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Sample records for artificial earth satellites

  1. Optical Studies of Artificial Earth Satellites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, D. A.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the visual and photographic methods and the design features of a camera at Aberystwyth with a brief justification for satellite tracking. Indicates that satellite measurements have been used to determine the shape of the earth and diurnal variations in atmospherical densities. (CC)

  2. First optical observations of artificial Earth's satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rykhlova, L. V.

    2008-08-01

    A review of the first optical observations of the artificial satellites in the USSR as well as in former communist countries (DDR, Romania,Poland) is given. The role by Alla G. Masevich, I.D. Zhongolovich and Yu.V. Batrakov is underlined in the organization of observations.

  3. Atmospheric effects on measurements of distance to Earth artificial satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kablak, N.; Klimyk, V.; Shvalagin, I.; Kablak, U.

    2005-06-01

    This paper is devoted to the problem of accuracy increasing in allowing for Earth's atmosphere influences on results of daily ranging observations of the Earth artificial satellites (ASE). Atmosphere delays and their spatial-timely variations for spherical-symmetrical and nonspherical models of atmosphere were determined radiosounding data gathered during a year in Ukraine region using, developed valuing and analysis of models reductions to over of atmosphere, which recommended of IERS for processing distance-ranging observations of the Earth artificial satellites. Investigated and improved models of reductions to over of the atmosphere on the basis of discovered regional and local peculiarity's of influence atmosphere on the laser and radio ranging observations of the Earth artificial satellites.

  4. Pole position studied with artificial earth satellites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaposchkin, E. M.

    1972-01-01

    Long-arc orbit computation of highest accuracy can provide pole positions. Optical Baker-Nunn and laser range observations of several satellites are combined. The accuracy of the pole position is comparable to that of the mean satellite-tracking station coordinates (plus or minus 5 m) when sufficient tracking data are available. Exploitation of the technique requires more accurate tracking data.

  5. Lunar perturbations of artificial satellites of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacaglia, G. E. O.

    1974-01-01

    The disturbing function for the lunar perturbations of an artificial satellite are derived, using ecliptic elements for the moon and equatorial elements for the satellite. Secular, long-period, and short-period perturbations are then computed, with the expressions kept in closed form in both inclination and eccentricity of the satellite. Alternative expressions for short-period perturbations of high satellites are also given, assuming small values of the eccentricity. The moon's position is specified by the inclination, node, argument of perigee, true (or mean) longitude, and its radius vector from the center of the earth. The results can then be applied to numerical integration by using coordinates of the moon from ephemeris tapes or to analytical representation by using results from lunar theory, with the moon's motion represented by a precessing and rotating elliptical orbit.

  6. Earth rotation and polar motion from laser ranging to the moon and artificial satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aardoom, L.

    1978-01-01

    Earth-based laser ranging to artificial satellites and to the moon is considered as a technique for monitoring the Earth's polar motion and diurnal rotation. The kinematics of Earth rotation as related to laser ranging is outlined. The current status of laser ranging as regards its measuring capabilities is reviewed. The relative merits of artificial satellite and lunar laser ranging are pointed out. It appears that multistation combined artificial satellite and lunar laser ranging is likely to ultimately meet a 0.002 arcseconds in pole position and 0.1 msec in UT1 daily precision requirement.

  7. Approximate analytic method for high-apogee twelve-hour orbits of artificial Earth's satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashkovyaka, M. A.; Zaslavskii, G. S.

    2016-09-01

    We propose an approach to the study of the evolution of high-apogee twelve-hour orbits of artificial Earth's satellites. We describe parameters of the motion model used for the artificial Earth's satellite such that the principal gravitational perturbations of the Moon and Sun, nonsphericity of the Earth, and perturbations from the light pressure force are approximately taken into account. To solve the system of averaged equations describing the evolution of the orbit parameters of an artificial satellite, we use both numeric and analytic methods. To select initial parameters of the twelve-hour orbit, we assume that the path of the satellite along the surface of the Earth is stable. Results obtained by the analytic method and by the numerical integration of the evolving system are compared. For intervals of several years, we obtain estimates of oscillation periods and amplitudes for orbital elements. To verify the results and estimate the precision of the method, we use the numerical integration of rigorous (not averaged) equations of motion of the artificial satellite: they take into account forces acting on the satellite substantially more completely and precisely. The described method can be applied not only to the investigation of orbit evolutions of artificial satellites of the Earth; it can be applied to the investigation of the orbit evolution for other planets of the Solar system provided that the corresponding research problem will arise in the future and the considered special class of resonance orbits of satellites will be used for that purpose.

  8. Auxiliary subprograms for calculating the navigational parameters of artificial Earth satellites. FORTRAN IV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokhorenko, V. I.

    1981-01-01

    Subprograms for transforming coordinates and time, for determining the position of the Moon and Sun, and for calculating the atmosphere and disturbances, which are specified by anomalies of the Earth's gravitational field are described. The subprograms are written in FORTRAN IV and form a major part of the package of applied programs for calculating the navigational parameters of artificial Earth satellites.

  9. Measurement of spectra and neutron fluxes on artificial earth satellites from the Cosmos series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudkin, V. Y.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Novikova, M. R.; Potapov, Y. V.; Skvortsov, S. S.; Smirennyy, L. N.

    1975-01-01

    In 1966-1967 measurements were carried out at the altitudes of 200 to 400 km to determine the spectra and fluxes of fast neutrons inside the hermetically sealed artificial earth satellites of the Cosmos series. The detectors used were nuclear emulsions of the B9 and BR types and an emulsion of the P9 type, filled with Li and P. Spectra and fluxes of neutrons in the range of energies from thermal energies to 10 MeV are presented. Neutron doses are also estimated.

  10. Estimation of residual microaccelerations on board an artificial earth satellite in the monoaxial solar orientation mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatov, A. I.; Sazonov, V. V.

    2013-09-01

    The mode of monoaxial solar orientation of a designed artificial Earth satellite (AES), intended for microgravitational investigations, is studied. In this mode the normal line to the plane of satellite’s solar batteries is permanently directed at the Sun, the absolute angular velocity of a satellite is virtually equal to zero. The mode is implemented by means of an electromechanical system of powered flywheels or gyrodynes. The calculation of the level of microaccelerations arising on board in such a mode, was carried out by mathematical modeling of satellite motion with respect to the center of masses under an effect of gravitational and restoring aerodynamic moments, as well as of the moment produced by the gyrosystem. Two versions of a law for controlling the characteristic angular momentum of a gyrosystem are considered. The first version provides only attenuation of satellite’s perturbed motion in the vicinity of the position of rest with the required velocity. The second version restricts, in addition, the increase in the accumulated angular momentum of a gyrosystem by controlling the angle of rotation of the satellite around the normal to the light-sensitive side of the solar batteries. Both control law versions are shown to maintain the monoaxial orientation mode to a required accuracy and provide a very low level of quasistatic microaccelerations on board the satellite.

  11. On the nature of the radial and cross track errors for artificial earth satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonavito, N. L.; Gordon, R. A.; Marsh, J. G.; Foreman, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    The paper discusses the analysis of the radial and cross track errors of artificial earth satellites in terms of the interference of two one-dimensional celestial mechanical wave trains. The resulting equations for these tracking errors describe the behavior of the uncertainties in the orbital parameters as oscillatory in nature, with a rapidly oscillating term, which is a function of the sum of the observed and computed orbital frequencies, modulated in amplitude by a slowly varying oscillation. This latter term is itself a function of either the difference between these orbital frequencies or between the values of the computed and observed right ascensions, depending upon whether it is the radial or cross track case under consideration. Results indicate that the cross track calculation describes the behavior of uncertainties in the right ascension of the ascending node and the inclination, while the radial calculation gives information on uncertainties in the semi-major axis, the eccentricity, and the argument of perigee.

  12. Data fusion with artificial neural networks (ANN) for classification of earth surface from microwave satellite measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lure, Y. M. Fleming; Grody, Norman C.; Chiou, Y. S. Peter; Yeh, H. Y. Michael

    1993-01-01

    A data fusion system with artificial neural networks (ANN) is used for fast and accurate classification of five earth surface conditions and surface changes, based on seven SSMI multichannel microwave satellite measurements. The measurements include brightness temperatures at 19, 22, 37, and 85 GHz at both H and V polarizations (only V at 22 GHz). The seven channel measurements are processed through a convolution computation such that all measurements are located at same grid. Five surface classes including non-scattering surface, precipitation over land, over ocean, snow, and desert are identified from ground-truth observations. The system processes sensory data in three consecutive phases: (1) pre-processing to extract feature vectors and enhance separability among detected classes; (2) preliminary classification of Earth surface patterns using two separate and parallely acting classifiers: back-propagation neural network and binary decision tree classifiers; and (3) data fusion of results from preliminary classifiers to obtain the optimal performance in overall classification. Both the binary decision tree classifier and the fusion processing centers are implemented by neural network architectures. The fusion system configuration is a hierarchical neural network architecture, in which each functional neural net will handle different processing phases in a pipelined fashion. There is a total of around 13,500 samples for this analysis, of which 4 percent are used as the training set and 96 percent as the testing set. After training, this classification system is able to bring up the detection accuracy to 94 percent compared with 88 percent for back-propagation artificial neural networks and 80 percent for binary decision tree classifiers. The neural network data fusion classification is currently under progress to be integrated in an image processing system at NOAA and to be implemented in a prototype of a massively parallel and dynamically reconfigurable Modular

  13. The Near-Earth Space Surveillance (NESS) Mission: Discovery, Tracking, and Characterization of Asteroids, Comets, and Artificial Satellites with a Microsatellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, A. R.; Carroll, K. A.; Balam, D. D.; Cardinal, R. D.; Matthews, J. M.; Kuschnig, R.; Walker, G. A. H.; Brown, P. G.; Tedesco, E. F.; Worden, S. P.

    2001-01-01

    The Near-Earth Space Surveillance (NESS) Mission, a microsatellite dedicated to observing near-Earth (NEO) and interior-to-the-Earth (IEO)asteroids and comets plus artificial satellites, is currently being studied under contract to the Canadian Space Agency. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  14. Periodic components of the atmospheric drag of Earth artificial satellites and their dependence on the state of space weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komendant, Volodymyr; Koshkin, Nikolay; Ryabov, Mikhail

    2016-07-01

    Based on the accumulated in the University Observatory extensive database of evolving orbital elements of low-orbit satellites, the behavior of the parameterwas studied, which characterizes their drag in the atmosphere of the Earth. The time spectra structure of drag of 25 artificial satellites is being studied by applying various methods of spectral analysis. Fifteen artificial satellites with circular orbits and ten artificial satellites with elliptical orbits are studied. The processed information includes ten years of observations that covers: declining and minimum phases of 23 ^{rd}(2005-2008) solar cycle; phases of rise and maximum of 24th(2009-2014) solar cycle. Time-frequency analysis of solar and geomagnetic activity indexes has been conducted. These indexes are: W - Wolf numbers; Sp - the total area of sunspot groups of the northern and southern hemispheres of the Sun, F10.7 - the solar radio flux at 10,7 cm; E - electron flux with energies more than 0,6 MeV i 2 MeV; planetary, high latitude and middle latitude geomagnetic index Ap. Periodograms of satellite's drag data, solar and geomagnetic activity indexes were constructed. In the atmospheric drag dynamics of satellites,the following periodswere detected: 6-year, 2.1-year, annual, semi-annual, 27-days, 13- and 11-days. Similar periods are identified in indexes of solar and geomagnetic activity. The ratios of the amplitudes of the spectral power of these periods vary in different phases of the solar cycle. The tables of the main periods in the drag of the artificial satellites and the main periods in the solar and geomagnetic activity indexes were obtained with the help of spectrograms. Their presence in certain phases of the solar cycle was researched. The calculation of multiple correlation' models of the orbital parameter characterizing the drag of satellites on various orbits, depending on the basic parameters of space weather has been done. These results have practical application for models

  15. Dynamics of an artificial satellite in an earth-fixed reference frame - Effects of polar motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinella, P.; Milani, A.; Nobili, A. M.; Sacerdote, F.

    Since such polar motions as precession, lunisolar nutation and free nutation introduce small, apparent forces in earth satellite equations of motion in earth-fixed reference frames, attention is given to the possibility of (1) integrating the orbit in such frames when tracking data are used for geophysical applications, and (2) determining a set of unknown parameters which describe long-period polar wandering from orbital data. It is shown that accuracy limits depend on the precision and geometry of the available range data, with the laser ranging method used in the LASSO system carried by the SIRIO 2 satellite equalling the performance of traditional methods, and more advanced laser ranging surpassing those accuracies.

  16. A second-order theory of an artificial satellite under the influence of the oblateness of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, J. J. F.

    1974-01-01

    The general theory of the method of averaging is used to study the effect of the oblateness of the earth on the motion of an artificial satellite. The first-order harmonic J2 and the second-order harmonics J3 and J4 are included in the analysis. The first-order, periodic variations together with the second-order, averaged and secular variations are derived for all the six orbital elements. Alternative orbital elements and necessary relations are introduced to deal with circular orbits, orbits at critical inclination and equatorial orbits. Essential transformations and initialization procedures are also outlined.

  17. Communications via the radio artificial earth satellite: Design of the tracking diagram and features for conducting QSO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobrozhanskiy, V.; Rybkin, V.

    1980-01-01

    A detailed examination is made of the operation of a transmitting artifical Earth satellite. A tracking diagram for the satellite is constructed. The zone of radio visibility can be determined based on the techniques proposed.

  18. Artificial gravity experiment satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Tadashi

    1992-07-01

    An overview of the conceptual study of an artificial gravity experiment satellite based on the assumption of a launch by the H-2 launch vehicle with a target launch date in the Year 2000 is presented. While many satellites provided with artificial gravity have been reported in relation to a manned Mars exploration spacecraft mission, the review has been conducted on missions and test subjects only for experimental purposes. Mission requirements were determined based on the results of reviews on the mission, test subjects, and model missions. The system baseline and development plan were based on the results of a study on conceptual structure and scale of the system, including measures to generate artificial gravity. Approximate scale of the system and arm length, mission orbit, visibility of the operation orbit from ground stations in Japan, and satellite attitude on the mission orbit are outlined.

  19. Evolution of the rotation of an artificial earth satellite under the influence of a perturbing moment which is constant in fixed axes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neyshtadt, A. I.; Pivovarov, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    The change in the modulus of the vector of the kinetic moment of a satellite which is noted during the determination of the actual orientation of an artificial earth is discussed. The change is due to the presence of a small perturbing moment, which is constant in fixed axes relative to the satellite. It is also shown that the averaged equations in this problem can be integrated.

  20. On the nature of the radial and cross track errors for artificial earth satellites. [GEOS 2 and OAR-901

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonavito, N. L.; Gordon, R. A.; Marsh, J. G.

    1975-01-01

    The analysis of the radial and cross track errors of artificial earth satellites is discussed in terms of the interference of two one-dimensional celestial mechanical wave trains. Resulting equations for these tracking errors describe the behavior of the uncertainties in the orbital parameters as oscillatory in nature, with a rapidly oscillating term, which is a function of the sum of the observed and computed orbital frequencies, modulated in amplitude by a slowly varying oscillation. This latter term is itself a function of either the difference between these orbital frequencies or between the values of the computed and observed right ascensions, depending upon whether it is the radial or cross track case under consideration. These results indicate that the cross track calculation describes the behavior of uncertainties in the right ascension of the ascending node and the inclination, while the radial calculation gives information on uncertainties in the semi-major axis, the eccentricity, and the argument of perigee. In addition, expressions for the radial and cross track oscillatory frequencies are obtained in terms of the orbital frequencies of the satellites. Data show that the time average of the radial and cross track errors in any case, will both approach zero.

  1. Exploring the possibility of following the movements of a bird from an artificial earth satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    The development of a harness to hold the transmitter is discussed along with satellite systems for monitoring the flight paths of the birds, and incorporating biological information into the tracking signal.

  2. Some procedures for computerized electronic data processing of absorption measurements from artificial earth satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinkkeller, B.

    1975-01-01

    The processing of data obtained from solar absorption radiation measurements is discussed. The position of the satellite was obtained by numerical integration of the differential equations of motion using initial conditions. The position of the sun was calculated as a function of time, and the tangential elevation was determined approximately from the positions of the satellite and the sun. The coefficients of an approximation formula and of a data smoothing process were determined, and the inversion of an Abel integral equation is solved analytically.

  3. The study of cosmic rays on the proton artificial earth satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grigorov, N. L.; Savenko, I. A.; Basilova, R. N.; Volodichev, N. N.; Voropayev, S. I.; Kalinkin, L. F.; Kakhidze, G. P.; Labutin, V. A.; Melioranskiy, A. S.; Pryakhin, E. A.

    1975-01-01

    Investigations were carried out with the space stations of the Proton series to study the physics of cosmic rays. The SEZ-13 device for the search of particles with a fractional electrical charge and the SEZ-11 device for the measurement of high energy electrons were mounted on the Proton-3 satellite. The mode of action of the SEZ-11 device differed from that of the SEZ-12 device used in the Proton-1 and Proton-2 satellites for similar purposes. Some of the results that were obtained are presented.

  4. On the determination of the long period tidal perturbations in the elements of artificial earth satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musen, P.; Felsentreger, T.

    1972-01-01

    The magnitude of the tidal effects depends upon the elastic properties of the earth as described by Love numbers. The Love numbers appear as the coefficients in the expansion of the exterior tidal potential in terms of spherical harmonics (in Maxwellian form). A single averaging process was performed only along the parallels of latitude. This process preserves additional long period tidal effects (with periods of a few days or more). It also eliminates the short period effects with periods of one day or less.

  5. A semi-analytic theory for the motion of a close-earth artificial satellite with drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, J. J. F.; Alford, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    A semi-analytic method is used to estimate the decay history/lifetime and to generate orbital ephemeris for close-earth satellites perturbed by the atmospheric drag and earth oblateness due to the spherical harmonics J2, J3, and J4. The theory maintains efficiency through the application of the theory of a method of averaging and employs sufficient numerical emphasis to include a rather sophisticated atmospheric density model. The averaged drag effects with respect to mean anomaly are evaluated by a Gauss-Legendre quadrature while the averaged variational equations of motion are integrated numerically with automatic step size and error control.

  6. Estimation of the accuracy with which the position of the center of mass of an Interkosmos series artificial earth satellite is calculated. [the effect of atmospheric density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elyasberg, P. Y.; Kugayenko, B. V.; Voyskovskiy, M. I.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of disturbing forces on position calculation, and errors in the initial conditions of motion and in the selected assignment calculation schemes are estimated. It is shown that the main disturbing effects on the accuracy are due to density variations of the upper atmosphere. Recommendations are presented for estimating the calculation accuracy along with an example of such an estimate for the Interkosmos-7 artificial earth satellite. Other factors considered include the adopted scheme and computational algorithms used, effects of disturbing forces not taken into account earlier, and errors in the values of constants and in models of disturbing forces.

  7. Orbital Dynamics of Space Debris around operational artificial satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampaio, Jarbas

    2016-07-01

    The increasing number of space debris, orbiting the Earth justifies and requires more efforts to observe and track them to avoid collisions among them and the earth's satellites. In this way, several studies are important to preserve the operability of the artificial satellites. In this work, the orbital dynamics of space debris are studied in the neighborhood of operational artificial satellites. The results show that the collision risks between these objects is high and solutions to avoid these events are necessary.

  8. Spore-Forming Thermophilic Bacterium within Artificial Meteorite Survives Entry into the Earth's Atmosphere on FOTON-M4 Satellite Landing Module.

    PubMed

    Slobodkin, Alexander; Gavrilov, Sergey; Ionov, Victor; Iliyin, Vyacheslav

    2015-01-01

    One of the key conditions of the lithopanspermia hypothesis is that microorganisms situated within meteorites could survive hypervelocity entry from space through the Earth's atmosphere. So far, all experimental proof of this possibility has been based on tests with sounding rockets which do not reach the transit velocities of natural meteorites. We explored the survival of the spore-forming thermophilic anaerobic bacterium, Thermoanaerobacter siderophilus, placed within 1.4-cm thick basalt discs fixed on the exterior of a space capsule (the METEORITE experiment on the FOTON-M4 satellite). After 45 days of orbital flight, the landing module of the space vehicle returned to Earth. The temperature during the atmospheric transit was high enough to melt the surface of basalt. T. siderophilus survived the entry; viable cells were recovered from 4 of 24 wells loaded with this microorganism. The identity of the strain was confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequence and physiological tests. This is the first report on the survival of a lifeform within an artificial meteorite after entry from space orbit through Earth's atmosphere at a velocity that closely approached the velocities of natural meteorites. The characteristics of the artificial meteorite and the living object applied in this study can serve as positive controls in further experiments on testing of different organisms and conditions of interplanetary transport. PMID:26151136

  9. Spore-Forming Thermophilic Bacterium within Artificial Meteorite Survives Entry into the Earth's Atmosphere on FOTON-M4 Satellite Landing Module.

    PubMed

    Slobodkin, Alexander; Gavrilov, Sergey; Ionov, Victor; Iliyin, Vyacheslav

    2015-01-01

    One of the key conditions of the lithopanspermia hypothesis is that microorganisms situated within meteorites could survive hypervelocity entry from space through the Earth's atmosphere. So far, all experimental proof of this possibility has been based on tests with sounding rockets which do not reach the transit velocities of natural meteorites. We explored the survival of the spore-forming thermophilic anaerobic bacterium, Thermoanaerobacter siderophilus, placed within 1.4-cm thick basalt discs fixed on the exterior of a space capsule (the METEORITE experiment on the FOTON-M4 satellite). After 45 days of orbital flight, the landing module of the space vehicle returned to Earth. The temperature during the atmospheric transit was high enough to melt the surface of basalt. T. siderophilus survived the entry; viable cells were recovered from 4 of 24 wells loaded with this microorganism. The identity of the strain was confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequence and physiological tests. This is the first report on the survival of a lifeform within an artificial meteorite after entry from space orbit through Earth's atmosphere at a velocity that closely approached the velocities of natural meteorites. The characteristics of the artificial meteorite and the living object applied in this study can serve as positive controls in further experiments on testing of different organisms and conditions of interplanetary transport.

  10. Imaging artificial satellites: An observational challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. A.; Hill, D. C.

    2016-10-01

    According to the Union of Concerned Scientists, as of the beginning of 2016 there are 1381 active satellites orbiting the Earth, and the United States' Space Surveillance Network tracks about 8000 manmade orbiting objects of baseball-size and larger. NASA estimates debris larger than 1 cm to number more than half a million. The largest ones can be seen by eye—unresolved dots of light that move across the sky in minutes. For most astrophotographers, satellites are annoying streaks that can ruin hours of work. However, capturing a resolved image of an artificial satellite can pose an interesting challenge for a student, and such a project can provide connections between objects in the sky and commercial and political activities here on Earth.

  11. Aqua satellite orbiting the Earth

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows the Aqua satellite orbiting the Earth on August 27, 2005 by revealing MODIS true-color imagery for that day. This animation is on a cartesian map projection, so the satellite w...

  12. Artificial-Satellite-Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, Johnny H.

    1989-01-01

    Artificial Satellite Analysis Program (ASAP) is general orbit-predicting computer program incorporating sufficient orbit-modeling accuracy for design and planning of missions and analysis of maneuvers. Suitable for study of planetary-orbit missions with spacecraft trajectories of reconnaissance (flyby) and exploratory (mapping) nature. Not written for specific mission and intended use for almost any planetary orbiting mission. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  13. Spore-Forming Thermophilic Bacterium within Artificial Meteorite Survives Entry into the Earth's Atmosphere on FOTON-M4 Satellite Landing Module

    PubMed Central

    Slobodkin, Alexander; Gavrilov, Sergey; Ionov, Victor; Iliyin, Vyacheslav

    2015-01-01

    One of the key conditions of the lithopanspermia hypothesis is that microorganisms situated within meteorites could survive hypervelocity entry from space through the Earth’s atmosphere. So far, all experimental proof of this possibility has been based on tests with sounding rockets which do not reach the transit velocities of natural meteorites. We explored the survival of the spore-forming thermophilic anaerobic bacterium, Thermoanaerobacter siderophilus, placed within 1.4-cm thick basalt discs fixed on the exterior of a space capsule (the METEORITE experiment on the FOTON-M4 satellite). After 45 days of orbital flight, the landing module of the space vehicle returned to Earth. The temperature during the atmospheric transit was high enough to melt the surface of basalt. T. siderophilus survived the entry; viable cells were recovered from 4 of 24 wells loaded with this microorganism. The identity of the strain was confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequence and physiological tests. This is the first report on the survival of a lifeform within an artificial meteorite after entry from space orbit through Earth’s atmosphere at a velocity that closely approached the velocities of natural meteorites. The characteristics of the artificial meteorite and the living object applied in this study can serve as positive controls in further experiments on testing of different organisms and conditions of interplanetary transport. PMID:26151136

  14. Electromagnetic deep-probing (100-1000 kms) of the Earth's interior from artificial satellites: Constraints on the regional emplacement of crustal resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermance, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    The reconnaissance phase of using satellite observtions to studying electromagnetic induction in the solid earth is summarized. Several points are made: (1) satellite data apparently suffer far less from the effects of near surface lateral heterogeneities in the earth than do ground-based data; (2) zonal ionospheric currents during the recovery phase of major magnetic storms appear to be minimal, at least in the dawn and dusk sectors wher MAGSAT was flown; hence the internal contributions that satellites observe during these times is in fact due primarily to induction in the Earth with little or no contribution from ionospheric currents; and (3) the interpretation of satellite data in terms of primitive electromagnetic response functions, while grossly over-simplified, results in a surprisingly well-resolved radius for an equivalent super-conductor representing the conductivity region of the Earth's interior (5,370 + or - 120 km).

  15. [Neurochemical characteristics of rats during flight on the Kosmos-782 artificial satellite and after returning to earth].

    PubMed

    Gazenko, O G; Demin, N N; Panov, A N; Rashevskaia, D A; Rubinskaia, N L

    1979-01-01

    The brain of rats flown aboard the biosatellite Cosmos-782 was sampled immediately postflight and taken under neurochemical study. It was shown cytospectrophotometrically that the absolute content of RNA decreased by 20% in the cytoplasm of cerebellar Purkinje cells and remained unaltered in glial cells-satellites, and that the protein content did not change. In the frontal cortex (homogenates) the concentration of sulfhydryl groups decreased by 26%, activity of nonspecific cholinesterase by 33%. The activity of the latter in the cerebellum also diminished.

  16. Electromagnetic deep-probing (100-1000 KMS) of the Earth's interior from artificial satellites: Constraints on the regional emplacement of crustal resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermance, J. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Model simulations show that induction in a spherical Earth by distant magnetospheric sources can contribute magnetic field fluctuations at MAGSAT altitudes which are 30 to 40 percent of the external field amplitudes. When the characteristic dimensions (e.g. depth of penetration, etc) of a particular situations are small compared with the Earth's radius, the Earth can be approximated by a plane horizontal half space. In this case, electromagnetic energy is reflected with close to 100 percent efficiency from the Earth's surface. This implies that the total horizontal field is twice the source field when the source is above the satellite, but is reduced to values which are much smaller than the source field when the source is below the satellite. This latter effect tends to enhance the signature of gross electrical discontinuities in the lithosphere when observed at satellite altitudes.

  17. Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS) mock-up in a space chamber test at General Electric's Space Division. The ERTS program represented a concentrated effort to observe and monitor the limited resources of the Earth, in order to best conserve and utilize the resources in support of a burgeoning world population. The first ERTS was launched in 1972 and was later named Land Remote-Sensing Satellite (Landsat), to better represent the civil satellite program's prime emphasis on remote sensing of land resources. Multiple sensors survey and relay back masses of data in various ways from the Landsat. NASA has built 7 Land Remote Sensing Satellites, which have helped agricultural experts pick up underutilized land areas and new prospects for land use through irrigation. It has also assisted in pinpointing the spread of crop disease and in charting new uses of the sea for oceanographers.

  18. Electromagnetic deep-probing (100-1000 KMS) of the Earth's interior from artificial satellites: Constraints on the regional emplacement of crustal resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermance, J. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The applicability of electromagnetic deep sounding experiments using natural sources in the magnetosphere by incorporating Magsat data with other geophysical data was evaluated. Magsat satellite data, ground based magnetic observations, appropriate reference field models, and other satellite data was analyzed. The optimal combination of observations which lead first to a global and then to a regional characterization of the conductivity of the Earth's upper mantle is sought.

  19. Satellite imagery of the earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merifield, P.M.; Cronin, J.; Foshee, L.L.; Gawarecki, S.J.; Neal, J.T.; Stevenson, R.E.; Stone, R.O.; Williams, R.S., Jr.

    1969-01-01

    Photography of the Earth from spacecraft has application to both atmospheric and Earth sciences. Gemini and Apollo photographs have furnished information on sea surface roughness, areas of potential upwelling and oceanic current systems. Regional geologic structures and geomorphologic features are also recorded in orbital photographs. Infrared satellite imagery provides meteorological and hydrological data and is potentially useful for locating fresh water springs along coastal areas, sources of geothermal power and volcanic activity. Ground and airborne surveys are being undertaken to create a basis for the interpretation of data obtained from future satellite systems.

  20. Time and frequency requirement for the earth and ocean physics applications program. [characteristics and orbital mechanics of artificial satellites for data acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonbun, F. O.

    1972-01-01

    The application of time and frequency standards to the Earth and Ocean Physics Applications Program (EOPAP) is discussed. The goals and experiments of the EOPAP are described. Methods for obtaining frequency stability and time synchronization are analyzed. The orbits, trajectories, and characteristics of the satellites used in the program are reported.

  1. Electromagnetic deep-probing (100-1000 KMS) of the Earth's interior from artificial satellites: Constraints on the regional emplacement of crustal resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermance, J. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    An algorithm was developed to address the problem of electromagnetic coupling of ionospheric current systems to both a homogeneous Earth having finite conductivity, and to an Earth having gross lateral variations in its conductivity structure, e.g., the ocean-land interface. Typical results from the model simulation for ionospheric currents flowing parallel to a representative geologic discontinuity are shown. Although the total magnetic field component at the satellite altitude is an order of magnitude smaller than at the Earth's surface (because of cancellation effects from the source current), the anomalous behavior of the satellite observations as the vehicle passes over the geologic contact is relatively more important pronounced. The results discriminate among gross lithospheric structures because of difference in electrical conductivity.

  2. Ballistic design of transfer trajectories from artificial-satellite earth orbit to halo orbit in the neighborhood of the L 2 point of the Sun-Earth system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'in, I. S.; Zaslavsky, G. S.; Lavrenov, S. M.; Sazonov, V. V.; Stepanyantz, V. A.; Tuchin, A. G.; Tuchin, D. A.; Yaroshevsky, V. S.

    2014-11-01

    The paper considers the ballistic design of spacecraft (SC) transfer to the neighborhood of the L 2 point and subsequent entry of the SC into the halo orbit. Trajectory calculations of one-impulse Earth-halo orbit transfers with and without using a lunar gravitational maneuver are presented. For the calculation of one-impulse trajectories of Earth-halo-orbit transfers, an algorithm for constructing initial approximations is applied. These approximations are constructed by calculating and analyzing the isolines as a function of two variables. This function is represented by the pericenter height of the outgoing orbit over the Earth's surface. The arguments of the function are special parameters that characterize the halo orbit. The mentioned algorithm allows one to obtain halo orbits with specified geometrical characteristics both in the ecliptic plane, and in the plane orthogonal to it. The estimates of the characteristic velocity expenses for maintaining SC in the selected halo orbit are obtained. The described technique was used to search for working orbits of the Spectr-RG and Millimetron spacecraft. Examples of orbits obtained are presented.

  3. Low Earth orbit communications satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moroney, D.; Lashbrook, D.; Mckibben, B.; Gardener, N.; Rivers, T.; Nottingham, G.; Golden, B.; Barfield, B.; Bruening, J.; Wood, D.

    1992-01-01

    A current thrust in satellite communication systems considers a low-Earth orbiting constellations of satellites for continuous global coverage. Conceptual design studies have been done at the time of this design project by LORAL Aerospace Corporation under the program name GLOBALSTAR and by Motorola under their IRIDIUM program. This design project concentrates on the spacecraft design of the GLOBALSTAR low-Earth orbiting communication system. Overview information on the program was gained through the Federal Communications Commission licensing request. The GLOBALSTAR system consists of 48 operational satellites positioned in a Walker Delta pattern providing global coverage and redundancy. The operational orbit is 1389 km (750 nmi) altitude with eight planes of six satellites each. The orbital planes are spaced 45 deg., and the spacecraft are separated by 60 deg. within the plane. A Delta 2 launch vehicle is used to carry six spacecraft for orbit establishment. Once in orbit, the spacecraft will utilize code-division multiple access (spread spectrum modulation) for digital relay, voice, and radio determination satellite services (RDSS) yielding position determination with accuracy up to 200 meters.

  4. Satellite Gravity Drilling the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vonFrese, R. R. B.; Potts, L. V.; Leftwich, T. E.; Kim, H. R.; Han, S.-H.; Taylor, P. T.; Ashgharzadeh, M. F.

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of satellite-measured gravity and topography can provide crust-to-core mass variation models for new insi@t on the geologic evolution of the Earth. The internal structure of the Earth is mostly constrained by seismic observations and geochemical considerations. We suggest that these constraints may be augmented by gravity drilling that interprets satellite altitude free-air gravity observations for boundary undulations of the internal density layers related to mass flow. The approach involves separating the free-air anomalies into terrain-correlated and -decorrelated components based on the correlation spectrum between the anomalies and the gravity effects of the terrain. The terrain-decorrelated gravity anomalies are largely devoid of the long wavelength interfering effects of the terrain gravity and thus provide enhanced constraints for modeling mass variations of the mantle and core. For the Earth, subcrustal interpretations of the terrain-decorrelated anomalies are constrained by radially stratified densities inferred from seismic observations. These anomalies, with frequencies that clearly decrease as the density contrasts deepen, facilitate mapping mass flow patterns related to the thermodynamic state and evolution of the Earth's interior.

  5. ASAP- ARTIFICIAL SATELLITE ANALYSIS PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, J.

    1994-01-01

    The Artificial Satellite Analysis Program (ASAP) is a general orbit prediction program which incorporates sufficient orbit modeling accuracy for mission design, maneuver analysis, and mission planning. ASAP is suitable for studying planetary orbit missions with spacecraft trajectories of reconnaissance (flyby) and exploratory (mapping) nature. Sample data is included for a geosynchronous station drift cycle study, a Venus radar mapping strategy, a frozen orbit about Mars, and a repeat ground trace orbit. ASAP uses Cowell's method in the numerical integration of the equations of motion. The orbital mechanics calculation contains perturbations due to non-sphericity (up to a 40 X 40 field) of the planet, lunar and solar effects, and drag and solar radiation pressure. An 8th order Runge-Kutta integration scheme with variable step size control is used for efficient propagation. The input includes the classical osculating elements, orbital elements of the sun relative to the planet, reference time and dates, drag coefficient, gravitational constants, and planet radius, rotation rate, etc. The printed output contains Cartesian coordinates, velocity, equinoctial elements, and classical elements for each time step or event step. At each step, selected output is added to a plot file. The ASAP package includes a program for sorting this plot file. LOTUS 1-2-3 is used in the supplied examples to graph the results, but any graphics software package could be used to process the plot file. ASAP is not written to be mission-specific. Instead, it is intended to be used for most planetary orbiting missions. As a consequence, the user has to have some basic understanding of orbital mechanics to provide the correct input and interpret the subsequent output. ASAP is written in FORTRAN 77 for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM PC compatible computer operating under MS-DOS. The ASAP package requires a math coprocessor and a minimum of 256K RAM. This program was last

  6. Earth and ocean dynamics satellites and systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonbun, F. O.

    1975-01-01

    An overview is presented of the present state of satellite and ground systems making observations of the dynamics of the solid earth and the oceans. Emphasis is placed on applications of space technology for practical use. Topics discussed include: satellite missions and results over the last two decades in the areas of earth gravity field, polar motions, earth tides, magnetic anomalies, and satellite-to-satellite tracking; laser ranging systems; development of the Very Long Baseline Interferometer; and Skylab radar altimeter data applications.

  7. Korea Earth Observation Satellite Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Myung-Jin; Kim, Zeen-Chul

    via Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) as the prime contractor in the area of Korea earth observation satellite program to enhance Korea's space program development capability. In this paper, Korea's on-going and future earth observation satellite programs are introduced: KOMPSAT- 1 (Korea Multi Purpose Satellite-1), KOMPSAT-2 and Communication, Broadcasting and Meteorological Satellite (CBMS) program. KOMPSAT-1 satellite successfully launched in December 1999 with Taurus launch vehicle. Since launch, KOMPSAT-1 is downlinking images of Korea Peninsular every day. Until now, KOMPSAT-1 has been operated more than 2 and half years without any major hardware malfunction for the mission operation. KOMPSAT-1 payload has 6.6m panchromatic spatial resolution at 685 km on-orbit and the spacecraft bus had NASA TOMS-EP (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer-Earth Probe) spacecraft bus heritage designed and built by TRW, U.S.A.KOMPSAT-1 program was international co-development program between KARI and TRW funded by Korean Government. be launched in 2004. Main mission objective is to provide geo-information products based on the multi-spectral high resolution sensor called Multi-Spectral Camera (MSC) which will provide 1m panchromatic and 4m multi-spectral high resolution images. ELOP of Israel is the prime contractor of the MSC payload system and KARI is the total system prime contractor including spacecraft bus development and ground segment. KARI also has the contract with Astrium of Europe for the purpose of technical consultation and hardware procurement. Based on the experience throughout KOMPSAT-1 and KOMPSAT-2 space system development, Korea is expecting to establish the infrastructure of developing satellite system. Currently, KOMPSAT-2 program is in the critical design stage. are scheduled to launch in 2008 and in 2014, respectively. The mission of CBMS consists of two areas. One is of space technology test for the communications mission, and the other is of a real

  8. Electromagnetic deep-probing (100-1000 kms) of the Earth's interior from artificial satellites: Constraints on the regional emplacement of crustal resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermance, J. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    A spherical harmonic analysis program is being tested which takes magnetic data in universal time from a set of arbitrarily space observatories and calculates a value for the instantaneous magnetic field at any point on the globe. The calculation is done as a least mean-squares value fit to a set of spherical harmonics up to any desired order. The program accepts as a set of input the orbit position of a satellite coordinates it with ground-based magnetic data for a given time. The output is a predicted time series for the magnetic field on the Earth's surface at the (r, theta) position directly under the hypothetically orbiting satellite for the duration of the time period of the input data set. By tracking the surface magnetic field beneath the satellite, narrow-band averages crosspowers between the spatially coordinated satellite and the ground-based data sets are computed. These crosspowers are used to calculate field transfer coefficients with minimum noise distortion. The application of this technique to calculating the vector response function W is discussed.

  9. On the Long-Period Effects in the Motion of an Artificial Satellite Caused by the Ellipticity of the Equator of the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musen, P.

    1962-01-01

    If a satellite has a mean daily motion nearly commensurable with the angular velocity of rotation of the earth, long-period perturbations will influence its motion. The eccentricity of such a commensurable orbit is not necessarily small, as the orbit of Explorer VI shows. This circumstance caused the author to develop a semianalytical method of treating these perturbations, which avoids the development of the disturbing function into powers of the eccentricity and consequently includes the cases of elongated orbits and orbits with moderate eccentricities.

  10. Autonomous navigation for artificial satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, P. S.

    1975-01-01

    An autonomous navigation system is considered that provides a satellite with sufficient numbers and types of sensors, as well as computational hardware and software, to enable it to track itself. Considered are attitude type sensors, meteorological cameras and scanners, one way Doppler, and image correlator.

  11. Earth radiation pressure effects on satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knocke, P. C.; Ries, J. C.; Tapley, B. D.

    1988-01-01

    A diffuse-earth radiation force model is presented, which includes a latitudinally varying representation of the shortwave and longwave radiation of the terrestrial sphere. Applications to various earth satellites indicate that this force, in particular the shortwave component, can materially affect the recovery of estimated parameters. Earth radiation pressure cannot explain the anomalous deceleration of LAGEOS, but can produce significant along track accelerations on satellites with highly eccentric orbits. Analyses of GEOS-1 tracking data confirm this result.

  12. Third-order solution of an artificial-satellite theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinoshita, H.

    1978-01-01

    A third-order solution is developed for the motions of artificial satellites moving in the gravitational field of the earth, whose potential includes the second-, third-, and fourth-order zonal harmonics. Third-order periodic perturbations with fourth-order secular perturbations are derived by Hori's perturbations method. All quantities are expanded into power series of the eccentricity, but the solution is obtained so as to be closed with respect to the inclination. A comparison with the results of numerical integration of the equations of motion indicates that the solution can predict the position of a close-earth satellite with a small eccentricity with an accuracy of better than 1 cm over 1 month.

  13. Third-order solution of an artificial-satellite theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinoshita, H.

    1977-01-01

    A third-order solution was developed for the motions of artificial satellites moving in the gravitational field of the earth, whose potential includes the second-, third-, and fourth-order zonal harmonics. Third-order periodic perturbations with fourth-order secular perturbations were derived by the Hori perturbation method. All quantities were expanded into power series of the eccentricity, but the solution was obtained so as to be closed with respect to the inclination. A comparison with the results of numerical integration of the equations of motion indicates that the solution can predict the position of a close-earth, small-eccentricity satellite with an accuracy of better than one cm over a period of one month.

  14. Navigational assignment of scientific measurements. [artificial satellites and their position calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elyasberg, P. Y.; Kugayenko, B. V.

    1975-01-01

    Some problems are considered in the navigational assignment of scientific measurements (the calculation of the position of the center of a spacecraft mass in space) as it applies to the Interkosmos series of artificial satellites. Possible models of disturbing forces and the corresponding perturbations in the orbits are analyzed. The following forces and their effect on artificial satellites are discussed: earth's gravity, atmospheric drag, the moon's gravity, the sun's gravity, and light pressure.

  15. NPP: Why Another Earth-Observing Satellite?

    NASA Video Gallery

    NPP will soon be NASA's newest Earth-observing satellite. To showcase how NPP will be used for both understanding the health of our planet now -- as well as how things might change in the future --...

  16. Naked-eye acquisition of visible near-earth satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansfield, Roger L.

    1988-01-01

    This paper develops visual sighting criteria for observing artificial near-earth satellites with the naked eye, and summarizes the mathematics needed to predict visibility efficiently from a set of mean orbital elements. It reports on a successful application of the sighting criteria and visibility-prediction mathematics, and shows that successful visual acquisition depends as much upon the observer's skill in recognizing the constellations as it does upon accurate visibility predictions.

  17. Uplink Power Control For Earth/Satellite/Earth Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakraborty, Dayamoy

    1994-01-01

    Proposed control subsystem adjusts power radiated by uplink transmitter in Earth station/satellite relay station/ Earth station communication system. Adjustments made to compensate for anticipated changes in attenuation by rain. Raw input is a received downlink beacon singal, amplitude of which affected not only by rain fade but also by scintillation, attenuation in atmospheric gases, and diurnal effects.

  18. Satellite to study earth's magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The Magnetic Field Satellite (Magsat) designed to measure the near earth magnetic field and crustal anomalies is briefly described. A scalar magnetometer to measure the magnitude of the earth's crustal magnetic field and a vector magnetometer to measure magnetic field direction as well as magnitude are included. The mission and its objectives are summarized along with the data collection and processing system.

  19. On inclination resonances in Artificial Satellite Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, Martin

    2015-05-01

    The frozen-perigee behavior of elliptic orbits at the critical inclination is usually displayed after an averaging procedure. However, this singularity in Artificial Satellite Theory manifests also in the presence of short-period effects. Indeed, a closed form expression relating orbital inclination and the ratio anomalistic draconitic frequencies is derived for the main problem, which demonstrates that the critical inclination results from commensurability between the periods with which the radial and polar variables evolve in the instantaneous plane of motion. This relation also shows that the critical inclination value is slightly modified by the degree of oblateness of the attracting body, as well as by the orbit's size and shape.

  20. NEAs' Satellites Under Close Encounters with Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, Rosana; Winter, O. C.

    2012-10-01

    In the present work we took into account the gravitational effects experienced by a NEA (Near-Earth Asteroid), during a close encounter with Earth, in order to estimate the stability regions of NEAs' satellites as a function of the encounter conditions and for different primary-satellite mass ratio values. Initially, the methodology consisted on numerically simulating a system composed by the Sun, the planets of the Solar System, and samples of NEAs belonging to the groups Apollo, Atens and Amor, for a period of 10 Myr. All encounters with Earth closer than 100 Earth's radius were registered. The next step consisted on simulating all those registered close encounters considering the Earth, the asteroid that perform the close encounter, and a cloud of satellites around the asteroid. We considered no-interacting satellites with circular orbits, random values for the inclination, longitude of the ascending node and true anomaly, and with radial distribution going from 0.024 to 0.4 Hill's radius of the asteroid. The largest radial distance for which all the satellites survive (no collision or ejection) is defined as the critical radius. We present a statistical analysis of the registered encounters and the critical radius found, defining the stable regions as a function of the impact parameter - d, and of the relative velocity - V. For the case of massless satellites, we found that all satellites survived for encounters with d>0.3 Earth Hill's radius. For impact parameter d<0.13 Earth Hill's radius, we found that particles with radial distance greater than 0.24 Hill's radius of the asteroid, are unstable, for any relative velocity. The results for the other considered cases will be presented and discussed. We also discuss the implications of the regions found, specially in the NEAs-binary scenarios.

  1. The Earth's gravity field from satellite geodesy - a 30 year adventure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, R. H.

    1991-12-01

    The first information on the Earth's gravitational field from artificial satellite observations was published in 1958. The next years have seen a dramatic improvement in the resolution and accuracy of the series representation of the Earth's gravity field. The improvements have taken place slowly taking advantage of improved measurement accuracy and the increasing number of satellites. The proposed ARISTOTELES mission would provide the opportunity to take a significant leap in improving our knowledge of the Earth's gravity field.

  2. Landsat—Earth observation satellites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2015-11-25

    Since 1972, Landsat satellites have continuously acquired space-based images of the Earth’s land surface, providing data that serve as valuable resources for land use/land change research. The data are useful to a number of applications including forestry, agriculture, geology, regional planning, and education. Landsat is a joint effort of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). NASA develops remote sensing instruments and the spacecraft, then launches and validates the performance of the instruments and satellites. The USGS then assumes ownership and operation of the satellites, in addition to managing all ground reception, data archiving, product generation, and data distribution. The result of this program is an unprecedented continuing record of natural and human-induced changes on the global landscape.

  3. Earth resources applications of the Synchronous Earth Observatory Satellite (SEOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, D. S.; Cook, J. J.

    1973-01-01

    The results are presented of a four month study to define earth resource applications which are uniquely suited to data collection by a geosynchronous satellite. While such a satellite could also perform many of the functions of ERTS, or its low orbiting successors, those applications were considered in those situations where requirements for timely observation limit the capability of ERTS or EOS. Thus, the application presented could be used to justify a SEOS.

  4. Electromagnetic deep-probing (100-1000 kms) of the Earth's interior from artificial satellites: Constraints on the regional emplacement of crustal resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermance, J. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Efforts continue in the development of a computer program for looking at the coupling of finite dimensioned source fields with a laterally heterogeneous Earth. An algorithm for calculating a time-varying reference field using ground-based magnetic observatory data is also under development as part of the production of noise-free estimates of global electromagnetic response functions using Magsat data.

  5. Earth laser beacon sensor for earth-oriented geosynchronous satellites.

    PubMed

    Sepp, G

    1975-07-01

    Geosynchronous satellites are often required to maintain accurately their orientation with respect to a selected point at the earth surface. Precise attitude determination of these satellites may be achieved using a laser beacon from ground to the satellite as a directional reference. Four simple implementations of this principle are analyzed, and the influence of the cloudy atmosphere on the laser beacon and, therefore, on the accuracy of the method is discussed. All-weather operation is not possible; for normal cloudiness conditions, however, two analyzed systems (pulsed Nd:YAG laser with photomultiplier and CO(2) laser with cryogenic detector) appear to be feasible.

  6. Electromagnetic deep-probing (100-1000 KMS) of the Earth's interior from artificial satellites: Constraints on the regional emplacement of crustal resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermance, J. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Efforts continue in the development of a computer program for looking at the coupling of finite-dimensional source fields with a laterally heterogeneous Earth. An algorithm is also being developed for calculating a time-varying reference field using ground-based magnetic observatory data. It was discovered that ground-based standard magnetic observation is not as so available for the time of the MAGSAT mission as might be expected. Attempts are being made to determine the exact times and observatories from which data are avaliable.

  7. Exploring the earth's magnetosphere with four satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehn, Guenther; Nord, Roland; Best, Rainer

    The Cluster mission scheduled to be launched onboard four satellites by an Ariene 5 rocket in late 1995 is discussed. The major scientific goal of the mission is the quantification of the related transfer mass, momentum, and energy across the magnetopause, a boundary layer that separates the earth's magnetosphere from the plasma and the magnetic field of the solar wind.

  8. Vietnam to launch Earth-watch satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Chadha, Kulvinder

    2010-09-01

    Aerospace firm Astrium will build a €55m Earth-observation satellite for the Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology (VAST) that will be used to monitor the changing shape of Vietnam's coastline, the erosion of its river channels and also the country's crops and forests.

  9. Low Earth Orbit satellite traffic simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoelzel, John

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a significant tool for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) capacity analysis, needed to support marketing, economic, and design analysis, known as a Satellite Traffic Simulator (STS). LEO satellites typically use multiple beams to help achieve the desired communication capacity, but the traffic demand in these beams in usually not uniform. Simulations of dynamic, average, and peak expected demand per beam is a very critical part of the marketing, economic, and design analysis necessary to field a viable LEO system. An STS is described in this paper which can simulate voice, data and FAX traffic carried by LEO satellite beams and Earth Station Gateways. It is applicable world-wide for any LEO satellite constellations operating over any regions. For aeronautical applications to LEO satellites. the anticipates aeronautical traffic (Erlangs for each hour of the day to be simulated) is prepared for geographically defined 'area targets' (each major operational region for the respective aircraft), and used as input to the STS. The STS was designed by Constellations Communications Inc. (CCI) and E-Systems for usage in Brazil in accordance with an ESCA/INPE Statement Of Work, and developed by Analytical Graphics Inc. (AGI) to execute on top of its Satellite Tool Kit (STK) commercial software. The STS simulates constellations of LEO satellite orbits, with input of traffic intensity (Erlangs) for each hour of the day generated from area targets (such as Brazilian States). accumulated in custom LEO satellite beams, and then accumulated in Earth Station Gateways. The STS is a very general simulator which can accommodate: many forms of orbital element and Walker Constellation input; simple beams or any user defined custom beams; and any location of Gateways. The paper describes some of these features, including Manual Mode dynamic graphical display of communication links, to illustrate which Gateway links are accessible and which links are not, at each 'step' of the

  10. Research of the dynamic properties of the radiation situation in near space by means of spectrometric and dosimetric investigations onboard artificial earth satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressel, I.; Doerschel, B.; Fellinger, J.; Hahn, T.; Hartmann, H.; Huebner, K.; Kadner, K.; Krahl, S.; Schmidt, P.; Streubel, G.

    1992-12-01

    Cosmic flights always imply the penetration into a new radiation climate alien to life on earth. This is expressed both in the higher values of the radiation dose to be expected and in the deviation of the type and spectral distribution of cosmic radiation in space from terrestrial radiation. For the dosimetry of cosmic radiation onboard spacecraft, this results in two tasks. First, the radiation exposure of the astronaut onboard is to be detected and, secondly, the influence of radiation on the proper functioning of equipment and materials on and in the spacecraft is to be determined. The radiation measuring technique used for this purpose has to supply statements on the radiation doses, types of radiation and their expected spectral distribution. Based on the known effectiveness of radiation as a function of its type and energy, it is possible to derive risks and possible protective measures. The overall goal of this project was to carry out further research of the dynamic radiation situation in near space by means of passive radiation detectors. The project was broken down into the following topics: (1) determination of the depth dose distribution of primary cosmic radiation behind thin screens outside spacecraft; (2) detection of the neutron energy distribution and neutron dose inside spacecraft; and (3) interpretation of the readings of TL detectors and solid-state trace detectors inside spacecraft.

  11. On the Tesseral-Harmonics Resonance Problem in Artificial-Satellite Theory, Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanowicz, B. A.

    1976-01-01

    Equations were derived for the perturbations on an artificial satellite when the motion of the satellite is commensurable with that of the earth. This was done by first selecting the tesseral harmonics that contribute the most to the perturbations and then by applying Hori's method by use of Lie series. Here, are introduced some modifications to the perturbations, which now result in better agreement with numerical integration.

  12. Earth rotation parameters from satellite techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaller, Daniela; Beutler, Gerhard; Jäggi, Adrian; Meindl, Michael; Dach, Rolf; Sosnica, Krzysztof; Baumann, Christian

    2013-04-01

    It has been demonstrated since several years that satellite techniques are capable of determining Earth Rotation Parameters (ERPs) with a daily or even sub-daily resolution. Especially Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) with their huge amount of observations can determine time series of polar motion (PM) and length of day (LOD) rather well. But also SLR with its spherical satellites whose orbital motions are easy to model and that allow long orbital arc lengths can deliver valuable contributions to Earth rotation. We analyze GNSS solutions (using GPS and GLONASS) and SLR solutions (using LAGEOS) regarding their potential of estimating polar motion and LOD with daily and subdaily temporal resolution. A steadily improving modeling applied in the analysis of space-geodetic data aims at improved time series of geodetic parameters, e.g., the ERPs. The Earth's gravity field and especially its temporal variations are one point of interest for an improved modeling for satellite techniques. For modeling the short-periodic gravity field variations induced by mass variations in the atmosphere and the oceans the GRACE science team provides the Atmosphere and Ocean Dealiasing (AOD) products. They contain 6-hourly gravity fields of the atmosphere and the oceans. We apply these corrections in the analysis of satellite-geodetic data and show the impact on the estimated ERPs. It is well known that the degree-2 coefficients of the Earth's gravity field are correlated with polar motion and LOD. We show to what extent temporal variations in the degree-2 coefficients are influencing the ERP estimates.

  13. On the tidal effects in the motion of earth satellites and the love parameters of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musen, P.; Estes, R.

    1972-01-01

    The tidal effects in the motion of artificial satellites are studied to determine the elastic properties of the earth as they are observed from extraterrestrial space. Considering Love numbers, the disturbing potential is obtained as the analytical continuation of the tidal potential from the surface of the earth into-outer space, with parameters which characterize the earth's elastic response to tidal attraction by the moon and the sun. It is concluded that the tidal effects represent a superposition of a large number of periodic terms, and the rotation of the lunar orbital plane produces a term of 18 years period in tidal perturbations of the ascending node of the satellite's orbit.

  14. Satellite tracking and earth dynamics research programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The SAO laser site in Arequipa continued routine operations throughout the reporting period except for the months of March and April when upgrading was underway. The laser in Orroral Valley was operational through March. Together with the cooperating stations in Wettzell, Grasse, Kootwikj, San Fernando, Helwan, and Metsahove the laser stations obtained a total of 37,099 quick-look observations on 978 passes of BE-C, Starlette, and LAGEOS. The Network continued to track LAGEOS at highest priority for polar motion and Earth rotation studies, and for other geophysical investigations, including crustal dynamics, Earth and ocean tides, and the general development of precision orbit determination. The Network performed regular tracking of BE-C and Starlette for refined determinations of station coordinate and the Earth's gravity field and for studies of solid earth dynamics. Monthly statistics of the passes and points are given by station and by satellite.

  15. Satellite-tracking and earth-dynamics research programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The activities and progress in the satellite tracking and earth dynamics research during the first half of calendar year 1975 are described. Satellite tracking network operations, satellite geodesy and geophysics programs, GEOS 3 project support, and atmospheric research are covered.

  16. Earth observing satellite: Understanding the Earth as a system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soffen, Gerald

    1990-01-01

    There is now a plan for global studies which include two very large efforts. One is the International Geosphere/Biosphere Program (IGBP) sponsored by the International Council of Scientific Unions. The other initiative is Mission to Planet Earth, an unbrella program for doing three kinds of space missions. The major one is the Earth Observation Satellite (EOS). EOS is large polar orbiting satellites with heavy payloads. Two will be placed in orbit by NASA, one by the Japanese and one or two by ESA. The overall mission measurement objectives of EOS are summarized: (1) the global distribution of energy input to and energy output from the Earth; (2) the structure, state variables, composition, and dynamics of the atmosphere from the ground to the mesopause; (3) the physical and biological structure, state, composition, and dynamics of the land surface, including terrestrial and inland water ecosystems; (4) the rates, important sources and sinks, and key components and processes of the Earth's biogeochemical cycles; (5) the circulation, surface temperature, wind stress, sea state, and the biological activity of the oceans; (6) the extent, type, state, elevation, roughness, and dynamics of glaciers, ice sheets, snow and sea ice, and the liquid equivalent of snow in the global cryosphere; (7) the global rates, amounts, and distribution of precipitation; and (8) the dynamic motions of the Earth (geophysics) as a whole, including both rotational dynamics and the kinematic motions of the tectonic plates.

  17. The Nimbus satellites - Pioneering earth observers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Carolynne

    1990-01-01

    The many scientific achievements of the Nimbus series of seven satellites for low-altitude atmospheric research and global weather surveillance are reviewed. The series provides information on fishery resources, weather modeling, atmospheric pollution monitoring, earth's radiation budget, ozone monitoring, ocean dynamics, and the effects of cloudiness. Data produced by the forty-eight instruments and sensors flown on the satellites are applied in the fields of oceanography, hydrology, geology, geomorphology, geography, cartography, agriculture and meteorology. The instruments include the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (which depicts phytoplankton concentrations in coastal areas), the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (which measures sea-surface temperatures and sea-surface wind-speed), and the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (which provides information on total amounts of ozone in the earth's atmosphere).

  18. Scheduling Earth Observing Satellites with Evolutionary Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Al; Crawford, James; Lohn, Jason; Pryor, Anna

    2003-01-01

    We hypothesize that evolutionary algorithms can effectively schedule coordinated fleets of Earth observing satellites. The constraints are complex and the bottlenecks are not well understood, a condition where evolutionary algorithms are often effective. This is, in part, because evolutionary algorithms require only that one can represent solutions, modify solutions, and evaluate solution fitness. To test the hypothesis we have developed a representative set of problems, produced optimization software (in Java) to solve them, and run experiments comparing techniques. This paper presents initial results of a comparison of several evolutionary and other optimization techniques; namely the genetic algorithm, simulated annealing, squeaky wheel optimization, and stochastic hill climbing. We also compare separate satellite vs. integrated scheduling of a two satellite constellation. While the results are not definitive, tests to date suggest that simulated annealing is the best search technique and integrated scheduling is superior.

  19. Numerical orbit generators of artificial earth satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugar, H. K.; Dasilva, W. C. C.

    1984-04-01

    A numerical orbit integrator containing updatings and improvements relative to the previous ones that are being utilized by the Departmento de Mecanica Espacial e Controle (DMC), of INPE, besides incorporating newer modellings resulting from the skill acquired along the time is presented. Flexibility and modularity were taken into account in order to allow future extensions and modifications. Characteristics of numerical accuracy, processing quickness, memory saving as well as utilization aspects were also considered. User's handbook, whole program listing and qualitative analysis of accuracy, processing time and orbit perturbation effects were included as well.

  20. On the tesseral-harmonics resonance problem in artificial-satellite theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanowicz, B. A.

    1975-01-01

    The longitude-dependent part of the geopotential usually gives rise only to short-period effects in the motion of an artificial satellite. However, when the motion of the satellite is commensurable with that of the earth, the path of the satellite repeats itself relative to the earth and perturbations build up at each passage of the satellite in the same spot, so that there can be important long-period effects. In order to take these effects into account in deriving a theoretical solution to the equations of motion of an artificial satellite, it is necessary to select terms in the longitude-dependent part of the geopotential that will contribute significantly to the perturbations. Attempts made to obtain a selection that is valid in a general case, regardless of the initial eccentricity of the orbit and of the order of the resonance, are reported. The solution to the equations of motion of an artificial satellite, in a geopotential thus determined, is then derived by using Hori's method by Lie series, which, by its properties regarding canonical invariance, has proved advantageous in the classical theory.

  1. SERIES - Satellite Emission Range Inferred Earth Surveying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdoran, P. F.; Spitzmesser, D. J.; Buennagel, L. A.

    1983-01-01

    The Satellite Emission Range Inferred Earth Surveying (SERIES) concept is based on the utilization of NAVSTAR Global Positioning System (GPS) radio transmissions without any satellite modifications and in a totally passive mode. The SERIES stations are equipped with lightweight 1.5 m diameter dish antennas mounted on trailers. A series baseline measurement accuracy demonstration is considered, taking into account a 100 meter baseline estimation from approximately one hour of differential Doppler data. It is planned to conduct the next phase of experiments on a 150 m baseline. Attention is given to details regarding future baseline measurement accuracy demonstrations, aspects of ionospheric calibration in connection with subdecimeter baseline accuracy requirements of geodesy, and advantages related to the use of the differential Doppler or pseudoranging mode.

  2. Stability of artificial and natural satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szebehely, V.

    1978-01-01

    A quantitative measure of stability based on Hill's definition is evaluated for direct and retrograde satellite orbits. These orbits are known as Poincare's first kind in the restricted problem of three bodies. Onsets of possible instabilities and captures are established. A critical (maximum) value of the satellites orbital radius is found for stability as a remarkably simple function of the mass-parameter. The results are applied to the natural satellites of the solar system.

  3. Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) system definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An executive summary of a study on the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) was presented. It was concluded that the overall costs of space systems could be reduced significantly by the development of a modular shuttle compatible standard spacecraft, and the use of that spacecraft with the Shuttle Transportation System. It was also demonstrated that the development of the standard spacecraft is feasible, desirable, and cost effective if applied to a series of missions. The ability to initially retrieve, refurbish, and reuse the spacecraft and its payload, and ultimately to perform in-orbit servicing, would result in significant cost savings. A number of specific conclusions and recommendations were also suggested.

  4. Earth observing satellite plans in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Y. S.; Behera, G.; Gupta, A. K.; Manikiam, B.

    One of the major objectives of the Indian Space Programme is to develop, launch and operate earth observing satellites to cater to the data needs of the remote sensing user community. Towards this, development of suitable multispectral sensors through satellites and aircraft have played a crucial role. The Rohini and Bhaskara satellites launched during early 1980's provided the base for further development. Presently the first of a series of Remote Sensing satellites, IRS-1A is in orbit and is providing data. The necessary expertise to utilise the remotely sensed data was developed through a set of application projects under Indian Remote Sensing Satellite - Utilisation Programme (IRS-UP) and Remote Sensing Application Mission (RSAM) being carried out with active collaboration of several Central/State user departments/agencies. The application projects cover several themes such as agriculture, water resources, forestry, soil, marine resources etc. in addition to natural calamities such as flood and drought. The IRS-UP projects initiated in 1983, has helped in developing several methodology packages for operational utilisation of remote sensing for natural resources monitoring. Nationwide projects such as Wasteland Mapping, Drinking Water Technology Mission etc. have remote sensing as a major input. Towards ensuring requisite infrastructure and facility, 5 Regional Remote Sensing Service Centres are being operationalised with VAX-11/780 computer based image processing system, in addition to setting up of remote sensing centres in each State/Union Territory. The training of adequate manpower has been another area of attention. The country is poised to reap the advantages of remote sensing technology towards its development.

  5. Earth Satellite Population Instability: Underscoring the Need for Debris Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-chyi; Johnson, N. L.

    2006-01-01

    A recent study by NASA indicates that the implementation of international orbital debris mitigation measures alone will not prevent a significant increase in the artificial Earth satellite population, beginning in the second half of this century. Whereas the focus of the aerospace community for the past 25 years has been on the curtailment of the generation of long-lived orbital debris, active remediation of the current orbital debris population should now be reconsidered to help preserve near-Earth space for future generations. In particular, we show in this paper that even if launch operations were to cease today, the population of space debris would continue to grow. Further, proposed remediation techniques do not appear to offer a viable solution. We therefore recommend that, while the aerospace community maintains the current debris-limiting mission regulations and postmission disposal procedures, future emphasis should be placed on finding new remediation technologies for solving this growing problem. Since the launch of Sputnik 1, space activities have created an orbital debris environment that poses increasing impact risks to existing space systems, including human space flight and robotic missions (1, 2). Currently, more than 9,000 Earth orbiting man-made objects (including many breakup fragments), with a combined mass exceeding 5 million kilograms, are tracked by the US Space Surveillance Network and maintained in the US satellite catalog (3-5). Three accidental collisions between cataloged satellites during the period from late 1991 to early 2005 have already been documented (6), although fortunately none resulted in the creation of large, trackable debris clouds. Several studies conducted during 1991-2001 demonstrated, with assumed future launch rates, the unintended growth potential of the Earth satellite population, resulting from random, accidental collisions among resident space objects (7-13). In some low Earth orbit (LEO) altitude regimes where

  6. Polarization Tracking Study of Earth Station in Satellite Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lihua; Hu, Chao; Pei, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Satellite communications, in telecommunications, the use of satellite can provide communications links between various points on the earth. Typical satellite communication is composed of a communication satellite, a signal transmitter and a signal receiver. As the signal transmitter or the signal receiver, an earth station plays a vital role in the satellite communications. Accurately adjustment of antenna azimuth, elevation and polarization angles on the earth station is the key to satellite communications. In the present paper, a study of polarization tracking of earth station is presented, and a detailed adjustment procession of the polarization angle is given. Combing with observation series of MEASAT-2 satellite in geostationary orbit, the polarization tracking accuracy is verified. The method can be embeded into computer program of antenna polarization adjustment in earth station.

  7. Earth satellites: A first look by the United States Navy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Immediately following World War II, the U.S. Navy considered the possibility of launching an earth satellite for navigational, communications, and meteorological applications. The technical feasibility of the satellite was based on extensions of German V-2 technology.

  8. Uniaxial aerodynamic attitude control of artificial satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sazonov, V. V.

    1983-01-01

    Within the context of a simple mechanical model the paper examines the movement of a satellite with respect to the center of masses under conditions of uniaxial aerodynamic attitude control. The equations of motion of the satellite take account of the gravitational and restorative aerodynamic moments. It is presumed that the aerodynamic moment is much larger than the gravitational, and the motion equations contain a large parameter. A two-parameter integrated surface of these equations is constructed in the form of formal series in terms of negative powers of the large parameter, describing the oscillations and rotations of the satellite about its lengthwise axis, approximately oriented along the orbital tangent. It is proposed to treat such movements as nominal undisturbed motions of the satellite under conditions of aerodynamic attitude control. A numerical investigation is made for the above integrated surface.

  9. Interferometric observations of an artificial satellite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preston, R. A.; Ergas, R.; Hinteregger, H. F.; Knight, C. A.; Robertson, D. S.; Shapiro, I. I.; Whitney, A. R.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Clark, T. A.

    1972-01-01

    Very-long-baseline interferometric observations of radio signals from the TACSAT synchronous satellite, even though extending over only 7 hours, have enabled an excellent orbit to be deduced. Precision in differential delay and delay-rate measurements reached 0.15 nanosecond and 0.05 picosecond per second, respectively. The results from this initial three-station experiment demonstrate the feasibility of using the method for accurate satellite tracking and for geodesy.

  10. Low Eccentricity Earth Satellite KAM Tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesel, William E.

    2015-09-01

    The accuracy of a new theory of Earth satellite motion is assessed across inclination and orbital altitude. This theory is based on periodic orbits in the zonal potential, with a Floquet solution for nearby motion, augmented by perturbation solutions for other perturbing forces. It is completely numerical and well adapted to the rich computational environments of today. Its root mean square error is generally in the tens of meters over a one day data arc, for eccentricities less than e = 0.1. The perturbation methods fail near geopotential resonances, but the theory has been adapted to handle the vicinity of a resonance without significant loss of accuracy. The geometric structure of the solution is also explored, and it is shown that most orbits in the full geopotential are static structures that rotate with the Earth's rotation. Geopotential KAM tori shrink down to a two dimensional surface as the analog of zero eccentricity orbits. A first attempt is made at visualizing the torus over the Earth's surface. Precision calculation of low eccentricity KAM tori may lead to much decreased stationkeeping costs for Walker constellations.

  11. Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) Definition Phase Report, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    System definition studies were conducted of the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS). The studies show that the concept of an Earth Observatory Satellite in a near-earth, sun-synchronous orbit would make a unique contribution to the goals of a coordinated program for acquisition of data for environmental research with applications to earth resource inventory and management. The technical details for the proposed development of sensors, spacecraft, and a ground data processing system are presented.

  12. Interferometric observations of an artificial satellite.

    PubMed

    Preston, R A; Ergas, R; Hinteregger, H F; Knight, C A; Robertson, D S; Shapiro, I I; Whitney, A R; Rogers, A E; Clark, T A

    1972-10-27

    Very-long-baseline interferometric observations of radio signals from the TACSAT synchronous satellite, even though extending over only 7 hours, have enabled an excellent orbit to be deduced. Precision in differenced delay and delay-rate measurements reached 0.15 nanosecond ( approximately 5 centimeters in equivalent differenced distance) and 0.05 picosecond per second ( approximately 0.002 centimeter per second in equivalent differenced velocity), respectively. The results from this initial three-station experiment demonstrate the feasibility of using the method for accurate satellite tracking and for geodesy. Comparisons are made with other techniques.

  13. Meteorological factors in Earth-Satellite propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levis, C. A.; Damon, E. K.; Lin, K. T.; Weller, A. E., III

    1984-01-01

    A 5-meter paraboloidal antenna operated at 28 GHz showed gain changes of 2 dB due to rain. While precise estimation of the corresponding angle of arrival changes is difficult, they appear to have been on the order of 0.02 degrees. The attenuation at 28.6 GHz inferred from radiometry agreed well with that measured simultaneously over a satellite/Earth link at the same frequency. The radiometers so calibrated have been used to add to the available site diversity data base using a 9 km baseline. An improved empirical model of site diversity gain was obtained by applying regression techniques to available published data. A brief review of the literature has led to suggestions for two experimental programs, one dealing with multifrequency radiometry and the other with the effects of the stochastic properties of precipitation on wideband data transmission.

  14. Operational evapotranspiration based on Earth observation satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellens-Meulenberghs, Françoise; Ghilain, Nicolas; Arboleda, Alirio; Barrios, Jose-Miguel

    2016-04-01

    Geostationary satellites have the potential to follow fast evolving atmospheric and Earth surface phenomena such those related to cloud cover evolution and diurnal cycle. Since about 15 years, EUMETSAT has set up a network named 'Satellite Application Facility' (SAF, http://www.eumetsat.int/website/home/Satellites/GroundSegment/Safs/index.html) to complement its ground segment. The Land Surface Analysis (LSA) SAF (http://landsaf.meteo.pt/) is devoted to the development of operational products derived from the European meteorological satellites. In particular, an evapotranspiration (ET) product has been developed by the Royal Meteorological Institute of Belgium. Instantaneous and daily integrated results are produced in near real time and are freely available respectively since the end of 2009 and 2010. The products cover Europe, Africa and the Eastern part of South America with the spatial resolution of the SEVIRI sensor on-board Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellites. The ET product algorithm (Ghilain et al., 2011) is based on a simplified Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere transfer (SVAT) scheme, forced with MSG derived radiative products (LSA SAF short and longwave surface fluxes, albedo). It has been extensively validated against in-situ validation data, mainly FLUXNET observations, demonstrating its good performances except in some arid or semi-arid areas. Research has then been pursued to develop an improved version for those areas. Solutions have been found in reviewing some of the model parameterizations and in assimilating additional satellite products (mainly vegetation indices and land surface temperature) into the model. The ET products will be complemented with related latent and sensible heat fluxes, to allow the monitoring of land surface energy partitioning. The new algorithm version should be tested in the LSA-SAF operational computer system in 2016 and results should become accessible to beta-users/regular users by the end of 2016/early 2017. In

  15. The long-term motion of artificial Jovian satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uphoff, C.

    1973-01-01

    This paper is a description of a preliminary study aimed at the classification and establishment of realistic orbit design criteria of artificial satellites of Jupiter. The work is concentrated on investigation of the factors that will affect the long-term motion, and particularly the dynamic lifetime, of the first Jupiter orbiters. Included is a perturbation analysis describing the effects of the Jovian gravity, the Galilean satellites, and the solar gravitational perturbations. An unusual problem is identified in the great difficulty of avoiding near-collisions with the Galilean satellites. The results of the perturbation and dynamic lifetime analyses are used in brief discussions of some possible Jupiter orbit missions.

  16. Investigations of the ionospheric using radio signals from artificial satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titheridge, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    The occurrence and characteristics of ionospheric irregularities in medium latitudes and in polar regions were measured using radio signals from artificial satellites. Ionospheric changes during quiet and disturbed conditions were also measured. Electron density, elevation angle, and amplitude and frequency of these high frequency signals were determined as well as the direction of their arrival.

  17. Hybrid systems for use in the dynamics of artificial satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozai, Y.

    1975-01-01

    The paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages of adopting either an inertial or a noninertial reference system for computing the orbital elements of artificial satellites. The effects of precession and nutation are examined, and determination of disturbing functions is explained for both an inertial and a noninertial system.

  18. On the tidal effects in the motion of artificial satellites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musen, P.; Estes, R.

    1972-01-01

    The general perturbations in the elliptic and vectorial elements of a satellite as caused by the tidal deformations of the non-spherical Earth are developed into trigonometric series in the standard ecliptical arguments of Hill-Brown lunar theory and in the equatorial elements of the satellite. The integration of the differential equations for variation of elements of the satellite in this theory is easy because all arguments are linear or nearly linear in time. The trigonometrical expansion permits a judgment about the relative significance of the amplitudes and periods of different tidal 'waves' over a long period of time. Graphs are presented of the tidal perturbations in the elliptic elements of the BE-C satellite which illustrate long term periodic behavior. The tidal effects are clearly noticeable in the observations and their comparison with the theory permits improvement of the 'global' Love numbers for the Earth.

  19. Looking at Earth from space: Direct readout from environmental satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Direct readout is the capability to acquire information directly from meteorological satellites. Data can be acquired from NASA-developed, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)-operated satellites, as well as from other nations' meteorological satellites. By setting up a personal computer-based ground (Earth) station to receive satellite signals, direct readout may be obtained. The electronic satellite signals are displayed as images on the computer screen. The images can display gradients of the Earth's topography and temperature, cloud formations, the flow and direction of winds and water currents, the formation of hurricanes, the occurrence of an eclipse, and a view of Earth's geography. Both visible and infrared images can be obtained. This booklet introduces the satellite systems, ground station configuration, and computer requirements involved in direct readout. Also included are lists of associated resources and vendors.

  20. NASA Now: Orbital Mechanics: Earth Observing Satellites

    NASA Video Gallery

    This NASA Now program is all about satellites and their orbits. Dr. James Gleason, project scientist for NPP, explains what it takes for a satellite to stay in orbit, why there are different types ...

  1. Artificial intelligence in a mission operations and satellite test environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busse, Carl

    1988-01-01

    A Generic Mission Operations System using Expert System technology to demonstrate the potential of Artificial Intelligence (AI) automated monitor and control functions in a Mission Operations and Satellite Test environment will be developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Expert system techniques in a real time operation environment are being studied and applied to science and engineering data processing. Advanced decommutation schemes and intelligent display technology will be examined to develop imaginative improvements in rapid interpretation and distribution of information. The Generic Payload Operations Control Center (GPOCC) will demonstrate improved data handling accuracy, flexibility, and responsiveness in a complex mission environment. The ultimate goal is to automate repetitious mission operations, instrument, and satellite test functions by the applications of expert system technology and artificial intelligence resources and to enhance the level of man-machine sophistication.

  2. Low Earth Orbit satellite/terrestrial mobile service compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheriff, Ray E.; Gardiner, John G.

    1993-01-01

    Currently the geostationary type of satellite is the only one used to provide commercial mobile-satellite communication services. Low earth orbit (LEO) satellite systems are now being proposed as a future alternative. By the implementation of LEO satellite systems, predicted at between 5 and 8 years time, mobile space/terrestrial technology will have progressed to the third generation stage of development. This paper considers the system issues that will need to be addressed when developing a dual mode terminal, enabling access to both terrestrial and LEO satellite systems.

  3. Artificially reproduced image of earth photographed by UV camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A reproduction of a color enhancement of a picture photographed in far-ultraviolet light by Astronaut John W. Young, Apollo 16 commander, showing the Earth. Note this is an artificially reproduced image. The three auroral belts, the sunlit atmosphere and background stars are visible.

  4. GPS early-orbit subsystem for earth satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laczo, V. T.; Maury, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The early-orbit capability of the Goddard Trajectory Determination System, which determines starting vectors for earth satellites from angles-only or range-angles observations, is described and documented. Early-orbit results obtained from a variety of satellites, data types and methods of solution are also presented.

  5. Earth-to-geosynchronous satellite laser beam transmission.

    PubMed

    Aruga, T; Araki, K; Hayashi, R; Iwabuchi, T; Takahashi, M; Nakamura, S

    1985-01-01

    Some experimental results for detection of a ground-based laser beacon by a geosynchronous satellite are reported. A 50-cm diam telescope and silicon intensifier tube camera were used for optical observation of the satellite. The transmitted argon laser beam was detected by the visible channel of a radiometer on board the Japanese Geostationary Meteorological Satellite. Two activities, (1) orbit prediction correction using optical observation and (2) detection of the earth laser beacon by the radiometer, are described.

  6. Satellite measurements of the earth's crustal magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnetzler, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    The literature associated with the Magsat mission has evaluated the capabilities and limitations of satellite measurements of the earth's crustal magnetic field, and demonstrated that there exists a 300-3000 km magnetic field, related to major features in the earth's crust, which is primarily caused by induction. Due to its scale and sensitivity, satellite data have been useful in the development of models for such large crustal features as subduction zones, submarine platforms, continental accretion boundaries, and rifts. Attention is presently given to the lack of agreement between laboratory and satellite estimates of lower crustal magnetization.

  7. The effects of general relativity on near-earth satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ries, J. C.; Watkins, M. M.; Tapley, B. D.; Huang, C.

    1990-01-01

    Whether one uses a solar system barycentric frame or a geocentric frame when including the general theory of relativity in orbit determination for near-earth satellites, the results should be equivalent to some limiting accuracy. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the effects of relativity in each frame and to demonstrate their equivalence through the analysis of three years of laser tracking data taken on the Lageos satellite. It is demonstrated that the simpler formulation in the geocentric frame is adequate for the purpose of near-earth satellite orbit determination. A correction to the conventional barycentric equations of motion is shown to be required.

  8. Algorithms and programs complex for solving inverse problems of artificial Earth satellite dynamics with using parallel computation. (Russian Title: Программно-математическое обеспечение для решения обратных задач динамики ИСЗ с использованием параллельных вычислений )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuvashov, I. N.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper complex of algorithms and programs for solving inverse problems of artificial earth satellite dynamics is described. Complex has been intended for satellite orbit improvement, calculation of motion model parameters and etc. Programs complex has been worked up for cluster "Skiff Cyberia". Results of numerical experiments obtained by using new complex in common the program "Numerical model of the system artificial satellites motion" is presented in this paper.

  9. CEOS Committee on Earth Observations Satellites consolidated report, 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-11-01

    A concise overview of the committee on Earth Observations Satellites (CEOS) and its Working Groups, covering the history and purpose of the Committee and its accomplishments to date are provided. The report will be updated annually before each Plenary meeting, and as developments in the Working Groups warrant. The committee on Earth Observations Satellites (originally named the International Earth Observations Satellite committee, IEOS) was treated in 1984, in response to a recommendation from the Economic Summit of Industrialized Nations Working Group on Growth, Technology, and Employment's Panel of Experts on Satellite Remote Sensing. This group recognized the multidisciplinary nature of satellite Earth observations, and the value of coordinating across all proposed missions. Thus, CEOS combined the previously existing groups for coordination on Ocean Remote-Sensing Satellites (CORSS) and coordination on Land Remote-Sensing Satellites (CLRSS), and established a broad framework for coordination across all spaceborne Earth observations missions. The first three LEOS Plenary meetings focused on treating and guiding the Working Groups deemed necessary to carry out the objectives of the CEOS members. After the third meeting, it was agreed that a more active orientation was required by the Plenary, and additional issues were brought before the group at the fourth meeting. At the fifth Plenary, international scientific programs and relevant intergovernmental organizations accepted invitations and participated as affiliate members of CEOS. This enabled progress toward integrating satellite data users' requirements into the CEOS process. Data exchange principles for global change research were also adopted. An interim CEOS Plenary meeting was held in April 1992, in preparation for the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED). Brief encapsulations of the Plenary sessions immediately follow the Terms of Reference that govern the activities of CEOS as

  10. CEOS Committee on Earth Observations Satellites Consolidated Report, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A concise overview of the committee on Earth Observations Satellites (CEOS) and its Working Groups, covering the history and purpose of the Committee and its accomplishments to date are provided. The report will be updated annually before each Plenary meeting, and as developments in the Working Groups warrant. The committee on Earth Observations Satellites (originally named the International Earth Observations Satellite committee, IEOS) was treated in 1984, in response to a recommendation from the Economic Summit of Industrialized Nations Working Group on Growth, Technology, and Employment's Panel of Experts on Satellite Remote Sensing. This group recognized the multidisciplinary nature of satellite Earth observations, and the value of coordinating across all proposed missions. Thus, CEOS combined the previously existing groups for coordination on Ocean Remote-Sensing Satellites (CORSS) and coordination on Land Remote-Sensing Satellites (CLRSS), and established a broad framework for coordination across all spaceborne Earth observations missions. The first three LEOS Plenary meetings focused on treating and guiding the Working Groups deemed necessary to carry out the objectives of the CEOS members. After the third meeting, it was agreed that a more active orientation was required by the Plenary, and additional issues were brought before the group at the fourth meeting. At the fifth Plenary, international scientific programs and relevant intergovernmental organizations accepted invitations and participated as affiliate members of CEOS. This enabled progress toward integrating satellite data users' requirements into the CEOS process. Data exchange principles for global change research were also adopted. An interim CEOS Plenary meeting was held in April 1992, in preparation for the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED). Brief encapsulations of the Plenary sessions immediately follow the Terms of Reference that govern the activities of CEOS as

  11. Observations of artificially produced scintillations using satellite transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, J. H.; Fritz, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    The ionospheric modification experiment, utilizing a high-powered transmitter, provides an opportunity to study ionospheric irregularities under relatively known conditions. The irregularities were studied by means of transionospheric signals from the polar-orbiting satellite ESSA 8 transmitting at 137 MHz. These observations show that scintillations occur when the satellite to ground station geometry is such that the ray from the satellite passes through the region in the ionosphere under modification. In general, a cut across the illuminated volume is obtained; thus an active region of about 100 km in diameter is indicated. For the most part, the artificial scintillations appear to be similar to those obtained from naturally occurring irregularities, but a systematic change from 3 to 1 sec in the fluctuation period is usually observed as the satellite traverses from the northern to the southern portions of the active region. The change in period appears to be produced by a systematic change in irregularity scale size from about 4 to about 1 km.

  12. Monitoring objects orbiting earth using satellite-based telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, Scot S.; Pertica, Alexander J.; Riot, Vincent J.; De Vries, Willem H.; Bauman, Brian J.; Nikolaev, Sergei; Henderson, John R.; Phillion, Donald W.

    2015-06-30

    An ephemeris refinement system includes satellites with imaging devices in earth orbit to make observations of space-based objects ("target objects") and a ground-based controller that controls the scheduling of the satellites to make the observations of the target objects and refines orbital models of the target objects. The ground-based controller determines when the target objects of interest will be near enough to a satellite for that satellite to collect an image of the target object based on an initial orbital model for the target objects. The ground-based controller directs the schedules to be uploaded to the satellites, and the satellites make observations as scheduled and download the observations to the ground-based controller. The ground-based controller then refines the initial orbital models of the target objects based on the locations of the target objects that are derived from the observations.

  13. Satellite-tracking and Earth dynamics research programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The major focus for operations during this period was the preliminary MERIT Campaign and its intensive tracking of LAGEOS for polar motion and Earth rotation studies. The data acquired from LAGEOS were used for other geophysical investigations, including studies of crustal dynamics, and Earth and ocean tides, and for the general development of precision orbit determination. The network performed regular tracking of several other retroreflector satellites including GEOS-1, GEOS-3, BE-C, and Starlette for refined determinations of station coordinates and Earth's gravity field and for studies of solid Earth dynamics.

  14. A comparison of three classical analytical theories for the motion of artificial satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, R. A.; Mistreets, G. D.; Watson, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    Motivated by the heavy reliance upon the analytic orbit theory in orbit determination operations at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), a comparison study is performed for three classical analytical theories of artificial satellite motion about an oblate earth. The three analytical theories are: (1) Brouwer, (2) a modified Brouwer, i.e., Brouwer-Lyddane and Cohen, and (3) Vinti. Comparison results for each theory are produced for a number of representative satellites of current or past interest which proved amenable to analytic theory application. The uniformity of these results has significant implications for current and future mission operations and planning activities. Subsidiary topics arising from the results of this study which relate to the optimum usage of the individual theories are also discussed

  15. Earth parameters from global satellite triangulation and trilateration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, I. I.

    1974-01-01

    Results obtained from 159-station global satellite triangulation and trilateration (including Baker-Nunn, BC-4, PC-1000 camera observations, SECOR, C-Band radar and EDM distance measurements) indicate differences in the semidiameter and orientation of the earth compared to results obtained from dynamic satellite solutions. Geoidal undulations obtained can be made consistent with dynamically determined ones at the expense of slight changes in the currently accepted parameters defining the gravity field of the level ellipsoid.

  16. Effect of equinoctial precession on geosynchronous earth satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurfil, P.

    The long-periodic effects of the equinoctial precession on geosynchronous Earth orbit satellites are investigated. The equations of motion in a reference frame that coprecesses with the Earth are developed, and the resulting variational equations are derived using mean classical orbital elements. The Earth gravitational model includes the J_2 and J_3 zonal harmonics, which induce the equinoctial precession due to the lunisolar gravitational torque. It is shown that the ever-growing lifetime and mass of geosynchronous Earth orbit satellites render the equinoctial precession a significant factor, which should be taken into account during mission design, as it affects north-south stationkeeping maneuvers. The equilibria of the variational equations including the zonal harmonics and the equinoctial precession are investigated and a class of stable frozen orbits which are equinoctial precession invariant is derived.

  17. Satellite-tracking and earth-dynamics research programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiffenbach, G. C.

    1973-01-01

    The following activities in Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's (SAO) earth-dynamics programs are covered: (1) satellite-tracking network operations; (2) satellite geodesy and geophysics programs; (3) atmospheric research. Approximately 46,000 successful range measurements were acquired by the SAO laser stations in Peru, South Africa, Brazil, and Arizona. The Peole satellite-tracking campaign conducted in conjunction with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales was completed in August 1973. The SAO network obtained 4482 validated returns of 310 arcs of Peole. These data are of particular value for obtaining more accurate gravity-field and zonal-harmonics coefficients.

  18. On the development of earth observation satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Subsequent to the launching of the first LANDSAT by NASA, Japan has recognized the importance of data from earth observation satellites, has conducted studies, and is preparing to develop an independent system. The first ocean observation satellite will be launched in 1983, the second in 1985. The first land observation satellite is scheduled to be launched in 1987 and by 1990 Japan intends to have both land and ocean observation systems in regular operation. The association reception and data processing systems are being developed.

  19. A Lower Size Limit for Near-Earth Asteroid Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, M.; Jacobson, S. A.; Benner, L.; Brozovic, M.; Howell, E. S.; Margot, J.; Naidu, S.; Shepard, M. K.; Taylor, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Over 40 near-Earth asteroids are now known to have satellites. Delay-Doppler radar imaging has identified the majority of these systems, including both known triple NEAs. Roughly one-sixth of NEAs larger than ~200 m in diameter have satellites; this fraction rises to two-thirds for rapidly rotating large NEAs with spin periods between 2 and 3.5 hours. This distribution is consistent with many NEAs being rubble-pile objects that are disrupted by YORP radiation-pressure spin-up. The observed volume and inferred mass ratios for NEA satellites vary widely, from about 1:1 for the nearly-equal-mass binary 69230 Hermes to 1:1000 or more for objects like 1862 Apollo. The smallest known satellite of any near-Earth asteroid is that of 2004 DC, which has a satellite that is ~60 m in diameter. We have studied archival radar observations to place limits on the occurrence of still smaller satellites. Nearly 60 NEAs with diameters >200 m and spin periods <3.5 hours have been imaged by the Arecibo and Goldstone planetary radars. Again, roughly two-thirds of these objects have satellites 60 m or more in diameter. For 14 objects, we would have been able to detect satellites as small as or smaller than 50 m had they been present, assuming a satellite spin period of >2 hours and setting an SNR threshold of >5/delay-Doppler pixel. For 10 objects, our detection limit was <15 m. For 3 objects, it was <5 m. We do not exclude small satellites entirely, but the fraction of large fast-spinning NEAs with satellites 15 - 50 m in diameter is conservatively <15%, many times less than the fraction with larger satellites. While rotational fission is the probable source of the NEA satellites, the details of satellite formation are not well understood. There are two proposed processes for producing satellites on stable orbits around their primaries. First, the primary may experience several small fission events, and the material in orbit accumulate into a single large satellite. Second, the primary

  20. Time variable Earth's gravity field from SLR satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sośnica, Krzysztof; Jäggi, Adrian; Meyer, Ulrich; Thaller, Daniela; Beutler, Gerhard; Arnold, Daniel; Dach, Rolf

    2015-10-01

    The time variable Earth's gravity field contains information about the mass transport within the system Earth, i.e., the relationship between mass variations in the atmosphere, oceans, land hydrology, and ice sheets. For many years, satellite laser ranging (SLR) observations to geodetic satellites have provided valuable information of the low-degree coefficients of the Earth's gravity field. Today, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission is the major source of information for the time variable field of a high spatial resolution. We recover the low-degree coefficients of the time variable Earth's gravity field using SLR observations up to nine geodetic satellites: LAGEOS-1, LAGEOS-2, Starlette, Stella, AJISAI, LARES, Larets, BLITS, and Beacon-C. We estimate monthly gravity field coefficients up to degree and order 10/10 for the time span 2003-2013 and we compare the results with the GRACE-derived gravity field coefficients. We show that not only degree-2 gravity field coefficients can be well determined from SLR, but also other coefficients up to degree 10 using the combination of short 1-day arcs for low orbiting satellites and 10-day arcs for LAGEOS-1/2. In this way, LAGEOS-1/2 allow recovering zonal terms, which are associated with long-term satellite orbit perturbations, whereas the tesseral and sectorial terms benefit most from low orbiting satellites, whose orbit modeling deficiencies are minimized due to short 1-day arcs. The amplitudes of the annual signal in the low-degree gravity field coefficients derived from SLR agree with GRACE K-band results at a level of 77 %. This implies that SLR has a great potential to fill the gap between the current GRACE and the future GRACE Follow-On mission for recovering of the seasonal variations and secular trends of the longest wavelengths in gravity field, which are associated with the large-scale mass transport in the system Earth.

  1. Analysing the Orbital Movement and Trajectory of LEO (Low Earth Orbit) Satellite Relative to Earth Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohra, Nafeesa; de Meer, Hermann; Memon, Aftab. A.

    Next generation of wireless Internet scenarios include LEOs (Low Earth Orbit Satellites). Lower altitudes of LEO constellations could allow global coverage while offering: low end-to-end propagation delay, low power consumption, and effective frequency usage both for the users and the satellite network. LEOs rotate asynchronously to the earth rotation. Fast movement of LEOs makes it necessary to include efficient mobility management. In past few years mobility patterns have been proposed by considering the full earth coverage constellation whereby, the rotation of earth was often assumed too negligible to be taken into account. The prime objective of this study is to provide facts and figures that show LEOs traverse relative to the rotation of earth. In order to analyse the orbital movement and trajectory of LEOs relative to earth rotation mathematical analysis have been done and justification have been made through equations.

  2. The EarthCARE satellite payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Kotska; Perez-Albinana, Abelardo; Lemanczyk, Jerzy; Heliere, Arnaud; Wehr, Tobias; Eisinger, Michael; Lefebvre, Alain; Nakatsuka, Hirotaka; Tomita, Eiichi

    2014-10-01

    EarthCARE is ESA's third Earth Explorer Core Mission, with JAXA providing one instrument. The mission facilitates unique data product synergies, to improve understanding of atmospheric cloud-aerosol interactions and Earth radiative balance, towards enhancing climate and numerical weather prediction models. This paper will describe the payload, consisting of two active instruments: an ATmospheric LIDar (ATLID) and a Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR), and two passive instruments: a Multi Spectral Imager (MSI) and a Broad Band Radiometer (BBR). ATLID is a UV lidar providing atmospheric echoes, with a vertical resolution of 100 m, up to 40 km altitude. Using very high spectral resolution filtering the relative contributions of particle (aerosols) and Rayleigh (molecular) back scattering will be resolved, allowing cloud and aerosol optical depth to be deduced. Particle scatter co- and cross-polarisation measurements will provide information about the cloud and aerosol particles' physical characteristics. JAXA's 94.05 GHz Cloud Profiling Radar operates with a pulse width of 3.3 μm and repetition frequency 6100 to 7500 Hz. The 2.5 m aperture radar will retrieve data on clouds and precipitation. Doppler shift measurements in the backscatter signal will furthermore allow inference of the vertical motion of particles to an accuracy of about 1 m/s. MSI's 500 m pixel data will provide cloud and aerosol information and give context to the active instrument measurements for 3-D scene construction. Four solar channels and three thermal infrared channels cover 35 km on one side to 115 km on the other side of the other instrument's observations. BBR measures reflected solar and emitted thermal radiation from the scene. To reduce uncertainty in the radiance to flux conversion, three independent view angles are observed for each scene. The combined data allows more accurate flux calculations, which can be further improved using MSI data.

  3. Microlensing planet detection via geosynchronous and low Earth orbit satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogavero, F.; Beaulieu, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Planet detection through microlensing is usually limited by a well-known degeneracy in the Einstein timescale tE, which prevents mass and distance of the lens to be univocally determined. It has been shown that a satellite in geosynchronous orbit could provide masses and distances for most standard planetary events (tE ≈ 20 days) via a microlens parallax measurement. This paper extends the analysis to shorter Einstein timescales, tE ≈ 1 day, when dealing with the case of Jupiter-mass lenses. We then study the capabilities of a low Earth orbit satellite on even shorter timescales, tE ≈ 0.1 days. A Fisher matrix analysis is employed to predict how the 1-σ error on parallax depends on tE and the peak magnification of the microlensing event. It is shown that a geosynchronous satellite could detect parallaxes for Jupiter-mass free floaters and discover planetary systems around very low-mass brown dwarfs. Moreover, a low Earth orbit satellite could lead to the discovery of Earth-mass free-floating planets. Limitations to these results can be the strong requirements on the photometry, the effects of blending, and in the case of the low orbit, the Earth's umbra.

  4. Sensor Web Interoperability Testbed Results Incorporating Earth Observation Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frye, Stuart; Mandl, Daniel J.; Alameh, Nadine; Bambacus, Myra; Cappelaere, Pat; Falke, Stefan; Derezinski, Linda; Zhao, Piesheng

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes an Earth Observation Sensor Web scenario based on the Open Geospatial Consortium s Sensor Web Enablement and Web Services interoperability standards. The scenario demonstrates the application of standards in describing, discovering, accessing and tasking satellites and groundbased sensor installations in a sequence of analysis activities that deliver information required by decision makers in response to national, regional or local emergencies.

  5. In-Orbit Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) Battery Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Anisa; Enciso, Marlon; Rao, Gopalakrishna

    2000-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation outlines the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) power system and battery history. ERBS spacecraft and battery cell failures are listed with the reasons for failure. The battery management decision and stabilization of the batteries is discussed. Present battery operations are shown to be successful.

  6. Reconfigurable HIL Testing of Earth Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) testing has carved a strong niche in several industries, such as automotive, aerospace, telecomm, and consumer electronics. As desktop computers have realized gains in speed, memory size, and data storage capacity, hardware/software platforms have evolved into high performance, deterministic HIL platforms, capable of hosting the most demanding applications for testing components and subsystems. Using simulation software to emulate the digital and analog I/O signals of system components, engineers of all disciplines can now test new systems in realistic environments to evaluate their function and performance prior to field deployment. Within the Aerospace industry, space-borne satellite systems are arguably some of the most demanding in terms of their requirement for custom engineering and testing. Typically, spacecraft are built one or few at a time to fulfill a space science or defense mission. In contrast to other industries that can amortize the cost of HIL systems over thousands, even millions of units, spacecraft HIL systems have been built as one-of-a-kind solutions, expensive in terms of schedule, cost, and risk, to assure satellite and spacecraft systems reliability. The focus of this paper is to present a new approach to HIL testing for spacecraft systems that takes advantage of a highly flexible hardware/software architecture based on National Instruments PXI reconfigurable hardware and virtual instruments developed using LabVIEW. This new approach to HIL is based on a multistage/multimode spacecraft bus emulation development model called Reconfigurable Hardware In-the-Loop or RHIL.

  7. Planning and Scheduling for Fleets of Earth Observing Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Jeremy; Jonsson, Ari; Morris, Robert; Smith, David E.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We address the problem of scheduling observations for a collection of earth observing satellites. This scheduling task is a difficult optimization problem, potentially involving many satellites, hundreds of requests, constraints on when and how to service each request, and resources such as instruments, recording devices, transmitters, and ground stations. High-fidelity models are required to ensure the validity of schedules; at the same time, the size and complexity of the problem makes it unlikely that systematic optimization search methods will be able to solve them in a reasonable time. This paper presents a constraint-based approach to solving the Earth Observing Satellites (EOS) scheduling problem, and proposes a stochastic heuristic search method for solving it.

  8. Space vehicle with artificial gravity and earth-like environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, V. H. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A space vehicle adapted to provide an artificial gravity and earthlike atmospheric environment for occupants is disclosed. The vehicle comprises a cylindrically shaped, hollow pressure-tight body, one end of which is tapered from the largest diameter of the body, the other end is flat and transparent to sunlight. The vehicle is provided with thrust means which rotates the body about its longitudinal axis, generating an artificial gravity effect upon the interior walls of the body due to centrifugal forces. The walls of the tapered end of the body are maintained at a temperature below the dew point of water vapor in the body and lower than the temperature near the transparent end of the body. The controlled environment and sunlight permits an earth like environment to be maintained wherein the CO2/O2 is balanced, and food for the travelers is supplied through a natural system of plant life grown on spacecraft walls where soil is located.

  9. The first Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordberg, W.

    1973-01-01

    The first Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS-1) makes images of the earth's surface in four portions of the electromagnetic spectrum with sufficient spatial resolution and with a minimum of geometric distortions, so that these images may be applied experimentally to the study of geophysical processes relating to earth resources, to the exploration and conservation of these resources, and to the assessments of environmental stresses. During the first six months of operation, ERTS-1 has imaged 6.5 million square kilometers of the earth's surface every day, covering most major land masses and coastal zones as well as both polar regions of this planet. These images as well as the results of their analyses are available to all people throughout the world. Scientific investigators of all countries have been invited to participate in the utilization of ERTS-1 observations. Many of them have already demonstrated the great efficiency, economy, and reliability of making earth surveys from space.

  10. Problems in merging Earth sensing satellite data sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Paul H.; Goldberg, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing systems provide a tremendous source of data flow to the Earth science community. These systems provide scientists with data of types and on a scale previously unattainable. Looking forward to the capabilities of Space Station and the Earth Observing System (EOS), the full realization of the potential of satellite remote sensing will be handicapped by inadequate information systems. There is a growing emphasis in Earth science research to ask questions which are multidisciplinary in nature and global in scale. Many of these research projects emphasize the interactions of the land surface, the atmosphere, and the oceans through various physical mechanisms. Conducting this research requires large and complex data sets and teams of multidisciplinary scientists, often working at remote locations. A review of the problems of merging these large volumes of data into spatially referenced and manageable data sets is presented.

  11. Determination of the Earth's lithospheric magnetic field with satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsiaros, Stavros; Olsen, Nils; Finlay, Christopher

    2016-07-01

    Satellites such as Magsat, Ørsted, CHAMP and Swarm provide the most effective means of determining on a global scale the Earth's lithospheric magnetic field. In particular, the Swarm three-satellite constellation mission aims at capturing the smallest-scale features of the lithospheric field that have ever been captured from space. To achieve that, explicit advantage of the constellation aspect of Swarm has to be taken by using gradient estimates. We derive lithospheric field models using more than one year of magnetic gradient data, which are approximated by first differences of field vector data between the two lower Swarm satellites and along each satellite orbit, respectively. We find that gradient data are less sensitive to large-scale external field fluctuations. Moreover, gradient data appear to be a very efficient way of increasing the resolution of lithospheric field models and thus providing an initial validation of the gradient concept underlying the Swarm mission.

  12. Simulation of interference between Earth stations and Earth-orbiting satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, D. F.

    1994-01-01

    It is often desirable to determine the potential for radio frequency interference between earth stations and orbiting spacecraft. This information can be used to select frequencies for radio systems to avoid interference or it can be used to determine if coordination between radio systems is necessary. A model is developed that will determine the statistics of interference between earth stations and elliptical orbiting spacecraft. The model uses orbital dynamics, detailed antenna patterns, and spectral characteristics to obtain accurate levels of interference at the victim receiver. The model is programmed into a computer simulation to obtain long-term statistics of interference. Two specific examples are shown to demonstrate the model. The first example is a simulation of interference from a fixed-satellite earth station to an orbiting scatterometer receiver. The second example is a simulation of interference from earth-exploration satellites to a deep-space earth station.

  13. Small satellite's role in future hyperspectral Earth observation missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guelman, M.; Ortenberg, F.

    2009-06-01

    Along with various advanced satellite onboard sensors, an important place in the near future will belong to hyperspectral instruments, considered as suitable for different scientific, commercial and military missions. As was demonstrated over the last decade, hyperspectral Earth observations can be provided by small satellites at considerably lower costs and shorter timescales, even though with some limitations on resolution, spectral response, and data rate. In this work the requirements on small satellites with imaging hyperspectral sensors are studied. Physical and technological limitations of hyperspectral imagers are considered. A mathematical model of a small satellite with a hyperspectral imaging spectrometer system is developed. The ability of the small satellites of different subclasses (micro- and mini-) to obtain hyperspectral images with a given resolution and quality is examined. As a result of the feasibility analysis, the constraints on the main technical parameters of hyperspectral instruments suitable for application onboard the small satellites are outlined. Comparison of the data for designed and planned instruments with simulation results validates the presented approach to the estimation of the small satellite size limitations. Presented analysis was carried out for sensors with conventional filled aperture optics.

  14. The NASA Earth Science Program and Small Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neeck, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    Earth's changing environment impacts every aspect of life on our planet and climate change has profound implications on society. Studying Earth as a single complex system is essential to understanding the causes and consequences of climate change and other global environmental concerns. NASA's Earth Science Division (ESD) shapes an interdisciplinary view of Earth, exploring interactions among the atmosphere, oceans, ice sheets, land surface interior, and life itself. This enables scientists to measure global and climate changes and to inform decisions by Government, other organizations, and people in the United States and around the world. The data collected and results generated are accessible to other agencies and organizations to improve the products and services they provide, including air quality indices, disaster prediction and response, agricultural yield projections, and aviation safety. ESD's Flight Program provides the spacebased observing systems and supporting infrastructure for mission operations and scientific data processing and distribution that support NASA's Earth science research and modeling activities. The Flight Program currently has 21 operating Earth observing space missions, including the recently launched Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission, the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2), the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, and the International Space Station (ISS) RapidSCAT and Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) instruments. The ESD has 22 more missions and instruments planned for launch over the next decade. These include first and second tier missions from the 2007 Earth Science Decadal Survey, Climate Continuity missions to assure availability of key climate data sets, and small-sized competitively selected orbital missions and instrument missions of opportunity belonging to the Earth Venture (EV) Program. Small satellites (500 kg or less) are critical contributors to these current and future satellite missions

  15. Interdisciplinary Earth Science Applications Using Satellite Radar Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, C.; Shum, C.; Lee, H.; Dai, C.; Yi, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite altimetry was conceived as a space geodetic concept for ocean surface topography mapping in the NASA-sponsored 1969 Williamstown, MA Conference, and was tested as part of the passive and active radar payload (S192), along with a radiometer and a scatterometer, on Skylab-1 in May 14, 1973. Since then, numerous radar and laser satellite altimetry missions orbiting/flying-by the Earth, Mars, Mercury, Titan and the Moon have been launched, evolving from the original scientific objective of marine gravity field mapping to a geodetic tool to address interdisciplinary Earth and planetary sciences. The accuracy of the radar altimeter has improved from 0.9 m RMS for the S-192 Skylab Ku-band compressed-pulse altimeter, to 2 cm RMS (2 second average) for the dual-frequency pulse-limited radar altimetry and associated sensors onboard TOPEX/POSEIDON. Satellite altimetry has evolved into a unique cross-disciplinary geodetic tool in addressing contemporary Earth science problems including sea-level rise, large-scale general ocean circulation, ice-sheet mass balance, terrestrial hydrology, and bathymetry. Here we provide a concise review and describe specific results on the additional recent innovative and unconventional applications of interdisciplinary science research using satellite radar altimetry, including geodynamics, land subsidence, snow depth, wetland and cold region hydrology.

  16. From Order to Chaos in Earth Satellite Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkolias, Ioannis; Daquin, Jérôme; Gachet, Fabien; Rosengren, Aaron J.

    2016-11-01

    We consider Earth satellite orbits in the range of semimajor axes where the perturbing effects of Earth’s oblateness and lunisolar gravity are of comparable order. This range covers the medium-Earth orbits (MEO) of the Global Navigation Satellite Systems and the geosynchronous orbits (GEO) of the communication satellites. We recall a secular and quadrupolar model, based on the Milankovitch vector formulation of perturbation theory, which governs the long-term orbital evolution subject to the predominant gravitational interactions. We study the global dynamics of this two-and-a-half degrees-of-freedom Hamiltonian system by means of the fast Lyapunov indicator (FLI), used in a statistical sense. Specifically, we characterize the degree of chaoticity of the action space using angle-averaged normalized FLI maps, thereby overcoming the angle dependencies of the conventional stability maps. Emphasis is placed upon the phase-space structures near secular resonances, which are of primary importance to the space debris community. We confirm and quantify the transition from order to chaos in MEO, stemming from the critical inclinations and find that highly inclined GEO orbits are particularly unstable. Despite their reputed normality, Earth satellite orbits can possess an extraordinarily rich spectrum of dynamical behaviors and, from a mathematical perspective, have all the complications that make them very interesting candidates for testing the modern tools of chaos theory.

  17. Satellite-tracking and earth-dynamics research programs. [NASA Programs on satellite orbits and satellite ground tracks of geodetic satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Observations and research progress of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory are reported. Satellite tracking networks (ground stations) are discussed and equipment (Baker-Nunn cameras) used to observe the satellites is described. The improvement of the accuracy of a laser ranging system of the ground stations is discussed. Also, research efforts in satellite geodesy (tides, gravity anomalies, plate tectonics) is discussed. The use of data processing for geophysical data is examined, and a data base for the Earth and Ocean Physics Applications Program is proposed. Analytical models of the earth's motion (computerized simulation) are described and the computation (numerical integration and algorithms) of satellite orbits affected by the earth's albedo, using computer techniques, is also considered. Research efforts in the study of the atmosphere are examined (the effect of drag on satellite motion), and models of the atmosphere based on satellite data are described.

  18. Orbit Determination System for Low Earth Orbit Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elisha, Yossi; Shyldkrot, Haim; Hankin, Maxim

    2007-01-01

    The IAI/MBT Precise Orbit Determination system for Low Earth Orbit satellites is presented. The system is based on GPS pesudorange and carrier phase measurements and implements the Reduced Dynamics method. The GPS measurements model, the dynamic model, and the least squares orbit determination are discussed. Results are shown for data from the CHAMP satellite and for simulated data from the ROKAR GPS receiver. In both cases the one sigma 3D position and velocity accuracy is about 0.2 m and 0.5 mm/sec respectively.

  19. Re-Evaluating Satellite Solar Power Systems for Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    2006-01-01

    The Solar Power Satellite System is a concept to collect solar power in space, and then transport it to the surface of the Earth by microwave (or possibly laser) beam, where if is converted into electrical power for terrestrial use. The recent increase in energy costs, predictions of the near-term exhaustion of oil, and prominence of possible climate change due to the "greenhouse effect" from burning of fossil fuels has again brought alternative energy sources to public attention, and the time is certainly appropriate to reexamine the economics of space based power. Several new concepts for Satellite Power System designs were evaluated to make the concept more economically feasible.

  20. Satellite emission radio interferometric earth surveying series - GPS geodetic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdoran, P. F.

    1979-01-01

    A concept called SERIES (satellite emissions radio interferometric earth surveying) which makes use of GPS (global positioning system) radio transmissions without any satellite modifications, is described. Through the use of very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) and its calibration methods, 0.5 to 3 cm three dimensional baseline accuracy can be achieved over distances of 2 to 200 km respectively, with only 2 hours of on-site data acquisition. Attention is given to such areas as: the radio flux equivalent of GPS transmissions, synthesized delay precision, transmission and frequency subsystem requirements, tropospheric and ionospheric errors. Applications covered include geodesy and seismic tectonics.

  1. Satellite-tracking and Earth dynamics research programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The activities carried out by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) are described. The SAO network continued to track LAGEOS at highest priority for polar motion and Earth rotation studies, and for other geophysical investigations, including crustal dynamics, Earth and ocean tides, and the general development of precision orbit determination. The network performed regular tracking of several other retroreflector satellites including GEOS-1, GEOS-3, BE-C, and Starlette for refined determinations of station coordinates and the Earth's gravity field and for studies of solid Earth dynamics. A major program in laser upgrading continued to improve ranging accuracy and data yield. This program includes an increase in pulse repetition rate from 8 ppm to 30 ppm, a reduction in laser pulse width from 6 nsec to 2 to 3 nsec, improvements in the photoreceiver and the electronics to improve daylight ranging, and an analog pulse detection system to improve range noise and accuracy. Data processing hardware and software are discussed.

  2. Application of China-Brazil Earth resources satellite in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yuliang; Zhao, Shangmin; Zhen, Liu; Bei, Jia

    2009-03-01

    The launch and successful operation of Chinese-Brazil Earth resources satellite (CBERS-1) in China has accelerated the application of space technology in China. These applications include agriculture, forestry, water conservation, land resources, city planning, environment protection and natural hazards monitoring and so on. The result of these applications provides a scientific basis for government decision making and has created great economic and social benefits in Chinese national economy construction. In this paper we present examples and provide auxiliary documentation of additional applications of the data from Earth resource monitoring.

  3. Enhancement of the Natural Earth Satellite Population Through Meteoroid Aerocapture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhead, Althea V.; Cooke, William J.

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority of meteoroids either fall to the ground as meteorites or ablate completely in the atmosphere. However, large meteoroids have been observed to pass through the atmosphere and reenter space in a few instances. These atmosphere-grazing meteoroids have been characterized using ground-based observation and satellite-based infrared detection. As these methods become more sensitive, smaller atmospheregrazing meteoroids will likely be detected. In anticipation of this increased detection rate, we compute the frequency with which centimeter-sized meteoroids graze and exit Earth's atmosphere. We characterize the post-atmosphere orbital characteristics of these bodies and conduct numerical simulations of their orbital evolution under the perturbing influence of the Sun and Moon. We find that a small subset of aerocaptured meteoroids are perturbed away from immediate atmospheric reentry and become temporary natural Earth satellites.

  4. Principle characteristics of the National Earth Observation Satellite. Project SPOT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cazenave, M.

    1977-01-01

    A recent meeting of the Economic and Social Committee examined the programs and means currently being implemented by France in the field in the field of space research and industry which could bring about fast results. This was prompted by man's desire to insure rational resource management of his planet and by man's awareness of the definite contribution that space observation can make to this field of research. Through discussion, the Economic and Social Committee has approved the plan for creating an earth observation satellite. A detailed discussion of the principle characteristics of this earth observation satellite include the objectives, the orbit, characteristics and operations of the platform, maintenance, attitude measurement, the power available and many other characteristics.

  5. Flyght Dynamics of Artificial Satellite of the Minor Asteroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Alexander; Eismont, Natan; Ledkov, Anton; Simonov, Alexander; Pol, Vadim

    During last years the scientific interest to the asteroid is constantly growing. It may be explained by different reasons. One of the most important from them is confirmation of the fact that the asteroids present the real hazard to the Earth. The Chelyabinsk event demonstrates strong in support of this statement. Besides, the asteroids exploration promises to supply new data for understanding of the solar system origin and evolution. And the projects aimed to reach this goal have begun from the NASA NEAR mission to Eros. It was the first one when the spacecraft was landed on the surface of the asteroid. The other successive mission was fulfilled by JAXA with Hayabusa spacecraft which has returned to the Earth soil samples of Itokawa asteroid. In the nearest future the mission to RQ 36 asteroid is planned supposing landing and soil samples return. Unavoidable phase of such missions is the spacecraft flight in vicinity of the target asteroid, for example on the asteroid satellite orbit. It should be mentioned that quite visible number of asteroids has geometric form which is far from being sphere. Accordingly the gravity field of such asteroid cannot be presented as the one close to sphere. The problem is that prior to the mission to the asteroid one cannot receive good enough knowledge of its gravity field and even its gravity field constant. In the paper the flight dynamics problem of spacecraft moving along asteroid satellite orbit is explored. It is supposed that the asteroid is comparatively small with diameter (maximum size) about 300 m, like Apophis asteroid has, or less. To approximate the gravity field of asteroid the last is considered as totality of mass points. We assume such approach as more simple and effective as compared with the commonly accepted use of Legendre polynomial expansion. Different orbits near asteroid are analyzed with the sets of orbital parameters determining the size of orbit, its shape and position with respect to the Sun. The goal

  6. Atmospheric tomography for artificial satellite observations with a single guide star.

    PubMed

    Hart, Michael; Jefferies, Stuart M; Hope, Douglas A

    2016-08-15

    Estimation of wavefront errors in three dimensions is required to mitigate isoplanatic errors when using adaptive optics or numerical restoration algorithms to recover high-resolution images from blurred data taken through atmospheric turbulence. Present techniques rely on multiple beacons, either natural stars or laser guide stars, to probe the atmospheric aberration along different lines of sight, followed by tomographic projection of the measurements. In this Letter, we show that a three-dimensional estimate of the wavefront aberration can be recovered from measurements by a single guide star in the case where the aberration is stratified, provided that the telescope tracks across the sky with nonuniform angular velocity. This is generally the case for observations of artificial Earth-orbiting satellites, and the new method is likely to find application in ground-based telescopes used for space situational awareness. PMID:27519073

  7. Atmospheric tomography for artificial satellite observations with a single guide star.

    PubMed

    Hart, Michael; Jefferies, Stuart M; Hope, Douglas A

    2016-08-15

    Estimation of wavefront errors in three dimensions is required to mitigate isoplanatic errors when using adaptive optics or numerical restoration algorithms to recover high-resolution images from blurred data taken through atmospheric turbulence. Present techniques rely on multiple beacons, either natural stars or laser guide stars, to probe the atmospheric aberration along different lines of sight, followed by tomographic projection of the measurements. In this Letter, we show that a three-dimensional estimate of the wavefront aberration can be recovered from measurements by a single guide star in the case where the aberration is stratified, provided that the telescope tracks across the sky with nonuniform angular velocity. This is generally the case for observations of artificial Earth-orbiting satellites, and the new method is likely to find application in ground-based telescopes used for space situational awareness.

  8. Management approach recommendations. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study (EOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Management analyses and tradeoffs were performed to determine the most cost effective management approach for the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) Phase C/D. The basic objectives of the management approach are identified. Some of the subjects considered are as follows: (1) contract startup phase, (2) project management control system, (3) configuration management, (4) quality control and reliability engineering requirements, and (5) the parts procurement program.

  9. Space simulation testing of the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magette, E.; Smith, D.

    1984-01-01

    The Earth radiation budget components and dynamics and the interactions of this energy cycle, which influences our climate were investigated. The satellite package was subjected to space simulation testing. The size of the spacecraft dictated that the testing be conducted in the new BRUTUS Thermal Vacuum Facility. Computer aided control (CAC), quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), and residual gas analysis (RGA) monitoring are combined with rigid contamination control procedures to protect the flight hardware from anomalous and potentially destructive out of scope test environments.

  10. Tracking target objects orbiting earth using satellite-based telescopes

    DOEpatents

    De Vries, Willem H; Olivier, Scot S; Pertica, Alexander J

    2014-10-14

    A system for tracking objects that are in earth orbit via a constellation or network of satellites having imaging devices is provided. An object tracking system includes a ground controller and, for each satellite in the constellation, an onboard controller. The ground controller receives ephemeris information for a target object and directs that ephemeris information be transmitted to the satellites. Each onboard controller receives ephemeris information for a target object, collects images of the target object based on the expected location of the target object at an expected time, identifies actual locations of the target object from the collected images, and identifies a next expected location at a next expected time based on the identified actual locations of the target object. The onboard controller processes the collected image to identify the actual location of the target object and transmits the actual location information to the ground controller.

  11. Magnus Effect on a Spinning Satellite in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramjatan, Sahadeo; Fitz-Coy, Norman; Yew, Alvin Garwai

    2016-01-01

    A spinning body in a flow field generates an aerodynamic lift or Magnus effect that displaces the body in a direction normal to the freestream flow. Earth orbiting satellites with substantial body rotation in appreciable atmospheric densities may generate a Magnus force to perturb orbital dynamics. We investigate the feasibility of using this effect for spacecraft at a perigee of 80km using the Systems Tool Kit (STK). Results show that for a satellite of reasonable properties, the Magnus effect doubles the amount of time in orbit. Orbital decay was greatly mitigated for satellites spinning at 10000 and 15000RPM. This study demonstrates that the Magnus effect has the potential to sustain a spacecraft's orbit at a low perigee altitude and could also serve as an orbital maneuver capability.

  12. Adaptive control of interference at satellite earth stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlin, J. W.; Chipaloski, A. C.; Steinberger, M. L.

    This paper presents system designs for adaptive interference cancellation at satellite earth stations. Cancellation systems to reduce co-frequency, foreign system (interference from terrestrial microwave radio systems) and adjacent satellite interference as well as interference from co-frequency, orthogonally polarized channels are considered. The systems employ common building blocks: rf weight circuits, an analog processor consisting of a multiplier and integrator, and a dither generator which provides multiple orthogonal sequences so that the rf weights in the cancellation network can be varied and optimized simultaneously. Measured data from field installations equipped with cross-pol. adjacent satellite and sidelobe cancellation systems is presented and discussed. The measured sidelobe canceler performance is compared with performance bounds calculated to result from tolerable circuit mismatches, thermal noise and 'power inversion' effects. The effect of multipath coupled interference is discussed and shown to be a significant factor which limits sidelobe canceler performance.

  13. Electric Propulsion for Low Earth Orbit Communication Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleson, Steven R.

    1997-01-01

    Electric propulsion was evaluated for orbit insertion, satellite positioning and de-orbit applications on big (hundreds of kilograms) and little (tens of kilograms) low earth orbit communication satellite constellations. A simple, constant circumferential thrusting method was used. This technique eliminates the complex guidance and control required when shading of the solar arrays must be considered. Power for propulsion was assumed to come from the existing payload power. Since the low masses of these satellites enable multiple spacecraft per launch, the ability to add spacecraft to a given launch was used as a figure of merit. When compared to chemical propulsion ammonia resistojets, ion, Hall, and pulsed plasma thrusters allowed an additional spacecraft per launch Typical orbit insertion and de-orbit times were found to range from a few days to a few months.

  14. Magsat - A new satellite to survey the earth's magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mobley, F. F.; Eckard, L. D.; Fountain, G. H.; Ousley, G. W.

    1980-01-01

    The Magsat satellite was launched on Oct. 30, 1979 into a sun-synchronous dawn-dusk orbit, of 97 deg inclination, 350 km perigee, and 550 km apogee. It contains a precision vector magnetometer and a cesium-vapor scalar magnetometer at the end of a 6-m long graphite epoxy scissors boom. The magnetometers are accurate to 2 nanotesla. A pair of star cameras are used to define the body orientation to 10 arc sec rms. An 'attitude transfer system' measures the orientation of the magnetometer sensors relative to the star cameras to approximately 5 arc sec rms. The satellite position is determined to 70 meters rms by Doppler tracking. The overall objective is to determine each component of the earth's vector magnetic field to an accuracy of 6 nanotesla rms. The Magsat satellite gathers a complete picture of the earth's magnetic field every 12 hours. The vector components are sampled 16 times per second with a resolution of 0.5 nanotesla. The data will be used by the U.S. Geological Survey to prepare 1980 world magnetic field charts and to detect large-scale magnetic anomalies in the earth's crust for use in planning resource exploration strategy.

  15. Satellite Attitude Control Utilizing the Earth's Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, John S.; Shigemoto, Fred H.; Bourquin, Kent

    1961-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the feasibility of a satellite attitude fine-control system using the interaction of the earth's magnetic field with current-carrying coils to produce torque. The approximate intensity of the earth's magnetic field was determined as a function of the satellite coordinates. Components of the magnetic field were found to vary essentially sinusoidally at approximately twice orbital frequency. Amplitude and distortion of the sinusoidal components were a function of satellite orbit. Two systems for two-axis attitude control evolved from this study, one using three coils and the other using two coils. The torques developed by the two systems differ only when the component of magnetic field along the tracking line is zero. For this case the two-coil system develops no torque whereas the three-coil system develops some effective torque which allows partial control. The equations which describe the three-coil system are complex in comparison to those of the two-coil system and require the measurement of all three components of the magnetic field as compared with only one for the two-coil case. Intermittent three-axis torquing can also be achieved. This torquing can be used for coarse attitude control, or for dumping the stored momentum of inertia reaction wheels. Such a system has the advantage of requiring no fuel aboard the satellite. For any of these magnetic torquing schemes the power required to produce the magnetic moment and the weight of the coil seem reasonable.

  16. Use of Earth Observing Satellites for Operational Hazard Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, H. M.; Lauritson, L.

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) relies on Earth observing satellite data to carry out its operational mission to monitor, predict, and assess changes in the Earth's atmosphere, land, and oceans. NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) uses satellite data to help lessen the impacts of natural and man-made disasters due to tropical cyclones, flash floods, heavy snowstorms, volcanic ash clouds (for aviation safety), sea ice (for shipping safety), and harmful algal blooms. Communications systems on NOAA satellites are used to support search and rescue and to relay data from data collection platforms to a variety of users. NOAA's Geostationary (GOES) and Polar (POES) Operational Environmental Satellites are used in conjunction with other satellites to support NOAA's operational mission. While NOAA's National Hurricane Center is responsible for predicting tropical cyclones affecting the U.S. mainland, NESDIS continuously monitors the tropics world wide, relaying valuable satellite interpretations of tropical systems strength and position to users throughout the world. Text messages are sent every six hours for tropical cyclones in the Western Pacific, South Pacific, and Indian Oceans. To support the monitoring, prediction, and assessment of flash floods and winter storms, NESDIS sends out text messages alerting U.S. weather forecast offices whenever NOAA satellite imagery indicates the occurrence of heavy rain or snow. NESDIS also produces a 24-hour rainfall composite graphic image covering those areas affected by heavy precipitation. The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) and other aviation concerns recognized the need to keep aviators informed of volcanic hazards. To that end, nine Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAAC's) were created to monitor volcanic ash plumes within their assigned airspace. NESDIS hosts one of the VAAC's. Although the NESDIS VAAC's primary responsibility is the

  17. Earth's Radiation Imbalance from a Constellation of 66 Iridium Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, J. C.; Wiscombe, W. J.

    2012-04-01

    The Earth Radiation Imbalance (ERI) at the top of the atmosphere is the primary driving force for climate change. If ERI is not zero, then Earth's temperature, both oceanic and atmospheric, will change gradually over time, tending toward a new steady state. The best estimates of current ERI from climate models range from 0.4 to 0.9 W/m2 (the imbalance being caused mainly by increasing CO2), but current satellite systems do not have the accuracy to measure ERI to even one significant digit. In this paper, we will describe a proposed constellation of 66 Earth radiation budget instruments, to be hosted on Iridium satellites. This system represents a quantum leap over current systems in several ways, in particular in providing ERI to at least one significant digit, thus enabling a crucial test of climate models. Because of its 24/7 coverage, the system will also provide ERI at three-hourly time scales without requiring extrapolations from narrowband geostationary instruments. This would allow studies of ERI's response to fast-evolving phenomena like dust storms and hurricanes. This offers a new, synoptic view of Earth radiation budget that will transform it from a monthly average into a dynamical variable alongside standard meteorological variables like temperature and pressure.

  18. Satellite Detection of the Convection Generated Stresses in Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Han-Shou; Kolenkiewicz, Ronald; Li, Jin-Ling; Chen, Jiz-Hong

    2003-01-01

    We review research developments on satellite detection of the convection generated stresses in the Earth for seismic hazard assessment and Earth resource survey. Particular emphasis is laid upon recent progress and results of stress calculations from which the origin and evolution of the tectonic features on Earth's surface can be scientifically addressed. An important aspect of the recent research development in tectonic stresses relative to earthquakes is the implications for earthquake forecasting and prediction. We have demonstrated that earthquakes occur on the ring of fire around the Pacific in response to the tectonic stresses induced by mantle convection. We propose a systematic global assessment of the seismic hazard based on variations of tectonic stresses in the Earth as observed by satellites. This space geodynamic approach for assessing the seismic hazard is unique in that it can pinpoint the triggering stresses for large earthquakes without ambiguities of geological structures, fault geometries, and other tectonic properties. Also, it is distinct from the probabilistic seismic hazard assessment models in the literature, which are based only on extrapolations of available earthquake data.

  19. Harnessing Satellite Imageries in Feature Extraction Using Google Earth Pro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Sim Joseph; Milano, Alan

    2016-07-01

    Climate change has been a long-time concern worldwide. Impending flooding, for one, is among its unwanted consequences. The Phil-LiDAR 1 project of the Department of Science and Technology (DOST), Republic of the Philippines, has developed an early warning system in regards to flood hazards. The project utilizes the use of remote sensing technologies in determining the lives in probable dire danger by mapping and attributing building features using LiDAR dataset and satellite imageries. A free mapping software named Google Earth Pro (GEP) is used to load these satellite imageries as base maps. Geotagging of building features has been done so far with the use of handheld Global Positioning System (GPS). Alternatively, mapping and attribution of building features using GEP saves a substantial amount of resources such as manpower, time and budget. Accuracy-wise, geotagging by GEP is dependent on either the satellite imageries or orthophotograph images of half-meter resolution obtained during LiDAR acquisition and not on the GPS of three-meter accuracy. The attributed building features are overlain to the flood hazard map of Phil-LiDAR 1 in order to determine the exposed population. The building features as obtained from satellite imageries may not only be used in flood exposure assessment but may also be used in assessing other hazards and a number of other uses. Several other features may also be extracted from the satellite imageries.

  20. Experimental quasi-single-photon transmission from satellite to earth.

    PubMed

    Yin, Juan; Cao, Yuan; Liu, Shu-Bin; Pan, Ge-Sheng; Wang, Jin-Hong; Yang, Tao; Zhang, Zhong-Ping; Yang, Fu-Min; Chen, Yu-Ao; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2013-08-26

    Free-space quantum communication with satellites opens a promising avenue for global secure quantum network and large-scale test of quantum foundations. Recently, numerous experimental efforts have been carried out towards this ambitious goal. However, one essential step--transmitting single photons from the satellite to the ground with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at realistic environments--remains experimental challenging. Here, we report a direct experimental demonstration of the satellite-ground transmission of a quasi-single-photon source. In the experiment, single photons (~0.85 photon per pulse) are generated by reflecting weak laser pulses back to earth with a cube-corner retro-reflector on the satellite CHAMP, collected by a 600-mm diameter telescope at the ground station, and finally detected by single-photon counting modules after 400-km free-space link transmission. With the help of high accuracy time synchronization, narrow receiver field-of-view and high-repetition-rate pulses (76 MHz), a SNR of better than 16:1 is obtained, which is sufficient for a secure quantum key distribution. Our experimental results represent an important step towards satellite-ground quantum communication.

  1. An Earth Orbiting Satellite Service and Repair Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, Andrew; Cardoza, Mike; Chen, John; Daley, Gunter; Frizzell, Andy; Linton, Richard; Rast, Wayne

    1989-01-01

    A conceptual design was produced for the Geosynchronous Satellite Servicing Platform (GSSP), an orbital facility capable of repairing and servicing satellites in geosynchronous orbit. The GSSP is a man-tended platform, which consists of a habitation module, operations module, service bay and truss assembly. This design review includes an analysis of life support systems, thermal and power requirements, robotic and automated systems, control methods and navigation, and communications systems. The GSSP will utilize existing technology available at the time of construction, focusing mainly on modifying and integrating existing systems. The entire facility, along with two satellite retrieval vehicles (SRV), will be placed in geosynchronous orbit by the Advanced Launch System. The SRV will be used to ferry satellites to and from the GSSP. Technicians will be transferred from Earth to the GSSP and back in an Apollo-derived Crew Transfer Capsule (CTC). These missions will use advanced telerobotic equipment to inspect and service satellites. Four of these missions are tentatively scheduled per year. At this rate, the GSSP will service over 650 satelites during the projected 25 year lifespan.

  2. Earth-viewing satellite perspectives on the Chelyabinsk meteor event.

    PubMed

    Miller, Steven D; Straka, William C; Bachmeier, A Scott; Schmit, Timothy J; Partain, Philip T; Noh, Yoo-Jeong

    2013-11-01

    Large meteors (or superbolides [Ceplecha Z, et al. (1999) Meteoroids 1998:37-54]), although rare in recorded history, give sobering testimony to civilization's inherent vulnerability. A not-so-subtle reminder came on the morning of February 15, 2013, when a large meteoroid hurtled into the Earth's atmosphere, forming a superbolide near the city of Chelyabinsnk, Russia, ∼1,500 km east of Moscow, Russia [Ivanova MA, et al. (2013) Abstracts of the 76th Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society, 5366]. The object exploded in the stratosphere, and the ensuing shock wave blasted the city of Chelyabinsk, damaging structures and injuring hundreds. Details of trajectory are important for determining its specific source, the likelihood of future events, and potential mitigation measures. Earth-viewing environmental satellites can assist in these assessments. Here we examine satellite observations of the Chelyabinsk superbolide debris trail, collected within minutes of its entry. Estimates of trajectory are derived from differential views of the significantly parallax-displaced [e.g., Hasler AF (1981) Bull Am Meteor Soc 52:194-212] debris trail. The 282.7 ± 2.3° azimuth of trajectory, 18.5 ± 3.8° slope to the horizontal, and 17.7 ± 0.5 km/s velocity derived from these satellites agree well with parameters inferred from the wealth of surface-based photographs and amateur videos. More importantly, the results demonstrate the general ability of Earth-viewing satellites to provide valuable insight on trajectory reconstruction in the more likely scenario of sparse or nonexistent surface observations. PMID:24145398

  3. Earth-viewing satellite perspectives on the Chelyabinsk meteor event.

    PubMed

    Miller, Steven D; Straka, William C; Bachmeier, A Scott; Schmit, Timothy J; Partain, Philip T; Noh, Yoo-Jeong

    2013-11-01

    Large meteors (or superbolides [Ceplecha Z, et al. (1999) Meteoroids 1998:37-54]), although rare in recorded history, give sobering testimony to civilization's inherent vulnerability. A not-so-subtle reminder came on the morning of February 15, 2013, when a large meteoroid hurtled into the Earth's atmosphere, forming a superbolide near the city of Chelyabinsnk, Russia, ∼1,500 km east of Moscow, Russia [Ivanova MA, et al. (2013) Abstracts of the 76th Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society, 5366]. The object exploded in the stratosphere, and the ensuing shock wave blasted the city of Chelyabinsk, damaging structures and injuring hundreds. Details of trajectory are important for determining its specific source, the likelihood of future events, and potential mitigation measures. Earth-viewing environmental satellites can assist in these assessments. Here we examine satellite observations of the Chelyabinsk superbolide debris trail, collected within minutes of its entry. Estimates of trajectory are derived from differential views of the significantly parallax-displaced [e.g., Hasler AF (1981) Bull Am Meteor Soc 52:194-212] debris trail. The 282.7 ± 2.3° azimuth of trajectory, 18.5 ± 3.8° slope to the horizontal, and 17.7 ± 0.5 km/s velocity derived from these satellites agree well with parameters inferred from the wealth of surface-based photographs and amateur videos. More importantly, the results demonstrate the general ability of Earth-viewing satellites to provide valuable insight on trajectory reconstruction in the more likely scenario of sparse or nonexistent surface observations.

  4. Small Earth Observing Satellites Flying with Large Satellites in the A-Train

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Angelita C.; Loverro, Adam; Case, Warren F.; Queruel, Nadege; Marechal, Chistophe; Barroso, Therese

    2009-01-01

    This paper/poster presents a real-life example of the benefits of flying small satellites with other satellites, large or small, and vice versa. Typically, most small satellites fly payloads consisting of one or two instruments and fly in orbits that are independent from that of other satellites. The science data from these satellites are either used in isolation or correlated with instrument data from other satellites. Data correlation with other satellites is greatly improved when the measurements of the same point or air mass are taken at approximately the same time. Scientists worldwide are beginning to take advantage of the opportunities for improved data correlation, or coincidental science, offered by the international Earth Observing Constellation known as the A-Train (sometimes referred to as the Afternoon Constellation). Most of the A-Train satellites are small - the A-Train is anchored by two large NASA satellites (EOS-Aqua and EOS-Aura), but consists also of 5 small satellites (CloudSat, CALIPSO, PARASOL, OCO and Glory these last two will join in 2009). By flying in a constellation, each mission benefits from coincidental observations from instruments on the other satellites in the constellation. Essentially, from a data point of view, the A-Train can be envisioned as a single, virtual science platform with multiple instruments. Satellites in the A-Train fly at 705 km in sun-synchronous orbits. Their mean local times at the equator are within seconds to a few minutes of each other. This paper describes the challenges of operating an international constellation of independent satellites from the U.S. and Europe to maximize the coincidental science opportunities while at the same time minimizing the level of operational interactions required between team members. The A-Train mission teams have been able to demonstrate that flying as members of an international constellation does not take away the flexibility to accommodate new requirements. Specific

  5. Satellite Emission Range Inferred Earth Survey (SERIES) project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buennagel, L. A.; Macdoran, P. F.; Neilan, R. E.; Spitzmesser, D. J.; Young, L. E.

    1984-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) was developed by the Department of Defense primarily for navigation use by the United States Armed Forces. The system will consist of a constellation of 18 operational Navigation Satellite Timing and Ranging (NAVSTAR) satellites by the late 1980's. During the last four years, the Satellite Emission Range Inferred Earth Surveying (SERIES) team at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has developed a novel receiver which is the heart of the SERIES geodetic system designed to use signals broadcast from the GPS. This receiver does not require knowledge of the exact code sequence being transmitted. In addition, when two SERIES receivers are used differentially to determine a baseline, few cm accuracies can be obtained. The initial engineering test phase has been completed for the SERIES Project. Baseline lengths, ranging from 150 meters to 171 kilometers, have been measured with 0.3 cm to 7 cm accuracies. This technology, which is sponsored by the NASA Geodynamics Program, has been developed at JPL to meet the challenge for high precision, cost-effective geodesy, and to complement the mobile Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) system for Earth surveying.

  6. A Modified Hansen's Theory as Applied to the Motion of Artificial Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musen, Peter

    1960-01-01

    This report presents a theory of oblateness perturbations of the orbits of artificial satellites based on Hansen's theory, with modification for adaptation to fast machine computation. The theory permits the easy inclusion of any gravitational terms and is suitable for the deduction of geo-physical and geodetic data from orbit observations on artificial satellites. The computations can be carried out to any desired order compatible with the accuracy of the geodetic parameters.

  7. Low earth orbit satellite/terrestrial mobile service compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheriff, R. E.; Gardiner, J. G.

    1993-01-01

    Digital cellular mobile 'second generation' systems are now gradually being introduced into service; one such example is GSM, which will provide a digital voice and data service throughout Europe. Total coverage is not expected to be achieved until the mid '90's, which has resulted in several proposals for the integration of GSM with a geostationary satellite service. Unfortunately, because terrestrial and space systems have been designed to optimize their performance for their particular environment, integration between a satellite and terrestrial system is unlikely to develop further than the satellite providing a back-up service. This lack of system compatibility is now being addressed by system designers of third generation systems. The next generation of mobile systems, referred to as FPLMTS (future public land mobile telecommunication systems) by CCIR and UMTS (universal mobile telecommunication system) in European research programs, are intended to provide inexpensive, hand-held terminals that can operate in either satellite, cellular, or cordless environments. This poses several challenges for system designers, not least in terms of the choice of multiple access technique and power requirements. Satellite mobile services have been dominated by the geostationary orbital type. Recently, however, a number of low earth orbit configurations have been proposed, for example Iridium. These systems are likely to be fully operational by the turn of the century, in time for the implementation of FPLMTS. The developments in LEO mobile satellite service technology were recognized at WARC-92 with the allocation of specific frequency bands for 'big' LEO's, as well as a frequency allocation for FPLMTS which included a specific satellite allocation. When considering integrating a space service into the terrestrial network, LEO's certainly appear to have their attractions: they can provide global coverage, the round trip delay is of the order of tens of milliseconds, and

  8. Risk Reduction Activities for the Near-Earth Object Surveillance Satellite Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bédard, D.; Scott, L.; Wallace, B.; Harvey, W.

    The Near-Earth Object Surveillance Satellite (NEOSSat) is a joint project between Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC) and the Canadian Space Agency (CSA). The NEOSSat project will develop a multi-mission micro-satellite bus that is expected to satisfy two concurrent missions: detection and tracking near-Earth asteroids (Near Earth Space Surveillance: NESS) and obtaining metric information on deep-space satellites (High Earth Orbit Surveillance System: HEOSS). The former will use NEOSSat's 15 cm diameter space telescope to discover and determine the orbits of inner Earth orbit (IEO) near-earth objects (NEOs) that cannot be easily observed from the ground. For its part, the HEOSS mission will demonstrate that a micro-satellite can be employed to produce surveillance of space (SofS) metric data of artificial earth-orbiting objects having orbital altitudes between 15,000 and 40,000 km having sufficient quality to be accepted by the U.S. Space Surveillance Network. As a risk reduction effort for the NEOSSat project, a joint satellite tracking experiment was conducted by DRDC, CSA, the University of British Columbia and Dynacon using the MOST (Microvariability Oscillations of STars) microsatellite. MOST conducts precision photometric observations of bright stars and does not usually image starfields, but in October 2005, MOST returned Canada's first space based satellite tracking observations of two GPS spacecraft. Good quality metric tracking data were obtained despite the fact MOST was not designed to image, let alone attempt satellite tracking. The observations also provided an estimate of the targeted satellite brightness and the results were consistent with ground based V-band observations. These results demonstrate the soundness of the NEOSSat concept and the feasibility of the HEOSS mission. The nature of both science missions will require the NEOSSat sensor to be pointed to a different position in the sky on average every five minutes, with a goal of

  9. The spatial resolving power of earth resources satellites: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townshend, J. R. G.

    1980-01-01

    The significance of spatial resolving power on the utility of current and future Earth resources satellites is critically discussed and the relative merits of different approaches in defining and estimating spatial resolution are outlined. It is shown that choice of a particular measure of spatial resolution depends strongly on the particular needs of the user. Several experiments have simulated the capabilities of future satellite systems by degradation of aircraft images. Surprisingly, many of these indicated that improvements in resolution may lead to a reduction in the classification accuracy of land cover types using computer assisted methods. However, where the frequency of boundary pixels is high, the converse relationship is found. Use of imagery dependent upon visual interpretation is likely to benefit more consistently from higher resolutions. Extraction of information from images will depend upon several other factors apart from spatial resolving power: these include characteristics of the terrain being sensed, the image processing methods that are applied as well as certain sensor characteristics.

  10. Earth-viewing satellite perspectives on the Chelyabinsk meteor event

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Steven D.; Straka, William C.; Bachmeier, A. Scott; Schmit, Timothy J.; Partain, Philip T.; Noh, Yoo-Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Large meteors (or superbolides [Ceplecha Z, et al. (1999) Meteoroids 1998:37–54]), although rare in recorded history, give sobering testimony to civilization’s inherent vulnerability. A not-so-subtle reminder came on the morning of February 15, 2013, when a large meteoroid hurtled into the Earth’s atmosphere, forming a superbolide near the city of Chelyabinsnk, Russia, ∼1,500 km east of Moscow, Russia [Ivanova MA, et al. (2013) Abstracts of the 76th Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society, 5366]. The object exploded in the stratosphere, and the ensuing shock wave blasted the city of Chelyabinsk, damaging structures and injuring hundreds. Details of trajectory are important for determining its specific source, the likelihood of future events, and potential mitigation measures. Earth-viewing environmental satellites can assist in these assessments. Here we examine satellite observations of the Chelyabinsk superbolide debris trail, collected within minutes of its entry. Estimates of trajectory are derived from differential views of the significantly parallax-displaced [e.g., Hasler AF (1981) Bull Am Meteor Soc 52:194–212] debris trail. The 282.7 ± 2.3° azimuth of trajectory, 18.5 ± 3.8° slope to the horizontal, and 17.7 ± 0.5 km/s velocity derived from these satellites agree well with parameters inferred from the wealth of surface-based photographs and amateur videos. More importantly, the results demonstrate the general ability of Earth-viewing satellites to provide valuable insight on trajectory reconstruction in the more likely scenario of sparse or nonexistent surface observations. PMID:24145398

  11. In-Orbit Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) Battery Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Anisa; Enciso, Marlon; Rao, Gopalakrishna

    1999-01-01

    This presentation reviews the history of the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and the problems which were experienced with the batteries. After two cells shorted on the first Battery, the decision was made to take battery 1 of line in late 1992. This left the second battery supporting all loads. The second battery began to experience problems in 1998 into 1999. The decision was made to bring the first battery on line and take the second battery off line. The steps to switching the batteries are reviewed, and the results are discussed.

  12. Navigation study for low-altitude Earth satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pastor, P. R.; Fang, B. T.; Yee, C. P.

    1985-01-01

    This document describes several navigation studies for low-altitude Earth satellites. The use of Global Positioning System Navigation Package data for LANDSAT-5 orbit determination is evaluated. In addition, a navigation analysis for the proposed Tracking and Data Aquisition System is presented. This analysis, based on simulations employing one-way Doppler data, is used to determine the agreement between the Research and Development Goddard Trajectory Determination System and the Sequential Error Analysis Program results. Properties of several geopotential error models are studied and an exploratory study of orbit smoother process noise is presented.

  13. NASDA's earth observation satellite data archive policy for the earth observation data and information system (EOIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobue, Shin-ichi; Yoshida, Fumiyoshi; Ochiai, Osamu

    1996-01-01

    NASDA's new Advanced Earth Observing Satellite (ADEOS) is scheduled for launch in August, 1996. ADEOS carries 8 sensors to observe earth environmental phenomena and sends their data to NASDA, NASA, and other foreign ground stations around the world. The downlink data bit rate for ADEOS is 126 MB/s and the total volume of data is about 100 GB per day. To archive and manage such a large quantity of data with high reliability and easy accessibility it was necessary to develop a new mass storage system with a catalogue information database using advanced database management technology. The data will be archived and maintained in the Master Data Storage Subsystem (MDSS) which is one subsystem in NASDA's new Earth Observation data and Information System (EOIS). The MDSS is based on a SONY ID1 digital tape robotics system. This paper provides an overview of the EOIS system, with a focus on the Master Data Storage Subsystem and the NASDA Earth Observation Center (EOC) archive policy for earth observation satellite data.

  14. Co-ordination of satellite and data programs: The committee on earth observation satellites' approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embleton, B. J. J.; Kingwell, J.

    1997-01-01

    Every year, an average of eight new civilian remote sensing satellite missions are launched. Cumulatively, over 250 such missions, each with a cost equivalent in current value to between US 100 million to US 1000 million, have been sponsored by space agencies in perhaps two dozen countries. These missions produce data and information products which are vital for informed decision making all over the world, on matters relating to natural resource exploitation, health and safety, sustainable national development, infrastructure planning, and a host of other applications. By contributing to better scientific understanding of global changes in the atmosphere, land surface, oceans and ice caps, these silently orbiting sentinels in the sky make it possible for governments and industries to make wiser environmental policy decisions and support the economic development needs of humanity. The international Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) is the premier world body for co-ordinating and planning civilian satellite missions for Earth observation. Through its technical working groups and special task teams, it endeavours to: • maximise the international benefits from Earth observation satellites; and • harmonise practice in calibration, validation, data management and information systems for Earth observation. CEOS encompasses not only space agencies (data providers), but also the great international scientific and operational programs which rely on Earth science data from space. The user organisations affiliated with CEOS, together with the mission operators, attempt to reconcile user needs with the complex set of considerations — including national interests, cost, schedule — which affect the undertaking of space missions. Without such an internationally co-ordinated consensual approach, there is a much greater risk of waste through duplication, and of missed opportunity, or through the absence of measurements of some vital physical or biological

  15. Determination of the gravitational coefficent of the earth from near-earth satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ries, J. C.; Eanes, R. J.; Huang, C.; Schutz, B. E.; Shum, C. K.

    1989-01-01

    Laser range, Doppler, and altimeter data collected from 14 near-earth satellites have been combined to determine the value of the geocentric gravitational coefficent (GM) of the earth. A long-arc solution using three years of laser range data to Lageos was used in a separate determination in which the effects of general relativity were invetigated. The value of GM (including the mass of the atmosphere) was determined to be 398600.4405 cu km/sq sec when all corrections for general relativity are taken into account. The uncertainty (1-sigma) in the value of GM is estimated to be 0.001 cu km/sq sec.

  16. Intelligent co-location system of many artificial satellites - strategy of guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umehara, Hiroaki

    A strategy of autonomous orbit-control with near-miss avoidance is considered in the co-located many artificial-satellite system. The potential-function guidance is applied to the autonomous formation-keeping of the eccentricity separation. The acceleration resulting from the continuous and throttled thrust is formulated as a function of positions and velocities of all satellites. If these state variables are measured by on-board sensors, the maneuvering schedule can be computed for each satellite.

  17. Effects of solar radiation pressure torque on the rotational motion of an artificial satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanardi, Maria Cecilia F. P. S.; Vilhenademoraes, Rodolpho

    1992-01-01

    The motion of an artificial satellite about its center of mass is studied considering torques due to the gravity gradient and direct solar radiation pressure. A model for direct solar radiation torque is derived for a circular cylindrical satellite. An analytical solution is obtained by the method of variation of the parameters. This solution shows that the angular variables have secular variation but that the modulus of the rotational angular momentum, the projection of rotational angular momentum on the z axis of the moment of inertia and inertial axis z, suffer only periodic variations. Considering a hypothetical artificial satellite, a numerical application is demonstrated.

  18. Artificially produced rare-earth free cosmic magnet

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Akihiro; Sharma, Parmanand; Sato, Kazuhisa; Takeuchi, Akira; Zhang, Yan; Takenaka, Kana

    2015-01-01

    Chemically ordered hard magnetic L10-FeNi phase of higher grade than cosmic meteorites is produced artificially. Present alloy design shortens the formation time from hundreds of millions of years for natural meteorites to less than 300 hours. Electron diffraction detects four-fold 110 superlattice reflections and a high chemical order parameter (S  0.8) for the developed L10-FeNi phase. The magnetic field of more than 3.5 kOe is required for the switching of magnetization. Experimental results along with computer simulation suggest that the ordered phase is formed due to three factors related to the amorphous state: high diffusion rates of the constituent elements at lower temperatures when crystallizing, a large driving force for precipitation of the L10 phase, and the possible presence of L10 clusters. Present results can resolve mineral exhaustion issues in the development of next-generation hard magnetic materials because the alloys are free from rare-earth elements, and the technique is well suited for mass production. PMID:26567704

  19. Solar power satellites: our next generation of satellites will deliver the sun's energy to Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flournoy, Don M.

    2009-12-01

    The paper addresses the means for gathering energy from sunlight in space and transmitting it to Earth via Solar Power Satellites. The motivating factor is that the output of our sun is the largest potential energy source available, with the capability of providing inexhaustible quantities of clean electrical energy to every location on Earth. The challenge is that considerable financial, intellectual and diplomatic resources must be focused on designing and implementing new types of energy infrastructures in space and on the ground. These include: 1) next-generation space platforms, arrays, and power transmission systems; 2) more flexible and powerful launch vehicles for delivering materials to space; 3) specialized receivers, converters and storage systems on earth, and the in-orbit position allocations, spectrum and software that make these systems work together efficiently and safely.

  20. [Results of mammalian cell culture exposure on artificial earth satellites].

    PubMed

    Sushkov, F V; Portugalov, V V; Rudneva, S V; Bobkova, N N; Iordanishvili, E K

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an exposure of cells of the Syrian hamster strain VNK-21 to space flight effects. In contrast to the cell culture kept in a thermostat at 29 degrees C, the cell culture that was maintained in thermally uncontrolled conditions developed noticeable structural and physiological changes induced by suboptimal temperatures. It was concluded that a 6-day exposure to weightlessness exerted no adverse effect on mammalian cells in vitro and produced no stable structural or physiological changes. Some changes that were detected in the cell culture--faster ageing, stable tendency to an increase of the number of cells with enlarged nuclei, an increase of the mitotic index at an early stage of cultivation--need further investigation.

  1. A Low Earth Orbit satellite marine communication system demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elms, T. Keith; Butt, Kenneth A.; Asmus, Ken W.

    1995-01-01

    An application of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite communications technology was investigated during a joint Canadian/American scientific expedition to the north pole in the summer of 1994. The Canadian ice breaker involved, was equipped with a store-and-forward LEO satellite terminal which was linked to a ground station in St. John's, Newfoundland, via the near-polar-orbiting satellite, HealthSat-l. The objective was to evaluate the performance of such a system while providing an alternate means of communications in the far north. The system performed well, given its inherent limitations. All 151 attempts to send data files to the ship were successful. Only two (2) of the 35 attempts to send files from the ship were unsuccessful. The files ranged in size from 0.1 to 60 Kbytes. In the high arctic, above 80 deg north, this system often provided the only practical means of data communications. This experiment demonstrated the potential of such a system for not-real-time communications with remote and/or mobile stations, and highlighted the many issues involved. This paper describes the project objectives, system configuration and experimental procedure used, related technical issues, trial results, future work, and conclusions.

  2. Velocity perturbation distributions in the breakup of artificial satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, Gautam D.; Tan, Arjun; Reynolds, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    A method is presented for calculating the three orthogonal components of the velocity perturbations of satellite fragments, with a view to ascertaining the nature and intensity of the satellite breakup. The method employs three simultaneous equations furnished by changes in fragment specific energy, specific angular momentum, and plane orientation. Velocity perturbations are thereby calculated for fragments from 20 major satellite breakup events; these results, in conjunction with a technique for determining fragment masses, yield a description of the breakup process.

  3. Earth Camp: Exploring Earth Change through the Use of Satellite Images and Scientific Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldridge, A.; Buxner, S.; Crown, D. A.; Colodner, D.; Orchard, A.; King, B.; Schwartz, K.; Prescott, A.; Prietto, J.; Titcomb, A.

    2014-07-01

    Earth Camp is a NASA-funded program that gives students and teachers opportunities to explore local, regional, and global earth change through a combination of hands-on investigations and the use of satellite images. Each summer, 20 middle school and 20 high school students participate in a two-week leadership program investigating contemporary issues (e.g., changes in river sheds, water quality, and land use management) through hands-on investigations, analyzing remote sensing data, and working with experts. Each year, 20 teachers participate in a year-long professional development program that includes monthly workshops, field investigations on Mt. Lemmon in Tucson, Arizona, and a week-long summer design workshop. Teachers conduct investigations of authentic questions using satellite images and create posters to present results of their study of earth change. In addition, teachers design lesson plans to expand their students' ability to investigate earth change with 21st Century tools. Lessons can be used as classroom exercises or for after-school club programs. Independent evaluation has been an integral part of program development and delivery for all three audiences, enabling the program staff and participants to reflect on and continually improve their practice and learning over the three-year period.

  4. A Comparison of Techniques for Scheduling Earth-Observing Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Al; Crawford, James; Lohn, Jason; Pryor, Anna

    2004-01-01

    Scheduling observations by coordinated fleets of Earth Observing Satellites (EOS) involves large search spaces, complex constraints and poorly understood bottlenecks, conditions where evolutionary and related algorithms are often effective. However, there are many such algorithms and the best one to use is not clear. Here we compare multiple variants of the genetic algorithm: stochastic hill climbing, simulated annealing, squeaky wheel optimization and iterated sampling on ten realistically-sized EOS scheduling problems. Schedules are represented by a permutation (non-temperal ordering) of the observation requests. A simple deterministic scheduler assigns times and resources to each observation request in the order indicated by the permutation, discarding those that violate the constraints created by previously scheduled observations. Simulated annealing performs best. Random mutation outperform a more 'intelligent' mutator. Furthermore, the best mutator, by a small margin, was a novel approach we call temperature dependent random sampling that makes large changes in the early stages of evolution and smaller changes towards the end of search.

  5. A geostationary Earth orbit satellite model using Easy Java Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, Loo Kang; Hwee Goh, Giam

    2013-01-01

    We develop an Easy Java Simulation (EJS) model for students to visualize geostationary orbits near Earth, modelled using a Java 3D implementation of the EJS 3D library. The simplified physics model is described and simulated using a simple constant angular velocity equation. We discuss four computer model design ideas: (1) a simple and realistic 3D view and associated learning in the real world; (2) comparative visualization of permanent geostationary satellites; (3) examples of non-geostationary orbits of different rotation senses, periods and planes; and (4) an incorrect physics model for conceptual discourse. General feedback from the students has been relatively positive, and we hope teachers will find the computer model useful in their own classes.

  6. Interactive analysis of a large aperture Earth observations satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, R. L.; Deryder, D. D.; Ferebee, M. J., Jr.; Smith, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    A system level design and analysis has been conducted on an Earth Observation Satellite (EOS) system using the Interactive Design and Evaluation of Advanced Spacecraft (IDEAS) computer-aided design and analysis program. The IDEAS program consists of about 40 user-friendly technical modules and an interactive graphics display. The reflector support system and feed mast of the EOS spacecraft are constructed with box-truss structural concept, a lattice configuration which can be packaged for delivery in a single Shuttle flight and deployed in orbit. The deployed spacecraft consists of a 120-m by 60-m parabolic focal axis. The spacecraft was modeled for structural, thermal, and control systems analysis and structural elements were designed. On-orbit dynamic and thermal loading analyses were conducted; spacecraft weights and developmental and first unit costs were determined.

  7. Spacecraft design project: Low Earth orbit communications satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moroney, Dave; Lashbrook, Dave; Mckibben, Barry; Gardener, Nigel; Rivers, Thane; Nottingham, Greg; Golden, Bill; Barfield, Bill; Bruening, Joe; Wood, Dave

    1991-01-01

    This is the final product of the spacecraft design project completed to fulfill the academic requirements of the Spacecraft Design and Integration 2 course (AE-4871) taught at the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School. The Spacecraft Design and Integration 2 course is intended to provide students detailed design experience in selection and design of both satellite system and subsystem components, and their location and integration into a final spacecraft configuration. The design team pursued a design to support a Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) communications system (GLOBALSTAR) currently under development by the Loral Cellular Systems Corporation. Each of the 14 team members was assigned both primary and secondary duties in program management or system design. Hardware selection, spacecraft component design, analysis, and integration were accomplished within the constraints imposed by the 11 week academic schedule and the available design facilities.

  8. Discovery of a Satellite around a Near-Earth Asteroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-07-01

    In the course of the major observational programme of asteroids by the Institute of Planetary Exploration of the German Aerospace Research Establishment (DLR) [1] in Berlin, two of the staff astronomers, Stefano Mottola and Gerhard Hahn , have discovered a small satellite (moon) orbiting the asteroid (3671) Dionysus. The new measurements were obtained with the DLR CCD Camera attached at the 60-cm Bochum telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory in Chile. This is only the second known case of an asteroid with a moon. Moons and planets Until recently, natural satellites were only known around the major planets . The Moon orbits the Earth, there are two tiny moons around Mars, each of the giant planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune has many more, and even the smallest and outermost, Pluto, is accompanied by one [2]. However, the new discovery now strengthens the belief of many astronomers that some, perhaps even a substantial number of the many thousands of minor planets (asteroids) in the solar system may also possess their own moons. The first discovery of a satellite orbiting an asteroid was made by the NASA Galileo spacecraft, whose imagery, obtained during a fly-by of asteroid (253) Ida in August 1993, unveiled a small moon that has since been given the name Dactyl. (3671) Dionysus: an Earth-crossing asteroid In the framework of the DLR asteroid monitoring programme, image sequences are acquired to measure an asteroid's brightness variations caused by the changing amount of sunlight reflected from the asteroid's illuminated surface as it spins, due to its irregular shape. The brightness variations may be used to derive the asteroid's rotational properties, such as speed of rotation and spin axis orientation. Asteroid Dionysus [3] was put on the observing list because it belongs to a special class of asteroids, the members of which occasionally come very close to the Earth and have a small, but non-negligible chance of colliding with our planet. Most of

  9. Earth observations satellite data policy: Process and outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, L.R.

    1994-12-31

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) develops, launches, and operates satellites to observe and monitor the Earth and its environment. This study categorizes each program based on the relationship between NASA and external organizations. A program can be an autonomous mission undertaken for NASA`s own constituency, or it can involve a client agency or a partner. These relationships affect how data policy decisions are made and implemented, and how the valuable output of NASA`s Earth observations satellites is managed. The process in NASA for determining which programs will be approved is very informal. Ideas and concepts surface and reach the consciousness of NASA management; if sufficient support is achieved, a proposal can move to the feasibility study phase and from there become an approved and funded mission. The handling of data can be an important consideration in generating political support for program approval. Autonomous programs tend to have decisions made at lower levels and documented informally or not at all. Data policy is part of routine implementation of programs and does not generally rise to the visibility of the agency head or congressional staff or the Executive Office of the President. Responsibility for data management for autonomous missions is retained at NASA centers. Client programs involve higher level decision makers, and are the subject of political interest because they cross agency boundaries. The data policy process includes presidential statements on data access. As part of the client relationship, NASA often provides resources to the client for data handling and analysis, and shares these responsibilities. Data policy for partner programs is the result of bargaining between the partners, either foreign government agencies or private companies.

  10. Analysis on high-altitude earth Orbit Satellite Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J.; Hou, Y. W.; Yang, L.

    2016-02-01

    The difference is introduced between approx circular apogee orbit and approx circular perigee one by error transmitting at first. Then the characteristic of secant compensation is analysed when radar tracking object with high elevation. And two kinds of orbit force be pressed to, their perturbation influence and their earth-core angles are explained. And then the series of emulation results are shown including error data emulated with Monte Carlo method, the influence of the velocity increment from the ejecting force of spring while satellite-rocket separating and their perturbation influence and the length of influence of the data arc. Then decision analysis of Wald method and Bayesian statistics rule and the results from the two rule are introduced. So the suitable orbit determination decision is put forward from the decision method. Finally the result is tested reasonable and feasible via the real data. In the end it is useful to reference to make orbit decision in short injection of circular orbit far from the earth for calculating concurrently precise and timely.

  11. Use of satellite gravimetry for estimating recent solid Earth changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramillien, Guillaume

    2014-05-01

    Since its launch in March 2002, the Gravity Recovery & Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission provides a global mapping of the time variations of the Earth's gravity field for the recent period. Official centers such as Center of Space Research (CSR) in Austin, TX, Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, CA and GeoForschungZentrum (GFZ) in Potsdam, Germany, provide 10-day and monthly solutions of Stokes coefficients (i.e., spherical harmonic coefficients of the geopotential) up to harmonic degree 50-60 (or, equivalently, a spatial resolution of 300-400 km) for the timespan 2002-2012. Tiny variations of the gravity measured by GRACE are mainly due to the total water storage change on continents. Therefore, these solutions of water mass can be used to correct other datasets, and then isolate the gravity signatures of large and sudden earthquakes, as well as of the continuous Post Glacial Rebound (PGR) rate. As these measured seasonal variations of continental hydrology represent the variations of water mass load, it is also possible to derive the deformation of the terrestrial surface associated to this varying load using Love numbers. These latter numbers are obtained by assuming an elastic Earth model. In the center of the Amazon basin, the seasonal displacements of the surface due to hydrology reach amplitudes of a few centimeters typically. Time-series of GRACE-based radial displacement of the surface can be analysed and compared with independent local GPS records for validation.

  12. Two locations, two times, and the element set. [applicable to orbit determination of artificial satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taff, L. G.; Randall, P. M. S.

    1985-01-01

    A robust analytical formulation is developed to apply classical initial orbital determination to artificial satellites whose locations are uncertain to about 1 cu km and separated in time by no more than 30 min. An analytical simplification reduces Gauss's method, iteration on the semilatus rectum, iteration on the true anomaly, and the Lambert-Euler technique, to the solution of a single equation in one unknown, instead of the usual coupled triplet of three equations in three unknowns. The method is demonstrated for all common artificial satellite orbits over a variety of time intervals between the two location vectors, and for a varied set of position and distance errors.

  13. Scheduling algorithm for data relay satellite optical communication based on artificial intelligent optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei-hu; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Shang-hong; Li, Yong-jun; Wang, Xiang; Dong, Yi; Dong, Chen

    2013-08-01

    Optical satellite communication with the advantages of broadband, large capacity and low power consuming broke the bottleneck of the traditional microwave satellite communication. The formation of the Space-based Information System with the technology of high performance optical inter-satellite communication and the realization of global seamless coverage and mobile terminal accessing are the necessary trend of the development of optical satellite communication. Considering the resources, missions and restraints of Data Relay Satellite Optical Communication System, a model of optical communication resources scheduling is established and a scheduling algorithm based on artificial intelligent optimization is put forwarded. According to the multi-relay-satellite, multi-user-satellite, multi-optical-antenna and multi-mission with several priority weights, the resources are scheduled reasonable by the operation: "Ascertain Current Mission Scheduling Time" and "Refresh Latter Mission Time-Window". The priority weight is considered as the parameter of the fitness function and the scheduling project is optimized by the Genetic Algorithm. The simulation scenarios including 3 relay satellites with 6 optical antennas, 12 user satellites and 30 missions, the simulation result reveals that the algorithm obtain satisfactory results in both efficiency and performance and resources scheduling model and the optimization algorithm are suitable in multi-relay-satellite, multi-user-satellite, and multi-optical-antenna recourses scheduling problem.

  14. Satellite Mapping of the Earth's Ozone and Sulfur Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin; Bhartia, P. K.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instruments are spatially-scanning UV spectrometers that have produced daily global images of total ozone over the last 21 years since the launch of the Nimbus 7 satellite. The instruments use a total ozone retrieval algorithm pioneered by J.V. Dave and C. L. Mateer for the Nimbus 4 Backscatter Ultraviolet (BUV) instrument, designed by D.F. Heath. The TOMS ozone maps have revealed the relations between total ozone and atmospheric dynamics, and shown the dramatic losses of ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole and the Northern hemisphere. The accepted long-term trends in global, regional, and local ozone are derived from data from the Nimbus 7 TOMS and three successive TOMS flights on Russian, Japanese, and American satellites. The next TOMS flight will be launched in 2000. The contiguous mapping design and fortuitous choice of TOMS wavelengths bands also permitted imaging of a second atmospheric gas, sulfur dioxide, which is transient due to its short lifetime. The importance of this measurement was first realized after the eruption of El Chichon volcano in 1982. The extreme range of sizes of volcanic eruptions and the associated danger require observations from a distant observing platform. The first quantitative time series of the input of sulfur dioxide by explosive volcanic eruptions into the atmosphere thus was developed from the TOMS missions. Finally, the Rayleigh and aerosol scattering spectral characteristic and reflectivity complete the four dominant pieces of information in the near UV albedo of the Earth. The four parameters are derived with a linear algorithm, the absorption coefficients of the gases, and effective paths computed from radiative transfer tables. Absorbing aerosol clouds (smoke, dust, volcanic ash) are readily identified by their deviation from a Rayleigh signature. The greatest shortcoming of the TOMS dataset is the 24 hour time resolution that is produced by the polar orbit of the satellite

  15. Satellite Mapping of the Earth's Ozone and Sulfur Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin; Bhartia, P. K.

    2000-01-01

    The Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instruments are spatially-scanning UV spectrometers that have produced daily global images of total ozone over the last 21 years since the launch of the Nimbus 7 satellite. The instruments use a total ozone retrieval algorithm pioneered by J.V. Dave and C. L. Mateer for the Nimbus 4 Backscatter Ultraviolet (BUV) instrument, designed by D.F. Heath. The TOMS ozone maps have revealed the relations between total ozone and atmospheric dynamics, and shown the dramatic losses of ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole and the Northern hemisphere. The accepted long-term trends in global, regional, and local ozone are derived from data from the Nimbus 7 TOMS and three successive TOMS flights on Russian, Japanese, and American satellites. The next TOMS flight will be launched in 2000. The contiguous mapping design and fortuitous choice of TOMS wavelengths bands also permitted imaging of a second atmospheric gas, sulfur dioxide, which is transient due to its short lifetime. The importance of this measurement was first realized after the eruption of El Chichon volcano in 1982. The extreme range of sizes of volcanic eruptions and the 'associated danger require observations from a distant observing platform. The first quantitative time series of the input of sulfur dioxide by explosive volcanic eruptions into the atmosphere thus was developed from the TOMS missions. Finally, the Rayleigh and aerosol scattering spectral characteristic and reflectivity complete the four dominant pieces of information in the near UV albedo of the Earth. The four parameters are derived with a linear algorithm, the absorption coefficients of the gases, and effective paths computed from radiative transfer tables. Absorbing aerosol clouds (smoke, dust, volcanic ash) are readily identified by their deviation from a Rayleigh signature. The greatest shortcoming of the TOMS dataset is the 24 hour time resolution that is produced by the polar orbit of the satellite

  16. Photovoltaic power system for satellite Earth stations in remote areas: Project status and design description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delombard, R.

    1984-01-01

    A photovoltaic power system which will be installed at a remote location in Indonesia to provide power for a satellite Earth station and a classroom for video and audio teleconferences are described. The Earth station may also provide telephone service to a nearby village. The use of satellite communications for development assistance applications and the suitability of a hybrid photovoltaic engine generator power system for remote satellite Earth stations are demonstrated. The Indonesian rural satellite project is discussed and the photovoltaic power system is described.

  17. A photovoltaic power system and a low-power satellite earth station for Indonesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delombard, Richard; Everson, Kent

    1985-01-01

    A photovoltaic power system and a low-power, two-way satellite earth station have been installed at Wawotobi, Sulawesi, Indonesia to provide university classroom communications for audio teleconferencing and video graphics. This project is a part of the Agency for International Development's Rural Satellite Program. The purpose of this program is to demonstrate the use of satellite communications for development assistance applications. The purpose of the photovoltaic power system is to demonstrate the suitability of a hybrid photovoltaic/engine-generator power system for a remote satellite earth station. This paper describes the design, installation and initial operation of the photovoltaic power system and the earth station.

  18. Discovery of a Satellite around a Near-Earth Asteroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-07-01

    In the course of the major observational programme of asteroids by the Institute of Planetary Exploration of the German Aerospace Research Establishment (DLR) [1] in Berlin, two of the staff astronomers, Stefano Mottola and Gerhard Hahn , have discovered a small satellite (moon) orbiting the asteroid (3671) Dionysus. The new measurements were obtained with the DLR CCD Camera attached at the 60-cm Bochum telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory in Chile. This is only the second known case of an asteroid with a moon. Moons and planets Until recently, natural satellites were only known around the major planets . The Moon orbits the Earth, there are two tiny moons around Mars, each of the giant planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune has many more, and even the smallest and outermost, Pluto, is accompanied by one [2]. However, the new discovery now strengthens the belief of many astronomers that some, perhaps even a substantial number of the many thousands of minor planets (asteroids) in the solar system may also possess their own moons. The first discovery of a satellite orbiting an asteroid was made by the NASA Galileo spacecraft, whose imagery, obtained during a fly-by of asteroid (253) Ida in August 1993, unveiled a small moon that has since been given the name Dactyl. (3671) Dionysus: an Earth-crossing asteroid In the framework of the DLR asteroid monitoring programme, image sequences are acquired to measure an asteroid's brightness variations caused by the changing amount of sunlight reflected from the asteroid's illuminated surface as it spins, due to its irregular shape. The brightness variations may be used to derive the asteroid's rotational properties, such as speed of rotation and spin axis orientation. Asteroid Dionysus [3] was put on the observing list because it belongs to a special class of asteroids, the members of which occasionally come very close to the Earth and have a small, but non-negligible chance of colliding with our planet. Most of

  19. Algorthms and prigrams complex for chaotic dynamics investigation of the Earth artificial sat-ellites. (Russian Title: Комплекс алгоритмов и программ для исследования хаотичности в динамике искусственных спутников Земли )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordovitsyna, T. V.; Aleksandrova, A. G.; Chuvashov, I. N.

    2010-12-01

    In this paper complex of algorithms and programs for revelation and investigation of dynamical chaotic state in the motion of the Earth artificial satellites by parallel computing is presented. Complex has been based on the program "Numerical model of the system artificial satellites motion" for cluster "Skiff Cyberia". Factor MEGNO as main indicator of chaotic state has been used. The factor is computed by combined numerical integration of equations of the motion, equations in variation and equations of MEGNO parameters. The results of program complex testing in the problem of MEGNO parameters calculation for different types of geostationary orbits are presented.

  20. Timation 3 satellite. [artificial satellite for navigation, space radiation, and time transfer applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartholomew, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics of the Timation 3 satellite are discussed. A diagram of the basic structure is provide to show the solar panels, navigation and telemetry antennas, gravity gradient booms, and solar cell experiments. The specific application of the satellite for time management or time transfer for navigation purposes is reported. Various measurements and experiments conducted by the satellite are described.

  1. How Long Does It Take for a Satellite to Fall to Earth?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lira, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce students of science and engineering to the orbital lifetimes of satellites in circular low Earth orbits. It is only necessary to know about classical mechanics for this calculation. The orbital decay of satellites is due to the interaction of the satellite with the surrounding gas, atmospheric drag.…

  2. Influence of satellite motion on polarization qubits in a Space-Earth quantum communication link.

    PubMed

    Bonato, Cristian; Aspelmeyer, Markus; Jennewein, Thomas; Pernechele, Claudio; Villoresi, Paolo; Zeilinger, Anton

    2006-10-16

    In a Space quantum-cryptography experiment a satellite pointing system is needed to send single photons emitted by the source on the satellite to the polarization analysis apparatus on Earth. In this paper a simulation is presented regarding how the satellite pointing systems affect the polarization state of the single photons, to help designing a proper compensation system.

  3. Analytic short period lunar and solar perturbations of artificial satellites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, D.

    1972-01-01

    The short period luni-solar theory of Kozai is generalized for arbitrary obliquity of the ecliptic and inclination of the moon's orbit to the ecliptic. Analytic first order lunar perturbations to the elements are derived. The theory is illustrated by an application to the communication satellite Intelsat 3F3.

  4. Analytic short period lunar and solar perturbations of artificial satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, D.

    1972-01-01

    A short period luni-solar theory was generalized for application to arbitrary obliquity of the ecliptic and inclination of the moon's orbit to the ecliptic. Analytic first order lunar perturbations to the elements were derived. The theory is illustrated by an application to the communication satellite Intelsat 3F3.

  5. History of satellite missions and measurements of the Earth Radiation Budget (1957-1984)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    House, F. B.; Gruber, A.; Hunt, G. E.; Mecherikunnel, A. T.

    1986-01-01

    The history of satellite missions and their measurements of the earth radiation budget from the beginning of the space age until the present time are reviewed. The survey emphasizes the early struggle to develop instrument systems to monitor reflected shortwave and emitted long-wave exitances from the earth, and the problems associated with the interpretation of these observations from space. In some instances, valuable data sets were developed from satellite measurements whose instruments were not specifically designed for earth radiation budget observations.

  6. Artificial Crater Formation on Satellite Surfaces Using an Orbiting Railgun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dissly, R. W.; Miller, K. L.; Carlson, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    The specification of greater than 45kW of disposable power available on the JIMO spacecraft raises the possibility of a new class of instrumentation that has utility at such power levels. In this presentation we discuss the concept of an electromagnetic mass driver that can launch projectiles from orbit around one of the Galilean satellites directed on a trajectory that will impact the satellite surface. The resulting impact will create a crater that will provide information on the mechanical properties of surface and near-surface materials, expose subsurface materials for remote spectral identification, and form a vapor cloud that can be sensed for composition either remotely or in-situ. An analog for such a controlled cratering experiment is Deep Impact, a mission to observe the crater and ensuing ejecta cloud formed by a ballistic projectile into a comet surface in July, 2005.

  7. On the Long Period Luni-Solar Effect in the Motion of an Artificial Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musen, Peter

    1961-01-01

    Two systems of formulas are presented for the determination of the long period perturbations caused by the Sun and the Moon in the motion of an artificial satellite. The first system can be used to determine the lunar effect for all satellites. The second method is more convenient for finding the lunar effect for close satellites and the solar effect for all satellites. Knowledge of these effects is essential for determining the stability of the satellite orbit. The basic equations of both systems are arranged in a form which permits the use of numerical integration. The two theories are more accurate and more adaptable to the use of electronic machines than the analytical developments obtained previously.

  8. Polarimetric remote sensing of the Earth from satellites: a perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, M. I.; Glory APS Science Team

    2011-12-01

    attempt to launch a more accurate aerosol-cloud polarimeter, called APS, as part of the NASA Glory Mission failed on 4 March 2011. However, much useful information has been obtained with the air-borne version of APS called RSP. In this talk I will briefly summarize the main results obtained with POLDER and RSP and discuss the prospects of polarimetric remote sensing from Earth-orbiting satellites.

  9. EUV observation from the Earth-orbiting satellite, EXCEED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, K.; Murakami, G.; Yoshikawa, I.; Ueno, M.; Uemizu, K.; Yamazaki, A.

    2010-01-01

    An Earth-orbiting small satellite “EXtreme ultraviolet spectrosCope for ExosphEric Dynamics” (EXCEED) which will be launched in 2012 is under development. The mission will carry out spectroscopic and imaging observation of EUV (Extreme Ultraviolet: 60-145 nm) emissions from tenuous plasmas around the planets (Venus, Mars, Mercury, and Jupiter). It is essential for EUV observation to put on an observing site outside the Earth’s atmosphere to avoid the absorption. It is also essential that the detection efficiency must be very high in order to catch the faint signals from those targets. In this mission, we employ cesium iodide coated microchannel plate as a 2 dimensional photon counting devise which shows 1.5-50 times higher quantum detection efficiency comparing with the bared one. We coat the surface of the grating and entrance mirror with silicon carbides by the chemical vapor deposition method in order to archive the high diffraction efficiency and reflectivity. The whole spectrometer is shielded by the 2 mm thick stainless steel to prevent the contamination caused by the high energy electrons from the inner radiation belt. In this paper, we will introduce the mission overview, its instrument, and their performance.

  10. Applications of Some Artificial Intelligence Methods to Satellite Soundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munteanu, M. J.; Jakubowicz, O.

    1985-01-01

    Hard clustering of temperature profiles and regression temperature retrievals were used to refine the method using the probabilities of membership of each pattern vector in each of the clusters derived with discriminant analysis. In hard clustering the maximum probability is taken and the corresponding cluster as the correct cluster are considered discarding the rest of the probabilities. In fuzzy partitioned clustering these probabilities are kept and the final regression retrieval is a weighted regression retrieval of several clusters. This method was used in the clustering of brightness temperatures where the purpose was to predict tropopause height. A further refinement is the division of temperature profiles into three major regions for classification purposes. The results are summarized in the tables total r.m.s. errors are displayed. An approach based on fuzzy logic which is intimately related to artificial intelligence methods is recommended.

  11. Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) Derived Data, Global Earth Coverage (GEC) from NASA's Earth Probe Satellite

    DOE Data Explorer

    This is data from an external datastream processed through the ARM External Data Center (XDC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The XDC identifies sources and acquires data, called "external data", to augment the data being generated within the ARM program. The external data acquired are usually converted from native format to either netCDF or HDF formats. The GEC collection contains global data derived from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument on the Earth Probe satellite, consisting of daily values of aerosol index, ozone and reflectivity remapped into a regular 1x1.25 deg grid. Data are available from July 25, 1996 - December 31, 2005, but have been updated or replaced as of September 2007. See the explanation on the ARM web site at http://www.arm.gov/xds/static/toms.stm and the information at the NASA/TOMS web site: http://toms.gsfc.nasa.gov/ (Registration required)

  12. Earth-satellite propagation above GHz: Papers from the 1972 spring URSI session on experiments utilizing the ATS-5 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ippolito, L. J. (Compiler)

    1972-01-01

    Papers are reported from the Special Session on Earth-Satellite Propagation Above 10 GHz, presented at The 1972 Spring Meeting of the United States National Committee, International Union of Radio Science, April 1972, Washington, D. C. This session was devoted to propagation measurements associated with the Applications Technology Satellite (ATS-5), which provided the first operational earth-space links at frequencies above 15 GHz. A comprehensive summary is presented of the major results of the ATS-5 experiment measurements and related radiometric, radar and meteorological studies. The papers are organized around seven selected areas of interest, with the results of the various investigators combined into a single paper presented by a principal author for that area. A comprehensive report is provided on the results of the ATS-5 satellite to earth transmissions. A complete list of published reports and presentations related to the ATS-5 Millimeter Wave Experiment is included.

  13. Status and trends of small satellite missions for Earth observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandau, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    Small satellites for remote sensing—how is a small satellite characterized, what is the basis for it, what are the trends, and what the application areas. The paper gives some insights in related facts and trends. The requirements concerning spatial, spectral and time resolution for the manifold application areas indicate the wide range of potential application for small satellites. Most of them can be covered using small satellites because of their already proven high performance capabilities in terms of spatial and spectral resolution. The implementation of satellite constellations to increase the time resolution and ground coverage is a unique feature of small, low-cost satellites. One payload example (BIRD) is given to show the potential of small satellites to give even better results compared to the existing fleet of larger satellites. More examples are given for small satellite constellations and formations in order to show how small satellites can be used to improve time resolution and ground coverage as well as to solve tasks which a single satellite is unable to solve.

  14. Present status and future plans of the Japanese earth observation satellite program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Kiyoshi; Arai, Kohei; Igarashi, Tamotsu

    Japan is now operating 3 earth observation satellites, i. e. MOS-1 (Marine Observation Satellite-1, Momo-1 in Japanese), EGS (Experimental Geodetic Satellite, Ajisai in Japanese) and GMS (Geostationary Meteorological Satellite, Himawari in Japanese). MOS-1 has 3 different sensors, MESSR (Multispectral Electronic Self Scanning Radiometer), VTIR (Visible and Thermal Infrared Radiometer) and MSR (Microwave Scanning Radiometer) in addition to DCS (Data Collection System). GMS has two sensors, VISSR (Visible and IR Spin Scan Radiometer) and SEM (Solar Environmental Monitor). EGS is equipped with reflecting mirrors of the sun light and laser reflecters. For the future earth observation satellites, ERS-1 (Earth Resources Satellite-1), MOS-1b, ADEOS (Advanced Earth Observing Satellite) are under development. Two sensors, AMSR (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer) and ITIR (Intermediate Thermal IR Radiometer) for NASA's polar platform are initial stage of development. Study and planning are made for future earth observation satellites including Japanese polor platform, TRMM, etc.). The study for the second generation GMS has been made by the Committee on the Function of Future GMS under the request of Japan Meteorological Agency in FY 1987.

  15. Design of a Representative Low Earth Orbit Satellite to Improve Existing Debris Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, S.; Dietrich, A.; Werremeyer, M.; Fitz-Coy, N.; Liou, J.-C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the process and methodologies used in the design of a small-satellite, DebriSat, that represents materials and construction methods used in modern day Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites. This satellite will be used in a future hypervelocity impact test with the overall purpose to investigate the physical characteristics of modern LEO satellites after an on-orbit collision. The major ground-based satellite impact experiment used by DoD and NASA in their development of satellite breakup models was conducted in 1992. The target used for that experiment was a Navy Transit satellite (40 cm, 35 kg) fabricated in the 1960 s. Modern satellites are very different in materials and construction techniques from a satellite built 40 years ago. Therefore, there is a need to conduct a similar experiment using a modern target satellite to improve the fidelity of the satellite breakup models. The design of DebriSat will focus on designing and building a next-generation satellite to more accurately portray modern satellites. The design of DebriSat included a comprehensive study of historical LEO satellite designs and missions within the past 15 years for satellites ranging from 10 kg to 5000 kg. This study identified modern trends in hardware, material, and construction practices utilized in recent LEO missions, and helped direct the design of DebriSat.

  16. A comparative study of spherical and flat-Earth geopotential modeling at satellite elevations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, M. H.; Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    Flat-Earth and spherical-Earth geopotential modeling of crustal anomaly sources at satellite elevations are compared by computing gravity and scalar magnetic anomalies perpendicular to the strike of variably dimensioned rectangular prisms at altitudes of 150, 300, and 450 km. Results indicate that the error caused by the flat-Earth approximation is less than 10% in most geometric conditions. Generally, error increase with larger and wider anomaly sources at higher altitudes. For most crustal source modeling applications at conventional satellite altitudes, flat-Earth modeling can be justified and is numerically efficient.

  17. [Studies on construction of artificial mutants of Cucumber mosaic virus satellite RNA and their biological activity].

    PubMed

    Jin, Bo; Chen, Ji-Shuang; Zhang, Hua-Rong

    2005-08-01

    Based on the full length cDNA clone of a Cucumber mosaic virus satellite RNA, which was 369nt in size, artificial mutants were developed by the method of error-prone PCR and DNA shuffling. The new satellite cDNAs were transcribed in vitro into ssRNA and pseudo-recombined with a helper Cucumber mosaic virus, which contains no satellite RNA. Sequence analysis showed that A to T/G or G to A replacement all the four mutants, named MS1, MS5, MS6 and MS11 respectively, and there is no C to G or G to C replacement, but amongst, only the mutants MS11 could replicated when recombined with the helper virus strain. No satellite RNA could be detected by RT-PCR amplification and double-stranded RNA analysis for those pseudo-recombination constitution of Cucumber mosaic virus strain with mutants MS1, MS5 and MS6.Sequence homological comparison showed that the single replacement of mutants MS1, MS5 and MS6 occurred in the highly conservative regions and the T to A replacement of mutant MS11 was located in the normal-variation region. This is the first artificial mutation of satellite RNA of plant RNA viruses. The results indicated that single base in the region of satellite RNA maybe important to maintaining the biological activity of satellite RNA for its replication and stability. The variation and evolution of satellite RNA could be hopefully studied through combination directed evolution by DNA shuffling with pseudo-recombination in vitro.

  18. Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) for the Earth Observing System (EOS) CHEM Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, R.; Glavich, T.; Rider, D.

    2000-01-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) is an imaging infrared Fourier transform spectrometer scheduled to be launched into polar sun-synchronous orbit on the Earth Observing System (EOS) CHEM satellite in December 2002.

  19. Jupiter and Planet Earth. [planetary and biological evolution and natural satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The evolution of Jupiter and Earth are discussed along with their atmospheres, the radiation belts around both planets, natural satellites, the evolution of life, and the Pioneer 10. Educational study projects are also included.

  20. A Major Threat of Satellite Radio Systems in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, R.

    1999-01-01

    Over the last two years several satellites in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and geosynchronous orbit (GEO) have experienced serious or catastrophic failures including interruption of desired communications due especially to non linear interference.

  1. Prediction of satellite motions in the earth's gravitational field with axial symmetry by the KS regularized theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharaf, Mohamed Adel; Awad, Mervat El-Sayed; Banaja, Mona A.

    1987-05-01

    In this paper, economical and stable recurrence formulas for the earth's zonal potential and its gradient for the KS regularized theory will be established for any number N of the zonal harmonic coefficient. A general recursive computational algorithm based on these formulas is also established for the initial value problem of the KS theory for the prediction of artificial satellites in the earth's gravitational field with axial symmetry. Applications of the algorithm for the problem of the final state prediction are illustrated by numerical examples of three test orbits each for two geopotential models corresponding to N = 2 and N = 36. A final state of any desired accuracy is obtained for each case study, a result which shows the flexibility of the algorithm.

  2. Semi-analytical study of the rotational motion stability of artificial satellites using quaternions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso dos Santos, Josué; Zanardi, Maria Cecília; Matos, Nicholas

    2013-10-01

    This study at aims performing the stability analysis of the rotational motion to artificial satellites using quaternions to describe the satellite attitude (orientation on the space). In the system of rotational motion equations, which is composed by four kinematic equations of the quaternions and by the three Euler equations in terms of the rotational spin components. The influence of the gravity gradient and the direct solar radiation pressure torques have been considered. Equilibrium points were obtained through numerical simulations using the softwares Matlab and Octave, which are then analyzed by the Routh-Hurwitz Stability Criterion.

  3. Study of effects of space power satellites on life support functions of the earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, M.; Laquey, R.; Deforest, S. E.; Lindsey, C.; Warshaw, H.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of the Satellite Solar Power System (SSPS) on the life support functions of the earth's magnetosphere were investigated. Topics considered include: (1) thruster effluent effects on the magnetosphere; (2) biological consequences of SSPS reflected light; (3) impact on earth bound astronomy; (4) catastrophic failure and debris; (5) satellite induced processes; and (6) microwave power transmission. Several impacts are identified and recommendations for further studies are provided.

  4. 78 FR 14952 - Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft Communicating with Fixed-Satellite Service Geostationary-Orbit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ... Electronic Comment Filing System (ECFS). See Electronic Filing of Documents in Rulemaking Proceedings, 63 FR... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 2 Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft Communicating with Fixed-Satellite Service.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Andrea Kelly, Satellite Division, International Bureau, FCC,...

  5. 78 FR 19172 - Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft Communicating with Fixed-Satellite Service Geostationary-Orbit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ..., FR Doc. 2013-04429, on page 14952, column 1, correct the DATES section to read as follows: DATES... COMMISSION 47 CFR Parts 2 and 25 Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft Communicating with Fixed-Satellite Service... Stations Aboard Aircraft. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Andrea Kelly, Satellite Division,...

  6. Outline of the survey on the development of earth observation satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    An independent earth observation system with land and sea satellites to be developed by Japan is described. Visible and infrared radiometers, microwave radiometers, microwave scattermeters, synthetic aperture radar, and laser sensors are among the instrumentation discussed. Triaxial attitude control, basic technology common to sea and land observation satellites as well as land data analytical technology developed for U.S. LANDSAT data are reviewed.

  7. Demonstrating Circular Motion with a Model Satellite/Earth System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittaker, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    A number of interesting demonstrations of circular and satellite motion have been described in this journal. This paper presents a variation of a centripetal force apparatus found in G.D. Freier and F.J. Anderson's "A Demonstration Handbook for Physics," which has been modified in order to demonstrate both centripetal force and satellite motion.…

  8. Remote Sensing of Sea Ice from Earth Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclain, E. P.

    1971-01-01

    The application of meteorological satellite data for mapping ice fields is discussed. The characteristics of the photographic records of sea ice formations are described. The derivation of the composite minimum brightness chart by computer processing of the mapped satellite vidicon data for several successive days is explained. The factors which create a quantitative delimiting of the sea ice conditions are explained.

  9. Effects of Solar Radiation Pressure on Earth Satellite Orbits.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, R W; Jones, H M; Shapiro, I I

    1960-03-25

    Calculations show that, at a mean altitude of 1000 miles, radiation pressure can displace the orbit of the 100-foot Echo balloon at rates up to 3.7 miles per day, the orbit of the 12-foot Beacon satellite at 0.7 mile per day. For certain resonant conditions this effect accumulates, drastically affecting the satellite's lifetime.

  10. An autonomous navigation algorithm for high orbit satellite using star sensor and ultraviolet earth sensor.

    PubMed

    Baohua, Li; Wenjie, Lai; Yun, Chen; Zongming, Liu

    2013-01-01

    An autonomous navigation algorithm using the sensor that integrated the star sensor (FOV1) and ultraviolet earth sensor (FOV2) is presented. The star images are sampled by FOV1, and the ultraviolet earth images are sampled by the FOV2. The star identification algorithm and star tracking algorithm are executed at FOV1. Then, the optical axis direction of FOV1 at J2000.0 coordinate system is calculated. The ultraviolet image of earth is sampled by FOV2. The center vector of earth at FOV2 coordinate system is calculated with the coordinates of ultraviolet earth. The autonomous navigation data of satellite are calculated by integrated sensor with the optical axis direction of FOV1 and the center vector of earth from FOV2. The position accuracy of the autonomous navigation for satellite is improved from 1000 meters to 300 meters. And the velocity accuracy of the autonomous navigation for satellite is improved from 100 m/s to 20 m/s. At the same time, the period sine errors of the autonomous navigation for satellite are eliminated. The autonomous navigation for satellite with a sensor that integrated ultraviolet earth sensor and star sensor is well robust.

  11. The 2011 Draconid Shower Risk to Earth-Orbiting Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, William J.; Moser, Danielle E.

    2010-01-01

    Current meteor shower forecast models project a strong Draconid outburst, possibly a storm, on October 8, 2011, with a duration of approximately 7 hours and peaking between 19 and 21 hours UT. Predicted rates span an order of magnitude, with maximum Zenithal Hourly Rates (ZHRs) ranging from a few tens to several hundred. Calibration of the NASA MSFC Meteoroid Stream Model 1 to radar and optical observations of past apparitions, particularly the 2005 Draconid outburst 2, suggest that the maximum rate will be several hundreds per hour. Given the high spatial density of the Draconid stream, this implies a maximum meteoroid flux of 5-10 Draconids km(exp -2)/hr (to a limiting diameter of 1 mm), some 25-50 times greater than the normal sporadic flux of 0.2 km(exp -2)/ hr for particles of this size. Total outburst fluence, assuming a maximum ZHR of 750, is 15.5 Draconids km(exp -2), resulting in an overall 10x risk increase to spacecraft surfaces vulnerable to hypervelocity impacts by 1 mm particles. It is now established that a significant fraction of spacecraft anomalies produced by shower meteoroids (e.g. OLYMPUS and LandSat 5) are caused by electrostatic discharges produced by meteoroid impacts. In these cases, the charge generated is roughly proportional to v(exp 3.5(4)), giving a Draconid moving at 20 km/s approximately 1/80th the electrical damage potential of a Leonid of the same mass. In other words, a Draconid outburst with a maximum ZHR of 800 presents the same electrical risk as a normal Leonid shower with a ZHR of 15, assuming the mass indices and shower durations are the same. This is supported by the fact that no spacecraft electrical anomalies were reported during the strong Draconid outbursts of 1985 and 1998. However, the lack of past anomalies should not be taken as carte blanche for satellite operators to ignore the 2011 Draconids, as the upcoming outburst will constitute a period of enhanced risk for vehicles in near-Earth space. Each spacecrft is

  12. Collision frequency of artificial satellites - The creation of a debris belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, D. J.; Cour-Palais, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    The probability of satellite collisions increases with the number of satellites. In the present paper, possible time scales for the growth of a debris belt from collision fragments are determined, and possible consequences of continued unrestrained launch activities are examined. Use is made of techniques formerly developed for studying the evolution (growth) of the asteroid belt. A model describing the flux from the known earth-orbiting satellites is developed, and the results from this model are extrapolated in time to predict the collision frequency between satellites. Hypervelocity impact phenomena are then examined to predict the debris flux resulting from collisions. The results are applied to design requirements for three types of future space missions.

  13. Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Visualization Single Satellite Footprint (SSF) Plot Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barsi, Julia A.

    1995-01-01

    The first Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument will be launched in 1997 to collect data on the Earth's radiation budget. The data retrieved from the satellite will be processed through twelve subsystems. The Single Satellite Footprint (SSF) plot generator software was written to assist scientists in the early stages of CERES data analysis, producing two-dimensional plots of the footprint radiation and cloud data generated by one of the subsystems. Until the satellite is launched, however, software developers need verification tools to check their code. This plot generator will aid programmers by geolocating algorithm result on a global map.

  14. Satellite Derived Earth Surface Temperatures: a Crop Assessment Tool.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosiar, Christy Lynn

    The data for this research consist of the following: 23 days of NOAA/AVHRR satellite data; AgRISTARS enumerator data (or ground truth data) for 26 counties in three midwestern states (Iowa, Nebraska and North Dakota) and radiosonde observations for nine upper air stations, producing an 8 state coverage. The objectives of this research are threefold: (1) to develop a regression model to estimate maximum shelter temperature, (2) to develop a method to assess crop conditions and (3) to determine the variability within a scan line due to changes in optical depth and/or scan angle. The regression model uses three independent variables derived from satellite data to predict maximum shelter temperature. The first independent variable is the satellite's first estimate of temperature, the channel 4 effective temperature. The second independent variable is the difference in the amount of radiation received by the satellite's two thermal channels (4 and 5) serving as a measure of the water vapor in the atmosphere. The third independent variable, path length, uses the pixel position within the scan line to calculate the viewing angle from nadir. This approach resulted in a good R^2 of.65. Three reasons to explain why this R ^2 is not stronger are as follows: (1) a known temperature difference between satellite and shelter temperature, (2) unregistered satellite data--the latitude and longitude of the satellite data are not the location of the shelter and (3) comparison of an area averaged temperature (satellite data) to a point source (shelter) measurement are two different values. The second objective is using satellite data, during the heading and flowering period, combined with the ground truth data or the enumerator data obtained through the AgRISTARS program to determine crop stress. Using two regression models, two satellite temperature indices are used as predictors of a ratio in yield. Statistically significant relationships exist for soybeans and sunflowers. The third

  15. Antenna servo design for tracking low-earth-orbiting satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawronski, W.; Mellstrom, J. A.

    1994-11-01

    The upcoming NASA missions will require tracking of low-orbit satellites. As a consequence, NASA antennas will be required to track satellites at higher rates than for the current deep-space missions. This paper investigates servo design issues for the 34-m beam-waveguide antennas that track low-orbit satellites. This includes upgrading the servo with a feedforward loop, monopulse controller design, and tracking error reduction either through proper choice of elevation pinion location or through application of a notch filter or adjustment of the elevation drive amplifier gain. Finally, improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio through averaging of the oversampled monopulse signal is described.

  16. Demonstrating Circular Motion with a Model Satellite/Earth System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, Jeff

    2008-04-01

    A number of interesting demonstrations of circular and satellite motion have been described in this journal.1-4 This paper presents a variation of a centripetal force apparatus found in G.D. Freier and F.J. Anderson's A Demonstration Handbook for Physics,5 which has been modified in order to demonstrate both centripetal force and satellite motion. Nice discussions of satellite motion may be found in a number of textbooks.6-8 The following is a description of how to construct the apparatus and some suggested experiments.

  17. Prediction of Communication Outage Period between Satellite and Earth station Due to Sun Interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yongjun; Kim, Kap-Sung; Jin, Ho; Lee, Byoung-Sun

    2010-03-01

    Geostationary satellites are located at an altitude of approximately 35,786km above the equator, and revolve in the same angular velocity as earth. Geostationary satellites can therefore, communicate with a ground earth station at all times. However, geostationary satellites also experience communication failure time, twice a year, closely one upon the other in spring and autumn quarters. The communication errors occur when ground station-satellite-the Sun are aligned closely, which occurs during spring and fall equinoxes. At such times, thermal noise emitted from the Sun's surface hits the rear side of the satellite and flows directly into the earth station antenna. This is called solar interference. Studies on duration calculation methods and prediction results of a solar interference phenomenon were implemented by many scientists (Vuong & Forsey 1983, Mohamadi & Lyon 1988, Lin & Yang 1989) abroad, and also by Lee et al. (1991) in Korea. To calculate the time of solar interference, information on precise position of the Sun and earth station antenna systems is necessary. Previous researches used the formula of Van Flandern (Van Flandern & Pulkkinen 1979) when calculating the Sun's position, but it has position error of about 1 arcmin. Using the precise ephemeris DE406, which published by NASA/JPL and the earth ellipsoid model, the study calculated the precise positioning of the Sun as causing error within 10 arcsec. For the verification of the calculation, we used TU media ground station located in Seongsu-dong and the MBSAT satellite operated by TU media.

  18. An introduction to orbit dynamics and its application to satellite-based earth monitoring systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    The long term behavior of satellites is studied at a level of complexity suitable for the initial planning phases of earth monitoring missions. First-order perturbation theory is used to describe in detail the basic orbit dynamics of satellite motion around the earth and relative to the sun. Surface coverage capabilities of satellite orbits are examined. Several examples of simulated observation and monitoring missions are given to illustrate representative applications of the theory. The examples stress the need for devising ways of maximizing total mission output in order to make the best possible use of the resultant data base as input to those large-scale, long-term earth monitoring activities which can best justify the use of satellite systems.

  19. Satellite Emission Radio Interferometric Earth Surveying (SERIES). [astrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdoran, P. F.

    1980-01-01

    Existing satellite radio emissions of the global positioning system were exploited as a resource for cost effective high accuracy geodetic measurements. System applications were directed toward crustal dynamics and earthquake research.

  20. Relative motion characteristics of 2 near-Earth Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, B. E.

    1984-01-01

    The stability of the nonlinear dynamical system of two GRAVSAT - type satellites was investigated by performing several numerical experiments which provide the simulations of the relative motion characteristics between the two satellites for various specified time intervals. The simulations included the relative range, range-rate, and relative acceleration magnitude. These simulations were generated with respect to appropriate initial orbital elements which were obtained such that the instantaneous separation distance between the two satellites has small fluctuations from a specified constant separation distance. The simulation results indicate that the behavior of the relative motions is very sensitive to the initial orbital elements of the satellites and that for a specified time interval of interest. A stable behavior is possible only with the use of an appropriate set of initial orbital elements compatible with the gravity field used to derive them.

  1. Combined Earth's gravity field models based on satellite and terrestrial data: are they necessarily better than satellite-only models?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi Farahani, H.; Ditmar, P.; Klees, R.

    2012-12-01

    In spite of rapid progress of satellite gravimetry, the spatial resolution of satellite-only Earth's gravity field models is currently limited to about 100 km. Improving the spatial resolution requires the combination of satellite gravimetry data (or satellite-only models) with terrestrial gravity and radar altimetry measurements. However, the optimal combination of all available data is non-trivial, among others due to the different spectral contents, spatial coverage, the presence of systematic errors, and uncertain noise models. In order to study how successfully this has been done so far, we have analyzed the accuracy of two pairs of recently produced models: (i) combined model EGM2008 and its satellite-only counterpart ITG-Grace03; and (ii) combined model EIGEN-6C and its satellite-only counterpart EIGEN-6S. As independent control data, we have used in our analysis (i) the data acquired by the GRACE and GOCE satellite missions after these models were compiled, as well as (ii) an independent model of the oceanic Mean Dynamic Topography (MDT). We demonstrate that combining terrestrial data with satellite ones may lead not only to improvements, but also to noticeable worsening a combined model as compared to its satellite-only counterpart, particularly in the continental areas poorly covered with terrestrial gravimetry measurements. The analysis allows one to conclude that additional efforts are needed to design improved data combination strategies, which better exploits the information content in satellite and terrestrial data. Furthermore, it demonstrates that the selection of the "best" gravity field model must be made in the context of a particular application; no model shows the best performance in all frequency ranges and geographical areas.

  2. Spectroscopic method for Earth-satellite-Earth laser long-path absorption measurements using Retroreflector In Space (RIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugimoto, Nobuo; Minato, Atsushi; Sasano, Yasuhiro

    1992-01-01

    The Retroreflector in Space (RIS) is a single element cube-corner retroreflector with a diameter of 0.5 m designed for earth-satellite-earth laser long-path absorption experiments. The RIS is to be loaded on the Advanced Earth Observing System (ADEOS) satellite which is scheduled for launch in Feb. 1996. The orbit for ADEOS is a sun synchronous subrecurrent polar-orbit with an inclination of 98.6 deg. It has a period of 101 minutes and an altitude of approximately 800 km. The local time at descending node is 10:15-10:45, and the recurrent period is 41 days. The velocity relative to the ground is approximately 7 km/s. In the RIS experiment, a laser beam transmitted from a ground station is reflected by RIS and received at the ground station. The absorption of the intervening atmosphere is measured in the round-trip optical path.

  3. Surveys of the earth's resources and environment by satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordberg, W.; Tiedemann, H.; Bohn, C.

    1975-01-01

    The potential and promise of observing the earth from the vantage point of space is discussed. The systematic surveying of processes and phenomena occurring on the surface of the earth by Landsat 1 and Nimbus 5 is considered to be useful in the following areas: assessment of water resources; mineral and petroleum exploration; land use planning; crop, forest, and rangeland inventory; assessment of flood, earthquake, and other environmental hazards; monitoring coastal processes; environmental effects of industrial effluents and of air pollution; mapping the distribution and types of ice covering the earth's polar caps and global soil moisture distributions.

  4. A transportable satellite earth station for television outside broadcast contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, J. M. C.

    1983-07-01

    In connection with the availability of communications satellites in Europe, the feasibility was considered of using satellites as a means of providing television outside broadcast sound and vision contribution circuits. The feasibility of designing a practical transportable satellite ground station was explored. It was finally decided to employ a two-axle trailer towed by a standard radio-link vehicle. The dish antenna is mounted on a turntable on the trailer. Attention is given to details concerning the design features, aspects of acceptance testing, and questions of operational experience. It is hoped to provide with the aid of the terminal circuits which would be impossible in the case of a use of conventional terrestrial links.

  5. Small Satellite Constellations: The Future for Operational Earth Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. Paul

    2007-01-01

    Nanosat, microsat and minisat are low-cost, rapid-response small-satellites built from advanced terrestrial technology. SSTL delivers the benefits of affordable access to space through low-cost, rapid response, small satellites designed and built with state-of-the-art COTS technologies by: a) reducing the cost of entry into space; b) Achieving more missions within fixed budgets; c) making constellations and formation flying financially viable; d) responding rapidly from initial concept to orbital operation; and e) bringing the latest industrial COTS component advances to space. Growth has been stimulated in constellations for high temporal revisit&persistent monitoring and military responsive space assets.

  6. Wave propagation and earth satellite radio emission studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, K. C.; Liu, C. H.; Flaherty, B. J.

    1974-01-01

    Radio propagation studies of the ionosphere using satellite radio beacons are described. The ionosphere is known as a dispersive, inhomogeneous, irregular and sometimes even nonlinear medium. After traversing through the ionosphere the radio signal bears signatures of these characteristics. A study of these signatures will be helpful in two areas: (1) It will assist in learning the behavior of the medium, in this case the ionosphere. (2) It will provide information of the kind of signal characteristics and statistics to be expected for communication and navigational satellite systems that use the similar geometry.

  7. Cost reductions through earth resource satellites in developed countries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweickart, R. L.; Buffalano, A. C.

    1975-01-01

    Data from detailed studies on the possible economic impact of the use of remote sensing technology in industry and agriculture are presented and analyzed. The utility of satellite surveillance in reduction of crop production forecast error, recognition and monitoring of crop diseases and insect infestations, and range management is evaluated. Application of satellite maps to facilitate land resource decisions, mineral exploration, geological studies, and water resource inventories is considered, as is the usefulness of early storm warning in the reduction of property damage. The cost of remote sensing is compared to that of conventional methods whenever possible.

  8. Investigating the Role of Earth's Quasi-Satellite Resonance in the Accretion of Interplanetary Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortenkamp, S.

    2012-12-01

    We studied the orbital evolution of low inclination asteroidal interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) decaying towards 1 AU under the influence of radiation pressure, PR drag, and solar wind drag. We used a series of β values (the ratio of radiation pressure to central gravity) ranging from 0.0025 up to 0.02. Assuming a composition consistent with astronomical silicate and a particle density of 2.5 g cm-3 these β values correspond to diameters ranging from 200 down to 25 microns, respectively. Simulations with the larger IDPs (>50 microns) typically showed that 100% of the dust particles became temporarily trapped in mean-motion resonances outside Earth's orbit. When trapped in these outer resonances a dust particle's orbital eccentricity significantly increases (sometimes to e > 0.2) while its decay in semi-major axis is halted. Most dust particles eventually slip out of these outer resonances and their orbits continue decaying inwards toward 1 AU. We found that a significant fraction of the initial populations subsequently became trapped in 1:1 co-orbital resonance with Earth. In addition to traditional horseshoe type co-orbitals, IDPs also became trapped as so-called quasi-satellites. About 1% of the smallest IDPs (25 microns) and 10% of the largest (200 microns) became trapped in the quasi-satellite resonance for some length of time. Quasi-satellite IDPs always remain relatively near to Earth, within about 0.2-0.3 AU, and undergo two close-encounters with Earth each year. While resonant perturbations from Earth halt the decay in semi-major axis of quasi-satellite IDPs their eccentricities continue to decrease, forcing the IDPs onto more Earth-like orbits and causing them to spiral closer and closer to Earth. This has dramatic consequences for the relative velocity and distance of closest approach between Earth and the IDPs. After about 104 years in the quasi-satellite resonance IDPs are typically less than 0.1 AU from Earth and consistently coming within about

  9. A study on artificial rare earth (RE2O3) based neutron absorber.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-O; Kim, Jong Kyung

    2015-11-01

    A new concept of a neutron absorption material (i.e., an artificial rare earth compound) was introduced for criticality control in a spent fuel storage system. In particular, spent nuclear fuels were considered as a potential source of rare earth elements because the nuclear fission of uranium produces a full range of nuclides. It was also found that an artificial rare earth compound (RE2O3) as a High-Level Waste (HLW) was naturally extracted from pyroprocessing technology developed for recovering uranium and transuranic elements (TRU) from spent fuels. In this study, various characteristics (e.g., activity, neutron absorption cross-section) were analyzed for validating the application possibility of this waste compound as a neutron absorption material. As a result, the artificial rare earth compound had a higher neutron absorption probability in the entire energy range, and it can be used for maintaining sub-criticality for more than 40 years on the basis of the neutron absorption capability of Boral™. Therefore, this approach is expected to vastly improve the efficiency of radioactive waste management by simultaneously keeping HLW and spent nuclear fuel in a restricted space.

  10. A study on artificial rare earth (RE2O3) based neutron absorber.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-O; Kim, Jong Kyung

    2015-11-01

    A new concept of a neutron absorption material (i.e., an artificial rare earth compound) was introduced for criticality control in a spent fuel storage system. In particular, spent nuclear fuels were considered as a potential source of rare earth elements because the nuclear fission of uranium produces a full range of nuclides. It was also found that an artificial rare earth compound (RE2O3) as a High-Level Waste (HLW) was naturally extracted from pyroprocessing technology developed for recovering uranium and transuranic elements (TRU) from spent fuels. In this study, various characteristics (e.g., activity, neutron absorption cross-section) were analyzed for validating the application possibility of this waste compound as a neutron absorption material. As a result, the artificial rare earth compound had a higher neutron absorption probability in the entire energy range, and it can be used for maintaining sub-criticality for more than 40 years on the basis of the neutron absorption capability of Boral™. Therefore, this approach is expected to vastly improve the efficiency of radioactive waste management by simultaneously keeping HLW and spent nuclear fuel in a restricted space. PMID:26241833

  11. Scheduler for monitoring objects orbiting earth using satellite-based telescopes

    DOEpatents

    Olivier, Scot S; Pertica, Alexander J; Riot, Vincent J; De Vries, Willem H; Bauman, Brian J; Nikolaev, Sergei; Henderson, John R; Phillion, Donald W

    2015-04-28

    An ephemeris refinement system includes satellites with imaging devices in earth orbit to make observations of space-based objects ("target objects") and a ground-based controller that controls the scheduling of the satellites to make the observations of the target objects and refines orbital models of the target objects. The ground-based controller determines when the target objects of interest will be near enough to a satellite for that satellite to collect an image of the target object based on an initial orbital model for the target objects. The ground-based controller directs the schedules to be uploaded to the satellites, and the satellites make observations as scheduled and download the observations to the ground-based controller. The ground-based controller then refines the initial orbital models of the target objects based on the locations of the target objects that are derived from the observations.

  12. Role of light satellites in the high-resolution Earth observation domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, Moshe

    1999-12-01

    Current 'classic' applications using and exploring space based earth imagery are exclusive, narrow niche tailored, expensive and hardly accessible. On the other side new, inexpensive and widely used 'consumable' applications will be only developed concurrently to the availability of appropriate imagery allowing that process. A part of these applications can be imagined today, like WWW based 'virtual tourism' or news media, but the history of technological, cultural and entertainment evolution teaches us that most of future applications are unpredictable -- they emerge together with the platforms enabling their appearance. The only thing, which can be ultimately stated, is that the definitive condition for such applications is the availability of the proper imagery platform providing low cost, high resolution, large area, quick response, simple accessibility and quick dissemination of the raw picture. This platform is a constellation of Earth Observation satellites. Up to 1995 the Space Based High Resolution Earth Observation Domain was dominated by heavy, super-expensive and very inflexible birds. The launch of Israeli OFEQ-3 Satellite by MBT Division of Israel Aircraft Industries (IAI) marked the entrance to new era of light, smart and cheap Low Earth Orbited Imaging satellites. The Earth Resource Observation System (EROS) initiated by West Indian Space, is based on OFEQ class Satellites design and it is capable to gather visual data of Earth Surface both at high resolution and large image capacity. The main attributes, derived from its compact design, low weight and sophisticated logic and which convert the EROS Satellite to valuable and productive system, are discussed. The major advantages of Light Satellites in High Resolution Earth Observation Domain are presented and WIS guidelines featuring the next generation of LEO Imaging Systems are included.

  13. Research on earth observing satellite segmenting and scheduling problem for area targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Renjie; Ruan, Qiming

    2005-10-01

    The mission of an Earth Observing Satellite (EOS) is to acquire images of specified areas on the Earth surface, in response to observation requests from customers for strategic, environmental, commercial, agricultural, and civil analysis and research. A target imaged can have one out of two shapes: a spot and a large polygonal area. A spot can be covered by a single scene of satellite sensor, while a polygonal area may require cutting-up into several contiguous strips to be completely imaged. Because of the orbit restriction, satellite can only view target during specific windows of opportunity when flying over the target. Furthermore, the satellite can only be tasked during such access time windows. Hence a scheduling method of satellite observing tasks has to be taken into account for utilizing satellite sensor efficiently. This paper intends to solve a specific segmenting and scheduling problem for area targets, which concerned with an optical observing satellite equipped with line array CCD sensor. In the paper, based on the analysis of characters of satellite sensor and observed area target, a new method of segmenting area target is given. And on the basis of segmenting results of area target, a scheduling model for multi area targets is proposed. In the paper end, experimental results and analysis are also presented.

  14. Introducing Multisensor Satellite Radiance-Based Evaluation for Regional Earth System Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsui, T.; Santanello, J.; Shi, J. J.; Tao, W.-K.; Wu, D.; Peters-Lidard, C.; Kemp, E.; Chin, M.; Starr, D.; Sekiguchi, M.; Aires, F.

    2014-01-01

    Earth System modeling has become more complex, and its evaluation using satellite data has also become more difficult due to model and data diversity. Therefore, the fundamental methodology of using satellite direct measurements with instrumental simulators should be addressed especially for modeling community members lacking a solid background of radiative transfer and scattering theory. This manuscript introduces principles of multisatellite, multisensor radiance-based evaluation methods for a fully coupled regional Earth System model: NASA-Unified Weather Research and Forecasting (NU-WRF) model. We use a NU-WRF case study simulation over West Africa as an example of evaluating aerosol-cloud-precipitation-land processes with various satellite observations. NU-WRF-simulated geophysical parameters are converted to the satellite-observable raw radiance and backscatter under nearly consistent physics assumptions via the multisensor satellite simulator, the Goddard Satellite Data Simulator Unit. We present varied examples of simple yet robust methods that characterize forecast errors and model physics biases through the spatial and statistical interpretation of various satellite raw signals: infrared brightness temperature (Tb) for surface skin temperature and cloud top temperature, microwave Tb for precipitation ice and surface flooding, and radar and lidar backscatter for aerosol-cloud profiling simultaneously. Because raw satellite signals integrate many sources of geophysical information, we demonstrate user-defined thresholds and a simple statistical process to facilitate evaluations, including the infrared-microwave-based cloud types and lidar/radar-based profile classifications.

  15. Applications of neural network methods to the processing of earth observation satellite data.

    PubMed

    Loyola, Diego G

    2006-03-01

    The new generation of earth observation satellites carries advanced sensors that will gather very precise data for studying the Earth system and global climate. This paper shows that neural network methods can be successfully used for solving forward and inverse remote sensing problems, providing both accurate and fast solutions. Two examples of multi-neural network systems for the determination of cloud properties and for the retrieval of total columns of ozone using satellite data are presented. The developed algorithms based on multi-neural network are currently being used for the operational processing of European atmospheric satellite sensors and will play a key role in related satellite missions planed for the near future.

  16. SILEX mission - First European experiment using optical frequencies between geostationary and low earth orbiting satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faup, Michel; Laurent, Bernard; Pera, Luigi

    1991-10-01

    Since 1982, CNES has investigated the possibility to relay data from a low earth orbiting satellite to the ground via a geostationary satellite through a high data rate optical link. This work has led to a collaboration between ESA and CNES to implement the Semiconductor Intersatellite Link experiment (SILEX) which involves two terminals, one on Artemis (ESA geostationary satellite) and one on SPOT-4 (French Earth Observation Satellite). This paper presents the technical baseline that has been selected for SILEX. A short discussion of the performance will be initiated mainly concerning the questions linked to interfaces with the host platforms and the expected communication performance. The areas of development that could help to define the next generation of optical communication experiments and applications are explored.

  17. Design description report for a photovoltaic power system for a remote satellite earth terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, N. A.; Naff, G. J.

    1987-01-01

    A photovoltaic (PV) power system has been installed as an adjunct to an agricultural school at Wawatobi on the large northern island of the Republic of Indonesia. Its purpose is to provide power for a satellite earth station and a classroom. The renewable energy developed supports the video and audio teleconferencing systems as well as the facility at large. The ground station may later be used to provide telephone service. The installation was made in support of the Agency for International Development's Rural Satellite Program, whose purpose is to demonstrate the use of satellite communications for rural development assistance applications. The objective of this particular PV power system is to demonstrate the suitability of a hybrid PV engine-generator configuration for remote satellite earth stations.

  18. Magsat: A satellite for measuring near earth magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.; Regan, R. D.; Murphy, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    Magsat, designed for making measurements of the geomagnetic vector field, is evaluated. For accurate vector measurements the attitude of the fluxgate magnetometer will be determined to about 15 arc-seconds. Expected measurement accuracy will be 6 (gamma) in each component and 3 in magnitude. The Magsat data will be applied to solid earth studies including modeling of the Earth's main magnetic field, delineation of regional magnetic anomalies of crustal origin, and interpretation of those anomalies in terms of geologic and geophysical models. An opportunity will be presented to the scientific community to participate in data use investigations.

  19. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study. Report no. 3: Design/cost tradeoff studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The key issues in the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) program which are subject to configuration study and tradeoff are identified. The issue of a combined operational and research and development program is considered. It is stated that cost and spacecraft weight are the key design variables and design options are proposed in terms of these parameters. A cost analysis of the EOS program is provided. Diagrams of the satellite configuration and subsystem components are included.

  20. Recursive analytical solution describing artificial satellite motion perturbed by an arbitrary number of zonal terms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical first order solution has been developed which describes the motion of an artificial satellite perturbed by an arbitrary number of zonal harmonics of the geopotential. A set of recursive relations for the solution, which was deduced from recursive relations of the geopotential, was derived. The method of solution is based on Von-Zeipel's technique applied to a canonical set of two-body elements in the extended phase space which incorporates the true anomaly as a canonical element. The elements are of Poincare type, that is, they are regular for vanishing eccentricities and inclinations. Numerical results show that this solution is accurate to within a few meters after 500 revolutions.

  1. The equations of motion of an artificial satellite in nonsingular variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacaglia, G. E. O.

    1977-01-01

    The equations of motion of an artificial satellite are given in nonsingular variables. Any term in the geopotential is considered as well as luni-solar perturbations up to an arbitrary power of r/r', r' being the geocentric distance of the disturbing body. Resonances with tesseral harmonics and with the moon or sun are also considered. By neglecting the shadow effect, the disturbing function for solar radiation is also developed in nonsingular variables for the long periodic perturbations. Formulas are developed for implementation of the theory in actual computations.

  2. The equations of motion of an artificial satellite in nonsingular variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacaglia, G. E. O.

    1975-01-01

    The equations of motion of an artificial satellite are given in nonsingular variables. Any term in the geopotential is considered as well as luni-solar perturbations up to an arbitrary power of r/r prime; r prime being the geocentric distance of the disturbing body. Resonances with tesseral harmonics and with the moon or sun are also considered. By neglecting the shadow effect, the disturbing function for solar radiation is also developed in nonsingular variables for the long periodic perturbations. Formulas are developed for implementation of the theory in actual computations.

  3. Design of volume hologram filters for suppression of daytime sky brightness in artificial satellite detection.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hanhong; Watson, Jonathan M; Stuart, Joseph Scott; Barbastathis, George

    2013-03-11

    We present a design methodology for volume hologram filters (VHFs) with telephoto objectives to improve contrast of solar-illuminated artificial satellites observed with a ground-based optical telescope and camera system operating in daytime. VHFs provide the ability to selectively suppress incoming light based on the range to the source, and are used to suppress the daylight background noise since signal (satellite) and noise (daylight scatterers) are located at different altitudes. We derive the overall signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) enhancement as the system metric, and balance main design parameters over two key performance considerations--daylight attenuation and spectral bandwidth--to optimize the functioning of VHFs. Overall SNR enhancement of 7.5 has been achieved. Usage of multi-pixel cameras can potentially further refine this system.

  4. Analysis of simulated multispectral data from earth resources satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, D. A.; Rouse, J. W., Jr.; Scheel, J. A.

    1971-01-01

    The validity of the applicability assumption was determined through the simulation of ERTS and Skylab data using available aircraft scanner systems. The research techniques compared aircraft multispectral scanner data obtained under nominal conditions at low altitudes. Maximum likelihood decision criteria algorithms implemented on a digital computer were used to classify training set data. Comparisons between percentages of correct classifications were made, along with implications as to the techniques of satellite analysis.

  5. Radio frequency interference from near-earth satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levitt, B. K.; Lesh, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    A pessimistic statistical model was developed for predicting the extent of radio frequency interference (RF1). Based on the assumptions underlying the model, DSN S-band operations can expect one RF1 interruption every 4.1 days, with the average incident lasting 24 s. This implies that 52 or more such satellites, with uncorrelated orbital trajectories, will cause in excess of 5 min of RF1 per day at a DSN station.

  6. The masses of Uranus and its major satellites from Voyager tracking data and earth-based Uranian satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, R. A.; Campbell, J. K.; Taylor, A. H.; Synnott, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    Improved values for the masses of the Uranian system and the satellites Ariel, Umbriel, Titania, Oberon, and Miranda are obtained on the basis of an analysis of the Doppler-tracking data and star-satellite imaging from the Voyager 2 spacecraft combined with earth-based astrometric satellite observations. Masses are expressed as the product, the universal gravitational constant times the mass of the body, in units of (cu km/sq s). The satellite masses are (4.4 +/- 0.5) for Miranda, (90.3 +/- 8.0) for Ariel, (78.2 +/- 9.0) for Umbriel, (235.3 +/- 6.0) for Titania, and (201.1 +/- 5.0) for Oberon. Quoted errors are standard errors and are the present assessment of the true rather than the formal errors. The Uranus rotational pole orientation angles and gravity harmonic coefficients were fixed at the values determined by French et al. (1988) from stellar occultations of the Uranian rings observed from both the earth and Voyager 2 and from the occultation of the spacecraft radio signal.

  7. On identifying the specular reflection of sunlight in earth-monitoring satellite data.

    SciTech Connect

    Nelsen, James M., Jr.; Hohlfelder, Robert James; Jackson, Dale Clayton; Longenbaugh, Randolph S.

    2009-03-01

    Among the background signals commonly seen by Earth-monitoring satellites is the specular reflection of sunlight off of Earth's surface, commonly referred to as a glint. This phenomenon, involving liquid or ice surfaces, can result in the brief, intense illumination of satellite sensors appearing from the satellite perspective to be of terrestrial origin. These glints are important background signals to be able to identify with confidence, particularly in the context of analyzing data from satellites monitoring for transient surface or atmospheric events. Here we describe methods for identifying glints based on the physical processes involved in their production, including spectral fitting and polarization measurements. We then describe a tool that, using the WGS84 spheroidal Earth model, finds the latitude and longitude on Earth where a reflection of this type could be produced, given input Sun and satellite coordinates. This tool enables the user to determine if the surface at the solution latitude and longitude is in fact reflective, thus identifying the sensor response as a true glint or an event requiring further analysis.

  8. A Geostationary Earth Orbit Satellite Model Using Easy Java Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wee, Loo Kang; Goh, Giam Hwee

    2013-01-01

    We develop an Easy Java Simulation (EJS) model for students to visualize geostationary orbits near Earth, modelled using a Java 3D implementation of the EJS 3D library. The simplified physics model is described and simulated using a simple constant angular velocity equation. We discuss four computer model design ideas: (1) a simple and realistic…

  9. The Earth's gravity field from satellite geodesy: A 30 year adventure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, Richard H.

    1991-12-01

    The history of research in the Earth's gravity field from satellite geodesy is described and limitations of existing geopotential models are indicated. Although current solutions have made outstanding achievements, their limited accuracy restricts their use for some oceanographic applications. An example is discussed where there appears to be an incompatibility of the long wavelength geoid undulation obtained through satellite analysis with independent estimates that have become available. The future Aristoteles mission is seen as providing a significant leap in Earth gravity field knowledge improvement.

  10. Improvement of the Earth's gravity field from terrestrial and satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, Richard H.

    1992-01-01

    The determination of the Earth's gravitational potential can be done through the analysis of satellite perturbations, the analysis of surface gravity data, or both. The combination of the two data types yields a solution that combines the strength of each method: the longer wavelength strength in the satellite analysis with the better high frequency information from surface gravity data. Since 1972, Ohio State has carried out activities that have provided surface gravity data to a number of organizations who have developed combination potential coefficient models that describe the Earth's gravitational potential.

  11. Mini-satellite exploration of very near earth space fuel objects

    SciTech Connect

    Zuppero, A.C.; Jacox, M.G.

    1992-09-19

    A prospecting plan is presented to assay near Earth objects (NEO) for their potential to yield rocket fuel. The plan calls out small satellites as the near-term means to achieve low cost surveys and deep subsurface sampling of NEO composition. The water bearing classes of NEO to be considered are limited to those accessible in short time and with small thrusters. These include the water bearing clay objects (phylosilicates) at nearly trivial distances from Earth, and the recently identified water ice objects such as comet ({number_sign}4015) 1979 VA. These objects are evaluated as small satellite prospecting and assay vehicle targets.

  12. Mini-satellite exploration of very near earth space fuel objects

    SciTech Connect

    Zuppero, A.C.; Jacox, M.G.

    1992-09-19

    A prospecting plan is presented to assay near Earth objects (NEO) for their potential to yield rocket fuel. The plan calls out small satellites as the near-term means to achieve low cost surveys and deep subsurface sampling of NEO composition. The water bearing classes of NEO to be considered are limited to those accessible in short time and with small thrusters. These include the water bearing clay objects (phylosilicates) at nearly trivial distances from Earth, and the recently identified water ice objects such as comet ([number sign]4015) 1979 VA. These objects are evaluated as small satellite prospecting and assay vehicle targets.

  13. Study on Orbital Decay of Near Earth Satellites with KS Orthogonal Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ps, Sandeep

    STUDY ON ORBITAL DECAY OF NEAR EARTH SATELLITES WITH KS ORTHOGONAL ELEMENTS SANDEEP P S The knowledge of satellite orbit decay and its expected life prior to launch is necessary for mission planning purpose. Several sets of data for various parametric studies is sought quite often, it is necessary to minimize computational time involved for generating decay predictions, keeping the prediction accuracy normally good. A number of factors play dominant role in perturbation modelling for near earth satellites such as oblateness of the Earth, presence of the atmosphere, luni-solar attraction and solar radiation pressure. This paper concerns with the study of orbital decay of near earth satellites with KS orthogonal elements, which provide accurate orbit predictions at low computational time. Perturbations considered are due to oblateness of the Earth and the atmospheric drag. The Earth’s zonal harmonic terms J2 to J6 are included and the drag is modeled with an analytical diurnally oblate atmosphere. Effect of Earth’s geomagnetic and solar activity is included in density and density scale height computations. JACCHIA77 atmospheric model is utilized. The developed software is validated with the orbital data of decayed objects taken from www.space-track.org.

  14. Determination of Azimuth Angle at Burnout for Placing a Satellite Over a Selected Earth Position

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skopinski, T. H.; Johnson, Katherine G.

    1960-01-01

    Expressions are presented for relating the satellite position in the orbital plane with the projected latitude and longitude on a rotating earth surface. An expression is also presented for determining the azimuth angle at a given burnout position on the basis of a selected passage position on the earth's surface. Examples are presented of a satellite launched eastward and one launched westward, each passing over a selected position sometime after having completed three orbits. Incremental changes from the desired latitude and longitude due to the earth's oblateness are included in the iteration for obtaining the azimuth angles of the two examples. The results for both cases are then compared with those obtained from a computing program using an oblate rotating earth. Changes from the selected latitude and longitude resulting from incremental changes from the burn-out azimuth angle and latitude are also analyzed.

  15. Lunar and Artificial Satellite Laser Ranging: The Use of Queue Scheduling and Worth Functions to Maximize Scientific Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelus, P. J.; Ricklefs, R. L.; Wiant, J. R.; Ries, J. G.

    2003-08-01

    The lunar and artificial satellite laser ranging network, part of the International Laser Ranging Service, monitors a large number of targets. Many scientific disciplines are investigated using these data. These include the realization and maintenance of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame; the 3-dimensional deformation of the solid Earth; Earth orientation; variations in the topography and volume of the liquid Earth, including ocean circulation, mean sea level, ice sheet thickness, and wave heights; tidally generated variations in atmospheric mass distribution; calibration of microwave tracking techniques; picosecond global time transfer; determination of the dynamic equinox, the obliquity of the ecliptic, the precession constant and theories of nutation; gravitational and general relativistic studies, including Einstein's Equivalence Principle, the Robertson-Walker b parameter and time rate of change of the gravitational constant; lunar physics, including the dissipation of rotational energy, shape of the core-mantle boundary (Love Number k2), and free librations and their stimulating mechanisms; Solar System ties to the International Celestial Reference Frame. With shrinking resources, we must not only assess specific data requirements for each target, but also maximize the efficiency of the observing network. Several factors must be considered. First, not only does a result depend critically upon the quality and quantity of the data, it also depends upon the data distribution. Second, as technology improves, the cost of obtaining data can increase. Both require that scientific endeavor pay close attention to the manner in which the data is gathered. We examine the evolution of the laser network, using data analysis requirements and efficient network scheduling to maximize the scientific return. This requires an understanding of the observing equipment, as well as the scientific principles being studied. Queue scheduling and worth functions become

  16. Reducing Formation-Keeping Maneuver Costs for Formation Flying Satellites in Low-Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Nicholas

    2001-01-01

    Several techniques are used to synthesize the formation-keeping control law for a three-satellite formation in low-earth orbit. The objective is to minimize maneuver cost and position tracking error. Initial reductions are found for a one-satellite case by tuning the state-weighting matrix within the linear-quadratic-Gaussian framework. Further savings come from adjusting the maneuver interval. Scenarios examined include cases with and without process noise. These results are then applied to a three-satellite formation. For both the one-satellite and three-satellite cases, increasing the maneuver interval yields a decrease in maneuver cost and an increase in position tracking error. A maneuver interval of 8-10 minutes provides a good trade-off between maneuver cost and position tracking error. An analysis of the closed-loop poles with respect to varying maneuver intervals explains the effectiveness of the chosen maneuver interval.

  17. The Smithsonian Earth Physics Satellite (SEPS) definition study, volumes 1 through 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A limited Phase B study was undertaken to determine the merit and feasibility of launching a proposed earth physics satellite with Apollo-type hardware. The study revealed that it would be feasible to launch this satellite using a S-IB stage, a S-IVB with restart capability, an instrument unit, a SLA for the satellite shroud, and a nose cone (AS-204 configuration). A definition of the proposed satellite is provided, which is specifically designed to satisfy the fundamental requirement of providing an orbiting benchmark of maximum accuracy. The satellite is a completely passive, solid 3628-kg sphere of 38.1-cm radius and very high mass-to-area ratio (7980 kg sq mi). In the suggested orbit of 55 degrees inclination, 3720 km altitude, and low eccentricity, the orbital lifetime is extremely long, so many decades of operation can be expected.

  18. NASA satellite to study earth's oceans from space. [Seasat-A satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of using microwave instruments to scan the world's oceans from space in order to obtain scientific data for oceanographers, meteorologists, and commercial users of the seas will be demonstrated during the mission of the Seasat A satellite which will be launched into an 800 kilometer high near circular orbit by an Agena Atlas-Agena launch vehicle. The satellite configuration, its payload, and data collection and processing capabilities are described as well as the launch vehicle system.

  19. Satellite on-board processing for earth resources data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodenheimer, R. E.; Gonzalez, R. C.; Gupta, J. N.; Hwang, K.; Rochelle, R. W.; Wilson, J. B.; Wintz, P. A.

    1975-01-01

    Results of a survey of earth resources user applications and their data requirements, earth resources multispectral scanner sensor technology, and preprocessing algorithms for correcting the sensor outputs and for data bulk reduction are presented along with a candidate data format. Computational requirements required to implement the data analysis algorithms are included along with a review of computer architectures and organizations. Computer architectures capable of handling the algorithm computational requirements are suggested and the environmental effects of an on-board processor discussed. By relating performance parameters to the system requirements of each of the user requirements the feasibility of on-board processing is determined for each user. A tradeoff analysis is performed to determine the sensitivity of results to each of the system parameters. Significant results and conclusions are discussed, and recommendations are presented.

  20. Satellite-tracking and Earth dynamics research programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The Arequipa station obtained a total of 31,989 quick-look range observations on 719 passes in the six months. Data were acquired from Metsahovi, San Fernando, Kootwijk, Wettzell, Grasse, Simosato, Graz, Dodaira and Herstmonceux. Work progressed on the setup of SAO 1. Discussions were also initiated with the Israelis on the relocation of SAO-3 to a site in southern Israel in FY-1984. Arequipa and the cooperating stations continued to track LAGEOS at highest priority for polar motion and Earth rotation studies, and for other geophysical investigations, including crustal dynamics, earth and ocean tides, and the general development of precision orbit determination. SAO completed the revisions to its field software as a part of its recent upgrading program. With cesium standards Omega receivers, and other timekeeping aids, the station was able to maintain a timing accuracy of better than plus or minus 6 to 8 microseconds.

  1. Online Resource for Earth-Observing Satellite Sensor Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCorkel, J.; Czapla-Myers, J.; Thome, K.; Wenny, B.

    2015-01-01

    The Radiometric Calibration Test Site (RadCaTS) at Railroad Valley Playa, Nevada is being developed by the University of Arizona to enable improved accuracy and consistency for airborne and satellite sensor calibration. Primary instrumentation at the site consists of ground-viewing radiometers, a sun photometer, and a meteorological station. Measurements made by these instruments are used to calculate surface reflectance, atmospheric properties and a prediction for top-of-atmosphere reflectance and radiance. This work will leverage research for RadCaTS, and describe the requirements for an online database, associated data formats and quality control, and processing levels.

  2. A simplified correlation technique for position location using earth satellites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, S. C.; Davies, W. D. T.

    1972-01-01

    To derive range to a moving vehicle for surveillance and navigation purposes, the phase delays in sets of sinusoidal tones may be measured using synchronous satellites for signal relay. When the number of users is large, problems of rapid acquisition and measurement occur in multiple-access systems. This paper describes the selection and processing of an orthogonal tone set which has several useful features. The paper also presents a simulation of a simplified digital technique for the noise-free case, as well as for a composite signal buried in wideband noise. The digital simulation is also modified to include the proposed 'hard limiting' or clipping technique.

  3. Systems definition summary. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study (EOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A standard spacecraft bus for performing a variety of earth orbit missions in the late 1970's and 1980's is defined. Emphasis is placed on a low-cost, multimission capability, benefitting from the space shuttle system. The subjects considered are as follows: (1) performance requirements, (2) internal interfaces, (3) redundancy and reliability, (4) communications and data handling module design, (5) payload data handling, (6) application of the modular design to various missions, and (7) the verification concept.

  4. Satellite on-board processing for earth resources data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodenheimer, R. E.; Gonzalez, R. C.; Gupta, J. N.; Hwang, K.; Rochelle, R. W.; Wilson, J. B.; Wintz, P. A.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility was investigated of an on-board earth resources data processor launched during the 1980-1990 time frame. Projected user applications were studied to define the data formats and the information extraction algorithms that the processor must execute. Based on these constraints, and the constraints imposed by the available technology, on-board processor systems were designed and their feasibility evaluated. Conclusions and recommendations are given.

  5. Design Concepts for a Small Space-Based GEO Relay Satellite for Missions Between Low Earth and near Earth Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, Kul B.; Warner, Joseph D.; Oleson, Steven; Schier, James

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of the Small Space-Based Geosynchronous Earth orbiting (GEO) satellite is to provide a space link to the user mission spacecraft for relaying data through ground networks to user Mission Control Centers. The Small Space Based Satellite (SSBS) will provide services comparable to those of a NASA Tracking Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) for the same type of links. The SSBS services will keep the user burden the same or lower than for TDRS and will support the same or higher data rates than those currently supported by TDRS. At present, TDRSS provides links and coverage below GEO; however, SSBS links and coverage capability to above GEO missions are being considered for the future, especially for Human Space Flight Missions (HSF). There is also a rising need for the capability to support high data rate links (exceeding 1 Gbps) for imaging applications. The communication payload on the SSBS will provide S/Ka-band single access links to the mission and a Ku-band link to the ground, with an optical communication payload as an option. To design the communication payload, various link budgets were analyzed and many possible operational scenarios examined. To reduce user burden, using a larger-sized antenna than is currently in use by TDRS was considered. Because of the SSBS design size, it was found that a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket could deliver three SSBSs to GEO. This will greatly reduce the launch costs per satellite. Using electric propulsion was also evaluated versus using chemical propulsion; the power system size and time to orbit for various power systems were also considered. This paper will describe how the SSBS will meet future service requirements, concept of operations, and the design to meet NASA users' needs for below and above GEO missions. These users' needs not only address the observational mission requirements but also possible HSF missions to the year 2030. We will provide the trade-off analysis of the communication payload design in terms of

  6. Land subsidence of natural transitional environments by satellite radar interferometry on artificial reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strozzi, Tazio; Teatini, Pietro; Tosi, Luigi; Wegmüller, Urs; Werner, Charles

    2013-06-01

    Land subsidence is a widespread phenomenon, particularly relevant to transitional environments, such as wetlands, deltas, and lagoons, characterized by low elevation with respect to the mean sea level. Satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry offers the possibility to effectively and precisely measure land displacements for dry surfaces or anthropogenic structures, but difficulties arise in identifying long-term stable targets in natural transitional regions. In order to improve the coverage of satellite SAR interferometry in salt marshes within the Venice Lagoon (Italy), we installed a network of 57 Trihedral Corner Reflectors (TCRs). The TCRs were monitored by ENVISAT ASAR and TerraSAR-X acquisitions covering the time period from November 2006 to September 2011. The results show that the northern lagoon basin is subsiding at ~3 mm/yr and that the central and southern portions are more stable. Larger subsidence rates, up to 6 mm/yr, are measured where surficial loads, such as artificial salt marshes or embankments, rise above the lagoon bottom. The accuracy of TerraSAR-X is greater than ENVISAT due to the shorter wavelength and higher spatial resolution in relationship to the size of the TCRs. The observations obtained in the Venice Lagoon indicate that SAR interferometry using a large network of artificial reflectors is an effective and powerful methodology to monitor land subsidence in transitional environments where the loss of elevation with respect to the mean sea level can yield significant morphological changes to the natural environment.

  7. Constructing Artificial Rock Outcrops as Tools for Fostering Earth and Environmental Science Thinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totten, I. M.; Hall, F.; Buxton, C.

    2004-12-01

    The Earth and Environmental Science Education Group at the University of New Orleans has created an innovative visualization teaching tool. Through funding made available by the National Science Foundation a 12'x10'x5' artificial rock outcrop was fabricated at the University of New Orleans. An accompanying curriculum, which includes a series of artificial rock outcrop labs, was also created for the outcrop. The labs incorporated fundamental concepts from the geosciences and the field of science education. The overarching philosophy behind the unity of the content knowledge and the pedagogy was to develop a more inclusive and deliberate teaching approach that utilized strategies known to enhance student learning in the sciences. The artificial outcrop lab series emphasized the following geoscience topics: relative dating, rock movement, and depositional environments. The series also integrated pedagogical ideas such as inquiry-based learning, conceptual mapping, constructivist teaching, pattern recognition, and contextualized knowledge development. Each component of the curriculum was purposefully designed to address what the body of research in science education reveals as critical to science teaching and learning. After developing the artificial rock outcrop curriculum a pilot study was done with 40 pre-service elementary education undergraduates. In the pilot study students completed the following assessments: three outcrop labs, journal reflections for each lab, pre/post attitude surveys, group video-recordings, and preconception and final interviews. Data from these assessments were analyzed using qualitative and quantitative methodologies. The following conclusions were revealed from the data: student's attitudes towards learning earth science increased after working with the artificial rock outcrop, students conceptual understanding of the concepts were clearer after working with the outcrop, students were able to answer multifaceted, higher order questions

  8. Daily Earth orientation parameters from satellite laser ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlis, E.

    2003-04-01

    The JCET/GSFC Associate Analysis Center for the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS) participated over the past year in a Pilot Project of the ILRS Analysis Working Group. The goal of the Pilot Project is the optimal combination of laser ranging data from ETALON 1 and 2 with the nominal data set from LAGEOS and LAGEOS 2, which ILRS normally uses in our series of Earth Orientation Parameters EOP, submitted to the International Earth Rotation Service (IERS). We present here the new re-analysis of the expanded data set for the definition of the Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF) and its crust-fixed orientation. This latest analysis of the SLR data set from LAGEOS and LAGEOS 2 with the addition of the data from ETALON 1 and 2, examines the possibility of improving the results for the TRF and EOP, with only a small increase in the processing effort. This work is being done in the framework of the ILRS Pilot Project for, amongst other things, the precise estimation of the EOP from SLR data in a routine fashion. Along with the Earth orientation and the static parameters of the TRF we determined a time series of variations of its origin with respect to the instantaneous center of mass of the Earth system (geocenter). The data from the two newly included targets, ETALON 1 and 2, come from an enhanced data set which is the result of a dedicated tracking campaign by the ILRS network of stations, initiated at the request of the ILRS Analysis Working Group on April 1, 2001 and currently in progress. Due to the different orbital geometry and tracking pattern of the two “constellations” (LAGEOS vs. ETALON), it was required to carefully evaluate the relative weight between the two data sets in order to optimally combine them. The data were reduced using NASA Goddard’s GEODYN/SOLVE II software, resulting in a final RMS error of about 8 mm. We will discuss our weighting scheme, vis-à-vis our solution for the EOP and geocenter, compare them to our previous solutions based

  9. Estimating the Earth's geometry, rotation and gravity field using a multi-satellite SLR solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefka, V.; Blossfeld, M.; Mueller, H.; Gerstl, M.; Panafidina, N.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) is the unique technique to determine station coordinates, Earth Orientation Parameter (EOP) and Stokes coefficients of the Earth's gravity field in one common adjustment. These parameters form the so called "three pillars" (Plag & Pearlman, 2009) of the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS). In its function as official analysis center of the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS), DGFI is developing and maintaining software to process SLR observations called "DGFI Orbit and Geodetic parameter estimation Software" (DOGS). The software is used to analyze SLR observations and to compute multi-satellite solutions. To take benefit of different orbit performances (e.g. inclination and altitude), a solution using ten different spherical satellites (ETALON1/2, LAGEOS1/2, STELLA, STARLETTE, AJISAI, LARETS, LARES, BLITS) covering the period of 12 years of observations is computed. The satellites are relatively weighted using a variance component estimation (VCE). The obtained weights are analyzed w.r.t. the potential of the satellite to monitor changes in the Earths geometry, rotation and gravity field. The estimated parameters (station coordinates and EOP) are validated w.r.t. official time series of the IERS. The Stokes coefficients are compared to recent gravity field solutions.

  10. Estimating the Earth's gravity field using a multi-satellite SLR solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloßfeld, Mathis; Stefka, Vojtech; Müller, Horst; Gerstl, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) is the unique technique to determine station coordinates, Earth Orientation Parameter (EOP) and Stokes coefficients of the Earth's gravity field in one common adjustment. These parameters form the so called "three pillars" (Plag & Pearlman, 2009) of the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS). In its function as official analysis center of the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS), DGFI is developing and maintaining software to process SLR observations called "DGFI Orbit and Geodetic parameter estimation Software" (DOGS). The software is used to analyze SLR observations and to compute multi-satellite solutions. To take benefit of different orbit performances (e.g. inclination and altitude), a solution using ten different spherical satellites (ETALON1/2, LAGEOS1/2, STELLA, STARLETTE, AJISAI, LARETS, LARES, BLITS) covering 12 years of observations is computed. The satellites are relatively weighted using a variance component estimation (VCE). The obtained weights are analyzed w.r.t. the potential of the satellite to monitor changes in the Earths geometry, rotation and gravity field. The estimated parameters (station coordinates and EOP) are validated w.r.t. official time series of the IERS. The obtained Stokes coefficients are compared to recent gravity field solutions and discussed in detail.

  11. Fault tolerant computer for low Earth orbit micro satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, D.; Arichandran, K.; McLoughlin, I.

    2004-11-01

    This paper describes the design of the On Board Computer of Singapore's X-Sat micro satellite. The architecture incorporates the philosophies of modularity and scalability. It is based around a reliable processing core made of at least one FPGA and one microprocessor. The rest of the hardware is grouped together into functional banks using redundancy in banks for higher reliability. After the first version of the platform is validated, development effort for future missions would be substantially reduced. The computer can be reconfigured to adapt to varying mission needs, thus building a heritage with the system. The FPGA in the processing core enables transparent interfacing between heterogeneous device types when required. This combined with the modular nature of the design provides for easy upgradeability to viable technologies that become available over time. This also provides a useful platform to test out emerging devices and device types.

  12. NASA to launch NOAA's GOES-C earth monitoring satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    NASA's launch of the GOES-C geostationary satellite from Kennedy Space Center, Florida is planned for June 16, 1978. The launch vehicle is a three stage Delta 2914. As its contribution, GOES-C will contribute information from a data sparse area of the world centered in the Indian Ocean. GOES-C will replace GOES-1 and will become GOES-3 once it has successfully orbited at 35,750 kilometers (22,300 miles). NASA's Spaceflight Tracking and Data Network (STDN) will provide support for the mission. Included in the article are: (1) Delta launch vehicle statistics, first, second and third stages; (2) Delta/GOES-C major launch events; (3) Launch operations; (4) Delta/GOES-C personnel.

  13. Celebrate with SATELLITES: An International Polar Year Partnership to Study Earth's Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedley, Mikell Lynne; Czajkowski, Kevin; Struble, Janet; Benko, Terri; Shellito, Brad; Sheridan, Scott; Stasiuk, Mandy Munroe

    2009-01-01

    The SATELLITES program uses geospatial technologies to study surface temperatures of Earth's materials, such as sand, soil, grass, and water. Data are collected using Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) protocols, which are then used in research projects that are a part of the International Polar Year (IPY).…

  14. System design and specifications. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study (EOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A design summary of the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) is presented. The systems considered in the summary are: (1) the spacecraft structure, (2) electrical power modules, (3) communications and data handling module, (4) attitude determination module, (5) actuation module, and (6) solar array and drive module. The documents which provide the specifications for the systems and the equipment are identified.

  15. The impact of earth resources exploration from space. [technology assessment/LANDSAT satellites -technological forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordberg, W.

    1975-01-01

    The use of Earth Resources Technology Satellites in solving global problems is examined. Topics discussed are: (1) management of food, water, and fiber resources; (2) exploration and management of energy and mineral resources; (3) protection of the environment; (4) protection of life and property; and (5) improvements in shipping and navigation.

  16. Effect of earth's precession on geosynchronous satellites under lunisolar perturbations and tesseral resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyanin, S.; Gurfil, P.

    2008-06-01

    In this study, we investigate the effect of Earth's precession on the orbital dynamics of geostationary satellites. Our astrodynamical model includes second-order zonal and tesseral harmonics, and lunisolar gravitation. We show that the equinoctial precession induces secular inclination growth and thus bares a non-negligible effect on north-south stationkeeping for long mission lifetimes.

  17. Effect of earth's precession on geosynchronous satellites under lunisolar perturbations and tesseral resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyanin, S.; Gurfil, P.

    2008-02-01

    In this study, we investigate the effect of Earth's precession on the orbital dynamics of geostationary satellites. Our astrodynamical model includes second-order zonal and tesseral harmonics, and lunisolar gravitation. We show that the equinoctial precession induces secular inclination growth and thus bares a non-negligible effect on north-south stationkeeping for long mission lifetimes.

  18. A study to define meteorological uses and performance requirements for the Synchronous Earth Observatory Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suomi, V. E.; Krauss, R. J.; Barber, D.; Levanon, N.; Martin, D. W.; Mclellan, D. W.; Sikdar, D. N.; Sromovsky, L. A.; Branch, D.; Heinricy, D.

    1973-01-01

    The potential meteorological uses of the Synchronous Earth Observatory Satellite (SEOS) were studied for detecting and predicting hazards to life, property, or the quality of the environment. Mesoscale meteorological phenonmena, and the observations requirements for SEOS are discussed along with the sensor parameters.

  19. Evaluation of scanning earth sensor mechanism on engineering test satellite 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikeuchi, M.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Ohkami, Y.; Kida, T.; Ishigaki, T.; Matsumoto, M.

    1983-01-01

    The results of the analysis and the evaluation of flight data obtained from the horizon sensor test project are described. The rotary mechanism of the scanning earth sensor composed of direct drive motor and bearings using solid lubricant is operated satisfactorily. The transmitted flight data from Engineering Test Satellite IV was evaluated in comparison with the design value.

  20. Third Earth Resources Technology Satellite-1 Symposium. Volume 1: Technical Presentations, section A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freden, S. C. (Compiler); Mercanti, E. P. (Compiler); Becker, M. A. (Compiler)

    1974-01-01

    Papers presented at the Third Symposium on Significant Results Obtained from the first Earth Resources Technology Satellite covered the areas of: agriculture, forestry, range resources, land use, mapping, mineral resources, geological structure, landform surveys, water resources, marine resources, environment surveys, and interpretation techniques.

  1. Study on networking issues of medium earth orbit satellite communications systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Araki, Noriyuki; Shinonaga, Hideyuki; Ito, Yasuhiko

    1993-01-01

    Two networking issues of communications systems with medium earth orbit (MEO) satellites, namely network architectures and location determination and registration methods for hand-held terminals, are investigated in this paper. For network architecture, five candidate architectures are considered and evaluated in terms of signaling traffic. For location determination and registration, two methods are discussed and evaluated.

  2. Effects of DeOrbitSail as applied to Lifetime predictions of Low Earth Orbit Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afful, Andoh; Opperman, Ben; Steyn, Herman

    2016-07-01

    Orbit lifetime prediction is an important component of satellite mission design and post-launch space operations. Throughout its lifetime in space, a spacecraft is exposed to risk of collision with orbital debris or operational satellites. This risk is especially high within the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) region where the highest density of space debris is accumulated. This paper investigates orbital decay of some LEO micro-satellites and accelerating orbit decay by using a deorbitsail. The Semi-Analytical Liu Theory (SALT) and the Satellite Toolkit was employed to determine the mean elements and expressions for the time rates of change. Test cases of observed decayed satellites (Iridium-85 and Starshine-1) are used to evaluate the predicted theory. Results for the test cases indicated that the theory fitted observational data well within acceptable limits. Orbit decay progress of the SUNSAT micro-satellite was analysed using relevant orbital parameters derived from historic Two Line Element (TLE) sets and comparing with decay and lifetime prediction models. This paper also explored the deorbit date and time for a 1U CubeSat (ZACUBE-01). The use of solar sails as devices to speed up the deorbiting of LEO satellites is considered. In a drag sail mode, the deorbitsail technique significantly increases the effective cross-sectional area of a satellite, subsequently increasing atmospheric drag and accelerating orbit decay. The concept proposed in this study introduced a very useful technique of orbit decay as well as deorbiting of spacecraft.

  3. A Model of the Earth's Magnetic Field From Two Years of Swarm Satellite Constellation Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, N.; Finlay, C. C.; Kotsiaros, S.

    2015-12-01

    Two years of data from ESA's Swarm constellation mission are used to derive a model of the Earth's magnetic field and its time variation (secular variation). The model describes contributions from the core and lithosphere as well as large-scale contributions from the magnetosphere (and its Earth-induced counterpart). We use data from geomagnetic quiet times and co-estimate the Euler angles describing the rotation between the vector magnetometer instrument frame and the North-East-Center (NEC) frame. In addition to the magnetic field observations provided by each of the three Swarm satellites and alongtrack first differences we include the East-west magnetic gradient information provided by the lower Swarm satellite pair, thereby explicitly taking advantage of the constellation aspect of Swarm. We assess the spatial and temporal model resolution that can be obtained from two years of Swarm satellite data by comparison with other recent models that also include non-Swarm magnetic observations.

  4. Observing the earth radiation budget from satellites - Past, present, and a look to the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    House, F. B.

    1985-01-01

    Satellite measurements of the radiative exchange between the planet earth and space have been the objective of many experiments since the beginning of the space age in the late 1950's. The on-going mission of the Earth Radiation Budget (ERB) experiments has been and will be to consider flight hardware, data handling and scientific analysis methods in a single design strategy. Research and development on observational data has produced an analysis model of errors associated with ERB measurement systems on polar satellites. Results show that the variability of reflected solar radiation from changing meteorology dominates measurement uncertainties. As an application, model calculations demonstrate that measurement requirements for the verification of climate models may be satisfied with observations from one polar satellite, provided there is information on diurnal variations of the radiation budget from the ERBE mission.

  5. Optimum satellite orbits for accurate measurement of the earth's radiation budget, summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, G. G.; Vonderhaar, T. H.

    1978-01-01

    The optimum set of orbit inclinations for the measurement of the earth radiation budget from spacially integrating sensor systems was estimated for two and three satellite systems. The best set of the two were satellites at orbit inclinations of 80 deg and 50 deg; of three the inclinations were 80 deg, 60 deg and 50 deg. These were chosen on the basis of a simulation of flat plate and spherical detectors flying over a daily varying earth radiation field as measured by the Nimbus 3 medium resolution scanners. A diurnal oscillation was also included in the emitted flux and albedo to give a source field as realistic as possible. Twenty three satellites with different inclinations and equator crossings were simulated, allowing the results of thousand of multisatellite sets to be intercompared. All were circular orbits of radius 7178 kilometers.

  6. Linking Satellites Via Earth "Hot Spots" and the Internet to Form Ad Hoc Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandl, Dan; Frye, Stu; Grosvenor, Sandra; Ingram, Mary Ann; Langley, John; Miranda, Felix; Lee, Richard Q.; Romanofsky, Robert; Zaman, Afoz; Popovic, Zoya

    2004-01-01

    As more assets are placed in orbit, opportunities emerge to combine various sets of satellites in temporary constellations to perform collaborative image collections. Often, new operations concepts for a satellite or set of satellites emerge after launch. To the degree with which new space assets can be inexpensively and rapidly integrated into temporary or "ad hoc" constellations, will determine whether these new ideas will be implemented or not. On the Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) satellite, a New Millennium Program mission, a number of experiments were conducted and are being conducted to demonstrate various aspects of an architecture that, when taken as a whole, will enable progressive mission autonomy. In particular, the target architecture will use adaptive ground antenna arrays to form, as close as possible, the equivalent of wireless access points for low earth orbiting satellites. Coupled with various ground and flight software and the Internet. the architecture enables progressive mission autonomy. Thus, new collaborative sensing techniques can be implemented post-launch. This paper will outline the overall operations concept and highlight details of both the research effort being conducted in satellites. Keywords: collaborative remote sensing smart antennas, adaptive antenna arrays, sensor webs. ad hoc constellations, mission autonomy and

  7. Simulation on change of generic satellite radar cross section via artificially created plasma sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Shen Shou Max; Chuang, Yu-Chou

    2016-06-01

    Recent advancements in antisatellite missile technologies have proven the effectiveness of such attacks, and the vulnerability of satellites in such exercises inspires a new paradigm in RF Stealth techniques suitable for satellites. In this paper we examine the possibility of using artificially created plasma sprays on the surface of the satellite’s main body to alter its radar cross section (RCS). First, we briefly review past research related to RF Stealth using plasma. Next, we discuss the physics between electromagnetic waves and plasma, and the RCS number game in RF Stealth design. A comparison of RCS in a generic satellite and a more complicated model is made to illustrate the effect of the RCS number game, and its meaning for a simulation model. We also run a comparison between finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) and multilevel fast multipole method (MLFMM) codes, and find the RCS results are very close. We then compare the RCS of the generic satellite and the plasma-covered satellite. The incident radar wave is a differentiated Gaussian monopulse, with 3 dB bandwidth between 1.2 GHz and 4 GHz, and we simulate three kinds of plasma density, with a characteristic plasma frequency ω P  =  0.1, 1, and 10 GHz. The electron-neutral collision frequency ν en is set at 0.01 GHz. We found the RCS of plasma-covered satellite is not necessarily smaller than the originally satellite. When ω P is 0.1 GHz, the plasma spray behaves like a dielectric, and there is minor reduction in the RCS. When ω P is 1 GHz, the X-Y cut RCS increases. When ω P is 10 GHz, the plasma behaves more like a metal to the radar wave, and stronger RCS dependency to frequency appears. Therefore, to use plasma as an RCS adjustment tool requires careful fine-tuning of plasma density and shape, in order to achieve the so-called plasma stealth effect.

  8. The Orbit and Future Motion of Earth Quasi-Satellite 2016 HO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chodas, Paul

    2016-10-01

    The newly discovered small asteroid 2016 HO3 is not only co-orbital with the Earth, it is currently trapped as a quasi-satellite, and it will remain a constant companion of our planet for centuries to come. Although it orbits the Sun, not the Earth, in a frame rotating with the Earth the asteroid appears to make yearly loops around our planet, and also bobs up and down through the ecliptic due to its 8-degree orbital inclination. What makes this asteroid a quasi-satellite is the fact that the Earth's gravity influences its motion so that it never wanders farther away than about 100 lunar distances. In the rotating frame, the asteroid's yearly cycles librate back and forth along the Earth's orbit, with a period of about 45 years. One other asteroid, 2003 YN107, followed a similar librational pattern from 1997 to 2006, but has since departed our vicinity. 2016 HO3, on the other hand, will continue to librate about our planet for centuries to come, making it the best and most stable example of a quasi-satellite to date.

  9. GeoEarthScope Airborne LiDAR and Satellite InSAR Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, D. A.; Jackson, M. E.; Meertens, C.

    2008-12-01

    UNAVCO has successfully acquired a significant volume of aerial and satellite geodetic imagery as part of GeoEarthScope, a component of the EarthScope Facility project funded by the National Science Foundation. All GeoEarthScope acquisition activities are now complete. Airborne LiDAR data acquisitions took place in 2007 and 2008 and cover a total area of more than 5000 square kilometers. The primary LiDAR survey regions cover features in Northern California, Southern/Eastern California, the Pacific Northwest, the Intermountain Seismic Belt (including the Wasatch and Teton faults and Yellowstone), and Alaska. We have ordered and archived more than 28,000 scenes (more than 81,000 frames) of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data suitable for interferometric analyses covering most of the western U.S. and parts of Alaska and Hawaii from several satellite platforms, including ERS-1/2, ENVISAT and RADARSAT. In addition to ordering data from existing archives, we also tasked the ESA ENVISAT satellite to acquire new SAR data in 2007 and 2008. GeoEarthScope activities were led by UNAVCO, guided by the community and conducted in partnership with the USGS and NASA. Processed imagery products, in addition to formats intended for use in standard research software, can also be viewed using general purpose tools such as Google Earth. We present a summary of these vast geodetic imagery datasets, totaling tens of terabytes, which are freely available to the community.

  10. High resolution earth observation satellites and services in the next decade a European perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Gunter; Dech, Stefan

    2005-07-01

    Projects to use very high resolution optical satellite sensor data started in the late 90s and are believed to be the major driver for the commercialisation of earth observation. The global political security situation and updated legislative frameworks created new opportunities for high resolution, dual use satellite systems. In addition to new optical sensors, very high resolution synthetic aperture radars will become in the next few years an important component in the imaging satellite fleet. The paper will review the development in this domain so far, and give perspectives on future emerging markets and opportunities. With dual-use satellite initiatives and new political frameworks agreed between the European Commission and the European Space Agency (ESA), the European market becomes very attractive for both service suppliers and customers. The political focus on "Global Monitoring for Environment and Security" (GMES) and the "European Defence and Security Policy" drive and amplify this demand which ranges from low resolution climate monitoring to very high resolution reconnaissance tasks. In order to create an operational and sustainable GMES in Europe by 2007, the European infrastructure need to be adapted and extended. This includes the ESA SENTINEL and OXYGEN programmes, aiming for a fleet of earth observation satellites and an open and operational earth observation ground segment. The harmonisation of national and regional geographic information is driven by the European Commission's INSPIRE programme. The necessary satellite capacity to complement existing systems in the delivery of space based data required for GMES is currently under definition. Embedded in a market with global competition and in the global political framework of a Global Earth Observation System of Systems, European companies, agencies and research institutions are now contributing to this joint undertaking. The paper addresses the chances, risks and options for the future.

  11. Properties of the moon, Mars, Martian satellites, and near-earth asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Jeffrey G.

    1989-01-01

    Environments and surface properties of the moon, Mars, Martian satellites, and near-earth asteroids are discussed. Topics include gravity, atmospheres, surface properties, surface compositions, seismicity, radiation environment, degradation, use of robotics, and environmental impacts. Gravity fields vary from large fractions of the earth's field such as 1/3 on Mars and 1/6 on the moon to smaller fractions of 0.0004 g on an asteroid 1 km in diameter. Spectral data and the analogy with meteor compositions suggest that near-earth asteroids may contain many resources such as water-rich carbonaceous materials and iron-rich metallic bodies. It is concluded that future mining and materials processing operations from extraterrestrial bodies require an investment now in both (1) missions to the moon, Mars, Phobos, Deimos, and near-earth asteroids and (2) earth-based laboratory research in materials and processing.

  12. A Survey of the Utility of Satellite Magnetometer Data for Application to Solid-earth Geophysical and Geological Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A survey of potential users of low altitude satellite magnetic measurements for solid-earth and geological studies was conducted. The principal objectives of this survey were to: document the utility and application of the data and resultant products obtained from such a satellite mission, and establish a users committee for the proposed low altitude vector magnetometer satellite.

  13. Asteroid (469219) 2016 HO3, the smallest and closest Earth quasi-satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente Marcos, C.; de la Fuente Marcos, R.

    2016-11-01

    A number of Earth co-orbital asteroids experience repeated transitions between the quasi-satellite and horseshoe dynamical states. Asteroids 2001 GO2, 2002 AA29, 2003 YN107 and 2015 SO2 are well-documented cases of such a dynamical behaviour. These transitions depend on the gravitational influence of other planets, owing to the overlapping of a multiplicity of secular resonances. Here, we show that the recently discovered asteroid (469219) 2016 HO3 is a quasi-satellite of our planet - the fifth one, joining the ranks of (164207) 2004 GU9, (277810) 2006 FV35, 2013 LX28, and 2014 OL339. This new Earth co-orbital also switches repeatedly between the quasi-satellite and horseshoe configurations. Its current quasi-satellite episode started nearly 100 yr ago and it will end in about 300 yr from now. The orbital solution currently available for this object is very robust and our full N-body calculations show that it may be a long-term companion (time-scale of Myr) to our planet. Among the known Earth quasi-satellites, it is the closest to our planet and as such, a potentially accessible target for future in situ study. Due to its presumably lengthy dynamical relationship with the Earth and given the fact that at present and for many decades this transient object remains well positioned with respect to our planet, the results of spectroscopic studies of this small body, 26-115 m, may be particularly useful to improve our understanding of the origins - local or captured - of Earth's co-orbital asteroid population. The non-negligible effect of the uncertainty in the value of the mass of Jupiter on the stability of this type of co-orbitals is also briefly explored.

  14. Asteroid (469219) 2016 HO3, the smallest and closest Earth quasi-satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente Marcos, C.; de la Fuente Marcos, R.

    2016-08-01

    A number of Earth co-orbital asteroids experience repeated transitions between the quasi-satellite and horseshoe dynamical states. Asteroids 2001 GO2, 2002 AA29, 2003 YN107 and 2015 SO2 are well-documented cases of such a dynamical behaviour. These transitions depend on the gravitational influence of other planets, owing to the overlapping of a multiplicity of secular resonances. Here, we show that the recently discovered asteroid (469219) 2016 HO3 is a quasi-satellite of our planet -the fifth one, joining the ranks of (164207) 2004 GU9, (277810) 2006 FV35, 2013 LX28, and 2014 OL339. This new Earth co-orbital also switches repeatedly between the quasi-satellite and horseshoe configurations. Its current quasi-satellite episode started nearly 100 yr ago and it will end in about 300 yr from now. The orbital solution currently available for this object is very robust and our full N-body calculations show that it may be a long-term companion (timescale of Myr) to our planet. Among the known Earth quasi-satellites, it is the closest to our planet and as such, a potentially accessible target for future in situ study. Due to its presumably lengthy dynamical relationship with the Earth and given the fact that at present and for many decades this transient object remains well positioned with respect to our planet, the results of spectroscopic studies of this small body, 26-115 m, may be particularly useful to improve our understanding of the origins -local or captured- of Earth's co-orbital asteroid population. The non-negligible effect of the uncertainty in the value of the mass of Jupiter on the stability of this type of co-orbitals is also briefly explored.

  15. Ocean tide models for satellite geodesy and Earth rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, Steven R.

    1991-01-01

    A theory is presented which predicts tides in turbulent, self-gravitating, and loading oceans possessing linearized bottom friction, realistic bathymetry, and continents (at coastal boundaries no-flow conditions are imposed). The theory is phrased in terms of spherical harmonics, which allows the tide equations to be reduced to linear matrix equations. This approach also allows an ocean-wide mass conservation constraint to be applied. Solutions were obtained for 32 long and short period luni-solar tidal constituents (and the pole tide), including the tidal velocities in addition to the tide height. Calibrating the intensity of bottom friction produces reasonable phase lags for all constituents; however, tidal amplitudes compare well with those from observation and other theories only for long-period constituents. In the most recent stage of grant research, traditional theory (Liouville equations) for determining the effects of angular momentum exchange on Earth's rotation were extended to encompass high-frequency excitations (such as short-period tides).

  16. Views of Earth's magnetosphere with the image satellite.

    PubMed

    Burch, J L; Mende, S B; Mitchell, D G; Moore, T E; Pollock, C J; Reinisch, B W; Sandel, B R; Fuselier, S A; Gallagher, D L; Green, J L; Perez, J D; Reiff, P H

    2001-01-26

    The IMAGE spacecraft uses photon and neutral atom imaging and radio sounding techniques to provide global images of Earth's inner magnetosphere and upper atmosphere. Auroral imaging at ultraviolet wavelengths shows that the proton aurora is displaced equatorward with respect to the electron aurora and that discrete auroral forms at higher latitudes are caused almost completely by electrons. Energetic neutral atom imaging of ions injected into the inner magnetosphere during magnetospheric disturbances shows a strong energy-dependent drift that leads to the formation of the ring current by ions in the several tens of kiloelectron volts energy range. Ultraviolet imaging of the plasmasphere has revealed two unexpected features-a premidnight trough region and a dayside shoulder region-and has confirmed the 30-year-old theory of the formation of a plasma tail extending from the duskside plasmasphere toward the magnetopause.

  17. Earth zonal harmonics from rapid numerical analysis of long satellite arcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    A zonal geopotential is presented to degree 21 from evaluation of mean elements for 21 satellites including 2 of low inclination. Each satellite is represented by an arc of at least one apsidal rotation. The lengths range from 200 to 800 days. Differential correction of the initial elements in all of the arcs, together with radiation pressure and atmospheric drag coefficients, was accomplished simultaneously with the correction for the zonal harmonics. The satellite orbits and their variations are generated by numerical integration of the Lagrange equations for mean elements. Disturbances due to precession and nutation of the earth's pole, atmospheric drag, radiation pressure and luni-solar gravity are added at from 1- to 8-day intervals in the integrated orbits. The results agree well with recent solutions from other authors using different methods and different satellite sets.

  18. Method and associated apparatus for capturing, servicing, and de-orbiting earth satellites using robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cepollina, Frank J. (Inventor); Burns, Richard D. (Inventor); Holz, Jill M. (Inventor); Corbo, James E. (Inventor); Jedhrich, Nicholas M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    This invention is a method and supporting apparatus for autonomously capturing, servicing and de-orbiting a free-flying spacecraft, such as a satellite, using robotics. The capture of the spacecraft includes the steps of optically seeking and ranging the satellite using LIDAR, and matching tumble rates, rendezvousing and berthing with the satellite. Servicing of the spacecraft may be done using supervised autonomy, which is allowing a robot to execute a sequence of instructions without intervention from a remote human-occupied location. These instructions may be packaged at the remote station in a script and uplinked to the robot for execution upon remote command giving authority to proceed. Alternately, the instructions may be generated by Artificial Intelligence (AI) logic onboard the robot. In either case, the remote operator maintains the ability to abort an instruction or script at any time as well as the ability to intervene using manual override to teleoperate the robot.

  19. Probing the earth's gravity field using Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking (SST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonbun, F. O.

    1976-01-01

    Satellite-to-Satellite (SST) tests, namely: (a) the ATS-6/GEOS-3 and (b) the ATS-6/Apollo-Soyuz experiment and some of the results obtained are described. The main purpose of these two experiments was first to track via ATS-6 the GEOS-3 as well as the Apollo-Soyuz and to use these tracking data to determine (a) both orbits, that is, ATS-6, GEOS-3 and/or the Apollo-Soyuz orbits at the same time; (b) each of these orbits alone; and (c) test the ATS-6/GEOS-3 and/or Apollo-Soyuz SST link to study local gravity anomalies; and, second, to test communications, command, and data transmission from the ground via ATS-6 to these spacecraft and back again to the ground. The Apollo-Soyuz Geodynamics Experiment is discussed in some detail.

  20. The Role of Satellite Earth Observation Data in Monitoring and Verifying International Environmental Treaties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Shaida

    2004-01-01

    The term verification implies compliance verification in the language of treaty negotiation and implementation, particularly in the fields of disarmament and arms control. The term monitoring on the other hand, in both environmental and arms control treaties, has a much broader interpretation which allows for use of supporting data sources that are not necessarily acceptable or adequate for direct verification. There are many ways that satellite Earth observation (EO) data can support international environmental agreements, from national forest inventories to use in geographic information system (GIs) tools. Though only a few references to satellite EO data and their use exist in the treaties themselves, an expanding list of applications can be considered in support of multilateral environmental agreements (MEAs). This paper explores the current uses of satellite Earth observation data which support monitoring activities of major environmental treaties and draws conclusions about future missions and their data use. The scope of the study includes all phases of environmental treaty fulfillment - development, monitoring, and enforcement - and includes a multinational perspective on the use of satellite Earth observation data for treaty support.

  1. Analyses of earth radiation budget data from unrestricted broadband radiometers on the ESSA 7 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, W. L.; House, F. B.

    1979-01-01

    Six months of data from the wide-field-of-view low resolution infrared radiometers on the Environmental Science Services Administration (ESSA) 7 satellite were analyzed. Earth emitted and earth reflected irradiances were computed at satellite altitude using data from a new in-flight calibration technique. Flux densitites and albedos were computed for the top of the earth's atmosphere. Monthly averages of these quantities over 100 latitude zones, each hemisphere, and the globe are presented for each month analyzed, and global distributions are presented for typical months. Emitted flux densities are generally lower and albedos higher than those of previous studies. This may be due, in part, to the fact that the ESSA 7 satellite was in a 3 p.m. Sun-synchronous orbit and some of the comparison data were obtained from satellites in 12 noon sun-synchronous orbits. The ESSA 7 detectors seem to smooth out spatial flux density variations more than scanning radiometers or wide-field-of-view fixed-plate detectors. Significant longitudinal and latitudinal variations of emitted flux density and albedo were identified in the tropics in a zone extending about + or - 25 deg in latitude.

  2. Detection of Amazonian Black Earth Sites using Hyperspectral Satellite Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braswell, B. H.; Palace, M.; Bush, M. B.; Neves, E.; Mcmichael, C.; Czarnecki, C.; Moraes, B.; Raczka, M.

    2012-12-01

    The pre-Columbian indigenous population estimates of the Amazon Basin lowlands are highly uncertain and the subject of considerable controversy. One of the archaeological sources used in reconstruction of Amazonian societies are Amazonian black earths (ABE) or terra preta soils. The immense size of Amazonia, remoteness of many areas, forest vegetation, and lack of archaeological field surveys, make remote sensing beneficial to archaeological studies in this region. Remote sensing allows for comparison and analysis of vegetation across vast areas. Previous research has shown that hyperspectral image data can detect vegetation canopy chemistry differences, associated with soil nutrients and chemistry anomalies at ABE locations. We conducted a preliminary analysis that indicates nine portions of the spectrum where three ABE sites are completely separable from the three non-ABE sites. A discriminant function analysis using stepwise variable selection indicated that five bands were adequate in distinguishing between ABE and non-ABE sites. These five bands ranged between the 2000-2400 nm, indicating that canopy moisture is useful in remotely sensing terra preta. The wealth of site locations we are compiling from numerous sources provides a unique opportunity to develop algorithms for the classification of ABE and non-ABE sites. Our current data holdings include over 1600 Hyperion images and a database of ABE/ non-ABE field observations at approximately 2900 sites. The distribution and number of ABE sites provides information useful for both archaeological research and has consequences for the interpretation of Amazonian forest ecology. Knowledge of the disturbance history of the Amazonian forest provides a context and framework for the placement of all environmental research in the region. This presentation reports results of statistical modeling using extracted spectra from about 400 sites that are within Hyperion scenes.

  3. Citizen Explorer. 1; An Earth Observer With New Small Satellite Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Zachary; Dunn, Catherine E.

    2003-01-01

    Citizen Explorer-I (CX-I), designed and built by students at Colorado Space Grant Consortium in Boulder to provide global ozone monitoring, employs a unique mission architecture and several innovative technologies during its mission. The mission design allows K-12 schools around the world to be involved as ground stations available to receive science data and telemetry from CX-I. Another important technology allows the spacecraft to be less reliant on ground operators. Spacecraft Command Language (SCL) allows mission designers to set constraints on the satellite operations. The satellite then automatically adheres to the constraints when the satellite is out of contact with Mission Operations. In addition to SCL, a low level of artificial intelligence will be supplied to the spacecraft through the use of the Automated Scheduling and Planning ENvironment (ASPEN). ASPEN is used to maintain a spacecraft schedule in order to achieve the objectives a mission operator would normally have to complete. Within the communications system of CX-I, internet of CX-I, internet protocols are the main method for communicating with the satellite. As internet protocols have not been widely used in satellite communication, CX-I provides an opportunity to study the effectiveness of using internet protocols over radio links. The Attitude Determination and Control System (ADCS) on CX-I uses a gravity gradient boom as a means of orienting the satellite's science instruments toward nadir. The boom design is unique because it is constructed of tape measure material. These new technologies' effectiveness will be tested for use on future small satellite projects within the space satellite industry.

  4. Solar Sail Halo Orbits at the Sun Earth Artificial L1 Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baoyin, Hexi; McInnes, Colin R.

    2006-02-01

    Halo orbits for solar sails at artificial Sun Earth L1 points are investigated by a third order approximate solution. Two families of halo orbits are explored as defined by the sail attitude. Case I: the sail normal is directed along the Sun-sail line. Case II: the sail normal is directed along the Sun Earth line. In both cases the minimum amplitude of a halo orbit increases as the lightness number of the solar sail increases. The effect of the z-direction amplitude on x- or y-direction amplitude is also investigated and the results show that the effect is relatively small. In case I, the orbit period increases as the sail lightness number increases, while in case II, as the lightness number increases, the orbit period increases first and then decreases after the lightness number exceeds ~0.01.

  5. Space-shuttle interfaces/utilization. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study (EOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The economic aspects of space shuttle application to a representative Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) operational mission in the various candidate Shuttle modes of launch, retrieval, and resupply are discussed. System maintenance of the same mission capability using a conventional launch vehicle is also considered. The studies are based on application of sophisticated Monte Carlo mission simulation program developed originally for studies of in-space servicing of a military satellite system. The program has been modified to permit evaluation of space shuttle application to low altitude EOS missions in all three modes. The conclusions generated by the EOS system study are developed.

  6. Candidate configuration trade study, Stellar-inertial Measurement Systems (SIMS) for an Earth Observation Satellite (EOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogletree, G.; Coccoli, J.; Mckern, R.; Smith, M.; White, R.

    1972-01-01

    The results of analytical and simulation studies of the stellar-inertial measurement system (SIMS) for an earth observation satellite are presented. Subsystem design analyses and sensor design trades are reported. Three candidate systems are considered: (1) structure-mounted gyros with structure-mounted star mapper, (2) structure-mounted gyros with gimbaled star tracker, and (3) gimbaled gyros with structure-mounted star mapper. The purpose of the study is to facilitate the decisions pertaining to gimbaled versus structure-mounted gyros and star sensors, and combinations of systems suitable for the EOS satellite.

  7. Space Network IP Services (SNIS): An Architecture for Supporting Low Earth Orbiting IP Satellite Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israel, David J.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Space Network (SN) supports a variety of missions using the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS), which includes ground stations in White Sands, New Mexico and Guam. A Space Network IP Services (SNIS) architecture is being developed to support future users with requirements for end-to-end Internet Protocol (IP) communications. This architecture will support all IP protocols, including Mobile IP, over TDRSS Single Access, Multiple Access, and Demand Access Radio Frequency (RF) links. This paper will describe this architecture and how it can enable Low Earth Orbiting IP satellite missions.

  8. Improvement of the Earth's gravity field from terrestrial and satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The terrestrial gravity data base was updated. Studies related to the Geopotential Research Mission (GRM) have primarily considered the local recovery of gravity anomalies on the surface of the Earth based on satellite to satellite tracking or gradiometer data. A simulation study was used to estimate the accuracy of 1 degree-mean anomalies which could be recovered from the GRM data. Numerous procedures were developed for the intent of performing computations at the laser stations in the SL6 system to improve geoid undulation calculations.

  9. Effect of limb darkening on earth radiation incident on a spherical satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzoff, S.; Smith, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    The thermal radiation from the earth incident on a spherical satellite depends on the angular distribution of earth-emitted radiation. An analysis is presented of this dependency, and calculated results are given, based on a published limb-darkening curve for the earth. The curve was determined from Tiros data, and is a statistical average over the entire globe between 75 deg latitude. The computed effect of limb darkening was 1.8 percent at 900 km altitude, 2.5 percent at 500 km altitude, and 3.0 percent at 300 km altitude. Below 300 km, it increased rapidly with decreasing altitude. Discussion is included of various other problems inherent in the use of orbiting spheres and stabilized flat plates to measure the heat radiated from the earth.

  10. NASA Perspectives on Earth Observations from Satellite or 50 Years of Meteorological Satellite Experiments-The NASA Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Einaudi, Franco

    2010-01-01

    The NASA was established in 1959. From those very eady days to the present NASA has been intimately involved with NOAA and the scientific community in the development and operation of satellite and sensor experiments. The early efforts included experiments on the TIROS and geostationary Applications Technology Satellites (ATS) series. In the latter case the spin-scan cameras conceived by Verner Suomi, along with the TIROS cameras, opened new vistas at what could be done in meteorological studies with the daily, nearly global, synoptic views from space-borne sensors As the years passed and the Nimbus series of satellites came into being in the 1960's, more quantitative observations with longer-lifetime, increasingly capable, better calibrated instruments came into being. NASA, in collaboration with and in support of NOAA, implemented operational systems that we now know as the Polar Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) series and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) series that provided dependable, continuous, dedicated satellite observations for use by the weather and atmospheric science communities. Through the 1970's, 1980's, and 1990's improved, well-calibrated instruments with more spectral bands extending into the thermal and the microwave portions of the electromagnetic spectrum were provided to obtain accurate soundings of the atmosphere, atmospheric chemistry constituents such as ozone, global sea surface temperature, snow and ice extent, vegetation dynamics, etc. In the 1990's and up to the present the NASA/Earth Observing System (EOS) has been developed, implemented, and operated over many years to provide a very comprehensive suite of observations of the atmosphere, as well as land and ocean parameters. The future looks bright wherein the development of new systems, broadly described by the National Academy of Science Decadal Study, is now underway. NASA, along with collaborations with NOAA, other agencies, and the

  11. Electric propulsion systems for small satellites: the low earth orbit mission perseus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, D.; Herdrich, G.; Lau, M.; Lengowski, M.; Schönherr, T.; Steinmetz, F.; Wollenhaupt, B.; Zeile, O.; Röser, H.-P.

    2011-10-01

    The Institute of Space Systems, Universität Stuttgart, launched a "Small a Satellite Program" in 2002. The first two of the four planed small satellites, Flying Laptop and PERSEUS, are both Low Earth Orbit (LEO) missions. The third mission Cermit is a reentry satellite and the last of the small satellites - Lunar Mission BW1 - is a mission to the Moon. For this purpose, different propulsion systems are mandatory. The propulsion system for Lunar Mission BW1 will consist of two different types of thruster systems: a cluster of pulsed magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters (SIMP-LEX) using solid polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) as propellant and a thermal arcjet thruster (TALOS) using gaseous ammonia as propellant. Both thruster systems are currently under development at IRS. They are planned to be tested on board the small satellite mission PERSEUS, one of the precursor missions of Lunar Mission BW1. The thruster systems have been investigated intensely in the past and, furthermore, optimization of the thrusters with respect to the mission requirements of Lunar Mission BW1 has been started. The test procedures for the technology demonstration on the PERSEUS satellite are under development at present.

  12. Optimal approach to the investigation of the Earth's gravitational field by means of satellite gradiometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrovskaya, M. S.

    The conventional approach to the recovery of the Earth's gravitational field from satellite gradiometry observations is based on constructing, from the start, several boundary value (BV) relations, each of them corresponding to a separate observable component of the gravity gradient (GG) tensor or a certain combination of them. In particular, one of such projects, the ARISTOTELES mission, assumes that only the radial and across-track components are accessible (by technical reasons). The purpose of the present paper is mainly to discuss the principle aspects of the problem of the Earth's potential recovering from satellite gradiometry, to give an optimal formulation of the problem and derive the basic boundary value equation in different forms.

  13. SatelliteDL - An IDL Toolkit for the Analysis of Satellite Earth Observations - GOES, MODIS, VIIRS and CERES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillmore, D. W.; Galloy, M. D.; Kindig, D.

    2013-12-01

    SatelliteDL is an IDL toolkit for the analysis of satellite Earth observations from a diverse set of platforms and sensors. The design features an abstraction layer that allows for easy inclusion of new datasets in a modular way. The core function of the toolkit is the spatial and temporal alignment of satellite swath and geostationary data. IDL has a powerful suite of statistical and visualization tools that can be used in conjunction with SatelliteDL. Our overarching objective is to create utilities that automate the mundane aspects of satellite data analysis, are extensible and maintainable, and do not place limitations on the analysis itself. Toward this end we have constructed SatelliteDL to include (1) HTML and LaTeX API document generation, (2) a unit test framework, (3) automatic message and error logs, (4) HTML and LaTeX plot and table generation, and (5) several real world examples with bundled datasets available for download. For ease of use, datasets, variables and optional workflows may be specified in a flexible format configuration file. Configuration statements may specify, for example, a region and date range, and the creation of images, plots and statistical summary tables for a long list of variables. SatelliteDL enforces data provenance; all data should be traceable and reproducible. The output NetCDF file metadata holds a complete history of the original datasets and their transformations, and a method exists to reconstruct a configuration file from this information. Release 0.1.0 of SatelliteDL is anticipated for the 2013 Fall AGU conference. It will distribute with ingest methods for GOES, MODIS, VIIRS and CERES radiance data (L1) as well as select 2D atmosphere products (L2) such as aerosol and cloud (MODIS and VIIRS) and radiant flux (CERES). Future releases will provide ingest methods for ocean and land surface products, gridded and time averaged datasets (L3 Daily, Monthly and Yearly), and support for 3D products such as temperature and

  14. Daily Earth Orientation Parameters From Satellite Laser Ranging to the LAGEOS and ETALON Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlis, E. C.

    2002-05-01

    The JCET/GSFC Associate Analysis Center for the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS) participated over the past year in a Pilot Project of the ILRS Analysis Working Group. The goal of the Pilot Project is the optimal combination of laser ranging data from ETALON 1 and 2 with the nominal data set from LAGEOS and LAGEOS 2, which ILRS normally uses in our series of Earth Orientation Parameters -EOP, submitted to the International Earth Rotation Service (IERS). We present here our analysis of the expanded data set for the definition of the Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF) and its crust-fixed orientation. The TRF plays an important role in the multi-technique monitoring of temporal variations in the gravitational field and its very low degree and order components, as well as changes in the inertia tensor as a result of angular momentum exchanges in the Earth system. This latest analysis of the SLR data set from LAGEOS and LAGEOS 2 with the addition of the data from ETALON 1 and 2, examines the possibility of improving the results for the TRF, with only a small increase in the processing effort. This work is being done in the framework of the ILRS Pilot Project for, amongst other things, the precise estimation of the EOP from SLR data in a routine fashion. Along with the static parameters of the TRF we determined a time series of variations of its origin with respect to the instantaneous center of mass of the Earth system (geocenter). The data from the two newly included targets, ETALON 1 and 2, come from an enhanced data set which is the result of a dedicated tracking campaign by the ILRS network of stations, initiated at the request of the ILRS Analysis Working Group on April 1, 2001 and currently in progress. Due to the different orbital geometry and tracking pattern of the two "constellations" (LAGEOS vs. ETALON), it was required to carefully evaluate the relative weight between the two data sets in order to optimally combine them. The data were reduced using

  15. Statistical Analysis of Interference Between Earth Stations and Earth-Orbiting Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, D.

    1994-01-01

    Determination of the potential for radio frequency interference between Earth stations and orbiting spacecraft is often desirable. This information can be used to select frequencies for radio systems to avoid interference or it can be used to determine if coordination between radio systems is necessary. Also, it is useful for planning emission standards and filtering requirements for future telecommunications equipment. A model is developed that will determine the statistics of interference between Earth stations and elliptical orbiting spacecraft. The model uses orbital dynamics, detailed antenna patterns, and spectral characteristics to obtain accurate levels of interference at the victim receiver. The model is programmed into a computer simulation to obtain long term statistics of interference.

  16. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study. Report 3: Design cost trade-off studies and recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An analysis of the design and cost tradeoff aspects of the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) development is presented. The design/cost factors that affect a series of mission/system level concepts are discussed. The subjects considered are as follows: (1) spacecraft subsystem cost tradeoffs, (2) ground system cost tradeoffs, and (3) program cost summary. Tables of data are provided to summarize the results of the analyses. Illustrations of the various spacecraft configurations are included.

  17. 30/20-GHz earth station components for satellite digital communication service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Takeo; Yamada, Yoshihide; Kawashima, Fujio

    1987-03-01

    This paper describes the design method, configurations and performance of two recently developed components for satellite digital communications application. The 30-GHz band high-power transmitters featuring a 300-watt output power are of two types: a small-size klystron tube unit and wide-bandwidth traveling wave tube unit. The 30/20-GHz band earth station antennas are a small size, lightweight axisymmetrical Gregorian and an offset Cassegrain having good wide angle directivity.

  18. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study. Report no. 4: Management approach recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A management approach for the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) which will meet the challenge of a constrained cost environment is presented. Areas of consideration are contracting techniques, test philosophy, reliability and quality assurance requirements, commonality options, and documentation and control requirements. The various functional areas which were examined for cost reduction possibilities are identified. The recommended management approach is developed to show the primary and alternative methods.

  19. Instrument constraints and interface specifications. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study (EOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The equipment specifications for the thematic mapper and high resolution pointable imager for use on the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) are presented. The interface requirements of the systems are defined. The interface requirements are extracted from the equipment specifications and are intended as a summary to be used by the system and spacecraft designer. The appropriate documentation from which the specifications of the equipment are established are identified.

  20. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study. Report 4: Low cost management approach and recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An analysis of low cost management approaches for the development of the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) is presented. The factors of the program which tend to increase costs are identified. The NASA/Industry interface is stressed to show how the interface can be improved to produce reduced program costs. Techniques and examples of cost reduction which can be applied to the EOS program are tabulated. Specific recommendations for actions to be taken to reduce costs in prescribed areas are submitted.

  1. Comparison of three techniques for modeling the Earth's gravity field on the basis of a satellite orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditmar, P.; van Eck van der Sluijs, A.

    2003-12-01

    At present, there are three techniques for the computation of the Earth's gravity field from a satellite orbit: (i) the "classical" approach based on the integration of variational equations (IVEA); (ii) the energy balance approach (EBA); (iii) the acceleration approach (AA), which directly relates the satellite accelerations to the gravity field in accordance with Newton's second law. Most of the results have been obtained so far with the IVEA and EBA. The AA is believed to be inferior because the double differentiation needed to convert the satellite orbit into the satellite accelerations amplifies data noise dramatically. We show that that a poor performance of the AA is a myth. One can easily prove that the solution of an inverse problem is invariant with respect to the linear transformation of the data vector of the kind d' = B d (where d is the original data vector, d' is the transformed data vector, and B is the transformation matrix) provided that the matrix B is square and invertible. The only pre-requisite is that the optimal estimation procedure is followed, including the usage of the properly transformed covariance matrix: Cd' = B Cd BT. In other words, such data vectors d' and d are equivalent. It is easy to show that the satellite positions and satellite accelerations are two nearly equivalent data sets (in order to reach a strict equivalence, the latter can be supplied, e.g., with the initial state vector). Therefore, these data sets may result in nearly the same gravity field model. A decision which technique is preferable should be made on the basis of practical considerations, e.g. the numerical efficiency. According to our experience, the AA leads to a much faster computational scheme than the IVEA. Furthermore, we have considered the EBA. It is easy to show that a set of kinetic energy measurements is nearly equivalent to a set of along-track satellite accelerations. The other two components of the acceleration vectors are ignored by the EBA

  2. Handover aspects for a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) CDMA Land Mobile Satellite (LMS) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, P.; Beach, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of handoff in a land mobile satellite (LMS) system between adjacent satellites in a low earth orbit (LEO) constellation. In particular, emphasis is placed on the application of soft handoff in a direct sequence code division multiple access (DS-CDMA) LMS system. Soft handoff is explained in terms of terrestrial macroscopic diversity, in which signals transmitted via several independent fading paths are combined to enhance the link quality. This concept is then reconsidered in the context of a LEO LMS system. A two-state Markov channel model is used to simulate the effects of shadowing on the communications path from the mobile to each satellite during handoff. The results of the channel simulation form a platform for discussion regarding soft handoff, highlighting the potential merits of the scheme when applied in a LEO LMS environment.

  3. Human factors dimensions in the evolution of increasingly automated control rooms for near-earth satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. M.

    1982-01-01

    The NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center is responsible for the control and ground support for all of NASA's unmanned near-earth satellites. Traditionally, each satellite had its own dedicated mission operations room. In the mid-seventies, an integration of some of these dedicated facilities was begun with the primary objective to reduce costs. In this connection, the Multi-Satellite Operations Control Center (MSOCC) was designed. MSOCC represents currently a labor intensive operation. Recently, Goddard has become increasingly aware of human factors and human-machine interface issues. A summary is provided of some of the attempts to apply human factors considerations in the design of command and control environments. Current and future activities with respect to human factors and systems design are discussed, giving attention to the allocation of tasks between human and computer, and the interface for the human-computer dialogue.

  4. A time variable model of Earth's albedo. [for climatology studies and interpretation of satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartman, F. L.

    1980-01-01

    A time variable model of Earth's albedo was prepared for use in climate studies and as an aid to the interpretation of satellite Earth radiation budget data. The features of the model include: a 10 deg latitude 10 deg longitude grid for numerical integration, surface albedo specified at 1 month intervals, calculation of zenith angle effect for surface albedo and of the additional effect of the atmosphere on the albedo. Percent cloud cover is specified for 29 different climatological cloud type regions at 8 times of the day for 12 months of the year. Cloud albedos were specified for each of the cloud climatological types. Diurnal and monthly variations of this model are described and results are compared with a model which is based on satellite measurements. A computer program was also written for use in studying the sampling effects in satellite radiation budget measurements. An example of the results of calculations with this program are compared with a previous study of the sampling effects. This program for satellite orbit characteristics is to be combined with the time-variable albedo model for further study of the sampling problem.

  5. SERB, a nano-satellite dedicated to the Earth-Sun relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, Mustapha; Bamas, Étienne; Cambournac, Pierre; Cherabier, Philippe; Demarets, Romain; Denis, Gaspard; Dion, Axel; Duroselle, Raphaël.; Duveiller, Florence; Eichner, Laetitia; Lozeve, Dimitri; Mestdagh, Guillaume; Ogier, Antoine; Oliverio, Romane; Receveur, Thibault; Souchet, Camille; Gilbert, Pierre; Poiet, Germain; Hauchecorne, Alain; Keckhut, Philippe; Sarkissian, Alain

    2016-05-01

    The Solar irradiance and Earth Radiation Budget (SERB) mission is an innovative proof-of-concept nano-satellite, with three ambitious scientific objectives. The nano-satellite aims at measuring on the same platform the absolute value of the total solar irradiance (TSI) and its variability, the ultraviolet (UV) solar spectral variability, and the different components of the Earth radiation budget. SERB is a joint project between CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales), Ecole polytechnique, and LATMOS (Laboratoire Atmospheres, Milieux, Observations Spatiales) scheduled for a launch in 2020-2021. It is a three-unit CubeSat (X-CubeSat II), developed by students from ´Ecole polytechnique. Critical components of instrumental payloads of future large missions (coatings, UV filters, etc.) can acquire the technical maturity by flying in a CubeSat. Nano-satellites also represent an excellent alternative for instrumentation testing, allowing for longer flights than rockets. More-over, specific scientific experiments can be performed by nano-satellites. This paper is intended to present the SERB mission and its scientific objectives.

  6. International two-way satellite time transfers using INTELSAT space segment and small Earth stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veenstra, Lester B.

    1990-01-01

    The satellite operated by the International Telecommunications Satellite Organization (INTELSAT) provides new and unique capabilities for the coordinates of international time scales on a world wide basis using the two-way technique. A network of coordinated clocks using small earth stations collocated with the scales is possible. Antennas as small as 1.8 m at K-band and 3 m at C-band transmitting powers of less than 1 W will provide signals with time jitters of less than 1 ns existing spread spectrum modems. One way time broadcasting is also possible, under the INTELSAT INTELNET system, possibly using existing international data distribution (press and financial) systems that are already operating spread spectrum systems. The technical details of the satellite and requirements on satellite earth stations are given. The resources required for a regular operational international time transfer service are analyzed with respect to the existing international digital service offerings of the INTELSAT Business Service (IBS) and INTELNET. Coverage areas, typical link budgets, and a summary of previous domestic and international work using this technique are provided. Administrative procedures for gaining access to the space segment are outlined. Contact information for local INTELSAT signatories is listed.

  7. The effect of lunarlike satellites on the orbital infrared light curves of Earth-analog planets.

    PubMed

    Moskovitz, Nicholas A; Gaidos, Eric; Williams, Darren M

    2009-04-01

    We have investigated the influence of lunarlike satellites on the infrared orbital light curves of Earth-analog extrasolar planets. Such light curves will be obtained by NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and ESA's Darwin missions as a consequence of repeat observations to confirm the companion status of a putative planet and determine its orbit. We used an energy balance model to calculate disk-averaged infrared (bolometric) fluxes from planet-satellite systems over a full orbital period (one year). The satellites are assumed to lack an atmosphere, have a low thermal inertia like that of the Moon, and span a range of plausible radii. The planets are assumed to have thermal and orbital properties that mimic those of Earth, while their obliquities and orbital longitudes of inferior conjunction remain free parameters. Even if the gross thermal properties of the planet can be independently constrained (e.g., via spectroscopy or visible-wavelength detection of specular glint from a surface ocean), only the largest (approximately Mars-sized) lunarlike satellites can be detected by light curve data from a TPF-like instrument (i.e., one that achieves a photometric signal-to-noise ratio of 10 to 20 at infrared wavelengths). Nondetection of a lunarlike satellite can obfuscate the interpretation of a given system's infrared light curve so that it may resemble a single planet with high obliquity, different orbital longitude of vernal equinox relative to inferior conjunction, and in some cases drastically different thermal characteristics. If the thermal properties of the planet are not independently established, then the presence of a lunarlike satellite cannot be inferred from infrared data, which would thus demonstrate that photometric light curves alone can only be used for preliminary study, and the addition of spectroscopic data will be necessary. PMID:19400731

  8. The effect of lunarlike satellites on the orbital infrared light curves of Earth-analog planets.

    PubMed

    Moskovitz, Nicholas A; Gaidos, Eric; Williams, Darren M

    2009-04-01

    We have investigated the influence of lunarlike satellites on the infrared orbital light curves of Earth-analog extrasolar planets. Such light curves will be obtained by NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and ESA's Darwin missions as a consequence of repeat observations to confirm the companion status of a putative planet and determine its orbit. We used an energy balance model to calculate disk-averaged infrared (bolometric) fluxes from planet-satellite systems over a full orbital period (one year). The satellites are assumed to lack an atmosphere, have a low thermal inertia like that of the Moon, and span a range of plausible radii. The planets are assumed to have thermal and orbital properties that mimic those of Earth, while their obliquities and orbital longitudes of inferior conjunction remain free parameters. Even if the gross thermal properties of the planet can be independently constrained (e.g., via spectroscopy or visible-wavelength detection of specular glint from a surface ocean), only the largest (approximately Mars-sized) lunarlike satellites can be detected by light curve data from a TPF-like instrument (i.e., one that achieves a photometric signal-to-noise ratio of 10 to 20 at infrared wavelengths). Nondetection of a lunarlike satellite can obfuscate the interpretation of a given system's infrared light curve so that it may resemble a single planet with high obliquity, different orbital longitude of vernal equinox relative to inferior conjunction, and in some cases drastically different thermal characteristics. If the thermal properties of the planet are not independently established, then the presence of a lunarlike satellite cannot be inferred from infrared data, which would thus demonstrate that photometric light curves alone can only be used for preliminary study, and the addition of spectroscopic data will be necessary.

  9. Data Dissemination System Status and Plan for Jaxa's Earth Observation Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuda, M.; Miura, S.

    2012-12-01

    1. INTRODUCTION JAXA is Japan's national aerospace agency and responsible for research, technology development and the launch of satellites into orbit, and is involved in many more advanced missions, such as asteroid exploration and possible manned exploration of the Moon. Since 1978, JAXA started to disseminate earth observation data acquired by satellites to researchers and those data scene became more than two Million scenes in 2011. This paper focuses on the status and future plan for JAXA's Data Dissemination System for those data. 2. STATUS JAXA is Japan's national aerospace agency and responsible for research, technology development and the launch of satellites into orbit. In October 1978, JAXA opened the Earth Observation Center (EOC) and started to archive and disseminate earth observation data acquired by multiple satellites. 2.1. Target data Currently, the disseminated data includes "JAXA's satellite/sensor data" and "non-JAXA's satellite/sensor data", as shown in Table 2-1. In 2011, the total disseminated data scene became more than two Million scenes. 2.2. Data Dissemination Guideline The JAXA basic data dissemination guideline is a free for researchers and specific agencies. JAXA has two approaches for dissemination. One is that the data is distributed for specific agencies by Mission Operation Systems (MOS). Each project has its own MOS, for example, GCOM-W1 has a GCOM-W1 MOS. Another is that the data is disseminated for many researchers by Data Distribution Systems. Now JAXA has three Data Distribution systems, EOIS, AUIG and GCOM-W1DPSS. Table 2-1 : Disseminated earth observation data from JAXA's facility Satellite Sensor Processing Level ALOS AVNIR-2 Level 1 PRISM Level 1 PALSAR Level 1 TRMM PR Level 1, 2, 3 CMB Level 1, 2, 3 TMI Level 1, 2, 3 VIR Level 1, 2, 3 Aqua AMSR-E Level 1, 2, 3 ADEOS-II AMSR Level 1, 2, 3 GLI-1km Level 1, 2, 3 GLI-250m Level 1, 2, 3 JERS-1 OSW Level 0, 1, 2 OVN Level 0, 1, 2, 5 SAR Level 1, 2 ADEOS AVNIR Level 1 OCTS

  10. Looking Down on the Earth: How Satellites Have Revolutionized Our Understanding of Our Home Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freilich, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Earth is a complex, dynamic system we do not yet fully understand. The Earth system, like the human body, comprises diverse components that interact in complex ways. We need to understand the Earth's atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, and biosphere as a single connected system. Our planet is changing on all spatial and temporal scales. This presentation will highlight how satellite observations are revolutionizing our understanding of and its response to natural or human-induced changes, and to improve prediction of climate, weather, and natural hazards. Bio: MICHAEL H. FREILICH, Director of the Earth Science Division, Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters. Prior to NASA, he was a Professor and Associate Dean in the College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University. He received Ph.D. in Oceanography from Scripps Institution of Oceanography (Univ. of CA., San Diego) in 1982. Dr. Freilich's research focuses on the determination, validation, and geophysical analysis of ocean surface wind velocity measured by satellite-borne microwave radar and radiometer instruments. He has developed scatterometer and altimeter wind model functions, as well as innovative validation techniques for accurately quantifying the accuracy of spaceborne environmental measurements. Dr. Freilich has served on many NASA, National Research Council (NRC), and research community advisory and steering groups, including the WOCE Science Steering Committee, the NASA EOS Science Executive Committee, the NRC Ocean Studies Board, and several NASA data system review committees. Freilich's non-scientific passions include nature photography and soccer refereeing at the youth, high school, and adult levels.

  11. Contingency study for the third international Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE-3) satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    The third satellite of the international Sun-Earth Explorer program was inserted into a periodic halo orbit about L sub 1, the collinear libration point between the Sun and the Earth-Moon barycenter. A plan is presented that was developed to enable insertion into the halo orbit in case there was a large underperformance of the Delta second or third stage during the maneuver to insert the spacecraft into the transfer trajectory. After one orbit of the Earth, a maneuver would be performed near perigee to increase the energy of the orbit. A relatively small second maneuver would put the spacecraft in a transfer trajectory to the halo orbit, into which it could be inserted for a total cost within the fuel budget. Overburns (hot transfer trajectory insertions) were also studied.

  12. Satellites Seek Gravity Signals for Remote Sensing the Seismotectonic Stresses in Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Han-Shou; Chen, Jizhong; Li, Jinling

    2003-01-01

    The ability of the mantle to withstand stress-difference due to superimposed loads would appear to argue against flow in the Earth s mantle, but the ironic fact is that the satellite determined gravity variations are the evidence of density differences associated with mantle flow. The type of flow which is most likely to be involved concerns convection currents. For the past 4 decades, models of mantle convection have made remarkable advancements. Although a large body of evidence regarding the seafloor depth, heat flow, lithospheric strength and forces of slab-pull and swell-push has been obtained, the global seismotectonic stresses in the Earth are yet to be determined. The problem is that no one has been able to come up with a satisfactory scenario that must characterize the stresses in the Earth which cause earthquakes and create tectonic features.

  13. On the use of wavelet for extracting feature patterns from Multitemporal google earth satellite data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasaponara, R.

    2012-04-01

    The great amount of multispectral VHR satellite images, even available free of charge in Google earth has opened new strategic challenges in the field of remote sensing for archaeological studies. These challenges substantially deal with: (i) the strategic exploitation of satellite data as much as possible, (ii) the setting up of effective and reliable automatic and/or semiautomatic data processing strategies and (iii) the integration with other data sources from documentary resources to the traditional ground survey, historical documentation, geophysical prospection, etc. VHR satellites provide high resolution data which can improve knowledge on past human activities providing precious qualitative and quantitative information developed to such an extent that currently they share many of the physical characteristics of aerial imagery. This makes them ideal for investigations ranging from a local to a regional scale (see. for example, Lasaponara and Masini 2006a,b, 2007a, 2011; Masini and Lasaponara 2006, 2007, Sparavigna, 2010). Moreover, satellite data are still the only data source for research performed in areas where aerial photography is restricted because of military or political reasons. Among the main advantages of using satellite remote sensing compared to traditional field archaeology herein we briefly focalize on the use of wavelet data processing for enhancing google earth satellite data with particular reference to multitemporal datasets. Study areas selected from Southern Italy, Middle East and South America are presented and discussed. Results obtained point out the use of automatic image enhancement can successfully applied as first step of supervised classification and intelligent data analysis for semiautomatic identification of features of archaeological interest. Reference Lasaponara R, Masini N (2006a) On the potential of panchromatic and multispectral Quickbird data for archaeological prospection. Int J Remote Sens 27: 3607-3614. Lasaponara R

  14. On the use of wavelet for extracting feature patterns from Multitemporal google earth satellite data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasaponara, R.

    2012-04-01

    The great amount of multispectral VHR satellite images, even available free of charge in Google earth has opened new strategic challenges in the field of remote sensing for archaeological studies. These challenges substantially deal with: (i) the strategic exploitation of satellite data as much as possible, (ii) the setting up of effective and reliable automatic and/or semiautomatic data processing strategies and (iii) the integration with other data sources from documentary resources to the traditional ground survey, historical documentation, geophysical prospection, etc. VHR satellites provide high resolution data which can improve knowledge on past human activities providing precious qualitative and quantitative information developed to such an extent that currently they share many of the physical characteristics of aerial imagery. This makes them ideal for investigations ranging from a local to a regional scale (see. for example, Lasaponara and Masini 2006a,b, 2007a, 2011; Masini and Lasaponara 2006, 2007, Sparavigna, 2010). Moreover, satellite data are still the only data source for research performed in areas where aerial photography is restricted because of military or political reasons. Among the main advantages of using satellite remote sensing compared to traditional field archaeology herein we briefly focalize on the use of wavelet data processing for enhancing google earth satellite data with particular reference to multitemporal datasets. Study areas selected from Southern Italy, Middle East and South America are presented and discussed. Results obtained point out the use of automatic image enhancement can successfully applied as first step of supervised classification and intelligent data analysis for semiautomatic identification of features of archaeological interest. Reference Lasaponara R, Masini N (2006a) On the potential of panchromatic and multispectral Quickbird data for archaeological prospection. Int J Remote Sens 27: 3607-3614. Lasaponara R

  15. Measurement of the Earth-Observer-1 Satellite X-Band Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perko, Kenneth; Dod, Louis; Demas, John

    2003-01-01

    The recent launch and successful orbiting of the EO-1 Satellite has provided an opportunity to validate the performance of a newly developed X-Band transmit-only phased array aboard the satellite. This paper will compare results of planar near-field testing before and after spacecraft installation as well as on-orbit pattern characterization. The transmit-only array is used as a high data rate antenna for relaying scientific data from the satellite to earth stations. The antenna contains distributed solid-state amplifiers behind each antenna element that cannot be monitored except for radiation pattern measurements. A unique portable planar near-field scanner allows both radiation pattern measurements and also diagnostics of array aperture distribution before and after environmental testing over the ground-integration and prelaunch testing of the satellite. The antenna beam scanning software was confirmed from actual pattern measurements of the scanned beam positions during the spacecraft assembly testing. The scanned radiation patterns on-orbit were compared to the near-field patterns made before launch to confirm the antenna performance. The near-field measurement scanner has provided a versatile testing method for satellite high gain data-link antennas.

  16. Method and associated apparatus for capturing, servicing and de-orbiting earth satellites using robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cepollina, Frank J. (Inventor); Burns, Richard D. (Inventor); Holz, Jill M. (Inventor); Corbo, James E. (Inventor); Jedhrich, Nicholas M. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    This invention is a method and supporting apparatus for autonomously capturing, servicing and de-orbiting a free-flying spacecraft, such as a satellite, using robotics. The capture of the spacecraft includes the steps of optically seeking and ranging the satellite using LIDAR; and matching tumble rates, rendezvousing and berthing with the satellite. Servicing of the spacecraft may be done using supervised autonomy, which is allowing a robot to execute a sequence of instructions without intervention from a remote human-occupied location. These instructions may be packaged at the remote station in a script and uplinked to the robot for execution upon remote command giving authority to proceed. Alternately, the instructions may be generated by Artificial Intelligence (AI) logic onboard the robot. In either case, the remote operator maintains the ability to abort an instruction or script at any time, as well as the ability to intervene using manual override to teleoperate the robot.In one embodiment, a vehicle used for carrying out the method of this invention comprises an ejection module, which includes the robot, and a de-orbit module. Once servicing is completed by the robot, the ejection module separates from the de-orbit module, leaving the de-orbit module attached to the satellite for de-orbiting the same at a future time. Upon separation, the ejection module can either de-orbit itself or rendezvous with another satellite for servicing. The ability to de-orbit a spacecraft further allows the opportunity to direct the landing of the spent satellite in a safe location away from population centers, such as the ocean.

  17. Method and associated apparatus for capturing, servicing, and de-orbiting earth satellites using robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cepollina, Frank J. (Inventor); Burns, Richard D. (Inventor); Holz, Jill M. (Inventor); Corbo, James E. (Inventor); Jedhrich, Nicholas M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    This invention is a method and supporting apparatus for autonomously capturing, servicing and de-orbiting a free-flying spacecraft, such as a satellite, using robotics. The capture of the spacecraft includes the steps of optically seeking and ranging the satellite using LIDAR; and matching tumble rates, rendezvousing and berthing with the satellite. Servicing of the spacecraft may be done using supervised autonomy, which is allowing a robot to execute a sequence of instructions without intervention from a remote human-occupied location. These instructions may be packaged at the remote station in a script and uplinked to the robot for execution upon remote command giving authority to proceed. Alternately, the instructions may be generated by Artificial Intelligence (AI) logic onboard the robot. In either case, the remote operator maintains the ability to abort an instruction or script at any time, as well as the ability to intervene using manual override to teleoperate the robot.In one embodiment, a vehicle used for carrying out the method of this invention comprises an ejection module, which includes the robot, and a de-orbit module. Once servicing is completed by the robot, the ejection module separates from the de-orbit module, leaving the de-orbit module attached to the satellite for de-orbiting the same at a future time. Upon separation, the ejection module can either de-orbit itself or rendezvous with another satellite for servicing. The ability to de-orbit a spacecraft further allows the opportunity to direct the landing of the spent satellite in a safe location away from population centers, such as the ocean.

  18. Method and associated apparatus for capturing, servicing, and de-orbiting earth satellites using robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cepollina, Frank J. (Inventor); Burns, Richard D. (Inventor); Holz, Jill M. (Inventor); Corbo, James E. (Inventor); Jedhrich, Nicholas M. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    This invention is a method and supporting apparatus for autonomously capturing, servicing and de-orbiting a free-flying spacecraft, such as a satellite, using robotics. The capture of the spacecraft includes the steps of optically seeking and ranging the satellite using LIDAR; and matching tumble rates, rendezvousing and berthing with the satellite. Servicing of the spacecraft may be done using supervised autonomy, which is allowing a robot to execute a sequence of instructions without intervention from a remote human-occupied location. These instructions may be packaged at the remote station in a script and uplinked to the robot for execution upon remote command giving authority to proceed. Alternately, the instructions may be generated by Artificial Intelligence (AI) logic onboard the robot. In either case, the remote operator maintains the ability to abort an instruction or script at any time, as well as the ability to intervene using manual override to teleoperate the robot.In one embodiment, a vehicle used for carrying out the method of this invention comprises an ejection module, which includes the robot, and a de-orbit module. Once servicing is completed by the robot, the ejection module separates from the de-orbit module, leaving the de-orbit module attached to the satellite for de-orbiting the same at a future time. Upon separation, the ejection module can either de-orbit itself or rendezvous with another satellite for servicing. The ability to de-orbit a spacecraft further allows the opportunity to direct the landing of the spent satellite in a safe location away from population centers, such as the ocean.

  19. Method and associated apparatus for capturing, servicing and de-orbiting earth satellites using robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cepollina, Frank J. (Inventor); Burns, Richard D. (Inventor); Holz, Jill M. (Inventor); Corbo, James E. (Inventor); Jedhrich, Nicholas M. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    This invention is a method and supporting apparatus for autonomously capturing, servicing and de-orbiting a free-flying spacecraft, such as a satellite, using robotics. The capture of the spacecraft includes the steps of optically seeking and ranging the satellite using LIDAR; and matching tumble rates, rendezvousing and berthing with the satellite. Servicing of the spacecraft may be done using supervised autonomy, which is allowing a robot to execute a sequence of instructions without intervention from a remote human-occupied location. These instructions may be packaged at the remote station in a script and uplinked to the robot for execution upon remote command giving authority to proceed. Alternately, the instructions may be generated by Artificial Intelligence (AI) logic onboard the robot. In either case, the remote operator maintains the ability to abort an instruction or script at any time, as well as the ability to intervene using manual override to teleoperate the robot.In one embodiment, a vehicle used for carrying out the method of this invention comprises an ejection module, which includes the robot, and a de-orbit module. Once servicing is completed by the robot, the ejection module separates from the de-orbit module, leaving the de-orbit module attached to the satellite for de-orbiting the same at a future time. Upon separation, the ejection module can either de-orbit itself or rendezvous with another satellite for servicing. The ability to de-orbit a spacecraft further allows the opportunity to direct the landing of the spent satellite in a safe location away from population centers, such as the ocean.

  20. Remote Sensing Education and Development Countries: Multilateral Efforts through the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, Leslie Bermann

    1998-01-01

    The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) is an international organization which coordinates space-based Earth observations world wide. Created in 1984, CEOS now comprises 38 national space agencies, regional organizations and international space-related and research groups. The aim of CEOS is to achieve international coordination in the planning of satellite missions for Earth observation and to maximize the utilization of data from these missions world-wide. With regard to developing countries, the fundamental aim of CEOS is to encourage the creation and maintenance of indigenous capability that is integrated into the local decision-making process, thereby enabling developing countries to obtain the maximum benefit from Earth observation. Obtaining adequate access to remote sensing information is difficult for developing countries and students and teachers alike. High unit data prices, the specialized nature of the technology , difficulty in locating specific data, complexities of copyright provisions, the emphasis on "leading edge" technology and research, and the lack of training materials relating to readily understood application are frequently noted obstacles. CEOS has developed an education CD-ROM which is aimed at increasing the integration of space-based data into school curricula, meeting the heretofore unsatisfied needs of developing countries for information about Earth observation application, data sources and future plans; and raising awareness around the world of the value of Earth observation data from space. The CD-ROM is designed to be used with an Internet web browser, increasing the information available to the user, but it can also be used on a stand-alone machine. It contains suggested lesson plans and additional resources for educators and users in developing countries.

  1. The evolution of Earth Observation satellites in Europe and its impact on the performance of emergency response services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denis, Gil; de Boissezon, Hélène; Hosford, Steven; Pasco, Xavier; Montfort, Bruno; Ranera, Franck

    2016-10-01

    The paper reviews the evolution of Earth Observation systems in Europe and Worldwide and analyses the potential impact of their performance in support of emergency response services. Earth Observation satellites play already a significant role in supporting the action of first responders in case of major disasters. The main principle is the coordinated use of satellites in order to ensure a rapid response and the timely delivery of images and geospatial information of the area affected by the event.

  2. Establishing the Antarctic Dome C community reference standard site towards consistent measurements from Earth observation satellites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cao, C.; Uprety, S.; Xiong, J.; Wu, A.; Jing, P.; Smith, D.; Chander, G.; Fox, N.; Ungar, S.

    2010-01-01

    Establishing satellite measurement consistency by using common desert sites has become increasingly more important not only for climate change detection but also for quantitative retrievals of geophysical variables in satellite applications. Using the Antarctic Dome C site (75°06′S, 123°21′E, elevation 3.2 km) for satellite radiometric calibration and validation (Cal/Val) is of great interest owing to its unique location and characteristics. The site surface is covered with uniformly distributed permanent snow, and the atmospheric effect is small and relatively constant. In this study, the long-term stability and spectral characteristics of this site are evaluated using well-calibrated satellite instruments such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS). Preliminary results show that despite a few limitations, the site in general is stable in the long term, the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model works well, and the site is most suitable for the Cal/Val of reflective solar bands in the 0.4–1.0 µm range. It was found that for the past decade, the reflectivity change of the site is within 1.35% at 0.64 µm, and interannual variability is within 2%. The site is able to resolve calibration biases between instruments at a level of ~1%. The usefulness of the site is demonstrated by comparing observations from seven satellite instruments involving four space agencies, including OrbView-2–SeaWiFS, Terra–Aqua MODIS, Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) – Hyperion, Meteorological Operational satellite programme (MetOp) – Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), Envisat Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) – dvanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR), and Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+). Dome C is a promising candidate site for climate quality calibration of satellite radiometers towards more consistent satellite measurements, as part

  3. Probability of satellite collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarter, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    A method is presented for computing the probability of a collision between a particular artificial earth satellite and any one of the total population of earth satellites. The collision hazard incurred by the proposed modular Space Station is assessed using the technique presented. The results of a parametric study to determine what type of satellite orbits produce the greatest contribution to the total collision probability are presented. Collision probability for the Space Station is given as a function of Space Station altitude and inclination. Collision probability was also parameterized over miss distance and mission duration.

  4. Automatic derivation of earth observation products from satellite data within the Siberian Earth System Science Cluster (SIB-ESS-C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, J.; Schmullius, C. C.

    2011-12-01

    The Siberian Earth System Science Cluster (SIB-ESS-C) established at the University of Jena (Germany) is a spatial data infrastructure implementing standards published by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) aimed at providing researchers with focus on Siberia with the technical means for data discovery, data access, data publication and data analysis in work with earth observation data. At the current development stage the SIB-ESS-C system comprises a federated metadata catalogue accessible through the SIB-ESS-C Web Portal or from any OGC-CSW compliant client. The Web Portal also contains a simple map-like visualization component which is currently being extended to a comprehensive visualization and analysis tool. The visualization component enables users to overlay different dataset found during a catalogue search. All data products are accessible as Web Mapping, Web Feature or Web Coverage Services allowing users to directly incorporate the data into their application. New developments aims on automatic registration and processing of raw earth observation data to derive permanently earth observation products. A data registry system within a whole process system including process chains to implement algorithms is currently designed. This will be extended with a system to process these incoming data automatically and permanently, depending on registered algorithms. Algorithms should know which input data is necessary and registered data should know which algorithms could be executed on it. This paper describes current developments as well as future ideas to build up a usefull and userfriendly access to satellite data, algorithms and therefrom derived products with state of the art web technologies and standards of the OGC.

  5. A recursively formulated first-order semianalytic artificial satellite theory based on the generalized method of averaging. Volume 1: The generalized method of averaging applied to the artificial satellite problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclain, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    A recursively formulated, first-order, semianalytic artificial satellite theory, based on the generalized method of averaging is presented in two volumes. Volume I comprehensively discusses the theory of the generalized method of averaging applied to the artificial satellite problem. Volume II presents the explicit development in the nonsingular equinoctial elements of the first-order average equations of motion. The recursive algorithms used to evaluate the first-order averaged equations of motion are also presented in Volume II. This semianalytic theory is, in principle, valid for a term of arbitrary degree in the expansion of the third-body disturbing function (nonresonant cases only) and for a term of arbitrary degree and order in the expansion of the nonspherical gravitational potential function.

  6. Mott Electrons in an Artificial Graphenelike Crystal of Rare-Earth Nickelate.

    PubMed

    Middey, S; Meyers, D; Doennig, D; Kareev, M; Liu, X; Cao, Y; Yang, Zhenzhong; Shi, Jinan; Gu, Lin; Ryan, P J; Pentcheva, R; Freeland, J W; Chakhalian, J

    2016-02-01

    Deterministic control over the periodic geometrical arrangement of the constituent atoms is the backbone of the material properties, which, along with the interactions, define the electronic and magnetic ground state. Following this notion, a bilayer of a prototypical rare-earth nickelate, NdNiO_{3}, combined with a dielectric spacer, LaAlO_{3}, has been layered along the pseudocubic [111] direction. The resulting artificial graphenelike Mott crystal with magnetic 3d electrons has antiferromagnetic correlations. In addition, a combination of resonant X-ray linear dichroism measurements and ab initio calculations reveal the presence of an ordered orbital pattern, which is unattainable in either bulk nickelates or nickelate based heterostructures grown along the [001] direction. These findings highlight another promising venue towards designing new quantum many-body states by virtue of geometrical engineering. PMID:26894726

  7. Artificial biospheres as a model for global ecology on planet Earth.

    PubMed

    Allen, J

    2000-01-01

    Artificial biospheres of the scale and complexity of Biosphere 2 can only work with coordinated rigorous design at each level of ecology: biospheres, biomes, bioregions, ecosystems, communities, patches, phases, physical-chemical functions, guilds, populations, organisms, and cells (both eucaryotic and procaryotic). This article reviews these theoretical concepts and provides examples of how this structure was applied to the design and development of Biosphere 2. In addition to this ecological engineering design, the addition of humans as inhabitants in the closed system required design of ethnological patterns and of technical and cybernetic systems for meeting specifically human requirements of labor efficiency, climate, nutrition, wastewater recycle, and pure air and water. Ecological levels of biospheric complexity can be directly applied to studies of the Earth's biosphere and, in fact, must be used to understand complex biospheric processes.

  8. ULF wave observations in the topside ionosphere from the low-Earth orbit Swarm satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasis, Georgios; Daglis, Ioannis A.; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Giannakis, Omiros

    2016-07-01

    The ongoing Swarm satellite mission provides an opportunity to a better knowledge of the near-Earth electromagnetic environment. Herein, we study the occurrence of ultra low frequency (ULF) wave events observed by the Swarm satellite mission for a period spanning twenty months after the constellation's final configuration. We present maps of the dependence of ULF wave power with magnetic latitude and magnetic local time (MLT) as well as geographic latitude and longitude from the three satellites at their different locations in the topside ionosphere. We derive daily and monthly variations of the Pc3 wave power (20-100 mHz) and show distributions for various wave properties of the detected events. Moreover, we include Swarm power maps of equatorial spread-F (ESF) signatures in the topside ionosphere revealing a global mirror fine structure along the magnetic equator for these instabilities. We also found an enhancement of ESF power in the region of South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) in agreement with the recently discovered by Swarm enhancement of compressional Pc3 wave energy in SAA. By combining Swarm results with wave observations from magnetospheric missions and ground-based magnetometer arrays we offer a useful platform to monitor the wave evolution from the outer boundaries of Earth's magnetosphere through the topside ionosphere down to the surface.

  9. Numerical integration of periodic orbits in the main problem of artificial satellite theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broucke, R. A.

    1994-02-01

    We describe a collection of results obtained by numerical integration of orbits in the main problem of artificial satellite theory (the J2 problem). The periodic orbits have been classified according to their stability and the Poincare surfaces of section computed for different values of J2 and H (where H is the z-component of angular momentum). The problem was scaled down to a fixed value (-1/2) of the energy constant. It is found that the pseudo-circular periodic solution plays a fundamental role. They are the equivalent of the Poincare first-kind solutions in the three-body problem. The integration of the variational equations shows that these pseudo-circular solutions are stable, except in a very narrow band near the critical inclination. This results in a sequence of bifurcations near the critical inclination, refining therefore some known results on the critical inclination, for instance by Izsak (1963), Jupp (1975, 1980) and Cushman (1983). We also verify that the double pitchfork bifurcation around the critical inclination exists for large values of J2, as large as absolute value of J2 = 0.2. Other secondary (higher-order) bifurcations are also described. The equations of motion were integrated in rotating meridian coordinates.

  10. Using artificial neural network and satellite data to predict rice yield in Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhand, Kawsar; Nizamuddin, Mohammad; Roytman, Leonid; Kogan, Felix; Goldberg, Mitch

    2015-09-01

    Rice production in Bangladesh is a crucial part of the national economy and providing about 70 percent of an average citizen's total calorie intake. The demand for rice is constantly rising as the new populations are added in every year in Bangladesh. Due to the increase in population, the cultivation land decreases. In addition, Bangladesh is faced with production constraints such as drought, flooding, salinity, lack of irrigation facilities and lack of modern technology. To maintain self sufficiency in rice, Bangladesh will have to continue to expand rice production by increasing yield at a rate that is at least equal to the population growth until the demand of rice has stabilized. Accurate rice yield prediction is one of the most important challenges in managing supply and demand of rice as well as decision making processes. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) is used to construct a model to predict Aus rice yield in Bangladesh. Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR)-based remote sensing satellite data vegetation health (VH) indices (Vegetation Condition Index (VCI) and Temperature Condition Index (TCI) are used as input variables and official statistics of Aus rice yield is used as target variable for ANN prediction model. The result obtained with ANN method is encouraging and the error of prediction is less than 10%. Therefore, prediction can play an important role in planning and storing of sufficient rice to face in any future uncertainty.

  11. A comparative study of spherical and flat-Earth geopotential modeling at satellite elevations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, M. H.; Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W.; Vonfrese, R. R. B.

    1985-01-01

    Flat-Earth modeling is a desirable alternative to the complex spherical-Earth modeling process. These methods were compared using 2 1/2 dimensional flat-earth and spherical modeling to compute gravity and scalar magnetic anomalies along profiles perpendicular to the strike of variably dimensioned rectangular prisms at altitudes of 150, 300, and 450 km. Comparison was achieved with percent error computations (spherical-flat/spherical) at critical anomaly points. At the peak gravity anomaly value, errors are less than + or - 5% for all prisms. At 1/2 and 1/10 of the peak, errors are generally less than 10% and 40% respectively, increasing to these values with longer and wider prisms at higher altitudes. For magnetics, the errors at critical anomaly points are less than -10% for all prisms, attaining these magnitudes with longer and wider prisms at higher altitudes. In general, in both gravity and magnetic modeling, errors increase greatly for prisms wider than 500 km, although gravity modeling is more sensitive than magnetic modeling to spherical-Earth effects. Preliminary modeling of both satellite gravity and magnetic anomalies using flat-Earth assumptions is justified considering the errors caused by uncertainties in isolating anomalies.

  12. Copernicus benefits the Norwegian Satellite Earth Observation Database for Marine and Polar Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korosov, Anton; Johannessen, Johnny

    2014-05-01

    The Norwegian Satellite Earth Observation Database for Marine and Polar Research (NORMAP) is developed for creating and maintaining a repository of Earth Observation data over the high latitude and Arctic regions to facilitate, stimulate and strengthen high quality and original multidisciplinary Earth System research, application, exploitation and education in marine, polar and climate sciences. As such it is complementing and supporting the Norwegian strategy for advancing these science disciplines in the high latitude and Arctic regions. In the international arena, NORMAP benefits and complements the EU GMES MyOcean project, and other previous GMES downstream services such as AQUAMAR, MONARCH-A, SIDARUS, etc. With the launch of the first Sentinel-1 mission NORMAP will be reinforced by the new data flow from the Copernicus Space Component. NORMAP is also acquiring data from a multitude of other satellites through the unified Copernicus system and will become one of the national thematic information services designed to benefit the environmental monitoring and support effective policy-making.

  13. Evolution of NASA's Near-Earth Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flaherty, Roger; Stocklin, Frank; Weinberg, Aaron

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) is now in its 23rd year of operations and its spacecraft fleet includes three second-generation spacecraft launched since the year 2000; a figure illustrates the first generation TDRSS spacecraft. During this time frame the TDRSS has provided communications relay support to a broad range of missions, with emphasis on low-earth-orbiting (LEO) spacecraft that include unmanned science spacecraft (e.g., Hubble Space Telescope), and human spaceflight (Space Shuttle and Space Station). Furthermore, the TDRSS has consistently demonstrated its uniqueness and adaptability in several ways. First, its S- and K-band services, combined with its multi-band/steerable single-access (SA) antennas and ground-based configuration flexibility, have permitted the mission set to expand to unique users such as scientific balloons and launch vehicles. Second, the bent-pipe nature of the system has enabled the introduction of new/improved services via technology insertion and upgrades at each of the ground terminals; a specific example here is the Demand Access Service (DAS), which, for example, is currently providing science-alert support to NASA science missions Third, the bent-pipe nature of the system, combined with the flexible ground-terminal signal processing architecture has permitted the demonstration/vaIidation of new techniques/services/technologies via a real satellite channel; over the past 10+ years these have, for example, included demonstrations/evaluations of emerging modulation/coding techniques. Given NASA's emerging Exploration plans, with missions beginning later this decade and expanding for decades to come, NASA is currently planning the development of a seamless, NASA-wide architecture that must accommodate missions from near-earth to deep space. Near-earth elements include Ground-Network (GN) and Near-Earth Relay (NER) components and both must efficiently and seamlessly support missions that encompass: earth

  14. Satellite communications provisions on NASA Ames instrumented aircraft platforms for Earth science research/applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shameson, L.; Brass, J. A.; Hanratty, J. J.; Roberts, A. C.; Wegener, S. S.

    1995-01-01

    Earth science activities at NASA Ames are research in atmospheric and ecosystem science, development of remote sensing and in situ sampling instruments, and their integration into scientific research platform aircraft. The use of satellite communications can greatly extend the capability of these agency research platform aircraft. Current projects and plans involve satellite links on the Perseus UAV and the ER-2 via TDRSS and a proposed experiment on the NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite. Provisions for data links on the Perseus research platform, via TDRSS S-band multiple access service, have been developed and are being tested. Test flights at Dryden are planned to demonstrate successful end-to-end data transfer. A Unisys Corp. airborne satcom STARLink system is being integrated into an Ames ER-2 aircraft. This equipment will support multiple data rates up to 43 Mb/s each via the TDRS S Ku-band single access service. The first flight mission for this high-rate link is planned for August 1995. Ames and JPL have proposed an ACTS experiment to use real-time satellite communications to improve wildfire research campaigns. Researchers and fire management teams making use of instrumented aircraft platforms at a prescribed burn site will be able to communicate with experts at Ames, the U.S. Forest Service, and emergency response agencies.

  15. Near-Earth asteroid satellite spins under spin-orbit coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Naidu, Shantanu P.; Margot, Jean-Luc

    2015-02-01

    We develop a fourth-order numerical integrator to simulate the coupled spin and orbital motions of two rigid bodies having arbitrary mass distributions under the influence of their mutual gravitational potential. We simulate the dynamics of components in well-characterized binary and triple near-Earth asteroid systems and use surface of section plots to map the possible spin configurations of the satellites. For asynchronous satellites, the analysis reveals large regions of phase space where the spin state of the satellite is chaotic. For synchronous satellites, we show that libration amplitudes can reach detectable values even for moderately elongated shapes. The presence of chaotic regions in the phase space has important consequences for the evolution of binary asteroids. It may substantially increase spin synchronization timescales, explain the observed fraction of asychronous binaries, delay BYORP-type evolution, and extend the lifetime of binaries. The variations in spin rate due to large librations also affect the analysis and interpretation of light curve and radar observations.

  16. Investigation of seismo-electromagnetic precursors by data analysis from low earth orbiting DEMETER satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Shourabh

    One of the major technological advancements in the subjective area of space science studies has been the investigation of seismo-electromagnetic phenomena with the help of satellite based data analysis. These studies primarily refer to the electric and magnetic field perturbations occurring before earthquakes and are observable a few days to a few hours before the seismic activities. In order to encourage such investigation which could serve as a tool for studying earthquake precursors, the DEMETER satellite has been launched from in 2004 which aims at the detection of such perturbations at ionospheric level. This satellite comprises of various on-board scientific experiments to detect the electric and magnetic field perturbations, electron density and ion density characteristics in the ionosphere. In this paper, the authors intent to present some vital results pertaining to seismo-electromagnetic phenomena observed before strong seismic activities in the recent past.The measurements and data analysis have been perfromed through data from low earth orbiting DEMETER satellite. In view of the results, the authors also discuss the long term benefits of such space based investigations for understanding and complexities of natural hazards such as earthquakes.

  17. Methods to Improve the Maintenance of the Earth Catalog of Satellites During Severe Solar Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkin, Paul G.; Tolson, Robert H.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to investigate methods to improve the ability to maintain the inventory of orbital elements of Earth satellites during periods of atmospheric disturbance brought on by severe solar activity. Existing techniques do not account for such atmospheric dynamics, resulting in tracking errors of several seconds in predicted crossing time. Two techniques are examined to reduce of these tracking errors. First, density predicted from various atmospheric models is fit to the orbital decay rate for a number of satellites. An orbital decay model is then developed that could be used to reduce tracking errors by accounting for atmospheric changes. The second approach utilizes a Kalman filter to estimate the orbital decay rate of a satellite after every observation. The new information is used to predict the next observation. Results from the first approach demonstrated the feasibility of building an orbital decay model based on predicted atmospheric density. Correlation of atmospheric density to orbital decay was as high as 0.88. However, it is clear that contemporary: atmospheric models need further improvement in modeling density perturbations polar region brought on by solar activity. The second approach resulted in a dramatic reduction in tracking errors for certain satellites during severe solar Storms. For example, in the limited cases studied, the reduction in tracking errors ranged from 79 to 25 percent.

  18. Satellite soil moisture for advancing our understanding of earth system processes and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorigo, Wouter; de Jeu, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Soil moisture products obtained from active and passive microwave satellites have reached maturity during the last decade (De Jeu and Dorigo, 2016): On the one hand, research algorithms that were initially applied to sensors designed for other purposes, e.g., for measuring wind speed (e.g. the Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT)), sea ice, or atmospheric parameters (e.g. the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System AMSR-E), have developed into fully operational products. On the other hand, dedicated soil moisture satellite missions were designed and launched by ESA (the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission) and NASA (the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission).

  19. Temporal variations of the earth's gravitational field from satellite laser ranging to LAGEOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nerem, R. S.; Chao, B. F.; Au, A. Y.; Chan, J. C.; Klosko, S. M.; Pavlis, N. K.; Williamson, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    Monthly values of the J2 and J3 earth gravitational coefficients were estimated using LAGEOS satellite laser ranging data collected between 1980 and 1989. Monthly variations in gravitational coefficients caused by atmospheric mass redistribution were calculated using measurements of variations in surface atmospheric pressure. Results for correlation studies of the two time series are presented. The LAGEOS and atmospheric J2 time series agree well and it appears that variations in J2 can be attributed to the redistribution of atmospheric mass. Atmospheric and LAGEOS estimates for J3 show poorer agreement, J3 estimates appear to be very sensitive to unmodeled forces acting on the satellite. Results indicate that the LAGEOS data can be used to detect small variations in the gravitational field.

  20. Estimating Photosynthetically Available Radiation (PAR) at the Earth's surface from satellite observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frouin, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Current satellite algorithms to estimate photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) at the earth' s surface are reviewed. PAR is deduced either from an insolation estimate or obtained directly from top-of-atmosphere solar radiances. The characteristics of both approaches are contrasted and typical results are presented. The inaccuracies reported, about 10 percent and 6 percent on daily and monthly time scales, respectively, are useful to model oceanic and terrestrial primary productivity. At those time scales variability due to clouds in the ratio of PAR and insolation is reduced, making it possible to deduce PAR directly from insolation climatologies (satellite or other) that are currently available or being produced. Improvements, however, are needed in conditions of broken cloudiness and over ice/snow. If not addressed properly, calibration/validation issues may prevent quantitative use of the PAR estimates in studies of climatic change. The prospects are good for an accurate, long-term climatology of PAR over the globe.

  1. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study. Report no. 2: Instrument constraints and interface specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The instruments to be flown on the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) system are defined. The instruments will be used to support the Land Resources Management (LRM) mission of the EOS. Program planning information and suggested acquisition activities for obtaining the instruments are presented. The subjects considered are as follows: (1) the performance and interface of the Thematic Mapper (TM) and the High Resolution Pointing Imager (HRPI), (2) procedure for interfacing the TM and HRPI with the EOS satellite, (3) a space vehicle integration plan suggesting the steps and sequence of events required to carry out the interface activities, and (4) suggested agreements between the contractors for providing timely and equitable solution of problems at minimum cost.

  2. Constraints on Energy Dissipation in the Earth's Body Tide From Satellite Tracking and Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Eanes, Richard J.; Lemoine, Frank G.

    1992-01-01

    The phase lag by which the earth's body tide follows the tidal potential is estimated for the principal lunar semidiurnal tide M(sub 2). The estimate results from combining recent tidal solutions from satellite tracking data and from Topex/Poseidon satellite altimeter data. Each data type is sensitive to the body-tide lag: gravitationally for the tracking data, geometrically for the altimetry. Allowance is made for the lunar atmospheric tide. For the tidal potential Love number kappa(sub 2) we obtain a lag epsilon of 0.20 deg +/- 0.05 deg, implying an effective body-tide Q of 280 and body-tide energy dissipation of 110 +/- 25 gigawatts.

  3. Improving the Transition of Earth Satellite Observations from Research to Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Steven J.; Lapenta, William M.; Jedlovec, Gary J.

    2004-01-01

    There are significant gaps between the observations, models, and decision support tools that make use of new data. These challenges include: 1) Decreasing the time to incorporate new satellite data into operational forecast assimilation systems, 2) Blending in-situ and satellite observing systems to produce the most accurate and comprehensive data products and assessments, 3) Accelerating the transition from research to applications through national test beds, field campaigns, and pilot demonstrations, and 4) Developing the partnerships and organizational structures to effectively transition new technology into operations. At the Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPORT) Center in Huntsville, Alabama, a NASA-NOAA-University collaboration has been developed to accelerate the infusion of NASA Earth science observations, data assimilation and modeling research into NWS forecast operations and decision-making. The SPoRT Center research focus is to improve forecasts through new observation capability and the regional prediction objectives of the US Weather Research Program dealing with 0-1 day forecast issues such as convective initiation and 24-hr quantitative precipitation forecasting. The near real-time availability of high-resolution experimental products of the atmosphere, land, and ocean from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the Advanced Infrared Spectroradiometer (AIRS), and lightning mapping systems provide an opportunity for science and algorithm risk reduction, and for application assessment prior to planned observations from the next generation of operational low Earth orbiting and geostationary Earth orbiting satellites. This paper describes the process for the transition of experimental products into forecast operations, current products undergoing assessment by forecasters, and plans for the future. The SPoRT Web page is at (http://www.ghcc.msfc.nasa.gov/sport).

  4. A vector method for synthesis of orbits and the structure of satellite constellations for multiswath periodic coverage of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saulskiy, V. K.

    2016-07-01

    Single satellites and multisatellite constellations for the periodic coverage of the Earth are considered. The main feature is the use of several cameras with different swath widths. A vector method is proposed which makes it possible to find orbits minimizing the periodicities of coverage of a given area of Earth uniformly for all swaths. Their number is not limited, but the relative dimensions should satisfy the Fibonacci series or some new numerical sequences. The results apply to constellations of any number of satellites. Formulas were derived for calculating their structure, i.e., relative position in the constellation. Examples of orbits and the structure of constellations for the Earth's multiswath coverage are presented.

  5. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study. Report no. 7: EOS system definition report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The design concept and operational aspects of the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) are presented. A table of the planned EOS missions is included to show the purpose of the mission, the instruments involved, and the launch date. The subjects considered in the analysis of the EOS development are: (1) system requirements, (2) design/cost trade methodology, (3) observatory design alternatives, (4) the data management system, (5) the design evaluation and preferred approach, (6) program cost compilation, (7) follow-on mission accommodation, and (8) space shuttle interfaces and utilization. Illustrations and block diagrams of the spacecraft configurations are provided.

  6. Some environmental problems and their satellite monitoring. [anthropogenic modifications of earth surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.

    1975-01-01

    Anthropogenic modification of the earth's surface is discussed in two problem areas: (1) land use changes and overgrazing, and how it affects albedo and land surface-atmosphere interactions, and (2) water and land surface pollution, especially oil slicks. A literature survey evidences the importance of these problems. The need for monitoring is stressed, and it is suggested that with some modifications to the sensors, ERTS (Landsat) series satellites can provide approximate monitoring information. The European Landsat receiving station in Italy will facilitate data collection for the tasks described.

  7. Human factors analysis of workstation design: Earth Radiation Budget Satellite Mission Operations Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, L. J.; Murphy, E. D.; Mitchell, C. M.

    1982-01-01

    A human factors analysis addressed three related yet distinct issues within the area of workstation design for the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) mission operation room (MOR). The first issue, physical layout of the MOR, received the most intensive effort. It involved the positioning of clusters of equipment within the physical dimensions of the ERBS MOR. The second issue for analysis was comprised of several environmental concerns, such as lighting, furniture, and heating and ventilation systems. The third issue was component arrangement, involving the physical arrangement of individual components within clusters of consoles, e.g., a communications panel.

  8. Efficient algorithms for numerical simulation of the motion of earth satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordovitsyna, T. V.; Bykova, L. E.; Kardash, A. V.; Fedyaev, Yu. A.; Sharkovskii, N. A.

    1992-08-01

    We briefly present our results obtained during the development and an investigation of the efficacy of algorithms for numerical prediction of the motion of earth satellites (ESs) using computers of different power. High accuracy and efficiency in predicting ES motion are achieved by using higher-order numerical methods, transformations that regularize and stabilize the equations of motion, and a high-precision model of the forces acting on an ES. This approach enables us to construct efficient algorithms of the required accuracy, both for universal computers with a large RAM and for personal computers with very limited capacity.

  9. Earth Radiation Budget Satellite extraterrestrial solar constant measurements - 1986-1987 increasing trend

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Robert B., III; Barkstrom, Bruce R.; Harrison, Edwin F.; Gibson, Michael A.; Natarajan, Sudha M.; Edmonds, William L.; Mecherikunnel, Ann T.; Kyle, H. Lee

    1988-01-01

    From June 1986 through Nov 1987, the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) pyrheliometric measurements indicated that the solar constant was increasing approximately +0.02 percent per year. Earlier ERBS measurements indicated that the solar constant was declining approximately -0.03 percent per year during the 1984 through mid-1986 period. Since mid-1986 represents the beginning of solar cycle 22, it is believed that the reversal in the long-term solar constant trend may be linked to increased solar activity associated with the beginning of the 11-year sunspot cycle. The typical value of the solar constant was found to be 1365 Wm-2.

  10. A study of Minnesota forests and lakes using data from earth resources technology satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This project is to foster and develop new applications of remote sensing under an interdisciplinary effort. Seven reports make up the specific projects presently being conducted throughout the State of Minnesota in cooperation with several agencies and municipalities. These are included under the general headings of: (1) applications of aerial photography and ERTS-1 data to agricultural, forest, and water resources management; (2) classification and dynamics of water and wetland resources of Minnesota; (3) studies of Lake Superior Bay; and (4) feasibility of detecting major air pollutants by earth-oriented satellite-borne sensors.

  11. Orbit/launch vehicle tradeoff studies. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study (EOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An evaluation of the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) design, performance, and cost factors which affect the choices of an orbit and a launch vehicle is presented. Primary emphasis is given to low altitude (300 to 900 nautical miles) land resources management applications for which payload design factors are defined. The subjects considered are: (1) a mission model, (2) orbit analysis and characterization, (3) characteristics and capabilities of candidate conventional launch vehicles, and space shuttle support. Recommendations are submitted for the EOS-A mission, the Single Multispectral Scanner payload, the Single Multispectral Scanner plus Thematic Mapper payload, the Dual Multispectral Scanner payload, and the Dual Multispectral Scanner plus Thematic Mapper payload.

  12. Climate studies from satellite observations - Special problems in the verification of earth radiation balance, cloud climatology, and related climate experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonder Haar, T. H.

    1982-01-01

    A body of techniques that have been developed and planned for use during the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP), and related climate experiments of the 1980's are reviewed. Validation and verification methods must apply for systems of satellites. They include: (1) use of a normalization or intercalibration satellite, (2) special intensive observation areas located over ground-truth sites, and (3) monitoring of sun and earth by several satellites and/or several instruments at the same time. Since each climate application area has a hierarchy of user communities, validation techniques vary from very detailed methods to those that simply assure high relative accuracy in detecting space and time variations for climate studies. It is shown that climate experiments generally require more emphasis on long-term stability and internal consistency of satellite data sets than high absolute accuracy.

  13. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study. Report 7: EOS system definition report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) study is summarized to show the modular design of a general purpose spacecraft, a mission peculiar segment which performs the EOS-A mission, an Operations Control Center, a Data Processing Facility, and a design for Low Cost Readout Stations. The study verified the practicality and feasibility of the modularized spacecraft with the capability of supporting many missions in the Earth Observation spectrum. The various subjects considered in the summary are: (1) orbit/launch vehicle tradeoff studies and recommendations, (2) instrument constraints and interfaces, (3) design/cost tradeoff and recommendations, (4) low cost management approach and recommendations, (5) baseline system description and specifications, and (6) space shuttle utilization and interfaces.

  14. Earth radiation budget measurements from satellites and their interpretation for climate modeling and studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonderhaar, T. H.; Stephens, G. L.; Campbell, G. G.

    1980-01-01

    The annual and seasonal averaged Earth atmosphere radiation budgets derived from the most complete set of satellite observations available are presented. The budgets were derived from a composite of 48 monthly mean radiation budget maps. Annually and seasonally averaged radiation budgets are presented as global averages and zonal averages. The geographic distribution of the various radiation budget quantities is described. The annual cycle of the radiation budget was analyzed and the annual variability of net flux was shown to be largely dominated by the regular semi and annual cycles forced by external Earth-Sun geometry variations. Radiative transfer calculations were compared to the observed budget quantities and surface budgets were additionally computed with particular emphasis on discrepancies that exist between the present computations and previous surface budget estimates.

  15. Selection of a model of Earth's albedo radiation, practical calculation of its effect on the trajectory of a satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    Theoretical models of Earth's albedo radiation was proposed. By comparing disturbing accelerations computed from a model to those measured in flight with the CACTUS Accelerometer, modified according to the results. Computation of the satellite orbit perturbations from a model is very long because for each position of this satellite the fluxes coming from each elementary surface of the terrestrial portion visible from the satellite must be summed. The speed of computation is increased ten times without significant loss of accuracy thanks to a stocking of some intermediate results. Now it is possible to confront the orbit perturbations computed from the selected model with the measurements of these perturbations found with satellite as LAGEOS.

  16. Testing the gravitational interaction in the field of the Earth via satellite laser ranging and the Laser Ranged Satellites Experiment (LARASE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchesi, D. M.; Anselmo, L.; Bassan, M.; Pardini, C.; Peron, R.; Pucacco, G.; Visco, M.

    2015-08-01

    In this work, the Laser Ranged Satellites Experiment (LARASE) is presented. This is a research program that aims to perform new refined tests and measurements of gravitation in the field of the Earth in the weak field and slow motion (WFSM) limit of general relativity (GR). For this objective we use the free available data relative to geodetic passive satellite lasers tracked from a network of ground stations by means of the satellite laser ranging (SLR) technique. After a brief introduction to GR and its WFSM limit, which aims to contextualize the physical background of the tests and measurements that LARASE will carry out, we focus on the current limits of validation of GR and on current constraints on the alternative theories of gravity that have been obtained with the precise SLR measurements of the two LAGEOS satellites performed so far. Afterward, we present the scientific goals of LARASE in terms of upcoming measurements and tests of relativistic physics. Finally, we introduce our activities and we give a number of new results regarding the improvements to the modelling of both gravitational and non-gravitational perturbations to the orbit of the satellites. These activities are a needed prerequisite to improve the forthcoming new measurements of gravitation. An innovation with respect to the past is the specialization of the models to the LARES satellite, especially for what concerns the modelling of its spin evolution, the neutral drag perturbation and the impact of Earth's solid tides on the satellite orbit.

  17. USGS Earth Explorer Client for Co-Discovery of Aerial and Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhenry, R.; Sohre, T.; McKinney, R.; Mentele, T.

    2011-12-01

    The United States Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation Science (EROS) Center is home to one of the largest civilian collections of images of the Earth's surface. These images are collected from recent satellite platforms such as the Landsat, Terra, Aqua and Earth Observer-1, historical airborne systems such as digital cameras and side-looking radar, and digitized historical aerial photography dating to the 1930's. The aircraft scanners include instruments such as the Advanced Solid State Array Spectrometer (ASAS). Also archived at EROS are specialized collections of aerial images, such as high-resolution orthoimagery, extensive collections over Antarctica, and historical airborne campaigns such as the National Aerial Photography Program (NAPP) and the National High Altitude Photography (NHAP) collections. These collections, as well as digital map data, declassified historical space-based photography, and variety of collections such as the Global Land Survey 2000 (GLS2000) and the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) are accessible through the USGS Earth Explorer (EE) client. EE allows for the visual discovery and browse of diverse datasets simultaneously, permitting the co-discovery and selection refinement of both satellite and aircraft imagery. The client, in use for many years was redesigned in 2010 to support requirements for next generation Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) data access and distribution. The redesigned EE is now supported by standards-based, open source infrastructure. EE gives users the capability to search 189 datasets through one interface, including over 8.4 million frames of aerial imagery. Since April 2011, NASA datasets archived at the Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC) including the MODIS land data products and ASTER Level-1B data products over the U.S. and Territories were made available via the EE client enabling users to co-discover aerial data archived at the USGS EROS along with USGS

  18. Documenting Liquefaction Failures Using Satellite Remote Sensing and Artificial Intelligence Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oommen, T.; Baise, L. G.; Gens, R.; Prakash, A.; Gupta, R. P.

    2009-12-01

    bands by neighborhood correlation image analysis using an artificial intelligence algorithm called support vector machine to remotely identify and document liquefaction failures across a region; and assess the reliability and accuracy of the thermal remote sensing approach in documenting regional liquefaction failures. Finally, we present the applicability of the satellite data analyzed and appropriateness of a multisensor and multispectral approach for documenting liquefaction related failures.

  19. Inferring Anthropogenic Trends from Satellite Data for Water-sustainability of US Cities Near Artificial Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yigzaw, W. Y.; Hossain, F.

    2015-12-01

    Impact of anthropogenic activities on water cycle and water supply has different effects at global and regional spatial scales, ensuing the need for a design and water management approach that considers anthropogenic inputs. One of the major inputs in local-to-regional availability of water and the water cycle are land use land cover change as a result of urbanization, artificial reservoirs and irrigation activity. This study employed a multi-factorial approach involving population trends, water use (and demand), streamflow; and various satellite derived water-relevant variables. These variables are: daily precipitation (from TRMM, 3B42.V7), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index-NDVI (from MODIS-MOD13A1), land surface temperature-LST (from MODIS-MOD11A2), and land cover (MODIS-MCD12Q1). Long terms exhibited by such data were used to understand temporal and spatial trends in impounded watersheds hosting a large and growing city in its proximity. The selected cities are: City of Atlanta-Georgia and Buford dam; Columbia-South Carolina and Saluda dam; Columbus-Ohio and Alum Creek dam; Montgomery-Alabama and Jordan dam; Tulsa-Oklahoma and Keystone dam; Tuscaloosa-Alabama and Tuscaloosa dam were selected. our study reveals that daily mean stream flow has been decreasing in all but one (Tulsa) of the areas selected. Satellite data trends between 2000 and 2012 showed a steady decrease in precipitation and NDVI; while LST has gradually increased. We attribute the NDVI (i.e., gradual decrease in vegetation cover) to LST rather than precipitation trends. The results of this research suggested that future temperature projection from climate models can be used in understanding vegetation activity and water availability over the study areas. Cities with larger upstream watershed area are potentially more sustainable and resilient (than those with small watersheds) as a result of spatial variability of water resources' response to climate change. Inter-basin water resources

  20. Inferring anthropogenic trends from satellite data for water-sustainability of US cities near artificial reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yigzaw, Wondmagegn; Hossain, Faisal

    2015-10-01

    Anthropogenic activities affect the water cycle and water supply at global and regional spatial scales, and approaches to water management must consider anthropogenic inputs. One of the major inputs in local-to-regional availability of water and the water cycle is land use land cover change as a result of urbanization, artificial reservoirs, and irrigation activity. To understand evolving trends in local hydrologic cycle for water sustainability of growing cities, this study employed a multi-factorial approach involving population trends, water use (and demand), streamflow, and various satellite-derived water-relevant variables. These variables are daily precipitation (from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission-TRMM, 3B42.V7), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) (from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer-MODIS-MOD13A1), land surface temperature (LST) (from MODIS-MOD11A2), and land cover (MODIS-MCD12Q1). Long term trends in such data were used to understand temporal and spatial trends in impounded watersheds hosting a large and growing city. The cities studied for water sustainability were Atlanta, Georgia and Buford dam; Columbia, South Carolina and Saluda dam; Columbus, Ohio and Alum Creek dam; Montgomery, Alabama and Jordan dam; Tulsa, Oklahoma and Keystone dam; and Tuscaloosa, Alabama and Tuscaloosa dam. Our study reveals that daily mean stream flow has been decreasing in all but one (Tulsa) of the areas selected. Satellite data trends between 2000 and 2012 showed a steady decrease in precipitation and NDVI, while LST has gradually increased. We attribute the NDVI (i.e., gradual decrease in vegetation cover) to LST rather than precipitation trends. The results of this research suggest that future temperature projections from climate models can be used in understanding vegetation activity and water availability over the study areas. Cities with larger upstream watershed area are potentially more sustainable and resilient (than those with small

  1. The use of Earth Resources Technology Satellite for relaying hydrologic data in the Delaware River basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    The earth resources data acquisition systems on ERTS are providing data from the earth's surface that have great potential for resources management. The Data Collection System is providing water resources data several times a day from widely scattered locations in the Delaware River Basin. Within the constraints of an experimental test, the data are being processed and released to water resources agencies in near-real time. The results of ERTS investigations have shown that there is a potential application for satellite-borne systems for earth resources data acquisition. It is becoming clear that the solutions to many natural resource problems can be found faster and more efficiently with the help of data acquisition systems such as those on the ERTS observatory. Under operational conditions, low cost battery-operated DCP's could provide the Geological Survey with data from a large number of field instruments. These data could be used by the Geological Survey to monitor the operational status of field instrumentation and could be used by cooperating agencies to monitor a wide range of earth resources conditions. Under operational conditions, the data flow could be in real time. The delay from time of data acquisition by ERTS to the time of data availability to data users could be reduced to seconds, rather than the present lag time of a few hours.

  2. Satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, J.A.; Matthews, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    The present work is based on a conference: Natural Satellites, Colloquium 77 of the IAU, held at Cornell University from July 5 to 9, 1983. Attention is given to the background and origins of satellites, protosatellite swarms, the tectonics of icy satellites, the physical characteristics of satellite surfaces, and the interactions of planetary magnetospheres with icy satellite surfaces. Other topics include the surface composition of natural satellites, the cratering of planetary satellites, the moon, Io, and Europa. Consideration is also given to Ganymede and Callisto, the satellites of Saturn, small satellites, satellites of Uranus and Neptune, and the Pluto-Charon system.

  3. The Role of Artificial Atmospheric CO2 Removal in Stabilizing Earth's Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokarska, Katarzyna; Zickfeld, Kirsten

    2014-05-01

    Recent research showed that global mean temperature remains approximately constant for several centuries after complete cessation of CO2 emissions, while global mean thermosteric sea level continues to rise. This implies that a net artificial removal of CO2 from the atmosphere may be necessary to decrease the atmospheric CO2 concentrations more rapidly and bring the climate system components to their previous states on human timescales. The purpose of this study is to explore the reversibility of climate responses to a range of realistic CO2 emission scenarios, which follow a gradual transition from fossil-fuel driven economy to a zero-emission energy system with implementation of negative CO2 emissions, using the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model of intermediate complexity (UVic ESCM 2.9). The CO2 emission pathways were designed to meet constraints related to the implementation of negative emission technologies derived from the integrated assessment literature. Our simulations show that while it is possible, in principle, to revert the global mean temperature after a phase of overshoot, the thermosteric sea level rise is not reversible on human timescales for the range of emission scenarios considered. During the negative emission phase, CO2 is released form the natural (terrestrial and marine) carbon sinks, which diminishes the efficiency of negative emissions implemented. In addition, spatial changes of vegetation distribution patterns are not entirely reversible on human timescales. We suggest that while negative emissions could potentially stabilize the global mean temperature at a desired level, such technology does not supersede reductions in fossil fuel emissions, as the artificial CO2 capture at large scale has many limitations and is unable to stabilize other climate system components (e.g. sea level) at desired levels.

  4. Cross-Calibration of Earth Observing System Terra Satellite Sensors MODIS and ASTER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCorkel, J.

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emissive and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) are two of the five sensors onboard the Earth Observing System's Terra satellite. These sensors share many similar spectral channels while having much different spatial and operational parameters. ASTER is a tasked sensor and sometimes referred to a zoom camera of the MODIS that collects a full-earth image every one to two days. It is important that these sensors have a consistent characterization and calibration for continued development and use of their data products. This work uses a variety of test sites to retrieve and validate intercalibration results. The refined calibration of Collection 6 of the Terra MODIS data set is leveraged to provide the up-to-date reference for trending and validation of ASTER. Special attention is given to spatially matching radiance measurements using prelaunch spatial response characterization of MODIS. Despite differences in spectral band properties and spatial scales, ASTER-MODIS is an ideal case for intercomparison since the sensors have nearly identical views and acquisitions times and therefore can be used as a baseline of intercalibration performance of other satellite sensor pairs.

  5. 0°C isotherm height distribution for Earth-space communication satellite links in Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojo, J. S.; Falodun, S. E.; Odiba, O.

    2014-06-01

    For an optimum performance of Earth-space satellite communication links, a number of meteorological parameters are needed to be considered along the Earth-space path for specific locations and the height of the 0°C isotherm (freezing level height) is among such parameters. Information regarding this parameter is always based on the recommendation of ITU-RP-839 in the form of contour maps. Since the meteorological parameters are location dependent, there is a need for the establishment of these parameters for specific locations. In addition, ITU-R model uses an yearly averaged constant rain height for the attenuation estimation, which may not be appropriate for tropical regions. In the present paper, the 0°C isotherm (ZDI) height has been established using two years of data collected on-board the precipitation radar of the Tropical Rain Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. The result shows the seasonal dependence of the 0°C isotherm height. It is observed, among other things, that the height is higher during the wet season as compared to the dry season. Rain induced attenuation at frequencies above 10 GHz is also estimated using the 0°C isotherm height derived for each of the locations over the elevation angle of the NIGCOMSAT-1R in Nigeria.

  6. Evaluation of Gravitational Field Models Based on the Laser Range Observation of Low Earth Orbit Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong-bo, Wang; Chang-yin, Zhao; Wei, Zhang; Jin-wei, Zhan; Sheng-xian, Yu

    2016-07-01

    The Earth gravitational field model is one of the most important dynamic models in satellite orbit computation. Several space gravity missions made great successes in recent years, prompting the publishing of several gravitational filed models. In this paper, two classical (JGM3, EGM96) and four latest (EIGEN-CHAMP05S, GGM03S, GOCE02S, EGM2008) models are evaluated by employing them in the precision orbit determination (POD) and prediction. These calculations are performed based on the laser ranging observation of four Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites, including CHAMP, GFZ-1, GRACE-A, and SWARM-A. The residual error of observation in POD is adopted to describe the accuracy of six gravitational field models. The main results we obtained are as follows. (1) For the POD of LEOs, the accuracies of 4 latest models are at the same level, and better than those of 2 classical models; (2) Taking JGM3 as reference, EGM96 model's accuracy is better in most situations, and the accuracies of the 4 latest models are improved by 12%-47% in POD and 63% in prediction, respectively. We also confirm that the model's accuracy in POD is enhanced with the increasing degree and order if they are smaller than 70, and when they exceed 70, the accuracy keeps constant, implying that the model's degree and order truncated to 70 are sufficient to meet the requirement of LEO computation of centimeter precision.

  7. Time-variable Earth's albedo model characteristics and applications to satellite sampling errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartman, F. L.

    1981-01-01

    Characteristics of the time variable Earth albedo model are described. With the cloud cover multiplying factor adjusted to produce a global annual average albedo of 30.3, the global annual average cloud cover is 45.5 percent. Global annual average sunlit cloud cover is 48.5 percent; nighttime cloud cover is 42.7 percent. Month-to-month global average albedo is almost sinusoidal with maxima in June and December and minima in April and October. Month-to-month variation of sunlit cloud cover is similar, but not in all details. The diurnal variation of global albedo is greatest from November to March; the corresponding variation of sunlit cloud cover is greatest from May to October. Annual average zonal albedos and monthly average zonal albedos are in good agreement with satellite-measured values, with notable differences in the polar regions in some months and at 15 S. The albedo of some 10 deg by 10 deg. areas of the Earth versus zenith angle are described. Satellite albedo measurement sampling effects are described in local time and in Greenwich mean time.

  8. Earth Radiation Imbalance from a Constellation of 66 Iridium Satellites: Technological Aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiscombe, W.; Chiu, C. J-Y.

    2012-01-01

    Iridium Communications Inc. is launching a new generation of polar orbiting communication satellites in 2015-2017. Iridium will provide a hosted payload bay on each of the 66 satellites (plus 6 in-space spares). This offers the potential for a paradigm shift in the way we measure Earth radiation imbalance from space, as well as massive cost savings. Because the constellation provides 24/7 global coverage, there is no need to account for diurnal cycle via extrapolations from uncalibrated narrowband geostationary imagers. And the spares can be rolled over to view the Sun and deep space, then transfer their calibration to the other members of the constellation during the frequent cross-overs. In part using simulations of the constellation viewing realistic Earth scenes, this presentation will address the technological aspects of such a constellation: (1) the calibration strategy; (2) the highly-accurate and stable radiometers for measuring outgoing flux; and (3) the GRACE-inspired algorithms for representing the outgoing flux field in spherical harmonics and thus achieving rv500-km spatial resolution and two-hour temporal resolution.

  9. Satellite and earth science data management activities at the U.S. geological survey's EROS data center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carneggie, David M.; Metz, Gary G.; Draeger, William C.; Thompson, Ralph J.

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center, the national archive for Landsat data, has 20 years of experience in acquiring, archiving, processing, and distributing Landsat and earth science data. The Center is expanding its satellite and earth science data management activities to support the U.S. Global Change Research Program and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Observing System Program. The Center's current and future data management activities focus on land data and include: satellite and earth science data set acquisition, development and archiving; data set preservation, maintenance and conversion to more durable and accessible archive medium; development of an advanced Land Data Information System; development of enhanced data packaging and distribution mechanisms; and data processing, reprocessing, and product generation systems.

  10. Space fragment in studies of the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avanesov, G. A.; Ziman, Y. L.

    1982-01-01

    The fragment apparatus, mounted on board the artificial earth satellite Meteor, was created for the operational study of the natural resources of the Earth in the optical range of electromagnetic waves. The orbit of the satellite at an altitude of about 650 km makes it possible to observe the same sectors of the Earth's surface at the same time of day with a periodicity of 15 days.

  11. Large divergence of satellite and Earth system model estimates of global terrestrial CO2 fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolby Smith, W.; Reed, Sasha C.; Cleveland, Cory C.; Ballantyne, Ashley P.; Anderegg, William R. L.; Wieder, William R.; Liu, Yi Y.; Running, Steven W.

    2016-03-01

    Atmospheric mass balance analyses suggest that terrestrial carbon (C) storage is increasing, partially abating the atmospheric [CO2] growth rate, although the continued strength of this important ecosystem service remains uncertain. Some evidence suggests that these increases will persist owing to positive responses of vegetation growth (net primary productivity; NPP) to rising atmospheric [CO2] (that is, `CO2 fertilization’). Here, we present a new satellite-derived global terrestrial NPP data set, which shows a significant increase in NPP from 1982 to 2011. However, comparison against Earth system model (ESM) NPP estimates reveals a significant divergence, with satellite-derived increases (2.8 +/- 1.50%) less than half of ESM-derived increases (7.6 +/- 1.67%) over the 30-year period. By isolating the CO2 fertilization effect in each NPP time series and comparing it against a synthesis of available free-air CO2 enrichment data, we provide evidence that much of the discrepancy may be due to an over-sensitivity of ESMs to atmospheric [CO2], potentially reflecting an under-representation of climatic feedbacks and/or a lack of representation of nutrient constraints. Our understanding of CO2 fertilization effects on NPP needs rapid improvement to enable more accurate projections of future C cycle-climate feedbacks; we contend that better integration of modelling, satellite and experimental approaches offers a promising way forward.

  12. Forecasting the impact of an 1859-caliber superstorm on geosynchronous Earth-orbiting satellites: Transponder resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odenwald, Sten F.; Green, James L.

    2007-06-01

    We calculate the economic impact on the existing geosynchronous Earth-orbiting satellite population of an 1859-caliber superstorm event were it to occur between 2008 and 2018 during the next solar activity cycle. From a detailed model for transponder capacity and leasing, we have investigated the total revenue loss over the entire solar cycle, as a function of superstorm onset year and intensity. Our Monte Carlo simulations of 1000 possible superstorms, of varying intensity and onset year, suggest that the minimum revenue loss could be of the order of 30 billion. The losses would be larger than this if more that 20 satellites are disabled, if future launch rates do not keep up with the expected rate of retirements, or if the number of spare transponders falls below ˜30%. Consequently, revenue losses can be significantly reduced below 30 billion if the current satellite population undergoes net growth beyond 300 units during Solar Cycle 24 and a larger margin of unused transponders is maintained.

  13. Large divergence of satellite and Earth system model estimates of global terrestrial CO2 fertilization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, W. Kolby; Reed, Sasha C.; Cleveland, Cory C.; Ballantyne, Ashley P; Anderegg, William R. L.; Wieder, William R.; Liu, Yi Y; Running, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric mass balance analyses suggest that terrestrial carbon (C) storage is increasing, partially abating the atmospheric [CO2] growth rate, although the continued strength of this important ecosystem service remains uncertain. Some evidence suggests that these increases will persist owing to positive responses of vegetation growth (net primary productivity; NPP) to rising atmospheric [CO2] (that is, ‘CO2 fertilization’). Here, we present a new satellite-derived global terrestrial NPP data set, which shows a significant increase in NPP from 1982 to 2011. However, comparison against Earth system model (ESM) NPP estimates reveals a significant divergence, with satellite-derived increases (2.8 ± 1.50%) less than half of ESM-derived increases (7.6  ±  1.67%) over the 30-year period. By isolating the CO2 fertilization effect in each NPP time series and comparing it against a synthesis of available free-air CO2 enrichment data, we provide evidence that much of the discrepancy may be due to an over-sensitivity of ESMs to atmospheric [CO2], potentially reflecting an under-representation of climatic feedbacks and/or a lack of representation of nutrient constraints. Our understanding of CO2 fertilization effects on NPP needs rapid improvement to enable more accurate projections of future C cycle–climate feedbacks; we contend that better integration of modelling, satellite and experimental approaches offers a promising way forward.

  14. Use of negotiated rulemaking in developing technical rules for low-Earth orbit mobile satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Leslie A.

    Technical innovations have converged with the exploding market demand for mobile telecommunications to create the impetus for low-earth orbit (LEO) communications satellite systems. The so-called 'Little LEO's' propose use of VHF and UHF spectrum to provide position - location and data messaging services. The so-called 'Big LEO's' propose to utilize the RDSS bands to provide voice and data services. In the United States, several applications were filed with the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to construct and operate these mobile satellite systems. To enable the prompt introduction of such new technology services, the FCC is using innovative approaches to process the applications. Traditionally, when the FCC is faced with 'mutually exclusive' applications, e.g. a grant of one would preclude a grant of the others, it uses selection mechanisms such as comparative hearings or lotteries. In the case of the LEO systems, the FCC has sought to avoid these time-consuming approaches by using negotiated rulemakings. The FCC's objective is to enable the multiple applicants and other interested parties to agree on technical and service rules which will enable the grant of all qualified applications. With regard to the VHF/UHF systems, the Advisory Committee submitted a consensus report to the FCC. The process for the systems operating in the bands above 1 GHz involved more parties and more issues but still provided the FCC useful technical information to guide the adoption of rules for the new mobile satellite service.

  15. Use of negotiated rulemaking in developing technical rules for low-Earth orbit mobile satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Leslie A.

    1993-01-01

    Technical innovations have converged with the exploding market demand for mobile telecommunications to create the impetus for low-earth orbit (LEO) communications satellite systems. The so-called 'Little LEO's' propose use of VHF and UHF spectrum to provide position - location and data messaging services. The so-called 'Big LEO's' propose to utilize the RDSS bands to provide voice and data services. In the United States, several applications were filed with the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to construct and operate these mobile satellite systems. To enable the prompt introduction of such new technology services, the FCC is using innovative approaches to process the applications. Traditionally, when the FCC is faced with 'mutually exclusive' applications, e.g. a grant of one would preclude a grant of the others, it uses selection mechanisms such as comparative hearings or lotteries. In the case of the LEO systems, the FCC has sought to avoid these time-consuming approaches by using negotiated rulemakings. The FCC's objective is to enable the multiple applicants and other interested parties to agree on technical and service rules which will enable the grant of all qualified applications. With regard to the VHF/UHF systems, the Advisory Committee submitted a consensus report to the FCC. The process for the systems operating in the bands above 1 GHz involved more parties and more issues but still provided the FCC useful technical information to guide the adoption of rules for the new mobile satellite service.

  16. A model of Earth's magnetic field derived from 2 years of Swarm satellite constellation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Nils; Finlay, Christopher C.; Kotsiaros, Stavros; Tøffner-Clausen, Lars

    2016-07-01

    More than 2 years of magnetic field data taken by the three-satellite constellation mission Swarm are used to derive a model of Earth's magnetic field and its time variation. This model is called SIFMplus. In addition to the magnetic field observations provided by each of the three Swarm satellites, explicit advantage is taken of the constellation aspect of Swarm by including East-West magnetic intensity and vector field gradient information from the lower satellite pair. Along-track differences of the magnetic intensity as well as of the vector components provide further information concerning the North-South gradient. The SIFMplus model provides a description of the static lithospheric field that is very similar to models determined from CHAMP data, up to at least spherical harmonic degree n=75. Also the core field part of SIFMplus, with a quadratic time dependence for n ≤ 6 and a linear time dependence for n=7-15, demonstrates the possibility to determine high-quality field models from only 2 years of Swarm data, thanks to the unique constellation aspect of Swarm. To account for the magnetic signature caused by ionospheric electric currents at polar latitudes we co-estimate, together with the model of the core, lithospheric and large-scale magnetospheric fields, a magnetic potential that depends on quasi-dipole latitude and magnetic local time.

  17. KAGLVis - On-line 3D Visualisation of Earth-observing-satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szuba, Marek; Ameri, Parinaz; Grabowski, Udo; Maatouki, Ahmad; Meyer, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    One of the goals of the Large-Scale Data Management and Analysis project is to provide a high-performance framework facilitating management of data acquired by Earth-observing satellites such as Envisat. On the client-facing facet of this framework, we strive to provide visualisation and basic analysis tool which could be used by scientists with minimal to no knowledge of the underlying infrastructure. Our tool, KAGLVis, is a JavaScript client-server Web application which leverages modern Web technologies to provide three-dimensional visualisation of satellite observables on a wide range of client systems. It takes advantage of the WebGL API to employ locally available GPU power for 3D rendering; this approach has been demonstrated to perform well even on relatively weak hardware such as integrated graphics chipsets found in modern laptop computers and with some user-interface tuning could even be usable on embedded devices such as smartphones or tablets. Data is fetched from the database back-end using a ReST API and cached locally, both in memory and using HTML5 Web Storage, to minimise network use. Computations, calculation of cloud altitude from cloud-index measurements for instance, can depending on configuration be performed on either the client or the server side. Keywords: satellite data, Envisat, visualisation, 3D graphics, Web application, WebGL, MEAN stack.

  18. Continental Land Mass Air Traffic Control (COLM ATC). [using three artificial satellite configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pecar, J. A.; Henrich, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    The application of various satellite systems and techniques relative to providing air traffic control services for the continental United States was studied. Three satellite configurations were reviewed. The characteristics and capabilities of the satellites are described. The study includes consideration for the various ranging waveforms, multiple access alternatives, and the power and bandwidth required as a function of the number of users.

  19. Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) perspectives about the GEO Supersite initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengert, Wolfgang; Zoffoli, Simona; Giguere, Christine; Hoffmann, Joern; Lindsay, Francis; Seguin, Guy

    2014-05-01

    This presentation is outlining the effort of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) using its global collaboration structure to support implementing the GEO priority action DI-01 Informing Risk Management and Disaster Reduction addressing the component: C2 Geohazards Monitoring, Alert, and Risk Assessment. A CEOS Supersites Coordination Team (SCT) has been established in order to make best use of the CEOS global satellite resources. For this, the CEOS SCT has taken a holistic view on the science data needs and availability of resources, considering the constraints and exploitation potentials of synergies. It is interfacing with the Supersites Science Advisory Group and the Principle Investigators to analyze how the satellite data associated with seismic and Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data can support national authorities and policy makers in risk assessment and the development of mitigation strategies. CEOS SCT aims to support the establishment of a fully integrated approach to geohazards monitoring, based on collaboration among existing networks and international initiatives, using new instrumentation such as in-situ sensors, and aggregating space (radar, optical imagery) and ground-based (subsurface) observations. The three Supersites projects which are funded under the EC FP7 action, namely (i) FUTUREVOLC: A European volcanological supersite in Iceland: a monitoring system and network for the future Geohazards Monitoring, Alert, and Risk Assessment, (ii) MARsite: New Directions in Seismic Hazard assessment through Focused Earth Observation in the Marmara Supersite, (iii) MED-SUV: MEDiterranean Volcanoes and related seismic risks, have been examined as a vehicle to fulfill these ambitious objectives. FUTUREVOLC has already been granted CEOS support. This presentation will outline CEOS agreed process and criteria applied by the Supersites Coordination Team (SCT), for selecting these Supersites in the context of the GSNL initiative, as

  20. Small Satellites for Atmospheric and near earth Space sciences - the Indian perspectives of a low cost access to Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, R.

    Small satellites of 100-400 kg class are expected to play bigger roles in the years to come. With the advancement of technology in terms of miniaturization and also reliability, it has become possible to configure small satellites which otherwise would have demanded larger platforms, both in terms of weight and power. The atmospheric and near Earth space processes are truly multi-dimensional and are extremely complex with large temporal and spatial variability and also respond closely to the processes in the Sun. As a consequence, no single satellite mission would be able to provide the complete information thus warranting multiple missions. With the successful demonstration of multiple satellites launching capability, the spare capacity of the launch vehicles could be effectively and judiciously used for launching dedicated small scientific satellites as co passengers with negligible cost factor. This is viewed as an opening up of an otherwise difficult opportunity involving dedicated launches. With the prospect of multiple satellites for science missions becoming a reality the overall mission with an active life of 2-3 years could be realized with judicious choice of components. This is expected to bring in a larger user community in the country. The first step in this direction is the configuration of a modular micro and small satellite bus. The upcoming missions of TWSAT (Third world satellite), Youth Sat (active participation of the student community), SARAL (Satellite for ARGOs and Altimetry), SENSE/E and SENSE/P (Satellite for Earth's Near Space environment), ISTAG (Indian Satellite for Aerosols and Gases), are utilizing the above concepts. ISRO has also come out with AO's for Astronomy and Astrophysics payloads, as most of the stringent requirements of various experiments could be met with the small satellite platforms themselves. A brief outline of the upcoming and proposed activities would be presented and discussed in the talk.

  1. From Earth to Heaven: Using `Newton's Cannon' Thought Experiment for Teaching Satellite Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velentzas, Athanasios; Halkia, Krystallia

    2013-10-01

    Thought Experiments are powerful tools in both scientific thinking and in the teaching of science. In this study, the historical Thought Experiment (TE) `Newton's Cannon' was used as a tool to teach concepts relating to the motion of satellites to students at upper secondary level. The research instruments were: (a) a teaching-interview designed and implemented according to the Teaching Experiment methodology and (b) an open-ended questionnaire administered to students 2 weeks after the teaching-interview. The sample consisted of forty students divided into eleven groups. The teaching and learning processes which occurred during the teaching-interview were recorded and analyzed. The findings of the present study show that the use of the TE helped students to mentally construct a physical system which has nothing to do with their everyday experience (i.e. they had to imagine themselves as observers in a context in which the whole Earth was visible) and to draw conclusions about phenomena within this system. Specifically, students managed (1) to conclude that if an object is appropriately launched, it may be placed in an orbit around the Earth and to support this conclusion by giving necessary arguments, and (2) to realize that the same laws of physics describe, on the one hand, the motion of the Moon around the Earth (and the motion of other celestial bodies as well) and, on the other hand, the motion of `terrestrial' objects (i.e. objects on the Earth, such as a tennis ball). The main difficulties students met were caused by their idea that there is no gravity in the vacuum (i.e. the area outside of the Earth's atmosphere) and also by their everyday experience, according to which it is impossible for a projectile to move continuously parallel to the ground.

  2. Recent changes of the Earth's core derived from satellite observations of magnetic and gravity fields.

    PubMed

    Mandea, Mioara; Panet, Isabelle; Lesur, Vincent; de Viron, Olivier; Diament, Michel; Le Mouël, Jean-Louis

    2012-11-20

    To understand the dynamics of the Earth's fluid, iron-rich outer core, only indirect observations are available. The Earth's magnetic field, originating mainly within the core, and its temporal variations can be used to infer the fluid motion at the top of the core, on a decadal and subdecadal time-scale. Gravity variations resulting from changes in the mass distribution within the Earth may also occur on the same time-scales. Such variations include the signature of the flow inside the core, though they are largely dominated by the water cycle contributions. Our study is based on 8 y of high-resolution, high-accuracy magnetic and gravity satellite data, provided by the CHAMP and GRACE missions. From the newly derived geomagnetic models we have computed the core magnetic field, its temporal variations, and the core flow evolution. From the GRACE CNES/GRGS series of time variable geoid models, we have obtained interannual gravity models by using specifically designed postprocessing techniques. A correlation analysis between the magnetic and gravity series has demonstrated that the interannual changes in the second time derivative of the core magnetic field under a region from the Atlantic to Indian Ocean coincide in phase with changes in the gravity field. The order of magnitude of these changes and proposed correlation are plausible, compatible with a core origin; however, a complete theoretical model remains to be built. Our new results and their broad geophysical significance could be considered when planning new Earth observation space missions and devising more sophisticated Earth's interior models. PMID:23064635

  3. Global satellite triangulation and trilateration for the National Geodetic Satellite Program (solutions WN 12, 14 and 16). [study and analysis of data from artificial satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, I. I.; Kumar, M.; Reilly, J. P.; Saxena, N.; Soler, T.

    1973-01-01

    A multi-year study and analysis of data from satellites launched specifically for geodetic purposes and from other satellites useful in geodetic studies was conducted. The program of work included theoretical studies and analysis for the geometric determination of station positions derived from photographic observations of both passive and active satellites and from range observations. The current status of data analysis, processing and results are examined.

  4. True Color Images of the Earth created with the Geostationary Satellite Instrument MSG SEVIRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Maximilian

    2013-04-01

    One of the most famous pictures ever taken was by the crew of Apollo 17 in 1972, showing our Earth from a distance of about 45000km. This picture was named 'Blue Marble' and it reminds us of the beauty and uniqueness of our home planet. With geostationary satellites, such views of the Earth are possible without the need to have a photographer in space. However, up to the present, the production of such Blue Marble type images from geostationary satellite data has been impaired by the lack of channels in the visible spectral region. A method for the generation of full disk MSG (METEOSAT Second Generation) SEVIRI (Scanning-Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager) true colour composite images will be presented. The algorithm mainly uses the SEVIRI channels VIS006 (0.6μm), NIR008 (0.8μm) and NIR016 (1.6μm). The lack of information in the blue and green parts of the visible spectrum is compensated by using data from NASA's (National Aeronautics and Space Administration's) Blue Marble next generation (BMNG) project to fill a look-up table (LUT) transforming RGB (red/green/blue) false colour composite images of VIS006/NIR008/NIR016 into true colour images. Tabulated radiative transfer calculations of a pure Rayleigh atmosphere are used to add an impression of Rayleigh scattering towards the sunlit horizon. The resulting images satisfy naive expectations: clouds are white or transparent, vegetated surfaces are greenish, deserts are sandy-coloured, the ocean is dark blue to black and a narrow halo due to Rayleigh scattering is visible at the sunlit horizon. Therefore, such images are easily interpretable also for inexperienced users not familiar with the characteristics of typical MSG false colour composite images. The images can be used for scientific applications to illustrate specific meteorological conditions or for non-scientific purposes, for example, for raising awareness in the public of the Earth's worthiness of protection.

  5. The EOS Aqua/Aura Experience: Lessons Learned on Design, Integration, and Test of Earth-Observing Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nosek, Thomas P.

    2004-01-01

    NASA and NOAA earth observing satellite programs are flying a number of sophisticated scientific instruments which collect data on many phenomena and parameters of the earth's environment. The NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Program originated the EOS Common Bus approach, which featured two spacecraft (Aqua and Aura) of virtually identical design but with completely different instruments. Significant savings were obtained by the Common Bus approach and these lessons learned are presented as information for future program requiring multiple busses for new diversified instruments with increased capabilities for acquiring earth environmental data volume, accuracy, and type.

  6. Basic research and data analysis for the earth and ocean physics applications program and for the National Geodetic Satellite program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Data acquisition using single image and seven image data processing is used to provide a precise and accurate geometric description of the earth's surface. Transformation parameters and network distortions are determined, Sea slope along the continental boundaries of the U.S. and earth rotation are examined, along with close grid geodynamic satellite system. Data are derived for a mathematical description of the earth's gravitational field; time variations are determined for geometry of the ocean surface, the solid earth, gravity field, and other geophysical parameters.

  7. Techniques to minimize adjacent band emissions from Earth Exploration Satellites to protect the Space Research (Category B) Earth Stations in the 8400-8450 MHz band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Charles C.; Sue, Miles K.; Manshadi, Farzin

    2004-01-01

    The Earth Exploration Satellites operating in the 8025-8400 MHz band can have strong adjacent band emissions on the8400-8450 MHz band which is allocated for Space Research (Category-B). The unwanted emission may exceed the protection criterion establish by the ITU-R for the protection of the Space Research (Category B) earth stations, i.e., deep-space earth stations. An SFCG Action Item (SF 23/14) was created during the 23rd SFCG meeting to explore technical and operational techniques to reduce the adjacent band emissions. In response to this action item, a study was conducted and results are presented in this document.

  8. Gravitational mechanism of active life of the Earth, planets and satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkin, Yury

    2010-05-01

    From positions of geodynamic model of the forced gravitational swing, wobble and displacements of shells of a planet are studied and fundamental problems of geodynamics, geology, geophysics, planetary sciences are solved etc.: 1) The mechanism of cyclic variations of activity of natural processes in various time scales. 2) The power of endogenous activity of planetary natural processes on planets and satellites. 3) The phenomenon of polar inversion of natural processes on planets and satellites. 4) Spasmodic and catastrophic changes of activity of natural processes. 5) The phenomenon of twisting of hemispheres (latitude zones or belts) of celestial bodies. 6) Formation of the pear-shaped form of celestial bodies and the mechanism of its change. 7) The ordered planetary structures of geological formations. 8) The phenomena of bipolarity of celestial bodies and antipodality of geology formations. Mechanism. The fundamental feature of a structure of celestial bodies is their shell structure. The most investigated is the internal structure of the Earth. For the Moon and wide set of other bodies of solar system models of an internal structure have been constructed on the basis of the data of observations obtained at studying of their gravitational fields as a result of realization of the appropriate space missions. The basic components for the majority of celestial bodies are the core, the mantle and the crust. To other shells we concern atmospheres (for example, at Venus, Mars, the Titan etc.) and oceanic shells (the Titan, the Earth, Enceladus etc.). Shells are the complex (composite) formations. Planets and satellites are not spherical celestial bodies. The centers of mass of shells of the given planet (or the satellite) and their appropriate principal axes of inertia do not coincide. Accordingly, all their shells are characterized by the certain dynamic oblatenesses. Differences of dynamical oblatenesses results in various forced influences of external celestial

  9. Impacts of artificial ocean alkalinization on the carbon cycle and climate in Earth system simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Miriam Ferrer; Ilyina, Tatiana

    2016-06-01

    Using the state-of-the-art emissions-driven Max Planck Institute Earth system model, we explore the impacts of artificial ocean alkalinization (AOA) with a scenario based on the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) framework. Addition of 114 Pmol of alkalinity to the surface ocean stabilizes atmospheric CO2 concentration to RCP4.5 levels under RCP8.5 emissions. This scenario removes 940 GtC from the atmosphere and mitigates 1.5 K of global warming within this century. The climate adjusts to the lower CO2 concentration preventing the loss of sea ice and high sea level rise. Seawater pH and the carbonate saturation state (Ω) rise substantially above levels of the current decade. Pronounced differences in regional sensitivities to AOA are projected, with the Arctic Ocean and tropical oceans emerging as hot spots for biogeochemical changes induced by AOA. Thus, the CO2 mitigation potential of AOA comes at a price of an unprecedented ocean biogeochemistry perturbation with unknown ecological consequences.

  10. K-Band Phased Array Developed for Low- Earth-Orbit Satellite Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anzic, Godfrey

    1999-01-01

    Future rapid deployment of low- and medium-Earth-orbit satellite constellations that will offer various narrow- to wide-band wireless communications services will require phased-array antennas that feature wide-angle and superagile electronic steering of one or more antenna beams. Antennas, which employ monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC), are perfectly suited for this application. Under a cooperative agreement, an MMIC-based, K-band phased-array antenna is being developed with 50/50 cost sharing by the NASA Lewis Research Center and Raytheon Systems Company. The transmitting array, which will operate at 19 gigahertz (GHz), is a state-of-the-art design that features dual, independent, electronically steerable beam operation ( 42 ), a stand-alone thermal management, and a high-density tile architecture. This array can transmit 622 megabits per second (Mbps) in each beam from Earth orbit to small Earth terminals. The weight of the total array package is expected to be less than 8 lb. The tile integration technology (flip chip MMIC tile) chosen for this project represents a major advancement in phased-array engineering and holds much promise for reducing manufacturing costs.

  11. A computer program for mapping satellite-borne narrow-beam antenna footprints on earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stagl, T. W.; Singh, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    A computer program has been developed that computes the locus of intersection of a quadric cone and a sphere. The outputs of the program are a list of the longitude and latitude coordinates of the locus of intersection and a plot of the locus. It was written primarily to define the area of the earth covered by a narrow beam antenna carried on a synchronous satellite in circular, near equatorial orbits. The program was written for use with a CalComp 570/563 off-line plotting system and uses the standard CalComp subroutines supplied with the system. The plot is drawn using linear longitude and latitude scales and nonlinear scales such as Mercator scales cannot be used. It should be noted that this program assumes the earth to be spherical rather than oblate is it actually is. However, by assuming a spherical earth, maximum error distances of about 11.5 nautical miles are introduced. For many purposes, this error can be ignored.

  12. Station coordinates in the Standard Earth III system derived by using camera data from ISAGEX. [International Satellite Geodesy Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaposchkin, E. M.; Latimer, J.; Mendes, G.

    1975-01-01

    Simultaneous and individual camera observations of Geos 1, Geos 2, Pageos, and Midas 4 obtained during the International Satellite Geodesy Experiment are used to determine station coordinates. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory Standard Earth III system of coordinates is utilized to tie the geometrical network to a geocentric system and as a reference for calculating satellite orbits. The normal systems for geometrical and dynamical solutions are combined.

  13. Results of the Calibration of the Delays of Earth Stations for TWSTFT Using the VSL Satellite Simulator Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deJong, Gerrit; Kirchner, Dieter; Ressler, Hubert; Hetzel, Peter; Davis, John; Pears, Peter; Powell, Bill; McKinley, Angela Davis; Klepczynski, Bill; DeYoung, James; Hackman, Christine; Jefferts, Steve R.; Parker, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    Two-way satellite time and frequency transfer (TWSTFT) is the most accurate and precise method of comparing two remote clocks or time scales. The accuracy obtained is dependent on the accuracy of the determination of the non-reciprocal delays of the transmit and the receive paths. When the same transponders in the satellite at the same frequencies are used, then the non-reciprocity in the Earth stations is the limiting factor for absolute time transfer.

  14. Dynamics of Satellites in Binary Near-Earth Asteroid Systems: A Study Based on Radar Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naidu, Shantanu

    In the past 15 years, three previously unrecognized sub-populations of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) have been discovered. About 15% of NEAs are binaries, at least 10% of NEAs are contact binaries, and dozens of asteroid pairs have been identified. Numerous science questions have arisen about the formation and evolution processes of these systems and about the inter-relationships between these groups. Addressing these questions informs us about a wide range of important solar system processes that shape small bodies and planetesimals. Here I have chosen to focus on providing one of the most complete characterizations of a binary system among all known asteroid binaries, and on studying the spin-orbit interactions in this and 8 additional binary systems. One hypothesis that has not been fully explored is the possibility of chaotic rotation of asteroid satellites and the impact that such a state has on the evolution of the binary systems. I examine this problem as well as the possibility of detecting librational motions in synchronous satellites. Because the Arecibo and Goldstone radar systems enable superb characterizations of binaries and NEAs in general, this dissertation makes abundant use of radar data. Radar observations provide images of asteroids at decameter resolution, and these images can be inverted to determine the 3D shapes of the components, which are essential to properly model the system dynamics. Radar data also enable precise determination of the mutual orbit, which is another crucial ingredient. In the first two chapters of the dissertation, I describe the observations and physical characterizations of asteroid 2000~ET70 and binary asteroid 2000 DP107. The characterization of 2000 DP107 includes size, shape, spin, mass, and density of each component, making this binary one of the best-characterized asteroid binary to date. In the last chapter of the dissertation, I describe a computationally efficient fourth-order numerical integrator that I used to

  15. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study. Report 5: System design and specifications. Volume 2: EOS-A system specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The objectives of the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) program are defined. The system specifications for the satellite payload are examined. The broad objectives of the EOS-A program are as follows: (1) to develop space-borne sensors for the measurement of land resources, (2) to evolve spacecraft systems and subsystems which will permit earth observation with greater accuracy, coverage, spatial resolution, and continuity than existing systems, (3) to develop improved information processing, extraction, display, and distribution systems, and (4) to use space transportation systems for resupply and retrieval of the EOS.

  16. Four identical satellites investigating the Earth's turbulent relationship with the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-05-01

    Once in space, the four satellites will manoeuvre to an eccentric polar trajectory along which they will fly in tetrahedral formation for the next two years. They will take highly precise and, for the first time, three- dimensional measurements of the extraordinarily dynamic phenomena that occur where the solar wind meets the near- Earth environment. They will gather an unprecedented volume of very high- quality information on the magnetic storms, electric currents and particle accelerations that take place in the space surrounding our planet, which give rise to all manner of events, such as the aurorae in the polar regions, power cuts, breakdowns in telecommunication systems, or satellite malfunctions, and perhaps even changes in climate. The Cluster mission will also gather a host of fundamental information on the ionised gases whose behaviour physicists are trying to reproduce under laboratory conditions with the ultimate aim of generating thermonuclear energy. A cosmic battlefield The Sun's flames are lapping at the Earth's doorstep. In its constant state of effervescence/evaporation, it emits into space a wind charged with ions, electrons and protons which reach Earth at speeds of 1.5 to 3 million kph. Fortunately, our planet is armed with a natural shield against this onslaught: the magnetosphere, a distant magnetic, ionised extension of our atmosphere which slows and deflects the bulk of the stream of particles emitted by the Sun. This shield does not provide complete protection, however. Under constant buffeting from the interplanetary wind, the "fluid" magnetic screen is buckled, distorted and occasionally torn, causing small holes. When this happens, intense electric currents, magnetic storms and particle accelerations immediately develop. The overall interaction between the solar wind and the magnetosphere is so violent that the energy transferred can be as much as 1013 watts - equivalent to worldwide power consumption - and the currents induced run to

  17. The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS): Discovering New Earths and Super-Earths in the Solar Neighborhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricker, George R.

    2015-12-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will discover thousands of exoplanets in orbit around the brightest stars in the sky. In its two-year prime survey mission, TESS will monitor more than 200,000 bright stars in the solar neighborhood for temporary drops in brightness caused by planetary transits. This first-ever spaceborne all-sky transit survey will identify planets ranging from Earth-sized to gas giants, around a wide range of stellar types and orbital distances.TESS stars will typically be 30-100 times brighter than those surveyed by the Kepler satellite; thus, TESS planets will be far easier to characterize with follow-up observations. For the first time it will be possible to study the masses, sizes, densities, orbits, and atmospheres of a large cohort of small planets, including a sample of rocky worlds in the habitable zones of their host stars.An additional data product from the TESS mission will be full frame images (FFI) with a cadence of 30 minutes or less. These FFI will provide precise photometric information for every object within the 2300 square degree instantaneous field of view of the TESS cameras. These objects will include more than 1 million stars and bright galaxies observed during sessions of several weeks. In total, more than 30 million objects brighter than I=16 will be precisely photometered during the two-year prime mission. In principle, the lunar-resonant TESS orbit could provide opportunities for an extended mission lasting more than a decade, with data rates in excess of 100 Mbits/s.An extended survey by TESS of regions surrounding the North and South Ecliptic Poles will provide prime exoplanet targets for characterization with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), as well as other large ground-based and space-based telescopes of the future.TESS will issue data releases every 4 months, inviting immediate community-wide efforts to study the new planets, as well as commensal survey candidates from the FFI. A NASA Guest

  18. Design/cost tradeoff studies. Appendix A. Supporting analyses and tradeoffs, book 1. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study (EOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A listing of the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) candidate missions is presented for use as a baseline in describing the EOS payloads. The missions are identified in terms of first, second, and third generation payloads. The specific applications of the EOS satellites are defined. The subjects considered are: (1) orbit analysis, (2) space shuttle interfaces, (3) thematic mapping subsystem, (4) high resolution pointable imager subsystem, (5) the data collection system, (6) the synthetic aperture radar, (7) the passive multichannel microwave radiometer, and (8) the wideband communications and handling equipment. Illustrations of the satellite and launch vehicle configurations are provided. Block diagrams of the electronic circuits are included.

  19. The problem of space nuclear power sources collisions with artificial space objects in near-earth orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gafarov, Albert A.

    1993-01-01

    Practically all space objects with onboard nuclear power sources stay in earth satellite orbits with an orbital lifetime long enough to reduce their radioactivity to levels presenting no danger for the Earth population. One of the reasons for orbit lifetime reduction can be collisions with other space objects in near-earth orbits. The possible consequence of collisions can be partial, or even complete, destruction of the spacecraft with an onboard nuclear power source; as well as delivery of additional impulse both to the spacecraft and its fragments. It is shown that collisions in orbit do not cause increase of radiation hazard for the Earth population if there is aerodynamic breakup of nuclear power sources into fragments of safe sizes during atmospheric reentry.

  20. A dynamic scheduling method of Earth-observing satellites by employing rolling horizon strategy.

    PubMed

    Dishan, Qiu; Chuan, He; Jin, Liu; Manhao, Ma

    2013-01-01

    Focused on the dynamic scheduling problem for earth-observing satellites (EOS), an integer programming model is constructed after analyzing the main constraints. The rolling horizon (RH) strategy is proposed according to the independent arriving time and deadline of the imaging tasks. This strategy is designed with a mixed triggering mode composed of periodical triggering and event triggering, and the scheduling horizon is decomposed into a series of static scheduling intervals. By optimizing the scheduling schemes in each interval, the dynamic scheduling of EOS is realized. We also propose three dynamic scheduling algorithms by the combination of the RH strategy and various heuristic algorithms. Finally, the scheduling results of different algorithms are compared and the presented methods in this paper are demonstrated to be efficient by extensive experiments.

  1. Extended Kalman filter for attitude estimation of the earth radiation budget satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutschmann, Julie; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.

    1989-01-01

    The design and testing of an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) for ground attitude determination, misalignment estimation and sensor calibration of the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) are described. Attitude is represented by the quaternion of rotation and the attitude estimation error is defined as an additive error. Quaternion normalization is used for increasing the convergence rate and for minimizing the need for filter tuning. The development of the filter dynamic model, the gyro error model and the measurement models of the Sun sensors, the IR horizon scanner and the magnetometers which are used to generate vector measurements are also presented. The filter is applied to real data transmitted by ERBS sensors. Results are presented and analyzed and the EKF advantages as well as sensitivities are discussed. On the whole the filter meets the expected synergism, accuracy and robustness.

  2. Earth Resources Technology Satellite data collection project, ERTS - Bolivia. [thematic mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockmann, C. E.

    1974-01-01

    The Earth Resources Technology Satellite program of Bolivia has developed a multidisciplinary project to carry out investigations in cartography and to prepare various thematic maps. In cartography, investigations are being carried out with the ERTS-1 images and with existing maps, to determine their application to the preparation of new cartographic products on one hand and on the other to map those regions where the cartography is still deficient. The application of the MSS images to the geological mapping has given more than satisfactory results. Working with conventional photointerpretation, it has been possible to prepare regional geological maps, tectonic maps, studies relative to mining, geomorphological maps, studies relative to petroleum exploration, volcanological maps and maps of hydrologic basins. In agriculture, the ERTS images are used to study land classification and forest and soils mapping.

  3. Design/cost tradeoff studies. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study (EOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The results of design/cost tradeoff studies conducted during the Earth Observatory Satellite system definition studies are presented. The studies are concerned with the definition of a basic modular spacecraft capable of supporting a variety of operational and/or research and development missions, with the deployment either by conventional launch vehicles or by means of the space shuttle. The three levels investigated during the study are: (1) subsystem tradeoffs, (2) spacecraft tradeoffs, and (3) system tradeoffs. The range of requirements which the modular concept must span is discussed. The mechanical, thermal, power, data and electromagnetic compatibility aspects of modularity are analyzed. Other data are provided for the observatory design concept, the payloads, integration and test, the ground support equipment, and ground data management systems.

  4. Insolation data for solar energy conversion derived from satellite measurements of earth radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thekaekara, M. P.

    1976-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the irradiance of the sun at ground locations is essential for the design and evaluation of solar energy conversion systems. The primary source of such data is the global network of weather stations. Such stations are often too far apart and for most locations the data available are only daily total irradiance or monthly averages. Solar energy conversion programs require insolation data with considerably higher geographical and temporal resolution. Meteorological satellites gather routinely extensive data on the energy reflected and scattered into space by the earth-atmosphere system. A program has been initiated to use such data for deriving ground insolation for energy conversion. Some of the preliminary results of this program will be discussed.

  5. The precision-processing subsystem for the Earth Resources Technology Satellite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapelle, W. E.; Bybee, J. E.; Bedross, G. M.

    1972-01-01

    Description of the precision processor, a subsystem in the image-processing system for the Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS). This processor is a special-purpose image-measurement and printing system, designed to process user-selected bulk images to produce 1:1,000,000-scale film outputs and digital image data, presented in a Universal-Transverse-Mercator (UTM) projection. The system will remove geometric and radiometric errors introduced by the ERTS multispectral sensors and by the bulk-processor electron-beam recorder. The geometric transformations required for each input scene are determined by resection computations based on reseau measurements and image comparisons with a special ground-control base contained within the system; the images are then printed and digitized by electronic image-transfer techniques.

  6. Feasibility study of scanning celestial Attitude System (SCADS) for Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The feasibility of using the Scanning Celestial Attitude Determination System (SCADS) during Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS) missions to compute an accurate spacecraft attitude by use of stellar measurements is considered. The spacecraft is local-vertical-stabilized. A heuristic discussion of the SCADS concept is first given. Two concepts are introduced: a passive system which contains no moving parts, and an active system in which the reticle is caused to rotate about the sensor's axis. A quite complete development of the equations of attitude motions is then given. These equations are used to generate the true attitude which in turn is used to compute the transit times of detectable stars and to determine the errors associated with the SCADS attitude. A more complete discussion of the analytical foundation of SCADS concept and its use for the geometries particular to this study, as well as salient design parameters for the passive and active systems are included.

  7. Microwave maps of the polar ice of the earth. [from Nimbus-5 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloersen, P.; Wilheit, T. T.; Chang, T. C.; Nordberg, W.; Campbell, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    Synoptic views of the entire polar regions of earth were obtained free of the usual persistent cloud cover using a scanning microwave radiometer operating at a wavelength of 1.55 cm on board the Nimbus-5 satellite. Three different views at each pole are presented utilizing data obtained at approximately one-month intervals during the winter of 1972-1973. The major discoveries resulting from an analysis of these data are as follows: (1) Large discrepancies exist between the climatic norm ice cover depicted in various atlases and the actual extent of the canopies. (2) The distribution of multiyear ice in the north polar region is markedly different from that predicted by existing ice dynamics models. (3) Irregularities in the edge of the Antarctic sea ice pack occur that have neither been observed previously nor anticipated. (4) The brightness temperatures of the Greenland and Antarctica glaciers show interesting contours probably related to the ice and snow morphologic structure.

  8. Earth resources technology satellite /ERTS/ data collection and transmission buoys for inland, neritic and oceanic waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, W. S.; Yen, H. H.

    1974-01-01

    As a result of a consortium of several industries and organizations, an economical, versatile, and stable data collection and transmission buoy has been designed, developed, and deployed to gather and transmit water quality data to a ground receiving station at three-minute intervals and to the earth resources technology satellite (ERTS) as it passes over the deployed buoy every 12 hours. The buoy system, designed for both fresh and salt water application, gathers data inclusive of temperature measurement, conductivity, relative acidity, dissolved oxygen, current speed, and direction. The mechanical design philosophy used to determine and satisfy boundary conditions involving stability, ease of deployment, servicing and maintenance, minimal manufacturing costs, and fresh and salt water installation capability is discussed. The development of peripheral handling equipment and anchoring systems is described.

  9. Plane wave spectrum treatment of microwave scattering by hydrometeors on an Earth-satellite link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haworth, D. P.

    1980-08-01

    For satellites operating at frequencies above 10 GHz, the effects of propagation through atmospheric hydrometeors are of major importance. In particular, the hydrometeors attenuate, cross polarize and scatter signals causing respectively: a loss in signal level, a decrease in the efficiency of dual polarized channels and station to station interference. For large Earth station antennas operating at high frequencies, the near or Fresnel region of the antenna can extend several kilometers from the antenna and consequently, during disturbed weather, a significant proportion of the hydrometeors affecting propagation are in the near or Fresnel region of the antenna. Previous treatment of propagation through hydrometeors in the Fresnel region of an antenna has proved unsatisfactory and the plane wave spectrum technique was used to accurately characterize antenna scatterer interaction in both the near and far fields of an antenna. The Van de Hulst refractive formula for the coherent propagation and the basis of the radiative transfer equation for the incoherent scattering are derived.

  10. A Comparison of Techniques for Scheduling Fleets of Earth-Observing Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Al; Crawford, James; Lohn, Jason; Pryor, Anna

    2003-01-01

    Earth observing satellite (EOS) scheduling is a complex real-world domain representative of a broad class of over-subscription scheduling problems. Over-subscription problems are those where requests for a facility exceed its capacity. These problems arise in a wide variety of NASA and terrestrial domains and are .XI important class of scheduling problems because such facilities often represent large capital investments. We have run experiments comparing multiple variants of the genetic algorithm, hill climbing, simulated annealing, squeaky wheel optimization and iterated sampling on two variants of a realistically-sized model of the EOS scheduling problem. These are implemented as permutation-based methods; methods that search in the space of priority orderings of observation requests and evaluate each permutation by using it to drive a greedy scheduler. Simulated annealing performs best and random mutation operators outperform our squeaky (more intelligent) operator. Furthermore, taking smaller steps towards the end of the search improves performance.

  11. Modification of Earth-satellite orbits using medium-energy pulsed lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, Claude R.

    1993-05-01

    Laser impulse space propulsion (LISP) has become an attractive concept, due to recent advances in gas laser technology, high-speed segmented mirrors, and improved coefficients for momentum coupling to targets in pulsed laser ablation. There are numerous specialized applications of the basic concept to space science -- ranging from far-future and high capital cost to the immediate and inexpensive, such as: LEO-LISP (launch of massive objects into low-Earth-orbit at dramatically improved cost-per-kg relative to present practice); LEGO-LISP (LEO to geosynchronous transfers); LO-LISP (periodic re-boost of decaying LEO orbits); and LISK (geosynchronous satellite station-keeping). It is unlikely that one type of laser will be best for all scenarios. In this paper, we discuss these most immediate applications, leaving LEO-LISP -- the application requiring the longest reach -- for another venue.

  12. Modification of earth-satellite orbits using medium-energy pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps, C.R.

    1992-10-01

    Laser Impulse Space Propulsion (LISP) has become an attractive concept, due to recent advances in gas laser technology, high-speed segmented mirrors and improved coeffici-ents for momentum coupling to targets in pulsed laser ablation. There are numerous specialized applications of the basic concept to space science-ranging from far-future and high capital cost to the immediate and inexpensive, such as: LEO-LISP (launch of massive objects into low-Earth-Orbit at dramatically improved cost-per-kg relative to present practice); LEGO-LISP (LEO to geosynchronous transfers); LO-LISP) (periodic re-boost of decaying LEO orbits); and LISK (geosynchronous satellite station-keeping). It is unlikely that one type of laser will be best for all scenarios. In this paper, we will focus on the last two applications.

  13. Modification of earth-satellite orbits using medium-energy pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps, C.R.

    1992-01-01

    Laser Impulse Space Propulsion (LISP) has become an attractive concept, due to recent advances in gas laser technology, high-speed segmented mirrors and improved coeffici-ents for momentum coupling to targets in pulsed laser ablation. There are numerous specialized applications of the basic concept to space science-ranging from far-future and high capital cost to the immediate and inexpensive, such as: LEO-LISP (launch of massive objects into low-Earth-Orbit at dramatically improved cost-per-kg relative to present practice); LEGO-LISP (LEO to geosynchronous transfers); LO-LISP) (periodic re-boost of decaying LEO orbits); and LISK (geosynchronous satellite station-keeping). It is unlikely that one type of laser will be best for all scenarios. In this paper, we will focus on the last two applications.

  14. Modification of Earth-satellite orbits using medium-energy pulsed lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, C. R.

    Laser Impulse Space Propulsion (LISP) has become an attractive concept, due to recent advances in gas laser technology, high-speed segmented mirrors and improved coefficients for momentum coupling to targets in pulsed laser ablation. There are numerous specialized applications of the basic concept to space science - ranging from far-future and high capital cost to the immediate and inexpensive, such as: LEO-LISP (launch of massive objects into low-Earth-Orbit at dramatically improved cost-per-kg relative to present practice); LEGO-LISP (LEO to geosynchronous transfers); LO-LISP (periodic re-boost of decaying LEO orbits); and LISK (geosynchronous satellite station-keeping). It is unlikely that one type of laser will be best for all scenarios. In this paper, we will focus on the last two applications.

  15. Origin of Lα{sup x} satellite in the light rare earths on the basis of plasmon theory

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Manjula; Shrivastava, B. D.

    2015-07-31

    The origin of most of the X-ray satellites can be explained on the basis of multiple ionization theory. However, there are several satellites which can be explained on the basis of plasmon theory. When a plasmon is excited during the X-ray emission process, one can get a low energy satellite because energy is used up in exciting the plasmon oscillations in the electron gas. A plasmon on decay can also transfer its energy to the transiting electron which subsequently fills the core vacancy giving rise to a high energy satellite. In our laboratory, a new high energy satellite Lα{sup x} has been observed in the Lα - emission spectra of the oxides of some light rare earths on the high energy side of the diagram line Lα{sub 1}. In the present paper, the origin of this high energy satellite has been explained using the theory of plasma oscillations in solids. The energy separation of the satellite from the emission line Lα{sub 1} has been calculated and then compared with the theoretical separation based on the plasmon theory. The agreement between the theoretical and experimental values is found to be good. Hence, the observed satellite can be designated as plasmon satellite.

  16. Evaluation of Gravitational Field Models Based on the Laser Range Observation of Low Earth Orbit Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. B.; Zhao, C. Y.; Zhang, W.; Zhan, J. W.; Yu, S. X.

    2015-09-01

    The Earth gravitational filed model is a kind of important dynamic model in satellite orbit computation. In recent years, several space gravity missions have obtained great success, prompting a lot of gravitational filed models to be published. In this paper, 2 classical models (JGM3, EGM96) and 4 latest models, including EIGEN-CHAMP05S, GGM03S, GOCE02S, and EGM2008 are evaluated by being employed in the precision orbit determination (POD) and prediction, based on the laser range observation of four low earth orbit (LEO) satellites, including CHAMP, GFZ-1, GRACE-A, and SWARM-A. The residual error of observation in POD is adopted to describe the accuracy of six gravitational field models. We show the main results as follows: (1) for LEO POD, the accuracies of 4 latest models (EIGEN-CHAMP05S, GGM03S, GOCE02S, and EGM2008) are at the same level, and better than those of 2 classical models (JGM3, EGM96); (2) If taking JGM3 as reference, EGM96 model's accuracy is better in most situations, and the accuracies of the 4 latest models are improved by 12%-47% in POD and 63% in prediction, respectively. We also confirm that the model's accuracy in POD is enhanced with the increasing degree and order if they are smaller than 70, and when they exceed 70 the accuracy keeps stable, and is unrelated with the increasing degree, meaning that the model's degree and order truncated to 70 are sufficient to meet the requirement of LEO orbit computation with centimeter level precision.

  17. 40 Years Young: Social Media for the World's Longest-Running Earth-Observation Satellite Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riebeek, H.; Rocchio, L. E.; Taylor, M.; Owen, T.; Allen, J. E.; Keck, A.

    2012-12-01

    With social media becoming a communication juggernaut it is essential to harness the medium's power to foster better science communication. On July 23, 2012, the Landsat Earth-observing satellite program celebrated the 40th anniversary of the first Landsat launch. To more effectively communicate the impact and importance of Landsat's four-decade long data record a carefully planned social media event was designed to supplement the day's traditional media communications. The social media event, dubbed the "Landsat Social," was modeled on and supported by the NASA Social methodology. The Landsat Social was the first such event for NASA Earth science not associated with a launch. For the Landsat Social, 23 social media-savvy participants were selected to attend a joint NASA/U.S. Geological Survey Landsat anniversary press event at the Newseum in Washington, D.C. The participants subsequently toured the NASA Goddard Space Flight Facility in Greenbelt, Maryland where they had the opportunity to learn about the latest Landsat satellite; visit the Landsat mission control; download and work with Landsat data; and meet Landsat scientists and engineers. All Landsat Social participants had Twitter accounts and used the #Landsat and #NASASocial hashtags to unify their commentary throughout the day. A few key Landsat messages were communicated to the Landsat Social participants at the event's onset. Propagation of this messaging was witnessed for the duration of the Landsat Social; and a spike in online Landsat interest followed. Here, we examine the Landsat 40th anniversary social event, explain impacts made, and report lessons learned.; Landsat Social attendees are busy tweeting, texting, and blogging as Project Scientist Dr. Jim Irons talks about the Landsat Data Continuity Mission in front of the Hyperwall at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Photo courtesy Bill Hrybyk.

  18. A high-fidelity N-body ephemeris generator for satellites in Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, David R.

    1991-01-01

    A program is currently used for mission planning called the Analytic Satellite Ephemeris Program (ASEP), which produces projected data for orbits that remain fairly close to Earth. Lunar and solar perturbations are taken into account in another program called GRAVE. This project is a revision of GRAVE which incorporates more flexible means of input for initial data, provides additional kinds of output information, and makes use of structured programming techniques to make the program more understandable and reliable. The computer program ORBIT was tested against tracking data for the first 313 days of operation of the CRRES satellite. A sample graph is given comparing the semi-major axis calculated by the program with the values supplied by NORAD. When calculated for points at which CRRES passes through the ascending node, the argument of perigee, the right ascension of the ascending node, and the mean anomaly all stay within about a degree of the corresponding values from NORAD; the inclination of the orbital plane is much closer. The program value of the eccentricity is in error by no more than 0.0002.

  19. Smoothing of functions of range and range rate measurements from earth orbiting satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grenchik, T. J.; Murray, C. W., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    It is shown that for satellites in circular Earth orbits with altitudes of 500 kilometers to 1500 kilometers, and for satellites in elliptical orbits with an approximate 4000 kilometer height of perigee, a high degree least squares polynomial (e.g., a 9th or 10th degree in some cases) is required to smooth both range and range rate data for purposes of input to orbit determination programs. In order to circumvent this problem, functions of range and range rate are smoothed with lower degree least squares polynomials (e.g., 3rd and 4th degree) and it is shown that under the above geometric constraints the standard deviation of fit can be reduced to levels commensurate with typical S-band tracking system resolution which is 1 to 2 meters in range and 0.005 meters/second in range rate for a 1 per second data rate. Also shown are the effects of Gaussian random noise, biases, and periodic noise. This analysis includes numerous examples applied to the 44 point data smoothing interval currently used in much of the operational preprocessing at the Goddard Space Flight Center.

  20. Solving climate uncertainty one tiny satellite at a time: Earth's Radiation Imbalance System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyrud, L. P.; Wiscombe, W. J.; Nag, S.; Lorentz, S. R.; Trenberth, K. E.; Chiu, J. C.; Rossow, W. B.; Schwartz, S. E.; Swartz, W. H.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change results from a less than 1% imbalance between incoming solar energy and the reflected and re-radiated energy out to space. This Earth radiation imbalance (ERI) is assumed to be zero over decadal averages in the pre-industrial era. Using climate models and ocean heat content data, present-day annual-global-average ERI is estimated to be in the range of 0.5-1 W/m^2. Measurements of ERI accurate to at least 0.3 W m^-2 are critically needed for understanding climate change and developing capability for projection of future climate change, but until now obtaining such measurements has not been practical because of lack of measurement accuracy and the required number of satellites (at least 30-40) and attendant cost. Measuring ERI is now possible due to advances in accurate radiation measurement technology and to the availability of low cost cube-sats and numerous ride-share launch opportunities. NASA has recently funded the demonstration of the first of these ERI cube-sat systems called RAVAN (see link). Here we discuss the scientific motivation and execution vision for a large scale and potentially international collaboration to continuously launch and manage a constellation of these satellites for as little as $10M per year.

  1. The Effects of Solar Maximum on the Earth's Satellite Population and Space Situational Awareness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2012-01-01

    The rapidly approaching maximum of Solar Cycle 24 will have wide-ranging effects not only on the number and distribution of resident space objects, but also on vital aspects of space situational awareness, including conjunction assessment processes. The best known consequence of high solar activity is an increase in the density of the thermosphere, which, in turn, increases drag on the vast majority of objects in low Earth orbit. The most prominent evidence of this is seen in a dramatic increase in space object reentries. Due to the massive amounts of new debris created by the fragmentations of Fengyun-1C, Cosmos 2251 and Iridium 33 during the recent period of Solar Minimum, this effect might reach epic levels. However, space surveillance systems are also affected, both directly and indirectly, historically leading to an increase in the number of lost satellites and in the routine accuracy of the calculation of their orbits. Thus, at a time when more objects are drifting through regions containing exceptionally high-value assets, such as the International Space Station and remote sensing satellites, their position uncertainties increase. In other words, as the possibility of damaging and catastrophic collisions increases, our ability to protect space systems is degraded. Potential countermeasures include adjustments to space surveillance techniques and the resetting of collision avoidance maneuver thresholds.

  2. On the computation of preliminary orbits for Earth satellites with radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronchi, G. F.; Dimare, L.; Bracali Cioci, D.; Ma, H.

    2015-08-01

    We introduce a new method to perform preliminary orbit determination for satellites on low Earth orbits (LEO). This method works with tracks of radar observations: each track is composed by n ≥ 4 topocentric position vectors per pass of the satellite, taken at very short time intervals. We assume very accurate values for the range ρ, while the angular positions (i.e. the line of sight, given by the pointing of the antenna) are less accurate. We wish to correct the errors in the angular positions already in the computation of a preliminary orbit. With the information contained in a pair of radar tracks, using the laws of the two-body dynamics, we can write eight equations in eight unknowns. The unknowns are the components of the topocentric velocity orthogonal to the line of sight at the two mean epochs of the tracks, and the corrections Δ to be applied to the angular positions. We take advantage of the fact that the components of Δ are typically small. We show the results of some tests, performed with simulated observations, and compare this method with Gibbs' and the Keplerian integrals methods.

  3. Stabilization of a symmetric artificial sun satellite in a light pressure force field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aganin, A. Iu.

    1992-10-01

    The paper is concerned with the problem of the motion of a dynamically symmetric satellite along a circular heliocentric orbit in gravitational and light pressure force fields. Three stationary positions of the satellite symmetry axis in orbital coordinates are determined, and it is proved that no other stationary positions exist. For the stationary positions, regions where the sufficient stability conditions are satisfied are determined.

  4. Low-earth-orbit Satellite Internet Protocol Communications Concept and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slywezak, Richard A.

    2004-01-01

    This report presents a design concept for a low-Earth-orbit end-to-end Internet-Protocol- (IP-) based mission. The goal is to maintain an up-to-date communications infrastructure that makes communications seamless with the protocols used in terrestrial computing. It is based on the premise that the use of IPs will permit greater interoperability while also reducing costs and providing users the ability to retrieve data directly from the satellite. However, implementing an IP-based solution also has a number of challenges, since wireless communications have different characteristics than wired communications. This report outlines the design of a low-Earth-orbit end-to-end IP-based mission; the ideas and concepts of Space Internet architectures and networks are beyond the scope of this document. The findings of this report show that an IP-based mission is plausible and would provide benefits to the user community, but the outstanding issues must be resolved before a design can be implemented.

  5. Earth Radiation Imbalance from a Constellation of 66 Iridium Satellites: Climate Science Aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiscombe, W.; Chiu, CJ. Y.

    2012-01-01

    The "global warming hiatus" since the 1998 El Nino, highlighted by Meehl et al., and the resulting "missing energy" problem highlighted by Trenberth et al., has opened the door to a more fundamental view of climate change than mere surface air temperature. That new view is based on two variables which are strongly correlated: the rate of change of ocean heat content d(OHC)/dt; and Earth Radiation Imbalance (ERI) at the top of the atmosphere, whose guesstimated range is 0.4 to 0.9 Watts per square meters (this imbalance being mainly due to increasing CO2). The Argo float array is making better and better measurements of OHC. But existing satellite systems cannot measure ERI to even one significant digit. So, climate model predictions of ERI are used in place of real measurements of it, and the satellite data are tuned to the climate model predictions. Some oceanographers say "just depend on Argo for understanding the global warming hiatus and the missing energy", but we don't think this is a good idea because d(OHC)/dt and ERI have different time scales and are never perfectly correlated. We think the ERB community needs to step up to measuring ERI correctly, just as oceanographers have deployed Argo to measure OHC correctly. This talk will overview a proposed constellation of 66 Earth radiation budget instruments, hosted on Iridium satellites, that will actually be able to measure ERI to at least one significant digit, thus enabling a crucial test of climate models. This constellation will also be able to provide ERI at two-hourly time scales and 500-km spatial scales without extrapolations from uncalibrated narrowband geostationary instruments, using the highly successful methods of GRACE to obtain spatial resolution. This high time resolution would make ERI a synoptic variable like temperature, and allow studies of ERI's response to fast-evolving phenomena like dust storms and hurricanes and even brief excursions of Total Solar Irradiance. Time permitting, we

  6. Tools and Data Services from the NASA Earth Satellite Observations for Climate Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicente, Gilberto A.

    2005-01-01

    Climate science and applications require access to vast amounts of archived high quality data, software tools and services for data manipulation and information extraction. These on the other hand require gaining detailed understanding of the data's internal structure and physical implementation to data reduction, combination and data product production. This time-consuming task must be undertaken before the core investigation can begin and is an especially difficult challenge when science objectives require users to deal with large multi-sensor data sets of different formats, structures, and resolutions. In order to address these issues the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Earth Sciences (GES), Data and Information Service Center (DISC) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) has made great progress in facilitating science and applications research by developing innovative tools and data services applied to the Earth sciences atmospheric and climate data. The GES/DISC/DAAC has successfully implemented and maintained a long-term climate satellite data archive and developed tools and services to a variety of atmospheric science missions including AIRS, AVHRR, MODIS, SeaWiFS, SORCE, TOMS, TOVS, TRMM, and UARS and Aura instruments providing researchers with excellent opportunities to acquire accurate and continuous atmospheric measurements. Since the number of climate science products from these various missions is steadily increasing as a result of more sophisticated sensors and new science algorithms, the main challenge for data centers like the GES/DISC/DAAC is to guide users through the variety of data sets and products, provide tools to visualize and reduce the volume of the data and secure uninterrupted and reliable access to data and related products. This presentation will describe the effort at the GES/DISC/DAAC to build a bridge between multi-sensor data and the effective scientific use of the data, with an emphasis on the heritage satellite observations

  7. Stability of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment scanner results for the first two years of multiple-satellite operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staylor, W. Frank

    1993-01-01

    Clear-sky albedos and outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) determined from Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) scanners on board the earth radiation budget satellite and NOAA-9 spacecraft were analyzed for three target sites for the months February 1985-January 1987. The targets were oceans, deserts, and a multiscene site covering half the earth's surface. Year-to-year ratios of the monthly albedos and OLR were within the 0.98-1.02 range with a standard error of about 1%. The data indicate that ERBE scanner measurements were stable to within a few tenths of a percent for the two-year periods.

  8. A test of general relativity using the LARES and LAGEOS satellites and a GRACE Earth gravity model. Measurement of Earth's dragging of inertial frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciufolini, Ignazio; Paolozzi, Antonio; Pavlis, Erricos C.; Koenig, Rolf; Ries, John; Gurzadyan, Vahe; Matzner, Richard; Penrose, Roger; Sindoni, Giampiero; Paris, Claudio; Khachatryan, Harutyun; Mirzoyan, Sergey

    2016-03-01

    We present a test of general relativity, the measurement of the Earth's dragging of inertial frames. Our result is obtained using about 3.5 years of laser-ranged observations of the LARES, LAGEOS, and LAGEOS 2 laser-ranged satellites together with the Earth gravity field model GGM05S produced by the space geodesy mission GRACE. We measure μ = (0.994 ± 0.002) ± 0.05, where μ is the Earth's dragging of inertial frames normalized to its general relativity value, 0.002 is the 1-sigma formal error and 0.05 is our preliminary estimate of systematic error mainly due to the uncertainties in the Earth gravity model GGM05S. Our result is in agreement with the prediction of general relativity.

  9. A Computer Program for Mapping Satellite-borne Narrow-Beam Antenna Footprints on Earth. Memorandum Number 72/3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stagl, Thomas W.; Singh, Jai P.

    Written primarily to define the area of the earth covered by a narrow-beam antenna carried on a synchronous satellite in circular, near equatorial orbits, a computer program has been developed that computes the locus of intersection of a quadric cone and a sphere. The program, which outputs a list of the longitude and latitude coordinates of the…

  10. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study. Report no. 5: System design and specifications. Part 1: Observatory system element specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The performance, design, and quality assurance requirements for the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) Observatory and Ground System program elements required to perform the Land Resources Management (LRM) A-type mission are presented. The requirements for the Observatory element with the exception of the instruments specifications are contained in the first part.

  11. Detection, identification, and classification of mosquito larval habitats using remote sensing scanners in earth-orbiting satellites*

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Richard O.; Maxwell, Eugene L.; Mitchell, Carl J.; Woodzick, Thomas L.

    1985-01-01

    A method of identifying mosquito larval habitats associated with fresh-water plant communities, wetlands, and other aquatic locations at Lewis and Clark Lake in the states of Nebraska and South Dakota, USA, using remote sensing imagery obtained by multispectral scanners aboard earth-orbiting satellites (Landsat 1 and 2) is described. The advantages and limitations of this method are discussed. PMID:2861917

  12. 78 FR 39200 - Federal Earth Stations-Non-Federal Fixed Satellite Service Space Stations; Spectrum for Non...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-01

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 2 Federal Earth Stations--Non-Federal Fixed Satellite Service Space Stations; Spectrum for Non-Federal Space Launch Operations AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: This document proposes to make spectrum allocation proposals for three different...

  13. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study. Report no. 5: System design and specifications. Part 2: Ground system element specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The Ground System requirements for the Land Resources Management (LRM) type-A and type-B missions of the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) program are presented. Specifications for the Thematic Mapper data processing are provided (LRM A mission). The specifications also cover the R and D instruments (Thematic Mapper and High Resolution Pointable Imager) data processing for the LRM type-B mission.

  14. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study. Report no. 7: EOS system definition report. Appendixes A through D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An analysis of the systems involved in the operation and support of the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) is presented. Among the systems considered are the following: (1) the data management system, (2) observatory to primary ground station communications links, (3) local user system, (4) techniques for recognizing ground control points, (5) the central data processing-implementation concept, and (6) program effectiveness analysis.

  15. News of Brazilian space activities. [use of satellite data in meteorology and Earth resources programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Remote sensing and meteorological observations of satellites are covered. Development of an oceanographic atlas, prediction of droughts, and results of geological surveys using satellite data are discussed.

  16. New Satellite Laser Ranging TRF and EOP Series for Mass Transport Studies in the Earth System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlis, E. C.

    2001-12-01

    The new millennium has started on the right note for geodesy. We finally see a series of gravity mapping missions materialize. What now becomes important is that well-established geodetic techniques rise to the challenge of validating and complementing the data these new missions will deliver. An area where this is likely to be important is the temporal variations in the zonal gravitational field and its very low degree and order components in general. Satellite laser ranging (SLR) has for a long time monitored the continuous redistribution of mass within the Earth system through concomitant changes in the Stokes' coefficients of the terrestrial gravity field. Secular changes in J2 due to post-glacial relaxation have been observed since many years and similar changes in J3, J4 J5, etc. are attributed to changes in the ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica. Seasonal changes in these coefficients have also been closely correlated with mass transfer in the atmosphere and oceans. JCET's latest analysis of the 1993-present SLR data set from LAGEOS and LAGEOS 2 data for the IERS (International Earth Rotation Service) Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) development, includes the weekly monitoring of such compound changes in the low degree and order harmonics. This latest solution (2001) incorporates several important changes in the modeling of SLR data with resulting improvements in the geophysical products. Along with the static parameters of the TRF we have determined a time series of variations of its origin with respect to the center of mass of the Earth system (geocenter). These estimates provide a measure of the total motion due to all sources of mass transport within the Earth system and can be used to either complement the estimates from the future missions or to validate them through comparisons with their estimates for the same quantities. The data were reduced using NASA Goddard's GEODYN/SOLVE II software, resulting to a final RMS error of ~8 mm - close to the

  17. Benefits of the use of Low Earth Orbit Satellites for some kind of services in developing countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciancaglini, Humberto R.

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to advise people of less industrialized countries about the possibilities and benefits of the application of Low Earth Orbit Satellites. A review of concepts contained on recent publications about LEO satellites, concerning technical characteristics, manufacture, launching and the type of signal they process will be given. Some projects of LEO constellations for future worldwide covering will be considered, with particular emphasis to the services they can provide. LEO satellites complement economically the services of geostationary satellites in various areas (information of position of vehicles onroute, monitoring the temperature of refrigerated transportation of fresh fruit, vegetables and other perishable products; measurement of physical magnitude of remotely located sensors; remote command operations, emergency alerts, etc).

  18. Generalized satellite image processing: eight years of ocean colour data for any region on earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhellemont, Quinten; Ruddick, Kevin

    2011-11-01

    During the past decade, the world's oceans have been systematically observed by orbiting spectroradiometers such as MODIS and MERIS. These sensors have generated a huge amount of data with unprecedented temporal and spatial coverage. The data is freely available, but not always accessible for marine researchers with no image processing experience. In order to provide historical and current oceanographic parameters for the jellyfish forecasting in the JELLYFOR project, a tool for the generalized processing and archiving of satellite data was created (GRIMAS). Using this generalized software, the large amount of remote sensing data can be accessed, and parameters such as chlorophyll a concentration (CHL), sea surface temperature (SST) and total suspended matter concentration (TSM) can be extracted and gridded for any region on earth. Time-series and climatologies can be easily extracted from this data archive. The products generated can be based on the standard products, as supplied by space agencies, or can be new or regionally calibrated products. All available MODIS and MERIS L2 images from an eight year period (2003-2010) were processed in order to create a gridded dataset of CHL, SST (MODIS only) and of TSM for the three JELLYFOR regions. For two of the regions, data for an extended region was also processed. Multi-year composites (climatologies) of satellite data and time-series can provide a wealth of information for different projects in any region. Climatologies from the two sensors are in good agreement, while significant differences can occur on a scene per scene basis. Total suspended matter concentrations match favourably with in situ data derived from sensors on autonomous buoys. MODIS sea surface temperature corresponds closely to temperature continuously measured underway on research vessels.

  19. 1999-2003 Shortwave Characterizations of Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS)/Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) Broadband Active Cavity Radiometer Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Robert B., III; Smith, George L.; Wong, Takmeng

    2008-01-01

    From October 1984 through May 2005, the NASA Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS/ )/Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE)ERBE nonscanning active cavity radiometers (ACR) were used to monitor long-term changes in the earth radiation budget components of the incoming total solar irradiance (TSI), earth-reflected TSI, and earth-emitted outgoing longwave radiation (OLR). From September1984 through September 1999, using on-board calibration systems, the ERBS/ERBE ACR sensor response changes, in gains and offsets, were determined from on-orbit calibration sources and from direct observations of the incoming TSI through calibration solar ports at measurement precision levels approaching 0.5 W/sq m , at satellite altitudes. On October 6, 1999, the onboard radiometer calibration system elevation drive failed. Thereafter, special spacecraft maneuvers were performed to observe cold space and the sun in order to define the post-September 1999 geometry of the radiometer measurements, and to determine the October 1999-September 2003 ERBS sensor response changes. Analyses of these special solar and cold space observations indicate that the radiometers were pointing approximately 16 degrees away from the spacecraft nadir and on the anti-solar side of the spacecraft. The special observations indicated that the radiometers responses were stable at precision levels approaching 0.5 W/sq m . In this paper, the measurement geometry determinations and the determinations of the radiometers gain and offset are presented, which will permit the accurate processing of the October 1999 through September 2003 ERBE data products at satellite and top-of-the-atmosphere altitudes.

  20. Assessing change in the earth's land surface albedo with moderate resolution satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qingsong

    Land surface albedo describes the proportion of incident solar radiant flux that is reflected from the Earth's surface and therefore is a crucial parameter in modeling and monitoring attempts to capture the current climate, hydrological, and biogeochemical cycles and predict future scenarios. Due to the temporal variability and spatial heterogeneity of land surface albedo, remote sensing offers the only realistic method of monitoring albedo on a global scale. While the distribution of bright, highly reflective surfaces (clouds, snow, deserts) govern the vast majority of the fluctuation, variations in the intrinsic surface albedo due to natural and human disturbances such as urban development, fire, pests, harvesting, grazing, flooding, and erosion, as well as the natural seasonal rhythm of vegetation phenology, play a significant role as well. The development of times series of global snow-free and cloud-free albedo from remotely sensed observations over the past decade and a half offers a unique opportunity to monitor and assess the impact of these alterations to the Earth's land surface. By utilizing multiple satellite records from the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) and the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instruments, and developing innovative spectral conversion coefficients and temporal gap-filling strategies, it has been possible to utilize the strengths of the various sensors to improve the spatial and temporal coverage of global land surface albedo retrievals. The availability of these products is particularly important in tropical regions where cloud cover obscures the forest for significant periods. In the Amazon, field ecologists have noted that some areas of the forest ecosystem respond rapidly with foliage growth at the beginning of the dry season, when sunlight can finally penetrate fully to the surface and have suggested this phenomenon can continue until

  1. Space in environmental diplomacy: Exploring the role of earth observing satellites for monitoring international environmental agreements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Shaida Sahami

    This research determines under what conditions, and for what types of environmental treaties, Earth observation (EO) is useful for monitoring international environmental agreements. The research extracts specific monitoring requirements from nine multilateral environmental agreements (MEAs) and explores how satellite EO data can be used to support them. The technical characteristics of the sensor systems and science data products associated with current and planned EO satellites were analyzed and mapped to the MEA requirements, providing a significant step toward linking the EO community with the international treaty community implementing these environmental agreements. The research results include a listing and analysis of the positive and negative factors that influence whether EO data are useful for monitoring and verifying MEAs, analysis of existing international EO institutions, and a set of key findings describing the conditions under which EO data are most useful to the treaties. The use of EO data in various treaty phases is also analyzed, drawing the conclusion that EO data are most useful for monitoring and treaty refinement and not very useful for compliance verification or enforcement. MEAs manage compliance using governance structures that offer expertise and resources to assist states that are reported to be in non-compliance, rather than enforce compliance with sanctions or other punishments. In addition, the temporal and spatial resolution of the current and planned fleet of satellites does not provide the required detail needed for MEA verification. Identifying specific treaty implementation deficiencies requires additional information that cannot be gathered from EO data; on-site economic, social, and environmental conditions are critical elements in assessing compliance verification. But for environmental monitoring and assessments, MEA effectiveness reviews, and national reporting required for each MEA, EO data are very useful. They provide

  2. MLRS - A lunar/artificial satellite laser ranging facility at the McDonald Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelus, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    Experience from lunar and satellite laser ranging experiments carried out at McDonald Observatory has been used to design the McDonald Laser Ranging Station (MLRS). The MLRS is a dual-purpose installation designed to obtain observations from the LAGEOS satellite and lunar targets. The instruments used at the station include a telescope assembly 0.76 meters in diameter; a Q-switched doubled neodymium YAG laser with a pulse rate of three nanoseconds; and a GaAs photodetector with Fabry-Perot interferometric filter. A functional diagram of the system is provided. The operating parameters of the instruments are summarized in a table.

  3. Using NASA's Giovanni Web Portal to Access and Visualize Satellite-Based Earth Science Data in the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, S. A.; Acker, J. G.; Prados, A. I.; Leptoukh, G. G.

    2008-12-01

    One of the biggest obstacles for the average Earth science student today is locating and obtaining satellite- based remote sensing datasets in a format that is accessible and optimal for their data analysis needs. At the Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES-DISC) alone, on the order of hundreds of Terabytes of data are available for distribution to scientists, students and the general public. The single biggest and time-consuming hurdle for most students when they begin their study of the various datasets is how to slog through this mountain of data to arrive at a properly sub-setted and manageable dataset to answer their science question(s). The GES DISC provides a number of tools for data access and visualization, including the Google-like Mirador search engine and the powerful GES-DISC Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure (Giovanni) web interface. Giovanni provides a simple way to visualize, analyze and access vast amounts of satellite-based Earth science data. Giovanni's features and practical examples of its use will be demonstrated, with an emphasis on how satellite remote sensing can help students understand recent events in the atmosphere and biosphere. Giovanni is actually a series of sixteen similar web-based data interfaces, each of which covers a single satellite dataset (such as TRMM, TOMS, OMI, AIRS, MLS, HALOE, etc.) or a group of related datasets (such as MODIS and MISR for aerosols, SeaWIFS and MODIS for ocean color, and the suite of A-Train observations co-located along the CloudSat orbital path). Recently, ground-based datasets have been included in Giovanni, including the Northern Eurasian Earth Science Partnership Initiative (NEESPI), and EPA fine particulate matter (PM2.5) for air quality. Model data such as the Goddard GOCART model and MERRA meteorological reanalyses (in process) are being increasingly incorporated into Giovanni to facilitate model- data intercomparison. A full suite of data

  4. Generalized probability model for calculation of interference to the Deep Space Network due to circularly Earth-orbiting satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruggier, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    The probability of exceeding interference power levels and the duration of interference at the Deep Space Network (DSN) antenna is calculated parametrically when the state vector of an Earth-orbiting satellite over the DSN station view area is not known. A conditional probability distribution function is derived, transformed, and then convolved with the interference signal uncertainties to yield the probability distribution of interference at any given instant during the orbiter's mission period. The analysis is applicable to orbiting satellites having circular orbits with known altitude and inclination angle.

  5. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study. Report 5: System design and specifications. Volume 5: Specification for EROS operations control center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The functional, performance, and design requirements for the Operations Control Center (OCC) of the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) system are presented. The OCC controls the operations of the EOS satellite to acquire mission data consisting of: (1) thematic mapper data, (2) multispectral scanner data on EOS-A, or High Resolution Pointable Imager data on EOS-B, and (3) data collection system (DCS) data. The various inputs to the OCC are identified. The functional requirements of the OCC are defined. The specific systems and subsystems of the OCC are described and block diagrams are provided.

  6. Evolving earth-based and in-situ satellite network architectures for Mars communications and navigation support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastrup, Rolf; Weinberg, Aaron; Mcomber, Robert

    1991-01-01

    Results of on-going studies to develop navigation/telecommunications network concepts to support future robotic and human missions to Mars are presented. The performance and connectivity improvements provided by the relay network will permit use of simpler, lower performance, and less costly telecom subsystems for the in-situ mission exploration elements. Orbiting relay satellites can serve as effective navigation aids by supporting earth-based tracking as well as providing Mars-centered radiometric data for mission elements approaching, in orbit, or on the surface of Mars. The relay satellite orbits may be selected to optimize navigation aid support and communication coverage for specific mission sets.

  7. The Earth Observing System Microwave Limb Sounder (EOS MLS) on the Aura Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, Joe W.; Froidevaux, Lucien; Harwood, Robert S.; Jarnot, Robert F.; Pickett, Herbert M.; Read, William G.; Siegel, Peter H.; Cofield, Richard E.; Filipiak, Mark J.; Flower, Dennis A.; Holden, James R.; Lau, Gary K.; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Manney, Gloria L; Pumphrey, Hugh C.; Santee, Michelle L.; Wu, Dong L.; Cuddy, David T.; Lay, Richard R.; Loo, Mario S.; Perun, Vincent S.; Schwartz, Michael J.; Stek, Paul C.; Thurstans, Robert P.; Boyles, Mark A.

    2006-01-01

    The Earth Observing System Microwave Limb Sounder measures several atmospheric chemical species (OH, HO2, H2O, O3, HCl, ClO, HOCl, BrO, HNO3, N2O, CO, HCN, CH3CN, volcanic SO2), cloud ice, temperature, and geopotential height to improve our understanding of stratospheric ozone chemistry, the interaction of composition and climate, and pollution in the upper troposphere. All measurements are made simultaneously and continuously, during both day and night. The instrument uses heterodyne radiometers that observe thermal emission from the atmospheric limb in broad spectral regions centered near 118, 190, 240, and 640 GHz, and 2.5 THz. It was launched July 15, 2004 on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Aura satellite and started full-up science operations on August 13, 2004. An atmospheric limb scan and radiometric calibration for all bands are performed routinely every 25 s. Vertical profiles are retrieved every 165 km along the suborbital track, covering 82 S to 82 N latitudes on each orbit. Instrument performance to date has been excellent; data have been made publicly available; and initial science results have been obtained.

  8. Design of a Formation of Earth Orbiting Satellites: The Auroral Lites Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hametz, Mark E.; Conway, Darrel J.; Richon, Karen

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has proposed a set of spacecraft flying in close formation around the Earth in order to measure the behavior of the auroras. The mission, named Auroral Lites, consists of four spacecraft configured to start at the vertices of a tetrahedron, flying over three mission phases. During the first phase, the distance between any two spacecraft in the formation is targeted at 10 kilometers (km). The second mission phase is much tighter, requiring satellite interrange spacing targeted at 500 meters. During the final phase of the mission, the formation opens to a nominal 100-km interrange spacing. In this paper, we present the strategy employed to initialize and model such a close formation during each of these phases. The analysis performed to date provides the design and characteristics of the reference orbit, the evolution of the formation during Phases I and II, and an estimate of the total mission delta-V budget. AI Solutions' mission design tool, FreeFlyer(R), was used to generate each of these analysis elements. The tool contains full force models, including both impulsive and finite duration maneuvers. Orbital maintenance can be fully modeled in the system using a flexible, natural scripting language built into the system. In addition, AI Solutions is in the process of adding formation extensions to the system facilitating mission analysis for formations like Auroral Lites. We will discuss how FreeFlyer(R) is used for these analyses.

  9. Design of a Formation of Earth-Orbiting Satellites: The Auroral Lites Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hametz, Mark E.; Conway, Darrel J.; Richon, Karen

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has proposed a set of spacecraft flying in close formation around the Earth in order to measure the behavior of the auroras. The mission, named Auroral Lites, consists of four spacecraft configured to start at the vertices of a tetrahedron, flying over three mission phases. During the first phase, the distance between any two spacecraft in the formation is targeted at 10 kilometers (km). The second mission phase is much tighter, requiring satellite interrange spacing targeted at 500 meters. During the final phase of the mission, the formation opens to a nominal 100-km interrange spacing. In this paper, we present the strategy employed to initialize and model such a close formation during each of these phases. The analysis performed to date provides the design and characteristics of the reference orbit, the evolution of the formation during Phases I and II, and an estimate of the total mission delta-V budget. AI Solutions' mission design tool, FreeFlyer, was used to generate each of these analysis elements. The tool contains full force models, including both impulsive and finite duration maneuvers. Orbital maintenance can be fully modeled in the system using a flexible, natural scripting language built into the system. In addition, AI Solutions is in the process of adding formation extensions to the system facilitating mission analysis for formations like Auroral Lites. We will discuss how FreeFlyer is used for these analyses.

  10. Sensitivity of satellite-derived net shortwave irradiance at the Earth's surface to radiometric calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gautier, C.; Frouin, R.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of radiometric calibration uncertainties on satellite-derived net shortwave irradiance at the Earth's surface was examined. Net shortwave irradiance sensitivity to calibration is expressed as a function of two basic components that depend on surface and cloud albedo sensitivities, respectively. The analysis of these sensitivities for a wide range of atmospheric and surface conditions, as well as radiation geometries, shows that a 10 percent uncertainty in the calibration induces up to 40 W/sqm errors in instantaneous net shortwave irradiance (negative when the calibration uncertainty is positive). The maximum relative errors are obtained in overcast conditions when cloud albedos are high. On a monthly time scale, the induced error becomes typically 13 W/sqm in the tropics and 16 W/sqm in higher latitude regions during summer. The error almost vanishes at high latitudes during winter. A 10 percent positive uncertainty in the calibration gives a net shortwave irradiance error similar to that induced by the 3 hr sampling of the ISCCP Project.

  11. SensorWeb Evolution Using the Earth Observing One (EO-1) Satellite as a Test Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandl, Daniel; Frye, Stuart; Cappelaere, Pat; Ly, Vuong; Handy, Matthew; Chien, Steve; Grossman, Robert; Tran, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The Earth Observing One (EO-1) satellite was launched in November 2000 as a one year technology demonstration mission for a variety of space technologies. After the first year, in addition to collecting science data from its instruments, the EO-1 mission has been used as a testbed for a variety of technologies which provide various automation capabilities and which have been used as a pathfinder for the creation of SensorWebs. A SensorWeb is the integration of variety of space, airborne and ground sensors into a loosely coupled collaborative sensor system that automatically provides useful data products. Typically, a SensorWeb is comprised of heterogeneous sensors tied together with a messaging architecture and web services. This paper provides an overview of the various technologies that were tested and eventually folded into normal operations. As these technologies were folded in, the nature of operations transformed. The SensorWeb software enables easy connectivity for collaboration with sensors, but the side benefit is that it improved the EO-1 operational efficiency. This paper presents the various phases of EO-1 operation over the past 12 years and also presents operational efficiency gains demonstrated by some metrics.

  12. Comparison and testing of extended Kalman filters for attitude estimation of the Earth radiation budget satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutschmann, Julie; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.; Rokni, Mohammad

    1990-01-01

    The testing and comparison of two Extended Kalman Filters (EKFs) developed for the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) is described. One EKF updates the attitude quaternion using a four component additive error quaternion. This technique is compared to that of a second EKF, which uses a multiplicative error quaternion. A brief development of the multiplicative algorithm is included. The mathematical development of the additive EKF was presented in the 1989 Flight Mechanics/Estimation Theory Symposium along with some preliminary testing results using real spacecraft data. A summary of the additive EKF algorithm is included. The convergence properties, singularity problems, and normalization techniques of the two filters are addressed. Both filters are also compared to those from the ERBS operational ground support software, which uses a batch differential correction algorithm to estimate attitude and gyro biases. Sensitivity studies are performed on the estimation of sensor calibration states. The potential application of the EKF for real time and non-real time ground attitude determination and sensor calibration for future missions such as the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) and the Small Explorer Mission (SMEX) is also presented.

  13. Larmor electric field observed at the Earth's magnetopause by Polar satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, D. Gonzalez, W. D.; Silveira, M. V. D.; Mozer, F. S.; Cardoso, F. R.

    2014-10-15

    We present, for the first time, observational evidence of a kinetic electric field near the X-line associated with asymmetric reconnection at the Earth's dayside magnetopause using Polar observations. On March 29, 2003, Polar satellite detected an asymmetric collisionless reconnection event. This event shows a unipolar Hall electric field signature and a simple deviation from the guide field during the magnetopause crossing, with the absence of an ion plasma jet outflow indicating that the magnetopause crossing was near the X-line. As expected from particle-in-cell simulations by Malakit et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 135001 (2013)), an earthward pointing normal electric field appears in the magnetospheric side of the ion diffusion region. The electric field satisfies two necessary conditions for the existence of the finite ion Larmor radius effect: (1) the ion Larmor radius (r{sub g2}) is larger than the distance between the stagnation point and the edge of the ion diffusion region in the strong magnetic field side (δ{sub S2}) and (2) the spatial extent of the kinetic electric field (δ{sub EL}) is of the order of the ion Larmor radius. Furthermore, it is shown that the peak value of the Larmor electric field is comparable to the predicted value. The observation of the Larmor electric field can be valuable in other analyses to show that the crossing occurred near the X-line.

  14. Formation Flying Satellite Control Around the L2 Sun-Earth Libration Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Nicholas H.

    2001-12-01

    A growing interest in formation flying satellites demands development and analysis of control and estimation algorithms for station-keeping and formation maneuvering. This thesis discusses the development of a discrete linear-quadratic- regulator control algorithm for formations in the vicinity of the L2 sun-earth libration point. The development of an appropriate Kalman filter is included as well. Simulations are created for the analysis of the station-keeping and various formation maneuvers of the Stellar Imager mission. The simulations provide tracking error, estimation error, and control effort results. From the control effort, useful design parameters such as AV and propellant mass are determined. For formation maneuvering, the drone spacecraft track to within 4 meters of their desired position and within 1.3 millimeters per second of their desired zero velocity. The filter, with few exceptions, keeps the estimation errors within their three-sigma values. Without noise, the controller performs extremely well, with the drones tracking to within several micrometers. Bach drone uses around 1 to 2 grams of propellant per maneuver, depending on the circumstances.

  15. Estimability and simple dynamical analyses of range (range-rate range-difference) observations to artificial satellites. [laser range observations to LAGEOS using non-Bayesian statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vangelder, B. H. W.

    1978-01-01

    Non-Bayesian statistics were used in simulation studies centered around laser range observations to LAGEOS. The capabilities of satellite laser ranging especially in connection with relative station positioning are evaluated. The satellite measurement system under investigation may fall short in precise determinations of the earth's orientation (precession and nutation) and earth's rotation as opposed to systems as very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) and lunar laser ranging (LLR). Relative station positioning, determination of (differential) polar motion, positioning of stations with respect to the earth's center of mass and determination of the earth's gravity field should be easily realized by satellite laser ranging (SLR). The last two features should be considered as best (or solely) determinable by SLR in contrast to VLBI and LLR.

  16. A singularity free analytical solution of artificial satellite motion with drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, A.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical satellite theory based on the regular, canonical Poincare-Similar (PS phi) elements is described along with an accurate density model which can be implemented into the drag theory. A computationally efficient manner in which to expand the equations of motion into a fourier series is discussed.

  17. Artificial neural network prediction model for geosynchronous electron fluxes: Dependence on satellite position and particle energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dae-Kyu; Lee, Dae-Young; Kim, Kyung-Chan; Hwang, Junga; Kim, Jaehun

    2016-04-01

    Geosynchronous satellites are often exposed to energetic electrons, the flux of which varies often to a large extent. Since the electrons can cause irreparable damage to the satellites, efforts to develop electron flux prediction models have long been made until recently. In this study, we adopt a neural network scheme to construct a prediction model for the geosynchronous electron flux in a wide energy range (40 keV to >2 MeV) and at a high time resolution (as based on 5 min resolution data). As the model inputs, we take the solar wind variables, geomagnetic indices, and geosynchronous electron fluxes themselves. We also take into account the magnetic local time (MLT) dependence of the geosynchronous electron fluxes. We use the electron data from two geosynchronous satellites, GOES 13 and 15, and apply the same neural network scheme separately to each of the GOES satellite data. We focus on the dependence of prediction capability on satellite's magnetic latitude and MLT as well as particle energy. Our model prediction works less efficiently for magnetic latitudes more away from the equator (thus for GOES 13 than for GOES 15) and for MLTs nearer to midnight than noon. The magnetic latitude dependence is most significant for an intermediate energy range (a few hundreds of keV), and the MLT dependence is largest for the lowest energy (40 keV). We interpret this based on degree of variance in the electron fluxes, which depends on magnetic latitude and MLT at geosynchronous orbit as well as particle energy. We demonstrate how substorms affect the flux variance.

  18. Analyses of the solid earth and ocean tidal perturbations on the orbits of the GEOS-1 and GEOS-2 satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felsentreger, T. L.; Marsh, J. G.; Agreen, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    The luni-solar tidal perturbations in the inclination of the GEOS-I and GEOS-II satellite orbits were analyzed for the solid Earth and ocean tide conditions. Precision reduced camera and TRANET Doppler observations spanning periods of over 600 days for each satellite were used to derive mean orbital elements. Perturbations due to the earth's gravity field, solar radiation pressure, and atmospheric drag were modelled, and the resulting inclination residuals were analyzed for tidal effects. The amplitudes of the observed total tidal effects were about 1.2 arc seconds (36 meters) in the inclination of GEOS-I and 4.5 arc seconds (135 meters) for GEOS-II. The solid earth tides were then modelled using earth tide measurements, earth rotation observations, and seismic data. The resulting inclination residuals were analyzed for ocean tide parameters. The derived parameters consist of one second degree coefficient and an accompanying phase angle in a spherical harmonic expansion of the ocean tidal potential for each tidal constituent. The results are presented.

  19. The Effects of Acceleration Noise Performance on the Determination of the Earth's Time-varying Gravity Field for Low-low satellite-to-satellite Tracking missions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, S. H.; Conklin, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    GRACE provides monthly average gravity field solutions in spherical harmonic coefficients, which gives us information about land and ocean mass variations with a spatial resolution of 1 degree and with an accuracy within 2 cm throughout the entire Earth. GRACE-FO is expected to be launched in 2017 to continue the work of GRACE and to test a new laser ranging interferometer (LRI) which measures the range between the two satellites with higher precision than the K-Band ranging system used in GRACE. Moreover, there have been simulation studies that show that an additional pair of satellites in an inclined orbit increases the sampling frequency and reduces temporal aliasing errors. On the other hand, GOCE used an electrostatic gravity gradiometer and a drag-free control system to compensate for the non-gravitational forces which had better performance than the electrostatic accelerometers of GRACE. Given the fact that future missions will likely continue to use the low-low satellite-to-satellite tracking formation with LRI onboard, it is expected that acceleration noise caused by non-gravitational forces will become a limiting factor for the time-varying gravity field solution. This research evaluates the effects of acceleration noise on the estimation of the time-varying gravity field for a single pair and the optimal double pairs of satellites, assuming that the satellites fly in collinear pairs with LRI. Spherical harmonic coefficients are used to represent the solution and a batch computation Kalman filter is used to estimate the solutions. Various levels of residual noise for existing drag-free systems are applied as acceleration noise to find suitable drag-free performance requirements for upcoming geodesy missions.

  20. Basic research and data analysis for the national geodetic satellite program and for the earth and ocean physics applications program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Activities related to the National Geodetic Satellite Program are reported and include a discussion of Ohio State University's OSU275 set of tracking station coordinates and transformation parameters, determination of network distortions, and plans for data acquisition and processing. The problems encountered in the development of the LAGEOS satellite are reported in an account of activities related to the Earth and Ocean Physics Applications Program. The LAGEOS problem involves transmission and reception of the laser pulse designed to make accurate determinations of the earth's crustal and rotational motions. Pulse motion, ephemeris, arc range measurements, and accuracy estimates are discussed in view of the problem. Personnel involved in the two programs are also listed, along with travel activities and reports published to date.