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Sample records for articular cartilage repair

  1. Supporting Biomaterials for Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Duarte Campos, Daniela Filipa; Drescher, Wolf; Rath, Björn; Tingart, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Orthopedic surgeons and researchers worldwide are continuously faced with the challenge of regenerating articular cartilage defects. However, until now, it has not been possible to completely mimic the biological and biochemical properties of articular cartilage using current research and development approaches. In this review, biomaterials previously used for articular cartilage repair research are addressed. Furthermore, a brief discussion of the state of the art of current cell printing procedures mimicking native cartilage is offered in light of their use as future alternatives for cartilage tissue engineering. Inkjet cell printing, controlled deposition cell printing tools, and laser cell printing are cutting-edge techniques in this context. The development of mimetic hydrogels with specific biological properties relevant to articular cartilage native tissue will support the development of improved, functional, and novel engineered tissue for clinical application. PMID:26069634

  2. A vision on the future of articular cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Cucchiarini, M; Madry, H; Guilak, F; Saris, D B; Stoddart, M J; Koon Wong, M; Roughley, P

    2014-05-06

    An AO Foundation (Davos, Switzerland) sponsored workshop "Cell Therapy in Cartilage Repair" from the Symposium "Where Science meets Clinics" (September 5-7, 2013, Davos) gathered leaders from medicine, science, industry, and regulatory organisations to debate the vision of cell therapy in articular cartilage repair and the measures that could be taken to narrow the gap between vision and current practice. Cell-based therapy is already in clinical use to enhance the repair of cartilage lesions, with procedures such as microfracture and articular chondrocyte implantation. However, even though long term follow up is good from a clinical perspective and some of the most rigorous randomised controlled trials in the regenerative medicine/orthopaedics field show beneficial effect, none of these options have proved successful in restoring the original articular cartilage structure and functionality in patients so far. With the remarkable recent advances in experimental research in cell biology (new sources for chondrocytes, stem cells), molecular biology (growth factors, genes), biomaterials, biomechanics, and translational science, a combined effort between scientists and clinicians with broad expertise may allow development of an improved cell therapy for cartilage repair. This position paper describes the current state of the art in the field to help define a procedure adapted to the clinical situation for upcoming translation in the patient.

  3. Hydrogels for the Repair of Articular Cartilage Defects

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Suzanne A.; Lowman, Anthony M.

    2011-01-01

    The repair of articular cartilage defects remains a significant challenge in orthopedic medicine. Hydrogels, three-dimensional polymer networks swollen in water, offer a unique opportunity to generate a functional cartilage substitute. Hydrogels can exhibit similar mechanical, swelling, and lubricating behavior to articular cartilage, and promote the chondrogenic phenotype by encapsulated cells. Hydrogels have been prepared from naturally derived and synthetic polymers, as cell-free implants and as tissue engineering scaffolds, and with controlled degradation profiles and release of stimulatory growth factors. Using hydrogels, cartilage tissue has been engineered in vitro that has similar mechanical properties to native cartilage. This review summarizes the advancements that have been made in determining the potential of hydrogels to replace damaged cartilage or support new tissue formation as a function of specific design parameters, such as the type of polymer, degradation profile, mechanical properties and loading regimen, source of cells, cell-seeding density, controlled release of growth factors, and strategies to cause integration with surrounding tissue. Some key challenges for clinical translation remain, including limited information on the mechanical properties of hydrogel implants or engineered tissue that are necessary to restore joint function, and the lack of emphasis on the ability of an implant to integrate in a stable way with the surrounding tissue. Future studies should address the factors that affect these issues, while using clinically relevant cell sources and rigorous models of repair. PMID:21510824

  4. Hydrogel-Based Controlled Delivery Systems for Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Madry, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Delivery of bioactive factors is a very valuable strategy for articular cartilage repair. Nevertheless, the direct supply of such biomolecules is limited by several factors including rapid degradation, the need for supraphysiological doses, the occurrence of immune and inflammatory responses, and the possibility of dissemination to nontarget sites that may impair their therapeutic action and raise undesired effects. The use of controlled delivery systems has the potential of overcoming these hurdles by promoting the temporal and spatial presentation of such factors in a defined target. Hydrogels are promising materials to develop delivery systems for cartilage repair as they can be easily loaded with bioactive molecules controlling their release only where required. This review exposes the most recent technologies on the design of hydrogels as controlled delivery platforms of bioactive molecules for cartilage repair. PMID:27642587

  5. Hydrogel-Based Controlled Delivery Systems for Articular Cartilage Repair.

    PubMed

    Rey-Rico, Ana; Madry, Henning; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2016-01-01

    Delivery of bioactive factors is a very valuable strategy for articular cartilage repair. Nevertheless, the direct supply of such biomolecules is limited by several factors including rapid degradation, the need for supraphysiological doses, the occurrence of immune and inflammatory responses, and the possibility of dissemination to nontarget sites that may impair their therapeutic action and raise undesired effects. The use of controlled delivery systems has the potential of overcoming these hurdles by promoting the temporal and spatial presentation of such factors in a defined target. Hydrogels are promising materials to develop delivery systems for cartilage repair as they can be easily loaded with bioactive molecules controlling their release only where required. This review exposes the most recent technologies on the design of hydrogels as controlled delivery platforms of bioactive molecules for cartilage repair. PMID:27642587

  6. Hydrogel-Based Controlled Delivery Systems for Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Madry, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Delivery of bioactive factors is a very valuable strategy for articular cartilage repair. Nevertheless, the direct supply of such biomolecules is limited by several factors including rapid degradation, the need for supraphysiological doses, the occurrence of immune and inflammatory responses, and the possibility of dissemination to nontarget sites that may impair their therapeutic action and raise undesired effects. The use of controlled delivery systems has the potential of overcoming these hurdles by promoting the temporal and spatial presentation of such factors in a defined target. Hydrogels are promising materials to develop delivery systems for cartilage repair as they can be easily loaded with bioactive molecules controlling their release only where required. This review exposes the most recent technologies on the design of hydrogels as controlled delivery platforms of bioactive molecules for cartilage repair.

  7. The Role of Tissue Engineering in Articular Cartilage Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lijie; Hu, Jerry; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage repair and regeneration continue to be largely intractable due to the poor regenerative properties of this tissue. The field of articular cartilage tissue engineering, which aims to repair, regenerate, and/or improve injured or diseased articular cartilage functionality, has evoked intense interest and holds great potential for improving articular cartilage therapy. This review provides an overall description of the current state and progress in articular cartilage repair and regeneration. Traditional therapies and related problems are introduced. More importantly, a variety of promising cell sources, biocompatible tissue engineered scaffolds, scaffoldless techniques, growth factors, and mechanical stimuli used in current articular cartilage tissue engineering are reviewed. Finally, the technical and regulatory challenges of articular cartilage tissue engineering and possible future directions are discussed. PMID:20201770

  8. Increasing the Dose of Autologous Chondrocytes Improves Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Guillén-García, Pedro; Rodríguez-Iñigo, Elena; Guillén-Vicente, Isabel; Caballero-Santos, Rosa; Guillén-Vicente, Marta; Abelow, Stephen; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Background: We hypothesized that implanting cells in a chondral defect at a density more similar to that of the intact cartilage could induce them to synthesize matrix with the features more similar to that of the uninjured one. Methods: We compared the implantation of different doses of chondrocytes: 1 million (n = 5), 5 million (n = 5), or 5 million mesenchymal cells (n = 5) in the femoral condyle of 15 sheep. Tissue generated by microfracture at the trochlea, and normal cartilage from a nearby region, processed as the tissues resulting from the implantation, were used as references. Histological and molecular (expression of type I and II collagens and aggrecan) studies were performed. Results: The features of the cartilage generated by implantation of mesenchymal cells and elicited by microfractures were similar and typical of a poor repair of the articular cartilage (presence of fibrocartilage, high expression of type I collagen and a low mRNA levels of type II collagen and aggrecan). Nevertheless, in the samples obtained from tissues generated by implantation of chondrocytes, hyaline-like cartilage, cell organization, low expression rates of type I collagen and high levels of mRNA corresponding to type II collagen and aggrecan were observed. These histological features, show less variability and are more similar to those of the normal cartilage used as control in the case of 5 million cells implantation than when 1 million cells were used. Conclusions: The implantation of autologous chondrocytes in type I/III collagen membranes at high density could be a promising tool to repair articular cartilage. PMID:26069691

  9. Repair and tissue engineering techniques for articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Makris, Eleftherios A.; Gomoll, Andreas H.; Malizos, Konstantinos N.; Hu, Jerry C.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2015-01-01

    Chondral and osteochondral lesions due to injury or other pathology commonly result in the development of osteoarthritis, eventually leading to progressive total joint destruction. Although current progress suggests that biologic agents can delay the advancement of deterioration, such drugs are incapable of promoting tissue restoration. The limited ability of articular cartilage to regenerate renders joint arthroplasty an unavoidable surgical intervention. This Review describes current, widely used clinical repair techniques for resurfacing articular cartilage defects; short-term and long-term clinical outcomes of these techniques are discussed. Also reviewed is a developmental pipeline of regenerative biological products that over the next decade could revolutionize joint care by functionally healing articular cartilage. These products include cell-based and cell-free materials such as autologous and allogeneic cell-based approaches and multipotent and pluripotent stem-cell-based techniques. Central to these efforts is the prominent role that tissue engineering has in translating biological technology into clinical products; therefore, concomitant regulatory processes are also discussed. PMID:25247412

  10. Articular cartilage repair with autologous bone marrow mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tomiya; Okabe, Takahiro; Ikawa, Tesshu; Iida, Takahiro; Yasuda, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Wakitani, Shigeyuki

    2010-11-01

    Articular cartilage defects that do not repair spontaneously induce osteoarthritic changes in joints over a long period of observation. In this study, we examined the usefulness of transplanting culture-expanded bone marrow mesenchymal cells into osteochondral defects of joints with cartilage defects. First, we performed experiments on rabbits and up on obtaining good results proceeded to perform the experiments on humans. Macroscopic and histological repair with this method was good, and good clinical results were obtained although there was no significant difference with the control group. Recent reports have indicated that this procedure is comparable to autologous chondrocyte implantation, and concluded that it was a good procedure because it required one step less than that required by surgery, reduced costs for patients, and minimized donor site morbidity. Although some reports have previously shown that progenitor cells formed a tumor when implanted into immune-deficient mice after long term in vitro culture, the safety of the cell transplantation was confirmed by our clinical experience. Thus, this procedure is useful, effective, and safe, but the repaired tissues were not always hyaline cartilage. To obtain better repair with this procedure, treatment approaches using some growth factors during in vitro culture or gene transfection are being explored.

  11. Donor site morbidity after articular cartilage repair procedures: a review.

    PubMed

    Matricali, Giovanni A; Dereymaeker, Greta Ph E; Luyten, Frank P

    2010-10-01

    In order to perform an Osteochondral Autologous Transplantation (OAT) or an Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation (ACI), the integrity of healthy intact articular cartilage at a second location needs to be violated. This creates the possibility for donor site morbidity. Only recently have any publications addressed this issue. The aim of this manuscript is to review the current knowledge on donor site morbidity after an OAT or an ACI. Reports were identified by searching Medline and Pubmed up to March 2010. Donor site morbidity was described mostly considering a clinical outcome, both in a qualitative (parameters in history or physical examination) and/or quantitative way (knee status reported by means of a numerical score). An increasing rate of problems is noted when using quantitative instead of qualitative parameters, and when donor site morbidity is the focus of attention, affecting up to more than half of the patients, in particular for an OAT procedure. The decision to harvest an osteochondral or cartilage biopsy to perform a repair procedure should therefore be taken with caution. This also underscores the need for further research to identify safe donor sites or to develop techniques that eliminate the need for a formal biopsy ccompletely.

  12. Heterotopic autologous chondrocyte transplantation--a realistic approach to support articular cartilage repair?

    PubMed

    El Sayed, Karym; Haisch, Andreas; John, Thilo; Marzahn, Ulrike; Lohan, Anke; Müller, Riccarda D; Kohl, Benjamin; Ertel, Wolfgang; Stoelzel, Katharina; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula

    2010-12-01

    Injured articular cartilage is limited in its capacity to heal. Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) is a suitable technique for cartilage repair, but it requires articular cartilage biopsies for sufficient autologous chondrocyte expansion in vitro. Hence, ACT is restricted by donor-site morbidity and autologous articular chondrocytes availability. The use of nonarticular heterotopic chondrocytes such as auricular, nasoseptal, or costal chondrocytes for ACT might overcome these limitations: heterotopic sources show lesser donor-site morbidity and a comparable extracellular cartilage matrix synthesis profile to articular cartilage. However, heterotopic (h)ACT poses a challenge. Particular tissue characteristics of heterotopic cartilage, divergent culturing peculiarities of heterotopic chondrocytes, and the advantages and drawbacks related to these diverse cartilage sources were critically discussed. Finally, available in vitro and in vivo experimental (h)ACT approaches were summarized. The quality of the cartilage engineered using heterotopic chondrocytes remains partly controversy due to the divergent methodologies and culture conditions used. While some encouraging in vivo results using (h)ACT have been demonstrated, standardized culturing protocols are strongly required. However, whether heterotopic chondrocytes implanted into joint cartilage defects maintain their particular tissue properties or can be adapted via tissue engineering strategies to fulfill regular articular cartilage functions requires further studies.

  13. Strategic Design and Fabrication of Engineered Scaffolds for Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Izadifar, Zohreh; Chen, Xiongbiao; Kulyk, William

    2012-01-01

    Damage to articular cartilage can eventually lead to osteoarthritis (OA), a debilitating, degenerative joint disease that affects millions of people around the world. The limited natural healing ability of cartilage and the limitations of currently available therapies make treatment of cartilage defects a challenging clinical issue. Hopes have been raised for the repair of articular cartilage with the help of supportive structures, called scaffolds, created through tissue engineering (TE). Over the past two decades, different designs and fabrication techniques have been investigated for developing TE scaffolds suitable for the construction of transplantable artificial cartilage tissue substitutes. Advances in fabrication technologies now enable the strategic design of scaffolds with complex, biomimetic structures and properties. In particular, scaffolds with hybrid and/or biomimetic zonal designs have recently been developed for cartilage tissue engineering applications. This paper reviews critical aspects of the design of engineered scaffolds for articular cartilage repair as well as the available advanced fabrication techniques. In addition, recent studies on the design of hybrid and zonal scaffolds for use in cartilage tissue repair are highlighted. PMID:24955748

  14. Guidelines for the Design and Conduct of Clinical Studies in Knee Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mithoefer, Kai; Saris, Daniel B.F.; Farr, Jack; Kon, Elizaveta; Zaslav, Kenneth; Cole, Brian J.; Ranstam, Jonas; Yao, Jian; Shive, Matthew; Levine, David; Dalemans, Wilfried; Brittberg, Mats

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To summarize current clinical research practice and develop methodological standards for objective scientific evaluation of knee cartilage repair procedures and products. Design: A comprehensive literature review was performed of high-level original studies providing information relevant for the design of clinical studies on articular cartilage repair in the knee. Analysis of cartilage repair publications and synopses of ongoing trials were used to identify important criteria for the design, reporting, and interpretation of studies in this field. Results: Current literature reflects the methodological limitations of the scientific evidence available for articular cartilage repair. However, clinical trial databases of ongoing trials document a trend suggesting improved study designs and clinical evaluation methodology. Based on the current scientific information and standards of clinical care, detailed methodological recommendations were developed for the statistical study design, patient recruitment, control group considerations, study endpoint definition, documentation of results, use of validated patient-reported outcome instruments, and inclusion and exclusion criteria for the design and conduct of scientifically sound cartilage repair study protocols. A consensus statement among the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) and contributing authors experienced in clinical trial design and implementation was achieved. Conclusions: High-quality clinical research methodology is critical for the optimal evaluation of current and new cartilage repair technologies. In addition to generally applicable principles for orthopedic study design, specific criteria and considerations apply to cartilage repair studies. Systematic application of these criteria and considerations can facilitate study designs that are scientifically rigorous, ethical, practical, and appropriate for the question(s) being addressed in any given cartilage repair research project

  15. Articular Cartilage Injury in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    McAdams, Timothy R.; Mithoefer, Kai; Scopp, Jason M.; Mandelbaum, Bert R.

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions in the athletic population are observed with increasing frequency and, due to limited intrinsic healing capacity, can lead to progressive pain and functional limitation over time. If left untreated, isolated cartilage lesions can lead to progressive chondropenia or global cartilage loss over time. A chondropenia curve is described to help predict the outcome of cartilage injury based on different lesion and patient characteristics. Nutriceuticals and chondroprotective agents are being investigated as tools to slow the development of chondropenia. Several operative techniques have been described for articular cartilage repair or replacement and, more recently, cartilage regeneration. Rehabilitation guidelines are being developed to meet the needs of these new techniques. Next-generation techniques are currently evaluated to optimize articular cartilage repair biology and to provide a repair cartilage tissue that can withstand the high mechanical loads experienced by the athlete with consistent long-term durability. PMID:26069548

  16. Resident mesenchymal progenitors of articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Candela, Maria Elena; Yasuhara, Rika; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage has poor capacity of self-renewal and repair. Insufficient number and activity of resident mesenchymal (connective tissue) progenitors is likely one of the underlying reasons. Chondroprogenitors reside not only in the superficial zone of articular cartilage but also in other zones of articular cartilage and in the neighboring tissues, including perichondrium (groove of Ranvier), synovium and fat pad. These cells may respond to injury and contribute to articular cartilage healing. In addition, marrow stromal cells can migrate through subchondral bone when articular cartilage is damaged. We should develop drugs and methods that correctly stimulate resident progenitors for improvement of repair and inhibition of degenerative changes in articular cartilage. PMID:25179676

  17. Resident mesenchymal progenitors of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Candela, Maria Elena; Yasuhara, Rika; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2014-10-01

    Articular cartilage has poor capacity of self-renewal and repair. Insufficient number and activity of resident mesenchymal (connective tissue) progenitors is likely one of the underlying reasons. Chondroprogenitors reside not only in the superficial zone of articular cartilage but also in other zones of articular cartilage and in the neighboring tissues, including perichondrium (groove of Ranvier), synovium and fat pad. These cells may respond to injury and contribute to articular cartilage healing. In addition, marrow stromal cells can migrate through subchondral bone when articular cartilage is damaged. We should develop drugs and methods that correctly stimulate resident progenitors for improvement of repair and inhibition of degenerative changes in articular cartilage. PMID:25179676

  18. Characterization of Chondrocyte Scaffold Carriers for Cell-based Gene Therapy in Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Shui, Wei; Yin, Liangjun; Luo, Jeffrey; Li, Ruidong; Zhang, Wenwen; Zhang, Jiye; Huang, Wei; Hu, Ning; Liang, Xi; Deng, Zhong-Liang; Hu, Zhenming; Shi, Lewis; Luu, Hue H.; Haydon, Rex C.; He, Tong-Chuan; Ho, Sherwin

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions in the knee are common injuries. Chondrocyte transplant represents a promising therapeutic modality for articular cartilage injuries. Here, we characterize the viability and transgene expression of articular chondrocytes cultured in 3-D scaffolds provided by four types of carriers. Articular chondrocytes are isolated from rabbit knees and cultured in four types of scaffolds: type I collagen sponge, fibrin glue, hyaluronan, and Open-cell PolyLactic Acid (OPLA). The cultured cells are transduced with adenovirus expressing green fluorescence protein (AdGFP) and luciferase (AdGL3-Luc). The viability and gene expression in the chondrocytes are determined with fluorescence microscopy and luciferase assay. Cartilage matrix production is assessed by Alcian blue staining. Rabbit articular chondrocytes are effectively infected by AdGFP and exhibited sustained GFP expression. All tested scaffolds support the survival and gene expression of the infected chondrocytes. However, the highest transgene expression is observed in the OPLA carrier. At four weeks, Alcian blue-positive matrix materials are readily detected in OPLA cultures. Thus, our results indicate that, while all tested carriers can support the survival of chondrocytes, OPLA supports the highest transgene expression and is the most conductive scaffold for matrix production, suggesting that OPLA may be a suitable scaffold for cell-based gene therapy of articular cartilage repairs. PMID:23629940

  19. New perspectives for articular cartilage repair treatment through tissue engineering: A contemporary review

    PubMed Central

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Leonardi, Rosalia; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Di Giunta, Angelo; Loreto, Carla; Castorina, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    In this paper review we describe benefits and disadvantages of the established methods of cartilage regeneration that seem to have a better long-term effectiveness. We illustrated the anatomical aspect of the knee joint cartilage, the current state of cartilage tissue engineering, through mesenchymal stem cells and biomaterials, and in conclusion we provide a short overview on the rehabilitation after articular cartilage repair procedures. Adult articular cartilage has low capacity to repair itself, and thus even minor injuries may lead to progressive damage and osteoarthritic joint degeneration, resulting in significant pain and disability. Numerous efforts have been made to develop tissue-engineered grafts or patches to repair focal chondral and osteochondral defects, and to date several researchers aim to implement clinical application of cell-based therapies for cartilage repair. A literature review was conducted on PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar using appropriate keywords, examining the current literature on the well-known tissue engineering methods for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. PMID:24829869

  20. Characterization of a macroporous polyvinyl alcohol scaffold for the repair of focal articular cartilage defects.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kenneth W; Torzilli, Peter A; Warren, Russell F; Maher, Suzanne A

    2014-02-01

    Focal cartilage defects reduce the ability of articular cartilage to resist mechanical loading and provide lubrication during joint motion. The limitations in current surgical treatments have motivated the use of biocompatible scaffolds as a future treatment option. Here we describe a second generation macroporous, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) scaffold with independently tunable morphological and mechanical properties. The compressive moduli of the PVA scaffold increased with increasing polymer concentration and applied compressive strain, with values in the range for human articular cartilage (HA  > 1000 kPa, EY  > 500 kPa). Scaffolds also possessed strain-dependent permeability and Poisson's ratio. The interconnected macroporous network was found to facilitate chondrocyte seeding and proliferation through the scaffold over one week in culture. Overall, these promising characteristics demonstrate the potential of this macroporous scaffold for future studies in focal cartilage defect repair.

  1. Does Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment repair articular cartilage injury? A rabbit model study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) regiment has been used to treat fractures with non-union and to promote bone union in general. The effect of LIPUS on articular cartilage metabolism has been characterized. Yet, the effect of LIPUS to repair articular cartilage injury remains unclear in vivo. Methods We designed a study to investigate the effect of LIPUS on articular cartilage repairing in a rabbit severe cartilage injury model. Eighteen rabbits were divided into three groups: Sham-operated group, operated group without-LIPUS-treatment, operated group with-LIPUS-treatment (a daily 20-minute treatment for 3 months). Full-thickness cartilage defects were surgically created on the right side distal femoral condyle without intending to penetrate into the subchondral bone, which mimicked severe chondral injury. MR images for experimental joints, morphology grading scale, and histopathological Mankin score were evaluated. Results The preliminary results showed that the operated groups with-LIPUS-treatment and without-LIPUS-treatment had significantly higher Mankin score and morphological grading scale compared with the sham-operated group. However, there was no significant difference between the with-LIPUS-treatment and without-LIPUS-treatment groups. Cartilage defects filled with proliferative tissue were observed in the with-LIPUS-treatment group grossly and under MR images, however which presented less up-take under Alcian blue stain. Furthermore, no new deposition of type II collagen or proliferation of chondrocyte was observed over the cartilage defect after LIPUS treatment. Conclusion LIPUS has no significant therapeutic potential in treating severe articular cartilage injury in our animal study. PMID:24507771

  2. Cell-Based Articular Cartilage Repair: The Link between Development and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Kenneth L.; Wang, Jinxi

    2014-01-01

    Context Clinical efforts to repair damaged articular cartilage (AC) currently face major obstacles due to limited intrinsic repair capacity of the tissue and unsuccessful biological interventions. This highlights a need for better therapeutic strategies. Evidence Acquisition Relevant articles were identified through a search of the PubMed database from January 1956 to August 2014 using the following keywords: articular cartilage repair, stem cell, cartilage tissue-engineering, synovium, and NFAT. Evidence Synthesis In both animals and humans, AC defects that penetrate into the subchondral bone marrow are mainly filled with fibrocartilaginous tissue through the differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), followed by degeneration of repaired cartilage and osteoarthritis. Cell therapy and tissue engineering techniques using culture-expanded chondrocytes, bone marrow MSCs, or pluripotent stem cells with chondroinductive growth factors may generate cartilaginous tissue in AC defects but do not form hyaline cartilage-based articular surface because repair cells often lose chondrogenic activity or result in chondrocyte hypertrophy. The new evidence that AC and synovium develop from the same pool of precursors with similar gene profiles and that synovium-derived chondrocytes have stable chondrogenic activity has promoted use of synovium as a new cell source for AC repair. The recent finding that NFAT1 and NFAT2 transcription factors inhibit chondrocyte hypertrophy and maintain metabolic balance in AC is a significant advance in the field of AC repair. Conclusions The use of synovial MSCs and discovery of upstream transcriptional regulators that help maintain the AC phenotype have opened new avenues to improve the outcome of AC regeneration. PMID:25450846

  3. Articular cartilage biochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Kuettner, K.E.; Schleyerbach, R.; Hascall, V.C.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains six parts, each consisting of several papers. The part titles are: Cartilage Matrix Components; Biosynthesis and Characterization of Cartilage--Specific Matrix Components and Events; Cartilage Metabolism; In Vitro Studies of Articular Cartilage Metabolism; Normal and Pathologic Metabolism of Cartilage; and Destruction of the Articular Cartilage in Rheumatoid Diseases. Some of the paper topics are: magnetic resonance imaging; joint destruction; age-related changes; proteoglycan structure; and biosynthesis of cartilage proteoglycan.

  4. Iron oxide labelling of human mesenchymal stem cells in collagen hydrogels for articular cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Heymer, Andrea; Haddad, Daniel; Weber, Meike; Gbureck, Uwe; Jakob, Peter M; Eulert, Jochen; Nöth, Ulrich

    2008-04-01

    For the development of new therapeutical cell-based strategies for articular cartilage repair, a reliable cell monitoring technique is required to track the cells in vivo non-invasively and repeatedly. We present a systematic and detailed study on the performance and biological impact of a simple and efficient labelling protocol for human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Commercially available very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (VSOPs) were used as magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent. Iron uptake via endocytosis was confirmed histologically with prussian blue staining and quantified by mass spectrometry. Compared with unlabelled cells, VSOP-labelling did neither influence the viability nor the proliferation potential of hMSCs. Furthermore, iron incorporation did not affect hMSCs in undergoing adipogenic, osteogenic or chondrogenic differentiation, as demonstrated histologically and by gene expression analyses. The efficiency of the labelling protocol was assessed with high-resolution MR imaging at 11.7T. VSOP-labelled hMSCs were visualised in a collagen type I hydrogel, which is in clinical use for matrix-based articular cartilage repair. The presence of VSOP-labelled hMSCs was indicated by distinct hypointense spots in the MR images, as a result of iron specific loss of signal intensity. In summary, this labelling technique has great potential to visualise hMSCs and track their migration after transplantation for articular cartilage repair with MR imaging.

  5. Epidemiology and imaging of the subchondral bone in articular cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Menetrey, Jacques; Unno-Veith, Florence; Madry, Henning; Van Breuseghem, Iwan

    2010-04-01

    Articular cartilage and the subchondral bone act as a functional unit. Following trauma, osteochondritis dissecans, osteonecrosis or osteoarthritis, this intimate connection may become disrupted. Osteochondral defects-the type of defects that extend into the subchondral bone-account for about 5% of all articular cartilage lesions. They are very often caused by trauma, in about one-third of the cases by osteoarthritis and rarely by osteochondritis dissecans. Osteochondral defects are predominantly located on the medial femoral condyle and also on the patella. Frequently, they are associated with lesions of the menisci or the anterior cruciate ligament. Because of the close relationship between the articular cartilage and the subchondral bone, imaging of cartilage defects or cartilage repair should also focus on the subchondral bone. Magnetic resonance imaging is currently considered to be the key modality for the evaluation of cartilage and underlying subchondral bone. However, the choice of imaging technique also depends on the nature of the disease that caused the subchondral bone lesion. For example, radiography is still the golden standard for imaging features of osteoarthritis. Bone scintigraphy is one of the most valuable techniques for early diagnosis of spontaneous osteonecrosis about the knee. A CT scan is a useful technique to rule out a possible depression of the subchondral bone plate, whereas a CT arthrography is highly accurate to evaluate the stability of the osteochondral fragment in osteochondritis dissecans. Particularly for the problem of subchondral bone lesions, image evaluation methods need to be refined for adequate and reproducible analysis. This article highlights recent studies on the epidemiology and imaging of the subchondral bone, with an emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging.

  6. Flavonoid Compound Icariin Activates Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α in Chondrocytes and Promotes Articular Cartilage Repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengzhen; Zhang, Fengjie; He, Qiling; Wang, Jianqi; Shiu, Hoi Ting; Shu, Yinglan; Tsang, Wing Pui; Liang, Shuang; Zhao, Kai; Wan, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage has poor capability for repair following trauma or degenerative pathology due to avascular property, low cell density and migratory ability. Discovery of novel therapeutic approaches for articular cartilage repair remains a significant clinical need. Hypoxia is a hallmark for cartilage development and pathology. Hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α) has been identified as a key mediator for chondrocytes to response to fluctuations of oxygen availability during cartilage development or repair. This suggests that HIF-1α may serve as a target for modulating chondrocyte functions. In this study, using phenotypic cellular screen assays, we identify that Icariin, an active flavonoid component from Herba Epimedii, activates HIF-1α expression in chondrocytes. We performed systemic in vitro and in vivo analysis to determine the roles of Icariin in regulation of chondrogenesis. Our results show that Icariin significantly increases hypoxia responsive element luciferase reporter activity, which is accompanied by increased accumulation and nuclear translocation of HIF-1α in murine chondrocytes. The phenotype is associated with inhibiting PHD activity through interaction between Icariin and iron ions. The upregulation of HIF-1α mRNA levels in chondrocytes persists during chondrogenic differentiation for 7 and 14 days. Icariin (10-6 M) increases the proliferation of chondrocytes or chondroprogenitors examined by MTT, BrdU incorporation or colony formation assays. Icariin enhances chondrogenic marker expression in a micromass culture including Sox9, collagen type 2 (Col2α1) and aggrecan as determined by real-time PCR and promotes extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis indicated by Alcian blue staining. ELISA assays show dramatically increased production of aggrecan and hydroxyproline in Icariin-treated cultures at day 14 of chondrogenic differentiation as compared with the controls. Meanwhile, the expression of chondrocyte catabolic marker genes

  7. Flavonoid Compound Icariin Activates Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α in Chondrocytes and Promotes Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    He, Qiling; Wang, Jianqi; Shiu, Hoi Ting; Shu, Yinglan; Tsang, Wing Pui; Liang, Shuang; Zhao, Kai; Wan, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage has poor capability for repair following trauma or degenerative pathology due to avascular property, low cell density and migratory ability. Discovery of novel therapeutic approaches for articular cartilage repair remains a significant clinical need. Hypoxia is a hallmark for cartilage development and pathology. Hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α) has been identified as a key mediator for chondrocytes to response to fluctuations of oxygen availability during cartilage development or repair. This suggests that HIF-1α may serve as a target for modulating chondrocyte functions. In this study, using phenotypic cellular screen assays, we identify that Icariin, an active flavonoid component from Herba Epimedii, activates HIF-1α expression in chondrocytes. We performed systemic in vitro and in vivo analysis to determine the roles of Icariin in regulation of chondrogenesis. Our results show that Icariin significantly increases hypoxia responsive element luciferase reporter activity, which is accompanied by increased accumulation and nuclear translocation of HIF-1α in murine chondrocytes. The phenotype is associated with inhibiting PHD activity through interaction between Icariin and iron ions. The upregulation of HIF-1α mRNA levels in chondrocytes persists during chondrogenic differentiation for 7 and 14 days. Icariin (10−6 M) increases the proliferation of chondrocytes or chondroprogenitors examined by MTT, BrdU incorporation or colony formation assays. Icariin enhances chondrogenic marker expression in a micromass culture including Sox9, collagen type 2 (Col2α1) and aggrecan as determined by real-time PCR and promotes extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis indicated by Alcian blue staining. ELISA assays show dramatically increased production of aggrecan and hydroxyproline in Icariin-treated cultures at day 14 of chondrogenic differentiation as compared with the controls. Meanwhile, the expression of chondrocyte catabolic marker genes

  8. Articular chondrocyte culturing for cell-based cartilage repair: needs and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Paolo; Cancedda, Ranieri

    2006-01-01

    Articular cartilage displays a limited capacity of self-regeneration after injury. Thus, the biology of this tissue and its cellular components - the chondrocytes - has become the focus of several investigations, driven by tissue engineering and the basic and clinical research fields, aiming to ameliorate the present clinical approaches to cartilage repair. In this work, we present a brief recapitulation of the events that lead to cartilage development during the skeletal embryonal growth. The intrinsic phenotypic plasticity of the mesenchymal precursors and the adult chondrocytes is evaluated, dependent on the cell source, its physiopathological state, and as a function of the donor's age. The phenotypic changes induced by the basic culturing techniques are also taken into account, thus highlighting the phenotypic plasticity of the chondrocyte as the main property which could couple the differentiation process to the repair process. Chondrocyte proliferation and the contemporary maintenance of the chondrogenic differentiation potential are regarded as the two primary goals to be achieved in order to fulfill the quantitative needs of the clinical applications and the qualitative requirements of a properly repaired tissue. In this light, the effects of several growth factors and medium supplements are investigated. Finally, the latest improvements in culturing conditions and their possible clinical applications are presented as well.

  9. The quality of healing: articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Gomoll, Andreas H; Minas, Tom

    2014-05-01

    Articular cartilage lacks an intrinsic capacity for self-repair, and once damaged, it never heals. This creates an opportunity for surgical intervention, whether to stimulate a healing response that results in the formation of a lower-quality fibrocartilaginous scar or formal cartilage repair in the form of cartilage transplants. This article will review the nature of cartilage injury and discuss indications and techniques for repair.

  10. Intra-articular injection of synovial mesenchymal stem cells improves cartilage repair in a mouse injury model.

    PubMed

    Mak, J; Jablonski, C L; Leonard, C A; Dunn, J F; Raharjo, E; Matyas, J R; Biernaskie, J; Krawetz, R J

    2016-01-01

    Controversy remains whether articular cartilage has an endogenous stem/progenitor cell population, since its poor healing capacity after injury can lead to diseases such as osteoarthritis. In the joint environment there are mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs) in the synovial membrane and synovial fluid that can differentiate into cartilage, but it is still under debate if these cells contribute to cartilage repair in vivo. In this study, we isolated a Sca-1 positive, chondrogenesis capable population of mouse synovial MSCs from C57BL6 and MRL/MpJ "super-healer" strains. Intra-articular injection of Sca-1 + GFP + synovial cells from C57BL6 or MRL/MpJ into C57BL6 mice following cartilage injury led to increased cartilage repair by 4 weeks after injury. GFP expression was detected in the injury site at 2 weeks, but not 4 weeks after injury. These results suggest that synovial stem/progenitor cells, regardless of strain background, have beneficial effects when injected into an injured joint. MSCs derived from MRL/MpJ mice did not promote an increased repair capacity compared to MSCs derived from non-healing C57BL6 controls; however, MRL/MpJ MSCs were observed within the defect area at the time points examined, while C57BL6 MSCs were not. PMID:26983696

  11. A preclinical evaluation of an autologous living hyaline-like cartilaginous graft for articular cartilage repair: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Peck, Yvonne; He, Pengfei; Chilla, Geetha Soujanya V. N.; Poh, Chueh Loo; Wang, Dong-An

    2015-01-01

    In this pilot study, an autologous synthetic scaffold-free construct with hyaline quality, termed living hyaline cartilaginous graft (LhCG), was applied for treating cartilage lesions. Implantation of autologous LhCG was done at load-bearing regions of the knees in skeletally mature mini-pigs for 6 months. Over the course of this study, significant radiographical improvement in LhCG treated sites was observed via magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, macroscopic repair was effected by LhCG at endpoint. Microscopic inspection revealed that LhCG engraftment restored cartilage thickness, promoted integration with surrounding native cartilage, produced abundant cartilage-specific matrix molecules, and re-established an intact superficial tangential zone. Importantly, the repair efficacy of LhCG was quantitatively shown to be comparable to native, unaffected cartilage in terms of biochemical composition and biomechanical properties. There were no complications related to the donor site of cartilage biopsy. Collectively, these results imply that LhCG engraftment may be a viable approach for articular cartilage repair. PMID:26549401

  12. In Vivo Evaluation of a Novel Oriented Scaffold-BMSC Construct for Enhancing Full-Thickness Articular Cartilage Repair in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Weimin; Liu, Jian; Sun, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering (TE) has been proven usefulness in cartilage defect repair. For effective cartilage repair, the structural orientation of the cartilage scaffold should mimic that of native articular cartilage, as this orientation is closely linked to cartilage mechanical functions. Using thermal-induced phase separation (TIPS) technology, we have fabricated an oriented cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM)-derived scaffold with a Young's modulus value 3 times higher than that of a random scaffold. In this study, we test the effectiveness of bone mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC)-scaffold constructs (cell-oriented and random) in repairing full-thickness articular cartilage defects in rabbits. While histological and immunohistochemical analyses revealed efficient cartilage regeneration and cartilaginous matrix secretion at 6 and 12 weeks after transplantation in both groups, the biochemical properties (levels of DNA, GAG, and collagen) and biomechanical values in the oriented scaffold group were higher than that in random group at early time points after implantation. While these differences were not evident at 24 weeks, the biochemical and biomechanical properties of the regenerated cartilage in the oriented scaffold-BMSC construct group were similar to that of native cartilage. These results demonstrate that an oriented scaffold, in combination with differentiated BMSCs can successfully repair full-thickness articular cartilage defects in rabbits, and produce cartilage enhanced biomechanical properties. PMID:26695629

  13. Gene Therapy for Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Madry, Henning; Orth, Patrick; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2011-01-01

    The concept of using gene transfer strategies for cartilage repair originates from the idea of transferring genes encoding therapeutic factors into the repair tissue, resulting in a temporarily and spatially defined delivery of therapeutic molecules to sites of cartilage damage. This review focuses on the potential benefits of using gene therapy approaches for the repair of articular cartilage and meniscal fibrocartilage, including articular cartilage defects resulting from acute trauma, osteochondritis dissecans, osteonecrosis, and osteoarthritis. Possible applications for meniscal repair comprise meniscal lesions, meniscal sutures, and meniscal transplantation. Recent studies in both small and large animal models have demonstrated the applicability of gene-based approaches for cartilage repair. Chondrogenic pathways were stimulated in the repair tissue and in osteoarthritic cartilage using genes for polypeptide growth factors and transcription factors. Although encouraging data have been generated, a successful translation of gene therapy for cartilage repair will require an ongoing combined effort of orthopedic surgeons and of basic scientists. PMID:26069580

  14. Low friction hydrogel for articular cartilage repair: evaluation of mechanical and tribological properties in comparison with natural cartilage tissue.

    PubMed

    Blum, Michelle M; Ovaert, Timothy C

    2013-10-01

    The mechanical and tribological properties of a novel biomaterial, a boundary lubricant functionalized hydrogel, were investigated and compared to natural cartilage tissue. This low friction hydrogel material was developed for use as a synthetic replacement for focal defects in articular cartilage. The hydrogel was made by functionalizing the biocompatible polymer polyvinyl alcohol with a carboxylic acid derivative boundary lubricant molecule. Two different gel processing techniques were used to create the hydrogels. The first method consisted of initially functionalizing the boundary lubricant to the polyvinyl alcohol and then creating hydrogels by physically crosslinking the reacted polymer. The second method consisted of creating non-functionalized polyvinyl alcohol hydrogels and then performing the functionalization reaction on the fully formed gel. Osteochondral bovine samples were collected and replicate experiments were conducted to compare the mechanical and tribological performance of the boundary lubricant functionalized hydrogels to non-functionalized hydrogels and native cartilage. Friction experiments displayed a maximum decrease in friction coefficient of 70% for the functionalized hydrogels compared to neat polyvinyl alcohol. Indentation investigated the elastic modulus of the hydrogels, demonstrating that stability of the hydrogel was affected by processing method. Hydrogel performance was within the lower ranges of natural cartilage tested under the exact same conditions, showing the potential of the boundary lubricant functionalized hydrogels to perform as a biomimetic synthetic articular cartilage replacement.

  15. Repair of experimentally produced defects in rabbit articular cartilage by autologous chondrocyte transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Grande, D.A.; Pitman, M.I.; Peterson, L.; Menche, D.; Klein, M.

    1989-01-01

    Using the knee joints of New Zealand White rabbits, a baseline study was made to determine the intrinsic capability of cartilage for healing defects that do not fracture the subchondral plate. A second experiment examined the effect of autologous chondrocytes grown in vitro on the healing rate of these defects. To determine whether any of the reconstituted cartilage resulted from the chondrocyte graft, a third experiment was conducted involving grafts with chondrocytes that had been labeled prior to grafting with a nuclear tracer. Results were evaluated using both qualitative and quantitative light microscopy. Macroscopic results from grafted specimens displayed a marked decrease in synovitis and other degenerative changes. In defects that had received transplants, a significant amount of cartilage was reconstituted (82%) compared to ungrafted controls (18%). Autoradiography on reconstituted cartilage showed that there were labeled cells incorporated into the repair matrix.

  16. Towards Regeneration of Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Masahiro; Ohta, Yoichi; Larmour, Colleen; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage is classified into permanent hyaline cartilage and has significant differences in structure, extracelluar matrix components, gene expression profile, and mechanical property from transient hyaline cartilage found in growth plate. In the process of synovial joint development, articular cartilage is originated from the interzone, developing at the edge of the cartilaginous anlagen, it establishes zonal structure over time and supports smooth movement of the synovial joint through life. The cascade actions of key regulators such as Wnts, GDF5, Erg, and PTHLH coordinate sequential steps of articular cartilage formation. Articular chondrocytes are restrictedly controlled not to differentiate into a hypertrophic stage by autocrine and paracrine factors and extracerllular matrix microenvironment, but retain potential to undergo hypertrophy. The basal calcified zone of articular cartilage is connected with subchondral bone, but not invaded by blood vessels nor replaced by bone, which is highly contrasted with the growth plate. Articular cartilage has limited regenerative capacity, but likely possesses and potentially uses intrinsic stem cell source in the superficial layer, Ranvier’s groove, the intra-articular tissues such as synovium and fat pad, and marrow below the subchondral bone. Considering the biological views on articular cartilage, several important points are raised for regeneration of articular cartilage. We should evaluate the nature of regenerated cartilage as permanent hyaline cartilage and not just hyaline cartilage. We should study how a hypertrophic phenotype of transplanted cells can be lastingly suppressed in regenerating tissue. Further, we should develop the methods and reagents to activate recruitment of intrinsic stem/progenitor cells into the damaged site. PMID:24078496

  17. Articular cartilage repair with recombinant human type II collagen/polylactide scaffold in a preliminary porcine study.

    PubMed

    Muhonen, Virpi; Salonius, Eve; Haaparanta, Anne-Marie; Järvinen, Elina; Paatela, Teemu; Meller, Anna; Hannula, Markus; Björkman, Mimmi; Pyhältö, Tuomo; Ellä, Ville; Vasara, Anna; Töyräs, Juha; Kellomäki, Minna; Kiviranta, Ilkka

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of a novel recombinant human type II collagen/polylactide scaffold (rhCo-PLA) in the repair of full-thickness cartilage lesions with autologous chondrocyte implantation technique (ACI). The forming repair tissue was compared to spontaneous healing (spontaneous) and repair with a commercial porcine type I/III collagen membrane (pCo). Domestic pigs (4-month-old, n = 20) were randomized into three study groups and a circular full-thickness chondral lesion with a diameter of 8 mm was created in the right medial femoral condyle. After 3 weeks, the chondral lesions were repaired with either rhCo-PLA or pCo together with autologous chondrocytes, or the lesion was only debrided and left untreated for spontaneous repair. The repair tissue was evaluated 4 months after the second operation. Hyaline cartilage formed most frequently in the rhCo-PLA treatment group. Biomechanically, there was a trend that both treatment groups resulted in better repair tissue than spontaneous healing. Adverse subchondral bone reactions developed less frequently in the spontaneous group (40%) and the rhCo-PLA treated group (50%) than in the pCo control group (100%). However, no statistically significant differences were found between the groups. The novel rhCo-PLA biomaterial showed promising results in this proof-of-concept study, but further studies will be needed in order to determine its effectiveness in articular cartilage repair. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:745-753, 2016. PMID:26573959

  18. Engineering Lubrication in Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    McNary, Sean M.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite continuous progress toward tissue engineering of functional articular cartilage, significant challenges still remain. Advances in morphogens, stem cells, and scaffolds have resulted in enhancement of the bulk mechanical properties of engineered constructs, but little attention has been paid to the surface mechanical properties. In the near future, engineered tissues will be able to withstand and support the physiological compressive and tensile forces in weight-bearing synovial joints such as the knee. However, there is an increasing realization that these tissue-engineered cartilage constructs will fail without the optimal frictional and wear properties present in native articular cartilage. These characteristics are critical to smooth, pain-free joint articulation and a long-lasting, durable cartilage surface. To achieve optimal tribological properties, engineered cartilage therapies will need to incorporate approaches and methods for functional lubrication. Steady progress in cartilage lubrication in native tissues has pushed the pendulum and warranted a shift in the articular cartilage tissue-engineering paradigm. Engineered tissues should be designed and developed to possess both tribological and mechanical properties mirroring natural cartilage. In this article, an overview of the biology and engineering of articular cartilage structure and cartilage lubrication will be presented. Salient progress in lubrication treatments such as tribosupplementation, pharmacological, and cell-based therapies will be covered. Finally, frictional assays such as the pin-on-disk tribometer will be addressed. Knowledge related to the elements of cartilage lubrication has progressed and, thus, an opportune moment is provided to leverage these advances at a critical step in the development of mechanically and tribologically robust, biomimetic tissue-engineered cartilage. This article is intended to serve as the first stepping stone toward future studies in functional

  19. Engineering lubrication in articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    McNary, Sean M; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A; Reddi, A Hari

    2012-04-01

    Despite continuous progress toward tissue engineering of functional articular cartilage, significant challenges still remain. Advances in morphogens, stem cells, and scaffolds have resulted in enhancement of the bulk mechanical properties of engineered constructs, but little attention has been paid to the surface mechanical properties. In the near future, engineered tissues will be able to withstand and support the physiological compressive and tensile forces in weight-bearing synovial joints such as the knee. However, there is an increasing realization that these tissue-engineered cartilage constructs will fail without the optimal frictional and wear properties present in native articular cartilage. These characteristics are critical to smooth, pain-free joint articulation and a long-lasting, durable cartilage surface. To achieve optimal tribological properties, engineered cartilage therapies will need to incorporate approaches and methods for functional lubrication. Steady progress in cartilage lubrication in native tissues has pushed the pendulum and warranted a shift in the articular cartilage tissue-engineering paradigm. Engineered tissues should be designed and developed to possess both tribological and mechanical properties mirroring natural cartilage. In this article, an overview of the biology and engineering of articular cartilage structure and cartilage lubrication will be presented. Salient progress in lubrication treatments such as tribosupplementation, pharmacological, and cell-based therapies will be covered. Finally, frictional assays such as the pin-on-disk tribometer will be addressed. Knowledge related to the elements of cartilage lubrication has progressed and, thus, an opportune moment is provided to leverage these advances at a critical step in the development of mechanically and tribologically robust, biomimetic tissue-engineered cartilage. This article is intended to serve as the first stepping stone toward future studies in functional

  20. Effect of Treadmill Exercise Timing on Repair of Full-Thickness Defects of Articular Cartilage by Bone-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells: An Experimental Investigation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue; Xu, Chang-peng; Cui, Zhuang; Jiang, Nan; Jia, Jun-jie; Yu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Objective Current medical practice for the treatment of articular cartilage lesions remains a clinical challenge due to the limited self-repair ability of articular cartilage. Both experimental and clinical researches show that moderate exercise can improve articular cartilage repair process. However, optimal timing of moderate exercise is unclear. We aimed to evaluate the effect of timing of moderate treadmill exercise on repair of full-thickness defects of articular cartilage. Design Full-thickness cartilage defects were drilled in the patellar groove of bilateral femoral condyles in a total of 40 male SD rats before they were randomly assigned into four even groups. In sedentary control (SED) group, no exercise was given; in 2-week (2W), 4-week (4W) and 8-week groups, moderate treadmill exercise was initiated respectively two, four and eight weeks after operation. Half of the animals were sacrificed at week 10 after operation and half at week 14 after operation. Femoral condyles were harvested for gross observation and histochemical measurement by O'Driscoll scoring system. Collagen type II was detected by immunohistochemistry and mRNA expressions of aggrecan and collagen type II cartilage by RT-PCR. Results Both 10 and 14 weeks post-operation, the best results were observed in 4W group and the worst results appeared in 2W group. The histochemistry scores and the expressions of collagen type II and aggrecan were significantly higher in 4W group than that in other three groups (P<0.05). Conclusions Moderate exercise at a selected timing (approximately 4 weeks) after injury can significantly promote the healing of cartilage defects but may hamper the repair process if performed too early while delayed intervention by moderate exercise may reduce its benefits in repair of the defects. PMID:24595327

  1. Imaging of articular cartilage: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    RONGA, MARIO; ANGERETTI, GLORIA; FERRARO, SERGIO; DE FALCO, GIOVANNI; GENOVESE, EUGENIO A.; CHERUBINO, PAOLO

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the gold standard method for non-invasive assessment of joint cartilage, providing information on the structure, morphology and molecular composition of this tissue. There are certain minimum requirements for a MRI study of cartilage tissue: machines with a high magnetic field (> 1.5 Tesla); the use of surface coils; and the use of T2-weighted, proton density-weighted fast-spin echo (T2 FSE-DP) and 3D fat-suppressed T1-weighted gradient echo (3D-FS T1W GRE) sequences. For better contrast between the different joint structures, MR arthography is a method that can highlight minimal fibrillation or fractures of the articular surface and allow evaluation of the integrity of the native cartilage-repair tissue interface. To assess the biochemical composition of cartilage and cartilage repair tissue, various techniques have been proposed for studying proteoglycans [dGEMRIC, T1rho mapping, sodium (23Na) imaging MRI, etc.], collagen, and water distribution [T2 mapping, “magnetisation transfer contrast”, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and so on]. Several MRI classifications have been proposed for evaluating the processes of joint degeneration (WORMS, BLOKS, ICRS) and post-surgical maturation of repair tissue (MOCART, 3D MOCART). In the future, isotropic 3D sequences set to improve image quality and facilitate the diagnosis of disorders of articular structures adjacent to cartilage. PMID:25606557

  2. [Present status and perspective of articular cartilage regeneration].

    PubMed

    Wakitani, Shigeyuki

    2007-05-01

    Because the capacity of articular cartilage for repair is limited, defects are a major clinical problem, and there is at present no satisfactory clinical technique to regenerate cartilage defects. Current clinical practice involves the bone stimulation technique, which breaks subchondral bone to facilitate cartilage repair from bone marrow derived cells and cytokines. This consists of multiple perforations, abrasions, and micro-fractures. However, with this procedure, cartilage defects are repaired with fibrocartilage, which is known to be biochemically and biomechanically different from normal hyaline cartilage and degeneration occurs in the reparative tissue. Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) for repair of human articular cartilage was reported in 1994, and approved by the USA Food and Drug Association in 1997. This procedure has been performed for more than 20000 people all over the world, but its effectiveness is still controversial. Mosaic plasty was explored in the 1990s. Using this procedure, we can repair defects with hyaline cartilage, but the donor site morbidity is unsolved. To explore a new method for cartilage repair, we transplanted autologous culture-expanded bone marrow mesenchymal cells into articular cartilage defects. Clinical symptoms were improred but the repair cartilage was not hyaline cartilage. Further improvement is required. Many investigations have been made in the search for better means of repair, including gene transduction and the addition of growth factors during cell culture. In addition to bone marrow mesenchymal cells, synovial cells, adipocytes, muscle cells, etc. have been evaluated.

  3. Tensorial electrokinetics in articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Reynaud, Boris; Quinn, Thomas M

    2006-09-15

    Electrokinetic phenomena contribute to biomechanical functions of articular cartilage and underlie promising methods for early detection of osteoarthritic lesions. Although some transport properties, such as hydraulic permeability, are known to become anisotropic with compression, the direction-dependence of cartilage electrokinetic properties remains unknown. Electroosmosis experiments were therefore performed on adult bovine articular cartilage samples, whereby fluid flows were driven by electric currents in directions parallel and perpendicular to the articular surface of statically compressed explants. Magnitudes of electrokinetic coefficients decreased slightly with compression (from approximately -7.5 microL/As in the range of 0-20% compression to -6.0 microL/As in the 35-50% range) consistent with predictions of microstructure-based models of cartilage material properties. However, no significant dependence on direction of the electrokinetic coupling coefficient was detected, even for conditions where the hydraulic permeability tensor is known to be anisotropic. This contrast may also be interpreted using microstructure-based models, and provides insights into structure-function relationships in cartilage extracellular matrix and physical mediators of cell responses to tissue compression. Findings support the use of relatively simple isotropic modeling approaches for electrokinetic phenomena in cartilage and related materials, and indicate that measurement of electrokinetic properties may provide particularly robust means for clinical evaluation of cartilage matrix integrity.

  4. Use of a biological reactor and platelet-rich plasma for the construction of tissue-engineered bone to repair articular cartilage defects

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huibo; Sun, Shui; Liu, Haili; Chen, Hua; Rong, Xin; Lou, Jigang; Yang, Yunbei; Yang, Yi; Liu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage defects are a major clinical burden worldwide. Current methods to repair bone defects include bone autografts, allografts and external fixation. In recent years, the repair of bone defects by tissue engineering has emerged as a promising approach. The present study aimed to assess a novel method using a biological reactor with platelet-rich plasma to construct tissue-engineered bone. Beagle bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were isolated and differentiated into osteoblasts and chondroblasts using platelet-rich plasma and tricalcium phosphate scaffolds cultured in a bioreactor for 3 weeks. The cell scaffold composites were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and implanted into beagles with articular cartilage defects. The expression of osteogenic markers, alkaline phosphatase and bone γ-carboxyglutamate protein (BGLAP) were assessed using polymerase chain reaction after 3 months. Articular cartilage specimens were observed histologically. Adhesion and distribution of BMSCs on the β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffold were confirmed by SEM. Histological examination revealed that in vivo bone defects were largely repaired 12 weeks following implantation. The expression levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and BGLAP in the experimental groups were significantly elevated compared with the negative controls. BMSCs may be optimum seed cells for tissue engineering in bone repair. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) provides a rich source of cytokines to promote BMSC function. The β-TCP scaffold is advantageous for tissue engineering due to its biocompatibility and 3D structure that promotes cell adhesion, growth and differentiation. The tissue-engineered bone was constructed in a bioreactor using BMSCs, β-TCP scaffolds and PRP and displayed appropriate morphology and biological function. The present study provides an efficient method for the generation of tissue-engineered bone for cartilage repair, compared with previously used

  5. Lubrication of Articular Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Sabrina; Seror, Jasmine; Klein, Jacob

    2016-07-11

    The major synovial joints such as hips and knees are uniquely efficient tribological systems, able to articulate over a wide range of shear rates with a friction coefficient between the sliding cartilage surfaces as low as 0.001 up to pressures of more than 100 atm. No human-made material can match this. The means by which such surfaces maintain their very low friction has been intensively studied for decades and has been attributed to fluid-film and boundary lubrication. Here, we focus especially on the latter: the reduction of friction by molecular layers at the sliding cartilage surfaces. In particular, we discuss such lubrication in the light of very recent advances in our understanding of boundary effects in aqueous media based on the paradigms of hydration lubrication and of the synergism between different molecular components of the synovial joints (namely hyaluronan, lubricin, and phospholipids) in enabling this lubrication.

  6. Autophagy modulates articular cartilage vesicle formation in primary articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Ann K; Gohr, Claudia M; Mitton-Fitzgerald, Elizabeth; Grewal, Rupinder; Ninomiya, James; Coyne, Carolyn B; Jackson, William T

    2015-05-22

    Chondrocyte-derived extracellular organelles known as articular cartilage vesicles (ACVs) participate in non-classical protein secretion, intercellular communication, and pathologic calcification. Factors affecting ACV formation and release remain poorly characterized; although in some cell types, the generation of extracellular vesicles is associated with up-regulation of autophagy. We sought to determine the role of autophagy in ACV production by primary articular chondrocytes. Using an innovative dynamic model with a light scatter nanoparticle counting apparatus, we determined the effects of autophagy modulators on ACV number and content in conditioned medium from normal adult porcine and human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Healthy articular chondrocytes release ACVs into conditioned medium and show significant levels of ongoing autophagy. Rapamycin, which promotes autophagy, increased ACV numbers in a dose- and time-dependent manner associated with increased levels of autophagy markers and autophagosome formation. These effects were suppressed by pharmacologic autophagy inhibitors and short interfering RNA for ATG5. Caspase-3 inhibition and a Rho/ROCK inhibitor prevented rapamycin-induced increases in ACV number. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes, which are deficient in autophagy, did not increase ACV number in response to rapamycin. SMER28, which induces autophagy via an mTOR-independent mechanism, also increased ACV number. ACVs induced under all conditions had similar ecto-enzyme specific activities and types of RNA, and all ACVs contained LC3, an autophagosome-resident protein. These findings identify autophagy as a critical participant in ACV formation, and augment our understanding of ACVs in cartilage disease and repair. PMID:25869133

  7. Autophagy modulates articular cartilage vesicle formation in primary articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Ann K; Gohr, Claudia M; Mitton-Fitzgerald, Elizabeth; Grewal, Rupinder; Ninomiya, James; Coyne, Carolyn B; Jackson, William T

    2015-05-22

    Chondrocyte-derived extracellular organelles known as articular cartilage vesicles (ACVs) participate in non-classical protein secretion, intercellular communication, and pathologic calcification. Factors affecting ACV formation and release remain poorly characterized; although in some cell types, the generation of extracellular vesicles is associated with up-regulation of autophagy. We sought to determine the role of autophagy in ACV production by primary articular chondrocytes. Using an innovative dynamic model with a light scatter nanoparticle counting apparatus, we determined the effects of autophagy modulators on ACV number and content in conditioned medium from normal adult porcine and human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Healthy articular chondrocytes release ACVs into conditioned medium and show significant levels of ongoing autophagy. Rapamycin, which promotes autophagy, increased ACV numbers in a dose- and time-dependent manner associated with increased levels of autophagy markers and autophagosome formation. These effects were suppressed by pharmacologic autophagy inhibitors and short interfering RNA for ATG5. Caspase-3 inhibition and a Rho/ROCK inhibitor prevented rapamycin-induced increases in ACV number. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes, which are deficient in autophagy, did not increase ACV number in response to rapamycin. SMER28, which induces autophagy via an mTOR-independent mechanism, also increased ACV number. ACVs induced under all conditions had similar ecto-enzyme specific activities and types of RNA, and all ACVs contained LC3, an autophagosome-resident protein. These findings identify autophagy as a critical participant in ACV formation, and augment our understanding of ACVs in cartilage disease and repair.

  8. Proteomic Analysis Profile of Engineered Articular Cartilage with Chondrogenic Differentiated Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells Loaded Polyglycolic Acid Mesh for Weight-Bearing Area Defect Repair

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Lunli; Zhou, Xiao; Wu, Yaohao; Zhang, Yun; Wang, Chen; Zhou, Heng; Guo, Fangfang

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the possibility of full-thickness defects repair in porcine articular cartilage (AC) weight-bearing area using chondrogenic differentiated autologous adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) with a follow-up of 3 and 6 months, which is successive to our previous study on nonweight-bearing area. The isolated ASCs were seeded onto the phosphoglycerate/polylactic acid (PGA/PLA) with chondrogenic induction in vitro for 2 weeks as the experimental group prior to implantation in porcine AC defects (8 mm in diameter, deep to subchondral bone), with PGA/PLA only as control. With follow-up time being 3 and 6 months, both neo-cartilages of postimplantation integrated well with the neighboring normal cartilage and subchondral bone histologically in experimental group, whereas only fibrous tissue in control group. Immunohistochemical and toluidine blue staining confirmed similar distribution of COL II and glycosaminoglycan in the regenerated cartilage to the native one. A vivid remolding process with repair time was also witnessed in the neo-cartilage as the compressive modulus significantly increased from 70% of the normal cartilage at 3 months to nearly 90% at 6 months, which is similar to our former research. Nevertheless, differences of the regenerated cartilages still could be detected from the native one. Meanwhile, the exact mechanism involved in chondrogenic differentiation from ASCs seeded on PGA/PLA is still unknown. Therefore, proteome is resorted leading to 43 proteins differentially identified from 20 chosen two-dimensional spots, which do help us further our research on some committed factors. In conclusion, the comparison via proteome provided a thorough understanding of mechanisms implicating ASC differentiation toward chondrocytes, which is further substantiated by the present study as a perfect supplement to the former one in nonweight-bearing area. PMID:24044689

  9. Evaluation of apparent fracture toughness of articular cartilage and hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yinghua; Rennerfeldt, Deena A.; Friis, Elizabeth A.; Gehrke, Stevin H.; Detamore, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, biomaterials-based tissue-engineering strategies, including the use of hydrogels, have offered great promise for repairing articular cartilage. Mechanical failure testing in outcome analyses is of crucial clinical importance to the success of engineered constructs. Interpenetrating networks (IPNs) are gaining more attention, due to their superior mechanical integrity. This study provided a combination testing method of apparent fracture toughness, which was applied to both articular cartilage and hydrogels. The apparent fracture toughnesses of two groups, hydrogels and articular cartilage, were evaluated based on the modified single-edge notch test and ASTM standards on the single-edge notch test and compact tension test. The results demonstrated that the toughness for articular cartilage (348 ± 43 MPa/mm½) was much higher than that for hydrogels. With a toughness value of 10.8 ± 1.4 MPa/mm½, IPNs of agarose and poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEG-DA) looked promising. The IPNs were 1.4 times tougher than PEG-DA alone, although still over an order of magnitude less tough than cartilage. A new method was developed to evaluate hydrogels and cartilage in a manner that enabled a more relevant direct comparison for fracture testing of hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering. Moreover, a target toughness value for cartilage of using this direct comparison method has been identified (348 ± 43 MPa/mm½), and the toughness discrepancy to be overcome between hydrogels and cartilage has been quantified. PMID:24700577

  10. The surface of articular cartilage contains a progenitor cell population.

    PubMed

    Dowthwaite, Gary P; Bishop, Joanna C; Redman, Samantha N; Khan, Ilyas M; Rooney, Paul; Evans, Darrell J R; Haughton, Laura; Bayram, Zubeyde; Boyer, Sam; Thomson, Brian; Wolfe, Michael S; Archer, Charles W

    2004-02-29

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that articular cartilage growth is achieved by apposition from the articular surface. For such a mechanism to occur, a population of stem/progenitor cells must reside within the articular cartilage to provide transit amplifying progeny for growth. Here, we report on the isolation of an articular cartilage progenitor cell from the surface zone of articular cartilage using differential adhesion to fibronectin. This population of cells exhibits high affinity for fibronectin, possesses a high colony-forming efficiency and expresses the cell fate selector gene Notch 1. Inhibition of Notch signalling abolishes colony forming ability whilst activated Notch rescues this inhibition. The progenitor population also exhibits phenotypic plasticity in its differentiation pathway in an embryonic chick tracking system, such that chondroprogenitors can engraft into a variety of connective tissue types including bone, tendon and perimysium. The identification of a chondrocyte subpopulation with progenitor-like characteristics will allow for advances in our understanding of both cartilage growth and maintenance as well as provide novel solutions to articular cartilage repair. PMID:14762107

  11. In vivo cartilage formation from growth factor modulated articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bradham, D M; Horton, W E

    1998-07-01

    Recent procedures for autologous repair of cartilage defects may be difficult in elderly patients because of the loss of stem cells and chondrocytes that occurs with age and the slow in vitro proliferation of chondrocytes from aged cartilage. In this study secondary chondroprogenitor cells were obtained by modulating the phenotype of articular chondrocytes with growth factors and stimulating the proliferation of these cells in culture. Chondrocytes isolated from the articular cartilage of mature New Zealand White rabbits were exposed to a combination of transforming growth factor beta and basic fibroblast growth factor treatment. These cells ceased the production of Collagen II (a marker for the chondrocyte phenotype) and underwent a 136-fold increase in cell number. Next, the cells were placed in high density culture and reexpressed the chondrocyte phenotype in vitro and formed hyaline cartilage in an in vivo assay. Primary chondrocytes obtained from articular cartilage of elderly humans could be manipulated in a similar fashion in vitro. These human secondary chondroprogenitor cells formed only cartilage tissue when assayed in vivo and in tissue bioreactors. This approach may be essential for autologous repair of degenerated articular cartilage in elderly patients with osteoarthritis.

  12. Three-dimensional collagen architecture in bovine articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, A K; Blunn, G W; Archer, C W; Bentley, G

    1991-09-01

    The three-dimensional architecture of bovine articular cartilage collagen and its relationship to split lines has been studied with scanning electron microscopy. In the middle and superficial zones, collagen was organised in a layered or leaf-like manner. The orientation was vertical in the intermediate zone, curving to become horizontal and parallel to the articular surface in the superficial zone. Each leaf consisted of a fine network of collagen fibrils. Adjacent leaves merged or were closely linked by bridging fibrils and were arranged according to the split-line pattern. The surface layer (lamina splendens) was morphologically distinct. Although ordered, the overall collagen structure was different in each plane (anisotropic) a property described in previous morphological and biophysical studies. As all components of the articular cartilage matrix interact closely, the three-dimensional organisation of collagen is important when considering cartilage function and the processes of cartilage growth, injury and repair. PMID:1894669

  13. Articular Cartilage Changes in Maturing Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Luria, Ayala; Chu, Constance R.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Articular cartilage has a unique functional architecture capable of providing a lifetime of pain-free joint motion. This tissue, however, undergoes substantial age-related physiologic, mechanical, biochemical, and functional changes that reduce its ability to overcome the effects of mechanical stress and injury. Many factors affect joint function in the maturing athlete—from chondrocyte survival and metabolism to structural composition and genetic/epigenetic factors governing cartilage and synovium. An evaluation of age-related changes for joint homeostasis and risk for osteoarthritis is important to the development of new strategies to rejuvenate aging joints. Objective: This review summarizes the current literature on the biochemical, cellular, and physiologic changes occurring in aging articular cartilage. Data Sources: PubMed (1969-2013) and published books in sports health, cartilage biology, and aging. Study Selection: Keywords included aging, athlete, articular cartilage, epigenetics, and functional performance with age. Study Design: Systematic review. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Data Extraction: To be included, research questions addressed the effect of age-related changes on performance, articular cartilage biology, molecular mechanism, and morphology. Results: The mature athlete faces challenges in maintaining cartilage health and joint function due to age-related changes to articular cartilage biology, morphology, and physiology. These changes include chondrocyte loss and a decline in metabolic response, alterations to matrix and synovial tissue composition, and dysregulation of reparative responses. Conclusion: Although physical decline has been regarded as a normal part of aging, many individuals maintain overall fitness and enjoy targeted improvement to their athletic capacity throughout life. Healthy articular cartilage and joints are needed to maintain athletic performance and general activities. Genetic and potentially reversible

  14. Species variability in the differentiation potential of in vitro-expanded articular chondrocytes restricts predictive studies on cartilage repair using animal models.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Paolo; Crovace, Antonio; Malpeli, Mara; Maggi, Ettore; Arbicò, Rafaella; Cancedda, Ranieri; Dozin, Beatrice

    2005-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation is currently applied in clinics as an innovative tool for articular cartilage repair. Animal models have been and still are being used to validate and further improve the technique. However, in various species, the outcome varies from hyaline-like cartilage to fibrocartilage. This may be due partly to the spontaneous dedifferentiation of chondrocytes once cultured in vitro. Here we assessed whether the extent of dedifferentiation varies between species and we hypothesized that the level of chondrocyte phenotype stability during expansion may contribute to the maintenance of their chondrogenic commitment and redifferentiation potential. Condyle chondrocytes were harvested from sheep, dog, and human, and expanded for 1, 6, or 12 cell duplications. At each interval, cell phenotype was monitored (morphology and biosynthesis of cartilage markers) and redifferentiation was assessed by an in vitro assay of chondrogenesis in micromass pellet and an in vivo assay of ectopic cartilage formation in immunodeficient mice. Results indicate that, during culture, the sheep chondrocyte phenotype is maintained better than that of human chondrocytes, which in turn dedifferentiate to a lesser extent than dog chondrocytes Accordingly, after expansion, sheep chondrocytes spontaneously reform hyaline-like cartilage; human chondrocytes redifferentiate only under stimulation with chondrogenic inducers whereas, after a few passages, dog chondrocytes lose any capacity to redifferentiate regardless of the presence of inducers. Thus, conditions allowing cartilage formation in one species are not necessarily transposable to other species. Therefore, results with animal models should be cautiously applied to humans. In addition, for tissue-engineering purposes, the number of cell duplications must be, for each species, carefully monitored to remain in the range of amplification allowing redifferentiation and chondrogenesis.

  15. Induced pluripotent stem cells in cartilage repair

    PubMed Central

    Lietman, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage repair techniques are challenging. Human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) theoretically provide an unlimited number of specialized cells which could be used in articular cartilage repair. However thus far chondrocytes from iPSCs have been created primarily by viral transfection and with the use of cocultured feeder cells. In addition chondrocytes derived from iPSCs have usually been formed in condensed cell bodies (resembling embryoid bodies) that then require dissolution with consequent substantial loss of cell viability and phenotype. All of these current techniques used to derive chondrocytes from iPSCs are problematic but solutions to these problems are on the horizon. These solutions will make iPSCs a viable alternative for articular cartilage repair in the near future. PMID:27004161

  16. Induced pluripotent stem cells in cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Lietman, Steven A

    2016-03-18

    Articular cartilage repair techniques are challenging. Human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) theoretically provide an unlimited number of specialized cells which could be used in articular cartilage repair. However thus far chondrocytes from iPSCs have been created primarily by viral transfection and with the use of cocultured feeder cells. In addition chondrocytes derived from iPSCs have usually been formed in condensed cell bodies (resembling embryoid bodies) that then require dissolution with consequent substantial loss of cell viability and phenotype. All of these current techniques used to derive chondrocytes from iPSCs are problematic but solutions to these problems are on the horizon. These solutions will make iPSCs a viable alternative for articular cartilage repair in the near future. PMID:27004161

  17. Animal models of cartilage repair

    PubMed Central

    Cook, J. L.; Hung, C. T.; Kuroki, K.; Stoker, A. M.; Cook, C. R.; Pfeiffer, F. M.; Sherman, S. L.; Stannard, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage repair in terms of replacement, or regeneration of damaged or diseased articular cartilage with functional tissue, is the ‘holy grail’ of joint surgery. A wide spectrum of strategies for cartilage repair currently exists and several of these techniques have been reported to be associated with successful clinical outcomes for appropriately selected indications. However, based on respective advantages, disadvantages, and limitations, no single strategy, or even combination of strategies, provides surgeons with viable options for attaining successful long-term outcomes in the majority of patients. As such, development of novel techniques and optimisation of current techniques need to be, and are, the focus of a great deal of research from the basic science level to clinical trials. Translational research that bridges scientific discoveries to clinical application involves the use of animal models in order to assess safety and efficacy for regulatory approval for human use. This review article provides an overview of animal models for cartilage repair. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;4:89–94. PMID:24695750

  18. Surface of articular cartilage: immunohistological studies.

    PubMed

    Duance, V C

    1983-10-01

    Using several physical techniques the surface of articular cartilage has been reported to be structurally different from the deeper layers. In this paper using immunohistochemical methods, the surface has been shown to contain a characteristically different collagen, Type I in contrast to Type II which is the major collagen of cartilage. These results support previous proposals for a surface layer, or lamina splendens, the presence of which would be of considerable importance in understanding the degradation of cartilage in arthritides. PMID:6678620

  19. Human stem cells and articular cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Inui, Atsuyuki; Iwakura, Takashi; Reddi, A Hari

    2012-11-05

    The regeneration of articular cartilage damaged due to trauma and posttraumatic osteoarthritis is an unmet medical need. Current approaches to regeneration and tissue engineering of articular cartilage include the use of chondrocytes, stem cells, scaffolds and signals, including morphogens and growth factors. Stem cells, as a source of cells for articular cartilage regeneration, are a critical factor for articular cartilage regeneration. This is because articular cartilage tissue has a low cell turnover and does not heal spontaneously. Adult stem cells have been isolated from various tissues, such as bone marrow, adipose, synovial tissue, muscle and periosteum. Signals of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily play critical roles in chondrogenesis. However, adult stem cells derived from various tissues tend to differ in their chondrogenic potential. Pluripotent stem cells have unlimited proliferative capacity compared to adult stem cells. Chondrogenesis from embryonic stem (ES) cells has been studied for more than a decade. However, establishment of ES cells requires embryos and leads to ethical issues for clinical applications. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are generated by cellular reprogramming of adult cells by transcription factors. Although iPS cells have chondrogenic potential, optimization, generation and differentiation toward articular chondrocytes are currently under intense investigation.

  20. Management of articular cartilage defects of the knee.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Asheesh; Feeley, Brian T; Williams, Riley J

    2010-04-01

    Articular cartilage has a poor intrinsic capacity for healing. The goal of surgical techniques to repair articular cartilage injuries is to achieve the regeneration of organized hyaline cartilage. Microfracture and other bone marrow stimulation techniques involve penetration of the subchondral plate in order to recruit mesenchymal stem cells into the chondral defect. The formation of a stable clot that fills the lesion is of paramount importance to achieve a successful outcome. Mosaicplasty is a viable option with which to address osteochondral lesions of the knee and offers the advantage of transplanting hyaline cartilage. However, limited graft availability and donor site morbidity are concerns. Transplantation of an osteochondral allograft consisting of intact, viable articular cartilage and its underlying subchondral bone offers the ability to address large osteochondral defects of the knee, including those involving an entire compartment. The primary theoretical advantage of autologous chondrocyte implantation is the development of hyaline-like cartilage rather than fibrocartilage in the defect, which presumably leads to better long-term outcomes and longevity of the healing tissue. Use of synthetic scaffolds is a potentially attractive alternative to traditional cartilage procedures as they are readily available and, unlike allogeneic tissue transplants, are associated with no risk of disease transmission. Their efficacy, however, has not been proven clinically.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Trattnig, Siegfried; Winalski, Carl S.; Marlovits, Stephan; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Welsch, Goetz H.; Potter, Hollis G.

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions are a common pathology of the knee joint, and many patients may benefit from cartilage repair surgeries that offer the chance to avoid the development of osteoarthritis or delay its progression. Cartilage repair surgery, no matter the technique, requires a noninvasive, standardized, and high-quality longitudinal method to assess the structure of the repair tissue. This goal is best fulfilled by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The present article provides an overview of the current state of the art of MRI of cartilage repair. In the first 2 sections, preclinical and clinical MRI of cartilage repair tissue are described with a focus on morphological depiction of cartilage and the use of functional (biochemical) MR methodologies for the visualization of the ultrastructure of cartilage repair. In the third section, a short overview is provided on the regulatory issues of the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) regarding MR follow-up studies of patients after cartilage repair surgeries. PMID:26069565

  2. Regeneration of Articular Cartilage Surface: Morphogens, Cells, and Extracellular Matrix Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Ryosuke; Iwakura, Takashi; Reddi, A Hari

    2015-10-01

    The articular cartilage is a well-organized tissue for smooth and friction-free joint movement for locomotion in animals and humans. Adult articular cartilage has a very low self-regeneration capacity due to its avascular nature. The regeneration of articular cartilage surface is critical to prevent the progression to osteoarthritis (OA). Although various joint resurfacing procedures in experimental articular cartilage defects have been developed, no standardized clinical protocol has yet been established. The three critical ingredients for tissue regeneration are morphogens and growth factors, cells, and scaffolds. The concepts based on the regeneration triad have been extensively investigated in animal models. However, these studies in animal models have demonstrated variable results and outcomes. An optimal animal model must precisely mimic and model the sequence of events in articular cartilage regeneration in human. In this article, the progress and remaining challenges in articular cartilage regeneration in animal models are reviewed. The role of individual morphogens and growth factors in cartilage regeneration has been investigated. In normal articular cartilage homeostasis, morphogens and growth factors function sequentially in tissue regeneration. Mesenchymal stem cell-based repair of articular cartilage defects, performed with or without various growth factors and scaffolds, has been widely attempted in animal models. Stem cells, including embryonic and adult stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, have also been reported as attractive cell sources for articular cartilage surface regeneration. Several studies with regard to scaffolds have been advanced, including recent investigations based on nanomaterials, functional mechanocompatible scaffolds, multilayered scaffolds, and extracellular matrix scaffolds for articular cartilage surface regeneration. Continuous refinement of animal models in chondral and osteochondral defects provide opportunities

  3. Preparation of Articular Cartilage Specimens for Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Stupina, T A

    2016-08-01

    We developed and adapted a technology for preparation of articular cartilage specimens for scanning electron microscopy. The method includes prefixation processing, fixation, washing, and dehydration of articular cartilage specimens with subsequent treatment in camphene and air-drying. The technological result consists in prevention of deformation of the articular cartilage structures. The method is simpler and cheaper than the known technologies. PMID:27591865

  4. Effect of passive motion on articular cartilage in rat osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jie; Liang, Jun; Wang, Yubin; Wang, Huifang

    2014-08-01

    fibers when compared with the control group, but not when compared with the three-week experimental group. Therefore, proper passive motion can repair and improve the metabolism of chondrocytes and delay the degenerative progress of articular cartilage in OA caused by knee fracture. However, for middle-stage OA, passive motion exhibits no significant repairing effect on the articular cartilage. This therapy increases the levels of proteoglycans and collagen fibers by reducing their decomposition, thereby improving the strength of the articular ligament and the stability of articulation. PMID:25009586

  5. Mesenchymal stem-cell potential in cartilage repair: an update

    PubMed Central

    Mazor, M; Lespessailles, E; Coursier, R; Daniellou, R; Best, T M; Toumi, H

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage damage and subsequent degeneration are a frequent occurrence in synovial joints. Treatment of these lesions is a challenge because this tissue is incapable of quality repair and/or regeneration to its native state. Non-operative treatments endeavour to control symptoms and include anti-inflammatory medications, viscosupplementation, bracing, orthotics and activity modification. Classical surgical techniques for articular cartilage lesions are frequently insufficient in restoring normal anatomy and function and in many cases, it has not been possible to achieve the desired results. Consequently, researchers and clinicians are focusing on alternative methods for cartilage preservation and repair. Recently, cell-based therapy has become a key focus of tissue engineering research to achieve functional replacement of articular cartilage. The present manuscript is a brief review of stem cells and their potential in the treatment of early OA (i.e. articular cartilage pathology) and recent progress in the field. PMID:25353372

  6. Polarized IR microscopic imaging of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Nagarajan; Xia, Yang; Bidthanapally, Aruna

    2007-08-01

    The objective of this spectroscopic imaging study is to understand the anisotropic behavior of articular cartilage under polarized infrared radiation at 6.25 microm pixel resolution. Paraffin embedded canine humeral cartilage-bone blocks were used to obtain 6 microm thick tissue sections. Two wire grid polarizers were used to manipulate the polarization states of IR radiation by setting them for various polarizer/analyzer angles. The characteristics of the major chemical components (amide I, amide II, amide III and sugar) of articular cartilage were investigated using (a) a polarizer and (b) a combination of a polarizer and an analyzer. These results were compared to those obtained using only an analyzer. The infrared anisotropy (variation in infrared absorption as a function of polarization angles) of amide I, amide II and amide III bands correlates with the orientation of collagen fibrils along the tissue depth in different histological zones. An 'anisotropic flipping' region of amide profiles indicates the possibility of using Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI) to determine the histological zones in cartilage. Cross-polarization experiment indicates the resolution of overlapping peaks of collagen triple helix and/or proteoglycan in articular cartilage.

  7. Polarized IR microscopic imaging of articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, Nagarajan; Xia, Yang; Bidthanapally, Aruna

    2007-08-01

    The objective of this spectroscopic imaging study is to understand the anisotropic behavior of articular cartilage under polarized infrared radiation at 6.25 µm pixel resolution. Paraffin embedded canine humeral cartilage-bone blocks were used to obtain 6 µm thick tissue sections. Two wire grid polarizers were used to manipulate the polarization states of IR radiation by setting them for various polarizer/analyzer angles. The characteristics of the major chemical components (amide I, amide II, amide III and sugar) of articular cartilage were investigated using (a) a polarizer and (b) a combination of a polarizer and an analyzer. These results were compared to those obtained using only an analyzer. The infrared anisotropy (variation in infrared absorption as a function of polarization angles) of amide I, amide II and amide III bands correlates with the orientation of collagen fibrils along the tissue depth in different histological zones. An 'anisotropic flipping' region of amide profiles indicates the possibility of using Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI) to determine the histological zones in cartilage. Cross-polarization experiment indicates the resolution of overlapping peaks of collagen triple helix and/or proteoglycan in articular cartilage.

  8. Resurfacing Damaged Articular Cartilage to Restore Compressive Properties

    PubMed Central

    Grenier, Stephanie; Donnelly, Patrick E.; Gittens, Jamila; Torzilli, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Surface damage to articular cartilage is recognized as the initial underlying process causing the loss of mechanical function in early-stage osteoarthritis. In this study, we developed structure-modifying treatments to potentially prevent, stabilize or reverse the loss in mechanical function. Various polymers (chondroitin sulfate, carboxymethylcellulose, sodium hyaluronate) and photoinitiators (riboflavin, irgacure 2959) were applied to the surface of collagenase-degraded cartilage and crosslinked in situ using UV light irradiation. While matrix permeability and deformation significantly increased following collagenase-induced degradation of the superficial zone, resurfacing using tyramine-substituted sodium hyaluronate and riboflavin decreased both values to a level comparable to that of intact cartilage. Repetitive loading of resurfaced cartilage showed minimal variation in the mechanical response over a 7 day period. Cartilage resurfaced using a low concentration of riboflavin had viable cells in all zones while a higher concentration resulted in a thin layer of cell death in the uppermost superficial zone. Our approach to repair surface damage initiates a new therapeutic advance in the treatment of injured articular cartilage with potential benefits that include enhanced mechanical properties, reduced susceptibility to enzymatic degradation and reduced adhesion of macrophages. PMID:25468298

  9. Inducing articular cartilage phenotype in costochondral cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Costochondral cells may be isolated with minimal donor site morbidity and are unaffected by pathologies of the diarthrodial joints. Identification of optimal exogenous stimuli will allow abundant and robust hyaline articular cartilage to be formed from this cell source. Methods In a three factor, two level full factorial design, the effects of hydrostatic pressure (HP), transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), and chondroitinase ABC (C-ABC), and all resulting combinations, were assessed in third passage expanded, redifferentiated costochondral cells. After 4 wks, the new cartilage was assessed for matrix content, superficial zone protein (SZP), and mechanical properties. Results Hyaline articular cartilage was generated, demonstrating the presence of type II collagen and SZP, and the absence of type I collagen. TGF-β1 upregulated collagen synthesis by 175% and glycosaminoglycan synthesis by 75%, resulting in a nearly 200% increase in tensile and compressive moduli. C-ABC significantly increased collagen content, and fibril density and diameter, leading to a 125% increase in tensile modulus. Hydrostatic pressure increased fibril diameter by 30% and tensile modulus by 45%. Combining TGF-β1 with C-ABC synergistically increased collagen content by 300% and tensile strength by 320%, over control. No significant differences were observed between C-ABC/TGF-β1 dual treatment and HP/C-ABC/TGF-β1. Conclusions Employing biochemical, biophysical, and mechanical stimuli generated robust hyaline articular cartilage with a tensile modulus of 2 MPa and a compressive instantaneous modulus of 650 kPa. Using expanded, redifferentiated costochondral cells in the self-assembling process allows for recapitulation of robust mechanical properties, and induced SZP expression, key characteristics of functional articular cartilage. PMID:24330640

  10. In vitro growth factor-induced bio engineering of mature articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ilyas M.; Francis, Lewis; Theobald, Peter S.; Perni, Stefano; Young, Robert D.; Prokopovich, Polina; Conlan, R. Steven; Archer, Charles W.

    2013-01-01

    Articular cartilage maturation is the postnatal development process that adapts joint surfaces to their site-specific biomechanical demands. Maturation involves gross morphological changes that occur through a process of synchronised growth and resorption of cartilage and generally ends at sexual maturity. The inability to induce maturation in biomaterial constructs designed for cartilage repair has been cited as a major cause for their failure in producing persistent cell-based repair of joint lesions. The combination of growth factors FGF2 and TGFβ1 induces accelerated articular cartilage maturation in vitro such that many molecular and morphological characteristics of tissue maturation are observable. We hypothesised that experimental growth factor-induced maturation of immature cartilage would result in a biophysical and biochemical composition consistent with a mature phenotype. Using native immature and mature cartilage as reference, we observed that growth factor-treated immature cartilages displayed increased nano-compressive stiffness, decreased surface adhesion, decreased water content, increased collagen content and smoother surfaces, correlating with a convergence to the mature cartilage phenotype. Furthermore, increased gene expression of surface structural protein collagen type I in growth factor-treated explants compared to reference cartilages demonstrates that they are still in the dynamic phase of the postnatal developmental transition. These data provide a basis for understanding the regulation of postnatal maturation of articular cartilage and the application of growth factor-induced maturation in vitro and in vivo in order to repair and regenerate cartilage defects. PMID:23182922

  11. The repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defects. Immune responses to reparative tissue formed by allogeneic growth plate chondrocyte implants

    SciTech Connect

    Kawabe, N.; Yoshinao, M. )

    1991-07-01

    Growth plate cartilage cultivated in vitro was attached with a fibrin clot to a full-thickness articular cartilage defect on knee joints in allogeneic New Zealand rabbits. The healing of the defects was assessed by gross examination, light microscopy, and immunologic analysis for 24 weeks. Immunologic assessment of cell-mediated immunity, cytotoxicity of a humoral antibody by a 51 chromium release assay, and immunofluorescence studies were carried out. During the first two weeks following grafting, healing was excellent in 11 of the 17 defects. From three to 24 weeks, 11 of 42 defects examined had good results. Host lymphocytes had accumulated around the allograft at two to 12 weeks. Most of the implanted cartilage grown in vitro died and was replaced by fibrous tissue. The immunologic studies suggested that the implanted cartilage began to degenerate two to three weeks after implantation partially because of a humoral immune response but more importantly because of cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

  12. Analysis of friction between articular cartilage and polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel artificial cartilage.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Wang, Anmin; Wang, Chengtao

    2016-05-01

    Many biomaterials are being used to repair damaged articular cartilage. In particular, poly vinyl alcohol hydrogel has similar mechanical properties to natural cartilage under compressive and shearing loading. Here, three-factor and two-level friction experiments and long-term tests were conducted to better evaluate its tribological properties. The friction coefficient between articular cartilage and the poly vinyl alcohol hydrogel depended primarily on the three factors of load, speed, and lubrication. When the speed increased from 10 to 20 mm/s under a load of 10 N, the friction coefficient increased from 0.12 to 0.147. When the lubricant was changed from Ringer's solution to a hyaluronic acid solution, the friction coefficient decreased to 0.084 with loads as high as 22 N. The poly vinyl alcohol hydrogel was severely damaged and lost its top surface layers, which were transferred to the articular cartilage surface. Wear was observed in the surface morphologies, which indicated the occurrence of surface adhesion of bovine cartilage. Surface fatigue and adhesive wear was the dominant wear mechanism. PMID:26970769

  13. Articular Cartilage Injury and Potential Remedies.

    PubMed

    Chubinskaya, Susanna; Haudenschild, Dominik; Gasser, Seth; Stannard, James; Krettek, Christian; Borrelli, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    Osteoarthritis affects millions of people worldwide, is associated with joint stiffness and pain, and often causes significant disability and loss of productivity. Osteoarthritis is believed to occur as a result of ordinary "wear and tear" on joints during the course of normal activities of daily living. Posttraumatic osteoarthritis is a particular subset of osteoarthritis that occurs after a joint injury. Developing clinically relevant animal models will allow investigators to delineate the causes of posttraumatic osteoarthritis and develop means to slow or prevent its development after joint injury. Chondroprotectant compounds, which attack the degenerative pathways at a variety of steps, are being developed in an effort to prevent posttraumatic osteoarthritis and offer great promise. Often times, cartilage degradation after joint injury occurs despite our best efforts. When this happens, there are several evolving techniques that offer at least short-term relief from the effects of posttraumatic osteoarthritis. Occasionally, these traumatic lesions are so large that dramatic steps must be taken in an attempt to restore articular congruity and joint stability. Fresh osteochondral allografts have been used in these settings and offer the possibility of joint preservation. For patients presenting with neglected displaced intra-articular fractures that have healed, intra-articular osteotomy techniques are being developed in an effort to restore joint congruity and function. This article reviews the results of a newly developed animal model of posttraumatic osteoarthritis, several promising chondroprotectant compounds, and also cartilage techniques that are used when degenerative cartilage lesions develop after joint injury. PMID:26584267

  14. PRP and Articular Cartilage: A Clinical Update

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Roberto; Castoldi, Filippo; Michielon, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    The convincing background of the recent studies, investigating the different potentials of platelet-rich plasma, offers the clinician an appealing alternative for the treatment of cartilage lesions and osteoarthritis. Recent evidences in literature have shown that PRP may be helpful both as an adjuvant for surgical treatment of cartilage defects and as a therapeutic tool by intra-articular injection in patients affected by osteoarthritis. In this review, the authors introduce the trophic and anti-inflammatory properties of PRP and the different products of the available platelet concentrates. Then, in a complex scenario made of a great number of clinical variables, they resume the current literature on the PRP applications in cartilage surgery as well as the use of intra-articular PRP injections for the conservative treatment of cartilage degenerative lesions and osteoarthritis in humans, available as both case series and comparative studies. The result of this review confirms the fascinating biological role of PRP, although many aspects yet remain to be clarified and the use of PRP in a clinical setting has to be considered still exploratory. PMID:26075244

  15. Nano-approaches in cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Paolo; Narcisi, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Technological improvements in biology, medicine, chemistry, engineering and material science have allowed deeper insights into the architectural and molecular organization levels of tissues and materials, providing innovative approaches and tools for medical treatments. One of the therapeutic targets that may benefit from these new issues is damaged human articular cartilage, a tissue unable to self-heal. In this review, we have not taken into consideration the pathological degenerations that may cause cartilage damage, but we have concentrated on the means of repair, providing a brief overview of the consolidated cellbased approaches for cartilage resurfacing. However, we have also focused on the tight relationships between chondrocytes and their surrounding extracellular matrix. The aim was to evidence the requirements of the cell components of the tissue, the un-fulfillment of which may cause unsatisfactory therapeutic outcomes in present therapies. A deeper analysis of the structural microand nano-characteristics of the articular cartilage matrix is presented to motivate the most recent "nano-approaches" that have been developed and published in the literature. Nanofiber technology, material surface topography and bioactivation, and recent advances in nanoparticle modifications are thus considered for their interesting contributions aimed at improving tissue engineering-based cartilage repair.

  16. In vitro targeted magnetic delivery and tracking of superparamagnetic iron oxide particles labeled stem cells for articular cartilage defect repair.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yong; Jin, Xuhong; Dai, Gang; Liu, Jun; Chen, Jiarong; Yang, Liu

    2011-04-01

    To assess a novel cell manipulation technique of tissue engineering with respect to its ability to augment superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO) labeled mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) density at a localized cartilage defect site in an in vitro phantom by applying magnetic force. Meanwhile, non-invasive imaging techniques were use to track SPIO-labeled MSCs by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Human bone marrow MSCs were cultured and labeled with SPIO. Fresh degenerated human osteochondral fragments were obtained during total knee arthroplasty and a cartilage defect was created at the center. Then, the osteochondral fragments were attached to the sidewalls of culture flasks filled with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) to mimic the human joint cavity. The SPIO-labeled MSCs were injected into the culture flasks in the presence of a 0.57 Tesla (T) magnetic force. Before and 90 min after cell targeting, the specimens underwent T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (SET2WI) sequence of 3.0 T MRI. MRI results were compared with histological findings. Macroscopic observation showed that SPIO-labeled MSCs were steered to the target region of cartilage defect. MRI revealed significant changes in signal intensity (P<0.01). HE staining exibited that a great number of MSCs formed a three-dimensional (3D) cell "sheet" structure at the chondral defect site. It was concluded that 0.57 T magnetic force permits spatial delivery of magnetically labeled MSCs to the target region in vitro. High-field MRI can serve as an very sensitive non-invasive technique for the visualization of SPIO-labeled MSCs.

  17. A Semi-Degradable Composite Scaffold for Articular Cartilage Defects

    PubMed Central

    Scholten, Paul M.; Ng, Kenneth W.; Joh, Kiwon; Serino, Lorenzo P.; Warren, Russell F.; Torzilli, Peter A.; Maher, Suzanne A.

    2010-01-01

    Few options exist to replace or repair damaged articular cartilage. The optimal solution that has been suggested is a scaffold that can carry load and integrate with surrounding tissues; but such a construct has thus far been elusive. The objectives of this study were to manufacture and characterize a non-degradable hydrated scaffold. Our hypothesis was that the polymer content of the scaffold can be used to control its mechanical properties, while an internal porous network augmented with biological agents can facilitate integration with the host tissue. Using a two-step water-in-oil emulsion process a porous poly-vinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogel scaffold combined with alginate microspheres was manufactured. The scaffold had a porosity of 11–30% with pore diameters of 107–187 μm, which readily allowed for movement of cells through the scaffold. Alginate microparticles were evenly distributed through the scaffold and allowed for the slow release of biological factors. The elastic modulus (Es) and Poisson’s ratio (υ), Aggregate modulus (Ha) and dynamic modulus (ED) of the scaffold were significantly affected by % PVA, as it varied from 10% to 20% wt/vol. Es and υ were similar to that of articular cartilage for both polymer concentrations, while Ha and ED were similar to that of cartilage only at 20% PVA. The ability to control scaffold mechanical properties, while facilitating cellular migration suggest that this scaffold is a potentially viable candidate for the functional replacement of cartilage defects. PMID:21308980

  18. Mechanical properties of hyaline and repair cartilage studied by nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Franke, O; Durst, K; Maier, V; Göken, M; Birkholz, T; Schneider, H; Hennig, F; Gelse, K

    2007-11-01

    Articular cartilage is a highly organized tissue that is well adapted to the functional demands in joints but difficult to replicate via tissue engineering or regeneration. Its viscoelastic properties allow cartilage to adapt to both slow and rapid mechanical loading. Several cartilage repair strategies that aim to restore tissue and protect it from further degeneration have been introduced. The key to their success is the quality of the newly formed tissue. In this study, periosteal cells loaded on a scaffold were used to repair large partial-thickness cartilage defects in the knee joint of miniature pigs. The repair cartilage was analyzed 26 weeks after surgery and compared both morphologically and mechanically with healthy hyaline cartilage. Contact stiffness, reduced modulus and hardness as key mechanical properties were examined in vitro by nanoindentation in phosphate-buffered saline at room temperature. In addition, the influence of tissue fixation with paraformaldehyde on the biomechanical properties was investigated. Although the repair process resulted in the formation of a stable fibrocartilaginous tissue, its contact stiffness was lower than that of hyaline cartilage by a factor of 10. Fixation with paraformaldehyde significantly increased the stiffness of cartilaginous tissue by one order of magnitude, and therefore, should not be used when studying biomechanical properties of cartilage. Our study suggests a sensitive method for measuring the contact stiffness of articular cartilage and demonstrates the importance of mechanical analysis for proper evaluation of the success of cartilage repair strategies. PMID:17586107

  19. Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Engraft into Rabbit Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen; He, Na; Feng, Chenchen; Liu, Victor; Zhang, Luyi; Wang, Fei; He, Jiaping; Zhu, Tengfang; Wang, Shuyang; Qiao, Weiwei; Li, Suke; Zhou, Guangdong; Zhang, Li; Dai, Chengxiang; Cao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known to have the potential for articular cartilage regeneration, and are suggested for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). Here, we investigated whether intra-articular injection of xenogeneic human adipose-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells (haMPCs) promoted articular cartilage repair in rabbit OA model and engrafted into rabbit articular cartilage. The haMPCs were cultured in vitro, and phenotypes and differentiation characteristics of cells were evaluated. OA was induced surgically by anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) and medical meniscectomy of knee joints. At six weeks following surgery, hyaluronic acid (HA) or haMPCs was injected into the knee joints, the contralateral knee served as normal control. All animals were sacrificed at the 16th week post-surgery. Assessments were carried out by macroscopic examination, hematoxylin/eosin (HE) and Safranin-O/Fast green stainings and immunohistochemistry. The data showed that haMPC treatment promoted cartilage repair. Signals of human mitochondrial can be directly detected in haMPC treated cartilage. The haMPCs expressed human leukocyte antigen I (HLA-I) but not HLA-II-DR in vivo. These results suggest that intra-articular injection of haMPCs promotes regeneration of articular cartilage in rabbit OA model, and support the notion that MPCs are transplantable between HLA-incompatible individuals. PMID:26023716

  20. Extracellular Matrix (ECM) Multilayer Membrane as a Sustained Releasing Growth Factor Delivery System for rhTGF-β3 in Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Hyug; Kim, Moon Suk; Kim, Young Jick; Choi, Byung Hyune; Lee, Chun Tek; Park, So Ra; Min, Byoung-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant human transforming growth factor beta-3 (rhTGF-β3) is a key regulator of chondrogenesis in stem cells and cartilage formation. We have developed a novel drug delivery system that continuously releases rhTGF-β3 using a multilayered extracellular matrix (ECM) membrane. We hypothesize that the sustained release of rhTGF-β3 could activate stem cells and result in enhanced repair of cartilage defects. The properties and efficacy of the ECM multilayer-based delivery system (EMLDS) are investigated using rhTGF-β3 as a candidate drug. The bioactivity of the released rhTGF-ß3 was evaluated through chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) using western blot and circular dichroism (CD) analyses in vitro. The cartilage reparability was evaluated through implanting EMLDS with endogenous and exogenous MSC in both in vivo and ex vivo models, respectively. In the results, the sustained release of rhTGF-ß3 was clearly observed over a prolonged period of time in vitro and the released rhTGF-β3 maintained its structural stability and biological activity. Successful cartilage repair was also demonstrated when rabbit MSCs were treated with rhTGF-β3-loaded EMLDS ((+) rhTGF-β3 EMLDS) in an in vivo model and when rabbit chondrocytes and MSCs were treated in ex vivo models. Therefore, the multilayer ECM membrane could be a useful drug delivery system for cartilage repair. PMID:27258120

  1. [Tribological assessment of articular cartilage. A system for the analysis of the friction coefficient of cartilage, regenerates and tissue engineering constructs; initial results].

    PubMed

    Schwarz, M L R; Schneider-Wald, B; Krase, A; Richter, W; Reisig, G; Kreinest, M; Heute, S; Pott, P P; Brade, J; Schütte, A

    2012-10-01

    Values for the friction coefficient of articular cartilage are given in ranges of percentage and lower and are calculated as a quotient of the friction force and the perpendicular loading force acting on it. Thus, a sophisticated system has to be provided for analysing the friction coefficient under different conditions in particular when cartilage should be coupled as friction partner. It is possible to deep-freeze articular cartilage before measuring the friction coefficient as the procedure has no influence on the results. The presented tribological system was able to distinguish between altered and native cartilage. Furthermore, tissue engineered constructs for cartilage repair were differentiated from native cartilage probes by their friction coefficient. In conclusion a tribological equipment is presented to analyze the friction coefficient of articular cartilage, in vivo generated cartilage regenerates and in vitro tissue engineered constructs regarding their biomechanical properties for quality assessment.

  2. Alterations in periarticular bone and cross talk between subchondral bone and articular cartilage in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The articular cartilage and the subchondral bone form a biocomposite that is uniquely adapted to the transfer of loads across the diarthrodial joint. During the evolution of the osteoarthritic process biomechanical and biological processes result in alterations in the composition, structure and functional properties of these tissues. Given the intimate contact between the cartilage and bone, alterations of either tissue will modulate the properties and function of the other joint component. The changes in periarticular bone tend to occur very early in the development of OA. Although chondrocytes also have the capacity to modulate their functional state in response to loading, the capacity of these cells to repair and modify their surrounding extracellular matrix is relatively limited in comparison to the adjacent subchondral bone. This differential adaptive capacity likely underlies the more rapid appearance of detectable skeletal changes in OA in comparison to the articular cartilage. The OA changes in periarticular bone include increases in subchondral cortical bone thickness, gradual decreases in subchondral trabeular bone mass, formation of marginal joint osteophytes, development of bone cysts and advancement of the zone of calcified cartilage between the articular cartilage and subchondral bone. The expansion of the zone of calcified cartilage contributes to overall thinning of the articular cartilage. The mechanisms involved in this process include the release of soluble mediators from chondrocytes in the deep zones of the articular cartilage and/or the influences of microcracks that have initiated focal remodeling in the calcified cartilage and subchondral bone in an attempt to repair the microdamage. There is the need for further studies to define the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the interaction between subchondral bone and articular cartilage and for applying this information to the development of therapeutic interventions to improve the

  3. Genesis and morphogenesis of limb synovial joints and articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Decker, Rebekah S; Koyama, Eiki; Pacifici, Maurizio

    2014-10-01

    Limb synovial joints are intricate structures composed of articular cartilage, synovial membranes, ligaments and an articular capsule. Together, these tissues give each joint its unique shape, organization and biomechanical function. Articular cartilage itself is rather complex and organized in distinct zones, including the superficial zone that produces lubricants and contains stem/progenitor cells. For many years there has been great interest in deciphering the mechanisms by which the joints form and come to acquire such unique structural features and diversity. Decades ago, classic embryologists discovered that the first overt sign of joint formation at each prescribed limb site was the appearance of a dense and compact population of mesenchymal cells collectively called the interzone. Work carried out since then by several groups has provided evidence that the interzone cells actively participate in joint tissue formation over developmental time. This minireview provides a succinct but comprehensive description of the many important recent advances in this field of research. These include studies using various conditional reporter mice to genetically trace and track the origin, fate and possible function of joint progenitor cells; studies on the involvement and roles in signaling pathways and transcription factors in joint cell determination and functioning; and studies using advanced methods of gene expression analyses to uncover novel genetic determinants of joint formation and diversity. The overall advances are impressive, and the findings are not only of obvious interest and importance but also have major implications in the conception of future translational medicine tools to repair and regenerate defective, overused or aging joints.

  4. Ultrasound Backscattering Is Anisotropic in Bovine Articular Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Inkinen, Satu I; Liukkonen, Jukka; Tiitu, Virpi; Virén, Tuomas; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha

    2015-07-01

    Collagen, proteoglycans and chondrocytes can contribute to ultrasound scattering in articular cartilage. However, anisotropy of ultrasound scattering in cartilage is not fully characterized. We investigate this using a clinical intravascular ultrasound device with ultrasound frequencies of 9 and 40 MHz. Osteochondral samples were obtained from intact bovine patellas, and cartilage was imaged in two perpendicular directions: through articular and lateral surfaces. At both frequencies, ultrasound backscattering was higher (p < 0.05) when measured through the lateral surface of cartilage. In addition, the composition and structure of articular cartilage were investigated with multiple reference methods involving light microscopy, digital densitometry, polarized light microscopy and Fourier infrared imaging. Reference methods indicated that acoustic anisotropy of ultrasound scattering arises mainly from non-uniform distribution of chondrocytes and anisotropic orientation of collagen fibers. To conclude, ultrasound backscattering in articular cartilage was found to be anisotropic and dependent on the frequency in use. PMID:25933711

  5. Ultrasound Backscattering Is Anisotropic in Bovine Articular Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Inkinen, Satu I; Liukkonen, Jukka; Tiitu, Virpi; Virén, Tuomas; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha

    2015-07-01

    Collagen, proteoglycans and chondrocytes can contribute to ultrasound scattering in articular cartilage. However, anisotropy of ultrasound scattering in cartilage is not fully characterized. We investigate this using a clinical intravascular ultrasound device with ultrasound frequencies of 9 and 40 MHz. Osteochondral samples were obtained from intact bovine patellas, and cartilage was imaged in two perpendicular directions: through articular and lateral surfaces. At both frequencies, ultrasound backscattering was higher (p < 0.05) when measured through the lateral surface of cartilage. In addition, the composition and structure of articular cartilage were investigated with multiple reference methods involving light microscopy, digital densitometry, polarized light microscopy and Fourier infrared imaging. Reference methods indicated that acoustic anisotropy of ultrasound scattering arises mainly from non-uniform distribution of chondrocytes and anisotropic orientation of collagen fibers. To conclude, ultrasound backscattering in articular cartilage was found to be anisotropic and dependent on the frequency in use.

  6. [Cell therapy in cartilage repair: cellular and molecular bases].

    PubMed

    Corvol, Marie-Thérèse; Tahiri, Khadija; Montembault, Alexandra; Daumard, Alain; Savouret, Jean-François; Rannou, François

    2008-01-01

    The destruction of articular cartilage represents the outcome of most inflammatory and degenerative rheumatic diseases and leads to severe disability. Articular cartilage being unable to repair spontaneously, alterations of the joint surface often results in end-stage osteoarthritis, requiring surgical intervention and total joint replacement. This makes damaged tissues repair a major challenge in our aging society. Cartilage harbors only one cell type, the chondrocyte, which synthesizes and secretes specific matrix proteins such as type II collagen and high molecular weight proteoglycans. Matrix proteins are responsible for the conservation of the chondrocyte phenotype and the maintenance of the mechanical functions of cartilage. Development of therapeutic strategies for cartilage repair should thus comprise not only the replacement of lost cartilage cells but also that of extracellular matrix with cartilage-like properties. Different protocols are under investigation. The most commonly employed materials include transplantation of autologous osteochondral tissue. More recently, cell-based therapies using autologous mature chondrocytes or pre-chondrogenic stem cells have drawn particular attention. Tissue-engineering procedures represent the actual trend in cartilage repair. This approach combines biodegradable polymeric three-dimensional matrixes and isolated prechondrogenic stem cells. The cells are seeded within the biocompatible matrix and then implanted into the joint. Numerous non-degradable and degradable polymers, which efficiently "mimic" the natural surroundings of cartilage cells, are currently under investigation.

  7. Combined effects of connective tissue growth factor-modified bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and NaOH-treated PLGA scaffolds on the repair of articular cartilage defect in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Songsong; Zhang, Bi; Man, Cheng; Ma, Yongqing; Liu, Xianwen; Hu, Jing

    2014-04-01

    In cartilage tissue engineering using stem cells, it is important to stimulate proliferation and control the differentiation of stem cells to specific lineages. Here we reported a combined technique for articular cartilage repair, consisting of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) transfected with connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) gene and NaOH-treated poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) scaffolds. In the present study, BMMSCs or CTGF-modified BMMSCs seeded on PLGA or NaOH-treated PLGA scaffolds were incubated in vitro and NaOH-treated PLGA significantly stimulated proliferation of BMMSCs, while CTGF gene transfer promoted chondrogenic differentiation. The effects of the composite on the repair of cartilage defects were evaluated in rabbit knee joints in vivo. Full-thickness cartilage defects (diameter: 5 mm; depth: 3 mm) were created unilaterally in the patellar groove. Defects were either left empty (n = 18) or implanted with BMMSCs/PLGA (n = 18), BMMSCs/NaOH-treated PLGA (n = 18), or CTGF-modified BMMSCs/NaOH-treated PLGA (n = 18). The defect area was examined grossly, histologically, and mechanically at 6, 12, and 24 weeks postoperatively. Implanted cells were tracked using adeno-LacZ labeling at 6 weeks after implantation. Overall, the CTGF-modified BMMSCs/NaOH-treated PLGA group showed successful hyaline-like cartilage regeneration similar to normal cartilage, which was superior to the other groups using gross examination, qualitative and quantitative histology, and mechanical assessment. The in vivo viability of the implanted cells was demonstrated by their retention for 6 weeks after implantation. These findings suggested that a combination of CTGF-modified BMMSCs and NaOH-treated PLGA may be an alternative treatment for large osteochondral defects in high-loading sites.

  8. 3D Hydrogel Scaffolds for Articular Chondrocyte Culture and Cartilage Generation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Human articular cartilage is highly susceptible to damage and has limited self-repair and regeneration potential. Cell-based strategies to engineer cartilage tissue offer a promising solution to repair articular cartilage. To select the optimal cell source for tissue repair, it is important to develop an appropriate culture platform to systematically examine the biological and biomechanical differences in the tissue-engineered cartilage by different cell sources. Here we applied a three-dimensional (3D) biomimetic hydrogel culture platform to systematically examine cartilage regeneration potential of juvenile, adult, and osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes. The 3D biomimetic hydrogel consisted of synthetic component poly(ethylene glycol) and bioactive component chondroitin sulfate, which provides a physiologically relevant microenvironment for in vitro culture of chondrocytes. In addition, the scaffold may be potentially used for cell delivery for cartilage repair in vivo. Cartilage tissue engineered in the scaffold can be evaluated using quantitative gene expression, immunofluorescence staining, biochemical assays, and mechanical testing. Utilizing these outcomes, we were able to characterize the differential regenerative potential of chondrocytes of varying age, both at the gene expression level and in the biochemical and biomechanical properties of the engineered cartilage tissue. The 3D culture model could be applied to investigate the molecular and functional differences among chondrocytes and progenitor cells from different stages of normal or aberrant development. PMID:26484414

  9. Leukocyte and Platelet Rich Plasma (L-PRP) Versus Leukocyte and Platelet Rich Fibrin (L-PRF) For Articular Cartilage Repair of the Knee: A Comparative Evaluation in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Davoud; Fakhrjou, Ashraf

    2015-01-01

    Background: Articular cartilage injuries of the knee are among the most debilitating injuries leading to osteoarthritis due to limited regenerative capability of cartilaginous tissue. The use of platelet concentrates containing necessary growth factors for cartilage healing has recently emerged as a new treatment method. Objectives: The efficacy of two types of different platelet concentrates were compared in the treatment of acute articular cartilage injuries of the knee in an animal model. Materials and Methods: Eighteen adult Iranian mixed breed male dogs were used to conduct this experimental study. Full thickness articular cartilage defects (diameter 6 mm, depth 5 mm) were created in the weight bearing area of femoral condyles of both hind limbs in all dogs (n = 72). Twelve dogs were randomly selected to receive treatment and their right and left hind limb defects were treated by L-PRP and L-PRF implantation respectively, while no treatment was undertaken in six other dogs as controls. The animals were euthanized at 4, 16 and 24 weeks following surgery and the resultant repair tissue was investigated macroscopically and microscopically. At each sampling time, 4 treated dogs and 2 control dogs were euthanized, therefore 8 defects per group were evaluated. Results: Mean macroscopic scores of the treated defects were higher than the controls at all sampling times with significant differences (P < 0.05) observed between L-PRF treated and control defects (10.13 vs. 8.37) and L-PRP treated and control defects (10 vs. 8.5) at 4 and 16 weeks, respectively. A similar trend in mean total microscopic scores was observed with a significant difference (P < 0.05) between L-PRP treated and control defects at 4 (9.87 vs. 7.62) and 16 (13.38 vs. 11) weeks. No significant difference was observed between the platelet concentrate treated defects in either mean macroscopic scores or mean total microscopic scores. Conclusions: Both L-PRP and L-PRF could be used to effectively

  10. Simultaneous Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Consolidation Measurement of Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Wellard, Robert Mark; Ravasio, Jean-Philippe; Guesne, Samuel; Bell, Christopher; Oloyede, Adekunle; Tevelen, Greg; Pope, James M.; Momot, Konstantin I.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers the opportunity to study biological tissues and processes in a non-disruptive manner. The technique shows promise for the study of the load-bearing performance (consolidation) of articular cartilage and changes in articular cartilage accompanying osteoarthritis. Consolidation of articular cartilage involves the recording of two transient characteristics: the change over time of strain and the hydrostatic excess pore pressure (HEPP). MRI study of cartilage consolidation under mechanical load is limited by difficulties in measuring the HEPP in the presence of the strong magnetic fields associated with the MRI technique. Here we describe the use of MRI to image and characterize bovine articular cartilage deforming under load in an MRI compatible consolidometer while monitoring pressure with a Fabry-Perot interferometer-based fiber-optic pressure transducer. PMID:24803188

  11. Signaling Pathways in Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, Erminia; Pulsatelli, Lia; Facchini, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    In adult healthy cartilage, chondrocytes are in a quiescent phase characterized by a fine balance between anabolic and catabolic activities. In ageing, degenerative joint diseases and traumatic injuries of cartilage, a loss of homeostatic conditions and an up-regulation of catabolic pathways occur. Since cartilage differentiation and maintenance of homeostasis are finely tuned by a complex network of signaling molecules and biophysical factors, shedding light on these mechanisms appears to be extremely relevant for both the identification of pathogenic key factors, as specific therapeutic targets, and the development of biological approaches for cartilage regeneration. This review will focus on the main signaling pathways that can activate cellular and molecular processes, regulating the functional behavior of cartilage in both physiological and pathological conditions. These networks may be relevant in the crosstalk among joint compartments and increased knowledge in this field may lead to the development of more effective strategies for inducing cartilage repair. PMID:24837833

  12. Repair of osteochondral defects in rabbits with ectopically produced cartilage.

    PubMed

    Emans, Pieter J; Hulsbosch, Martine; Wetzels, Gwendolyn M R; Bulstra, Sjoerd K; Kuijer, Roel

    2005-01-01

    Cartilage has poor regenerative capacity. Donor site morbidity and interference with joint homeostasis should be considered when applying the autologous chondrocyte transplantation technique. The use of ectopically produced cartilage, derived from periosteum, might be a novel method to heal cartilage defects. Ectopic cartilage was produced by dissecting a piece of periosteum from the tibia of rabbits. After 14 days the reactive tissue at the dissection site was harvested and a graft was cored out and press-fit implanted in an osteochondral defect in the medial condyle of the femur with or without addition of hyaluronan. After 3 weeks and 3 months the repair reaction was evaluated by histology. Thionine- and collagen type II-stained sections were evaluated for graft viability, ingrowth of the graft, and joint surface repair. Empty defects remained empty 3 weeks after implantation, ectopic cartilage filled the defect to the level of the surrounding cartilage. Histologically, the grafts were viable, consisting mainly of cartilage, and showed a variable pattern of ingrowth. Three months after implantation empty defects with or without hyaluronan were filled primarily with fibrocartilaginous tissue. Defects treated with ectopic cartilage contained mixtures of fibrocartilaginous and hyaline cartilage. Sometimes a tidemark was observed in the new articular cartilage and the orientation of the cells resembled that of healthy articular cartilage. Subchondral bone repair was excellent. The modified O'Driscoll scores for empty defects without and with hyaluronan were 12.7 +/- 6.4 and 15.3 +/- 3.2; for treated defects scores were better (15.4 +/- 3.9 and 18.2 +/- 2.9). In this conceptual study the use of ectopic cartilage derived from periosteum appears to be a promising novel method for joint surface repair in rabbits.

  13. The effects of exercise on human articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Eckstein, F; Hudelmaier, M; Putz, R

    2006-01-01

    The effects of exercise on articular hyaline articular cartilage have traditionally been examined in animal models, but until recently little information has been available on human cartilage. Magnetic resonance imaging now permits cartilage morphology and composition to be analysed quantitatively in vivo. This review briefly describes the methodological background of quantitative cartilage imaging and summarizes work on short-term (deformational behaviour) and long-term (functional adaptation) effects of exercise on human articular cartilage. Current findings suggest that human cartilage deforms very little in vivo during physiological activities and recovers from deformation within 90 min after loading. Whereas cartilage deformation appears to become less with increasing age, sex and physical training status do not seem to affect in vivo deformational behaviour. There is now good evidence that cartilage undergoes some type of atrophy (thinning) under reduced loading conditions, such as with postoperative immobilization and paraplegia. However, increased loading (as encountered by elite athletes) does not appear to be associated with increased average cartilage thickness. Findings in twins, however, suggest a strong genetic contribution to cartilage morphology. Potential reasons for the inability of cartilage to adapt to mechanical stimuli include a lack of evolutionary pressure and a decoupling of mechanical competence and tissue mass. PMID:16637874

  14. A comparison of healthy human and swine articular cartilage dynamic indentation mechanics.

    PubMed

    Ronken, S; Arnold, M P; Ardura García, H; Jeger, A; Daniels, A U; Wirz, D

    2012-05-01

    Articular cartilage is a multicomponent, poroviscoelastic tissue with nonlinear mechanical properties vital to its function. A consequent goal of repair or replacement of injured cartilage is to achieve mechanical properties in the repair tissue similar to healthy native cartilage. Since fresh healthy human articular cartilage (HC) is not readily available, we tested whether swine cartilage (SC) could serve as a suitable substitute for mechanical comparisons. To a first approximation, cartilage tissue and surgical substitutes can be evaluated mechanically as viscoelastic materials. Stiffness measurements (dynamic modulus, loss angle) are vital to function and are also a non-destructive means of evaluation. Since viscoelastic material stiffness is strongly strain rate dependent, stiffness was tested under different loading conditions related to function. Stiffness of healthy HC and SC specimens was determined and compared using two non-destructive, mm-scale indentation test modes: fast impact and slow sinusoidal deformation. Deformation resistance (dynamic modulus) and energy handling (loss angle) were determined. For equivalent anatomic locations, there was no difference in dynamic modulus. However, the HC loss angle was ~35% lower in fast impact and ~12% higher in slow sinusoidal mode. Differences seem attributable to age (young SC, older HC) but also to species anatomy and biology. Test mode-related differences in human-swine loss angle support use of multiple function-related test modes. Keeping loss angle differences in mind, swine specimens could serve as a standard of comparison for mechanical evaluation of e.g. engineered cartilage or synthetic repair materials.

  15. ELASTICITY OF ARTICULAR CARTILAGE: EFFECT OF IONS AND VISCOUS SOLUTIONS.

    PubMed

    SOKOLOFF, L

    1963-09-13

    The deformability of articular cartilage is increased by cations, more so by polyvalent than monovalent ones. Trivalent cations also depress elastic recovery. Failure of viscous solutions to alter the elastic behavior suggests ultra-filtration by cartilage as a possible mechanism in synovial lubrication.

  16. Chondrogenesis, chondrocyte differentiation, and articular cartilage metabolism in health and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Goldring, Mary B

    2012-08-01

    Chondrogenesis occurs as a result of mesenchymal cell condensation and chondroprogenitor cell differentiation. Following chondrogenesis, the chondrocytes remain as resting cells to form the articular cartilage or undergo proliferation, terminal differentiation to chondrocyte hypertrophy, and apoptosis in a process termed endochondral ossification, whereby the hypertrophic cartilage is replaced by bone. Human adult articular cartilage is a complex tissue of matrix proteins that varies from superficial to deep layers and from loaded to unloaded zones. A major challenge to efforts to repair cartilage by stem cell-based and other tissue-engineering strategies is the inability of the resident chondrocytes to lay down a new matrix with the same properties as it had when it was formed during development. Thus, understanding and comparing the mechanisms of cartilage remodeling during development, osteoarthritis (OA), and aging may lead to more effective strategies for preventing cartilage damage and promoting repair. The pivotal proteinase that marks OA progression is matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP-13), the major type II collagen-degrading collagenase, which is regulated by both stress and inflammatory signals. We and other investigators have found that there are common mediators of these processes in human OA cartilage. We also observe temporal and spatial expression of these mediators in early through late stages of OA in mouse models and are analyzing the consequences of knockout or transgenic overexpression of critical genes. Since the chondrocytes in adult human cartilage are normally quiescent and maintain the matrix in a low turnover state, understanding how they undergo phenotypic modulation and promote matrix destruction and abnormal repair in OA may to lead to identification of critical targets for therapy to block cartilage damage and promote effective cartilage repair. PMID:22859926

  17. Molecular conformational changes in articular cartilage using NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, Justin; Schmidt, Walter

    2004-03-01

    NMR spectroscopy is used to study the conformational changes of the collagen and glycosaminoglycan molecules in bovine articular cartilage. Molecular conformation will change with the charge on each molecule. The charge on each molecule varies spatially throughout the cartilage. For a given point in space, the charge on each molecule can be screened by placing the cartilage in an increasingly ionic environment. The conformational changes are noted through changes in the chemical shifts in the NMR spectrum as a function of salt concentration.

  18. [Structure of the articular cartilage in the middle aged].

    PubMed

    Kop'eva, T N; Mul'diiarov, P Ia; Bel'skaia, O B; Pastel', V B

    1983-10-01

    In persons 17-83 years of age having no articular disorders 39 samples of the patellar articular cartilage, the articulated surface and the femoral head have been studied histochemically, histometrically and electron microscopically. Age involution of the articular cartilage is revealed after 40 years of age as a progressive decrease in chondrocytes density in the superficial and (to a less degree) in the intermediate zones. This is accompanied with a decreasing number of 3- and 4-cellular lacunae and with an increasing number of unicellular and hollow lacunae. In some chondrocytes certain distrophic and necrotic changes are revealed. In the articular matrix the zone with the minimal content of glycosaminoglycans becomes thicker and keratansulfate content in the territorial matrix of the cartilage deep zone grows large.

  19. Generating Cartilage Repair from Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Aixin; Hardingham, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of degeneration and injury of articular cartilage has been very challenging for scientists and surgeons. As an avascular and hypocellular tissue, cartilage has a very limited capacity for self-repair. Chondrocytes are the only cell type in cartilage, in which they are surrounded by the extracellular matrix that they secrete and assemble. Autologous chondrocyte implantation for cartilage defects has achieved good results, but the limited resources and complexity of the procedure have hindered wider application. Stem cells form an alternative to chondrocytes as a source of chondrogenic cells due to their ability to proliferate extensively while retaining the potential for differentiation. Adult stem cells such as mesenchymal stem cells have been differentiated into chondrocytes, but the limitations in their proliferative ability and the heterogeneous cell population hinder their adoption as a prime alternative source for generating chondrocytes. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are attractive as candidates for cell replacement therapy because of their unlimited self-renewal and ability for differentiation into mesodermal derivatives as well as other lineages. In this review, we focus on current protocols for chondrogenic differentiation of ESCs, in particular the chemically defined culture system developed in our lab that could potentially be adapted for clinical application. PMID:23957872

  20. Chondrocyte distribution in the articular cartilage of human femoral condyles.

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, R S; Palfrey, A J

    1988-01-01

    The distribution of chondrocytes throughout the total thickness of articular cartilage from the femoral condyles of infants, children and adults has been studied using serial sections cut parallel as well as perpendicular to the articular surface. The thickness of the articular cartilage was estimated in fixed sections. In one of the adult specimens, the thickness of the articular cartilage was estimated firstly by direct measurement of the cut surfaces of a series of blocks cut from both condyles and then from the number of parallel sections of the cartilage prepared from those blocks. Cell density was highest in the superficial zone of all specimens examined, declining to lower values in the deep zone of the cartilage. Within this pattern the infant specimens had the highest values for cell density and the adults the lowest, with values for children in an intermediate range. There was no significant variation in cell density across the condyles of the selected adult specimen. The absolute values for cartilage thickness depended on the method used, but in general total thickness was found to approximately double from late gestation to maturity. In the selected adult specimen, the cartilage was thickest just anterior and posterior to the main weight-bearing area of the condyles. PMID:3198480

  1. Cryoprotectant kinetic analysis of a human articular cartilage vitrification protocol.

    PubMed

    Shardt, Nadia; Al-Abbasi, Khaled K; Yu, Hana; Jomha, Nadr M; McGann, Locksley E; Elliott, Janet A W

    2016-08-01

    We recently published a protocol to vitrify human articular cartilage and a method of cryoprotectant removal in preparation for transplantation. The current study's goal was to perform a cryoprotectant kinetic analysis and theoretically shorten the procedure used to vitrify human articular cartilage. First, the loading of the cryoprotectants was modeled using Fick's law of diffusion, and this information was used to predict the kinetics of cryoprotectant efflux after the cartilage sample had been warmed. We hypothesized that diffusion coefficients obtained from the permeation of individual cryoprotectants into porcine articular cartilage could be used to provide a reasonable prediction of the cryoprotectant loading and of the combined cryoprotectant efflux from vitrified human articular cartilage. We tested this hypothesis with experimental efflux measurements. Osteochondral dowels from three patients were vitrified, and after warming, the articular cartilage was immersed in 3 mL X-VIVO at 4 °C in two consecutive solutions, each for 24 h, with the solution osmolality recorded at various times. Measured equilibrium values agreed with theoretical values within a maximum of 15% for all three samples. The results showed that diffusion coefficients for individual cryoprotectants determined from experiments with 2-mm thick porcine cartilage can be used to approximate the rate of efflux of the combined cryoprotectants from vitrified human articular cartilage of similar thickness. Finally, Fick's law of diffusion was used in a computational optimization to shorten the protocol with the constraint of maintaining the theoretical minimum cryoprotectant concentration needed to achieve vitrification. The learning provided by this study will enable future improvements in tissue vitrification.

  2. Single cell sorting identifies progenitor cell population from full thickness bovine articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yin; Zheng, Hongjun; Buckwalter, Joseph A.; Martin, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To date, no approved clinical intervention successfully prevents the progressive degradation of injured articular cartilage that leads to osteoarthritis (OA). Stem/progenitor cell populations within tissues of diarthrodial joint have shown their therapeutic potential in treating OA. However, this potential has not been fully realized due in part to the heterogeneity of these subpopulations. Characterization of clonal populations derived from a single cell may help identify more homogenous stem/progenitor populations within articular cartilage. Moreover, chondrogenic potential of clonal populations from different zones could be further examined to elucidate their differential roles in maintaining articular cartilage homeostasis. Method We combined FACS (Fluorescence-activated cell sorting) and clonogenicity screening to identify stem/progenitor cells cloned from single cells. High-efficiency colony-forming cells (HCCs) were isolated, and evaluated for stem/progenitor cell characteristics. HCCs were also isolated from different zones of articular cartilage. Their function was compared by lineage-specific gene expression, and differentiation potential. Results A difference in colony-forming efficiency was observed in terms of colony sizes. HCCs were highly clonogenic and multipotent, and overexpressed stem/progenitor cell markers. Also, proliferation and migration associated genes were over-expressed in HCCs. HCCs showed zonal differences with deep HCCs more chondrogenic and osteogenic than superficial HCCs. Conclusion Our approach is a simple yet practical way to identify homogeneous stem/progenitor cell populations with clonal origin. The discovery of progenitor cells demonstrates the intrinsic self-repairing potential of articular cartilage. Differences in differentiation potential may represent the distinct roles of superficial and deep zone stem/progenitor cells in the maintenance of articular cartilage homeostasis. PMID:25038490

  3. Cell and matrix modulation in prenatal and postnatal equine growth cartilage, zones of Ranvier and articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Löfgren, Maria; Ekman, Stina; Svala, Emilia; Lindahl, Anders; Ley, Cecilia; Skiöldebrand, Eva

    2014-11-01

    Formation of synovial joints includes phenotypic changes of the chondrocytes and the organisation of their extracellular matrix is regulated by different factors and signalling pathways. Increased knowledge of the normal processes involved in joint development may be used to identify similar regulatory mechanisms during pathological conditions in the joint. Samples of the distal radius were collected from prenatal and postnatal equine growth plates, zones of Ranvier and articular cartilage with the aim of identifying Notch signalling components and cells with stem cell-like characteristics and to follow changes in matrix protein localisation during joint development. The localisation of the Notch signalling components Notch1, Delta4, Hes1, Notch dysregulating protein epidermal growth factor-like domain 7 (EGFL7), the stem cell-indicating factor Stro-1 and the matrix molecules cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), fibromodulin, matrilin-1 and chondroadherin were studied using immunohistochemistry. Spatial changes in protein localisations during cartilage maturation were observed for Notch signalling components and matrix molecules, with increased pericellular localisation indicating new synthesis and involvement of these proteins in the formation of the joint. However, it was not possible to characterise the phenotype of the chondrocytes based on their surrounding matrix during normal chondrogenesis. The zone of Ranvier was identified in all horses and characterised as an area expressing Stro-1, EGFL7 and chondroadherin with an absence of COMP and Notch signalling. Stro-1 was also present in cells close to the perichondrium, in the articular cartilage and in the fetal resting zone, indicating stem cell-like characteristics of these cells. The presence of stem cells in the articular cartilage will be of importance for the repair of damaged cartilage. Perivascular chondrocytes and hypertrophic cells of the cartilage bone interface displayed positive staining for

  4. Cell and matrix modulation in prenatal and postnatal equine growth cartilage, zones of Ranvier and articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Löfgren, Maria; Ekman, Stina; Svala, Emilia; Lindahl, Anders; Ley, Cecilia; Skiöldebrand, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Formation of synovial joints includes phenotypic changes of the chondrocytes and the organisation of their extracellular matrix is regulated by different factors and signalling pathways. Increased knowledge of the normal processes involved in joint development may be used to identify similar regulatory mechanisms during pathological conditions in the joint. Samples of the distal radius were collected from prenatal and postnatal equine growth plates, zones of Ranvier and articular cartilage with the aim of identifying Notch signalling components and cells with stem cell-like characteristics and to follow changes in matrix protein localisation during joint development. The localisation of the Notch signalling components Notch1, Delta4, Hes1, Notch dysregulating protein epidermal growth factor-like domain 7 (EGFL7), the stem cell-indicating factor Stro-1 and the matrix molecules cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), fibromodulin, matrilin-1 and chondroadherin were studied using immunohistochemistry. Spatial changes in protein localisations during cartilage maturation were observed for Notch signalling components and matrix molecules, with increased pericellular localisation indicating new synthesis and involvement of these proteins in the formation of the joint. However, it was not possible to characterise the phenotype of the chondrocytes based on their surrounding matrix during normal chondrogenesis. The zone of Ranvier was identified in all horses and characterised as an area expressing Stro-1, EGFL7 and chondroadherin with an absence of COMP and Notch signalling. Stro-1 was also present in cells close to the perichondrium, in the articular cartilage and in the fetal resting zone, indicating stem cell-like characteristics of these cells. The presence of stem cells in the articular cartilage will be of importance for the repair of damaged cartilage. Perivascular chondrocytes and hypertrophic cells of the cartilage bone interface displayed positive staining for

  5. Targeting TGFβ Signaling in Subchondral Bone and Articular Cartilage Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Gehau; Cao, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common degenerative joint disease, and there is no disease-modifying therapy for OA currently available. Targeting of articular cartilage alone may not be sufficient to halt this disease progression. Articular cartilage and subchondral bone act as a functional unit. Increasing evidence indicates that transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) plays a crucial role in maintaining homeostasis of both articular cartilage and subchondral bone. Activation of extracellular matrix latent TGFβ at the appropriate time and location is the prerequisite for its function. Aberrant activation of TGFβ in the subchondral bone in response to abnormal mechanical loading environment induces formation of osteroid islets at onset of osteoarthritis. As a result, alteration of subchondral bone structure changes the stress distribution on the articular cartilage and leads to its degeneration. Thus, inhibition of TGFβ activity in the subchondral bone may provide a new avenue of treatment for OA. In this review, we will respectively discuss the role of TGFβ in homeostasis of articular cartilage and subchondral bone as a novel target for OA therapy. PMID:24745631

  6. Computational aspects in mechanical modeling of the articular cartilage tissue.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Hadi; Mequanint, Kibret; Herzog, Walter

    2013-04-01

    This review focuses on the modeling of articular cartilage (at the tissue level), chondrocyte mechanobiology (at the cell level) and a combination of both in a multiscale computation scheme. The primary objective is to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of conventional models implemented to study the mechanics of the articular cartilage tissue and chondrocytes. From monophasic material models as the simplest form to more complicated multiscale theories, these approaches have been frequently used to model articular cartilage and have contributed significantly to modeling joint mechanics, addressing and resolving numerous issues regarding cartilage mechanics and function. It should be noted that attentiveness is important when using different modeling approaches, as the choice of the model limits the applications available. In this review, we discuss the conventional models applicable to some of the mechanical aspects of articular cartilage such as lubrication, swelling pressure and chondrocyte mechanics and address some of the issues associated with the current modeling approaches. We then suggest future pathways for a more realistic modeling strategy as applied for the simulation of the mechanics of the cartilage tissue using multiscale and parallelized finite element method.

  7. Biphasic surface amorphous layer lubrication of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Graindorge, Simon; Ferrandez, Wendy; Jin, Zhongmin; Ingham, Eileen; Grant, Colin; Twigg, Peter; Fisher, John

    2005-12-01

    The biphasic nature of articular cartilage has been acknowledged for some time and is known to play an important role in many of the biomechanical functions performed by this unique tissue. From the lubrication point of view however, a simple biphasic model is unable to account for the extremely low friction coefficients that have been recorded experimentally, particularly during start-up. In addition, research over the last decade has indicated the presence of a surface amorphous layer on top of articular cartilage. Here, we present results from a finite element model of articular cartilage that includes a thin, soft, biphasic surface amorphous layer (BSAL). The results of this study show that a thin BSAL, with lower elastic modulus, dramatically altered the load sharing between the solid and liquid phases of articular cartilage, particularly in the near-surface regions of the underlying bulk cartilage and within the surface amorphous layer itself where the fluid load support exceeded 85%. By transferring the load from the solid phase to the fluid phase, the biphasic surface layer improves lubrication and reduces friction, whilst also protecting the underlying cartilage surface by 'shielding' the solid phase from elevated stresses. The increase in lubrication effectiveness is shown to be greatest during short duration loading scenarios, such as shock loads.

  8. Combining Freshly Isolated Chondroprogenitor Cells from the Infrapatellar Fat Pad with a Growth Factor Delivery Hydrogel as a Putative Single Stage Therapy for Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Ahearne, Mark; Liu, Yurong

    2014-01-01

    results of these in vitro studies do not provide strong evidence to support the use of selective substrate adhesion as a means to isolate chondroprogenitor cells, the findings demonstrate the potential of combining a growth factor delivery hydrogel and FI IFP cells as a single stage therapy for cartilage defect repair. PMID:24090441

  9. Microscale surface friction of articular cartilage in early osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Desrochers, Jane; Amrein, Matthias W; Matyas, John R

    2013-09-01

    Articular cartilage forms the articulating surface of long bones and facilitates energy dissipation upon loading as well as joint lubrication and wear resistance. In normal cartilage, boundary lubrication between thin films at the cartilage surface reduces friction in the absence of interstitial fluid pressurization and fluid film lubrication by synovial fluid. Inadequate boundary lubrication is associated with degenerative joint conditions such as osteoarthritis (OA), but relations between OA and surface friction, lubrication and wear in boundary lubrication are not well defined. The purpose of the present study was to measure microscale boundary mode friction of the articular cartilage surface in an in vivo experimental model to better understand changes in cartilage surface friction in early OA. Cartilage friction was measured on the articular surface by atomic force microscopy (AFM) under applied loads ranging from 0.5 to 5 μN. Microscale AFM friction analyses revealed depth dependent changes within the top-most few microns of the cartilage surface in this model of early OA. A significant increase of nearly 50% was observed in the mean engineering friction coefficient for OA cartilage at the 0.5 μN load level; no significant differences in friction coefficients were found under higher applied loads. Changes in cartilage surface morphology observed by scanning electron microscopy included cracking and roughening of the surface indicative of disruption and wear accompanied by an apparent disintegration of the thin surface lamina from the underlying matrix. Immunohistochemical staining of lubricin - an important cartilage surface boundary lubricant - did not reveal differences in spatial distribution near the cartilage surface in OA compared to controls. The increase in friction at the 0.5 μN force level is interpreted to reflect changes in the interfacial mechanics of the thin surface lamina of articular cartilage: increased friction implies reduced

  10. Contact models of repaired articular surfaces: influence of loading conditions and the superficial tangential zone.

    PubMed

    Owen, John R; Wayne, Jennifer S

    2011-07-01

    The superficial tangential zone (STZ) plays a significant role in normal articular cartilage's ability to support loads and retain fluids. To date, tissue engineering efforts have not replicated normal STZ function in cartilage repairs. This finite element study examined the STZ's role in normal and repaired articular surfaces under different contact conditions. Contact area and pressure distributions were allowed to change with time, tension-compression nonlinearity modeled collagen behavior in the STZ, and nonlinear geometry was incorporated to accommodate finite deformation. Responses to loading via impermeable and permeable rigid surfaces were compared to loading via normal cartilage, a more physiologic condition, anticipating the two rigid loading surfaces would bracket that of normal. For models loaded by normal cartilage, an STZ placed over the inferior repair region reduced the short-term axial compression of the articular surface by 15%, when compared to a repair without an STZ. Covering the repair with a normal STZ shifted the flow patterns and strain levels back toward that of normal cartilage. Additionally, reductions in von Mises stress (21%) and an increase in fluid pressure (13%) occurred in repair tissue under the STZ. This continues to show that STZ properties of sufficient quality are likely critical for the survival of transplanted constructs in vivo. However, response to loading via normal cartilage did not always fall within ranges predicted by the rigid surfaces. Use of more physiologic contact models is recommended for more accurate investigations into properties critical to the success of repair tissues.

  11. Application of stem cells for articular cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Nathaniel S; Elisseeff, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Articular cartilage is a highly organized tissue lacking self-regeneration capacity upon lesion. Current surgical intervention by application of in vitro-expanded autologous chondrocytes transplantation procedure is associated with several disadvantages, including donor-site morbidity and inferior fibrocartilage formation at the defect site. However, recent advancements in tissue engineering have provided notable strategies for stem cell-based therapies and articular cartilage tissue engineering. In this review, we discuss the current strategies to engineer cartilage tissues from adult stem cells and human embryonic stem cell-derived cells. The characteristics of adult stem cells, the microenvironmental control of cell fate determination, and the limitation imposed by the intrinsic nature of stem cells are discussed. The strategy to commit the stem cells for functional cartilage tissues in vivo is also discussed.

  12. Evidence for a negative Pasteur effect in articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Lee, R B; Urban, J P

    1997-01-01

    Uptake of external glucose and production of lactate were measured in freshly-excised bovine articular cartilage under O2 concentrations ranging from 21% (air) to zero (N2-bubbled). Anoxia (O2 concentration < 1% in the gas phase) severely inhibited both glucose uptake and lactate production. The decrease in lactate formation correlated closely with the decrease in glucose uptake, in a mole ratio of 2:1. This reduction in the rate of glycolysis in anoxic conditions is seen as evidence of a negative Pasteur effect in bovine articular cartilage. Anoxia also suppressed glycolysis in articular cartilage from horse, pig and sheep. Inhibitors acting on the glycolytic pathway (2-deoxy-D-glucose, iodoacetamide or fluoride) strongly decreased aerobic lactate production and ATP concentration, consistent with the belief that articular cartilage obtains its principal supply of ATP from substrate-level phosphorylation in glycolysis. Azide or cyanide lowered the ATP concentration in aerobic cartilage to approximately the same extent as did anoxia but, because glycolysis (lactate production) was also inhibited by these treatments, the importance of any mitochondrial ATP production could not be assessed. A negative Pasteur effect would make chondrocytes particularly liable to suffer a shortage of energy under anoxic conditions. Incorporation of [35S]sulphate into proteoglycan was severely curtailed by treatments, such as anoxia, which decreased the intracellular concentration of ATP.

  13. Poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel as a biocompatible viscoelastic mimetic for articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Grant, Colin; Twigg, Pete; Egan, Alex; Moody, Alexandra; Smith, Annie; Eagland, Donald; Crowther, Nicholas; Britland, Steve

    2006-01-01

    The prevalence of suboptimal outcome for surgical interventions in the treatment of full-thickness articular cartilage damage suggests that there is scope for a materials-based strategy to deliver a more durable repair. Given that the superficial layer of articular cartilage creates and sustains the tribological function of synovial joints, it is logical that candidate materials should have surface viscoelastic properties that mimic native articular cartilage. The present paper describes force spectroscopy analysis by nano-indentation to measure the elastic modulus of the surface of a novel poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel with therapeutic potential as a joint implant. More than 1 order of magnitude decrease in the elastic modulus was detected after adsorption of a hyaluronic acid layer onto the hydrogel, bringing it very close to previously reported values for articular cartilage. Covalent derivatization of the hydrogel surface with fibronectin facilitated the adhesion and growth of cultured rat tibial condyle chondrocytes as evidenced morphologically and by the observance of metachromatic staining with toluidine blue dye. The present results indicate that hydrogel materials with potential therapeutic benefit for injured and diseased joints can be engineered with surfaces with biomechanical properties similar to those of native tissue and are accepted as such by their constituent cell type. PMID:17022680

  14. Depth Dependence of Shear Properties in Articular Cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Mark; Gleghorn, Jason; Bonassar, Lawrence; Cohen, Itai

    2007-03-01

    Articular cartilage is a highly complex and heterogeneous material in its structure, composition and mechanical behavior. Understanding these spatial variations is a critical step in designing replacement tissue and developing methods to diagnose and treat tissue affected by damage or disease. Existing techniques in particle image velocimetry (PIV) have been used to map the shear properties of complex materials; however, these methods have yet to be applied to understanding shear behavior in cartilage. In this talk, we will show that confocal microscopy in conjunction with PIV techniques can be used to determine the depth dependence of the shear properties of articular cartilage. We will show that the shear modulus of this tissue varies by over an order of magnitude over its depth, with the least stiff region located about 200 microns from the surface. Furthermore, our data indicate that the shear strain profile of articular cartilage is sensitive to both the degree of compression and the total applied shear strain. In particular, we find that cartilage strain stiffens most dramatically in a region 200-500 microns below the surface. Finally, we will describe a physical model that accounts for this behavior by taking into account the local buckling of collagen fibers just below the cartilage surface and present second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging data addressing the collagen orientation before and after shear.

  15. Human cartilage repair with a photoreactive adhesive-hydrogel composite.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Blanka; Fermanian, Sara; Gibson, Matthew; Unterman, Shimon; Herzka, Daniel A; Cascio, Brett; Coburn, Jeannine; Hui, Alexander Y; Marcus, Norman; Gold, Garry E; Elisseeff, Jennifer H

    2013-01-01

    Surgical options for cartilage resurfacing may be significantly improved by advances and application of biomaterials that direct tissue repair. A poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel was designed to support cartilage matrix production, with easy surgical application. A model in vitro system demonstrated deposition of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix in the hydrogel biomaterial and stimulation of adjacent cartilage tissue development by mesenchymal stem cells. For translation to the joint environment, a chondroitin sulfate adhesive was applied to covalently bond and adhere the hydrogel to cartilage and bone tissue in articular defects. After preclinical testing in a caprine model, a pilot clinical study was initiated where the biomaterials system was combined with standard microfracture surgery in 15 patients with focal cartilage defects on the medial femoral condyle. Control patients were treated with microfracture alone. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that treated patients achieved significantly higher levels of tissue fill compared to controls. Magnetic resonance spin-spin relaxation times (T(2)) showed decreasing water content and increased tissue organization over time. Treated patients had less pain compared with controls, whereas knee function [International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC)] scores increased to similar levels between the groups over the 6 months evaluated. No major adverse events were observed over the study period. With further clinical testing, this practical biomaterials strategy has the potential to improve the treatment of articular cartilage defects. PMID:23303605

  16. Study of the collagen structure in the superficial zone and physiological state of articular cartilage using a 3D confocal imaging technique

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian P; Kirk, Thomas B; Zheng, Ming H

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The collagen structure in the superficial zone of articular cartilage is critical to the tissue's durability. Early osteoarthritis is often characterized with fissures on the articular surface. This is closely related to the disruption of the collagen network. However, the traditional histology can not offer visualization of the collagen structure in articular cartilage because it uses conventional optical microscopy that does not have insufficient imaging resolution to resolve collagen from proteoglycans in hyaline articular cartilage. This study examines the 3D collagen network of articular cartilage scored from 0 to 2 in the scoring system of International Cartilage Repair Society, and aims to develop a 3D histology for assessing early osteoarthritis. Methods Articular cartilage was visually classified into five physiological groups: normal cartilage, aged cartilage, cartilage with artificial and natural surface disruption, and fibrillated. The 3D collagen matrix of the cartilage was acquired using a 3D imaging technique developed previously. Traditional histology was followed to grade the physiological status of the cartilage in the scoring system of International Cartilage Repair Society. Results Normal articular cartilage contains interwoven collagen bundles near the articular surface, approximately within the lamina splendens. However, its collagen fibres in the superficial zone orient predominantly in a direction spatially oblique to the articular surface. With age and disruption of the articular surface, the interwoven collagen bundles are gradually disappeared, and obliquely oriented collagen fibres change to align predominantly in a direction spatially perpendicular to the articular surface. Disruption of the articular surface is well related to the disappearance of the interwoven collagen bundles. Conclusion A 3D histology has been developed to supplement the traditional histology and study the subtle changes in the collagen network in the

  17. The Challenge and the Promise of Bone Marrow Cells for Human Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The cartilage repair potential of bone marrow–derived stem cells has been well described. Harnessing this potential for human articular cartilage repair remains challenging. Accessing bone marrow repair cells through marrow stimulation techniques such as microfracture is readily achieved with generally good but inconsistent results. Animal and human studies show feasibility for ex vivo processing of bone marrow to isolate, concentrate, and culture mesenchymal stem cells. Nevertheless, it has been difficult to show consistent and clinically meaningful improvement using bone marrow cell preparations above what has been achieved with microfracture. Consequently, microfracture continues to be the simplest and most commonly used method to enhance repair of focal articular cartilage defects. Emerging preclinical work in the equine model suggests a role for enhancing marrow-stimulation techniques through the use of natural scaffolds such as autologous platelet enriched fibrin as well as optimization of joint biology through localized gene therapy to support cartilage repair. In contrast to joint replacement where inert materials of known mechanical properties are used, host biology determines the relative success, failure, and durability of cartilage repair. As such, development of personalized strategies to improve the quality and durability of bone marrow cell–based articular cartilage repair represent exciting new areas of inquiry. Continued advances in stem cell biology, scaffold technologies, and methods to delineate and enhance host biology, both systemically and within the joint, hold promise for harnessing the full power of bone marrow cells to facilitate cartilage repair and regeneration. PMID:27340515

  18. Arthroscopic optical coherence tomography provides detailed information on articular cartilage lesions in horses.

    PubMed

    te Moller, N C R; Brommer, H; Liukkonen, J; Virén, T; Timonen, M; Puhakka, P H; Jurvelin, J S; van Weeren, P R; Töyräs, J

    2013-09-01

    Arthroscopy enables direct inspection of the articular surface, but provides no information on deeper cartilage layers. Optical coherence tomography (OCT), based on measurement of reflection and backscattering of light, is a diagnostic technique used in cardiovascular surgery and ophthalmology. It provides cross-sectional images at resolutions comparable to that of low-power microscopy. The aim of this study was to determine if OCT is feasible for advanced clinical assessment of lesions in equine articular cartilage during diagnostic arthroscopy. Diagnostic arthroscopy of 36 metacarpophalangeal joints was carried out ex vivo. Of these, 18 joints with varying degrees of cartilage damage were selected, wherein OCT arthroscopy was conducted using an OCT catheter (diameter 0.9 mm) inserted through standard instrument portals. Five sites of interest, occasionally supplemented with other locations where defects were encountered, were arthroscopically graded according to the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) classification system. The same sites were evaluated qualitatively (ICRS classification and morphological description of the lesions) and quantitatively (measurement of cartilage thickness) on OCT images. OCT provided high resolution images of cartilage enabling determination of cartilage thickness. Comparing ICRS grades determined by both arthroscopy and OCT revealed poor agreement. Furthermore, OCT visualised a spectrum of lesions, including cavitation, fibrillation, superficial and deep clefts, erosion, ulceration and fragmentation. In addition, with OCT the arthroscopically inaccessible area between the dorsal MC3 and P1 was reachable in some cases. Arthroscopically-guided OCT provided more detailed and quantitative information on the morphology of articular cartilage lesions than conventional arthroscopy. OCT could therefore improve the diagnostic value of arthroscopy in equine orthopaedic surgery. PMID:23810744

  19. Major biological obstacles for persistent cell-based regeneration of articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Steinert, Andre F; Ghivizzani, Steven C; Rethwilm, Axel; Tuan, Rocky S; Evans, Christopher H; Nöth, Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    Hyaline articular cartilage, the load-bearing tissue of the joint, has very limited repair and regeneration capacities. The lack of efficient treatment modalities for large chondral defects has motivated attempts to engineer cartilage constructs in vitro by combining cells, scaffold materials and environmental factors, including growth factors, signaling molecules, and physical influences. Despite promising experimental approaches, however, none of the current cartilage repair strategies has generated long lasting hyaline cartilage replacement tissue that meets the functional demands placed upon this tissue in vivo. The reasons for this are diverse and can ultimately result in matrix degradation, differentiation or integration insufficiencies, or loss of the transplanted cells and tissues. This article aims to systematically review the different causes that lead to these impairments, including the lack of appropriate differentiation factors, hypertrophy, senescence, apoptosis, necrosis, inflammation, and mechanical stress. The current conceptual basis of the major biological obstacles for persistent cell-based regeneration of articular cartilage is discussed, as well as future trends to overcome these limitations. PMID:17561986

  20. An in vitro model for the pathological degradation of articular cartilage in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Grenier, Stephanie; Bhargava, Madhu M; Torzilli, Peter A

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an in vitro cartilage degradation model that emulates the damage seen in early-stage osteoarthritis. To this end, cartilage explants were collagenase-treated to induce enzymatic degradation of collagen fibers and proteoglycans at the articular surface. To assess changes in mechanical properties, intact and degraded cartilage explants were subjected to a series of confined compression creep tests. Changes in extracellular matrix structure and composition were determined using biochemical and histological approaches. Our results show that collagenase-induced degradation increased the amount of deformation experienced by the cartilage explants under compression. An increase in apparent permeability as well as a decrease in instantaneous and aggregate moduli was measured following collagenase treatment. Histological analysis of degraded explants revealed the presence of surface fibrillation, proteoglycan depletion in the superficial and intermediate zones and loss of the lamina splendens. Collagen cleavage was confirmed by the Col II-3/4Cshort antibody. Degraded specimens experienced a significant decrease in proteoglycan content but maintained total collagen content. Repetitive testing of degraded samples resulted in the gradual collapse of the articular surface and the compaction of the superficial zone. Taken together, our data demonstrates that enzymatic degradation with collagenase can be used to emulate changes seen in early-stage osteoarthritis. Further, our in vitro model provides information on cartilage mechanics and insights on how matrix changes can affect cartilage's functional properties. More importantly, our model can be applied to develop and test treatment options for tissue repair. PMID:24360770

  1. Degradome expression profiling in human articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Swingler, Tracey E; Waters, Jasmine G; Davidson, Rosemary K; Pennington, Caroline J; Puente, Xose S; Darrah, Clare; Cooper, Adele; Donell, Simon T; Guile, Geoffrey R; Wang, Wenjia; Clark, Ian M

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The molecular mechanisms underlying cartilage destruction in osteoarthritis are poorly understood. Proteolysis is a key feature in the turnover and degradation of cartilage extracellular matrix where the focus of research has been on the metzincin family of metalloproteinases. However, there is strong evidence to indicate important roles for other catalytic classes of proteases, with both extracellular and intracellular activities. The aim of this study was to profile the expression of the majority of protease genes in all catalytic classes in normal human cartilage and that from patients with osteoarthritis (OA) using a quantitative method. Methods Human cartilage was obtained from femoral heads at joint replacement for either osteoarthritis or following fracture to the neck of femur (NOF). Total RNA was purified, and expression of genes assayed using Taqman® low-density array quantitative RT-PCR. Results A total of 538 protease genes were profiled, of which 431 were expressed in cartilage. A total of 179 genes were differentially expressed in OA versus NOF cartilage: eight aspartic proteases, 44 cysteine proteases, 76 metalloproteases, 46 serine proteases and five threonine proteases. Wilcoxon ranking as well as the LogitBoost-NR machine learning approach were used to assign significance to each gene, with the most highly ranked genes broadly similar using each method. Conclusions This study is the most complete quantitative analysis of protease gene expression in cartilage to date. The data help give direction to future research on the specific function(s) of individual proteases or protease families in cartilage and may help to refine anti-proteolytic strategies in OA. PMID:19549314

  2. Intra-Articular Injections of Polyphenols Protect Articular Cartilage from Inflammation-Induced Degradation: Suggesting a Potential Role in Cartilage Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Venkatachalam; Madhan, Balaraman; Tiku, Moti L

    2015-01-01

    Arthritic diseases, such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, inflict an enormous health care burden on society. Osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease with high prevalence among older people, and rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune inflammatory disease, both lead to irreversible structural and functional damage to articular cartilage. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of polyphenols such as catechin, quercetin, epigallocatechin gallate, and tannic acid, on crosslinking type II collagen and the roles of these agents in managing in vivo articular cartilage degradation. The thermal, enzymatic, and physical stability of bovine articular cartilage explants following polyphenolic treatment were assessed for efficiency. Epigallocatechin gallate and tannic acid-treated explants showed >12 °C increase over native cartilage in thermal stability, thereby confirming cartilage crosslinking. Polyphenol-treated cartilage also showed a significant reduction in the percentage of collagen degradation and the release of glycosaminoglycans against collagenase digestion, indicating the increase physical integrity and resistance of polyphenol crosslinked cartilage to enzymatic digestion. To examine the in vivo cartilage protective effects, polyphenols were injected intra-articularly before (prophylactic) and after (therapeutic) the induction of collagen-induced arthritis in rats. The hind paw volume and histomorphological scoring was done for cartilage damage. The intra-articular injection of epigallocatechin gallate and tannic acid did not significantly influence the time of onset or the intensity of joint inflammation. However, histomorphological scoring of the articular cartilage showed a significant reduction in cartilage degradation in prophylactic- and therapeutic-groups, indicating that intra-articular injections of polyphenols bind to articular cartilage and making it resistant to degradation despite ongoing inflammation. These studies establish

  3. Biochemical composition of the superficial layer of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Crockett, R; Grubelnik, A; Roos, S; Dora, C; Born, W; Troxler, H

    2007-09-15

    To gain more information on the mechanism of lubrication in articular joints, the superficial layer of bovine articular cartilage was mechanically removed in a sheet of ice that formed on freezing the cartilage. Freeze-dried samples contained low concentrations of chondroitin sulphate and protein. Analysis of the protein by SDS PAGE showed that the composition of the sample was comparable to that of synovial fluid (SF). Attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy of the dried residue indicated that the sample contained mostly hyaluronan. Moreover, ATR-IR spectroscopy of the upper layer of the superficial layer, adsorbed onto silicon, showed the presence of phospholipids. A gel could be formed by mixing hyaluronan and phosphatidylcholine in water with mechanical properties similar to those of the superficial layer on cartilage. Much like the superficial layer of natural cartilage, the surface of this gel became hydrophobic on drying out. Thus, it is proposed that the superficial layer forms from hyaluronan and phospholipids, which associate by hydrophobic interactions between the alkyl chains of the phospholipids and the hydrophobic faces of the disaccharide units in hyaluronan. This layer is permeable to material from the SF and the cartilage, as shown by the presence of SF proteins and chondroitin sulphate. As the cartilage dries out after removal from the joint, the phospholipids migrate towards the surface of the superficial layer to reduce the surface tension. It is also proposed that the highly efficient lubrication in articular joints can, at least in part, be attributed to the ability of the superficial layer to adsorb and hold water on the cartilage surface, thus creating a highly viscous boundary protection.

  4. Hyperosmolarity protects chondrocytes from mechanical injury in human articular cartilage: an experimental report.

    PubMed

    Amin, A K; Huntley, J S; Patton, J T; Brenkel, I J; Simpson, A H R W; Hall, A C

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether exposure of human articular cartilage to hyperosmotic saline (0.9%, 600 mOsm) reduces in situ chondrocyte death following a standardised mechanical injury produced by a scalpel cut compared with the same assault and exposure to normal saline (0.9%, 285 mOsm). Human cartilage explants were exposed to normal (control) and hyperosmotic 0.9% saline solutions for five minutes before the mechanical injury to allow in situ chondrocytes to respond to the altered osmotic environment, and incubated for a further 2.5 hours in the same solutions following the mechanical injury. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy, we identified a sixfold (p = 0.04) decrease in chondrocyte death following mechanical injury in the superficial zone of human articular cartilage exposed to hyperosmotic saline compared with normal saline. These data suggest that increasing the osmolarity of joint irrigation solutions used during open and arthroscopic articular surgery may reduce chondrocyte death from surgical injury and could promote integrative cartilage repair.

  5. Mesenchymal stem cells as a potent cell source for articular cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Baghaban Eslaminejad, Mohamadreza; Malakooty Poor, Elham

    2014-07-26

    Since articular cartilage possesses only a weak capacity for repair, its regeneration potential is considered one of the most important challenges for orthopedic surgeons. The treatment options, such as marrow stimulation techniques, fail to induce a repair tissue with the same functional and mechanical properties of native hyaline cartilage. Osteochondral transplantation is considered an effective treatment option but is associated with some disadvantages, including donor-site morbidity, tissue supply limitation, unsuitable mechanical properties and thickness of the obtained tissue. Although autologous chondrocyte implantation results in reasonable repair, it requires a two-step surgical procedure. Moreover, chondrocytes expanded in culture gradually undergo dedifferentiation, so lose morphological features and specialized functions. In the search for alternative cells, scientists have found mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to be an appropriate cellular material for articular cartilage repair. These cells were originally isolated from bone marrow samples and further investigations have revealed the presence of the cells in many other tissues. Furthermore, chondrogenic differentiation is an inherent property of MSCs noticed at the time of the cell discovery. MSCs are known to exhibit homing potential to the damaged site at which they differentiate into the tissue cells or secrete a wide spectrum of bioactive factors with regenerative properties. Moreover, these cells possess a considerable immunomodulatory potential that make them the general donor for therapeutic applications. All of these topics will be discussed in this review.

  6. Current Concepts of Articular Cartilage Restoration Techniques in the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Camp, Christopher L.; Stuart, Michael J.; Krych, Aaron J.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Articular cartilage injuries are common in patients presenting to surgeons with primary complaints of knee pain or mechanical symptoms. Treatment options include comprehensive nonoperative management, palliative surgery, joint preservation operations, and arthroplasty. Evidence Acquisition: A MEDLINE search on articular cartilage restoration techniques of the knee was conducted to identify outcome studies published from 1993 to 2013. Special emphasis was given to Level 1 and 2 published studies. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Results: Current surgical options with documented outcomes in treating chondral injuries in the knee include the following: microfracture, osteochondral autograft transfer, osteochondral allograft transplant, and autologous chondrocyte transplantation. Generally, results are favorable regarding patient satisfaction and return to sport when proper treatment algorithms and surgical techniques are followed, with 52% to 96% of patients demonstrating good to excellent clinical outcomes and 66% to 91% returning to sport at preinjury levels. Conclusion: Clinical, functional, and radiographic outcomes may be improved in the majority of patients with articular cartilage restoration surgery; however, some patients may not fully return to their preinjury activity levels postoperatively. In active and athletic patient populations, biological techniques that restore the articular surface may be options that provide symptom relief and return patients to their prior levels of function. PMID:24790697

  7. Arthroscopic laser in intra-articular knee cartilage disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosir, Hany R.; Siebert, Werner E.

    1996-12-01

    Different assemblies have endeavored to develop arthroscopic laser surgery. Various lasers have been tried in the treatment of orthopaedic problems, and the most useful has turned out to be the Hol-YAG laser 2.1 nm which is a near- contact laser. By using the laser as a powerful tool, and cutting back on the power level, one is able to better achieve the desired treatment effect. Clinical studies to evaluating the role of the laser in different arthroscopic knee procedures, comparing to conventional techniques, showed that the overall outcome attains a momentous confidence level which is shifted to the side of the laser versus the conventional for all maneuvers, barring meniscectomy where there is not perceiving disparity between laser versus the conventional. Meniscectomy continues to be one of the most commonly performed orthopaedic procedures. Laser provides a single tool which can ablate and debride meniscal rims with efficiency and safety. Chondroplasty can also be accomplished with ease using defocused laser energy. Both lateral release and soft tissue cermilization benefit from the cutting effect of laser along with its hemostatic effect. Synovial reduction with a defocused laser is also easily accomplished. By one gadget, one can cut, ablate, smooth, coagulate, congeal and with authentic tissue depth control The future of laser arthroscopic surgery lies in its ability to weld or repair tissues. Our research study has shown that laser activated photoactive dyes can produce a molecular bonding of collagen fibers, and therefore a repair 'weld' can be achieved with both meniscal tissues and with articular cartilage lesions.

  8. Current clinical therapies for cartilage repair, their limitation and the role of stem cells.

    PubMed

    Dhinsa, Baljinder S; Adesida, Adetola B

    2012-03-01

    The management of osteochondral defects of articular cartilage, whether from trauma or degenerative disease, continues to be a significant challenge for Orthopaedic surgeons. Current treatment options such as abrasion arthroplasty procedures, osteochondral transplantation and autologous chondrocyte implantation fail to produce repair tissue exhibiting the same mechanical and functional properties of native articular cartilage. This results in repair tissue that inevitably fails as it is unable to deal with the mechanical demands of articular cartilage, and does not prevent further degeneration of the native cartilage. Mesenchymal stem cells have been proposed as a potential source of cells for cell-based cartilage repair due to their ability to self-renew and undergo multi-lineage differentiation. This proposed procedure has the advantage of not requiring harvesting of cells from the joint surface, and its associated donor site morbidity, as well as having multiple possible adult donor tissues such as bone marrow, adipose tissue and synovium. Mesenchymal stem cells have multi-lineage potential, but can be stimulated to undergo chondrogenesis in the appropriate culture medium. As the majority of work with mesenchymal stem cell-derived articular cartilage repair has been carried out in vitro and in animal studies, more work still has to be done before this technique can be used for clinical purposes. This includes realizing the ideal method of harvesting mesenchymal stem cells, the culture medium to stimulate proliferation and differentiation, appropriate choice of scaffold incorporating growth factors directly or with gene therapy and integration of repair tissue with native tissue.

  9. Effects of surgically induced instability on rat knee articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J M; Felten, D L; Peterson, R G; O'Connor, B L

    1982-01-01

    Degenerative lesions in the articular cartilage were present following transection of the anterior cruciate ligament in the rat. These lesions included surface disruptions, a reduction in matrix proteoglycans, and cellular changes and therefore were similar to lesions seen in dogs following transection of the anterior cruciate ligament as well as lesions seen in other mechanical derangement models. Lesions were more frequently encountered in animals that had been exercised on a treadmill. This suggests that the rat knee joint may be a useful small animal model in studying the effect of mechanical derangement on articular tissues. Images Figs. 1-2 Figs. 3-4 Figs. 5-6 PMID:7076535

  10. Direct Human Cartilage Repair Using Three-Dimensional Bioprinting Technology

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiaofeng; Breitenkamp, Kurt; Finn, M.G.; Lotz, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Current cartilage tissue engineering strategies cannot as yet fabricate new tissue that is indistinguishable from native cartilage with respect to zonal organization, extracellular matrix composition, and mechanical properties. Integration of implants with surrounding native tissues is crucial for long-term stability and enhanced functionality. In this study, we developed a bioprinting system with simultaneous photopolymerization capable for three-dimensional (3D) cartilage tissue engineering. Poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (PEGDMA) with human chondrocytes were printed to repair defects in osteochondral plugs (3D biopaper) in layer-by-layer assembly. Compressive modulus of printed PEGDMA was 395.73±80.40 kPa, which was close to the range of the properties of native human articular cartilage. Printed human chondrocytes maintained the initially deposited positions due to simultaneous photopolymerization of surrounded biomaterial scaffold, which is ideal in precise cell distribution for anatomic cartilage engineering. Viability of printed human chondrocytes increased 26% in simultaneous polymerization than polymerized after printing. Printed cartilage implant attached firmly with surrounding tissue and greater proteoglycan deposition was observed at the interface of implant and native cartilage in Safranin-O staining. This is consistent with the enhanced interface failure strength during the culture assessed by push-out testing. Printed cartilage in 3D biopaper had elevated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content comparing to that without biopaper when normalized to DNA. These observations were consistent with gene expression results. This study indicates the importance of direct cartilage repair and promising anatomic cartilage engineering using 3D bioprinting technology. PMID:22394017

  11. Quantitative proteomic profiling of human articular cartilage degradation in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lourido, Lucía; Calamia, Valentina; Mateos, Jesús; Fernández-Puente, Patricia; Fernández-Tajes, Juan; Blanco, Francisco J; Ruiz-Romero, Cristina

    2014-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common rheumatic pathology and is characterized primarily by articular cartilage degradation. Despite its high prevalence, there is no effective therapy to slow disease progression or regenerate the damaged tissue. Therefore, new diagnostic and monitoring tests for OA are urgently needed, which would also promote the development of alternative therapeutic strategies. In the present study, we have performed an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis of secretomes from healthy human articular cartilage explants, comparing their protein profile to those from unwounded (early disease) and wounded (advanced disease) zones of osteoarthritic tissue. This strategy allowed us to identify a panel of 76 proteins that are distinctively released by the diseased tissue. Clustering analysis allowed the classification of proteins according to their different profile of release from cartilage. Among these proteins, the altered release of osteoprotegerin (decreased in OA) and periostin (increased in OA), both involved in bone remodelling processes, was verified in further analyses. Moreover, periostin was also increased in the synovial fluid of OA patients. Altogether, the present work provides a novel insight into the mechanisms of human cartilage degradation and a number of new cartilage-characteristic proteins with possible biomarker value for early diagnosis and prognosis of OA.

  12. An In Vitro Model for the Pathological Degradation of Articular Cartilage in Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Grenier, Stephanie; Bhargava, Madhu M.; Torzilli, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an in vitro cartilage degradation model that emulates the damage seen in early-stage osteoarthritis. To this end, cartilage explants were collagenase-treated to induce enzymatic degradation of collagen fibers and proteoglycans at the articular surface. To assess changes in mechanical properties, intact and degraded cartilage explants were subjected to a series of confined compression creep tests. Changes in extracellular matrix structure and composition were determined using biochemical and histological approaches. Our results show that collagenase-induced degradation increased the amount of deformation experienced by the cartilage explants under compression. An increase in apparent permeability as well as a decrease in instantaneous and aggregate moduli were measured following collagenase treatment. Histological analysis of degraded explants revealed the presence of surface fibrillation, proteoglycan depletion in the superficial and intermediate zones and loss of the lamina splendens. Collagen cleavage was confirmed by the Col II–¾Cshort antibody. Degraded specimens experienced a significant decrease in proteoglycan content but maintained total collagen content. Repetitive testing of degraded samples resulted in the gradual collapse of the articular surface and the compaction of the superficial zone. Taken together, our data demonstrates that enzymatic degradation with collagenase can be used to emulate changes seen in early-stage osteoarthritis. Further, our in vitro model provides information on cartilage mechanics and insights on how matrix changes can affect cartilage’s functional properties. More importantly, our model can be applied to develop and test treatment options for tissue repair. PMID:24360770

  13. Tissue Neogenesis and STRO-1 Expression in Immature and Mature Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Otsuki, Shuhei; Grogan, Shawn P.; Miyaki, Shigeru; Kinoshita, Mitsuo; Asahara, Hiroshi; Lotz, Martin K.

    2010-01-01

    This study determined the potential for neo tissue formation and the role of STRO-1+ cells in immature versus mature articular cartilage. Cartilage explants from immature and mature bovine knee joints were cultured for up to 12 weeks and stained with Safranin O, for type II collagen and STRO-1. Bovine chondrocyte pellet cultures and murine knee joints at the age of 2 weeks and 3 months and surgically injured cartilage were analyzed for changes in STRO-1 expression patterns. Results show that immature explants contained more STRO-1+ cells than mature explants. After 8 weeks in culture, immature explants showed STRO-1+ cell proliferation and newly formed tissue, which contained glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen. Mature cartilage explants showed only minimal cell expansion and neo tissue formation. Pellet cultures with chondrocytes from immature cartilage showed increased glycosaminoglycan synthesis and STRO-1+ staining as compared to pellets from mature chondrocytes. The frequency of STRO-1+ cells in murine knee joints significantly declined with joint maturation. Following surgical injury, immature explants had higher potential for tissue repair than mature explants. In conclusion, these findings suggest that the high percentage of STRO-1+ cells in immature cartilage changes with joint maturation. STRO-1+ cells have the potential to form new cartilage spontaneously and after tissue injury. PMID:19603515

  14. Structural and metabolic changes in articular cartilage induced by iodoacetate.

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, J.; Hoedt-Schmidt, S.; Kalbhen, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    The chemically induced injury to articular cartilage, caused by two successive intra-articular injections of sodium iodoacetate, has been used in studies on the effects of anti-inflammatory and of potentially chondroprotective agents. It has been assumed that the injurious effects are caused by inhibition of the glycolytic pathway. In the present study this inhibition has been shown to be greater than expected from in vitro studies, and to influence equally other oxidative pathways. However, the response is clearly not a simple one in that some of the surface chondrocytes, and synovial lining cells in close proximity to the cartilage, show virtually no inhibition. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:1390193

  15. 3D braid scaffolds for regeneration of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hyunchul; Kim, Kyoung Ju; Park, Sook Young; Huh, Jeong Eun; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Yu, Woong-Ryeol

    2014-06-01

    Regenerating articular cartilage in vivo from cultured chondrocytes requires that the cells be cultured and implanted within a biocompatible, biodegradable scaffold. Such scaffolds must be mechanically stable; otherwise chondrocytes would not be supported and patients would experience severe pain. Here we report a new 3D braid scaffold that matches the anisotropic (gradient) mechanical properties of natural articular cartilage and is permissive to cell cultivation. To design an optimal structure, the scaffold unit cell was mathematically modeled and imported into finite element analysis. Based on this analysis, a 3D braid structure with gradient axial yarn distribution was designed and manufactured using a custom-built braiding machine. The mechanical properties of the 3D braid scaffold were evaluated and compared with simulated results, demonstrating that a multi-scale approach consisting of unit cell modeling and continuum analysis facilitates design of scaffolds that meet the requirements for mechanical compatibility with tissues. PMID:24556323

  16. Repair of articular osteochondral defects of the knee joint using a composite lamellar scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Y. M.; Yu, Q. S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The major problem with repair of an articular cartilage injury is the extensive difference in the structure and function of regenerated, compared with normal cartilage. Our work investigates the feasibility of repairing articular osteochondral defects in the canine knee joint using a composite lamellar scaffold of nano-ß-tricalcium phosphate (ß-TCP)/collagen (col) I and II with bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) and assesses its biological compatibility. Methods The bone–cartilage scaffold was prepared as a laminated composite, using hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nano-HAP)/collagen I/copolymer of polylactic acid–hydroxyacetic acid as the bony scaffold, and sodium hyaluronate/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) as the cartilaginous scaffold. Ten-to 12-month-old hybrid canines were randomly divided into an experimental group and a control group. BMSCs were obtained from the iliac crest of each animal, and only those of the third generation were used in experiments. An articular osteochondral defect was created in the right knee of dogs in both groups. Those in the experimental group were treated by implanting the composites consisting of the lamellar scaffold of ß-TCP/col I/col II/BMSCs. Those in the control group were left untreated. Results After 12 weeks of implantation, defects in the experimental group were filled with white semi-translucent tissue, protruding slightly over the peripheral cartilage surface. After 24 weeks, the defect space in the experimental group was filled with new cartilage tissues, finely integrated into surrounding normal cartilage. The lamellar scaffold of ß-TCP/col I/col II was gradually degraded and absorbed, while new cartilage tissue formed. In the control group, the defects were not repaired. Conclusion This method can be used as a suitable scaffold material for the tissue-engineered repair of articular cartilage defects. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:56–64 PMID:25837672

  17. Strategies for Controlled Delivery of Biologics for Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Johnny; Lu, Steven; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2014-01-01

    The delivery of biologics is an important component in the treatment of osteoarthritis and the functional restoration of articular cartilage. Numerous factors have been implicated in the cartilage repair process, but the uncontrolled delivery of these factors may not only reduce their full reparative potential and can also cause unwanted morphological effects. It is therefore imperative to consider the type of biologic to be delivered, the method of delivery, and the temporal as well as spatial presentation of the biologic to achieve the desired effect in cartilage repair. Additionally, the delivery of a single factor may not be sufficient in guiding neo-tissue formation, motivating recent research towards the delivery of multiple factors. This review will discuss the roles of various biologics involved in cartilage repair and the different methods of delivery for appropriate healing responses. A number of spatiotemporal strategies will then be emphasized for the controlled delivery of single and multiple bioactive factors in both in vitro and in vivo cartilage tissue engineering applications. PMID:24993610

  18. Cellular and Acellular Approaches for Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There are several choices of cells to use for cartilage repair. Cells are used as internal or external sources and sometimes in combination. In this article, an analysis of the different cell choices and their use and potential is provided. Embryonic cartilage formation is of importance when finding more about how to be able to perfect cartilage repair. Some suggestions for near future research based on up-to-date knowledge on chondrogenic cells are given to hopefully stimulate more studies on the final goal of cartilage regeneration. PMID:27340516

  19. Biochemical effects of estrogen on articular cartilage in ovariectomized sheep.

    PubMed

    Turner, A S; Athanasiou, K A; Zhu, C F; Alvis, M R; Bryant, H U

    1997-01-01

    Cartilage is a sex-hormone-sensitive tissue but the role of estrogen in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA) remains controversial. In this study, intrinsic material properties and thickness of articular cartilage of the knee joint of ovariectomized (OVX) and estrogen-treated sheep were measured. Skeletally mature ewes (N = 36, same breed, same housing 4-5 years old) were divided into; sham treated (n = 9), OVX (N = 13), OVX plus one estradiol implant (OVXE; N = 10) and OVX plus two estradiol implants (OVX2E; N = 4). Twelve months following sham procedure or OVX, sheep were euthanized and articular cartilage from a total of 216 points in the left femorotibial (knee) joints was tested for aggregate modulus, Poisson's ratio, permeability, thickness and shear modulus (six sites per sheep). When all of the sites in each knee were grouped together, OVX had a significant effect on articular cartilage. The sham cartilage of all sites grouped together had a larger aggregate modulus (P = 0.001) and a larger shear modulus (P = 0.054) than the OVX tissue. No statistically significant differences were seen for permeability and thickness between OVX, sham, OVXE and OVX2E. Differences existed in biomechanical properties at the different sites that were tested. Overall, no one location tended to be lowest or highest for all variables. This biomechanical study suggests that OVX may have a detrimental effect on the intrinsic material properties of the articular cartilage of the knee, even though the cartilage of the OVX animals appeared normal. Treatment with estradiol implants ameliorated these deleterious effects and may have helped maintain the tissue's structural integrity. Our study supports epidemiological studies of OA in women after menopause. The protective effect of estrogen and it's therapeutic effect remain to be further defined. This model may allow the relationship of estrogen and estrogen antagonists to be studied in greater detail, and may be valuable for the

  20. Composite three-dimensional woven scaffolds with interpenetrating network hydrogels to create functional synthetic articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Liao, I-Chien; Moutos, Franklin T; Estes, Bradley T; Zhao, Xuanhe; Guilak, Farshid

    2013-12-17

    The development of synthetic biomaterials that possess mechanical properties that mimic those of native tissues remains an important challenge to the field of materials. In particular, articular cartilage is a complex nonlinear, viscoelastic, and anisotropic material that exhibits a very low coefficient of friction, allowing it to withstand millions of cycles of joint loading over decades of wear. Here we show that a three-dimensionally woven fiber scaffold that is infiltrated with an interpenetrating network hydrogel can provide a functional biomaterial that provides the load-bearing and tribological properties of native cartilage. An interpenetrating dual-network "tough-gel" consisting of alginate and polyacrylamide was infused into a porous three-dimensionally woven poly(ε-caprolactone) fiber scaffold, providing a versatile fiber-reinforced composite structure as a potential acellular or cell-based replacement for cartilage repair. PMID:24578679

  1. Composite three-dimensional woven scaffolds with interpenetrating network hydrogels to create functional synthetic articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Liao, I-Chien; Moutos, Franklin T; Estes, Bradley T; Zhao, Xuanhe; Guilak, Farshid

    2013-12-17

    The development of synthetic biomaterials that possess mechanical properties that mimic those of native tissues remains an important challenge to the field of materials. In particular, articular cartilage is a complex nonlinear, viscoelastic, and anisotropic material that exhibits a very low coefficient of friction, allowing it to withstand millions of cycles of joint loading over decades of wear. Here we show that a three-dimensionally woven fiber scaffold that is infiltrated with an interpenetrating network hydrogel can provide a functional biomaterial that provides the load-bearing and tribological properties of native cartilage. An interpenetrating dual-network "tough-gel" consisting of alginate and polyacrylamide was infused into a porous three-dimensionally woven poly(ε-caprolactone) fiber scaffold, providing a versatile fiber-reinforced composite structure as a potential acellular or cell-based replacement for cartilage repair.

  2. The collagen fibril organization in human articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Minns, R J; Steven, F S

    1977-01-01

    In this scanning electron microscopic study blocks of collagen fibrils were prepared from human articular cartilage, using two techinques which selectively removed either the proteoglycans alone, or both the proteoglycans and the collagen fibrils, of the non-calcified cartilage layer. Amino acid analysis of the fibrils confirmed the purity of the collagen after proteoglycan extraction. The cartilage was scanned in four different ways: (1) normal to the articular surface, (2) in superficial sections, (3) on surfaces of blocks which had been broken in planes parallel to artificial splits make by the insertion of a pin, and (4) on fracture surfaces which traversed the calcified cartilage and the subchondral bone. Five features of the organization of the collagen fibrils were specially noted: (1) Individual fibrils within the trabeculae joined to form small fibre bundles which became grouped into larger bundles at the calcified/uncalcified interface. (2) Fibrils in the deep and middle zones which, exhibiting the characteristic surface periodicity of collagen, were generally oriented towars the articular surface in large bundles approximately 55 micronm across. (3) In the superficial zone, fibrils ran parallel to the surface. (4) The surface fibrils had random orientation, even at the bases of empty lacunae vacated by chondrocytes during specimen preparation. (5) The collagen fibrils of the lacunar walls appeared to be thinner and more closely packed than thos between the lacunae. The fine collagen fibrils associated with the lacunar walls were frequently observed to pass through a large lacunar space, resulting in the formation of two or more compartments, each of which was presumably filled with a chondrocyte in the living cartilage. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 PMID:870478

  3. In vivo articular cartilage deformation: noninvasive quantification of intratissue strain during joint contact in the human knee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Deva D.; Cai, Luyao; Butz, Kent D.; Trippel, Stephen B.; Nauman, Eric A.; Neu, Corey P.

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo measurement of articular cartilage deformation is essential to understand how mechanical forces distribute throughout the healthy tissue and change over time in the pathologic joint. Displacements or strain may serve as a functional imaging biomarker for healthy, diseased, and repaired tissues, but unfortunately intratissue cartilage deformation in vivo is largely unknown. Here, we directly quantified for the first time deformation patterns through the thickness of tibiofemoral articular cartilage in healthy human volunteers. Magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions were synchronized with physiologically relevant compressive loading and used to visualize and measure regional displacement and strain of tibiofemoral articular cartilage in a sagittal plane. We found that compression (of 1/2 body weight) applied at the foot produced a sliding, rigid-body displacement at the tibiofemoral cartilage interface, that loading generated subject- and gender-specific and regionally complex patterns of intratissue strains, and that dominant cartilage strains (approaching 12%) were in shear. Maximum principle and shear strain measures in the tibia were correlated with body mass index. Our MRI-based approach may accelerate the development of regenerative therapies for diseased or damaged cartilage, which is currently limited by the lack of reliable in vivo methods for noninvasive assessment of functional changes following treatment.

  4. In vivo articular cartilage deformation: noninvasive quantification of intratissue strain during joint contact in the human knee

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Deva D.; Cai, Luyao; Butz, Kent D.; Trippel, Stephen B.; Nauman, Eric A.; Neu, Corey P.

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo measurement of articular cartilage deformation is essential to understand how mechanical forces distribute throughout the healthy tissue and change over time in the pathologic joint. Displacements or strain may serve as a functional imaging biomarker for healthy, diseased, and repaired tissues, but unfortunately intratissue cartilage deformation in vivo is largely unknown. Here, we directly quantified for the first time deformation patterns through the thickness of tibiofemoral articular cartilage in healthy human volunteers. Magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions were synchronized with physiologically relevant compressive loading and used to visualize and measure regional displacement and strain of tibiofemoral articular cartilage in a sagittal plane. We found that compression (of 1/2 body weight) applied at the foot produced a sliding, rigid-body displacement at the tibiofemoral cartilage interface, that loading generated subject- and gender-specific and regionally complex patterns of intratissue strains, and that dominant cartilage strains (approaching 12%) were in shear. Maximum principle and shear strain measures in the tibia were correlated with body mass index. Our MRI-based approach may accelerate the development of regenerative therapies for diseased or damaged cartilage, which is currently limited by the lack of reliable in vivo methods for noninvasive assessment of functional changes following treatment. PMID:26752228

  5. Regulatory Challenges for Cartilage Repair Technologies.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Kevin B; Stiegman, Glenn

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, few Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved options exist for the treatment of focal cartilage and osteochondral lesions. Developers of products for cartilage repair face many challenges to obtain marketing approval from the FDA. The objective of this review is to discuss the necessary steps for FDA application and approval for a new cartilage repair product. FDA Guidance Documents, FDA Panel Meetings, scientific organization recommendations, and clinicaltrials.gov were reviewed to demonstrate the current thinking of FDA and the scientific community on the regulatory process for cartilage repair therapies. Cartilage repair therapies can receive market approval from FDA as medical devices, drugs, or biologics, and the specific classification of product can affect the nonclinical, clinical, and regulatory strategy to bring the product to market. Recent FDA guidance gives an outline of the required elements to bring a cartilage repair product to market, although these standards are often very general. As a result, companies have to carefully craft their study patient population, comparator group, and clinical endpoint to best showcase their product's attributes. In addition, regulatory strategy and manufacturing process validation need to be considered early in the clinical study process to allow for timely product approval following the completion of clinical study. Although the path to regulatory approval for a cartilage repair therapy is challenging and time-consuming, proper clinical trial planning and attention to the details can eventually save companies time and money by bringing a product to the market in the most expeditious process possible.

  6. Multiscale Mechanics of Articular Cartilage: Potentials and Challenges of Coupling Musculoskeletal, Joint, and Microscale Computational Models

    PubMed Central

    Halloran, J. P.; Sibole, S.; van Donkelaar, C. C.; van Turnhout, M. C.; Oomens, C. W. J.; Weiss, J. A.; Guilak, F.; Erdemir, A.

    2012-01-01

    Articular cartilage experiences significant mechanical loads during daily activities. Healthy cartilage provides the capacity for load bearing and regulates the mechanobiological processes for tissue development, maintenance, and repair. Experimental studies at multiple scales have provided a fundamental understanding of macroscopic mechanical function, evaluation of the micromechanical environment of chondrocytes, and the foundations for mechanobiological response. In addition, computational models of cartilage have offered a concise description of experimental data at many spatial levels under healthy and diseased conditions, and have served to generate hypotheses for the mechanical and biological function. Further, modeling and simulation provides a platform for predictive risk assessment, management of dysfunction, as well as a means to relate multiple spatial scales. Simulation-based investigation of cartilage comes with many challenges including both the computational burden and often insufficient availability of data for model development and validation. This review outlines recent modeling and simulation approaches to understand cartilage function from a mechanical systems perspective, and illustrates pathways to associate mechanics with biological function. Computational representations at single scales are provided from the body down to the microstructure, along with attempts to explore multiscale mechanisms of load sharing that dictate the mechanical environment of the cartilage and chondrocytes. PMID:22648577

  7. Importance of reference gene selection for articular cartilage mechanobiology studies

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sabah, A.; Stadnik, P.; Gilbert, S.J.; Duance, V.C.; Blain, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective Identification of genes differentially expressed in mechano-biological pathways in articular cartilage provides insight into the molecular mechanisms behind initiation and/or progression of osteoarthritis (OA). Quantitative PCR (qPCR) is commonly used to measure gene expression, and is reliant on the use of reference genes for normalisation. Appropriate validation of reference gene stability is imperative for accurate data analysis and interpretation. This study determined in vitro reference gene stability in articular cartilage explants and primary chondrocytes subjected to different compressive loads and tensile strain, respectively. Design The expression of eight commonly used reference genes (18s, ACTB, GAPDH, HPRT1, PPIA, RPL4, SDHA and YWHAZ) was determined by qPCR and data compared using four software packages (comparative delta-Ct method, geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper). Calculation of geometric means of the ranked weightings was carried out using RefFinder. Results Appropriate reference gene(s) for normalisation of mechanically-regulated transcript levels in articular cartilage tissue or isolated chondrocytes were dependent on experimental set-up. SDHA, YWHAZ and RPL4 were the most stable genes whilst glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and to a lesser extent Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT), showed variable expression in response to load, demonstrating their unsuitability in such in vitro studies. The effect of using unstable reference genes to normalise the expression of aggrecan (ACAN) and matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3) resulted in inaccurate quantification of these mechano-sensitive genes and erroneous interpretation/conclusions. Conclusion This study demonstrates that commonly used ‘reference genes’ may be unsuitable for in vitro cartilage chondrocyte mechanobiology studies, reinforcing the principle that careful validation of reference genes is essential prior to each experiment to

  8. Articular Cartilage Deformation Determined in an Intact Tibiofemoral Joint by Displacement-Encoded Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Deva D.; Neu, Corey P.; Hull, Maury L.

    2009-01-01

    This study demonstrates the in vitro displacement and strain of articular cartilage in a cyclically-compressed and intact joint using displacement-encoded imaging with stimulated echoes (DENSE) and fast spin echo (FSE). Deformation and strain fields exhibited complex and heterogeneous patterns. The displacements in the loading direction ranged from −1688 to −1481 μm in the tibial cartilage and from −1601 to −764 μm in the femoral cartilage. Corresponding strains ranged from −9.8% to 0.7% and from −4.3% to 0.0%. The displacement and strain precision were determined to be 65 μm and less than 0.2%, respectively. Displacement-encoded magnetic resonance imaging is capable of determining the nonuniform displacements and strains in the articular cartilage of an intact joint to a high precision. Knowledge of these nonuniform strains is critical for the in situ characterization of normal and diseased tissue, as well as the comprehensive evaluation of repair constructs designed using regenerative medicine. PMID:19189290

  9. Ultrasound evaluation of site-specific effect of simulated microgravity on articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Zheng, Yong-Ping; Wang, Xiao-Yun; Huang, Yan-Ping; Liu, Mu-Qing; Wang, Shu-Zhe; Zhang, Zong-Kang; Guo, Xia

    2010-07-01

    Space flight induces acute changes in normal physiology in response to the microgravity environment. Articular cartilage is subjected to high loads under a ground reaction force on Earth. The objectives of this study were to investigate the site dependence of morphological and ultrasonic parameters of articular cartilage and to examine the site-specific responses of articular cartilage to simulated microgravity using ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM). Six rats underwent tail suspension (simulated microgravity) for four weeks and six other rats were kept under normal Earth gravity as controls. Cartilage thickness, ultrasound roughness index (URI), integrated reflection coefficient (IRC) and integrated backscatter coefficient (IBC) of cartilage tissues, as well as histological degeneration were measured at the femoral head (FH), medial femoral condyle (MFC), lateral femoral condyle (LFC), patello-femoral groove (PFG) and patella (PAT). The results showed site dependence not significant in all UBM parameters except cartilage thickness (p < 0.01) in the control specimens. Only minor changes in articular cartilage were induced by 4-week tail suspension, although there were significant decreases in cartilage thickness at the MFC and PAT (p < 0.05) and a significant increase in URI at the PAT (p < 0.01). This study suggested that the 4-week simulated microgravity had only mild effects on femoral articular cartilage in the rat model. This information is useful for human spaceflight and clinical medicine in improving understanding of the effect of microgravity on articular cartilage. However, the effects of longer duration microgravity experience on articular cartilage need further investigation. PMID:20620696

  10. Zn deposition at the bone cartilage interface in equine articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, D. A.; Moger, C. J.; Winlove, C. P.

    2007-09-01

    In articular cartilage metalloproteinases, a family of enzymes whose function relies on the presence of divalent cations such as Zn and Ca plays a central role in the normal processes of growth and remodelling and in the degenerative and inflammatory processes of arthritis. Another important enzyme, alkaline phosphatase, involved in cartilage mineralisation also relies on metallic cofactors. The local concentration of divalent cations is therefore of considerable interest in cartilage pathophysiology and several authors have used synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (XRF) to map metal ion distributions in bone and cartilage. We report use of a bench-top XRF analytical microscope, providing spatial resolution of 10 μm and applicable to histological sections, facilitating correlation of the distribution with structural features. The study seeks to establish the elemental distribution in normal tissue as a precursor to investigation of changes in disease. For six samples prepared from equine metacarpophalangeal joint, we observed increased concentration of Zn and Sr ions around the tidemark between normal and mineralised cartilage. This is believed to be an active site of remodelling but its composition has hitherto lacked detailed characterization. We also report preliminary results on two of the samples using Proton-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). This confirms our previous observations using synchrotron-based XRF of enhanced deposition of Sr and Zn at the surface of the subchondral bone and in articular cartilage.

  11. A reappraisal of the structure of normal canine articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, J; Shackleton, D R; Billingham, M E; Bitensky, L; Chayen, J; Muir, I H

    1988-01-01

    It has been shown that some of the controversy over the structure of articular cartilage may be due to slight differences in the orientation of the sample that has been studied. As our decisive criterion we have used the simple physical fact that elongate proteins, such as collagen micelles, that can exhibit form-birefringence, had to show virtually straight extinction when viewed under crossed polars. The use of a variably adjustable microtome chuck facilitated small adjustments in the orientation of the cartilage to meet this criterion. Under these conditions, the collagen of the matrix has been shown to be aligned mainly perpendicularly to the surface which was bounded by a thin lamina in which the collagen showed birefringence at 90 degrees to that of the matrix. The conventionally described zonation of articular cartilage has been shown to be inadequate for that of the dog tibial plateau. The conventional Zone 2 has been shown to consist of two zones, Zones 2a and 2b, with different cell sizes, cell concentrations, and concentration of matrix components. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:3198487

  12. Quantitative assessment of optical properties in healthy cartilage and repair tissue by optical coherence tomography and histology (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Sanne M. A.; Cernohorsky, Paul; de Bruin, Daniel M.; van der Pol, Edwin; Savci-Heijink, Cemile D.; Strackee, Simon D.; Faber, Dirk J.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2016-02-01

    Quantification of the OCT signal is an important step toward clinical implementation of a diagnostic tool in cartilage imaging. Discrimination of structural cartilage differences in patients with osteoarthritis is critical, yet challenging. This study assesses the variation in the optical attenuation coefficient (μOCT) between healthy cartilage, repair tissue, bone and layers within repair tissue in a controlled setting. OCT and histology was used to assess goat talus articular surfaces in which central osteochondral defects were created. Exact matches of OCT and histology were selected for research. μOCT measurements were taken from healthy cartilage, repair tissue and bone. Measured μOCT in healthy cartilage was higher compared to both repair tissue and bone tissue. Two possible mechanisms for the difference in attenuation were investigated. We studied morphological parameters in terms of nucleus count, nucleus size and inter-nucleus distance. Collagen content in healthy cartilage and repair tissue was assessed using polarization microscopy. Quantitative analysis of the nuclei did not demonstrate a difference in nucleus size and count between healthy cartilage and repair tissue. In healthy cartilage, cells were spaced farther apart and had a lower variation in local nuclear density compared to repair tissue. Polarization microscopy suggested higher collagen content in healthy cartilage compared to repair tissue. μOCT measurements can distinguish between healthy cartilage, repair tissue and bone. Results suggest that cartilage OCT attenuation measurements could be of great impact in clinical diagnostics of osteoarthritis.

  13. Expression of novel extracellular sulfatases Sulf-1 and Sulf-2 in normal and osteoarthritic articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Otsuki, Shuhei; Taniguchi, Noboru; Grogan, Shawn P; D'Lima, Darryl; Kinoshita, Mitsuo; Lotz, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Changes in sulfation of cartilage glycosaminoglycans as mediated by sulfatases can regulate growth factor signaling. The aim of this study was to analyze expression patterns of recently identified extracellular sulfatases Sulf-1 and Sulf-2 in articular cartilage and chondrocytes. Methods Sulf-1 and Sulf-2 expressions in human articular cartilage from normal donors and patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and in normal and aged mouse joints were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting. Results In normal articular cartilage, Sulf-1 and Sulf-2 mRNAs and proteins were expressed predominantly in the superficial zone. OA cartilage showed significantly higher Sulf-1 and Sulf-2 mRNA expression as compared with normal human articular cartilage. Sulf protein expression in OA cartilage was prominent in the cell clusters. Western blotting revealed a profound increase in Sulf protein levels in human OA cartilage. In normal mouse joints, Sulf expression was similar to human cartilage, and with increasing age, there was a marked upregulation of Sulf. Conclusion The results show low levels of Sulf expression, restricted to the superficial zone in normal articular cartilage. Sulf mRNA and protein levels are increased in aging and OA cartilage. This increased Sulf expression may change the sulfation patterns of heparan sulfate proteoglycans and growth factor activities and thus contribute to abnormal chondrocyte activation and cartilage degradation in OA. PMID:18507859

  14. Nanofibrous poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate) scaffolds provide a functional microenvironment for cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Ching, Kuan Y; Andriotis, Orestis G; Li, Siwei; Basnett, Pooja; Su, Bo; Roy, Ipsita; Tare, Rahul S; Sengers, Bram G; Stolz, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Articular cartilage defects, when repaired ineffectively, often lead to further deterioration of the tissue, secondary osteoarthritis and, ultimately, joint replacement. Unfortunately, current surgical procedures are unable to restore normal cartilage function. Tissue engineering of cartilage provides promising strategies for the regeneration of damaged articular cartilage. As yet, there are still significant challenges that need to be overcome to match the long-term mechanical stability and durability of native cartilage. Using electrospinning of different blends of biodegradable poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate), we produced polymer scaffolds and optimised their structure, stiffness, degradation rates and biocompatibility. Scaffolds with a poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate) ratio of 1:0.25 exhibit randomly oriented fibres that closely mimic the collagen fibrillar meshwork of native cartilage and match the stiffness of native articular cartilage. Degradation of the scaffolds into products that could be easily removed from the body was indicated by changes in fibre structure, loss of molecular weight and a decrease in scaffold stiffness after one and four months. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis after three weeks of culture with human articular chondrocytes revealed a hyaline-like cartilage matrix. The ability to fine tune the ultrastructure and mechanical properties using different blends of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate) allows to produce a cartilage repair kit for clinical use to reduce the risk of developing secondary osteoarthritis. We further suggest the development of a toolbox with tailor-made scaffolds for the repair of other tissues that require a 'guiding' structure to support the body's self-healing process.

  15. Nanofibrous poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate) scaffolds provide a functional microenvironment for cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Ching, Kuan Y; Andriotis, Orestis G; Li, Siwei; Basnett, Pooja; Su, Bo; Roy, Ipsita; Tare, Rahul S; Sengers, Bram G; Stolz, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Articular cartilage defects, when repaired ineffectively, often lead to further deterioration of the tissue, secondary osteoarthritis and, ultimately, joint replacement. Unfortunately, current surgical procedures are unable to restore normal cartilage function. Tissue engineering of cartilage provides promising strategies for the regeneration of damaged articular cartilage. As yet, there are still significant challenges that need to be overcome to match the long-term mechanical stability and durability of native cartilage. Using electrospinning of different blends of biodegradable poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate), we produced polymer scaffolds and optimised their structure, stiffness, degradation rates and biocompatibility. Scaffolds with a poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate) ratio of 1:0.25 exhibit randomly oriented fibres that closely mimic the collagen fibrillar meshwork of native cartilage and match the stiffness of native articular cartilage. Degradation of the scaffolds into products that could be easily removed from the body was indicated by changes in fibre structure, loss of molecular weight and a decrease in scaffold stiffness after one and four months. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis after three weeks of culture with human articular chondrocytes revealed a hyaline-like cartilage matrix. The ability to fine tune the ultrastructure and mechanical properties using different blends of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate) allows to produce a cartilage repair kit for clinical use to reduce the risk of developing secondary osteoarthritis. We further suggest the development of a toolbox with tailor-made scaffolds for the repair of other tissues that require a 'guiding' structure to support the body's self-healing process. PMID:27013217

  16. Black Colouration of the Knee Articular Cartilage after Spontaneously Recurrent Haemarthrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ishimaru, Daichi; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Mild discolouration of the articular cartilage is known to gradually occur during aging. However, pathological tissue pigmentation is occasionally induced under several specific conditions. In the present case, we performed total knee replacement in a patient with recurrent haemarthrosis. However, during the operation, we observed severe black colouration of the knee articular cartilage, due to the deposition of hemosiderin and lipofuscin. To our knowledge, this is the first report of severe cartilage pigmentation, due to hemosiderin and lipofuscin deposition in articular cartilage. PMID:27293933

  17. Preliminary investigation of intrinsic UV fluorescence spectroscopic changes associated with proteolytic digestion of bovine articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, William; Padilla-Martinez, Juan-Pablo; Ortega-Martinez, Antonio; Franco, Walfre

    2016-03-01

    Degradation and destruction of articular cartilage is the etiology of osteoarthritis (OA), an entity second only to cardiovascular disease as a cause of disability in the United States. Joint mechanics and cartilage biochemistry are believed to play a role in OA; an optical tool to detect structural and chemical changes in articular cartilage might offer benefit for its early detection and treatment. The objective of the present study was to identify the spectral changes in intrinsic ultraviolet (UV) fluorescence of cartilage that occur after proteolytic digestion of cartilage. Bovine articular cartilage samples were incubated in varying concentrations of collagenase ranging from 10ug/mL up to 5mg/mL for 18 hours at 37°C, a model of OA. Pre- and post-incubation measurements were taken of the UV excitation-emission spectrum of each cartilage sample. Mechanical tests were performed to determine the pre- and post-digestion force/displacement ratio associated with indentation of each sample. Spectral changes in intrinsic cartilage fluorescence and stiffness of the cartilage were associated with proteolytic digestion. In particular, changes in the relative intensity of fluorescence peaks associated with pentosidine crosslinks (330 nm excitation, 390 nm emission) and tryptophan (290 nm excitation, 340 nm emission) were found to correlate with different degrees of cartilage digestion and cartilage stiffness. In principle, it may be possible to use UV fluorescence spectral data for early detection of damage to articular cartilage, and as a surrogate measure for cartilage stiffness.

  18. A nonlinear biphasic viscohyperelastic model for articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    García, José Jaime; Cortés, Daniel Humberto

    2006-01-01

    Experiments on articular cartilage have shown nonlinear stress-strain curves under finite deformations as well as intrinsic viscous effects of the solid phase. The aim of this study was to propose a nonlinear biphasic viscohyperelastic model that combines the intrinsic viscous effects of the proteoglycan matrix with a nonlinear hyperelastic constitutive equation. The proposed equation satisfies objectivity and reduces for uniaxial loading to a solid type viscous model in which the actions of the springs are represented by the hyperelastic function proposed by Holmes and Mow [1990. J. Biomechanics 23, 1145-1156.]. Results of the model, that were efficiently implemented in an updated Lagrangian algorithm, were compared with experimental infinitesimal data reported by DiSilverstro and Suh [2001. J. Biomechanics 34, 519-525.] and showed acceptable fitting for the axial force (R(2)=0.991) and lateral displacement (R(2)=0.914) curves in unconfined compression as well as a good fitting of the axial indentation force curve (R(2)=0.982). In addition, the model showed an excellent fitting of finite-deformation confined compression stress relaxation data reported by Ateshian et al. [1997. J. Biomechanics 30, 1157-1164.] and Huang et al. [2005. J. Biomechanics 38, 799-809.] (R(2)=0.993 and R(2)=0.995, respectively). The constitutive equation may be used to represent the mechanical behavior of the proteoglycan matrix in a fiber reinforced model of articular cartilage.

  19. A nonlinear biphasic viscohyperelastic model for articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    García, José Jaime; Cortés, Daniel Humberto

    2006-01-01

    Experiments on articular cartilage have shown nonlinear stress-strain curves under finite deformations as well as intrinsic viscous effects of the solid phase. The aim of this study was to propose a nonlinear biphasic viscohyperelastic model that combines the intrinsic viscous effects of the proteoglycan matrix with a nonlinear hyperelastic constitutive equation. The proposed equation satisfies objectivity and reduces for uniaxial loading to a solid type viscous model in which the actions of the springs are represented by the hyperelastic function proposed by Holmes and Mow [1990. J. Biomechanics 23, 1145-1156.]. Results of the model, that were efficiently implemented in an updated Lagrangian algorithm, were compared with experimental infinitesimal data reported by DiSilverstro and Suh [2001. J. Biomechanics 34, 519-525.] and showed acceptable fitting for the axial force (R(2)=0.991) and lateral displacement (R(2)=0.914) curves in unconfined compression as well as a good fitting of the axial indentation force curve (R(2)=0.982). In addition, the model showed an excellent fitting of finite-deformation confined compression stress relaxation data reported by Ateshian et al. [1997. J. Biomechanics 30, 1157-1164.] and Huang et al. [2005. J. Biomechanics 38, 799-809.] (R(2)=0.993 and R(2)=0.995, respectively). The constitutive equation may be used to represent the mechanical behavior of the proteoglycan matrix in a fiber reinforced model of articular cartilage. PMID:16316659

  20. Delivering Agents Locally into Articular Cartilage by Intense MHz Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Nieminen, Heikki J.; Ylitalo, Tuomo; Suuronen, Jussi-Petteri; Rahunen, Krista; Salmi, Ari; Saarakkala, Simo; Serimaa, Ritva; Hæggström, Edward

    2015-01-01

    There is no cure for osteoarthritis. Current drug delivery relies on systemic delivery or injections into the joint. Because articular cartilage (AC) degeneration can be local and drug exposure outside the lesion can cause adverse effects, localized drug delivery could permit new drug treatment strategies. We investigated whether intense megahertz ultrasound (frequency: 1.138 MHz, peak positive pressure: 2.7 MPa, Ispta: 5 W/cm2, beam width: 5.7 mm at −6 dB, duty cycle: 5%, pulse repetition frequency: 285 Hz, mechanical index: 1.1) can deliver agents into AC without damaging it. Using ultrasound, we delivered a drug surrogate down to a depth corresponding to 53% depth of the AC thickness without causing histologically detectable damage to the AC. This may be important because early osteoarthritis typically exhibits histopathologic changes in the superficial AC. In conclusion, we identify intense megahertz ultrasound as a technique that potentially enables localized non-destructive delivery of osteoarthritis drugs or drug carriers into articular cartilage. PMID:25922135

  1. Non-linear model for compression tests on articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Alfio; Guaily, Amr; Giverso, Chiara; Federico, Salvatore

    2015-07-01

    Hydrated soft tissues, such as articular cartilage, are often modeled as biphasic systems with individually incompressible solid and fluid phases, and biphasic models are employed to fit experimental data in order to determine the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the tissues. Two of the most common experimental setups are confined and unconfined compression. Analytical solutions exist for the unconfined case with the linear, isotropic, homogeneous model of articular cartilage, and for the confined case with the non-linear, isotropic, homogeneous model. The aim of this contribution is to provide an easily implementable numerical tool to determine a solution to the governing differential equations of (homogeneous and isotropic) unconfined and (inhomogeneous and isotropic) confined compression under large deformations. The large-deformation governing equations are reduced to equivalent diffusive equations, which are then solved by means of finite difference (FD) methods. The solution strategy proposed here could be used to generate benchmark tests for validating complex user-defined material models within finite element (FE) implementations, and for determining the tissue's mechanical and hydraulic properties from experimental data.

  2. Collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold incorporated with PLGA microsphere for cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianhua; Yang, Qiu; Cheng, Niangmei; Tao, Xiaojun; Zhang, Zhihua; Sun, Xiaomin; Zhang, Qiqing

    2016-04-01

    For cartilage repair, ideal scaffolds should mimic natural extracellular matrix (ECM) exhibiting excellent characteristics, such as biocompatibility, suitable porosity, and good cell affinity. This study aimed to prepare a collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold incorporated with poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microsphere that can be applied in repairing cartilage. To obtain optimum conditions for manufacturing a composite scaffold, a scaffold composed of different collagen-to-silk fibroin ratios was evaluated by determining porosity, water absorption, loss rate in hot water, and cell proliferation. Results suggested that the optimal ratio of collagen and silk fibroin composite scaffold was 7:3. The microstructure and morphological characteristics of the obtained scaffold were also examined through scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results of in vitro fluorescence staining of bone marrow stromal cells revealed that collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold enhanced cell proliferation without eliciting side effects. The prepared composite scaffold incorporated with PLGA microsphere was implanted in fully thick articular cartilage defects in rabbits. Collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold with PLGA microspheres could enhance articular cartilage regeneration and integration between the repaired cartilage and the surrounding cartilage. Therefore, this composite will be a promising material for cartilage repair and regeneration.

  3. Collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold incorporated with PLGA microsphere for cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianhua; Yang, Qiu; Cheng, Niangmei; Tao, Xiaojun; Zhang, Zhihua; Sun, Xiaomin; Zhang, Qiqing

    2016-04-01

    For cartilage repair, ideal scaffolds should mimic natural extracellular matrix (ECM) exhibiting excellent characteristics, such as biocompatibility, suitable porosity, and good cell affinity. This study aimed to prepare a collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold incorporated with poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microsphere that can be applied in repairing cartilage. To obtain optimum conditions for manufacturing a composite scaffold, a scaffold composed of different collagen-to-silk fibroin ratios was evaluated by determining porosity, water absorption, loss rate in hot water, and cell proliferation. Results suggested that the optimal ratio of collagen and silk fibroin composite scaffold was 7:3. The microstructure and morphological characteristics of the obtained scaffold were also examined through scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results of in vitro fluorescence staining of bone marrow stromal cells revealed that collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold enhanced cell proliferation without eliciting side effects. The prepared composite scaffold incorporated with PLGA microsphere was implanted in fully thick articular cartilage defects in rabbits. Collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold with PLGA microspheres could enhance articular cartilage regeneration and integration between the repaired cartilage and the surrounding cartilage. Therefore, this composite will be a promising material for cartilage repair and regeneration. PMID:26838900

  4. Temporal assessment of ribose treatment on self-assembled articular cartilage constructs

    PubMed Central

    Eleswarapu, Sriram V.; Chen, Justin A.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage cannot repair itself in response to degradation from injury or osteoarthritis. As such, there is a substantial clinical need for replacements of damaged cartilage. Tissue engineering aims to fulfill this need by developing replacement tissues in vitro. A major goal of cartilage tissue engineering is to produce tissues with robust biochemical and biomechanical properties. One technique that has been proposed to improve these properties in engineered tissue is the use of non-enzymatic glycation to induce collagen crosslinking, an attractive solution that may avoid the risks of cytotoxicity posed by conventional crosslinking agents such as glutaraldehyde. The objectives of this study were 1) to determine whether continuous application of ribose would enhance biochemical and biomechanical properties of self-assembled articular cartilage constructs, and 2) to identify an optimal time window for continuous ribose treatment. Self-assembled constructs were grown for 4 weeks using a previously established method and were subjected to continuous 7-day treatment with 30 mM ribose during culture weeks 1, 2, 3, or 4, or for the entire 4-week culture. Control constructs were grown in parallel, and all groups were evaluated for gross morphology, histology, cellularity, collagen and sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content, and compressive and tensile mechanical properties. Compared to control constructs, it was found that treatment with ribose during week 2 and for the entire duration of culture resulted in significant 62% and 40% increases in compressive stiffness, respectively; significant 66% and 44% increases in tensile stiffness; and significant 50% and 126% increases in tensile strength. Similar statistically significant trends were observed for collagen and GAG. In contrast, constructs treated with ribose during week 1 had poorer biochemical and biomechanical properties, although they were significantly larger and more cellular than all other groups. We

  5. Evolution of Autologous Chondrocyte Repair and Comparison to Other Cartilage Repair Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Dewan, Ashvin K.; Gibson, Matthew A.; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.; Trice, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage defects have been addressed using microfracture, abrasion chondroplasty, or osteochondral grafting, but these strategies do not generate tissue that adequately recapitulates native cartilage. During the past 25 years, promising new strategies using assorted scaffolds and cell sources to induce chondrocyte expansion have emerged. We reviewed the evolution of autologous chondrocyte implantation and compared it to other cartilage repair techniques. Methods. We searched PubMed from 1949 to 2014 for the keywords “autologous chondrocyte implantation” (ACI) and “cartilage repair” in clinical trials, meta-analyses, and review articles. We analyzed these articles, their bibliographies, our experience, and cartilage regeneration textbooks. Results. Microfracture, abrasion chondroplasty, osteochondral grafting, ACI, and autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis are distinguishable by cell source (including chondrocytes and stem cells) and associated scaffolds (natural or synthetic, hydrogels or membranes). ACI seems to be as good as, if not better than, microfracture for repairing large chondral defects in a young patient's knee as evaluated by multiple clinical indices and the quality of regenerated tissue. Conclusion. Although there is not enough evidence to determine the best repair technique, ACI is the most established cell-based treatment for full-thickness chondral defects in young patients. PMID:25210707

  6. Modeling IL-1 induced degradation of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Kar, Saptarshi; Smith, David W; Gardiner, Bruce S; Li, Yang; Wang, Yang; Grodzinsky, Alan J

    2016-03-15

    In this study, we develop a computational model to simulate the in vitro biochemical degradation of articular cartilage explants sourced from the femoropatellar grooves of bovine calves. Cartilage explants were incubated in culture medium with and without the inflammatory cytokine IL-1α. The spatio-temporal evolution of the cartilage explant's extracellular matrix components is modelled. Key variables in the model include chondrocytes, aggrecan, collagen, aggrecanase, collagenase and IL-1α. The model is first calibrated for aggrecan homeostasis of cartilage in vivo, then for data on (explant) controls, and finally for data on the IL-1α driven proteolysis of aggrecan and collagen over a 4-week period. The model was found to fit the experimental data best when: (i) chondrocytes continue to synthesize aggrecan during the cytokine challenge, (ii) a one to two day delay is introduced between the addition of IL-1α to the culture medium and subsequent aggrecanolysis, (iii) collagen degradation does not commence until the total concentration of aggrecan (i.e. both intact and degraded aggrecan) at any specific location within the explant becomes ≤ 1.5 mg/ml and (iv) degraded aggrecan formed due to the IL-1α induced proteolysis of intact aggrecan protects the collagen network while collagen degrades in a two-step process which, together, significantly modulate the collagen network degradation. Under simulated in vivo conditions, the model predicts increased aggrecan turnover rates in the presence of synovial IL-1α, consistent with experimental observations. Such models may help to infer the course of events in vivo following traumatic joint injury, and may also prove useful in quantitatively evaluating the efficiency of various therapeutic molecules that could be employed to avoid or modify the course of cartilage disease states. PMID:26874194

  7. [The early development of the articular cartilage. IV. The metamorphosing cartilage].

    PubMed

    Knese, K H

    1980-01-01

    The definite articular cartilage originate from 2 anlagen, the primordial tangential layer and the greater part including the joint bone plate from the metamorphosing cartilage. The tangential layer grow by apposition from the perichondrium. Additional the layer becomes also dilatated as a result of the growing volume of the ossification center. In this way the Lamina splendens with residues of cells may be formed. The chondrocytes resemble partly fibroblasts, in older animals possibly even tendocytes. Moreover the cells exhibit a varying different shape. Today it is impossible to interpret the polymorphism of the cells. In the primordial state, the chondrocyts are embedded in a network from thin cartilage fibrils. Later on collagen fibrils from varied thickness (up to 900 A) are formed. The fibrils run only partly parallel to each other, in general they form a network, in which they cross with a low angle. There are great local differences in the fibrillar structure by the same animal. PMID:7461420

  8. Effects of immobilization on articular cartilage: Autohistoradiographic findings with S35

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Digiovanni, C.; Desantis, E.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of immobilization on the articular cartilage of rabbits was studied by light microscope. The knee joint of each rabbit was immobilized in a plaster in a position midway between flexion and extension for a 10 to 120 days period. Degenerative changes in the articular cartilage of increasing severity were observed. The fixation of the labeled SO4 by cartilage cells was decreased in advanced immobilization.

  9. Cartilage Repair With Autologous Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Shinya; Mera, Hisashi; Itokazu, Maki; Hashimoto, Yusuke

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials of various procedures, including bone marrow stimulation, mosaicplasty, and autologous chondrocyte implantation, have been explored to treat articular cartilage defects. However, all of them have some demerits. We focused on autologous culture-expanded bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC), which can proliferate without losing their capacity for differentiation. First, we transplanted BMSC into the defective articular cartilage of rabbit and succeeded in regenerating osteochondral tissue. We then applied this transplantation in humans. Our previous reports showed that treatment with BMSC relieves the clinical symptoms of chondral defects in the knee and elbow joint. We investigated the efficacy of BMSC for osteoarthritic knee treated with high tibial osteotomy, by comparing 12 BMSC-transplanted patients with 12 cell-free patients. At 16-month follow-up, although the difference in clinical improvement between both groups was not significant, the arthroscopic and histological grading score was better in the cell-transplanted group. At the over 10-year follow-up, Hospital for Special Surgery knee scores improved to 76 and 73 in the BMSC-transplanted and cell-free groups, respectively, which were better than preoperative scores. Additionally, neither tumors nor infections were observed in all patients, and in the clinical study, we have never observed hypertrophy of repaired tissue, thereby guaranteeing the clinical safety of this therapy. Although we have never observed calcification above the tidemark in rabbit model and human histologically, the repair cartilage was not completely hyaline cartilage. To elucidate the optimum conditions for cell therapy, other stem cells, culture conditions, growth factors, and gene transfection methods should be explored. PMID:26069698

  10. Articular-cartilage matrix gamma-carboxyglutamic acid-containing protein. Characterization and immunolocalization.

    PubMed Central

    Loeser, R; Carlson, C S; Tulli, H; Jerome, W G; Miller, L; Wallin, R

    1992-01-01

    Matrix gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla)-containing protein (MGP) was found to be present in articular cartilage by Western-blot analysis of guanidinium chloride extracts of human and bovine cartilage and was further localized by immunohistochemical studies on human and monkey specimens. In newborn articular cartilage MGP was present diffusely throughout the matrix, whereas in growth-plate cartilage it was seen mainly in late hypertrophic and calcifying-zone chondrocytes. In adult articular cartilage MGP was present primarily in chondrocytes and the pericellular matrix. Immunoelectron microscopy studies revealed an association between MGP and vesicular structures with an appearance consistent with matrix vesicles. MGP may be an important regulator of cartilage calcification because of its localization in cartilage and the known affinity of Gla-containing proteins for Ca2+ and hydroxyapatite. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:1540125

  11. Compressive properties and function-composition relationships of developing bovine articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Williamson, A K; Chen, A C; Sah, R L

    2001-11-01

    The composition of cartilage is known to change during fetal and postnatal development. The objectives of this study were to characterize the compressive biomechanical properties of the 1 mm thick articular layer of cartilage of the distal femur from third-trimester bovine fetuses, from 1 to 3 week old bovine calf and from young adult bovine knees, and to correlate these properties with tissue components. The confined compression modulus increased 180% from the fetus to the calf and adult. The hydraulic permeability at 45% offset compression (relative to the free-swelling thickness) decreased by 70% from fetus to adult. These development-associated changes in biomechanical properties were primarily associated with a marked (approximately 2-3-fold) increase during development in collagen content and no detectable change in glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content. A role for collagen in the compressive properties of cartilage and the gradual increase in collagen during development suggest that collagen metabolism is critical for cartilage tissue engineering and repair therapies.

  12. Transient anabolic effects accompany epidermal growth factor receptor signal activation in articular cartilage in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Signals from the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have typically been considered to provide catabolic activities in articular cartilage, and accordingly have been suggested to have a causal role in osteoarthritis progression. The aim of this study was to determine in vivo roles for endogenous EGFR signal activation in articular cartilage. Methods Transgenic mice with conditional, limb-targeted deletion of the endogenous intracellular EGFR inhibitor Mig-6 were generated using CreLoxP (Mig-6-flox; Prx1Cre) recombination. Histology, histochemical staining and immunohistochemistry were used to confirm activation of EGFR signaling in the articular cartilage and joints, and to analyze phenotypic consequences of Mig-6 loss on articular cartilage morphology, proliferation, expression of progenitor cell markers, presence of chondrocyte hypertrophy and degradation of articular cartilage matrix. Results The articular cartilage of Mig-6-conditional knockout (Mig-6-cko) mice was dramatically and significantly thicker than normal articular cartilage at 6 and 12 weeks of age. Mig-6-cko articular cartilage contained a population of chondrocytes in which EGFR signaling was activated, and which were three to four times more proliferative than normal Mig-6-flox articular chondrocytes. These cells expressed high levels of the master chondrogenic regulatory factor Sox9, as well as high levels of putative progenitor cell markers including superficial zone protein (SZP), growth and differentiation factor-5 (GDF-5) and Notch1. Expression levels were also high for activated β-catenin and the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) mediators phospho-Smad2/3 (pSmad2/3). Anabolic effects of EGFR activation in articular cartilage were followed by catabolic events, including matrix degradation, as determined by accumulation of aggrecan cleavage fragments, and onset of hypertrophy as determined by type × collagen expression. By 16 weeks of age, the articular cartilage of

  13. Proteoglycan concentrations in healthy and diseased articular cartilage by Fourier transform infrared imaging and principal component regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jianhua; Xia, Yang

    2014-12-01

    Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI) combining with principal component regression (PCR) analysis were used to determine the reduction of proteoglycan (PG) in articular cartilage after the transection of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). A number of canine knee cartilage sections were harvested from the meniscus-covered and meniscus-uncovered medial tibial locations from the control joints, the ACL joints at three time points after the surgery, and their contralateral joints. The PG loss in the ACL cartilage was related positively to the durations after the surgery. The PG loss in the contralateral knees was less than that of the ACL knees. The PG loss in the meniscus-covered cartilage was less than that of the meniscus-uncovered tissue in both ACL and contralateral knees. The quantitative mapping of PG loss could monitor the disease progression and repair processes in arthritis.

  14. Elastin fibers display a versatile microfibril network in articular cartilage depending on the mechanical microenvironments.

    PubMed

    He, Bo; Wu, Jian Ping; Chen, Hong Hui; Kirk, Thomas Brett; Xu, Jiake

    2013-09-01

    Elastin fibers are major extracellular matrix macromolecules that are critical in maintaining the elasticity and resilience of tissues such as blood vessels, lungs and skins. However, the role of elastin in articular cartilage is poorly defined. The present study investigated the organization of elastin fiber in articular cartilage, its relationship to collagen fibers and the architecture of elastin fibers from different mechanical environments by using a kangaroo model. Five morphologies of elastin fibers were identified: Straight fiber, straight fiber with branches, branching fibers directly associated with chondrocyte, wave fiber and fine elastin. The architecture of the elastin network varied significantly with cartilage depth. In the most superficial layer of tibial plateau articular cartilage, dense elastin fibers formed a distinctive cobweb-like meshwork which was parallel to the cartilage surface. In the superficial zone, elastin fibers were well organized in a preferred orientation which was parallel to collagen fibers. In the deep zone, no detectable elastin fiber was found. Moreover, differences in the organization of elastin fibers were also observed between articular cartilage from the tibial plateau, femoral condyle, and distal humerus. This study unravels the detailed microarchitecture of elastin fibers which display a well-organized three-dimensional versatile network in articular cartilage. Our findings imply that elastin fibers may play a crucial role in maintaining the integrity, elasticity, and the mechanical properties of articular cartilage, and that the local mechanical environment affects the architectural development of elastin fibers. PMID:23649803

  15. Comprehensive Genome-Wide Transcriptomic Analysis of Immature Articular Cartilage following Ischemic Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head in Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Adapala, Naga Suresh; Kim, Harry K. W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Ischemic osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) in piglets results in an ischemic injury to the immature articular cartilage. The molecular changes in the articular cartilage in response to ONFH have not been investigated using a transcriptomic approach. The purpose of this study was to perform a genome-wide transcriptomic analysis to identify genes that are upregulated in the immature articular cartilage following ONFH. Methods ONFH was induced in the right femoral head of 6-week old piglets. The unoperated femoral head was used as the normal control. At 24 hours (acute ischemic-hypoxic injury), 2 weeks (avascular necrosis in the femoral head) and 4 weeks (early repair) after surgery (n = 4 piglets/time point), RNA was isolated from the articular cartilage of the femoral head. A microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix Porcine GeneChip Array. An enrichment analysis and functional clustering of the genes upregulated due to ONFH were performed using DAVID and STRING software, respectively. The increased expression of selected genes was confirmed by a real-time qRTPCR analysis. Results Induction of ONFH resulted in the upregulation of 383 genes at 24 hours, 122 genes at 2 weeks and 124 genes at 4 weeks compared to the normal controls. At 24 hours, the genes involved in oxidoreductive, cell-survival, and angiogenic responses were significantly enriched among the upregulated genes. These genes were involved in HIF-1, PI3K-Akt, and MAPK signaling pathways. At 2 weeks, secretory and signaling proteins involved in angiogenic and inflammatory responses, PI3K-Akt and matrix-remodeling pathways were significantly enriched. At 4 weeks, genes that represent inflammatory cytokines and chemokine signaling pathways were significantly enriched. Several index genes (genes that are upregulated at more than one time point following ONFH and are known to be important in various biological processes) including HIF-1A, VEGFA, IL-6, IL6R, IL-8, CCL2, FGF2, TGFB2

  16. Morphological and functional interrelationships of articular cartilage matrices.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, C A; Flint, M H; Beaumont, B W

    1984-01-01

    The pericellular, territorial and interterritorial matrices of canine tibial cartilage have been identified ultrastructurally on the basis of their collagen fibre density and organisation, proteoglycan distribution and their structural response to experimentally applied compressive loads. In addition, a discrete pericellular capsule composed of fine, faintly banded fibrils is described which surrounds and encloses the pericellular matrix and chondrocytes of the middle and deep layers but not of the superficial layer. It is suggested that the fine fibrils which comprise this pericellular capsule represent some of the new minor collagen species recently localised in a similar position in hyaline cartilages. The densely compacted cupola which forms the articular pole of the capsule is frequently penetrated by a clearly defined pericellular channel, consistently orientated in the direction of the articular surface. Membrane-bound vesicles are observed in the pericellular matrix, within the lumen of the pericellular channel and accumulated in the territorial matrix immediately beyond the pericellular channel. The constancy of this distribution pattern strongly suggests a flow of material through the pericellular channel from the pericellular matrix to the territorial matrix and beyond, possibly in response to minute pressure gradients generated during compressive deformation of the non-distensible capsule. Furthermore, it is suggested that the random dispersal and subsequent rupture of matrix vesicles may represent a mechanism whereby chondrocytes, with limited mobility, could exercise homeostatic control over the cartilage matrix at some distance from the cell. Chondrocytes in the deeper layers of canine tibial cartilage are each surrounded by three distinct compartments, a pericellular matrix and capsule, a territorial matrix and an interterritorial matrix. The response of each of these concentric compartments to experimental load suggests that they function

  17. Clinically Translatable Cell Tracking and Quantification by MRI in Cartilage Repair Using Superparamagnetic Iron Oxides

    PubMed Central

    van Buul, Gerben M.; Kotek, Gyula; Wielopolski, Piotr A.; Farrell, Eric; Bos, P. Koen; Weinans, Harrie; Grohnert, Anja U.; Jahr, Holger; Verhaar, Jan A. N.; Krestin, Gabriel P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Articular cartilage has very limited intrinsic regenerative capacity, making cell-based therapy a tempting approach for cartilage repair. Cell tracking can be a major step towards unraveling and improving the repair process of these therapies. We studied superparamagnetic iron oxides (SPIO) for labeling human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) regarding effectivity, cell viability, long term metabolic cell activity, chondrogenic differentiation and hBMSC secretion profile. We additionally examined the capacity of synovial cells to endocytose SPIO from dead, labeled cells, together with the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for intra-articular visualization and quantification of SPIO labeled cells. Methodology/Prinicipal Findings Efficacy and various safety aspects of SPIO cell labeling were determined using appropriate assays. Synovial SPIO re-uptake was investigated in vitro by co-labeling cells with SPIO and green fluorescent protein (GFP). MRI experiments were performed on a clinical 3.0T MRI scanner. Two cell-based cartilage repair techniques were mimicked for evaluating MRI traceability of labeled cells: intra-articular cell injection and cell implantation in cartilage defects. Cells were applied ex vivo or in vitro in an intra-articular environment and immediately scanned. SPIO labeling was effective and did not impair any of the studied safety aspects, including hBMSC secretion profile. SPIO from dead, labeled cells could be taken up by synovial cells. Both injected and implanted SPIO-labeled cells could accurately be visualized by MRI in a clinically relevant sized joint model using clinically applied cell doses. Finally, we quantified the amount of labeled cells seeded in cartilage defects using MR-based relaxometry. Conclusions SPIO labeling appears to be safe without influencing cell behavior. SPIO labeled cells can be visualized in an intra-articular environment and quantified when seeded in cartilage defects. PMID

  18. Mesenchymal stem cells in regenerative medicine: Focus on articular cartilage and intervertebral disc regeneration.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Stephen M; Kalamegam, Gauthaman; Pushparaj, Peter N; Matta, Csaba; Memic, Adnan; Khademhosseini, Ali; Mobasheri, Reza; Poletti, Fabian L; Hoyland, Judith A; Mobasheri, Ali

    2016-04-15

    Musculoskeletal disorders represent a major cause of disability and morbidity globally and result in enormous costs for health and social care systems. Development of cell-based therapies is rapidly proliferating in a number of disease areas, including musculoskeletal disorders. Novel biological therapies that can effectively treat joint and spine degeneration are high priorities in regenerative medicine. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from bone marrow (BM-MSCs), adipose tissue (AD-MSCs) and umbilical cord (UC-MSCs) show considerable promise for use in cartilage and intervertebral disc (IVD) repair. This review article focuses on stem cell-based therapeutics for cartilage and IVD repair in the context of the rising global burden of musculoskeletal disorders. We discuss the biology MSCs and chondroprogenitor cells and specifically focus on umbilical cord/Wharton's jelly derived MSCs and examine their potential for regenerative applications. We also summarize key components of the molecular machinery and signaling pathways responsible for the control of chondrogenesis and explore biomimetic scaffolds and biomaterials for articular cartilage and IVD regeneration. This review explores the exciting opportunities afforded by MSCs and discusses the challenges associated with cartilage and IVD repair and regeneration. There are still many technical challenges associated with isolating, expanding, differentiating, and pre-conditioning MSCs for subsequent implantation into degenerate joints and the spine. However, the prospect of combining biomaterials and cell-based therapies that incorporate chondrocytes, chondroprogenitors and MSCs leads to the optimistic view that interdisciplinary approaches will lead to significant breakthroughs in regenerating musculoskeletal tissues, such as the joint and the spine in the near future. PMID:26384579

  19. Regenerating cartilages by engineered ASCs: prolonged TGF-β3/BMP-6 expression improved articular cartilage formation and restored zonal structure.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chia-Hsin; Yeh, Tsung-Szu; Yeh, Chia-Lin; Fang, Yu-Hua Dean; Sung, Li-Yu; Lin, Shih-Yeh; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Chang, Yu-Han; Hu, Yu-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) hold promise for cartilage regeneration but their chondrogenesis potential is inferior. Here, we used a baculovirus (BV) system that exploited FLPo/Frt-mediated transgene recombination and episomal minicircle formation to genetically engineer rabbit ASCs (rASCs). The BV system conferred prolonged and robust TGF-β3/BMP-6 expression in rASCs cultured in porous scaffolds, which critically augmented rASCs chondrogenesis and suppressed osteogenesis/hypertrophy, leading to the formation of cartilaginous constructs with improved maturity and mechanical properties in 2-week culture. Twelve weeks after implantation into full-thickness articular cartilage defects in rabbits, these engineered constructs regenerated neocartilages that resembled native hyaline cartilages in cell morphology, matrix composition and mechanical properties. The neocartilages also displayed cartilage-specific zonal structures without signs of hypertrophy and degeneration, and eventually integrated with host cartilages. In contrast, rASCs that transiently expressed TGF-β3/BMP-6 underwent osteogenesis/hypertrophy and resulted in the formation of inferior cartilaginous constructs, which after implantation regenerated fibrocartilages. These data underscored the crucial role of TGF-β3/BMP-6 expression level and duration in rASCs in the cell differentiation, constructs properties and in vivo repair. The BV-engineered rASCs that persistently express TGF-β3/BMP-6 improved the chondrogenesis, in vitro cartilaginous constructs production and in vivo hyaline cartilage regeneration, thus representing a remarkable advance in cartilage engineering. PMID:23851345

  20. Prenatal caffeine exposure induces a poor quality of articular cartilage in male adult offspring rats via cholesterol accumulation in cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hanwen; Li, Jing; Cao, Hong; Tan, Yang; Magdalou, Jacques; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological investigations indicate that osteoarthritis is associated with intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) and abnormal cholesterol metabolism. Our previous studies showed that prenatal caffeine exposure (PCE) induced chondrogenesis retardation in IUGR offspring rats. The current study sought to investigate the effects of PCE on male IUGR offspring rats’ articular cartilage, and the mechanisms associated with abnormal cholesterol metabolism. Based on the results from both male fetal and adult fed a high-fat diet (HFD) studies of rats that experienced PCE (120 mg/kg.d), the results showed a poor quality of articular cartilage and cholesterol accumulation in the adult PCE group. Meanwhile, the serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations were increased in adult PCE offspring. We also observed lower expression of insulin-like growth factor1 (IGF1) and impaired cholesterol efflux in adult articular cartilage. Furthermore, the expression of cartilage functional genes, components of the IGF1 signaling pathway and cholesterol efflux pathway related genes were decreased in PCE fetal cartilage. In conclusion, PCE induced a poor quality of articular cartilage in male adult offspring fed a HFD. This finding was shown to be due to cholesterol accumulation in the cartilage, which may have resulted from intrauterine reduced activity of the IGF1 signaling pathway. PMID:26639318

  1. Prenatal caffeine exposure induces a poor quality of articular cartilage in male adult offspring rats via cholesterol accumulation in cartilage.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hanwen; Li, Jing; Cao, Hong; Tan, Yang; Magdalou, Jacques; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2015-12-07

    Epidemiological investigations indicate that osteoarthritis is associated with intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) and abnormal cholesterol metabolism. Our previous studies showed that prenatal caffeine exposure (PCE) induced chondrogenesis retardation in IUGR offspring rats. The current study sought to investigate the effects of PCE on male IUGR offspring rats' articular cartilage, and the mechanisms associated with abnormal cholesterol metabolism. Based on the results from both male fetal and adult fed a high-fat diet (HFD) studies of rats that experienced PCE (120 mg/kg.d), the results showed a poor quality of articular cartilage and cholesterol accumulation in the adult PCE group. Meanwhile, the serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations were increased in adult PCE offspring. We also observed lower expression of insulin-like growth factor1 (IGF1) and impaired cholesterol efflux in adult articular cartilage. Furthermore, the expression of cartilage functional genes, components of the IGF1 signaling pathway and cholesterol efflux pathway related genes were decreased in PCE fetal cartilage. In conclusion, PCE induced a poor quality of articular cartilage in male adult offspring fed a HFD. This finding was shown to be due to cholesterol accumulation in the cartilage, which may have resulted from intrauterine reduced activity of the IGF1 signaling pathway.

  2. Pannocytes: distinctive cells found in rheumatoid arthritis articular cartilage erosions.

    PubMed Central

    Zvaifler, N. J.; Tsai, V.; Alsalameh, S.; von Kempis, J.; Firestein, G. S.; Lotz, M.

    1997-01-01

    A distinctive cell was identified from sites of rheumatoid arthritis cartilage injury. Similar cells are not found in lesions of osteoarthritis cartilage. We have designated them as pannocytes (PCs). Their rhomboid morphology differs from the bipolar shape of fibroblast-like synoviocytes or the spherical configuration of primary human articular chondrocytes. Chondrocytes are short-lived, whereas the original PC line grew for 25 passages before becoming senescent. Features in common with cultured primary chondrocytes include maximal proliferation in response to transforming growth factor-beta a catabolic response to interleukin-1 beta, collagenase production, and mRNA for the induced lymphocyte antigen and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Despite the presence of the inducible nitric oxide synthase message, PCs do not produce NO either constitutively or when cytokine stimulated. Each of the mesenchymal cells, fibroblast-like synoviocytes, primary chondrocytes, and PCs have the gene for type I collagen, but the type II collagen gene is detected only in primary chondrocytes. PCs can be distinguished from fibroblast-like synoviocytes and primary chondrocytes by their morphology, bright VCAM-1 staining, and growth response to cytokines and growth factors. Their prolonged life span in vitro suggests that PCs might represent an earlier stage of mesenchymal cell differentiation, and they could have a heretofore unrecognized role in rheumatoid arthritis joint destruction. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 10 PMID:9060847

  3. Imaging articular cartilage using second harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, Jessica C.; Winlove, C. Peter; Knapp, Karen; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2006-02-01

    Sub cellular resolution images of equine articular cartilage have been obtained using both second harmonic generation microscopy (SHGM) and two-photon fluorescence microscopy (TPFM). The SHGM images clearly map the distribution of the collagen II fibers within the extracellular matrix while the TPFM images show the distribution of endogenous two-photon fluorophores in both the cells and the extracellular matrix, highlighting especially the pericellular matrix and bright 2-3μm diameter features within the cells. To investigate the source of TPF in the extracellular matrix experiments have been carried out to see if it may originate from the proteoglycans. Pure solutions of the following proteoglycans hyaluronan, chondroitin sulfate and aggrecan have been imaged, only the aggrecan produced any TPF and here the intensity was not great enough to account for the TPF in the extracellular matrix. Also cartilage samples were subjected to a process to remove proteoglycans and cellular components. After this process the TPF from the samples had decreased by a factor of two, with respect to the SHG intensity.

  4. Time-dependent processes in stem cell-based tissue engineering of articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Gadjanski, Ivana; Spiller, Kara; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2012-01-01

    Articular cartilage (AC), situated in diarthrodial joints at the end of the long bones, is composed of a single cell type (chondrocytes) embedded in dense extracellular matrix comprised of collagens and proteoglycans. AC is avascular and alymphatic and is not innervated. At first glance, such a seemingly simple tissue appears to be an easy target for the rapidly developing field of tissue engineering. However, cartilage engineering has proven to be very challenging. We focus on time-dependent processes associated with the development of native cartilage starting from stem cells, and the modalities for utilizing these processes for tissue engineering of articular cartilage. PMID:22016073

  5. Multi-parametric MRI characterization of enzymatically degraded articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Nissi, Mikko J; Salo, Elli-Noora; Tiitu, Virpi; Liimatainen, Timo; Michaeli, Shalom; Mangia, Silvia; Ellermann, Jutta; Nieminen, Miika T

    2016-07-01

    Several laboratory and rotating frame quantitative MRI parameters were evaluated and compared for detection of changes in articular cartilage following selective enzymatic digestion. Bovine osteochondral specimens were subjected to 44 h incubation in control medium or in collagenase or chondroitinase ABC to induce superficial collagen or proteoglycan (glycosaminoglycan) alterations. The samples were scanned at 9.4 T for T1 , T1 Gd (dGEMRIC), T2 , adiabatic T1 ρ , adiabatic T2 ρ , continuous-wave T1 ρ , TRAFF2 , and T1 sat relaxation times and for magnetization transfer ratio (MTR). For reference, glycosaminoglycan content, collagen fibril orientation and biomechanical properties were determined. Changes primarily in the superficial cartilage were noted after enzymatic degradation. Most of the studied parameters were sensitive to the destruction of collagen network, whereas glycosaminoglycan depletion was detected only by native T1 and T1 Gd relaxation time constants throughout the tissue and by MTR superficially. T1 , adiabatic T1 ρ , adiabatic T2 ρ , continuous-wave T1 ρ , and T1 sat correlated significantly with the biomechanical properties while T1 Gd correlated with glycosaminoglycan staining. The findings indicated that most of the studied MRI parameters were sensitive to both glycosaminoglycan content and collagen network integrity, with changes due to enzymatic treatment detected primarily in the superficial tissue. Strong correlation of T1 , adiabatic T1ρ , adiabatic T2 ρ , continuous-wave T1 ρ , and T1 sat with the altered biomechanical properties, reflects that these parameters were sensitive to critical functional properties of cartilage. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1111-1120, 2016. PMID:26662555

  6. Effect of Autologous Platelet Rich Fibrin on the Healing of Experimental Articular Cartilage Defects of the Knee in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Davoud; Fakhrjou, Ashraf; Mirzazadeh Dizaji, Vahid; Khanzadeh Alishahi, Majid

    2014-01-01

    The effect of autologous platelet rich fibrin (PRF), a second generation platelet product, on the healing of experimental articular cartilage lesions was evaluated in an animal model. Full thickness cartilage lesions with a diameter of 6 mm and depth of 5 mm were created in the weight bearing area of femoral condyles of both hind limbs in 12 adult mixed breed dogs. Defects in the left hind limb of each dog were repaired by PRF implantation whereas those in the right hind limb were left empty. The animals were euthanized at 4, 16, and 24 weeks following surgery and the resultant repair tissue was investigated macroscopically and microscopically. The results of macroscopic and histological evaluations indicated that there were significant differences between the PRF treated and untreated defects. In conclusion, the present study indicated that the use of platelet rich fibrin as a source of autologous growth factors leads to improvement in articular cartilage repair. PMID:25028656

  7. Epigenetic regulation in chondrocyte phenotype maintenance for cell-based cartilage repair

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Li; Liang, Yujie; Ma, Bin; Zhu, Weimin; Wang, Daping

    2015-01-01

    Loss of hyaline chondrocyte phenotype during the monolayer culture in vitro is a major obstacle for cell-based articular cartilage repair. Increasing evidence implicates an important role of the epigenetic regulation in maintaining the chondrocyte phenotype. DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNAs have all been shown to contribute to chondrocyte dedifferentiation and hypertrophy. Moreover, the interplay among epigenetic regulators forms a complicated epigenetic network in regulating chondrocyte dedifferentiation. This review provides a detailed overview of the epigenetic regulation in maintaining the chondrocyte phenotype for chondrocyte-based cartilage repair. PMID:26807163

  8. Intra-articular injection of Torin 1 reduces degeneration of articular cartilage in a rabbit osteoarthritis model

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, N-T.; Cui, Y-P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Recent studies have shown that systemic injection of rapamycin can prevent the development of osteoarthritis (OA)-like changes in human chondrocytes and reduce the severity of experimental OA. However, the systemic injection of rapamycin leads to many side effects. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of intra-articular injection of Torin 1, which as a specific inhibitor of mTOR which can cause induction of autophagy, is similar to rapamycin, on articular cartilage degeneration in a rabbit osteoarthritis model and to investigate the mechanism of Torin 1’s effects on experimental OA. Methods Collagenase (type II) was injected twice into both knees of three-month-old rabbits to induce OA, combined with two intra–articular injections of Torin 1 (400 nM). Degeneration of articular cartilage was evaluated by histology using the Mankin scoring system at eight weeks after injection. Chondrocyte degeneration and autophagosomes were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Matrix metallopeptidase-13 (MMP-13) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression were analysed by quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR).Beclin-1 and light chain 3 (LC3) expression were examined by Western blotting. Results Intra-articular injection of Torin 1 significantly reduced degeneration of the articular cartilage after induction of OA. Autophagosomes andBeclin-1 and LC3 expression were increased in the chondrocytes from Torin 1-treated rabbits. Torin 1 treatment also reduced MMP-13 and VEGF expression at eight weeks after collagenase injection. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that intra-articular injection of Torin 1 reduces degeneration of articular cartilage in collagenase-induced OA, at least partially by autophagy activation, suggesting a novel therapeutic approach for preventing cartilage degeneration and treating OA. Cite this article: N-T. Cheng, A. Guo, Y-P. Cui. Intra-articular injection of Torin 1 reduces degeneration of articular cartilage in a

  9. Chondrocyte death in mechanically injured articular cartilage--the influence of extracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Amin, Anish K; Huntley, James S; Bush, Peter G; Simpson, A Hamish R W; Hall, Andrew C

    2009-06-01

    Calcium is thought to be an important regulator of chondrocyte death associated with articular cartilage injury. Our objective was to determine the influence of extracellular calcium on chondrocyte death following mechanical injury. Using a surgically relevant model of sharp mechanical injury (with a scalpel) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), in situ chondrocyte death was quantified within the full thickness of articular cartilage as a function of medium calcium concentration and time (2.5 h and 7 days). Exposure of articular cartilage to calcium-free media (approximately 0 mM) significantly reduced superficial zone chondrocyte death after mechanical injury compared with exposure to calcium-rich media (2-20 mM, ANOVA at 2.5 h, p = 0.002). In calcium-rich media, although the extent of chondrocyte death increased with increasing medium calcium concentration, cell death remained localized to the superficial zone of articular cartilage over 7 days (ANOVA, p < 0.05). However, in calcium-free media, there was an increase in chondrocyte death within deeper zones of articular cartilage over 7 days. The early (within hours) chondroprotective effect in calcium-free media suggests that the use of joint irrigation solutions without added calcium may decrease chondrocyte death from mechanical injury during articular surgery. The delayed (within days) increase in chondrocyte death in calcium-free media supports the use of calcium supplementation in media used during cartilage culture for tissue engineering or transplantation.

  10. Influence of dynamic load on friction behavior of human articular cartilage, stainless steel and polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel as artificial cartilage.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Su, Yonglin; Wang, Jianping; Wu, Gang; Wang, Chengtao

    2010-01-01

    Many biomaterials are being developed to be used for cartilage substitution and hemiarthroplasty implants. The lubrication property is a key feature of the artificial cartilage. The frictional behavior of human articular cartilage, stainless steel and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogel were investigated under cartilage-on-PVA hydrogel contact, cartilage-on-cartilage contact and cartilage-on-stainless steel contact using pin-on-plate method. Tests under static load, cyclic load and 1 min load change were used to evaluate friction variations in reciprocating motion. The results showed that the lubrication property of cartilage-on-PVA hydrogel contact and cartilage-on-stainless steel contact were restored in both 1 min load change and cyclic load tests. The friction coefficient of PVA hydrogel decreased from 0.178 to 0.076 in 60 min, which was almost one-third of the value under static load in continuous sliding tests. In each test, the friction coefficient of cartilage-on-cartilage contact maintained far lower value than other contacts. It is indicated that a key feature of artificial cartilage is the biphasic lubrication properties.

  11. Current perspectives in stem cell research for knee cartilage repair

    PubMed Central

    Orth, Patrick; Rey-Rico, Ana; Venkatesan, Jagadeesh K; Madry, Henning; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2014-01-01

    Protocols based on the delivery of stem cells are currently applied in patients, showing encouraging results for the treatment of articular cartilage lesions (focal defects, osteoarthritis). Yet, restoration of a fully functional cartilage surface (native structural organization and mechanical functions) especially in the knee joint has not been reported to date, showing the need for improved designs of clinical trials. Various sources of progenitor cells are now available, originating from adult tissues but also from embryonic or reprogrammed tissues, most of which have already been evaluated for their chondrogenic potential in culture and for their reparative properties in vivo upon implantation in relevant animal models of cartilage lesions. Nevertheless, particular attention will be needed regarding their safe clinical use and their potential to form a cartilaginous repair tissue of proper quality and functionality in the patient. Possible improvements may reside in the use of biological supplements in accordance with regulations, while some challenges remain in establishing standardized, effective procedures in the clinics. PMID:24520197

  12. Localization of hyaluronic acid in human articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Asari, A; Miyauchi, S; Kuriyama, S; Machida, A; Kohno, K; Uchiyama, Y

    1994-04-01

    To demonstrate localization of hyaluronic acid (HA) in articular cartilage of the human femur, biotinylated HA-binding region, which specifically binds HA molecules, was applied to the tissue. In sections fixed by 2% paraformaldehyde-2% glutaraldehyde, HA staining was detected in lamina splendens and chondrocytes in the middle zone. By pretreatment with trypsin, intense HA staining appeared in the extracellular matrix of the deep zone and weak staining in the superficial and middle zones. Moreover, pre-treatment with chondroitinase ABC (CHase ABC) intensely enhanced the stainability for HA in the superficial and middle zones and weakly in the deeper zone. Combined pre-treatment of trypsin with CHase ABC abolished intra- and extracellular staining for HA in all zones. By microbiochemical study, the concentrations of HA and dermatan sulfate were high in the middle zone, whereas those of chondroitin sulfate and keratan sulfate were high in the deep zone. These results suggest that HA is abundantly synthesized in and secreted from the chondrocytes, particularly in the middle zone, whereas it is largely masked by proteoglycan constituents in the extracellular matrix. PMID:8126377

  13. Role of uppermost superficial surface layer of articular cartilage in the lubrication mechanism of joints

    PubMed Central

    KUMAR, P.; OKA, M.; TOGUCHIDA, J.; KOBAYASHI, M.; UCHIDA, E.; NAKAMURA, T.; TANAKA, K.

    2001-01-01

    The uppermost superficial surface layer of articular cartilage, the ‘lamina splendens’ which provides a very low friction lubrication surface in articular joints, was investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Complementary specimens were also observed under SEM at −10 °C without dehydration or sputter ion coating. Fresh adult pig osteochondral specimens were prepared from the patellas of pig knee joints and digested with the enzymes, hyaluronidase, chondroitinase ABC and alkaline protease. Friction coefficients between a pyrex glass plate and the osteochondral specimens digested by enzymes as well as natural (undigested) specimens were measured, using a thrust collar apparatus. Normal saline, hyaluronic acid (HA) and a mixture of albumin, globulin, HA (AGH) were used as lubrication media. The surface irregularities usually observed in SEM studies were not apparent under AFM. The articular cartilage surface was resistant to hyaluronidase and also to chondroitinase ABC, but a fibrous structure was exhibited in alkaline protease enzymes-digested specimens. AFM analysis revealed that the thickness of the uppermost superficial surface layer of articular cartilage was between 800 nm and 2 μm in adult pig articular cartilage. The coefficient of friction (c.f.) was significantly higher in chondroitinase ABC and alkaline protease enzymes digested specimens. Generally, in normal saline lubrication medium, c.f. was higher in comparison to HA and AGH lubrication media. The role of the uppermost, superficial surface layer of articular cartilage in the lubrication mechanism of joints is discussed. PMID:11554503

  14. Role of uppermost superficial surface layer of articular cartilage in the lubrication mechanism of joints.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P; Oka, M; Toguchida, J; Kobayashi, M; Uchida, E; Nakamura, T; Tanaka, K

    2001-09-01

    The uppermost superficial surface layer of articular cartilage, the 'lamina splendens' which provides a very low friction lubrication surface in articular joints, was investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Complementary specimens were also observed under SEM at -10 degrees C without dehydration or sputter ion coating. Fresh adult pig osteochondral specimens were prepared from the patellas of pig knee joints and digested with the enzymes, hyaluronidase, chondroitinase ABC and alkaline protease. Friction coefficients between a pyrex glass plate and the osteochondral specimens digested by enzymes as well as natural (undigested) specimens were measured, using a thrust collar apparatus. Normal saline, hyaluronic acid (HA) and a mixture of albumin, globulin, HA (AGH) were used as lubrication media. The surface irregularities usually observed in SEM studies were not apparent under AFM. The articular cartilage surface was resistant to hyaluronidase and also to chondroitinase ABC, but a fibrous structure was exhibited in alkaline protease enzymes-digested specimens. AFM analysis revealed that the thickness of the uppermost superficial surface layer of articular cartilage was between 800 nm and 2 microm in adult pig articular cartilage. The coefficient of friction (c.f.) was significantly higher in chondroitinase ABC and alkaline protease enzymes digested specimens. Generally, in normal saline lubrication medium, c.f. was higher in comparison to HA and AGH lubrication media. The role of the uppermost, superficial surface layer of articular cartilage in the lubrication mechanism of joints is discussed. PMID:11554503

  15. Comparison of friction and wear of articular cartilage on different length scales.

    PubMed

    Kienle, Sandra; Boettcher, Kathrin; Wiegleb, Lorenz; Urban, Joanna; Burgkart, Rainer; Lieleg, Oliver; Hugel, Thorsten

    2015-09-18

    The exceptional tribological properties of articular cartilage are still far from being fully understood. Articular cartilage is able to withstand high loads and provide exceptionally low friction. Although the regeneration abilities of the tissue are very limited, it can last for many decades. These biomechanical properties are realized by an interplay of different lubrication and wear protection mechanisms. The deterioration of cartilage due to aging or injury leads to the development of osteoarthritis. A current treatment strategy focuses on supplementing the intra-articular fluid with a saline solution containing hyaluronic acid. In the work presented here, we investigated how changing the lubricating fluid affects friction and wear of articular cartilage, focusing on the boundary and mixed lubrication as well as interstitial fluid pressurization mechanisms. Different length and time scales were probed by atomic force microscopy, tribology and profilometry. We compared aqueous solutions with different NaCl concentrations to a viscosupplement containing hyaluronic acid (HA). In particular, we found that the presence of ions changes the frictional behavior and the wear resistance. In contrast, hyaluronic acid showed no significant impact on the friction coefficient, but considerably reduced wear. This study confirms the previous notion that friction and wear are not necessarily correlated in articular cartilage tribology and that the main role of HA might be to provide wear protection for the articular surface.

  16. Monitoring the Progression of Spontaneous Articular Cartilage Healing with Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Megan P.; Penmatsa, Madhuri; Palukuru, Uday; West, Paul; Yang, Xu; Bostrom, Mathias P. G.; Freeman, Theresa

    2015-01-01

    Objective Evaluation of early compositional changes in healing articular cartilage is critical for understanding tissue repair and for therapeutic decision-making. Fourier transform infrared imaging spectroscopy (FT-IRIS) can be used to assess the molecular composition of harvested repair tissue. Furthermore, use of an infrared fiber-optic probe (IFOP) has the potential for translation to a clinical setting to provide molecular information in situ. In the current study, we determined the feasibility of IFOP assessment of cartilage repair tissue in a rabbit model, and assessed correlations with gold-standard histology. Design Bilateral osteochondral defects were generated in mature white New Zealand rabbits, and IFOP data obtained from defect and adjacent regions at 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, and 16 weeks postsurgery. Tissues were assessed histologically using the modified O’Driscoll score, by FT-IRIS, and by partial least squares (PLS) modeling of IFOP spectra. Results The FT-IRIS parameters of collagen content, proteoglycan content, and collagen index correlated significantly with modified O’Driscoll score (P = 0.05, 0.002, and 0.02, respectively), indicative of their sensitivity to tissue healing. Repair tissue IFOP spectra were distinguished from normal tissue IFOP spectra in all samples by PLS analysis. However, the PLS model for prediction of histological score had a high prediction error, which was attributed to the spectral information being acquired from the tissue surface only. Conclusion The strong correlations between FT-IRIS data and histological score support further development of the IFOP technique for clinical applications, although further studies to optimize data collection from the full sample depths are required. PMID:26175863

  17. Comparative potential of juvenile and adult human articular chondrocytes for cartilage tissue formation in three-dimensional biomimetic hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Smeriglio, Piera; Lai, Janice H; Dhulipala, Lakshmi; Behn, Anthony W; Goodman, Stuart B; Smith, Robert L; Maloney, William J; Yang, Fan; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of human articular cartilage is inherently limited and extensive efforts have focused on engineering the cartilage tissue. Various cellular sources have been studied for cartilage tissue engineering including adult chondrocytes, and embryonic or adult stem cells. Juvenile chondrocytes (from donors below 13 years of age) have recently been reported to be a promising cell source for cartilage regeneration. Previous studies have compared the potential of adult and juvenile chondrocytes or adult and osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes. To comprehensively characterize the comparative potential of young, old, and diseased chondrocytes, here we examined cartilage formation by juvenile, adult, and OA chondrocytes in three-dimensional (3D) biomimetic hydrogels composed of poly(ethylene glycol) and chondroitin sulfate. All three human articular chondrocytes were encapsulated in the 3D biomimetic hydrogels and cultured for 3 or 6 weeks to allow maturation and extracellular matrix formation. Outcomes were analyzed using quantitative gene expression, immunofluorescence staining, biochemical assays, and mechanical testing. After 3 and 6 weeks, juvenile chondrocytes showed a greater upregulation of chondrogenic gene expression than adult chondrocytes, while OA chondrocytes showed a downregulation. Aggrecan and type II collagen deposition and glycosaminoglycan accumulation were high for juvenile and adult chondrocytes but not for OA chondrocytes. Similar trend was observed in the compressive moduli of the cartilage constructs generated by the three different chondrocytes. In conclusion, the juvenile, adult and OA chondrocytes showed differential responses in the 3D biomimetic hydrogels. The 3D culture model described here may also provide a useful tool to further study the molecular differences among chondrocytes from different stages, which can help elucidate the mechanisms for age-related decline in the intrinsic capacity for cartilage repair. PMID:25054343

  18. Age related changes and osteochondrosis in swine articular and epiphyseal cartilage: light ane electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, R; Christian, R G; Nakano, T; Aherne, F X; Thompson, J R

    1981-04-01

    Age related changes and osteochondrosis in swine were studied using light microscopy and electron microscopy in articular cartilage and light microscopy and epiphyseal cartilage of swine from three days to 30 weeks of age. Thickness, cellularity and vascularity of both the epiphyseal and articular cartilage, decreased as the swine aged. Osteochondrotic changes included formation of "plugs" of cartilage indicating localized failure of ossification and separation and space formation in epiphyseal cartilage. Eosinophilic streaks and space formation in epiphyseal cartilage was observed in relation to epiphyseal separation. Electron microscopy showed a continuous fibrillar layer on the surface of the cartilage corresponding to the lamina splendens of light microscopy. This layer increased in the thickness and showed accumulation of amorphous material between the fibrils with aging. In the matrix, the orientation and distribution of the collagen fibers changed with growth and thicker fibers with clear sub banding were more common in older age groups. Also, necrotic cells, glycogen containing bodies and cellular debris were noticed in the matrix of normal cartilage in old animals. Chondrocytes in the younger cartilage showed accumulation of organelles responsible for protein synthesis; while Golgi bodies, vesicles, lysosomes, well developed foot processes and other inclusions were noticed in older cartilage. Cartilage erosions had a clumped and disrupted lamina splendens on the surface and electron lucent patches in the ground substances of the matrix and chondrocyte cytoplasm. PMID:7260732

  19. Development of hybrid scaffolds using ceramic and hydrogel for articular cartilage tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Seol, Young-Joon; Park, Ju Young; Jeong, Wonju; Kim, Tae-Ho; Kim, Shin-Yoon; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-04-01

    The regeneration of articular cartilage consisting of hyaline cartilage and hydrogel scaffolds has been generally used in tissue engineering. However, success in in vivo studies has been rarely reported. The hydrogel scaffolds implanted into articular cartilage defects are mechanically unstable and it is difficult for them to integrate with the surrounding native cartilage tissue. Therefore, it is needed to regenerate cartilage and bone tissue simultaneously. We developed hybrid scaffolds with hydrogel scaffolds for cartilage tissue and with ceramic scaffolds for bone tissue. For in vivo study, hybrid scaffolds were press-fitted into osteochondral tissue defects in a rabbit knee joints and the cartilage tissue regeneration in blank, hydrogel scaffolds, and hybrid scaffolds was compared. In 12th week after implantation, the histological and immunohistochemical analyses were conducted to evaluate the cartilage tissue regeneration. In the blank and hydrogel scaffold groups, the defects were filled with fibrous tissues and the implanted hydrogel scaffolds could not maintain their initial position; in the hybrid scaffold group, newly generated cartilage tissues were morphologically similar to native cartilage tissues and were smoothly connected to the surrounding native tissues. This study demonstrates hybrid scaffolds containing hydrogel and ceramic scaffolds can provide mechanical stability to hydrogel scaffolds and enhance cartilage tissue regeneration at the defect site.

  20. Directed differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells into chondrogenic lineages for articular cartilage treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lach, Michał; Richter, Magdalena; Pawlicz, Jarosław; Suchorska, Wiktoria M

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, increases in the number of articular cartilage injuries caused by environmental factors or pathological conditions have led to a notable rise in the incidence of premature osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis, considered a disease of civilization, is the leading cause of disability. At present, standard methods for treating damaged articular cartilage, including autologous chondrocyte implantation or microfracture, are short-term solutions with important side effects. Emerging treatments include the use of induced pluripotent stem cells, a technique that could provide a new tool for treatment of joint damage. However, research in this area is still early, and no optimal protocol for transforming induced pluripotent stem cells into chondrocytes has yet been established. Developments in our understanding of cartilage developmental biology, together with the use of modern technologies in the field of tissue engineering, provide an opportunity to create a complete functional model of articular cartilage. PMID:25383175

  1. Cell Therapy and Tissue Engineering Approaches for Cartilage Repair and/or Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Mardones, Rodrigo; Jofré, Claudio M; Minguell, José J

    2015-05-01

    Articular cartilage injuries caused by traumatic, mechanical and/or by progressive degeneration result in pain, swelling, subsequent loss of joint function and finally osteoarthritis. Due to the peculiar structure of the tissue (no blood supply), chondrocytes, the unique cellular phenotype in cartilage, receive their nutrition through diffusion from the synovial fluid and this limits their intrinsic capacity for healing. The first cellular avenue explored for cartilage repair involved the in situ transplantation of isolated chondrocytes. Latterly, an improved alternative for the above reparative strategy involved the infusion of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), which in addition to a self-renewal capacity exhibit a differentiation potential to chondrocytes, as well as a capability to produce a vast array of growth factors, cytokines and extracellular matrix compounds involved in cartilage development. In addition to the above and foremost reparative options up till now in use, other therapeutic options have been developed, comprising the design of biomaterial substrates (scaffolds) capable of sustaining MSC attachment, proliferation and differentiation. The implantation of these engineered platforms, closely to the site of cartilage damage, may well facilitate the initiation of an 'in situ' cartilage reparation process. In this mini-review, we examined the timely and conceptual development of several cell-based methods, designed to repair/regenerate a damaged cartilage. In addition to the above described cartilage reparative options, other therapeutic alternatives still in progress are portrayed. PMID:26019754

  2. Cell Therapy and Tissue Engineering Approaches for Cartilage Repair and/or Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mardones, Rodrigo; Jofré, Claudio M.; Minguell, José J.

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage injuries caused by traumatic, mechanical and/or by progressive degeneration result in pain, swelling, subsequent loss of joint function and finally osteoarthritis. Due to the peculiar structure of the tissue (no blood supply), chondrocytes, the unique cellular phenotype in cartilage, receive their nutrition through diffusion from the synovial fluid and this limits their intrinsic capacity for healing. The first cellular avenue explored for cartilage repair involved the in situ transplantation of isolated chondrocytes. Latterly, an improved alternative for the above reparative strategy involved the infusion of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), which in addition to a self-renewal capacity exhibit a differentiation potential to chondrocytes, as well as a capability to produce a vast array of growth factors, cytokines and extracellular matrix compounds involved in cartilage development. In addition to the above and foremost reparative options up till now in use, other therapeutic options have been developed, comprising the design of biomaterial substrates (scaffolds) capable of sustaining MSC attachment, proliferation and differentiation. The implantation of these engineered platforms, closely to the site of cartilage damage, may well facilitate the initiation of an ‘in situ’ cartilage reparation process. In this mini-review, we examined the timely and conceptual development of several cell-based methods, designed to repair/regenerate a damaged cartilage. In addition to the above described cartilage reparative options, other therapeutic alternatives still in progress are portrayed. PMID:26019754

  3. Effects of freezing rates and cryoprotectant on thermal expansion of articular cartilage during freezing process.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Sun, H J; Lv, Y; Zou, J C; Lin, B L; Hua, T C

    2013-01-01

    The intact articular cartilage has not yet been successfully preserved at low temperature most likely due to the volume expansion from water to ice during freezing. The objective of this current study focuses on examining thermal expansion behavior of articular cartilage (AC) during freezing from 0 degree C to -100 degree C. Thermo Mechanical Analysis (TMA) was used to investigate the effects of different concentrations of dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) (0%, 10%, 30% and 60% v/v) and different freezing rates (1 C/min, 3 C/min and 5 C/min). The results showed that: (1) the inhomogeneous thermal expansion (or contraction) presents due to inhomogeneous water distributions in articular cartilage during freezing, which also may be the most likely reason that the matrix has been damaged in cryopreserved intact articular cartilage; (2) at the phase transition temperature range, the maximum thermal strain change value for 5C/min is approximately 1.45 times than that for 1 C/min, but the maximum thermal expansion coefficient of the later is about six times than that of the former; (3) the thermal expansion coefficient decreases with increasing cooling rate at the unfrozen temperature region, but some opposite results are obtained at the frozen temperature region; (4) the higher the DMSO concentration is, at the phase change temperature region, the smaller the thermal strain change as well as the maximum thermal expansion coefficient are, but DMSO concentration exhibits little effect on the thermal expansion coefficient at both unfrozen and frozen region. Once the DMSO concentration increasing enough, e.g. 60% v/v, the thermal strain decreases linearly and smoothly without any abrupt change due to little or no ice crystal forms (i.e. vitrification) in frozen articular cartilage. This study may improve our understanding of the thermal expansion (or contraction) behavior of cryopreserved articular cartilage and it may be useful for the future study on cryopreservation of intact

  4. Demonstration of fibronectin in human articular cartilage by an indirect immunoperoxidase technique.

    PubMed

    Clemmensen, I; Hølund, B; Johansen, N; Andersen, R B

    1982-01-01

    Fresh frozen tissue sections of human articular cartilage was treated without and with human testicular hyaluronidase (2 x 10(6) units/l) for 60 min at 37 degrees C and stained by the indirect immunoperoxidase technique with rabbit antihuman fibronectin. The rabbit antihuman fibronectin was purified by affinity chromatography on human fibronectin-Sepharose. Fibronectin was only found on the acellular surface of the articular cartilage in tissue sections not treated with hyaluronidase. In this surface layer, probably identical to "lamina splendens", the arrangement of fibronectin was as a membrane. No collagen was seen in this area by van Gieson staining. No staining for fibronectin was found in the cartilage matrix or in the chondrocytes. Treatment of the cartilage tissue with hyaluronidase resulted in visualization of high amount of fibronectin in the cartilage matrix, with the highest intensity around the chondrocytes. The staining of the acellular surface layer of the articular cartilage was identical with the results obtained without hyaluronidase treatment. These results indicate that articular cartilage is rich in fibronectin probably in complex with hyaluronic acid, and that the chondrocytes produce fibronectin in situ. It also demonstrates the steric hindrance of hyaluronic acid aggregates in diffusion of the antibody and the value of hyaluronidase treatment of tissue before demonstration of fibronectin. PMID:6757202

  5. Loss of decorin from the surface zone of articular cartilage in a chick model of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Massé, P G; Carrino, D A; Morris, N; Wenger, L; Mahuren, J D; Howell, D S

    1997-11-01

    The objective of this study was to immunolocalize decorin and to assess changes as a result of pyridoxine (PN) deficiency in chick articular cartilage from femoral condyles. After maintenance on a normal diet for the first two weeks after hatching, 15 broiler chickens were deprived of this vitamin for 6 weeks. It was previously shown that the ankle joints of PN-deficient animals are swollen with effusions. They also present an abnormal gait, enlarged bony margins, and fissuring of the articular cartilages. Milder changes (no fissures) were also shown in the knee joints. Data from a previous study were suggestive that sulfated glycosaminoglycans are lost from the knee cartilage surface into synovial fluid. The current study was focused on the small proteoglycan, decorin, which coats the surface of collagen fibrils and may regulate their morphology. To examine decorin in normal and PN-deficient articular cartilage, a monoclonal antibody to an epitope on the protein core of decorin was used for immunohistochemical staining of tissue sections and for Western Blot analysis of cartilage extracts. Reduction of staining with the antibody was demonstrated in the tangential surface zone of PN-deficient cartilage, and Western Blot analysis showed reduced intensity of decorin bands compared to normal controls. These data suggest that a lack of decorin may play a role in the enlargement of collagen bundles in the tangential zone of PN-deficient articular cartilage as observed in a previous electron microscopic study.

  6. Effect of highly purified capsaicin on articular cartilage and rotator cuff tendon healing: An in vivo rabbit study.

    PubMed

    Friel, Nicole A; McNickle, Allison G; DeFranco, Michael J; Wang, FanChia; Shewman, Elizabeth F; Verma, Nikhil N; Cole, Brian J; Bach, Bernard R; Chubinskaya, Susan; Kramer, Susan M; Wang, Vincent M

    2015-12-01

    Highly purified capsaicin has emerged as a promising injectable compound capable of providing sustained pain relief following a single localized treatment during orthopedic surgical procedures. To further assess its reliability for clinical use, the potential effect of highly purified capsaicin on articular cartilage metabolism as well as tendon structure and function warrants clarification. In the current study, rabbits received unilateral supraspinatus transection and repair with a single 1 ml injection of capsaicin (R+C), PEG-only placebo (R+P), or saline (R+S) into the glenohumeral joint (GHJ). An additional group received 1 ml capsaicin onto an intact rotator cuff (I+C). At 18 weeks post-op, cartilage proteoglycan (PG) synthesis and content as well as cell viability were similar (p>0.05) across treatment groups. Biomechanical testing revealed no differences (p>0.05) among tendon repair treatment groups. Similarly, histologic features of both cartilage and repaired tendons showed minimal differences across groups. Hence, in this rabbit model, a single injection of highly purified capsaicin into the GHJ does not induce a deleterious response with regard to cartilage matrix metabolism and cell viability, or rotator cuff healing. These data provide further evidence supporting the use of injectable, highly purified capsaicin as a safe alternative for management of postoperative pain following GHJ surgery. PMID:26135547

  7. Effect of highly purified capsaicin on articular cartilage and rotator cuff tendon healing: An in vivo rabbit study.

    PubMed

    Friel, Nicole A; McNickle, Allison G; DeFranco, Michael J; Wang, FanChia; Shewman, Elizabeth F; Verma, Nikhil N; Cole, Brian J; Bach, Bernard R; Chubinskaya, Susan; Kramer, Susan M; Wang, Vincent M

    2015-12-01

    Highly purified capsaicin has emerged as a promising injectable compound capable of providing sustained pain relief following a single localized treatment during orthopedic surgical procedures. To further assess its reliability for clinical use, the potential effect of highly purified capsaicin on articular cartilage metabolism as well as tendon structure and function warrants clarification. In the current study, rabbits received unilateral supraspinatus transection and repair with a single 1 ml injection of capsaicin (R+C), PEG-only placebo (R+P), or saline (R+S) into the glenohumeral joint (GHJ). An additional group received 1 ml capsaicin onto an intact rotator cuff (I+C). At 18 weeks post-op, cartilage proteoglycan (PG) synthesis and content as well as cell viability were similar (p>0.05) across treatment groups. Biomechanical testing revealed no differences (p>0.05) among tendon repair treatment groups. Similarly, histologic features of both cartilage and repaired tendons showed minimal differences across groups. Hence, in this rabbit model, a single injection of highly purified capsaicin into the GHJ does not induce a deleterious response with regard to cartilage matrix metabolism and cell viability, or rotator cuff healing. These data provide further evidence supporting the use of injectable, highly purified capsaicin as a safe alternative for management of postoperative pain following GHJ surgery.

  8. Articular cartilage superficial zone collagen birefringence reduced and cartilage thickness increased before surface fibrillation in experimental osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Panula, H.; Hyttinen, M.; Arokoski, J.; Langsjo, T.; Pelttari, A.; Kiviranta, I.; Helminen, H.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To investigate articular cartilage collagen network, thickness of birefringent cartilage zones, and glycosaminoglycan concentration in macroscopically normal looking knee joint cartilage of young beagles subjected to experimental slowly progressive osteoarthritis (OA).
METHODS—OA was induced by a tibial 30° valgus osteotomy in 15 female beagles at the age of 3 months. Fifteen sisters were controls. Cartilage specimens were collected seven (Group 1) and 18 months (Group 2) postoperatively. Collagen induced optical path difference and cartilage zone thickness measurements were determined from histological sections of articular cartilage with smooth and intact surface by computer assisted quantitative polarised light microscopy. Volume density of cartilage collagen fibrils was determined by image analysis from transmission electron micrographs and content of glycosaminoglycans by quantitative digital densitometry from histological sections.
Results—In the superficial zone of the lateral tibial and femoral cartilage, the collagen induced optical path difference (birefringence) decreased by 19 to 71% (p < 0.05) seven months postoperatively. This suggests that severe superficial collagen fibril network deterioration took place, as 18 months postoperatively, macroscopic and microscopic OA was present in many cartilage areas. Thickness of the uncalcified cartilage increased while the superficial zone became thinner in the same sites. In operated dogs, glycosaminoglycan content first increased (Group 1) in the lateral tibial condyle and then decreased (Group 2) (p < 0.05).
Conclusion—In this OA model, derangement of the superficial zone collagen network was the probable reason for birefringence reduction. This change occurred well before macroscopic OA.

 Keywords: cartilage; birefringence PMID:9709181

  9. Dependence of nanoscale friction and adhesion properties of articular cartilage on contact load.

    PubMed

    Chan, S M T; Neu, C P; Komvopoulos, K; Reddi, A H

    2011-04-29

    Boundary lubrication of articular cartilage by conformal, molecularly thin films reduces friction and adhesion between asperities at the cartilage-cartilage contact interface when the contact conditions are not conducive to fluid film lubrication. In this study, the nanoscale friction and adhesion properties of articular cartilage from typical load-bearing and non-load-bearing joint regions were studied in the boundary lubrication regime under a range of physiological contact pressures using an atomic force microscope (AFM). Adhesion of load-bearing cartilage was found to be much lower than that of non-load-bearing cartilage. In addition, load-bearing cartilage demonstrated steady and low friction coefficient through the entire load range examined, whereas non-load-bearing cartilage showed higher friction coefficient that decreased nonlinearly with increasing normal load. AFM imaging and roughness calculations indicated that the above trends in the nanotribological properties of cartilage are not due to topographical (roughness) differences. However, immunohistochemistry revealed consistently higher surface concentration of boundary lubricant at load-bearing joint regions. The results of this study suggest that under contact conditions leading to joint starvation from fluid lubrication, the higher content of boundary lubricant at load-bearing cartilage sites preserves synovial joint function by minimizing adhesion and wear at asperity microcontacts, which are precursors for tissue degeneration.

  10. The study on the mechanical characteristics of articular cartilage in simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Hai-Jun; Wang, Qing; Wang, Yue-Xiang; Li, Ang; Sun, Lian-Wen; Yan, Yan; Fan, Fan; Li, De-Yu; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2012-10-01

    The microgravity environment of a long-term space flight may induce acute changes in an astronaut's musculo-skeletal systems. This study explores the effects of simulated microgravity on the mechanical characteristics of articular cartilage. Six rats underwent tail suspension for 14 days and six additional rats were kept under normal earth gravity as controls. Swelling strains were measured using high-frequency ultrasound in all cartilage samples subject to osmotic loading. Site-specific swelling strain data were used in a triphasic theoretical model of cartilage swelling to determine the uniaxial modulus of the cartilage solid matrix. No severe surface irregularities were found in the cartilage samples obtained from the control or tail-suspended groups. For the tail-suspended group, the thickness of the cartilage at a specified site, as determined by ultrasound echo, showed a minor decrease. The uniaxial modulus of articular cartilage at the specified site decreased significantly, from (6.31 ± 3.37)MPa to (5.05 ± 2.98)MPa ( p < 0.05). The histology-stained image of a cartilage sample also showed a reduced number of chondrocytes and decreased degree of matrix staining. These results demonstrated that the 14 d simulated microgravity induced significant effects on the mechanical characteristics of articular cartilage. This study is the first attempt to explore the effects of simulated microgravity on the mechanical characteristics of articular cartilage using an osmotic loading method and a triphasic model. The conclusions may provide reference information for manned space flights and a better understanding of the effects of microgravity on the skeletal system.

  11. Role of computer aided detection (CAD) integration: case study with meniscal and articular cartilage CAD applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safdar, Nabile; Ramakrishna, Bharath; Saiprasad, Ganesh; Siddiqui, Khan; Siegel, Eliot

    2008-03-01

    Knee-related injuries involving the meniscal or articular cartilage are common and require accurate diagnosis and surgical intervention when appropriate. With proper techniques and experience, confidence in detection of meniscal tears and articular cartilage abnormalities can be quite high. However, for radiologists without musculoskeletal training, diagnosis of such abnormalities can be challenging. In this paper, the potential of improving diagnosis through integration of computer-aided detection (CAD) algorithms for automatic detection of meniscal tears and articular cartilage injuries of the knees is studied. An integrated approach in which the results of algorithms evaluating either meniscal tears or articular cartilage injuries provide feedback to each other is believed to improve the diagnostic accuracy of the individual CAD algorithms due to the known association between abnormalities in these distinct anatomic structures. The correlation between meniscal tears and articular cartilage injuries is exploited to improve the final diagnostic results of the individual algorithms. Preliminary results from the integrated application are encouraging and more comprehensive tests are being planned.

  12. Immunohistochemical demonstration of fibronectin in the most superficial layer of normal rabbit articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, K; Inoue, H; Murakami, T

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To locate fibronectin ultrastructurally in the most superficial layer of normal articular cartilage of rabbits, in order to clarify its role in joint physiology. METHODS--Articular cartilage was obtained from the femoral condyle of seven normal adult rabbits and prepared by a method that included tannic acid fixation. Polyclonal antibodies against rabbit fibronectin were used in an immunohistochemical electron microscopic study, without any enzymic digestion but with a pre-embedding method for the transmission electron microscopy. RESULTS--The cartilage surface was successfully preserved by tannic acid fixation. The most superficial layer in electron photomicrographs was approximately 200-300 nm thick, cell free, and appeared to have two parallel components: the more superficial lamina and the deeper lamina. Gold labelled fibronectin lined this layer in immunohistochemical electron photomicrographs. CONCLUSIONS--Fibronectin covering the surface of the articular cartilage may have a role in joint lubrication and protection of the cartilage by binding with the collagenous matrix and hyaluronic acid in synovial fluid. Chondroitin sulphates may act as a charge barrier in close relationship with the collagen fibrils in the deeper lamina. Significant alteration in these functions may be one of the first causal steps leading to destruction of the articular cartilage. Images PMID:8546534

  13. Investigation of the friction and surface degradation of innovative chondroplasty materials against articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Northwood, E; Fisher, J; Kowalski, R

    2007-04-01

    Understanding the wear of the biomaterial-cartilage interface is vital for the development of innovative chondroplasty. The aim of this study was to investigate a number of biphasic materials as potential chondroplasty biomaterials. Simple geometry friction and wear studies were conducted using bovine articular cartilage pins loaded against a range of single-phase and biphasic materials. The frictions of each biomaterial was compared within simple and protein-containing lubricants. Longer-term continuous sliding tests within a protein containing lubricant were also conducted at various loading conditions to evaluate the friction and degradation for each surface. All single-phase materials showed a steady rise in friction, which was dependent on the loss of interstitial fluid load support from the opposing cartilage pin. All biphasic materials demonstrated a marked reduction in friction when compared with the single-phase materials. It is postulated that the biphasic nature of each material allowed an element of fluid load support to be maintained by fluid rehydration and expulsion. In the longer-term study, significant differences in the articular cartilage pin (surface damage) between the positive control (stainless steel) and the negative control (articular cartilage) was found. The potential biphasic chondroplasty materials produced a reduction in articular cartilage pin damage when compared with the single-phase materials. The changes in surface topography of the cartilage pin were associated with increased levels of friction achieved during the continuous wear test. The study illustrated the importance of the biphasic properties of potential chondroplasty materials, and future work will focus on the optimization of biphasic properties as well as long-term durability, such that materials will more closely mimic the biotribology of natural articular cartilage.

  14. Modeling the transport of cryoprotective agents in articular cartilage for cryopreservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torqabeh, Alireza Abazari

    Loading vitrifiable concentrations of cryoprotective agents is an important step for cryopreservation of biological tissues by vitrification for research and transplantation purposes. This may be done by immersing the tissue in a cryoprotective agent (CPA) solution, and increasing the concentration, continuously or in multiple steps, and simultaneously decreasing the temperature to decrease the toxicity effects of the cryoprotective agent on the tissue cellular system. During cryoprotective agent loading, osmotic water movement from the tissue to the surrounding solution, and the resultant tissue shrinkage and stress-strain in the tissue matrix as well as on the cellular system can significantly alter the outcome of the cryopreservation protocol. In this thesis, a biomechanical model for articular cartilage is developed to account for the transport of the cryoprotective agent, the nonideal-nondilute properties of the vitrifiable solutions, the osmotic water movement and the resultant tissue shrinkage and stress-strain in the tissue matrix, and the osmotic volume change of the chondrocytes, during cryoprotective agent loading in the cartilage matrix. Four essential transport parameters needed for the model were specified, the values of which were obtained uniquely by fitting the model to experimental data from porcine articular cartilage. Then, it was shown that using real nonuniform initial distributions of water and fixed charges in cartilage, measured separately in this thesis using MRI, in the model can significantly affect the model predictions. The model predictions for dimethyl sulfoxide diffusion in porcine articular cartilage were verified by comparing to spatially and temporally resolved measurements of dimethyl sulfoxide concentration in porcine articular cartilage using a spectral MRI technique, developed for this purpose and novel to the field of cryobiology. It was demonstrated in this thesis that the developed mathematical model provides a novel tool

  15. Effects of Chondroitinase ABC-Mediated Proteoglycan Digestion on Decellularization and Recellularization of Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, Catherine A.; Park, Hee Jun; Mazur, Courtney M.; Aaron, Roy K.

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage has a limited capacity to heal itself and thus focal defects often result in the development of osteoarthritis. Current cartilage tissue engineering strategies seek to regenerate injured tissue by creating scaffolds that aim to mimic the unique structure and composition of native articular cartilage. Decellularization is a novel strategy that aims to preserve the bioactive factors and 3D biophysical environment of the native extracellular matrix while removing potentially immunogenic factors. The purpose of this study was to develop a procedure that can enable decellularization and recellularization of intact articular cartilage matrix. Full-thickness porcine articular cartilage plugs were decellularized with a series of freeze-thaw cycles and 0.1% (w/v) sodium dodecyl sulfate detergent cycles. Chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) was applied before the detergent cycles to digest glycosaminoglycans in order to enhance donor chondrocyte removal and seeded cell migration. Porcine synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells were seeded onto the decellularized cartilage scaffolds and cultured for up to 28 days. The optimized decellularization protocol removed 94% of native DNA per sample wet weight, while collagen content and alignment were preserved. Glycosaminoglycan depletion prior to the detergent cycles increased removal of nuclear material. Seeded cells infiltrated up to 100 μm into the cartilage deep zone after 28 days in culture. ChABC treatment enhances decellularization of the relatively dense, impermeable articular cartilage by reducing glycosaminoglycan content. ChABC treatment did not appear to affect cell migration during recellularization under static, in vitro culture, highlighting the need for more dynamic seeding methods. PMID:27391810

  16. Exploiting endogenous fibrocartilage stem cells to regenerate cartilage and repair joint injury

    PubMed Central

    Embree, Mildred C.; Chen, Mo; Pylawka, Serhiy; Kong, Danielle; Iwaoka, George M.; Kalajzic, Ivo; Yao, Hai; Shi, Chancheng; Sun, Dongming; Sheu, Tzong-Jen; Koslovsky, David A.; Koch, Alia; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue regeneration using stem cell-based transplantation faces many hurdles. Alternatively, therapeutically exploiting endogenous stem cells to regenerate injured or diseased tissue may circumvent these challenges. Here we show resident fibrocartilage stem cells (FCSCs) can be used to regenerate and repair cartilage. We identify FCSCs residing within the superficial zone niche in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condyle. A single FCSC spontaneously generates a cartilage anlage, remodels into bone and organizes a haematopoietic microenvironment. Wnt signals deplete the reservoir of FCSCs and cause cartilage degeneration. We also show that intra-articular treatment with the Wnt inhibitor sclerostin sustains the FCSC pool and regenerates cartilage in a TMJ injury model. We demonstrate the promise of exploiting resident FCSCs as a regenerative therapeutic strategy to substitute cell transplantation that could be beneficial for patients suffering from fibrocartilage injury and disease. These data prompt the examination of utilizing this strategy for other musculoskeletal tissues. PMID:27721375

  17. Autologous chondrocyte repair of an articular defect in the humeral head.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Anthony A; Cole, Brian J; Mazzocca, Augustus D; Fox, Jeff A; Freeman, Kevin B; Joy, Edward

    2002-10-01

    Articular cartilage lesions remain a difficult problem for the patient and physician. A variety of procedures and treatments have been proposed to lessen symptoms and restore the articular surface. The knee joint has been the focus of the vast majority of these cartilage restoration procedures. Articular cartilage lesions of the humerus are significantly less common, and their management remains poorly defined. This paper presents a case report of a young athlete with a large full-thickness articular cartilage defect of the proximal humerus and subsequent treatment using autologous chondrocyte implantation.

  18. Are Articular Cartilage Lesions and Meniscus Tears Predictive of IKDC, KOOS, and Marx Activity Level Outcomes after ACL Reconstruction? A 6-Year Multicenter Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Charles L.; Huston, Laura J.; Dunn, Warren R.; Reinke, Emily K.; Nwosu, Samuel K.; Parker, Richard D.; Wright, Rick W.; Kaeding, Christopher C.; Marx, Robert G.; Amendola, Annunziata; McCarty, Eric C.; Wolf, Brian R.; Harrell, Frank E.; Spindler, Kurt P.

    2014-01-01

    on the MFC. Lateral meniscus repairs did not correlate with inferior results, but medial meniscus repairs predicted worse IKDC and KOOS scores. Lateral meniscus tears left alone significantly improved prognosis. Small partial meniscectomies (<33%) on the medial meniscus fared worse, but conversely, larger excisions (>50%) on either the medial or lateral menisci improved prognosis. Analogous to previous studies, other significant predictors of lower outcome scores were lower baseline scores, higher BMI, lower education level, smoking, and ACL revisions. Conclusions Both articular cartilage injury and meniscal tears/treatment at the time of ACLR were significant predictors of IKDC and KOOS scores 6 years following ACLR. Similarly, having a grade 4 MFC lesion significantly reduced a patient’s Marx activity level score at 6 years. PMID:24647881

  19. Indentation stiffness of young canine knee articular cartilage--influence of strenuous joint loading.

    PubMed

    Jurvelin, J; Kiviranta, I; Säämänen, A M; Tammi, M; Helminen, H J

    1990-01-01

    The indentation stiffness of knee articular cartilage subjected to strenuous physical training (SPT: treadmill running 20 km day-1 for 15 weeks, n = 6) of young Beagles was tested and compared to that obtained from age-matched (55 weeks, n = 9) controls. The mathematical solution for the shear modulus, as determined from indentation of an elastic layer bonded to a rigid half space, was extended to small Poisson's ratios and applied to the analysis of cartilage response after a step stress (0.39 MPa) application. In these measurements with an impervious, plane-ended indenter, the equilibrium deformation was systematically greater than values predicted from the instant response by the linear biphasic theory. Therefore, the accurate determination of Poisson's ratio from the creep curves was not possible. The mean shear modulus (calculated by using the deformation at 900 s after load application and assuming a constant Poisson's ratio of 0.40 for the matrix) of canine knee articular cartilage was 0.37 MPa. While the cartilage thickness was not affected by SPT, the cartilage of the lateral tibial plateau was stiffer (13.3%, p less than 0.05) than that in controls. However, in the femoral condyles, the stiffness was at the control level or even below. Our results on cartilage structure and properties suggest that SPT, in contrast to our previous findings with moderate training, does not necessarily improve the biological properties of articular cartilage in young animals.

  20. What can biophotonics tell us about the 3D microstructure of articular cartilage?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Connective tissues such as articular cartilage have been the subject of study using novel optical techniques almost since the invention of polarized light microscopy (PLM). Early studies of polarized light micrographs were the main evidential basis for the establishment of quantitative models of articular cartilage collagen structure by Benninghoff and others. Even now, state of the art optical techniques including quantitative polarized light microscopy (qPLM), optical coherence tomography (OCT), polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT), second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) microscopy, Raman and optical hyperspectral reflectance and fluorescence imaging are providing new insights into articular cartilage structure from the nanoscale through to the mesoscale. New insights are promised by emerging modalities such as optical elastography. This short review highlights some key recent results from modern optical techniques. PMID:25694964

  1. Irrigating solutions used in arthroscopy and their effect on articular cartilage. An in vivo study

    SciTech Connect

    Arciero, R.A.; Little, J.S.; Liebenberg, S.P.; Parr, T.J.

    1986-11-01

    The effect of arthroscopic irrigating solutions on articular cartilage was determined by the use of an animal model. Rabbit knee joints were irrigated continuously for two hours with either normal saline, Ringer's lactate, or sterile water. Subsequently, the rate of incorporation of /sup 35/SO/sub 4/ by articular cartilage was used to measure the effect of the irrigants on chondrocyte metabolism. In addition, the irrigated groups were compared to an unirrigated control group. There was no significant difference in /sup 35/SO/sub 4/ incorporation between the groups. This suggested that none of the irrigating solutions used in this study adversely affected articular cartilage function. On the basis of these findings, it appears that normal saline, Ringer's lactate, and sterile water can be safely used as irrigating solutions during most arthroscopic procedures.

  2. What can biophotonics tell us about the 3D microstructure of articular cartilage?

    PubMed

    Matcher, Stephen J

    2015-02-01

    Connective tissues such as articular cartilage have been the subject of study using novel optical techniques almost since the invention of polarized light microscopy (PLM). Early studies of polarized light micrographs were the main evidential basis for the establishment of quantitative models of articular cartilage collagen structure by Benninghoff and others. Even now, state of the art optical techniques including quantitative polarized light microscopy (qPLM), optical coherence tomography (OCT), polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT), second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) microscopy, Raman and optical hyperspectral reflectance and fluorescence imaging are providing new insights into articular cartilage structure from the nanoscale through to the mesoscale. New insights are promised by emerging modalities such as optical elastography. This short review highlights some key recent results from modern optical techniques. PMID:25694964

  3. Autoradiographic evidence of sup 125 I-. beta. -endorphin binding sites in the articular cartilage of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Castano, M.T.; Freire-Garabal, M.; Giraldez, M.; Nunez, M.J.; Belmonte, A.; Couceiro, J.; Jorge, J. )

    1991-01-01

    After {sup 125}I-{beta}-endorphin was intravenously injected to rats, an autoradiographic study of distal femur articular cartilage was performed. Results show a specific binding of {sup 125}I-{beta}-endorphin to chondrocytes, suggesting the possible existence of an opiate modulation of articular cartilage.

  4. Progression of Gene Expression Changes following a Mechanical Injury to Articular Cartilage as a Model of Early Stage Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    McCulloch, R. S.; Ashwell, M. S.; Maltecca, C.; O'Nan, A. T.; Mente, P. L.

    2014-01-01

    An impact injury model of early stage osteoarthritis (OA) progression was developed using a mechanical insult to an articular cartilage surface to evaluate differential gene expression changes over time and treatment. Porcine patellae with intact cartilage surfaces were randomized to one of three treatments: nonimpacted control, axial impaction (2000 N), or a shear impaction (500 N axial, with tangential displacement to induce shear forces). After impact, the patellae were returned to culture for 0, 3, 7, or 14 days. At the appropriate time point, RNA was extracted from full-thickness cartilage slices at the impact site. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to evaluate differential gene expression for 18 OA related genes from four categories: cartilage matrix, degradative enzymes and inhibitors, inflammatory response and signaling, and cell apoptosis. The shear impacted specimens were compared to the axial impacted specimens and showed that shear specimens more highly expressed type I collagen (Col1a1) at the early time points. In addition, there was generally elevated expression of degradative enzymes, inflammatory response genes, and apoptosis markers at the early time points. These changes suggest that the more physiologically relevant shear loading may initially be more damaging to the cartilage and induces more repair efforts after loading. PMID:25478225

  5. Identification of a Prg4-positive articular cartilage progenitor cell population

    PubMed Central

    Kozhemyakina, Elena; Zhang, Minjie; Ionescu, Andreia; Ayturk, Ugur M.; Ono, Noriaki; Kobayashi, Akio; Kronenberg, Henry; Warman, Matthew L.; Lassar, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We generated knock-in mice that express a tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase from the Prg4 locus (Prg4GFPCreERt2), and used these animals to fate-map the progeny of Prg4-positive articular cartilage cells at various ages. Methods We crossed Prg4GFPCreERt2 mice to Rosa26floxlacZ or Rosa26mTmG reporter strains, administered tamoxifen to the double heterozygous offspring at different ages, and assayed Cre-mediated recombination by histochemistry and/or fluorescence microscopy. Results In 1-month-old mice, the expression of the Prg4GFPCreERt2 allele mirrors expression of endogenous Prg4 and, when tamoxifen is given for 10 days, causes Cre-mediated recombination in ~70% of the superficial-most chondrocytes. Prg4GFPCreERt2 expressing cells are mostly confined to the top three cell layers of the articular cartilage in 1-month-old mice, but descendants of these cells are located in deeper regions of the articular cartilage in aged mice. At embryonic day 17.5, Prg4GFPCreERt2 expressing cells are largely restricted to the superficial-most cell layer of the forming joint, yet at approximately 1 year, progeny of these cells span the depth of the articular cartilage. Conclusions Our results indicate that Prg4-expressing cells located at the joint surface in the embryo serve as a progenitor population for all deeper layers of the mature articular cartilage. Also, our data reveal that Prg4GFPCreERt2 is expressed by superficial chondrocytes in young mice, but expands into deeper regions of the articular cartilage as the animals age. The Prg4GFPCreERt2 allele should be a useful tool for inducing efficient Cre-mediated recombination of floxed alleles at sites of Prg4 expression. PMID:25603997

  6. [Basophilic line of the articular cartilage in normal and various pathological states].

    PubMed

    Gongadze, L R

    1987-04-01

    Epiphyses of long tubular bones in the man and animals of various age, as well as experimental material of the adjuvant arthritis, with special reference to the basal part of the articular cartilage have been studied by means of histological, histochemical and histometrical methods. The structural-chemical organization of the basophilic line (tidemark) of the articular cartilage ensures its barrier role and participation in regulating selective permeability. Reconstruction of the tidemark in the process of physiological ageing and in cases of the articular pathology is aimed to preserve its integrity and in this way a complete differentiation of the noncalcified and calcified structures is secured. Disturbance of the basophilic line results in changes of the articular selective permeability, in invasion of vessels and structural elements of the bone marrow, and in development of profound distrophic and destructive changes of the cartilage--in deforming artrosis. Deflations in the structural-chemical organization of the tidemark indicate certain disturbances in the state of the system articular cartilage--subchondral bone. These data can be of prognostic importance.

  7. Prolonged effect of iodoacetate on articular cartilage and its modification by an anti-rheumatic drug.

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, J.; Hoedt-Schmidt, S.; Kalbhen, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The intra-articular injection of iodoacetate into the knee joint of rats produced changes in the articular cartilage which resembled those of osteoarthritis. It caused virtually total loss of many of the oxidative enzymes, indicating inhibition of the main oxidative pathways. Treatment with an anti-rheumatic drug had little early effect but ultimately led to partial restoration of these pathways. The reduced progression of cartilage degradation induced by this drug was accompanied by some unusual histological features. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8334078

  8. The effects of joint immobilization on articular cartilage of the knee in previously exercised rats

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, Diogo Correa; da Silva, Marcelo Cavenaghi Pereira; Neto, Semaan El-Razi; Souza, Mônica Rodrigues; Souza, Romeu Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    Studies have determined the effects of joint immobilization on the articular cartilage of sedentary animals, but we are not aware of any studies reporting the effects of joint immobilization in previously trained animals. The objective of the present study was to determine whether exercise could prevent degeneration of the articular cartilage that accompanies joint immobilization. We used light microscopy to study the thickness, cell density, nuclear size, and collagen density of articular cartilage of the femoral condyle of Wistar rats subjected to aerobic physical activity on an adapted treadmill five times per week. Four groups of Wistar rats were used: a control group (C), an immobilized group (I), an exercised group (E), and an exercised and then immobilized group (EI). The right knee joints from rats in groups I and EI were immobilized at 90 °C of flexion using a plastic cast for 8 weeks. Cartilage thickness decreased significantly in group I (mean, 120.14 ± 15.6 μm, P < 0.05), but not in group EI (mean, 174 ± 2.25), and increased significantly in group E (mean, 289.49 ± 9.15) compared with group C (mean, 239.20 ± 6.25). The same results were obtained for cell density, nuclear size, and collagen density (in all cases, P < 0.05). We concluded that exercise can prevent degenerative changes in femoral articular cartilage caused by immobilization of the knee joint. PMID:23480127

  9. Quantitative MRI Evaluation of Articular Cartilage Using T2 Mapping Following Hip Arthroscopy for Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Stephanie W.; Wagner, Naomi; Fields, Kara G.; Wentzel, Catherine; Burge, Alissa; Potter, Hollis G.; Lyman, Stephen; Kelly, Bryan T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) causes a shearing and delamination injury to the acetabular articular cartilage due to a mismatch between the size of the femoral head and the acetabulum. This mechanism is thought to lead to early osteoarthritis in this population. Cam decompression has been advocated to eliminate impingement, with the ultimate goal of halting the progression of articular cartilage delamination. Although outcomes following this procedure in the young adult population have been favorable at short and medium term follow up, it is not known whether the articular cartilage itself is protected from further injury by changing the biomechanics of the joint with decompression of the cam morphology. The purpose of this study is to compare the pre- and post-operative integrity of the acetabular articular cartilage using T2 mapping to determine if hip arthroscopy is protective of the articular cartilage at short- to medium term follow up. Methods: Males between 18 and 35 years of age who had pre-operative T2 mapping MRIs, underwent hip arthroscopy for cam or mixed-type FAI with an alpha angle greater than 50°, and had at least 2 year follow-up were identified. Post-operative MRIs were performed and T2 relaxation times in the transition zone and weight bearing articular cartilage in the anterosuperior acetabulum at deep and superficial chondral layers were recorded at nine points on three sagittal sequences on pre and post-operative MRIs. A paired t-test was used to compare T2 relaxation values between pre-operative and post-operative scans. Results: Eleven hips were evaluated. Mean age was 26.3 years (range 21 - 35). Mean follow up time to post-operative T2 mapping MRI was 2.6 years (range 2.4 - 2.7). The change in T2 relaxation time was not significantly different between pre- and post-operative MRI scans for any of the nine regions in the deep zone of the acetabular cartilage (p=0.065 - 0.969) or the superficial zone of the

  10. Pulsed CO2 laser for intra-articular cartilage vaporization and subchondral bone perforation in horses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, Alan J.; Roth, Jerry E.; Krook, Lennart P.

    1991-05-01

    A pulsed carbon dioxide laser was used to vaporize articular cartilage in four horses, and perforate the cartilage and subchondral bone in four horses. Both intercarpal joints were examined arthroscopically and either a 1 cm cartilage crater or a series of holes was created in the third carpal bone of one joint. The contralateral carpus served as a control. The horses were evaluated clinically for 8 weeks, euthanatized and the joints examined radiographically, grossly, and histologically. Pulsed carbon dioxide laser vaporized cartilage readily but penetrated bone poorly. Cartilage vaporization resulted in no greater swelling, heat, pain on flexion, lameness, or synovial fluid reaction than the sham procedure. Laser drilling resulted in a shallow, charred hole with a tenacious carbon residue, and in combination with the thermal damage to deeper bone, resulted in increased swelling, mild lameness and a low-grade, but persistent synovitis. Cartilage removal by laser vaporization resulted in rapid regrowth with fibrous and fibrovascular tissue and occasional regions of fibrocartilage at week 8. The subchondral bone, synovial membrane, and draining lymph nodes appeared essentially unaffected by the laser cartilage vaporization procedure. Conversely, carbon dioxide laser drilling of subchondral bone resulted in poor penetration, extensive areas of thermal necrosis of bone, and significant secondary damage to the apposing articular surface of the radial carpal bone. The carbon dioxide laser is a useful intraarticular instrument for removal of cartilage and has potential application in inaccessible regions of diarthrodial joints. It does not penetrate bone sufficiently to have application in subchondral drilling.

  11. State of the art and future perspectives of articular cartilage regeneration: a focus on adipose-derived stem cells and platelet-derived products.

    PubMed

    Hildner, F; Albrecht, C; Gabriel, C; Redl, H; van Griensven, M

    2011-04-01

    Trauma, malposition and age-related degeneration of articular cartilage often result in severe lesions that do not heal spontaneously. Many efforts over the last centuries have been undertaken to support cartilage healing, with approaches ranging from symptomatic treatment to structural cartilage regeneration. Microfracture and matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) can be regarded as one of the most effective techniques available today to treat traumatic cartilage defects. Research is focused on the development of new biomaterials, which are intended to provide optimized physical and biochemical conditions for cell proliferation and cartilage synthesis. New attempts have also been undertaken to replace chondrocytes with cells that are more easily available and cause less donor site morbidity, e.g. adipose derived stem cells (ASC). The number of in vitro studies on adult stem cells has rapidly increased during the last decade, indicating that many variables have yet to be optimized to direct stem cells towards the desired lineage. The present review gives an overview of the difficulties of cartilage repair and current cartilage repair techniques. Moreover, it reviews new fields of cartilage tissue engineering, including stem cells, co-cultures and platelet-rich plasma (PRP).

  12. Treatment and Prevention of (Early) Osteoarthritis Using Articular Cartilage Repair—Fact or Fiction? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    de Windt, Tommy S.; Vonk, Lucienne A.; Brittberg, Mats

    2013-01-01

    Early osteoarthritis (OA) is increasingly being recognized in patients who wish to remain active while not accepting the limitations of conservative treatment or joint replacement. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the existing evidence for treatment of patients with early OA using articular cartilage repair techniques. A systematic search was performed in EMBASE, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane collaboration. Articles were screened for relevance and appraised for quality. Nine articles of generally low methodological quality (mean Coleman score 58) including a total of 502 patients (mean age range = 36-57 years) could be included. In the reports, both radiological and clinical criteria for early OA were applied. Of all patients included in this review, 75% were treated with autologous chondrocyte implantation. Good short-term clinical outcome up to 9 years was shown. Failure rates varied from 8% to 27.3%. The conversion to total knee arthroplasty rate was 2.5% to 6.5%. Although a (randomized controlled) trial in this patient category with long-term follow-up is needed, the literature suggests autologous chondrocyte implantation could provide good short- to mid-term clinical outcome and delay the need for total knee arthroplasty. The use of standardized criteria for early OA and implementation of (randomized) trials with long-term follow-up may allow for further expansion of the research field in articular cartilage repair to the challenging population with (early) OA. PMID:26069664

  13. Mechanisms of disruption of the articular cartilage surface in inflammation. Neutrophil elastase increases availability of collagen type II epitopes for binding with antibody on the surface of articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Jasin, H E; Taurog, J D

    1991-01-01

    We recently observed that specific antibodies to type II collagen do not bind in appreciable amounts to the intact surface of articular cartilage, whereas antibodies to the minor collagen types V, VI, and IX do. These results suggest that the outermost cartilage surface layer prevented interaction of the antibodies with the major collagen type in articular cartilage. The present studies were designed to investigate the pathogenic mechanisms involved in the disruption of the cartilage surface layer in inflammatory arthritis. Articular cartilage obtained from rabbits undergoing acute antigen-induced arthritis of 72 h duration showed a significant increase in binding of anti-type II antibody to cartilage surfaces compared with normal control cartilage (P less than 0.01). Augmentation of anti-type II binding was also observed upon in vitro incubation of bovine articular slices or intact rabbit patellar cartilage for 1 h with human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), PMN lysates, or purified human PMN elastase. This increase was not inhibited by sodium azide, nor was it enhanced by incubation of cartilage with the strong oxidant hypochlorous acid. Chondrocyte-mediated matrix proteoglycan degradation in cartilage explants cultured in the presence of cytokines failed to increase antibody binding appreciably. The augmentation in antibody binding seen with PMN lysates was inhibited by the nonspecific serine-esterase inhibitor PMSF, but not by the divalent metal chelator EDTA. The elastase-specific inhibitor AAPVCMK also inhibited most of the PMN-induced increase in antibody binding, whereas the cathepsin G-specific inhibitor GLPCMK was much less effective. Incubation of intact cartilage with purified human PMN elastase indicated that this serine esterase could account for the increase in anti-type II collagen antibody binding to intact cartilage surfaces. These studies suggest that in an inflammatory response, PMN-derived elastase degrades the outer layer of articular

  14. Cartilage change after arthroscopic repair for an isolated meniscal tear.

    PubMed

    Soejima, Takashi; Murakami, Hidetaka; Inoue, Takashi; Kanazawa, Tomonoshin; Katouda, Michihiro; Nagata, Kensei

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the direct effect to the cartilage caused by the meniscal repair, we examined patients who underwent an isolated meniscal repair without any other abnormalities by arthroscopic examination. A total of 17 patients were examined by second-look arthroscopy after an average interval of 9 months from the meniscal repair, and have been evaluated the status of the repaired meniscus and of the relative femoral condylar cartilage. Changes in the severity of the cartilage lesion between at the time of meniscal repair and the time of the second-look arthroscopy were considered based on the status of the repaired meniscus. Regardless of the healing status of the repair site, it was possible to prevent degeneration in the cartilage in 9 of the 10 patients who demonstrated no degeneration in the meniscal body. Of the 7 patients who demonstrated degeneration in the meniscal body, progression in cartilage degeneration was noted as 1 grade in 2 patients and 2 grades in another 3 patients. Even in those in which stable fusion of the repair site was achieved, the condition of the inner meniscal body was not necessarily maintained favorably in all cases, indicating that degeneration in the meniscal body was a risk factor for cartilage degeneration. It was concluded that recovery could not be expected even at 9 months after the repair if the lesion had already demonstrated degeneration in the meniscal body at the time of repair.

  15. In Vivo Dynamic Deformation of Articular Cartilage in Intact Joints Loaded by Controlled Muscular Contractions.

    PubMed

    Abusara, Ziad; Von Kossel, Markus; Herzog, Walter

    2016-01-01

    When synovial joints are loaded, the articular cartilage and the cells residing in it deform. Cartilage deformation has been related to structural tissue damage, and cell deformation has been associated with cell signalling and corresponding anabolic and catabolic responses. Despite the acknowledged importance of cartilage and cell deformation, there are no dynamic data on these measures from joints of live animals using muscular load application. Research in this area has typically been done using confined and unconfined loading configurations and indentation testing. These loading conditions can be well controlled and allow for accurate measurements of cartilage and cell deformations, but they have little to do with the contact mechanics occurring in a joint where non-congruent cartilage surfaces with different material and functional properties are pressed against each other by muscular forces. The aim of this study was to measure in vivo, real time articular cartilage deformations for precisely controlled static and dynamic muscular loading conditions in the knees of mice. Fifty and 80% of the maximal knee extensor muscular force (equivalent to approximately 0.4N and 0.6N) produced average peak articular cartilage strains of 10.5±1.0% and 18.3±1.3% (Mean ± SD), respectively, during 8s contractions. A sequence of 15 repeat, isometric muscular contractions (0.5s on, 3.5s off) of 50% and 80% of maximal muscular force produced cartilage strains of 3.0±1.1% and 9.6±1.5% (Mean ± SD) on the femoral condyles of the mouse knee. Cartilage thickness recovery following mechanical compression was highly viscoelastic and took almost 50s following force removal in the static tests. PMID:26807930

  16. In Vivo Dynamic Deformation of Articular Cartilage in Intact Joints Loaded by Controlled Muscular Contractions

    PubMed Central

    Abusara, Ziad; Von Kossel, Markus; Herzog, Walter

    2016-01-01

    When synovial joints are loaded, the articular cartilage and the cells residing in it deform. Cartilage deformation has been related to structural tissue damage, and cell deformation has been associated with cell signalling and corresponding anabolic and catabolic responses. Despite the acknowledged importance of cartilage and cell deformation, there are no dynamic data on these measures from joints of live animals using muscular load application. Research in this area has typically been done using confined and unconfined loading configurations and indentation testing. These loading conditions can be well controlled and allow for accurate measurements of cartilage and cell deformations, but they have little to do with the contact mechanics occurring in a joint where non-congruent cartilage surfaces with different material and functional properties are pressed against each other by muscular forces. The aim of this study was to measure in vivo, real time articular cartilage deformations for precisely controlled static and dynamic muscular loading conditions in the knees of mice. Fifty and 80% of the maximal knee extensor muscular force (equivalent to approximately 0.4N and 0.6N) produced average peak articular cartilage strains of 10.5±1.0% and 18.3±1.3% (Mean ± SD), respectively, during 8s contractions. A sequence of 15 repeat, isometric muscular contractions (0.5s on, 3.5s off) of 50% and 80% of maximal muscular force produced cartilage strains of 3.0±1.1% and 9.6±1.5% (Mean ± SD) on the femoral condyles of the mouse knee. Cartilage thickness recovery following mechanical compression was highly viscoelastic and took almost 50s following force removal in the static tests. PMID:26807930

  17. Age related changes and osteochondrosis in swine articular and epiphyseal cartilage: light ane electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, R; Christian, R G; Nakano, T; Aherne, F X; Thompson, J R

    1981-01-01

    Age related changes and osteochondrosis in swine were studied using light microscopy and electron microscopy in articular cartilage and light microscopy and epiphyseal cartilage of swine from three days to 30 weeks of age. Thickness, cellularity and vascularity of both the epiphyseal and articular cartilage, decreased as the swine aged. Osteochondrotic changes included formation of "plugs" of cartilage indicating localized failure of ossification and separation and space formation in epiphyseal cartilage. Eosinophilic streaks and space formation in epiphyseal cartilage was observed in relation to epiphyseal separation. Electron microscopy showed a continuous fibrillar layer on the surface of the cartilage corresponding to the lamina splendens of light microscopy. This layer increased in the thickness and showed accumulation of amorphous material between the fibrils with aging. In the matrix, the orientation and distribution of the collagen fibers changed with growth and thicker fibers with clear sub banding were more common in older age groups. Also, necrotic cells, glycogen containing bodies and cellular debris were noticed in the matrix of normal cartilage in old animals. Chondrocytes in the younger cartilage showed accumulation of organelles responsible for protein synthesis; while Golgi bodies, vesicles, lysosomes, well developed foot processes and other inclusions were noticed in older cartilage. Cartilage erosions had a clumped and disrupted lamina splendens on the surface and electron lucent patches in the ground substances of the matrix and chondrocyte cytoplasm. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2 and 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10 and 11. Fig. 12. Fig. 13. Fig. 14. Fig. 15. Fig. 16. Fig. 17. Fig. 18. PMID:7260732

  18. Mesenchymal progenitor cell markers in human articular cartilage: normal distribution and changes in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Grogan, Shawn P; Miyaki, Shigeru; Asahara, Hiroshi; D'Lima, Darryl D; Lotz, Martin K

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Recent findings suggest that articular cartilage contains mesenchymal progenitor cells. The aim of this study was to examine the distribution of stem cell markers (Notch-1, Stro-1 and VCAM-1) and of molecules that modulate progenitor differentiation (Notch-1 and Sox9) in normal adult human articular cartilage and in osteoarthritis (OA) cartilage. Methods Expression of the markers was analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and flow cytometry. Hoechst 33342 dye was used to identify and sort the cartilage side population (SP). Multilineage differentiation assays including chondrogenesis, osteogenesis and adipogenesis were performed on SP and non-SP (NSP) cells. Results A surprisingly high number (>45%) of cells were positive for Notch-1, Stro-1 and VCAM-1 throughout normal cartilage. Expression of these markers was higher in the superficial zone (SZ) of normal cartilage as compared to the middle zone (MZ) and deep zone (DZ). Non-fibrillated OA cartilage SZ showed reduced Notch-1 and Sox9 staining frequency, while Notch-1, Stro-1 and VCAM-1 positive cells were increased in the MZ. Most cells in OA clusters were positive for each molecule tested. The frequency of SP cells in cartilage was 0.14 ± 0.05% and no difference was found between normal and OA. SP cells displayed chondrogenic and osteogenic but not adipogenic differentiation potential. Conclusions These results show a surprisingly high number of cells that express putative progenitor cell markers in human cartilage. In contrast, the percentage of SP cells is much lower and within the range of expected stem cell frequency. Thus, markers such as Notch-1, Stro-1 or VCAM-1 may not be useful to identify progenitors in cartilage. Instead, their increased expression in OA cartilage implicates involvement in the abnormal cell activation and differentiation process characteristic of OA. PMID:19500336

  19. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Synovial Joint and Articular Cartilage Formation

    PubMed Central

    Pacifici, Maurizio; Koyama, Eiki; Shibukawa, Yoshihiro; Wu, Changshan; Tamamura, Yoshihiro; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi; Iwamoto, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    Synovial joints and articular cartilage play crucial roles in skeletal function, but relatively little is actually known about their embryonic development. Here we first focused on the interzone, a thin mesenchymal cell layer forming at future joint sites that is widely thought to be critical for joint and articular cartilage development. To determine interzone cell origin and fate, we microinjected the vital fluorescent dye DiI at several peri-joint sites in chick limbs and monitored behavior and fate of labeled cells over time. Peri-joint mesenchymal cells located immediately adjacent to incipient joints migrated, became part of the interzone, and were eventually found in epiphyseal articular layer and joint capsule. Interzone cells isolated and reared in vitro expressed typical phenotypic markers, including GDF-5, Wnt-14 and CD-44, and differentiated into chondrocytes over time. To determine the molecular mechanisms of articular chondrocyte formation, we carried out additional studies on the ets transcription factor family member ERG and its alternatively-spliced variant C-1-1 that we previously found to be expressed in developing avian articular chondrocytes. We cloned the human counterpart of avian C-1-1 (ERGp55Δ81) and conditionally expressed it in transgenic mice under cartilage-specific Col2 gene promoter-enhancer control. The entire transgenic mouse limb chondrocyte population exhibited an immature articular-like phenotype and a virtual lack of growth plate formation and chondrocyte maturation compared to wild type littermate. Together, our studies reveal that peri-joint mesenchymal cells take part in interzone and articular layer formation, interzone cells can differentiate into chondrocytes, and acquisition of a permanent articular chondrocyte phenotype is aided and perhaps dictated by ets transcription factor ERG. PMID:16831907

  20. Effects of osmotic challenges on membrane potential in human articular chondrocytes from healthy and osteoarthritic cartilage.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Julio C; López-Zapata, Diego F

    2010-01-01

    Changes in external osmolarity arise from variations in mechanical loads on joints and may affect the homeostasis of chondrocytes, which are the only cell type responsible for matrix turnover. Accordingly, variations in membrane potential may affect cartilage production. The present study assessed the effects of variations in external osmolarity on membrane potential and the possible mechanisms responsible for this response. Membrane potential was measured by the patch clamp whole-cell technique using human articular chondrocytes freshly isolated from healthy and osteoarthritic cartilage. The membrane potential was -39±4 mV in articular human chondrocytes from healthy cartilage and -26±4 mV in those from osteoarthritic cartilage. Increasing the osmolarity produced a reversible hyperpolarization mediated by K+ efflux through BKCa channels in both groups of chondrocytes, but the response in osteoarthritic cells was significantly reduced; no other K+ pathways were involved in this effect. Alternatively, decreasing the osmolarity elicited depolarization in healthy chondrocytes but did not produce any response in chondrocytes from osteoarthritic cartilage. The depolarization was dependent on Na+ influx through Gd3+-sensitive stretch-activated cation channels and was independent of external Ca2+. The differential responses observed in chondrocytes from osteoarthritic cartilage suggest that disregulation on the responses to external osmolarity may be involved in the process that leads to the alterations in the cartilage structure observed in osteoarthritis.

  1. The lamina splendens of articular cartilage is an artefact of phase contrast microscopy.

    PubMed

    Aspden, R M; Hukins, D W

    1979-11-30

    The so-called lamina splendens of articular cartilage is shown to be a characteristic of phase contrast microscopy; this technique provides no evidence for an anatomically distinct surface layer. Fresnel diffraction occurs at edges separating regions of different refractive indices. These diffraction effects, when viewed under phase contrast, lead to the appearance of a bright line along the edge. PMID:42065

  2. Glucosamine:chondroitin or ginger root extract have little effect on articular cartilage in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sows are culled at a high rate from breeding herds due to musclo-skeletal problems and lameness. Research in our laboratory has shown that even first-parity sows have significant amounts of osteochondritic lesions of their articular cartilage. Glusoamine chondroitin and ginger root extract have both...

  3. Low-field one-dimensional and direction-dependent relaxation imaging of bovine articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rössler, Erik; Mattea, Carlos; Mollova, Ayret; Stapf, Siegfried

    2011-12-01

    The structure of articular cartilage is separated into three layers of differently oriented collagen fibers, which is accompanied by a gradient of increasing glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and decreasing water concentration from the top layer towards the bone interface. The combined effect of these structural variations results in a change of the longitudinal and transverse relaxation times as a function of the distance from the cartilage surface. In this paper, this dependence is investigated at a magnetic field strength of 0.27 T with a one-dimensional depth resolution of 50 μm on bovine hip and stifle joint articular cartilage. By employing this method, advantage is taken of the increasing contrast of the longitudinal relaxation rate found at lower magnetic field strengths. Furthermore, evidence for an orientational dependence of relaxation times with respect to an axis normal to the surface plane is given, an observation that has recently been reported using high-field MRI and that was explained by preferential orientations of collagen bundles in each of the three cartilage zones. In order to quantify the extent of a further contrast mechanism and to estimate spatially dependent glycosaminoglycan concentrations, the data are supplemented by proton relaxation times that were acquired in bovine articular cartilage that was soaked in a 0.8 mM aqueous Gd ++ solution.

  4. Biphasic indentation of articular cartilage--II. A numerical algorithm and an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Mow, V C; Gibbs, M C; Lai, W M; Zhu, W B; Athanasiou, K A

    1989-01-01

    Part I (Mak et al., 1987, J. Biomechanics 20, 703-714) presented the theoretical solutions for the biphasic indentation of articular cartilage under creep and stress-relaxation conditions. In this study, using the creep solution, we developed an efficient numerical algorithm to compute all three material coefficients of cartilage in situ on the joint surface from the indentation creep experiment. With this method we determined the average values of the aggregate modulus. Poisson's ratio and permeability for young bovine femoral condylar cartilage in situ to be HA = 0.90 MPa, vs = 0.39 and k = 0.44 x 10(-15) m4/Ns respectively, and those for patellar groove cartilage to be HA = 0.47 MPa, vs = 0.24, k = 1.42 x 10(-15) m4/Ns. One surprising finding from this study is that the in situ Poisson's ratio of cartilage (0.13-0.45) may be much less than those determined from measurements performed on excised osteochondral plugs (0.40-0.49) reported in the literature. We also found the permeability of patellar groove cartilage to be several times higher than femoral condyle cartilage. These findings may have important implications on understanding the functional behavior of cartilage in situ and on methods used to determine the elastic moduli of cartilage using the indentation experiments.

  5. Modeling and Simulation of the Effects of Cyclic Loading on Articular Cartilage Lesion Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiayi; Ayati, Bruce P.; Brouillete, Marc J.; Graham, Jason M.; Ramakrishnan, Prem S.; Martin, James A.

    2015-01-01

    We present a model of articular cartilage lesion formation to simulate the effects of cyclic loading. This model extends and modifies the reaction-diffusion-delay model by Graham et al. [20] for the spread of a lesion formed though a single traumatic event. Our model represents “implicitly” the effects of loading, meaning through a cyclic sink term in the equations for live cells. Our model forms the basis for in silico studies of cartilage damage relevant to questions in osteoarthritis, for example, that may not be easily answered through in vivo or in vitro studies. Computational results are presented that indicate the impact of differing levels of EPO on articular cartilage lesion abatement. PMID:24753483

  6. Regeneration of Articular Cartilage in Lizard Knee from Resident Stem/Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2015-09-01

    The epiphysis of femur and tibia in the lizard Podarcis muralis can extensively regenerate after injury. The process involves the articular cartilage and metaphyseal (growth) plate after damage. The secondary ossification center present between the articular cartilage and the growth plate is replaced by cartilaginous epiphyses after about one month of regeneration at high temperature. The present study analyzes the origin of the chondrogenic cells from putative stem cells located in the growing centers of the epiphyses. The study is carried out using immunocytochemistry for the detection of 5BrdU-labeled long retaining cells and for the localization of telomerase, an enzyme that indicates stemness. The observations show that putative stem cells retaining 5BrdU and positive for telomerase are present in the superficial articular cartilage and metaphyseal growth plate located in the epiphyses. This observation suggests that these areas represent stem cell niches lasting for most of the lifetime of lizards. In healthy long bones of adult lizards, the addition of new chondrocytes from the stem cells population in the articular cartilage and the metaphyseal growth plate likely allows for slow, continuous longitudinal growth. When the knee is injured in the adult lizard, new populations of chondrocytes actively producing chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan are derived from these stem cells to allow for the formation of completely new cartilaginous epiphyses, possibly anticipating the re-formation of secondary centers in later stages. The study suggests that in this lizard species, the regenerative ability of the epiphyses is a pre-adaptation to the regeneration of the articular cartilage.

  7. Regeneration of Articular Cartilage in Lizard Knee from Resident Stem/Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The epiphysis of femur and tibia in the lizard Podarcis muralis can extensively regenerate after injury. The process involves the articular cartilage and metaphyseal (growth) plate after damage. The secondary ossification center present between the articular cartilage and the growth plate is replaced by cartilaginous epiphyses after about one month of regeneration at high temperature. The present study analyzes the origin of the chondrogenic cells from putative stem cells located in the growing centers of the epiphyses. The study is carried out using immunocytochemistry for the detection of 5BrdU-labeled long retaining cells and for the localization of telomerase, an enzyme that indicates stemness. The observations show that putative stem cells retaining 5BrdU and positive for telomerase are present in the superficial articular cartilage and metaphyseal growth plate located in the epiphyses. This observation suggests that these areas represent stem cell niches lasting for most of the lifetime of lizards. In healthy long bones of adult lizards, the addition of new chondrocytes from the stem cells population in the articular cartilage and the metaphyseal growth plate likely allows for slow, continuous longitudinal growth. When the knee is injured in the adult lizard, new populations of chondrocytes actively producing chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan are derived from these stem cells to allow for the formation of completely new cartilaginous epiphyses, possibly anticipating the re-formation of secondary centers in later stages. The study suggests that in this lizard species, the regenerative ability of the epiphyses is a pre-adaptation to the regeneration of the articular cartilage. PMID:26340619

  8. Regeneration of Articular Cartilage in Lizard Knee from Resident Stem/Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The epiphysis of femur and tibia in the lizard Podarcis muralis can extensively regenerate after injury. The process involves the articular cartilage and metaphyseal (growth) plate after damage. The secondary ossification center present between the articular cartilage and the growth plate is replaced by cartilaginous epiphyses after about one month of regeneration at high temperature. The present study analyzes the origin of the chondrogenic cells from putative stem cells located in the growing centers of the epiphyses. The study is carried out using immunocytochemistry for the detection of 5BrdU-labeled long retaining cells and for the localization of telomerase, an enzyme that indicates stemness. The observations show that putative stem cells retaining 5BrdU and positive for telomerase are present in the superficial articular cartilage and metaphyseal growth plate located in the epiphyses. This observation suggests that these areas represent stem cell niches lasting for most of the lifetime of lizards. In healthy long bones of adult lizards, the addition of new chondrocytes from the stem cells population in the articular cartilage and the metaphyseal growth plate likely allows for slow, continuous longitudinal growth. When the knee is injured in the adult lizard, new populations of chondrocytes actively producing chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan are derived from these stem cells to allow for the formation of completely new cartilaginous epiphyses, possibly anticipating the re-formation of secondary centers in later stages. The study suggests that in this lizard species, the regenerative ability of the epiphyses is a pre-adaptation to the regeneration of the articular cartilage. PMID:26340619

  9. An Autologous Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell–Derived Extracellular Matrix Scaffold Applied with Bone Marrow Stimulation for Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Cheng; Jin, Chengzhe; Du, Xiaotao; Yan, Chao; Min, Byoung-Hyun; Xu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: It is well known that implanting a bioactive scaffold into a cartilage defect site can enhance cartilage repair after bone marrow stimulation (BMS). However, most of the current scaffolds are derived from xenogenous tissue and/or artificial polymers. The implantation of these scaffolds adds risks of pathogen transmission, undesirable inflammation, and other immunological reactions, as well as ethical issues in clinical practice. The current study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of implanting autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell–derived extracellular matrix (aBMSC-dECM) scaffolds after BMS for cartilage repair. Methods: Full osteochondral defects were performed on the trochlear groove of both knees in 24 rabbits. One group underwent BMS only in the right knee (the BMS group), and the other group was treated by implantation of the aBMSC-dECM scaffold after BMS in the left knee (the aBMSC-dECM scaffold group). Results: Better repair of cartilage defects was observed in the aBMSC-dECM scaffold group than in the BMS group according to gross observation, histological assessments, immunohistochemistry, and chemical assay. The glycosaminoglycan and DNA content, the distribution of proteoglycan, and the distribution and arrangement of type II and I collagen fibers in the repaired tissue in the aBMSC-dECM scaffold group at 12 weeks after surgery were similar to that surrounding normal hyaline cartilage. Conclusions: Implanting aBMSC-dECM scaffolds can enhance the therapeutic effect of BMS on articular cartilage repair, and this combination treatment is a potential method for successful articular cartilage repair. PMID:24666429

  10. Growth of immature articular cartilage in vitro: correlated variation in tensile biomechanical and collagen network properties.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Amanda K; Masuda, Koichi; Thonar, Eugene J-M A; Sah, Robert L

    2003-08-01

    Articular cartilage biochemical composition and mechanical properties evolve during in utero and in vivo growth, with marked differences between fetus, newborn, and young adult. The objectives of this study were to test whether in vitro growth of bovine fetal and newborn calf articular cartilage explants resulted in changes in biochemical and tensile properties during up to 6 weeks of free-swelling culture in serum-supplemented medium. During this culture period, both fetal and calf cartilage grew markedly in size, increasing in dry and wet mass by 150-270%. This was due in part to increases in sulfated glycosaminoglycan (+248%), collagen (+96%), and pyridinoline cross-link (+133%). This was accompanied by an increase in water content so that the concentration of matrix components decreased, despite the overall net increase in mass. The ratio of pyridinoline cross-link to collagen remained low and characteristic of immature tissue. The equilibrium and dynamic tensile moduli and strength of both fetal and calf cartilage decreased during the culture period. The biochemical and biomechanical properties of the cartilage explants were correlated, such that the low values of modulus and strength were associated with low concentrations of collagen and pyridinoline. Thus, the tested culture conditions supported growth and maintenance cartilage in an immature state, but did not induce biomechanical or collagen network maturation.

  11. Load distribution of articular cartilage from MR-images by neural nets.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Peter; Hanke, Göran; Gründer, Wilfried

    2005-01-01

    Artificial neural nets were used to determine the Young's modulus and spatial load distribution in articular cartilage by means of T2-weighted MR imaging. MR images were obtained in vitro (ex vivo?) from the joints of sheep of different ages (3 months, 9 months, 15 months, 1.5 years, 5 years, 5.5 years) and pigs (4 and 6 months) with a Bruker AMX 300 (7 T) spectrometer equipped with a micro-imaging unit. The knee of a 29-year-old male volunteer was studied in vivo under mechanical load using a clinical Siemens Vision MRT (1.5 T). The load of the cartilage is understood as a non-linear image transformation of loaded versus unloaded images. The artificial neural net was used to recognize given reference pixels of the unloaded cartilage within the image of the loaded cartilage. The Young's modulus was calculated from the local strain and the external pressure using the Hooke's law. With this method, the average Young's modulus was obtained in relationship to the biological age of the cartilage. The investigated age interval showed a progressive increase of 0.5 +/- 0.3 MPa per year. These results are consistent with published results. As shown in this pilot study, the method of neural nets allows the visualization of the spatial load distribution within the articular cartilage.

  12. Inhomogeneous Response of Articular Cartilage: A Three-Dimensional Multiphasic Heterogeneous Study

    PubMed Central

    Manzano, Sara; Armengol, Monica; J. Price, Andrew; A. Hulley, Philippa; S. Gill, Harinderjit; Doblaré, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage exhibits complex mechano-electrochemical behaviour due to its anisotropy, inhomogeneity and material non-linearity. In this work, the thickness and radial dependence of cartilage properties are incorporated into a 3D mechano-electrochemical model to explore the relevance of heterogeneity in the behaviour of the tissue. The model considers four essential phenomena: (i) osmotic pressure, (ii) convective and diffusive processes, (iii) chemical expansion and (iv) three-dimensional through-the-thickness heterogeneity of the tissue. The need to consider heterogeneity in computational simulations of cartilage behaviour and in manufacturing biomaterials mimicking this tissue is discussed. To this end, healthy tibial plateaus from pigs were mechanically and biochemically tested in-vitro. Heterogeneous properties were included in the mechano-electrochemical computational model to simulate tissue swelling. The simulation results demonstrated that swelling of the heterogeneous samples was significantly lower than swelling under homogeneous and isotropic conditions. Furthermore, there was a significant reduction in the flux of water and ions in the former samples. In conclusion, the computational model presented here can be considered as a valuable tool for predicting how the variation of cartilage properties affects its behaviour, opening up possibilities for exploring the requirements of cartilage-mimicking biomaterials for tissue engineering. Besides, the model also allows the establishment of behavioural patterns of swelling and of water and ion fluxes in articular cartilage. PMID:27327166

  13. The role of lubricant entrapment at biological interfaces: reduction of friction and adhesion in articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Chan, S M T; Neu, C P; Komvopoulos, K; Reddi, A H

    2011-07-28

    Friction and adhesion of articular cartilage from high- and low-load-bearing regions of bovine knee joints were examined with a tribometer under various loads and equilibration times. The effect of trapped lubricants was investigated by briefly unloading the cartilage sample before friction testing, to allow fluid to reflow into the contact interface and boundary lubricants to rearrange. Friction and adhesion of high-load-bearing joint regions were consistently lower than those of low-load-bearing regions. This investigation is the first to demonstrate the regional variation in the friction and adhesion properties of articular cartilage. Friction coefficient decreased with increasing contact pressure and decreasing equilibration time. Briefly unloading cartilage before the onset of sliding resulted in significantly lower friction and adhesion and a loss of the friction dependence on contact pressure, suggesting an enhancement of the cartilage tribological properties by trapped lubricants. The results of this study reveal significant differences in the friction and adhesion properties between high- and low-load-bearing joint regions and elucidate the role of trapped lubricants in cartilage tribology.

  14. Inhomogeneous Response of Articular Cartilage: A Three-Dimensional Multiphasic Heterogeneous Study.

    PubMed

    Manzano, Sara; Armengol, Monica; J Price, Andrew; A Hulley, Philippa; S Gill, Harinderjit; Doblaré, Manuel; Hamdy Doweidar, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage exhibits complex mechano-electrochemical behaviour due to its anisotropy, inhomogeneity and material non-linearity. In this work, the thickness and radial dependence of cartilage properties are incorporated into a 3D mechano-electrochemical model to explore the relevance of heterogeneity in the behaviour of the tissue. The model considers four essential phenomena: (i) osmotic pressure, (ii) convective and diffusive processes, (iii) chemical expansion and (iv) three-dimensional through-the-thickness heterogeneity of the tissue. The need to consider heterogeneity in computational simulations of cartilage behaviour and in manufacturing biomaterials mimicking this tissue is discussed. To this end, healthy tibial plateaus from pigs were mechanically and biochemically tested in-vitro. Heterogeneous properties were included in the mechano-electrochemical computational model to simulate tissue swelling. The simulation results demonstrated that swelling of the heterogeneous samples was significantly lower than swelling under homogeneous and isotropic conditions. Furthermore, there was a significant reduction in the flux of water and ions in the former samples. In conclusion, the computational model presented here can be considered as a valuable tool for predicting how the variation of cartilage properties affects its behaviour, opening up possibilities for exploring the requirements of cartilage-mimicking biomaterials for tissue engineering. Besides, the model also allows the establishment of behavioural patterns of swelling and of water and ion fluxes in articular cartilage. PMID:27327166

  15. Synergy between Piezo1 and Piezo2 channels confers high-strain mechanosensitivity to articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Lee, Whasil; Leddy, Holly A; Chen, Yong; Lee, Suk Hee; Zelenski, Nicole A; McNulty, Amy L; Wu, Jason; Beicker, Kellie N; Coles, Jeffrey; Zauscher, Stefan; Grandl, Jörg; Sachs, Frederick; Guilak, Farshid; Liedtke, Wolfgang B

    2014-11-25

    Diarthrodial joints are essential for load bearing and locomotion. Physiologically, articular cartilage sustains millions of cycles of mechanical loading. Chondrocytes, the cells in cartilage, regulate their metabolic activities in response to mechanical loading. Pathological mechanical stress can lead to maladaptive cellular responses and subsequent cartilage degeneration. We sought to deconstruct chondrocyte mechanotransduction by identifying mechanosensitive ion channels functioning at injurious levels of strain. We detected robust expression of the recently identified mechanosensitive channels, PIEZO1 and PIEZO2. Combined directed expression of Piezo1 and -2 sustained potentiated mechanically induced Ca(2+) signals and electrical currents compared with single-Piezo expression. In primary articular chondrocytes, mechanically evoked Ca(2+) transients produced by atomic force microscopy were inhibited by GsMTx4, a PIEZO-blocking peptide, and by Piezo1- or Piezo2-specific siRNA. We complemented the cellular approach with an explant-cartilage injury model. GsMTx4 reduced chondrocyte death after mechanical injury, suggesting a possible therapy for reducing cartilage injury and posttraumatic osteoarthritis by attenuating Piezo-mediated cartilage mechanotransduction of injurious strains.

  16. Collagen fibre arrangement in the tibial plateau articular cartilage of man and other mammalian species

    PubMed Central

    KÄÄB, M. J.; AP GWYNN, I.; NÖTZLI, H. P.

    1998-01-01

    Experimental animal models are frequently used to study articular cartilage, but the relevance to man remains problematic. In this study animal models were compared by examination of the collagen fibre arrangement in the medial tibial plateau of human, cow, pig, dog, sheep, rabbit and rat specimens. 24 cartilage samples from each species were prepared and maximum cartilage thickness in the central tibial plateau measured. Samples were fixed, dehydrated, freeze-fractured and imaged by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). At low magnification, 2 different arrangements of collagen fibres were observed: leaf-like (human, pig, dog) and columnar (cow, sheep, rabbit, rat). The porcine collagen structure was the most similar to that of man. This arrangement was consistent from the radial to the upper zones. Under higher magnification at the surface of the leaves, the collagen was more randomly oriented, whereas the columns consisted of parallel collagen fibrils. The maximum thickness of cartilage did not correlate with the type of collagen arrangement but was correlated with the body weight of the species (r=0.785). When using animal models for investigating human articular cartilage function or pathology, the differences in arrangement of collagen fibres in tibial plateau cartilage between laboratory animals should be considered especially if morphological evaluation is planned. PMID:9758134

  17. Synergy between Piezo1 and Piezo2 channels confers high-strain mechanosensitivity to articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Whasil; Leddy, Holly A.; Chen, Yong; Lee, Suk Hee; Zelenski, Nicole A.; McNulty, Amy L.; Wu, Jason; Beicker, Kellie N.; Coles, Jeffrey; Zauscher, Stefan; Grandl, Jörg; Sachs, Frederick; Liedtke, Wolfgang B.

    2014-01-01

    Diarthrodial joints are essential for load bearing and locomotion. Physiologically, articular cartilage sustains millions of cycles of mechanical loading. Chondrocytes, the cells in cartilage, regulate their metabolic activities in response to mechanical loading. Pathological mechanical stress can lead to maladaptive cellular responses and subsequent cartilage degeneration. We sought to deconstruct chondrocyte mechanotransduction by identifying mechanosensitive ion channels functioning at injurious levels of strain. We detected robust expression of the recently identified mechanosensitive channels, PIEZO1 and PIEZO2. Combined directed expression of Piezo1 and -2 sustained potentiated mechanically induced Ca2+ signals and electrical currents compared with single-Piezo expression. In primary articular chondrocytes, mechanically evoked Ca2+ transients produced by atomic force microscopy were inhibited by GsMTx4, a PIEZO-blocking peptide, and by Piezo1- or Piezo2-specific siRNA. We complemented the cellular approach with an explant-cartilage injury model. GsMTx4 reduced chondrocyte death after mechanical injury, suggesting a possible therapy for reducing cartilage injury and posttraumatic osteoarthritis by attenuating Piezo-mediated cartilage mechanotransduction of injurious strains. PMID:25385580

  18. Exercise increases osteophyte formation and diminishes fibrillation following chemically induced articular cartilage injury.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J M; Brandt, K D

    1984-01-01

    The present study shows that a treadmill exercise regimen imposed on guinea-pigs whose articular cartilage has been damaged by intra-articular injection of IA reduces chondrocyte depletion, results in an increase in pericellular Safranin-O staining around surviving chondrocytes, and prevents fibrillation of the articular surface. The data suggest that exercise protected, or facilitated recovery of, chondrocytes subjected to chemical injury, and that the surviving cells then synthesised a matrix which was sufficiently normal to withstand impulsive joint loading. On the other hand, the exercise regimen accelerated osteophyte formation, and led to formation of osteophytes in sites at which they did not develop in animals which received intra-articular IA but which were not exercised. Images Fig. 1 (cont.) Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:6526713

  19. Boundary mode lubrication of articular cartilage by recombinant human lubricin.

    PubMed

    Gleghorn, Jason P; Jones, Aled R C; Flannery, Carl R; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2009-06-01

    Lubrication of cartilage involves a variety of physical and chemical factors, including lubricin, a synovial glycoprotein that has been shown to be a boundary lubricant. It is unclear how lubricin boundary lubricates a wide range of bearings from tissue to artificial surfaces, and if the mechanism is the same for both soluble and bound lubricin. In the current study, experiments were conducted to investigate the hypothesis that recombinant human lubricin (rh-lubricin) lubricates cartilage in a dose-dependent manner and that soluble and bound fractions of rh-lubricin both contribute to the lubrication process. An rh-lubricin dose response was observed with maximal lubrication achieved at concentrations of rh-lubricin greater than 50 microg/mL. A concentration-response variable-slope model was fit to the data, and indicated that rh-lubricin binding to cartilage was not first order. The pattern of decrease in equilibrium friction coefficient indicated that aggregation of rh-lubricin or steric arrangement may regulate boundary lubrication. rh-lubricin localized at the cartilage surface was found to lubricate a cartilage-glass interface in boundary mode, as did soluble rh-lubricin at high concentrations (150 microg/mL); however, the most effective lubrication occurred when both soluble and bound rh-lubricin were present at the interface. These findings point to two distinct mechanisms by which rh-lubricin lubricates, one mechanism involving lubricin bound to the tissue surface and the other involving lubricin in solution.

  20. Effects of Hyaluronic Acid and γ–Globulin Concentrations on the Frictional Response of Human Osteoarthritic Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Son, Kyeong-Min; Thompson, Mark S.; Park, Sungchan; Chang, Jun-Dong; Nam, Ju-Suk; Park, Seonghun; Lee, Sang-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Synovial fluid plays an important role in lubricating synovial joints. Its main constituents are hyaluronic acid (HA) and γ–globulin, acting as boundary lubricants for articular cartilage. The aim of the study was to demonstrate the concentration-dependent effect of HA and γ–globulin on the boundary-lubricating ability of human osteoarthritis (OA) cartilage. Normal, early and advance stage articular cartilage samples were obtained from human femoral heads and in presence of either HA or γ–globulin, cartilage frictional coefficient (µ) was measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). In advanced stage OA, the cartilage superficial layer was observed to be completely removed and the damaged cartilage surface showed a higher µ value (∼0.409) than the normal cartilage surface (∼0.119) in PBS. Adsorbed HA and γ–globulin molecules significantly improved the frictional behavior of advanced OA cartilage, while they were ineffective for normal and early OA cartilage. In advanced-stage OA, the concentration-dependent frictional response of articular cartilage was observed with γ–globulin, but not with HA. Our result suggested that HA and γ–globulin may play a significant role in improving frictional behavior of advanced OA cartilage. During early-stage OA, though HA and γ–globulin had no effect on improving frictional behavior of cartilage, however, they might contribute to disease modifying effects of synovial fluid as observed in clinical settings. PMID:25426992

  1. Characterization of enzymatically induced degradation of articular cartilage using high frequency ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Töyräs, J.; Rieppo, J.; Nieminen, M. T.; Helminen, H. J.; Jurvelin, J. S.

    1999-11-01

    Ultrasound may provide a quantitative technique for the characterization of cartilage changes typical of early osteoarthrosis. In this study, specific changes in bovine articular cartilage were induced using collagenase and chondroitinase ABC, enzymes that selectively degrade collagen fibril network and digest proteoglycans, respectively. Changes in cartilage structure and properties were quantified using high frequency ultrasound, microscopic analyses and mechanical indentation tests. The ultrasound reflection coefficient of the physiological saline-cartilage interface (R1) decreased significantly (-96.4%, p<0.01) in the collagenase digested cartilage compared to controls. Also a significantly lower ultrasound velocity (-6.2%, p<0.01) was revealed after collagenase digestion. After chondroitinase ABC digestion, a new acoustic interface at the depth of the enzyme penetration front was detected. Cartilage thickness, as determined with ultrasound, showed a high, linear correlation (R = 0.943, n = 60, average difference 0.073 mm (4.0%)) with the thickness measured by the needle-probe method. Both enzymes induced a significant decrease in the Young's modulus of cartilage (p<0.01). Our results indicate that high frequency ultrasound provides a sensitive technique for the analysis of cartilage structure and properties. Possibly ultrasound may be utilized in vivo as a quantitative probe during arthroscopy.

  2. A biphasic finite element study on the role of the articular cartilage superficial zone in confined compression

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongqiang; Maher, Suzanne A.; Torzilli, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the superficial zone on the mechanical behavior of articular cartilage. Confined compression of articular cartilage was modeled using a biphasic finite element analysis to calculate the one-dimensional deformation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and movement of the interstitial fluid through the ECM and articular surface. The articular cartilage was modeled as an inhomogeneous, nonlinear hyperelastic biphasic material with depth and strain-dependent material properties. Two loading conditions were simulated, one where the superficial zone was loaded with a porous platen (normal test) and the other where the deep zone was loaded with the porous platen (upside down test). Compressing the intact articular cartilage with 0.2 MPa stress reduced the surface permeability by 88%. Removing the superficial zone increased the rate of change for all mechanical parameters and decreased the fluid support ratio of the tissue, resulting in increased tissue deformation. Apparent permeability linearly increased after superficial removal in the normal test, yet it did not change in the upside down test. Orientation of the specimen affected the time-dependent biomechanical behavior of the articular cartilage, but not equilibrium behavior. The two tests with different specimen orientations resulted in very different apparent permeabilities, suggesting that in an experimental study which quantifies material properties of an inhomogeneous material, the specimen orientation should be stated along with the permeability result. The current study provides new insights into the role of the superficial zone on mechanical behavior of the articular cartilage. PMID:25465194

  3. Blocking aggrecanase cleavage in the aggrecan interglobular domain abrogates cartilage erosion and promotes cartilage repair

    PubMed Central

    Little, Christopher B.; Meeker, Clare T.; Golub, Suzanne B.; Lawlor, Kate E.; Farmer, Pamela J.; Smith, Susan M.; Fosang, Amanda J.

    2007-01-01

    Aggrecan loss from cartilage in arthritis is mediated by aggrecanases. Aggrecanases cleave aggrecan preferentially in the chondroitin sulfate–2 (CS-2) domain and secondarily at the E373↓374A bond in the interglobular domain (IGD). However, IGD cleavage may be more deleterious for cartilage biomechanics because it releases the entire CS-containing portion of aggrecan. Recent studies identifying aggrecanase-2 (ADAMTS-5) as the predominant aggrecanase in mouse cartilage have not distinguished aggrecanolysis in the IGD from aggrecanolysis in the CS-2 domain. We generated aggrecan knockin mice with a mutation that rendered only the IGD resistant to aggrecanases in order to assess the contribution of this specific cleavage to cartilage pathology. The knockin mice were viable and fertile. Aggrecanase cleavage in the aggrecan IGD was not detected in knockin mouse cartilage in situ nor following digestion with ADAMTS-5 or treatment of cartilage explant cultures with IL-1α. Blocking cleavage in the IGD not only diminished aggrecan loss and cartilage erosion in surgically induced osteoarthritis and a model of inflammatory arthritis, but appeared to stimulate cartilage repair following acute inflammation. We conclude that blocking aggrecanolysis in the aggrecan IGD alone protects against cartilage erosion and may potentiate cartilage repair. PMID:17510707

  4. Changes in permeability of rabbit articular cartilage caused by joint contracture as revealed by the peroxidase method.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Ohta, N; Kawaji, W; Takata, K; Hirano, H

    1984-11-01

    Changes in permeability of adult rabbit articular cartilage caused by joint contracture were studied by light and transmission electron microscopy, employing horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as an indicator. The knee joint was plaster-immobilized for 0, 2, 4, 6, or 8 weeks in the flexion position. One ml of 4% HRP was administered in the articular cavity of the knee joint and allowed to diffuse and permeate into the articular cartilage. Distribution of the permeated HRP was visualized in the cartilage taken from the lateral condyle of the femur, utilizing the DAB-H2O2 reaction. In the normal and the non-immobilized joints, the permeated HRP reached to the matrix and chondrocytes situated in the deep layer of the articular cartilage. HRP was heavily deposited in the intercellular matrices, particularly around the chondrocytes, and was actively endocytosed by these cells. In the plaster-immobilized joints, especially after 4 weeks or longer of immobilization, the administered HRP had not permeated well and was restricted to the surface (lamina splendens) and the superficial layer of the cartilage. These results show that administered HRP diffuses into the deep layer of the articular cartilage and is actively endocytosed by chondrocytes and that the permeability of articular cartilage is remarkably reduced by joint contracture. PMID:6532371

  5. Highly nonlinear stress-relaxation response of articular cartilage in indentation: Importance of collagen nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, J T A; Korhonen, R K

    2016-06-14

    Modern fibril-reinforced computational models of articular cartilage can include inhomogeneous tissue composition and structure, and nonlinear mechanical behavior of collagen, proteoglycans and fluid. These models can capture well experimental single step creep and stress-relaxation tests or measurements under small strains in unconfined and confined compression. Yet, it is known that in indentation, especially at high strain velocities, cartilage can express highly nonlinear response. Different fibril reinforced poroelastic and poroviscoelastic models were used to assess measured highly nonlinear stress-relaxation response of rabbit articular cartilage in indentation. Experimentally measured depth-dependent volume fractions of different tissue constituents and their mechanical nonlinearities were taken into account in the models. In particular, the collagen fibril network was modeled using eight separate models that implemented five different constitutive equations to describe the nonlinearity. These consisted of linear elastic, nonlinear viscoelastic and multiple nonlinear elastic representations. The model incorporating the most nonlinearly increasing Young׳s modulus of collagen fibrils as a function of strain captured best the experimental data. Relative difference between the model and experiment was ~3%. Surprisingly, the difference in the peak forces between the experiment and the model with viscoelastic collagen fibrils was almost 20%. Implementation of the measured volume fractions did not improve the ability of the model to capture the measured mechanical data. These results suggest that a highly nonlinear formulation for collagen fibrils is needed to replicate multi-step stress-relaxation response of rabbit articular cartilage in indentation with high strain rates. PMID:27130474

  6. Highly nonlinear stress-relaxation response of articular cartilage in indentation: Importance of collagen nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, J T A; Korhonen, R K

    2016-06-14

    Modern fibril-reinforced computational models of articular cartilage can include inhomogeneous tissue composition and structure, and nonlinear mechanical behavior of collagen, proteoglycans and fluid. These models can capture well experimental single step creep and stress-relaxation tests or measurements under small strains in unconfined and confined compression. Yet, it is known that in indentation, especially at high strain velocities, cartilage can express highly nonlinear response. Different fibril reinforced poroelastic and poroviscoelastic models were used to assess measured highly nonlinear stress-relaxation response of rabbit articular cartilage in indentation. Experimentally measured depth-dependent volume fractions of different tissue constituents and their mechanical nonlinearities were taken into account in the models. In particular, the collagen fibril network was modeled using eight separate models that implemented five different constitutive equations to describe the nonlinearity. These consisted of linear elastic, nonlinear viscoelastic and multiple nonlinear elastic representations. The model incorporating the most nonlinearly increasing Young׳s modulus of collagen fibrils as a function of strain captured best the experimental data. Relative difference between the model and experiment was ~3%. Surprisingly, the difference in the peak forces between the experiment and the model with viscoelastic collagen fibrils was almost 20%. Implementation of the measured volume fractions did not improve the ability of the model to capture the measured mechanical data. These results suggest that a highly nonlinear formulation for collagen fibrils is needed to replicate multi-step stress-relaxation response of rabbit articular cartilage in indentation with high strain rates.

  7. Hierarchical Structure of Articular Bone-Cartilage Interface and Its Potential Application for Osteochondral Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Weiguo; Qin, Lian; Li, Dichen; Wang, Jin; Jin, Zhongmin

    2010-09-01

    The artificial biodegradable osteochondral construct is one of mostly promising lifetime substitute in the joint replacement. And the complex hierarchical structure of natural joint is important in developing the osteochondral construct. However, the architecture features of the interface between cartilage and bone, in particular those at the micro-and nano-structural level, remain poorly understood. This paper investigates these structural data of the cartilage-bone interface by micro computerized tomography (μCT) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The result of μCT shows that important bone parameters and the density of articular cartilage are all related to the position in the hierarchical structure. The conjunctions of bone and cartilage were defined by SEM. All of the study results would be useful for the design of osteochondral construct further manufactured by nano-tech. A three-dimensional model with gradient porous structure is constructed in the environment of Pro/ENGINEERING software.

  8. Incomplete restoration of immobilization induced softening of young beagle knee articular cartilage after 50-week remobilization.

    PubMed

    Haapala, J; Arokoski, J; Pirttimäki, J; Lyyra, T; Jurvelin, J; Tammi, M; Helminen, H J; Kiviranta, I

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the biomechanical and structural changes in canine knee cartilage after an initial 11-week immobilization and subsequent remobilization period of 50 weeks. Cartilage from the immobilized and remobilized knee was compared with the tissue from age-matched control animals. Compressive stiffness, in the form of instant shear modulus (ISM) and equilibrium shear modulus (ESM) of articular cartilage, was investigated using an in situ indentation creep technique. The local variations in cartilage of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) concentration were measured with a microspectrophotometer after safranin O staining of histological sections. Using a computer-based quantitative polarized light microscopy method, collagen-related optical retardation, gamma, of cartilage zones were performed to investigate the collagen network of cartilage. Macroscopically, cartilage surfaces of the knee joint remained intact both after immobilization and remobilization periods. Immobilization caused significant softening of the lateral femoral and tibial cartilages, as expressed by ESM (up to 30%, p < 0.05). Remobilization restored the biomechanical properties of cartilage in the lateral condyle of tibia, but in the lateral condyle of femur ESM remained 15% below the control level (p = 0.05). The instant shear modulus was not changed either after immobilization or remobilization. The GAG content of the cartilage was slightly decreased after immobilization, especially in the superficial zone of cartilage, but the change was not statistically significant. After remobilization the intensity of safranin O content rose to control level. Neither immobilization nor remobilization had any effect on the gamma value of collagen fibril network either in the superficial or the deep zone at any of the test points. The changes of ESM were positively correlated with the alterations in GAG content of the superficial and deep zones after immobilization and remobilization. This

  9. Effects of Fiber Orientation on the Frictional Properties and Damage of Regenerative Articular Cartilage Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Accardi, Mario Alberto; McCullen, Seth D.; Callanan, Anthony; Chung, Sangwon; Cann, Philippa M.

    2013-01-01

    Articular cartilage provides a low-friction, wear-resistant surface for diarthrodial joints. Due to overloading and overuse, articular cartilage is known to undergo significant wear and degeneration potentially resulting in osteoarthritis (OA). Regenerative medicine strategies offer a promising solution for the treatment of articular cartilage defects and potentially localized early OA. Such strategies rely on the development of materials to restore some aspects of cartilage. In this study, microfibrous poly(ɛ-caprolactone) scaffolds of varying fiber orientations (random and aligned) were cultured with bovine chondrocytes for 4 weeks in vitro, and the mechanical and frictional properties were evaluated. Mechanical properties were quantified using unconfined compression and tensile testing techniques. Frictional properties were investigated at physiological compressive strains occurring in native articular cartilage. Scaffolds were sheared along the fiber direction, perpendicular to the fiber direction and in random orientation. The evolution of damage as a result of shear was evaluated via white light interferometry and scanning electron microscopy. As expected, the fiber orientation strongly affected the tensile properties as well as the compressive modulus of the scaffolds. Fiber orientation did not significantly affect the equilibrium frictional coefficient, but it was, however, a key factor in dictating the evolution of surface damage on the surface. Scaffolds shear tested perpendicular to the fiber orientation displayed the highest surface damage. Our results suggest that the fiber orientation of the scaffold implanted in the joint could strongly affect its resistance to damage due to shear. Scaffold fiber orientation should thus be carefully considered when using microfibrous scaffolds. PMID:23688110

  10. Chondroprotective Effect of Kartogenin on CD44-Mediated Functions in Articular Cartilage and Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Yohei; Ishizuka, Shinya; Knudson, Cheryl B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: A recent report identified the small molecule kartogenin as a chondrogenic and chondroprotective agent. Since changes in hyaluronan metabolism occur during cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis, we began studies to determine whether there was a connection between extracellular hyaluronan, CD44–hyaluronan interactions and the effects of kartogenin on articular chondrocytes. Methods: Chondrocytes cultured in monolayers, bioengineered neocartilages, or cartilage explants were treated with kartogenin with or without stimulation by IL-1β. Accumulation of matrix was visualized by a particle exclusion assay or by safranin O staining and release of sulfated glycosaminoglycans was determined. Production of aggrecanases and aggrecan G1-ITEGE neoepitope, fragmentation of CD44 and the SMAD1/5/8 signaling pathway were evaluated by western blotting. Results: Kartogenin treatment enhanced chondrocyte pericellular matrix assembly and retention in the presence of IL-1β. The chondroprotective effects of kartogenin on IL-1β-induced release of sulfated glycosaminoglycans from articular cartilage explants, reduction in safranin O staining of neocartilage discs as well as a reduction in aggrecan G1-ITEGE neoepitope in chondrocyte and explant cartilage cultures were observed. Kartogenin partially blocked the IL-1β-induced increased expression of ADAMTS-5. Additionally, kartogenin-treated articular chondrocytes exhibited a decrease in CD44 proteolytic fragmentation. However, kartogenin treatment did not enhance proteoglycan in control, non-IL-1β-treated cultures. Similarly, kartogenin enhanced the SMAD1 phosphorylation but only following pretreatment with IL-1β. Conclusion: These studies provide novel information on the chondroprotective function of kartogenin in adult articular cartilage. The effects of kartogenin are significant after activation of chondrocytic chondrolysis, which may occur following disruption of homeostasis maintained by hyaluronan–CD44

  11. Palmitate has proapoptotic and proinflammatory effects on articular cartilage and synergizes with interleukin-1

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Garcia, Oscar; Rogers, Nicole H; Smith, Roy G; Lotz, Martin K

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Obesity is a major risk factor for the development of osteoarthritis (OA) that is associated with a state of low-grade inflammation, and increased circulating adipokines and free fatty acids (FFA). The aim of this study was to analyze effects of saturated (palmitate) and monounsaturated (oleate) free fatty acids (FFA) on articular chondrocytes and cartilage. Methods Human articular chondrocytes and fibroblast-like synoviocytes obtained from young healthy donors, and OA chondrocytes from patients undergoing total knee replacement were treated with palmitate or oleate alone or with interleukin 1-β (IL-1β). Cell viability, caspase activation, and gene expression of proinflammatory factors, extracellular matrix proteins, and extracellular proteases were studied. In addition, chondrocyte viability, interleukin-6 (IL-6) production and matrix damage were assessed in bovine and human articular cartilage explants cultured with FFA with or without IL-1β. Results Palmitate, but not oleate, induced caspase activation and cell death in IL-1β-stimulated normal chondrocytes, and upregulated il6 and cox2 expression in chondrocytes and fibroblast-like synoviocytes through toll-like receptor-4 signaling. In cartilage explants, palmitate induced chondrocyte death, IL-6 release and extracellular matrix degradation. Palmitate synergized with IL-1β in stimulating proapoptotic and proinflammatory cellular responses. Pharmacological inhibition of caspases or TLR-4 signaling reduced palmitate and IL-1β-induced cartilage damage. Conclusions Palmitate acts as a pro-inflammatory and catabolic factor that, in synergy with IL-1β, induces chondrocyte apoptosis and articular cartilage breakdown. Collectively, our data suggest that elevated levels of saturated FFA often found in obesity may contribute to OA pathogenesis. PMID:24591481

  12. Freeze-thaw treatment effects on the dynamic mechanical properties of articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background As a relatively non-regenerative tissue, articular cartilage has been targeted for cryopreservation as a method of mitigating a lack of donor tissue availability for transplant surgeries. In addition, subzero storage of articular cartilage has long been used in biomedical studies using various storage temperatures. The current investigation studies the potential for freeze-thaw to affect the mechanical properties of articular cartilage through direct comparison of various subzero storage temperatures. Methods Both subzero storage temperature as well as freezing rate were compared using control samples (4°C) and samples stored at either -20°C or -80°C as well as samples first snap frozen in liquid nitrogen (-196°C) prior to storage at -80°C. All samples were thawed at 37.5°C to testing temperature (22°C). Complex stiffness and hysteresis characterized load resistance and damping properties using a non-destructive, low force magnitude, dynamic indentation protocol spanning a broad loading rate range to identify the dynamic viscoelastic properties of cartilage. Results Stiffness levels remained unchanged with exposure to the various subzero temperatures. Hysteresis increased in samples snap frozen at -196°C and stored at -80°C, though remained unchanged with exposure to the other storage temperatures. Conclusions Mechanical changes shown are likely due to ice lens creation, where frost heave effects may have caused collagen damage. That storage to -20°C and -80°C did not alter the mechanical properties of articular cartilage shows that when combined with a rapid thawing protocol to 37.5°C, the tissue may successfully be stored at subzero temperatures. PMID:20932309

  13. A new method for evaluating the degeneration of articular cartilage using pulse-echo ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Sun, Anyu; Bai, Xiaolong; Ju, Bing-Feng

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a novel nondestructive ultrasonic technique for measuring the sound speed and acoustic impedance of articular cartilage using the pulsed Vz,t technique. Vz,t data include a series of pulsed ultrasonic echoes collected using different distances between the ultrasonic transducer and the specimen. The 2D Fourier transform is applied to the Vz,t data to reconstruct the 2D reflection spectrum Rθ,ω. To obtain the reflection coefficient of articular cartilage, the Vz,t data from a reference specimen with a well-known reflection coefficient are obtained to eliminate the dependence on the general system transfer function. The ultrasound-derived aggregate modulus (Ha) is computed based on the measured reflection coefficient and the sound speed. In the experiment, 32 cartilage-bone samples were prepared from bovine articular cartilage, and 16 samples were digested using 0.25% trypsin solution. The sound speed and Ha of these cartilage samples were evaluated before and after degeneration. The magnitude of the sound speed decreased with trypsin digestion (from 1663 ± 5.6 m/s to 1613 ± 5.3 m/s). Moreover, the Young's modulus in the corresponding degenerative state was measured and was correlated with the ultrasound-derived aggregate modulus. The ultrasound-derived aggregate modulus was determined to be highly correlated with the Young's modulus (n = 16, r>0.895, p<0.003, Pearson correlation test for each measurement). The results demonstrate the effectiveness of using the proposed method to assess the changes in sound speed and the ultrasound-derived aggregate modulus of cartilage after degeneration. PMID:25832249

  14. Evaluation of Se-75 BISTAES as a potential articular cartilage imaging agent

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.W.K.

    1987-01-01

    The potential of Se-75 bis (..beta..-N,N,N-trimethylamino)-ethyl) selenide diiodide (Se-75 BISTAES) as an articular cartilage imaging agent for the early diagnosis of osteoarthritis was evaluated. The compound was synthesized and the identity was established. The radiochemical purity and stability were determined initially and over a two-month period of storage at three temperatures. The biodistribution of Se-75 BISTAES in rabbits and guinea pigs was studied. A high concentration of radioactivity was found in the knee and shoulder cartilage. The radioactivity in the cartilage was the highest at 15 minutes to one hour post-injection. In rabbits, the highest ratio of radioactivity in the cartilage to the surrounding tissues was about 30. A minimal ratio of 10 is required for nuclear medicine imaging. Nuclear medicine imaging conducted on rabbits demonstrated increased radioactivity in the articular cartilage in the knee and shoulder. The impression from the nuclear medicine images and the findings of the biodistribution study indicated that the route of excretion of Se-75 BISTAES was the urine. The in vitro binding between Se-75 BISTAES and chondroitin sulfate was determined by an equilibrium dialysis technique.

  15. Wear and Damage of Articular Cartilage with Friction Against Orthopaedic Implant Materials

    PubMed Central

    Oungoulian, Sevan R.; Durney, Krista M.; Jones, Brian K.; Ahmad, Christopher S.; Hung, Clark T.; Ateshian, Gerard A.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the wear response of immature bovine articular cartilage tested against glass or alloys used in hemiarthroplasties. Two cobalt chromium alloys and a stainless steel alloy were selected for these investigations. The surface roughness of one of the cobalt chromium alloys was also varied within the range considered acceptable by regulatory agencies. Cartilage disks were tested in a configuration that promoted loss of interstitial fluid pressurization to accelerate conditions believed to occur in hemiarthroplasties. Results showed that considerably more damage occurred in cartilage samples tested against stainless steel (10 nm roughness) and low carbon cobalt chromium alloy (27 nm roughness) compared to glass (10 nm) and smoother low or high carbon cobalt chromium (10 nm). The two materials producing the greatest damage also exhibited higher equilibrium friction coefficients. Cartilage damage occurred primarily in the form of delamination at the interface between the superficial tangential zone and the transitional middle zone, with much less evidence of abrasive wear at the articular surface. These results suggest that cartilage damage from frictional loading occurs as a result of subsurface fatigue failure leading to the delamination. Surface chemistry and surface roughness of implant materials can have a significant influence on tissue damage, even when using materials and roughness values that satisfy regulatory requirements. PMID:25912663

  16. Wear and damage of articular cartilage with friction against orthopedic implant materials.

    PubMed

    Oungoulian, Sevan R; Durney, Krista M; Jones, Brian K; Ahmad, Christopher S; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2015-07-16

    The objective of this study was to measure the wear response of immature bovine articular cartilage tested against glass or alloys used in hemiarthroplasties. Two cobalt chromium alloys and a stainless steel alloy were selected for these investigations. The surface roughness of one of the cobalt chromium alloys was also varied within the range considered acceptable by regulatory agencies. Cartilage disks were tested in a configuration that promoted loss of interstitial fluid pressurization to accelerate conditions believed to occur in hemiarthroplasties. Results showed that considerably more damage occurred in cartilage samples tested against stainless steel (10 nm roughness) and low carbon cobalt chromium alloy (27 nm roughness) compared to glass (10 nm) and smoother low or high carbon cobalt chromium (10 nm). The two materials producing the greatest damage also exhibited higher equilibrium friction coefficients. Cartilage damage occurred primarily in the form of delamination at the interface between the superficial tangential zone and the transitional middle zone, with much less evidence of abrasive wear at the articular surface. These results suggest that cartilage damage from frictional loading occurs as a result of subsurface fatigue failure leading to the delamination. Surface chemistry and surface roughness of implant materials can have a significant influence on tissue damage, even when using materials and roughness values that satisfy regulatory requirements.

  17. The collagen structure of equine articular cartilage, characterized using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugryumova, Nadya; Attenburrow, Don P.; Winlove, C. Peter; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2005-08-01

    Optical coherence tomography and polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography images of equine articular cartilage are presented. Measurements were made on intact joint surfaces. Significant (e.g. × 2) variations in the intrinsic birefringence were found over spatial scales of a few millimetres, even on samples taken from young (18 month) animals that appeared visually homogeneous. A comparison of data obtained on a control tissue (equine flexor tendon) further suggests that significant variations in the orientation of the collagen fibres relative to the plane of the joint surface exist. Images of visually damaged cartilage tissue show characteristic features both in terms of the distribution of optical scatterers and of the birefringent components.

  18. Nanomechanics of Engineered Articular Cartilage: Synergistic Influences of Transforming Growth Factor-β3 and Oscillating Pressure.

    PubMed

    Nazempour, Arshan; Quisenberry, Chrystal R; Van Wie, Bernard J; Abu-Lail, Nehal I

    2016-03-01

    Articular cartilage (AC), tissue with the lowest volumetric cellular density, is not supplied with blood and nerve tissue resulting in limited ability for self-repair upon injury. Because there is no treatment capable of fully restoring damaged AC, tissue engineering is being investigated. The emphasis of this field is to engineer functional tissues in vitro in bioreactors capable of mimicking in vivo envi- ronments required for appropriate cellular growth and differentiation. In a step towards engineering AC, human adipose-derived stem cells were differentiated in a unique centrifugal bioreactor under oscillating hydrostatic pressure (OHP) and supply of transforming growth factor beta 3 (TGF-β3) that mimic in vivo environments. Static micromass and pellet cultures were used as controls. Since withstanding and absorbing loads are among the main functions of an AC, mechanical properties of the engineered AC tissues were assayed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) under a controlled indentation depth of 100 nm. Young's moduli of elasticity were quantified by modeling AFM force-indentation data using the Hertz model of contact mechanics. We found exposure to OHP causes cartilage constructs to have 45-fold higher Young's moduli compared to static cultures. Addition of TGF-β3 further increases Young's moduli in bioreactor samples by 1.9-fold bringing it within 70.6% of the values estimated for native cartilage. Our results imply that OHP and TGF-β3 act synergistically to improve the mechanics of engineered tissues. PMID:27455774

  19. Programmed Application of Transforming Growth Factor β3 and Rac1 Inhibitor NSC23766 Committed Hyaline Cartilage Differentiation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells for Osteochondral Defect Repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shouan; Chen, Pengfei; Wu, Yan; Xiong, Si; Sun, Heng; Xia, Qingqing; Shi, Libing

    2014-01-01

    Hyaline cartilage differentiation is always the challenge with application of stem cells for joint repair. Transforming growth factors (TGFs) and bone morphogenetic proteins can initiate cartilage differentiation but often lead to hypertrophy and calcification, related to abnormal Rac1 activity. In this study, we developed a strategy of programmed application of TGFβ3 and Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 to commit the hyaline cartilage differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) for joint cartilage repair. ADSCs were isolated and cultured in a micromass and pellet culture model to evaluate chondrogenic and hypertrophic differentiation. The function of Rac1 was investigated with constitutively active Rac1 mutant and dominant negative Rac1 mutant. The efficacy of ADSCs with programmed application of TGFβ3 and Rac1 inhibitor for cartilage repair was studied in a rat model of osteochondral defects. The results showed that TGFβ3 promoted ADSCs chondro-lineage differentiation and that NSC23766 prevented ADSC-derived chondrocytes from hypertrophy in vitro. The combination of ADSCs, TGFβ3, and NSC23766 promoted quality osteochondral defect repair in rats with much less chondrocytes hypertrophy and significantly higher International Cartilage Repair Society macroscopic and microscopic scores. The findings have illustrated that programmed application of TGFβ3 and Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 can commit ADSCs to chondro-lineage differentiation and improve the efficacy of ADSCs for cartilage defect repair. These findings suggest a promising stem cell-based strategy for articular cartilage repair. PMID:25154784

  20. Programmed Application of Transforming Growth Factor β3 and Rac1 Inhibitor NSC23766 Committed Hyaline Cartilage Differentiation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells for Osteochondral Defect Repair.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shouan; Chen, Pengfei; Wu, Yan; Xiong, Si; Sun, Heng; Xia, Qingqing; Shi, Libing; Liu, Huanhuan; Ouyang, Hong Wei

    2014-10-01

    Hyaline cartilage differentiation is always the challenge with application of stem cells for joint repair. Transforming growth factors (TGFs) and bone morphogenetic proteins can initiate cartilage differentiation but often lead to hypertrophy and calcification, related to abnormal Rac1 activity. In this study, we developed a strategy of programmed application of TGFβ3 and Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 to commit the hyaline cartilage differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) for joint cartilage repair. ADSCs were isolated and cultured in a micromass and pellet culture model to evaluate chondrogenic and hypertrophic differentiation. The function of Rac1 was investigated with constitutively active Rac1 mutant and dominant negative Rac1 mutant. The efficacy of ADSCs with programmed application of TGFβ3 and Rac1 inhibitor for cartilage repair was studied in a rat model of osteochondral defects. The results showed that TGFβ3 promoted ADSCs chondro-lineage differentiation and that NSC23766 prevented ADSC-derived chondrocytes from hypertrophy in vitro. The combination of ADSCs, TGFβ3, and NSC23766 promoted quality osteochondral defect repair in rats with much less chondrocytes hypertrophy and significantly higher International Cartilage Repair Society macroscopic and microscopic scores. The findings have illustrated that programmed application of TGFβ3 and Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 can commit ADSCs to chondro-lineage differentiation and improve the efficacy of ADSCs for cartilage defect repair. These findings suggest a promising stem cell-based strategy for articular cartilage repair.

  1. Surgical management of articular cartilage defects in the knee.

    PubMed

    Cole, Brian J; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Grumet, Robert C

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of isolated cartilage lesions of the knee is based on several underlying principles, including a predictable reduction in the patient's symptoms, improvements in function and joint congruence, and prevention of progressive damage. Surgical options for cartilage restoration are described as palliative treatments, such as débridement and lavage; reparative, such as marrow stimulation techniques; or restorative, such as osteochondral grafting and autologous chondrocyte implantation. The choice of an appropriate treatment should be made on an individual basis, with consideration for the patient's specific goals (such as pain reduction or functional improvement), physical demand level, prior treatment history, lesion size and location, and a systematic evaluation of the knee that considers comorbidities, including alignment, meniscal status, and ligament integrity. It is important for the physician to be familiar with the indications, surgical techniques, and clinical outcomes of the available treatment options for chondral defects of the knee. PMID:20415379

  2. Effect of low-level helium-neon laser therapy on histological and ultrastructural features of immobilized rabbit articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Bayat, Mohammad; Ansari, Enayatallah; Gholami, Narges; Bayat, Aghdas

    2007-05-25

    The present study investigates whether low-level helium-neon laser therapy can increase histological parameters of immobilized articular cartilage in rabbits or not. Twenty five rabbits were divided into three groups: the experiment group, which received low-level helium-neon laser therapy with 13J/cm(2) three times a week after immobilization of their right knees; the control group which did not receive laser therapy after immobilization of their knees; and the normal group which received neither immobilization nor laser therapy. Histological and electron microscopic examinations were performed at 4 and 7 weeks after immobilization. Depth of the chondrocyte filopodia in four-week immobilized experiment group, and depth of articular cartilage in seven-week immobilized experiment group were significantly higher than those of relevant control groups (exact Fisher test, p=0.001; student's t-test, p=0.031, respectively). The surfaces of articular cartilages of the experiment group were relatively smooth, while those of the control group were unsmooth. It is therefore concluded that low-level helium-neon laser therapy had significantly increased the depth of the chondrocyte filopodia in four-week immobilized femoral articular cartilage and the depth of articular cartilage in seven-week immobilized knee in comparison with control immobilized articular cartilage.

  3. On the functional organisation of hyaline articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Pieper, K S; Fehrmann, P; Vergani, G; Herrmann, M

    1995-01-01

    Function of agonists and antagonists and the centering effect of the muscles on the connected joint result in constant changes of the site of load. Based on a model it is assumed that chondric cells organise in form of "functional units" within the single layers of the hyaline tectorial cartilage. In each case a small number of those units is subject to the rhythm of load and relief in a fixed period of time given. After 24-hour-culture of small pieces of cartilage in Ham's F-10 medium erected cilia are found on the predominantly ciliated chondrocytes with this indicating relief of pressure. In these cells massive glycogen synthesis and an active Golgi apparatus are present. In parallel, chondrones are found in which cellular contact functions via a cilium. Time-dependent glycogen occurs in these cells too. Cells having almost the same synthesis time course of the glycogen join up to form "functional units", which are particularly involved in the biomechanic cartilage behavior in the radiar cell zone. PMID:11322284

  4. MRI T1ρ and T2 mapping for the assessment of articular cartilage changes in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis after hemicallotasis osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, E.; Hirose, J.; Okamoto, N.; Yamabe, S.; Mizuta, H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to clarify the appearance of the reparative tissue on the articular surface and to analyse the properties of the reparative tissue after hemicallotasis osteotomy (HCO) using MRI T1ρ and T2 mapping. Methods Coronal T1ρ and T2 mapping and three-dimensional gradient-echo images were obtained from 20 subjects with medial knee osteoarthritis. We set the regions of interest (ROIs) on the full-thickness cartilage of the medial femoral condyle (MFC) and medial tibial plateau (MTP) of the knee and measured the cartilage thickness (mm) and T1ρ and T2 relaxation times (ms). Statistical analysis of time-dependent changes in the cartilage thickness and the T1ρ and T2 relaxation times was performed using one-way analysis of variance, and Scheffe’s test was employed for post hoc multiple comparison. Results The cartilage-like repair tissue appeared on the cartilage surface of the medial compartment post-operatively, and the cartilage thickness showed a significant increase between the pre-operative and one-year post-operative time points (MFC; p = 0.003, MTP; p < 0.001). The T1ρ values of the cartilage-like repair tissue showed no difference over time, however, the T2 values showed a significant decrease between the pre-operative and one-year post-operative time points (MFC; p = 0.004, MTP; p = 0.040). Conclusion This study clarified that the fibrocartilage-like repair tissue appeared on the articular surface of the medial compartment after HCO as evidenced by MRI T1ρ and T2 mapping. Cite this article: H. Nishioka, E. Nakamura, J. Hirose, N. Okamoto, S. Yamabe, H. Mizuta. MRI T1ρ and T2 mapping for the assessment of articular cartilage changes in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis after hemicallotasis osteotomy. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:294–300. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.57.BJR-2016-0057.R1. PMID:27421285

  5. High-resolution measurements of the multilayer ultra-structure of articular cartilage and their translational potential

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Current musculoskeletal imaging techniques usually target the macro-morphology of articular cartilage or use histological analysis. These techniques are able to reveal advanced osteoarthritic changes in articular cartilage but fail to give detailed information to distinguish early osteoarthritis from healthy cartilage, and this necessitates high-resolution imaging techniques measuring cells and the extracellular matrix within the multilayer structure of articular cartilage. This review provides a comprehensive exploration of the cellular components and extracellular matrix of articular cartilage as well as high-resolution imaging techniques, including magnetic resonance image, electron microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, second harmonic generation microscopy, and laser scanning confocal arthroscopy, in the measurement of multilayer ultra-structures of articular cartilage. This review also provides an overview for micro-structural analysis of the main components of normal or osteoarthritic cartilage and discusses the potential and challenges associated with developing non-invasive high-resolution imaging techniques for both research and clinical diagnosis of early to late osteoarthritis. PMID:24946278

  6. Deletion of IFT80 Impairs Epiphyseal and Articular Cartilage Formation Due to Disruption of Chondrocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xue; Yang, Shuying

    2015-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport proteins (IFT) play important roles in cilia formation and organ development. Partial loss of IFT80 function leads Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (JATD) or short-rib polydactyly (SRP) syndrome type III, displaying narrow thoracic cavity and multiple cartilage anomalies. However, it is unknown how IFT80 regulates cartilage formation. To define the role and mechanism of IFT80 in chondrocyte function and cartilage formation, we generated a Col2α1; IFT80f/f mouse model by crossing IFT80f/f mice with inducible Col2α1-CreER mice, and deleted IFT80 in chondrocyte lineage by injection of tamoxifen into the mice in embryonic or postnatal stage. Loss of IFT80 in the embryonic stage resulted in short limbs at birth. Histological studies showed that IFT80-deficient mice have shortened cartilage with marked changes in cellular morphology and organization in the resting, proliferative, pre-hypertrophic, and hypertrophic zones. Moreover, deletion of IFT80 in the postnatal stage led to mouse stunted growth with shortened growth plate but thickened articular cartilage. Defects of ciliogenesis were found in the cartilage of IFT80-deficient mice and primary IFT80-deficient chondrocytes. Further study showed that chondrogenic differentiation was significantly inhibited in IFT80-deficient mice due to reduced hedgehog (Hh) signaling and increased Wnt signaling activities. These findings demonstrate that loss of IFT80 blocks chondrocyte differentiation by disruption of ciliogenesis and alteration of Hh and Wnt signaling transduction, which in turn alters epiphyseal and articular cartilage formation. PMID:26098911

  7. Fractional calculus model of articular cartilage based on experimental stress-relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, P. A.; Green, I.

    2015-05-01

    Articular cartilage is a unique substance that protects joints from damage and wear. Many decades of research have led to detailed biphasic and triphasic models for the intricate structure and behavior of cartilage. However, the models contain many assumptions on boundary conditions, permeability, viscosity, model size, loading, etc., that complicate the description of cartilage. For impact studies or biomimetic applications, cartilage can be studied phenomenologically to reduce modeling complexity. This work reports experimental results on the stress-relaxation of equine articular cartilage in unconfined loading. The response is described by a fractional calculus viscoelastic model, which gives storage and loss moduli as functions of frequency, rendering multiple advantages: (1) the fractional calculus model is robust, meaning that fewer constants are needed to accurately capture a wide spectrum of viscoelastic behavior compared to other viscoelastic models (e.g., Prony series), (2) in the special case where the fractional derivative is 1/2, it is shown that there is a straightforward time-domain representation, (3) the eigenvalue problem is simplified in subsequent dynamic studies, and (4) cartilage stress-relaxation can be described with as few as three constants, giving an advantage for large-scale dynamic studies that account for joint motion or impact. Moreover, the resulting storage and loss moduli can quantify healthy, damaged, or cultured cartilage, as well as artificial joints. The proposed characterization is suited for high-level analysis of multiphase materials, where the separate contribution of each phase is not desired. Potential uses of this analysis include biomimetic dampers and bearings, or artificial joints where the effective stiffness and damping are fundamental parameters.

  8. Deletion of IFT80 Impairs Epiphyseal and Articular Cartilage Formation Due to Disruption of Chondrocyte Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xue; Yang, Shuying

    2015-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport proteins (IFT) play important roles in cilia formation and organ development. Partial loss of IFT80 function leads Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (JATD) or short-rib polydactyly (SRP) syndrome type III, displaying narrow thoracic cavity and multiple cartilage anomalies. However, it is unknown how IFT80 regulates cartilage formation. To define the role and mechanism of IFT80 in chondrocyte function and cartilage formation, we generated a Col2α1; IFT80f/f mouse model by crossing IFT80f/f mice with inducible Col2α1-CreER mice, and deleted IFT80 in chondrocyte lineage by injection of tamoxifen into the mice in embryonic or postnatal stage. Loss of IFT80 in the embryonic stage resulted in short limbs at birth. Histological studies showed that IFT80-deficient mice have shortened cartilage with marked changes in cellular morphology and organization in the resting, proliferative, pre-hypertrophic, and hypertrophic zones. Moreover, deletion of IFT80 in the postnatal stage led to mouse stunted growth with shortened growth plate but thickened articular cartilage. Defects of ciliogenesis were found in the cartilage of IFT80-deficient mice and primary IFT80-deficient chondrocytes. Further study showed that chondrogenic differentiation was significantly inhibited in IFT80-deficient mice due to reduced hedgehog (Hh) signaling and increased Wnt signaling activities. These findings demonstrate that loss of IFT80 blocks chondrocyte differentiation by disruption of ciliogenesis and alteration of Hh and Wnt signaling transduction, which in turn alters epiphyseal and articular cartilage formation. PMID:26098911

  9. The surface lamina of the articular cartilage of human zygapophyseal joints.

    PubMed

    Giles, L G

    1992-07-01

    Literature referring to the conflicting results of investigations into the possible existence and composition of the lamina splendens is reviewed. Two hundred micrometer thick histological sections from 80 human cadaveric lower lumbar zygapophyseal joint articular cartilages were examined by ordinary light and darkfield microscopy. The findings illustrate what appears to be an acellular surface lamina on the opposing cartilaginous surfaces. No speculation is made regarding the possible physiological significance of the lamina based on this anatomical study. PMID:1609968

  10. Poroelastic response of articular cartilage by nanoindentation creep tests at different characteristic lengths.

    PubMed

    Taffetani, M; Gottardi, R; Gastaldi, D; Raiteri, R; Vena, P

    2014-07-01

    Nanoindentation is an experimental technique which is attracting increasing interests for the mechanical characterization of articular cartilage. In particular, time dependent mechanical responses due to fluid flow through the porous matrix can be quantitatively investigated by nanoindentation experiments at different penetration depths and/or by using different probe sizes. The aim of this paper is to provide a framework for the quantitative interpretation of the poroelastic response of articular cartilage subjected to creep nanoindentation tests. To this purpose, multiload creep tests using spherical indenters have been carried out on saturated samples of mature bovine articular cartilage achieving two main quantitative results. First, the dependence of indentation modulus in the drained state (at equilibrium) on the tip radius: a value of 500 kPa has been found using the large tip (400 μm radius) and of 1.7 MPa using the smaller one (25 μm). Secon, the permeability at microscopic scale was estimated at values ranging from 4.5×10(-16) m(4)/N s to 0.1×10(-16) m(4)/N s, from low to high equivalent deformation. Consistently with a poroelastic behavior, the size-dependent response of the indenter displacement disappears when characteristic size and permeability are accounted for. For comparison purposes, the same protocol was applied to intrinsically viscoelastic homogeneous samples of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS): both indentation modulus and time response have been found size-independent. PMID:24814573

  11. Tibial articular cartilage and meniscus geometries combine to influence female risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    PubMed

    Sturnick, Daniel R; Van Gorder, Robert; Vacek, Pamela M; DeSarno, Michael J; Gardner-Morse, Mack G; Tourville, Timothy W; Slauterbeck, James R; Johnson, Robert J; Shultz, Sandra J; Beynnon, Bruce D

    2014-11-01

    Tibial plateau subchondral bone geometry has been associated with the risk of sustaining a non-contact ACL injury; however, little is known regarding the influence of the meniscus and articular cartilage interface geometry on risk. We hypothesized that geometries of the tibial plateau articular cartilage surface and meniscus were individually associated with the risk of non-contact ACL injury. In addition, we hypothesized that the associations were independent of the underlying subchondral bone geometry. MRI scans were acquired on 88 subjects that suffered non-contact ACL injuries (27 males, 61 females) and 88 matched control subjects that were selected from the injured subject's teammates and were thus matched on sex, sport, level of play, and exposure to risk of injury. Multivariate analysis of the female data revealed that increased posterior-inferior directed slope of the middle articular cartilage region and decreased height of the posterior horn of the meniscus in the lateral compartment were associated with increased risk of sustaining a first time, non-contact ACL injury, independent of each other and of the slope of the tibial plateau subchondral bone. No measures were independently related to risk of non-contact ACL injury among males.

  12. Structure-Function Relations and Rigidity Percolation in the Shear Properties of Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Silverberg, Jesse L.; Barrett, Aliyah R.; Das, Moumita; Petersen, Poul B.; Bonassar, Lawrence J.; Cohen, Itai

    2014-01-01

    Among mammalian soft tissues, articular cartilage is particularly interesting because it can endure a lifetime of daily mechanical loading despite having minimal regenerative capacity. This remarkable resilience may be due to the depth-dependent mechanical properties, which have been shown to localize strain and energy dissipation. This paradigm proposes that these properties arise from the depth-dependent collagen fiber orientation. Nevertheless, this structure-function relationship has not yet been quantified. Here, we use confocal elastography, quantitative polarized light microscopy, and Fourier-transform infrared imaging to make same-sample measurements of the depth-dependent shear modulus, collagen fiber organization, and extracellular matrix concentration in neonatal bovine articular cartilage. We find weak correlations between the shear modulus |G∗| and both the collagen fiber orientation and polarization. We find a much stronger correlation between |G∗| and the concentration of collagen fibers. Interestingly, very small changes in collagen volume fraction vc lead to orders-of-magnitude changes in the modulus with |G∗| scaling as (vc – v0)ξ. Such dependencies are observed in the rheology of other biopolymer networks whose structure exhibits rigidity percolation phase transitions. Along these lines, we propose that the collagen network in articular cartilage is near a percolation threshold that gives rise to these large mechanical variations and localization of strain at the tissue’s surface. PMID:25296326

  13. Cryoscanning electron microscopic study of the surface amorphous layer of articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, S; Yonekubo, S; Kurogouchi, Y

    1995-01-01

    In order to elucidate the structure near the articular surface, frozen unfixed hydrated articular cartilage with subchondral bone from the pig knee was examined using a cryoscanning electron microscope (cryo-SEM). This method is considered to reduce the introduction of artefacts due to fixation and drying. An amorphous layer, without a collagen-fibril network or chondrocytes, covered most of the surface of the cartilage. This layer was termed the surface amorphous layer. It showed various appearances, which were classified into 4 groups. The average thickness of the layer did not differ among the 8 anatomical regions from which the specimens were taken. The thickness of the layer was found to correlate with the type of appearance of the layer. The 4 appearances associated with thicknesses in descending order are: 'streaked', 'foliate', 'spotted', and 'vestigial'. The surface layer observed in the cryo-SEM was thicker than that observed by a conventional SEM. This difference may be attributable to dehydration of the specimen used in specimen preparation for the latter technique. The layer was also observed in articular cartilage taken from human and rabbit knees. The layer was found to be unstable and to have very variable features. Its thickness and appearance may be influenced by various factors such as dehydration, fluid absorption or mechanical stress. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 PMID:7592006

  14. Articular cartilage friction increases in hip joints after the removal of acetabular labrum.

    PubMed

    Song, Yongnam; Ito, Hiroshi; Kourtis, Lampros; Safran, Marc R; Carter, Dennis R; Giori, Nicholas J

    2012-02-01

    The acetabular labrum is believed to have a sealing function. However, a torn labrum may not effectively prevent joint fluid from escaping a compressed joint, resulting in impaired lubrication. We aimed to understand the role of the acetabular labrum in maintaining a low friction environment in the hip joint. We did this by measuring the resistance to rotation (RTR) of the hip, which reflects the friction of the articular cartilage surface, following focal and complete labrectomy. Five cadaveric hips without evidence of osteoarthritis and impingement were tested. We measured resistance to rotation of the hip joint during 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 times body weight (BW) cyclic loading in the intact hip, and after focal and complete labrectomy. Resistance to rotation, which reflects articular cartilage friction in an intact hip was significantly increased following focal labrectomy at 1-3 BW loading, and following complete labrectomy at all load levels. The acetabular labrum appears to maintain a low friction environment, possibly by sealing the joint from fluid exudation. Even focal labrectomy may result in increased joint friction, a condition that may be detrimental to articular cartilage and lead to osteoarthritis.

  15. Cryoscanning electron microscopy of loaded articular cartilage with special reference to the surface amorphous layer.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Yonekubo, S; Kurogouchi, Y

    1996-04-01

    The surface layer (i.e. the surface lamina) of articular cartilage, which is devoid of a collagen fibril network or cells, was investigated in the pig and human. It overlies the collagenous main part of the articular cartilage which contains chondrocytes and is thought to be important biomechanically. In order to examine morphological changes in this layer when under load, knee articular cartilage of the pig, along with the underlying subchondral bone, was compressed with a cylindrical indenter. The specimen was frozen by immersion in liquid nitrogen to maintain the loaded condition and was then freeze-fractured at the indented region. The fracture face was examined with a cryoscanning electron microscope. The surface layer was compressed beneath the indenter regardless of loading pressure or period and was expanded around the indenter to form a triangular bulge in cross section. The height of the bulge was related to the applied pressure and not to the loading period. Recovery of the cartilage from indentation was also examined. Immediately after removal of the indenter, the bulge of the surface layer moved back into the previously indented region. The region was covered by a thick surface layer after 2 s. The response of the surface layer to and recovery from indentation was largely instantaneous and elastic. Under heavy load conditions, the main part of the cartilage under the indenter was observed to have a striped pattern which was made up of bands of densely packed collagen fibrils with fibrillar networks remaining between them. These morphological findings agree well with previously reported biomechanical hypotheses and can be explained by the flow of interstitial fluid provoked by stress application. PMID:8621329

  16. STRUCTURE-FUNCTION RELATIONSHIPS IN OSTEOARTHRITIC HUMAN HIP JOINT ARTICULAR CARTILAGE

    PubMed Central

    Mäkelä, Janne T.A.; Huttu, Mari R.J.; Korhonen, Rami K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives It is currently poorly known how different structural and compositional components in human articular cartilage are related to their specific functional properties at different stages of osteoarthritis (OA). The objective of this study was to characterize the structure-function relationships of articular cartilage obtained from osteoarthritic human hip joints. Methods Articular cartilage samples with their subchondral bone (n = 15) were harvested during hip replacement surgeries from human femoral necks. Stress-relaxation tests, Mankin scoring, spectroscopic and microscopic methods were used to determine the biomechanical properties, OA grade, and the composition and structure of the samples. In order to obtain the mechanical material parameters for the samples, a fibril-reinforced poroviscoelastic model was fitted to the experimental data obtained from the stress-relaxation experiments. Results The strain-dependent collagen network modulus (Efε) and the collagen orientation angle exhibited a negative linear correlation (r = −0.65, p < 0.01), while the permeability strain-dependency factor (M) and the collagen content exhibited a positive linear correlation (r = 0.56, p < 0.05). The non-fibrillar matrix modulus (Enf) also exhibited a positive linear correlation with the proteoglycan content (r = 0.54, p < 0.05). Conclusion The study suggests that increased collagen orientation angle during OA primarily impairs the collagen network and the tensile stiffness of cartilage in a strain-dependent manner, while the decreased collagen content in OA facilitates fluid flow out of the tissue especially at high compressive strains. Thus, the results provide interesting and important information of the structure-function relationships of human hip joint cartilage and mechanisms during the progression of OA. PMID:22858669

  17. Effects of growth and exercise on composition, structural maturation and appearance of osteoarthritis in articular cartilage of hamsters.

    PubMed

    Julkunen, Petro; Halmesmäki, Esa P; Iivarinen, Jarkko; Rieppo, Lassi; Närhi, Tommi; Marjanen, Juho; Rieppo, Jarno; Arokoski, Jari; Brama, Pieter A; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Helminen, Heikki J

    2010-09-01

    Articular cartilage composition and structure are maintained and remodeled by chondrocytes under the influence of loading. Exercise-induced changes in the composition, structure, mechanical properties and tissue integrity of growing and aging hamster articular cartilage were investigated. Articular cartilage samples (n = 191) were harvested from the proximal tibiae of hamsters aged 1, 3, 6, 12 and 15 months. The hamsters were divided into runners and controls. The runners had free access to a running wheel between 1 and 3 months (runner groups 3-, 12- and 15-month-old hamsters) or 1 and 6 months (runner group 6-month-old hamsters) of age. Control animals were subjected to a sedentary lifestyle. Mechanical indentation tests and depth-wise compositional and structural analyses were performed for the cartilage samples. Furthermore, the integrity of articular cartilage was assessed using histological osteoarthritis grading. Exercise affected the collagen network organization after a 5-month exercise period, especially in the middle and deep zones. However, no effect on the mechanical properties was detected after exercise. Before the age of 12 months, the runners showed less osteoarthritis than the controls, whereas at 15 months of age the situation was reversed. It is concluded that, in hamsters, physical exercise at a young age enhances cartilage maturation and alters the depth-wise cartilage structure and composition. This may be considered beneficial. However, exercise at a young age demonstrated adverse effects on cartilage at a later age with a significant increase in the incidence of osteoarthritis.

  18. Friction coefficients for mechanically damaged bovine articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liu; Brunski, Daniel B; Sikavitsas, Vassilios I; Johnson, Matthew B; Striolo, Alberto

    2012-07-01

    We used a pin-on-disc tribometer to measure the friction coefficient of both pristine and mechanically damaged cartilage samples in the presence of different lubricant solutions. The experimental set up maximizes the lubrication mechanism due to interstitial fluid pressurization. In phosphate buffer solution (PBS), the measured friction coefficient increases with the level of damage. The main result is that when poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) or hyaluronic acid (HA) are dissolved in PBS, or when synovial fluid (SF) is used as lubricant, the friction coefficients measured for damaged cartilage samples are only slightly larger than those obtained for pristine cartilage samples, indicating that the surface damage is in part alleviated by the presence of the various lubricants. Among the lubricants considered, 100 mg/mL of 100,000 Da MW PEO in PBS appears to be as effective as SF. We attempted to discriminate the lubrication mechanism enhanced by the various compounds. The lubricants viscosity was measured at shear rates comparable to those employed in the friction experiments, and a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring was used to study the adsorption of PEO, HA, and SF components on collagen type II adlayers pre-formed on hydroxyapatite. Under the shear rates considered the viscosity of SF is slightly larger than that of PBS, but lower than that of lubricant formulations containing HA or PEO. Neither PEO nor HA showed strong adsorption on collagen adlayers, while evidence of adsorption was found for SF. Combined, these results suggest that synovial fluid is likely to enhance boundary lubrication. It is possible that all three formulations enhance lubrication via the interstitial fluid pressurization mechanism, maximized by the experimental set up adopted in our friction tests.

  19. Biosynthesis of collagen and other matrix proteins by articular cartilage in experimental osteoarthrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Eyre, D R; McDevitt, C A; Billingham, M E; Muir, H

    1980-01-01

    Osteoarthrosis was induced in one knee joint of dogs by an established surgical procedure. Changes in the articular cartilage in the biosynthesis of collagen and other proteins were sought by radiochemical labelling in vivo, with the following findings. (1) Collagen synthesis was stimulated in all cartilage surfaces of the experimental joints at 2, 8 and 24 weeks after surgery. Systemic labelling with [3H]proline showed that over 10 times more collagen was being deposited per dry weight of experimental cartilage compared with control cartilage in the unoperated knee. (2) Type-II collagen was the radiolabelled product in all samples of experimental cartilage ranging in quality from undamaged to overtly fibrillated, and was the only collagen detected chemically in the matrix of osteoarthrotic cartilage from either dog or human joints. (3) Hydroxylysine glycosylation was examined in the newly synthesized cartilage collagen by labelling dog joints in vivo with [3H]lysine. In experimental knees the new collagen was less glycosylated than in controls. However, no difference in glycosylation of the total collagen in the tissues was observed by chemical analysis. (4) Over half the protein-bound tritium was extracted by 4 M-guanidinium chloride from control cartilage labelled with [3H]proline, compared with one-quarter or less from experimental cartilage. Two-thirds of the extracted tritium separated in the upper fraction on density-gradient centrifugation in CsCl under associative conditions. Much of this ran with a single protein band on sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions. The identity of this protein was unknown, although it resembled serum albumin in mobility afte disulphide-bond cleavage. Images Fig. 3. PMID:7470037

  20. Periodic rewetting enhances the viability of chondrocytes in human articular cartilage exposed to air.

    PubMed

    Pun, S Y; Teng, M S; Kim, H T

    2006-11-01

    Desiccation of articular cartilage during surgery is often unavoidable and may result in the death of chondrocytes, with subsequent joint degeneration. This study was undertaken to determine the extent of chondrocyte death caused by exposure to air and to ascertain whether regular rewetting of cartilage could decrease cell death. Macroscopically normal human cartilage was exposed to air for 0, 30, 60 or 120 minutes. Selected samples were wetted in lactated Ringer's solution for ten seconds every ten or 20 minutes. The viability of chondrocytes was measured after three days by Live/Dead staining. Chondrocyte death correlated with the length of exposure to air and the depth of the cartilage. Drying for 120 minutes caused extensive cell death mainly in the superficial 500 microm of cartilage. Rewetting every ten or 20 minutes significantly decreased cell death. The superficial zone is most susceptible to desiccation. Loss of superficial chondrocytes likely decreases the production of essential lubricating glycoproteins and contributes to subsequent degeneration. Frequent wetting of cartilage during arthrotomy is therefore essential.

  1. Galectin-3 Binds to Lubricin and Reinforces the Lubricating Boundary Layer of Articular Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Reesink, Heidi L; Bonnevie, Edward D; Liu, Sherry; Shurer, Carolyn R; Hollander, Michael J; Bonassar, Lawrence J; Nixon, Alan J

    2016-01-01

    Lubricin is a mucinous, synovial fluid glycoprotein that enables near frictionless joint motion via adsorption to the surface of articular cartilage and its lubricating properties in solution. Extensive O-linked glycosylation within lubricin's mucin-rich domain is critical for its boundary lubricating function; however, it is unknown exactly how glycosylation facilitates cartilage lubrication. Here, we find that the lubricin glycome is enriched with terminal β-galactosides, known binding partners for a family of multivalent lectins called galectins. Of the galectin family members present in synovial fluid, we find that galectin-3 is a specific, high-affinity binding partner for lubricin. Considering the known ability of galectin-3 to crosslink glycoproteins, we hypothesized that galectins could augment lubrication via biomechanical stabilization of the lubricin boundary layer. We find that competitive inhibition of galectin binding results in lubricin loss from the cartilage surface, and addition of multimeric galectin-3 enhances cartilage lubrication. We also find that galectin-3 has low affinity for the surface layer of osteoarthritic cartilage and has reduced affinity for sialylated O-glycans, a glycophenotype associated with inflammatory conditions. Together, our results suggest that galectin-3 reinforces the lubricin boundary layer; which, in turn, enhances cartilage lubrication and may delay the onset and progression of arthritis.

  2. Discrimination of healthy and osteoarthritic articular cartilage by Fourier transform infrared imaging and Fisher's discriminant analysis.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhi-Hua; Yin, Jian-Hua; Zhang, Xue-Xi; Wang, Xiao; Xia, Yang

    2016-02-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging (FTIRI) technique can be used to obtain the quantitative information of content and spatial distribution of principal components in cartilage by combining with chemometrics methods. In this study, FTIRI combining with principal component analysis (PCA) and Fisher's discriminant analysis (FDA) was applied to identify the healthy and osteoarthritic (OA) articular cartilage samples. Ten 10-μm thick sections of canine cartilages were imaged at 6.25μm/pixel in FTIRI. The infrared spectra extracted from the FTIR images were imported into SPSS software for PCA and FDA. Based on the PCA result of 2 principal components, the healthy and OA cartilage samples were effectively discriminated by the FDA with high accuracy of 94% for the initial samples (training set) and cross validation, as well as 86.67% for the prediction group. The study showed that cartilage degeneration became gradually weak with the increase of the depth. FTIRI combined with chemometrics may become an effective method for distinguishing healthy and OA cartilages in future. PMID:26977354

  3. Galectin-3 Binds to Lubricin and Reinforces the Lubricating Boundary Layer of Articular Cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reesink, Heidi L.; Bonnevie, Edward D.; Liu, Sherry; Shurer, Carolyn R.; Hollander, Michael J.; Bonassar, Lawrence J.; Nixon, Alan J.

    2016-05-01

    Lubricin is a mucinous, synovial fluid glycoprotein that enables near frictionless joint motion via adsorption to the surface of articular cartilage and its lubricating properties in solution. Extensive O-linked glycosylation within lubricin’s mucin-rich domain is critical for its boundary lubricating function; however, it is unknown exactly how glycosylation facilitates cartilage lubrication. Here, we find that the lubricin glycome is enriched with terminal β-galactosides, known binding partners for a family of multivalent lectins called galectins. Of the galectin family members present in synovial fluid, we find that galectin-3 is a specific, high-affinity binding partner for lubricin. Considering the known ability of galectin-3 to crosslink glycoproteins, we hypothesized that galectins could augment lubrication via biomechanical stabilization of the lubricin boundary layer. We find that competitive inhibition of galectin binding results in lubricin loss from the cartilage surface, and addition of multimeric galectin-3 enhances cartilage lubrication. We also find that galectin-3 has low affinity for the surface layer of osteoarthritic cartilage and has reduced affinity for sialylated O-glycans, a glycophenotype associated with inflammatory conditions. Together, our results suggest that galectin-3 reinforces the lubricin boundary layer; which, in turn, enhances cartilage lubrication and may delay the onset and progression of arthritis.

  4. Galectin-3 Binds to Lubricin and Reinforces the Lubricating Boundary Layer of Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Reesink, Heidi L.; Bonnevie, Edward D.; Liu, Sherry; Shurer, Carolyn R.; Hollander, Michael J.; Bonassar, Lawrence J.; Nixon, Alan J.

    2016-01-01

    Lubricin is a mucinous, synovial fluid glycoprotein that enables near frictionless joint motion via adsorption to the surface of articular cartilage and its lubricating properties in solution. Extensive O-linked glycosylation within lubricin’s mucin-rich domain is critical for its boundary lubricating function; however, it is unknown exactly how glycosylation facilitates cartilage lubrication. Here, we find that the lubricin glycome is enriched with terminal β-galactosides, known binding partners for a family of multivalent lectins called galectins. Of the galectin family members present in synovial fluid, we find that galectin-3 is a specific, high-affinity binding partner for lubricin. Considering the known ability of galectin-3 to crosslink glycoproteins, we hypothesized that galectins could augment lubrication via biomechanical stabilization of the lubricin boundary layer. We find that competitive inhibition of galectin binding results in lubricin loss from the cartilage surface, and addition of multimeric galectin-3 enhances cartilage lubrication. We also find that galectin-3 has low affinity for the surface layer of osteoarthritic cartilage and has reduced affinity for sialylated O-glycans, a glycophenotype associated with inflammatory conditions. Together, our results suggest that galectin-3 reinforces the lubricin boundary layer; which, in turn, enhances cartilage lubrication and may delay the onset and progression of arthritis. PMID:27157803

  5. Biochemical and metabolic abnormalities in normal and osteoarthritic human articular cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, J.; Treadwell, B.V.; Mankin, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    Incorporation of radioactive precursors into macromolecules was studied with human normal and osteoarthritic articular cartilage organ culture. Analysis of the salt extracted matrix components separated by cesium chloride buoyant density gradient centrifugation showed an increase in the specific activities of all gradient fractions prepared from the osteoarthritic cartilage. Further analysis of these fractions showed the osteoarthritic cartilage contained 5 times as much sulfate incorporated into proteoglycans, and an even greater amount of 3H-glucosamine incorporated into material sedimenting to the middle of the gradient. Greater than half of this radioactive middle fraction appears to be hyaluronate, as judged by the position it elutes from a DEAE column and its susceptibility to hyaluronidase digestion. This study supports earlier findings showing increased rates of macromolecular synthesis in osteoarthritis, and in addition, an even greater synthetic rate for hyaluronic acid is demonstrated.

  6. Adsorption and Distribution of Fluorescent Solutes near the Articular Surface of Mechanically Injured Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Sarah G.A.; Moeini, Mohammad; Chin, Hooi Chuan; Rosenzweig, Derek H.; Quinn, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    The development of cartilage-specific imaging agents supports the improvement of tissue assessment by minimally invasive means. Techniques for highlighting cartilage surface damage in clinical images could provide for sensitive indications of posttraumatic injury and early stage osteoarthritis. Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that fluorescent solutes interact with cartilage surfaces strongly enough to affect measurement of their partition coefficients within the tissue bulk. In this study, these findings were extended by examining solute adsorption and distribution near the articular surface of mechanically injured cartilage. Using viable cartilage explants injured by an established protocol, solute distributions near the articular surface of three commonly used fluorophores (fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate (TRITC), and carboxytetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA)) were observed after absorption and subsequent desorption to assess solute-specific matrix interactions and reversibility. Both absorption and desorption processes demonstrated a trend of significantly less solute adsorption at surfaces of fissures compared to adjacent intact surfaces of damaged explants or surfaces of uninjured explants. After adsorption, normalized mean surface intensities of fissured surfaces of injured explants were 6%, 40%, and 32% for FITC, TRITC, and TAMRA, respectively, compared to uninjured surfaces. Similar values were found for sliced explants and after a desorption process. After desorption, a trend of increased solute adsorption at the site of intact damaged surfaces was noted (316% and 238% for injured and sliced explants exposed to FITC). Surface adsorption of solute was strongest for FITC and weakest for TAMRA; no solutes negatively affected cell viability. Results support the development of imaging agents that highlight distinct differences between fissured and intact cartilage surfaces. PMID:24268155

  7. Cartilage regeneration and repair testing in a surrogate large animal model.

    PubMed

    Simon, Timothy M; Aberman, Harold M

    2010-02-01

    The aging human population is experiencing increasing numbers of symptoms related to its degenerative articular cartilage (AC), which has stimulated the investigation of methods to regenerate or repair AC. However, the seemingly inherent limited capacity for AC to regenerate persists to confound the various repair treatment strategies proposed or studied. Animal models for testing AC implant devices and reparative materials are an important and required part of the Food and Drug Administration approval process. Although final testing is ultimately performed in humans, animal testing allows for a wider range of parameters and combinations of test materials subjected to all the biological interactions of a living system. We review here considerations, evaluations, and experiences with selection and use of animal models and describe two untreated lesion models useful for testing AC repair strategies. These created lesion models, one deep (6 mm and through the subchondral plate) the other shallow (to the level of the subchondral bone plate) were placed in the middle one-third of the medial femoral condyle of the knee joints of goats. At 1-year neither the deep nor the shallow full-thickness chondral defects generated a repair that duplicated natural AC. Moreover, progressive deleterious changes occurred in the AC surrounding the defects. There are challenges in translation from animals to humans as anatomy and structures are different and immobilization to protect delicate repairs can be difficult. The tissues potentially generated by proposed cartilage repair strategies must be compared with the spontaneous changes that occur in similarly created untreated lesions. The prevention of the secondary changes in the surrounding cartilage and subchondral bone described in this article should be addressed with the introduction of treatments for repairs of the articulating surface.

  8. Activated platelet-rich plasma improves adipose-derived stem cell transplantation efficiency in injured articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) have been isolated, expanded, and applied in the treatment of many diseases. ADSCs have also been used to treat injured articular cartilage. However, there is controversy regarding the treatment efficiency. We considered that ADSC transplantation with activated platelet-rich plasma (PRP) may improve injured articular cartilage compared with that of ADSC transplantation alone. In this study, we determined the role of PRP in ADSC transplantation to improve the treatment efficiency. Methods ADSCs were isolated and expanded from human adipose tissue. PRP was collected and activated from human peripheral blood. The effects of PRP were evaluated in vitro and in ADSC transplantation in vivo. In vitro, the effects of PRP on ADSC proliferation, differentiation into chondrogenic cells, and inhibition of angiogenic factors were investigated at three concentrations of PRP (10%, 15% and 20%). In vivo, ADSCs pretreated with or without PRP were transplanted into murine models of injured articular cartilage. Results PRP promoted ADSC proliferation and differentiation into chondrogenic cells that strongly expressed collagen II, Sox9 and aggrecan. Moreover, PRP inhibited expression of the angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor. As a result, PRP-pretreated ADSCs improved healing of injured articular cartilage in murine models compared with that of untreated ADSCs. Conclusion Pretreatment of ADSCs with PRP is a simple method to efficiently apply ADSCs in cartilage regeneration. This study provides an important step toward the use of autologous ADSCs in the treatment of injured articular cartilage. PMID:23915433

  9. The Effect of Exercise on the Early Stages of Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Induced Cartilage Repair in a Rat Osteochondral Defect Model

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Shoki; Aoyama, Tomoki; Ito, Akira; Nagai, Momoko; Iijima, Hirotaka; Tajino, Junichi; Zhang, Xiangkai; Kiyan, Wataru; Kuroki, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The repair of articular cartilage is challenging owing to the restriction in the ability of articular cartilage to repair itself. Therefore, cell supplementation therapy is possible cartilage repair method. However, few studies have verified the efficacy and safety of cell supplementation therapy. The current study assessed the effect of exercise on early the phase of cartilage repair following cell supplementation utilizing mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) intra-articular injection. An osteochondral defect was created on the femoral grooves bilaterally of Wistar rats. Mesenchymal stromal cells that were obtained from male Wistar rats were cultured in monolayer. After 4 weeks, MSCs were injected into the right knee joint and the rats were randomized into an exercise or no-exercise intervention group. The femurs were divided as follows: C group (no exercise without MSC injection); E group (exercise without MSC injection); M group (no exercise with MSC injection); and ME group (exercise with MSC injection). At 2, 4, and 8 weeks after the injection, the femurs were sectioned and histologically graded using the Wakitani cartilage repair scoring system. At 2 weeks after the injection, the total histological scores of the M and ME groups improved significantly compared with those of the C group. Four weeks after the injection, the scores of both the M and ME groups improved significantly. Additionally, the scores in the ME group showed a significant improvement compared to those in the M group. The improvement in the scores of the E, M, and ME groups at 8 weeks were not significantly different. The findings indicate that exercise may enhance cartilage repair after an MSC intra-articular injection. This study highlights the importance of exercise following cell transplantation therapy. PMID:26968036

  10. Quantitative zonal differentiation of articular cartilage by microscopic magnetic resonance imaging, polarized light microscopy, and Fourier-transform infrared imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Xia, Yang

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to synchronize the zonal differentiation of the full-thickness articular cartilage by three micro-imaging techniques, namely microscopic magnetic resonance imaging (µMRI), polarized light microscopy (PLM), and Fourier-transform infrared imaging (FTIRI). Eighteen cartilage-bone blocks from three canine humeral joints were imaged by: (a) µMRI T2 relaxation at 0° and 55° orientations in a 7 T magnetic field, (b) PLM optical retardation and azimuthal angle, and (c) FTIRI amide I and amide II anisotropies at 0° and 90° polarizations relative to the articular surface. In addition, µMRI T1 relaxation was imaged before and after the tissue being immersed in gadolinium (contrast agent) solution, to calculate the proteoglycan concentration. A set of previously established criteria in cartilage imaging was revised. The new criteria could simultaneously correlate the thicknesses of the three consecutive subtissue zones in articular cartilage among these imaging techniques.

  11. In-situ imaging of articular cartilage of the first carpometacarpal joint using co-registered optical coherence tomography and computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cernohorsky, Paul; de Bruin, Daniel M.; van Herk, Marcel; Bras, Johannes; Faber, Dirk J.; Strackee, Simon D.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2012-06-01

    Conventional imaging modalities are unable to depict the early degeneration of articular cartilage in osteoarthritis, especially in small joints. Optical coherence tomography has previously been used successfully in high-resolution imaging of cartilage tissue. This pilot cadaver study demonstrates the use of intra-articular optical coherence tomography in imaging of articular cartilage of the first carpometacarpal joint, producing high resolution images of the articular surface in which cartilage thickness and surface characteristics were assessed. Findings on optical coherence tomography were confirmed with histology. Furthermore, co-registration of optical coherence tomography and computed tomography was used to accurately determine the scanned trajectory and reconstruct a true-scale image overlay.

  12. Transthyretin deposition in articular cartilage: a novel mechanism in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Akasaki, Yukio; Reixach, Natàlia; Matsuzaki, Tokio; Alvarez-Garcia, Oscar; Olmer, Merissa; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Buxbaum, Joel N.; Lotz, Martin K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Amyloid deposits are prevalent in osteoarthritis (OA)-affected joints. This study defined the dominant precursor and determined if the deposits affect chondrocyte functions. Methods Amyloid deposition in normal and OA human knee cartilage was determined by Congo red staining. Transthyretin (TTR) in cartilage and synovial fluid was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and western blotting. The effects of recombinant amyloidogenic and non-amyloidogenic TTR variants were tested in human chondrocyte cultures. Results Normal cartilage from young donors did not contain detectable amyloid deposits but 58% (7/12) of aged normal cartilage and 100% (12/12) of OA cartilage samples showed Congo red staining with green birefringence under polarized light. TTR, located predominantly at the cartilage surfaces, was detected in all OA and a majority of aged, but not young normal cartilage. Chondrocytes and synoviocytes did not contain significant amounts of TTR mRNA. Synovial fluid TTR levels were similar in normal and OA knees. In cultured chondrocytes, only an amyloidogenic TTR variant induced cell death, the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, and extracellular matrix degrading enzymes. The effects of amyloidogenic TTR on gene expression were mediated by in part by Toll-like receptor-4, Receptor for advanced glycation endproducts and p38 MAP kinase. TTR-induced cytotoxicity was inhibited by resveratrol, a plant polyphenol that stabilizes the native tetrameric structure of TTR. Conclusions The findings are the first to suggest that TTR amyloid deposition contributes to cell and extracellular matrix damage in articular cartilage in human OA and that therapies designed to reduce TTR amyloid formation might be useful. PMID:25940564

  13. Optimization and translation of MSC-based hyaluronic acid hydrogels for cartilage repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Isaac E.

    2011-12-01

    Traumatic injury and disease disrupt the ability of cartilage to carry joint stresses and, without an innate regenerative response, often lead to degenerative changes towards the premature development of osteoarthritis. Surgical interventions have yet to restore long-term mechanical function. Towards this end, tissue engineering has been explored for the de novo formation of engineered cartilage as a biologic approach to cartilage repair. Research utilizing autologous chondrocytes has been promising, but clinical limitations in their yield have motivated research into the potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as an alternative cell source. MSCs are multipotent cells that can differentiate towards a chondrocyte phenotype in a number of biomaterials, but no combination has successfully recapitulated the native mechanical function of healthy articular cartilage. The broad objective of this thesis was to establish an MSC-based tissue engineering approach worthy of clinical translation. Hydrogels are a common class of biomaterial used for cartilage tissue engineering and our initial work demonstrated the potential of a photo-polymerizable hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel to promote MSC chondrogenesis and improved construct maturation by optimizing macromer and MSC seeding density. The beneficial effects of dynamic compressive loading, high MSC density, and continuous mixing (orbital shaker) resulted in equilibrium modulus values over 1 MPa, well in range of native tissue. While compressive properties are crucial, clinical translation also demands that constructs stably integrate within a defect. We utilized a push-out testing modality to assess the in vitro integration of HA constructs within artificial cartilage defects. We established the necessity for in vitro pre-maturation of constructs before repair to achieve greater integration strength and compressive properties in situ. Combining high MSC density and gentle mixing resulted in integration strength over 500 k

  14. A theoretical solution for the frictionless rolling contact of cylindrical biphasic articular cartilage layers.

    PubMed

    Ateshian, G A; Wang, H

    1995-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that interstitial fluid pressurization plays an important role in the load support mechanism of articular cartilage under normal step loading. These studies have demonstrated that interstitial fluid pressurization decreases with time if the applied load is maintained constant. In the present study, a theoretical solution is obtained for another common loading of articular cartilage, namely the contact of surfaces in rolling motion. Pure rolling of symmetrical frictionless cylindrical cartilage layers is analyzed under steady state. The linear biphasic model of Mow et al. [J. Biomech. Engng 102, 73-84 (1980)] is used to describe the mechanical response of articular cartilage. The solution of this contact problem reduces to simultaneously solving a set of four integral equations, akin to the dual integral problem of elastic contact. It is found that the solution is dependent on four non-dimensional parameters: Rh = Vb/HAk, W/2 mu b, R/b, and v, where V is the surface velocity, b the cartilage thickness, HA the aggregate modulus, mu the shear modulus, v Poisson's ratio, k the permeability, R the radius of cylindrical surfaces, and W the applied load per unit cylinder length. For Rh < 1, interstitial fluid pressurization is found to be negligible, and all the applied load is supported by the solid collagen-proteoglycan phase of the tissue, thus causing significant cartilage deformation. As Rh increases to a physiological level (Rh approximately 10(4)), interstitial fluid pressurization may support more than 90% of the total applied load, shielding the solid matrix from high effective stresses and reducing matrix strains and deformation. The protective effect of interstitial fluid pressurization is observed to increase with increasing joint congruence (R/b); similarly, as the applied load (W/2 mu b) is increased, a greater proportion of it is supported by the fluid. In degenerative cartilage, Rh may drop by one or more orders of magnitude

  15. Intracellular Na+ and Ca2+ Modulation Increases the Tensile Properties of Developing Engineered Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Natoli, Roman M.; Skaalure, Stacey; Bijlani, Shweta; Chen, Ke X.; Hu, Jerry; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Significant collagen content and tensile properties are difficult to achieve in articular cartilage tissue engineering. This study investigated whether treating developing tissue engineered cartilage constructs with modulators of intracellular Na+ or Ca2+ could increase collagen concentration and tensile properties. Methods Inhibitors of Na+ ion transporters and increasers of intracellular Ca2+ were investigated for their ability to affect articular cartilage development in a scaffold-less, 3D chondrocyte culture. Using a systematic approach, ouabain (Na+/K+ ATPase inhibitor), bumetanide (Na+/K+/2Cl− tritransporter inhibitor), histamine (cAMP activator), and ionomycin (a Ca2+ ionophore) were applied to tissue engineered constructs for 1 hr per day on days 10–14 of culture and examined at 2 or 4 wks. Gross morphology, biochemical content, and compressive and tensile mechanical properties of the constructs were assayed. Results Analysis showed that 20 µM ouabain, 0.3 µM ionomycin, or their combination increased the tensile modulus by 40–95% compared to untreated controls and resulted in increased collagen normalized to wet weight. In constructs exposed to ouabain, the increased collagen per wet weight was secondary to decreased GAG production on a per cell basis. Treatment with 20 µM ouabain also increased the neo-tissue’s ultimate tensile strength 56–86% at 4 wks. Other construct properties, such as construct growth and collagen type I production, were affected differently by Na+ modulation with ouabain versus Ca2+ modulation with ionomycin. Conclusions These data are the first to show that treatments known to alter intracellular ion concentrations are a viable method for increasing the mechanical properties of engineered articular cartilage and identify potentially important relationships to hydrostatic pressure mechanotransduction. Ouabain and ionomycin may be useful pharmacological agents for increasing tensile integrity and directing

  16. Arthroscopic transtendinous repair of articular-sided pasta (partial articular supraspinatus tendon avulsion) injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Lu, Liangyu; Lu, Zhe; Xiao, Lei; Kang, Yifan; Wang, Zimin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate clinical efficacy of arthroscopic transtendinous repair of partial articular-sided PASTA (partial articular supraspinatus tendon avulsion) injury. Methods: From February 2011 to July 2014, 12 cases of PASTA, aged 29 to 72 years with an average of 52.9 ± 13.3 years, were treated arthoscopically. To repair PASTA, articular-sided rotator cuff tear was explored, injury site was punctured and labeled with PDS absorbable monofilament suture (Ethicon, Somerville, NJ, USA) suture, subacromial bursa was cleaned up with acromioplasty, and integrity of bursa-side rotator cuff was assessed. Then with arthroscope in glenohumeral joint, footprint of the bursa-side supraspinatus tendon was preserved, rivets were introduced into the joint through supraspinatus tendon, joint-side partial tear was sutured, and anatomical reconstruction of the rotator cuff footprint was established. The patients were followed up post-operatively for 12-36 months, average 22 ± 7.3 months. The clinical outcomes were emulated with ASES (American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons) Shoulder Score system and UCLA (University of California at Los Angeles) Shoulder rating scale. Results: The post-operative ASES score was 89.7 ± 5.6, higher than the pre-operative one 49.8 ± 9.8 (t = 12.25, P <0.0001). While UCLA scale increased from the pre-operative 17.3, ± 3.3 to the post-operative 30.4 ± 3.2 points (t = 9.87, P <0.0001), with a satisfaction rate of 11/12 (91.7%). Conclusion: Trans-tendon repair is ideal for PASTA with advantage of maximal preservation of the normal rotator cuff tissue, anatomical reconstruction of the rotator cuff footprint and stable fixation of tendon-bone interface. PMID:25784979

  17. Modeling the Matrix of Articular Cartilage Using a Continuous Fiber Angular Distribution Predicts Many Observed Phenomena

    PubMed Central

    Ateshian, Gerard A.; Rajan, Vikram; Chahine, Nadeen O.; Canal, Clare E.; Hung, Clark T.

    2010-01-01

    Background Cartilage is a hydrated soft tissue whose solid matrix consists of negatively charged proteoglycans enmeshed within a fibrillar collagen network. Though many aspects of cartilage mechanics are well understood today, most notably in the context of porous media mechanics, there remain a number of responses observed experimentally whose prediction from theory has been challenging. Method of approach In this study the solid matrix of cartilage is modeled with a continuous fiber angular distribution, where fibers can only sustain tension, swelled by the osmotic pressure of a proteoglycan ground matrix. Results It is shown that this representation of cartilage can predict a number of observed phenomena in relation to the tissue’s equilibrium response to mechanical and osmotic loading, when flow-dependent and flow-independent viscoelastic effects have subsided. In particular, this model can predict the transition of Poisson’s ratio from very low values in compression (~0.02) to very high values in tension (~2.0). Most of these phenomena cannot be explained when using only three orthogonal fiber bundles to describe the tissue matrix, a common modeling assumption used to date. Conclusions The main picture emerging from this analysis is that the anisotropy of the fibrillar matrix of articular cartilage is intimately dependent on the mechanism of tensed fiber recruitment, in the manner suggested by our recent theoretical study (G. A. Ateshian. J Biomech Eng, 129(2):240-9, 2007). PMID:19449957

  18. Non-invasive and in vivo assessment of osteoarthritic articular cartilage: a review on MRI investigations.

    PubMed

    Hani, Ahmad Fadzil Mohd; Kumar, Dileep; Malik, Aamir Saeed; Ahmad, Raja Mohd Kamil Raja; Razak, Ruslan; Kiflie, Azman

    2015-01-01

    Early detection of knee osteoarthritis (OA) is of great interest to orthopaedic surgeons, rheumatologists, radiologists, and researchers because it would allow physicians to provide patients with treatments and advice to slow the onset or progression of the disease. Early detection can be achieved by identifying early changes in selected features of degenerative articular cartilage (AC) using non-invasive imaging modalities. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is becoming the standard for assessment of OA. The aim of this paper was to review the influence of MRI on the selection, detection, and measurement of AC features associated with early OA. Our review of the literature indicates that the changes associated with early OA are in cartilage thickness, cartilage volume, cartilage water content, and proteoglycan content that can be accurately, consistently, and non-invasively measured using MRI. Choosing an MR pulse sequence that provides the capability to assess cartilage physiology and morphology in a single acquisition and advanced multi-nuclei MRI is desirable. The results of the review indicate that using an ultra-high magnetic strength, MR imager does not affect early OA detection. In conclusion, MRI is currently the most suitable modality for early detection of knee OA, and future research should focus on the quantitative evaluation of early OA features using advances in MR hardware, software, and data processing with sophisticated image/pattern recognition techniques.

  19. Effect of Glutaraldehyde Fixation on the Frictional Response of Immature Bovine Articular Cartilage Explants

    PubMed Central

    Oungoulian, Sevan R.; Hehir, Kristin E.; Zhu, Kaicen; Willis, Callen E.; Marinescu, Anca G.; Merali, Natasha; Ahmad, Christopher S.; Hung, Clark T.; Ateshian, Gerard A.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined functional properties and biocompatibility of glutaraldehyde-fixed bovine articular cartilage over several weeks of incubation at body temperature to investigate its potential use as a resurfacing material in joint arthroplasty. In the first experiment, treated cartilage disks were fixed using 0.02, 0.20 and 0.60 percent glutaraldehyde for 24 h then incubated, along with an untreated control group, in saline for up to 28 days at 37 °C. Both the equilibrium compressive and tensile moduli increased nearly twofold in treated samples compared to day 0 control, and remained at that level from day 1 to 28; the equilibrium friction coefficient against glass rose nearly twofold immediately after fixation (day 1) but returned to control values after day 7. Live explants co-cultured with fixed explants showed no quantitative difference in cell viability over 28 days. In general, no significant differences were observed between 0.20 and 0.60 percent groups, so 0.20 percent was deemed sufficient for complete fixation. In the second experiment, cartilage-on-cartilage frictional measurements were performed under a migrating contact configuration. In the treated group, one explant was fixed using 0.20 percent glutaraldehyde while the apposing explant was left untreated; in the control group both explants were left untreated. From day 1 to 28, the treated group exhibited either no significant difference or slightly lower friction coefficient than the untreated group. These results suggest that a properly titrated glutaraldehyde treatment can reproduce the desired functional properties of native articular cartilage and maintain these properties for at least 28 days at body temperature. PMID:24332617

  20. Of Mice, Men and Elephants: The Relation between Articular Cartilage Thickness and Body Mass

    PubMed Central

    Malda, Jos; de Grauw, Janny C.; Benders, Kim E. M.; Kik, Marja J. L.; van de Lest, Chris H. A.; Creemers, Laura B.; Dhert, Wouter J. A.; van Weeren, P. René

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian articular cartilage serves diverse functions, including shock absorption, force transmission and enabling low-friction joint motion. These challenging requirements are met by the tissue’s thickness combined with its highly specific extracellular matrix, consisting of a glycosaminoglycan-interspersed collagen fiber network that provides a unique combination of resilience and high compressive and shear resistance. It is unknown how this critical tissue deals with the challenges posed by increases in body mass. For this study, osteochondral cores were harvested post-mortem from the central sites of both medial and lateral femoral condyles of 58 different mammalian species ranging from 25 g (mouse) to 4000 kg (African elephant). Joint size and cartilage thickness were measured and biochemical composition (glycosaminoclycan, collagen and DNA content) and collagen cross-links densities were analyzed. Here, we show that cartilage thickness at the femoral condyle in the mammalian species investigated varies between 90 µm and 3000 µm and bears a negative allometric relationship to body mass, unlike the isometric scaling of the skeleton. Cellular density (as determined by DNA content) decreases with increasing body mass, but gross biochemical composition is remarkably constant. This however need not affect life-long performance of the tissue in heavier mammals, due to relatively constant static compressive stresses, the zonal organization of the tissue and additional compensation by joint congruence, posture and activity pattern of larger mammals. These findings provide insight in the scaling of articular cartilage thickness with body weight, as well as in cartilage biochemical composition and cellularity across mammalian species. They underscore the need for the use of appropriate in vivo models in translational research aiming at human applications. PMID:23437402

  1. Chromatin protein HMGB2 regulates articular cartilage surface maintenance via β-catenin pathway

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Noboru; Caramés, Beatriz; Kawakami, Yasuhiko; Amendt, Brad A.; Komiya, Setsuro; Lotz, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The superficial zone (SZ) of articular cartilage is critical in maintaining tissue function and homeostasis and represents the site of the earliest changes in osteoarthritis. Mechanisms that regulate the unique phenotype of SZ chondrocytes and maintain SZ integrity are unknown. We recently demonstrated that expression of the chromatin protein high mobility group box (HMGB) protein 2 is restricted to the SZ in articular cartilage suggesting a transcriptional regulation involving HMGB2 in SZ. Here, we show that an interaction between HMGB2 and the Wnt/β-catenin pathway regulates the maintenance of the SZ. We found that the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is active specifically in the SZ in normal mouse knee joints and colocalizes with HMGB2. Both Wnt signaling and HMGB2 expression decrease with aging in mouse joints. Our molecular studies show that HMGB2 enhances the binding of Lef-1 to its target sequence and potentiates transcriptional activation of the Lef-1-β-catenin complex. The HMG domain within HMGB2 is crucial for interaction with Lef-1, suggesting that both HMGB2 and HMGB1 may be involved in this function. Furthermore, conditional deletion of β-catenin in cultured mouse chondrocytes induced apoptosis. These findings define a pathway where protein interactions of HMGB2 and Lef-1 enhance Wnt signaling and promote SZ chondrocyte survival. Loss of the HMGB2-Wnt signaling interaction is a new mechanism in aging-related cartilage pathology. PMID:19805379

  2. Effects of multiple chondroitinase ABC applications on tissue engineered articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Natoli, Roman M.; Responte, Donald J.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Increasing tensile properties and collagen content is a recognized need in articular cartilage tissue engineering. This study tested the hypothesis that multiple applications of chondroitinase ABC (C-ABC), a glycosaminoglycan (GAG) degrading enzyme, could increase construct tensile properties in a scaffold-less approach for articular cartilage tissue engineering. Developing constructs were treated with C-ABC at 2 wks, 4 wks, or both 2 and 4 wks. At 4 and 6 wks, construct sulfated GAG composition, collagen composition, and compressive and tensile biomechanical properties were assessed, along with immunohistochemistry (IHC) for collagens type I, II, and VI, and the proteoglycan decorin. At 6 wks, the tensile modulus and ultimate tensile strength of the group treated at both 2 and 4 wks were significantly increased over controls by 78% and 64%, reaching values of 3.4 and 1.4 MPa, respectively. Collagen concentration also increased 43%. Further, groups treated at either 2 wks or 4 wks alone also had increased tensile stiffness compared to controls. Surprisingly, though GAG was depleted in the treated groups, by 6 wks there were no significant differences in compressive stiffness. IHC showed abundant collagen type II and VI in all groups, with no collagen type I. Further, decorin staining was reduced following C-ABC treatment, but returned during subsequent culture. The results support the use of C-ABC in cartilage tissue engineering for increasing tensile properties. PMID:19123232

  3. The mechanical and material properties of elderly human articular cartilage subject to impact and slow loading.

    PubMed

    Burgin, L V; Edelsten, L; Aspden, R M

    2014-02-01

    The mechanical properties of articular cartilage vary enormously with loading rate, and how these properties derive from the composition and structure of the tissue is still unclear. This study investigates the mechanical properties of human articular cartilage at rapid rates of loading, compares these with measurements at slow rates of loading and explores how they relate to the gross composition of the tissue. Full-depth femoral head cartilage biopsies were subjected to a slow, unconfined compression test followed by an impact at an energy of 78.5mJ and velocity 1.25ms(-1). The modulus was calculated from the slope of the loading curve and the coefficient of restitution from the areas under the loading and unloading curves. Tissue composition was measured as water, collagen and glycosaminoglycan contents. The maximum dynamic modulus ranged from 25 to 150MPa. These values compared with 1-3MPa measured during quasi-static loading. The coefficient of restitution was 0.502 (0.066) (mean (standard deviation)) and showed no site variation. Water loss was not detectable. Composition was not strongly associated with modulus; water and collagen contents together predicted about 25% of the variance in modulus.

  4. A biphasic viscohyperelastic fibril-reinforced model for articular cartilage: formulation and comparison with experimental data.

    PubMed

    García, José Jaime; Cortés, Daniel Humberto

    2007-01-01

    Experiments in articular cartilage have shown highly nonlinear stress-strain curves under finite deformations, nonlinear tension-compression response as well as intrinsic viscous effects of the proteoglycan matrix and the collagen fibers. A biphasic viscohyperelastic fibril-reinforced model is proposed here, which is able to describe the intrinsic viscoelasticity of the fibrillar and nonfibrillar components of the solid phase, the nonlinear tension-compression response and the nonlinear stress-strain curves under tension and compression. A viscohyperelastic constitutive equation was used for the matrix and the fibers encompassing, respectively, a hyperelastic function used previously for the matrix and a hyperelastic law used before to represent biological connective tissues. This model, implemented in an updated Lagrangian finite element code, displayed good ability to follow experimental stress-strain equilibrium curves under tension and compression for human humeral cartilage. In addition, curve fitting of experimental reaction force and lateral displacement unconfined compression curves showed that the inclusion of viscous effects in the matrix allows the description of experimental data with material properties for the fibers consistent with experimental tensile tests, suggesting that intrinsic viscous effects in the matrix of articular cartilage plays an important role in the mechanical response of the tissue.

  5. A biphasic viscohyperelastic fibril-reinforced model for articular cartilage: formulation and comparison with experimental data.

    PubMed

    García, José Jaime; Cortés, Daniel Humberto

    2007-01-01

    Experiments in articular cartilage have shown highly nonlinear stress-strain curves under finite deformations, nonlinear tension-compression response as well as intrinsic viscous effects of the proteoglycan matrix and the collagen fibers. A biphasic viscohyperelastic fibril-reinforced model is proposed here, which is able to describe the intrinsic viscoelasticity of the fibrillar and nonfibrillar components of the solid phase, the nonlinear tension-compression response and the nonlinear stress-strain curves under tension and compression. A viscohyperelastic constitutive equation was used for the matrix and the fibers encompassing, respectively, a hyperelastic function used previously for the matrix and a hyperelastic law used before to represent biological connective tissues. This model, implemented in an updated Lagrangian finite element code, displayed good ability to follow experimental stress-strain equilibrium curves under tension and compression for human humeral cartilage. In addition, curve fitting of experimental reaction force and lateral displacement unconfined compression curves showed that the inclusion of viscous effects in the matrix allows the description of experimental data with material properties for the fibers consistent with experimental tensile tests, suggesting that intrinsic viscous effects in the matrix of articular cartilage plays an important role in the mechanical response of the tissue. PMID:17014853

  6. Stem cells catalyze cartilage formation by neonatal articular chondrocytes in 3D biomimetic hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Janice H.; Kajiyama, Glen; Smith, Robert Lane; Maloney, William; Yang, Fan

    2013-12-01

    Cartilage loss is a leading cause of disability among adults and effective therapy remains elusive. Neonatal chondrocytes (NChons) are an attractive allogeneic cell source for cartilage repair, but their clinical translation has been hindered by scarce donor availability. Here we examine the potential for catalyzing cartilage tissue formation using a minimal number of NChons by co-culturing them with adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in 3D hydrogels. Using three different co-culture models, we demonstrated that the effects of co-culture on cartilage tissue formation are dependent on the intercellular distance and cell distribution in 3D. Unexpectedly, increasing ADSC ratio in mixed co-culture led to increased synergy between NChons and ADSCs, and resulted in the formation of large neocartilage nodules. This work raises the potential of utilizing stem cells to catalyze tissue formation by neonatal chondrocytes via paracrine signaling, and highlights the importance of controlling cell distribution in 3D matrices to achieve optimal synergy.

  7. Stimulation of the Superficial Zone Protein and Lubrication in the Articular Cartilage by Human Platelet-Rich Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, Ryosuke; McNary, Sean M.; Miyatake, Kazumasa; Lee, Cassandra A.; Van den Bogaerde, James M.; Marder, Richard A.; Reddi, A. Hari

    2016-01-01

    Background Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) contains high concentrations of autologous growth factors that originate from platelets. Intra-articular injections of PRP have the potential to ameliorate the symptoms of osteoarthritis in the knee. Superficial zone protein (SZP) is a boundary lubricant in articular cartilage and plays an important role in reducing friction and wear and therefore is critical in cartilage homeostasis. Purpose To determine if PRP influences the production of SZP from human joint-derived cells and to evaluate the lubricating properties of PRP on normal bovine articular cartilage. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods Cells were isolated from articular cartilage, synovium, and the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) from 12 patients undergoing ACL reconstruction. The concentrations of SZP in PRP and culture media were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Cellular proliferation was quantified by determination of cell numbers. The lubrication properties of PRP from healthy volunteers on bovine articular cartilage were investigated using a pin-on-disk tribometer. Results In general, PRP stimulated proliferation in cells derived from articular cartilage, synovium, and ACL. It also significantly enhanced SZP secretion from synovium- and cartilage-derived cells. An unexpected finding was the presence of SZP in PRP (2.89 ± 1.23 µg/mL before activation and 3.02 ± 1.32 µg/mL after activation). In addition, under boundary mode conditions consisting of high loads and low sliding speeds, nonactivated and thrombin-activated PRP decreased the friction coefficient (μ = 0.012 and μ = 0.015, respectively) compared with saline (μ = 0.047, P < 0.004) and high molecular weight hyaluronan (μ = 0.080, P < 0.006). The friction coefficient of the cartilage with PRP was on par with that of synovial fluid. Conclusion PRP significantly stimulates cell proliferation and SZP secretion by articular cartilage and synovium of the human knee joint

  8. 3D Dynamic Culture of Rabbit Articular Chondrocytes Encapsulated in Alginate Gel Beads Using Spinner Flasks for Cartilage Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feiyue; Xu, Lei; Wang, Qi; Ye, Zhaoyang; Zhou, Yan; Tan, Wen-Song

    2014-01-01

    Cell-based therapy using chondrocytes for cartilage repair suffers from chondrocyte dedifferentiation. In the present study, the effects of an integrated three-dimensional and dynamic culture on rabbit articular chondrocytes were investigated. Cells (passages 1 and 4) were encapsulated in alginate gel beads and cultured in spinner flasks in chondrogenic and chondrocyte growth media. Subcutaneous implantation of the cell-laden beads was performed to evaluate the ectopic chondrogenesis. It was found that cells remained viable after 35 days in the three-dimensional dynamic culture. Passage 1 cells demonstrated a proliferative growth in both media. Passage 4 cells showed a gradual reduction in DNA content in growth medium, which was attenuated in chondrogenic medium. Deposition of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) was found in all cultures. While passage 1 cells generally produced higher amounts of GAG than passage 4 cells, GAG/DNA became similar on day 35 for both cells in growth media. Interestingly, GAG/DNA in growth medium was greater than that in chondrogenic medium for both cells. Based on GAG quantification and gene expression analysis, encapsulated passage 1 cells cultured in growth medium displayed the best ectopic chondrogenesis. Taken together, the three-dimensional and dynamic culture for chondrocytes holds great potential in cartilage regeneration. PMID:25506593

  9. Treatment with recombinant lubricin attenuates osteoarthritis by positive feedback loop between articular cartilage and subchondral bone in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhuang; Xu, Changpeng; Li, Xue; Song, Jinqi; Yu, Bin

    2015-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a most commonly multifactorial degenerative joint disease along with the aging population, particularly in postmenopausal women. During the onset of OA, articular cartilage and subchondral bone act in concert as a functional unit. This present study is to investigate the effects of early or late treatment with recombinant lubricin on the onset of osteoarthritis (OA) in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. We found that both early and late recombinant lubricin treatments attenuated the onset of OA by positive feedback loop between articular cartilage and subchondral bone, although late treatment contributed to a lesser effect compared with early treatment. Specifically, treatment with recombinant lubricin protected articular cartilage from degeneration, demonstrated by lower proteoglycan loss, lower OARSI scores, less calcification cartilage zone and reduced immunostaining for collagen X (Col X) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-13) but increased the expression of lubricin, in comparison with vehicle-treated OVX rat group. Further, chondroprotective effects of lubricin normalized bone remodeling in subchondral bone underneath. It's suggested that treatment with recombinant lubricin inhibited the elevation of TRAP and Osterix positive cells in OVX rats and led to the normalization of subchondral bone microarchitectures with the suppression of subsidence of bone volume ratio (BV/TV) and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) and the increase of trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) in vehicle-treated OVX rats. What's more, the normalization of subchondral bone in turn attenuated the articular cartilage erosion by inhibiting vascular invasion from subchondral bone to calcified cartilage zone, exemplified by inhibiting the elevation of CD31 positive cells in calcified cartilage and angiography in subchondral bone. Together, these results shed light that both early and late recombinant lubricin treatments attenuate the onset of OA by balancing the interplay between articular

  10. The effects of physical activity on apoptosis and lubricin expression in articular cartilage in rats with glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Loreto, Carla; Leonardi, Rosalia; Castorina, Sergio; Giunta, Salvatore; Carnazza, Maria Luisa; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Pichler, Karin; Weinberg, Annelie Martina

    2013-05-01

    Glucocorticoids are considered the most powerful anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating drugs. However, a number of side-effects are well documented in different diseases, including articular cartilage, where increases or decreases in the synthesis of hormone-dependent extracellular matrix components are seen. The objective of this study has been to test the effects of procedures or drugs affecting bone metabolism on articular cartilage in rats with prednisolone-induced osteoporosis and to evaluate the outcomes of physical activity with treadmill and vibration platform training on articular cartilage. The animals were divided into 5 groups, and bone and cartilage evaluations were performed using whole-body scans and histomorphometric analysis. Lubricin and caspase-3 expression were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis and biochemical analysis. These results confirm the beneficial effect of physical activity on the articular cartilage. The effects of drug therapy with glucocorticoids decrease the expression of lubricin and increase the expression of caspase-3 in the rats, while after physical activity the values return to normal compared to the control group. Our findings suggest that it might be possible that mechanical stimulation in the articular cartilage could induce the expression of lubricin, which is capable of inhibiting caspase-3 activity, preventing chondrocyte death. We can assume that the physiologic balance between lubricin and caspase-3 could maintain the integrity of cartilage. Therefore, in certain diseases such as osteoporosis, mechanical stimulation could be a possible therapeutic treatment. With our results we can propose the hypothesis that physical activity could also be used as a therapeutic treatment for cartilage disease such as osteoarthritis.

  11. Chondrocyte-intrinsic Smad3 represses Runx2-inducible MMP-13 expression to maintain articular cartilage and prevent osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Carol G.; Thuillier, Daniel; Chin, Emily N.; Alliston, Tamara

    2012-01-01

    Objective To identify mechanisms by which Smad3 maintains articular cartilage and prevents osteoarthritis. Methods A combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches was used to test the hypothesis that Smad3 represses Runx2-inducible gene expression to prevent articular cartilage degeneration. Col2-Cre;Smad3fl/fl mice allowed study of the chondrocyte-intrinsic role of Smad3, independently of its role in the perichondrium or other tissues. Primary Smad3fl/fl articular chondrocytes and ATDC5 chondroprogenitors were employed to evaluate Smad3 and Runx2 regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) mRNA and protein expression. Results Chondrocyte-specific reduction of Smad3 causes progressive articular cartilage degeneration due to imbalanced cartilage matrix synthesis and degradation. In addition to reduced collagen II mRNA expression, Col2-Cre;Smad3fl/fl articular cartilage is severely deficient in collagen II and aggrecan protein, due to excessive MMP-13-mediated proteolysis of these key cartilage matrix constituents. Normally, TGF-β signals through Smad3 to confer a rapid and dynamic repression of Runx2-inducible MMP-13 expression. However, in the absence of Smad3, TGF-β signals through p38 and Runx2 to induce MMP-13 expression. Conclusion This work elucidates a mechanism by which Smad3 mutations in humans and mice cause cartilage degeneration and osteoarthritis. Specifically, Smad3 maintains the balance between cartilage matrix synthesis and degradation by inducing collagen II expression and repressing Runx2-inducible MMP-13 expression. Selective activation of TGF-β signaling through Smad3, rather than p38, may help to restore the balance between matrix synthesis and proteolysis that is lost in osteoarthritis. PMID:22674505

  12. Treatment with recombinant lubricin attenuates osteoarthritis by positive feedback loop between articular cartilage and subchondral bone in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhuang; Xu, Changpeng; Li, Xue; Song, Jinqi; Yu, Bin

    2015-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a most commonly multifactorial degenerative joint disease along with the aging population, particularly in postmenopausal women. During the onset of OA, articular cartilage and subchondral bone act in concert as a functional unit. This present study is to investigate the effects of early or late treatment with recombinant lubricin on the onset of osteoarthritis (OA) in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. We found that both early and late recombinant lubricin treatments attenuated the onset of OA by positive feedback loop between articular cartilage and subchondral bone, although late treatment contributed to a lesser effect compared with early treatment. Specifically, treatment with recombinant lubricin protected articular cartilage from degeneration, demonstrated by lower proteoglycan loss, lower OARSI scores, less calcification cartilage zone and reduced immunostaining for collagen X (Col X) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-13) but increased the expression of lubricin, in comparison with vehicle-treated OVX rat group. Further, chondroprotective effects of lubricin normalized bone remodeling in subchondral bone underneath. It's suggested that treatment with recombinant lubricin inhibited the elevation of TRAP and Osterix positive cells in OVX rats and led to the normalization of subchondral bone microarchitectures with the suppression of subsidence of bone volume ratio (BV/TV) and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) and the increase of trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) in vehicle-treated OVX rats. What's more, the normalization of subchondral bone in turn attenuated the articular cartilage erosion by inhibiting vascular invasion from subchondral bone to calcified cartilage zone, exemplified by inhibiting the elevation of CD31 positive cells in calcified cartilage and angiography in subchondral bone. Together, these results shed light that both early and late recombinant lubricin treatments attenuate the onset of OA by balancing the interplay between articular

  13. Repair of the superior sulcus deformity using autogenous costal cartilage.

    PubMed

    Sutula, F C; Thomas, O

    1982-05-01

    Superior sulcus deformity is a late sequela of surgical anophthalmos. Many methods have been proposed to treat this difficult problem. A technique using autogenous costal cartilage that has resulted in satisfactory repair is presented. In addition to standard photographs and exophthalmometry measurements to follow these patients, a specific device to accurately measure orbital volume gain after operation was fashioned. PMID:7099560

  14. The organization of collagen in cryofractured rabbit articular cartilage: a scanning electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Clark, J M

    1985-01-01

    Adult rabbit articular cartilage was prepared for scanning electron microscopy using, in order, glutaraldehyde fixation, enzymatic removal of proteoglycan, dehydration in ethanol, cryofracture in liquid nitrogen, and critical-point drying. Enzymes were effective in fixed material. Fixation, cryofracture, alignment of fracture surfaces with "split lines," and retention of subchondral bone were found to be necessary steps for the preservation of collagen detail. The fibrous framework was found to be similar to that proposed by Benninghoff and favored by more recent phase-contrast microscopic studies. Vertical fibers extending from subchondral bone and a network of tangentially oriented superficial fibrils converge in the transitional zone. No random layer is seen. Pericellular capsules interdigitate with the vertical fibers. When cartilage is prepared in a manner that minimizes tissue damage, scanning electron microscopy provides useful, unique information. PMID:3981292

  15. Identification of link proteins in canine synovial cell cultures and canine articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Link proteins are glycoproteins in cartilage that are involved in the stabilization of aggregates of proteoglycans and hyaluronic acid. We have identified link proteins in synovial cell cultures form normal canine synovium using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, immunofluorescence, and immunolocation with specific antibodies by electrophoretic transfer. We have also found evidence for the synthesis of link proteins in these cultures by fluorography of radiolabeled synovial cell extracts. We have identified a 70,000 mol-wt protein in canine synovial cell culture extracts that has antigenic cross-reactivity with the 48,000-mol-wt link protein. Three link proteins were identified in normal canine articular cartilage. These results indicate that link proteins are more widely distributed in connective tissues than previously recognized and may have biological functions other than aggregate stabilization. PMID:3980578

  16. Elastoviscous Transitions of Articular Cartilage Reveal a Mechanism of Synergy between Lubricin and Hyaluronic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Bonnevie, Edward D.; Galesso, Devis; Secchieri, Cynthia; Cohen, Itai; Bonassar, Lawrence J.

    2015-01-01

    When lubricated by synovial fluid, articular cartilage provides some of the lowest friction coefficients found in nature. While it is known that macromolecular constituents of synovial fluid provide it with its lubricating ability, it is not fully understood how two of the main molecules, lubricin and hyaluronic acid, lubricate and interact with one another. Here, we develop a novel framework for cartilage lubrication based on the elastoviscous transition to show that lubricin and hyaluronic acid lubricate by distinct mechanisms. Such analysis revealed nonspecific interactions between these molecules in which lubricin acts to concentrate hyaluronic acid near the tissue surface and promotes a transition to a low friction regime consistent with the theory of viscous boundary lubrication. Understanding the mechanics of synovial fluid not only provides insight into the progression of diseases such as arthritis, but also may be applicable to the development of new biomimetic lubricants. PMID:26599797

  17. Elastoviscous Transitions of Articular Cartilage Reveal a Mechanism of Synergy between Lubricin and Hyaluronic Acid.

    PubMed

    Bonnevie, Edward D; Galesso, Devis; Secchieri, Cynthia; Cohen, Itai; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2015-01-01

    When lubricated by synovial fluid, articular cartilage provides some of the lowest friction coefficients found in nature. While it is known that macromolecular constituents of synovial fluid provide it with its lubricating ability, it is not fully understood how two of the main molecules, lubricin and hyaluronic acid, lubricate and interact with one another. Here, we develop a novel framework for cartilage lubrication based on the elastoviscous transition to show that lubricin and hyaluronic acid lubricate by distinct mechanisms. Such analysis revealed nonspecific interactions between these molecules in which lubricin acts to concentrate hyaluronic acid near the tissue surface and promotes a transition to a low friction regime consistent with the theory of viscous boundary lubrication. Understanding the mechanics of synovial fluid not only provides insight into the progression of diseases such as arthritis, but also may be applicable to the development of new biomimetic lubricants.

  18. Aging-related loss of the chromatin protein HMGB2 in articular cartilage is linked to reduced cellularity and osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Noboru; Caramés, Beatriz; Ronfani, Lorenza; Ulmer, Ulrich; Komiya, Setsuro; Bianchi, Marco E.; Lotz, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease and typically begins with an aging-related disruption of the articular cartilage surface. Mechanisms leading to the aging-related cartilage surface degeneration remain to be determined. Here, we demonstrate that nonhistone chromatin protein high-mobility group box (HMGB) protein 2 is uniquely expressed in the superficial zone (SZ) of human articular cartilage. In human and murine cartilage, there is an aging-related loss of HMGB2 expression, ultimately leading to its complete absence. Mice genetically deficient in HMGB2 (Hmgb2−/−) show earlier onset of and more severe OA. This is associated with a profound reduction in cartilage cellularity attributable to increased cell death. These cellular changes precede glycosaminoglycan depletion and progressive cartilage erosions. Chondrocytes from Hmgb2−/− mice are more susceptible to apoptosis induction in vitro. In conclusion, HMGB2 is a transcriptional regulator specifically expressed in the SZ of human articular cartilage and supports chondrocyte survival. Aging is associated with a loss of HMGB2 expression and reduced cellularity, and this contributes to the development of OA. PMID:19139395

  19. Effect of low-power helium-neon laser irradiation on 13-week immobilized articular cartilage of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bayat, Mohammad; Ansari, Anayatallah; Hekmat, Hossien

    2004-09-01

    Influence of low-power (632.8 nm, Helium-Neon, 13 J/cm2, three times a week) laser on 13-week immobilized articular cartilage was examined with rabbits knee model. Number of chondrocytes and depth of articular cartilage of experimental group were significantly higher than those of sham irradiated group. Surface morphology of sham-irradiated group had rough prominences, fibrillation and lacunae but surface morphology of experimental group had more similarities to control group than to sham irradiated group. There were marked differences between ultrastructure features of control group and experimental group in comparison with sham irradiated group. Low-power Helium-Neon laser irradiation on 13-week immobilized knee joints of rabbits neutrilized adverse effects of immobilization on articular cartilage.

  20. Secretion of an articular cartilage proteoglycan-degrading enzyme activity by murine T lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Kammer, G M; Sapolsky, A I; Malemud, C J

    1985-01-01

    Destruction of articular cartilage is the hallmark of inflammatory arthritides. Enzymes elaborated by mononuclear cells infiltrating the synovium mediate, in part, the degradation of the cartilage extracellular matrix. Since mononuclear cells are the dominant cell type found in chronic inflammatory synovitis, we investigated whether interaction of immune mononuclear cells with antigen initiated the synthesis and secretion of a proteoglycan-degrading enzyme activity. Proteoglycan-degrading enzyme activity was monitored by the capacity of murine spleen cell conditioned medium to release [3H]serine/35SO4 incorporated into rabbit cartilage proteoglycan monomer fraction (A1D1), and by the relative change in specific viscosity of bovine nasal cartilage proteoglycan monomer. The results demonstrated that both virgin and immune mononuclear cells spontaneously generated proteoglycan-degrading enzyme activity and that cellular activation and proliferation induced by the antigen keyhole limpet hemocyanin or the mitogen phytohemagglutinin was not required. Kinetic studies demonstrated stable release of the enzyme activity over 72 h. Cell separation studies showed that T lymphocytes, a thymoma line, and macrophages separately produced proteoglycan-degrading enzyme activity. The enzyme activity has been partially characterized and appears to belong to a class of neutral pH metal-dependent proteinases. These observations, the first to demonstrate that T lymphocytes secrete an enzyme capable of degrading cartilage proteoglycan, raise the possibility that this enzyme activity contributes to cartilage extracellular matrix destruction in vivo. Moreover, these data support the conclusion that production of this enzyme by T lymphocytes is independent of an antigen-specific stimulus. PMID:3897284

  1. Pharmacological influence of antirheumatic drugs on proteoglycans from interleukin-1 treated articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Steinmeyer, J; Daufeldt, S

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether drugs used in the treatment of arthritic disorders possess any inhibitory potential on the proteoglycanolytic activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and to determine whether drugs which inhibit these enzymes also modulate the biosynthesis and release of proteoglycans (PGs) from interleukin-1-(IL-1) treated articular cartilage explants. The cartilage-bone marrow extract and the glycosaminoglycan-peptide complex (DAK-16) dose-dependently inhibited MMP proteoglycanases in vitro when tested at concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 55 mg/mL, displaying an IC50 value of 31.78 mg/mL and 10.64 mg/mL (1.9 x 10[-4] M) respectively. (R,S)-N-[2-[2-(hydroxyamino)-2-oxoethyl]-4-methyl-1-oxopentyl++ +]-L-leucyl-L-phenylalaninamide (U-24522) proved to be a potent inhibitor of MMP proteoglycanases (IC50 value 1.8 x 10[-9] M). None of the other tested drugs, such as possible chondroprotective drugs, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), glucocorticoids and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors tested at a concentration of 10(-4) M displayed any significant inhibition. Only U-24522, tested at a concentration ranging from 10(-4) to 10(-6) M, significantly inhibited the IL-1-induced augmentation of PG loss from cartilage explants into the nutrient media, whereas DAK-16 and the cartilage-bone marrow extract were ineffective. DAK-16 and the cartilage-bone marrow extract did not modulate the IL-1-mediated reduced biosynthesis and aggregability of PGs by the cartilage explants. The addition of 10(-5) M U-24522, however, partially maintained the aggregability of PGs ex vivo. In our experiments, both possible chondroprotective drugs as well as U-24522 demonstrated no cytotoxic effects on chondrocytes.

  2. Very early osteoarthritis changes sensitively fluid flow properties of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, J T A; Han, S-K; Herzog, W; Korhonen, R K

    2015-09-18

    In this study, fibril-reinforced poroelastic (FRPE) modeling was used for rabbit knee after anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) to assess how the mechanical properties of collagen, proteoglycans, and fluid in articular cartilage change in early osteoarthritis, and how site-specific these changes are. Unilateral ACLT was performed in eight skeletally mature, female New Zealand white rabbits. A separate control (CTRL) group consisted of knee joints of five non-operated rabbits. Animals were sacrificed at four weeks after ACLT and cartilage-on-bone samples from femoral groove, medial and lateral femoral condyles, and tibial plateaus were harvested. A stress-relaxation protocol in indentation geometry was applied and the FRPE model was fitted to the experimental force-time curve by minimizing the mean absolute error between experiment and simulation. The optimized parameters were: fibril network modulus (Ef), representing the collagen network; non-fibrillar matrix modulus (Enf), representing the PG matrix; and permeability (k), representing fluid flow. Permeability was increased significantly in the ACLT group compared to the CTRL group knees at all sites except for the medial tibial plateau. ACLT also caused a decrease in the Ef at all sites except for the medial and lateral tibial plateaus. The Enf of the ACLT group knees was altered only for the lateral femoral condyle. The results of this study suggest that early osteoarthritis primarily affects cartilage permeability and impairs the collagen network stiffness in a site-specific manner. These findings from early osteoarthritis indicate that fluid flow velocity in articular cartilage may change prior to quantifiable structural alterations in the tissue.

  3. T2 Relaxation Time Quantitation Differs Between Pulse Sequences in Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Matzat, Stephen J.; McWalter, Emily J.; Kogan, Feliks; Chen, Weitian; Gold, Garry E.

    2015-01-01

    Background To compare T2 relaxation time measurements between MR pulse sequences at 3 Tesla in agar phantoms and in vivo patellar, femoral, and tibial articular cartilage. Methods T2 relaxation times were quantified in phantoms and knee articular cartilage of eight healthy individuals using a single echo spin echo (SE) as a reference standard and five other pulse sequences: multi-echo SE (MESE), fast SE (2D-FSE), magnetization-prepared spoiled gradient echo (3D-MAPSS), three-dimensional (3D) 3D-FSE with variable refocusing flip angle schedules (3D vfl-FSE), and quantitative double echo steady state (qDESS). Cartilage was manually segmented and average regional T2 relaxation times were obtained for each sequence. A regression analysis was carried out between each sequence and the reference standard, and root-mean-square error (RMSE) was calculated. Results Phantom measurements from all sequences demonstrated strong fits (R2>0.8; P<0.05). For in vivo cartilage measurements, R2 values, slope, and RMSE were: MESE: 0.25/0.42/5.0 ms, 2D-FSE: 0.64/1.31/9.3 ms, 3D-MAPSS: 0.51/0.66/3.8 ms, 3D vfl-FSE: 0.30/ 0.414.2 ms, qDESS: 0.60/0.90/4.6 ms. Conclusion 2D-FSE, qDESS, and 3D-MAPSS demonstrated the best fits with SE measurements as well as the greatest dynamic ranges. The 3D-MAPSS, 3D vfl-FSE, and qDESS demonstrated the closest average measurements to SE. Discrepancies in T2 relaxation time quantitation between sequences suggest that care should be taken when comparing results between studies. PMID:25244647

  4. Very early osteoarthritis changes sensitively fluid flow properties of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, J T A; Han, S-K; Herzog, W; Korhonen, R K

    2015-09-18

    In this study, fibril-reinforced poroelastic (FRPE) modeling was used for rabbit knee after anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) to assess how the mechanical properties of collagen, proteoglycans, and fluid in articular cartilage change in early osteoarthritis, and how site-specific these changes are. Unilateral ACLT was performed in eight skeletally mature, female New Zealand white rabbits. A separate control (CTRL) group consisted of knee joints of five non-operated rabbits. Animals were sacrificed at four weeks after ACLT and cartilage-on-bone samples from femoral groove, medial and lateral femoral condyles, and tibial plateaus were harvested. A stress-relaxation protocol in indentation geometry was applied and the FRPE model was fitted to the experimental force-time curve by minimizing the mean absolute error between experiment and simulation. The optimized parameters were: fibril network modulus (Ef), representing the collagen network; non-fibrillar matrix modulus (Enf), representing the PG matrix; and permeability (k), representing fluid flow. Permeability was increased significantly in the ACLT group compared to the CTRL group knees at all sites except for the medial tibial plateau. ACLT also caused a decrease in the Ef at all sites except for the medial and lateral tibial plateaus. The Enf of the ACLT group knees was altered only for the lateral femoral condyle. The results of this study suggest that early osteoarthritis primarily affects cartilage permeability and impairs the collagen network stiffness in a site-specific manner. These findings from early osteoarthritis indicate that fluid flow velocity in articular cartilage may change prior to quantifiable structural alterations in the tissue. PMID:26159056

  5. Depth-dependent shear behavior of bovine articular cartilage: relationship to structure

    PubMed Central

    Motavalli, Mostafa; Akkus, Ozan; Mansour, Joseph M

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of bovine articular cartilage in shear was measured and related to its structure through the depth of the tissue. To make these measurements, we designed an apparatus that could apply controlled shear displacement and measure the resulting shear force on cartilage specimens. Shear displacement and shear strain were obtained from confocal images of photobleached lines on fluorescently stained deformed samples. Depth-dependent collagen structure was obtained using compensated polarized light microscopy. Depth-dependent shear behavior and structure of samples from two animals were measured (group A and B). Both animals were 18–24 months old, which is the range in which they are expected reach skeletal maturity. In mature samples (group A), the stiffest region was located beneath the superficial zone, and the most compliant region was found in the radial zone. In contrast, in samples that were in the process of maturing (group B) the most compliant region was located in the superficial zone. Compensated polarized light microscopy suggested that the animal from which the group A samples were obtained was skeletally mature, whereas the animal yielding the group B samples was in the process of maturing. Compensated polarized light microscopy was an important adjunct to the mechanical shear behavior in that it provided a means to reconcile differences in observed shear behavior in mature and immature cartilage. Although samples were harvested from two animals, there were clear differences in structure and shear mechanical behavior. Differences in the depth-dependent shear strain were consistent with previous studies on mature and immature samples and, based on the structural variation between mature and immature articular cartilage, their mechanical behavior differences can be tenable. These results suggest that age, as well as species and anatomic location, need to be considered when reporting mechanical behavior results. PMID:25146377

  6. A nonlinear biphasic fiber-reinforced porohyperviscoelastic model of articular cartilage incorporating fiber reorientation and dispersion.

    PubMed

    Seifzadeh, A; Wang, J; Oguamanam, D C D; Papini, M

    2011-08-01

    A nonlinear biphasic fiber-reinforced porohyperviscoelastic (BFPHVE) model of articular cartilage incorporating fiber reorientation effects during applied load was used to predict the response of ovine articular cartilage at relatively high strains (20%). The constitutive material parameters were determined using a coupled finite element-optimization algorithm that utilized stress relaxation indentation tests at relatively high strains. The proposed model incorporates the strain-hardening, tension-compression, permeability, and finite deformation nonlinearities that inherently exist in cartilage, and accounts for effects associated with fiber dispersion and reorientation and intrinsic viscoelasticity at relatively high strains. A new optimization cost function was used to overcome problems associated with large peak-to-peak differences between the predicted finite element and experimental loads that were due to the large strain levels utilized in the experiments. The optimized material parameters were found to be insensitive to the initial guesses. Using experimental data from the literature, the model was also able to predict both the lateral displacement and reaction force in unconfined compression, and the reaction force in an indentation test with a single set of material parameters. Finally, it was demonstrated that neglecting the effects of fiber reorientation and dispersion resulted in poorer agreement with experiments than when they were considered. There was an indication that the proposed BFPHVE model, which includes the intrinsic viscoelasticity of the nonfibrillar matrix (proteoglycan), might be used to model the behavior of cartilage up to relatively high strains (20%). The maximum percentage error between the indentation force predicted by the FE model using the optimized material parameters and that measured experimentally was 3%. PMID:21950897

  7. Articular cartilage optical properties in the spectral range 300--850 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Daniel W.; Roberts, Cynthia J.; Farrar, Stuart K.; Johnston, William M.; Litsky, Alan S.; Bertone, Alicia L.

    1998-07-01

    Measurements of absolute total reflectance were recorded from weight-bearing (n equals 9) and nonweight-bearing (n equals 9) equine articular cartilage specimens from 300 to 850 nm using a spectrophotometer with integrating sphere attachment. Following correction of measured spectra for interfacial reflections and edge losses, Kubelka-Munk theory was applied to estimate absorption and scattering coefficient, 1D light intensity distribution, and light penetration depth. Kubelka-Munk absorption coefficients ranged from approximately 7 cm-1 at 330 nm to approximately 1 cm-1 at 850 nm. A localized absorption peak was noted at approximately 340 nm. Above 510 nm, weight-bearing cartilage demonstrated significantly higher absorption coefficients than nonweight-bearing tissue (paired t-test, p < 0.05). Kubelka-Munk scattering coefficients ranged from approximately 40 cm-1 at 360 nm to approximately 6 cm-1 at 850 nm. No statistical differences in scattering coefficient were noted between weight-bearing and nonweight-bearing tissue. Penetration depths predicted by Kubelka-Munk theory ranged from 0.6 mm at 350 nm to over 3 mm at 850 nm. Stronger absorption in weight-bearing cartilage compared to nonweight-bearing tissue resulted in lower light penetration depths in weight-bearing cartilage at all wavelengths longer than 510 nm.

  8. Long-term storage and preservation of tissue engineered articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Nover, Adam B; Stefani, Robert M; Lee, Stephanie L; Ateshian, Gerard A; Stoker, Aaron M; Cook, James L; Hung, Clark T

    2016-01-01

    With limited availability of osteochondral allografts, tissue engineered cartilage grafts may provide an alternative treatment for large cartilage defects. An effective storage protocol will be critical for translating this technology to clinical use. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the Missouri Osteochondral Allograft Preservation System (MOPS) for room temperature storage of mature tissue engineered grafts, focusing on tissue property maintenance during the current allograft storage window (28 days). Additional research compares MOPS to continued culture, investigates temperature influence, and examines longer-term storage. Articular cartilage constructs were cultured to maturity using adult canine chondrocytes, then preserved with MOPS at room temperature, in refrigeration, or kept in culture for an additional 56 days. MOPS storage maintained desired chondrocyte viability for 28 days of room temperature storage, retaining 75% of the maturity point Young's modulus without significant decline in biochemical content. Properties dropped past this time point. Refrigeration maintained properties similar to room temperature at 28 days, but proved better at 56 days. For engineered grafts, MOPS maintained the majority of tissue properties for the 28-day window without clearly extending that period as it had for native grafts. These results are the first evaluating engineered cartilage storage.

  9. Tight regulation of wingless-type signaling in the articular cartilage - subchondral bone biomechanical unit: transcriptomics in Frzb-knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this research was to study molecular changes in the articular cartilage and subchondral bone of the tibial plateau from mice deficient in frizzled-related protein (Frzb) compared to wild-type mice by transcriptome analysis. Methods Gene-expression analysis of the articular cartilage and subchondral bone of three wild-type and three Frzb-/- mice was performed by microarray. Data from three wild-type and two Frzb-/- samples could be used for pathway analysis of differentially expressed genes and were explored with PANTHER, DAVID and GSEA bioinformatics tools. Activation of the wingless-type (WNT) pathway was analysed using Western blot. The effects of Frzb gain and loss of function on chondrogenesis and cell proliferation was examined using ATDC5 micro-masses and mouse ribcage chondrocytes. Results Extracellular matrix-associated integrin and cadherin pathways, as well as WNT pathway genes were up-regulated in Frzb-/- samples. Several WNT receptors, target genes and other antagonists were up-regulated, but no difference in active β-catenin was found. Analysis of ATDC5 cell micro-masses overexpressing FRZB indicated an up-regulation of aggrecan and Col2a1, and down-regulation of molecules related to damage and repair in cartilage, Col3a1 and Col5a1. Silencing of Frzb resulted in down-regulation of aggrecan and Col2a1. Pathways associated with cell cycle were down-regulated in this transcriptome analysis. Ribcage chondrocytes derived from Frzb-/- mice showed decreased proliferation compared to wild-type cells. Conclusions Our analysis provides evidence for tight regulation of WNT signalling, shifts in extracellular matrix components and effects on cell proliferation and differentiation in the articular cartilage - subchondral bone unit in Frzb-/- mice. These data further support an important role for FRZB in joint homeostasis and highlight the complex biology of WNT signaling in the joint. PMID:22264237

  10. An analysis of the integration between articular cartilage and nondegradable hydrogel using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Sharan; Wang, Dong-An; Fishbein, Kenneth W; Elisseeff, Jennifer H; Spencer, Richard G

    2006-04-01

    A hydrogel is a highly hydrated polymer gel suitable for use as a scaffold for tissue engineering. One important application is to the repair of cartilage defects due to injury or osteoarthritis. Integration of the hydrogel with surrounding tissue is critical for the long-term functionality of the implant; however direct visualization of integration is difficult and invasive. Accordingly, we used MRI to noninvasively investigate the integration of hydrogel in cartilage. Two integration methods were assessed: (1) cartilage-initiated and (2) chemical, using chondroitin sulphate-methacrylate-aldehyde (CS-MA-ald) as an adhesive. These were compared to a control group, that is, standard, nonintegrated hydrogel photopolymerization. Spatial variation of the transverse relaxation time, T(2), across the transition region was used to determine the effectiveness of integration. In the CS-MA-ald group only, two interfaces were found. This provides evidence of an intermediate adhesive layer between hydrogel and cartilage. Second, the thickness of the transition region between hydrogel to cartilage in the CS-MA-ald group was 1.32 mm as compared to 1.20 mm and 1.17 mm in the tissue-initiated and nonintegrated groups, respectively. We interpret this as a more gradual transition region of hydrogel to cartilage and hence a greater degree of integration when an adhesive layer is present.

  11. Altered responsiveness to TGF-β results in reduced Papss2 expression and alterations in the biomechanical properties of mouse articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies have indicated that transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signaling has a critical role in cartilage homeostasis and repair, yet the mechanisms of TGF-β's chondroprotective effects are not known. Our objective in this study was to identify downstream targets of TGF-β that could act to maintain biochemical and biomechanical properties of cartilage. Methods Tibial joints from 20-week-old mice that express a dominant-negative mutation of the TGF-β type II receptor (DNIIR) were graded histologically for osteoarthritic changes and tested by indentation to evaluate their mechanical properties. To identify gene targets of TGF-β, microarray analysis was performed using bovine articular chondrocytes grown in micromass culture that were either treated with TGF-β or left untreated. Phosphoadenosine phosphosynthetase 2 (PAPSS2) was identified as a TGF-β-responsive gene. Papss2 expression is crucial for proper sulfation of cartilage matrix, and its deficiency causes skeletal defects in mice and humans that overlap with those seen in mice with mutations in TGF-β-signaling genes. Regulation of Papss2 was verified by real time RT-PCR and Western blot analyses. Alterations in sulfation of glycosaminoglycans were analyzed by critical electrolyte concentration and Alcian blue staining and immunofluorescence for chondroitin-4-sulfate, unsulfated chondroitin and the aggrecan core protein. Results DNIIR mutants showed reduced mechanical properties and osteoarthritis-like changes when compared to wild-type control mice. Microarray analysis identified a group of genes encoding matrix-modifying enzymes that were regulated by TGF-β. Papss2 was upregulated in bovine articular chondrocytes after treatment with TGF-β and downregulated in cartilage from DNIIR mice. Articular cartilage in DNIIR mice demonstrated reduced Alcian blue staining at critical electrolyte concentrations and reduced chondroitin-4-sulfate staining. Staining for unsulfated

  12. Effect of Human Adipose Tissue Mesenchymal Stem Cells on the Regeneration of Ovine Articular Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Zorzi, Alessandro R; Amstalden, Eliane M I; Plepis, Ana Maria G; Martins, Virginia C A; Ferretti, Mario; Antonioli, Eliane; Duarte, Adriana S S; Luzo, Angela C M; Miranda, João B

    2015-11-09

    Cell therapy is a promising approach to improve cartilage healing. Adipose tissue is an abundant and readily accessible cell source. Previous studies have demonstrated good cartilage repair results with adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells in small animal experiments. This study aimed to examine these cells in a large animal model. Thirty knees of adult sheep were randomly allocated to three treatment groups: CELLS (scaffold seeded with human adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells), SCAFFOLD (scaffold without cells), or EMPTY (untreated lesions). A partial thickness defect was created in the medial femoral condyle. After six months, the knees were examined according to an adaptation of the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS 1) score, in addition to a new Partial Thickness Model scale and the ICRS macroscopic score. All of the animals completed the follow-up period. The CELLS group presented with the highest ICRS 1 score (8.3 ± 3.1), followed by the SCAFFOLD group (5.6 ± 2.2) and the EMPTY group (5.2 ± 2.4) (p = 0.033). Other scores were not significantly different. These results suggest that human adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells promoted satisfactory cartilage repair in the ovine model.

  13. Effect of Human Adipose Tissue Mesenchymal Stem Cells on the Regeneration of Ovine Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Zorzi, Alessandro R.; Amstalden, Eliane M. I.; Plepis, Ana Maria G.; Martins, Virginia C. A.; Ferretti, Mario; Antonioli, Eliane; Duarte, Adriana S. S.; Luzo, Angela C. M.; Miranda, João B.

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapy is a promising approach to improve cartilage healing. Adipose tissue is an abundant and readily accessible cell source. Previous studies have demonstrated good cartilage repair results with adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells in small animal experiments. This study aimed to examine these cells in a large animal model. Thirty knees of adult sheep were randomly allocated to three treatment groups: CELLS (scaffold seeded with human adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells), SCAFFOLD (scaffold without cells), or EMPTY (untreated lesions). A partial thickness defect was created in the medial femoral condyle. After six months, the knees were examined according to an adaptation of the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS 1) score, in addition to a new Partial Thickness Model scale and the ICRS macroscopic score. All of the animals completed the follow-up period. The CELLS group presented with the highest ICRS 1 score (8.3 ± 3.1), followed by the SCAFFOLD group (5.6 ± 2.2) and the EMPTY group (5.2 ± 2.4) (p = 0.033). Other scores were not significantly different. These results suggest that human adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells promoted satisfactory cartilage repair in the ovine model. PMID:26569221

  14. Can Signal Abnormalities Detected with MR Imaging in Knee Articular Cartilage Be Used to Predict Development of Morphologic Cartilage Defects? 48-Month Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    PubMed

    Schwaiger, Benedikt J; Gersing, Alexandra S; Mbapte Wamba, John; Nevitt, Michael C; McCulloch, Charles E; Link, Thomas M

    2016-10-01

    Purpose To determine the incidence with which morphologic articular cartilage defects develop over 48 months in cartilage with signal abnormalities at baseline magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in comparison with the incidence in articular cartilage without signal abnormalities at baseline. Materials and Methods The institutional review boards of all participating centers approved this HIPAA-compliant study. Right knees of 90 subjects from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (mean age, 55 years ± 8 [standard deviation]; 51% women) with cartilage signal abnormalities but without morphologic cartilage defects at 3.0-T MR imaging and without radiographic osteoarthritis (Kellgren-Lawrence score, 0-1) were frequency matched for age, sex, Kellgren-Lawrence score, and body mass index with right knees in 90 subjects without any signal abnormalities or morphologic defects in the articular cartilage (mean age, 54 years ± 5; 51% women). Individual signal abnormalities (n = 126) on intermediate-weighted fast spin-echo MR images were categorized into four subgrades: subgrade A, hypointense; subgrade B, inhomogeneous; subgrade C, hyperintense; and subgrade D, hyperintense with swelling. The development of morphologic articular cartilage defects (Whole-Organ MR Imaging Score ≥2) at 48 months was analyzed on a compartment level and was compared between groups by using generalized estimating equation logistic regression models. Results Cartilage signal abnormalities were more frequent in the patellofemoral joint than in the tibiofemoral joint (59.5% vs 39.5%). Subgrade A was seen more frequently than were subgrades C and D (36% vs 22%). Incidence of morphologic cartilage defects at 48 months was 57% in cartilage with baseline signal abnormalities, while only 4% of compartments without baseline signal abnormalities developed morphologic defects at 48 months (all compartments combined and each compartment separately, P < .01). The development of morphologic defects was not significantly

  15. Cartilage repair in osteoarthritic patients: utopia or real opportunity?

    PubMed

    Henrotin, Yves; Dubuc, Jean-Emile

    2009-01-01

    As medical advances lengthen average life expectancy, osteoarthritis (OA) will become a larger public health problem - not only because it is a manifestation of aging but also because it usually takes many years to reach clinical relevance. OA is already one of the ten most disabling diseases in industrialized countries. The huge financial burden emphasizes the acute need for new and more effective treatments for articular cartilage defects, especially since there are few disease modifying drugs or treatments for OA. There is no cure for OA and the management of OA is largely palliative, focusing on the alleviation of symptoms. Recent longitudinal non-controlled trials suggest that autologous chondrocyte transplantation techniques, which are indicated for young people with traumatic cartilage defects, could also be used in degenerative defects of elderly people with OA. This report discusses this therapeutic opportunity in view of some recently published data.

  16. Cartilage repair by human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells with different hydrogels in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong-Beom; Song, Minjung; Lee, Choong-Hee; Kim, Jin-A; Ha, Chul-Won

    2015-11-01

    This study was carried out to assess the feasibility of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) in articular cartilage repair and to further determine a suitable delivering hydrogel in a rat model. Critical sized full thickness cartilage defects were created. The hUCB-MSCs and three different hydrogel composites (hydrogel A; 4% hyaluronic acid/30% pluronic (1:1, v/v), hydrogel B; 4% hyaluronic acid, and hydrogel C; 4% hyaluronic acid/30% pluronic/chitosan (1:1:2, v/v)) were implanted into the experimental knee (right knee) and hydrogels without hUCB-MSCs were implanted into the control knee (left knee). Defects were evaluated after 8 weeks. The hUCB-MSCs with hydrogels composites resulted in a better repair as seen by gross and histological evaluation compared with hydrogels without hUCB-MSCs. Among the three different hydrogels, the 4% hyaluronic acid hydrogel composite (hydrogel B) showed the best result in cartilage repair as seen by the histological evaluation compared with the other hydrogel composites (hydrogel A and C). The results of this study suggest that hUCB-MSCs may be a promising cell source in combination with 4% hyaluronic acid hydrogels in the in vivo repair of cartilage defects.

  17. Utility of delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI (dGEMRIC) for qualitative evaluation of articular cartilage of patellofemoral joint.

    PubMed

    Nojiri, Takehiro; Watanabe, Nobuyoshi; Namura, Takehiko; Narita, Wataru; Ikoma, Kazuya; Suginoshita, Takehiko; Takamiya, Hisatake; Komiyama, Hiroto; Ito, Hirotoshi; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2006-08-01

    Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) was used for the measurement of relative proteoglycan depletion of articular cartilage in the patellofemoral (PF) joint following a proprietary protocol, which was compared with the X-ray images, proton density weighted MR images (PDWI) and arthroscopic findings. The study examined 30 knees. The ages ranged from 16 to 74 (average 40.3) years. The Gd-DTPA(2-)containing contrast medium was used in a single dose. The subjects were made to exercise the knee joint for 10 min; and MR images were taken 2 h after intravenous injection of contrast medium. T1-calculated images were produced and the region of interest (ROI) was set as follows. (1) ROI1: entire articular cartilage in a slice through the center of the patella. (2) ROI2: low signal region in T1-calculated images, which were set in a blind fashion by two observers. (3) ROI3: articular cartilage on one side that includes ROI2 where low signal region were detected (medial or lateral). ROI3 was set to examine the contrast of ROI2 with surrounding articular cartilage. The average T1 values of ROI1 was 393.5+/-33.6 ms for radiographic grade 0 and 361.3+/-11.1 ms for grade I, which showed a significant difference (P=0.036). The T1 value of ROI2 was 351.6+/-28.2 ms for grade I, 361.9+/-38.3 ms for grade II, 362.1+/-67.7 ms for grade III, and 297.8+/-54.1 ms for grade IV according to arthroscopic Outerbridge classification. All cases, that demonstrated decrease of T1 values on dGEMRIC (ROI2), showed abnormal arthroscopic or direct viewing findings. The ratio (ROI3/ROI2) in cases of only slight damage classified as Outerbridge grade I (6 cases) was an average of 1.04+/-0.02 and was 1.0 or greater in all cases, thereby indicating well-defined contrast with the surrounding cartilage. The diagnosis of damage in articular cartilage was possible in all 16 cases with radiographic K-L grade I on dGEMRIC, while the intensity changes were not found in 10 of 16 cases on PDWI

  18. Transport Phenomena in Articular Cartilage Cryopreservation as Predicted by the Modified Triphasic Model and the Effect of Natural Inhomogeneities

    PubMed Central

    Abazari, Alireza; Thompson, Richard B.; Elliott, Janet A.W.; McGann, Locksley E.

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the spatial and temporal distribution of cryoprotective agent (CPA) is necessary for the cryopreservation of articular cartilage. Cartilage dehydration and shrinkage, as well as the change in extracellular osmolality, may have a significant impact on chondrocyte survival during and after CPA loading, freezing, and thawing, and during CPA unloading. In the literature, Fick's law of diffusion is commonly used to predict the spatial distribution and overall concentration of the CPA in the cartilage matrix, and the shrinkage and stress-strain in the cartilage matrix during CPA loading are neglected. In this study, we used a previously described biomechanical model to predict the spatial and temporal distributions of CPA during loading. We measured the intrinsic inhomogeneities in initial water and fixed charge densities in the cartilage using magnetic resonance imaging and introduced them into the model as initial conditions. We then compared the prediction results with the results obtained using uniform initial conditions. The simulation results in this study demonstrate the presence of a significant mechanical strain in the matrix of the cartilage, within all layers, during CPA loading. The osmotic response of the chondrocytes to the cartilage dehydration during CPA loading was also simulated. The results reveal that a transient shrinking occurs to different levels, and the chondrocytes experience a significant decrease in volume, particularly in the middle and deep zones of articular cartilage, during CPA loading. PMID:22455911

  19. Mechanics and crack formation in the extracellular matrix with articular cartilage as a model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearns, Sarah; Silverberg, Jesse; Bonassar, Lawrence; Cohen, Itai; Das, Moumita

    We investigate the mechanical structure-function relations in the extracellular matrix (ECM) with focus on crack formation and failure. As a model system, our study focuses on the ECM in articular cartilage (AC), the tissue that covers the ends of bones, and distributes load in joints including in the knees, shoulders, and hips. The strength, toughness, and crack resistance of native articular cartilage is unparalleled in materials made by humankind. This mechanical response is mainly due to its ECM. The ECM in AC has two major mechanobiological components: a network of the biopolymer collagen and a flexible aggrecan gel. We model this system as a biopolymer network embedded in a swelling gel, and investigate the conditions for the formation and propagation of cracks using a combination of rigidity percolation theory and energy minimization approaches. Our results may provide useful insights into the design principles of the ECM as well as of biomimetic hydrogels that are mechanically robust and can, at the same time, easily adapt to cues in their surroundings. This work was partially supported by a Cottrell College Science Award.

  20. Sclerostin Immunoreactivity Increases in Cortical Bone Osteocytes and Decreases in Articular Cartilage Chondrocytes in Aging Mice.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Michelle L; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan Miguel; Mantyh, Patrick W

    2016-03-01

    Sclerostin is a 24-kDa secreted glycoprotein that has been identified as a negative modulator of new bone formation and may play a major role in age-related decline in skeletal function. Although serum levels of sclerostin markedly increase with age, relatively little is known about whether cells in the skeleton change their expression of sclerostin with aging. Using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy, we explored sclerostin immunoreactivity (sclerostin-IR) in the femurs of 4-, 9-, and 24-month-old adult C3H/HeJ male mice. In the femur, the only two cell types that expressed detectable levels of sclerostin-IR were bone osteocytes and articular cartilage chondrocytes. At three different sites along the diaphysis of the femur, only a subset of osteocytes expressed sclerostin-IR and the percentage of osteocytes that expressed sclerostin-IR increased from approximately 36% to 48% in 4- vs. 24-month-old mice. In marked contrast, in the same femurs, there were ~40% fewer hypertrophic chondrocytes of articular cartilage that expressed sclerostin-IR when comparing 24- vs. 4-month-old mice. Understanding the mechanism(s) that drive these divergent changes in sclerostin-IR may provide insight into understanding and treating the age-related decline of the skeleton.

  1. The Effects of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Deficiency on the Meniscus and Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Arner, Justin W.; Irvine, James N.; Zheng, Liying; Gale, Tom; Thorhauer, Eric; Hankins, Margaret; Abebe, Ermias; Tashman, Scott; Zhang, Xudong; Harner, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury increases the risk of meniscus and articular cartilage damage, but the causes are not well understood. Previous in vitro studies were static, required extensive knee dissection, and likely altered meniscal and cartilage contact due to the insertion of pressure sensing devices. Hypothesis: ACL deficiency will lead to increased translation of the lateral meniscus and increased deformation of the medial meniscus as well as alter cartilage contact location, strain, and area. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: With minimally invasive techniques, six 1.0-mm tantalum beads were implanted into the medial and lateral menisci of 6 fresh-frozen cadaveric knees. Dynamic stereo x-rays (DSXs) were obtained during dynamic knee flexion (from 15° to 60°, simulating a standing squat) with a 46-kg load in intact and ACL-deficient states. Knee kinematics, meniscal movement and deformation, and cartilage contact were compared by novel imaging coregistration. Results: During dynamic knee flexion from 15° to 60°, the tibia translated 2.6 mm (P = .05) more anteriorly, with 2.3° more internal rotation (P = .04) with ACL deficiency. The medial and lateral menisci, respectively, translated posteriorly an additional 0.7 mm (P = .05) and 1.0 mm (P = .03). Medial and lateral compartment cartilage contact location moved posteriorly (2.0 mm [P = .05] and 2.0 mm [P = .04], respectively). Conclusion: The lateral meniscus showed greater translation with ACL deficiency compared with the medial meniscus, which may explain the greater incidences of acute lateral meniscus tears and chronic medial meniscus tears. Furthermore, cartilage contact location moved further posteriorly than that of the meniscus in both compartments, possibly imparting more meniscal stresses that may lead to early degeneration. This new, minimally invasive, dynamic in vitro model allows the study of meniscus function and cartilage contact and can be

  2. Characterization and Localization of Citrullinated Proteoglycan Aggrecan in Human Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Glant, Tibor T.; Ocsko, Timea; Markovics, Adrienn; Szekanecz, Zoltan; Katz, Robert S.; Rauch, Tibor A.; Mikecz, Katalin

    2016-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease of the synovial joints. The autoimmune character of RA is underscored by prominent production of autoantibodies such as those against IgG (rheumatoid factor), and a broad array of joint tissue-specific and other endogenous citrullinated proteins. Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) can be detected in the sera and synovial fluids of RA patients and ACPA seropositivity is one of the diagnostic criteria of RA. Studies have demonstrated that RA T cells respond to citrullinated peptides (epitopes) of proteoglycan (PG) aggrecan, which is one of the most abundant macromolecules of articular cartilage. However, it is not known if the PG molecule is citrullinated in vivo in human cartilage, and if so, whether citrulline-containing neoepitopes of PG (CitPG) can contribute to autoimmunity in RA. Methods CitPG was detected in human cartilage extracts using ACPA+ RA sera in dot blot and Western blot. Citrullination status of in vitro citrullinated recombinant G1 domain of human PG (rhG1) was confirmed by antibody-based and chemical methods, and potential sites of citrullination in rhG1 were explored by molecular modeling. CitPG-specific serum autoantibodies were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and CitPG was localized in osteoarthritic (OA) and RA cartilage using immunohistochemistry. Findings Sera from ACPA+ RA patients reacted with PG purified from normal human cartilage specimens. PG fragments (mainly those containing the G1 domain) from OA or RA cartilage extracts were recognized by ACPA+ sera but not by serum from ACPA- individuals. ACPA+ sera also reacted with in vitro citrullinated rhG1 and G3 domain-containing fragment(s) of PG. Molecular modeling suggested multiple sites of potential citrullination within the G1 domain. The immunohistochemical localization of CitPG was different in OA and RA cartilage. Conclusions CitPG is a new member of citrullinated proteins identified in human

  3. Structural Variations in Articular Cartilage Matrix Are Associated with Early-Onset Osteoarthritis in the Spondyloepiphyseal Dysplasia Congenita (Sedc) Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, David W.; Squires, Ryan S.; Avery, Shaela A.; Adams, Jason; Baker, Melissa; Cunningham, Christopher R.; Heimann, Nicholas B.; Kooyman, David L.; Seegmiller, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Heterozgyous spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (sedc/+) mice expressing a missense mutation in col2a1 exhibit a normal skeletal morphology but early-onset osteoarthritis (OA). We have recently examined knee articular cartilage obtained from homozygous (sedc/sedc) mice, which express a Stickler-like phenotype including dwarfism. We examined sedc/sedc mice at various levels to better understand the mechanistic process resulting in OA. Mutant sedc/sedc, and control (+/+) cartilages were compared at two, six and nine months of age. Tissues were fixed, decalcified, processed to paraffin sections, and stained with hematoxylin/eosin and safranin O/fast green. Samples were analyzed under the light microscope and the modified Mankin and OARSI scoring system was used to quantify the OA-like changes. Knees were stained with 1C10 antibody to detect the presence and distribution of type II collagen. Electron microscopy was used to study chondrocyte morphology and collagen fibril diameter. Compared with controls, mutant articular cartilage displayed decreased fibril diameter concomitant with increases in size of the pericellular space, Mankin and OARSI scores, cartilage thickness, chondrocyte clustering, proteoglycan staining and horizontal fissuring. In conclusion, homozygous sedc mice are subject to early-onset knee OA. We conclude that collagen in the mutant’s articular cartilage (both heterozygote and homozygote) fails to provide the normal meshwork required for matrix integrity and overall cartilage stability. PMID:23939426

  4. Vulnerability of the Superficial Zone of Immature Articular Cartilage to Compressive Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Rolauffs, R.; Muehleman, C; Li, J; Kurz, B; Kuettner, K; Frank, E; Grodzinsky, A

    2010-01-01

    The zonal composition and functioning of adult articular cartilage causes depth-dependent responses to compressive injury. In immature cartilage, shear and compressive moduli as well as collagen and sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content also vary with depth. However, there is little understanding of the depth-dependent damage caused by injury. Since injury to immature knee joints most often causes articular cartilage lesions, this study was undertaken to characterize the zonal dependence of biomechanical, biochemical, and matrix-associated changes caused by compressive injury. Disks from the superficial and deeper zones of bovine calves were biomechanically characterized. Injury to the disks was achieved by applying a final strain of 50% compression at 100%/second, followed by biomechanical recharacterization. Tissue compaction upon injury as well as sGAG density, sGAG loss, and biosynthesis were measured. Collagen fiber orientation and matrix damage were assessed using histology, diffraction-enhanced x-ray imaging, and texture analysis. Injured superficial zone disks showed surface disruption, tissue compaction by 20.3 {+-} 4.3% (mean {+-} SEM), and immediate biomechanical impairment that was revealed by a mean {+-} SEM decrease in dynamic stiffness to 7.1 {+-} 3.3% of the value before injury and equilibrium moduli that were below the level of detection. Tissue areas that appeared intact on histology showed clear textural alterations. Injured deeper zone disks showed collagen crimping but remained undamaged and biomechanically intact. Superficial zone disks did not lose sGAG immediately after injury, but lost 17.8 {+-} 1.4% of sGAG after 48 hours; deeper zone disks lost only 2.8 {+-} 0.3% of sGAG content. Biomechanical impairment was associated primarily with structural damage. The soft superficial zone of immature cartilage is vulnerable to compressive injury, causing superficial matrix disruption, extensive compaction, and textural alteration, which results

  5. Equine subchondral bone failure threshold under impact compression applied through articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Malekipour, Fatemeh; Oetomo, Denny; Lee, Peter Vee-Sin

    2016-07-01

    Subchondral bone microdamage due to high-impact loading is a key factor leading to post-traumatic knee osteoarthritis. A quantified assessment of the mechanical characteristics of subchondral bone at the tissue-level is essential to study the mechanism of impact-induced microdamage. We combined mechanical impact testing of equine cartilage-bone with µCT image-based finite element models (μFEM) of each specimen to determine subchondral bone (including calcified cartilage: CCSB) elastic tissue modulus and local stresses and strains associated with micro-fractures within the CCSB tissue. The material properties of each specimen-specific μFEM were iteratively adjusted to match the FE-predicted stress-strain curves with experimental results. Isotropic homogeneous material properties for both uncalcified cartilage (UC) and CCSB were assumed. UC large-deformation was simulated using hyperelastic material properties. Final UC shear and CCSB tissue elastic modulus of G=38±20MPa and E(t)=3.3±0.7GPa were achieved after fit procedure. The results suggested that initial failure in CCSB occurred at local tensile and compressive stresses of 29.47±5.34 MPa and 64.3±21.3MPa, and tensile and compressive strains of 1.12±0.06% and 1.99±0.41%, respectively. Tissue-level material properties can be used in finite element modeling of diarthrodial joints under impact loading, and also in designing artificial cartilage-bone to replace the damaged tissue in the joint. Results can provide an estimate for the threshold of initial failure in subchondral bone tissue due to an impact compression transmitted through the overlying articular cartilage. PMID:27260020

  6. Altered mechano-chemical environment in hip articular cartilage: effect of obesity.

    PubMed

    Travascio, Francesco; Eltoukhy, Moataz; Cami, Sonila; Asfour, Shihab

    2014-10-01

    The production of extracellular matrix (ECM) components of articular cartilage is regulated, among other factors, by an intercellular signaling mechanism mediated by the interaction of cell surface receptors (CSR) with insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). In ECM, the presence of binding proteins (IGFBP) hinders IGF-1 delivery to CSR. It has been reported that levels of IGF-1 and IGFBP in obese population are, respectively, lower and higher than those found in normal population. In this study, an experimental-numerical approach was adopted to quantify the effect of this metabolic alteration found in obese population on the homeostasis of femoral hip cartilage. A new computational model, based on the mechano-electrochemical mixture theory, was developed to describe competitive binding kinetics of IGF-1 with IGFBP and CSR, and associated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) biosynthesis. Moreover, a gait analysis was carried out on obese and normal subjects to experimentally characterize mechanical loads on hip cartilage during walking. This information was deployed into the model to account for effects of physiologically relevant tissue deformation on GAG production in ECM. Numerical simulations were performed to compare GAG biosynthesis in femoral hip cartilage of normal and obese subjects. Results indicated that the lower ratio of IGF-1 to IGFBP found in obese population reduces cartilage GAG concentration up to 18 % when compared to normal population. Moreover, moderate physical activity, such as walking, has a modest beneficial effect on GAG production. The findings of this study suggest that IGF-1/IGFBP metabolic unbalance should be accounted for when considering the association of obesity with hip osteoarthritis.

  7. Healing results in meniscus and articular cartilage photochemically welded with 1,8-naphthalimide dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judy, Millard M.; Jackson, Robert W.; Nosir, Hany R.; Matthews, James Lester; Loyd, John D.; Lewis, David E.; Utecht, Ronald E.; Yuan, Dongwu

    1997-05-01

    Meniscal tears and partial thickness defects in articular cartilage do not heal spontaneously. In this paper results are described of studies of a procedure for evoking the healing response in such lesions by a non-thermal tissue sparing photochemical weld using 1,8-naphthalimide dyes. Fifteen essentially mature Barbados sheep 40 - 60 pounds in weight received a 2 - 3 mm flap tear by incision in the red white zone of the medial meniscus oriented parallel to the table of the tibia. The animals were divided into four groups; Group I, no treatment; Group II, treatment by laser activated photoactive dyes; Group III, treatment by suturing; Group IV, treatment by laser irradiation only; Group V, treatment by photoactive dyes only. In another group of 12 sheep partial thickness flap tear was created by incision in the articular cartilage of the femoral condyle. These were divided into four groups as for the meniscus study, omitting the sutured control. Welds were made using the dimeric dye MBM Gold BW 012-012-012 at 12 mM in PBS, 457.9 nm argon ion laser radiation at 800 mW/cm2, 7.5 minutes (360 J/cm2) with approximately 2 kg/cm2 externally applied pressure. Animals were sacrificed at 24 hr, 4 weeks, 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Gross appearance of menisci and cartilage in all welded knees was normal and all welds resisted deformation or loosening under forceful probing. Histology of studies of both tissues out to 6 moths disclosed close bonding of welded area, continuing healing response in the form of cellular recruitment and protein deposition and the absence of inflammatory response. Tissue erosion and arthritic changes were evident in all unwelded controls.

  8. Regulation of the friction coefficient of articular cartilage by TGF-beta1 and IL-1beta.

    PubMed

    DuRaine, Grayson; Neu, Corey P; Chan, Stephanie M T; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos; June, Ronald K; Reddi, A Hari

    2009-02-01

    Articular cartilage functions to provide a low-friction surface for joint movement for many decades of life. Superficial zone protein (SZP) is a glycoprotein secreted by chondrocytes in the superficial layer of articular cartilage that contributes to effective boundary lubrication. In both cell and explant cultures, TGF-beta1 and IL-1beta have been demonstrated to, respectively, upregulate and downregulate SZP protein levels. It was hypothesized that the friction coefficient of articular cartilage could also be modulated by these cytokines through SZP regulation. The friction coefficient between cartilage explants (both untreated and treated with TGF-beta1 or IL-1beta) and a smooth glass surface due to sliding in the boundary lubrication regime was measured with a pin-on-disk tribometer. SZP was quantified using an enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay and localized by immunohistochemistry. Both TGF-beta1 and IL-1beta treatments resulted in the decrease of the friction coefficient of articular cartilage in a location- and time-dependent manner. Changes in the friction coefficient due to the TGF-beta1 treatment corresponded to increased depth of SZP staining within the superficial zone, while friction coefficient changes due to the IL-1beta treatment were independent of SZP depth of staining. However, the changes induced by the IL-1beta treatment corresponded to changes in surface roughness, determined from the analysis of surface images obtained with an atomic force microscope. These findings demonstrate that the low friction of articular cartilage can be modified by TGF-beta1 and IL-1beta treatment and that the friction coefficient depends on multiple factors, including SZP localization and surface roughness.

  9. Cartilage Repair Using Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Chondroprogenitors

    PubMed Central

    Kapacee, Zoher; Peng, Jiang; Lu, Shibi; Lucas, Robert J.; Hardingham, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    In initial work, we developed a 14-day culture protocol under potential GMP, chemically defined conditions to generate chondroprogenitors from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). The present study was undertaken to investigate the cartilage repair capacity of these cells. The chondrogenic protocol was optimized and validated with gene expression profiling. The protocol was also applied successfully to two lines of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Chondrogenic cells derived from hESCs were encapsulated in fibrin gel and implanted in osteochondral defects in the patella groove of nude rats, and cartilage repair was evaluated by histomorphology and immunocytochemistry. Genes associated with chondrogenesis were upregulated during the protocol, and pluripotency-related genes were downregulated. Aggregation of chondrogenic cells was accompanied by high expression of SOX9 and strong staining with Safranin O. Culture with PluriSln1 was lethal for hESCs but was tolerated by hESC chondrogenic cells, and no OCT4-positive cells were detected in hESC chondrogenic cells. iPSCs were also shown to generate chondroprogenitors in this protocol. Repaired tissue in the defect area implanted with hESC-derived chondrogenic cells was stained for collagen II with little collagen I, but negligible collagen II was observed in the fibrin-only controls. Viable human cells were detected in the repair tissue at 12 weeks. The results show that chondrogenic cells derived from hESCs, using a chemically defined culture system, when implanted in focal defects were able to promote cartilage repair. This is a first step in evaluating these cells for clinical application for the treatment of cartilage lesions. PMID:25273540

  10. Effect of loading on the organization of the collagen fibril network in juvenile equine articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Brama, Pieter A J; Holopainen, Jaakko; van Weeren, P René; Firth, Elwyn C; Helminen, Heikki J; Hyttinen, Mika M

    2009-09-01

    We investigated the effects of exercise-induced loading on the collagen network of equine articular cartilage. Collagen fibril architecture at a site (1) subjected to intermittent high-intensity loading was compared with that of an adjacent site (2) sustaining continuous low-level load. From horses exposed to forced exercise (CONDEX group) or not (PASTEX group), the spatial parallelism of fibrils and the orientation angle between fibrils and the surface at depths 9 microm apart through cartilage from surface to tidemark were determined using polarized light microscopy, and expressed as parallelism index (PI) and orientation index (OI). PI was significantly higher in site 2 than 1 in CONDEX and PASTEX groups. PI was significantly higher in forced exercised horses at site 2 but not site 1. OI was significantly greater (more perpendicular to the surface) in the superficial and deep cartilage of site 2 than 1 in both CONDEX and PASTEX groups. Superficial zone OI was higher in exercised horses at site 1 but not at site 2. Exercise increased collagen parallelism and affected orientation. The site differences in OI indicate that Benninghoff's classic predominantly perpendicular arcades appear not to be a consistent architectural feature, but adapt to local forces sustained.

  11. Effects of refrigeration and freezing on the electromechanical and biomechanical properties of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Changoor, Adele; Fereydoonzad, Liah; Yaroshinsky, Alex; Buschmann, Michael D

    2010-06-01

    In vitro electromechanical and biomechanical testing of articular cartilage provide critical information about the structure and function of this tissue. Difficulties obtaining fresh tissue and lengthy experimental testing procedures often necessitate a storage protocol, which may adversely affect the functional properties of cartilage. The effects of storage at either 4°C for periods of 6 days and 12 days, or during a single freeze-thaw cycle at -20°C were examined in young bovine cartilage. Non-destructive electromechanical measurements and unconfined compression testing on 3 mm diameter disks were used to assess cartilage properties, including the streaming potential integral (SPI), fibril modulus (Ef), matrix modulus (Em), and permeability (k). Cartilage disks were also examined histologically. Compared with controls, significant decreases in SPI (to 32.3±5.5% of control values, p<0.001), Ef (to 31.3±41.3% [corrected] of control values, p=0.046), Em (to 6.4±8.5% of control values, p<0.0001), and an increase in k (to 2676.7±2562.0% of control values, p=0.004) were observed at day 12 of refrigeration at 4°C, but no significant changes were detected at day 6. A trend toward detecting a decrease in SPI (to 94.2±6.2% of control values, p=0.083) was identified following a single freeze-thaw cycle, but no detectable changes were observed for any biomechanical parameters. All numbers are mean±95% confidence interval. These results indicate that fresh cartilage can be stored in a humid chamber at 4°C for a maximum of 6 days with no detrimental effects to cartilage electromechanical and biomechanical properties, while one freeze-thaw cycle produces minimal deterioration of biomechanical and electromechanical properties. A comparison to literature suggested that particular attention should be paid to the manner in which specimens are thawed after freezing, specifically by minimizing thawing time at higher temperatures.

  12. Nutrient Channels Aid the Growth of Articular Surface-Sized Engineered Cartilage Constructs.

    PubMed

    Cigan, Alexander D; Durney, Krista M; Nims, Robert J; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2016-09-01

    Symptomatic osteoarthritic lesions span large regions of joint surfaces and the ability to engineer cartilage constructs at clinically relevant sizes would be highly desirable. We previously demonstrated that nutrient transport limitations can be mitigated by the introduction of channels in 10 mm diameter cartilage constructs. In this study, we scaled up our previous system to cast and cultivate 40 mm diameter constructs (2.3 mm overall thickness); 4 mm diameter and channeled 10 mm diameter constructs were studied for comparison. Furthermore, to assess whether prior results using primary bovine cells are applicable for passaged cells-a more clinically realistic scenario-we cast constructs of each size with primary or twice-passaged cells. Constructs were assessed mechanically for equilibrium compressive Young's modulus (EY), dynamic modulus at 0.01 Hz (G*), and friction coefficient (μ); they were also assessed biochemically, histologically, and immunohistochemically for glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen contents. By maintaining open channels, we successfully cultured robust constructs the size of entire human articular cartilage layers (growing to ∼52 mm in diameter, 4 mm thick, mass of 8 g by day 56), representing a 100-fold increase in scale over our 4 mm diameter constructs, without compromising their functional properties. Large constructs reached EY of up to 623 kPa and GAG contents up to 8.9%/ww (% of wet weight), both within native cartilage ranges, had G* >2 MPa, and up to 3.5%/ww collagen. Constructs also exhibited some of the lowest μ reported for engineered cartilage (0.06-0.11). Passaged cells produced tissue of lower quality, but still exhibited native EY and GAG content, similar to their smaller controls. The constructs produced in this study are, to our knowledge, the largest engineered cartilage constructs to date which possess native EY and GAG, and are a testament to the effectiveness of nutrient channels in

  13. Comparison of ultrasound and optical coherence tomography techniques for evaluation of integrity of spontaneously repaired horse cartilage.

    PubMed

    Virén, T; Huang, Y P; Saarakkala, S; Pulkkinen, H; Tiitu, V; Linjama, A; Kiviranta, I; Lammi, M J; Brünott, A; Brommer, H; Van Weeren, R; Brama, P A J; Zheng, Y P; Jurvelin, J S; Töyräs, J

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare sensitivity of ultrasound and optical coherence tomography (OCT) techniques for the evaluation of the integrity of spontaneously repaired horse cartilage. Articular surfaces of horse intercarpal joints, featuring both intact tissue and spontaneously healed chondral or osteochondral defects, were imaged ex vivo with arthroscopic ultrasound and laboratory OCT devices. Quantitative ultrasound (integrated reflection coefficient (IRC), apparent integrated backscattering coefficient (AIB) and ultrasound roughness index (URI)) and optical parameters (optical reflection coefficient (ORC), optical roughness index (ORI) and optical backscattering (OBS)) were determined and compared with histological integrity and mechanical properties of the tissue. Spontaneously healed tissue could be quantitatively discerned from the intact tissue with ultrasound and OCT techniques. Furthermore, several significant correlations (p < 0.05) were detected between ultrasound and OCT parameters. Superior resolution of OCT provided a more accurate measurement of cartilage surface roughness, while the ultrasound backscattering from the inner structures of the cartilage matched better with the histological findings. Since the techniques were found to be complementary to each other, dual modality imaging techniques could provide a useful tool for the arthroscopic evaluation of the integrity of articular cartilage.

  14. Fabrication and in vitro evaluation of an articular cartilage extracellular matrix-hydroxyapatite bilayered scaffold with low permeability for interface tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteochondral interface regeneration is challenging for functional and integrated cartilage repair. Various layered scaffolds have been used to reconstruct the complex interface, yet the influence of the permeability of the layered structure on cartilage defect healing remains largely unknown. Methods We designed and fabricated a novel bilayered scaffold using articular cartilage extracellular matrix (ACECM) and hydroxyapatite (HAp), involving a porous, oriented upper layer and a dense, mineralised lower layer. By optimising the HAp/ACECM ratio, differing pore sizes and porosities were obtained simultaneously in the two layers. To evaluate the effects of permeability on cell behaviour, rabbit chondrocytes were seeded. Results Morphological observations demonstrated that a gradual interfacial region was formed with pore sizes varying from 128.2 ± 20.3 to 21.2 ± 3.1 μm. The permeability of the bilayered scaffold decreased with increasing compressive strain and HAp content. Mechanical tests indicated that the interface was stable to bearing compressive and shear loads. Accordingly, the optimum HAp/ACECM ratio (7 w/v%) in the layer to mimic native calcified cartilage was found. Chondrocytes could not penetrate the interface and resided only in the upper layer, where they showed high cellularity and abundant matrix deposition. Conclusions Our findings suggest that a bilayered scaffold with low permeability, rather than complete isolation, represents a promising candidate for osteochondral interface tissue engineering. PMID:24950704

  15. Topographical variations in articular cartilage and subchondral bone of the normal rat knee are age-related.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Nina; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter; Niehoff, Anja

    2014-09-01

    In osteoarthritis animal models the rat knee is one of the most frequently investigated joint. However, it is unknown whether topographical variations in articular cartilage and subchondral bone of the normal rat knee exist and how they are linked or influenced by growth and maturation. Detailed knowledge is needed in order to allow interpretation and facilitate comparability of published osteoarthritis studies. For the first time, the present study maps topographical variations in cartilage thickness, cartilage compressive properties and subchondral bone microarchitecture between the medial and lateral tibial compartment of normal growing rat knees (7 vs. 13 weeks). Thickness and compressive properties (aggregate modulus) of cartilage were determined and the subchondral bone was analyzed by micro-computed tomography. We found that articular cartilage thickness is initially homogenous in both compartments, but then differentiates during growth and maturation resulting in greater cartilage thickness in the medial compartment in the 13-week-old animals. Cartilage compressive properties did not vary between the two sites independently of age. In both age-groups, subchondral plate thickness as well as trabecular bone volume ratio and trabecular thickness were greater in the medial compartment. While a high porosity of subchondral bone plate with a high topographical variation (medial/lateral) could be observed in the 7-week-old animals, the porosity was reduced and was accompanied by a reversion in topographical variation when reaching maturity. Our findings highlight that there is a considerable topographical variation in articular cartilage and subchondral bone within the normal rat knee in relation to the developmental status.

  16. A Stable Isotope Method for the Simultaneous Measurement of Matrix Synthesis and Cell Proliferation in Articular Cartilage In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kelvin W.; Siraj, Sebrin A.; Cheng, Erika W.; Awada, Mohamad; Hellerstein, Marc K.; Turner, Scott M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Measurements of cell proliferation and matrix synthesis in cartilage explants have identified regulatory factors (e.g., interleukin 1, IL-1) that contribute to osteoarthritis and anabolic mediators (e.g., BMP-7) that may have therapeutic potential. The objective of this study was to develop a robust method for measuring cell proliferation and glycosaminoglycan synthesis in articular cartilage that could be applied in vivo. Methods A stable isotope-mass spectrometry approach was validated by measuring the metabolic effects of IL-1 and BMP-7 in cultures of mature and immature bovine cartilage explants. The method was also applied in vivo to quantify physiologic turnover rates of matrix and cells in the articular cartilage of normal rats. Heavy water was administered to explants in the culture medium and to rats via drinking water, and cartilage was analyzed for labeling of chondroitin sulfate (CS), hyaluronic acid (HA) and DNA. Results As expected, IL-1 inhibited the synthesis of DNA and CS in cartilage explants. However, IL-1 inhibited HA synthesis only in immature cartilage. Futhermore, BMP-7 was generally stimulatory, but immature cartilage was significantly more responsive than mature cartilage, particularly in terms of HA and DNA synthesis. In vivo, labeling of CS and DNA in normal rats for up to a year indicated half-lives of 22 and 862 days, respectively, in the joint. Conclusions We describe a method by which deuterium from heavy water is traced into multiple metabolites from a single cartilage specimen to profile its metabolic activity. This method was demonstrated in tissue culture and rodents but may have significant clinical applications. PMID:19230856

  17. Cartilage issues in football-today's problems and tomorrow's solutions.

    PubMed

    Mithoefer, Kai; Peterson, Lars; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy; Mandelbaum, Bert R

    2015-05-01

    Articular cartilage injury is prevalent in football players and results from chronic joint stress or acute traumatic injuries. Articular cartilage injury can often result in progressive painful impairment of joint function and limit sports participation. Management of articular cartilage injury in athletes aims to return the player to competition, and requires effective and durable joint surface restoration that resembles normal hyaline articular cartilage that can withstand the high joint stresses of football. Existing articular cartilage repair techniques can return the athlete with articular cartilage injury to high-impact sports, but treatment does not produce normal articular cartilage, and this limits the success rate and durability of current cartilage repair in athletes. Novel scientific concepts and treatment techniques that apply modern tissue engineering technologies promise further advancement in the treatment of these challenging injuries in the high demand athletic population. We review the current knowledge of cartilage injury pathophysiology, epidemiology and aetiology, and outline existing management algorithms, developing treatment options and future strategies to manage articular cartilage injuries in football players. PMID:25878075

  18. Cartilage issues in football—today's problems and tomorrow's solutions

    PubMed Central

    Mithoefer, Kai; Peterson, Lars; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy; Mandelbaum, Bert R

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage injury is prevalent in football players and results from chronic joint stress or acute traumatic injuries. Articular cartilage injury can often result in progressive painful impairment of joint function and limit sports participation. Management of articular cartilage injury in athletes aims to return the player to competition, and requires effective and durable joint surface restoration that resembles normal hyaline articular cartilage that can withstand the high joint stresses of football. Existing articular cartilage repair techniques can return the athlete with articular cartilage injury to high-impact sports, but treatment does not produce normal articular cartilage, and this limits the success rate and durability of current cartilage repair in athletes. Novel scientific concepts and treatment techniques that apply modern tissue engineering technologies promise further advancement in the treatment of these challenging injuries in the high demand athletic population. We review the current knowledge of cartilage injury pathophysiology, epidemiology and aetiology, and outline existing management algorithms, developing treatment options and future strategies to manage articular cartilage injuries in football players. PMID:25878075

  19. Unique biomaterial compositions direct bone marrow stem cells into specific chondrocytic phenotypes corresponding to the various zones of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Lonnissa H; Kudva, Abhijit K; Guckert, Nicole L; Linse, Klaus D; Roy, Krishnendu

    2011-02-01

    Numerous studies have reported generation of cartilage-like tissue from chondrocytes and stem cells, using pellet cultures, bioreactors and various biomaterials, especially hydrogels. However, one of the primary unsolved challenges in the field has been the inability to produce tissue that mimics the highly organized zonal architecture of articular cartilage; specifically its spatially varying mechanical properties and extra-cellular matrix (ECM) composition. Here we show that different combinations of synthetic and natural biopolymers create unique niches that can "direct" a single marrow stem cell (MSC) population to differentiate into the superficial, transitional, or deep zones of articular cartilage. Specifically, incorporating chondroitin sulfate (CS) and matrix metalloproteinase-sensitive peptides (MMP-pep) into PEG hydrogels (PEG:CS:MMP-pep) induced high levels of collagen II and low levels of proteoglycan expression resulting in a low compressive modulus, similar to the superficial zone. PEG:CS hydrogels produced intermediate-levels of both collagen II and proteoglycans, like the transitional zone, while PEG:hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels induced high proteoglycan and low collagen II levels leading to high compressive modulus, similar to the deep zone. Additionally, the compressive moduli of these zone-specific matrices following cartilage generation showed similar trend as the corresponding zones of articular cartilage, with PEG:CS:MMP-pep having the lowest compressive modulus, followed by PEG:CS while PEG:HA had the highest modulus. These results underscore the potential for composite scaffold structures incorporating these biomaterial compositions such that a single stem-progenitor cell population can give rise to zonally-organized, functional articular cartilage-like tissue. PMID:21067807

  20. Effects of Balsamodendron mukul Gum Resin Extract on Articular Cartilage in Papain-induced Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Manjhi, Jayanand; Gupta, Maneesh; Sinha, Anvesha; Rawat, Beena; Rai, Durg V

    2016-07-01

    Context • Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases of the musculoskeleton, causing functional disability among older adults. Management of OA includes conventional pharmacological treatments consisting primarily of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), acetaminophen, physiotherapy, and surgical procedures. The medications are not ideal therapeutic agents; NSAIDs in particular can cause serious side effects. Objective • The study was conducted to investigate the effects of Balsamodendron mukul (BDM) gum resin extract on cartilage damage and microstructural changes in the subchondral bone of rats with papain-induced, osteoarthritic knee joints. Design • The authors designed a parallel randomized, controlled study to examine the effects of 3 concentrations of BDM on OA in a murine model. Setting • The present study was undertaken at the research laboratory, Faculty of Biological Engineering, Shobhit University (Modipuram, Meerut, India). Intervention • OA was induced by intra-articular injections of 0.2 mL of 4% papain solution and 0.1 mL of 0.03 M cysteine through the patellar ligament using a 26-gauge, 1.27-cm needle. The rats in the sham group received same volume of isotonic sodium chloride solution. The rats were divided into 6 groups : (1) control group-fresh rats, with ages and genders similar to those of the other groups but with no induction of OA and no treatments; (2) sham group-rats receiving a sham induction of OA using an intra-articular injection of saline of the same volume as the papain given to all OA rats but no treatments; (3) OA group-rats induced with OA but receiving no treatments; (4) OA + BDM (10%) group-rats induced with OA that received a 10% dose of BDM; (5) OA + BDM (20%) group-rats induced with OA that received a 20% dose of BDM; and (6) OA + BDM (40%) group-rats induced with OA that received a 40% dose of BDM. Rats in the treatment groups were fed their respective doses of BDM extract for 30 d

  1. Chondroblastoma of the femoral head disrupting the articular cartilage. Description of a novel surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Givissis, Panagiotis; Agathangelidis, Filon; Christodoulou, Evangelos; Christodoulou, Anastasios

    2012-06-01

    Chondroblastoma is a rare benign tumour. Involvement of the femoral head may often lead to a delayed diagnosis. We present the case of a 15-year-old patient with right hip pain which was first attributed to adductor tendinitis. Following aggravation of the symptoms, thorough investigation including a CT-guided biopsy, revealed the diagnosis of chondroblastoma of the femoral head. Removal of the lesion based on the techniques described in literature was not possible, mainly because the articular cartilage was breached. A novel surgical technique was used in order to address the rare location and behaviour of the tumour. This technique offered the patient pain relief and return to his previous every day and sports activities. No recurrence was seen at two years follow-up.

  2. Nonlinear mechanical response of the extracellular matrix: learning from articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearns, Sarah; Das, Moumita

    2015-03-01

    We study the mechanical structure-function relations in the extracellular matrix (ECM) with focus on nonlinear shear and compression response. As a model system, our study focuses on the ECM in articular cartilage tissue which has two major mechanobiological components: a network of the biopolymer collagen that acts as a stiff, reinforcing matrix, and a flexible aggrecan network that facilitates deformability. We model this system as a double network hydrogel made of interpenetrating networks of stiff and flexible biopolymers respectively. We study the linear and nonlinear mechanical response of the model ECM to shear and compression forces using a combination of rigidity percolation theory and energy minimization approaches. Our results may provide useful insights into the design principles of the ECM as well as biomimetic hydrogels that are mechanically robust and can, at the same time, easily adapt to cues in their surroundings.

  3. Enzyme studies in the articular cartilage of diabetic rats and of rats bearing transplanted pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Silberberg, R; Hirshberg, G E; Lesker, P

    1977-08-01

    The articular cartilage of normal rats, of rats made diabetic with streptozotocin, and of rats made diabetic with streptozotocin and subsequently transplanted with isologous pancreatic islets was examined for the activities of enzymes engaged in the synthesis and degradation of glycosaminoglycans (mucopolysaccharides). The activities assayed were those of the degrading enzymes B-glucuronidase, B-acetyglucosaminidase, B-acetylgalactosaminidase, B-galactosidase, and those active in synthesis: uridine diphosphate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphate dehyrogenase, and phosphofructokinase. In the diabetic animals all enzyme activities were increased, thos of the degrading enzymes more than those of the others. Implantation of pancreatic islets reversed the changes produced by diabetes, enzyme activities returning to near-normal levels. PMID:142034

  4. Spatially localized structure-function relations in the elastic properties of sheared articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverberg, Jesse; Bonassar, Lawrence; Cohen, Itai

    2013-03-01

    Contemporary developments in therapeutic tissue engineering have been enabled by basic research efforts in the field of biomechanics. Further integration of technology in medicine requires a deeper understanding of the mechanical properties of soft biological materials and the structural origins of their response under extreme stresses and strains. Drawing on the science generated by the ``Extreme Mechanics'' community, we present experimental results on the mechanical properties of articular cartilage, a hierarchically structured soft biomaterial found in the joints of mammalian long bones. Measurements of the spatially localized structure and mechanical properties will be compared with theoretical descriptions based on networks of deformed rods, poro-visco-elasticity, and standard continuum models. Discrepancies between experiment and theory will be highlighted, and suggestions for how models can be improved will be given.

  5. Chondroblastoma of the femoral head disrupting the articular cartilage. Description of a novel surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Givissis, Panagiotis; Agathangelidis, Filon; Christodoulou, Evangelos; Christodoulou, Anastasios

    2012-06-01

    Chondroblastoma is a rare benign tumour. Involvement of the femoral head may often lead to a delayed diagnosis. We present the case of a 15-year-old patient with right hip pain which was first attributed to adductor tendinitis. Following aggravation of the symptoms, thorough investigation including a CT-guided biopsy, revealed the diagnosis of chondroblastoma of the femoral head. Removal of the lesion based on the techniques described in literature was not possible, mainly because the articular cartilage was breached. A novel surgical technique was used in order to address the rare location and behaviour of the tumour. This technique offered the patient pain relief and return to his previous every day and sports activities. No recurrence was seen at two years follow-up. PMID:22822587

  6. The organisation of collagen fibrils in the superficial zones of articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, J M

    1990-01-01

    The origin and structure of collagen fibres in the surface of articular cartilage were studied using SEM. Cryofracture was used to create orthogonal fracture surfaces in three planes. Fibres which originated in the radial zone could be traced into the surface where they flattened and overlapped in a common direction. Thick fibres from the periosteum ran into the surface as well, but apparently ended there and did not enter the radial zone. The tangential fibres were covered by a dense, separate layer of small fibrils. The fundamental aspects of the model proposed by Benninghoff are supported by these findings. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:2081698

  7. Micromechanical response of articular cartilage to tensile load measured using nonlinear microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bell, J S; Christmas, J; Mansfield, J C; Everson, R M; Winlove, C P

    2014-06-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) is a highly anisotropic biomaterial, and its complex mechanical properties have been a topic of intense investigation for over 60 years. Recent advances in the field of nonlinear optics allow the individual constituents of AC to be imaged in living tissue without the need for exogenous contrast agents. Combining mechanical testing with nonlinear microscopy provides a wealth of information about microscopic responses to load. This work investigates the inhomogeneous distribution of strain in loaded AC by tracking the movement and morphological changes of individual chondrocytes using point pattern matching and Bayesian modeling. This information can be used to inform models of mechanotransduction and pathogenesis, and is readily extendable to various other connective tissues.

  8. Collagen VI regulates pericellular matrix properties, chondrocyte swelling, and mechanotransduction in articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Zelenski, Nicole A.; Leddy, Holly A.; Sanchez-Adams, Johannah; Zhang, Jinzi; Bonaldo, Paolo; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Guilak, Farshid

    2015-01-01

    Objective Mechanical factors play a critical role in the physiology and pathology of articular cartilage, although the mechanisms of mechanical signal transduction are not fully understood. We examined the hypothesis that type VI collagen is necessary for mechanotransduction in articular cartilage, by determining the effects of type VI collagen knockout on the activation of the mechano-osmosensitive calcium-permeable channel, transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), osmotically-induced chondrocyte swelling, and pericellular matrix (PCM) mechanical properties. Methods Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to image TRPV4-mediated calcium signaling and osmotically-induced cell swelling in intact femora from 2 and 9 month old wild type (WT) and type VI collagen deficient (Col6a1−/−) mice. Immunofluorescence-guided atomic force microscopy was used to map PCM mechanical properties based on the presence of perlecan. Results Hypo-osmotic stress induced TRPV4-mediated calcium signaling was increased in Col6a1−/− mice relative to WT controls at 2 months. Col6a1−/− mice exhibited significantly increased osmotically-induced cell swelling and decreased PCM moduli relative to WT controls at both ages. Conclusion In contrast to our original hypothesis, type VI collagen was not required for TRPV4-mediated Ca2+ signaling; however, knockout of type VI collagen altered the mechanical properties of the PCM, which in turn increased the extent of cell swelling and osmotically-induced TRPV4 signaling in an age-dependent manner. These findings emphasize the role of the PCM as a transducer of mechanical and physicochemical signals, and suggest that alterations in PCM properties, as may occur with aging or osteoarthritis, can influence mechanotransduction via TRPV4 or other ion channels. PMID:25604429

  9. 2-D finite difference time domain model of ultrasound reflection from normal and osteoarthritic human articular cartilage surface.

    PubMed

    Kaleva, Erna; Liukkonen, Jukka; Toyras, Juha; Saarakkala, Simo; Kiviranta, Panu; Jurvelin, Jukka

    2010-04-01

    Quantitative high-frequency ultrasonic evaluation of articular cartilage has shown a potential for the diagnosis of osteoarthritis, where the roughness of the surface, collagen and proteoglycan contents, and the density and mechanical properties of cartilage change concurrently. Experimentally, these factors are difficult to investigate individually and thus a numerical model is needed. The present study is the first one to use finite difference time domain modeling of pulse-echo measurements of articular cartilage. Ultrasound reflection from the surface was investigated with varying surface roughness, material parameters (Young's modulus, density, longitudinal, and transversal velocities) and inclination of the samples. The 2-D simulation results were compared with the results from experimental measurements of the same samples in an identical geometry. Both the roughness and the material parameters contributed significantly to the ultrasound reflection. The angular dependence of the ultrasound reflection was strong for a smooth cartilage surface but disappeared for the samples with a rougher surface. These results support the findings of previous experimental studies and indicate that ultrasound detects changes in the cartilage that are characteristic of osteoarthritis. In the present study there are differences between the results of the simulations and the experimental measurements. However, the systematic patterns in the experimental behavior are correctly reproduced by the model. In the future, our goal is to develop more realistic acoustic models incorporating inhomogeneity and anisotropy of the cartilage. PMID:20378451

  10. Insulin-like growth factor-1 suspended in hyaluronan improves cartilage and subchondral cancellous bone repair in osteoarthritis of temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Liu, X-W; Hu, J; Man, C; Zhang, B; Ma, Y-Q; Zhu, S-S

    2011-02-01

    This study sought to evaluate the effects of intra-articular injection of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) suspended in hyaluronan (HA) on the cartilage and subchondral cancellous bone repair in osteoarthritis (OA) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Disc perforation was performed bilaterally in rabbit TMJs to induce OA. Four groups of animals (n=12) received OA induction only, and either intra-articular HA injection alone, intra-articular IGF-1 injection alone, or a combination of HA and IGF-1 injection. All therapy was begun 4 weeks after OA induction. The animals were killed 12 or 24 weeks after the first injection, for histology and micro-CT examinations. Two additional animals were used as normal controls. Typical cartilage and subchondral cancellous bone lesions were observed in the OA group. No protective effect on cartilage and subchondral cancellous bone was found in the HA or IGF-1 alone groups. Better histological repair and nearly normal micro-architectural properties of the subchondral cancellous bone were observed in the HA+IGF-1 group compared with the HA or IGF-1 alone groups. HA may be used as an effective carrier for intra-articular injection of IGF-1 and the combination of HA/IGF-1 shows promise as a new rational approach to therapy of TMJ OA. PMID:21055904

  11. Hypoxia Potentiates Anabolic Effects of Exogenous Hyaluronic Acid in Rat Articular Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Ichimaru, Shohei; Nakagawa, Shuji; Arai, Yuji; Kishida, Tsunao; Shin-Ya, Masaharu; Honjo, Kuniaki; Tsuchida, Shinji; Inoue, Hiroaki; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Shimomura, Seiji; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is used clinically to treat osteoarthritis (OA), but its pharmacological effects under hypoxic conditions remain unclear. Articular chondrocytes in patients with OA are exposed to a hypoxic environment. This study investigated whether hypoxia could potentiate the anabolic effects of exogenous HA in rat articular cartilage and whether these mechanisms involved HA receptors. HA under hypoxic conditions significantly enhanced the expression of extracellular matrix genes and proteins in explant culture, as shown by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blotting, and dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) assays. Staining with Safranin-O and immunohistochemical staining with antibody to type II collagen were also enhanced in pellet culture. The expression of CD44 was increased by hypoxia and significantly suppressed by transfection with siRNAs targeting hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (siHIF-1α). These findings indicate that hypoxia potentiates the anabolic effects of exogenous HA by a mechanism in which HIF-1α positively regulates the expression of CD44, enhancing the binding affinity for exogenous HA. The anabolic effects of exogenous HA may increase as OA progresses. PMID:27347945

  12. Hypoxia Potentiates Anabolic Effects of Exogenous Hyaluronic Acid in Rat Articular Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Ichimaru, Shohei; Nakagawa, Shuji; Arai, Yuji; Kishida, Tsunao; Shin-Ya, Masaharu; Honjo, Kuniaki; Tsuchida, Shinji; Inoue, Hiroaki; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Shimomura, Seiji; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is used clinically to treat osteoarthritis (OA), but its pharmacological effects under hypoxic conditions remain unclear. Articular chondrocytes in patients with OA are exposed to a hypoxic environment. This study investigated whether hypoxia could potentiate the anabolic effects of exogenous HA in rat articular cartilage and whether these mechanisms involved HA receptors. HA under hypoxic conditions significantly enhanced the expression of extracellular matrix genes and proteins in explant culture, as shown by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blotting, and dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) assays. Staining with Safranin-O and immunohistochemical staining with antibody to type II collagen were also enhanced in pellet culture. The expression of CD44 was increased by hypoxia and significantly suppressed by transfection with siRNAs targeting hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (siHIF-1α). These findings indicate that hypoxia potentiates the anabolic effects of exogenous HA by a mechanism in which HIF-1α positively regulates the expression of CD44, enhancing the binding affinity for exogenous HA. The anabolic effects of exogenous HA may increase as OA progresses.

  13. Hypoxia Potentiates Anabolic Effects of Exogenous Hyaluronic Acid in Rat Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Ichimaru, Shohei; Nakagawa, Shuji; Arai, Yuji; Kishida, Tsunao; Shin-Ya, Masaharu; Honjo, Kuniaki; Tsuchida, Shinji; Inoue, Hiroaki; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Shimomura, Seiji; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is used clinically to treat osteoarthritis (OA), but its pharmacological effects under hypoxic conditions remain unclear. Articular chondrocytes in patients with OA are exposed to a hypoxic environment. This study investigated whether hypoxia could potentiate the anabolic effects of exogenous HA in rat articular cartilage and whether these mechanisms involved HA receptors. HA under hypoxic conditions significantly enhanced the expression of extracellular matrix genes and proteins in explant culture, as shown by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blotting, and dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) assays. Staining with Safranin-O and immunohistochemical staining with antibody to type II collagen were also enhanced in pellet culture. The expression of CD44 was increased by hypoxia and significantly suppressed by transfection with siRNAs targeting hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (siHIF-1α). These findings indicate that hypoxia potentiates the anabolic effects of exogenous HA by a mechanism in which HIF-1α positively regulates the expression of CD44, enhancing the binding affinity for exogenous HA. The anabolic effects of exogenous HA may increase as OA progresses. PMID:27347945

  14. Computational Wear Simulation of Patellofemoral Articular Cartilage during In Vitro Testing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lingmin; Patil, Shantanu; Steklov, Nick; Bae, Won; Temple-Wong, Michele; D'Lima, Darryl D.; Sah, Robert L.; Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2011-01-01

    Though changes in normal joint motions and loads (e.g., following anterior cruciate ligament injury) contribute to the development of knee osteoarthritis, the precise mechanism by which these changes induce osteoarthritis remains unknown. As a first step toward identifying this mechanism, this study evaluates computational wear simulations of a patellofemoral joint specimen wear tested on a knee simulator machine. A multi-body dynamic model of the specimen mounted in the simulator machine was constructed in commercial computer-aided engineering software. A custom elastic foundation contact model was used to calculate contact pressures and wear on the femoral and patellar articular surfaces using geometry created from laser scan and MR data. Two different wear simulation approaches were investigated – one that wore the surface geometries gradually over a sequence of 10 one-cycle dynamic simulations (termed the “progressive” approach), and one that wore the surface geometries abruptly using results from a single one-cycle dynamic simulation (termed the “non-progressive” approach). The progressive approach with laser scan geometry reproduced the experimentally measured wear depths and areas for both the femur and patella. The less costly non-progressive approach predicted deeper wear depths, especially on the patella, but had little influence on predicted wear areas. Use of MR data for creating the articular and subchondral bone geometry altered wear depth and area predictions by at most 13%. These results suggest that MR-derived geometry may be sufficient for simulating articular cartilage wear in vivo and that a progressive simulation approach may be needed for the patella and tibia since both remain in continuous contact with the femur. PMID:21453922

  15. International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) Recommended Guidelines for Histological Endpoints for Cartilage Repair Studies in Animal Models and Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Hoemann, Caroline; Kandel, Rita; Roberts, Sally; Saris, Daniel B.F.; Creemers, Laura; Mainil-Varlet, Pierre; Méthot, Stephane; Hollander, Anthony P.; Buschmann, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Cartilage repair strategies aim to resurface a lesion with osteochondral tissue resembling native cartilage, but a variety of repair tissues are usually observed. Histology is an important structural outcome that could serve as an interim measure of efficacy in randomized controlled clinical studies. The purpose of this article is to propose guidelines for standardized histoprocessing and unbiased evaluation of animal tissues and human biopsies. Methods were compiled from a literature review, and illustrative data were added. In animal models, treatments are usually administered to acute defects created in healthy tissues, and the entire joint can be analyzed at multiple postoperative time points. In human clinical therapy, treatments are applied to developed lesions, and biopsies are obtained, usually from a subset of patients, at a specific time point. In striving to standardize evaluation of structural endpoints in cartilage repair studies, 5 variables should be controlled: 1) location of biopsy/sample section, 2) timing of biopsy/sample recovery, 3) histoprocessing, 4) staining, and 5) blinded evaluation with a proper control group. Histological scores, quantitative histomorphometry of repair tissue thickness, percentage of tissue staining for collagens and glycosaminoglycan, polarized light microscopy for collagen fibril organization, and subchondral bone integration/structure are all relevant outcome measures that can be collected and used to assess the efficacy of novel therapeutics. Standardized histology methods could improve statistical analyses, help interpret and validate noninvasive imaging outcomes, and permit cross-comparison between studies. Currently, there are no suitable substitutes for histology in evaluating repair tissue quality and cartilaginous character. PMID:26069577

  16. Human articular cartilage in osteoarthrosis. I. The matrix. Transmission electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Montella, A; Manunta, A; Espa, E; Gasparini, G; De Santis, E; Gulisano, M

    1992-01-01

    The present research has been carried out with the aim of contributing to the understanding of morphological changes in human articular cartilage during osteoarthrosis and to evaluate the usefulness of TEM in this application. Only the matrix was examined in this first phase of study. Fragments from the femoral head of 20 patients subjected total hip arthroplasis, were studied by TEM after treatment with current procedures. The images obtained were considered observing the division of cartilage into superficial, intermediate and deep layers. Patients were divided according to the gravity of their clinical conditions. The least severe forms of pathology seem to involve only the superficial layer, which quickly loses the lamina splendens and may be affected by rarefactions of the matrix, which becomes fissured, while the deep layers are only slightly involved. During the later stages, the pathology progresses with irregularity of disposition and size of the collagen fibres and an increase in the number and size of fissures. The intermediate layer shows architectural disorder in the collagen fibres, even reaching the deep layer. The interfibrillar distance appears greater. As pathology progresses, the superficial layer tends to disappear, while the successive layers undergo progressive alteration in disposition and size of the collagen fibres. Globular aggregations of various dimensions and electron density similar to collagen are present in the deep layer. PMID:1288443

  17. A Biphasic Multiscale Study of the Mechanical Microenvironment of Chondrocytes within Articular Cartilage under Unconfined Compression

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongqiang; Maher, Suzanne A.; Torzilli, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Computational analyses have been used to study the biomechanical microenvironment of the chondrocyte that cannot be assessed by in vitro experimental studies; yet all computational studies thus far have focused on the effect of zonal location (superficial, middle, and deep) on the mechanical microenvironment of chondrocytes. The aim of this paper was to study the effect of both zonal and radial locations on the biomechanical microenvironment of chondrocytes in inhomogeneous cartilage under unconfined stress relaxation. A biphasic multiscale approach was employed and nine chondrocytes in different locations were studied. Hyperelastic biphasic theory and depth-dependent aggregate modulus and permeability of articular cartilage were included in the models. It was found that both zonal and radial locations affected the biomechanical stresses and strains of the chondrocytes. Chondrocytes in the mid-radial location had increased volume during the early stage of the loading process. Maximum principal shear stress at the interface between the chondrocyte and the extracellular matrix (ECM) increased with depth, yet that at the ECM-pericellular matrix (PCM) interface had an inverse trend. Fluid pressure decreased with depth, while the fluid pressure difference between the top and bottom boundaries of the microscale model increased with depth. Regardless of location, fluid was exchanged between the chondrocyte, PCM, and ECM. These findings suggested that even under simple compressive loading conditions, the biomechanical microenvironment of the chondrocytes, PCM and ECM were spatially dependent. The current study provides new insight on chondrocyte biomechanics. PMID:24882738

  18. MRI properties of a unique hypo-intense layer in degraded articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nian; Badar, Farid; Xia, Yang

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the characteristics of a hypo-intense laminar appearance in articular cartilage under external loading, microscopic magnetic resonance imaging (μMRI) T1, T2 and T1ρ experiments of a total of 15 specimens of healthy and trypsin-degraded cartilage were performed at different soaking solutions (saline and 100 mM phosphate buffered saline (PBS)). T2 and T1ρ images of the healthy tissue in saline showed no load-induced laminar appearance, while a hypo-intense layer was clearly visible in the deep part of the degraded tissue at the magic angle. A significant difference was found between T2 values at 0° and 55° (from 16.5  ±  2.8 ms to 20.2  ±  2.7 ms, p  =  0.0005), and at 0° and 90° (16.5  ±  2.8 ms to 21.3  ±  2.6 ms, p  <  0.0001) in saline solution. In contrast, this hypo-intense laminar appearance largely disappeared when tissue was soaked in PBS. The visualization of this hypo-intensity appearance in different soaking mediums calls for caution in interpreting the data of relaxation times, chemical exchange and collagen fiber deformation.

  19. Unique glycosignature for intervertebral disc and articular cartilage cells and tissues in immaturity and maturity

    PubMed Central

    Collin, E. C.; Kilcoyne, M.; White, S. J.; Grad, S.; Alini, M.; Joshi, L.; Pandit, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, on/off markers for intervertebral disc (IVD) and articular cartilage (AC) cells (chondrocytes) and distinct glycoprofiles of cell and tissue-types were identified from immaturity to maturity. Three and eleven month-old ovine IVD and AC tissues were histochemically profiled with a panel of lectins and antibodies. Relationships between tissue and cell types were analysed by hierarchical clustering. Chondroitin sulfate (CS) composition of annulus fibrosus (AF), nucleus pulposus (NP) and AC tissues was determined by HPLC analysis. Clear on/off cell type markers were identified, which enabled the discrimination of chondrocytes, AF and NP cells. AF and NP cells were distinguishable using MAA, SNA-I, SBA and WFA lectins, which bound to both NP cells and chondrocytes but not AF cells. Chondrocytes were distinguished from NP and AF cells with a specific binding of LTA and PNA lectins to chondrocytes. Each tissue showed a unique CS composition with a distinct switch in sulfation pattern in AF and NP tissues upon disc maturity while cartilage maintained the same sulfation pattern over time. In conclusion, distinct glycoprofiles for cell and tissue-types across age groups were identified in addition to altered CS composition and sulfation patterns for tissue types upon maturity. PMID:26965377

  20. Gene expression profile of the cartilage tissue spontaneously regenerated in vivo by using a novel double-network gel: Comparisons with the normal articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We have recently found a phenomenon that spontaneous regeneration of a hyaline cartilage-like tissue can be induced in a large osteochondral defect by implanting a double-network (DN) hydrogel plug, which was composed of poly-(2-Acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid) and poly-(N, N'-Dimetyl acrylamide), at the bottom of the defect. The purpose of this study was to clarify gene expression profile of the regenerated tissue in comparison with that of the normal articular cartilage. Methods We created a cylindrical osteochondral defect in the rabbit femoral grooves. Then, we implanted the DN gel plug at the bottom of the defect. At 2 and 4 weeks after surgery, the regenerated tissue was analyzed using DNA microarray and immunohistochemical examinations. Results The gene expression profiles of the regenerated tissues were macroscopically similar to the normal cartilage, but showed some minor differences. The expression degree of COL2A1, COL1A2, COL10A1, DCN, FMOD, SPARC, FLOD2, CHAD, CTGF, and COMP genes was greater in the regenerated tissue than in the normal cartilage. The top 30 genes that expressed 5 times or more in the regenerated tissue as compared with the normal cartilage included type-2 collagen, type-10 collagen, FN, vimentin, COMP, EF1alpha, TFCP2, and GAPDH genes. Conclusions The tissue regenerated by using the DN gel was genetically similar but not completely identical to articular cartilage. The genetic data shown in this study are useful for future studies to identify specific genes involved in spontaneous cartilage regeneration. PMID:21955995

  1. The Relationship between MR Parameters and Biomechanical Quantities of Loaded Human Articular Cartilage in Osteoarthritis: An In-Vitro Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juráš, V.; Szomolányi, P.; Gäbler, S.; Frollo, I.; Trattnig, S.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the changes in MRI parameters during applied load directly in MR scanner and correlate these changes with biomechanical parameters of human articular cartilage. Cartilage explants from patients who underwent total knee replacement were examined in the micro-imaging system in 3T scanner. Respective MRI parameters (T1 without- and T1 with contrast agent as a marker of proteoglycan content, T2 as a marker of collagen network anisotropy and ADC as a measure of diffusivity) were calculated in pre- and during compression state. Subsequently, these parameters were compared to the biomechanical properties of articular cartilage, instantaneous modulus (I), equilibrium modulus (Eq) and time of tissue relaxation (τ). Significant load-induced changes of T2 and ADC were recorded. High correlation between T1Gd and I (r = 0.6324), and between ADC and Eq (r = -0.4884) was found. Multi-parametric MRI may have great potential in analyzing static and dynamic biomechanical behavior of articular cartilage in early stages of osteoarthritis (OA).

  2. Biochemical and physiochemical characterization of pepsin-solubilized type-II collagen from bovine articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Herbage, D; Bouillet, J; Bernengo, J C

    1977-01-01

    Solubilization of collagen from bovine articular with pepsin requires the preliminary extraction of proteoglycans from the ground substance. Biochemical and physiochemical properties of this pepsin-solubilized collagen are independent of the pretreatment (extraction with 1.5M-CaCl2, 5M-guanidinium chloride or 0.2M-NaOH) and of the age range (2-4-year-old and 2-month-old animals). Characterization of the de-natured components, of the CNBr peptides and of the amino acid and cross-link composition shows that the collagen of the hyaline cartilage is all type II. Electrical birefringence measurements showed the presence of tropocollagen molecules (length 280nm) and molecules whose length is slightly less than twice that of the tropocollagen molecules. This latter molecule may be a dimer composed of two monomers linked by intermolecular head-to-tail bonds and whose theoretical length (530nm), according to the quarter-stagger theory, is in good agreement with our measured values (510-530nm). We have verified that the beta-components of this collagen are formed of two alpha-chains linked by the stable intermolecular bond, dehydrodihydroxylysinonorleucine. These dimeric molecules are absent from solutions of skin collagen whose beta-components possess only aldol-type intramolecular cross-links. Although reconstituted fibres from solutions of skin and cartilage collagen are similar, the segment-long spacing crystallites formed with pepsin-solubilized cartilage collagen present a symmetrical and dimeric form corresponding to the lateral aggregation of two monomers with an overlap (90nm) of the C-terminal ends. Images PLATE 1 PLATE 2 PLATE 3 PMID:322656

  3. 24R,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Protects against Articular Cartilage Damage following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Transection in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Boyan, Barbara D; Hyzy, Sharon L; Pan, Qingfen; Scott, Kayla M; Coutts, Richard D; Healey, Robert; Schwartz, Zvi

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) in humans is associated with low circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3]. In vitamin D replete rats, radiolabeled 24R,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [24R,25(OH)2D3] accumulates in articular cartilage following injection of [3H]-25(OH)D3. Previously, we showed that 24R,25(OH)2D3 blocks chondrocyte apoptosis via phospholipase D and p53, suggesting a role for 24R,25(OH)2D3 in maintaining cartilage health. We examined the ability of 24R,25(OH)2D3 to prevent degenerative changes in articular cartilage in an OA-like environment and the potential mechanisms involved. In vitro, rat articular chondrocytes were treated with IL-1β with and without 24R,25(OH)2D3 or 1α,25(OH)2D3. 24R,25(OH)2D3 but not 1α,25(OH)2D3 blocked the effects of IL-1β in a dose-dependent manner, and its effect was partially mediated through the TGF-β1 signaling pathway. In vivo, unilateral anterior cruciate ligament transections were performed in immunocompetent rats followed by intra-articular injections of 24R,25(OH)2D3 or vehicle (t = 0, 7, 14, 21 days). Tissues were harvested on day 28. Joints treated with vehicle had changes typical of OA whereas joints treated with 24R,25(OH)2D3 had less articular cartilage damage and levels of inflammatory mediators. These results indicate that 24R,25(OH)2D3 protects against OA, and suggest that it may be a therapeutic approach for preventing trauma-induced osteoarthritis. PMID:27575371

  4. 24R,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Protects against Articular Cartilage Damage following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Transection in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Boyan, Barbara D.; Hyzy, Sharon L.; Pan, Qingfen; Scott, Kayla M.; Coutts, Richard D.; Healey, Robert; Schwartz, Zvi

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) in humans is associated with low circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3]. In vitamin D replete rats, radiolabeled 24R,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [24R,25(OH)2D3] accumulates in articular cartilage following injection of [3H]-25(OH)D3. Previously, we showed that 24R,25(OH)2D3 blocks chondrocyte apoptosis via phospholipase D and p53, suggesting a role for 24R,25(OH)2D3 in maintaining cartilage health. We examined the ability of 24R,25(OH)2D3 to prevent degenerative changes in articular cartilage in an OA-like environment and the potential mechanisms involved. In vitro, rat articular chondrocytes were treated with IL-1β with and without 24R,25(OH)2D3 or 1α,25(OH)2D3. 24R,25(OH)2D3 but not 1α,25(OH)2D3 blocked the effects of IL-1β in a dose-dependent manner, and its effect was partially mediated through the TGF-β1 signaling pathway. In vivo, unilateral anterior cruciate ligament transections were performed in immunocompetent rats followed by intra-articular injections of 24R,25(OH)2D3 or vehicle (t = 0, 7, 14, 21 days). Tissues were harvested on day 28. Joints treated with vehicle had changes typical of OA whereas joints treated with 24R,25(OH)2D3 had less articular cartilage damage and levels of inflammatory mediators. These results indicate that 24R,25(OH)2D3 protects against OA, and suggest that it may be a therapeutic approach for preventing trauma-induced osteoarthritis. PMID:27575371

  5. The collagen structure of equine articular cartilage characterized using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography and non-linear microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, Jessica C.; Ugryumova, Nadya; Knapp, Karen M.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2006-09-01

    Equine articular cartilage has been imaged using both polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) and non-linear microscopy. PS-OCT has been used to spatially map the birefringence in the cartilage and we have found that in the vicinity of the lesion the images display a characteristic disruption in the regular birefringence bands shown by normal cartilage. We also note that significant (e.g. x2) variations in the apparent birefringence of samples taken from young (18 month) animals that otherwise appear visually homogeneous are found over spatial scales of a few millimeters. We have also imaged the cartilage using non-linear microscopy and compare the scans taken with second harmonic generation (SHG) light and the two photon fluorescence (TPF) light. SHG images collected using 800 nm excitation reveals the spatial distribution of collagen fibers, whilst TPF images clearly shows the distribution of intracellular and pericellular fluorophores.

  6. Developmentally Inspired Combined Mechanical and Biochemical Signaling Approach on Zonal Lineage Commitment of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Articular Cartilage Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Tahereh; Barati, Danial; Karaman, Ozan; Moeinzadeh, Sina; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage is organized into multiple zones including superficial, middle and calcified zones with distinct cellular and extracellular components to impart lubrication, compressive strength, and rigidity for load transmission to bone, respectively. During native cartilage tissue development, changes in biochemical, mechanical, and cellular factors direct the formation of stratified structure of articular cartilage. The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of combined gradients in cell density, matrix stiffness, and zone-specific growth factors on the zonal organization of articular cartilage. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were encapsulated in acrylate-functionalized lactide-chain-extended polyethylene glycol (SPELA) gels simulating cell density and stiffness of the superficial, middle and calcified zones. The cell-encapsulated gels were cultivated in medium supplemented with growth factors specific to each zone and the expression of zone-specific markers was measured with incubation time. Encapsulation of 60×106 cells/mL hMSCs in a soft gel (80 kPa modulus) and cultivation with a combination of TGF-β1 (3 ng/mL) and BMP-7 (100 ng/mL) led to the expression of markers for the superficial zone. Conversely, encapsulation of 15×106 cells/mL hMSCs in a stiff gel (320 MPa modulus) and cultivation with a combination of TGF-β1 (30 ng/mL) and hydroxyapatite (3%) led to the expression of markers for the calcified zone. Further, encapsulation of 20×106 cells/mL hMSCs in a gel with 2.1 MPa modulus and cultivation with a combination of TGF-β1 (30 ng/mL) and IGF-1 (100 ng/mL) led to up-regulation of the middle zone markers. Results demonstrate that a developmental approach with gradients in cell density, matrix stiffness, and zone-specific growth factors can potentially regenerate zonal structure of the articular cartilage. PMID:25387395

  7. Next Generation Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC)–Based Cartilage Repair Using Scaffold-Free Tissue Engineered Constructs Generated with Synovial Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shimomura, Kazunori; Ando, Wataru; Moriguchi, Yu; Sugita, Norihiko; Yasui, Yukihiko; Koizumi, Kota; Fujie, Hiromichi; Hart, David A.; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Because of its limited healing capacity, treatments for articular cartilage injuries are still challenging. Since the first report by Brittberg, autologous chondrocyte implantation has been extensively studied. Recently, as an alternative for chondrocyte-based therapy, mesenchymal stem cell–based therapy has received considerable research attention because of the relative ease in handling for tissue harvest, and subsequent cell expansion and differentiation. This review summarizes latest development of stem cell therapies in cartilage repair with special attention to scaffold-free approaches. PMID:27340513

  8. Early articular cartilage degeneration in a developmental dislocation of the hip model results from activation of β-catenin.

    PubMed

    Ning, Bo; Sun, Jun; Yuan, Yi; Yao, Jie; Wang, Peng; Ma, Ruixue

    2014-01-01

    Developmental dislocation or dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is one of the most common deformities in children. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent long-term complication. The molecular mechanism of early articular cartilage degeneration in DDH is still unclear. It is well known that β-catenin plays a crucial role in articular cartilage degeneration. The objective of this study was to verify the relationship between β-catenin and DDH cartilage degeneration. We used a DDH model that was established by modification of swaddling position in newborn Wistar rats. The hips were isolated from the DDH model rats and untreated control group at the age of 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks. β-Catenin gene and protein were investigated by quantitative (q)RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Collagen X and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, markers of early cartilage degeneration, were assessed by qRT-PCR. Primary chondrocytes were cultured from cartilage of two groups at the age of 8 weeks. Expression of β-catenin, collagen X and MMP-13 was detected. Continued high expression of β-catenin was observed in cartilage from DDH model rats. mRNA and protein expression of β-catenin was significantly increased in primary chondrocytes of the DDH model compared with the control group. Collagen X and MMP-13 expression was higher in the cartilage and chondrocytes from DDH model rats than the control group. Our findings suggest that early cartilage degeneration in DDH may result from activation of β-catenin signaling. PMID:24817933

  9. Nociceptive Sensitizers Are Regulated in Damaged Joint Tissues, Including Articular Cartilage, When Osteoarthritic Mice Display Pain Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Clare; Chanalaris, Anastasios; Knights, Chancie; Ismail, Heba; Sacitharan, Pradeep K.; Gentry, Clive; Bevan, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Objective Pain is the most common symptom of osteoarthritis (OA), yet where it originates in the joint and how it is driven are unknown. The aim of this study was to identify pain‐sensitizing molecules that are regulated in the joint when mice subjected to surgical joint destabilization develop OA‐related pain behavior, the tissues in which these molecules are being regulated, and the factors that control their regulation. Methods Ten‐week‐old mice underwent sham surgery, partial meniscectomy, or surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM). Pain‐related behavior as determined by a variety of methods (testing of responses to von Frey filaments, cold plate testing for cold sensitivity, analgesiometry, incapacitance testing, and forced flexion testing) was assessed weekly. Once pain‐related behavior was established, RNA was extracted from either whole joints or microdissected tissue samples (articular cartilage, meniscus, and bone). Reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed to analyze the expression of 54 genes known to regulate pain sensitization. Cartilage injury assays were performed using avulsed immature hips from wild‐type or genetically modified mice or by explanting articular cartilage from porcine joints preinjected with pharmacologic inhibitors. Levels of nerve growth factor (NGF) protein were measured by enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assay. Results Mice developed pain‐related behavior 8 weeks after undergoing partial meniscectomy or 12 weeks after undergoing DMM. NGF, bradykinin receptors B1 and B2, tachykinin, and tachykinin receptor 1 were significantly regulated in the joints of mice displaying pain‐related behavior. Little regulation of inflammatory cytokines, leukocyte activation markers, or chemokines was observed. When tissue samples from articular cartilage, meniscus, and bone were analyzed separately, NGF was consistently regulated in the articular cartilage. The other pain sensitizers were

  10. Intact Pericellular Matrix of Articular Cartilage Is Required for Unactivated Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 in the Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lin; Polur, Ilona; Servais, Jacqueline M.; Hsieh, Sirena; Lee, Peter L.; Goldring, Mary B.; Li, Yefu

    2011-01-01

    Increased expression of the discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) results from its interaction with collagen type II. This induces expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, leading to osteoarthritis (OA). To investigate the impact of the pericellular matrix of chondrocytes on DDR2, we generated a mouse model with inducible overexpression of DDR2 in cartilage. Conditional overexpression of DDR2 in mature mouse articular cartilage was controlled via the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein promoter using the Tet-Off-inducible system. Doxycycline was withdrawn at 1 month of age, and knee joints were examined at 2, 3, and 4 months of age. Microsurgery was performed on 3-month-old transgenic mice overexpressing DDR2 to destabilize the medial meniscus, and serial paraffin sections were examined at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after surgery. DDR2 expression increased in the knee joints of transgenic mice. However, the increased DDR2 did not induce MMP-13 expression. No OA-like changes were observed in the transgenic mice at the age of 4 months. When transgenic mice were subjected to destabilizing of the medial meniscus, we observed accelerated progression to OA, which was associated with DDR2 activation. Therefore, conditionally overexpressing DDR2 in the mature articular cartilage of mouse knee joints requires activation to induce OA, and altered biomechanical stress can accelerate the onset of cartilage loss and progression to OA in transgenic mice. PMID:21855682

  11. Physiological assessment of in vivo human knee articular cartilage using sodium MR imaging at 1.5 T.

    PubMed

    Hani, Ahmad Fadzil Mohd; Kumar, Dileep; Malik, Aamir Saeed; Razak, Ruslan

    2013-09-01

    Osteoarthritis is a common joint disorder that is most prevalent in the knee joint. Knee osteoarthritis (OA) can be characterized by the gradual loss of articular cartilage (AC). Formation of lesion, fissures and cracks on the cartilage surface has been associated with degenerative AC and can be measured by morphological assessment. In addition, loss of proteoglycan from extracellular matrix of the AC can be measured at early stage of cartilage degradation by physiological assessment. In this case, a biochemical phenomenon of cartilage is used to assess the changes at early degeneration of AC. In this paper, a method to measure local sodium concentration in AC due to proteoglycan has been investigated. A clinical 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with multinuclear spectroscopic facility is used to acquire sodium images and quantify local sodium content of AC. An optimised 3D gradient-echo sequence with low echo time has been used for MR scan. The estimated sodium concentration in AC region from four different data sets is found to be ~225±19mmol/l, which matches the values that has been reported for the normal AC. This study shows that sodium images acquired at clinical 1.5-T MRI system can generate an adequate quantitative data that enable the estimation of sodium concentration in AC. We conclude that this method is potentially suitable for non-invasive physiological (sodium content) measurement of articular cartilage.

  12. Concepts in regenerative medicine: Past, present, and future in articular cartilage treatment.

    PubMed

    Anz, Adam W; Bapat, Asawari; Murrell, William D

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is emerging with great interest and hope from patients, industry, academia, and medical professionals. Cartilage regeneration, restoration, or repair is one of the prime targets that remains largely unsolved, and many believe that regenerative medicine can possibly deliver solutions that can be widely used to address the current gap(s) in treatment. In the United States, Europe, Australia, and India the regulation of regenerative based treatments has become a big debate. Although the rules and regulations remain unclear, clinicians that are interested should carry-on with the best available guidelines to ensure safety and compliance during delivery in clinical practice to avoid regulatory infraction. Many have made significant investment of time, resources, and facilities in recent years to provide new regenerative treatment options and advance medical care for patients. Instead of reinventing the wheel, it would be more efficient to adopt currently accepted standards and nomenclature borrowed from transplantation science, and cord blood storage industries. The purposes of this article are to provide some historical background to the field of regenerative medicine as it applies to cartilage, and how this field has developed. This will be followed by a separate discussion on regulatory oversight and input and how it has influenced access to care. Furthermore, we discuss current clinical techniques and progress, and ways to deliver these treatments to patients safely, effectively, and in a cost sensitive manner, concluding with an overview of some of the promising regenerative techniques specific to cartilage. PMID:27489407

  13. Multicomponent T2 Analysis of Articular Cartilage With Synovial Fluid Partial Volume Correction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Chaudhary, Rajeev; Block, Walter F.; Samsonov, Alexey; Kijowski, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the use of a three-pool model to account for the confounding effects of synovial fluid on multicomponent T2 analysis of articular cartilage using Multicomponent Driven Equilibrium Single Shot Observation of T1 and T2 (mcDESPOT). Materials and Methods mcDESPOT was performed on the knee of eight asymptomatic volunteers and eight patients with osteoarthritis at 3.0T with multicomponent T2 maps created using the two-pool model and a three-pool model containing a nonexchanging synovial fluid water pool. The fraction of the fast-relaxing water component (FF) and the T2 relaxation times for the fast-relaxing (T2F) and slow-relaxing (T2S) water components were measured in the superficial and deep layers of patellar cartilage using the two-pool and three-pool models in asymptomatic volunteers and patients with osteoarthritis and were compared using Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Results Within the superficial layer of patellar cartilage, FF was 22.5% and 25.6% for asymptomatic volunteers and 21.3% and 22.8% for patients with osteoarthritis when using the two-pool and three-pool models, respectively, while T2S was 73.9 msec and 62.0 msec for asymptomatic volunteers and 72.0 msec and 63.1 msec for patients with osteoarthritis when using the two-pool and three-pool models, respectively. For both asymptomatic volunteers and patients with osteoarthritis, the two-pool model provided significantly (P < 0.05) lower FF and higher T2S than the three-pool model, likely due to the effects of synovial fluid partial volume averaging. Conclusion The effects of partial volume averaging between superficial cartilage and synovial fluid may result in biased multicomponent T2 measurements that can be corrected using an mcDESPOT three-pool model containing a nonexchanging synovial fluid water pool. PMID:26435385

  14. Tantalum oxide nanoparticles for the imaging of articular cartilage using X-ray computed tomography: visualization of ex vivo/in vivo murine tibia and ex vivo human index finger cartilage.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Jonathan D; Lusic, Hrvoje; Snyder, Brian D; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2014-08-01

    The synthesis and characterization of tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) nanoparticles (NPs) as new X-ray contrast media for microcomputed tomography (μCT) imaging of articular cartilage are reported. NPs, approximately 5-10 nm in size, and possessing distinct surface charges, were synthesized using phosphonate (neutral), ammonium (cationic), and carboxylate (anionic) ligands as end functional groups. Assessment of a cartilage defect in a human cadaver distal metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint with the ammonium nanoparticles showed good visualization of damage and preferential uptake in areas surrounding the defect. Finally, an optimized nontoxic cationic NP contrast agent was evaluated in an in vivo murine model and the cartilage was imaged. These nanoparticles represent a new type of contrast agent for imaging articular cartilage, and the results demonstrate the importance of surface charge in the design of nanoparticulate agents for targeting the surface or interior zones of articular cartilage.

  15. Melanocortin 1 Receptor-Signaling Deficiency Results in an Articular Cartilage Phenotype and Accelerates Pathogenesis of Surgically Induced Murine Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hackmayer, Gerit; Greth, Carina; Bauer, Richard J.; Kleinschmidt, Kerstin; Bettenworth, Dominik; Böhm, Markus; Grifka, Joachim; Grässel, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides exert pleiotropic effects via binding to melanocortin receptors (MCR). MCR-subtypes have been detected in cartilage and bone and mediate an increasing number of effects in diathrodial joints. This study aims to determine the role of MC1-receptors (MC1) in joint physiology and pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA) using MC1-signaling deficient mice (Mc1re/e). OA was surgically induced in Mc1re/e and wild-type (WT) mice by transection of the medial meniscotibial ligament. Histomorphometry of Safranin O stained articular cartilage was performed with non-operated controls (11 weeks and 6 months) and 4/8 weeks past surgery. µCT–analysis for assessing epiphyseal bone architecture was performed as a longitudinal study at 4/8 weeks after OA-induction. Collagen II, ICAM-1 and MC1 expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry. Mc1re/e mice display less Safranin O and collagen II stained articular cartilage area compared to WT prior to OA-induction without signs of spontaneous cartilage surface erosion. This MC1-signaling deficiency related cartilage phenotype persisted in 6 month animals. At 4/8 weeks after OA-induction cartilage erosions were increased in Mc1re/e knees paralleled by weaker collagen II staining. Prior to OA-induction, Mc1re/e mice do not differ from WT with respect to bone parameters. During OA, Mc1re/e mice developed more osteophytes and had higher epiphyseal bone density and mass. Trabecular thickness was increased while concomitantly trabecular separation was decreased in Mc1re/e mice. Numbers of ICAM-positive chondrocytes were equal in non-operated 11 weeks Mc1re/e and WT whereas number of positive chondrocytes decreased during OA-progression. Unchallenged Mc1re/e mice display smaller articular cartilage covered area without OA-related surface erosions indicating that MC1-signaling is critical for proper cartilage matrix integrity and formation. When challenged with OA, Mc1re/e mice develop a more severe OA

  16. Ultrastructural study of upper surface layer in rat articular cartilage by "in vivo cryotechnique" combined with various treatments.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, M; Leng, C G; Toriumi, H; Hamada, Y; Akamatsu, N; Ohno, S

    2000-01-01

    The ultrastructures of the upper surface layer of rat articular cartilage were studied with our "in vivo cryotechnique" followed by freeze-substitution method for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) or transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Rat hip or knee articular cartilage was quickly frozen by the in vivo cryotechnique with liquid isopentane-propane cryogen (-193 degrees C), and surface areas of some frozen specimens were freeze-fractured with a scalpel in liquid nitrogen. They were freeze-substituted and freeze-dried, ion-sputtered, and then observed in SEM. Other frozen specimens were routinely freeze-substituted and embedded in epoxy resin for TEM. Many globular structures were detected in the thick upper surface layer that had not been revealed by the conventional fixation methods. Their sizes were reduced by Triton X-100 treatment, and their localization was also detected in synovial fluid, as revealed by SEM. Such globular lipid-like structures in the upper surface layer of hip or knee articular cartilage might contribute to joint lubrication. PMID:11810453

  17. Synthesis and characterization of a lubricin mimic (mLub) to reduce friction and adhesion on the articular cartilage surface.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Alexandra; Xu, Xin; Bible, Melissa D; Calve, Sarah; Neu, Corey P; Panitch, Alyssa

    2015-12-01

    The lubricating proteoglycan, lubricin, facilitates the remarkable low friction and wear properties of articular cartilage in the synovial joints of the body. Lubricin lines the joint surfaces and plays a protective role as a boundary lubricant in sliding contact; decreased expression of lubricin is associated with cartilage degradation and the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis. An unmet need for early osteoarthritis treatment is the development of therapeutic molecules that mimic lubricin function and yet are also resistant to enzymatic degradation common in the damaged joint. Here, we engineered a lubricin mimic (mLub) that is less susceptible to enzymatic degradation and binds to the articular surface to reduce friction. mLub was synthesized using a chondroitin sulfate backbone with type II collagen and hyaluronic acid (HA) binding peptides to promote interaction with the articular surface and synovial fluid constituents. In vitro and in vivo characterization confirmed the binding ability of mLub to isolated type II collagen and HA, and to the cartilage surface. Following trypsin treatment to the cartilage surface, application of mLub, in combination with purified or commercially available hyaluronan, reduced the coefficient of friction, and adhesion, to control levels as assessed over macro-to micro-scales by rheometry and atomic force microscopy. In vivo studies demonstrate an mLub residency time of less than 1 week. Enhanced lubrication by mLub reduces surface friction and adhesion, which may suppress the progression of degradation and cartilage loss in the joint. mLub therefore shows potential for treatment in early osteoarthritis following injury.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of a lubricin mimic (mLub) to reduce friction and adhesion on the articular cartilage surface.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Alexandra; Xu, Xin; Bible, Melissa D; Calve, Sarah; Neu, Corey P; Panitch, Alyssa

    2015-12-01

    The lubricating proteoglycan, lubricin, facilitates the remarkable low friction and wear properties of articular cartilage in the synovial joints of the body. Lubricin lines the joint surfaces and plays a protective role as a boundary lubricant in sliding contact; decreased expression of lubricin is associated with cartilage degradation and the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis. An unmet need for early osteoarthritis treatment is the development of therapeutic molecules that mimic lubricin function and yet are also resistant to enzymatic degradation common in the damaged joint. Here, we engineered a lubricin mimic (mLub) that is less susceptible to enzymatic degradation and binds to the articular surface to reduce friction. mLub was synthesized using a chondroitin sulfate backbone with type II collagen and hyaluronic acid (HA) binding peptides to promote interaction with the articular surface and synovial fluid constituents. In vitro and in vivo characterization confirmed the binding ability of mLub to isolated type II collagen and HA, and to the cartilage surface. Following trypsin treatment to the cartilage surface, application of mLub, in combination with purified or commercially available hyaluronan, reduced the coefficient of friction, and adhesion, to control levels as assessed over macro-to micro-scales by rheometry and atomic force microscopy. In vivo studies demonstrate an mLub residency time of less than 1 week. Enhanced lubrication by mLub reduces surface friction and adhesion, which may suppress the progression of degradation and cartilage loss in the joint. mLub therefore shows potential for treatment in early osteoarthritis following injury. PMID:26398308

  19. Determining collagen distribution in articular cartilage using contrast-enhanced micro-computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nieminen, H.J.; Ylitalo, T.; Karhula, S.; Suuronen, J.-P.; Kauppinen, S.; Serimaa, R.; Hæggström, E.; Pritzker, K.P.H.; Valkealahti, M.; Lehenkari, P.; Finnilä, M.; Saarakkala, S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective Collagen distribution within articular cartilage (AC) is typically evaluated from histological sections, e.g., using collagen staining and light microscopy (LM). Unfortunately, all techniques based on histological sections are time-consuming, destructive, and without extraordinary effort, limited to two dimensions. This study investigates whether phosphotungstic acid (PTA) and phosphomolybdic acid (PMA), two collagen-specific markers and X-ray absorbers, could (1) produce contrast for AC X-ray imaging or (2) be used to detect collagen distribution within AC. Method We labeled equine AC samples with PTA or PMA and imaged them with micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) at pre-defined time points 0, 18, 36, 54, 72, 90, 180, 270 h during staining. The micro-CT image intensity was compared with collagen distributions obtained with a reference technique, i.e., Fourier-transform infrared imaging (FTIRI). The labeling time and contrast agent producing highest association (Pearson correlation, Bland–Altman analysis) between FTIRI collagen distribution and micro-CT -determined PTA distribution was selected for human AC. Results Both, PTA and PMA labeling permitted visualization of AC features using micro-CT in non-calcified cartilage. After labeling the samples for 36 h in PTA, the spatial distribution of X-ray attenuation correlated highly with the collagen distribution determined by FTIRI in both equine (mean ± S.D. of the Pearson correlation coefficients, r = 0.96 ± 0.03, n = 12) and human AC (r = 0.82 ± 0.15, n = 4). Conclusions PTA-induced X-ray attenuation is a potential marker for non-destructive detection of AC collagen distributions in 3D. This approach opens new possibilities in development of non-destructive 3D histopathological techniques for characterization of OA. PMID:26003951

  20. Concentration profiles of collagen and proteoglycan in articular cartilage by Fourier transform infrared imaging and principal component regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jianhua; Xia, Yang; Lu, Mei

    2012-03-01

    Fourier-transform infrared imaging (FT-IRI) technique with the principal component regression (PCR) method was used to quantitatively determine the 2D images and the depth-dependent concentration profiles of two principal macromolecular components (collagen and proteoglycan) in articular cartilage. Ten 6 μm thick sections of canine humeral cartilage were imaged at a pixel size of 6.25 μm in FT-IRI. The infrared spectra extracted from FT-IRI experiments were imported into a PCR program to calculate the quantitative distributions of both collagen and proteoglycan in dry cartilage, which were subsequently converted into the wet-weight based concentration profiles. The proteoglycan profiles by FT-IRI and PCR significantly correlated in linear regression with the proteoglycan profiles by the non-destructive μMRI (the goodness-of-fit 0.96 and the Pearson coefficient 0.98). Based on these concentration relationships, the concentration images of collagen and proteoglycan in both healthy and lesioned articular cartilage were successfully constructed two dimensionally. The simultaneous construction of both collagen and proteoglycan concentration images demonstrates that this combined imaging and chemometrics approach could be used as a sensitive tool to accurately resolve and visualize the concentration distributions of macromolecules in biological tissues.

  1. Pathology of articular cartilage and synovial membrane from elbow joints with and without degenerative joint disease in domestic cats.

    PubMed

    Freire, M; Meuten, D; Lascelles, D

    2014-09-01

    The elbow joint is one of the feline appendicular joints most commonly and severely affected by degenerative joint disease. The macroscopic and histopathological lesions of the elbow joints of 30 adult cats were evaluated immediately after euthanasia. Macroscopic evidence of degenerative joint disease was found in 22 of 30 cats (39 elbow joints) (73.33% cats; 65% elbow joints), and macroscopic cartilage erosion ranged from mild fibrillation to complete ulceration of the hyaline cartilage with exposure of the subchondral bone. Distribution of the lesions in the cartilage indicated the presence of medial compartment joint disease (most severe lesions located in the medial coronoid process of the ulna and medial humeral epicondyle). Synovitis scores were mild overall and correlated only weakly with macroscopic cartilage damage. Intra-articular osteochondral fragments either free or attached to the synovium were found in 10 joints. Macroscopic or histologic evidence of a fragmented coronoid process was not found even in those cases with intra-articular osteochondral fragments. Lesions observed in these animals are most consistent with synovial osteochondromatosis secondary to degenerative joint disease. The pathogenesis for the medial compartmentalization of these lesions has not been established, but a fragmented medial coronoid process or osteochondritis dissecans does not appear to play a role.

  2. Effects of holmium:YAG laser on equine articular cartilage and subchondral bone adjacent to traumatic lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Michael A.; Haugland, L. Mark; Bellamy, Janine; Johnson, Lanny L.; Rohrer, Michael D.; Walls, Robert C.; Bartels, Kenneth E.

    1994-09-01

    The effects of Ho:YAG laser energy on articular cartilage and subchondral bone adjacent to traumatically created cartilage lesions in a continuous weight-bearing model were investigated. The 2.1 micrometers wavelength was delivered in hand-controlled contact and near-contact hard tissue arthroscopic surgery in a saline medium. Bilateral arthroscopy was performed on normal antebrachiocarpal and intercarpal joints of four adult horses. One-hundred twenty traumatic lesions were created on three weight-bearing articular surfaces with a knife, curette, or a motorized burr. Depths of the lesions were partial and full thickness. Configurations of the lesions were lacerations, scrapes, and craters. Left limbs were used as controls. Right limb lesions were treated with various intensities of laser energy. Animals were sacrificed at intervals of 1, 3, and 8 weeks. Gross microscopic anatomy was documented, and tissue sections were subjected to blind review by a pathologist. Mankin grading for cellularity and proteoglycan content was used to qualitatively evaluate cartilage response. Cartilage adjacent to all lesions exposed to laser energy had better cellularity and proteoglycan content than corresponding controls by Mankin grading.

  3. Chondroitinase ABC Treatment Results in Greater Tensile Properties of Self-Assembled Tissue-Engineered Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Natoli, Roman M.; Revell, Christopher M.

    2009-01-01

    Collagen content and tensile properties of engineered articular cartilage have remained inferior to glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content and compressive properties. Based on a cartilage explant study showing greater tensile properties after chondroitinase ABC (C-ABC) treatment, C-ABC as a strategy for cartilage tissue engineering was investigated. A scaffold-less approach was employed, wherein chondrocytes were seeded into non-adherent agarose molds. C-ABC was used to deplete GAG from constructs 2 weeks after initiating culture, followed by 2 weeks culture post-treatment. Staining for GAG and type I, II, and VI collagen and transmission electron microscopy were performed. Additionally, quantitative total collagen, type I and II collagen, and sulfated GAG content were measured, and compressive and tensile mechanical properties were evaluated. At 4 wks, C-ABC treated construct ultimate tensile strength and tensile modulus increased 121% and 80% compared to untreated controls, reaching 0.5 and 1.3 MPa, respectively. These increases were accompanied by increased type II collagen concentration, without type I collagen. As GAG returned, compressive stiffness of C-ABC treated constructs recovered to be greater than 2 wk controls. C-ABC represents a novel method for engineering functional articular cartilage by departing from conventional anabolic approaches. These results may be applicable to other GAG-producing tissues functioning in a tensile capacity, such as the musculoskeletal fibrocartilages. PMID:19344291

  4. Surface Zone Articular Chondrocytes Modulate the Bulk and Surface Mechanical Properties of the Tissue-Engineered Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Gordon; McNary, Sean M.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2014-01-01

    The central hypothesis of functional tissue engineering is that an engineered construct can serve as a viable replacement tissue in vivo by replicating the structure and function of native tissue. In the case of articular cartilage, this requires the reproduction of the bulk mechanical and surface lubrication properties of native hyaline cartilage. Cartilage tissue engineering has primarily focused on achieving the bulk mechanical properties of native cartilage such as the compressive aggregate modulus and tensile strength. A scaffold-free self-assembling process has been developed that produces engineered cartilage with compressive properties approaching native tissue levels. Thus, the next step in this process is to begin addressing the friction coefficient and wear properties of these engineered constructs. The superficial zone protein (SZP), also known as lubricin or PRG4, is a boundary mode lubricant that is synthesized by surface zone (SZ) articular chondrocytes. Under conditions of high loading and low sliding speeds, SZP reduces friction and wear at the articular surface. The objective of this investigation was to determine whether increasing the proportion of SZ chondrocytes in cartilage constructs, in the absence of external stimuli such as growth factors and mechanical loading, would enhance the secretion of SZP and improve their frictional properties. In this study, cartilage constructs were engineered through a self-assembling process with varying ratios of SZ and middle zone (MZ) chondrocytes (SZ:MZ): 0:100, 25:75, 50:50, 75:25, and 100:0. Constructs containing different ratios of SZ and MZ chondrocytes did not significantly differ in the glycosaminoglycan composition or compressive aggregate modulus. In contrast, tensile properties and collagen content were enhanced in nearly all constructs containing greater amounts of SZ chondrocytes. Increasing the proportion of SZ chondrocytes had the hypothesized effect of improving the synthesis and secretion

  5. Cellular aspects of the development of diarthrodial joints and articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Archer, C W; Morrison, H; Pitsillides, A A

    1994-01-01

    There have been many reports on the histological development of mammalian diarthrodial or synovial joints. While these are useful for comparative purposes, they tell us little of the cellular basis of joint morphogenesis which must underlie a number of morphogenetic defects. The process of joint morphogenesis is complex and can be subdivided into a number of facets and this report will focus on 2 of them. First, the process of joint cavitation in the chick metatarsophalangeal joint, where we propose that the selective secretion of hyaluronan into the presumptive cavity plays a central role. Secondly, the development of articular cartilage where we have used the South American opossum Monodelphis domestica as a model for mammalian development. Like most marsupials, the young are born at a much earlier developmental stage than eutherian mammals. Using antibodies which detect proliferating chondrocytes and those synthesising insulin-like growth factors 1 and 2 and insulin-like growth factor 1 binding protein, we report that the majority of growth (as assessed by these indicators) appears appositional. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7928634

  6. Collagen-mimetic peptide-modifiable hydrogels for articular cartilage regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, Paresh A.; Chow, Lesley W.; St-Pierre, Jean-Philippe; Horejs, Christine-Maria; Peng, Yong Y.; Werkmeister, Jerome A.; Ramshaw, John A.M.; Stevens, Molly M.

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative medicine strategies for restoring articular cartilage face significant challenges to recreate the complex and dynamic biochemical and biomechanical functions of native tissues. As an approach to recapitulate the complexity of the extracellular matrix, collagen-mimetic proteins offer a modular template to incorporate bioactive and biodegradable moieties into a single construct. We modified a Streptococcal collagen-like 2 protein with hyaluronic acid (HA) or chondroitin sulfate (CS)-binding peptides and then cross-linked with a matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP7)-sensitive peptide to form biodegradable hydrogels. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) encapsulated in these hydrogels exhibited improved viability and significantly enhanced chondrogenic differentiation compared to controls that were not functionalized with glycosaminoglycan-binding peptides. Hydrogels functionalized with CS-binding peptides also led to significantly higher MMP7 gene expression and activity while the HA-binding peptides significantly increased chondrogenic differentiation of the hMSCs. Our results highlight the potential of this novel biomaterial to modulate cell-mediated processes and create functional tissue engineered constructs for regenerative medicine applications. PMID:25907054

  7. Highly Porous Gelatin Reinforced 3D Scaffolds for Articular Cartilage Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Amadori, Sofia; Torricelli, Paola; Panzavolta, Silvia; Parrilli, Annapaola; Fini, Milena; Bigi, Adriana

    2015-07-01

    3D highly porous (93% total porosity) gelatin scaffolds were prepared according to a novel, simple method, which implies gelatin foaming, gelification, soaking into ethanol and successive freeze-drying. Reinforcement of the as-prepared scaffolds (GEL) was performed through immersion in aqueous solutions at different gelatin concentrations. Reinforcement solutions with and without genipin addition allowed to prepare two series of samples:cross-linked and uncross-linked samples, respectively. The amount of gelatin adsorbed onto the reinforced samples increases as a function of gelatin concentration in solution and provokes a drastic improvement of the compressive modulus and collapse strength up to values of about 30 and 4 MPa, respectively. The open and interconnected porosity, although slightly reduced, is still of the order of 80% in the samples reinforced with the highest concentration of gelatin. Water uptake ability evaluated after immersion in PBS for 20 s decreases with gelatin reinforcement. The presence of genipin in cross-linked samples reduces gelatin release and stabilizes the scaffolds in solution. Chondrocytes from human articular cartilage adhere, proliferate, and penetrate into the scaffolds. The evaluation of differentiation markers both on the supernatants of cell culture and by means of quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) indicates a dose-dependent promotion of cell differentiation.

  8. Effects of introducing cultured human chondrocytes into a human articular cartilage explant model.

    PubMed

    Secretan, Charles; Bagnall, Keith M; Jomha, Nadr M

    2010-02-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) heals poorly and effective host-tissue integration after reconstruction is a concern. We have investigated the ability of implanted chondrocytes to attach at the site of injury and to be incorporated into the decellularized host matrix adjacent to a defect in an in vitro human explant model. Human osteochondral dowels received a standardized injury, were seeded with passage 3 chondrocytes labelled with PKH 26 and compared with two control groups. All dowels were cultured in vitro, harvested at 0, 7, 14 and 28 days and assessed for chondrocyte adherence and migration into the region of decellularized tissue adjacent to the defects. Additional evaluation included cell viability, general morphology and collagen II production. Seeded chondrocytes adhered to the standardized defect and areas of lamina splendens disruption but did not migrate into the adjacent acellular region. A difference was noted in viable-cell density between the experimental group and one control group. A thin lattice-like network of matrix surrounded the seeded chondrocytes and collagen II was present. The results indicate that cultured human chondrocytes do indeed adhere to regions of AC matrix injury but do not migrate into the host tissue, despite the presence of viable cells. This human explant model is thus an effective tool for studying the interaction of implanted cells and host tissue. PMID:20012649

  9. Collagen-mimetic peptide-modifiable hydrogels for articular cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Paresh A; Chow, Lesley W; St-Pierre, Jean-Philippe; Horejs, Christine-Maria; Peng, Yong Y; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Ramshaw, John A M; Stevens, Molly M

    2015-06-01

    Regenerative medicine strategies for restoring articular cartilage face significant challenges to recreate the complex and dynamic biochemical and biomechanical function