ulhôa

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To prospectively assess the surgical results from patients undergoing repairs to rotator cuff injuries via open and arthroscopic procedures, with regard to functional and clinical features, and by means of ultrasound examinations, and to compare occurrences of renewed tearing. Methods: Sixty patients underwent operations performed by the same surgeon (29 via open surgery and 31 via arthroscopy), to repair complete rotator cuff tears. The procedures were performed at Hospital Governor Israel Pinheiro (HGIP) and Mater Dei Hospital in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, between August 2007 and February 2009. The patients were assessed functionally by means of the UCLA score before and after the operation, and magnetic resonance imaging was done before the operation. All the patients were reassessed at least 12 months after the operation, and an ultrasound examination was also performed at this time. Results: Out of the 29 patients who underwent open surgery, 27 (93.1%) presented good or excellent results, with a mean UCLA score of 32 after the operation. Their mean follow-up was 14 months. Three patients presented renewed tearing on ultrasound, of whom one remained asymptomatic. Out of the 31 patients who underwent arthroscopic procedures, 29 (93.5%) presented good or excellent results, with a mean UCLA score of 33 after the operation. Their mean follow-up was 19 months. Two patients presented renewed tearing, of whom one remained asymptomatic and one evolved with loosening of an anchor, with an unsatisfactory result. Conclusion: The repairs on rotator cuff injuries presented good results by means of both open surgery and arthroscopy, with similar functional results in the two groups and similar rates of renewed tearing. PMID:27027052

  11. Arthroscopic labral repair and treatment of femoroacetabular impingement in professional hockey players.

    PubMed

    Philippon, Marc J; Weiss, Douglass R; Kuppersmith, David A; Briggs, Karen K; Hay, Connor J

    2010-01-01

    Hip injuries are common among professional hockey players in the National Hockey League (NHL). Professional hockey players will return to a high level of function and ice hockey after arthroscopic labral repair and treatment of femoroacetabular impingement. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Twenty-eight professional hockey players (NHL) were unable to perform at the professional level due to unremitting and debilitating hip pain. Players underwent arthroscopic labral repair and were treated for femoroacetabular impingement from March 2005 to December 2007. Players who had bilateral hip symptoms were excluded. Athletes completed the Modified Harris Hip Score preoperatively and postoperatively and also completed a patient satisfaction questionnaire postoperatively. Return to sport was defined as the player resuming skating for training or participation in the sport of ice hockey. The average age at the time of surgery was 27 years (range, 18-37). There were 11 left hips and 17 right hips. Player positions included 9 defensemen, 12 offensive players, and 7 goaltenders. All players had labral lesions that required repair. In addition, all patients had evidence of femoroacetabular impingement at the time of surgery. The average time to return to skating/hockey drills was 3.4 months. The average time to follow-up was 24 months (range, 12-42). The Modified Harris Hip Score improved from 70 (range, 57-100) preoperatively to an average of 95 (range, 74-100) at follow-up. The median patient satisfaction was 10 (range, 5-10). Two players had reinjury and required additional hip arthroscopy. Treatment of femoroacetabular impingement and labral lesions in professional hockey players resulted in successful outcomes, with high patient satisfaction and prompt return to sport.

  12. REHABILITATION AFTER ARTHROSCOPIC ROTATOR CUFF REPAIR: CURRENT CONCEPTS REVIEW AND EVIDENCE-BASED GUIDELINES

    PubMed Central

    Westgard, Paul; Chandler, Zachary; Gaskill, Trevor R.; Kokmeyer, Dirk; Millett, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To provide an overview of the characteristics and timing of rotator cuff healing and provide an update on treatments used in rehabilitation of rotator cuff repairs. The authors' protocol of choice, used within a large sports medicine rehabilitation center, is presented and the rationale behind its implementation is discussed. Background: If initial nonsurgical treatment of a rotator cuff tear fails, surgical repair is often the next line of treatment. It is evident that a successful outcome after surgical rotator cuff repair is as much dependent on surgical technique as it is on rehabilitation. To this end, rehabilitation protocols have proven challenging to both the orthopaedic surgeon and the involved physical therapist. Instead of being based on scientific rationale, traditionally most rehabilitation protocols are solely based on clinical experience and expert opinion. Methods: A review of currently available literature on rehabilitation after arthroscopic rotator cuff tear repair on PUBMED / MEDLINE and EMBASE databases was performed to illustrate the available evidence behind various postoperative treatment modalities. Results: There is little high-level scientific evidence available to support or contest current postoperative rotator cuff rehabilitation protocols. Most existing protocols are based on clinical experience with modest incorporation of scientific data. Conclusion: Little scientific evidence is available to guide the timing of postsurgical rotator cuff rehabilitation. To this end, expert opinion and clinical experience remains a large facet of rehabilitation protocols. This review describes a rotator cuff rehabilitation protocol that incorporates currently available scientific literature guiding rehabilitation. PMID:22530194

  13. Arthroscopic Bristow procedure for anterior instability in shoulders with a stretched or deficient capsule: the "belt-and-suspenders" operative technique and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Boileau, Pascal; Bicknell, Ryan T; El Fegoun, A Benchikh; Chuinard, Christopher

    2007-06-01

    We report the results of a new technique consisting of a combined arthroscopic Bankart repair associated with a transfer of the coraco-biceps tendon to reinforce the deficient anterior capsule by lowering the subscapularis. The procedure combines 2 parts: an arthroscopic Bankart repair, which recreates the glenoid concavity and retensions the inferior glenohumeral ligament (i.e., "the belt," or intra-articular ligamentoplasty), and an arthroscopic transfer of the conjoined tendon with a coracoid fragment, to reinforce the stretched or torn inferior glenohumeral ligament (i.e., "the suspenders," or extra-articular ligamentoplasty). The coracoid fragment is exteriorized, shaped, and calibrated, and a tenodesis of the coraco-biceps tendon is performed above the subscapularis tendon by fixing the coracoid fragment with a bioabsorbable interference screw in a glenoid socket in the scapular neck. Thirty-six patients were available for clinical and radiographic review with a minimum 1-year follow-up. Of the patients, 28 (78%) were very satisfied, 5 (14%) were satisfied, and 3 (8%) were disappointed. In comparison to the contralateral shoulder, postoperative mobility revealed no loss of active anterior elevation, a mean deficit of 9 degrees in external rotation with the arm at the side, a mean deficit of 15 degrees in external rotation in abduction, and no loss of internal rotation. The mean Walch-Duplay score was 87 points. Failures occurred in 3 patients (8%) who presented with recurrent instability. This new intra- and extra-articular combined technique constitutes an alternative in the treatment of anterior shoulder instability in patients with deficient or stretched anterior capsule. It combines the theoretic advantages of the Bristow bone-block procedure and the arthroscopic Bankart repair while eliminating the potential disadvantages of each. Level IV, therapeutic case series.

  14. Are the good functional results from arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff injuries maintained over the long term?☆

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Checchia, Sérgio Luiz; Yonamine, Alexandre Maris

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether the good and excellent functional results from arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff tears are maintained over the long term. Methods From the sample of the study conducted by our group in 2006, in which we evaluated the functional results from arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff tears, 35 patients were reassessed, 8 years after the first evaluation. The inclusion criteria were that these patients with massive rotator cuff tears operated by means of an arthroscopic technique, who participated in the previous study and achieved good or excellent outcomes according to the UCLA criteria. Patients whose results were not good or excellent in the first evaluation according to the UCLA criteria were excluded. Results Among the 35 patients reassessed, 91% of them continued to present good and excellent results (40% excellent and 51% good), while 3% presented fair results and 6% poor results. The time interval between the first and second evaluations was 8 years and the minimum length of follow-up since the immediate postoperative period was 9 years (range: 9–17 years), with an average of 11.4 years. Conclusion The good and excellent results from arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff tears were mostly maintained (91%), with the same level of function and satisfaction, even though 8 years had passed since the first assessment, with a follow-up period averaging 11.4 years. PMID:26962491

  15. The use of small (2.7 mm) screws for arthroscopically guided repair of carpal chip fractures.

    PubMed

    Wright, I M; Smith, M R W

    2011-05-01

    Removal of large chip fractures of the carpal bones and the osteochondral deficits that result, have been associated with a worse prognosis than removal of small fragments in similar locations. Reducing the articular defects by repair of large osteochondral fragments may have advantages over removal. Horses with osteochondral chip fractures that were of sufficient size and infrastructure to be repaired with small (2.7 mm diameter) AO/ASIF cortex screws were identified and repair effected by arthroscopically guided internal fixation. Thirty-three horses underwent surgery to repair 35 fractures of the dorsodistal radial carpal bone (n = 25), the dorsal margin of the radial facet of the third carpal bone (n = 9) and the intermediate facet of the distal radius (n = 1). There were no surgical complications and fractures healed satisfactorily in 26 of 28 horses and 23 horses returned to racing performance. Arthroscopically guided repair of carpal chip fractures with small diameter cortex screws is technically feasible and experiences with 33 cases suggest that this may have advantages over fragment removal in managing such cases. Surgeons treating horses with large chip fractures of the carpal bones should consider arthroscopically guided internal fixation as an alternative to removal. © 2010 EVJ Ltd.

  16. Arthroscopic Repair of the Medial Meniscus Radial/Oblique Tear Prevents the Progression of Meniscal Extrusion in Mildly Osteoarthritic Knees.

    PubMed

    Furumatsu, Takayuki; Kodama, Yuya; Kamatsuki, Yusuke; Hino, Tomohito; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2017-10-01

    Extrusion of the medial meniscus (MM) is associated with knee joint pain in osteoarthritic knees. The relationships among MM radial/oblique tears, MM extrusion (MME), and the effect of arthroscopic meniscal repair are not established. Here we evaluated the effects of arthroscopic all-inside MM repair on MME and the clinical outcomes in patients with radially oriented MM tears and mildly osteoarthritic knees. Twenty patients with a symptomatic radial or oblique tear of the MM posterior segment, MME ≥2.5 mm, and mildly osteoarthritic knees were treated using FasT-Fix 360 All-inside Meniscal Suture devices. We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure the patients' MM body width (MMBW), absolute MME, and relative MME. The Japanese Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, Lysholm, Tegner, IKDC Subjective Knee Evaluation, and Visual Analogue Scale scores were obtained. Arthroscopic all-inside MM repair prevented increases of absolute and relative MME. The preoperative and 3- and 12-month MRI-based MMBW values were similar. Over a 24-month follow-up after the MM repairs, the clinical scores showed significant improvements. Our results suggest that all-inside meniscal repairs would be useful in preventing the progression of MME in patients suffering from symptomatic MM radial/oblique tears associated with mildly osteoarthritic knees.

  17. Arthroscopic compared with open repairs for recurrent anterior shoulder instability. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lenters, Tim R; Franta, Amy K; Wolf, Fredric M; Leopold, Seth S; Matsen, Frederick A

    2007-02-01

    Both arthroscopic and open surgical repairs are utilized for the management of anterior glenohumeral instability. To determine the evidence supporting the relative effectiveness of these two approaches, we conducted a rigorous and comprehensive analysis of all reports comparing arthroscopic and open repairs. A systematic analysis of eighteen published or presented studies was performed to determine if there were significant differences between the two approaches with regard to recurrence (recurrent dislocation, subluxation, and/or apprehension and/or a reoperation for instability), return to work and/or sports, and Rowe scores. We also performed subgroup analysis to determine if the quality of the study or the arthroscopic technique influenced the results. We identified four randomized controlled trials, ten controlled clinical trials, and four other comparative studies. Results were influenced both by the quality of the study and by the arthroscopic technique. Meta-analysis revealed that, compared with open methods, arthroscopic repairs were associated with significantly higher risks of recurrent instability (p < 0.00001, relative risk = 2.37, 95% confidence interval = 1.66 to 3.38), recurrent dislocation (p < 0.0001, relative risk = 2.74, 95% confidence interval = 1.75 to 4.28), and a reoperation (p = 0.002, relative risk = 2.32, 95% confidence interval = 1.35 to 3.99). When considered alone, arthroscopic suture anchor techniques were associated with significantly higher risks of recurrent instability (p = 0.01, relative risk = 2.25, 95% confidence interval = 1.21 to 4.17) and recurrent dislocation (p = 0.004, relative risk = 2.57, 95% confidence interval = 1.35 to 4.92) than were open methods. Arthroscopic approaches were also less effective than open methods with regard to enabling patients to return to work and/or sports (p = 0.03, relative risk = 0.87, 95% confidence interval = 0.77 to 0.99). On the other hand, analysis of the randomized clinical trials

  18. Arthroscopic Removal and Tendon Repair for Refractory Rotator Cuff Calcific Tendinitis of the Shoulder.

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, Hiroshi; Iwashita, Satoshi; Okubo, Atsushi; Takai, Shinro

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical and radiological outcomes of arthroscopic treatment for refractory rotator cuff calcific tendinitis of the shoulder. Subjects were 37 patients (35 women and 2 men; mean age, 47.8 years; age range 34-61 years) who had undergone arthroscopic treatment for calcific tendinitis of the shoulder. Despite sufficient nonsurgical treatments, all patients had residual calcific deposit with persistent or recurrent pain. Before surgery, all patients underwent 3-directional radiographs of the shoulder and three-dimensional computed tomography to determine the location and size of calcific deposit. Arthroscopic surgery was performed with the patient under general anesthesia in the lateral decubitus position. A 2-cm single longitudinal incision was made with a radiofrequency hook blade on the tendon surface above calcific deposit. Calcific deposit was removed as much as possible with a curette and a motorized shaver. The incised tendon was repaired with a side-to-side suture with strong sutures. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association shoulder score was used to evaluate clinical outcomes. The extent of calcific deposit removal was evaluated with radiographs obtained before surgery, 1 week after the surgery and at the final follow-up examination. The mean follow-up duration was 30.4 (range, 13-72) months. The mean shoulder score significantly improved from 69.7 (range, 58-80) points before surgery to 97.8 (range, 89-100) points at the final follow-up examination. Postoperative radiographs in all patients, showed that the calcific deposit was resolved or reduced and those from 1 week after surgery to the final examination showed no evidence of recurrence or enlargement of calcific deposit. The calcific deposit had completely resolved in 34 patients but remained in 3 patients. When treating calcific tendinitis of the shoulder, it is important to accurately determine the size and location of calcific deposit by radiographs and 3

  19. Arthroscopic repair of "peel-off" lesion of the posterior cruciate ligament at the femoral condyle.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Federica; Bisicchia, Salvatore; Amendola, Annunziato

    2014-02-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries are uncommon, and most occur in association with other lesions. The treatment of PCL injuries remains controversial; in addition, PCL injuries have been documented to have a propensity to heal. In the literature several different patterns of PCL injury have been described including midsubstance tears/injuries, tibial bony avulsions, femoral bony avulsions, and femoral "peel-off" injuries. A peel-off injury is a complete or incomplete soft-tissue disruption of the PCL at its femoral attachment site without associated bony avulsion. In recent years arthroscopic repair of femoral avulsion and peel-off lesions of the PCL has been reported. In most of these articles, a transosseous repair with sutures passed through 2 bone tunnels into the medial femoral condyle has been described. We present a case of a femoral PCL avulsion in a 20-year-old collegiate football player with an associated medial collateral ligament injury, and we report about a novel technique for PCL repair using 2 No. 2 FiberWire sutures and two 2.9-mm PushLock anchors (Arthrex) to secure tensioning the ligament at its footprint.

  20. Posterior Horn of Medial Meniscal Peripheral Capsular Lesion: The Arthroscopic Repair Technique Working in the Posterior Compartment.

    PubMed

    Kongmalai, Pinkawas; Chernchujit, Bancha

    2016-08-01

    A posterior horn of medial meniscal peripheral capsular is usually associated with the anterior cruciate ligament injury. The conventional repair technique with the camera in the anterolateral portal cannot precisely restore the slope capsular synovium to the original attachment point. We present the arthroscopic technique for improving the accuracy and quality of the repair by working in the posterior compartment. When the posterolateral portal is used as the viewing portal, the accuracy of repair is improved because we can assess the full extent of the lesion and lift the sagging peripheral tissue to the more central part.

  1. The rotator cuff tear repair with a new arthroscopic transosseous system: the Sharc-FT(®).

    PubMed

    Baudi, P; Rasia Dani, E; Campochiaro, G; Rebuzzi, M; Serafini, F; Catani, F

    2013-06-01

    Today, in rotator cuff tear repair, the transosseous sutures are considered superior from a biological and biomechanical point of view. Our purpose is to present the early clinical and biomechanical data of a new arthroscopic rotator cuff tear transosseous repair system: the Sharc-FT®. A total of 34 patients with rotator cuff tear affecting supraspinatus and infraspinatus, 1 to 3 cm wide, were treated and evaluated from 2010 to 2013. The average age was 63.2 years. Mean follow-up was 18.6 months. All patients were assessed through Constant score in the preoperative step and at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up, performing an MRI 6 months after surgery. The patients have shown a mean preoperative Constant score of 24.5 pt that constantly increases after surgery, until a mean value of 86.9 at 12 months. Regarding complications two cases of adhesive capsulitis were recorded. This device permits to obtain transosseous sutures with cortical fixation; to greatly reduce the problems of lack of bone resistance; to decrease motion at tendon-footprint interface improving fatigue resistance; to make the stress-load distribution homogeneous at the footprint, thus optimizing biological healing. A later evaluation will be necessary, especially for the incidence of retears.

  2. Rehabilitation after arthroscopic repair of intra-articular disorders of the hip in a professional football athlete.

    PubMed

    Philippon, Marc J; Christensen, Jesse C; Wahoff, Michael S

    2009-02-01

    To report the 4-phase rehabilitation progression of a professional athlete who underwent arthroscopic intra-articular repair of the hip after injury during the 2006-07 season. Case study; level of evidence, 4. Objective values were obtained by standard goniometric measurements, handheld dynamometer, dynamic sports testing, and clinical testing for intra-articular pathology. This case report illustrates improvements in hip mobility, muscle-force output, elimination of clinical signs of intra-articular involvement, and ability to perform high-level sport-specific training at 9 wk postsurgery. At 16 wk postsurgery, the patient was able to return to full preparation for sport for the following season. After the 4-phase rehabilitation program, the patient demonstrated improvement in all areas of high-level function after an arthroscopic intra-articular repair of the hip. The preoperative management to return to sport is outlined, with clinical outcomes and criteria for return to competition.

  3. Arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament repair for proximal anterior cruciate ligament tears in skeletally immature patients: Surgical technique and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Bigoni, Marco; Gaddi, Diego; Gorla, Massimo; Munegato, Daniele; Pungitore, Marco; Piatti, Massimiliano; Turati, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears in children are increasingly common and present difficult treatment decisions due to the risk of growth disturbance. Although open primary ACL repair was abandoned in the historical literature, recent studies have suggested that there is a role for arthroscopic primary repair in patients with proximal tears. This is a retrospective review of five consecutive patients aged 9.2years (range 8 to 10) who underwent suture anchor ACL reinsertion. Patients were included if they were Tanner stages 1-2 and proximal ACL tears with adequate tissue quality confirmed arthroscopically. The time frame was 81days. Arthroscopic ACL reinsertion was performed with bioabsorbable suture anchor. Clinical evaluation, KT-1000™, and MRI were re-evaluated. Clinical outcomes were measured using International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), Lysholm and Tegner activity score. At a mean follow-up of 43.4months (range 25 to 56), no re-injury and leg length discrepancies were observed. Four patients had negative Lachman tests. The remainder had a grade 1 Lachman test. The mean side-to-side difference was 3 (2-4mm). In MRI obtained at the last follow-up, no articular lesions or growth arrest were observed and the reinserted ACL was recognized in every exam. All patients returned to previous level of activity and presented normal and nearly normal IKDC score. The mean Lysholm score was 93.6. Arthroscopic ACL repair can achieve good short-term results with joint stability and recovery of sport activity in skeletally immature patients, with proximal ACL avulsion tear. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Does immobilization position after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair impact work quality or comfort?

    PubMed

    Gumina, S; Candela, V; Passaretti, D; Mariani, L; Orsina, L

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify subjective discomfort and decrease in working performance in patients submitted to arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. We enrolled 101 asymptomatic administrative employees (mean age 55). Subjects were asked to write a text using Microsoft Word and to make a table using Microsoft Excel, with and without shoulder braces which kept the right shoulder in neutral (brace A) and internal rotation (brace B). Total time needed to complete the tests and number of mistakes committed were annotated. Furthermore, a questionnaire to assess the subjective and interpersonal discomfort caused by the braces was compiled. Data were submitted to statistical analysis. When any brace is worn, both times and mistakes are higher than those registered without brace (p < 0.02). Both times and mistakes are higher for brace B in comparison with brace A (p < 0.02). Subjects wearing brace B had a severe/very severe discomfort degree three times higher than that registered in subjects wearing brace A. Finally, 91 % of subjects preferred brace A to brace B. If the choice of the brace is not supported by biological or clinical advantages, we recommend to use the brace that keeps the arm at the side, since it ensures better working performance and lower discomfort. It also received the greatest satisfaction of the respondents. IV.

  5. Tape Versus Suture in Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Biomechanical Analysis and Assessment of Failure Rates at 6 Months

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui Wen; Lam, Patrick Hong; Shepherd, Henry M.; Murrell, George A. C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff retears after surgical repair are associated with poorer subjective and objectives clinical outcomes than intact repairs. Purpose: The aims of this study were to (1) examine the biomechanical differences between rotator cuff repair using No. 2 suture and tape in an ovine model and (2) compare early clinical outcomes between patients who had rotator cuff repair with tape and patients who had repair with No. 2 suture. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study and cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Biomechanical testing of footprint contact pressure and load to failure were conducted with 16 ovine shoulders using a tension band repair technique with 2 different types of sutures (No. 2 suture [FiberWire; Arthrex] and tape [FiberTape; Arthrex]) with the same knotless anchor system. A retrospective study of 150 consecutive patients (tape, n = 50; suture, n = 100) who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair by a single surgeon with tear size larger than 1.5 × 1 cm was conducted. Ultrasound was used to evaluate the repair integrity at 6 months postsurgery. Results: Rotator cuff repair using tape had greater footprint contact pressure (mean ± standard error of the mean, 0.33 ± 0.03 vs 0.11 ± 0.3 MPa; P < .0001) compared with repair using No. 2 sutures at 0° abduction with a 30-N load applied across the repaired tendon. The ultimate failure load of the tape repair was greater than that for suture repair (217 ± 28 vs 144 ± 14 N; P < .05). The retear rate was similar between the tape (16%; 8/50) and suture groups (17%; 17/100). Conclusion: Rotator cuff repair with the wider tape compared with No. 2 suture did not affect the retear rate at 6 months postsurgery, despite having superior biomechanical properties. PMID:28451619

  6. Outcome After Arthroscopic Decompression of Inferior Labral Cysts Combined With Labral Repair.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jae-Jung; Panchal, Karnav; Park, Sang-Eun; Kim, Young-Yul; Lee, Jae-Min; Lee, Jun-Ku; Ji, Jong-Hun

    2015-06-01

    To analyze the clinical and radiologic outcomes of arthroscopic cyst decompression and labral repair in patients with inferior paralabral cysts with chronic shoulder pain. Between March 2006 and September 2012, 16 patients who were identified as having inferior paralabral cysts presented with chronic shoulder pain. All patients underwent a thorough physical examination and preoperative magnetic resonance arthrographic evaluation. The mean age was 30 years (range, 17 to 50 years). The mean follow-up period was 38 months (range, 16 to 60 months). Clinical outcome scores (American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons; University of California, Los Angeles; and Simple Shoulder Test) and passive shoulder range of motion were evaluated at last follow-up. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging was performed at a mean of 8 months to determine the labral healing status and assess for cyst recurrence. The incidence of isolated inferior paralabral cysts was 0.6% (16 of 2,656 cases). Of the patients, 8 had multiple cysts and 8 had a single cyst. The mean length and width of the cysts were 1.0 cm and 0.4 cm, respectively. Eight cases had a history of trauma, and 13 patients were involved in sports activities. Seventy-five percent of cases showed a positive relocation test. The mean American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons; University of California, Los Angeles; and Simple Shoulder Test scores improved from 64, 22, and 8.7, respectively, preoperatively to 83, 31, and 10, respectively (P < .001), at final follow-up. Shoulder range of motion did not show any significant improvement. The location of the labral tear was as follows: anteroinferior tear in 5 cases, posteroinferior tear in 8 cases, and combined anteroinferior and posteroinferior tear in 3 cases. All cysts were found to be in association with a labral tear. A mean of 2.7 anchors were used for inferior labral repair. These cysts were found only in male patients. None of the patients showed any evidence of cyst recurrence on follow

  7. All-arthroscopic versus mini-open repair of small to large sized rotator cuff tears: a meta-analysis of clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Shan, Liancheng; Fu, Dong; Chen, Kai; Cai, Zhengdong; Li, Guodong

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare clinical outcomes of patients with full-thickness small to large sized tears undergoing all-arthroscopic versus mini-open rotator cuff repair. A literature search for electronic databases and references for eligible studies was conducted through Medline, Embase and Cochrane library between 1969 and 2013. A total of 12 comparative studies (n = 770 patients) were included. Pooled results showed: there were no differences in function outcome, pain scores, retear rate or the incidence of adhesive capsulitis between all arthroscopic and mini-open repair groups. There were no differences in outcomes between the arthroscopic and mini-open rotator cuff repair techniques, they should be considered alternative treatment options. Level IV, Meta analysis.

  8. EVALUATION OF THE RESULTS FROM ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR ON ROTATOR CUFF INJURIES AMONG PATIENTS UNDER 50 YEARS OF AGE

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Santos, Ruy Mesquita Maranhão; de Souza, Adriano; Checchia, Sérgio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the results from arthroscopic surgical treatment of rotator cuff injuries among patients under 50 years of age. Methods: Sixty-three patients with rotator cuff injuries who underwent arthroscopic surgical treatment performed by the Shoulder and Elbow Group of the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, in the Fernandinho Simonsen wing of Santa Casa Medical School, São Paulo, between August 1998 and December 2007, were reassessed. The study included all patients with rotator cuff injuries who were under 50 years of age and had been followed up postoperatively for at least 24 months. Results: According to the UCLA evaluation criteria, 59 patients (92%) showed excellent and good results; five (8%) showed fair results; and none showed poor results. The postoperative evaluation showed that the mean range of motion was 145° for elevation, 47° for lateral rotation and T10 for medial rotation. Unsatisfactory results were associated with prolonged duration of the injury, with a statistically significant relationship. Conclusion: Arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff injuries in young patients produces excellent or good results for most patients. PMID:27047819

  9. Recovery of Muscle Strength After Intact Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair According to Preoperative Rotator Cuff Tear Size.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sang-Jin; Chung, Jaeyoon; Lee, Juyeob; Ko, Young-Won

    2016-04-01

    The recovery of muscle strength after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair based on the preoperative tear size has not yet been well described. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the recovery period of muscle strength by a serial assessment of isometric strength after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair based on the preoperative tear size. The hypothesis was that muscle strength in patients with small and medium tears would recover faster than that in those with large-to-massive tears. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 164 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were included. Isometric strength in forward flexion (FF), internal rotation (IR), and external rotation (ER) was evaluated preoperatively and at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after surgery. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging scans were assessed to evaluate the quality of the rotator cuff muscle, including fatty infiltration, occupation ratio, and tangent sign. Patient satisfaction as well as visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), and Constant scores were assessed at every follow-up. Muscle strength demonstrated the slowest recovery in pain relief and the restoration of shoulder function. To reach the strength of the uninjured contralateral shoulder in all 3 planes of motion, recovery took 6 months in patients with small tears and 18 months in patients with medium tears. Patients with large-to-massive tears showed continuous improvement in strength up to 18 months; however, they did not reach the strength of the contralateral shoulder at final follow-up. At final follow-up, mean strength in FF, IR, and ER was 113.0%, 118.0%, and 112.6% of the contralateral shoulder in patients with small tears, respectively; 105.0%, 112.1%, and 102.6% in patients with medium tears, respectively; and 87.6%, 89.5%, and 85.2% in patients with large-to-massive tears, respectively. Muscle strength in any direction did not significantly correlate with

  10. Arthroscopic Correction of the Critical Shoulder Angle Through Lateral Acromioplasty: A Safe Adjunct to Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Christian; Catanzaro, Sabrina; Betz, Michael; Ernstbrunner, Lukas

    2018-03-01

    To investigate whether arthroscopic lateral acromioplasty reliably decreases the critical shoulder angle (CSA) and whether it is associated with damage to the deltoid or other complications. Patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (RCR) with lateral but without anterior acromioplasty for degenerative, full-thickness rotator cuff tears and a CSA of 34° or greater were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with traumatic or irreparable rotator cuff tears, osteoarthritis, or previous surgery were excluded. Clinical and radiographic outcomes were assessed at a minimum of 12 months' follow-up. We reviewed 49 consecutive patients (mean age, 56 years; age range, 39-76 years) at a mean of 30 months (range, 12-47 months). There were 7 RCR failures (14%). The mean CSA was reduced from 37.5° preoperatively (95% confidence interval [CI], 36.7°-38.3°) to 33.9° postoperatively (95% CI, 33.3°-34.6°; P < .001). There were no cases of dehiscence, increases in fatty infiltration, or significant atrophy of the deltoid. Scarring at the deltoid origin was noted in 18 patients (37%). The mean absolute and relative Constant scores increased from 59 points (95% CI, 54-64 points) to 74 points (95% CI, 70-78 points) and from 66% (95% CI, 61%-71%) to 83% (95% CI, 79%-87%) respectively, and the Subjective Shoulder Value increased from 45% (95% CI, 39%-50%) to 80% (95% CI, 74%-86%) (P < .001 for all 3 improvements). The postoperative CSA was significantly larger in failed than in healed repairs (P = .026). Patients with a healed RCR and a CSA corrected to 33° or less (n = 22) had 25% more abduction strength than patients with a healed cuff and a CSA corrected to 35° or greater (n = 14, P = .04). Arthroscopic lateral acromioplasty performed in addition to arthroscopic RCR can reduce the CSA without significantly compromising the deltoid origin, deltoid muscle, or function. It is not associated with any additional complications of arthroscopic RCR. Insufficiently

  11. Descriptive Report of Shoulder Range of Motion and Rotational Strength Six and 12 Weeks Following Arthroscopic Superior Labral Repair

    PubMed Central

    Sueyoshi, Tetsuro; Winters, Matthew; Zeman, David

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To measure short-term post surgery glenohumeral internal and external rotation strength, shoulder range of motion (ROM), and subjective self-report ratings following arthroscopic superior labral (SLAP) repair. Background Physical therapists provide rehabilitation for patients following arthroscopic repair of the superior labrum. Little research has been published regarding the short-term results of this procedure while the patient is typically under the direct care of the physical therapist. Methods Charts from 39 patients (7 females and 32 males) with a mean age of 43.4±14.9 years following SLAP repair were reviewed. All patients underwent rehabilitation by the same therapist using a standardized protocol and were operated on and referred by the same orthopaedic surgeon. Retrospective chart review was performed to obtain descriptive profiles of shoulder ROM at 6 and 12 weeks post surgery and isokinetically documented internal and external rotation strength 12 weeks post surgery. Results At 12 weeks post-surgery, involved shoulder flexion, abduction, and external rotation active ROM values were 2-6 degrees greater than the contralateral, non-involved extremity. Isokinetic internal and external rotation strength deficits of 7-11% were found as compared to the uninjured extremity. Patients completed the self-report section of the Modified American Shoulder Elbow Surgeons Rating Scale and scored a mean of 37/45 points. Conclusion The results of this study provide objective data for both glenohumeral joint ROM and rotator cuff strength following superior labral repair at time points during which the patient is under the direct care of the physical therapist. These results show a nearly complete return of active ROM and muscular strength following repair of the superior labrum and post-operative physical therapy. PMID:21509132

  12. Hand lesion after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: Association with complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tanesue, Ryo; Gotoh, Masafumi; Mitsui, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Hidehiro; Honda, Hirokazu; Ohzono, Hiroki; Shimokobe, Hisao; Tokunaga, Tsuyoshi; Imai, Takaki; Okawa, Takahiro; Shiba, Naoto

    2018-01-01

    It is known that complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) occurs after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR); however, few studies have investigated this complication. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to evaluate CRPS after ARCR. A total of 182 patients who underwent ARCR were enrolled in this study. The average age of patients was 62.8 ± 10.0 years, with an average follow-up period of 21.5 ± 38.1 months. CRPS criteria outlined by the Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare study team for CRPS in Japan (MHLWJ) and International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP 2005) were utilized for diagnosis. There are two rating systems for the "clinical purpose" and "research purpose" in both criteria, respectively. Clinical outcomes, including Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) and University of California, Los Angeles scores, were evaluated using univariate and multivariate analysis. CRPS exclusively occurred in the hand of the operated limb, developing within 3 months of surgery. Two or more of the following symptoms were noted in patients with the hand lesion associated with CRPS: edema (93.4%), restricted range of motion (83.4%), hyperalgesia (30.1%), paridrosis (20.4%), and atrophic change (12.2%). Under these conditions, the incidences of CRPS were 24.2% (44/182) when evaluated by the MHLWJ rating system for the "clinical purpose;" 11% (22/182) by the MHLWJ rating system for the "research purpose;" 6% (11/182) by the IASP 2005 for the "clinical purpose;" and 0.5% (1/182) by the IASP 2005 for the "research purpose." Results of multivariate analysis demonstrated that "Function" in the JOA score was a risk factor for the development of CRPS after ARCR, when evaluated by a system for the "clinical purpose" of the MHLWJ. Following ARCR, CRPS-induced hand lesions occur more frequently than is generally believed, thereby suggesting that its impact on surgical outcomes should be clarified in the future. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Orthopaedic

  13. Single-row vs. double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: clinical and 3 Tesla MR arthrography results.

    PubMed

    Tudisco, Cosimo; Bisicchia, Salvatore; Savarese, Eugenio; Fiori, Roberto; Bartolucci, Dario A; Masala, Salvatore; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2013-01-27

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has become popular in the last few years because it avoids large skin incisions and deltoid detachment and dysfunction. Earlier arthroscopic single-row (SR) repair methods achieved only partial restoration of the original footprint of the tendons of the rotator cuff, while double-row (DR) repair methods presented many biomechanical advantages and higher rates of tendon-to-bone healing. However, DR repair failed to demonstrate better clinical results than SR repair in clinical trials. MR imaging at 3 Tesla, especially with intra-articular contrast medium (MRA), showed a better diagnostic performance than 1.5 Tesla in the musculoskeletal setting. The objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the clinical and 3 Tesla MRA results in two groups of patients operated on for a medium-sized full-thickness rotator cuff tear with two different techniques. The first group consisted of 20 patients operated on with the SR technique; the second group consisted of 20 patients operated on with the DR technique. All patients were evaluated at a minimum of 3 years after surgery. The primary end point was the re-tear rate at 3 Tesla MRA. The secondary end points were the Constant-Murley Scale (CMS), the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) scores, surgical time and implant expense. The mean follow-up was 40 months in the SR group and 38.9 months in the DR group. The mean postoperative CMS was 70 in the SR group and 68 in the DR group. The mean SST score was 9.4 in the SR group and 10.1 in the DR group. The re-tear rate was 60% in the SR group and 25% in the DR group. Leakage of the contrast medium was observed in all patients. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on 3 Tesla MRA in the evaluation of two different techniques of rotator cuff repair. DR repair resulted in a statistically significant lower re-tear rate, with longer surgical time and higher implant expense, despite no difference in clinical outcomes. We think that

  14. Arthroscopic Removal and Rotator Cuff Repair Without Acromioplasty for the Treatment of Symptomatic Calcifying Tendinitis of the Supraspinatus Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Ranalletta, Maximiliano; Rossi, Luciano Andrés; Bongiovanni, Santiago Luis; Tanoira, Ignacio; Piuzzi, Nicolas; Maignon, Gastón

    2015-01-01

    Background: Calcified rotator cuff tendinitis is a common cause of chronic shoulder pain that leads to significant pain and functional limitations. Although most patients respond well to conservative treatment, some eventually require surgical treatment. Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcome with arthroscopic removal of calcific deposit and rotator cuff repair without acromioplasty for the treatment of calcific tendinitis of the supraspinatus tendon. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: This study retrospectively evaluated 30 consecutive patients with a mean age of 49.2 years. The mean follow-up was 35 months (range, 24-88 months). Pre- and postoperative functional assessment was performed using the Constant score, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) score, and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH). Pain was assessed by visual analog scale (VAS). Radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed to evaluate the recurrence of calcifications and the indemnity of the supraspinatus tendon repair. Results: Significant improvement was obtained for pain (mean VAS, 8.7 before surgery to 0.8 after; P < .001). The mean Constant score increased from 23.9 preoperatively to 85.3 postoperatively (P < .001), the mean Quick DASH score decreased from 47.3 preoperatively to 8.97 postoperatively (P < .001), and the UCLA score increased from 15.8 preoperatively to 32.2 postoperatively (P < .001). MRI examination at last follow-up (70% of patients) showed no tendon tears, and 96.2% of patients were satisfied with their results. Conclusion: Arthroscopic removal and rotator cuff repair without acromioplasty can lead to good results in patients with symptomatic calcifying tendonitis of the supraspinatus tendon. PMID:26665052

  15. Arthroscopic Repair of Recurrent Posterior Shoulder Subluxation After Total Shoulder Arthroplasty: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Grieshaber-Bouyer, Ricardo; Gerber, Christian

    2017-01-01

    A 53-year-old man presented with osteoarthritis (Walch biconcave [B2] glenoid retroversion, 22°; glenohumeral subluxation index, 65%) and a partial rupture of the supraspinatus tendon in the left shoulder. Following anatomic total joint replacement, he developed disabling recurrent posterior subluxation despite a stable prosthesis and a correctly centered glenoid head, as observed with postoperative radiography and computed tomography. In order to avoid bone loss and the complications associated with revision arthroplasty, we performed arthroscopic reefing of the posterior capsule as an experimental minimally invasive treatment. The reduction in capsular volume successfully stabilized the shoulder for approximately 9 years; thereafter, the recurrence of instability ultimately required the conversion to a reverse prosthesis. Arthroscopic capsular reefing proved to be an effective treatment for posterior shoulder subluxations after total shoulder arthroplasty, and can be considered to avoid revision arthroplasty in young patients with a stable and correctly centered prosthesis.

  16. Influence of capsular repair versus unrepaired capsulotomy on 2-year clinical outcomes after arthroscopic hip preservation surgery.

    PubMed

    Domb, Benjamin G; Stake, Christine E; Finley, Zachary J; Chen, Tian; Giordano, Brian D

    2015-04-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine whether capsular management technique influences clinical outcomes at a minimum of 2 years after arthroscopic hip preservation surgery. A retrospective review of prospectively collected data was conducted to determine the relative influence of 2 capsular management strategies on clinical outcomes: unrepaired capsulotomy (group A) and capsular repair (group B). Four hundred three patients who had undergone arthroscopic hip preservation surgery met the inclusion criteria and had 2-year outcome data available. All patients completed 4 patient-reported outcome (PRO) questionnaires preoperatively and at a minimum of 2 years' follow-up. These included the Hip Outcome Score-Activities of Daily Living (HOS-ADL) and Hip Outcome Score-Sport-Specific Subscale (HOS-SSS) subsets, Non-Arthritic Hip Score (NAHS), and modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS). Group A included 235 patients and group B, 168. The mean age of all patients at final follow-up was 36.9 years. Patients in group A were significantly older (42.3 years v 29.4 years, P < .0001) and had a significantly higher body mass index (26.8 kg/m(2)v 22.9 kg/m(2), P < .0001) compared with group B. In addition, female patients were more likely than male patients to undergo capsular repair (136 female patients v 32 male patients, P < .0001). Patients in group A also showed greater chondral damage by acetabular labrum articular disruption classification (P = .0081) and reduced preoperative PROs (HOS-ADL of 60.5 v 66.0, P = .087; HOS-SSS of 37.0 v 46.4, P = .0002; NAHS of 54.6 v 62.2, P < .0001; mHHS of 58.7 v 64.4, P = .0009; and visual analog scale score of 6.3 v 5.84, P = .028). All PROs showed statistically significant improvements for both groups at a minimum follow-up of 2 years (HOS-ADL, 60.5 to 82.2 in group A and 66 to 86.1 in group B; HOS-SSS, 36.9 to 67.3 and 46.4 to 71.2, respectively; NAHS, 54.6 to 79 and 62.2 to 82.8, respectively; visual analog scale

  17. Can Surgical Trainees Achieve Arthroscopic Competence at the End of Training Programs? A Cross-sectional Study Highlighting the Impact of Working Time Directives.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Robert M; Vo, Austin; Ferguson, Jamie; Judge, Andrew; Alvand, Abtin; Price, Andrew J; Rees, Jonathan L

    2017-06-01

    To provide training guidance on procedure numbers by assessing how the number of previously performed arthroscopic procedures relate to both competent and expert performance in simulated arthroscopic shoulder tasks. A cross-sectional study that assessed simulated shoulder arthroscopic performance was undertaken. A total of 45 participants of varying experience performed 2 validated tasks: a simple diagnostic task and a more complex Bankart labral repair task. All participants provided logbook numbers for previously performed arthroscopies. Performance was assessed with the Global Rating Scale and motion analysis. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses were conducted to identify optimum cut points for task proficiency at both "competent" and "expert" levels. Increasing surgical experience resulted in significantly better performance for both tasks as assessed by Global Rating Scale or motion analysis (P < .0001). Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses demonstrated 52 previous arthroscopies were needed to perform to a competent level at the diagnostic task and 248 to be competent at the complex task. To perform at an expert level, 290 and 476 previous arthroscopies, respectively, were needed. This study provides quantified guidance for arthroscopic training and highlights the positive relationship between arthroscopic case load and arthroscopic competency. We have estimated that the number of arthroscopies required to achieve competency in a basic arthroscopic task exceed those recommended in some countries. These estimates provide useful guidance to those responsible for training program. The numbers to achieve competent arthroscopic performance in the assessed simulated tasks exceed what is recommended and what is possible during surgical training programs in some countries. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. All rights reserved.

  18. Arthroscopic Repair of Articular Surface Partial-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears: Transtendon Technique versus Repair after Completion of the Tear-A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yohei; Woodmass, Jarret M; Bois, Aaron J; Boorman, Richard S; Thornton, Gail M; Lo, Ian K Y

    2016-01-01

    Articular surface partial-thickness rotator cuff tears (PTRCTs) are commonly repaired using two different surgical techniques: transtendon repair or repair after completion of the tear. Although a number of studies have demonstrated excellent clinical outcomes, it is unclear which technique may provide superior clinical outcomes and tendon healing. The purpose was to evaluate and compare the clinical outcomes following arthroscopic repair of articular surface PTRCT using a transtendon technique or completion of the tear. A systematic review of the literature was performed following PRISMA guidelines and checklist. The objective outcome measures evaluated in this study were the Constant Score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, Visual Analogue Scale, physical examination, and complications. Three studies met our criteria. All were prospective randomized comparative studies with level II evidence and published from 2012 to 2013. A total of 182 shoulders (mean age 53.7 years; mean follow-up 40.5 months) were analyzed as part of this study. Both procedures provided excellent clinical outcomes with no significant difference in Constant Score and other measures between the procedures. Both procedures demonstrated improved clinical outcomes. However, there were no significant differences between each technique. Further studies are required to determine the long-term outcome of each technique.

  19. Arthroscopic Repair of “Peel-Off” Lesion of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament at the Femoral Condyle

    PubMed Central

    Rosso, Federica; Bisicchia, Salvatore; Amendola, Annunziato

    2014-01-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries are uncommon, and most occur in association with other lesions. The treatment of PCL injuries remains controversial; in addition, PCL injuries have been documented to have a propensity to heal. In the literature several different patterns of PCL injury have been described including midsubstance tears/injuries, tibial bony avulsions, femoral bony avulsions, and femoral “peel-off” injuries. A peel-off injury is a complete or incomplete soft-tissue disruption of the PCL at its femoral attachment site without associated bony avulsion. In recent years arthroscopic repair of femoral avulsion and peel-off lesions of the PCL has been reported. In most of these articles, a transosseous repair with sutures passed through 2 bone tunnels into the medial femoral condyle has been described. We present a case of a femoral PCL avulsion in a 20-year-old collegiate football player with an associated medial collateral ligament injury, and we report about a novel technique for PCL repair using 2 No. 2 FiberWire sutures and two 2.9-mm PushLock anchors (Arthrex) to secure tensioning the ligament at its footprint. PMID:24749037

  20. Epinephrine Diluted Saline-Irrigation Fluid in Arthroscopic Shoulder Surgery: A Significant Improvement of Clarity of Visual Field and Shortening of Total Operation Time. A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    van Montfoort, Douwe O; van Kampen, Paulien M; Huijsmans, Pol E

    2016-03-01

    To determine the influence of epinephrine saline irrigation in therapeutic shoulder arthroscopy procedures on the clarity of arthroscopic view. Three subgroups were analyzed; (1) Bankart/SLAP repairs; (2) rotator cuff repairs; and (3) subacromial procedures without rotator cuff repair. Secondary objectives were to evaluate the influence on total operating time and potential cardiovascular adverse reactions. The design of the study was a prospective, randomized, double-blind controlled trial. A total of 101 patients were included. Pressure pump-controlled regular saline irrigation fluid was used in the control group. In the epinephrine group, epinephrine (0.33 mg/L) was added to the saline-irrigation fluid. Visual clarity was rated by a Numeric Rating Scale. Total operation time, total use of irrigation fluid, increases in pump pressure, heart rate, blood pressure, and electrocautery use were registered. Visual clarity (P = .002) was significantly better and total operating time (P = .008) significantly shorter in the epinephrine group. Total irrigation fluid used was significantly lower in the epinephrine group (P = .001). The greatest effect on visual clarity and shortening of operation time up to 15 minutes was seen in Bankart and SLAP repairs. No significant effect of the addition of epinephrine on heart rate and blood pressure was observed. The addition of epinephrine (0.33 mg/L) to irrigation fluid significantly improves visual clarity in most common types of therapeutic shoulder arthroscopy. A significant reduction in total operating time and use of irrigation fluid was observed. The greatest effect on visual clarity and shortening of operation time was seen in Bankart and SLAP group. Therefore, one of our initial hypotheses that the greatest effect would be observed in subacromial and rotator cuff repair procedures was not supported by the data presented. No cardiovascular adverse reactions were seen. Level 1, Randomized controlled trial. Copyright

  1. Reduction of postoperative stiffness after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: results of a customized physical therapy regimen based on risk factors for stiffness.

    PubMed

    Koo, Samuel S; Parsley, B K; Burkhart, Stephen S; Schoolfield, John D

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the benefits of a modified rehabilitation protocol (incorporating early closed-chain overhead stretching) in reducing the risk of postoperative stiffness after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. During a 17-month period, we performed primary arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs in 152 patients. After surgery, patients with risk factors identified in the previous study (calcific tendonitis, adhesive capsulitis, PASTA [partial articular surface tendon avulsion]-type rotator cuff repair, concomitant labral repair, or single-tendon cuff repair) were enrolled in a modified rehabilitation protocol that added early overhead closed-chain passive motion exercises to our standard protocol; alternatively, patients without risk factors received a standard conservative rehabilitation program. Historical controls were used and comprised patients in the senior author's practice who all received the conservative rehabilitation protocol. The prevalence of postoperative stiffness was compared between the historical cohort and current study patients by use of Fisher exact tests. Among the 152 patients studied, 79 were positive for at least 1 of the specified risk factors and received the modified protocol. Postoperative stiffness developed in none of the 79 patients enrolled in the modified program. This finding represented a significant improvement (Fisher exact test, P = .004) over the historical controls, in which 18 of the 231 at-risk patients had significant postoperative stiffness develop. In at-risk patients (with calcific tendonitis, adhesive capsulitis, PASTA repair, concomitant labral repair, and single-tendon repair), a postoperative rehabilitation regimen that incorporates early closed-chain passive overhead motion can reduce the incidence of postoperative stiffness after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Copyright © 2011 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The development of a quantitative scoring system to predict whether a large-to-massive rotator cuff tear can be arthroscopically repaired.

    PubMed

    Kim, S-J; Park, J-S; Lee, K-H; Lee, B-G

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a quantitative scoring system to predict whether a large-to-massive rotator cuff tear was arthroscopically reparable prior to surgery. We conducted a retrospective review of the pre-operative MR imaging and surgical records of 87 patients (87 shoulders) who underwent arthroscopic repair of a large-to-massive rotator cuff tear. Patients were divided into two groups, based on the surgical outcome of the repair. Of the 87 patients, 53 underwent complete repair (Group I) and 34 an incomplete repair (Group II). Pre-operative MR images were reviewed to quantify several variables. Between-group differences were evaluated and multiple logistic regression analysis was used to calculate the predictive value of significant variables. The reparability index (RI) was constructed using the odds ratios of significant variables and a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis performed to identify the optimal RI cutoff to differentiate between the two groups. The following variables were identified as independent predictors of arthroscopic reparability: the size of the defect with medial-lateral diameter (cutoff, 4.2 cm) and anterior-posterior diameter (cutoff, 3.7cm); Patte's grade of muscle atrophy (cutoff, grade 3) and Goutallier grade of fatty degeneration (cutoff, grade 3). An RI cutoff value of 2.5 provided the highest differentiation between groups I and II, with an area under the curve of 0.964, and a sensitivity of 73.5% and specificity of 96.2%. The RI developed in our study may prove to be an efficient clinical scoring system to predict whether a large-to-massive rotator cuff tear is arthroscopically reparable. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:1656-61. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  3. The effect of platelet enriched plasma on clinical outcomes in patients with femoroacetabular impingement following arthroscopic labral repair and femoral neck osteoplasty

    PubMed Central

    LaFrance, Russell; Kenney, Raymond; Giordano, Brian; Mohr, Karen; Cabrera, Jennifer; Snibbe, Jason

    2015-01-01

    To compare the clinical outcome of patients treated with and without platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection while undergoing arthroscopic labral repair and femoral neck osteoplasty for femoral acetabular impingement. Patients were randomized at the time of surgery to receive either an intra-articular injection of 5 cc of PRP, or an equal volume of 0.9% normal saline. All patients underwent arthroscopic labral repair and osteoplasty of the femoral neck and, at the conclusion of the case, received the injection. One week following surgery, thigh circumference (measured 10 cm distal to the tip of the greater trochanter) and the presence of ecchymosis of the thigh were recorded. Clinical outcome scores, including Non-Arthritic Hip Score, Modified Harris Hip Score and Hip Outcome Score were collected prior to surgery at 1, 3, 6 and a minimum of 12 months post-operatively. Thirty-five patients were enrolled into this study. Twenty patients received a PRP injection and 15 received a saline injection. Thigh circumference was compared pre-operatively and 1 week post-operatively. There was no significant difference between the two groups. Ecchymosis was compared between the two groups at 1 week post-operatively. Four of the 20 patients in the PRP group and 10 of the 15 in the placebo group demonstrated bruising on the lateral thigh. This was compared with a Chi-Square test and found to be statistically significant (P = 0.005). There was no significant difference in any of the outcome scores between the two groups. An intra-articular injection of PRP after labral repair did not improve the clinical outcome up to 1 year post-operatively in patients undergoing arthroscopic labral repair and osteoplasty of the femoral neck. Level of evidence is level I study. PMID:27011833

  4. Improved outcomes after hip arthroscopic surgery in patients undergoing T-capsulotomy with complete repair versus partial repair for femoroacetabular impingement: a comparative matched-pair analysis.

    PubMed

    Frank, Rachel M; Lee, Simon; Bush-Joseph, Charles A; Kelly, Bryan T; Salata, Michael J; Nho, Shane J

    2014-11-01

    Hip capsular management after hip arthroscopic surgery for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is controversial. To compare the clinical outcomes of patients undergoing hip arthroscopic surgery for FAI with T-capsulotomy with partial capsular repair (PR; closed vertical incision, open interportal incision) versus complete capsular repair (CR; full closure of both incisions). The hypothesis was that there would be improved clinical outcomes in patients undergoing CR compared with those undergoing PR. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Consecutive patients undergoing hip arthroscopic surgery for FAI by a single fellowship-trained surgeon from January 2011 to January 2012 were prospectively collected and analyzed. Inclusion criteria included all patients between ages 16 and 65 years with physical examination and radiographic findings consistent with symptomatic FAI, with a minimum 2-year follow-up. For analysis, patients were matched according to sex and age ±2 years. Primary clinical outcomes were measured via the Hip Outcome Score Activities of Daily Living (HOS-ADL) and Sport-Specific (HOS-SS) subscales, the modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), patient satisfaction (measured on a visual analog scale), and clinical improvement at baseline, 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years. Statistical analysis was performed utilizing Student paired and unpaired t tests, with P < .05 considered significant. A total of 64 patients were included in the study, with 32 patients (12 male, 20 female) in each group. The average follow-up was 29.9 ± 2.6 months. There were no significant demographic differences between the groups. The CR group demonstrated significantly superior outcomes in the HOS-SS at 6 months (PR: 63.8 ± 31.1 vs CR: 72.2 ± 16.1; P = .039), 1 year (PR: 72.7 ± 14.7 vs CR: 82.5 ± 10.7; P = .006), and 2.5 years (PR: 83.6 ± 9.6 vs CR: 87.3 ± 8.3; P < .0001) after surgery. Patient satisfaction at final follow-up was significantly better in the CR group (PR: 8.4 ± 1.0 vs CR

  5. Arthroscopic all-inside ramp lesion repair using the posterolateral transseptal portal view.

    PubMed

    Keyhani, Sohrab; Ahn, Jin Hwan; Verdonk, René; Soleymanha, Mehran; Abbasian, Mohammadreza

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and describe the clinical results and outcomes of a novel method for all-inside suture repair of medial meniscus ramp lesions through posteromedial and posterolateral transseptal portals during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Further, this investigation compared the posterolateral view to the notch view for diagnosis and repair. Between 2011 and 2014, 166 patients had ramp lesions concomitantly with ACL injury; 128 patients (107 men and 21 women) were enrolled in the study after qualification. All patients underwent repair of the posterior horn ramp lesion of the medial meniscus, using a suture hook device with PDS No. 1 through a posteromedial portal while viewing from the posterolateral transseptal portal during ACL reconstruction, with a minimum of a 2-year follow-up. Patients were followed up for a minimum of 2 years (range 24-47 months). Their average Lysholm score increased from 61.7 ± 3.2 preoperatively to 87.8 ± 3.9 at last follow-up (p < 0.001). Moreover, their average IKDC scores also improved from 53.6 ± 2.1 (pre-op) to 82.1 ± 3.5 (at last follow-up) (p < 0.001). The peroneal nerve and the popliteal neurovascular bundle were not damaged in any of the patients. This study provides evidence that the posterolateral transseptal technique protects neurovascular structures. This technique may be used safely and easily for repair of the posterior horn ramp lesion of the medial meniscus during ACL reconstruction. IV.

  6. Longitudinal Long-term Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Clinical Follow-up After Single-Row Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Clinical Superiority of Structural Tendon Integrity.

    PubMed

    Heuberer, Philipp R; Smolen, Daniel; Pauzenberger, Leo; Plachel, Fabian; Salem, Sylvia; Laky, Brenda; Kriegleder, Bernhard; Anderl, Werner

    2017-05-01

    The number of arthroscopic rotator cuff surgeries is consistently increasing. Although generally considered successful, the reported number of retears after rotator cuff repair is substantial. Short-term clinical outcomes are reported to be rarely impaired by tendon retears, whereas to our knowledge, there is no study documenting long-term clinical outcomes and tendon integrity after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. To investigate longitudinal long-term repair integrity and clinical outcomes after arthroscopic rotator cuff reconstruction. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Thirty patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with suture anchors for a full-tendon full-thickness tear of the supraspinatus or a partial-tendon full-thickness tear of the infraspinatus were included. Two and 10 years after initial arthroscopic surgery, tendon integrity was analyzed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) score and Constant score as well as subjective questions regarding satisfaction with the procedure and return to normal activity were used to evaluate short- and long-term outcomes. At the early MRI follow-up, 42% of patients showed a full-thickness rerupture, while 25% had a partial rerupture, and 33% of tendons remained intact. The 10-year MRI follow-up (129 ± 11 months) showed 50% with a total rerupture, while the other half of the tendons were partially reruptured (25%) or intact (25%). The UCLA and Constant scores significantly improved from preoperatively (UCLA total: 50.6% ± 20.2%; Constant total: 44.7 ± 10.5 points) to 2 years (UCLA total: 91.4% ± 16.0% [ P < .001]; Constant total: 87.8 ± 15.3 points [ P < .001]) and remained significantly higher after 10 years (UCLA total: 89.7% ± 15.9% [ P < .001]; Constant total: 77.5 ± 15.6 points [ P < .001]). The Constant total score and Constant strength subscore, but not the UCLA score, were also significantly better at 10 years postoperatively in patients

  7. Patient Preference Before and After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Which Is More Important, Pain Relief or Strength Return?

    PubMed

    Virk, Mandeep S; Levy, David M; Kuhns, Benjamin D; Krecher, James S; Parsley, Billy K; Burkhart, Stephen S; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N; Cole, Brian J

    Our understanding of patients' desired outcomes and expectations of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR) is limited, particularly regarding the importance of pain relief and strength return relative to each other. We conducted a study of patient's ratings of the importance of pain relief and strength return after ARCR. Before undergoing surgery, 60 patients completed a shoulder questionnaire on which they assessed severity of symptoms and rated, on a 10-point scale, the importance of postoperative improvements in pain relief and strength return. After surgery, they completed the same questionnaire, again rating the importance of pain relief and strength return. About 50% of the patients valued pain relief and strength return equally before and after ARCR. However, overall patient ratings were higher for strength return over pain relief, both before surgery, mean (SD), 9.2 (2.1) vs 8.6 (2.3) (P = .02), and afterward, at a follow-up of 5.2 (0.2) years, 8.9 (1.9) vs 8.2 (3.1) (P = .03). This significant preference for strength return held irrespective of sex, age, active sports involvement, preoperative self-assessed pain score, and subjective shoulder weakness. Before surgery, increasing age was associated with a stronger preference for pain relief (r = 0.33, P = .01), and retirees preferred pain relief over strength return. These results show the patterns of patient preference for pain relief and strength return after ARCR. Improved understanding of these patients' expectations will allow meaningful changes in patient satisfaction.

  8. Arthroscopic pubic symphysis debridement and adductor enthesis repair in athletes with athletic pubalgia: technical note and video illustration.

    PubMed

    Hopp, Sascha; Tumin, Masjudin; Wilhelm, Peter; Pohlemann, Tim; Kelm, Jens

    2014-11-01

    We elaborately describe our novel arthroscopic technique of the symphysis pubis in athletes with osteitis pubis and concomitant adductor enthesopathy who fail to conservative treatment modalities. The symphysis pubis is debrided arthroscopically and the degenerated origin of adductor tendon (enthesis) is excised and reattached. With our surgical procedure the stability of the symphysis pubis is successfully preserved and the adductor longus enthesopathy simultaneously addressed in the same setting.

  9. A preliminary report of acute and subacute arthroscopic repair of the radial ulnohumeral ligament after elbow dislocation in the high-demand patient.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Michael J; Lee Murphy, Randall; Savoie, Felix H

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate functional outcomes, range of motion (ROM), elbow stability, and time to return to full activities after acute and subacute arthroscopic repair of a simple elbow dislocation in high-demand patients. "High-demand patients" were defined as in-season athletes and individuals who required use of both hands for their profession and believed that they could not miss the 6 weeks of work that may be required with conservative treatment in an elbow brace. We retrospectively reviewed 14 consecutive patients with a simple elbow dislocation who underwent arthroscopic repair of the radial ulnohumeral ligament from 2008-2012. Outcomes measures included the Mayo Elbow Performance Score (MEPS), elbow ROM, elbow stability, and time to return to full activities. Each patient was contacted once by telephone to determine the current activity level and presence of any pain or functional limitations. The mean patient age was 25 years, with telephone follow-up at a mean of 30 months and clinical examination after a minimum of 6 months. The postoperative MEPS was excellent (mean, 99.6; range, 95 to 100) for all 14 patients, and all returned to their preinjury level of function with no restrictions or instability. Final ROM averaged -3° of full extension to greater than 130° of flexion. The mean time to return to full activities in and out of a brace was 2.7 weeks and 6.6 weeks, respectively, in the acute group and 4.6 weeks and 8.9 weeks, respectively, in the subacute group. All patients were satisfied with their outcome. Conservative management remains the gold standard for most simple elbow dislocations. We believe that certain high-demand patients may be candidates for acute arthroscopic ligamentous repair. Our preliminary data show that acute arthroscopic repair of the radial ulnohumeral ligament is a safe, effective procedure that restores stability to the elbow and allows patients to quickly return to full activities. Level IV, therapeutic

  10. Arthroscopic management of massive rotator cuff tears: an evaluation of debridement, complete, and partial repair with and without force couple restoration.

    PubMed

    Heuberer, Philipp R; Kölblinger, Roman; Buchleitner, Stefan; Pauzenberger, Leo; Laky, Brenda; Auffarth, Alexander; Moroder, Philipp; Salem, Sylvia; Kriegleder, Bernhard; Anderl, Werner

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of arthroscopic debridement (DB), partial (PR), and complete repair (CR) for massive rotator cuff tears (mRCT) in terms of functional and subjective parameters, and repair integrity. For this single-centre study, 68 consecutive shoulders with mRCT involving at least three tendons and treated with arthroscopic DB (n = 23), PR (n = 22), and CR (n = 23) were included. All patients (52-81 years) were prospectively assessed before and at a mean of 45 months after surgery using functional and subjective parameters. Preoperative tendon rupture pattern and post-operative repair integrity were assessed by MRI. A coding system describing accurately rotator cuff rupture, treatment, and integrity was established. All treatment groups improved significantly from pre- to post-operative (P < 0.01), while preoperative parameters, except fatty degeneration, were not significantly different. However, post-operative comparisons revealed similar scores with DB (constant score, CS 65.8 ± 14.7, qDASH 24.1 ± 20.6) and PR (CS 67.5 ± 9.9, P = n.s.; qDASH 20.5 ± 14.4, P = n.s.), while CR were significantly better (CS 80.3 ± 8.9; qDASH 7.0 ± 8.7; P ≤ 0.001). Force couple restoration of PR did not significantly influence outcome. Re-tear rates with CR (29 %) were lower compared to PR (53 %). Intact CR compared to intact PR showed better CS (83.4 ± 7.3 vs. 68.5 ± 10.6, P = 0.009) and qDASH (5.4 ± 8.3 vs. 21.2 ± 9.5, P = 0.006). The vast majority of patients were satisfied with their arthroscopic procedure (DB 87 %; PR 86 %; CR 91 %). Arthroscopic DB, PR, and CR were effective in treating mRCT involving at least three tendons. Reparability of mRCT was influenced by fatty degeneration of the muscles. However, CR showed the most favourable short-term improvements. IV.

  11. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for postoperative pain relief after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a prospective double-blinded randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Mahure, Siddharth A; Rokito, Andrew S; Kwon, Young W

    2017-09-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR) can be associated with significant postoperative pain. Concern for opioid abuse has led surgeons to identify alternative, efficacious methods of postoperative analgesia. To determine whether transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) can have a similarly beneficial effect after shoulder procedures, we conducted a prospective double-blinded randomized trial in patients undergoing outpatient ARCR. All patients undergoing ARCR of a full-thickness rotator cuff tear by the senior authors were identified. Patients with a history of recent narcotic use or prior narcotic abuse and those under management of a pain control specialist were excluded. Patients were randomized into 2 groups, active or placebo TENS, and used the device for 4 sessions/day for 45 minutes/session for the first postoperative week. All patients received Percocet 5/325 mg (oxycodone/acetaminophen) for use as rescue pain pills. One-week narcotic consumption and visual analog scale pain scores were compared between groups. The final analysis included 37 patients (21 active,16 placebo). Baseline and procedural differences were not different between groups. At 1 week postoperatively, patients in the active group had significantly lower pain scores (3.6 ± 2.1 vs. 5.8 ± 1.2; P= .008). Postoperative Percocet consumption during the initial 48 hours (12.8 ± 4.7 vs. 17.2 ± 6.3; P = .020) and during the first week (25.2 ± 9.9 vs. 33.8 ± 14.3; P = .037) was also significantly lower in the active group. Results from this prospective double-blinded randomized trial demonstrate that compared with placebo TENS, active TENS can result in significantly less pain and reduced opioid use in the immediate postoperative period after ARCR, suggesting that TENS may be potentially useful in a multimodal approach to managing postoperative pain. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier

  12. ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR OF SMALL AND MEDIUM TEARS OF THE SUPRASPINATUS MUSCLE TENDON: EVALUATION OF THE CLINICAL AND FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES AFTER TWO YEARS OF FOLLOW-UP

    PubMed Central

    Ikemoto, Roberto Yukio; Murachovsky, Joel; Nascimento, Luís Gustavo Prata; Bueno, Rogério Serpone; Almeida, Luis Henrique; Strose, Eric; Castiglia, Marcello Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical and functional outcomes from arthroscopic repairs on small and medium-sized tears of the supraspinatus muscle tendon. Methods: 129 cases of isolated small and medium tears of the supraspinatus muscle tendon were evaluated retrospectively. The average duration of pain was 29 months. The average joint range of motion comprised active elevation of 136°, lateral rotation of 58° and medial rotation at T12 level; and the preoperative functional UCLA score averaged 17 points. In all the cases, complete repair could be achieved. Results: The average score on the UCLA functional scale in the postoperative period was 32 points. The average length of follow-up was 39 months. Seventy-five cases (58%) had excellent results and 42 (32%) had good results. The average final active elevation was 156° with an average gain of 20°, and the average final lateral rotation was 57° with an average gain of 9°. Both of these were statistically significant (P < 0.05). The patients who underwent tenotomy of the long head of the biceps (LHB), with or without tenodesis, did not present statistically inferior functional outcomes, in comparison with the patients who only underwent decompression and lesion repair (P = 1.00). Fourteen cases (10.8%) presented complications during the postoperative period. Six (4.6%) developed adhesive capsulitis and four (3.1%) presented re-rupture of the tendon, proven by means of magnetic resonance imaging. Conclusions: Arthroscopic repair of small and medium tears of the supraspinatus muscle tendon provided a functional clinical improvement, with good and excellent results in 90% of the cases. PMID:27047846

  13. Results of arthroscopic repair of partial- or full-thickness longitudinal medial meniscal tears by single or double vertical sutures using the inside-out technique.

    PubMed

    Haklar, Ugur; Donmez, Ferdi; Basaran, Serdar Hakan; Canbora, Mehmet Kerem

    2013-03-01

    Although numerous studies have assessed arthroscopic repair of meniscal tears, no study has described the repair of partial- or full-thickness longitudinal medial meniscal tears using single or double vertical sutures. To present the intermediate-term results of medial meniscal tears repaired with single or double vertical sutures. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. The authors evaluated the results of 112 longitudinal medial meniscal tears treated with inside-out single or double vertical sutures, with or without anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, based on the clinical resolution of symptoms, the Lysholm knee scoring scale, and the Tegner activity scale. Re-examination was also performed by magnetic resonance imaging after the repair. The length of the tears was evaluated arthroscopically. Eighty-five tears of 112 were >2 cm in length, and 27 were tears ≤2 cm. Eighty-nine (79.4%) of the 112 repairs were performed in conjunction with ACL reconstructions, and the remaining 23 (20.6%) repairs were performed in ACL-intact knees. The tear type of the menisci in our study was full thickness in 66 (58.9%) cases and partial thickness in 46 (41.1%) cases. Double vertical sutures were used for full-thickness tears, and single vertical sutures were used for partial-thickness tears. The cases were evaluated after a mean follow-up duration of 49.3 months (range, 12-88 months). Clinical and radiological examination results determined that 99 (88.4%) meniscal repairs had healed, and the remaining 13 cases (10.6%) were considered to be failures. The healing rate of the full-thickness group was 80.3%, while in the partial-thickness group, the rate was 100%. The mean Lysholm score improved significantly from a preoperative value of 63.8 to a postoperative value of 89.5 (P < .001). The mean Tegner activity score was 3.3 preoperatively and 6.7 postoperatively (P < .001). Logistic regression analysis found that concurrent ACL reconstruction, tear length, and smoking as

  14. Return to sports after arthroscopic capsulolabral repair using knotless suture anchors for anterior shoulder instability in soccer players: minimum 5-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Álvarez-Díaz, Pedro; Doblas, Jesús; Steinbacher, Gilbert; Seijas, Roberto; Ares, Oscar; Boffa, Juan José; Cuscó, Xavier; Cugat, Ramón

    2016-02-01

    To report the return to sports and recurrence rates in competitive soccer players after arthroscopic capsulolabral repair using knotless suture anchors at a minimum of 5 years of follow-up. All competitive soccer players with anterior glenohumeral instability treated by arthroscopic capsulolabral repair using knotless suture anchors between 2002 and 2009 were retrospectively identified through the medical records. Inclusion criteria were: no previous surgical treatment of the involved shoulder, absence of glenoid or tuberosity fractures, absence of large Hill-Sachs or glenoid bone defect, minimum follow-up of 5 years, instability during soccer practice or games, and failure of non-surgical treatment. The charts of included players were reviewed, and a phone call was performed in a cross-sectional manner to obtain information on: current soccer, return to soccer, recurrence of instability, shoulder function (Rowe score), and disability [Quick-Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score and Quick-DASH Sports/Performing Arts Module]. Fifty-seven young male soccer players were finally included with a median (range) follow-up of 8 (5-10) years. Forty-nine (86 %) of the soccer players were able to return to soccer and 36 of them (73 %) at the same pre-injury level. There were 6 (10.5 %) re-dislocations in the 57 players, all of them of traumatic origin produced during soccer and other unrelated activities. The main reasons to not return to soccer were: knee injuries (two players), changes in personal life (two players), and job-related (three players). None of the players quit playing soccer because of their shoulder instability injury. The median (range) Rowe score, Quick-DASH score, and Quick-DASH sports score were 80 (25-100), 2.3 (0-12.5), and 0 (0-18.8), respectively. Competitive soccer players undergoing arthroscopic capsulolabral repair with knotless suture anchors for shoulder instability without significant bone loss demonstrate excellent return to

  15. Arthroscopic Surgery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Arthroscopic surgery (or microsurgery) is a significant breakthrough in treating knee injuries. Its applications range from basic diagnosis to arthroscopic menisectomy, although its use in some procedures is still highly controversial. Many surgeons perform the diagnostic procedure, but follow this with the conventional surgical approach.…

  16. Fiber-optics couple arthroscope to TV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franke, J. M.; Rhodes, D. B.

    1981-01-01

    Convenient, hand-held coupler images output of arthroscope onto coherent fiber bundle. Arthroscope allows surgeons to examine internal organs through any small opening in body. Coupler is also used for engine inspection, instrument repair, and around-corner visual inspection. Image from arthroscope travels along flexible bundle and appears at other cable end where it is recollimated by lens. Image is read from lens or projected on color TV camera.

  17. Effects of arthroscopy-guided suprascapular nerve block combined with ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Jun; Hwang, Jung-Taek; Kim, Do-Young; Lee, Sang-Soo; Hwang, Sung Mi; Lee, Na Rea; Kwak, Byung-Chan

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the pain relieving effect of ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block (ISB) combined with arthroscopy-guided suprascapular nerve block (SSNB) with that of ultrasound-guided ISB alone within the first 48 h after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Forty-eight patients with rotator cuff tears who had undergone arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were enrolled. The 24 patients in group 1 received ultrasound-guided ISB and arthroscopy-guided SSNB; the remaining 24 patients in group 2 underwent ultrasound-guided ISB alone. Visual analogue scale pain score and patient satisfaction score were checked at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 48 h post-operatively. Group 1 had a lower visual analogue scale pain score at 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 48 h post-operatively (1.7 < 2.6, 1.6 < 4.0, 3.5 < 5.8, 3.6 < 5.2, 3.2 < 4.2, 1.3 < 2.0), and a higher patient satisfaction score at 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 h post-operatively than group 2 (7.8 > 6.0, 6.2 > 4.3, 6.4 > 5.1, 6.9 > 5.9, 7.9 > 7.1). Six patients in group 1 developed rebound pain twice, and the others in group 1 developed it once. All of the patients in group 2 had one rebound phenomenon each (p = 0.010). The mean timing of rebound pain in group 1 was later than that in group 2 (15.5 > 9.3 h, p < 0.001), and the mean size of rebound pain was smaller in group 1 than that in group 2 (2.5 > 4.0, p = 0.001). Arthroscopy-guided SSNB combined with ultrasound-guided ISB resulted in lower visual analogue scale pain scores at 3-24 and 48 h post-operatively, and higher patient satisfaction scores at 6-36 h post-operatively with the attenuated rebound pain compared to scores in patients who received ultrasound-guided ISB alone after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The combined blocks may relieve post-operative pain more effectively than the single block within 48 h after arthroscopic cuff repair. Randomized controlled trial, Level I. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier

  18. A Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial Evaluating the Effectiveness of Daily Vibration After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Lam, Patrick H; Hansen, Kaitlyn; Keighley, Geffrey; Hackett, Lisa; Murrell, George A C

    2015-11-01

    Rotator cuff repair is a common method to treat rotator cuff tears; however, retear rates remain high. High-frequency, low-magnitude vibration has been demonstrated to promote new bone formation in both animal models and in humans. This type of mechanical stimulation applied postoperatively will enhance tendon-to-bone healing and reduce postoperative retear rates. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted to investigate the effects of 5 minutes of 80-Hz vibration applied daily after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for 6 months on postoperative rotator cuff healing. The primary outcome was ultrasound-assessed repair integrity at 6 months after repair. Recruited patients were randomized into 2 groups: one group received a vibration device that oscillated at 80 Hz, and the other group received a placebo device. The postoperative retear rates of both groups were similar (9.1% [5/55] in the vibration group, and 9.3% [5/54] in the placebo group) at 6 months as determined by ultrasound imaging. Vibration did provide acute pain relief at 6 weeks after surgery (visual analog scale [VAS] score, 2.24 ± 0.29 cm) compared with placebo (VAS score, 3.67 ± 0.48 cm) (P < .003). Six months after surgery, both groups had significant reductions in pain during overhead activities, at rest, and during sleep and overall shoulder pain compared with before surgery (P < .001). Both the vibration and placebo groups had significant increases in shoulder strength with abduction in the scapular plane, adduction, liftoff, internal rotation, and external rotation 6 months after surgery. Statistical analysis showed that vibration was not a contributing factor at improving these parameters in these periods. High-frequency, low-magnitude vibration did provide acute pain relief on application 6 weeks after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair surgery. However, vibration did not improve tendon-to-bone healing

  19. Does Additional Biceps Augmentation Improve Rotator Cuff Healing and Clinical Outcomes in Anterior L-Shaped Rotator Cuff Tears? Clinical Comparisons With Arthroscopic Partial Repair.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yoon Sang; Lee, Juyeob; Kim, Rag Gyu; Ko, Young-Won; Shin, Sang-Jin

    2017-11-01

    The repair of anterior L-shaped tears is usually difficult because of the lack of anterior rotator cuff tendon to cover the footprint. The biceps tendon is usually exposed from the retracted anterolateral corner of the torn tendon and can be easily used to augment rotator cuff repair. Hypothesis/Purpose: This study compared the clinical outcomes of the biceps augmentation technique with those of partial tendon repair for the arthroscopic treatment of large anterior L-shaped rotator cuff tears to evaluate the role of additional biceps augmentation in tendon healing. We hypothesized that the biceps augmentation technique would lead to a lower rotator cuff tendon retear rate and provide satisfactory functional outcomes. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. This study included 64 patients with anterior L-shaped rotator cuff tears who underwent arthroscopic repair. Patients were divided into 2 groups: group A (31 patients) underwent repair of an anterior L-shaped tear combined with biceps augmentation, and group B (33 patients) had a partially repaired tendon whose footprint was exposed after repair without undue tension on the retracted tendon. Clinical evaluations were performed using the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, Constant score, muscle strength, visual analog scale for pain, and patient satisfaction. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed for tendon integrity at 6 months postoperatively. The mean period of follow-up was 29.1 ± 3.5 months (range, 24-40 months). The mean ASES and Constant scores significantly improved from 52.8 ± 10.6 and 43.2 ± 9.9 preoperatively to 88.2 ± 6.9 and 86.8 ± 6.2 at final follow-up in group A ( P < .001) and from 53.0 ± 11.8 and 44.3 ± 11.3 preoperatively to 87.4 ± 7.2 and 87.9 ± 7.3 at final follow-up in group B ( P < .001). Overall muscle strength (given as % of the other side's strength) significantly increased from preoperatively to final follow-up in group A (forward flexion [FF]: 62.0 ± 8

  20. Single-Step Arthroscopic Repair With Cell-Free Polymer-Based Scaffold in Osteochondral Lesions of the Talus: Clinical and Radiological Results.

    PubMed

    Kanatlı, Ulunay; Eren, Ali; Eren, Toygun Kağan; Vural, Abdurrahman; Geylan, Dilan Ece; Öner, Ali Yusuf

    2017-09-01

    To report the clinical and radiological results of patients with talar osteochondral lesions who were treated by microfracture and cell-free scaffold implantation in a single-step arthroscopic surgery. Forty patients, treated with a single-step arthroscopic surgery, were evaluated in this single-center-based retrospective study. Patients with degenerative arthritis (n = 1), history of ankle fracture (n = 1), kissing lesions (n = 1), lower extremity deformity (n = 1), and lesions <1.5 cm 2 (n = 4) were excluded. Oversized (>10 mm depth) bone cysts were additionally treated with bone graft. Patients were evaluated clinically, using the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot score. Radiological assessment was performed with magnetic resonance imaging, using the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) score. Thirty-two patients with a mean age of 38 ± 12 years were evaluated. The mean defect size was 2.5 ± 0.8 cm 2 and the mean defect volume was 2.4 ± 1.9 cm 3 . The mean preoperative AOFAS score was 52.8 ± 13.9 and increased to 87.1 ± 11.1 postoperatively at the mean follow-up of 33.8 ± 14.0 months (P = .0001). A total of 84.4% of patients had good to excellent clinical scores. Clinical scores had no significant relation with age, lesion size, depth, or body mass index. The mean MOCART score was 64.2 ± 12.0. There was no significant correlation between the total MOCART and AOFAS scores (P = .123). A significant relation was found between the defect filling (the subgroup of the MOCART score) and the clinical outcomes (P = .0001, rho = 0.731). The arthroscopic scaffold implantation technique is a single-step, safe, and effective method for the treatment of talar osteochondral lesions with satisfactory clinical and radiological outcomes. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Critical reflection of the advanced rehabilitation of an elite rugby league player sustaining a posterior Bankart lesion.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Andrew; Funk, Lennard

    2013-02-01

    The following is a critical description and discussion of the successful assessment and rehabilitation of a right shoulder posterior Bankart repair in an elite rugby league player. The rehabilitation follows accelerated, goal based guidelines, widely adopted in current sports practice but not well documented in the literature (Funk & Snow, 2007; Park, Lin, Yokota, & McFarland, 2004). The study serves to be the first critical discussion of such a regime. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A novel arthroscopic all-inside suture technique using the Fast-Fix 360 system for repairing horizontal meniscal tears in young athletes

    PubMed Central

    Atsumi, Satoru; Hara, Kunio; Arai, Yuji; Yamada, Manabu; Mizoshiri, Naoki; Kamitani, Aguri; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Considering the risk of osteoarthritis following resection of a horizontally torn meniscus of the knee, repairing and preserving the meniscus as much as possible is preferred. We report 3 cases of restoration of horizontally torn menisci using a novel arthroscopic method we have called “all-inside interleaf vertical suture” that afforded preservation. Patient concerns: The 3 patients (aged 14, 17, and 21 years) had knee pain through sports activity. Diagnoses: All patients had horizontal tears in the posteromedial part of the meniscus. Interventions: The method uses Fast-Fix, whereby a first anchor is inserted from the tibial surface of the tear's superior leaflet and a second anchor is inserted from the femoral surface of the tear's inferior leaflet, and the 2 leaflets are closed using vertical suture. In all cases, the suture knots were embedded between the superior leaflet and inferior leaflet, avoiding contact with the articular cartilage, and superior leaflet and inferior leaflet crimping was good. Outcomes: All 3 were able to resume competing in sport and ≥ 1 year after surgery they had no pain and their postoperative mean Lysholm scores were 99.7. There were no complications or recurrence. On magnetic resonance imaging, the signal intensity of all the horizontal tears was high before surgery but low after surgery, suggesting that the repaired tear was healing. Lessons: The all-inside interleaf vertical suture procedure is a new surgical technique that can repair posteromedial horizontal meniscal tears of the knee of young people by easy crimping of the superior and inferior leaflets without the suture knots causing complications. PMID:29443758

  3. Effect of sodium hyaluronate/carboxymethyl cellulose (Guardix-sol) on retear rate and postoperative stiffness in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair patients: A prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jeung Yeol; Chung, Pill Ku; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2017-01-01

    Hyaluronate-based anti-adhesive agents are expected to enhance rotator cuff healing; however, their effect on the incidence and extent of postoperative complications such as stiffness and retears has not been investigated. From July 2012 to February 2013, 80 patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair surgery were prospectively enrolled. Forty patients were assigned to the control group, while the other 40 were assigned to the injection group and received a Guardix-sol injection immediately after surgery. Passive range of motion, pain visual analog scale, and functional score were assessed at 8 weeks, 6 months, and 24 months postoperatively. Gliding motion between the deltoid muscle and the greater tuberosity of the proximal humerus was evaluated using ultrasonography at 2 and 8 weeks postoperatively, and tendon integrity was evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging at 6 months postoperatively. We found no significant difference between the groups regarding gliding motion at 2 weeks postoperatively. However, at 8 weeks, the incidence of poor gliding motion was 2.5% and 15% for the injected patients and control group, respectively, which was statistically significant. At 6 months after surgery, the retear rate between the two groups was not statistically significant. We found no statistically significant difference between the two groups regarding retear rate and clinical score throughout the follow-up period. We noted no complications related to the use of Guardix-sol. Patients who received the Guardix-sol injection showed improved gliding motion between the deltoid muscle and the greater tuberosity in the early postoperative period.

  4. Full-thickness rotator cuff tears in patients younger than 55 years: clinical outcome of arthroscopic repair in comparison with older patients.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Tim; Razmjou, Helen; Holtby, Richard

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether younger patients had a similar response to repair of a full-thickness rotator cuff tear (RCT) as older patients. A secondary analysis was conducted of prospectively collected data of patients with full-thickness RCTs. Patients were categorized into patients <55 years of age and patients 55 and older. Patient-related outcome measures of disability at 2 years following surgery were the Short Western Ontario Rotator Cuff (Short WORC), American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeon's (ASES) assessment form, and absolute Constant-Murley score (ACMS). Review of the database between 2001 and 2011 identified 344 patients (median age 62, range 24-90). Of these, 83 (24 %) patients were younger than 55 years of age (median age 48, range 24-54) and 261 (76 %) were in the older age group (median age 66, range 55-90). The median follow-up was 24 months (range 23-25). Patients in the younger age group had a higher prevalence of traumatic events (p = 0.02), had sustained more work-related injuries (p < 0.0001), and had a higher ratio of smaller tears (p = 0.0001). No difference was seen between groups with respect to post-operative scores of Short WORC, ASES, or ACMS. Pre-operative scores, having a work-related claim, increased tear size, and concomitant procedures affected the 2-year outcome scores. This study shows that younger patients with full-thickness RCTs who undergo an arthroscopic repair do as well as older individuals regardless of the measure used to document their recovery. Retrospective outcome study, Level II.

  5. Biomechanical evaluation of a simulated Bankart lesion.

    PubMed

    Speer, K P; Deng, X; Borrero, S; Torzilli, P A; Altchek, D A; Warren, R F

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of sectioning of the anterior part of the inferior glenohumeral ligament (a simulated Bankart lesion) on load-induced multidirectional glenohumeral motion. Nine fresh, intact cadaveric shoulders were tested on a special apparatus that constrained three rotations but allowed simultaneous measurement of anterior-posterior, superior-inferior, and medial-lateral translation. Coupled anterior-posterior and superior-posterior translations were recorded while anterior, posterior, superior, and inferior forces of fifty newtons were applied sequentially. Testing was done in three positions of humeral elevation in the scapular plane, in three positions of humeral rotation, and with an externally applied joint-compression load of twenty-two newtons. A liquid-metal strain-gauge was placed on the posterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament to assess concomitant posterior capsular strain during the various test conditions. All shoulders were tested intact and again after the inferior glenohumeral ligament and the labrum had been detached from the glenoid from just superior to the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament to a point just posterior to the infraglenoid tubercle. The simulated Bankart lesion resulted in selected increases in anterior translation at all positions of elevation, in posterior translation at 90 degrees of elevation, and in inferior translation at all positions of elevation. However, these increases were very small; the maximum mean increase in translation seen over-all was only 3.4 millimeters, which occurred during inferior translation at 45 degrees of elevation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. An arthroscopic bone block procedure is effective in restoring stability, allowing return to sports in cases of glenohumeral instability with glenoid bone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Taverna, Ettore; Garavaglia, Guido; Perfetti, Carlo; Ufenast, Henri; Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Guarrella, Vincenzo

    2018-04-06

    A group of patients affected by bone loss in the context of recurrent anterior shoulder instability were treated arthroscopically with a modified Eden-Hybinette technique since 2005. The last modification was made in 2013, consisting of fixation using a pair of specifically designed double round Endobuttons, which secure the bone graft to the glenoid rim placed through a guide. This report describes patients operated on after this last modification. No reports have described the results of this technique, and the purpose of this study was to assess early clinical and radiological results of an arthroscopic bone block procedure with double round Endobutton fixation. We hypothesized that this technique would restore shoulder stability in patients with anteroinferior glenohumeral instability with glenoid bone deficit, with excellent clinical and radiological results. The clinical and radiological efficacy of this procedure was retrospectively evaluated in 26 patients with an average follow-up of 29.6 months (range 24-33 months). At minimum 2-year follow-up, we had no recurrent anterior dislocations, excellent clinical results [average Walch-Duplay score 93.2, (SD 7.8); average Rowe score, 96.4 (SD 6.5); average SSV, 87.4 (SD 12.1); satisfaction rate, 88.5%; average loss of external rotation, 4.4° (SD 8.7°)] optimal graft positioning, and a healing rate of 92.3% on computed tomography scan. Arthroscopic bone block grafting combined with a standard Bankart repair restored shoulder stability in patients with anteroinferior glenohumeral instability with glenoid bone deficit, with excellent clinical and radiological results. This procedure did not substantially limit external rotation, allowing a high rate of return to sports even among competitive, overhead, and "at risk" athletes.

  7. Costs, quality of life and cost-effectiveness of arthroscopic and open repair for rotator cuff tears: an economic evaluation alongside the UKUFF trial.

    PubMed

    Murphy, J; Gray, A; Cooper, C; Cooper, D; Ramsay, C; Carr, A

    2016-12-01

    A trial-based comparison of the use of resources, costs and quality of life outcomes of arthroscopic and open surgical management for rotator cuff tears in the United Kingdom NHS was performed using data from the United Kingdom Rotator Cuff Study (UKUFF) randomised controlled trial. Using data from 273 patients, healthcare-related use of resources, costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were estimated at 12 months and 24 months after surgery on an intention-to-treat basis with adjustment for covariates. Uncertainty about the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for arthroscopic versus open management at 24 months of follow-up was incorporated using bootstrapping. Multiple imputation methods were used to deal with missing data. There were no significant differences between the arthroscopic and open groups in terms of total mean use and cost of resources or QALYs at any time post-operatively. Open management dominated arthroscopic management in 59.8% of bootstrapped cost and effect differences. The probability that arthroscopic management was cost-effective compared with open management at a willingness-to-pay threshold of £20 000 per QALY gained was 20.9%. There was no significant overall difference in the use or cost of resources or quality of life between arthroscopic and open management in the trial. There was uncertainty about which strategy was most cost-effective. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:1648-55. ©2016 Gray et al.

  8. Acute Proximal Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears: Outcomes After Arthroscopic Suture Anchor Repair Versus Anatomic Single-Bundle Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Achtnich, Andrea; Herbst, Elmar; Forkel, Philipp; Metzlaff, Sebastian; Sprenker, Frederike; Imhoff, Andreas B; Petersen, Wolf

    2016-12-01

    To compare clinical and radiologic results of primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) suture anchor repair and microfracturing with anatomic ACL single-bundle reconstruction in patients with acute proximal ACL avulsion tears. Between January 2010 and December 2013, 420 patients underwent ACL treatment. Forty-one patients were included in this study. The inclusion criteria were as follows: unilateral acute proximal ACL rupture, concomitant meniscus lesions, no previous knee ligament surgery, and no additional ligament injuries or absence of ligament injury of the contralateral knee. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging confirming a proximal avulsion tear of the ACL was required. Patients had to undergo surgical treatment within 6 weeks after injury. Follow-up examination included Lachman and pivot-shift testing, KT-1000 measurement, and the International Knee Documentation Committee score. At a mean follow-up of 28 months (range, 24 to 31 month), 20 patients in each group were available. A mean KT-1000 arthrometer result of less than 3 mm indicated stability in all patients (P = .269). Three patients had a 1+ Lachman test (P = .072) and 4 patients had a 1+ pivot-shift test in the ACL repair group (P = .342). The International Knee Documentation Committee score results did not differ significantly (P > .99), but there was a significant correlation between poor results and failure rate (P = .001) in the refixation group. The failure rate was 15% in the ACL refixation group and 0% in the reconstruction group (P = .231). Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed homogeneous signal and proper ACL position in 100% of patients in the control group and 86% in the ACL repair group. Proximal refixation of the ACL using knotless suture anchors and microfracturing restores knee stability and results in comparable functional outcomes to a control group treated with single-bundle ACL reconstruction. The results suggest that refixation of the ACL is a feasible treatment

  9. The lasso-loop, lasso-mattress and simple-cinch stitch for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: are there biomechanical differences?

    PubMed

    Liodakis, Emmanouil; Dratzidis, Antonios; Kraemer, Manuel; Hurschler, Christof; Krettek, Christian; Hawi, Ahmed; Omar, Mohamed; Meller, Rupert; Hawi, Nael

    2016-11-01

    Various stitching techniques have been described to facilitate arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tears. The aim of the present study was to compare the biomechanical properties of the lasso-loop, lasso-mattress and simple-cinch stitch for rotator cuff repair. Twelve infraspinatus tendons were harvested from sheep and split in half. The tendons were randomized into three different stitch configuration groups for biomechanical testing: lasso-loop, lasso-mattress and simple-cinch stitch. Each specimen was first cyclically loaded on a universal materials testing machine under force control from 5 to 30 N at 0.25 Hz for twenty cycles. Then, each specimen was loaded to failure under displacement control at a rate of 1 mm/s. Cyclic elongation, peak-to-peak displacement and ultimate tensile load were reported as mean ± standard error and compared using one way analysis of variance. The type of failure was recorded. No differences in cyclic elongation (1.31 ± 0.09 mm for the simple-cinch vs. 1.49 ± 0.07 mm for the lasso-mattress vs. 1.61 ± 0.09 mm for the lasso-loop stitch, p = 0.063) or peak-to-peak displacement (0.58 ± 0.04 mm for the simple-cinch, 0.50 ± 0.03 mm for the lasso-mattress and 0.62 ± 0.06 mm for the lasso-loop stitch, p = 0.141) were seen between all tested stitch configurations. In the load-to-failure test, the simple cinch stitch (149.38 ± 11.89 N) and the lasso-mattress (149.38 ± 10.33 N) stitch demonstrated significantly higher ultimate load than the lasso-loop stitch (65.88 ± 4.75 N, p < 0.001). All stitch configurations failed with suture pull out. The lasso-mattress and the simple-cinch stitch showed similar biomechanical properties with significant higher tensile loads needed for failure than the lasso-loop stitch.

  10. High-grade bursal-side partial rotator cuff tears: comparison of mid- and long-term results following arthroscopic repair after conversion to a full-thickness tear.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Nuri; Karaismailoglu, Bedri

    2017-07-21

    Partial-thickness rotator cuff tears (PTRCTs) are one of the leading causes of shoulder dysfunction. Successful results have been reported with different treatment techniques, but the long-term consequences of these procedures are not yet clearly known. The purposes of this study were to evaluate and compare the mid- and long-term clinical outcomes of arthroscopically repaired bursal-side PTRCTs after conversion to full-thickness tears and identify the possible effects of age, gender, and hand dominance on clinical outcomes. Twenty-nine patients who had undergone arthroscopic repair of a significant bursal-side PTRCT were functionally evaluated. The repair was made after conversion to a full-thickness tear. The average patient age was 55.2 years (range 35-69 years, SD ±7.6 years). Clinical outcomes were evaluated at 2 and 5 years after surgery. Constant Shoulder Score (CSS) and Visual Analogue Scale for Pain (VAS pain) were used as outcome measures. The average CSS improved from 38.9 preoperatively to 89.2 and 87.8 at 2 and 5 years after surgery, respectively (p < 0.001). The average VAS pain score decreased from 7.90 preoperatively to 1.17 and 1.31 at 2 and 5 years after surgery, respectively (p < 0.001). A significant improvement was detected in patient functional outcomes and VAS pain scores at 2 and 5 years after surgery compared with the preoperative period. The patients who underwent surgery from their non-dominant extremity showed a significantly higher CSS increase relative to those who underwent surgery on the dominant extremity (p = 0.022). Arthroscopic repair of high-grade bursal-side PTRCTs after conversion to full-thickness tears is a reliable surgical technique with good functional outcomes and pain relief both at mid- and long-term follow-ups. Surgery on the non-dominant side may be related to better functional outcomes.

  11. Restoring the Labral Height for Treatment of Bankart Lesions: A Comparison of Suture Anchor Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Slabaugh, Mark A.; Friel, Nicole A.; Wang, Vincent M.; Cole, Brian J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate glenoid labral heights before injury and after repair with 2 suture anchors: (1) traditional suture anchor secured with knots and (2) knotless suture anchor. Methods Ten matched pairs of human cadaveric glenoids were examined. In each specimen the labrum was detached from the 3-o’clock position to the 6:30 clock position on the anteroinferior glenoid, and labral repair was performed with either (1) traditional Bio-SutureTak suture anchors (n = 10) (Arthrex, Naples, FL) or (2) knotless PushLock suture anchors (n = 10, contralateral side) (Arthrex). By use of a 3-dimensional digitizer, the labral height, measured from the deepest point of the glenoid articular surface to the highest tip of the labrum, was measured in all specimens before injury and after repair at the 3:30, 4:30, and 5:30 clock positions. The degree of labral height increase was computed as a percent increase in labral height from before injury to after repair. Results Labral height increased significantly for all specimens from before injury (5.35 mm) to after repair (8.05 mm) (159.1% ± 13.7%, P < .0001). Increases in labral height from before injury to after repair were similar (P > .05) for Bio-SutureTak suture anchors (164.6% ± 18.7%, P < .0001) and PushLock suture anchors (153.6% ± 5.8%, P < .0001). The amount of labral height increase did not vary by anatomic location (157.0% ± 50.2%, 168.9% ± 51.0%, and 150.4% ± 35.2% at 3:30, 4:30, and 5:30, respectively; P = .46). Conclusions An increase in labral height can be achieved to create a significant height increase from before injury to after labral repair. The difference in labral height afforded by a traditional suture anchor and a knotless anchor is not statistically significant. Clinical Relevance Both traditional and knotless suture anchor constructs provide a reliable restoration of labral height in an acute Bankart model. PMID:20434654

  12. [Arthroscopic treatment of rotator cuff calcifying tendinitis].

    PubMed

    Ozkoç, Gürkan; Akpinar, Sercan; Hersekli, Murat Ali; Ozalay, Metin; Tandoğan, Reha N

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of arthroscopic treatment in patients with rotator cuff calcifying tendinitis unresponsive to conservative treatment. Arthroscopic treatment was performed in 10 patients (6 females, 4 males; mean age 46 years; range 34 to 53 years) in whom pain and functional disability persisted for more than a year despite conservative therapy for rotator cuff calcifying tendinitis. Arthroscopic bursectomy was also carried out. One patient underwent repair for rotator cuff tear. The patients were evaluated before and after surgery with the use of Constant scores and direct radiographs. The mean follow-up period was 12 months (range 6 to 19 months). The mean Constant scores were 66 (range 45 to 70) and 93 (range 89 to 96) before surgery and on final examinations, respectively. Postoperative radiographs demonstrated incomplete removal of calcifications in four patients; however, complaints of pain disappeared in these patients and radiologic controls showed that residual deposits underwent spontaneous resorption. Arthroscopic removal of calcium deposits together with bursectomy seems to be effective and reliable in patients with chronic calcifying tendinitis unresponsive to conservative treatment.

  13. Sports ability after Bankart procedure in professional athletes.

    PubMed

    Pavlik, A; Csépai, D; Hidas, P; Bánóczy, A

    1996-01-01

    Recurrent anterior shoulder instability and the restoration of sports ability after surgery are common problems, especially among professional athletes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the rate, level and time of returning to sports activity activity after Bankart procedure in anterior shoulder instability in high level athletes. From 1992-1994 61 patients suffering from recurrent anterior shoulder instability were operated on open Bankart procedure, 44 out of 61 were professional athletes. There were 7 handball, 7 basketball, 6 football, 2 waterpolo and 1 baseball player and 4 wrestlers, 2 weight-lifters, 2 boxers, 3 bicyclists, 2 motorists, 2 swimmers, 2 sailors, 2 kayakers and 2 skiers. The mean duration of instability was 19.1 months (3-72) before operation. 29 patients had posttraumatic recurrent anterior dislocation and 15 patients had posttraumatic anterior subluxations. The average number of redislocations was 4.4, ranging from 2 to 11. At the follow-up examination the patients were tested clinically for instability using the special score created by Walch and Duplay and the Constant functional score. We measured the strength of the rotator cuff by Kintrex isokinetic device from the 10th postoperative week. 35 out of 44 professional athletes could be followed-up. The average follow-up period was 14.2 months, from 6 to 31. 88% of the patients were able to return to sports participation, 66% on the previous level and 22% on a lower level. 12% of the patients finished their professional sports career. The mean rehabilitation period was 5.8 months, the average period of full restoration of sports ability was 9.3 months. Similar results were documented with the Constant score and the Walch-Duplay test (88% excellent or good, 12% fair). The main reason for the inability to continue sports activity was some pain during extreme abduction and external rotation of the arm and recurrent sensations of subluxation (3 cases). Based on the results of the follow

  14. Compressive cryotherapy versus ice-a prospective, randomized study on postoperative pain in patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair or subacromial decompression.

    PubMed

    Kraeutler, Matthew J; Reynolds, Kirk A; Long, Cyndi; McCarty, Eric C

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of compressive cryotherapy (CC) vs. ice on postoperative pain in patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy for rotator cuff repair or subacromial decompression. A commercial device was used for postoperative CC. A standard ice wrap (IW) was used for postoperative cryotherapy alone. Patients scheduled for rotator cuff repair or subacromial decompression were consented and randomized to 1 of 2 groups; patients were randomized to use either CC or a standard IW for the first postoperative week. All patients were asked to complete a "diary" each day, which included visual analog scale scores based on average daily pain and worst daily pain as well as total pain medication usage. Pain medications were then converted to a morphine equivalent dosage. Forty-six patients completed the study and were available for analysis; 25 patients were randomized to CC and 21 patients were randomized to standard IW. No significant differences were found in average pain, worst pain, or morphine equivalent dosage on any day. There does not appear to be a significant benefit to use of CC over standard IW in patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy for rotator cuff repair or subacromial decompression. Further study is needed to determine if CC devices are a cost-effective option for postoperative pain management in this population of patients. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical and structural outcomes after arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears with and without platelet-rich product supplementation: a meta-analysis and meta-regression.

    PubMed

    Warth, Ryan J; Dornan, Grant J; James, Evan W; Horan, Marilee P; Millett, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic review, meta-analysis, and meta-regression of all Level I and Level II studies comparing the clinical or structural outcomes, or both, after rotator cuff repair with and without platelet-rich product (PRP) supplementation. A literature search of the PubMed and EMBASE databases was performed to identify all Level I or II studies comparing the clinical or structural outcomes, or both, after arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears with (PRP+ group) and without (PRP- group) PRP supplementation. Data included outcome scores (American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons [ASES], University of California Los Angeles [UCLA], Constant, Simple Shoulder Test [SST] and visual analog scale [VAS] scores) and retears diagnosed with imaging studies. Meta-analyses compared preoperative, postoperative, and gain in outcome scores and relative risk ratios for retears. Meta-regression compared the effect of PRP treatment on outcome scores and retear rates according to 6 covariates. Minimum effect sizes that were detectable with 80% power were also calculated for each study. Eleven studies were included in this review and a maximum of 8 studies were used for meta-analyses according to data availability. There were no statistically significant differences between the PRP+ and PRP- groups for overall outcome scores or retear rates (P > .05). Overall gain in the Constant score was decreased when liquid PRP was injected over the tendon surface compared with PRP application at the tendon-bone interface (-6.88 points v +0.78 points, respectively; P = .046); however, this difference did not reach the previously reported minimum clinically important difference (MCID) for Constant scores. When the initial tear size was greater than 3 cm in anterior-posterior length, the PRP+ group exhibited decreased retear rates after double-row repairs when compared with the PRP- group (25.9% v 57.1%, respectively; P = .046). Sensitivity power

  16. Biomechanical Comparison of the Latarjet Procedure with and without Capsular Repair.

    PubMed

    Kleiner, Matthew T; Payne, William B; McGarry, Michelle H; Tibone, James E; Lee, Thay Q

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if capsular repair used in conjunction with the Latarjet procedure results in significant alterations in glenohumeral rotational range of motion and translation. Glenohumeral rotational range of motion and translation were measured in eight cadaveric shoulders in 90° of abduction in both the scapular and coronal planes under the following four conditions: intact glenoid, 20% bony Bankart lesion, modified Latarjet without capsular repair, and modified Latarjet with capsular repair. Creation of a 20% bony Bankart lesion led to significant increases in anterior and inferior glenohumeral translation and rotational range of motion (p < 0.005). The Latarjet procedure restored anterior and inferior stability compared to the bony Bankart condition. It also led to significant increases in glenohumeral internal and external rotational range of motion relative to both the intact and bony Bankart conditions (p < 0.05). The capsular repair from the coracoacromial ligament stump to the native capsule did not significantly affect translations relative to the Latarjet condition; however it did cause a significant decrease in external rotation in both the scapular and coronal planes (p < 0.005). The Latarjet procedure is effective in restoring anteroinferior glenohumeral stability. The addition of a capsular repair does not result in significant added stability; however, it does appear to have the effect of restricting glenohumeral external rotational range of motion relative to the Latarjet procedure performed without capsular repair.

  17. Biomechanical Comparison of the Latarjet Procedure with and without Capsular Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kleiner, Matthew T.; Payne, William B.; McGarry, Michelle H.; Tibone, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine if capsular repair used in conjunction with the Latarjet procedure results in significant alterations in glenohumeral rotational range of motion and translation. Methods Glenohumeral rotational range of motion and translation were measured in eight cadaveric shoulders in 90° of abduction in both the scapular and coronal planes under the following four conditions: intact glenoid, 20% bony Bankart lesion, modified Latarjet without capsular repair, and modified Latarjet with capsular repair. Results Creation of a 20% bony Bankart lesion led to significant increases in anterior and inferior glenohumeral translation and rotational range of motion (p < 0.005). The Latarjet procedure restored anterior and inferior stability compared to the bony Bankart condition. It also led to significant increases in glenohumeral internal and external rotational range of motion relative to both the intact and bony Bankart conditions (p < 0.05). The capsular repair from the coracoacromial ligament stump to the native capsule did not significantly affect translations relative to the Latarjet condition; however it did cause a significant decrease in external rotation in both the scapular and coronal planes (p < 0.005). Conclusions The Latarjet procedure is effective in restoring anteroinferior glenohumeral stability. The addition of a capsular repair does not result in significant added stability; however, it does appear to have the effect of restricting glenohumeral external rotational range of motion relative to the Latarjet procedure performed without capsular repair. PMID:26929804

  18. Biomechanical comparison of open and arthroscopic Latarjet procedures.

    PubMed

    Schulze-Borges, Johanna; Agneskirchner, Jens D; Bobrowitsch, Evgenij; Patzer, Thilo; Struck, Melena; Smith, Tomas; Wellmann, Mathias

    2013-04-01

    To biomechanically compare the effectiveness of the standard open and arthroscopic techniques of the Latarjet procedure to address a critical anterior glenoid defect in combination with a capsular insufficiency. Translation testing of 12 human cadaveric shoulder specimens was performed in a robot-assisted setup under 3 different conditions: (1) intact/vented shoulder joint, (2) combined anterior glenoid bone and capsular defect, and (3) open and arthroscopic Latarjet procedures. Testing was performed for each condition in 2 test positions: 60° of glenohumeral abduction with neutral rotation (ABD position) and 60° of abduction and external rotation (ABER position). Each position was tested with a passive humerus load of 30 N in the anterior, inferior, and anteroinferior directions. Translational movement of the humeral head was evaluated with and without the application of a 10-N load to the conjoint tendon (CJT). In the ABD position, translations after the open Latarjet procedure significantly differed from the arthroscopic technique in the anterior and anteroinferior directions when testing was performed with loading of the CJTs (CJT loading). Without CJT loading, the open Latarjet technique showed significantly lower translations in the anterior, inferior (P = .004), and anteroinferior (P = .001) testing directions in the ABD position. In the ABER position, the arthroscopic procedure showed no significant difference compared with the standard open procedure. We found a superior stabilization effect of the open Latarjet technique in the ABD position. The difference is ascribed to the anterior capsular repair, which was performed within the open technique and omitted during the arthroscopic procedure. The reduction of translation in a pure abduction position of the arm is more effectively performed with a conventional open Latarjet technique that includes a capsular repair. In combined ABER position, there was no difference found between the open and

  19. Arthroscopic psoas tenotomy.

    PubMed

    Wettstein, Michael; Jung, Jochen; Dienst, Michael

    2006-08-01

    Tenotomy may be indicated for psoas tendinitis or painful snapping if conservative treatment remains unsuccessful. Because of significant complications with open techniques, endoscopic operations have been developed. We present a new arthroscopic technique to access and release the psoas tendon from the hip joint. This procedure can be performed in addition to other arthroscopic procedures of the hip joint or alone. To exclude additional hip disease, a diagnostic round of the joint should be completed. After hip arthroscopy of the central compartment has been performed, traction is released and the 30 degrees arthroscope is placed via the proximal anterolateral portal lying on the anterior femoral neck. The medial synovial fold can be identified. This fold lies slightly medially underneath the anteromedial capsule at the level of the psoas tendon. The arthroscope is turned toward the anterior capsule. Sometimes, the tendon shines through a thin articular capsule, or it may even be accessed directly via a hole connecting the hip joint and the iliopectineal bursa at the level of the anterior head-neck junction. If this cannot be done, an electrothermic probe is introduced via the anterior portal to make a 2-cm transverse capsular incision. The tendon is released with the back side of the electrothermic device turned to the iliacus muscle that lies anterior to the psoas tendon. A complete release is achieved when the tendon stumps can be seen gapping at a distance and the fibers of the iliacus muscle are visible. The first 9 patients who underwent surgery performed according to this technique developed no complications, and their hip flexion strength was restored to normal within 3 months.

  20. Do Bankart lesions heal better in shoulders immobilized in external rotation?

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose Immobilization in external rotation (ER) for shoulder dislocation has been reported to improve the coaptation of Bankart lesions to the glenoid. We compared the position of the labrum in patients treated with immobilization in ER or internal rotation (IR). A secondary aim was to evaluate the rate of Bankart lesions. Patients and methods 55 patients with primary anterior shoulder dislocation, aged between 16 and 40 years, were randomized to immobilization in ER or IR. Computer tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed shortly after the injury. After the immobilization, MRI arthrography was performed. We evaluated the rate of Bankart lesions and measured the separation and displacement of the labrum as well as the length of the detached part of the capsule on the glenoid neck. Results Immobilization in ER reduced the number of Bankart lesions (OR = 3.8, 95% CI: 1.1 –13; p = 0.04). Separation decreased to a larger extent in the ER group than in the IR group (mean difference 0.6 mm, 95% CI: 0.1 – 1.1, p = 0.03). Displacement of the labrum and the detached part of the capsule showed no significant differences between the groups. Interpretation Immobilization in ER results in improved coaptation of the labrum after primary traumatic shoulder dislocation. PMID:19916693

  1. Arthroscopic all-inside treatment of popliteomeniscal fascicles tears: surgical technique and results from the first 6 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Simonetta, R; Di Vico, G; Papalia, R; Vasta, S; Denaro, V

    2016-01-01

    Athletes whose knees are subjected to sudden changes of direction and high jumps such as martial arts athletes, dancers, wrestlers and football players are at higher risk of injuring popliteomeniscal fascicles. Painful squatting and mechanical symptoms such as locking sensation are common. Current available treatments includes open or arthroscopic in repair. Arthroscopic repair with all-inside device can relieve symptoms and restore knee function. Six patients from two surgical centers with isolated popliteomeniscal fascicles tears were treated with arthroscopic all-inside repair. The surgical technique is thoroughly described. All patients showed consistent symptoms and MRI findings, as well as meniscal hypermobility during arthroscopic probing. Moreover, four out of six showed a chondral lesion of the lateral femoral condyle. All of them had their lateral meniscus sutured with one or more sutures. Symptoms were relieved and all but one were able to return to play at the pre-injury level. No postoperative complications were encountered. The diagnosis of the disruption of popliteomeniscal fascicles is challenging and often seen in athletes that play sports which involve repetitive twisting. However, patients’ complaints are consistent. Arthroscopic repair with an all-inside device showed to be a reliable and easy technique for addressing the condition, although some issues still need to be investigated, such as how much constraint the repair should provide. Arthroscopic all-inside repair of popliteomeniscal tears prove to be safe and effective in the short-term follow-up, allowing for sport activity resumption.

  2. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF ELBOW STIFFNESS

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Luis Alfredo Gómez; Dal Molin, Fabio Farina; Visco, Adalberto; Fernandes, Luis Filipe Daneu; dos Santos, Murilo Cunha Rafael; Cardozo Filho, Nivaldo Souza; Gómez Cordero, Nicolas Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    To present the arthroscopic surgical technique and the evaluation of the results from this technique for treating elbow stiffness. Methods: Between April 2007 and January 2010, ten elbows of ten patients with elbow stiffness underwent arthroscopic treatment to release the range of motion. The minimum follow-up was 11 months, with an average of 27 months. All the patients were male and their average age was 32.8 years (ranging from 22 to 48 years). After the arthroscopic treatment, they were followed up weekly in the first month and every three months thereafter. The clinical evaluation was made using the criteria of the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). Results: All the patients were satisfied with the results from the arthroscopic treatment. The average UCLA score was 33.8 points. Conclusion: Arthroscopic treatment for elbow stiffness is a minimally invasive surgical technique that was shown to be efficient for treating this complication. PMID:27027027

  3. Arthroscopic meniscal allograft transplantation without bone plugs.

    PubMed

    Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Seijas Vázquez, Roberto; García Balletbó, Montserrat; Álvarez Díaz, Pedro; Steinbacher, Gilbert; Cuscó Segarra, Xavier; Rius Vilarrubia, Marta; Cugat Bertomeu, Ramón

    2011-02-01

    Partial or total meniscectomy are common procedures performed at Orthopedic Surgery departments. Despite providing a great relief of pain, it has been related to early onset knee osteoarthritis. Meniscal allograft transplantation has been proposed as an alternative to meniscectomy. The purposes of this study were to describe an arthroscopic meniscal allograft transplantation without bone plugs technique and to report the preliminary results. All meniscal allograft transplantations performed between 2001 and 2006 were approached for eligibility, and a total of 35 patients (involving 37 menisci) were finally engaged in the study. Patients were excluded if they had ipsilateral knee ligament reconstruction or cartilage repair surgery before meniscal transplantation or other knee surgeries after the meniscal transplantation. Scores on Lysholm, Subjective IKDC Form, and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scale for pain were obtained at a mean follow-up of 38.6 months and compared to pre-operative data. Data on chondral lesions were obtained during the arthroscopic procedure and through imaging (radiographs and MRI) studies pre-operatively. Two graft failures out of 59 transplants (3.4%) were found. Daily life accidents were responsible for all graft failures. Significant improvements for Lysholm, Subjective IKDC Form, and VAS for pain scores following the meniscal allograft transplantation were found (P < 0.0001). Controlling for chondral lesion, there was no significant interactions for Lysholm (n.s.), Subjective IKDC Form (n.s.), and VAS for pain scores (n.s.). This study demonstrated that an arthroscopic meniscal allograft transplantation without bone plugs improved knee function and symptoms after a total meniscectomy. Improvements were observed independently of the degree of chondral lesion.

  4. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF ACROMIOCLAVICULAR JOINT DISLOCATION BY TIGHT ROPE TECHNIQUE (ARTHREX®)

    PubMed Central

    GÓmez Vieira, Luis Alfredo; Visco, Adalberto; Daneu Fernandes, Luis Filipe; GÓmez Cordero, Nicolas Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Presenting the arthroscopic treatment by Tight Rope - Arthrex® system for acute acromioclavicular dislocation and to evaluate results obtained with this procedure. Methods: Between August 2006 and May 2007, 10 shoulders of 10 patients with acute acromioclavicular dislocation were submitted to arthroscopic repair using the Tight Rope - Arthrex® system. Minimum follow-up was 12 months, with a mean of 15 months. Age ranged from 26 to 42, mean 34 years. All patients were male. Radiology evaluation was made by trauma series x-ray. The patients were assisted in the first month weekly and after three months after the procedure. Clinical evaluation was based on the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) criteria. Results: All patients were satisfied after the arthroscopic procedure and the mean UCLA score was 32,5. Conclusion: The arthroscopic treatment by Tight Rope – Arthrex® system for acute acromioclavicular dislocation showed to be an efficient technique. PMID:26998453

  5. 2009 survey results: surgeon practice patterns regarding arthroscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Redfern, John; Burks, Robert

    2009-12-01

    A survey was conducted to collect information on the surgical management and practice preferences of the audience members at a recent continuing medical education conference. Participants were polled on a variety of surgical topics, and their responses were recorded using a wireless audience response system. The answers were tabulated and are presented in this report. The majority of respondents preferred an arthroscopic repair for rotator cuff tears (52%) and shoulder instability (71%). Most (50%) perform single-row repair; 33% perform double-row repair. For simple knee arthroscopy, most use preoperative antibiotics (85%), no tourniquet (53%), and no chemical anticoagulation or only compression boots (69%). For cruciate ligament reconstruction, the majority preferred only a preoperative antibiotic (67%), no chemical anticoagulation or only compression boots (56%), and single-bundle reconstruction (88%) using a transtibial femoral tunnel (78%). Most (47%) prefer an all inside suture-based meniscus repair device.

  6. Meniscal Repair

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Kyoung Ho

    2014-01-01

    The meniscus has several important roles, such as transmission of the load, absorption of the shock in the knee joint, acting as a secondary anteroposterior stabilizer of the knee joint, and contributing to proprioception of the knee joint. Degenerative changes of the knee joint develop in the long-term follow-up even after partial meniscectomy. Thus, there has been growing interest in meniscal repair. In addition, with increased understanding of the important roles of the meniscal root and advancement of diagnostic methods, efforts have been made to ensure preservation of the meniscal roots. In this review article, we will discuss operative techniques and clinical outcomes of arthroscopic repair of the meniscus and the meniscal root and postoperative rehabilitation and complications as well. PMID:24944971

  7. Arthroscopic biceps tenodesis using suture anchors through the subclavian portal.

    PubMed

    Nord, Keith D; Smith, Garrison B; Mauck, Benjamin M

    2005-02-01

    Biceps tenodesis is typically performed through an open anterior incision. Even when an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is performed, an open procedure is typically performed to address the biceps rupture or subluxation. Recently, there has been great interest in performing this procedure arthroscopically. Techniques have included using an interference screw or 2 suture anchors through an anterior cannula. If the biceps is partially ruptured or subluxated and the proximal end is still visible in the joint, a biceps tenodesis can be performed using standard arthroscopic techniques and suture anchors. The senior author (K.D.N.) developed the subclavian portal in 1997 for arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tears using a pointed suture grasper. This portal is located 1 to 2 cm medial to the acromioclavicular joint line, directly above and slightly medial to the coracoid. It provides an optimal angle for suture anchor placement directly through the anterior supraspinatus or coracohumeral ligament and into the humeral head at the edge of the articular cartilage. Anchors inserted through the subclavian portal reproduce the 45 degrees Deadman's angle, which was described for placing anchors during rotator cuff repair. Using a burr or shaver through the lateral portal, the articular and bony surface under the biceps tendon and just proximal to the bicipital groove are abraded. Suture anchors are inserted through the subclavian portal, then through the biceps tendon, and into the bone. Sutures are retrieved and tied through the lateral cannula if there is a tear of the supraspinatus. If the supraspinatus is intact, the sutures can be tied intra-articularly through the anterior cannula. Release of the biceps is not performed until the repair is accomplished, which prevents the tendon from retracting down the bicipital groove. The anatomy of the subclavian portal is reviewed and the technique of the arthroscopic biceps tenodesis is presented. Preliminary results of 11 cases

  8. 21 CFR 888.1100 - Arthroscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Arthroscope. 888.1100 Section 888.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 888.1100 Arthroscope. (a) Identification. An arthroscope is an...

  9. 21 CFR 888.1100 - Arthroscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Arthroscope. 888.1100 Section 888.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 888.1100 Arthroscope. (a) Identification. An arthroscope is an...

  10. 21 CFR 888.1100 - Arthroscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Arthroscope. 888.1100 Section 888.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 888.1100 Arthroscope. (a) Identification. An arthroscope is an...

  11. 21 CFR 888.1100 - Arthroscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Arthroscope. 888.1100 Section 888.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 888.1100 Arthroscope. (a) Identification. An arthroscope is an...

  12. 21 CFR 888.1100 - Arthroscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arthroscope. 888.1100 Section 888.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 888.1100 Arthroscope. (a) Identification. An arthroscope is an...

  13. [Arthroscopic treatment of psoas impingement].

    PubMed

    Möckel, G; Miehlke, W

    2018-03-14

    Tenotomy of the psoas tendon in symptomatic internal coxa saltans or psoas impingement should relieve pain. Indicated in conservative treatment-resistant internal coxa saltans and in psoas impingement. Contraindications are symptomatic psoas pathologies in hip dysplasia patients. Three different procedures exist with the arthroscopic technique, in which the psoas tenotomy can be performed at one of three different levels. These are the arthroscopic transcapsular, the endoscopic extra-articular, and the arthroscopic central techniques. Forearm crutches are recommended for approximately 2-4 weeks as well as physiotherapy to strengthen the hip flexors. A literature-based comparison could reveal no difference between the extra-articular and transcapsular techniques. Particularly in the long term was no loss of strength evident. Various different authors describe the techniques as good, finding neither complications nor recurrence of internal snapping hip.

  14. Arthroscopic treatment of infrapatellar tendonitis.

    PubMed

    Romeo, A A; Larson, R V

    1999-04-01

    Infrapatellar tendonitis is a chronic overload lesion in the patellar ligament at the attachment to the lower pole of the patella. This lesion is found primarily in athletes who participate in jumping sports. Magnetic resonance imaging or ultrasound can show the extent of tendon pathology. Patellar tendonitis is treated with modification of activities, medications, and therapy. When conservative measures fail, operative debridement has been recommended. Previous reports have described a technique of open debridement of the patellar tendon, followed by an extended period of rehabilitation before returning to sports. Two athletes with persistent infrapatellar tendonitis were treated with an arthroscopic debridement. Both athletes returned to full activities without restrictions within 8 weeks of surgery. Arthroscopic treatment of infrapatellar tendonitis has not been previously described. This technical note describes the technique and two case reports of the arthroscopic treatment of infrapatellar tendonitis.

  15. Does arthroscopic knee surgery work?

    PubMed

    Krych, Aaron J; Carey, James L; Marx, Robert G; Dahm, Diane L; Sennett, Brian J; Stuart, Michael J; Levy, Bruce A

    2014-05-01

    A recent randomized trial from the Finnish Degenerative Meniscal Lesion Study Group was published in the New England Journal of Medicine and attempted to determine the efficacy of partial meniscectomy without osteoarthritis. Patients were randomized to either arthroscopic partial meniscectomy or sham surgery. The authors concluded that the clinical outcomes after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy were no better than those after the sham surgical procedure. However, there are several important limitations of this trial that make it difficult to generalize to the 700,000 arthroscopic partial meniscectomies performed in the United States each year. In this small sample of 146 patients, patients with traumatic meniscal tears and locking symptoms-those most likely to benefit from a partial meniscectomy-were excluded. In addition, although patients with radiographic arthritis were excluded, most of the patients in the study had degenerative changes at the time of arthroscopy. Therefore it is difficult to determine whether the patients were symptomatic from their chondral degeneration or their degenerative meniscal tear. In our opinion this study does not change the role of surgery in current clinical practice. The primary indication for arthroscopic partial meniscectomy remains symptoms of well-localized joint line pain with acute onset and mechanical symptoms such as catching or locking that have failed comprehensive nonoperative management. Copyright © 2014 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Arthroscopic excision of heterotopic calcification in a chronic rectus femoris origin injury: a case report

    PubMed Central

    El-Husseiny, M; Sukeik, M; Haddad, FS

    2012-01-01

    Rectus femoris origin injuries in adult athletes are uncommon. In the acute phase, conservative treatment seems to have a favourable outcome, with surgical repair reserved for unsuccessful cases only. However, a group of patients may develop chronic pain and disability after recovery from the acute phase due to heterotopic calcification occurring at the site of injury. Open and arthroscopic excision of such calcifications has been described in the literature although arthroscopic excision of large calcified lesions in the rectus femoris has not been reported previously. A relevant case is presented and discussed. PMID:22507710

  17. The POLPSA lesion: MR imaging findings with arthroscopic correlation in patients with posterior instability.

    PubMed

    Yu, Joseph S; Ashman, Carol J; Jones, Grant

    2002-07-01

    To evaluate the features of the posterior labrocapsular periosteal sleeve avulsion (POLPSA) lesion on MR imaging in athletes with posterior shoulder instability. Six male athletes (age range 19-43 years) with avulsion of the posterior glenoid periosteum were identified on MR imaging. There were four football players, one wrestler, and one competitive weightlifter. The weightlifter had a bilateral condition so that seven shoulders were evaluated. MR imaging was performed with a 1.5 T magnet utilizing conventional and fat-saturated fast spin-echo coronal oblique and sagittal oblique sequences and a 3D-GRE transaxial sequence. Surgical correlation was available in all shoulders. All patients presented with pain and a joint effusion. The size of the periosteal sleeve and redundant joint recess was variable. Fibrous proliferation was noted arthroscopically in four shoulders beneath the sleeve. Although the posterior labrum was detached in all studies, only one labrum had a tear while two showed marked degeneration. The POLPSA lesion is an abnormality that can be associated with posterior instability. It differs from a reverse Bankart lesion because the periosteum, although detached, remains intact with the posterior capsule and detached posterior labrum. This lesion may represent an acute form of a Bennett lesion.

  18. [Arthroscopic release for shoulder stiffness].

    PubMed

    Berndt, T; Elki, S; Sedlinsch, A; Lerch, S

    2015-04-01

    Arthroscopic capsular release for refractory shoulder stiffness to recreate active and passive shoulder joint mobility. Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder (primary and secondary frozen shoulder) after receiving at least 3 months of conservative treatment. Boney-related stiffening of the shoulder joint, joint infection, freezing phase of the primary frozen shoulder and shoulder stiffness after reconstructive surgery. Opening of the lower shoulder joint capsule over a gentle unidirectional manipulation under general anesthesia. A diagnostic arthroscopy in lateral position with extension of the arm is then performed. The release is completed with incision of the ventral and the dorsal part of the capsule under arthroscopic control. While still in the operation room, the anesthetist places an interscalene brachial plexus catheter, thus, delivering the best possible analgesia. This enables full range of active and passive movement of the shoulder joint for at least 3 days. Outpatient continuation of physiotherapy with anti-inflammatory and analgesic medication. The literature shows good functional results with age- and gender-related Constant scores greater than 75 %. Our retrospective inquiry of 37 cases with a mean follow-up of 40 months confirms this outcome. The disease duration was shortened by arthroscopic release. Ability to work was achieved after a mean of 1.9 months; treatment ended 3.6 months after operation. In 10 cases with secondary shoulder stiffness, residual symptoms remained.

  19. Performance of arthroscopic irrigation systems assessed with automatic blood detection.

    PubMed

    Tuijthof, G J M; de Vaal, M M; Sierevelt, I N; Blankevoort, L; van der List, M P J

    2011-11-01

    During arthroscopies, bleeding episodes occur as a result of tissue damage. Irrigation systems assist in minimizing these disturbances. The performance of three arthroscopic irrigation systems in clearing bleeding episodes was evaluated objectively. One surgeon performed 99 shoulder arthroscopies using three irrigation systems: gravity infusion, single roller, and double roller pump. The three irrigation systems groups were matched postoperatively for type of surgery-acromioplasty, SLAP, release, rotator cuff repair and capsule repair, and operation duration. The recorded arthroscopies were analyzed for the presence of bleeding episodes with a special computer program that automatically detects the tinctures of red-colored blood. A least 20% of an arthroscopic image had to be covered with blood to qualify as bleeding episode. The median (min-max) presence of bleeding episodes as a percentage of the operation time was 6.6% (0.0-43.6%) for gravity infusion, 3.7% (0.2-46.4%) for the single roller, and 3.3% (0.0-19.3%) for the double roller pump, respectively. The large variation could be attributed to the occurrence of arterial bleeding episodes during some procedures. No significant differences were found between the irrigation systems. For a subgroup including acromioplasties and releases, significant differences were found in favor of both roller pumps (P < 0.05). Overall, the roller pumps did not outperform gravity infusion. However, from the results, high-risk procedures for bleeding episodes were identified (acromioplasty and release of a frozen shoulder) that can benefit from the use of roller pumps. A clear view is essential to perform an arthroscopic procedure safely and efficiently.

  20. Arthroscopic laser in intra-articular knee cartilage disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosir, Hany R.; Siebert, Werner E.

    1996-12-01

    Different assemblies have endeavored to develop arthroscopic laser surgery. Various lasers have been tried in the treatment of orthopaedic problems, and the most useful has turned out to be the Hol-YAG laser 2.1 nm which is a near- contact laser. By using the laser as a powerful tool, and cutting back on the power level, one is able to better achieve the desired treatment effect. Clinical studies to evaluating the role of the laser in different arthroscopic knee procedures, comparing to conventional techniques, showed that the overall outcome attains a momentous confidence level which is shifted to the side of the laser versus the conventional for all maneuvers, barring meniscectomy where there is not perceiving disparity between laser versus the conventional. Meniscectomy continues to be one of the most commonly performed orthopaedic procedures. Laser provides a single tool which can ablate and debride meniscal rims with efficiency and safety. Chondroplasty can also be accomplished with ease using defocused laser energy. Both lateral release and soft tissue cermilization benefit from the cutting effect of laser along with its hemostatic effect. Synovial reduction with a defocused laser is also easily accomplished. By one gadget, one can cut, ablate, smooth, coagulate, congeal and with authentic tissue depth control The future of laser arthroscopic surgery lies in its ability to weld or repair tissues. Our research study has shown that laser activated photoactive dyes can produce a molecular bonding of collagen fibers, and therefore a repair 'weld' can be achieved with both meniscal tissues and with articular cartilage lesions.

  1. Arthroscopically assisted percutaneous osteosynthesis of lateral tibial plateau fractures.

    PubMed

    Kayali, Cemil; Oztürk, Hasan; Altay, Taskin; Reisoglu, Ali; Agus, Haluk

    2008-10-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the results of lateral tibial plateau fractures treated with arthroscopically assisted percutaneous osteosynthesis (AAPO). Twenty-one patients (14 men and 7 women) with a mean age of 41 years underwent AAPO to repair low-energy Schatzker I-III tibial plateau fractures. Under pneumatic tourniquet, we reduced and fixed the fracture with 1 or 2 subchondral cannulated screws. Accompanying lesions included 10 meniscus tears, which we partially excised in 9 patients and repaired in 1 patient. On the second postoperative day, patients began range-of-motion exercises. We encouraged partial and full weight-bearing by the sixth and tenth weeks, respectively. The mean follow-up period was 38 (range 12-96) months, and we evaluated the patients using Rasmussen's clinical and radiologic criteria. We used a t test for statistical analysis. There were 13 excellent (62%), 6 good (28%) and 2 fair (10%) clinical results, and 11 excellent (52%), 7 good (33%) and 3 fair (14%) radiologic results. We observed mild or moderate arthritic changes in 5 patients (24%). There were no infection or wound problems, but we removed hardware in 4 patients. Arthroscopically assisted treatment of lateral tibial plateau fractures yields satisfactory results and can be accepted as an alternative and effective method for the treatment of low-energy tibial plateau fractures.

  2. Return to Play Following Shoulder Stabilization: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ialenti, Marc N.; Mulvihill, Jeffrey D.; Feinstein, Max; Zhang, Alan L.; Feeley, Brian T.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Anterior shoulder instability can be a disabling condition for the young athlete; however, the best surgical treatment remains controversial. Traditionally, anterior shoulder instability was treated with open stabilization. More recently, arthroscopic repair of the Bankart injury with suture anchor fixation has become an accepted technique. Hypothesis: No systematic reviews have compared the rate of return to play following arthroscopic Bankart repair with suture anchor fixation with the Bristow-Latarjet procedure and open stabilization. We hypothesized that the rate of return to play will be similar regardless of surgical technique. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis focused on return to play following shoulder stabilization. Inclusion criteria included studies in English that reported on rate of return to play and clinical outcomes following primary arthroscopic Bankart repair with suture anchors, the Latarjet procedure, or open stabilization. Statistical analyses included Student t tests and analyses of variance. Results: Sixteen papers reporting on 1036 patients were included. A total of 545 patients underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair with suture anchors, 353 with the Latarjet procedure, and 138 with open repair. No significant difference was found in patient demographic data among the studies. Patients returned to sport at the same level of play (preinjury level) more consistently following arthroscopic Bankart repair (71%) or the Latarjet procedure (73%) than open stabilization (66%) (P < .05). Return to play at any level and postoperative Rowe scores were not significantly different among studies. Recurrent dislocation was significantly less following the Latarjet procedure (3.5%) than after arthroscopic Bankart repair (6.6%) or open stabilization (6.7%) (P < .05). Conclusion: This systematic review demonstrates a greater rate of return to play at the preinjury

  3. Clinical results of arthroscopic polyglycolic acid sheet patch graft for irreparable rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Yu; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2015-01-01

    The high retear rates after surgery for irreparable rotator cuff tears can be explained by the healing capacity potential of tendons and the native rotator cuff enthesis characterised by complex morphological structures, called direct insertion. Many experimental researches have focused on biologically augmenting the rotator cuff reconstruction and improving tendon-bone healing of the rotator cuff. The results of the experimental study showed that the polyglycolic acid sheet scaffold material allows for the regeneration of not only tendon-to-tendon, but also tendon-to-bone interface in an animal model. We performed a clinical study of the arthroscopic polyglycolic acid sheet patch graft used for the repair of irreparable rotator cuff tears. One-year clinical results of the repair of irreparable rotator cuff tears by arthroscopic patch graft with a polyglycolic acid sheet demonstrated improved shoulder function and a significantly lower retear rate, compared with patients treated with a fascia lata patch.

  4. Rotator cuff tears in luxatio erecta: an arthroscopic perspective of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Vivek; Madi, Sandesh; Tapashetti, Sandeep; Acharya, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Luxatio erecta accounts for only 0.5% of all shoulder dislocations. More than 150 cases have been described in the literature, focusing mainly on the method of reduction and/or associated complications. Some of the well-described complications include injuries to the humeral head, glenoid, clavicle, rotator cuff, capsules and ligaments, brachial plexus and axillary artery/vein. Among these, rotator cuff injuries are reported to occur in about 80% of cases. However, in the majority of instances, cuff injuries have been managed conservatively and have been reported to apparently provide optimal functional outcomes. We report our experience with two cases of luxatio erecta associated with massive rotator cuff injuries, which were evaluated and further managed by arthroscopic repair. The emphasis in these cases is to define cuff injuries and proceed based on patients’ age, demands and characteristics of the cuff tears. Arthroscopic evaluation and cuff repairs should be contemplated in these patients, to improve shoulder functions. PMID:26561229

  5. Effect of glenohumeral position on contact pressure between the capsulolabral complex and the glenoid in free ALPSA and Bankart lesions.

    PubMed

    Kim, DooSup; Chung, HoeJeong; Yi, Chang-Ho; Yoon, Yeo-Seung; Son, Jongsang; Kim, Youngho; On, Myoung-Gi; Yang, JaeHyung

    2016-02-01

    Anterior shoulder dislocation is a common injury, but the optimal management of dislocation remains controversial. We hypothesized that reducing the shoulder in externally rotated position would aid the reduction in capsulolabral lesions. Thus, in this study, contact pressure between the capsulolabral lesion and the glenoid in free ALPSA and Bankart lesions was measured using a cadaver model. In 10 specimens, the humerus was externally rotated by abduction on the coronal plane to measure the contact pressure between the capsulolabral complex and glenoid in free ALPSA and Bankart lesions using a Tekscan pressure system. Stability of the joint was confirmed using the Vicon motion analysis system. In the normal shoulder joint, the peak pressure between the subscapularis muscle and the anterior capsule according to the location of the glenohumeral joint decreased to 83.4 ± 21.2 kPa in the 0° abduction and -30° external rotation positions and showed a 300.7 ± 42.9 kPa peak value in the 60° abduction and 60° external rotation positions. In both free ALPSA and Bankart lesions, the lowest pressure between the labral lesion and the glenoid was measured at 0° abduction and -30° external rotation, and the highest pressure was recorded at 60° external rotation and 60° abduction. The contact pressure between the capsulolabral complex and the glenoid significantly increased when the abduction and external rotation angles were increased. Based on our results, the conservative management in free ALPSA lesions would respond better than Bankart lesions. YWMR-12-0-038.

  6. Arthroscopic biceps tenodesis: a new technique using bioabsorbable interference screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Boileau, Pascal; Krishnan, Sumant G; Coste, Jean-Sebastien; Walch, Gilles

    2002-01-01

    To report a new technique of arthroscopic biceps tenodesis using bioabsorbable interference screw fixation and the early results. Prospective, nonrandomized study. The principle of arthroscopic biceps tenodesis is simple: after biceps tenotomy, the tendon is exteriorized and doubled on a suture; the biceps tendon is then pulled into a humeral socket (7 or 8 mm x 25 mm) drilled at the top of the bicipital groove, and fixed using a bioabsorbable interference screw (8 or 9 mm x 25 mm) under arthroscopic control. 43 patients treated with this technique between 1997 and 1999 were followed-up for at least 1 year. The technique was indicated in 3 clinical situations: (1) with arthroscopic cuff repair (3 cases), (2) in case of isolated pathology of the biceps tendon with an intact cuff (6 cases), and (3) as an alternative to biceps tenotomy in patients with massive, degenerative and irreparable cuff tears (34 cases). The biceps pathology was tenosynovitis (4 cases), prerupture (15 cases), subluxation (11 cases), and luxation (13 cases). The absolute Constant score improved from 43 points preoperatively to 79 points at review (P <.005). There was no loss of elbow movement and biceps strength was 90% of the strength of the other side. Two patients, operated on early in the series, presented with a rupture of the tenodesis. In both cases the bicipital tendon was very friable and the diameter of the screw proved to be insufficient (7 mm). No neurologic or vascular complications occurred. Arthroscopic biceps tenodesis using bioabsorbable screw fixation is technically possible and gives good clinical results. This technique can be used in cases of isolated pathologic biceps tendon or a cuff tear. A very thin, fragile, almost ruptured biceps tendon is the technical limit of this arthroscopic technique.

  7. Behavior of arthroscopic irrigation systems.

    PubMed

    Tuijthof, G J M; Dusée, L; Herder, J L; van Dijk, C N; Pistecky, P V

    2005-04-01

    In the literature, no consensus exists about optimal irrigation of joints during arthroscopic operations. The goal of this paper is to study the behavior of irrigation systems resulting in the proposal of guidelines for optimal irrigation. To this end, optimal irrigation is defined as the steady state of irrigation of a joint in which a sufficient positive intra-articular pressure and a sufficient flow are maintained. A model of the complete irrigation system was created to schematically elucidate the behavior of pump systems. Additionally, clinical experiments were performed during arthroscopic knee operations in which the pressure at different locations and the irrigation flow were measured. The combination of model prediction and clinical results could well be used to derive guidelines, since the clinical results, which showed considerable variation, were used to verify the model, and the model could be used to explain the typical trends. The main findings are twofold the set pressure is always higher than the intra-articular pressure, and the scope-sheath combination has a significant influence on irrigation control, because of its large restriction. Based on the results, we advice to increase the set pressure during active suction, and to include the sheath-scope combination in the control loop.

  8. Arthroscopic treatment of pigmented villonodular synovitis involving bilateral shoulders.

    PubMed

    Koh, Kyoung Hwan; Lim, Kyung Sub; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2010-06-09

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a lesion of benign proliferative synovium that invades joint, tendon sheath, and bursa. It mainly occurs in 1 joint, the knee joint or hand, and multi-joint invasion is reported to be <1%. Rare cases have been reported of PVNS occurring in the shoulder joint. Generally, total synovectomy is a standard treatment of PVNS. However, complete synovectomy is sometimes impossible because of difficulty of visualization and access to the whole joint and subacromial space. Therefore, recurrence of the disease is always of concern. This article presents a case of 64-year-old patient with pain and swelling of bilateral shoulder joints of 4 months' duration. Physical examination showed atrophy of the deltoid and infraspinatus and a mass-like protrusion on the anterior portion of left shoulder. Active forward elevation was limited to 30 degrees on the right and 90 degrees on the left. Overall synovial hyperplasia and nodular mass was observed on magnetic resonance imaging. Massive rotator cuff tear and invasion of the lesion toward the subacromial space and deltoid muscle was noted as well. Arthroscopic examination revealed a typical finding of PVNS: yellowish brown pigmentation over the overall joint capsule and subacromial space. Arthroscopic total synovectomy without rotator cuff repair was performed for both shoulders. Clinical outcomes showed good pain relief and no recurrence of the disease, although range of motion and muscle strength was not significantly improved, possibly due to accompanied massive rotator cuff tear. Arthroscopic total synovectomy in the treatment of PVNS of the shoulder joint is a minimally invasive and effective method, which makes it possible to access the whole joint space and subacromial space. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Arthroscopic Stabilization of Posterior Shoulder Instability Is Successful in American Football Players.

    PubMed

    Arner, Justin W; McClincy, Michael P; Bradley, James P

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate subjective and objective clinical outcomes of arthroscopic posterior capsulolabral repair for the treatment of symptomatic unidirectional posterior shoulder instability in American football players. Fifty-six consecutive American football players with unidirectional posterior shoulder instability underwent an arthroscopic posterior capsulolabral repair with or without suture anchors. Patients were evaluated, with return to play as the primary outcome measure supplemented with the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scoring system. Stability, range of motion, strength, pain, and function were also assessed with subjective scales. At a mean follow-up of 44.7 months postoperatively, 93% returned to sport and 79% returned to sport at the same level. Significant improvements (P < .01) were seen between preoperative and postoperative evaluations in ASES score and subjective scores of stability, range of motion, strength, pain, and function. Excellent or good results (ASES score > 60; stability < 6) were achieved in 96.5% of athletes, and 96% were satisfied with their operations. Arthroscopic capsulolabral repair for unidirectional posterior shoulder instability is effective in American football players because it improves stability, pain, and joint function, which optimizes the likelihood of successful return to play. Case series; Level of evidence, IV. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Synovial cyst formation resulting from nonabsorbable meniscal repair devices for meniscal repair.

    PubMed

    Nakamae, Atsuo; Deie, Masataka; Yasumoto, Masanori; Kobayashi, Kenji; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2004-07-01

    Several arthroscopic meniscal repair techniques and devices have been developed during the past decade. The Mitek Meniscal Repair System (Mitek, Ethicon, Norderstedt, Germany) is one of these devices. We report a case of synovial cyst formation after medial meniscus repair with a nonabsorbable Mitek Meniscal Repair System. The cyst in the right knee developed 5 months after the meniscus repair. After excision of the synovial cysts and removal of these devices, the mass and pain of the knee were relieved. To our knowledge, this is the first report of synovial cyst formation resulting from this device.

  11. Arthroscopic Synovectomy of Wrist in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jae Woo; Park, Min Jong

    2017-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disorder affecting multiple joints. Wrist involvement is common. Patients with persistent symptoms despite medical management are candidates for surgery. Synovectomy can provide pain relief and functional improvement for rheumatoid wrist. Arthroscopic synovectomy is a safe and reliable method, with minimal postoperative morbidity. This article reviews the role, technique, and results of arthroscopic synovectomy in the rheumatoid wrist. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Arthroscopically assisted acromioclavicular joint reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Baumgarten, Keith M; Altchek, David W; Cordasco, Frank A

    2006-02-01

    Arthroscopically assisted acromioclavicular joint reconstruction avoids the large incisions necessary with open reconstructions. This acromioclavicular joint reconstruction technique via the subacromial space does not violate the rotator interval or require screw removal. The patient is placed in a modified beach-chair position. The arthroscope is placed into the subacromial space, and a bursectomy is performed through a lateral subacromial portal. The coracoacromial ligament is released from the acromion with an electrocautery and an arthroscopic elevator. A nonabsorbable suture is passed through the coracoacromial ligament with a suture passer, and an arthroscopic suture grasper is used to deliver both ends of the suture out through the lateral portal. The coracoid is identified and isolated using a radiofrequency ablator placed through the anterior portal while visualizing through the lateral portal. A percutaneous shuttle device is passed through the skin superomedial to the coracoid. The shuttle is visualized entering superior to the coracoid and is passed just medial to the coracoid. Once the tip of the shuttle can be visualized in the recess inferior to the coracoid, the shuttle loop is advanced. A suture grasper is used to deliver both ends of the shuttle out through the anterior portal. A semitendinosus allograft is used to reconstruct the coracoclavicular ligament. A nonabsorbable suture is passed through both ends of the allograft. Three strands of nonabsorbable suture are braided together. The tendon and the braided suture are shuttled around the coracoid. At this point, both the braided suture and the allograft tendon enter the anterior portal, wrap around the coracoid base, and exit the anterior portal. A 3-cm incision is made over the distal clavicle. A hole is drilled through the clavicle with a 5-mm drill. A loop of 22-gauge wire is passed through the hole in the clavicle, and a looped suture is shuttled through the hole. A curved clamp is used to

  13. Arthroscopic training resources in orthopedic resident education.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Ryan; John, Tamara; Lawler, Jeffrey; Moorman, Claude; Nicandri, Gregg

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of use, perceived effectiveness, and preference for arthroscopic surgical skill training resources. An electronic survey was sent to orthopedics residents, residency program directors, and orthopedic sports medicine attending physicians in the United States. The frequency and perceived effectiveness of 10 types of adjunctive arthroscopic skills training was assessed. Residents and faculty members were asked to rate their confidence in resident ability to perform common arthroscopic procedures. Surveys were completed by 40 of 152 (26.3%) orthopedic residency program directors, 70 of 426 (16.4%) sports medicine faculty, and 235 of 3,170 (7.4%) orthopedic residents. The use of adjunctive methods of training varied from only 9.8% of programs with virtual reality training to 80.5% of programs that used reading of published materials to develop arthroscopic skill. Practice on cadaveric specimens was viewed as the most effective and preferred adjunctive method of training. Residents trained on cadaveric specimens reported increased confidence in their ability to perform arthroscopic procedures. The resources for developing arthroscopic surgical skill vary considerably across orthopedic residency programs in the United States. Adjunctive training methods were perceived to be effective at supplementing traditional training in the operating room. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  14. [Meniscal repair in patients with chronic lesions].

    PubMed

    Ponce de León, José Clemente Ibarra; Sierra Suárez, Luis; Almazán Díaz, Arturo; Cruz López, Francisco; Pérez Jiménez, Francisco Xavier; Encalada Díaz, Iván; León Hernández, Saúl Renán; Angulo Gutiérrez, Maritza

    2008-01-01

    To analyze the subjective and objective outcome of arthroscopic meniscal repair in patients with chronic meniscal lesions. A group of patients that underwent arthroscopic meniscal repair of chronic tears with a minimum follow-up of six months was retrospectively evaluated. Physical examination oriented at finding persistent meniscal lesions was performed. IKDC, Lysholm and Tegner scores were applied, and a control magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed. Twenty seven menisci in 25 patients were repaired. There were 21 male and 4 female patients with a mean age of 29.6 +/- 8.2 years (20-45). Mean time from lesion to surgery was 25.24 +/- 26 months (6-120). 27. There was significant improvement in all parameters evaluated in 21 patients. Four patients were found to have signs and symptoms of persistent meniscal tears. Abnormal increased signal intensity in the repaired menisci was observed by MRI in all patients, not correlating with clinical findings. Short-term success rate of 85% was obtained with arthroscopic repair of chronic meniscal lesions in this study, which supports the fact that a long period of time before surgery does not necessarily lead to failure. It is valid to perform a meniscal repair in patients with chronic tears as long as the proper surgical technique and an adequate rehabilitation protocol are used.

  15. The Arthroscopic Surgical Skill Evaluation Tool (ASSET).

    PubMed

    Koehler, Ryan J; Amsdell, Simon; Arendt, Elizabeth A; Bisson, Leslie J; Braman, Jonathan P; Bramen, Jonathan P; Butler, Aaron; Cosgarea, Andrew J; Harner, Christopher D; Garrett, William E; Olson, Tyson; Warme, Winston J; Nicandri, Gregg T

    2013-06-01

    Surgeries employing arthroscopic techniques are among the most commonly performed in orthopaedic clinical practice; however, valid and reliable methods of assessing the arthroscopic skill of orthopaedic surgeons are lacking. The Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool (ASSET) will demonstrate content validity, concurrent criterion-oriented validity, and reliability when used to assess the technical ability of surgeons performing diagnostic knee arthroscopic surgery on cadaveric specimens. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Content validity was determined by a group of 7 experts using the Delphi method. Intra-articular performance of a right and left diagnostic knee arthroscopic procedure was recorded for 28 residents and 2 sports medicine fellowship-trained attending surgeons. Surgeon performance was assessed by 2 blinded raters using the ASSET. Concurrent criterion-oriented validity, interrater reliability, and test-retest reliability were evaluated. Content validity: The content development group identified 8 arthroscopic skill domains to evaluate using the ASSET. Concurrent criterion-oriented validity: Significant differences in the total ASSET score (P < .05) between novice, intermediate, and advanced experience groups were identified. Interrater reliability: The ASSET scores assigned by each rater were strongly correlated (r = 0.91, P < .01), and the intraclass correlation coefficient between raters for the total ASSET score was 0.90. Test-retest reliability: There was a significant correlation between ASSET scores for both procedures attempted by each surgeon (r = 0.79, P < .01). The ASSET appears to be a useful, valid, and reliable method for assessing surgeon performance of diagnostic knee arthroscopic surgery in cadaveric specimens. Studies are ongoing to determine its generalizability to other procedures as well as to the live operating room and other simulated environments.

  16. Arthroscopic double-row suture anchor fixation of minimally displaced greater tuberosity fractures.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jong-Hun; Kim, Weon-Yoo; Ra, Ki-Hang

    2007-10-01

    In cases of displaced greater tuberosity fractures, treatments by arthroscopic-assisted reduction and percutaneous screw fixation have been reported. However, in cases in which there is a comminuted fracture or a minimally displaced fracture combined with concomitant lesions such as rotator cuff tear or labral pathology, it is difficult to reduce the fracture and to treat other pathologies by use of a percutaneous screw. Recently, many surgeons have used the double-row repair method in rotator cuff repair, which provides a tendon-bone interface better suited for biologic healing and restoring normal anatomy. In accordance with this method, we used the arthroscopic technique of double-row suture anchor fixation for a minimally displaced greater tuberosity fracture without additional incision. Initially, debridement was performed on the fracture surface by use of a shaver, and the medial-row anchor was inserted through the anterior portal or the intact cuff. Two lateral-row anchors were inserted just anterior and posterior to the lower margin of the fractured fragment under C-arm guidance. The medial-row sutures and lateral-row sutures were then placed. Arthroscopic double-row suture anchor fixation of a displaced greater tuberosity fracture restores the original footprint of the rotator cuff and normal tendon-bone interface of the displaced greater tuberosity fracture.

  17. Arthroscopically assisted reduction and percutaneous fixation of dorsal perilunate dislocations and fracture-dislocations.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Jong; Ahn, Jin Hwan

    2005-09-01

    Perilunate injuries are severe disruptions of the wrist joint that produce variable patterns of injury to the carpal anatomy. Most surgeons advocate an open reduction followed by ligament repair or internal fixation. We tried to reduce and fix the carpal bones under arthroscopic control to minimize surgical trauma and to preserve blood supply. While viewing the articular surface with the arthroscope, the disrupted proximal carpal row was anatomically reduced using Kirschner wires as joysticks, and fixed percutaneously without any repair of the capsuloligamentous tears. Three patients with dorsal perilunate dislocations or fracture-dislocations were treated by this technique. All the patients achieved accurate reduction and stable fixation, and showed successful healing of the carpal fractures with proper alignment after 10 to 12 weeks of immobilization. At 16 to 22 months follow-up, all patients showed normal radiographic findings with no evidence of instability or arthritis. The arthroscopic treatment of acute dorsal perilunate injuries is technically feasible in achieving anatomic reduction and stable fixation. Our preliminary clinical results were encouraging, but the long-term results need to be observed.

  18. Arthroscopic management of traumatic anterior shoulder instability in collision athletes: analysis of 204 cases with a 4- to 9-year follow-up and results with the suture anchor technique.

    PubMed

    Larrain, Mario Victor; Montenegro, Hugo Jorge; Mauas, David Marcelo; Collazo, Cristian Carlos; Pavón, Facundo

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of arthroscopy in the selection of surgical procedure and treatment of both acute and recurrent traumatic anterior shoulder instability in rugby players by use of pre-established selection criteria. We describe the injury mechanisms, analyze the pathologic lesions and treatment indications based on surgical findings, and assess the results in patients treated with the arthroscopic suture anchor technique. From November 1996 to November 2001, 204 rugby players with acute or recurrent traumatic anterior instability underwent an initial arthroscopic examination. Criteria such as type of Bankart lesion, tissue quality, and presence of bony defects were evaluated and used to determine the method of stabilization: arthroscopy or open stabilization. Open surgery was indicated in patients with bone humeral deficiencies greater than one fourth of the articular humeral head, bone glenoid deficiencies greater than 25% of the glenoid extension, capsular laxity with poor tissue quality, and humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament; all other patients underwent arthroscopic reconstruction via the bone suture anchor technique. The mean follow-up was 5.9 years (range, 3.9 to 8.9 years). We performed arthroscopic stabilization in 39 cases of acute instability; only 1 case (2.5%) required the mini-open technique for reinsertion of humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament. Of 158 cases of recurrent instability, 121 underwent arthroscopic stabilization, and 37 (23.4%) required reconstruction with open surgery. The main cause was bony deficiency (treated with the Latarjet procedure). The results of the arthroscopic reconstructions were evaluated by use of the Rowe scale and analyzed according to stability and range of motion. Good or excellent results were found in 94.9% of cases in the acute instability group and in 91.8% in the recurrent instability group, the poor results were due to instability recurrence. In

  19. The low-anterolateral portal for arthroscopic biceps tenodesis: description of technique and cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Michael L; Hibbard, Jason C; Nuckley, David J; Braman, Jonathan P

    2014-02-01

    Arthroscopic biceps tenodesis surgery is an important procedure for the correction of biceps tendonitis or in conjunction with rotator cuff repair with biceps symptoms. Recent trends have developed in placing the biceps tendon lower in the bicipital groove for a tenodesis. However, a more distal biceps tenodesis location is technically challenging when carried out arthroscopically with standard posterior and lateral portals. We aimed to establish the safety of a low-anterolateral portal location for direct access to the lowest aspect of the bicipital groove. An anatomical study design was used to examine portal to neurovascular structural measurements in 23 cadaveric shoulders. These shoulders had undergone low-anterolateral portal placement over the inferior most aspect of the bicipital groove as determined by palpation and direct arthroscopic visualization. No arthroscopic irrigation was performed. Following this, the shoulders underwent open dissection with the cannula in place to evaluate for any potential damage to any portion of the axillary nerve. All of the resultant portals in this study provided direct access to the inferior most aspect of the bicipital groove, and the dissection revealed that the portal was touching a small distal axillary nerve branch on the undersurface of the anterior deltoid in nearly half of the shoulders. The placement of a low-anterolateral portal for arthroscopic biceps tenodesis at the distal bicipital groove does not produce significant neurovascular damage; the portal trajectory comes close to distal anterior branches of the axillary nerve. Given these findings, this portal should be placed bluntly to best protect these underlying neurovascular structures.

  20. Arthroscopic surgery and a new classification system.

    PubMed

    Jackson, R W

    1998-01-01

    Arthroscopic lavage and debridement is of significant value in the earlier stages of arthritis. This is probably through the removal or dilution of enzymes that are part of the degradative process of osteoarthritis. Mechanical problems such as meniscal tears and loose bodies also can be addressed at the same time. However, patients must be selected carefully for arthroscopic treatment. A severity scale is proposed based on clinical and radiological findings that should indicate in advance those patients who will have the greatest opportunity for improvement from an arthroscopic procedure. Critics have said that lavage and debridement does nothing to change the natural history of the disease and is no more than a placebo effect. While there is no strong evidence to suggest that it does modify the natural history of the disease, it definitely improves the quality of life for a significant period of time, with little in the way of complications or morbidity associated with the procedure. The placebo effect might explain some of the results, but the placebo effect is well-known in medicine, and if it does produce a positive result in terms of reduction of symptoms, it cannot be entirely discounted. The biological resurfacing of a joint under arthroscopic control is the challenge facing orthopedic surgeons today. Healing and restoration of articular tissues back to some functional biological state would seem to be a reasonable goal. If this can be achieved, the future will lie in the salvage of joints through arthroscopic procedures rather than the replacement of joints by arthroplasty.

  1. Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Enhanced by Platelet-Rich Plasma Maintain Adhesion to Scaffolds in Arthroscopic Simulation.

    PubMed

    Hoberman, Alexander R; Cirino, Carl; McCarthy, Mary Beth; Cote, Mark P; Pauzenberger, Leo; Beitzel, Knut; Mazzocca, Augustus D; Dyrna, Felix

    2018-03-01

    To assess the response of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (bMSCs) enhanced by platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in the setting of a normal human tendon (NHT), a demineralized bone matrix (DBM), and a fibrin scaffold (FS) with simulated arthroscopic mechanical washout stress. Bone marrow was aspirated from the humeral head and concentrated. BMSCs were counted, plated, and grown to confluence. Cells were seeded onto 3 different scaffolds: (1) NHT, (2) DBM, and (3) FS. Each scaffold was treated with a combination of (+)/(-) PRP and (+)/(-) arthroscopic washout simulation. A period of 60 minutes was allotted before arthroscopic washout. Adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation assays were performed to assess cellular activity in each condition. Significant differences were seen in mesenchymal stromal cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation among the scaffolds. DBM and FS showed superior results to NHT for cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. PRP significantly enhanced cellular adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Arthroscopic simulation did not significantly decrease bMSC adhesion. We found that the type of scaffold impacts bMSCs' behavior. Both scaffolds (DBM and FS) were superior to NHT. The use of an arthroscopic simulator did not significantly decrease the adhesion of bMSCs to the scaffolds nor did it decrease their biologic differentiation potential. In addition, PRP enhanced cellular adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Improved healing after tendon repair can lead to better clinical outcomes. BMSCs are attractive for enhancing healing given their accessibility and regenerative potential. Application of bMSCs using scaffolds as cell carriers relies on arthroscopic feasibility. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Second-Look Arthroscopic Evaluation of Cartilage Lesions After Mesenchymal Stem Cell Implantation in Osteoarthritic Knees.

    PubMed

    Koh, Yong Gon; Choi, Yun Jin; Kwon, Oh Ryong; Kim, Yong Sang

    2014-07-01

    Cartilage regenerative procedures have been receiving increased interest because of their potential to alter the progression of osteoarthritis (OA). The application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been proposed as a new treatment option for OA based on the ability of these cells to differentiate into chondrocytes. To investigate the clinical and second-look arthroscopic outcomes of MSC implantation and to identify prognostic factors associated with this treatment. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. This study retrospectively evaluated 37 knees examined using second-look arthroscopic surgery after MSC implantation for cartilage lesions in OA knees. Clinical outcomes were evaluated according to the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score and Tegner activity scale, and cartilage repair was assessed using International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) grading. Statistical analyses were performed to identify various prognostic factors associated with the clinical and second-look arthroscopic outcomes. The mean patient age was 57.4 years (range, 48-69 years), the mean follow-up period was 26.5 months (range, 24-34 months), the mean body mass index (BMI) was 26.3 kg/m2 (range, 19.8-31.2 kg/m2), and the mean lesion size was 5.4 ± 2.9 cm2 (range, 2.3-8.9 cm2). The mean IKDC and Tegner activity scale scores were significantly improved from 38.0 ± 7.8 to 61.0 ± 11.0 and from 2.5 ± 0.5 to 3.6 ± 0.7, respectively (P < .001 for both). According to the ICRS overall repair grades at second-look arthroscopic surgery, 2 of the 37 lesions (5%) were grade I (normal), 7 (19%) were grade II (near normal), 20 (54%) were grade III (abnormal), and 8 (22%) were grade IV (severely abnormal). In terms of overall patient satisfaction with the operation, 33 (94%) patients reported good to excellent satisfaction. High BMI (≥27.5 kg/m2) and large lesion size (≥5.4 cm2) were found to be significant predictors of poor clinical and arthroscopic outcomes (P < .05 for both

  3. In Vivo Evaluation of the Potential of High-Frequency Ultrasound for Arthroscopic Examination of the Shoulder Joint

    PubMed Central

    Puhakka, Jani; Afara, Isaac O.; Paatela, Teemu; Sormaala, Markus J.; Timonen, Matti A.; Virén, Tuomas; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Töyräs, Juha; Kiviranta, Ilkka

    2015-01-01

    Objective Accurate arthroscopic evaluation of cartilage lesions could significantly improve the outcome of repair surgery. In this study, we investigated for the first time the potential of intra-articular ultrasound as an arthroscopic tool for grading cartilage defects in the human shoulder joint in vivo and compared the outcome to results from arthroscopic evaluation and magnetic resonance imaging findings. Design A total of 26 sites from 9 patients undergoing routine shoulder arthroscopy were quantitatively evaluated with a clinical intravascular (40MHz) ultrasound imaging system, using the regular arthroscopy portals. Reflection coefficient (R), integrated reflection coefficient (IRC), apparent integrated backscattering (AIB), and ultrasound roughness index (URI) were calculated, and high-resolution ultrasound images were obtained per site. Each site was visually graded according to the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) system. “Ultrasound scores” corresponding to the ICRS system were determined from the ultrasound images. Magnetic resonance imaging was conducted and cartilage integrity at each site was classified into 5 grades (0 = normal, 4 = severely abnormal) by a radiologist. Results R and IRC were lower at sites with damaged cartilage surface (P = 0.033 and P = 0.043, respectively) and correlated with arthroscopic ICRS grades (rs = −0.444, P = 0.023 and rs = −0.426, P = 0.03, respectively). Arthroscopic ICRS grades and ultrasound scores were significantly correlated (rs = 0.472, P = 0.015), but no significant correlation was found between magnetic resonance imaging data and other parameters. Conclusion The results suggest that ultrasound arthroscopy could facilitate quantitative clinical appraisal of articular cartilage integrity in the shoulder joint and provide information on cartilage lesion depth and severity for quantitative diagnostics in surgery. PMID:27375840

  4. Arthroscopic Synovectomy in Rheumatoid Arthritis of Wrist

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Jung, Kwang-Am

    2007-01-01

    The wrist is the most commonly involved region of the upper extremity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Because the wrist joint becomes involved early during the disease course and its involvement rapidly progresses, and because the disabilities associated with progressive RA are significant, early and adequate treatment must be introduced to prevent disease progression. Various treatment methods can be employed to treat RA wrists based on radiological and clinical findings. Arthroscopic synovectomy is recommended for pain relief and functional recovery in early stage RA, and is also helpful in advanced staged RA with Larsen stage III. However, arthroscopic synovectomy is not recommended as an effective method of treatment for all patients with advanced radiographic changes. Nevertheless, arthroscopic synovectomy may delay the need for complex surgery, such as wrist arthrodesis or total wrist arthroplasty in selective cases. Although arthroscopic synovectomy of the wrist cannot improve grip strength or range of motion, it can reduce wrist pain and improve function, and thus facilitate return to work. PMID:18086905

  5. INDIRECT ARTHROSCOPIC DECOMPRESSION OF SPINOGLENOID CYST WITH SUPRASCAPULAR NEUROPATHY: REPORT OF TWO CASES AND LITERATURE REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Marcos Rassi; Fernandes, Rui José

    2015-01-01

    Suprascapular nerve compression is rare and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with shoulder pain and external rotation deficit. Spinoglenoidal cysts may cause compression, and posterosuperior glenoid labrum lesions are the most likely hypothesis to explain their appearance. Magnetic resonance imaging and electromyography define the diagnosis. Indirect arthroscopic decompression of the cyst and repair of the glenoid labrum enable complete neurological recovery. The authors report two cases of isolated paralysis of the infraspinatus muscle caused by compression due to spinoglenoidal cysts that were treated by means of arthroscopy, and present the pre and postoperative assessments. PMID:27022558

  6. Arthroscopic biceps tenodesis: technique and results in six dogs.

    PubMed

    Cook, James L; Kenter, Keith; Fox, Derek B

    2005-01-01

    Biceps tenodesis was performed using an arthroscopic-assisted technique on six dogs diagnosed with chronic bicipital tendon pathology. The technique was performed using two different fixation methods (i.e., cannulated interference screw, cannulated screw and tissue washer). All six dogs had successful outcomes in terms of return to full function at a mean follow-up time of 11.7 months after surgery. Arthroscopic biceps tenodesis is a feasible option for surgical management of biceps tendon pathology, and it may have advantages over open tenodesis and open or arthroscopic tenotomy. Further study is needed before definitive recommendations regarding indications, complications, and prognosis associated with arthroscopic biceps tenodesis can be made.

  7. The Circumferential Compression Stitch for Meniscus Repair

    PubMed Central

    Saliman, Justin D.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, many patients have benefited from arthroscopically assisted meniscus repair surgery and its ability to preserve a healthy knee. Although techniques have evolved, the basic premise of central-to-peripheral needle penetration across the tear with fixation into the capsular region immediately peripheral to the meniscus has remained. Suture repair techniques that involve encircling the tear have been discussed but have remained largely impractical because of the anatomic constraints of the arthroscopic knee. A suture-passing technology designed to function within these constraints was recently made available from Ceterix Orthopaedics (Menlo Park, CA). It allows surgeons to arthroscopically place circumferential sutures around meniscus tears to provide uniform, anatomic compression of the tear edges through an all-inside technique. This stitch is likely to improve healing rates and safety, as well as to enable repair of tears that were previously considered difficult or impossible to sew. The purposes of this note and accompanying video are to show the feasibility of placing all-inside circumferential compression stitches to treat tears of the knee meniscus and to discuss the potential benefits of such techniques. PMID:24265995

  8. The Arthroscopic Surgical Skill Evaluation Tool (ASSET)

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Ryan J.; Amsdell, Simon; Arendt, Elizabeth A; Bisson, Leslie J; Braman, Jonathan P; Butler, Aaron; Cosgarea, Andrew J; Harner, Christopher D; Garrett, William E; Olson, Tyson; Warme, Winston J.; Nicandri, Gregg T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Surgeries employing arthroscopic techniques are among the most commonly performed in orthopaedic clinical practice however, valid and reliable methods of assessing the arthroscopic skill of orthopaedic surgeons are lacking. Hypothesis The Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool (ASSET) will demonstrate content validity, concurrent criterion-oriented validity, and reliability, when used to assess the technical ability of surgeons performing diagnostic knee arthroscopy on cadaveric specimens. Study Design Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3 Methods Content validity was determined by a group of seven experts using a Delphi process. Intra-articular performance of a right and left diagnostic knee arthroscopy was recorded for twenty-eight residents and two sports medicine fellowship trained attending surgeons. Subject performance was assessed by two blinded raters using the ASSET. Concurrent criterion-oriented validity, inter-rater reliability, and test-retest reliability were evaluated. Results Content validity: The content development group identified 8 arthroscopic skill domains to evaluate using the ASSET. Concurrent criterion-oriented validity: Significant differences in total ASSET score (p<0.05) between novice, intermediate, and advanced experience groups were identified. Inter-rater reliability: The ASSET scores assigned by each rater were strongly correlated (r=0.91, p <0.01) and the intra-class correlation coefficient between raters for the total ASSET score was 0.90. Test-retest reliability: there was a significant correlation between ASSET scores for both procedures attempted by each individual (r = 0.79, p<0.01). Conclusion The ASSET appears to be a useful, valid, and reliable method for assessing surgeon performance of diagnostic knee arthroscopy in cadaveric specimens. Studies are ongoing to determine its generalizability to other procedures as well as to the live OR and other simulated environments. PMID:23548808

  9. Arthroscopic lavage and debridement for osteoarthritis of the knee: an evidence-based analysis.

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    MEDICAL TREATMENT, THERE IS LEVEL 1B EVIDENCE THAT: Arthroscopic lavage gives rise to a statistically significant, but not clinically meaningful effect in improving pain (WOMAC pain and VAS pain) up to 12 months following surgery. The effect on joint function (WOMAC function) and the primary outcome (WOMAC aggregate) was neither statistically nor clinically significant. IN MODERATE OR SEVERE OA OF THE KNEE WITH PAIN REFRACTORY TO MEDICAL TREATMENT, THERE IS: Level 1b evidence that the effect on pain and function of arthroscopic lavage (10 L saline) and debridement (with 10 L saline lavage) is not statistically significant up to 24 months following surgery.Level 2 evidence that arthroscopic debridement (with 3 L saline lavage) is effective in the control of pain in severe OA of the medial femoral condyle for up to 5 years.For debridement in combination with meniscectomy, there is level 4 evidence that the procedure, as appropriate, might be effective in earlier stages, unicompartmental disease, shorter symptom duration, sudden onset of mechanical symptoms, and preoperative full range of motion. However, as these findings are derived from very poor quality evidence, the identification of subsets of patients that may benefit from this procedure requires further testing.In patients with pain due to a meniscal tear, of the medial compartment in particular, repair of the meniscus results in better pain control at 2 years following surgery than if the pain is attributable to other causes. There is insufficient evidence to comment on the effectiveness of lateral meniscus repair on pain control. Arthroscopic debridement of the knee has thus far only been found to be effective for medial compartmental OA. All other indications should be reviewed with a view to reducing arthroscopic debridement as an effective therapy. Arthroscopic lavage of the knee is not indicated for any stage of OA. There is very poor quality evidence on the effectiveness of debridement with partial

  10. Arthroscopic Correlates of Subtle Syndesmotic Injury.

    PubMed

    Guyton, Gregory P; DeFontes, Kenneth; Barr, Cameron R; Parks, Brent G; Camire, Lyn M

    2017-05-01

    Arthroscopic criteria for identifying syndesmotic disruption have been variable and subjective. We aimed to quantify syndesmotic disruption arthroscopically using a standardized measurement device. Ten cadaveric lower extremity specimens were tested in intact state and after serial sectioning of the syndesmotic structures (anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament [AiTFL], interosseous ligament [IOL], posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament [PiTFL], deltoid). Diagnostic ankle arthroscopy was performed after each sectioning. Manual external rotational stress was applied across the tibiofibular joint. Custom-manufactured spherical balls of increasing diameter mounted on the end of an arthroscopic probe were inserted into the tibiofibular space to determine the degree of diastasis of the tibiofibular joint under each condition. A ball 3 mm in diameter reliably indicated a high likelihood of combined disruption of the AiTFL and IOL. Disruption of the AiTFL alone could not be reliably distinguished from the intact state. Use of a spherical probe placed into the tibiofibular space during manual external rotation of the ankle provided an objective measure of syndesmotic instability. Passage of a 2.5-mm probe indicated some disruption of the syndesmosis, but the test had poor negative predictive value. Passage of a 3.0-mm spherical probe indicated very high likelihood of disruption of both the AiTFL and the IOL. The findings challenge the previously used but unsupported standard of a 2-mm diastasis of the tibiofibular articulation for diagnosis of subtle syndesmotic instability.

  11. Multirater agreement on arthroscopic image quality.

    PubMed

    Tuijthof, G J M; Abbink, M; Sierevelt, I N; van Dijk, C N

    2009-02-01

    In arthroscopy (minimally invasive orthopaedic surgery), the view is frequently disturbed. To optimize the view, quantification of the arthroscopic image quality is important. Thereto, disturbances were categorized as bleeding, air bubbles, turbidity (synovial fluid), loose fibrous tissue, and attached fibrous tissue, which cover the arthroscopic image area. The goal is to determine the percentages of disturbance coverage for which the view is acceptable. Thirty-two short films of the five disturbances were selected from arthroscopic knee procedures. The films showed disturbances covering different percentages of the image area. Thirty-nine orthopaedic surgeons were asked to judge whether or not the view of each film was acceptable. Multiple-choice questions on irrigation and disturbances were asked. A clear transition from acceptable to unacceptable view was found for bleeding (5 per cent of the covered area was acceptable; 25 per cent was not acceptable), and air bubbles (10 per cent was acceptable; 20 per cent was not acceptable). Loose fibrous tissue showed a gradual transition where 25 per cent was still accepted by a third of the surgeons. Turbidity and attached fibrous tissue were tolerated up to 50 per cent by half of the surgeons. Surgeons using a mechanical pump tolerated a lower percentage of synovial fluid (p<0.05). The most intolerable disturbance was bleeding. The results were consistent and will be used for computerized detection of disturbances.

  12. Clinical factors that affect perceived quality of life in arthroscopic reconstruction for acromioclavicular joint dislocation.

    PubMed

    Abat, F; Gich, I; Natera, L; Besalduch, M; Sarasquete, J

    To analyse the results of arthroscopic repair of acromioclavicular dislocation in terms of health-related quality of life. Prospective study of patients with acromioclavicular dislocation Rockwood grade iii-v, treated arthroscopically with a mean follow up of 25.4 months. The demographics of the series were recorded and evaluations were performed preoperatively, at 3 months and 2 years with validated questionnaires as Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36), visual analogue scale (VAS), The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH), Constant-Murley Shoulder Outcome Score (Constant) and Walch-Duplay Score (WD). Twenty patients, 17 men and 3 women with a mean age of 36.1 years, were analysed. According to the classification of Rockwood, 3 patients were grade iii, 3 grade iv and 14 grade v. Functional and clinical improvement was detected in all clinical tests (SF-36, VAS and DASH) at 3 months and 2 years follow up (P<.001). The final Constant score was 95.3±2.4 and the WD was 1.8±0.62. It was not found that the health-related quality of life was affected by any variable studied except the evolution of DASH. The health-related quality of life (assessed by SF-36) in patients undergoing arthroscopic repair of acromioclavicular joint dislocation grades iii-v was not influenced by gender, age, grade, displacement, handedness, evolution of the VAS, scoring of the Constant or by the WD. However, it is correlated with the evolution in the DASH score. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Arthroscopic Treatment of Discoid Lateral Meniscus Tears in Children With Achondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Atanda, Alfred; Wallace, Maegen; Bober, Michael B; Mackenzie, William

    2016-01-01

    Achondroplasia is the most common form of skeletal dysplasia that presents to the pediatric orthopaedist. More than half of achondroplasia patients are affected with knee pain. It is thought that the majority of this pain may be due to spinal stenosis, hip pathology, or knee malalignment. Discoid menisci can be a source of lateral knee joint pain in skeletally immature patients in general. We present the first case series of patients with achondroplasia who had symptomatic discoid lateral menisci treated with arthroscopic knee surgery. The charts of 6 patients (8 knees) with achondroplasia who underwent arthroscopic knee surgery for symptomatic discoid lateral menisci were collected. History and physical examination data, magnetic resonance imaging findings, and operative reports were reviewed. Meniscal tear configuration and treatment type (meniscectomy vs. repair) were noted. Each patient was found to have a tear of the discoid meniscus. All menisci were treated with saucerization. In addition, meniscal repair was performed in 2 cases, partial meniscectomy in 3 cases, and subtotal meniscectomy in 3 cases. Two patients had bilateral discoid meniscal tears which were treated. Average follow-up was 2.4 years (range, 1 to 4.5 y) and the average pediatric International Knee Documentation Committee (pedi-IKDC) score was 85.3% (range, 75% to 95.4%). At final follow-up, all patients were pain free and able to return to full activities. Discoid meniscus tears may be a source of lateral joint line pain in patients with achondroplasia. These injuries can be successfully treated with arthroscopic surgery in this patient population. Future studies need to be done to determine the exact incidence of discoid menisci in achondroplasia patients and also to determine whether there is a genetic relationship between the 2 conditions. Level IV-case series.

  14. The Results of All-Inside Meniscus Repair Using the Viper Repair System Simultaneously with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hong Je; Chun, Churl Hong; Kim, Kwang Mee; Cho, Hang Hwan; Espinosa, Johnsel C

    2015-06-01

    Meniscus tears are commonly associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures. It is essential to repair meniscal tears as much as possible to prevent early osteoarthritis and to gain additional stability in the knee joint. We evaluated the results of arthroscopic all-inside repair using the Meniscal Viper Repair System (Arthrex) on meniscus tears simultaneously with ACL reconstruction. Nineteen out of 22 patients who were treated with arthroscopic all-inside repair using the Meniscal Viper Repair System for meniscus tear associated with ACL rupture were evaluated. ACL reconstructions were performed at the same period. The mean follow-up period was 16.5 months (range, 12 to 24 months). The clinical results of the meniscus repair were evaluated by symptoms (such as catching or locking), tenderness, effusion, range of motion limitation, and the McMurray test. Clinical success was defined by negative results in all five categories. The Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) score was evaluated. Objective results were evaluated with secondary look arthroscopy or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI results were categorized as completely repaired, incompletely repaired, and failure by Henning's classification. The results of second-look arthroscopy were evaluated with the criteria of meniscal healing. The clinical success rate was 95.4% and the HSS scores were 93.9 ± 5.4 at the final follow-up. According to Henning's classification, 15 out of 18 cases showed complete healing (83.3%) and two cases (11.1%) showed incomplete healing. Seventeen out of 18 cases that underwent second-look arthroscopy showed complete healing (94.4%) according to the criteria of meniscal healing. Only one case showed failure and the failure was due to a re-rupture at the sutured area. Complications of ACL reconstruction or meniscus repair were not present. The results demonstrate that arthroscopic all-inside repair using the Meniscal Viper Repair System is an effective treatment

  15. Arthroscopic Assessment and Treatment of Dancers' Knee Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Daniel M.; Campbell, Pat

    1985-01-01

    Arthroscopic examination of 16 dancers with dance-related knee injuries which defied conservative treatment showed 15 meniscal tears and 4 cases of chondromalacia patellae. Partial arthroscopic meniscectomy was used to treat the tears. The results were excellent, with 13 of the 16 returning to preoperative levels of dance activity. (MT)

  16. Short-term clinical results of arthroscopic osteochondral fixation for elbow osteochondritis dissecans in teenaged baseball players.

    PubMed

    Takeba, Jun; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Seiji; Imai, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Umakoshi, Kensuke; Matsumoto, Hironori; Ohshita, Muneaki; Miura, Hiromasa; Aibiki, Mayuki

    2015-11-01

    Reports regarding arthroscopic fixation of the osteochondral fragments for elbow osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) are few. This study assessed the clinical outcomes of arthroscopic fixation of unstable osteochondral fragments by using absorbable pins over a postoperative period of at least 1 year. The patients were 13 adolescent baseball players with a mean age of 14 years (range, 12-16 years) who underwent OCD of primary lesions at International Cartilage Repair Society grades III and IV. The patients were evaluated by using validated outcome measures at a mean follow-up period of 24 months (range, 12-50 months). The mean (standard deviation) score in the disability/symptom section of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand improved from 12.4 (6.0) before the surgery to 0.5 (1.2) after the surgery, and the sports section improved from 74.5 (25.4) to 1.4 (5.2). The mean (standard deviation) extension improved from -11° (10.8) to -2° (3.9; P < .001). The mean (SD) flexion improved from 129° (11.6) to 137° (5.6; P = .040). All patients were able to resume playing baseball, and 9 (69%) resumed playing at the same position as before their injuries. The clinical results of arthroscopic osteochondral fragment fixation in the teenaged baseball players with elbow OCD, albeit obtained over only a short period, were favorable. This arthroscopic treatment enables repair of lesions and is considered appropriate for unstable OCD during the adolescent growth spurt. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Arthroscopic assisted femoral tunnel drilling for the intra-articular anatomic cranial cruciate ligament reconstruction in dogs.

    PubMed

    Bolia, A; Böttcher, P

    2015-01-01

    To develop and test an arthroscopic aiming device for extra- to intra-articular femoral tunnel drilling emerging at the center of the femoral insertion of the cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) in medium to large breed dogs. Hindlimbs (n = 12) of six cadaveric dogs (≥ 20 kg bodyweight). One hindlimb from each cadaver was randomly chosen. On a standard medio-lateral stifle radiograph the caudo-cranial position of the CrCL center was measured and transferred onto an adjustable aiming device. After arthroscopic debridement of the CrCL the aiming device was hooked behind the lateral condyle and a 2.4 mm guide pin was placed from extra- to intra-articular. The intra-articular position of the resulting bone tunnel was evaluated radiographically as well as compared to the anatomic CrCl center of the contralateral hindlimb using 3D renderings. According to the postoperative radiographs all six drill tunnels were located at or near the CrCL center. The median absolute 3D error from the anatomical center of the CrCL was 0.6 mm (range: 0.2-0.9 mm). Precise anatomic placement of the femoral tunnel for intra-articular repair of the CrCL was achieved using an adjustable aiming device. The proposed technique will reduce femoral tunnel misplacement when performing intra-articular CrCL repair in dogs. In combination with the published technique for arthroscopic tibial tunnel drilling using a similar aiming device, the technical requirements for arthroscopic assisted tunnel positioning for anatomical graft replacement are available.

  18. [Arthroscopic treatment for calcaneal spur syndrome].

    PubMed

    Stropek, S; Dvorák, M

    2008-10-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY Arthroscopic treatment of calcaneal spur syndrome is a tissue-sparing and effective approach when conservative therapy has failed. This method, its results and our experience with the treatment of this syndrome are presented here. MATERIAL Between January 2003 and November 2007, 26 patients underwent an arthroscopic procedure for calcaneal spur syndrome; of these, 20 were women with an average age of 49 years, and six were men with an average age of 45 years. Four, three women and one man, were lost to follow-up, therefore 22 patients with 24 heels were eventually evaluated. All had conservative therapy for 3 to 6 monts. METHODS The arthroscopic method used was developed by the arthroscopic group of the Orthopaedic Service of Hospital Hermanos Ameijeiras in Havana, Cuba. The surgical technique insolves treatment of the spur and plantar fasciitis commonly found in calcaneal spur syndrome, but it also addresses adjacent calcaneal periostitis. RESULTS The results were evaluated on the scale that is part of the foot function index developed by Budiman-Mak for measuring rheumatoid arthritis pain. The patients were asked mine questions on pain intensity during various activities before and after surgery. Pain was evaluated on a scale with grades from 0 to 9. The average value was 5.9 before surgery and 1.4 after surgery. A 0-1 pain range was reported by 25 %, 1-2 by 26 % and 2-4 by 22 % of the patients. All patients reported improvement. DISCUSSION The orthopaedic group in Havana led by Carlos achieved 85 % excellent outcomes (pain range, 0-2) at one-year followup; this was 79 % in our study, in which no problems with foot arches or wound infection were recorded. CONCLUSIONS The heel spur syndrome is a result of an inflamed ligament (plantar fascia) due to repeated microtrauma. It is not a traction osteophyte,but a reaction of the tissue where it attaches to the calcaneus. Adjacent calcaneal periostitis is usually present as well. Therefore, this

  19. Arthroscopic-Assisted Open Reduction Internal Fixation.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Graham A; Doyle, Matthew D; Castellucci-Garza, Francesca M

    2018-04-01

    The indications for arthroscopy have expanded over the years. Arthroscopic-assisted open reduction internal fixation in the setting of acute trauma is gaining popularity with foot and ankle surgeons. It serves to facilitate direct visualization of fracture fragments and allows for precise articular reduction with minimal soft tissue insult. Current evidence reports a high incidence of chondral injury with ankle fractures. Arthroscopy performed at the time of open reduction internal fixation allows for joint inspection and potential treatment of these posttraumatic defects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Do arthroscopic and open stabilization techniques restore equivalent stability to the shoulder in the setting of anterior glenohumeral instability? a systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Peter N; Mascarenhas, Randy; Leroux, Timothy; Sayegh, Eli T; Verma, Nikhil N; Cole, Brian J; Romeo, Anthony A

    2015-02-01

    Shoulder instability frequently recurs in young patients without operative treatment. Both open and arthroscopic approaches to shoulder stabilization with labral repair and capsulorrhaphy have been described and are routinely used. Multiple trials have been conducted to compare these approaches, with multiple meta-analyses performed to synthesize these trials; however, the results remain controversial. The purpose of this study was to critically evaluate the current meta-analyses to identify the current state of the art. In this study we evaluate available scientific support for the ability of both arthroscopic and open soft-tissue stabilization techniques to restore stability of the shoulder by performing a systematic review of the literature for previous meta-analyses. Data were extracted for rates of recurrence and patient outcomes. Study quality was measured with the Oxman-Guyatt and QUOROM (Quality of Reporting of Meta-analyses) systems. The Jadad algorithm was applied independently by 4 authors to determine which meta-analysis provided the highest level of available evidence. After application of the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 8 meta-analyses were included. Both studies published prior to 2007 concluded that open stabilization provided lower recurrence rates than arthroscopic stabilization, the 3 studies published in 2007 are discordant, and all 3 studies published after 2008 concluded that open and arthroscopic stabilization provided equivalent results. Two meta-analyses had low Oxman-Guyatt scores (<3) signifying major flaws. Four authors independently selected the same meta-analysis as providing the highest quality of evidence using the Jadad algorithm, and this meta-analysis found no difference in recurrence rates between open and arthroscopic stabilization. This systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses comparing arthroscopic and open shoulder stabilization suggests that according to current best available evidence, there are no significant

  1. The Grapefruit: An Alternative Arthroscopic Tool Skill Platform.

    PubMed

    Molho, David A; Sylvia, Stephen M; Schwartz, Daniel L; Merwin, Sara L; Levy, I Martin

    2017-08-01

    To establish the construct validity of an arthroscopic training model that teaches arthroscopic tool skills including triangulation, grasping, precision biting, implant delivery and ambidexterity and uses a whole grapefruit for its training platform. For the grapefruit training model (GTM), an arthroscope and arthroscopic instruments were introduced through portals cut in the grapefruit skin of a whole prepared grapefruit. After institutional review board approval, participants performed a set of tasks inside the grapefruit. Performance for each component was assessed by recording errors, achievement of criteria, and time to completion. A total of 19 medical students, orthopaedic surgery residents, and fellowship-trained orthopaedic surgeons were included in the analysis and were divided into 3 groups based on arthroscopic experience. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the post hoc Tukey test were used for statistical analysis. One-way ANOVA showed significant differences in both time to completion and errors between groups, F(2, 16) = 16.10, P < .001; F(2, 16) = 17.43, P < .001. Group A had a longer time to completion and more errors than group B (P = .025, P = .019), and group B had a longer time to completion and more errors than group C (P = .023, P = .018). The GTM is an easily assembled and an alternative arthroscopic training model that bridges the gap between box trainers, cadavers, and virtual reality simulators. Our findings suggest construct validity when evaluating its use for teaching the basic arthroscopic tool skills. As such, it is a useful addition to the arthroscopic training toolbox. There is a need for validated low-cost arthroscopic training models that are easily accessible. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Surgical repair of mid-body proximal sesamoid bone fractures in 25 horses.

    PubMed

    Busschers, Evita; Richardson, Dean W; Hogan, Patricia M; Leitch, Midge

    2008-12-01

    To describe the characteristics of unilateral mid-body proximal sesamoid bone (PSB) fractures, to determine factors associated with the outcome of horses after surgical repair, and to describe a technique for arthroscopically assisted screw fixation in lag fashion. Retrospective case series. Horses (n=25) with unilateral mid-body PSB fracture. Medical records (1996-2006), radiographs, and arthroscopic videos of horses with surgically repaired unilateral mid-body PSB fractures were reviewed. Retrieved data included signalment, affected limb and PSB, fracture characteristics, and surgical technique. Outcome was established by radiographic assessment of healing and race records; categorical data were analyzed using Fisher's Exact test. Medial forelimb PSBs were most commonly affected (80%). Surgical technique and degree of reduction were significantly associated with outcome; 44% of horses with screw repair and none of the horses with wire fixation raced (P=.047). Factors that may have influenced this outcome were differences in fracture reduction (improved reduction in 22% wire repairs and 88% screw repairs, P=.002) and use of external coaptation (22% wire repair and 88% lag screw repair, P=.002). None of the horses with unimproved reduction raced after surgery. Only 28% of horses with mid-body PSB fractures raced after surgery. Compared with wire fixation, screw fixation in lag fashion resulted in good reduction and is seemingly a superior repair technique. For mid-body PSB fractures, arthroscopically assisted screw fixation in lag fashion and external coaptation for anesthesia recovery and initial support provides the best likelihood of return to athletic use.

  3. All arthroscopic stabilization of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation with fiberwire and endobutton system

    PubMed Central

    Spoliti, Marco; De Cupis, Mauro; Via, Alessio Giai; Oliva, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Summary Introduction: acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation is common in athletes and in contact sports and about 9% of shoulder injuries involves this joint. The majority of these AC lesions can be successfully treated conservatively but high grade dislocation and some cases of type III dislocation need a surgical treatment. Many different operative techniques have been described over the years. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the results of arthroscopic stabilization of AC joint dislocation with TightRope® system. Materials and methods: nineteen patients with acute AC dislocation were treated by arthroscopic fixation with TightRope® system. Any associated lesions were repaired. All patients were assessed before surgery (T0), at 3 months (T1), at 6 months (T2) and at 1 year after the surgery (T3) using a visual analogic scale (VAS) and Constant-Murley Score (CMS). All patients were evaluated with X-ray. Results: six AC-joint dislocations involved the right shoulder and thirteen the left shoulder. Ten were type III dislocation, three were type IV and six were type V dislocation. We found a statistically significant reduction of pain (p< 0.01) at T1 compared to the pretreatment scores. The CMS measures showed an improvement between T1, T2 and T3, but the difference was statistically significant only between T1 and T3 (p= 0.017). The postoperative X-Ray of the shoulder showed a good reduction of the AC joint dislocation. We had 1 case of recurrence and 2 cases of loss of intraoperative reduction. Conclusion: arthroscopic technique for acute AC joint dislocations with the use of the TightRope® device is minimally invasive and it allows an anatomic restoration of the joint. It is a safe and effective procedure ensuring stable AC joint reconstruction and good cosmetic results. PMID:25767774

  4. Arthroscopic Surgical Technique for an Acute Talar Dome Osteochondral Lesion in a Professional Rugby League Player.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Martin; Fraser, Ethan J; Linklater, James; Harris, Craig; Morgan, Kieran

    2017-06-01

    Talar osteochondral lesions represent challenging clinical entities, particularly in high-demand athletes. Surgical treatment of large lesions often requires a 2-step procedure, or the use of osteotomy in the case of autologous osteochondral transfer, which can delay return to sport. A professional rugby league player underwent surgery for a complex injury to the ankle. A talar osteochondral lesion with a maximal diameter of 15 mm was treated in an arthroscopic fashion using the cartilage taken from the completely displaced osteochondral fragment. Cartilage was cut into chips and combined with bone graft product containing platelet-derived growth factor and a porous collagen scaffold. Autologous cartilage was then reimplanted arthroscopically. The patient was allowed full ankle motion from 2 weeks postoperatively, and weightbearing was commenced at 6 weeks. Follow-up imaging and functional outcomes, including return to sport, were assessed at regular intervals. The patient was able to return to professional rugby league by 23 weeks postoperatively. Magnetic resonance imaging at 16 months postoperatively showed restoration of the subchondral plate and osseous infill. At final follow-up, the patient remained pain free and was playing at preinjury level. This report describes good outcomes using a novel, 1-step cartilage repair technique to treat a large talar osteochondral lesion in a professional athlete. Level V: Expert opinion.

  5. Arthroscopic resection of pisotriquetral joint loose body: a case report.

    PubMed

    Katolik, Leonid I

    2008-02-01

    Pisotriquetral disease is a key element in the differential diagnosis of ulnar-sided wrist pain. A loose body within the pisotriquetral joint is an uncommon entity. After appropriate diagnosis, arthroscopic removal is a feasible alternative to open resection.

  6. [Arthroscopic treatment of osteoarthritis of scaphotrapezotrapezoid joint].

    PubMed

    Da Rin, F; Mathoulin, C

    2006-11-01

    Osteoarthritis of scaphotrapezotrapezoid joint corresponds to 13% of wrist arthritis. It is seldom isolated. The arthroscopic treatment associates a radial mid carpal portal and a STT portal called 1-2 midcarpal portal. Between 2002 and 2005, we carried out 13 resection isolated from the distal pole of the scaphoid. There were only women whose average age was 58 years. The improvement was real on the level of the pain, mobility and the muscular force. In same time, we operated on 13 patients by associating an implant in pyrocarbone as interposition after resection. The average age was 67 years. The average follow-up was 20 months. We had two implant dislocations for technical errors. The quality of the results helped by the invasive initially mini-approach and the arthroscopy can make it possible to select some indications.

  7. [Clinical application of computed arthroscope of the temporomandibular joint].

    PubMed

    Yang, C; Qiu, W; Wang, X; Cai, X; Ha, Q

    2000-10-01

    The effect of clinical application on the computed arthroscope of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is evaluated. The single arthroscopic images were input into computer and memorized into magneto optical disk. With the help of Photoshop 5.0 in WINDOWS 95, the images were combined by technique of virtual process, adjusted by rotation of images, marginal blur, and chromatism correction to compound sagittal and/or coronal panoramic images of articular surfaces. According to different needs, the composite images can be printed with different printers. During the period from May 1998 to May 1999, the TMJ preoperative panoramic images were composed with computed arthroscope (CA) in the 32 joints. Of them, there were 12 joints with internal derangement (ID), 8 osteoarthrosis (OA), 8 adhesion, 2 disk perforation, and 2 synovial chondromatosis. The post-operative panoramic images were also made up to evaluate the surgical effects in 10 joints. In all of 32 joints, the 32 panoramic arthroscopic images of upper cavities were composed. In addition, the images of lower cavities were composed in 2 OA and 1 perforation. The postoperative panoramic images were also made up in 4 OA, 4 adhesion, and 2 synovial chondromatosis. All of the above-mentioned images showed integrally the entire structure of articular cavity, intracapsular pathologic/surgical appearances, and the relationships among the different tissues or articular surfaces. The CA can enhance the comprehensive ability of diagnostic arthroscope, and help to exchange and spread the experiences of the TMJ arthroscopic surgery.

  8. Arthroscopic knee anatomy in young achondroplasia patients.

    PubMed

    Del Pilar Duque Orozco, M; Record, N C; Rogers, K J; Bober, M B; Mackenzie, W G; Atanda, A

    2017-06-01

    Achondroplasia is the most common form of skeletal dysplasia, affecting more than 250 000 individuals worldwide. In these patients, the developing knee undergoes multiple anatomical changes. The purpose of this study was to characterise the intra-articular knee anatomy in children with achondroplasia who underwent knee arthroscopy. Records of achondroplasia patients who underwent knee arthroscopy between 2009 and 2014 were reviewed. Demographic data, operative reports, follow-up notes, MRI and arthroscopy images were reviewed. Bony, cartilaginous and ligamentous changes were noted. The trochlea sulcus angle was measured from intra-operative arthroscopic images. A total of 12 knee arthroscopies in nine patients were performed. The mean age at surgery was 16.9 years (12 to 22). In all patients, the indication for surgery was knee pain and/or mechanical symptoms that were refractory to non-operative treatment. Three anatomical variations involving the distal femur were found in all knees: a deep femoral trochlea; a high A-shaped intercondylar notch; and a vertically oriented anterior cruciate ligament. The average trochlea sulcus angle measured 123°. Pathology included: synovial plica (one knee); chondral lesions (three knees); discoid lateral meniscus (11 knees); and meniscal tears (six knees). All patients were pain-free and returned to normal activity at final follow-up. Children with achondroplasia have characteristic distal femur anatomy noted during knee arthroscopy. These variations should be considered normal during knee arthroscopy in these patients. Arthroscopic findings confirmed previous MRI findings within this specific population with the addition of a deep trochlear groove which was not previously reported.

  9. Arthroscopic knee anatomy in young achondroplasia patients

    PubMed Central

    del Pilar Duque Orozco, M.; Record, N. C.; Rogers, K. J; Bober, M. B.; Mackenzie, W. G.; Atanda, A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Purpose Achondroplasia is the most common form of skeletal dysplasia, affecting more than 250 000 individuals worldwide. In these patients, the developing knee undergoes multiple anatomical changes. The purpose of this study was to characterise the intra-articular knee anatomy in children with achondroplasia who underwent knee arthroscopy. Methods Records of achondroplasia patients who underwent knee arthroscopy between 2009 and 2014 were reviewed. Demographic data, operative reports, follow-up notes, MRI and arthroscopy images were reviewed. Bony, cartilaginous and ligamentous changes were noted. The trochlea sulcus angle was measured from intra-operative arthroscopic images. Results A total of 12 knee arthroscopies in nine patients were performed. The mean age at surgery was 16.9 years (12 to 22). In all patients, the indication for surgery was knee pain and/or mechanical symptoms that were refractory to non-operative treatment. Three anatomical variations involving the distal femur were found in all knees: a deep femoral trochlea; a high A-shaped intercondylar notch; and a vertically oriented anterior cruciate ligament. The average trochlea sulcus angle measured 123°. Pathology included: synovial plica (one knee); chondral lesions (three knees); discoid lateral meniscus (11 knees); and meniscal tears (six knees). All patients were pain-free and returned to normal activity at final follow-up. Conclusion Children with achondroplasia have characteristic distal femur anatomy noted during knee arthroscopy. These variations should be considered normal during knee arthroscopy in these patients. Arthroscopic findings confirmed previous MRI findings within this specific population with the addition of a deep trochlear groove which was not previously reported. PMID:28828058

  10. Arthroscopic transosseous reinsertion of the rotator cuff.

    PubMed

    Matis, Nicholas; Hübner, Clemens; Aschauer, Erwin; Resch, Herbert

    2006-03-01

    Arthroscopic reinsertion of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons by means of imitation of an open transosseous reinsertion technique. Tears in the tendon cuffs of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles. Patients < 75 years of age. Retracted tendons that cannot be sufficiently mobilized to provide a tension-free reinsertion. Tears of the tendon cuff of the subscapsularis muscle. The free edges of the tendons are sparingly resected. The tendon attachment site on the greater tuberosity is freed of soft tissue and decorticated using an arthroscopic bone burr. A full-radius burr is used to drill insertion sites for the sutures in the tuberosity. A hollow needle is inserted percutaneously to puncture the free edges of the tendon for a single reinsertion suture. The hollow needle is then fed through the greater tuberosity to the lateral portal. The suture is guided through the needle and advanced via a working cannula. If the tear is > 2 cm in width, a mattress suture should be placed via another channel in the bone. This is to provide plane contact of the tendon to the reinsertion site. Restriction of movement using a shoulder bandage for 6 weeks after the operation. In the 75 patients treated using a single suture, there was an improvement compared to the related Constant Score from 55.8% before the operation to 80.4% at the follow-up examination, after an average of 26.8 months. The average age in this group was 58.2 years (range 35-75 years). In the 21 patients treated with a mattress suture, there was an improvement compared to the related Constant score from 59% before the operation to 83% at 14.3 months after the operation. The average age in this group was 58 years (range 35-75 years).

  11. Effects of Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields on Return to Sports After Arthroscopic Debridement and Microfracture of Osteochondral Talar Defects: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter Trial.

    PubMed

    Reilingh, Mikel L; van Bergen, Christiaan J A; Gerards, Rogier M; van Eekeren, Inge C; de Haan, Rob J; Sierevelt, Inger N; Kerkhoffs, Gino M M J; Krips, Rover; Meuffels, Duncan E; van Dijk, C N; Blankevoort, Leendert

    2016-05-01

    Osteochondral defects (OCDs) of the talus usually affect athletic patients. The primary surgical treatment consists of arthroscopic debridement and microfracture. Various possibilities have been suggested to improve the recovery process after debridement and microfracture. A potential solution to obtain this goal is the application of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs), which stimulate the repair process of bone and cartilage. The use of PEMFs after arthroscopic debridement and microfracture of an OCD of the talus leads to earlier resumption of sports and an increased number of patients that resume sports. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. A total of 68 patients were randomized to receive either PEMFs (n = 36) or placebo (n = 32) after arthroscopic treatment of an OCD of the talus. The primary outcomes (ie, the number of patients who resumed sports and time to resumption of sports) were analyzed with Kaplan-Meier curves as well as Mann-Whitney U, chi-square, and log-rank tests. Secondary functional outcomes were assessed with questionnaires (American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score, Foot and Ankle Outcome Score, EuroQol, and numeric rating scales for pain and satisfaction) at multiple time points up to 1-year follow-up. To assess bone repair, computed tomography scans were obtained at 2 weeks and 1 year postoperatively. Almost all outcome measures improved significantly in both groups. The percentage of sport resumption (PEMF, 79%; placebo, 80%; P = .95) and median time to sport resumption (PEMF, 17 weeks; placebo, 16 weeks; P = .69) did not differ significantly between the treatment groups. Likewise, there were no significant between-group differences with regard to the secondary functional outcomes and the computed tomography results. PEMF does not lead to a higher percentage of patients who resume sports or to earlier resumption of sports after arthroscopic debridement and microfracture of talar OCDs. Furthermore, no

  12. Arthroscopically Assisted Reconstruction of Acute Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocations: Anatomic AC Ligament Reconstruction With Protective Internal Bracing—The “AC-RecoBridge” Technique

    PubMed Central

    Izadpanah, Kaywan; Jaeger, Martin; Ogon, Peter; Südkamp, Norbert P.; Maier, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    An arthroscopically assisted technique for the treatment of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocations is presented. This pathology-based procedure aims to achieve anatomic healing of both the acromioclavicular ligament complex (ACLC) and the coracoclavicular ligaments. First, the acromioclavicular joint is reduced anatomically under macroscopic and radiologic control and temporarily transfixed with a K-wire. A single-channel technique using 2 suture tapes provides secure coracoclavicular stabilization. The key step of the procedure consists of the anatomic repair of the ACLC (“AC-Reco”). Basically, we have observed 4 patterns of injury: clavicular-sided, acromial-sided, oblique, and midportion tears. Direct and/or transosseous ACLC repair is performed accordingly. Then, an X-configured acromioclavicular suture tape cerclage (“AC-Bridge”) is applied under arthroscopic assistance to limit horizontal clavicular translation to a physiological extent. The AC-Bridge follows the principle of internal bracing and protects healing of the ACLC repair. The AC-Bridge is tightened on top of the repair, creating an additional suture-bridge effect and promoting anatomic ACLC healing. We refer to this combined technique of anatomic ACLC repair and protective internal bracing as the “AC-RecoBridge.” A detailed stepwise description of the surgical technique, including indications, technical pearls and pitfalls, and potential complications, is given. PMID:26052493

  13. Blind suprascapular and axillary nerve block for post-operative pain in arthroscopic rotator cuff surgery.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Young; Bang, Jin-Young; Oh, Kyung-Soo

    2016-12-01

    The goal of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of additional axillary nerve block (ANB) with suprascapular nerve block (SSNB) and patient-controlled anaesthesia (PCA) with no device assistance after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The hypothesis is that patients with intravenous (IV) PCA and the blockade of the two main nerves (SSNB + ANB) experienced lesser pain than patients with IV PCA or IV PCA + SSNB. The 114 patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were allocated randomly to three groups as follows: group I, intravenous PCA pumps (only PCA); group II, IV PCA + SSNB using a blind technique (PCA + SSNB); and group III, IV PCA + SSNB + ANB using a blind technique (PCA + SSNB + ANB). Pain visual analogue scale (VAS) scores were evaluated at 1, 6, 12, 24, 36, and 48 post-operative hours. Furthermore, the degree of pain was compared according to cuff tear size. The pain VAS score of group III was lower than that of the other two groups and was significantly lower at post-operative hours 1, 6, and 12. In addition, the larger cuff tear tended to be indicative of greater pain. However, all groups experienced rebound pain. PCA + SSNB + ANB using a blind technique is a better pain control method than PCA + SSNB and only PCA during the initial 12 post-operative hours. PCA + SSNB + ANB is a cost-effective, time-saving, and easily performed method for post-operative pain control as an axis of multimodal pain control strategy. II.

  14. Sports-specific differences in postsurgical infections after arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Krutsch, Werner; Zellner, Johannes; Zeman, Florian; Nerlich, Michael; Koch, Matthias; Pfeifer, Christian; Angele, Peter

    2017-12-01

    Post-operative infection after arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a rare but severe complication, particularly for young and active patients. It is unclear whether the prevalence of knee infection is correlated with the type of sports or the level of performance. From 2008 to 2012, the internal single-centre ACL registry of the FIFA Medical Centre of Excellence Regensburg was retrospectively screened for sex, age, time between isolated primary ACL rupture and surgery, surgical technique, rate of infection after ACL reconstruction and the type of sports practised. In total, 4801 ACL reconstructions had been conducted over 5 years, 4579 in amateur and 221 in professional athletes. After application of the exclusion criteria, 1809 athletes with ACL reconstruction were analysed regarding postsurgical infection and the type of sports practised. Professionals and amateurs did not significantly differ with regard to infection rates (n.s.) but in the timing of ACL repair (p < 0.001). Eleven of 1130 football players had developed postsurgical infection after ACL reconstruction (1.0%) in contrast to 557 skiers and snowboarders without infection (p = 0.02). The timing of ACL repair did not differ between the different types of sports (n.s.). Staphylococcus aureus and epidermidis were the predominant detected bacteria. All patients were hospitalised and successfully treated with arthroscopic lavage and antibiotic medication. ACL infections showed sports-related differences. Athletes practising summer outdoor sports such as football had a significantly higher risk of infection after ACL reconstruction than winter sports athletes. No difference was found between professional and amateur athletes. Relevant prevention strategies for postsurgical ACL infections should consider influencing patient factors such as the type of sports activity and attendant circumstances. III.

  15. Arthroscopic treatment of femoral nerve paresthesia caused by an acetabular paralabral cyst.

    PubMed

    Kanauchi, Taira; Suganuma, Jun; Mochizuki, Ryuta; Uchikawa, Shinichi

    2014-05-01

    This report describes a rare case of femoral nerve paresthesia caused by an acetabular paralabral cyst of the hip joint. A 68-year-old woman presented with a 6-month history of right hip pain and paresthesia along the anterior thigh and radiating down to the anterior aspect of the knee. Radiography showed osteoarthritis with a narrowed joint space in the right hip joint. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a cyst with low T1- and high T2-weighted signal intensity arising from a labral tear at the anterior aspect of the acetabulum. The cyst was connected to the joint space and displaced the femoral nerve to the anteromedial side. The lesion was diagnosed as an acetabular paralabral cyst causing femoral neuropathy. Because the main symptom was femoral nerve paresthesia and the patient desired a less invasive procedure, arthroscopic labral repair was performed to stop synovial fluid flow to the paralabral cyst that was causing the femoral nerve paresthesia. After surgery, the cyst and femoral nerve paresthesia disappeared. At the 18-month follow-up, the patient had no recurrence. There have been several reports of neurovascular compression caused by the cyst around the hip joint. To the authors' knowledge, only 3 cases of acetabular paralabral cysts causing sciatica have been reported. The current patient appears to represent a rare case of an acetabular paralabral cyst causing femoral nerve paresthesia. The authors suggest that arthroscopic labral repair for an acetabular paralabral cyst causing neuropathy can be an option for patients who desire a less invasive procedure. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Second-look assessment after all-arthroscopic autologous chondrocyte implantation with spheroides at the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Siebold, Rainer; Karidakis, Georgios; Feil, Sven; Fernandez, Francis

    2016-05-01

    To report arthroscopic second look as well as clinical results after arthroscopic autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) for articular cartilage repair at the knee joint. A second-look assessment after arthroscopic ACI using spheroides was performed in 41 patients with 57 full-size articular cartilage defects of the knee. The median time from ACI to second-look arthroscopy was 10 (6-72) months. The ACI was assessed macroscopically and by probing according to the International Cartilage Repair Score (ICRS)-Cartilage Repair Assessment (CRA) to get information on the amount and quality of regeneration. Clinical follow-up with subjective outcome scores was performed an average of 34.5 ± 19.2 months after ACI. Twenty-seven (65.8 %) of ACI's were combined with additional procedures. The ICRS-CRA was rated "normal" or "nearly normal" in 52 of 57 (91.3 %) and "abnormal" in 5 (8.8 %) of all cartilage defects. At follow-up, evaluation of KOOS was an average of 81.0 ± 12.9 for pain, 76.8 ± 16.6 for symptoms, 85.1 ± 14.9 for activities of daily living, 55.3 ± 27.7 for sport and recreation and 50.6 ± 23.8 for quality of live. IKDC was 63.0 ± 18.8, Lysholm score was 79.0 ± 18.0, and Tegner score was 4 (1-6). Subjective assessment according to the VAS scale was an average of 7.4 ± 2.1 for overall satisfaction and 6.7 ± 2.5 satisfaction for the operated knee. Seven patients (22.6 %) showed low subjective outcome scores at last follow-up-of these, 2 patients showed a CRA 3 and 5 a CRA 1 or 2. At second-look arthroscopy, 52 (91.3 %) of all cartilage defects showed a normal or nearly normal macroscopic articular cartilage regeneration after arthroscopic ACI using spheroides. Twenty-four patients (77.4 %) showed good subjective clinical results. The high number of concomitant surgery reflexes the complex aetiology of cartilage lesions and complexity of treatment. Thus, a strict indication and surgical planing is necessary to avoid clinical

  17. Arthroscopic autologous chondrocyte implantation in the hip for the treatment of full-thickness cartilage defects

    PubMed Central

    Thier, Steffen; Weiss, Christel; Fickert, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Current literature indicates that the appropriate treatment of articular cartilage defects has significant influence on the postoperative outcome after hip arthroscopy. In the hip, arthroscopic treatment of cartilage defects is technically challenging, especially the autologous chondrocyte implantation/matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI/MACI) procedures. The purpose of this prospective study was to introduce two injectable MACI products with self-adherent properties. Furthermore, we report short-term outcome and review the current literature. Methods: Full-thickness cartilage defects of 29 patients caused by the femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) were treated arthroscopically with an injectable MACI product in a two-step surgical procedure. The patient-related outcome was assessed with International Hip Outcome Tool (iHOT33), Euro-Quol group score (EQ-5D) and Non-Arthritic-Hip-Score (NAHS) at baseline, six weeks, six, 12 and 24 months. Results: Twenty-nine out of 46 patients (27 male/two female) with a mean age of 30.3 years (range 18–45 years) and an average defect size of 2.21 cm2 were available for follow-up after a mean of 19 months (range 6–24 months). All defects were located on the acetabulum International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) grade 3A–3D (nine 3A; eleven 3B; six 3C; three 3D). Twenty-six patients had associated labral pathology (23 repair 1–5 anchors; three partial trimming). Twenty-seven defects were caused by the FAI (20 CAM, six combined, one Pincer), two cases were of traumatic cause. An overall statistically significant improvement was observed for all assessment scores at an average follow-up of 19 months. Conclusion: In this study, we present short-term data of new arthroscopic injectable matrix-associated, autologous chondrocyte implants as a treatment option for full-thickness cartilage defects of the hip. All patient-administered assessment scores demonstrated an increase in activity level

  18. Radiographic Identification of Arthroscopically Relevant Acetabular Structures.

    PubMed

    Lee, W Andrew; Saroki, Adriana J; Løken, Sverre; Trindade, Christiano A C; Cram, Tyler R; Schindler, Broc R; LaPrade, Robert F; Philippon, Marc J

    2016-01-01

    The anatomy of the acetabulum has been described extensively in the literature, but radiographic acetabular guidelines have not been well established. This study provides a radiographic map of acetabular landmarks in the hip. The purpose of this study was to quantify the precise radiographic location of arthroscopic landmarks around the acetabulum. The hypothesis was that their locations were reproducible despite variability in the anatomy and positioning of pelvic specimens. Descriptive laboratory study. Ten fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens were dissected, and radio-opaque hardware was placed for each landmark of interest. Anteroposterior (AP) and false-profile radiographs were obtained, and measurements were taken using a digital picture archiving and communication system. On AP radiographs, the direct and indirect heads of the rectus femoris were a mean 48.2 ± 4.6 mm and 44.7 ± 4.3 mm proximal to the teardrop line, respectively. The mean radiographic distance between their insertions was 5.0 ± 3.4 mm. Moreover, the anterior inferior iliac spine was a mean 11.5 ± 3.8 mm from the acetabular rim. On false-profile radiographs, the mean distance between the direct and indirect heads of the rectus femoris was 31.4 ± 6.2 mm. The mean distance between the superior margin of the anterior labral sulcus (the psoas-u) and the midpoint of the transverse acetabular ligament was 41.0 ± 5.7 mm. Additionally, the direct and indirect heads of the rectus femoris corresponded to the 2:30 and 1:30 locations on the acetabular clockface, respectively. The midpoint of the transverse acetabular ligament was located at 7 o'clock on the clockface. The most important finding of this study, determined by quantitative measurements, was that the described surgical landmarks had reliable locations on radiographs. Distances between landmarks as well as distances between landmarks and reference lines were reproducible in both AP and false-profile views. An understanding of how acetabular

  19. Medical Malpractice Litigation Following Arthroscopic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kalpit N; Eltorai, Adam E M; Perera, Sudheesha; Durand, Wesley M; Shantharam, Govind; Owens, Brett D; Daniels, Alan H

    2018-04-10

    Our study aims to analyze a variety of factors involving malpractice lawsuits following arthroscopy, focusing on reasons for lawsuit and establishing predictors for the outcome of the lawsuit. Two legal databases, VerdictSearch and Westlaw, were queried for arthroscopic cases in adult patients. For all included cases, clinical and demographic data were recorded. The effects of plaintiff demographics, joint involved, lawsuit allegation, case ruling, and size of indemnity payments were assessed. Of the 240 included cases, 62 (26%) resulted in plaintiff verdict, 160 (67%) resulted in defense verdict, and 18 (8%) were settled without trial. Plaintiff demographics (age and sex) had no effect on the case ruling. There was no statistical difference between indemnity awards for plaintiff verdicts ($1,013,494) and settled cases ($848,331; P = .13). Patient death was noted in 20 cases (8.3%); a significantly higher proportion of these cases were settled versus went to trial (P = .0022), including 19 patients (95%) who had knee arthroscopy and 16 deaths (80%) resulting from a pulmonary embolus. Plaintiff verdict or settlement were seen significantly more frequently for vascular complications and wrong-sided surgery. Alternatively, defense verdicts followed lawsuits alleging surgeon technical error. Wrong-sided surgery, retained instruments, deep venous thrombosis, and postoperative infections were seen at a significantly higher proportion after knee arthroscopy than after arthroscopy of other joints. Similarly, neurological injury was significantly associated with elbow and hip arthroscopy, while allegations of technical error by the surgeon and block-related complications were associated with shoulder arthroscopy. Plaintiff verdict or settlement were seen for vascular complications and wrong-sided surgery, while defense verdicts followed lawsuits alleging surgeon technical error and block-related complications. We also identified types of allegations that were associated

  20. Level of the Subscapularis Split During Arthroscopic Latarjet.

    PubMed

    Lädermann, Alexandre; Denard, Patrick J; Arrigoni, Paolo; Narbona, Pablo; Burkhart, Stephen S; Barth, Johannes

    2017-12-01

    To determine the location of the subscapularis split during arthroscopic Latarjet created by an inside-out technique passing a switching stick from the posterior portal across the glenohumeral joint. An inside-out technique was used to arthroscopically create a subscapularis split in 20 fresh-frozen human cadaveric shoulders. The distance between the exit point of the switching stick and the upper border of the subscapularis and the anterior circumflex vessels was measured arthroscopically and after open dissection. Twelve splits were in the upper third of the subscapularis, 3 were at the junction of the upper third and the middle third, and 5 were in the middle third. None were at the junction between the middle and lower third as desired. Using the inside-out method during arthroscopic Latarjet may produce a high subscapularis split if it is performed from with a switching stick that is inserted through the posterior approach, and passed across the glenohumeral joint at the level of the inferior glenoid. This study analyzed the relative risk of high subscapularis split during the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of two arthroscopic pump systems based on image quality.

    PubMed

    Tuijthof, G J M; van den Boomen, H; van Heerwaarden, R J; van Dijk, C N

    2008-06-01

    The effectiveness of arthroscopic pump systems has been investigated with either subjective measures or measures that were unrelated to the image quality. The goal of this study is to determine the performance of an automated pump in comparison to a gravity pump based on objective assessment of the quality of the arthroscopic view. Ten arthroscopic operations performed with a gravity pump and ten performed with an automated pump (FMS Duo system) were matched on duration of the surgery and shaver usage, type of operation, and surgical experience. Quality of the view was defined by means of the presence or absence of previously described definitions of disturbances (bleeding, turbidity, air bubbles, and loose fibrous tissue). The percentage of disturbances for all operations was assessed with a time-disturbance analysis of the recorded operations. The Mann-Whitney U test shows a significant difference in favor of the automated pump for the presence of turbidity only (Exact Sig. [2*(1-tailed Sig.)] = 0.015). Otherwise, no differences were determined (Exact Sig. [2*(1-tailed Sig.)] > 0.436). A new objective method is successfully applied to assess efficiency of pump systems based on the quality of the arthroscopic view. Important disturbances (bleeding, air bubbles, and loose fibrous tissue) are not reduced by an automated pump used in combination with a tourniquet. The most frequent disturbance turbidity is reduced by around 50%. It is questionable if this result justifies the use of an automated pump for straightforward arthroscopic knee surgeries using a tourniquet.

  2. Arthroscopic Anatomy of the Ankle Joint.

    PubMed

    Ray, Ronald G

    2016-10-01

    There are a number of variations in the intra-articular anatomy of the ankle which should not be considered pathological under all circumstances. The anteromedial corner of the tibial plafond (between the anterior edge of the tibial plafond and the medial malleolus) can have a notch, void of cartilage and bone. This area can appear degenerative arthroscopically; it is actually a normal variant of the articular surface. The anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (AITF) can possess a lower, accessory band which can impinge on the anterolateral edge of the talar dome. In some cases it can cause irritation along this area of the talus laterally. If it is creating local irritation it can be removed since it does not provide any additional stabilization to the syndesmosis. There is a beveled region at the anterior leading edge of the lateral and dorsal surfaces of the talus laterally. This triangular region is void of cartilage and subchondral bone. The lack of talar structure in this region allows the lower portion of the AITF ligament to move over the talus during end range dorsiflexion of the ankle, preventing impingement. The variation in talar anatomy for this area should not be considered pathological. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Simulation of arthroscopic surgery using MRI data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heller, Geoffrey; Genetti, Jon

    1994-01-01

    With the availability of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technology in the medical field and the development of powerful graphics engines in the computer world the possibility now exists for the simulation of surgery using data obtained from an actual patient. This paper describes a surgical simulation system which will allow a physician or a medical student to practice surgery on a patient without ever entering an operating room. This could substantially lower the cost of medial training by providing an alternative to the use of cadavers. This project involves the use of volume data acquired by MRI which are converted to polygonal form using a corrected marching cubes algorithm. The data are then colored and a simulation of surface response based on springy structures is performed in real time. Control for the system is obtained through the use of an attached analog-to-digital unit. A remote electronic device is described which simulates an imaginary tool having features in common with both arthroscope and laparoscope.

  4. Gastroschisis repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... the skin and muscles covering the belly (abdominal wall). The opening allows the intestines and sometimes other ... back into the belly. The opening in the wall of the belly is repaired. Staged repair is ...

  5. Arthroscopic management of tibial plateau fractures: special techniques.

    PubMed

    Perez Carro, L

    1997-04-01

    Arthroscopic assessment and treatment of tibial plateau fractures has gained popularity in recent years. This article describes some maneuvers to facilitate the management of these fractures with the arthroscope. We use a 14-mm rounded curved periosteal elevator to manipulate fragments within the joint instead of using a probe. To facilitate visualization of fractures, we describe the use of loop sutures around the meniscus to retract the meniscus when there is a tear in the meniscus. We suggest the use of the arthroscope for directly viewing the interosseous space to be sure that any internal fixation devices remain outside the articular space. The use of these tactics will allow a faster, more accurate reduction with less radiation exposure in patients with displaced tibial plateau fractures.

  6. Arthroscopic bursectomy for recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis after hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Van Hofwegen, Christopher; Baker, Champ L; Savory, Carlton G; Baker, Champ L

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the use of arthroscopic bursectomy for pain relief in patients with trochanteric bursitis after hip arthroplasty. In this retrospective case series of 12 patients undergoing arthroscopic treatment of recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis after hip arthroplasty, outcomes were assessed via phone interview with a numeric pain rating scale from 1 to 10 and were compared with preoperative pain ratings. Patients were asked the percentage of time they had painless hip function and whether they would have the surgery again. At an average 36-month follow-up (range, 4-85 months), the average numeric pain scale rating improved from 9.3 to 3.3. At an average of 62% of the time, patients had painless use of the hip. Ten of 12 patients in the study felt the pain relief gained was substantial enough to warrant having procedure again. In these patients, arthroscopic bursectomy was a viable option for patients with recalcitrant bursitis after hip arthroplasty.

  7. Open Latarjet versus arthroscopic Latarjet: clinical results and cost analysis.

    PubMed

    Randelli, P; Fossati, C; Stoppani, C; Evola, F R; De Girolamo, L

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the clinical results between open and arthroscopic Latarjet and perform a cost analysis of the two techniques. A systematic review of articles present in PubMed and MEDLINE was performed in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. Studies concerning post-operative outcomes following Latarjet procedures for chronic anterior shoulder instability were selected for analysis. The clinical and radiographic results as well as the costs of the open and arthroscopic techniques were evaluated. Twenty-three articles, describing a total of 1317 shoulders, met the inclusion criteria: 17 studies were related to open Latarjet, and 6 to the arthroscopic technique. Despite the heterogeneity of the evaluation scales, the clinical results seemed very satisfactory for both techniques. We detected a statistically significant difference in the percentage of bone graft healing in favour of the open technique (88.6 vs 77.6 %). Recurrent dislocation was more frequent following open surgery (3.3 % after open surgery vs 0.3 % after arthroscopy), but this finding was biased by the large difference in follow-up duration between the two techniques. The direct costs of the arthroscopic procedure were double in comparison to open surgery (€2335 vs €1040). A lack of data prevented evaluation of indirect costs and, therefore, a cost-effectiveness analysis. The open and arthroscopic Latarjet techniques showed excellent and comparable clinical results. However, the much higher direct costs of the arthroscopic procedure do not seem, at present, to be justified by a benefit to the patient. III.

  8. Two-Year Evaluation of Osteochondral Repair with a Novel Biphasic Graft Saturated in Bone Marrow in an Equine Model

    PubMed Central

    McCarrel, Taralyn M.; Pownder, Sarah L.; Gilbert, Susannah; Koff, Matthew F.; Castiglione, Emme; Saska, Ryan A.; Bradica, Gino; Fortier, Lisa A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate a biphasic cartilage repair device (CRD) for feasibility of arthroscopic implantation, safety, biocompatibility, and efficacy for long-term repair of large osteochondral defects. Methods The CRD was press-fit into defects (10 mm diameter, 10 mm deep) created in the femoral trochlea of 12 horses. In the contralateral limb, 10 mm diameter full-thickness chondral defects were treated with microfracture (MFX). Radiographs were obtained pre- and postoperatively, and at 4, 12, and 24 months. Repeat arthroscopy was performed at 4 and 12 months. Gross assessment, histology, mechanical testing, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed at 24 months. Results The CRD was easily placed arthroscopically. There was no evidence of joint infection, inflammation, or degeneration. CRD-treated defects had significantly more sclerosis compared to MFX early (P = 0.0006), but was not different at 24 months. CRD had better arthroscopic scores at 4 months compared to MFX (P = 0.0069). At 24 months, there was no difference in repair tissue on histology or mechanical testing. Based on MRI, CRD repair tissue had less proteoglycan (deep P = 0.027, superficial P = 0.015) and less organized collagen (deep P = 0.028) compared to MFX. Cartilage surrounding MFX defects had more fissures compared to CRD. Conclusion The repair tissue formed after CRD treatment of a large osteochondral lesion is fibrocartilage similar to that formed in simple chondral defects treated with MFX. The CRD can be easily placed arthroscopically, is safe, and biocompatible for 24 months. The CRD results in improved early arthroscopic repair scores and may limit fissure formation in adjacent cartilage. PMID:28934879

  9. Hip instability treated with arthroscopic capsular plication.

    PubMed

    Kalisvaart, Michael M; Safran, Marc R

    2017-01-01

    Atraumatic microinstability of the hip is felt to be a cause of intra-articular pathology, particularly tears of the anterior labrum. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a consecutive series of patients with atraumatic hip microinstability that resulted in anterior labral and cartilage pathology, treated with hip arthroscopy and capsular plication without any associated bony procedures. Thirty-two patients underwent hip arthroscopy and suture capsular plication for the treatment of hip instability without concomitant bony resections of the acetabulum or proximal femur between November 2009 and November 2012 and were followed for a minimum of 12 months. Patients were clinically evaluated preoperatively and again at 3, 6, 12, 24, and 36 months postoperatively with the modified Harris hip score (mHHS) and iHOT score in some patients (as this was introduced late in the study). Comparison was made evaluating centre-edge angle, Tönnis angle, physical examination findings, and demographics on outcome. There was significant improvement in the mean mHHS from 67 (SD = 8.7) to 97 (SD = 4.7) and iHOT score from 41 (SD = 18.3) to 85 (SD = 10.1) at final follow-up. When comparing patients with mild hip dysplasia to patients without hip dysplasia, there was no significant difference in clinical outcome at any point in follow-up. There was no significant association between patient age, duration of preoperative symptoms, previous ipsilateral hip arthroscopy, nature of onset of symptoms, centre-edge angle, Tönnis angle, or preoperative physical examination findings with clinical outcome at final follow-up. Isolated arthroscopic suture capsular plication performed for the treatment of hip instability resulted in improved patient pain and function at a minimum of 1-year follow-up.

  10. Quantification of the Learning Curve for Arthroscopic Os Trigonum Excision.

    PubMed

    Yamakado, Kotaro

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to quantify the learning curve for arthroscopic os trigonum excision using the log-linear model. Twenty-three consecutive feet underwent arthroscopic os trigonum excision and release of the flexor hallucis longus. The required time from the beginning of shaving of the soft tissue until completion of os trigonum excision and release of the flexor hallucis longus (van Dijk time) was recorded. Regression analysis was applied to predict the required time on the basis of the cumulative case volume after logarithmic transformation of both statistics. The mean required time was 35.2 (range 9 to 90) minutes. After logarithmic transformation, a significant linear correlation was observed between the required time and the cumulative case volume (p = .0043). The best-fit linear equation was calculated as log (y, estimated required time)  = -0.41 log (x, case volume) + 1.86, resulting in an estimated learning rate of 75.3% (= 2 -0.41 ). The results showed an overall time reduction in arthroscopic os trigonum excision in support of a learning curve effect with an ~75% learning rate, indicating that the required time for arthroscopic os trigonum excision can decrease by ≤25% when the cumulative volume of cases has doubled. Copyright © 2017 The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A meta-analysis of tourniquet assisted arthroscopic knee surgery.

    PubMed

    Smith, Toby O; Hing, Caroline B

    2009-10-01

    The purpose was to compare the intra- and post-operative outcomes of tourniquet assisted to non-tourniquet-assisted surgery during arthroscopic knee procedures. A systematic review was undertaken of the electronic databases MEDLINE, CINAHL, AMED and EMBASE, in addition to a review of unpublished material and a hand search of pertinent orthopaedic journals. The evidence-base was critically appraised using the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group quality assessment tool. Study heterogeneity was statistically measured using the Chi(2) and I(2) statistical tests. When appropriate, a random-effect meta-analysis was undertaken to pool the results of the primary studies assessing the mean difference of each outcome. Nine studies were identified evaluating seven outcome measures and parameters. Arthroscopic ACL reconstruction knee surgery with a tourniquet experienced less operative visualisation difficulties compared to surgery without a tourniquet. There was no significant difference between tourniquet and non-tourniquet arthroscopic knee surgery for all other outcomes. The evidence-base exhibited a number of methodological limitations. There is limited evidence to suggest that a tourniquet assists in arthroscopic knee surgery. The methodological quality of the present evidence-base remains weak. Further study is required to answer this research question.

  12. Systematic arthroscopic investigation of the bovine stifle joint.

    PubMed

    Hagag, U; Tawfiek, M G; Brehm, W

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to establish a protocol for arthroscopic exploration of the bovine stifle joint using craniomedial, caudolateral and caudomedial approaches. An anatomic and arthroscopic study using 26 cadaveric limbs from 13 non-lame adult dairy cows was performed. The craniomedial approach was created between the middle and medial patellar ligaments to investigate the cranial pouches of the stifle joint. The inter-condylar eminence, the proximal aspect of the medial femoral trochlear ridge and the lateral aspect of the lateral femoral condyle were used as starting points for systematic examination of the medial femorotibial, the femoropatellar and the lateral femorotibial joints, respectively. The observed structures were: the suprapatellar pouch, articular surfaces of the patella, femoral trochlear ridges, cruciate ligaments, menisci, and the meniscotibial ligaments. The arthroscopic portal for the caudomedial femorotibial pouch was about 6-8 cm caudal to the medial collateral ligament. The proximal and distal caudolateral femorotibial pouches were explored 3 cm and 1.5 cm caudal to the ipsilateral collateral ligament, respectively. The observed structures were the caudal aspect of femoral condyles, menisci, caudal cruciate ligament, popliteal tendon and the meniscofemoral ligament. Restricted joint size and risk of common peroneal nerve damage were the major limitations for exploration of the caudal femorotibial compartments. The study described the arthroscopic portals and normal intra-articular anatomy of the bovine stifle joint but further investigations are warranted to validate these techniques in clinical cases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The reliability of arthroscopic classification of acetabular rim labrochondral disease.

    PubMed

    Nepple, Jeffrey J; Larson, Christopher M; Smith, Matthew V; Kim, Young-Jo; Zaltz, Ira; Sierra, Rafael J; Clohisy, John C

    2012-10-01

    The results of surgical treatment for femoroacetabular impingement have been increasingly reported, and more advanced intra-articular disease has been identified as an important predictive factor of outcome. Yet, the reliability of arthroscopic hip disease classification has not been well defined. Purpose/ To determine the intraobserver and interobserver reliability of the Beck classification of labral and articular cartilage disease (anterior-superior acetabular rim) encountered in hip arthroscopy. Secondly, we identified the sources of poor reliability that may be improved with future disease classification schemes. Our hypothesis was that the Beck classification of labral and chondral lesions would demonstrate substantial reliability, while the differentiation of early forms of disease would be a common source of disagreement. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Four experienced hip arthroscopists reviewed standardized arthroscopic videos of 40 cases. Arthroscopic findings at the anterior-superior acetabular rim were classified using the Beck classification of labral and articular cartilage disease. Repeat classification of videos was performed at least 2 weeks later. The reliability of arthroscopic classification was defined using the average weighted Cohen κ values and agreement rates. Arthroscopic classification of labral disease using the Beck classification demonstrated moderate to substantial interobserver reliability (average κ = .62; range, .48-.78) and an overall agreement rate of 81.7%. Intraobserver reliability showed a similar level of reliability (average κ = .65; agreement rate, 80.6%). The differentiation between labral degeneration and labral detachment was a common source of disagreement. Similarly, the Beck classification of articular cartilage disease had moderate to substantial interobserver reliability (average κ = .65; range, .49-.78) and overall agreement rate of 57.5%. Intraobserver reliability showed a slightly better level of

  14. Arthroscopic treatment of iliopsoas impingement (IPI) after total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Jerosch, Jorg; Neuhäuser, Christian; Sokkar, Sherif M

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to present our arthroscopic surgical technique and the results in patient with an iliopsoas impingement (IPI) syndrome after a hip replacement. Between 1999 and 2011, 35 patients with the clinical picture of an IPI after total hip replacement were diagnosed and treated arthroscopically. The age was ranged from 58 to 82 years. All patients underwent conservative treatment for at least 6 months without success. The indication for the arthroscopic procedure was the failure of the conservative therapy as well as typical clinical signs as painful hip flexion, a positive local anesthesia test and radiological evidence of the presence of a prominent anterior acetabular component. The arthroscopic treatment was performed in all patients with anterior capsulotomy and partial capsulectomy of the hip joint. After identification of the pathology an arthroscopic release of the iliopsoas tendon in the region of the proved lesion was performed. The average follow-up period was 3.6 years (6 months to 12 years). In all patients osseous integrated acetabular components were found. In six cases there was a surface replacement, in three cases it was a cementless screw-in cup and in the other three cases it was a cementless modular press-fit cup. 8 out of 12 patients suffered from a hip dysplasia with a secondary osteoarthritis. After establishing an anterior capsular window arthroscopically, the iliopsoas tendon could be visualized in all cases. In addition to multiple local tendinitis all patients already showed mechanical limitation with partial rupture of variable extent in the iliopsoas tendon. During the arthroscopy the lesion was detected at the level of the anterior prominent acetabular component as well as distal to it. 10 out of 12 patients reported immediately after postoperative mobilization that the typical preoperative complaints have disappeared. Two patients still had residual pain. In one of those patients this was relieved by the time

  15. Fundamental arthroscopic skill differentiation with virtual reality simulation.

    PubMed

    Rose, Kelsey; Pedowitz, Robert

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use and validity of virtual reality modules as part of the educational approach to mastering arthroscopy in a safe environment by assessing the ability to distinguish between experience levels. Additionally, the study aimed to evaluate whether experts have greater ambidexterity than do novices. Three virtual reality modules (Swemac/Augmented Reality Systems, Linkoping, Sweden) were created to test fundamental arthroscopic skills. Thirty participants-10 experts consisting of faculty, 10 intermediate participants consisting of orthopaedic residents, and 10 novices consisting of medical students-performed each exercise. Steady and Telescope was designed to train centering and image stability. Steady and Probe was designed to train basic triangulation. Track and Moving Target was designed to train coordinated motions of arthroscope and probe. Metrics reflecting speed, accuracy, and efficiency of motion were used to measure construct validity. Steady and Probe and Track a Moving Target both exhibited construct validity, with better performance by experts and intermediate participants than by novices (P < .05), whereas Steady and Telescope did not show validity. There was an overall trend toward better ambidexterity as a function of greater surgical experience, with experts consistently more proficient than novices throughout all 3 modules. This study represents a new way to assess basic arthroscopy skills using virtual reality modules developed through task deconstruction. Participants with the most arthroscopic experience performed better and were more consistent than novices on all 3 virtual reality modules. Greater arthroscopic experience correlates with more symmetry of ambidextrous performance. However, further adjustment of the modules may better simulate fundamental arthroscopic skills and discriminate between experience levels. Arthroscopy training is a critical element of orthopaedic surgery resident training

  16. Graft position and fusion rate following arthroscopic Latarjet.

    PubMed

    Casabianca, Laurent; Gerometta, Antoine; Massein, Audrey; Khiami, Frederic; Rousseau, Romain; Hardy, Alexandre; Pascal-Moussellard, Hugues; Loriaut, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    The arthroscopic Latarjet procedure is recently becoming an increasingly popular technique. Nevertheless, position and fusion of the autograft had not been well studied yet. The purpose of this study was to assess the positioning of the coracoid graft and the fusion rate on CT scan in the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure. The study design was a prospective series of 19 consecutive patients who received arthroscopic Latarjet procedure. Radiological assessment on CT scan performed 3 months post-operatively included an analysis of the fusion and the position of the coracoid bone graft using a validated method. 02:30-04:20 was considered an ideal positioning in the sagittal view. In the axial view, the positioning was considered as flush, congruent, medial, too medial, or lateral. The median age of patients was 27.6 (±6.9). Mean operative time was of 161 min ±34.8. The fusion rate was of 78 %. Coracoid grafts were positioned 01:52 h (56° ± 14°) to 4:04 h (122° ± 12.5°). In the axial view, 32 % of the grafts positioning were considered as flush, 38 % as congruent, 30 % as medial, and 6 % too medial. No lateral position was noted. Two complications occurred, one graft fracture during screwing requiring opening conversion and an early case of osteolysis in a medial-positioned graft. The arthroscopic Latarjet procedure is a technically challenging technique that provides satisfactory fusion rate and graft positioning with a low complication rate. The clinical importance of this study lies in the observation that it is the first study to evaluate the position of the coracoid bone graft in arthroscopic Latarjet according to a detailed and validated method. IV.

  17. Minimum 2-Year Outcomes of Hip Arthroscopic Surgery in Patients With Acetabular Overcoverage and Profunda Acetabulae Compared With Matched Controls With Normal Acetabular Coverage.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Sivashankar; Darwish, Nader; Chaharbakhshi, Edwin O; Suarez-Ahedo, Carlos; Lodhia, Parth; Domb, Benjamin G

    2017-09-01

    -up; 215 patients satisfied the inclusion criteria for the control (normal coverage) group, of which 183 (85.1%) had a minimum 2-year follow-up. Thirty-six patients were matched in each group using the above criteria. There was no difference with respect to range of motion and impingement signs between the groups. The study group had significantly higher radiological markers of overcoverage but not retroversion compared with the control group. The study group had a significantly higher incidence of Seldes type 2 tears compared with the control group: 50.0% versus 19.4%, respectively ( P = .013). Both groups demonstrated significant improvements in the mean scores of all PROs, but the study group had a lower magnitude of improvement for all the PROs compared with the control group, with the modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS) achieving statistical significance: 13.5 versus 21.7 points, respectively ( P = .032). The study group had a significantly lower mean patient satisfaction score compared with the control group: 6.61 versus 7.91, respectively ( P = .019). The study group also had a significantly higher incidence of conversion to THA compared with the control group: 4 versus 0, respectively ( P = .040). Hip arthroscopic surgery for the management of symptomatic labral tears in patients with combined overcoverage and coxa profunda is associated with improvements in patient outcomes and pain at a minimum 2-year follow-up. However, the degree of improvement is of lower magnitude compared with a matched cohort with normal coverage undergoing the arthroscopic management of symptomatic labral tears. While hips with lateral overcoverage combined with coxa profunda may have a smaller potential for improvement compared with hips with normal coverage, this type of osseous morphology is still repairable with arthroscopic treatment.

  18. Short-term outcomes of arthroscopic TightRope® fixation are better than hook plate fixation in acute unstable acromioclavicular joint dislocations.

    PubMed

    Bin Abd Razak, Hamid Rahmatullah; Yeo, Eng-Meng Nicholas; Yeo, William; Lie, Tijauw-Tjoen Denny

    2017-12-09

    The aim of this study was to compare the short-term outcomes of arthroscopic TightRope ® fixation with that of hook plate fixation in patients with acute unstable acromioclavicular joint dislocations. We conducted a prospective case-control study of twenty-six patients with an acute ACJ dislocation who underwent surgical repair with either an arthroscopic TightRope ® fixation or a hook plate from 2013 to 2016. Clinical and radiological data were collected prospectively. Clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Constant Score, the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) Shoulder Score, Oxford Shoulder Score as well as the visual analogue scale. Radiological outcomes were assessed with the coracoclavicular distance (CCD). Sixteen patients underwent arthroscopic TightRope ® fixation, while 10 patients underwent hook plate fixation. There were no significant differences in the preoperative variables except for the mean UCLA 4b infraspinatus score (TightRope ® 2.8 vs. hook plate 3.8; p = 0.030). Duration of surgery was significantly longer in the TightRope ® group. At 1 year post-operatively, the TightRope ® group had a significantly better Constant Score and CCD with no complications. All patients with hook plate fixation had to undergo a second procedure for removal of implant, and 3 patients had complications. Arthroscopic TightRope ® fixation is a good option for the treatment of acute unstable ACJ dislocations. It has better short-term clinical and radiological outcomes as well as lesser complications when compared to hook plate fixation. Therapeutic, Level III.

  19. Repair Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Lacks, Sanford A.

    1999-07-09

    Maintaining the integrity of its genetic blueprint is of central importance for a living cell and the organism of which it is a part. To preserve the function of the genetic material within the cell and to ensure its accurate transmission to future generations, numerous mechanisms have evolved to repair errors and damage in DNA. As an example of the cellular resources devoted to this end, consider that of 1709 proteins encoded by the first bacterial genome to be sequenced, that of Haemophilus influenzae, at least 45 function in DNA repair mechanisms. The complementary, double-stranded structure of DNA, a crucialmore » feature that allows it to be readily replicated, also facilitates its repair. The objects of repair range from mismatched bases resulting from errors in DNA replication to base damage and even gross distortion of the DNA structure by physical and chemical agents. In a few instances damage is directly reversed. Most repair mechanisms, however, first remove the damaged region together with a segment of the DNA strand in which it occurred and then resynthesize that segment correctly using the complementary strand as a template. Depending on the component initially removed or recognized, these mechanisms have been categorized as base excision, nucleotide (oroligonucleotide) excision, and mismatch repair. When the damage cannot be so simply repaired, a mechanism of recombinational repair, requiring interaction with another copy of the genome, may intervene.« less

  20. The 25 most cited articles in arthroscopic orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Cassar Gheiti, Adrian J; Downey, Richard E; Byrne, Damien P; Molony, Diarmuid C; Mulhall, Kevin J

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to use Web of Knowledge to determine which published arthroscopic surgery-related articles have been cited most frequently by other authors by ranking the 25 most cited articles. We furthermore wished to determine whether there is any difference between a categorical "journal-by-journal" analysis and an "all-database" analysis in arthroscopic surgery and whether such a search methodology would alter the results of previously published lists of "citation classics" in the field. We analyzed the characteristics of these articles to determine what qualities make an article important to this subspecialty of orthopaedic surgery. Web of Knowledge was searched on March 7, 2011, using the term "arthroscopy" for citations to articles related to arthroscopy in 61 orthopaedic journals and using the all-database function. Each of the 61 orthopaedic journals was searched separately for arthroscopy-related articles to determine the 25 most cited articles. An all-database search for arthroscopy-related articles was carried out and compared with a journal-by-journal search. Each article was reviewed for basic information including the type of article, authorship, institution, country, publishing journal, and year published. The number of citations ranged from 189 to 567 in a journal-by-journal search and from 214 to 1,869 in an all-database search. The 25 most cited articles on arthroscopic surgery were published in 11 journals: 8 orthopaedic journals and 3 journals from other specialties. The most cited article in arthroscopic orthopaedic surgery was published in The New England Journal of Medicine, which was not previously identified by a journal-by-journal search. An all-database search in Web of Knowledge gives a more in-depth methodology of determining the true citation ranking of articles. Among the top 25 most cited articles, autologous chondrocyte implantation/transplantation is currently the most cited and most popular topic in arthroscopic

  1. Amount of meniscal resection after failed meniscal repair.

    PubMed

    Pujol, Nicolas; Barbier, Olivier; Boisrenoult, Philippe; Beaufils, Philippe

    2011-08-01

    The failure rate after arthroscopic meniscal repair ranges from 5% to 43.5% (mean, 15%) in the literature. But little is known about the amount of meniscal tissue removed after failed meniscal repair. The volume of subsequent meniscectomy after failed meniscal repair is not increased when compared with the volume of meniscectomy that would have been performed if not initially repaired. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. From January 2000 to December 2009, 295 knees underwent arthroscopic meniscal repair for unstable peripheral vertical tears. When present (219 cases), all anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears underwent reconstruction. Patients with multiple ligament injuries and posterior cruciate ligament injuries were excluded from the analysis. Thirty-two medial and 5 lateral menisci underwent subsequent meniscectomy after failed repair at a mean of 26 months postoperatively (range, 3-114 months). Five parameters were specifically evaluated: the amount of meniscectomy related to the initial tear, the ACL status, the appearance of chondral lesions, the time from the initial injury to meniscal repair, and the time from repair to meniscectomy. The posterior segment of the meniscus was involved in all tears and retears. Among failures, resection of the meniscal segments primarily repaired occurred for 17 medial and 2 lateral meniscal tears (52%); the tear extended in 5 cases (all medial menisci), and healing of some repaired segments led to a partial resection of the initial lesion in 35% of cases (10 medial menisci, 3 lateral menisci). The time from injury to meniscal repair was correlated with an increasing volume of meniscus removed (P < .05) and with the presence of stage 2 or 3 chondral lesions at revision (P < .03). All knees with extended tears (5 cases) and/or with significant chondral degeneration (8 cases) occurred in ACL-reconstructed knees. Among them, 50% (6 of 12) of ACL-reconstructed knees were ACL deficient. There are few detrimental effects when

  2. Comparison of Ankle Joint Visualization Between the 70° and 30° Arthroscopes: A Cadaveric Study.

    PubMed

    Tonogai, Ichiro; Hayashi, Fumio; Tsuruo, Yoshihiro; Sairyo, Koichi

    2018-02-01

    Ankle arthroscopy is an important diagnostic and therapeutic tool. Arthroscopic ankle surgery for anterior ankle impingement or osteochondral lesions (OCLs) is mostly performed with a 30° arthroscope; however, visualization of lesions is sometimes difficult. This study sought to compare ankle joint visualization between 70° and 30° arthroscopes and clarify the effectiveness of 70° arthroscopy. Standard anterolateral and anteromedial portals were placed with 4-mm 70° or 30° angled arthroscopes in a fresh 77-year-old male cadaveric ankle. The medial ligament and surrounding tissue were dissected via a medial malleolar skin incision. Kirschner wires were inserted into the distal tibia anterior edge; 5-mm diameter OCLs were created on the medial talar gutter anteriorly, midway, and posteriorly. The talar dome and distal tibia anterior edge were visualized using both arthroscopes. The 70° arthroscope displayed the anterior edge of the distal tibia immediately in front of the arthroscope, allowing full visualization of the posterior OCL of the medial talar gutter more clearly than the 30° arthroscope. This study revealed better ankle joint visualization with the 70° arthroscope, and may enable accurate, safe, and complete debridement, especially in treatment of medial talar gutter posterior OCLs and removal of anterior distal tibial edge bony impediments. Level IV, Anatomic study.

  3. [The value of arthroscopic labrum stapling in anterior shoulder dislocation].

    PubMed

    Goertzen, M; Hille, E; Schmitz, S; Spahnke, B

    1990-09-01

    Shoulder luxations are common injuries in relation to sports. Isokinetic strength was evaluated in 24 patients on the average 1 year after performing arthroscopic stabilisation of an anterior shoulder luxation. Using the Merac (Universal Gym Equip., Cedar Rapids, Iowa, USA), test data were gathered on both shoulders in flexion-extension, abduction-adduction and in the supine 90 degrees abducted test position in external-internal rotation. Tests were performed at 60, 180 and 500 deg/sec. Means and standard deviations for peak torque, total work, peak torque to body weight ratios and agonist/antagonist ratios are presented. Our one year follow-up showed, that 82% of all patients were free from complaints and had almost the same data as on the non-operated shoulders. Arthroscopic stabilisation of anterior shoulder luxations in combination with intensive physiotherapy gave excellent results in most cases.

  4. Arthroscopic Resection of a Bilateral Calcaneonavicular Coalition in a Child.

    PubMed

    Nehme, Alexandre H; Bou Monsef, Jad; Bou Ghannam, Alaa G; Imad, Joseph P; Moucharafieh, Ramzi; Wehbe, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Calcaneonavicular coalition is a congenital anomaly characterized by a connection between the calcaneus and the navicular. It can manifest as lateral foot pain, peroneal spastic flatfoot, and repeated ankle sprains. Surgery is required in the case of chronic pain and after failure of conservative treatment. The aim of surgical intervention is pain relief and preventing recurrence. Arthroscopic resection is a minimally invasive alternative that has the advantages of quicker recovery and better aesthetic results. This technique has shown significant symptomatic improvement and no recurrence at early follow-up points in a small number of reported cases. The present report presents the case of a child with bilateral calcaneonavicular coalition. This is the first report to our knowledge that describes the outcome of simultaneous bilateral arthroscopic resection of calcaneonavicular coalition in a child with a 2-year follow-up period. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Open and Arthroscopic Surgical Treatment of Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Kuhns, Benjamin D.; Frank, Rachel M.; Pulido, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a common cause of hip pain, and when indicated, can be successfully managed through open surgery or hip arthroscopy. The goal of this review is to describe the different approaches to the surgical treatment of FAI. We present the indications, surgical technique, rehabilitation, and complications associated with (1) open hip dislocation, (2) reverse periacetabular osteotomy, (3) the direct anterior “mini-open” approach, and (4) arthroscopic surgery for FAI. PMID:26697431

  6. Evaluation of arthroscopic training using a porcine knee model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-June; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kyung, Hee-Soo

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of arthroscopic skills training. A routine diagnostic arthroscopic exercise using a porcine knee was performed. A checklist of 10 tasks was used in the training and the time taken to complete the checklist was evaluated, and the Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool (ASSET) score was used to score the training and evaluate the practice session. A total of 14 residents attended this training, including five first- and second-year residents, five third- and fourth-year residents, and four orthopedic fellows. The ASSET score and time taken to complete the task checklist were evaluated, and the first and third practice sessions were scored to evaluate the effectiveness of the training. The mean ASSET score improved from 21.8 in the first practice session to 24.9 in the third session ( p < 0.001); the time taken to complete the task checklist decreased from 242 s in the first practice session to 207.5 s in the third session ( p < 0.001). The ASSET score and the time taken to complete the task improved in all groups between the first and third practice sessions. The degree of improvement in the ASSET score and the time taken to complete the task checklist between the first and third practice sessions in each group were not statistically different among the groups ( p = 0.857, p = 0.263, respectively). Porcine knees provide good material for residents and young orthopedic surgeons for teaching and training of arthroscopic surgical techniques.

  7. Arthroscopic Revision Surgery for Failure of Open Latarjet Technique.

    PubMed

    Cuéllar, Adrián; Cuéllar, Ricardo; de Heredia, Pablo Beltrán

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the efficacy in treating pain, limited range of motion, and continued instability of the Latarjet open technique via the use of arthroscopy. A retrospective review of patients who underwent arthroscopic capsule plication after failure of an open Latarjet technique was performed. Revision surgery was indicated in cases of recurrent instability and associated pain. Only patients with a glenoid defect <25% were considered. The Constant and Rowe scores were administered, whereas pain was assessed with a visual analog scale before the reoperation and at 24 months after operation. Radiographs, computed tomography, and CT arthrography scans were performed. Twelve patients met the inclusion criteria. All patients had capsular distension and consequently were subjected to a capsuloplasty. Shoulder function, stability, and pain had all improved significantly at 24 months after arthroscopic revision (P < .0001). In particular, the Constant score increased from 44.9 (standard deviation [SD] 7.10) to 89.3 (SD 12.6) points, the Rowe score improved from 49.5 (SD 10.1) to 80.9 (SD 10.9), whereas the visual analog scale pain score decreased from 6.75 (SD 1.17) to 1.38 (SD 1.06). Primary open Latarjet with a glenoid bone defect <25% that failed due to capsular redundancy is amenable to successful treatment with arthroscopic capsuloplasty. Arthroscopic approaches can offer a good solution for treating previously failed open Latarjet procedures. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Suture-bridge subscapularis tendon repair technique using low anterior portals.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Young; Park, Jun-Suk; Jung, Jae-Kyung; Kumar, Praveen; Oh, Kyung-Soo

    2011-02-01

    A suture-bridge technique has been introduced to facilitate fixation procedures and to achieve increased holding strength in posterosuperior rotator cuff. Based on biomechanical studies, this technique has been suggested as an effective method that could optimize rotator cuff tendon-footprint contact area and mean pressure, as well as holding strength. In this technique, the suture-bridge creation is adapted for arthroscopic subscapularis repair to attain the ideal cuff integrity and footprint restoration. To obtain enough working portals and space, two accessory portals were made on the anterior aspect of the shoulder and use an elevator to retract the conjoined tendons and deltoid muscle. This technique could be useful for the repair of subscapularis tears, which are not easily approached using other arthroscopic techniques. From a biomechanical point of view, the subscapularis tendon could be restored more ideally using the suture-bridge technique.

  9. Historical review of arthroscopic surgery of the hip.

    PubMed

    Magrill, Abigail C L; Nakano, Naoki; Khanduja, Vikas

    2017-10-01

    Increasing our appreciation of the historical foundations of hip arthroscopy offers greater insight and understanding of the field's current and future applications. This article offers a broad history of the progress of hip arthroscopy. Hip arthroscopy's development from the early technologies of endoscopy to the present day is described through a review of the available literature. Endoscopic science begins with the Lichtleiter, developed by Phillip Bozzini (1779-1809) in 1806, but endoscopes were not applied to joints until 1912, as presented by Severin Nordentoft (1866-1922). The work of Kenji Takagi (1888-1963), especially, was instrumental in the arthroscope's development, allowing Michael Burman (1901-75) to perform the first recorded hip arthroscopy, detailed in a 1931 paper after extensive cadaveric research. Although World War II stalled further development, a renewed application of fibre optics following post-war innovations in glass manufacture heralded the modern arthroscope's invention. During the 1970s hip arthroscopy was first mobilized for diagnosis and exploration, leading to its later adoption for therapeutic surgical interventions. Modern hip arthroscopy has been facilitated by international research into optimum distraction, portals of entry, positioning of patients, and the technology of arthroscopic instruments. In 2008, the International Society for Hip Arthroscopy (ISHA) was founded to represent this international expert community. Technology, communication and evidence-based medicine have jointly facilitated the development of this young but promising corner of Orthopaedics.

  10. Arthroscopic treatment of refractory adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Marcos Rassi

    2014-01-01

    to evaluate the results of arthroscopic treatment of refractory adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder associated as for improved range of motion after a minimum follow up of six years. from August 2002 to December 2004, ten patients with adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder resistant to conservative treatment underwent arthroscopic surgery. One interscalene catheter was placed for postoperative analgesia before the procedure. All were in Phase II, with a minimum follow up of two years. The mean age was 52.9 years (39-66), predominantly female (90%), six on the left shoulder. The time between onset of symptoms and surgical treatment ranged from six to 20 months. Four adhesive capsulitis were found to be primary (40%) and six secondary (60%). the preoperative mean of active anterior elevation was 92°, of external rotation was 10.5° of the L5 level internal rotation; the postoperative ones were 149°, 40° and T12 level, respectively. Therefore, the average gain was 57° for the anterior elevation, 29.5° for external rotation in six spinous processes. There was a significant difference in movements' gains between the pre and post-operative periods (p<0.001). By the Constant Score (range of motion), there was an increase of 13.8 (average pre) to 32 points (average post). the arthroscopic treatment proved effective in refractory adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder resistant to conservative treatment, improving the range of joint movements of patients evaluated after a minimum follow up of six years.

  11. Use of an Irrigation Pump System in Arthroscopic Procedures.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Mark S; Kusnezov, Nicholas; Sieg, Ryan N; Owens, Brett D; Herzog, Joshua P

    2016-05-01

    Since its inception, arthroscopic surgery has become widely adopted among orthopedic surgeons. It is therefore important to have an understanding of the basic principles of arthroscopy. Compared with open techniques, arthroscopic procedures are associated with smaller incisions, less structural damage, improved intra-articular visualization, less pain in the immediate postoperative period, and faster recovery for patients. Pump systems used for arthroscopic surgery have evolved over the years to provide improved intraoperative visualization. Gravity flow systems were described first and are still commonly used today. More recently, automated pump systems with pressure or dual pressure and volume control have been developed. The advantages of automated irrigation systems over gravity irrigation include a more consistent flow, a greater degree of joint distention, improved visualization especially with motorized instrumentation, decreased need for tourniquet use, a tamponade effect on bleeding, and decreased operative time. Disadvantages include the need for additional equipment with increased cost and maintenance, the initial learning curve for the surgical team, and increased risk of extra-articular fluid dissection and associated complications such as compartment syndrome. As image quality and pump systems improve, so does the list of indications including diagnostic and treatment modalities to address intra-articular pathology of the knee, shoulder, hip, wrist, elbow, and ankle joints. This article reviews the current literature and presents the history of arthroscopy, basic science of pressure and flow, types of irrigation pumps and their functions, settings, applications, and complications. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e474-e478.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Craniosynostosis repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... children having an open repair may need a transfusion) Reaction to medicines Risks for this surgery are: Infection in the brain Bones connect together again, and more surgery is needed Brain swelling Damage to brain tissue

  13. Pothole repair

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1999-11-01

    The primary objective of the pothole experiment was to determine which combinations of materials and patching procedures provide the most cost-effective repair of potholes in asphalt concrete-surfaced pavements. This technical summary summarizes the ...

  14. Ptosis repair.

    PubMed

    Ng, John; Hauck, Matthew J

    2013-02-01

    Acquired blepharoptosis presents as both a functional and cosmetic problem commonly encountered by facial plastic surgeons. Ptosis repair can be both challenging and frustrating, especially given ever-increasing demands for an optimal cosmetic surgical result. The authors present a brief overview of key points to consider when attempting to achieve excellent blepharoptosis repair outcomes. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  15. Evaluation of repair of the hip labrum under simulated full weight-bearing.

    PubMed

    Koh, Jason L; Gupta, Kavish

    2017-02-21

    Repairs of labral tears are performed for unstable tears, hip instability, and after detachment concomitant to the treatment of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), but limited data is known about the strength of repair. This study evaluated the effect of simulated axial weight-bearing on suture anchor based repair of the acetabular labrum. 3 cadaveric pelvises underwent creation of a 1.5 cm anterior-superior labral tear in each hip. The tears were then repaired using 2 suture anchors per hip. Following repair, the hip joint underwent axial cyclic loading to 756 N, and were inspected for separation of the labrum from the acetabulum. The strength of the suture anchor repair was evaluated by testing load to failure, in-line with insertion. Upon visual examination, all 6 repairs remained fully intact following loading with no visible gap formation or damage at the repair site. In all cases an arthroscopic probe could not be inserted under the edge of the repair. The mean failure force of the 12 suture anchors, in-line with insertion, was 154 N ± 44 N. Acetabular labral suture anchor repairs may be able to immediately withstand the physiological loads of axial weight-bearing. Labral repair may be able to tolerate axial weight-bearing immediately after repair, preserving the strength and integrity of muscles and soft tissues.

  16. Trends in Shoulder Stabilization Techniques Used in the United States Based on a Large Private-Payer Database

    PubMed Central

    Riff, Andrew J.; Frank, Rachel M.; Sumner, Shelby; Friel, Nicole; Bach, Bernard R.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Romeo, Anthony A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Arthroscopic stabilization is the most broadly used surgical procedure in the United States for management of recurrent shoulder instability. Latarjet coracoid transfer has been considered a salvage surgical procedure for failed arthroscopic repairs or cases of significant glenoid bone loss; however, with recent literature suggesting reduced risk of recurrent instability with Latarjet, several surgeons have advocated its broader utilization as a primary operation for treatment of shoulder instability. Purpose: To determine trends in shoulder stabilization techniques used in the United States. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: A retrospective analysis of a publicly available national insurance database was performed to identify shoulder stabilization procedures performed over 9 years (2007-2015). The following Current Procedural Terminology codes were searched: 29806 (arthroscopic stabilization), 23455 (open capsulolabral repair), 23466 (open capsular shift), 23462 (Latarjet coracoid transfer), and 23460 (open anterior capsulorrhaphy with other bone block augmentation). Outcomes of interest included (1) trends in the use of each technique throughout the study interval, (2) age and sex distributions of patients undergoing each technique, and (3) regional predilections for the use of each technique. Results: Arthroscopic stabilization was the most broadly used shoulder stabilization procedure in the database (87%), followed by open Bankart (7%), Latarjet (3.2%), open capsular shift (2.6%), and alternative bone block procedure (0.8%). Throughout the study period, the incidence of arthroscopic stabilization and Latarjet increased (8% and 15% per year, respectively); the incidence of open capsular shift remained relatively constant; and the incidence of open Bankart decreased (9% per year). Arthroscopic stabilization, open Bankart, and Latarjet each had similar sex-based distributions (roughly 70% male), while open capsular shift and alternative

  17. Posterior Root Meniscal Tears: Preoperative, Intraoperative, and Postoperative Imaging for Transtibial Pullout Repair.

    PubMed

    Palisch, Andrew R; Winters, Ronald R; Willis, Marc H; Bray, Collin D; Shybut, Theodore B

    2016-10-01

    The menisci play an important biomechanical role in axial load distribution of the knees by means of hoop strength, which is contingent on intact circumferentially oriented collagen fibers and meniscal root attachments. Disruption of the meniscal root attachments leads to altered biomechanics, resulting in progressive cartilage loss, osteoarthritis, and subchondral edema, with the potential for development of a subchondral insufficiency fracture. Identification of meniscal root tears at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is crucial because new arthroscopic surgical techniques (transtibial pullout repair) have been developed to repair meniscal root tears and preserve the tibiofemoral cartilage of the knee. An MR imaging classification of posterior medial meniscal root ligament lesions has been recently described that is dedicated to the posterior root of the medial meniscus. An arthroscopic classification of meniscal root tears has been described that can be applied to the anterior and posterior roots of both the medial meniscus and the lateral meniscus. This arthroscopic classification includes type 1, partial stable root tears; type 2, complete radial root tears; type 3, vertical longitudinal bucket-handle tears; type 4, complex oblique tears; and type 5, bone avulsion fractures of the root attachments. Knowledge of these classifications and the potential contraindications to meniscal root repair can aid the radiologist in the preoperative reporting of meniscal root tear types and the evaluation of the tibiofemoral cartilage. As more patients undergo arthroscopic repair of meniscal root tears, familiarity with the surgical technique and the postoperative radiographic and MR imaging appearance is important to adequately report the imaging findings. © RSNA, 2016.

  18. Aquarium Portal Technique for PASTA Lesion Repair.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Dominik C; Gerber, Christian; Familiari, Filippo

    2017-10-01

    The simultaneous arthroscopic exposure of the subacromial and intra-articular space of the shoulder is challenging in the presence of only partial-thickness rotator cuff tears. We present our experience and method of entering the joint through the opened rotator cuff interval from an anterosuperior portal between the coracoid process and anterior acromion. With moderate (approximately 30°) abduction and external rotation, the rotator interval opens readily, offering a view with the camera toward the anterior edge of the supraspinatus tendon. An anterior view on the anterior leading edge of the supraspinatus tendon is obtained, showing the subacromial space above and the glenohumeral space below the tendon, similar to the view in an aquarium. The rotator cuff can be elevated using a rod inserted intra-articularly from posterior, whereas anchors and other instruments may be inserted from lateral. This approach offers the advantages of full exposure of the posterior undersurface of the rotator cuff insertion; a convenient approximately 90° angle between the camera and instruments; and no need to change portals for anchor placement, tendon stitching, or suture handling. The objective of this Technical Note is to describe our arthroscopic repair approach (aquarium technique) to PASTA (partial articular supraspinatus tendon avulsion) lesions.

  19. [Osteochondritis Dissecans in Children - Treated with Arthroscopic Drilling].

    PubMed

    Přidal, J; Šťastný, E; Trč, T; Havlas, V

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF STUDY Osteochondritis dissecans (OCHD) is an increasingly diagnosed disease among adolescent patients. It is a condition affecting subchondral bone and the lining cartilage. If left untreated, it can cause destruction of cartilage of the affected joint leading to early development of arthrosis. Mostly affected joints are knees and ankles, but affected elbow and other joints have been described too. The purpose of our study is to present the patients diagnosed and treated surgically at our clinic with arthroscopic drilling in the period 2010-2015, and subsequently the clinical findings obtained at follow-up checks after the surgery. MATERIAL AND METHODS Between 2010 and 2015, a total of 34 patients (36 joints) underwent surgical treatment at our clinic. Their age ranged from 6 to 19 years at the time of surgery, 17 girls and 17 boys underwent the surgery. All the patients were treated with transarticular antegrade arthroscopic drilling. Each patient was diagnosed based on the clinical finding, radiographs, or MRI. The patients were followed after 6 weeks, thereafter 3, 6, and 12 months after the surgery. Each patient was evaluated based on the clinical findings (presence of swelling, range of motion, and pain according to VAS), and radiographs. RESULTS The preoperative VAS was 2.9 and dropped down to 1.5 at the first follow-up visit. None of the patients complained of pain at 1-year follow-up. 34 (out of 36) patients suffered joint swelling preoperatively, 6 weeks after the surgery only 9 patients presented with ongoing swelling, at 1-year follow-up no patient reported this problem. The X-ray findings showed regression in 35 of 36 patients one year after the surgery. One female patient underwent redo surgery because of an ongoing restriction of movement and X-ray finding persistence. DISCUSSION Majority of patients with OCHD can be treated conservatively. Physical activity modification and temporary immobilization are commonly used treatment methods of

  20. Osteoarthritis Classification Scales: Interobserver Reliability and Arthroscopic Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Rick W.; Ross, James R.; Haas, Amanda K.; Huston, Laura J.; Garofoli, Elizabeth A.; Harris, David; Patel, Kushal; Pearson, David; Schutzman, Jake; Tarabichi, Majd; Ying, David; Albright, John P.; Allen, Christina R.; Amendola, Annunziato; Anderson, Allen F.; Andrish, Jack T.; Annunziata, Christopher C.; Arciero, Robert A.; Bach, Bernard R.; Baker, Champ L.; Bartolozzi, Arthur R.; Baumgarten, Keith M.; Bechler, Jeffery R.; Berg, Jeffrey H.; Bernas, Geoffrey A.; Brockmeier, Stephen F.; Brophy, Robert H.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Butler V, J. Brad; Campbell, John D.; Carpenter, James E.; Cole, Brian J.; Cooper, Daniel E.; Cooper, Jonathan M.; Cox, Charles L.; Creighton, R. Alexander; Dahm, Diane L.; David, Tal S.; DeBerardino, Thomas M.; Dunn, Warren R.; Flanigan, David C.; Frederick, Robert W.; Ganley, Theodore J.; Gatt, Charles J.; Gecha, Steven R.; Giffin, James Robert; Hame, Sharon L.; Hannafin, Jo A.; Harner, Christopher D.; Harris, Norman Lindsay; Hechtman, Keith S.; Hershman, Elliott B.; Hoellrich, Rudolf G.; Hosea, Timothy M.; Johnson, David C.; Johnson, Timothy S.; Jones, Morgan H.; Kaeding, Christopher C.; Kamath, Ganesh V.; Klootwyk, Thomas E.; Lantz, Brett A.; Levy, Bruce A.; Ma, C. Benjamin; Maiers, G. Peter; Mann, Barton; Marx, Robert G.; Matava, Matthew J.; Mathien, Gregory M.; McAllister, David R.; McCarty, Eric C.; McCormack, Robert G.; Miller, Bruce S.; Nissen, Carl W.; O’Neill, Daniel F.; Owens, LTC Brett D.; Parker, Richard D.; Purnell, Mark L.; Ramappa, Arun J.; Rauh, Michael A.; Rettig, Arthur; Sekiya, Jon K.; Shea, Kevin G.; Sherman, Orrin H.; Slauterbeck, James R.; Smith, Matthew V.; Spang, Jeffrey T.; Spindler, Kurt P.; Stuart, Michael J.; Svoboda, LTC Steven J.; Taft, Timothy N.; Tenuta, COL Joachim J.; Tingstad, Edwin M.; Vidal, Armando F.; Viskontas, Darius G.; White, Richard A.; Williams, James S.; Wolcott, Michelle L.; Wolf, Brian R.; York, James J.; Carey, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis of the knee is commonly diagnosed and monitored with radiography. However, the reliability of radiographic classification systems for osteoarthritis and the correlation of these classifications with the actual degree of confirmed degeneration of the articular cartilage of the tibiofemoral joint have not been adequately studied. Methods: As the Multicenter ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) Revision Study (MARS) Group, we conducted a multicenter, prospective longitudinal cohort study of patients undergoing revision surgery after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. We followed 632 patients who underwent radiographic evaluation of the knee (an anteroposterior weight-bearing radiograph, a posteroanterior weight-bearing radiograph made with the knee in 45° of flexion [Rosenberg radiograph], or both) and arthroscopic evaluation of the articular surfaces. Three blinded examiners independently graded radiographic findings according to six commonly used systems—the Kellgren-Lawrence, International Knee Documentation Committee, Fairbank, Brandt et al., Ahlbäck, and Jäger-Wirth classifications. Interobserver reliability was assessed with use of the intraclass correlation coefficient. The association between radiographic classification and arthroscopic findings of tibiofemoral chondral disease was assessed with use of the Spearman correlation coefficient. Results: Overall, 45° posteroanterior flexion weight-bearing radiographs had higher interobserver reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.63; 95% confidence interval, 0.61 to 0.65) compared with anteroposterior radiographs (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.55; 95% confidence interval, 0.53 to 0.56). Similarly, the 45° posteroanterior flexion weight-bearing radiographs had higher correlation with arthroscopic findings of chondral disease (Spearman rho = 0.36; 95% confidence interval, 0.32 to 0.39) compared with anteroposterior radiographs (Spearman rho = 0.29; 95

  1. Biomechanical characteristics of single-row repair in comparison to double-row repair with consideration of the suture configuration and suture material.

    PubMed

    Baums, M H; Buchhorn, G H; Spahn, G; Poppendieck, B; Schultz, W; Klinger, H-M

    2008-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the time zero mechanical properties of single- versus double-row configuration for rotator cuff repair in an animal model with consideration of the stitch technique and suture material. Thirty-two fresh-frozen sheep shoulders were randomly assigned to four repair groups: suture anchor single-row repair coupled with (1) braided, nonabsorbable polyester suture sized USP No. 2 (SRAE) or (2) braided polyblend polyethylene suture sized No. 2 (SRAH). The double-row repair was coupled with (3) USP No. 2 (DRAE) or (4) braided polyblend polyethylene suture No. 2 (DRAH). Arthroscopic Mason-Allen stitches were used (single-row) and combined with medial horizontal mattress stitches (double-row). Shoulders were cyclically loaded from 10 to 180 N. Displacement to gap formation of 5- and 10-mm at the repair site, cycles to failure, and the mode of failure were determined. The ultimate tensile strength was verified in specimens that resisted to 3,000 cycles. DRAE and DRAH had a lower frequency of 5- (P = 0.135) and 10-mm gap formation (P = 0.135). All DRAE and DRAH resisted 3,000 cycles while only three SRAE and one SRAH resisted 3,000 cycles (P < 0.001). The ultimate tensile strength in double-row specimens was significantly higher than in others (P < 0.001). There was no significant variation in using different suture material (P > 0.05). Double-row suture anchor repair with arthroscopic Mason-Allen/medial mattress stitches provides initial strength superior to single-row repair with arthroscopic Mason-Allen stitches under isometric cyclic loading as well as under ultimate loading conditions. Our results support the concept of double-row fixation with arthroscopic Mason-Allen/medial mattress stitches in rotator cuff tears with improvement of initial fixation strength and ultimate tensile load. Use of new polyblend polyethylene suture material seems not to increase the initial biomechanical aspects of the repair construct.

  2. Transtendon repair in partial articular supraspinatus tendon tear.

    PubMed

    Osti, Leonardo; Buda, Matteo; Andreotti, Mattia; Osti, Raffaella; Massari, Leo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2017-09-01

    Partial thickness rotator cuff tears (PTRCTs) are common, with an incidence between 17% and 37%, and a high prevalence in throwing athletes. Different surgical procedures are suggested when partial tears involve the articular portion of the rotator cuff, including arthroscopic debridement of the tear, debridement with acromioplasty, tear completion and repair, and lately transtendon repair. This systematic review describes the transtendon repair and examines indications, contraindications, complications and clinical outcome. We identified clinical studies listed in the Pubmed Google Scholar, CINAHL, Cochrane Central and Embase Biomedical databases in English and Italian concerning the clinical outcomes following treatment of partial articular supraspinatus tendon tear using transtendon surgical repair. Eighteen studies fulfilled our inclusion criteria. All were published between 2005 and 2016, three were retrospective, and 15 prospective. The total number of patients was 507 with a mean age of 50.8 years. Tear completion and repair and transtendon repair alone produce similar results. Transtendon surgical repair allows to obtain good-excellent results in the treatment of partial articular supraspinatus tendon tears. Further studies are needed to produce clear guidelines in the treatment of partial articular supraspinatus tendon tears. IV. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  3. The METEOR trial: no rush to repair a torn meniscus.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yong Gil; Kwoh, C Kent

    2014-04-01

    It is uncertain whether arthroscopic partial meniscectomy is better than physical therapy in patients who have a symptomatic torn meniscus on top of osteoarthritis of the knee. The Meniscal Repair in Osteoarthritis Research (METEOR) trial concluded that physical therapy is acceptable at first, and that surgery is not routinely needed. In patients assigned to physical therapy who eventually needed surgery, the delay resulting from a trial of conservative management did not impair outcomes at 12 months from the initial presentation. Here, we analyze the background, design, findings, and clinical implications of the METEOR trial.

  4. [Arthroscopic diagnostics and treatment for cysts of the anterior cruciate ligament].

    PubMed

    Pawlas, R; Szlachta, Z

    1994-01-01

    From among over 500 knees examined arthroscopically in 5 cases operated on because of painful limitation of the range of motion besides an inveterate ACL injury a cyst located around injured fibers was found. Arthroscopic removal of the cyst rendered permanent improvement in all cases. No recurrence has occurred.

  5. [Arthroscopic excision of elastofibroma dorsi at scapulothoracic joint: a surgical technique].

    PubMed

    Çakmak, Gökhan; Ergün, Tarkan; Şahin, M Şükrü

    2014-01-01

    Elastofibroma dorsi is a rare soft tissue pseudotumor which is located at the anteroinferior aspect of the scapula. In this article, we report a 19-year-old female case who had arthroscopic marginal excision of elastofibroma dorsi at the scapulothoracic joint without recurrences during follow-up. The arthroscopic marginal excision of the elastofibroma dorsi may have good clinical results in selected cases.

  6. Prevalence and Impact of Hip Arthroscopic Surgery on Future Participation in Elite American Football Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Knapik, Derrick M.; Sheehan, Joe; Nho, Shane J.; Voos, James E.; Salata, Michael J.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Intra-articular injuries to the hip in elite athletes represent a source of significant pain and disability. Hip arthroscopic surgery has become the gold standard for the treatment of disorders involving the hip joint. Purpose: To examine the incidence of and abnormalities treated with hip arthroscopic surgery as well as the impact on future participation in American football athletes invited to the National Football League (NFL) Scouting Combine with a history of hip arthroscopic surgery. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Athletes invited to the NFL Combine from 2012 to 2015 were evaluated for a history of hip arthroscopic surgery. Athlete demographics, imaging findings, and physical examination results were gathered using the NFL Combine database. Information on prospective participation in the NFL with regard to draft status, games played, games started, and current status was gathered using publicly available databases and compared against all other athletes participating in the combine. Results: Fourteen athletes (15 hips) had a history of arthroscopic hip surgery. Acetabular labral tears were treated in 93% (14 hips), with femoroacetabular impingement decompression performed in 33% (5 hips). Compared with athletes who had no history of hip arthroscopic surgery, those undergoing arthroscopic surgery did not possess a lower likelihood of being drafted (66% vs 71%, respectively; P = .78) or of being on an active roster (52% vs 43%, respectively; P = .44) after their first season in the NFL. Moreover, there was no significant difference in the number of regular-season games played (10.9 ± 4.8 with arthroscopic surgery vs 11.0 ± 5.1 without; P = .96) or started (7.0 ± 3.6 with arthroscopic surgery vs 7.1 ± 5.3 without; P = .98). Conclusion: American football athletes invited to the NFL Combine with a history of hip arthroscopic surgery were not at risk for diminished participation when compared with all other athletes

  7. Prevalence and Impact of Hip Arthroscopic Surgery on Future Participation in Elite American Football Athletes.

    PubMed

    Knapik, Derrick M; Sheehan, Joe; Nho, Shane J; Voos, James E; Salata, Michael J

    2018-02-01

    Intra-articular injuries to the hip in elite athletes represent a source of significant pain and disability. Hip arthroscopic surgery has become the gold standard for the treatment of disorders involving the hip joint. To examine the incidence of and abnormalities treated with hip arthroscopic surgery as well as the impact on future participation in American football athletes invited to the National Football League (NFL) Scouting Combine with a history of hip arthroscopic surgery. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Athletes invited to the NFL Combine from 2012 to 2015 were evaluated for a history of hip arthroscopic surgery. Athlete demographics, imaging findings, and physical examination results were gathered using the NFL Combine database. Information on prospective participation in the NFL with regard to draft status, games played, games started, and current status was gathered using publicly available databases and compared against all other athletes participating in the combine. Fourteen athletes (15 hips) had a history of arthroscopic hip surgery. Acetabular labral tears were treated in 93% (14 hips), with femoroacetabular impingement decompression performed in 33% (5 hips). Compared with athletes who had no history of hip arthroscopic surgery, those undergoing arthroscopic surgery did not possess a lower likelihood of being drafted (66% vs 71%, respectively; P = .78) or of being on an active roster (52% vs 43%, respectively; P = .44) after their first season in the NFL. Moreover, there was no significant difference in the number of regular-season games played (10.9 ± 4.8 with arthroscopic surgery vs 11.0 ± 5.1 without; P = .96) or started (7.0 ± 3.6 with arthroscopic surgery vs 7.1 ± 5.3 without; P = .98). American football athletes invited to the NFL Combine with a history of hip arthroscopic surgery were not at risk for diminished participation when compared with all other athletes during their first season in the NFL.

  8. Repair process and a repaired component

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, III, Herbert Chidsey; Simpson, Stanley F.

    2018-02-20

    Matrix composite component repair processes are disclosed. The matrix composite repair process includes applying a repair material to a matrix composite component, securing the repair material to the matrix composite component with an external securing mechanism and curing the repair material to bond the repair material to the matrix composite component during the securing by the external securing mechanism. The matrix composite component is selected from the group consisting of a ceramic matrix composite, a polymer matrix composite, and a metal matrix composite. In another embodiment, the repair process includes applying a partially-cured repair material to a matrix composite component, and curing the repair material to bond the repair material to the matrix composite component, an external securing mechanism securing the repair material throughout a curing period, In another embodiment, the external securing mechanism is consumed or decomposed during the repair process.

  9. Repair process and a repaired component

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, III, Herbert Chidsey; Simpson, Stanley F.

    2018-02-20

    Matrix composite component repair processes are disclosed. The matrix composite repair process includes applying a repair material to a matrix composite component, securing the repair material to the matrix composite component with an external securing mechanism and curing the repair material to bond the repair material to the matrix composite component during the securing by the external securing mechanism. The matrix composite component is selected from the group consisting of a ceramic matrix composite, a polymer matrix composite, and a metal matrix composite. In another embodiment, the repair process includes applying a partially-cured repair material to a matrix composite component,more » and curing the repair material to bond the repair material to the matrix composite component, an external securing mechanism securing the repair material throughout a curing period, In another embodiment, the external securing mechanism is consumed or decomposed during the repair process.« less

  10. [Knee dislocation: concurrent arthroscopic ACL and PCL reconstruction - operating technique].

    PubMed

    Piontek, Tomasz; Ciemniewska-Gorzela, Kinga; Szulc, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Injuries involving knee luxation or subluxation generally result in damage to two or three out of the four major ligaments which stabilize this joint. Past treatment of this type of multiligament injuries, consisting in 6- to 12-week immobilization in a plaster cast, does not allow for restoration of the normal, anatomical course of these ligaments. A consequence of this type of healing, which involves the formation of random scars in place of ligaments, is mechanical and functional instability of the knee joint. The goal of this article is to present a classification of multiligament knee injuries and surgical treatment options. We also present our own technique of arthroscopic, concurrent reconstruction of knee joint ligaments. The study material consisted of 20 patients who underwent surgical treatment for multiligament knee injuries in the Department of Pediatric Orthopedics and Traumatology in Poznań. We performed concurrent arthroscopic reconstruction of ACL and PCL in all 20 patients. In addition, reconstruction of the medial complex was performed in 7 patients, and lateral complex was reconstructed in another 7 patients. In three cases we stitched the medial meniscus using a Smith & Nephew FasT-Fix system, and partial menisectomy was performed in 2 patients. The details of the proposed concurrent arthroscopic ACL and PCL reconstruction are extensively discussed. One of the advantages of this operating technique is the exclusive use of autogenous ST and GR tendon grafts for reconstruction of all damaged knee joint structures. The presented operating technique makes possible the reconstruction of all damaged knee joint ligaments in less than two hours, which in turn allows the surgery to be performed in an ischemic setting using an Esmarch band around the limb.

  11. The Thrower's Elbow: Arthroscopic Treatment of Valgus Extension Overload Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Altchek, David W.

    2006-01-01

    Injury to the medial collateral ligament of the elbow (MCL) can be a career-threatening injury for an overhead athlete without appropriate diagnosis and treatment. It has been considered separately from other athletic injuries due to the unique constellation of pathology that results from repetitive overhead throwing. The past decade has witnessed tremendous gains in understanding of the complex interplay between the dynamic and static stabilizers of the athlete's elbow. Likewise, the necessity to treat these problems in a minimally invasive manner has driven the development of sophisticated techniques and instrumentation for elbow arthroscopy. MCL injuries, ulnar neuritis, valgus extension overload with osteophyte formation and posteromedial impingement, flexor pronator strain, medial epicondyle pathology, and osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the capitellum have all been described as sequelae of the overhead throwing motion. In addition, loose body formation, bony spur formation, and capsular contracture can all be present in conjunction with these problems or as isolated entities. Not all pathology in the thrower's elbow is amenable to arthroscopic treatment; however, the clinician must be familiar with all of these problems in order to form a comprehensive differential diagnosis for an athlete presenting with elbow pain, and he or she must be comfortable with the variety of open and arthroscopic treatments available to best serve the patient. An understanding of the anatomy and biomechanics of the thrower's elbow is critical to the care of this population. The preoperative evaluation should focus on a thorough history and physical examination, as wellas on specific diagnostic imaging modalities. Arthroscopic setup, including anesthesia, patient positioning, and portal choices will be discussed. Operative techniques in the anterior and posterior compartments will bereviewed, as well as postoperative rehabilitationandsurgical results. Lastly, complications will

  12. The Functional and Structural Outcomes of Arthroscopic Iliopsoas Release.

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, Jacob B; Kapron, Ashley L; Wylie, James D; Wilkinson, Brandon G; Maak, Travis G; Gonzalez, Cristian D; Aoki, Stephen K

    2016-05-01

    Arthroscopic release of the iliopsoas tendon may alleviate pain associated with internal snapping hip, but previous reports of physical function, hip strength, and muscle atrophy after surgery are mixed. The hips of patients who underwent arthroscopic iliopsoas release would demonstrate significantly reduced hip flexion strength and iliopsoas muscle volume when compared with their contralateral hips and the hips of patients who underwent hip arthroscopy without psoas release. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Eighteen patients who underwent hip arthroscopy with iliopsoas release for symptomatic internal snapping hip and concomitant femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and/or chondrolabral damage (release group) and 18 patients who underwent arthroscopy for FAI and/or chondrolabral damage without iliopsoas release (control group) were evaluated at a mean of 21 months (range, 16-30 months) postoperatively. Magnetic resonance images were performed and segmented to calculate iliopsoas volume. Isometric hip flexion strength was evaluated in the supine and seated positions with a custom testing apparatus. Differences between groups and differences between the operative and nonoperative limbs within groups were compared with unpaired and paired t tests, respectively. In the release group, the iliopsoas muscle of the surgical limb was significantly smaller (288 ± 98 vs 384 ± 113 cm(3), P < .001) and weaker in the seated position (13 ± 4.7 vs 17 ± 5.8 kg, P < .001) than the contralateral limb. Compared with the control group, the release group demonstrated a greater percentage decrease in iliopsoas volume on magnetic resonance imaging (-25% ± 9.1% vs -0.6% ± 4.6%, P < .001) and seated hip flexion strength (-19% ± 16% vs -3.9% ± 20%, P = .018) between the operative and contralateral limbs. There were no significant differences in supine strength between limbs or groups (all P > .168). Arthroscopic iliopsoas release results in iliopsoas atrophy with a 25% volume loss

  13. Calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder: midterm results after arthroscopic treatment.

    PubMed

    Balke, Maurice; Bielefeld, Rebecca; Schmidt, Carolin; Dedy, Nicolas; Liem, Dennis

    2012-03-01

    Calcifying tendinitis is a common and painful disorder of the shoulder characterized by the presence of calcific deposits in the tendons of the rotator cuff. When nonoperative treatment over a prolonged period of time fails, surgical treatment should be considered. Midterm success rates are inconsistent, and the role of subacromial decompression is still unclear. Our hypotheses were that the rate of supraspinatus tears after arthroscopic treatment of calcifying tendinitis is comparable with that in the contralateral uninvolved shoulder and that subacromial decompression does not have beneficial effects compared with calcium removal alone. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. In 70 shoulders of 62 patients with a mean age of 54 years, arthroscopic removal of calcium deposits of the supraspinatus tendon was performed. In 44 shoulders, additional subacromial decompression was performed. After a mean follow-up of 6 years (range, 2-13 years), patients were clinically investigated, and function was statistically evaluated using Constant and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores. Affected and contralateral shoulders were examined by ultrasound in 48 shoulders, and rotator cuff tears were documented. The mean Constant scores of the operated shoulders were significantly lower than those of the healthy shoulders (P < .001). The ASES scores significantly (P < .001) increased after surgery but were still lower than the ASES scores of the healthy shoulders (P < .001). Concerning the additional subacromial decompression, there were no significant differences in the overall ASES and Constant scores; the subitem "pain" was significantly better in the subacromial decompression group (P = .048). Ultrasound examination at last follow-up (48 shoulders) showed a partial supraspinatus tendon tear in 11 operated and 3 contralateral shoulders. Although the good clinical results after arthroscopic treatment of calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder persist midterm, the affected

  14. Snowmobile Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helbling, Wayne

    This guide is designed to provide and/or improve instruction for occupational training in the area of snowmobile repair, and includes eight areas. Each area consists of one or more units of instruction, with each instructional unit including some or all of the following basic components: Performance objectives, suggested activities for teacher and…

  15. Motorcycle Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, Jim; Bundy, Mike

    This motorcycle repair curriculum guide contains the following ten areas of study: brake systems, clutches, constant mesh transmissions, final drives, suspension, mechanical starting mechanisms, electrical systems, fuel systems, lubrication systems, and overhead camshafts. Each area consists of one or more units of instruction. Each instructional…

  16. Development of a virtual reality arthroscopic knee simulator.

    PubMed

    Mabrey, J D; Cannon, W D; Gillogly, S D; Kasser, J R; Sweeney, H J; Zarins, B; Mevis, H; Garrett, W E; Poss, R

    2000-01-01

    The virtual reality arthroscopic knee simulator (VR-AKS) consists of a computer platform, a video display, and two force-feedback (haptic) interfaces which also monitor the position of the instruments in the user's hands. The forces that the user would normally apply to the lower limb during arthroscopy are directed through an instrumented surrogate leg. Proprietary software furnishes the mathematical representation of the physical world and replicates the visual, mechanical, and behavioral aspects of the knee while task-oriented programs monitor and record specific areas of user performance. A prototype has demonstrated the feasibility of the system and work on the first, fully functional simulator will begin soon.

  17. [ARTHROSCOPIC RESECTION OF BENIGN TUMOR IN THE KNEE POSTERIOR SEPTUM].

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhu; Chen, Zhiwei; Liao, Ying; Fan, Weijie

    2015-03-01

    To explore the technique of arthroscopic resection of benign tumor in the knee posterior septum and to evaluate its clinical results. Between June 2008 and June 2012, 12 cases of benign tumor in the knee posterior septum were treated by arthroscopic surgery. There were 8 males and 4 females with an average age of 36.5 years (range, 22-50 years). The average disease duration was 8.4 months (range, 3 months to 2 years). Of 12 cases, there were 2 cases of chronic synovitis, 5 cases of ganglion, 4 cases of tenosynovial giant cell tumor, and 1 case of synovial hemangioma; solitary tumor involved in the knee posterior septum in 10 cases, and in the posterior septum and other part of the knee in 2 cases. All the patients underwent tumor removal under arthroscope with routine anterolateral and anteromedial portal, additional posteromedial portal and/or posterolateral portal. Trans-septal approach was used in 6 cases because the tumors located in the middle of the posterior septum. All wounds healed by first intention with no complications such as infection, haematoma in the knee, injury of vessels and nerves, deep vein thrombosis, osteofascial compartment syndrome, or cutaneous necrosis. All patients were followed up 12-46 months with an average of 18.5 months. All patients achieved relief of knee pain and improvement of knee movement. The range of motion of the knee was significantly improved from (57.08 ± 12.52) degrees at pre-operation to (120.83 ± 13.95) degrees at last follow-up (t = -12.84, P = 0.00). The visual analogue scale (VAS) score was significantly reduced from 5.00 ± 1.04 at pre-operation to 1.50 ± 0.91 at last follow-up (t = -18.00, P = 0.00). The Lysholm score was significantly improved from 49.50?9.07 at pre-operation to 84.58 ± 6.82 at last follow-up (t = -8.04, P = 0.00). The benign tumor in the knee posterior septum can be completely resected under arthroscope, and the procedure is minimally invasive and useful to the restore knee function.

  18. Arthroscopic Management of Anterior, Posterior, and Multidirectional Shoulder Instabilities.

    PubMed

    Field, Larry D; Ryu, Richard K N; Abrams, Jeffrey S; Provencher, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Arthroscopic shoulder stabilization offers several potential advantages compared with open surgery, including the opportunity to more accurately evaluate the glenohumeral joint at the time of diagnostic assessment; comprehensively address multiple pathologic lesions that may be identified; and avoid potential complications unique to open stabilization, such as postoperative subscapularis failure. A thorough understanding of normal shoulder anatomy and biomechanics, along with the pathoanatomy responsible for anterior, posterior, and multidirectional shoulder instability patterns, is very important in the management of patients who have shoulder instability. The treating physician also must be familiar with diagnostic imaging and physical examination maneuvers that are required to accurately diagnose shoulder instability.

  19. Turbine repair process, repaired coating, and repaired turbine component

    DOEpatents

    Das, Rupak; Delvaux, John McConnell; Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2015-11-03

    A turbine repair process, a repaired coating, and a repaired turbine component are disclosed. The turbine repair process includes providing a turbine component having a higher-pressure region and a lower-pressure region, introducing particles into the higher-pressure region, and at least partially repairing an opening between the higher-pressure region and the lower-pressure region with at least one of the particles to form a repaired turbine component. The repaired coating includes a silicon material, a ceramic matrix composite material, and a repaired region having the silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material. The repaired turbine component a ceramic matrix composite layer and a repaired region having silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material.

  20. Four-Quadrant Approach to Capsulolabral Repair: An Arthroscopic Road Map to the Glenoid

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    locutaneous nerve and superolateral to the axillary nerve . The cephalic vein is a mean of 9.8 mm lateral to this portal.6 Because we do not use this...posterolateral corner of the acromion. It enters the joint through the teres minor tendon at a relative safe distance of 39 mm from the axillary nerve and 29...and superior capsulolabral injury , orthopaedic surgeons have encountered and are able to address combined lesions, posterior labral tears, 270° to 360

  1. Stable Meniscal Tears Left In Situ at the Time of Arthroscopic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Rothermich, Marcus A; Cohen, Jared A; Wright, Rick

    2016-04-01

    Meniscal tears can be incidentally encountered at the time of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. In these cases, the surgeon has several treatment options that include benign neglect, debridement, trephination, and repair. The authors performed a systematic review of the literature studying the various treatment options for meniscal tears discovered at the time of ACL reconstruction. This systematic review included eight articles that had relevant data regarding benign neglect compared with debridement, trephination, or repair of incidentally encountered meniscal tears. Combined data from these studies resulted in a total of 646 meniscal tears treated with benign neglect with follow-up information available. Importantly, there were differences in reoperation rates between medial and lateral meniscal tears left in situ. However, stable medial and lateral meniscal tears treated with benign neglect did not have different subjective or objective outcomes than those treated with surgical intervention. This systematic review concludes that when stable meniscal tears are encountered at the time of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction, benign neglect can be used for a successful outcome. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  2. Arthroscopic evaluation and management after repeated luxatio erecta of the glenohumeral joint.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Sean C; Myer, Jonathan J

    2009-05-01

    Luxatio erecta, inferior dislocation of the glenohumeral joint, is a relatively rare type of glenohumeral dislocation, accounting for <0.5% of all shoulder dislocations. It has been well described in terms of presentation and conservative management. Arthroscopic findings after the more commonly found anteroinferior glenohumeral dislocation have also been described. However, we know of only 1 case report that details the arthroscopic findings and open surgical management in a patient who sustained a single episode of luxatio erecta. Additionally, we were unable to find any reports in the literature of the arthroscopic management of this type of dislocation. We present the arthroscopic findings and arthroscopic management of an 18-year-old male college football player who reported 7 episodes of left shoulder luxatio erecta. Arthroscopic evaluation revealed an extensive anterior capsulolabral injury as well as a superior labrum anteroposterior (SLAP) tear. Additionally, there were extensive articular cartilage changes of the anterosuperior glenoid, a posterior Hill-Sachs lesion, and an anterosuperior humeral head cartilage indentation. The anterior capsulolabral injury and the SLAP lesion were fixed arthroscopically with suture anchors. The remainder of the lesions were debrided. The patient was able to return to college-level football and reported no further episodes of instability, pain, or stiffness at 3-year follow-up.

  3. Comparison of arthroscopic and open Latarjet with a learning curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, G; Benchouk, S; Kherad, O; Lädermann, A

    2016-02-01

    To compare arthroscopic and open Latarjet performed by a single shoulder surgeon with learning curve analysis A comparative and learning curve analysis was carried out on a prospectively gathered database of 2 consecutive series of patients treated with arthroscopic and open Latarjet procedures performed by a single shoulder surgeon between 2008 and 2014. The database included patient characteristics, ISIS scores, operative time, intra- and postoperative complications, graft and screws positioning, as well as pre- and postoperative Walch-Duplay scores. Sixty-four patients were included in the study, 28 in the arthroscopic group and 36 in the open group with similar age, sex ratio and preoperative ISIS score. Operative time was significantly higher in the arthroscopic group (146 versus 81 min, p = 0.001), and although no intra-operative complications were recorded in either group, there were significantly more postoperative complications in the arthroscopic group (29 vs. 11 %, p = 0.03). Screw placement was more accurate in the open group, and postoperative Walch-Duplay score did not show any significant difference between the groups (88 points in the arthroscopic group and 91 points in the open group). The arthroscopic Latarjet learning curve analysis showed that the need for conversion ceased after the first 10 patients and that surgical time came close to that of open procedure after 20 procedures. In this study, 10 arthroscopic Latarjet procedures were needed to overcome the need for conversion, and 20 procedures to achieve equal operating time to the open technique. Even though functional outcome and patient satisfaction were similar in both techniques, complications, screw placement inaccuracy, persistent apprehension and recurrences still remain higher with the arthroscopic technique. Retrospective comparative analysis, Level III.

  4. Arthroscopic assessment of stifle synovitis in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Little, Jeffrey P; Bleedorn, Jason A; Sutherland, Brian J; Sullivan, Ruth; Kalscheur, Vicki L; Ramaker, Megan A; Schaefer, Susan L; Hao, Zhengling; Muir, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CR) is a degenerative condition in dogs that typically has a non-contact mechanism. Subsequent contralateral rupture often develops in dogs with unilateral CR. Synovitis severity is an important factor that promotes ligament degradation. Consequently, we wished to evaluate the utility of arthroscopy for assessment of stifle synovitis in dogs with CR. Herein, we report results of a prospective study of 27 dogs with unilateral CR and bilateral radiographic osteoarthritis. Arthroscopic images and synovial biopsies from the lateral and medial joint pouches were obtained bilaterally and graded for synovial hypertrophy, vascularity, and synovitis. Synovial tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive (TRAP+) macrophages, CD3(+) T lymphocytes, Factor VIII+ blood vessels, and synovial intima thickness were quantified histologically and related to arthroscopic observations. Risk of subsequent contralateral CR was examined using survival analysis. We found that arthroscopic scores were increased in the index stifle, compared with the contralateral stifle (p<0.05). Numbers of CD3+ T lymphocytes (SR = 0.50, p<0.05) and TRAP+ cells in joint pouches (SR = 0.59, p<0.01) were correlated between joint pairs. Arthroscopic grading of vascularity and synovitis was correlated with number density of Factor VIII+ vessels (SR>0.34, p<0.05). Arthroscopic grading of villus hypertrophy correlated with numbers of CD3(+) T lymphocytes (SR = 0.34, p<0.05). Synovial intima thickness was correlated with arthroscopic hypertrophy, vascularity, and synovitis (SR>0.31, p<0.05). Strong intra-observer and moderate inter-observer agreement for arthroscopic scoring was found. Dog age and arthroscopic vascularity significantly influenced risk of contralateral CR over time. We conclude that arthroscopic grading of synovitis is a precise tool that correlates with histologic synovitis. Arthroscopy is useful for assessment of stifle synovitis in client-owned dogs, and could

  5. Efficacy of Arthroscopic Teaching Methods: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Luke; Spanyer, Jonathon; Yenna, Zachary; Burchell, Patrick; Garber, Andrew; Riehl, John

    Arthroscopic education research recently has been focused on the use of skills labs to facilitate resident education and objective measure development to gauge technical skill. This study evaluates the effectiveness of three different teaching methods. Medical students were randomized into three groups. The first group received only classroom-based lecture. The second group received the same lecture and 28 minutes of lab-based hands-off arthroscopy instruction using a cadaver and arthroscopy setup. The final group received the same lecture and 7 minutes of hands-on arthroscopy instruction in the lab on a cadaver knee. The arthroscopic knee exam that followed simulated a diagnostic knee exam and subjects were measured on task completion and by the number of look downs. The number of look downs and the number of tasks completed did not achieve statistical significance between groups. Posttest survey results revealed that the hands-on group placed significantly more value on their educational experience as compared with the other two groups. (Journal of Surgical Orthopaedic Advances.

  6. Arthroscopic treatment of unresolved Osgood-Schlatter lesions.

    PubMed

    DeBerardino, Thomas M; Branstetter, Joanna G; Owens, Brett D

    2007-10-01

    Osgood-Schlatter disease is a self-limiting condition in most cases. Those with unresolved pain after conservative treatment can obtain relief with surgical debridement of the mobile ossicles and tibial tuberosity. We present an arthroscopic technique for debridement. The location of the inferomedial and lateral parapatella tendon portals can be raised slightly to allow improved instrumentation and visualization in the anterior interval. An anterior interval release is performed with the mechanical shaver and radiofrequency ablation device. Care is taken to visualize the meniscal anterior horns and intermeniscal ligament. By staying anterior to these structures, debridement can be performed aggressively onto the anterior tibial slope. The bony lesions are shelled out from their soft-tissue attachments. Small and loose fragments are removed with a pituitary ronguer, whereas larger lesions are removed with an arthroscopic burr. Working deep along the anterior tibial slope is facilitated by extending the knee and taking tension off the patellar tendon. Postoperatively, patients are allowed full weight bearing and unrestricted range of motion. The advantages of this technique include the avoidance of the patellar tendon longitudinal split required for open procedures and the ability to address concomitant intra-articular pathology.

  7. Tunnel malpositions in anterior cruciate ligament risk cartilaginous changes and bucket-handle meniscal tear: Arthroscopic survey in both primary and revision surgery.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Daisuke; Tsuda, Eiichi; Tsukada, Harehiko; Iio, Kohei; Ishibashi, Yasuyuki

    2017-09-01

    There are not many chances to arthroscopically reassess how graft tunnel malpositions in primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) associate with intra-articular degeneration in revision ACLR. This study was aimed to evaluate whether radiographic tunnel position in primary ACLR affect cartilaginous changes and bucket-handle meniscus tears in revision ACLR. Thirty-five patients who underwent revision ACLR were recruited; their primary surgeries were single-bundle reconstructions. Tunnel positions were evaluated using the plain radiographs after primary surgery. The sagittal tunnel positions of the femur (FP) and tibia (TP) were determined on the lateral view. The articular cartilage was evaluated arthroscopically at primary and revision surgery using the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) score. A progression of two grades was considered as cartilaginous changes. Meniscal tears were evaluated with an arthroscopic probe. Logistic regression analysis was conducted using the prevalence of cartilaginous changes or bucket-handle meniscus tears as the dependent variable; tunnel parameters were used as the independent variables. Seven patients (20.0%) had cartilaginous changes and nine patients (25.7%) had bucket-handle tears in the medial meniscus. In logistic regression analysis, %FP [odds ratio (OR): 1.212; P = 0.007] and the cut-off of 60% in the FP (OR: 22.000; P = 0.008) were correlated with cartilaginous changes. %TP (OR: 1.126; P = 0.036) was correlated with the prevalence of bucket-handle meniscus tears. Anterior femoral tunnel malposition in the femur was associated with the cartilaginous changes, and posterior tibial tunnel malposition with the development of bucket-handle meniscus tears. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Arthroscopic removal of an osteoid osteoma of the talus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Resnick, R B; Jarolem, K L; Sheskier, S C; Desai, P; Cisa, J

    1995-04-01

    This article describes a patient with a 10-year history of persistent ankle pain. Differential diagnosis included osteoid osteoma and anterior ankle impingement. This patient subsequently underwent arthroscopic excision of a lesion on the talar neck following a complete radiographic work-up, which was nondiagnostic. The diagnosis of osteoid osteoma was finalized upon pathologic study of the arthroscopic shavings. The use of a motorized instrument for excision did not preclude pathologic evaluation of the specimen. Therefore, in an accessible location on the talar neck, arthroscopic excision of an osteoid osteoma can be performed.

  9. [Arthroscopic reconstruction of the glenoid concavity with an autologous bone block procedure].

    PubMed

    Scheibel, M; Kraus, N

    2011-01-01

    Open bone block procedures for glenohumeral stabilization have been used for a long time in different variations. Recently published clinical and radiological studies were able to demonstrate that anatomical reconstruction of the glenoid concavity using a pre-shaped iliac crest autograft represents an effective and durable treatment option for bony-mediated anterior shoulder instability. With the advancement of arthroscopic techniques and the development of sophisticated instruments and implants apposition of the bone block can now be performed via an all-arthroscopic approach. This article describes the history, principles, indications, surgical technique and early results of the all-arthroscopic iliac crest bone block procedure.

  10. Intra-articular knee arborescent lipoma: a case treated with arthroscopic synoviectomy.

    PubMed

    Saidi, Aymen; Hassini, Lassaad; Fekih, Aymen; Othmen, Monia Ben; Allagui, Mohamed; Abid, Abderrazek; Aloui, Issam

    2017-01-01

    Arborescent lipoma is an unusual intra-articular lesion that typically develops in the knee and has to be evoked before chronic effusion. It corresponds to hyperplasia of mature fatty tissue and hypertrophy of synovial villi, developing within a joint. The reference treatment is synovectomy by arthrotomy. The rare forms localized to the anterior compartment of the knee can benefit from an arthroscopic synovectomy. The authors report a case of arborescent knee lipoma in a 47-year-old patient who received arthroscopic synoviectomy. To our knowledge, only a few cases of arborescent lipoma treated by arthroscopic synoviectomy have been reported in the literature.

  11. Successful anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and meniscal repair in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Young; Cho, Tae-Joon; Lee, Myung Chul; Han, Hyuk-Soo

    2018-03-20

    A case of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with meniscal repair in an osteogenesis imperfecta patient is reported. A 24-year-old female with osteogenesis imperfecta type 1a suffered from a valgus extension injury resulting in tear of ACL and medial meniscus. She underwent an arthroscopic-assisted ACL reconstruction and medial meniscus repair. Meniscal tear at the menisco-capsular junction of the posterior horn of medial meniscus was repaired with three absorbable sutures via inside-out technique. ACL reconstruction was then performed with a bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft. The patient was followed up for 1 year with intact ACL grafts and healed medial meniscus. This case report showed that successful ACL reconstruction and meniscal repair is possible in an osteogenesis imperfecta patient.Level of evidence V.

  12. Arthroscopic Shoulder Surgery in Female Professional Tennis Players: Ability and Timing to Return to Play.

    PubMed

    Young, Simon W; Dakic, Jodie; Stroia, Kathleen; Nguyen, Michael L; Safran, Marc R

    2017-07-01

    To assess the outcome and time to return to previous level of competitive play after shoulder surgery in professional tennis players. Retrospective case series. Tertiary academic centre. The records of all female tennis players on the Women's Tennis Association (WTA) professional circuit between January 2008 and June 2010 were reviewed to identify players who underwent shoulder surgery on their dominant (serving) shoulder. Primary outcomes were the ability and time to return to professional play and if they were able to return to their previous level of function as determined by singles ranking. Preoperative and postoperative singles rankings were used to determine rate and completeness of return to preoperative function. During the study period, 8 professional women tennis players from the WTA tour underwent shoulder surgery on their dominant arm. Indications included rotator cuff debridement or repair, labral reconstruction for instability or superior labral anterior posterior lesion, and neurolysis of the suprascapular nerve. Seven players (88%) returned to professional play. The mean time to return to play was 7 months after surgery. However, only 25% (2 of 8) players achieved their preinjury singles rank or better by 18 months postoperatively. In total, 4 players returned to their preinjury singles ranking, with their peak singles ranking being attained at a mean of 2.4 years postoperatively. In professional female tennis players, a high return to play rate after arthroscopic shoulder surgery is associated with a prolonged and often incomplete return to previous level of performance. Thus, counseling the patient to this fact is important to manage expectations. Level IV-Case Series.

  13. [Osteoathritis after SLAP Lesion? Clinical and arthro-MRI evaluation after arthroscopic SLAP refixation].

    PubMed

    Lehmann, L J; Dinter, D; Monateseri, S; Scharf, H P; Weckbach, S

    2009-09-01

    The development of glenohumeral osteoarthritis is sufficiently described after instability and rotator cuff pathologies. The purpose of this work was to evaluate a coherency between glenohumeral osteoarthritis and SLAP lesions by means of MR arthrography which has not been described up to now in the literature. 20 patients with a SLAP lesion type II were treated with arthroscopic SLAP repair. MR arthrography was performed after intra-articular administration of diluted gadolinium (after positive vote of the ethics committee) after a mean FU of 36 months (26 to 54 months). The MR arthrography data were analysed by 3 investigators (two radiologists, one orthopaedic surgeon) in consensus. Osteoarthritis was graded according to the modified Outerbridge classification for MRI. Besides image quality and artifacts, adhesions from the tendon to the bone and the rotator cuff were evaluated. Intraoperative documented findings were used for comparison. The clinical investigation encompassed Roweand Constant score, clinical investigation of instability and SLAP lesion (O'Brian test, SLAP apprehension test) as well as the subjective contentment. The statistical evaluation was performed with SAS reverse. In 12 of 20 cases an increase of glenohumeral osteoarthritis was seen, in 4 cases a circumscribed entire cartilage defect appeared in the MRI. Osteoarthritis did not correlate with the subjective and objectively collected clinical results or the aetiology of the SLAP lesion at the time of the re-examination. Results of the MR arthrography revealed that, in six cases, the biceps anchor did not show proper bony ingrowth. Nonetheless, these cases do not correlate with a poorer clinical result. Due to the small case number a correlation between SLAP lesion and osteoarthritis cannot be postulated statistically, however, the results still indicate a trend which should be pursued in the long-term course. Copyright Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart . New York .

  14. Rotator cuff preservation in arthroscopic treatment of calcific tendinitis.

    PubMed

    Maier, Dirk; Jaeger, Martin; Izadpanah, Kaywan; Bornebusch, Lutz; Suedkamp, Norbert Paul; Ogon, Peter

    2013-05-01

    We sought to evaluate (1) clinical and radiologic results after arthroscopic calcific deposit (CD) removal and (2) the relevance of remnant calcifications (RCs). The study included 102 patients undergoing arthroscopic CD removal, preserving integrity of the rotator cuff. Postoperatively, we divided patients into 2 groups according to the extent of CD removal achieved. Group 1 consisted of patients with complete CD removal. Group 2 included patients showing minor RCs. Ninety-three patients (99 shoulders) completed follow-up. The mean patient age was 50.6 years (31 to 68 years), and the mean follow-up period was 37.3 months (24 to 83 months). We obtained anteroposterior (AP) and outlet radiographs before surgery, postoperatively, and at follow-up. We used the absolute and age- and sex-related Constant scores (CSabs, CSrel) as outcome measures. We compared both groups statistically (Mann-Whitney U test; P < .05). Complete CD removal was achieved in 82 of 99 (82.8%) shoulders (group 1). Postoperatively, minor RCs were found in 17 of 99 (17.2%) shoulders (group 2), an average of 58.6% (± 26.2) of the mean preoperative size. All RCs showed complete (14 of 17) or virtually complete (3 of 17) resolution at follow-up. Overall mean CSabs and CSrel were 88.8 points (± 10.4) and 99.0% (± 3.7), respectively. Mean values of CSabs and CSrel in group 1 (89.5 points ± 9.5 and 99.1% ± 3.7, respectively) and group 2 (86.1 points ± 12.9 and 98.7% ± 4.2, respectively) did not differ. Arthroscopic CD removal, preserving integrity of the rotator cuff yielded good to excellent results in 90% of patients and avoided iatrogenic tendon defects in all patients. Minor RCs did not impair clinical outcome and spontaneously resolved at follow-up. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Arthroscopic trans-capsular axillary nerve decompression: indication and surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Millett, Peter J; Gaskill, Trevor R

    2011-10-01

    Symptomatic axillary nerve compression is rare yet results in debilitating pain, weakness, and decreased athletic performance in some patients. If nonoperative modalities fail, surgical intervention is necessary to reduce symptoms and avoid functional decline. Traditionally, open techniques have been described to decompress the axillary nerve and are reported to provide satisfactory results. Similar to suprascapular nerve decompression, recent advances have provided the opportunity to develop all-arthroscopic axillary nerve decompression techniques. Although direct comparisons between open and arthroscopic techniques do not exist, arthroscopic axillary nerve decompression may provide some benefits over open techniques. Therefore we present a technique and early results for all-arthroscopic trans-capsular axillary nerve decompression. Copyright © 2011 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Can arthroscopic revision surgery for shoulder instability be a fair option?

    PubMed

    De Giorgi, Silvana; Garofalo, Raffaele; Tafuri, Silvio; Cesari, Eugenio; Rose, Giacomo Delle; Castagna, Alessandro

    2014-04-01

    the aim of this study was to evaluate the role of arthroscopic capsuloplasty in the treatment of failed primary arthroscopic treatment of glenohumeral instability. we retrospectively examined at a minimum of 3-years follow-up 22 patients who underwent arthroscopic treatment between 1999 and 2007 who had recurrent anterior shoulder instability with a post-surgical failure. A statistical analysis was performed to evaluate which variable could influence the definitive result and clinical outcomes at final follow-up. A p value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. we observed after revision surgery an overall failure rate of 8/22 (36.4%) including frank dislocations, subluxations and also apprehension that seriously inhibit the patient's quality of life. No significant differences were observed in the examined parameters. according to our outcomes we generally do not recommend an arthroscopic revision procedure for failed instability surgery.

  17. Editorial Commentary: Go Ahead and Repair That Shoulder Rotator Cuff Tear in Your Obese Patient: Just Be Prepared to Admit Them.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Timothy J

    2018-03-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in the obese patient offers functional outcomes and rates of complications comparable to those seen in nonobese patients. Future prospective studies with better methodology, as well as including larger numbers of severely obese patients with a body mass index of 40 or greater, will help to further elucidate if obesity truly affects outcomes in rotator cuff repair. In the meantime, be sure to consider admission of your obese rotator cuff repair patients. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. All-Arthroscopic Technique for Reconstruction of Acute Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Cutbush, Kenneth; Hirpara, Kieran M.

    2015-01-01

    Acromioclavicular joint dislocations are a common injury particularly among contact sports players. There has been an increasing trend toward arthroscopic management of these injuries. To date, these reconstructions have primarily addressed superoinferior instability by reconstructing the coracoclavicular ligaments. We describe an all-arthroscopic technique for reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments using Arthrex ABS TightRopes (Arthrex, Naples, FL), with additional stabilization of the superior acromioclavicular joint capsule using an anchor-based suture bridge to address anteroposterior instability. PMID:26697307

  19. Anatomic and radiographic comparison of arthroscopic suprapectoral and open subpectoral biceps tenodesis sites.

    PubMed

    Johannsen, Adam M; Macalena, Jeffrey A; Carson, Eric W; Tompkins, Marc

    2013-12-01

    Arthroscopic suprapectoral and open subpectoral surgical techniques are both commonly utilized approaches for proximal biceps tenodesis of the long head of the biceps brachii. A central limitation to the widespread use of an arthroscopic approach for biceps tenodesis is that the tendon may be tenodesed too proximally in the bicipital groove, leading to persistent pain and tendinopathy. Purpose/ The purpose of this study was to determine the in vivo tenodesis location using arthroscopic suprapectoral and open subpectoral techniques for proximal biceps tenodesis in relation to clinically pertinent anatomic and radiographic landmarks. The null hypothesis was that arthroscopic suprapectoral biceps tenodesis would not be significantly different in terms of the location from open subpectoral biceps tenodesis. Controlled laboratory study. A total of 20 matched pairs of cadaveric shoulder specimens were randomized such that within each pair, 1 shoulder underwent a standard open subpectoral biceps tenodesis and the other underwent an arthroscopic suprapectoral tenodesis. Limited dissection and exposure of the surgical tunnel site and reference landmarks were subsequently performed, and anteroposterior and lateral radiographs were obtained. Direct measurements were performed anatomically using a digital caliper and radiographically using picture archiving and communication system (PACS) software from the proximal lip of the humeral tunnel to regional landmarks. Both techniques were able to place the humeral tunnel distal to the bicipital groove in all specimens. On average, the open subpectoral approach placed the tunnel 2.2 cm distal to the arthroscopic suprapectoral approach. The arthroscopic suprapectoral biceps tenodesis technique used in this study consistently placed the tenodesis tunnel distal to the bicipital groove, which may allay concerns about the bicipital groove as a pain source after this procedure. This anatomic study provides new information on tunnel

  20. Open Versus Arthroscopic Latarjet Procedure for Anterior Shoulder Instability: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Eoghan T; Lim Fat, Daren; Farrington, Shane K; Mullett, Hannan

    2018-03-01

    Anterior shoulder instability with significant glenoid bone loss is a challenging condition. The open Latarjet procedure is the established standard treatment method in this setting, but there is an increasing use of the arthroscopic technique. To systematically review the current evidence in the literature to ascertain if the open or arthroscopic Latarjet procedure resulted in improved patient outcomes. Systematic review and meta-analysis. A literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library was performed based on the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses) guidelines. Cohort studies comparing the open and arthroscopic Latarjet procedures for anterior shoulder instability were included. Clinical outcomes were compared, with all statistical analysis performed using Review Manager (version 5.3). A P value of <.05 was considered statistically significant. Six clinical trials with 896 patients were included. The open and arthroscopic Latarjet procedures resulted in a similar number of total recurrent instability (2.0% vs 2.4%; P = .75), revision procedures (2.4% vs 5.4%; P = .06), and total complications (13.8% vs 11.9%; P = .50), but the open procedure had a lower rate of persistent apprehension (10.2% vs 35.7%; P < .05). In addition, after the learning curve, the operative time was similar between the 2 procedures. Both the open and arthroscopic Latarjet procedures result in significant improvements in patient function and outcome scores, with low rates of recurrent instability and similar complication rates. While technically challenging, the arthroscopic procedure has been shown to be a safe and viable alternative. However, there is a significant learning curve associated with the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure. The significant learning curve associated with this procedure suggests the arthroscopic procedure may be advisable to perform only in high-volume centers with experienced arthroscopists.

  1. Open and Arthroscopic Surgical Anatomy of the Ankle

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Rachel M.; Hsu, Andrew R.; Gross, Christopher E.; Walton, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Ankle-related complaints are among the most commonly encountered problems for musculoskeletal clinicians. Ankle pathology is widely variable, including, but not limited to, fractures, deformity, infection, oncologic diseases, neuromuscular conditions, and arthritis. While nonoperative management with activity modification, bracing and/or shoe modifications, and medications is usually indicated as first line of treatment, surgical intervention may become necessary. A thorough understanding of the complex anatomy and biomechanics of the ankle, and in particular, the potential neurovascular structures that may be encountered, is important to reduce complications and obtain good surgical outcomes. The purpose of this review is to discuss the most common open and arthroscopic exposures to the ankle with a focus on surgically relevant anatomy for each approach. PMID:24288614

  2. The pathoanatomy and arthroscopic management of femoroacetabular impingement

    PubMed Central

    Tibor, L. M.; Leunig, M.

    2012-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) causes pain and chondrolabral damage via mechanical overload during movement of the hip. It is caused by many different types of pathoanatomy, including the cam ‘bump’, decreased head–neck offset, acetabular retroversion, global acetabular overcoverage, prominent anterior–inferior iliac spine, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, and the sequelae of childhood Perthes’ disease. Both evolutionary and developmental factors may cause FAI. Prevalence studies show that anatomic variations that cause FAI are common in the asymptomatic population. Young athletes may be predisposed to FAI because of the stress on the physis during development. Other factors, including the soft tissues, may also influence symptoms and chondrolabral damage. FAI and the resultant chondrolabral pathology are often treated arthroscopically. Although the results are favourable, morphologies can be complex, patient expectations are high and the surgery is challenging. The long-term outcomes of hip arthroscopy are still forthcoming and it is unknown if treatment of FAI will prevent arthrosis. PMID:23610655

  3. [Evolution of the technique of arthroscopic reinsertion of the rotator cuff. Our experience from the years 1998 to 2008].

    PubMed

    Holibka, R; Neoral, P; Kalina, R; Radová, L; Gallo, J

    2012-01-01

    . The frequency of deep wound infection was 0.7% (2/319). Six patients (2.1%) required repeat surgery for symptomatic bursitis and adhesive capsulitis. A recent meta-analysis has found no significant difference between the results of surgical rotator cuff reconstruction and its conservative treatment. We do not support this view but present here evidence that, when certain conditions are fulfilled, arthroscopic reconstruction can produce a very good clinical outcome. The arthroscopic reconstruction of a rotator cuff tears results in a marked relief of pain and improved joint function. An ideal candidate for this treatment should show passive free motion at the shoulder joint, no clinical signs of bursitis, and mobilisable tendon stumps of the torn rotator cuff. In addition, these patients should be highly motivated for post-operative rehabilitation. A suture device was most effective in rotator cuff repair. For good fixation into the bone it is recommended to use special implants that have a minimal risk of dislodgement or anchor thread failure.

  4. Arthroscopic transphyseal anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in adolescent athletes.

    PubMed

    Dei Giudici, Luca; Fabbrini, Roberto; Garro, Luca; Arima, Serena; Gigante, Antonio; Tucciarone, Agostino

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the 5-year outcome of arthroscopic transphyseal anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in 19 adolescent athletes. 14 male and 5 female adolescent athletes aged 12 to 16 (mean, 13.9) years with Tanner stage 2 or 3 open physes underwent arthroscopic transphyseal ACL reconstruction by a single surgeon and were followed up for 5 years. Patients were evaluated using the numerical rating score (NRS) for pain, knee osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS), International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, Tegner Activity Scale, and Lysholm Score, as well as the leg length discrepancy, femorotibial alignment, varus or valgus deformities, active and passive knee range of motion. At 5-year follow-up, physes were closed in all patients. The mean NRS for pain improved from 7.2 to 1.6; the KOOS improved from 55.3 to 88; the mean IKDC score improved from 34.5 to 84; the mean Tegner Activity Scale improved from 2.7 to 8.2 and was comparable with that before injury (8.4); and the mean Lysholm score improved from 36.3 to 84.6. All except 2 patients returned to their pre-injury level of sports activity after a mean of 25 weeks. The 2 exceptions had a 2+ Jerk test and a 3+ Lachman test; one of them also had positive signs for a lateral meniscal lesion. Both had sustained a second trauma not long before the 5-year follow-up. Two patients had reduced sensitivity in the anteromedial aspect of the proximal third of the tibia. One patient had leg length discrepancy of +1.5 cm owing to overgrowth response of the physis. Transphyseal ACL reconstruction is a viable option for skeletally immature patients, with high reproducibility, a high rate of return to sport, and a low incidence of growth disturbance. Early surgery can prevent the onset of meniscal lesions and early osteoarthritis.

  5. Structural damage and chemical contaminants on reprocessed arthroscopic shaver blades.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masahiko; Nakagawa, Yasuaki; Okamoto, Yukihiro; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Nakamura, Takashi

    2009-02-01

    on the reprocessed arthroscopic shaver blades. Surgeons should keep in mind that mechanical damage and chemical contamination are found on reprocessed arthroscopic blades.

  6. Interactive stereotaxic teleassistance of remote experts during arthroscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Arne; Undt, Gerhard; Schicho, Kurt; Wanschitz, Felix; Watzinger, Franz; Murakami, Kenichiro; Czerny, Christian; Ewers, Rolf

    2002-01-01

    This article describes the technical setup for stereotaxic telesurgical assistance for arthroscopic procedures. It also outlines the current state, limitations, and feasibility of this technical development. Teleassistance or teleconsultation implemented in endoscopic or arthroscopic procedures have not yet been reported. In this study, 7 computer-assisted arthroscopies of the temporomandibular joint were supported by extramural experts via interactive stereotaxic teleconsultation from distant locations. The external experts were supplied with close to real-time video, audio, and stereotaxic navigation data directly from the operation site. This setup allows the surgeons and external experts to interactively determine portals, target structures, and instrument positions relative to the patient's anatomy and to discuss any step of the procedures. Optoelectronic tracking interfaced to computer- based navigation technology allowed precise positioning of instruments for single or multiple temporomandibular joint punctures. The average error of digitizing probe measurements was 1.3 mm (range, 0.0 to 2.5 mm) and the average standard deviation was 0.7 mm (range, 0.4 to 0.9 mm). Evaluation of the reliability and accuracy of this technique suggests that it is sufficient for controlled navigation, even inside the small temporomandibular joint, a fact that encourages further applications for arthroscopy in general. The minimum requirement for high-quality video transmission for teleassisted procedures are integrated services digital network (ISDN) connections. Conventional ISDN-based videoconferencing can be combined with computer-aided intraoperative navigation. Transmission control protocol/internet protocol (TCP/IP)-based stereotaxic teleassistance data transmission via ATM or satellite seem to be promising techniques to considerably improve the field of arthroscopy.

  7. Impact of extra-articular pathologies on groin pain: An arthroscopic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Mitsunori

    2018-01-01

    For patients who have anterior hip pain evaluated by Patrick's test and tenderness at Scarpa's triangle, we perform periarticular debridement based on the hypothesis that extra-articular pathologies are responsible for the hip pain. The purpose of this study was to categorize the endoscopic extra-articular findings and to evaluate the clinical significance of periarticular pathologies in anterior hip pain. Arthroscopic findings of 77 patients who underwent periarthritic debridement were evaluated. As extra-articular pathologies, injuries of the direct head and reflective head of the rectus femoris muscle were evaluated. A thin layer of fat tissue normally exists on the anterior inferior iliac spine (AIIS), the attachment site of the direct head of the rectus femoris muscle. The macroscopic appearance of the fat pad on the AIIS was categorized as normal, blood vessel-rich adipose tissue or adipose tissue with fibrosis or scar formation and histologically confirmed. Adhesion of gluteal muscles to the joint capsule was also evaluated. Of the 77 patients, 75 had rupture of the direct head of the rectus femoris. In contrast, rupture of the reflective head was extremely rare. Seven patients had a normal fat pad on the AIIS, 11 had blood vessel-rich adipose tissue and 55 had adipose tissue with fibrosis. Fat tissue was completely replaced by fibrous scar tissue in another 4 patients. In 64 patients, adhesion between the anterior joint capsule and gluteus muscles was marked. Groin pain disappeared soon after the operation even when labral tears were not repaired and all patients returned to daily life and sports activities within 2 weeks after operation. Rectus femoris tendinosis, fibrosis of the AIIS fat pad, and adhesion of gluteal and rectus femoris muscles are common extra-articular pathologies in patients with anterior hip pain. Management of only these lesions induces rapid relief of anterior hip pain even in the absence of labral tear repair. My observations suggest

  8. Medialized repair for retracted rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Kyu; Jung, Kyu-Hak; Won, Jun-Sung; Cho, Seung-Hyun

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional outcomes of medialized rotator cuff repair and the continuity of repaired tendon in chronic retracted rotator cuff tears. Thirty-five consecutive patients were selected from 153 cases that underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for more than medium-sized posterosuperior rotator cuff tears between July 2009 and July 2012 performed with the medialized repair. All cases were available for at least 2 years of postoperative follow-up. The visual analog scale of pain, muscle strength, Constant score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, and University of California-Los Angeles score were evaluated. At the final follow-up, all clinical outcomes were significantly improved. The visual analog scale score for pain improved from 6 ± 1 preoperatively to 2 ± 1 postoperatively. The range of motion increased from preoperatively to postoperatively: active forward elevation, from 134° ± 49° to 150° ± 16°; active external rotation at the side, from 47° ± 15° to 55° ± 10°; and active internal rotation, from L3 to L1. The shoulder score also improved: Constant score, from 53.5 ± 16.7 to 79 ± 10; American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, from 51 ± 15 to 82 ± 8; and University of California-Los Angeles score, from 14 ± 4 to 28 ± 4. The retear cases at the final follow-up were 6 (17%). Medialized repair may be useful in cases in which anatomic bone-to-tendon repair would be difficult because of the excessive tension of the repaired tendon and a torn tendon that does not reach the anatomic insertion. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Brain aneurysm repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened. A metal clip is placed at ...

  10. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lazy eye repair - discharge; Strabismus repair - discharge; Extraocular muscle surgery - discharge ... You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle ... term for crossed eyes is strabismus. Children most often ...

  11. Mismatch Repair*

    PubMed Central

    Fishel, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Highly conserved MutS homologs (MSH) and MutL homologs (MLH/PMS) are the fundamental components of mismatch repair (MMR). After decades of debate, it appears clear that the MSH proteins initiate MMR by recognizing a mismatch and forming multiple extremely stable ATP-bound sliding clamps that diffuse without hydrolysis along the adjacent DNA. The function(s) of MLH/PMS proteins is less clear, although they too bind ATP and are targeted to MMR by MSH sliding clamps. Structural analysis combined with recent real-time single molecule and cellular imaging technologies are providing new and detailed insight into the thermal-driven motions that animate the complete MMR mechanism. PMID:26354434

  12. Arthroscopic versus posterior endoscopic excision of a symptomatic os trigonum: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jae Hoon; Kim, Yoon-Chung; Kim, Ha-Yong

    2013-05-01

    Both subtalar arthroscopic and posterior endoscopic techniques are used to treat posterior ankle impingement syndrome (PAIS). However, there have been no studies comparing the 2 procedures. Both arthroscopic and endoscopic excisions of the os trigonum are safe and effective in treating PAIS. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Twenty-eight patients were treated with excision of the os trigonum either by an arthroscopic (16 patients) or endoscopic (12 patients) technique. The mean patient age was 29.8 years (range, 17-55 years), and the mean follow-up period was 30 months (range, 18-58 months). Preoperative and postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) score for pain, American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score, and Maryland Foot Score (MFS) were used to analyze the functional results. Duration of surgery, time to return to sports (RTS), and patient satisfaction were evaluated as well. The size of the os trigonum was measured using T1-weighted sagittal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The clinical and MRI results were compared between the 2 groups. The VAS score, AOFAS score, and MFS for both the arthroscopic group (preoperative: 6.3, 63.8, and 61.5, respectively; postoperative: 1.2, 89.9, and 89.6, respectively) and endoscopic group (preoperative: 6.7, 64.8, and 62.5, respectively; postoperative: 1.2, 89.9, and 88.4, respectively) improved significantly (P < .01). The mean surgery and RTS times were 39.4 minutes and 7.5 weeks in the arthroscopic group and 34.8 minutes and 8.0 weeks in the endoscopic group, respectively (P > .05). All patients were satisfied with the results. There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in the preoperative and postoperative VAS score, AOFAS score, or MFS (P > .05). The mean size of the os trigonum was 11.1 × 8.8 mm(2) in the arthroscopic group and 12.6 × 10.4 mm(2) in the endoscopic group, and the difference was significant (P < .05). Two patients underwent both arthroscopic and endoscopic procedures

  13. Supramalleolar Osteotomy With Bone Marrow Stimulation for Varus Ankle Osteoarthritis: Clinical Results and Second-Look Arthroscopic Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Sang; Park, Eui Hyun; Koh, Yong Gon; Lee, Jin Woo

    2014-07-01

    Supramalleolar osteotomy (SMO), which redistributes the load line within the ankle joint, has been reported as an effective treatment for varus ankle osteoarthritis. However, no study has examined cartilage regeneration in the medial compartment of the ankle after SMO. This study aimed to investigate the clinical and radiological outcomes of SMO and to identify the association between the outcomes of SMO and cartilage regeneration evaluated by second-look arthroscopy. The hypothesis was that cartilage regeneration would be an important predictor of the outcomes of SMO and that arthroscopic marrow stimulation would aid in cartilage regeneration. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A total of 31 ankles were retrospectively evaluated after arthroscopic marrow stimulation with SMO for varus ankle osteoarthritis; second-look arthroscopy was conducted for all these ankles. Clinical outcome measures included a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score. Radiological outcome variables included the tibial-ankle surface angle (TAS), talar tilt (TT), and tibial-lateral surface angle (TLS), and progression of degenerative arthritis of the ankle was assessed. In the second-look arthroscopy, cartilage regeneration was evaluated using the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) grade. The mean ± standard deviation VAS and AOFAS scores were 7.1 ± 0.8 and 62.9 ± 4.0 preoperatively, and they significantly improved to 3.4 ± 1.3 and 83.1 ± 7.5, respectively (P < .001, for both) at the time of the second-look arthroscopy (mean, 13.2 months postoperatively). However, at final follow-up (mean, 27.4 months postoperatively), they were significantly decreased to 4.1 ± 1.6 and 79.9 ± 8.0, respectively, compared with the values at second-look arthroscopy (P < .001, for both). The mean TAS, TT, and TLS improved significantly after SMO but showed no significant correlation with the clinical outcomes and ICRS grade (P > .05

  14. Biomechanical analysis comparing a traditional superior-inferior arthroscopic rotator interval closure with a novel medial-lateral technique in a cadaveric multidirectional instability model.

    PubMed

    Farber, Adam J; ElAttrache, Neal S; Tibone, James E; McGarry, Michelle H; Lee, Thay Q

    2009-06-01

    Commonly performed arthroscopic rotator interval closure techniques that imbricate the rotator interval in a superior-inferior direction have been unable to reproduce the stabilizing effects of an open medial-lateral rotator interval imbrication. The medial-lateral rotator interval closure will allow less inferior and posterior glenohumeral translation than the superior-inferior rotator interval closure, and the medial-lateral rotator interval closure will result in less loss of external rotation than the superior-inferior closure. Controlled laboratory study. Eight match-paired cadaveric shoulders were stretched to 10% beyond the maximum range of motion in 0 degrees and 60 degrees of glenohumeral abduction to create a multidirectional instability model. Shoulders were then repaired using a superior-inferior rotator interval closure or an arthroscopic medial-lateral rotator interval closure with an anchor in the humeral head. Rotational range of motion, glenohumeral translation, and humeral head apex position were measured for intact, stretched, and repaired conditions in both 0 degrees and 60 degrees of glenohumeral abduction. In 0 degrees of abduction, after both rotator interval closure techniques, external rotation decreased significantly (by 4.4%; P < .05) relative to the stretched state and was restored to the intact state. In 60 degrees of abduction, only the medial-lateral rotator interval closure restored range of motion to the intact state. In 60 degrees of abduction, the medial-lateral rotator interval closure was more effective in reducing posterior translation than was the superior-inferior closure (P = .03). The medial-lateral rotator interval closure restored range of motion to the intact state better than the superior-inferior closure. Compared with the superior-inferior rotator interval closure, the medial-lateral closure significantly decreased posterior translation with the shoulder in abduction and external rotation. Arthroscopic medial

  15. Infected shoulder joint with loose Suture Anchor in the joint after Bankart’s Repair- A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mukesh; Thilak, Jai

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The glenoid labrum is frequently torn in traumatic glenohumeral dislocation; arthroscopic repair is the standard method of treatment. The complications associated with this repair are pulling out of metal suture anchors, chondrolysis and joint infection. The infection of joint after arthroscopy is less than 1%. Staphylococcus is most common organism and rarely followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We report a case of infected shoulder with chondrolysis of the joint and pulled out metal suture anchor lying inside the joint after Bankart’s repair. Case Report: A 22-year-old gentleman came to us with complaints of shoulder joint pain & gross restriction of movements for one year, with history of intermittent fever and treatment in nearby hospital. He also gives past history of recurrent dislocation of shoulder with last episode 18 months back, which was diagnosed as Bankart’s lesion and arthroscopic Bankart’s repair was done 15 months back. He was evaluated at our institute and suspected to have infection of shoulder joint with pulled out metal suture anchor inside the joint. Arthroscopic removal of suture anchor and debridement of shoulder joint was done, Culture was obtained and culture specific antibiotics were given for six weeks, and significant improvement was observed with this line of treatment. At lyear follow up, the patient was able to perform his daily activities with terminal restriction of range of motion. Conclusions: Shoulder joint infection is rare after Bankart’s repair and required a high degree of suspicion. Any foreign materials inside the joint should be taken out & followed with aggressive treatment by debridement, irrigation and culture specific antibiotics. Suppression of joint infection with antibiotics should be avoided specially when there is foreign body inside the joint. PMID:27703928

  16. Accuracy of Coracoid Bone Graft Placement: Open versus Arthroscopic Latarjet.

    PubMed

    Russo, Adriano; Grasso, Andrea; Arrighi, Annalisa; Pistorio, Angela; Molfetta, Luigi

    2017-06-01

    Purpose  The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of the coracoid bone graft placement with the open Latarjet-Patte and arthroscopic Latarjet (arthro-Latarjet) procedures in the treatment of anterior instability of the shoulder. Methods  Forty-six patients affected by anterior shoulder instability were divided into two groups. In group A ( n  = 25), patients were operated by arthroscopic Latarjet (arthro-Latarjet) procedure and in group B ( n  = 21), patients were operated by open Latarjet-Patte procedure. Instrumental investigation was based on three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) at a minimum 1-year follow-up. Graft placement and integration, divergence and posterior protrusion of the screws, and glenohumeral osteoarthritis were considered as outcomes. Statistical analysis was performed with chi-square or Fisher's exact test. Significance was set at p  < 0.05. Results  Positioning of the coracoid graft proved to be optimal in 76% (19/25) of patients of group A and in 100% (21/21) of patients of group B (Fisher's exact test, p  = 0.025). Screw placement with respect to the glenoid surface showed a posterior divergence in 44% (11/25) of patients in group A and in 24% (5/21) of patients in group B ( p  = 0.15). Posterior protrusion of screw was observed in 76% (19/25) of patients in group A and 71.4% (15/21) of patients in group B ( p  = 0.73). Graft integration was present in 76% (19/25) of patients in group A and 85.7% (18/21) of patients in group B (Fisher's exact test, p  = 0.48). Mild signs of glenohumeral osteoarthritis were observed in 12% (3/25) of patients in group A and 28.6% (6/21) of patients in group B (Fisher's exact test, p  = 0.26). Conclusion  Patients operated with open Latarjet-Patte procedure showed better results than those of the arthro-Latarjet group in reference to the positioning of the graft on the coronal plane ( p  = 0.025). No significant differences between the groups were

  17. Accuracy of Coracoid Bone Graft Placement: Open versus Arthroscopic Latarjet

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Adriano; Grasso, Andrea; Arrighi, Annalisa; Pistorio, Angela; Molfetta, Luigi

    2017-01-01

    Purpose  The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of the coracoid bone graft placement with the open Latarjet-Patte and arthroscopic Latarjet (arthro-Latarjet) procedures in the treatment of anterior instability of the shoulder. Methods  Forty-six patients affected by anterior shoulder instability were divided into two groups. In group A ( n  = 25), patients were operated by arthroscopic Latarjet (arthro-Latarjet) procedure and in group B ( n  = 21), patients were operated by open Latarjet-Patte procedure. Instrumental investigation was based on three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) at a minimum 1-year follow-up. Graft placement and integration, divergence and posterior protrusion of the screws, and glenohumeral osteoarthritis were considered as outcomes. Statistical analysis was performed with chi-square or Fisher's exact test. Significance was set at p  < 0.05. Results  Positioning of the coracoid graft proved to be optimal in 76% (19/25) of patients of group A and in 100% (21/21) of patients of group B (Fisher's exact test, p  = 0.025). Screw placement with respect to the glenoid surface showed a posterior divergence in 44% (11/25) of patients in group A and in 24% (5/21) of patients in group B ( p  = 0.15). Posterior protrusion of screw was observed in 76% (19/25) of patients in group A and 71.4% (15/21) of patients in group B ( p  = 0.73). Graft integration was present in 76% (19/25) of patients in group A and 85.7% (18/21) of patients in group B (Fisher's exact test, p  = 0.48). Mild signs of glenohumeral osteoarthritis were observed in 12% (3/25) of patients in group A and 28.6% (6/21) of patients in group B (Fisher's exact test, p  = 0.26). Conclusion  Patients operated with open Latarjet-Patte procedure showed better results than those of the arthro-Latarjet group in reference to the positioning of the graft on the coronal plane ( p  = 0.025). No significant differences between the groups were

  18. Book Repair Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milevski, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    This book repair manual developed for the Illinois Cooperative Conservation Program includes book structure and book problems, book repair procedures for 4 specific problems, a description of adhesive bindings, a glossary, an annotated list of 11 additional readings, book repair supplies and suppliers, and specifications for book repair kits. (LRW)

  19. Iatrogenic suprascapular nerve injury after repair of type II SLAP lesion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Hun; Koh, Yong-Gon; Sung, Chang-Hun; Moon, Hong-Kyo; Park, Young-Sik

    2010-07-01

    Suprascapular neuropathy after an arthroscopic repair of a SLAP lesion is theoretically possible, but it has been rarely reported. We present a case of suprascapular nerve injury at the spinoglenoid notch as a complication of an improperly inserted suture anchor after repair of a type II SLAP lesion. The diagnosis was confirmed by the magnetic resonance imaging findings and an electrodiagnostic study, and direct compression of the nerve was visualized under repeat arthroscopy. An anatomic study of the superior glenoid shows that the available bone stock of the superior glenoid rim for the anchor insertion is found to decrease posteriorly. During the repair of a SLAP lesion, surgeons should consider the possibility of an iatrogenic injury to the suprascapular nerve by an improperly inserted suture anchor. Copyright (c) 2010 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Introduction of "Papazian Pusher: " A Modified-Design Knot Pusher for Surgical Repair of Cleft Palates.

    PubMed

    Papazian, Nazareth J; Chahine, Fadl; Atiyeh, Bishara; Deeba, Samer; Zgheib, Elias; Abu-Sittah, Ghassan

    2015-09-01

    Tying sutures is an integral aspect of any surgery and reliable instruments are essential for hassle-free procedures including craniofacial surgeries. Knot pushers have been widely known for their application in various laparoscopic, arthroscopic, and anal surgeries. The literature reveals numerous articles pertaining to knot pushers, as well as improvements on existing designs. Nevertheless, no application of knot pushers in the surgical repair of cleft palates has been described. We describe a new knot pusher "Papazian Pusher" (PP) finely designed for application in oral surgeries in general and repair of cleft palates in particular. The instrument was used satisfactorily in repair of cleft palate surgeries and no complications were encountered. The PP was found, overall, to be easy to use, and helps in performing faster, stronger, smooth, and secure knots.

  1. Patients With Impingement Syndrome With and Without Rotator Cuff Tears Do Well 20 Years After Arthroscopic Subacromial Decompression.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Moritz; Berndt, Thomas; Rühmann, Oliver; Lerch, Solveig

    2016-03-01

    To present the long-term outcome of arthroscopic subacromial decompression (ASD) for patients with impingement syndrome with or without rotator cuff tears as well as with or without calcific tendinitis in a follow-up of 20 years. We included 95 patients after a mean follow-up of 19.9 (19.5 to 20.5) years. All patients underwent ASD, including acromioplasty, resection of the coracoacromial ligament, and coplaning without cuff repair. The Constant score was used to assess the functioning of the shoulder. In addition, we defined a combined failure end point of a poor Constant score and revision surgery. Revision surgery was performed in14.7% of the patients. The combined end point showed successful results in 78.8% of all cases. All patients with isolated impingement syndrome achieved successful results. Those with partial-thickness tears had successful outcomes in 90.9% of all cases, and patients with full-thickness tears had successful outcomes in 70.6% of all cases. The tendinitis calcarea group showed the poorest results, with a 65.2% success rate. Our long-term results show that patients with impingement syndrome who received ASD, including acromioplasty, resection of the coracoacromial ligament, and coplaning do well 20 years after the index surgery. ASD without cuff repair even appears to be a safe, efficacious, and sustainable procedure for patients with partial rotator cuff tears. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Recovery of sensory disturbance after arthroscopic decompression of the suprascapular nerve.

    PubMed

    Oizumi, Naomi; Suenaga, Naoki; Funakoshi, Tadanao; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Minami, Akio

    2012-06-01

    The existence of sensory branches of the suprascapular nerve (SSN) has recently been reported, and sensory disturbance at the lateral and posterior aspect of the shoulder has been focused on as a symptom of SSN palsy. We have performed arthroscopic release of SSN at the suprascapular notch in patients with sensory disturbance since 2006. The purposes of this study were to introduce the arthroscopic surgical technique and investigate postoperative recovery of sensory disturbance. The study included 11 men and 14 women (25 shoulders), with an average age of 63.9 years (range, 41-77 years). Arthroscopic decompression of the SSN was performed using a suprascapular nerve (SN) portal as a landmark for approaching the suprascapular notch. Sensory disturbance of the shoulder was evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively. The average follow-up was 18.5 months (range, 12-30 months). The arthroscopic procedures were performed safely. The preoperative sensory disturbance fully recovered postoperatively in all shoulders. Arthroscopic release of the SSN is a useful procedure for SSN entrapment at the suprascapular notch. The sensory disturbance at the lateral and posterior aspect of the shoulder can be used as one of the criteria of diagnosing SSN palsy, especially in shoulders with massive rotator cuff tear, in which diagnosing and assessing the treatment results of associated SSN palsy is usually difficult. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Lateral Decubitus All-Arthroscopic Latarjet Procedure for Treatment of Shoulder Instability

    PubMed Central

    Lewington, Matthew R.; Urquhart, Nathan; Wong, Ivan H.

    2015-01-01

    Shoulder instability can be a challenging condition to treat when it becomes refractory to soft-tissue procedures or when bone loss exceeds 25% to 27% of the glenoid. The Bristow-Latarjet procedure has been developed and popularized to deal with these concerns. Traditionally, the procedure has been performed as an open approach; however, this has been recently supplanted by novel arthroscopic techniques. We present a technique for the procedure performed with the patient in a semi-lateral decubitus position that assists with optimal graft placement on the native glenoid. We use the cannulated Bristow-Latarjet Instability Shoulder System (DePuy Mitek, Raynham, MA). After a diagnostic arthroscopic evaluation, we use multiple arthroscopic anterior portals to debride the rim of the glenoid. The coracoid is prepared and taken down arthroscopically, and the cannulated guide is attached and advanced through an arthroscopically created subscapularis split. With the shoulder held in a reduced position, we are then able to drill and anchor the graft to the native glenoid. The patient is able to begin gentle range-of-motion exercises immediately postoperatively. PMID:26258032

  4. A multi-centre randomized controlled trial comparing arthroscopic osteochondroplasty and lavage with arthroscopic lavage alone on patient important outcomes and quality of life in the treatment of young adult (18-50) femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    2015-03-20

    Several cross-sectional studies have estimated that the prevalence of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) ranges from 14-17% among asymptomatic young adults to almost 95% among competitive athletes. With FAI, there is abnormal contact between the proximal femur and the acetabulum, resulting in abnormal mechanics with terminal motion such as hip flexion and rotation. This condition results from bony anomalies of the acetabular rim (Pincer) and or femoral head/neck junction (CAM) and typically causes hip pain and decreased hip function. The development of hip pain potentially serves as an indicator for early cartilage and labral damage that may result in hip osteoarthritis. Although surgical correction of the misshaped bony anatomy and associated intra-articular soft tissue damage of the hip is thought to improve hip pain and alter the natural history of degenerative disease, the supportive evidence is based upon low quality observational studies. The Femoroacetabular Impingement RandomiSed controlled Trial (FIRST) compares outcomes following surgical correction of the impingement morphology (arthroscopic osteochondroplasty) with/without labral repair versus arthroscopic lavage of the hip joint in adults aged 18 to 50 diagnosed with FAI. FIRST is a multi-centre, randomized controlled trial with a sample size of 220 patients. Exclusion criteria include the presence of hip syndromes, previous surgery or trauma to the affected hip, and significant medical comorbidities. The primary outcome is pain and the secondary outcomes include patient function, quality of life, complications, and cost-effectiveness--all within one year of follow-up. Patients are stratified based on centre and impingement sub-type. Patients, outcome assessors, data analysts, and the Steering Committee are blinded to surgical allocation. Using an intention-to-treat approach, outcome analyses will be performed using an analysis of covariance and descriptive statistics. Symptomatic FAI is associated

  5. Arthroscopic lens distortion correction applied to dynamic cartilage loading.

    PubMed

    Kallemeyn, Nicole A; Grosland, Nicole M; Magnotta, Wincent A; Martin, James A; Pedersen, Douglas R

    2007-01-01

    It is difficult to study the deformation of articular cartilage because it is an inhomogenous material with depth dependent constituents. In many experimental studies, cartilage is assumed to behave homogeneously and is subjected to only static or quasi-static loads. In this study, a thick walled, mechanically active culture device (TRIAX) was used to apply cyclic loading to cartilage explants at physiological stress levels. An arthroscope was fitted into the wall of the TRIAX to monitorand record the cyclic compressive behavior of the cartilage and to measure depth dependent cartilage strains. A common concern with arthroscopy systems is that the images obtained are radially distorted about a central point ("fisheye" view); therefore it is necessary to correct this distortion in order to accurately quantify distances between objects within the images. To do this, an algorithm was developed which used a calibration pattern to create an image transform. Digital video of the cyclic cartilage compression was recorded, and the distortion algorithm was applied to the images to measure the cartilage as it deformed. This technique will provide valuable and practical insight into cartilage mechanics and viability (via calcein AM-stained chondrocytes) during multiday cyclic loading of living cartilage explants. The implementation of an arthroscopy system provides the advantage of bringing microscope-level resolution into a cartilage compression device to allow for digital visualization of the entire explant at the whole-tissue level.

  6. [Foreign Material-Free Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair with Hamstring Graft, Felmet Technique].

    PubMed

    Chmielnicki, Marc; Siebert, Wolfram; Prokop, Axel

    2018-04-01

    Rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a common sports injury. Shear forces can damage the articular cartilage and lead to early osteoarthritis. Ligamentary stabilisation of the knee is necessary. Today, arthroscopic ACL repair is a standard knee procedure. Transplant fixation is often performed using implants, e.g. interference screws. The foreign material-free procedure using the Felmet technique enables biological, mechanically stable fixation of the hamstring tendon graft. We demonstrate the surgical technique, including meniscus suture and a video case study. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Meniscal Ramp Lesion Repair by a Trans-septal Portal Technique.

    PubMed

    Buyukdogan, Kadir; Laidlaw, Michael S; Miller, Mark D

    2017-08-01

    The identification of meniscal ramp lesions can be quite difficult or even impossible with conventional anterior arthroscopic viewing and working portals. Although even the use of transnotch viewing maneuvers into the posteromedial compartment increases the likelihood of diagnosis, it is the posteromedial and trans-septal portals that provide the best direct visualization of these many times "hidden lesions." In this surgical technique description, we describe a method to not only adequately visualize the ramp lesion, but also provide subtle variations to existing surgical techniques that can help limit injury to neurovascular structures as well as gain satisfactory vertical suture repair of this posteromedial meniscocapsular injury.

  8. Medial Posterior Capsular Plication Reduces Anterior Shoulder Instability Similar to Remplissage Without Restricting Motion in the Setting of an Engaging Hill-Sachs Defect.

    PubMed

    Werner, Brian C; Chen, Xiang; Camp, Christopher L; Kontaxis, Andreas; Dines, Joshua S; Gulotta, Lawrence V

    2017-07-01

    Numerous surgical options for the management of engaging Hill-Sachs lesions exist, of which remplissage has emerged as one of the most popular arthroscopic techniques. Remplissage is not without disadvantages, however, and has been demonstrated to potentially result in a loss of external rotation (ER) due to nonanatomic tethering of the infraspinatus tendon and a potential decrease in infraspinatus strength clinically. The efficacy of posterior medial capsular plication in addition to Bankart repair was examined as an arthroscopic management strategy for an engaging Hill-Sachs defect. Controlled laboratory study. Eight fresh-frozen human cadaveric shoulders were utilized for the study. After testing baseline translation and motion, 30% Hill-Sachs lesions were created in each specimen. Three experimental groups were assembled: (1) isolated Bankart repair (HSD), (2) Bankart repair with remplissage (RM), and (3) Bankart repair with posterior medial capsular plication (PL). Biomechanical testing was performed to determine anterior translation, range of motion, and Hill-Sachs engagement. Translation and motion measurements were normalized to the baseline laxity values for each specimen. A significant reduction in anterior translation was noted at 60° of abduction and 60° of ER for both the PL and RM groups compared with the HSD group throughout most of the joint loads tested ( P < .05), but no significant differences were noted between the PL and RM groups at any load. The RM group had significantly less normalized ER at 60° of abduction compared with the HSD and PL groups ( P < .05). There were no differences in internal rotation between the groups. All 8 specimens in the HSD group engaged, while no specimens in the RM and PL groups engaged ( P < .001). In a cadaveric model, medial posterior capsular plication as an adjunct to Bankart repair offers similar resistance to anterior translation and Hill-Sachs engagement as compared with remplissage in the setting of an

  9. Arthroscopic decompression with indigo carmine for treating paralabral cysts in the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Kabuto, Y; Morihara, T; Furukawa, R; Kida, Y; Sukenari, T; Onishi, O; Minami, M; Arai, Y; Fujiwara, H; Kubo, T

    2016-12-01

    Paralabral cysts in the shoulder are a relatively rare pathology. It is sometimes difficult to detect the location of a paralabral cyst in the shoulder using arthroscopy, and it can be difficult to confirm sufficient decompression by arthroscopy. We describe the case of a 64-year-old woman who underwent arthroscopic decompression for a paralabral cyst in the shoulder. Indigo carmine was injected into the cyst under ultrasonography guidance just before the operation. The leakage point of indigo carmine was detected using arthroscopy. Arthroscopic decompression was performed until the indigo carmine was completely discharged. Her shoulder pain, limited range of motion, and muscle weakness during abduction and external rotation improved postoperatively. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the disappearance of the cyst. Arthroscopic decompression using an ultrasonography-guided injection of indigo carmine is a useful treatment for a paralabral cyst in the shoulder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Enhancement of KTP/532 laser disc decompression and arthroscopic microdiscectomy with a vital dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, Anthony T.

    1993-07-01

    Currently, the clinical indications and results of arthroscopic microdiscectomy and laser disc decompression come close to, but do not exceed, the results of classic discectomy or microdiscectomy for the whole spectrum of surgical disc herniations. However, as minimally invasive techniques continue to evolve, results can be expected to equal or be potentially superior to conventional surgery. This exhibit demonstrates how the use of a vital dye can enhance standard arthroscopic microdiscectomy techniques and, when used in conjunction with KTP/532 laser disc decompression, allows for better arthroscopic visualization, documentation, and extraction of nucleus pulposus, ultimately expanding the current limiting criteria for minimally invasive techniques. When proper patient selection is combined with good clinical indications, the surgical results are rather dramatic, often achieving immediate relief of sciatica in the operating room.

  11. [The arthroscopic "wafer procedure" in degenerative disc ulnocarpal tears with ulnocarpal compression syndrome. Techniques, indications, results].

    PubMed

    Feldkamp, G

    2004-06-01

    The wafer procedure is a technique involving the partial resection of the distal ulna for the treatment of patients with symptomatic tears of the TFCC, for ulnar abutment syndrome or both. The TFCC-tears are classified as Palmer type 2. The wafer procedure can be performed as an open procedure or arthroscopically. It is an alternative to a shortening osteotomy of the ulna and decompresses the ulnocarpal joint. In ten cases with long-term follow-up, the preferability of the arthroscopic method is demonstrated: a minimally invasive technique, optimal assessment of all lesions, maximum protection of all uninjured structures in comparison to the open method, single stage procedure, and low complication rate. The long-term results are predominantly positive, so that the arthroscopic wafer procedure should be performed more often than it is today.

  12. Arthroscopic hemitrapeziectomy with tendon interposition for arthritis at the first carpometacarpal joint.

    PubMed

    Earp, Brandon E; Leung, Albert C; Blazar, Philip E; Simmons, Barry P

    2008-03-01

    The first carpometacarpal (CMC) joint, also referred to as trapeziometacarpal joint, is the area of the hand most commonly symptomatic of osteoarthritis. Although there are a variety of surgical techniques that treat this condition, this article focuses on the technical aspects of arthroscopic hemitrapeziectomy with tendon interposition. Furthermore, this study evaluated the use of arthroscopy to treat CMC arthritis, with the expectation that an arthroscopic procedure would lead to low morbidity, quick recovery of function, rapid resolution of pain, and satisfactory results in patients' strength, range of motion, and pain relief. Early outcomes data indicate that all patients experienced statistically significant improvement in their pain scale rating at a mean of 11 months after the operation. All patients were satisfied with the outcome of their surgery. All patients would choose to have this surgery again. This study supports arthroscopic hemitrapeziectomy with tendon interposition as a safe and effective treatment for CMC arthritis.

  13. Infected total knee arthroplasty treated by arthroscopic irrigation and débridement.

    PubMed

    Waldman, B J; Hostin, E; Mont, M A; Hungerford, D S

    2000-06-01

    Sixteen patients with infected total knee arthroplasties (4 postoperative and 12 late hematogenous) were treated by arthroscopic irrigation and débridement. All patients had < or = 7 days of knee symptoms, and there were no radiographic signs of osteitis or prosthetic loosening. Six of the 16 original total knee arthroplasties (38%) did not need prosthesis removal at a mean follow-up of 64 months (range, 36-151 months). Ten other knees were treated with irrigation, débridement, and hardware removal within 7 weeks of the latest procedure used to try to retain components. Two (13%) of these cases ultimately required an arthrodesis for persistent infection. Although we still believe that this method is preferable to resorting immediately to implant removal for acute infections, arthroscopic débridement was less efficacious for most situations when compared with open treatment. We would use arthroscopic irrigation and débridement only under selected circumstances (medically unstable or anticoagulated patients).

  14. Is There a Role for Internal Bracing and Repair of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament? A Systematic Literature Review.

    PubMed

    van Eck, Carola F; Limpisvasti, Orr; ElAttrache, Neal S

    2017-08-01

    Renewed interest has arisen in arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repair techniques. ACL repair with or without some form of internal bracing could lead to good outcomes in a carefully selected subset of patients. Systematic review. An electronic database search was performed to identify 89 papers describing preclinical and clinical studies on the outcome of ACL repair. Proximal ACL tear patterns showed a better healing potential with primary repair than distal or midsubstance tears. Some form of internal bracing increased the success rate of ACL repair. Improvement in the biological characteristics of the repair was obtained by bone marrow access by drilling tunnels or microfracture. Augmentation with platelet-rich plasma was beneficial only in combination with a structural scaffold. Skeletally immature patients had the best outcomes. Acute repair offered improved outcomes with regard to load, stiffness, laxity, and rerupture. ACL repair may be a viable option in young patients with acute, proximal ACL tears. The use of internal bracing, biological augmentation, and scaffold tissue may increase the success rate of repair.

  15. Rapid road repair vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Mara, L.M.

    1998-05-05

    Disclosed is a rapid road repair vehicle capable of moving over a surface to be repaired at near normal posted traffic speeds to scan for and find at the high rate of speed, imperfections in the pavement surface, prepare the surface imperfection for repair by air pressure and vacuum cleaning, applying a correct amount of the correct patching material to effect the repair, smooth the resulting repaired surface, and catalog the location and quality of the repairs for maintenance records of the road surface. The rapid road repair vehicle can repair surface imperfections at lower cost, improved quality, at a higher rate of speed than was not heretofor possible, with significantly reduced exposure to safety and health hazards associated with this kind of road repair activities in the past. 2 figs.

  16. Rapid road repair vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Mara, Leo M.

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed is a rapid road repair vehicle capable of moving over a surface to be repaired at near normal posted traffic speeds to scan for and find an the high rate of speed, imperfections in the pavement surface, prepare the surface imperfection for repair by air pressure and vacuum cleaning, applying a correct amount of the correct patching material to effect the repair, smooth the resulting repaired surface, and catalog the location and quality of the repairs for maintenance records of the road surface. The rapid road repair vehicle can repair surface imperfections at lower cost, improved quality, at a higher rate of speed than was was heretofor possible, with significantly reduced exposure to safety and health hazards associated with this kind of road repair activities in the past.

  17. Arthroscopic decompression at the suprascapular notch: a radiographic and anatomic roadmap.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Lindsey N; Bentley, Ashley; Savage, Jay A; Momaya, Amit M; Larrison, Matthew C; McGwin, Gerald; Ponce, Brent A

    2015-03-01

    Arthroscopic decompression of the suprascapular nerve (SSN) at the suprascapular notch is a technically demanding procedure. Additional preoperative and intraoperative information may assist surgeons. The purpose of this study was to (1) identify which imaging modality most accurately represents the anatomic distance to the notch and (2) quantify the mean intraoperative distances from routine arthroscopic portals to the notch. Ten matched pairs of fresh cadaveric shoulders were imaged by roentgenogram, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging, and 3-dimensional (3D) CT, followed by arthroscopic SSN decompression at the notch and anatomic dissection. Measurements obtained included the distances from the anterolateral, posterior, and SSN portal sites to the notch in addition to the distance from the anterolateral acromion to the notch. Statistical analysis with Spearman correlation coefficients and Bland-Altman plots were used to determine the correlation and agreement between measurements. The preoperative imaging modality with the highest correlation to anatomic distances from the anterolateral acromion to the notch was 3D CT (Rs = 0.90, P < .0001). The mean intraoperative distances to the notch from the anterolateral, posterior, and SSN arthroscopic portals were 89 mm, 88 mm, and 49 mm, respectively. The mean anatomic distance from the anterolateral acromion to the notch was 64 mm. Preoperative imaging with 3D CT may assist surgeons in performing arthroscopic SSN decompression. Understanding of the mean distances from the portal sites to the suprascapular notch and being cautious of arthroscopic instruments placed beyond 9 cm from laterally based portals may result in safer intraoperative medial dissection. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The efficacy of post-operative devices following knee arthroscopic surgery: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gatewood, Corey T; Tran, Andrew A; Dragoo, Jason L

    2017-02-01

    There is a wide array of device modalities available for post-operative treatment following arthroscopic knee surgery; however, it remains unclear which types and duration of modality are the most effective. This systematic review aimed to investigate the efficacy of device modalities used following arthroscopic knee surgery. A systematic search of the literature was performed on: PubMed; Scopus; MEDLINE; EMBASE; PEDro; SportDiscus; and CINAHL databases (1995-2015) for clinical trials using device modalities following arthroscopic knee surgery: cryotherapy, continuous passive motion (CPM), neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), surface electromyographic (sEMG) biofeedback and shockwave therapy (ESWT). Only level 1 and 2 studies were included and the methodological quality of studies was evaluated using Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scores. Outcome measures included: muscle strength, range of motion, swelling, blood loss, pain relief, narcotic use, knee function evaluation and scores, patient satisfaction and length of hospital stay. Twenty-five studies were included in this systematic review, nineteen of which found a significant difference in outcomes. For alleviating pain and decreasing narcotic consumption following arthroscopic knee surgery, cryocompression devices are more effective than traditional icing alone, though not more than compression alone. CPM does not affect post-operative outcomes. sEMG biofeedback and NMES improve quadriceps strength and overall knee functional outcomes following knee surgery. There is limited evidence regarding the effects of ESWT. Cryotherapy, NMES and sEMG are recommended for inclusion into rehabilitation protocols following arthroscopic knee surgery to assist with pain relief, recovery of muscle strength and knee function, which are all essential to accelerate recovery. CPM is not warranted in post-operative protocols following arthroscopic knee surgery because of its limited effectiveness in returning knee

  19. Utility of Modern Arthroscopic Simulator Training Models: A Meta-analysis and Updated Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Frank, Rachel M; Wang, Kevin C; Davey, Annabelle; Cotter, Eric J; Cole, Brian J; Romeo, Anthony A; Bush-Joseph, Charles A; Bach, Bernard R; Verma, Nikhil N

    2018-01-20

    To determine the utility of modern arthroscopic simulators in transferring skills learned on the model to the operating room. A meta-analysis and systematic review of all English-language studies relevant to validated arthroscopic simulation models using PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses) guidelines from 1999 to 2016 was performed. Data collected included the specific simulator model, the joint used, participant demographic characteristics, participant level of training, training session information, type and number of tasks, pre- and post-training assessments, and overall outcomes of simulator performance. Three independent reviewers analyzed all studies. Fifty-seven studies with 1,698 participants met the study criteria and were included. Of the studies, 25 (44%) incorporated an arthroscopic training program into the study methods whereas 32 (56%) did not. In 46 studies (81%), the studies' respective simulator models were used to assess arthroscopic performance, whereas 9 studies (16%) used Sawbones models, 8 (14%) used cadaveric models, and 4 (7%) evaluated subject performance on a live patient in the operating room. In 21 studies (37%), simulator performance was compared with experience level, with 20 of these (95%) showing that clinical experience correlated with simulator performance. In 25 studies (44%), task performance was evaluated before and after simulator training, with 24 of these (96%) showing improvement after training. All 4 studies that included live-patient arthroscopy reported improved operating room performance after simulator training compared with the performance of subjects not participating in a training program. This review suggests that (1) training on arthroscopic simulators improves performance on arthroscopic simulators and (2) performance on simulators for basic diagnostic arthroscopy correlates with experience level. Limited data suggest that simulator training can improve basic diagnostic

  20. The arthroscopic latarjet procedure for anterior shoulder instability: 5-year minimum follow-up.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Guillaume D; Fogerty, Simon; Rosso, Claudio; Lafosse, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    The arthroscopic Latarjet procedure combines the benefits of arthroscopic surgery with the low rate of recurrent instability associated with the Latarjet procedure. Only short-term outcomes after arthroscopic Latarjet procedure have been reported. To evaluate the rate of recurrent instability and patient outcomes a minimum of 5 years after stabilization performed with the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Patients who underwent the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure before June 2008 completed a questionnaire to determine whether they had experienced a dislocation, subluxation, or further surgery. The patients also completed the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI). A total of 62 of 87 patients (64/89 shoulders) were contacted for follow-up. Mean follow-up time was 76.4 months (range, 61.2-100.7 months). No patients had reported a dislocation since their surgery. One patient reported having subluxations since the surgery. Thus, 1 patient (1.59%) had recurrent instability after the procedure. The mean ± standard deviation aggregate WOSI score was 90.6% ± 9.4%. Mean WOSI domain scores were as follows: Physical Symptoms, 90.1% ± 8.7%; Sports/Recreation/Work, 90.3% ± 12.9%; Lifestyle, 93.7% ± 9.8%; and Emotions, 88.7% ± 17.3%. The rate of recurrent instability after arthroscopic Latarjet procedure is low in this series of patients with a minimum 5-year follow-up. Patient outcomes as measured by the WOSI are good. © 2014 The Author(s).

  1. Comparison of Three Virtual Reality Arthroscopic Simulators as Part of an Orthopedic Residency Educational Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kevin D; Akoh, Craig C; Amendola, Annunziato; Phisitkul, Phinit

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic education continues to move towards evidence-based curriculum in order to comply with new residency accreditation mandates. There are currently three high fidelity arthroscopic virtual reality (VR) simulators available, each with multiple instructional modules and simulated arthroscopic procedures. The aim of the current study is to assess face validity, defined as the degree to which a procedure appears effective in terms of its stated aims, of three available VR simulators. Thirty subjects were recruited from a single orthopedic residency training program. Each subject completed one training session on each of the three leading VR arthroscopic simulators (ARTHRO mentor-Symbionix, ArthroS-Virtamed, and ArthroSim-Toltech). Each arthroscopic session involved simulator-specific modules. After training sessions, subjects completed a previously validated simulator questionnaire for face validity. The median external appearances for the ARTHRO Mentor (9.3, range 6.7-10.0; p=0.0036) and ArthroS (9.3, range 7.3-10.0; p=0.0003) were statistically higher than for Arthro- Sim (6.7, range 3.3-9.7). There was no statistical difference in intraarticular appearance, instrument appearance, or user friendliness between the three groups. Most simulators reached an appropriate level of proportion of sufficient scores for each categor y (≥70%), except for ARTHRO Mentor (intraarticular appearance-50%; instrument appearance- 61.1%) and ArthroSim (external appearance- 50%; user friendliness-68.8%). These results demonstrate that ArthroS has the highest overall face validity of the three current arthroscopic VR simulators. However, only external appearance for ArthroS reached statistical significance when compared to the other simulators. Additionally, each simulator had satisfactory intraarticular quality. This study helps further the understanding of VR simulation and necessary features for accurate arthroscopic representation. This data also provides objective data for

  2. When Should We Repair Partial-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears? Outcome Comparison Between Immediate Surgical Repair Versus Delayed Repair After 6-Month Period of Nonsurgical Treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yang-Soo; Lee, Hyo-Jin; Kim, Jong-Ho; Noh, Dong-Young

    2018-04-01

    Patients with partial-thickness rotator cuff tears (PTRCTs) can be treated nonoperatively and/or undergo operative treatment, but the ideal time for surgical intervention is unclear. To compare the results of immediate arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with repair after 6 months of nonoperative care of PTRCTs involving more than 50% of the tendon thickness. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 2. The authors prospectively randomized and analyzed 78 consecutive patients diagnosed with either isolated bursal-side or articular-side PTRCTs (supraspinatus only). Group 1 (n = 44) received immediate rotator cuff repair. Group 2 (n = 34) received delayed rotator cuff repair after 6 months of nonoperative treatment. The American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) Score, Constant score, visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, and range of motion at initial visit; months 3, 6, and 12 postoperatively; and the last visit after 24 months were used for the evaluation. Cuff integrity was assessed with magnetic resonance imaging at 12 months postoperatively. There were no significant differences in age, sex (18/26 vs 13/21, male/female), symptom duration, composition of PTRCTs, or clinical outcomes between groups 1 and 2 ( P > .05). In group 2, 10 patients voluntarily dropped out from the study due to improvement of symptoms during the 6 months of preoperative nonoperative treatment. The mean follow-up period in groups 1 and 2 was 31.9 ± 1.5 months and 37.0 ± 2.2 months, respectively. At the end of the study, both groups showed significant improvements in terms of functional scores and pain VAS scores compared with the initial period. There were no significant differences between the 2 groups, except for lower pain VAS score and higher ASES Score in group 2 at 6 months postoperatively. At 12 months postoperatively, 1 patient from group 1 and 2 patients from group 2 experienced a retear. Both immediate surgical repair and delayed repair after nonsurgical care for PTRCTs were

  3. Clinical Outcomes of Hip Arthroscopic Surgery: A Prospective Survival Analysis of Primary and Revision Surgeries in a Large Mixed Cohort.

    PubMed

    Domb, Benjamin G; Gui, Chengcheng; Hutchinson, Mark R; Nho, Shane J; Terry, Michael A; Lodhia, Parth

    2016-10-01

    With the rapid increase in hip preservation procedures, revision hip arthroscopic surgery and conversion to total hip arthroplasty (THA) or hip resurfacing (HR) after primary hip arthroscopic surgery have become a large focus in the recent literature. The primary purpose was to perform a survival analysis in a large mixed cohort of patients undergoing hip arthroscopic surgery at a high-volume tertiary referral center for hip preservation with a minimum 2-year follow-up. The secondary purpose was to compare clinical outcomes of primary versus revision hip arthroscopic surgery. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. From February 2008 to June 2012, data were prospectively collected on all patients undergoing primary or revision hip arthroscopic surgery. Patients were assessed preoperatively and postoperatively with the modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), Non-Arthritic Hip Score (NAHS), Hip Outcome Score-Activities of Daily Living (HOS-ADL), and Hip Outcome Score-Sport-Specific Subscale (HOS-SSS). Pain was estimated on a visual analog scale (VAS). Patient satisfaction was measured with the question "How satisfied are you with your surgery results?" (1 = not at all, 10 = the best it could be). There were a total of 1155 arthroscopic procedures performed, including 1040 primary arthroscopic procedures (926 patients) and 115 revision arthroscopic procedures (106 patients). Of these, 931 primary arthroscopic procedures (89.5%) in 824 patients (89.0%) and 107 revision arthroscopic procedures (93.0%) in 97 patients (91.5%) were available for follow-up and included in our study. The mean change in patient-reported outcome (PRO) scores at 2-year follow-up in the primary arthroscopic surgery group was 17.4 for the mHHS, 19.7 for the HOS-ADL, 23.8 for the HOS-SSS, 21.3 for the NAHS, and -3.0 for the VAS, and the mean change in the revision arthroscopic surgery group was 13.4, 10.9, 16.1, 15.4, and -2.7, respectively. All scores improved significantly compared with preoperatively (P

  4. The golf ball sign: arthroscopic localization of an osteochondritis dissecans lesion of the knee.

    PubMed

    Piposar, Jonathan; Sutton, Karen

    2014-06-01

    We report on the arthroscopic treatment of a 12-year-old boy diagnosed with an osteochondral defect of the medial femoral condyle. He underwent arthroscopic fixation of the defect, and during the surgery, a blunt trocar was used to localize the lesion. The trocar created a transient dimpling effect on the cartilage overlying the osteochondral defect that resembled the surface of a golf ball. This "golf ball sign" then served as a visual guide during placement of a chondral dart. When present, it is believed that this sign can benefit arthroscopists by helping to improve intraoperative localization of an osteochondral defect.

  5. DNA Mismatch Repair

    PubMed Central

    MARINUS, M. G.

    2014-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair functions to correct replication errors in newly synthesized DNA and to prevent recombination between related, but not identical (homeologous), DNA sequences. The mechanism of mismatch repair is best understood in Escherichia coli and is the main focus of this review. The early genetic studies of mismatch repair are described as a basis for the subsequent biochemical characterization of the system. The effects of mismatch repair on homologous and homeologous recombination are described. The relationship of mismatch repair to cell toxicity induced by various drugs is included. The VSP (Very Short Patch) repair system is described in detail. PMID:26442827

  6. All-Extra-articular Repair of Anterosuperior Rotator Cuff Tears.

    PubMed

    Holschen, Malte; Witt, Kai-Axel; Steinbeck, Jörn

    2018-02-01

    Anterosuperior rotator cuff tears involve the subscapularis tendon, supraspinatus tendon, and rotator interval. The long head of the biceps is usually affected and unstable in these complex lesions. Arthroscopic repair of anterosuperior rotator cuff tears often consists of 2 different procedures. Whereas the subscapularis tendon is reconstructed under intra-articular visualization, the supraspinatus tendon is reconstructed under extra-articular visualization. The rotator interval is often sacrificed to improve visualization and instrumentation. The presented technique uses an all-extra-articular approach, which helps to reconstruct these complex rotator cuff lesions in their whole extent without switching from the inside to the outside of the shoulder joint. The preservation of the rotator interval leads to a more stable and anatomic reconstruction.

  7. Therapeutic outcomes of muscular advancement by an arthroscopic-assisted modified Debeyre-Patte procedure for irreparable large and massive rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Morihara, Toru; Kida, Yoshikazu; Furukawa, Ryuhei; Sukenari, Tsuyoshi; Kabuto, Yukichi; Kurokawa, Masao; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2018-02-16

    In cases of the large or massive rotator cuff tears, retear rates after rotator cuff repairs remain high. We introduced an arthroscopic-assisted modified Debeyre-Patte procedure which enables to decrease the tension of torn rotator cuff by sliding supraspinatus and infraspinatus laterally keeping fascia connection to the rhomboids. The objective of this study was to examine the clinical outcomes and retear rates after an arthroscopic-assisted modified Debeyre-Patte procedure for irreparable large and massive rotator cuff tears. Thirty-three rotator cuff tear patients (34 shoulders) were selected. These patients underwent arthroscopic-assisted modified Debeyre-Patte procedures and were observed postoperatively for at least 24 months. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to evaluate the preoperative location of the torn rotator cuff stump and fatty infiltration of the muscles composing the rotator cuff, as well as the repaired rotator cuffs. Shoulder functional evaluations through the use of the Constant and Murley scores and the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) shoulder score were compared before and after surgery, and the preoperative global fatty degeneration index (GFDI) was compared between retear and healed shoulders. MRI showed that 77% of shoulders were healed and 23% exhibited retear postoperatively. The mean preoperative GFDI was 1.99 among the 26 healed shoulders and 2.54 among the 8 retear shoulders (p < .05). When the Goutallier's classification was grade 3 or lower for all 3 cuff muscles for fatty infiltration, the retear rate was 14.3%. The mean Constant and Murley scores in healed and retear groups respectively improved from 34.7 ± 15.8, 30.0 ± 15.1 points (p = 0.47) preoperatively to 70.8 ± 8.3, 53.9 ± 14.0 points (p < .001), and UCLA scores in healed and retear groups from 13.8 ± 3.9, 12.4 ± 5.0 points (p = 0.46) preoperatively to 32.8 ± 2.7, 28.4 ± 3.6 points (p < .001). The clinical outcomes of

  8. Energy-Based Metrics for Arthroscopic Skills Assessment.

    PubMed

    Poursartip, Behnaz; LeBel, Marie-Eve; McCracken, Laura C; Escoto, Abelardo; Patel, Rajni V; Naish, Michael D; Trejos, Ana Luisa

    2017-08-05

    Minimally invasive skills assessment methods are essential in developing efficient surgical simulators and implementing consistent skills evaluation. Although numerous methods have been investigated in the literature, there is still a need to further improve the accuracy of surgical skills assessment. Energy expenditure can be an indication of motor skills proficiency. The goals of this study are to develop objective metrics based on energy expenditure, normalize these metrics, and investigate classifying trainees using these metrics. To this end, different forms of energy consisting of mechanical energy and work were considered and their values were divided by the related value of an ideal performance to develop normalized metrics. These metrics were used as inputs for various machine learning algorithms including support vector machines (SVM) and neural networks (NNs) for classification. The accuracy of the combination of the normalized energy-based metrics with these classifiers was evaluated through a leave-one-subject-out cross-validation. The proposed method was validated using 26 subjects at two experience levels (novices and experts) in three arthroscopic tasks. The results showed that there are statistically significant differences between novices and experts for almost all of the normalized energy-based metrics. The accuracy of classification using SVM and NN methods was between 70% and 95% for the various tasks. The results show that the normalized energy-based metrics and their combination with SVM and NN classifiers are capable of providing accurate classification of trainees. The assessment method proposed in this study can enhance surgical training by providing appropriate feedback to trainees about their level of expertise and can be used in the evaluation of proficiency.

  9. Arthroscopic Versus Open Ankle Arthrodesis: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Ho; Kim, Hyun Jung; Suh, Dong Hun; Lee, Jin Woo; Kim, Hak Jun; Oh, Myung Jae; Choi, Gi Won

    2018-03-01

    To perform a systematic review comparing the clinical scores, union rate, complications, reoperations, hospital stay, and operation time between open ankle arthrodesis (OAA) and arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis (AAA). We conducted a comprehensive search in the MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases. Only comparative studies were included in this meta-analysis. The literature search, data extraction, and quality assessment were conducted by 2 independent reviewers. The outcomes analyzed included clinical scores, union rate, complications, reoperations, hospital stay, operation time, and intraoperative blood loss. A total of 7 retrospective comparative studies were included in this systematic review. Clinical scores were noted in 3 studies. The American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score and the Ankle Osteoarthritis Scale score were better in the AAA group than in the OAA group. The union rate was similar between the OAA (70%-100%) and AAA (76.2%-100%) groups. The complication rate was higher in the OAA group (6.7%-47.1%) than in the AAA group (0%-23.8%) in 6 studies. The reoperation rate was similar between the OAA (0%-26.5%) and AAA (0%-27.6%) groups. The hospital stay was shorter in the AAA group in 6 studies. Among the 5 studies that reported operation time, 4 reported no significant difference. Two studies showed that intraoperative blood loss was significantly less in the AAA group. AAA was shown to offer the advantages of better clinical scores, fewer complications, a shorter hospital stay, and less blood loss compared with OAA. However, the union rate, reoperation rate, and operation time were similar overall between the 2 groups. Level III, systematic review of Level III studies. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Arthroscopic refixation of TFCC by bone screw anchor].

    PubMed

    Schmelzer-Schmied, N

    2016-08-01

    The goal of this operation technique is a stable refixation of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) to the fovea ulnaris. The stability of the distal radio-ulnar joint (DRUJ) should be re-established. The patients pain and the feeling of instability should be reduced. Lesions of the foveal component of the TFCC resulting in DRUJ instability. Combined lesions of both components of the TFCC. Complete detachment of the TFCC from the ulna either without fracture of the styloid process of the ulna or with fracture (floating styloid). Severe lacerations of the TFCC and clinically relevant arthrosis of the DRUJ. Severely osteoporotic bone. Following diagnostic arthroscopy and performance of stability control of the TFCC with a palpation hook, reduction of the DRUJ with supination position of the wrist. Bone anchor fixation through the direct foveal portal (DF). Under arthroscopic control through the 3/4 portal, the suture from the DF portal is placed through the TFCC. Pull out and tie the strands through the 6 U portal. Restriction of rotation of the forearm in a Munster cast or special cast brace for 6 weeks. Self-controlled exercise of the wrist after 6 weeks. Physiotherapy and strength building 8 weeks postoperatively. Clinical studies of this technique showed a significant amelioration of pain perception, improved range of motion and DASH score in all patients after anchor fixation. The results are comparable to other techniques. All patients returned to work after the operation. Accordingly, using this technique a very good stabilization of the DRUJ with low complications can be achieved.

  11. Arthroscopic suprascapular neurotomy for the painful irreparable rotator cuff tear

    PubMed Central

    Mclaughlin-Symon, Iain; Heasley, Richard; Morgan, Barnes; Ravenscroft, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Background Massive irreparable rotator cuff tears are becoming increasingly difficult to manage. Methods Patients were considered for treatment if they had a painful shoulder in the presence of a compensated cuff tear. All patients had radiological evidence of a massive irreparable cuff tear and underwent suprascapular neurotomy, arthroscopically. Results There were 15 males and 25 females with a mean age of 74 years (range 59 years to 88 years). The mean pre-operative Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS) in all patients was 17.7, with a mean pre-operative visual analogue score (VAS) of 8.0. The mean post-operative OSS was 30.8 [27.42–34.18 = confidence interval (CI) 95%] with a mean VAS of 3.6 (2.64–4.56 CI 95%) at the 3-month (short-term) period (n = 32). The medium-term (1-year) OSS and VAS had improved to 33.6 (32.27–34.93 = CI 95%) and 3.7 (0–8.39 CI 95%) respectively (n = 26). The difference pre- and postoperatively at 12 months was statistically significant (p < 0.001). Patients who underwent biceps tenotomy at the time of surgery had a less significant improvement in their VAS and OSS. Conclusions Suprascapular neurotomy can afford medium-term benefit in over two-thirds of the patients who would otherwise have undergone reverse polarity shoulder replacements. We consider that this is a reproducible technique. PMID:27582962

  12. Hydrocele repair - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaginalis into the scrotum. This is called an inguinal hernia. If a hydrocele persists past the first six ... months of life, it should be surgically repaired. Inguinal hernia in infants is usually repaired within the first ...

  13. Collision Repair Campaign

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Collision Repair Campaign targets meaningful risk reduction in the Collision Repair source category to reduce air toxic emissions in their communities. The Campaign also helps shops to work towards early compliance with the Auto Body Rule.

  14. Pallet repair and salvage

    Treesearch

    Richard E. Frost; Hollis R. Large

    1975-01-01

    Efficient unit-load handling with permanent pallets requires a well-organized pallet repair program. To provide basic infomation on pallet damage that could be used in establishing repair standards, we inspected a total of 1700 damaged pallets at four repair facilities. All damage was recorded by type, severity, and location. This survey determined that missing...

  15. A novel technique of arthroscopic excision of a symptomatic os trigonum.

    PubMed

    Horibe, Shuji; Kita, Keisuke; Natsu-ume, Takashi; Hamada, Masayuki; Mae, Tatsuo; Shino, Konsei

    2008-01-01

    We describe a new arthroscopic excision technique for a symptomatic os trigonum. With the patient lying in a prone position, a posterolateral portal just lateral to the Achilles tendon, at the 5-mm level proximal to the tip of the fibula, is used for the arthroscope and an accessory posterolateral portal just posterior to the peroneal tendon at the same level is used for instruments. The synovial tissues are then debrided with a power shaver through the accessory posterolateral portal for better visualization. An elevator is used to release the fibrous tissue between the os trigonum and the talus. The os trigonum is completely excised with a grasper to visualize the flexor hallucis longus tendon. Radiographic control is helpful to check the position of the arthroscope if it happens to be inserted into the ankle joint as a result of the reduced subtalar joint space. Postoperatively, no immobilization is necessary, and full weight-bearing is allowed as tolerated. Three of us have performed 11 procedures with excellent results and no cases of complications. This arthroscopic excision technique for the symptomatic os trigonum is a safe and effective procedure.

  16. Arthroscopic resection of benign tumors of the knee posterior compartment: a report of 15 cases.

    PubMed

    Masquefa, T; Dunet, B; Verdier, N; Pallaro, J; Fabre, T; Tournier, C

    2015-09-01

    The management of tumors located in the posterior compartment of the knee, whatever the nature of the tumor, remains surgical excision and can be done by open surgery or under arthroscopic control. The objective of this study was to evaluate the arthroscopic management of intra-articular tumors of the posterior compartment of the knee. The hypothesis is that tumors or tumor-like lesions confined to the posterior compartment are accessible by arthroscopy with low iatrogenic risk. All patients with an intra-articular tumor of the posterior compartment of the knee were enrolled between 2009 and 2013. The surgical management consisted of arthroscopic resection. Patients underwent postoperative MRI, repeated at last follow-up. The outcomes were the occurrence of complications, functional evaluation using the Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale, and the recurrence rate. Fifteen patients were included. All patients had a complete resection. One case of delayed healing of the arthroscopic entry point was observed. At a mean 22months, the mean Lysholm Knee Score increased from 74 (±8.5) preoperatively to 92 (±7.7) postoperatively, a significant increase of 18 points (P=0.001). One patient had a recurrence of osteochondromatosis, requiring removal of a foreign body. Resection of posterior intra-articular tumors of the knee using arthroscopy is possible, subject to a learning curve. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  17. Arthroscopic contact Nd:YAG laser meniscectomy: basic science, surgical technique, and clinical follow up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Stephen J.; Fealy, Stephen V.; Gibney, Mary A.; Miller, Drew V.; Kelly, Anne M.

    1990-06-01

    Recent basic science studies (5) have provided a scientific foundation for the use of the Contact Nd:YAG Laser as an arthroscopic tool for xneniscal resection and acroxnioplasty of the shoulder in a saline medium. This study prospectively evaluates the results of a three stage laboratory investigation as well as the clinical results of arthroscopic xneniscal resection. Fifteen patients with meniscal tears underwent subtotal meniscectomies utilizing a Contact Nd:YAG Laser (Surgical Laser Technologies; Malvern, Pennsylvania) . This was done in a saline medium with an average laser wattage of 25 W, (range 20 W to 30 W). Patients were evaluated postoperatively with reference to subjective and objective parameters at one week and four weeks postoperatively. Patients were evaluated with regard to wound healing, intraarticular swelling and pain. Assessment of technical parameters such as ease of resection, time of resection and instrument access were compared to conventional instruments. All fifteen patients were rated as having clinically excellent results based on pain relief, wound healing and swelling. In addition, although there was increased time with setting up the laser and calibrating it, there was not an increase in time for meniscal resection. Little, or no, secondary "trimmuning" was necessary with the laser. Increased accessibility was noted due to the small size of the laser. Arthroscopic Contact Nd:YAG Laser surgery is a safe and effective tool for menisca]. resection and coagulation in arthroscopic acromioplasties. It provides significant advantages over conventional cutting instruments with regard to accessibility and reduced need for secondary instruments.

  18. Arthroscopic biceps brachii tenotomy as a treatment for canine bicipital tenosynovitis.

    PubMed

    Wall, Corey R; Taylor, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Five dogs of varying breeds, ranging from 4 to 8 years in age, were presented with clinical signs consistent with bicipital tenosynovitis. After failure of conservative treatment, each dog underwent shoulder arthroscopy. Following examination of the scapular humeral joint, the bicipital tendon was severed with a bipolar radiofrequency electrosurgical system. The arthroscopic procedure resulted in a good to excellent outcome for all five dogs.

  19. Arthroscopic irrigation of the bovine stifle joint increases cartilage surface friction and decreases superficial zone lubricin.

    PubMed

    Teeple, Erin; Karamchedu, Naga Padmini; Larson, Katherine M; Zhang, Ling; Badger, Gary J; Fleming, Braden C; Jay, Gregory D

    2016-09-06

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of arthroscopic irrigation on cartilage superficial zone lubricin and surface friction. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy is one of the most commonly performed orthopedic surgeries in the United States, but rates of osteoarthritis progression following this procedure are high. The effect of arthroscopic irrigation on articular surface lubrication has not been previously considered as a contributing factor in outcomes after arthroscopy. Fourteen bovine stifle joints were randomized to receive arthroscopic irrigation (n=7) or no treatment (n=7). Full-thickness osteochondral explants from these joints underwent friction testing to measure static and dynamic coefficients of friction. Following mechanical testing, samples were fixed and stained for lubricin. Percent integrated density, a measure of the amount of lubricin in the superficial zone (0-100µm depth), was determined. Static and dynamic coefficients of friction were found to be significantly greater in arthroscopy specimens compared to controls (p=0.02 and p<0.001, respectively). Percent integrated density of lubricin in the superficial zone was significantly lower in arthroscopy specimens compared to controls (p<0.001). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Determination of the normal arthroscopic anatomy of the femoropatellar and cranial femorotibial joints of cattle

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Sylvain; Anderson, David E.

    2014-01-01

    The arthroscopic approach and anatomy of the bovine femoropatellar and femorotibial joints are described. A 4-mm diameter, 15-cm long arthroscope with a 30° forward angle view was used. The structures viewed were recorded according to the position of the arthroscope within the joint. The femoropatellar joint was best accessed via a lateral approach, between the middle and lateral patellar ligaments. The axial portion of the medial femorotibial joint was viewed from a medial approach between the middle and medial patellar ligaments and the abaxial portion was viewed from a lateral approach between the middle and the lateral patellar ligaments. The axial portion of the lateral femorotibial joint was viewed from a lateral approach between the middle and the lateral patellar ligaments and the abaxial portion was viewed from a medial approach between the middle and medial patellar ligaments. The results of this study provide guidelines regarding the location of arthroscopic portals to evaluate precisely different areas of the stifle in cattle. PMID:24587506

  1. Determination of the normal arthroscopic anatomy of the femoropatellar and cranial femorotibial joints of cattle.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Sylvain; Anderson, David E

    2014-03-01

    The arthroscopic approach and anatomy of the bovine femoropatellar and femorotibial joints are described. A 4-mm diameter, 15-cm long arthroscope with a 30° forward angle view was used. The structures viewed were recorded according to the position of the arthroscope within the joint. The femoropatellar joint was best accessed via a lateral approach, between the middle and lateral patellar ligaments. The axial portion of the medial femorotibial joint was viewed from a medial approach between the middle and medial patellar ligaments and the abaxial portion was viewed from a lateral approach between the middle and the lateral patellar ligaments. The axial portion of the lateral femorotibial joint was viewed from a lateral approach between the middle and the lateral patellar ligaments and the abaxial portion was viewed from a medial approach between the middle and medial patellar ligaments. The results of this study provide guidelines regarding the location of arthroscopic portals to evaluate precisely different areas of the stifle in cattle.

  2. Identification of a Remodeled Neo-tendon After Arthroscopic Latarjet Procedure.

    PubMed

    Smolen, Daniel; Went, Philip; Tomala, Dirk; Sternberg, Christoph; Lafosse, Laurent; Leuzinger, Jan

    2017-03-01

    To macroscopically, histologically, and radiologically describe a time-dependent remodeling process of a neo-tendon or -ligament in the shoulder after the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure. During follow-up surgery after the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure, 17 shoulders in 16 patients were evaluated for a remodeled tendon-like structure. The mean overall follow-up period was 27.4 months. The mean time between the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure and revision was 11.6 months. All shoulders were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging, and seven histologic specimens were obtained during revision surgery. A distinct, oriented strand of tissue was found in 16 of 17 shoulders on revision surgery. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging analyses showed a signal-free, longitudinal tendon-like structure originating at the tip of the acromion, traversing the space of the former subcoracoid bursa to attach in the course of the transposed conjoint tendon or the proximal short head of the biceps. Histologic analysis of seven specimens showed a characteristic timeline of remodeling. A tendon- or ligament-like structure is remodeled between the anterior bottom tip of the acromion and the transposed coracoid process in a time-dependent manner after the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Case report: correction of neglected club foot deformity by arthroscopic assisted triple arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2010-08-01

    Neglected club foot deformity at the adulthood is difficult to correct. It is usually a rigid deformity associated with arthritic change of the hindfoot joint. Combined bone and soft tissue procedure is necessary to correct the deformity. We present a case of neglected club foot in adulthood who was successfully corrected with arthroscopic triple arthrodesis.

  4. [Local anesthesia of the knee for arthroscopic surgery. Our experience in 1,000 cases].

    PubMed

    Monzó, E; Manzanos, A; Cruz, A; Ruiz-Uchupi, P; Mansilla, T

    1992-01-01

    We performed local anesthesia of the knee for arthroscopic surgery in 1,000 patients who were diagnosed of meniscopathy, chondropathy, or block of the knee. We established two anesthetic times. The first consisted of an intraarticular administration of 40 ml of a mixture containing bupivacaine 0.5%, lidocaine 0.5% or prilocaine 1%, and adrenaline 1:200,000. The second was extraarticular and consisted of a local infiltration at the sites of entrance of the arthroscope or instrumental material with lidocaine 0.5% or prilocaine 1%, with adrenaline 1:100,000. We kept a latency period of 10 to 15 min, time required for setting up the arthroscopic procedure. Ischemia was systematically avoided. With this technique the following surgical treatments were performed: meniscectomy, curettage of articular cartilage, synovectomy, plica sections, and extraction of free bodies. Tolerance to surgery was excellent in 32.3% cases, good in 46.5%, regular in 16%, and bad in 5.2%. In no cases more complex anesthetic techniques were undertaken. We conclude that the anesthetic technique used in this study is appropriate for arthroscopic surgery of the knee and allows to perform ambulatory surgery. The procedure is not useful in cases of ligament reconstruction, regional infection, and rupture of the articular capsula. Although the anesthetic technique is easy some factors should be considered before indication of the procedure such as a careful selection of the patient, skillfulness of the surgeon in performing the arthroscopy, and the accuracy of the preoperative diagnosis.

  5. Morphological classification of acromial spur: correlation between Rockwood tilt view and arthroscopic finding.

    PubMed

    Kongmalai, Pinkawas; Apivatgaroon, Adinun; Chernchujit, Bancha

    2017-01-01

    Purpose and hypothesis: Acromion spur is the extrinsic factor for impingement syndrome and rotator cuff tear. The Rockwood tilt view can be used to evaluate prominence of the anterior acromion, however no study has shown the correlation of findings between the Rockwood tilt view and the arthroscopic finding. We developed the arthroscopic classification of acromion spur as type 1 flat spur, type 2 bump spur, type 3 heel spur, type 4 keel spur, and type 5 irregular spur. Patients with rotator cuff syndrome who underwent arthroscopic surgery were recruited. Two observers were asked to classify the type of spur from arthroscopic findings and Rockwood tilt views separately in random pattern. The prevalence of supraspinatus tendon tear was also recorded as no tear, partial-thickness tear, and full-thickness tear. The keel spur (33.9%) was the most common finding followed by the heel spur (27.8%). The correlation was high especially for the heel, the keel, and the irregular spur (75.47%, 74.03%, and 72.73%, respectively.) These three types of spurs have a high prevalence of full thickness of supraspinatus tendon tear. The Rockwood tilt view can be used to evaluate the morphology of an acromion spur, especially the at-risk spur that correlates highly with the full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear. The arthroscopic classification will also be a useful tool to improve communication between the surgeon and the guide for appropriate treatment in a rotator cuff tear patient when encountering the heel, keel, and irregular spur. © The Authors, published by EDP Sciences, 2017.

  6. Morphological classification of acromial spur: correlation between Rockwood tilt view and arthroscopic finding

    PubMed Central

    Kongmalai, Pinkawas; Apivatgaroon, Adinun; Chernchujit, Bancha

    2017-01-01

    Purpose and hypothesis: Acromion spur is the extrinsic factor for impingement syndrome and rotator cuff tear. The Rockwood tilt view can be used to evaluate prominence of the anterior acromion, however no study has shown the correlation of findings between the Rockwood tilt view and the arthroscopic finding. Methods: We developed the arthroscopic classification of acromion spur as type 1 flat spur, type 2 bump spur, type 3 heel spur, type 4 keel spur, and type 5 irregular spur. Patients with rotator cuff syndrome who underwent arthroscopic surgery were recruited. Two observers were asked to classify the type of spur from arthroscopic findings and Rockwood tilt views separately in random pattern. The prevalence of supraspinatus tendon tear was also recorded as no tear, partial-thickness tear, and full-thickness tear. Results: The keel spur (33.9%) was the most common finding followed by the heel spur (27.8%). The correlation was high especially for the heel, the keel, and the irregular spur (75.47%, 74.03%, and 72.73%, respectively.) These three types of spurs have a high prevalence of full thickness of supraspinatus tendon tear. Conclusion: The Rockwood tilt view can be used to evaluate the morphology of an acromion spur, especially the at-risk spur that correlates highly with the full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear. The arthroscopic classification will also be a useful tool to improve communication between the surgeon and the guide for appropriate treatment in a rotator cuff tear patient when encountering the heel, keel, and irregular spur. PMID:28074776

  7. A Checklist Intervention to Assess Resident Diagnostic Knee and Shoulder Arthroscopic Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Nwachukwu, Benedict; Gaudiani, Michael; Hammann-Scala, Jennifer; Ranawat, Anil

    The purpose of this investigation was to apply an arthroscopic shoulder and knee checklist in the evaluation of orthopedic resident arthroscopic skill efficiency and to demonstrate the use of a surgical checklist for assessing resident surgical efficiency over the course of a surgical rotation. Orthopedic surgery residents rotating on the sports medicine service at our institution between 2011 and 2015 were enrolled in this study. Residents were administered a shoulder and knee arthroscopy assessment tool at the beginning and end of their 6-week rotation. The assessment tools consisted of checklist items for knee and shoulder arthroscopy skills. Residents were timed while performing these checklist tasks. The primary outcome measure was resident improvement as a function of time to completion for the checklist items, and the intervention was participation in a 6-week resident rotation with weekly arthroscopy didactics, cadaver simulator work, and operating room experience. A paired t test was used to compare means. Mean time to checklist completion during week 1 among study participants for the knee checklist was 787.4 seconds for the knee checklist and 484.4 seconds at the end of the rotation. Mean time to checklist completion during week 1 among study participants for the shoulder checklist was 1655.3 seconds and 832.7 seconds for the shoulder checklist at the end of the rotation. Mean improvement in time to completion was 303 seconds (p = 0.0006, SD = 209s) and 822.6 seconds (p = 0.00008, SD = 525.2s) for the arthroscopic knee and shoulder assessments, respectively. An arthroscopic checklist is 1 method to evaluate and assess resident efficiency and improvement during surgical training. Among residents participating in this study, we found statistically significant improvements in time for arthroscopic task completion. II. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Arthroscopic revision release of gluteal muscle contracture after failed primary open surgery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xintao; Jiang, Xiaocheng; He, Feilin; Liang, Zuru; You, Tian; Jin, Dadi; Zhang, Wentao

    2017-08-01

    The treatment of gluteal muscle contracture (GMC) after failed primary open release surgery has rarely been reported in the literature. GMC is a troublesome health problem in some developing countries, and it can result in the limitation of patients' hip function, leading to the development of inferiority complexes. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of arthroscopic revision surgery after failed primary open release on patients with GMC. A total of 278 hips of 140 patients who underwent arthroscopic revision procedures after failed primary open surgeries were gathered from the department files. All patients were treated using a "three-step" arthroscopic release procedure by the same surgeon group. The mean follow-up for the 136 patients was 38.9 months. There was significant difference (P < 0.05) between the patients' mean post-revision and pre-operative results on the Harris scoring system. Unreleased contracture tissues that needed revision operations included the gluteus maximus, tensor fasciae latae muscle, and gluteus medius in all patients, and the gluteus minimus and hip capsule in 11.0% and 8.1% of patients, respectively. Short-term complications included subcutaneous bruising of the abdomen in 11 patients, extensive ecchymosis in the lateral thigh in 12 patients, and a transient reduction of muscle strength in all patients. No complications involving postoperative incision infection, nerve and blood vessel damage, or positive Trendelenburg sign occurred. Symptoms of hip snapping and limitation of range of motion (ROM), combined with a positive Trendelenburg sign in two patients after the primary open surgery, were all resolved except for the Trendelenburg sign through arthroscopic revision release. The overall satisfaction rate of the revision operations was 90.4%. The three-step arthroscopic release procedure is effective for failed primary open GMC surgeries as shown by improved post-operative function and patient satisfaction

  9. Effect of irrigation fluid temperature on core body temperature and inflammatory response during arthroscopic shoulder surgery.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoyun; Ye, Luyou; Liu, Zhongtang; Wen, Hong; Hu, Yuezheng; Xu, Xinxian

    2015-08-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the influence of irrigation fluid on the patients' physiological response to arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Patients who were scheduled for arthroscopic shoulder surgery were prospectively included in this study. They were randomly assigned to receive warm arthroscopic irrigation fluid (Group W, n = 33) or room temperature irrigation fluid (Group RT, n = 33) intraoperatively. Core body temperature was measured at regular intervals. The proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, and IL-10 were measured in drainage fluid and serum. The changes of core body temperatures in Group RT were similar with those in Group W within 15 min after induction of anesthesia, but the decreases in Group RT were significantly greater after then. The lowest temperature was 35.1 ± 0.4 °C in Group RT and 35.9 ± 0.3 °C in Group W, the difference was statistically different (P < 0.05). Hypothermia occurred in 31 out of 33 subjects in Group RT (31/33; 94 %), but was significantly lower in Group W (9/24; 27 %; P < 0.05). Serum TNF-α changes were undetectable postoperatively. No statistical significant differences in serum IL-1 and serum IL-10 levels were observed between groups. Serum IL-6 levels were significantly lower in Group W (P < 0.05). The levels of the above cytokines in drainage fluid were all significantly lower in Group W after surgery (P < 0.05). Hypothermia occurs more often in arthroscopic shoulder surgery by using room temperature irrigation fluid compared with warm irrigation fluid. And local inflammatory response is significantly reduced by using warm irrigation fluid. It seems that warm irrigation fluid is more recommendable for arthroscopic shoulder surgery.

  10. Mechanisms underpinning longitudinal increases in the knee adduction moment following arthroscopic partial meniscectomy.

    PubMed

    Hall, Michelle; Wrigley, Tim V; Metcalf, Ben R; Hinman, Rana S; Dempsey, Alasdair R; Mills, Peter M; Cicuttini, Flavia M; Lloyd, David G; Bennell, Kim L

    2014-09-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is common following arthroscopic partial meniscectomy and a higher external peak knee adduction moment is believed to be a contributor. The peak knee adduction moment has been shown to increase over 2 years (from 3-months post-arthroscopic partial meniscectomy). The aim of this study was to evaluate mechanisms underpinning the increase in peak knee adduction moment over 2 years observed in people 3-months following arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. Sixty-six participants with medial arthroscopic partial meniscectomy were assessed at baseline and again 2 years later. Parameters were evaluated at time of peak knee adduction moment as participants walked barefoot at their self-selected normal and fast pace for both time points. For normal pace walking, an increase in frontal plane ground reaction force-to-knee lever arm accounted for 30% of the increase in peak knee adduction moment (B=0.806 [95% CI 0.501-1.110], P<0.001). For fast pace walking, an increase in the frontal plane ground reaction force magnitude accounted for 21% of the increase in peak knee adduction moment (B=2.343 [95% CI 1.219-3.468], P<0.001); with an increase in tibia varus angle accounting for a further 15% (B=0.310 [95% CI 0.145-0.474], P<0.001). Our data suggest that an increase in lever arm and increase in frontal plane ground reaction force magnitude are contributors to the increased knee adduction moment observed over time in people following arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Short-term Complications of the Arthroscopic Latarjet Procedure: A North American Experience.

    PubMed

    Athwal, George S; Meislin, Robert; Getz, Charles; Weinstein, David; Favorito, Paul

    2016-10-01

    To report on the intraoperative and early postoperative (<3 months) problems and complications encountered with the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure in patients with complex anterior shoulder instability. Between 2010 and 2014, 83 patients underwent an arthroscopic Latarjet procedure for recurrent post-traumatic anterior instability. The group's mean age was 28 ± 10 years and consisted of 76 (92%) male patients. A "problem" was defined as an unanticipated perioperative event that was not likely to affect the patient's final outcome. A "complication" was defined as an event that was likely to negatively affect outcome. At a mean follow-up of 17 months (range, 3 to 43 months), 20 (24%) patients sustained either a problem and/or a complication. The problem rate was 18% and the complication rate was 10%. The most commonly encountered adverse event was intraoperative fracture of the coracoid graft, which occurred in 6 patients (7%). In addition, 1 arthroscopic case was intraoperatively converted to open and 1 patient sustained a transient axillary nerve injury. A total of 7 cases underwent secondary operative procedures. The rate of problems and/or complications in primary cases was not significantly different than revision cases (P = .335). The rate of adverse events reported in this arthroscopic series is not insignificant and is similar to that reported with the traditional open Latarjet. With appropriate training, the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure can be effective for the management of patients with complex shoulder instability. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. MID-LONG TERM RESULTS OF MANIPULATION AND ARTHROSCOPIC RELEASE IN FROZEN SHOULDER.

    PubMed

    Celik, Haluk; Seckin, Mustafa Faik; Akcal, Mehmet Akif; Kara, Adnan; Kilinc, Bekir Eray; Akman, Senol

    2017-01-01

    Surgical treatment options should be discussed in cases of frozen shoulder, which is usually treated in a conservative manner. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of manipulation and arthroscopic release in cases of frozen shoulder which resisted conservative treatment. A total of 32 patients who underwent manipulation and arthroscopic capsular release in 34 shoulders were included in the study. The average follow-up period was 49.5 months (range: 24-90 months). No reason for onset could be found in 8 (25%) patients, who were classified as primary frozen shoulder; twenty-four (75%) patients were classified as secondary frozen shoulder due to underlying pathologies. The average pre-operative complaint period was 11 months (range: 3-24 months). After arthroscopic examination, manipulation was performed first, followed by arthroscopic capsular release. The range of motion in both shoulders was compared before the procedure and in the last follow-up visit. Constant and Oxford classifications were used to assess functional results, and the results were assessed statistically. Patient values for passive elevation, abduction, adduction-external rotation, abduction-external rotation, and abduction-internal rotation increased in a statistically significant manner between the preoperative assessment and follow-up evaluation (p<0.01). The average change of 47.97±21.03 units observed in the patients' values obtained in the control measurements against the pre-op Constant scores was determined to be statistically significant (p<0.01). According to the Oxford classification, 29 shoulders were sufficient. Successful results can be obtained with arthroscopic release performed after manipulation in patients with frozen shoulder resistant to conservative treatment. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series.

  13. [Experimental study about the dorsal approach to arthroscopic lateral release in hallux valgus surgery].

    PubMed

    Gui, Jian-chao; Wang, Li-ming; Wang, Xu; Yin, Heng; Liu, Ling-feng; Xu, Yan; Fan, Su-hong; Ma, Xin; Gu, Xiang-jie

    2007-11-15

    To study the availability and method of the dorsal approach to arthroscopic lateral release in hallux valgus (HAV) surgery. Ten fresh foot specimens with ankle preserved were included. Lateral capsule and the oblique head of hallucis adductus muscle were released using blade under arthroscopic visualization. Inspection was made for the relationship of the dorsal portals and the surrounding nerves, vessels and tendons. The ranges of release were also recorded. Five cases underwent the dorsal approach to arthroscopic lateral release in hallux valgus surgery. All patients were female, and the average age was 30 years old. The average hallux valgus angle was 30 degrees. The proximal portal was in close proximity to the extensor hallucis brevis tendon at a distance of 0 - 3 mm (average 1.5 mm) and was at a distance of 1 - 4 mm to the extensor hallucis longus tendon (average 2.4 mm). The distal portal was in close proximity to the first dorsal digital artery and nerve which were vulnerable to injury due to the short distance of 1 - 3 mm (average 1.4 mm). Among the 6 normal feet, metatarsal sesamoid ligament (MSL) was totally released in 1 specimens, and was partially released (70%) in 1 specimen, while in the other 4 HAV feet, 2 specimens had MSL totally released, 1 specimen partially released (50%). The 5 patients were all followed up with the average of 9 months. And the angle of hallux valgus was improved to 7 degrees (range from 4 degrees - 9 degrees). Dorsal approach to do arthroscopic lateral release in HAV is available. The advantages are small incisions, clear arthroscopic visualization, higher flexibility to release the lateral structures, less possibility of avascular necrosis of the metatarsal head as a result of no vessel injury.

  14. Short-term outcomes after arthroscopic capsular release for adhesive capsulitis.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Callum P; Lam, Patrick H; Murrell, George A C

    2016-09-01

    Little is known about the short-term temporal outcomes of an arthroscopic capsular release for adhesive capsulitis (frozen shoulder). Specifically, it is not known how immediate the improvements are and how quickly patients return to normal function after an arthroscopic release. The study included 140 shoulders in 133 patients with idiopathic adhesive capsulitis who underwent a complete arthroscopic release of the shoulder capsule, performed by a single surgeon in a day surgery setting. Patient-reported pain and shoulder function were evaluated with the use of Likert scales, and an independent examiner assessed shoulder strength and range of motion preoperatively and at 1 week, 6 weeks, 12 weeks, and 24 weeks postoperatively. Arthroscopic capsular release resulted in immediate improvements in pain, functional outcomes, and range of motion (P < .0001). External rotation increased from 21° ± 17° (mean ±  standard deviation) to 76° ± 17° at 1 week. Passive range of shoulder motion improved at 1 week, deteriorated slightly at 6 weeks, and then continued to improve at 12 and 24 weeks. Before surgery, 38% of patients reported that they "always" experienced extreme pain. This proportion reduced to 30% (P < .0001) at 1 week postoperatively and 2% (P < .0001) at 24 weeks postoperatively. There were no complications. Patients who underwent an arthroscopic capsular release for idiopathic adhesive capsulitis experienced significant reductions in pain, improvements in range of motion, and improvements in overall shoulder function in the first postoperative week. These immediate improvements in pain and function continue to improve at 6, 12, and 24 weeks postoperatively. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Arthroscopic Changes of the Biceps Pulley in Rotator Cuff Tear and Its Clinical Significance in Relation to Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chang Hyuk; Kim, Se Sik; Lee, Ju Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Background In the case of rotator cuff tears, the biceps pulley can be stressed by the unstable biceps tendon, and this can subsequently affect the stability of the subscapularis tendon. Therefore, it is important to distinguish between normal variations and lesions of the biceps pulley that affect anterosuperior lesions in cases of rotator cuff tears. Methods From January 2002 through November 2010, we observed biceps pulley and associated anterosuperior lesions in 589 of 634 cases (93%) of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, including 72 cases (12.2%) of small tears, 219 cases (37.2%) of medium tears, 134 cases (22.8%) of large tears, and 164 cases (27.8%) of massive tears. We classified normal stretched biceps pulleys as type I, stretched biceps pulleys with mild changes as type II, those with a partial tear as type III, and torn pulleys as type IV. Results We were able to classify 589 cases of biceps pulleys as type I, II, III, or IV associated lesions in rotator cuff tears. Type I was seen in 91 cases (15.4%), type II in 216 cases (36.7%), type III in 157 cases (26.7%), and type IV in 101 cases (17.1%); unidentified cases numbered 24 (4.1%). Nearly three-quarters, 73.3%, of the cases (432/589) had associated anterosuperior lesions, and combined treatment for the associated lesions was administered in 29.2% (172/589) of cases. Conclusions Biceps pulley lesions with more than partial tears were identified in 48% of rotator cuff tear cases. The incidence and severity of pulley lesions were related to the rotator cuff tear size, the status of the long head of the biceps tendon and subscapularis tendon lesion, and the treatment methods. PMID:26330960

  16. Cell biological and biomechanical evaluation of two different fixation techniques for rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Klinger, H-M; Koelling, S; Baums, M H; Kahl, E; Steckel, H; Smith, M M; Schultz, W; Miosge, N

    2009-06-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the cell biology and biomechanical aspects of the healing process after two different techniques in open rotator cuff surgery - double-loaded bio-absorbable suture anchors combined with so-called arthroscopic Mason-Allen stitches (AAMA) and a trans-osseous suture technique combined with traditional modified Mason-Allen stitches (SMMA). Thirty-six mature sheep were randomized into two repair groups. After 6, 12, or 26 weeks, evaluation of the reinsertion site of the infraspinatus tendon was performed. The mechanical load-to-failure and stiffness results did not indicate a significant difference between the two groups. After 26 weeks, fibrocartilage was sparse in the AAMA group, whereas the SMMA group showed the most pronounced amount of fibrocartilage. We found no ultrastructural differences in collagen fiber organization between the two groups. The relative expression of collagen type II mRNA in the normal group was 1.11. For the AAMA group, 6 weeks after surgery, the relative expression was 55.47, whereas for the SMMA group it was 1.90. This in vivo study showed that the AAMA group exhibited a tendon-to-bone healing process more favorable in its cell biology than that of the traditional SMMA technique. Therefore, the AAMA technique might also be more appropriate for arthroscopic repair.

  17. Ear Acupuncture for Post-Operative Pain Associated with Ambulatory Arthroscopic Knee Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-14

    E7(/(3+21(180%(5 ,QFOXGHDUHDFRGH 14 Jan 2014 Final Report Ear acupuncture for post-operative pain associated with ambulatory arthroscopic...DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release: distribution unlimited. The purpose of this study is to compare ear acupuncture plus standard therapy versus...3298 Ear Acupuncture for Post-operative Pa111 Assoc1ated With Ambulatory Arthroscopic Knee Surgery A Randomized Controlled Trial ’• V ’’ ’-’ I

  18. Does the Rotator Cuff Tear Pattern Influence Clinical Outcomes After Surgical Repair?

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Scott; Allen, Benjamin; Robbins, Chris; Bedi, Asheesh; Gagnier, Joel J.; Miller, Bruce

    2018-01-01

    Background: Limited literature exists regarding the influence of rotator cuff tear morphology on patient outcomes. Purpose: To determine the effect of rotator cuff tear pattern (crescent, U-shape, L-shape) on patient-reported outcomes after rotator cuff repair. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Patients undergoing arthroscopic repair of known full-thickness rotator cuff tears were observed prospectively at regular intervals from baseline to 1 year. The tear pattern was classified at the time of surgery as crescent, U-shaped, or L-shaped. Primary outcome measures were the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (WORC), the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), and a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain. The tear pattern was evaluated as the primary predictor while controlling for variables known to affect rotator cuff outcomes. Mixed-methods regression and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to examine the effects of tear morphology on patient-reported outcomes after surgical repair from baseline to 1 year. Results: A total of 82 patients were included in the study (53 male, 29 female; mean age, 58 years [range, 41-75 years]). A crescent shape was the most common tear pattern (54%), followed by U-shaped (25%) and L-shaped tears (21%). There were no significant differences in outcome scores between the 3 groups at baseline. All 3 groups showed statistically significant improvement from baseline to 1 year, but analysis failed to show any predictive effect in the change in outcome scores from baseline to 1 year for the WORC, ASES, or VAS when tear pattern was the primary predictor. Further ANOVA also failed to show any significant difference in the change in outcome scores from baseline to 1 year for the WORC (P = .96), ASES (P = .71), or VAS (P = .86). Conclusion: Rotator cuff tear pattern is not a predictor of functional outcomes after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. PMID:29623283

  19. The Bristow-Latarjet procedure, a historical note on a technique in comeback.

    PubMed

    van der Linde, J A; van Wijngaarden, R; Somford, M P; van Deurzen, D F P; van den Bekerom, M P J

    2016-02-01

    The Bristow-Latarjet procedure is a well-known surgical technique designed to treat shoulder instability. In this procedure, the coracoid process is transferred to the glenoid rim, to serve as augmentation of an associated bony defect. Because long-term results following a soft tissue procedure (Bankart repair) reveal that up to 21 and 33 % of the patients might experience recurrent instability and with the advent of the arthroscopic coracoid transfer, there is renewed interest in this procedure to treat shoulder instability. The aim of this study is to provide a historical overview, with emphasis on the original inventors Bristow and Latarjet, the complications and following modifications regarding the surgical approach, the coracoid transfer and the arthroscopic technique. Level of evidence V.

  20. Arthroscopic capsular plication and labral preservation in borderline hip dysplasia: two-year clinical outcomes of a surgical approach to a challenging problem.

    PubMed

    Domb, Benjamin G; Stake, Christine E; Lindner, Dror; El-Bitar, Youssef; Jackson, Timothy J

    2013-11-01

    The role of hip arthroscopy in the treatment of patients with dysplasia is unclear because of the spectrum of dysplasia that exists. Patients with borderline dysplasia are generally not candidates for periacetabular osteotomy because of the invasive nature of the procedure. However, arthroscopy in dysplasia has had mixed results and has the potential to exacerbate instability. Patients with borderline dysplasia will demonstrate postoperative improvement, high satisfaction rates, and low reoperation rates after a surgical approach that includes arthroscopic labral repair augmented by capsular plication with inferior shift. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Between April 2008 and November 2010, patients less than 40 years old who underwent hip arthroscopy for symptomatic intra-articular hip disorders, with a lateral center-edge (CE) angle ≥18° and ≤25°, were included in this study. Patients with Tönnis grade 2 or greater, severe hip dysplasia (CE ≤17°), and Legg-Calve-Perthes disease were excluded. Patient-reported outcome scores, including the modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), Non-Arthritic Hip Score (NAHS), Hip Outcome Score-Sport-Specific Subscale (HOS-SSS), Hip Outcome Score-Activity of Daily Living (HOS-ADL), and visual analog scale (VAS) for pain were obtained in all patients preoperatively and at 1, 2, and 3 years postoperatively. Revision surgery and complications were recorded for each group. A total of 26 patients met the criteria to be included in the study. Of these, 22 (85%) patients were available for follow-up. The mean (± standard deviation) length of follow-up for this cohort was 27.5 ± 5.5 months (range, 17-39 months) and the average age was 20 years (range, 14-39 years). The mean lateral CE angle was 22.2° (range, 18°-25°) and the mean Tönnis angle was 5.8° (range, 0°-17°). There was significant improvement in all patient-reported outcome scores (mHHS, NAHS, HOS-SSS, and HOS-ADL) (P < .0001). There was a significant improvement

  1. Clinical and Radiographic Predictors for Worsened Clinical Outcomes After Hip Arthroscopic Labral Preservation and Capsular Closure in Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Soshi; Utsunomiya, Hajime; Mori, Toshiharu; Taketa, Tomonori; Nishikino, Shoichi; Nakamura, Toshitaka; Sakai, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    group than in the success group (8/9 [89%] vs 3/19 [16%] patients, respectively; P < .001). The median femoral neck-shaft (FNS) angle in the failure group was significantly higher than that in the success group (139° vs 134°, respectively; P = .01). Further, Cox hazard proportional analysis of the failure group showed that the predictors for a poor clinical outcome were the presence of a broken Shenton line, FNS angle >140°, center-edge (CE) angle <19°, body mass index (BMI) >23 kg/m(2), acetabular cartilage damage (MAHORN grades 3-5), and cartilage damage of the femoral head (International Cartilage Repair Society grades 2-4). The most important predictors for a poor clinical outcome at the time of surgery were a broken Shenton line and an FNS angle >140°. Patients with a broken Shenton line, FNS angle >140°, CE angle <19°, or BMI >23 kg/m(2) at the time of surgery are not good candidates for the arthroscopic management of DDH. © 2015 The Author(s).

  2. Preoperative CT planning of screw length in arthroscopic Latarjet.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Alexandre; Gerometta, Antoine; Granger, Benjamin; Massein, Audrey; Casabianca, Laurent; Pascal-Moussellard, Hugues; Loriaut, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    The Latarjet procedure has shown its efficiency for the treatment of anterior shoulder dislocation. The success of this technique depends on the correct positioning and fusion of the bone block. The length of the screws that fix the bone block can be a problem. They can increase the risk of non-union if too short or be the cause of nerve lesion or soft tissue discomfort if too long. Suprascapular nerve injuries have been reported during shoulder stabilisation surgery up to 6 % of the case. Bone block non-union depending on the series is found around 20 % of the cases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of this CT preoperative planning to predict optimal screws length. The clinical importance of this study lies in the observation that it is the first study to evaluate the efficiency of CT planning to predict screw length. Inclusion criteria were patients with chronic anterior instability of the shoulder with an ISIS superior to 4. Exclusion criteria were patients with multidirectional instability or any previous surgery on this shoulder. Thirty patients were included prospectively, 11 of them went threw a CT planning, before their arthroscopic Latarjet. Optimal length of both screws was calculated, adding the size of the coracoid at 5 and 15 mm from the tip to the glenoid. Thirty-two-mm screws were used for patients without planning. On a post-operative CT scan with 3D reconstruction, the distance between the screw tip and the posterior cortex was measured. A one-sample Wilcoxon test was used to compare the distance from the tip of the screw to an acceptable positioning of ±2 mm from the posterior cortex. In the group without planning, screw 1 tended to differ from the acceptable positioning: mean 3.44 mm ± 3.13, med 2.9 mm, q1; q3 [0.6; 4.75] p = 0.1118, and screw 2 differed significantly from the acceptable position: mean 4.83 mm ± 4.11, med 3.7 mm, q1; q3 [1.7; 5.45] p = 0.0045. In the group with planning, position of

  3. Retinal detachment repair

    MedlinePlus

    Scleral buckling; Vitrectomy; Pneumatic retinopexy; Laser retinopexy; Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment repair ... eye doctor can close the holes using a laser. This procedure is most often done in the ...

  4. Outcomes After Arthroscopic Treatment of Femoroacetabular Impingement for Patients With Borderline Hip Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Nawabi, Danyal H; Degen, Ryan M; Fields, Kara G; McLawhorn, Alexander; Ranawat, Anil S; Sink, Ernest L; Kelly, Bryan T

    2016-04-01

    The outcomes of hip arthroscopy in the treatment of dysplasia are variable. Historically, arthroscopic treatment of severe dysplasia (lateral center-edge angle [LCEA] <18°) resulted in poor outcomes and iatrogenic instability. However, in milder forms of dysplasia, favorable outcomes have been reported. To compare outcomes after hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) in borderline dysplastic (BD) patients compared with a control group of nondysplastic patients. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3 METHODS: Between March 2009 and July 2012, a BD group (LCEA, 18°-25°) of 46 patients (55 hips) was identified. An age- and sex-matched control group of 131 patients (152 hips) was also identified (LCEA, 25°-40°). Patient-reported outcome scores, including the modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), the Hip Outcome Score-Activities of Daily Living (HOS-ADL) and Sport-Specific Subscale (HOS-SSS), and the International Hip Outcome Tool (iHOT-33), were collected preoperatively and at 1 and 2 years postoperatively. The mean LCEA was 22.4° ± 2.0° (range, 18.4°-24.9°) in the BD group and 31.0° ± 3.1° (range, 25.4°-38.7°) in the control group (P < .001). The mean preoperative alpha angle was 66.3° ± 9.9° in the BD group and 61.7° ± 13.0° in the control group (P = .151). Cam decompression was performed in 98.2% and 99.3% of cases in the BD and control groups, respectively; labral repair was performed in 69.1% and 75.3% of the BD and control groups, respectively, with 100% of patients having a complete capsular closure performed in both groups. At a mean follow-up of 31.3 ± 7.6 months (range, 23.1-67.3 months) in unrevised patients and 21.6 ± 13.3 months (range, 4.7-40.6 months) in revised patients, there was significant improvement (P < .001) in all patient-reported outcome scores in both groups. Multiple regression analysis did not identify any significant differences between groups. Importantly, female sex did not appear to be a predictor for

  5. Are Outcomes After Meniscal Repair Age Dependent? A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Rothermel, Shane D; Smuin, Dallas; Dhawan, Aman

    2018-03-01

    To determine if the failure rate and functional outcome after arthroscopic meniscus suture repair are age dependent. A systematic review was conducted using a computerized search of the electronic databases MEDLINE and ScienceDirect in adherence with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Extracted data from each included study were recorded on a standardized form. Studies were included if they (1) were English-language studies in peer-reviewed journals, (2) used a distinct age cut-off to evaluate outcome of meniscal surgery for those above and below the specified cut-off, and (3) used meniscal repairs using suture based technique with inside-out, outside-in, or all-inside techniques. Review papers, case reports, technique papers, non-English language publications, abstracts, and data on meniscal repairs using meniscal screws, arrows, or darts were excluded. 15 of 305 identified articles met the inclusion/exclusion criteria. There were 1,141 menisci treated in 1,063 patients. Seven and 8 studies met the inclusion/exclusion criteria for analysis for the age thresholds of 25 years and 30 years, respectively, demonstrating no difference in failure rates relative to age threshold. Four of 6 studies that met analysis criteria found no difference in failure rates above or below an age threshold of 35 years. No significant difference in failure in patients younger than 40 than patients older than 40 was found for 4 of the 5 studies in that arm of the review. Analysis of the composite data in this systematic review reveals that no significant difference exists when evaluating meniscal repair failure rate as a function of age above or below the given age thresholds. Level IV, systematic review of level III and IV studies. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of conservative therapy applied before arthroscopic subacromial decompression on the clinical outcome in patients with stage 2 shoulder impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Ali; Yildiz, Vahit; Topal, Murat; Tuncer, Kutsi; Köse, Mehmet; Şenocak, Eyüp

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effects of conservative therapy applied before arthroscopic subacromial decompression on the clinical outcome in patients with stage 2 shoulder impingement syndrome. Sixty-eight patients having stage 2 shoulder impingement syndrome and treated with arthroscopic subacromial decompression were included in the study. We divided these patients into 2 groups, whereby 32 (47%) patients received conservative therapy before arthroscopic subacromial decompression and 36 (53%) patients did not receive conservative therapy. We compared both groups in terms of the the Constant, UCLA, and VAS scores for shoulder pain before and after arthroscopic subacromial decompression. Constant, UCLA, and VAS scores were statistically significantly improved in both groups after arthroscopic subacromial decompression (P <0.001). Constant, UCLA, and VAS scores before arthroscopic subacromial decompression were statistically better in Group 1 than in Group 2 (P < 0.001). No statistically significant difference was found between the groups in terms of Constant, UCLA, and VAS scores after arthroscopic subacromial decompression (P > 0.05). Conservative therapy applied in patients with stage 2 shoulder impingement syndrome before arthroscopic subacromial decompression does not have a positive contribution on the clinical outcome after arthroscopic subacromial decompression.

  7. Recurrent posterior shoulder instability after rifle shooting.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jae-Ho; Chung, Nam-Su; Song, Hyung-Keun; Lee, Doo-Hyung

    2012-11-01

    Rifle shooting produces a sudden counterforce against the body thorough the anterior shoulder, which may produce a traumatic injury in soldiers. Posterior instability of the shoulder can occur in soldiers who practice rifle shooting. To the authors' knowledge, few reports have examined shooting-related injuries in soldiers. This article describes the case of a 27-year-old male soldier who presented with left shoulder pain and instability after rifle training. He developed symptoms, and presented radiographic findings consistent with a posterior Bankart lesion. Intraoperatively, while in the lateral decubitus position, a posterior portal was created 3 cm inferior and 2 cm lateral to the posterolateral corner of acromion for making a proper angle for inserting anchors. A reverse bony Bankart lesion and adjacent cartilage breakdown at the glenoid rim were noted. An arthroscopic capsulolabral repair was performed with 3-mm bioabsorbable anchors to the glenoid rim. No gross reverse Hill-Sachs lesion or hyaline cartilage lesion was noted. Postoperatively, the arm was supported in a sling with an abduction pillow for 5 weeks. Codman's exercises, scapular protraction exercises, and elbow and wrist exercises were started. Physical therapy focused on reestablishing glenohumeral range of motion and rotator cuff and periscapular muscle strength. Six months postoperatively, the patient had normal scapular kinesis and reported no shoulder pain or symptoms of instability associated with a reverse bony Bankart lesion. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Outcome in the arthroscopic treatment of synovial chondromatosis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Samson, Lucjan; Mazurkiewicz, Stanisław; Treder, Mariusz; Wiśniewski, Piotr

    2005-08-30

    Background. Synovial osteochondromatosis is a disease in which loose cartilaginous bodies develop around large joints, usually the knee. It is caused by synovial metaplasia of unknown etiology. Symptoms are due either to mechanical problems caused by the loose bodies or to the degenerative arthritis that follows after several years. Surgical or arthroscopic removal of the loose bodies appears to be the only effective treatment. This article reports treatment outcome in synovial chondromatosis of the knee. Material and methods. We treated 13 patients: 11 by arthroscopy and 2 by arthrotomy. The follow-up examination was performed at least two years after after surgery. Results. There were 6 good and very good outcomes, while 2 patients required arthroscopic re-operation. Conclusions. Arthroscopy seems to be the treatment of choice in synovial chondromatosis of the knee.

  9. Arthroscopic assisted fixation of juvenile intra-articular epiphyseal ankle fractures.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Meagan M; Lagaay, Pieter; Schuberth, John M

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to present the long-term follow-up of a case series of arthroscopically assisted fixation of juvenile intraarticular epiphyseal ankle fractures. The functional and radiographic outcomes of 6 patients with a range of follow-up of 1 to 5 years were evaluated. Five of the 6 patients had triplane injuries, whereas the remaining patient sustained a juvenile Tillaux fracture. All of the patients returned to full activity within 14 weeks of surgery, and none of the patients had any restriction in the ankle range of motion at the time of last follow-up. The results of this small series of patients suggest that arthroscopic-assisted, percutaneous fixation of intraarticular juvenile epiphyseal ankle fractures is an effective, less invasive surgical technique. Several surgical maneuvers that are helpful in the consistent execution of this technique are also mentioned.

  10. Arthroscopic contact Nd:YAG laser meniscectomy: surgical technique and clinical follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Stephen J.; Miller, Drew V.; Fealy, Stephen V.; Gibney, Mary A.; Kelly, Anne M.

    1991-05-01

    Fifteen patients were studied prospectively as a pilot study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the contact Neodynium: Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser in performing arthroscopic meniscal resection in a saline medium, (Surgical Laser Technologies; Malverne, PA). All fifteen patients were rated as having clinically excellent results based on pain relief, wound healing, and post-operative swelling. Although there was increased time involved with setting up and calibrating the laser, there was not an increase in time for meniscal resection. In addition, the decreased need for secondary trimming and increased accessibility to the posterior horns of the menisci represent advantages over conventional instruments. Based on the findings, arthroscopic contact Nd:YAG laser surgery is a safe and effective clinical tool for meniscal resection which may, with increased technological advancements and cost reduction, replace standard instrumentation.

  11. Arthroscopic treatment of chronically painful calcific tendinitis of the rectus femoris

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Relatively large calcific tendinitis with persistent symptoms after extended periods of conservative treatment is an indication for operative therapy. Arthroscopy, as a treatment for calcific tendinitis of the hip abductors and calcinosis circumscripta, has been described previously; however, to our knowledge, the clinical and radiological response to arthroscopic removal of calcific tendinitis of the rectus femoris tendon has not. Methods We present arthroscopic treatment of unusual calcific tendonitis of the origin of the rectus femoris and associated intra-articular lesions in 3 patients with chronic coxa pain. Results Our cases show that hip arthroscopy is an effective therapeutic modality for calcific tendinitis of the hip joint with satisfactory short-term outcomes. Conclusions Calcific tendinitis, although an uncommon clinical entity, should be a part of the differential diagnosis of acute or chronic hip pain. PMID:24266900

  12. Arthroscopic treatment of tibial eminence fracture: a systematic review of different fixation methods

    PubMed Central

    Osti, Leonardo; Buda, Matteo; Soldati, Francesco; Del Buono, Angelo; Osti, Raffaella; Maffulli, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Arthroscopy procedures are the gold standard for the management of tibial spine avulsion. This review evaluates and compares different arthroscopic treatment options for tibial spine fractures. Source of data PubMed, Medline, Ovid, Google Scholar and Embase databases were systematically searched with no limit regarding the year of publication. Areas of agreement An arthroscopic approach compared with arthrotomy reduces complications such as soft-tissue lesions, post-operative pain and length of hospitalization. Areas of controversy The use of suture techniques, compared to cannulated screw technique, avoids a second surgery for removal of the screws, but requires longer immobilization and partial weight bearing. Growing points Clinical outcomes and radiographic results do not seem to differ in relation to the chosen method of fixation. Areas timely for developing research Further studies are needed to produce clear guidelines to define the best choice in terms of clinical outcomes, function and complications. PMID:27151952

  13. Arthroscopic treatment of tibial eminence fracture: a systematic review of different fixation methods.

    PubMed

    Osti, Leonardo; Buda, Matteo; Soldati, Francesco; Del Buono, Angelo; Osti, Raffaella; Maffulli, Nicola

    2016-06-01

    Arthroscopy procedures are the gold standard for the management of tibial spine avulsion. This review evaluates and compares different arthroscopic treatment options for tibial spine fractures. PubMed, Medline, Ovid, Google Scholar and Embase databases were systematically searched with no limit regarding the year of publication. An arthroscopic approach compared with arthrotomy reduces complications such as soft-tissue lesions, post-operative pain and length of hospitalization. The use of suture techniques, compared to cannulated screw technique, avoids a second surgery for removal of the screws, but requires longer immobilization and partial weight bearing. Clinical outcomes and radiographic results do not seem to differ in relation to the chosen method of fixation. Further studies are needed to produce clear guidelines to define the best choice in terms of clinical outcomes, function and complications. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Complications following arthroscopic fixation of acromioclavicular separations: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Woodmass, Jarret M; Esposito, John G; Ono, Yohei; Nelson, Atiba A; Boorman, Richard S; Thornton, Gail M; Lo, Ian KY

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Over the past decade, a number of arthroscopic or arthroscopically assisted reconstruction techniques have emerged for the management of acromioclavicular (AC) separations. These techniques provide the advantage of superior visualization of the base of the coracoid, less soft tissue dissection, and smaller incisions. While these techniques have been reported to provide excellent functional results with minimal complications, discrepancies exist within the literature. This systematic review aims to assess the rate of complications following these procedures. Methods Two independent reviewers completed a search of Medline, Embase, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library entries up to December 2013. The terms “Acromioclavicular Joint (MeSH)” OR “acromioclavicular* (text)” OR “coracoclavicular* (text)” AND “Arthroscopy (MeSH)” OR “Arthroscop* (text)” were used. Pooled estimates and 95% confidence intervals were calculated assuming a random-effects model. Statistical heterogeneity was quantified using the I2 statistic. Level of evidence IV Results A total of 972 abstracts met the search criteria. After removal of duplicates and assessment of inclusion/exclusion criteria, 12 articles were selected for data extraction. The rate of superficial infection was 3.8% and residual shoulder/AC pain or hardware irritation occurred at a rate of 26.7%. The rate of coracoid/clavicle fracture was 5.3% and occurred most commonly with techniques utilizing bony tunnels. Loss of AC joint reduction occurred in 26.8% of patients. Conclusion Arthroscopic AC reconstruction techniques carry a distinct complication profile. The TightRope/Endobutton techniques, when performed acutely, provide good radiographic outcomes at the expense of hardware irritation. In contrast, graft reconstructions in patients with chronic AC separations demonstrated a high risk for loss of reduction. Fractures of the coracoid/clavicle remain a significant complication occurring predominately with

  15. International trends in arthroscopic hip preservation surgery-are we treating the same patient?

    PubMed

    Erickson, Brandon J; Cvetanovich, Gregory L; Frank, Rachel M; Bhatia, Sanjeev; Bush-Joseph, Charles A; Nho, Shane J; Harris, Joshua D

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the entire arthroscopic hip preservation literature to answer the question, 'Across the world, are we treating the same patient?' There are significant differences in arthroscopic hip preservation publications, subjects and techniques based on both continent and country published. A systematic review was registered with PROSPERO and performed with PRISMA guidelines using three publicly available databases. Therapeutic clinical outcome investigations reporting arthroscopic hip preservation were eligible for inclusion. All study, subject and surgical technique demographics were analyzed and compared between continents and countries. Statistics were calculated using Student's t-tests, one-way analysis of variance, chi-squared and two-proportion Z-tests. There were 134 studies included in the analysis (10 752 subjects; 11 007 hips; 51% female; mean 37.6 years of age; mean 27.2 months length of follow-up), which had a low Modified Coleman Methodology Score (mean 32.4; poor). North America published the largest number of studies (58%) and the most subjects (55%) and hips (56%). Australia (22%) and Europe (18%) operated on subjects with some amount of osteoarthritis most commonly. North America (2.7%) and Europe (2.0%) operated on subjects with dysplasia or borderline dysplasia most commonly. The Modified Harris Hip Score was the most frequently utilized outcome score (24% of studies). The quantity and quality of arthroscopic hip preservation literature is significantly increasing with time. Several significant differences in study, subject and surgical technique demographics between continents and countries were identified. Deficiencies in use of clinical outcome scores and definitions of treated pathologies preclude complete subject comparisons and serve as an impetus for future study quality improvements.

  16. Three-dimensional volume measurement of coracoid graft osteolysis after arthroscopic Latarjet procedure.

    PubMed

    Haeni, David L; Opsomer, Gaëtan; Sood, Amit; Munji, Jeremy; Sanchez, Matthieu; Villain, Benoit; Walch, Gilles; Lafosse, Laurent

    2017-03-01

    The Latarjet procedure has been shown to be a reliable method to prevent recurrent anterior shoulder instability. Coracoid bone graft osteolysis is a potential catastrophic complication and can lead to recurrent instability. The purpose of our study is to present a novel quantitative method to measure the amount of coracoid bone osteolysis using 3-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) scan imaging. This is a prospective study with 15 patients (16 shoulders) who underwent an arthroscopic Latarjet procedure. Three-dimensional CT scans were obtained at 6 weeks and 6 months. Using volumetric analysis, we quantified the amount of bone loss using our described method. Interobserver reliability and intraobserver reliability were calculated. On the basis of our new volumetric analysis of the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure using 3D CT scans, we found that the superior half of the coracoid bone graft undergoes a significant amount of osteolysis at 6 months postoperatively. The interobserver reliability and intraobserver reliability were excellent. This study presents a reproducible method to quantify and compare coracoid bone graft osteolysis after an arthroscopic Latarjet procedure. We also developed a description system that may be used for comparison studies. To our knowledge, this is the first method that quantifies the amount of coracoid bone graft osteolysis using more accurate 3D CT scanning. The 3D analysis we propose is a valid method to measure the amount of coracoid bone graft osteolysis after an arthroscopic Latarjet procedure. Our description system may guide the surgeon regarding possible revision surgery when faced with significant osteolysis of the coracoid bone graft. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Functional outcomes after open versus arthroscopic Latarjet procedure: A prospective comparative study.

    PubMed

    Nourissat, G; Neyton, L; Metais, P; Clavert, P; Villain, B; Haeni, D; Walch, G; Lafosse, L

    2016-12-01

    The Latarjet procedure provides effective stabilization of chronically unstable shoulders. Since this procedure is mainly performed in a young athletic population, the functional impact is significant. Published data does not shed light on the time needed to recover work-related or sports-related function. Performing this procedure arthroscopically may improve functional recovery. This led us to carry out a prospective, multicenter study to compare the functional recovery after arthroscopic versus open Latarjet procedure. Between June and November 2014, 184 patients were included in a prospective multicenter study: 85 in the open group and 99 in the arthroscopy group. The patients were evaluated preoperatively with the WOSI score. The early postoperative pain was evaluated on D3, D7 and D30. The WOSI score was determined postoperatively at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months of follow-up. The functional scores of the shoulder in both cohorts were identical overall preoperatively. In the immediate postoperative period, the arthroscopy group had statistically lower pain levels on D3 and D7. The postoperative WOSI was improved in both groups at 3 months, then continued to improve until it reached a plateau at 1 year. The WOSI score was better in the arthroscopy group at 3 months, but better in the open group at 6 months. This study found that a Latarjet procedure performed arthroscopically generates less immediately postoperative pain than when it is performed as an open procedure. The Latarjet procedure (whether open or arthroscopic) improves shoulder function, with normal function returning after 1 year. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical Outcomes and Return to Sport After Arthroscopic Anterior, Posterior, and Combined Shoulder Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Kraeutler, Matthew J; Aberle, Nicholas S; Brown, Colin C; Ptasinski, Joseph J; McCarty, Eric C

    2018-04-01

    Glenohumeral instability is a common abnormality, especially among athletes. Previous studies have evaluated outcomes after arthroscopic stabilization in patients with anterior or posterior shoulder instability but have not compared outcomes between groups. To compare return-to-sport and other patient-reported outcomes in patients after primary arthroscopic anterior, posterior, and combined anterior and posterior shoulder stabilization. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Patients who underwent primary arthroscopic anterior, posterior, or combined anterior and posterior shoulder stabilization were contacted at a minimum 2-year follow-up. Patients completed a survey that consisted of return-to-sport outcomes as well as the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI), Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE), American Shoulder and Elbow Sur'geons (ASES) score, and Shoulder Activity Scale. A total of 151 patients were successfully contacted (anterior: n = 81; posterior: n = 22; combined: n = 48) at a mean follow-up of 3.6 years. No significant differences were found between the groups with regard to age at the time of surgery or time to follow-up. No significant differences were found between the groups in terms of WOSI (anterior: 76; posterior: 70; combined: 78; P = .28), SANE (anterior: 87; posterior: 85; combined: 87; P = .79), ASES (anterior: 88; posterior: 83; combined: 91; P = .083), or Shoulder Activity Scale (anterior: 12.0; posterior: 12.5; combined: 12.5; P = .74) scores. No significant difference was found between the groups in terms of the rate of return to sport (anterior: 73%; posterior: 68%; combined: 75%; P = .84). Athletes undergoing arthroscopic stabilization of anterior, posterior, or combined shoulder instability can be expected to share a similar prognosis. High patient-reported outcome scores and moderate to high rates of return to sport were achieved by all groups.

  19. Results of arthroscopic treatment in unresolved Osgood-Schlatter disease in athletes.

    PubMed

    Circi, Esra; Beyzadeoglu, Tahsin

    2017-02-01

    In this study we aimed to determine outcomes following arthroscopic ossicle excision in athletes with unresolved Osgood-Schlatter disease (OSD). Arthroscopy was performed on 11 patients (11 knees) with OSD between September 2008 and November 2014. Surgical treatment inclusion criteria were determined as: failure of conservative treatment; isolated pain over the tibial tubercle and distal patellar tendon; pain limiting sporting performance at a competitive level. All patients had a documented history of OSD; the mean duration of persistent pain over the tibial tubercle was 15.5 months. The mean age was 23 years. The mean follow-up period was 66.1 months. The mean latency in returning to sports related training activities after the surgery was 6.7 weeks. The mean Kujala patello-femoral score improved from 82.9 points pre-operatively, to 98.5 points at the final follow-up (p < 0.01). The mean Lysholm knee scale score was 87.5 points in the pre-operative period, increasing to a score of 96.9 points at final follow-up (p < 0.01). The mean Tegner activity level score was 7.5 in the pre-operative period, increasing to 8.5 post-operatively (p < 0.01). We investigated the functional outcomes after arthroscopic treatment of unresolved OSD in athletes. All athletes with OSD showed satisfactory functional recovery following arthroscopic treatment. All patients were able to return to the same level of athletic activity. Arthroscopic surgery for unresolved OSD has the major advantage of faster recovery and avoiding damage to the patellar tendon.

  20. Long-term outcomes after arthroscopic capsular release for idiopathic adhesive capsulitis.

    PubMed

    Le Lievre, Hugh M J; Murrell, George A C

    2012-07-03

    One management strategy for the treatment of idiopathic adhesive capsulitis, or frozen shoulder, is arthroscopic capsular release. While there are long-term data regarding nonoperative treatment and good short-term outcomes following a release for idiopathic adhesive capsulitis, little is known about the outcomes five years or more after arthroscopic capsular release. Patients with idiopathic adhesive capsulitis treated with a circumferential arthroscopic capsular release of the glenohumeral joint by a single surgeon were assessed with use of patient-reported pain scores, shoulder functional scores with use of a Likert scale, and shoulder range of motion at the preoperative evaluation and at one, six, twelve, twenty-four, and fifty-two weeks and a mean of seven years after surgery. At a mean follow-up of seven years (range, five through thirteen years), forty-three patients (forty-nine shoulders) had significant improvement with regard to pain frequency and severity, patient-reported shoulder function, stiffness, and difficulty in completing activities compared with the findings at the initial presentation (p < 0.001) and the one-year follow-up evaluation (p < 0.01 to p < 0.001). Shoulder motion also improved (p < 0.001) and was comparable with that of the contralateral shoulder. There were no complications. Patients with idiopathic adhesive capsulitis treated with an arthroscopic capsular release had early significant improvements in shoulder range of motion, pain frequency and severity, and function. These improvements were maintained and/or enhanced at seven years. In contrast to results reported for nonoperative treatment, shoulder range of motion at seven years was equivalent to that in the contralateral shoulder.

  1. Arthroscopic irrigation and debridement in the treatment of septic arthritis after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Saper, Michael; Stephenson, Kyle; Heisey, Meredith

    2014-06-01

    To systematically review the literature and characterize the success and failure rates of arthroscopic irrigation and debridement (I & D) in the treatment of septic arthritis after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions. We also aimed to identify which variables affected the failure rate. Five databases (MEDLINE, Ovid, Medscape, Web of Science, and Google Scholar) were screened for clinical studies involving the treatment of septic arthritis after ACL reconstruction with arthroscopic I & D. A full-text review of eligible studies was conducted. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied to the searched studies. Failure of I & D was defined as the need for graft removal or revision ACL reconstructive surgery because of infection. Data from the selected studies were combined for statistical analyses to elucidate factors associated with the success or failure. We identified 11 eligible studies involving 90 patients. These studies described the results of 90 arthroscopic I & D procedures with an overall success rate of 85.6%. Repeated I & D was necessary in 34.5% of patients. Removal of the graft with or without subsequent revision ACL reconstruction was reported in 13 (14.4%) cases. Statistical analysis showed that cases involving Staphylococcus aureus (P = .053), 2 or more I & D procedures (P = .029), and allografts (P < .0001) were at greater risk of failure. Arthroscopic I & D with graft retention is an effective treatment for patients with septic arthritis after ACL reconstruction. Factors affecting the failure rate may include graft choice and organism virulence. Level IV, systematic review of Level IV studies. Copyright © 2014 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Chain Saw Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Mark; Helbling, Wayne

    This curriculum is designed to supplement the Comprehensive Small Engine Repair guide by covering in detail all aspects of chain saw repair. The publication contains materials for both teacher and student and is written in terms of student performance using measurable objectives. The course includes six units. Each unit contains some or all of the…

  3. Arthroscopic approach and intraarticular anatomy of the stifle in South American camelids.

    PubMed

    Pentecost, Rebecca L; Niehaus, Andrew J; Santschi, Elizabeth

    2012-05-01

    To describe a cranial arthroscopic approach to the stifle of South American camelids and to report our clinical experience with camelid stifle arthroscopy. Experimental study and retrospective case series. (1) Cadaveric alpaca hindlimbs (n = 18; 9 alpacas); (2) 1 alpaca and 1 llama Polymethylmethacrylate joint casts (n = 2) were made to define stifle joint dimensions. Cadaveric stifle joints (n = 16) were evaluated arthroscopically to determine arthroscopic portal locations, describe the intraarticular anatomy, and report potential complications. An alpaca and a llama with stifle joint disease had diagnostic arthroscopy. Successful entry into the stifle joint was achieved in 16 cadaver limbs. Observed structures were: the suprapatellar pouch, articular surface of the patella, femoral trochlear ridges and groove, cranial aspect of the femoral condyles (n = 16); distal aspect of the cranial and proximal aspect of the caudal cruciate ligaments (14); and cranial aspects of the medial and lateral menisci (11), and cranial meniscotibial and intermeniscal ligaments (8). Stifle arthroscopy allowed for joint evaluation and removal of osteochondral fragments in 1 alpaca and 1 llama with naturally occurring stifle disease. Complications of cadaver or live procedures included minor cartilage scoring (3 stifles) and subcutaneous periarticular fluid accumulation (8 stifles). Arthroscopy provides a safe approach for diagnosis and treatment of stifle lesions in South American camelids. Copyright 2012 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  4. Distraction arthroplasty with arthroscopic microfracture in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis of the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Nakasa, Tomoyuki; Adachi, Nobuo; Kato, Tomohiro; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2015-01-01

    We treated a 39-year-old female who had experienced destruction of her ankle joint owing to rheumatoid arthritis. This relatively young patient wished to avoid ankle fusion and joint replacement. Therefore, distraction arthroplasty with arthroscopic microfracture was performed to improve her symptoms and preserve motion. A microfracture procedure specifically for cartilage defects of the tibial plafond and talar dome was performed with the arthroscope, after which a hinged external fixator was applied to distract the ankle joint. The ankle joint space was enlarged by the external device and joint movement allowed. After 3 months, removal of the external device and repeat arthroscopy revealed newly formed fibrocartilage on the surfaces of both the tibia and the talus. At 2 years after the surgery, a radiograph showed that the joint space enlargement of the ankle had been maintained. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score improved from 37 points preoperatively to 82 points at 2 years postoperatively. Our findings suggest that good clinical results can be achieved with distraction arthroplasty and arthroscopic microfracture in a relatively young patient with rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Return to Sports and Recurrences After Arthroscopic Anterior Shoulder Stabilization in Martial Arts Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Ranalletta, Maximiliano; Rossi, Luciano A.; Sirio, Adrian; Dilernia, Fernando Diaz; Bertona, Agustin; Maignon, Gastón D.; Bongiovanni, Santiago L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The high demands to the glenohumeral joint and the violent shoulder blows experienced during martial arts (MA) could compromise return to sports and increase the recurrence rate after arthroscopic stabilization for anterior shoulder instability in these athletes. Purpose: To report the functional outcomes, return to sports, and recurrences in a series of MA athletes with anterior shoulder instability treated with arthroscopic stabilization with suture anchors. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A total of 20 consecutive MA athletes were treated for anterior shoulder instability at a single institution between January 2008 and December 2013. Range of motion (ROM), the Rowe score, a visual analog scale (VAS), and the Athletic Shoulder Outcome Scoring System (ASOSS) were used to assess functional outcomes. Return-to-sport and recurrence rates were also evaluated. Results: The mean age at the time of surgery was 25.4 years (range, 18-35 years), and the mean follow-up was 71 months (range, 36-96 months). No significant difference in preoperative and postoperative shoulder ROM was found. The Rowe, VAS, and ASOSS scores showed statistical improvement after surgery (P < .001). In all, 19 athletes (95%) returned to sports. However, only 60% achieved ≥90% recovery after surgery. The recurrence rate was 20%. Conclusion: In this retrospective study of a consecutive cohort of MA athletes, arthroscopic anterior shoulder stabilization significantly improved functional scores. However, only 60% of the athletes achieved the same level of competition, and there was a 20% recurrence rate. PMID:28932751

  6. Arthroscopic treatment of osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum: Report of 5 female athletes.

    PubMed

    Krijnen, Matthijs R; Lim, Liesbeth; Willems, W Jaap

    2003-02-01

    The management of osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum of the adolescent elbow is still controversial. We report on 5 cases of female high-level athletes aged from 10 to 19 years (4 gymnasts, 1 waterpolo player). All these athletes had a symptomatic osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum, which was treated arthroscopically in all cases. Follow-up time averaged 5 months (1 to 6.5 months). During the arthroscopy, loose osteochondral fragments of the capitellum and radial head were removed, and the defect was debrided. Thorough evaluation of the anterior and posterior joint including the olecranon fossa was performed. One of the 5 patients had a loose body requiring arthroscopic removal. Within 6 months after surgery, all except 1 elbow, the elbow with a loose body, regained maximum range of motion. Two patients returned to a high level of gymnastics and 1 was considering return. The short-term results of this treatment suggest that arthroscopic debridement of the loose osteochondral fragments provides a good result.

  7. Return to Sports and Recurrences After Arthroscopic Anterior Shoulder Stabilization in Martial Arts Athletes.

    PubMed

    Ranalletta, Maximiliano; Rossi, Luciano A; Sirio, Adrian; Dilernia, Fernando Diaz; Bertona, Agustin; Maignon, Gastón D; Bongiovanni, Santiago L

    2017-09-01

    The high demands to the glenohumeral joint and the violent shoulder blows experienced during martial arts (MA) could compromise return to sports and increase the recurrence rate after arthroscopic stabilization for anterior shoulder instability in these athletes. To report the functional outcomes, return to sports, and recurrences in a series of MA athletes with anterior shoulder instability treated with arthroscopic stabilization with suture anchors. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A total of 20 consecutive MA athletes were treated for anterior shoulder instability at a single institution between January 2008 and December 2013. Range of motion (ROM), the Rowe score, a visual analog scale (VAS), and the Athletic Shoulder Outcome Scoring System (ASOSS) were used to assess functional outcomes. Return-to-sport and recurrence rates were also evaluated. The mean age at the time of surgery was 25.4 years (range, 18-35 years), and the mean follow-up was 71 months (range, 36-96 months). No significant difference in preoperative and postoperative shoulder ROM was found. The Rowe, VAS, and ASOSS scores showed statistical improvement after surgery ( P < .001). In all, 19 athletes (95%) returned to sports. However, only 60% achieved ≥90% recovery after surgery. The recurrence rate was 20%. In this retrospective study of a consecutive cohort of MA athletes, arthroscopic anterior shoulder stabilization significantly improved functional scores. However, only 60% of the athletes achieved the same level of competition, and there was a 20% recurrence rate.

  8. Arthroscopic sternoclavicular joint resection arthroplasty: a technical note and illustrated case report.

    PubMed

    Warth, Ryan J; Lee, Jared T; Campbell, Kevin J; Millett, Peter J

    2014-02-01

    Open resection arthroplasty of the sternoclavicular (SC) joint has historically provided good long-term results in patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis of the SC joint. However, the procedure is rarely performed because of the risk of injury to vital mediastinal structures and concern regarding postoperative joint instability. Arthroscopic decompression of the SC joint has therefore emerged as a potential treatment option because of many recognized advantages including minimal tissue dissection, maintenance of joint stability, avoidance of posterior SC joint dissection, expeditious recovery, and improved cosmesis. There are, however, safety concerns given the proximity of neurovascular structures. In this article we demonstrate a technique for arthroscopic SC joint resection arthroplasty in a 26-year-old active man with bilateral, painful, idiopathic degenerative SC joint osteoarthritis. This case also highlights the pearls and pitfalls of arthroscopic resection arthroplasty for the SC joint. There were no perioperative complications. Four months postoperatively, the patient had returned to full activities, including weightlifting, without pain or evidence of SC joint instability. One year postoperatively, the patient showed substantial improvements in the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score; Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation score; Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score; and Short Form 12 Physical Component Summary score over preoperative baseline values.

  9. Arthroscopic treatment of chronic patellar tendinopathy in high-level athletes

    PubMed Central

    Alaseirlis, Dimosthenis Artemis; Konstantinidis, George Athanasios; Malliaropoulos, Nikolaos; Nakou, Lamprini Stefanos; Korompilias, Anastasios; Maffulli, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Summary To present the results of arthroscopic treatment of patellar tendinopathy in high-level competition athletes. Eleven high-level athletes presented chronic patellar tendinopathy which did not respond to long term conservative treatment. Average age of the patients was 24.8 ±3.4 years old. All patients received an arthroscopic procedure with osteoplasty of the distal patellar pole, debridement of the underlying Hoffa fat pad and of the degenerated areas of the proximal posterior patella tendon and cauterization of the visible neo-vessels. Mean duration of follow-up was 17.4±4 months. Patients showed a major improvement in the Lysholm score from 49.9±5.2 to 92.5±7 and in the VISA P score from 41.2±5.2 to 86.8±14.9 on tenth post-operative week. All patients had returned to sports activities by the twelfth postoperative week. Arthroscopic treatment of chronic patellar tendinopathy found to be a minimal invasive and safe technique which produced satisfactory results. PMID:23738308

  10. Is there a niche for arthroscopic laser surgery of the temporomandibular joint?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuebler-Moritz, Michael; Hering, Peter; Bachmaier, Uli; Schiessl, Robert; Rueschoff, Josef; Meister, Joerg

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate and compare effects of currently available laser systems at different wavelengths (XeCl excimer laser, Holmium:YAG laser, Erbium:YAG laser) on porcine articulating facets, capsule and meniscus of the temporomandibular joint via photomacroscopy, light and scanning electron microscopy. From a critical review of the relevant literature and the preliminary observations of this investigation, it appears that the Neodymium:YAG laser is inappropriate for TMJ arthroscopic surgery with regard to the huge thermal injury caused to the remaining tissue. The Holmium:YAG laser suffers from remarkable photomechanical and photothermal side effects, whereas the Erbium:YAG laser ablates temporomandibular joint tissue efficiently with minimal adjacent damage--similar to the XeCl excimer laser, without entailing the risk of potential mutagenity. To sum up, it can be concluded that there is a clinical need for laser- assisted arthroscopic surgery of the craniomandibular articulation. Nevertheless, at present none of the available laser systems meet the medical demands completely. Currently, the Erbium:YAG laser seems to be the most suitable for TMJ arthroscopic surgery.

  11. Over-optimistic patient expectations of recovery and leisure activities after arthroscopic meniscus surgery.

    PubMed

    Pihl, Kenneth; Roos, Ewa M; Nissen, Nis; JøRgensen, Uffe; Schjerning, Jeppe; Thorlund, Jonas B

    2016-12-01

    Background and purpose - Patients' expectations of outcomes following arthroscopic meniscus surgery are largely unknown. We investigated patients' expectations concerning recovery and participation in leisure-time activities after arthroscopic meniscus surgery and the postoperative fulfillment of these. Patients and methods - The study sample consisted of 491 consecutively recruited patients (mean age 50 (SD 13) years, 55% men) who were assigned for arthroscopy on suspicion of meniscus injury and later verified by arthroscopy. Before surgery, patients completed questionnaires regarding their expectations of recovery time and postoperative participation in leisure activities. 3 months after surgery, the patients completed questionnaires on their actual level of leisure activity and their degree of satisfaction with their current knee function. We analyzed differences between the expected outcome and the actual outcome, and between fulfilled/exceeded expectations and satisfaction with knee function. Results - 478 patients (97%) completed the follow-up. 91% had expected to be fully recovered within 3 months. We found differences between patients' preoperative expectations of participation in leisure activities postoperatively and their actual participation in these, with 59% having unfulfilled expectations (p < 0.001). Satisfaction with current knee function was associated with expectations of leisure activities being fulfilled/exceeded. Interpretation - In general, patients undergoing arthroscopic meniscus surgery were too optimistic regarding their recovery time and postoperative participation in leisure activities. This highlights the need for shared decision making which should include giving the patient information on realistic expectations of recovery time and regarding participation in leisure-time activities after meniscal surgery.

  12. Massive cuff tears treated with arthroscopically assisted latissimus dorsi transfer. Surgical technique

    PubMed Central

    De Cupis, Vincenzo; De Cupis, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    Summary Latissimus dorsi transfer is our preferred treatment for active disabled patients with a posterosuperior massive cuff tear. We present an arthroscopically assisted technique which avoids an incision through the deltoid obtaining a better and faster clinical outcome. The patient is placed in lateral decubitus. After the arthroscopic evaluation of the lesion through a posterior and a posterolateral portal, with the limb in traction we perform the preparation of the greater tuberosity of the humerus. We place the arm in abduction and internal rotation and we proceed to the harvest of the latissimus dorsi and the tendon preparation by stitching the two sides using very resistant sutures. After restoring limb traction, under arthroscopic visualization, we pass a curved grasper through the posterolateral portal by going to the armpit in the space between the teres minor and the posterior deltoid. Once the grasper has exited the access at the level of the axilla we fix two drainage transparent tubes, each with a wire inside, and, withdrawing it back, we shuttle the two tubes in the subacromial space. After tensioning the suture wires from the anterior portals these are assembled in a knotless anchor of 5.5 mm that we place in the prepared site on the greater tuberosity of the humerus. A shoulder brace at 15° of abduction and neutral rotation protect the patient for the first month post-surgery but physical therapy can immediately start. PMID:23738290

  13. Dorsal Arthroscopic Approach and Intra-Articular Anatomy of the Bovine Antebrachiocarpal and Middle Carpal Joints.

    PubMed

    Lardé, Hélène; Nichols, Sylvain; Babkine, Marie; Desrochers, André

    2016-07-01

    To determine arthroscopic approaches to the dorsal synovial compartments of the antebrachiocarpal and middle carpal joints in adult cattle, and to describe the arthroscopic intra-articular anatomy from each approach. Ex vivo study. Six fresh adult bovine cadavers. Two carpi were injected with latex and dissected to determine the ideal location for arthroscopic portals. Arthroscopy of the antebrachiocarpal and middle carpal joints of 10 carpi was then performed. The dorsolateral approach was made between the extensor carpi radialis and common digital extensor tendons. The dorsomedial approach was made medial to the extensor carpi radialis tendon, midway between the distal radius and proximal row of carpal bones (antebrachiocarpal joint) and midway between the two rows of carpal bones (middle carpal joint), with the joint in flexion. Arthroscopy of the antebrachiocarpal joint allowed visualization of the distal radius, proximal aspect of the radial, intermediate and ulnar carpal bones, and a palmar ligament located between the radius and the intermediate carpal bone. The approach to the middle carpal joint allowed visualization of the distal aspect of the radial, intermediate, and ulnar carpal bones, the proximal aspect of the fourth and fused second and third carpal bones and an interosseous ligament. The most lateral articular structures (lateral glenoid cavity of the distal radius, ulnar carpal and fourth carpal bones) were difficult to assess. Dorsal approaches to the antebrachiocarpal and middle carpal joints allowed visualization of most intra-articular dorsal structures in adult cattle. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  14. The effect of forced-air warming during arthroscopic shoulder surgery with general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hyung Seok; Park, Sung Wook; Yi, Jae Woo; Kwon, Moo Il; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the change in body temperature between the cotton blanket group and forced-air warming blanket group during arthroscopic shoulder surgery. In both groups irrigation fluid at room temperature (22 degrees C) was used. We randomly assigned 44 American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I and II patients scheduled for elective shoulder arthroscopic surgery to receive 1 cotton blanket (group I, n = 22) or a forced-air warming blanket (group II, n = 22). Body temperatures were measured with an esophageal stethoscope, which was inserted immediately after intubation. A significant difference in body temperatures was observed at 60 minutes after induction (P = .0192), 90 minutes after induction (P = .0004), 120 minutes after induction (P = .0003), and 150 minutes after induction (P = .0228). Shivering on arrival in the postanesthesia care unit was found in 15 patients in group I (68.1%) and only 1 patient in group II (4.5%). We conclude that forced-air warming is significantly more efficient than a cotton blanket alone at maintaining perioperative normothermia during arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Level I, randomized controlled trial.

  15. Translational manipulation after failed arthroscopic capsular release for recalcitrant adhesive capsulitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Roubal, Paul J; Placzek, Jeffrey

    2008-10-01

    This article reports the use of translational manipulation after failed arthroscopic capsular release for adhesive capsulitis. The patient was a 40-year-old woman, insulin-dependent diabetic with the insidious onset of right shoulder adhesive capsulitis. The patient underwent physical therapy 3 times a week for 6 weeks with minimal changes in her range of motion or pain. After failing physical therapy, the patient had arthroscopic capsular release and long-lever arm rotational manipulation of the right shoulder. The patient participated in physical therapy again, failing to regain her range of motion. Subsequently, the patient underwent interscalene block and translational manipulation by the same therapist followed by physical therapy. The patient's range-of-motion measures, strength testing, pain scale measurements, and functional scoring were recorded throughout her rehabilitation. She returned 2 years postdischarge for the same tests and measurements. Adhesive capsulitis in association with diabetes mellitus poses a serious treatment dilemma. Arthroscopic release may have limited benefits secondary to limited release and/or postoperative pain limiting rehabilitation. Translational manipulation under interscalene block may be considered in this difficult treatment group.

  16. Effects of ultrasound-guided stellate ganglion block on acute pain after arthroscopic shoulder surgery.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Mi; Kim, Eun Mi; Chung, Mi Hwa; Park, Jong Hee; Lee, Hyo Keun; Choi, Young Rong; Lee, Mihyeon

    2015-01-01

    Apart from a few case reports, the effectiveness of stellate ganglion block (SGB) as a monotherapy in acute nociceptive pain has not been determined. We aimed to assess the effects of SGB on postoperative pain after arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Randomized, blind, controlled, clinical trial University Hospital outpatient Forty-six patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery were assigned randomly to 2 groups: group S included patients who underwent SGB prior to surgery and group C did not. In group S, subfascial ultrasound-guided SGB was conducted with 4 mL of 0.375% levobupivacaine. For the first postoperative 48 hours, postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) and analgesic requirements were compared. The results of 40 patients were included in the study. There was no difference between groups with regards to analgesics requirement for the first postoperative 48 hours and no difference in VAS score (P > 0.05). Small number of patients in study. Preoperative ultrasound-guided SGB did not reduce postoperative acute pain in arthroscopic shoulder surgery.

  17. Relationship of physical examination test of shoulder instability to arthroscopic findings in dogs.

    PubMed

    Devitt, Chad M; Neely, Marlon R; Vanvechten, Brian J

    2007-10-01

    To determine the diagnostic validity of commonly used physical examination maneuvers for shoulder instability. Retrospective study. Dogs (n=24) referred for shoulder arthroscopy. Results of physical maneuvers and arthroscopic findings were recorded and sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratios (LR+), and negative likelihood ratios (LR-) were calculated for each of 4 physical examination test findings for arthroscopic changes in the medial, lateral, cranial, or caudal compartments of the shoulder joint viewed in dorsal recumbency by lateral and craniomedial portals. Distribution of compartment changes was: medial (17 dogs), caudal (15), cranial (12), and lateral (5). The biceps test had a moderate effect (LR+=9) on post-test probability of cranial compartment changes and a small effect on post-test probability of lateral and caudal compartment changes (LR+=3 and 2.4, respectively). Hyperabduction had a minimal effect and mediolateral instability test had a small effect (LR+=1.64 and 2.68, respectively) on post-test probability of medial compartment changes. Craniocaudal instability test had little to no effect on post-test probability of changes in any compartment. Physical examination tests evaluated were limited in their ability to predict the type of arthroscopic pathology in this study population. Clinicians should understand that a diagnostic test performs inconsistently based on prevalence of a condition in a given patient population. The use of likelihood ratios can assist clinicians in determining the probability of intraarticular changes from a group with a differing prevalence than the patient population presented.