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Sample records for artificial food color

  1. Alternatives to those artificial FD&C food colorants.

    PubMed

    Wrolstad, Ronald E; Culver, Catherine A

    2012-01-01

    Replacement of artificial food dyes with natural colorants is a current marketing trend, notwithstanding the fact that neither the United States nor the European Union (EU) has defined natural with respect to food colors. Consumer groups have concerns over the safety of synthetic colorants, and in addition, many of the naturally derived colorants provide health benefits. Food scientists frequently have the assignment of replacing artificial colorants with natural alternatives. This can be challenging, as naturally derived colorants are usually less stable, and all desired hues might, in fact, not be obtainable. In this review, the chemical and physical properties, limitations, and more suitable applications for those colorants that are legally available as substitutes for the synthetic colorants are summarized. Issues and challenges for certain foods are discussed, and in addition, colorants that may be available in the future are briefly described.

  2. Case Studies of Effects of Artificial Food Colors on Hyperactivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spring, Carl; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A double blind, double crossover study with six hyperactive boys (8 to 13 years old) tested B. Feingold's hypothesis that synthetic food colors cause hyperactivity in some children. All Ss were on the Feingold diet, eliminating artificial colors and flavors. The authors conclude that evidence for Feingold's hypothesis is weak. (Author)

  3. The functional relationship between artificial food colors and hyperactivity.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, T L

    1978-01-01

    The presence of a functional relationship between the ingestion of artificial food colors and an increase in the frequency and/or duration of selected behaviors that are representative of the hyperactive behavior syndrome was experimentally investigated. Two eight-year-old females, who had been on the Feingold K-P diet for a minimum of 11 months, were the subjects studied. The experimental design was a variation of the BAB design, with double-blind conditions. This design allowed an experimental analysis of the placebo phases as well as challenge phases. Data were obtained by trained observers on Out of Seat, On Task, and Physically Aggressive behaviors, as they occurred in the subjects' regular class setting. Results indicated (a) the existence of a functional relationship between the ingestion of artificial food colors and an increase in both the duration and frequency of hyperactive behaviors, (b) the absence of a placebo effect, and (c) differential sensitivity of the dependent variables to the challenge effects. PMID:365851

  4. Nonlinear System Of Equations For Multicomponent Analysis Of Artificial Food Coloring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santosa, I. E.; Budiasih, L. K.

    2010-12-01

    In multicomponent analysis of artificial food coloring (AFC), nonlinear relation of the absorbance and the concentration forms a nonlinear system of equations. The Newton's method based algorithm has been used to calculate individual AFC concentration in the mixture of two AFCs. The absorbance was measured using a spectrophotometer at two different wavelengths.

  5. Multivariate curve resolution of spectrophotometric data for the determination of artificial food colors.

    PubMed

    Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Kessler, Waltraud

    2008-07-23

    In the analysis of food additives, past emphasis was put on the development of chromatographic techniques to separate target components from a complex matrix. Especially in the case of artificial food colors, direct spectrophotometric measurement was seen to lack in specificity due to a high spectral overlap between different components. Multivariate curve resolution (MCR) may be used to overcome this limitation. MCR is able to (i) extract from a complex spectral feature the number of involved components, (ii) attribute the resulting spectra to chemical compounds, and (iii) quantify the individual spectral contributions with or without a priori knowledge. We have evaluated MCR for the routine analysis of yellow and blue food colors in absinthe spirits. Using calibration standards, we were able to show that MCR equally performs as compared to partial least-squares regression but with much improved chemical information contained in the predicted spectra. MCR was then applied to an authentic collective of different absinthes. As confirmed by reference analytics, the food colors were correctly assigned with a sensitivity of 0.93 and a specificity of 0.85. Besides the artificial colors, the algorithm detected a further component in some samples that could be assigned to natural coloring from chlorophyll.

  6. Prevalence of Artificial Food Colors in Grocery Store Products Marketed to Children.

    PubMed

    Batada, Ameena; Jacobson, Michael F

    2016-10-01

    Artificial food colors (AFCs) in foods and beverages may be harmful to children. This study assesses the percentage of grocery store products marketed to children that contain AFCs, by category and company. The research team collected product and food-color information about 810 products in one grocery store in North Carolina in 2014. Overall, 350 products (43.2%) contained AFCs. The most common AFCs were Red 40 (29.8% of products), Blue 1 (24.2%), Yellow 5 (20.5%), and Yellow 6 (19.5%). Produce was the only category that did not have any AFCs. The highest percentage of products with AFCs was found in candies (96.3%), fruit-flavored snacks (94%), and drink mixes/powders (89.7%). Forty-one of the 66 companies marketed products containing AFCs. Given concerns about health effects of AFCs and high proportions of high-AFC categories, clinicians, parents, food companies, and the government can take steps to support children's healthy eating and development by reducing AFCs in children's diets. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Artificial food colors and attention-deficit/hyperactivity symptoms: conclusions to dye for.

    PubMed

    Arnold, L Eugene; Lofthouse, Nicholas; Hurt, Elizabeth

    2012-07-01

    The effect of artificial food colors (AFCs) on child behavior has been studied for more than 35 years, with accumulating evidence from imperfect studies. This article summarizes the history of this controversial topic and testimony to the 2011 Food and Drug Administration Food Advisory Committee convened to evaluate the current status of evidence regarding attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Features of ADHD relevant to understanding the AFC literature are explained: ADHD is a quantitative diagnosis, like hypertension, and some individuals near the threshold may be pushed over it by a small symptom increment. The chronicity and pervasiveness make caregiver ratings the most valid measure, albeit subjective. Flaws in many studies include nonstandardized diagnosis, questionable sample selection, imperfect blinding, and nonstandardized outcome measures. Recent data suggest a small but significant deleterious effect of AFCs on children's behavior that is not confined to those with diagnosable ADHD. AFCs appear to be more of a public health problem than an ADHD problem. AFCs are not a major cause of ADHD per se, but seem to affect children regardless of whether or not they have ADHD, and they may have an aggregated effect on classroom climate if most children in the class suffer a small behavioral decrement with additive or synergistic effects. Possible biological mechanisms with published evidence include the effects on nutrient levels, genetic vulnerability, and changes in electroencephalographic beta-band power. A table clarifying the Food and Drug Administration and international naming systems for AFCs, with cross-referencing, is provided.

  8. A research model for investigating the effects of artificial food colorings on children with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Kleinman, Ronald E; Brown, Ronald T; Cutter, Gary R; Dupaul, George J; Clydesdale, Fergus M

    2011-06-01

    The United Kingdom and European Union recently restricted the use of artificial food colorings (AFCs) to improve the health of children. These decisions provide an interesting case study of the role of scientific evidence in the assessment of food additives and risk to children's health and formulation of food policy. Although there continues to be uncertainty concerning the link between AFCs and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), policy decisions have been made that have far-reaching implications. In addition, publicity surrounding the policy changes may shape public perceptions concerning effective management of ADHD. We believe that the balance of existing evidence neither refutes nor supports the link between AFCs and ADHD, which highlights the need for carefully designed studies to further investigate the link between AFCs and ADHD. In this article we describe a model for such studies. In developing our model, we drew from current investigative standards in ADHD research, such as those used in the landmark Multimodal Treatment Study of Children With ADHD. These standards encompass methodologic considerations including sample selection, outcome assessment, and data analyses. It is our hope that this model research methodology may prove valuable in addressing design considerations in future studies of AFCs and ADHD with the goal of producing reliable data that will enable policy-makers to better formulate effective, evidence-based food-policy decisions.

  9. Study on the interaction of artificial and natural food colorants with human serum albumin: A computational point of view.

    PubMed

    Masone, Diego; Chanforan, Céline

    2015-06-01

    Due to the high amount of artificial food colorants present in infants' diets, their adverse effects have been of major concern among the literature. Artificial food colorants have been suggested to affect children's behavior, being hyperactivity the most common disorder. In this study we compare binding affinities of a group of artificial colorants (sunset yellow, quinoline yellow, carmoisine, allura red and tartrazine) and their natural industrial equivalents (carminic acid, curcumin, peonidin-3-glucoside, cyanidin-3-glucoside) to human serum albumin (HSA) by a docking approach and further refinement through atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Due to the protein-ligand conformational interface complexity, we used collective variable driven molecular dynamics to refine docking predictions and to score them according to a hydrogen-bond criterion. With this protocol, we were able to rank ligand affinities to HSA and to compare between the studied natural and artificial food additives. Our results show that the five artificial colorants studied bind better to HSA than their equivalent natural options, in terms of their H-bonding network, supporting the hypothesis of their potential risk to human health. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mechanisms of behavioral, atopic, and other reactions to artificial food colors in children.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Laura J; Kuczek, Thomas; Burgess, John R; Stochelski, Mateusz A; Arnold, L Eugene; Galland, Leo

    2013-05-01

    This review examines the research on mechanisms by which artificial food colors (AFCs) and common foods may cause behavioral changes in children with and without attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Children with ADHD show excess inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Studies have shown that a subgroup of children (with or without ADHD) react adversely to challenges with AFCs. Many early studies found few children who reacted to challenges with 20-40 mg of AFCs. However, studies using at least 50 mg of AFCs showed a greater percentage of children who reacted to the challenge. Three types of potential mechanisms are explored: toxicological, antinutritional, and hypersensitivity. Suggestions for future studies in animals and/or children include dose studies as well as studies to determine the effects of AFCs on the immune system, the intestinal mucosa, and nutrient absorption. Given the potential negative behavioral effects of AFCs, it is important to determine why some children may be more sensitive to AFCs than others and to identify the tolerable upper limits of exposure for children in general and for children at high risk.

  11. Amounts of artificial food colors in commonly consumed beverages and potential behavioral implications for consumption in children.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Laura J; Burgess, John R; Stochelski, Mateusz A; Kuczek, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Artificial food colors (AFCs) are widely used to color foods and beverages. The amount of AFCs the Food and Drug Administration has certified over the years has increased more than 5-fold since 1950 (12 mg/capita/day) to 2012 (68 mg/capita/day). In the past 38 years, there have been studies of adverse behavioral reactions such as hyperactivity in children to double-blind challenges with AFCs. Studies that used 50 mg or more of AFCs as the challenge showed a greater negative effect on more children than those which used less. The study reported here is the first to quantify the amounts of AFCs in foods (specifically in beverages) commonly consumed by children in the United States. Consumption data for all foods would be helpful in the design of more challenge studies. The data summarized here should help clinicians advise parents about AFCs and beverage consumption.

  12. Does maternal exposure to artificial food coloring additives increase oxidative stress in the skin of rats?

    PubMed

    Başak, K; Başak, P Y; Doğuç, D K; Aylak, F; Oğuztüzün, S; Bozer, B M; Gültekin, F

    2016-11-16

    Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and cytochrome P450 family 1 subfamily A polypeptide 1 (CYP1A1) metabolize and detoxify carcinogens, drugs, environmental pollutants, and reactive oxygen species. Changes of GST expression in tissues and gene mutations have been reported in association with many neoplastic skin diseases and dermatoses. Widely used artificial food coloring additives (AFCAs) also reported to effect primarily behavioral and cognitive function and cause neoplastic diseases and several inflammatory skin diseases. We aimed to identify the changes in expression of GSTs, CYP1A1, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in rat skin which were maternally exposed AFCAs. A rat model was designed to evaluate the effects of maternal exposure of AFCAs on skin in rats. "No observable adverse effect levels" of commonly used AFCAs as a mixture were given to female rats before and during gestation. Immunohistochemical expression of GSTs, CYP1A1, and VEGF was evaluated in their offspring. CYP1A1, glutathione S-transferase pi (GSTP), glutathione S-transferase alpha (GSTA), glutathione S-transferase mu (GSTM), glutathione S-transferase theta (GSTT), and VEGF were expressed by epidermal keratinocytes, dermal fibroblasts, sebaceous glands, hair follicle, and subcutaneous striated muscle in the normal skin. CYP1A1, GSTA, and GSTT were expressed at all microanatomical sites of skin in varying degrees. The expressions of CYP1A1, GSTA, GSTT, and VEGF were decreased significantly, while GSTM expression on sebaceous gland and hair follicle was increased. Maternal exposure of AFCAs apparently effects expression of the CYP1A1, GSTs, and VEGF in the skin. This prominent change of expressions might play role in neoplastic and nonneoplastic skin diseases.

  13. Immune reactivity to food coloring.

    PubMed

    Vojdani, Aristo; Vojdani, Charlene

    2015-01-01

    Artificial food dyes are made from petroleum and have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the enhancement of the color of processed foods. They are widely used in the food and pharmaceutical industries to increase the appeal and acceptability of their products. Synthetic food colorants can achieve hues not possible for natural colorants and are cheaper, more easily available, and last longer. However, since the use of artificial food coloring has become widespread, many allergic and other immune reactive disorders have increasingly been reported. During the past 50 y, the amount of synthetic dye used in foods has increased by 500%. Simultaneously, an alarming rise has occurred in behavioral problems in children, such as aggression, attention deficit disorder (ADD), and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The ingestion of food delivers the greatest foreign antigenic load that challenges the immune system. Artificial colors can also be absorbed via the skin through cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. The molecules of synthetic colorants are small, and the immune system finds it difficult to defend the body against them. They can also bond to food or body proteins and, thus, are able to act in stealth mode to circumvent and disrupt the immune system. The consumption of synthetic food colors, and their ability to bind with body proteins, can have significant immunological consequences. This consumption can activate the inflammatory cascade, can result in the induction of intestinal permeability to large antigenic molecules, and could lead to cross-reactivities, autoimmunities, and even neurobehavioral disorders. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recently found a 41% increase in diagnoses of ADHD in boys of high-school age during the past decade. More shocking is the legal amount of artificial colorants allowed by the FDA in the foods, drugs, and cosmetics that we consume and use every day. The consuming public is largely

  14. Overview of Food Ingredients, Additives and Colors

    MedlinePlus

    ... natural sources such as vegetables, minerals or animals. Nature derived color additives are typically more expensive than ... food coloring). Other ingredients are not found in nature and therefore must be synthetically produced as artificial ...

  15. Food colors: Existing and emerging food safety concerns.

    PubMed

    Oplatowska-Stachowiak, Michalina; Elliott, Christopher T

    2017-02-11

    Food colors are added to different types of commodities to increase their visual attractiveness or to compensate for natural color variations. The use of these additives is strictly regulated in the European Union, the United States, and many other countries worldwide. There is a growing concern about the safety of some commonly used legal food colorants and there is a trend to replace the synthetic forms with natural products. Additionally, a number of dyes with known or suspected genotoxic or carcinogenic properties have been shown to be added illegally to foods. Robust monitoring programs based on reliable detection methods are required to assure the food is free from harmful colors. The aim of this review is to present an up to date status of the various concerns arising from use of color additives in food. The most important food safety concerns in the field of food colors are lack of uniform regulation concerning legal food colors worldwide, possible link of artificial colors to hyperactive behavior, replacement of synthetic colors with natural ones, and the presence of harmful illegal dyes-both known but also new, emerging ones in food. The legal status of food color additives in the EU, United States, and worldwide is summarized. The reported negative health effects of both legal and illegal colors are presented. The European Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed notifications and US import alerts concerning food colors are analyzed and trends in fraudulent use of color additives identified. The detection methods for synthetic colors are also reviewed.

  16. Determination of green, blue and yellow artificial food colorants and their abuse in herb-coloured green Easter beers on tap.

    PubMed

    Stachová, Ivana; Lhotská, Ivona; Solich, Petr; Šatínský, Dalibor

    2016-07-01

    Beer is one of the most popular alcoholic beverages worldwide. For consumer acceptance, significant factors are its taste, flavour and colour. This study determines selected synthetic green, blue and yellow food colorants in popular Easter herb-coloured green beers on tap produced in breweries on Holy Thursday. The abuse of beer colouring with Tartrazine (E 102), Quinoline yellow (E 104), Sunset yellow (E 110), Patent blue (E 131), Indigo carmine (E 132), Brilliant blue FCF (E 133), Green S (E 142) and Fast green FCF (E 143) was assessed in 11 green beer samples purchased in local restaurants. HPLC was used for the separation and detection of artificial colorants with diode-array detection and a Chromolith Performance CN 100 × 4.6 mm column with guard pre-column Chromolith CN 5 × 4.6 mm. Separation was performed in gradient elution with mobile phase containing methanol-aqueous 2% ammonium acetate at pH 7.0. The study showed that eight beers (70%) marketed in the Czech Republic contained artificial colorants (Tartrazine and Brilliant blue FCF). The concentration of colorants found in analysed green herb-coloured beers ranged from 1.58 to 3.49 mg l(-)(1) for Tartrazine, 0.45-2.18 mg l(-)(1) for Brilliant blue, while Indigo carmine was detected only once at concentration 2.36 mg l(-)(1). Only three beers showed no addition of the synthetic colorants. However, the levels of artificial colorants found in beers marketed in the Czech region were very low and did not show a serious risk for consumers' health.

  17. Food colorants: anthocyanins.

    PubMed

    Francis, F J

    1989-01-01

    Interest in food colorants as shown by the number of patents has doubled in recent years with natural pigments outnumbering synthetics by five to one. The natural colorant area can be subdivided into anthocyanins, betalains, chlorophylls, carotenoids, flavonoids, polyphenols, Monascus, hemes, quinones, biliproteins, safflower, turmeric, and miscellaneous. All involve different groups of chemical compounds which may be used directly as colorants, or may be chemically modified to produce different hues or increased stability. All usually involve a method of collection, extraction, purification, possibly stabilization, and formulation. A variety of hues can be obtained ranging from green through yellow, orange, red, blue, and violet, depending on the source of colorant. Similarly, water or oil-soluble formulations can be prepared depending on the type of colorant.

  18. Food analysis using artificial senses.

    PubMed

    Śliwińska, Magdalena; Wiśniewska, Paulina; Dymerski, Tomasz; Namieśnik, Jacek; Wardencki, Waldemar

    2014-02-19

    Nowadays, consumers are paying great attention to the characteristics of food such as smell, taste, and appearance. This motivates scientists to imitate human senses using devices known as electronic senses. These include electronic noses, electronic tongues, and computer vision. Thanks to the utilization of various sensors and methods of signal analysis, artificial senses are widely applied in food analysis for process monitoring and determining the quality and authenticity of foods. This paper summarizes achievements in the field of artificial senses. It includes a brief history of these systems, descriptions of most commonly used sensors (conductometric, potentiometric, amperometic/voltammetric, impedimetric, colorimetric, piezoelectric), data analysis methods (for example, artificial neural network (ANN), principal component analysis (PCA), model CIE L*a*b*), and application of artificial senses to food analysis, in particular quality control, authenticity and falsification assessment, and monitoring of production processes.

  19. Artificial Structural Color Pixels: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuqian; Zhao, Yong; Hu, Sheng; Lv, Jiangtao; Ying, Yu; Gervinskas, Gediminas; Si, Guangyuan

    2017-01-01

    Inspired by natural photonic structures (Morpho butterfly, for instance), researchers have demonstrated varying artificial color display devices using different designs. Photonic-crystal/plasmonic color filters have drawn increasing attention most recently. In this review article, we show the developing trend of artificial structural color pixels from photonic crystals to plasmonic nanostructures. Such devices normally utilize the distinctive optical features of photonic/plasmon resonance, resulting in high compatibility with current display and imaging technologies. Moreover, dynamical color filtering devices are highly desirable because tunable optical components are critical for developing new optical platforms which can be integrated or combined with other existing imaging and display techniques. Thus, extensive promising potential applications have been triggered and enabled including more abundant functionalities in integrated optics and nanophotonics. PMID:28805736

  20. Identity of Artificial Color on Oranges; Analysis for Spoilage Indicators in Butter; Rapid Identity of Margarine and Butter; Identity of Synthetic Colors in Foods. FDA's Science Project Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food and Drug Administration (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    These guides are four of several prepared through the F.D.A.'s Science Project Series for senior high school chemistry students and teachers investigating the quality of constituents of foods through experimentation. Each eight page pamphlet gives background information on the subject, equipment and reagents needed for the experiment, the…

  1. Artificial food colouring and hyperactivity symptoms in children.

    PubMed

    2009-10-01

    (1) A hypothesis has been proposed that artificial food colourings have a role in exacerbating hyperactive behavior in children; (2) A placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover clinical study in 297 children representative of the general population showed higher hyperactivity scores during the periods when they were ingesting food colourings; (3) A meta-analysis of 15 double-blind clinical trials that evaluated artificial food colouring in children already considered to be hyperactive showed an increase in their hyperactive behavior; (4) In practice, even though the mechanism underlying this phenomenon has not be elucidated, these data suggest that it is best to avoid exposing children to artificial food coloring.

  2. Structural colors: from natural to artificial systems.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yulan; Tippets, Cary A; Donev, Eugenii U; Lopez, Rene

    2016-09-01

    Structural coloration has attracted great interest from scientists and engineers in recent years, owing to fascination with various brilliant examples displayed in nature as well as to promising applications of bio-inspired functional photonic structures and materials. Much research has been done to reveal and emulate the physical mechanisms that underlie the structural colors found in nature. In this article, we review the fundamental physics of many natural structural colors displayed by living organisms as well as their bio-inspired artificial counterparts, with emphasis on their connections, tunability strategies, and proposed applications, which aim to maximize the technological benefits one could derive from these photonic nanostructures. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:758-775. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1396 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  3. Sugar holograms with artificial organic colorants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejias-Brizuela, N. Y.; Olivares-Pérez, A.; Páez-Trujillo, G.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.

    2007-09-01

    The sugar cane crystals (sucrose) are used as matrix to obtain computer holograms. We made a sugar solution (sugar in water) and it is irradiated with ultraviolet light, since the maximum absorption spectra is localized at UV region, to wavelength 200 nm. This step also corresponds to sugar photopolymer process. It is recorded applying conventional lithography technique and measures the parameter of diffraction efficiency. With the purpose to reduce the exposition time at UV radiation of this emulsion, we made studies with artificial organic colorant with azo components.

  4. Color regeneration from reflective color sensor using an artificial intelligent technique.

    PubMed

    Saracoglu, Ömer Galip; Altural, Hayriye

    2010-01-01

    A low-cost optical sensor based on reflective color sensing is presented. Artificial neural network models are used to improve the color regeneration from the sensor signals. Analog voltages of the sensor are successfully converted to RGB colors. The artificial intelligent models presented in this work enable color regeneration from analog outputs of the color sensor. Besides, inverse modeling supported by an intelligent technique enables the sensor probe for use of a colorimetric sensor that relates color changes to analog voltages.

  5. Anthocyanins as Functional Food Colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motohashi, Noboru; Sakagami, Hiroshi

    Anthocyanins, a proanthocyanidin-type of flavonoid, contain an abundance of functional phytochemicals and occur in fruits such as cranberry, blueberry, orange, apple and in vegetables such as tomato, sweet pepper, spinach, and radishes. Functional and essential diets have been ingested in daily life since the primitive era of history. When anthocyanins are coupled with some water-soluble sugar molecules, their color becomes red, yellow, violet, or blue. It is very intriguing that anthocyanins provide the colorful variety of pigments for pansies, petunias, plums, and other diverse flowers. Chlorophyll in various fruits and vegetables is the main green phyto-component, while anthocyanins are probably the most important visible plant pigments in the natural kingdom having specific colors. Anthocyanins have been clinically used in many folklore medicines worldwide. Anthocyanins could provide health benefits for age-related diseases as well as other diseases. Anthocyanins have higher antioxidant capacity against oxidative stress induced by excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide radicals, hydrogen peroxide, and thus the human body might be protected from oxidative injury by anthocyanins. On the basis of these facts, we review the synthesis of plant flavonoids and their ability to scavenge oxidants, inhibit or activate enzymes, and the safety of proanthocyanidins and anthocyanidins present in common foods.

  6. Analytical method for Buddleja colorants in foods.

    PubMed

    Aoki, H; Kuze, N; Ichi, T; Koda, T

    2001-04-01

    Buddleja yellow colorant derived from Buddleja officinalis Maxim. has recently been approved for use as a new kind of natural colorant for food additives in China. In order to distinguish Buddleja yellow colorant from other yellow colorants, two known phenylpropanoid glycosides, acteoside (= verbascoside) and poliumoside, were isolated from the colorant as marker substances for Buddleja yellow colorant. Poliumoside has not been detected in B. officinalis Maxim. previously. These phenylpropanoid glycosides were not detected in the fruits of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis or in the stamens of the flowers of Crocus sativus L., which also contain crocetin derivatives as coloring components, using a photodiode array and mass chromatograms. Thus, an analytical HPLC method was developed to distinguish foods that have been colored with yellow colorants containing crocetin derivatives, using phenylpropanoid glycosides as markers.

  7. Skin discoloration with blue food coloring.

    PubMed

    Zillich, A J; Kuhn, R J; Petersen, T J

    2000-01-01

    To describe a pediatric patient who developed a clinical cyanotic appearance after receiving an excessive amount of blue food coloring. An 11-year-old white girl with cerebral palsy was admitted for unresolving aspiration pneumonia and dehydration. Antibiotics and intravenous fluids were administered. During the hospital course, enteral nutrition containing blue food coloring was also administered. Twelve hours after the start of enteral nutrition, the patient appeared cyanotic despite a regular respiratory rate and normal oxygen saturation. The pediatric code response team was called. Enteral nutrition was stopped and then restarted without blue food coloring. Over the next 24 hours, the cyanotic appearance resolved and no further complications developed. At our institution, blue food coloring is used with enteral nutrition for detecting aspiration of stomach contents. The dietary department supplies food coloring to each nursing unit in pint-sized medicine bottles. Nurses place an unstandardized amount of blue food coloring into each enteral nutrition bag. This child received an unspecified amount of FD&C Blue No. 1 food coloring. No toxicity studies exist for acute or human ingestion, but the National Academy of Sciences lists 363 mg/d of FD&C Blue No. 1 as a safe level for humans. We estimated this child ingested 780-3,940 mg of dye over a 12-hour period. This is the first known report of an adverse effect from blue food coloring. To prevent similar occurrences within our institution, the blue food coloring for tube feedings will be dispensed by the pharmacy department in standardized units.

  8. Amounts of artificial food dyes and added sugars in foods and sweets commonly consumed by children.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Laura J; Burgess, John R; Stochelski, Mateusz A; Kuczek, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Artificial food colors (AFCs) are used to color many beverages, foods, and sweets in the United States and throughout the world. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) limits the AFCs allowed in the diet to 9 different colors. The FDA certifies each batch of manufactured AFCs to guarantee purity and safety. The amount certified has risen from 12 mg/capita/d in 1950 to 62 mg/capita/d in 2010. Previously, we reported the amounts of AFCs in commonly consumed beverages. In this article, the amounts of AFCs in commonly consumed foods and sweets are reported. In addition, the amount of sugars in each product is included. Amounts of AFCs reported here along with the beverage data show that many children could be consuming far more dyes than previously thought. Clinical guidance is given to help caregivers avoid AFCs and reduce the amount of sugars in children's diets.

  9. Color as a factor in food choice.

    PubMed

    Clydesdale, F M

    1993-01-01

    From birth, nature teaches us to make judgements on our environment based in large measure on color. As such, it plays a key role in food choice by influencing taste thresholds, sweetness perception, food preference, pleasantness, and acceptability. Its role is elusive and difficult to quantify, however, which at times has placed color in a secondary role to the other sensory characteristics, a position not entirely consistent with the facts. Color, in a quantitative sense, has been shown to be able to replace sugar and still maintain sweetness perception in flavored foods. It interferes with judgments of flavor intensity and identification and in so doing has been shown to dramatically influence the pleasantness and acceptability of foods. Studies in the literature have used cross-sectional population panels to study these effects, but a recent investigation of color-sensory interactions in beverages has compared the response of a college age group with the response of a panel consisting of a more mature population. Interestingly, the older group showed significant differences from the college age group in their response to the effects of color on several sensory parameters as well as showing a direct correlation between beverage consumption and color. Color is often taken for granted, but this position must be reevaluated in view of such studies and the need to create more appealing foods for different segments of our society.

  10. Health safety issues of synthetic food colorants.

    PubMed

    Amchova, Petra; Kotolova, Hana; Ruda-Kucerova, Jana

    2015-12-01

    Increasing attention has been recently paid to the toxicity of additives used in food. The European Parliament and the Council published the REGULATION (EC) No. 1333/2008 on food additives establishing that the toxicity of food additives evaluated before 20th January 2009 must be re-evaluated by European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). The aim of this review is to survey current knowledge specifically on the toxicity issues of synthetic food colorants using official reports published by the EFSA and other available studies published since the respective report. Synthetic colorants described are Tartrazine, Quinoline Yellow, Sunset Yellow, Azorubine, Ponceau 4R, Erythrosine, Allura Red, Patent Blue, Indigo Carmine, Brilliant Blue FCF, Green S, Brilliant Black and Brown HT. Moreover, a summary of evidence on possible detrimental effects of colorant mixes on children's behaviour is provided and future research directions are outlined.

  11. Artificial life approach to color contrast manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, William R.

    1999-02-01

    Contrast enhancement methods have a long history of use in image processing for forensics and have been used to effect in the evaluation patterned injury of the skin. Most contrast enhancement methods, however, were developed for the evaluation of greyscale images and involve the manipulation of one dimension of data at a time. Contrast enhancement in a three- or more dimensional space poses challenges to the implementation of histogram equalization and similar algorithms. A number of approaches to dealing with this problem have been suggested, including performing operations on each channel independently or by various color `explosion' methods. Our laboratory has been investigating dispersion- and diffusion-based methods by modeling changes in color space as biological processes. In short, we model the migration and dispersion of points in color space as migration and differentiation. In this model, biological differentiation signals are used for segmentation in color space (color quantization) and chemoattractant and diffusion models are used for swarming and dispersal. The results of this method are compared with more traditional methods. Implementation issues are discussed. Extensions to the use of reaction-diffusion equations for color-space segmentation are discussed.

  12. Foods The Indians Gave Us. Coloring Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hail, Raven

    This children's coloring book devotes a page to each of twenty of the most familiar American Indian plant foods: avocado, green beans, black walnuts, cocoa, corn, peanuts, pecans, chile peppers, pineapples, popcorn, potatoes, pumpkins, squash, strawberries, sugar maple, sunflowers, sweet potatoes, tapioca, tomatoes, and vanilla. Illustrating each…

  13. Foods The Indians Gave Us. Coloring Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hail, Raven

    This children's coloring book devotes a page to each of twenty of the most familiar American Indian plant foods: avocado, green beans, black walnuts, cocoa, corn, peanuts, pecans, chile peppers, pineapples, popcorn, potatoes, pumpkins, squash, strawberries, sugar maple, sunflowers, sweet potatoes, tapioca, tomatoes, and vanilla. Illustrating each…

  14. The Color Red Supports Avoidance Reactions to Unhealthy Food.

    PubMed

    Rohr, Michaela; Kamm, Friederike; Koenigstorfer, Joerg; Groeppel-Klein, Andrea; Wentura, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Empirical evidence suggests that the color red acts like an implicit avoidance cue in food contexts. Thus specific colors seem to guide the implicit evaluation of food items. We built upon this research by investigating the implicit meaning of color (red vs. green) in an approach-avoidance task with healthy and unhealthy food items. Thus, we examined the joint evaluative effects of color and food: Participants had to categorize food items by approach-avoidance reactions, according to their healthfulness. Items were surrounded by task-irrelevant red or green circles. We found that the implicit meaning of the traffic light colors influenced participants' reactions to the food items. The color red (compared to green) facilitated automatic avoidance reactions to unhealthy foods. By contrast, approach behavior toward healthy food items was not moderated by color. Our findings suggest that traffic light colors can act as implicit cues that guide automatic behavioral reactions to food.

  15. Fading of artificial hair color and its prevention by photofilters.

    PubMed

    Locke, B; Jachowicz, J

    2005-01-01

    Fading of artificial hair color has been investigated by simulating actual usage conditions through exposure to artificial radiation in a weatherometer, with 0.35 mW/(m(2) nm) at 340 nm, for 16 to 48 hours, and by periodical washing. Hair color was produced by using commercial two-part, permanent hair dyes with light auburn, medium auburn, and dark auburn shades. Formulations based on red couplers, such as 4-amino-2-hydroxytoluene and 1-naphtol, as well as primary intermediates, such as 1-hydroxyethyl-4,5-diamino pyrazole sulfate, were employed. Results indicate that the extent of fading, as measured by the total color change parameter, dE, is greatest for colored hair subjected to both irradiation and shampooing, and significantly smaller for hair undergoing only irradiation or washing. Color loss has been also found to be dependent upon the hair type employed, with colored natural white and bleached hair undergoing much greater change than colored brown hair. It has been also shown that hair color based on pyrazole intermediates displayed the deepest fading as a result of shampooing (dE approximately 4-6 after ten shampooings) and irradiation/shampooing (dE approximately 14-16 after 32 hours of light exposure and four shampooings). The contribution of UV light (UVB + UVA) to the artificial hair-color loss was found experimentally to be dependent upon the irradiation dose and varied from 63% at 16 hours of irradiation time to 27% at 48 hours of light exposure. The theoretical extent of photoprotection by a formulation was assessed by calculating the percentage of UV light it attenuates in the wavelength range from 290 nm to 400 nm. The results indicate that UVB photofilters, such as octyl methoxy cinnamate, absorb less than 25% of the total UV irradiation at concentrations as high as 30 mg/(g hair). UVA absorbers were found to be more effective, with benzophenone-3 and benzophenone-4 absorbing about 40% of UV at the same concentration. Corresponding experimental

  16. The Chemistry of Food Dyes. Palette of Color Monograph Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epp, Dianne N.

    Dyes aren't just for fabrics--colorants have been added to food for centuries to enhance its appearance. This monograph and teaching guide investigates both the compounds that give foods their natural color and synthetic colorants currently approved for use in foods. Problem-solving inquiry based activities involve high school level students in…

  17. The Chemistry of Food Dyes. Palette of Color Monograph Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epp, Dianne N.

    Dyes aren't just for fabrics--colorants have been added to food for centuries to enhance its appearance. This monograph and teaching guide investigates both the compounds that give foods their natural color and synthetic colorants currently approved for use in foods. Problem-solving inquiry based activities involve high school level students in…

  18. 21 CFR 25.32 - Foods, food additives, and color additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Foods, food additives, and color additives. 25.32 Section 25.32 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT CONSIDERATIONS Categorical Exclusions § 25.32 Foods, food additives, and color additives...

  19. 21 CFR 25.32 - Foods, food additives, and color additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Foods, food additives, and color additives. 25.32 Section 25.32 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT CONSIDERATIONS Categorical Exclusions § 25.32 Foods, food additives, and color additives...

  20. 21 CFR 25.32 - Foods, food additives, and color additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Foods, food additives, and color additives. 25.32... ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT CONSIDERATIONS Categorical Exclusions § 25.32 Foods, food additives, and color additives.... (b) Action on a request for exemption for investigational use of a food additive if the food additive...

  1. 21 CFR 25.32 - Foods, food additives, and color additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Foods, food additives, and color additives. 25.32... ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT CONSIDERATIONS Categorical Exclusions § 25.32 Foods, food additives, and color additives.... (b) Action on a request for exemption for investigational use of a food additive if the food additive...

  2. 21 CFR 25.32 - Foods, food additives, and color additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Foods, food additives, and color additives. 25.32... ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT CONSIDERATIONS Categorical Exclusions § 25.32 Foods, food additives, and color additives.... (b) Action on a request for exemption for investigational use of a food additive if the food additive...

  3. Artificial selection for food colour preferences

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Gemma L.; Endler, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Colour is an important factor in food detection and acquisition by animals using visually based foraging. Colour can be used to identify the suitability of a food source or improve the efficiency of food detection, and can even be linked to mate choice. Food colour preferences are known to exist, but whether these preferences are heritable and how these preferences evolve is unknown. Using the freshwater fish Poecilia reticulata, we artificially selected for chase behaviour towards two different-coloured moving stimuli: red and blue spots. A response to selection was only seen for chase behaviours towards the red, with realized heritabilities ranging from 0.25 to 0.30. Despite intense selection, no significant chase response was recorded for the blue-selected lines. This lack of response may be due to the motion-detection mechanism in the guppy visual system and may have novel implications for the evolvability of responses to colour-related signals. The behavioural response to several colours after five generations of selection suggests that the colour opponency system of the fish may regulate the response to selection. PMID:25740894

  4. Artificial selection for food colour preferences.

    PubMed

    Cole, Gemma L; Endler, John A

    2015-04-07

    Colour is an important factor in food detection and acquisition by animals using visually based foraging. Colour can be used to identify the suitability of a food source or improve the efficiency of food detection, and can even be linked to mate choice. Food colour preferences are known to exist, but whether these preferences are heritable and how these preferences evolve is unknown. Using the freshwater fish Poecilia reticulata, we artificially selected for chase behaviour towards two different-coloured moving stimuli: red and blue spots. A response to selection was only seen for chase behaviours towards the red, with realized heritabilities ranging from 0.25 to 0.30. Despite intense selection, no significant chase response was recorded for the blue-selected lines. This lack of response may be due to the motion-detection mechanism in the guppy visual system and may have novel implications for the evolvability of responses to colour-related signals. The behavioural response to several colours after five generations of selection suggests that the colour opponency system of the fish may regulate the response to selection.

  5. 9 CFR 381.119 - Declaration of artificial flavoring or coloring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Declaration of artificial flavoring or... Containers § 381.119 Declaration of artificial flavoring or coloring. (a) When an artificial smoke flavoring... “Artificial Smoke Flavoring Added” or “Smoke Flavoring Added,” as applicable, and the ingredient...

  6. 9 CFR 381.119 - Declaration of artificial flavoring or coloring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Declaration of artificial flavoring or... Containers § 381.119 Declaration of artificial flavoring or coloring. (a) When an artificial smoke flavoring... “Artificial Smoke Flavoring Added” or “Smoke Flavoring Added,” as applicable, and the ingredient...

  7. 9 CFR 381.119 - Declaration of artificial flavoring or coloring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Declaration of artificial flavoring or... Containers § 381.119 Declaration of artificial flavoring or coloring. (a) When an artificial smoke flavoring... “Artificial Smoke Flavoring Added” or “Smoke Flavoring Added,” as applicable, and the ingredient...

  8. 9 CFR 381.119 - Declaration of artificial flavoring or coloring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Declaration of artificial flavoring or... Containers § 381.119 Declaration of artificial flavoring or coloring. (a) When an artificial smoke flavoring... “Artificial Smoke Flavoring Added” or “Smoke Flavoring Added,” as applicable, and the ingredient...

  9. Degradation products of the artificial azo dye, Allura red, inhibit esterase activity of carbonic anhydrase II: A basic in vitro study on the food safety of the colorant in terms of enzyme inhibition.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili, Sajjad; Ashrafi-Kooshk, Mohammad Reza; Khaledian, Koestan; Adibi, Hadi; Rouhani, Shohre; Khodarahmi, Reza

    2016-12-15

    Allura red is a widely used food colorant, but there is debate on its potential security risk. In the present study, we found that degradation products of the dye were more potent agents with higher carbonic anhydrase inhibitory action than the parent dye. The mechanism by which the compounds inhibit the enzyme activity has been determined as competitive mode. In addition, the enzyme binding properties of the compounds were investigated employing different spectroscopic techniques and molecular docking. The analyses of fluorescence quenching data revealed the existence of the same binding site for the compounds on the enzyme molecule. The thermodynamic parameters of ligand binding were not similar, which indicates that different interactions are responsible in binding of the parent dye and degradation products to the enzyme. It appears that enzyme inhibition should be considered, more seriously, as a new opened dimension in food safety.

  10. Fabrication of Artificial Food Bolus for Evaluation of Swallowing

    PubMed Central

    Hosotsubo, Miyu; Magota, Tetsuro; Egusa, Masahiko; Miyawaki, Takuya; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    Simple and easy methods to evaluate swallowing are required because of the recently increased need of rehabilitation for dysphagia. "Artificial food bolus", but not "artificial food", would be a valuable tool for swallowing evaluation without considering the mastication effect which is altered according to the individual's oral condition. Thus, this study was carried out to fabricate artificial bolus resembling natural food bolus. The mechanical property and the volume change of food bolus in normal people were firstly investigated. Thirty healthy adults without dysphagia were selected and asked to chew four sample foods (rice cake, peanut, burdock, and gummy candy). The results indicated that Young’s modulus of bolus before swallowing was below 150 kPa. The bolus volume before swallowing was below 400 mm3. In addition, the saliva component ratio of each bolus was approximately 30wt%, and the average saliva viscosity of research participants was approximately 10 mPa•s. Based on the obtained data, artificial food bolus was designed and fabricated by using alginate hydrogel as a visco-elastic material and gelatin solution as a viscotic material with a ratio of 7:3 based on weight. Consequently, the swallowing time of fabricated artificial food bolus was measured among the same participants. The results indicated the participants swallowed fabricated food bolus with similar manner reflecting their mechanical property and volume. Thus, this artificial food bolus would be a promising tool for evaluation of swallowing. PMID:27977775

  11. Fabrication of Artificial Food Bolus for Evaluation of Swallowing.

    PubMed

    Hosotsubo, Miyu; Magota, Tetsuro; Egusa, Masahiko; Miyawaki, Takuya; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    Simple and easy methods to evaluate swallowing are required because of the recently increased need of rehabilitation for dysphagia. "Artificial food bolus", but not "artificial food", would be a valuable tool for swallowing evaluation without considering the mastication effect which is altered according to the individual's oral condition. Thus, this study was carried out to fabricate artificial bolus resembling natural food bolus. The mechanical property and the volume change of food bolus in normal people were firstly investigated. Thirty healthy adults without dysphagia were selected and asked to chew four sample foods (rice cake, peanut, burdock, and gummy candy). The results indicated that Young's modulus of bolus before swallowing was below 150 kPa. The bolus volume before swallowing was below 400 mm3. In addition, the saliva component ratio of each bolus was approximately 30wt%, and the average saliva viscosity of research participants was approximately 10 mPa•s. Based on the obtained data, artificial food bolus was designed and fabricated by using alginate hydrogel as a visco-elastic material and gelatin solution as a viscotic material with a ratio of 7:3 based on weight. Consequently, the swallowing time of fabricated artificial food bolus was measured among the same participants. The results indicated the participants swallowed fabricated food bolus with similar manner reflecting their mechanical property and volume. Thus, this artificial food bolus would be a promising tool for evaluation of swallowing.

  12. Attempt for percentile analysis of food colorants with photoacoustic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, T. M.; Vidotti, E. C.; Rollemberg, M. C. E.; Baesso, M. L.; Bento, A. C.

    2005-06-01

    In this work the photoacoustic (PAS) method is applied in polyester-type polyurethane foam (PUF) doped with food colorants. Aiming to resolve binary mixtures of synthetic colorants such as Sunset Yellow, Tartrazine, Brilliant Blue and Amaranth, a single spectroscopic method is described. Based upon individual spectra, a Gaussian deconvolution is used and the fraction of each colorant is found.

  13. 78 FR 14664 - Food and Color Additives; Technical Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 73, 172, 173, 176, 177, 178, 184, and 189 Food and Color Additives; Technical Amendments AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule; technical amendments. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending certain...

  14. 9 CFR 381.119 - Declaration of artificial flavoring or coloring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Containers § 381.119 Declaration of artificial flavoring or coloring. (a) When an artificial smoke flavoring or a smoke flavoring is added as an ingredient in the formula of any poultry product, there shall... “Artificial Smoke Flavoring Added” or “Smoke Flavoring Added,” as applicable, and the ingredient statement...

  15. Effect of artificial food colours on childhood behaviour.

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, I; Warner, J O

    1990-01-01

    We performed an objective evaluation of 39 children whose behaviour was observed by their parents to improve on an artificial food additive free diet and to deteriorate with dietary lapses. Only 19 children completed a double blind placebo controlled challenge study with artificial food colours. In these children food colours were shown to have an adverse effect on a daily Conners' rating of behaviour, but most parents could not detect these changes. A pharmacological mechanism of food additive intolerance is proposed to explain these effects. PMID:2301986

  16. Optical effects of different colors of artificial gingiva on ceramic crowns.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Lin, Jin; Gil, Mindy; Da Silva, John D; Wright, Robert; Ishikawa-Nagai, Shigemi

    2013-08-01

    The interaction between gingival color and the shade of ceramic restorations has never been fully studied. The purpose of this study is to investigate the optical effects of altering artificial gingival color on the ceramic crown shade in the cervical area. Thirty-one all-ceramic crowns of different shades were used in this study with six different artificial gingival colors. Using a spectrophotometer (Crystaleye(®) Olympus, Japan), we measured the shade of crowns in cervical areas with each of six different artificial gingiva. The crown color measured in the presence of pink artificial gingiva (control) was compared with the crown color with five other artificial gingiva. color difference values ΔE* were calculated and compared between the control group and test groups and the correlation of the artificial gingival color with the crown color was also assessed. Significant differences were found in the mean L* and a* values of all-ceramic crowns at the cervical regions in all six gingival color groups (p<0.001) and significant Pearson correlations were also found for the mean L* (r=0.987, p<0.001) and a* (r=0.856, p=0.03) values between the artificial gingiva and the ceramic crowns. The mean ΔE* values between the control group and each of the five other gingival groups were all significantly larger than the clinical perceptual threshold of ΔE* 1.6 (p<0.001). Different colors of artificial gingiva generated clinically detectable shade differences in the cervical region of ceramic crowns. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Fungal polyketide azaphilone pigments as future natural food colorants?

    PubMed

    Mapari, Sameer A S; Thrane, Ulf; Meyer, Anne S

    2010-06-01

    The recent approval of fungal carotenoids as food colorants by the European Union has strengthened the prospects for fungal cell factories for the production of polyketide pigments. Fungal production of colorants has the main advantage of making the manufacturer independent of the seasonal supply of raw materials, thus minimizing batch-to-batch variations. Here, we review the potential of polyketide pigments produced from chemotaxonomically selected non-toxigenic fungal strains (e.g. Penicillium and Epicoccum spp.) to serve as food colorants. We argue that the production of polyketide azaphilone pigments from such potentially safe hosts is advantageous over traditional processes that involve Monascus spp., which risks co-production of the mycotoxin citrinin. Thus, there is tremendous potential for the development of robust fungal production systems for polyketide pigments, both to tailor functionality and to expand the color palette of contemporary natural food colorants.

  18. Color stability of the artificial iris button in an ocular prosthesis before and after acrylic resin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Amália; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Oliveira, Kamila Freitas; Iyda, Mariana Garib; Haddad, Marcela Filié; de Carvalho Dekon, Stefan Fiuza; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of the ocular prosthesis fabrication technique and the paint on the color stability of the artificial iris button before and after polymerization of the colorless resin. Sixty samples simulating artificial eyes were made, including 30 samples with blue- and 30 samples with sepia-colored artificial irises. Ten samples were made by each of three techniques (i.e., conventional, prefabricated cap, and inverted painting) for each color. The color of the artificial iris button was measured through reflection spectrophotometry by the CIE L*a* b* system before and after polymerization of the prosthesis (colorless resin). Data were evaluated by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey honestly significant different (HSD) tests (α=0.05). All of the samples exhibited color changes. Samples made by the prefabricated cap technique exhibited the highest color change values for both colors (P<.05). The inverted painting technique exhibited the lowest color change values for the sepia-colored artificial irises (P<.05). Sepia-colored artificial irises exhibited lower color change values than blue-colored artificial irises for both techniques (P<.05). In conclusion, the technique used to obtain the ocular prosthesis significantly affected the stability of the artificial iris color for each color tone and the conventional technique and the painting technique inverted were considered clinically acceptable for sepia color.

  19. Effect of Light-Activated Tooth Whitening on Color Change Relative to Color of Artificially Stained Teeth.

    PubMed

    Kwon, So Ran; Kurti, Steven R; Oyoyo, Udochukwu; Li, Yiming

    2015-01-01

    There is still controversy as to the efficacy of light activation used in tooth whitening. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of light activation on tooth color change relative to the artificial dye color. Extracted human third molars (160) were randomly distributed into eight groups of 20 specimens each based on artificial staining and use of light activation. All groups received three 45-minute sessions of in-office whitening at 3-day intervals. Color measurements were performed with an intraoral spectrophotometer at baseline prior to staining (T0), after artificial staining (T1), 1-day--(T2), and 1-week--(T3) post-whitening. Color differences were calculated relative to after artificial staining color parameters (L*1, a*1, b*1) with the use of a software analysis program enabling synchronization of two images. Within the same staining groups, the light-activated samples exhibited a greater color change than their nonlight-activated counterparts. However, only in the case of the yellow-stained samples at 1-day post-whitening was there a significant difference between the nonlight-activated and light-activated groups (Tukey's post hoc multiple comparison test for pairwise comparisons, p < 0.05). Light activation is a valid method for enhancing the efficacy of tooth whitening with respect to overall color change and works best with yellow stains. Light activation is a valid method for enhancing the efficacy of tooth whitening with respect to overall color change and works best with yellow stains.

  20. Applications of artificial neural networks (ANNs) in food science.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yiqun; Kangas, Lars J; Rasco, Barbara A

    2007-01-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been applied in almost every aspect of food science over the past two decades, although most applications are in the development stage. ANNs are useful tools for food safety and quality analyses, which include modeling of microbial growth and from this predicting food safety, interpreting spectroscopic data, and predicting physical, chemical, functional and sensory properties of various food products during processing and distribution. ANNs hold a great deal of promise for modeling complex tasks in process control and simulation and in applications of machine perception including machine vision and electronic nose for food safety and quality control. This review discusses the basic theory of the ANN technology and its applications in food science, providing food scientists and the research community an overview of the current research and future trend of the applications of ANN technology in the field.

  1. Applications of Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) in Food Science

    SciTech Connect

    HUang, Yiqun; Kangas, Lars J.; Rasco, Barbara A.

    2007-02-01

    Abstract Artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been applied in almost every aspect of food science over the past two decade, although most applications are in the development stage. ANNs are useful tools for food safety and quality analyses, which include modeling of microbial growth and from this predicting food safety, interpreting spectroscopic data, and predicting physical, chemical, functional and sensory properties of various food products during processing and distribution. ANNs have a great deal of promise for modeling complex tasks in process control and simulation, and in applications of machine perception including machine vision and the electronic nose for food safety and quality control. This review discusses the basic theory of the ANN technology and its applications in food science, providing food scientists and the research community an overview of the current research and future trend of the applications of ANN technology in this field.

  2. The Effect of pH and Color Stability of Anthocyanin on Food Colorant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahyuningsih, S.; Wulandari, L.; Wartono, M. W.; Munawaroh, H.; Ramelan, A. H.

    2017-04-01

    Anthocyanins are naturally occurring pigments of red and purple. Red anthocyanin pigments provide a strong and sharp and widely applied in various industries such as food coloring or drink. Anthocyanins isolated by maceration, extraction and thin layer chromatography (TLC). The extract has been obtained from the initial stages of maceration then separated into several fractions by chromatography to isolate fractions colored dark red. Identification of chemical compounds with TLC (Thin Layer Chromatography) is able to distinguish the fraction of anthocyanin produced. FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy) used to identification of the functional group of a compound. The UV-Vis absorption spectra have to produce maximum absorbance values that describe the intensity of anthocyanin spectra in different colors for different pH. Anthocyanins are more stable at low pH (acidic conditions) which gives a red pigment. Meanwhile, the higher the pH value of anthocyanin will provide color fading of the color blue. So as a food colorant, anthocyanin with a low pH or height pH has a significant effect on the food colorant.

  3. Evaluation of the color stability of two techniques for reproducing artificial irides after microwave polymerization.

    PubMed

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Santos, Daniela Micheline dos; Moreno, Amália; Gennari-Filho, Humberto; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza

    2011-01-01

    The use of ocular prostheses for ophthalmic patients aims to rebuild facial aesthetics and provide an artificial substitute to the visual organ. Natural intemperate conditions promote discoloration of artificial irides and many studies have attempted to produce irides with greater chromatic paint durability using different paint materials. The present study evaluated the color stability of artificial irides obtained with two techniques (oil painting and digital image) and submitted to microwave polymerization. Forty samples were fabricated simulating ocular prostheses. each sample was constituted by one disc of acrylic resin N1 and one disc of colorless acrylic resin with the iris interposed between the discs. The irides in brown and blue color were obtained by oil painting or digital image. The color stability was determined by a reflection spectrophotometer and measurements were taken before and after microwave polymerization. Statistical analysis of the techniques for reproducing artificial irides was performed by applying the normal data distribution test followed by 2-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD test (α=.05). Chromatic alterations occurred in all specimens and statistically significant differences were observed between the oil-painted samples and those obtained by digital imaging. There was no statistical difference between the brown and blue colors. Independently of technique, all samples suffered color alterations after microwave polymerization. The digital imaging technique for reproducing irides presented better color stability after microwave polymerization.

  4. Evaluation of the color stability of two techniques for reproducing artificial irides after microwave polymerization

    PubMed Central

    GOIATO, Marcelo Coelho; dos SANTOS, Daniela Micheline; MORENO, Amália; GENNARI-FILHO, Humberto; PELLIZZER, Eduardo Piza

    2011-01-01

    The use of ocular prostheses for ophthalmic patients aims to rebuild facial aesthetics and provide an artificial substitute to the visual organ. Natural intemperate conditions promote discoloration of artificial irides and many studies have attempted to produce irides with greater chromatic paint durability using different paint materials. Objectives The present study evaluated the color stability of artificial irides obtained with two techniques (oil painting and digital image) and submitted to microwave polymerization. Material and Methods Forty samples were fabricated simulating ocular prostheses. Each sample was constituted by one disc of acrylic resin N1 and one disc of colorless acrylic resin with the iris interposed between the discs. The irides in brown and blue color were obtained by oil painting or digital image. The color stability was determined by a reflection spectrophotometer and measurements were taken before and after microwave polymerization. Statistical analysis of the techniques for reproducing artificial irides was performed by applying the normal data distribution test followed by 2-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD test (α=.05). Results Chromatic alterations occurred in all specimens and statistically significant differences were observed between the oil-painted samples and those obtained by digital imaging. There was no statistical difference between the brown and blue colors. Independently of technique, all samples suffered color alterations after microwave polymerization. Conclusion The digital imaging technique for reproducing irides presented better color stability after microwave polymerization. PMID:21625733

  5. Food Color Induced Hepatotoxicity in Swiss Albino Rats, Rattus norvegicus

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Beenam; Sharma, Shiv

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Certain dietary constituents can induce toxicity and play a critical role in the development of several hepatic disorders. Tartrazine, metanil yellow and sunset yellow are widely used azo dyes in food products, so the present study is aimed to investigate the food color induced hepatotoxicity in Swiss albino rats. Materials and Methods: Swiss albino rats were divided into four groups, each group having six animals. Group I served as control, Group II, Group III and Group IV were administered with 25, 50 and 75 mg/kg body weight blend of sunset yellow, metanil yellow and tartrazine for 30 days. Hepatotoxicity in rats treated with a blend of these food colors was studied by assessing parameters such as serum total protein, serum albumin, serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) as well as hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA). The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), reduced glutathione (GSH) and catalase (CAT) were assessed. Results: Significantly increased concentrations of serum total protein, serum albumin, serum ALP and hepatic MDA and significantly lowered levels of SOD, reduced GSH and CAT in the liver tissue of treated animals were observed when compared with control animals. The alteration in the liver includes necrosis of hepatocytes, infiltration and vacuolation. Conclusion: The result indicates that consumption of food color in diet induces liver tissue damage. The used doses of food color were mostly attributable to hepatocellular damage and drastic alteration in antioxidant defense system. PMID:26862277

  6. Artificial selection for structural color on butterfly wings and comparison with natural evolution

    PubMed Central

    Wasik, Bethany R.; Liew, Seng Fatt; Lilien, David A.; Dinwiddie, April J.; Noh, Heeso; Cao, Hui; Monteiro, Antónia

    2014-01-01

    Brilliant animal colors often are produced from light interacting with intricate nano-morphologies present in biological materials such as butterfly wing scales. Surveys across widely divergent butterfly species have identified multiple mechanisms of structural color production; however, little is known about how these colors evolved. Here, we examine how closely related species and populations of Bicyclus butterflies have evolved violet structural color from brown-pigmented ancestors with UV structural color. We used artificial selection on a laboratory model butterfly, B. anynana, to evolve violet scales from UV brown scales and compared the mechanism of violet color production with that of two other Bicyclus species, Bicyclus sambulos and Bicyclus medontias, which have evolved violet/blue scales independently via natural selection. The UV reflectance peak of B. anynana brown scales shifted to violet over six generations of artificial selection (i.e., in less than 1 y) as the result of an increase in the thickness of the lower lamina in ground scales. Similar scale structures and the same mechanism for producing violet/blue structural colors were found in the other Bicyclus species. This work shows that populations harbor large amounts of standing genetic variation that can lead to rapid evolution of scales’ structural color via slight modifications to the scales’ physical dimensions. PMID:25092295

  7. Artificial selection for structural color on butterfly wings and comparison with natural evolution.

    PubMed

    Wasik, Bethany R; Liew, Seng Fatt; Lilien, David A; Dinwiddie, April J; Noh, Heeso; Cao, Hui; Monteiro, Antónia

    2014-08-19

    Brilliant animal colors often are produced from light interacting with intricate nano-morphologies present in biological materials such as butterfly wing scales. Surveys across widely divergent butterfly species have identified multiple mechanisms of structural color production; however, little is known about how these colors evolved. Here, we examine how closely related species and populations of Bicyclus butterflies have evolved violet structural color from brown-pigmented ancestors with UV structural color. We used artificial selection on a laboratory model butterfly, B. anynana, to evolve violet scales from UV brown scales and compared the mechanism of violet color production with that of two other Bicyclus species, Bicyclus sambulos and Bicyclus medontias, which have evolved violet/blue scales independently via natural selection. The UV reflectance peak of B. anynana brown scales shifted to violet over six generations of artificial selection (i.e., in less than 1 y) as the result of an increase in the thickness of the lower lamina in ground scales. Similar scale structures and the same mechanism for producing violet/blue structural colors were found in the other Bicyclus species. This work shows that populations harbor large amounts of standing genetic variation that can lead to rapid evolution of scales' structural color via slight modifications to the scales' physical dimensions.

  8. Inaccurate Color Discrimination by Pollinators Promotes Evolution of Discrete Color Polymorphism in Food-Deceptive Flowers.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Kotaro; Takimoto, Gaku

    2016-02-01

    Many plant species employing a food-deceptive pollination strategy show discrete or continuous floral polymorphism within their populations. Previous studies have suggested that negative frequency-dependent selection (NFDS) caused by the learning behavior of pollinators was responsible for the maintenance of floral polymorphism. However, NFDS alone does not explain why and when discrete or continuous polymorphism evolves. In this study, we use an evolutionary simulation model to propose that inaccurate discrimination of flower colors by pollinators results in evolution of discrete flower color polymorphism. Simulations showed that associative learning based on inaccurate discrimination in pollinators caused disruptive selection of flower colors. The degree of inaccuracy determined the number of discrete flower colors that evolved. Our results suggest that animal behavior based on inaccurate discrimination may be a general cause of disruptive selection that promotes discrete trait polymorphism.

  9. Artificial food dyes and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Kanarek, Robin B

    2011-07-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common behavioral disorders in children. Symptoms of ADHD include hyperactivity, low frustration tolerance, impulsivity, and inattention. While the biological pathways leading to ADHD are not clearly delineated, a number of genetic and environmental risk factors for the disorder are recognized. In the early 1970s, research conducted by Dr. Benjamin Feingold found that when hyperactive children were given a diet free of artificial food additives and dyes, symptoms of hyperactivity were reduced. While some clinical studies supported these findings, more rigorous empirical studies conducted over the next 20 years were less positive. As a result, research on the role of food additives in contributing to ADHD waned. In recent years, however, interest in this area has revived. In response to more recent research and public petitions, in December 2009 the British government requested that food manufacturers remove most artificial food dyes from their products. While these strictures could have positive effects on behavior, the removal of food dyes is not a panacea for ADHD, which is a multifaceted disorder with both biological and environmental underpinnings.

  10. Color stability of maxillofacial silicone with nanoparticle pigment and opacifier submitted to disinfection and artificial aging.

    PubMed

    Filié Haddad, Marcela; Coelho Goiato, Marcelo; Micheline Dos Santos, Daniela; Moreno, Amália; Filipe D'almeida, Nuno; Alves Pesqueira, Aldiéris

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the color stability of a maxillofacial elastomer with the addition of a nanoparticle pigment and∕or an opacifier submitted to chemical disinfection and artificial aging. Specimens were divided into four groups (n = 30): group I: silicone without pigment or opacifier, group II: ceramic powder pigment, group III: Barium sulfate (BaSO(4)) opacifier, and group IV: ceramic powder and BaSO(4) opacifier. Specimens of each group (n = 10) were disinfected with effervescent tablets, neutral soap, or 4% chlorhexidine gluconate. Disinfection was done three times a week during two months. Afterward, specimens were submitted to different periods of artificial aging. Color evaluation was initially done, after 60 days (disinfection period) and after 252, 504, and 1008 h of artificial aging with aid of a reflection spectrophotometer. Data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and Tukey test (α = 0.05). The isolated factor disinfection did not statistically influence the values of color stability among groups. The association between pigment and BaSO(4) opacifier (GIV) was more stable in relationship to color change (△E). All values of △E obtained, independent of the disinfectant and the period of artificial aging, were considered acceptable in agreement with the norms presented in literature.

  11. Color stability of maxillofacial silicone with nanoparticle pigment and opacifier submitted to disinfection and artificial aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filié Haddad, Marcela; Coelho Goiato, Marcelo; Micheline Dos Santos, Daniela; Moreno, Amália; Filipe D'Almeida, Nuno; Alves Pesqueira, Aldiéris

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the color stability of a maxillofacial elastomer with the addition of a nanoparticle pigment and/or an opacifier submitted to chemical disinfection and artificial aging. Specimens were divided into four groups (n = 30): group I: silicone without pigment or opacifier, group II: ceramic powder pigment, group III: Barium sulfate (BaSO4) opacifier, and group IV: ceramic powder and BaSO4 opacifier. Specimens of each group (n = 10) were disinfected with effervescent tablets, neutral soap, or 4% chlorhexidine gluconate. Disinfection was done three times a week during two months. Afterward, specimens were submitted to different periods of artificial aging. Color evaluation was initially done, after 60 days (disinfection period) and after 252, 504, and 1008 h of artificial aging with aid of a reflection spectrophotometer. Data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and Tukey test (α = 0.05). The isolated factor disinfection did not statistically influence the values of color stability among groups. The association between pigment and BaSO4 opacifier (GIV) was more stable in relationship to color change (▵E). All values of ▵E obtained, independent of the disinfectant and the period of artificial aging, were considered acceptable in agreement with the norms presented in literature.

  12. Verification of rapid method for estimation of added food colorant type in boiled sausages based on measurement of cross section color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanović, J.; Petronijević, R. B.; Lukić, M.; Karan, D.; Parunović, N.; Branković-Lazić, I.

    2017-09-01

    During the previous development of a chemometric method for estimating the amount of added colorant in meat products, it was noticed that the natural colorant most commonly added to boiled sausages, E 120, has different CIE-LAB behavior compared to artificial colors that are used for the same purpose. This has opened the possibility of transforming the developed method into a method for identifying the addition of natural or synthetic colorants in boiled sausages based on the measurement of the color of the cross-section. After recalibration of the CIE-LAB method using linear discriminant analysis, verification was performed on 76 boiled sausages, of either frankfurters or Parisian sausage types. The accuracy and reliability of the classification was confirmed by comparison with the standard HPLC method. Results showed that the LDA + CIE-LAB method can be applied with high accuracy, 93.42 %, to estimate food color type in boiled sausages. Natural orange colors can give false positive results. Pigments from spice mixtures had no significant effect on CIE-LAB results.

  13. Artificial Nutrition (Food) and Hydration (Fluids) at the End of Life

    MedlinePlus

    Artificial Nutrition (Food) and Hydration (Fluids) at the End of Life It is very common for doctors to provide ... or recovering from surgery. This is called “artificial nutrition and hydration” and like all medical treatments, it ...

  14. Color matching of fabric blends: hybrid Kubelka-Munk + artificial neural network based method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furferi, Rocco; Governi, Lapo; Volpe, Yary

    2016-11-01

    Color matching of fabric blends is a key issue for the textile industry, mainly due to the rising need to create high-quality products for the fashion market. The process of mixing together differently colored fibers to match a desired color is usually performed by using some historical recipes, skillfully managed by company colorists. More often than desired, the first attempt in creating a blend is not satisfactory, thus requiring the experts to spend efforts in changing the recipe with a trial-and-error process. To confront this issue, a number of computer-based methods have been proposed in the last decades, roughly classified into theoretical and artificial neural network (ANN)-based approaches. Inspired by the above literature, the present paper provides a method for accurate estimation of spectrophotometric response of a textile blend composed of differently colored fibers made of different materials. In particular, the performance of the Kubelka-Munk (K-M) theory is enhanced by introducing an artificial intelligence approach to determine a more consistent value of the nonlinear function relationship between the blend and its components. Therefore, a hybrid K-M+ANN-based method capable of modeling the color mixing mechanism is devised to predict the reflectance values of a blend.

  15. Using Artificial Neural Networks Approach for the Color Enhance of High Power LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsi-Chao; Wu, Guo-Yang; Yang, Chi-Hao; Chen, Peng-Ying; Lai, Mei-Jyun; Huang, Kuo-Ting

    2012-10-01

    High power light-emitting diodes (HP-LEDs) always are applied for energy-saving to replace the traditional light sources. HP-LEDs lighting has been regarded in the next generation lighting. In this study, the RGY colors enhance of whit LED lighting was researched and modulated by artificial neural network (ANN). An ANN model was used to investigate the correlated color temperature (CCT) and luminous flux (Lux) for the white LED enhanced with different power of single RYG LEDs. The starting color temperature of the white LED will be set at 7500K (D75 white light standard), then changed the voltage of the single LED of the red, green or yellow, respectively, to find the best tuning function for the color temperature and luminous efficiency. These results exhibited that changing the voltage of red LED had the broader color temperature from 7500 K to 1500 K than the range of green and yellow LEDs from 7500K to 8200K and 7500K to 4700K, respectively. Then, these experimental results were used as input data for the training model. After the learning model was completed, an analysis was used to obtain the internal representation of the color information by the responses of the individual chips of the three hidden units in the middle layer. Identification rate of data would be achieved to 100% by the neural network pattern-recognition tool. Anyway, the correlation coefficient could reach to 99% by the ANN fitting tool for the color enhancement.

  16. Color and opacity of composites protected with surface sealants and submitted to artificial accelerated aging

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Fabiano Gamero; Roberti Garcia, Lucas da Fonseca; Cruvinel, Diogo Rodrigues; Sousa, Ana Beatriz Silva; de Carvalho Panzeri Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the color similarity, stability and opacity of composites (TPH, Charisma, and Concept, shade A2) protected with surface sealants (Fortify Plus and Biscover) and cyanoacrylate (Super Bonder). Methods: Forty specimens of each composite were made and separated into 4 groups (n=10) according to the surface protection: GI - without sealant; GII - cyanoacrylate; GIII - Fortify Plus; GIV - Biscover. Color and opacity readings were taken before and after Artificial Acelerated Aging (AAA) and the values obtained for color stability were submitted to statistical analysis by 2-way ANOVA and Bonferroni’s test (P<.05). The values acquired for color similarity were submitted to 1-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (P<.05). The specimen sufaces were compared before and after AAA using Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM). Results: Studied composites did not present the same values for the coordinates L*, a* and b * before AAA, indicating that there was no color similarity among them. All composites presented color alteration after AAA with clinically unacceptable values. Protected groups presented lower opacity variation after AAA, in comparison with the control goup. SEM evaluation demonstrated that AAA increased the surface irregularities in all of the studied groups. Conclusion: Surface sealants were not effective in maintaining composite color, but were able to maintain opacity. PMID:22229004

  17. Color and opacity of composites protected with surface sealants and submitted to artificial accelerated aging.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Fabiano Gamero; Roberti Garcia, Lucas da Fonseca; Cruvinel, Diogo Rodrigues; Sousa, Ana Beatriz Silva; de Carvalho Panzeri Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the color similarity, stability and opacity of composites (TPH, Charisma, and Concept, shade A2) protected with surface sealants (Fortify Plus and Biscover) and cyanoacrylate (Super Bonder). Forty specimens of each composite were made and separated into 4 groups (n=10) according to the surface protection: GI - without sealant; GII - cyanoacrylate; GIII - Fortify Plus; GIV - Biscover. Color and opacity readings were taken before and after Artificial Acelerated Aging (AAA) and the values obtained for color stability were submitted to statistical analysis by 2-way ANOVA and Bonferroni's test (P<.05). The values acquired for color similarity were submitted to 1-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (P<.05). The specimen sufaces were compared before and after AAA using Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM). Studied composites did not present the same values for the coordinates L*, a* and b * before AAA, indicating that there was no color similarity among them. All composites presented color alteration after AAA with clinically unacceptable values. Protected groups presented lower opacity variation after AAA, in comparison with the control goup. SEM evaluation demonstrated that AAA increased the surface irregularities in all of the studied groups. Surface sealants were not effective in maintaining composite color, but were able to maintain opacity.

  18. Artificial neural networks and the study of evolution of prey coloration.

    PubMed

    Merilaita, Sami

    2007-03-29

    In this paper, I investigate the use of artificial neural networks in the study of prey coloration. I briefly review the anti-predator functions of prey coloration and describe both in general terms and with help of two studies as specific examples the use of neural network models in the research on prey coloration. The first example investigates the effect of visual complexity of background on evolution of camouflage. The second example deals with the evolutionary choice of defence strategy, crypsis or aposematism. I conclude that visual information processing by predators is central in evolution of prey coloration. Therefore, the capability to process patterns as well as to imitate aspects of predator's information processing and responses to visual information makes neural networks a well-suited modelling approach for the study of prey coloration. In addition, their suitability for evolutionary simulations is an advantage when complex or dynamic interactions are modelled. Since not all behaviours of neural network models are necessarily biologically relevant, it is important to validate a neural network model with empirical data. Bringing together knowledge about neural networks with knowledge about topics of prey coloration would provide a potential way to deepen our understanding of the specific appearances of prey coloration.

  19. A spectrocolorimetric and chemical study on color modification of heat-treated wood during artificial weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xianai; Kocaefe, Duygu; Kocaefe, Yasar; Boluk, Yaman; Pichette, Andre

    2012-05-01

    Effect of artificial weathering on the wood surface color modifications of three North American species (jack pine, aspen, and birch) heat-treated under different temperatures was studied by spectrocolorimetric colormeter (datacolor, CHECK TM). Data was analyzed using the reflectance spectra (400-700 nm) as well as the CIE-L*a*b* system and ΔE. Kubelka-Munk (K-M) spectra of samples were recorded as a function of artificial weathering time to obtain the absorption maxima of the chromophore woods formed during artificial weathering. The results were compared with those of the respective untreated (Kiln-dried) species. Analysis of chemical components shows that the lignin percent of jack pine, aspen, and birch increased after heat treatment (28.66-35.9%, 20.27-26.41%, and 19.04-22.71% respectively) which might be due to smaller influence of heat treatment on lignin content than hemicelluloses. This improves the resistance of heat-treated wood to photo-degradation. This is also supported by the smaller change observed in K-M spectra and total color parameters in CIE-L*a*b* system of heat-treated wood samples compared to those of untreated wood when weathered for72 h. However, the lignin percent of heat-treated woods reduce to maximum 2.5% after artificial weathering of 1512 h. This suggests that the weathering degrades most lignin matrix; consequently, both the colors of heat-treated woods and untreated woods are lighter and very similar after a long period of artificial weathering.

  20. Betanin--a food colorant with biological activity.

    PubMed

    Esatbeyoglu, Tuba; Wagner, Anika E; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B; Rimbach, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Betalains are water-soluble nitrogen-containing pigments that are subdivided in red-violet betacyanins and yellow-orange betaxanthins. Due to glycosylation and acylation betalains exhibit a huge structural diversity. Betanin (betanidin-5-O-β-glucoside) is the most common betacyanin in the plant kingdom. According to the regulation on food additives betanin is permitted quantum satis as a natural red food colorant (E162). Moreover, betanin is used as colorant in cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. Recently, potential health benefits of betalains and betalain-rich foods (e.g. red beet, Opuntia sp.) have been discussed. Betanin is a scavenger of reactive oxygen species and exhibits gene-regulatory activity partly via nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2-(Nrf2) dependent signaling pathways. Betanin may induce phase II enzymes and antioxidant defense mechanisms. Furthermore, betanin possibly prevents LDL oxidation and DNA damage. Potential blood pressure lowering effects of red beet seem to be mainly mediated by dietary nitrate rather than by betanin per se.

  1. Indigo Dye Derived from Indigofera Tinctoria as Natural Food Colorant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahyuningsih, S.; Ramelan, A. H.; Wardani, D. K.; Aini, F. N.; Sari, P. L.; Tamtama, B. P. N.; Kristiawan, Y. R.

    2017-04-01

    Recently, the uses of dyes are increasingly widespread especially in foods and beverages as food colors to attract the consumers. The dye that currently attracts is indigo. Indigo is a group of carbonyl compounds, one of the oldest known dyes in terms of natural blue dye derived from the Indigofera tinctoria plant. The use of indigo as a natural food dye intended to reduce the use of synthetic dyes are carcinogenic impact. The method used in this study includes the analysis of indigo using UV-Vis spectrophotometry and FTIR analysis. Based on the UV-Vis Spectrophotometer analysis results with the various concentrations of 0.002 mg/mL; 0.004 mg/mL; 0.006 mg/mL and 0.008 mg/mL were obtained maximum absorption peak at wavelength of 550-700 nm. The indigo dyes in various concentrations produce a stable pH at an average pH 9, therefore it can make the colors not easily fade (strong staining). Based on infrared spectrophotometer measurement were obtained absorption spectrum at 3100-3500 cm-1 as primary N-H and secondary amine, 1600 cm-1 as aromatic C=C, 1000-1350 cm-1 as aromatic C-N, 690-900 cm-1 as aromatic C-H.

  2. 21 CFR 73.1 - Diluents in color additive mixtures for food use exempt from certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... sequestrant in color additive mixtures intended only for ingested use; the color additive mixture (solution or... additive mixture (solution or dispersion) may contain not more than 1 percent by weight of the diluent... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Diluents in color additive mixtures for food...

  3. 76 FR 71248 - Animal Food Labeling; Declaration of Certifiable Color Additives

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 501 Animal Food Labeling; Declaration of Certifiable Color Additives AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Food... additives on the labels of animal food including animal feeds and pet foods. FDA is issuing a final...

  4. Energy efficiency and color quality limits in artificial light sources emulating natural illumination.

    PubMed

    Hertog, Wim; Llenas, Aleix; Quintero, Jesús M; Hunt, Charles E; Carreras, Josep

    2014-12-15

    We present in this work a calculation of the theoretical limits attainable for natural light emulation with regard to the joint optimization of the Luminous Efficacy of Radiation and color fidelity by using multiple reflectance spectra datasets, along with an implementation of a physical device that approaches these limits. A reduced visible spectrum of blackbody radiators is introduced and demonstrated which allows lamps designed to emulate natural light to operate with excellent color fidelity and higher efficiency as compared to full visible spectrum sources. It is shown that even though 3,000K and 5,500K blackbody sources have maximum efficacies of 21 lm/W and 89 lm/W, respectively, reduced-spectrum artificial light sources can exceed those values up to 363 lm/W and 313 lm/W, respectively, while retaining excellent color fidelity. Experimental demonstration approaching these values is accomplished through the design and implementation of a 12-channel light engine which emits arbitrarily-tunable spectra. The color fidelity of the designed spectra is assessed through Color Rendering Maps, showing that color fidelity is preserved uniformly over a large spectral reflectance dataset, unlike other approaches to generate white light.

  5. Why children learn color and size words so differently: evidence from adults' learning of artificial terms.

    PubMed

    Sandhofer, C M; Smith, L B

    2001-12-01

    An adult simulation study examined why children's learning of color and size terms follow different developmental patterns, one in which word comprehension precedes success in nonlinguistic matching tasks versus one in which matching precedes word comprehension. In 4 experiments, adults learned artificial labels for values on novel dimensions. Training mimicked that characteristic for children learning either color words or size words. The results suggest that the learning trajectories arise from the different frames in which different dimensions are trained: Using a comparison (size-like) training regimen helps learners pick out the relevant dimension, and using a categorization (color-like) training regimen helps the learner correctly comprehend and produce dimension terms. The results indicate that the training regimen, not the meanings of the terms or the specific dimensions, determines the pattern of learning.

  6. Simultaneous determination of red and yellow artificial food colourants and carotenoid pigments in food products.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yixiao; Zhang, Xiumei; Prinyawiwatkul, Witoon; Xu, Zhimin

    2014-08-15

    A method for simultaneously determining four artificial food colourants [Red Nos. 2 (R2) and 40 (R40), Yellow Nos. 5 (Y5) and 6 (Y6)] and three carotenoids [lycopene, lutein, and β-carotene] was developed. They were successfully separated by the developed high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) method combined with a photo diode array detector. The detection limit (at signal to noise>4) was from the lowest of 0.2 ng/mL for lutein to the highest of 50.0 ng/mL for R40. With a two-phase solvent and ultrasound-assisted extraction, the recoveries of the artificial and natural pigments in fifteen different types of food products were between 80.5-97.2% and 80.1-98.4%, respectively. This HPLC method with the ultrasound-assisted extraction protocol could be used as a sensitive and reliable analysis technique in simultaneously identifying and quantifying the reddish and yellowish pigments in different foods regardless of they are artificial food colourants or/and natural carotenoids.

  7. Comparison of interactions between three food colorants and BSA.

    PubMed

    Li, Tian; Cheng, Zhengjun; Cao, Lijun; Jiang, Xiaohui

    2016-03-01

    Fast Green FCF (FCF), Patent Blue V (PBV) and Acid Blue 1 (AB1) are used as food colorants. Multiple spectroscopic techniques were employed to probe in depth the affinity of FCF/PBV/AB1 with BSA in different pH and/or salt concentrations. The results showed that FCF/PBV/AB1 quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA by a static process, and electrostatic force dominated the formation of BSA-FCF/PBV/AB1 complex which was confirmed by the effects of salt on their interactions. Subdomain IIA was the primary binding site for FCF/PBV/AB1 on BSA in the pH range of 5.5-7.4, while both Trp 212 and Trp 134 residues of BSA might be bound by FCF/PBV/AB1 at pH 4.8. The K values suggested that the binding ability of three food colorants with BSA was FCF>PBV>AB1. The results of UV-vis absorption, synchronous fluorescence, 3D fluorescence and FT-IR spectra proved that the structure of BSA altered by FCF/PBV/AB1.

  8. Listing of color additives for coloring sutures; [phthalocyaninato(2-)] copper. Food and Drug Administration, HHS. Final rule.

    PubMed

    1999-04-30

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the color additive regulations to provide for the safe use of [phthalocyaninato(2-)] copper in coloring nonabsorbable sutures for general and ophthalmic surgery made from a blend of poly(vinylidene fluoride) and poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene). This action responds to a petition filed by Ethicon, Inc.

  9. Effects of maternally exposed food coloring additives on laryngeal histology in rats.

    PubMed

    Başak, Kayhan; Doguç, Duygu Kumbul; Aylak, Firdevs; Karadayi, Nimet; Gültekin, Fatih

    2014-01-01

    Experimental reports showed carcinogenic effects of artificial food colors and additives (AFCAs) on many organs, including the head and neck region. We aimed to investigate the effect of AFCAs on laryngeal histomorphology and immunohistochemical expression in maternally exposed rats. "No observable adverse effect levels" of commonly used AFCAs as a mixture were given to female rats before and during gestation. Histopathological and immunohistochemical findings were evaluated in their offspring. Significant decreasing in goblet cell count and cilia loss were observed with AFCAs in maternally exposed rats (p<0.05). Immunohistochemically, the Ki67 index was significantly increased and villin expression was significantly reduced in laryngeal epithelium in the study group (p<0.05), whereas expression of cyclooxygenase type 2, Muc-2, Muc-5AC, p53, and epidermal growth factor receptors did not differ between the groups. This study demonstrated that maternal exposure of AFCAs plays a role in the mucosal defense system and possibly in carcinogenesis.

  10. The application of computer color matching techniques to the matching of target colors in a food substrate: a first step in the development of foods with customized appearance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sandra; Golding, Matt; Archer, Richard H

    2012-06-01

    A predictive color matching model based on the colorimetric technique was developed and used to calculate the concentrations of primary food dyes needed in a model food substrate to match a set of standard tile colors. This research is the first stage in the development of novel three-dimensional (3D) foods in which color images or designs can be rapidly reproduced in 3D form. Absorption coefficients were derived for each dye, from a concentration series in the model substrate, a microwave-baked cake. When used in a linear, additive blending model these coefficients were able to predict cake color from selected dye blends to within 3 ΔE*(ab,10) color difference units, or within the limit of a visually acceptable match. Absorption coefficients were converted to pseudo X₁₀, Y₁₀, and Z₁₀ tri-stimulus values (X₁₀(P), Y₁₀(P), Z₁₀(P)) for colorimetric matching. The Allen algorithm was used to calculate dye concentrations to match the X₁₀(P), Y₁₀(P), and Z₁₀(P) values of each tile color. Several recipes for each color were computed with the tile specular component included or excluded, and tested in the cake. Some tile colors proved out-of-gamut, limited by legal dye concentrations; these were scaled to within legal range. Actual differences suggest reasonable visual matches could be achieved for within-gamut tile colors. The Allen algorithm, with appropriate adjustments of concentration outputs, could provide a sufficiently rapid and accurate calculation tool for 3D color food printing. The predictive color matching approach shows potential for use in a novel embodiment of 3D food printing in which a color image or design could be rendered within a food matrix through the selective blending of primary dyes to reproduce each color element. The on-demand nature of this food application requires rapid color outputs which could be provided by the color matching technique, currently used in nonfood industries, rather than by empirical food

  11. Synergistic effects of food colors on the toxicity of 3-amino-1,4-dimethyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole (Trp-P-1) in primary cultured rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ashida, H; Hashimoto, T; Tsuji, S; Kanazawa, K; Danno, G

    2000-06-01

    The synergistic effect of food additives or food colors on the toxicity of 3-amino-1,4-dimethyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole (Trp-P-1) was investigated using primary cultured rat hepatocytes. When hepatocytes from rats fed a standard diet were treated with a mixture of four major food additives (sorbitol, sodium L(+)-glutamate, benzoic acid, and propylene glycol) or a mixture of six typical artificial food colors (erythrosine, allura red, new coccine, brilliant blue, tertrazine, and fast green), the in vitro treated food-color mixture itself showed cytotoxicity: the reduction of cell viability and decreases in the activities of gluconeogenesis and ureogenesis. The food-color mixture enhanced cytotoxicity of Trp-P-1 obviously. We then investigated the effects of in vivo-dosed food additives or food colors on Trp-P-1-caused toxicity. Hepatocytes were isolated and cultured from rats fed a diet containing a mixture of food additives or a mixture of food colors with half the amount of their respective acceptable daily intake for 4 wk. Trp-P-1 was administered to the hepatocytes at various concentrations for 12 h. Synergistic effects of in vivo-dosed food additives and food colors were not observed on Trp-P-1-caused cytotoxicity as estimated by a loss of cell viability and the reductions of DNA and protein syntheses. On the contrary, we have observed that in vivo administered food colors synergistically facilitated to reduce the activities of gluconeogenesis and ureogenesis in Trp-P-1-treated hepatocytes. These results suggest that the daily intake of artificial food colors may impair hepatic functions such as gluconeogenesis and ureogenesis, when dietary carcinogens are exposed to the liver cells.

  12. Immunological aspects of the common food colorants, amaranth and tartrazine.

    PubMed

    Koutsogeorgopoulou, L; Maravelias, C; Methenitou, G; Koutselinis, A

    1998-02-01

    We describe a sensitive and reproducible microassay model using human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) for discrimination between the cytotoxic and immunosuppressive effects of food colorants such as amaranth and tartrazine. The cytotoxic effects of a wide range of concentrations of these substances were studied on human PBL by the colorimetric in vitro cytotoxicity assays, neutral red uptake (NR) and thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT). The immunotoxic properties of these 2 substances were determined by a [3H]-thymidine DNA incorporation assay on phytohemagglutinin stimulated or non-stimulated lymphocytes, as well as by a Cr51 release Natural Killer assays. The results showed clear immunosuppressive effects from the 2 substances tested, although the concentrations chosen for this study proved to be non-cytotoxic by NR and MTT cytotoxic endpoints.

  13. Composites Associated with Pulp-Protection Material: Color-Stability Analysis after Accelerated Artificial Aging

    PubMed Central

    Cruvinel, Diogo Rodrigues; Garcia, Lucas da Fonseca Roberti; Consani, Simonides; de Carvalho Panzeri Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: This study assessed the color stability of two composites associated with two pulp protectors submitted to accelerated artificial aging (AAA). Methods: 60 test specimens were made with 0.5 mm of protection material (calcium hydroxide - CH or glass ionomer cement - GIC) and 2.5 mm of restoration material (Concept or QuixFil) and divided into 3 groups (n=10) according to the type of protection material/composite, and the control group (no protection). After polishing, color readings were obtained with a spectrophotometer (PCB 6807 Byk Gardner) before and after AAA for 384 hours, and L*, a*, and b* coordinates and total color variation (ΔE) were analyzed (2-way ANOVA, Bonferroni, α=05). Results: Composites placed on CH presented lower L* levels than those on GIC, which presented higher L* values than the control group and lower b* values than those of the CH group. The Concept composite presented higher ΔE levels for all groups, differing statistically from QuixFil, except when placed on GIC. Conclusions: It was concluded that the protection material could affect the color stability and AAA is a factor that enhances this effect, depending on the type of composite used. PMID:20046473

  14. Food color is in the eye of the beholder: the role of human trichromatic vision in food evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Foroni, Francesco; Pergola, Giulio; Rumiati, Raffaella Ida

    2016-01-01

    Non-human primates evaluate food quality based on brightness of red and green shades of color, with red signaling higher energy or greater protein content in fruits and leafs. Despite the strong association between food and other sensory modalities, humans, too, estimate critical food features, such as calorie content, from vision. Previous research primarily focused on the effects of color on taste/flavor identification and intensity judgments. However, whether evaluation of perceived calorie content and arousal in humans are biased by color has received comparatively less attention. In this study we showed that color content of food images predicts arousal and perceived calorie content reported when viewing food even when confounding variables were controlled for. Specifically, arousal positively co-varied with red-brightness, while green-brightness was negatively associated with arousal and perceived calorie content. This result holds for a large array of food comprising of natural food - where color likely predicts calorie content - and of transformed food where, instead, color is poorly diagnostic of energy content. Importantly, this pattern does not emerged with nonfood items. We conclude that in humans visual inspection of food is central to its evaluation and seems to partially engage the same basic system as non-human primates. PMID:27841327

  15. Food color is in the eye of the beholder: the role of human trichromatic vision in food evaluation.

    PubMed

    Foroni, Francesco; Pergola, Giulio; Rumiati, Raffaella Ida

    2016-11-14

    Non-human primates evaluate food quality based on brightness of red and green shades of color, with red signaling higher energy or greater protein content in fruits and leafs. Despite the strong association between food and other sensory modalities, humans, too, estimate critical food features, such as calorie content, from vision. Previous research primarily focused on the effects of color on taste/flavor identification and intensity judgments. However, whether evaluation of perceived calorie content and arousal in humans are biased by color has received comparatively less attention. In this study we showed that color content of food images predicts arousal and perceived calorie content reported when viewing food even when confounding variables were controlled for. Specifically, arousal positively co-varied with red-brightness, while green-brightness was negatively associated with arousal and perceived calorie content. This result holds for a large array of food comprising of natural food - where color likely predicts calorie content - and of transformed food where, instead, color is poorly diagnostic of energy content. Importantly, this pattern does not emerged with nonfood items. We conclude that in humans visual inspection of food is central to its evaluation and seems to partially engage the same basic system as non-human primates.

  16. LC/MS method using cloud point extraction for the determination of permitted and illegal food colors in liquid, semiliquid, and solid food matrixes: single-laboratory validation.

    PubMed

    Ates, Ebru; Mittendorf, Klaus; Senyuva, Hamide

    2011-01-01

    A cloud point extraction method is reported using LC/MS for the determination of regulated water-soluble food colors (Allura Red, Sunset Yellow, erythrosine, and tartrazine) and banned fat-soluble synthetic azo dyes (Sudan I, II, III, and IV; Red B; 7B; Black B; Red G; Metanil Yellow; and Rhodamine B). The extraction of all 14 colors was carried out with cloud point extraction using the nonionic surfactant Triton X 114. Optimized conditions for cloud point extraction were 3% Triton X 114 (w/v), 0.1 M ammonium acetate, and heating at 50 degrees C for 30 min. This approach proved effective in giving quantitative recoveries from a diverse range of food matrixes, and optimized LC gave baseline chromatographic separation for all colors including Sudan IV and Red B. Single-laboratory validation was performed with spiking into liquid matrixes (wine and homemade wine), semiliquid matrixes (sauce and homemade paprika paste), and solid matrixes (spice and homemade chili powder) using the respective blank matrixes for matrix-matched calibration. The LOQ values for water-soluble colors were in the range of 15-150 mg/kg, and for the fat-soluble colors, 0.1-1.5 mg/kg. The mean recovery values were in the range of 69.6-116.0% (except Allura Red and Sunset Yellow in wine, for which recoveries were lower). The mean RSDs for colors were in the range of 4.0-14.8%. A small survey was conducted of samples of confectionery products, dried fruits, wines, bitter sodas, juices, sauces, pastes, and spices, which demonstrated the applicability of the method to a diverse selection of real food samples. Allura Red was detected in strawberry jelly and Sunset Yellow in artificial saffron.

  17. Color change of newly developed esthetic restorative material immersed in food-simulating solutions.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Megumi; Kawakami, Susumu; Noda, Mamoru; Sano, Hidehiko

    2006-06-01

    Recently, an esthetic tooth coating material has been developed. The material consisted of a primer solution, a base coat, and a top coat. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to evaluate the color change of this tooth coating material and two resin composites after immersion in food-simulating, staining solutions. To this end, the newly developed coating material with and without its top coat, a flowable resin composite, and a hybrid resin composite were employed for the evaluation. The specimens were subjected to an experimental 24-hour staining cycle: 7-hour immersion in coffee, green tea or red wine, then 17-hour immersion in artificial saliva solution containing 0.3% mucin. After 24 hours, 3 days, 1, 2, and 4 weeks of immersion, the color changes of all specimen surfaces were measured. Compared with the other materials, the deltaE* value of coating material without its top coat tended to increase as the immersion period increased until 4 weeks. On the other hand, the deltaE* value of coating material with its top coat measured the lowest among the materials tested. Based on the results obtained, it was concluded that when using this recently developed tooth coating material in dental clinics, its top coat should be properly applied.

  18. Squid Pen Chitin Chitooligomers as Food Colorants Absorbers

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Tzu-Wen; Huang, Chih-Ting; Dzung, Nguyen Anh; Wang, San-Lang

    2015-01-01

    One of the most promising applications of chitosanase is the conversion of chitinous biowaste into bioactive chitooligomers (COS). TKU033 chitosanase was induced from squid pen powder (SPP)-containing Bacillus cereus TKU033 medium and purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and column chromatography. The enzyme was relatively more thermostable in the presence of the substrate and had an activity of 93% at 50 °C in a pH 5 buffer solution for 60 min. Furthermore, the enzyme used for the COS preparation was also studied. The enzyme products revealed various mixtures of COS that with different degrees of polymerization (DP), ranging from three to nine. In the culture medium, the fermented SPP was recovered, and it displayed a better adsorption rate (up to 96%) for the disperse dyes than the water-soluble food colorants, Allura Red AC (R40) and Tartrazne (Y4). Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopic (FT-IR) analysis proved that the adsorption of the dyes onto fermented SPP was a physical adsorption. Results also showed that fermented SPP was a favorable adsorber and could be employed as low-cost alternative for dye removal in wastewater treatment. PMID:25608726

  19. 76 FR 47210 - Notices of Filing of Petitions for Food Additives and Color Additives; Relocation in the Federal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Notices of Filing of Petitions for Food Additives and Color Additives; Relocation in the Federal Register AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... petitions for food additives and color additives that are published in accordance with the Federal Food...

  20. A preliminary study for identification of candidate AFLP markers under artificial selection for shell color in pearl oyster Pinctada fucata.

    PubMed

    Zou, Keshu; Zhang, Dianchang; Guo, Huayang; Zhu, Caiyan; Li, Min; Jiang, Shigui

    2014-05-25

    Pearl oyster Pinctada fucata is widely cultured to produce seawater pearl in South China, and the quality of pearl is significantly affected by its shell color. Thus the Pearl Oyster Selective Breeding Program (POSBP) was carried out for the shell color and growth traits. The black (B), gold (G), red (R) and white (W) shell strains with fast growth trait were achieved after five successive generation selection. In this study, AFLP technique was used to scan genome of four strains with different shell colors to identify the candidate markers under artificial selection. Eight AFLP primer combinations were screened and yielded 688 loci, 676 (98.26%) of which were polymorphic. In black, gold, red and white strains, the percentage of polymorphic loci was 90.41%, 87.79%, 93.60% and 93.31%, respectively, Nei's gene diversity was 0.3225, 0.2829, 0.3221 and 0.3292, Shannon's information index was 0.4801, 0.4271, 0.4825 and 0.4923, and the value of FST was 0.1805. These results suggested that the four different shell color strains had high genetic diversity and great genetic differentiation among strains, which had been subjected to the continuous selective pressures during the artificial selective breeding. Furthermore, six outlier loci were considered as the candidate markers under artificial selection for shell color. This study provides a molecular evidence for the inheritance of shell color of P. fucata.

  1. Food color, flavor, and conditioned avoidance among red-winged blackbirds.

    PubMed

    Werner, Scott J; Kimball, Bruce A; Provenza, Frederick D

    2008-01-28

    The relationship between food flavors and postingestive feedback enables mammalian herbivores to procure nutrients and avoid toxins within ever-changing environments. We conducted four experiments with red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) in captivity to determine the relative roles of color and flavor cues paired with negative postingestive feedback. We first conducted baseline tests to assess preferences for colors and flavors. All blackbirds preferred red- to blue-colored food, and they preferred umami- (l-alanine) flavored to bitter/astringent food (tannic acid). We observed no difference in consumption of salty (NaCl) vs sour (citric acid) foods during baseline tests (i.e., neutral flavors). We then conditioned experimentally naïve blackbirds with intraperitoneal injections of lithium chloride (LiCl) to avoid food treated with red and l-alanine, or red and NaCl (n=30 birds per conditioning group). Subsequent to conditioning with LiCl, three test groups were established from each conditioned group to evaluate color and flavor preferences, and preferences for novel color-flavor pairings (e.g., red/tannic acid vs blue/l-alanine). Blackbirds avoided red and salty food throughout the 4-day test. Avoidance conditioned with LiCl extinguished for preferred flavors, but not for colors, of food. Conditioning affected indifference for the otherwise preferred flavor and avoidance for the otherwise neutral flavor. Relative to the neutral-flavor conditioning group, the group conditioned with a preferred flavor exhibited stronger conditioned avoidance of colored food. Unlike conditioned flavor avoidance, birds were conditioned to avoid red food only when blue food was made familiar prior to conditioning. Collectively, these results illustrate that blackbirds used affective processes (flavor-feedback relationships) to shift preference for both novel and familiar flavors, and cognitive associations (colors) to avoid food, subsequent to toxin exposure. We discuss the

  2. Classification of Weed Species Using Artificial Neural Networks Based on Color Leaf Texture Feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhichen; An, Qiu; Ji, Changying

    The potential impact of herbicide utilization compel people to use new method of weed control. Selective herbicide application is optimal method to reduce herbicide usage while maintain weed control. The key of selective herbicide is how to discriminate weed exactly. The HIS color co-occurrence method (CCM) texture analysis techniques was used to extract four texture parameters: Angular second moment (ASM), Entropy(E), Inertia quadrature (IQ), and Inverse difference moment or local homogeneity (IDM).The weed species selected for studying were Arthraxon hispidus, Digitaria sanguinalis, Petunia, Cyperus, Alternanthera Philoxeroides and Corchoropsis psilocarpa. The software of neuroshell2 was used for designing the structure of the neural network, training and test the data. It was found that the 8-40-1 artificial neural network provided the best classification performance and was capable of classification accuracies of 78%.

  3. 37 CFR 1.776 - Calculation of patent term extension for a food additive or color additive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... extension for a food additive or color additive. 1.776 Section 1.776 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights... Calculation of patent term extension for a food additive or color additive. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a food additive or color additive is eligible for extension, the term...

  4. 37 CFR 1.776 - Calculation of patent term extension for a food additive or color additive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... extension for a food additive or color additive. 1.776 Section 1.776 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights... Calculation of patent term extension for a food additive or color additive. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a food additive or color additive is eligible for extension, the term...

  5. 37 CFR 1.776 - Calculation of patent term extension for a food additive or color additive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... extension for a food additive or color additive. 1.776 Section 1.776 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights... Calculation of patent term extension for a food additive or color additive. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a food additive or color additive is eligible for extension, the term...

  6. 37 CFR 1.776 - Calculation of patent term extension for a food additive or color additive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... extension for a food additive or color additive. 1.776 Section 1.776 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights... Calculation of patent term extension for a food additive or color additive. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a food additive or color additive is eligible for extension, the term...

  7. 37 CFR 1.776 - Calculation of patent term extension for a food additive or color additive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... extension for a food additive or color additive. 1.776 Section 1.776 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights... Calculation of patent term extension for a food additive or color additive. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a food additive or color additive is eligible for extension, the term...

  8. Effects of artificial sweeteners on body weight, food and drink intake.

    PubMed

    Polyák, Eva; Gombos, K; Hajnal, B; Bonyár-Müller, K; Szabó, Sz; Gubicskó-Kisbenedek, A; Marton, K; Ember, I

    2010-12-01

    Artificial sweeteners are widely used all over the world. They may assist in weight management, prevention of dental caries, control of blood glucose of diabetics, and also can be used to replace sugar in foods. In the animal experimentation mice were given oral doses of water solutions of table top artificial sweeteners (saccharin, cyclamate based, acesulfame-K based, and aspartame) the amount of maximum Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) ad libitum. The controls received only tap water with the same drinking conditions as the treated groups. The mice were fed chow ad libitum.We measured food intake and body weight once a week, water and solutions of artificial sweeteners intake twice a week. The data were analysed by statistical methods (T-probe, regression analysis).Consumption of sweeteners resulted in significantly increased body weight; however, the food intake did not change.These results question the effect of non-caloric artificial sweeteners on weight-maintenance or body weight decrease.

  9. Bactericidal activity of the food color additive Phloxine B against Staphylococcus aureus and other food borne microbial pathogens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The spread of antibiotic resistance among Staphylococcus aureus strains requires the development of new anti S. aureus agents. The objective of this study was evaluating the antimicrobial activity of the food color additive Phloxine B against S. aureus and other food microbial pathogens. Our result ...

  10. Effects of different food colorants and polishing techniques on color stability of provisional prosthetic materials.

    PubMed

    Rutkunas, Vygandas; Sabaliauskas, Vaidotas; Mizutani, Hiroshi

    2010-03-01

    The main objective was to investigate the effects of different polishing techniques on the color stability of provisional prosthetic materials upon exposure to different staining agents by mimicking the oral environment in vitro. Fifty-six cylindrical specimens were prepared for each type of material: bis-acryl and light-polymerized composite resins, and methyl methacrylate- and ethyl methacrylatebased resins. The specimens were polished using seven different polishing techniques and then immersed in four different staining agents. Color was measured with a spectrophotometer before and after immersion, and color changes (DeltaE) were calculated. The effects of the type of provisional material, polishing procedure, staining agent, and their interactions on color stability were significant (p<0.05). Amongst these factors, the staining agent exerted the strongest effect on color stability. Amongst the provisional materials tested, methacrylate-based resins exhibited the highest color stability irrespective of polishing technique and staining agent.

  11. Evaluation of the Effect of Surface Polishing, Oral Beverages and Food Colorants on Color Stability and Surface Roughness of Nanocomposite Resins

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, R Veena; Nagaraj, Hema; Siddaraju, Kishore; Poluri, Ramya Krishna

    2015-01-01

    sample in Subgroup A, second in Subgroup B, third in Subgroup C, fourth in Subgroup D, and fifth in Subgroup E. Each was immersed in the respective test solution for 10 min, twice a day for 30 days. Group A - Tea, Group B - Coffee, Group C - Cola, Group D - Turmeric, Group E - Control (artificial saliva). Post immersion profilometric value was recorded to evaluate roughness bought about by the solutions (Ra3) and spectrophotometric value was recorded to evaluate the color change in samples (ΔE2). Results were statistically analyzed using ANOVA. Results: Higher mean roughness (Ra2-Ra1) value was recorded in Sof-Lex, followed by Diamond polishing paste and Control group. Comparison of surface roughness caused due to beverages and food colorant solution showed subgroup C (Coca Cola) increased surface roughness in all groups (Group I, II, III). Subgroup D (Turmeric) had the highest discoloration potential (P < 0001) in all groups, followed by coffee, tea, coca-cola and artificial saliva. Sof-Lex polishing System showed most color stability. Conclusion: Polishing procedures significantly roughen the surface of the restoration compared to the unpolished Mylar controls. One-step polishing system (diamond polishing paste) produces a smoother surface compared to a multi-step system (Sof-Lex polishing disks). Turmeric solution caused maximum staining of the samples, to a visually perceptible level. PMID:26229373

  12. Evaluation of the Effect of Surface Polishing, Oral Beverages and Food Colorants on Color Stability and Surface Roughness of Nanocomposite Resins.

    PubMed

    Kumari, R Veena; Nagaraj, Hema; Siddaraju, Kishore; Poluri, Ramya Krishna

    2015-07-01

    Subgroup C, fourth in Subgroup D, and fifth in Subgroup E. Each was immersed in the respective test solution for 10 min, twice a day for 30 days. Group A - Tea, Group B - Coffee, Group C - Cola, Group D - Turmeric, Group E - Control (artificial saliva). Post immersion profilometric value was recorded to evaluate roughness bought about by the solutions (Ra3) and spectrophotometric value was recorded to evaluate the color change in samples (ΔE2). Results were statistically analyzed using ANOVA. Higher mean roughness (Ra2-Ra1) value was recorded in Sof-Lex, followed by Diamond polishing paste and Control group. Comparison of surface roughness caused due to beverages and food colorant solution showed subgroup C (Coca Cola) increased surface roughness in all groups (Group I, II, III). Subgroup D (Turmeric) had the highest discoloration potential (P < 0001) in all groups, followed by coffee, tea, coca-cola and artificial saliva. Sof-Lex polishing System showed most color stability. Polishing procedures significantly roughen the surface of the restoration compared to the unpolished Mylar controls. One-step polishing system (diamond polishing paste) produces a smoother surface compared to a multi-step system (Sof-Lex polishing disks). Turmeric solution caused maximum staining of the samples, to a visually perceptible level.

  13. Evaluation of photo-mutagenicity and photo-cytotoxicity of food coloring agents.

    PubMed

    Arimoto-Kobayashi, Sakae; Machida, Masaki; Okamoto, Keinosuke; Yamaguchi, Akie

    2005-05-01

    Pigments extracted from natural products are widely used for food coloration in Japan. An investigation concerning the photo-mutagenicity and photo-carcinogenicity of frequently used colorants in Japan was performed. Colorants examined were from Laccifer lacca (lac-color), Coccus cacti (cochineal-color), Carthamus tinctorius (carthamus yellow), Gardenia augusta (gardenia yellow and gardenia blue), Monascus anka and Monascus purpureus (monascus red), the skin of Vitis vinifera and Vitis labrusca (grape-skin color), Tamarindus indica (tamarind brown) and Beta vulgaris (beet red). No significant increase in bacterial mutation was found when Salmonella typhimurium TA98, TA100 and TA102 were simultaneously treated with colorants and subjected to UVA irradiation for 30 min. When colorant solutions were subjected to UVA irradiation for 4 h, irradiated solutions containing lac-color became slightly mutagenic toward S.typhimurium TA98 without metabolic activation. A decrease in cell survival resulted when WTK-1 cells were subjected to UVA irradiation for 60 min in the presence of purpurin at 1 mg/ml. Delayed cytotoxicity was also observed following 24 h incubation in fresh medium of samples that were subjected to UVA irradiation for 60 min in the presence of colorant (carthamus yellow, grape-skin color, gardenia blue, cochineal-color, monascus red or purpurin).

  14. Comparative Thermal Degradation Patterns of Natural Yellow Colorants Used in Foods.

    PubMed

    Giménez, Pedro J; Fernández-López, José A; Angosto, José M; Obón, José M

    2015-12-01

    There is a great interest in natural yellow colorants due to warnings issued about certain yellow food colorings of synthetic origin. However, no comparative studies have been reported of their thermal stability. For this reason, the thermal stabilities of six natural yellow colorants used in foods--lutein, riboflavin, curcumin, ß-carotene, gardenia yellow and Opuntia betaxanthins--were studied in simple solutions over a temperature range 30-90 °C. Spectral properties and visual color were investigated during 6 h of heat treatment. Visual color was monitored from the CIEL*a*b* parameters. The remaining absorbance at maximum wavelength and the total color difference were used to quantify color degradation. The rate of color degradation increased as the temperature rose. The results showed that the thermal degradation of the colorants followed a first-order reaction kinetics. The reaction rate constants and half-life periods were determined as being central to understanding the color degradation kinetics. The temperature-dependent degradation was adequately modeled on the Arrhenius equation. Activation energies ranged from 3.2 kJmol(-1) (lutein) to 43.7 kJmol(-1) (Opuntia betaxanthins). ß-carotene and lutein exhibited high thermal stability, while betaxanthins and riboflavin degraded rapidly as temperature increased. Gardenia yellow and curcumin were in an intermediate position.

  15. Lack of genotoxicity in vivo for food color additive Allura Red AC.

    PubMed

    Bastaki, Maria; Farrell, Thomas; Bhusari, Sachin; Pant, Kamala; Kulkarni, Rohan

    2017-07-01

    Allura Red AC is an approved food color additive internationally with INS number 129, in the United States as food color subject to batch certification "Food, Drug, and Cosmetic" (FD&C) Red No. 40, and in Europe as food color additive with E number 129. In their evaluation of the color (2013), the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) expressed concerns of potential genotoxicity, based primarily on one genotoxicity study that was not conducted according to Guidelines. The present in vivo genotoxicity study was conducted according to OECD Guidelines in response to EFSA's request for additional data. The animal species and strain, and the tissues examined were selected specifically to address the previously reported findings. The results show clear absence of genotoxic activity for Allura Red AC, in the bone marrow micronucleus assay and the Comet assay in the liver, stomach, and colon. These data addressed EFSA's concerns for genotoxicity. The Joint WHO/FAO Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) (2016) also reviewed the study and concluded that there is no genotoxicity concern for Allura Red AC. Negative findings in parallel genotoxicity studies on Tartrazine and Ponceau 4R (published separately) are consistent with lack of genotoxicity for azo dyes used as food colors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Color and odor of artificial fruit used to signal potential dispersers in the Atlantic forest in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barcelos, Aliny Oliveira; Perônico, Clayton; Eutrópio, Frederico Jacob

    2012-06-01

    Fruit color and odor are the main features regulating the rate of fruit predation and dispersal. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of odor and color on fruit predators and dispersers. The present study was conducted in a 30ha area of secondary forest in Southeastern Atlantic Brazil. This area was divided into two transects, in which four points were marked with a 30m distance from each other. Each sampling point contained a total of 30 artificial fruit which belong to six different treatment groups, with five artificial fruit per group. Each group was randomly placed on the ground and that artificial fruit was checked every seven days. For each group of five fruit, 5mL of essence (vanilla or pineapple) were placed, and no essence was used in the control group. Artificial fruit was made with green and red nontoxic modeling clay, as well as artificial essences (vanilla and pineapple). A total of 960 fruits were used. Predated fruit equaled 26.9% (258 units), from which the red/pineapple had the highest predation rate (81.9%), followed by red/vanilla (46.3%), while green/control fruits were not predated. Throughout the experiment, bitten fruit and pecked fruit equaled 58.3% and 41.7%, respectively. No significant differences were recorded (x2=7.57, df=5, p=0.182) between bitten and pecked fruit. Fruit color and odor are important in attracting predators and dispersers, which explains the high rate of predation of red/ vanilla and red/pineapple, and the absence of predated fruits in the green/control group. Regarding the potential disperser, there was no statistically significant difference between pecked fruit and bitten fruit. As a result, it should be taken into consideration that zoochory (mammalochory and ornithochory) is the most important dispersal; therefore, it should be concluded that birds are more attracted by color and mammals by odor.

  17. Food color and appearance measurement, specification and communication, can we do better?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchings, John; Singleton, Mark; Plater, Keith; Dias, Benjamin

    2002-06-01

    Conventional methods of color specification demand a sample that is flat, uniformly colored, diffusely reflecting and opaque. Very many natural, processed and manufactured foods, on the other hand, are three-dimensional, irregularly shaped unevenly colored and translucent. Hence, spectrophotometers and tristimulus colorimeters can only be used for reliable and accurate color measurement in certain cases and under controlled conditions. These techniques are certainly unsuitable for specification of color patterning and other factors of total appearance in which, for example, surface texture and gloss interfere with the surface color. Hence, conventional techniques are more appropriate to food materials than to foods themselves. This paper reports investigations on the application of digital camera and screen technologies to these problems. Results indicated that accuracy sufficient for wide scale use in the food industry is obtainable. Measurement applications include the specification and automatic measurement and classification of total appearance properties of three-dimensional products. This will be applicable to specification and monitoring of fruit and vegetables within the growing, storage and marketing supply chain and to on-line monitoring. Applications to sensory panels include monitoring of color and appearance changes occurring during paneling and the development of physical reference scales based pigment chemistry changes. Digital technology will be extendable to the on-screen judging of real and virtual products as well as to the improvement of appearance archiving and communication.

  18. Filamentous fungi are large-scale producers of pigments and colorants for the food industry.

    PubMed

    Dufossé, Laurent; Fouillaud, Mireille; Caro, Yanis; Mapari, Sameer A S; Sutthiwong, Nuthathai

    2014-04-01

    With globalization in the research trends, healthier life styles, and the growing market for the natural food colorants in the economically fast-growing countries all over the world, filamentous fungi are being investigated as readily available sources of chemically diverse colorants. With two selected examples, polyketide-Monascus-like pigments from the new fungal production strains, and the promising and yet unexplored hydroxy-anthraquinoid colorants, the present review highlights exciting recent findings, which may pave the way for alternative and/or additional biotechnological processes for the industrial production of natural food colorants of improved functionality. As an additional aspect, marine fungi are discussed as potential sources of novel pigments of numerous color hues and atypical chemical structures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Color stability of sealed composite resin restorative materials after ultraviolet artificial aging and immersion in staining solutions.

    PubMed

    Catelan, Anderson; Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Sundfeld, Renato Hermann; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; dos Santos, Paulo Henrique

    2011-04-01

    The color alteration of resin-based materials is one of the most common reasons to replace esthetic dental restorations. This study assessed the influence of surface sealant (Biscover) on the color stability of nanofilled (Supreme XT) and microhybrid (Vit-l-escence and Opallis) composite resins after artificial aging. One hundred disc-shaped (6 × 1.5 mm) specimens were made for each composite resin. After 24 hours, all specimens were polished and sealant was applied to 50 specimens of each material. Baseline color was measured according to the CIE L*a*b* system using a reflection spectrophotometer. Ten specimens of each group were aged for 252 h in an ultraviolet (UV)-accelerated aging chamber or immersed for 4 weeks in cola soft drink, orange juice, red wine staining solutions or distilled water as control. Color difference (ΔE) after aging was calculated based on the color coordinates before (baseline) and after aging/staining treatment. Data were analyzed with 2-way ANOVA and Fisher's test (α=.05). The results showed significant changes in color after artificial aging in all the groups (P<.05). Independent of the material studied, red wine resulted in the highest level of discoloration. Intermediate values were found for orange juice, UV accelerated aging, and the cola soft drink. The lowest values of ΔE were found for specimens stored in distilled water. All composite resins showed some color alteration after the aging methods. The surface sealant did not alter the color stability of the tested materials. Copyright © 2011 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Bleaching Agent Action on Color Stability, Surface Roughness and Microhardness of Composites Submitted to Accelerated Artificial Aging

    PubMed Central

    Rattacaso, Raphael Mendes Bezerra; da Fonseca Roberti Garcia, Lucas; Aguilar, Fabiano Gamero; Consani, Simonides; de Carvalho Panzeri Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bleaching agent action on color stability, surface roughness and microhardness of composites (Charisma, Filtek Supreme and Heliomolar - A2) submitted to accelerated artificial aging (AAA). Methods: A Teflon matrix (12 x 2 mm) was used to fabricate 18 specimens (n=6) which, after polishing (Sof-Lex), were submitted to initial color reading (ΔE), Knoop microhardness (KHN) (50 g/15 s load) and roughness (Ra) (cut-off 0.25 mm) tests. Afterwards, the samples were submitted to AAA for 384 hours and new color, microhardness and roughness readings were performed. After this, the samples were submitted to daily application (4 weeks) of 16% Carbamide Peroxide (NiteWhite ACP) for 8 hours and kept in artificial saliva for 16 hours. New color, microhardness and roughness readings were made at the end of the cycle, and 15 days after bleaching. Results: Comparison of the ΔE means (2-way ANOVA, Bonferroni, P<.05) indicated clinically unacceptable color alteration for all composites after AAA, but without significant difference. Statistically significant increase in the KHN values after AAA was observed, but without significant alterations 15 days after bleaching. For Ra there was no statistically significant difference after AAA and 15 days after bleaching. Conclusions: The alterations promoted by the bleaching agent and AAA are material dependent. PMID:21494380

  1. Estimates of dietary exposure of children to artificial food colours in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Husain, A; Sawaya, W; Al-Omair, A; Al-Zenki, S; Al-Amiri, H; Ahmed, N; Al-Sinan, M

    2006-03-01

    To assess the intake of artificial food colour additives by 5-14-year-old children in the State of Kuwait, a 24-h dietary recall was conducted twice on 3141 male and female Kuwaiti and non-Kuwaiti children from 58 schools. The determination of colour additives in 344 foods items consumed was performed using high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detector. A comparison with the Food and Agriculture Organization and World Health Organization acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) was undertaken to evaluate the potential risk associated with the consumption of artificial colour additives by children in Kuwait. The results indicated that out of nine permitted colours, four exceeded their ADIs by factors of 2-8: tartrazine, sunset yellow, carmoisine and allura red. Further, follow-up studies to provide insight into potential adverse health effects associated with the high intakes of these artificial colour additives on the test population are warranted.

  2. Effects of high-pressure CO2 processing on flavor, texture, and color of foods.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Linyan; Bi, Xiufang; Xu, Zenghui; Yang, Yingjie; Liao, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    High-pressure CO2 (HPCD) is a pasteurization method that inactivates microorganism and enzymes through molecular effects of CO2 under pressures below 50 MPa without exposing foods to adverse effects of heat. Thermal pasteurization can impart undesirable changes on organoleptic and nutritional quality of the foods, which can reduce sensory perception and consumer acceptance of the foods. As a novel nonthermal processing technique, HPCD does avoid drawbacks such as loss of flavor, denaturation of nutrients, production of side toxic reactions, as well as changes in physical, mechanical, and optical properties of the food materials involved in the processing. This review gives a survey and analysis of recent publications regarding the effects of HPCD on the flavor, texture and color of processed foods, and possible mechanisms explaining HPCD technique on the flavor, texture, and color of the foods were discussed.

  3. Food coloring agents and plant food supplements derived from Vitis vinifera: a new source of human exposure to ochratoxin A.

    PubMed

    Solfrizzo, Michele; Piemontese, Luca; Gambacorta, Lucia; Zivoli, Rosanna; Longobardi, Francesco

    2015-04-08

    Grape pomaces are increasingly being used as starting material in the industrial production of plant food supplements (PFS), food coloring, and tartrates, but they are at risk of ochratoxin A (OTA) contamination, a mycotoxin with nephrotoxic and carcinogenic effects. We analyzed 24 commercial PFS and 13 food coloring samples derived from Vitis vinifera, mainly pomaces, using a HPLC-FLD method for OTA determination. OTA was found in 75% of PFS samples and 69% of food coloring samples at levels of <1.16-20.23 μg/kg and <1.16-32.00 μg/kg, respectively. The four commercial leavening agents containing tartrates were found to be negative for OTA. All eight samples collected in two distilleries that use grape pomaces and wine lees to produce tartrates and other byproducts contained OTA at levels of <1.16-240.93 μg/kg. The high incidence of OTA contamination in PFS and food coloring agents derived from V. vinifera suggests that maximum permitted level(s) should be established for this mycotoxin in these products.

  4. Color constrasts in advertising: facade colors of food and drink consumption venues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchings, John

    2002-06-01

    The building facade has a visually defined impact and there are numerous forces driving the choice of colors used. Commercial premises such as pubs, restaurants and bars are normally but not always clearly marked as such. Although we human beings can have the option of free choice in the colors we use around the home there are numerous positive driving forces dictating those we use in business life. Many of these factors have been identified. They depend on the type of population these venues serve, their geography and their traditions.

  5. Analysis of the Influence of Food Colorings in Esthetic Orthodontic Elastomeric Ligatures

    PubMed Central

    Dias da Silva, Vanessa; de Lima, Eduardo Martinelli S; Dias, Caroline; Osório, Leandro Berni

    2016-01-01

    Proposition: The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vitro the color changes of esthetic orthodontic elastomeric ligatures of different shades when exposed to four food colorings commonly found in the diet of patients. Materials and Methods: The sample consisted of esthetic orthodontic elastomeric ligatures in the colors pearl, pearl blue, pearl white and colorless, which were immersed for 72 hours in five different solutions: distilled water (control group), coffee, tea, Coca-Cola ® and wine. The color changes of the esthetic orthodontic elastomeric ligatures were measured with the aid of a spectrophotometer, at T1 - as provided by the manufacturer; and T2 - after colorings process. Results: The results indicated that the esthetic orthodontic elastomeric ligatures of all initial hues are susceptible to pigmentation. Among the evaluated colors, all changed the finished look and the color of the samples tested. In ascending order, the color of the samples was as follows: distilled water, Coca-Cola®, black tea, wine and coffee. Conclusion: The substances that have a greater potential for pigmentation in esthetic orthodontic elastomeric ligatures were black tea, wine and coffee, respectively. All shades of esthetic orthodontic elastomeric ligatures are susceptible to color change. PMID:27733878

  6. Induction of giant cells by the synthetic food colorants viz. lemon yellow and orange red.

    PubMed

    Prajitha, V; Thoppil, John E

    2016-05-01

    Cytotoxicity and giant cell formation induced by lemon yellow and orange red synthetic food colorants were evaluated in the present study. The aqueous solutions of both the dye solutions were tested for cytotoxicity using Allium cepa assay. Frequency of giant cells were determined after treating the root tips with different concentrations of both food colorant solutions viz., 0.005, 0.01, 0.05, 0.1 % for varying time durations (1/2, 1, 2, 3 h). These colorants may cause giant cell formation primarily by interfering with the normal course of mitosis. Giant cells showing multiple aberrations viz. bridged and binucleate condition, cellular fragmentation, nuclear lesion, double and multiple nuclear lesions, double nuclear peaks and cellular breakage, elongated nucleus, nuclear budding, hyperchromasia, micronucleus, nuclear erosion, pulverized nucleus etc. were induced in root tips treated with both of the colorants. The synthetic food colorant treated cells showed inhibition of cell division and induction of giant cells. A dose dependant decrease in the mitotic index [88.20 % (c(-ve), 3h) to 81.54 % (Lx4, 3h) and 88.20 % (c(-ve), 3h) to 73.17 % (Ox4, 3h)] was observed. All mitotic phases show significant induction of giant cells when treated with both food colorants. Interphase stage shows higher percentage of giant cells, whereas in cytokinesis it was negligible. The orange red food colorant is observed to be more toxic because it recorded higher percentage of giant cell induction when compared with lemon yellow [27.93 % (Lx4, 3h) and 28.07 % (Ox4, 3h)].

  7. Color stability and flexural strength of poly (methyl methacrylate) and bis-acrylic composite based provisional crown and bridge auto-polymerizing resins exposed to beverages and food dye: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Gujjari, Anil K; Bhatnagar, Vishrut M; Basavaraju, Ravi M

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the color stability and flexural strength of poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and bis-acrylic composite based provisional crown and bridge auto-polymerizing resins exposed to tea, coffee, cola, and food dye. Two provisional crown and bridge resins, one DPI self-cure tooth molding powder (PMMA) (Group A), and one Protemp 4 Temporization Material (bis-acrylic composite) (Group B) were used. Disk-shaped specimens for color stability testing (n = 30 for each material) and bar-shaped specimens for flexural strength testing (n = 30 for each material) were fabricated using a metal mold. The specimens were immersed in artificial saliva, artificial saliva + tea, artificial saliva + coffee, artificial saliva + cola, and artificial saliva + food dye solutions and stored in an incubator at 37°C. Color measurements were taken before immersion, and then after 3 and 7 days of immersion. Flexural strength was evaluated after 7 days of immersion. Group A showed significantly higher color stability as compared to Group B, and artificial saliva + coffee solution had the most staining capacity for the resins. Test solutions had no effect on the flexural strength of Group A, but Group B specimens immersed in artificial saliva + cola showed significantly lower flexural strength values as compared to the control group. The findings of the study showed that for materials used in the study, PMMA was more color stable than bis-acrylic composite based resin. Also, material based on PMMA was more resistant to damage from dietary beverages as compared to bis-acrylic composite based provisional crown and bridge resin.

  8. Determination of seven certified color additives in food products using liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Harp, Bhakti Petigara; Miranda-Bermudez, Enio; Barrows, Julie N

    2013-04-17

    This study describes a new method for determining FD&C Blue No. 1, FD&C Blue No. 2, FD&C Green No. 3, FD&C Red No. 3, FD&C Red No. 40, FD&C Yellow No. 5, and FD&C Yellow No. 6 in food products. These seven color additives are water-soluble dyes that are required to be batch certified by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) before they may be used in food and other FDA-regulated products. In the new method, the color additives are extracted from a product using one of two procedures developed for various product types, isolated from the noncolored components, and analyzed by liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection. The method was validated by determining linearity, range, precision, recovery from various matrices, limit of detection, limit of quantitation, and relative standard deviation for each color additive. A survey of 44 food products, including beverages, frozen treats, powder mixes, gelatin products, candies, icings, jellies, spices, dressings, sauces, baked goods, and dairy products, found total color additives ranging from 1.9 to 1221 mg/kg. FDA intends to use the new method for conducting a rigorous, comprehensive dietary exposure assessment of certified color additives in products likely to be consumed by children.

  9. Warning Color Changes in Response to Food Deprivation in the Pipevine Swallowtail Butterfly, Battus philenor

    PubMed Central

    Pegram, Kimberly V.; Nahm, Alexandra C.; Rutowski, Ronald L.

    2013-01-01

    Predation on distasteful animals should favor warning coloration that is relatively conspicuous and phenotypically invariable. However, even among similarly colored individuals there can be variation in their warning signals. In butterflies, individual differences in larval feeding history could cause this variation. The warning signal of the pipevine swallowtail butterfly, Battus philenor L. (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) consists of both a blue iridescent patch and pigmentbased orange spots on the ventral hindwing. B. philenor males also display a dorsal surface iridescent patch that functions as a sexual indicator signal. A previous study of iridescence in B. philenor found that the iridescent blue on both the dorsal and ventral hind wings is variable and significantly different between lab-reared and field-caught individuals. These differences could be the result of larval food deprivation in the field. Through experimental manipulation of larval diet, larval food deprivation was evaluated as a potential cause of the differences observed between lab and field individuals, and if food deprivation is a source of inter-individual variation in warning signals. B. philenor larvae were food restricted starting at two points in the last larval instar, and one group was fed through pupation. Adult coloration was then compared. Food deprivation led to poorer adult condition, as indicated by lower adult body mass, forewing length, and fat content of stressed individuals. As the level of food deprivation increased, the hue of the iridescent patches on both the dorsal and ventral hind wing shifted to shorter wavelengths, and the chroma of the orange spots decreased. The shifts in iridescent color did not match the differences previously found between lab and field individuals. However, the treatment differences indicate that food deprivation may be a significant source of warning color variation. The differences between the treatment groups are likely detectable by predators

  10. Effect of opacifiers and UV absorbers on pigmented maxillofacial silicone elastomer, part 1: color stability after artificial aging.

    PubMed

    Han, Ying; Powers, John M; Kiat-Amnuay, Sudarat

    2013-06-01

    Much dissatisfaction with the color instability and reduced lifetime of extraoral maxillofacial prostheses due to degradation has been reported. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of a UV mineral-based light protecting agent (LP) on the color stability of pigmented maxillofacial silicone elastomer MDX-4210/Type A after artificial aging to 2 widely used opacifiers. Forty-five groups were established (n=225 total). Three different types of opacifiers (LP, titanium white dry pigment [TW], or silicone intrinsic white [SW]) were added to silicone MDX-4210/type A at 3 concentrations (5%, 10%, or 15%) and subsequently combined with each of 5 colors (no pigments [control], red, blue, yellow, or mixed pigments). Artists' oil pigment was used with LP and TW, while intrinsic silicone pigment was used to color SW. Before and after an energy exposure of 450 kJ/m(2), CIE L*a*b* values were measured with a spectrophotometer. The CIELAB 50:50% perceptibility (ΔE*=1.1) and acceptability threshold (ΔE*=3.0) were used to interpret color changes (ΔE*). Color differences after aging were subjected to 3-way ANOVA. Means were compared by the Fisher PLSD intervals at α=.05. The ΔE* values of all groups were below the acceptability threshold of ΔE*=3.0, except for the control group of SW at 10%, which showed the greatest color change (ΔE*=3.1). When mixed pigment groups were considered, at 5% concentration, LP showed the smallest color change, followed by SW and TW (P<.05); at 10%, no significant differences among the 3 opacifiers were noted (P>.05); at 15%, LP showed the smallest color change, followed by TW and SW (P<.05). All 3 opacifiers at all concentrations protected pigmented silicone MDX4-4210/Type A from color degradation. The LP group showed the smallest color changes. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [The effect of artificial selection for coat color on fitness in a farm population of the sable (Martes zibellina)].

    PubMed

    Kashtanov, S N; Lazebnyĭ, O E; Beketov, S V; Imasheva, A G

    2008-06-01

    The relationship between the response to artificial selection for darker coat color and fitness in a farm population of the sable (Martes zibellina L.) from the Pushkinskoe Fur Farm (Moscow oblast) was studied. The selection was performed during 41 years. By the moment of the study, a response to the selection for this character had been obtained: the coat color in the selected population had become darker, and the proportion of black animals in it increased. In addition, sables with black heads, which were absent in the original population, had appeared. Artificial selection was accompanied by a decrease in the fitness of the selected population, which was expressed in decreased female reproductive capacity parameters (the fertility, maturation rate, and duration of the reproductive period). A selection technique consisting in the use of only highly fertile animals in the selection originally made it possible to restore the fitness parameters to the initial level almost without a decrease in the dark shade of the fur. However, further selection led to a drastic decrease in fitness that could not be precluded by any selection method used. The possible ways to overcome this unfavorable effect of artificial selection are discussed.

  12. [Survey of toxic heavy metals and arsenic in existing food additives (natural colors)].

    PubMed

    Ogimoto, Mami; Uematsu, Yoko; Suzuki, Kumi; Kabashima, Junichiro; Nakazato, Mitsuo

    2009-10-01

    Pollution levels of toxic heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Hg) and arsenic in existing food additives used as food colors (40 samples of 15 kinds) were investigated. Heavy metals were detected in 8 samples; Pb in 1 sample (2.8 microg/g), Hg in 8 samples (0.1-3.4 microg/g) and arsenic in 2 samples (1.7, 2.6 microg/g). The Pb level in 1 sample of lac color (2.8 microg/g) exceeded the limit of 2 microg/g proposed by JECFA and Hg levels in 3 samples of cacao color (1.2-3.4 microg/g) exceeded the limit of 1 microg/g in the EU specification.

  13. Black bean anthocyanin-rich extracts as food colorants: Physicochemical stability and antidiabetes potential

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Black beans contain anthocyanins that could be used as colorants in foods with associated health benefits. The objective was to optimize anthocyanins extraction from black bean coats and evaluate their physicochemical stability and antidiabetes potential. Optimal extraction conditions were 24% ethan...

  14. Genome Sequence of Talaromyces atroroseus, Which Produces Red Colorants for the Food Industry

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Kasper Bøwig; Petersen, Bent; Rasmussen, Simon; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Talaromyces atroroseus is a known producer of Monascus colorants suitable for the food industry. Furthermore, genetic tools have been established that facilitate elucidation and engineering of its biosynthetic pathways. Here, we report the draft genome of a potential fungal cell factory, T. atroroseus IBT 11181 (CBS 123796). PMID:28254987

  15. Determination of synthetic food colorants in fish products by an HPLC-DAD method.

    PubMed

    Karanikolopoulos, G; Gerakis, A; Papadopoulou, K; Mastrantoni, I

    2015-06-15

    Reliable methods for quantification of synthetic water-soluble colors in complex food matrices are currently not available. The present work describes the development and validation of an improved protocol for the analysis of synthetic food colorants in complex food matrices presenting high protein and/or fat content. The method developed employs an extraction stage, followed by a subsequent sonification, centrifugation and concentration step. A final clean up via SPE on polyamide cartridges was also employed. The isolated colorants were separated and analyzed by an RP-HPLC/DAD system. High and consistent recoveries (min. 81%) and low RSDs (max. 6%) were achieved for all studied colorants. The issue of high fat content matrices was also addressed showing the need for an additional defatting step in the procedure. Overall, the protocol presented shows high precision and accuracy of detection and can provide the basis for future development of similar methods in other complex food matrices. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Urine Color

    MedlinePlus

    ... is often caused by medications, certain foods or food dyes. In some cases, though, changes in urine color ... may be caused by: Dyes. Some brightly colored food dyes can cause green urine. Dyes used for some ...

  17. Oxone/Fe[superscript 2+] Degradation of Food Dyes: Demonstration of Catalyst-Like Behavior and Kinetic Separation of Color

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nalliah, Ruth E.

    2015-01-01

    A demonstration of the degradation of food coloring dyes by oxidation via the Fenton reaction can be substituted with a simpler demonstration using the oxidant oxone with iron(II) ions as an activator. The addition of small amounts of solid oxone and iron(II) sulfate to solutions containing mixtures of food coloring results in successive…

  18. Oxone/Fe[superscript 2+] Degradation of Food Dyes: Demonstration of Catalyst-Like Behavior and Kinetic Separation of Color

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nalliah, Ruth E.

    2015-01-01

    A demonstration of the degradation of food coloring dyes by oxidation via the Fenton reaction can be substituted with a simpler demonstration using the oxidant oxone with iron(II) ions as an activator. The addition of small amounts of solid oxone and iron(II) sulfate to solutions containing mixtures of food coloring results in successive…

  19. Visual illusions and plate design: the effects of plate rim widths and rim coloring on perceived food portion size.

    PubMed

    McClain, A D; van den Bos, W; Matheson, D; Desai, M; McClure, S M; Robinson, T N

    2014-05-01

    The Delboeuf Illusion affects perceptions of the relative sizes of concentric shapes. This study was designed to extend research on the application of the Delboeuf illusion to food on a plate by testing whether a plate's rim width and coloring influence perceptual bias to affect perceived food portion size. Within-subjects experimental design. Experiment 1 tested the effect of rim width on perceived food portion size. Experiment 2 tested the effect of rim coloring on perceived food portion size. In both experiments, participants observed a series of photographic images of paired, side-by-side plates varying in designs and amounts of food. From each pair, participants were asked to select the plate that contained more food. Multilevel logistic regression examined the effects of rim width and coloring on perceived food portion size. Experiment 1: participants overestimated the diameter of food portions by 5% and the visual area of food portions by 10% on plates with wider rims compared with plates with very thin rims (P<0.0001). The effect of rim width was greater with larger food portion sizes. Experiment 2: participants overestimated the diameter of food portions by 1.5% and the visual area of food portions by 3% on plates with rim coloring compared with plates with no coloring (P=0.01). The effect of rim coloring was greater with smaller food portion sizes. The Delboeuf illusion applies to food on a plate. Participants overestimated food portion size on plates with wider and colored rims. These findings may help design plates to influence perceptions of food portion sizes.

  20. Visual illusions and plate design: The effects of plate rim widths and rim coloring on perceived food portion size

    PubMed Central

    McClain, Arianna; van den Bos, Wouter; Matheson, Donna; Desai, Manisha; McClure, Samuel M.; Robinson, Thomas N.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The Delboeuf Illusion affects perceptions of the relative sizes of concentric shapes. This study was designed to extend research on the application of the Delboeuf illusion to food on a plate by testing whether a plate’s rim width and coloring influence perceptual bias to affect perceived food portion size. DESIGN AND METHODS Within-subjects experimental design. Experiment 1 tested the effect of rim width on perceived food portion size. Experiment 2 tested the effect of rim coloring on perceived food portion size. In both experiments, participants observed a series of photographic images of paired, side-by-side plates varying in designs and amounts of food. From each pair, participants were asked to select the plate that contained more food. Multi-level logistic regression examined the effects of rim width and coloring on perceived food portion size. RESULTS Experiment 1: Participants overestimated the diameter of food portions by 5% and the visual area of food portions by 10% on plates with wider rims compared to plates with very thin rims (P<0.0001). The effect of rim width was greater with larger food portion sizes. Experiment 2: Participants overestimated the diameter of food portions by 1.5% and the visual area of food portions by 3% on plates with rim coloring compared to plates with no coloring (P=0.01). The effect of rim coloring was greater with smaller food portion sizes. CONCLUSION The Delboeuf illusion applies to food on a plate. Participants overestimated food portion size on plates with wider and colored rims. These findings may help design plates to influence perceptions of food portion sizes. PMID:24005858

  1. Anthocyanidins and anthocyanins: colored pigments as food, pharmaceutical ingredients, and the potential health benefits

    PubMed Central

    Khoo, Hock Eng; Azlan, Azrina; Tang, Sou Teng; Lim, See Meng

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Anthocyanins are colored water-soluble pigments belonging to the phenolic group. The pigments are in glycosylated forms. Anthocyanins responsible for the colors, red, purple, and blue, are in fruits and vegetables. Berries, currants, grapes, and some tropical fruits have high anthocyanins content. Red to purplish blue-colored leafy vegetables, grains, roots, and tubers are the edible vegetables that contain a high level of anthocyanins. Among the anthocyanin pigments, cyanidin-3-glucoside is the major anthocyanin found in most of the plants. The colored anthocyanin pigments have been traditionally used as a natural food colorant. The color and stability of these pigments are influenced by pH, light, temperature, and structure. In acidic condition, anthocyanins appear as red but turn blue when the pH increases. Chromatography has been largely applied in extraction, separation, and quantification of anthocyanins. Besides the use of anthocyanidins and anthocyanins as natural dyes, these colored pigments are potential pharmaceutical ingredients that give various beneficial health effects. Scientific studies, such as cell culture studies, animal models, and human clinical trials, show that anthocyanidins and anthocyanins possess antioxidative and antimicrobial activities, improve visual and neurological health, and protect against various non-communicable diseases. These studies confer the health effects of anthocyanidins and anthocyanins, which are due to their potent antioxidant properties. Different mechanisms and pathways are involved in the protective effects, including free-radical scavenging pathway, cyclooxygenase pathway, mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, and inflammatory cytokines signaling. Therefore, this review focuses on the role of anthocyanidins and anthocyanins as natural food colorants and their nutraceutical properties for health. Abbreviations: CVD: Cardiovascular disease VEGF: Vascular endothelial growth factor PMID:28970777

  2. Color-Coded Front-of-Pack Nutrition Labels-An Option for US Packaged Foods?

    PubMed

    Dunford, Elizabeth K; Poti, Jennifer M; Xavier, Dagan; Webster, Jacqui L; Taillie, Lindsey Smith

    2017-05-10

    The implementation of a standardized front-of-pack-labelling (FoPL) scheme would likely be a useful tool for many consumers trying to improve the healthfulness of their diets. Our objective was to examine what the traffic light labelling scheme would look like if implemented in the US. Data were extracted from Label Insight's Open Access branded food database in 2017. Nutrient levels and the proportion of products classified as "Red" (High), "Amber" (Medium) or "Green" (Low) in total fat, saturated fat, total sugar and sodium for food and beverage items were examined. The proportion of products in each category that had each possible combination of traffic light colors, and met the aggregate score for "healthy" was examined. Out of 175,198 products, >50% of all US packaged foods received a "Red" rating for total sugar and sodium. "Confectionery" had the highest mean total sugar (51.9 g/100 g) and "Meat and meat alternatives" the highest mean sodium (781 mg/100 g). The most common traffic light label combination was "Red" for total fat, saturated fat and sodium and "Green" for sugar. Only 30.1% of products were considered "healthy". A wide variety (n = 80) of traffic light color combinations were observed. A color coded traffic light scheme appears to be an option for implementation across the US packaged food supply to support consumers in making healthier food choices.

  3. Prediction of fermentation index of cocoa beans (Theobroma cacao L.) based on color measurement and artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    León-Roque, Noemí; Abderrahim, Mohamed; Nuñez-Alejos, Luis; Arribas, Silvia M; Condezo-Hoyos, Luis

    2016-12-01

    Several procedures are currently used to assess fermentation index (FI) of cocoa beans (Theobroma cacao L.) for quality control. However, all of them present several drawbacks. The aim of the present work was to develop and validate a simple image based quantitative procedure, using color measurement and artificial neural network (ANNs). ANN models based on color measurements were tested to predict fermentation index (FI) of fermented cocoa beans. The RGB values were measured from surface and center region of fermented beans in images obtained by camera and desktop scanner. The FI was defined as the ratio of total free amino acids in fermented versus non-fermented samples. The ANN model that included RGB color measurement of fermented cocoa surface and R/G ratio in cocoa bean of alkaline extracts was able to predict FI with no statistical difference compared with the experimental values. Performance of the ANN model was evaluated by the coefficient of determination, Bland-Altman plot and Passing-Bablok regression analyses. Moreover, in fermented beans, total sugar content and titratable acidity showed a similar pattern to the total free amino acid predicted through the color based ANN model. The results of the present work demonstrate that the proposed ANN model can be adopted as a low-cost and in situ procedure to predict FI in fermented cocoa beans through apps developed for mobile device. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Synthetic Food Colors and Neurobehavioral Hazards: The View from Environmental Health Research

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background: The proposition that synthetic food colors can induce adverse behavioral effects in children was first enunciated in 1975 by Feingold [Why Your Child Is Hyperactive. New York:Random House (1975)], who asserted that elevated sensitivity to food additives underlies the signs of hyperactivity observed in some children. Although the evidence suggested that some unknown proportion of children did respond to synthetic food colors, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) interpreted the evidence as inconclusive. A study published in 2007 [McCann et al. Food additives and hyperactive behaviour in 3-year-old and 8/9-year-old children in the community: a randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial. Lancet 370:1560–1567 (2007)] drew renewed attention to the hypothesis because of the study’s size and scope. It led the FDA to review the evidence, hold a public hearing, and seek the advice of its Food Advisory Committee. In preparation for the hearing, the FDA reviewed the available evidence and concluded that it did not warrant further agency action. Objectives: In this commentary I examine the basis of the FDA’s position, the elements of the review that led to its decision and that of the Food Advisory Committee, and the reasons that this is an environmental health issue. Discussion: The FDA review confined itself, in essence, to the clinical diagnosis of hyperactivity, as did the charge to the committee, rather than asking the broader environmental question of behavioral effects in the general population; it failed to recognize the significance of vulnerable subpopulations; and it misinterpreted the meaning of effect size as a criterion of risk. The FDA’s response would have benefited from adopting the viewpoints and perspectives common to environmental health research. At the same time, the food color debate offers a lesson to environmental health researchers; namely, too narrow a focus on a single outcome or criterion can be misleading. PMID

  5. Nanofabrication and coloration study of artificial Morpho butterfly wings with aligned lamellae layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sichao; Chen, Yifang

    2015-11-01

    The bright and iridescent blue color from Morpho butterfly wings has attracted worldwide attentions to explore its mysterious nature for long time. Although the physics of structural color by the nanophotonic structures built on the wing scales has been well established, replications of the wing structure by standard top-down lithography still remains a challenge. This paper reports a technical breakthrough to mimic the blue color of Morpho butterfly wings, by developing a novel nanofabrication process, based on electron beam lithography combined with alternate PMMA/LOR development/dissolution, for photonic structures with aligned lamellae multilayers in colorless polymers. The relationship between the coloration and geometric dimensions as well as shapes is systematically analyzed by solving Maxwell’s Equations with a finite domain time difference simulator. Careful characterization of the mimicked blue by spectral measurements under both normal and oblique angles are carried out. Structural color in blue reflected by the fabricated wing scales, is demonstrated and further extended to green as an application exercise of the new technique. The effects of the regularity in the replicas on coloration are analyzed. In principle, this approach establishes a starting point for mimicking structural colors beyond the blue in Morpho butterfly wings.

  6. Nanofabrication and coloration study of artificial Morpho butterfly wings with aligned lamellae layers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sichao; Chen, Yifang

    2015-11-18

    The bright and iridescent blue color from Morpho butterfly wings has attracted worldwide attentions to explore its mysterious nature for long time. Although the physics of structural color by the nanophotonic structures built on the wing scales has been well established, replications of the wing structure by standard top-down lithography still remains a challenge. This paper reports a technical breakthrough to mimic the blue color of Morpho butterfly wings, by developing a novel nanofabrication process, based on electron beam lithography combined with alternate PMMA/LOR development/dissolution, for photonic structures with aligned lamellae multilayers in colorless polymers. The relationship between the coloration and geometric dimensions as well as shapes is systematically analyzed by solving Maxwell's Equations with a finite domain time difference simulator. Careful characterization of the mimicked blue by spectral measurements under both normal and oblique angles are carried out. Structural color in blue reflected by the fabricated wing scales, is demonstrated and further extended to green as an application exercise of the new technique. The effects of the regularity in the replicas on coloration are analyzed. In principle, this approach establishes a starting point for mimicking structural colors beyond the blue in Morpho butterfly wings.

  7. Nanofabrication and coloration study of artificial Morpho butterfly wings with aligned lamellae layers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sichao; Chen, Yifang

    2015-01-01

    The bright and iridescent blue color from Morpho butterfly wings has attracted worldwide attentions to explore its mysterious nature for long time. Although the physics of structural color by the nanophotonic structures built on the wing scales has been well established, replications of the wing structure by standard top-down lithography still remains a challenge. This paper reports a technical breakthrough to mimic the blue color of Morpho butterfly wings, by developing a novel nanofabrication process, based on electron beam lithography combined with alternate PMMA/LOR development/dissolution, for photonic structures with aligned lamellae multilayers in colorless polymers. The relationship between the coloration and geometric dimensions as well as shapes is systematically analyzed by solving Maxwell’s Equations with a finite domain time difference simulator. Careful characterization of the mimicked blue by spectral measurements under both normal and oblique angles are carried out. Structural color in blue reflected by the fabricated wing scales, is demonstrated and further extended to green as an application exercise of the new technique. The effects of the regularity in the replicas on coloration are analyzed. In principle, this approach establishes a starting point for mimicking structural colors beyond the blue in Morpho butterfly wings. PMID:26577813

  8. Drinking water with red beetroot food color antagonizes esophageal carcinogenesis in N-nitrosomethylbenzylamine-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Lechner, John F; Wang, Li-Shu; Rocha, Claudio M; Larue, Bethany; Henry, Cassandra; McIntyre, Colleen M; Riedl, Kenneth M; Schwartz, Steven J; Stoner, Gary D

    2010-06-01

    This study was undertaken to determine if the oral consumption of red beetroot food color would result in an inhibition of N-nitrosomethylbenzylamine (NMBA)-induced tumors in the rat esophagus. Rats were treated with NMBA and given either regular water ad libitum or water containing 78 microg/mL commercial red beetroot dye, E162. The number of NMBA-induced esophageal papillomas was reduced by 45% (P < .001) in animals that received the food color compared to controls. The treatment also resulted in reduced rates of cell proliferation in both precancerous esophageal lesions and in papillomas of NMBA-treated rats, as measured by immunohistochemical staining of Ki-67 in esophageal tissue specimens. The effects of beetroot food color on angiogenesis (microvessel density by CD34 immunostaining), inflammation (by CD45 immunostaining), and apoptosis (by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end-labeling staining) in esophageal tissue specimens were also determined. Compared to rats treated with NMBA only, the levels of angiogenesis and inflammation in the beetroot color-consuming animals were reduced, and the apoptotic rate was increased. Thus, the mechanism(s) of chemoprevention by the active constituents of red beetroot color include reducing cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and inflammation and stimulating apoptosis. Importantly, consumption of the dye in the drinking water for a period of 35 weeks did not appear to induce any overt toxicity. Based on the fact that red beetroot color contains betanins, which have strong antioxidant activity, it is postulated that these effects are mediated through inhibition of oxygen radical-induced signal transduction. However, the sum of constituents of E162 has not been determined, and other components with other mechanisms may also be involved in antagonizing cancer development.

  9. Drinking Water with Red Beetroot Food Color Antagonizes Esophageal Carcinogenesis in N-Nitrosomethylbenzylamine-Treated Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lechner, John F.; Wang, Li-Shu; Rocha, Claudio M.; Larue, Bethany; Henry, Cassandra; McIntyre, Colleen M.; Riedl, Kenneth M.; Schwartz, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract This study was undertaken to determine if the oral consumption of red beetroot food color would result in an inhibition of N-nitrosomethylbenzylamine (NMBA)-induced tumors in the rat esophagus. Rats were treated with NMBA and given either regular water ad libitum or water containing 78 μg/mL commercial red beetroot dye, E162. The number of NMBA-induced esophageal papillomas was reduced by 45% (P < .001) in animals that received the food color compared to controls. The treatment also resulted in reduced rates of cell proliferation in both precancerous esophageal lesions and in papillomas of NMBA-treated rats, as measured by immunohistochemical staining of Ki-67 in esophageal tissue specimens. The effects of beetroot food color on angiogenesis (microvessel density by CD34 immunostaining), inflammation (by CD45 immunostaining), and apoptosis (by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end-labeling staining) in esophageal tissue specimens were also determined. Compared to rats treated with NMBA only, the levels of angiogenesis and inflammation in the beetroot color-consuming animals were reduced, and the apoptotic rate was increased. Thus, the mechanism(s) of chemoprevention by the active constituents of red beetroot color include reducing cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and inflammation and stimulating apoptosis. Importantly, consumption of the dye in the drinking water for a period of 35 weeks did not appear to induce any overt toxicity. Based on the fact that red beetroot color contains betanins, which have strong antioxidant activity, it is postulated that these effects are mediated through inhibition of oxygen radical-induced signal transduction. However, the sum of constituents of E162 has not been determined, and other components with other mechanisms may also be involved in antagonizing cancer development. PMID:20438319

  10. 16 CFR 301.19 - Pointing, dyeing, bleaching or otherwise artificially coloring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... bleaching means the process for producing a lighter shade of a fur, or removing off-color spots and stains... approximately .1000 grams of mink hair into a beaker with 20 ml. concentrated nitric acid. Evaporate just...

  11. 16 CFR 301.19 - Pointing, dyeing, bleaching or otherwise artificially coloring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... bleaching means the process for producing a lighter shade of a fur, or removing off-color spots and stains... approximately .1000 grams of mink hair into a beaker with 20 ml. concentrated nitric acid. Evaporate just...

  12. 16 CFR 301.19 - Pointing, dyeing, bleaching or otherwise artificially coloring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... bleaching means the process for producing a lighter shade of a fur, or removing off-color spots and stains... approximately .1000 grams of mink hair into a beaker with 20 ml. concentrated nitric acid. Evaporate just...

  13. 16 CFR 301.19 - Pointing, dyeing, bleaching or otherwise artificially coloring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... bleaching means the process for producing a lighter shade of a fur, or removing off-color spots and stains... approximately .1000 grams of mink hair into a beaker with 20 ml. concentrated nitric acid. Evaporate just...

  14. 16 CFR 301.19 - Pointing, dyeing, bleaching or otherwise artificially coloring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... bleaching means the process for producing a lighter shade of a fur, or removing off-color spots and stains... approximately .1000 grams of mink hair into a beaker with 20 ml. concentrated nitric acid. Evaporate just...

  15. Risk assessment for the combinational effects of food color additives: neural progenitor cells and hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Park, Mikyung; Park, Hee Ra; Kim, So Jung; Kim, Min-Sun; Kong, Kyoung Hye; Kim, Hyun Soo; Gong, Ein Ji; Kim, Mi Eun; Kim, Hyung Sik; Lee, Byung Mu; Lee, Jaewon

    2009-01-01

    In 2006, the Korea Food and Drug Administration reported that combinations of dietary colors such as allura red AC (R40), tartrazine (Y4), sunset yellow FCF (Y5), amaranth (R2), and brilliant blue FCF (B1) are widely used in food manufacturing. Although individual tar food colors are controlled based on acceptable daily intake (ADI), there is no apparent information available for how combinations of these additives affect food safety. In the current study, the potencies of single and combination use of R40, Y4, Y5, R2, and B1 were examined on neural progenitor cell (NPC) toxicity, a biomarker for developmental stage, and neurogenesis, indicative of adult central nervous system (CNS) functions. R40 and R2 reduced NPC proliferation and viability in mouse multipotent NPC, in the developing CNS model. Among several combinations tested in mouse model, combination of Y4 and B1 at 1000-fold higher than average daily intake in Korea significantly decreased numbers of newly generated cells in adult mouse hippocampus, indicating potent adverse actions on hippocampal neurogenesis. However, other combinations including R40 and R2 did not affect adult hippocampal neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus. Evidence indicates that single and combination use of most tar food colors may be safe with respect to risk using developmental NPC and adult hippocampal neurogenesis. However, the response to excessively high dose combination of Y4 and B1 is suggestive of synergistic effects to suppress proliferation of NPC in adult hippocampus. Data indicated that combinations of tar colors may adversely affect both developmental and adult hippocampal neurogenesis; thus, further extensive studies are required to assess the safety of these additive combinations.

  16. Discriminating nutritional quality of foods using the 5-Color nutrition label in the French food market: consistency with nutritional recommendations.

    PubMed

    Julia, Chantal; Ducrot, Pauline; Péneau, Sandrine; Deschamps, Valérie; Méjean, Caroline; Fézeu, Léopold; Touvier, Mathilde; Hercberg, Serge; Kesse-Guyot, Emmanuelle

    2015-09-28

    Our objectives were to assess the performance of the 5-Colour nutrition label (5-CNL) front-of-pack nutrition label based on the Food Standards Agency nutrient profiling system to discriminate nutritional quality of foods currently on the market in France and its consistency with French nutritional recommendations. Nutritional composition of 7777 foods available on the French market collected from the web-based collaborative project Open Food Facts were retrieved. Distribution of products across the 5-CNL categories according to food groups, as arranged in supermarket shelves was assessed. Distribution of similar products from different brands in the 5-CNL categories was also assessed. Discriminating performance was considered as the number of color categories present in each food group. In the case of discrepancies between the category allocation and French nutritional recommendations, adaptations of the original score were proposed. Overall, the distribution of foodstuffs in the 5-CNL categories was consistent with French recommendations: 95.4% of 'Fruits and vegetables', 72.5% of 'Cereals and potatoes' were classified as 'Green' or 'Yellow' whereas 86.0% of 'Sugary snacks' were classified as 'Pink' or 'Red'. Adaptations to the original FSA score computation model were necessary for beverages, added fats and cheese in order to be consistent with French official nutritional recommendations. The 5-CNL label displays a high performance in discriminating nutritional quality of foods across food groups, within a food group and for similar products from different brands. Adaptations from the original model were necessary to maintain consistency with French recommendations and high performance of the system.

  17. Toxic effects of some synthetic food colorants and/or flavor additives on male rats.

    PubMed

    El-Wahab, Hanan Mohamed Fathy Abd; Moram, Gehan Salah El-Deen

    2013-03-01

    The objective of the present work was to evaluate the broadest toxic effect of some synthetic additives of colorants and/or flavors on different body organs and metabolic aspects in rats. A number of chemical food color and flavor additives are routinely added during processing to improve the aesthetic appearance of the dietary items. However, many of them are toxic after prolonged use. In this experiment, a total of 100 male albino rats of Spargue Dawley strain were divided into 10 groups: G(1) was fed basal diet and served as control, G(2): basal diet + Brilliant blue (blue dye, No. 2, 124 mg/kg diet), G(3): basal diet + carmoisine (red dye, No. 3, 70 mg/kg diet), G(4): basal diet + tartrazine (yellow dye, FD & C yellow No. 5, 75 mg/kg diet), G(5): basal diet + trans-anethole (4.5 g/kg diet) G(6): basal diet + propylene glycol (0.25 g/kg diet), G(7): basal diet + vanillin(1.25 g/kg diet), G(8): basal diet + Brilliant blue + propylene glycol, G(9): basal diet + carmoisine + trans-anethole, G(10): basal diet + tartrazine + vanillin for 42 successive days. All food colorants mixed with or without flavor additives induced a significant decrease in body weight, hemoglobin concentration and red blood cell count. Also there was a significant decrease in reduced glutathione content; glutathione-S-transferase and superoxide dismutase activities in both blood and liver compared to control group. On the other hand, a significant increase in serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase activities, bilirubin, urea, creatinine, total protein and albumin were observed in all test groups when compared to control group. Finally, it is advisable to limit the uses of these food colorants and/or food flavor additives especially those used by children.

  18. Structural determination of unknown subsidiary colors in food yellow no. 5 (Sunset yellow FCF).

    PubMed

    Yamada, M; Nakamura, M; Yamada, T; Maitani, T; Goda, Y

    1996-08-01

    Major unknown subsidiary colors A (Sub A) and B (Sub B) in commercial Sunset Yellow FCF (Food Yellow No. 5 in Japan) have been isolated by preparative HPLC. Spectroscopic analyses of Sub A and Sub B revealed that their structures are trisodium salt of 6-hydroxy-7-(4-sulfophenyl)-5-(4-sulfophenylazo)-2-naphthale nesulfonic acid, and disodium salt of 3-hydroxy-4-(4-sulfophenylazo)-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid, respectively.

  19. Surface Tension Demonstration using Water and Food Coloring in the U.S. Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-01-19

    ISS006-E-18446 (19 January 2003) --- View of surface tension demonstration using water that is being held in place by a metal loop. Food coloring has been added to the water for demonstration purposes only. Astronaut Donald R. Pettit, Expedition Six NASA ISS science officer, photographed these demonstrations for educational purposes. The experiment took place in the Destiny laboratory on the International Space Station (ISS).

  20. Surface Tension Demonstration using Water and Food Coloring in the U.S. Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-01-19

    ISS006-E-18432 (19 January 2003) --- View of surface tension demonstration using water that is being held in place by a metal loop. Food coloring has been added to the water for demonstration purposes only. Astronaut Donald R. Pettit, Expedition Six NASA ISS science officer, photographed these demonstrations for educational purposes. The experiment took place in the Destiny laboratory on the International Space Station (ISS).

  1. Surface Tension Demonstration using Water and Food Coloring in the U.S. Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-01-19

    ISS006-E-18405 (19 January 2003) --- View of surface tension demonstration using water that is being held in place by a metal loop. Food coloring has been added to the water for demonstration purposes only. Astronaut Donald R. Pettit, Expedition Six NASA ISS science officer, photographed these demonstrations for educational purposes. The experiment took place in the Destiny laboratory on the International Space Station (ISS).

  2. Surface Tension Demonstration using Water and Food Coloring in the U.S. Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-01-19

    ISS006-E-18431 (19 January 2003) --- View of surface tension demonstration using water that is being held in place by a metal loop. Food coloring has been added to the water for demonstration purposes only. Astronaut Donald R. Pettit, Expedition Six NASA ISS science officer, photographed these demonstrations for educational purposes. The experiment took place in the Destiny laboratory on the International Space Station (ISS).

  3. Influence of surface sealant agents on the surface roughness and color stability of artificial teeth.

    PubMed

    Şahin, Onur; Dede, Doğu Ömür; Köroğlu, Ayşegül; Yılmaz, Burak

    2015-07-01

    Although various surface sealant agents are available and recommended for chairside polishing procedures, their effect on the surface roughness and color stability of denture teeth is not clear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of sealant agents on the surface roughness and color stability of various denture tooth materials. Eighty disk-shaped specimens were prepared for each type of denture tooth material (SR Vivodent, PMMA; Vitapan, reinforced-PMMA; SR Phonares II, composite resin). The specimens were assigned to 4 groups according to the surface treatment used (n=20): surface sealant agents (Palaseal; Heraeus Kulzer GmbH, Optiglaze; GC Corp Biscover; Bisco Inc) and a conventional laboratory polishing technique (control group). A thermal cycling procedure was applied for half of the specimens (n=10). The surface roughness (Ra) values of thermocycled and nonthermocycled specimens were measured with a profilometer. The CIELab color parameters of both thermocycled and nonthermocycled specimens were measured with a spectrophotometer at baseline and after 7-day storage in a coffee solution. The color differences were calculated from the CIEDE2000 (ΔE00) formula. Data were statistically analyzed with 3-way ANOVA and the Tukey HSD test (α=.05). The type of tooth material, surface treatment technique, and their interactions were significant for Ra values, and each variable and their interactions were also significant for ΔE00 values (P<.05). Thermal cycling had a significant effect only on ΔE00 values (P<.05). Palaseal and Optiglaze sealant agents provided smoother and more color-stable denture tooth surfaces than the conventional polishing technique. The use of the Biscover agent with SR Vivodent and Phonares II teeth increased the Ra values. The color of conventionally polished SR Vivodent and Phonares II teeth changed more with thermal cycling. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by

  4. Color me healthy: food diversity in school community gardens in two rapidly urbanising Australian cities.

    PubMed

    Guitart, Daniela A; Pickering, Catherine M; Byrne, Jason A

    2014-03-01

    Community garden research has focused on social aspects of gardens, neglecting systematic analysis of what food is grown. Yet agrodiversity within community gardens may provide health benefits. Diverse fruit and vegetables provide nutritional benefits, including vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals. This paper reports research that investigated the agro-biodiversity of school-based community gardens in Brisbane and Gold Coast cities, Australia. Common motivations for establishing these gardens were education, health and environmental sustainability. The 23 gardens assessed contained 234 food plants, ranging from 7 to 132 plant types per garden. This included 142 fruits and vegetables. The nutritional diversity of fruits and vegetable plants was examined through a color classification system. All gardens grew fruits and vegetables from at least four food color groups, and 75% of the gardens grew plants from all seven color groups. As places with high agrodiversity, and related nutritional diversity, some school community gardens can provide children with exposure to a healthy range of fruit and vegetables, with potential flow-on health benefits.

  5. Common food colorants and allergic reactions in children: Myth or reality?

    PubMed

    Feketea, Gavriela; Tsabouri, Sophia

    2017-09-01

    Various additives, including food colorants (FCs), are used in the food industry to make food appealing to consumers and to add variety. Despite the widespread usage of FCs, adverse reactions related to their consumption, including reactions triggered by immune (immediate and delayed-type hypersensitivity) and non-immune (intolerance) mechanisms, are considered rare. There is a discrepancy between the perception of patients and parents (7.4%) and the reported prevalence of adverse reactions to additives (0.01-0.23%), which is higher in atopic individuals (2-7%). Documented reactions are mild, involving mainly the skin, and, rarely, anaphylaxis. A major problem in diagnosing reactions to FCs is identification of the offending agent(s), which is based on careful dietary history taking. Allergy testing is usually unrevealing, except for reaction to some natural colorants. Treatment consists of avoidance of the offending colorant as no successful desensitization procedures have been reported. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Thermal stability of selected natural red extracts used as food colorants.

    PubMed

    Fernández-López, José A; Angosto, José M; Giménez, Pedro J; León, Gerardo

    2013-03-01

    The color degradation of aqueous solutions of six natural red pigment extracts (elderberry, red cabbage, hibiscus, red beet, Opuntia fruits and red cochineal) used commercially as food colorants was investigated at temperatures between 50 and 90 °C. Color degradation was studied in respect to both spectral properties and visual color. The remaining absorbance at 535 nm as a function of the incubation time and temperature was used to quantify the degradation process. Red cochineal was the most thermoresistant extract with a remaining absorbance of 95 % after 6 h at 90 °C. Anthocyanin extracts (elderberry, red cabbage, hibiscus) showed remaining absorbance percentages of 63.8, 46.1 and 26.7, respectively. Betacyanin extracts (red beet, Opuntia fruits) were the most thermosensitive maintaining only 12.5 and 1.7 %, respectively, of the initial absorbance at 535 nm. Applying a first-order kinetic model to the degradation processes, reaction rate constants (k) and half-life periods (t 1/2 ) were calculated. The temperature dependence of the degradation rate constant obeyed the Arrhenius relationship, with activation energies (E a ) ranging between 3.02 and 53.37 kJ mol(-1). The higher activation energy values indicated greater temperature sensitivity. Changes in visual color attributes corroborated the high thermal stability of the red cochineal extract.

  7. Influence of pigments and opacifiers on color stability of an artificially aged facial silicone.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Moreno, Amália; Pesqueira, Aldiéris Alves; Haddad, Marcela Filiè

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of two pigments (ceramic powder and oil paint) and one opacifier (barium sulfate) on the color stability of MDX4-4210 facial silicone submitted to accelerated aging. Sixty specimens of silicone were fabricated and divided into six groups--colorless (G1), colorless with opacifier (G2), ceramic (G3), ceramic with opacifier (G4), oil (G5), oil with opacifier (G6). All replicas were submitted to accelerated aging for 1008 hours. The evaluations of chromatic alteration through visual analysis and reflection spectrophotometry were carried out initially and after 252, 504, and 1008 hours of aging. The results were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% level of significance. All groups exhibited chromatic alteration (ΔE > 0); however, this color alteration was not perceptible through visual analysis of the color. The pigmented groups with opacifier presented the lowest ΔE values, with a statistical difference from the other groups. For the groups without opacifier, the group pigmented with oil paint exhibited the lowest ΔE values in the different aging periods, with a statistical difference. Accelerated aging generated significant chromatic alterations in all groups after 252 hours, except for the colorless and oil groups, both with opacifier (G2 and G6). The opacifier protects facial silicones against color degradation, and oil paint is a stable pigment even without addition of opacifier. © 2010 by The American College of Prosthodontists.

  8. Color-Coded Front-of-Pack Nutrition Labels—An Option for US Packaged Foods?

    PubMed Central

    Dunford, Elizabeth K.; Poti, Jennifer M.; Xavier, Dagan; Webster, Jacqui L.; Taillie, Lindsey Smith

    2017-01-01

    The implementation of a standardized front-of-pack-labelling (FoPL) scheme would likely be a useful tool for many consumers trying to improve the healthfulness of their diets. Our objective was to examine what the traffic light labelling scheme would look like if implemented in the US. Data were extracted from Label Insight’s Open Access branded food database in 2017. Nutrient levels and the proportion of products classified as “Red” (High), “Amber” (Medium) or “Green” (Low) in total fat, saturated fat, total sugar and sodium for food and beverage items were examined. The proportion of products in each category that had each possible combination of traffic light colors, and met the aggregate score for “healthy” was examined. Out of 175,198 products, >50% of all US packaged foods received a “Red” rating for total sugar and sodium. “Confectionery” had the highest mean total sugar (51.9 g/100 g) and “Meat and meat alternatives” the highest mean sodium (781 mg/100 g). The most common traffic light label combination was “Red” for total fat, saturated fat and sodium and “Green” for sugar. Only 30.1% of products were considered “healthy”. A wide variety (n = 80) of traffic light color combinations were observed. A color coded traffic light scheme appears to be an option for implementation across the US packaged food supply to support consumers in making healthier food choices. PMID:28489037

  9. Cytogenetic evaluation and DNA interaction studies of the food colorants amaranth, erythrosine and tartrazine.

    PubMed

    Mpountoukas, Panagiotis; Pantazaki, Anastasia; Kostareli, Efterpi; Christodoulou, Pantelitsa; Kareli, Dimitra; Poliliou, Stamatia; Mourelatos, Costas; Lambropoulou, Vasso; Lialiaris, Theodore

    2010-10-01

    Food coloring agents, amaranth, erythrosine and tartrazine have been tested at 0.02-8mM in human peripheral blood cells in vitro, in order to investigate their genotoxic, cytotoxic and cytostatic potential. Amaranth at the highest concentration (8mM) demonstrates high genotoxicity, cytostaticity and cytotoxicity. The frequency of SCEs/cell was increased 1.7 times over the control level. Additionally, erythrosine at 8, 4 and 2mM shows a high cytotoxicity and cytostaticity. Finally, tartrazine seems to be toxic at 8 and 4mM. No signs of genotoxicity were observed. Reversely, tartrazine showed cytotoxicity at 1 and 2mM. Furthermore, spectroscopic titration studies for the interaction of these food additives with DNA showed that these dyes bind to calf thymus DNA and distinct isosbestic points are observed clearly suggesting binding of the dyes to DNA. Additionally DNA electrophoretic mobility experiments showed that these colorants are obviously capable for strong binding to linear dsDNA causing its degradation. PCR amplification of all DNA fragments (which previously were pre-treated with three different concentrations of the colorants, extracted from agarose gel after separation and then purified), seems to be attenuated with a manner dye concentration-dependent reflecting in a delayed electrophoretic mobility due to the possible binding of some molecules of the dyes. Evaluation of the data and curves were obtained after quantitative and qualitative analysis of the lanes of the gel by an analyzer computer program. Our results indicate that these food colorants had a toxic potential to human lymphocytes in vitro and it seems that they bind directly to DNA.

  10. Assessing the use of food coloring as an appropriate visual guide for homogenously mixed capsule powders in extemporaneous compounding.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Brittany; Carlson, Christie; Rao, Deepa A

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the use of food colors as a visual aid to determine homogeneous mixing in the extemporaneous preparation of capsules. Six different batches of progesterone slow-release 200-mg capsules were prepared by different mixing methods until visually determined as homogeneous based on yellow food coloring distribution in the preparation by the Central Iowa Compounding Pharmacy, Des Moines, Iowa. UV-Vis spectrophotometry was used to extract and evaluate yellow food coloring content in each of these batches and compared to an in-house, small-batch geometric dilution preparation of progesterone slow- release 200-mg capsules. Of the 6 batches tested, only one, which followed the principles of additive dilution and an appropriate mixing time, was both visually and quantitatively homogeneous in the detection of yellow food coloring. The use of food coloring alone is not a valid quality-assurance tool in determining homogeneous mixing. Principles of geometric and/or additive dilution and appropriate mixing times along with the food color can serve as a quality-assurance tool.

  11. Potential role of antioxidant food supplements, preservatives and colorants in the pathogenesis of allergy and asthma.

    PubMed

    Zaknun, Daniela; Schroecksnadel, Sebastian; Kurz, Katharina; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2012-01-01

    A significant increase in the incidence of allergy and asthma has been observed during the past decades. The background of this phenomenon has not been well explained, but changes in lifestyle and habits are heavily discussed as contributing factors. Among these is a too clean environment, which may predispose individuals to increased sensitivity to allergic responses. Also the increase in dietary supplements including preservatives and colorants may contribute to this. In vitro, we and others have shown in freshly isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells that antioxidant compounds like vitamins C and E as well as food preservatives and colorants exert significant suppressive effects on the Th1 immune activation cascade. The effects observed may be based on the interaction of antioxidant compounds with proinflammatory cascades involving important signal transduction elements such as nuclear factor-κB. Although only obtained in vitro, these results show an anti-inflammatory property of compounds which could shift the Th1-Th2-type immune balance towards Th2-type immunity. This review article discusses the potential role of increased use of antioxidant food supplements as well as preservatives and colorants in the increase in allergy and asthma in the Western world.

  12. The impact of traffic light color-coding on food health perceptions and choice.

    PubMed

    Trudel, Remi; Murray, Kyle B; Kim, Soyoung; Chen, Shuo

    2015-09-01

    Government regulators and consumer packaged goods companies around the world struggle with methods to help consumers make better nutritional decisions. In this research we find that, depending on the consumer, a traffic light color-coding (TLC) approach to product labeling can have a substantial impact on perceptions of foods' health quality and food choice. Across 3 lab experiments and a field experiment, we find that TLC labels provide nondieters with an information processing cue that directly influences evaluations in a manner that is consistent with the "stop" and "go" logic behind the traffic light labels. In contrast, we find that dieters do not simply adopt the red, yellow, and green cues into their health quality evaluations. Instead, regardless of the color, the TLC approach increases the depth at which dieters process label information. Dieters tend to focus on the costs of consumption and, as a result, lower their health quality evaluations. In a field study, measuring actual behavior in a grocery store, health quality evaluations predicted consumption and consistent with the color coding of the labels nondieters consumed the most when they were presented with a predominantly green label. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Effects of maternally exposed coloring food additives on receptor expressions related to learning and memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Ceyhan, Betul Mermi; Gultekin, Fatih; Doguc, Duygu Kumbul; Kulac, Esin

    2013-06-01

    Exposure to artificial food colors and additives (AFCAs) has been implicated in the induction and severity of some childhood behavioral and learning disabilities. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nACHRs) are thought to be effective in the learning and memory-generating process. In this study, we investigated the effects of intrauterine exposure to AFCAs on subunit concentrations of NMDARs and nAChRs isoforms in rats. We administered a mixture of AFCAs (Eritrosin, Ponceau 4R, Allura Red AC, Sunset Yellow FCF, Tartrazin, Amaranth, Brilliant Blue, Azorubin and Indigotin) to female rats before and during gestation. The concentration of NR2A and NR2B subunits and nAChR α7, α4β2 isoforms in their offspring's hippocampi were measured by Western Blotting. Expressions of NR2B and nAChR β2 were significantly increased (17% and 6.70%, respectively), whereas expression of nAChR α4 was significantly decreased (5.67%) in male experimental group compared to the male control group (p<0.05). In the female experimental group, AFCAs caused a 14% decrease in NR2B expression when compared to the female control group (p<0.05). Our results indicate that exposure to AFCAs during the fetal period may lead to alterations in expressions of NMDARs and nAChRs in adulthood. These alterations were different between male and female genders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Potential weekly intake of artificial food colours by 3-14-year-old children in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Toledo, M C; Guerchon, M S; Ragazzi, S

    1992-01-01

    The Potential Weekly Intake (PWI) of artificial food colours by 3-14-year-old children living in the District of Barão Geraldo, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil, was estimated on the basis of average consumption data of artificially coloured food and analytically determined colour concentration in foodstuffs ingested. Coloured food consumption data were obtained through dietary recall interviews and collection of the packages and/or labels of the coloured foods consumed during a two-week period. Colours found in the individual types of foods detected through the consumption survey were identified and determined by methods that included wool dyeing and polyamide column extractions, ascending paper chromatography and spectrophotometry. The results showed that all artificial colours used in the composition of 83 commercial food products, including jellies, juices, soft drinks, syrups and 57 different candies, were permitted for use in food in Brazil the year the survey was conducted (1986), in amounts below those prescribed by law. Statistical analysis performed to compare the PWI for different population groups demonstrated that young male children, especially from lower social classes, were most exposed to artificial colours. Comparison of the estimated potential intakes with the toxicologically Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) showed that consumption of Amaranth, Sunset Yellow, Indigotine and Tartrazine by all children in the study represented approximately 24%, 3%, 0.05% and 0.4%, of the actual ADI values, respectively.

  15. Stable isotopes in aquatic food web of an artificial lagoon in the Hangzhou Bay, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Weimin; Shi, Liyan; Chen, Yaqu

    2010-05-01

    Stable isotope values, δ13C and δ15N, were determined for four primary producers and 19 dominant consumers in a small artificial lagoon located in Hangzhou Bay. Based on these results the major pathways for energy flow and trophic structure of the artificial lagoon ecosystem were characterized. The mean δ13C values for the 19 consumers ranged from -22.99‰ to -14.24‰. Apart from so-iny mullet Liza haematocheila, the other 18 consumers had intermediate δ13C values between those of epibenthic microalgae and particulate organic matter (POM). The results of a multiple source linear mixing model (IsoSource model) indicated that 50% or more of the organic carbon in the tissues of most consumers was derived from epibenthic microalgae. This indicated that these primary producers were the main food source fueling the lagoon food web. The mean δ15N values for the 19 consumers varied between 4.93‰ and 12.97‰ and indicated four trophic levels in the lagoon. Four macroinvertebrates and zooplankton represented the primary consumers, whilst the other 14 consumers occupied the secondary and tertiary consumer levels. The 19 consumers were divided into three trophic guilds (detritivores/suspension feeders, omnivores and carnivores).

  16. [A rapid dialysis method for analysis of artificial sweeteners in food].

    PubMed

    Tahara, Shoichi; Fujiwara, Takushi; Yasui, Akiko; Hayafuji, Chieko; Kobayashi, Chigusa; Uematsu, Yoko

    2014-01-01

    A simple and rapid dialysis method was developed for the extraction and purification of four artificial sweeteners, namely, sodium saccharin (Sa), acesulfame potassium (AK), aspartame (APM), and dulcin (Du), which are present in various foods. Conventional dialysis uses a membrane dialysis tube approximately 15 cm in length and is carried out over many hours owing to the small membrane area and owing to inefficient mixing. In particular, processed cereal products such as cookies required treatment for 48 hours to obtain satisfactory recovery of the compounds. By increasing the tube length to 55 cm and introducing efficient mixing by inversion at half-hour intervals, the dialysis times of the four artificial sweeteners, spiked at 0.1 g/kg in the cookie, were shortened to 4 hours. Recovery yields of 88.9-103.2% were obtained by using the improved method, whereas recovery yields were low (65.5-82.0%) by the conventional method. Recovery yields (%) of Sa, AK, APM, and Du, spiked at 0.1 g/kg in various foods, were 91.6-100.1, 93.9-100.1, 86.7-100.0 and 88.7-104.7 using the improved method.

  17. Enumeration of total yeasts and molds in foods by the SimPlate Yeast and Mold-Color Indicator method and conventional culture methods: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Feldsine, Philip T; Lienau, Andrew H; Leung, Stephanie C; Mui, Linda A

    2003-01-01

    The relative effectiveness of the SimPlate Yeast and Mold-Color Indicator method (Y&M-CI) was compared to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM) method and the proposed International Organization for Standardization (ISO) method, ISO/CD 21527, for enumerating yeasts and molds in foods. Test portions were prepared and incubated according to the conditions stated in both the BAM and ISO methods. Six food types were analyzed: frozen corn dogs, nut meats, frozen fruits, cake mix, cereal, and fresh cheese. Nut meats, frozen fruits, and fresh cheese were naturally contaminated. All other foods were artificially contaminated with either a yeast or mold. Seventeen laboratories throughout North America and Europe participated in the study. Three method comparisons were conducted. In general, there was <0.3 mean log count difference in recovery between the SimPlate method and the 2 corresponding reference methods. Moreover, mean log counts between the 2 reference methods were also very similar. The repeatability (Sr) and reproducibility (SR) standard deviations were comparable between the 3 method comparisons. These results indicate that the BAM method and the SimPlate method are equivalent for enumerating yeast and mold populations in foods. Similarly, the SimPlate method is comparable to the proposed ISO method when test portions are prepared and incubated as defined in the proposed ISO method.

  18. The food colorant erythrosine is a promiscuous protein-protein interaction inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Lakshmi; Margolles-Clark, Emilio; Song, Yun; Buchwald, Peter

    2011-03-15

    Following our observation that erythrosine B (FD&C Red No. 3) is a relatively potent inhibitor of the TNF-R-TNFα and CD40-CD154 protein-protein interactions, we investigated whether this inhibitory activity extends to any other protein-protein interactions (PPI) as well as whether any other approved food colors possess such inhibitory activity. We found erythrosine, a poly-iodinated xanthene dye, to be a non-specific promiscuous inhibitor of a number of PPIs within the tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNF-R-TNFα, CD40-CD154, BAFF-R-BAFF, RANK-RANKL, OX40-OX40L, 4-1BB-4-1BBL) as well as outside of it (EGF-R-EGF) with a remarkably consistent median inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) in the 2-20 μM (approximately 2-20mg/L) range. In agreement with this, erythrosine also showed cellular effects including clear cytotoxic effects around this concentration range (IC₅₀≈50 μM). Among the seven FDA-approved food colorants, only erythrosine showed consistent PPI inhibitory activity in the sub-100 μM range, which might also explain (at least partially) why it also has the lowest approved acceptable daily intake (ADI) (0.1 mg/kg body weight/day). Among a number of xanthene structural analogs of erythrosine tested for activity, rose Bengal, a food colorant approved in Japan, showed similar, maybe even more pronounced, promiscuous inhibitory activity, whereas fluorescein was inactive and gallein, phloxine, and eosin were somewhat active in some of the assays.

  19. Extraction methods and food uses of a natural red colorant from dye sorghum.

    PubMed

    Akogou, Folachodé Ug; Kayodé, Ap Polycarpe; den Besten, Heidy Mw; Linnemann, Anita R

    2017-06-10

    The interest in stable natural colorants for food applications continues to grow. A red pigment extracted from the leaf sheaths of a sorghum variety (Sorghum bicolor) with a high content of apigeninidin is widely used as a biocolorant in processed foods in West Africa. This study compared the colour and anthocyanin composition from traditional extraction methods to determine options for improvement and use of the red biocolorant from dye sorghum in the food sector. Sorghum biocolorant was commonly applied in fermented and heated foods. Traditional extraction methods predominantly differed in two aspects, namely the use of an alkaline rock salt (locally known as kanwu) and the temperature of the extraction water. Cool extraction using the alkaline ingredient was more efficient than hot alkaline and hot aqueous extractions in extracting anthocyanins. The apigeninidin content was three times higher in the cool and hot alkaline extracts than in the aqueous extract. Cool and hot alkaline extractions at pH 8-9 were the most efficient methods for extracting apigeninidin from dye sorghum leaf sheaths. Broader use of the sorghum biocolorant in foods requires further research on its effects on nutrient bioavailability and antioxidant activity. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Evaluation of intolerance to analgesics, preservatives and food colorants with challenge tests.

    PubMed

    Rosenhall, L

    1982-09-01

    In 504 patients with asthma or rhinitis 1,868 oral challenge tests with analgesics, preservatives and food colorants were performed. Sodium benzoate and other benzoic compounds, as well as tartrazine and other azo dyes, were found to give similar but milder adverse reactions than acetylsalicylic acid. No patients reacted to potassium sorbate, another preservative, or to Patent Blue, which is not an azo dye. Intolerance was demonstrated most frequently in patients with a history of adverse reactions to analgesics or food, but also in 6% of patients investigated for other reasons. There are obvious risks for false positive or false negative results with a challenge test. Examples of these are given. The need for repeated tests and the clinical importance of all reproducible challenge reactions is stressed.

  1. Pharmacokinetics and Biodistribution of the Illegal Food Colorant Rhodamine B in Rats.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung-Yi; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2017-02-08

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) demonstrated rhodamine B as a potential carcinogen in 1978. Nevertheless, rhodamine B has been illegally used as a colorant in food in many countries. Few pharmacokinetic and toxicological investigations have been performed since the first pharmacokinetic study on rhodamine B in 1961. The aims of this study were to develop a simple and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography method with fluorescence detection for the quantitative detection of rhodamine B in the plasma and organs of rats and to estimate its pharmacokinetics and biodistribution. The results demonstrated that the oral bioavailabilities of rhodamine B were 28.3 and 9.8% for the low-dose and high-dose exposures, respectively. Furthermore, rhodamine B was highly accumulated in the liver and, to a lesser extent, the kidney, but was undetectable in the brain. These results provide useful information for improving the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of rhodamine B, supporting additional food safety evaluations.

  2. [Household appliances and food insecurity: gender, referred skin color and socioeconomic differences].

    PubMed

    Marin-Leon, Leticia; Francisco, Priscila Maria Stolses Bergamo; Segall-Corrêa, Ana Maria; Panigassi, Giseli

    2011-09-01

    Data from the National Household Survey 2004 was analyzed to compare differences in prevalence among moderate or severe food insecurity. Also, it was compared food security or mild food insecurity households in relation to the assets and other socioeconomic and demographic conditions of the household. Private permanent households, with per capita monthly income of up to one minimum wage and with the Brazilian Food Insecurity Scale answered by a household resident were studied (n=51,357). Association of variables with the dependent variable (food security) was verified using χ² test, with 5% significance level. Crude prevalence ratio, respective 95% confidence interval and adjusted analyses were carried out using Poisson multiple regression Stata 8.0. It considers the weights of the complex sampling design of the survey. The per capita monthly household income was the variable with strongest association to food security. Both in urban and rural areas, there were higher risk of moderate or severe food insecurity prevalence ratio when the head of the household was a female, black color, presence of six or more members in the household, metropolitan area and with absence of some specific assets (stove, water filter, refrigerator, freezer, washing machine and cellular phone). In a model that, among assets, included just the refrigerator, it was observed the highest prevalence ratio for household income of up to ¼ of a minimum wage and after this, the absence of refrigerator among households headed by white and black males and white or black female. Although female and black headed households have greater food restriction, internal differences among these groups were higher for households headed by white males and lower for those headed by black females. At national level and households with monthly income of up to one minimum age, poor socioeconomic conditions are associated to household food insecurity. This situation is worse among those headed by women and black

  3. Black bean anthocyanin-rich extracts as food colorants: Physicochemical stability and antidiabetes potential.

    PubMed

    Mojica, Luis; Berhow, Mark; Gonzalez de Mejia, Elvira

    2017-08-15

    Black beans contain anthocyanins that could be used as colorants in foods with associated health benefits. The objective was to optimize anthocyanins extraction from black bean coats and evaluate their physicochemical stability and antidiabetes potential. Optimal extraction conditions were 24% ethanol, 1:40 solid-to-liquid ratio and 29°C (P<0.0001). Three anthocyanins were identified by MS ions, delphinidin-3-O-glucoside (465.1m/z), petunidin-3-O-glucoside (479.1m/z) and malvidin-3-O-glucoside (493.1m/z). A total of 32mg of anthocyanins were quantified per gram of dry extract. Bean anthocyanins were stable at pH 2.5 and low-temperature 4°C (89.6%), with an extrapolated half-life of 277days. Anthocyanin-rich extracts inhibited α-glucosidase (37.8%), α-amylase (35.6%), dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (34.4%), reactive oxygen species (81.6%), and decreased glucose uptake. Black bean coats are a good source of anthocyanins and other phenolics with the potential to be used as natural-source food colorants with exceptional antidiabetes potential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Automated grading of left ventricular segmental wall motion by an artificial neural network using color kinesis images.

    PubMed

    Murta, L O; Ruiz, E E S; Pazin-Filho, A; Schmidt, A; Almeida-Filho, O C; Simões, M V; Marin-Neto, J A; Maciel, B C

    2006-01-01

    The present study describes an auxiliary tool in the diagnosis of left ventricular (LV) segmental wall motion (WM) abnormalities based on color-coded echocardiographic WM images. An artificial neural network (ANN) was developed and validated for grading LV segmental WM using data from color kinesis (CK) images, a technique developed to display the timing and magnitude of global and regional WM in real time. We evaluated 21 normal subjects and 20 patients with LVWM abnormalities revealed by two-dimensional echocardiography. CK images were obtained in two sets of viewing planes. A method was developed to analyze CK images, providing quantitation of fractional area change in each of the 16 LV segments. Two experienced observers analyzed LVWM from two-dimensional images and scored them as: 1) normal, 2) mild hypokinesia, 3) moderate hypokinesia, 4) severe hypokinesia, 5) akinesia, and 6) dyskinesia. Based on expert analysis of 10 normal subjects and 10 patients, we trained a multilayer perceptron ANN using a back-propagation algorithm to provide automated grading of LVWM, and this ANN was then tested in the remaining subjects. Excellent concordance between expert and ANN analysis was shown by ROC curve analysis, with measured area under the curve of 0.975. An excellent correlation was also obtained for global LV segmental WM index by expert and ANN analysis (R2 = 0.99). In conclusion, ANN showed high accuracy for automated semi-quantitative grading of WM based on CK images. This technique can be an important aid, improving diagnostic accuracy and reducing inter-observer variability in scoring segmental LVWM.

  5. Functional groupings and food web of an artificial reef used for sea cucumber aquaculture in northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qinzeng; Zhang, Libin; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Xuelei; Yang, Hongsheng

    2017-01-01

    Artificial reef is considered as a useful tool to remodel habitats in coastal and estuarine area. Some artificial reefs (ARs) were conducted in Shandong Peninsula for sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA). Little is known about the main feeding type and food resources of living organisms in this IMTA ecosystem. Neither is the information about other animals competing food with A. japonicus. Functional group (FG) and their food resources of mobile organisms and epifauna in ARs area were investigated. There were three types of food resources and five FGs within two trophic levels in studied area. Particle organic matter (POM), seaweed detritus and sediment were considered to be the main food resources. The first three FGs were primary consumers and were mainly epifauna, while the other two FGs were secondary consumers. FG 1 species were filter feeders, and group 2 was all deposit feeders and A. japonicus was in this group. FG 2 contained few species and this indicated that A. japonicus had few food competitors. FG 3 contained most epifauna species which were detritus feeders and this result implied that the artificial oyster shell reed can retain detritus effectively. The food sources of group 4 were complex. Species of group 5, mostly fish, occupied the top trophic level and fed primarily on species of FG 1 and FG 2. This kind of ARs can retain detritus effectively and provide suitable habitat to epifauna and surrounding natural fauna community.

  6. Enumeration of total coliforms and E. coli in foods by the SimPlate coliform and E. coli color indicator method and conventional culture methods: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Feldsine, Philip T; Lienau, Andrew H; Roa, Nerie H; Green, Shannon T

    2005-01-01

    The relative effectiveness of the SimPlate Coliform and E. coli Color Indicator (CEc-CI) method was compared to the AOAC 3-tube Most Probable Number (MPN) methods for enumerating and confirming coliforms and Escherichia coli in foods (966.23 and 966.24). In this study, test portions were prepared and analyzed according to the conditions stated in both the AOAC methods and SimPlate directions for use. Six food types were artificially contaminated with coliform bacteria and E. coli: frozen burritos, frozen broccoli, fluid pasteurized milk, whole almond nut meats, cheese, and powdered cake mix. Method comparisons were conducted. Overall, the SimPlate method demonstrated <0.3 log difference for total coliform and E. coli counts compared to the AOAC reference methods for the majority of food types and levels analyzed. In all cases, the repeatability and reproducibility of the SimPlate CEc-CI method were not different from those of the reference methods and in certain cases, were statistically better than those of the AOAC 3-tube MPN methods. These results indicate that the SimPlate CEc-CI method and the reference culture methods are comparable for enumeration of both total coliforms and E. coli in foods.

  7. Colorful Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Suzanne

    1991-01-01

    Described is an color-making activity where students use food coloring, eyedroppers, and water to make various colored solutions. Included are the needed materials and procedures. Students are asked to write up the formulas for making their favorite color. (KR)

  8. Foraging for carotenoids: do colorful male hihi target carotenoid-rich foods in the wild?

    PubMed Central

    Thorogood, Rose; Karadas, Filiz; Raubenheimer, David; Kilner, Rebecca M.; Ewen, John G.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary access to carotenoids is expected to determine the strength of carotenoid-based signal expression and potentially to maintain signal honesty. Species that display carotenoid-based yellow, orange, or red plumage are therefore expected to forage selectively for carotenoid-rich foods when they are depositing these pigments during molt, but whether they actually do so is unknown. We set out to address this in the hihi (Notiomystis cincta), a New Zealand passerine where males, but not females, display yellow carotenoid-based plumage. We measured circulating carotenoid concentrations in male and female hihi during breeding and molt, determined the nutritional content of common foods in the hihi diet, and conducted feeding observations of male and female hihi during molt. We found that although male and female hihi do not differ significantly in plasma carotenoid concentration, male hihi have a greater proportion of carotenoid-rich foods in their diet than do females. This is a consequence of a greater fruit and lower invertebrate intake than females and an avoidance of low-carotenoid content fruit. By combining behavioral observations with quantification of circulating carotenoids, we present evidence that colorful birds forage to maximize carotenoid intake, a conclusion we would not have drawn had we examined plasma carotenoids alone. PMID:25214753

  9. Foraging for carotenoids: do colorful male hihi target carotenoid-rich foods in the wild?

    PubMed

    Walker, Leila K; Thorogood, Rose; Karadas, Filiz; Raubenheimer, David; Kilner, Rebecca M; Ewen, John G

    2014-09-01

    Dietary access to carotenoids is expected to determine the strength of carotenoid-based signal expression and potentially to maintain signal honesty. Species that display carotenoid-based yellow, orange, or red plumage are therefore expected to forage selectively for carotenoid-rich foods when they are depositing these pigments during molt, but whether they actually do so is unknown. We set out to address this in the hihi (Notiomystis cincta), a New Zealand passerine where males, but not females, display yellow carotenoid-based plumage. We measured circulating carotenoid concentrations in male and female hihi during breeding and molt, determined the nutritional content of common foods in the hihi diet, and conducted feeding observations of male and female hihi during molt. We found that although male and female hihi do not differ significantly in plasma carotenoid concentration, male hihi have a greater proportion of carotenoid-rich foods in their diet than do females. This is a consequence of a greater fruit and lower invertebrate intake than females and an avoidance of low-carotenoid content fruit. By combining behavioral observations with quantification of circulating carotenoids, we present evidence that colorful birds forage to maximize carotenoid intake, a conclusion we would not have drawn had we examined plasma carotenoids alone.

  10. [What is has the artificial sweeteners in indication the food of our diabetics?].

    PubMed

    Demnati, Cyrine; Ben Mami, Faika; Fendi, Olfa; Gaigi, Imene; Trimèche, Abdelmajid; Trabelsi, Nabil; Dakhli, Saber; Achour, Ahmed

    2012-03-01

    Artificial Sweeteners are food additives increasingly developed by the food industry. Study of the consumption of sweeteners in diabetic patients. This prospective cross study performed using a questionnaire to 100 patients recruited at random outpatients of the National Institute of Nutrition. Data on the BMI,the blood sugar were found in clinical records. 94% of diabetics have at least heard of sweeteners and 50% use it regularly. Sweetener table are the most consumed sweeteners, in order of frequency Saccharin, Sucralose and Aspartame, used to sweeten coffee and tea. The trade products "light" are consumed by 29% of patients. Yet consumers have no real information on these products. There was no statistically significant correlation between the consumption of sweeteners and BMI, balance and diabetes evolution. A statistically significant correlation was found between consumption and socio-economic and cultural development of patients. The education of diabetic patients should include information of patients on these sweeteners, their interest, their against-indications and adverse reactions.

  11. Inadequate awareness among chronic kidney disease patients regarding food and drinks containing artificially added phosphate.

    PubMed

    Shutto, Yoshiko; Shimada, Michiko; Kitajima, Maiko; Yamabe, Hideaki; Saitoh, Yoko; Saitoh, Hisao; Razzaque, Mohammed S

    2013-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemia is an important determinant of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Patients with CKD are advised to consume a low phosphate diet and are often prescribed phosphate-lowering drug therapy. However, commercially processed food and drinks often contain phosphate compounds, but the phosphate level is not usually provided in the ingredient list, which makes it difficult for CKD patients to choose a correct diet. We conducted a survey of the awareness of food/beverages containing artificially added phosphate among CKD patients undergoing hemodialysis. The subjects were 153 patients (77 males and 76 females; average age 56±11 years) who were randomly selected from the Dialysis Center of Hirosaki City, Japan. The subjects were provided with a list of questions. The survey results showed that 93% of the subjects were aware of the presence of high sugar content in soda, whereas only 25% were aware of the presence of phosphate (phosphoric acid) in such drinks. Despite 78% of the subjects being aware of the detrimental effects of consumption of a high phosphate diet, 43% drank at least 1 to 5 cans of soda per week and about 17% consumed "fast food" once each week. We also assessed the immediate effects of high-phosphate containing carbonated soda consumption by determining urinary calcium, phosphate, protein and sugar contents in overnight fasted healthy volunteers (n = 55; average age 20.7±0.3 years old, 20 males and 35 females). Significantly higher urinary calcium (adjusted using urinary creatinine) excretion was found 2 h after consuming 350 ml of carbonated soda compared to the fasting baseline level (0.15±0.01 vs. 0.09±0.01, p = 0.001). Our survey results suggest that CKD patients undergoing hemodialysis are not adequately aware of the hidden source of phosphate in their diet, and emphasize the need for educational initiatives to raise awareness of this issue among CKD patients.

  12. Component of Caramel Food Coloring, THI, Causes Lymphopenia Indirectly via a Key Metabolic Intermediate.

    PubMed

    Ohtoyo, Mamoru; Machinaga, Nobuo; Inoue, Ryotaku; Hagihara, Katsunobu; Yuita, Hiroshi; Tamura, Masakazu; Hashimoto, Ryuji; Chiba, Jun; Muro, Fumihito; Watanabe, Jun; Kobayashi, Yoshimasa; Abe, Koji; Kita, Yasuo; Nagasaki, Miyuki; Shimozato, Takaichi

    2016-05-19

    Caramel color is widely used in the food industry, and its many variations are generally considered to be safe. It has been known for a long time that THI (2-acetyl-4-(tetrahydroxybutyl)imidazole), a component of caramel color III, causes lymphopenia in animals through sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) lyase (S1PL) inhibition. However, this mechanism of action has not been fully validated because THI does not inhibit S1PL in vitro. To reconcile this situation, we examined molecular details of THI mechanism of action using "smaller" THI derivatives. We identified a bioactive derivative, A6770, which has the same lymphopenic effect as THI via S1PL inhibition. In the case of A6770 we observe this effect both in vitro and in vivo, and demonstrate that A6770 is phosphorylated and inhibits S1PL in the same way as 4-deoxypyridoxine. In addition, A6770 was detected in rat plasma following oral administration of THI, suggesting that A6770 is a key metabolic intermediate of THI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Reaction of a Food Colorant with Sodium Hypochlorite: A Student-Designed Kinetics Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce, Josefina; Betancourt, Rosa; Rivera, Yamil; Pijem, Joan

    1998-09-01

    The kinetics of the reaction of the food colorant FD&C Blue #1 with sodium hypochlorite (Clorox) is described in a student-designed experimental format. In this format, students are guided- by means of questions- to make decisions regarding concentration of reagents, choice of equipment, and actual laboratory procedures to be followed. This format provides an opportunity for students to apply the concepts and skills learned in class and in previous laboratory sessions to a new problem. We have found that this experience helps students gain depth of understanding of all concepts involved. The reaction (with a large excess of NaOCl) is followed with a Spectronic 20 at the Blue #1 colorant lmax of 630 nm. The %T is measured over time and three graphs: A vs time, ln A vs time and 1/A vs time are plotted to find that the second one is linear and thus first order with respect to the Blue #1. When the concentration of NaOCl is reduced to one-half the original value, it is found that the rate is reduced by one-half, indicating that the reaction is first order with respect to NaOCl and second order overall. The rate constant of the reaction is determined from the slope of the curve and the mean obtained by our students is 17 M-1 min-1 at room temperature (about 28° C).

  14. Online prediction of organileptic data for snack food using color images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Honglu; MacGregor, John F.

    2004-11-01

    In this paper, a study for the prediction of organileptic properties of snack food in real-time using RGB color images is presented. The so-called organileptic properties, which are properties based on texture, taste and sight, are generally measured either by human sensory response or by mechanical devices. Neither of these two methods can be used for on-line feedback control in high-speed production. In this situation, a vision-based soft sensor is very attractive. By taking images of the products, the samples remain untouched and the product properties can be predicted in real time from image data. Four types of organileptic properties are considered in this study: blister level, toast points, taste and peak break force. Wavelet transform are applied on the color images and the averaged absolute value for each filtered image is used as texture feature variable. In order to handle the high correlation among the feature variables, Partial Least Squares (PLS) is used to regress the extracted feature variables against the four response variables.

  15. A simple and rapid chromatographic method to determine unauthorized basic colorants (rhodamine B, auramine O, and pararosaniline) in processed foods

    PubMed Central

    Tatebe, Chiye; Zhong, Xining; Ohtsuki, Takashi; Kubota, Hiroki; Sato, Kyoko; Akiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    A simple and rapid high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method to determine basic colorants such as pararosaniline (PA), auramine O (AO), and rhodamine B (RB) in various processed foods was developed. Linearity of the calibration curves ranged from 0.05 to 50 μg/mL for PA and 0.05–100 μg/mL for AO and RB. The detection and quantification limits (LOD and LOQ) of the basic colorants, which were evaluated as signal-to-noise ratios of 3 for LOD and 10 for LOQ, ranged from 0.0125 to 0.05 and 0.025 to 0.125 μg/g, respectively. The recoveries and relative standard deviations of three basic colorants in six processed foods, namely, chili sauce, curry paste, gochujang (hot pepper paste), tandoori chicken (roasted chicken prepared with yogurt and spices), powder soup, and shrimp powder ranged from 70.2% to 102.8% and 0.8% to 8.0%, respectively. The intraday precision of the recovery test ranged from 1.7% to 4.5%, whereas the interday precision ranged from 3.7% to 7.7%. The reported method has been successfully applied to basic colorant determination in various processed foods such as fat-based food matrices (curry paste and tandoori chicken), chili products (gochujang and chili sauce), and protein-based products (shrimp powder and powder soup). Thin layer chromatography and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry methods for the determination of basic colorants in processed foods were also developed for rapid analysis and identification, respectively. These methods are very useful for monitoring unauthorized basic colorants in inspection centers or quarantine laboratories in many countries. PMID:25473512

  16. What Type of Food Can Older Adults Masticate?: Evaluation of Mastication Performance Using Color-Changeable Chewing Gum.

    PubMed

    Wada, Shinichi; Kawate, Nobuyuki; Mizuma, Masazumi

    2017-05-04

    This study determines if older adults can masticate regular foods via a simple test conducted using a color-changeable chewing gum. Seventy-nine consecutive inpatients of our clinic receiving rehabilitation and general medicine were assessed for eligibility. The inclusion criterion was >65 years. Thirty patients consented to participate. The main outcome variable was the food bolus texture at the swallowing threshold for five regular foods. The main explanatory variable was the a* value of the color-changeable chewing gum after 120 s of chewing (a* represents the degree of color between red and green, and a positive a* value indicates red). The mean age ± standard deviation of the participants was 81.6 ± 8.6 years, and 40% were men. Participants being able to prepare the food with suitable texture for swallowing was positively associated with the a* values in boiled rice, ginger-fried pork loin, boiled fish-paste, and rice cracker (Crude OR 1.18, 1.15, 1.17, and 1.50; P < 0.001, = 0.026, <0.001, and <0.001, respectively). The cut-off a* values had markedly high specificities (1.0) for boiled rice and boiled fish-paste and high sensitivities (0.86-0.94) for three foods, except boiled rice. We believe that mastication evaluation using the color-changeable chewing gum is not only useful but also extremely practical, even for older adults in a wide range of settings, including an individual's home. This approach would lead to a reduction in unnecessary mechanically altered or pureed food for older adults who can eat pureed food and safely provide palatable food.

  17. Color encoded microbeads-based flow cytometric immunoassay for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in food.

    PubMed

    Meimaridou, Anastasia; Haasnoot, Willem; Noteboom, Linda; Mintzas, Dimitrios; Pulkrabova, Jana; Hajslová, Jana; Nielen, Michel W F

    2010-07-05

    Food contamination caused by chemical hazards such as persistent organic pollutants (POPs) is a worldwide public health concern and requires continuous monitoring. The chromatography-based analysis methods for POPs are accurate and quite sensitive but they are time-consuming, laborious and expensive. Thus, there is a need for validated simplified screening tools, which are inexpensive, rapid, have automation potential and can detect multiple POPs simultaneously. In this study we developed a flow cytometry-based immunoassay (FCIA) using a color-encoded microbeads technology to detect benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) and other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in buffer and food extracts as a starting point for the future development of rapid multiplex assays including other POPs in food, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). A highly sensitive assay for BaP was obtained with an IC(50) of 0.3 microg L(-1) using a monoclonal antibody (Mab22F12) against BaP, similar to the IC(50) of a previously described enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using the same Mab. Moreover, the FCIA was 8 times more sensitive for BaP compared to a surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensor immunoassay (BIA) using the same reagents. The selectivity of the FCIAs was tested, with two Mabs against BaP for 25 other PAHs, including two hydroxyl PAH metabolites. Apart from BaP, the FCIAs can detect PAHs such as indenol[1,2,3-cd]pyrene (IP), benz[a]anthracene (BaA), and chrysene (CHR) which are also appointed by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) as suitable indicators of PAH contamination in food. The FCIAs results were in agreement with those obtained with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for the detection of PAHs in real food samples of smoked carp and wheat flour and has great potential for the future routine application of this assay in a simplex or multiplex format in combination with simplified extraction procedure which

  18. Food preferences of Knysna and purple-crested turacos fed varying concentrations of equicaloric and equimolar artificial fruit.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Amy-Leigh; Downs, Colleen T

    2011-02-15

    The effects that different fruit sugar types and concentrations have on food preferences of avian frugivores have been relatively poorly studied. Although it has been recently advocated that preference is based on equicaloric energy it is also important to note whether preferences change as energy content changes. Therefore, sugar preferences of equicaloric and equimolar artificial fruit of different sugar types at varying concentrations and molarities were investigated in two relatively large South African frugivores, Knysna (Tauraco corythaix) and purple-crested (Gallirex porphyreolophus) turacos. Artificial fruits containing 6.6, 12.4 or 22% sucrose or glucose, and artificial fruits containing 0.42, 0.83 or 1.66 mol l(-1) sucrose or glucose, were used to determine sugar preferences. Knysna turacos preferred the sucrose to the glucose equicaloric artificial fruit diet at low concentrations whereas purple-crested turacos showed no preference for either diet. Both turacos species preferred the sucrose equimolar artificial fruit diet to the glucose at low concentrations. At high concentrations neither species showed a preference for either equicaloric or equimolar artificial fruit diets. This suggests that energy requirements influence food preferences more than sugar type and that birds will select fruit that is higher in energy irrespective of sugar type. This complements an earlier study on digestion of differing equicaloric and equimolar artificial fruit sugar types. It again emphasizes the need for future studies looking at the composition of indigenous forest fruit sugars in order to obtain insight into the role of these avian frugivores as potential seed dispersers of fruiting tree species.

  19. An Evaluation of Foods Processed in Tray Pack versus Two Standard Food Service Containers. Part 1. Sensory, Container and Bacteriological Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-01

    Paprika Oleoresin Paprika Artificial Color Citric Acid Onion Garlic Natural Flavor **Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein Monosodium Glutamate Hydrogenated...Pepper Salt Food Starch-Modified Salt Wheat Flour Salt Sugar Sugar Dehydrated Onions Paprika Paprika Spices Dehydrated Onion Onion Flavoring Flavoring...Monosodium Glutamate Oleoresin Paprika Spice Garlic Monosodium Glutamate Monosodium Glutamate Artificial Color Citric Acid - -...- *Chili Pepper Cumin

  20. Tracing artificial trans fat in popular foods in Europe: a market basket investigation

    PubMed Central

    Stender, Steen; Astrup, Arne; Dyerberg, Jørn

    2014-01-01

    Objective To minimise the intake of industrial artificial trans fat (I-TF), nearly all European countries rely on food producers to voluntarily reduce the I-TF content in food. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of this strategy on I-TF content in prepackaged biscuits/cakes/wafers in 2012–2013 in 20 European countries. Design The I-TF content was assessed in a market basket investigation. Three large supermarkets were visited in each capital, and in some countries, three additional ethnic shops were included. Results A total of 598 samples of biscuits/cakes/wafers with ‘partially hydrogenated vegetable fat’ or a similar term high on the list of ingredients were analysed, 312 products had more than 2% of fat as I-TF, exceeding the legislatively determined I-TF limit in Austria and Denmark; the mean (SD) was 19 (7)%. In seven countries, no I-TF was found, whereas nine predominantly Eastern European countries had products with very high I-TF content, and the remaining four countries had intermediate levels. Of the five countries that were examined using the same procedure as in 2006, three had unchanged I-TF levels in 2013, and two had lower levels. The 18 small ethnic shops examined in six Western European countries sold 83 products. The mean (SD) was 23 (12)% of the fat as I-TF, all imported from countries in Balkan. In Sweden, this type of food imported from Balkan was also available in large supermarkets. Conclusions The findings suggest that subgroups of the population in many countries in Europe still consume I-TF in amounts that increase their risk of coronary heart disease. Under current European Union (EU) legislation, the sale of products containing I-TF is legal but conflicts with the WHO recommendation to minimise the intake of I-TF. An EU-legislative limit on I-TF content in foods is expected to be an effective strategy to achieve this goal. PMID:24844273

  1. Tracing artificial trans fat in popular foods in Europe: a market basket investigation.

    PubMed

    Stender, Steen; Astrup, Arne; Dyerberg, Jørn

    2014-05-20

    To minimise the intake of industrial artificial trans fat (I-TF), nearly all European countries rely on food producers to voluntarily reduce the I-TF content in food. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of this strategy on I-TF content in prepackaged biscuits/cakes/wafers in 2012-2013 in 20 European countries. The I-TF content was assessed in a market basket investigation. Three large supermarkets were visited in each capital, and in some countries, three additional ethnic shops were included. A total of 598 samples of biscuits/cakes/wafers with 'partially hydrogenated vegetable fat' or a similar term high on the list of ingredients were analysed, 312 products had more than 2% of fat as I-TF, exceeding the legislatively determined I-TF limit in Austria and Denmark; the mean (SD) was 19 (7)%. In seven countries, no I-TF was found, whereas nine predominantly Eastern European countries had products with very high I-TF content, and the remaining four countries had intermediate levels. Of the five countries that were examined using the same procedure as in 2006, three had unchanged I-TF levels in 2013, and two had lower levels. The 18 small ethnic shops examined in six Western European countries sold 83 products. The mean (SD) was 23 (12)% of the fat as I-TF, all imported from countries in Balkan. In Sweden, this type of food imported from Balkan was also available in large supermarkets. The findings suggest that subgroups of the population in many countries in Europe still consume I-TF in amounts that increase their risk of coronary heart disease. Under current European Union (EU) legislation, the sale of products containing I-TF is legal but conflicts with the WHO recommendation to minimise the intake of I-TF. An EU-legislative limit on I-TF content in foods is expected to be an effective strategy to achieve this goal. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to

  2. Food preservatives sodium benzoate and propionic acid and colorant curcumin suppress Th1-type immune response in vitro.

    PubMed

    Maier, Elisabeth; Kurz, Katharina; Jenny, Marcel; Schennach, Harald; Ueberall, Florian; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2010-07-01

    Food preservatives sodium benzoate and propionic acid and colorant curcumin are demonstrated to suppress in a dose-dependent manner Th1-type immune response in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in vitro. Results show an anti-inflammatory property of compounds which however could shift the Th1-Th2-type immune balance towards Th2-type immunity.

  3. Sustainable fuel, food, fertilizer and ecosystems through a global artificial photosynthetic system: overcoming anticompetitive barriers

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Alex; Faunce, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses challenges that artificial photosynthetic (AP) systems will face when entering and competing in a global market characterized by established fossil fuel technology. It provides a perspective on the neoliberal principles underpinning much policy entrenching such environmentally destructive technology and outlines how competition law could aid overcoming these hurdles for AP development. In particular, it critiques the potential for competition law to promote a global AP initiative with greater emphasis on atmospheric carbon dioxide and nitrogen fixation (as well as solar-driven water splitting) to produce an equitable, globally distributed source of human food, fertilizer and biosphere sustainability, as well as hydrogen-based fuel. Some relevant strategies of competition law evaluated in this context include greater citizen–consumer involvement in shaping market values, legal requirements to factor services from the natural environment (i.e. provision of clean air, water, soil pollution degradation) into corporate costs, reform of corporate taxation and requirements to balance maximization of shareholder profit with contribution to a nominated public good, a global financial transactions tax, as well as prohibiting horizontal cartels, vertical agreements and unilateral misuse of market power. PMID:26052427

  4. Sustainable fuel, food, fertilizer and ecosystems through a global artificial photosynthetic system: overcoming anticompetitive barriers.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Alex; Faunce, Thomas

    2015-06-06

    This article discusses challenges that artificial photosynthetic (AP) systems will face when entering and competing in a global market characterized by established fossil fuel technology. It provides a perspective on the neoliberal principles underpinning much policy entrenching such environmentally destructive technology and outlines how competition law could aid overcoming these hurdles for AP development. In particular, it critiques the potential for competition law to promote a global AP initiative with greater emphasis on atmospheric carbon dioxide and nitrogen fixation (as well as solar-driven water splitting) to produce an equitable, globally distributed source of human food, fertilizer and biosphere sustainability, as well as hydrogen-based fuel. Some relevant strategies of competition law evaluated in this context include greater citizen-consumer involvement in shaping market values, legal requirements to factor services from the natural environment (i.e. provision of clean air, water, soil pollution degradation) into corporate costs, reform of corporate taxation and requirements to balance maximization of shareholder profit with contribution to a nominated public good, a global financial transactions tax, as well as prohibiting horizontal cartels, vertical agreements and unilateral misuse of market power.

  5. A Rapid Dialysis Method for Analysis of Artificial Sweeteners in Foods (2nd Report).

    PubMed

    Tahara, Shoichi; Yamamoto, Sumiyo; Yamajima, Yukiko; Miyakawa, Hiroyuki; Uematsu, Yoko; Monma, Kimio

    2017-01-01

    Following the previous report, a rapid dialysis method was developed for the extraction and purification of four artificial sweeteners, namely, sodium saccharide (Sa), acesulfame potassium (AK), aspartame (APM), and dulcin (Du), which are present in various foods. The method was evaluated by the addition of 0.02 g/kg of these sweeteners to a cookie sample, in the same manner as in the previous report. Revisions from the previous method were: reduction of the total dialysis volume from 200 to 100 mL, change of tube length from 55 to 50 cm, change of dialysate from 0.01 mol/L hydrochloric aqueous solution containing 10% sodium chloride to 30% methanol solution, and change of dialysis conditions from ambient temperature with occasional shaking to 50℃ with shaking at 160 rpm. As a result of these revisions, the recovery reached 99.3-103.8% with one hour dialysis. The obtained recovery yields were comparable to the recovery yields in the previous method with four hour dialysis.

  6. Antiproliferative and genotoxic effects of nature identical and artificial synthetic food additives of aroma and flavor.

    PubMed

    Nunes, R D M; Sales, I M S; Silva, S I O; Sousa, J M C; Peron, A P

    2016-07-25

    This study aimed to analyze the antiproliferative and genotoxic potential of synthetic food flavorings, nature identical passion fruit and artificial vanilla. This assessment used root meristem cells of Allium cepa L., in exposure times of 24 and 48 hours and using doses of 0.2; 0.4 and 0.6 mL. Roots were fixed in Carnoy's solution, hydrolyzed in hydrochloric acid, stained with acetic orcein and analyzed with optical microscope at 400× magnification, 5,000 cells for each treatment. For data analysis, it was used Chi-square test at 5%. Doses of 0.2 mL at ET 48 h; 0.4 and 0.6 mL at ET 24 and 48 h of passion fruit flavor, and the three doses of the vanilla flavor at ET 24 and 48 h significantly reduced the cell division rate in the meristems of roots, proving to be cytotoxic. Doses of 0.2; 0.4 and 0.6 mL of the passion fruit additive, and the three doses of vanilla tested, in the two exposure times, induced mitotic spindle changes and micronuclei formation in the cells of the test organism used, proving to be genotoxic. Therefore, under the studied conditions, flavoring solutions of vanilla and passion fruit, marketed nationally and internationally, significantly altered the functioning of the cell cycle in root meristem cells of A. cepa.

  7. Growth, food consumption, and energy status of juvenile pallid sturgeon fed natural or artificial diets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, Hilary A.; Chipps, Steven R.; Graeb, Brian D. S.; Klumb, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Stocking of hatchery-raised fish is an important part of the pallid sturgeon Scaphirhynchus albus recovery program. In the wild, juvenile pallid sturgeon consume primarily aquatic insects, although little is known about specific dietary needs. In hatchery settings, pallid sturgeon are fed commercial diets that are formulated for salmonids. To compare food consumption, growth, and energy status of pallid sturgeon fed artificial or natural diets, we conducted a laboratory study using 24 juvenile pallid sturgeon (initial fork length 153–236 mm). Pallid sturgeon were fed a daily ration of either commercial pellets (1 mm, slow sinking; 45% protein, 19% fat) or chironomid larvae for 5 wk. Natural-fed pallid sturgeon exhibited a greater specific growth rate (2.12% d−1) than pellet-fed fish (0.06% d−1). Similarly, relative condition was greater for natural-fed sturgeon (Kn = 1.11) than that observed for pellet-fed fish (Kn = 0.87). In contrast, the hepatosomatic index was significantly higher in pellet-fed fish (2.5%), indicating a high lipid diet compared with natural-fed sturgeon (1.4%). Given the importance of natural diets to fish digestion and growth, it is suggested that a more holistic approach be applied in the development of a practical diet for pallid sturgeon that incorporates attributes of natural prey.

  8. Simultaneous kinetic spectrophotometric analysis of five synthetic food colorants with the aid of chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yongnian; Wang, Yong; Kokot, Serge

    2009-04-30

    This paper describes a simple and sensitive kinetic spectrophotometric method for the simultaneous determination of Amaranth, Ponceau 4R, Sunset Yellow, Tartrazine and Brilliant Blue in mixtures with the aid of chemometrics. The method involved two coupled reactions, viz. the reduction of iron(III) by the analytes to iron(II) in sodium acetate/hydrochloric acid solution (pH 1.71) and the chromogenic reaction between iron(II) and hexacyanoferrate(III) ions to yield a Prussian blue peak at 760 nm. The spectral data were recorded over the 500-1000 nm wavelength range every 2s for 600 s. The kinetic data were collected at 760 nm and 600 s, and linear calibration models were satisfactorily constructed for each of the dyes with detection limits in the range of 0.04-0.50 mg L(-1). Multivariate calibration models for kinetic data were established and verified for methods such as the Iterative target transform factor analysis (ITTFA), principal component regression (PCR), partial least squares (PLS), and principal component-radial basis function-artificial neural network (PC-RBF-ANN) with and without wavelet packet transform (WPT) pre-treatment. The PC-RBF-ANN with WPT calibration performed somewhat better than others on the basis of the %RPE(T) (approximately 9) and %Recovery parameters (approximately 108), although the effect of the WPT pre-treatment was marginal (approximately 0.5% RPE(T)). The proposed method was applied for the simultaneous determination of the five colorants in foodstuff samples, and the results were comparable with those from a reference HPLC method.

  9. Genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of Sunset Yellow and Brilliant Blue, colorant food additives, on human blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Kus, Esra; Eroglu, Halil Erhan

    2015-01-01

    The synthetic dyes over fifty are used in many areas including the food industry around the world. Sunset Yellow FCF and Brilliant Blue FCF are used as colorant food additives in many food products. The present study investigated the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of Sunset Yellow and Brilliant Blue. Genotoxic and cytotoxic activities of the food additives were evaluated in lymphocyte cell cultures using mitotic index, replication index and micronucleus assay. Mitotic index frequencies and replication index values were decreased and micronucleus frequency was increased with increasing concentrations of Sunset Yellow and Brilliant Blue. The changes in mitotic index and micronucleus are statistically significant (p<0.05). The results show that the Sunset Yellow and Brilliant Blue can have cytotoxic and genotoxic potential. It care must be taken when using these materials as a food additive.

  10. Multispectroscopic and calorimetric studies on the binding of the food colorant tartrazine with human hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anirban; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2016-11-15

    Interaction of the food colorant tartrazine with human hemoglobin was studied using multispectroscopic and microcalorimetric techniques to gain insights into the binding mechanism and thereby the toxicity aspects. Hemoglobin spectrum showed hypochromic changes in the presence of tartrazine. Quenching of the fluorescence of hemoglobin occurred and the quenching mechanism was through a static mode as revealed from temperature dependent and time-resolved fluorescence studies. According to the FRET theory the distance between β-Trp37 of hemoglobin and bound tartrazine was evaluated to be 3.44nm. Synchronous fluorescence studies showed that tartrazine binding led to alteration of the microenvironment around the tryptophans more in comparison to tyrosines. 3D fluorescence and FTIR data provided evidence for conformational changes in the protein on binding. Circular dichroism studies revealed that the binding led to significant loss in the helicity of hemoglobin. The esterase activity assay further complemented the circular dichroism data. Microcalorimetric study using isothermal titration calorimetry revealed the binding to be exothermic and driven largely by positive entropic contribution. Dissection of the Gibbs energy change proposed the protein-dye complexation to be dominated by non-polyelectrolytic forces. Negative heat capacity change also corroborated the involvement of hydrophobic forces in the binding process.

  11. Conjugate gradient and approximate Newton methods for an optimal probablilistic neural network for food color classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chtioui, Younes; Panigrahi, Suranjan; Marsh, Ronald A.

    1998-11-01

    The probabilistic neural network (PNN) is based on the estimation of the probability density functions. The estimation of these density functions uses smoothing parameters that represent the width of the activation functions. A two-step numerical procedure is developed for the optimization of the smoothing parameters of the PNN: a rough optimization by the conjugate gradient method and a fine optimization by the approximate Newton method. The thrust is to compare the classification performances of the improved PNN and the standard back-propagation neural network (BPNN). Comparisons are performed on a food quality problem: french fry classification into three different color classes (light, normal, and dark). The optimized PNN correctly classifies 96.19% of the test data, whereas the BPNN classifies only 93.27% of the same data. Moreover, the PNN is more stable than the BPNN with regard to the random initialization. The optimized PNN requires 1464 s for training compared to only 71 s required by the BPNN.

  12. Food protective and color alteration effects of acaricidal aldehydes on Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Schrank).

    PubMed

    Sung, B K; Lim, J H; Lee, H S

    2006-07-01

    The activities of benzaldehyde isolated from Prunus persica seeds and of commercially available aldehydes against Tyrophagus putrescentiae (a stored-food mite) adults were examined and compared with those of the synthetic acaricides benzyl benzoate and N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide. On the basis of the 50% lethal dose (LD50), the compound most toxic to T. putrescentiae adults was salicylaldehyde (LD50 of 1.02 microg/cm2) followed by cinnamaldehyde (1.66 microg/cm2), benzaldehyde (4.23 microg/cm2), phthaldialdehyde (5.16 microg/cm2), benzyl benzoate (9.75 microg/cm2), and N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide (16.26 micorg/cm2). Benzaldehyde was about 2.3 and 3.8 times more toxic than benzyl benzoate and N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide, respectively, against T. putrescentiae adults. These results indicated that benzaldehyde isolated from P. persica seeds and the three aldehydes (cinnamaldehyde, salicylaldehyde, and phthaldialdehyde) are useful as lead compounds for developing acaricidal agents against T. putrescentiae adults. The color of the T. putrescentiae cuticle was changed by treatment with cinnamaldehyde, salicylaldehyde, and phthaldialdehyde.

  13. Evaluation of colour and hardness changes of soft lining materials in food colorant solutions.

    PubMed

    Canay, S; Hersek, N; Tulunoğlu, I; Uzun, G

    1999-10-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the colour stability and viscoelastic properties of three commercially available soft lining materials in vitro, by exposing them to 3% erythrosine, tartrazine and sunset yellow solutions. The colour changes were determined using a computer controlled spectrophotometer. The colour change of three soft lining materials--Molloplast B, Flexor and Coe Super Soft--were determined after 1, 3 and 6 months storage in three different food colorant solutions. The colour changes of Molloplast B was not noticeable. Only the initial colour value of Flexor was significantly different from the other time interval colour measurements. On the other hand, the colour difference of Coe Super Soft was found to be significantly different at all comparative time interval measurements (P<0.05). According to Shore A hardness values, Molloplast B had an initial hardness of 44 in all three solutions, and there was a slight increase after 6 months. Flexor had an initial hardness of 39, at the end of 6 months the hardness changed a little. Coe Super Soft was fairly hard after processing and Shore A hardness was initially 89 which increased to 95 later on. According to these results, only the hardness values of Coe Super Soft showed a statistically significant difference when compared using Wilcoxon signed rank test at the P<0.05 level. As a conclusion, silicon type soft lining material seems to be more resistant to colour change and hardness than the acrylic type soft liners.

  14. Lifespan psychomotor behaviour profiles of multigenerational prenatal stress and artificial food dye effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Zachary T; Falkenberg, Erin A; Metz, Gerlinde A S

    2014-01-01

    The consumption of artificial food dye (AFD) during childhood and adolescence has been linked to behavioural changes, such as hyperactivity. It is possible that the vulnerability to AFDs is modified by prenatal stress. Common consequences of prenatal stress include hyperactivity, thus potentially leading to synergistic actions with AFDs. Here, we investigated the compounding effect of multigenerational prenatal stress (MPS) and AFD consumption on the development of hyperactivity and anxiety-related behaviours across the lifespan in male rats. MPS treatment involved a family history of four consecutive generations of prenatal stress (F4 generation). AFD treatment included a 4%-concentration of FD&C Red 40, FD&C Yellow 5, FD&C Yellow 6, and FD&C Blue 1 in the drinking water from postnatal days 22 to 50 to resemble juvenile and adolescent dietary exposure. Using several exploration tasks, animals were tested in motor activity and anxiety-like behaviours from adolescence to 13 months of age. MPS resulted in hyperactivity both early (50 days) and later in life (13 months), with normalized activity patterns at reproductive age. AFD consumption resulted in hyperactivity during consumption, which subsided following termination of treatment. Notably, both MPS and AFD promoted risk-taking behaviour in young adults (3 months). There were few synergistic effects between MPS and AFD in this study. The findings suggest that AFDs exert the most noticeable effects at the time of exposure. MPS, however, results in a characteristic lifespan profile of behavioural changes, indicating that development and aging represent particularly vulnerable periods in life during which a family history of prenatal stress may precipitate.

  15. Lifespan Psychomotor Behaviour Profiles of Multigenerational Prenatal Stress and Artificial Food Dye Effects in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Zachary T.; Falkenberg, Erin A.; Metz, Gerlinde A. S.

    2014-01-01

    The consumption of artificial food dye (AFD) during childhood and adolescence has been linked to behavioural changes, such as hyperactivity. It is possible that the vulnerability to AFDs is modified by prenatal stress. Common consequences of prenatal stress include hyperactivity, thus potentially leading to synergistic actions with AFDs. Here, we investigated the compounding effect of multigenerational prenatal stress (MPS) and AFD consumption on the development of hyperactivity and anxiety-related behaviours across the lifespan in male rats. MPS treatment involved a family history of four consecutive generations of prenatal stress (F4 generation). AFD treatment included a 4%-concentration of FD&C Red 40, FD&C Yellow 5, FD&C Yellow 6, and FD&C Blue 1 in the drinking water from postnatal days 22 to 50 to resemble juvenile and adolescent dietary exposure. Using several exploration tasks, animals were tested in motor activity and anxiety-like behaviours from adolescence to 13 months of age. MPS resulted in hyperactivity both early (50 days) and later in life (13 months), with normalized activity patterns at reproductive age. AFD consumption resulted in hyperactivity during consumption, which subsided following termination of treatment. Notably, both MPS and AFD promoted risk-taking behaviour in young adults (3 months). There were few synergistic effects between MPS and AFD in this study. The findings suggest that AFDs exert the most noticeable effects at the time of exposure. MPS, however, results in a characteristic lifespan profile of behavioural changes, indicating that development and aging represent particularly vulnerable periods in life during which a family history of prenatal stress may precipitate. PMID:24937660

  16. Inadequate Awareness among Chronic Kidney Disease Patients Regarding Food and Drinks Containing Artificially Added Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Shutto, Yoshiko; Shimada, Michiko; Kitajima, Maiko; Yamabe, Hideaki; Saitoh, Yoko; Saitoh, Hisao; Razzaque, Mohammed S.

    2013-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemia is an important determinant of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Patients with CKD are advised to consume a low phosphate diet and are often prescribed phosphate-lowering drug therapy. However, commercially processed food and drinks often contain phosphate compounds, but the phosphate level is not usually provided in the ingredient list, which makes it difficult for CKD patients to choose a correct diet. We conducted a survey of the awareness of food/beverages containing artificially added phosphate among CKD patients undergoing hemodialysis. The subjects were 153 patients (77 males and 76 females; average age 56±11 years) who were randomly selected from the Dialysis Center of Hirosaki City, Japan. The subjects were provided with a list of questions. The survey results showed that 93% of the subjects were aware of the presence of high sugar content in soda, whereas only 25% were aware of the presence of phosphate (phosphoric acid) in such drinks. Despite 78% of the subjects being aware of the detrimental effects of consumption of a high phosphate diet, 43% drank at least 1 to 5 cans of soda per week and about 17% consumed “fast food” once each week. We also assessed the immediate effects of high-phosphate containing carbonated soda consumption by determining urinary calcium, phosphate, protein and sugar contents in overnight fasted healthy volunteers (n = 55; average age 20.7±0.3 years old, 20 males and 35 females). Significantly higher urinary calcium (adjusted using urinary creatinine) excretion was found 2 h after consuming 350 ml of carbonated soda compared to the fasting baseline level (0.15±0.01 vs. 0.09±0.01, p = 0.001). Our survey results suggest that CKD patients undergoing hemodialysis are not adequately aware of the hidden source of phosphate in their diet, and emphasize the need for educational initiatives to raise awareness of this issue among CKD patients. PMID:24236030

  17. Comparison of conventional and plant-extract disinfectant solutions on the hardness and color stability of a maxillofacial elastomer after artificial aging.

    PubMed

    Guiotti, Aimée Maria; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Vechiato-Filho, Aljomar José; Cunha, Bruno Guandalini; Paulini, Marcela Borghi; Moreno, Amália; de Almeida, Margarete Teresa Gottardo

    2016-04-01

    Silicone elastomers undergo physical and chemical degradation with disinfecting solutions. Phytotherapy may be a suitable solution for disinfection. However, its effect on the properties of the silicone material is unknown. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of disinfection with conventional and plant-extract solutions and of artificial aging on the hardness and color stability of a facial silicone associated with pigments and an opacifier. Four hundred specimens of silicone (MDX4-4210) were fabricated (5×6 mm). Two pigment shades and 1 dry opacifier were combined in the tested material, and 4 groups (n=10) were obtained: colorless (GI), colorless with opacifier (GII), medium pigment with opacifier (GIII), and black pigment with opacifier (GIV). Specimens were subjected to disinfection (30 days) using saline solution, water, and neutral soap (digital friction, 30 seconds), chlorhexidine 4%, Hydrastis canadensis, and Cymbopogon nardus extracts (immersion, 10 minutes). Shore A hardness (ASTM D2240) and color analyses were performed before and after disinfection. Specimens were then exposed to 1008 hours of artificial aging (ASTM 53) and subjected to final hardness and color readings. The results were analyzed with ANOVA and the Tukey significant difference test (α=.05). The opacifier increased the hardness (GII). For GII, the H. canadensis solution and the friction with water and soap promoted significantly reduced hardness; the friction also promoted a reduction in this property for GIV. The GIII was not affected after disinfection. A significant difference was found between the ΔE values of the specimens disinfected with H. canadensis, C. nardus, and chlorhexidine, and specimens subjected to saline solution and neutral soap. The hardness of MDX4-4210 after the experimental procedure was considered clinically acceptable for facial prostheses. All groups showed clinically unacceptable color alterations regardless of the disinfecting

  18. [A case of late-onset schizophrenia with the predominant symptom of delusional perception of the color of food].

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Manabu; Hinohara, Kei; Yamaga, Kuniaki; Kato, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    Herein, we report the case of a woman in her late 60s with late-onset schizophrenia in which the predominant symptom was delusional perception of the color of food based on a delusional "rule of colors" system constructed by the patient. This paranoid type schizophrenia is considered a core type of schizophrenia in which first-rank Schneiderian symptoms are initially exhibited. After approximately four years, the chronic phase, characterized by a poor social function, is reached. In this respect, the main psychopathological characteristics of the present case of late-onset schizophrenia are the same as those of typical cases of schizophrenia in young patients. In this study, the patient's delusional "rule of colors" system is analyzed according to Matussek's theory of delusional perception.

  19. Jagua blue derived from Genipa americana L. fruit: A natural alternative to commonly used blue food colorants?

    PubMed

    Brauch, J E; Zapata-Porras, S P; Buchweitz, M; Aschoff, J K; Carle, R

    2016-11-01

    Due to consumers' increasing health awareness, food industry aims at replacing synthetic dyes by natural counterparts. The substitution of blue synthetic dyes is particularly challenging since current natural alternatives such as phycocyanin (Spirulina) suffer from poor stability. Jagua blue (produced from Genipa americana L. fruit) might represent a potential novel blue pigment source. However, only little is known about its color properties, and application in food systems. Therefore, the blue color and the stability of Jagua blue were assessed for the first time and compared to commonly used colorants, namely, Spirulina, brilliant blue FCF (Blue no. 1), and indigo carmine (Blue no. 2). The reaction rate of Jagua blue was independent of its concentration, confirming thermal degradation to follow first-order kinetics. Between pH 3.6 and 5.0, the color hue of Jagua blue solutions was similar to that of Blue no. 2. However, Jagua blue revealed markedly higher storage stabilities (t1/2=86-105days) than Blue no. 2 (t1/2≤9days) and was less susceptible to acidic pH of 3.6 (t1/2=86days) than Spirulina (t1/2=70days). High negative b* values (blueness) of colored gelatin gels were only obtained for Jagua blue and Spirulina, and the former exhibited higher light stabilities (t1/2=15days) than Spirulina gels (t1/2=4days). Our findings indicate Jagua blue to be a most promising alternative to synthetic dyes, providing relevant information regarding potential food applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Red pepper (Capsicum annuum) carotenoids as a source of natural food colors: analysis and stability-a review.

    PubMed

    Arimboor, Ranjith; Natarajan, Ramesh Babu; Menon, K Ramakrishna; Chandrasekhar, Lekshmi P; Moorkoth, Vidya

    2015-03-01

    Carotenoids are increasingly drawing the attention of researchers as a major natural food color due to their inherent nutritional characteristics and the implicated possible role in prevention and protection against degenerative diseases. In this report, we review the role of red pepper as a source for natural carotenoids. The composition of the carotenoids in red pepper and the application of different methodologies for their analysis were discussed in this report. The stability of red pepper carotenoids during post-harvest processing and storage is also reviewed. This review highlights the potential of red pepper carotenoids as a source of natural food colors and also discusses the need for a standardized approach for the analysis and reporting of composition of carotenoids in plant products and designing model systems for stability studies.

  1. 21 CFR 101.22 - Foods; labeling of spices, flavorings, colorings and chemical preservatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD LABELING Specific Food... hydrolysate used in food for its effects on flavor may be declared simply as “flavor,” “natural flavor,” or... Food and Drug Administration or any other employee acting on behalf of the Secretary of Health and...

  2. 21 CFR 101.22 - Foods; labeling of spices, flavorings, colorings and chemical preservatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD LABELING Specific Food... hydrolysate used in food for its effects on flavor may be declared simply as “flavor,” “natural flavor,” or... Food and Drug Administration or any other employee acting on behalf of the Secretary of Health and...

  3. 21 CFR 101.22 - Foods; labeling of spices, flavorings, colorings and chemical preservatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD LABELING Specific Food... hydrolysate used in food for its effects on flavor may be declared simply as “flavor,” “natural flavor,” or... Food and Drug Administration or any other employee acting on behalf of the Secretary of Health and...

  4. 21 CFR 101.22 - Foods; labeling of spices, flavorings, colorings and chemical preservatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD LABELING Specific Food... hydrolysate used in food for its effects on flavor may be declared simply as “flavor,” “natural flavor,” or... Food and Drug Administration or any other employee acting on behalf of the Secretary of Health and...

  5. 21 CFR 101.22 - Foods; labeling of spices, flavorings, colorings and chemical preservatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD LABELING Specific Food... hydrolysate used in food for its effects on flavor may be declared simply as “flavor,” “natural flavor,” or... Food and Drug Administration or any other employee acting on behalf of the Secretary of Health and...

  6. Registered Designation of Origin Areas of Fermented Food Products Defined by Microbial Phenotypes and Artificial Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, M. F. S.; Pereira, C. I.; Rodrigues, F. M. S.; Martins, M. P.; Mimoso, M. C.; Barros, T. C.; Figueiredo Marques, J. J.; Tenreiro, R. P.; Almeida, J. S.; Barreto Crespo, M. T.

    1999-01-01

    Cheese produced from raw ewes’ milk and chouriço, a Portuguese dry fermented sausage, are still produced in a traditional way in certain regions of Portugal by relying on colonization by microbial populations associated with the raw materials, equipment, and local environments. For the purpose of describing the product origins and types of these fermented foods, metabolic phenotypes can be used as descriptors of the product as well as to determine the presence of compounds with organoleptic value. The application of artificial neural networks to the metabolic profiles of bacterial isolates was assayed and allowed the separation of products from different regions. This method could then be used for the Registered Designation of Origin certification process of food products. Therefore, besides test panel results for these traditionally produced food products, another tool for validating products for the marketplace is available to the producers. The method can be improved for the detection of counterfeit products. PMID:10508079

  7. Color Doppler flow imaging for the early detection of nonpregnant cattle at 20 days after timed artificial insemination.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, L G B; Areas, V S; Ghetti, A M; Fonseca, J F; Palhao, M P; Fernandes, C A C; Viana, J H M

    2013-10-01

    The objective was to determine the accuracy of a pregnancy test for predicting nonpregnant cattle based on the evaluation of corpus luteum (CL) blood flow at 20 d (CLBF-d20) after timed artificial insemination (TAI). Crossbred Holstein-Gir dairy heifers (n=209) and lactating cows (n=317) were synchronized for TAI using the following protocol: intravaginal implant (1.0 g of progesterone) and 2mg of estradiol benzoate i.m. on d -10, implant removal and 0.526 mg of sodium cloprostenol i.m. on d -2, 1mg of estradiol benzoate i.m. on d -1, and TAI on d 0. On d 20, animals underwent grayscale ultrasonography (US) to locate the CL and color flow Doppler to evaluate CLBF-d20 using a portable ultrasound equipped with a 7.5-MHz rectal transducer. Based only on a visual, subjective CLBF evaluation, the animals were classified as pregnant or not pregnant. On d 30 to 35, blinded from results of the previous diagnosis, the same operator performed a final pregnancy diagnosis using US to visualize the fetal heartbeat (gold standard; US-d30). A second evaluator also analyzed the CLBF-d20 in the same animals by watching 7-s recorded videos. Blood samples were collected from a subset of 171 females to determine, by RIA, plasma progesterone (P4) concentrations, which indicate CL function. The final pregnancy outcome (US-d30) was retrospectively compared with the CLBF-d20 diagnoses and then classified either as correct or incorrect. The number of true positive, true negative, false positive, and false negative decisions were inserted into a 2 × 2 decision matrix. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of the CLBF-d20 test were calculated using specific equations. Binomial variables (pregnancy rate and proportions) were analyzed using Fisher's exact test for the effect of parity and to compare between evaluators and tests (CLBF-d20 vs. plasma P₄). The kappa values were calculated to quantify the agreement between CLBF-d20 and

  8. Micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatographic determination of artificial sweeteners in low-Joule soft drinks and other foods.

    PubMed

    Thompson, C O; Trenerry, V C; Kemmery, B

    1995-03-10

    A rapid method for the determination of artificial sweeteners in low-Joule soft drinks and other foods by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MEKC) is described. Caffeine, benzoic acid and sorbic acid, which are often added to soft drinks, can also be determined with this procedure. The artificial sweeteners, aspartame, saccharin, acesulfame-K, alitame and dulcin, and the other food additives are well separated in less than 12 min using an uncoated fused-silica capillary column with a buffer consisting of 0.05 M sodium deoxycholate, 0.01 M potassium dihydrogenorthophosphate, 0.01 M sodium borate operating at 20 kV. Dehydroacetic acid was used as the internal standard for the determinations. The levels of artificial sweeteners, preservatives and caffeine were in good agreement with those determined by the high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) procedure currently used in our Laboratory. The MEKC procedure has the same order of repeatability, is faster and less costly to operate than the HPLC method.

  9. Determination of 4-Methylimidazole and 2-Acetyl-4()- tetrahydroxybutylimidazole in Caramel Color and Processed Foods by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Rang; Kim, Su Un; Shin, Young; Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Sang Me; Kim, Jung Hun

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the quick HPLC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous separation of 2-acetyl-4(5)-tetrahydrox-ybuthylimidazole (THI) and 4-(5)-methylimidazole (4-MI) in alkaline medium was used for caramel color and processed foods in Korea. After a simple sample pretreatment, 51 4-MI-labeled samples were positive for 4-MI and 2 also contained THI. The concentration of 4-MI was 260.5 ~ 24,499.3 μg/kg in caramel color, less than LOD ~ 1,712.5 μg/kg in sauce, 1,242.3, 5,972.2 μg/kg in balsamic vinegar, 2,118.3 ~ 5,802.4 μg/kg in complex seasoning, 82.7 ~ 5,110.6 μg/kg in curry, and 29.9 ~ 464.4 μg/kg in soft drinks. The recovery rate of 4-MI was 97.1 ~ 111.0% in sauce and 81.9 ~ 110.0% in powder and that of THI was 83.6 ~ 106.4% in sauce and 61.2 ~ 99.4% in powder. Our results concluded a safe amount of 4-MI and THI compared to the limit of Korea additive code but the processed foods do not have a limit of caramel color and 4-MI in Korea. Therefore, research and monitoring of 4-MI and THI is needed for processed foods in Korea.

  10. 21 CFR 501.22 - Animal foods; labeling of spices, flavorings, colorings, and chemical preservatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... contains a solely natural flavor(s), the flavor shall be so labeled, e.g., strawberry flavor, banana flavor, or natural strawberry flavor. In cases where the flavor contains both a natural flavor and an artificial flavor, the flavor shall be so labeled, e.g., natural and artificial strawberry flavor. In cases...

  11. Use of an artificial bromeliad to show the importance of color value in restricting colonization of bromeliads by Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus.

    PubMed

    Frank, J H

    1985-03-01

    An artificial bromeliad was developed which, painted and containing an infusion water, elicited ovipositional response by caged adult Aedes aegypti, Culex quinquefasciatus, Wyeomyia vanduzeei and Wy. mitchellii. Comparison was made of the ovipositional response of adults of the four mosquito species to artificial bromeliads painted black, white, dark green and deep blue. Adult Ae, aegypti and Wy. vanduzeei did not discriminate significantly between white, dark green and deep blue, but whereas Ae. aegypti showed a preference for black, Wy. vanduzeei showed an aversion to black. Adult Wy. mitchelli responded similarly to Wy. vanduzeei except that although deep blue was preferred to black, it elicited a significantly weaker response than did dark green and white. Adult Cx. quinquefasciatus responded similarly to Ae. aegypti but did not show a significant preference for black over dark green. The high color value (i.e., lightness) of natural bromeliad leaves is likely to deter oviposition by adult Ae. aegypti and Cx quinquefasciatus in favor of competing oviposition sites of lower color value.

  12. Influence of Different Types of Resin Luting Agents on Color Stability of Ceramic Laminate Veneers Subjected to Accelerated Artificial Aging.

    PubMed

    Silami, Francisca Daniele Jardilino; Tonani, Rafaella; Alandia-Román, Carla Cecilia; Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of accelerated aging (AAA) on the color stability of resin cements for bonding ceramic laminate veneers of different thicknesses. The occlusal surfaces of 80 healthy human molars were flattened. Ceramic laminate veneers (IPS e-max Ceram) of two thicknesses (0.5 and 1.0 mm) were bonded with three types of luting agents: light-cured, conventional dual and self-adhesive dual cement. Teeth without restorations and cement samples (0.5 mm) were used as control. After initial color evaluations, the samples were subjected to AAA for 580 h. After this, new color readouts were made, and the color stability (ΔE) and luminosity (ΔL) data were analyzed. The greatest color changes (p<0.05) occurred when 0.5 mm veneers were fixed with light-cured cement and the lowest when 1.0 mm veneers were fixed with conventional dual cement. There was no influence of the restoration thickness when the self-adhesive dual cement was used. When veneers were compared with the control groups, it was verified that the cement samples presented the greatest alterations (p<0.05) in comparison with both substrates and restored teeth. Therefore, it was concluded that the thickness of the restoration influences color and luminosity changes for conventional dual and light-cured cements. The changes in self-adhesive cement do not depend on restoration thickness.

  13. Discontinuity, bubbles, and translucence: major error factors in food color measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDougall, Douglas B.

    2002-06-01

    Four samples of breakfast cereals exhibiting discontinuity, two samples of baked goods with bubbles and two translucent drinks were measured to show the degree of differences that exist between their colors measured in CIELAB and their visual equivalence to the nearest NCS atlas color. Presentation variables and the contribution of light scatter to the size of the errors were examined.

  14. Color Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrolstad, Ronald E.; Smith, Daniel E.

    Color, flavor, and texture are the three principal quality attributes that determine food acceptance, and color has a far greater influence on our judgment than most of us appreciate. We use color to determine if a banana is at our preferred ripeness level, and a discolored meat product can warn us that the product may be spoiled. The marketing departments of our food corporations know that, for their customers, the color must be "right." The University of California Davis scorecard for wine quality designates four points out of 20, or 20% of the total score, for color and appearance (1). Food scientists who establish quality control specifications for their product are very aware of the importance of color and appearance. While subjective visual assessment and use of visual color standards are still used in the food industry, instrumental color measurements are extensively employed. Objective measurement of color is desirable for both research and industrial applications, and the ruggedness, stability, and ease of use of today's color measurement instruments have resulted in their widespread adoption.

  15. A Global Perspective on the History, Use, and Identification of Synthetic Food Dyes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Vinita; McKone, Harold T.; Markow, Peter G.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a brief history of the artificial coloration of foods, a discussion of the worldwide use of synthetic food dyes, and methods for separating and identifying 14 dyes in common use globally. The United States Food and Drug Administration presently has certified seven synthetic dyes for use in foods. An additional seven synthetic…

  16. A Global Perspective on the History, Use, and Identification of Synthetic Food Dyes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Vinita; McKone, Harold T.; Markow, Peter G.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a brief history of the artificial coloration of foods, a discussion of the worldwide use of synthetic food dyes, and methods for separating and identifying 14 dyes in common use globally. The United States Food and Drug Administration presently has certified seven synthetic dyes for use in foods. An additional seven synthetic…

  17. Artificial sweeteners and mixture of food additives cause to break oral tolerance and induce food allergy in murine oral tolerance model for food allergy.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, H; Matsuhara, H; Miotani, S; Sako, Y; Matsui, T; Tanaka, H; Inagaki, N

    2017-09-01

    Processed foods are part of daily life. Almost all processed foods contain food additives such as sweeteners, preservatives and colourants. From childhood, it is difficult to avoid consuming food additives. It is thought that oral tolerance for food antigens is acquired during early life. If tolerance fails, adverse immune responses to food proteins may occur. We hypothesized that food additives prevent acquisition of oral tolerance and aimed to verify the safety of food additives. We induced experimental oral tolerance in mice for ovalbumin (OVA), a food antigen, by previous oral treatment with OVA before sensitization with OVA injections. Food additives were administered at the induction of oral tolerance, and food allergy was induced by repeated administration of OVA. Symptoms of food allergy were defined as a change in body temperature and allergic diarrhoea. Saccharin sodium and a mixture of food additives inhibited acquisition of oral tolerance. Hypothermia and allergic diarrhoea with elevation of OVA-specific IgE were induced in the murine model of oral tolerance. Analyses of antigen-presenting cells in mesenteric lymph nodes showed that food additives affected their manner of migration. Additionally, food additives decreased the proportion of CD25(hi) regulatory T cells among CD4(+) T cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes. A large amount of food additives may prevent acquisition of oral tolerance. Intake of food additives in early life may increase the risk of food allergies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Use of artificial sweeteners and fat-modified foods in weight loss maintainers and always normal weight individuals

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, Suzanne; Lang, Wei; Jordan, Dustin; Wing, Rena R.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to compare the dietary strategies and use of fat and sugar-modified foods and beverages in a weight loss maintainer group (WLM) and an always normal weight group (NW). Subjects WLM (N = 172) had maintained ≥ 10% weight loss for 11.5 yr, and had a BMI of 22.0 kg/m2. NW (N=131) had a BMI of 21.3 kg/m2 and no history of overweight. Three, 24-h recalls on random, non-consecutive days were used to assess dietary intake. Results WLM reported consuming a diet that was lower in fat (28.7% vs. 32.6%, p < .0001) and used more fat-modification strategies than NW. WLM also consumed a significantly greater percentage of modified dairy (60% vs. 49%; p = .002) and modified dressings and sauces (55% vs. 44%; p = .006) than NW. WLM reported consuming three times more daily servings of artificially sweetened soft drinks (0.91 vs. 0.37; p = .003), significantly fewer daily servings of sugar-sweetened soft drinks (0.07 vs. 0.16; p =.03), and more daily servings of water (4.72 vs 3.48; p=.002) than NW. Conclusions These findings suggests that WLM use more dietary strategies to accomplish their weight loss maintenance, including greater restriction of fat intake, use of fat- and sugar-modified foods, reduced consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages, and increased consumption of artificially sweetened beverages. Ways to promote the use of fat-modified foods and artificial sweeteners merits further research in both prevention and treatment controlled trials. PMID:19636318

  19. Chemical oxygen demand and color removal from textile wastewater by UV/H2O2 using artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Yonar, T; Kilic, M Yalili

    2014-11-01

    The photooxidation of pollutants, especially chemical oxygen demand (COD) and color, in textile industrial wastewater was performed in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), using 256 nm UV light (15 W), to model the discoloration and COD elimination processes and characterize the influence of process variables. Within this study, data were obtained through a NeuroSolutions 5.06 model and successfully tested. Each sample was characterized by three independent variables (i.e., pH, H2O2 concentration, and time of operation) and two dependent variables (i.e., color and COD). The results indicated that pH was the predominant variable, and the reaction mean time and H2O2 volume were the less influential variables. The neural model obtained presented coefficients of correlation of 99% for COD and 97% for color, indicating the prediction power of the model and its character of generalization.

  20. Using Artificial Soil and Dry-Column Flash Chromatography to Simulate Organic Substance Leaching Process: A Colorful Environmental Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Avellar, Isa G. J.; Cotta, Tais A. P. G.; Neder, Amarilis de V. Finageiv

    2012-01-01

    Soil is an important and complex environmental compartment and soil contamination contributes to the pollution of aquifers and other water basins. A simple and low-cost experiment is described in which the mobility of three organic compounds in an artificial soil is examined using dry-column flash chromatography. The compounds were applied on top…

  1. Using Artificial Soil and Dry-Column Flash Chromatography to Simulate Organic Substance Leaching Process: A Colorful Environmental Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Avellar, Isa G. J.; Cotta, Tais A. P. G.; Neder, Amarilis de V. Finageiv

    2012-01-01

    Soil is an important and complex environmental compartment and soil contamination contributes to the pollution of aquifers and other water basins. A simple and low-cost experiment is described in which the mobility of three organic compounds in an artificial soil is examined using dry-column flash chromatography. The compounds were applied on top…

  2. Mutagenicity testing of certified food colors and related azo, xanthene and triphenylmethane dyes with the Salmonella/microsome system.

    PubMed

    Brown, J P; Roehm, G W; Brown, R J

    1978-01-01

    Thirty-seven azo, xanthene and triphenylmethane dyes including FD and C colors currently approved for use in the U.S.A. and a number of delisted food colors, were tested in the Salmonella/microsome system. In addition to direct plate tests with five tester strains (TA1535, TA100, TA1537, TA1538, TA98), the azo dyes were also assayed after chemical reduction to their component amines. Also, a selected group of azo dyes was subjected to liquid tests (both aerobic with microsomes and anaerobic) and to plate tests involving initial 16 h anaerobic incubations to facilitate microbial reduction of the azo bond. None of the presently listed FD and C colors was mutagenic in any of the test modifications. Among formerly listed colors only Butter Yellow (p-dimethylaminoazobenzene), a recognized animal carcinogen, was mutagenic in the aerobic liquid test. Several other azo dyes were either directly mutagenic, viz. Acid Alizarin Yellow R and Alizarin Yellow GG; required microsomal activation, viz. Acid Alizarin Red B and Methyl Red; or required chemical reduction and microsomal activation, viz. Acid Alizarin Violet N and Sudan IV. Of the non-azo dyes tested only two xanthene dyes appeared to be mutagenic, viz. 9-(2-sulfophenyl)-6-hydroxy-3-isoxanthenone and its 2,4,5,7-tetrabromo derivative.

  3. Evaluation of the effect of various beverages and food material on the color stability of provisional materials – An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Gaurav; Gupta, Tina

    2011-01-01

    Aim: This study evaluated the color stability of four provisional materials: 1) Poly-methyl methacrylates (DPI); 2) Bis-acryl composite (ProtempTM II – 3M ESPE); 3) Bis-acryl composite (Systemp® c and b – Ivoclar Vivadent) and 4) Light polymerized composite resin (Revotek LC- GC). Materials and Methods: The color and color difference of each specimen after immersion in different staining solutions i.e. 1) tea and artificial saliva, 2) coffee and artificial saliva, 3) Pepsi and artificial saliva, 4) turmeric solution and artificial saliva was measured using reflectance spectrophotometer with CIELAB system before immersion and after immersion at 2, 5 ,7 , 10 and 15 days. Results: Revotek LC- GC (light polymerized composite resin) was found to be the most color stable provisional restorative material followed by Protemp II (Bis-acryl composite), Systemp (Bis-acryl composite) and DPI (Methylmethacrylate resin). Turmeric solution had the maximum staining potential followed by coffee, tea and Pepsi. PMID:22025835

  4. Effect of artificial toothbrushing and water storage on the surface roughness and micromechanical properties of tooth-colored CAD-CAM materials.

    PubMed

    Flury, Simon; Diebold, Elisabeth; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian

    2017-06-01

    Because of the different composition of resin-ceramic computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) materials, their polishability and their micromechanical properties vary. Moreover, depending on the composition of the materials, their surface roughness and micromechanical properties are likely to change with time. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of artificial toothbrushing and water storage on the surface roughness (Ra and Rz) and the micromechanical properties, surface hardness (Vickers [VHN]) and indentation modulus (EIT), of 5 different tooth-colored CAD-CAM materials when polished with 2 different polishing systems. Specimens (n=40 per material) were cut from a composite resin (Paradigm MZ100; 3M ESPE), a feldspathic ceramic (Vitablocs Mark II; Vita Zahnfabrik), a resin nanoceramic (Lava Ultimate; 3M ESPE), a hybrid dental ceramic (Vita Enamic; Vita Zahnfabrik), and a nanocomposite resin (Ambarino High-Class; Creamed). All specimens were roughened in a standardized manner and polished either with Sof-Lex XT discs or the Vita Polishing Set Clinical. Surface roughness, VHN, and EIT were measured after polishing and after storage for 6 months (tap water, 37°C) with periodic, artificial toothbrushing. The surface roughness, VHN, and EIT results were analyzed with a nonparametric ANOVA followed by Kruskal-Wallis and exact Wilcoxon rank sum tests (α=.05). Irrespective of polishing system and of artificial toothbrushing and storage, Lava Ultimate generally showed the lowest surface roughness and Vitablocs Mark II the highest. As regards micromechanical properties, the following ranking of the CAD-CAM materials was found (from highest VHN/EIT to lowest VHN/EIT): Vitablocs Mark II > Vita Enamic > Paradigm MZ100 > Lava Ultimate > Ambarino High-Class. Irrespective of material and of artificial toothbrushing and storage, polishing with Sof-Lex XT discs resulted in lower surface roughness than the Vita Polishing Set

  5. Effect of salmon type and presence/absence of bone on color, sensory characteristics, and consumer acceptability of pureed and chunked infant food products.

    PubMed

    DeSantos, F A; Ramamoorthi, L; Bechtel, P; Smiley, S; Brewer, M S

    2010-08-01

    Salmon-based infant food (puree) and toddler food (puree plus chunks) were manufactured from pink salmon, with and without bone, and from Sockeye salmon, with and without bone, to contain 45% salmon, 55% water, and 5% starch. Products were retort processed at 118 to 121 degrees C for 55 min in a steam-jacketed still retort. A trained descriptive panel (n = 7) evaluated infant and toddler foods separately. Instrumental color, pH, and water activity were also determined. Infant and toddler foods were also evaluated by a consumer panel (n = 104) of parents for product acceptability. During the manufacturing process (cooking, homogenization, retort processing), salmon infant food from pink salmon lost much of its characteristic pink color while that from sockeye salmon retained a greater amount. Bitterness was more evident in samples with bones. In the toddler food formulation containing chunks, the odor and flavor characteristics were influenced primarily by the type of salmon. The presence of bone affected visual pink color and lightness, and salmon odor only. Consumers scored products made with sockeye salmon as more acceptable despite the fact that they had more off-flavor than products from pink salmon. The appearance and thickness of the pureed infant food was more acceptable than the toddler food with chunks despite the chunky toddler product having more acceptable salmon flavor. This indicates that the color and appearance of the prototypes were the main drivers for liking. Of the total number of parents surveyed, 73% would feed this salmon product to their children.

  6. 21 CFR 501.22 - Animal foods; labeling of spices, flavorings, colorings, and chemical preservatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., meat, fish, poultry, eggs, dairy products, or fermentation products thereof. Artificial flavor includes..., protein hydrolysate, distillate, or any product of roasting, heating or enzymolysis, which contains the... tissues derived from fruit, vegetable, meat, fish, or poultry, e.g., powdered or granulated onions, garlic...

  7. 21 CFR 501.22 - Animal foods; labeling of spices, flavorings, colorings, and chemical preservatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., meat, fish, poultry, eggs, dairy products, or fermentation products thereof. Artificial flavor includes..., protein hydrolysate, distillate, or any product of roasting, heating or enzymolysis, which contains the... tissues derived from fruit, vegetable, meat, fish, or poultry, e.g., powdered or granulated onions, garlic...

  8. Artificial food lump from porous neoprene and the method of its use for the evaluation of adaptation patients to the dental constructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnikov, A.; Urakov, A.; Kasatkin, A.; Soiher, M. G.; Kopylov, M.

    2016-04-01

    New dental product called artificial food lump is offered for dental practices. In its size and shape it is similar to the natural food bolus, which is formed in adult's mouth when chewing white bread. This innovative product resembles an inedible and non-swallowable chewing gum. Artificial lump is made of porous neoprene; it is elastic and has food flavor. It is not destroyed by chewing and has stable elasticity during chewing. Besides, artificial lump is manufactured in a way that it can be attached to the patient's clothes with a braid line. New medical device is intended to create the masticatory loading in patients' mouth in order to evaluate the quality of mounted dental restorations as well as patient's adaptation to it during the chewing process.

  9. Food search through the eyes of a monkey: a functional substitution approach for assessing the ecology of primate color vision.

    PubMed

    Melin, A D; Kline, D W; Hickey, C M; Fedigan, L M

    2013-06-28

    Efficient detection and selection of reddish fruits against green foliage has long been thought to be a major selective pressure favoring the evolution of primate trichromatic color vision. This has recently been questioned by studies of free-ranging primates that fail to show predicted differences in foraging efficiency between dichromats and trichromats. In the present study, we use a unique approach to evaluate the adaptive significance of trichromacy for fruit detection by undertaking a functional substitution model. The color vision phenotypes of neotropical monkeys are simulated for human observers, who use a touch-sensitive computer interface to search for monkey food items in digital images taken under natural conditions. We find an advantage to trichromatic phenotypes - especially the variant with the most spectrally separated visual pigments - for red, yellow and greenish fruits, but not for dark (purple or black) fruits. These results indicate that trichromat advantage is task-specific, and that shape, size and achromatic contrast variation between ripe and unripe fruits cannot completely mitigate the advantage of color vision. Similarities in fruit foraging performance between primates with different phenotypes in the wild likely reflect the behavioral flexibility of dichromats in overcoming a chromatic disadvantage.

  10. 21 CFR 70.10 - Color additives in standardized foods and new drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Where an application for a new drug is received and this application proposes, for coloring purposes... intended use has not already been established. (2) If an application for a new drug inferentially contains... date of filing of the new-drug application....

  11. Modeling of lactose crystallization and color changes in model infant foods.

    PubMed

    Nasirpour, A; Scher, J; Linder, M; Desobry, S

    2006-07-01

    Lactose crystallization and color changes in formulas containing beta-lactoglobulin and gelatinized starch were investigated. Model infant formulas were prepared by colyophilization of 3 components (lactose, beta-lactoglobulin, and gelatinized starch). A mixture design was used to choose the percentage of each mixture component. These formulas were stored for 3 mo at different relative humidities (RH), ranging from approximately 0 to 94.6%, to study the lactose crystallization and color changes. Crystallization kinetics was studied by gravimetric methods, and lactose state (crystalline vs. amorphous) was verified before and after storage by differential scanning calorimetry. Before storage, lyophilized lactose was amorphous, but during storage it crystallized, depending on the RH. The lactose crystallization RH depended on the quantity of beta-lactoglobulin and gelatinized starch, and by increasing these quantities, the crystallization RH increased. For some formulas, the crystallization RH was noted at 3 different RH during storage. The first was noted after 1 d of storage and the second and third were observed later on, showing that crystallization is a time-dependent phenomenon. Nonenzymatic browning was studied in model infant formulas by yellow color changes of samples at 11.3, 43.2, 54.5, and 75.4% RH. In this study, 7 mathematical models were proposed to predict the moisture sorption properties and color changes at different RH, and the models were validated by experimental results.

  12. Case of elevated blood lead in a South Asian family that has used Sindoor for food coloring.

    PubMed

    Vassilev, Zdravko P; Marcus, Steven M; Ayyanathan, Karpukarasi; Ciuffo, Vincent; Bogden, John D; Kemp, Francis W; Ruck, Bruce; Jennis, Thelma; Jani, Nisha; Halperin, William

    2005-01-01

    After a routine blood testing, a local pediatrician discovered that a 13-month-old boy had an elevated blood lead level (BLL) of 57 microg/dL. Since the baby was mostly breast-fed, the pediatrician did a blood test on the mother, and the result showed a BLL of 85 microg/dL. As the mother denied any history of pica behavior, the pediatrician suspected a source of lead to which the entire family might have been exposed and tested the father's BLL. The results showed a BLL of 95 microg/dL, and the pediatrician informed the poison center. The subsequent epidemiological investigation revealed that the parents had used a product called Sindoor for food coloring. Laboratory analyses showed that the product contains more than 57.8% of acid-extractable lead by weight. Given the extremely high content of Pb in this product, Sindoor poses a serious risk of lead poisoning if it is used for food coloring.

  13. Enhancement of prodigiosin production by Serratia marcescens TKU011 and its insecticidal activity relative to food colorants.

    PubMed

    Liang, Tzu-Wen; Chen, Shin-Yi; Chen, Yen-Chern; Chen, Chia-Hung; Yen, Yue-Horng; Wang, San-Lang

    2013-11-01

    Prodigiosin (PG) has been reported to have various biological activities. With the aim of increasing Serratia marcescens TKU011 PG production on squid pen powder (SPP)-containing medium, the effects of phosphate and ferrous ion supplementation, autoclave treatment, and aeration were studied. Autoclave treatment showed positive results for PG productivity (2.48 mg/mL), which increased 2.5-fold when the organism was incubated in 50 mL of 40-min autoclaved medium in a baffle-based flask (250 mL) containing 1.5% SPP at 30 °C for 1 day and then at 25 °C for 2 additional days. Furthermore, the use of pigments including PG and the food colorants Allura Red AC (R40) and Tartrazine (Y4) as insecticides was also investigated. The lethal concentrations causing 50% Drosophila larval mortality (LC50) of PG, Y4, and R40 using a 5-d exposure period were 230, 449, and 30000 ppm, respectively. The results indicated that the biopigment PG and the food colorant Y4 were potentially toxic to Drosophila larvae.

  14. A multifactorial test of the effects of carotenoid access, food intake and parasite load on the production of ornamental feathers and bill coloration in American goldfinches.

    PubMed

    Hill, Geoffrey E; Hood, Wendy R; Huggins, Kristal

    2009-04-01

    It has been well established that carotenoid and melanin pigmentation are often condition-dependent traits in vertebrates. Expression of carotenoid coloration in birds has been shown to reflect pigment intake, food access and parasite load; however, the relative importance of and the potential interactions among these factors have not been previously considered. Moreover, carotenoid and melanin pigmentation have been proposed to signal fundamentally different aspects of individual condition but few data exist to test this idea. We simultaneously manipulated three environmental conditions under which American goldfinches (Cardeulis tristis) grew colorful feathers and developed carotenoid pigmentation of their bills. Male goldfinches were held with either high or low carotenoid supplementation, pulsed or continuous antimicrobial drug treatment, or restricted or unlimited access to food. Carotenoid supplementation had an overriding effect on yellow feather coloration. Males given more lutein and zeaxanthin grew yellow feathers with hue shifted toward orange and with higher yellow chroma than males supplemented with fewer carotenoids. Parasites and food access did not significantly affect yellow feather coloration, and there were only minor interaction effects for the three treatments. By contrast, bill coloration was significantly affected by all three treatments. Carotenoid supplementation had a significant effect on yellow chroma of bills, drug treatment and food access both had a significant effect on bill hue, and food access had a significant effect on the yellow brightness of bills. Neither the size nor blackness of the black caps of male goldfinches was affected by any treatment. These results indicate that pigment intake, food access and parasite load can have complex and variable effects on color displays, and that feather and bill coloration signal different aspects of male condition.

  15. Measurement uncertainty assessment of magnesium trisilicate column for determination of Sudan colorants in food by HPLC using C8 column.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; He, Chao; Cheng, Jing-Jun; Huang, Wen-Yao; Shao, Sheng-Wen; Jiang, Ya-Ping; Dai, Ling-Feng; Liu, Jia-Fa; Song, Yi

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to conduct measurement uncertainty assessment of a new method for determination of Sudan colorants (Sudan I, II, III and IV) in food by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Samples were extracted with organic solvents (hexane, 20% acetone) and first purified by magnesium trisilicate (2MgO·3SiO2). The Sudan colorants (Sudan I-IV) were also initially separated on C8 by gradient elution using acetonitrile and 0.1% (v/v) formic acid aqueous solution as the mobile phases and detected with diode-array detector (DAD). The uncertainty of mathematical model of Sudan I, II, III and IV is based on EURACHEM guidelines. The sources and components of uncertainty were calculated. The experiment gave a good linear relationship over the concentration from 0.4 to 4.0 μg/mL and spiked recoveries were from 74.0% to 97.5%. The limits of determination (LOD) were 48, 61, 36, 58 μg/kg for the four analytes, respectively. The total uncertainty of Sudan colorants (Sudan I, II, III and IV) was 810±30.8, 790±28.4, 750±27.0, 730±50.0 μg/kg, respectively. The recovery uncertainty was the most significant factor contributing to the total uncertainty. The developed method is simple, rapid, and highly sensitive. It can be used for the determination of trace Sudan dyes in food samples. The sources of uncertainty have been identified and uncertainty components have been simplified and considered.

  16. Separation and simultaneous determination of four artificial sweeteners in food and beverages by ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; Guo, Yingying; Ye, Mingli; James, Frits S

    2005-08-26

    In this paper, the separation and determination of four artificial sweeteners (aspartame, sodium cyclamate, acesulfame-K and sodium saccharin) by ion chromatography coupled with suppressed conductivity detector is reported. The four artificial sweeteners were separated using KOH eluent generator. Due to the use of eluent generator, very low conductance background conductivity can be obtained and sensitivity of sweeteners has been greatly improved. Under the experimental condition, several inorganic anions, such as F-, Cl-, NO3-, NO2-, Br-, SO4(2)-, PO4(3)- and some organic acid such as formate, acetate, benzoate, and citrate did not interfere with the determination. With this method, good linear relationship, sensitivity and reproducibility were obtained. Detection limits of aspartame, sodium cyclamate, acesulfame-K, sodium saccharin were 0.87, 0.032, 0.019, 0.045 mg/L, respectively. Rate of recovery were between 98.23 and 105.42%, 99.48 and 103.57%, 97.96 and 103.23%, 98.46 and 102.40%, respectively. The method has successfully applied to the determination of the four sweeteners in drinks and preserved fruits.

  17. Meta-Analysis of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder or Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms, Restriction Diet, and Synthetic Food Color Additives

    PubMed Central

    Nigg, Joel T.; Lewis, Kara; Edinger, Tracy; Falk, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective The role of diet and of food colors in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or its symptoms warrants updated quantitative meta-analysis, in light of recent divergent policy in Europe and the United States. Method Studies were identified through a literature search using the PubMed, Cochrane Library, and PsycNET databases through February 2011. Twenty-four publications met inclusion criteria for synthetic food colors; 10 additional studies informed analysis of dietary restriction. A random-effects meta-analytic model generated summary effect sizes. Results Restriction diets reduced ADHD symptoms at an effect of g = 0.29 (95% CI, 0.07–0.53). For food colors, parent reports yielded an effect size of g = 0.18 (95% CI, 0.08–0.24; p = .0007), which decreased to 0.12 (95% CI, 0.01–0.23; p < .05) after adjustment for possible publication bias. The effect was reliable in studies restricted to food color additives (g = 0.21, 95% CI = 0.06–0.36) but did not survive correction for possible publication bias and was not reliable in studies confined to Food and Drug Administration–approved food colors. Teacher/observer reports yielded a nonsignificant effect of 0.07 (95% CI = −0.03 to 0.18; p = .14). However, high-quality studies confined to color additives yielded a reliable effect (g = 0.22, 95% CI = 0.10–0.41, p = .030) that survived correction. In psychometric tests of attention, the summary effect size was 0.27 (95% CI = 0.07–0.47; p = .007) and survived correction. An estimated 8% of children with ADHD may have symptoms related to synthetic food colors. Conclusions A restriction diet benefits some children with ADHD. Effects of food colors were notable were but susceptible to publication bias or were derived from small, nongeneralizable samples. Renewed investigation of diet and ADHD is warranted. PMID:22176942

  18. Meta-analysis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms, restriction diet, and synthetic food color additives.

    PubMed

    Nigg, Joel T; Lewis, Kara; Edinger, Tracy; Falk, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The role of diet and of food colors in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or its symptoms warrants updated quantitative meta-analysis, in light of recent divergent policy in Europe and the United States. Studies were identified through a literature search using the PubMed, Cochrane Library, and PsycNET databases through February 2011. Twenty-four publications met inclusion criteria for synthetic food colors; 10 additional studies informed analysis of dietary restriction. A random-effects meta-analytic model generated summary effect sizes. Restriction diets reduced ADHD symptoms at an effect of g = 0.29 (95% CI, 0.07-0.53). For food colors, parent reports yielded an effect size of g = 0.18 (95% CI, 0.08-0.24; p = .0007), which decreased to 0.12 (95% CI, 0.01-0.23; p < .05) after adjustment for possible publication bias. The effect was reliable in studies restricted to food color additives (g = 0.21, 95% CI = 0.06-0.36) but did not survive correction for possible publication bias and was not reliable in studies confined to Food and Drug Administration-approved food colors. Teacher/observer reports yielded a nonsignificant effect of 0.07 (95% CI = -0.03 to 0.18; p = .14). However, high-quality studies confined to color additives yielded a reliable effect (g = 0.22, 95% CI = 0.10-0.41, p = .030) that survived correction. In psychometric tests of attention, the summary effect size was 0.27 (95% CI = 0.07-0.47; p = .007) and survived correction. An estimated 8% of children with ADHD may have symptoms related to synthetic food colors. A restriction diet benefits some children with ADHD. Effects of food colors were notable were but susceptible to publication bias or were derived from small, nongeneralizable samples. Renewed investigation of diet and ADHD is warranted. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. In vivo tissue uptake of intravenously injected water soluble all-trans beta-carotene used as a food colorant.

    PubMed

    Yamanushi, Tomoko T; Torii, Midori I; Janjua, Najma; Kabuto, Hideaki

    2009-12-01

    Water soluble beta-carotene (WS-BC) is a carotenoid form that has been developed as a food colorant. WS-BC is known to contain 10% of all-trans beta-carotene (AT-BC). The aim of the present study was to investigate in vivo tissue uptake of AT-BC after the administration of WS-BC into rats. Seven-week-old male rats were administered 20 mg of WS-BC dissolved in saline by intravenous injection into the tail vein. At 0, 6, 24, 72, 120 and 168 hours (n = 7/time), blood was drawn and liver, lungs, adrenal glands, kidneys and testes were dissected. The levels of AT-BC in the plasma and dissected tissues were quantified with HPLC. After intravenous administration, AT-BC level in plasma first increased up to 6 h and returned to normal at 72 h. In the testes, the AT-BC level first increased up to 24 h and then did not decrease but was retained up to 168 h. In the other tissues, the level first increased up to 6 h and then decreased from 6 to 120 or 168 h but did not return to normal. The accumulation of WS-BC in testes but not in the other 5 tissues examined may suggest that AT-BC was excreted or metabolized in these tissues but not in testes. Although WS-BC is commonly used as a food colorant, its effects on body tissues are still not clarified. Results of the present study suggest that further investigations are required to elucidate effects of WS-BC on various body tissues.

  20. Use of poultry protein isolate as a food ingredient: sensory and color characteristics of low-fat Turkey bologna.

    PubMed

    Omana, Dileep A; Pietrasik, Zeb; Betti, Mirko

    2012-07-01

    The potential of using poultry protein isolate (PPI) as a food ingredient to substitute either soy protein isolate (SPI) or meat protein in turkey bologna was investigated. PPI was prepared from mechanically separated turkey meat using pH-shift technology and the prepared PPI was added to turkey bologna at 2 different concentrations (1.5% and 2% dry weight basis). Product characteristics were compared with those prepared with the addition of 2% SPI, 11% meat protein (control-1), or 13% meat protein (control-2). All the 5 treatments were subjected to sensory analysis to evaluate aroma, appearance, color, flavor, saltiness, juiciness, firmness, and overall acceptability of the turkey bologna samples using 9-point hedonic scales. A turkey bologna control sample with 11% meat protein appeared to be softer compared to other treatments as revealed by texture profile analysis while purge loss during storage in a retail display case was significantly (P < 0.05) higher compared to other treatments. Lightness (L*) value of the products decreased during 4 wk of retail storage. A turkey bologna control sample with 13% meat protein appeared to be darker and more reddish compared to other treatments. Replacing meat protein with protein isolates caused increase in yellowish color of turkey bologna. Sensory analysis concluded that 1.5% PPI and 2% PPI could be used as substitute of SPI or lean meat and the treatments could be improved by increasing saltiness and decreasing firmness. The study revealed that with slight modifications in saltiness, turkey bologna can be prepared with the addition of poultry protein isolates as an acceptable substitute for soy protein isolate or meat protein. This will help to avoid usage of nonmeat ingredients (as SPI substitute) and to reduce the cost of production (as meat protein substitute) of low-fat turkey bologna. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  1. Artificial Fruit: Postharvest Online Monitoring of Agricultural Food by Measuring Humidity and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübert, T.; Lang, C.

    2012-09-01

    An online monitoring of environmental and inherent product parameters is required during transportation and storage of fruit and vegetables to avoid quality degradation and spoilage. The control of transpiration losses is suggested as an indicator for fruit freshness by humidity measurements. For that purpose, an electronic sensor is surrounded by a wet porous fiber material which is in contact with the outer atmosphere. Transpiration reduces the water content of the porous material and thus also the internal water activity. The sensor system, known as "artificial fruit," measures the relative humidity and temperature inside the wet material. Humidity and temperature data are collected and transmitted on demand by a miniaturized radio communication unit. The decrease in the measured relative humidity has been calibrated against the mass loss of tomatoes under different external influencing parameters such as temperature, humidity, and air flow. Current battery life allows the sensor system, embedded in a fruit crate, to transmit data on transpiration losses via radio transmission for up to two weeks.

  2. [A shift in prey color preference in the green toad Bufo viridis Laur. after food satiation].

    PubMed

    Fal'tsman, I A; Bastakov, V A

    1999-01-01

    In the behavioural experiments when showing simultaneously coloured stimuli (food targets) and also in choosing between two stimuli, red and blue, it had been shown with a high level of reliability that the hungry Bufo viridis which had not been fed for at least a week, in the overwhelming majority of cases chose the red-coloured food targets. Within 1-3 days after an abundant feeding, in the same animals the changes occurred in their preferences of the prey colour. The percentage of choosing the blue targets by the satiated toads significantly increases. In a separate series of experiments had been demonstrated that the changing motivation is conditioned by colour, since hungry and satiated Bufo viridis under conditions of simultaneous demonstration of four stimuli, black and three different grey stimuli, chose exclusively the black stimulus.

  3. Meta-Analysis of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder or Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms, Restriction Diet, and Synthetic Food Color Additives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigg, Joel T.; Lewis, Kara; Edinger, Tracy; Falk, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The role of diet and of food colors in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or its symptoms warrants updated quantitative meta-analysis, in light of recent divergent policy in Europe and the United States. Method: Studies were identified through a literature search using the PubMed, Cochrane Library, and PsycNET databases…

  4. Meta-Analysis of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder or Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms, Restriction Diet, and Synthetic Food Color Additives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigg, Joel T.; Lewis, Kara; Edinger, Tracy; Falk, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The role of diet and of food colors in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or its symptoms warrants updated quantitative meta-analysis, in light of recent divergent policy in Europe and the United States. Method: Studies were identified through a literature search using the PubMed, Cochrane Library, and PsycNET databases…

  5. Lead poisoning associated with imported candy and powdered food coloring--California and Michigan.

    PubMed

    1998-12-11

    Although the most common source of pediatric lead poisoning is dust within the home that contains deteriorated lead-based paint from walls and windowsills, other less common sources (1-3) can result in excess exposure among children (i.e., blood lead levels [BLLs] > or =10 microg/dL). This report describes two cases of pediatric lead poisoning associated with eating imported candy and food stuffs and underscores the importance of thorough history-taking to identify unusual sources of lead exposure.

  6. Antiproliferative effect of a food coloring on colon cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Norizadeh Tazehkand, M

    2017-01-01

    4-MEI (4-Methylimidazole) is used as a chemical intermediate, crude material or component in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals, photographic and photothermographic chemicals, dyes and pigments and agricultural chemicals. 4-MEI is unintentionally found in our food. Caramel colour (which is the most used beverage colouring and food), dark beers and common brands of cola drinks may comprise more than 100 μg of this compound per 12-ounce serving. 4-MEI is widely used by people and colon cancer is common in our countries. So, it was decided to do in vitro analysis of anti-cancer effect of 4-MEI by MTT test using htc-116 cell line.In this study, mouse Htc-116 cell line was treated with 4-MEI concentrations of 300, 450, 600 and 750 µg/mL for 24 hours and 48 hours periods, after that antiproliferative effect of the 4-MEI was studied by MTT assay. In this study 4-MEI at highest concentration of 24h and at all concentration for 48 h treatment time significantly inhibited cell proliferation when it was compared to control. Also, exposing to the 4-MEI for 48 hours led to a decrease in cells proliferation by concentration dependent manner. This result showed that 4-MEI had anticancer effect in htc-116 cells. However, it has to be evaluated with different new studies (Tab. 1, Fig. 4, Ref. 19).

  7. Cell-mediated immune responses to artificial food additives in chronic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Warrington, R J; Sauder, P J; McPhillips, S

    1986-11-01

    In some cases of chronic urticaria it is suspected that food additives such as tartrazine and sodium benzoate or salicylates may play a role in the pathogenesis of the condition. Since, at times, chronic urticaria may appear histologically similar to a mild cell-mediated immune response, the release of the T cell-derived lymphokine leucocyte inhibitory factor (LIF), in response to incubation with these additives and with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), was measured in vitro using cells from normal controls, from patients with chronic urticaria with or without clinically associated additive sensitivity and from patients with asthma with or without associated ASA sensitivity. It was found that significant production of LIF occurred in response to tartrazine and sodium benzoate in those individuals with chronic additive induced urticaria. In addition, tartrazine caused LIF release from mononuclear cells of ASA-sensitive asthmatics. These results may indicate a possible role for additive-induced cell-mediated immune responses in the pathogenesis of some cases of chronic urticaria and suggest a potential diagnostic test for this condition.

  8. Simultaneous determination of artificial sweeteners, preservatives, caffeine, theobromine and theophylline in food and pharmaceutical preparations by ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Q C; Wang, J

    2001-12-07

    A novel ion chromatographic method was proposed for the simultaneous determination of artificial sweeteners (sodium saccharin, aspartame, acesulfame-K), preservatives (benzoic acid, sorbic acid), caffeine, theobromine and theophylline. The separation was performed on an anion-exchange analytical column operated at 40 degrees C within 45 min by an isocratic elution with 5 mM aqueous NaH2PO4 (pH 8.20) solution containing 4% (v/v) acetonitrile as eluent, and the determination by wavelength-switching ultraviolet absorbance detection. The detection limits (signal-to-noise ratio 3:1) for all analytes were below the sub-microg/ml level. Under the experimental conditions, several organic acids, including citric acid, malic acid, tartaric acid and ascorbic acid, did not interfere with the determination. The method has been successfully applied to the analysis of various food and pharmaceutical preparations, and the average recoveries for real samples ranged from 85 to 104%. The levels of all analytes determined by this method were in good agreement with those obtained by the high-performance liquid chromatographic procedure. The results also indicated that ion chromatography would be possibly a beneficial alternative to conventional high-performance liquid chromatography for the separation and determination of these compounds.

  9. Linking optimal foraging behavior to bird community structure in an urban-desert landscape: field experiments with artificial food patches.

    PubMed

    Shochat, Eyal; Lerman, Susannah B; Katti, Madhusudan; Lewis, David B

    2004-08-01

    Urban bird communities exhibit high population densities and low species diversity, yet mechanisms behind these patterns remain largely untested. We present results from experimental studies of behavioral mechanisms underlying these patterns and provide a test of foraging theory applied to urban bird communities. We measured foraging decisions at artificial food patches to assess how urban habitats differ from wildlands in predation risk, missed-opportunity cost, competition, and metabolic cost. By manipulating seed trays, we compared leftover seed (giving-up density) in urban and desert habitats in Arizona. Deserts exhibited higher predation risk than urban habitats. Only desert birds quit patches earlier when increasing the missed-opportunity cost. House finches and house sparrows coexist by trading off travel cost against foraging efficiency. In exclusion experiments, urban doves were more efficient foragers than passerines. Providing water decreased digestive costs only in the desert. At the population level, reduced predation and higher resource abundance drive the increased densities in cities. At the community level, the decline in diversity may involve exclusion of native species by highly efficient urban specialists. Competitive interactions play significant roles in structuring urban bird communities. Our results indicate the importance and potential of mechanistic approaches for future urban bird community studies.

  10. Studies on the interaction of the food colorant tartrazine with double stranded deoxyribonucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anirban; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2016-05-01

    Interaction of the food additive tartrazine with double-stranded DNA was studied by spectroscopic and calorimetric techniques. Absorbance studies revealed that tartrazine exhibited hypochromism in the presence of DNA without any bathochromic effects. Minor groove displacement assay of DAPI and Hoechst 33258 suggested that tartrazine binds in the minor groove of DNA. The complexation was predominantly entropy driven with a smaller but favorable enthalpic contribution to the standard molar Gibbs energy. The equilibrium constant was evaluated to be (3.68 ± .08) × 10(4) M(-1) at 298.15 K. The negative standard molar heat capacity value along with an enthalpy-entropy compensation phenomenon proposed the involvement of dominant hydrophobic forces in the binding process. Tartrazine enhanced the thermal stability of DNA by 7.53 K under saturation conditions.

  11. PILOT STUDY: CCQM-P13 pilot study. Metals in artificial food digest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff Briche, C. S. J.

    2003-01-01

    The accuracy of elemental analyses in complex matrices is usually assessed by analysis of a suitable matrix reference material. The reference value is ascribed by consensus mean and by application of primary methods of analysis. However, the quality of this value will be affected by problems such as matrix-induced interferences, moisture corrections and heterogeneity. Pilot study CCQM-P13 was undertaken to assess the capabilities of National Metrology Institutes to analyse Ca, Cu and Cd in an acidic solution that simulates the digest of a food sample. This study filled the gap between the analysis of a gravimetrically prepared calibration solution and the analysis of an unknown in a complex matrix requiring extensive sample preparation. Having an independent reference value, with a small uncertainty, allowed a more rigorous estimation of the reliability of the institutes' analysis and uncertainty estimates, without including issues around sample digestion. The reference values were: 1.6617 +/- 0.0020 µmol/g for Ca, 7.037 +/- 0.012 nmol/g for Cu and 45.57 +/- 0.10 pmol/g for Cd (expanded uncertainties are quoted with coverage factor of 2). The other elements in the matrix were: Na (~25 µg/g), K (~90 µg/g), Cl (~120 µg/g), Fe (~100 ng/g), Mg (~5 µg/g), P (~5 µg/g), Sn (~80 ng/g) and Zn (~200 ng/g). Twelve international laboratories, representing eight countries, determined the amount content of the analytes. A range of techniques that include ID-ICP-MS (high resolution and collision cell), ICP-MS, ICP-OES, AAS, voltametry and potentiometry were used. The results for this pilot study averaged: 1.654 +/- 0.058 µmol/g for Ca (n = 10), 7.26 +/- 0.53 nmol/g for Cu (n = 12) and 45.2 +/- 5.1 pmol/g for Cd (n = 11) where the values associated with the averages are the standard deviations of n participants. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database

  12. Color space conversion for linear color grading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dah-Jye

    2000-10-01

    Color grading is an important process for various industries such as food processing, fruit and vegetable grading, etc. Quality and price are often determined by the color of product. For example, darker red color for apples means higher price. In color machine vision applications, image is acquired with a color CCD camera that outputs color information in three channels, red, gree, and blue. When grading color, these three primary colors must be processed to determine the color level for separation. A very popular color space conversion technique for color image processing is RGB-to-HSI, where HSI represents hue, saturation, and intensity, respectively. However, the conversion result is still 3D information that makes determining color grades very difficult. A new color space conversion technique that can be implemented for high-speed real-time processing for color grading is introduced in this paper. Depending on the application, different color space conversion equations must be used. The result of this technique is a simple one-dimensional array that represents different color levels. This linear array makes linear color grading adjustment possible.

  13. Dispersive solid-phase microextraction and capillary electrophoresis separation of food colorants in beverages using diamino moiety functionalized silica nanoparticles as both extractant and pseudostationary phase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng-Jie; Liu, Chuan-Ting; Li, Wei; Tang, An-Na

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a new method for the determination of food colorants in beverage samples is developed, using diamino moiety functionalized silica nanoparticles (dASNPs) as both adsorbents in dispersive solid-phase microextraction (dSPME) and pseudostationary phases (PSPs) in capillary electrophoresis (CE) separation. dASNPs were firstly used as adsorbents for the preconcentration of four colorants by the dSPME process. After that, colorants were efficiently separated by CE using 30 mM phosphate buffer (pH 6.0) containing 2 mM β-CD and 0.9 mg/mL dASNPs as additives. All factors influencing dSPME and CE separations were optimized in detail. The investigated analytes showed good linearities with correlation coefficients (R(2)) higher than 0.9932. The limits of detection for the four food colorants were between 0.030 and 0.36 mg/L, which are lower than those reported previously. The established method was also used to analyze four colorants in beverage samples with recoveries ranging from 82.7% to 114.6%. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time to use NPs both as extractants in dSPME and pseudostationary phases in CE for the analytical purpose. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Minor groove binding of the food colorant carmoisine to DNA: spectroscopic and calorimetric characterization studies.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anirban; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2014-01-08

    The interaction of the food additive carmoisine with herring testes DNA was studied by multifaceted biophysical techniques. Carmoisine exhibited hypochromic effects in absorbance, whereas in fluorescence the intensity enhanced upon complexation with DNA. Energy transfer from the DNA base pairs to carmoisine molecules occurred upon complexation. A groove binding model of interaction was envisaged for carmoisine-DNA complexation from 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and Hoechst displacement studies. The binding of carmoisine stabilized the DNA structure against thermal denaturation. The binding induced moderate conformational perturbations in the B-form structure of DNA. The binding affinity (10(4) M(-1)) values, calculated from absorbance and fluorescence data, and calorimetry titrations were in close agreement with each other. The binding was characterized to be exothermic and favored by small negative enthalpic and large positive entropic contributions. Salt-dependent calorimetric studies revealed that the binding reaction was dominated by nonpolyelectrolytic forces. The negative heat capacity value suggested the role of hydrophobic effect in the interaction.

  15. Nurses' attitudes towards artificial food or fluid administration in patients with dementia and in terminally ill patients: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bryon, E; de Casterlé, B Dierckx; Gastmans, C

    2008-06-01

    Although nurses have an important role in the care process surrounding artificial food or fluid administration in patients with dementia or in terminally ill patients, little is known about their attitudes towards this issue. The purpose of this study was to thoroughly examine nurses' attitudes by means of a literature review. An extensive systematic search of the electronic databases PubMed, Cinahl, PsycINFO, The Cochrane Library, FRANCIS, Philosopher's Index and Social Sciences Citation Index was conducted to identify pertinent articles published from January 1990 to January 2007. Nurses' arguments for or against could be categorised as ethical-legal, clinical or social-professional. The most important arguments explicitly for artificial food and fluid administration in patients with dementia or in terminally ill patients were sanctity of life, considering artificial food and fluid administration as basic nursing care, and giving reliable nutrition, hydration or medication. An explicit counter-argument was the high cost of treatment. Arguments used by opponents and proponents were quality of life and dignified death. The arguments were not strikingly different for the two patient populations. It turned out that the nurses' ethical arguments remarkably reflected the current ethical debate. But some of their clinical presuppositions contradicted current clinical evidence. The interaction between clinical facts and ethical reflections makes the findings of this review extremely relevant for clinical ethics. A large need exists to clearly communicate to nurses the latest clinical evidence and the main results of ongoing ethical debates.

  16. Genetic damage induced by a food coloring dye (sunset yellow) on meristematic cells of Brassica campestris L.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Kshama; Kumar, Girjesh

    2015-01-01

    We have performed the present piece of work to evaluate the effect of synthetic food coloring azo dye (sunset yellow) on actively dividing root tip cells of Brassica campestris L. Three doses of azo dye were administered for the treatment of actively dividing root tip cells, namely, 1%, 3%, and 5%, for 6-hour duration along with control. Mitotic analysis clearly revealed the azo dye induced endpoint deviation like reduction in the frequency of normal divisions in a dose dependent manner. Mitotic divisions in the control sets were found to be perfectly normal while dose based reduction in MI was registered in the treated sets. Azo dye has induced several chromosomal aberrations (genotoxic effect) at various stages of cell cycle such as stickiness of chromosomes, micronuclei formation, precocious migration of chromosome, unorientation, forward movement of chromosome, laggards, and chromatin bridge. Among all, stickiness of chromosomes was present in the highest frequency followed by partial genome elimination as micronuclei. The present study suggests that extensive use of synthetic dye should be forbidden due to genotoxic and cytotoxic impacts on living cells. Thus, there is an urgent need to assess potential hazardous effects of these dyes on other test systems like human and nonhuman biota for better scrutiny.

  17. Genetic Damage Induced by a Food Coloring Dye (Sunset Yellow) on Meristematic Cells of Brassica campestris L.

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Kshama; Kumar, Girjesh

    2015-01-01

    We have performed the present piece of work to evaluate the effect of synthetic food coloring azo dye (sunset yellow) on actively dividing root tip cells of Brassica campestris L. Three doses of azo dye were administered for the treatment of actively dividing root tip cells, namely, 1%, 3%, and 5%, for 6-hour duration along with control. Mitotic analysis clearly revealed the azo dye induced endpoint deviation like reduction in the frequency of normal divisions in a dose dependent manner. Mitotic divisions in the control sets were found to be perfectly normal while dose based reduction in MI was registered in the treated sets. Azo dye has induced several chromosomal aberrations (genotoxic effect) at various stages of cell cycle such as stickiness of chromosomes, micronuclei formation, precocious migration of chromosome, unorientation, forward movement of chromosome, laggards, and chromatin bridge. Among all, stickiness of chromosomes was present in the highest frequency followed by partial genome elimination as micronuclei. The present study suggests that extensive use of synthetic dye should be forbidden due to genotoxic and cytotoxic impacts on living cells. Thus, there is an urgent need to assess potential hazardous effects of these dyes on other test systems like human and nonhuman biota for better scrutiny. PMID:25954313

  18. Dehydrated Basella alba Fruit Juice as a Novel Natural Colorant: Pigment Stability, In Vivo Food Safety Evaluation and Anti-Inflammatory Mechanism Characterization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fu-Long; Chiou, Robin Y-Y; Chen, Wei-Cheng; Ko, Huey-Jiun; Lai, Li-Jung; Lin, Shu-Mei

    2016-09-01

    Flesh of Basella alba L. mature fruits bearing deep-violet juice provides a novel and potential source of natural colorant. To minimize the pigment purification process and warrant safety acceptability, B. alba colorant powder (BACP) was prepared using mature fruits through a practical batch preparation and subjected to fundamental pigment characterization, food safety assessment and bio-function evaluation. Yield of the dehydrated B. alba colorant powder (BACP) was 37 g/kg fresh fruits. Reconstituted aqueous solution of the BACP exhibited an identical visible spectrum (400-700 nm) as that of fresh juice. Color of the solution (absorbance at 540 nm) was stable in a broad pH ranged from 3 to 8 and enhanced by co-presence of calcium and magnesium ions, while was rapidly bleached by ferrous and ferric ions. For in vivo food safety evaluation, ICR mice were daily gavage administered with BACP up to 1000 mg/kg body weight for 28 days. Organ weight determination, serum biochemical analysis and histopathological examination of hearts, livers, lungs and kidneys revealed no obvious health hazard. In vitro anti-inflammatory activity of BACP was characterized in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced RAW 264.7 macrophages. BACP exerted potent anti-inflammatory activity by down-regulation of inflammatory mediators including nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-12 and the blockage of IκB kinase (IKK)/IκB/nuclear factor-κ B (NFκB) activation cascade. These results supported that BACP may serve as a beneficial alternative of natural food colorant.

  19. Searching for flavor labels in food products: the influence of color-flavor congruence and association strength.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Carlos; Wan, Xiaoang; Knoeferle, Klemens; Zhou, Xi; Salgado-Montejo, Alejandro; Spence, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Prior research provides robust support for the existence of a number of associations between colors and flavors. In the present study, we examined whether congruent (vs. incongruent) combinations of product packaging colors and flavor labels would facilitate visual search for products labeled with specific flavors. The two experiments reported here document a Stroop-like effect between flavor words and packaging colors. The participants were able to search for packaging flavor labels more rapidly when the color of the packaging was congruent with the flavor label (e.g., red/tomato) than when it was incongruent (e.g., yellow/tomato). In addition, when the packaging color was incongruent, those flavor labels that were more strongly associated with a specific color yielded slower reaction times and more errors (Stroop interference) than those that were less strongly tied to a specific color. Importantly, search efficiency was affected both by color/flavor congruence and association strength. Taken together, these results therefore highlight the role of color congruence and color-word association strength when it comes to searching for specific flavor labels.

  20. The effect of the color red on consuming food does not depend on achromatic (Michelson) contrast and extends to rubbing cream on the skin.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Nicola; Martani, Margherita; Corsini, Claudia; Oleari, Claudio

    2013-12-01

    Recent literature suggests that individuals may consume less food when this is served on red plates. We explored this intriguing effect in three experiments. Independent groups of participants were presented with constant amounts of popcorns, chocolate chips, or moisturizing cream, on red, blue, or white plates. They were asked to sample the foods (by tasting them) or the cream (by rubbing it on the hand and forearm) as they wished and to complete mock "sensory analysis" questionnaires. Results confirmed that red plates reduce taste-related consumption and extended this effect to the touch-related consumption of moisturizing cream. Suggesting that the effect was not due to a decrease in the consciously experienced appeal of products on red plates, overall appreciation of the foods or cream did not differ according to plate color. After careful photometric measures of the materials used for each food-plate pairing, we determined that food and cream consumption was not predicted by Michelson (achromatic) contrast. Although the origin of the intriguing effect of the color red on consumption remains unclear, our results may prove useful to future potential explanations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Determination of 4-Methylimidazole and 2-Acetyl-4(5)- tetrahydroxybutylimidazole in Caramel Color and Processed Foods by LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Rang; Kim, Su Un; Shin, Young; Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Sang Me; Kim, Jung Hun

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the quick HPLC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous separation of 2-acetyl-4(5)-tetrahydrox-ybuthylimidazole (THI) and 4-(5)-methylimidazole (4-MI) in alkaline medium was used for caramel color and processed foods in Korea. After a simple sample pretreatment, 51 4-MI-labeled samples were positive for 4-MI and 2 also contained THI. The concentration of 4-MI was 260.5 ~ 24,499.3 μg/kg in caramel color, less than LOD ~ 1,712.5 μg/kg in sauce, 1,242.3, 5,972.2 μg/kg in balsamic vinegar, 2,118.3 ~ 5,802.4 μg/kg in complex seasoning, 82.7 ~ 5,110.6 μg/kg in curry, and 29.9 ~ 464.4 μg/kg in soft drinks. The recovery rate of 4-MI was 97.1 ~ 111.0% in sauce and 81.9 ~ 110.0% in powder and that of THI was 83.6 ~ 106.4% in sauce and 61.2 ~ 99.4% in powder. Our results concluded a safe amount of 4-MI and THI compared to the limit of Korea additive code but the processed foods do not have a limit of caramel color and 4-MI in Korea. Therefore, research and monitoring of 4-MI and THI is needed for processed foods in Korea. PMID:24551828

  2. Rapid identification of synthetic colorants in food samples by using indium oxide nanoparticle-functionalized porous polymer monolith coupled with HPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Qi, Ruifang; Zhou, Xiao; Li, Xiqian; Ma, Jiutong; Lu, Chunmei; Mu, Jun; Zhang, Xuguang; Jia, Qiong

    2014-12-07

    A synthetic protocol for the preparation of an indium oxide nanoparticle-functionalized poly(methacrylic acid-glycidyl methacrylate-ethylene dimethacrylate-ethanediamine) monolithic column is reported. Various techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and thermal gravimetric analysis-derivative thermogravimetric analysis were employed to characterize the synthesized monolith. The modified monolithic column was coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) for determining synthetic colorants in various food samples. Under optimized conditions, good linearity was obtained for all the targets with squared regression coefficients greater than 0.9982. The limits of detection (S/N = 3) for 12 synthetic colorants were in the range of 0.012-2.97 μg kg(-1). The intra-day and inter-day relative standard deviations, ranging from 2.7% to 8.5%, were within the acceptable range. The developed method was successfully applied to the determination of synthetic colorants in food samples (candy, milk, jelly, jam, canned food, juice, and carbonated drink). Target recoveries at different spiked levels ranged from 73.5% to 112.1% with relative standard deviations of less than 10.3%.

  3. Searching for flavor labels in food products: the influence of color-flavor congruence and association strength

    PubMed Central

    Velasco, Carlos; Wan, Xiaoang; Knoeferle, Klemens; Zhou, Xi; Salgado-Montejo, Alejandro; Spence, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Prior research provides robust support for the existence of a number of associations between colors and flavors. In the present study, we examined whether congruent (vs. incongruent) combinations of product packaging colors and flavor labels would facilitate visual search for products labeled with specific flavors. The two experiments reported here document a Stroop-like effect between flavor words and packaging colors. The participants were able to search for packaging flavor labels more rapidly when the color of the packaging was congruent with the flavor label (e.g., red/tomato) than when it was incongruent (e.g., yellow/tomato). In addition, when the packaging color was incongruent, those flavor labels that were more strongly associated with a specific color yielded slower reaction times and more errors (Stroop interference) than those that were less strongly tied to a specific color. Importantly, search efficiency was affected both by color/flavor congruence and association strength. Taken together, these results therefore highlight the role of color congruence and color–word association strength when it comes to searching for specific flavor labels. PMID:25870568

  4. Activity patterns during food provisioning are affected by artificial light in free living great tits (Parus major).

    PubMed

    Titulaer, Mieke; Spoelstra, Kamiel; Lange, Cynthia Y M J G; Visser, Marcel E

    2012-01-01

    Artificial light may have severe ecological consequences but there is limited experimental work to assess these consequences. We carried out an experimental study on a wild population of great tits (Parus major) to assess the impact of light pollution on daily activity patterns during the chick provisioning period. Pairs that were provided with a small light outside their nest box did not alter the onset, cessation or duration of their working day. There was however a clear effect of artificial light on the feeding rate in the second half of the nestling period: when provided with artificial light females increased their feeding rate when the nestlings were between 9 and 16 days old. Artificial light is hypothesised to have affected the perceived photoperiod of either the parents or the offspring which in turn led to increased parental care. This may have negative fitness consequences for the parents, and light pollution may thus create an ecological trap for breeding birds.

  5. Investigation of Age Polyethism in Food Processing of the Fungus-Growing Termite Odontotermes formosanus (Blattodea: Termitidae) Using a Laboratory Artificial Rearing System.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongjie; Yang, Mengyi; Chen, Yonger; Zhu, Na; Lee, Chow-Yang; Wei, Ji-Qian; Mo, Jianchu

    2015-02-01

    Laboratory rearing systems are useful models for studying Rhinotermitid behavior. Information on the biology of fungus-growing termites, however, is limited because of the difficulty of rearing colonies in the laboratory settings. The physical structure of termite nests makes it impossible to photograph or to observe colonies in the field. In this study, an artificial rearing system for field-collected colonies of the fungus-growing termite Odontotermes formosanus (Shiraki) was developed to facilitate observation in the laboratory. We recorded colony activity within the artificial rearing system and documented a variety of social behaviors that occurred throughout the food processing of the colony. This complex miniature ecosystem was cooperatively organized via division of labor in the foraging and processing of plant materials, and the observed patterns largely resembled the caste and age-based principles present in Macrotermes colonies. This work extends our insights into polyethism in the subfamily Macrotermitinae.

  6. Artificial sweeteners: a place in the field of functional foods? Focus on obesity and related metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Raben, Anne; Richelsen, Bjørn

    2012-11-01

    Artificial sweeteners can be a helpful tool to reduce energy intake and body weight and thereby risk for diabetes and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Considering the prevailing diabesity (obesity and diabetes) epidemic, this can, therefore, be an important alternative to natural, calorie-containing sweeteners. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current evidence on the effect of artificial sweeteners on body weight, appetite, and risk markers for diabetes and CVD in humans. Short-term intervention studies have shown divergent results wrt appetite regulation, but overall artificial sweeteners cannot be claimed to affect hunger. Data from longer term intervention studies are scarce, but together they point toward a beneficial effect of artificial sweeteners on energy intake, body weight, liver fat, fasting and postprandial glycemia, insulinemia, and/or lipidemia compared with sugar. Epidemiological studies are not equivocal, but large cohort studies from the USA point toward decreased body weight and lower risk of type-2 diabetes and coronory heart diseases with increased intake of artificial sweeteners compared with sugar. Artificial sweeteners, especially in beverages, can be a useful aid to maintain reduced energy intake and body weight and decrease risk of type-2 diabetes and CVD compared with sugars. However, confirmative long-term intervention trials are still needed.

  7. The effects of a double blind, placebo controlled, artificial food colourings and benzoate preservative challenge on hyperactivity in a general population sample of preschool children

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, B; Warner, J; Hutchinson, E; Dean, T; Rowlandson, P; Gant, C; Grundy, J; Fitzgerald, C; Stevenson, J

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To determine whether artificial food colourings and a preservative in the diet of 3 year old children in the general population influence hyperactive behaviour. Methods: A sample of 1873 children were screened in their fourth year for the presence of hyperactivity at baseline (HA), of whom 1246 had skin prick tests to identify atopy (AT). Children were selected to form the following groups: HA/AT, not-HA/AT, HA/not-AT, and not-HA/not-AT (n = 277). After baseline assessment, children were subjected to a diet eliminating artificial colourings and benzoate preservatives for one week; in the subsequent three week within subject double blind crossover study they received, in random order, periods of dietary challenge with a drink containing artificial colourings (20 mg daily) and sodium benzoate (45 mg daily) (active period), or a placebo mixture, supplementary to their diet. Behaviour was assessed by a tester blind to dietary status and by parents' ratings. Results: There were significant reductions in hyperactive behaviour during the withdrawal phase. Furthermore, there were significantly greater increases in hyperactive behaviour during the active than the placebo period based on parental reports. These effects were not influenced by the presence or absence of hyperactivity, nor by the presence or absence of atopy. There were no significant differences detected based on objective testing in the clinic. Conclusions: There is a general adverse effect of artificial food colouring and benzoate preservatives on the behaviour of 3 year old children which is detectable by parents but not by a simple clinic assessment. Subgroups are not made more vulnerable to this effect by their prior levels of hyperactivity or by atopy. PMID:15155391

  8. Physical properties of root crops treated with novel softening technology capable of retaining the shape, color, and nutritional value of foods.

    PubMed

    Umene, Shingo; Hayashi, Masahiro; Kato, Kumiko; Masunaga, Hiroaki

    2015-04-01

    Hard, difficult-to-eat root crops (carrots and burdock roots) were homogeneously softened by an enzyme permeation method so that they could be mashed easily by the tongue while retaining appearance, flavor, and nutrients. The appearance, color, and nutritional value of these foods were equivalent to those of normally cooked root crops of the same type. The firmness of the softened root crops was at least 100 times as low as normally cooked root crops and lower than some care food products for patients with swallowing disorders. Compared with control root crops, which were treated with a freeze-thaw infusion method, the treated foods were 10 to 25 times as soft, with significantly lower rates of foodstuff syneresis and better preservation of color and nutritional value. Furthermore, the cell walls of the treated burdock roots resembled those of normally cooked ones, while the cells of freeze-thaw infusion burdock roots were destroyed and few cell walls remained. It was expected that these root crops softened by the enzymatic processing could be one of the best model foods for patients with masticatory disturbance or swallowing disorders or both.

  9. Stable Benzacridine Pigments by Oxidative Coupling of Chlorogenic Acid with Amino Acids and Proteins: Toward Natural Product-Based Green Food Coloring.

    PubMed

    Iacomino, Mariagrazia; Weber, Fabian; Gleichenhagen, Maike; Pistorio, Valeria; Panzella, Lucia; Pizzo, Elio; Schieber, Andreas; d'Ischia, Marco; Napolitano, Alessandra

    2017-08-09

    The occasional greening of sweet potatoes and other plant tissues observed during cooking or other food processing has been shown to arise from the autoxidative coupling of chlorogenic acid (CGA, 5-caffeoylquinic acid) with amino acid components, leading to trihydroxybenzacridine pigments. To explore the potential of this reaction for food coloring, we report herein the optimized biomimetic preparation of trihydroxybenzacridine pigments from CGA and amino acids such as glycine and lysine, their straightforward purification by gel filtration chromatography, the UHPLC-MS/MS analysis of the purified pigment fraction, and a detailed characterization of the pH-dependent trihydroxybenzacridine chromophore. Similar green pigments were also obtained by analogous reaction of CGA with a low-cost protein, bovine serum albumin, and by simply adding CGA to chicken egg white (CEW) under stirring. Neither the purified pigments from amino acids nor the pigmented CEW exerted significant toxicity against two human cell lines, Caco-2 and HepG2, at doses compatible with common use in food coloring. Additions of the pure pigments or pigmented CEW to different food matrices imparted intense green hues, and the thermal stability of these preparations proved satisfactory up to 90 °C. The potential application of the greening reaction for the sensing of fish deterioration is also disclosed.

  10. Statement Summarizing Research Findings on the Issue of the Relationship Between Food-Additive-Free Diets and Hyperkinesis in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipton, Morris; Wender, Esther

    The National Advisory Committee on Hyperkinesis and Food Additives paper summarized some research findings on the issue of the relationship between food-additive-free diets and hyperkinesis in children. Based on several challenge studies, it is concluded that the evidence generally refutes Dr. B. F. Feingold's claim that artificial colorings in…

  11. Statement Summarizing Research Findings on the Issue of the Relationship Between Food-Additive-Free Diets and Hyperkinesis in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipton, Morris; Wender, Esther

    The National Advisory Committee on Hyperkinesis and Food Additives paper summarized some research findings on the issue of the relationship between food-additive-free diets and hyperkinesis in children. Based on several challenge studies, it is concluded that the evidence generally refutes Dr. B. F. Feingold's claim that artificial colorings in…

  12. The ethics of withdrawing artificial food and fluid from terminally ill patients: an end-of-life dilemma for Japanese nurses and families.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Emiko; Davis, Anne J; Aiba, Toshiaki

    2002-01-01

    End-of-life issues have become an urgent problem in Japan, where people are among the longest lived in the world and most of them die while connected to high-technology medical equipment. This study examines a sensitive end-of-life ethical issue that concerns patients, families and nurses: the withdrawal of artificial food and fluid from terminally ill patients. A sample of 160 Japanese nurses, who completed a questionnaire that included forced-choice and open-ended questions, supported this act under only two specific conditions: if the patient requested it, and if it relieved the patient's suffering. They considered that the doctor's orders, the family's request, or the patient's advanced age did not ethically justify this act. A small number of people who had recently lost a relative took part in semistructured interviews focusing on their experiences of their terminally ill relatives being given artificial food and fluid. Ethical, social and cultural factors surrounding this issue are discussed.

  13. Color of whole-wheat foods prepared from a bright-white hard winter wheat and the phenolic acids in its coarse bran.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hongxin; Martin, Joe; Okot-Kotber, Moses; Seib, Paul A

    2011-08-01

    The color of wheat kernels often impacts the color and thereby the value of wheat-based foods. A line of hard white winter wheat (B-W HW) with bright appearing kernels has been developed at the Kansas State Agricultural Research Center. The objective of this study was to compare the color of several foods made from the B-W HW wheat with those of 2 hard white wheat cultivars, Trego and Lakin. The B-W HW kernels showed higher lightness (L*, 57.6) than Trego (55.5) and Lakin (56.8), and the increased lightness was carried over to its bran and whole-wheat flour. Alkaline noodle and bread crumb made from the B-W HW whole-wheat flour showed slightly higher lightness (L*) than those made from Trego and Lakin. The sum of soluble and bound phenolics extracted from the 3 wheat brans, which had not been preextracted to remove lipids, was found to be 17.22 to 18.98 mg/g. The soluble phenolic acids in the brans were principally vanillic, ferulic, and syringic. The bound phenolic acids in the brans were dominated by ferulic, which accounted for 50.1% to 82.2% of total identified bound phenolic acids. Other bound phenolic acids were protocatechuic, caffeic, syringic, trans-cinnamic, p-hydroxybenzoic, p-coumaric, and vanillic. The lightness (L*) values of coarse wheat brans correlated positively with their levels of bound protocatechuic (r = 0.72, P < 0.01) and p-hydroxybenzoic acids (r = 0.75, P < 0.01). © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  14. Nanocarbon-{[Na10(PrW10O36)]2·130H2O} composite to detect toxic food coloring dyes at nanolevel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Taposhree; Sarkar, Sabyasachi

    2016-11-01

    Monitoring of adulterated and toxic food colors is important due to their potential toxicity and pathogenicity. Here, we repot an Ln-POM (lanthanide polyoxometalate) cluster, {[Na10(PrW10O36)]2·130H2O}, with carbon nano-onion (CNO) hybrid composite which is a highly efficient sensor for the rapid detection of toxic dyes like metanil yellow, auramine O, Orange II and in allura red (red 40) as low as 3.83; 4.73; 4.14 and 2.90 nmol ml-1 concentration, respectively, by fluorescence spectroscopy.

  15. Stability improvement of natural food colors: Impact of amino acid and peptide addition on anthocyanin stability in model beverages.

    PubMed

    Chung, Cheryl; Rojanasasithara, Thananunt; Mutilangi, William; McClements, David Julian

    2017-03-01

    Anthocyanins are prone to chemical degradation and color fading in the presence of vitamin C. The potential of three amino acids (l-phenylalanine, l-tyrosine, l-tryptophan) and a polypeptide (ε-poly-l-lysine) in prolonging the color stability of purple carrot anthocyanins (0.025%) in model beverages (0.05% l-ascorbic acid, citric acid, pH 3.0) stored at elevated temperature (40°C/7 days) was examined. In the absence of amino acids or peptides, anthocyanin degraded at first-order reaction rate. Addition of amino acids or peptide (0.1%) increased the color stability of anthocyanins, with the most significant improvement observed for l-tryptophan. The average half-life of anthocyanin color increased from 2 days to 6 days with l-tryptophan addition. Fluorescence quenching measurements revealed that the l-tryptophan interacted with anthocyanins mainly through hydrogen bonding, although some hydrophobic interaction may also have been involved. Overall, this study suggests that amino acid or peptide addition may prolong the color stability of anthocyanin in beverage products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Food or Medicine: Ethnic Variations in Perceptions of Advanced Cancer Patients and their Caregivers Regarding Artificial Hydration During the Last Weeks of Life

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Vigil, I; Cohen, MZ; de la Rosa, A; Cárdenas-Turanzas, ML; Burbach, BE; Tarleton, KW; Shen, WM; Bruera, E

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To identify whether advanced cancer patients receiving home hospice care and their primary caregivers view artificial hydration (AH) as food or medicine and the demographic and clinical factors influencing these perceptions. Methods Participants were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind controlled trial examining the efficacy of AH in cancer hospice patients. In-depth interviews at days 1 and 4 of study enrollment explored the meanings attributed to AH at the end-of-life. Responses to the question, “Are these fluids more like food or more like medicine?” were categorized as “food”, “medicine”, “both” or “other”. Chi-square analyses were conducted with data from 122 interviews (54 patients and 68 caregivers) to identify differences between patients and caregivers, and by gender, age, ethnicity and caregiver relationship. Predictors of perceptions were identified using logistic regression analysis. Results Overall, 47 participants (38%) understood the fluids to be more like food, 41 (34%) as medicine, 17 (14%) as both and 17 (14%) as “other”. Ethnic minority participants (N = 34, 66%) were significantly more likely than Non-Hispanic European Americans (N = 30, 42%) to view AH as food, or both as food and medicine (P = 0.034). Ethnic differences persisted in the final regression model (odds ratio [OR] 2.7; 95% CI 1.3–5.7, P = 0.010). No significant differences were detected between patients and caregivers, or across gender, age, caregivers’ relationship to the patients, group assignment, disease severity or cancer type. Conclusions AH was perceived as food/nutrition by many cancer patients and caregivers in the study, particularly among ethnic minorities. This perception may lead to greater distress if fluids are discontinued or withheld. Asking patients/caregivers about their AH perceptions may enhance patient/provider communication and culturally appropriate end-of-life care. PMID:24654201

  17. Synthesis and application of (13)C-labeled 2-acetyl-4-((1R,2S,3R)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroxybutyl)imidazole (THI), an immunosuppressant observed in caramel food colorings.

    PubMed

    Elsinghorst, Paul W; Raters, Marion; Dingel, Anna; Fischer, Jochen; Matissek, Reinhard

    2013-08-07

    2-Acetyl-4-((1R,2S,3R)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroxybutyl)imidazole (THI) is a minor toxic contaminant observed in caramel food colorings and was shown to exert immunosuppressant activity when fed to rodents. Because of this toxicity, maximum levels of THI in caramel food colorings have been defined by international and European authorities. Several reports of THI analysis using external standardization have been published for liquid foods such as beers and soft drinks. However, no suitable internal standard has yet been described allowing THI analysis in more complex samples. In this paper we describe the preparation of a labeled [(13)C6]THI analogue and its application for the successful validation of the first stable isotope dilution assay (SIDA) of THI in caramel food colorings. A brief survey of THI levels in commercially available caramel class III (E 150c) and IV (E 150d) food colorings is also included, corroborating that THI occurs only in caramel class III food colorings.

  18. 21 CFR 73.169 - Grape color extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Grape color extract. 73.169 Section 73.169 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.169 Grape color extract. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive grape color extract is an aqueous solution of anthocyanin grape pigments made from...

  19. 21 CFR 73.169 - Grape color extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Grape color extract. 73.169 Section 73.169 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.169 Grape color extract. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive grape color extract is an aqueous solution of anthocyanin grape pigments made from...

  20. 21 CFR 73.169 - Grape color extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Grape color extract. 73.169 Section 73.169 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.169 Grape color extract. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive grape color extract is an aqueous solution of anthocyanin grape pigments made from...

  1. 21 CFR 73.169 - Grape color extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Grape color extract. 73.169 Section 73.169 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.169 Grape color extract. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive grape color extract is an aqueous solution of anthocyanin grape pigments made from...

  2. 21 CFR 73.169 - Grape color extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Grape color extract. 73.169 Section 73.169 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.169 Grape color extract. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive grape color extract is an aqueous solution of anthocyanin grape pigments made from...

  3. Determination of 40 synthetic food colors in drinks and candies by high-performance liquid chromatography using a short column with photodiode array detection.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, N; Ichihashi, K

    2008-02-15

    Forty synthetic food colors were determined in drinks and candies by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection. The following food colors were analyzed within 19 min using a short analytical column (50 mm x 4.6 mm i.d., 1.8 microm) at 50 degrees C with gradient elution: Ponceau 6R, Tartrazine, Fast yellow AB, Amaranth, Indigotine, Naphthol yellow S, Chrysoine, Ponceau 4R, Sunset yellow FCF, Red 10B, Orange G, Acid violet 7, Brilliant black PN, Allura red AC, Yellow 2G, Red 2G, Uranine, Fast red E, Green S, Ponceau 2R, Azorubine, Orange I, Quinoline yellow, Martius yellow, Ponceau SX, Ponceau 3R, Fast green FCF, Eosine, Brilliant blue FCF, Orange II, Orange RN, Acid blue 1, Erythrosine, Amido black 10B, Acid red 52, Patent blue V, Acid green 9, Phloxine B, Benzyl violet 4B, and Rose bengal. The recoveries of these compounds added to soft drinks and candies at 5 microg/g ranged from 76.6 to 115.0%, and relative standard deviations (R.S.D.s) were within 6.0%. The limits of detection and the limits of quantitation were 0.03 and 0.1 microg/g, respectively.

  4. Enumeration of total aerobic microorganisms in foods by SimPlate Total Plate Count-Color Indicator methods and conventional culture methods: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Feldsine, Philip T; Leung, Stephanie C; Lienau, Andrew H; Mui, Linda A; Townsend, David E

    2003-01-01

    The relative efficacy of the SimPlate Total Plate Count-Color Indicator (TPC-CI) method (SimPlate 35 degrees C) was compared with the AOAC Official Method 966.23 (AOAC 35 degrees C) for enumeration of total aerobic microorganisms in foods. The SimPlate TPC-CI method, incubated at 30 degrees C (SimPlate 30 degrees C), was also compared with the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 4833 method (ISO 30 degrees C). Six food types were analyzed: ground black pepper, flour, nut meats, frozen hamburger patties, frozen fruits, and fresh vegetables. All foods tested were naturally contaminated. Nineteen laboratories throughout North America and Europe participated in the study. Three method comparisons were conducted. In general, there was <0.3 mean log count difference in recovery among the SimPlate methods and their corresponding reference methods. Mean log counts between the 2 reference methods were also very similar. Repeatability (Sr) and reproducibility (SR) standard deviations were similar among the 3 method comparisons. The SimPlate method (35 degrees C) and the AOAC method were comparable for enumerating total aerobic microorganisms in foods. Similarly, the SimPlate method (30 degrees C) was comparable to the ISO method when samples were prepared and incubated according to the ISO method.

  5. Comparative accumulation efficiency of [sup 109]cadmium from natural food (Hyalella azteca) and artificial diet by rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, S.E. ); Curtis, P.J. )

    1992-11-01

    Bioaccumulation models have been proposed to predict the accumulation of chemicals throughout aquatic food-chains. The efficiency with which organisms at each trophic level absorb these substances from their diet is an important component of such models. Metal absorption from food is typically estimated by applying metal salts surficially to commercial fish diets. However, this method may not provide an accurate estimate of in situ accumulation because the efficiency of absorption of metals applied surficially to commercial diets may differ from that of metals absorbed through the food chain. For example, both sunfish (Lepomis gibbosus) and plaice (Pleuronectes platessa) accumulated [sup 65]zinc applied surficially to foods more efficiently than [sup 65]zinc incorporated into live foods. There have apparently been no similar comparisons made for cadmium using fish. Furthermore, few studies have fitted data to exponential equations to provide estimates of the absorption efficiency coefficient (E) and the excretion coefficient (k[sub 2]) for cadmium. We report here the results of direct comparisons of cadmium absorption from commercial trout diet surficially-contaminated with [sup 109]Cd and from natural food (the amphipod Hyalella azteca) cultured in [sup 109]Cd-contaminated microcosms. We calculated absorption efficiency and excretion coefficients for cadmium by monitoring [sup 109]Cd accumulation and excretion in rainbow trout fingerlings fed on the two diets. 19 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Modelling of solid-phase tea waste extraction for the removal of manganese from food samples by using artificial neural network approach.

    PubMed

    Khajeh, Mostafa; Barkhordar, Afsaneh

    2013-11-15

    In this study, a three-layer artificial neural network (ANN) model was employed to develop prediction model for removal of manganese from food samples using tea waste as a low cost adsorbent. After removal of manganese from food samples with acetic acid (5molL(-1)), manganese was adsorbed to a small amount of tea waste, desorbed with nitric acid as a eluent solvent, and determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The input parameters chosen of the model was pH, amount of tea waste, extraction time and eluent concentration. After backpropagation (BP) training, the ANN model was able to predict extraction efficiency of manganese with a tangent sigmoid transfer function at hidden layer and a linear transfer function at output layer. Under the optimum conditions, the detection limit was 0.6ngg(-1). The method was applied to the separation, pre-concentration and determination of manganese in food samples and one reference material. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of voluntary exercise on spontaneous physical activity and food consumption in mice: Results from an artificial selection experiment.

    PubMed

    Copes, Lynn E; Schutz, Heidi; Dlugosz, Elizabeth M; Acosta, Wendy; Chappell, Mark A; Garland, Theodore

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated the effect of voluntary exercise on spontaneous physical activity (SPA) and food consumption in mice from 4 replicate lines bred for 57 generations for high voluntary wheel running (HR) and from 4 non-selected control (C) lines. Beginning at ~24 days of age, mice were housed in standard cages or in cages with attached wheels. Wheel activity and SPA were monitored in 1-min intervals. Data from the 8th week of the experiment were analyzed because mice were sexually mature and had plateaued in body mass, weekly wheel running distance, SPA, and food consumption. Body mass, length, and masses of the retroperitoneal fat pad, liver, and heart were recorded after the 13th week. SPA of both HR and C mice decreased with wheel access, due to reductions in both duration and average intensity of SPA. However, total activity duration (SPA+wheel running; min/day) was ~1/3 greater when mice were housed with wheels, and food consumption was significantly increased. Overall, food consumption in both HR and C mice was more strongly affected by wheel running than by SPA. Duration of wheel running had a stronger effect than average speed, but the opposite was true for SPA. With body mass as a covariate, chronic wheel access significantly reduced fat pad mass and increased heart mass in both HR and C mice. Given that both HR and C mice housed with wheels had increased food consumption, the energetic cost of wheel running was not fully compensated by concomitant reductions in SPA. The experiment demonstrates that both duration and intensity of both wheel running and SPA were significant predictors of food consumption. This sort of detailed analysis of the effects of different aspects of physical activity on food consumption has not previously been reported for a non-human animal, and it sets the stage for longitudinal examination of energy balance and its components in rodent models.

  8. Food.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Athnasios, Albert K.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Topics covered in this review of analytical methods include: additives, adulteration, contamination, decomposition, carbohydrates, color, enzymes, fats, oils, fatty acids, flavor, identifying compounds, inorganic methods, moisture, organic acids, nitrogen processes, and vitamins. (MVL)

  9. Food.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Athnasios, Albert K.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Topics covered in this review of analytical methods include: additives, adulteration, contamination, decomposition, carbohydrates, color, enzymes, fats, oils, fatty acids, flavor, identifying compounds, inorganic methods, moisture, organic acids, nitrogen processes, and vitamins. (MVL)

  10. Single and joint effects of Zn and Cd on Porcellio scaber (Crustacea, Isopoda) exposed to artificially contaminated food.

    PubMed

    Zidar, Primoz; Van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Strus, Jasna

    2009-11-01

    This study aimed at determining effects of Zn, Cd and their equitoxic mixtures on metal assimilation and food consumption of the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber, in relation to metal availability in the food. Cd was four times less water-extractable than Zn. Cd or Zn extractability was affected neither by metal concentration nor by the presence of the other metal. In single metal exposures, assimilation efficiency (AE) was up to five times higher for Cd than for Zn. In a mixture, AE of Cd significantly increased at low mixture concentrations and decreased at high mixture concentrations. AE of Zn significantly increased at intermediate mixture concentrations. Effects of the Zn and Cd mixture on food consumption were additive (28-day EC(50,total)=1.10TU; EC(50,water-extractable)=1.18TU) when based on total and water-extractable concentrations but antagonistic when related to internal metal concentrations in the isopods (EC(50,internal)=1.40TU).

  11. Measuring the color and brightness of artificial sky glow from cities using an all-sky imaging system calibrated with astronomical methods in the Johnson-Cousins B and V photometric systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipkin, Ashley; Duriscoe, Dan M.; Lughinbuhl, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Artificial light at night, when observed at some distance from a city, results in a dome of sky glow, brightest at the horizon. The spectral power distribution of electric light utilized will determine its color of the light dome and the amount of light will determine its brightness. Recent outdoor lighting technologies have included blue-rich light emitting diode (LED) sources that may increase the relative amount of blue to green light in sky glow compared to typical high pressure sodium (HPS) sources with warmer spectra. Measuring and monitoring this effect is important to the preservation of night sky visual quality as seen from undeveloped areas outside the city, such as parks or other protected areas, since the dark-adapted human eye is more sensitive to blue and green. We present a method using a wide field CCD camera which images the entire sky in both Johnson V and B photometric bands. Standard stars within the images are used for calibration. The resulting all-sky brightness maps, and a derived B-V color index map, provide a means to assess and track the impact of specific outdoor lighting practices. We also present example data from several cities, including Las Vegas, Nevada, Flagstaff, Arizona, and Cheyenne, Wyoming.

  12. Color recognition with bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Frydrych, M; Silfsten, P; Parkkinen, S; Parkkinen, J; Jaaskelainen, T

    1998-01-01

    We have studied opto-electric properties of wild type bacteriorhodopsin and its two artificial variants. We have measured opto-electric responses with respect to wavelength for all three proteins and we describe the use of the proteins for color detection. Opto-electric responses of proteins to set of colored lights were measured and it has been shown that bacteriorhodopsin and its variants can be used to recognize color. A simple equation for estimating opto-electric response to arbitrary spectrum is given.

  13. Light and Color Research Continues in Arkansas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sydoriak, Diane

    1984-01-01

    Describes a research project that will measure whether student achievement, blood pressure, height, and weight gain are influenced by the choice of color and/or the source of artificial light in the classroom. Four third-grade classrooms will be the treatment groups involving two colors and three different artificial light sources. (MLF)

  14. Determination of seven artificial sweeteners in diet food preparations by reverse-phase liquid chromatography with absorbance detection.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, J F; Charbonneau, C F

    1988-01-01

    The artificial sweeteners aspartame, saccharin, cyclamate, alitame, acesulfam-K, sucralose, and dulcin are determined in diet soft drinks and tabletop sweetener preparations. Samples are diluted, filtered, and analyzed directly by liquid chromatography on a C-18 reverse-phase column with a mobile phase gradient ranging from 3% acetonitrile in 0.02M KH2PO4 (pH 5) to 20% acetonitrile in 0.02M KH2PO4 (pH 3.5). Diet puddings and dessert toppings are extracted with ethanol, filtered, and diluted with mobile phase for analysis. The sweeteners, except sucralose and cyclamate, were detected by UV absorbance at either 200 or 210 nm. Sucralose was determined at 200 nm or by refractive index. Cyclamate was determined after post-column ion-pair extraction. The sweeteners stevioside and talin were not detected. Additives such as caffeine, sorbic acid, and benzoic acid did not interfere.

  15. Color Blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... rose in full bloom. If you have a color vision defect, you may see these colors differently than most people. There are three main kinds of color vision defects. Red-green color vision defects are the most ...

  16. Artificial trans fat in popular foods in 2012 and in 2014: a market basket investigation in six European countries

    PubMed Central

    Stender, Steen; Astrup, Arne; Dyerberg, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    Objective To minimise the intake of industrially produced trans fat (I-TF) and thereby decrease the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), nearly all European countries rely on food producers to voluntarily reduce the I-TF content in food. The objective of this study was to monitor the change in presence of I-TF in biscuits/cakes/wafers in six countries in South-eastern Europe from 2012 to 2014, including two members of the European Union (Slovenia and Croatia). Design Three large supermarkets were visited in each of the six capitals in 2012. Pre-packaged biscuits/cakes/wafers were bought if the products contained more than 15 g of total fat per 100 g of product and if partially hydrogenated oil or a similar term was disclosed at the beginning of the ingredients list. These same supermarkets were revisited in 2014 and the same collection procedure was followed. All foods were subsequently analysed for total fat and trans fat in the same laboratory. Results The number of packages bought in the six countries taken together was 266 in 2012 and 643 in 2014. Some were identical, and therefore only 226 were analysed in 2012 and 434 in 2014. Packages with less than 2% of fat from I-TF went up from 69 to 235, while products with more than 2% (illegal in Denmark) doubled from an average of 33 to an average of 68 products for the six countries, with considerable variation across countries. The per cent of I-TF in total fat decreased slightly, from a mean (SD) of 22 (13) in 2012 to 18 (9) in 2014. Conclusions The findings suggest that voluntary reduction of I-TF in foods with high amounts is an ineffective strategy in several European countries. Alternative strategies both within and outside the European Union are necessary to protect all subgroups of the populations against an increased risk of CHD. PMID:26975938

  17. 21 CFR 886.3200 - Artificial eye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Artificial eye. 886.3200 Section 886.3200 Food and... OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3200 Artificial eye. (a) Identification. An artificial eye is a device resembling the anterior portion of the eye, usually made of glass or plastic, intended to...

  18. 21 CFR 886.3200 - Artificial eye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Artificial eye. 886.3200 Section 886.3200 Food and... OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3200 Artificial eye. (a) Identification. An artificial eye is a device resembling the anterior portion of the eye, usually made of glass or plastic, intended to...

  19. 21 CFR 886.3200 - Artificial eye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Artificial eye. 886.3200 Section 886.3200 Food and... OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3200 Artificial eye. (a) Identification. An artificial eye is a device resembling the anterior portion of the eye, usually made of glass or plastic, intended to...

  20. 21 CFR 886.3200 - Artificial eye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Artificial eye. 886.3200 Section 886.3200 Food and... OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3200 Artificial eye. (a) Identification. An artificial eye is a device resembling the anterior portion of the eye, usually made of glass or plastic, intended to...

  1. Food Additives and Hyperkinesis: A Controlled Double-Blind Experiment. (Includes NIE Staff Critique).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conners, C. Keith; And Others

    Fifteen hyperkinetic children (6-12 years old) were involved in a pilot study to test B. Feingold's hypothesis that hyperkinesis may be caused by artificial flavors and colors in food. Prior to treatment, parents and teachers completed bi-weekly questionnaires regarding each Ss' behavior both on medication (pretreatment period) and when medication…

  2. Applying Color.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, David

    1984-01-01

    Most schools teach the triadic color system, utilizing red, blue, and yellow as primary colors. Other systems, such as additive and subtractive color systems, Munsell's Color Notation System, and the Hering Opponent Color Theory, can broaden children's concepts and free them to better choose color in their own work. (IS)

  3. Parsimonious classification of binary lacunarity data computed from food surface images using kernel principal component analysis and artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Abdullah; Valous, Nektarios A; Sun, Da-Wen; Allen, Paul

    2011-02-01

    Lacunarity is about quantifying the degree of spatial heterogeneity in the visual texture of imagery through the identification of the relationships between patterns and their spatial configurations in a two-dimensional setting. The computed lacunarity data can designate a mathematical index of spatial heterogeneity, therefore the corresponding feature vectors should possess the necessary inter-class statistical properties that would enable them to be used for pattern recognition purposes. The objectives of this study is to construct a supervised parsimonious classification model of binary lacunarity data-computed by Valous et al. (2009)-from pork ham slice surface images, with the aid of kernel principal component analysis (KPCA) and artificial neural networks (ANNs), using a portion of informative salient features. At first, the dimension of the initial space (510 features) was reduced by 90% in order to avoid any noise effects in the subsequent classification. Then, using KPCA, the first nineteen kernel principal components (99.04% of total variance) were extracted from the reduced feature space, and were used as input in the ANN. An adaptive feedforward multilayer perceptron (MLP) classifier was employed to obtain a suitable mapping from the input dataset. The correct classification percentages for the training, test and validation sets were 86.7%, 86.7%, and 85.0%, respectively. The results confirm that the classification performance was satisfactory. The binary lacunarity spatial metric captured relevant information that provided a good level of differentiation among pork ham slice images.

  4. Artificial trans fat in popular foods in 2012 and in 2014: a market basket investigation in six European countries.

    PubMed

    Stender, Steen; Astrup, Arne; Dyerberg, Jørn

    2016-03-14

    To minimise the intake of industrially produced trans fat (I-TF) and thereby decrease the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), nearly all European countries rely on food producers to voluntarily reduce the I-TF content in food. The objective of this study was to monitor the change in presence of I-TF in biscuits/cakes/wafers in six countries in South-eastern Europe from 2012 to 2014, including two members of the European Union (Slovenia and Croatia). Three large supermarkets were visited in each of the six capitals in 2012. Pre-packaged biscuits/cakes/wafers were bought if the products contained more than 15 g of total fat per 100 g of product and if partially hydrogenated oil or a similar term was disclosed at the beginning of the ingredients list. These same supermarkets were revisited in 2014 and the same collection procedure was followed. All foods were subsequently analysed for total fat and trans fat in the same laboratory. The number of packages bought in the six countries taken together was 266 in 2012 and 643 in 2014. Some were identical, and therefore only 226 were analysed in 2012 and 434 in 2014. Packages with less than 2% of fat from I-TF went up from 69 to 235, while products with more than 2% (illegal in Denmark) doubled from an average of 33 to an average of 68 products for the six countries, with considerable variation across countries. The per cent of I-TF in total fat decreased slightly, from a mean (SD) of 22 (13) in 2012 to 18 (9) in 2014. The findings suggest that voluntary reduction of I-TF in foods with high amounts is an ineffective strategy in several European countries. Alternative strategies both within and outside the European Union are necessary to protect all subgroups of the populations against an increased risk of CHD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  5. Enriching tortoises: assessing color preference.

    PubMed

    Passos, Luiza F; Mello, Humberto Espirito Santo; Young, Robert John

    2014-01-01

    Environmental enrichment is a principle that is used to enhance the quality of care for nonhuman animals in captivity. To achieve this, it is necessary to understand the animal's needs. This study focused on color preference to provide food stimuli as a source of environmental enrichment for the tortoise, Chelonoidis denticulata. During this study, the stimuli green-, blue-, yellow-, and red-colored bananas and plaster blocks were randomly offered to the tortoises. Analysis of the data showed that the tortoises had a preference for the stimuli dyed with colors red and yellow over the other presented colors. It was possible to conclude that presenting food in different colors stimulated the animals to evaluate their environment and make choices in relation to their color preference. Thus, this experiment introduced an element of choice into their lives, beyond identifying color food preferences for the tortoises. The element of choice is known to be important to animal welfare.

  6. Does skipping a meal matter to a butterfly's appearance? Effects of larval food stress on wing morphology and color in monarch butterflies.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Haley; Solensky, Michelle J; Satterfield, Dara A; Davis, Andrew K

    2014-01-01

    In animals with complex life cycles, all resources needed to form adult tissues are procured at the larval stage. For butterflies, the proper development of wings involves synthesizing tissue during metamorphosis based on the raw materials obtained by larvae. Similarly, manufacture of pigment for wing scales also requires resources acquired by larvae. We conducted an experiment to test the effects of food deprivation in the larval stage on multiple measures of adult wing morphology and coloration of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus), a species in which long-distance migration makes flight efficiency critical. In a captive setting, we restricted food (milkweed) from late-stage larvae for either 24 hrs or 48 hrs, then after metamorphosis we used image analysis methods to measure forewing surface area and elongation (length/width), which are both important for migration. We also measured the brightness of orange pigment and the intensity of black on the wing. There were correlations between several wing features, including an unexpected association between wing elongation and melanism, which will require further study to fully understand. The clearest effect of food restriction was a reduction in adult wing size in the high stress group (by approximately 2%). Patterns observed for other wing traits were ambiguous: monarchs in the low stress group (but not the high) had less elongated and paler orange pigmentation. There was no effect on wing melanism. Although some patterns obtained in this study were unclear, our results concerning wing size have direct bearing on the monarch migration. We show that if milkweed is limited for monarch larvae, their wings become stunted, which could ultimately result in lower migration success.

  7. Does Skipping a Meal Matter to a Butterfly's Appearance? Effects of Larval Food Stress on Wing Morphology and Color in Monarch Butterflies

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Haley; Solensky, Michelle J.; Satterfield, Dara A.; Davis, Andrew K.

    2014-01-01

    In animals with complex life cycles, all resources needed to form adult tissues are procured at the larval stage. For butterflies, the proper development of wings involves synthesizing tissue during metamorphosis based on the raw materials obtained by larvae. Similarly, manufacture of pigment for wing scales also requires resources acquired by larvae. We conducted an experiment to test the effects of food deprivation in the larval stage on multiple measures of adult wing morphology and coloration of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus), a species in which long-distance migration makes flight efficiency critical. In a captive setting, we restricted food (milkweed) from late-stage larvae for either 24 hrs or 48 hrs, then after metamorphosis we used image analysis methods to measure forewing surface area and elongation (length/width), which are both important for migration. We also measured the brightness of orange pigment and the intensity of black on the wing. There were correlations between several wing features, including an unexpected association between wing elongation and melanism, which will require further study to fully understand. The clearest effect of food restriction was a reduction in adult wing size in the high stress group (by approximately 2%). Patterns observed for other wing traits were ambiguous: monarchs in the low stress group (but not the high) had less elongated and paler orange pigmentation. There was no effect on wing melanism. Although some patterns obtained in this study were unclear, our results concerning wing size have direct bearing on the monarch migration. We show that if milkweed is limited for monarch larvae, their wings become stunted, which could ultimately result in lower migration success. PMID:24695643

  8. Spectrophotometric determination of synthetic colorants using PSO-GA-ANN.

    PubMed

    Benvidi, Ali; Abbasi, Saleheh; Gharaghani, Sajjad; Dehghan Tezerjani, Marzieh; Masoum, Saeed

    2017-04-01

    Four common food colorants, containing tartrazine, sunset yellow, ponceau 4R and methyl orange, are simultaneously quantified without prior chemical separation. In this study, an effective artificial neural network (ANN) method is designed for modeling multicomponent absorbance data with the presence of shifts or changes of peak shapes in spectroscopic analysis. Gradient descent methods such as Levenberg-Marquardt function are usually used to determine the parameters of ANN. However, these methods may provide inappropriate parameters. In this paper, we propose combination of genetic algorithms (GA) and partial swarm optimization (PSO) to optimize parameters of ANN, and then the algorithm is used to process the relationship between the absorbance data and the concentration of analytes. The hybrid algorithm has the benefits of both PSO and GA techniques. The performance of this algorithm is compared to the performance of PSO-ANN, PC-ANN and ANN based Levenberg-Marquardt function. The obtained results revealed that the designed model can accurately determine colorant concentrations in real and synthetic samples. According to the observations, it is clear that the proposed hybrid method is a powerful tool to estimate the concentration of food colorants with a high degree of overlap using nonlinear artificial neural network. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A colored avocado seed extract as a potential natural colorant.

    PubMed

    Dabas, Deepti; Elias, Ryan J; Lambert, Joshua D; Ziegler, Gregory R

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing consumer demand for and scientific interest in new natural colorants. Avocado (Persea americana) seed when crushed with water develops an orange color (= 480 nm) in a time-dependent manner. Heat treatment of the seed prevented color development, whereas the addition of exogenous polyphenol oxidase (PPO), but not peroxidase restored color development. Color development was also inhibited by the addition of tropolone, an inhibitor of PPO. Color formation resulted in a decrease in the concentration of polyphenols indicating utilization for color formation. The orange color intensified as the pH was adjusted from 2.0 to 11.0, and these changes were only partially reversible when pH was adjusted from 7.5 to 11.0 in the presence of oxygen, but completely reversible when the pH was changed in the absence of oxygen. The color was found to be stable in solution at -18 °C for 2 mo. These results suggest that the avocado seed may be a potential source of natural colorant, and that color development is PPO-dependent. There is growing public and scientific interest in the development of natural alternatives to synthetic colorants in foods. Extracts of turmeric, paprika, and beets are examples of food-derived natural colorants. Avocado seeds, which represent an under-utilized waste stream, form a stable orange color when crushed in the presence of air. Our data indicate that avocado seed represents a potential source of new natural colorants for use in foods. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  10. A Vector Signal Processing Approach to Color

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    AD-A259 499 Technical Report 1349 A Vector Signal Processing Approach to Color Kah-Kay Sun MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory DTIC S EELECTE JAN2...ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION Artificial Intelligence Laboratory REPORT NUMBER 545 Technology Square Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 AIM 1349 9...report describes research done at the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at MIT. This rc- search is sponsored by the Artificial Intelligence Center of

  11. Color blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... have trouble telling the difference between red and green. This is the most common type of color ... color blindness often have problems seeing reds and greens, too. The most severe form of color blindness ...

  12. Production of superoxide radical in reductive metabolism of a synthetic food-coloring agent, indigocarmine, and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Yoichi; Kitamura, Shigeyuki; Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Sugihara, Kazumi; Ohta, Shigeru

    2005-06-24

    Indigocarmine, which is widely used as a synthetic colouring agent for foods and cosmetics in many countries, was reduced to its leuco form and decolorized by rat liver microsomes with NADPH under anaerobic conditions. The reductase activity was enhanced in liver microsomes of phenobarbital-treated rats, and inhibited by diphenyliodonium chloride, a NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (P450 reductase) inhibitor, but was not inhibited by SKF 525-A or carbon monoxide. Indigocarmine reductase activity was exhibited by purified rat P450 reductase. In contrast, when indigocarmine was incubated with rat liver microsomes and NADPH under aerobic conditions, superoxide radical was produced and its production was inhibited by superoxide dismutase and diphenyliodonium chloride. When indigocarmine was incubated with purified rat P450 reductase in the presence of NADPH, superoxide radical production was enhanced 17.7-fold (similar to the enhancement of indigocarmine-reducing ability) as compared with that of rat liver microsomes. A decrease of one molecule of NADPH was accompanied with formation of about two molecules of superoxide radical. P450 reductase exhibited little reductase activity towards indigo and tetrabromoindigo, which also afforded little superoxide radical under aerobic conditions. These results indicate that indigocarmine is reduced by P450 reductase to its leuco form, and superoxide radical is produced by autoxidation of the leuco form, through a mechanism known as futile redox cycling.

  13. 7 CFR 58.329 - Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Color. 58.329 Section 58.329 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....329 Color. Coloring, when used shall be Annatto or any color which is approved by the U.S. Food and...

  14. 7 CFR 58.329 - Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Color. 58.329 Section 58.329 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....329 Color. Coloring, when used shall be Annatto or any color which is approved by the U.S. Food and...

  15. 7 CFR 58.329 - Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Color. 58.329 Section 58.329 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....329 Color. Coloring, when used shall be Annatto or any color which is approved by the U.S. Food and...

  16. 7 CFR 58.329 - Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Color. 58.329 Section 58.329 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....329 Color. Coloring, when used shall be Annatto or any color which is approved by the U.S. Food and...

  17. 7 CFR 58.329 - Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Color. 58.329 Section 58.329 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....329 Color. Coloring, when used shall be Annatto or any color which is approved by the U.S. Food and...

  18. Artificial Reefs and Ocean Dumping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glueck, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    Activities and instructional strategies for two multigrade lessons are provided. Activity objectives include describing an artificial reef (such as a sunken ocean liner) as an ecosystem, knowing animal types in the ecosystem, and describing a food web. (JN)

  19. Artificial Reefs and Ocean Dumping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glueck, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    Activities and instructional strategies for two multigrade lessons are provided. Activity objectives include describing an artificial reef (such as a sunken ocean liner) as an ecosystem, knowing animal types in the ecosystem, and describing a food web. (JN)

  20. Artificial Ligaments: Promise or Panacea?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubell, Adele

    1987-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration has approved a prosthetic ligament for limited use in persons with damaged anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL). This article addresses ligament repair, ACL tears, current treatment, development of the Gore-Tex artificial ligament, other artificial ligaments in process, and arguments for and against their use.…

  1. Artificial Ligaments: Promise or Panacea?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubell, Adele

    1987-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration has approved a prosthetic ligament for limited use in persons with damaged anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL). This article addresses ligament repair, ACL tears, current treatment, development of the Gore-Tex artificial ligament, other artificial ligaments in process, and arguments for and against their use.…

  2. Artificial Limbs

    MedlinePlus

    ... you are missing an arm or leg, an artificial limb can sometimes replace it. The device, which is ... activities such as walking, eating, or dressing. Some artificial limbs let you function nearly as well as before.

  3. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waltz, David L.

    1982-01-01

    Describes kinds of results achieved by computer programs in artificial intelligence. Topics discussed include heuristic searches, artificial intelligence/psychology, planning program, backward chaining, learning (focusing on Winograd's blocks to explore learning strategies), concept learning, constraint propagation, language understanding…

  4. Artificial vision workbench.

    PubMed

    Frenger, P

    1997-01-01

    Machine vision is an important component of medical systems engineering. Inexpensive miniature solid state cameras are now available. This paper describes how these devices can be used as artificial retinas, to take snapshots and moving pictures in monochrome or color. Used in pairs, they produce a stereoscopic field of vision and enable depth perception. Macular and peripheral vision can be simulated electronically. This paper also presents the author's design of an artificial orbit for this synthetic eye. The orbit supports the eye, protects it, and provides attachment points for the ocular motion control system. Convergence and image fusion can be produced, and saccades simulated, along with the other ocular motions. The use of lenses, filters, irises and focusing mechanisms are also discussed. Typical camera-computer interfaces are described, including the use of "frame grabbers" and analog-to-digital image conversion. Software programs for eye positioning, image manipulation, feature extraction and object recognition are discussed, including the application of artificial neural networks.

  5. Quenching mechanism and kinetics of ascorbic acid on the photosensitizing effects of synthetic food colorant FD&C Red Nr 3.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tsung-Shi; Min, David B

    2009-01-01

    The pH effect on the oxidative stability of ascorbic acid in the presence of food colorant FD&C Red Nr 3 during storage with or without light was investigated. The quenching mechanism and kinetics of ascorbic acid on the FD&C Red Nr 3 photosensitized oxidation in an aqueous system at 25 degrees C were also studied by measuring the degradation of ascorbic acid or depletion of headspace oxygen. Red Nr 3 had no influence on the oxidation of ascorbic acid under dark storage, but accelerated its oxidation rate under light storage. The oxidative stability of ascorbic acid decreased as the pH increased from 4 to 7 under light without FD&C Red Nr 3. The quenching rates of ascorbic acid on the singlet oxygen by measuring the degradation of ascorbic acid in the presence of Red Nr 3 under light storage were 1.53 +/- 0.15 x 10(8), 1.86 +/- 0.25 x 10(8), and 1.19 +/- 0.12 x 10(8) M(-1)S(-1) at pH 4, 5.6, and 7, respectively.

  6. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Information Technology Quarterly, 1985

    1985-01-01

    This issue of "Information Technology Quarterly" is devoted to the theme of "Artificial Intelligence." It contains two major articles: (1) Artificial Intelligence and Law" (D. Peter O'Neill and George D. Wood); (2) "Artificial Intelligence: A Long and Winding Road" (John J. Simon, Jr.). In addition, it contains two sidebars: (1) "Calculating and…

  7. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Information Technology Quarterly, 1985

    1985-01-01

    This issue of "Information Technology Quarterly" is devoted to the theme of "Artificial Intelligence." It contains two major articles: (1) Artificial Intelligence and Law" (D. Peter O'Neill and George D. Wood); (2) "Artificial Intelligence: A Long and Winding Road" (John J. Simon, Jr.). In addition, it contains two sidebars: (1) "Calculating and…

  8. Meio- and Macrofaunal Communities in Artificial Water-Filled Tree Holes: Effects of Seasonality, Physical and Chemical Parameters, and Availability of Food Resources

    PubMed Central

    Ptatscheck, Christoph; Traunspurger, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In this study we investigated the dynamics of meiofaunal and macrofaunal communities in artificial water-filled tree holes. The abundances and, for the first time, biomasses and secondary production rates of these communities were examined. The experimental set-up consisted of 300 brown plastic cups placed in temperate mixed forests and sampled five times over a period of 16 months to determine the impact of (i) seasonal events, (ii) physicochemical parameters, and (iii) food resources on the tree hole metazoans. Outcomes Metazoan organisms, especially the meiofauna (rotifers and nematodes) occupied nearly all of the cups (> 99%) throughout the year. Between 55% and 99% of the metazoan community was represented by rotifers (max. 557,000 individuals 100 cm-2) and nematodes (max. 58,000 individuals 100 cm-2). Diptera taxa, particularly Dasyhelea sp. (max. 256 individuals 100 cm-2) dominated the macrofaunal community. Macrofauna accounted for the majority of the metazoan biomass, with a mean dry weight of 5,800 μg 100 cm-2 and an annual production rate of 20,400 μg C 100 cm-2, whereas for meiofauna mean biomass and annual production were 100 μg 100 cm-2 and 5,300 μg C 100 cm-2, respectively. The macrofaunal taxa tended to show more fluctuating population dynamic while the meiofaunal dynamic was rather low with partly asynchronous development. Seasonality (average temperature and rain intervals) had a significant impact on both meiofauna and macrofauna. Furthermore, bottom-up control (chlorophyll-a and organic carbon), mainly attributable to algae, was a significant factor that shaped the metazoan communities. In contrast, physicochemical water parameters had no evident influence. 23.7% of organism density distribution was explained by redundancy analysis (RDA) indicating a high dynamic and asynchrony of the systems. PMID:26284811

  9. Color realism and color science.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Alex; Hilbert, David R

    2003-02-01

    The target article is an attempt to make some progress on the problem of color realism. Are objects colored? And what is the nature of the color properties? We defend the view that physical objects (for instance, tomatoes, radishes, and rubies) are colored, and that colors are physical properties, specifically, types of reflectance. This is probably a minority opinion, at least among color scientists. Textbooks frequently claim that physical objects are not colored, and that the colors are "subjective" or "in the mind." The article has two other purposes: First, to introduce an interdisciplinary audience to some distinctively philosophical tools that are useful in tackling the problem of color realism and, second, to clarify the various positions and central arguments in the debate. The first part explains the problem of color realism and makes some useful distinctions. These distinctions are then used to expose various confusions that often prevent people from seeing that the issues are genuine and difficult, and that the problem of color realism ought to be of interest to anyone working in the field of color science. The second part explains the various leading answers to the problem of color realism, and (briefly) argues that all views other than our own have serious difficulties or are unmotivated. The third part explains and motivates our own view, that colors are types of reflectances and defends it against objections made in the recent literature that are often taken as fatal.

  10. 21 CFR 145.131 - Artificially sweetened canned figs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... artificially sweetened food is subject to the requirements for label statement of ingredients used, as... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Artificially sweetened canned figs. 145.131 Section 145.131 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  11. 21 CFR 70.45 - Allocation of color additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Allocation of color additives. 70.45 Section 70.45 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL COLOR ADDITIVES Safety Evaluation § 70.45 Allocation of color additives. Whenever, in the consideration of a...

  12. 21 CFR 81.1 - Provisional lists of color additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Provisional lists of color additives. 81.1 Section... GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS AND GENERAL RESTRICTIONS FOR PROVISIONAL COLOR ADDITIVES FOR USE IN FOODS, DRUGS, AND COSMETICS § 81.1 Provisional lists of color additives. The Commissioner of Food and Drugs finds...

  13. 21 CFR 81.1 - Provisional lists of color additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Provisional lists of color additives. 81.1 Section... GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS AND GENERAL RESTRICTIONS FOR PROVISIONAL COLOR ADDITIVES FOR USE IN FOODS, DRUGS, AND COSMETICS § 81.1 Provisional lists of color additives. The Commissioner of Food and Drugs finds...

  14. 21 CFR 70.45 - Allocation of color additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allocation of color additives. 70.45 Section 70.45 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL COLOR ADDITIVES Safety Evaluation § 70.45 Allocation of color additives. Whenever, in the consideration of a...

  15. 21 CFR 70.45 - Allocation of color additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Allocation of color additives. 70.45 Section 70.45 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL COLOR ADDITIVES Safety Evaluation § 70.45 Allocation of color additives. Whenever, in the consideration of a...

  16. 21 CFR 70.45 - Allocation of color additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Allocation of color additives. 70.45 Section 70.45 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL COLOR ADDITIVES Safety Evaluation § 70.45 Allocation of color additives. Whenever, in the consideration of a...

  17. 21 CFR 70.45 - Allocation of color additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allocation of color additives. 70.45 Section 70.45 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL COLOR ADDITIVES Safety Evaluation § 70.45 Allocation of color additives. Whenever, in the consideration of a...

  18. 21 CFR 81.1 - Provisional lists of color additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Provisional lists of color additives. 81.1 Section... GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS AND GENERAL RESTRICTIONS FOR PROVISIONAL COLOR ADDITIVES FOR USE IN FOODS, DRUGS, AND COSMETICS § 81.1 Provisional lists of color additives. The Commissioner of Food and Drugs finds...

  19. Artificial Intelligence,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PATTERN RECOGNITION, * ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE , *TEXTBOOKS, COMPUTER PROGRAMMING, MATHEMATICAL LOGIC, ROBOTS, PROBLEM SOLVING, STATISTICAL ANALYSIS, GAME THEORY, NATURAL LANGUAGE, SELF ORGANIZING SYSTEMS.

  20. Entropy, color, and color rendering.

    PubMed

    Price, Luke L A

    2012-12-01

    The Shannon entropy [Bell Syst. Tech J.27, 379 (1948)] of spectral distributions is applied to the problem of color rendering. With this novel approach, calculations for visual white entropy, spectral entropy, and color rendering are proposed, indices that are unreliant on the subjectivity inherent in reference spectra and color samples. The indices are tested against real lamp spectra, showing a simple and robust system for color rendering assessment. The discussion considers potential roles for white entropy in several areas of color theory and psychophysics and nonextensive entropy generalizations of the entropy indices in mathematical color spaces.

  1. 21 CFR 886.1170 - Color vision tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Color vision tester. 886.1170 Section 886.1170...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1170 Color vision tester. (a) Identification. A color vision tester is a device that consists of various colored materials, such as colored yarns...

  2. 21 CFR 886.1170 - Color vision tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Color vision tester. 886.1170 Section 886.1170...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1170 Color vision tester. (a) Identification. A color vision tester is a device that consists of various colored materials, such as colored yarns...

  3. 21 CFR 886.1170 - Color vision tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Color vision tester. 886.1170 Section 886.1170...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1170 Color vision tester. (a) Identification. A color vision tester is a device that consists of various colored materials, such as colored yarns...

  4. 21 CFR 886.1170 - Color vision tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Color vision tester. 886.1170 Section 886.1170...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1170 Color vision tester. (a) Identification. A color vision tester is a device that consists of various colored materials, such as colored yarns...

  5. 21 CFR 886.1170 - Color vision tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Color vision tester. 886.1170 Section 886.1170...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1170 Color vision tester. (a) Identification. A color vision tester is a device that consists of various colored materials, such as colored yarns...

  6. Perspective: the evolution of warning coloration is not paradoxical.

    PubMed

    Marples, Nicola M; Kelly, David J; Thomas, Robert J

    2005-05-01

    Animals that are brightly colored have intrigued scientists since the time of Darwin, because it seems surprising that prey should have evolved to be clearly visible to predators. Often this self-advertisement is explained by the prey being unprofitable in some way, with the conspicuous warning coloration helping to protect the prey because it signals to potential predators that the prey is unprofitable. However, such signals only work in this way once predators have learned to associate the conspicuous color with the unprofitability of the prey. The evolution of warning coloration is still widely considered to be a paradox, because it has traditionally been assumed that the very first brightly colored individuals would be at an immediate selective disadvantage because of their greater conspicuousness to predators that are naive to the meaning of the signal. As a result, it has been difficult to understand how a novel conspicuous color morph could ever avoid extinction for long enough for predators to become educated about the signal. Thus, the traditional view that the evolution of warning coloration is difficult to explain rests entirely on assumptions about the foraging behavior of predators. However, we review recent evidence from a range of studies of predator foraging decisions, which refute these established assumptions. These studies show that: (1) Many predators are so conservative in their food preferences that even very conspicuous novel prey morphs are not necessarily at a selective disadvantage. (2) The survival and spread of novel color morphs can be simulated in field and aviary experiments using real predators (birds) foraging on successive generations of artificial prey populations. This work demonstrates that the foraging preferences of predators can regularly (though not always) result in the increase to fixation of a novel morph appearing in a population of familiar-colored prey. Such fixation events occur even if both novel and familiar prey

  7. Seeing Color

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texley, Juliana

    2005-01-01

    Colors are powerful tools for engaging children, from the youngest years onward. We hang brightly patterned mobiles above their cribs and help them learn the names of colors as they begin to record their own ideas in pictures and words. Colors can also open the door to an invisible world of electromagnetism, even when children can barely imagine…

  8. Color Facsimile.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-02-01

    modification of existing JPEG compression and decompression software available from Independent JPEG Users Group to process CIELAB color images and to use...externally specificed Huffman tables. In addition a conversion program was written to convert CIELAB color space images to red, green, blue color space

  9. Color Algebras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulligan, Jeffrey B.

    2017-01-01

    A color algebra refers to a system for computing sums and products of colors, analogous to additive and subtractive color mixtures. We would like it to match the well-defined algebra of spectral functions describing lights and surface reflectances, but an exact correspondence is impossible after the spectra have been projected to a three-dimensional color space, because of metamerism physically different spectra can produce the same color sensation. Metameric spectra are interchangeable for the purposes of addition, but not multiplication, so any color algebra is necessarily an approximation to physical reality. Nevertheless, because the majority of naturally-occurring spectra are well-behaved (e.g., continuous and slowly-varying), color algebras can be formulated that are largely accurate and agree well with human intuition. Here we explore the family of algebras that result from associating each color with a member of a three-dimensional manifold of spectra. This association can be used to construct a color product, defined as the color of the spectrum of the wavelength-wise product of the spectra associated with the two input colors. The choice of the spectral manifold determines the behavior of the resulting system, and certain special subspaces allow computational efficiencies. The resulting systems can be used to improve computer graphic rendering techniques, and to model various perceptual phenomena such as color constancy.

  10. Seeing Color

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texley, Juliana

    2005-01-01

    Colors are powerful tools for engaging children, from the youngest years onward. We hang brightly patterned mobiles above their cribs and help them learn the names of colors as they begin to record their own ideas in pictures and words. Colors can also open the door to an invisible world of electromagnetism, even when children can barely imagine…

  11. Bathochromic and hyperchromic effects of aluminum salt complexation by anthocyanins from edible sources for blue color development.

    PubMed

    Sigurdson, Gregory T; Giusti, M Monica

    2014-07-23

    Use of artificial food colorants has declined due to health concerns and consumer demand, making natural alternatives a high demand. The effects of Al(3+) salt on food source anthocyanins were evaluated with the objective to better understand blue color development of metalloanthocyanins. This is one of the first known studies to evaluate the effects of food source anthocyanin structures, including acylation, with chelation of aluminum. Cyanidin and delphinidin derivatives from different plants were treated with factorial excess of Al(3+) in pH 3-6 and evaluated by spectrophotometry and colorimetry over 28 days. Anthocyanin concentration, salt ratio, and pH determined final color and intensity. Pyrogallol moieties on delphinidin showed furthest bathochromic shifts, whereas acylation promoted higher chroma. Blue color developed at lower pH when acylated anthocyanins reacted with Al(3+); hue ∼270 occurred with acylated delphinidin at pH ≥ 2.5. Highest chelate stability was found with AlCl3100-500× anthocyanin concentration. This investigation showed anthocyanin-metal chelation can produce a variety of intense violet to blue colors under acidic pH with potential for food use.

  12. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornburg, David D.

    1986-01-01

    Overview of the artificial intelligence (AI) field provides a definition; discusses past research and areas of future research; describes the design, functions, and capabilities of expert systems and the "Turing Test" for machine intelligence; and lists additional sources for information on artificial intelligence. Languages of AI are…

  13. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Linda C.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A series of articles focuses on artificial intelligence research and development to enhance information systems and services. Topics discussed include knowledge base designs, expert system development tools, natural language processing, expert systems for reference services, and the role that artificial intelligence concepts should have in…

  14. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornburg, David D.

    1986-01-01

    Overview of the artificial intelligence (AI) field provides a definition; discusses past research and areas of future research; describes the design, functions, and capabilities of expert systems and the "Turing Test" for machine intelligence; and lists additional sources for information on artificial intelligence. Languages of AI are…

  15. [Artificial organs].

    PubMed

    Raguin, Thibaut; Dupret-Bories, Agnès; Debry, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Research has been fighting against organ failure and shortage of donations by supplying artificial organs for many years. With the raise of new technologies, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, many organs can benefit of an artificial equivalent: thanks to retinal implants some blind people can visualize stimuli, an artificial heart can be proposed in case of cardiac failure while awaiting for a heart transplant, artificial larynx enables laryngectomy patients to an almost normal life, while the diabetic can get a glycemic self-regulation controlled by smartphones with an artificial device. Dialysis devices become portable, as well as the oxygenation systems for terminal respiratory failure. Bright prospects are being explored or might emerge in a near future. However, the retrospective assessment of putative side effects is not yet sufficient. Finally, the cost of these new devices is significant even if the advent of three dimensional printers may reduce it. © 2017 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  16. Artificial blood.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Suman

    2008-07-01

    Artificial blood is a product made to act as a substitute for red blood cells. While true blood serves many different functions, artificial blood is designed for the sole purpose of transporting oxygen and carbon dioxide throughout the body. Depending on the type of artificial blood, it can be produced in different ways using synthetic production, chemical isolation, or recombinant biochemical technology. Development of the first blood substitutes dates back to the early 1600s, and the search for the ideal blood substitute continues. Various manufacturers have products in clinical trials; however, no truly safe and effective artificial blood product is currently marketed. It is anticipated that when an artificial blood product is available, it will have annual sales of over $7.6 billion in the United States alone.

  17. Color Terms and Color Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidoff, Jules

    2006-01-01

    In their lead articles, both Kowalski and Zimiles (2006) and O'Hanlon and Roberson (2006) declare a general relation between color term knowledge and the ability to conceptually represent color. Kowalski and Zimiles, in particular, argue for a priority for the conceptual representation in color term acquisition. The complexities of the interaction…

  18. Color Categories and Color Appearance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Michael A.; Kay, Paul

    2012-01-01

    We examined categorical effects in color appearance in two tasks, which in part differed in the extent to which color naming was explicitly required for the response. In one, we measured the effects of color differences on perceptual grouping for hues that spanned the blue-green boundary, to test whether chromatic differences across the boundary…

  19. Color Categories and Color Appearance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Michael A.; Kay, Paul

    2012-01-01

    We examined categorical effects in color appearance in two tasks, which in part differed in the extent to which color naming was explicitly required for the response. In one, we measured the effects of color differences on perceptual grouping for hues that spanned the blue-green boundary, to test whether chromatic differences across the boundary…

  20. 21 CFR 145.126 - Artificially sweetened canned cherries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Artificially sweetened canned cherries. 145.126... § 145.126 Artificially sweetened canned cherries. (a) Artificially sweetened canned cherries is the food which conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for canned cherries by §...

  1. 21 CFR 145.131 - Artificially sweetened canned figs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Artificially sweetened canned figs. 145.131... § 145.131 Artificially sweetened canned figs. (a) Artificially sweetened canned figs is the food which conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for canned figs by § 145.130, except that...

  2. 21 CFR 145.176 - Artificially sweetened canned pears.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Artificially sweetened canned pears. 145.176... § 145.176 Artificially sweetened canned pears. (a) Artificially sweetened canned pears is the food which conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for canned pears by § 145.175(a) except...

  3. 21 CFR 145.176 - Artificially sweetened canned pears.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Artificially sweetened canned pears. 145.176... § 145.176 Artificially sweetened canned pears. (a) Artificially sweetened canned pears is the food which conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for canned pears by § 145.175(a) except...

  4. 21 CFR 145.176 - Artificially sweetened canned pears.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Artificially sweetened canned pears. 145.176... § 145.176 Artificially sweetened canned pears. (a) Artificially sweetened canned pears is the food which conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for canned pears by § 145.175(a) except...

  5. 21 CFR 145.136 - Artificially sweetened canned fruit cocktail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Artificially sweetened canned fruit cocktail. 145... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CANNED FRUITS Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned Fruits § 145.136 Artificially sweetened canned fruit cocktail. (a) Artificially sweetened canned fruit...

  6. 21 CFR 145.136 - Artificially sweetened canned fruit cocktail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Artificially sweetened canned fruit cocktail. 145... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CANNED FRUITS Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned Fruits § 145.136 Artificially sweetened canned fruit cocktail. (a) Artificially sweetened canned fruit...

  7. 21 CFR 145.136 - Artificially sweetened canned fruit cocktail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Artificially sweetened canned fruit cocktail. 145... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CANNED FRUITS Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned Fruits § 145.136 Artificially sweetened canned fruit cocktail. (a) Artificially sweetened canned fruit...

  8. 21 CFR 145.136 - Artificially sweetened canned fruit cocktail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Artificially sweetened canned fruit cocktail. 145... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CANNED FRUITS Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned Fruits § 145.136 Artificially sweetened canned fruit cocktail. (a) Artificially sweetened canned fruit...

  9. 21 CFR 145.116 - Artificially sweetened canned apricots.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Artificially sweetened canned apricots. 145.116... § 145.116 Artificially sweetened canned apricots. (a) Artificially sweetened canned apricots is the food which conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for canned apricots by § 145.115(a...

  10. 21 CFR 145.116 - Artificially sweetened canned apricots.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Artificially sweetened canned apricots. 145.116... § 145.116 Artificially sweetened canned apricots. (a) Artificially sweetened canned apricots is the food which conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for canned apricots by § 145.115(a...

  11. 21 CFR 145.116 - Artificially sweetened canned apricots.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Artificially sweetened canned apricots. 145.116... § 145.116 Artificially sweetened canned apricots. (a) Artificially sweetened canned apricots is the food which conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for canned apricots by § 145.115(a...

  12. 21 CFR 145.116 - Artificially sweetened canned apricots.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Artificially sweetened canned apricots. 145.116... § 145.116 Artificially sweetened canned apricots. (a) Artificially sweetened canned apricots is the food which conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for canned apricots by § 145.115(a...

  13. 21 CFR 145.181 - Artificially sweetened canned pineapple.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Artificially sweetened canned pineapple. 145.181... § 145.181 Artificially sweetened canned pineapple. (a) Artificially sweetened canned pineapple is the food that conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for canned pineapple by § 145...

  14. 21 CFR 145.181 - Artificially sweetened canned pineapple.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Artificially sweetened canned pineapple. 145.181... § 145.181 Artificially sweetened canned pineapple. (a) Artificially sweetened canned pineapple is the food that conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for canned pineapple by § 145...

  15. 21 CFR 145.181 - Artificially sweetened canned pineapple.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Artificially sweetened canned pineapple. 145.181... § 145.181 Artificially sweetened canned pineapple. (a) Artificially sweetened canned pineapple is the food that conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for canned pineapple by § 145...

  16. 21 CFR 145.171 - Artificially sweetened canned peaches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Artificially sweetened canned peaches. 145.171... § 145.171 Artificially sweetened canned peaches. (a) Artificially sweetened canned peaches is the food which conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for canned peaches by § 145.170(a...

  17. 21 CFR 145.171 - Artificially sweetened canned peaches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Artificially sweetened canned peaches. 145.171... § 145.171 Artificially sweetened canned peaches. (a) Artificially sweetened canned peaches is the food which conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for canned peaches by § 145.170(a...

  18. 21 CFR 145.126 - Artificially sweetened canned cherries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Artificially sweetened canned cherries. 145.126... § 145.126 Artificially sweetened canned cherries. (a) Artificially sweetened canned cherries is the food which conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for canned cherries by § 145.125(a...

  19. 21 CFR 145.126 - Artificially sweetened canned cherries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Artificially sweetened canned cherries. 145.126... § 145.126 Artificially sweetened canned cherries. (a) Artificially sweetened canned cherries is the food which conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for canned cherries by § 145.125(a...

  20. 21 CFR 145.126 - Artificially sweetened canned cherries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Artificially sweetened canned cherries. 145.126... § 145.126 Artificially sweetened canned cherries. (a) Artificially sweetened canned cherries is the food which conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for canned cherries by § 145.125(a...

  1. 21 CFR 145.126 - Artificially sweetened canned cherries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Artificially sweetened canned cherries. 145.126... § 145.126 Artificially sweetened canned cherries. (a) Artificially sweetened canned cherries is the food which conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for canned cherries by § 145.125(a...

  2. Color terms and color concepts.

    PubMed

    Davidoff, Jules

    2006-08-01

    In their lead articles, both Kowalski and Zimiles (2006) and O'Hanlon and Roberson (2006) declare a general relation between color term knowledge and the ability to conceptually represent color. Kowalski and Zimiles, in particular, argue for a priority for the conceptual representation in color term acquisition. The complexities of the interaction are taken up in the current commentary, especially with regard to the neuropsychological evidence. Data from aphasic patients also argue for a priority for abstract thought, but nevertheless it may still be that the use of color terms is the only way in which to form color categories even if both linguistic and attentional factors play an important role.

  3. Color categories and color appearance

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Michael A.; Kay, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We examined categorical effects in color appearance in two tasks, which in part differed in the extent to which color naming was explicitly required for the response. In one, we measured the effects of color differences on perceptual grouping for hues that spanned the blue–green boundary, to test whether chromatic differences across the boundary were perceptually exaggerated. This task did not require overt judgments of the perceived colors, and the tendency to group showed only a weak and inconsistent categorical bias. In a second case, we analyzed results from two prior studies of hue scaling of chromatic stimuli (De Valois, De Valois, Switkes, & Mahon, 1997; Malkoc, Kay, & Webster, 2005), to test whether color appearance changed more rapidly around the blue–green boundary. In this task observers directly judge the perceived color of the stimuli and these judgments tended to show much stronger categorical effects. The differences between these tasks could arise either because different signals mediate color grouping and color appearance, or because linguistic categories might differentially intrude on the response to color and/or on the perception of color. Our results suggest that the interaction between language and color processing may be highly dependent on the specific task and cognitive demands and strategies of the observer, and also highlight pronounced individual differences in the tendency to exhibit categorical responses. PMID:22176751

  4. Processing of Color Words Activates Color Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richter, Tobias; Zwaan, Rolf A.

    2009-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate whether color representations are routinely activated when color words are processed. Congruency effects of colors and color words were observed in both directions. Lexical decisions on color words were faster when preceding colors matched the color named by the word. Color-discrimination responses…

  5. Processing of Color Words Activates Color Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richter, Tobias; Zwaan, Rolf A.

    2009-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate whether color representations are routinely activated when color words are processed. Congruency effects of colors and color words were observed in both directions. Lexical decisions on color words were faster when preceding colors matched the color named by the word. Color-discrimination responses…

  6. 7 CFR 58.633 - Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Color. 58.633 Section 58.633 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....633 Color. Coloring used for ice cream and related products shall be those certified by the U.S. Food...

  7. 7 CFR 58.633 - Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Color. 58.633 Section 58.633 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....633 Color. Coloring used for ice cream and related products shall be those certified by the U.S. Food...

  8. 7 CFR 58.633 - Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Color. 58.633 Section 58.633 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....633 Color. Coloring used for ice cream and related products shall be those certified by the U.S. Food...

  9. 7 CFR 58.633 - Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Color. 58.633 Section 58.633 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....633 Color. Coloring used for ice cream and related products shall be those certified by the U.S. Food...

  10. 7 CFR 58.633 - Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Color. 58.633 Section 58.633 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....633 Color. Coloring used for ice cream and related products shall be those certified by the U.S. Food...

  11. Overweight/obesity is associated with food choices related to rice and beans, colors of salads, and portion size among consumers at a restaurant serving buffet-by-weight in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Alline Gouvea Martins; Proença, Rossana Pacheco da Costa; Calvo, Maria Cristina Marino; Fiates, Giovanna Medeiros Rataichesck

    2012-10-01

    The present study investigated the prevalence of overweight/obesity and its relationship with behavioral and food choice characteristics among consumers at a restaurant serving buffet-by-weight in the city of Florianopolis, southern Brazil, during lunch time. An analytical cross-sectional survey of 675 consumers aged 16-81 years was conducted. The measures included anthropometric, socio-demographic, and behavioral characteristics, as well as portion size and a photographic record of the plate chosen by the consumer. The results indicated a prevalence of overweight/obesity in the sample of 33.8%. Overall, after an adjustment for other variables (sex, age, schooling, marital status, and food choice variables), overweight/obesity was positively associated with not choosing rice and beans (PR=1.11) and larger portion sizes (PR=1.08 for a portion size of 347-462 g and PR=1.16 for a portion size of 463 g or more). Moreover, choosing 1-2 colors of salads showed a positive association when compared with choosing 3 or more colors of salads (PR=1.06). Efforts in helping consumers make healthier food choices when eating out and thereby possibly reduce weight gain should address those aspects along with socio-demographic factors.

  12. Colored percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Sumanta; Manna, S. S.

    2017-05-01

    A model called "colored percolation" has been introduced with its infinite number of versions in two dimensions. The sites of a regular lattice are randomly occupied with probability p and are then colored by one of the n distinct colors using uniform probability q =1 /n . Denoting different colors by the letters of the Roman alphabet, we have studied different versions of the model like A B ,A B C ,A B C D ,A B C D E ,... etc. Here, only those lattice bonds having two different colored atoms at the ends are defined as connected. The percolation threshold pc(n ) asymptotically converges to its limiting value of pc as 1 /n . The model has been generalized by introducing a preference towards a subset of colors when m out of n colors are selected with probability q /m each and the rest of the colors are selected with probability (1 -q )/(n -m ) . It has been observed that pc(q ,m ) depends nontrivially on q and has a minimum at qmin=m /n . In another generalization the fractions of bonds between similarly and dissimilarly colored atoms have been treated as independent parameters. Phase diagrams in this parameter space have been drawn exhibiting percolating and nonpercolating phases.

  13. Polar Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 3 May 2004 This nighttime visible color image was collected on January 1, 2003 during the Northern Summer season near the North Polar Troughs.

    This daytime visible color image was collected on September 4, 2002 during the Northern Spring season in Vastitas Borealis. The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 79, Longitude 346 East (14 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with

  14. Quantum Color

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-20

    The idea of electric charges and electricity in general is a familiar one to the science savvy viewer. However, electromagnetism is but one of the four fundamental forces and not the strongest one. The strongest of the fundamental forces is called the strong nuclear force and it has its own associated charge. Physicists call this charge “color” in analogy with the primary colors, although there is no real connection with actual color. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains why it is that we live in a colorful world.

  15. Natural colorants from filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Torres, Fábio Aurélio Esteves; Zaccarim, Bruna Regina; de Lencastre Novaes, Letícia Celia; Jozala, Angela Faustino; Dos Santos, Carolina Alves; Teixeira, Maria Francisca Simas; Santos-Ebinuma, Valéria Carvalho

    2016-03-01

    In the last years, there is a trend towards the replacement of synthetic colorants by natural ones, mainly due to the increase of consumer demand for natural products. The natural colorants are used to enhance the appearance of pharmaceutical products, food, and different materials, making them preferable or attractive. This review intends to provide and describe a comprehensive overview of the history of colorants, from prehistory to modern time, of their market and their applications, as well as of the most important aspects of the fermentation process to obtain natural colorants. Focus is given to colorants produced by filamentous fungal species, aiming to demonstrate the importance of these microorganisms and biocompounds, highlighting the production performance to get high yields and the aspects of conclusion that should be taken into consideration in future studies about natural colorants.

  16. Color Metric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Office of Education, Springfield.

    This booklet was designed to convey metric information in pictoral form. The use of pictures in the coloring book enables the more mature person to grasp the metric message instantly, whereas the younger person, while coloring the picture, will be exposed to the metric information long enough to make the proper associations. Sheets of the booklet…

  17. Color Metric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Office of Education, Springfield.

    This booklet was designed to convey metric information in pictoral form. The use of pictures in the coloring book enables the more mature person to grasp the metric message instantly, whereas the younger person, while coloring the picture, will be exposed to the metric information long enough to make the proper associations. Sheets of the booklet…

  18. Artificial sweeteners - a review.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Sanchari; Raychaudhuri, Utpal; Chakraborty, Runu

    2014-04-01

    Now a days sugar free food are very much popular because of their less calorie content. So food industry uses various artificial sweeteners which are low in calorie content instead of high calorie sugar. U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved aspartame, acesulfame-k, neotame, cyclamate and alitame for use as per acceptable daily intake (ADI) value. But till date, breakdown products of these sweeteners have controversial health and metabolic effects. On the other hand, rare sugars are monosaccharides and have no known health effects because it does not metabolize in our body, but shows same sweet taste and bulk property as sugar. Rare sugars have no such ADI value and are mainly produced by using bioreactor and so inspite of high demand, rare sugars cannot be produced in the desired quantities.

  19. 21 CFR 81.1 - Provisional lists of color additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... section may not be used in products which are intended to be used in the area of the eye. The color... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Provisional lists of color additives. 81.1 Section... GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS AND GENERAL RESTRICTIONS FOR PROVISIONAL COLOR ADDITIVES FOR USE IN FOODS, DRUGS...

  20. 21 CFR 81.1 - Provisional lists of color additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... section may not be used in products which are intended to be used in the area of the eye. The color... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Provisional lists of color additives. 81.1 Section... GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS AND GENERAL RESTRICTIONS FOR PROVISIONAL COLOR ADDITIVES FOR USE IN FOODS, DRUGS...

  1. Quantum Color

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-05

    The idea of electric charges and electricity in general is a familiar one to the science savvy viewer. However, electromagnetism is but one of the four fundamental forces and not the strongest one. The strongest of the fundamental forces is called the strong nuclear force and it has its own associated charge. Physicists call this charge “color” in analogy with the primary colors, although there is no real connection with actual color. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains why it is that we live in a colorful world.

  2. 21 CFR 880.2900 - Clinical color change thermometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Clinical color change thermometer. 880.2900... Monitoring Devices § 880.2900 Clinical color change thermometer. (a) Identification. A clinical color change... end of a plastic or metal strip. Body heat causes a stable color change in the heat sensitive...

  3. 21 CFR 880.2900 - Clinical color change thermometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Clinical color change thermometer. 880.2900... Monitoring Devices § 880.2900 Clinical color change thermometer. (a) Identification. A clinical color change... end of a plastic or metal strip. Body heat causes a stable color change in the heat sensitive...

  4. 21 CFR 880.2900 - Clinical color change thermometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Clinical color change thermometer. 880.2900... Monitoring Devices § 880.2900 Clinical color change thermometer. (a) Identification. A clinical color change... end of a plastic or metal strip. Body heat causes a stable color change in the heat sensitive...

  5. 21 CFR 880.2900 - Clinical color change thermometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Clinical color change thermometer. 880.2900... Monitoring Devices § 880.2900 Clinical color change thermometer. (a) Identification. A clinical color change... end of a plastic or metal strip. Body heat causes a stable color change in the heat sensitive...

  6. 21 CFR 880.2900 - Clinical color change thermometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Clinical color change thermometer. 880.2900... Monitoring Devices § 880.2900 Clinical color change thermometer. (a) Identification. A clinical color change... end of a plastic or metal strip. Body heat causes a stable color change in the heat sensitive...

  7. Organic food.

    PubMed

    Jukes, T H

    1977-01-01

    "Organic" or "organically grown" foods are commonly represented as "food grown without pesticides; grown without artificial fertilizers; grown in soil whose humus content is increased by the additions of organic matter; grown in soil whose mineral content is increased with applications of natural mineral fertilizers; has not been treated with preservatives, hormones, antibiotics etc." The substitution of "organic" for "chemical" fertilizers during the growth of plants produces no change in the nutritional or chemical properties of foods. All foods are made of "chemicals." Traces of pesticides have been reported to be present in about 20 to 30% of both "organic" and conventional foods. These traces are usually within the official tolerance levels. Such levels are set low enough to protect consumers adequately. Indeed, there is no record of a single case of injury to a consumer resulting from the application of pesticides to food crops at permitted levels.

  8. Mobile image based color correction using deblurring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Xu, Chang; Boushey, Carol; Zhu, Fengqing; Delp, Edward J.

    2015-03-01

    Dietary intake, the process of determining what someone eats during the course of a day, provides valuable insights for mounting intervention programs for prevention of many chronic diseases such as obesity and cancer. The goals of the Technology Assisted Dietary Assessment (TADA) System, developed at Purdue University, is to automatically identify and quantify foods and beverages consumed by utilizing food images acquired with a mobile device. Color correction serves as a critical step to ensure accurate food identification and volume estimation. We make use of a specifically designed color checkerboard (i.e. a fiducial marker) to calibrate the imaging system so that the variations of food appearance under different lighting conditions can be determined. In this paper, we propose an image quality enhancement technique by combining image de-blurring and color correction. The contribution consists of introducing an automatic camera shake removal method using a saliency map and improving the polynomial color correction model using the LMS color space.

  9. Mobile Image Based Color Correction Using Deblurring

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Xu, Chang; Boushey, Carol; Zhu, Fengqing; Delp, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary intake, the process of determining what someone eats during the course of a day, provides valuable insights for mounting intervention programs for prevention of many chronic diseases such as obesity and cancer. The goals of the Technology Assisted Dietary Assessment (TADA) System, developed at Purdue University, is to automatically identify and quantify foods and beverages consumed by utilizing food images acquired with a mobile device. Color correction serves as a critical step to ensure accurate food identification and volume estimation. We make use of a specifically designed color checkerboard (i.e. a fiducial marker) to calibrate the imaging system so that the variations of food appearance under different lighting conditions can be determined. In this paper, we propose an image quality enhancement technique by combining image de-blurring and color correction. The contribution consists of introducing an automatic camera shake removal method using a saliency map and improving the polynomial color correction model using the LMS color space. PMID:28572697

  10. 21 CFR 872.3910 - Backing and facing for an artificial tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Backing and facing for an artificial tooth. 872.3910 Section 872.3910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... artificial tooth. (a) Identification. A backing and facing for an artificial tooth is a device intended...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3910 - Backing and facing for an artificial tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Backing and facing for an artificial tooth. 872.3910 Section 872.3910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... artificial tooth. (a) Identification. A backing and facing for an artificial tooth is a device intended...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3910 - Backing and facing for an artificial tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Backing and facing for an artificial tooth. 872.3910 Section 872.3910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... artificial tooth. (a) Identification. A backing and facing for an artificial tooth is a device intended...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3910 - Backing and facing for an artificial tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Backing and facing for an artificial tooth. 872.3910 Section 872.3910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... artificial tooth. (a) Identification. A backing and facing for an artificial tooth is a device intended...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3910 - Backing and facing for an artificial tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Backing and facing for an artificial tooth. 872.3910 Section 872.3910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... artificial tooth. (a) Identification. A backing and facing for an artificial tooth is a device intended...

  15. 21 CFR 868.5375 - Heat and moisture condenser (artificial nose).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Heat and moisture condenser (artificial nose). 868.5375 Section 868.5375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... moisture condenser (artificial nose). (a) Identification. A heat and moisture condenser (artificial...

  16. 21 CFR 868.5375 - Heat and moisture condenser (artificial nose).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Heat and moisture condenser (artificial nose). 868.5375 Section 868.5375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... moisture condenser (artificial nose). (a) Identification. A heat and moisture condenser (artificial...

  17. 21 CFR 868.5375 - Heat and moisture condenser (artificial nose).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Heat and moisture condenser (artificial nose). 868.5375 Section 868.5375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... moisture condenser (artificial nose). (a) Identification. A heat and moisture condenser (artificial...

  18. Color constancy for an unseen surface.

    PubMed

    Norman, Liam J; Akins, Kathleen; Heywood, Charles A; Kentridge, Robert W

    2014-12-01

    The illumination of a scene strongly affects our perception of objects in that scene, e.g., the pages of a book illuminated by candlelight will appear quite yellow relative to other types of artificial illuminants. Yet at the same time, the reader still judges the pages as white, their surface color unaffected by the interplay of paper and illuminant. It has been shown empirically that we can indeed report two quite different interpretations of "color": one is dependent on the constant surface spectral reflectance of an object (surface color) and the other on the power of light of different wavelengths reflected from that object (reflected color). How then are these two representations related? The common view, dating from Aristotle, is that our experience of surface color is derived from reflected color or, in more familiar terms, that color perception follows from color sensation. By definition, color constancy requires that vision "discounts the illuminant"; thus, it seems reasonable that vision begins with the color of objects as they naively appear and that we infer from their appearances their surface color. Here, we question this classic view. We use metacontrast-masked priming and, by presenting the unseen prime and the visible mask under different illuminants, dissociate two ways in which the prime matched the mask: in surface color or in reflected color. We find that priming of the mask occurs when it matches the prime in surface color, not reflected color. It follows that color perception can arise without prior color sensation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wash, Darrel Patrick

    1989-01-01

    Making a machine seem intelligent is not easy. As a consequence, demand has been rising for computer professionals skilled in artificial intelligence and is likely to continue to go up. These workers develop expert systems and solve the mysteries of machine vision, natural language processing, and neural networks. (Editor)

  20. Artificial Sweeteners and Other Sugar Substitutes

    MedlinePlus

    ... American Dietetic Association Complete Food and Nutrition Guide. 4th ed. Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons; 2012: ... cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Risk/artificial-sweeteners. Accessed July 23, 2015. How sweet it is: All about ...

  1. Apple Fool! An Introduction to Artificial Flavors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents a science activity on consumer chemistry in which students explore artificial flavors that are commonly used in foods, such as isoamyl acetate and methyl salicylate. Includes instructor information and a student worksheet. (YDS)

  2. Apple Fool! An Introduction to Artificial Flavors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents a science activity on consumer chemistry in which students explore artificial flavors that are commonly used in foods, such as isoamyl acetate and methyl salicylate. Includes instructor information and a student worksheet. (YDS)

  3. Auditory color constancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluender, Keith R.; Kiefte, Michael

    2003-10-01

    It is both true and efficient that sensorineural systems respond to change and little else. Perceptual systems do not record absolute level be it loudness, pitch, brightness, or color. This fact has been demonstrated in every sensory domain. For example, the visual system is remarkable at maintaining color constancy over widely varying illumination such as sunlight and varieties of artificial light (incandescent, fluorescent, etc.) for which spectra reflected from objects differ dramatically. Results will be reported for a series of experiments demonstrating how auditory systems similarly compensate for reliable characteristics of spectral shape in acoustic signals. Specifically, listeners' perception of vowel sounds, characterized by both local (e.g., formants) and broad (e.g., tilt) spectral composition, changes radically depending upon reliable spectral composition of precursor signals. These experiments have been conducted using a variety of precursor signals consisting of meaningful and time-reversed vocoded sentences, as well as novel nonspeech precursors consisting of multiple filter poles modulating sinusoidally across a source spectrum with specific local and broad spectral characteristics. Constancy across widely varying spectral compositions shares much in common with visual color constancy. However, auditory spectral constancy appears to be more effective than visual constancy in compensating for local spectral fluctuations. [Work supported by NIDCD DC-04072.

  4. Color vision test

    MedlinePlus

    ... present from birth) color vision problems: Achromatopsia -- complete color blindness , seeing only shades of gray Deuteranopia -- difficulty telling ... Vision test - color; Ishihara color vision test Images Color blindness tests References Bowling B. Hereditary fundus dystrophies. In: ...

  5. Artificial ribonucleases.

    PubMed

    Morrow, J R

    1994-01-01

    Many inorganic and organic compounds promote the reactions catalyzed by RNase A. Both the transesterification step, where a 2',3'-cyclic phosphate is formed with concomitant cleavage of RNA, and the hydrolysis step, where the 2',3'-cyclic phosphate is converted to a phosphate monoester, may be mimicked with compounds that are readily synthesized in the laboratory. Electrophilic activation of the phosphate ester and charge neutralization are generally important means by which artificial RNases promote phosphate diester displacement reactions. Several artificial RNases operate by a bifunctional general acid/general base mechanism, as does RNase A. Provision of an intramolecular nucleophile appears to be an important pathway for metal complex promoted phosphate diester hydrolysis. In contrast to the successful design of compounds that promote the reactions catalyzed by RNase A, there are no artificial nucleases to date that will cleave the 3' P-O bond of RNA or hydrolyze an oligonucleotide of DNA. Artificial RNases based on both metal complexes and organic compounds have been described. Metal complexes may be particularly effective catalysts for both transesterification and hydrolysis reactions of phosphate diesters. Under physiological conditions (37 degrees C and neutral pH), several metal complexes catalyze the transesterification of RNA. Future work should involve the development of metal complexes which are inert to metal ion release but which maintain open coordination sites for catalytic activity. The design of compounds containing multiple amine or imidazole groups that may demonstrate bifunctional catalysis is a promising route to new artificial RNases. Further design of these compounds and careful placement of catalytic groups may yield new RNase mimics that operate under physiological conditions. The attachment of artificial RNases to recognition agents such as oligodeoxynucleotides to create new sequence-specific endoribonucleases is an exciting field of

  6. Color vision.

    PubMed

    Swanson, William H; Cohen, Jay M

    2003-06-01

    Many visual disorders produce acquired color vision defects. Color vision theory emphasizes several stages of visual processing: prereceptoral filters (lens, macular pigment, pupil), cone photopigments (L-, M-, and S-cones), and postreceptoral processes (red-green, S-cone, and luminance channels). Congenital color defects, which affect 8% to 10% of males and 0.4% to 0.5% of females, result from alterations in the photopigment absorption spectra or the absence of one or more photopigments. The most common defects are color vision deficiencies (protan and deutan defects), which are milder than the rarer achromatopsias (complete loss of color vision). Acquired color vision defects can be attributed to a number of different causes: alteration of prereceptoral filters, reduced cone photopigment optical density, greater loss of one cone type than the others, and disruption of postreceptoral processes. Acquired color vision defects have been divided into three classes: type 1, red-green defect with scotopization; type 2, red-green defect without scotopization; and type 3, blue defects (with or without pseudoprotanomaly). Blue defects are usually type 3 acquired defects because congenital tritan defects have an incidence of one in several tens of thousands. Red-green defects can be acquired or congenital, and ruling out acquired defects can require a battery of tests (plates and arrangement tests, anomaloscopy, perhaps genetic analysis). Color vision tests must be administered carefully (with a standard illuminant and protocol), and pupillary miosis or high lens density should be noted and their possible effects considered when interpreting test results. Plate tests provide a simple screening method but do not provide a diagnosis. Arrangement tests and anomaloscope testing take more time and make greater demands on the tester, but they provide a more thorough evaluation. When standard protocols are followed and results are interpreted in terms of prereceptoral filters

  7. Differential incorporation of natural spawners vs. artificially planted salmon carcasses in a stream food web: Evidence from delta 15N of juvenile coho salmon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Placement of salmon carcasses is a common restoration technique in Oregon and Washington streams, with the goal of improving food resources and productivity of juvenile salmon. To explore the effectiveness of this restoration technique, we measured the δ15N of juvenile coho salmo...

  8. Differential incorporation of natural spawners vs. artificially planted salmon carcasses in a stream food web: Evidence from delta 15N of juvenile coho salmon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Placement of salmon carcasses is a common restoration technique in Oregon and Washington streams, with the goal of improving food resources and productivity of juvenile salmon. To explore the effectiveness of this restoration technique, we measured the δ15N of juvenile coho salmo...

  9. Artificial Intelligence.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, David R; Palacios-González, César; Harris, John

    2016-04-01

    It seems natural to think that the same prudential and ethical reasons for mutual respect and tolerance that one has vis-à-vis other human persons would hold toward newly encountered paradigmatic but nonhuman biological persons. One also tends to think that they would have similar reasons for treating we humans as creatures that count morally in our own right. This line of thought transcends biological boundaries-namely, with regard to artificially (super)intelligent persons-but is this a safe assumption? The issue concerns ultimate moral significance: the significance possessed by human persons, persons from other planets, and hypothetical nonorganic persons in the form of artificial intelligence (AI). This article investigates why our possible relations to AI persons could be more complicated than they first might appear, given that they might possess a radically different nature to us, to the point that civilized or peaceful coexistence in a determinate geographical space could be impossible to achieve.

  10. Artificial Rheotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacci, Jeremie; Sacanna, Stefano; Abramian, Anais; Hanson, Kasey; Pine, David; Chaikin, Paul; CSMR, NYU Team

    2013-11-01

    Self propelled colloids realize a controlled realization of an artificial bacterium. However living systems present a range of advanced properties such as the migration in gradients, or taxis, based on complex conformational change of proteins. For example, rheotaxis, the directed movement of an organism resulting from a fluid flow, has been reported notably for fish, e.g. salmon, or spermatozoa. Here, we present experimental observations of artificial rheotaxis, i.e. upstream migration of self propelled particles in the presence of a flow. We will present a simple model to account for this surprising effect. In the absence of biological component, this effect is intriguing and questions the ingredients at stake in the living matter.

  11. Artificial Rheotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacci, Jeremie; Sacanna, Stefano; Hanson, Kasey; Vatchinsky, Adrian; Pine, David; Chaikin, Paul; CSMR Team

    2013-03-01

    Self propelled colloids realize a controlled realization of an artificial bacterium. However living systems present a range of advanced properties such as the migration in gradients, or taxis, based on complex conformational change of proteins. For example, rheotaxis, the directed movement of an organism resulting from a fluid flow, has been reported notably for fish, e.g. salmon, or spermatozoa. Here, we present experimental observations of artificial rheotaxis, i.e. upstream migration of self propelled particles in the presence of a flow. We will present a simple model to account for this surprising effect. In the absence of biological component, this effect is intriguing and questions the ingredients at stake in the living matter.

  12. Bio-inspired variable structural color materials.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuanjin; Xie, Zhuoying; Gu, Hongcheng; Zhu, Cun; Gu, Zhongze

    2012-04-21

    Natural structural color materials, especially those that can undergo reversible changes, are attracting increasing interest in a wide variety of research fields. Inspired by the natural creatures, many elaborately nanostructured photonic materials with variable structural colors were developed. These materials have found important applications in switches, display devices, sensors, and so on. In this critical review, we will provide up-to-date research concerning the natural and bio-inspired photonic materials with variable structural colors. After introducing the variable structural colors in natural creatures, we will focus on the studies of artificial variable structural color photonic materials, including their bio-inspired designs, fabrications and applications. The prospects for the future development of these fantastic variable structural color materials will also be presented. We believe this review will promote the communications among biology, bionics, chemistry, optical physics, and material science (196 references).

  13. Color superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wilczek, F.

    1997-09-22

    The asymptotic freedom of QCD suggests that at high density - where one forms a Fermi surface at very high momenta - weak coupling methods apply. These methods suggest that chiral symmetry is restored and that an instability toward color triplet condensation (color superconductivity) sets in. Here I attempt, using variational methods, to estimate these effects more precisely. Highlights include demonstration of a negative pressure in the uniform density chiral broken phase for any non-zero condensation, which we take as evidence for the philosophy of the MIT bag model; and demonstration that the color gap is substantial - several tens of MeV - even at modest densities. Since the superconductivity is in a pseudoscalar channel, parity is spontaneously broken.

  14. Artificial vision.

    PubMed

    Zarbin, M; Montemagno, C; Leary, J; Ritch, R

    2011-09-01

    A number treatment options are emerging for patients with retinal degenerative disease, including gene therapy, trophic factor therapy, visual cycle inhibitors (e.g., for patients with Stargardt disease and allied conditions), and cell transplantation. A radically different approach, which will augment but not replace these options, is termed neural prosthetics ("artificial vision"). Although rewiring of inner retinal circuits and inner retinal neuronal degeneration occur in association with photoreceptor degeneration in retinitis pigmentosa (RP), it is possible to create visually useful percepts by stimulating retinal ganglion cells electrically. This fact has lead to the development of techniques to induce photosensitivity in cells that are not light sensitive normally as well as to the development of the bionic retina. Advances in artificial vision continue at a robust pace. These advances are based on the use of molecular engineering and nanotechnology to render cells light-sensitive, to target ion channels to the appropriate cell type (e.g., bipolar cell) and/or cell region (e.g., dendritic tree vs. soma), and on sophisticated image processing algorithms that take advantage of our knowledge of signal processing in the retina. Combined with advances in gene therapy, pathway-based therapy, and cell-based therapy, "artificial vision" technologies create a powerful armamentarium with which ophthalmologists will be able to treat blindness in patients who have a variety of degenerative retinal diseases.

  15. Identification and classification of similar looking food grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anami, B. S.; Biradar, Sunanda D.; Savakar, D. G.; Kulkarni, P. V.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the comparative study of Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers by taking a case study of identification and classification of four pairs of similar looking food grains namely, Finger Millet, Mustard, Soyabean, Pigeon Pea, Aniseed, Cumin-seeds, Split Greengram and Split Blackgram. Algorithms are developed to acquire and process color images of these grains samples. The developed algorithms are used to extract 18 colors-Hue Saturation Value (HSV), and 42 wavelet based texture features. Back Propagation Neural Network (BPNN)-based classifier is designed using three feature sets namely color - HSV, wavelet-texture and their combined model. SVM model for color- HSV model is designed for the same set of samples. The classification accuracies ranging from 93% to 96% for color-HSV, ranging from 78% to 94% for wavelet texture model and from 92% to 97% for combined model are obtained for ANN based models. The classification accuracy ranging from 80% to 90% is obtained for color-HSV based SVM model. Training time required for the SVM based model is substantially lesser than ANN for the same set of images.

  16. Quantifying nonhomogeneous colors in agricultural materials part I: method development.

    PubMed

    Balaban, M O

    2008-11-01

    Measuring the color of food and agricultural materials using machine vision (MV) has advantages not available by other measurement methods such as subjective tests or use of color meters. The perception of consumers may be affected by the nonuniformity of colors. For relatively uniform colors, average color values similar to those given by color meters can be obtained by MV. For nonuniform colors, various image analysis methods (color blocks, contours, and "color change index"[CCI]) can be applied to images obtained by MV. The degree of nonuniformity can be quantified, depending on the level of detail desired. In this article, the development of the CCI concept is presented. For images with a wide range of hue values, the color blocks method quantifies well the nonhomogeneity of colors. For images with a narrow hue range, the CCI method is a better indicator of color nonhomogeneity.

  17. Removable colored coatings based on calcium alginate hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Kobaslija, Muris; McQuade, D Tyler

    2006-08-01

    This article describes the creation of a nontoxic, biodegradable coating using calcium alginate and FD&C approved dyes. The coating is robust but is rapidly removed upon treatment with disodium ethylenediamine tetraacetate (EDTA). Dye leaching from calcium alginate films was studied, and it was determined that the efficiency of dye retention is proportional to the degree of cross-linking. Degradation rates were studied on calcium alginate beads serving as a model for a coating. We determined that degradation rates depend on the gel's cross-linking and on the amount of EDTA used. Bead size also influenced the degradation rates; smaller beads degraded faster than larger beads. We show that the coating can be used as an easily removable and environmentally friendly logotype on an artificial turf surface. Applications of these coatings can be extended to food, cosmetic, medicinal, and textile uses and to wherever nontoxic, easily removable colored coating is desired.

  18. 21 CFR 874.3375 - Battery-powered artificial larynx.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Battery-powered artificial larynx. 874.3375... artificial larynx. (a) Identification. A battery-powered artificial larynx is an externally applied device intended for use in the absence of the larynx to produce sound. When held against the skin in the area...

  19. 21 CFR 874.3375 - Battery-powered artificial larynx.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Battery-powered artificial larynx. 874.3375... artificial larynx. (a) Identification. A battery-powered artificial larynx is an externally applied device intended for use in the absence of the larynx to produce sound. When held against the skin in the area...

  20. 21 CFR 874.3375 - Battery-powered artificial larynx.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Battery-powered artificial larynx. 874.3375... artificial larynx. (a) Identification. A battery-powered artificial larynx is an externally applied device intended for use in the absence of the larynx to produce sound. When held against the skin in the area...

  1. 21 CFR 874.3375 - Battery-powered artificial larynx.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Battery-powered artificial larynx. 874.3375... artificial larynx. (a) Identification. A battery-powered artificial larynx is an externally applied device intended for use in the absence of the larynx to produce sound. When held against the skin in the area...

  2. 21 CFR 874.3375 - Battery-powered artificial larynx.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Battery-powered artificial larynx. 874.3375... artificial larynx. (a) Identification. A battery-powered artificial larynx is an externally applied device intended for use in the absence of the larynx to produce sound. When held against the skin in the area...

  3. 21 CFR 70.42 - Criteria for evaluating the safety of color additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Criteria for evaluating the safety of color... SERVICES GENERAL COLOR ADDITIVES Safety Evaluation § 70.42 Criteria for evaluating the safety of color... listed color additive will be safe for its intended use or uses in or on food, drugs, or cosmetics. The...

  4. Effect of salmon type, and presence/absence of bone on color, sensory characteristics, and consumer acceptability of pureed and chunked infant food products

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of salmon type (pink/red), bone (presence/absence) and retort processing on an infant food product. Salmon fillets were cooked (3 min), homogenized (40%) in water (55%) then starch (5%) was added. The product was hot-filled into glass jars then...

  5. Color Sense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Heidi S. S.; Maki, Jennifer A.

    2009-01-01

    This article reports a study conducted by members of the WellU Academic Integration Subcommittee of The College of St. Scholastica's College's Healthy Campus Initiative plan whose purpose was to determine whether changing color in the classroom could have a measurable effect on students. One simple improvement a school can make in a classroom is…

  6. Color transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, B.K.; Miller, G.A.

    1993-11-01

    The anomously large transmission of nucleons through a nucleus following a hard collision is explored. This effect, known as color transparency, is believed to be a prediction of QCD. The necessary conditions for its occurrence and the effects that must be included a realistic calculation are discussed.

  7. Colorful television

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    What are the challenges and rewards for American men and women of color who chose to become scientists? The Public Broadcasting Service intends to show us through an upcoming 6-hour documentary series entitled “Breakthrough: The Changing Face of Science in America.”

  8. The influence of pH and chemical composition of beverages on color stability of a nanofilled composite resin.

    PubMed

    Dias, Hercules Bezerra; Carrera, Emanuelle Teixeira; de Souza Rastelli, Alessandra Nara

    2016-01-01

    Due to increasing consumer knowledge about the health benefits associated with anthocyanin-rich foods and beverages-such as acai and blueberry juices-the growing consumption of these products should be a source of concern for dentists. Since anthocyanins are colorants that can discolor teeth and restorations, the aim of this study was to investigate the staining effects of 2 anthocyanin-rich beverages on a nanofilled composite resin. Specimens were prepared, separated into 3 groups, and immersed in either artificial saliva or 1 of the 2 staining solutions (blueberry or acai juice) at 37°C for 7 days. The color stability of the resin was significantly affected by both the storage times (P < 0.001) and the solutions (P < 0.001). The blueberry juice, which had the lowest pH level, had the greatest effect on color stability and changes in lightness of the composite resin (ΔE* = 14.71; ΔL* = -8.25; P < 0.001), followed by acai juice (ΔE* = 10.21; ΔL* = -8.77; P < 0.001) and artificial saliva (ΔE* = 1.36; ΔL* = -0.44; P < 0.001). In the present study, a nanofilled composite resin did not exhibit color stability when exposed to acai and blueberry beverages.

  9. 21 CFR 70.20 - Packaging requirements for straight colors (other than hair dyes).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Packaging requirements for straight colors (other than hair dyes). 70.20 Section 70.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... straight colors (other than hair dyes). Straight colors shall be packaged in containers which prevent...

  10. 21 CFR 70.25 - Labeling requirements for color additives (other than hair dyes).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Labeling requirements for color additives (other than hair dyes). 70.25 Section 70.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... color additives (other than hair dyes). (a) General labeling requirements. All color additives shall be...

  11. 21 CFR 70.20 - Packaging requirements for straight colors (other than hair dyes).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Packaging requirements for straight colors (other than hair dyes). 70.20 Section 70.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... straight colors (other than hair dyes). Straight colors shall be packaged in containers which prevent...

  12. 21 CFR 70.20 - Packaging requirements for straight colors (other than hair dyes).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Packaging requirements for straight colors (other than hair dyes). 70.20 Section 70.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... straight colors (other than hair dyes). Straight colors shall be packaged in containers which prevent...

  13. 21 CFR 70.25 - Labeling requirements for color additives (other than hair dyes).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Labeling requirements for color additives (other than hair dyes). 70.25 Section 70.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... color additives (other than hair dyes). (a) General labeling requirements. All color additives shall be...

  14. 21 CFR 70.25 - Labeling requirements for color additives (other than hair dyes).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Labeling requirements for color additives (other than hair dyes). 70.25 Section 70.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... color additives (other than hair dyes). (a) General labeling requirements. All color additives shall be...

  15. 21 CFR 70.20 - Packaging requirements for straight colors (other than hair dyes).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Packaging requirements for straight colors (other than hair dyes). 70.20 Section 70.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... straight colors (other than hair dyes). Straight colors shall be packaged in containers which prevent...

  16. 21 CFR 70.20 - Packaging requirements for straight colors (other than hair dyes).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Packaging requirements for straight colors (other than hair dyes). 70.20 Section 70.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... straight colors (other than hair dyes). Straight colors shall be packaged in containers which prevent...

  17. Determination of caramel colorants' by-products in liquid foods by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Goscinny, Séverine; Hanot, Vincent; Trabelsi, Hasna; Van Loco, Joris

    2014-01-01

    2-Methylimidazole, 4-methylimidazole (2-MI and 4-MI), 2-acetyl-4-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydroxybutyl) imidazole (THI) and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) are neo-formed compounds generated during the manufacture of caramel colours and are transferred to the processed food. These contaminants are known to have a toxicological profile that may pose health risks. Hence, to characterise THI, 2- and 4-MI and 5-HMF levels in liquid foods, an ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method was developed and sample preparation was divided into two analytical strategies depending on the concentration range expected in the type of foods targeted. For the determination of the imidazole substitutes (THI, 2- and 4-MI), a sample enrichment and clean-up step by strong cation solid-phase extraction was developed. This method is capable of quantifying over a range of 5 ng ml⁻¹ (LOQ) to 500 ng ml⁻¹ with recoveries of 75.4-112.4% and RSDs of 1.5-15%. For determination of 5-HMF, a standard addition method was applied covering the linear range of 0.25-30 µg ml⁻¹ with RSDs from 2.8% (for intraday precision) to 9.2% (for intermediate precision). The validated analytical methods were applied to 28 liquid food samples purchased from local markets. THI was found only in the beer samples at levels up to 141.2 ng ml⁻¹. For 2-MI, non-quantifiable traces were observed for all samples, while 4-MI was observed in all samples with large concentration variations (from < LOQ to 563.9 ng ml⁻¹). 5-HMF was found at expected concentrations, except for a sherry vinegar sample (113 µg ml⁻¹), which required a high level of dilution before following the standard addition protocol.

  18. Learning to Manipulate and Categorize in Human and Artificial Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morlino, Giuseppe; Gianelli, Claudia; Borghi, Anna M.; Nolfi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the acquisition of integrated object manipulation and categorization abilities through a series of experiments in which human adults and artificial agents were asked to learn to manipulate two-dimensional objects that varied in shape, color, weight, and color intensity. The analysis of the obtained results and the…

  19. Electrochromic artificial muscles based on nanoporous metal-polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detsi, E.; Onck, P. R.; De Hosson, J. T. M.

    2013-11-01

    This work shows that a nano-coating of electrochromic polymer grown onto the ligaments of nanoporous gold causes reversible dimensional and color changes during electrochemical actuation. This combination of electromechanical and optical properties opens additional avenues for the applications of artificial muscles, i.e., a metallic muscle exhibits its progress during work by changing color that can be detected by optical means.

  20. Learning to Manipulate and Categorize in Human and Artificial Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morlino, Giuseppe; Gianelli, Claudia; Borghi, Anna M.; Nolfi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the acquisition of integrated object manipulation and categorization abilities through a series of experiments in which human adults and artificial agents were asked to learn to manipulate two-dimensional objects that varied in shape, color, weight, and color intensity. The analysis of the obtained results and the…

  1. 78 FR 59624 - Guidance for Industry #223: Small Entity Compliance Guide-Declaring Color Additives in Animal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-27

    ... Compliance Guide--Declaring Color Additives in Animal Foods; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug... Color Additives in Animal Foods.'' This small entity compliance guide (SECG) aids industry in complying... regulations regarding the declaration of certified color additives on the labels of animal food including...

  2. 21 CFR 145.131 - Artificially sweetened canned figs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Artificially sweetened canned figs. 145.131 Section 145.131 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CANNED FRUITS Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned Fruits...

  3. 21 CFR 145.131 - Artificially sweetened canned figs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Artificially sweetened canned figs. 145.131 Section 145.131 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CANNED FRUITS Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned Fruits...

  4. 21 CFR 145.181 - Artificially sweetened canned pineapple.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Artificially sweetened canned pineapple. 145.181 Section 145.181 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CANNED FRUITS Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned Fruits...

  5. 21 CFR 145.176 - Artificially sweetened canned pears.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Artificially sweetened canned pears. 145.176 Section 145.176 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CANNED FRUITS Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned Fruits...

  6. 21 CFR 145.176 - Artificially sweetened canned pears.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Artificially sweetened canned pears. 145.176 Section 145.176 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CANNED FRUITS Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned Fruits...

  7. 21 CFR 145.181 - Artificially sweetened canned pineapple.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Artificially sweetened canned pineapple. 145.181 Section 145.181 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CANNED FRUITS Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned Fruits...

  8. 21 CFR 145.171 - Artificially sweetened canned peaches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Artificially sweetened canned peaches. 145.171 Section 145.171 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CANNED FRUITS Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned...

  9. 21 CFR 145.171 - Artificially sweetened canned peaches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Artificially sweetened canned peaches. 145.171 Section 145.171 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CANNED FRUITS Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned...

  10. Color sensitive retina based on bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Frydrych, M; Silfsten, P; Parkkinen, S; Parkkinen, J; Jaaskelainen, T

    2000-01-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin (BR), a membrane protein of a microorganism Halobacterium salinarium has been studied since the 80's as a potential material for information technology. The information processing applications of BR employ either photochromic or photoelectric properties of the protein. In this study we discuss about design principles and describe our study of the use of bacteriorhodopsin as a sensor material for a color sensitive artificial retina. This retina includes low-level processing of input information. The design of a color sensitive matrix element, the self-organizing color adaptation algorithm and a system model for the retina are presented.

  11. Colorful Bedrock

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-03

    This image captured by NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter MRO covers diverse surface units on the floor of eastern Coprates Chasma in eastern Valles Marineris. The bedrock has diverse minerals producing wonderful color contrasts. In over 10 years of orbiting Mars, HiRISE has acquired nearly 50,000 large images, but they cover less than 3 percent of the Martian surface. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21606

  12. Mineral loss and color change of enamel after bleaching and staining solutions combination.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Larissa Sgarbosa Napoleão; dos Santos, Paulo Henrique; Anchieta, Rodolfo Bruniera; Catelan, Anderson; Fraga Briso, André Luiz; Fraga Zaze, Ana Carolina Soares; Sundfeld, Renato Herman

    2013-10-01

    Pigments of food and beverages could affect dental bleaching efficacy. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate color change and mineral loss of tooth enamel as well as the influence of staining solutions normally used by adolescent patients undergoing home bleaching. Initial hardness and baseline color were measured on enamel blocks. Specimens were divided into five groups (n=5): G1 (control) specimens were kept in artificial saliva throughout the experiment (3 weeks); G2 enamel was exposed to 10% carbamide peroxide for 6 h daily, and after this period, the teeth were cleaned and stored in artificial saliva until the next bleaching session; and G3, G4, and G5 received the same treatments as G2, but after bleaching, they were stored for 1 h in cola soft drink, melted chocolate, or red wine, respectively. Mineral loss was obtained by the percentage of hardness reduction, and color change was determined by the difference between the data obtained before and after treatments. Data were subjected to analysis of variance and Fisher's test (α=0.05). G3 and G5 showed higher mineral loss (92.96 ± 5.50 and 94.46 ± 1.00, respectively) compared to the other groups (p ≤ 0.05). G5 showed high-color change (9.34 ± 2.90), whereas G1 presented lower color change (2.22 ± 0.44) (p ≤ 0.05). Acidic drinks cause mineral loss of the enamel, which could modify the surface and reduce staining resistance after bleaching.

  13. Colorful drying.

    PubMed

    Lakio, Satu; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2010-03-01

    Drying is one of the standard unit operations in the pharmaceutical industry and it is important to become aware of the circumstances that dominate during the process. The purpose of this study was to test microcapsulated thermochromic pigments as heat indicators in a fluid bed drying process. The indicator powders were manually granulated with alpha-lactose monohydrate resulting in three particle-size groups. Also, pellets were coated with the indicator powders. The granules and pellets were fluidized in fluid bed dryer to observe the progress of the heat flow in the material and to study the heat indicator properties of the indicator materials. A tristimulus colorimeter was used to measure CIELAB color values. Color indicator for heat detection can be utilized to test if the heat-sensitive API would go through physical changes during the pharmaceutical drying process. Both the prepared granules and pellets can be used as heat indicator in fluid bed drying process. The colored heat indicators give an opportunity to learn new aspects of the process at real time and could be exploded, for example, for scaling-up studies.

  14. Development of a Smartphone Application to Capture Carbohydrate, Lipid, and Protein Contents of Daily Food: Need for Integration in Artificial Pancreas for Patients With Type 1 Diabetes?

    PubMed

    Diouri, Omar; Place, Jerome; Traverso, Magali; Georgescu, Vera; Picot, Marie-Christine; Renard, Eric

    2015-09-30

    Meal lipids (LIP) and proteins (PRO) may influence the effect of insulin doses based on carbohydrate (CHO) counting in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D). We developed a smartphone application for CHO, LIP, and PRO counting in daily food and assessed its usability in real-life conditions and potential usefulness. Ten T1D patients used the android application for 1 week to collect their food intakes. Data included meal composition, premeal and 2-hour postmeal blood glucose, corrections for hypo- or hyperglycemia after meals, and time for entering meals in the application. Meal insulin doses were based on patients' CHO counting (application in blinded mode). Linear mixed models were used to assess the statistical differences. In all, 187 meals were analyzed. Average computed CHO amount was 74.37 ± 31.78 grams; LIP amount: 20.26 ± 14.28 grams and PRO amount: 25.68 ± 16.68 grams. Average CHO, LIP, and PRO contents were significantly different between breakfast and lunch/dinner. The average time for meal entry in the application moved from 3-4 minutes to 2.5 minutes during the week. No significant impact of LIP and PRO was found on available blood glucose values. Our study shows CHO, LIP, and PRO intakes can be easily captured by an application on smartphone for meal entry used by T1D patients. Although LIP and PRO meal contents did not influence glucose levels when insulin doses were based on CHO in this pilot study, this application could be used for further investigation of this topic, including in closed-loop conditions. © 2015 Diabetes Technology Society.

  15. The combined effect of pasteurization intensity, water activity, pH and incubation temperature on the survival and outgrowth of spores of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus pumilus in artificial media and food products.

    PubMed

    Samapundo, S; Heyndrickx, M; Xhaferi, R; de Baenst, I; Devlieghere, F

    2014-07-02

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the combined effects of pasteurization intensity (no heat treatment and 10 min at 70, 80 and 90 °C), water activity (aw) (0.960-0.990), pH (5.5-7.0) and storage temperature (7 and 10 °C) on the survival and outgrowth of psychrotolerant spores of Bacillus cereus FF119b and Bacillus pumilus FF128a. The experiments were performed in both artificial media and a validation was performed on real food products (cream, béchamel sauce and mixed vegetable soup). It was determined that in general, heat treatments of 10 min at 70 °C or 80 °C activated the spores of both B. cereus FF119b and B. pumilus FF128a, resulting in faster outgrowth compared to native (non-heat treated) spores. A pasteurization treatment of 10 min at 90 °C generally resulted in the longest lag periods before outgrowth of both isolates. Some of the spores were inactivated by this heat treatment, with more inactivation being observed the lower the pH value of the heating medium. Despite this, it was also observed that under some conditions the remaining (surviving) spores were actually activated as their outgrowth took place after a shorter period of time compared to native non-heated spores. While the response of B. cereus FF119b to the pasteurization intensity in cream and béchamel sauce was similar to the trends observed in the artificial media at 10 °C, in difference, outgrowth was only observed at 7 °C in both products when the spores had been heated for 10 min at 80 °C. Moreover, no inactivation was observed in cream or béchamel sauce when the spores were heated for 10 min at 90 °C in these two products. This was attributed to the protective effect of fat in the cream and the ingredients in the béchamel sauce. The study provides some insight into the potential microbial (stability and safety) consequences of the current trend towards milder heat treatments which is being pursued in the food industry. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. What is Color Blindness?

    MedlinePlus

    ... three color cone cells to determine our color perception. Color blindness can occur when one or more ... Anyone who experiences a significant change in color perception should see an ophthalmologist (Eye M.D.). Next ...

  17. Introduction To Color Vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorell, Lisa G.

    1983-08-01

    Several human cognitive studies have reported that color facilitates certain learning, memory and search tasks. Consideration of the color-opponent organization of human color vision and the spatial modulation transfer function for color suggests several simple sensory explanations.

  18. Coincident disruptive coloration

    PubMed Central

    Cuthill, Innes C.; Székely, Aron

    2008-01-01

    Even if an animal matches its surroundings perfectly in colour and texture, any mismatch between the spatial phase of its pattern and that of the background, or shadow created by its three-dimensional relief, is potentially revealing. Nevertheless, for camouflage to be fully broken, the shape must be recognizable. Disruptive coloration acts against object recognition by the use of high-contrast internal colour boundaries to break up shape and form. As well as the general outline, characteristic features such as eyes and limbs must also be concealed; this can be achieved by having the colour patterns on different, but adjacent, body parts aligned to match each other (i.e. in phase). Such ‘coincident disruptive coloration’ ensures that there is no phase disjunction where body parts meet, and causes different sections of the body to blend perceptually. We tested this theory using field experiments with predation by wild birds on artificial moth-like targets, whose wings and (edible pastry) bodies had colour patterns that were variously coincident or not. We also carried out an experiment with humans searching for analogous targets on a computer screen. Both experiments show that coincident disruptive coloration is an effective mechanism for concealing an otherwise revealing body form. PMID:18990668

  19. Artificial rheotaxis.

    PubMed

    Palacci, Jérémie; Sacanna, Stefano; Abramian, Anaïs; Barral, Jérémie; Hanson, Kasey; Grosberg, Alexander Y; Pine, David J; Chaikin, Paul M

    2015-05-01

    Motility is a basic feature of living microorganisms, and how it works is often determined by environmental cues. Recent efforts have focused on developing artificial systems that can mimic microorganisms, in particular their self-propulsion. We report on the design and characterization of synthetic self-propelled particles that migrate upstream, known as positive rheotaxis. This phenomenon results from a purely physical mechanism involving the interplay between the polarity of the particles and their alignment by a viscous torque. We show quantitative agreement between experimental data and a simple model of an overdamped Brownian pendulum. The model notably predicts the existence of a stagnation point in a diverging flow. We take advantage of this property to demonstrate that our active particles can sense and predictably organize in an imposed flow. Our colloidal system represents an important step toward the realization of biomimetic microsystems with the ability to sense and respond to environmental changes.

  20. Artificial Hydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Bryan E.; Olsen, Matthew T.; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.

    2010-01-01

    Decades of biophysical study on the hydrogenase (H2ase) enzymes have yielded sufficient information to guide the synthesis of analogues of their active sites. Three families of enzymes serve as inspiration for this work: the [FeFe]-, [NiFe]-, and [Fe]-H2ases, all of which feature iron centers bound to both CO and thiolate. Artificial H2ases effect the oxidation of H2 of H2 and the reverse reaction, the reduction of protons. These reactions occur via the intermediacy of metal hydrides. The inclusion of amine bases within the catalysts is an important design feature that is emulated in related bioinspired catalysts. Continuing challenges are the low reactivity of H2 towards biomimetic H2ases. PMID:20356731